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Sample records for current mood disorder

  1. Disruptive mood dysregulation disorder: current insights

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baweja R

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Raman Baweja, Susan D Mayes, Usman Hameed, James G Waxmonsky Department of Psychiatry, Penn State University College of Medicine, Hershey, PA, USA Abstract: Disruptive mood dysregulation disorder (DMDD was introduced as a new diagnostic entity under the category of depressive disorders in Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fifth Edition (DSM-5. It was included in DSM-5 primarily to address concerns about the misdiagnosis and consequent overtreatment of bipolar disorder in children and adolescents. DMDD does provide a home for a large percentage of referred children with severe persistent irritability that did not fit well into any DSM, Fourth Edition (DSM-IV diagnostic category. However, it has been a controversial addition to the DSM-5 due to lack of published validity studies, leading to questions about its validity as a distinct disorder. In this article, the authors discuss the diagnostic criteria, assessment, epidemiology, criticism of the diagnosis, and pathophysiology, as well as treatment and future directions for DMDD. They also review the literature on severe mood dysregulation, as described by the National Institute of Mental Health, as the scientific support for DMDD is based primarily on studies of severe mood dysregulation. Keywords: disruptive mood dysregulation disorder, persistent irritability, temper outbursts 

  2. Current Neural and Behavioral Dimensional Constructs across Mood Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langenecker, Scott A; Jacobs, Rachel H; Passarotti, Alessandra M

    2014-09-01

    Our understanding of the underlying neurobiology for mood disorders is still limited. We present an integrated model for conceptualizing and understanding mood disorders drawing upon a broad literature pertinent to mood disorders. The integrated model of emotion processing and regulation incorporates the linguistic constructs of the Research Domain Criteria (RDoC) initiative. In particular, we focus on the Positive Valence domain/circuit (PVC), highlighting recent reward research and the Negative Valence domain/circuit (NVC), highlighting rumination. Furthermore, we also illustrate the Cognitive Control and Problem Solving (CCaPS) circuit, which is heavily involved in emotion regulation, as well as the default mode network (DMN) and interactions between circuits. We conclude by proposing methods for addressing challenges in the developmental study of mood disorders including using high-risk design that incorporates risk for many disorders.

  3. Clinical application of brain imaging for the diagnosis of mood disorders: the current state of play.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savitz, J B; Rauch, S L; Drevets, W C

    2013-05-01

    In response to queries about whether brain imaging technology has reached the point where it is useful for making a clinical diagnosis and for helping to guide treatment selection, the American Psychiatric Association (APA) has recently written a position paper on the Clinical Application of Brain Imaging in Psychiatry. The following perspective piece is based on our contribution to this APA position paper, which specifically emphasized the application of neuroimaging in mood disorders. We present an introductory overview of the challenges faced by researchers in developing valid and reliable biomarkers for psychiatric disorders, followed by a synopsis of the extant neuroimaging findings in mood disorders, and an evidence-based review of the current research on brain imaging biomarkers in adult mood disorders. Although there are a number of promising results, by the standards proposed below, we argue that there are currently no brain imaging biomarkers that are clinically useful for establishing diagnosis or predicting treatment outcome in mood disorders.

  4. Chronobiology and Mood Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yavuz Selvi

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Living organizms show cyclic rhythmicity in a variety of physiological, hormonal, behavioral, and psychological processes. Sleep-wake cycles, body temperature, hormone levels, mood and cognition display a circadian rhythm in humans. Delays, advances or desynchronizations of circadian rhythm are known to be strongly associated with mental illness especially mood disorders such as bipolar disorder, major depression and seasonal affective disorder. Furthermore, some of the mood stabilizers, sleep deprivation and light treatment are employed to treat mood disorders by shifting circadian rhythm. This paper reviews the relationship between mood disorders and circadian rhythm, and describes treatment options by altering circadian rhythm.

  5. Mood disorders in Asians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeung, Albert; Chang, Doris

    2014-02-01

    Mood disorders are disorders that have a disturbance in mood as the predominant feature. They are common psychiatric disorders and are associated with significant distress and functional impairment. As the theory of mood disorders is based on the philosophy of mind/body dichotomy in the West, it contradicts the holistic tradition of medicine in the East. This may partially explain why many Asians with mood disorders emphasize their physical symptoms in discussions with their treatment providers. In the development of the DSM and ICD diagnostic systems, it is presumed that the diagnostic categories are applicable to all races and ethnicities. Similarly, many consider pharmacological and psychological treatment approaches to mood disorders universally applicable. To effectively treat Asians with mood disorders, clinicians need to customize biological and psychosocial interventions in consideration of patients' potential genetic and cultural differences.

  6. Epilepsy and Mood Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sermin Kesebir

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Mood disorders are the most common psychiatric comorbid disorder that affects quality of life and prognosis in epilepsy. The relation between depression and epilepsy is bidirectional. Not only the risk of having a depression among epilepsy cases is more than the healthy control cases, but also the risk of having epilepsy among depressive cases is more than the healthy control cases. People diagnosed with epilepsy are five times more likely than their peers to commit suicide. Moreover it seems that some epilepsy types like temporal lobe epilepsy have a much higher risk (25 times for suicide. Risk of suicide in epilepsy, which is independent from depression, increases more with the presence of depression. The common pathway between epilepsy, depression and suicide is hypofrontality and irregularity of serotonin metabolism. Contrary to depression, data on relationship between bipolar disorder and epilepsy is limited. However, mood disorder, mixed episodes with irritable character and mania are more frequent than assumed. As a matter of fact, both disorders share some common features. Both are episodic and can become chronic. Kindling phenomenon, irregularities in neurotransmitters, irregularities in voltage gate ion channels and irregularities in secondary messenger systems are variables that are presented in the etiologies of both disorders. Anticonvulsant drugs with mood regulatory effects are the common points of treatment. Understanding their mechanisms of action will clarify the pathophysiological processes. In this article, the relationhip between epilepsy and mood disorders, comorbidity, secondary states and treatment options in both cases have been discussed.

  7. Sleep Disturbances in Mood Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rumble, Meredith E; White, Kaitlin Hanley; Benca, Ruth M

    2015-12-01

    The article provides an overview of common and differentiating self-reported and objective sleep disturbances seen in mood-disordered populations. The importance of considering sleep disturbances in the context of mood disorders is emphasized, because a large body of evidence supports the notion that sleep disturbances are a risk factor for onset, exacerbation, and relapse of mood disorders. In addition, potential mechanisms for sleep disturbance in depression, other primary sleep disorders that often occur with mood disorders, effects of antidepressant and mood-stabilizing drugs on sleep, and the adjunctive effect of treating sleep in patients with mood disorders are discussed.

  8. Chronobiology of mood disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malhi, G S; Kuiper, S

    2013-01-01

    As part of a series of papers examining chronobiology ['Getting depression clinical guidelines right: time for change?' Kuiper et al. Acta Psychiatr Scand 2013;128(Suppl. 444):24-30; and 'Manipulating melatonin in managing mood' Boyce & Hopwood. ActaPsychiatrScand 2013;128(Suppl. 444):16-23], in this article, we review and synthesise the extant literature pertaining to the chronobiology of depression and provide a preliminary model for understanding the neural systems involved. A selective literature search was conducted using search engines such as MEDLINE/PubMed, combining terms associated with chronobiology and mood disorders. We propose that understanding of sleep-wake function and mood can be enhanced by simultaneously considering the circadian system, the sleep homoeostat and the core stress system, all of which are likely to be simultaneously disrupted in major mood disorders. This integrative approach is likely to allow flexible modelling of a much broader range of mood disorder presentations and phenomenology. A preliminary multifaceted model is presented, which will require further development and testing. Future depression research should aim to examine multiple systems concurrently in order to derive a more sophisticated understanding of the underlying neurobiology. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Mood and affect disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Michael H; Pinsky, Elizabeth G

    2015-02-01

    Depressive disorders are common in children and adolescents, with estimates for depressive episodes as high as 18.2% for girls and 7.7% for boys by age 17 years, and are a major cause of morbidity and even mortality. The primary care pediatrician should be able to (1) diagnose depressive disorders and use standardized instruments; (2) ask about suicide, self-harm, homicide, substance use, mania, and psychosis; (3) triage the severity of illness; (4) be aware of the differential diagnosis, including normal development, other depressive disorders, bipolar disorders, and comorbid disorders, such as anxiety and substance use; (5) refer to evidenced-based psychotherapies; (6) prescribe first-line medications; and (7) provide ongoing coordination in a medical home. Pediatric bipolar disorders and the new disruptive mood dysregulation disorder (DMDD) diagnoses are controversial but not uncommon, with prevalence estimates ranging from 0.8% to 4.3% in children at various ages. Although the pediatrician is not likely to be prescribing medications for children with bipolar disorder and DMDD diagnoses, all clinicians should be familiar with common neuroleptics and other mood stabilizers, including important potential adverse effects. Basic management of depressive and bipolar disorders is an important skill for primary care pediatricians.

  10. Review of Cohort Studies for Mood Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeon, Hong Jin; Baek, Ji Hyun; Ahn, Yong-Min; Kim, Se Joo; Ha, Tae Hyun; Cha, Boseok; Moon, Eunsoo; Kang, Hee-Ju; Ryu, Vin; Cho, Chul-Hyun; Heo, Jung-Yoon; Kim, Kiwon

    2016-01-01

    This paper aimed to review currently available cohort studies of subjects with mood disorders such as major depressive disorder (MDD) and bipolar disorder (BD). Using the PubMed and KoreaMed databases, we reviewed eight major cohort studies. Most studies recruited participants with MDD and BD separately, so direct comparison of factors associated with diagnostic changes was difficult. Regular and frequent follow-up evaluations utilizing objective mood ratings and standardized evaluation methods in a naturalistic fashion are necessary to determine detailed clinical courses of mood disorders. Further, biological samples should also be collected to incorporate clinical findings in the development of new diagnostic and therapeutic approaches. An innovative cohort study that can serve as a platform for translational research for treatment and prevention of mood disorders is critical in determining clinical, psychosocial, neurobiological and genetic factors associated with long-term courses and consequences of mood disorders in Korean patients. PMID:27247592

  11. [Epidemiology of mood disorders].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rouillon, Frédéric

    2008-02-29

    The 12 months and lifetime prevalence of is respectively 5 and 9% in the general population; moreover 10 to 20% of general practice patients are depressed. Depression is involved in about 40 to 80% of suicide and induces one of the greatest social burden. Mood disorders are more frequent in women, individual living alone and people with low socio-economic level. Risk factors are stressfull life events, biological vulnerability (genetic factors), somatic diseases, psychiatric comorbidity including personality disorders and addictions. Depressive disorders are underdiagnosed and undertreated despite efficacious pharmacological and psychotherapeutic strategies in their treatment. It's the reason why public health programs to prevent depression have been promoted by many countries like European Alliance against Depression. Their efficacy must be evaluated as their cost-efficiency.

  12. Biology of mood & anxiety disorders

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    2011-01-01

    An open access peer-reviewed journal that publishes highly innovative basic, translational, and clinical research that advances our understanding of the pathophysiology of mood and anxiety disorders...

  13. Kleptomania, mood disorder and lithium

    OpenAIRE

    Fábio Lopes Rocha; Maria Elizabete Guimarães Rocha

    1992-01-01

    Kleptomania has been found in association with major depression in a fairly large number of reports in recent years. We describe a patient with concurrent DSM-III-R Bipolar Mood Disorder and Kleptomania, whose symptoms remitted completely, apparently in response to lithium therapy, which raised the possibility that pharmacological treatment may benefit kleptomania. Further studies are needed to establish the possible relationship between kleptomania, mood disorders and lithium therapy.

  14. Kleptomania, mood disorder and lithium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fábio Lopes Rocha

    1992-12-01

    Full Text Available Kleptomania has been found in association with major depression in a fairly large number of reports in recent years. We describe a patient with concurrent DSM-III-R Bipolar Mood Disorder and Kleptomania, whose symptoms remitted completely, apparently in response to lithium therapy, which raised the possibility that pharmacological treatment may benefit kleptomania. Further studies are needed to establish the possible relationship between kleptomania, mood disorders and lithium therapy.

  15. Mood disorders in childhood and adolescence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thiago Botter Maio Rocha

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The identification and treatment of mood disorders in children and adolescents has grown over the last decades. Major depression is one of the most common and debilitating disorders worldwide, imposing a massive burden to the youth population. Bipolar disorder is being increasingly recognized as having its roots early in life, and its presentation during childhood and adolescence has been submitted to extensive research. This review aims to highlight clinical aspects of the current knowledge on mood disorders in the pediatric population, presenting updated information on epidemiology, diagnostic procedures, and management strategies. Limitations of available evidence and future directions of research in the field are also discussed.

  16. New Therapeutic Targets for Mood Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodrigo Machado-Vieira

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Existing pharmacological treatments for bipolar disorder (BPD and major depressive disorder (MDD are often insufficient for many patients. Here we describe a number of targets/compounds that clinical and preclinical studies suggest could result in putative novel treatments for mood disorders. These include: (1 glycogen synthase kinase-3 (GSK-3 and protein kinase C (PKC, (2 the purinergic system, (3 histone deacetylases (HDACs, (4 the melatonergic system, (5 the tachykinin neuropeptides system, (6 the glutamatergic system, and (7 oxidative stress and bioenergetics. The paper reviews data on new compounds that have shown antimanic or antidepressant effects in subjects with mood disorders, or similar effects in preclinical animal models. Overall, an improved understanding of the neurobiological underpinnings of mood disorders is critical in order to develop targeted treatments that are more effective, act more rapidly, and are better tolerated than currently available therapies.

  17. Signs and Symptoms of Mood Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Public Service Announcements Partnering with DBSA Signs and Symptoms of Mood Disorders Depression and bipolar disorder (also ... a Confidential Online Mood Disorder Screening Signs and symptoms of depression Prolonged sadness or unexplained crying spells ...

  18. Reproductive Hormones and Mood Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sermin Kesebir

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available During the menstrual cycle, pregnancy and breast-feeding periods, as well as in menopausal and post-menopausal periods, the physiological and psychological processes that change according to the hormonal fluctuations influence every women similarly and each one differently. These physiological processes are controlled by neuroendocrine sequences, of which the hypothalamo-pituitary-adrenal axis and the hypothalamo-pituitary-gonadal axis are the most important ones. The hypothalamo-pituitary-gonadal axis affects mood, anxiety, cognition and pain. The interaction of these hormones with mood and behavior is bidirectional. The differences in phenomenology and epidemiology of mood disorders with regards to gender can be explained with the effects of hormones. All of the periods mentioned above are related with mood disorders at terms of risk factors, disease symptoms, progress of disease and response to treatment. Epidemiologic data supports the relationship between the mood disorders and reproductive processes. The prevalence of major depression increases in women with the menarche and ceases in post- menopausal period. Similarly, the initial symptoms of bipolar disorder begins around the menarche period in 50% of the cases. Despite proper treatment, some female patients with major depression experience recurrence during the premenstrual period of their menstrual cycles. The conformity and change in a woman’s brain during pregnancy is controlled dominantly by the neuroendocrine systems, while it is controlled by the external stimuli actively related to the baby during nursing period. The changes that occur are closely related to postpartum mood disorders. Again, all the changes and suspension of medication during this procedure are risk factors for early depressive and dysphoric situations. Variables of a wide range, from follicle stimulating hormone, melatonin, and sleep to body mass index interact with mood disorders in menopausal and post

  19. Prevalence of Mood Disorders in Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamid Reza Pouretemad

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available Objective:To study the prevalence and demographic characteristics of mood disorders among Iranian adults. Method: In this cross-sectional population-based epidemiological study (age > 18 in Iran, 25180 individuals were selected through a randomized cluster sampling method for a diagnosis using the Schedule for Affective Disorders and Schizophrenia (SADS. They were then interviewed at home by 250 trained clinical psychologists. Results: The estimated lifetime prevalence of Major Depressive Disorder (MDD and Minor Depressive Disorder (mDD were 3.1% and 0.3% respectively. Also, the estimated lifetime prevalence of Bipolar Mood disorder (BMD type I and type II were 0.1% and 0.7% respectively. The current prevalence of MDD, mDD, BMD-I, and BMD-II were 1.8%, 0.2%, 0.04%, and 0.3% respectively. Mood disorders were associated with female gender, lower education, being married, being middle-aged, living in cities, and not being a homemaker. Conclusion: The prevalence of mood disorders was lower among Iranian adults than reported in Western studies, and a number of demographic associations differed from those reported in Western studies. Important cultural differences in the nature or manifestation of depression are implied by these results.

  20. Current research and trends in the use of smartphone applications for mood disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Torous

    2015-05-01

    Conclusions: While the research base for smartphone applications is limited, it is still informative. Numerous opportunities for further research exist, especially in the use of passive data for, major depressive disorder, validating passive data to detect mania in bipolar disorder, and exploring the use of physiological data. As interest in smartphones for psychiatry and mental health continues to expand, it is important that the research base expands to fill these gaps and provide clinically useful results.

  1. Disruptive Mood Dysregulation Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Labs at NIMH Home Research Areas Principal Investigators Administrative Oversight & Support Collaborations & Partnerships Join A Study News & ... the first time in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-5), published in 2013 . & ...

  2. About Mood Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... people of all ages, races, ethnic groups and social classes. Although it can occur at any age, the ... is found among all races, ethnic groups and social classes. Like depression and other serious illnesses, bipolar disorder ...

  3. There is an app for that! The current state of mobile applications (apps) for DSM-5 obsessive-compulsive disorder, posttraumatic stress disorder, anxiety and mood disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Ameringen, Michael; Turna, Jasmine; Khalesi, Zahra; Pullia, Katrina; Patterson, Beth

    2017-06-01

    Mental health apps are viewed as a promising modality to extend the reach of mental health care beyond the clinic. They do so by providing a means of assessment, tracking, and treatment through a smartphone. Given that nearly 2/3 of the American population owns a smartphone, mental health apps offer the possibility of overcoming treatment barriers such as geographic location or financial barriers. Unfortunately, the excitement surrounding mental health apps may be premature as the current supporting literature regarding their efficacy is limited. The app marketplace is littered with apps claiming to treat or assess symptoms, but even those created by reputable organizations or those incorporating components of evidence-based treatments have not yet been validated in terms of their efficacy. This review aims to provide a comprehensive review of the current state of the mental health app literature by examining published reports of apps designed for DSM-5 anxiety and mood disorders, OCD, and PTSD. The breadth of apps reviewed includes those oriented around assessment, symptom tracking, and treatment as well as "multipurpose" apps, which incorporate several of these components. This review will also present some of the most popular mental health apps which may have clinical utility and could be prescribed to clients. While we discuss many potential benefits of mental health apps, we focus on a number of issues that the current state of the app literature presents. Overall there is a significant disconnect between app developers, the scientific community and health care, leaving the utility of existing apps questionable. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Delayed mood transitions in major depressive disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korf, Jakob

    2014-05-01

    The hypothesis defended here is that the process of mood-normalizing transitions fails in a significant proportion of patients suffering from major depressive disorder. Such a failure is largely unrelated to the psychological content. Evidence for the hypothesis is provided by the highly variable and unpredictable time-courses of the depressive episodes. The main supporting observations are: (1) mood transitions within minutes or days have been reported during deep brain stimulation, naps after sleep deprivation and bipolar mood disorders; (2) sleep deprivation, electroconvulsive treatment and experimental drugs (e.g., ketamine) may facilitate mood transitions in major depressive disorder within hours or a few days; (3) epidemiological and clinical studies show that the time-to-recovery from major depressive disorder can be described with decay models implying very short depressive episodes; (4) lack of relationship between the length of depression and recovery episodes in recurrent depression; (5) mood fluctuations predict later therapeutic success in major depressive disorder. We discuss some recent models aimed to describe random mood transitions. The observations together suggest that the mood transitions have a wide variety of apparently unrelated causes. We suggest that the mechanism of mood transition is compromised in major depressive disorder, which has to be recognized in diagnostic systems.

  5. Validation of the Chinese version of the "Mood Disorder Questionnaire" for screening bipolar disorder among patients with a current depressive episode

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gan Zhaoyu

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Mood Disorder Questionnaire (MDQ is a well-recognized screening tool for bipolar disorder, but its Chinese version needs further validation. This study aims to measure the accuracy of the Chinese version of the MDQ as a screening instrument for bipolar disorder (BPD in a group of patients with a current major depressive episode. Methods 142 consecutive patients with an initial DSM-IV-TR diagnosis of a major depressive episode were screened for BPD using the Chinese translation of the MDQ and followed up for one year. The final diagnosis, determined by a special committee consisting of three trained senior psychiatrists, was used as a 'gold standard' and ROC was plotted to evaluate the performance of the MDQ. The optimal cut-off was chosen by maximizing the Younden's index. Results Of the 142 patients, 122 (85.9% finished the one year follow-up. On the basis of a semi-structured clinical interview 48.4% (59/122 received a diagnosis of unipolar depression (UPD, 36.9% (45/122 BPDII and 14.8% (18/122 BPDI. At the end of the one year follow-up,9 moved from UPD to BPD, 2 from BPDII to UPD, 1 from BPDII to BPDI, the overall rate of initial misdiagnosis was 16.4%. MDQ showed a good accuracy for BPD: the optimal cut-off was 4, with a sensitivity of 0.72 and a specificity of 0.73. When BPDII and BPDI were calculated independently, the optimal cut-off for BPDII was 4, with a sensitivity of 0.70 and a specificity of 0.73; while the optimal cut-off for BPDI was 5, with a sensitivity of 0.67 and a specificity of 0.86. Conclusions Our results show that the Chinese version of MDQ is a valid tool for screening BPD in a group of patients with current depressive episode on the Chinese mainland.

  6. Adult mood disorders and childhood psychological trauma

    OpenAIRE

    Zavaschi Maria Lucrécia Scherer; Graeff Maria Elisa; Menegassi Marcos Tatit; Mardini Victor; Pires Denise Winkler Simões; Carvalho Rafael Homem de; Rohde Luis Augusto; Eizirik Cláudio Laks

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the association between adult mood disorders and childhood psychological trauma in a developing country. METHOD: Adults with and without mood disorders were assessed in a case-control study using the Mini International Neuropsychiatric Interview. Assessment of childhood trauma included physical and sexual abuse, frequent exposure to violence, and parental loss. RESULTS: In two independent multivariate analyses, after adjusting for potential confounding factors, we found...

  7. Treating mood disorders during pregnancy: safety considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eberhard-Gran, Malin; Eskild, Anne; Opjordsmoen, Stein

    2005-01-01

    Mood disorders in pregnancy may have a negative effect on self care and pregnancy outcome that affects the mother directly and the child indirectly. Thus, some women may require pharmacological treatment. Pharmacotherapy of mood disorders during pregnancy implies specific considerations. This paper presents an updated review of available studies on the treatment of mood disorders and present knowledge on teratogenicity, neonatal effects and long-term neurobehavioural effects for the different psychotropic drugs, including treatment with selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs), tricyclic antidepressants (TCAs), other antidepressants, benzodiazepines, lithium, carbamazepine/valproic acid, lamotrigine and novel antipsychotics. However, the existing knowledge on the use of antidepressants and mood stabilising agents during pregnancy is hampered by a lack of results from randomised controlled trials.SSRIs and TCAs have not been associated with an increased risk of major malformations, but poor neonatal adaptation has been described. Benzodiazepines used in the first trimester have been associated with orofacial clefts. Mood stabilisers such as lithium, carbamazepine and valproic acid (sodium valproate) are associated with an increased risk of fetal malformations. Both benzodiazepines and lithium may cause adaptation problems in the newborn. In utero exposure to novel antipsychotics has not been associated with congenital malformations; however, the data are still limited. The knowledge about long-term neurobehavioural effects in the offspring is still limited for all agents and requires further investigation. Possible adverse effects of fetal exposure must be balanced against the adverse effects of an untreated maternal mood disorder.

  8. Gut microbiota in autism and mood disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mangiola, Francesca; Ianiro, Gianluca; Franceschi, Francesco; Fagiuoli, Stefano; Gasbarrini, Giovanni; Gasbarrini, Antonio

    2016-01-07

    The hypothesis of an important role of gut microbiota in the maintenance of physiological state into the gastrointestinal (GI) system is supported by several studies that have shown a qualitative and quantitative alteration of the intestinal flora in a number of gastrointestinal and extra-gastrointestinal diseases. In the last few years, the importance of gut microbiota impairment in the etiopathogenesis of pathology such as autism, dementia and mood disorder, has been raised. The evidence of the inflammatory state alteration, highlighted in disorders such as schizophrenia, major depressive disorder and bipolar disorder, strongly recalls the microbiota alteration, highly suggesting an important role of the alteration of GI system also in neuropsychiatric disorders. Up to now, available evidences display that the impairment of gut microbiota plays a key role in the development of autism and mood disorders. The application of therapeutic modulators of gut microbiota to autism and mood disorders has been experienced only in experimental settings to date, with few but promising results. A deeper assessment of the role of gut microbiota in the development of autism spectrum disorder (ASD), as well as the advancement of the therapeutic armamentarium for the modulation of gut microbiota is warranted for a better management of ASD and mood disorders.

  9. Mood Disorders in Systemic Lupus Erythematosus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hanly, John G; Su, Li; Urowitz, Murray B

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To examine the frequency, characteristics, and outcome of mood disorders, as well as clinical and autoantibody associations, in a multiethnic/racial, prospective inception cohort of patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). METHODS: Patients were assessed annually for mood...... disorders (4 types, according to the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition) and 18 other neuropsychiatric events. Global disease activity scores (SLE Disease Activity Index 2000 [SLEDAI-2K]), damage scores (Systemic Lupus International Collaborating Clinics/American College...... time. The lack of association with global SLE disease activity, cumulative organ damage, and lupus autoantibodies emphasizes the multifactorial etiology of mood disorders and a role for non-lupus-specific therapies....

  10. Childhood attention deficit hyperactivity disorder features in adult mood disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joo, Eun-Jeong; Lee, Kyu Young; Choi, Kyeong-Sook; Kim, Se Hyun; Song, Joo Youn; Bang, Yang Weon; Ahn, Yong Min; Kim, Yong Sik

    2012-04-01

    A significant overlap between childhood mood disorders and many aspects of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) has been established. High rates of co-occurrence, familial aggregation, and more severe clinical manifestations of the illnesses when they are comorbid suggest that common genetic and environmental factors may contribute to the development of both disorders. Research on the co-occurrence of childhood ADHD and mood disorders in childhood has been conducted. We retrospectively investigated childhood ADHD features in adults with mood disorders. Childhood ADHD features were measured with the Korean version of the Wender Utah Rating Scale (WURS). The sample consisted of 1305 subjects: 108 subjects were diagnosed with bipolar disorder type I, 41 with bipolar disorder type II, 101 with major depressive disorder, and 1055 served as normal controls. We compared total WURS scores as well as scores on 3 factors (impulsivity, inattention, and mood instability and anxiety) among the 4 different diagnostic groups. The 4 groups differed significantly from one another on all scores. The group with bipolar disorder type II obtained the highest total scores on the WURS. The impulsivity and inattention associated with childhood ADHD were more significantly related to bipolar disorder type II than with bipolar disorder type I. The mood instability and anxiety associated with childhood ADHD seem to be significantly related to major depressive disorder in adulthood. In conclusion, multifactorial childhood ADHD features were associated with mood disorders of adulthood.

  11. Cellular circadian clocks in mood disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarthy, Michael J; Welsh, David K

    2012-10-01

    Bipolar disorder (BD) and major depressive disorder (MDD) are heritable neuropsychiatric disorders associated with disrupted circadian rhythms. The hypothesis that circadian clock dysfunction plays a causal role in these disorders has endured for decades but has been difficult to test and remains controversial. In the meantime, the discovery of clock genes and cellular clocks has revolutionized our understanding of circadian timing. Cellular circadian clocks are located in the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN), the brain's primary circadian pacemaker, but also throughout the brain and peripheral tissues. In BD and MDD patients, defects have been found in SCN-dependent rhythms of body temperature and melatonin release. However, these are imperfect and indirect indicators of SCN function. Moreover, the SCN may not be particularly relevant to mood regulation, whereas the lateral habenula, ventral tegmentum, and hippocampus, which also contain cellular clocks, have established roles in this regard. Dysfunction in these non-SCN clocks could contribute directly to the pathophysiology of BD/MDD. We hypothesize that circadian clock dysfunction in non-SCN clocks is a trait marker of mood disorders, encoded by pathological genetic variants. Because network features of the SCN render it uniquely resistant to perturbation, previous studies of SCN outputs in mood disorders patients may have failed to detect genetic defects affecting non-SCN clocks, which include not only mood-regulating neurons in the brain but also peripheral cells accessible in human subjects. Therefore, reporters of rhythmic clock gene expression in cells from patients or mouse models could provide a direct assay of the molecular gears of the clock, in cellular clocks that are likely to be more representative than the SCN of mood-regulating neurons in patients. This approach, informed by the new insights and tools of modern chronobiology, will allow a more definitive test of the role of cellular circadian clocks

  12. Contingent negative variation of mood disorder patients

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yingzhi Lu; Wenbin Zong; Qingtao Ren; Jinyu Pu; Jun Chen; Juan Li; Xingshi Chen; Yong Wang

    2011-01-01

    Studies on brain-evoked potential and contingent negative variation (CNV) in mood disorder remain controversial. To date, no CNV difference between unipolar and bipolar depression has been reported. Brain-evoked potentials were measured in the present study to analyze CNV in three subtypes of mood disorder (mania, unipolar depression, and bipolar depression), and these results were compared with normal controls. In the mania group, CNV amplitude B was greater than in controls, and the depression group exhibited lower CNV amplitude B and smaller A-S'2 area, and prolonged post-imperative negative variation latency. The CNV comparison between unipolar and bipolar depression found that the prolonged post-imperative negative variation latency was only in unipolar depression. These results suggest that prolonged post-imperative negative variation latency is a characteristic of unipolar depression, and CNV amplitude change is a state characteristic of mood disorder patients.

  13. Light treatment of mood disorders

    OpenAIRE

    Parry, Barbara L.; Maurer, Eva L.

    2003-01-01

    In 1981, seven patients with nonseasonal depression were treated with bright white light in 1982, bright artificial light was used to treat a manic-depressive patient with a seasonal mood cycle. In the last 20 years, a plethora of studies have further defined the depressive populations, who are responsive to light treatment; the optimal timing, intensity, spectral frequency, and duration of treatment; its comparison with other pharmacological interventions; predictors of response; side-effect...

  14. Mood Stabilizers in Children and Adolescents With Autism Spectrum Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canitano, Roberto

    2015-01-01

    Autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) are a group of neurodevelopmental disorders including autistic disorder, Asperger syndrome, and pervasive developmental disorder not otherwise specified as to Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition. All these categories are grouped together in Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fifth Edition, classification under the category of Autism Spectrum Disorders.Behavioral disorders including irritability, attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) symptoms, and aggression are additional symptoms found in up to 20% of children and adolescents with ASD and require careful evaluation for appropriate treatment. Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder is defined by impaired attention, hyperactivity, and impulsivity, whereas ASD is defined by social dysfunction, communicative impairment, and restricted/repetitive behaviors. They should be distinctly evaluated in children and adolescents with ASD and intellectual disability in contrast to individuals without intellectual disability, because significant differences between these conditions exist. Mood disorders are also common in ASD and should be systematically investigated in this population of children and adolescents. Approximately 50% of children and adolescents with ASD receive medication for comorbid behavioral/ADHD and mood symptoms, mostly stimulants, antiepileptics and antipsychotics. Guidelines for the evaluation and treatment including medications for ADHD-like symptoms have recently been provided and should be carefully considered. Antiepileptic drugs are commonly used in ASDs with epilepsy, because seizures are associated with ASD in 10% to 30% of young patients, and as mood stabilizers. Lithium is another option for children and adolescents with ASD who present with symptoms of a mood disorder, such as elevated moods/euphoria, mania, and paranoia, whether accompanied or not by irritability. Experimental treatments are under

  15. Delayed mood transitions in major depressive disorder

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Korf, Jakob

    2014-01-01

    The hypothesis defended here is that the process of mood-normalizing transitions fails in a significant proportion of patients suffering from major depressive disorder. Such a failure is largely unrelated to the psychological content. Evidence for the hypothesis is provided by the highly variable an

  16. The relationship between creativity and mood disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andreasen, Nancy C

    2008-01-01

    Research designed to examine the relationship between creativity and mental illnesses must confront multiple challenges. What is the optimal sample to study? How should creativity be defined? What is the most appropriate comparison group? Only a limited number of studies have examined highly creative individuals using personal interviews and a noncreative comparison group. The majority of these have examined writers. The preponderance of the evidence suggests that in these creative individuals the rate of mood disorder is high, and that both bipolar disorder and unipolar depression are quite common. Clinicians who treat creative individuals with mood disorders must also confront a variety of challenges, including the fear that treatment may diminish creativity. In the case of bipolar disorder, however, it is likely that reducing severe manic episodes may actually enhance creativity in many individuals.

  17. Hippocampal subfield volumes in mood disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, B; Passos, I C; Mwangi, B; Amaral-Silva, H; Tannous, J; Wu, M-J; Zunta-Soares, G B; Soares, J C

    2017-01-24

    Volume reduction and shape abnormality of the hippocampus have been associated with mood disorders. However, the hippocampus is not a uniform structure and consists of several subfields, such as the cornu ammonis (CA) subfields CA1-4, the dentate gyrus (DG) including a granule cell layer (GCL) and a molecular layer (ML) that continuously crosses adjacent subiculum (Sub) and CA fields. It is known that cellular and molecular mechanisms associated with mood disorders may be localized to specific hippocampal subfields. Thus, it is necessary to investigate the link between the in vivo hippocampal subfield volumes and specific mood disorders, such as bipolar disorder (BD) and major depressive disorder (MDD). In the present study, we used a state-of-the-art hippocampal segmentation approach, and we found that patients with BD had reduced volumes of hippocampal subfields, specifically in the left CA4, GCL, ML and both sides of the hippocampal tail, compared with healthy subjects and patients with MDD. The volume reduction was especially severe in patients with bipolar I disorder (BD-I). We also demonstrated that hippocampal subfield volume reduction was associated with the progression of the illness. For patients with BD-I, the volumes of the right CA1, ML and Sub decreased as the illness duration increased, and the volumes of both sides of the CA2/3, CA4 and hippocampal tail had negative correlations with the number of manic episodes. These results indicated that among the mood disorders the hippocampal subfields were more affected in BD-I compared with BD-II and MDD, and manic episodes had focused progressive effect on the CA2/3 and CA4 and hippocampal tail.Molecular Psychiatry advance online publication, 24 January 2017; doi:10.1038/mp.2016.262.

  18. Prevalence and functions of mental disability caused by mood disorders in China: A national sample.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ning; Du, Wei; Zhang, Lei; Chen, Gong; Zheng, Xiaoying

    2015-07-15

    Mood disorders are common mental illness in China, but little was known about mental disability caused by mood disorders. In this study, we aimed to describe the prevalence rate of mental disability caused by mood disorders, and resulting impairment on physical and social functions. Data were derived from the 2006 second China National Survey on Disability (CNSD), and identification of mental disability caused by mood disorders were based on consensus manuals. The prevalence rate of mental disability caused by mood disorders in China was 0.366‰ (95% CI=0.334-0.398). Prevalence rate of mental disability caused by mood disorders was higher among female, elderly people, illiterate population, people currently not married, and people with an annual family income equal or lower than national average. People with mental disability caused by mood disorders were less likely to have severe or extreme difficulty in all 6 aspects of functions. This study revealed a lower prevalence rate of mental disability caused by mood disorders. The findings indicate that more studies are needed to obtain a precise overview of mood disorders in China, and intervention programs aimed at early identification and treatment for mood disorders should be developed. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Current Mood vs. Recalled Impacts of Current Moods after Exposures to Sequences of Uncertain Monetary Outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olsson, Lars E.; Gärling, Tommy; Ettema, Dick; Friman, Margareta; Ståhl, Michael

    2017-01-01

    Events in a sequence may each be evaluated as good or bad. We propose that such good-bad evaluations evoke emotional responses that change current mood. A model of recurrent updating of current mood is developed and compared to a model of how a sequence of events evoking emotional responses is evaluated retrospectively. In Experiment 1, 149 undergraduates are presented sequences of lottery outcomes with a fixed probability of losing or winning different amounts of money. Ratings of current mood are made after the sequence. Retrospective evaluations are either made after the ratings of current mood or, in a control condition, when no ratings of current mood are made. The results show an expected effect on current mood of the valence of the end of the sequence. The results are less clear in showing an expected beginning effect on the retrospective evaluations. An expected beginning effect on retrospective evaluations is found in Experiment 2 in which 41 undergraduates are first asked to remember the different amounts of money, then to evaluate the sequence as lottery outcomes.

  20. Current Mood vs. Recalled Impacts of Current Moods after Exposures to Sequences of Uncertain Monetary Outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olsson, Lars E; Gärling, Tommy; Ettema, Dick; Friman, Margareta; Ståhl, Michael

    2017-01-01

    Events in a sequence may each be evaluated as good or bad. We propose that such good-bad evaluations evoke emotional responses that change current mood. A model of recurrent updating of current mood is developed and compared to a model of how a sequence of events evoking emotional responses is evaluated retrospectively. In Experiment 1, 149 undergraduates are presented sequences of lottery outcomes with a fixed probability of losing or winning different amounts of money. Ratings of current mood are made after the sequence. Retrospective evaluations are either made after the ratings of current mood or, in a control condition, when no ratings of current mood are made. The results show an expected effect on current mood of the valence of the end of the sequence. The results are less clear in showing an expected beginning effect on the retrospective evaluations. An expected beginning effect on retrospective evaluations is found in Experiment 2 in which 41 undergraduates are first asked to remember the different amounts of money, then to evaluate the sequence as lottery outcomes.

  1. [Mood disorders and epilepsy surgery: A review].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yrondi, A; Arbus, C; Valton, L; Schmitt, L

    2017-04-01

    Historically, there is a strong link between depression and epilepsy. Patients with epilepsy are four to five times more likely to develop a depressive syndrome. It seems that the link between epilepsy and depression is bidirectional. There is little data on mood disorders secondary to epilepsy surgery. The goal of epilepsy surgery is to reduce the number and frequency of attacks, which in turn would allow improvements in mood disorders and cognitive impairment. A systematic search of the international literature was performed using the bibliographic search engines PubMed and Embase. The following MESH terms were used: epilepsy surgery AND (depression OR depressive disorder OR mood disorder). We also used the "related articles" of PubMed, bibliography surveys, conference abstracts and Google Scholar to identify additional relevant papers. Of the 130 studies found by the systematic search, 112 are excluded because they did not take into account the mood disorders secondary to epilepsy surgery. Fifteen studies are included in this review of the literature with a case study. Depression is the psychopathological condition that is the most frequently studied. According to several studies, the prevalence of depression is approximately 30% with nearly 70% of cases diagnosed during the first three months following epilepsy surgery. The majority of patients presented depressive symptoms during the first 3 to 12months after epilepsy surgery. In these studies, the risk of developing depression is correlated with the existence of previous depressive elements relative to the epilepsy surgery. A small number of studies reported cases of de novo depression. Studies have shown a correlation between very good to excellent control of epileptic seizures and a persistent improvement of mood disorders. It would seem that depressive symptoms post-surgery are more common when the surgical intervention concerns the temporal lobe and in particular mesial resections. There are only very

  2. Cyclothymia, a circular mood disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baethge, Christopher; Salvatore, Paola; Baldessarini, Ross J

    2003-09-01

    Ewald Hecker (1843-1909) was a collaborator of Karl Ludwig Kahlbaum (1828-1899). Both worked outside the university and public mental institutions of Germany. By meticulously observing clinical signs and illness-course, they laid the groundwork for modern descriptive psychiatry. Their clinical approach influenced Kraepelin and continues to dominate psychiatric classification. Hecker popularized several of Kahlbaum's syndromal concepts, including hebephrenia. Another was cyclothymia, a relatively benigh form of manic-depressive illness, introduced by Kahlbaum, in 1882. It included depressive (dysthymia), hypomanic (hyperthymia), and mixed hypomanic-depressive phases. The Kahlbaum-Hecker syndrome of cyclothymia survives in DSM-IV bipolar II disorder and cyclothymia. An annotated English translation of Hecker's 1898 paper is provided, with historical notes on Hecker and the significance of his work.

  3. Social disability of Brazilian mood disorder patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tucci A.M.

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Mood disorders cause many social problems, often involving family relationships. Few studies are available in the literature comparing patients with bipolar, unipolar, dysthymic, and double depressive disorders concerning these aspects. In the present study, demographic and disease data were collected using a specifically prepared questionnaire. Social adjustment was assessed using the Disability Adjustment Scale and family relationships were evaluated using the Global Assessment of Relational Functioning Scale. One hundred patients under treatment for at least 6 months were evaluated at the Psychiatric Outpatient Clinic of the Botucatu School of Medicine, UNESP. Most patients were women (82% more than 50 (49% years old with at least two years of follow-up, with little schooling (62% had less than 4 years, and of low socioeconomic level. Logistic regression analysis showed that a diagnosis of unipolar disorder (P = 0.003, OR = 0.075, CI = 0.014-0.403 and dysthymia (P = 0.001, OR = 0.040, CI = 0.006-0.275 as well as family relationships (P = 0.002, OR = 0.953, CI = 0914-0.992 played a significant role in social adjustment. Unipolar and dysthymic patients presented better social adjustment than bipolar and double depressive patients (P < 0.001, results that were not due to social class. These patients, treated at a teaching hospital, may represent the severest mood disorder cases. Evaluations were made knowing the diagnosis of the patients, which might also have influenced some of the results. Social disabilities among mood disorder patients are very frequent and intensive.

  4. Mood disorders and complementary and alternative medicine: a literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qureshi NA

    2013-05-01

    patients. Dehydroepiandrosterone is effective both in bipolar depression and depression in the setting of comorbid physical disease, although doses should be titrated to avoid adverse effects. Ayurvedic and homeopathic therapies have the potential to improve symptoms of depression, although larger controlled trials are needed. Mind-body-spirit and integrative medicine approaches can be used effectively in mild to moderate depression and in treatment-resistant depression. Currently, although CAM therapies are not the primary treatment of mood disorders, level 1 evidence could emerge in the future showing that such treatments are effective.Keywords: complementary and alternative medicine, mood disorders, Ayurveda, homeopathy, integrative medicine

  5. Progress in understanding mood disorders: optogenetic dissection of neural circuits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lammel, S; Tye, K M; Warden, M R

    2014-01-01

    Major depression is characterized by a cluster of symptoms that includes hopelessness, low mood, feelings of worthlessness and inability to experience pleasure. The lifetime prevalence of major depression approaches 20%, yet current treatments are often inadequate both because of associated side effects and because they are ineffective for many people. In basic research, animal models are often used to study depression. Typically, experimental animals are exposed to acute or chronic stress to generate a variety of depression-like symptoms. Despite its clinical importance, very little is known about the cellular and neural circuits that mediate these symptoms. Recent advances in circuit-targeted approaches have provided new opportunities to study the neuropathology of mood disorders such as depression and anxiety. We review recent progress and highlight some studies that have begun tracing a functional neuronal circuit diagram that may prove essential in establishing novel treatment strategies in mood disorders. First, we shed light on the complexity of mesocorticolimbic dopamine (DA) responses to stress by discussing two recent studies reporting that optogenetic activation of midbrain DA neurons can induce or reverse depression-related behaviors. Second, we describe the role of the lateral habenula circuitry in the pathophysiology of depression. Finally, we discuss how the prefrontal cortex controls limbic and neuromodulatory circuits in mood disorders.

  6. Childhood adversity and chronicity of mood disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angst, Jules; Gamma, Alex; Rössler, Wulf; Ajdacic, Vladeta; Klein, Daniel N

    2011-02-01

    To evaluate the potential impact of early childhood problems on the chronicity of mood disorders. A representative cohort from the population was prospectively studied from ages 19/20 to 39/40. Unipolar (UP) and bipolar disorders (BP) were operationally defined applying broad Zurich criteria for bipolarity. Chronicity required the presence of symptoms for more days than not over 2 years prior to an interview, or almost daily occurrence for 1 year. A family history and a history of childhood problems were taken at ages 27/28 and 29/30. Data include the first of multiple self-assessments with the Symptom-Checklist-90 R at age 19/20, and mastery and self-esteem assessed 1 year later. A factor analysis of childhood problems yielded two factors: family problems and conduct problems. Sexual trauma, which did not load on either factor, and conduct problems were unrelated to chronicity of UP or BP or both together. In contrast, childhood family problems increased the risk of chronicity by a factor of 1.7. An anxious personality in childhood and low self-esteem and mastery in early adulthood were also associated with chronicity. Childhood family problems are strong risk factors for the chronicity of mood disorders (UP and BP). The risk may be mediated partly by anxious personality traits, poor coping and low self-esteem.

  7. Recurrence and Relapse in Bipolar Mood Disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Gh Mousavi

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Despite the effectiveness of pharmacotherapy in acute phase of bipolar mood disorder, patients often experience relapses or recurrent episodes. Hospitalization of patients need a great deal of financial and humanistic resources which can be saved through understanding more about the rate of relapse and factors affecting this rate. Methods: In a descriptive analytical study, 380 patients with bipolar disorder who were hospitalized in psychiatric emergency ward of Noor hospital, Isfahan, Iran, were followed. Each patient was considered for; the frequency of relapse and recurrence, kind of pharmachotherapy, presence of psychotherapeutic treatments, frequency of visits by psychiatrist and the rank of present episode. Results: The overall prevalence of recurrence was 42.2%. Recurrence was lower in patients using lithium carbonate or sodium valproate or combined therapy (about 40%, compared to those using carbamazepine (80%. Recurrence was higher in patients treated with only pharmacotherapy (44.5% compared to those treated with both pharmacotherapy and psychotherapy (22.2%. Patients who were visited monthy by psychiatrist had lower rate of recurrence compared to those who had irregular visits. Conclusion: The higher rate of recurrence observed in carbamazepine therapy may be due to its adverse reactions and consequently poor compliance to this drug. Lower rates of recurrence with psychotherapy and regular visits may be related to the preventive effects of these procedures and especially to the effective management of stress. Keywords: Bipolar Mood Disorder, Recurrence, Relapse.

  8. Mood disorders and complementary and alternative medicine: a literature review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qureshi, Naseem Akhtar; Al-Bedah, Abdullah Mohammed

    2013-01-01

    symptoms of depression, although larger controlled trials are needed. Mind-body-spirit and integrative medicine approaches can be used effectively in mild to moderate depression and in treatment-resistant depression. Currently, although CAM therapies are not the primary treatment of mood disorders, level 1 evidence could emerge in the future showing that such treatments are effective. PMID:23700366

  9. The role of melatonin in mood disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    De Berardis D

    2015-11-01

    melatonin is often used as an indicator phase position since it is a well-defined, high-amplitude rhythm controlled by the hypothalamic suprachiasmatic nuclei. Melatonin production is controlled by this endogenous circadian timing system. It peaks during the night and is suppressed by daylight. Mood spectrum disorders, including bipolar disorder (BD, major depressive disorder (MDD, and seasonal affective disorder (SAD, have been observed to be accompanied by circadian dysregulation as well as dysregulation in melatonin secretion. Simultaneously, it has also been documented that disruptions in circadian rhythms, including the sleep/wake cycle, though environmental means can produce mood-related problems in vulnerable individuals. These findings suggested that altered circadian rhythms might be biological markers of these disorders. As melatonin is considered a chronobiotic factor, ie, able to entrain the circadian rhythms of several biological functions (eg, activity/rest, sleep/wake, body temperature, endocrine rhythms, etc, its use may provide a new therapeutic approach for the treatment of affective disorders. However, the available evidence is controversial. This review summarizes the data published so far about reliable evidence on the role of melatonin in affective disorders.Keywords: melatonin, melatonergic system, mood disorders, depression, seasonal affective disorder, bipolar disorder 

  10. Early trauma and mood disorders in youngsters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caroline Elizabeth Konradt

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To verify early experiences of childhood abuse and neglect among young with bipolar disorder (BD, major depression (MDD, and controls. METHOD: Case-control study nested to a population-based cross-sectional study. The diagnosis was performed via the structured clinical interview for DSM-IV Axis I Disorders (SCID. Traumatic events were analyzed using the Portuguese version - Questionário sobre Traumas na Infância (CTQ - based on the Childhood Trauma Questionnaire. RESULTS: The sample comprised 231 adolescents with 95 individuals in the control group, 82 with MDD and 54 with BD (32 of type I and 22 type II. The prevalence of trauma or violence in childhood was 42.2%; among those, 54.7% had BD, 62.2% had MDD and 18.1% were in the control group. Young people with BD or MDD obtained higher means in total CTQ and among their components when compared with those in the control group. DISCUSSION: Reports on early traumatic experiences were more frequent among young people with mood disorders than in the general population, corroborating the literature on the subject. In this sense, the traumatic experiences during childhood seemed to contribute to the onset of the disorder.

  11. Neurological soft signs discriminating mood disorders from first episode schizophrenia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boks, MPM; Liddle, PF; Burgerhof, JGM; Knegtering, R; Bosch, RJ

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the specificity of neurological soft signs (NSS) for first episode schizophrenia compared with mood disorders. Method: We assessed NSS in a sample of 60 healthy controls, 191 first episode psychosis patients and 81 mood disorder patients. We used a principle component analy

  12. Genomic studies of mood disorders - the brain as a muscle?

    OpenAIRE

    Niculescu, Alexander B.

    2005-01-01

    Recent genomic studies showing abnormalities in the fibroblast growth factor system in the postmortem brains of people with major depressive disorder support previous indications of a role for growth factors in mood disorders. Similar molecular pathways, volumetric changes, and the effects of exercise on mood suggest a superficial analogy, and perhaps a deeper relationship, between muscle and brain functioning.

  13. Comparison of catatonia presentation in patients with schizophrenia and mood disorder in Lagos, Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Afe Taiwo

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available "nObjective: To compare the clinical profile and pattern of catatonic symptoms of patients with schizophrenia and mood disorder. "n "nMethod: Records of 13,968 patients seen between 1983-1985 and 2003- 2005 were reviewed for symptoms of catatonia by resident doctors in psychiatry. Cases in which the diagnosis were schizophrenia or mood disorder were then noted. Socio-demographic and clinical features were described for each diagnosis. "nResults: There were a total of 98 cases with catatonia out of the 13,968 case notes reviewed. Schizophrenia accounted for 82.5% and 53.4% in the two periods, while the proportion associated with mood disorders increased from 10% to 20.7%. Male to female  ratio was 1.2:1 in schizophrenia and 1:3 in mood disorder. Those with schizophrenia were younger and with an earlier age of onset of symptoms than those with mood disorders. "nConclusion:Catatonia associated with mood disorder was found to be increasing over the years when compared with schizophrenia. Differences were observed in socio-demographic characteristics and number of predominant catatonic symptoms. Having a separate category for catatonia due to the mood disorders in the current diagnostic guidelines (10th edition of the International Classification of Diseases and the 4th edition of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual will help in better diagnosis of catatonia.

  14. Depressive mood, eating disorder symptoms, and perfectionism in female college students: a mediation analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Villamisar, Domingo; Dattilo, John; Del Pozo, Araceli

    2012-01-01

    Although perfectionism has long been established as an important risk factor for depressive mood and eating disorders, the mechanisms through which this temperamental predisposition mediates the relationship between depressive mood and eating disorder symptoms are still relatively unclear. In this study we hypothesized that both perfectionism dimensions, self-oriented perfectionism and socially prescribed perfectionism, would mediate the relationship between current symptoms of depression and eating disorders in a non-clinical sample of Spanish undergraduate females. Two hundred sixteen female undergraduate students of the University Complutense of Madrid (Spain) completed the Spanish versions of the Eating Attitudes Test (EAT-40), the Multidimensional Perfectionism Scale (MPS), OBQ-44, and BDI-II and BAI. Results demonstrated the importance of socially prescribed perfectionism in mediation of the relationship between depressive mood and symptoms of eating disorders. Socially prescribed perfectionism mediates the relationship between depressive mood and eating disorder symptoms for female college students.

  15. Theoretical and clinical overview of affective temperaments in mood disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xenia Gonda

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Temperaments are imperturbable variations of personality, traits and ways of reacting to the environment that characterize individuals and remain constant throughout several different situations. Temperaments usually play a central role in determining emotional reactions, therefore several temperamental models have attempted to establish the potential relationship between temperaments and affective disorders. According to Hagop Akiskal, affective temperaments are subclinical and subaffective trait-like manifestations of affective disorders. Unlike several models of temperament which were exclusively developed theoretically in order to describe healthy human functioning, later extrapolated to capture the pathological domains of mental and behavioral features, the current model of affective temperaments was developed on classical traditions and mainly based on the observation of subjects with mood disorders and their healthy first degree relatives. There is accumulating evidence concerning the development of affective temperaments based on their adaptive evolutionary characteristics and genetic background, and normative data from large national studies on general and healthy samples indicate their universal characteristics. Studies in affective patient populations indicate that the relationship between affective temperaments and affective illness is more complex than a simple extrapolation from psychopathology and mental health, and affective temperaments may represent a latent state of the staging model, playing a pathoplastic role in mood disorders determining their evolution, clinical features, main characteristics and outcome. A large body of data on affective temperaments has been published during the last decade, deserving a critical analysis presented in this overview.

  16. Pediatric Bipolar Disorder and Mood Dysregulation: Diagnostic Controversies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shain, Benjamin N

    2014-08-01

    Pediatric bipolar disorder, once thought rare, has gone through stages of conceptualization. DSM criteria were reinterpreted such that children and adolescents, particularly those with ADHD, were commonly diagnosed with bipolar disorder and thought to be atypical by adult standards. Research criteria separated pediatric bipolar patients into 3 phenotypes, including a research diagnosis of "severe mood dysregulation." DSM-5 largely maintained previous criteria for bipolar disorder at all ages and created a new diagnosis called "disruptive mood dysregulation disorder," categorized as a depressive disorder, for persistently angry or irritable patients with symptoms of childhood onset. However, the controversy regarding the diagnosis of pediatric bipolar disorder continues. Progress has been made in the classification of children and adolescents with mood symptoms who are predominantly irritable or angry, but lack of clarity remains regarding classification of children and adolescents with "symptoms characteristic of bipolar disorder" who do not meet criteria for bipolar I disorder, bipolar II disorder, or cyclothymia.

  17. Sexual dysfunction, mood, anxiety, and personality disorders in female patients with fibromyalgia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kayhan, Fatih; Küçük, Adem; Satan, Yılmaz; İlgün, Erdem; Arslan, Şevket; İlik, Faik

    2016-01-01

    Background We aimed to investigate the current prevalence of sexual dysfunction (SD), mood, anxiety, and personality disorders in female patients with fibromyalgia (FM). Methods This case–control study involved 96 patients with FM and 94 healthy women. The SD diagnosis was based on a psychiatric interview in accordance with the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, fourth edition criteria. Mood and anxiety disorders were diagnosed using the Structured Clinical Interview. Personality disorders were diagnosed according to the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM, Revised Third Edition Personality Disorders. Results Fifty of the 96 patients (52.1%) suffered from SD. The most common SD was lack of sexual desire (n=36, 37.5%) and arousal disorder (n=10, 10.4%). Of the 96 patients, 45 (46.9%) had a mood or anxiety disorder and 13 (13.5%) had a personality disorder. The most common mood, anxiety, and personality disorders were major depression (26%), generalized anxiety disorder (8.3%), and histrionic personality disorder (10.4%). Conclusion SD, mood, and anxiety disorders are frequently observed in female patients with FM. Pain plays a greater role in the development of SD in female patients with FM. PMID:26937190

  18. Family-Based Interventions for Childhood Mood Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Andrea S; Fristad, Mary A

    2015-07-01

    Childhood mood disorders are associated with substantial impairment and risks for youth and their families. Identifying interventions that improve child and family functioning is essential for child, family, and public health. Several individual therapy modalities have been developed with historically little attention on family participation. However, with the accumulation of research demonstrating the roles family interactions can play in symptom presentation and course, interventions that include family involvement are garnering more attention and have demonstrated promising benefits for children with mood disorders. This article reviews evidence-based family-focused interventions for childhood mood disorders and provides examples of their implementation. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Evaluation of Mood Disorder Questionnaire (MDQ in patients with mood disorders: a multicenter trial across China.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hai-Chen Yang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The aim of this study was to test the ability of the Chinese version of the Mood Disorder Questionnaire (MDQ to identify Bipolar Disorders (BD in patients diagnosed with Major Depressive Disorder (MDD or Unipolar Disorder (UD in the clinical setting. METHODS: 1,487 being treated for MDD or UD at 12 mental health centers across China, completed the MDQ and subsequently examined by the Mini International Neuropsychiatric Interview (MINI. Receiver Operating Characteristic(ROC curves were used to determine the ability of the MDQ to differentiate between BD (BD, BD-I and BD-II and MDD or UD and patients with BD-I from patients with BD-II. RESULTS: Of the 1,487 patients, 309 (20.8% satisfied the DSM-IV criteria for BD: 118 (7.9% for BD-I and 191 (12.8% for BD-II. When only part one of the MDQ was used, the best cutoff was 7 between BD and UD (sensitivity 0.66, specificity 0.88, positive predictive value 0.59, negative predictive value 0.91, 6 between BD-II and UD, and 10 between BD-I and BD-II. If all three parts of the MDQ were used, the MDQ could not distinguish between BD and UD at a cutoff of 7 (or 6, and the sensitivity was only 0.22 (or 0.24. CONCLUSION: The Chinese version of the MDQ had good psychometric features in screening bipolar disorders from depressive patients with mood disorders when part two and part three of the MDQ were ignored.

  20. Clinical Trials: Information and Options for People with Mood Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Releases & Announcements Public Service Announcements Partnering with DBSA Clinical Trials: Information and Options for People with Mood Disorders What are clinical trials? Clinical trials are research studies involving people, which ...

  1. Omega-3 fatty acids in mood disorders: an overview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Young Christopher

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available This review addresses the potential role of omega-3 fatty acids in mood disorders, from the biochemical rationale for their use to the growing body of data supporting their clinical efficacy.

  2. Mood disorders in adolescents: concepts and interrogations among Francophone psychiatrists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zdanowicz, Nicolas; Jacques, Denis; Janne, Pascal; Mylisnki, Anne; Messaud, Charles; Tordeurs, David; Reynaert, Christine

    2013-09-01

    With the publication of DSM III, the nosology of children and adolescents' disorders has evolved differently in Francophone and Anglo-Saxon countries. We want to 1 / familiarize readers with the nosographic concepts of mood disorders and bipolar disorders in the Francophone world of Adolescent Psychiatry; 2/ highlight the major current issues of concern to both Francophone and Anglo-Saxon adolescents' psychiatrists. A review of the literature in PubMed, PsycINFO and PsycARTICLES, but also of Francophone journals or textbooks not included in these databases nor distributed outside Francophone countries. Although Francophone adolescents' psychiatrists still rely on the DSM II, particularly in reference to the transitory dimension of problems during adolescence, the DSM III led to a tightening of criteria for bipolar disorder in the Anglo-Saxon countries. These disorders have become rare in the 2000s while still common in Francophone countries. Nowadays the evolution of current criteria in Anglo-Saxon countries tends to bring the diagnostic criteria closer to the Francophone's one even though important differences still persist. Despite differences between these two approaches in Psychiatry, there is agreement regarding the poor prognosis of type I bipolar disorder, particularly when psychotic traits are observed. Early diagnosis and treatment are therefore a challenge for both, but their limitations are inherent to their respective approaches. In Anglo-Saxon countries, if the criteria are met for bipolar disorder, treatment is decided at the risk of over-diagnosis and stigmatization of false positives. In Francophone countries, even if the criteria for bipolar disorder are met, it is still necessary that the psychopathological analysis of the disorder in the developmental framework of adolescence confirms that the disorder is stable, at the risk of later treatment and of increase of insufficiently treated false negatives. A reconciliation of these fields may limit

  3. Narcissistic Personality Disorder and suicidal behavior in mood disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coleman, Daniel; Lawrence, Ryan; Parekh, Amrita; Galfalvy, Hanga; Blasco-Fontecilla, Hilario; Brent, David A; Mann, J John; Baca-Garcia, Enrique; Oquendo, Maria A

    2017-02-01

    The relationship of Narcissistic Personality Disorder (NPD) to suicidal behavior is understudied. The modest body of existing research suggests that NPD is protective against low-lethality suicide attempts, but is associated with high lethality attempts. Mood-disordered patients (N = 657) received structured interviews including Axis I and II diagnosis and standardized clinical measures. Following chi-square and t-tests, a logistical regression model was constructed to identify predictors of suicide attempt. While there was no bivariate relationship of NPD on suicide attempt, in the logistic regression patients with NPD were 2.4 times less likely to make a suicide attempt (OR = 0.41; 95% CI = 0.19 - 0.88; p < 0.05), compared with non-NPD patients and controlling for possible confounding variables. NPD was not associated with attempt lethality. NPD patients were more likely to be male, to have a substance use disorder, and to have high aggression and hostility scores. Limitations include that the sample consists of only mood-disordered patients, a modest sample size of NPD, and the data are cross-sectional. The multivariate protective effect of NPD on suicide attempt is consistent with most previous research. The lower impulsivity of NPD patients and less severe personality pathology relative to other personality disorders may contribute to this effect. No relationship of NPD to attempt lethality was found, contradicting other research, but perhaps reflecting differences between study samples. Future studies should oversample NPD patients and include suicide death as an outcome. Clinical implications include discussion of individualized suicide risk assessment with NPD patients.

  4. Mood lability and bipolar disorder in children and adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Leslie; Barnett, Shannon

    2008-04-01

    Pediatric bipolar disorder, once considered rare, has reportedly increased in incidence over the past 10 years. There is significant debate about the phenomenology, diagnosis and treatment of this illness. The diagnostic assessment of children with severe mood and behavioural disturbance is of considerable public health importance as the ultimate diagnosis can have significant treatment implications and can impact the level of stigma experienced by children and their families. The purposes of this paper are to: 1) review current issues in the phenomenology and diagnostic assessment of bipolar disorder in children and adolescents; 2) review recent research suggesting that youths with a chronic course of illness should be considered a separate group from those with an episodic course; and 3) offer suggestions for future studies to address the various phenomenological controversies.

  5. Neurocognitive performance as an endophenotype for mood disorder subgroups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merikangas, Alison K; Cui, Lihong; Calkins, Monica E; Moore, Tyler M; Gur, Ruben C; Gur, Raquel E; Merikangas, Kathleen R

    2017-06-01

    There is growing evidence that neurocognitive function may be an endophenotype for mood disorders. The goal of this study is to examine the specificity and familiality of neurocognitive functioning across the full range of mood disorder subgroups, including Bipolar I (BP-I), Bipolar II (BP-II), Major Depressive Disorders (MDD), and controls in a community-based family study. A total of 310 participants from 137 families with mood spectrum disorders (n=151) and controls (n=159) completed the University of Pennsylvania's Computerized Neurocognitive Battery (CNB) that assessed the accuracy and speed of task performance across five domains. Mixed effects regression models tested association and familiality. Compared to those without mood disorders, participants with BP-I had increased accuracy in complex cognition, while participants with MDD were more accurate in emotion recognition. There was also a significant familial association for accuracy of complex cognition. Mood disorder subgroups did not differ in performance speed in any of the domains. The small number of BP-I cases, and family size limited the statistical power of these analyses, and the cross-sectional assessment of neurocognitive function precluded our ability to determine whether performance precedes or post dates onset of disorder. This is one of the few community-based family studies of potential neurocognitive endophenotypes that includes the full range of mood disorder subgroups. There were few differences in neurocognitive function except enhanced accuracy in specific domains among those with BP-I and MDD. The differential findings across specific mood disorder subgroups substantiate their heterogeneity in other biologic and endophenotypic domains. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Mood disorders in restless legs syndrome (Willis-Ekbom disease).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, Philip M; Sharon, Denise

    2014-07-01

    Restless legs syndrome (RLS), also known as Willis-Ekbom disease, is a sensorimotor disorder that can result in considerable sleep disruption. This narrative review provides an overview of RLS diagnosis and reports epidemiologic evidence for an association between RLS and mood disorders. Possible links between RLS, sleep disturbances, and mood disorders are considered, and theoretical pathophysiologic pathways are discussed. Finally, pharmacologic therapies for RLS are summarized. A PubMed search was performed using the search term restless legs syndrome in combination with affective/anxiety, antidepressants, anxiety/anxiety disorder, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, depression/depressive disorder, mood/mood disorder, neuropsychiatric, panic/panic disorder, psychiatric disorder, and psychosis. English-language articles published between January 1993 and May 2013 were retrieved. Additional studies were identified from the reference lists of relevant publications. 173 publications were retrieved. Articles related to the association between idiopathic RLS and depression, anxiety, and mood disorders were reviewed. In total, 32 epidemiologic studies were identified. These studies were reviewed in detail and ranked according to quality. Data were extracted on the basis of relevance to the topic. Epidemiologic studies were assessed using 3 parameters: methodology, data quality, and generalizability of the results. Each factor was scored from 1 (high quality) to 4 (low quality), giving a total score of between 3 and 12 for each study. RLS and mood disorders are frequently comorbid. Recognition and appropriate treatment of comorbid RLS are particularly important in patients with psychiatric disorders, as RLS is a common medical reason for insomnia, and antidepressant use may exacerbate sensory symptoms. © Copyright 2014 Physicians Postgraduate Press, Inc.

  7. The association between parental history of diagnosed mood/anxiety disorders and psychiatric symptoms and disorders in young adult offspring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Low Nancy CP

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Parental history of mood or anxiety disorders is one of the strongest and most consistent risk factors for the development of these disorders in offspring. Gaps remain however in our knowledge of whether maternal or paternal disorders are more strongly associated with offspring disorders, and whether the association exists in non-clinical samples. This study uses a large population-based sample to test if maternal or paternal history of mood and/or anxiety disorders increases the risk of mood and/or anxiety disorders, or symptoms of specific anxiety disorders, in offspring. Methods Data were drawn from the Nicotine Dependence in Teens Study, a prospective cohort investigation of 1293 grade 7 students. Data on mental health outcomes were collected in mailed self-report questionnaires when participants were aged 20.4 (0.7 years on average. Parental data were collected in mailed self-report questionnaires. This current analysis pertains to 564 participants with maternal and/or paternal data. The association between maternal and paternal history and each of diagnosed anxiety disorder, diagnosed mood disorder, and symptoms of specific anxiety disorders in offspring was studied in multivariate logistic regression. Results A higher proportion of mothers than fathers had a diagnosed mood/anxiety disorder (23% versus 12%. Similarly, 14% of female offspring had a diagnosed mood/anxiety disorder, compared to 6% of male offspring. The adjusted odds ratio (95% confidence interval for maternal history was 2.2 (1.1, 4.5 for diagnosed mood disorders, 4.0 (2.1, 7.8 for diagnosed anxiety disorders, and 2.2 (1.2, 4.0 for social phobia symptoms. Paternal history was not associated with any of the mental health outcomes in offspring. Conclusion Maternal, but not paternal mood/anxiety disorders were associated with diagnosed psychiatric disorders, as well as symptoms of specific anxiety disorders, in offspring. Efforts to detect mood and anxiety

  8. Social, familial and psychological risk factors for mood and anxiety disorders in childhood and early adulthood

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hyland, Philip; Shevlin, Mark; Elklit, Ask

    2016-01-01

    history of any anxiety and mood disorder, parental history of self-harming behaviour, advanced paternal age, gender, urban dwelling, economic deprivation, family dissolution, and childhood adversity were used to predict diagnosis of both anxiety and mood disorders from ages 10 to 21 years. Results: Binary...... by simultaneously testing a range of established psychosocial risk factors. Method: A national birth cohort of the Danish population born in 1984 and tracked over the course of the first 21 years of their life was used in the current study (n = 54,458). Psychosocial risk factors including paternal and maternal...... logistic regression analysis showed that being female and a parental history of a mood or anxiety disorder are the strongest predictors of both disorders. Economic deprivation, and family dissolution also increase likelihood of both disorders. Urban dwelling and childhood adversity are predictors...

  9. Autism Spectrum Disorder Scale Scores in Pediatric Mood and Anxiety Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pine, Daniel S.; Guyer, Amanda E.; Goldwin, Michelle; Towbin, Kenneth A.; Leibenluft, Ellen

    2008-01-01

    A study compares the scores on autism spectrum disorder (ASD) symptom scales in healthy children and in children with mood or anxiety disorders. It is observed that children with mood or anxiety disorders obtained higher scores on ASD symptom scales than healthy children.

  10. Metabolic syndrome among psychiatric outpatients with mood and anxiety disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, Ching-I; Liu, Chia-Yih; Hsiao, Mei-Chun; Yu, Nan-Wen; Chu, Chun-Lin

    2014-06-21

    Few studies have simultaneously compared the impacts of pharmacotherapy and mental diagnoses on metabolic syndrome (MetS) among psychiatric outpatients with mood and anxiety disorders. This study aimed to investigate the impacts of pharmacotherapy and mental diagnoses on MetS and the prevalence of MetS among these patients. Two-hundred and twenty-nine outpatients (men/women = 85/144) were enrolled from 1147 outpatients with mood and anxiety disorders by systematic sampling. Psychiatric disorders and MetS were diagnosed using the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV-TR and the new International Diabetics Federation definition, respectively. The numbers of antipsychotics, mood stabilizers, and antidepressants being taken were recorded. Logistic regression was used to investigate the impacts of pharmacotherapy and psychiatric diagnoses on MetS. Among 229 subjects, 51 (22.3%) fulfilled the criteria for MetS. The prevalence of MetS was highest in the bipolar I disorder (46.7%) patients, followed by bipolar II disorder (25.0%), major depressive disorder (22.0%), anxiety-only disorders (16.7%), and no mood and/or anxiety disorders (14.3%). The percentages of MetS among the five categories were correlated with those of the patients being treated with antipsychotics and mood stabilizers. Use of antipsychotics and/or mood stabilizers independently predicted a higher risk of MetS after controlling for demographic variables and psychiatric diagnoses. When adding body mass index (BMI) as an independent variable in the regression model, BMI became the most significant factor to predict MetS. BMI was found to be an important factor related to MetS. Pharmacotherapy might be one of underlying causes of elevated BMI. The interactions among MetS, BMI, pharmacotherapy, and psychiatric diagnoses might need further research.

  11. [Stressful life events and mood disorders: a community sample].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jansen, Karen; Cardoso, Taiane de Azevedo; Mondin, Thaíse Campos; Matos, Mariana Bonati de; Souza, Luciano Dias de Mattos; Pinheiro, Ricardo Tavares; Magalhães, Pedro Vieira da Silva; Silva, Ricardo Azevedo da

    2014-09-01

    Mood disorders are a consequence of the interaction between environmental and biological factors. The objective of this study was to identify associations between stressful life events (LEs) and mood disorders in a community sample of young people in southern Brazil. It is a cross-sectional population-based study on young people between 18 and 24 years of age. The selection of the sample was conducted via conglomerates. Mini International Neuropsychiatric Interviews were used to evaluate mood disorders, and the Social Readjustment Rating Scale to assess stressful life events. The sample included 1172 young people. Of the total sample, the proportion of stressful life events in the last year in each category was: 53.8% work, 42.4% loss of social support, 63.8% family, 50.9% environmental changes, 61.1% personal difficulties, and 38.7% finances. A significant relationship was found between categories of stressful life events and mood disorder episodes. A higher incidence of stressful life events was found among young people in a mixed episode compared to young people in a depressive, (hypo)maniac episode with controls. This finding suggests a psychosocial interaction between stressful life events and the occurrence of mood disorders.

  12. Complexity of childhood sexual abuse: Predictors of current PTSD, mood disorders, substance use, and sexual risk behavior among adult men who have sex with men

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boroughs, Michael S.; Valentine, Sarah E.; Ironson, Gail H.; Shipherd, Jillian C.; Safren, Steven A.; Taylor, S. Wade; Dale, Sannisha K.; Baker, Joshua S.; Wilner, Julianne G.; O'Cleirigh, Conall

    2016-01-01

    Men who have sex with men (MSM) are the group most at risk for HIV and represent the majority of new infections in the United States. Rates of childhood sexual abuse (CSA) among MSM have been estimated as high as 46%. CSA is associated with increased risk of HIV and greater likelihood of HIV sexual risk behavior. The purpose of this study was to identify the relationships between CSA complexity indicators and mental health, substance use, sexually transmitted infections (STIs) and HIV sexual risk among MSM. MSM with CSA histories (n = 162) who were screened for an HIV-prevention efficacy trial completed comprehensive psychosocial assessments. Five indicators of complex CSA experiences were created: CSA by family member, CSA with penetration, CSA with physical injury, CSA with intense fear, and first CSA in adolescence. Adjusted regression models were used to identify relationships between CSA complexity and outcomes. Participants reporting CSA by family member were at 2.6 odds of current alcohol use disorder (OR: 2.64: CI 1.24 – 5.63), 2 times higher odds of substance use disorder (OR 2.1: CI 1.02 – 2.36), and 2.7 times higher odds of reporting an STI in the past year (OR 2.7: CI 1.04 – 7.1). CSA with penetration was associated with increased likelihood of current PTSD (OR 3.17: CI 1.56 – 6.43), recent HIV sexual risk behavior (OR 2.7: CI 1.16 – 6.36) and a greater number of casual sexual partners (p = .02). Both CSA with Physical Injury (OR 4.05: CI 1.9 – 8.7) and CSA with Intense Fear (OR 5.16: CI 2.5 – 10.7) were related to increased odds for current PTSD. First CSA in adolescence was related to increased odds of major depressive disorder. These findings suggest that CSA, with one or more complexities, creates patterns of vulnerabilities for MSM, including PTSD, substance use, and sexual risk taking and suggests the need for detailed assessment of CSA and the development of integrated HIV prevention programs that address mental health and substance

  13. Disruptive mood dysregulation disorder and its effect on bipolar disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faheem, Shama; Petti, Victoria; Mellos, George

    2017-05-01

    In the last few decades, a noticeable increase in the diagnosis of bipolar disorder (BD) in youth has raised concerns, particularly because of a consequent increase in the use of psychotropic medications with adverse side effects. After observing the development of those youth into adulthood, clinicians and researchers have questioned the notion of expanding the diagnostic boundaries of BD to encapsulate these youth. Our research is aimed at gleaning further information on disruptive mood dysregulation disorder (DMDD) and to observe whether its introduction has affected the rates of BD in children and adolescents. In a retrospective study, we calculated the frequencies of patients with BD admitted to a pediatric psychiatric hospital both before and after the introduction of DSM-5. We also observed age, sex, comorbid disorders, and management of DMDD. We found a decrease in the diagnosis of BD with the introduction of DMDD in DSM-5, without much change in treatment interventions utilized. Research on DMDD is limited so far. Further studies are needed to put together evidence-based guidelines and practice parameters for its management.

  14. Mood disorders in oocyte donor candidates: brief report and implications for future research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Katherine E; Stemmle, Pascale G; Westphal, Lynn M; Rasgon, Natalie L

    2011-04-01

    BACKGROUND IVF, using donor oocytes, has become increasingly common. The donation procedure carries psychiatric risks, including depression, anxiety and rarely, psychosis, and this risk increases when there is a past history of psychiatric illness. We report on the psychiatric status, at intake assessment, of a group of candidate oocyte donors. METHODS The authors reviewed clinical records of 63 women continuously presenting to a University medical center for psychiatric evaluation as part of the screening process for oocyte donation. A board certified psychiatrist administered a structured clinical interview to candidate donors, and self-report measures were obtained from 28 women. RESULTS There was a significant discrepancy between psychiatric history of depression and current mood status, as measured by both clinical interview and psychometric self-report data. Nearly one-quarter of candidate donors (22%) reported a history of major depressive disorder; however, all candidate donors denied current mood disturbance on clinical interview, and mean Beck depression inventory and profile of mood states scores were lower than expected compared with psychometric norms (P mood symptoms, and the moderate heritability of mood disorders, careful evaluation of candidate donor affective disorder history is recommended. This evaluation should focus on sensitivity to mood destabilization during times of hormonal change. Measures that examine whether a candidate donor may have a tendency to present herself in an overly favorable manner, and/or a tendency to minimize symptoms, are recommended.

  15. Controversies about a common etiology for eating and mood disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clara eRossetti

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Obesity and depression represent a growing health concern worldwide. For many years, basic science and medicine have considered obesity as a metabolic illness, while depression was classified a psychiatric disorder. Despite accumulating evidence suggesting that obesity and depression may share commonalities though, the causal link between eating and mood disorders remains to be fully understood. This etiology is highly complex, consisting of multiple environmental and genetic risk factors that interact with each other. In this review, we sought to summarize the preclinical and clinical evidence supporting a common etiology for eating and mood disorders, with a particular emphasis on signaling pathways involved in the maintenance of energy balance and mood stability, among which orexigenic and anorexigenic neuropeptides, metabolic factors, stress responsive hormones, cytokines and neurotrophic factors.

  16. Optimizing the treatment of mood disorders in the perinatal period

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meltzer-Brody, Samantha; Jones, Ian

    2015-01-01

    The perinatal period is a time of high risk for women with unipolar and bipolar mood disorders. We discuss treatment considerations for perinatal mood disorders, including unipolar and bipolar depression as well as postpartum psychosis. We further explore the unique issues faced by women and their families across the full trajectory of the perinatal period from preconception planning through pregnancy and following childbirth. Treatment of perinatal mood disorders requires a collaborative care approach between obstetrics practitioners and mental health providers, to ensure that a thoughtful risk : benefit analysis is conducted. It is vital to consider the risks of the underlying illness versus risks of medication exposure during pregnancy or lactation. When considering medication treatment, attention must be paid to prior medication trials that were most efficacious and best tolerated. Lastly, it is important to assess the impact of individual psychosocial stressors and lifestyle factors on treatment response. PMID:26246794

  17. Botanicals for mood disorders with a focus on epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ketcha Wanda, Germain Jean Magloire; Ngitedem, Steve Guemnang; Njamen, Dieudonné

    2015-11-01

    Mood disorders are among the major health problems that exist worldwide. They are highly prevalent in the general population and cause significant disturbance of life quality and social functioning of the affected persons. The two major classes of mood disorders are bipolar disorders and depression. The latter is assumed to be the most frequent psychiatric comorbidity in epilepsy. Studies published during the second half of the 20th century recognized that certain patients with epilepsy present a depressed mood. Synthesized pharmaceuticals have been in use for decades to treat both mood disorders and epilepsy, but despite their efficiency, their use is limited by numerous side effects. On the other hand, animal models have been developed to deeply study potential botanicals which have an effect on mood disorders. Studies to investigate the potential effects of medicinal plants acting on the nervous system and used to treat seizures and anxiety are increasingly growing. However, these studies discuss the two conditions separately without association. In this review, we present animal models of depression and investigative models (methods of assessing depression) of depression and anxiety in animals. Other classical test models for prediction of clinical antidepressant activity are presented. Finally, this review also highlights antidepressant activities of herbals focusing specially on depression-like behaviors associated with epilepsy. The pharmacological properties and active principles of cited medicinal plants are emphasized. This review, therefore, provides an overview of the work done on botanicals for mood disorders, potential mechanisms of action of botanicals, and the major compounds. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled "Botanicals for Epilepsy".

  18. Sexual dysfunction, mood, anxiety, and personality disorders in female patients with fibromyalgia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kayhan F

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Fatih Kayhan,1 Adem Küçük,2 Yılmaz Satan,3 Erdem İlgün,4 Şevket Arslan,5 Faik İlik6 1Department of Psychiatry, Faculty of Medicine, Selçuk University, 2Department of Rheumatology, Faculty of Medicine, Necmettin Erbakan University, 3Department of Psychiatry, Konya Numune State Hospital, 4Department of Physical Therapy and Rehabilitation, Faculty of Medicine, Mevlana University, 5Department of Internal Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Necmettin Erbakan University, 6Department of Neurology, Faculty of Medicine, Başkent University, Konya, Turkey Background: We aimed to investigate the current prevalence of sexual dysfunction (SD, mood, anxiety, and personality disorders in female patients with fibromyalgia (FM.  Methods: This case–control study involved 96 patients with FM and 94 healthy women. The SD diagnosis was based on a psychiatric interview in accordance with the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, fourth edition criteria. Mood and anxiety disorders were diagnosed using the Structured Clinical Interview. Personality disorders were diagnosed according to the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM, Revised Third Edition Personality Disorders.  Results: Fifty of the 96 patients (52.1% suffered from SD. The most common SD was lack of sexual desire (n=36, 37.5% and arousal disorder (n=10, 10.4%. Of the 96 patients, 45 (46.9% had a mood or anxiety disorder and 13 (13.5% had a personality disorder. The most common mood, anxiety, and personality disorders were major depression (26%, generalized anxiety disorder (8.3%, and histrionic personality disorder (10.4%.  Conclusion: SD, mood, and anxiety disorders are frequently observed in female patients with FM. Pain plays a greater role in the development of SD in female patients with FM. Keywords: anxiety, depression, fibromyalgia, sexual dysfunction

  19. Evidence for use of mood stabilizers and anticonvulsants in the treatment of nonaffective disorders in children and adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amaladoss, Alfred; Roberts, Nasreen; Amaladoss, Franklin

    2010-01-01

    Mood stabilizers and anticonvulsants have been frequently used to control behaviors in children and adolescent with nonaffective disorders. The purpose of this study was to review the literature to evaluate the evidence of these agents as treatment options in this subset of patients. We reviewed all the literature between 1949 and 2009 on the use of anticonvulsants and mood stabilizers in controlling severe behavior dysregulation and aggression in child and adolescent who do not meet the criteria for any mood disorder. The review revealed a total of 19 studies. Of the different mood stabilizers/anticonvulsants, both lithium and divalproex showed some promise in treating children and adolescents with nonmood disorders. Larger studies are nevertheless needed to support the ongoing use of these current anticonvulsants and mood stabilizers in children and adolescents with nonmood disorders. Also, further investigation to the potential use in the long term would need to be established, bearing in mind the balance of side effects and treatment benefit.

  20. Lithium safety and tolerability in mood disorders: a critical review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivan Aprahamian

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Background : Lithium is a first-line treatment for bipolar disorder in all phases, also indicated as add-on drug for unipolar depression and suicide prevention. This study encompasses a broad critical review on the safety and tolerability of lithium for mood disorders. Methods : A computerized search for English written human studies was made in MEDLINE, using the keywords “lithium” and “mood disorders”, starting from July 1993 through July 2013 (n = 416. This initial search aimed to select clinical trials, prospective data, and controlled design studies of lithium treatment for mood disorders reporting adverse effects (n = 36. The final selection yielded 91 studies. Results : The most common general side effects in patients on lithium treatment were thirst, frequent urination, dry mouth, weight gain, fatigue and cognitive complaints. Lithium users showed a high prevalence of hypothyroidism, hyperparathyroidism, and decrease in urinary concentration ability. Reduction of glomerular filtration rate in patients using lithium was also observed, but in a lesser extent. The evidence of teratogenicity associated with lithium use is not well established. Anti-inflammatory non-steroidal drugs, thiazide diuretics, angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors, and alprazolam may increase serum lithium and the consequent risk for intoxication. Discussion : Short-term lithium treatment is associated with mild side effects. Medium and long-term lithium treatment, however, might have effects on target organs which may be prevented by periodical monitoring. Overall, lithium is still a safe option for the treatment of mood disorders.

  1. Exploring the Relationship between Mood Disorders and Gifted Individuals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Missett, Tracy C.

    2013-01-01

    Researchers of the gifted have traditionally advanced the theory, though they are often without data to support it, that an association between intellectual and/or creative giftedness and mood disorders exists. This assumed association is often referred to as the "mad genius theory." This article explores the origins and development of…

  2. Fluoxetine Monotherapy in Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder and Comorbid Non-Bipolar Mood Disorders in Children and Adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quintana, Humberto; Butterbaugh, Grant J.; Purnell, William; Layman, Ann K.

    2007-01-01

    Children with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) are at increased risk for developing comorbid non-bipolar mood disorders. Fluoxetine monotherapy is an established treatment for pediatric mood disorders; however its efficacy in ADHD and comorbid mood disorder is unknown. Therefore, we evaluated 30 children who met DSM-IV criteria for…

  3. Fluoxetine Monotherapy in Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder and Comorbid Non-Bipolar Mood Disorders in Children and Adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quintana, Humberto; Butterbaugh, Grant J.; Purnell, William; Layman, Ann K.

    2007-01-01

    Children with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) are at increased risk for developing comorbid non-bipolar mood disorders. Fluoxetine monotherapy is an established treatment for pediatric mood disorders; however its efficacy in ADHD and comorbid mood disorder is unknown. Therefore, we evaluated 30 children who met DSM-IV criteria for…

  4. Autoimmune diseases and severe infections as risk factors for mood disorders a nationwide study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Benros, Michael E.; Waltoft, Berit L.; Nordentoft, Merete;

    2013-01-01

    Mood disorders frequently co-occur with medical diseases that involve inflammatory pathophysiologic mechanisms. Immune responses can affect the brain and might increase the risk of mood disorders, but longitudinal studies of comorbidity are lacking....

  5. Discovering new genetic and psychosocial pathways in Major Depressive Disorder: the NewMood project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freeborough, Annabel; Kimpton, Jessica

    2011-09-01

    The World Health Organisation predicts that Major Depressive Disorder (MDD) will be the second greatest contributor to the global burden of disease by 2020, however, the neurobiological mechanisms behind the disease and the risk factors for it are yet unknown. NewMood (New Molecules for Mood Disorders) was a research project funded by the EU, collaborating work from 10 European countries with the aim of finding new molecular mechanisms behind MDD to develop more effective treatment options. This review explains the aims and objectives of NewMood and how it intends to achieve them with regards to the current literature. It also outlines two of its most recent projects: genome wide association replication study for single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) increasing susceptibility to MDD and stress related pathways in depression using the cortisol awakening response (CAR). Both of these studies had significant results and could further contribute to our current understanding of MDD.

  6. Anxiety, Mood, and Substance Use Disorders in Parents of Children with Anxiety Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Alicia A.; Furr, Jami M.; Sood, Erica D.; Barmish, Andrea J.; Kendall, Philip C.

    2009-01-01

    Examined the prevalence of anxiety, mood, and substance use disorders in the parents of anxiety disordered (AD) children relative to children with no psychological disorder (NPD). The specificity of relationships between child and parent anxiety disorders was also investigated. Results revealed higher prevalence rates of anxiety disorders in…

  7. Mood impairments in adults previously diagnosed with Developmental Coordination Disorder

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    Background: Developmental coordination disorder (DCD) affects up to 6% of the population and is diagnosed on the basis of poor motor coordination. While we know rather little about its lifetime consequences, clear and significant difficulties remain through the lifespan for the majority. Reduced physical activity and, outside of the motor domain, significant mental health issues exist for many with DCD. Aims: This study provides the first investigation of the presence of mood disorders in ...

  8. Knowledge assisted diagnosis of mood disorders using DSM-3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fritz, Robert H.

    1990-01-01

    As part of an Expert Systems class at the University of Houston Clear Lake, a system has been developed using CLIPS to allow a clinical psychologist or psychiatrist to diagnose mood disturbances by providing answers to questions corresponding to branches of a DSM-III criteria tree. Experienced clinicians may assert indications of the client's behavior in order to circumvent multiple levels of the tree, thus speeding diagnosis. An explanation facility was developed for validation of the diagnosis . It also allows for 'what if' scenarios by allowing the clinician to move backwards from the diagnosis to any decision branch and alter the answer previously provided. The system was implemented with a limited vocabulary of symptoms associated primarily with depressive disorders. However, the design supports the addition of vocabulary modules and knowledge bases for other types of disorders. The system currently has applicability in an instructional setting. With the addition of a more complete vocabulary, it could have applicability in a clinical setting. The overall design will support any application where determinations are made via a decision tree.

  9. Antidepressant-emergent mood switch in Korean adolescents with mood disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Kee Jeong; Shon, Seunghyun; Lee, Hyun-Jeong; Joo, Yeonho; Youngstrom, Eric A; Kim, Hyo-Won

    2014-01-01

    The objectives of this study were to compare clinical characteristics of children and adolescents who experienced antidepressant-emergent mood switch (AEMS) and those who did not, and to investigate the predictors of AEMS in a clinical sample of Korean children and adolescents. Two psychiatrists retrospectively reviewed the medical records of 115 children and adolescents (age, 15.0 [2.0] years; 45 boys) that were prescribed antidepressants or lamotrigine for the treatment of a depressive episode of bipolar or depressive disorders from March 2010 to February 2012 at the Department of Psychiatry of Asan Medical Center. The diagnosis was reviewed and confirmed for each subject. Demographic information, clinical characteristics, family history, and psychiatric comorbidities were compared across subjects with and without AEMS. Twelve subjects (10.4%) experienced AEMS. The latency to AEMS was 25.9 (20.9) days (range, 2-56 days; median, 18 days). Antidepressant-emergent mood switch was more frequent in subjects with bipolar disorder (BD) than in subjects with depressive disorder (P disorder (P = 0.001), and concomitant antipsychotics (P = 0.006) were more common in subjects with AEMS than in subjects without AEMS. In multivariate logistic regression, diagnosis of BD (odds ratio [95% confidence interval], 15.94 [1.83-139.16]), concomitant antipsychotics (26.90 [2.43-297.38]), and family history of other psychiatric disorder (39.55 [3.05-512.22]) were significant predictors of AEMS. Children and adolescents who experienced AEMS had distinct profiles of clinical characteristics. Antidepressant-emergent mood switch may be more associated with BD than with depressive disorder.

  10. Early trauma and mood disorders in youngsters

    OpenAIRE

    Caroline Elizabeth Konradt; Karen Jansen; Pedro Vieira da Silva Magalhães; Ricardo Tavares Pinheiro; Flávio Pereira Kapczinski; Ricardo Azevedo da Silva; Luciano Dias de Mattos Souza

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To verify early experiences of childhood abuse and neglect among young with bipolar disorder (BD), major depression (MDD), and controls. METHOD: Case-control study nested to a population-based cross-sectional study. The diagnosis was performed via the structured clinical interview for DSM-IV Axis I Disorders (SCID). Traumatic events were analyzed using the Portuguese version - Questionário sobre Traumas na Infância (CTQ) - based on the Childhood Trauma Questionnaire. RESULTS: The s...

  11. Creativity, Mood Disorders, and Emotional Intelligence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guastello, Stephen J.; Guastello, Denise D.; Hanson, Casey A.

    2004-01-01

    The study addressed two findings in the creativity literature that show, on the one hand, that bipolar disorder and other clinical dysfunctions are overrepresented among eminently creative people, and that positive affect is positively associated with creativity. The central hypothesis of the study was that emotional intelligence could be an…

  12. Creativity, Mood Disorders, and Emotional Intelligence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guastello, Stephen J.; Guastello, Denise D.; Hanson, Casey A.

    2004-01-01

    The study addressed two findings in the creativity literature that show, on the one hand, that bipolar disorder and other clinical dysfunctions are overrepresented among eminently creative people, and that positive affect is positively associated with creativity. The central hypothesis of the study was that emotional intelligence could be an…

  13. Mood Disorder as the Presenting Manifestation of Demyelination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Tapos

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To report an unusual presenting manifestation of multiple sclerosis in a teenager. Case Report: We report the case of a 16-year-old male who was diagnosed with schizoaffective disorder a year prior to his neurological consultation. Neurological examination showed evidence of mild lower extremity spasticity with ataxia and dysarthria. Imaging revealed lesions suggestive of multiple sclerosis. Conclusion: An organic basis for psychiatric disorders is often overlooked. Children presenting with symptoms suggestive of a mood disorder, decline in cognition or psychosis deserve a detailed neurological examination and appropriate imaging if indicated, before starting them on antidepressant or neuroleptic medication.

  14. Hypothesis: Grandiosity and Guilt Cause Paranoia; Paranoid Schizophrenia is a Psychotic Mood Disorder; a Review

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Lake, Charles Raymond

    2008-01-01

    ... schizophrenia to psychotic bipolar disorder warrants reevaluation. To address whether paranoia associates more with schizophrenia or mood disorders, a selected literature is reviewed and 11 cases are summarized...

  15. A Consensus Statement on the Use of Ketamine in the Treatment of Mood Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanacora, Gerard; Frye, Mark A; McDonald, William; Mathew, Sanjay J; Turner, Mason S; Schatzberg, Alan F; Summergrad, Paul; Nemeroff, Charles B

    2017-04-01

    Several studies now provide evidence of ketamine hydrochloride's ability to produce rapid and robust antidepressant effects in patients with mood and anxiety disorders that were previously resistant to treatment. Despite the relatively small sample sizes, lack of longer-term data on efficacy, and limited data on safety provided by these studies, they have led to increased use of ketamine as an off-label treatment for mood and other psychiatric disorders. This review and consensus statement provides a general overview of the data on the use of ketamine for the treatment of mood disorders and highlights the limitations of the existing knowledge. While ketamine may be beneficial to some patients with mood disorders, it is important to consider the limitations of the available data and the potential risk associated with the drug when considering the treatment option. The suggestions provided are intended to facilitate clinical decision making and encourage an evidence-based approach to using ketamine in the treatment of psychiatric disorders considering the limited information that is currently available. This article provides information on potentially important issues related to the off-label treatment approach that should be considered to help ensure patient safety.

  16. Mood and metabolic consequences of sleep deprivation as a potential endophenotype' in bipolar disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aydin, Adem; Selvi, Yavuz; Besiroglu, Lutfullah; Boysan, Murat; Atli, Abdullah; Ozdemir, Osman; Kilic, Sultan; Balaharoglu, Ragıp

    2013-09-05

    It has been commonly recognized that circadian rhythm and sleep/wake cycle are causally involved in bipolar disorder. There has been a paucity of systematic research considering the relations between sleep and mood states in bipolar disorder. The current study examines the possible influences of sleep deprivation on mood states and endocrine functions among first-degree relatives of patients with bipolar disorder and healthy controls. Blood samples were taken at two time points in the consecutive mornings at predeprivation and postdeprivation periods. Participants simultaneously completed the Profiles of Mood States at two time points after giving blood samples. Plasma T3 and TSH levels increased after total sleep deprivation in both groups. Sleep deprivation induced TSH levels were reversely associated with depression-dejection among healthy controls. A paradoxical effect was detected for only the first-degree relatives of the patients that changes in plasma cortisol levels negatively linked to depression-dejection and anger-hostility scores after total sleep deprivation. Plasma DHEA levels became correlated with vigor-activity scores after sleep deprivation among first-degree relatives of bipolar patients. On the contrary, significant associations of depression-dejection, anger-hostility, and confusion-bewilderment with the baseline plasma DHEA levels became statistically trivial in the postdeprivation period. Findings suggested that first-degree relatives of patients with bipolar disorder had completely distinct characteristics with respect to sleep deprivation induced responses in terms of associations between endocrine functions and mood states as compared to individuals whose relatives had no psychiatric problems. Considering the relationships between endocrine functions and mood states among relatives of the patients, it appears like sleep deprivation changes the receptor sensitivity which probably plays a pivotal role on mood outcomes among the first

  17. Clinical neuroimaging markers of response to treatment in mood disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porcu, Michele; Balestrieri, Antonella; Siotto, Paolo; Lucatelli, Pierleone; Anzidei, Michele; Suri, Jasjit S; Zaccagna, Fulvio; Argiolas, Giovanni Maria; Saba, Luca

    2016-10-11

    Mood disorders (MD) are important and frequent psychiatric illness. The management of patients affected by these conditions represents an important factor of disability as well as a significant social and economic burden. The "in-vivo" studies can help researchers to understand the first developmental events of the pathology and to identify the molecular and non-molecular targets of therapies. However, they have strong limitations due to the fact that human brain circuitry can not be reproduced in animal models. In addition, these neural pathways are difficult to be selectively studied with the modern imaging (such as Magnetic Resonance and Positron Emitted Tomography/Computed Tomography) and non-imaging (such as electroencephalography, magnetoencephalography, transcranial magnetic stimulation and evoked potentials) methods. In comparison with other methods, the "in-vivo" imaging investigations have higher temporal and spatial resolution compared to the "in-vivo" non-imaging techniques. All these factors make difficult to fully understand the aetiology and pathophysiology of these disorders, and consequently hinder the analysis of the effects of pharmacological and non-pharmacological therapies, which have been demonstrated effective in clinical settings. In this review, we will focus our attention on the current state of the art of imaging in the assessment of treatment efficacy in MD. We will analyse briefly the actual classification of MD; then we will focus on the "in vivo" imaging methods used in research and clinical activity, the current knowledge about the neural models at the base of MD. Finally the last part of the review will focus on the analysis of the main markers of response to treatment. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Impact of psychotic symptoms on cognitive functioning in child and adolescent psychiatric inpatients with severe mood disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarthy, James B; Weiss, Shira R; Segovich, Kristin T; Barbot, Baptiste

    2016-10-30

    Despite established differences in cognitive functioning of adults with mood disorder-related psychosis and those with non-affective psychotic disorders, there is limited evidence of the impact of psychotic symptoms on the cognitive functioning of children and adolescents with mood disorders. This study investigates IQ, working memory, and processing speed scores in 80 child and adolescent inpatients discharged from an intermediate care state psychiatric hospital, using a retrospective chart review. Associations between diagnosis based on DSM-IV criteria (7 with Major Depression- MDD; 43 with Bipolar Disorders-BD, and 30 with Mood Disorders Not Otherwise Specified-NOS), presence of current psychotic features, and cognitive functioning (WISC-IV IQ, Coding, Symbol Search, and Digit Span) were investigated using Multivariate Analyses of Variance. No differences were found in cognitive functioning between patients with MDD and BD, or between those with severe Mood Disorders (MDD or BD) and those with NOS, when controlling for age, gender, and presence of psychotic features. However, patients with severe mood disorders and psychotic features showed lower IQs and greater working memory deficits than those without psychotic features or NOS. Results are discussed in terms of treatment planning for children and adolescents at risk for developing psychotic symptoms and severe mood disorders. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Mood disorders and non-celiac gluten sensitivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casella, Giovanni; Pozzi, Roberta; Cigognetti, Marta; Bachetti, Francesco; Torti, Gabriele; Cadei, Moris; Villanacci, Vincenzo; Baldini, Vittorio; Bassotti, Gabrio

    2017-03-01

    The association between gluten related disorders and psychiatric diseases has been firmly demonstrated. Non-celiac gluten sensitivity (NCGS) is a syndrome diagnosed in patients responsive to gluten-free diet after ruling out celiac disease and wheat allergy. The pathogenesis of neuro-psychiatric disorders in NCGS is unclear. An association between gluten and schizophrenia was described for the first time in 1950 by Bender et al. In the 1950's, Dicke noted that gluten-free diet improved mood in celiac patients. In 1970, Goldberg et al., in a study of 80 celiac patients, found that 34% of them showed minor affective disorders. Bipolar disorder patients show an increase of blood anti gliadin deamidated antibodies (IgG). The effect of diet and nutrition on autistic spectrum disorders has been investigated in the last two decades, particularly focusing on the symptoms of hyperactivity and attention. Toxoplasma gondii and other neurotropic pathogens as Influenzavirus and Coronavirus may be associated with mood disorders, probably secondary to an increased intestinal permeability. Abnormalities of host-microbiota interactions or of gut-microbiota composition have been associated with central nervous system disorders, such as autism, anxiety, depression and the integrity of intestinal microbiota may be considered a potential therapeutic goal to treat these conditions.

  20. Clinical neuroimaging markers of response to treatment in mood disorders

    OpenAIRE

    Porcu, M.; Balestrieri, A; Siotto, P; Lucatelli, P; M. Anzidei; Suri, Js; Zaccagna, F; Argiolas, GM; Saba, L

    2015-01-01

    Mood disorders (MD) are important and frequent psychiatric pathologies, and the management of the patients affected by thes conditions represent an important factor of disability and a huge problem in socialterms and an economic burden. The "in-vivo" studies can help researchers to understand the first events at the base of the development of the pathology and to identify the molecular and non-molecular targets of therapies, but theyhave strong limitations due to the fact that human brain cir...

  1. Storm in My Brain: Kids and Mood Disorders (Bipolar Disorder and Depression)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... yourself—Learn about mood disorders and the side effects of treatments prescribed for your student(s). • Identify and reduce stressors: sensory overload, boredom, bullying, homework, competition. • Suggest psychoeducational testing. • Identify a person ...

  2. [Dissociative symptoms in patients with mood and anxiety disorders].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moscariello, Marianna Margherita; Ratti, Flavia; Quartini, Adele; Forcén, Fernando Espí; Munuera, Joaquin Nieto; Bersani, Giuseppe

    2010-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the occurrence of dissociative symptoms in outpatients affected by mood or anxiety disorder and their potential implication in general psychopathology and treatment response. The sample was recruited at Italian and Spanish psychiatric outpatient services. The sample consisted in 40 (13 Male, 27 Female) outpatients, 22 Italians (55%) and 18 Spanish (45%). Inclusion criteria were the Axis I diagnosis of any DSM-IV-TR mood or anxiety disorder and Clinical Global Impression/Global Severity Index (CGI) baseline scores > or = 3 and Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HAM-D) and Hamilton Anxiety Scale (HAM-A) baseline scores > or = 18. General psychopathology, dissociative symptoms and personality traits were respectively assessed by the self-report symptom inventory Symptom Check-List 90 (SCL-90), the Dissociative Experience Scale (DES) and the Cloninger's Temperament and Character Inventory (TCI). Dissociative symptoms emerged as relatively frequent in mood and anxiety disorders. Globally, depression symptoms seem to correlate positively with the dissociative experiences and the severity of global psychopathology. Dissociative symptoms seem to correlate positively with some personality traits and the severity of global psychopathology and should receive further investigation in clinical practice, as might be a predictor of poor response to conventional drug treatment.

  3. Managing mood disorders in patients attending pulmonary rehabilitation clinics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Selvarajah S

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Colleen Doyle,1–3 David Dunt,2 David Ames,1 Suganya Selvarajah11National Ageing Research Institute, Royal Melbourne Hospital Royal Park Campus, Parkville, Victoria, Australia; 2Centre for Health Policy, Programs and Economics, University of Melbourne, Parkville, Victoria, Australia; 3Australian Catholic University, Fitzroy, Victoria, AustraliaBackground: There is good evidence for the positive benefits of pulmonary rehabilitation (PR in the prevention of hospital admissions, lower mortality, and improved health-related quality of life. There is also increasing evidence about the impact of PR on mental health and, in particular, mood disorders. We aimed to identify how depression in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD patients in Victoria, Australia, is being managed in PR, to identify the prevalence of depressive symptoms among COPD patients who attend PR, and to determine whether patients with depressive symptoms or anxiety symptoms dropped out of PR early.Method: Of 61 PR clinics, 44 were invited and 22 agreed to participate. Telephone interviews were conducted to see how depression and anxiety in COPD patients were being recognized and managed in these clinics. A total of 294 questionnaires were distributed to patients by clinic coordinators to determine the prevalence of anxiety/depression, as measured by the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale. Coordinators were contacted to provide information on whether respondents dropped out of rehabilitation early or continued with their treatment at 2–4 months post program.Results: Seven clinics were not aware of local guidelines on assessment/treatment/management of mood. Four clinics did not use any screening tools or other aids in the recognition and management of depression and/or anxiety. Overall, eight clinics participating in this study requested advice on suitable screening tools. The patient survey indicated that the mean depression score on the Hospital Anxiety and Depression

  4. Dimensional psychiatry: reward dysfunction and depressive mood across psychiatric disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hägele, Claudia; Schlagenhauf, Florian; Rapp, Michael; Sterzer, Philipp; Beck, Anne; Bermpohl, Felix; Stoy, Meline; Ströhle, Andreas; Wittchen, Hans-Ulrich; Dolan, Raymond J; Heinz, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    A dimensional approach in psychiatry aims to identify core mechanisms of mental disorders across nosological boundaries. We compared anticipation of reward between major psychiatric disorders, and investigated whether reward anticipation is impaired in several mental disorders and whether there is a common psychopathological correlate (negative mood) of such an impairment. We used functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) and a monetary incentive delay (MID) task to study the functional correlates of reward anticipation across major psychiatric disorders in 184 subjects, with the diagnoses of alcohol dependence (n = 26), schizophrenia (n = 44), major depressive disorder (MDD, n = 24), bipolar disorder (acute manic episode, n = 13), attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD, n = 23), and healthy controls (n = 54). Subjects' individual Beck Depression Inventory-and State-Trait Anxiety Inventory-scores were correlated with clusters showing significant activation during reward anticipation. During reward anticipation, we observed significant group differences in ventral striatal (VS) activation: patients with schizophrenia, alcohol dependence, and major depression showed significantly less ventral striatal activation compared to healthy controls. Depressive symptoms correlated with dysfunction in reward anticipation regardless of diagnostic entity. There was no significant correlation between anxiety symptoms and VS functional activation. Our findings demonstrate a neurobiological dysfunction related to reward prediction that transcended disorder categories and was related to measures of depressed mood. The findings underline the potential of a dimensional approach in psychiatry and strengthen the hypothesis that neurobiological research in psychiatric disorders can be targeted at core mechanisms that are likely to be implicated in a range of clinical entities.

  5. Exploring the Physiological Link between Psoriasis and Mood Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connor, Cody J; Liu, Vincent; Fiedorowicz, Jess G

    2015-01-01

    Psoriasis is a chronic, immune-mediated skin condition with a high rate of psychiatric comorbidity, which often goes unrecognized. Beyond the negative consequences of mood disorders like depression and anxiety on patient quality of life, evidence suggests that these conditions can worsen the severity of psoriatic disease. The mechanisms behind this relationship are not entirely understood, but inflammation seems to be a key feature linking psoriasis with mood disorders, and physiologic modulators of this inflammation, including the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis and sympathetic nervous system, demonstrate changes with psychopathology that may be contributory. Cyclical disruptions in the secretion of the sleep hormone, melatonin, are also observed in both depression and psoriasis, and with well-recognized anti-inflammatory and antioxidant activity, this aberration may represent a shared contributor to both conditions as well as common comorbidities like diabetes and cardiovascular disease. While understanding the complexities of the biological mechanisms at play will be key in optimizing the management of patients with comorbid psoriasis and depression/anxiety, one thing is certain: recognition of psychiatric comorbidity is an imperative first step in effectively treating these patients as a whole. Evidence that improvement in mood decreases psoriasis severity underscores how psychological awareness can be critical to clinicians in their practice.

  6. Exploring the Physiological Link between Psoriasis and Mood Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cody J. Connor

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Psoriasis is a chronic, immune-mediated skin condition with a high rate of psychiatric comorbidity, which often goes unrecognized. Beyond the negative consequences of mood disorders like depression and anxiety on patient quality of life, evidence suggests that these conditions can worsen the severity of psoriatic disease. The mechanisms behind this relationship are not entirely understood, but inflammation seems to be a key feature linking psoriasis with mood disorders, and physiologic modulators of this inflammation, including the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis and sympathetic nervous system, demonstrate changes with psychopathology that may be contributory. Cyclical disruptions in the secretion of the sleep hormone, melatonin, are also observed in both depression and psoriasis, and with well-recognized anti-inflammatory and antioxidant activity, this aberration may represent a shared contributor to both conditions as well as common comorbidities like diabetes and cardiovascular disease. While understanding the complexities of the biological mechanisms at play will be key in optimizing the management of patients with comorbid psoriasis and depression/anxiety, one thing is certain: recognition of psychiatric comorbidity is an imperative first step in effectively treating these patients as a whole. Evidence that improvement in mood decreases psoriasis severity underscores how psychological awareness can be critical to clinicians in their practice.

  7. Sleep study in Disruptive Mood Dysregulation Disorder and Bipolar children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estrada-Prat, Xavier; Álvarez-Guerrico, Ion; Bleda-Hernández, María J; Camprodon-Rosanas, Ester; Batlle-Vila, Santiago; Pujals-Altes, Elena; Nascimento-Osorio, María T; Martín-López, Luís M; Álvarez-Martínez, Enric; Pérez-Solá, Víctor; Romero-Cela, Soledad

    2017-01-01

    Decreased need for sleep has been proposed as a core symptom of mania and it has been associated with the pathogenesis of Bipolar Disorder. The emergence of Disruptive Mood Dysregulation Disorder (DMDD) as a new diagnostic has been controversial and much has been speculated about its relationship with the bipolar spectrum. REM sleep fragmentation could be a biomarker of affective disorders and it would help us to differentiate them from other disorders. Polysomnographic cross-sectional study of children with DMDD, bipolar disorder and Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD). All participants underwent a psychiatric semi-structured interview to obtain the diagnosis, comorbidities and primary sleep disorders. DMDD’s sample was performed following DSM5 criteria. Perform polysomnography in a sample of bipolar, DMDD and ADHD children and compare their profiles to provide more evidence about the differences or similarities between bipolar disorder and DMDD. Bipolar group had the highest REM density values while ADHD had the lowest. REM density was not statiscally different between bipolar phenotypes. REM density was associated with antidepressant treatment, episodes of REM and their interaction. REM latency was associated with antipsychotic treatment and school performance. Bipolar patients had higher scores on the depression scale than DMDD and ADHD groups. No significant differences between the two compared affective disorders were found. However there were differences in REM density between bipolar and ADHD groups. REM sleep study could provide a new theoretical framework to better understand the pathogenesis of pediatric bipolar disorder.

  8. The Mood Disorder Questionnaire: A Simple, Patient-Rated Screening Instrument for Bipolar Disorder

    OpenAIRE

    Hirschfeld, Robert M.A.

    2002-01-01

    Bipolar disorder is frequently encountered in primary care settings, often in the form of poor response to treatment for depression. Although lifetime prevalence of bipolar I disorder is 1%, the prevalence of bipolar spectrum disorders (e.g., bipolar I, bipolar II, and cyclothymia) is much higher, especially among patients with depression. The consequences of misdiagnosis can be devastating. One way to improve recognition of bipolar spectrum disorders is to screen for them. The Mood Disorder ...

  9. Stemmingsstoornissen in de DSM-5 [Mood disorders in the DSM-5

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spijker, J.; Claes, S.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The DSM-5 was published in May, 2013. AIM: To discuss and comment on the important changes that appear in the sections of DSM-5 dealing with mood disorders. METHOD: The DSM-5 chapters on mood disorders are reviewed. RESULTS: Bipolar disorders and depressive disorders are now dealt with

  10. Psychedelics in the treatment of unipolar mood disorders: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rucker, James Jh; Jelen, Luke A; Flynn, Sarah; Frowde, Kyle D; Young, Allan H

    2016-12-01

    Unipolar mood disorders, including major depressive disorder and persistent depressive disorder (dysthymia), confer high rates of disability and mortality and a very high socioeconomic burden. Current treatment is suboptimal in most cases and there is little of note in the pharmaceutical development pipeline. The psychedelic drugs, including lysergic acid diethylamide and psilocybin, were used extensively in the treatment of mood disorders, and other psychiatric conditions, before their prohibition in the late 1960s. They are relatively safe when used in medically controlled environments, with no reported risk of dependence. Here, we present a systematic review of published clinical treatment studies using psychedelics in patients with broadly defined UMD, and consider their place in psychiatry. Whilst all of the included studies have methodological shortcomings, of 423 individuals in 19 studies, 335 (79.2%) showed clinician-judged improvement after treatment with psychedelics. A recently completed pilot study in the UK favours the use of psilocybin with psychological support in treatment resistant depressive disorder. The evidence overall strongly suggests that psychedelics should be re-examined in modern clinical trials for their use in unipolar mood disorders and other non-psychotic mental health conditions. © The Author(s) 2016.

  11. Association between the 5-HTTLPR Genotype and Childhood Characteristics in Mood Disorders

    OpenAIRE

    Eun, Tae Kyung; Jeong, Seong Hoon; Lee, Kyu Young; Kim, Se Hyun; Ahn, Yong Min; Bang, Yang Weon; Joo, Eun-Jeong

    2016-01-01

    Objective The features of childhood attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) are significantly associated with adult mood disorders. Some genetic factors may be common to both ADHD and mood disorders underlie the association between these two phenotypes. The present study aimed to determine whether a genetic role may be played by the serotonin transporter-linked polymorphic region (5-HTTLPR) in the childhood ADHD features of adult patients with mood disorders. Methods The present study...

  12. Psychiatric problems in fibromyalgia: clinical and neurobiological links between mood disorders and fibromyalgia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Atzeni

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. To review the literature addressing the relationship between mood disorders and fibromyalgia/chronic pain and our current understanding of overlapping pathophysiological processes and pain and depression circuitry. Methods. We selectively reviewed articles on the co-occurrence of mood disorders and fibromyalgia/chronic pain published between 1990 and July 2012 in PubMed. Bibliographies and cross references were considered and included when appropriate. Results. Forty-nine out of 138 publications were retained for review. The vast majority of the studies found an association between depression and fibromyalgia. There is evidence that depression is often accompanied by symptoms of opposite polarity characterised by heights of mood, thinking and behaviour that have a considerable impact on pharmacological treatment. Recent developments support the view that the high rates of fibromyalgia and mood disorder comorbidity is generated by largely overlapping pathophysiological processes in the brain, that provide a neurobiological basis for the bidirectional, mutually exacerbating and disabling relationship between pain and depression. Conclusions. The finding of comparable pathophysiological characteristics of pain and depression provides a framework for understanding the relationship between the two conditions and sheds some light on neurobiological and therapeutic aspects.

  13. [The treatment of mood stabilizers in children and adolescents suffering from bipolar affective disorder].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Tamar; Shoval, Gal; Weizman, Abraham

    2005-11-01

    Bipolar disorder is defined as a mood disorder. It is characterized by alteration in mood, from elation and/or irritability to depression. The prevalence of this disorder in children and adolescents is 1%, and it disrupts the lives of children and adolescents. The treatment of bipolar disorder includes mood stabilizers. In contrast to the extensive literature in adult bipolar disorder, controlled studies of lithium and anticonvulsants in the management of mood disorders in childhood are scarce. This review summarizes recent clinical pharmacologic studies of mood stabilizers, including lithium and anticonvulsants in the management of bipolar disorder in children and adolescents who suffer from this syndrome. In addition, the authors review new anticonvulsants such as lamotrigine, gabapentin and topiramate as mood stabilizers.

  14. Set-shifting abilities, mood and loss of control over eating in binge eating disorder: An experimental study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dingemans, Alexandra E; Visser, Hiske; Paul, Linda; van Furth, Eric F

    2015-12-15

    Executive functions play an important role in problem-solving and self-control. Set-shifting is an aspect of executive functioning and represents cognitive flexibility. The inability to control eating in Binge Eating Disorder (BED) may imply deficits in set-shifting which could be exacerbated by negative mood and depressive symptoms. The aim of the study was to test whether there is a causal relationship between set-shifting ability, changes in mood and loss of control over eating in BED. Seventy-five participants diagnosed with BED were randomly assigned to a negative or neutral mood induction. Set-shifting abilities, depressive symptoms, current mood and loss of control over eating were assessed. Having depressive symptoms and poorer set-shifting abilities resulted in a more negative mood after a negative mood induction, whereas this was not observed in the neutral mood induction. Post-hoc analyses revealed that individuals with poorer set-shifting abilities and more changes in negative mood, experienced more feelings of loss of control over eating than individuals whose set-shifting abilities were better and whose mood did not change. The results suggest that both depressive symptoms and deficits in set-shifting abilities may decrease an individual's ability to handle negative affect and increase loss of control over eating in individuals with BED.

  15. Is there a "metabolic-mood syndrome"? A review of the relationship between obesity and mood disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mansur, Rodrigo B; Brietzke, Elisa; McIntyre, Roger S

    2015-05-01

    Obesity and mood disorders are highly prevalent and co-morbid. Epidemiological studies have highlighted the public health relevance of this association, insofar as both conditions and its co-occurrence are associated with a staggering illness-associated burden. Accumulating evidence indicates that obesity and mood disorders are intrinsically linked and share a series of clinical, neurobiological, genetic and environmental factors. The relationship of these conditions has been described as convergent and bidirectional; and some authors have attempted to describe a specific subtype of mood disorders characterized by a higher incidence of obesity and metabolic problems. However, the nature of this association remains poorly understood. There are significant inconsistencies in the studies evaluating metabolic and mood disorders; and, as a result, several questions persist about the validity and the generalizability of the findings. An important limitation in this area of research is the noteworthy phenotypic and pathophysiological heterogeneity of metabolic and mood disorders. Although clinically useful, categorical classifications in both conditions have limited heuristic value and its use hinders a more comprehensive understanding of the association between metabolic and mood disorders. A recent trend in psychiatry is to move toward a domain specific approach, wherein psychopathology constructs are agnostic to DSM-defined diagnostic categories and, instead, there is an effort to categorize domains based on pathogenic substrates, as proposed by the National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH) Research Domain Criteria Project (RDoC). Moreover, the substrates subserving psychopathology seems to be unspecific and extend into other medical illnesses that share in common brain consequences, which includes metabolic disorders. Overall, accumulating evidence indicates that there is a consistent association of multiple abnormalities in neuropsychological constructs, as well as

  16. Treatment Options for the Cardinal Symptoms of Disruptive Mood Dysregulation Disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tourian, Leon; LeBoeuf, Amélie; Breton, Jean-Jacques; Cohen, David; Gignac, Martin; Labelle, Réal; Guile, Jean-Marc; Renaud, Johanne

    2015-01-01

    DSM-5 has added a new developmentally appropriate child and adolescent mood disorder subtype called disruptive mood dysregulation disorder (DMDD). The core features of DMDD are temper outbursts (manifested by either verbal rages and/or physical aggression) and unrelenting irritability or anger. Currently, the literature is lacking a thorough review of the possible treatment options for the cardinal symptoms constituting DMDD. The objective of this article is to provide a thorough review of peer-reviewed studies on the subject of pharmacological treatment options for children and adolescents with the cardinal symptoms of DMDD. Relevant articles for this study were obtained through Pubmed, Medline, PsychINFO and PsychINDEXplus using the key words: "adolescents," "children," "paediatric," "youth," "irritability," "temper outbursts," "aggression," "rage," "disruptive behaviour," "treatment," "dysphoria," "autism," "mental retardation/intellectual disability," "impulsivity," "ADHD," "oppositional defiant disorder," and "conduct disorder." A total of 823 studies were generated; only English studies focusing on pharmacological treatment were retained. Currently there are no established guidelines or thorough reviews summarizing the treatment of DMDD. Pharmacotherapeutic treatment options of both aggression and chronic irritability include: antidepressants/selective norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors, mood stabilizers, psychostimulants, antipsychotics, and alpha-2 agonists. Treatment options of severe, persistent irritability in youth are numerous, and a consensual treatment algorithm has not yet emerged from the literature. Further studies and clinical trials are warranted to determine efficacious and safe treatment modalities.

  17. Comorbid mood, psychosis, and marijuana abuse disorders: a theoretical review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Natascha; Cadet, Jean Lud

    2009-10-01

    There is a need to bridge the gap between the fields of addiction psychiatry and general psychiatry to effectively treat co-morbid substance abuse and psychiatric disorders. This alarming epidemic transcends communities and severely impacts healthcare worldwide, yielding poor treatment outcomes and prognoses for afflicted patients. Because substance abuse can exacerbate or trigger psychosis and mood disorders, it is important to keep these issues in the forefront when evaluating patients. To address some of the complications stemming from not enough interactions between various groups of practitioners, this review addresses the neurobehavioral effects of cannabis use and their impact on patients who suffer from psychotic or affective disorders. The hope is that this article will serve as a spring board for further discussions among practitioners who treat these patients. Greater interactions between caretakers are bound to impact the care of our patients in a very positive way.

  18. Molecular imaging in patients with mood disorders: a review of PET findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Qiaozhen [Zhejiang University, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Second Affiliated Hospital, School of Medicine, Hangzhou, Zhejiang (China); Zhejiang University, Department of Psychiatry, Second Affiliated Hospital, School of Medicine, Hangzhou (China); Zhejiang University, Medical PET Center, Hangzhou (China); Zhejiang University, Institute of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, Hangzhou (China); Key Laboratory of Medical Molecular Imaging of Zhejiang Province, Hangzhou (China); Liu, Weibo; Li, Huichun [Zhejiang University, Department of Psychiatry, Second Affiliated Hospital, School of Medicine, Hangzhou (China); Zhang, Hong [Zhejiang University, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Second Affiliated Hospital, School of Medicine, Hangzhou, Zhejiang (China); Zhejiang University, Medical PET Center, Hangzhou (China); Zhejiang University, Institute of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, Hangzhou (China); Key Laboratory of Medical Molecular Imaging of Zhejiang Province, Hangzhou (China); Tian, Mei [The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Department of Experimental Diagnostic Imaging, Houston, TX (United States)

    2011-07-15

    Mood disorders are chronic, recurrent psychiatric disorders with high morbidity rates that cause severe disability. Researchers have used molecular imaging extensively in studies of mood disorders. In this article, we concisely and selectively review the major findings of positron emission tomography studies of patients with mood disorders. Specifically, we describe findings from cerebral blood flow, cerebral glucose/oxygen metabolism, and radioligand studies in both cross-sectional and longitudinal investigations. Patients with mood disorders have mood-correlated regional metabolism changes and molecular abnormalities in several neurotransmitter systems. Although the findings of these studies are not completely consistent and confounding factors, including drug effects and specific methodology, should be strictly controlled, these results reveal the pathophysiology of mood disorders and aid the development of novel treatment approaches for mood disorders. Future positron emission tomography research will benefit greatly from the development of better radioligands to simultaneously identify multiple neurotransmitter systems in the specific brain region and the integration of more detecting methods in specifying the neurobiological predictors of treatment response in patients with mood disorders. Understanding the molecular mechanisms in underlying mood disorders will result in aetiological diagnosis and individualization of treatment of these disorders. (orig.)

  19. White blood cell count correlates with mood symptom severity and specific mood symptoms in bipolar disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Köhler, Ole; Sylvia, Louisa G; Bowden, Charles L; Calabrese, Joseph R; Thase, Michael; Shelton, Richard C; McInnis, Melvin; Tohen, Mauricio; Kocsis, James H; Ketter, Terence A; Friedman, Edward S; Deckersbach, Thilo; Ostacher, Michael J; Iosifescu, Dan V; McElroy, Susan; Nierenberg, Andrew A

    2017-04-01

    Immune alterations may play a role in bipolar disorder etiology; however, the relationship between overall immune system functioning and mood symptom severity is unknown. The two comparative effectiveness trials, the Clinical and Health Outcomes Initiatives in Comparative Effectiveness for Bipolar Disorder Study (Bipolar CHOICE) and the Lithium Treatment Moderate-Dose Use Study (LiTMUS), were similar trials among patients with bipolar disorder. At study entry, white blood cell count and bipolar mood symptom severity (via Montgomery-Aasberg Depression Rating Scale and Bipolar Inventory of Symptoms Scale) were assessed. We performed analysis of variance and linear regression analyses to investigate relationships between deviations from median white blood cell and multinomial regression analysis between higher and lower white blood cell levels. All analyses were adjusted for age, gender, body mass index, smoking, diabetes, hypertension and hyperlipidemia. Among 482 Bipolar CHOICE participants, for each 1.0 × 10(9)/L white blood cell deviation, the overall Bipolar Inventory of Symptoms Scale severity increased significantly among men (coefficient = 2.13; 95% confidence interval = [0.46, -3.79]; p = 0.013), but not among women (coefficient = 0.87; 95% confidence interval = [-0.87, -2.61]; p = 0.33). Interaction analyses showed a trend toward greater Bipolar Inventory of Symptoms Scale symptom severity among men (coefficient = 1.51; 95% confidence interval = [-0.81, -3.82]; p = 0.2). Among 283 LiTMUS participants, higher deviation from the median white blood cell showed a trend toward higher Montgomery-Aasberg Depression Rating Scale scores among men (coefficient = 1.33; 95% confidence interval = [-0.22, -2.89]; p = 0.09), but not among women (coefficient = 0.34; 95% confidence interval = [-0.64, -1.32]; p = 0.50). When combining LiTMUS and Bipolar CHOICE, Montgomery-Aasberg Depression Rating Scale scores

  20. Mood and anxiety disorders : comorbidity and implications for treatment with antidepressants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kemp, E.C.M. de

    2001-01-01

    Mood and anxiety disorders are the most prevalent psychiatric disorders and the their symptoms also frequently co-occur. In the present thesis, the implications of this so called comorbitidy of mood and anxiety disorders for the accuracy of psychiatric diagnosis and the implications of such comorbid

  1. Differentiating Bipolar Disorder--Not Otherwise Specified and Severe Mood Dysregulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Towbin, Kenneth; Axelson, David; Leibenluft, Ellen; Birmaher, Boris

    2013-01-01

    Objective: Bipolar disorder--not otherwise specified (BP-NOS) and severe mood dysregulation (SMD) are severe mood disorders that were defined to address questions about the diagnosis of bipolar disorder (BD) in youth. SMD and BP-NOS are distinct phenotypes that differ in clinical presentation and longitudinal course. The purpose of this review is…

  2. Differentiating Bipolar Disorder--Not Otherwise Specified and Severe Mood Dysregulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Towbin, Kenneth; Axelson, David; Leibenluft, Ellen; Birmaher, Boris

    2013-01-01

    Objective: Bipolar disorder--not otherwise specified (BP-NOS) and severe mood dysregulation (SMD) are severe mood disorders that were defined to address questions about the diagnosis of bipolar disorder (BD) in youth. SMD and BP-NOS are distinct phenotypes that differ in clinical presentation and longitudinal course. The purpose of this review is…

  3. Circadian Rhythms and Mood Disorders: Are The Phenomena and Mechanisms Causally Related?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William eBechtel

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper reviews some of the compelling evidence of disrupted circadian rhythms in individuals with mood disorders (major depressive disorder, seasonal affective disorder, and bipolar disorder and that treatments such as bright light, designed to alter circadian rhythms, are effective in treating these disorders. Neurotransmitters in brain regions implicated in mood regulation exhibit circadian rhythms. A mouse model originally employed to identify a circadian gene has proven a potent model for mania. While this evidence is suggestive of an etiological role for altered circadian rhythms in mood disorders, it is compatible with other explanations, including that disrupted circadian rhythms and mood disorders are effects of a common cause and that genes and proteins implicated in both simply have pleiotropic effects. In light of this, the paper advances a proposal as to what evidence would be needed to establish a direct causal link between disruption of circadian rhythms and mood disorders.

  4. Complexity of childhood sexual abuse: predictors of current post-traumatic stress disorder, mood disorders, substance use, and sexual risk behavior among adult men who have sex with men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boroughs, Michael S; Valentine, Sarah E; Ironson, Gail H; Shipherd, Jillian C; Safren, Steven A; Taylor, S Wade; Dale, Sannisha K; Baker, Joshua S; Wilner, Julianne G; O'Cleirigh, Conall

    2015-10-01

    Men who have sex with men (MSM) are the group most at risk for HIV and represent the majority of new infections in the United States. Rates of childhood sexual abuse (CSA) among MSM have been estimated as high as 46 %. CSA is associated with increased risk of HIV and greater likelihood of HIV sexual risk behavior. The purpose of this study was to identify the relationships between CSA complexity indicators and mental health, substance use, sexually transmitted infections, and HIV sexual risk among MSM. MSM with CSA histories (n = 162) who were screened for an HIV prevention efficacy trial completed comprehensive psychosocial assessments. Five indicators of complex CSA experiences were created: CSA by family member, CSA with penetration, CSA with physical injury, CSA with intense fear, and first CSA in adolescence. Adjusted regression models were used to identify relationships between CSA complexity and outcomes. Participants reporting CSA by family member were at 2.6 odds of current alcohol use disorder (OR 2.64: CI 1.24-5.63), two times higher odds of substance use disorder (OR 2.1: CI 1.02-2.36), and 2.7 times higher odds of reporting an STI in the past year (OR 2.7: CI 1.04-7.1). CSA with penetration was associated with increased likelihood of current PTSD (OR 3.17: CI 1.56-6.43), recent HIV sexual risk behavior (OR 2.7: CI 1.16-6.36), and a greater number of casual sexual partners (p = 0.02). Both CSA with Physical Injury (OR 4.05: CI 1.9-8.7) and CSA with Intense Fear (OR 5.16: CI 2.5-10.7) were related to increased odds for current PTSD. First CSA in adolescence was related to increased odds of major depressive disorder. These findings suggest that CSA, with one or more complexities, creates patterns of vulnerabilities for MSM, including post-traumatic stress disorder, substance use, and sexual risk taking, and suggests the need for detailed assessment of CSA and the development of integrated HIV prevention programs that address mental health and

  5. Mood disorders insight scale: Validation of Persian version

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hajar Ahmadi Vazmalaei

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Lack of insight in patients with bipolar I disorder has been associated with poor course and clinical outcome and compromised therapeutic compliance. Therefore, it is important to evaluate insight and use more specialized scales such as Mood Disorder Insight Scale (MDIS in these patients. Our objective in this study was to assess validity and reliability of Persian version of MDIS. Materials and Methods: A hundred forty five bipolar patients were selected from Iran Hospital of Psychiatry. They were interviewed by The Persian Structured Clinical Interview for Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorder, 4th edition′s (DSM-IV axis I disorders (SCID-I and the Scale to Assess Unawareness of Mental Disorder (SUMD. The translated version of MDIS in Persian was subsequently completed by patients. Results: The internal consistency was satisfactory (Cronbach alpha coefficients = 0.8. The test-retest reliability (coefficient alpha was 0.95 (p < 0.01. Construct validity and concurrent validity were supported by factor analysis and Spearman rank correlation between MDIS and SUMD (0.85. Conclusions: Persian version of the MDIS could be a useful instrument for assessing insight in patients with bipolar I disorder.

  6. Affective Cognition and its Disruption in Mood Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elliott, Rebecca; Zahn, Roland; Deakin, J F William; Anderson, Ian M

    2011-01-01

    In this review, we consider affective cognition, responses to emotional stimuli occurring in the context of cognitive evaluation. In particular, we discuss emotion categorization, biasing of memory and attention, as well as social/moral emotion. We discuss limited neuropsychological evidence suggesting that affective cognition depends critically on the amygdala, ventromedial frontal cortex, and the connections between them. We then consider neuroimaging studies of affective cognition in healthy volunteers, which have led to the development of more sophisticated neural models of these processes. Disturbances of affective cognition are a core and specific feature of mood disorders, and we discuss the evidence supporting this claim, both from behavioral and neuroimaging perspectives. Serotonin is considered to be a key neurotransmitter involved in depression, and there is a considerable body of research exploring whether serotonin may mediate disturbances of affective cognition. The final section presents an overview of this literature and considers implications for understanding the pathophysiology of mood disorder as well as developing and evaluating new treatment strategies. PMID:20571485

  7. Preliminary investigation of lithium for mood disorder symptoms in children and adolescents with autism spectrum disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siegel, Matthew; Beresford, Carol A; Bunker, Madisun; Verdi, Mary; Vishnevetsky, Donna; Karlsson, Cassie; Teer, Olivia; Stedman, Amy; Smith, Kahsi A

    2014-09-01

    Children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) have higher rates of comorbid psychiatric disorders, including mood disorders, than the general child population. Although children with ASD may experience irritability (aggression, self-injury, and tantrums), a portion also experience symptoms that are typical of a mood disorder, such as euphoria/elevated mood, mania, hypersexuality, paranoia, or decreased need for sleep. Despite lithium's established efficacy in controlling mood disorder symptoms in the neurotypical population, lithium has been rarely studied in children with ASD. We performed a retrospective chart review of 30 children and adolescents diagnosed with ASD by the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, 4th ed., Text Revision (DSM-IV-TR) criteria who were prescribed lithium in order to assess target symptoms, safety, and tolerability. Clinical Global Impressions - Improvement (CGI-I) ratings were performed by two board-certified child psychiatrists with expertise in ASD. CGI-I scores were dichotomized into "improved" (CGI-I score of 1 or 2) or "not improved" (CGI-I score ≥3). Forty-three percent of patients who received lithium were rated as "improved" on the CGI-I. Seventy-one percent of patients who had two or more pretreatment mood disorder symptoms were rated as "improved." The presence of mania (p=0.033) or euphoria/elevated mood (p=0.041) were the pretreatment symptoms significantly associated with an "improved" rating. The mean lithium blood level was 0.70 mEq/L (SD=0.26), and the average length of lithium treatment was 29.7 days (SD=23.9). Forty-seven percent of patients were reported to have at least one side effect, most commonly vomiting (13%), tremor (10%), fatigue (10%), irritability (7%), and enuresis (7%). This preliminary assessment of lithium in children and adolescents with ASD suggests that lithium may be a medication of interest for those who exhibit two or more mood disorder symptoms, particularly mania or euphoria

  8. Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder and bipolar mood disorder in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2009-06-19

    Jun 19, 2009 ... aspects of this disorder, including its diagnosis, co-morbidities, longitudinal .... narcissistic personality constructs may also present with an inflated self-esteem ... of time and are often ultraradian (multiple cycles occurring within.

  9. Mood disorders and patterns of creativity in British writers and artists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jamison, K R

    1989-05-01

    Extremes in mood, thought and behavior--including psychosis--have been linked with artistic creativity for as long as man has observed and written about those who write, paint, sculpt or compose. The history of this long and fascinating association, as well as speculations about its reasons for being, have been discussed by several modern authors and investigators, including Koestler (1975), Storr (1976), Andreasen (1978), Becker (1978), Rothenberg (1979), Richards (1981), Jamison (in press) and Prentky (in press). The association between extreme states of emotion and mind and creativity not only is fascinating but also has significant theoretical, clinical, literary and societal-ethical implications. These issues, more thoroughly reviewed elsewhere (Jamison et al. 1980; Richards 1981; Jamison, in press), include the understanding of cognitive, perceptual, mood and behavioral changes common to manic, depressive and creative states; the potential ability to lessen the stigma of mental illness; effects of psychiatric treatment (for example, lithium) on creativity; and concerns raised about genetic research on mood disorders. The current study was designed to ascertain rates of treatment for affective illness in a sample of eminent British writers and artists; to study differences in subgroups (poets, novelists, playwrights, biographers, artists); to examine seasonal patterns of moods and productivity; and to inquire into the perceived role of very intense moods in the writers' and artists' work. One of the major purposes of this investigation was to look at possible similarities and dissimilarities between periods of intense creative activity and hypomania. Hypothesized similarities were based on the overlapping nature of mood, cognitive and behavioral changes associated with both; the episodic nature of both; and possible links between the durational, frequency and seasonal patterns of both experiences.

  10. Effects of noise on a computational model for disease states of mood disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tobias Huber, Martin; Krieg, Jürgen-Christian; Braun, Hans Albert; Moss, Frank

    2000-03-01

    Nonlinear dynamics are currently proposed to explain the progressive course of recurrent mood disorders starting with isolated episodes and ending with accelerated irregular (``chaotic") mood fluctuations. Such a low-dimensional disease model is attractive because of its principal accordance with biological disease models, i.e. the kindling and biological rhythms model. However, most natural systems are nonlinear and noisy and several studies in the neuro- and physical sciences have demonstrated interesting cooperative behaviors arising from interacting random and deterministic dynamics. Here, we consider the effects of noise on a recent neurodynamical model for the timecourse of affective disorders (Huber et al.: Biological Psychiatry 1999;46:256-262). We describe noise effects on temporal patterns and mean episode frequencies of various in computo disease states. Our simulations demonstrate that noise can cause unstructured randomness or can maximize periodic order. The frequency of episode occurence can increase with noise but it can also remain unaffected or even can decrease. We show further that noise can make visible bifurcations before they would normally occur under deterministic conditions and we quantify this behavior with a recently developed statistical method. All these effects depend critically on both, the dynamic state and the noise intensity. Implications for neurobiology and course of mood disorders are discussed.

  11. Mood disorders in everyday life : A systematic review of experience sampling and ecological momentary assessment studies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aan het Rot, M.; Hogenelst, Koen; Schoevers, R.A.

    In the past two decades, the study of mood disorder patients using experience sampling methods (ESM) and ecological momentary assessment (EMA) has yielded important findings. In patients with major depressive disorder (MDD), the dynamics of their everyday mood have been associated with various

  12. Mood disorders in everyday life : A systematic review of experience sampling and ecological momentary assessment studies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aan het Rot, M.; Hogenelst, Koen; Schoevers, R.A.

    2012-01-01

    In the past two decades, the study of mood disorder patients using experience sampling methods (ESM) and ecological momentary assessment (EMA) has yielded important findings. In patients with major depressive disorder (MDD), the dynamics of their everyday mood have been associated with various aspec

  13. Family history of alcohol dependence modulates functional neurophysiology in mood/anxiety disorders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sjoerds, Z.; van Tol, M.J.; van den Brink, W.; van der Wee, N.J.A.; Aleman, A.; Beekman, A.T.F.; Penninx, B.W.J.H.; Veltman, D.J.

    2013-01-01

    Background. A family history (FH) of alcohol dependence (AD) not only increases the risk for AD, but is also associated with an increased risk for mood and anxiety disorders. However, it is unknown how a FH of AD affects neural substrates in patients with mood and anxiety disorders. In this study we

  14. Cognitive remediation therapy for mood disorders: rationale, early evidence, and future directions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowie, Christopher R; Gupta, Maya; Holshausen, Katherine

    2013-06-01

    People with mood disorders experience cognitive impairments that are predictive of functional disability. Cognitive remediation (CR) is an empirically validated intervention that is designed to remediate neurocognitive deficits and improve functioning. Although much of the focus of this treatment during the last decade has centred on attention deficit disorders, brain injury, and schizophrenia spectrum disorders, emerging evidence suggests that CR is an effective intervention for mood disorders and that these treatment effects translate into improvements in cognitive performance and possibly functioning. Our review aims to examine the profile and magnitude of cognitive impairments in mood disorders, review the evidence in support of CR for this population, and discuss future research directions in CR.

  15. Lifetime prevalence of gender-based violence in US women: associations with mood/anxiety and substance use disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, Kate; Keyes, Katherine M; Koenen, Karestan C; Hasin, Deborah

    2015-03-01

    No population-representative US study has examined how lifetime exposure to gender-based violence (GBV) is related to a broad range of mood/anxiety and substance use disorders. The current study advances the literature by examining the relative contributions of developmental timing of earliest GBV exposure and amount of lifetime GBV exposure on risk for eight mood/anxiety and ten substance use disorders. Participants were 20,089 women from wave 2 (2004-2005) of the National Epidemiologic Survey of Alcohol and Related Conditions. Women reporting lifetime GBV (25%; n = 5284) had 3.6 and 2.5 times the odds of meeting lifetime mood/anxiety and substance use disorder criteria, respectively. Number of types and number of incidents of GBV were associated with risk for both types of disorders in a dose-response fashion; when examined simultaneously, number of types of GBV was the stronger predictor of mood/anxiety and substance use disorders. Relative to those who first experienced GBV during adulthood, first exposure during childhood and adolescence was associated with increased risk for mood/anxiety and substance use disorders. One in four women reported lifetime GBV, which had pernicious effects on mood/anxiety and substance use disorders, particularly for women who had experienced multiple types of GBV. The GBV effect varied by developmental period of exposure. Prevention of GBV is critical to reducing its burden. Among those exposed to GBV, clinicians should consider assessing a range of disorders and providing integrated treatment targeting multiple outcomes.

  16. Anxiety and mood disorders in narcolepsy: a case-control study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Droogleever Fortuyn, H.A.; Lappenschaar, G.A.M.; Furer, J.W.; Hodiamont, P.P.G.; Rijnders, C.A.T.; Renier, W.O.; Buitelaar, J.K.; Overeem, S.

    2010-01-01

    Introduction: Narcolepsy is a primary sleeping disorder with excessive daytime sleepiness and cataplexy as core symptoms. There is increasing interest in the psychiatric phenotype of narcolepsy. Although many authors suggest an overrepresentation of mood disorders, few systematic studies have been

  17. Anxiety and mood disorders in narcolepsy: a case-control study.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fortuyn, H.A.; Lappenschaar, M.A.; Furer, J.W.; Hodiamont, P.P.G.; Rijnders, C.A.T.; Renier, W.O.; Buitelaar, J.K.; Overeem, S.

    2010-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Narcolepsy is a primary sleeping disorder with excessive daytime sleepiness and cataplexy as core symptoms. There is increasing interest in the psychiatric phenotype of narcolepsy. Although many authors suggest an overrepresentation of mood disorders, few systematic studies have been

  18. Neural correlates of improved executive function following erythropoietin treatment in mood disorders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Miskowiak, K W; Vinberg, M; Glerup, L

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Cognitive dysfunction in depression and bipolar disorder (BD) is insufficiently targeted by available treatments. Erythropoietin (EPO) increases neuroplasticity and may improve cognition in mood disorders, but the neuronal mechanisms of these effects are unknown. This functional magne...

  19. Lifetime prevalence of gender-based violence in US women: Associations with mood/anxiety and substance use disorders

    OpenAIRE

    Walsh, Kate; Keyes, Katherine M.; Karestan C. Koenen; Hasin, Deborah

    2015-01-01

    No population-representative US study has examined how lifetime exposure to gender-based violence (GBV) is related to a broad range of mood/anxiety and substance use disorders. The current study advances the literature by examining the relative contributions of developmental timing of earliest GBV exposure and amount of lifetime GBV exposure on risk for eight mood/anxiety and ten substance use disorders. Participants were 20,089 women from wave 2 (2004–2005) of the National Epidemiologic Surv...

  20. Mood disorders and quality of life in polycystic ovary syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Podfigurna-Stopa, Agnieszka; Luisi, Stefano; Regini, Cristina; Katulski, Krzysztof; Centini, Gabriele; Meczekalski, Blazej; Petraglia, Felice

    2015-06-01

    Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) affects 5-10% of the population of women. The exact etiology of PCOS remains unclear, but it is believed to result from complex interactions between genetic, behavioral and environmental factors. The spectrum of its symptoms such as hirsutism, skin problems, obesity and finally infertility has a huge negative impact on the individuals' psychological and interpersonal functioning. PCOS symptoms can lead to significant deterioration in quality of life and be highly stressful negatively affecting psychological well-being and sexuality. Fear symptoms like palpitation, being out of breath and tension might be caused by many somatic diseases. Moreover, detection and continuous thinking about illness can lead to significant negative impact on individual functioning in society. PCOS may be a factor potentially favoring the occurrence of mood disorders and depression. Biological, social and psychological consequences of PCOS among women of reproductive age are opening a new perspective on management of women's health in these patients.

  1. Prevalence of mood and anxiety disorder in self reported irritable bowel syndrome (IBS. An epidemiological population based study of women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mykletun Arnstein

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS is commonly regarded as a functional disorder, and is hypothesized to be associated with anxiety and depression. This evidence mainly rests on population-based studies utilising self-report screening instruments for psychopathology. Other studies applying structured clinical interviews are generally based on small clinical samples, which are vulnerable to biases. The extant evidence base for an association between IBS and psychopathology is hence not conclusive. The aim of this study was therefore to re-examine the hypothesis using population-based data and psychiatric morbidity established with a structured clinical interview. Methods Data were derived from a population-based epidemiological study (n = 1077. Anxiety and mood disorders were established using the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV-TR (SCID-I/NP and the General Health Questionnaire (GHQ-12. Current and lifetime IBS was self-reported. Hypertension and diabetes were employed as comparison groups as they are expected to be unrelated to mental health. Results Current IBS (n = 69, 6.4% was associated with an increased likelihood of current mood and/or anxiety disorders (OR = 2.62, 95%CI 1.49 - 4.60. Half the population reporting a lifetime IBS diagnosis also had a lifetime mood or anxiety disorder. Exploratory analyses demonstrated an increased prevalence of IBS across most common anxiety and mood disorders, the exception being bipolar disorder. The association with IBS and symptoms load (GHQ-12 followed a curved dose response pattern. In contrast, hypertension and diabetes were consistently unrelated to psychiatric morbidity. Conclusions IBS is significantly associated with anxiety and mood disorders. This study provides indicative evidence for IBS as a disorder with a psychosomatic aspect.

  2. Neuronal plasticity: a link between stress and mood disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calabrese, Francesca; Molteni, Raffaella; Racagni, Giorgio; Riva, Marco A

    2009-12-01

    Although stress represents the major environmental element of susceptibility for mood disorders, the relationship between stress and disease remains to be fully established. In the present article we review the evidence in support for a role of neuronal plasticity, and in particular of neurotrophic factors. Even though decreased levels of norepinephrine and serotonin may underlie depressive symptoms, compelling evidence now suggests that mood disorders are characterized by reduced neuronal plasticity, which can be brought about by exposure to stress at different stages of life. Indeed the expression of neurotrophic molecules, such as the neurotrophin BDNF, is reduced in depressed subjects as well as in experimental animals exposed to adverse experience at early stages of life or at adulthood. These changes show an anatomical specificity and might be sustained by epigenetic mechanisms. Pharmacological intervention may normalize such defects and improve neuronal function through the modulation of the same factors that are defective in depression. Several studies have demonstrated that chronic, but not acute, antidepressant treatment increases the expression of BDNF and may enhance its localization at synaptic level. Antidepressant treatment can normalize deficits in neurotrophin expression produced by chronic stress paradigms, but may also alter the modulation of BDNF under acute stressful conditions. In summary, there is good agreement in considering neuronal plasticity, and the expression of key proteins such as the neurotrophin BDNF, as a central player for the effects of stress on brain function and its implication for psychopathology. Accordingly, effective treatments should not limit their effects to the control of neurotransmitter and hormonal dysfunctions, but should be able to normalize defective mechanisms that sustain the impairment of neuronal plasticity.

  3. Hypothesis: Grandiosity and Guilt Cause Paranoia; Paranoid Schizophrenia is a Psychotic Mood Disorder; a Review

    OpenAIRE

    Lake, Charles Raymond

    2007-01-01

    Delusional paranoia has been associated with severe mental illness for over a century. Kraepelin introduced a disorder called “paranoid depression,” but “paranoid” became linked to schizophrenia, not to mood disorders. Paranoid remains the most common subtype of schizophrenia, but some of these cases, as Kraepelin initially implied, may be unrecognized psychotic mood disorders, so the relationship of paranoid schizophrenia to psychotic bipolar disorder warrants reevaluation. To address whethe...

  4. Is cannabis treatment for anxiety, mood, and related disorders ready for prime time?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turna, Jasmine; Patterson, Beth; Van Ameringen, Michael

    2017-06-21

    Anxiety and related disorders are the most common mental conditions affecting the North American population. Despite their established efficacy, first-line antidepressant treatments are associated with significant side effects, leading many afflicted individuals to seek alternative treatments. Cannabis is commonly viewed as a natural alternative for a variety of medical and mental health conditions. Currently, anxiety ranks among the top five medical symptoms for which North Americans report using medical marijuana. However, upon careful review of the extant treatment literature, the anxiolytic effects of cannabis in clinical populations are surprisingly not well-documented. The effects of cannabis on anxiety and mood symptoms have been examined in healthy populations and in several small studies of synthetic cannabinoid agents but there are currently no studies which have examined the effects of the cannabis plant on anxiety and related disorders. In light of the rapidly shifting landscape regarding the legalization of cannabis for medical and recreational purposes, it is important to highlight the significant disconnect between the scientific literature, public opinion, and related policies. The aim of this article is to provide a comprehensive review of the current cannabis treatment literature, and to identify the potential for cannabis to be used as a therapeutic intervention for anxiety, mood, and related disorders. Searches of five electronic databases were conducted (PubMed, MEDLINE, Web of Science, PsychINFO, and Google Scholar), with the most recent in February 2017. The effects of cannabis on healthy populations and clinical psychiatric samples will be discussed, focusing primarily on anxiety and mood disorders. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Biomarkers in mood disorders research: developing new and improved therapeutics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MARK J. NICIU

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background Recently, surrogate neurobiological biomarkers that correlate with target engagement and therapeutic response have been developed and tested in early phase studies of mood disorders. Objective The identification of biomarkers could help develop personalized psychiatric treatments that may impact public health. Methods These biomarkers, which are associated with clinical response post-treatment, can be directly validated using multimodal approaches including genetic tools, proteomics/metabolomics, peripheral measures, neuroimaging, biostatistical predictors, and clinical predictors. Results To date, early phase biomarker studies have sought to identify measures that can serve as “biosignatures”, or biological patterns of clinical response. These studies have also sought to identify clinical predictors and surrogate outcomes associated with pathophysiological domains consistently described in the National Institute of Mental Health’s (NIMH new Research Domain Criteria (RDoC. Using the N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA antagonist ketamine as an example, we identified changes in several domains (clinical, cognitive, and neurophysiological that predicted ketamine’s rapid and sustained antidepressant effects in individuals with treatment-resistant major depressive disorder (MDD or bipolar depression. Discussion These approaches may ultimately provide clues into the neurobiology of psychiatric disorders and may have enormous impact Backon the development of novel therapeutics.

  6. Comorbidity of mood and substance use disorders in patients with binge-eating disorder: Associations with personality disorder and eating disorder pathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, Daniel F; Grilo, Carlos M

    2015-08-01

    Binge-eating disorder (BED) is associated with elevated rates of mood and substance use disorders, but the significance of such comorbidity is ambiguous. We compared personality disorder and eating disorder psychopathology in four subgroups of BED patients: those with mood disorders, those with substance use disorders, those with both, and those with neither. Subjects were 347 patients who met DSM-IV research criteria for BED. Semistructured interviews evaluated lifetime DSM-IV axis I disorders, DSM-IV personality disorder features, and eating disorder psychopathology. Among these patients, 129 had co-occurring mood disorder, 34 had substance use disorder, 60 had both, and 124 had neither. Groups differed on personality disorder features, with those having mood disorder and both mood and substance use disorders showing the highest frequencies. Although groups did not differ in body mass index or binge eating frequency, they did differ on eating disorder psychopathology-with the groups having mood disorder and both comorbidities demonstrating higher eating, weight, and shape concerns. No differences were observed between groups with respect to ages of onset for specific eating behaviors, but some differences were observed for ages of disorder onset. Mood and substance use disorders co-occur frequently among patients with BED. Compared with a previous work, the additional comparison group (those with both mood and substance use disorders) and the control group (those with neither) afforded better discrimination regarding the significance of these comorbidities. Our findings suggest approaches to subtyping BED based on psychiatric comorbidity, and may also have implications for treatment. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Autobiographical Memory in Adults with Autism Spectrum Disorder: The role of Depressed Mood, Rumination, Working Memory and Theory of Mind

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crane, Laura; Goddard, Lorna; Pring, Linda

    2013-01-01

    Autobiographical memory difficulties have been widely reported in adults with autism spectrum disorder (ASD). The aim of the current study was to explore the potential correlates of autobiographical memory performance (including depressed mood, rumination, working memory and theory of mind) in adults with ASD, relative to a group of typical adults…

  8. Autobiographical Memory in Adults with Autism Spectrum Disorder: The role of Depressed Mood, Rumination, Working Memory and Theory of Mind

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crane, Laura; Goddard, Lorna; Pring, Linda

    2013-01-01

    Autobiographical memory difficulties have been widely reported in adults with autism spectrum disorder (ASD). The aim of the current study was to explore the potential correlates of autobiographical memory performance (including depressed mood, rumination, working memory and theory of mind) in adults with ASD, relative to a group of typical adults…

  9. The thyroid-brain interaction in thyroid disorders and mood disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, M; Goetz, T; Glenn, T; Whybrow, P C

    2008-10-01

    Thyroid hormones play a critical role in the metabolic activity of the adult brain, and neuropsychiatric manifestations of thyroid disease have long been recognised. However, it is only recently that methodology such as functional neuroimaging has been available to facilitate investigation of thyroid hormone metabolism. Although the role of thyroid hormones in the adult brain is not yet specified, it is clear that without optimal thyroid function, mood disturbance, cognitive impairment and other psychiatric symptoms can emerge. Additionally, laboratory measurements of peripheral thyroid function may not adequately characterise central thyroid metabolism. Here, we review the relationship between thyroid hormone and neuropsychiatric symptoms in patients with primary thyroid disease and primary mood disorders.

  10. Multiple dimensions of familial psychopathology affect risk of mood disorder in children of bipolar parents

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wals, M; van Os, J; Reichart, CG; Hillegers, MHJ; Ormel, J; Verhulst, FC; Nolen, WA

    2004-01-01

    The aim of our study was to determine whether familial loading of unipolar disorder, bipolar disorder, and substance use disorder are associated with DSM-IV mood disorders in adolescents at risk for bipolar disorder. One hundred and forty adolescents aged 12-21 years of 86 bipolar parents participat

  11. Mood Disorders in Mothers of Children on the Autism Spectrum Are Associated with Higher Functioning Autism

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    Roma A. Vasa

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Mood disorders occur more frequently in family members of individuals with autism spectrum disorders (ASD than in the general population. There may be associations between maternal mood disorder history patterns and specific ASD phenotypes. We therefore examined the relationship between maternal mood disorders and child autism spectrum disorders in 998 mother-child dyads enrolled in a national online autism registry and database. Mothers of children with ASD completed online questionnaires addressing their child’s ASD as well as their own mood disorder history. In multivariate logistic regression models of ASD diagnoses, the odds of an Asperger disorder versus autistic disorder diagnosis were higher among those children whose mothers had a lifetime history of bipolar disorder (OR 2.11, CI 1.20, 3.69 or depression (OR 1.62, CI 1.19, 2.19. Further, maternal mood disorder onset before first pregnancy was associated with higher odds (OR 2.35, CI 1.48, 3.73 of an Asperger versus autism diagnosis among this sample of children with ASD. These data suggest that differences in maternal mood disorder history may be associated with ASD phenotype in offspring.

  12. A comparison of mood-dependent memory in bipolar disorder and normal controls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nutt, Rachel M; Lam, Dominic

    2011-01-01

    Mood-dependent memory was investigated in a sample of 28 individuals, with a diagnosis of bipolar disorder I but not during acute episodes, and 30 non-clinical controls by using the word lists from Wechsler Memory Scale--Third Edition and abstract inkblot recognition. Positive or negative mood induction procedures were used prior to and after the stimuli were presented. After either the same or contrasting high or low mood inductions, participants attempted to recall the word list and performed an inkblot recognition task. Bipolar patients were significantly better at the inkblot recognition in the same mood state, showing mood-dependent memory. No differences were found in the verbal recall task. This study paves the way for further investigation into memory differences of this sort in mood disorders.

  13. Personality disorders in offspring of mothers with mood disorders: results from a longitudinal family study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cullen, Kathryn R; Eberly, Lynn E; Heller, Monika D; Schlesinger, Amanda; Gold, Phillip W; Martinez, Pedro E; Klimes-Dougan, Bonnie

    2014-08-30

    Offspring of mothers with mood disorders are known to be at risk for a range of adverse outcomes, but the prevalence of personality disorders (PDs) in this group is unknown. The goal of this study was to assess risk of PD diagnoses and symptoms in offspring of mothers with and without mood disorders, and to explore contributing factors to this risk. This longitudinal study assessed PDs and symptoms of PDs in offspring of mothers with bipolar disorder (O-BD), major depression (O-MDD), and no psychiatric diagnosis (O-WELL) in mid-adolescence and in early adulthood. O-BD were more likely to develop a Cluster B PD than O-MDD or O-WELL in adolescence, and more likely to develop a Cluster B PD then O-WELL in early adulthood. Dimensional analyses revealed that O-BD had elevated symptoms in PDs across all PD clusters at mid-adolescence and young adulthood. O-MDD showed elevated symptoms of antisocial PD at both time points, and of obsessive-compulsive PD at young adulthood. Offspring of mothers with mood disorders, especially O-BD, are at increased risk for PD diagnoses and symptoms in mid-adolescence and early adulthood. Contributing factors to risk of PD symptoms in at-risk offspring are discussed.

  14. Comorbidity of Anxiety Disorders and Substance Abusewith Bipolar Mood Disorders and Relationship with ClinicalCourse

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    Ali Reza Shafiee-Kandjani

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available "n Objective: Patients with bipolar mood disorder constitute a relatively large number of individuals hospitalized in psychiatric hospitals. This disorder is highly co-morbid with other psychiatric disorders and may effect their clinical course. The goal of this study was to determine the co-occurrence rate of anxiety disorders and substance abuse with bipolar mood disorders and their impact on clinical course. "n Methods: 153 bipolar patients (type I were selected among the hospitalized patients at Razi Psychiatric Hospital in Tabriz, Iran, from September 2007 to October 2008 through convenience sampling method. The participants were evaluated by a structured clinical interview based on DSM-IV criteria (SCID, Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression (HRSD and Young Mania Rating Scale (YMRS. Results: Co-morbidity of anxiety disorders was 43% . Occurrence of anxiety disorders was 26% for obsessive-compulsive disorder, 24.8% for generalized anxiety disorder, 3.9% for phobia and 2% for panic disorder. Co-morbidity of substance abuse was 7.2% and the highest occurrence of substance abuse was 5.2% for alcoholism and 3.9% for opium. No significant difference was observed between the severity of disease and duration of hospitalization in bipolar patients with or without anxiety disorder. The severity of disease and duration of hospitalization in bipolar patients with substance abuse was higher compared to bipolar patients without substance abuse (P<0.05. "nConclusions: This study suggests that there is a high co-morbidity between anxiety disorders and substance abuse with bipolar disorder. Further, this study suggests that co-occurrence of substance abuse disorder with bipolar disorder increases the severity of the disease and duration of hospitalization.

  15. Mood disorders and parity – A clue to the aetiology of the postpartum trigger

    OpenAIRE

    di Florio, Arianna; Jones, Lisa; Forty, Liz; Gordon-Smith, Katherine; Robertson Blackmore, Emma; Heron, Jess; Craddock, Nick; Jones, Ian

    2014-01-01

    Background Episodes of postpartum psychosis have been associated with first pregnancies in women with bipolar I disorder. It is unclear, however, if the effect extends to episodes at other times in relation to childbirth and to women with other mood disorders such as major depression and bipolar II disorder. This primiparity effect, which is also seen in other pregnancy related conditions such as pre-eclampsia, is a potentially important clue to the aetiology of childbirth related mood episod...

  16. Positive mood on negative self-statements: paradoxical intervention in geriatric patients with major depressive disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanza, Claudia; Müller, Christine; Riepe, Matthias W

    2017-03-30

    Mood regulation is said to be age-specific. Negative self-statements (NST) are used to induce negative mood. However, little is known about NST in older persons and geriatric patients with major depressive disorder. We investigated healthy young (YC) and older (OC) control subjects and older patients with major depressive disorder (OP). Subjects were exposed to NST subsequent to baseline assessment comprising psychological and psychometric tests. Preferences for emotionally salient stimuli were measured with an eye-tracking task. Mood in YC shifted towards depressive mood or remained stable on NST. In OC and more so in OP some subjects responded paradoxically subsequent to NST with mood being more positive than at baseline. Extent and direction of mood change correlated with prevailing mood at baseline and total score in the Hamilton Depression Anxiety Scale. At baseline, YC had a preference for 'happy' stimuli. Subsequent to NST view preference shifted towards 'sad.' In contrast, OC had no preference at baseline but shifted towards 'happy' on NST. Mood change on NST is age-specific. In geriatric patients with depressive disorder, however, NST may induce a shift towards more positive mood and thus may be used in future as a therapeutic intervention.

  17. Joint Effects: A Pilot Investigation of the Impact of Bipolar Disorder and Marijuana Use on Cognitive Function and Mood.

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    Kelly A Sagar

    Full Text Available Marijuana is the most widely used illicit substance in those diagnosed with bipolar I disorder. However, there is conflicting evidence as to whether marijuana may alleviate or exacerbate mood symptomatology. As bipolar disorder and marijuana use are individually associated with cognitive impairment, it also remains unclear whether there is an additive effect on cognition when bipolar patients use marijuana. The current study aimed to determine the impact of marijuana on mood in bipolar patients and to examine whether marijuana confers an additional negative impact on cognitive function. Twelve patients with bipolar disorder who smoke marijuana (MJBP, 18 bipolar patients who do not smoke (BP, 23 marijuana smokers without other Axis 1 pathology (MJ, and 21 healthy controls (HC completed a neuropsychological battery. Further, using ecological momentary assessment, participants rated their mood three times daily as well as after each instance of marijuana use over a four-week period. Results revealed that although the MJ, BP, and MJBP groups each exhibited some degree of cognitive impairment relative to HCs, no significant differences between the BP and MJBP groups were apparent, providing no evidence of an additive negative impact of BPD and MJ use on cognition. Additionally, ecological momentary assessment analyses indicated alleviation of mood symptoms in the MJBP group after marijuana use; MJBP participants experienced a substantial decrease in a composite measure of mood symptoms. Findings suggest that for some bipolar patients, marijuana may result in partial alleviation of clinical symptoms. Moreover, this improvement is not at the expense of additional cognitive impairment.

  18. A Proposal for a Dimensional Classification System Based on the Shared Features of the "DSM-IV" Anxiety and Mood Disorders: Implications for Assessment and Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Timothy A.; Barlow, David H.

    2009-01-01

    A wealth of evidence attests to the extensive current and lifetime diagnostic comorbidity of the "Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders" (4th ed., "DSM-IV") anxiety and mood disorders. Research has shown that the considerable cross-sectional covariation of "DSM-IV" emotional disorders is accounted for by common higher order…

  19. Signs of mood and anxiety disorders in chimpanzees.

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    Hope R Ferdowsian

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: In humans, traumatic experiences are sometimes followed by psychiatric disorders. In chimpanzees, studies have demonstrated an association between traumatic events and the emergence of behavioral disturbances resembling posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD and depression. We addressed the following central question: Do chimpanzees develop posttraumatic symptoms, in the form of abnormal behaviors, which cluster into syndromes similar to those described in human mood and anxiety disorders? METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In phase 1 of this study, we accessed case reports of chimpanzees who had been reportedly subjected to traumatic events, such as maternal separation, social isolation, experimentation, or similar experiences. We applied and tested DSM-IV criteria for PTSD and major depression to published case reports of 20 chimpanzees identified through PrimateLit. Additionally, using the DSM-IV criteria and ethograms as guides, we developed behaviorally anchored alternative criteria that were applied to the case reports. A small number of chimpanzees in the case studies met DSM-IV criteria for PTSD and depression. Measures of inter-rater reliability, including Fleiss' kappa and percentage agreement, were higher with use of the alternative criteria for PTSD and depression. In phase 2, the alternative criteria were applied to chimpanzees living in wild sites in Africa (n = 196 and chimpanzees living in sanctuaries with prior histories of experimentation, orphanage, illegal seizure, or violent human conflict (n = 168. In phase 2, 58% of chimpanzees living in sanctuaries met the set of alternative criteria for depression, compared with 3% of chimpanzees in the wild (p = 0.04, and 44% of chimpanzees in sanctuaries met the set of alternative criteria for PTSD, compared with 0.5% of chimpanzees in the wild (p = 0.04. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Chimpanzees display behavioral clusters similar to PTSD and depression in their key

  20. Catatonia in inpatients with psychiatric disorders: A comparison of schizophrenia and mood disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grover, Sandeep; Chakrabarti, Subho; Ghormode, Deepak; Agarwal, Munish; Sharma, Akhilesh; Avasthi, Ajit

    2015-10-30

    This study aimed to evaluate the symptom threshold for making the diagnosis of catatonia. Further the objectives were to (1) to study the factor solution of Bush Francis Catatonia Rating Scale (BFCRS); (2) To compare the prevalence and symptom profile of catatonia in patients with psychotic and mood disorders among patients admitted to the psychiatry inpatient of a general hospital psychiatric unit. 201 patients were screened for presence of catatonia by using BFCRS. By using cluster analysis, discriminant analysis, ROC curve, sensitivity and specificity analysis, data suggested that a threshold of 3 symptoms was able to correctly categorize 89.4% of patients with catatonia and 100% of patients without catatonia. Prevalence of catatonia was 9.45%. There was no difference in the prevalence rate and symptom profile of catatonia between those with schizophrenia and mood disorders (i.e., unipolar depression and bipolar affective disorder). Factor analysis of the data yielded 2 factor solutions, i.e., retarded and excited catatonia. To conclude this study suggests that presence of 3 symptoms for making the diagnosis of catatonia can correctly distinguish patients with and without catatonia. This is compatible with the recommendations of DSM-5. Prevalence of catatonia is almost equal in patients with schizophrenia and mood disorders.

  1. Do certain signal transduction mechanisms explain the comorbidity of epilepsy and mood disorders?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocha, Luisa; Alonso-Vanegas, Mario; Orozco-Suárez, Sandra; Alcántara-González, David; Cruzblanca, Humberto; Castro, Elena

    2014-09-01

    It is well known that mood disorders are highly prevalent in patients with epilepsy. Although several studies have aimed to characterize alterations in different types of receptors associated with both disturbances, there is a lack of studies focused on identifying the causes of this comorbidity. Here, we described some changes at the biochemical level involving serotonin, dopamine, and γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) receptors as well as signal transduction mechanisms that may explain the coexistence of both epilepsy and mood disorders. Finally, the identification of common pathophysiological mechanisms associated with receptor-receptor interaction (heterodimers) could allow designing new strategies for treatment of patients with epilepsy and comorbid mood disorders.

  2. Borderline personality disorder: bipolarity, mood stabilizers and atypical antipsychotics in treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belli, Hasan; Ural, Cenk; Akbudak, Mahir

    2012-10-01

    In this article, it is aimed to review the efficacies of mood stabilizers and atypical antipsychotics, which are used commonly in psychopharmacological treatments of bipolar and borderline personality disorders. In this context, common phenomenology between borderline personality and bipolar disorders and differential features of clinical diagnosis will be reviewed in line with the literature. Both disorders can demonstrate common features in the diagnostic aspect, and can overlap phenomenologically. Concomitance rate of both disorders is quite high. In order to differentiate these two disorders from each other, quality of mood fluctuations, impulsivity types and linear progression of disorders should be carefully considered. There are various studies in mood stabilizer use, like lithium, carbamazepine, oxcarbazepine, sodium valproate and lamotrigine, in the treatment of borderline personality disorder. Moreover, there are also studies, which have revealed efficacies of risperidone, olanzapine and quetiapine as atypical antipsychotics. It is not easy to differentiate borderline personality disorder from the bipolar disorders. An intensively careful evaluation should be performed. This differentiation may be helpful also for the treatment. There are many studies about efficacy of valproate and lamotrigine in treatment of borderline personality disorder. However, findings related to other mood stabilizers are inadequate. Olanzapine and quetiapine are reported to be more effective among atypical antipsychotics. No drug is approved for the treatment of borderline personality disorder by the entitled authorities, yet. Psychotherapeutic approaches have preserved their significant places in treatment of borderline personality disorder. Moreover, symptom based approach is recommended in use of mood stabilizers and atypical antipsychotics.

  3. Red blood cell folate levels in pregnant women with a history of mood disorders: a case series

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yaremco, Elyse; Inglis, Angela; Innis, Sheila M.; Hippman, Catriona; Carrion, Prescilla; Lamers, Yvonne; Honer, William G.; Austin, Jehannine

    2014-01-01

    Objective Maternal folate supplementation reduces offspring risk for neural tube defects (NTDs) and other congenital abnormalities. Maternal red blood cell (RBC) folate concentrations of >906nmol/L have been associated with the lowest risk of having an NTD affected pregnancy. Mood disorders (e.g. depression, bipolar disorder) are common among women and can be associated with folate deficiency. Thus, pregnant women with histories of mood disorders may be prone to RBC folate levels insufficient to provide optimal protection against NTDs. While previous studies have assessed RBC folate concentrations in pregnant women from the general population, none have looked specifically at a group of pregnant women who have a history of a mood disorder. Methods We collected data about RBC folate concentrations and folic acid supplement intake during early pregnancy (906nmol/L, despite all participants reporting current daily use of folic acid supplements. Data regarding offspring were available for 22 women: birthweights ranged from 2296g to 4819g, and congenital abnormalities were identified in two (hypoplastic left heart, annular pancreas). Conclusion Data from this exploratory case series suggest a need for future larger scale controlled studies investigating RBC folate concentrations in early pregnancy and offspring outcomes among women with and without histories of mood disorders. PMID:23760977

  4. Mood regulation in seasonal affective disorder patients and healthy controls studied in forced desynchrony

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koorengevel, Kathelijne M.; Beersma, Domien G.M.; den Boer, Johan; Hoofdakker, Rutger H. van den

    2003-01-01

    In healthy subjects, both the duration of wakefulness and the circadian pacemaker have been demonstrated to be involved in the regulation of mood. Some features of affective disorders suggest that these two factors also play a role in the dysregulation of mood. In particular, disturbances of the

  5. Disruptive Mood Dysregulation Disorder Symptoms by Age in Autism, ADHD, and General Population Samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayes, Susan Dickerson; Kokotovich, Cari; Mathiowetz, Christine; Baweja, Raman; Calhoun, Susan L.; Waxmonsky, James

    2017-01-01

    Disruptive mood dysregulation disorder (DMDD) is a controversial "DSM-5" diagnosis. It is not known how DMDD symptoms vary by age and if differences are similar for autism, ADHD, and general population samples. Our study analyzed the two DMDD symptoms (irritable-angry mood and temper outbursts) in 1,827 children with autism or ADHD (with…

  6. The dynamics of mood and coping in bipolar disorder: longitudinal investigations of the inter-relationship between affect, self-esteem and response styles.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hana Pavlickova

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Previous research has suggested that the way bipolar patients respond to depressive mood impacts on the future course of the illness, with rumination prolonging depression and risk-taking possibly triggering hypomania. However, the relationship over time between variables such as mood, self-esteem, and response style to negative affect is complex and has not been directly examined in any previous study--an important limitation, which the present study seeks to address. METHODS: In order to maximize ecological validity, individuals diagnosed with bipolar disorder (N = 48 reported mood, self-esteem and response styles to depression, together with contextual information, up to 60 times over a period of six days, using experience sampling diaries. Entries were cued by quasi-random bleeps from digital watches. Longitudinal multilevel models were estimated, with mood and self-esteem as predictors of subsequent response styles. Similar models were then estimated with response styles as predictors of subsequent mood and self-esteem. Cross-sectional associations of daily-life correlates with symptoms were also examined. RESULTS: Cross-sectionally, symptoms of depression as well as mania were significantly related to low mood and self-esteem, and their increased fluctuations. Longitudinally, low mood significantly predicted rumination, and engaging in rumination dampened mood at the subsequent time point. Furthermore, high positive mood (marginally instigated high risk-taking, and in turn engaging in risk-taking resulted in increased positive mood. Adaptive coping (i.e. problem-solving and distraction was found to be an effective coping style in improving mood and self-esteem. CONCLUSIONS: This study is the first to directly test the relevance of response style theory, originally developed to explain unipolar depression, to understand symptom changes in bipolar disorder patients. The findings show that response styles significantly impact on

  7. Mood, anxiety, and alcohol use disorders and later cause-specific sick leave in young adult employees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torvik, Fartein Ask; Reichborn-Kjennerud, Ted; Gjerde, Line C; Knudsen, Gun Peggy; Ystrom, Eivind; Tambs, Kristian; Røysamb, Espen; Østby, Kristian; Ørstavik, Ragnhild

    2016-08-03

    Mental disorders strongly influence work capability in young adults, but it is not clear which disorders that are most strongly associated with sick leave, and which diagnoses that are stated on the sick leave certificates. Better knowledge of the impairments associated with different mental disorders is needed for optimal planning of interventions and prioritization of health services. In the current study, we investigate the prospective associations between eight mood, anxiety, and alcohol use disorders, and later sick leave granted for mental, somatic, or any disorder. Lifetime mental disorders were assessed by structured diagnostic interviews in 2,178 young adults followed for eight years with registry data on sick leave. Relative risk ratios were estimated for the associations between each mental disorder and the different forms of sick leave. All included diagnoses were associated with later sick leave. In adjusted analyses, major depressive disorder and generalized anxiety disorder were the strongest predictors of sick leave granted for mental disorders, whereas social anxiety disorder and specific phobia were the strongest predictors of sick leave granted for somatic disorders. Specific phobia and major depressive disorder had the highest attributable fractions for all-cause sick leave. Mood and anxiety disorders constituted independent risk factors for all cause sick leave, whereas alcohol use disorders seemed to be of less importance in young adulthood. Disorders characterised by distress were most strongly associated with sick leave granted for mental disorders, whereas disorders characterised by fear primarily predicted sick leave granted for somatic conditions. A large part of all sick leave is related to specific phobia, due to the high prevalence of this disorder. The impairment associated with this common disorder may be under-acknowledged, and it could decrease work capacity among individuals with somatic disorders. This disorder has good treatment

  8. Mood regulation and quality of life in social anxiety disorder: An examination of generalized expectancies for negative mood regulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sung, Sharon C.; Porter, Eliora; Robinaugh, Donald J.; Marks, Elizabeth H.; Marques, Luana M.; Otto, Michael W.; Pollack, Mark H.; Simon, Naomi M.

    2014-01-01

    The present study examined negative mood regulation expectancies, anxiety symptom severity, and quality of life in a sample of 167 patients with social anxiety disorder (SAD) and 165 healthy controls with no DSM-IV Axis I disorders. Participants completed the Generalized Expectancies for Negative Mood Regulation Scale (NMR), the Beck Anxiety Inventory, and the Quality of Life Enjoyment and Satisfaction Questionnaire. SAD symptom severity was assessed using the Liebowitz Social Anxiety Scale. Individuals with SAD scored significantly lower than controls on the NMR. Among SAD participants, NMR scores were negatively correlated with anxiety symptoms and SAD severity, and positively correlated with quality of life. NMR expectancies positively predicted quality of life even after controlling for demographic variables, comorbid diagnoses, anxiety symptoms, and SAD severity. Individuals with SAD may be less likely to engage in emotion regulating strategies due to negative beliefs regarding their effectiveness, thereby contributing to poorer quality of life. PMID:22343166

  9. [Internet dependency as a symptom of depressive mood disorders].

    Science.gov (United States)

    te Wildt, Bert T; Putzig, Inken; Zedler, Markus; Ohlmeier, Martin D

    2007-09-01

    In psychiatric contexts, the quick distribution of virtual techniques in private and professional everyday life gives rise to the question, if these can evoke a psychological addiction. Yet, the diagnostic assessment of internet or computer game dependency remains problematic. Within a study with 23 internet-dependent patients with significant psychological strain, 18 (77.8%) were diagnosed with a depressive mood disorder by thorough clinical examination and structured interviews. The presented work compares psychometric test results of the depressed subpopulation with healthy controls matched for age, sex and school education. In the Barrat Impulsiveness Scale patients with internet dependency scored significantly higher than the control group (p Internet Addiction Scale. Becks Depression Inventory and the Symptom-Checklist subscale for depression revealed significantly higher scores within the patient group as compared to controls (p internet dependent subjects showed significantly more pathological scores than the healthy subjects (p internet dependency can be understood as a novel psychopathology of well known psychiatric conditions, every psychiatrist should be able to detect and treat it adequately, as long as there is a willingness to deal with the contents and impacts of cyberspace. Especially with depressed patients, it seems to be crucial to include questions about media usage in psychiatric examination taking.

  10. Transtornos de humor refratários a tratamento Treatment-resistant mood disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodrigo Machado-Vieira

    2007-10-01

    sub-syndromal symptoms and treatment resistance are challenging aspects and need to be urgently addressed. The objective of this literature review is to evaluate the current concepts of treatment resistance and refractoriness in mood disorders. RESULTS: Genetic factors, misdiagnosis, use of inappropriate pharmacological approaches, non-compliance and biological/psychosocial stressors account for dysfunctions in mood regulation, thus increasing the prevalence of refractory mood disorders. Regarding available treatments, the use of effective doses during an adequate period followed by augmentation with a second and/or third agent, and finally switching to other agent are steps frequently necessary to optimize efficacy. However, in the treatment-resistant paradigm, drugs mimicking standard strategies, which target preferentially the monoaminergic system, can present reduced therapeutic effects. Thus, the search for new effective treatments for mood disorders is critical to decreasing the overall morbidity secondary to treatment resistance. CONCLUSION: Emerging strategies targeting brain plasticity pathways or 'plasticity enhancers', including antiglutamatergic drugs, glucocorticoid receptor antagonists and neuropeptides, have been considered promising therapeutic options for difficult-to-treat mood disorders.

  11. Critical exploration of co-occurring Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder, mood disorder and Substance Use Disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regnart, Judith; Truter, Ilse; Meyer, Anneke

    2017-06-01

    Co-occurring disorders (CODs) describe a Substance Use Disorder (SUD) accompanied by a comorbid psychiatric disorder. Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) and mood disorders are common CODs with high prevalence rates in SUD populations. It is proposed that literature on a tri-condition presentation of ADHD, mood disorder and SUD is limited. Areas covered: A literature search was conducted using a keyword search on EBSCOhost. Initially 2 799 records were identified, however, only two articles included all three conditions occurring concurrently in individuals. CODs constitute a major concern due to their overarching burden on society as a whole. Diagnosis and treatment of such patients is challenging. There is evidence that dysfunction of dopamine in the brain reward circuitry impacts the development or symptomology of all three disorders. Disparity exists regarding whether ADHD or mood disorders are greater modifiers for increased SUD severity. However, it has been reported that poor functional capacity may have a greater influence than comorbidities on SUD development. Expert commentary: Challenges exist which confound the clear distinction of CODs, however, with greater emergence of adult ADHD its screening in SUD populations should become standard practice to establish data on multi-condition presentations with the ultimate goal of improving clinical outcomes.

  12. Genome-Wide Association Study of Suicide Attempts in Mood Disorder Patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Perlis, Roy H.; Huang, Jie; Purcell, Shaun; Fava, Maurizio; Rush, A. John; Sullivan, Patrick F.; Hamilton, Steven P.; McMahon, Francis J.; Schulze, Thomas; Potash, James B.; Zandi, Peter P.; Willour, Virginia L.; Penninx, Brenda W.; Boomsma, Dorret I.; Vogelzangs, Nicole; Middeldorp, Christel M.; Rietschel, Marcella; Noethen, Markus; Cichon, Sven; Gurling, Hugh; Bass, Nick; McQuillin, Andrew; Hamshere, Marian; Craddock, Nick; Sklar, Pamela; Smoller, Jordan W.

    2010-01-01

    Objective: Family and twin studies suggest that liability for suicide attempts is heritable and distinct from mood disorder susceptibility. The authors therefore examined the association between common genomewide variation and lifetime suicide attempts. Method: The authors analyzed data on lifetime

  13. Sleep-wake cycle in young and older persons with a lifetime history of mood disorders.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rébecca Robillard

    Full Text Available Considering the marked changes in sleep and circadian rhythms across the lifespan, age may contribute to the heterogeneity in sleep-wake profiles linked to mood disorders. This study aimed to investigate the contributions of age and depression severity to sleep-wake disturbances. The Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HDRS was administered to assess current symptoms severity in 238 persons with a history of a mood disorder between 12 and 90 years of age (y.o.. Actigraphy was recorded over five to 22 days. Regression analyses and analyses of variance [age (12-19 y.o., 20-39 y.o., 40-59 y.o., and ≥ 60 y.o. by depression severity (HDRS< and ≥ 8] were conducted. The 12-19 y.o. and 20-39 y.o. groups had a delayed sleep schedule and acrophase compared to all other groups. The ≥ 60 y.o. group had a lower rhythmicity and amplitude (p ≤ .006 than the 12-19 y.o. group (p ≤ .046. Participants with a HDRS ≥ 8 spent longer time in bed, had later sleep offset times and had lower circadian rhythmicity than those with a HDRS<8 (p ≤ .036. Younger age and higher HDRS score correlated with later sleep onset and offset times, longer time in bed, higher WASO, lower sleep efficiency and later acrophase (p ≤ .023. Age was a significant predictor of delayed sleep and activity schedules (p ≤ .001. The profile of sleep-wake cycle disturbances associated with mood disorders changes with age, with prominent sleep phase delay during youth and reduced circadian strength in older persons. Conversely, disruptions in sleep consolidation seem more stable across age.

  14. Using a hybrid model to investigate the comorbidity and symptom overlap between social phobia and the other anxiety disorders and unipolar mood disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gros, Daniel F; McCabe, Randi E; Antony, Martin M

    2013-11-30

    New hybrid models of psychopathology have been proposed that combine the current categorical approach with symptom dimensions that are common across various disorders. The present study investigated the new hybrid model of social anxiety in a large sample of participants with anxiety disorders and unipolar mood disorders to improve understanding of the comorbidity and symptom overlap between social phobia (SOC) and the other anxiety disorders and unipolar mood disorders. Six hundred and eighty two participants from a specialized outpatient clinic for anxiety treatment completed a semi-structured diagnostic interview and the Multidimensional Assessment of Social Anxiety (MASA). A hybrid model symptom profile was identified for SOC and compared with each of the other principal diagnoses. Significant group differences were identified on each of the MASA scales. Differences also were identified when common sets of comorbidities were compared within participants diagnosed with SOC. The findings demonstrated the influence of both the principal diagnosis of SOC and other anxiety disorders and unipolar mood disorders as well as the influence of comorbid diagnoses with SOC on the six symptom dimensions. These findings highlight the need to shift to transdiagnostic assessment and treatment practices that go beyond the disorder-specific focus of the current categorical diagnostic systems.

  15. Acceptance and commitment therapy for perinatal mood and anxiety disorders: development of an inpatient group intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonacquisti, Alexa; Cohen, Matthew J; Schiller, Crystal Edler

    2017-06-10

    Perinatal mood and anxiety disorders are a leading cause of morbidity and mortality for childbearing women. Current treatments, such as cognitive behavioral therapy and interpersonal therapy, have demonstrated modest success in addressing perinatal psychiatric symptoms; however, additional treatment options are needed to address the limitations of current approaches, particularly for women experiencing moderate to severe perinatal mental illness during pregnancy or postpartum. We discuss the use of acceptance and commitment therapy (ACT) as a promising treatment approach that may be uniquely suited for perinatal women due to its emphasis of values, mindfulness, and acceptance; these psychological constructs notably address the significant psychiatric and behavioral health condition comorbidity, somatic symptoms, and stigma associated with perinatal mood and anxiety disorders. In addition, we describe the development of a four-session ACT-based group intervention at the Perinatal Psychiatry Inpatient Unit at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Sessions focus on core ACT processes of acceptance, cognitive defusion, present-moment awareness, value identification, and goal setting, and we describe how each of these processes is relevant to the perinatal population. Implications for future clinical applications and research investigations are discussed.

  16. Impaired sensory processing measured by functional MRI in Bipolar disorder manic and depressed mood states.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaffer, Joseph J; Johnson, Casey P; Fiedorowicz, Jess G; Christensen, Gary E; Wemmie, John A; Magnotta, Vincent A

    2017-07-03

    Bipolar disorder is characterized by recurring episodes of depression and mania. Defining differences in brain function during these states is an important goal of bipolar disorder research. However, few imaging studies have directly compared brain activity between bipolar mood states. Herein, we compare functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) responses during a flashing checkerboard stimulus between bipolar participants across mood states (euthymia, depression, and mania) in order to identify functional differences between these states. 40 participants with bipolar I disorder and 33 healthy controls underwent fMRI during the presentation of the stimulus. A total of 23 euthymic-state, 16 manic-state, 15 depressed-state, and 32 healthy control imaging sessions were analyzed in order to compare functional activation during the stimulus between mood states and with healthy controls. A reduced response was identified in the visual cortex in both the depressed and manic groups compared to euthymic and healthy participants. Functional differences between bipolar mood states were also observed in the cerebellum, thalamus, striatum, and hippocampus. Functional differences between mood states occurred in several brain regions involved in visual and other sensory processing. These differences suggest that altered visual processing may be a feature of mood states in bipolar disorder. The key limitations of this study are modest mood-state group size and the limited temporal resolution of fMRI which prevents the segregation of primary visual activity from regulatory feedback mechanisms.

  17. Disordered eating, body dissatisfaction, perfectionism, and mood state in female adolescents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonardo de Sousa FORTES

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Objective The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between body dissatisfaction, perfectionism, mood, and disordered eating in female adolescents. Methods Three hundred and seventy one adolescents aged between 12 and 16 years of age participated in this research. The Body Shape Questionnaire, Multidimensional Perfectionism Scale, Brunel Mood Scale, and the Eating Attitudes Test - 26 were used to assess, respectively, body dissatisfaction, perfectionism, mood state, and disordered eating. Stepwise multiple linear regression was used to determine the relationship between the independent variables and the Eating Attitudes Test subscale scores. Multivariate analysis of covariance was used to compare the Eating Attitudes Test subscale scores according to body dissatisfaction, perfectionism, and mood state classifications. Results The findings showed that body dissatisfaction (p=0.001, perfectionism (p=0.04, and mood state (p=0.05 were associated with disordered eating in the female adolescents evaluated. Despite the statistically significant results obtained for all independent variables, it is worth mentioning that body dissatisfaction was the main determinant of disordered eating in the multiple regression model. Conclusion It can be concluded that body dissatisfaction explains the variance in disordered eating; however, it is also important to note that perfectionism and mood state are also associated to the disordered eating in female adolescents, although to a lesser extent.

  18. The feasibility of screening for suicidal risk with the Hypomania Checklist and Mood Disorder Questionnaire

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘艳红

    2014-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the feasibility of screening for suicidal risk with the Hypomania Checklist(HCL-32)and Mood Disorder Questionnaire(MDQ)among patients of bipolar disorder or depression.Methods This was the re-analysis of data from Bipolar Screening Investigation Project.1 487 consecutive subjects with bipolar disorder or

  19. Omega 3 Fatty Acids: Novel Neurotherapeutic Targets for Cognitive Dysfunction in Mood Disorders and Schizophrenia?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knöchel, Christian; Voss, Martin; Grüter, Florian; Alves, Gilberto S; Matura, Silke; Sepanski, Beate; Stäblein, Michael; Wenzler, Sofia; Prvulovic, David; Carvalho, André F; Oertel-Knöchel, Viola

    2015-01-01

    An increasing body of evidences from preclinical as well as epidemiological and clinical studies suggest a potential beneficial role of dietary intake of omega-3 fatty acids for cognitive functioning. In this narrative review, we will summarize and discuss recent findings from epidemiological, interventional and experimental studies linking dietary consumption of omega-3 fatty acids to cognitive function in healthy adults. Furthermore, affective disorders and schizophrenia (SZ) are characterized by cognitive dysfunction encompassing several domains. Cognitive dysfunction is closely related to impaired functioning and quality of life across these conditions. Therefore, the current review focues on the potential influence of omega-3 fatty acids on cognition in SZ and affective disorders. In sum, current data predominantly from mechanistic models and animal studies suggest that adjunctive omega-3 fatty acid supplementation could lead to improved cognitive functioning in SZ and affective disorders. However, besides its translational promise, evidence for clinical benefits in humans has been mixed. Notwithstanding evidences indicate that adjunctive omega-3 fatty acids may have benefit for affective symptoms in both unipolar and bipolar depression, to date no randomized controlled trial had evaluated omega-3 as cognitive enhancer for mood disorders, while a single published controlled trial suggested no therapeutic benefit for cognitive improvement in SZ. Considering the pleiotropic mechanisms of action of omega-3 fatty acids, the design of well-designed controlled trials of omega-3 supplementation as a novel, domain-specific, target for cognitive impairment in SZ and affective disorders is warranted.

  20. Disruptive Mood Dysregulation Disorder at Age Six and Clinical and Functional Outcomes Three Years Later

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dougherty, Lea R.; Smith, Victoria C.; Bufferd, Sara J.; Kessel, Ellen M.; Carlson, Gabrielle A.; Klein, Daniel N.

    2017-01-01

    Background Little is known about the predictive validity of disruptive mood dysregulation disorder (DMDD). This longitudinal, community-based study examined associations of DMDD at age six with psychiatric disorders, functional impairment, peer functioning, and service use at age nine. Methods 473 children were assessed at ages six and nine. Child psychopathology and functional impairment were assessed at age six with the Preschool Age Psychiatric Assessment (PAPA) with parents and at age nine with the Kiddie-Schedule of Affective Disorders and Schizophrenia (K-SADS) with parents and children. At age nine, mothers, fathers and youth completed the Child Depression Inventory (CDI) and the Screen for Anxiety Related Disorders (SCARED), and teachers and K-SADS interviewers completed measures of peer functioning. Significant demographic covariates were included in all models. Results DMDD at age six predicted a current diagnosis of DMDD at age nine. DMDD at age six also predicted current and lifetime depressive disorder and attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) at age nine, after controlling for all age six psychiatric disorders. In addition, DMDD predicted depressive, ADHD, and disruptive behavior disorder (DBD) symptoms on the K-SADS, and maternal and paternal reports of depressive symptoms on the CDI, after controlling for the corresponding symptom scale at age six. Lastly, DMDD at age six predicted greater functional impairment, peer problems, and educational support service use at age nine, after controlling for all psychiatric disorders at age six. Conclusions Children with DMDD are at high risk for impaired functioning across childhood, and this risk is not accounted by comorbid conditions. PMID:26786551

  1. Prevalence of current anxiety disorders in people with bipolar disorder during euthymia: a meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavlova, B; Perlis, R H; Mantere, O; Sellgren, C M; Isometsä, E; Mitchell, P B; Alda, M; Uher, R

    2017-04-01

    Anxiety disorders are highly prevalent in people with bipolar disorder, but it is not clear how many have anxiety disorders even at times when they are free of major mood episodes. We aimed to establish what proportion of euthymic individuals with bipolar disorder meet diagnostic criteria for anxiety disorders. We performed a random-effects meta-analysis of prevalence rates of current DSM-III- and DSM-IV-defined anxiety disorders (panic disorder, agoraphobia, social anxiety disorder, generalized anxiety disorder, specific phobia, obsessive-compulsive disorder, post-traumatic stress disorder, and anxiety disorder not otherwise specified) in euthymic adults with bipolar disorder in studies published by 31 December 2015. Across 10 samples with 2120 individuals with bipolar disorder, 34.7% met diagnostic criteria for one or more anxiety disorders during euthymia [95% confidence interval (CI) 23.9-45.5%]. Direct comparison of 189 euthymic individuals with bipolar disorder and 17 109 population controls across three studies showed a 4.6-fold increase (risk ratio 4.60, 95% CI 2.37-8.92, p bipolar disorder. These findings suggest that anxiety disorders are common in people with bipolar disorder even when their mood is adequately controlled. Euthymic people with bipolar disorder should be routinely assessed for anxiety disorders and anxiety-focused treatment should be initiated if indicated.

  2. Application of machine learning classification for structural brain MRI in mood disorders: Critical review from a clinical perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yong-Ku; Na, Kyoung-Sae

    2018-01-03

    Mood disorders are a highly prevalent group of mental disorders causing substantial socioeconomic burden. There are various methodological approaches for identifying the underlying mechanisms of the etiology, symptomatology, and therapeutics of mood disorders; however, neuroimaging studies have provided the most direct evidence for mood disorder neural substrates by visualizing the brains of living individuals. The prefrontal cortex, hippocampus, amygdala, thalamus, ventral striatum, and corpus callosum are associated with depression and bipolar disorder. Identifying the distinct and common contributions of these anatomical regions to depression and bipolar disorder have broadened and deepened our understanding of mood disorders. However, the extent to which neuroimaging research findings contribute to clinical practice in the real-world setting is unclear. As traditional or non-machine learning MRI studies have analyzed group-level differences, it is not possible to directly translate findings from research to clinical practice; the knowledge gained pertains to the disorder, but not to individuals. On the other hand, a machine learning approach makes it possible to provide individual-level classifications. For the past two decades, many studies have reported on the classification accuracy of machine learning-based neuroimaging studies from the perspective of diagnosis and treatment response. However, for the application of a machine learning-based brain MRI approach in real world clinical settings, several major issues should be considered. Secondary changes due to illness duration and medication, clinical subtypes and heterogeneity, comorbidities, and cost-effectiveness restrict the generalization of the current machine learning findings. Sophisticated classification of clinical and diagnostic subtypes is needed. Additionally, as the approach is inevitably limited by sample size, multi-site participation and data-sharing are needed in the future. Copyright

  3. The relationship between parents' poor emotional health status and childhood mood and anxiety disorder in Florida children, national survey of children's health, 2011-2012.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reid, Keshia M

    2015-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine how parents' emotional health relates to childhood mood and anxiety disorder among Florida children in the 2011-2012 National Survey of Children's Health. Analyses were restricted to 1,241 Florida children 6-17 years of age. Childhood mood and anxiety disorder was defined as a parent-reported diagnosis of current depression or anxiety. Parents' emotional health status was a composite measure of the lowest reported emotional health of any parent in the household. To assess the association between parents' emotional health and childhood mood and anxiety disorder, bivariate and multivariate logistic regression analyses were performed. Nearly 5 % of Florida children had a mood or anxiety disorder in 2011-2012. Children living with a parent in poor emotional health were significantly more likely to have a mood or anxiety disorder compared to children living with a parent in good emotional health (OR 5.01; 95 % CI 1.89, 13.29). After adjusting for covariates, this association remained substantial and significant (aOR 4.33; 95 % CI 1.49, 12.57). Findings presented here are consistent with national findings and emphasize the strong link between parents' emotional health status and childhood mood and anxiety disorders. To address the mental health of children in the state of Florida, Florida public health initiatives should consider family processes and child level characteristics.

  4. Omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids and mood disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Astorg Pierre

    2007-05-01

    greater risk of mood disorder, as well as a therapeutic potential of n-3 PUFA in depressed or bipolar patients. Other works are necessary in order to establish a causal relation between n-3 PUFA deficiency and depression, and to further explore their preventive or therapeutic use.

  5. Effects of frontal transcranial direct current stimulation on emotional processing and mood in healthy humans

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    Michael A. Nitsche

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The prefrontal cortex is involved in mood and emotional processing. In patients suffering from depression, the left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex is hypoactive, while activity of the right dorsolateral prefrontal cortex is enhanced. Counterbalancing these pathological excitability alterations by repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS or transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS improves mood in these patients. In healthy subjects, however, rTMS of the same areas has no major effect, and the effects of tDCS are mixed. We aimed to evaluate the effects of prefrontal tDCS on mood and mood-related cognitive processing in healthy humans. In a first study, we administered excitability-enhancing anodal, excitability-diminishing cathodal and placebo tDCS to the left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, combined with antagonistic stimulation of the right frontopolar cortex, and tested acute mood changes by an adjective checklist. Subjective mood was not influenced by tDCS. Emotional face identification, however, which was explored in a second experiment, was subtly improved by a tDCS-driven excitability modulation of the prefrontal cortex, markedly by anodal tDCS of the left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex for positive emotional content. We conclude that tDCS of the prefrontal cortex improves mood processing in healthy subjects, but does not influence subjective mood state.

  6. The relation between anger management style, mood and somatic symptoms in anxiety disorders and somatoform disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koh, Kyung Bong; Kim, Dong Kee; Kim, Shin Young; Park, Joong Kyu; Han, Mooyoung

    2008-09-30

    The objective of this study was to examine the relationship between anger management style, depression, anxiety and somatic symptoms in anxiety disorder and somatoform disorder patients. The subjects comprised 71 patients with anxiety disorders and 47 with somatoform disorders. The level of anger expression or anger suppression was assessed by the Anger Expression Scale, the severity of anxiety and depression by the Symptom Checklist-90-Revised (SCL-90-R) anxiety and depression subscales, and the severity of somatic symptoms by the Somatization Rating Scale and the SCL-90-R somatization subscale. The results of path analyses showed that anger suppression had only an indirect effect on somatic symptoms through depression and anxiety in each of the disorders. In addition, only anxiety had a direct effect on somatic symptoms in anxiety disorder patients, whereas both anxiety and depression had direct effects on somatic symptoms in somatoform disorder patients. However, the anxiety disorder group showed a significant negative correlation between anger expression and anger suppression in the path from anger-out to anger-in to depression to anxiety to somatic symptoms, unlike the somatoform disorder group. The results suggest that anger suppression, but not anger expression, is associated with mood, i.e. depression and anxiety, and somatic symptoms characterize anxiety disorder and somatoform disorder patients. Anxiety is likely to be an important source of somatic symptoms in anxiety disorders, whereas both anxiety and depression are likely to be important sources of somatic symptoms in somatoform disorders. In addition, anger suppression preceded by inhibited anger expression is associated with anxiety and somatic symptoms in anxiety disorders.

  7. Prevalence of mood and anxiety disorders in women with systemic lupus erythematosus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bachen, Elizabeth A.; Chesney, Margaret A.; Criswell, Lindsey A.

    2009-01-01

    Objective To examine the lifetime prevalence of mood and anxiety disorders in patients with SLE. Demographic and disease-related variables were examined for association with lifetime major depressive disorder and the presence of any mood or anxiety disorder. Methods Three-hundred and twenty-six Caucasian women with SLE completed the Composite International Diagnostic Interview (CIDI) and the Systemic Lupus Activity Questionnaire (SLAQ), a self-report measure of disease activity in SLE. The binomial test was used to compare the prevalence of psychiatric diagnoses in SLE patients to a population sample of Caucasian women. Results Sixty-five percent of participants received a lifetime mood or anxiety diagnosis. Major depressive disorder (47%), specific phobia (24%), panic disorder (16%), obsessive-compulsive disorder (9%), and bipolar I disorder (6%) were more common among the SLE patients compared to Caucasian women (p = 0.00009 for specific phobia, all other p values = 0.00001). Although most patients with histories of mood disorders reported their psychiatric symptoms to a medical provider, a substantial number of patients with anxiety disorders did not. Self-reported disease activity was associated with a lifetime history of major depression (p = 0.001) and presence of a mood or anxiety disorder (p = 0.001), after controlling for demographic and clinical characteristics. Conclusion Several mood and anxiety disorders are more common in women with SLE compared to the general population, and disease activity may contribute to this higher risk. Brief self-report questionnaires may help providers identify patients with these conditions, particularly when patients are reluctant to disclose their symptoms. PMID:19479699

  8. Thyroid, brain and mood modulation in affective disorder: insights from molecular research and functional brain imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, M; London, E D; Silverman, D H; Rasgon, N; Kirchheiner, J; Whybrow, P C

    2003-11-01

    The efficacy resulting from adjunctive use of supraphysiological doses of levothyroxine has emerged as a promising approach to therapy and prophylaxis for refractory mood disorders. Most patients with mood disorders who receive treatment with supraphysiological doses of levothyroxine have normal peripheral thyroid hormone levels, and also respond differently to the hormone and tolerate it better than healthy individuals and patients with primary thyroid diseases. Progress in molecular and functional brain imaging techniques has provided a new understanding of these phenomena, illuminating the relationship between thyroid function, mood modulation and behavior. Thyroid hormones are widely distributed in the brain and have a multitude of effects on the central nervous system. Notably many of the limbic system structures where thyroid hormone receptors are prevalent have been implicated in the pathogenesis of mood disorders. The influence of the thyroid system on neurotransmitters (particularly serotonin and norepinephrine), which putatively play a major role in the regulation of mood and behavior, may contribute to the mechanisms of mood modulation. Recent functional brain imaging studies using positron emission tomography (PET) with [ (18)F]-fluorodeoxyglucose demonstrated that thyroid hormone treatment with levothyroxine affects regional brain metabolism in patients with hypothyroidism and bipolar disorder. Theses studies confirm that thyroid hormones are active in modulating metabolic function in the mature adult brain, and provide intriging neuroanatomic clues that may guide future research.

  9. Monotherapy With Major Antihypertensive Drug Classes and Risk of Hospital Admissions for Mood Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boal, Angela H.; Smith, Daniel J.; McCallum, Linsay; Muir, Scott; Touyz, Rhian M.; Dominiczak, Anna F.

    2016-01-01

    Major depressive and bipolar disorders predispose to atherosclerosis, and there is accruing data from animal model, epidemiological, and genomic studies that commonly used antihypertensive drugs may have a role in the pathogenesis or course of mood disorders. In this study, we propose to determine whether antihypertensive drugs have an impact on mood disorders through the analysis of patients on monotherapy with different classes of antihypertensive drugs from a large hospital database of 525 046 patients with follow-up for 5 years. There were 144 066 eligible patients fulfilling the inclusion criteria: age 40 to 80 years old at time of antihypertensive prescription and medication exposure >90 days. The burden of comorbidity assessed by Charlson and Elixhauser scores showed an independent linear association with mood disorder diagnosis. The median time to hospital admission with mood disorder was 847 days for the 299 admissions (641 685 person-years of follow-up). Patients on angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors or angiotensin receptor blockers had the lowest risk for mood disorder admissions, and compared with this group, those on β-blockers (hazard ratio=2.11; [95% confidence interval, 1.12–3.98]; P=0.02) and calcium antagonists (2.28 [95% confidence interval, 1.13–4.58]; P=0.02) showed higher risk, whereas those on no antihypertensives (1.63 [95% confidence interval, 0.94–2.82]; P=0.08) and thiazide diuretics (1.56 [95% confidence interval, 0.65–3.73]; P=0.32) showed no significant difference. Overall, our exploratory findings suggest possible differential effects of antihypertensive medications on mood that merits further study: calcium antagonists and β-blockers may be associated with increased risk, whereas angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors and angiotensin receptor blockers may be associated with a decreased risk of mood disorders. PMID:27733585

  10. Coding and Noncoding Gene Expression Biomarkers in Mood Disorders and Schizophrenia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Firoza Mamdani

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Mood disorders and schizophrenia are common and complex disorders with consistent evidence of genetic and environmental influences on predisposition. It is generally believed that the consequences of disease, gene expression, and allelic heterogeneity may be partly the explanation for the variability observed in treatment response. Correspondingly, while effective treatments are available for some patients, approximately half of the patients fail to respond to current neuropsychiatric treatments. A number of peripheral gene expression studies have been conducted to understand these brain-based disorders and mechanisms of treatment response with the aim of identifying suitable biomarkers and perhaps subgroups of patients based upon molecular fingerprint. In this review, we summarize the results from blood-derived gene expression studies implemented with the aim of discovering biomarkers for treatment response and classification of disorders. We include data from a biomarker study conducted in first-episode subjects with schizophrenia, where the results provide insight into possible individual biological differences that predict antipsychotic response. It is concluded that, while peripheral studies of expression are generating valuable results in pathways involving immune regulation and response, larger studies are required which hopefully will lead to robust biomarkers for treatment response and perhaps underlying variations relevant to these complex disorders.

  11. Social Welfare Centers Protect Outpatients with Mood Disorders from Risk of Hospital Admission.

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    Kyu-Tae Han

    Full Text Available South Korea faces difficulties in the management of mental disorders, and those difficulties are expected to gradually worsen. Therefore, we analyzed the relationship between social welfare centers and hospital admission after outpatient treatment for mood disorders.We used data from the National Health Insurance Service National Sample Cohort 2002-2013, which included all medical claims filed for the 50,160 patients who were newly diagnosed with a mood disorder among the 1,025,340 individuals in a nationally representative sample. We performed a logistic regression analysis using generalized estimating equation (GEE models to examine the relationship between social welfare centers and hospital admission after outpatient treatment for mood disorders (ICD-10: F3.There was a 3.9% admission rate among a total of 99,533 person-years. Outpatients who lived in regions with more social welfare centers were less likely to be admitted to a hospital (per increase of five social welfare centers per 100,000 people; OR: 0.958; 95% CI: 0.919-0.999. Social welfare centers had an especially strong protective effect on patients with relatively mild mood disorders and those who were vulnerable to medical expenditures.Considering the protective role of social welfare centers in managing patients with mood disorders, health-policy makers need to consider strategies for activating mental healthcare.

  12. Creativity and mood disorders: The enigmatic case of Isaak Il'ich Levitan (1860-1900).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lerner, Vladimir; Margolin, Jacob; Witztum, Eliezer

    2015-08-25

    Isaak Levitan (1860-1900) was one of Russia's most influential landscape artists. He lived a very short life, only 40 years, but left more than 1000 paintings. He suffered from mood fluctuations, and died as a result of serious heart disease. After an introduction related to the issue of creativity and mental disorders, a short biography of Levitan's life is outlined, followed by some examples of his mood and behavior. A section on the mood's reflection in Levitan's professional work is followed by a description of his romantic loves and disappointments and his relationship with his contemporary Russian, the writer Anton Chekhov.

  13. Mood disorders are associated with a more severe hypovitaminosis D than schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belzeaux, Raoul; Boyer, Laurent; Ibrahim, El Chérif; Féron, François; Leboyer, Marion; Fond, Guillaume

    2015-09-30

    Patients with psychiatric disorders display high levels of hypovitaminosis D (Hypovitaminosis D was significantly lower in patients with mood disorders than patients with schizophrenia (standardized β coefficient=0.385, p=0.007). Further studies are warranted to determine specific causes of hypovitaminosis D and the interest of supplementation.

  14. Combined psychotherapy and pharmacotherapy for mood and anxiety disorders in adults: Review and analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Otto, M.W.; Smits, J.A.J.; Reese, H.E.

    2005-01-01

    Studies suggest a complex relationship between cognitive-behavior therapy (CBT) and pharmacotherapy for the combined treatment of mood disorders and anxiety disorders. Combined treatment for depression may have beneficial effects when applied to patients with chronic depression and in cases to preve

  15. Baseline dimensional psychopathology and future mood disorder onset : findings from the Dutch Bipolar Offspring Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mesman, E.; Nolen, W. A.; Keijsers, L.; Hillegers, M. H. J.

    2017-01-01

    Objective: To identify the early signs of mood disorder development, specifically bipolar disorder (BD), in a population at familial risk for BD. Method: The sample included 107 Dutch adolescent bipolar offspring (age 12-21) followed into adulthood (age 22-32). Lifetime DSM-IV axis I diagnoses were

  16. Mood, Anxiety, and Substance-Use Disorders and Suicide Risk in a Military Population Cohort

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conner, Kenneth R.; McCarthy, Michael D.; Bajorska, Alina; Caine, Eric D.; Tu, Xin M.; Knox, Kerry L.

    2012-01-01

    There are meager prospective data from nonclinical samples on the link between anxiety disorders and suicide or the extent to which the association varies over time. We examined these issues in a cohort of 309,861 U.S. Air Force service members, with 227 suicides over follow-up. Mental disorder diagnoses including anxiety, mood, and substance-use…

  17. A dynamic course of T cell defects in individuals at risk for mood disorders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Snijders, G.; Schiweck, C.; Mesman, E.; Grosse, L.; De Wit, H.; Nolen, W. A.; Drexhage, H. A.; Hillegers, M. H. J.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: T cell abnormalities have been repeatedly reported in adult patients with mood disorders, suggesting a role of these cells in the pathogenesis of these disorders. In the present study, we explored the dynamics of circulating T cell subsets over time in a population at high familial risk

  18. Disproportionate longer-term opioid use among U.S. adults with mood disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halbert, Brian T; Davis, Roger B; Wee, Christina C

    2016-11-01

    Adults with mood disorders frequently use prescription opioids. The factors associated with this increased use remain unclear. We used the Medical Expenditure Panel Surveys from 2005 to 2011 to measure the association of mood disorders with new opioid use and the transition to longer-term opioid use for a variety of pain conditions before and after controlling for patient characteristics and clinical disability. We analyzed 33,450 adults with likely acute or potentially chronic pain conditions who were not using opioids at baseline. Among respondents with likely acute pain conditions, those with mood disorders initiated opioids more frequently for that pain condition compared with those without mood disorders (19.3%, vs 17.2%, P = 0.01). After initiation, they also transitioned to longer-term opioid therapy more frequently (11.7% vs 5.3%, P new opioid use for likely acute (adjusted odds ratio [aOR] 1.05 [0.92-1.20]) or potentially chronic pain (aOR 0.91 [0.80-1.03]). However, there remained a strong association between mood disorders and the transition to longer-term opioid use for likely acute (aOR 1.77 [1.15-2.72]) and potentially chronic pain (aOR 1.95 [1.42-2.68]). Targeting the transition to longer-term opioid use may help clinicians reduce potentially inappropriate opioid prescriptions in this high-risk population.

  19. Relationship between maternal depression as a risk factor for childhood trauma and mood disorders in young adults

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    Luana Porto Barbosa

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Background Maternal depression may be a risk factor for childhood trauma (CT, with resultant offspring development of mood disorders (MD in adult life. Objective To verify the relationship between maternal depression (as a risk factor for childhood trauma and mood disorders in young adults. Methods The sample was composed of 164 young adults and their mothers. Maternal depression was identified through the Mini International Neuropsychiatric Interview (M.I.N.I.. Mood Disorders in the young adults were confirmed with the Structured Interview for the DSM-IV (SCID, whereas the CT was evaluated using the Childhood Trauma Questionnaire (CTQ. Results In the group of young adults with MD, individuals who had depressed mothers presented higher mean scores of CT in comparison to the ones who did not have mothers with Depression (p < 0.005. Childhood trauma was also associated with lower social classes (p < 0.005. In the group of young adults without MD, the only variable that was associated with CT was the young adult’s (not current work (p < 0.005. Discussion Maternal depression was considered to be a risk factor for CT and MD in young adults. Thus, preventing and treating maternal psychiatric disorders may diminish the risk of offspring childhood trauma, and, consequently, avoid negative effects in the offspring’s adult life.

  20. Stress, Glucocorticoid Hormones and Hippocampal Neural Progenitor Cells: Implications to Mood Disorders

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    Tomoshige eKino

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA axis and its end-effectors glucocorticoid hormones play central roles in the adaptive response to numerous stressors that can be either internal or external. Thus, this system has a strong impact on the brain hippocampus and its major functions, such as cognition, memory as well as behavior and mood. The hippocampal area of the adult brain contains neural stem cells or more committed neural progenitor cells, which retain throughout the human life the ability of self-renewal and to differentiate into multiple neural cell lineages, such as neurons, astrocytes and oligodendrocytes. Importantly, these characteristic cells contribute significantly to the above-indicated functions of the hippocampus, while various stressors and glucocorticoids influence proliferation, differentiation and fate of these cells. This review offers an overview of the current understanding on the interactions between the HPA axis/glucocorticoid stress-responsive system and hippocampal neural progenitor cells by focusing on the actions of glucocorticoids. Also addressed is a further discussion on the implications of such interactions to the pathophysiology of mood disorders.

  1. Mood disorders, psychiatric symptoms, and distress in women presenting for infertility evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Downey, J; Yingling, S; McKinney, M; Husami, N; Jewelewicz, R; Maidman, J

    1989-09-01

    Women who undergo treatment for infertility frequently report depression, but it is crucial to distinguish between subjective distress, symptoms, and clinical depressive disorders. In the initial assessment of a prospective, longitudinal study, 59 women presenting for infertility treatment were compared with 35 women presenting for routine gynecological care. Infertility patients and controls were not significantly different on self-report measures of partner satisfaction, sexual functioning, or self-esteem. There was also no difference in psychiatric symptomatology, or in the percentage of subjects who were currently experiencing or had ever experienced a major depressive episode. However, the infertility patients perceived themselves to have been already quite affected by their inability to conceive. For instance, 49.2% reported changes in their sexual functioning and 74.6% reported changes in their mood.

  2. First- and Third-Person Perspectives in Psychotic Disorders and Mood Disorders with Psychotic Features

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucrezia Islam

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Lack of insight, very frequent in schizophrenia, can be considered a deficit in Theory of Mind (ToM performances, and is also found in other psychiatric disorders. In this study, we used the first- to third-person shift to examine subjects with psychotic and psychotic mood disorders. 92 patients were evaluated with SANS and SAPS scales and asked to talk about their delusions. They were asked to state whether they thought what they said was believable for them and for the interviewer. Two weeks later, 79 patients listened to a tape where their delusion was reenacted by two actors and were asked the same two questions. Some patients gained insight when using third-person perspective. These patients had lower SAPS scores, a lower score on SAPS item on delusions, and significant improvement in their SAPS delusion score at the second interview. Better insight was not related to a specific diagnostic group.

  3. What do patients with psychotic and mood disorders know about ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2008-07-29

    Jul 29, 2008 ... While there are several papers on psychoeducation in the literature, there is a paucity ... disorder about their diagnosis and treatment to assist the goals of treatment and ..... comorbid personality disorders. Bipolar Disord 2004 ...

  4. Classification of mood disorders in DSM-V and DSM-VI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joyce, Peter R

    2008-10-01

    For any diagnostic system to be clinically useful, and go beyond description, it must provide an understanding that informs about aetiology and/or outcome. DSM-III and DSM-IV have provided reliability; the challenge for DSM-V and DSM-VI will be to provide validity. For DSM-V this will not be achieved. Believers in DSM-III and DSM-IV have impeded progress towards a valid classification system, so DSM-V needs to retain continuity with its predecessors to retain reliability and enhance research, but position itself to inform a valid diagnostic system by DSM-VI. This review examines the features of a diagnostic system and summarizes what is really known about mood disorders. The review also questions whether what are called mood disorders are primarily disorders of mood. Finally, it provides suggestions for DSM-VI.

  5. Cytomegalovirus Antibody Elevation in Bipolar Disorder: Relation to Elevated Mood States

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. R. Prossin

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The neurobiology of mood states is complicated by exposure to everyday stressors (e.g., psychosocial, ubiquitous environmental infections like CMV, each fluctuating between latency and reactivation. CMV reactivation induces proinflammatory cytokines (e.g., TNF-α associated with induction of neurotoxic metabolites and the presence of mood states in bipolar disorder (BD. Whether CMV reactivation is associated with bipolar diagnoses (trait or specific mood states is unclear. We investigated 139 BD type I and 99 healthy controls to determine if concentrations of IgG antibodies to Herpesviridae (e.g., CMV, HSV-1, and HSV-2 were associated with BD-I diagnosis and specific mood states. We found higher CMV antibody concentration in BD-I than in healthy controls (T234=3.1, Puncorr=0.002; Pcorr=0.006 but no difference in HSV-1 (P>0.10 or HSV-2 (P>0.10. Compared to euthymic BD-I volunteers, CMV IgG was higher in BD-I volunteers with elevated moods (P0.10. While relationships presented between BD-I diagnosis, mood states, and CMV antibodies are encouraging, they are limited by the study’s cross sectional nature. Nevertheless, further testing is warranted to replicate findings and determine whether reactivation of CMV infection exacerbates elevated mood states in BD-I.

  6. [ORAL CONTRACEPTIVES AND MOOD/SEXUAL DISORDERS IN WOMEN].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sirakov, M; Tomova, E

    2015-01-01

    Oral contraceptives are used since more than 50 years and are very popular due to offering more than 99% confidence in preventing pregnancy. Over 100 million women worldwide use oral contraceptives. In the UK 27% of women between 16 and 49 y. use pills. In the United States they are about 30%, in Germany - 40%, and in The Netherlands - 60%. According to a study by B. Pehlivanov, 2008, in Bulgaria only 4% of women use OC. (1) Despite the convenience and security, in the U.S.A. 29% of women taking OC interrupt prematurely their use (2), while the percentage of adolescents appears to be higher (3) Earlier studies of the reasons for refusal of OC focus on their influence on the menstrual cycle, as well as on some physical side effects such as the appearance of hair growth, weight gain, bloating etc. They paid very little attention to their impact on mood and sexual behavior of women (4). Newer studies suggest that the side effects associated with mood and sexual behavior proved more powerful factor leading to early termination of the use of OC (5). This paper is a review of the literature and evaluation of the facts presented in studies from different countries. They found a high incidence of symptoms such as anxiety, susceptibility to stress, mood changes, incl. depression, anxiety, increased irritability and affection of sexual desire of women. (6) There are many indications that OC-users are at increased risk of suicide and mental illnesses. (9).

  7. Hypothesis: grandiosity and guilt cause paranoia; paranoid schizophrenia is a psychotic mood disorder; a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lake, Charles Raymond

    2008-11-01

    Delusional paranoia has been associated with severe mental illness for over a century. Kraepelin introduced a disorder called "paranoid depression," but "paranoid" became linked to schizophrenia, not to mood disorders. Paranoid remains the most common subtype of schizophrenia, but some of these cases, as Kraepelin initially implied, may be unrecognized psychotic mood disorders, so the relationship of paranoid schizophrenia to psychotic bipolar disorder warrants reevaluation. To address whether paranoia associates more with schizophrenia or mood disorders, a selected literature is reviewed and 11 cases are summarized. Comparative clinical and recent molecular genetic data find phenotypic and genotypic commonalities between patients diagnosed with schizophrenia and psychotic bipolar disorder lending support to the idea that paranoid schizophrenia could be the same disorder as psychotic bipolar disorder. A selected clinical literature finds no symptom, course, or characteristic traditionally considered diagnostic of schizophrenia that cannot be accounted for by psychotic bipolar disorder patients. For example, it is hypothesized here that 2 common mood-based symptoms, grandiosity and guilt, may underlie functional paranoia. Mania explains paranoia when there are grandiose delusions that one's possessions are so valuable that others will kill for them. Similarly, depression explains paranoia when delusional guilt convinces patients that they deserve punishment. In both cases, fear becomes the overwhelming emotion but patient and physician focus on the paranoia rather than on underlying mood symptoms can cause misdiagnoses. This study uses a clinical, case-based, hypothesis generation approach that warrants follow-up with a larger representative sample of psychotic patients followed prospectively to determine the degree to which the clinical course observed herein is typical of all such patients. Differential diagnoses, nomenclature, and treatment implications are

  8. Mood-stabilizing pharmacological treatment in bipolar disorders and risk of suicide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søndergård, Lars; Lopez, A.G.; Andersen, Per Kragh;

    2008-01-01

    Objectives: This study investigated the association between continued mood-stabilizing treatment (lithium and anticonvulsants) in bipolar disorder (BD) and the risk of suicide. Methods: Using linkage of national registers, the association between continued mood-stabilizing treatment and suicide....... Although the rate of suicide was higher during periods when patients purchased anticonvulsants (293 suicides per 100,000 person-years) than during periods with lithium (136 suicides per 100,000 person-years), the suicide rate decreased with the number of prescriptions in a rather similar way for patients...... first treated with lithium and patients first treated with anticonvulsants: patients who continued treatment with mood-stabilizing drugs had a decreased rate of suicide compared to patients who purchased mood stabilizers once only [rate ratio for anticonvulsants = 0.28, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 0...

  9. Irritable mood and the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Safer Daniel J

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The terms 'irritable mood' and 'irritability' have been applied to describe and define a variety of different categories in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM. More precise diagnostic terms and concepts are needed. Methods A concise critical historical review of DSM categories characterized by irritability, anger, and aggression is presented followed by recommendations. Results This analysis describes the broad ranging and imprecise use of the term irritability since the first DSM in 1952. A more age-appropriate and functional realignment of psychiatric categories linked to dysfunctional anger is suggested. Among other recommendations, this realignment would remove irritability as a problematic definer in the present DSM mood categories: expand oppositional defiant disorder to include adults; link the callous unemotional subtype of conduct disorder in adolescents to antisocial personality disorder; move intermittent explosive disorder to an appropriate category: and expand the term 'mood' to apply also to dysfunctional anger and anxiety. Conclusion The non-specific term 'irritability' commonly used in the DSM has had an adverse effect on diagnostic specificity and thereby on treatment. Dysfunctional anger is a major mood disorder which merits a more prominent and better defined representation in psychiatric nomenclature.

  10. Three patients with mood disorders showing catatonia and frontotemporal lobes atrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Utumi, Yushi; Iseki, Eizo; Arai, Heii

    2013-12-01

    Here we report the cases of three patients with mood disorders showing catatonia and frontotemporal lobe atrophy. Catatonia is a syndrome linked to frontal dysfunction that most frequently occurs in patients with mood disorders. The diagnostic criteria of catatonia and frontotemporal dementia partly overlap. In the present patients, catatonia might be closely related to frontal dysfunction caused by frontotemporal lobe atrophy. With regard to therapeutics for catatonia, we found that administering a low dose of lorazepam alone or after electroconvulsive therapy may be useful for treating and preventing catatonia. We also found that administering glutaminate antagonists such as memantine may be useful for treating lorazepam-resistant catatonia.

  11. Prevalence and Correlates of Disruptive Mood Dysregulation Disorder Among Adolescents with Bipolar Disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Rachel H B; Timmins, Vanessa; Collins, Jordan; Scavone, Antonette; Iskric, Adam; Goldstein, Benjamin I

    2016-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the prevalence and correlates of disruptive mood dysregulation disorder phenotype (DMDDP) in a clinical population of adolescents with bipolar disorder (BD). DMDD criteria were modified and applied to a sample of 116 adolescents with BD-I (n = 30), BD-II (n = 46) or BD-not otherwise specified (NOS) (n = 40) from a tertiary teaching hospital. Diagnoses were determined via the Kiddie Schedule for Affective Disorders and Schizophrenia for School-Aged Children, Present and Lifetime version (KSADS-PL). Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-5) DMDD Criteria A-G were derived from the KSADS oppositional defiant disorder (ODD) screening interview and supplement, as well as narrative summaries. Chi-square analyses or t tests (p adolescents because of missing data from the ODD supplement. Twenty-five percent of the remainder (27/108) met criteria for DMDDP. DMDDP was not associated with BD subtype or with family history of BD. In univariate analyses, after controlling for age, sex, and race, DMDDP was associated with lower functioning, increased family conflict, assault history, and attention deficit and/or hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) (FDR adjusted p values: disorder and medication use approached significance (adjusted p = 0.05). In logistic regression, DMDDP was independently associated with greater parent-reported family conflict (odds ratio [OR] 1.17; confidence interval [CI- 1.06-1.30; p = 0.001) and greater functional impairment (OR 0.89; CI 0.82-0.97; p = 0.006). DMDDP was also associated with a threefold increase in ADHD, although ADHD was only marginally significant (OR 3.3; CI 0.98-10.94; p = 0.05). Despite the positioning of DMDD as phenotypically and biologically distinct from BD, these phenotypes commonly overlap in clinical settings. This overlap is not explained by BD-NOS or by nonfamilial BD. The association of ADHD with DMDDP in this sample draws into question whether

  12. Predictors and moderators in the randomized trial of multifamily psychoeducational psychotherapy for childhood mood disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacPherson, Heather A; Algorta, Guillermo Perez; Mendenhall, Amy N; Fields, Benjamin W; Fristad, Mary A

    2014-01-01

    This study investigated predictors and moderators of mood symptoms in the randomized controlled trial (RCT) of Multi-Family Psychoeducational Psychotherapy (MF-PEP) for childhood mood disorders. Based on predictors and moderators in RCTs of psychosocial interventions for adolescent mood disorders, we hypothesized that children's greater functional impairment would predict worse outcome, whereas children's stress/trauma history and parental expressed emotion and psychopathology would moderate outcome. Exploratory analyses examined other demographic, functioning, and diagnostic variables. Logistic regression and linear mixed effects modeling were used in this secondary analysis of the MF-PEP RCT of 165 children, ages 8 to 12, with mood disorders, a majority of whom were male (73%) and White, non-Hispanic (90%). Treatment nonresponse was significantly associated with higher baseline levels of global functioning (i.e., less impairment; Cohen's d = 0.51) and lower levels of stress/trauma history (d = 0.56) in children and Cluster B personality disorder symptoms in parents (d = 0.49). Regarding moderators, children with moderately impaired functioning who received MF-PEP had significantly decreased mood symptoms (t = 2.10, d = 0.33) compared with waitlist control. MF-PEP had the strongest effect on severely impaired children (t = 3.03, d = 0.47). Comprehensive assessment of demographic, youth, parent, and familial variables should precede intervention. Treatment of mood disorders in high-functioning youth without stress/trauma histories and with parents with elevated Cluster B symptoms may require extra therapeutic effort, whereas severely impaired children may benefit most from MF-PEP.

  13. Physical aggression, diagnostic presentation, and executive functioning in inpatient adolescents diagnosed with mood disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holler, Karen; Kavanaugh, Brian

    2013-08-01

    While a relationship has been identified between physical aggression and executive functioning within the adult population, this relationship has not yet been consistently examined in the adolescent population. This study examined the association between physical aggression towards others, self-reported depressive symptoms, and executive functioning within an adolescent inpatient sample diagnosed with a mood disorder. This study consisted of a retrospective chart review of 105 adolescent inpatients (ages 13-19) that received a diagnosis of a mood disorder (excluding Bipolar Disorder). Participants were grouped based on history of aggression towards others, resulting in a mood disorder with physically aggressive symptoms group (n = 49) and a mood disorder without physically aggressive symptoms group (n = 56). Ten scores on various measures of executive functioning were grouped into five executive functioning subdomains: Problem Solving/Planning, Cognitive Flexibility/Set Shifting, Response Inhibition/Interference Control, Fluency, and Working Memory/Simple Attention. Results from analyses of covariance indicated that there were no significant differences (p executive functioning subdomains. Correlation analyses (p executive dysfunction in adolescent psychiatric conditions, and the specific executive subdomains that are implicated.

  14. Mood disorders in the elderly: prevalence, functional impact, and management challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valiengo, Leandro da Costa Lane; Stella, Florindo; Forlenza, Orestes Vicente

    2016-01-01

    Despite the lower prevalence of severe mood disorders in the elderly as compared to younger adults, late-life depression and bipolar disorder (BD) are more strongly associated with negative outcomes related to the presence of medical comorbidities, cognitive deficits, and increased suicide risk and overall mortality. The mechanisms that contribute to these associations are probably multifactorial, involving pathological factors related directly and indirectly to the disease itself, ranging from biological to psychosocial factors. Most of the accumulated knowledge on the nature of these associations derives from naturalistic and observational studies, and controlled data are still scarce. Nonetheless, there has clearly been a recent growth of the scientific interest on late-life BD and geriatric depression. In the present study, we review the most relevant studies on prevalence, clinical presentation, and cognitive/functional impact of mood disorders in elderly. Several clinical–epidemiological studies were dedicated to the study of the prevalence of mood disorders in old age in distinct settings; however, fewer studies investigated the underlying neurobiological findings and treatment specificities in late-life depression and BD. In the present study, we further discuss the implications of these findings on the management of mood disorders in older adults. PMID:27601905

  15. Mood disorders in the elderly: prevalence, functional impact, and management challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valiengo, Leandro da Costa Lane; Stella, Florindo; Forlenza, Orestes Vicente

    2016-01-01

    Despite the lower prevalence of severe mood disorders in the elderly as compared to younger adults, late-life depression and bipolar disorder (BD) are more strongly associated with negative outcomes related to the presence of medical comorbidities, cognitive deficits, and increased suicide risk and overall mortality. The mechanisms that contribute to these associations are probably multifactorial, involving pathological factors related directly and indirectly to the disease itself, ranging from biological to psychosocial factors. Most of the accumulated knowledge on the nature of these associations derives from naturalistic and observational studies, and controlled data are still scarce. Nonetheless, there has clearly been a recent growth of the scientific interest on late-life BD and geriatric depression. In the present study, we review the most relevant studies on prevalence, clinical presentation, and cognitive/functional impact of mood disorders in elderly. Several clinical-epidemiological studies were dedicated to the study of the prevalence of mood disorders in old age in distinct settings; however, fewer studies investigated the underlying neurobiological findings and treatment specificities in late-life depression and BD. In the present study, we further discuss the implications of these findings on the management of mood disorders in older adults.

  16. Effects of Erythropoietin on Hippocampal Volume and Memory in Mood Disorders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Miskowiak, Kamilla Woznica; Vinberg, Maj; Macoveanu, Julian

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Persistent cognitive dysfunction in depression and bipolar disorder (BD) impedes patients' functional recovery. Erythropoietin (EPO) increases neuroplasticity and reduces cognitive difficulties in treatment-resistant depression (TRD) and remitted BD. This magnetic resonance imaging...... assessment with the Rey Auditory Verbal Learning Test, and mood ratings with the Beck Depression Inventory, Hamilton Depression Rating Scale, and Young Mania Rating Scale at baseline and week 14. Hippocampus segmentation and analysis of hippocampal volume, shape, and gray matter density were conducted...... with subfield hippocampal volume increase independent of mood change. CONCLUSIONS: EPO-associated memory improvement in TRD and BD may be mediated by reversal of brain matter loss in a subfield of the left hippocampus. EPO may provide a therapeutic option for patients with mood disorders who have impaired...

  17. Autobiographical memory in adults with autism spectrum disorder: the role of depressed mood, rumination, working memory and theory of mind.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crane, Laura; Goddard, Lorna; Pring, Linda

    2013-03-01

    Autobiographical memory difficulties have been widely reported in adults with autism spectrum disorder (ASD). The aim of the current study was to explore the potential correlates of autobiographical memory performance (including depressed mood, rumination, working memory and theory of mind) in adults with ASD, relative to a group of typical adults matched for age, gender and IQ. Results demonstrated that the adults with ASD reported higher levels of depressed mood and rumination than the typical adults, and also received lower scores on measures of theory of mind and working memory. Correlational analysis suggested that theory of mind and working memory were associated with autobiographical memory performance in the adults with ASD, but no significant relationships were observed between autobiographical memory, depressed mood and rumination in this group. To explore these patterns further, two cases of adults with a dual diagnosis of ASD and depression are discussed. These participants present a profile in line with the idea that depressed mood and rumination do not have the same influence on autobiographical memory in adults with ASD as they do in typical adults.

  18. Predictors of self-reported negative mood following a depressive mood induction procedure across previously depressed, currently anxious, and control individuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scherrer, Martin C; Dobson, Keith S; Quigley, Leanne

    2014-09-01

    This study identified and examined a set of potential predictors of self-reported negative mood following a depressive mood induction procedure (MIP) in a sample of previously depressed, clinically anxious, and control participants. The examined predictor variables were selected on the basis of previous research and theories of depression, and included symptoms of depression and anxiety, negative and positive affect, negative and positive automatic thoughts, dysfunctional beliefs, rumination, self-concept, and occurrence and perceived unpleasantness of recent negative events. The sample consisted of 33 previously depressed, 22 currently anxious, and 26 non-clinical control participants, recruited from community sources. Participant group status was confirmed through structured diagnostic interviews. Participants completed the Velten negative self-statement MIP as well as self-report questionnaires of affective, cognitive, and psychosocial variables selected as potential predictors of mood change. Symptoms of anxiety were associated with increased self-reported negative mood shift following the MIP in previously depressed participants, but not clinically anxious or control participants. Increased occurrence of recent negative events was a marginally significant predictor of negative mood shift for the previously depressed participants only. None of the other examined variables was significant predictors of MIP response for any of the participant groups. These results identify factors that may increase susceptibility to negative mood states in previously depressed individuals, with implications for theory and prevention of relapse to depression. The findings also identify a number of affective, cognitive, and psychosocial variables that do not appear to influence mood change following a depressive MIP in previously depressed, currently anxious, and control individuals. Limitations of the study and directions for future research are discussed. Current anxiety

  19. Impact of depression mood disorder on the adverse drug reaction incidence rate of anticancer drugs in cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, T; Duan, J J; Zhou, G P; Cai, J Y; Huang, Z H; Zeng, Y T; Xu, F

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study was to explore the impact of depression mood disorder on the incidence of adverse drug reactions of anticancer drugs in cancer patients. The Hamilton Depression Scale 17 was used to evaluate the depression mood disorder level in 73 cancer patients before chemotherapy. Pharmacists monitored adverse drug reactions during the chemotherapy period. The relationship between depression mood disorder level and the incidence of adverse drug reactions was analysed. The frequency and extent of total adverse drug reactions were not related to depression mood disorder level. The frequency and extent of subjectively experienced adverse drug reactions such as anorexia, nausea and fatigue were related to depression mood disorder level. In conclusion, psychological support and intervention should be provided to cancer patients in order to improve patient adherence and cancer chemotherapy effectiveness, and to decrease the incidence of adverse drug reactions.

  20. Seasonality and Sleep: A Clinical Study on Euthymic Mood Disorder Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chiara Brambilla

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Research on mood disorders has progressively focused on the study of seasons and on the mood in association with them during depressive or manic episodes yet few studies have focused on the seasonal fluctuation that characterizes the patient's clinical course both during an illness episode and during euthymic periods. Methods. 113 euthymic outpatients 46 affected by major recurrent depression and 67 affected by bipolar disorder were recruited. We evaluated the impact of clinical “rhythmical” factors: seasonality, sleep disturbance, and chronotype. Patients completed the SPAQ+ questionnaire, the MEQ questionnaire, and the medical outcomes study (MOS sleep scale. We used t-test analyses to compare differences of clinical “rhythmical” and sociodemographic variables and of differences in the assessment scales among the diagnostic groups. Results. Patients reporting a family history for mood disorders have higher fluctuations throughout seasons. Sleep disturbance is more problematic in unipolars when compared to bipolars. Conclusions. Sleep, light, and seasonality seem to be three interconnected features that lie at the basis of chronobiology that, when altered, have an important effect both on the psychopathology and on the treatment of mood disorders.

  1. High familial risk for mood disorder is associated with low dorsolateral prefrontal cortex serotonin transporter binding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frokjaer, Vibe G; Vinberg, Maj; Erritzoe, David;

    2009-01-01

    was measured with [(11)C]DASB PET. The volumes of interest included the orbitofrontal cortex, the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, the ventrolateral prefrontal cortex, anterior cingulate, caudate, putamen, thalamus, and midbrain. We found that individuals at high familial risk for mood disorders had a 35...

  2. Anxiety in Children with Mood Disorders: A Treatment Help or Hindrance?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cummings, Colleen M.; Fristad, Mary A.

    2012-01-01

    This study examined the role of comorbid anxiety in treatment outcome for children with mood disorders (N = 165; age 8-11) participating in Multi-Family Psychoeducational Psychotherapy (MF-PEP). Assessments occurred at baseline, 6, 12, and 18 months for two randomly assigned groups: immediate treatment and 1-year wait-list. Most children (69%) had…

  3. Pediatric Bipolar Disorder versus Severe Mood Dysregulation: Risk for Manic Episodes on Follow-Up

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stringaris, Argyris; Baroni, Argelinda; Haimm, Caroline; Brotman, Melissa; Lowe, Catherine H.; Myers, Frances; Rustgi, Eileen; Wheeler, Wanda; Kayser, Reilly; Towbin, Kenneth; Leibenluft, Ellen

    2010-01-01

    Objective: An important question in pediatric bipolar research is whether marked nonepisodic irritability is a manifestation of bipolar disorder in youth. This study tests the hypothesis that youth with severe mood dysregulation (SMD), a category created for the purpose of studying children presenting with severe nonepisodic irritability, will be…

  4. Immigrating to Canada During Early Childhood Associated with Increased Risk for Mood Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Islam, Farah

    2015-08-01

    This study explored the impact of age at time of immigration on mental health in Canada. The Canadian Community Health Survey (CCHS) 2011 was analyzed to determine prevalence rates for mood disorders for those who immigrated during early childhood, middle childhood, adolescence, and adulthood. Multivariable logistic regression analysis was carried out on pooled CCHS 2007-2011 data to calculate risk of mood disorders. Those who immigrated during early childhood (before the age of six) had a significantly higher prevalence rate of mood disorders (6.83 %, 95 % CI 6.77-6.89) compared to those who immigrated later in life (4.83-4.88 %, 95 % CI 4.56-4.93). Immigrating during early childhood was also associated with elevated risk of mood disorders (OR 1.40, 95 % CI 1.04-1.88) compared to those who immigrated as adults after adjusting for key factors. Mental health services need to consider the factors associated with early childhood migration and the implications for early intervention programming.

  5. The impact of sleep and mood disorders on quality of life in Parkinson's disease patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Havlikova, E.; van Dijk, J.P.; Nagyova, I.; Rosenberger, J.; Middel, B.; Dubayova, T.; Gdovinová, Zuzana; Groothoff, J.W.

    2011-01-01

    Sleep disturbances are common and often severe in patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) and their symptoms can be present at any time of day. The purpose of our study was to examine how excessive daytime sleepiness or poor nocturnal sleep quality and mood disorders influence the quality of life (Qo

  6. The impact of sleep and mood disorders on quality of life in Parkinson's disease patients.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Havlikova, E.; Dijk, J.P. van; Nagyova, I.; Rosenberger, J.; Middel, B.; Dubayova, T.; Gdovinova, Z.; Groothoff, J.W.

    2011-01-01

    Sleep disturbances are common and often severe in patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) and their symptoms can be present at any time of day. The purpose of our study was to examine how excessive daytime sleepiness or poor nocturnal sleep quality and mood disorders influence the quality of life (Qo

  7. Mood-Dependent Cognitive Change in a Man with Bipolar Disorder Who Cycles Every 24 Hours

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lam, Dominic; Mansell, Warren

    2008-01-01

    A case study of a bipolar patient whose mood changes every 24 hours is described to illustrate the changes in cognitive processing and content during different phases of bipolar disorder. The participant completed a battery of questionnaires and tasks on 4 separate occasions: twice when depressed and twice when manic. Depression tended to be…

  8. Neural Correlates of Reversal Learning in Severe Mood Dysregulation and Pediatric Bipolar Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adleman, Nancy E.; Kayser, Reilly; Dickstein, Daniel; Blair, R. James R.; Pine, Daniel; Leibenluft, Ellen

    2011-01-01

    Objective: Outcome and family history data differentiate children with severe mood dysregulation (SMD), a syndrome characterized by chronic irritability, from children with "classic" episodic bipolar disorder (BD). Nevertheless, the presence of cognitive inflexibility in SMD and BD highlights the need to delineate neurophysiologic similarities and…

  9. Pediatric Bipolar Disorder versus Severe Mood Dysregulation: Risk for Manic Episodes on Follow-Up

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stringaris, Argyris; Baroni, Argelinda; Haimm, Caroline; Brotman, Melissa; Lowe, Catherine H.; Myers, Frances; Rustgi, Eileen; Wheeler, Wanda; Kayser, Reilly; Towbin, Kenneth; Leibenluft, Ellen

    2010-01-01

    Objective: An important question in pediatric bipolar research is whether marked nonepisodic irritability is a manifestation of bipolar disorder in youth. This study tests the hypothesis that youth with severe mood dysregulation (SMD), a category created for the purpose of studying children presenting with severe nonepisodic irritability, will be…

  10. Unmet needs and research challenges for late-life mood disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghio, Lucio; Vaggi, Marco; Amore, Mario; Ferrannini, Luigi; Natta, Werner

    2014-04-01

    Mood disorders are common and often under-recognised in older people whereby, together with the general ageing of the population, they are becoming a significant and growing public health problem worldwide. However, the need to address the problem of late life mood disorders in a real-world setting is met with a surprising lack of strong evidence in this field. Randomised clinical trials which focus on elderly mood disorders are not very common and the majority of them focus on pharmacological treatment of major depression. The aim of this study was to review first the main unmet needs and research challenges in late-life mood disorders as a basis to then review the state of the art evidence resulting from randomised clinical trials and the main critical aspects of their implementation. Comorbidity as well as polypharmacy, cognitive decline, unpredictable placebo response, and uncertainty on optimal duration of trials are some of the challenges the investigator has to address. Moreover, some methodological limitations of randomised clinical trials reduce the applicability of the results of such studies to common clinical practices and have encouraged some authors to investigate the existence of possible alternative research designs such as pragmatic randomised clinical trials.

  11. Abnormal retinoid and TrkB signaling in the prefrontal cortex in mood disorders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Qi, Xin-Rui; Zhao, Juan; Liu, Ji; Fang, Hui; Swaab, Dick F; Zhou, Jiang-Ning

    2015-01-01

    The prefrontal cortex shows structural and functional alterations in mood disorders. Retinoid signaling, brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), and its receptor TrkB are reported to be involved in depression. Here, we found that mRNA levels of key elements of retinoid signaling were significantly

  12. Responses to Conflict and Cooperation in Adolescents with Anxiety and Mood Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    McClure, Erin B.; Parrish, Jessica M.; Nelson, Eric E.; Easter, Joshua; Thorne, John F.; Rilling, James K.; Ernst, Monique; Pine, Daniel S.

    2007-01-01

    This study examined patterns of behavioral and emotional responses to conflict and cooperation in adolescents with anxiety/mood disorders and healthy peers. We compared performance on and emotional responses to the Prisoner's Dilemma (PD) game, an economic exchange task involving conflict and cooperation, between adolescents with…

  13. Applications of time-series analysis to mood fluctuations in bipolar disorder to promote treatment innovation: a case series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmes, E A; Bonsall, M B; Hales, S A; Mitchell, H; Renner, F; Blackwell, S E; Watson, P; Goodwin, G M; Di Simplicio, M

    2016-01-26

    Treatment innovation for bipolar disorder has been hampered by a lack of techniques to capture a hallmark symptom: ongoing mood instability. Mood swings persist during remission from acute mood episodes and impair daily functioning. The last significant treatment advance remains Lithium (in the 1970s), which aids only the minority of patients. There is no accepted way to establish proof of concept for a new mood-stabilizing treatment. We suggest that combining insights from mood measurement with applied mathematics may provide a step change: repeated daily mood measurement (depression) over a short time frame (1 month) can create individual bipolar mood instability profiles. A time-series approach allows comparison of mood instability pre- and post-treatment. We test a new imagery-focused cognitive therapy treatment approach (MAPP; Mood Action Psychology Programme) targeting a driver of mood instability, and apply these measurement methods in a non-concurrent multiple baseline design case series of 14 patients with bipolar disorder. Weekly mood monitoring and treatment target data improved for the whole sample combined. Time-series analyses of daily mood data, sampled remotely (mobile phone/Internet) for 28 days pre- and post-treatment, demonstrated improvements in individuals' mood stability for 11 of 14 patients. Thus the findings offer preliminary support for a new imagery-focused treatment approach. They also indicate a step in treatment innovation without the requirement for trials in illness episodes or relapse prevention. Importantly, daily measurement offers a description of mood instability at the individual patient level in a clinically meaningful time frame. This costly, chronic and disabling mental illness demands innovation in both treatment approaches (whether pharmacological or psychological) and measurement tool: this work indicates that daily measurements can be used to detect improvement in individual mood stability for treatment innovation (MAPP).

  14. Impulsivity in children and adolescents with mood disorders and unaffected offspring of bipolar parents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanches, Marsal; Scott-Gurnell, Kathy; Patel, Anita; Caetano, Sheila C; Zunta-Soares, Giovana B; Hatch, John P; Olvera, Rene; Swann, Alan C; Soares, Jair C

    2014-08-01

    Increased impulsivity seems to be present across all phases of bipolar disorder (BD). Impulsivity may therefore represent an endophenotype for BD, if it is also found among normal individuals at high genetic risk for mood disorders. In this study, we assessed impulsivity across four different groups of children and adolescents: patients with BD, major depressive disorder (MDD) patients, unaffected offspring of bipolar parents (UO), and healthy controls (HC). 52 patients with BD, 31 with MDD, 20 UO, and 45 HC completed the Barratt Impulsiveness Scale (BIS-11), an instrument designed to measure trait impulsivity. UO displayed significantly higher total BIS-11 impulsivity scores than HC (p=0.02) but lower scores than BD patients (F=27.12, pchildren and adolescents with mood disorders, as well as in unaffected individuals at high genetic risk for BD. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Disruptive Mood Dysregulation Disorder and Bipolar Disorder Not Otherwise Specified: Fraternal or Identical Twins?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fristad, Mary A; Wolfson, Hannah; Algorta, Guillermo Perez; Youngstrom, Eric A; Arnold, L Eugene; Birmaher, Boris; Horwitz, Sarah; Axelson, David; Kowatch, Robert A; Findling, Robert L

    2016-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine similarities and differences between disruptive mood dysregulation disorder (DMDD) and bipolar disorder not otherwise specified (BP-NOS) in baseline sociodemographic and clinical characteristics and 36 month course of irritability in children 6-12.9 years of age. A total of 140 children with DMDD and 77 children with BP-NOS from the Longitudinal Assessment of Manic Symptoms cohort were assessed at baseline, then reassessed every 6 months for 36 months. Groups were similar on most sociodemographic and baseline clinical variables other than most unfiltered (i.e., interviewer-rated regardless of occurrence during a mood episode) Young Mania Rating Scale (YMRS) and parent-reported General Behavior Inventory-10 Item Mania (PGBI-10M) items. Children with DMDD received lower scores on every item (including irritability) except impaired insight; differences were significant except for sexual interest and disruptive-aggressive behavior. Children with DMDD received lower scores on eight of 10 PGBI-10M items, the other two items rated irritability. Youth with DMDD were significantly less likely to have a biological parent with a bipolar diagnosis than were youth with BP-NOS. Children with DMDD were more likely to be male and older than children with BP-NOS, both small effect sizes, but had nearly double the rate of disruptive behavior disorders (large effect). Caregiver ratings of irritability based on the Child and Adolescent Symptom Inventory-4R (CASI-4R) were comparable at baseline; the DMDD group had a small but significantly steeper decline in scores over 36 months relative to the BP-NOS group (b = -0.24, SE = 0.12, 95% CI -0.48 to -0.0004). Trajectories for both groups were fairly stable, in the midrange of possible scores. In a sample selected for elevated symptoms of mania, twice as many children were diagnosed with DMDD than with BP-NOS. Children with DMDD and BP-NOS are similar on most characteristics other than manic

  16. Correlates of well-being among Canadians with mood and/or anxiety disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Orpana

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Our objective was to examine variables associated with well-being as measured by high self-rated mental health (SRMH and life satisfaction (LS, among Canadian adults (aged 18+ living with a mood and/or an anxiety disorder. Methods: We used nationally representative data from the 2014 Survey on Living with Chronic Diseases in Canada–Mood and Anxiety Disorders Component (SLCDC-MA to describe the association between well-being and self-management behaviours (physical activity, sleep and meditation as well as perceived stress, coping and social support. We used multivariate logistic regression to model the relationship between these factors and measures of well-being. Results: Approximately one in three individuals with mood and/or anxiety disorders reported high SRMH. The logistic regression models demonstrated that several characteristics such as being older, and reporting higher self-rated general health, fewer functional limitations, lower levels of perceived life stress, higher levels of perceived coping and higher levels of perceived social support were associated with higher levels of well-being. Self-management behaviours (including starting physical activity, meditation, adopting good sleep habits and attaining a certain number of hours of nightly sleep were not significantly associated with measures of well-being in our multivariate model. Conclusion: Canadian adults with mood and/or anxiety disorders who reported lower levels of perceived stress and higher levels of social support and coping were more likely to report high levels of well-being. This study contributes evidence from a representative population-based sample indicating well-being is achievable, even in the presence of a mood and/or an anxiety disorder.

  17. Blonanserin-induced Mood Alteration in Schizophrenia and Schizoaffective Disorder: Two Cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Min, Aran; Kim, Daeho

    2013-12-01

    We report two outpatients, one with schizophrenia and one with schizoaffective disorder, who developed manic or hypomanic episodes following the initiation of blonanserin during the course of treatment. Blonanserin is a novel antipsychotic that acts as a 5-HT and D2 receptor antagonist. Both patients developed hypomanic episodes within 2 weeks of receiving a small dose (6-8 mg) of blonanserin, and one patient later developed full-blown mania; both episodes ended within 1 month of discontinuing blonanserin. The mood alteration observed in these cases suggests a possible antidepressant effect of blonanserin; thus, clinicians should monitor mood changes when administering this antipsychotic.

  18. Evaluation of relationship between metacognition components and dysfunctional attitudes in outpatients with bipolar mood disorder II

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H Kazemi

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The aim of this study was to evaluate the relationship between metacognitive components and dysfunctional attitudes in outpatients with bipolar mood disorder II. Methods: Thirty-six young adult outpatients with current diagnoses of BMD II(20 females and 16 males were recruited from Esfahan Counseling Center. Diagnoses were based on the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV Axis I Disorder-Clinical Version(SCID-CV. A battery of questionnaires including Metacognition Questionnaire and Dysfunctional Attitude Scale(DAS were self-assessed by patients before medical therapy. Results: Pearson's correlation analysis showed that the components of metacognition and its relationship with dysfunctional attitudes is positive and significant(r= 28/0, p<0/05. Multiple regression analysis showed that two of the metacognitive components emerged as potentially useful in prediction of dysfunctional attitudes(negative beliefs about uncontrollability, danger and thoughts control. Also, results indicated that those two components have a significant positive relationship with vulnerability, perfectionism and effectivenessR²= 0/29, 0/35; p<0/05. Components of positive beliefs about worry and beliefs about cognitive self-consciousness related to cognitive confidence in predicting the criterion variable and its components showed no significant contribution. Conclusion: Study findings suggest that DSM-IV BMD II outpatients with metacognitive distortions have shown higher levels of dysfunctional attitudes.

  19. Stimulation of serotonin (5-HT) activity reduces spontaneous stereotypies in female but not in male bank voles (Clethrionomys glareolus) Stereotyping female voles as a new animal model for human anxiety and mood disorders?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schønecker, Bryan; Heller, Knud Erik

    2003-01-01

    Bank voles, Stereotypies, Sex differences, Clozapine, Citalopram, Animal model, Anxiety, Mood disorders......Bank voles, Stereotypies, Sex differences, Clozapine, Citalopram, Animal model, Anxiety, Mood disorders...

  20. Food intake and blood cholesterol levels of community-based adults with mood disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Davison Karen M

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A growing body of literature links nutrition to mood, especially in epidemiological surveys, but there is little information characterizing food intake in people with diagnosed mood disorders. Methods Food intake obtained from 3-day food records was evaluated in 97 adults with mood disorders, whose diagnoses were confirmed in structured interviews. Information from a population nutrition survey, national guidelines for nutritional intakes (Eating Well with Canada's Food Guide and North American dietary guidelines (Dietary Reference Intakes was utilized to evaluate the quality of their food intake. Results Compared to the regional nutrition survey data and national guidelines, a greater proportion of study participants consumed fewer of the recommended servings of grains (p p p p p p 5.2 and ≤ 6.2 mmol/L and 21% had hypercholesterolemia (> 6.2 mmol/L. Conclusions Much research has proposed multiple ways in which healthier diets may exert protective effects on mental health. The results of this study suggest that adults with mood disorders could benefit from nutritional interventions to improve diet quality.

  1. Clinical and genetic factors associated with suicide in mood disorder patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antypa, Niki; Souery, Daniel; Tomasini, Mario; Albani, Diego; Fusco, Federica; Mendlewicz, Julien; Serretti, Alessandro

    2016-03-01

    Suicidality is a continuum ranging from ideation to attempted and completed suicide, with a complex etiology involving both genetic heritability and environmental factors. The majority of suicide events occur in the context of psychiatric conditions, preeminently major depression and bipolar disorder. The present study investigates clinical factors associated with suicide in a sample of 553 mood disorder patients, recruited within the 'Psy Pluriel' center, Centre Européen de Psychologie Médicale, and the Department of Psychiatry of Erasme Hospital (Brussels). Furthermore, genetic association analyses examining polymorphisms within COMT, BDNF, MAPK1 and CREB1 genes were performed in a subsample of 259 bipolar patients. The presence or absence of a previous suicide attempt and of current suicide risk were assessed. A positive association with suicide attempt was reported for younger patients, females, lower educated, smokers, those with higher scores on depressive symptoms and higher functional disability and those with anxiety comorbidity and familial history of suicidality in first- and second-degree relatives. Anxiety disorder comorbidity was the stronger predictor of current suicide risk. No associations were found with polymorphisms within COMT and BDNF genes, whereas significant associations were found with variations in rs13515 (MAPK1) and rs6740584 (CREB1) polymorphisms. From a clinical perspective, our study proposes several clinical characteristics, such as increased depressive symptomatology, anxiety comorbidity, functional disability and family history of suicidality, as correlates associated with suicide. Genetic risk variants in MAPK1 and CREB1 genes might be involved in a dysregulation of inflammatory and neuroplasticity pathways and are worthy of future investigation.

  2. Short-term effects of media exposure to the thin ideal in female inpatients with an eating disorder compared to female inpatients with a mood or anxiety disorder or women with no psychiatric disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loeber, Sabine; Burgmer, Ramona; Wyssen, Andrea; Leins, Judith; Rustemeier, Martina; Munsch, Simone; Herpertz, Stephan

    2016-07-01

    Previous research demonstrated that the exposure to media portrayals of the thin body ideal negatively affects body satisfaction and mood of healthy women and thus represents a sociocultural risk factor for the development of eating disorders. However, at present, it is not known whether negative effects of the thin ideal are pronounced in eating-disordered patients. Female inpatients with a current diagnosis of anorexia nervosa (N = 36), bulimia nervosa (N = 32), or mood or anxiety disorder (N = 31), and women with no current psychiatric diagnosis were randomly assigned to exposure to magazine pictures depicting the thin female body ideal or landscape scenes in two experimental phases (leafing through a magazine followed by instructed imagination of a picture from the magazine). The groups were compared on measures of body satisfaction and mood that were collected before and after the two phases. Leafing through a fashion magazine was not associated with negative effects on body satisfaction or mood in all groups. Imagining the thin ideal resulted in a decrease in body satisfaction and a decrease in positive mood. We found no diagnosis-specific effects indicating no stronger negative impact of the thin ideal on eating-disorder patients. Given the lacking differences between eating-disordered patients and controls, these findings underline the importance of future research to enhance our understanding of what happens when patients are exposed to external or internal stimuli of media images of the thin ideal. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. (Int J Eat Disord 2016; 49:708-715). © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Use of medication and psychological counselling among Canadians with mood and/or anxiety disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siobhan O'Donnell

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: This study describes the use of prescription medications and psychological counselling in the past 12 months among Canadian adults with a self-reported mood and/or anxiety disorder diagnosis; the sociodemographic and clinical characteristics associated with their use; and reasons for not using them. Methods: We used data from the 2014 Survey on Living with Chronic Diseases in Canada-Mood and Anxiety Disorders Component. The study sample (n = 2916 was divided into four treatment subgroups: (1 taking medication only; (2 having received counselling only; (3 both; or (4 neither. We combined the first three subgroups and carried out descriptive and multivariate logistic regression analyses comparing those who are taking medication and/or have received counselling in the past 12 months, versus those doing neither. Estimates were weighted to represent the Canadian adult household population living in the 10 provinces with diagnosed mood and/or anxiety disorders. Results: The majority (81.8% of Canadians with a mood and/or an anxiety disorder diagnosis reported they are taking medications and/or have received counselling (47.6% taking medications only; 6.9% received counselling only; and 27.3% taking/having received both. Upon controlling for individual characteristics, taking medications and/or having received counselling was significantly associated with older age; higher household income; living in the Atlantic region or Quebec versus Ontario; and having concurrent disorders or mood disorders only. Symptoms controlled without medication was the most common reason for not taking medications, while preferring to manage on their own and taking medications were among the common reasons for not having received counselling. Conclusion: The majority of Canadian adults with a mood and/or an anxiety disorder diagnosis are taking medications, while few have received counselling. Insights gained regarding the factors associated with these

  4. Mood, anxiety, and personality disorders among first and second-generation immigrants to the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salas-Wright, Christopher P; Kagotho, Njeri; Vaughn, Michael G

    2014-12-30

    A careful examination of the multigenerational relationship between immigrant status and mental disorders can provide important information about the robustness and nature of the immigrant-mental health link. We examine immigrant status as a protective factor against mental illness, assess intergenerational effects, examine differences across race/ethnicity, and report the prevalence of mood, anxiety, and personality disorders of immigrants across major world regions. We employ data from the National Epidemiologic Survey on Alcohol and Related Conditions (NESARC) and compare first (n=5363) and second-generation (n=4826) immigrants from Asia, Africa, Europe, and Latin America to native-born Americans (n=24,461) with respect to mental disorders. First-generation immigrants are significantly less likely than native-born Americans to be diagnosed with a mood, anxiety, or personality disorder, though the prevalence of mental health diagnoses increases among second generation immigrants. Similar results were observed for immigrants from major world regions as the prevalence of psychiatric morbidity was lower among immigrants from Africa, Latin America, Europe, and Asia compared to native-born Americans. Findings provide evidence in support of the notion that the immigrant paradox may be extended to include mood, anxiety, and personality disorders in the United States.

  5. Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of Interventions Relevant for Young Offenders with Mood Disorders, Anxiety Disorders, or Self-Harm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Townsend, Ellen; Walker, Dawn-Marie; Sargeant, Sally; Vostanis, Panos; Hawton, Keith; Stocker, Olivia; Sithole, Jabulani

    2010-01-01

    Background: Mood and anxiety disorders, and problems with self-harm are significant and serious issues that are common in young people in the Criminal Justice System. Aims: To examine whether interventions relevant to young offenders with mood or anxiety disorders, or problems with self-harm are effective. Method: Systematic review and…

  6. Effect of mood states on QT interval and QT dispersion in eating disorder patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takimoto, Yoshiyuki; Yoshiuchi, Kazuhiro; Akabayashi, Akira

    2008-04-01

    Prolonged QT interval and QT dispersion have been reported in patients with eating disorders. Although the factors that cause prolongation remain unclear, mood states such as anxiety have been reported to influence QT interval and dispersion, probably via the autonomic nervous system. Therefore the aim of the present paper was to investigate mood effect on prolonged QT interval and QT dispersion. The subjects were 47 female anorexia nervosa (AN) and 48 female bulimia nervosa (BN) patients. In all of the patients, serum electrolyte levels were normal. QT interval and QT dispersion were measured from 12-lead electrocardiographic recordings. Mood states in each patient were measured using a Profile of Mood States (POMS) evaluation, and the patients were divided into high- and low-score groups for each POMS subscale. The differences in QT variables were compared between the two groups for each subscale. In the BN group, QT interval and QT dispersion in the high depression score group were significantly longer than those in the low depression score group, and QT dispersion was significantly greater in the high anxiety score group than in the low anxiety score group. In addition, QT interval and QT dispersion were significantly correlated with depression scores. In the AN group there were no significant differences in QT interval or QT dispersion between the high- and low-score groups for any POMS subscale. BN patients with worse states of depression or anxiety had longer QT intervals and larger QT dispersion. In BN patients, mood disturbance might increase the risk of arrhythmias.

  7. The effect of ostracism upon mood in youth with borderline personality disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawrence, Katherine A; Chanen, Andrew M; Allen, J Sabura

    2011-10-01

    The experience of rejection or abandonment in Borderline Personality Disorder (BPD) can lead to profound changes in affect. Yet, the intensity, duration, and type of mood changes that occur in response to rejection remain unclear. This study examined the effect of ostracism upon mood in 30 outpatient youth diagnosed with BPD and 22 healthy community control participants (aged 15-24). Cyberball, a virtual balltoss game, was used to simulate ostracism and 13 mood states were recorded before, immediately after, and 15 minutes after the game. The results showed that while ostracism induced changes in anger, rejection, surprise, suspicion, and joy, there were no differences in the pattern of emotional responding and regulation between the two groups. The BPD group consistently rated their mood as more intense across all 13 mood states and across time compared with the control group. These findings suggest that, compared to healthy individuals, those youth with BPD experience negative emotions as more intense and that in mild cases of interpersonal rejection, their emotional responding and regulation are similar to their healthy peers.

  8. Early ERP modulation during mood adjectives processing in patients with affective disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grzybowski, Szczepan J; Wyczesany, Miroslaw

    2016-10-06

    Attentional bias is considered a key feature in mood disorders, and yet little is known of its neural correlates within the early stream of information processing in manic and depressed patients. The study aimed to capture and detail attentional bias during emotional word processing in patients within the first 500ms of stimulus exposition. 28 mood adjectives (14 positive and 14 negative) were used as stimuli. We expected differences in adjective encoding between groups during lexico-semantic analysis based on varying attentional resource allocation. Differences were evidenced within the first 100ms after stimulus onset with higher amplitudes for both patient groups than controls, possibly indicating more automatic attention allocation to stimuli during sensory analysis stages. Between 200-290ms after the words' onset, a specific valence mood-word mismatch was registered which approached significance, with higher responses evoked to negative than positive words in manic patients, and the opposite pattern of activity observed in depressed patients, suggesting cognitive bias based on mood incongruence during the lexico-semantic analysis stage. There was also a lateralized pattern of activity, with higher amplitudes over the right hemisphere posteriorly, and higher over the left frontally in the patient groups, especially in the manic individuals. The study points to attentional bias based on mood incongruence processing during crucial stages of meaning encoding within the early stream of information processing.

  9. Beyond dogma: from diagnostic controversies to data about pediatric bipolar disorder and children with chronic irritability and mood dysregulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickstein, Daniel P; Leibenluft, Ellen

    2012-01-01

    From the mid-1990s through the present, studies have demonstrated a significant rise in the numbers of children and adolescents diagnosed with bipolar disorder (BD). Why is this? The present manuscript reviews several possibilities, most notably ambiguity in the diagnostic criteria for mania and how they may apply to children with functionally-impairing irritability. Furthermore, we discuss ongoing phenomenological and affective neuroscience research approaches to address those children most on the fringes of our current psychiatric nosology. In summary, these studies suggest that BD youths may be distinguished on some measures from those with chronic irritability and severe mood dysregulation, although the two groups also have some shared deficits.

  10. Targeting Treatments to Improve Cognitive Function in Mood Disorder

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Miskowiak, Kamilla Woznica; Rush, A. John; Gerds, Thomas A.

    2016-01-01

    Learning Test (RAVLT) total recall with multiple logistic regression adjusted for diagnosis, age, gender, symptom severity, and education levels. RESULTS: We included 79 patients with an ICD-10 diagnosis of unipolar or bipolar disorder, of whom 39 received EPO and 40 received placebo (saline). For EPO......OBJECTIVE: There is no established efficacious treatment for cognitive dysfunction in unipolar and bipolar disorder. This may be partially due to lack of consensus regarding the need to screen for cognitive impairment in cognition trials or which screening criteria to use. We have demonstrated in 2...... randomized placebo-controlled trials that 8 weeks of erythropoietin (EPO) treatment has beneficial effects on verbal memory across unipolar and bipolar disorder, with 58% of EPO-treated patients displaying a clinically relevant memory improvement as compared to 15% of those treated with placebo. METHODS: We...

  11. The neurobiology of psychedelic drugs: implications for the treatment of mood disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vollenweider, Franz X; Kometer, Michael

    2010-09-01

    After a pause of nearly 40 years in research into the effects of psychedelic drugs, recent advances in our understanding of the neurobiology of psychedelics, such as lysergic acid diethylamide (LSD), psilocybin and ketamine have led to renewed interest in the clinical potential of psychedelics in the treatment of various psychiatric disorders. Recent behavioural and neuroimaging data show that psychedelics modulate neural circuits that have been implicated in mood and affective disorders, and can reduce the clinical symptoms of these disorders. These findings raise the possibility that research into psychedelics might identify novel therapeutic mechanisms and approaches that are based on glutamate-driven neuroplasticity.

  12. A multinational health professional perspective of the prevalence of mood disorders in patients with acute and chronic wounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Upton, Dominic; Solowiej, Kazia; Woo, Kevin Y

    2014-12-01

    Recent research has started to identify mood disorders and problems associated with acute and chronic wounds, which have been shown to contribute to delayed healing, poor patient well-being and a reduced quality of life. Furthermore, mood disorders have been shown to have a negative impact on financial costs for service providers and the wider society in terms of treatment and sickness absence. This study aimed to survey a multinational sample of health professionals to explore their perspective and awareness of mood disorders amongst acute and chronic wound patients. Responses were received from n = 908 health professionals working in Asia, Africa, Australia, Europe, North America and South America. A strong awareness of the prevalence of mood disorders appeared to be widespread among the health professionals across the world, in addition to a view on the potential factors contributing to these problems with mood. Despite this, it was thought that few patients were actually receiving treatment for their mood disorders. Implications for clinical practice include the need for health professionals to engage actively with their patients to enable them to learn from their experiences. Studies that explore the benefits of treatments and techniques appropriate for minimising mood disorders in patients with wounds would provide empirical evidence for health professionals to make recommendations for patients with acute and chronic wounds. © 2013 The Authors. International Wound Journal © 2013 Medicalhelplines.com Inc and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Nosographic classification of mood disorders: from symptoms to diagnosis and treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Umberto Albert

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Mood disorders represent a main health concern, due to their high prevalence in the general population and because they are related to a severe worsening of quality of life and psychosocial functioning of those who are affected. Because of the importance of such diseases, that, according to WHO, might become the major cause of morbidity by 2020, an efficacious, targeted and precise approach is essential in everyday clinical practice. This article reviews the methods of diagnostic approach, with the aim of describing the different phases of nosographic classification of mood disorders and their meaning. In particular, the most reliable classification distinguishes between unipolar (major depressive disorder and bipolar (type I and II disorders: the right differential diagnosis is important because there are great differences in the optimal management of these conditions (antidepressants vs. mood stabilizers and diagnostic errors can potentially worsen the patient’s prognosis. In conclusion, the right nosographic classification allows the right therapeutic and prognostic approach. This may result in higher rates of remission and response, thus improving patient’s quality of life and overall wellness.http://dx.doi.org/10.7175/rhc.v3i3.200

  14. The Impact of Mood and Anxiety Disorders on Incident Hypertension at One Year

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simon L. Bacon

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Studies assessing the association between psychological factors and hypertension have been equivocal, which may reflect limitations in the assessment of psychological factors. Purpose. To assess the relationship between mood and anxiety disorders, measured using a psychiatric interview, and 1-year incident hypertension. Methods. 197 nonhypertensive individuals undergoing exercise stress testing at baseline provided follow-up data at 1 year. Baseline assessments included a structure psychiatric interview (PRIME-MD, physician diagnosis of hypertension, and measured blood pressure. At follow-up, hypertension status was assessed via self-reported physician diagnosis. Results. Having an anxiety disorder was associated with a 4-fold increase in the risk of developing hypertension (adjusted OR = 4.14, 95% CIs = 1.18–14.56. In contrast, having a mood disorder was not associated with incident hypertension (adjusted OR = 1.21, 95% CIs = 0.24–5.86. Conclusions. There are potential mechanisms which could explain our differential mood and anxiety findings. The impact of screening and treatment of anxiety disorders on hypertension needs to be explored.

  15. Mood disorders in Huntington's disease: from behavior to cellular and molecular mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pla, Patrick; Orvoen, Sophie; Saudou, Frédéric; David, Denis J; Humbert, Sandrine

    2014-01-01

    Huntington's disease (HD) is a neurodegenerative disorder that is best known for its effect on motor control. Mood disturbances such as depression, anxiety, and irritability also have a high prevalence in patients with HD, and often start before the onset of motor symptoms. Various rodent models of HD recapitulate the anxiety/depressive behavior seen in patients. HD is caused by an expanded polyglutamine stretch in the N-terminal part of a 350 kDa protein called huntingtin (HTT). HTT is ubiquitously expressed and is implicated in several cellular functions including control of transcription, vesicular trafficking, ciliogenesis, and mitosis. This review summarizes progress in efforts to understand the cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying behavioral disorders in patients with HD. Dysfunctional HTT affects cellular pathways that are involved in mood disorders or in the response to antidepressants, including BDNF/TrkB and serotonergic signaling. Moreover, HTT affects adult hippocampal neurogenesis, a physiological phenomenon that is implicated in some of the behavioral effects of antidepressants and is linked to the control of anxiety. These findings are consistent with the emerging role of wild-type HTT as a crucial component of neuronal development and physiology. Thus, the pathogenic polyQ expansion in HTT could lead to mood disorders not only by the gain of a new toxic function but also by the perturbation of its normal function.

  16. Mood disorders in Huntington’s disease: from behavior to cellular and molecular mechanisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick ePla

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Huntington’s disease (HD is a neurodegenerative disorder that is best known for its effect on motor control. Mood disturbances such as depression, anxiety, and irritability also have a high prevalence in patients with HD, and often start before the onset of motor symptoms. Various rodent models of HD recapitulate the anxiety/depressive behavior seen in patients. HD is caused by an expanded polyglutamine stretch in the N-terminal part of a 350 kDa protein called huntingtin (HTT. HTT is ubiquitously expressed and is implicated in several cellular functions including control of transcription, vesicular trafficking, ciliogenesis, and mitosis. This review summarizes progress in efforts to understand the cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying behavioral disorders in patients with HD. Dysfunctional HTT affects cellular pathways that are involved in mood disorders or in the response to antidepressants, including BDNF/TrkB and serotonergic signaling. Moreover, HTT affects adult hippocampal neurogenesis, a physiological phenomenon that is implicated in some of the behavioral effects of antidepressants and is linked to the control of anxiety. These findings are consistent with the emerging role of wild-type HTT as a crucial component of neuronal development and physiology. Thus, the pathogenic polyQ expansion in HTT could lead to mood disorders not only by the gain of a new toxic function but also by the perturbation of its normal function.

  17. Interparental violence and maternal mood disorders as predictors of adolescent physical aggression within the family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narayan, Angela J; Chen, Muzi; Martinez, Pedro P; Gold, Philip W; Klimes-Dougan, Bonnie

    2015-05-01

    Although a wealth of research has examined the effects of parental mood disorders on offspring maladjustment, studies have not identified whether elevated interparental violence (IPV) may be an exacerbating influence in this pathway. This study examined levels of physical IPV perpetration and victimization in mothers with unipolar depression or Bipolar Disorder (BD) and the processes by which maternal physical IPV moderated adolescents' physical aggression in families with maternal mood disorders. Mothers with lifetime mood disorders were predicted to have elevated IPV compared to well mothers, and maternal IPV was expected to moderate the association between lifetime mood disorders and adolescent aggression. Participants included 61 intact families with maternal depression (n = 24), BD (n = 13), or well mothers (n = 24) and two siblings (ages 10 to 18 years). Using the Conflict Tactics Scale, mothers reported on IPV perpetration and victimization, and adolescents reported on physical aggression. Mothers with BD reported significantly higher IPV perpetration, but not victimization, than depressed or well mothers. An interaction between maternal BD and IPV perpetration was a significant predictor of adolescent aggression. Main effects of maternal IPV victimization and interaction effects of maternal depression and either type of IPV on adolescent aggression were not significant. Adolescents of mothers who have BD and perpetrate IPV may be particularly vulnerable to being aggressive. Prevention and policy efforts to deter transmission of aggression in high-risk families should target families with maternal BD and intervene at the level of conflict resolution within the family. Aggr. Behav. 41:253-266, 2015. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. The multiple dimensions of the social anxiety spectrum in mood disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fournier, Jay C; Cyranowski, Jill M; Rucci, Paola; Cassano, Giovanni B; Frank, Ellen

    2012-09-01

    Major depressive disorder and bipolar spectrum disorders are debilitating conditions associated with severe impairment. The presence of co-occurring social phobia can make the clinical course of these disorders even more challenging. To better understand the nature of social anxiety in the context of ongoing mood disorders, we report the results of exploratory factor analyses of the Social Phobia Spectrum Self-Report Instrument (SHY), a 162-item measure designed to capture the full spectrum of manifestations and features associated with social anxiety experienced across the lifespan. We examined data from 359 adult outpatients diagnosed with major depressive disorder and 403 outpatients diagnosed with a bipolar spectrum disorder. The measure was divided into its two components: the SHY-General (SHY-G), reflecting general social anxiety features, and the SHY-Specific (SHY-S), reflecting anxiety in specific situations. Exploratory factor analyses were conducted for each using tetrachoric correlation matrices and an unweighted least squares estimator. Item invariance was evaluated for important patient subgroups. Five factors were identified for the SHY-G, representing general features of social anxiety: Fear of Social Disapproval, Childhood Social Anxiety, Somatic Social Anxiety, Excessive Agreeableness, and Behavioral Submission. Seven specific-situation factors were identified from the SHY-S: Writing in Public, Dating, Public Speaking, Eating in Public, Shopping Fears, Using Public Restrooms, and Unstructured Social Interactions. The identified dimensions provide clinically valuable information about the nature of the social fears experienced by individuals diagnosed with mood disorders and could help guide the development of tailored treatment strategies for individuals with co-occurring mood disorders and social anxiety.

  19. Childhood socioeconomic deprivation, but not current mood, is associated with behavioural disinhibition in adults

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    Tünde Paál

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available There is evidence to suggest that impulsivity is predicted by socioeconomic background, with people from more deprived backgrounds tending to be more impulsive, and by current mood, with poorer mood associated with greater impulsivity. However, impulsivity is not a unitary construct, and previous research in this area has focused on measures of ‘waiting’ impulsivity rather than behavioural disinhibition. We administered a standard measure of behavioural disinhibition, the stop-signal task, to 58 adult participants from a community sample. We had measured socioeconomic background using participant postcode at age 16, and assigned participants to receive either a neutral or a negative mood induction. We found no effects of mood on behavioural disinhibition, but we found a significant effect of socioeconomic background. Participants who had lived in more deprived postcodes at age 16 showed longer stop-signal reaction times, and hence greater behavioural disinhibition. The pattern was independent of participant age and overall reaction time. Though caution is required inferring causality from correlation, it is possible that that experiencing socioeconomic deprivation in childhood and adolescence may lead to greater behavioural disinhibition in adulthood.

  20. Stigma and Discrimination in People Suffering with a Mood Disorder: A Cross-Sectional Study

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    L. Lazowski

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Much research is done on the stigma of mental illness, but little research has been done to characterize these phenomena from the perspective of people with mood disorders. Objective. To characterize the extent to which individuals with bipolar disorder and depression are stigmatized, determine factors related to higher levels of stigmatization, and assess the reliability of the Inventory of Stigmatizing Experiences in a population of people with a mood disorder. Methods. Two hundred and fourteen individuals with depression and bipolar disorder were recruited from a tertiary care psychiatric hospital and surveyed using the Inventory of Stigmatizing Experiences. Results. Participants reported high levels of stigma experiences and this did not differ by diagnosis (P=0.578. However, people with bipolar disorder reported greater psychosocial impact of stigma on themselves and their family members compared to people with depression (P=0.019. The two subscales produced internally consistent results with both populations. Conclusion. Stigma negatively affects those with both depression and bipolar disorder but appears to have a greater psychosocial impact on those with bipolar disorder.

  1. [Multiaxial evaluation of the pathophysiology of mood disorder and therapeutic mechanisms of clinical drugs by neuronal plasticity and neuronal load].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omata, Naoto; Mizuno, Tomoyuki; Mitsuya, Hironori; Wada, Yuji

    2013-11-01

    Impairment of neuronal plasticity is important in the pathophysiology of mood disorder. Both zinc deficiency and social isolation impair neuronal plasticity. Both cause a depressive state. However, in experiments using animals, their combined loading induced manic-like behavior. Therefore, it was inferred that moderate impairment of neuronal plasticity induces a depressive state, and that further impairment of neuronal plasticity induces a manic state. However, some kind of load toward neuronal function through neural transmission can influence mood disorder symptoms without direct effects on neuronal plasticity. Our hypothesis is that mania is an aggravation of depression from the perspective of neuronal plasticity, and that multiaxial evaluation by neuronal plasticity and neuronal load through neural transmission is useful for understanding the pathophysiology of mood disorder. There are many clinical aspects that have been difficult to interpret in mood disorder: Why is a mood stabilizer or electric convulsive therapy useful for both mania and depression? What is the pathophysiology of the mixed state? Why does manic switching by an antidepressant occur or not? Our hypothesis is useful to understand these aspects, and using this hypothesis, it is expected that the pathophysiology of mood disorder and clinical mechanism of mood stabilizers and antidepressants can now be understood as an integrated story.

  2. Food insecurity in adults with mood disorders: prevalence estimates and associations with nutritional and psychological health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davison, Karen M; Kaplan, Bonnie J

    2015-01-01

    Because little is known about food insecurity in people with mental health conditions, we investigated relationships among food insecurity, nutrient intakes, and psychological functioning in adults with mood disorders. Data from a study of adults randomly selected from the membership list of the Mood Disorder Association of British Columbia (n = 97), Canada, were analyzed. Food insecurity status was based on validated screening questions asking if in the past 12 months did the participant, due to a lack of money, worry about or not have enough food to eat. Nutrient intakes were derived from 3-day food records and compared to the Dietary Reference Intakes (DRIs). Psychological functioning measures included Global Assessment of Functioning, Hamilton Depression scale, and Young Mania Rating Scale. Using binomial tests of two proportions, Mann-Whitney U tests, and Poisson regression we examined: (1) food insecurity prevalence between the study respondents and a general population sample from the British Columbia Nutrition Survey (BCNS; n = 1,823); (2) differences in nutrient intakes based on food insecurity status; and (3) associations of food insecurity and psychological functioning using bivariate and Poisson regression statistics. In comparison to the general population (BCNS), food insecurity was significantly more prevalent in the adults with mood disorders (7.3% in BCNS vs 36.1%; p food-insecure had lower median intakes of carbohydrates and vitamin C (p food insecurity had protein, folate, and zinc intakes below the DRI benchmark of potential inadequacy (p food insecurity and mania symptoms (adjusted prevalence ratio = 2.37, 95% CI 1.49-3.75, p Food insecurity is associated with both nutritional and psychological health in adults with mood disorders. Investigation of interventions aimed at food security and income can help establish its role in enhancing mental health.

  3. Related factors of co-occurring mood disorders among heroin-dependent patients

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨梅

    2014-01-01

    Objective To explore related factors of co-occurring mood disorders among heroin-dependent patients.Methods A cross-sectional study was conducted.Subjects were 1002 heroin-dependent patients who were consecutively admitted into three drug rehabilitation institutes in Hunan Province.A questionnaire was developed to get demographic and drug use-related information of the subjects.The Structured Clinical Interview for

  4. Serum triglycerides, but not cholesterol or leptin, are decreased in suicide attempters with mood disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Graça Cantarelli, Maria; Nardin, Patrícia; Buffon, Andréia; Eidt, Murilo Castilhos; Antônio Godoy, Luiz; Fernandes, Brisa S; Gonçalves, Carlos-Alberto

    2015-02-01

    Many peripheral biomarkers, including low cholesterol and its fractions, have been examined to identify suicidal behavior. Herein, we assessed serum lipid profile and some proteins putatively associated with suicidal behavior in subjects with mood disorder (bipolar disorder or major depressive disorder) with a recent suicide attempt and with no lifetime history of suicide attempts. Fifty subjects had presented an episode of attempted suicide during the last 15 days, and 36 subjects had no history of any suicide attempt. We measured total cholesterol, HDL, LDL and triglycerides as well as serum leptin, brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), S100B and C-reactive protein (CRP). Individuals that had attempted suicide presented decreased body mass index (BMI) and waist circumference. After adjusting for these confounders, we found that triglycerides were decreased in attempted suicide subjects. We found no differences among total cholesterol, LDL, and HDL or leptin, S100B, CRP and BDNF. This is a cross-sectional study, and we cannot therefore assess whether a decrease in triglycerides caused a mood episode with suicidal ideation that led to a suicide attempt or if the presence of a mood episode originated a loss of appetite and consequent loss of weight, therefore decreasing triglyceride levels. These results do not support the hypothesis that lower levels of cholesterol are associated with suicidal behavior in a mood disorder sample. However, our data support the idea that adiposity is differentiated in these patients (reduced BMI, waist circumference and serum triglycerides), which could lead to an altered communication between the adipose tissue and brain. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Self stigmatization, cognitive functions and social functioning in mood disorders

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    Gulsum Ozge Doganavsargil Baysal

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Internalized stigmatization (IS generally has a negative effect on diagnosis, treatment, rehabilitation and prognosis of diseases. The purpose of this study is to compare patients with bipolar disorder and unipolar depression both are in remission in terms of IS and social functioning (SF, cognitive function and secondly to consider relationship between IS, cognitive functions and SF. Methods: This cross-sectional study is carried out with bipolar (BD and unipolar depression (UD patients in remission, admitted to the psychiatry outpatient clinics of Akdeniz University Hospital. The sample size is estimated as 35 patients. Basic independent variable is the type of disease and dependent variables are; IS, cognitive functions and SF. Performed scales are: The internalized stigma of mental ilness scale, the social functioning scale and for the assesment of cognitive functions: Wisconsin card sorting, stroop test, test of verbal memory process. Results.Concerning the results there was negative corelation between IS and SF scores in all groups. There was only significant relationship between verbal memory and IS in UD patients. There was not any significant relationship between IS and cognitive function in BD patients. Conclusion: This study indicates that in terms of cognitive functions, patients with unipolar depression are effected as much as the patients with bipolar disorder also manifesting the inverse relation between IS and SF, however cognitive functions were relevant to IS only in UD patients. [Cukurova Med J 2013; 38(3.000: 390-402

  6. Prevalence of comorbidities between mood and anxiety disorders: associated factors in a population sample of young adults in southern Brazil

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    Mariane Ricardo Acosta Lopez Molina

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available This research aims to evaluate factors associated with the presence of comorbidities between mood and anxiety disorders in young adults aged 18 to 24 years, from Pelotas, Rio Grande do Sul State, Brazil. This was a cross-sectional, population-based study with a probabilistic sample by conglomerates. The Mini International Neuropsychiatric Interview (MINI was used to assess mood and anxiety disorders. The prevalence of mental disorders in the sample (n = 1,561 was of 26.8% of which 9.7% had comorbidities between mood and anxiety disorders. The prevalence of comorbidities on mood and anxiety disorders is almost three times higher among women than men (p < 0.001. Lower education levels, socioeconomic status (p < 0.001 and a history of divorced parents (p < 0.050 was associated with comorbidities between mood and anxiety disorders. The main conclusion is that social factors are highly associated with comorbidities between mood and anxiety disorders. Prevention strategies on mental health should focus particularly on women in vulnerable social conditions.

  7. Mood and anxiety disorders as early manifestations of medical illness: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cosci, Fiammetta; Fava, Giovanni A; Sonino, Nicoletta

    2015-01-01

    Affective disturbances involving alterations of mood, anxiety and irritability may be early symptoms of medical illnesses. The aim of this paper was to provide a systematic review of the literature with qualitative data synthesis. MEDLINE, PsycINFO, EMBASE, Cochrane, and ISI Web of Science were systematically searched from inception to February 2014. Search terms were 'prodrome/early symptom', combined using the Boolean 'AND' operator with 'anxiety/depression/mania/hypomania/irritability/irritable mood/hostility', combined with the Boolean 'AND' operator with 'medical illness/medical disorder'. PRISMA guidelines were followed. A total of 21 studies met the inclusion criteria and were analyzed. Depression was found to be the most common affective prodrome of medical disorders and was consistently reported in Cushing's syndrome, hypothyroidism, hyperparathyroidism, pancreatic and lung cancer, myocardial infarction, Wilson's disease, and AIDS. Mania, anxiety and irritability were less frequent. Physicians may not pursue medical workup of cases that appear to be psychiatric in nature. They should be alerted that disturbances in mood, anxiety and irritability may antedate the appearance of a medical disorder.

  8. Cyclic mood disorder heralding adult-onset autosomal dominant leucodystrophy: a clinical masquerader.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Rajendra S; Prakash, Swayam; Raghavendra, B S; Nagpal, Kadam; Handa, Rahul

    2014-06-01

    Leucodystrophies are a heterogeneous group of progressive white matter diseases which may be inherited in dominant, recessive or X-linked fashion depending on the type. Adrenoleucodystrophy (ALD) and metachromatic leucodystrophy (MLD) are rather commoner forms of leucodystrophies whereas krabbes disease, alexander disease, cannavans disease etc. are of less common type. Adult-onset autosomal dominant leucodystrophy (ADLD) is a lately described rarer form of leucodystrophy with perhaps no case report from India. Various leucodystrophies may have different clinical presentations, ranging from subtle cognitive and psychiatric manifestations to gross motor disabilities, visual impairment and seizure. Psychiatric manifestations in the form of psychoses and frank schizophrenia are commonly described in MLD. Depression though uncommonly reported in MLD, cyclic mood disorders have been rarely described in any form of leucodystrophies. We are reporting an eye opener, a case of ADLD which masqueraded as a rapid cyclic mood disorder for initial four years, later to be followed by progressive neurological signs and symptoms. To the best of our knowledge, this is perhaps the first case report of ADLD presenting as rapid cyclic mood disorder in the world literature.

  9. Effect on return to work or education of Individual Placement and Support modified for people with mood and anxiety disorders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hellström, Lone; Bech, Per; Hjorthøj, Carsten

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The effect of Individual Placement and Support (IPS) on return to work or education among people with mood or anxiety disorders is unclear, while IPS increases return to work for people with severe mental illness. We examined the effect of IPS modified for people with mood and anxiety...... disorders (IPS-MA) on return to work and education compared with services as usual (SAU). METHODS: In a randomised clinical superiority trial, 326 participants with mood and anxiety disorders were centrally randomised to IPS-MA, consisting of individual mentor support and career counselling (n=162) or SAU.......6 points vs SAU 48.5 points, p=0.83) at 24 months. CONCLUSION: The modified version of IPS, IPS-MA, was not superior to SAU in supporting people with mood or anxiety disorders in return to work at 24 months. TRIAL REGISTRATION NUMBER: NCT01721824....

  10. A multiple case study comparison of normal private preparatory school and substance abusing/mood disordered adolescents and their families.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeh, L S; Hedgespeth, J

    1995-01-01

    This multiple case study of ten families of normal private preparatory school adolescents and five families of substance abusing/mood disordered adolescents was an effort to identify factors that may suggest a relationship between the abuse of substances in adolescents who also have mood disorders and the following family factors: parental marital discord, degree of family satisfaction, and family problem-solving styles. The fifteen families completed four assessment instruments and participated in a videotaped problem-solving exercise. The results of this study showed that all members of the substance abusing/mood disordered adolescents' families rated themselves as dysfunctional in all major areas of family life. In contrast, the normal private preparatory school families reported satisfaction with most areas of family functioning. Communication styles also differed considerably between the two small groups of families. These results appear to support the importance of family evaluation and treatment when addressing the issue of adolescent substance abusers with mood disorders.

  11. Treatment in a specialised out-patient mood disorder clinic v. standard out-patient treatment in the early course of bipolar disorder

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kessing, Lars Vedel; Hansen, Hanne Vibe; Hvenegaard, Anne

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Little is known about whether treatment in a specialised out-patient mood disorder clinic improves long-term prognosis for patients discharged from initial psychiatric hospital admissions for bipolar disorder. AIMS: To assess the effect of treatment in a specialised out-patient mood...... randomised to treatment in a specialised out-patient mood disorder clinic or standard care (ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT00253071). The primary outcome measure was readmission to hospital, which was obtained from the Danish Psychiatric Central Register. RESULTS: A total of 158 patients with mania/bipolar disorder...... or an antipsychotic and satisfaction with treatment was more prevalent than among patients who received standard care. CONCLUSIONS: Treatment in a specialised mood disorder clinic early in the course of bipolar disorder substantially reduces readmission to a psychiatric hospital and increases satisfaction with care....

  12. How research on the meta-structure of psychopathology aids in understanding biological correlates of mood and anxiety disorders

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    Ofrat Shani

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Research on biological correlates of psychopathology stands to benefit from being interwoven with an empirically based, quantitative model of mental disorders. Empirically-based classification approaches help to deal effectively with issues such as comorbidity among diagnoses, which often serve as challenges to interpreting research on biological correlates. With regard to the mood and anxiety disorders specifically, quantitative research shows how mood and anxiety disorders are well conceptualized as elements within a broad internalizing spectrum of psychopathology, such that many putative biological correlates of specific disorders may be better conceptualized as delineating the pathophysiology of the broader mechanisms underlying multiple disorders.

  13. Mindfulness Meditation Improves Mood, Quality of Life, and Attention in Adults with Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bueno, Viviane Freire; Kozasa, Elisa H.; da Silva, Maria Aparecida; Alves, Tânia Maria; Louzã, Mario Rodrigues; Pompéia, Sabine

    2015-01-01

    Objective. Adults with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) display affective problems and impaired attention. Mood in ADHD can be improved by mindful awareness practices (MAP), but results are mixed regarding the enhancement of attentional performance. Here we evaluated MAP-induced changes in quality of life (QoL), mood, and attention in adult ADHD patients and controls using more measures of attention than prior studies. Methods. Twenty-one ADHD patients and 8 healthy controls underwent 8 weekly MAP sessions; 22 similar patients and 9 controls did not undergo the intervention. Mood and QoL were assessed using validated questionnaires, and attention was evaluated using the Attentional Network Test (ANT) and the Conners Continuous Performance Test (CPT II), before and after intervention. Results. MAP enhanced sustained attention (ANT) and detectability (CPT II) and improved mood and QoL of patients and controls. Conclusion. MAP is a complementary intervention that improves affect and attention of adults with ADHD and controls. PMID:26137496

  14. Mindfulness Meditation Improves Mood, Quality of Life, and Attention in Adults with Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viviane Freire Bueno

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. Adults with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD display affective problems and impaired attention. Mood in ADHD can be improved by mindful awareness practices (MAP, but results are mixed regarding the enhancement of attentional performance. Here we evaluated MAP-induced changes in quality of life (QoL, mood, and attention in adult ADHD patients and controls using more measures of attention than prior studies. Methods. Twenty-one ADHD patients and 8 healthy controls underwent 8 weekly MAP sessions; 22 similar patients and 9 controls did not undergo the intervention. Mood and QoL were assessed using validated questionnaires, and attention was evaluated using the Attentional Network Test (ANT and the Conners Continuous Performance Test (CPT II, before and after intervention. Results. MAP enhanced sustained attention (ANT and detectability (CPT II and improved mood and QoL of patients and controls. Conclusion. MAP is a complementary intervention that improves affect and attention of adults with ADHD and controls.

  15. Mood stabilizers for patients with bipolar disorder: the state of the art.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altamura, A Carlo; Lietti, Licia; Dobrea, Cristina; Benatti, Beatrice; Arici, Chiara; Dell'Osso, Bernardo

    2011-01-01

    Bipolar disorder (BD) is a prevalent and disabling condition, often comorbid with other medical and psychiatric conditions and frequently misdiagnosed. International treatment guidelines for BD recommend the use of mood stabilizers - either in monotherapy or in association - as the gold standard in both acute and long-term therapy. Commonly used in the clinical practice of BD, mood stabilizers have represented an evolving field over the last few years. The concept of stabilization, in fact, has been stressed as the ultimate objective of the treatment of BD, given the chronic and recurrent nature of the illness, which accounts for its significant levels of impairment and disability. To date, different compounds are included within the broad class of mood stabilizers, with lithium, anticonvulsants and, more recently, atypical antipsychotics being the most representative agents. This article is aimed at providing an updated review of the available literature in relation to the role of mood stabilizers in BD, with particular emphasis on their mechanism of action, main clinical aspects and specific use in the different phases of BD treatment, according to the most recently published international treatment guidelines.

  16. Self-Management Strategies in Recovery From Mood and Anxiety Disorders

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    Benjamin Villaggi

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Mood and anxiety disorders are the most prevalent mental disorders. People with such disorders implement self-management strategies to reduce or prevent their symptoms and to optimize their health and well-being. Even though self-management strategies are known to be essential to recovery, few researchers have examined them. The aim of this study is to explore strategies used by people recovering from depressive, anxiety, and bipolar disorders by asking 50 of them to describe their own strategies. Strategies were classified according to dimensions of recovery: social, existential, functional, physical, and clinical. Within these themes, 60 distinct strategies were found to be used synergistically to promote personal recovery as well as symptom reduction. Findings highlight the diversity of strategies used by people, whether they have depressive, anxiety, or bipolar disorders. This study underscores the importance of supporting self-management in a way that respects individual experience.

  17. Self-Management Strategies in Recovery From Mood and Anxiety Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villaggi, Benjamin; Provencher, Hélène; Coulombe, Simon; Meunier, Sophie; Radziszewski, Stephanie; Hudon, Catherine; Roberge, Pasquale; Provencher, Martin D; Houle, Janie

    2015-01-01

    Mood and anxiety disorders are the most prevalent mental disorders. People with such disorders implement self-management strategies to reduce or prevent their symptoms and to optimize their health and well-being. Even though self-management strategies are known to be essential to recovery, few researchers have examined them. The aim of this study is to explore strategies used by people recovering from depressive, anxiety, and bipolar disorders by asking 50 of them to describe their own strategies. Strategies were classified according to dimensions of recovery: social, existential, functional, physical, and clinical. Within these themes, 60 distinct strategies were found to be used synergistically to promote personal recovery as well as symptom reduction. Findings highlight the diversity of strategies used by people, whether they have depressive, anxiety, or bipolar disorders. This study underscores the importance of supporting self-management in a way that respects individual experience.

  18. Polyunsaturated fatty acids and suicide risk in mood disorders: A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pompili, Maurizio; Longo, Lucia; Dominici, Giovanni; Serafini, Gianluca; Lamis, Dorian A; Sarris, Jerome; Amore, Mario; Girardi, Paolo

    2017-03-06

    Deficiency of omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) and an alteration between the ratio of omega-3 and omega-6 PUFAs may contribute to the pathogenesis of bipolar disorder and unipolar depression. Recent epidemiological studies have also demonstrated an association between the depletion of PUFAs and suicide. Our aim was to investigate the relationship between PUFAs and suicide; assess whether the depletion of PUFAs may be considered a risk factor for suicidal behavior; in addition to detailing the potential use of PUFAs in clinical practice. We performed a systematic review on PUFAs and suicide in mood disorders, searching MedLine, Excerpta Medica, PsycLit, PsycInfo, and Index Medicus for relevant epidemiological, post-mortem, and clinical studies from January 1997 to September 2016. A total of 20 articles from peer-reviewed journals were identified and selected for this review. The reviewed studies suggest that subjects with psychiatric conditions have a depletion of omega-3 PUFAs compared to control groups. This fatty acid depletion has also been found to contribute to suicidal thoughts and behavior in some cases. However, large epidemiological studies have generally not supported this finding, as the depletion of omega-3 PUFAs was not statistically different between controls and patients diagnosed with a mental illness and/or who engaged in suicidal behavior. Increasing PUFA intake may be relevant in the treatment of depression, however in respect to the prevention of suicide, the data is currently not supportive of this approach. Changes in levels of PUFAs may however be a risk factor to evaluate when assessing for suicide risk. Clinical studies should be conducted to prospectively assess whether prescriptive long-term use of PUFAs in PUFA-deficient people with depression, may have a preventative role in attenuating suicide.

  19. Lithium and suicide in mood disorders: Updated meta-review of the scientific literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Katharine A; Cipriani, Andrea

    2017-09-12

    Suicide and suicidal behaviour are increased in mood disorders, particularly bipolar disorders. Observational studies and small randomized controlled trials (RCTs) support the idea that taking lithium is associated with a reduction in these rates. This paper aims to review the best evidence for the effect of lithium on rates of suicide and self harm. We searched PubMed, PsycINFO, and the Cochrane Library systematically for systematic reviews and meta-analyses of RCTs of lithium and suicide and self harm published between January 1980 and June 2017. In the case of multiple publications on the same topic, only the most recent or most comprehensive review was considered. A large number of reviews were identified, but only 16 publications were systematic reviews. Of these, three systematic reviews of lithium and suicide rates and one of lithium and self harm confined only to RCTs were identified. Despite some methodological concerns and heterogeneity in terms of participants, diagnoses, comparators, durations, and phase of illness, the evidence to date is overwhelmingly in favour of lithium as an antisuicidal agent, even balanced against any potential disadvantages of its use in regular clinical practice. The anti-suicidal effects of lithium have been consistently reported over the past 40 years. The most robust evidence comes from RCTs, but these results are also discussed in the context of the difficulties in conducting high quality studies in this area, and the supporting evidence that observational and non-randomized studies can also provide. Given this evidence, however, the use of lithium is still underrepresented in clinical practice and should be incorporated more assertively into current guidelines. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Bipolar disorder recurrence prevention using self-monitoring daily mood charts: case reports from a 5 year period

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    Yasui-Furukori N

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Norio Yasui-Furukori, Kazuhiko Nakamura Department of Neuropsychiatry, Graduate School of Medicine, Hirosaki University, Hirosaki, Japan Abstract: Mood symptoms in bipolar disorders are significantly related to psychosocial events, and the personalized identification of symptom triggers is important. Ecological momentary assessments have been used in paper-and-pencil form to explore emotional reactivity to daily life stress in patients with bipolar disorder. However, there are few data on long-term recurrence prevention effects using ecological momentary assessments. Subjects were three outpatients with bipolar disorder who had a history of at least one admission. They recorded self-monitoring daily mood charts using a 5-point Likert scale. Paper-and-pencil mood charts included mood, motivation, thinking speed, and impulsivity. Additionally, they recorded waking time, bedtime, and medication compliance. Fewer manic or depressive episodes including admissions occurred after self-monitoring daily mood charts compared to patients’ admissions in the past 3 years. This study suggests that self-monitoring daily mood in addition to mood stabilizing medication has some effect on recurrence prevention in follow-up periods of at least 5 years. Further studies with rigorous designs and large sample sizes are needed. Keywords: bipolar disorders, recurrence, self-monitoring, ecological momentary assessments

  1. Central beliefs in patients with depressive mood disorder diagnosis in a colombian sample

    OpenAIRE

    Londoño Arredondo, Nora Helena; Ramírez Posada, Maria Isabel

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to identify the central beliefs of character disorders in patients diagnosed with depressive mood disorder, compared with a control group in the city of Medellín, Colombia. The method chosen is a transversal control case study. Sample: 87 adults: 43 in the case study group (30 women and 14 men) and 44 in the control group (36 women and 7 men). Variables of analysis: central beliefs of the obsessive- compulsive, passive-aggressive, histrionic, narcissistic, schizoi...

  2. Experimental evidence for the involvement of PDLIM5 in mood disorders in hetero knockout mice.

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    Yasue Horiuchi

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Reports indicate that PDLIM5 is involved in mood disorders. The PDLIM5 (PDZ and LIM domain 5 gene has been genetically associated with mood disorders; it's expression is upregulated in the postmortem brains of patients with bipolar disorder and downregulated in the peripheral lymphocytes of patients with major depression. Acute and chronic methamphetamine (METH administration may model mania and the evolution of mania into psychotic mania or schizophrenia-like behavioral changes, respectively. METHODS: To address whether the downregulation of PDLIM5 protects against manic symptoms and cause susceptibility to depressive symptoms, we evaluated the effects of reduced Pdlim5 levels on acute and chronic METH-induced locomotor hyperactivity, prepulse inhibition, and forced swimming by using Pdlim5 hetero knockout (KO mice. RESULTS: The homozygous KO of Pdlim5 is embryonic lethal. The effects of METH administration on locomotor hyperactivity and the impairment of prepulse inhibition were lower in Pdlim5 hetero KO mice than in wild-type mice. The transient inhibition of PDLIM5 (achieved by blocking the translocation of protein kinase C epsilon before the METH challenge had a similar effect on behavior. Pdlim5 hetero KO mice showed increased immobility time in the forced swimming test, which was diminished after the chronic administration of imipramine. Chronic METH treatment increased, whereas chronic haloperidol treatment decreased, Pdlim5 mRNA levels in the prefrontal cortex. Imipramine increased Pdlim5 mRNA levels in the hippocampus. CONCLUSION: These findings are partially compatible with reported observations in humans, indicating that PDLIM5 is involved in psychiatric disorders, including mood disorders.

  3. Impact of stressful life events, familial loading and their interaction on the onset of mood disorders - Study in a high-risk cohort of adolescent offspring of parents with bipolar disorder

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hillegers, MHJ; Burger, H; Wals, M; Reichart, CG; Verhulst, FC; Nolen, WA; Ormel, J

    2004-01-01

    Background Stressful life events are established as risk factors for the onset of mood disorders, but few studies have investigated their impact on the development of mood disorders in adolescents. Aims To study the effect of life events on the development of mood disorders in the offspring of paren

  4. Impact of stressful life events, familial loading and their interaction on the onset of mood disorders - Study in a high-risk cohort of adolescent offspring of parents with bipolar disorder

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hillegers, MHJ; Burger, H; Wals, M; Reichart, CG; Verhulst, FC; Nolen, WA; Ormel, J

    2004-01-01

    Background Stressful life events are established as risk factors for the onset of mood disorders, but few studies have investigated their impact on the development of mood disorders in adolescents. Aims To study the effect of life events on the development of mood disorders in the offspring of paren

  5. Do We Really Know How to Treat a Child with Bipolar Disorder or One with Severe Mood Dysregulation? Is There a Magic Bullet?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajeev Jairam

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Despite controversy, bipolar disorder (BD is being increasingly diagnosed in under 18s. There is scant information regarding its treatment and uncertainty regarding the status of “severe mood dysregulation (SMD” and how it overlaps with BD. This article collates available research on treatment of BD in under 18s and explores the status of SMD. Methods. Literature on treatment of BD in under 18s and on SMD were identified using major search engines; these were then collated and reviewed. Results. Some markers have been proposed to differentiate BD from disruptive behaviour disorders (DBD in children. Pharmacotherapy restricted to short-term trials of mood-stabilizers and atypical-antipsychotics show mixed results. Data on maintenance treatment and non-pharmacological interventions are scant. It is unclear whether SMD is an independent disorder or an early manifestation of another disorder. Conclusions. Valproate, lithium, risperidone, olanzapine, aripiprazole and quetiapine remain first line treatments for acute episodes in the under 18s with BD. Their efficacy in maintenance treatment remains unclear. There is no validated treatment for SMD. It is likely that some children who are currently diagnosed with BD and DBD and possibly most children currently diagnosed with SMD will be subsumed under the proposed category in the DSM V of disruptive mood dysregulation disorder with dysphoria.

  6. Anxiety and Depressed Mood Decline Following Smoking Abstinence in Adult Smokers with Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Covey, Lirio S; Hu, Mei-Chen; Winhusen, Theresa; Lima, Jennifer; Berlin, Ivan; Nunes, Edward

    2015-12-01

    A preponderance of relevant research has indicated reduction in anxiety and depressive symptoms following smoking abstinence. This secondary analysis investigated whether the phenomenon extends to smokers with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). The study setting was an 11-Week double-blind placebo-controlled randomized trial of osmotic release oral system methylphenidate (OROS-MPH) as a cessation aid when added to nicotine patch and counseling. Participants were 255 adult smokers with ADHD. The study outcomes are: anxiety (Beck Anxiety Inventory (BAI)) and depressed mood (Beck Depression Inventory II (BDI)) measured one Week and six Weeks after a target quit day (TQD). The main predictor is point-prevalence abstinence measured at Weeks 1 and 6 after TQD. Covariates are treatment (OROS-MPH vs placebo), past major depression, past anxiety disorder, number of cigarettes smoked daily, demographics (age, gender, education, marital status) and baseline scores on the BAI, BDI, and the DSM-IV ADHD Rating Scale. Abstinence was significantly associated with lower anxiety ratings throughout the post-quit period (panxiety (pAnxiety and depression ratings at baseline predicted increased ratings of corresponding measures during the post-quit period. Stopping smoking yielded reductions in anxiety and depressed mood in smokers with ADHD treated with nicotine patch and counseling. Treatment with OROS-MPH yielded mood reductions in delayed manner. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. The Effects of Mood Disorders and Dissociative Symptoms on Suicide Attempts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Halil ÖZCAN

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The aim of this study is to examine patients with suicide attempts in respect of mood disorders and dissociative symptoms and to understand the impact of these symptoms on suicide attempts. Method: Seventy participants who were directed to psychiatry outpatient department from the Kastamonu State Hospital crisis intervention unit between January 2009 and January 2010 and who agreed to participate in the study were included. All of the patients were evaluated by psychiatric interview. A detailed sociodemographic and clinical data form was filled for all included patients and present or past history of psychiatric illness were explored. The Mood Disorders Questionnaire (MDQ, Beck Depression Inventory (BDI, Beck Suicide Intention Scale (BSIS, Dissociative Experiences Scale (DES were applied to all participants. Results: The mean score of DES was 39±21.3, of MDQ 7.5±2.5, of BDI 28±14 and of BSIS 15.3±5.8. Participants who scored higher than 7 in the MDQ had statistically more dissociative experiences than those who scored lower than 7 in MDQ. In addition, participants who scored higher than 5 points in the MDQ had more dissociative experiences than those who scored lower than 5 in the MDQ. Having higher scores on DES, MDQ and BDI was positively correlated with having higher scores on BSIS. Conclusion: The etiologies of suicides are complex. Suicide attempter might often have both mood symptoms and dissociative experiences.

  8. The protocadherin 17 gene affects cognition, personality, amygdala structure and function, synapse development and risk of major mood disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, H; Hoshina, N; Zhang, C; Ma, Y; Cao, H; Wang, Y; Wu, D-D; Bergen, S E; Landén, M; Hultman, C M; Preisig, M; Kutalik, Z; Castelao, E; Grigoroiu-Serbanescu, M; Forstner, A J; Strohmaier, J; Hecker, J; Schulze, T G; Müller-Myhsok, B; Reif, A; Mitchell, P B; Martin, N G; Schofield, P R; Cichon, S; Nöthen, M M; Walter, H; Erk, S; Heinz, A; Amin, N; van Duijn, C M; Meyer-Lindenberg, A; Tost, H; Xiao, X; Yamamoto, T; Rietschel, M; Li, M

    2017-01-10

    Major mood disorders, which primarily include bipolar disorder and major depressive disorder, are the leading cause of disability worldwide and pose a major challenge in identifying robust risk genes. Here, we present data from independent large-scale clinical data sets (including 29 557 cases and 32 056 controls) revealing brain expressed protocadherin 17 (PCDH17) as a susceptibility gene for major mood disorders. Single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) spanning the PCDH17 region are significantly associated with major mood disorders; subjects carrying the risk allele showed impaired cognitive abilities, increased vulnerable personality features, decreased amygdala volume and altered amygdala function as compared with non-carriers. The risk allele predicted higher transcriptional levels of PCDH17 mRNA in postmortem brain samples, which is consistent with increased gene expression in patients with bipolar disorder compared with healthy subjects. Further, overexpression of PCDH17 in primary cortical neurons revealed significantly decreased spine density and abnormal dendritic morphology compared with control groups, which again is consistent with the clinical observations of reduced numbers of dendritic spines in the brains of patients with major mood disorders. Given that synaptic spines are dynamic structures which regulate neuronal plasticity and have crucial roles in myriad brain functions, this study reveals a potential underlying biological mechanism of a novel risk gene for major mood disorders involved in synaptic function and related intermediate phenotypes.Molecular Psychiatry advance online publication, 10 January 2017; doi:10.1038/mp.2016.231.

  9. 心境稳定剂在精神疾病治疗中的应用%Application of mood stabilizers in the treatment of psychiatric disorders

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郭晓云; 王韵; 吴彦

    2014-01-01

    目前临床上常用的心境稳定剂包括锂盐、抗惊厥药物和非典型抗精神病药物。此外,现还新上市了一些具有潜在心境稳定作用的药物或辅助用药。本文概要介绍主要心境稳定剂及其在精神疾病治疗中的应用。%Mood stabilizers including lithium, anticonvulsants and atypical antipsychotics were widely used in the current clinical practice. In addition, there are some new drugs with potential mood stabilizing effects or adjuvant effect for the treatment of bipolar disorder on the market. This paper reviews those mood stabilizers and their application in mental illness.

  10. Liraglutide promotes improvements in objective measures of cognitive dysfunction in individuals with mood disorders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mansur, Rodrigo B; Ahmed, Juhie; Cha, Danielle S

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: There is a paucity of treatments that are capable of reliably and robustly improving cognitive function in adults with mood disorders. Glucagon-like peptide-1 is synthesized centrally and its receptors are abundantly expressed in neural circuits subserving cognitive function. We aimed...... to determine the effects of liraglutide, a GLP-1 receptor (GLP-1R) agonist, on objective measures of cognition in adults with a depressive or bipolar disorder. METHODS: In this 4-week, pilot, open-label, domain-based study (e.g. cognition), we recruited 19 individuals with major depressive disorder (MDD......) or bipolar disorder (BD) and an impairment in executive function, defined as a below-average performance in the Trail Making Test-B (TMTB). Liraglutide 1.8mg/day was added as an adjunct to existing pharmacotherapy. RESULTS: Participants had significant increases from baseline to week 4 in the TMTB standard...

  11. Effects of erythropoietin on memory-relevant neurocircuitry activity and recall in mood disorders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Miskowiak, K W; Macoveanu, J; Vinberg, M

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Erythropoietin (EPO) improves verbal memory and reverses subfield hippocampal volume loss across depression and bipolar disorder (BD). This study aimed to investigate with functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) whether these effects were accompanied by functional changes in memory...... cohort. The effects of EPO were not correlated with change in mood, red blood cells, blood pressure, or medication. CONCLUSION: The findings highlight enhanced encoding-related dlPFC and temporo-parietal activity as key neuronal underpinnings of EPO-associated memory improvement.......MRI at 3T, mood ratings, and blood tests at baseline and week 14. During fMRI, participants performed a picture encoding task followed by postscan recall. RESULTS: Sixty-two patients had complete data (EPO: N = 32, saline: N = 30). EPO improved picture recall and increased encoding-related activity...

  12. Bipolar disorder recurrence prevention using self-monitoring daily mood charts: case reports from a 5 year period

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasui-Furukori, Norio; Nakamura, Kazuhiko

    2017-01-01

    Mood symptoms in bipolar disorders are significantly related to psychosocial events, and the personalized identification of symptom triggers is important. Ecological momentary assessments have been used in paper-and-pencil form to explore emotional reactivity to daily life stress in patients with bipolar disorder. However, there are few data on long-term recurrence prevention effects using ecological momentary assessments. Subjects were three outpatients with bipolar disorder who had a history of at least one admission. They recorded self-monitoring daily mood charts using a 5-point Likert scale. Paper-and-pencil mood charts included mood, motivation, thinking speed, and impulsivity. Additionally, they recorded waking time, bedtime, and medication compliance. Fewer manic or depressive episodes including admissions occurred after self-monitoring daily mood charts compared to patients’ admissions in the past 3 years. This study suggests that self-monitoring daily mood in addition to mood stabilizing medication has some effect on recurrence prevention in follow-up periods of at least 5 years. Further studies with rigorous designs and large sample sizes are needed. PMID:28331323

  13. Quetiapine fumarate augmentation for patients with a primary anxiety disorder or a mood disorder: a pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Yi-Chih

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Comorbid anxiety symptoms,in patients with a primary anxiety disorder or a mood disorder, leads to poor patient outcomes and burdens the healthcare system. This pilot study evaluated the feasibility of extended-release quetiapine fumarate (quetiapine XR for the treatment of patients with either a primary anxiety disorder or a mood disorder with comorbid anxiety symptoms compared to a placebo, as an adjunct to antidepressant therapy. Methods Thirty-nine patients with a diagnosis of a primary anxiety disorder or a mood disorder with comorbid anxiety symptoms were enrolled in this study. Patients with a stable dose of antidepressant therapy were randomized according to a 2:1 probability of receiving either quetiapine XR or a placebo adjunctive treatment for 8 weeks. The efficacy was assessed by the Hamilton Anxiety Rating Scale (HAM-A and the Clinical Global Impression of severity (CGI-S score at baseline, week 1, 4, and 8. Results A total of 35 patients were included in this intention-to treat (ITT population for the efficacy analysis (quetiapine XR: 22 patients; placebo: 13 patients. At week 4, statistically significant differences were observed on both the HAM-A score (p = 0.003 and the CGI-S score (p = 0.025, favouring the quetiapine XR (−13.00 ± 4.14 compared to placebo (−6.63 ± 5.42. However, no statistically significant difference was observed between the two groups with regard to changes from the baseline to week 8 on the HAM-A score (p = 0.332 or the CGI-S score (p = 0.833. Conclusions Augmentation of antidepressant treatment with quetiapine XR did not result in clinical improvement according to the outcome measure of anxiety using the HAM-A and CGI-S scores at week 8, among the patients with either a primary anxiety disorder or a mood disorder with comorbid anxiety symptoms. However, treatment with quetiapine XR as an adjunct to antidepressant therapy appeared to provide a short

  14. The longitudinal relationship between flourishing mental health and incident mood, anxiety and substance use disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schotanus-Dijkstra, Marijke; Ten Have, Margreet; Lamers, Sanne M A; de Graaf, Ron; Bohlmeijer, Ernst T

    2017-06-01

    High levels of mental well-being might protect against the onset of mental disorders but longitudinal evidence is scarce. This study examines whether flourishing mental health predicts first-incidence and recurrent mental disorders 3 years later. Data were used from 4482 representative adults participating in the second (2010-12) and third wave (2013-15) of the Netherlands Mental Health Survey and Incidence Study-2 (NEMESIS-2). Mental well-being was assessed with the Mental Health Continuum-Short Form (MHC-SF) at the second wave. The classification criteria of this instrument were used to classify participants as having flourishing mental health: high levels of both hedonic well-being (life-satisfaction, happiness) and eudaimonic well-being (social contribution, purpose in life, personal growth). DSM-IV mood, anxiety and substance use disorders were measured with the Composite International Diagnostic Interview (CIDI) 3.0 at all waves. Odds ratios of (first and recurrent) incident disorders were estimated, using logistic regression analyses adjusting for potential confounders. Flourishing reduced the risk of incident mood disorders by 28% and of anxiety disorders by 53%, but did not significantly predicted substance use disorders. A similar pattern of associations was found for either high hedonic or high eudaimonic well-being. Significant results were found for substance use disorders when life-events and social support were removed as covariates. This study underscores the rationale of promoting mental well-being as a public mental health strategy to prevent mental illness. In wealthy European nations it seems fruitful to measure and pursuit a flourishing life rather than merely high levels of hedonic well-being.

  15. Startle eye-blink modulation by facial self-resemblance and current mood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finke, Johannes B; Larra, Mauro F; Schilling, Thomas M; Lass-Hennemann, Johanna; Blumenthal, Terry D; Schächinger, Hartmut

    2015-06-01

    Although salient stimuli are known to modulate startle eye-blink responses, and one's own face is considered of particular salience, effects of facial self-resemblance on startle responsiveness have not been systematically investigated. For the present study, pictures from the FACES database (rated as neutral) were digitally morphed to resemble the participants' (N=37) faces to varying degrees (25-50-75%). Perceptually matched geometrical shapes served as a control condition. At SOAs of either 300ms or 3000ms after picture onset, startle responses were elicited by white noise (50ms, 105dB), and recorded at the orbicularis oculi via EMG. Prior to the experiment, self-reported mood was assessed by means of the PANAS. Relative to non-face stimuli, the presentation of faces reduced startle magnitude at short, but not long, lead intervals. Furthermore, for probes presented at a SOA of 300ms, a linear decrease in startle magnitude with higher levels of self-resemblance was observed, presumably reflecting higher salience of the self-face. The startle modulating effect of self-resembling faces during longer lead intervals was moderated by the participants' current mood: negative affect predicted stronger patterns of attenuation, which might be interpreted as an increase in self-focus resulting from more negative mood.

  16. [Efficacy of cognitive behavioral therapy in the treatment of mood and anxiety disorders in adults].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sighvatsson, Magnús Blöndahl; Kristjánsdottir, Hafrún; Sigurdsson, Engibert; Sigurdsson, Jón Fridrik

    2011-11-01

    Cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) represents that form of psychotherapy which has most research data to build on in the treatment of mood and anxiety disorders for adults. In this review we will introduce CBT and present the results of pertinent outcome research. Efficacy at the end of treatment is discussed, as well as long term effectiveness and the efficacy of combined treatment with medication and CBT. In addition, we discuss the pros and cons of group CBT compared to CBT in individual format, and comorbidity of mental disorders. According to this review CBT is efficacious for major depressive disorder, generalized anxiety disorder, panic disorder, post-traumatic stress disorder, obsessive compulsive disorder, social phobia and specific phobia. Efficacy of CBT is equal to or better than efficacy of drugs in the treatment of the above disorders, but there is less access to CBT. Longterm effectiveness of CBT appears to be good, but research on combined treatment is yet in its infancy and conclusions are premature on its place in treatment. Key words: Cognitive behavioral therapy, psychotropic treatment, efficacy, long-term effects, combined treatment, mental disorders, adults.

  17. Rapid Relief of Catatonia in Mood Disorder by Lorazepam and Diazepam

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Chi Huang

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Catatonia has risks of severe morbidity and mortality and needs early treatment. In this study, we investigated more patients to discuss the efficacy of this treatment in patients with major depressive disorder (MDD or bipolar I disorder (BPI. Methods: During a period of 9 years, we identified 12 catatonic patients with mood disorder, with MDD (n = 10 and BPI (n = 2 in the emergency department, inpatient and outpatient units of a general hospital. The patients received intramuscular injection (IMI of 2 mg lorazepam once or twice during the first 2 h. If intramuscular lorazepam failed, intravenous dripping (IVD of 10 mg diazepam in 500 mL normal saline every 8 h for 1 day was prescribed. Results: Eight patients had full remission of catatonia after receiving one dose of 2 mg lorazepam IMI. Two patients needed two doses of 2 mg lorazepam IMI. Two patients with BPI recovered from catatonia using one dose of 10 mg diazepam IVD over 8 h after they failed to respond to two doses of 2 mg lorazepam IMI. The response rate to lorazepam IMI was 83.3%. All catatonic features remitted in 24 h with 100% response rate. Conclusions: The lorazepam-diazepam treatment strategy is a safe and effective method to relieve catatonia in mood disorder within 1 day. Psychiatrist consultation is helpful for final diagnosis and rapid treatment of catatonia.

  18. Increased prevalence of mood disorders and suicidal ideation in type 2 diabetic patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ceretta, Luciane B; Réus, Gislaine Z; Abelaira, Helena M; Jornada, Luciano K; Schwalm, Magada T; Hoepers, Neiva J; Tomazzi, Cristiane D; Gulbis, Karina G; Ceretta, Renan A; Quevedo, João

    2012-12-01

    This study evaluated the association of mood disorders, suicidal ideation and the quality of life in patients with type 2 diabetes. We used a case-control study employing 996 patients suffering with type 2 diabetes (using insulin for over 1 year), and 2.145 individuals without diabetes. The groups were then used to evaluate the presence of different mood disorders and suicidal ideation, beyond quality of life. In addition to this, fasting glucose and glycosylated hemoglobin (Hb1C) were also evaluated. The data were analyzed using the Pearson chi-squared test, logistic regression, ANCOVA and Student's t-tests. We showed an association between type 2 diabetes and depressive episodes (adjusted OR = 1.8, CI 95 % 1.7-2.0, p < 0.001), recurrent depressive episodes (adjusted OR = 2.4, CI 95 % 2.2-2.6, p < 0.001), dysthymia (adjusted OR = 5.2, CI 95 % 4.9-5.5, p < 0.001), mood disorder with psychotic symptoms (adjusted OR = 2.5, CI 95 % 1.5-3.4, p < 0.001) and suicidal ideation (adjusted OR = 3.6, CI 95 % 2.5-4.8, p < 0.001, light; adjusted OR = 4.6, CI 95 % 1.5-7.7, p < 0.01, moderate and severe). The recurrent depression (OR = 1.3, CI 95 % 1.1-1.7, p < 0.05) and psychotic symptoms (OR = 4.1, CI 95 % 1.1-15.1, p < 0.05) were associated with higher levels of Hb1C. Dysthymia was associated with high blood glucose (OR = 1.6, CI 95 % 1.1-2.5, p < 0.05). Patients had lower mean scores in the following domains: physical [36.5 (13.6) × 56.0 (4.9), p < 0.001)], psychological [42.6 (8.6) × 47.9 (8.6), p < 0.001] and environmental [40.0 (8.6) × 49.3 (8.3), p < 0.001], but had higher scores in the area of social relations [50.2 (16.9) × 35.7 (27.9), p < 0.001]. The data demonstrated a worse quality of life, a high comorbidity of type 2 DM with depressive disorders and suicidal ideation. In addition, the poor control of DM is associated with the severity of mood disorders.

  19. Mood Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to developing effective medications, NIH research has produced cognitive-behavioral interventions—therapies that identify harmful patterns of thoughts and behaviors and replace them with helpful ones—for depression, which studies show to be as effective as ...

  20. Prospective, open-label trial measuring satisfaction and convenience of two formulations of lamotrigine in subjects with mood disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sajatovic M

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Martha Sajatovic,1 Thomas R Thompson,2 Kevin Nanry,3 Suzanne Edwards,2 Ranjani Manjunath21Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine and University Hospitals of Cleveland, Cleveland, OH, 2GlaxoSmithKline, Research Triangle Park, NC; 3Quintiles, Durham, NC, USABackground: Lamotrigine is an anticonvulsant drug indicated for the maintenance treatment of bipolar I disorder and for various types of epilepsy. An orally disintegrating tablet (ODT of lamotrigine was developed to provide a formulation option that might increase patient convenience and satisfaction.Methods: Subjects with mood disorders who reported difficulty swallowing currently prescribed lamotrigine immediate-release medication (baseline were enrolled and treated with lamotrigine ODT for three weeks (end of treatment. Subject satisfaction and convenience were measured using the Treatment Satisfaction Questionnaire for Medication (TSQM. Also measured were global psychopathology using the Clinical Global Impression severity index (CGI-S and depressive symptoms using the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI-II.Results: Lamotrigine ODT was found to be significantly more convenient to use than lamotrigine immediate-release (change in baseline TSQM convenience score: 23.3, n = 97, P < 0.001. The mean TSQM global satisfaction score was similar at baseline (76.3 and after treatment with lamotrigine ODT (76.0. There were no significant changes on CGI-S and BDI-II.Conclusion: Subjects reported that lamotrigine ODT was significantly more convenient than lamotrigine immediate-release, while both formulations were associated with good satisfaction. Lamotrigine ODT may be a treatment option for patients who have difficulty swallowing medication.Keywords: lamotrigine, epilepsy, antiepileptic drug, bipolar disorder, mood disorder

  1. A Role for the Placenta in Programming Maternal Mood and Childhood Behavioural Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janssen, A B; Kertes, D A; McNamara, G I; Braithwaite, E C; Creeth, H D J; Glover, V I; John, R M

    2016-08-01

    Substantial data demonstrate that the early-life environment, including in utero, plays a key role in later life disease. In particular, maternal stress during pregnancy has been linked to adverse behavioural and emotional outcomes in children. Data from human cohort studies and experimental animal models suggest that modulation of the developing epigenome in the foetus by maternal stress may contribute to the foetal programming of disease. Here, we summarise insights gained from recent studies that may advance our understanding of the role of the placenta in mediating the association between maternal mood disorders and offspring outcomes. First, the placenta provides a record of exposures during pregnancy, as indicated by changes in the placental trancriptome and epigenome. Second, prenatal maternal mood may alter placental function to adversely impact foetal and child development. Finally, we discuss the less well established but interesting possibility that altered placental function, more specifically changes in placental hormones, may adversely affect maternal mood and later maternal behaviour, which can also have consequence for offspring well-being.

  2. Amitriptyline reverses hyperalgesia and improves associated mood-like disorders in a model of experimental monoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amorim, D; David-Pereira, A; Pertovaara, A; Almeida, A; Pinto-Ribeiro, F

    2014-05-15

    Affective disorders are common comorbidities of chronic inflammatory pain that are often overlooked in primary care. As the impact of inflammatory pain upon mood-like disorders in animal models is not well known, our objective was to assess whether prolonged experimental monoarthritis (ARTH) induced the development of anxiety and depressive-like behaviours in rodents and if amitriptyline, an antidepressant commonly used in the treatment of chronic pain, could reverse both nociceptive and mood-like impairments. Experimental ARTH was induced through an injection of kaolin/carrageenan into the right knee joint with control (SHAM) animals injected with saline. Four weeks after induction, ARTH animals displayed mechanical hyperalgesia and a depressive-like phenotype as they showed a significant increase in immobility and a decrease in the latency to immobility in the forced-swimming test at the expense of the time spent climbing/swimming. ARTH animals also displayed a decreased sucrose preference, an index of anhedonia and anxiety-like behaviour as time spent exploring the open arms of the elevated-plus-maze was decreased when compared to controls. The anxiety-like phenotype was also supported by an increase in the number of fecal boli left in the open field. In ARTH animals, the administration of amitriptyline decreased mechanical hyperalgesia and increased sucrose preference and the time spent climbing, although it had a deleterious effect in the performance of control animals. Our data show that this model of ARTH can be useful for the study of chronic pain-mood disorders comorbidities and that amitriptyline is able to partly reverse the associated nociceptive and emotional impairments.

  3. Dissociative symptoms in female patients with mood and anxiety disorders: a psychopathological and temperamental investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bersani, G; Moscariello, M A; Bersani, F S; Colletti, C; Anastasia, A; Prinzivalli, E; Valeriani, G; Salviati, M

    2014-01-01

    Dissociative symptoms are frequent among psychiatric patients and may considerably affect patients' psychopathological condition and treatment outcomes. The objectives of the study are to assess the presence of dissociative symptoms in female patients with mood and anxiety disorders, to investigate their correlation with the clinical severity of the disorders and to investigate those personality traits that are more frequent in patients with high levels of dissociation. 50 Caucasian females were enrolled in the study. Patients were assessed through the Self-Report Symptom Check-List, the Dissociative Experiences Scale (DES) and rating scales for Depression and Anxiety. The mean DES score in the overall sample was 16.6. 32% of patients had a DES score > 20. Depressive symptoms positively correlated with the DES total scores. Dissociator patients presented some significantly different temperamental characteristics in comparison with non dissociator patients. Dissociative symptoms are highly present in patients with mood and anxiety disorders and correlate with the severity of depressive symptoms. Specific personality traits more frequently observed in dissociator people may represent predisposing factors; their early identification could be clinically relevant.

  4. Effect of acute alcohol use on the lethality of suicide attempts in patients with mood disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sher, Leo; Oquendo, Maria A; Richardson-Vejlgaard, Randall; Makhija, Nita M; Posner, Kelly; Mann, J John; Stanley, Barbara H

    2009-07-01

    Acute alcohol use is an important risk factor for attempted and completed suicide. We evaluated the effect of acute alcohol intake on the lethality of suicide attempts to test the hypothesis that acute alcohol intoxication is associated with more lethal suicide attempts. This retrospective study included 317 suicide attempters enrolled in mood disorders protocols. Demographic and clinical parameters were assessed. The use of alcohol at the time of the most lethal suicide attempt was determined. On the basis of their responses participants were classified into three groups: participants who reported "Enough alcohol intake to impair judgment, reality testing and diminish responsibility" or "Intentional intake of alcohol in order to facilitate implementation of attempt" were included in the group "Alcohol" (A); participants who reported "Some alcohol intake prior to but not related to attempt, reportedly not enough to impair judgment, reality testing" were included in the group "Some Alcohol" (SA); and participants who reported "No alcohol intake immediately prior to attempt" were included in the group "No Alcohol" (NA). Lethality of the most lethal suicide attempts was higher in the A group compared to the SA and NA groups. Prevalence of patients with alcohol use disorders was higher in the A group compared to the SA and NA groups. SA participants reported more reasons for living and lower suicide intent scores at the time of their most lethal suicide attempt compared to the A and NA groups. Acute alcohol use increases the lethality of suicide attempts in individuals with mood disorders.

  5. Fahr’s disease with bipolar mood disorder presentation (Case report)

    OpenAIRE

    Azari, P.

    2006-01-01

    Fahr’s disease is a progressive and idiopathic basal ganglia calcification with normal metabolism of calcium and phosphore with motor and psychiatric sings and symptoms. Dementi, chorea attetosise, psychosis and depression due to Fahr’s disease are frequently reported, but Fahr’s disease with bipolar mood disorder manifestation is very rare and we found only 3 cases in review of literature from 1995 to 2005. In this case report, a 21-years old girl is presented who was admitted to Sari-Zare p...

  6. [The guideline for the treatment of mood disorders in USA and Japan].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higuchi, T

    2001-08-01

    Recently, the number of available antidepressants has increased dramatically and psychopharmacological treatment is becoming complex. It is important to present some guideline for supporting clinical decision making. Three different kinds of guideline for the treatment of mood disorders, that is, the APA style guideline, the algorithm and the consensus guideline, have been developed in our country. The APA style guideline and the algorithm are basically evidence based and the consensus guideline is developed through the consensus panel format. These guidelines should be used as 'a starting point' for specifying decisions that will be modified occasionally.

  7. Epidemiology and treatment of mood disorders in a day hospital setting from 1996 to 2007: an Italian study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luca M

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Maria Luca,1 Giuseppa Prossimo,1 Vincenzo Messina,1 Antonina Luca,2 Salvatore Romeo,1 Carmela Calandra11Department of Medical and Surgery Specialties, Psychiatry Unit, 2Department of Neuroscience, University Hospital Policlinico-Vittorio Emanuele, Catania, Sicily, ItalyBackground: The present study aimed: to assess prescribing patterns in the treatment of major depression, bipolar disorder type I, cyclothymia, and dysthymia from 1996 to 2007 in a day hospital setting; to evaluate the prevalence of the above-mentioned mood disorders and gender distribution; and to relate familiality, comorbidity, and marital status to each diagnosis.Methods: Medical records for 777 day hospital patients with a diagnosis of major depression, bipolar disorder type I, cyclothymia, or dysthymia were grouped into two 6-year periods so as to compare the prescribing patterns of tricyclic antidepressants, selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors, noradrenergic reuptake inhibitors, serotonin and norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors, noradrenergic and specific serotonergic antidepressants, first-generation antipsychotics, second-generation antipsychotics, and mood stabilizers. Gender, prevalence, familiality, comorbidity, and marital status were related to each diagnosis.Results: The most common mood disorder, with a female preponderance, was major depression, regardless of marital status. High percentages of familiality and comorbidity were found for major depression, while a reduction was found in the utilization of tricyclic antidepressants. There was no statistically significant difference in rates of prescription of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors and noradrenergic reuptake inhibitors, but some irregularities were found upon evaluating each diagnosis (eg, increased utilization of these agents in dysthymia and major depression, respectively. There was an increase in prescriptions for serotonin and norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors, but no marked differences in

  8. Clinical utility of resting-state functional connectivity magnetic resonance imaging for mood and cognitive disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takamura, T; Hanakawa, T

    2017-07-01

    Although functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) has long been used to assess task-related brain activity in neuropsychiatric disorders, it has not yet become a widely available clinical tool. Resting-state fMRI (rs-fMRI) has been the subject of recent attention in the fields of basic and clinical neuroimaging research. This method enables investigation of the functional organization of the brain and alterations of resting-state networks (RSNs) in patients with neuropsychiatric disorders. Rs-fMRI does not require participants to perform a demanding task, in contrast to task fMRI, which often requires participants to follow complex instructions. Rs-fMRI has a number of advantages over task fMRI for application with neuropsychiatric patients, for example, although applications of task fMR to participants for healthy are easy. However, it is difficult to apply these applications to patients with psychiatric and neurological disorders, because they may have difficulty in performing demanding cognitive task. Here, we review the basic methodology and analysis techniques relevant to clinical studies, and the clinical applications of the technique for examining neuropsychiatric disorders, focusing on mood disorders (major depressive disorder and bipolar disorder) and dementia (Alzheimer's disease and mild cognitive impairment).

  9. Validation of the Seven Up Seven Down Inventory in bipolar offspring : screening and prediction of mood disorders. Findings from the Dutch Bipolar Offspring Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mesman, Esther; Youngstrom, E. A.; Juliana, N. K.; Nolen, W. A.; Hillegers, M. H. J.

    2017-01-01

    Objective: To validate the Seven Up Seven Down (7U7D), an abbreviated version of the General Behavior Inventory (GBI), as screener for mood disorders and test its ability to predict mood disorders over time in individuals at risk for bipolar disorder (BD). Methods: Bipolar offspring (n=108) were

  10. Exploring the Use of Information and Communication Technology by People With Mood Disorder: A Systematic Review and Metasynthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fulford, Hamish; McSwiggan, Linda; Kroll, Thilo; MacGillivray, Stephen

    2016-07-01

    There is a growing body of evidence relating to how information and communication technology (ICT) can be used to support people with physical health conditions. Less is known regarding mental health, and in particular, mood disorder. To conduct a metasynthesis of all qualitative studies exploring the use of ICTs by people with mood disorder. Searches were run in eight electronic databases using a systematic search strategy. Qualitative and mixed-method studies published in English between 2007 and 2014 were included. Thematic synthesis was used to interpret and synthesis the results of the included studies. Thirty-four studies were included in the synthesis. The methodological design of the studies was qualitative or mixed-methods. A global assessment of study quality identified 22 studies as strong and 12 weak with most having a typology of findings either at topical or thematic survey levels of data transformation. A typology of ICT use by people with mood disorder was created as a result of synthesis. The systematic review and metasynthesis clearly identified a gap in the research literature as no studies were identified, which specifically researched how people with mood disorder use mobile ICT. Further qualitative research is recommended to understand the meaning this type of technology holds for people. Such research might provide valuable information on how people use mobile technology in their lives in general and also, more specifically, how they are being used to help with their mood disorders.

  11. Development and validation of a screening instrument for bipolar spectrum disorder: The Mood Disorder Questionnaire Thai version

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Waleeprakhon P

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Punjaporn Waleeprakhon,1 Pichai Ittasakul,1 Manote Lotrakul,1 Pattarabhorn Wisajun,1 Sudawan Jullagate,1 Terence A Ketter2 1Department of Psychiatry, Faculty of Medicine, Ramathibodi Hospital, Mahidol University, Bangkok, Thailand; 2Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA, USA Background: The Mood Disorder Questionnaire (MDQ has been translated to many languages and has been used in many countries as a screening instrument for bipolar disorder. The main objective of this study was to evaluate validity of the Thai version of the MDQ as a screening instrument for bipolar disorder in a psychiatric outpatient sample, and to determine its optimum question #1 item threshold value for bipolar disorder.Methods: The English language Mood Disorder Questionnaire (MDQ was translated into Thai. The process involved back-translation, cross-cultural adaptation, field testing of the prefinal version, as well as final adjustments. Two hundred and fifty major depressive disorder outpatients were further assessed by the Thai version of the MDQ and the Thai version of the Mini International Neuropsychiatric Interview (MINI. During the assessment, reliability and validity analyses, and receiver operating characteristic curve (ROC analysis were performed.Results: The Thai version of the MDQ screening had adequate internal consistency (Cronbach’s alpha =0.791, omega total =0.68, and omega hierarchical =0.69. The optimal question #1 item threshold value was at least five positive items, which yielded adequate sensitivity (76.5%, specificity (72.7%, positive predictive value (74.3%, and negative predictive value (75.0%. The ROC area under the curve (AUC for this study was 0.82 (95% confidence interval: 0.70 to 0.90.Conclusion: The Thai version of the MDQ had some useful psychometric properties for screening for bipolar disorder in a mood disorder clinic setting, with a recommended question #1 item

  12. Evaluation of an integrated group cognitive-behavioral treatment for comorbid mood, anxiety, and substance use disorders: A pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milosevic, Irena; Chudzik, Susan M; Boyd, Susan; McCabe, Randi E

    2017-03-01

    This paper presents the development and preliminary evaluation of an integrated group cognitive-behavioral treatment (CBT) for comorbid mood, anxiety, and substance use disorders. The 12-session, manualized treatment was developed collaboratively by a mental health program in a teaching hospital and a community-based addictions service and administered in both settings. Results from an uncontrolled effectiveness trial of 29 treatment completers suggest that integrated group CBT may reduce stress and alcohol use symptoms and improve substance refusal self-efficacy. Changes in symptoms of anxiety, depression, and drug use were not significant, although the effect size for anxiety reduction was in the medium range. Nonetheless, the clinical significance of treatment effects on mood, anxiety, and substance use symptoms was modest. Changes in coping skills and quality of life were not significant, although medium-to-large effects were observed for changes in several coping skills. Participants reported being highly satisfied with treatment, found the treatment strategies to be useful, and noted an improvement in their functioning, particularly socially. Methodological and sample size limitations warrant more rigorous follow-up investigations of this treatment. Results are considered in the context of the current literature on integrated psychological treatments for these common comorbidities. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Fatigue states after cancer treatment occur both in association with, and independent of, mood disorder: a longitudinal study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Davenport Tracey

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Persistent fatigue is recognised as one of the most common, ongoing symptoms reported by patients following cancer treatment and may have profound effects on the quality of life. However, recent cross-sectional studies also highlight the close relationship between cancer related fatigue (CRF and diagnoses of depression or anxiety disorder. There is currently limited information about the relationships between these conditions over time. We sought to examine the longitudinal relationships between fatigue and mood disorder in women treated with adjuvant therapy for early stage breast cancer. Methods Women who had recently completed adjuvant therapy for Stage I or II breast cancer (n = 212 were sent a questionnaire with established case thresholds for clinically-significant fatigue and psychological disorder, as well as a questionnaire assessing disability. Potentially relevant variables linked to fatigue states, including age, treatment modality, menopausal status, and hematological indices were recorded. The illness outcomes were assessed over 48 months of follow-up. Results The 176 women who responded to the questionnaire (84% had a mean age of 55 (range 24–83 years and had completed adjuvant treatment on average 10 (range 4.7 – 16.3 months previously. Radiotherapy had been administered, either alone (50% of women or in combination with chemotherapy (36%. Responses from 87 women (48% indicated a significant fatigue state (termed here post-cancer fatigue; PCF, and from 59 women (33% responses indicated significant psychological distress. Thirty-four women (19% were cases of fatigue alone (i.e. unaccompanied by psychological disorder, whereas 52 (30% were cases of both disorders. Multivariate analysis did not reveal any association between demographic, clinical or laboratory variables, and caseness for PCF. Self-reported functional disability was significantly associated with fatigue. Follow-up at 24, 36 and 48 months

  14. Feeling and Time: The Phenomenology of Mood Disorders, Depressive Realism, and Existential Psychotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghaemi, S. Nassir

    2007-01-01

    Phenomenological research suggests that pure manic and depressive states are less common than mixtures of the two and that the two poles of mood are characterized by opposite ways of experiencing time. In mania, the subjective experience of time is sped up and in depression it is slowed down, perhaps reflecting differences in circadian pathophysiology. The two classic mood states are also quite different in their effect on subjective awareness: manic patients lack insight into their excitation, while depressed patients are quite insightful into their unhappiness. Consequently, insight plays a major role in overdiagnosis of unipolar depression and misdiagnosis of bipolar disorder. The phenomenology of depression also is relevant to types of psychotherapies used to treat it. The depressive realism (DR) model, in contrast to the cognitive distortion model, appears to better apply to many persons with mild to moderate depressive syndromes. I suggest that existential psychotherapy is the necessary corollary of the DR model in those cases. Further, some depressive morbidities may in fact prove, after phenomenological study, to involve other mental states instead of depression. The chronic subsyndromal depression that is often the long-term consequence of treated bipolar disorder may in fact represent existential despair, rather than depression proper, again suggesting intervention with existential psychotherapeutic methods. PMID:17122410

  15. Feeling and time: the phenomenology of mood disorders, depressive realism, and existential psychotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghaemi, S Nassir

    2007-01-01

    Phenomenological research suggests that pure manic and depressive states are less common than mixtures of the two and that the two poles of mood are characterized by opposite ways of experiencing time. In mania, the subjective experience of time is sped up and in depression it is slowed down, perhaps reflecting differences in circadian pathophysiology. The two classic mood states are also quite different in their effect on subjective awareness: manic patients lack insight into their excitation, while depressed patients are quite insightful into their unhappiness. Consequently, insight plays a major role in overdiagnosis of unipolar depression and misdiagnosis of bipolar disorder. The phenomenology of depression also is relevant to types of psychotherapies used to treat it. The depressive realism (DR) model, in contrast to the cognitive distortion model, appears to better apply to many persons with mild to moderate depressive syndromes. I suggest that existential psychotherapy is the necessary corollary of the DR model in those cases. Further, some depressive morbidities may in fact prove, after phenomenological study, to involve other mental states instead of depression. The chronic sub-syndromal depression that is often the long-term consequence of treated bipolar disorder may in fact represent existential despair, rather than depression proper, again suggesting intervention with existential psychotherapeutic methods.

  16. Data Mining Approaches for Genome-Wide Association of Mood Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pirooznia, Mehdi; Seifuddin, Fayaz; Judy, Jennifer; Mahon, Pamela B.; Potash, James B.; Zandi, Peter P.

    2012-01-01

    Mood disorders are highly heritable forms of major mental illness. A major breakthrough in elucidating the genetic architecture of mood disorders was anticipated with the advent of genome-wide association studies (GWAS). However, to date few susceptibility loci have been conclusively identified. The genetic etiology of mood disorders appears to be quite complex, and as a result, alternative approaches for analyzing GWAS data are needed. Recently, a polygenic scoring approach that captures the effects of alleles across multiple loci was successfully applied to the analysis of GWAS data in schizophrenia and bipolar disorder (BP). However, this method may be overly simplistic in its approach to the complexity of genetic effects. Data mining methods are available that may be applied to analyze the high dimensional data generated by GWAS of complex psychiatric disorders. We sought to compare the performance of five data mining methods, namely, Bayesian Networks (BN), Support Vector Machine (SVM), Random Forest (RF), Radial Basis Function network (RBF), and Logistic Regression (LR), against the polygenic scoring approach in the analysis of GWAS data on BP. The different classification methods were trained on GWAS datasets from the Bipolar Genome Study (2,191 cases with BP and 1,434 controls) and their ability to accurately classify case/control status was tested on a GWAS dataset from the Wellcome Trust Case Control Consortium. The performance of the classifiers in the test dataset was evaluated by comparing area under the receiver operating characteristic curves (AUC). BN performed the best of all the data mining classifiers, but none of these did significantly better than the polygenic score approach. We further examined a subset of SNPs in genes that are expressed in the brain, under the hypothesis that these might be most relevant to BP susceptibility, but all the classifiers performed worse with this reduced set of SNPs. The discriminative accuracy of all of these

  17. Unequal depression for equal work? How the wage gap explains gendered disparities in mood disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Platt, Jonathan; Prins, Seth; Bates, Lisa; Keyes, Katherine

    2016-01-01

    Mood disorders, such as depression and anxiety, are more prevalent among women than men. This disparity may be partially due to the effects of structural gender discrimination in the work force, which acts to perpetuate gender differences in opportunities and resources and may manifest as the gender wage gap. We sought to quantify and operationalize the wage gap in order to explain the gender disparity in depression and anxiety disorders, using data from a 2001-2002 US nationally representative survey of 22,581 working adults ages 30-65. Using established Oaxaca-Blinder decomposition methods to account for gender differences in individual-level productivity, our models reduced the wage gap in our sample by 13.5%, from 54% of men's pay to 67.5% of men's pay. We created a propensity-score matched sample of productivity indicators to test if the direction of the wage gap moderated the effects of gender on depression or anxiety. Where female income was less than the matched male counterpart, odds of both disorders were significantly higher among women versus men (major depressive disorder OR: 2.43, 95% CI: 1.95-3.04; generalized anxiety disorder OR: 4.11, 95% CI: 2.80-6.02). Where female income was greater than the matched male, the higher odds ratios for women for both disorders were significantly attenuated (Major Depressive Disorder OR: 1.20; 95% CI: 0.96-1.52) (Generalized Anxiety Disorder OR: 1.5; 95% CI: 1.04-2.29). The test for effect modification by sex and wage gap direction was statistically significant for both disorders. Structural forms of discrimination may explain mental health disparities at the population level. Beyond prohibiting overt gender discrimination, policies must be created to address embedded inequalities in procedures surrounding labor markets and compensation in the workplace.

  18. Adverse childhood experiences in relation to mood and anxiety disorders in a population-based sample of active military personnel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sareen, J; Henriksen, C A; Bolton, S L; Afifi, T O; Stein, M B; Asmundson, G J G

    2013-01-01

    Although it has been posited that exposure to adverse childhood experiences (ACEs) increases vulnerability to deployment stress, previous literature in this area has demonstrated conflicting results. Using a cross-sectional population-based sample of active military personnel, the present study examined the relationship between ACEs, deployment related stressors and mood and anxiety disorders. Data were analyzed from the 2002 Canadian Community Health Survey-Canadian Forces Supplement (CCHS-CFS; n = 8340, age 18-54 years, response rate 81%). The following ACEs were self-reported retrospectively: childhood physical abuse, childhood sexual abuse, economic deprivation, exposure to domestic violence, parental divorce/separation, parental substance abuse problems, hospitalization as a child, and apprehension by a child protection service. DSM-IV mood and anxiety disorders [major depressive disorder, post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), generalized anxiety disorder (GAD), panic attacks/disorder and social phobia] were assessed using the composite international diagnostic interview (CIDI). Even after adjusting for the effects of deployment-related traumatic exposures (DRTEs), exposure to ACEs was significantly associated with past-year mood or anxiety disorder among men [adjusted odds ratio (aOR) 1.34, 99% confidence interval (CI) 1.03-1.73, p < 0.01] and women [aOR 1.37, 99% CI 1.00-1.89, p = 0.01]. Participants exposed to both ACEs and DRTEs had the highest prevalence of past-year mood or anxiety disorder in comparison to those who were exposed to either ACEs alone, DRTEs alone, or no exposure. ACEs are associated with several mood and anxiety disorders among active military personnel. Intervention strategies to prevent mental health problems should consider the utility of targeting soldiers with exposure to ACEs.

  19. Perceived relational evaluation as a predictor of self-esteem and mood in people with a psychotic disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norman, Ross M G; Windell, Deborah; Lynch, Jill; Manchanda, Rahul

    2012-05-01

    There is evidence that social support predicts self-esteem and related moods for people with psychotic disorders. However, there has been little investigation of relative importance of specific components of social support. Evidence from social psychology suggests that perceived relational evaluation (PRE) or the extent to which people see others as valuing them, is a particularly important determinant of self-esteem and mood. Our study compared the importance of PRE and other types of social support, in predicting self-esteem and depressive mood, anxiety, and anger-hostility in a sample of patients in an early intervention program for psychotic disorders. One hundred and two patients of the Prevention and Early Intervention Program for Psychoses in London, Ontario, completed measures of PRE, appraisal, tangible and general emotional social support, self-esteem, and mood. In addition, ratings of positive and negative symptoms were completed for all participants. In general, perceived relational value was the most important predictor of self-esteem and mood. These relations were not a result of confounding with positive or negative symptoms. PRE appears to be a particularly important aspect of social support in predicting self-esteem and mood states. Possible implications of these findings and future research directions are discussed.

  20. Genetic testing of children for predisposition to mood disorders: anticipating the clinical issues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erickson, Jessica A; Kuzmich, Lili; Ormond, Kelly E; Gordon, Erynn; Christman, Michael F; Cho, Mildred K; Levinson, Douglas F

    2014-08-01

    Large-scale sequencing information may provide a basis for genetic tests for predisposition to common disorders. In this study, participants in the Coriell Personalized Medicine Collaborative (N = 53) with a personal and/or family history of Major Depressive Disorder or Bipolar Disorder were interviewed based on the Health Belief Model around hypothetical intention to test one's children for probability of developing a mood disorder. Most participants (87 %) were interested in a hypothetical test for children that had high ("90 %") positive predictive value, while 51 % of participants remained interested in a modestly predictive test ("20 %"). Interest was driven by beliefs about effects of test results on parenting behaviors and on discrimination. Most participants favored testing before adolescence (64 %), and were reluctant to share results with asymptomatic children before adulthood. Participants anticipated both positive and negative effects of testing on parental treatment and on children's self-esteem. Further investigation will determine whether these findings will generalize to other complex disorders for which early intervention is possible but not clearly demonstrated to improve outcomes. More information is also needed about the effects of childhood genetic testing and sharing of results on parent-child relationships, and about the role of the child in the decision-making process.

  1. The concept of post-traumatic mood disorder and its implications for adolescent suicidal behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sher, L

    2008-12-01

    Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is a common psychiatric disorder which is frequently comorbid with major depressive disorder (MDD). It has been suggested that some or all individuals diagnosed with comorbid PTSD and MDD have a separate psychobiological condition that can be termed ''post-traumatic mood disorder'' (PTMD). The idea was based on the fact that a significant number of studies suggested that patients suffering from comorbid PTSD and MDD differed clinically and biologically from individuals with PTSD alone or MDD alone. Individuals with comorbid PTSD and MDD are characterized by greater severity of symptoms and the higher level of impairment in social and occupational functioning compared to individuals with PTSD alone or MDD alone. Neurobiological evidence supporting the concept of PTMD includes the findings from neuroendocrine challenge, cerebrospinal fluid, neuroimaging, sleep and other studies. It has been demonstrated that child abuse increases the risk for PTSD, MDD, and suicidal behavior in adolescents and adults. Many victims of childhood abuse develop comorbid PTSD and depression, i.e., they develop PTMD. PTMD is associated with suicidal behavior. The link between childhood abuse, suicidal behavior in adolescents and PTMD indicates that it is important to develop interventions to prevent PTMD in victims of child abuse; to develop measures to prevent suicidal behavior in adolescents with PTMD; and to study psychobiology of PTMD in order to develop treatments for PTMD. Priorities for intervening to reduce adolescent suicidal behavior lie with interventions focused upon the improved recognition, treatment and management of adolescents with psychiatric disorders including PTMD.

  2. Telemonitoring with respect to Mood Disorders and Information and Communication Technologies: Overview and Presentation of the PSYCHE Project

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hervé Javelot

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper reviews what we know about prediction in relation to mood disorders from the perspective of clinical, biological, and physiological markers. It then also presents how information and communication technologies have developed in the field of mood disorders, from the first steps, for example, the transition from paper and pencil to more sophisticated methods, to the development of ecological momentary assessment methods and, more recently, wearable systems. These recent developments have paved the way for the use of integrative approaches capable of assessing multiple variables. The PSYCHE project stands for Personalised monitoring SYstems for Care in mental HEalth.

  3. Telemonitoring with respect to mood disorders and information and communication technologies: overview and presentation of the PSYCHE project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Javelot, Hervé; Spadazzi, Anne; Weiner, Luisa; Garcia, Sonia; Gentili, Claudio; Kosel, Markus; Bertschy, Gilles

    2014-01-01

    This paper reviews what we know about prediction in relation to mood disorders from the perspective of clinical, biological, and physiological markers. It then also presents how information and communication technologies have developed in the field of mood disorders, from the first steps, for example, the transition from paper and pencil to more sophisticated methods, to the development of ecological momentary assessment methods and, more recently, wearable systems. These recent developments have paved the way for the use of integrative approaches capable of assessing multiple variables. The PSYCHE project stands for Personalised monitoring SYstems for Care in mental HEalth.

  4. Addressing access barriers to services for mothers at risk for perinatal mood disorders: A social work perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keefe, Robert H; Brownstein-Evans, Carol; Rouland Polmanteer, Rebecca S

    2016-01-01

    This article identifies variables at the micro/individual, mezzo/partner/spouse and family, and macro/health care-system levels that inhibit mothers at risk for perinatal mood disorders from accessing health and mental health care services. Specific recommendations are made for conducting thorough biopsychosocial assessments that address the mothers' micro-, mezzo-, and macro-level contexts. Finally, the authors provide suggestions for how to intervene at the various levels to remove access barriers for mothers living with perinatal mood disorders as well as their families.

  5. Comparing Executive Function and Behavioral Inhibition in Schizophrenia, Bipolar Mood Disorder Type I and Normal Groups

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marziye Khodaee

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Cognitive performance in patients with schizophrenia and Bipolar I disorder seems to be different from the normal individuals, that these defects affect their treatment results. Therefore, this study aimed to compare executive function and behavioral inhibition within patients suffering from schizophrenia, bipolar type I as well as a normal group. Methods: In this descriptive-comparative study, out of all patients hospitalized in daily psychiatric clinic in Najafabad in 2014 due to these disorders, 20 schizophrenia and 20 bipolar type I as well as 20 normal individuals were selected via the convinience sampling. All the study participants completed the computerizing tests including Tower of London and Go-No Go. The study data were analyzed utilizing SPSS software (ver 22 via MANOVA. Results: The study findings revealed a significant difference between the two patient groups and the normal group in regard with executive function and behavioral inhibition (p<0.05, whereas no differences were detected between schizophrenics and bipolar patient groups. Furthermore, patients suffering from schizophrenia and bipolar I mood disorder demonstrated significantly poor performance in cognitive function and behavioral inhibition compared to the normal group. Conclusion: The present study results can be significantly applied in pathology and therapy of these disorders, so as recognizing the inability of such patients can be effective in developing cognitive rehabilitation programs in these patients.

  6. The neuropsychiatry of multiple sclerosis: focus on disorders of mood, affect and behaviour.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paparrigopoulos, Thomas; Ferentinos, Panagiotis; Kouzoupis, Anastasios; Koutsis, George; Papadimitriou, George N

    2010-01-01

    Neuropsychiatric symptoms are common in multiple sclerosis (MS). They include two broad categories of disturbances: abnormalities in cognition, and abnormalities of mood, affect and behaviour. The present review deals with the epidemiology, clinical features, etiology and treatment of disturbances included in the second category, i.e., major depression, fatigue and sleep disorders, bipolar disorder, euphoria, pathological laughing and crying, anxiety, psychosis and personality changes. Major depression is one of the most common neuropsychiatric disorders in MS with an approximate 50% lifetime prevalence rate. Early recognition and management of depression in MS is of major importance because it is a key predictor of morbidity, mortality, quality of life, possibly physical outcome and disease exacerbations, adherence to immunomodulatory treatments and suicide risk in MS patients, as well as of the caregiver's distress and quality of life. The etiopathogenesis of neuropsychiatric disorders in MS has been incompletely investigated. It is postulated that a complex interplay of biological, disease-related, behavioural and psychosocial factors contribute to the pathophysiology of most of them. Management of neuropsychiatric symptoms in MS is often effective, although commonly based on evidence provided by case studies and uncontrolled trials. A comprehensive biopsychosocial neuropsychiatric approach is essential for the optimal care of patients with MS.

  7. Effects of erythropoietin on memory-relevant neurocircuitry activity and recall in mood disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miskowiak, K W; Macoveanu, J; Vinberg, M; Assentoft, E; Randers, L; Harmer, C J; Ehrenreich, H; Paulson, O B; Knudsen, G M; Siebner, H R; Kessing, L V

    2016-09-01

    Erythropoietin (EPO) improves verbal memory and reverses subfield hippocampal volume loss across depression and bipolar disorder (BD). This study aimed to investigate with functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) whether these effects were accompanied by functional changes in memory-relevant neuro-circuits in this cohort. Eighty-four patients with treatment-resistant unipolar depression who were moderately depressed or BD in remission were randomized to eight weekly EPO (40 000 IU) or saline infusions in a double-blind, parallel-group design. Participants underwent whole-brain fMRI at 3T, mood ratings, and blood tests at baseline and week 14. During fMRI, participants performed a picture encoding task followed by postscan recall. Sixty-two patients had complete data (EPO: N = 32, saline: N = 30). EPO improved picture recall and increased encoding-related activity in dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (dlPFC) and temporo-parietal regions, but not in hippocampus. Recall correlated with activity in the identified dlPFC and temporo-parietal regions at baseline, and change in recall correlated with activity change in these regions from baseline to follow-up across the entire cohort. The effects of EPO were not correlated with change in mood, red blood cells, blood pressure, or medication. The findings highlight enhanced encoding-related dlPFC and temporo-parietal activity as key neuronal underpinnings of EPO-associated memory improvement. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Pituitary gigantism presenting with depressive mood disorder and diabetic ketoacidosis in an Asian adolescent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuo, Sheng-Fong; Chuang, Wen-Yu; Ng, Sohching; Chen, Chih-Hung; Chang, Chen-Nen; Chou, Chi-Hsiang; Weng, Wei-Chieh; Yeh, Chih-Hua; Lin, Jen-Der

    2013-01-01

    Hyperglycemia is seldom described in young patients with pituitary gigantism. Here, we describe the case of a 17-year-old Taiwanese boy who developed depressive mood disorder and diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) at the presentation of pituitary gigantism. The boy complained of lethargy and dysphoric mood in June 2008. He presented at the emergency department with epigastralgia and dyspnea in January 2009. Results of laboratory tests suggested type 1 diabetes mellitus with DKA. However, serum C-peptide level was normal on follow-up. Although he had no obvious features of acral enlargement, a high level of insulin-like growth factor 1 was detected, and a 75 g oral glucose suppression test showed no suppression of serum growth hormone levels. A pituitary macroadenoma was found on subsequent magnetic resonance imaging. The pituitary adenoma was surgically removed, followed by gamma-knife radiosurgery, and Sandostatin long-acting release treatment. He was then administered metformin, 500 mg twice daily, and to date, his serum glycohemoglobin has been <7%.

  9. Depressed visual field and mood are associated with sleep disorder in glaucoma patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayaki, Masahiko; Shiba, Daisuke; Negishi, Kazuno; Tsubota, Kazuo

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate sleep and mood disorders and related ocular parameters in glaucoma patients. We focused on visual fields and the retinal nerve fibre layer, because decreased circadian photoreception by damaged intrinsically photosensitive retinal ganglion cells is suspected in glaucoma. A cross-sectional study was performed on 140 subjects: 69 with glaucoma and 71 normal controls. Individuals with cataract, dry eye, or retinal pathology were excluded from the study. Participants completed the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI) and Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS) and underwent comprehensive ophthalmological examinations for glaucoma. Patients with advanced glaucoma had significantly worse PSQI scores than normal controls (P < 0.05). Stepwise multivariate linear regression analysis revealed PSQI was significantly correlated with the mean deviation in the worse eye, the number and frequency of medications, and anxiety and depression subscores of the HADS after adjustment for age and sex (P < 0.05). We did not find a significant correlation between PSQI scores and the thickness of retinal nerve fibre layer. In conclusion, the subjective sleep quality of glaucoma patients was correlated with visual field loss and mood status. PMID:27168309

  10. Weight Gain and Metabolic Effects of Mood Stabilizers and Antipsychotics in Pediatric Bipolar Disorder: A Systematic Review and Pooled Analysis of Short-Term Trials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Correll, Christoph U.

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To review weight and metabolic effects of mood-stabilizing treatments in pediatric bipolar disorder. Method: Systematic PubMed/Medline search of studies reporting on change in weight and/or glucose/lipid values with mood-stabilizing drugs in at least nine pediatric patients with bipolar disorder. Results: Nineteen studies, including 24…

  11. Personality disorder symptom severity predicts onset of mood episodes and conversion to bipolar I disorder in individuals with bipolar spectrum disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Tommy H; Burke, Taylor A; Stange, Jonathan P; Walshaw, Patricia D; Weiss, Rachel B; Urosevic, Snezana; Abramson, Lyn Y; Alloy, Lauren B

    2017-04-01

    Although personality disorders (PDs) are highly comorbid with bipolar spectrum disorders (BSDs), little longitudinal research has been conducted to examine the prospective impact of PD symptoms on the course of BSDs. The aim of this study is to examine whether PD symptom severity predicts shorter time to onset of bipolar mood episodes and conversion to bipolar I disorder over time among individuals with less severe BSDs. Participants (n = 166) with bipolar II disorder, cyclothymia, or bipolar disorder not otherwise specified completed diagnostic interview assessments of PD symptoms and self-report measures of mood symptoms at baseline. They were followed prospectively with diagnostic interviews every 4 months for an average of 3.02 years. Cox proportional hazard regression analyses indicated that overall PD symptom severity significantly predicted shorter time to onset of hypomanic (hazard ratio [HR] = 1.42; p conversion to bipolar I disorder (HR = 2.51; p conversion to bipolar I disorder (HR = 2.77; p < .001), whereas cluster C severity (HR = 1.56; p < .001) predicted shorter time to onset of major depressive episodes. These results support predisposition models in suggesting that PD symptoms may act as a risk factor for a more severe course of BSDs. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved).

  12. Electronic self-monitoring of mood using IT platforms in adult patients with bipolar disorder: A systematic review of the validity and evidence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Faurholt-Jepsen, Maria; Munkholm, Klaus; Frost, Mads

    2016-01-01

    in the majority of studies. Conclusions: Electronic self-monitoring of mood in depression appears to be a valid measure of mood in contrast to self-monitoring of mood in mania. There are yet few studies on the effect of electronic self-monitoring of mood in bipolar disorder. The evidence of electronic self......Background: Various paper-based mood charting instruments are used in the monitoring of symptoms in bipolar disorder. During recent years an increasing number of electronic self-monitoring tools have been developed. The objectives of this systematic review were 1) to evaluate the validity...... of electronic self-monitoring tools as a method of evaluating mood compared to clinical rating scales for depression and mania and 2) to investigate the effect of electronic self-monitoring tools on clinically relevant outcomes in bipolar disorder. Methods: A systematic review of the scientific literature...

  13. Anger and parent-to-child aggression in mood and anxiety disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mammen, O K; Pilkonis, P A; Kolko, D J

    2000-01-01

    The relationship between anger and parent-to-child aggression (PTCA) was examined in mothers presenting for treatment of mood and anxiety disorders, because parental anger may have adverse effects on children and anger may decrease with treatment. Anger's role as mediator and moderator of the effects of the following predictors on PTCA was assessed: depression, anxiety, and ecologic variables that can induce or buffer against stress (partner verbal aggression, satisfaction with and perceived availability of social support, socioeconomic status, and number of children). Anger was found to mediate the effects of depression, partner verbal aggression, satisfaction with social support, and number of children on PTCA. Anger also had significant effects on PTCA after controlling for these variables. The other predictors did not have effects on PTCA, and anger did not moderate their effects. If replicated, these findings suggest the importance of examining whether treatment to reduce parental anger will reduce PTCA.

  14. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor in mood disorders and antidepressant treatments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castrén, Eero; Kojima, Masami

    2017-01-01

    Levels of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) are reduced in the brain and serum of depressed patients and at least the reduction in serum levels is reversible upon successful treatment. These data, together with a wealth of reports using different animal models with depression-like behavior or manipulation of expression of BDNF or its receptor TrkB have implicated BDNF in the pathophysiology of depression as well as in the mechanism of action of antidepressant treatments. Recent findings have shown that posttranslational processing of BDNF gene product can yield different molecular entities that differently influence signaling through BNDF receptor TrkB and the pan-neurotrophin receptor p75(NTR). We will here review these data and discuss new insights into the possible pathophysiological roles of those new BDNF subtypes as well as recent findings on the role of BDNF mediated neuronal plasticity in mood disorders and their treatments.

  15. Deficits in Attention to Emotional Stimuli Distinguish Youth with Severe Mood Dysregulation from Youth with Bipolar Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rich, Brendan A.; Brotman, Melissa A.; Dickstein, Daniel P.; Mitchell, Derek G. V.; Blair, R. James R.; Leibenluft, Ellen

    2010-01-01

    Studying attention in the context of emotional stimuli may aid in differentiating pediatric bipolar disorder (BD) from severe mood dysregulation (SMD). SMD is characterized by chronic irritability, arousal, and hyper-reactivity; SMD youth frequently receive a BD diagnosis although they do not meet DSM-IV criteria for BD because they lack manic…

  16. The association between self-reported and clinically determined hypomanic symptoms and the onset of major mood disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preisig, Martin; Gholamrezaee, Mehdi; Grof, Paul; Angst, Jules; Duffy, Anne

    2017-01-01

    Background Hypomanic symptoms may be a useful predictor of mood disorder among young people at high risk for bipolar disorder. Aims To determine whether hypomanic symptoms differentiate offspring of parents with bipolar disorder (high risk) and offspring of well parents (control) and predict the development of mood episodes. Method High-risk and control offspring were prospectively assessed using semi-structured clinical interviews annually and completed the Hypomania Checklist-32 Revised (HCL-32). Clinically significant sub-threshold hypomanic symptoms (CSHS) were coded. Results HCL-32 total and active or elated scores were higher in control compared with high-risk offspring, whereas 14% of high-risk and 0% of control offspring had CSHS. High-risk offspring with CSHS had a fivefold increased risk of developing recurrent major depression (P=0.0002). The median onset of CSHS in high-risk offspring was 16.4 (6–31) years and was before the onset of major mood episodes. Conclusions CSHS are precursors to major mood episodes in high-risk offspring and could identify individuals at ultra-high risk for developing bipolar disorder. Declaration of interest None. Copyright and usage © The Royal College of Psychiatrists 2017. This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Non-Commercial, No Derivatives (CC BY-NC-ND) license.

  17. Stressful life events and onset of mood disorders in children of bipolar parents during 14-month follow-up

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wals, M; Hillegers, MHJ; Reichart, CG; Verhulst, FC; Nolen, WA; Ormel, J

    2005-01-01

    Background: Although multiple studies have examined the association between stressful life events (SLEs) and the development of mood disorders, the exact nature of the association and the degree to which it is independent from familial loading (FL) and gender-specific are still not fully elucidated.

  18. Cross-Sectional and Longitudinal Abnormalities in Brain Structure in Children with Severe Mood Dysregulation or Bipolar Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adleman, Nancy E.; Fromm, Stephen J.; Razdan, Varun; Kayser, Reilly; Dickstein, Daniel P.; Brotman, Melissa A.; Pine, Daniel S.; Leibenluft, Ellen

    2012-01-01

    Background: There is debate as to whether chronic irritability (operationalized as severe mood dysregulation, SMD) is a developmental form of bipolar disorder (BD). Although structural brain abnormalities in BD have been demonstrated, no study compares neuroanatomy among SMD, BD, and healthy volunteers (HV) either cross-sectionally or over time.…

  19. French antecedents of "contemporary" concepts in the American Psychiatric Association's classification of bipolar (mood) disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haustgen, Thierry; Akiskal, Hagop

    2006-12-01

    Although first detailed descriptions of what we today term "bipolar disorders" are generally attributed to E. Kraepelin [Kraepelin, E., 1899 (1976 tr). Manic depressive insanity and paranoia. (reprint of English translation). Arno, New York], a review of French psychiatric literature from Esquirol to the middle of 20th century reveals major clinical contributions to the development of the concept of cyclic mood disorders, their phenomenology and classification as embodied in DSM-IV. The main treatise was published by the Paris psychiatric schools of Salpêtrière, Bicêtre, Charenton, Sainte-Anne and Vanves. Already much before Kraepelin, French authors had described most symptoms and the course of future DSM-IV bipolar, manic, major depressive [Falret, J.-P., 1854. De la folie circulaire ou forme de maladie mentale caracterisée par l'alternative régulière de la manie et de la mélancolie, Bull. Acad. Méd. XIX, 382-400.; Baillarger, J., 1854. Note sur un genre de folie dont les accès sont caractérisés par deux périodes régulières, l'une de dépression, l'autre d'excitation, Bull. Acad. Méd. XIX, 340 et Ann. Méd. Psychol. XII, 369], hypomanic and mixed episodes [Falret, J., 1861. Principes à suivre dans la classification des maladies mentales, Ann. Méd. Psychol. XIX, 145.; Falret, J., 1866, 1867. La folie raisonnante ou folie morale, Ann. Méd. Psychol. XXIV, 382, XXV, 68], as well as - under other names - the characteristics of bipolar II disorder, various specifiers describing mood episode and course of recurrent episodes [Ritti, A., 1883. Traité clinique de la folie à double forme (folie, circulaire, délire à formes alternes). Doin, Paris]. The synthesis of these clinical observations led to Magnan's "intermittent madness" (1893), a precursor of Kraepelin's "manic-depressive psychosis". After 1899, French authors generally adhered to their classification of autonomous depressive disorder (melancholia), as distinct from manic-depressive insanity

  20. The underlying neurobiology of key functional domains in young people with mood and anxiety disorders: a systematic review

    OpenAIRE

    Iorfino, Frank; Hickie, Ian B.; Lee, Rico S C; Lagopoulos, Jim; Daniel F Hermens

    2016-01-01

    Background Mood and anxiety disorders are leading causes of disability and mortality, due largely to their onset during adolescence and young adulthood and broader impact on functioning. Key factors that are associated with disability and these disorders in young people are social and economic participation (e.g. education, employment), physical health, suicide and self-harm behaviours, and alcohol and substance use. A better understanding of the objective markers (i.e. neurobiological parame...

  1. Mood disorder with mixed, psychotic features due to vitamin b12 deficiency in an adolescent: case report

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Vitamin B12 is one of the essential vitamins affecting various systems of the body. Reports of psychiatric disorders due to its deficiency mostly focus on middle aged and elderly patients. Here we report a case of vitamin B 12 deficiency in a 16-year old, male adolescent who presented with mixed mood disorder symptoms with psychotic features. Chief complaints were “irritability, regressive behavior, apathy, crying and truancy” which lasted for a year. Premorbid personality was unrema...

  2. Hypomania spectrum disorder in adolescence : a 15-year follow-up of non-mood morbidity in adulthood

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    Background: We investigated whether adolescents with hypomania spectrum episodes have an excess risk of mental and physical morbidity in adulthood, as compared with adolescents exclusively reporting major depressive disorder (MDD) and controls without a history of adolescent mood disorders. Methods: A community sample of adolescents (N = 2 300) in the town of Uppsala, Sweden, was screened for depressive symptoms. Both participants with positive screening and matched controls (in total 631) we...

  3. The link between neurosteroids and syndromic/syndromal components of the mood spectrum disorders in women during the premenstrual phase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dell'Osso Liliana

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objectives Females with a lifetime diagnosis of major mood disorder (Bipolar Disorder BD, Major Depressive Disorder MMD investigated during the luteal phase of their menstrual cycle and in a condition of clinical well-being showed higher blood serum concentrations of progesterone and allopregnanolone compared to healthy controls. Women with BD presented even higher levels than those affected by MDD. This study attempted to verify, in line with a dimensional approach, if the possible differences in neurohormonal levels may be directly linked to some syndromal clusters (dimensions of the mood spectrum disorders indipendently of diagnosis. Methods Premenstrual concentrations of allopregnanolone, THDOC, progesterone, and cortisol were measured in 3 groups of women: 17 BD and 14 MDD outpatients, and 16 control subjects. Psychiatric evaluation was performed with the SCID-I interview and the SCI-MOODS-SR questionnaire. The correlation between steroid levels and mood disorder syndromal cluster (SCI-MOODS-SR domains and sub-domains was evaluated by means of analysis of main components with Varimax rotation and Kaiser's normalization (which provided for inclusion of all components with an Eigen value >1. Results Analysis of the main components evidenced the presence of 3 components: 1 mania, 2 depression both with mixed component 3 steroid + manic cognitivity and suicidal ideas. Conclusion Levels of allopregnanolone and progesterone do not correlate with the association of the depressive and manic syndromes, but rather with mixed symptomatological aspects, and in particular with cognitive manic and depressive (with suicidal thoughts dimensions. Further studies should be carried out to confirm these findings.

  4. Epigenetic modifications associated with suicide and common mood and anxiety disorders: a systematic review of the literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    El-Sayed Abdulrahman M

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Epigenetic modifications are those reversible, mitotically heritable alterations in genomic expression that occur independent of changes in gene sequence. Epigenetic studies have the potential to improve our understanding of the etiology of mood and anxiety disorders and suicide by bridging the gap in knowledge between the exogenous environmental exposures and pathophysiology that produce common mood and anxiety disorders and suicide. We systematically reviewed the English-language peer-reviewed literature about epigenetic regulation in these disorders between 2001–2011, summarizing and synthesizing this literature with respect to directions for future work. Twenty-one articles met our inclusion criteria. Twelve studies were concerned with epigenetic changes among suicide completers; other studies considered epigenetic regulation in depression, post-traumatic stress disorder, and panic disorder. Several studies focused on epigenetic regulation of amine, glucocorticoid, and serotonin metabolism in the production of common mood and anxiety disorders and suicide. The literature is nascent and has yet to reach consensus about the roles of particular epigenetic modifications in the etiology of these outcomes. Future studies require larger sample sizes and measurements of environmental exposures antecedent to epigenetic modification. Further work is also needed to clarify the link between epigenetic modifications in the brain and peripheral tissues and to establish ‘gold standard’ epigenetic assays.

  5. Current Mood Symptoms Do Not Affect the Accuracy of Retrospective Self-Ratings of Childhood ADHD Symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grogan, Katie; Bramham, Jessica

    2016-12-01

    Given that the diagnosis of adulthood ADHD depends on the retrospective self-report of childhood ADHD symptoms, this study aimed to establish whether current mood affects the accuracy of retrospective self-ratings of childhood ADHD. Barkley's Adult ADHD Rating Scale (BAARS) was used to assess the retrospective self- and parent-reports of childhood ADHD symptoms of 160 adults with ADHD and 92 adults without ADHD. Self-rated current mood was also measured using the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS). Higher BAARS self-ratings correlated with higher HADS self-ratings. Strongest correlations were evident between hyperactive/impulsive symptoms and anxiety symptoms. There was no relationship between current mood and accuracy of self-report. Current mood does not affect the accuracy of retrospective self-ratings of ADHD. Future research should aim to provide new measures of anxiety in ADHD to avoid the double counting of hyperactive/impulsive and anxiety symptoms. © The Author(s) 2014.

  6. The 2014 Survey on Living with Chronic Diseases in Canada on Mood and Anxiety Disorders: a methodological overview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. O’Donnell

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: There is a paucity of information about the impact of mood and anxiety disorders on Canadians and the approaches used to manage them. To address this gap, the 2014 Survey on Living with Chronic Diseases in Canada–Mood and Anxiety Disorders Component (SLCDC-MA was developed. The purpose of this paper is to describe the methodology of the 2014 SLCDC-MA and examine the sociodemographic characteristics of the final sample. Methods: The 2014 SLCDC-MA is a cross-sectional follow-up survey that includes Canadians from the 10 provinces aged 18 years and older with mood and/or anxiety disorders diagnosed by a health professional that are expected to last, or have already lasted, six months or more. The survey was developed by the Public Health Agency of Canada (PHAC through an iterative, consultative process with Statistics Canada and external experts. Statistics Canada performed content testing, designed the sampling frame and strategies and collected and processed the data. PHAC used descriptive analyses to describe the respondents’ sociodemographic characteristics, produced nationally representative estimates using survey weights provided by Statistics Canada, and generated variance estimates using bootstrap methodology. Results: The final 2014 SLCDC-MA sample consists of a total of 3361 respondents (68.9% response rate. Among Canadian adults with mood and/or anxiety disorders, close to two-thirds (64% were female, over half (56% were married/in a common-law relationship and 60% obtained a post-secondary education. Most were young or middle-aged (85%, Canadian born (88%, of non-Aboriginal status (95%, and resided in an urban setting (82%. Household income was fairly evenly distributed between the adequacy quintiles; however, individuals were more likely to report a household income adequacy within the lowest (23% versus highest (17% quintile. Forty-five percent reported having a mood disorder only, 24% an anxiety disorder only and 31

  7. Induced abortion and anxiety, mood, and substance abuse disorders: isolating the effects of abortion in the national comorbidity survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coleman, Priscilla K; Coyle, Catherine T; Shuping, Martha; Rue, Vincent M

    2009-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine associations between abortion history and a wide range of anxiety (panic disorder, panic attacks, PTSD, Agoraphobia), mood (bipolar disorder, mania, major depression), and substance abuse disorders (alcohol and drug abuse and dependence) using a nationally representative US sample, the national comorbidity survey. Abortion was found to be related to an increased risk for a variety of mental health problems (panic attacks, panic disorder, agoraphobia, PTSD, bipolar disorder, major depression with and without hierarchy), and substance abuse disorders after statistical controls were instituted for a wide range of personal, situational, and demographic variables. Calculation of population attributable risks indicated that abortion was implicated in between 4.3% and 16.6% of the incidence of these disorders. Future research is needed to identify mediating mechanisms linking abortion to various disorders and to understand individual difference factors associated with vulnerability to developing a particular mental health problem after abortion.

  8. Screening the risk of bipolar spectrum disorders: Validity evidence of the Mood Disorder Questionnaire in adolescents and young adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fonseca-Pedrero, Eduardo; Ortuño-Sierra, Javier; Paino, Mercedes; Muñiz, José

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to gather sources of validity evidence of the Mood Disorder Questionnaire (MDQ) in young adults for its use as a screening tool for bipolar spectrum disorders. The sample was composed of 1,002 participants, 268 men (26.7%). The mean age of participants was 21.1 years (SD=3.9). The results showed that between 3 and 59% of the sample reported some hypomanic experience. Gender differences were found in the total score of the MDQ. The analysis of the internal structure by exploratory factor analysis yielded 2 factors, called Energy-Activity and Disinhibition-Attention. This dimensional structure was replicated in the exploratory structural equation modeling (ESEM), and also had factorial equivalence by gender. Participants who met the cut-off points of the MDQ reported a worse perceived mental health status and more consummatory and anticipatory pleasure, compared to the low scores group. These findings indicate that the MDQ has adequate psychometric properties in non-clinical samples, and could be useful as a screening tool in psychopathology, with the possibility of optimizing strategies for early identification and prevention in individuals at high risk for bipolar disorders. Future studies should further explore the role of subclinical bipolar phenotype and conduct longitudinal studies in samples of the general population.

  9. Cytokine variations and mood disorders: influence of social stressors and social support

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marie-Claude eAudet

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Stressful events have been implicated in the evolution of mood disorders. In addition to brain neurotransmitters and growth factors, the view has been offered that these disorders might be provoked by the activation of the inflammatory immune system as well as by de novo changes of inflammatory cytokines within the brain. The present review describes the impact of social stressors in animals and in humans on behavioral changes reminiscent of depressive states as well as on cytokine functioning. Social stressors increase pro-inflammatory cytokines in circulation as well as in brain regions that have been associated with depression, varying with the animal’s social status and/or behavioral methods used to contend with social challenges. Likewise, in humans, social stressors that favor the development of depression are accompanied by elevated circulating cytokine levels and conversely, conditions that limit the cytokine elevations correlated with symptoms attenuation or reversal. The implications of these findings are discussed in relation to the potentially powerful effects of social support, social identity, and connectedness in maintaining well-being and in diminishing symptoms of depression.

  10. The Use of Antiepileptic Drugs (AEDs for the Treatment of Pediatric Aggression and Mood Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph Gonzalez-Heydrich

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Aggressive symptomatology presents across multiple psychiatric, developmental, neurological and behavioral disorders, complicating the diagnosis and treatment of the underlying pathology. Anti-Epileptic Drugs (AEDs have become an appealing alternative in the treatment of aggression, mood lability and impulsivity in adult and pediatric populations, although few controlled trials have explored their efficacy in treating pediatric populations. This review of the literature synthesizes the available data on ten AEDs – valproate, carbamazepine, oxcarbazepine, phenytoin, lamotrigine, topiramate, levetiracetam, zonisamide, gabapentin and tiagabine – in an attempt to assess evidence for the efficacy of AEDs in the treatment of aggression in pediatric populations. Our review revealed modest evidence that some of the AEDs produced improvement in pediatric aggression, but controlled trials in pediatric bipolar disorder have not been promising. Valproate is the best supported AED for aggression and should be considered as a first line of treatment. When monotherapy is insufficient, combining an AED with either lithium or an atypical anti-psychotic can result in better efficacy. Additionally, our review indicates that medications with predominately GABA-ergic mechanisms of action are not effective in treating aggression, and medications which decrease glutaminergic transmission tended to have more cognitive adverse effects. Agents with multiple mechanisms of action may be more effective.

  11. ANALYSIS OF THE CURRENT STATUS OF INTERNET USE AND MOOD DISORDER AMONG MIDDLE-SCHOOL STUDENTS IN SCHOOLS OF XINXIANG%新乡市在校中学生网络成瘾现状及其情绪障碍分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    潘苗; 张三强; 张秀丽; 穆俊林; 张瑞岭

    2011-01-01

    [目的]了解新乡市中学生网络成瘾(IAD)的现状及其与情绪障碍的关系. [方法]采用网络一般使用情况问卷、网络成瘾诊断问卷(YDQ)、焦虑和抑郁自评量表(SAS、SDS)对新乡市5所学校6 500名中学生进行问卷调查. [结果]有效问卷5 804份(93.0%),检出网络成瘾102例,男79例(2.902%),女性23例(0.746%),差异有统计学意义(x2=38.915,P=0.000);职高检出率高于普通中学,差异有统计学意义(x2=19.427,P=0.000);SAS和SDS评分,IAD组明显高于对照组(P< 0.001),且IAD组中有焦虑抑郁情绪的患者的例数明显高于对照组(x2=3 325.788,P=0.000).[结论]性别、学校类型、焦虑、抑郁情绪是中学生网络成瘾的相关因素,网络成瘾对中学生情绪存在明显影响,应引起社会的高度重视,并及时采取有效措施进行干预.%[Objective] To investigate on internet use and mood disorder among middle-school students in various schools of Xinxiang. [Methods] By using the questionnaire on YDQ, SAS and SDS, 6 500 middle school students from different middle-schools in Xinciang were investigated. [Results] Among 5 804 (93.0%) middle-school students, 102 were diagnosed as IAD. The prevalence rate of IAD among female students was lower than that among male students and with significant difference (x2 = 38.915, P = 0.000); the prevalence in vocational senior schools was higher than that in ordinary senior schools (x2 = 19.427, P - 0.000). In IAD group, SAS and SDS scores were significantly higher than in control group (P < 0.001); In IAD group, the number of anxiety and depression was significantly more than that in control group (x2= 3 325.788, P = 0.000). [Conclusion] Internet addiction of middle-school students is associated significantly with the gender, the type of school, anxiety and depression problem. Internet addiction obviously affects emotion of middle-school students. Enough attention should be paid to the negative effects in mood disorder

  12. Transdiagnostic treatment using a unified protocol: application for patients with a range of comorbid mood and anxiety disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Claudia C. de Ornelas Maia

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the effectiveness of a unified cognitive-behavioral therapy protocol for group treatment of patients with a range of comorbid mood and anxiety disorders. METHODS: In this open-trial study, the unified protocol was followed for the psychotherapeutic treatment of 16 patients with comorbid mood and anxiety disorders, confirmed by the Mini International Neuropsychiatric Interview. Beck Depression and Anxiety Inventories, the World Health Organization Quality of Life evaluation instrument, and the ARIZONA scale of sexual function were used to evaluate progress in patients throughout the therapeutic process. RESULTS: All patients showed unipolar depressive disorder. Comorbidity with anxiety disorders was distributed as follows: generalized anxiety disorder, 13 (81.3%; panic disorder, 3 (18.8%; social anxiety disorder, 1 (6.3%; and post-traumatic stress disorder, 1 (6.3%. Improvement was observed in the signs and symptoms of depression (F = 78.62, p < 0.001 and anxiety (F = 19.64, p < 0.001, overall quality of life (F = 39.72, p < 0.001, physical domain (F = 28.15, p < 0.001, psychological variables (F = 9.90, p = 0.007, social functioning (F = 36.86, p < 0.001, environmental variables (F = 27.63, p < 0.001, and sexuality (F = 13.13; p < 0.005. All parameters showed highly significant correlations (p < 0.01. CONCLUSION: An effort to establish one unified treatment protocol for a whole family of emotional disorders (primarily mood and anxiety disorders showed benefits in the field of clinical psychology and for the treatment of patients. No other data were found in the literature describing the implementation of the unified protocol in a transdiagnostic group. Our results revealed statistically significant improvement in all variables, suggesting that the protocol proposed can become an important tool to improve quality of life, sexuality, and anxiety/depression symptoms in patients with different diagnoses.

  13. Rates of Detection of Mood and Anxiety Disorders in Primary Care: A Descriptive, Cross-Sectional Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vermani, Monica; Marcus, Madalyn; Katzman, Martin A.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To determine the incidence of major depressive disorder, bipolar disorder, panic disorder, social anxiety disorder, and generalized anxiety disorder and to assess their detection rates in the Canadian primary care setting. Method: The descriptive, cross-sectional study was conducted in 7 primary care clinics in 3 Canadian provinces, Ontario, British Columbia, and Nova Scotia, from December 6, 2005, to May 5, 2006. Patients in clinic waiting rooms who consented to participate in the study were administered the Mini International Neuropsychiatric Interview (MINI) (N = 840). These patients' medical charts were then reviewed for evidence of previous diagnosis of a mood or anxiety disorder. Misdiagnosis was defined as cases for which a diagnosis was reached on the MINI but not in the patient's chart. Results: Of the 840 primary care patients assessed, 27.2%, 11.4%, 12.6%, 31.2%, and 16.5% of patients met criteria for major depressive disorder, bipolar disorder, panic disorder, generalized anxiety disorder, and social anxiety disorder, respectively. Misdiagnosis rates reached 65.9% for major depressive disorder, 92.7% for bipolar disorder, 85.8% for panic disorder, 71.0% for generalized anxiety disorder, and 97.8% for social anxiety disorder. Conclusions: With high prevalence rates and poor detection, there is an obvious need to enhance diagnostic screening in the primary care setting. PMID:21977354

  14. [Clinical characteristics of patients with workplace-associated mood disorder --comparison with non-workplace-associated group].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okazaki, Tsubasa; Kato, Satoshi

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe the clinical characteristics of patients with workplace-associated mood disorder. We conducted a clinical survey involving 84 clinical cases (regular employees suffering from mood disorder) who were hospitalized in the Psychiatry Department of Jichi Medical University Hospital, for a period over 8 years and 4 months between April 1st, 2000 and July 31st, 2008. The size of the workplace-associated group as a percentage of those patients in whom the onset of the symptom was occasioned by an evident issue at their workplace was 65%. This rate accounted for 74% of the total patients if clinical cases in which an evident issue at the workplace served as a significant trigger for the symptom were added to these patients in the case of an initial episode in the "non-workplace associated group". In the workplace-associated group, cases in which the premorbid character was a "depression-related personality" comprised only 42%, and was noticeably characterized by a perfection-oriented habit, enthusiastic character, conformity with other people, etc. Furthermore, the percentage of patients who were diagnosed with a "depression-related personality" comprised only 59% of the "overworked group", in which a heavy workload was evident in the workplace-associated group. In the workplace-associated group, the percentage of cases involving managerial workers was significantly high; their rate as initial cases was significantly high, as well the proportion of favorable outcomes. In the workplace-associated group, the percentage of patients who showed unambiguous depression at the initial stage was significantly low. Likewise, a similar result was obtained in the overworked group. Workplace-associated mood disorder today tends to have a stress-related aspect, or aspect of adjustment disorder. There was a period in many cases during which the main symptoms were insomnia, headache, panic attack, etc., prior to the onset of unambiguous depression

  15. The association between cannabis use and mood disorders: A longitudinal study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feingold, Daniel; Weiser, Mark; Rehm, Jürgen; Lev-Ran, Shaul

    2015-02-01

    The association between cannabis use and mood disorders is well documented, yet evidence regarding causality is conflicting. This study explored the association between cannabis use, major depressive disorder (MDD) and bipolar disorder (BPD) in a 3-year prospective study. Data was drawn from waves 1 and 2 of the National Epidemiologic Survey on Alcohol and Related Conditions (NESARC). MDD and BPD were controlled at baseline and defined as meeting full criteria in the 12 months prior to the follow-up. Initiation of cannabis use was defined as any cannabis used by former lifetime abstainers in the time period between baseline and follow-up. Cannabis use was not significantly associated with increased incidence of MDD (Adjusted Odds Ratio (AOR) for daily use=0.58(0.22-1.51)). Weekly to almost daily cannabis use was associated with increased incidence of BPD ((AOR for weekly to daily use=2.47(1.03-5.92)); daily use was not (AOR=0.52(0.17-1.55)). Baseline MDD was associated with initiation of cannabis use (AOR=1.72(1.1-2.69)). A crude association between baseline BPD and incidence of cannabis use was not maintained in adjusted models (AOR=0.61(0.36-1.04)). Lack of information regarding frequency of cannabis use at follow-up and limitations regarding generalization of the results. Our findings do not support a longitudinal association between cannabis use and incidence of MDD. Results regarding the association between cannabis use and incidence of BPD are conflicting and require further investigation. Baseline MDD, but not BPD, may be associated with future initiation of cannabis use. This may have implications for clinical, social and legislative aspects of cannabis use. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Characterization of patients with mood disorders for their prevalent temperament and level of hopelessness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pompili, Maurizio; Innamorati, Marco; Gonda, Xenia; Erbuto, Denise; Forte, Alberto; Ricci, Federica; Lester, David; Akiskal, Hagop S; Vázquez, Gustavo H; Rihmer, Zoltan; Amore, Mario; Girardi, Paolo

    2014-09-01

    Mood disorders (MD) are disabling conditions throughout the world associated with significant psychosocial impairment. Affective temperaments, as well as hopelessness, may play a significant role in the pathophysiology of MD. The present study was designed to characterize patients with MD for their prevalent affective temperament and level of hopelessness. Five hundred fifty-nine (253 men and 306 women) consecutive adult inpatients were assessed using the Temperament Evaluation of Memphis, Pisa, Paris and San Diego-Autoquestionnaire version (TEMPS-A), the Gotland Scale for Male Depression (GSMD), the Beck Hopelessness Scale (BHS) and the Mini International Neuropsychiatric Interview (MINI). Higher cyclothymia and irritable temperaments were found in bipolar disorder-I (BD-I) patients compared to those with other Axis I diagnoses. Major depressive disorder (MDD) patients had lower hyperthymia than BD-I and BD-II patients and higher anxiety than patients with other Axis I diagnoses. Severe "male" depression was more common in BD-II patients compared to BD-I and MDD patients. BD-I patients and those with other axis I diagnoses reported lower BHS ≥9 scores than those with BD-II and MDD. The study had the limitations of all naturalistic designs, that is, potentially relevant variables were not addressed. Furthermore, the cross-sectional nature of the study did not allow conclusions about causation, and the use of self-report measures could be potentially biased by social desirability. MDD patients were more likely to have higher anxious temperament, higher hopelessness and lower hyperthymic temperament scores, while BD-I patients more often had cyclothymic and irritable temperaments than patients with other Axis I diagnoses. The implications of the present results were discussed. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. An exploratory clinical study of disruptive mood dysregulation disorder in children and adolescents from India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiwari, Rashmi; Agarwal, Vivek; Arya, Amit; Gupta, Pawan Kumar; Mahour, Pooja

    2016-06-01

    Children with chronic non-episodic irritability were frequently diagnosed as suffering from pediatric bipolar disorder. Therefore in DSM-5 a new diagnosis of Disruptive Mood Dysregulation Disorder (DMDD) was included for such children. This study aimed to identify DMDD in children and adolescents in Indian child and adolescent psychiatry clinic and elicit its phenomenology and co-morbidities. Children of 6-16 years, presenting with irritability for more than one year were assessed using DSM 5 diagnostic criteria to make a diagnosis of DMDD. Severity of irritability was assessed using Affective Reactivity index (ARI). Co-morbidities were screened on Kiddie Schedule for Affective Disorders and Schizophrenia present and lifetime version (KSADS-PL) and diagnosed as per DSM-IV TR criteria. Overall behavioral problems were assessed on Conner's parent symptom questionnaire (CPSQ) and impairment in functioning on children's global assessment of functioning scale(C-GAS). 21 subjects were diagnosed with DMDD. Majority of the subjects (15, 71.4%) were in the age group 6-12 years (mean age11.1±2.9 years) and were males (16, 76.2%). Most common presenting complaints were, frequent irritability and anger outbursts in 21 (100%) and inattention towards studies in 20 (95.2%) subjects. Most of the subjects (18, 85.7%) had moderate to severe irritability. 13 (61.9%) subjects had co-morbidities. Mean CGAS was 46.1±6.9. DMDD can be diagnosed in Indian children using DSM 5 criteria. Such children presented with complaints of irritability and problems in studies. They commonly had co-morbidities and had moderate impairment of functioning. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  18. Endocannabinoid system and mood disorders: priming a target for new therapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Micale, Vincenzo; Di Marzo, Vincenzo; Sulcova, Alexandra; Wotjak, Carsten T; Drago, Filippo

    2013-04-01

    The endocannabinoid system (ECS), comprising two G protein-coupled receptors (the cannabinoid receptors 1 and 2 [CB1 and CB2] for marijuana's psychoactive principle ∆(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol [∆(9)-THC]), their endogenous small lipid ligands (namely anandamide [AEA] and 2-arachidonoylglycerol [2-AG], also known as endocannabinoids), and the proteins for endocannabinoid biosynthesis and degradation, has been suggested as a pro-homeostatic and pleiotropic signaling system activated in a time- and tissue-specific way during physiopathological conditions. In the brain activation of this system modulates the release of excitatory and inhibitory neurotransmitters and of cytokines from glial cells. As such, the ECS is strongly involved in neuropsychiatric disorders, particularly in affective disturbances such as anxiety and depression. It has been proposed that synthetic molecules that inhibit endocannabinoid degradation can exploit the selectivity of endocannabinoid action, thus activating cannabinoid receptors only in those tissues where there is perturbed endocannabinoid turnover due to the disorder, and avoiding the potential side effects of direct CB1 and CB2 activation. However, the realization that endocannabinoids, and AEA in particular, also act at other molecular targets, and that these mediators can be deactivated by redundant pathways, has recently led to question the efficacy of such approach, thus opening the way to new multi-target therapeutic strategies, and to the use of non-psychotropic cannabinoids, such as cannabidiol (CBD), which act via several parallel mechanisms, including indirect interactions with the ECS. The state of the art of the possible therapeutic use of endocannabinoid deactivation inhibitors and phytocannabinoids in mood disorders is discussed in this review article.

  19. Therapeutic Potential of Mood Stabilizers Lithium and Valproic Acid: Beyond Bipolar Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiu, Chi-Tso; Wang, Zhifei; Hunsberger, Joshua G.

    2013-01-01

    The mood stabilizers lithium and valproic acid (VPA) are traditionally used to treat bipolar disorder (BD), a severe mental illness arising from complex interactions between genes and environment that drive deficits in cellular plasticity and resiliency. The therapeutic potential of these drugs in other central nervous system diseases is also gaining support. This article reviews the various mechanisms of action of lithium and VPA gleaned from cellular and animal models of neurologic, neurodegenerative, and neuropsychiatric disorders. Clinical evidence is included when available to provide a comprehensive perspective of the field and to acknowledge some of the limitations of these treatments. First, the review describes how action at these drugs’ primary targets—glycogen synthase kinase-3 for lithium and histone deacetylases for VPA—induces the transcription and expression of neurotrophic, angiogenic, and neuroprotective proteins. Cell survival signaling cascades, oxidative stress pathways, and protein quality control mechanisms may further underlie lithium and VPA’s beneficial actions. The ability of cotreatment to augment neuroprotection and enhance stem cell homing and migration is also discussed, as are microRNAs as new therapeutic targets. Finally, preclinical findings have shown that the neuroprotective benefits of these agents facilitate anti-inflammation, angiogenesis, neurogenesis, blood-brain barrier integrity, and disease-specific neuroprotection. These mechanisms can be compared with dysregulated disease mechanisms to suggest core cellular and molecular disturbances identifiable by specific risk biomarkers. Future clinical endeavors are warranted to determine the therapeutic potential of lithium and VPA across the spectrum of central nervous system diseases, with particular emphasis on a personalized medicine approach toward treating these disorders. PMID:23300133

  20. Depressive Mood and Testosterone Related to Declarative Verbal Memory Decline in Middle-Aged Caregivers of Children with Eating Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romero-Martínez, Ángel; Ruiz-Robledillo, Nicolás; Moya-Albiol, Luis

    2016-03-04

    Caring for children diagnosed with a chronic psychological disorder such as an eating disorder (ED) can be used as a model of chronic stress. This kind of stress has been reported to have deleterious effects on caregivers' cognition, particularly in verbal declarative memory of women caregivers. Moreover, high depressive mood and variations in testosterone (T) levels moderate this cognitive decline. The purpose of this study was to characterize whether caregivers of individuals with EDs (n = 27) show declarative memory impairments compared to non-caregivers caregivers (n = 27), using for this purpose a standardized memory test (Rey's Auditory Verbal Learning Test). Its purpose was also to examine the role of depressive mood and T in memory decline. Results showed that ED caregivers presented high depressive mood, which was associated to worse verbal memory performance, especially in the case of women. In addition, all caregivers showed high T levels. Nonetheless, only in the case of women caregivers did T show a curvilinear relationship with verbal memory performance, meaning that the increases of T were associated to the improvement in verbal memory performance, but only up to a certain point, as after such point T continued to increase and memory performance decreased. Thus, chronic stress due to caregiving was associated to disturbances in mood and T levels, which in turn was associated to verbal memory decline. These findings should be taken into account in the implementation of intervention programs for helping ED caregivers cope with caregiving situations and to prevent the risk of a pronounced verbal memory decline.

  1. Geographic variation of clinically diagnosed mood and anxiety disorders in Christchurch after the 2010/11 earthquakes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hogg, Daniel; Kingham, Simon; Wilson, Thomas M; Griffin, Edward; Ardagh, Michael

    2014-11-01

    The 22nd February 2011 Christchurch earthquake killed 185 people, injured over 8000, damaged over 100,000 buildings and on-going aftershocks maintained high anxiety levels. This paper examines the dose of exposure effect of earthquake damage assessments, earthquake intensity measures, liquefaction and lateral spreading on mood and anxiety disorders in Christchurch after this event. We hypothesise that such disorders are more likely to develop in people who have experienced greater exposure to these impacts within their neighborhood than others who have been less exposed, but also live in the city. For this purpose, almost all clinically diagnosed incident and relapsed cases in Christchurch in a 12 months period after the 2011 earthquake were analysed. Spatio-temporal cluster analysis shows that people living in the widely affected central and eastern parts after the 2010/11 earthquakes have a 23% higher risk of developing a mood or anxiety disorder than people living in other parts of the city. Generally, mood and anxiety-related disorders increase with closer proximity to damage from liquefaction and moderate to major lateral spreading, as well as areas that are more likely to suffer from damage in future earthquakes.

  2. Randomized controlled trial of a health plan-level mood disorders psychosocial intervention for solo or small practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilbourne, Amy M; Nord, Kristina M; Kyle, Julia; Van Poppelen, Celeste; Goodrich, David E; Kim, Hyungjin Myra; Eisenberg, Daniel; Un, Hyong; Bauer, Mark S

    2014-01-01

    Mood disorders represent the most expensive mental disorders for employer-based commercial health plans. Collaborative care models are effective in treating chronic physical and mental illnesses at little to no net healthcare cost, but to date have primarily been implemented by larger healthcare organizations in facility-based models. The majority of practices providing commercially insured care are far too small to implement such models. Health plan-level collaborative care treatment can address this unmet need. The goal of this study is to implement at the national commercial health plan level a collaborative care model to improve outcomes for persons with mood disorders. A randomized controlled trial of a collaborative care model versus usual care will be conducted among beneficiaries of a large national health plan from across the country seen by primary care or behavioral health practices. At discharge 344 patients identified by health plan claims as hospitalized for unipolar depression or bipolar disorder will be randomized to receive collaborative care (patient phone-based self-management support, care management, and guideline dissemination to practices delivered by a plan-level care manager) or usual care from their provider. Primary outcomes are changes in mood symptoms and mental health-related quality of life at 12 months. Secondary outcomes include rehospitalization, receipt of guideline-concordant care, and work productivity. This study will determine whether a collaborative care model for mood disorders delivered at the national health plan level improves outcomes compared to usual care, and will inform a business case for collaborative care models for these settings that can reach patients wherever they receive treatment. ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT02041962; registered January 3, 2014.

  3. Disturbed sleep: linking allergic rhinitis, mood and suicidal behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Beverly J; Tonelli, Leonardo H; Soriano, Joseph J; Postolache, Teodor T

    2010-01-01

    Allergic inflammation is associated with mood disorders, exacerbation of depression, and suicidal behavior. Mediators of inflammation modulate sleep , with Th1 cytokines promoting NREM sleep and increasing sleepiness and Th2 cytokines (produced during allergic inflammation) impairing sleep. As sleep impairment is a rapidly modifiable suicide risk factor strongly associated with mood disorders, we review the literature leading to the hypothesis that allergic rhinitis leads to mood and anxiety disorders and an increased risk of suicide via sleep impairment. Specifically, allergic rhinitis can impair sleep through mechanical (obstructive) and molecular (cytokine production) processes. The high prevalence of mood and anxiety disorders and allergy, the nonabating suicide incidence, the currently available treatment modalities to treat sleep impairment and the need for novel therapeutic targets for mood and anxiety disorders, justify multilevel efforts to explore disturbance of sleep as a pathophysiological link.

  4. Obsessive compulsive disorder with bipolar mood disorder: A rare comorbidity in India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bindu Annigeri

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Obsessive compulsive features occurring in mania have been well documented. Though there have been some studies on obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD comorbid with mania in the western countries, there are very few case reports and studies in India. Our aim is to report one such case here, who presented with OC features which are not typical of the symptom cluster of the OCD commonly seen with mania in earlier reports. Also, the comorbidities in OCD should be recognized as this can have important diagnostic and therapeutic implications.

  5. Short sleep duration, complaints of vital exhaustion and perceived stress are prevalent among pregnant women with mood and anxiety disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiu Chunfang

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Psychiatric disorders have been associated with sleep disorders in men and non-pregnant women, but little is known about sleep complaints and disorders among pregnant women with psychiatric disorders. Methods A cohort of 1,332 women was interviewed during early pregnancy. We ascertained psychiatric diagnosis status and collect information about sleep duration, daytime sleepiness, vital exhaustion and perceived stress. Logistic regression procedures were used to estimate odds ratios (ORs and 95% confidence intervals (CIs. Results Approximately 5.1% of the cohort (n=68 reported having a physician-diagnosis of mood or anxiety disorder before interview. Compared with women without a psychiatric diagnosis, the multivariable-adjusted OR (95% CI for short sleep duration in early pregnancy (≤6 hours were 1.95 (1.03-3.69. The corresponding OR (95%CI for long sleep duration (≥9 hours during early pregnancy was 1.13 (0.63-2.03. Women with psychiatric disorders had an increased risk of vital exhaustion (OR=2.41; 95%CI 1.46-4.00 and elevated perceived stress (OR=3.33; 95%CI 1.89-5.88. Observed associations were more pronounced among overweight/obese women. Conclusions Women with a psychiatric disorder were more likely to report short sleep durations, vital exhaustion and elevated perceived stress. Prospective studies are needed to more thoroughly explore factors that mediate the apparent mood/anxiety-sleep comorbidity among pregnant women.

  6. The effects of optimism, religion, and hope on mood and anxiety disorders in women with the FMR1 premutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowell, E P; Tonnsen, B L; Bailey, D B; Roberts, J E

    2017-10-01

    The FMR1 premutation, caused by a CGG trinucleotide repeat expansion on the FMR1 gene, has been identified as a genetic risk factor for mood and anxiety disorders. Building on recent studies identifying increased risk for mood and affective disorders in this population, we examined effects of potential protective factors (optimism, religion, hope) on depression and anxiety diagnoses in a prospective, longitudinal cohort. Eighty-three women with the FMR1 premutation participated in the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV-TR Disorders at two-time points, 3 years apart. Participants also completed measures of optimism, religion, personal faith, hope, and child and family characteristics. We used logistic regression to examine correlates of major depressive disorder (MDD) and anxiety disorders at the initial assessment, as well as predictors of the diagnostic course over time. Lower optimism and higher religious participation relevant to fragile X syndrome at the initial assessment were associated with a lifetime history of MDD. Lower optimism also predicted the occurrence and reoccurrence of an anxiety disorder 3 years later. In women with the FMR1 premutation, elevated optimism may reduce the occurrence or severity of MDD and anxiety disorders. These findings underscore the importance of supporting mental health across the FMR1 spectrum of involvement. © 2017 MENCAP and International Association of the Scientific Study of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Loving-Kindness Meditation to Target Affect in Mood Disorders: A Proof-of-Concept Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefan G. Hofmann

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Conventional treatments for mood disorders primarily focus on reducing negative affect, but little on enhancing positive affect. Loving-kindness meditation (LKM is a traditional meditation practice directly oriented toward enhancing unconditional and positive emotional states of kindness towards oneself and others. We report here two independent and uncontrolled studies carried out at different centers, one in Boston, USA (n = 10, and one in Frankfurt, Germany (n = 8, to examine the potential therapeutic utility of a brief LKM group intervention for symptoms of dysthymia and depression. Results at both centers suggest that LKM was associated with large-sized effects on self-reported symptoms of depression (d = 3.33 and 1.90, negative affect (d = 1.98 and 0.92, and positive affect (d = 1.63 and 0.94. Large effects were also found for clinician-reported changes in depression, rumination and specific positive emotions, and moderate effects for changes in adaptive emotion regulation strategies. The qualitative data analyses provide additional support for the potential clinical utility of the intervention. This proof-of-concept evaluation of LKM as a clinical strategy warrants further investigation.

  8. Sleep and mood disorders in dry eye disease and allied irritating ocular diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayaki, Masahiko; Kawashima, Motoko; Negishi, Kazuno; Kishimoto, Taishiro; Mimura, Masaru; Tsubota, Kazuo

    2016-03-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate sleep and mood disorders in patients with irritating ocular diseases. The study design was a cross-sectional/case-control study conducted in six eye clinics. Out of 715 outpatients diagnosed with irritating ocular surface diseases and initially enrolled, 301 patients with dry eye disease (DED) and 202 age-matched control participants with other ocular surface diseases were analyzed. The mean Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI) and Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS) scores were 6.4 ± 3.2 and 11.1 ± 5.7 for severe DED (n = 146), 5.5 ± 3.3 and 9.8 ± 4.0 for mild DED (n = 155), 5.5 ± 3.1 and 9.5 ± 6.6 for chronic conjunctivitis (n = 124), and 5.0 ± 3.3 and 8.9 ± 5.3 for allergic conjunctivitis (n = 78). There were significant differences among these diagnostic groups for PSQI (P sleep quality in patients with DED is significantly worse than in patients with other irritating ocular surface diseases and it is correlated with the severity of DED.

  9. The impact of sleep and mood disorders on quality of life in Parkinson's disease patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Havlikova, Eva; van Dijk, Jitse P; Nagyova, Iveta; Rosenberger, Jaroslav; Middel, Berrie; Dubayova, Tatiana; Gdovinova, Zuzana; Groothoff, Johan W

    2011-12-01

    Sleep disturbances are common and often severe in patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) and their symptoms can be present at any time of day. The purpose of our study was to examine how excessive daytime sleepiness or poor nocturnal sleep quality and mood disorders influence the quality of life (QoL) in PD patients. Ninety-three PD patients from eastern Slovakia were recruited (49.5% males, mean age 68.0 ± 9.5 years, mean disease duration 6.1 ± 5.9 years). Sleep disturbances were measured using the Epworth Sleepiness Scale (ESS) and the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI); QoL with the Parkinson's Disease Quality of Life Questionnaire (PDQ-39); depression and anxiety with the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS) and disease severity with the Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS). χ (2) test, bivariate correlations and multiple linear regressions were performed. PSQI and ESS had significant correlations with worse QoL (p duration (p sleep and anxiety are important contributors leading to a worse QoL. As these are treatable conditions, they should be recognized by clinicians and managed properly.

  10. Factors impacting decisions to decline or adhere to antidepressant medication in perinatal women with mood and anxiety disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misri, Shaila; Eng, Andrea B; Abizadeh, Jasmin; Blackwell, Ekin; Spidel, Alicia; Oberlander, Tim F

    2013-11-01

    To identify specific quantitative and qualitative factors that govern the decision to adhere or decline antidepressant medication in antenatal women with moderate-to-severe mood and anxiety disorders. Fifty women (30 adherers, 20 decliners) were recruited between 18 and 34 weeks gestation in a tertiary care clinic for perinatal mothers. They were prospectively monitored 4 weeks apart up to 1-month postpartum on the: Hamilton Anxiety Scale, Hamilton Depression Scale, Mood Disorders Insight Scale, Antidepressant Compliance Questionnaire, Penn State Worry Questionnaire, and NEO Personality Inventory. Qualitative interviews were conducted at baseline. Hierarchical linear modeling determined illness trajectories of the two groups. Significantly different course of illness was observed in adherers versus decliners. Adherers had healthier attitudes toward depression and compliance with medication (P antidepressant medication therapy for their illness. Risk perception, attitudes, and illness insight impacted decisions surrounding adherence and decline. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. CSF 5-HIAA and DST non-suppression--orthogonal biologic risk factors for suicide in male mood disorder inpatients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jokinen, Jussi; Nordström, Anna-Lena; Nordström, Peter

    2009-01-30

    Two biomarkers of suicide risk; non-suppression in the dexamethasone suppression test (DST) and low 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid (5-HIAA) in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) have been reported to be predictors of suicide in mood disorders. The interrelation of the two systems seems to be different in suicide attempters compared with depressed inpatients who have not made a suicide attempt, indicating that the two biomarkers may be seen as independent. This investigation examined the interrelation of low CSF 5-HIAA and DST non-suppression in suicide victims with mood disorder. Fifty-eight mood disorder inpatients not receiving any treatment with antidepressants underwent lumbar puncture and the DST. Plasma cortisol levels at 8:00 a.m., 4:00 p.m. and 11:00 p.m. were analysed in relation to CSF 5-HIAA. All patients were followed up for causes of death and suicides were verified with death certificates. During follow-up (mean 21 years), 11 (19%) patients had committed suicide. In male suicide victims (n=6), the serum cortisol level at 4:00 p.m. showed a significant positive correlation with CSF 5-HIAA. Low CSF 5-HIAA predicted all early suicides (within 1 year), whereas all males who committed suicide after 1 year were DST non-suppressors. In female suicide victims (n=5), the post-DST serum cortisol did not correlate with CSF 5-HIAA. Low CSF 5-HIAA and DST non-suppression are orthogonal biologic risk factors for suicide in male mood disorder inpatients. CSF 5-HIAA is associated with short-term suicide risk; dysregulation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis seems to be a long-term suicide predictor.

  12. The Melatonergic System in Mood and Anxiety Disorders and the Role of Agomelatine: Implications for Clinical Practice

    OpenAIRE

    Domenico De Berardis; Stefano Marini; Michele Fornaro; Venkataramanujam Srinivasan; Felice Iasevoli; Carmine Tomasetti; Alessandro Valchera; Giampaolo Perna; Maria-Antonia Quera-Salva; Giovanni Martinotti; Massimo di Giannantonio

    2013-01-01

    Melatonin exerts its actions through membrane MT1/MT2 melatonin receptors, which belong to the super family of G-protein-coupled receptors consisting of the typical seven transmembrane domains. MT1 and MT2 receptors are expressed in various tissues of the body either as single ones or together. A growing literature suggests that the melatonergic system may be involved in the pathophysiology of mood and anxiety disorders. In fact, some core symptoms of depression show disturbance of the circad...

  13. Gene expression changes in the prefrontal cortex, anterior cingulate cortex and nucleus accumbens of mood disorders subjects that committed suicide.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adolfo Sequeira

    Full Text Available Suicidal behaviors are frequent in mood disorders patients but only a subset of them ever complete suicide. Understanding predisposing factors for suicidal behaviors in high risk populations is of major importance for the prevention and treatment of suicidal behaviors. The objective of this project was to investigate gene expression changes associated with suicide in brains of mood disorder patients by microarrays (Affymetrix HG-U133 Plus2.0 in the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC: 6 Non-suicides, 15 suicides, the anterior cingulate cortex (ACC: 6NS, 9S and the nucleus accumbens (NAcc: 8NS, 13S. ANCOVA was used to control for age, gender, pH and RNA degradation, with P ≤ 0.01 and fold change ± 1.25 as criteria for significance. Pathway analysis revealed serotonergic signaling alterations in the DLPFC and glucocorticoid signaling alterations in the ACC and NAcc. The gene with the lowest p-value in the DLPFC was the 5-HT2A gene, previously associated both with suicide and mood disorders. In the ACC 6 metallothionein genes were down-regulated in suicide (MT1E, MT1F, MT1G, MT1H, MT1X, MT2A and three were down-regulated in the NAcc (MT1F, MT1G, MT1H. Differential expression of selected genes was confirmed by qPCR, we confirmed the 5-HT2A alterations and the global down-regulation of members of the metallothionein subfamilies MT 1 and 2 in suicide completers. MTs 1 and 2 are neuro-protective following stress and glucocorticoid stimulations, suggesting that in suicide victims neuroprotective response to stress and cortisol may be diminished. Our results thus suggest that suicide-specific expression changes in mood disorders involve both glucocorticoids regulated metallothioneins and serotonergic signaling in different regions of the brain.

  14. Neurocognition and social skill in older persons with schizophrenia and major mood disorders: An analysis of gender and diagnosis effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueser, Kim T.; Pratt, Sarah I.; Bartels, Stephen J.; Forester, Brent; Wolfe, Rosemarie; Cather, Corinne

    2010-01-01

    Effective social interactions necessary for getting affiliative and instrumental needs met require the smooth integration of social skills, including verbal, non-verbal, and paralinguistic behaviors. Schizophrenia is characterized by prominent impairments in social and role functioning, and research on younger individuals with the illness has shown that social skills deficits are both common and distinguish the disease from other psychiatric disorders. However, less research has focused on diagnostic differences and correlates of social skills in older persons with schizophrenia. To address this question, we examined diagnostic and gender differences in social skills in a community-dwelling sample of 183 people older than age 50 with severe mental illness, and the relationships between social skills and neurocognitive functioning, symptoms, and social contact. Individuals with schizophrenia had worse social skills than those with bipolar disorder or major depression, with people with schizoaffective disorder in between. Social contact and cognitive functioning, especially executive functions and verbal fluency, were strongly predictive of social skills in people with schizophrenia and schizoaffective disorder, but not those with mood disorder. Other than blunted affect, symptoms were not predictive of social skills in either the schizophrenia spectrum or the mood disorder group. Older age was associated with worse social skills in both groups, whereas female gender was related to better skills in the mood disorder group, but not the schizophrenia group. The findings suggest that poor social skills, which are related to the cognitive impairment associated with the illness, are a fundamental feature of schizophrenia that persists from the onset of the illness into older age. PMID:21113403

  15. The Melatonergic System in Mood and Anxiety Disorders and the Role of Agomelatine: Implications for Clinical Practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Domenico De Berardis

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Melatonin exerts its actions through membrane MT1/MT2 melatonin receptors, which belong to the super family of G-protein-coupled receptors consisting of the typical seven transmembrane domains. MT1 and MT2 receptors are expressed in various tissues of the body either as single ones or together. A growing literature suggests that the melatonergic system may be involved in the pathophysiology of mood and anxiety disorders. In fact, some core symptoms of depression show disturbance of the circadian rhythm in their clinical expression, such as diurnal mood and other symptomatic variation, or are closely linked to circadian system functioning, such as sleep-wake cycle alterations. In addition, alterations have been described in the circadian rhythms of several biological markers in depressed patients. Therefore, there is interest in developing antidepressants that have a chronobiotic effect (i.e., treatment of circadian rhythm disorders. As melatonin produces chronobiotic effects, efforts have been aimed at developing agomelatine, an antidepressant with melatonin agonist activity. The present paper reviews the role of the melatonergic system in the pathophysiology of mood and anxiety disorders and the clinical characteristics of agomelatine. Implications of agomelatine in “real world” clinical practice will be also discussed.

  16. Near infrared spectroscopy study of the frontopolar hemodynamic response and depressive mood in children with major depressive disorder: a pilot study

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Usami, Masahide; Iwadare, Yoshitaka; Kodaira, Masaki; Watanabe, Kyota; Saito, Kazuhiko

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the frontopolar hemodynamic response and depressive mood in children with mild or moderate major depressive disorder during six weeks treatment without medication...

  17. Near Infrared Spectroscopy Study of the Frontopolar Hemodynamic Response and Depressive Mood in Children with Major Depressive Disorder: A Pilot Study: e86290

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Masahide Usami; Yoshitaka Iwadare; Masaki Kodaira; Kyota Watanabe; Kazuhiko Saito

    2014-01-01

      AIM The aim of this study was to evaluate the frontopolar hemodynamic response and depressive mood in children with mild or moderate major depressive disorder during six weeks treatment without medication...

  18. Nutrient- and non-nutrient-based natural health product (NHP) use in adults with mood disorders: prevalence, characteristics and potential for exposure to adverse events

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Davison, Karen M; Kaplan, Bonnie J

    2013-01-01

    To address knowledge gaps regarding natural health product (NHP) usage in mental health populations, we examined their use in adults with mood disorders, and explored the potential for adverse events...

  19. Excessive mood elevation and behavioral activation with antidepressant treatment of juvenile depressive and anxiety disorders: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Offidani, Emanuela; Fava, Giovanni A; Tomba, Elena; Baldessarini, Ross J

    2013-01-01

    The prevalence, characteristics and implications of excessive arousal-activation in children and adolescents treated with antidepressants for specific illnesses have not been systematically examined. We compared reports of antidepressant trials (n = 6,767 subjects) in juvenile depressive (n = 17) and anxiety disorders (n = 25) for consensus-based indications of psychopathological mood elevation or behavioral activation. Rates of excessive arousal-activation during treatment with antidepressants were at least as high in juvenile anxiety (13.8%) as depressive (9.79%) disorders, and much lower with placebos (5.22 vs. 1.10%, respectively; both p antidepressant/placebo risk ratio for such reactions in paired comparisons was 3.50 (12.9/3.69%), and the meta-analytically pooled rate ratio was 1.7 (95% confidence interval: 1.2-2.2; both p ≤ 0.001). Overall rates for 'mania or hypomania', specifically, were 8.19% with and 0.17% without antidepressant treatment, with large drug/placebo risk ratios among depressive (10.4/0.45%) and anxiety (1.98/0.00%) disorder patients. Risks of excessive mood elevation during antidepressant treatment, including mania-hypomania, were much greater than with placebo, and similar in juvenile anxiety and depressive disorders. Excessive arousal-activation in children or adolescents treated with antidepressants for anxiety as well as depressive disorders calls for particular caution and monitoring for potential risk of future bipolar disorder. Copyright © 2013 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  20. The influence of episodic mood disorders on length of stay among patients admitted to private and non-profit hospitals with alcohol dependence syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Justin B. Dickerson

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Episodic mood disorders are often associated with alcohol dependence. Few studies have explored the contribution of episodic mood disorders to length of stay among those hospitalized with alcohol dependence syndrome. Filling this research gap could improve care for patients while minimizing hospital utilization costs. This study was a cross-sectional analysis of the National Hospital Discharge Survey. ICD-9-CM diagnosis codes were used to identify those admitted to a private or non-profit hospital with alcohol dependence syndrome, and a co-morbid diagnosis of an episodic mood disorder (n=358. Descriptive statistics were used to highlight differences in key demographic and hospital variables between those with and without episodic mood disorders. Negative binomial regression was used to associate episodic mood disorders with hospital length of stay. Incidence rate ratios were calculated. Co-morbid episodic mood disorders (b=0.31, P=0.001, referral to a hospital by a physician (b=0.35, P=0.014, and increasing age (b= 0.01, P=0.001 were associated with longer hospital stays. Hospital patients with an admitting diagnosis of alcohol dependence syndrome were 36% more likely to have a longer hospital stay if they also had a co-morbid diagnosis of an episodic mood disorder (IRR=1.36, CI=1.14-1.62. Patients admitted to a hospital with alcohol dependence syndrome should be routinely screened for episodic mood disorders. Opportunities exist for enhanced transitional care between acute, ambulatory, and community-based care settings to lower hospital utilization.

  1. The influence of episodic mood disorders on length of stay among patients admitted to private and non-profit hospitals with alcohol dependence syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickerson, Justin B

    2011-02-22

    Episodic mood disorders are often associated with alcohol dependence. Few studies have explored the contribution of episodic mood disorders to length of stay among those hospitalized with alcohol dependence syndrome. Filling this research gap could improve care for patients while minimizing hospital utilization costs. This study was a cross-sectional analysis of the National Hospital Discharge Survey. ICD-9-CM diagnosis codes were used to identify those admitted to a private or non-profit hospital with alcohol dependence syndrome, and a co-morbid diagnosis of an episodic mood disorder (n=358). Descriptive statistics were used to highlight differences in key demographic and hospital variables between those with and without episodic mood disorders. Negative binomial regression was used to associate episodic mood disorders with hospital length of stay. Incidence rate ratios were calculated. Co-morbid episodic mood disorders (β=0.31, P=0.001), referral to a hospital by a physician (β=0.35, P=0.014), and increasing age (β= 0.01, P=0.001) were associated with longer hospital stays. Hospital patients with an admitting diagnosis of alcohol dependence syndrome were 36% more likely to have a longer hospital stay if they also had a co-morbid diagnosis of an episodic mood disorder (IRR=1.36, CI=1.14-1.62). Patients admitted to a hospital with alcohol dependence syndrome should be routinely screened for episodic mood disorders. Opportunities exist for enhanced transitional care between acute, ambulatory, and community-based care settings to lower hospital utilization.

  2. Relationship between uncertainty in illness, mood state and coping style in patients with temporomandibular disorders

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    Dong-ye Yang

    2015-12-01

    Conclusions: Both uncertainty in illness and mood state were related to coping style. These data suggest that nurses should be trained to offer appropriate guidance to help decrease patients' uncertainty in illness and relieve their negative emotions.

  3. IRRITABLE MOOD IN ADULT MAJOR DEPRESSIVE DISORDER: RESULTS FROM THE WORLD MENTAL HEALTH SURVEYS

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    Kovess-Masfety, Viviane; Alonso, Jordi; Angermeyer, Matthias; Bromet, Evelyn; de Girolamo, Giovanni; de Jonge, Peter; Demyttenaere, Koen; Florescu, Silvia E.; Gruber, Michael J.; Gureje, Oye; Hu, Chiyi; Huang, Yueqin; Karam, Elie G.; Jin, Robert; Lépine, Jean-Pierre; Levinson, Daphna; McLaughlin, Katie A.; Medina-Mora, María E.; O’Neill, Siobhan; Ono, Yutaka; Posada-Villa, José A.; Sampson, Nancy A.; Scott, Kate M.; Shahly, Victoria; Stein, Dan J.; Viana, Maria C.; Zarkov, Zahari; Kessler, Ronald C.

    2014-01-01

    Background Although irritability is a core symptom of DSM-IV major depressive disorder (MDD) for youth but not adults, clinical studies find comparable rates of irritability between nonbipolar depressed adults and youth. Including irritability as a core symptom of adult MDD would allow detection of depression-equivalent syndromes with primary irritability hypothesized to be more common among males than females. We carried out a preliminary examination of this issue using cross-national community-based survey data from 21 countries in the World Mental Health (WMH) Surveys (n = 110,729). Methods The assessment of MDD in the WHO Composite International Diagnostic Interview includes one question about persistent irritability. We examined two expansions of the definition of MDD involving this question: (1) cases with dysphoria and/or anhedonia and exactly four of nine Criterion A symptoms plus irritability; and (2) cases with two or more weeks of irritability plus four or more other Criterion A MDD symptoms in the absence of dysphoria or anhedonia. Results Adding irritability as a tenth Criterion A symptom increased lifetime prevalence by 0.4% (from 11.2 to 11.6%). Adding episodes of persistent irritability increased prevalence by an additional 0.2%. Proportional prevalence increases were significantly higher, but nonetheless small, among males compared to females. Rates of severe role impairment were significantly lower among respondents with this irritable depression who did not meet conventional DSM-IV criteria than those with DSM-IV MDD. Conclusion Although limited by the superficial assessment in this single question on irritability, results do not support expanding adult MDD criteria to include irritable mood. PMID:23364997

  4. Gaze Synchrony between Mothers with Mood Disorders and Their Infants: Maternal Emotion Dysregulation Matters.

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    Annett Lotzin

    Full Text Available A lowered and heightened synchrony between the mother's and infant's nonverbal behavior predicts adverse infant development. We know that maternal depressive symptoms predict lowered and heightened mother-infant gaze synchrony, but it is unclear whether maternal emotion dysregulation is related to mother-infant gaze synchrony. This cross-sectional study examined whether maternal emotion dysregulation in mothers with mood disorders is significantly related to mother-infant gaze synchrony. We also tested whether maternal emotion dysregulation is relatively more important than maternal depressive symptoms in predicting mother-infant gaze synchrony, and whether maternal emotion dysregulation mediates the relation between maternal depressive symptoms and mother-infant gaze synchrony. We observed 68 mothers and their 4- to 9-month-old infants in the Still-Face paradigm during two play interactions, before and after social stress was induced. The mothers' and infants' gaze behaviors were coded using microanalysis with the Maternal Regulatory Scoring System and Infant Regulatory Scoring System, respectively. The degree of mother-infant gaze synchrony was computed using time-series analysis. Maternal emotion dysregulation was measured by the Difficulties in Emotion Regulation Scale; depressive symptoms were assessed using the Beck Depression Inventory. Greater maternal emotion dysregulation was significantly related to heightened mother-infant gaze synchrony. The overall effect of maternal emotion dysregulation on mother-infant gaze synchrony was relatively more important than the effect of maternal depressive symptoms in the five tested models. Maternal emotion dysregulation fully mediated the relation between maternal depressive symptoms and mother-infant gaze synchrony. Our findings suggest that the effect of the mother's depressive symptoms on the mother-infant gaze synchrony may be mediated by the mother's emotion dysregulation.

  5. Gaze Synchrony between Mothers with Mood Disorders and Their Infants: Maternal Emotion Dysregulation Matters.

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    Lotzin, Annett; Romer, Georg; Schiborr, Julia; Noga, Berit; Schulte-Markwort, Michael; Ramsauer, Brigitte

    2015-01-01

    A lowered and heightened synchrony between the mother's and infant's nonverbal behavior predicts adverse infant development. We know that maternal depressive symptoms predict lowered and heightened mother-infant gaze synchrony, but it is unclear whether maternal emotion dysregulation is related to mother-infant gaze synchrony. This cross-sectional study examined whether maternal emotion dysregulation in mothers with mood disorders is significantly related to mother-infant gaze synchrony. We also tested whether maternal emotion dysregulation is relatively more important than maternal depressive symptoms in predicting mother-infant gaze synchrony, and whether maternal emotion dysregulation mediates the relation between maternal depressive symptoms and mother-infant gaze synchrony. We observed 68 mothers and their 4- to 9-month-old infants in the Still-Face paradigm during two play interactions, before and after social stress was induced. The mothers' and infants' gaze behaviors were coded using microanalysis with the Maternal Regulatory Scoring System and Infant Regulatory Scoring System, respectively. The degree of mother-infant gaze synchrony was computed using time-series analysis. Maternal emotion dysregulation was measured by the Difficulties in Emotion Regulation Scale; depressive symptoms were assessed using the Beck Depression Inventory. Greater maternal emotion dysregulation was significantly related to heightened mother-infant gaze synchrony. The overall effect of maternal emotion dysregulation on mother-infant gaze synchrony was relatively more important than the effect of maternal depressive symptoms in the five tested models. Maternal emotion dysregulation fully mediated the relation between maternal depressive symptoms and mother-infant gaze synchrony. Our findings suggest that the effect of the mother's depressive symptoms on the mother-infant gaze synchrony may be mediated by the mother's emotion dysregulation.

  6. [Drop-out risk factors in mood disorder: a clinical study].

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    Armando, Marco; Bensi, Marco; Brandizzi, Martina; Censi, Viviana; Lindau, Juliana Fortes; Fiori Nastro, Paolo

    2010-01-01

    The aims of this study are (i) to assess the drop-out rate in an outpatient sample with mood disorder diagnosis in a psychotherapy unit; (ii) to focus clinical and sociodemographic variables related with drop-out; (iii) to delineate a psychopathological profile of the dropping-out patient through the SCL-90-R and OPD scores. The sample of this study includes 90 depressive patients, which came to our service for a psychotherapy. The outcome is classified as drop-out and non drop-out. Each patient is submitted to the multidimensional scale SCL-90-R in the course of the first interview. At the end of the first visit each patient has been evaluated through the first and the fourth OPD axis. A descriptive analysis of all the data collected was made and the principal links between clinical and sociodemographic variables and dropout, between SCL-90-R score and drop-out, and between OPD scores and drop-out were detected. About 42% of the patients were drop-out, of which 89% by the third session. The variables associated with drop-out are: pathological score in the paranoic and interpersonal sensibility scale of SCL-90-R, low compliance scores, low integration of defences, self perception, object's perception and link. The drop-out rate in depressive patients turned out to be frequent. The patient's resources in terms of relationship, self-perception and object's perception are strongly related to the drop-out risk. These results are suggestive for the idea that the evaluation of drop-out risk in psychiatric patients must considerate the subjective aspects of the patient besides the clinical features.

  7. Dissecting the catatonia phenotype in psychotic and mood disorders on the basis of familial-genetic factors.

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    Peralta, Victor; Fañanás, Lourdes; Martín-Reyes, Migdyrai; Cuesta, Manuel J

    2017-09-14

    This study examines the familial aggregation (familiality) of different phenotypic definitions of catatonia in a sample of multiplex families with psychotic and mood disorders. Participants were probands with a lifetime diagnosis of a DSM-IV functional psychotic disorder, their parents and at least one first-degree relative with a psychotic disorder. The study sample included 441 families comprising 2703 subjects, of whom 1094 were affected and 1609 unaffected. Familiality (h(2)) was estimated by linear mixed models using family membership as a random effect, with h(2) indicating the portion of phenotypic variance accounted for by family membership. Familiality estimates highly varied for individual catatonia signs (h(2)=0.17-0.65), principal component analysis-derived factors (h(2)=0.29-0.49), number of catatonia signs present (h(2)=0.03-0.43) and severity of the catatonia syndrome (h(2)=0.25-0.59). Phenotypes maximizing familiality estimates included individual signs (mutism and rigidity, both h(2)=0.65), presence of ≥5 catatonia signs (h(2)=0.43), a classical catatonia factor (h(2)=0.49), a DSM-IV catatonia syndrome at a severity level of moderate or higher (h(2)=0.59) and the diagnostic construct of psychosis with prominent catatonia features (h(2)=0.56). Familiality estimates of a DSM-IV catatonia syndrome did not significantly differ across the diagnostic categories of psychotic and mood disorders (h(2)=0.40-0.47). The way in which catatonia is defined has a strong impact on familiality estimates with some catatonia phenotypes exhibiting substantial familial aggregation, which may inform about the most adequate phenotypes for molecular studies. From a familial-genetic perspective, the catatonia phenotype in psychotic and mood disorders has a transdiagnostic character. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Evaluation of Bipolar Disorder in Children and Adolescents Referred to a Mood Service: Diagnostic Pathways and Manic Dimensions.

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    Ferreira-Maia, Ana P; Boronat, Alexandre C; Boarati, Miguel A; Fu-I, Lee; Wang, Yuan-Pang

    2016-11-01

    Few studies have examined pediatric mental health services for early-onset bipolar disorder (BD). The goal of this study was to describe diagnostic pathways and manic dimensions in BD among referred children and adolescents. Data were obtained from a review of the charts of 814 subjects, 2 to 17 years of age, with a complaint of mood disturbances who were referred between 2003 and 2012 to a university-based child and adolescent clinic that specializes in mood disorders. After screening, eligible participants (N=494) were systematically assessed and followed to determine diagnoses on the basis of criteria in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition, Text Revision in accordance with the best-estimate approach. Manic symptoms were subjected to principal component analysis to investigate the dimensional bipolar profile of the sample. Among the total help-seeking sample, approximately one third of the participants dropped out at intake and, after an average follow-up of 1.7 years, one third had been determined to meet criteria for BD and one third did not fulfill operational criteria for BD. The diagnostic status was changed in 35% of patients: approximately 10% were false positive (going from any bipolar diagnosis to a nonbipolar diagnosis) and approximately 25% were false negative (going from a nonbipolar diagnosis to any bipolar diagnosis). Most patients who converted to a bipolar diagnosis were initially labeled with major depressive disorder or attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder and had a longer follow-up period. Relevant manic dimensions were elation, grandiosity, and disruption, which explained 41.4% of total variance. Regular reappraisal and follow-up of children and adolescents with mood disturbances provides a window for detection of BD (eg, of core manic dimensions). A coordinated and hierarchical connection among pediatric mental health services with different degrees of specialization is recommended.

  9. Group cognitive behaviour therapy for adults with Asperger syndrome and anxiety or mood disorder: a case series.

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    Weiss, Jonathan A; Lunsky, Yona

    2010-01-01

    Individuals with Asperger syndrome are at increased risk for mental health problems compared with the general population, especially with regard to mood and anxiety disorders. Generic mental health services are often ill-equipped to offer psychotherapeutic treatments to this population, and specialized supports are difficult to find. This case series used a manualized cognitive behaviour therapy group programme (Mind Over Mood) with three adults diagnosed with Asperger syndrome, who were each unable to access psychotherapy through mainstream mental health services. This review highlights the benefits of a cognitive behaviour therapy (CBT) group approach for adults with Asperger syndrome and suggests some potential modifications to traditional CBT provision.  © 2010 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  10. Is blunted cardiovascular reactivity in depression mood-state dependent? A comparison of major depressive disorder remitted depression and healthy controls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salomon, Kristen; Bylsma, Lauren M; White, Kristi E; Panaite, Vanessa; Rottenberg, Jonathan

    2013-10-01

    Prior work has repeatedly demonstrated that people who have current major depression exhibit blunted cardiovascular reactivity to acute stressors (e.g., Salomon et al., 2009). A key question regards the psychobiological basis for these deficits, including whether such deficits are depressed mood-state dependent or whether these effects are trait-like and are observed outside of depression episodes in vulnerable individuals. To examine this issue, we assessed cardiovascular reactivity to a speech stressor task and a forehead cold pressor in 50 individuals with current major depressive disorder (MDD), 25 with remitted major depression (RMD), and 45 healthy controls. Heart rate (HR), blood pressure and impedance cardiography were assessed and analyses controlled for BMI and sex. Significant group effects were found for SBP, HR, and PEP for the speech preparation period and HR, CO, and PEP during the speech. For each of these parameters, only the MDD group exhibited attenuated reactivity as well as impaired SBP recovery. Reactivity and recovery in the RMD group more closely resembled the healthy controls. Speeches given by the MDD group were rated as less persuasive than the RMD or healthy controls' speeches. No significant differences were found for the cold pressor. Blunted cardiovascular reactivity and impaired recovery in current major depression may be mood-state dependent phenomena and may be more reflective of motivational deficits than deficits in the physiological integrity of the cardiovascular system.

  11. Depressive Mood and Testosterone Related to Declarative Verbal Memory Decline in Middle-Aged Caregivers of Children with Eating Disorders

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    Ángel Romero-Martínez

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Caring for children diagnosed with a chronic psychological disorder such as an eating disorder (ED can be used as a model of chronic stress. This kind of stress has been reported to have deleterious effects on caregivers’ cognition, particularly in verbal declarative memory of women caregivers. Moreover, high depressive mood and variations in testosterone (T levels moderate this cognitive decline. The purpose of this study was to characterize whether caregivers of individuals with EDs (n = 27 show declarative memory impairments compared to non-caregivers caregivers (n = 27, using for this purpose a standardized memory test (Rey’s Auditory Verbal Learning Test. Its purpose was also to examine the role of depressive mood and T in memory decline. Results showed that ED caregivers presented high depressive mood, which was associated to worse verbal memory performance, especially in the case of women. In addition, all caregivers showed high T levels. Nonetheless, only in the case of women caregivers did T show a curvilinear relationship with verbal memory performance, meaning that the increases of T were associated to the improvement in verbal memory performance, but only up to a certain point, as after such point T continued to increase and memory performance decreased. Thus, chronic stress due to caregiving was associated to disturbances in mood and T levels, which in turn was associated to verbal memory decline. These findings should be taken into account in the implementation of intervention programs for helping ED caregivers cope with caregiving situations and to prevent the risk of a pronounced verbal memory decline.

  12. Correlates of current suicide risk among Thai patients with bipolar I disorder: findings from the Thai Bipolar Disorder Registry

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    Suttajit S

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Sirijit Suttajit,1 Suchat Paholpak,2 Somrak Choovanicvong,3 Khanogwan Kittiwattanagul,4 Wetid Pratoomsri,5 Manit Srisurapanont1On behalf of the Thai Bipolar Registry Group1Department of Psychiatry, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai, 2Department of Psychiatry, Khon Kaen University, Khon Kaen, 3Srithanya Hospital, Nonthaburi, 4Khon Kaen Rajanagarindra Psychiatric Hospital, Khon Kaen, 5Chachoengsao Hospital, Chachoengsao, ThailandBackground: The Thai Bipolar Disorder Registry was a prospective, multisite, naturalistic study conducted in 24 hospitals across Thailand. This study aimed to examine the correlates of current suicide risk in Thai patients with bipolar I disorder.Methods: Participants were adult inpatients or outpatients with bipolar disorder, based on the Diagnosis and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, fourth edition. All were assessed by using the Mini International Neuropsychiatric Interview (MINI, version 5. The severity of current suicide risk was determined by using the total score of the MINI suicidality module. Mood symptoms were assessed by using the Young Mania Rating Scale and the Montgomery Asberg Depression Rating Scale.Results: The data of 383 bipolar I disorder patients were included in the analyses. Of these, 363 (94.8% were outpatients. The mean (standard deviation of the MINI suicide risk score was 1.88 (5.0. The demographic/clinical variables significantly associated with the MINI suicide risk scores included age, number of overall previous episodes, the Young Mania Rating Scale score, the Montgomery Asberg Depression Rating Scale scores, and the Clinical Global Impression Severity of Illness Scale for Bipolar Disorder mania score, depression score, and overall score. The variables affecting the differences of suicide risk scores between or among groups were type of first mood episode, a history of rapid cycling, anxiety disorders, and alcohol use disorders. The stepwise multiple linear regression model revealed

  13. Single-Session Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation Temporarily Improves Symptoms, Mood, and Self-Regulatory Control in Bulimia Nervosa: A Randomised Controlled Trial.

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    Kekic, Maria; McClelland, Jessica; Bartholdy, Savani; Boysen, Elena; Musiat, Peter; Dalton, Bethan; Tiza, Meyzi; David, Anthony S; Campbell, Iain C; Schmidt, Ulrike

    2017-01-01

    Evidence suggests that pathological eating behaviours in bulimia nervosa (BN) are underpinned by alterations in reward processing and self-regulatory control, and by functional changes in neurocircuitry encompassing the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC). Manipulation of this region with transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) may therefore alleviate symptoms of the disorder. This double-blind sham-controlled proof-of-principle trial investigated the effects of bilateral tDCS over the DLPFC in adults with BN. Thirty-nine participants (two males) received three sessions of tDCS in a randomised and counterbalanced order: anode right/cathode left (AR/CL), anode left/cathode right (AL/CR), and sham. A battery of psychological/neurocognitive measures was completed before and after each session and the frequency of bulimic behaviours during the following 24-hours was recorded. AR/CL tDCS reduced eating disorder cognitions (indexed by the Mizes Eating Disorder Cognitions Questionnaire-Revised) when compared to AL/CR and sham tDCS. Both active conditions suppressed the self-reported urge to binge-eat and increased self-regulatory control during a temporal discounting task. Compared to sham stimulation, mood (assessed with the Profile of Mood States) improved after AR/CL but not AL/CR tDCS. Lastly, the three tDCS sessions had comparable effects on the wanting/liking of food and on bulimic behaviours during the 24 hours post-stimulation. These data suggest that single-session tDCS transiently improves symptoms of BN. They also help to elucidate possible mechanisms of action and highlight the importance of selecting the optimal electrode montage. Multi-session trials are needed to determine whether tDCS has potential for development as a treatment for adult BN.

  14. Application of Chinese version of Mood Disorder Questionnaire in patients with mood disorder%中文版心境障碍问卷在心境障碍患者中的应用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    曹岚; 方贻儒; 苑成梅; 李则挚; 黄佳; 王勇; 洪武; 彭代辉; 易正辉; 胡莺燕

    2011-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the feasibility of Chinese version of Mood Disorder Questionnaire ( MDQ-C) in screening patients with mood disorder, and analyse the clinical characteristics of patients with potential bipolar disorder in those with depression disorder. Methods Three hundred and eight patients with mood disorder were evaluated by MDQ-C, including 134 patients with bipolar disorder( bipolar disorder group) and 174 patients with depression disorder (depression disorder group) . The clinical characteristics of patients with MDQ-C score^5 and those with MDQ-C score 5 in depression disorder group(34. 5%, 60/174) was significantly lower than that in bipolar disorder group (64.9%, 87/134) (x2 =28.121, P= 0.000). Logistic regression analysis revealed that the majority of patients with depression disorder and MDQ-C score >5 were males (odds ratio =0.342, P =0.004) and younger ones age <25 years (odds ratio =0.952, P = 0.001), and were characterized by appetite increase at first episode (odds ratio =5.007, P =0.029). Conclusion A substantial proportion of patients with depression disorder may have unrecognized bipolar disorder, and MDQ-C may serve as a screening tool to increase the recognition of bipolar disorder. Patients with depression disorder and characteristics of male gender, age < 25 years and appetite increase at first episode may potentially be those with bipolar disorder.%目的 探讨中文版心境障碍问卷( MDQ-C)筛查双相障碍的可行性,对抑郁障碍患者中有双相障碍可能的患者进行临床特征分析.方法 采用MDQ-C对308例心境障碍患者进行测评,包括双相障碍134例(双相障碍组)和抑郁障碍174例(抑郁障碍组).对抑郁障碍组中MDQ得分≥5和MDQ得分<5的患者的临床特征进行比较分析.结果 抑郁障碍组患者MDQ得分(3.90±2.92)明显低于双相障碍组(6.48±3.76),差异有统计学意义(t=6.574,P=0.000);抑郁障碍组MDQ得分≥5的患者比例(34.5%,60/174)

  15. Does transcranial direct current stimulation to prefrontal cortex affect mood and emotional memory retrieval in healthy individuals?

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    Morgan, Helen M; Davis, Nick J; Bracewell, R Martyn

    2014-01-01

    Studies using transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) of prefrontal cortex to improve symptoms of depression have had mixed results. We examined whether using tDCS to change the balance of activity between left and right dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC) can alter mood and memory retrieval of emotional material in healthy volunteers. Participants memorised emotional images, then tDCS was applied bilaterally to DLPFC while they performed a stimulus-response compatibility task. Participants were then presented with a set of images for memory retrieval. Questionnaires to examine mood and motivational state were administered at the beginning and end of each session. Exploratory data analyses showed that the polarity of tDCS to DLPFC influenced performance on a stimulus-response compatibility task and this effect was dependent on participants' prior motivational state. However, tDCS polarity had no effect on the speed or accuracy of memory retrieval of emotional images and did not influence positive or negative affect. These findings suggest that the balance of activity between left and right DLPFC does not play a critical role in the mood state of healthy individuals. We suggest that the efficacy of prefrontal tDCS depends on the initial activation state of neurons and future work should take this into account.

  16. Transtorno de estresse pós-traumático e transtorno de humor bipolar Posttraumatic stress disorder and bipolar mood disorder

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    Rodrigo Machado Vieira

    2003-06-01

    Full Text Available O Transtorno Bipolar (THB não é somente uma condição endógena. Severos eventos negativos durante a vida influenciam o desenvolvimento do primeiro episódio e alteram o curso do THB durante a vida. O Transtorno de Estresse Pós-Traumático (TEPT é uma severa e incapacitante doença mental que afeta uma significativa parcela da população, em algum momento de suas vidas. A presença concomitante de TEPT e THB parece mais freqüente que anteriormente sugerido, e pacientes psicóticos com história de trauma tem sintomas mais severos e maior tendência a abusar de substância psicoativas ilícitas. Pensamentos intrusivos e pesadelos ocorrem com freqüência nos pacientes com TEPT e têm sido associados aos transtornos de humor. O tratamento farmacológico dessa comorbidade ainda está relacionado a estudo empíricos ou não-controlados. Neste artigo, são revisados aspectos atuais relacionados a essa comorbidade e enfatizados aspectos referentes à epidemiologia, etiologia, curso e tratamento farmacológico da comorbidade entre TEPT e THB. Especialmente, este estudo enfatiza a importância de avaliar sistematicamente a história de trauma em pacientes com THB.Bipolar disorder (BD is not only an endogenous condition. Severe negative life events have been shown to influence the development of the first episode and lifetime course of BD. Posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD is a severe and incapacitating mental condition that affect a significant proportion of the general population at some time in their lives. The concomitant presence of BD and PTSD has been shown to be more frequent than previously suggested and psychotic patients with trauma histories have a tendency to present more severe symptoms and are more proned to present substance use disorders. Trauma-related intrusive memories and nightmares of PTSD have been associated with mood changes. Also, kindling and behavioral sensitization have been proposed to explain the etiology and

  17. Familial risk for mood disorder and the personality risk factor, neuroticism, interact in their association with frontolimbic serotonin 2A receptor binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frokjaer, Vibe G; Vinberg, Maj; Erritzoe, David; Baaré, William; Holst, Klaus Kähler; Mortensen, Erik Lykke; Arfan, Haroon; Madsen, Jacob; Jernigan, Terry L; Kessing, Lars Vedel; Knudsen, Gitte Moos

    2010-04-01

    Life stress is a robust risk factor for later development of mood disorders, particularly for individuals at familial risk. Likewise, scoring high on the personality trait neuroticism is associated with an increased risk for mood disorders. Neuroticism partly reflects stress vulnerability and is positively correlated to frontolimbic serotonin 2A (5-HT(2A)) receptor binding. Here, we investigate whether neuroticism interacts with familial risk in relation to frontolimbic 5-HT(2A) receptor binding. Twenty-one healthy twins with a co-twin history of mood disorder and 16 healthy twins without a co-twin history of mood disorder were included. They answered self-report personality questionnaires and underwent [(18)F]altanserin positron emission tomography. We found a significant interaction between neuroticism and familial risk in predicting the frontolimbic 5-HT(2A) receptor binding (p=0.026) in an analysis adjusting for age and body mass index. Within the high-risk group only, neuroticism and frontolimbic 5-HT(2A) receptor binding was positively associated (p=0.0037). In conclusion, our data indicate that familial risk and neuroticism interact in their relation to frontolimbic 5-HT(2A) receptor binding. These findings point at a plausible neurobiological link between genetic and personality risk factors and vulnerability to developing mood disorders. It contributes to our understanding of why some people at high risk develop mood disorders while others do not. We speculate that an increased stress reactivity in individuals at high familial risk for mood disorders might enhance the effect of neuroticism in shaping the impact of potential environmental stress and thereby influence serotonergic neurotransmission.

  18. Temporal course and structural relationships among dimensions of temperament and DSM-IV anxiety and mood disorder constructs.

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    Brown, Timothy A

    2007-05-01

    The temporal stability and directional relations among dimensions of temperament (e.g., neuroticism) and selected Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (4th ed.; DSM-IV; American Psychiatric Association, 1994) disorder constructs (depression, generalized anxiety disorder, social phobia) were examined in 606 outpatients with anxiety and mood disorders, assessed on 3 occasions over a 2-year period. Neuroticism/behavioral inhibition (N/BI) and behavioral activation/positive affect (BA/P) accounted for the cross-sectional covariance of the DSM-IV constructs. Although N/BI evidenced the most change of the constructs examined, initial levels of N/BI predicted less improvement in 2 of the 3 disorder constructs. Unlike the DSM-IV disorder constructs, the temporal stability of N/BI increased as a function of initial severity. Moreover, N/BI explained all the temporal covariation of the DSM-IV disorder constructs. The results are discussed in regard to conceptual models of temperament that define N/BI and BA/P as higher order dimensions accounting for the course and covariation of emotional disorder psychopathology.

  19. [Validation of the Spanish version of the Mood Disorder Questionnaire to detect bipolar disorder type II in patients with major depression disorder].

    Science.gov (United States)

    González, Alfonso; Arias, Astrid; Mata, Salvador; Lima, Lucimney

    2009-06-01

    The Mood Disorder Questionnaire (MDQ) is an inventory used to detect bipolar disorder type II (BD II) and it has been validated in several countries, other than Venezuela. For this reason, the authors tried to determine the criterion validity of the Venezuelan version of the MDQ in Venezuelan patients. The study was carried out in two stages at the Psychiatric Department of the Hospital Vargas of Caracas, Venezuela, which is a general teaching hospital. A group of 199 adult outpatients, who had been previously diagnosed as suffering from major depression disorder--single episode or recurrent--were evaluated. Initially, they were diagnosed using the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV for Axis I Disorders (SCID-I). Afterwards, they were asked to answer the MDQ using a cut-off point > or = 7/13. The protocol was approved by the institutional review board of the Hospital Vargas of Caracas. A total of 78.4% of the subjects were female. The mean age was 43.60 years for males (SD = 14.19) and 43.94 years for females (SD = 12.06). The frequency of false unipolar patients was 28.1% (23.6% bipolar disorder type I and 4.5% BD II). While comparing the results of the SCID-I and the MDQ, a sensibility of 100.0% (95% CI: 0.66-1.00) and a specificity of 61.1% (95% CI: 0.53-0.68) were found for the diagnosis of BD II. According to our results, the MDQ with a cut-off point > or = 7/13 is a valid instrument to detect the bipolar disorder type II in Venezuelan depressed outpatients.

  20. Chronic unpredictable stress (CUS)-induced anxiety and related mood disorders in a zebrafish model: altered brain proteome profile implicates mitochondrial dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakravarty, Sumana; Reddy, Bommana R; Sudhakar, Sreesha R; Saxena, Sandeep; Das, Tapatee; Meghah, Vuppalapaty; Brahmendra Swamy, Cherukuvada V; Kumar, Arvind; Idris, Mohammed M

    2013-01-01

    Anxiety and depression are major chronic mood disorders, and the etiopathology for each appears to be repeated exposure to diverse unpredictable stress factors. Most of the studies on anxiety and related mood disorders are performed in rodents, and a good model is chronic unpredictable stress (CUS). In this study, we have attempted to understand the molecular basis of the neuroglial and behavioral changes underlying CUS-induced mood disorders in the simplest vertebrate model, the zebrafish, Danio rerio. Zebrafish were subjected to a CUS paradigm in which two different stressors were used daily for 15 days, and thorough behavioral analyses were performed to assess anxiety and related mood disorder phenotypes using the novel tank test, shoal cohesion and scototaxis. Fifteen days of exposure to chronic stressors appears to induce an anxiety and related mood disorder phenotype. Decreased neurogenesis, another hallmark of anxiety and related disorders in rodents, was also observed in this zebrafish model. The common molecular markers of rodent anxiety and related disorders, corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF), calcineurin (ppp3r1a) and phospho cyclic AMP response element binding protein (pCREB), were also replicated in the fish model. Finally, using 2DE FTMS/ITMSMS proteomics analyses, 18 proteins were found to be deregulated in zebrafish anxiety and related disorders. The most affected process was mitochondrial function, 4 of the 18 differentially regulated proteins were mitochondrial proteins: PHB2, SLC25A5, VDAC3 and IDH2, as reported in rodent and clinical samples. Thus, the zebrafish CUS model and proteomics can facilitate not only uncovering new molecular targets of anxiety and related mood disorders but also the routine screening of compounds for drug development.

  1. Suicide trends in discharged patients with mood disorders: associations with selective serotonin uptake inhibitors and comorbid substance misuse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fazel, Seena; Grann, Martin; Goodwin, Guy M

    2006-03-01

    We determined the rates of suicide in two consecutive time intervals of low and high selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) prescribing for men and women with mood disorders, who were at relatively high risk of suicide, in a discharged hospitalized sample. High quality Swedish national registers were cross-linked to estimate rates of suicide. The results were stratified by three age-bands, and rates of comorbid substance misuse were explored. These were compared with general population suicide rates. There were 1606 suicides in discharged patients with mood disorders. Suicide rates decreased for all women during 1989-94 and 1995-2000 [odds ratio (OR) = 0.74, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 0.64-0.85] and a trend was found towards lower rates in men (OR = 0.89, 95% CI = 0.78-1.02). Approximately 90% of suicides occurred in those aged over 40 years; thus, the inpatient sample lacked the power to discriminate clear effects in the younger age groups. There was no increase or decrease in the rates of substance use disorders in patients who committed suicide. There were 20 851 suicides in the general population during 1989-2000. Suicide rates were lower at all ages for men and women in the general population in the interval of high SSRI prescribing. We conclude that there is no evidence from this study of an increase in suicide rates following the introduction of SSRIs in the general population or in a high-risk inpatient sample.

  2. The Effect of Group Psychoeducation Program on Medication Adherence in Patients with Bipolar Mood Disorders: a Randomized Controlled Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farnaz Rahmani

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Medication nonadherence is highly prevalent in patients with bipolar disorders and often results in worsening disease prognosis. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of group psychoeducation on medication adherence in female patients with bipolar mood disorder type I. Methods: This randomized controlled trial was conducted on 76 patients with bipolar mood disorder admitted in female psychiatric wards of Razi teaching hospital, Tabriz, Iran. The participants were selected by convenience sampling method and were randomly assigned to experimental and control groups. Patients in experimental group received 10 continuous 90 minutes sessions of psychoeducation, two times a week. Medication adherence was measured using the medicine check list and medication adherence rating scale (MARS before and after intervention. Data analysis was performed with SPSS ver.13. Results: There was no significant difference between two groups regarding medication adherence before the intervention. After the study intervention, the mean scores of medication adherence check list and medication adherence rating scale in the experimental group were significantly higher than the control group. Conclusion: Since group psychoeducation was effective in improving patients' medication adherence, it could be recommended for psychiatric nurses to apply this intervention in the clinical setting.

  3. Is the association between offspring intelligence and parents' educational attainment influenced by schizophrenia or mood disorder in parents?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aja Neergaard Greve

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Results from twin, family, and adoption studies all suggest that general intelligence is highly heritable. Several studies have shown lower premorbid intelligence in individuals before the onset of both mood disorders and psychosis, as well as in children and adolescents at genetic high risk for developing schizophrenia. Based on these findings, we aim to investigate if the association between educational achievement in parents and intelligence in their offspring is influenced by schizophrenia or mood disorder in parents. In a large population-based sample of young adult male conscripts (n = 156,531 the presence of a mental disorder in the parents were associated with significantly lower offspring scores on a test of general intelligence, the Børge Priens Prøve (BPP, and higher educational attainment in parents was significantly associated with higher BPP test scores in offspring. A significant interaction suggested that the positive association between maternal education and offspring intelligence was stronger in offspring of mothers with schizophrenia compared to the control group (p = 0.03. The associations between parental education and offspring intelligence are also observed when restricting the sample to conscripts whose parents are diagnosed after 30 years of age. In conclusion, findings from this study show a more positive effect of education on offspring intelligence in mothers with schizophrenia compared to mothers from the control group. This effect could have both environmental and genetic explanations.

  4. Three types of self-efficacy associated with medication adherence in patients with co-occurring HIV and substance use disorders, but only when mood disorders are present

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reif S

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Susan Reif,1 Rae Jean Proeschold-Bell,1,2 Jia Yao,1 Sara LeGrand,1,2 Anna Uehara,2 Edgar Asiimwe,2 Evelyn Byrd Quinlivan31Duke Center for Health Policy and Inequalities Research, 2Duke Global Health Institute, Duke University, Durham, NC, 3Center for Infectious Diseases, University of North Carolina Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC, USABackground: Adherence with medication regimens for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV is a life-saving behavior for people with HIV infection, yet adherence is challenging for many individuals with co-occurring substance use and/or mood disorders. Medication-taking self-efficacy, which is the confidence that one can take one's medication as prescribed, is associated with better adherence with HIV medication. However, little is known about the influence that other kinds of self-efficacy have on adherence with HIV medication, especially among HIV-infected individuals with co-occurring substance use and/or mood disorders. We sought to examine the relationship between adherence with HIV medication among substance users and three specific kinds of self-efficacy, ie, one's confidence that one can communicate with medical providers, get support, and manage one's mood. We further sought to examine whether symptoms of depression and anxiety moderate these relationships.Methods: Patients were recruited from three HIV clinics in the southeastern United States as part of an integrated study of treatment for HIV and substance use.Results: We interviewed 154 patients with HIV and substance use who reported taking HIV medications. Based on symptoms of depression and anxiety using the Patient Health Questionnaire-9 and the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale-Anxiety, 63% had probable depression and/or anxiety. Higher levels of self-efficacy in provider communication (β = 3.86, P < 0.01, getting needed support (β = 2.82, P < 0.01, and mood management (β = 2.29, P < 0.05 were related to better self-reported adherence with HIV

  5. Electronic self-monitoring of mood using IT platforms in adult patients with bipolar disorder: A systematic review of the validity and evidence

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    Background Various paper-based mood charting instruments are used in the monitoring of symptoms in bipolar disorder. During recent years an increasing number of electronic self-monitoring tools have been developed. The objectives of this systematic review were 1) to evaluate the validity of electronic self-monitoring tools as a method of evaluating mood compared to clinical rating scales for depression and mania and 2) to investigate the effect of electronic self-monitoring tools on clinicall...

  6. Ghrelin's Role in the Hypothalamic-Pituitary-Adrenal Axis Stress Response: Implications for Mood Disorders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spencer, S.J.; Emmerzaal, T.L.; Kozicz, L.T.; Andrews, Z.B.

    2015-01-01

    Ghrelin is a stomach hormone normally associated with feeding behavior and energy homeostasis. Recent studies highlight that ghrelin targets the brain to regulate a diverse number of functions, including learning, memory, motivation, stress responses, anxiety, and mood. In this review, we discuss re

  7. [Transcranial direct current stimulation for depressive disorders].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aust, S; Palm, U; Padberg, F; Bajbouj, M

    2015-12-01

    Major depressive disorders are one of the most prevalent psychiatric disorders worldwide but approximately 20-30 % of patients do not respond to standard guideline conform treatment. Recent neuroimaging studies in depressive patients revealed altered activation patterns in prefrontal brain areas and that successful cognitive behavioral therapy and psychopharmacological interventions are associated with a reversal of these neural alterations. Therefore, a direct modulation of prefrontal brain activation by non-invasive brain stimulation techniques, such as transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) seems to be a promising and innovative approach for the treatment of depressive disorders. In addition, recent neuropsychological findings indicated an augmentation of positive tDCS effects by simultaneous external activation of the stimulated brain area, for example by cognitive training tasks. Based on these findings, the possibility to augment cognitive-emotional learning processes during cognitive behavioral therapy by simultaneous tDCS to increase antidepressive therapeutic effects is discussed in this article.

  8. Neurosurgical treatment of mood disorders: traditional psychosurgery and the advent of deep brain stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sachdev, Perminder S; Chen, Xiaohua

    2009-01-01

    From its peak in the 1940s and 1950s, psychosurgery (or, neurosurgery for psychiatric disorders) has had a gradual decline, with only a few centers around the world continuing with the procedure into the 1980s and 1990s. With recent developments in brain stimulation techniques, the continuing relevance of psychosurgery in the treatment of psychiatric disorders is worthy of examination. A review of databases (PubMed, Medline, Current Contents and Embase) suggests that psychosurgery in the form of stereotactic focal ablation is still practiced in a few centers, although the number has decreased further from the 1990s. Procedures have not changed substantively, although modern imaging and stereotaxy have made them more precise. No good predictors of treatment response have been identified. There is a major shift in interest to deep brain stimulation (DBS) instead of ablative surgery. Studies of DBS in resistant depression and obsessive-compulsive disorder have been few and have involved small numbers, but this field is growing rapidly. Although ablative psychosurgery using stereotactic procedures continues to be used to a small extent, psychiatrists remain ambivalent about this procedure. The baton of psychosurgery, however, appears to have been passed on to DBS, but more data are needed on technical details and outcomes before the possible therapeutic role of DBS can be established.

  9. The application of mindfulness-based cognitive interventions in the treatment of co-occurring addictive and mood disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoppes, Kimberly

    2006-11-01

    This article reviews the theory, clinical application, and empirical findings on mindfulness-based cognitive therapy (MBCT) for mental health and addictive disorders. Expanding upon the research demonstrating the efficacy of cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) for addiction, this article develops and explores the rationale for combining mindfulness-based interventions with evidence-based CBTs in treating addictive disorders, with an emphasis on substance use disorders with co-occurring mood disorders. This article proposes that deficits in affect--regulation related to the behavioral and emotional effects of neurobiological changes that occur with long-term substance abuse--pose a unique set of challenges in early recovery. Prolonged use of addictive substances impairs the brain pathways that mediate certain affect regulation functions. These functions involve attention and inhibitory control, the saliency of and response to addictive versus natural reward stimuli, and the ability to detach or maintain perspective in response to strong emotional states. In treating this affective dysregulation, which can contribute to the vulnerability to relapse in the early stages of recovery, the affect-regulation-specific focus of MBCT adds a valuable element to augment CBT for addiction. Summarizing magnetic resonance imaging and positron emission tomography findings on the effects of MBCT and the neurobiology of drug addiction, this article outlines directions for further research on potential benefits of MBCT for the recovering individual. Finally, this article describes a structured protocol, developed at the Mount Sinai School of Medicine in New York City, which combines CBT with mindfulness-based intervention, for the treatment of affect-regulation issues specific to co-occurring addictive and mood disorders.

  10. Current debates over nosology of somatoform disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amlan K Jana

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available There is a wide debate among the researchers and clinicians over the diagnostic categories subsumed under the rubric of somatoform disorders (SDs. Recent proposals vary from radical views that call for removing this category altogether to the conservative views that suggests cosmetic changes in the diagnostic criteria of SDs. We have the reviewed the relevant literature through PUBMED search supplemented with manual search on current concepts of SD.

  11. Neural circuitry of masked emotional face processing in youth with bipolar disorder, severe mood dysregulation, and healthy volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Laura A; Brotman, Melissa A; Bones, Brian L; Chen, Gang; Rosen, Brooke H; Pine, Daniel S; Leibenluft, Ellen

    2014-04-01

    Youth with bipolar disorder (BD) and those with severe, non-episodic irritability (severe mood dysregulation, SMD) show face-emotion labeling deficits. These groups differ from healthy volunteers (HV) in neural responses to emotional faces. It is unknown whether awareness is required to elicit these differences. We compared activation in BD (N=20), SMD (N=18), and HV (N=22) during "Aware" and "Non-aware" priming of shapes by emotional faces. Subjects rated how much they liked the shape. In aware, a face (angry, fearful, happy, neutral, blank oval) appeared (187 ms) before the shape. In non-aware, a face appeared (17 ms), followed by a mask (170 ms), and shape. A Diagnosis-by-Awareness-by-Emotion ANOVA was not significant. There were significant Diagnosis-by-Awareness interactions in occipital regions. BD and SMD showed increased activity for non-aware vs. aware; HV showed the reverse pattern. When subjects viewed angry or neutral faces, there were Emotion-by-Diagnosis interactions in face-emotion processing regions, including the L precentral gyrus, R posterior cingulate, R superior temporal gyrus, R middle occipital gyrus, and L medial frontal gyrus. Regardless of awareness, BD and SMD differ in activation patterns from HV and each other in multiple brain regions, suggesting that BD and SMD are distinct developmental mood disorders.

  12. Neural circuitry of masked emotional face processing in youth with bipolar disorder, severe mood dysregulation, and healthy volunteers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura A. Thomas

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Youth with bipolar disorder (BD and those with severe, non-episodic irritability (severe mood dysregulation, SMD show face-emotion labeling deficits. These groups differ from healthy volunteers (HV in neural responses to emotional faces. It is unknown whether awareness is required to elicit these differences. We compared activation in BD (N = 20, SMD (N = 18, and HV (N = 22 during “Aware” and “Non-aware” priming of shapes by emotional faces. Subjects rated how much they liked the shape. In aware, a face (angry, fearful, happy, neutral, blank oval appeared (187 ms before the shape. In non-aware, a face appeared (17 ms, followed by a mask (170 ms, and shape. A Diagnosis-by-Awareness-by-Emotion ANOVA was not significant. There were significant Diagnosis-by-Awareness interactions in occipital regions. BD and SMD showed increased activity for non-aware vs. aware; HV showed the reverse pattern. When subjects viewed angry or neutral faces, there were Emotion-by-Diagnosis interactions in face-emotion processing regions, including the L precentral gyrus, R posterior cingulate, R superior temporal gyrus, R middle occipital gyrus, and L medial frontal gyrus. Regardless of awareness, BD and SMD differ in activation patterns from HV and each other in multiple brain regions, suggesting that BD and SMD are distinct developmental mood disorders.

  13. Effect of obesity on cognition in adults with and without a mood disorder: study design and methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Restivo, Maria R; McKinnon, Margaret C; Frey, Benicio N; Hall, Geoffrey B; Taylor, Valerie H

    2016-02-29

    Obesity is a common medical illness that is increasingly recognised as conferring risk of decline in cognitive performance, independent of other comorbid medical conditions. Individuals with mood disorders (bipolar disorder (BD) or major depressive disorder (MDD)) display an increased prevalence of both obesity and risk factors for cardiovascular diseases. Moreover, BD and MDD are associated with impairment in cognitive functioning across multiple domains. The independent contribution of obesity to cognitive decline in this population has not been explored. This study examines the impact of obesity on cognition by comparing neuropsychological performance in obese individuals, with or without a mood disorder before and after undergoing bariatric surgery. This study compares measures of declarative memory, executive functioning and attention in obese individuals (body mass index >35 kg/m(2)) with BD or MDD, and 2 control populations (obese individuals without a psychiatric illness and healthy non-obese controls) prior to and following bariatric surgery. Participants (ages 18-60) receive a psychiatric diagnosis via the Structured Clinical Interview for the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition (DSM-IV; SCID). Mood ratings, physical measurements, nutritional and health questionnaires are also administered. A standardised battery of neuropsychological tests aimed at establishing performance in areas of declarative memory, executive functioning and attention are administered. Warrington's Recognition Memory Task (RMT) and an N-Back Task are performed in a 3 T functional MRI to investigate patterns of neural activation during cognitive performance. Additionally, anatomical MRI data are obtained to investigate potential changes in neural structures. Baseline data will be analysed for between-group differences and later compared with postsurgical data to investigate cognitive change. This study has been approved by the Hamilton Integrated

  14. Mood disorder as an early presentation of epidermoid of quadrigeminal cistern

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    Sujita Kumar Kar

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Intracranial epidermoids are space-occupying lesions of rare variant. Although cerebropontine angle and parasellar region are common sites of occurrence, it has been reported in various other parts of the intracranial cavity. Headache and features of increased intracranial tension are the common clinical manifestation. Report of psychiatric symptoms as the initial presentation of epidermoid is not known in literature except a single case report, which describes mutism to be the manifestation of intracranial epidermoid. We present here the case of a young male, who presented with long depressive episode persisting for 3 years with subsequent switch to mania, which persisted for more than 3 years. An episode of unconsciousness warranted neuroimaging, which revealed a large epidermoid of the quadrigeminal cistern. Surgical resection of the epidermoid was done. Persisting mood symptoms had responded to mood stabilizer and antipsychotic treatment.

  15. Mood Disorder as an Early Presentation of Epidermoid of Quadrigeminal Cistern.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kar, Sujita Kumar; Das, Kuntal Kanti; Jaiswal, Awadhesh Kumar; Jaiswal, Sushila

    2017-01-01

    Intracranial epidermoids are space-occupying lesions of rare variant. Although cerebropontine angle and parasellar region are common sites of occurrence, it has been reported in various other parts of the intracranial cavity. Headache and features of increased intracranial tension are the common clinical manifestation. Report of psychiatric symptoms as the initial presentation of epidermoid is not known in literature except a single case report, which describes mutism to be the manifestation of intracranial epidermoid. We present here the case of a young male, who presented with long depressive episode persisting for 3 years with subsequent switch to mania, which persisted for more than 3 years. An episode of unconsciousness warranted neuroimaging, which revealed a large epidermoid of the quadrigeminal cistern. Surgical resection of the epidermoid was done. Persisting mood symptoms had responded to mood stabilizer and antipsychotic treatment.

  16. Circadian rhythms and mood: opportunities for multi-level analyses in genomics and neuroscience: circadian rhythm dysregulation in mood disorders provides clues to the brain's organizing principles, and a touchstone for genomics and neuroscience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jun Z

    2014-03-01

    In the healthy state, both circadian rhythm and mood are stable against perturbations, yet they are capable of adjusting to altered internal cues or ongoing changes in external conditions. The dual demands of stability and flexibility are met by the collective properties of complex neural networks. Disruption of this balance underlies both circadian rhythm abnormality and mood disorders. However, we do not fully understand the network properties that govern the crosstalk between the circadian system and mood regulation. This puzzle reflects a challenge at the center of neurobiology, and its solution requires the successful integration of existing data across all levels of neural organization, from molecules, cells, circuits, network dynamics, to integrated mental function. This essay discusses several open questions confronting the cross-level synthesis, and proposes that circadian regulation, and its role in mood, stands as a uniquely tractable system to study the causal mechanisms of neural adaptation. Also watch the Video Abstract. Editor's suggested further reading in BioEssays Major depressive disorder: A loss of circadian synchrony? Abstract. © 2014 The Author. Bioessays published by WILEY Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Web-based interventions for prevention and treatment of perinatal mood disorders: a systematic review

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    Background Perinatal depression is strikingly common with a prevalence of 10–15 %. The adverse effects of perinatal depression on maternal and child health are profound with considerable costs. Despite this, few women seek medical attention. E-health, providing healthcare via the Internet is an accessible and effective solution for the treatment of depression in the general population. We aimed to conduct a systematic review of web-based interventions for the prevention and treatment of mood ...

  18. Mood disorder with mixed, psychotic features due to vitamin b12 deficiency in an adolescent: case report

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    Tufan Ali

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Vitamin B12 is one of the essential vitamins affecting various systems of the body. Reports of psychiatric disorders due to its deficiency mostly focus on middle aged and elderly patients. Here we report a case of vitamin B 12 deficiency in a 16-year old, male adolescent who presented with mixed mood disorder symptoms with psychotic features. Chief complaints were “irritability, regressive behavior, apathy, crying and truancy” which lasted for a year. Premorbid personality was unremarkable with no substance use/exposure or infections. No stressors were present. The patient was not vegetarian. Past medical history and family history was normal. Neurological examination revealed glossitis, ataxia, rigidity in both shoulders, cog-wheel rigidity in the left elbow, bilateral problems of coordination in cerebellar examination, reduced swinging of the arms and masked face. Romberg’s sign was present. Laboratory evaluations were normal. Endoscopy and biopsy revealed atrophy of the gastric mucosa with Helicobacter Pylori colonization. Schilling test was suggestive of malabsorbtion. He was diagnosed with Mood disorder with Mixed, Psychotic Features due to Vitamin B12 Deficiency and risperidone 0.5 mg/day and intramuscular vitamin B12 500 mcg/day were started along with referral for treatment of Helicobacter pylori. A visit on the second week revealed no psychotic features. Romberg’s sign was negative and cerebellar tests were normal. Extrapyramidal symptoms were reduced while Vitamin B12 levels were elevated. Risperidone was stopped and parenteral Vitamin B12 treatment was continued with monthly injections for 3 months. Follow-up endoscopy and biopsy at the first month demonstrated eradication of H. pylori. He was followed monthly for another 6 months and psychiatric symptoms did not recur at the time of last evaluation. Despite limitations, this case may underline the observation that mood disorders with psychotic features

  19. Sulfasalazine plus Chloroquine-Induced Mood Disorder in a Patient with Rheumatoid Arthritis

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    Gulcan Gulec

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Rheumatoid arthritis is a chronic systemic inflammatory diseasethat affects approximately 0.5-1% of the world population.The current approach to this disease is to start an intensivetreatment without delay once the disease has developed.Various studies in the literature have shown that combinationof disease modifying antirheumatic drugs such as sulfasalazineand chloroquine offers a more advantageous treatment.Although these drugs may cause central nervous system adverseeffects such as serious psychiatric problems includingmania and psychosis, these symptoms have been reported tooccur only infrequently. The present case study reports a femalepatient who was hospitalized due to bipolar affective disorder-mixed episode. She had been receiving 250 mg/daychloroquine for 9 months for rheumatoid arthritis without exhibitingany adverse psychiatric effects. However, upon receivinga combination of 250 mg/day chloroquine and 2 gr/day sulfasalazine,she developed serious psychiatric symptoms.

  20. Autistic-Like Traits in Adult Patients with Mood Disorders and Schizophrenia

    OpenAIRE

    Junko Matsuo; Yoko Kamio; Hidetoshi Takahashi; Miho Ota; Toshiya Teraishi; Hiroaki Hori; Anna Nagashima; Reiko Takei; Teruhiko Higuchi; Nobutaka Motohashi; Hiroshi Kunugi

    2015-01-01

    Autism spectrum disorder often co-occurs with other psychiatric disorders. Although a high prevalence of autistic-like traits/symptoms has been identified in the pediatric psychiatric population of normal intelligence, there are no reports from adult psychiatric population. This study examined whether there is a greater prevalence of autistic-like traits/symptoms in patients with adult-onset psychiatric disorders such as major depressive disorder (MDD), bipolar disorder, or schizophrenia, and...

  1. Mortality of 403 patients with mood disorders 48 to 52 years after their psychiatric hospitalisation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angst, Jules; Hengartner, Michael P; Gamma, Alex; von Zerssen, Detlev; Angst, Felix

    2013-08-01

    The purpose is to analyse differences in mortality among patients with major depressive disorders (MDD), bipolar-II (BP-II), bipolar-I (BP-I) disorders and mania with or without minor depressive disorders and to identify risk factors of mortality. The sample represents all admissions for depression or mania over 5 years (1959-1963) to the Psychiatric Hospital of Zurich University, serving a large area. 403 patients were included and followed up every 5 years until 1985; thereafter, mortality data were collected repeatedly until 2009 when 352 (87 %) patients had died. Standardised mortality ratios (SMRs) were computed and survival analyses applied. With the exception of BP-II disorder, the three other diagnostic groups showed elevated SMRs. The group with mania had the highest SMR for cardiovascular deaths and the group with MDD the highest for deaths by suicide. Mortality was also high among patients with late-onset MDD. Across the diagnostic spectrum, we found differences in risk factors for mortality, such as a family history of suicides and personality type: more anxious patients with MDD lived longer, and among patients with BP disorders, more tense (aggressive) types had shorter lives. Long-term medication had a protective effect against mortality in patients with MDD during years 1-9 and in patients with BP disorders during years 1-19 after admission. We found marked differences in causes of death and risk factors between subgroups of mood disorders. For the purpose of further research, it would be recommendable to distinguish pure mania from bipolar disorders.

  2. Perinatal and postnatal risk factors for disruptive mood dysregulation disorder at age 11: 2004 Pelotas Birth Cohort Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munhoz, Tiago N; Santos, Iná S; Barros, Aluísio J D; Anselmi, Luciana; Barros, Fernando C; Matijasevich, Alicia

    2017-06-01

    To date, there have been few studies of DMDD examining the risk factors during gestation and during the first years of life. We assessed the perinatal and postnatal risk factors associated with the occurrence of disruptive mood dysregulation disorder (DMDD) by 11 years of age. Prospective longitudinal study. Mothers completed a standardized questionnaire shortly after childbirth. We used the Development and Well-Being Assessment, administered to the mothers or legal guardians, to identify DMDD among the 11-year-old subjects. We also employed logistic regression to perform bivariate and multivariate analyses, using a theoretical model of conceptual analysis. We evaluated data related to 3563 subjects at 11 years of age. The prevalence of DMDD was 2.5% (95% CI=2.0-3.0). After adjusting for potential confounders, we found that the early risk factors for the development of DMDD by 11 years of age were maternal mood symptoms during pregnancy, maternal depression during the first years after childbirth, and low maternal level of education. We were unable to evaluate the genetic characteristics of the family at the birth of each subject, and there were no data available regarding the prenatal or postnatal mental health of the fathers. The prevalence of DMDD in early adolescence is low and its risk factors are related to potentially modifiable maternal characteristics. Scientific evidence indicates that DMDD is a major predictor of other psychiatric disorders, especially depression and anxiety. Effective prenatal and postnatal mental health care could prevent mental disorders in offspring. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Do parents know best? Parent-reported vs. child-reported depression symptoms as predictors of future child mood disorder in a high-risk sample.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Katie J S; Mars, Becky; Lewis, Gemma; Rice, Frances; Sellers, Ruth; Thapar, Ajay K; Craddock, Nicholas; Collishaw, Stephan; Thapar, Anita

    2012-12-10

    Parents with depression are thought to be unreliable reporters of children's depression symptoms, but findings are contradictory and primarily focus on discrepancies between parent and child reports rather than on the predictive validity of informants. Using a sample of parents with recurrent depression, our analyses utilised data from a prospective high-risk longitudinal study (the Early Prediction of Adolescent Depression study) to investigate whether baseline parental reports of child depression symptoms predicted new onset mood disorder (NOMD) in children. The sample included 287 parents with a history of recurrent depression and their adolescent offspring (aged 9-17 at baseline). Families were assessed at three time points. The Child and Adolescent Psychiatric assessment (parent and child versions) was used to assess the number of child depression symptoms (computed separately by informant at baseline) and NOMD at follow-up. All DSM-IV diagnoses were confirmed by two child psychiatrists. Parent reports of child depression symptoms at baseline significantly predicted NOMD in children. Secondary analyses stratifying the sample according to child age showed that, for younger children, parent reports were significantly better at predicting NOMD compared to child reports. For children aged 12 or older, there were no significant differences between parent and child reports in predicting NOMD. The pattern of association remained the same once we controlled for baseline levels of parental depression. Not all parents were currently experiencing an episode of depression at the baseline assessments; the sample consisted predominantly of mothers, thus findings may not be applicable to fathers or families without a history of parental depression. In this high risk sample, child and parent ratings of depression predict new onset child mood disorder to a similar degree. Clinicians and researchers should give due consideration to parent ratings of their children's depression

  4. [J. Delay hypothymic disorder. Current aspects and pertinence of the concept in schizophrenic states].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dollfus, S; Petit, M

    1993-01-01

    In the first part, the authors re-examined the concept of "hypothymie" described by J. Delay in 1946. "Hypothymie" is characterized by a mood disorder and particularly by an absence of mood and it is a fundamental syndrome of hebephrenia. From this syndrome "hypothymie", others signs will appear such as schizophrenic symptoms (characterized by attention disorder and formal thought disorder), paranoid symptoms or catatonic ones. Several authors, like J. Delay, had emphasized the importance of the mood disorder (an absence) in this pathology. It is the case of Kretschmer, Dide and Guiraud (who evoked the "athymhormie"), Bleuler, Kraepelin and also Stransky, Griesinger and at the beginning of the XIXth century, Haslam in England and Pinel in France. In the present time, "hypothymie" is related to some current concepts, especially the deficit forms of schizophrenia described by Carpenter and the schizophrenia type II defined by Crow. In the second part, the relationships between paranoid symptoms, depression and "hypothymie" were studied. The authors stressed the fact that there is an overlap between depressive and paranoid symptoms at the acute phase. They gave an illustration including 51 patients in an acute phase and in a stabilized one. In the acute phase, there was a negative correlation between positive symptoms and depressive symptoms in particular between conceptual disorganization, suspiciousness/persecution, positive formal thought disorder and depression (r = -0.65, p < 0.01; r = -0.57, p < 0.01; r = -0.66, p < 0.01 respectively). These correlations disappeared at discharge of the hospital and did not exist in the stabilized group.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  5. Pathophysiology of mood disorders in temporal lobe epilepsy Fisiopatologia dos transtornos de humor na epilepsia do lobo temporal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ludmyla Kandratavicius

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: There is accumulating evidence that the limbic system is pathologically involved in cases of psychiatric comorbidities in temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE patients. Our objective was to develop a conceptual framework describing how neuropathological, neurochemical and electrophysiological aspects might contribute to the development of psychiatric symptoms in TLE and the putative neurobiological mechanisms that cause mood disorders in this patient subgroup. METHODS: In this review, clinical, experimental and neuropathological findings, as well as neurochemical features of the limbic system were examined together to enhance our understanding of the association between TLE and psychiatric comorbidities. Finally, the value of animal models in epilepsy and mood disorders was discussed. CONCLUSIONS:TLE and psychiatric symptoms coexist more frequently than chance would predict. Alterations and neurotransmission disturbance among critical anatomical networks, and impaired or aberrant plastic changes might predispose patients with TLE to mood disorders. Clinical and experimental studies of the effects of seizures on behavior and electrophysiological patterns may offer a model of how limbic seizures increase the vulnerability of TLE patients to precipitants of psychiatric symptoms.OBJETIVO: Há evidências crescentes do envolvimento do sistema límbico nas comorbidades psiquiátricas associadas à epilepsia do lobo temporal (ELT. Nosso objetivo foi descrever o panorama atual das alterações neuropatológicas, neuroquímicas e eletrofisiológicas que podem contribuir para o desenvolvimento de sintomas psiquiátricos na ELT e explorar possíveis mecanismos neurobiológicos que podem levar ao aparecimento das desordens de humor nesse subgrupo de pacientes. MÉTODOS: Achados clínicos, de modelos experimentais e neuropatológicos foram revistos, assim como características neuroquímicas do sistema límbico foram examinadas em conjunto para auxiliar

  6. Presence or absence of cognitive complaints in Parkinson's disease: mood disorder or anosognosia?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro, Pollyanna Celso F; Aquino, Camila Catherine; Felício, André C; Doná, Flávia; Medeiros, Leonardo M I; Silva, Sônia M C A; Ferraz, Henrique Ballalai; Bertolucci, Paulo Henrique F; Borges, Vanderci

    2016-06-01

    We intended to evaluate whether non-demented Parkinsons's disease (PD) patients, with or without subjective cognitive complaint, demonstrate differences between them and in comparison to controls concerning cognitive performance and mood. We evaluated 77 subjects between 30 and 70 years, divided as follows: PD without cognitive complaints (n = 31), PD with cognitive complaints (n = 21) and controls (n = 25). We applied the following tests: SCOPA-Cog, Trail Making Test-B, Phonemic Fluency, Clock Drawing Test, Boston Naming Test, Neuropsychiatric Inventory, Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS) and Beck Depression Inventory. PD without complaints presented lower total score on Scales for outcome of Parkinson's disease-cognition as compared to controls (p = 0.048). PD with complaints group showed higher scores on HADS (p = 0.011). PD without complaints group showed poorer cognitive performance compared to controls, but was similar to the PD with complaints group. Moreover, this group was different from the PD without complaints and control groups concerning mood.

  7. Anxiety and mood disorder in young males with mitral valve prolapse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    For-Wey Lung

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available For-Wey Lung1–4, Chih-Tao Cheng5, Wei-To Chang6, Bih-Ching Shu71Department of Psychiatry, Kaohsiung Armed Forces General Hospital, Kaohsiung, Taiwan; 2Graduate Institute of Behavioral Sciences, Kaohsiung Medical Center, Taiwan; 3Department of Psychiatry, National Defense Medical Center, Taipei, Taiwan; 4Calo Psychiatric Center, Pingtung County, Taiwan; 5School of public Health, University of California, Berkeley, CA, USA; 6Liu Chia-Hsiu Hospital, Kaohsiung County, Taiwan; 7Institute of Allied Health Sciences and Department of Nursing, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan, TaiwanObjective: This study explored the prevalence of panic disorder and other psychiatric disorders in young Han Chinese males with mitral valve prolapse (MVP. With the factors of age, sex, and ethnicity controlled, the specific role of MVP in panic disorder was analyzed. Methods: Subjects with chest pain aged between 18 and 25 years were assessed with the echocardiograph for MVP and the Chinese version of the Mini-International Neuropsychiatric Interview for panic disorder (n = 39.Results: Of the 39 participants, 35.9% met the diagnosis of anxiety disorder, 46.2% met at least one criterion of anxiety disorder, and 23.1% met the diagnostic criteria of major depressive disorder. There was no statistically significant difference in the prevalence of panic disorder between one of the (8.3% MVP patients, and two (7.4% control participants.Conclusions: There is a high prevalence of psychiatric disorder, including anxiety disorder and major depressive disorder, in those who report pain symptoms, so that diagnosis and treatment of these patients is of great importance. In addition, individuals with MVP did not have an increased risk for panic disorder. Whether MVP may be a modifier or mediating factor for panic disorder needs to be further assessed in a larger scale study.Keywords: mitral valve prolapse, panic disorder, Han Chinese males, major depressive disorder

  8. Prevalence of mood disorders among residents in Guangxi Zhuang Autonomous Region%广西壮族自治区城乡居民心境障碍流行病学调查

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    马贞玉; 冯启明; 陈强; 潘润德; 罗红叶; 苏莉; 陈发钦; 黎火佳; 韦波

    2012-01-01

    目的 了解广西壮族自治区≥15岁城乡居民心境障碍的患病水平和分布特征.方法 采用多阶段分层整群随机抽样方法抽取广西壮族自治区城乡10 100户≥15岁18 219名常住居民为调查对象进行入户调查.采用复合性国际诊断问卷(CIDI 3.0)为筛查工具,以国际疾病及相关健康问题分类第10版(ICD-10)为诊断标准.结果 广西壮族自治区城乡居民心境障碍时点患病率为4.50‰,终生患病率为6.70‰;多因素logistic回归分析显示女性心境障碍的危险度高于男性(OR=1.47,95%CI=1.05-2.23),少数民族患心境障碍的危险性高于汉族(OR-1.30,95%CI=1.06~ 1.76);离婚人群心境障碍时点患病率和终生患病率均较高(P<0.01).结论 广西心境障碍的患病率较高,其中少数民族、离婚人群患病率高;重性抑郁是广西需要重点防治的特定心境障碍.%Objective To examine the prevalence of mood disorders among residents in Guangxi Zhuang Autonomous Region. Methods From July 2007 to December 2007,a total of 18 219 residents aged more than 15 years were randomly selected from 6 prefecture-level cities and 10 counties with stratified multi-stage cluster sampling. All subjects were investigated by face-to-face interviews. The Chinese Version of Composite International Diagnostic Interview (CIDI 3. 0) provided by the Chinese Center for Disease Control and Prevention was used as the screening tool and the diagnoses were made according to the International Classification of Diseases-lOth edition. Results The general current prevalence and the general lifetime prevalence of mood disorders in the residents were 4. 50%c and 6. 70%o. The risk factors of mood disorders were female gender, minority, and divorce based on logistic regression analyses. The general current prevalence was higher in the women than in the men ( odds ratio [ OR ] =1.47,95% confidence interval [ CI ] : 1.05-2.23) and higher in the minorities than in the Han

  9. Paradoxical Reaction to Alprazolam in an Elderly Woman with a History of Anxiety, Mood Disorders, and Hypothyroidism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Kirkpatrick

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available With less than 1% of patients who use benzodiazepines being affected, paradoxical responses to benzodiazepines are rare. In this case report, we outline the course of an 80-year-old female who developed a paradoxical response to benzodiazepines. Significant medical and psychiatric history includes anxiety, mood disorder, hypothyroidism, bilateral mastectomy, goiter removal, and triple bypass. The patient presented with mental status changes, anxiety, motor restlessness, and paranoia. Over time, a temporal relationship between the severity of the patient’s motor agitation and intake of alprazolam was observed. As doses of alprazolam were decreased, her motor agitation became less severe. In addition to motor agitation, the patient also demonstrated increased aggressiveness, a subjective feeling of restlessness, and increased talkativeness. As her dose of alprazolam decreased, many of the patient’s symptoms were observed to decrease. This case report also discusses theories regarding the pathophysiology of paradoxical reactions to benzodiazepines, known risk factors, and appropriate treatment.

  10. Paradoxical Reaction to Alprazolam in an Elderly Woman with a History of Anxiety, Mood Disorders, and Hypothyroidism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirkpatrick, Daniel; Smith, Tyler; Kerfeld, Mitchell; Ramsdell, Taylor; Sadiq, Hasnain; Sharma, Arun

    2016-01-01

    With less than 1% of patients who use benzodiazepines being affected, paradoxical responses to benzodiazepines are rare. In this case report, we outline the course of an 80-year-old female who developed a paradoxical response to benzodiazepines. Significant medical and psychiatric history includes anxiety, mood disorder, hypothyroidism, bilateral mastectomy, goiter removal, and triple bypass. The patient presented with mental status changes, anxiety, motor restlessness, and paranoia. Over time, a temporal relationship between the severity of the patient's motor agitation and intake of alprazolam was observed. As doses of alprazolam were decreased, her motor agitation became less severe. In addition to motor agitation, the patient also demonstrated increased aggressiveness, a subjective feeling of restlessness, and increased talkativeness. As her dose of alprazolam decreased, many of the patient's symptoms were observed to decrease. This case report also discusses theories regarding the pathophysiology of paradoxical reactions to benzodiazepines, known risk factors, and appropriate treatment. PMID:27092285

  11. The Temporal Course of Anxiety Sensitivity in Outpatients with Anxiety and Mood Disorders: Relationships with Behavioral Inhibition and Depression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosellini, Anthony J.; Fairholme, Christopher P.; Brown, Timothy A.

    2011-01-01

    The present study evaluated the temporal course of three dimensions of anxiety sensitivity (AS; concerns over physical symptoms, mental incapacitation, and social embarrassment) and their relationships with behavioral inhibition (BI) and depression (DEP) in 606 outpatients with anxiety and mood disorders. A semi-structured interview and self-report questionnaires were administered on three occasions over a two-year period. All three constructs decreased over the study period and AS temporally functioned more similar to DEP than BI. Cross-sectional and temporal correlations supported the discriminant validity of AS from BI. As expected, initial levels of BI predicted less improvement in all AS dimensions. In contrast, higher initial levels of mental incapacitation AS were associated with greater improvement in DEP. Our results are discussed in regard to the measurement of AS in clinical samples, conceptualizations of AS as a lower-order vulnerability, and prognostic implications of directional paths between BI and AS and AS and DEP. PMID:21377316

  12. Factors characterizing access and latency to first pharmacological treatment in Italian patients with schizophrenia, mood, and anxiety spectrum disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dell'Osso, Bernardo; Cremaschi, Laura; Palazzo, Carlotta; Suardi, Neva; Spagnolin, Gregorio; Camuri, Giulia; Benatti, Beatrice; Oldani, Lucio; Dobrea, Cristina; Arici, Chiara; Pace, Giovanna; Tiseo, Alessandra; Nahum, Ester Sembira; Castellano, Filippo; D'Urso, Nazario; Clerici, Massimo; Primavera, Diego; Carpiniello, Bernardo; Altamura, A Carlo

    2015-01-01

    Latency to first pharmacological treatment [duration of untreated illness (DUI)] in psychiatric disorders can be measured in years, with differences across diagnostic areas and relevant consequences in terms of socio-occupational functioning and outcome. Within the psychopathological onset of a specific disorder, many factors influence access and latency to first pharmacotherapy and the present study aimed to investigate such factors, through an ad-hoc developed questionnaire, in a sample of 538 patients with diagnoses of schizophrenia-spectrum disorder (SZ), mood disorder (MD), and anxiety disorder (AD). Patients with SZs showed earlier ages at onset, first diagnosis and treatment, as well as shorter DUI compared with other patients (43.17 months vs. 58.64 and 80.43 months in MD and AD; F=3.813, P=0.02). Patients with MD and AD reported more frequently onset-related stressful events, benzodiazepines as first treatment, and autonomous help seeking compared with patients with SZs. In terms of first therapist, psychiatrist referral accounted for 43.6% of the cases, progressively decreasing from SZ to MD and AD (57.6, 41.8, and 38.3%, respectively). The opposite phenomenon was observed for nonpsychiatrist clinician referrals, whereas psychologist referrals remained constant. The present findings confirm the presence of a relevant DUI in a large sample of Italian patients with different psychiatric disorders (5 years, on average), pointing out specific differences, in terms of treatment access and latency, between psychotic and affective patients. Such aspects are relevant for detection of at-risk patients and implement early intervention programs.

  13. Comorbidity and correlates of disruptive mood dysregulation disorder in 6-8-year-old children with ADHD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulraney, Melissa; Schilpzand, Elizabeth J; Hazell, Philip; Nicholson, Jan M; Anderson, Vicki; Efron, Daryl; Silk, Timothy J; Sciberras, Emma

    2016-03-01

    This study aimed to characterize the nature and impact of disruptive mood dysregulation disorder (DMDD) in children with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) including its co-occurrence with other comorbidities and its independent influence on daily functioning. Children with ADHD (6-8 years) were recruited through 43 Melbourne schools, using a 2-stage screening (parent and teacher Conners 3 ADHD index) and case-confirmation (Diagnostic Interview Schedule for Children, Version IV; [DISC-IV]) procedure. Proxy DMDD diagnosis was confirmed via items from the oppositional defiant disorder (ODD) and major depressive disorder modules of the DISC-IV. Outcome domains included comorbid mental health disorders, academic functioning, social functioning, child and family quality of life, parent mental health, and parenting behaviors. Unadjusted and adjusted linear and logistic regression were used to compare children with comorbid ADHD and DMDD and children with ADHD without DMDD. Thirty-nine out of 179 children (21.8 %) with ADHD had comorbid DMDD. Children with ADHD and DMDD had a high prevalence of ODD (89.7 %) and any anxiety disorder (41.0 %). Children with ADHD and DMDD had poorer self-control and elevated bullying behaviors than children with ADHD without DMDD. Children with ADHD and DMDD were similar to children with ADHD in the other domains measured when taking into account other comorbidities including ODD. One in five children with ADHD in their second year of formal schooling met criteria for DMDD. There was a very high diagnostic overlap with ODD; however, the use of a proxy DMDD diagnosis containing items from the ODD module of the DISC-IV may have artificially inflated the comorbidity rates. DMDD added to the burden of ADHD particularly in the area of social functioning.

  14. Health-related quality of life (HRQOL), activity of daily living (ADL) and depressive mood disorder in temporal lobe epilepsy patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehrner, J; Kalchmayr, R; Serles, W; Olbrich, A; Pataraia, E; Aull, S; Bacher, J; Leutmezer, F; Gröppel, G; Deecke, L; Baumgartner, C

    1999-04-01

    We determined the interrelations of chronological age, age at seizure onset, duration of seizure disorder, cognitive functioning (IQ), scales of activities of daily living, depressive mood disorder and measures of health-related quality of life (HRQOL). Furthermore, we investigated the association of the laterality of seizure onset zone and absence/presence of hippocampal atrophy and/or sclerosis (HA/HS) with measures of HRQOL, activities of daily living (ADL) and depressive mood disorder. In the setting of pre-surgical epilepsy evaluation, a sample of 56 patients with temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) was studied using the Bonner Skalen für Epilepsie (BPSE) and the depression inventory D-S of von Zerssen. Patients reported high levels of dependency on others and poor coping capabilities. Our data also showed specific ADL-behaviour suggesting social withdrawal and isolation. Our results indicate emotional impairment as a major problem in TLE, because 45% of our patients scored in the depressive range of the D-S depression scale. Depression score was found to be a powerful predictor of self-reported quality of life after adjusting for seizure-related variables, demographic variables and cognitive functioning (IQ). The only scale showing a significant laterality effect was ADL-home. No relationship between the dependent measures of HRQOL, ADL-social, ADL-cultural, depressive mood disorder and laterality of the epileptogenic zone or absence/presence of HA/HS was found. HRQOL and depressive mood disorder are strongly interrelated indicating that patients with depressive symptoms report lower quality of life and specific patterns of ADL. HRQOL, ADL and depressive mood disorder are largely independent of biological markers such as laterality of seizure onset zone and absence/presence of HA/HS in TLE.

  15. Practitioner Review: The effects of atypical antipsychotics and mood stabilisers in the treatment of depressive symptoms in paediatric bipolar disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atkin, Tobias; Nuñez, Nicolas; Gobbi, Gabriella

    2017-08-01

    The management of depressive and mixed symptoms in children and adolescents with bipolar disorder (BD) remains a matter of debate. The goal of this review is, thus, to systematically examine the impact of atypical antipsychotics (AAPs) and mood stabilisers in the treatment of bipolar depression and/or mixed states. A literature search was conducted for studies assessing the efficacy of pharmacological treatments for bipolar disorder type I, type II and not otherwise specified with a recent depressive, mixed or manic episode (with depressive symptoms) following DSM-IV criteria in children and adolescents as either acute or maintenance treatment. The databases searched were PubMed/Medline, Google Scholar and Tripdatabase, as well as ClinicalTrials.gov. The search was limited to clinical trials, systematic reviews, meta-analyses and open-label trials published in the English language between the years 2000 and 2015. Sixty clinical studies were found assessing the efficacy of mood stabilisers and AAPs in paediatric BD. Fifteen studies were not included in the primary analysis because they did not assess depressive symptomology/include scores on rating scales of depressive symptoms (Online Supplementary Material). There is sufficient evidence for a Grade A recommendation of the use of olanzapine plus fluoxetine at reducing depressive symptoms in bipolar depression and of quetiapine at high doses for depressive symptoms occurring during mixed episodes. Importantly, even though monotherapy with aripiprazole, risperidone, valproate and lithium was effective at controlling mania, these drugs were not effective at reducing depressive symptoms (level A evidence for nonrecommendation). These results mostly overlap with the approved treatments for bipolar depression in adults. © 2017 Association for Child and Adolescent Mental Health.

  16. Colorimetric determinations of lithium levels in drop-volumes of human plasma for monitoring patients with bipolar mood disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qassem, M; Hickey, M; Kyriacou, P A

    2016-08-01

    Lithium preparations are considered the most reliable form of mood stabilizing medication for patients with Bipolar disorder. Nevertheless, lithium is a toxic element and its therapeutic range is extremely narrow, with levels of 0.61.0 mEq considered normal, whereas levels above 1.5 mEq are toxic. Thus unfortunately, many patients reach toxic levels that lead to unnecessary complications. It is believed that personal monitoring of blood lithium levels would benefit patients taking lithium medication. Therefore, our aim is to develop a personal lithium blood level analyzer for patients with bipolar mood disorder, and we report here our initial results of a colorimetric-based method used to test drop-volumes of human plasma that had been spiked with lithium. It was possible to validate results with standard flame photometry readings. Applying the Partial Least Squares (PLS) method on preprocessed spectra, therapeutic concentrations of lithium in a single drop can be predicted in a rapid manner, and furthermore, the calibration results were used to select effective wavelengths which were employed as inputs in Multiple Linear Regression (MLR). The simplified algorithms of this would prove useful when developing a personal lithium analyzer. Overall, both calibration methods gave high correlation and small error outputs with a R2= 0.99036 and RMSEC = 0.03778, and R2= 0.994148 and RMSEC= 0.0294404, for PLS and MLR methods, respectively. The results show that the spectrophotometric determination of blood lithium levels can be extended beyond laboratory applications and indicate the capability of this testing principle to be employed in a personal monitoring device. Future work will now focus on the technical development of a miniaturized system for measurement of lithium levels in blood with an acceptable level of accuracy and sensitivity.

  17. Mood instability in bipolar disorder type I versus type II-continuous daily electronic self-monitoring of illness activity using smartphones

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Faurholt-Jepsen, Maria; Ritz, Christian; Frost, Mads

    2015-01-01

    I and II using daily data. The objectives were to investigate differences in daily illness activity between bipolar disorder type I and II. METHODS: A smartphone-based system for self-monitoring was developed. A total of 33 patients treated in a mood clinic used the system for daily self...

  18. Suicide and War: The Mediating Effects of Negative Mood, Posttraumatic Stress Disorder Symptoms, and Social Support among Army National Guard Soldiers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffith, James

    2012-01-01

    The mediating effects of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms, negative mood, and social support on the relationship of war experiences to suicidality were examined. The research literature suggested a sequence among study scales representing these constructs, which was then tested on survey data obtained from a sample of National Guard…

  19. Stable prediction of mood and anxiety disorders based on behavioral and emotional problems in childhood: a 14-year follow-up during childhood, adolescence, and young adulthood

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S.J. Roza (Sabine); M.B. Hofstra (Marijke); J. van der Ende (Jan); F.C. Verhulst (Frank)

    2003-01-01

    textabstractOBJECTIVE: The goal of this study was to predict the onset of mood and anxiety disorders from parent-reported emotional and behavioral problems in childhood across a 14-year period from childhood into young adulthood. METHOD: In 1983, parent reports of behavioral and em

  20. Meta-analysis of the association between suicidal ideation and later suicide among patients with either a schizophrenia spectrum psychosis or a mood disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapman, C L; Mullin, K; Ryan, C J; Kuffel, A; Nielssen, O; Large, M M

    2015-03-01

    Recent studies of patients with a mix of psychiatric diagnoses have suggested a modest or weak association between suicidal ideation and later suicide. The aim of this study was to examine the extent to which the association between expressed suicidal ideation and later suicide varies according to psychiatric diagnosis. A systematic meta-analysis of studies that report the association between suicidal ideation and later suicide in patients with 'mood disorders', defined to include major depression, dysthymia and bipolar disorder, or 'schizophrenia spectrum psychosis', defined to include schizophrenia, schizophreniform disorder and delusional disorder. Suicidal ideation was strongly associated with suicide among patients with schizophrenia spectrum psychosis [14 studies reporting on 567 suicides, OR = 6.49, 95% confidence interval (CI) 3.82-11.02]. The association between suicidal ideation and suicide among patients with mood disorders (11 studies reporting on 860 suicides, OR = 1.49, 95% CI 0.92-2.42) was not significant. Diagnostic group made a significant contribution to between-study heterogeneity (Q-value = 16.2, df = 1, P disorders over periods of follow-up of schizophrenia spectrum psychosis than in mood disorders this result should be interpreted cautiously due to the high degree of between-study heterogeneity and because studies that used stronger methods of reporting had a weaker association between suicidal ideation and suicide. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Efficacy of memoral herbal on prevention of electroconvulsive therapy-induced memory impairment in mood disorder patients (isfahan - iran 2011).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mousavi, Seyed Ghafur; Mohsen, Ghasemi; Reza, Maracy M; Amrollah, Ebrahimi; Majid, Barekatain; Fariba, Noori

    2012-07-01

    Electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) is one of the most efficacious treatment for major depressive disorder (MDD), it is also used as a rapid and efficacious treatment for other psychiatric disorders, especially treatment resistant ones. The cognitive impairment is one of the most important side effects of ECT. This study examined the Memoral herbal efficacy in prevention of ECT-induced memory impairment. In a randomized clinical trial, 70 patients with mood disorders who were candidates for ECT enrolled in either Memoral or Control group, and received either Memoral or placebo. The memory was assessed by Addenbrook Cognitive Examination (ACE), and the findings were analyzed by ANOVA under SPSS18. The Memoral group patients showed significantly higher total ACE scores than placebo group (P memory subscales not only never decreased during the study in Memoral group, but also increased. There was no significant difference between these scores of Memoral and placebo groups for the subscales of language and visuospacial ability. The Memoral herbal is an efficacious and safe choice in prevention of ECT- induced cognitive impairment.

  2. The CANMAT task force recommendations for the management of patients with mood disorders and comorbid medical conditions: diagnostic, assessment, and treatment principles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramasubbu, Rajamannar; Beaulieu, Serge; Taylor, Valerie H; Schaffer, Ayal; McIntyre, Roger S

    2012-02-01

    Medical comorbidity is commonly encountered in individuals with major depressive disorder (MDD) and bipolar disorder (BD). The presence of medical comorbidity has diagnostic, prognostic, treatment, and etiologic implications underscoring the importance of timely detection and treatment. A selective review of relevant articles and reviews published in English-language databases (1968 to April 2011) was conducted. Studies describing epidemiology, temporality of onset, treatment implications, and prognosis were selected for review. A growing body of evidence from epidemiologic, clinical, and biologic studies suggests that the relationship between medical illness and mood disorder is bidirectional in nature. It provides support for the multiplay of shared and specific etiologic factors interlinking these conditions. This article describes the complex interactions between medical illness and mood disorders and provides a meaningful approach to their comorbid clinical diagnosis and management.

  3. Prediction of depression in individuals at high familial risk of mood disorders using functional magnetic resonance imaging.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heather C Whalley

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Bipolar disorder is a highly heritable condition. First-degree relatives of affected individuals have a more than a ten-fold increased risk of developing bipolar disorder (BD, and a three-fold risk of developing major depressive disorder (MDD than the general population. It is unclear however whether differences in brain activation reported in BD and MDD are present before the onset of illness. METHODS: We studied 98 young unaffected individuals at high familial risk of BD and 58 healthy controls using functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI scans and a task involving executive and language processing. Twenty of the high-risk subjects subsequently developed MDD after the baseline fMRI scan. RESULTS: At baseline the high-risk subjects who later developed MDD demonstrated relatively increased activation in the insula cortex, compared to controls and high risk subjects who remained well. In the healthy controls and high-risk group who remained well, this region demonstrated reduced engagement with increasing task difficulty. The high risk subjects who subsequently developed MDD did not demonstrate this normal disengagement. Activation in this region correlated positively with measures of cyclothymia and neuroticism at baseline, but not with measures of depression. CONCLUSIONS: These results suggest that increased activation of the insula can differentiate individuals at high-risk of bipolar disorder who later develop MDD from healthy controls and those at familial risk who remain well. These findings offer the potential of future risk stratification in individuals at risk of mood disorder for familial reasons.

  4. The effect of IPS-modified, an early intervention for people with mood and anxiety disorders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hellström, Lone; Bech, Per; Nordentoft, Merete

    2013-01-01

    Anxiety and affective disorders can be disabling and have a major impact on the ability to work. In Denmark, people with a mental disorder, and mainly non-psychotic disorders, represent a substantial and increasing part of those receiving disability pensions. Previous studies have indicated...... that Individual Placement and Support (IPS) has a positive effect on employment when provided to people with severe mental illness. This modified IPS intervention is aimed at supporting people with recently diagnosed anxiety or affective disorders in regaining their ability to work and facilitate their return...... to work or education.Aim: To investigate whether an early modified IPS intervention has an effect on employment and education when provided to people with recently diagnosed anxiety or affective disorders in a Danish context.Methods/design: The trial is a randomised, assessor-blinded, clinical superiority...

  5. Anxious mood and memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foa, E B; McNally, R; Murdock, T B

    1989-01-01

    Influenced by Bower (Am. Psychol. 36, 129-148, 1981) and Lang (Anxiety and the Anxiety Disorders, Erlbaum, Hillsdale, N.J., 1985), we tested three hypotheses concerning anxious mood and memory: (1) the mood state dependent hypothesis which states that memory retrieval will be greater when mood at encoding and at recall are the same than when they are different: (2) the encoding mood congruent hypothesis which states that information semantically related to mood at encoding is retrieved more readily than information unrelated to mood at encoding; and (3) the recall mood congruent hypothesis which states that information semantically related to mood at recall is retrieved more readily than information unrelated to mood at recall. We induced anxiety in speech anxious students by informing them that they would be delivering a speech during the experiment. Mood could be either anxious or nonanxious at encoding, recall, both, or neither. Hence, there were four groups: Anxiety-Anxiety, Anxiety-Nonanxiety, Nonanxiety-Anxiety, and Nonanxiety-Nonanxiety. Subjects were asked to rate the self-descriptiveness of anxiety (e.g. NERVOUS) and nonanxiety adjective (e.g. POLITE) during the encoding phase, and to recall them later. Anxious mood was measured by self-report scales and by heart rate. No support was obtained for any of the three hypotheses. However, post-hoc analyses indicated that anxiety words were recalled least often in subjects whose heart rate increased from encoding to recall. This suggests that attention to threat information may diminish in aroused nonclinical subjects.

  6. Glutamate modulators as novel interventions for mood disorders Moduladores de glutamato como novas intervenções em transtornos do humor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanjay J Mathew

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available Recent evidence suggests that critical molecules in neurotrophic signaling cascades are long-term targets for currently available monoaminergic antidepressants. As chronic and severe mood disorders are characterized by impairments in neuronal resilience, pharmacological strategies that subserve a neuroprotective function might alter disorder pathophysiology and modify disease progression. Several promising approaches involve modulation of the glutamate neurotransmitter system, via post-synaptic receptor blockade or potentiation and presynaptic vesicular release inhibition. A focused review of the extant scientific literature was conducted, with a discussion of 3 compounds or classes of drugs currently undergoing clinical investigation: ketamine, riluzole, and AMPA receptor potentiators. Recent investigations in mood disordered patients suggest that the NMDA receptor antagonist ketamine might demonstrate rapid antidepressant properties. Riluzole has been shown to reverse glutamate-mediated impairments in neuronal plasticity and to stimulate the synthesis of brain derived neurotrophic factor. Open-label trials in treatment-resistant depression have yielded promising results. Likewise, AMPA receptor potentiators favorably impact neurotrophic factors as well as enhance cognition. CONCLUSIONS: Pharmacological approaches that modulate components of the glutamate system offer novel targets for severe, recurrent mood disorders. Controlled studies are necessary.Recentes evidências sugerem que as moléculas críticas nas cascatas de sinalização neurotrófica são alvos de longo prazo dos antidepressivos monoaminérgicos disponíveis atualmente. Na medida em que transtornos graves e crônicos são caracterizados por deficiências na resiliência neuronal, estratégias farmacológicas que sejam úteis para uma função neuroprotetora talvez possam alterar a fisiopatologia e modificar a progressão da doença. Vários enfoques promissores envolvem a

  7. Autistic-like traits in adult patients with mood disorders and schizophrenia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junko Matsuo

    Full Text Available Autism spectrum disorder often co-occurs with other psychiatric disorders. Although a high prevalence of autistic-like traits/symptoms has been identified in the pediatric psychiatric population of normal intelligence, there are no reports from adult psychiatric population. This study examined whether there is a greater prevalence of autistic-like traits/symptoms in patients with adult-onset psychiatric disorders such as major depressive disorder (MDD, bipolar disorder, or schizophrenia, and whether such an association is independent of symptom severity. The subjects were 290 adults of normal intelligence between 25 and 59 years of age (MDD, n=125; bipolar disorder, n=56; schizophrenia, n=44; healthy controls, n=65. Autistic-like traits/symptoms were measured using the Social Responsiveness Scale for Adults. Symptom severity was measured using the Positive and Negative Symptoms Scale, the Hamilton Depression Rating Scale, and/or the Young Mania Rating Scale. Almost half of the clinical subjects, except those with remitted MDD, exhibited autistic-like traits/symptoms at levels typical for sub-threshold or threshold autism spectrum disorder. Furthermore, the proportion of psychiatric patients that demonstrated high autistic-like traits/symptoms was significantly greater than that of healthy controls, and not different between that of remitted or unremitted subjects with bipolar disorder or schizophrenia. On the other hand, remitted subjects with MDD did not differ from healthy controls with regard to the prevalence or degree of high autistic-like traits/symptoms. A substantial proportion of adults with bipolar disorder and schizophrenia showed high autistic-like traits/symptoms independent of symptom severity, suggesting a shared pathophysiology among autism spectrum disorder and these psychiatric disorders. Conversely, autistic-like traits among subjects with MDD were associated with the depressive symptom severity. These findings suggest the

  8. Autistic-like traits in adult patients with mood disorders and schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuo, Junko; Kamio, Yoko; Takahashi, Hidetoshi; Ota, Miho; Teraishi, Toshiya; Hori, Hiroaki; Nagashima, Anna; Takei, Reiko; Higuchi, Teruhiko; Motohashi, Nobutaka; Kunugi, Hiroshi

    2015-01-01

    Autism spectrum disorder often co-occurs with other psychiatric disorders. Although a high prevalence of autistic-like traits/symptoms has been identified in the pediatric psychiatric population of normal intelligence, there are no reports from adult psychiatric population. This study examined whether there is a greater prevalence of autistic-like traits/symptoms in patients with adult-onset psychiatric disorders such as major depressive disorder (MDD), bipolar disorder, or schizophrenia, and whether such an association is independent of symptom severity. The subjects were 290 adults of normal intelligence between 25 and 59 years of age (MDD, n=125; bipolar disorder, n=56; schizophrenia, n=44; healthy controls, n=65). Autistic-like traits/symptoms were measured using the Social Responsiveness Scale for Adults. Symptom severity was measured using the Positive and Negative Symptoms Scale, the Hamilton Depression Rating Scale, and/or the Young Mania Rating Scale. Almost half of the clinical subjects, except those with remitted MDD, exhibited autistic-like traits/symptoms at levels typical for sub-threshold or threshold autism spectrum disorder. Furthermore, the proportion of psychiatric patients that demonstrated high autistic-like traits/symptoms was significantly greater than that of healthy controls, and not different between that of remitted or unremitted subjects with bipolar disorder or schizophrenia. On the other hand, remitted subjects with MDD did not differ from healthy controls with regard to the prevalence or degree of high autistic-like traits/symptoms. A substantial proportion of adults with bipolar disorder and schizophrenia showed high autistic-like traits/symptoms independent of symptom severity, suggesting a shared pathophysiology among autism spectrum disorder and these psychiatric disorders. Conversely, autistic-like traits among subjects with MDD were associated with the depressive symptom severity. These findings suggest the importance of

  9. Association of perceived stigma and mood and anxiety disorders : results from the World Mental Health Surveys

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Alonso, J.; Buron, A.; Bruffaerts, R.; He, Y.; Posada-Villa, J.; Lepine, J-P.; Angermeyer, M. C.; Levinson, D.; de Girolamo, G.; Tachimori, H.; Mneimneh, Z. N.; Medina-Mora, M. E.; Ormel, J.; Scott, K. M.; Gureje, O.; Haro, J. M.; Gluzman, S.; Lee, S.; Vilagut, G.; Kessler, R. C.; Von Korff, M.

    2008-01-01

    Objective: We assessed the prevalence of perceived stigma among persons with mental disorders and chronic physical conditions in an international study. Method: Perceived stigma (reporting health-related embarrassment and discrimination) was assessed among adults reporting significant disability. Me

  10. Association of perceived stigma and mood and anxiety disorders: results from the World Mental Health Surveys

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Alonso, J.; Buron, A.; Bruffaerts, R.; He, Y.; Posada-Villa, J.; Lepine, J.P.; Angermeyer, M.C.; Levinson, D.; De Girolamo, G.; Tachimori, H.; Mneimneh, Z.N.; Medina-Mora, M.E.; Ormel, J.; Scott, K.M.; Gureje, O.; Haro, J.M.; Gluzman, S.; Lee, S.; Vilagut, G.; Kessler, R.C.; Von Korff, M.

    2008-01-01

    Objective: We assessed the prevalence of perceived stigma among persons with mental disorders and chronic physical conditions in an international study. Method: Perceived stigma (reporting health-related embarrassment and discrimination) was assessed among adults reporting significant disability.

  11. Association of perceived stigma and mood and anxiety disorders : results from the World Mental Health Surveys

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Alonso, J.; Buron, A.; Bruffaerts, R.; He, Y.; Posada-Villa, J.; Lepine, J-P.; Angermeyer, M. C.; Levinson, D.; de Girolamo, G.; Tachimori, H.; Mneimneh, Z. N.; Medina-Mora, M. E.; Ormel, J.; Scott, K. M.; Gureje, O.; Haro, J. M.; Gluzman, S.; Lee, S.; Vilagut, G.; Kessler, R. C.; Von Korff, M.

    2008-01-01

    Objective: We assessed the prevalence of perceived stigma among persons with mental disorders and chronic physical conditions in an international study. Method: Perceived stigma (reporting health-related embarrassment and discrimination) was assessed among adults reporting significant disability.

  12. Association of perceived stigma and mood and anxiety disorders : results from the World Mental Health Surveys

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Alonso, J.; Buron, A.; Bruffaerts, R.; He, Y.; Posada-Villa, J.; Lepine, J-P.; Angermeyer, M. C.; Levinson, D.; de Girolamo, G.; Tachimori, H.; Mneimneh, Z. N.; Medina-Mora, M. E.; Ormel, J.; Scott, K. M.; Gureje, O.; Haro, J. M.; Gluzman, S.; Lee, S.; Vilagut, G.; Kessler, R. C.; Von Korff, M.

    2008-01-01

    Objective: We assessed the prevalence of perceived stigma among persons with mental disorders and chronic physical conditions in an international study. Method: Perceived stigma (reporting health-related embarrassment and discrimination) was assessed among adults reporting significant disability. Me

  13. Association of perceived stigma and mood and anxiety disorders: results from the World Mental Health Surveys

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Alonso, J.; Buron, A.; Bruffaerts, R.; He, Y.; Posada-Villa, J.; Lepine, J.P.; Angermeyer, M.C.; Levinson, D.; De Girolamo, G.; Tachimori, H.; Mneimneh, Z.N.; Medina-Mora, M.E.; Ormel, J.; Scott, K.M.; Gureje, O.; Haro, J.M.; Gluzman, S.; Lee, S.; Vilagut, G.; Kessler, R.C.; Von Korff, M.

    2008-01-01

    Objective: We assessed the prevalence of perceived stigma among persons with mental disorders and chronic physical conditions in an international study. Method: Perceived stigma (reporting health-related embarrassment and discrimination) was assessed among adults reporting significant disability. Me

  14. Neurobiological narratives: Experiences of mood disorder through the lens of neuroimaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buchman, Daniel Z; Borgelt, Emily L; Whiteley, Louise Emma

    2013-01-01

    Many scientists, healthcare providers, policymakers and patients are awaiting in anticipation the application of biomedical technologies such as functional neuroimaging for the prediction, diagnosis and treatment of mental disorders. The potential efficacy of such applications is controversial...... illness view functional neuroimaging, or of the potential psychological impacts of its clinical use. We conducted 12 semi-structured interviews with adults diagnosed with major depression or bipolar disorder, probing their experiences with mental health care and their perspectives on the prospect...... may have previously been de-legitimised since they lacked objective representation, through objective representations of disorder; and (iv) reifying DSM-IV-TR disorder categories and links to identity. We discuss these anticipated outcomes in the context of participant lived experience and attitudes...

  15. Omega-3 Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids in Prevention of Mood and Anxiety Disorders

    OpenAIRE

    Su, Kuan-Pin; Matsuoka, Yutaka; Pae, Chi-Un

    2015-01-01

    Psychiatric disorders in general, and major depression and anxiety disorders in particular, account for a large burden of disability, morbidity and premature mortality worldwide. Omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) have a range of neurobiological activities in modulation of neurotransmitters, anti-inflammation, anti-oxidation and neuroplasticity, which could contribute to psychotropic effects. Here we reviewed recent research on the benefits of omega-3 PUFA supplements in prevention a...

  16. Association study of neurotrophic tyrosine kinase receptor type 2 (NTRK2) and childhood-onset mood disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Jennifer H; Wigg, Karen G; King, Nicole; Burcescu, Irina; Vetró, Agnes; Kiss, Eniko; Baji, Ildikó; George, Charles J; Kennedy, James L; Kovacs, Maria; Barr, Cathy L

    2005-01-05

    Childhood-onset mood disorders (COMD) are often familial, and twin studies of COMD provide compelling evidence that genetic factors are involved. Deficits in neural plasticity have been suggested to underlie the development of depression. The receptor tropomyosin related kinase B (TrkB) and its ligand, brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), play essential roles in neural plasticity, and mRNA expression of both of these genes has been shown to be influenced by stress and chronic antidepressant treatment. In addition, TrkB knock-out mice display inappropriate stress coping mechanisms. Having previously shown that BDNF is associated with COMD, in this study we investigated the gene encoding TrkB, neurotrophic tyrosine kinase, receptor, type 2 (NTRK2) as a susceptibility factor in COMD. We tested for association of NTRK2 with COMD in two independent samples: (a) a case-control sample matched on ethnicity and gender, consisting of 120 cases who met DSM III/IV criteria for major depressive or dysthymic disorder before age 14 or bipolar I/II before the age of 18, and controls, and (b) a family based control sample of 113 families collected in Hungary, identified by a proband between the age of 7 and 14 who met DSM IV criteria for major depressive disorder or bipolar I/II disorder. There was no evidence for an allelic or genotypic association of three polymorphisms of NTRK2 with COMD in the case-control sample. Also, in the family based sample, using the transmission disequilibrium test (TDT), we did not identify any evidence of allelic association for each marker individually or when haplotypes were analyzed. Based on these results, using these three polymorphisms, we do not find support for NTRK2 as a susceptibility gene for COMD.

  17. Parental quality of life and depressive mood following methylphenidate treatment of children with attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yeni; Kim, Bongseog; Chang, Jae-Seung; Kim, Bung-Nyun; Cho, Soo-Churl; Hwang, Jun-Won

    2014-07-01

    This naturalistic study investigated the associations between quality of life and depressive mood in parents and symptom changes in attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) children. At baseline and at weeks 4 and 8, the parents evaluated their children, who were receiving treatment with osmotic-release oral system methylphenidate (mean dosage 36.3 ± 15.5 mg/day), using the Swanson, Nolan, and Pelham - Fourth Edition (SNAP-IV-18) scale. The parents evaluated themselves using the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) and the World Health Organization Quality of Life Assessment, Brief Version (WHOQOL-BREF). A significant reduction in SNAP-IV-18 scores and improvements in parental BDI scores and parental WHOQOL-BREF scores were observed. The decrease in BDI scores from baseline to 8 weeks was significantly associated with increases in WHOQOL-BREF sub-domain scores from baseline to 8 weeks, with a greater decrease at 4 weeks and after. The decrease in the SNAP-IV-18 hyperactivity-impulsivity score was significantly associated with increases in WHOQOL social sub-domain scores from baseline to 8 weeks. For those patients who showed a 25% or greater decrease in the SNAP-IV-18 total scores from baseline to 8 weeks, the decreases in the SNAP-IV-18 total score and in the inattention and hyperactivity-impulsivity scores were significantly associated with a decrease in BDI scores from baseline to 8 weeks. Methylphenidate treatment for ADHD was associated with both symptom alleviation in children with ADHD and improvement in parental depressive mood and quality of life, suggesting that the effects of treatment could go beyond symptom improvement in ADHD. © 2014 The Authors. Psychiatry and Clinical Neurosciences © 2014 Japanese Society of Psychiatry and Neurology.

  18. Mixed states in bipolar disorder - changes in DSM-5 and current treatment recommendations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Betzler, Felix; Stöver, Laura Apollonia; Sterzer, Philipp; Köhler, Stephan

    2017-11-01

    Mixed states in affective disorders represent a particular challenge in clinical routine, characterized by a complicated course of treatment and a worse treatment response. Clinical features of mixed states and the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-5) criteria are presented and critical discussed. We then performed a systematic review using the terms 'bipolar', 'mixed' and 'randomized' to evaluate current treatment options. For pharmacological treatment of mixed states in total, there is still insufficient data from RCTs. However, there is some evidence for efficacy in mixed states from RCTs for atypical antipsychotics, especially olanzapine, aripiprazole and asenapine as well as mood stabilizers as valproate and carbamazepine. Mixed states are of a high clinical relevance and the DSM-5 criteria substantially reduced the diagnostic threshold. Besides advantages of a better characterization of patients with former DSM-IV-defined mixed episodes, disadvantages arise for example differential diagnoses with a substantial overlap in symptoms such as borderline personality disorders. Atypical antipsychotics, valproate and carbamazepine demonstrated efficacy in a limited sample of RCTs. The number of RCTs in the treatment of mixed states is highly limited. Furthermore, nearly all studies were funded by pharmaceutical companies which may lead to an underestimation of classical mood stabilizers such as lithium.

  19. Sexual violence, mood disorders and suicide risk: a population-based study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mondin, Thaíse Campos; Cardoso, Taiane de Azevedo; Jansen, Karen; Konradt, Caroline Elizabeth; Zaltron, Rosana Ferrazza; Behenck, Monalisa de Oliveira; de Mattos, Luciano Dias; da Silva, Ricardo Azevedo

    2016-03-01

    This article seeks to analyze the association between sexual violence, manic and depressive episodes, and suicide risk among young adults. This is a cross-sectional population-based study carried out with young people between 18 and 24 years of age in a town in southern Brazil. The sample was selected through clusters. The prevalence of sexual violence, manic, depressive and mixed episodes and suicide risk were evaluated, as well as the association between them. The chi-square test and Poisson regression were used for statistical analysis. The study sample comprised 1,560 subjects. Among these, 3.1% had suffered sexual violence at some point in their life. The prevalence of depressive, mixed episodes, and (hypo)manic episodes were 10%, 2.4% and 2.3%, respectively. Suicide risk had a prevalence of 8.6% in the total sample. Young people who have suffered sexual violence are more likely to be subject to mood changes or suicide risk than those who have not (p sexual violence and depressive and mixed episodes and suicide risk.

  20. Sexual violence, mood disorders and suicide risk: a population-based study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thaíse Campos Mondin

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract This article seeks to analyze the association between sexual violence, manic and depressive episodes, and suicide risk among young adults. This is a cross-sectional population-based study carried out with young people between 18 and 24 years of age in a town in southern Brazil. The sample was selected through clusters. The prevalence of sexual violence, manic, depressive and mixed episodes and suicide risk were evaluated, as well as the association between them. The chi-square test and Poisson regression were used for statistical analysis. The study sample comprised 1,560 subjects. Among these, 3.1% had suffered sexual violence at some point in their life. The prevalence of depressive, mixed episodes, and (hypomanic episodes were 10%, 2.4% and 2.3%, respectively. Suicide risk had a prevalence of 8.6% in the total sample. Young people who have suffered sexual violence are more likely to be subject to mood changes or suicide risk than those who have not (p < 0.05, except for the occurrence of (hypomanic episodes. These results revealed a strong association between sexual violence and depressive and mixed episodes and suicide risk.

  1. Cyclothymic temperament rather than polarity is associated with hopelessness and suicidality in hospitalized patients with mood disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Innamorati, Marco; Rihmer, Zoltan; Akiskal, Hagop; Gonda, Xenia; Erbuto, Denise; Belvederi Murri, Martino; Perugi, Giulio; Amore, Mario; Girardi, Paolo; Pompili, Maurizio

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to assess sociodemographic and clinical differences between inpatients with major mood disorders (bipolar disorder - BD - and major depression - MDD) and the cyclothymic phenotype (CYC), and pure BDs or MDDs. Participants were 281 adult inpatients (134 men and 147 women) consecutively admitted to the Department of Psychiatry of the Sant׳Andrea University Hospital in Rome, Italy, between January 2008 and June 2010. The patients completed the Hamilton Scale for Depression (HAMD17), the Young Mania Rating Scale, the TEMPS-A (Temperament Evaluation of the Memphis, Pisa, Paris and San Diego-Autoquestionnaire), and the Beck Hopelessness Scale. 38.7% of the MDD patients and 48.3% of the BD patients satisfied criteria to be included in the cyclothymic groups. Above 92% of the patients with the cyclothymic phenotype reported suicidal ideation at the item #3 of the HAMD17. Furthermore, patients with the cyclothymic phenotype reported higher hopelessness than other patients. Our results are potentially limited by the small number of MDD-CYC patients included in the sample. Our results support the clinical usefulness of the concept of soft bipolar spectrum. Patients with the cyclothymic phenotype differ from pure MDD patients and BD patients for temperamental profile and clinical variables. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Predicting quality of life in multiple sclerosis: accounting for physical disability, fatigue, cognition, mood disorder, personality, and behavior change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benedict, Ralph H B; Wahlig, Elizabeth; Bakshi, Rohit; Fishman, Inna; Munschauer, Frederick; Zivadinov, Robert; Weinstock-Guttman, Bianca

    2005-04-15

    Health-related quality of life (HQOL) is poor in multiple sclerosis (MS) but the clinical precipitants of the problem are not well understood. Previous correlative studies demonstrated relationships between various clinical parameters and diminished HQOL in MS. Unfortunately, these studies failed to account for multiple predictors in the same analysis. We endeavored to determine what clinical parameters account for most variance in predicting HQOL, and employability, while accounting for disease course, physical disability, fatigue, cognition, mood disorder, personality, and behavior disorder. In 120 MS patients, we measured HQOL (MS Quality of Life-54) and vocational status (employed vs. disabled) and then conducted detailed clinical testing. Data were analyzed by linear and logistic regression methods. MS patients reported lower HQOL (pPhysical HQOL was predicted by fatigue, depression, and physical disability. Mental HQOL was associated with only depression and fatigue. In contrast, vocational status was predicted by three cognitive tests, conscientiousness, and disease duration (p<0.05). Thus, for the first time, we predicted HQOL in MS while accounting for measures from these many clinical domains. We conclude that self-report HQOL indices are most strongly predicted by measures of depression, whereas vocational status is predicted primarily by objective measures of cognitive function. The findings highlight core clinical problems that merit early identification and further research regarding the development of effective treatment.

  3. Characteristics of children with juvenile bipolar disorder or disruptive behavior disorders and negative mood: can they be distinguished in the clinical setting?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connor, Daniel F; Doerfler, Leonard A

    2012-11-01

    Because of continuing controversy over distinguishing juvenile bipolar disorder (JBD) from disruptive behavior disorders (DBDs) in the clinical setting, we investigated whether referred children with a DBD and a negative mood component could be differentiated from those diagnosed with JBD. The distinction is important because treatments differ. In this single-site sample, 96 children with non-attention-deficit/hyperactivity DBD and depression were compared with 27 JBD children and 187 psychiatric comparison children on measures assessing behavior, functional impairment, symptom severity, psychopathology, and comorbid psychiatric diagnosis. Few differences were found between children with DBD and depression and those with JBD on measures of conduct problems, oppositionality, aggression, hostility, and psychopathology. More functional impairment was found in the JBD group who also had higher rates of comorbid posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), substance use disorders, and suicidality than the other groups. These results do not support the specificity of aggression as a defining criterion for JBD and clinicians assessing such patients also should consider complex DBDs with an associated depressive component in the differential diagnosis. Children with JBD must be specifically assessed for comorbid developmental trauma, substance abuse, and suicidality. The association between JBD and PTSD needs further investigation in clinical research.

  4. Usefulness of the Spanish version of the mood disorder questionnaire for screening bipolar disorder in routine clinical practice in outpatients with major depression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Montes José

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background According to some studies, almost 40% of depressive patients – half of them previously undetected – are diagnosed of bipolar II disorder when systematically assessed for hypomania. Thus, instruments for bipolar disorder screening are needed. The Mood Disorder Questionnaire (MDQ is a self-reported questionnaire validated in Spanish in stable patients with a previously known diagnosis. The purpose of this study is to evaluate in the daily clinical practice the usefulness of the Spanish version of the MDQ in depressive patients. Methods Patients (n = 87 meeting DSM-IV-TR criteria for a major depressive episode, not previously known as bipolar were included. The affective module of the Structured Clinical Interview (SCID was used as gold standard. Results MDQ screened 24.1% of depressive patients as bipolar, vs. 12.6% according to SCID. For a cut-off point score of 7 positive answers, sensitivity was 72.7% (95% CI = 63.3 – 82.1 and specificity 82.9% (95% CI = 74.9–90.9. Likelihood ratio of positive and negative tests were 4,252 y 0,329 respectively. Limitations The small sample size reduced the power of the study to 62%. Conclusion Sensitivity and specificity of the MDQ were high for screening bipolar disorder in patients with major depression, and similar to the figures obtained in stable patients. This study confirms that MDQ is a useful instrument in the daily clinical assessment of depressive patients.

  5. The link between thyroid autoimmunity (antithyroid peroxidase autoantibodies with anxiety and mood disorders in the community: a field of interest for public health in the future

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sardu Claudia

    2004-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To evaluate the association between mood and anxiety disorders and thyroid autoimmunity in a community sample. Methods: A community based sample of 222 subjects was examined. Psychiatric diagnoses were formulated using the International Composite Diagnostic Interview Simplified (CIDIS, according to DSM-IV criteria. All subjects underwent a complete thyroid evaluation including physical examination, thyroid echography and measure of serum free T4 (FT4, free T3 (FT3, thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH and anti-thyroid peroxidase autoantibodies (anti-TPO. Results 16.6% of the overall sample had an anti-TPO value above the normal cut-off. Subjects with at least one diagnosis of anxiety disorders (OR = 4.2, C.L. 95% 1.9–38.8 or mood disorders (OR = 2.9, Cl 95% 1.4–6.6, P Conclusions The study seems to suggest that individuals in the community with thyroid autoimmunity may be at high risk for mood and anxiety disorders. The psychiatric disorders and the autoimmune reaction seem to be rooted in a same (and not easy correctable aberrancy in the immuno-endocrine system. Should our results be confirmed, the findings may be of great interest for future preventive and case finding projects.

  6. Tackling nonadherence in psychiatric disorders: current opinion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farooq S

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Saeed Farooq,1,2 Farooq Naeem3 1Staffordshire University, Staffordshire, UK; 2Postgraduate Medical Institute, Lady Reading Hospital, Peshawar, Pakistan; 3Department of Psychiatry, Queen's University, Kingston, Ontario, Canada Abstract: Nonadherence to treatment is a major challenge in all fields of medicine, and it has been claimed that increasing the effectiveness of adherence interventions may have far greater impact on the health of the population than any improvement in specific medical treatments. However, despite widespread use of terms such as adherence and compliance, there is little agreement on definitions or measurements. Nonadherence can be intermittent or continuous, voluntary or involuntary, and may be specific to single or multiple interventions, which makes reliable measurement problematic. Both direct and indirect methods of assessment have their limitations. The current literature focuses mainly on psychotic disorders. A large number of trials of various psychological, social, and pharmacologic interventions has been reported. The results are mixed, but interventions specifically designed to improve adherence with a more intensive and focused approach and interventions combining elements from different approaches such as cognitive-behavioral therapy, family-based, and community-based approaches have shown better outcomes. Pharmacologic interventions include careful drug selection, switching when a treatment is not working, dose adjustment, simplifying the treatment regimen, and the use of long-acting injections. The results for the most studied pharmacologic intervention, ie, long-acting injections, are far from clear, and there are discrepancies between randomized controlled trials, nationwide cohort studies, and mirror-image studies. Nonadherence with treatment is often paid far less attention in routine clinical practice and psychiatric training. Strategies to measure and improve adherence in clinical practice are based more

  7. Electroconvulsive therapy-induced brain plasticity determines therapeutic outcome in mood disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dukart, Juergen; Regen, Francesca; Kherif, Ferath; Colla, Michael; Bajbouj, Malek; Heuser, Isabella; Frackowiak, Richard S.; Draganski, Bogdan

    2014-01-01

    There remains much scientific, clinical, and ethical controversy concerning the use of electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) for psychiatric disorders stemming from a lack of information and knowledge about how such treatment might work, given its nonspecific and spatially unfocused nature. The mode of action of ECT has even been ascribed to a “barbaric” form of placebo effect. Here we show differential, highly specific, spatially distributed effects of ECT on regional brain structure in two populations: patients with unipolar or bipolar disorder. Unipolar and bipolar disorders respond differentially to ECT and the associated local brain-volume changes, which occur in areas previously associated with these diseases, correlate with symptom severity and the therapeutic effect. Our unique evidence shows that electrophysical therapeutic effects, although applied generally, take on regional significance through interactions with brain pathophysiology. PMID:24379394

  8. Nutrients, neurodevelopment, and mood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casper, Regina C

    2004-12-01

    Human neurodevelopment is the result of genetic and environmental interactions. This paper examines the role of prenatal nutrition relative to psychiatric disorders and explores the relationship among nutrients, mood changes, and mood disorders. Epidemiologic studies have found that adults who were born with a normal, yet low birth weight have an increased susceptibility to diseases such as coronary heart disease, diabetes, and stroke in adulthood. Prenatal caloric malnutrition, low birth weight, and prematurity also increase the risk for neurodevelopmental disorders, schizophrenia, affective disorders, and schizoid and antisocial personality disorders. Placebo-controlled studies in medicated patients suggest that add-on treatment with omega-3 fatty acids, particularly eicosapentaenoic acid, may ameliorate symptoms of major depressive disorder. Additional studies are necessary to confirm any benefits for bipolar disorders.

  9. Stepped care for depression and anxiety: from primary care to specialized mental health care: a randomised controlled trial testing the effectiveness of a stepped care program among primary care patients with mood or anxiety disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seekles Wike

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mood and anxiety disorders are highly prevalent and have a large impact on the lives of the affected individuals. Therefore, optimal treatment of these disorders is highly important. In this study we will examine the effectiveness of a stepped care program for primary care patients with mood and anxiety disorders. A stepped care program is characterized by different treatment steps that are arranged in order of increasing intensity. Methods This study is a randomised controlled trial with two conditions: stepped care and care as usual, whereby the latter forms the control group. The stepped care program consists of four evidence based interventions: (1 Watchful waiting, (2 Guided self-help, (3 Problem Solving Treatment and (4 Medication and/or specialized mental health care. The study population consists of primary care attendees aged 18–65 years. Screeners are sent to all patients of the participating general practitioners. Individuals with a Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of mental disorders (DSM diagnosis of major depression, dysthymia, panic disorder (with or without agoraphobia, generalized anxiety disorder, or social phobia are included as well as individuals with minor depression and anxiety disorders. Primary focus is the reduction of depressive and anxiety symptoms. Both conditions are monitored at 8, 16 and 24 weeks. Discussion This study evaluates the effectiveness of a stepped care program for patients with depressive and anxiety disorder. If effective, a stepped care program can form a worthwhile alternative for care as usual. Strengths and limitations of this study are discussed. Trial Registration Current Controlled Trails: ISRCTN17831610.

  10. Mood disorders and risk of lung cancer in the EAGLE case-control study and in the U.S. Veterans Affairs inpatient cohort.

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    David E Capo-Ramos

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Mood disorders may affect lung cancer risk. We evaluated this hypothesis in two large studies. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We examined 1,939 lung cancer cases and 2,102 controls from the Environment And Genetics in Lung cancer Etiology (EAGLE case-control study conducted in Italy (2002-2005, and 82,945 inpatients with a lung cancer diagnosis and 3,586,299 person-years without a lung cancer diagnosis in the U.S. Veterans Affairs Inpatient Cohort (VA study, composed of veterans with a VA hospital admission (1969-1996. In EAGLE, we calculated odds ratios (ORs and 95% confidence intervals (CI, with extensive adjustment for tobacco smoking and multiple lifestyle factors. In the VA study, we estimated lung cancer relative risks (RRs and 95% CIs with time-dependent Poisson regression, adjusting for attained age, calendar year, hospital visits, time within the study, and related previous medical diagnoses. In EAGLE, we found decreased lung cancer risk in subjects with a personal history of mood disorders (OR: 0.59, 95% CI: 0.44-0.79, based on 121 lung cancer incident cases and 192 controls and family history of mood disorders (OR: 0.62, 95% CI: 0.50-0.77, based on 223 lung cancer cases and 345 controls. The VA study analyses yielded similar results (RR: 0.74, 95% CI: 0.71-0.77, based on 2,304 incident lung cancer cases and 177,267 non-cancer person-years in men with discharge diagnoses for mood disorders. History of mood disorders was associated with nicotine dependence, alcohol and substance use and psychometric scales of depressive and anxiety symptoms in controls for these studies. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The consistent finding of a relationship between mood disorders and lung cancer risk across two large studies calls for further research into the complex interplay of risk factors associated with these two widespread and debilitating diseases. Although we adjusted for smoking effects in EAGLE, residual confou