WorldWideScience

Sample records for current large marine

  1. Seabird diversity hotspot linked to ocean productivity in the Canary Current Large Marine Ecosystem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Attrill, Martin J.; Becker, Peter H.; Egevang, Carsten; Furness, Robert W.; Grémillet, David; Kopp, Matthias; Lescroël, Amélie; Matthiopoulos, Jason; Peter, Hans-Ulrich; Phillips, Richard A.

    2016-01-01

    Upwelling regions are highly productive habitats targeted by wide-ranging marine predators and industrial fisheries. In this study, we track the migratory movements of eight seabird species from across the Atlantic; quantify overlap with the Canary Current Large Marine Ecosystem (CCLME) and determine the habitat characteristics that drive this association. Our results indicate the CCLME is a biodiversity hotspot for migratory seabirds; all tracked species and more than 70% of individuals used this upwelling region. Relative species richness peaked in areas where sea surface temperature averaged between 15 and 20°C, and correlated positively with chlorophyll a, revealing the optimum conditions driving bottom-up trophic effects for seabirds. Marine vertebrates are not confined by international boundaries, making conservation challenging. However, by linking diversity to ocean productivity, our research reveals the significance of the CCLME for seabird populations from across the Atlantic, making it a priority for conservation action. PMID:27531154

  2. Regime shifts in demersal assemblages of the Benguela Current Large Marine Ecosystem: a comparative assessment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kirkman, Stephen P.; Yemane, Dawit; Atkinson, Lara J.

    2015-01-01

    Using long‐term survey data, changes in demersal faunal communities in the Benguela Current Large Marine Ecosystem were analysed at community and population levels to provide a comparative overview of the occurrence and timing of regime shifts. For South Africa, the timing of a community‐level sh......Using long‐term survey data, changes in demersal faunal communities in the Benguela Current Large Marine Ecosystem were analysed at community and population levels to provide a comparative overview of the occurrence and timing of regime shifts. For South Africa, the timing of a community......‐level shift observed in the early 1990s, and of a lesser shift observed in the mid‐2000s, corresponded well with the results of other studies that showed environmental, community‐level or population‐level changes at similar times, suggesting that environmental forcing had played a role. Several population......‐level shifts were detected for Namibia; these and a regime shift in the overall community identified for this country corresponded well to the timing of severe environmental perturbations and an extensive regime shift in the pelagic ecosystem of this area. However, the interpretation of these shifts...

  3. Atmospheric Wind Relaxations and the Oceanic Response in the California Current Large Marine Ecosystem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fewings, M. R.; Dorman, C. E.; Washburn, L.; Liu, W.

    2010-12-01

    the Gulf of Alaska influence ocean conditions in central and southern California via these wind relaxations. The ocean response within a few km of the coast involves poleward-flowing currents that transport warm water out of the lees of capes and headlands and counter to the direction of the California Current [Send et al. 1987, Harms and Winant 1998, Winant et al. 2003, Melton et al. 2009]. A similar response occurs in the Benguela and Canary Current coastal upwelling systems. The ocean response involves both barotropic and baroclinic dynamics and is consistent with existing geophysical models of buoyant, coastally-trapped plumes [Washburn et al., in prep]. Our ongoing work includes i) studying the regional ocean response to determine its spatial extent, time evolution, and ocean-atmosphere coupling dynamics; ii) developing an atmospheric index to predict wind relaxations in southern California based on pressure in the Gulf of Alaska; iii) examining the strength and frequency of wind relaxations over the past 30 years for connections to El Niño and the Pacific Decadal Oscillation; and iv) predicting future variations in wind relaxations and the response of the California Current Large Marine Ecosystem.

  4. Declining abundance of beaked whales (family Ziphiidae in the California Current large marine ecosystem.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeffrey E Moore

    Full Text Available Beaked whales are among the most diverse yet least understood groups of marine mammals. A diverse set of mostly anthropogenic threats necessitates improvement in our ability to assess population status for this cryptic group. The Southwest Fisheries Science Center (NOAA conducted six ship line-transect cetacean abundance surveys in the California Current off the contiguous western United States between 1991 and 2008. We used a Bayesian hidden-process modeling approach to estimate abundance and population trends of beaked whales using sightings data from these surveys. We also compiled records of beaked whale stranding events (3 genera, at least 8 species on adjacent beaches from 1900 to 2012, to help assess population status of beaked whales in the northern part of the California Current. Bayesian posterior summaries for trend parameters provide strong evidence of declining beaked whale abundance in the study area. The probability of negative trend for Cuvier's beaked whale (Ziphius cavirostris during 1991-2008 was 0.84, with 1991 and 2008 estimates of 10771 (CV = 0.51 and ≈7550 (CV = 0.55, respectively. The probability of decline for Mesoplodon spp. (pooled across species was 0.96, with 1991 and 2008 estimates of 2206 (CV = 0.46 and 811 (CV = 0.65. The mean posterior estimates for average rate of decline were 2.9% and 7.0% per year. There was no evidence of abundance trend for Baird's beaked whale (Berardius bairdii, for which annual abundance estimates in the survey area ranged from ≈900 to 1300 (CV≈1.3. Stranding data were consistent with the survey results. Causes of apparent declines are unknown. Direct impacts of fisheries (bycatch can be ruled out, but impacts of anthropogenic sound (e.g., naval active sonar and ecosystem change are plausible hypotheses that merit investigation.

  5. Declining abundance of beaked whales (family Ziphiidae) in the California Current large marine ecosystem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Jeffrey E; Barlow, Jay P

    2013-01-01

    Beaked whales are among the most diverse yet least understood groups of marine mammals. A diverse set of mostly anthropogenic threats necessitates improvement in our ability to assess population status for this cryptic group. The Southwest Fisheries Science Center (NOAA) conducted six ship line-transect cetacean abundance surveys in the California Current off the contiguous western United States between 1991 and 2008. We used a Bayesian hidden-process modeling approach to estimate abundance and population trends of beaked whales using sightings data from these surveys. We also compiled records of beaked whale stranding events (3 genera, at least 8 species) on adjacent beaches from 1900 to 2012, to help assess population status of beaked whales in the northern part of the California Current. Bayesian posterior summaries for trend parameters provide strong evidence of declining beaked whale abundance in the study area. The probability of negative trend for Cuvier's beaked whale (Ziphius cavirostris) during 1991-2008 was 0.84, with 1991 and 2008 estimates of 10771 (CV = 0.51) and ≈7550 (CV = 0.55), respectively. The probability of decline for Mesoplodon spp. (pooled across species) was 0.96, with 1991 and 2008 estimates of 2206 (CV = 0.46) and 811 (CV = 0.65). The mean posterior estimates for average rate of decline were 2.9% and 7.0% per year. There was no evidence of abundance trend for Baird's beaked whale (Berardius bairdii), for which annual abundance estimates in the survey area ranged from ≈900 to 1300 (CV≈1.3). Stranding data were consistent with the survey results. Causes of apparent declines are unknown. Direct impacts of fisheries (bycatch) can be ruled out, but impacts of anthropogenic sound (e.g., naval active sonar) and ecosystem change are plausible hypotheses that merit investigation.

  6. Exploring local adaptation and the ocean acidification seascape – studies in the California Current Large Marine Ecosystem

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. E. Hofmann

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The California Current Large Marine Ecosystem (CCLME, a temperate marine region dominated by episodic upwelling, is predicted to experience rapid environmental change in the future due to ocean acidification. Aragonite saturation state within the California Current System is predicted to decrease in the future, with near-permanent undersaturation conditions expected by the year 2050. Thus, the CCLME is a critical region to study due to the rapid rate of environmental change that resident organisms will experience and because of the economic and societal value of this coastal region. Recent efforts by a research consortium – the Ocean Margin Ecosystems Group for Acidification Studies (OMEGAS – has begun to characterize a portion of the CCLME; both describing the mosaic of pH in coastal waters and examining the responses of key calcification-dependent benthic marine organisms to natural variation in pH and to changes in carbonate chemistry that are expected in the coming decades. In this review, we present the OMEGAS strategy of co-locating sensors and oceanographic observations with biological studies on benthic marine invertebrates, specifically measurements of functional traits such as calcification-related processes and genetic variation in populations that are locally adapted to conditions in a particular region of the coast. Highlighted in this contribution are (1 the OMEGAS sensor network that spans the west coast of the US from central Oregon to southern California, (2 initial findings of the carbonate chemistry amongst the OMEGAS study sites, (3 an overview of the biological data that describes the acclimatization and the adaptation capacity of key benthic marine invertebrates within the CCLME.

  7. Physical oceanography - Developing end-to-end models of the California Current Large Marine Ecosystem

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The purpose of this project is to develop spatially discrete end-to-end models of the California Current LME, linking oceanography, biogeochemistry, food web...

  8. Atlantis model outputs - Developing end-to-end models of the California Current Large Marine Ecosystem

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The purpose of this project is to develop spatially discrete end-to-end models of the California Current LME, linking oceanography, biogeochemistry, food web...

  9. Marine Hydrokinetic Energy from Western Boundary Currents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bane, John M.; He, Ruoying; Muglia, Michael; Lowcher, Caroline F.; Gong, Yanlin; Haines, Sara M.

    2017-01-01

    The kinetic energy in ocean currents, or marine hydrokinetic (MHK) energy, is a renewable energy resource that can help meet global energy requirements. An ocean circulation model–based census shows that subtropical surface western boundary currents (WBCs) are the only nearshore, large-scale currents swift enough to drive large electricity-generating ocean turbines envisioned for future use. We review several WBCs in the context of kinetic energy extraction. The power density in the Gulf Stream off North Carolina at times reaches several thousand watts per square meter at 75 m below the surface, and the annual average power is approximately 500–1,000 W m‑2. Significant fluctuations occur with periods of 3–20 days (Gulf Stream meanders) and weeks to months (Gulf Stream path shifts). Interannual variations in annual average power occur because of year-to-year changes in these WBC motions. No large-scale turbines presently exist, and the road to establishing MHK facilities in WBCs will encounter challenges that are similar in many aspects to those associated with the development of offshore wind power.

  10. Climate projections for selected large marine ecosystems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Muyin; Overland, James E.; Bond, Nicholas A.

    2010-02-01

    In preparation for the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) Fourth Assessment Report (AR4) modeling centers from around the world carried out sets of global climate simulations under various emission scenarios with a total of 23 coupled atmosphere-ocean general circulation models. We evaluated the models' 20th century hindcasts of selected variables relevant to several large marine ecosystems and examined 21st century projections by a subset of these models under the A1B (middle range) emission scenario. In general we find that a subset (about half) of the models are able to simulate large-scale aspects of the historical observations reasonably well, which provides some confidence in their application for projections of ocean conditions into the future. Over the North Pacific by the mid-21st century, the warming due to the trend in wintertime sea surface temperature (SST) will be 1°-1.5 °C, which is as large as the amplitude of the major mode of variability, the Pacific Decadal Oscillation (PDO). For areas northwest of the Hawaiian Islands, these models projected a steady increase of 1.2 °C in summer SST over the period from 2000 to 2050. For the Bering and Barents seas, a subset of models selected on the basis of their ability to simulate sea-ice area in late 20th century yield an average decrease in sea-ice coverage of 43% and 36%, respectively, by the decade centered on 2050 with a reasonable degree of consistency. On the other hand, model simulations of coastal upwelling for the California, Canary and Humboldt Currents, and of bottom temperatures in the Barents Sea, feature a relatively large degree of uncertainty. These results illustrate that 21st century projections for marine ecosystems in certain regions using present-generation climate models require additional analysis.

  11. 2002–2012: 10 Years of Research Progress in Horizontal-Axis Marine Current Turbines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kai-Wern Ng

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Research in marine current energy, including tidal and ocean currents, has undergone significant growth in the past decade. The horizontal-axis marine current turbine is one of the machines used to harness marine current energy, which appears to be the most technologically and economically viable one at this stage. A number of large-scale marine current turbines rated at more than 1 MW have been deployed around the World. Parallel to the development of industry, academic research on horizontal-axis marine current turbines has also shown positive growth. This paper reviews previous research on horizontal-axis marine current turbines and provides a concise overview for future researchers who might be interested in horizontal-axis marine current turbines. The review covers several main aspects, such as: energy assessment, turbine design, wakes, generators, novel modifications and environmental impact. Future trends for research on horizontal-axis marine current turbines are also discussed.

  12. Combined climate- and prey-mediated range expansion of Humboldt squid (Dosidicus gigas), a large marine predator in the California Current System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Julia S; Hazen, Elliott L; Bograd, Steven J; Byrnes, Jarrett E K; Foley, David G; Gilly, William F; Robison, Bruce H; Field, John C

    2014-06-01

    Climate-driven range shifts are ongoing in pelagic marine environments, and ecosystems must respond to combined effects of altered species distributions and environmental drivers. Hypoxic oxygen minimum zones (OMZs) in midwater environments are shoaling globally; this can affect distributions of species both geographically and vertically along with predator-prey dynamics. Humboldt (jumbo) squid (Dosidicus gigas) are highly migratory predators adapted to hypoxic conditions that may be deleterious to their competitors and predators. Consequently, OMZ shoaling may preferentially facilitate foraging opportunities for Humboldt squid. With two separate modeling approaches using unique, long-term data based on in situ observations of predator, prey, and environmental variables, our analyses suggest that Humboldt squid are indirectly affected by OMZ shoaling through effects on a primary food source, myctophid fishes. Our results suggest that this indirect linkage between hypoxia and foraging is an important driver of the ongoing range expansion of Humboldt squid in the northeastern Pacific Ocean.

  13. West Coast fish, mammal, bird life history and abunance parameters - Developing end-to-end models of the California Current Large Marine Ecosystem

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The purpose of this project is to develop spatially discrete end-to-end models of the California Current LME, linking oceanography, biogeochemistry, food web...

  14. West Coast fish, mammal, and bird species diets - Developing end-to-end models of the California Current Large Marine Ecosystem

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The purpose of this project is to develop spatially discrete end-to-end models of the California Current LME, linking oceanography, biogeochemistry, food web...

  15. Stability analysis of offshore wind farm and marine current farm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shawon, Mohammad Hasanuzzaman

    Renewable energy has been playing an important role to meet power demand and 'Green Energy' market is getting bigger platform all over the world in the last few years. Due to massive increase in the prices of fossil fuels along with global warming issues, energy harvesting from renewable energy sources has received considerable interest, nowadays, where extensive researches are going on to ensure optimum use of renewable sources. In order to meet the increasing demand of electricity and power, integration of renewable energy is getting highest priorities around the world. Wind is one of the most top growing renewable energy resources and wind power market penetration is expected to reach 3.35 percent by 2013 from its present market of about 240 GW. A wind energy system is the most environmental friendly, cost effective and safe among all renewable energy resources available. Another promising form of renewable energy is ocean energy which covers 70 % of the earth. Ocean energy can be tapped from waves, tides and thermal elements. Offshore Wind farm (OWF) has already become very popular for large scale wind power integration with the onshore grid. Recently, marine current farm (MCF) is also showing good potential to become mainstream energy sources and already successfully commissioned in United Kingdom. However, squirrel cage induction generator (SCIG) has the stability problem similar to synchronous generator especially during fault location to restore the electromagnetic torque. Series dynamic braking resistor (SDBR) has been known as a useful mean to stabilize fixed speed wind generator system. On the other hand, doubly fed induction generator (DFIG) has the capability of coupling the control of active and reactive power and to provide necessary reactive power demand during grid fault conditions. Series dynamic braking resistor (SDBR) can also be employed with DFIG to limit the rotor over current. An integration of wind and tidal energy represents a new

  16. Marine aerosol production: a review of the current knowledge

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    O'Dowd, C.D.; Leeuw, G. de

    2007-01-01

    The current knowledge in primary and secondary marine aerosol formation is reviewed. For primary marine aerosol source functions, recent source functions have demonstrated a significant flux of submicrometre particles down to radii of 20 nm. Moreover, the source functions derived from different tech

  17. Wake Survey of a Marine Current Turbine Under Steady Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lust, Ethan; Luznik, Luksa; Flack, Karen

    2016-11-01

    A submersible particle image velocimetry (PIV) system was used to study the wake of a horizontal axis marine current turbine. The turbine was tested in a large tow tank facility at the United States Naval Academy. The turbine is a 1/25th scale model of the U.S. National Renewable Energy Laboratory's Reference Model 1 (RM1) tidal turbine. It is a two-bladed turbine measuring 0.8 m in diameter and featuring a NACA 63-618 airfoil cross section. Separate wind tunnel testing has shown the foil section used on the turbine to be Reynolds number independent with respect to lift at the experimental parameters of tow carriage speed (Utow = 1 . 68 m/s) and tip speed ratio (TSR = 7). The wake survey was conducted over an area extending 0.25D forward of the turbine tip path to 2.0D aft, and to a depth of 1.0D beneath the turbine output shaft in the streamwise plane. Each field of view was approximately 30 cm by 30 cm, and each overlapped the adjacent fields of view by 5 cm. The entire flow field was then reconstructed into a single field of investigation. Results include streamwise and vertical ensemble average velocity fields averaged over approximately 1,000 realizations, as well as higher-order statistics. Turbine tip vortex centers were identified and plotted showing increasing aperiodicity with wake age. keywords: horizontal axis marine current turbine, particle image velocimetry, towing tank, wake survey

  18. Medicinal foods from marine animals: current status and prospects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Se-Kwon; Pallela, Ramjee

    2012-01-01

    The lifestyle of human being is changing day by day toward the simplified and more convenient way of living. Human wellbeing is majorly dependent on the daily food habits that are in accordance with the habits of individual community and the surrounding environments. Although the food habits are simplified and fashioned according to the current lifestyle, many of the Asians are still showing much importance to the naturally derived and traditional foods. One such medicinally important natural source is the foods from marine organisms, which are an important growing notion for the development of marine nutraceuticals and functional foods. In this context, we have already brought the recent trends and applications of marine algal (macro and micro) foods in my previous volume. The current preliminary chapter of this book volume on marine animals and microbes describes about the prospects of various marine animals and their derived substances/materials as medicinal foods. In addition, this chapter encourages the new researchers as well as various health communities to implement the marine animal-based medicinal foods and their applications.

  19. The role of large marine vertebrates in the assessment of the quality of pelagic marine ecosystems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fossi, Maria Cristina; Casini, Silvia; Caliani, Ilaria; Panti, Cristina; Marsili, Letizia; Viarengo, Aldo; Giangreco, Roberto; Notarbartolo di Sciara, Giuseppe; Serena, Fabrizio; Ouerghi, Atef; Depledge, Michael H

    2012-06-01

    The Marine Strategy Framework Directive (MSFD) establishing a framework for community action in the field of marine environmental policy has been developed and is being implemented, with the objective to deliver "Good Environmental Status" by 2020. A pragmatic way forward has been achieved through the development of 11 "qualitative descriptors". In an attempt to identify gaps in MSFD, regarding the data on large marine vertebrates, the SETAC--Italian Branch organised a workshop in Siena (IT). Particular attention was paid to the qualitative descriptors 8 (contaminants and pollution effects) and 10 (marine litter). The specific remit was to discuss the potential use of large marine vertebrates (from large pelagic fish, sea turtles, sea birds and cetaceans) in determining the environmental status of pelagic marine ecosystems. During the workshop it emerged that large pelagic fish may be especially useful for monitoring short- to medium-term changes in pelagic ecosystems, while cetaceans provided a more integrated view over the long-term. A theme that strongly emerged was the broad recognition that biomarkers offer real potential for the determination of good ecological status detecting the "undesirable biological effects" (indicator for descriptor 8). Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Large flux of iron from the Amery Ice Shelf marine ice to Prydz Bay, East Antarctica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herraiz-Borreguero, L.; Lannuzel, D.; van der Merwe, P.; Treverrow, A.; Pedro, J. B.

    2016-08-01

    The Antarctic continental shelf supports a high level of marine primary productivity and is a globally important carbon dioxide (CO2) sink through the photosynthetic fixation of CO2 via the biological pump. Sustaining such high productivity requires a large supply of the essential micronutrient iron (Fe); however, the pathways for Fe delivery to these zones vary spatially and temporally. Our study is the first to report a previously unquantified source of concentrated bioavailable Fe to Antarctic surface waters. We hypothesize that Fe derived from subglacial processes is delivered to euphotic waters through the accretion (Fe storage) and subsequent melting (Fe release) of a marine-accreted layer of ice at the base of the Amery Ice Shelf (AIS). Using satellite-derived Chlorophyll-a data, we show that the soluble Fe supplied by the melting of the marine ice layer is an order of magnitude larger than the required Fe necessary to sustain the large annual phytoplankton bloom in Prydz Bay. Our finding of high concentrations of Fe in AIS marine ice and recent data on increasing rates of ice shelf basal melt in many of Antarctica's ice shelves should encourage further research into glacial and marine sediment transport beneath ice shelves and their sensitivity to current changes in basal melt. Currently, the distribution, volume, and Fe concentration of Antarctic marine ice is poorly constrained. This uncertainty, combined with variable forecasts of increased rates of ice shelf basal melt, limits our ability to predict future Fe supply to Antarctic coastal waters.

  1. [Management of large marine ecosystem based on ecosystem approach].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Jian-song

    2011-09-01

    Large marine ecosystem (LME) is a large area of ocean characterized by distinct oceanology and ecology. Its natural characteristics require management based on ecosystem approach. A series of international treaties and regulations definitely or indirectly support that it should adopt ecosystem approach to manage LME to achieve the sustainable utilization of marine resources. In practices, some countries such as Canada, Australia, and U.S.A. have adopted ecosystem-based approach to manage their oceans, and some international organizations such as global environment fund committee have carried out a number of LME programs based on ecosystem approach. Aiming at the sustainable development of their fisheries, the regional organizations such as Caribbean Community have established regional fisheries mechanism. However, the adoption of ecosystem approach to manage LME is not only a scientific and legal issue, but also a political matter largely depending on the political will and the mutual cooperation degree of related countries.

  2. Current and future trends in marine image annotation software

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomes-Pereira, Jose Nuno; Auger, Vincent; Beisiegel, Kolja; Benjamin, Robert; Bergmann, Melanie; Bowden, David; Buhl-Mortensen, Pal; De Leo, Fabio C.; Dionísio, Gisela; Durden, Jennifer M.; Edwards, Luke; Friedman, Ariell; Greinert, Jens; Jacobsen-Stout, Nancy; Lerner, Steve; Leslie, Murray; Nattkemper, Tim W.; Sameoto, Jessica A.; Schoening, Timm; Schouten, Ronald; Seager, James; Singh, Hanumant; Soubigou, Olivier; Tojeira, Inês; van den Beld, Inge; Dias, Frederico; Tempera, Fernando; Santos, Ricardo S.

    2016-12-01

    Given the need to describe, analyze and index large quantities of marine imagery data for exploration and monitoring activities, a range of specialized image annotation tools have been developed worldwide. Image annotation - the process of transposing objects or events represented in a video or still image to the semantic level, may involve human interactions and computer-assisted solutions. Marine image annotation software (MIAS) have enabled over 500 publications to date. We review the functioning, application trends and developments, by comparing general and advanced features of 23 different tools utilized in underwater image analysis. MIAS requiring human input are basically a graphical user interface, with a video player or image browser that recognizes a specific time code or image code, allowing to log events in a time-stamped (and/or geo-referenced) manner. MIAS differ from similar software by the capability of integrating data associated to video collection, the most simple being the position coordinates of the video recording platform. MIAS have three main characteristics: annotating events in real time, posteriorly to annotation and interact with a database. These range from simple annotation interfaces, to full onboard data management systems, with a variety of toolboxes. Advanced packages allow to input and display data from multiple sensors or multiple annotators via intranet or internet. Posterior human-mediated annotation often include tools for data display and image analysis, e.g. length, area, image segmentation, point count; and in a few cases the possibility of browsing and editing previous dive logs or to analyze the annotations. The interaction with a database allows the automatic integration of annotations from different surveys, repeated annotation and collaborative annotation of shared datasets, browsing and querying of data. Progress in the field of automated annotation is mostly in post processing, for stable platforms or still images

  3. Succession of cable bacteria and electric currents in marine sediment

    OpenAIRE

    Schauer, Regina; Risgaard-Petersen, Nils; Kjeldsen, Kasper U.; Tataru Bjerg, Jesper J; B Jørgensen, Bo; Schramm, Andreas; Nielsen, Lars Peter

    2014-01-01

    Filamentous Desulfobulbaceae have been reported to conduct electrons over centimetre-long distances, thereby coupling oxygen reduction at the surface of marine sediment to sulphide oxidation in sub-surface layers. To understand how these ‘cable bacteria' establish and sustain electric conductivity, we followed a population for 53 days after exposing sulphidic sediment with initially no detectable filaments to oxygen. After 10 days, cable bacteria and electric currents were established through...

  4. One-Dimensional Modelling of Marine Current Turbine Runaway Behaviour

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Staffan Lundin

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available If a turbine loses its electrical load, it will rotate freely and increase speed, eventually achieving that rotational speed which produces zero net torque. This is known as a runaway situation. Unlike many other types of turbine, a marine current turbine will typically overshoot the final runaway speed before slowing down and settling at the runaway speed. Since the hydrodynamic forces acting on the turbine are dependent on rotational speed and acceleration, turbine behaviour during runaway becomes important for load analyses during turbine design. In this article, we consider analytical and numerical models of marine current turbine runaway behaviour in one dimension. The analytical model is found not to capture the overshoot phenomenon, while still providing useful estimates of acceleration at the onset of runaway. The numerical model incorporates turbine wake build-up and predicts a rotational speed overshoot. The predictions of the models are compared against measurements of runaway of a marine current turbine. The models are also used to recreate previously-published results for a tidal turbine and applied to a wind turbine. It is found that both models provide reasonable estimates of maximum accelerations. The numerical model is found to capture the speed overshoot well.

  5. Heat Transfer in Large Two-Stroke Marine Diesel Engines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Michael Vincent

    Heat transfer between the cylinder gas and the piston surface during combustion in large two-stroke uniflow scavenged marine diesel engines has been investigated in the present work. The piston surface experiences a severe thermal load during combustion due to the close proximity of the combustion...... marine diesel engines. The contribution from thermal radiation to the piston surface heat flux was not investigated in the present work, but a coarse estimation of the magnitude was performed. The obtained estimations indicate a peak piston surface heat flux level in the interval from about 1 MW/m2...... and up to 9.5 MW/m2 with the actual value probably being in the lower part of this interval. This is about the same magnitude as that previously reported for automotive size diesel engines. The obtained interval is relatively large, but a more accurate prediction is difficult to achieve with the applied...

  6. Research on Low Power Marine Current Power Generation System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dongkai Peng

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available This study proposes a simple topological structure and power control method for a small scale stand alone marine current system, in which a diode rectifier, DC/DC boost converter for the maximum power control, battery as a storage element and a single phase inverter to link with load. The study establishes the steady-state mathematical model of marine current power generation system and derives the formula between the maximum power point and dc battery voltage. Then use the measurements of DC voltage and DC current to obtain Maximum Power Point Tracking (MPPT by controlling the duty cycle of the boost converter switch in order to simplify the system structure and the control strategies. In this case, the hill climbing searching algorithm is employed to get maximum power point and the double closed loops control strategy is used to improve the dynamic and static performance of single phase inverter. The simulation model is developed in MATLAB/Simulink. And the control method is executed in dSPACE1104 real-time platform. The simulation and experimental results demonstrate the feasibility and validity of the proposed control strategies.

  7. Marine mimivirus relatives are probably large algal viruses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claverie Jean-Michel

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Acanthamoeba polyphaga mimivirus is the largest known ds-DNA virus and its 1.2 Mb-genome sequence has revealed many unique features. Mimivirus occupies an independent lineage among eukaryotic viruses and its known hosts include only species from the Acanthamoeba genus. The existence of mimivirus relatives was first suggested by the analysis of the Sargasso Sea metagenomic data. Results We now further demonstrate the presence of numerous "mimivirus-like" sequences using a larger marine metagenomic data set. We also show that the DNA polymerase sequences from three algal viruses (CeV01, PpV01, PoV01 infecting different marine algal species (Chrysochromulina ericina, Phaeocystis pouchetii, Pyramimonas orientalis are very closely related to their homolog in mimivirus. Conclusion Our results suggest that the numerous mimivirus-related sequences identified in marine environments are likely to originate from diverse large DNA viruses infecting phytoplankton. Micro-algae thus constitute a new category of potential hosts in which to look for new species of Mimiviridae.

  8. Succession of cable bacteria and electric currents in marine sediment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schauer, Regina; Risgaard-Petersen, Nils; Kjeldsen, Kasper Urup

    2014-01-01

    ][mu]m, with a general increase over time and depth, and yet they shared 16S rRNA sequence identity of >98%. Comparison of the increase in biovolume and electric current density suggested high cellular growth efficiency. While the vertical expansion of filaments continued over time and reached 30[thinsp]mm, the electric......Filamentous Desulfobulbaceae have been reported to conduct electrons over centimetre-long distances, thereby coupling oxygen reduction at the surface of marine sediment to sulphide oxidation in sub-surface layers. To understand how these /`cable bacteria/' establish and sustain electric...... conductivity, we followed a population for 53 days after exposing sulphidic sediment with initially no detectable filaments to oxygen. After 10 days, cable bacteria and electric currents were established throughout the top 15[thinsp]mm of the sediment, and after 21 days the filament density peaked with a total...

  9. Succession of cable bacteria and electric currents in marine sediment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schauer, Regina; Risgaard-Petersen, Nils; Kjeldsen, Kasper Urup

    2014-01-01

    Filamentous Desulfobulbaceae have been reported to conduct electrons over centimetre-long distances, thereby coupling oxygen reduction at the surface of marine sediment to sulphide oxidation in sub-surface layers. To understand how these /`cable bacteria/' establish and sustain electric...... conductivity, we followed a population for 53 days after exposing sulphidic sediment with initially no detectable filaments to oxygen. After 10 days, cable bacteria and electric currents were established throughout the top 15[thinsp]mm of the sediment, and after 21 days the filament density peaked with a total......][mu]m, with a general increase over time and depth, and yet they shared 16S rRNA sequence identity of >98%. Comparison of the increase in biovolume and electric current density suggested high cellular growth efficiency. While the vertical expansion of filaments continued over time and reached 30[thinsp]mm, the electric...

  10. Twisted Savonius turbine based marine current energy conversion system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassan, Md. Imtiaj

    The Ocean Network Seafloor Instrumentation (ONSFI) Project is a multidisciplinary research and development project that aims to design, fabricate and validate a proof-of-concept seafloor array of wireless marine sensors for use in monitoring seabed processes. The sensor pods, known as Seaformatics, will be powered by ocean bottom currents and will be able to communicate with each other and to the Internet through surface master units to facilitate observation of the ocean floor from the shore. This thesis explores the use of the twisted Savonius turbine as a means of converting the kinetic energy of the free flowing water into electrical energy for the pods. This will eliminate the need for battery replacement. A physical model of the turbine was constructed and tested in the Water Flume at the Marine Institute of Memorial University and in the Wind Tunnel in the Engineering Building at Memorial University. A mathematical model of the turbine was constructed in SolidWorks. This was tested in the Computational Fluid Dynamics or CFD software FLOW-3D. Experimental results were compared with CFD results and the agreement was reasonable. A twisted Savonius turbine emulator was developed to test a dc-dc boost converter. A low cost microcontroller based MPPT algorithm was developed to obtain maximum power from the turbine. Overall the thesis shows that the twisted Savonius turbine can provide the power needed by the sensor pods. It also shows that CFD is a viable way to study the performance of the Savonius type of turbine.

  11. Current status on marine litter indicators in Nordic waters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Strand, Jakob; Tairova, Zhanna; Magnusson, Kerstin

    Status for project on Marine litter in the Nordic waters. This includes a review of Nordic studies on marine litter indicators. Various studies as part of either research or existing monitoring have provided information on occurrence of marine litter in Nordic waters from Baltic Sea to the Arctic....

  12. Succession of cable bacteria and electric currents in marine sediment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schauer, Regina; Risgaard-Petersen, Nils; Kjeldsen, Kasper U; Tataru Bjerg, Jesper J; B Jørgensen, Bo; Schramm, Andreas; Nielsen, Lars Peter

    2014-06-01

    Filamentous Desulfobulbaceae have been reported to conduct electrons over centimetre-long distances, thereby coupling oxygen reduction at the surface of marine sediment to sulphide oxidation in sub-surface layers. To understand how these 'cable bacteria' establish and sustain electric conductivity, we followed a population for 53 days after exposing sulphidic sediment with initially no detectable filaments to oxygen. After 10 days, cable bacteria and electric currents were established throughout the top 15 mm of the sediment, and after 21 days the filament density peaked with a total length of 2 km cm(-2). Cells elongated and divided at all depths with doubling times over the first 10 days of 98%. Comparison of the increase in biovolume and electric current density suggested high cellular growth efficiency. While the vertical expansion of filaments continued over time and reached 30 mm, the electric current density and biomass declined after 13 and 21 days, respectively. This might reflect a breakdown of short filaments as their solid sulphide sources became depleted in the top layers of the anoxic zone. In conclusion, cable bacteria combine rapid and efficient growth with oriented movement to establish and exploit the spatially separated half-reactions of sulphide oxidation and oxygen consumption.

  13. Influence of turbulence on the wake of a marine current turbine simulator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blackmore, T; Batten, W M J; Bahaj, A S

    2014-10-08

    Marine current turbine commercial prototypes have now been deployed and arrays of multiple turbines under design. The tidal flows in which they operate are highly turbulent, but the characteristics of the inflow turbulence have not being considered in present design methods. This work considers the effects of inflow turbulence on the wake behind an actuator disc representation of a marine current turbine. Different turbulence intensities and integral length scales were generated in a large eddy simulation using a gridInlet, which produces turbulence from a grid pattern on the inlet boundary. The results highlight the significance of turbulence on the wake profile, with a different flow regime occurring for the zero turbulence case. Increasing the turbulence intensity reduced the velocity deficit and shifted the maximum deficit closer to the turbine. Increasing the integral length scale increased the velocity deficit close to the turbine due to an increased production of turbulent energy. However, the wake recovery was increased due to the higher rate of turbulent mixing causing the wake to expand. The implication of this work is that marine current turbine arrays could be further optimized, increasing the energy yield of the array when the site-specific turbulence characteristics are considered.

  14. Dynamic Stability Enhancement and Power Flow Control of a Hybrid Wind and Marine-Current Farm Using SMES

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Li; Chen, Shiang-Shong; Lee, Wei-Jen

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents a control scheme based on a superconducting magnetic energy storage (SMES) unit to achieve both power flow control and damping enhancement of a novel hybrid wind and marine-current farm (MCF) connected to a large power grid. The performance of the studied wind farm (WF) is sim...

  15. Large ancient organic matter contributions to Arctic marine sediments (Svalbard)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kim, J.-H.; Peterse, F.; Willmott, V.; Klitgaard Kristensen, D.; Baas, M.; Schouten, S.; Sinninghe Damsté, J.S.

    2011-01-01

    Soils, fine-grained ice-rafted detritus (IRD), coals, and marine surface sediments in the Arctic realm (Svalbard) were collected in 2007 and 2008 to characterize organic matter (OM) sources in Arctic marine sediments. Bulk geochemical (C : N ratio and stable carbon isotopic composition) parameters s

  16. Large ancient organic matter contributions to Arctic marine sediments (Svalbard)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kim, J.-H.; Peterse, F.; Willmott, V.; Klitgaard Kristensen, D.; Baas, M.; Schouten, S.; Sinninghe Damsté, J.S.

    2011-01-01

    Soils, fine-grained ice-rafted detritus (IRD), coals, and marine surface sediments in the Arctic realm (Svalbard)were collected in 2007 and 2008 to characterize organic matter (OM) sources in Arctic marine sediments. Bulkgeochemical (C : N ratio and stable carbon isotopic composition) parameters sug

  17. Dynamics of a Marine Turbine for Deep Ocean Currents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ling-Yuan Chang

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available For most of the ocean currents, such as the Kuroshio at east Taiwan, the Gulf Stream at east Florida and the Agulhas Current at southeast Africa, the depth of the seabed is generally deeper than one hundred meters, some waters of which can even reach one thousand meters. In such deep waters, the design of the turbine, as well as the anchoring system shall have special features so that existing ocean engineering technologies can be applied and the engineering cost can be lowered. Thus, as regards design, in addition to the analysis of the interaction between turbine and current, priority shall also be given to the design of the anchoring system of the turbine. To address the concerns, the authors propose an ocean turbine featured as follows: (1 it can be anchored in deep waters with a single cable; (2 it can generate high power in a current of moderate flow speed while producing low drag; (3 it can be self-balanced against current disturbance; (4 it is shrouded to enhance power efficiency; (5 the dynamic variations due to the interaction between the turbine and current are small. All of these features are confirmed with the computational results, leading to a detailed design of the turbine structure. If the easy-to-install high-efficiency shrouded turbines, having the capability to self-balance and requiring minimum maintenance effort, are successfully developed, the power supply pressure in Taiwan can be greatly alleviated. The Kuroshio was chosen as the typical current for the present dynamic analysis because, firstly, the flow characteristics of Kuroshio are similar to those of other large-scale currents mentioned above, and secondly, the data of Kuroshio are highly available to us so that a thorough analysis can be done.

  18. The stratigraphic distribution of large marine vertebrates and shell beds in the Pliocene of Tuscany

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dominici, Stefano; Benvenuti, Marco; Danise, Silvia

    2015-04-01

    The record of 337 shark fossils, 142 cetaceans and 10 sea cows from the Pliocene of Tuscany, mostly from historical museum collections, is revised. The majority of these fossils are concentrated at a few geographic sites from separated hinterland basins, on the South-Western side of the Northern Apennines. To better understand the meaning of these concentrations, the sequence stratigraphic distribution of more recent findings of large marine vertebrates is reconstructed against a high-resolution framework based on sedimentary facies analysis. These remains are usually covered by, or included in mudstones deposited far from the coast (N=12), skeletons being usually articulated, slightly displaced, and often bioeroded. A minor part of better preserved articulated skeletons is associated with sandstones from deltaic paleonenvironments (N=2). Marine mammal and shark remains may be associated with laterally-continuous shell accumulations, a type of concentration occurring at maximum flooding surfaces, separating relatively coarse-grained facies from open marine mudstones. Shell beds were bulk-sampled at 66 locations from six basins, covering a wide range of sedimentary facies, and spanning a chronologic interval of about 2.5 million years. A dataset of 62,655 mollusc specimens belonging to 496 species formed the basis of a statistical study to reconstruct the structure of the benthic communities, and to estimate paleodepths from intertidal to upper bathyal settings. Mollusc associations closely mirror the distribution of sedimentary facies, allowing for a fine tuning of the sequence stratigraphic architecture. Merging paleogeographic, stratigraphic and paleoecologic data, we conclude that the more abundant and diverse accumulations of large vertebrates took place in settings under the influence of coastal upwelling. A modern analogue occurs today in the Ligurian Sea, on the Tuscan offshore, where abundant nutrients carried by deep-marine currents of Western origin

  19. Marines in the Boxer Rebellion as a Model for Current Marine Corps Operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-10

    Security Group ....................................................................... 45 Marine Corps Operations during the Cold War ...47 vii Post- Cold War Operations...naval gun crews in most of the major naval battles of the war .17 After the Civil War , the Marine Corps returned to Asia in support of national

  20. Large Eddy Simulation of Crashback in Marine Propulsors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Hyunchul

    Crashback is an operating condition to quickly stop a propelled vehicle, where the propeller is rotated in the reverse direction to yield negative thrust. The crashback condition is dominated by the interaction of the free stream flow with the strong reverse flow. This interaction forms a highly unsteady vortex ring, which is a very prominent feature of crashback. Crashback causes highly unsteady loads and flow separation on the blade surface. The unsteady loads can cause propulsor blade damage, and also affect vehicle maneuverability. Crashback is therefore well known as one of the most challenging propeller states to analyze. This dissertation uses Large-Eddy Simulation (LES) to predict the highly unsteady flow field in crashback. A non-dissipative and robust finite volume method developed by Mahesh et al. (2004) for unstructured grids is applied to flow around marine propulsors. The LES equations are written in a rotating frame of reference. The objectives of this dissertation are: (1) to understand the flow physics of crashback in marine propulsors with and without a duct, (2) to develop a finite volume method for highly skewed meshes which usually occur in complex propulsor geometries, and (3) to develop a sliding interface method for simulations of rotor-stator propulsor on parallel platforms. LES is performed for an open propulsor in crashback and validated against experiments performed by Jessup et al. (2004). The LES results show good agreement with experiments. Effective pressures for thrust and side-force are introduced to more clearly understand the physical sources of thrust and side-force. Both thrust and side-force are seen to be mainly generated from the leading edge of the suction side of the propeller. This implies that thrust and side-force have the same source---the highly unsteady leading edge separation. Conditional averaging is performed to obtain quantitative information about the complex flow physics of high- or low-amplitude events. The

  1. Microplastics in the marine environment: Current trends and future perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barboza, Luís Gabriel Antão; Gimenez, Barbara Carolina Garcia

    2015-08-15

    Over the last decade, the presence of microplastics on marine environments has become an important environmental concern and focus of interest of many researches. Thus, to provide a more integrated view of the research trends regarding this topic, we use a scientometric approach to systematically assess and quantify advances in knowledge related to microplastics in the marine environment. The papers that we used for our assessment were obtained from the database Thomson Reuters (ISI Web of Science), between 2004 and 2014. Our results reveal the overall research performance in the study area of microplastics present in the marine environment over the past decade as a newly developed research field. It has been recognized that there are several important issues that should be investigated. Toward that end, based on the suggested directions on all papers reviewed, we point out areas/topics of interest that may guide future work in the coming years.

  2. Current status of marine protected areas in latin america and the Caribbean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guarderas, A Paulina; Hacker, Sally D; Lubchenco, Jane

    2008-12-01

    Marine protected areas (MPAs), including no-take marine reserves (MRs), play an important role in the conservation of marine biodiversity. We document the status of MPAs and MRs in Latin America and the Caribbean, where little has been reported on the scope of such protection. Our survey of protected area databases, published and unpublished literature, and Internet searches yielded information from 30 countries and 12 overseas territories. At present more than 700 MPAs have been established, covering more than 300,000 km(2) or 1.5% of the coastal and shelf waters. We report on the status of 3 categories of protection: MPAs (limited take throughout the area), MRs (no-take throughout the area), and mixed-use (a limited-take MPA that contains an MR). The majority of protected areas in Latin America and the Caribbean are MPAs, which allow some or extensive extractive activities throughout the designated area. These 571 sites cover 51,505 km(2) or 0.3% of coastal and shelf waters. There are 98 MRs covering 16,862 km(2) or 0.1% of the coastal and shelf waters. Mixed-use MPAs are the fewest in number (87), but cover the largest area (236,853 km(2), 1.2%). Across Latin America and the Caribbean, many biogeographic provinces are underrepresented in these protected areas. Large coastal regions remain unprotected, in particular, the southern Pacific and southern Atlantic coasts of South America. Our analysis reveals multiple opportunities to strengthen marine conservation in Latin America and the Caribbean by improving implementation, management, and enforcement of existing MPAs; adding new MPAs and MRs strategically to enhance connectivity and sustainability of existing protection; and establishing new networks of MPAs and MRs or combinations thereof to enhance protection where little currently exists.

  3. Potential scour for marine current turbines based on experience of offshore wind turbine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, L.; Lam, W. H.; Shamsuddin, A. H.

    2013-06-01

    The oceans have tremendous untapped natural resources. These sources are capable to make significant contribution to our future energy demands. Marine current energy offers sustainable and renewable alternative to conventional sources. Survival problems of Marine Current Turbines (MCTs) need to be addressed due to the harsh marine environment. The analogous researches in wind turbine have been conducted. Some of the results and knowledge are transferable to marine current energy industry. There still exist some gaps in the state of knowledge. Scour around marine structures have been well recognised as an engineering issue as scour is likely to cause structural instability. This paper aims to review different types of foundation of MCTs and potential scour and scour protection around these foundations based on the experience of offshore wind turbine farm.

  4. Current and future patterns of global marine mammal biodiversity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristin Kaschner

    Full Text Available Quantifying the spatial distribution of taxa is an important prerequisite for the preservation of biodiversity, and can provide a baseline against which to measure the impacts of climate change. Here we analyse patterns of marine mammal species richness based on predictions of global distributional ranges for 115 species, including all extant pinnipeds and cetaceans. We used an environmental suitability model specifically designed to address the paucity of distributional data for many marine mammal species. We generated richness patterns by overlaying predicted distributions for all species; these were then validated against sightings data from dedicated long-term surveys in the Eastern Tropical Pacific, the Northeast Atlantic and the Southern Ocean. Model outputs correlated well with empirically observed patterns of biodiversity in all three survey regions. Marine mammal richness was predicted to be highest in temperate waters of both hemispheres with distinct hotspots around New Zealand, Japan, Baja California, the Galapagos Islands, the Southeast Pacific, and the Southern Ocean. We then applied our model to explore potential changes in biodiversity under future perturbations of environmental conditions. Forward projections of biodiversity using an intermediate Intergovernmental Panel for Climate Change (IPCC temperature scenario predicted that projected ocean warming and changes in sea ice cover until 2050 may have moderate effects on the spatial patterns of marine mammal richness. Increases in cetacean richness were predicted above 40° latitude in both hemispheres, while decreases in both pinniped and cetacean richness were expected at lower latitudes. Our results show how species distribution models can be applied to explore broad patterns of marine biodiversity worldwide for taxa for which limited distributional data are available.

  5. Current and future patterns of global marine mammal biodiversity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaschner, Kristin; Tittensor, Derek P; Ready, Jonathan; Gerrodette, Tim; Worm, Boris

    2011-01-01

    Quantifying the spatial distribution of taxa is an important prerequisite for the preservation of biodiversity, and can provide a baseline against which to measure the impacts of climate change. Here we analyse patterns of marine mammal species richness based on predictions of global distributional ranges for 115 species, including all extant pinnipeds and cetaceans. We used an environmental suitability model specifically designed to address the paucity of distributional data for many marine mammal species. We generated richness patterns by overlaying predicted distributions for all species; these were then validated against sightings data from dedicated long-term surveys in the Eastern Tropical Pacific, the Northeast Atlantic and the Southern Ocean. Model outputs correlated well with empirically observed patterns of biodiversity in all three survey regions. Marine mammal richness was predicted to be highest in temperate waters of both hemispheres with distinct hotspots around New Zealand, Japan, Baja California, the Galapagos Islands, the Southeast Pacific, and the Southern Ocean. We then applied our model to explore potential changes in biodiversity under future perturbations of environmental conditions. Forward projections of biodiversity using an intermediate Intergovernmental Panel for Climate Change (IPCC) temperature scenario predicted that projected ocean warming and changes in sea ice cover until 2050 may have moderate effects on the spatial patterns of marine mammal richness. Increases in cetacean richness were predicted above 40° latitude in both hemispheres, while decreases in both pinniped and cetacean richness were expected at lower latitudes. Our results show how species distribution models can be applied to explore broad patterns of marine biodiversity worldwide for taxa for which limited distributional data are available.

  6. Climate change alters stability and species potential interactions in a large marine ecosystem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffith, Gary P; Strutton, Peter G; Semmens, Jayson M

    2017-09-04

    We have little empirical evidence of how large-scale overlaps between large numbers of marine species may have altered in response to human impacts. Here, we synthesized all available distribution data (>1 million records) since 1992 for 61 species of the East Australian marine ecosystem, a global hot spot of ocean warming and continuing fisheries exploitation. Using a novel approach, we constructed networks of the annual changes in geographical overlaps between species. Using indices of changes in species overlap, we quantified changes in the ecosystem stability, species robustness, species sensitivity and structural keystone species. We then compared the species overlap indices with environmental and fisheries data to identify potential factors leading to the changes in distributional overlaps between species. We found that the structure of the ecosystem has changed with a decrease in asymmetrical geographical overlaps between species. This suggests that the ecosystem has become less stable and potentially more susceptible to environmental perturbations. Most species have shown a decrease in overlaps with other species. The greatest decrease in species overlap robustness and sensitivity to the loss of other species has occurred in the pelagic community. Some demersal species have become more robust and less sensitive. Pelagic structural keystone species, predominately the tunas and billfish, have been replaced by demersal fish species. The changes in species overlap were strongly correlated with regional oceanographic changes, in particular increasing ocean warming and the southward transport of warmer and saltier water with the East Australian Current (EAC), but less correlated with fisheries catch. Our study illustrates how large-scale multispecies distribution changes can help identify structural changes in marine ecosystems associated with climate change. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All

  7. Assessment of Current Practice for Tank Testing of Small Marine Energy Devices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kofoed, Jens Peter; Frigaard, Peter

    Discussion Report. Equitable Testing and Evaluation of Marine Energy Extraction Devices in terms of Performance, Cost and Environmental Impact. The report is a contribution by Aalborg University (AAU) to the deliverable on Assessment of current practice for tank testing of small marine energy...

  8. CURRENT ENVIRONMENT STATE OF COASTAL MARINE WATER OF DAGESTAN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. A. Guseinova

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. We analysed current environmental state of the Dagestan coast of the Caspian Sea. Data on the spatial variability of contaminants in the coastal areas of the Dagestan segment of the Caspian Sea from the northern districts (Lopatin to the central (Sulak coastal land and, further, to the southern district (within Russian subsoil management confirm that it is caused by irregular contamination of the sea by above-ground sources. Location. Dagestan coastal area of the Caspian SeaMethods. Concentration analysis of background contamination of chemical agents in the Dagestan coastal water from northern districts (Lopatin to southern (Sulak coastal land during the period between 2004 and 2007.Results. Data on the spatial variability of contaminants in the coastal areas of the Dagestan segment of the Caspian Sea from the northern districts (Lopatin to the central (Sulak coastal land and, further, to the southern district (within Russian subsoil management confirm that it is caused by irregular contamination of the sea by above-ground sources.Main conclusions. The envisaged large-scale hydrocarbon resource development requires regular monitoring of sea currents on Makhachkala, Izberbash and Derbent roads.

  9. Marine biodiversity in South Africa: an evaluation of current states of knowledge.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charles L Griffiths

    Full Text Available Continental South Africa has a coastline of some 3,650 km and an Exclusive Economic Zone (EEZ of just over 1 million km(2. Waters in the EEZ extend to a depth of 5,700 m, with more than 65% deeper than 2,000 m. Despite its status as a developing nation, South Africa has a relatively strong history of marine taxonomic research and maintains comprehensive and well-curated museum collections totaling over 291,000 records. Over 3 million locality records from more than 23,000 species have been lodged in the regional AfrOBIS (African Ocean Biogeographic Information System data center (which stores data from a wider African region. A large number of regional guides to the marine fauna and flora are also available and are listed. The currently recorded marine biota of South Africa numbers at least 12,914 species, although many taxa, particularly those of small body size, remain poorly documented. The coastal zone is relatively well sampled with some 2,500 samples of benthic invertebrate communities have been taken by grab, dredge, or trawl. Almost none of these samples, however, were collected after 1980, and over 99% of existing samples are from depths shallower than 1,000 m--indeed 83% are from less than 100 m. The abyssal zone thus remains almost completely unexplored. South Africa has a fairly large industrial fishing industry, of which the largest fisheries are the pelagic (pilchard and anchovy and demersal (hake sectors, both focused on the west and south coasts. The east coast has fewer, smaller commercial fisheries, but a high coastal population density, resulting in intense exploitation of inshore resources by recreational and subsistence fishers, and this has resulted in the overexploitation of many coastal fish and invertebrate stocks. South Africa has a small aquaculture industry rearing mussels, oysters, prawns, and abalone-the latter two in land-based facilities. Compared with many other developing countries, South Africa has a well

  10. Effects of currents and tides on fine-scale use of marine bird habitats in a Southeast Alaska hotspot

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drew, Gary S.; Piatt, John F.; Hill, David J.

    2013-01-01

    Areas with high species richness have become focal points in the establishment of marine protected areas, but an understanding of the factors that support this diversity is still incomplete. In coastal areas, tidal currents—modulated by bathymetry and manifested in variable speeds—are a dominant physical feature of the environment. However, difficulties resolving tidally affected currents and depths at fine spatial-temporal scales have limited our ability to understand their influence the distribution of marine birds. We used a hydrographic model of the water mass in Glacier Bay, Alaska to link depths and current velocities with the locations of 15 common marine bird species observed during fine-scale boat-based surveys of the bay conducted during June of four consecutive years (2000-2003). Marine birds that forage on the bottom tended to occupy shallow habitats with slow-moving currents; mid-water foragers used habitats with intermediate depths and current speeds; and surface-foraging species tended to use habitats with fast-moving, deep waters. Within foraging groups there was variability among species in their use of habitats. While species obligated to foraging near bottom were constrained to use similar types of habitat, species in the mid-water foraging group were associated with a wider range of marine habitat characteristics. Species also showed varying levels of site use depending on tide stage. The dramatic variability in bottom topography—especially the presence of numerous sills, islands, headlands and channels—and large tidal ranges in Glacier Bay create a wide range of current-affected fine-scale foraging habitats that may contribute to the high diversity of marine bird species found there.

  11. Potential effects of climate change on a marine invasion: The importance of current context

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabelle M. CÔTÉ, Stephanie J. GREEN

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Species invasions threaten marine biodiversity globally. There is a concern that climate change is exacerbating this problem. Here, we examined some of the potential effects of warming water temperatures on the invasion of Western Atlantic habitats by a marine predator, the Indo-Pacific lionfish (Pterois volitans and P. miles. We focussed on two temperature-dependent aspects of lionfish life-history and behaviour: pelagic larval duration, because of its link to dispersal potential, and prey consumption rate, because it is an important determinant of the impacts of lionfish on native prey. Using models derived from fundamental metabolic theory, we predict that the length of time spent by lionfish in the plankton in early life should decrease with warming temperatures, with a concomitant reduction in potential dispersal distance. Although the uncertainty around change in dispersal distances is large, predicted reductions are, on average, more than an order of magnitude smaller than the current rate of range expansion of lionfish in the Caribbean. Nevertheless, because shorter pelagic larval duration has the potential to increase local retention of larvae, local lionfish management will become increasingly important under projected climate change. Increasing temperature is also expected to worsen the current imbalance between rates of prey consumption by lionfish and biomass production by their prey, leading to a heightened decline in native reef fish biomass. However, the magnitude of climate-induced decline is predicted to be minor compared to the effect of current rates of lionfish population increases (and hence overall prey consumption rates on invaded reefs. Placing the predicted effects of climate change in the current context thus reveals that, at least for the lionfish invasion, the threat is clear and present, rather than future [Current Zoology 58 (1: 1–8, 2012].

  12. Potential effects of climate change on a marine invasion: The importance of current context

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Isabelle M. C(O)T(E); Stephanie J. GREEN

    2012-01-01

    Species invasions threaten marine biodiversity globally.There is a concern that climate change is exacerbating this problem.Here,we examined some of the potential effects of warming water temperatures on the invasion of Western Atlantic habitats by a marine predator,the lndo-Pacific lionfish (Pterois volitans and P.miles).We focussed on two temperature-dependent aspects of lionfish life-history and behaviour:pelagic larval duration,because of its link to dispersal potential,and prey consumption rate,because it is an important determinant of the impacts of lionfish on native prey.Using models derived from fundamental metabolic theory,we predict that the length of time spent by lionfish in the plankton in early life should decrease with warming temperatures,with a concomitant reduction in potential dispersal distance.Although the uncertainty around change in dispersal distances is large,predicted reductions are,on average,more than an order of magnitude smaller than the current rate of range expansion of lionfish in the Caribbean.Nevertheless,because shorter pelagic larval duration has the potential to increase local retention of larvae,local lionfish management will become increasingly important under projected climate change.Increasing temperature is also expected to worsen the current imbalance between rates of prey consumption by lionfish and biomass production by their prey,leading to a heightened decline in native reef fish biomass.However,the magnitude of climate-induced decline is predicted to be minor compared to the effect of current rates of lionfish population increases (and hence overall prey consumption rates) on invaded reefs.Placing the predicted effects of climate change in the current context thus reveals that,at least for the lionfish invasion,the threat is clear and present,rather than future [Current Zoology 58 (1):1-8,2012].

  13. Piston surface heat transfer during combustion in large marine diesel engines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Michael Vincent; Walther, Jens Honore

    2010-01-01

    In the design process of large marine diesel engines information on the maximum heat load on the piston surface experienced during the engine cycle is an important parameter. The peak heat load occurs during combustion when hot combustion products impinge on the piston surface. Although the maximum...... with burning off piston surface material. In this work the peak heat load on the piston surface of large marine diesel engines during combustion was investigated. Measurements of the instantaneous surface temperature and surface heat flux on pistons in large marine engines are difficult due to expensive...... was calculated under different conditions in the numerical setup in order to obtain information of the actual peak heat flux experienced at the piston in large marine diesel engines during combustion. The variation of physical parameters influencing the heat transfer during combustion included a variation...

  14. Specimen banking of marine organisms in the United States: current status and long-term prospective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, P R; Wise, S A; Thorsteinson, L; Koster, B J; Rowles, T

    1997-05-01

    A major part of the activities conducted over the last decade by the National Biomonitoring Specimen Bank (NBSB) has involved the archival of marine specimens collected by ongoing environmental monitoring programs. These archived specimens include bivalves, marine sediments, and fish tissues collected by the National Status and Trends and the Exxon Valdez Oil Spill Damage Assessment programs, and marine mammal tissues collected by the Marine Mammal Health and Stranding, Response Program and the Alaska Marine Mammal Tissue Archival Project. In addition to supporting these programs, the specimens have been used to investigate circumpolar patterns of chlorinated hydrocarbon concentrations, genetic separation of marine animal stocks, baseline levels of essential and nonessential elements in marine mammals, and the potential risk to human consumers in the Arctic from anthropogenic contaminants found in local subsistence foods. The NBSB specimens represent a resource that has the potential for addressing future issues of marine environmental quality and ecosystem changes through retrospective analysis; however, an ecosystem-based food web approach would maximize this potential. The current status of the NBSB activities related to the banking of marine organisms is presented and discussed, the long-term prospective of these activities is presented, and the importance of an ecosystem-based food web monitoring approach to the value of specimen banking is discussed.

  15. Specimen banking of marine organisms in the United States: Current status and long-term prospective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, P.R.; Wise, S.A.; Thorsteinson, L.; Koster, B.J.; Rowles, T.

    1997-01-01

    A major part of the activities conducted over the last decade by the National Biomonitoring Specimen Bank (NBSB) has involved the archival of marine specimens collected by ongoing environmental monitoring programs. These archived specimens include bivalves, marine sediments, and fish tissues collected by the National Status and Trends and the Exxon Valdez Oil Spill Damage Assessment programs, and marine mammal tissues collected by the Marine Mammal Health and Stranding Response Program and the Alaska Marine Mammal Tissue Archival Project. In addition to supporting these programs, the specimens have been used to investigate circumpolar patterns of chlorinated hydrocarbon concentrations, genetic separation of marine animal stocks, baseline levels of essential and nonessential elements in marine mammals, and the potential risk to human consumers in the Arctic from anthropogenic contaminants found in local subsistence foods. The NBSB specimens represent a resource that has the potential for addressing future issues of marine environmental quality and ecosystem changes through retrospective analysis; however, an ecosystem-based food web approach would maximize this potential. The current status of the NBSB activities related to the banking of marine organisms is presented and discussed, the long-term prospective of these activities is presented, and the importance of an ecosystem-based food web monitoring approach to the value of specimen banking is discussed.

  16. The Large Marine Ecosystem Approach for 21st Century Ocean Health and International Sustainable Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honey, K. T.

    2014-12-01

    The global coastal ocean and watersheds are divided into 66 Large Marine Ecosystems (LMEs), which encompass regions from river basins, estuaries, and coasts to the seaward boundaries of continental shelves and margins of major currents. Approximately 80% of global fisheries catch comes from LME waters. Ecosystem goods and services from LMEs contribute an estimated US 18-25 trillion dollars annually to the global economy in market and non-market value. The critical importance of these large-scale systems, however, is threatened by human populations and pressures, including climate change. Fortunately, there is pragmatic reason for optimism. Interdisciplinary frameworks exist, such as the Large Marine Ecosystem (LME) approach for adaptive management that can integrate both nature-centric and human-centric views into ecosystem monitoring, assessment, and adaptive management practices for long-term sustainability. Originally proposed almost 30 years ago, the LME approach rests on five modules are: (i) productivity, (ii) fish and fisheries, (iii) pollution and ecosystem health, (iv) socioeconomics, and (v) governance for iterative adaptive management at a large, international scale of 200,000 km2 or greater. The Global Environment Facility (GEF), World Bank, and United Nations agencies recognize and support the LME approach—as evidenced by over 3.15 billion in financial assistance to date for LME projects. This year of 2014 is an exciting milestone in LME history, after 20 years of the United Nations and GEF organizations adopting LMEs as a unit for ecosystem-based approaches to management. The LME approach, however, is not perfect. Nor is it immutable. Similar to the adaptive management framework it propones, the LME approach itself must adapt to new and emerging 21st Century technologies, science, and realities. The LME approach must further consider socioeconomics and governance. Within the socioeconomics module alone, several trillion-dollar opportunities exist

  17. Matrix Metalloproteinase Inhibitors (MMPIs from Marine Natural Products: the Current Situation and Future Prospects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Se-Kwon Kim

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs are a family of more than twenty five secreted and membrane-bound zinc-endopeptidases which can degrade extracellular matrix (ECM components. They also play important roles in a variety of biological and pathological processes. Matrix metalloproteinase inhibitors (MMPIs have been identified as potential therapeutic candidates for metastasis, arthritis, chronic inflammation and wrinkle formation. Up to present, more than 20,000 new compounds have been isolated from marine organisms, where considerable numbers of these naturally occurring derivatives are developed as potential candidates for pharmaceutical application. Eventhough the quantity of marine derived MMPIs is less when compare with the MMPIs derived from terrestrial materials, huge potential for bioactivity of these marine derived MMPIs has lead to large number of researches. Saccharoids, flavonoids and polyphones, fatty acids are the most important groups of MMPIs derived from marine natural products. In this review we focus on the progress of MMPIs from marine natural products.

  18. Carotenoids in Marine Invertebrates Living along the Kuroshio Current Coast

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshikazu Sakagami

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Carotenoids of the corals Acropora japonica, A. secale, and A. hyacinthus, the tridacnid clam Tridacna squamosa, the crown-of-thorns starfish Acanthaster planci, and the small sea snail Drupella fragum were investigated. The corals and the tridacnid clam are filter feeders and are associated with symbiotic zooxanthellae. Peridinin and pyrrhoxanthin, which originated from symbiotic zooxanthellae, were found to be major carotenoids in corals and the tridacnid clam. The crown-of-thorns starfish and the sea snail D. fragum are carnivorous and mainly feed on corals. Peridinin-3-acyl esters were major carotenoids in the sea snail D. fragum. On the other hand, ketocarotenoids such as 7,8-didehydroastaxanthin and astaxanthin were major carotenoids in the crown-of-thorns starfish. Carotenoids found in these marine animals closely reflected not only their metabolism but also their food chains.

  19. Recovering microplastics from marine samples: A review of current practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Michaela E; Kroon, Frederieke J; Motti, Cherie A

    2017-09-05

    An important component of microplastic research is development of reproducible methods for microplastic recovery and characterization. Presented is a review of the literature comparing microplastic separation and identification methodologies from seawater, sediment and marine organisms. The efficiency of methods was examined, including processing time, recovery rates, and potential destruction of microplastics. Visual examination and acid digestion were the most common separation methods for seawater samples and organisms, while density flotation was the primary method for sediment. Few studies reported recovery rates, or investigated the physical or chemical impact on plastics. This knowledge gap may lead to misidentification of plastic or unreliable pollution estimates. Further investigation of the impact chemical treatments have on plastic is warranted. Factors, i.e. biomass loading, recovery rates, and chemical compatibility, must be considered to allow for appropriate methodology. Standardizing this will contribute to efficient sample processing, and allow for direct comparison of microplastic contamination across environments. Crown Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Large Igneous Province Volcanism, Ocean Anoxia and Marine Mass Extinction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ruhl, Micha; Bjerrum, Christian J.; Canfield, Donald

    2013-01-01

    -Triassic (~252 Ma) boundaries, which coincide with Central Atlantic Magmatic Province (CAMP) and Siberian Trap volcanism, respectively. The Triassic-Jurassic mass extinction is often contributed to carbon release driven ocean acidification while the Permian-Triassic mass extinction is suggested to be related...... to widespread ocean anoxia. We compare Permian-Triassic and Triassic-Jurassic ocean redox change along continental margins in different geographic regions (Permian-Triassic: Greenland, Svalbard, Iran; Triassic-Jurassic: UK, Austria) and discuss its role in marine mass extinction. Speciation of iron [(FeHR/ Fe...... extinctions however shows 2 phases of euxinia along continental margins, with an initial short peak at the onset of volcanism followed by a shift to ferruginous conditions, possibly due to a strongly diminished ocean sulphate reservoir because of massive initial pyrite burial. D34Spyrite suggests...

  1. Current Large Deviations for Asymmetric Exclusion Processes with Open Boundaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bodineau, T.; Derrida, B.

    2006-04-01

    We study the large deviation functional of the current for the Weakly Asymmetric Simple Exclusion Process in contact with two reservoirs. We compare this functional in the large drift limit to the one of the Totally Asymmetric Simple Exclusion Process, in particular to the Jensen-Varadhan functional. Conjectures for generalizing the Jensen-Varadhan functional to open systems are also stated.

  2. Ocean currents shape the microbiome of Arctic marine sediments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamdan, Leila J; Coffin, Richard B; Sikaroodi, Masoumeh; Greinert, Jens; Treude, Tina; Gillevet, Patrick M

    2013-04-01

    Prokaryote communities were investigated on the seasonally stratified Alaska Beaufort Shelf (ABS). Water and sediment directly underlying water with origin in the Arctic, Pacific or Atlantic oceans were analyzed by pyrosequencing and length heterogeneity-PCR in conjunction with physicochemical and geographic distance data to determine what features structure ABS microbiomes. Distinct bacterial communities were evident in all water masses. Alphaproteobacteria explained similarity in Arctic surface water and Pacific derived water. Deltaproteobacteria were abundant in Atlantic origin water and drove similarity among samples. Most archaeal sequences in water were related to unclassified marine Euryarchaeota. Sediment communities influenced by Pacific and Atlantic water were distinct from each other and pelagic communities. Firmicutes and Chloroflexi were abundant in sediment, although their distribution varied in Atlantic and Pacific influenced sites. Thermoprotei dominated archaea in Pacific influenced sediments and Methanomicrobia dominated in methane-containing Atlantic influenced sediments. Length heterogeneity-PCR data from this study were analyzed with data from methane-containing sediments in other regions. Pacific influenced ABS sediments clustered with Pacific sites from New Zealand and Chilean coastal margins. Atlantic influenced ABS sediments formed another distinct cluster. Density and salinity were significant structuring features on pelagic communities. Porosity co-varied with benthic community structure across sites and methane did not. This study indicates that the origin of water overlying sediments shapes benthic communities locally and globally and that hydrography exerts greater influence on microbial community structure than the availability of methane.

  3. Population vulnerability of marine birds within the California Current System

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Six metrics were used to determine Population Vulnerability: global population size, annual occurrence in the California Current System (CCS), percent of the...

  4. Population vulnerability of marine birds within the California Current System

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Six metrics were used to determine Population Vulnerability: global population size, annual occurrence in the California Current System (CCS), percent of the...

  5. Electric currents couple spatially separated biogeochemical processes in marine sediment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Lars Peter; Risgaard-Petersen, Nils; Fossing, Henrik;

    2010-01-01

    be coupled by electric currents in nature. Here we provide evidence that electric currents running through defaunated sediment couple oxygen consumption at the sediment surface to oxidation of hydrogen sulphide and organic carbon deep within the sediment. Altering the oxygen concentration in the sea water...... in the sediment was driven by electrons conducted from the anoxic zone. A distinct pH peak in the oxic zone could be explained by electrochemical oxygen reduction, but not by any conventional sets of aerobic sediment processes. We suggest that the electric current was conducted by bacterial nanowires combined...... with pyrite, soluble electron shuttles and outer-membrane cytochromes. Electrical communication between distant chemical and biological processes in nature adds a new dimension to our understanding of biogeochemistry and microbial ecology....

  6. Electric currents couple spatially separated biogeochemical processes in marine sediment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Lars Peter; Risgaard-Petersen, Nils; Fossing, Henrik

    2010-01-01

    Some bacteria are capable of extracellular electron transfer, thereby enabling them to use electron acceptors and donors without direct cell contact 1, 2, 3, 4 . Beyond the micrometre scale, however, no firm evidence has previously existed that spatially segregated biogeochemical processes can...... be coupled by electric currents in nature. Here we provide evidence that electric currents running through defaunated sediment couple oxygen consumption at the sediment surface to oxidation of hydrogen sulphide and organic carbon deep within the sediment. Altering the oxygen concentration in the sea water...... in the sediment was driven by electrons conducted from the anoxic zone. A distinct pH peak in the oxic zone could be explained by electrochemical oxygen reduction, but not by any conventional sets of aerobic sediment processes. We suggest that the electric current was conducted by bacterial nanowires combined...

  7. Submerged electricity generation plane with marine current-driven motors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dehlsen, James G.P.; Dehlsen, James B.; Fleming, Alexander

    2014-07-01

    An underwater apparatus for generating electric power from ocean currents and deep water tides. A submersible platform including two or more power pods, each having a rotor with fixed-pitch blades, with drivetrains housed in pressure vessels that are connected by a transverse structure providing buoyancy, which can be a wing depressor, hydrofoil, truss, or faired tube. The platform is connected to anchors on the seafloor by forward mooring lines and a vertical mooring line that restricts the depth of the device in the water column. The platform operates using passive, rather than active, depth control. The wing depressor, along with rotor drag loads, ensures the platform seeks the desired operational current velocity. The rotors are directly coupled to a hydraulic pump that drives at least one constant-speed hydraulic-motor generator set and enables hydraulic braking. A fluidic bearing decouples non-torque rotor loads to the main shaft driving the hydraulic pumps.

  8. Submerged electricity generation plane with marine current-driven motors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dehlsen, James G.P.; Dehlsen, James B.; Fleming, Alexander

    2014-07-01

    An underwater apparatus for generating electric power from ocean currents and deep water tides. A submersible platform including two or more power pods, each having a rotor with fixed-pitch blades, with drivetrains housed in pressure vessels that are connected by a transverse structure providing buoyancy, which can be a wing depressor, hydrofoil, truss, or faired tube. The platform is connected to anchors on the seafloor by forward mooring lines and a vertical mooring line that restricts the depth of the device in the water column. The platform operates using passive, rather than active, depth control. The wing depressor, along with rotor drag loads, ensures the platform seeks the desired operational current velocity. The rotors are directly coupled to a hydraulic pump that drives at least one constant-speed hydraulic-motor generator set and enables hydraulic braking. A fluidic bearing decouples non-torque rotor loads to the main shaft driving the hydraulic pumps.

  9. Large Antenna Control Methods: Current Status and Future Trends

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez, G.; Lin, Y. H.; Milman, M. H.

    1985-01-01

    Current methods for control of large antennas, as well as future trends required for improved performance are addressed. Some of the target missions in which these methods would be used are: the Land Mobile Satellite System (LMSS) for communications; the Satellite Surveillance (SSS) for aircraft traffic control; the orbiting Very Long Baseline Interferometer (VLBI), or QUASAT, for radio astronomy; and the Large Deployable Reflector (LDR) for IR and submillimeter astronomy.

  10. Unusually large tsunamis frequent a currently creeping part of the Aleutian megathrust

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witter, Robert C.; Carver, G.A.; Briggs, Richard; Gelfenbaum, Guy R.; Koehler, R.D.; La Selle, SeanPaul M.; Bender, Adrian M.; Engelhart, S.E.; Hemphill-Haley, E.; Hill, Troy D.

    2016-01-01

    Current models used to assess earthquake and tsunami hazards are inadequate where creep dominates a subduction megathrust. Here we report geological evidence for large tsunamis, occurring on average every 300–340 years, near the source areas of the 1946 and 1957 Aleutian tsunamis. These areas bookend a postulated seismic gap over 200 km long where modern geodetic measurements indicate that the megathrust is currently creeping. At Sedanka Island, evidence for large tsunamis includes six sand sheets that blanket a lowland facing the Pacific Ocean, rise to 15 m above mean sea level, contain marine diatoms, cap terraces, adjoin evidence for scour, and date from the past 1700 years. The youngest sheet, and modern drift logs found as far as 800 m inland and >18 m elevation, likely record the 1957 tsunami. Modern creep on the megathrust coexists with previously unrecognized tsunami sources along this part of the Aleutian Subduction Zone.

  11. Nonlinear Dynamic Modeling for a Diesel Engine Propeller Shafting Used in Large Marines

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Qinglei; DUAN Jianguo; ZHANG Suohuai; FU Yumin

    2014-01-01

    Longitudinal vibration, torsional vibration and their coupled vibration are the main vibration modes of the crankshaft-sliding bearing system. However, these vibrations of the propeller-crankshaft-sliding bearing system generated by the fluid exciting force on the propeller are much more complex. Currently, the torsional and longitudinal vibrations have been studied separately while the research on their coupled vibration is few, and the influence of the propeller structure to dynamic characteristics of a crankshaft has not been studied yet. In order to describe the dynamic properties of a crankshaft accurately, a nonlinear dynamic model is proposed taking the effect of torsional-longitudinal coupling and the variable inertia of propeller, connecting rod and piston into account. Numerical simulation cases are carried out to calculate the response data of the system in time and frequency domains under the working speed and over-speed, respectively. Results of vibration analysis of the propeller and crankshaft system coupled in torsional and longitudinal direction indicate that the system dynamic behaviors are relatively complicated especially in the components of the frequency response. For example, the 4 times of an exciting frequency acting on the propeller by fluid appears at 130 r/min, while not yield at 105 r/min. While the possible abnormal vibration at over-speed just needs to be vigilant. So when designing the propeller shafting used in marine diesel engines, strength calculation and vibration analysis based only on linear model may cause great errors and the proposed research provides some references to design diesel engine propeller shafting used in large marines.

  12. Optimal marine mammal welfare under human care: Current efforts and future directions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brando, Sabrina; Broom, Donald M; Acasuso-Rivero, Cristina; Clark, Fay

    2017-09-18

    Marine mammals include cetaceans, pinnipeds, sirenians, sea otters and polar bears, many of which are charismatic and popular species commonly kept under human care in zoos and aquaria. However, in comparison with their fully terrestrial counterparts their welfare has been less intensively studied, and their partial or full reliance on the aquatic environment leads to unique welfare challenges. In this paper we attempt to collate and review the research undertaken thus far on marine mammal welfare, and identify the most important gaps in knowledge. We use 'best practice case studies' to highlight examples of research promoting optimal welfare, include suggestions for future directions of research efforts, and make recommendations to strive for optimal welfare, where it is currently lacking, above and beyond minimum legislation and guidelines. Our review of the current literature shows that recently there have been positive forward strides in marine mammal welfare assessment, but fundamental research is still required to validate positive and negative indicators of welfare in marine mammals. Across all marine mammals, more research is required on the dimensions and complexity of pools and land areas necessary for optimal welfare, and the impact of staff absence for most of the 24-h day, as standard working hours are usually between 0900 and 1700. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. High temperature superconducting current leads for the Large Hadron Collider

    CERN Document Server

    Ballarino, A

    1999-01-01

    The large hadron collider (LHC) will be equipped with about 8000 superconducting magnets. Some 3380 leads will feed the currents ranging from 60 to 13000 A. To reduce the heat inleak into the liquid helium, CERN aims to use high temperature superconducting material for leads having current ratings between 600 and 13000 A. Specifications have been written for 13000 A current leads, incorporating a high temperature superconducting section, for the main of the LHC, and contracts have been placed with several firms for the supply of prototypes for comparative testing. The leads used for feeding locally the 60 and 120 A dipole orbit correctors will be conventional conduction cooledmagnets resistive leads. An optimized lead of variable cross section has been tested, and an integral design has been initiated. This report describes the design status of the current leads for the LHC, emphasizing, for the different solutions, the principle of optimization and the choice of cooling methods. (8 refs).

  14. Diffuser Design for Marine Outfalls in Areas with Strong Currents, High waves and Sediment Transport

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Torben

    1995-01-01

    The design of marine outfalls is often based on environmental criteria for a minimum initial dilution. Accordingly advanced diffuser arrangement are designed to fulfil these requirements. A large number of examples of malfunction and blocking in sea outfalls have occurred around the world...

  15. Experiments on the magnetic coupling in a small scale counter rotating marine current turbine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, I. C.; Lee, N. J.; Wata, J.; Hyun, B. S.; Lee, Y. H.

    2016-05-01

    Modern economies are dependent on energy consumption to ensure growth or sustainable development. Renewable energy sources provide a source of energy that can provide energy security and is renewable. Tidal energy is more predictable than other sources or renewable energy like the sun or wind. Horizontal axis marine current turbines are currently the most advanced and commercially feasible option for tidal current convertors. A dual rotor turbine is theoretically able to produce more power than a single rotor turbine at the same fluid velocity. Previous experiments for a counter rotating dual rotor horizontal axis marine current turbine used a mechanical oil seal coupling that caused mechanical losses when water entered through small gaps at the shaft. A new magnetic coupling assembly eliminates the need for a shaft to connect physically with the internal mechanisms and is water tight. This reduces mechanical losses in the system and the effect on the dual rotor performance is presented in this paper.

  16. Characteristics of Sulfuric Acid Condensation on Cylinder Liners of Large Two-Stroke Marine Engines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cordtz, Rasmus Lage; Mayer, Stefan; Schramm, Jesper;

    The present work seeks to clarify the characteristics of sulfuric acid condensation on the cylinder liner of a large two–stroke marine engine. The liner is directly exposed to the cylin-der gas (i.e. no protective lube oil film) and is represented by a constant temperature over the full stroke...

  17. Annual changes in abundance of non-indigenous marine benthos on a very large spatial scale

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Mads S.; Wernberg, Thomas; Stæhr, Peter Anton

    2008-01-01

    Non-indigenous marine species (NIMS) have only recently caught general interest in Denmark, and baseline studies are needed to identify what species are of particular importance in order to prioritize management and research efforts. We used large data sets compiled in monitoring databases to qua...

  18. Annual changes in abundance of non-indigenous marine benthos on a very large spatial scale

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Mads S.; Wernberg, Thomas; Stæhr, Peter Anton;

    2008-01-01

    Non-indigenous marine species (NIMS) have only recently caught general interest in Denmark, and baseline studies are needed to identify what species are of particular importance in order to prioritize management and research efforts. We used large data sets compiled in monitoring databases to qua...

  19. Metal-to-metal-switches for large currents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schade, D.W.; Weise, T.H.G.G.; Braunsberger, U.E.; Salge, J.G.H. (Inst. fuer Hochspannungstechnik, Technische Univ. Braunschweig, Postfach 3329, D-3300 Braunschweig (DE))

    1991-01-01

    The operation of electromagnetic rail launchers requires switching large currents. For rail gun accelerators with driving currents of some MA it is important to keep the resistance of the total energy supply circuit small compared to that of the moving projectile, which is velocity dependent and low. Among the great variety of switches which can be used for this purpose those with metallic contacts offer the advantage that their ohmic resistance in the closed position can be kept more than an order of magnitude smaller than gas discharge or solid state switches. The paper reviews existing metal contact switches, originally developed mainly for nuclear fusion research experiments, and discusses their properties with respect to an application in large capacitor banks for linear mass accelerators.

  20. Current developments in marine microbiology: high-pressure biotechnology and the genetic engineering of piezophiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yu; Li, Xuegong; Bartlett, Douglas H; Xiao, Xiang

    2015-06-01

    A key aspect of marine environments is elevated pressure; for example, ∼70% of the ocean is at a pressure of at least 38MPa. Many types of Bacteria and Archaea reside under these high pressures, which drive oceanic biogeochemical cycles and catalyze reactions among rocks, sediments and fluids. Most marine prokaryotes are classified as piezotolerant or as (obligate)-piezophiles with few cultivated relatives. The biochemistry and physiology of these organisms are largely unknown. Recently, high-pressure cultivation technology has been combined with omics and DNA recombination methodologies to examine the physiology of piezophilic marine microorganisms. We are now beginning to understand the adaptive mechanisms of these organisms, along with their ecological functions and evolutionary processes. This knowledge is leading to the further development of high-pressure-based biotechnology.

  1. Cumulative human impacts on Mediterranean and Black Sea marine ecosystems: assessing current pressures and opportunities.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fiorenza Micheli

    Full Text Available Management of marine ecosystems requires spatial information on current impacts. In several marine regions, including the Mediterranean and Black Sea, legal mandates and agreements to implement ecosystem-based management and spatial plans provide new opportunities to balance uses and protection of marine ecosystems. Analyses of the intensity and distribution of cumulative impacts of human activities directly connected to the ecological goals of these policy efforts are critically needed. Quantification and mapping of the cumulative impact of 22 drivers to 17 marine ecosystems reveals that 20% of the entire basin and 60-99% of the territorial waters of EU member states are heavily impacted, with high human impact occurring in all ecoregions and territorial waters. Less than 1% of these regions are relatively unaffected. This high impact results from multiple drivers, rather than one individual use or stressor, with climatic drivers (increasing temperature and UV, and acidification, demersal fishing, ship traffic, and, in coastal areas, pollution from land accounting for a majority of cumulative impacts. These results show that coordinated management of key areas and activities could significantly improve the condition of these marine ecosystems.

  2. Cumulative human impacts on Mediterranean and Black Sea marine ecosystems: assessing current pressures and opportunities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Micheli, Fiorenza; Halpern, Benjamin S; Walbridge, Shaun; Ciriaco, Saul; Ferretti, Francesco; Fraschetti, Simonetta; Lewison, Rebecca; Nykjaer, Leo; Rosenberg, Andrew A

    2013-01-01

    Management of marine ecosystems requires spatial information on current impacts. In several marine regions, including the Mediterranean and Black Sea, legal mandates and agreements to implement ecosystem-based management and spatial plans provide new opportunities to balance uses and protection of marine ecosystems. Analyses of the intensity and distribution of cumulative impacts of human activities directly connected to the ecological goals of these policy efforts are critically needed. Quantification and mapping of the cumulative impact of 22 drivers to 17 marine ecosystems reveals that 20% of the entire basin and 60-99% of the territorial waters of EU member states are heavily impacted, with high human impact occurring in all ecoregions and territorial waters. Less than 1% of these regions are relatively unaffected. This high impact results from multiple drivers, rather than one individual use or stressor, with climatic drivers (increasing temperature and UV, and acidification), demersal fishing, ship traffic, and, in coastal areas, pollution from land accounting for a majority of cumulative impacts. These results show that coordinated management of key areas and activities could significantly improve the condition of these marine ecosystems.

  3. Large Eddy Simulation Study on Arctic Marine Clouds: the Effect of Aerosol-Cloud Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raatikainen, T.; Ahola, J.; Tonttila, J.; Romakkaniemi, S.; Laaksonen, A.; Korhonen, H.

    2016-12-01

    Dynamics of marine stratocumulus clouds depend on radiative cooling from cloud tops, turbulent transport of moisture and heat from the sea surface, and the availability of atmospheric aerosols to act as cloud condensation nuclei (CCN). These processes and especially aerosol-cloud interactions can be examined with a recently developed Large Eddy Simulation (LES) model UCLALES-SALSA (Tonttila et al., Geosci. Model Dev. Discuss., 2016). Unlike most other LES models, UCLALES-SALSA has fully interactive sectional description for aerosols and liquid and frozen cloud species. UCLALES-SALSA simulations are initialized using atmospheric observations from the Arctic Summer Cloud Ocean Study (ASCOS). First, the model is used to examine the effects of initial total aerosol number concentration on cloud properties. In agreement with several observations, lowering aerosol number concentration decreases cloud lifetime by increasing drizzle and precipitation rates, which further decreases aerosol number concentration. The second test includes comparison between model versions with different microphysics. The new sectional approach seems to produce thicker and more persistent clouds than a two moment model version (Stevens et al., J. Atmos. Sci., 1999) even when the models are tuned to have equal cloud droplet number concentrations. The third part of the study is focused on the effect of ice on cloud properties. Preliminary results indicate that the current cloud case is so warm that the liquid phase dominates, but further studies are ongoing. In general, the results show that cloud evolution depends on aerosol-cloud interactions.

  4. Currents and Radiation from the large $D$ Black Hole Membrane

    CERN Document Server

    Bhattacharyya, Sayantani; Mandlik, Mangesh; Mehta, Umang; Minwalla, Shiraz; Sharma, Utkarsh; Thakur, Somyadip

    2016-01-01

    It has recently been demonstrated that black hole dynamics in a large number of dimensions $D$ reduces to the dynamics of a codimension one membrane propagating in flat space. In this paper we define a stress tensor and charge current on this membrane and explicitly determine these currents at low orders in the expansion in $\\frac{1}{D}$. We demonstrate that dynamical membrane equations of motion derived in earlier work are simply conservation equations for our stress tensor and charge current. Through the paper we focus on solutions of the membrane equations which vary on a time scale of order unity. Even though the charge current and stress tensor are not parametrically small in such solutions, we show that the radiation sourced by the corresponding membrane currents is generically of order $\\frac{1}{D^D}$. In this regime it follows that the `near horizon' membrane degrees of freedom are decoupled from asymptotic flat space at every perturbative order in the $\\frac{1}{D}$ expansion. We also define an entrop...

  5. Large-scale climatic anomalies affect marine predator foraging behaviour and demography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bost, Charles A.; Cotté, Cedric; Terray, Pascal; Barbraud, Christophe; Bon, Cécile; Delord, Karine; Gimenez, Olivier; Handrich, Yves; Naito, Yasuhiko; Guinet, Christophe; Weimerskirch, Henri

    2015-10-01

    Determining the links between the behavioural and population responses of wild species to environmental variations is critical for understanding the impact of climate variability on ecosystems. Using long-term data sets, we show how large-scale climatic anomalies in the Southern Hemisphere affect the foraging behaviour and population dynamics of a key marine predator, the king penguin. When large-scale subtropical dipole events occur simultaneously in both subtropical Southern Indian and Atlantic Oceans, they generate tropical anomalies that shift the foraging zone southward. Consequently the distances that penguins foraged from the colony and their feeding depths increased and the population size decreased. This represents an example of a robust and fast impact of large-scale climatic anomalies affecting a marine predator through changes in its at-sea behaviour and demography, despite lack of information on prey availability. Our results highlight a possible behavioural mechanism through which climate variability may affect population processes.

  6. Large-Scale Trade in Legally Protected Marine Mollusc Shells from Java and Bali, Indonesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nijman, Vincent; Spaan, Denise; Nekaris, K Anne-Isola

    2015-01-01

    Tropical marine molluscs are traded globally. Larger species with slow life histories are under threat from over-exploitation. We report on the trade in protected marine mollusc shells in and from Java and Bali, Indonesia. Since 1987 twelve species of marine molluscs are protected under Indonesian law to shield them from overexploitation. Despite this protection they are traded openly in large volumes. We collected data on species composition, origins, volumes and prices at two large open markets (2013), collected data from wholesale traders (2013), and compiled seizure data by the Indonesian authorities (2008-2013). All twelve protected species were observed in trade. Smaller species were traded for Java and Bali, but the trade involves networks stretching hundreds of kilometres throughout Indonesia. Wholesale traders offer protected marine mollusc shells for the export market by the container or by the metric ton. Data from 20 confiscated shipments show an on-going trade in these molluscs. Over 42,000 shells were seized over a 5-year period, with a retail value of USD700,000 within Indonesia; horned helmet (Cassis cornuta) (>32,000 shells valued at USD500,000), chambered nautilus (Nautilus pompilius) (>3,000 shells, USD60,000) and giant clams (Tridacna spp.) (>2,000 shells, USD45,000) were traded in largest volumes. Two-thirds of this trade was destined for international markets, including in the USA and Asia-Pacific region. We demonstrated that the trade in protected marine mollusc shells in Indonesia is not controlled nor monitored, that it involves large volumes, and that networks of shell collectors, traders, middlemen and exporters span the globe. This impedes protection of these species on the ground and calls into question the effectiveness of protected species management in Indonesia; solutions are unlikely to be found only in Indonesia and must involve the cooperation of importing countries.

  7. Implementation of lng as marine fuel in current vessels : Perspectives and improvements on their environmental efficiency

    OpenAIRE

    Sastre Buades, Llorenç

    2017-01-01

    Liquefied Natural Gas (LNG) as marine fuel currently appears to be an attractive, potential and technically feasible option for new building vessels to comply with air pollution regulations. Consequently, the implementation of LNG on board vessels has been conducted together with the development of LNG-fuelled engines, LNG fuel tanks, gas supply systems and LNG infrastructure. LNG-fuelled vessels are equipped principally with lean-burn gas engines or dual-fuel (DF) engines, vacuum insulated C...

  8. Simulation of electricity generation by marine current turbines at Istanbul Bosphorus Strait

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yazicioglu, Hasan; Tunc, K. M. Murat; Ozbek, Muammer

    2016-01-01

    becomes economically feasible.In this study, several simulations are performed for a 10 MW marine turbine farm/cluster whose location is selected by taking into account several factors such as the canal morphology, current speed and passage of vessels. 360 different simulations are performed for 15......% change in the average value. For each simulation the annual energy yield and cluster efficiency are calculated. (C) 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved....

  9. Collision and displacement vulnerability among marine birds of the California Current System associated with offshore wind energy infrastructure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Josh; Kelsey, Emily C.; Felis, Jonathan J.; Pereksta, David M.

    2016-10-27

    With growing climate change concerns and energy constraints, there is an increasing need for renewable energy sources within the United States and globally. Looking forward, offshore wind-energy infrastructure (OWEI) has the potential to produce a significant proportion of the power needed to reach our Nation’s renewable energy goal. Offshore wind-energy sites can capitalize open areas within Federal waters that have persistent, high winds with large energy production potential. Although there are few locations in the California Current System (CCS) where it would be acceptable to build pile-mounted wind turbines in waters less than 50 m deep, the development of technology able to support deep-water OWEI (>200 m depth) could enable wind-energy production in the CCS. As with all human-use of the marine environment, understanding the potential impacts of wind-energy infrastructure on the marine ecosystem is an integral part of offshore wind-energy research and planning. Herein, we present a comprehensive database to quantify marine bird vulnerability to potential OWEI in the CCS (see https://doi.org/10.5066/F79C6VJ0). These data were used to quantify marine bird vulnerabilities at the population level. For 81 marine bird species present in the CCS, we created three vulnerability indices: Population Vulnerability, Collision Vulnerability, and Displacement Vulnerability. Population Vulnerability was used as a scaling factor to generate two comprehensive indicies: Population Collision Vulnerability (PCV) and Population Displacement Vulnerability (PDV). Within the CCS, pelicans, terns (Forster’s [Sterna forsteri], Caspian [Hydroprogne caspia], Elegant [Thalasseus elegans], and Least Tern [Sternula antillarum]), gulls (Western [Larus occidentalis] and Bonaparte’s Gull [Chroicocephalus philadelphia]), South Polar Skua (Stercorarius maccormicki), and Brandt’s Cormorant (Phalacrocorax penicillatus) had the greatest PCV scores. Brown Pelican (Pelicanus occidentalis

  10. Collision and displacement vulnerability among marine birds of the California Current System associated with offshore wind energy infrastructure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Josh; Kelsey, Emily C.; Felis, Jonathan J.; Pereksta, David M.

    2016-10-27

    With growing climate change concerns and energy constraints, there is an increasing need for renewable energy sources within the United States and globally. Looking forward, offshore wind-energy infrastructure (OWEI) has the potential to produce a significant proportion of the power needed to reach our Nation’s renewable energy goal. Offshore wind-energy sites can capitalize open areas within Federal waters that have persistent, high winds with large energy production potential. Although there are few locations in the California Current System (CCS) where it would be acceptable to build pilemounted wind turbines in waters less than 50 m deep, the development of technology able to support deep-water OWEI (>200 m depth) could enable wind-energy production in the CCS. As with all humanuse of the marine environment, understanding the potential impacts of wind-energy infrastructure on the marine ecosystem is an integral part of offshore wind-energy research and planning. Herein, we present a comprehensive database to quantify marine bird vulnerability to potential OWEI in the CCS (see http://dx.doi.org/10.5066/F79C6VJ0). These data were used to quantify marine bird vulnerabilities at the population level. For 81 marine bird species present in the CCS, we created three vulnerability indices: Population Vulnerability, Collision Vulnerability, and Displacement Vulnerability. Population Vulnerability was used as a scaling factor to generate two comprehensive indicies: Population Collision Vulnerability (PCV) and Population Displacement Vulnerability (PDV). Within the CCS, pelicans, terns (Forster’s [Sterna forsteri], Caspian [Hydroprogne caspia], Elegant [Thalasseus elegans], and Least Tern [Sternula antillarum]), gulls (Western [Larus occidentalis] and Bonaparte’s Gull [Chroicocephalus philadelphia]), South Polar Skua (Stercorarius maccormicki), and Brandt’s Cormorant (Phalacrocorax penicillatus) had the greatest PCV scores. Brown Pelican (Pelicanus occidentalis

  11. Industrial Large Scale Applications of Superconductivity -- Current and Future Trends

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amm, Kathleen

    2011-03-01

    Since the initial development of NbTi and Nb3Sn superconducting wires in the early 1960's, superconductivity has developed a broad range of industrial applications in research, medicine and energy. Superconductivity has been used extensively in NMR low field and high field spectrometers and MRI systems, and has been demonstrated in many power applications, including power cables, transformers, fault current limiters, and motors and generators. To date, the most commercially successful application for superconductivity has been the high field magnets required for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), with a global market well in excess of 4 billion excluding the service industry. The unique ability of superconductors to carry large currents with no losses enabled high field MRI and its unique clinical capabilities in imaging soft tissue. The rapid adoption of high field MRI with superconducting magnets was because superconductivity was a key enabler for high field magnets with their high field uniformity and image quality. With over 30 years of developing MRI systems and applications, MRI has become a robust clinical tool that is ever expanding into new and developing markets. Continued innovation in system design is continuing to address these market needs. One of the key questions that innovators in industrial superconducting magnet design must consider today is what application of superconductivity may lead to a market on the scale of MRI? What are the key considerations for where superconductivity can provide a unique solution as it did in the case of MRI? Many companies in the superconducting industry today are investigating possible technologies that may be the next large market like MRI.

  12. Large dynamic range diagnostics for high current electron LINACs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Evtushenko, Pavel [JLAB

    2013-11-01

    The Jefferson Lab FEL driver accelerator - Energy Recovery Linac has provided a beam with average current of up to 9 mA and beam energy of 135 MeV. The high power beam operations have allowed developing and testing methods and approaches required to set up and tune such a facility simultaneously for the high beam power and high beam quality required for high performance FEL operations. In this contribution we briefly review this experience and outline problems that are specific to high current - high power non-equilibrium linac beams. While the original strategy for beam diagnostics and tuning have proven to be quite successful, some shortcomings and unresolved issues were also observed. The most important issues are the non-equilibrium (non-Gaussian) nature of the linac beam and the presence of small intensity - large amplitude fraction of the beam a.k.a. beam halo. Thus we also present a list of the possible beam halo sources and discuss possible mitigations means. We argue that for proper understanding and management of the beam halo large dynamic range (>10{sup 6}) transverse and longitudinal beam diagnostics can be used. We also present results of transverse beam profile measurements with the dynamic range approaching 10{sup 5} and demonstrate the effect the increased dynamic range has on the beam characterization, i.e., emittance and Twiss parameters measurements. We also discuss near future work planned in this field and where the JLab FEL facility will be used for beam tests of the developed of new diagnostics.

  13. Large dynamic range diagnostics for high current electron LINACs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Evtushenko, P., E-mail: Pavel.Evtushenko@jlab.org [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility 12000 Jefferson Avenue, Newport News, VA 23606 (United States)

    2013-11-07

    The Jefferson Lab FEL driver accelerator - Energy Recovery Linac has provided a beam with average current of up to 9 mA and beam energy of 135 MeV. The high power beam operations have allowed developing and testing methods and approaches required to set up and tune such a facility simultaneously for the high beam power and high beam quality required for high performance FEL operations. In this contribution we briefly review this experience and outline problems that are specific to high current - high power non-equilibrium linac beams. While the original strategy for beam diagnostics and tuning have proven to be quite successful, some shortcomings and unresolved issues were also observed. The most important issues are the non-equilibrium (non-Gaussian) nature of the linac beam and the presence of small intensity - large amplitude fraction of the beam a.k.a. beam halo. Thus we also present a list of the possible beam halo sources and discuss possible mitigations means. We argue that for proper understanding and management of the beam halo large dynamic range (>10{sup 6}) transverse and longitudinal beam diagnostics can be used. We also present results of transverse beam profile measurements with the dynamic range approaching 10{sup 5} and demonstrate the effect the increased dynamic range has on the beam characterization, i.e., emittance and Twiss parameters measurements. We also discuss near future work planned in this field and where the JLab FEL facility will be used for beam tests of the developed of new diagnostics.

  14. An Algorithm for Surface Current Retrieval from X-band Marine Radar Images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chengxi Shen

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, a novel current inversion algorithm from X-band marine radar images is proposed. The routine, for which deep water is assumed, begins with 3-D FFT of the radar image sequence, followed by the extraction of the dispersion shell from the 3-D image spectrum. Next, the dispersion shell is converted to a polar current shell (PCS using a polar coordinate transformation. After removing outliers along each radial direction of the PCS, a robust sinusoidal curve fitting is applied to the data points along each circumferential direction of the PCS. The angle corresponding to the maximum of the estimated sinusoid function is determined to be the current direction, and the amplitude of this sinusoidal function is the current speed. For validation, the algorithm is tested against both simulated radar images and field data collected by a vertically-polarized X-band system and ground-truthed with measurements from an acoustic Doppler current profiler (ADCP. From the field data, it is observed that when the current speed is less than 0.5 m/s, the root mean square differences between the radar-derived and the ADCP-measured current speed and direction are 7.3 cm/s and 32.7°, respectively. The results indicate that the proposed procedure, unlike most existing current inversion schemes, is not susceptible to high current speeds and circumvents the need to consider aliasing. Meanwhile, the relatively low computational cost makes it an excellent choice in practical marine applications.

  15. Use of Biosensors as Alternatives to Current Regulatory Methods for Marine Biotoxins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis M. Botana

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Marine toxins are currently monitored by means of a bioassay that requires the use of many mice, which poses a technical and ethical problem in many countries. With the exception of domoic acid, there is a legal requirement for the presence of other toxins (yessotoxin, saxitoxin and analogs, okadaic acid and analogs, pectenotoxins and azaspiracids in seafood to be controlled by bioassay, but other toxins, such as palytoxin, cyclic imines, ciguatera and tetrodotoxin are potentially present in European food and there are no legal requirements or technical approaches available to identify their presence. The need for alternative methods to the bioassay is clearly important, and biosensors have become in recent years a feasible alternative to animal sacrifice. This review will discuss the advantages and disadvantages of using biosensors as alternatives to animal assays for marine toxins, with particular focus on surface plasmon resonance (SPR technology.

  16. Overview of current marine juvenile salmon research by the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helle, John H.; Eisner, L.B.; Farley, Edward V.; Martinson, Ellen C.; Martinson, Angela; Moss, Jamal H.; Murphy, James M.; Orsi, Joseph A.; Sturdevant, Mollly V.; Wertheimer, Alex C.; Wing, Bruce L.; Brodeur, R.D.; Emmett, Robert; Bucher, Cynthia; MacFarlane, Bruce; Harding, Jeff; Ammann, Arnold; Zimmerman, Christian E.

    2007-01-01

    A history of juvenile salmon research on Pacific salmon in coastal areas conducted by the United States (U.S.) was published by Brodeur et al. (2003). Presently, juvenile Pacific salmon research in the U.S. occurs in the coastal areas of all of the Pacific states: California, Oregon, Washington, and Alaska (Fig. 1). Major objectives of this research are to understand how dynamics in marine ecosystems influence migration, distribution, growth, and survival of juvenile salmon during their early ocean residence. Several large-scale studies in coastal areas from California to Alaska are currently being conducted by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS), in collaboration with university and state scientists. Studies off California are operated by the Southwest Fisheries Science Center, Santa Cruz Laboratory in Santa Cruz, California and University of California Santa Cruz. Studies off Oregon and Washington are operated by the Northwest Fisheries Science Center, Newport Laboratory and Oregon State University in Newport, Oregon. Studies in the Gulf of Alaska, Bering Sea and in the seaward migration corridors in the coastal waters of southeastern Alaska are operated by the Alaska Fisheries Science Center, Auke Bay Laboratory in Juneau, Alaska, in collaboration with Alaska Department of Fish and Game, University of Alaska Fairbanks, Bering Sea Fishermen’s Association, and Yukon River Drainage Fishermen’s Association. In addition to these large studies, smaller estuarine studies on juvenile salmon occur in northwestern Alaska in Kuskokwim Bay by the U.S. Geological Survey (Anchorage) and University of Alaska Fairbanks (Juneau), and, in Norton Sound by LGL Alaska Research Associates and Norton Sound Economic Development Corporation both headquartered in Anchorage (Fig. 1). The estuarine studies on juvenile salmon in Alaska operate in shallow water and a variety of gear is used to capture salmon. A small trawl

  17. Properties Variation of Carbon Fiber Reinforced Composite for Marine Current Turbine in Seawater

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Jing

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Turbine blade which are generally made of composite is a core device among components of tidal current power generator that converts the flow of tidal current into a turning force. Recent years, damages of composite turbine blades have been reported due to reasons like seawater degradation, lake of strength, manufacture etc. In this paper, water absorption, tensile, bending, longitudinal transverse shearing properties of carbon fiber reinforced plastic (CRP composite which would be applied to fabricate the marine current turbine blade has been investigated. Furthermore, the variations of properties with seawater immersion period were studied. The results indicated that the water absorption increased almost linearly at the beginning of immersion and then became stable. Tensile strength of specimen tended to decrease firstly and then recovered slightly. However, the longitudinal transverse shearing strength showed reverse variation trend comparing to tensile strength. And the bending property of specimens was depressed significantly. The properties variations in seawater shall be referenced to design and fabrication of composite marine current turbine blade.

  18. Current State Overview of the Vama Veche - 2 Mai Marine Reserve, Black Sea, Romania

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victor Niţă

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The Vama Veche - 2 Mai marine area is an almost unique combination at the Romanian coast, covering a wide variety of elementaryhabitats, the area being considered a true mosaic. The extremely rich benthic and pelagic life, expressed by the high biodiversity in the area, isa real milestone for the Romanian coast, being at the same time shelter and breeding area for many nektonic marine organisms. The NationalInstitute for Marine Research and Development “Grigore Antipa“ Constanta was custodian of the reserve in the period 2004 - 2009, duringwhich an intense research activity was developed in the area, evidenced by the numerous scientific papers published, as well as the ManagementPlan and Regulation of the Reserve, completed and submitted for approval to the Ministry of Environment. Since December 2011, the Institutehas again taken into custody the Vama Veche Reserve, for a period of five years. The paper herein is a brief scan of the current state of the protectedarea, based mainly on the research conducted there by the Institute, within many projects focusing on the quality of the Romanian marineenvironment.

  19. Effect of Flow Velocity on Corrosion Rate and Corrosion Protection Current of Marine Material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Seong Jong [Kunsan National University, Kunsan (Korea, Republic of); Han, Min Su; Jang, Seok Ki; Kim, Seong Jong [Mokpo National Maritime University, Mokpo (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-15

    In spite of highly advanced paint coating techniques, corrosion damage of marine metal and alloys increase more and more due to inherent micro-cracks and porosities in coatings formed during the coating process. Furthermore, flowing seawater conditions promote the breakdown of the protective oxide of the materials introducing more oxygen into marine environments, leading to the acceleration of corrosion. Various corrosion protection methods are available to prevent steel from marine corrosion. Cathodic protection is one of the useful corrosion protection methods by which the potential of the corroded metal is intentionally lowered to an immune state having the advantage of providing additional protection barriers to steel exposed to aqueous corrosion or soil corrosion, in addition to the coating. In the present investigation, the effect of flow velocity was examined for the determination of the optimum corrosion protection current density in cathodic protection as well as the corrosion rate of the steel. It is demonstrated from the result that the material corrosion under dynamic flowing conditions seems more prone to corrosion than under static conditions.

  20. Ethogram of Immature Green Turtles: Behavioral Strategies for Somatic Growth in Large Marine Herbivores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okuyama, Junichi; Nakajima, Kana; Noda, Takuji; Kimura, Satoko; Kamihata, Hiroko; Kobayashi, Masato; Arai, Nobuaki; Kagawa, Shiro; Kawabata, Yuuki; Yamada, Hideaki

    2013-01-01

    Animals are assumed to obtain/conserve energy effectively to maximise their fitness, which manifests itself in a variety of behavioral strategies. For marine animals, however, these behavioral strategies are generally unknown due to the lack of high-resolution monitoring techniques in marine habitats. As large marine herbivores, immature green turtles do not need to allocate energy to reproduction but are at risk of shark predation, although it is a rare occurrence. They are therefore assumed to select/use feeding and resting sites that maximise their fitness in terms of somatic growth, while avoiding predation. We investigated fine-scale behavioral patterns (feeding, resting and other behaviors), microhabitat use and time spent on each behavior for eight immature green turtles using data loggers including: depth, global positioning system, head acceleration, speed and video sensors. Immature green turtles at Iriomote Island, Japan, spent an average of 4.8 h feeding on seagrass each day, with two peaks, between 5∶00 and 9∶00, and between 17∶00 and 20∶00. This feeding pattern appeared to be restricted by gut capacity, and thus maximised energy acquisition. Meanwhile, most of the remaining time was spent resting at locations close to feeding grounds, which allowed turtles to conserve energy spent travelling and reduced the duration of periods exposed to predation. These behavioral patterns and time allocations allow immature green turtles to effectively obtain/conserve energy for growth, thus maximising their fitness.

  1. Ethogram of Immature Green Turtles: Behavioral Strategies for Somatic Growth in Large Marine Herbivores.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junichi Okuyama

    Full Text Available Animals are assumed to obtain/conserve energy effectively to maximise their fitness, which manifests itself in a variety of behavioral strategies. For marine animals, however, these behavioral strategies are generally unknown due to the lack of high-resolution monitoring techniques in marine habitats. As large marine herbivores, immature green turtles do not need to allocate energy to reproduction but are at risk of shark predation, although it is a rare occurrence. They are therefore assumed to select/use feeding and resting sites that maximise their fitness in terms of somatic growth, while avoiding predation. We investigated fine-scale behavioral patterns (feeding, resting and other behaviors, microhabitat use and time spent on each behavior for eight immature green turtles using data loggers including: depth, global positioning system, head acceleration, speed and video sensors. Immature green turtles at Iriomote Island, Japan, spent an average of 4.8 h feeding on seagrass each day, with two peaks, between 5∶00 and 9∶00, and between 17∶00 and 20∶00. This feeding pattern appeared to be restricted by gut capacity, and thus maximised energy acquisition. Meanwhile, most of the remaining time was spent resting at locations close to feeding grounds, which allowed turtles to conserve energy spent travelling and reduced the duration of periods exposed to predation. These behavioral patterns and time allocations allow immature green turtles to effectively obtain/conserve energy for growth, thus maximising their fitness.

  2. Marine chemistry, fish / shell-fish surveys, benthic organisms, and marine toxic substances and pollutants data from current meter and other instruments in the Gulf of Mexico from 26 January 1993 to 13 June 1994 (NODC Accession 9500088)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Marine chemistry, fish / shell-fish surveys, benthic organisms, and marine toxic substances and pollutants data were collected using current meter and other...

  3. Quantifying fish assemblages in large, offshore marine protected areas: an Australian case study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicole A Hill

    Full Text Available As the number of marine protected areas (MPAs increases globally, so does the need to assess if MPAs are meeting their management goals. Integral to this assessment is usually a long-term biological monitoring program, which can be difficult to develop for large and remote areas that have little available fine-scale habitat and biological data. This is the situation for many MPAs within the newly declared Australian Commonwealth Marine Reserve (CMR network which covers approximately 3.1 million km2 of continental shelf, slope, and abyssal habitat, much of which is remote and difficult to access. A detailed inventory of the species, types of assemblages present and their spatial distribution within individual MPAs is required prior to developing monitoring programs to measure the impact of management strategies. Here we use a spatially-balanced survey design and non-extractive baited video observations to quantitatively document the fish assemblages within the continental shelf area (a multiple use zone, IUCN VI of the Flinders Marine Reserve, within the Southeast marine region. We identified distinct demersal fish assemblages, quantified assemblage relationships with environmental gradients (primarily depth and habitat type, and described their spatial distribution across a variety of reef and sediment habitats. Baited videos recorded a range of species from multiple trophic levels, including species of commercial and recreational interest. The majority of species, whilst found commonly along the southern or south-eastern coasts of Australia, are endemic to Australia, highlighting the global significance of this region. Species richness was greater on habitats containing some reef and declined with increasing depth. The trophic breath of species in assemblages was also greater in shallow waters. We discuss the utility of our approach for establishing inventories when little prior knowledge is available and how such an approach may inform future

  4. Testing of Bearing Materials for Large Two-stroke Marine Diesel Engines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klit, Peder; Persson, Sebastian; Vølund, Anders

    2013-01-01

    In large two-stroke marine diesel engines bearings are designed with the intention that these need not be replaced during the life of the engine. The design has shown very good service experiences. The design parameters of the main bearings are, among others, based on the average maximum specific...... load which the bearing should operate under. In general, the frictional loss is less than 1% of the nominal power of the engine but is still a target for optimization. Fatigue mechanisms of bearing lining material are not fully understood and the design limits with regards to minimum oil film thickness...

  5. Quantized acoustoelectric current in the presence of large tunneling counterflow

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gloos, K.; Utko, P.; Hansen, Jørn Bindslev;

    2004-01-01

    A surface acoustic wave drives an electrical current through a short quantum wire. A second tunneling current is injected by biasing one side of the quantum wire. These two contributions to the total current, which flow in opposite directions, are controlled almost independently by the gate and t...

  6. Numerical and experimental study of the interaction between two marine current turbines

    CERN Document Server

    Mycek, Paul; Germain, Grégory; Pinon, Grégory; Rivoalen, Elie

    2013-01-01

    The understanding of interaction effects between marine energy converters represents the next step in the research process that should eventually lead to the deployment of such devices. Although some a priori considerations have been suggested recently, very few real condition studies have been carried out concerning this issue. Trials were run on 1/30th scale models of three-bladed marine current turbine prototypes in a flume tank. The present work focuses on the case where a turbine is placed at different locations in the wake of a first one. The interaction effects in terms of performance and wake of the second turbine are examined and compared to the results obtained on the case of one single turbine. Besides, a three-dimensional software, based on a vortex method is currently being developed, and will be used in the near future to model more complex layouts. The experimental study shows that the second turbine is deeply affected by the presence of an upstream device and that a compromise between individu...

  7. The Influence of Fuel Sulfur on the Operation of Large Two-Stroke Marine Diesel Engines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cordtz, Rasmus Faurskov

    The present work focusses on SO3/H2SO4 formation and sulfuric acid (H2SO4) condensation in a large low speed 2-stroke marine diesel engine. SO3 formation is treated theoretically from a formulated multizone engine model described in this work that includes a detailed and validated sulfur reaction...... as also demonstrated by a number of SO3 experiments described in this work. The experiments are carried out with a heavy duty medium speed 4 stroke diesel engine operating on heavy fuel oil including ≈ 2 wt. % sulfur. SO3 was measured successfully in the exhaust gas with the PENTOL SO3 analyzer...... mechanism. Model results show that for a large marine engine generally about 3 % - 6 % of the fuel sulfur converts to SO3 while the remainder leaves the engine as SO2 from which the SO3 is formed during the expansion stroke. SO3 formation scales with the cylinder pressure and inversely with the engine speed...

  8. Testing of bearing materials for large two-stroke marine diesel engines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vølund, Anders; Klit, Peder; Persson, Sebastian

    2017-01-01

    In large two-stroke marine diesel engines, bearings are designed to last the lifetime of the engine. The design has shown very good service experiences. The design parameters of the main bearings are, among others, based on the average maximum specific load which the bearing should operate under...... gradient are not established. Large two-stroke journal bearings are not suitable for fatigue test due to the size, the low rotational speed and the complexity of such a test-rig. The disc fatigue test rig was designed with the purpose to test white metal coatings under realistic bearing conditions......, in a confined time-frame. The test-rig simulates a scale model of a thrust bearing, in contrary to standard design, the bearing lining material is applied to the rotating collar. Parameters, such as bearing load, rotational speed, oil temperature, oil contamination is controlled/monitored in order to achieve...

  9. Shellfish Fishery Severely Reduces Condition and Survival of Oystercatchers Despite Creation of Large Marine Protected Areas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne L. Rutten

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available Fisheries and other human activities pose a global threat to the marine environment. Marine protected areas (MPAs are an emerging tool to cope with such threats. In the Dutch Wadden Sea, large MPAs (covering 31% of all intertidal flats have been created to protect shellfish-eating birds and allow recovery of important habitats. Even though shellfish fishing is prohibited in these areas, populations of shellfish-eating birds in the Wadden Sea have declined sharply. The role of shellfish fisheries in these declines is hotly debated, therefore, we investigated the effectiveness of MPAs for protecting oystercatcher (Haematopus ostralegus populations. Shellfish stocks (cockles, Cerastoderma edule were substantially higher in the MPAs, but surprisingly this has not resulted in a redistribution of wintering oystercatchers. Oystercatchers in unprotected areas had less shellfish in their diet and lower condition (a combined measure of mass and haematological parameters, and their estimated mortality was 43% higher. It is likely, therefore, that shellfish fishing explains at least part of the 40% decline in oystercatcher numbers in recent years. Condition and mortality effects were strongest in males, and the population sex ratio was female biased, in agreement with the fact that males rely more on shellfish. The unprotected areas apparently function as an “ecological trap,” because oystercatchers did not respond as anticipated to the artificial spatial heterogeneity in food supply. Consequently, the MPAs are effective on a local scale, but not on a global scale. Similar problems are likely to exist in terrestrial ecosystems, and distribution strategies of target species need to be considered when designing terrestrial and marine protected areas if they are to be effective.

  10. Analysis of reproductive patterns of fishes from three Large Marine Ecosystems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isaac eTrindade-Santos

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Fish reproductive biology plays an important role for fishery management, especially in developing countries. The aim of this study was to compile all available information and analyze reproduction patterns of marine fishes in three Large Marine Ecosystems (LMEs: North, East, and South Brazil Shelves. We tested the hypothesis that the onset and duration of spawning season differ among these three LMEs; compared the ratio between length at first maturity and asymptotic length with the global trend observed; analyzed sex ratios; and tested whether females allocate more energy into reproduction than males. The following data were compiled from published sources and ‘grey’ literature: sex ratio, spawning season, gonadosomatic indices (GSI, and length at first maturity (Lm. The reproductive load was estimated as Lm/L∞. The median extension of the spawning season in the North, East, and South Brazil Shelves were 6.5, 6.0 and 5.0 months, respectively, with higher frequency during austral summer in South Brazil. Marine fishes from these three LMEs can be grouped in summer and non-summer spawners. About ninety six percent of the cases the reproductive load was between 0.3 and 0.8, which is slightly shifted toward smaller values, compared with the global range of 0.4-0.9. Gonadosomatic indices for females were higher. Contrary to some expectations, there is seasonality in the reproduction of tropical fishes. However, seasonality is stronger in southern populations. Size at first maturity is not efficiently used as a tool for fisheries management in the ecosystems analyzed.

  11. A Back-to-Back 2L-3L Grid Integration of a Marine Current Energy Converter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Senad Apelfröjd

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper proposes a back-to-back 2L-3L grid connection topology for a marine current energy converter. A prototype marine current energy converter has been deployed by a research group at Uppsala University. The concept behind the prototype revolves around a fixed pitch vertical axis turbine directly connected to a permanent magnet synchronous generator (PMSG. The proposed grid connection system utilizes a well known and proven two level voltage source converter generator-side combined with a three-level cascaded H-bridge (CHB multilevel converter grid-side. The multilevel converter brings benefits in terms of efficiency, power quality and DC-link utilization. The system is here presented for a single marine current energy converter but can easily be scaled up for clusters of marine current energy converters. Control schemes for both grid-side and generator-side voltage source converters are presented. The start-up, steady state and dynamic performance of the marine current energy converter are investigated and simulation results are presented in this paper.

  12. The ISMAR high frequency coastal radar network: Monitoring surface currents for management of marine resources

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carlson, Daniel Frazier

    2015-01-01

    The Institute of Marine Sciences (ISMAR) of the National Research Council of Italy (CNR) established a High Frequency (HF) Coastal Radar Network for the measurement of the velocity of surface currents in coastal seas. The network consists of four HF radar systems located on the coast of the Gargano...... of geospatial data, a netCDF architecture has been defined on the basis of the Radiowave Operators Working Group (US ROWG) recommendations and compliant to the Climate and Forecast (CF) Metadata Conventions CF-1.6. The hourly netCDF files are automatically attached to a Thematic Real-time Environmental...... by the ISMAR HF radar network are presently used in a number of applications, ranging from oil spill and SAR to fishery and coastal management applications....

  13. Chemical pollution in the Arctic and Sub-Arctic marine ecosystems: an overview of current knowledge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Savinova, T.N.; Gabrielsen, G.W.; Falk-Petersen, S.

    1995-02-01

    This report is part of a research project in the framework of the Norwegian-Russian Environmental Cooperation, which was initiated in 1991 to elucidate the present status of environmental contaminants in the highly sensitive Arctic aquatic ecosystem, with special focus on sea birds. Although these ecosystems are the least polluted areas in the world, they are contaminated. The main pathways of contamination into Arctic and sub-Arctic marine ecosystems are atmospheric transport, ocean currents and rivers and in some areas, dumping and ship accidents. A literature survey reveals: (1) there is a lack of data from several trophic levels, (2) previous data are difficult to compare with recent data because of increased quality requirement, (3) not much has been done to investigate the effects of contaminants on the cellular level, at individual or population levels. 389 refs., 7 figs., 32 tabs.

  14. Numerical simulation of marine currents in the Bunaken Strait, North Sulawesi, Indonesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rompas, P. T. D.; Manongko, J. D. I.

    2016-04-01

    This study intended for the generation of hydroelectric power at suitable area of the strait in order to provide electric current to a close environment. The project uses a three-dimensional model of taking flow into account the variation of hydrostatic pressure in the liquid vertical layers. We brought back to a two-dimensional calculation using the shallow water equations. The objectives of the study are getting simultaneous obtaining the velocities of currents by the component of velocities and distributions of the kinetic energy from the numerical results. The Bunaken strait is 5280 m width for an average depth of 130 m. Numerical calculation is simulated using horizontal meshes of 60 side meters. The numerical solutions obtained by using a time step of one second. It found that there was no great difference between 2D and 3D numerical simulations because the effect of flow velocity in the vertical direction is very small. The numerical results have shown that the average current velocities when low and high tide currents are 1.46 m/s and 0.85 m/s respectively. The kinetic energy ranged from 0.01 to 2.54 kW/m2 when low and high tide in the Bunaken strait area at discharge of 1 Sv, whereas at discharge 2 Sv, 0.11-17.40 kW/m2 and 0.11-2.77 kW/m2 (when low and high tide currents). These results can used in the design of turbines for power generation marine currents in the Bunaken strait at depths below 60 meters.

  15. Piston surface heat transfer during combustion in large marine diesel engines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Michael Vincent; Walther, Jens Honore

    2010-01-01

    limited. The numerical investigation focused on the simulation of a hot turbulent gas jet impinging on a wall under very high pressure, thus approximating the process of the actual impingement of hot combustion gasses on the piston surface during combustion. The surface heat flux at the wall......In the design process of large marine diesel engines information on the maximum heat load on the piston surface experienced during the engine cycle is an important parameter. The peak heat load occurs during combustion when hot combustion products impinge on the piston surface. Although the maximum...... instrumentation and high engine running costs compared to automotive engines. Therefore the investigation in this work was carried out numerically with the use of a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) code. At the same time, numerical work on detailed in-cylinder wall heat transfer in engines has been quite...

  16. Biodegradation of marine surface floating crude oil in a large-scale field simulated experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bao, Mutai; Sun, Peiyan; Yang, Xiaofei; Wang, Xinping; Wang, Lina; Cao, Lixin; Li, Fujuan

    2014-08-01

    Biodegradation of marine surface floating crude oil with hydrocarbon degrading bacteria, rhamnolipid biosurfactants, and nutrients was carried out by a large-scale field simulated experiment in this paper. After a 103 day experiment, for n-alkanes, the maximum biodegradation rate reached 71% and the results showed hydrocarbon degrading bacteria, rhamnolipid biosurfactants, and nutrients have a comprehensive effect. It also showed that rhamnolipid biosurfactants could shorten the biodegradation time through an emulsifying function; the nutrients could greatly increase the biodegradation rate by promoting HDB production. For PAHs, the chrysene series had higher weathering resistance. For the same series, the weathering resistance ability is C1- biodegradation was found for different n-alkanes in two pools which only had added rhamnolipid biosurfactants or nutrients, respectively. Except for C14, C15 and C16 sesquiterpanes, most of the steranes and terpanes had high antibiodegradability.

  17. Patterns and drivers of fish community assembly in a large marine ecosystem

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pécuchet, Lauréne; Törnroos, Anna; Lindegren, Martin

    2016-01-01

    shaping community composition. However, community composition in the eastern part, an area beyond the steep decline in salinity, was characterized by fewer species with largely different trait characteristics, indicating that community assembly is also affected by biotic interactions. Our results add......The presence and survival of the species in a community depend on their abilities to maximize fitness in a given environment. The study of the processes that control survival and co‑existence, termed ‘assembly rules’, follows various mechanisms, primarily related to biotic or abiotic factors....... To determine assembly rules, ecological similarities of co-occurring species are often investigated. This can be evaluated using trait-based indices summarizing the species’ niches in a given community. In order to investigate the underlying processes shaping community assembly in marine ecosystems, we...

  18. Enabling the Integrated Assessment of Large Marine Ecosystems: Informatics to the Forefront of Science-Based Decision Support

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Stefano, M.; Fox, P. A.; Beaulieu, S. E.; Maffei, A. R.; West, P.; Hare, J. A.

    2012-12-01

    Integrated assessments of large marine ecosystems require the understanding of interactions between environmental, ecological, and socio-economic factors that affect production and utilization of marine natural resources. Assessing the functioning of complex coupled natural-human systems calls for collaboration between natural and social scientists across disciplinary and national boundaries. We are developing a platform to implement and sustain informatics solutions for these applications, providing interoperability among very diverse and heterogeneous data and information sources, as well as multi-disciplinary organizations and people. We have partnered with NOAA NMFS scientists to facilitate the deployment of an integrated ecosystem approach to management in the Northeast U.S. (NES) and California Current Large Marine Ecosystems (LMEs). Our platform will facilitate the collaboration and knowledge sharing among NMFS natural and social scientists, promoting community participation in integrating data, models, and knowledge. Here, we present collaborative software tools developed to aid the production of the Ecosystem Status Report (ESR) for the NES LME. The ESR addresses the D-P-S portion of the DPSIR (Driver-Pressure-State-Impact-Response) management framework: reporting data, indicators, and information products for climate drivers, physical and human (fisheries) pressures, and ecosystem state (primary and secondary production and higher trophic levels). We are developing our tools in open-source software, with the main tool based on a web application capable of providing the ability to work on multiple data types from a variety of sources, providing an effective way to share the source code used to generate data products and associated metadata as well as track workflow provenance to allow in the reproducibility of a data product. Our platform retrieves data, conducts standard analyses, reports data quality and other standardized metadata, provides iterative

  19. A methodology for laser diagnostics in large-bore marine two-stroke diesel engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hult, J.; Mayer, S.

    2013-04-01

    Large two-stroke diesel engines for marine propulsion offer several challenges to successful implementation of the laser diagnostic techniques applied extensively in smaller automotive engines. For this purpose a fully operational large-bore engine has been modified to allow flexible optical access, through 24 optical ports with clear diameters of 40 mm. By mounting the entire optical set-up directly to the engine, effects of the vigorous vibrations and thermal drifts on alignment can be minimized. Wide-angle observation and illumination, as well as relatively large aperture detection, is made possible through mounting of optical modules and relays inside optical ports. This allows positioning of the last optical element within 10 mm from the cylinder wall. Finally, the implementation on a multi-cylinder engine allows for flexible and independent operation of the optically accessible cylinder for testing purposes. The performance of the integrated optical engine and imaging system developed is demonstrated through laser Mie scattering imaging of fuel jet structures, from which information on liquid penetration and spray angles can be deduced. Double pulse laser-sheet imaging of native in-cylinder structures is also demonstrated, for the purpose of velocimetry.

  20. Anomalous dimensions of higher spin currents in large N CFTs

    CERN Document Server

    Hikida, Yasuaki

    2016-01-01

    We examine anomalous dimensions of higher spin currents in the critical O(N) scalar model and the Gross-Neveu model in arbitrary d dimensions. These two models are proposed to be dual to the type A and type B Vasiliev theories, respectively. We reproduce the known results on the anomalous dimensions to the leading order in 1/N by using conformal perturbation theory. This work can be regarded as an extension of previous work on the critical O(N) scalars in 3 dimensions, where it was shown that the bulk computation for the masses of higher spin fields on AdS_4 can be mapped to the boundary one in conformal perturbation theory. The anomalous dimensions of the both theories agree with each other up to an overall factor depending only on d, and the coincidence is explained for d=3 by making use of N=2 supersymmetry.

  1. Diving deeper into individual foraging specializations of a large marine predator, the southern sea lion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baylis, A M M; Orben, R A; Arnould, J P Y; Peters, K; Knox, T; Costa, D P; Staniland, I J

    2015-12-01

    Despite global declines in the abundance of marine predators, knowledge of foraging ecology, necessary to predict the ecological consequences of large changes in marine predator abundance, remains enigmatic for many species. Given that populations suffering severe declines are of conservation concern, we examined the foraging ecology of southern sea lions (SSL) (Otaria flavescens)-one of the least studied otariids (fur seal and sea lions)-which have declined by over 90% at the Falkland Islands since the 1930s. Using a combination of biologging devices and stable isotope analysis of vibrissae, we redress major gaps in the knowledge of SSL ecology and quantify patterns of individual specialization. Specifically, we revealed two discrete foraging strategies, these being inshore (coastal) and offshore (outer Patagonian Shelf). The majority of adult female SSL (72% or n = 21 of 29 SSL) foraged offshore. Adult female SSL that foraged offshore travelled further (92 ± 20 vs. 10 ± 4 km) and dived deeper (75 ± 23 vs. 21 ± 8 m) when compared to those that foraged inshore. Stable isotope analysis revealed long-term fidelity (years) to these discrete foraging habitats. In addition, we found further specialization within the offshore group, with adult female SSL separated into two clusters on the basis of benthic or mixed (benthic and pelagic) dive behavior (benthic dive proportion was 76 ± 9 vs. 51 ± 8%, respectively). We suggest that foraging specialization in depleted populations such as SSL breeding at the Falkland Islands, are influenced by foraging site fidelity, and could be independent of intraspecific competition. Finally, the behavioral differences we describe are crucial to understanding population-level dynamics, impediments to population recovery, and threats to population persistence.

  2. Progress and Current Challenges in Modeling Large RNAs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Somarowthu, Srinivas

    2016-02-27

    Recent breakthroughs in next-generation sequencing technologies have led to the discovery of several classes of non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs). It is now apparent that RNA molecules are not only just carriers of genetic information but also key players in many cellular processes. While there has been a rapid increase in the number of ncRNA sequences deposited in various databases over the past decade, the biological functions of these ncRNAs are largely not well understood. Similar to proteins, RNA molecules carry out a function by forming specific three-dimensional structures. Understanding the function of a particular RNA therefore requires a detailed knowledge of its structure. However, determining experimental structures of RNA is extremely challenging. In fact, RNA-only structures represent just 1% of the total structures deposited in the PDB. Thus, computational methods that predict three-dimensional RNA structures are in high demand. Computational models can provide valuable insights into structure-function relationships in ncRNAs and can aid in the development of functional hypotheses and experimental designs. In recent years, a set of diverse RNA structure prediction tools have become available, which differ in computational time, input data and accuracy. This review discusses the recent progress and challenges in RNA structure prediction methods.

  3. Description of the East Brazil Large Marine Ecosystem using a trophic model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kátia M.F. Freire

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to describe the marine ecosystem off northeastern Brazil. A trophic model was constructed for the 1970s using Ecopath with Ecosim. The impact of most of the forty-one functional groups was modest, probably due to the highly reticulated diet matrix. However, seagrass and macroalgae exerted a strong positive impact on manatee and herbivorous reef fishes, respectively. A high negative impact of omnivorous reef fishes on spiny lobsters and of sharks on swordfish was observed. Spiny lobsters and swordfish had the largest biomass changes for the simulation period (1978-2000; tunas, other large pelagics and sharks showed intermediate rates of biomass decline; and a slight increase in biomass was observed for toothed cetaceans, large carnivorous reef fishes, and dolphinfish. Recycling was an important feature of this ecosystem with low phytoplankton-originated primary production. The mean transfer efficiency between trophic levels was 11.4%. The gross efficiency of the fisheries was very low (0.00002, probably due to the low exploitation rate of most of the resources in the 1970s. Basic local information was missing for many groups. When information gaps are filled, this model may serve more credibly for the exploration of fishing policies for this area within an ecosystem approach.

  4. Marine mammal impacts in exploited ecosystems: would large scale culling benefit fisheries?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morissette, Lyne; Christensen, Villy; Pauly, Daniel

    2012-01-01

    Competition between marine mammals and fisheries for marine resources-whether real or perceived-has become a major issue for several countries and in international fora. We examined trophic interactions between marine mammals and fisheries based on a resource overlap index, using seven Ecopath models including marine mammal groups. On a global scale, most food consumed by marine mammals consisted of prey types that were not the main target of fisheries. For each ecosystem, the primary production required (PPR) to sustain marine mammals was less than half the PPR to sustain fisheries catches. We also developed an index representing the mean trophic level of marine mammal's consumption (TL(Q)) and compared it with the mean trophic level of fisheries' catches (TL(C)). Our results showed that overall TL(Q) was lower than TL(C) (2.88 versus 3.42). As fisheries increasingly exploit lower-trophic level species, the competition with marine mammals may become more important. We used mixed trophic impact analysis to evaluate indirect trophic effects of marine mammals, and in some cases found beneficial effects on some prey. Finally, we assessed the change in the trophic structure of an ecosystem after a simulated extirpation of marine mammal populations. We found that this lead to alterations in the structure of the ecosystems, and that there was no clear and direct relationship between marine mammals' predation and the potential catch by fisheries. Indeed, total biomass, with no marine mammals in the ecosystem, generally remained surprisingly similar, or even decreased for some species.

  5. The multi-objective optimization of the horizontal-axis marine current turbine based on NSGA-II algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, G. J.; Guo, P. C.; Luo, X. Q.; Feng, J. J.

    2012-11-01

    The present paper describes a hydrodynamic optimization technique for horizontal-axial marine current turbine. The pitch angle distribution is important to marine current turbine. In this paper, the pitch angle distribution curve is parameterized as four control points by Bezier curve method. The coordinates of the four control points are chosen as optimization variables, and the sample space are structured according to the Box-Behnken experimental design method (BBD). Then the power capture coefficient and axial thrust coefficient in design tip-speed ratio is obtained for all the elements in the sample space by CFD numerical simulation. The power capture coefficient and axial thrust are chosen as objective function, and quadratic polynomial regression equations are constructed to fit the relationship between the optimization variables and each objective function according to response surface model. With the obtained quadratic polynomial regression equations as performance prediction model, the marine current turbine is optimized using the NSGA-II multi-objective genetic algorithm, which finally offers an improved marine current turbine.

  6. Landscape mapping at sub-Antarctic South Georgia provides a protocol for underpinning large-scale marine protected areas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hogg, Oliver T.; Huvenne, Veerle A. I.; Griffiths, Huw J.; Dorschel, Boris; Linse, Katrin

    2016-10-01

    Global biodiversity is in decline, with the marine environment experiencing significant and increasing anthropogenic pressures. In response marine protected areas (MPAs) have increasingly been adopted as the flagship approach to marine conservation, many covering enormous areas. At present, however, the lack of biological sampling makes prioritising which regions of the ocean to protect, especially over large spatial scales, particularly problematic. Here we present an interdisciplinary approach to marine landscape mapping at the sub-Antarctic island of South Georgia as an effective protocol for underpinning large-scale (105-106  km2) MPA designations. We have developed a new high-resolution (100 m) digital elevation model (DEM) of the region and integrated this DEM with bathymetry-derived parameters, modelled oceanographic data, and satellite primary productivity data. These interdisciplinary datasets were used to apply an objective statistical approach to hierarchically partition and map the benthic environment into physical habitats types. We assess the potential application of physical habitat classifications as proxies for biological structuring and the application of the landscape mapping for informing on marine spatial planning.

  7. Investigation of Different Piston Ring Curvatures on Lubricant Transport along Cylinder Liner in Large Two-Stroke Marine Diesel Engines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Overgaard, Hannibal Christian; Klit, Peder; Vølund, Anders

    2016-01-01

    A theoretical investigation of the hydrodynamic lubrication of the top compression piston ring in a large two-stroke marine diesel engine is presented. The groove mounted piston ring is driven by the reciprocal motion of the piston. The ring shape follows a circular geometry and the effect...

  8. OPTIMIZING THE SHAPE OF ROTOR BLADES FOR MAXIMUM POWER EXTRACTION IN MARINE CURRENT TURBINES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.A. Esfahani

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available In this paper the shape of rotor blades in Marine Current Turbines (MCTs are investigated. The evaluation of hydrodynamic loads on blades is performed based on the Blade Element Momentum (BEM theory. The shape of blades is optimized according to the main parameters in the configuration and operation of these devices. The optimization is conducted based on the ability of the blades to harness the maximum energy during operating. The main parameters investigated are the tip speed ratio and angle of attack. Furthermore, the influence of these parameters on the maximum energy extraction from fluid flow over a hydrofoil is evaluated. It is shown that the effect of the angle of attack on power extraction is greater than that of the tip speed ratio, while both are found to be significant. Additionally, the proper angle of attack is the angle at which the lift to drag ratio is at its maximum value. However, if a proper angle of attack is chosen, the variations in power coefficient would not be effectively changed with small variations in the tip speed ratio.

  9. Multi-point design optimization of hydrofoil for marine current turbine

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    罗兴锜; 朱国俊; 冯建军

    2014-01-01

    The comprehensive performance of the marine current turbine is an important issue in the ocean energy development. Its key is the performance of the hydrofoil, which is used to form the turbine blade. A multi-point optimization method of the hydrofoil is proposed in this paper. In this method, the Bezier curve is used to parameterize the hydrofoil. The geometrical parameters are used as variables while the lift-drag ratio and the cavitation performance of the hydrofoil are used as the objective functions. The NSGA-II algorithm is chosen as the optimization algorithm. In order to resolve the difficulty of this high-dimensional multi-objective optimi- zation problem, the conception of the distance metric in the metric space is introduced to unify the lift-drag ratio and the cavitation performance under different working conditions. And then, the above optimization method is applied in the NACA63-815 hydro- foil’s optimal design under three typical conditions. Finally, the results from the performance comparison of the original and optimi- zed hydrofoils obtained by using the CFD simulation are analyzed in detail. It is indicated that the optimized hydrofoils enjoy a better hydrodynamic performance than the original ones under the three conditions. The feasibility and the theoretical validity of this optimization method are confirmed by the results.

  10. Application of flow cytometry in marine phytoplankton research: current applications and future perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcel J.W. Veldhuis

    2000-06-01

    Full Text Available A brief overview is given of current applications of flow cytometry (FCM in marine phytoplankton research. This paper presents a selection of highlights and various technical and analytical problems we encountered during the past 10 years. In particular, the conversion of the relative values obtained in terms of size and fluorescence applying FCM to quantitative estimates of cell size, pigment concentration, genome size etc., is addressed. The introduction of DNA -cell-cycle analysis made easily assessable by flow cytometry has been of great importance, allowing in situ measurement of species specific growth rates. Key questions in ecology such as factors determining the wax and wane of phytoplankton bloom can now be better answered in terms of species specific growth and mortality. Finally, flow cytometry provides detailed information of the physiological status of the individual algal cells. New staining methods enable us to distinguish between viable and non-viable cells and so will help us to elucidate the importance of automortality in aquatic ecosystems.

  11. Island Power Management using a Marine Current Turbine Farm and an Ocean Compressed Air Energy Storage System

    OpenAIRE

    Sheng, Lei; ZHOU, Zibhin; Charpentier, Jean-Frederic; Benbouzid, Mohamed

    2015-01-01

    Due to the high predictability and the high energy density, marine tidal resource has become an area of increasing interest with various academic and industrial projects around the world. In fact, several Marine Current Turbine (MCT) farm projects with multi-megawatt capacity are planned to be installed in the coming years. In this paper, an MCT farm is supposed to be associated to the energy supply of a stand-aloneisland. In order to compensate the MCT farm power variation due to tidal pheno...

  12. A new biomimicry marine current turbine:Study of hydrodynamic performan- ce and wake using software OpenFOAM

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yung-Jeh CHU

    2016-01-01

    Inspired by Dryobalanops aromatica seed, a new biomimicry marine current turbine is proposed. Hydrodynamic perfor- mance and wake properties are two key factors determining whether a new marine current turbine design is practical or not. Thus, a study of hydrodynamic performance and wake of the proposed biomimicry turbine is conducted. The computational fluid dynamics (CFD) software, OpenFOAM is used to generate the required results for the mentioned study. The hydrodynamic performance and wake properties of the proposed biomimicry turbine is compared to two conventional turbines of Bahaj et al. and Pinon et al. re- spectively. The simulation results showed that the proposed biomimicry marine current turbine gives optimum power output with its power coefficient,CP≈0.376 at the tip speed ratio (TSR) of 1.5. Under the same boundary conditions, the maximum torque pro- duced by the proposed biomimicry turbine at zero rotational speed is 38.71 Nm which is 1110% greater than the torque generated by the turbine of Bahaj et al.. The recovery distance for the wake of the biomimicry turbine is predicted to be 10.6% shorter than that of IFREMER-LOMC turbine. The above-mentioned results confirm the potential application of the proposed biomimicry marine curre- nt turbine in the renewable energy industry.

  13. Modelling of temporal and spatial evolution of sulphur oxides and sulphuric acid under large, two-stroke marine engine-like conditions using integrated CFD-chemical kinetics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pang, Kar Mun; Karvounis, Nikolas; Walther, Jens Honore

    2017-01-01

    In this work, three-dimensional computational fluid dynamics (CFD) studies of sulphur oxides (SOx) andsulphuric acid (H2SO4) formation processes in a large, low speed two-stroke marine diesel engine are carriedout. The current numerical study aims to investigate the conversion of sulphuric dioxide...... that the flameimpinges at the cylinder liner near top dead centre. The gas is cooled rapidly by the wall temperatureand H2SO4 is produced in the region where the local temperature is less than 600 K. Based on the fluegas correlation, the acid dew point temperature is higher than the wall temperature, suggesting...

  14. Solid Waste Transportation through Ocean Currents: Marine Debris Sightings and their Waste Quantification at Port Dickson Beaches, Peninsular Malaysia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chong Jing Yi

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Four beaches at Port Dickson, Peninsular Malaysia, namely Saujana Beach, Nelayan Beach, Bagan Pinang Beach and Cermin beach have been sampled for marine debris from 7th June 2014 until 26th July 2014, on every Saturday. These beaches face the Strait of Malacca with a coastline stretching 18 km each. Our observations revealed a total debris items of 13193 in those beaches. The top three items of highest frequency were cigarette butts, foamed fragments and food wrappers. Plastic debris scaled high upto 41% of the total debris. Compared to the ocean conservancy�s 2013 report of marine debris in Malaysian beaches, which was 27,005 items with in 6.44 km, the current count is slightly low. However, Malaysia was ranked 14th place among the top 20 countries in International Marine Debris Watch program. Nelayan Beach is the dirtiest beach in Port Dickson. Around 50% of the total plastic items collected are found on those beaches. The marine debris items indicated that they arrived there by land-based and ocean-based activities. High energy conditions such as wind and waves in the beaches correlated well with less debris deposition on the beaches. With debris equivalent of 4193 items/km, Malaysia harvests less solid wastes compared to Croatia, USA, Singapore and Turkey. However, a nation wide survey is needed to assess the seriousness of marine debris problem in Malaysia.

  15. Pharmacological developments obtained from marine natural products and current pipeline perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galeano, Elkin; Rojas, Jhon J; Martínez, Alejandro

    2011-02-01

    Marine organisms represent a new extensive source for bioactive molecules. They have the potential to provide new therapeutic alternatives to treat human diseases. In this paper, we describe and discuss a variety of isolated and semisynthetic molecules obtained from marine sources. These compounds are in phase II, phase III and at the commercialization stage of new drug development. A description of the mechanism of action, dosage used and side effects are also reported. The positive results obtained from these studies have triggered the development of new studies to evaluate the prospects for utilization of marine organisms.

  16. Steady-State Configuration and Tension Calculations of Marine Cables Under Complex Currents via Separated Particle Swarm Optimization

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    徐雪松

    2014-01-01

    Under complex currents, the motion governing equations of marine cables are complex and nonlinear, and the calculations of cable configuration and tension become difficult compared with those under the uniform or simple currents. To obtain the numerical results, the usual Newton−Raphson iteration is often adopted, but its stability depends on the initial guessed solution to the governing equations. To improve the stability of numerical calculation, this paper proposed separated the particle swarm optimization, in which the variables are separated into several groups, and the dimension of search space is reduced to facilitate the particle swarm optimization. Via the separated particle swarm optimization, these governing nonlinear equations can be solved successfully with any initial solution, and the process of numerical calculation is very stable. For the calculations of cable configuration and tension of marine cables under complex currents, the proposed separated swarm particle optimization is more effective than the other particle swarm optimizations.

  17. Spring-time distributions of migratory marine birds in the southern California Current: Oceanic eddy associations and coastal habitat hotspots over 17 years

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yen, P. P. W.; Sydeman, W. J.; Bograd, S. J.; Hyrenbach, K. D.

    2006-02-01

    We used a 17-year time series of shipboard observations to address the hypothesis that marine birds associate with persistent hydrographic features in the southern California Current System (CCS). Overall, approximately 27,000 km of ocean habitat were surveyed, averaging 1600 km per cruise. We identified mesoscale features (eddy centers and the core of the California Current), based on dynamic height anomalies, and considered habitat associations for seven migratory seabird species: black-footed albatross ( Phoebastria nigripes), Cook's petrel ( Pterodroma cookii), Leach's storm-petrel ( Oceanodroma leucorhoa), dark shearwaters (mainly sooty shearwater Puffinus griseus, with a few short-tailed shearwaters Puffinus tenuirostris), northern fulmar ( Fulmarus glacialis), red phalarope ( Phalaropus fulicaria), and red-necked phalarope ( Phalaropus lobatus). We explored associations (presence/absence and density relationships) of marine birds with mesoscale features (eddies, current jet) and metrics of primary productivity (chlorophyll a and nitrate concentrations). Mesoscale eddies were consistently identified in the study region, but were spatially and temporally variable. The resolved eddies were large-scale features associated with meanders of the equatorward-flowing California Current. Cook's petrel was found offshore with no specific habitat affinities. Black-footed albatross, red phalarope, and Leach's storm petrel were found in association with offshore eddies and/or the core of the California Current, but the functional relationship for these species varied, possibly reflecting differences in flight capabilities. The more coastal species, including the shearwaters, fulmar, and red-necked phalarope, were positively associated with proxies of primary productivity. Of the hydrographic habitats considered, the upwelling region of Point Conception appears to be an important "hotspot" of sustained primary production and marine bird concentrations. Point Conception and

  18. Offshore renewable energies, offshore wind power marine currents and waves; Energies renouvelables en mer eolien en mer courants marins et vagues

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paillard, M. [Institut Francais de Recherche pour l' Exploitation de la Mer, 92 - Issy les Moulineaux (France); Peirano, E. [Agence de Environnement et de la Maitrise de l' Energie (ADEME), 06 - Valbonne (France)

    2004-07-01

    This colloquium aims to take stock on the development of ocean energies, mainly exploitation of offshore wind energy, but also exploitation of marine currents and waves for energy conversion by discussing their perspectives, their constraints, and their environmental and socio-economic impacts. It proposes also a review the recent methodological and technological advances. The different subjects introduced are: state of the art and prospects; resource assessments, forecasting and short-term prediction, site conditions; technical assessments, installation,decommissioning, certification; environmental impacts, social aspects and acceptability; policies, market perspectives and constraints; project developments and feedback. (A.L.B.)

  19. The Marine Corps Civil Military Operations (CMO) Capability: Inadequate for Current and Future Irregular Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-02

    training, used it to navigate their way through uncertain conditions. For example, in Iraq in May, 2003, the commander of the First B attal iot ~, 𔄁Lh...again the struggle for survival of the Marine Corps as an autonomous branch ’ of the armed services will rear its Llgly head. The Marine Corps is...compete with such traditional budget buste1:s as fighter aircraft and amphibious assault vehicles . But then the CMO challenge is more of an intellectual

  20. Marine Stewardship Council certification of fisheries in Russia: a current status and prospects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dmitry Liudvigovich Lajus

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Russia supports the sixth largest fisheries worldwide, which grew 25% during the last decade and is forecasted to grow 40% more up to 2020. Such voluminous and fast growing fisheries cause challenges for their sustainability. Marine Stewardship Council (MSC voluntary certification is now the most recognized system aimed to achieve sustainability of fisheries through informed choice of consumers. The certified fisheries benefit through recognition of MSC logo by consumers. The certificate is awarded to fisheries with a good status of target species and limited impact to structure and function of ecosystems, and to protected species. The recent research showed that MSC certified fisheries in average refer to healthier stocks than non-certified ones. Russia entered the program in the second half of the 2000s, and the first certificate was awarded in 2009. Now the MSC process in Russia is very intensive and currently involves thirteen fisheries, seven of them already are certified. The certified fisheries can be subdivided into three groups: (i set net Pacific salmon fisheries of the Far East, (ii bottom trawl codfish fisheries in the Barents Sea, and (iii pelagic trawl Alaska pollock fisheries in the Sea of Okhotsk. The total catch of fisheries involved in the MSC program now is about one-third for Pacific salmon, most of codfish and about a half for Alaska pollock. Process of MSC certifications in Russia faces various problems, caused by differences between western and Russian traditions of fishery management, difficulties of access to scientific information, insufficient support from governmental institutions, illegal fishing, insufficient independent observance, influence of hatcheries on salmon wild stocks and others. We believe that to improve sustainability of Russian fisheries, it is needed to demonstrate economical benefits of certification for those fisheries which are not involved in the program, to involve new fisheries in the process

  1. Using expert judgment to estimate marine ecosystem vulnerability in the California Current.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teck, Sarah J; Halpern, Benjamin S; Kappel, Carrie V; Micheli, Fiorenza; Selkoe, Kimberly A; Crain, Caitlin M; Martone, Rebecca; Shearer, Christine; Arvai, Joe; Fischhoff, Baruch; Murray, Grant; Neslo, Rabin; Cooke, Roger

    2010-07-01

    As resource management and conservation efforts move toward multi-sector, ecosystem-based approaches, we need methods for comparing the varying responses of ecosystems to the impacts of human activities in order to prioritize management efforts, allocate limited resources, and understand cumulative effects. Given the number and variety of human activities affecting ecosystems, relatively few empirical studies are adequately comprehensive to inform these decisions. Consequently, management often turns to expert judgment for information. Drawing on methods from decision science, we offer a method for eliciting expert judgment to (1) quantitatively estimate the relative vulnerability of ecosystems to stressors, (2) help prioritize the management of stressors across multiple ecosystems, (3) evaluate how experts give weight to different criteria to characterize vulnerability of ecosystems to anthropogenic stressors, and (4) identify key knowledge gaps. We applied this method to the California Current region in order to evaluate the relative vulnerability of 19 marine ecosystems to 53 stressors associated with human activities, based on surveys from 107 experts. When judging the relative vulnerability of ecosystems to stressors, we found that experts primarily considered two criteria: the ecosystem's resistance to the stressor and the number of species or trophic levels affected. Four intertidal ecosystems (mudflat, beach, salt marsh, and rocky intertidal) were judged most vulnerable to the suite of human activities evaluated here. The highest vulnerability rankings for coastal ecosystems were invasive species, ocean acidification, sea temperature change, sea level rise, and habitat alteration from coastal engineering, while offshore ecosystems were assessed to be most vulnerable to ocean acidification, demersal destructive fishing, and shipwrecks. These results provide a quantitative, transparent, and repeatable assessment of relative vulnerability across ecosystems to

  2. Environmental impact assessment - A management tool for conservation of large marine ecosystems

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Nair, V.R.

    of negative aspects of fishing have been developed, an operational definition of marine environmental quality for fishing activity is yet to be formulated within a rational framework. There is growing concern about the environmental implications of aquaculture...

  3. Current direction, marine toxic substances, and wind wave spectra data from moored current meter casts and other instruments in the Gulf of Mexico as part of the Brine Disposal project, 22 December 1977 - 30 September 1979 (NODC Accession 7900336)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Current direction, marine toxic substances, and wind wave spectra data were collected using moored current meter casts and other instruments in the Gulf of Mexico...

  4. Current direction, marine toxic substances, and other data from current meters and grab casts from the GUSS III and other platforms in support of the Brine Disposal project from 20 October 1977 to 16 April 1979 (NODC Accession 8000029)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Current direction, marine toxic substances, and other data from were collected from current meters and grab casts from the GUSS III and other platforms from 20...

  5. Current direction, chemical, and marine toxic substances data from moored current meter casts and other instruments in the Gulf of Mexico during the Brine Disposal project, 09 September 1978 - 19 November 1979 (NODC Accession 8000043)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Current direction, marine toxic substances, and chemical data were collected using moored current meter casts and other instruments in the Gulf of Mexico from...

  6. Current direction, marine toxic substances, and wind wave spectra data from moored current meter casts and other instruments in the Gulf of Mexico as part of the Brine Disposal project, 15 September 1977 - 30 June 1979 (NODC Accession 7900295)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Current direction, marine toxic substances, and wind wave spectra data were collected using moored current meter casts and other instruments in the Gulf of Mexico...

  7. Role of self-propulsion of marine larvae on their probability of contact with a protruding collector located in a sea current

    CERN Document Server

    Zilman, Gregory; Liberzon, Alex; Perkol-Finkel, Shimrit; Benayahu, Yehuda

    2011-01-01

    Settlement of marine larvae on a substrate is a fundamental problem of marine life. The probability of settlement is one of the quantitative characteristic of the settlement process. The probability of larval contact with a substrate is the upper bound of the probability of settlement. This work addresses the problem of contact probability and contact rate of marine invertebrate larvae with an isolated protruding collector located in an unbounded sea current. There are two common approaches to the problem of contact probability. In one, a collector induces certain cues, which help a larvae find the collector. In such a case, the larva moves towards the collector deliberately, using its navigation and propulsion devices. In the second approach, a larva moves towards a collector as a passive small particle. In this case, the cause of contact of a larva with a collector is a mechanical collision of a small moving body with a large obstacle. We considered a larva which does not know the location of the collector,...

  8. The current state and future directions of marine turtle toxicology research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finlayson, Kimberly A; Leusch, Frederic D L; van de Merwe, Jason P

    2016-09-01

    Chemical contamination of marine turtles has been well documented in the literature, although information on the toxicological effects of these contaminants is poorly understood. This paper systematically and quantitatively presents the available marine turtle toxicological research (excluding oil chemicals and natural toxins) and the related fields of cell line establishment and biomarkers as indicators of exposure. Examination of the published literature identified a total of 49 papers on marine turtle toxicology, which were split into three categories: toxicity studies (n=33, 67%), cell line establishment (n=7, 14%), and publications using biomarkers (n=13, 27%). Toxicity studies were further broken down into four subcategories: those correlating contaminants with toxicological endpoints (n=16, 48%); in vitro exposure experiments (n=11, 33%); in vivo exposure experiments (n=5, 15%); and screening risk assessments using hazard quotients (n=3, 9%). In quantitatively assessing the literature, trends and gaps in this field of research were identified. This paper highlights the need for more marine turtle toxicology research on all species, particularly using high throughput and non-invasive in vitro assays developed for marine turtle cells, including investigations into further toxicological endpoints and mixture effects. This will provide more comprehensive species-specific assessment of the impacts of chemical contaminants on these threatened animals, and improve conservation and management strategies globally.

  9. Annotated bibliography: Marine geologic hazards of the Hawaiian Islands with special focus on submarine slides and turbidity currents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Normark, W.R.; Herring, H.H.

    1993-10-01

    This annotated bibliography was compiled to highlight the submarine geology of the Hawaiian Islands and identify known and potential marine geologic hazards with special emphasis on turbidity currents, submarine slides and tsunamis. Some references are included that are not specific to Hawaii but are needed to understand the geologic processes that can affect the integrity of submarine cables and other man-made structures. Entries specific to the Hawaiian Island area are shown in bold type.

  10. 13-Deoxytedanolide, a marine sponge-derived antitumor macrolide, binds to the 60S large ribosomal subunit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishimura, Shinichi; Matsunaga, Shigeki; Yoshida, Minoru; Hirota, Hiroshi; Yokoyama, Shigeyuki; Fusetani, Nobuhiro

    2005-01-17

    13-Deoxytedanolide is a potent antitumor macrolide isolated from the marine sponge Mycale adhaerens. In spite of its remarkable activity, the mode of action of 13-deoxytedanolide has not been elucidated. [11-3H]-(11S)-13-Deoxydihydrotedanolide derived from the macrolide was used for identifying the target molecule from the yeast cell lysate. Fractionation of the binding protein revealed that the labeled 13-deoxytedanolide derivative strongly bound to the 80S ribosome as well as to the 60S large subunit, but not to the 40S small subunit. In agreement with this observation, 13-deoxytedanolide efficiently inhibited the polypeptide elongation. Interestingly, competition studies demonstrated that 13-deoxytedanolide shared the binding site on the 60S large subunit with pederin and its marine-derived analogues. These results indicate that 13-deoxytedanolide is a potent protein synthesis inhibitor and is the first macrolide to inhibit the eukaryotic ribosome.

  11. Large Recovery of Fish Biomass in a No-Take Marine Reserve

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aburto-Oropeza, Octavio; Erisman, Brad; Galland, Grantly R.; Mascareñas-Osorio, Ismael; Sala, Enric; Ezcurra, Exequiel

    2011-01-01

    No-take marine reserves are effective management tools used to restore fish biomass and community structure in areas depleted by overfishing. Cabo Pulmo National Park (CPNP) was created in 1995 and is the only well enforced no-take area in the Gulf of California, Mexico, mostly because of widespread support from the local community. In 1999, four years after the establishment of the reserve, there were no significant differences in fish biomass between CPNP (0.75 t ha−1 on average) and other marine protected areas or open access areas in the Gulf of California. By 2009, total fish biomass at CPNP had increased to 4.24 t ha−1 (absolute biomass increase of 3.49 t ha−1, or 463%), and the biomass of top predators and carnivores increased by 11 and 4 times, respectively. However, fish biomass did not change significantly in other marine protected areas or open access areas over the same time period. The absolute increase in fish biomass at CPNP within a decade is the largest measured in a marine reserve worldwide, and it is likely due to a combination of social (strong community leadership, social cohesion, effective enforcement) and ecological factors. The recovery of fish biomass inside CPNP has resulted in significant economic benefits, indicating that community-managed marine reserves are a viable solution to unsustainable coastal development and fisheries collapse in the Gulf of California and elsewhere. PMID:21858183

  12. Large recovery of fish biomass in a no-take marine reserve.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Octavio Aburto-Oropeza

    Full Text Available No-take marine reserves are effective management tools used to restore fish biomass and community structure in areas depleted by overfishing. Cabo Pulmo National Park (CPNP was created in 1995 and is the only well enforced no-take area in the Gulf of California, Mexico, mostly because of widespread support from the local community. In 1999, four years after the establishment of the reserve, there were no significant differences in fish biomass between CPNP (0.75 t ha(-1 on average and other marine protected areas or open access areas in the Gulf of California. By 2009, total fish biomass at CPNP had increased to 4.24 t ha(-1 (absolute biomass increase of 3.49 t ha(-1, or 463%, and the biomass of top predators and carnivores increased by 11 and 4 times, respectively. However, fish biomass did not change significantly in other marine protected areas or open access areas over the same time period. The absolute increase in fish biomass at CPNP within a decade is the largest measured in a marine reserve worldwide, and it is likely due to a combination of social (strong community leadership, social cohesion, effective enforcement and ecological factors. The recovery of fish biomass inside CPNP has resulted in significant economic benefits, indicating that community-managed marine reserves are a viable solution to unsustainable coastal development and fisheries collapse in the Gulf of California and elsewhere.

  13. Impacts of marine aquaculture at large spatial scales: evidences from n and p catchment loading and phytoplankton biomass

    OpenAIRE

    2011-01-01

    Abstract While several studies point at off-shore aquaculture as a possible source of impacts on the local marine environment, very few have analysed its effects at large scales such as at the bay, gulf or basin levels. Similar analyses are hampered by the multiple sources of disturbance that may concomitantly affect a given area. The present paper addresses these issues taking the Gulf of Castellammare (Southern Tyrrhenian Sea) as an example. Nitrogen (N) and phosphorous (P) loads...

  14. Development, installation and testing of a large-scale tidal current turbine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thake, J.

    2005-10-15

    This report summarises the findings of the Seaflow project to investigate the feasibility of building and operating a commercial scale marine current horizontal axis tidal turbine and to evaluate the long-term economics of producing electricity using tidal turbines. Details are given of competitive tidal stream technologies and their commercial status, the selection of the site on the North Devon coast of the UK, and the evaluation of the turbine design, manufacture, testing, installation, commissioning, and maintenance of the turbine. The organisations working on the Seaflow project and cost estimations are discussed.

  15. The North Atlantic Data Portal: A Current Approach To Improving Marine Geophysical Data Discovery And Access

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jencks, J. H.; Cartwright, J.; Varner, J. D.

    2016-12-01

    Exploring, understanding, and managing the global oceans are a challenge when hydrographic maps are available for only 5% of the world's oceans. Seafloor mapping is expensive and most government and academic budgets continue to tighten. The first step for any mapping program, before setting out to map uncharted waters, should be to identify if data currently exist in the area of interest. There are many reasons why this seemingly simple suggestion is easier said than done.While certain datasets are accessible online (e.g., NOAA's NCEI, EMODnet, IHO-DCDB), many are not. In some cases, data that are publicly available are difficult to discover and access. No single agency can successfully resolve the complex and pressing demands of ocean and coastal mapping and the associated data stewardship. The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) is an active participant in numerous campaign mapping projects whose goals are to carry out coordinated and comprehensive ocean mapping efforts. One of these international programs is an outcome of the Galway Statement on Atlantic Ocean Cooperation signed by the European Union, Canada, and the United States in 2013. At NOAA's National Centers for Environmental Information (NCEI), resources are focused on ensuring the security and widespread availability of the Nation's scientific marine geophysical data through long-term stewardship. NCEI draws on a variety of software technologies and adheres to international standards to meet this challenge. The result is a geospatial framework built on spatially-enabled databases, standards-based web services, and International Standards Organization (ISO) metadata. Through the use of industry standards, the services are constructed such that they can be combined and re-used in a variety of contexts. For example, users may leverage the services in desktop analysis tools, web applications created by the hosting organizations (e.g. the North Atlantic Data Portal), or in custom

  16. Current Trends and Problems of Development of the Arctic Marine Freight Traffic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vladimir Stepanovich Selin

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The article analyzes the trends and evaluates the prospects of functioning of the Northern Sea Route. It shows that after the change of its management model its freight traffic has dropped 4-fold, and in the Eastern sector (outside the Vilkitsky Strait – 40-fold. In the recent years there has been a certain revival of transportation, including transit, which reached its maximum of 1.27 million tons in 2012. However, over the next two years they declined again; the drop was particularly significant in 2014 and amounted to a total of 240 thousand tons. The main problem is that this rather complex system is influenced by many factors, often contradictory and poorly predictable. Thus, the growing need for energy resources determines the overall need for developing the Arctic shelf. However, the possibility of climate cooling and the deterioration of ice situation can influence the possibility of transporting these resources. Besides, the Ukrainian crisis followed by the “war of sanctions” will cause a significant decline, especially in the medium term, the attractiveness of the European oil and gas market, which will cause the shift of strategic interests of Russian companies to the Asia-Pacific region. This necessitates the modernization of the Arctic transport and logistics system and introduction of new technical solutions. For instance, even nuclearpowered icebreakers series LA-60Ya that are currently under construction will not be able to escort linear tankers and gas carriers with a deadweight of more than 100 thousand tons along the eastern sector of the Northern Sea Route. It is necessary to create more powerful vessels of the classical type or to design new models. All these driving forces and constraints are not always predictable within the framework of standard economic and statistical approaches. In this regard, the study reflected in the article used expert approaches along with the methods of factor and economic analysis. The

  17. Stepped Holocene sea-level rise and its influence on sedimentation in a large marine embayment: Maputo Bay, Mozambique

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Lecea, A. M.; Green, A. N.; Strachan, K. L.; Cooper, J. A. G.; Wiles, E. A.

    2017-07-01

    The sedimentary record in large marine embayments holds important information on Holocene environmental and sea-level changes. This paper investigates the evolution of a large subtropical marine embayment, Maputo Bay, in southern Mozambique. Using a combination of sediment cores, stable isotope data, seismic reflection profiling and 14C dating, we show complex back-barrier changes during the Holocene and link these to stepped rises in sea level. Our data reveal a sea-level ;slowstand; followed by an abrupt rise that we correlate with the 8.2 ka global rise in sea level. Sedimentological, isotope and seismic evidence point to a subsequent slowstand interspersed by two punctuated rises in sea level that formed clear tidal ravinement surfaces. Sedimentary changes in the embayment are primarily forced by sea-level change, whereby tidal ravinement surfaces sandwich normal regressive packages formed via marginal progradation and shallowing of the system during ;slow-; or still-stands. Large marine embayment systems hold great potential in unravelling relative sea-level change. Axiomatically, this reduces their utility as archives of climate-change.

  18. Tracking marine mammals and ships with small and large-aperture hydrophone arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gassmann, Martin

    Techniques for passive acoustic tracking in all three spatial dimensions of marine mammals and ships were developed for long-term acoustic datasets recorded continuously over months using custom-designed arrays of underwater microphones (hydrophones) with spacing ranging from meters to kilometers. From the three-dimensional tracks, the acoustical properties of toothed whales and ships, such as sound intensity and directionality, were estimated as they are needed for the passive acoustic abundance estimation of toothed whales and for a quantitative description of the contribution of ships to the underwater soundscape. In addition, the tracks of the toothed whales reveal their underwater movements and demonstrate the potential of the developed tracking techniques to investigate their natural behavior and responses to sound generated by human activity, such as from ships or military SONAR. To track the periodically emitted echolocation sounds of toothed whales in an acoustically refractive environment in the upper ocean, a propagation-model based technique was developed for a hydrophone array consisting of one vertical and two L-shaped subarrays deployed from the floating instrument platform R/P FLIP. The technique is illustrated by tracking a group of five shallow-diving killer whales showing coordinated behavior. The challenge of tracking the highly directional echolocation sounds of deep-diving (whales, in particular Cuvier's beaked whales, was addressed by embedding volumetric small-aperture (≈ 1 m element spacing) arrays into a large-aperture (≈ 1 km element spacing) seafloor array to reduce the minimum number of required receivers from five to two. The capabilities of this technique are illustrated by tracking several groups of up to three individuals over time periods from 10 min to 33 min within an area of 20 km2 in the Southern California Bight. To track and measure the underwater radiated sound of ships, a frequency domain beamformer was implemented for

  19. Investigating the Marine Protected Areas most at risk of current-driven pollution in the Gulf of Finland, the Baltic Sea, using a Lagrangian transport model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delpeche-Ellmann, Nicole C; Soomere, Tarmo

    2013-02-15

    The possibility of current-driven propagation of contaminants released along a major fairway polluting the Marine Protected Areas (MPAs) in the Gulf of Finland, the Baltic Sea, is examined using a 3D circulation model, a Lagrangian transport model and statistics. Not surprisingly, the number of hits to the MPA decreases almost linearly with its distance from the fairway. In addition, the potential pollution released during a ship accident with the pollutants carried by currents may affect MPAs at very large distances. Typically, a fairway section approximately 125 km long (covering about 1/3 of the approximate 400-km-long gulf) may serve as a source of pollution for each MPA. The largest MPA (in the Eastern Gulf of Finland) may receive pollution from an approximately 210-km-long section (covering about 1/2 of the entire length of the gulf). This information may be useful in assisting maritime management.

  20. Numerical analysis of the scavenge flow and convective heat transfer in large two-stroke marine diesel engines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sigurdsson, Eythor; Ingvorsen, Kristian Mark; Jensen, Michael Vincent

    2014-01-01

    A novel computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model is presented for the study of the scavenging processand convective heat transfer in a large two-stroke low-speed uniflow-scavenged marine diesel engine.The engine is modeled using a fully resolved 12 sector, corresponding to one scavenge port...... an effective scavenging and a low convective heat loss in agreement with experimental data forlarge marine diesel engines.© 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved......., with cyclicboundaries in the tangential direction. The CFD model is strongly coupled to experiments and effectivelyprovides a high order ‘‘interpolation’’ of the engine processes through the solution of the Reynolds-AveragedNavier–Stokes (RANS) equations subject to boundary conditions obtained through experiments...

  1. Large-scale spatial and interspecies differences in trace elements and stable isotopes in marine wild fish from Chinese waters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Wei [Key Laboratory of Marine Bio-resources Sustainable Utilization, South China Sea Institute of Oceanology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Guangzhou 510301 (China); Graduate School, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Wang, Wen-Xiong, E-mail: wwang@ust.hk [Division of Life Science, HKUST, Clear Water Bay, Kowloon (Hong Kong)

    2012-05-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A large-scale study on trace element levels in marine wild fish from Chinese waters. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Spatial variation found for Al, As, Cd, Cr, Fe, Ni, Pb, but not for Ag, Cu, Mo, Se and Zn. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The Pearl River Estuary contained the highest concentrations of Al, Cr, Ni, and Pb. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer No biomagnification occurred for any of the trace elements studied in marine fish. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer No obvious health risk from the intake of trace elements through fish consumption. - Abstract: We conducted a large scale investigation of twelve trace element levels and stable isotopes ({delta}{sup 13}C and {delta}{sup 15}N) in twenty-nine marine wild fish species collected from Chinese coastal waters. Trace element levels varied significantly with species. Clear spatial variations were found for Al, As, Cd, Cr, Fe, Ni, and Pb, whereas Ag, Cu, Mo, Se and Zn did not show much spatial variation. The Pearl River Estuary contained the highest concentrations of Al, Cr, Ni, and Pb, whereas the most southern waters (Haikou) contained the lowest concentrations of Al, Fe, and Pb. There was no correlation between log-transformed trace elements concentrations and {delta}{sup 15}N values or {delta}{sup 13}C values, indicating no biomagnification among these trace elements. The calculated hazard quotients (HQ) of 10 elements were less than 1, thus there was no obvious health risk from the intake of trace elements through marine wild fish consumption.

  2. Interplay of multiple goods, ecosystem services, and property rights in large social-ecological marine protected areas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalie C. Ban

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Protected areas are a cornerstone of biodiversity conservation, and increasingly, conservation science is integrating ecological and social considerations in park management. Indeed, both social and ecological factors need to be considered to understand processes that lead to changes in environmental conditions. Here, we use a social-ecological systems lens to examine changes in governance through time in an extensive regional protected area network, the Great Barrier Reef Marine Park. We studied the peer-reviewed and nonpeer-reviewed literature to develop an understanding of governance of the Great Barrier Reef Marine Park and its management changes through time. In particular, we examined how interacting and changing property rights, as designated by the evolving marine protected area network and other institutional changes (e.g., fisheries management, defined multiple goods and ecosystem services and altered who could benefit from them. The rezoning of the Great Barrier Reef Marine Park in 2004 substantially altered the types and distribution of property rights and associated benefits from ecosystem goods and services. Initially, common-pool resources were enjoyed as common and private benefits at the expense of public goods (overexploited fisheries and reduced biodiversity and ecosystem health. The rezoning redefined the available goods and benefits and who could benefit, prioritizing public goods and benefits (i.e., biodiversity conservation, and inducing private costs (through reduced fishing. We also found that the original conceptualization of the step-wise progression of property rights from user to owner oversimplifies property rights based on its division into operational and collective-choice rule-making levels. Instead, we suggest that a diversity of available management tools implemented simultaneously can result in interactions that are seldom fully captured by the original conceptualization of the bundling of property rights

  3. Review of the effects of protection in marine protected areas: current knowledge and gaps

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ojeda–Martínez, C.

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available The effectiveness of marine protected areas (MPAs and the conservation of marine environments must be based on reliable information on the quality of the marine environment that can be obtained in a reasonable timeframe. We reviewed studies that evaluated all aspects related to the effectiveness of MPAs in order to describe how the studies were conducted and to detect fields in which research is lacking. Existing parameters used to evaluate the effectiveness of MPAs are summarised. Two-hundred and twenty-two publications were reviewed. We identified the most commonly used study subjects and methodological approaches. Most of the studies concentrated on biological parameters. Peer reviewed studies were based on control vs. impact design. BACI and mBACI designs were used in very few studies. Through this review, we have identified gaps in the objectives assigned to MPAs and the way in which they have been evaluated. We suggest some guidelines aimedat improving the assessment of the effects of protection in MPAs.

  4. Inside pyroclastic density currents - uncovering the enigmatic flow structure and transport behaviour in large-scale experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breard, Eric C. P.; Lube, Gert

    2017-01-01

    Pyroclastic density currents (PDCs) are the most lethal threat from volcanoes. While there are two main types of PDCs (fully turbulent, fully dilute pyroclastic surges and more concentrated pyroclastic flows encompassing non-turbulent to turbulent transport) pyroclastic flows, which are the subject of the present study, are far more complex than dilute pyroclastic surges and remain the least understood type despite their far greater hazard, greater runout length and ability to transport vast quantities of material across the Earth's surface. Here we present large-scale experiments of natural volcanic material and gas in order to provide the missing quantitative view of the internal structure and gas-particle transport mechanisms in pyroclastic flows. We show that the outer flow structure with head, body and wake regions broadly resembles current PDC analogues of dilute gravity currents. However, the internal structure, in which lower levels consist of a concentrated granular fluid and upper levels are more dilute, contrasts significantly with the internal structure of fully dilute gravity currents. This bipartite vertical structure shows strong analogy to current conceptual models of high-density turbidity currents, which are responsible for the distribution of coarse sediment in marine basins and of great interest to the hydrocarbon industry. The lower concentrated and non-turbulent levels of the PDC (granular-fluid basal flow) act as a fast-flowing carrier for the more dilute and turbulent upper levels of the current (ash-cloud surge). Strong kinematic coupling between these flow parts reduces viscous dissipation and entrainment of ambient air into the lower part of the ash-cloud surge. This leads to a state of forced super-criticality whereby fast and destructive PDCs can endure even at large distances from volcanoes. Importantly, the basal flow/ash-cloud surge coupling yields a characteristically smooth rheological boundary across the non

  5. A Numerical Model of Seawater Volume and Velocity Dynamic for Marine Currents Power Plant in the Bangka Strait, North Sulawesi, Indonesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rompas, P. T. D.; Taunaumang, H.; Sangari, F. J.

    2017-03-01

    One of equipment as prime movers in the marine current power plant is turbine. Marine current turbines require a data of marine currents velocity in its design. The objective of this study was to get the velocities distribution of marine currents in the Bangka strait. The method used survey, observation, and measurement in the Bangka strait. The data of seawater density conducted measurement in the Bangka strait. The data of width and depth of the strait collected from the map of Bangka strait and its depth of the sea. Problem solving of the study used a numerical model. The velocities distribution of marine current obtained from a numerical model in the form of numerical program. The results showed that the velocities distribution at seawater column when low and high tide currents which the maximum happened at 0.1 Sv were 0-0.9 and 0-1.0 m/s respectively, while at 0.3 Sv were 0-2.7 and 0-3.0 m/s respectively. The results will be a product in analyzing the potential kinetic energy that used to design profile of the turbines as prime mover for marine currents power plant in the Bangka strait, North Sulawesi, Indonesia.

  6. Large fluctuations of the macroscopic current in diffusive systems: A numerical test of the additivity principle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurtado, Pablo I.; Garrido, Pedro L.

    2010-04-01

    Most systems, when pushed out of equilibrium, respond by building up currents of locally conserved observables. Understanding how microscopic dynamics determines the averages and fluctuations of these currents is one of the main open problems in nonequilibrium statistical physics. The additivity principle is a theoretical proposal that allows to compute the current distribution in many one-dimensional nonequilibrium systems. Using simulations, we validate this conjecture in a simple and general model of energy transport, both in the presence of a temperature gradient and in canonical equilibrium. In particular, we show that the current distribution displays a Gaussian regime for small current fluctuations, as prescribed by the central limit theorem, and non-Gaussian (exponential) tails for large current deviations, obeying in all cases the Gallavotti-Cohen fluctuation theorem. In order to facilitate a given current fluctuation, the system adopts a well-defined temperature profile different from that of the steady state and in accordance with the additivity hypothesis predictions. System statistics during a large current fluctuation is independent of the sign of the current, which implies that the optimal profile (as well as higher-order profiles and spatial correlations) are invariant upon current inversion. We also demonstrate that finite-time joint fluctuations of the current and the profile are well described by the additivity functional. These results suggest the additivity hypothesis as a general and powerful tool to compute current distributions in many nonequilibrium systems.

  7. Formation and fate of marine snow : small-scale processes with large-scale implications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kiørboe, Thomas

    2001-01-01

    to the aggregate. Also, suspended bacteria may enjoy the elevated concentration of organic solutes in the plume. I explore these small-scale formation and degradation processes by means of models, experiments and field observations. The larger scale implications for the structure and functioning of pelagic food......Marine snow aggregates are believed to be the main vehicles for vertical material transport in the ocean. However, aggregates are also sites of elevated heterotrophic activity, which may rather cause enhanced retention of aggregated material in the upper ocean. Small-scale biological......-physical interactions govern the formation and fate of marine snow. Aggregates may form by physical coagulation: fluid motion causes collisions between small primary particles (e.g. phytoplankton) that may then stick together to form aggregates with enhanced sinking velocities. Bacteria may subsequently solubilise...

  8. Assessing the risk of ships striking large whales in marine spatial planning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redfern, J V; McKenna, M F; Moore, T J; Calambokidis, J; Deangelis, M L; Becker, E A; Barlow, J; Forney, K A; Fiedler, P C; Chivers, S J

    2013-04-01

    Marine spatial planning provides a comprehensive framework for managing multiple uses of the marine environment and has the potential to minimize environmental impacts and reduce conflicts among users. Spatially explicit assessments of the risks to key marine species from human activities are a requirement of marine spatial planning. We assessed the risk of ships striking humpback (Megaptera novaeangliae), blue (Balaenoptera musculus), and fin (Balaenoptera physalus) whales in alternative shipping routes derived from patterns of shipping traffic off Southern California (U.S.A.). Specifically, we developed whale-habitat models and assumed ship-strike risk for the alternative shipping routes was proportional to the number of whales predicted by the models to occur within each route. This definition of risk assumes all ships travel within a single route. We also calculated risk assuming ships travel via multiple routes. We estimated the potential for conflict between shipping and other uses (military training and fishing) due to overlap with the routes. We also estimated the overlap between shipping routes and protected areas. The route with the lowest risk for humpback whales had the highest risk for fin whales and vice versa. Risk to both species may be ameliorated by creating a new route south of the northern Channel Islands and spreading traffic between this new route and the existing route in the Santa Barbara Channel. Creating a longer route may reduce the overlap between shipping and other uses by concentrating shipping traffic. Blue whales are distributed more evenly across our study area than humpback and fin whales; thus, risk could not be ameliorated by concentrating shipping traffic in any of the routes we considered. Reducing ship-strike risk for blue whales may be necessary because our estimate of the potential number of strikes suggests that they are likely to exceed allowable levels of anthropogenic impacts established under U.S. laws.

  9. Reorganization of a large marine ecosystem due to atmospheric and anthropogenic pressure: a discontinuous regime shift in the Central Baltic Sea

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moellmann, C; Diekmann, Rabea; Muller-Karulis, B

    2009-01-01

    Marine ecosystems such as the Baltic Sea are currently under strong atmospheric and anthropogenic pressure. Besides natural and human-induced changes in climate, major anthropogenic drivers such as overfishing and anthropogenic eutrophication are significantly affecting ecosystem structure...

  10. Cumulants and large deviations of the current through non-equilibrium steady states

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bodineau, Thierry; Derrida, Bernard

    2007-06-01

    Using a generalisation of detailed balance for systems maintained out of equilibrium by contact with 2 reservoirs at unequal temperatures or at unequal densities, one can recover the fluctuation theorem for the large deviation function of the current. For large diffusive systems, we show how the large deviation function of the current can be computed using a simple additivity principle. The validity of this additivity principle and the occurrence of phase transitions are discussed in the framework of the macroscopic fluctuation theory. To cite this article: T. Bodineau, B. Derrida, C. R. Physique 8 (2007).

  11. Weak compliance undermines the success of no-take zones in a large government-controlled marine protected area.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stuart J Campbell

    Full Text Available The effectiveness of marine protected areas depends largely on whether people comply with the rules. We quantified temporal changes in benthic composition, reef fish biomass, and fishing effort among marine park zones (including no-take areas to assess levels of compliance following the 2005 rezoning of the government-controlled Karimunjawa National Park (KNP, Indonesia. Four years after the rezoning awareness of fishing regulations was high amongst local fishers, ranging from 79.5±7.9 (SE % for spatial restrictions to 97.7±1.2% for bans on the use of poisons. Despite this high awareness and strong compliance with gear restrictions, compliance with spatial restrictions was weak. In the four years following the rezoning reef fish biomass declined across all zones within KNP, with >50% reduction within the no-take Core and Protection Zones. These declines were primarily driven by decreases in the biomass of groups targeted by local fishers; planktivores, herbivores, piscivores, and invertivores. These declines in fish biomass were not driven by changes in habitat quality; coral cover increased in all zones, possibly as a result of a shift in fishing gears from those which can damage reefs (i.e., nets to those which cause little direct damage (i.e., handlines and spears. Direct observations of fishing activities in 2009 revealed there was limited variation in fishing effort between zones in which fishing was allowed or prohibited. The apparent willingness of the KNP communities to comply with gear restrictions, but not spatial restrictions is difficult to explain and highlights the complexities of the social and economic dynamics that influence the ecological success of marine protected areas. Clearly the increased and high awareness of fishery restrictions following the rezoning is a positive step. The challenge now is to understand and foster the conditions that may facilitate compliance with spatial restrictions within KNP and marine parks

  12. Weak Compliance Undermines the Success of No-Take Zones in a Large Government-Controlled Marine Protected Area

    KAUST Repository

    Campbell, Stuart J.

    2012-11-30

    The effectiveness of marine protected areas depends largely on whether people comply with the rules. We quantified temporal changes in benthic composition, reef fish biomass, and fishing effort among marine park zones (including no-take areas) to assess levels of compliance following the 2005 rezoning of the government-controlled Karimunjawa National Park (KNP), Indonesia. Four years after the rezoning awareness of fishing regulations was high amongst local fishers, ranging from 79.5±7.9 (SE) % for spatial restrictions to 97.7±1.2% for bans on the use of poisons. Despite this high awareness and strong compliance with gear restrictions, compliance with spatial restrictions was weak. In the four years following the rezoning reef fish biomass declined across all zones within KNP, with >50% reduction within the no-take Core and Protection Zones. These declines were primarily driven by decreases in the biomass of groups targeted by local fishers; planktivores, herbivores, piscivores, and invertivores. These declines in fish biomass were not driven by changes in habitat quality; coral cover increased in all zones, possibly as a result of a shift in fishing gears from those which can damage reefs (i.e., nets) to those which cause little direct damage (i.e., handlines and spears). Direct observations of fishing activities in 2009 revealed there was limited variation in fishing effort between zones in which fishing was allowed or prohibited. The apparent willingness of the KNP communities to comply with gear restrictions, but not spatial restrictions is difficult to explain and highlights the complexities of the social and economic dynamics that influence the ecological success of marine protected areas. Clearly the increased and high awareness of fishery restrictions following the rezoning is a positive step. The challenge now is to understand and foster the conditions that may facilitate compliance with spatial restrictions within KNP and marine parks worldwide. © 2012

  13. Numerical Simulation of Condensation of Sulfuric Acid and Water in a Large Two-stroke Marine Diesel Engine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Walther, Jens Honore; Karvounis, Nikolas; Pang, Kar Mun

    2016-01-01

    We present results from computational fluid dynamics simulations of the condensation of sulfuric acid (H2SO4) and water (H2O) in a large two-stroke marine diesel engine. The model uses a reduced n-heptane skeletal chemical mechanism coupled with a sulfur subsetto simulate the combustion process...... and the formation of SOx and H2SO4. Condensation is modeled using a fluid film model coupled with the Eulerian in-cylindergas phase. The fluid film condensation model is validated against both experimental and numerical results. The engine simulations reveal that the fluid film has a significant effect...

  14. Marine parasites as biological tags in South American Atlantic waters, current status and perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cantatore, D M P; Timi, J T

    2015-01-01

    Many marine fisheries in South American Atlantic coasts (SAAC) are threatened by overfishing and under serious risk of collapsing. The SAAC comprises a diversity of environments, possesses a complex oceanography and harbours a vast biodiversity that provide an enormous potential for using parasites as biological tags for fish stock delineation, a prerequisite for the implementation of control and management plans. Here, their use in the SAAC is reviewed. Main evidence is derived from northern Argentine waters, where fish parasite assemblages are dominated by larval helminth species that share a low specificity, long persistence and trophic transmission, parasitizing almost indiscriminately all available fish species. The advantages and constraints of such a combination of characteristics are analysed and recommendations are given for future research. Shifting the focus from fish/parasite populations to communities allows expanding the concept of biological tags from local to regional scales, providing essential information to delineate ecosystem boundaries for host communities. This new concept arose as a powerful tool to help the implementation of ecosystem-based approaches to fisheries management, the new paradigm for fisheries science. Holistic approaches, including parasites as biological tags for stock delineation will render valuable information to help insure fisheries and marine ecosystems against further depletion and collapse.

  15. A Biogeographic Assessment of the Stellwagen Bank National Marine Sanctuary - Surface Current Model Outputs

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Surface and sub-surface current model outputs were obtained from researchers at the University of Massachusetts-Boston to examine spatial and temporal current...

  16. A Biogeographic Assessment of the Stellwagen Bank National Marine Sanctuary - Subsurface Current Model Outputs

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Surface and sub-surface current model outputs were obtained from researchers at the University of Massachusetts-Boston to examine spatial and temporal current...

  17. Formation and fate of marine snow: small-scale processes with large- scale implications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Kiørboe

    2001-12-01

    Full Text Available Marine snow aggregates are believed to be the main vehicles for vertical material transport in the ocean. However, aggregates are also sites of elevated heterotrophic activity, which may rather cause enhanced retention of aggregated material in the upper ocean. Small-scale biological-physical interactions govern the formation and fate of marine snow. Aggregates may form by physical coagulation: fluid motion causes collisions between small primary particles (e.g. phytoplankton that may then stick together to form aggregates with enhanced sinking velocities. Bacteria may subsequently solubilise and remineralise aggregated particles. Because the solubilization rate exceeds the remineralization rate, organic solutes leak out of sinking aggregates. The leaking solutes spread by diffusion and advection and form a chemical trail in the wake of the sinking aggregate that may guide small zooplankters to the aggregate. Also, suspended bacteria may enjoy the elevated concentration of organic solutes in the plume. I explore these small-scale formation and degradation processes by means of models, experiments and field observations. The larger scale implications for the structure and functioning of pelagic food chains of export vs. retention of material will be discussed.

  18. The NC Power Supply Design of Large Current and Wide Frequency Pulse in SEAM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianping Zhou

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available There are a lot of ways to achieve large current pulse power supply, and the more common way is to adopt the inverter switching circuit to achieve pulse power supply. The core of the NC power supply design of large current and wide frequency pulse in SEAM is using two-stage modulation. Combined with inverter technology, DC chopper technology and NC technology, it not only can achieve the adjustability of the output pulse amplitude, but also can realize continuous adjustment of the output pulses and the duty cycle. The front stage of power supply uses DC/DC transformation circuit with the UC3879 integrated control chip as the core. With the microcontroller as the control core, the backward stage uses DC chopper circuit to achieve the NC power supply of multi-parameter adjustable output large current pulse.

  19. Current Status on Marine Products with Reversal Effect on Cancer Multidrug Resistance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huiqin Guo

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available The resistance of tumor cells to a broad range of anticancer agents continues to be a problem for the success of cancer chemotherapy. Multidrug resistance (MDR is due in part to three drug transporter proteins: ABCB1/P-glycoprotein (P-gp, ABCC1/multidrug resistance protein 1 (MRP1 and ABCG2/breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP. These transporters are part of the ATP-binding cassette (ABC superfamily, whose members function as ATP-dependent drug-efflux pumps. Their activity can be blocked by various drugs such as verapamil (calcium channel blocker and cyclosporin A (immunosuppressive agent, etc. These compounds are called MDR modulators or reversals. This review highlights several marine natural products with reversal effect on multidrug resistance in cancer, including agosterol A, ecteinascidin 743, sipholane triterpenoids, bryostatin 1, and welwitindolinones.

  20. Biology of the Marine Heterotrophic Dinoflagellate Oxyrrhis marina: Current Status and Future Directions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Zhiling; Zhang, Huan; Liu, Sheng; Lin, Senjie

    2013-10-21

    Heterotrophic dinoflagellates are prevalent protists in marine environments, which play an important role in the carbon cycling and energy flow in the marine planktonic community. Oxyrrhismarina (Dinophyceae), a widespread heterotrophic dinoflagellate, is a model species used for a broad range of ecological, biogeographic, and evolutionary studies. Despite the increasing research effort on this species, there lacks a synthesis of the existing data and a coherent picture of this organism. Here we reviewed the literature to provide an overview of what is known regarding the biology of O. marina, and identify areas where further studies are needed. As an early branch of the dinoflagellate lineage, O. marina shares similarity with typical dinoflagellates in permanent condensed chromosomes, less abundant nucleosome proteins compared to other eukaryotes, multiple gene copies, the occurrence of trans-splicing in nucleus-encoded mRNAs, highly fragmented mitochondrial genome, and disuse of ATG as a start codon for mitochondrial genes. On the other hand, O. marina also exhibits some distinct cytological features (e.g., different flagellar structure, absence of girdle and sulcus or pustules, use of intranuclear spindle in mitosis, presence of nuclear plaque, and absence of birefringent periodic banded chromosomal structure) and genetic features (e.g., a single histone-like DNA-associated protein, cob-cox3 gene fusion, 5' oligo-U cap in the mitochondrial transcripts of protein-coding genes, the absence of mRNA editing, the presence of stop codon in the fused cob-cox3 mRNA produced by post-transcriptional oligoadenylation, and vestigial plastid genes). The best-studied biology of this dinoflagellate is probably the prey and predators types, which include a wide range of organisms. On the other hand, the abundance of this species in the natural waters and its controlling factors, genome organization and gene expression regulation that underlie the unusual cytological and

  1. Lower Current Large Deviations for Zero-Range Processes on a Ring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chleboun, Paul; Grosskinsky, Stefan; Pizzoferrato, Andrea

    2017-04-01

    We study lower large deviations for the current of totally asymmetric zero-range processes on a ring with concave current-density relation. We use an approach by Jensen and Varadhan which has previously been applied to exclusion processes, to realize current fluctuations by travelling wave density profiles corresponding to non-entropic weak solutions of the hyperbolic scaling limit of the process. We further establish a dynamic transition, where large deviations of the current below a certain value are no longer typically attained by non-entropic weak solutions, but by condensed profiles, where a non-zero fraction of all the particles accumulates on a single fixed lattice site. This leads to a general characterization of the rate function, which is illustrated by providing detailed results for four generic examples of jump rates, including constant rates, decreasing rates, unbounded sublinear rates and asymptotically linear rates. Our results on the dynamic transition are supported by numerical simulations using a cloning algorithm.

  2. Non equilibrium steady states: fluctuations and large deviations of the density and of the current

    OpenAIRE

    Derrida, B.

    2007-01-01

    These lecture notes give a short review of methods such as the matrix ansatz, the additivity principle or the macroscopic fluctuation theory, developed recently in the theory of non-equilibrium phenomena. They show how these methods allow to calculate the fluctuations and large deviations of the density and of the current in non-equilibrium steady states of systems like exclusion processes. The properties of these fluctuations and large deviation functions in non-equilibrium steady states (fo...

  3. Quisqualate-activated single channel currents in neuromuscular preparations of small and large crayfish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finger, W; Martin, C; Pareto, A

    1988-06-01

    Single channel currents elicited by 1-5 mumol/l quisqualate in neuromuscular preparations in large (greater than 16 month old) and small (1-3 month old) crayfish were recorded by means of the patch-clamp technique. In preparations from large crayfish single channel currents of variable amplitude (-1 to -12 pA) were induced by quisqualate. The mean burst lengths of these currents were tau approximately equal to 1-2 ms. In the opener muscle of the first walking leg and the contractor epimeralis muscle of small crayfish the mean burst lengths of single channel currents evoked by quisqualate were prolonged by a factor of about 4 (tau approximately equal to 5 ms). Moreover, in the opener muscle of the first walking leg of small crayfish single channel currents of small amplitude (-0.5 to -2.5 pA) were preferentially evoked by quisqualate. By contrast, in the contractor epimeralis muscle of small crayfish mainly single channel currents of large amplitude (-10 to -12 pA) were elicited by quisqualate. The results suggest that at the stage of neuromuscular development characterizing the small crayfish, gating properties of excitatory postsynaptic channels are different from those in adult crayfish. Furthermore, the results obtained in the opener muscle of the first walking leg of small crayfish are consistent with those obtained previously by means of the noise analysis technique.

  4. Chemical Speciation of Sulfur in Marine Cloud Droplets and Particles: Analysis of Individual Particles from Marine Boundary Layer over the California Current

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    William R. Wiley Environmental Sciences Laboratory, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory; Gilles, Mary K; Hopkins, Rebecca J.; Desyaterik, Yury; Tivanski, Alexei V.; Zaveri, Rahul A.; Berkowitz, Carl M.; Tyliszczak, Tolek; Gilles, Mary K.; Laskin, Alexander

    2008-03-12

    Detailed chemical speciation of the dry residue particles from individual cloud droplets and interstitial aerosol collected during the Marine Stratus Experiment (MASE) was performed using a combination of complementary microanalysis techniques. Techniques include computer controlled scanning electron microscopy with energy dispersed analysis of X-rays (CCSEM/EDX), time-of-flight secondary ionization mass spectrometry (TOF-SIMS), and scanning transmission X-ray microscopy with near edge X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy (STXM/NEXAFS). Samples were collected at the ground site located in Point Reyes National Seashore, approximately 1 km from the coast. This manuscript focuses on the analysis of individual particles sampled from air masses that originated over the open ocean and then passed through the area of the California current located along the northern California coast. Based on composition, morphology, and chemical bonding information, two externally mixed, distinct classes of sulfur containing particles were identified: chemically modified (aged) sea salt particles and secondary formed sulfate particles. The results indicate substantial heterogeneous replacement of chloride by methanesulfonate (CH3SO3-) and non-sea salt sulfate (nss-SO42-) in sea-salt particles with characteristic ratios of nss-S/Na>0.10 and CH3SO3-/nss-SO42->0.6.

  5. Non-equilibrium steady states: fluctuations and large deviations of the density and of the current

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derrida, Bernard

    2007-07-01

    These lecture notes give a short review of methods such as the matrix ansatz, the additivity principle or the macroscopic fluctuation theory, developed recently in the theory of non-equilibrium phenomena. They show how these methods allow us to calculate the fluctuations and large deviations of the density and the current in non-equilibrium steady states of systems like exclusion processes. The properties of these fluctuations and large deviation functions in non-equilibrium steady states (for example, non-Gaussian fluctuations of density or non-convexity of the large deviation function which generalizes the notion of free energy) are compared with those of systems at equilibrium.

  6. Research on resistance characteristics of YBCO tape under short-time DC large current impact

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhifeng; Yang, Jiabin; Qiu, Qingquan; Zhang, Guomin; Lin, Liangzhen

    2017-06-01

    Research of the resistance characteristics of YBCO tape under short-time DC large current impact is the foundation of the developing DC superconducting fault current limiter (SFCL) for voltage source converter-based high voltage direct current system (VSC-HVDC), which is one of the valid approaches to solve the problems of renewable energy integration. SFCL can limit DC short-circuit and enhance the interrupting capabilities of DC circuit breakers. In this paper, under short-time DC large current impacts, the resistance features of naked tape of YBCO tape are studied to find the resistance - temperature change rule and the maximum impact current. The influence of insulation for the resistance - temperature characteristics of YBCO tape is studied by comparison tests with naked tape and insulating tape in 77 K. The influence of operating temperature on the tape is also studied under subcooled liquid nitrogen condition. For the current impact security of YBCO tape, the critical current degradation and top temperature are analyzed and worked as judgment standards. The testing results is helpful for in developing SFCL in VSC-HVDC.

  7. Compensation methods applied in current control schemes for large AC drive systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rus, D. C.; Preda, N. S.; Teodorescu, Remus;

    2012-01-01

    The paper deals with modified PI current control structures for large AC drive systems which use surface mounted permanent magnet synchronous machines or squirrel-cage induction motors supplied with voltage source inverters. In order to reduce the power losses caused by high frequency switching...

  8. Current fluctuations and statistics during a large deviation event in an exactly solvable transport model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurtado, Pablo I.; Garrido, Pedro L.

    2009-02-01

    We study the distribution of the time-integrated current in an exactly solvable toy model of heat conduction, both analytically and numerically. The simplicity of the model allows us to derive the full current large deviation function and the system statistics during a large deviation event. In this way we unveil a relation between system statistics at the end of a large deviation event and for intermediate times. The mid-time statistics is independent of the sign of the current, a reflection of the time-reversal symmetry of microscopic dynamics, while the end-time statistics does depend on the current sign, and also on its microscopic definition. We compare our exact results with simulations based on the direct evaluation of large deviation functions, analyzing the finite-size corrections of this simulation method and deriving detailed bounds for its applicability. We also show how the Gallavotti-Cohen fluctuation theorem can be used to determine the range of validity of simulation results.

  9. Backwash process of marine macroplastics from a beach by nearshore currents around a submerged breakwater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kataoka, Tomoya; Hinata, Hirofumi; Kato, Shigeru

    2015-12-30

    A key factor for determining the residence time of macroplastics on a beach is the process by which the plastics are backwashed offshore (backwash process). Here, we deduced the backwash process of plastic fishing floats on Wadahama Beach based on the analysis of two-year mark-recapture experiments as well as nearshore current structures revealed by sequential images taken by za webcam installed at the edge of a cliff behind the beach. The analysis results revealed the occurrence of a combination of offshore currents and convergence of alongshore currents in the surf zone in storm events around a submerged breakwater off the northern part of the beach, where 48% of the backwashed floats were last found. We conclude that the majority of the floats on the beach were transported alongshore and tended to concentrate in the convergence zone, from where they were backwashed offshore by the nearshore currents generated in the events.

  10. Effect of bidirectional internal flow on fluid–structure interaction dynamics of conveying marine riser model subject to shear current

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zheng-Shou Chen

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available This article presents a numerical investigation concerning the effect of two kinds of axially progressing internal flows (namely, upward and downward on fluid–structure interaction (FSI dynamics about a marine riser model which is subject to external shear current. The CAE technology behind the current research is a proposed FSI solution, which combines structural analysis software with CFD technology together. Efficiency validation for the CFD software was carried out first. It has been proved that the result from numerical simulations agrees well with the observation from relating model test cases in which the fluidity of internal flow is ignorable. After verifying the numerical code accuracy, simulations are conducted to study the vibration response that attributes to the internal progressive flow. It is found that the existence of internal flow does play an important role in determining the vibration mode (/dominant frequency and the magnitude of instantaneous vibration amplitude. Since asymmetric curvature along the riser span emerges in the case of external shear current, the centrifugal and Coriolis accelerations owing to up- and downward internal progressive flows play different roles in determining the fluid–structure interaction response. The discrepancy between them becomes distinct, when the velocity ratio of internal flow against external shear current is relatively high.

  11. Advancing marine hydrokinetic turbine arrays towards large-scale deployments in sandy rivers: a laboratory study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musa, Mirko; Hill, Craig; Guala, Michele

    2016-11-01

    A staggered array of twelve axial-flow marine hydrokinetic (MHK) turbine models was investigated at the St. Anthony Falls Laboratory under live-bed sediment transport conditions. In particular, the interaction between the MHK power plant and the complex migrating bedforms was monitored using a state-of-the-art high-resolution submersible laser scanning device able to provide spatio(x,y)-temporally(t) resolved channel bathymetry z(x,y,t). Results revealed both a local signature of each individual turbine and a cumulative array effect that extends farther from the site. Single turbine localized scour results from the blockage effect of the operating rotor and the consequent flow acceleration between the lower rotor tip and the erodible bed. The resultant shear stress enhancement around the device protects the turbine during extreme sediment transport conditions, ultimately preventing the blades from impacting the incoming bedforms. A turbine failure case was simulated to illustrate the consequence of such event, which can irreversibly bury and damage the turbine. Additionally, velocity and turbine performance estimates provided a preliminary description of the power plant energy output, revealing similar features already observed in experimental wind farm models. NSF Career Grant - Geophysical Flow Control, Dr. Michele Guala.

  12. Marine ice regulates the future stability of a large Antarctic ice shelf

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulessa, Bernd; Jansen, Daniela; Luckman, Adrian J.; King, Edward C.; Sammonds, Peter R.

    2014-01-01

    The collapses of the Larsen A and B ice shelves on the Antarctic Peninsula in 1995 and 2002 confirm the impact of southward-propagating climate warming in this region. Recent mass and dynamic changes of Larsen B’s southern neighbour Larsen C, the fourth largest ice shelf in Antarctica, may herald a similar instability. Here, using a validated ice-shelf model run in diagnostic mode, constrained by satellite and in situ geophysical data, we identify the nature of this potential instability. We demonstrate that the present-day spatial distribution and orientation of the principal stresses within Larsen C ice shelf are akin to those within pre-collapse Larsen B. When Larsen B’s stabilizing frontal portion was lost in 1995, the unstable remaining shelf accelerated, crumbled and ultimately collapsed. We hypothesize that Larsen C ice shelf may suffer a similar fate if it were not stabilized by warm and mechanically soft marine ice, entrained within narrow suture zones. PMID:24751641

  13. Large-scale tests for vortex shedding effects on marine risers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hartnup, G.C.; Lyons, G.J.; Patel, M.H.; Sarohia, S.

    1983-05-01

    The interest increasingly being shown in floating production systems has drawn renewed attention to the problems of riser design. The production riser is clearly a crucial item which requires a design procedure in which a high degree of confidence can be placed. In this respect the requirements of a production riser are more exacting than those of the drilling risers used in the exploratory phase. A reliable prediction of service stress history is essential to the prediction of fatigue life. This is usually obtained from one or more of the computer simulation packages available for riser simulation. Any computer simulation is only as accurate as the mathematical modelling it contains, and in writing such a program assumptions are made as to which effects are significant enough to include, the manner in which to simulate them, and in the choice of various empirical constants involved. Many riser simulations are purely two-dimensional but experimental data, such as that presented here, shows that a uni-directional wave input does not result in a uni-directional response. Vortex shedding effects are a significant result of wave loading on a marine riser.

  14. The tropical marine boundary layer under a deep convection system: a large-eddy simulation study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D A Randall

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available The tropical marine PBL under the influence of a deep convection system is investigated using a largedomain LES that resolves a wide range of scales, from mesoscale cloud clusters down to energy-containing turbulence. The simulated PBL is dominated by both turbulence and cloud-induced cold-pools. The variance of vertical velocity in the PBL resides mostly in the turbulence scales while that of water vapor mixing ratio resides mostly at the cold-pool scales; however, both turbulence and cold-pool scales contribute about equally to their covariance. The broad scale range of the LES flow field is decomposed into the filtered (i.e., cloud system and the subfilter (i.e., small convection and turbulence components using a Gaussian filter with various filter widths. Such decomposed flow fields are used to retrieve information of spatial distribution of the subfilter-scale fluxes and their relationship to the filtered field. This information is then used to evaluate the performance of an eddy-viscosity model commonly used in cloud-resolving models. The subfilter-scale fluxes computed from the eddy-viscosity model correlate reasonably with those retrieved from the LES in the lower cloud layer but not in the PBL; the correlation coefficients between the modeled and the retrieved fluxes are about 0.5 in the lower cloud layer but smaller than 0.2 in the PBL.

  15. Development of an Online Climate and Fisheries Data Dashboard for Stakeholders in the Northeast Shelf Large Marine Ecosystem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young Morse, R.

    2016-12-01

    Fisheries managers make decisions that shape the future of ecosystems and the communities that depend on them. These decisions are often made without reference to environmental conditions, or are made assuming that past conditions (physical conditions, productivity, and species distributions) will persist. The rapid changes experienced in the Northeast Shelf Large Marine Ecosystem (NES LME), as well as the high degree of natural variability in this system, are prompting new discussions about how to incorporate environmental information into fisheries policy and management and into the industry. Through this project, we are facilitating access to fisheries and climate data for fisheries stakeholders in the Northeast through the creation of an online dynamic data dashboard. The primary goal is to make complex climate-relevant data accessible and easy to understand. Information on past, present, and future environmental conditions in the NES LME are presented in the context of fisheries dependent data. Working with marine fisheries stakeholders, including fisheries management council members, industry leaders and non-profits, we have developed a suite of open source processes and tools to acquire and subset climate relevant data from a variety of sources (satellites, sensors, models), develop long range climatologies, and display through dynamically updated interactive data visualizations. The resulting dashboard allows users to quickly assess conditions in the ocean and evaluate them in the context of past and projected change.

  16. Drag reduction through wave-current interactions with a marine hydrofoil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tully, Susan; Viola, Ignazio Maria; Ingram, David

    2015-11-01

    A hydrofoil exposed to oscillating flow experiences a reduction in drag due to the Knoller-Betz effect. This is experimentally identifiable by an increasingly inverted von Kármán wake and a corresponding thrust force on the foil. The rate of drag reduction, dependent on plunge amplitude and frequency, reduces with unsteady flow phenomena at higher reduced frequencies. For experimental ease, investigations of this effect have relied on actively plunging/pitching a foil within a steady current. However, one potential application is to drag reduction in high-speed ships adopting submerged foils. In this case the foil is travelling through wave-current induced oscillatory flow, resulting in an additional dynamic variation of hydrostatic pressure across the chord; a phenomena not fully addressed in previous experiments. Here we investigate the effects of this pressure gradient on drag reduction for a stationary foil in combined waves and current, through a combination of force measurements and particle image velocimetry.

  17. Extensive closed cell marine stratocumulus downwind of Europe—A large aerosol cloud mediated radiative effect or forcing?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goren, Tom; Rosenfeld, Daniel

    2015-06-01

    Marine stratocumulus clouds (MSC) cover large areas over the oceans and possess super sensitivity of their cloud radiative effect to changes in aerosol concentrations. Aerosols can cause transitions between regimes of fully cloudy closed cells and open cells. The possible role of aerosols in cloud cover has a big impact on the amount of reflected solar radiation from the clouds, thus potentially constitutes very large aerosol indirect radiative effect, which can exceed 100 Wm-2. It is hypothesized that continentally polluted clouds remain in closed cells regime for longer time from leaving continent and hence for longer distance away from land, thus occupying larger ocean areas with full cloud cover. Attributing this to anthropogenic aerosols would imply a very large negative radiative forcing with a significant climate impact. This possibility is confirmed by analyzing a detailed case study based on geostationary and polar-orbiting satellite observations of the microphysical and dynamical evolution of MSC. We show that large area of closed cells was formed over the northeast Atlantic Ocean downwind of Europe in a continentally polluted air mass. The closed cells undergo cleansing process that was tracked for 3.5 days that resulted with a rapid transition from closed to open cells once the clouds started drizzling heavily. The mechanism leading to the eventual breakup of the clouds due to both meteorological and aerosol considerations is elucidated. We termed this cleansing and cloud breakup process maritimization. Further study is needed to assess the climatological significance of such situations.

  18. Using environmental DNA to census marine fishes in a large mesocosm.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryan P Kelly

    Full Text Available The ocean is a soup of its resident species' genetic material, cast off in the forms of metabolic waste, shed skin cells, or damaged tissue. Sampling this environmental DNA (eDNA is a potentially powerful means of assessing whole biological communities, a significant advance over the manual methods of environmental sampling that have historically dominated marine ecology and related fields. Here, we estimate the vertebrate fauna in a 4.5-million-liter mesocosm aquarium tank at the Monterey Bay Aquarium of known species composition by sequencing the eDNA from its constituent seawater. We find that it is generally possible to detect mitochondrial DNA of bony fishes sufficient to identify organisms to taxonomic family- or genus-level using a 106 bp fragment of the 12S ribosomal gene. Within bony fishes, we observe a low false-negative detection rate, although we did not detect the cartilaginous fishes or sea turtles present with this fragment. We find that the rank abundance of recovered eDNA sequences correlates with the abundance of corresponding species' biomass in the mesocosm, but the data in hand do not allow us to develop a quantitative relationship between biomass and eDNA abundance. Finally, we find a low false-positive rate for detection of exogenous eDNA, and we were able to diagnose non-native species' tissue in the food used to maintain the mesocosm, underscoring the sensitivity of eDNA as a technique for community-level ecological surveys. We conclude that eDNA has substantial potential to become a core tool for environmental monitoring, but that a variety of challenges remain before reliable quantitative assessments of ecological communities in the field become possible.

  19. Large-scale assessment of Mediterranean marine protected areas effects on fish assemblages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guidetti, Paolo; Baiata, Pasquale; Ballesteros, Enric; Di Franco, Antonio; Hereu, Bernat; Macpherson, Enrique; Micheli, Fiorenza; Pais, Antonio; Panzalis, Pieraugusto; Rosenberg, Andrew A; Zabala, Mikel; Sala, Enric

    2014-01-01

    Marine protected areas (MPAs) were acknowledged globally as effective tools to mitigate the threats to oceans caused by fishing. Several studies assessed the effectiveness of individual MPAs in protecting fish assemblages, but regional assessments of multiple MPAs are scarce. Moreover, empirical evidence on the role of MPAs in contrasting the propagation of non-indigenous-species (NIS) and thermophilic species (ThS) is missing. We simultaneously investigated here the role of MPAs in reversing the effects of overfishing and in limiting the spread of NIS and ThS. The Mediterranean Sea was selected as study area as it is a region where 1) MPAs are numerous, 2) fishing has affected species and ecosystems, and 3) the arrival of NIS and the northward expansion of ThS took place. Fish surveys were done in well-enforced no-take MPAs (HP), partially-protected MPAs (IP) and fished areas (F) at 30 locations across the Mediterranean. Significantly higher fish biomass was found in HP compared to IP MPAs and F. Along a recovery trajectory from F to HP MPAs, IP were similar to F, showing that just well enforced MPAs triggers an effective recovery. Within HP MPAs, trophic structure of fish assemblages resembled a top-heavy biomass pyramid. Although the functional structure of fish assemblages was consistent among HP MPAs, species driving the recovery in HP MPAs differed among locations: this suggests that the recovery trajectories in HP MPAs are likely to be functionally similar (i.e., represented by predictable changes in trophic groups, especially fish predators), but the specific composition of the resulting assemblages may depend on local conditions. Our study did not show any effect of MPAs on NIS and ThS. These results may help provide more robust expectations, at proper regional scale, about the effects of new MPAs that may be established in the Mediterranean Sea and other ecoregions worldwide.

  20. Large-scale assessment of Mediterranean marine protected areas effects on fish assemblages.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paolo Guidetti

    Full Text Available Marine protected areas (MPAs were acknowledged globally as effective tools to mitigate the threats to oceans caused by fishing. Several studies assessed the effectiveness of individual MPAs in protecting fish assemblages, but regional assessments of multiple MPAs are scarce. Moreover, empirical evidence on the role of MPAs in contrasting the propagation of non-indigenous-species (NIS and thermophilic species (ThS is missing. We simultaneously investigated here the role of MPAs in reversing the effects of overfishing and in limiting the spread of NIS and ThS. The Mediterranean Sea was selected as study area as it is a region where 1 MPAs are numerous, 2 fishing has affected species and ecosystems, and 3 the arrival of NIS and the northward expansion of ThS took place. Fish surveys were done in well-enforced no-take MPAs (HP, partially-protected MPAs (IP and fished areas (F at 30 locations across the Mediterranean. Significantly higher fish biomass was found in HP compared to IP MPAs and F. Along a recovery trajectory from F to HP MPAs, IP were similar to F, showing that just well enforced MPAs triggers an effective recovery. Within HP MPAs, trophic structure of fish assemblages resembled a top-heavy biomass pyramid. Although the functional structure of fish assemblages was consistent among HP MPAs, species driving the recovery in HP MPAs differed among locations: this suggests that the recovery trajectories in HP MPAs are likely to be functionally similar (i.e., represented by predictable changes in trophic groups, especially fish predators, but the specific composition of the resulting assemblages may depend on local conditions. Our study did not show any effect of MPAs on NIS and ThS. These results may help provide more robust expectations, at proper regional scale, about the effects of new MPAs that may be established in the Mediterranean Sea and other ecoregions worldwide.

  1. Diffuser Design For Marine Outfalls in Areas With Strong Currents, High Waves and Sediment Transport

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Torben

    1995-01-01

    of this uncompromising accept of environmental demands. Two examples of unconventional design are given in the paper. Both cases involved risk of blockage of the diffuser section because of wave and current induced sediment transport. The paper also discusses how acceptable far field dilution conditions can be achieved...

  2. The current situation of inorganic elements in marine turtles: A general review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cortés-Gómez, Adriana A; Romero, Diego; Girondot, Marc

    2017-10-01

    Inorganic elements (Pb, Cd, Hg, Al, As, Cr, Cu, Fe, Mn, Ni, Se and Zn) are present globally in aquatic systems and their potential transfer to marine turtles can be a serious threat to their health status. The environmental fate of these contaminants may be traced by the analysis of turtle tissues. Loggerhead turtles (Caretta caretta) are the most frequently investigated of all the sea turtle species with regards to inorganic elements, followed by Green turtles (Chelonia mydas); all the other species have considerably fewer studies. Literature shows that blood, liver, kidney and muscle are the tissues most frequently used for the quantification of inorganic elements, with Pb, Cd, Cu and Zn being the most studied elements. Chelonia mydas showed the highest concentrations of Cr in muscle (4.8 ± 0.12), Cu in liver (37 ± 7) and Mg in kidney (17 μg g(-1) ww), Cr and Cu from the Gulf of Mexico and Mg from Japanese coasts; Lepidochelys olivacea presented the highest concentrations of Pb in blood (4.46 5) and Cd in kidney (150 ± 110 μg g(-1) ww), both from the Mexican Pacific; Caretta caretta from the Mediterranean Egyptian coast had the highest report of Hg in blood (0.66 ± 0.13 μg g(-1) ww); and Eretmochelys imbricata from Japan had the highest concentration of As in muscle (30 ± 13 13 μg g(-1) ww). The meta-analysis allows us to examine some features that were not visible when data was analyzed alone. For instance, Leatherbacks show a unique pattern of concentration compared to other species. Additionally, contamination of different tissues shows some tendencies independent of the species with liver and kidney on one side and bone on the other being different from other tissues. This review provides a general perspective on the accumulation and distribution of these inorganic elements alongside existing information for the 7 sea turtle species. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Survival and progression rates of large European silver eel Anguilla anguilla in late freshwater and early marine phases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aarestrup, Kim; Thorstad, Eva B.; Koed, Anders;

    2010-01-01

    The population of European silver eel Anguilla anguilla has declined tremendously in the last decades. The cause of this decline is unknown, and it is necessary to investigate the migratory behaviour and survival rates of silver eels during the reproductive migration in order to understand...... was high in fresh water. However, 60% of eels were lost in the inner and outer fjord, supporting the hypothesis that mortality is large in the early phase of the marine migration and that fishing may be a major cause of mortality of silver eels. There was no indication that the slowest......-migrating individuals were more prone to fishing mortality than the faster-migrating individuals. Progression rate increased as the eels proceeded downriver and out of the fjord. The migration was predominantly nocturnal, both in the river and fjord. Based on the available evidence, a considerable increase in eel...

  4. Marine Habitat Mapping for the Norwegian Sea

    OpenAIRE

    Noji, Thomas; Thorsnes, Terje; Fosså, Jan Helge

    2000-01-01

    An initiative is currently being taken by several Norwegian organizations to obtain funds to intensify ongoing investigations on marine sea-floor mapping off Norway. Led by the Geological Survey of Norway and Institute of Marine Research, planning during the last two years has led to the inception of a large-scale mapping project entitled “MAREANO - Marine Areal Database for the Norwegian Sea”. The investigation area covers 270 000 km2 of the shelf and deep sea off the central ...

  5. Renormalization of the baryon axial vector current in large-N{sub c}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hernandez-Ruiz, Maria de los Angeles [University Aut. de San Luis Potosi, Av. V. Carranza 2405, 78216, San Luis Potosi (Mexico)

    2010-07-01

    The baryon axial vector current is computed at one-loop order in heavy baryon chiral perturbation theory in the large-N{sub c} limit, where N{sub c} is the number of colors. Loop graphs with octet and decuplet intermediate states cancel to various orders in N{sub c} as a consequence of the large-N{sub c} spin-flavor symmetry of QCD baryons. We present a preliminary study of the convergence of the chiral expansion with 1/N{sub c} corrections in the case of g{sub A} = N{sub c} = 3. (author)

  6. Investigations on the performances of the electrical generator of a rim-driven marine current turbine”

    OpenAIRE

    2008-01-01

    In this paper, the electrical generator of a rim-driven horizontal-axis current turbine is modeled in detail. Its main characteristics and performances are evaluated (efficiency, mass, cost, etc). This generator is of permanent magnet direct-driven synchronous type and is connected to a variable speed power electronics drive. It is then compared to a more traditional technology (a pod generator) in terms of mass and cost for a common set of specification. In addition, due to the specific geom...

  7. Fully reversible current driven by a dual marine photosynthetic microbial community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darus, Libertus; Lu, Yang; Ledezma, Pablo; Keller, Jürg; Freguia, Stefano

    2015-11-01

    The electrochemical activity of two seawater microbial consortia were investigated in three-electrode bioelectrochemical cells. Two seawater inocula - from the Sunshine Coast (SC) and Gold Coast (GC) shores of Australia - were enriched at +0.6 V vs. SHE using 12/12 h day/night cycles. After re-inoculation, the SC consortium developed a fully-reversible cathodic/anodic current, with a max. of -62 mA m(-2) during the day and +110 mA m(-2) at night, while the GC exhibited negligible daytime output but +98 mA m(-2) at night. Community analysis revealed that both enrichments were dominated by cyanobacteria, indicating their potential as biocatalysts for indirect light conversion to electricity. Moreover, the presence of γ-proteobacterium Congregibacter in SC biofilm was likely related to the cathodic reductive current, indicating its effectiveness at catalysing cathodic oxygen reduction at a surprisingly high potential. For the first time a correlation between a dual microbial community and fully reversible current is reported.

  8. Small-scale open ocean currents have large effects on wind wave heights

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ardhuin, Fabrice; Gille, Sarah T.; Menemenlis, Dimitris; Rocha, Cesar B.; Rascle, Nicolas; Chapron, Bertrand; Gula, Jonathan; Molemaker, Jeroen

    2017-06-01

    Tidal currents and large-scale oceanic currents are known to modify ocean wave properties, causing extreme sea states that are a hazard to navigation. Recent advances in the understanding and modeling capability of open ocean currents have revealed the ubiquitous presence of eddies, fronts, and filaments at scales 10-100 km. Based on realistic numerical models, we show that these structures can be the main source of variability in significant wave heights at scales less than 200 km, including important variations down to 10 km. Model results are consistent with wave height variations along satellite altimeter tracks, resolved at scales larger than 50 km. The spectrum of significant wave heights is found to be of the order of 70>>2/>(g2>>2>) times the current spectrum, where >> is the spatially averaged significant wave height, >> is the energy-averaged period, and g is the gravity acceleration. This variability induced by currents has been largely overlooked in spite of its relevance for extreme wave heights and remote sensing.Plain Language SummaryWe show that the variations in currents at scales 10 to 100 km are the main source of variations in wave heights at the same scales. Our work uses a combination of realistic numerical models for currents and waves and data from the Jason-3 and SARAL/AltiKa satellites. This finding will be of interest for the investigation of extreme wave heights, remote sensing, and air-sea interactions. As an immediate application, the present results will help constrain the error budget of the up-coming satellite missions, in particular the Surface Water and Ocean Topography (SWOT) mission, and decide how the data will have to be processed to arrive at accurate sea level and wave measurements. It will also help in the analysis of wave measurements by the CFOSAT satellite.

  9. Energy Resolution of Large Area Current-mode Si-PIN Detector

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SU; Dan; ZHANG; Guo-guang; WANG; Guo-bao

    2013-01-01

    Large area current-mode Si-PIN detector is fabricated by adopting planar technology.Diameter are ?20 mm,?50 mm,?60 mm,and thickness is 300μm.Energy resolution and peak position of 226Ra-αparticles are measured in the vacuum chamber.The peak energy of the 226Ra-αparticle is 4 784.4,5 304.5,

  10. Update on marine omega-3 fatty acids: management of dyslipidemia and current omega-3 treatment options.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weintraub, Howard

    2013-10-01

    Low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) is currently the primary target in the management of dyslipidemia, and statins are first-line pharmacologic interventions. Adjunct therapy such as niacins, fibrates, bile acid sequestrants, or cholesterol absorption inhibitors may be considered to help reduce cardiovascular risk. This review discusses the need for alternative adjunct treatment options and the potential place for omega-3 fatty acids as such. The cardiovascular benefits of fish consumption are attributed to the omega-3 fatty acids eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), and a variety of omega-3 fatty acid products are available with varied amounts of EPA and DHA. The product types include prescription drugs, food supplements, and medical foods sourced from fish, krill, algal and plant oils or purified from these oils. Two prescription omega-3 fatty acids are currently available, omega-3 fatty acid ethyl esters (contains both EPA and DHA ethyl esters), and icosapent ethyl (IPE; contains high-purity EPA ethyl ester). A pharmaceutical containing free fatty acid forms of omega-3 is currently in development. Omega-3 fatty acid formulations containing EPA and DHA have been shown to increase LDL-C levels while IPE has been shown to lower triglyceride levels without raising LDL-C levels, alone or in combination with statin therapy. In addition, recent studies have not been able to demonstrate reduced cardiovascular risk following treatment with fibrates, niacins, cholesterol absorption inhibitors, or omega-3 fatty acid formulations containing both EPA and DHA in statin-treated patients; thus, there remains a need for further cardiovascular outcomes studies for adjunct therapy.

  11. Large-Scale Biotechnological Production of the Antileukemic Marine Natural Product Sorbicillactone A

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johannes F. Imhoff

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available In the search for novel bioactive compounds from sponge-derived microorganisms, we have recently identified two structurally and biosynthetically unprecedented fungal metabolites, the novel-type alkaloids sorbicillactone A and sorbicillactone B. Sorbicillactone A is active against leukemia cells without showing notable cytotoxicity. Therefore, we have developed an efficient process for its biotechnological production and isolation on a large scale supplying sufficient material for the ongoing preclinical investigations and structure-activity relationship (SAR studies.

  12. Turbulent Flow and Large Surface Wave Events in the Marine Boundary Layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-30

    Belcher, S. E., A. A. L. M. Grant, K. E. Hanley, B. Fox- Kemper , L. Van Roekel, P. P. Sullivan, W. G. Large, A. Brown, A. Hines, D. Calvert, A...Meteorological Society, [in press]. Van Roekel, L. P., B. Fox- Kemper , P. P. Sullivan, P. E. Hamlington, & S. R. Haney, 2012: The form and orientation of...Fox- Kemper , B., P. E. Hamlington, L. Van Roekel & P.P. Sullivan, 2012: Parameterization of submesoscale and Langmuir-scale processes and

  13. Large naturally-produced electric currents and voltage traverse damaged mammalian spinal cord

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Borgens Richard B

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Immediately after damage to the nervous system, a cascade of physical, physiological, and anatomical events lead to the collapse of neuronal function and often death. This progression of injury processes is called "secondary injury." In the spinal cord and brain, this loss in function and anatomy is largely irreversible, except at the earliest stages. We investigated the most ignored and earliest component of secondary injury. Large bioelectric currents immediately enter damaged cells and tissues of guinea pig spinal cords. The driving force behind these currents is the potential difference of adjacent intact cell membranes. For perhaps days, it is the biophysical events caused by trauma that predominate in the early biology of neurotrauma. Results An enormous (≤ mA/cm2 bioelectric current transverses the site of injury to the mammalian spinal cord. This endogenous current declines with time and with distance from the local site of injury but eventually maintains a much lower but stable value (2. The calcium component of this net current, about 2.0 pmoles/cm2/sec entering the site of damage for a minimum of an hour, is significant. Curiously, injury currents entering the ventral portion of the spinal cord may be as high as 10 fold greater than those entering the dorsal surface, and there is little difference in the magnitude of currents associated with crush injuries compared to cord transection. Physiological measurements were performed with non-invasive sensors: one and two-dimensional extracellular vibrating electrodes in real time. The calcium measurement was performed with a self-referencing calcium selective electrode. Conclusion The enormous bioelectric current, carried in part by free calcium, is the major initiator of secondary injury processes and causes significant damage after breach of the membranes of vulnerable cells adjacent to the injury site. The large intra-cellular voltages, polarized along the length of

  14. Marine Benthic Habitats and Seabed Suitability Mapping for Potential Ocean Current Energy Siting Offshore Southeast Florida

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amanda Mulcan

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available This study examines the legal framework for ocean current energy policy and regulation to develop a metric for assessing the biological and geological characteristics of a seabed area with respect to the siting of OCE devices, a framework of criteria by which to assess seabed suitability (seabed suitability framework that can facilitate the siting, and implementation of ocean current energy (OCE projects. Seafloor geology and benthic biological data were analyzed in conjunction with seafloor core sample geostatistical interpolation to locate suitable substrates for OCE anchoring. Existing submarine cable pathways were considered to determine pathways for power transmission cables that circumvent biologically sensitive areas. Suitability analysis indicates that areas east of the Miami Terrace and north of recently identified deep-sea coral mounds are the most appropriate for OCE siting due to abundance of sand/sediment substrate, existing underwater cable route access, and minimal biological presence (i.e., little to no benthic communities. Further reconnaissance requires higher resolution maps of geological substrate and benthic community locations to identify specific OCE development locations, classify benthic conditions, and minimize potentially negative OCE environmental impacts.

  15. Marine oil degrading bacteria related to oil inputs and surface currents in the western Caribbean Sea

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lizarraga-Partida, M.L.; Vicuna, F.B.I.; Chang, I.W. (Centro de Investigacion Cientifica y de Educacion Superior de Ensenada (CICESE), Ensenada (Mexico))

    1990-01-01

    The distribution of oil degrading bacteria (ODB) and its ratios to viable heterotrophic bacteria (CFU) and direct counts (AODC) were examined in relation to the surface currents of the western Caribbean Sea. High ODB/CFU and ODB/AODC ratios were found, suggesting that chronic sources of hydrocarbons in the region may have a larger impact than those in the southern Gulf of Mexico, where previous studies have been performed. It was concluded that, in western Caribbean waters, the distribution of oil degrading bacteria, or its ratios to CFU or AODC, could be useful indicators of chronic oil inputs originating at the east of the Caribbean Sea, as well as their motions afterwards. (author).

  16. Ten years of marine current measurements in Espartel Sill, Strait of Gibraltar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sammartino, S.; García Lafuente, J.; Naranjo, C.; Sánchez Garrido, J. C.; Sánchez Leal, R.; Sánchez Román, A.

    2015-09-01

    More than 10 year of Acoustic Doppler Current Profiler observations collected at the westernmost sill (Espartel sill) of the Strait of Gibraltar by a monitoring station have been carefully processed to provide the most updated estimation of the Mediterranean outflow. A comprehensive quality control of the factors affecting the uncertainty of the measurements has been carried out and great care has been paid to infer the current at the bottom layer, where direct observations are lacking. The mean outflow in the southern channel of the sill section has been estimated as -0.82 Sv (1 Sv = 1 × 106 m3 s-1), with an average contribution of the eddy fluxes of -0.04 Sv. This figure is an overestimation, as the mooring measurements, assumed valid for the whole section, ignore the lateral friction. On the other hand, it only gives the flow through the southern channel and disregards the fraction flowing through shallower northern part. Both drawbacks have been addressed by investigating the cross-strait structure of the outflow from hindcasts produced by the MITgcm numerical model, run in a high-resolution domain covering the Gulf of Cádiz and Alboran Sea basins. An overall rectifying factor of 1.039 was found satisfactory to correct the first estimate, so that the final mean outflow computed from this data set is -0.85 Sv, complemented with an uncertainty of ±0.03 Sv based on the interannual variability of the series. The temporal analysis of the series shows an outflow seasonality of around the 8% of the mean value, with maximum outflow in early spring.

  17. Experimental Results of a DC Bus Voltage Level Control for a Load-Controlled Marine Current Energy Converter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johan Forslund

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper investigates three load control methods for a  marine current energy converter using a vertical axis current  turbine (VACT mounted on a permanent magnet synchronous generator  (PMSG. The three cases are; a fixed AC load, a fixed pulse width  modulated (PWM DC load and DC bus voltage control of a DC  load. Experimental results show that the DC bus voltage control  reduces the variations of rotational speed by a factor of 3.5 at the cost  of slightly increased losses in the generator and transmission lines.  For all three cases, the tip speed ratio \\(\\lambda\\ can be kept close to  the expected \\(\\lambda_{opt}\\. The power coefficient is estimated to be  0.36 at \\(\\lambda_{opt}\\; however, for all three cases, the average  extracted power was about \\(\\sim 19\\\\%. A maximum power point  tracking (MPPT system, with or without water velocity measurement,  could increase the average extracted power.

  18. Marine genomics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Oliveira Ribeiro, Ângela Maria; Foote, Andrew D.; Kupczok, Anne

    2017-01-01

    Marine ecosystems occupy 71% of the surface of our planet, yet we know little about their diversity. Although the inventory of species is continually increasing, as registered by the Census of Marine Life program, only about 10% of the estimated two million marine species are known. This lag......-throughput sequencing approaches have been helping to improve our knowledge of marine biodiversity, from the rich microbial biota that forms the base of the tree of life to a wealth of plant and animal species. In this review, we present an overview of the applications of genomics to the study of marine life, from...... evolutionary biology of non-model organisms to species of commercial relevance for fishing, aquaculture and biomedicine. Instead of providing an exhaustive list of available genomic data, we rather set to present contextualized examples that best represent the current status of the field of marine genomics....

  19. Environmental assessment of a large industrial marine complex based on a community of benthic filter-feeders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carballo, José Luis; Naranjo, Santiago

    2002-07-01

    Biological quality in a bay affected by man's activities was evaluated by means of the composition of assemblages of sponges and ascidians. Our results showed that the structure of these two groups of filter-feeders aided in discriminating between undisturbed and disturbed areas, establishing different "environmental health categories" from moderately to strongly disturbed areas, and in ascertaining the extension of the area of each "health category". We were able to divide the bay into four zones based on type of disturbance or anthropogenic source: (1) stations free of any source of disturbance, (2) stations under moderate disturbance, located close to industrial ports, millworks, etc., (3) stations that are under the direct influence of industrial wastes such as a power station and oil refinery, and (4) stations near strongly disturbed areas, influenced directly by harmful steelworks activities. We differentiated clearly between four large species assemblages, and related the composition of these assemblages to different kinds of disturbances. Thus, these species could be used to manage the marine environment in this bay by comparing the observed fauna, with expected fauna in an unstressed site. Moreover, the joint presence of the sponge Cliona vastifica and tunicate Policitor adriaticum seems always to indicate a more or less pristine environmental situation, functioning as bioindicators of normal conditions. We think that the use of specific bioindicators for monitoring disturbance is a valid tool to establish baselines to predict impacts associated with industrial development in many marine ecosystems. The advantages to monitoring communities on hard rocks versus sandy or muddy bottoms are also commented upon.

  20. Inductive current startup in large tokamaks with expanding minor radius and rf assist

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borowski, S.K.

    1984-02-01

    Auxiliary rf heating of electrons before and during the current-rise phase of a large tokamak, such as the Fusion Engineering Device (R = 4.8 m, a = 1.3 m, sigma = 1.6, B/sub T/ = 3.62 T), is examined as a means of reducing both the initiation loop voltage and resistive flux expenditure during startup. Prior to current initiation, 1 to 2 MW of electron cyclotron resonance heating power at approx. 90 GHz is used to create a small volume of high conductivity plasma (T/sub e/ approx. = 100 eV, n/sub e/ approx. = 10/sup 19/ m/sup -3/) near the upper hybrid resonance (UHR) region. This plasma conditioning permits a small radius (a/sub 0/ approx. = 0.2 to 0.4 m) current channel to be established with a relatively low initial loop voltage (less than or equal to 25 V as opposed to approx. 100 V without rf assist). During the subsequent plasma expansion and current ramp phase, a combination of rf heating (up to 5 MW) and current profile control leads to a substantial savings in volt-seconds by: (1) minimizing the resistive flux consumption; and (2) maintaining the internal flux at or near the flat profile limit.

  1. Estuarine refugia and fish responses to a large anoxic, hydrogen sulphide, “black tide” event in the adjacent marine environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamberth, S. J.; Branch, G. M.; Clark, B. M.

    2010-01-01

    The fish fauna of the Berg River Estuary was sampled from the mouth to 40 km upstream using a small-meshed seine-net before (summer 1993), during (summer 1994) and after (summer 1996) a low-oxygen, hydrogen sulphide "black tide" event that caused a mass mortality of fish in St Helena Bay. These data were compared to determine how the species composition, abundance and distribution of the fish fauna of the Berg River Estuary differed before, during and after the event as well as to ascertain which species, if any, found refuge in the estuary. The overall catch-per-unit-effort of 1637 fish.haul -1 during the event was almost double the 932 fish.haul -1 and 643 fish.haul -1 in the years before and after respectively. All the fish recorded alive in the estuary during the event were species known to have some degree of estuarine association. No representatives of the purely marine species found dead on the adjacent shoreline were recorded live in the estuary during the event. Of the 10 estuarine-associated species sampled, 5 extended their range and/or modal peaks of abundance further upstream during the event. One species, Liza richardsonii, was abundant enough to examine its size distribution in different breaches of the estuary. Large/adult fish were concentrated further upstream than small/juvenile fish, which appeared to be unable to escape tidal currents and were concentrated at the edge of the low-oxygen front. Collectively this circumstantial evidence indicates that (1) fish used the Berg Estuary as a refuge from low-oxygen conditions in the marine environment during the "black tide" event, and (2) the ability to secure refuge in the estuary was restricted to species described as "estuarine-associated" or "estuarine-dependent".

  2. Comparative analysis of European wide marine ecosystem shifts: a large-scale approach for developing the basis for ecosystem-based management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Möllmann, Christian; Conversi, Alessandra; Edwards, Martin

    2011-08-23

    Abrupt and rapid ecosystem shifts (where major reorganizations of food-web and community structures occur), commonly termed regime shifts, are changes between contrasting and persisting states of ecosystem structure and function. These shifts have been increasingly reported for exploited marine ecosystems around the world from the North Pacific to the North Atlantic. Understanding the drivers and mechanisms leading to marine ecosystem shifts is crucial in developing adaptive management strategies to achieve sustainable exploitation of marine ecosystems. An international workshop on a comparative approach to analysing these marine ecosystem shifts was held at Hamburg University, Institute for Hydrobiology and Fisheries Science, Germany on 1-3 November 2010. Twenty-seven scientists from 14 countries attended the meeting, representing specialists from seven marine regions, including the Baltic Sea, the North Sea, the Barents Sea, the Black Sea, the Mediterranean Sea, the Bay of Biscay and the Scotian Shelf off the Canadian East coast. The goal of the workshop was to conduct the first large-scale comparison of marine ecosystem regime shifts across multiple regional areas, in order to support the development of ecosystem-based management strategies. This journal is © 2011 The Royal Society

  3. Drug discovery from marine microbes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerwick, William H; Fenner, Amanda M

    2013-05-01

    The marine environment has been a source of more than 20,000 inspirational natural products discovered over the past 50 years. From these efforts, 9 approved drugs and 12 current clinical trial agents have been discovered, either as natural products or as molecules inspired from the natural product structure. To a significant degree, these have come from collections of marine invertebrates largely obtained from shallow-water tropical ecosystems. However, there is a growing recognition that marine invertebrates are oftentimes populated with enormous quantities of "associated" or symbiotic microorganisms and that microorganisms are the true metabolic sources of these most valuable of marine natural products. Also, because of the inherently multidisciplinary nature of this field, a high degree of innovation is characteristic of marine natural product drug discovery efforts.

  4. Experimental study on the effects of surface gravity waves of different wavelengths on the phase averaged performance characteristics of marine current turbine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luznik, L.; Lust, E.; Flack, K. A.

    2014-12-01

    There are few studies describing the interaction between marine current turbines and an overlying surface gravity wave field. In this work we present an experimental study on the effects of surface gravity waves of different wavelengths on the wave phase averaged performance characteristics of a marine current turbine model. Measurements are performed with a 1/25 scale (diameter D=0.8m) two bladed horizontal axis turbine towed in the large (116m long) towing tank at the U.S. Naval Academy equipped with a dual-flap, servo-controlled wave maker. Three regular waves with wavelengths of 15.8, 8.8 and 3.9m with wave heights adjusted such that all waveforms have the same energy input per unit width are produced by the wave maker and model turbine is towed into the waves at constant carriage speed of 1.68 m/s. This representing the case of waves travelling in the same direction as the mean current. Thrust and torque developed by the model turbine are measured using a dynamometer mounted in line with the turbine shaft. Shaft rotation speed and blade position are measured using in in-house designed shaft position indexing system. The tip speed ratio (TSR) is adjusted using a hysteresis brake which is attached to the output shaft. Free surface elevation and wave parameters are measured with two optical wave height sensors, one located in the turbine rotor plane and other one diameter upstream of the rotor. All instruments are synchronized in time and data is sampled at a rate of 700 Hz. All measured quantities are conditionally sampled as a function of the measured surface elevation and transformed to wave phase space using the Hilbert Transform. Phenomena observed in earlier experiments with the same turbine such as phase lag in the torque signal and an increase in thrust due to Stokes drift are examined and presented with the present data as well as spectral analysis of the torque and thrust data.

  5. Climate change and marine life

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Richardson, Anthony J.; Brown, Christopher J.; Brander, Keith

    2012-01-01

    A Marine Climate Impacts Workshop was held from 29 April to 3 May 2012 at the US National Center of Ecological Analysis and Synthesis in Santa Barbara. This workshop was the culmination of a series of six meetings over the past three years, which had brought together 25 experts in climate change...... ecology, analysis of large datasets, palaeontology, marine ecology and physical oceanography. Aims of these workshops were to produce a global synthesis of climate impacts on marine biota, to identify sensitive habitats and taxa, to inform the current Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC......) process, and to strengthen research into ecological impacts of climate change...

  6. Large-Eddy Simulation: Current Capabilities, Recommended Practices, and Future Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Georgiadis, Nicholas J.; Rizzetta, Donald P.; Fureby, Christer

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents the results of an activity by the Large Eddy Simulation (LES) Working Group of the AIAA Fluid Dynamics Technical Committee to (1) address the current capabilities of LES, (2) outline recommended practices and key considerations for using LES, and (3) identify future research needs to advance the capabilities and reliability of LES for analysis of turbulent flows. To address the current capabilities and future needs, a survey comprised of eleven questions was posed to LES Working Group members to assemble a broad range of perspectives on important topics related to LES. The responses to these survey questions are summarized with the intent not to be a comprehensive dictate on LES, but rather the perspective of one group on some important issues. A list of recommended practices is also provided, which does not treat all aspects of a LES, but provides guidance on some of the key areas that should be considered.

  7. Solar cell evaluation using electron beam induced current with the large chamber scanning electron microscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wink, Tara; Kintzel, Edward; Marienhoff, Peter; Klein, Martin

    2012-02-01

    An initial study using electron beam induced current (EBIC) to evaluate solar cells has been carried out with the large chamber scanning electron microscope (LC-SEM) at the Western Kentucky University Nondestructive Analysis Center. EBIC is a scanning electron microscope technique used for the characterization of semiconductors. To facilitate our studies, we developed a Solar Amplification System (SASY) for analyzing current distribution and defects within a solar cell module. Preliminary qualitative results will be shown for a solar cell module that demonstrates the viability of the technique using the LC-SEM. Quantitative EBIC experiments will be carried out to analyze defects and minority carrier properties. Additionally, a well-focused spot of light from an LED mounted at the side of the SEM column will scan the same area of the solar cell using the LC-SEM positioning system. SASY will then output the solar efficiency to be compared with the minority carrier properties found using EBIC.

  8. Heating of the solar middle chromosphere by large-scale electric currents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodman, M. L.

    1995-01-01

    A global resistive, two-dimensional, time-dependent magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) model is used to introduce and support the hypothesis that the quiet solar middle chromosphere is heated by resistive dissipation of large-scale electric currents which fill most of its volume. The scale height and maximum magnitude of the current density are 400 km and 31.3 m/sq m, respectively. The associated magnetic field is almost horizontal, has the same scale height as the current density, and has a maximum magnitude of 153 G. The current is carried by electrons flowing across magnetic field lines at 1 m/s. The resistivity is the electron contribution to the Pedersen resitivity for a weakly ionized, strongly magnetized, hydrogen gas. The model does not include a driving mechanism. Most of the physical quantities in the model decrease exponentially with time on a resistive timescale of 41.3 minutes. However, the initial values and spatial; dependence of these quantities are expected to be essentially the same as they would be if the correct driving mechanism were included in a more general model. The heating rate per unit mass is found to be 4.5 x 10(exp 9) ergs/g/s, independent of height and latitude. The electron density scale height is found to be 800 km. The model predicts that 90% of the thermal energy required to heat the middle chromosphere is deposited in the height range 300-760 km above the temperature minimum. It is shown to be consistent to assume that the radiation rate per unit volume is proportional to the magnetic energy density, and then it follows that the heating rate per unit volume is also proportional to the energy from the photosphere into the overlying chromosphere are briefly discussed as possible driving mechanisms for establishing and maintaining the current system. The case in which part of or all of the current is carried by protons and metal ions, and the contribution of electron-proton scattering to the current are also considered, with the conclusion

  9. Large Eddy Simulations of Compositional Density Currents Flowing Over a Mobile Bed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kyrousi, Foteini; Zordan, Jessica; Leonardi, Alessandro; Juez, Carmelo; Zanello, Francesca; Armenio, Vincenzo; Franca, Mário J.

    2017-04-01

    Density currents are a ubiquitous phenomenon caused by natural events or anthropogenic activities, and play an important role in the global sediment cycle; they are agents of long distance sediment transport in lakes, seas and oceans. Density gradients induced by salinity, temperature differences, or by the presence of suspended material are all possible triggers of a current. Such flows can travel long distances while eroding or depositing bed materials. This can provoke rapid topological changes, which makes the estimation of their transport capacity of prime interest for environmental engineering. Despite their relevance, field data regarding their dynamics is limited due to density currents scattered and unpredictable occurrence in nature. For this reason, laboratory experiments and numerical simulations have been a preferred way to investigate sediment transport processes associated to density currents. The study of entrainment and deposition processes requires detailed data of velocities spatial and temporal distributions in the boundary layer and bed shear stress, which are troublesome to obtain in laboratory. Motivated by this, we present 3D wall-resolved Large Eddy Simulations (LES) of density currents generated by lock-exchange. The currents travel over a smooth flat bed, which includes a section composed by erodible fine sediment susceptible of eroding. Several sediment sizes and initial density gradients are considered. The grid is set to resolve the velocity field within the boundary layer of the current (a tiny fraction of the total height), which in turn allows to obtain predictions of the bed shear stress. The numerical outcomes are compared with experimental data obtained with an analogous laboratory setting. In laboratory experiments salinity was chosen for generating the initial density gradient in order to facilitate the identification of entrained particles, since salt does not hinder the possibility to track suspended particles. Under these

  10. Heating of the solar middle chromosphere by large-scale electric currents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodman, M. L.

    1995-01-01

    A global resistive, two-dimensional, time-dependent magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) model is used to introduce and support the hypothesis that the quiet solar middle chromosphere is heated by resistive dissipation of large-scale electric currents which fill most of its volume. The scale height and maximum magnitude of the current density are 400 km and 31.3 m/sq m, respectively. The associated magnetic field is almost horizontal, has the same scale height as the current density, and has a maximum magnitude of 153 G. The current is carried by electrons flowing across magnetic field lines at 1 m/s. The resistivity is the electron contribution to the Pedersen resitivity for a weakly ionized, strongly magnetized, hydrogen gas. The model does not include a driving mechanism. Most of the physical quantities in the model decrease exponentially with time on a resistive timescale of 41.3 minutes. However, the initial values and spatial; dependence of these quantities are expected to be essentially the same as they would be if the correct driving mechanism were included in a more general model. The heating rate per unit mass is found to be 4.5 x 10(exp 9) ergs/g/s, independent of height and latitude. The electron density scale height is found to be 800 km. The model predicts that 90% of the thermal energy required to heat the middle chromosphere is deposited in the height range 300-760 km above the temperature minimum. It is shown to be consistent to assume that the radiation rate per unit volume is proportional to the magnetic energy density, and then it follows that the heating rate per unit volume is also proportional to the energy from the photosphere into the overlying chromosphere are briefly discussed as possible driving mechanisms for establishing and maintaining the current system. The case in which part of or all of the current is carried by protons and metal ions, and the contribution of electron-proton scattering to the current are also considered, with the conclusion

  11. Global, Energy-Dependent Ring Current Response During Two Large Storms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldstein, J.; Angelopoulos, V.; Burch, J. L.; De Pascuale, S.; Fuselier, S. A.; Genestreti, K. J.; Kurth, W. S.; LLera, K.; McComas, D. J.; Reeves, G. D.; Spence, H. E.; Valek, P. W.

    2015-12-01

    Two recent large (~200 nT) geomagnetic storms occurred during 17--18 March 2015 and 22--23 June 2015. The global, energy-dependent ring current response to these two extreme events is investigated using both global imaging and multi-point in situ observations. Energetic neutral atom (ENA) imaging by the Two Wide-angle Imaging Neutral-atom Spectrometers (TWINS) mission provides a global view of ring current ions. Local measurements are provided by two multi-spacecraft missions. The two Van Allen Probes measure in situ plasma (including ion composition) and fields at ring current and plasmaspheric L values. The recently launched Magnetospheric Multiscale (MMS) comprises four spacecraft that have just begun to measure particles (including ion composition) and fields at outer magnetospheric L-values. We analyze the timing and energetics of the stormtime evolution of ring current ions, both trapped and precipitating, using TWINS ENA images and in situ data by the Van Allen Probes and MMS.

  12. Investigation of Characteristics of Large dB/dt for Geomagnetically Induced Currents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munoz, D.; Ngwira, C.; Damas, M. C.

    2016-12-01

    When geomagnetically induced currents (GICs) flow through electrical networks, they become a potential threat for electrical power systems. Changes in the geomagnetic field (dB/dt) during severe geomagnetic disturbances are the main sources of GICs. These dB/dt phenomena were studied by selecting 24 strong geomagnetic storms with Dst ≤ - 150 nT. ACE spacecraft solar wind data: flow speed, proton density, By and Bz IMF components of the solar wind were correlated with measurements of the magnetic field detected on ground stations at different latitudes. This article reports characteristics of the solar wind during time intervals of large changes in the horizontal geomagnetic field with a threshold of dB/dt ≥ ± 20 nT/min for the 24 geomagnetic storms. The results of this investigation can help scientists to understand the mechanisms responsible for causing large magnetic field variations in order to predict and mitigate possible large events in the future, which is critical for our society that relies constantly on electricity for livelihood and security. In addition, this ongoing project will continue to investigate electron flux response before, during, and after large changes in geomagnetic field.

  13. Projecting changes in the distribution and productivity of living marine resources: A critical review of the suite of modelling approaches used in the large European project VECTORS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Peck, Myron A.; Arvanitidis, Christos; Butenschön, Momme; Canu, Donata Melaku; Chatzinikolaou, Eva; Cucco, Andrea; Domenici, Paolo; Fernandes, Jose A.; Gasche, Loic; Huebert, Klaus B.; Hufnagl, Marc; Jones, Miranda C.; Kempf, Alexander; Keyl, Friedemann; Maar, Marie; Mahévas, Stéphanie; Marchal, Paul; Nicolas, Delphine; Pinnegar, John K.; Rivot, Etienne; Rochette, Sébastien; Sell, Anne F.; Sinerchia, Matteo; Solidoro, Cosimo; Somerfield, Paul J.; Teal, Lorna R.; Travers-trolet, Morgan; De Wolfshaar, Van Karen E.

    2016-01-01

    We review and compare four broad categories of spatially-explicit modelling approaches currently used to understand and project changes in the distribution and productivity of living marine resources including: 1) statistical species distribution models, 2) physiology-based, biophysical models of si

  14. Projecting changes in the distribution and productivity of living marine resources: A critical review of the suite of modelling approaches used in the large European project VECTORS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Peck, Myron A.; Arvanitidis, Christos; Butenschön, Momme; Canu, Donata Melaku; Chatzinikolaou, Eva; Cucco, Andrea; Domenici, Paolo; Fernandes, Jose A.; Gasche, Loic; Huebert, Klaus B.; Hufnagl, Marc; Jones, Miranda C.; Kempf, Alexander; Keyl, Friedemann; Maar, Marie; Mahévas, Stéphanie; Marchal, Paul; Nicolas, Delphine; Pinnegar, John K.; Rivot, Etienne; Rochette, Sébastien; Sell, Anne F.; Sinerchia, Matteo; Solidoro, Cosimo; Somerfield, Paul J.; Teal, Lorna R.; Travers-trolet, Morgan; De Wolfshaar, Van Karen E.

    2016-01-01

    We review and compare four broad categories of spatially-explicit modelling approaches currently used to understand and project changes in the distribution and productivity of living marine resources including: 1) statistical species distribution models, 2) physiology-based, biophysical models of

  15. PIV study of the effect of piston position on the in-cylinder swirling flow during the scavenging process in large two-stroke marine diesel engines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haider, Sajjad; Schnipper, Teis; Obeidat, Anas

    2013-01-01

    A simplified model of a low speed large twostroke marine diesel engine cylinder is developed. The effect of piston position on the in-cylinder swirling flow during the scavenging process is studied using the stereoscopic particle image velocimetry technique. The measurements are conducted...

  16. Image subsampling and point scoring approaches for large-scale marine benthic monitoring programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perkins, Nicholas R.; Foster, Scott D.; Hill, Nicole A.; Barrett, Neville S.

    2016-07-01

    Benthic imagery is an effective tool for quantitative description of ecologically and economically important benthic habitats and biota. The recent development of autonomous underwater vehicles (AUVs) allows surveying of spatial scales that were previously unfeasible. However, an AUV collects a large number of images, the scoring of which is time and labour intensive. There is a need to optimise the way that subsamples of imagery are chosen and scored to gain meaningful inferences for ecological monitoring studies. We examine the trade-off between the number of images selected within transects and the number of random points scored within images on the percent cover of target biota, the typical output of such monitoring programs. We also investigate the efficacy of various image selection approaches, such as systematic or random, on the bias and precision of cover estimates. We use simulated biotas that have varying size, abundance and distributional patterns. We find that a relatively small sampling effort is required to minimise bias. An increased precision for groups that are likely to be the focus of monitoring programs is best gained through increasing the number of images sampled rather than the number of points scored within images. For rare species, sampling using point count approaches is unlikely to provide sufficient precision, and alternative sampling approaches may need to be employed. The approach by which images are selected (simple random sampling, regularly spaced etc.) had no discernible effect on mean and variance estimates, regardless of the distributional pattern of biota. Field validation of our findings is provided through Monte Carlo resampling analysis of a previously scored benthic survey from temperate waters. We show that point count sampling approaches are capable of providing relatively precise cover estimates for candidate groups that are not overly rare. The amount of sampling required, in terms of both the number of images and

  17. Development of a towing tank PIV system and a wake survey of a marine current turbine under steady conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lust, Ethan; Luznik, Luksa; Flack, Karen

    2015-11-01

    A submersible particle image velocimetry (PIV) system was designed and built at the U.S. Naval Academy. The system was used to study the wake of a scale-independent horizontal axis marine current turbine. The turbine is a 1/25th scale model of the U.S. National Renewable Energy Laboratory's Reference Model 1 (RM1) tidal turbine. It is a two-bladed turbine measuring 0.8 m in diameter and featuring a NACA 63-618 airfoil cross-section. The wake survey was conducted over an area extending 0.25D forward of the turbine tip path to 2.0D aft to a depth of 1.0D beneath the turbine output shaft in the streamwise plane. Each field of view was approximately 30 cm by 30 cm, and each overlapped the adjacent fields of view by 5 cm. The entire flow field was then reconstructed by registering the resultant vector fields together into a single field of investigation. Results include the field of investigation from a representative case, for the mean velocity field averaged over approximately 1,000 realizations, and turbulent statistics including turbulence intensities, Reynolds shear stresses, and turbulent kinetic energy. This research was funded by the Office of Naval Research.

  18. The colonial ascidian Didemnum sp. A: current distribution, basic biology and potential threat to marine communities of the northeast and west coasts of North America

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bullard, S.G.; Lambert, G.; Carman, M.R.; Byrnes, J.; Whitlatch, R.B.; Ruiz, G.; Miller, R.J.; Harris, L.; Valentine, P.C.; Collie, J.S.; Pederson, J.; McNaught, D.C.; Cohen, A.N.; Asch, R.G.; Dijkstra, J.; Heinonen, K.

    2007-01-01

    Didemnum sp. A is a colonial ascidian with rapidly expanding populations on the east and west coasts of North America. The origin of Didemum sp. A is unknown. Populations were first observed on the northeast coast of the U.S. in the late 1980s and on the west coast during the 1990s. It is currently undergoing a massive population explosion and is now a dominant member of many subtidal communities on both coasts. To determine Didemnum sp. A's current distribution, we conducted surveys from Maine to Virginia on the east coast and from British Columbia to southern California on the west coast of the U.S. between 1998 and 2005. In nearshore locations Didemnum sp. A currently ranges from Eastport, Maine to Shinnecock Bay, New York on the east coast. On the west coast it has been recorded from Humboldt Bay to Port San Luis in California, several sites in Puget Sound, Washington, including a heavily fouled mussel culture facility, and several sites in southwestern British Columbia on and adjacent to oyster and mussel farms. The species also occurs at deeper subtidal sites (up to 81 m) off New England, including Georges, Stellwagen and Tillies Banks. On Georges Bank numerous sites within a 230 km2 area are 50–90% covered by Didemnum sp. A; large colonies cement the pebble gravel into nearly solid mats that may smother infaunal organisms. These observations suggest that Didemnum sp. A has the potential to alter marine communities and affect economically important activities such as fishing and aquaculture.

  19. Marine biology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thurman, H.V.; Webber, H.H.

    1984-01-01

    This book discusses both taxonomic and ecological topics on marine biology. Full coverage of marine organisms of all five kingdoms is provided, along with interesting and thorough discussion of all major marine habitats. Organization into six major parts allows flexibility. It also provides insight into important topics such as disposal of nuclear waste at sea, the idea that life began on the ocean floor, and how whales, krill, and people interact. A full-color photo chapter reviews questions, and exercises. The contents are: an overview marine biology: fundamental concepts/investigating life in the ocean; the physical ocean, the ocean floor, the nature of water, the nature and motion of ocean water; general ecology, conditions for life in the sea, biological productivity and energy transfer; marine organisms; monera, protista, mycota and metaphyta; the smaller marine animals, the large animals marine habitats, the intertidal zone/benthos of the continental shelf, the photic zone, the deep ocean, the ocean under stress, marine pollution, appendix a: the metric system and conversion factors/ appendix b: prefixes and suffixes/ appendix c: taxonomic classification of common marine organisms, and glossary, and index.

  20. Influence of near-shore marine structures in a beach nourishment project on tidal currents in Haitan Bay, facing the Taiwan Strait

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    顾杰; 马悦; 王彬谕; Jueyi SUI; 匡翠萍; 刘建辉; 雷刚

    2016-01-01

    The Longfengtou Beach in the Haitan Bay, located in Fujian Province of China and facing the Haitan Strait, has been suffering severe erosion due to the construction of seawalls. A simple beach nourishment project implemented has not achieved the anticipated beach restoration. Thus a practical solution has to rely on a combination with near-shore marine structures. In this study, a 2-D calibrated flow model is set up to investigate the effects of three different layouts of near-shore marine structures on the tidal current. It is shown that the breakwaters situated in both the north and south ends play a vital part in the protection against erosion. The offshore breakwaters can serve as a barrier to obstruct the current circulation then reduce the current velocity. The groyne linking the Guimo islet and the coast significantly reduces the south-to-north water exchange through the channel and redirects the current direction nearly perpendicular to the north breakwater, which cuts off the longshore transport that may have a negative influence on the beach, especially, the northern part. It is also noted that the monsoon at the site with different directions increases the current velocity. In general, proper layouts of marine structures can reduce the current velocity thus lead to less intense sand transport near the beach.

  1. Current helicity pattern of large-scale magnetic field on the photosphere

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    Following Pevtsov and Latushko, we study the current helicity pattern of the large-scale magnetic field on the photosphere. We use the same technique as theirs to derive the vector magnetic field (Br,Bθ,Bφ) from full-disk longitudinal magnetograms based on the assumption that large-scale magnetic fields evolve rather slowly and the variations of the longitudinal magnetic fields within certain time duration are caused by the changing position angles only. Different from their study, we have calculated the current helicity maps directly from the derived vector magnetograms, rather than from obtaining the latitudinal variation of hc by ignoring the role of Bθ component and averaging Br and Bφ over all solar longitudes. This approach significantly strengthens the evidence of the hemispheric rule presented in the reconstructed vector magnetic field. Our study shows that the established hemispheric sign rule, that is, positive helicity sign in the southern hemisphere and negative helicity sign in the northern hemisphere, is applicable everywhere in the global magnetic field, namely, also evident in weak fields outside active regions, and that the obtained sign pattern is independent of the longitudinal magnetograms and the parameters that we have used.

  2. Influence of outlet geometry on the swirling flow in a simplfied model of a large two-stroke marine diesel engine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haider, Sajjad; Schnipper, Teis; Meyer, Knud Erik

    We present Stereoscopic particle image velocimetry measurements of the effect of a dummy-valve on the in-cylinder swirling flow in a simplified scale model of a large two-stroke marine diesel engine cylinder using air at room temperature and pressure as the working fluid and Reynolds number 19500...... dummy-valve at the cylinder outlet, the magnitude of reverse flow at the inlet increases, the strong swirl is diminished and the axial jet disappears. We compare these findings with previous measurements in vortex chambers and discuss the relevance of these results with respect to development of marine...

  3. Numerical Simulation of Condensation of Sulfuric Acid and Water in a Large Two-stroke Marine Diesel Engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walther, J. H.; Karvounis, N.; Pang, K. M.

    2016-11-01

    We present results from computational fluid dynamics simulations of the condensation of sulfuric acid (H2SO 4) and water (H2 O) in a large two-stroke marine diesel engine. The model uses a reduced n-heptane skeletal chemical mechanism coupled with a sulfur subset to simulate the combustion process and the formation of SOx and H2SO 4 . Condensation is modeled using a fluid film model coupled with the Eulerian in-cylinder gas phase. The fluid film condensation model is validated against both experimental and numerical results. The engine simulations reveal that the fluid film has a significant effect on the sulfuric acid gas phase. A linear correlation is found between the fuel sulfur content and the sulfuric acid condensation rate. The initial in-cylinder water content is found not to affect the sulfuric acid condensation but it has a high impact on water condensation. The scavenging pressure level shows an inverse correlation between pressure and condensation rate due to change in the flame propagation speed. Finally, increasing the cylinder liner temperature significantly decreases water condensation but has a negligible influence on the condensation of sulfuric acid.

  4. Development and sea trials of a subsea holographic camera for large volume in-situ recording of marine organisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, John; Alexander, Stephen J.; Craig, Gary; Hendry, David C.; Hobson, Peter R.; Lampitt, R. S.; Marteau, J.-M.; Nareid, Helge; Nebrensky, J. J.; Player, Michael A.; Saw, Kevin; Tipping, Keith

    2002-06-01

    We describe the development, construction and sea testing of An underwater holographic camera (HoloCam) for in situ recording of marine organisms and particles in large volumes of sea water. HoloCam comprises a laser, power supply, holographic recording optics, and plate holders, a water- tight housing and a support frame. Added to this are control electronics such that the entire camera is remotely operable and controllable from ship or dock-side. Uniquely the camera can simultaneously record both in-line and off-axis holograms using a pulsed frequency double Nd:YAG laser. In- line holography is capable of producing images of organisms with a resolution of better than 10 micrometers . Off-axis holograms of aquatic systems of up to 50,000 cm3 volume, have been recorded. Following initial laboratory testing, the holo-camera was evaluated in an observation tank and ultimately was tested in Loch Etive, Scotland. In-line and off-axis holograms were recorded to a depth of 100 m. We will present result on the ste dives and evaluation of the camera performance.

  5. Investigating marine stratocumulus with a fully coupled cloud-aerosol scheme in a WRF/Chem Large Eddy Simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazil, J.; Wang, H.; Feingold, G.

    2009-12-01

    Drizzle in stratocumulus clouds is triggered by low concentrations of cloud condensation nuclei (CCN), and concurrently acts as a sink of CCN. The progression of this cloud-aerosol feedback may result in a transition in marine boundary layer dynamics and cloud structure; Closed cell circulation, characterized by a solid stratocumulus layer, may transition into an open cellular mode featuring low cloud fraction. Aerosol sources may balance the loss of CCN from drizzle, and delay or prevent the emergence of open cell circulation. Such sources include particle emissions from the sea surface, entrainment of aerosol from the free troposphere into the cloud deck, advection from land sources, and aerosol nucleation. In order to investigate the role of aerosol sources and processes in the transition between these two states, we have coupled in detail aerosol processes, cloud microphysics, and gas and aqueous chemistry in the WRF/Chem model. We operate WRF/Chem in Large Eddy Simulation mode. Aerosol nucleation is described with a sulfuric acid/water scheme based on laboratory measurements of the nucleation process. Here we present first results on the role of aerosol nucleation for cloud properties and drizzle formation in pristine conditions of the South-East Pacific region, and in polluted conditions.

  6. Analysis of a novel autonomous marine hybrid power generation/energy storage system with a high-voltage direct current link

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, L.; Lee, D. J.; Lee, W. J.

    2008-01-01

    This paper presents both time-domain and frequency-domain simulated results of a novel marine hybrid renewable-energy power generation/energy storage system (PG/ESS) feeding isolated loads through an high-voltage direct current (HVDC) link. The studied marine PG subsystems comprise both offshore......) absorbing a part of generated energy from WTGs and WETGs to generate available hydrogen for fuel cells (FCs) are also included in the PG subsystems. The ES subsystems consist of a flywheel energy storage system(FESS) and a compressed air energy storage (CAES) system to balance the required energy...... in the hybrid PG/ESS. It can be concluded from the simulation results that the proposed hybrid marine PG/ESS feeding isolated loads can stably operate to achieve system power-frequency balance condition....

  7. Large-sized cylinder of Bi-2223/Ni meshes composite bulk for current lead

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sakamoto, M. [Department of Electrical Engineering, Kogakuin University, 2665-1, Nakano, Hachioji, Tokyo 192-0015 (Japan); Yoshizawa, S. [Department of Environmental Systems, Meisei University, 2-1-1, Hodokubo, Hino, Tokyo 191-8506 (Japan)]. E-mail: yoshizaw@es.meisei-u.ac.jp; Hishinuma, Y. [Fusion Engineering Research Center, National Institute for Fusion Science, 322-6, Oroshi, Toki, Gifu 509-5202 (Japan); Nishimura, A. [Fusion Engineering Research Center, National Institute for Fusion Science, 322-6, Oroshi, Toki, Gifu 509-5202 (Japan); Yamazaki, S. [Department of Electrical Engineering, Kogakuin University, 2665-1, Nakano, Hachioji, Tokyo 192-0015 (Japan); Kojima, S. [Department of Electrical Engineering, Kogakuin University, 2665-1, Nakano, Hachioji, Tokyo 192-0015 (Japan)

    2006-10-01

    In order to improve the critical current density (J {sub c}) and mechanical property of Bi-2223 sintered bulk, Ni wire meshes were added in the bulk. For fabricating large-sized cylindrical Bi-2223/Ni meshes composite, composing meshes are easy to produce compared with adding a lot of wires. The mesh concentration was 18 x 18 meshes/cm{sup 2} using Ni wires of 0.25 mm in diameter. The Ni meshes were plated with Ag by 0.03 mm in thickness. We prepared the cylindrical sintered bulk for a current lead, 32 mm in outer diameter, 2 mm in thickness and 110 mm in length using a cold isostatic pressing (CIP) method. The samples were sintered at 845 deg. C for 50 h. After treatment again with CIP as an intermediate pressing, the samples were re-sintered. Small species were cut from the cylinder for measurement of critical current density (J {sub c}) at 77 K under self-field. There existed higher J {sub c} portions and low J {sub c} portions in the composite cylinder. Scanning electron microscope (SEM) observation showed that highly c-axis oriented and densely structured Bi-2223 plate-like grains could be formed around the interfacial region between the superconducting oxide and the Ag-plated Ni wires. There observed structural dislocation, which lead to low J {sub c} portions in the cylinder.

  8. The Index to Marine and Lacustrine Geological Samples: Improving Sample Accessibility and Enabling Current and Future Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, C.

    2011-12-01

    The Index to Marine and Lacustrine Geological Samples is a community designed and maintained resource enabling researchers to locate and request sea floor and lakebed geologic samples archived by partner institutions. Conceived in the dawn of the digital age by representatives from U.S. academic and government marine core repositories and the NOAA National Geophysical Data Center (NGDC) at a 1977 meeting convened by the National Science Foundation (NSF), the Index is based on core concepts of community oversight, common vocabularies, consistent metadata and a shared interface. Form and content of underlying vocabularies and metadata continue to evolve according to the needs of the community, as do supporting technologies and access methodologies. The Curators Consortium, now international in scope, meets at partner institutions biennially to share ideas and discuss best practices. NGDC serves the group by providing database access and maintenance, a list server, digitizing support and long-term archival of sample metadata, data and imagery. Over three decades, participating curators have performed the herculean task of creating and contributing metadata for over 195,000 sea floor and lakebed cores, grabs, and dredges archived in their collections. Some partners use the Index for primary web access to their collections while others use it to increase exposure of more in-depth institutional systems. The Index is currently a geospatially-enabled relational database, publicly accessible via Web Feature and Web Map Services, and text- and ArcGIS map-based web interfaces. To provide as much knowledge as possible about each sample, the Index includes curatorial contact information and links to related data, information and images; 1) at participating institutions, 2) in the NGDC archive, and 3) at sites such as the Rolling Deck to Repository (R2R) and the System for Earth Sample Registration (SESAR). Over 34,000 International GeoSample Numbers (IGSNs) linking to SESAR are

  9. Role of lung surfactant in respiratory disease: current knowledge in large animal medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christmann, U; Buechner-Maxwell, V A; Witonsky, S G; Hite, R D

    2009-01-01

    Lung surfactant is produced by type II alveolar cells as a mixture of phospholipids, surfactant proteins, and neutral lipids. Surfactant lowers alveolar surface tension and is crucial for the prevention of alveolar collapse. In addition, surfactant contributes to smaller airway patency and improves mucociliary clearance. Surfactant-specific proteins are part of the innate immune defense mechanisms of the lung. Lung surfactant alterations have been described in a number of respiratory diseases. Surfactant deficiency (quantitative deficit of surfactant) in premature animals causes neonatal respiratory distress syndrome. Surfactant dysfunction (qualitative changes in surfactant) has been implicated in the pathophysiology of acute respiratory distress syndrome and asthma. Analysis of surfactant from amniotic fluid allows assessment of fetal lung maturity (FLM) in the human fetus and exogenous surfactant replacement therapy is part of the standard care in premature human infants. In contrast to human medicine, use and success of FLM testing or surfactant replacement therapy remain limited in veterinary medicine. Lung surfactant has been studied in large animal models of human disease. However, only a few reports exist on lung surfactant alterations in naturally occurring respiratory disease in large animals. This article gives a general review on the role of lung surfactant in respiratory disease followed by an overview of our current knowledge on surfactant in large animal veterinary medicine.

  10. Bioprospecting marine plankton.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abida, Heni; Ruchaud, Sandrine; Rios, Laurent; Humeau, Anne; Probert, Ian; De Vargas, Colomban; Bach, Stéphane; Bowler, Chris

    2013-11-14

    The ocean dominates the surface of our planet and plays a major role in regulating the biosphere. For example, the microscopic photosynthetic organisms living within provide 50% of the oxygen we breathe, and much of our food and mineral resources are extracted from the ocean. In a time of ecological crisis and major changes in our society, it is essential to turn our attention towards the sea to find additional solutions for a sustainable future. Remarkably, while we are overexploiting many marine resources, particularly the fisheries, the planktonic compartment composed of zooplankton, phytoplankton, bacteria and viruses, represents 95% of marine biomass and yet the extent of its diversity remains largely unknown and underexploited. Consequently, the potential of plankton as a bioresource for humanity is largely untapped. Due to their diverse evolutionary backgrounds, planktonic organisms offer immense opportunities: new resources for medicine, cosmetics and food, renewable energy, and long-term solutions to mitigate climate change. Research programs aiming to exploit culture collections of marine micro-organisms as well as to prospect the huge resources of marine planktonic biodiversity in the oceans are now underway, and several bioactive extracts and purified compounds have already been identified. This review will survey and assess the current state-of-the-art and will propose methodologies to better exploit the potential of marine plankton for drug discovery and for dermocosmetics.

  11. Bioprospecting Marine Plankton

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chris Bowler

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The ocean dominates the surface of our planet and plays a major role in regulating the biosphere. For example, the microscopic photosynthetic organisms living within provide 50% of the oxygen we breathe, and much of our food and mineral resources are extracted from the ocean. In a time of ecological crisis and major changes in our society, it is essential to turn our attention towards the sea to find additional solutions for a sustainable future. Remarkably, while we are overexploiting many marine resources, particularly the fisheries, the planktonic compartment composed of zooplankton, phytoplankton, bacteria and viruses, represents 95% of marine biomass and yet the extent of its diversity remains largely unknown and underexploited. Consequently, the potential of plankton as a bioresource for humanity is largely untapped. Due to their diverse evolutionary backgrounds, planktonic organisms offer immense opportunities: new resources for medicine, cosmetics and food, renewable energy, and long-term solutions to mitigate climate change. Research programs aiming to exploit culture collections of marine micro-organisms as well as to prospect the huge resources of marine planktonic biodiversity in the oceans are now underway, and several bioactive extracts and purified compounds have already been identified. This review will survey and assess the current state-of-the-art and will propose methodologies to better exploit the potential of marine plankton for drug discovery and for dermocosmetics.

  12. Bioprospecting Marine Plankton

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abida, Heni; Ruchaud, Sandrine; Rios, Laurent; Humeau, Anne; Probert, Ian; De Vargas, Colomban; Bach, Stéphane; Bowler, Chris

    2013-01-01

    The ocean dominates the surface of our planet and plays a major role in regulating the biosphere. For example, the microscopic photosynthetic organisms living within provide 50% of the oxygen we breathe, and much of our food and mineral resources are extracted from the ocean. In a time of ecological crisis and major changes in our society, it is essential to turn our attention towards the sea to find additional solutions for a sustainable future. Remarkably, while we are overexploiting many marine resources, particularly the fisheries, the planktonic compartment composed of zooplankton, phytoplankton, bacteria and viruses, represents 95% of marine biomass and yet the extent of its diversity remains largely unknown and underexploited. Consequently, the potential of plankton as a bioresource for humanity is largely untapped. Due to their diverse evolutionary backgrounds, planktonic organisms offer immense opportunities: new resources for medicine, cosmetics and food, renewable energy, and long-term solutions to mitigate climate change. Research programs aiming to exploit culture collections of marine micro-organisms as well as to prospect the huge resources of marine planktonic biodiversity in the oceans are now underway, and several bioactive extracts and purified compounds have already been identified. This review will survey and assess the current state-of-the-art and will propose methodologies to better exploit the potential of marine plankton for drug discovery and for dermocosmetics. PMID:24240981

  13. A ~60 Myr periodicity is common to marine-87Sr/86Sr, fossil biodiversity, and large-scale sedimentation: what does the periodicity reflect?

    CERN Document Server

    Melott, Adrian L; Petersen, K D; McArthur, John M

    2012-01-01

    We find that the marine 87Sr/86Sr record shows a significant periodicity of 59.3 \\pm 3 Myr. The 87Sr/86Sr record is 171{\\deg} \\pm 12{\\deg}out of phase with a 62 (\\pm 3) Myr periodicity previously reported in the record of marine-animal diversity. These periodicities are close to 58 (\\pm 4) Myr cycles found for the number of gap-bounded sedimentary carbonate packages of North America We propose that these periodicities reflect the operation of a periodic "pulse of the Earth" in large-scale, Earth processes. These may be linked to mantle or plate-tectonic events, possibly uplift, which affects Earth's climate and oceans, and so the geochemistry, sedimentation, and biodiversity of the marine realm. Alternately, they may be linked to oscillation of the solar system normal to the plane of the galaxy.

  14. Evidence for large-area superemission into a high-current glow discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartmann, W.; Dominic, V.; Kirkman, G. F.; Gundersen, M. A.

    1988-10-01

    This letter presents evidence for large-area (≊1 cm2) cathode superemission (˜10 000 A/cm2) into a high-current glow discharge in a pseudospark or back lighted thyratron switch. Cathodes studied with a scannning electron microscope following operation at 6-8 kA, ≊1 μs pulse length, and 105 pulses in a low-pressure H2 discharge show evidence of melting of a thin surface layer within a radius of ˜4 mm, indicating that the discharge is a superdense glow with a cross-sectional area of the order of 1 cm2, rather than an arc. Further supporting evidence is provided by streak camera data. An ion beam present during the avalanche phase of the discharge is responsible for heating the cathode surface resulting in a significant field-enhanced thermionic emission.

  15. The Utilisation of Pisang Island as a Platform to Support the Current Safety and Security Needs of Marine Navigation in the Straits of Malacca

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmad Faizal Ahmad Fuad

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Current marine navigational practice relies less on long-range visual marine signals such as lighthouses for reference purposes. This is due to the availability of Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSS, which are integrated with other navigational aids on ships. Therefore, the objective of this study is to review the function of Pisang Island lighthouse and to propose the most relevant use of Pisang Island for current navigational needs. The function of the lighthouse was reviewed according to the IALA Navigational Guide and the AIS data image. The result showed that the most suitable navigational use of the lighthouse is to act as a reference for Line of Position (LOP. The AIS data image indicated that mariners are not using Pisang Island lighthouse for LOP. The trend in the Straits of Malacca (SoM was compared with the trend in the Straits of Dover, UK. The selected experts verified that LOP was not practised there. As a specific example, a tanker ship route in the South China Sea was used to further support that LOP was not practised. This evidence supported the view that Pisang Island lighthouse is less relevant for current navigational practice and does not directly support the coastal state VTS operation and the establishment of the marine electronic highway. Furthermore, the existing shore-based VTS radar has limitations on range and the detection of targets near Pisang Island. Therefore, this study proposes the establishment of a new radar station on Pisang Island at the existing site of the lighthouse. The proposed new radar station on Pisang Island will add to the existing coverage of the VTS radar, bridging the coverage gaps to overcome the weakness of the existing shore-based radar and improve the safety and security of marine navigation in the SoM.

  16. Presence and distribution of current-use pesticides in surface marine sediments from a Mediterranean coastal lagoon (SE Spain).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno-González, R; León, V M

    2017-03-01

    The spatial and seasonal distributions of current-use pesticides (CUPs), including triazines, organophosphorus pesticides, and tributylphosphate, were characterized in surface sediments from the Mar Menor lagoon during 2009 and 2010. The impact of two flash flood events on the input of CUPs and their distribution in the lagoon were also assessed. The total (dissolved + sorbed phase) input of CUPs in the two flash floods through the El Albujón watercourse into the lagoon was estimated at 38.9 kg, of which 9.9 kg corresponded to organophosphorus pesticides and 5.5 kg to triazines. CUP distribution onto sediments was not homogeneous in the lagoon due to the different contaminant sources, sediment types, and the physicochemical and hydrodynamic conditions of the Mar Menor lagoon. Thirteen CUPs were detected in 2009 and 19 in 2010, including mainly herbicides, insecticides, and the additive tributylphosphate. Mean CUP concentrations in the lagoon were generally below 20 ng g(-1), except for chlorpyrifos and tributylphosphate in 2010. The highest concentrations were detected in depositional areas of the lagoon, in the area of influence of the El Albujón watercourse and other wadis with groundwater contributions such as El Mirador (north) and Los Alcázares (east) and that of marine water from El Estacio channel. In fact, the maximum concentration was detected close to El Albujón watercourse (chlorpyrifos, 102.8 ng g(-1) dry weight). Four herbicides, two insecticides, two fungicides, and tributylphosphate showed a risk quotient higher than 1, with that for chlorpyrifos ranging from 96 to 35,200 after flash flood events.

  17. Large step-down DC-DC converters with reduced current stress

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ismail, Esam H. [Department of Electrical Engineering, College of Technological Studies, P.O. Box 35007, 36051 Al-Shaab (Kuwait)

    2009-02-15

    In this paper, several DC-DC converters with large voltage step-down ratios are introduced. A simple modification in the output section of the conventional buck and quadratic converters can effectively extend the duty-cycle range. Only two additional components (an inductor and diode) are necessary for extending the duty-cycle range. The topologies presented in this paper show an improvement in the duty-cycle (about 40%) over the conventional buck and quadratic converters. Consequently, they are well suited for extreme step-down voltage conversion ratio applications. With extended duty-cycle, the current stress on all components is reduced, leading to a significant improvement of the system losses. The principle of operation, theoretical analysis, and comparison of circuit performances with other step-down converters is discussed regarding voltage and current stress. Experimental results of one prototype rated 40-W and operating at 100 kHz are provided in this paper to verify the performance of this new family of converters. The efficiency of the proposed converters is higher than the quadratic converters. (author)

  18. Fractional Modeling of the AC Large-Signal Frequency Response in Magnetoresistive Current Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergio Iván Ravelo Arias

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Fractional calculus is considered when derivatives and integrals of non-integer order are applied over a specific function. In the electrical and electronic domain, the transfer function dependence of a fractional filter not only by the filter order n, but additionally, of the fractional order α is an example of a great number of systems where its input-output behavior could be more exactly modeled by a fractional behavior. Following this aim, the present work shows the experimental ac large-signal frequency response of a family of electrical current sensors based in different spintronic conduction mechanisms. Using an ac characterization set-up the sensor transimpedance function  is obtained considering it as the relationship between sensor output voltage and input sensing current,[PLEASE CHECK FORMULA IN THE PDF]. The study has been extended to various magnetoresistance sensors based in different technologies like anisotropic magnetoresistance (AMR, giant magnetoresistance (GMR, spin-valve (GMR-SV and tunnel magnetoresistance (TMR. The resulting modeling shows two predominant behaviors, the low-pass and the inverse low-pass with fractional index different from the classical integer response. The TMR technology with internal magnetization offers the best dynamic and sensitivity properties opening the way to develop actual industrial applications.

  19. Operational Experience and Consolidations for the Current Lead Control Valves of the Large Hadron Collider

    CERN Document Server

    Perin, A; Pirotte, O; Krieger, B; Widmer, A

    2012-01-01

    The Large Hadron Collider superconducting magnets are powered by more than 1400 gas cooled current leads ranging from 120 A to 13000 A. The gas flow required by the leads is controlled by solenoid proportional valves with dimensions from DN 1.8 mm to DN 10 mm. During the first months of operation, signs of premature wear were found in the active parts of the valves. This created major problems for the functioning of the current leads threatening the availability of the LHC. Following the detection of the problems, a series of measures were implemented to keep the LHC running, to launch a development program to solve the premature wear problem and to prepare for a global consolidation of the gas flow control system. This article describes first the difficulties encountered and the measures taken to ensure a continuous operation of the LHC during the first year of operation. The development of new friction free valves is then presented along with the consolidation program and the test equipment developed to val...

  20. Wideband Precision Current Transformer for the Magnet Current of the Beam Extraction Kicker Magnet of the Large Hadron Collider

    CERN Document Server

    Gräwer, G

    2004-01-01

    The LHC beam extraction system is composed of 15 fast kicker magnets per beam to extract the particles in one turn of the collider and to safely dispose them on external absorbers. Each magnet is powered by a separate pulse generator. The generator produces a magnet current pulse with 3 us rise time, 20 kA amplitude and 1.8 ms fall time, of which 90 us are needed to dump the beam. The beam extraction system requires a high level of reliability. To detect any change in the magnet current characteristics, which might indicate a slow degradation of the pulse generator, a high precision wideband current transformer will be installed. For redundancy reasons, the results obtained with this device will be cross-checked with a Rogowski coil, installed adjacent to the transformer. A prototype transformer has been successfully tested at nominal current levels and showed satisfactory results compared with the output of a high frequency resistive coaxial shunt. The annular core of the ring type transformer is composed of...

  1. Current Status of the Facility Instrumentation Suite at The Large Binocular Telescope Observatory

    CERN Document Server

    Rothberg, Barry; Edwards, Michelle L; Hill, John M; Thompson, David; Veillet, Christian; Wagner, R Mark

    2016-01-01

    We review the current status of the facility instrumentation for the Large Binocular Telescope (LBT). The LBT has 2x 8.4m primary mirrors on a single mount with an effective collecting area of 11.8m or 23m when interferometrically combined. The facility instruments are: 1) the Large Binocular Cameras (LBCs), each with a 23'x25' field of view (FOV). The blue and red optimized optical LBCs are mounted at the prime focus of the left and right primary mirrors, respectively. The filter suite of the two LBCs covers 0.3-1.1{\\mu}m, including the new TiO (0.78{\\mu}m) and CN (0.82{\\mu}m) filters; 2) the Multi-Object Double Spectrograph (MODS), two identical optical spectrographs each mounted at a straight through f/15 Gregorian mount. MODS-1 & -2 can do imaging with Sloan filters and medium resolution (R~2000) spectroscopy, each with 24 interchangeable masks (multi-object or longslit) over a 6'x6' FOV. Each MODS is capable of blue (0.32-0.6{\\mu}m) and red (0.5-1.05{\\mu}m) wavelength only coverage or, using a dichro...

  2. Toxicity of seven priority hazardous and noxious substances (HNSs) to marine organisms: Current status, knowledge gaps and recommendations for future research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rocha, A. Cristina S., E-mail: cristinasrocha@gmail.com; Reis-Henriques, Maria Armanda; Galhano, Victor; Ferreira, Marta, E-mail: marta.ferreira@usp.ac.fj; Guimarães, Laura

    2016-01-15

    Shipping industry and seaborne trade have rapidly increased over the last fifty years, mainly due to the continuous increasing demand for chemicals and fuels. Consequently, despite current regulations, the occurrence of accidental spills poses an important risk. Hazardous and noxious substances (HNSs) have been raising major concern among environmental managers and scientific community for their heterogeneity, hazardous potential towards aquatic organisms and associated social-economic impacts. A literature review on ecotoxicological hazards to aquatic organisms was conducted for seven HNSs: acrylonitrile, n-butyl acrylate, cyclohexylbenzene, hexane, isononanol, trichloroethylene and xylene. Information on the mechanisms of action of the selected HNS was also reviewed. The main purpose was to identify: i) knowledge gaps in need of being addressed in future research; and ii) a set of possible biomarkers suitable for ecotoxicological assessment and monitoring in both estuarine and marine systems. Main gaps found concern the scarcity of information available on ecotoxicological effects of HNS towards marine species and their poorly understood mode of action in wildlife. Differences were found between the sensitivity of freshwater and seawater organisms, so endpoints produced in the former may not be straightforwardly employed in evaluations for the marine environment. The relationship between sub-individual effects and higher level detrimental alterations (e.g. behavioural, morphological, reproductive effects and mortality) are not fully understood. In this context, a set of biomarkers associated to neurotoxicity, detoxification and anti-oxidant defences is suggested as potential indicators of toxic exposure/effects of HNS in marine organisms. Overall, to support the development of contingency plans and the establishment of environmental safety thresholds, it will be necessary to undertake targeted research on HNS ecotoxicity in the marine environment. Research should

  3. An overview and the current status of instrumentation at the Large Binocular Telescope Observatory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, R. Mark; Edwards, Michelle L.; Kuhn, Olga; Thompson, David; Veillet, Christian

    2014-07-01

    An overview of instrumentation for the Large Binocular Telescope (LBT) is presented. Optical instrumentation includes the Large Binocular Camera (LBC), a pair of wide-field (24' × 24') mosaic CCD imagers at the prime focus, and the Multi-Object Double Spectrograph (MODS), a pair of dual-beam blue-red optimized long-slit spectrographs mounted at the left and right direct F/15 Gregorian foci incorporating multiple slit masks for multi-object spectroscopy over a 6' field and spectral resolutions of up to 2000. Infrared instrumentation includes the LBT Near-IR Spectrometer (LUCI), a modular near-infrared (0.9-2.5 μm) imager and spectrograph pair mounted at the left and right front-bent F/15 Gregorian foci and designed for seeing-limited (FOV: 4' × 4') imaging, long-slit spectroscopy, and multi-object spectroscopy utilizing cooled slit masks and diffraction limited (FOV: 0'.5 x 0'.5) imaging and long-slit spectroscopy. Strategic instruments under development that can utilize the full 23 m baseline of the LBT include an interferometric cryogenic beam combiner with near-infrared and thermal-infrared instruments for Fizeau imaging and nulling interferometry (LBTI) and an optical bench near- infrared beam combiner utilizing multi-conjugate adaptive optics for high angular resolution and sensitivity (LINC-NIRVANA). LBTI is currently undergoing commissioning and performing science observations on the LBT utilizing the installed adaptive secondary mirrors in both single-sided and two-sided beam combination modes. In addition, a fiber-fed bench spectrograph (PEPSI) capable of ultra high resolution spectroscopy and spectropolarimetry (R = 40,000-300,000) will be available as a principal investigator instrument. Installation and testing of the bench spectrograph will begin in July 2014. Over the past four years the LBC pair, LUCI1, and MODS1 have been commissioned and are now scheduled for routine partner science observations. Both LUCI2 and MODS2 passed their laboratory

  4. A tropical marine microbial natural products geobibliography as an example of desktop exploration of current research using web visualisation tools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukherjee, Joydeep; Llewellyn, Lyndon E; Evans-Illidge, Elizabeth A

    2008-01-01

    Microbial marine biodiscovery is a recent scientific endeavour developing at a time when information and other technologies are also undergoing great technical strides. Global visualisation of datasets is now becoming available to the world through powerful and readily available software such as Worldwind, ArcGIS Explorer and Google Earth. Overlaying custom information upon these tools is within the hands of every scientist and more and more scientific organisations are making data available that can also be integrated into these global visualisation tools. The integrated global view that these tools enable provides a powerful desktop exploration tool. Here we demonstrate the value of this approach to marine microbial biodiscovery by developing a geobibliography that incorporates citations on tropical and near-tropical marine microbial natural products research with Google Earth and additional ancillary global data sets. The tools and software used are all readily available and the reader is able to use and install the material described in this article.

  5. Analysis of a novel autonomous marine hybrid power generation/energy storage system with a high-voltage direct current link

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Li; Lee, Dong-Jing; Lee, Wei-Jen; Chen, Zhe

    This paper presents both time-domain and frequency-domain simulated results of a novel marine hybrid renewable-energy power generation/energy storage system (PG/ESS) feeding isolated loads through an high-voltage direct current (HVDC) link. The studied marine PG subsystems comprise both offshore wind turbines and Wells turbines to respectively capture wind energy and wave energy from marine wind and ocean wave. In addition to wind-turbine generators (WTGs) and wave-energy turbine generators (WETGs) employed in the studied system, diesel-engine generators (DEGs) and an aqua electrolyzer (AE) absorbing a part of generated energy from WTGs and WETGs to generate available hydrogen for fuel cells (FCs) are also included in the PG subsystems. The ES subsystems consist of a flywheel energy storage system (FESS) and a compressed air energy storage (CAES) system to balance the required energy in the hybrid PG/ESS. It can be concluded from the simulation results that the proposed hybrid marine PG/ESS feeding isolated loads can stably operate to achieve system power-frequency balance condition.

  6. Maximum swimming speeds of sailfish and three other large marine predatory fish species based on muscle contraction time and stride length

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svendsen, Morten B S; Domenici, Paolo; Marras, Stefano;

    2016-01-01

    , and three other large marine pelagic predatory fish species, by measuring the twitch contraction time of anaerobic swimming muscle. The highest estimated maximum swimming speeds were found in sailfish (8.3±1.4 m s(-1)), followed by barracuda (6.2±1.0 m s(-1)), little tunny (5.6±0.2 m s(-1)) and dorado (4...

  7. A test of the interpersonal theory of suicide in a large sample of current firefighters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Carol; Buchman-Schmitt, Jennifer M; Hom, Melanie A; Stanley, Ian H; Joiner, Thomas E

    2016-06-30

    Recent research suggests that firefighters experience elevated rates of suicidal ideation and behaviors. The interpersonal theory of suicide may shed light on this finding. This theory postulates that suicidal desire is strongest among individuals experiencing perceived burdensomeness and thwarted belongingness, and that the combination of suicide desire and acquired capability for suicide is necessary for the development of suicidal behaviors. We tested the propositions of the interpersonal theory in a large sample of current United States firefighters (N=863). Participants completed self-report measures of perceived burdensomeness, thwarted belongingness, fearlessness about death (FAD; a component of acquired capability), and career suicidal ideation and suicide attempt history. Regression models were used to examine the association between interpersonal theory constructs, career suicidal ideation severity, and the presence of career suicide attempts. In line with theory predictions, the three-way interaction between perceived burdensomeness, thwarted belongingness, and FAD was significantly associated with career suicide attempts, beyond participant sex. However, findings were no longer significant after accounting for years of firefighter service or age. Contrary to predictions, the two-way interaction between perceived burdensomeness and thwarted belongingness was not significantly related to career suicidal ideation severity. Applications of the theory to firefighters and future research are discussed.

  8. Efficient Preparation of Streptochlorin from Marine Streptomyces sp. SYYLWHS-1-4 by Combination of Response Surface Methodology and High-Speed Counter-Current Chromatography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lin Li

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Since first isolated from the lipophilic extract of Streptomyces sp. SF2583, streptochlorin, has attracted a lot of attention because of its various pharmacological properties, such as antibiotic, antiallergic, antitumor, and anti-inflammatory activities. For the efficient preparation of streptochlorin from a producing strain Streptomyces sp. SYYLWHS-1-4, we developed a combinative method by using response surface methodology (RSM and high-speed counter-current chromatography (HSCCC. In the fermentation process, we used RSM to optimize the condition for the efficient accumulation of streptochlorin, and the optimal parameters were: yeast extract 1.889 g/L, soluble starch 8.636 g/L, K2HPO4 0.359 g/L, CaCl2 2.5 g/L, MgSO4 0.625 g/L, marine salt 25 g/L, medium volume 50%, initial pH value 7.0, temperature 27.5 °C, which enhanced streptochlorin yield by 17.7-fold. During the purification process, the preparative HSCCC separation was performed using a petroleum ether–ethyl acetate–methanol–water (9:0.8:5:5, v/v/v/v biphasic solvent system, where 300 mg of crude sample yielded 16.5 mg streptochlorin with over 95% purity as determined by UPLC. Consequently, the combination method provided a feasible strategy for highly effective preparation of streptochlorin, which ensured the supply of large amounts of streptochlorin for in vivo pharmacological assessments or other requirements.

  9. Formation of a spark discharge in an inhomogeneous electric field with current limitation by a large ballast Resistance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baldanov, B. B., E-mail: baibat@mail.ru [Russian Academy of Sciences, Institute of Physical Material Science, Siberian Branch (Russian Federation)

    2016-01-15

    Results of studies of a spark discharge initiated in argon in a point–plane electrode gap with limitation of the discharge current by a large ballast resistance are presented. It is shown that the current flowing through the plasma channel of such a low-current spark has the form of periodic pulses. It is experimentally demonstrated that, when a low-current spark transforms into a constricted glow discharge, current pulses disappear, the spatial structure of the cathode glow changes abruptly, and a brightly glowing positive plasma column forms in the gap.

  10. Phylogeny drives large scale patterns in Australian marine bioactivity and provides a new chemical ecology rationale for future biodiscovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans-Illidge, Elizabeth A; Logan, Murray; Doyle, Jason; Fromont, Jane; Battershill, Christopher N; Ericson, Gavin; Wolff, Carsten W; Muirhead, Andrew; Kearns, Phillip; Abdo, David; Kininmonth, Stuart; Llewellyn, Lyndon

    2013-01-01

    Twenty-five years of Australian marine bioresources collecting and research by the Australian Institute of Marine Science (AIMS) has explored the breadth of latitudinally and longitudinally diverse marine habitats that comprise Australia's ocean territory. The resulting AIMS Bioresources Library and associated relational database integrate biodiversity with bioactivity data, and these resources were mined to retrospectively assess biogeographic, taxonomic and phylogenetic patterns in cytotoxic, antimicrobial, and central nervous system (CNS)-protective bioactivity. While the bioassays used were originally chosen to be indicative of pharmaceutically relevant bioactivity, the results have qualified ecological relevance regarding secondary metabolism. In general, metazoan phyla along the deuterostome phylogenetic pathway (eg to Chordata) and their ancestors (eg Porifera and Cnidaria) had higher percentages of bioactive samples in the assays examined. While taxonomy at the phylum level and higher-order phylogeny groupings helped account for observed trends, taxonomy to genus did not resolve the trends any further. In addition, the results did not identify any biogeographic bioactivity hotspots that correlated with biodiversity hotspots. We conclude with a hypothesis that high-level phylogeny, and therefore the metabolic machinery available to an organism, is a major determinant of bioactivity, while habitat diversity and ecological circumstance are possible drivers in the activation of this machinery and bioactive secondary metabolism. This study supports the strategy of targeting phyla from the deuterostome lineage (including ancestral phyla) from biodiverse marine habitats and ecological niches, in future biodiscovery, at least that which is focused on vertebrate (including human) health.

  11. Sustainability of small reservoirs and large scale water availability under current conditions and climate change

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Krol, Martinus S.; de Vries, Marjella J.; van Oel, P.R.; Carlos de Araújo, José

    2011-01-01

    Semi-arid river basins often rely on reservoirs for water supply. Small reservoirs may impact on large-scale water availability both by enhancing availability in a distributed sense and by subtracting water for large downstream user communities, e.g. served by large reservoirs. Both of these impacts

  12. Sustainability of small reservoirs and large scale water availability under current conditions and climate change

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Krol, Maarten S.; Vries, de Marjella J.; Oel, van Pieter R.; Carlos de Araújo, José

    2011-01-01

    Semi-arid river basins often rely on reservoirs for water supply. Small reservoirs may impact on large-scale water availability both by enhancing availability in a distributed sense and by subtracting water for large downstream user communities, e.g. served by large reservoirs. Both of these impacts

  13. Current meter and marine toxic substances data from moored current meter casts and other instruments in the North Pacific Ocean as part of the Deep Ocean Mining and Environmental Study (DOMES) project, 29 August 1975 - 01 December 1977 (NODC Accession 7800741)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Current meter and marine toxic substances data were collected using moored current meter casts and other instruments in the North Pacific Ocean from August 29, 1975...

  14. Solid Waste Transportation through Ocean Currents: Marine Debris Sightings and their Waste Quantification at Port Dickson Beaches, Peninsular Malaysia

    OpenAIRE

    Chong Jing Yi; Narayanan Kannan

    2016-01-01

    Four beaches at Port Dickson, Peninsular Malaysia, namely Saujana Beach, Nelayan Beach, Bagan Pinang Beach and Cermin beach have been sampled for marine debris from 7th June 2014 until 26th July 2014, on every Saturday. These beaches face the Strait of Malacca with a coastline stretching 18 km each. Our observations revealed a total debris items of 13193 in those beaches. The top three items of highest frequency were cigarette butts, foamed fragments and food wrappers. Plastic debris scaled h...

  15. Current status and future prospects for the assessment of marine and coastal ecosystem services: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liquete, Camino; Piroddi, Chiara; Drakou, Evangelia G; Gurney, Leigh; Katsanevakis, Stelios; Charef, Aymen; Egoh, Benis

    2013-01-01

    Research on ecosystem services has grown exponentially during the last decade. Most of the studies have focused on assessing and mapping terrestrial ecosystem services highlighting a knowledge gap on marine and coastal ecosystem services (MCES) and an urgent need to assess them. We reviewed and summarized existing scientific literature related to MCES with the aim of extracting and classifying indicators used to assess and map them. We found 145 papers that specifically assessed marine and coastal ecosystem services from which we extracted 476 indicators. Food provision, in particular fisheries, was the most extensively analyzed MCES while water purification and coastal protection were the most frequently studied regulating and maintenance services. Also recreation and tourism under the cultural services was relatively well assessed. We highlight knowledge gaps regarding the availability of indicators that measure the capacity, flow or benefit derived from each ecosystem service. The majority of the case studies was found in mangroves and coastal wetlands and was mainly concentrated in Europe and North America. Our systematic review highlighted the need of an improved ecosystem service classification for marine and coastal systems, which is herein proposed with definitions and links to previous classifications. This review summarizes the state of available information related to ecosystem services associated with marine and coastal ecosystems. The cataloging of MCES indicators and the integrated classification of MCES provided in this paper establish a background that can facilitate the planning and integration of future assessments. The final goal is to establish a consistent structure and populate it with information able to support the implementation of biodiversity conservation policies.

  16. A Tropical Marine Microbial Natural Products Geobibliography as an Example of Desktop Exploration of Current Research Using Web Visualisation Tools

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth A. Evans-Illidge

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Microbial marine biodiscovery is a recent scientific endeavour developing at a time when information and other technologies are also undergoing great technical strides. Global visualisation of datasets is now becoming available to the world through powerful and readily available software such as Worldwind ™, ArcGIS Explorer ™ and Google Earth ™. Overlaying custom information upon these tools is within the hands of every scientist and more and more scientific organisations are making data available that can also be integrated into these global visualisation tools. The integrated global view that these tools enable provides a powerful desktop exploration tool. Here we demonstrate the value of this approach to marine microbial biodiscovery by developing a geobibliography that incorporates citations on tropical and near-tropical marine microbial natural products research with Google Earth ™ and additional ancillary global data sets. The tools and software used are all readily available and the reader is able to use and install the material described in this article.

  17. Large Aperture Low Threshold Current 980nm VCSELs Fabricated with Pulsed Anodic Oxidation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Pulsed anodic oxidation technique, a new way of forming current blocking layers, was successfully used in ridge-waveguide QW laser fabrication. This method was applied in 980 nm VCSELs fabrication to form a high-quality native oxide current blocking layer, which simplifies the device process. A significant reduction of threshold current and a distinguished device performance are achieved. The 500 μm diameter device has a current threshold as low as 0.48 W. The maximum CW operation output power at room tempe...

  18. Current status of the facility instrumentation suite at the Large Binocular Telescope Observatory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rothberg, Barry; Kuhn, Olga; Edwards, Michelle L.; Hill, John M.; Thompson, David; Veillet, Christian; Wagner, R. Mark

    2016-07-01

    The current status of the facility instrumentation for the Large Binocular Telescope (LBT) is reviewed. The LBT encompasses two 8.4 meter primary mirrors on a single mount yielding an effective collecting area of 11.8 meters or 23 meters when interferometrically combined. The three facility instruments at LBT include: 1) the Large Binocular Cameras (LBCs), each with a 23'× 25' field of view (FOV). The blue optimized and red optimized optical wavelength LBCs are mounted at the prime focus of the SX (left) and DX (right) primary mirrors, respectively. Combined, the filter suite of the two LBCs cover 0.3-1.1 μm, including the addition of new medium-band filters centered on TiO (0.78 μm) and CN (0.82 μm) 2) the Multi-Object Double Spectrograph (MODS), two identical optical spectrographs each mounted at the straight through f/15 Gregorian focus of the primary mirrors. The capabilities of MODS-1 and -2 include imaging with Sloan filters (u, g, r, i, and z) and medium resolution (R ˜ 2000) spectroscopy, each with 24 interchangeable masks (multi-object or longslit) over a 6'× 6' FOV. Each MODS is capable of blue (0.32-0.6 μm) and red (0.5-1.05 μm) wavelength only spectroscopy coverage or both can employ a dichroic for 0.32-1.05 μm wavelength coverage (with reduced coverage from 0.56- 0.57 μm) and 3) the two LBT Utility Camera in the Infrared instruments (LUCIs), are each mounted at a bent-front Gregorian f/15 focus of a primary mirror. LUCI-1 and 2 are designed for seeing-limited (4'× 4' FOV) and active optics using thin-shell adaptive secondary mirrors (0.5'× 0.5' FOV) imaging and spectroscopy over the wavelength range of 0.95-2.5 μm and spectroscopic resolutions of 400 advantage of the active optics SX secondary; and to install a grating designed primarily for use with high resolution active optics. Thus, like MODS-1 and -2, both LUCIs now have specifications nearly identical to each other. The software interface for both LUCIs have also been replaced

  19. Current Status of the Late Triassic and Early Jurassic APTS from Continental Sediments and Correlation with Standard Marine Stages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kent, D. V.; Olsen, P. E.; Muttoni, G.

    2014-12-01

    A reproducible geomagnetic polarity template for the Late Triassic and earliest Jurassic continues to be that determined from ~5,000 meters of cored section in the Newark basin and ~2,500 meters of outcrop section in the Hartford basin, sampled at nominal ~20 kyr intervals according to a well-developed climate cyclicity that characterizes the lacustrine strata present in all but the fluviatile portions of the basins [Kent & Olsen, 1999, 2008 JGR]. The age model is based on the 405 kyr Milankovich climate cycle and pegging the sequence to high precision U-Pb dating of the Central Atlantic Magmatic Province (CAMP) at 201.6 to 200.9 Ma [Blackburn+2013 Science], the initiation of which is practically coincident with the end-Triassic extinction level (formerly set to 202 Ma) and within a climatic precession cycle after magnetochron E23r. The resulting astrochronostratigraphic polarity time scale (APTS) has 66 Poisson-distributed polarity intervals from chrons E8r (~225 Ma) to H27n (~199 Ma) with a constant sediment-accumulation rate extrapolation to chron E1r (~233 Ma). Magnetostratigraphic correlations from the most complete and usually the thickest Tethyan marine sections suggest that the Carnian/Norian boundary occurs within ~E7n [Channell+2003 PPP; Muttoni+2004 GSAB] at an APTS age of 227.5 Ma and for the Norian/Rhaetian boundary anywhere from E16n [Husing+2011 EPSL] at ~210.5 Ma to E20r [Maron+2014 Geology] at ~205.4 Ma depending on choice of conodont taxa, whereas the Hettangian/Sinemurian boundary can be placed at ~199.5 Ma within the marine equivalent of H25r [Husing+2014 EPSL]. These APTS ages are in substantive agreement with available high-precision dates in marine strata for the late Carnian [231 Ma: Furin+2006 Geology], latest Norian [205.5 Ma: Wotslaw+2014 Geology], and the boundaries of the Triassic/Jurassic [201.3 Ma: Guex+2012 PPP] and the Hettangian/Sinemurian [199.5 Ma: Schaltegger+2008 EPSL]. Carnian magnetostratigraphy needs to be improved but

  20. Chemical, benthic organisms, zooplankton, marine toxic substances, and other data from moored current meter casts and other instruments in the Gulf of Mexico during the Brine Disposal project, 30 August 1979 - 21 September 1981 (NODC Accession 8200012)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Chemical, marine toxic substances, benthic organisms, zooplankton, and other data were collected using moored current meter casts and other instruments in the Gulf...

  1. Chemical, zooplankton, and marine toxic substances data from moored current meter casts and other instruments in the Gulf of Mexico during the Brine Disposal project, 02 June 1978 - 02 June 1979 (NODC Accession 8000002)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Chemical, zooplankton, and marine toxic substances data were collected using moored current meter casts and other instruments in the Gulf of Mexico from June 2, 1978...

  2. Large Aperture Low Threshold Current 980 nm VCSELs Fabricated with Pulsed Anodic Oxidation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CUI Jin-jiang; NING Yong-qiang; LI Te; LIU Guang-yu; ZHANG Yan; PENG Biao; SUN Yan-fang; WANG Li-jun

    2007-01-01

    Pulsed anodic oxidation technique, a new way of forming current blocking layers, was successfully used in ridge-waveguide QW laser fabrication. This method was applied in 980 nm VCSELs fabrication to form a high-quality native oxide current blocking layer, which simplifies the device process. A significant reduction of threshold current and a distinguished device performance are achieved. The 500 μm diameter device has a current threshold as low as 048 W. The maximum CW operation output power at room temperature is 1.48 W. The lateral divergence angle θ‖ and vertical divergence angle θ⊥ are as low as 15.3° and 13.8° without side-lobes at a current of 6 A.

  3. Cloning, Stem Cells, and the Current National Debate: Incorporating Ethics into a Large Introductory Biology Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fink, Rachel D.

    2002-01-01

    Discussing the ethical issues involved in topics such as cloning and stem cell research in a large introductory biology course is often difficult. Teachers may be wary of presenting material biased by personal beliefs, and students often feel inhibited speaking about moral issues in a large group. Yet, to ignore what is happening "out there"…

  4. Cobalt and marine redox evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swanner, Elizabeth D.; Planavsky, Noah J.; Lalonde, Stefan V.; Robbins, Leslie J.; Bekker, Andrey; Rouxel, Olivier J.; Saito, Mak A.; Kappler, Andreas; Mojzsis, Stephen J.; Konhauser, Kurt O.

    2014-03-01

    Cobalt (Co) is a bio-essential trace element and limiting nutrient in some regions of the modern oceans. It has been proposed that Co was more abundant in poorly ventilated Precambrian oceans based on the greater utilization of Co by anaerobic microbes relative to plants and animals. However, there are few empirical or theoretical constraints on the history of seawater Co concentrations. Herein, we present a survey of authigenic Co in marine sediments (iron formations, authigenic pyrite and bulk euxinic shales) with the goal of tracking changes in the marine Co reservoir throughout Earth's history. We further provide an overview of the modern marine Co cycle, which we use as a platform to evaluate how changes in the redox state of Earth's surface were likely to have affected marine Co concentrations. Based on sedimentary Co contents and our understanding of marine Co sources and sinks, we propose that from ca. 2.8 to 1.8 Ga the large volume of hydrothermal fluids circulating through abundant submarine ultramafic rocks along with a predominantly anoxic ocean with a low capacity for Co burial resulted in a large dissolved marine Co reservoir. We tentatively propose that there was a decrease in marine Co concentrations after ca. 1.8 Ga resulting from waning hydrothermal Co sources and the expansion of sulfide Co burial flux. Changes in the Co reservoir due to deep-water ventilation in the Neoproterozoic, if they occurred, are not resolvable with the current dataset. Rather, Co enrichments in Phanerozoic euxinic shales deposited during ocean anoxic events (OAE) indicate Co mobilization from expanded anoxic sediments and enhanced hydrothermal sources. A new record of marine Co concentrations provides a platform from which we can reevaluate the role that environmental Co concentrations played in shaping biological Co utilization throughout Earth's history.

  5. Near-Earth Magnetic Field Effects of Large-Scale Magnetospheric Currents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luehr, Hermann; Xiong, Chao; Olsen, Nils; Le, Guan

    2016-01-01

    Magnetospheric currents play an important role in the electrodynamics of near- Earth space. This has been the topic of many space science studies. Here we focus on the magnetic fields they cause close to Earth. Their contribution to the geomagnetic field is the second largest after the core field. Significant progress in interpreting the magnetic fields from the different sources has been achieved thanks to magnetic satellite missions like Ørsted, CHAMP and now Swarm. Of particular interest for this article is a proper representation of the magnetospheric ring current effect. Uncertainties in modelling its effect still produce the largest residuals between observations and present-day geomagnetic field models. A lot of progress has been achieved so far, but there are still open issues like the characteristics of the partial ring current. Other currents discussed are those flowing in the magnetospheric tail. Also their magnetic contribution at LEO orbits is non-negligible. Treating them as an independent source is a more recent development, which has cured some of the problems in geomagnetic field modelling. Unfortunately there is no index available for characterizing the tail current intensity. Here we propose an approach that may help to properly quantify the magnetic contribution from the tail current for geomagnetic field modelling. Some open questions that require further investigation are mentioned at the end.

  6. Energy distributions of the large-scale horizontal currents caused by wind in the baroclinic ocean

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHOU; Lei; TIAN; Jiwei; WANG; Dongxiao

    2005-01-01

    Ocean current data for nearly 3 months in the South China Sea (SCS), combined with the NCEP/NCAR reanalysis wind data, are analyzed. The results indicate that the wind energy enters the upper mixed layer in a wide continuous frequency band. In addition, the interaction between the low-frequency wind anomaly and the low-frequency current anomaly is the most ‘effective’ way for the energy input from the wind to the upper ocean. However, only the inertial and the near inertial energy propagate downwards through the upper mixed layer. The downward-propagating energy is distributed into the barotropic currents, the baroclinic currents and each mode of the baroclinic currents following the normal distributions. The energy change ratios between the barotropic motion to the baroclinic motion induced by the wind present a normal distribution of N (0.0242, 0.3947). The energy change ratios of the first 4 baroclinic modes to the whole baroclinic currents also follow the normal distributions. The first baroclinic mode follows N (0.2628, 0.1872), the second N (0.1979, 0.1504), the third N (0.1331, 0.1633), and the fourth N (0.0650, 0.1540), respectively.

  7. The tax administration of the large taxpayers in Ukraine: Current practice and directions for improvement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olha Vatamaniuk

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Considering the urgent need of the government in financial resources, the article touches upon the actual issues of tax administration of the large taxpayers, which, because of the high financial potential, play an important role in the formation of state budget revenues. The priority of establishing the optimal mechanism of taxation of the large taxpayers, due to the need of filling the state treasury, requires the development of new scientific approaches to improve tax administration in Ukraine, which defines the purpose of the study. The outlined aim of the research substantiated the importance of detailed analysis of tax servicing of the large taxpayers by specialized state tax inspectorates in Ukraine, as well as the illustration of the main advantages of switching to personalized tax support. As a result of conducted research it was determined that the improvement of the human resources management and the fiscal policy of the state tax authority bodies and the implementation of fully functional horizontal monitoring as a method of tax control for the large taxpayers will substantially optimize the large taxpayers administration mechanism. The importance of increasing the prestigious status of the large taxpayers and of enhancing the positive image of the tax authorities is also stressed.

  8. A propidium monoazide-quantitative PCR method for the detection and quantification of viable Enterococcus faecalis in large-volume samples of marine waters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salam, Khaled W; El-Fadel, Mutasem; Barbour, Elie K; Saikaly, Pascal E

    2014-10-01

    The development of rapid detection assays of cell viability is essential for monitoring the microbiological quality of water systems. Coupling propidium monoazide with quantitative PCR (PMA-qPCR) has been successfully applied in different studies for the detection and quantification of viable cells in small-volume samples (0.25-1.00 mL), but it has not been evaluated sufficiently in marine environments or in large-volume samples. In this study, we successfully integrated blue light-emitting diodes for photoactivating PMA and membrane filtration into the PMA-qPCR assay for the rapid detection and quantification of viable Enterococcus faecalis cells in 10-mL samples of marine waters. The assay was optimized in phosphate-buffered saline and seawater, reducing the qPCR signal of heat-killed E. faecalis cells by 4 log10 and 3 log10 units, respectively. Results suggest that high total dissolved solid concentration (32 g/L) in seawater can reduce PMA activity. Optimal PMA-qPCR standard curves with a 6-log dynamic range and detection limit of 10(2) cells/mL were generated for quantifying viable E. faecalis cells in marine waters. The developed assay was compared with the standard membrane filter (MF) method by quantifying viable E. faecalis cells in seawater samples exposed to solar radiation. The results of the developed PMA-qPCR assay did not match that of the standard MF method. This difference in the results reflects the different physiological states of E. faecalis cells in seawater. In conclusion, the developed assay is a rapid (∼5 h) method for the quantification of viable E. faecalis cells in marine recreational waters, which should be further improved and tested in different seawater settings.

  9. A propidium monoazide–quantitative PCR method for the detection and quantification of viable Enterococcus faecalis in large-volume samples of marine waters

    KAUST Repository

    Salam, Khaled W.

    2014-08-23

    The development of rapid detection assays of cell viability is essential for monitoring the microbiological quality of water systems. Coupling propidium monoazide with quantitative PCR (PMA-qPCR) has been successfully applied in different studies for the detection and quantification of viable cells in small-volume samples (0.25-1.00 mL), but it has not been evaluated sufficiently in marine environments or in large-volume samples. In this study, we successfully integrated blue light-emitting diodes for photoactivating PMA and membrane filtration into the PMA-qPCR assay for the rapid detection and quantification of viable Enterococcus faecalis cells in 10-mL samples of marine waters. The assay was optimized in phosphate-buffered saline and seawater, reducing the qPCR signal of heat-killed E. faecalis cells by 4 log10 and 3 log10 units, respectively. Results suggest that high total dissolved solid concentration (32 g/L) in seawater can reduce PMA activity. Optimal PMA-qPCR standard curves with a 6-log dynamic range and detection limit of 102 cells/mL were generated for quantifying viable E. faecalis cells in marine waters. The developed assay was compared with the standard membrane filter (MF) method by quantifying viable E. faecalis cells in seawater samples exposed to solar radiation. The results of the developed PMA-qPCR assay did not match that of the standard MF method. This difference in the results reflects the different physiological states of E. faecalis cells in seawater. In conclusion, the developed assay is a rapid (∼5 h) method for the quantification of viable E. faecalis cells in marine recreational waters, which should be further improved and tested in different seawater settings. © 2014 Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg.

  10. Design optimization of 600 A-13 kA current leads for the Large Hadron Collider project at CERN

    CERN Document Server

    Spiller, D M; Al-Mosawl, M K; Friend, C M; Thacker, P; Ballarino, A

    2001-01-01

    The requirements of the Large Hadron Collider project at CERN for high-temperature superconducting (HTS) current leads have been widely publicized. CERN require hybrid current leads of resistive and HTS materials with current ratings of 600 A, 6 kA and 13 kA. BICC General Superconductors, in collaboration with the University of Southampton, have developed and manufactured prototype current leads for the Large Hadron Collider project. The resistive section consists of a phosphorus de-oxidized copper conductor and heat exchanger and the HTS section is constructed from BICC General's (Pb, Bi)2223 tapes with a reduced thermal conductivity Ag alloy sheath. We present the results of the materials optimization studies for the resistive and the HTS sections. Some results of the acceptance tests at CERN are discussed. (9 refs).

  11. Bed forms created by simulated waves and currents in a large flume

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lacy, Jessica R.; Rubin, David M.; Ikeda, Hiroshi; Mokudai, Kuniyasu; Hanes, Daniel M.

    2007-01-01

    The morphology and evolution of bed forms created by combinations of waves and currents were investigated using an oscillating plate in a 4-m-wide flume. Current speed ranged from 0 to 30 cm/s, maximum oscillatory velocity ranged from 20 to 48 cm/s, oscillation period was 8 s (except for one run with 12 s period), and the median grain size was 0.27 mm. The angle between oscillations and current was 90°, 60°, or 45°. At the end of each run the sand bed was photographed and ripple dimensions were measured. Ripple wavelength was also determined from sonar images collected throughout the runs. Increasing the ratio of current to wave (i.e., oscillatory) velocity decreased ripple height and wavelength, in part because of the increased fluid excursion during the wave period. Increasing the ratio of current to waves, or decreasing the angle between current and waves, increased the three-dimensionality of bed forms. During the runs, ripple wavelength increased by a factor of about 2. The average number of wave periods for evolution of ripple wavelength to 90% of its final value was 184 for two-dimensional ripples starting from a flat bed. Bed form orientations at the end of each run were compared to four potential controlling factors: the directions of waves, current, maximum instantaneous bed shear stress, and maximum gross bed form normal transport (MGBNT). The directions of waves and of MGBNT were equally good predictors of bed form orientations, and were significantly better than the other two factors.

  12. Modeling the condensation of sulfuric acid and water on the cylinder liner of a large two-stroke marine diesel engine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cordtz, Rasmus Faurskov; Mayer, Stefan; Eskildsen, Svend S.

    2017-01-01

    how fuel sulfur content, charge air humidity and liner temperature variations affects the deposition of water and sulfuric acid at low load operation. A phenomenological engine model is applied to simulate the formation of cylinder/bulk gas combustion products and dew points comply with H2O–H2SO4......Corrosive wear of cylinder liners in large two-stroke marine diesel engines that burn heavy fuel oil containing sulfur is coupled to the formation of gaseous sulfur trioxide (SO3) and subsequent combined condensation of sulfuric acid (H2SO4) and water (H2O) vapor. The present work seeks to address...

  13. Empirical links between trace metal cycling and marine microbial ecology during a large perturbation to Earth's carbon cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owens, Jeremy D.; Reinhard, Christopher T.; Rohrssen, Megan; Love, Gordon D.; Lyons, Timothy W.

    2016-09-01

    Understanding the global redox state of the oceans and its cause-and-effect relationship with periods of widespread organic-carbon deposition is vital to interpretations of Earth's climatic and biotic feedbacks during periods of expanded oceanic oxygen deficiency. Here, we present a compilation of new and published data from an organic-rich locality within the proto-North Atlantic Ocean during the Cenomanian-Turonian boundary event that shows a dramatic drawdown of redox-sensitive trace elements. Iron geochemistry independently suggests euxinic deposition (i.e., anoxic and sulfidic bottom waters) for the entire section, thus confirming its potential as an archive of global marine metal inventories. In particular, depleted molybdenum (Mo) and vanadium (V) concentrations effectively record the global expansion of euxinic and oxygen-deficient but non-sulfidic waters, respectively. The V drawdown precedes the OAE, fingerprinting an expansion of oxygen deficiency prior to an expansion of euxinia. Molybdenum drawdown, in contrast, is delayed with respect to V and coincides with the onset of OAE2. Parallel lipid biomarker analyses provide evidence for significant and progressive reorganization of marine microbial ecology during the OAE in this region of the proto-North Atlantic, with the smallest relative eukaryotic contributions to total primary production occurring during metal-depleted intervals. This relationship may be related to decreasing supplies of enzymatically important trace elements. Similarly, box modeling suggests that oceanic drawdown of Mo may have approached levels capable of affecting marine nitrogen fixation. Predictions of possible nitrogen stress on eukaryotic production, locally and globally, are consistent with the low observed levels of Mo and a rise in 2-methylhopane index values during the peak of the OAE. At the same time, the environmental challenge presented by low dissolved oxygen and euxinia coincides with increased turnover rates of

  14. Large-scale, multidirectional larval connectivity among coral reef fish populations in the Great Barrier Reef Marine Park

    KAUST Repository

    Williamson, David H.

    2016-11-15

    Larval dispersal is the key process by which populations of most marine fishes and invertebrates are connected and replenished. Advances in larval tagging and genetics have enhanced our capacity to track larval dispersal, assess scales of population connectivity, and quantify larval exchange among no-take marine reserves and fished areas. Recent studies have found that reserves can be a significant source of recruits for populations up to 40 km away, but the scale and direction of larval connectivity across larger seascapes remain unknown. Here, we apply genetic parentage analysis to investigate larval dispersal patterns for two exploited coral reef groupers (Plectropomus maculatus and Plectropomus leopardus) within and among three clusters of reefs separated by 60–220 km within the Great Barrier Reef Marine Park, Australia. A total of 69 juvenile P. maculatus and 17 juvenile P. leopardus (representing 6% and 9% of the total juveniles sampled, respectively) were genetically assigned to parent individuals on reefs within the study area. We identified both short-distance larval dispersal within regions (200 m to 50 km) and long-distance, multidirectional dispersal of up to ~250 km among regions. Dispersal strength declined significantly with distance, with best-fit dispersal kernels estimating median dispersal distances of ~110 km for P. maculatus and ~190 km for P. leopardus. Larval exchange among reefs demonstrates that established reserves form a highly connected network and contribute larvae for the replenishment of fished reefs at multiple spatial scales. Our findings highlight the potential for long-distance dispersal in an important group of reef fishes, and provide further evidence that effectively protected reserves can yield recruitment and sustainability benefits for exploited fish populations.

  15. Regional modeling of large wildfires under current and potential future climates in Colorado and Wyoming, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    West, Amanda; Kumar, Sunil; Jarnevich, Catherine S.

    2016-01-01

    Regional analysis of large wildfire potential given climate change scenarios is crucial to understanding areas most at risk in the future, yet wildfire models are not often developed and tested at this spatial scale. We fit three historical climate suitability models for large wildfires (i.e. ≥ 400 ha) in Colorado andWyoming using topography and decadal climate averages corresponding to wildfire occurrence at the same temporal scale. The historical models classified points of known large wildfire occurrence with high accuracies. Using a novel approach in wildfire modeling, we applied the historical models to independent climate and wildfire datasets, and the resulting sensitivities were 0.75, 0.81, and 0.83 for Maxent, Generalized Linear, and Multivariate Adaptive Regression Splines, respectively. We projected the historic models into future climate space using data from 15 global circulation models and two representative concentration pathway scenarios. Maps from these geospatial analyses can be used to evaluate the changing spatial distribution of climate suitability of large wildfires in these states. April relative humidity was the most important covariate in all models, providing insight to the climate space of large wildfires in this region. These methods incorporate monthly and seasonal climate averages at a spatial resolution relevant to land management (i.e. 1 km2) and provide a tool that can be modified for other regions of North America, or adapted for other parts of the world.

  16. On the Damper Cage Bar´s Currents Calculation Forsalient Pole Large Synchronous Machina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liliana Vicol

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The damper cage bars’ currents occur only when the synchronous machine operates in a dynamic regime and its rotor speed differs from the stator field speed. Basically there are two ways of calculating the damper cage currents, by using the machine equivalent circuit or by employing a 2D or 3D finite element method (FEM analysis. In this paper are discussedtwo methods to calculate the damper cage currents, one based on a coupled field-circuit approach when all the machine dimensions and winding should be known and another based on DC-decay tests conducted with the rotor on d, respectively q axis when all the transient parameters and time constants are obtained. Both methods are quite simple and offer an acceptable accuracy.

  17. Data for calculating population, collision and displacement vulnerability among marine birds of the California Current System associated with offshore wind energy infrastructure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Josh; Kelsey, Emily; Felis, Jonathan J.; Pereksta, David M.

    2016-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey, Western Ecological Research Center (USGS-WERC) was requested by the Bureau of Ocean Energy Management (BOEM) to create a database for marine birds of the California Current System (CCS) that would allow quantification and species ranking regarding vulnerability to offshore wind energy infrastructure (OWEI). This was needed so that resource managers could evaluate potential impacts associated with siting and construction of OWEI within the California Current System section of the Pacific Offshore Continental Shelf, including California, Oregon, and Washington. Along with its accompanying Open File Report (OFR), this comprehensive database can be used (and modified or updated) to quantify marine bird vulnerability to OWEIs in the CCS at the population level. For 81 marine bird species present in the CCS, we generated numeric scores to represent three vulnerability indices associated with potential OWEI: population vulnerability, collision vulnerability, and displacement vulnerability. The metrics used to produce these scores includes global population size, proportion of the population in the CCS, threat status, adult survival, breeding score, annual occurrence in the CCS, nocturnal and diurnal flight activity, macro-avoidance behavior, flight height, and habitat flexibility; values for these metrics can be updated and adjusted as new data become available. The scoring methodology was peer-reviewed to evaluate if the metrics identified and the values generated were appropriate for each species considered. The numeric vulnerability scores in this database can readily be applied to areas in the CCS with known species distributions and where offshore renewable energy development is being considered. We hope that this information can be used to assist meaningful planning decisions that will impact seabird conservation. These data support the following publication: Adams, J., Kelsey, E.C., Felis J.J., and Pereksta, D.M., 2016

  18. Near-Earth Magnetic Field Effects of Large-Scale Magnetospheric Currents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lühr, Hermann; Xiong, Chao; Olsen, Nils

    2016-01-01

    . Significant progress in interpreting the magnetic fields from the different sources has been achieved thanks to magnetic satellite missions like Ørsted, CHAMP and now Swarm. Of particular interest for this article is a proper representation of the magnetospheric ring current effect. Uncertainties in modelling...... in the magnetospheric tail. Also their magnetic contribution at LEO orbits is non-negligible. Treating them as an independent source is a more recent development, which has cured some of the problems in geomagnetic field modelling. Unfortunately there is no index available for characterising the tail current intensity...

  19. Large-R jets in Atlas Tile Calorimeter current and upgraded geometry

    CERN Document Server

    Cecchini, Vincent Egidio

    2017-01-01

    This report describes a comparative study of two different geometries of the Atlas Tile Calorimeter to assess the performance of an increased granularity upgrade. The current geometry is compared to the upgraded one, needed because of the luminosity increase in the High-Luminosity LHC. Those geometries had been simulated in Geant4 to provide Monte-Carlo events simulations allowing us to compare the behaviour of the upgraded geometry with the current one. Data analysis is made from this simulation to compare the behaviour of the reconstructed jets substructure in the two different geometries.

  20. Influence of the Leakage Current on the Performance of Large Area Silicon Drift Detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Rashevsky, A; CERN. Geneva; Piemonte, C

    2000-01-01

    Abstract In this paper we investigate the influence of the leakage current on the performance of Silicon Drift Detectors. First, analytical considerations are given in order to highlight the problems, specific for this type of detector, that emerge with leakage current. Then the obtained results are compared with the data of laboratory measurements. Aiming at a mass production of SDDs for the Inner Tracking System of the ALICE experiment at LHC, we propose a simple and fast measurement for a preliminary selection before passing to a detailed acceptance test.

  1. Design and Tests on the 30 to 600 A HTS Current Leads for the Large Hadron Collider

    CERN Document Server

    Ballarino, A

    1997-01-01

    Some 800 correction magnets of the Large Hadron Collider will be individually powered. Each of them needs a pair of current leads. To reduce the heat leak through these leads, the current has been chosen as low as reasonably possible, 30 to 600 A. For the same reason CERN started in-house a development of current leads using commercial bulk BSCCO-2212 material.This paper discusses the design and the test results of this lead. We tested several prototypes, measured the heat leak through the lead, studied and tested what happens if the lead is brought to critical temperature causing it to quench.

  2. Near-Earth Magnetic Field Effects of Large-Scale Magnetospheric Currents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lühr, Hermann; Xiong, Chao; Olsen, Nils

    2017-01-01

    Magnetospheric currents play an important role in the electrodynamics of near-Earth space. This has been the topic of many space science studies. Here we focus on the magnetic fields they cause close to Earth. Their contribution to the geomagnetic field is the second largest after the core field...

  3. Effects of imbalanced currents on large-format LiFePO4/graphite batteries systems connected in parallel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Wei; Hu, Xiaosong; Jin, Chao; Jiang, Jiuchun; Zhang, Yanru; Yip, Tony

    2016-05-01

    With the development and popularization of electric vehicles, it is urgent and necessary to develop effective management and diagnosis technology for battery systems. In this work, we design a parallel battery model, according to equivalent circuits of parallel voltage and branch current, to study effects of imbalanced currents on parallel large-format LiFePO4/graphite battery systems. Taking a 60 Ah LiFePO4/graphite battery system manufactured by ATL (Amperex Technology Limited, China) as an example, causes of imbalanced currents in the parallel connection are analyzed using our model, and the associated effect mechanisms on long-term stability of each single battery are examined. Theoretical and experimental results show that continuously increasing imbalanced currents during cycling are mainly responsible for the capacity fade of LiFePO4/graphite parallel batteries. It is thus a good way to avoid fast performance fade of parallel battery systems by suppressing variations of branch currents.

  4. Analytical model for current distribution in large-area organic light emitting diodes with parallel metal grid lines

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Barink, M.; Harkema, S.

    2012-01-01

    In this study, an analytical solution for the current distribution of a large-area organic light emitting diodes (OLEDs) with parallel equidistant gridlines is derived. In contrast to numerical methods, this analytical solution allows for a very quick scan of the OLED design space, even for very lar

  5. Large area polycrystalline diamond films as high current photocathodes for linear induction accelerators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shurter, R.P.; Moir, D.C.; Devlin, D.J.; Springer, R.W.

    1997-08-01

    Investigations are underway at Los Alamos to develop a new generation of high current, low source temperature photo cathodes able to operate in vacuum environments with pressures above 10e-6 torr without poisoning or degradation of emission properties. Polycrystalline diamond films are emerging as the ideal material for these photocathodes. Robustness, high quantum efficiency and high thermal conductivity are fundamental necessary attributes that are found in diamond. The high electron/hole mobility in the boron doped diamond lattice and the ability to create a negative electron affinity surface through downward band bending allow for high current density emission with quantum efficiencies of 0.5% when illuminated by a ArF laser. We report the results to date toward the development of a four kiloampere photocathode with a source temperature below 5eV for the DARHT linear induction Accelerator

  6. Right-handed charged currents in the era of the Large Hadron Collider arXiv

    CERN Document Server

    Alioli, S.; Dekens, W.; de Vries, J.; Mereghetti, E.

    We discuss the phenomenology of right-handed charged currents in the framework of the Standard Model Effective Field Theory, in which they arise due to a single gauge-invariant dimension-six operator. We study the manifestations of the nine complex couplings of the $W$ to right-handed quarks in collider physics, flavor physics, and low-energy precision measurements. We first obtain constraints on the couplings under the assumption that the right-handed operator is the dominant correction to the Standard Model at observable energies. We subsequently study the impact of degeneracies with other Beyond-the-Standard-Model effective interactions and identify observables, both at colliders and low-energy experiments, that would uniquely point to right-handed charged currents.

  7. Ionic current correlations underlie the global tuning of large numbers of neuronal activity attributes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Shunbing; Golowasch, Jorge

    2012-09-26

    Ionic conductances in identified neurons are highly variable. This poses the crucial question of how such neurons can produce stable activity. Coexpression of ionic currents has been observed in an increasing number of neurons in different systems, suggesting that the coregulation of ionic channel expression, by thus linking their variability, may enable neurons to maintain relatively constant neuronal activity as suggested by a number of recent theoretical studies. We examine this hypothesis experimentally using the voltage- and dynamic-clamp techniques to first measure and then modify the ionic conductance levels of three currents in identified neurons of the crab pyloric network. We quantify activity by measuring 10 different attributes (oscillation period, spiking frequency, etc.), and find linear, positive and negative relationships between conductance pairs and triplets that can enable pyloric neurons to maintain activity attributes invariant. Consistent with experimental observations, some of the features most tightly regulated appear to be phase relationships of bursting activity. We conclude that covariation (and probably a tightly controlled coregulation) of ionic conductances can help neurons maintain certain attributes of neuronal activity invariant while at the same time allowing conductances to change over wide ranges in response to internal or environmental inputs and perturbations. Our results also show that neurons can tune neuronal activity globally via coordinate expression of ion currents.

  8. Large critical current density improvement in Bi-2212 wires through the groove-rolling process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malagoli, A.; Bernini, C.; Braccini, V.; Romano, G.; Putti, M.; Chaud, X.; Debray, F.

    2013-04-01

    Recently there has been a growing interest in Bi-2212 superconductor round wire for high magnetic field use despite the fact that an increase of the critical current is still needed to boost its successful use in such applications. Recent studies have demonstrated that the main obstacle to current flow, especially in long wires, is the residual porosity inside these powder-in-tube processed conductors that develops from bubble agglomeration when the Bi-2212 melts. In this work we tried to overcome this issue affecting the wire densification by changing the deformation process. Here we show the effects of groove rolling versus the drawing process on the critical current density JC and on the microstructure. In particular, groove-rolled multifilamentary wires show a JC increased by a factor of about 3 with respect to drawn wires prepared with the same Bi-2212 powder and architecture. We think that this approach in the deformation process is able to produce the required improvements both because the superconducting properties are enhanced and because it makes the fabrication process faster and cheaper.

  9. Current Concepts of Using Large Femoral Heads in Total Hip Arthroplasty

    OpenAIRE

    Cho, Myung-Rae; Choi, Won Kee; Kim, Jae Jung

    2016-01-01

    Instability and dislocation after total hip arthroplasty are the most common causes of revisions and major complications for failure of inserted prostheses, leading to a reduction in quality of life. Because the use of artificial femoral head sizes smaller than patient's own size is the important cause for dislocation, the use of large femoral head have increased. Femoral head sizes greater than 32 mm offer multiple advantages in physical function and activity levels of patients by improving ...

  10. Clickers in the Large Classroom: Current Research and Best-Practice Tips

    OpenAIRE

    Caldwell, Jane E.

    2007-01-01

    Audience response systems (ARS) or clickers, as they are commonly called, offer a management tool for engaging students in the large classroom. Basic elements of the technology are discussed. These systems have been used in a variety of fields and at all levels of education. Typical goals of ARS questions are discussed, as well as methods of compensating for the reduction in lecture time that typically results from their use. Examples of ARS use occur throughout the literature and often detai...

  11. Clickers in the large classroom: current research and best-practice tips.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caldwell, Jane E

    2007-01-01

    Audience response systems (ARS) or clickers, as they are commonly called, offer a management tool for engaging students in the large classroom. Basic elements of the technology are discussed. These systems have been used in a variety of fields and at all levels of education. Typical goals of ARS questions are discussed, as well as methods of compensating for the reduction in lecture time that typically results from their use. Examples of ARS use occur throughout the literature and often detail positive attitudes from both students and instructors, although exceptions do exist. When used in classes, ARS clickers typically have either a benign or positive effect on student performance on exams, depending on the method and extent of their use, and create a more positive and active atmosphere in the large classroom. These systems are especially valuable as a means of introducing and monitoring peer learning methods in the large lecture classroom. So that the reader may use clickers effectively in his or her own classroom, a set of guidelines for writing good questions and a list of best-practice tips have been culled from the literature and experienced users.

  12. Large benefits to marine fisheries of meeting the 1.5°C global warming target.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheung, William W L; Reygondeau, Gabriel; Frölicher, Thomas L

    2016-12-23

    Translating the Paris Agreement to limit global warming to 1.5°C above preindustrial level into impact-related targets facilitates communication of the benefits of mitigating climate change to policy-makers and stakeholders. Developing ecologically relevant impact-related targets for marine ecosystem services, such as fisheries, is an important step. Here, we use maximum catch potential and species turnover as climate-risk indicators for fisheries. We project that potential catches will decrease by more than 3 million metric tons per degree Celsius of warming. Species turnover is more than halved when warming is lowered from 3.5° to 1.5°C above the preindustrial level. Regionally, changes in maximum catch potential and species turnover vary across ecosystems, with the biggest risk reduction in the Indo-Pacific and Arctic regions when the Paris Agreement target is achieved.

  13. A hydrological budget (2002-2008) for a large subtropical wetland ecosystem indicates marine groundwater discharge accompanies diminished freshwater flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saha, Amartya K.; Moses, Christopher S.; Price, Rene M.; Engel, Victor; Smith, Thomas J.; Anderson, Gordon

    2012-01-01

    Water budget parameters are estimated for Shark River Slough (SRS), the main drainage within Everglades National Park (ENP) from 2002 to 2008. Inputs to the water budget include surface water inflows and precipitation while outputs consist of evapotranspiration, discharge to the Gulf of Mexico and seepage losses due to municipal wellfield extraction. The daily change in volume of SRS is equated to the difference between input and outputs yielding a residual term consisting of component errors and net groundwater exchange. Results predict significant net groundwater discharge to the SRS peaking in June and positively correlated with surface water salinity at the mangrove ecotone, lagging by 1 month. Precipitation, the largest input to the SRS, is offset by ET (the largest output); thereby highlighting the importance of increasing fresh water inflows into ENP for maintaining conditions in terrestrial, estuarine, and marine ecosystems of South Florida.

  14. A study of current maintenance challenges in a large offshore wind farm

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Kristian Rasmus; Madsen, Erik Skov; Bilberg, Arne

    The aim of the present research project is to obtain a better understanding of the operations and maintenance (O&M) processes that are performed in the offshore wind energy sector. So far, the focus on O&M of offshore wind parks has been very limited and is currently in its early phase. A compara...... used in this study is the case study method. We have followed a team of service-technicians for a longer period of time to investigate their work tasks. This has given an insight in how maintenance jobs are planned, carried out and....

  15. A Study on Measurement Error during Alternating Current Induced Voltage Tests on Large Transformers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Xuan; LI Yun-ge; CAO Xiao-long; LIU Ying

    2006-01-01

    The large transformer is pivotal equipment in an electric power supply system; Its partial discharge test and the induced voltage withstand test on large transformers are carried out at a frequency about twice the working frequency. If the magnetizing inductance cannot compensate for the stray capacitance, the test sample turns into a capacitive load and a capacitive rise exhibits in the testing circuit. For self-restoring insulation, a method has been recommended in IEC60-1 that an unapproved measuring system be calibrated by an approved system at a voltage not less than 50% of the rated testing voltage, and the result then be extrapolated linearly. It has been found that this method leads to great error due to the capacitive rise if it is not correctly used during a withstand voltage test under certain testing conditions, especially for a test on high voltage transformers with large capacity. Since the withstand voltage test is the most important means to examine the operation reliability of a transformer, and it can be destructive to the insulation, a precise measurement must be guaranteed. In this paper a factor, named as the capacitive rise factor, is introduced to assess the rise. The voltage measurement error during the calibration is determined by the parameters of the test sample and the testing facilities, as well as the measuring point. Based on theoretical analysis in this paper, a novel method is suggested and demonstrated to estimate the error by using the capacitive rise factor and other known parameters of the testing circuit.

  16. Large Deviation Generating Function for Currents in the Pauli-Fierz Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Roeck, Wojciech

    We consider a finite quantum system coupled to quasifree thermal reservoirs at different temperatures. We construct the statistics of energy transport between the reservoirs and we show that the corresponding large deviation generating function exists and it is analytic on a compact set. This result is valid for small coupling and exponentially decaying reservoir correlation functions. Our technique consists of a diagrammatic expansion that uses the Markovian limit of the system as a reference. As a corollary, we derive the Gallavotti-Cohen fluctuation relation for the entropy production.

  17. Friction and mixing effects on potential vorticity for bottom current crossing a marine strait: an application to the Sicily Channel (central Mediterranean Sea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Falcini

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available We discuss here the evolution of vorticity and potential vorticity (PV for a bottom current crossing a marine channel in shallow-water approximation, focusing on the effect of friction and mixing. We argue that bottom current vorticity is prone to significant sign changes and oscillations due to topographic effects when, in particular, the current flows over the sill of a channel. These vorticity variations are, however, modulated by frictional effects due to seafloor roughness and morphology. Such behavior is also reflected in the PV spatial evolution, which shows an abrupt peak around the sill region. Our theoretical findings are discussed by means of in situ hydrographic data related to the Eastern Mediterranean Deep Water, i.e., a dense, bottom water vein that flows northwestward, along the Sicily Channel (Mediterranean Sea. Indeed, the narrow sill of this channel implies that friction and entrainment need to be considered. Small tidal effects in the Sicily Channel allow for a steady theoretical approach. Our diagnoses on vorticity and PV allow us to obtain general insights about the effect of mixing and friction on the pathway and internal structure of bottom-trapped currents flowing through channels and straits, and to discuss spatial variability of the frictional coefficient. Our approach significantly differs from other PV-constant approaches previously used in studying the dynamics of bottom currents flowing through rotating channels.

  18. Attributes of direct current aperiodic and alternating current harmonic components derived from large amplitude Fourier transformed voltammetry under microfluidic control in a channel electrode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthews, Sinéad M; Shiddiky, Muhammad J A; Yunus, Kamran; Elton, Darrell M; Duffy, Noel W; Gu, Yunfeng; Fisher, Adrian C; Bond, Alan M

    2012-08-07

    The flow rate dependencies of the aperiodic direct current (dc) and fundamental to eighth alternating current (ac) harmonic components derived from large-amplitude Fourier transformed ac (FT-ac) voltammetry have been evaluated in a microfluidic flow cell containing a 25 μm gold microband electrode. For the oxidation of ferrocenemethanol ([FcMeOH]/[FcMeOH](+) process) in aqueous 0.1 M KNO(3) electrolyte, standard "Levich-like" dc behavior is observed for the aperiodic dc component, which enables the diffusion coefficient for FcMeOH to be obtained. In experimental studies, the first and second ac harmonic components contain contributions from the double layer capacitance current, thereby allowing details of the non-Faradaic current to be established. In contrast, the higher order harmonics and dc aperiodic component are essentially devoid of double layer capacitance contributions allowing the faradaic current dependence on flow rate to be studied. Significantly, flow rate independent data conforming to linear diffusion controlled theory are found in the sixth and higher ac harmonics at a frequency of 15 Hz and for all ac harmonics at a frequency of ≥ 90 Hz. Analysis of FT-ac voltammograms by theory based on stationary microband or planar electrode configurations confirms that stationary microband and planar electrode configurations and experimental data all converge for the higher order harmonics and establishes that the electrode kinetics are very fast (≥1 cms(-1)). The ability to locate, from a single experiment, a dc Faradaic component displaying Levich behavior, fundamental and second harmonics that contain details of the double layer capacitance, and Faradaic ac higher order harmonic currents that are devoid of capacitance, independent of the volume flow rate and also conform closely to mass transport by planar diffusion, provides enhanced flexibility in mass transport and electrode kinetic analysis and in understanding the performance of hydrodynamic

  19. Long-time and large-distance asymptotic behavior of the current-current correlators in the non-linear Schroedinger model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kozlowski, K.K. [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany); Terras, V. [CNRS, ENS Lyon (France). Lab. de Physique

    2010-12-15

    We present a new method allowing us to derive the long-time and large-distance asymptotic behavior of the correlations functions of quantum integrable models from their exact representations. Starting from the form factor expansion of the correlation functions in finite volume, we explain how to reduce the complexity of the computation in the so-called interacting integrable models to the one appearing in free fermion equivalent models. We apply our method to the time-dependent zero-temperature current-current correlation function in the non-linear Schroedinger model and compute the first few terms in its asymptotic expansion. Our result goes beyond the conformal field theory based predictions: in the time-dependent case, other types of excitations than the ones on the Fermi surface contribute to the leading orders of the asymptotics. (orig.)

  20. The flow structure of pyroclastic density currents: evidence from particle models and large-scale experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dellino, Pierfrancesco; Büttner, Ralf; Dioguardi, Fabio; Doronzo, Domenico Maria; La Volpe, Luigi; Mele, Daniela; Sonder, Ingo; Sulpizio, Roberto; Zimanowski, Bernd

    2010-05-01

    Pyroclastic flows are ground hugging, hot, gas-particle flows. They represent the most hazardous events of explosive volcanism, one striking example being the famous historical eruption of Pompeii (AD 79) at Vesuvius. Much of our knowledge on the mechanics of pyroclastic flows comes from theoretical models and numerical simulations. Valuable data are also stored in the geological record of past eruptions, i.e. the particles contained in pyroclastic deposits, but they are rarely used for quantifying the destructive potential of pyroclastic flows. In this paper, by means of experiments, we validate a model that is based on data from pyroclastic deposits. It allows the reconstruction of the current's fluid-dynamic behaviour. We show that our model results in likely values of dynamic pressure and particle volumetric concentration, and allows quantifying the hazard potential of pyroclastic flows.

  1. Biomass Gasification - A synthesis of technical barriers and current research issues for deployment at large scale

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heyne, Stefan [Chalmers Univ. of Technology, Gothenburg (Sweden); Liliedahl, Truls [KTH, Royal Inst. of Technology, Stockholm (Sweden); Marklund, Magnus [Energy Technology Centre, Piteaa (Sweden)

    2013-09-01

    Thermal gasification at large scale for cogeneration of power and heat and/or production of fuels and materials is a main pathway for a sustainable deployment of biomass resources. However, so far no such full scale production exists and biomass gasification projects remain at the pilot or demonstration scale. This report focuses on the key critical technology challenges for the large-scale deployment of the following biomass-based gasification concepts: Direct Fluidized Bed Gasification (FBG), Entrained Flow Gasification (EFG) and indirect Dual Fluidized Bed Gasification (DFBG). The main content in this report is based on responses from a number of experts in biomass gasification obtained from a questionnaire. The survey was composed of a number of more or less specific questions on technical barriers as to the three gasification concepts considered. For formalising the questionnaire, the concept of Technology Readiness Level (TRL 1-9) was used for grading the level of technical maturity of the different sub-processes within the three generic biomass gasification technologies. For direct fluidized bed gasification (FBG) it is mentioned that the technology is already available at commercial scale as air-blown technology and thus that air-blown FBG gasification may be reckoned a mature technology. The remaining technical challenge is the conversion to operation on oxygen with the final goal of producing chemicals or transport fuels. Tar reduction, in particular, and gas cleaning and upgrading in general are by far the most frequently named technical issues considered problematic. Other important aspects are problems that may occur when operating on low-grade fuels - i.e. low-cost fuels. These problems include bed agglomeration/ash sintering as well as alkali fouling. Even the preparation and feeding of these low-grade fuels tend to be problematic and require further development to be used on a commercial scale. Furthermore, efficient char conversion is mentioned by

  2. Current knowledge of the South East Asian large branchiopod Crustacea (Anostraca, Notostraca, Laevicaudata, Spinicaudata, Cyclestherida

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Christopher Rogers

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available The large branchiopod crustaceans (fairy shrimp, tadpole shrimp and clam shrimp of South East (SE Asia have only recently been examined with scientific vigor. Although more than 70 species have been reported for Asia and Indonesia, only six native taxa and one introduced species are known from SE Asia. The majority of records are from Thailand, with fewer than three records each from Laos, Myanmar, Malaysia, Cambodia, Vietnam, and Singapore. Eleven genera reported from adjacent regions may potentially occur in SE Asia. Spinicaudatan clam shrimp have been collected from Thailand and Cambodia, but have not been identified beyond genus. Four of the five native fairy shrimp species are endemic to SE Asia. The limited distributions of these few taxa suggest that this region has a distinct branchiopod fauna. In addition, we present new species and records of clam shrimp from Thailand. Future survey efforts will undoubtedly reveal additional taxa.

  3. The effect of current-induced stress perturbation on large- and meso-scale air-sea interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Lian

    -layer flow is briefly discussed. Computations for simple current patterns and constant large-scale winds show that substantial updraft at the top of the trade wind boundary layer can be produced by the ageostrophic transport divergence induced mechanically by an intense oceanic jet.

  4. Engaging Scientists in K-12 Professional Development and Curriculum Development in the Context of Alaska's Large Marine Ecosystems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sigman, M.; Anderson, A.; Deans, N. L.; Dublin, R.; Dugan, D.; Matsumoto, G. I.; Warburton, J.

    2012-12-01

    Alaska marine ecosystem-based professional development workshops have proven to be a robust context for engaging scientists from a variety of disciplines in overcoming barriers to communication and collaboration among scientists and educators. Scientists came away from scientist-teacher workshops with effective K-12 outreach strategies as well as a deeper understanding about how to contribute meaningfully to K-12 education. The establishment of the Alaskan Center for Ocean Sciences Education Excellence (COSEE-AK) in 2009 was the catalyst for a series of professional development workshops related to the North Pacific Research Board's (NPRB) marine focus areas (Bering Sea/Aleutian Islands, Gulf of Alaska, and Arctic Ocean) for Integrated Ecosystem Research Programs (IERPs). During 2010-2012, COSEE-AK and NPRB partnered with the Arctic Research Consortium of the U.S. (ARCUS), the Alaska Ocean Observing System (AOOS), and the Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute (MBARI) to support a five-day professional development workshop focused on each ecosystem. The workshops brought together three types of participants: 1) Alaska-focused marine ecosystem scientists; 2) rural Alaskan teachers living within each ecosystem; and 3) teachers from outside Alaska who had research experiences with scientists in the ecosystem. Over the course of the workshops, we developed a workshop model with four objectives: 1) to increase the science content knowledge of educators and their ability to teach ecosystem science; 2) to provide the scientists an opportunity to have broader impacts from their research on educators and Alaska Native and rural students; 3) to increase the knowledge and skills of educator and scientist participants to provide effective learning experiences for K-12 students; and 4) to facilitate the collaborative development of lesson plans. A total of 28 scientists and 41 educators participated in the three workshops. The success of the workshop for the educators was

  5. Assessing the role of large herbivores in the structuring and functioning of freshwater and marine angiosperm ecosystems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bakker, Elisabeth S.; Pagès, Jordi F.; Arthur, Rohan; Alcoverro, Teresa

    2016-01-01

    While large herbivores can have strong impacts on terrestrial ecosystems, much less is known of their role in aquatic systems. We reviewed the literature to determine: (1) which large herbivores (>10 kg) have a (semi-)aquatic lifestyle and are important consumers of submerged vascular plants, (2) th

  6. Preparative separation of sulfur-containing diketopiperazines from marine fungus Cladosporium sp. using high-speed counter-current chromatography in stepwise elution mode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Binbin; Zhang, Yanying; Ding, Lijian; He, Shan; Wu, Bin; Dong, Junde; Zhu, Peng; Chen, Juanjuan; Zhang, Jinrong; Yan, Xiaojun

    2015-01-09

    High-speed counter-current chromatography (HSCCC) was successively applied to the separation of three sulfur-containing diketopiperazines (DKPs) (including two new compounds cladosporin A (1) and cladosporin B (3), and a known compound haematocin (2)) from a marine fungus Cladosporium sp. The two-phase solvent system composed of n-hexane-ethyl acetate-methanol-water at (1:1:1:1, v/v) and (2:1:2:1, v/v), in stepwise elution mode, was used for HSCCC. The preparative HSCCC separation was performed on 300 mg of crude sample yielding 26.7 mg of compound 3 at a purity of over 95%, 53.6 mg of a mixture of compounds 1 and 2, which was further separated by preparative-HPLC yielding 14.3 mg of compound 1 and 25.4 mg of compound 2 each at a purity of over 95%. Their structures were established by spectroscopic methods. The sulfur-containing DKPs suppressed the proliferation of hepatocellular carcinoma cell line HepG2. The present work represents the first application of HSCCC in the efficient preparation of marine fungal natural products.

  7. Preparative Separation of Sulfur-Containing Diketopiperazines from Marine Fungus Cladosporium sp. Using High-Speed Counter-Current Chromatography in Stepwise Elution Mode

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Binbin Gu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available High-speed counter-current chromatography (HSCCC was successively applied to the separation of three sulfur-containing diketopiperazines (DKPs (including two new compounds cladosporin A (1 and cladosporin B (3, and a known compound haematocin (2 from a marine fungus Cladosporium sp. The two-phase solvent system composed of n-hexane-ethyl acetate-methanol-water at (1:1:1:1, v/v and (2:1:2:1, v/v, in stepwise elution mode, was used for HSCCC. The preparative HSCCC separation was performed on 300 mg of crude sample yielding 26.7 mg of compound 3 at a purity of over 95%, 53.6 mg of a mixture of compounds 1 and 2, which was further separated by preparative-HPLC yielding 14.3 mg of compound 1 and 25.4 mg of compound 2 each at a purity of over 95%. Their structures were established by spectroscopic methods. The sulfur-containing DKPs suppressed the proliferation of hepatocellular carcinoma cell line HepG2. The present work represents the first application of HSCCC in the efficient preparation of marine fungal natural products.

  8. Current-driven flow instabilities in large-scale liquid metal batteries, and how to tame them

    CERN Document Server

    Weber, Norbert; Stefani, Frank; Weier, Tom

    2013-01-01

    The use of liquid metal batteries is considered as one promising option for electric grid stabilisation. While large versions of such batteries are preferred in view of the economies of scale, they are susceptible to various magnetohydrodynamic instabilities which imply a risk of short-circuiting the battery due to the triggered fluid flow. Here we focus on the current driven Tayler instability and give critical electrical currents for its onset as well as numerical estimates for the appearing flow structures and speeds. Scaling laws for different materials, battery sizes and geometries are found. We further discuss and compare various means for preventing the instability.

  9. Measurements of the large-scale direct-current Earth potential and possible implications for the geomagnetic dynamo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1985-07-05

    The magnitude of the large-scale direct-current earth potential was measured on a section of a recently laid transatlantic telecommunications cable. Analysis of the data acquired on the 4476-kilometer cable yielded a mean direct-current potential drop of less than about 0.072 +/- 0.050 millivolts per kilometer. Interpreted in terms of a generation of the potential by the earth's geodynamo, such a small value of the mean potential implies that the toroidal and poloidal magnetic fields of the dynamo are approximately equal at the core-mantle boundary.

  10. The Generation of a Large-Scale Galactic Magnetic Field by Electric Currents of Energetic Particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolginov, A. Z.; Toptygin, I. N.

    2003-06-01

    We consider the generation of a magnetic field in the Galaxy by the electric currents excited by cosmic-ray particles in the disk and halo. We assume that the sources of relativistic particles are distributed continuously and uniformly in the Galactic disk, their total power is equal to the observed value, and the particles themselves undergo anisotropic diffusion in a homogeneous medium. We take into account the differential rotation of the Galactic disk but disregard the turbulence gyrotropy (the alpha-effect). The strength of the generated magnetic field in our model is shown to strongly depend on the symmetry of the relativistic proton and thermal electron diffusion tensors, as well as on the relations between the tensor components. In particular, if the diffusion is isotropic, then no magnetic field is generated. For the independent tensor components estimated from observed parameters of the Galactic medium and with a simultaneous allowance made for the turbulent field dissipation processes, the mechanism under consideration can provide an observable magnetic-field strength of the order of several microgauss. This mechanism does not require any seed magnetic field, which leads us to suggest that relativistic particles can give an appreciable and, possibly, determining contribution to the formation of the global Galactic magnetic field. However, a final answer can be obtained only from a nonlinear self-consistent treatment, in which the symmetry and magnitude of the particle diffusion tensor components should be determined together with the calculation of the magnetic field.

  11. The baryon axial current in large $N_c$ chiral perturbation theory

    CERN Document Server

    Hernandez-Ruiz, Maria A

    2014-01-01

    In this thesis we calculate the baryon axial current within the combined framework of the $1/N_c$ expansion and chiral perturbation theory, where $N_c$ is the number of colors. This calculation shall consider Feynman diagrams to order of one-loop, octet and decuplet intermediaries states. We obtain corrections due to one-loop and perturbative SU(3) symmetry breaking. The first corrections come from Feynman diagrams, then talk about a broken chiral symmetry in the implicit limit $m_q \\rightarrow 0$, where $m_q$ is the quark mass and the second corrections are obtained by ignoring isospin breaking and in that case the SU(3) symmetry breaking a first-order perturbation is included, leading an explicit break symmetry. The matrix elements of the spatial components of the axial operator between the states of the spin flavor symmetry, give the typical values of the axial vector coupling. For the baryon octet, links axial vector are $g_A$, just as they are defined in experiments of baryon semileptonic decays, where $...

  12. Sustainable production of toxin free marine microalgae biomass as fish feed in large scale open system in the Qatari desert.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Probir; Thaher, Mahmoud Ibrahim; Hakim, Mohammed Abdul Quadir Mohd Abdul; Al-Jabri, Hareb Mohammed S J

    2015-09-01

    Mass cultivation of microalgae biomass for feed should be cost effective and toxin free. Evaporation loss in Qatar can be as high as 2 cm/d. Hence, production of marine microalgae biomass in Qatar would also require mitigating water loss as there was only very limited groundwater reserve. To address these issues, a combination of four growth conditions were applied to a 25,000 L raceway pond: locally isolated microalgae strain was selected which could grow in elevated salinity; strain that did not require silica and vitamins; volume of the culture would increase over time keeping denser inoculum in the beginning, and evaporation water loss would be balanced by adding seawater only. A local saline tolerant Nannochloropsis sp. was selected which did not require silica and vitamins. When the above conditions were combined in the pond, average areal biomass productivities reached 20.37 g/m(2)/d, and the culture was not contaminated by any toxic microalgae. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Large dunes on the outer shelf off the Zambezi Delta, Mozambique: evidence for the existence of a Mozambique Current

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flemming, Burghard W.; Kudrass, Hermann-Rudolf

    2017-06-01

    The existence of a continuously flowing Mozambique Current, i.e. a western geostrophic boundary current flowing southwards along the shelf break of Mozambique, was until recently accepted by oceanographers studying ocean circulation in the south-western Indian Ocean. This concept was then cast into doubt based on long-term current measurements obtained from current-meter moorings deployed across the northern Mozambique Channel, which suggested that southward flow through the Mozambique Channel took place in the form of successive, southward migrating and counter-clockwise rotating eddies. Indeed, numerical modelling found that, if at all, strong currents on the outer shelf occurred for not more than 9 days per year. In the present study, the negation of the existence of a Mozambique Current is challenged by the discovery of a large (50 km long, 12 km wide) subaqueous dune field (with up to 10 m high dunes) on the outer shelf east of the modern Zambezi River delta at water depths between 50 and 100 m. Being interpreted as representing the current-modified, early Holocene Zambezi palaeo-delta, the dune field would have migrated southwards by at least 50 km from its former location since sea level recovered to its present-day position some 7 ka ago and after the former delta had been remoulded into a migrating dune field. Because a large dune field composed of actively migrating bedforms cannot be generated and maintained by currents restricted to a period of only 9 days per year, the validity of those earlier modelling results is questioned for the western margin of the flow field. Indeed, satellite images extracted from the Perpetual Ocean display of NASA, which show monthly time-integrated surface currents in the Mozambique Channel for the 5 month period from June-October 2006, support the proposition that strong flow on the outer Mozambican shelf occurs much more frequently than postulated by those modelling results. This is consistent with more recent modelling

  14. Numerical Analysis of Consolidation Settlement and Creep Deformation of Artificial Island Revetment Structure in a Large-Scale Marine Reclamation Land Project

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jie Zhao

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available In order to analyze the influential factors of soft foundation settlement in a marine reclamation land project, the consolidation settlement and pore pressure dissipation of the entire area are numerically simulated using Soft-Soil- Creep Model, in which the PLAXIS finite element software for professional geotechnical engineering is applied and empirical data of Japanese Kansai’s airport project are used. Moreover, the figures of settlement and pore pressure results in the different basic period are drawn, and the corresponding analysis conclusions are ob-tained based on the comparison among the results from the computational parameters of depth. In addition,, the influence rules of various parameters on settlement results is concluded through running the parameter sensitivity analysis in Soft-Soil-Creep Model, and the experience and conclusions can be for reference in the design and con-struction of similar large-scale marine reclamation land project. Also the empirical value method of the creep index has not been applied widely. Further research needs to be done.

  15. Uplifted marine terraces in Davao Oriental Province, Mindanao Island, Philippines and their implications for large prehistoric offshore earthquakes along the Philippine trench

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos, Noelynna T.; Tsutsumi, Hiroyuki; Perez, Jeffrey S.; Bermas, Percival P.

    2012-02-01

    We conducted systematic mapping of Holocene marine terraces in eastern Mindanao Island, Philippines for the first time. Raised marine platforms along the 80-km-long coastline of eastern Davao Oriental Province are geomorphic evidence of tectonic deformation resulting from the westward subduction of the Philippine Sea plate along the Philippine trench. Holocene coral platforms consist of up to four terrace steps: T1: 1-5 m, T2: 3-6 m, T3: 6-10 m, and T4: 8-12 m amsl, from the lowest to highest, respectively. Terraces are subhorizontal, exposing cemented coral shingle and eroded coral heads, while terrace risers are 1-3 m high. Radiocarbon ages, 8080-4140 cal yr BP, reveal that erosional surfaces were carved onto the Holocene transgressive reef complex which grew upward until ˜8000 years ago. The maximum uplift rate is ˜1.5 mm/yr based on the highest Holocene terrace at Philippine trench were not large enough to produce meter-scale coastal uplift, suggesting that much larger earthquakes occurred in the past. A long-term tectonic uplift rate of ˜1.3 mm/yr was also estimated based on Late Pleistocene terraces.

  16. 海洋生物 DNA 条形码研究现状与展望%Current status and future prospect of DNA barcoding in marine biology

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    林森杰; 王路; 郑连明; 董云伟; 柳淑芳; 丁少雄; 叶乃好; 曹文清; 庄志猛

    2014-01-01

    海洋生物种类多样,分布广泛,具有复杂性、多样性和趋同性等特点,为了对物种进行更快速、准确地鉴定,急需在传统形态分类学基础上,建立并结合便捷准确的分子鉴定手段。DNA 条形码提供了可信息化的分类标准和有效的分类学手段,已成为近年来分类学与生物多样性研究中重要的技术依托。本文概述了 DNA 条形码当前的发展现状与趋势,并介绍了 DNA 条形码技术在主要海洋浮游植物(红藻、褐藻、绿藻、硅藻、甲藻)、无脊椎动物(海绵动物、刺胞动物、甲壳动物和软体动物等)和鱼类中的研究进展,以及不同条形码基因针对于不同生物类群的有效性和适用性,指出了目前条形码技术在各海洋类群中存在的主要问题,并对未来的相关工作做了展望,希望为今后我国的海洋生物DNA 条形码研究提供理论基础。%Marine organisms are highly diverse,widely distributed,with high complexity and homoplasy.To enable fast and accurate identification of species,it is imperative to establish molecular techniques,to complement the tradi-tional morphological metbodology.DNA barcoding provides digitalized criteria and effective means for species iden-tification,and is becoming an important technical tool in the research on taxonomy and biodiversity.In this review, we summarize the major recent progress and current trend in DNA barcoding,particularly as it applies to the fields of marine phytoplankton (Rhodophyte,Phaeophyta,Chlorophyta,Bacillariophyta and Dinophyta ),invertebrates (Spongia,Cnidaria,Custacea,Mollusca,etc.)and fish.We provide an overview of the deffectiveness and suitability of different barcoding markers in different groups of marine organisms.We also discuss current challenges and fu-ture prospects of marine DNA barcoding in hope to provide a framework for future marine DNA barcoding research in China.

  17. Innovative real-time and non-destructive method of beam profile measurement under large beam current irradiation for BNCT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takada, M., E-mail: m_takada@nirs.go.jp [National Institute of Radiological Sciences, 4-9-1 Anagawa, Inage-ku, Chiba 263-8555 (Japan); Kamada, S.; Suda, M. [National Institute of Radiological Sciences, 4-9-1 Anagawa, Inage-ku, Chiba 263-8555 (Japan); Fujii, R.; Nakamura, M. [Cancer Intelligence Care Systems, Inc., 3-5-7 Ariake, Koto-ku, Tokyo 135-0063 (Japan); Hoshi, M. [Research Institute for Radiation Biology and Medicine, Hiroshima University, 1-2-3 kasumi, Minami-ku, Hiroshima 734-8553 (Japan); Sato, H. [Ibaraki Prefectural University of Health Sciences, 4669-2, Ami Ami-Cho, Inashiki-gun, Ibaraki 300-0394 (Japan); Endo, S. [Quantum Energy Applications, Graduate School of Engineering, Hiroshima University, 1-4-1 Kagamiyama, Higashi-Hiroshima 739-8527 (Japan); Hamano, T. [National Institute of Radiological Sciences, 4-9-1 Anagawa, Inage-ku, Chiba 263-8555 (Japan); Arai, S.; Higashimata, A. [Sanki Industry Co., 318-6, Sannoh, Inage-ku, Chiba 263-0002 (Japan)

    2012-10-11

    We developed a real-time and non-destructive method of beam profile measurement on a target under large beam current irradiation, and without any complex radiation detectors or electrical circuits. We measured the beam profiles on a target by observing the target temperature using an infrared-radiation thermometer camera. The target temperatures were increased and decreased quickly by starting and stopping the beam irradiation within 1 s in response speed. Our method could trace beam movements rapidly. The beam size and position were calibrated by measuring O-ring heat on the target. Our method has the potential to measure beam profiles at beam current over 1 mA for proton and deuteron with the energy around 3 MeV and allows accelerator operators to adjust the beam location during beam irradiation experiments without decreasing the beam current.

  18. The magnetic shear-current effect: generation of large-scale magnetic fields by the small-scale dynamo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Squire, J.; Bhattacharjee, A.

    2016-04-01

    > A novel large-scale dynamo mechanism, the magnetic shear-current effect, is discussed and explored. The effect relies on the interaction of magnetic fluctuations with a mean shear flow, meaning the saturated state of the small-scale dynamo can drive a large-scale dynamo - in some sense the inverse of dynamo quenching. The dynamo is non-helical, with the mean field coefficient zero, and is caused by the interaction between an off-diagonal component of the turbulent resistivity and the stretching of the large-scale field by shear flow. Following up on previous numerical and analytic work, this paper presents further details of the numerical evidence for the effect, as well as an heuristic description of how magnetic fluctuations can interact with shear flow to produce the required electromotive force. The pressure response of the fluid is fundamental to this mechanism, which helps explain why the magnetic effect is stronger than its kinematic cousin, and the basic idea is related to the well-known lack of turbulent resistivity quenching by magnetic fluctuations. As well as being interesting for its applications to general high Reynolds number astrophysical turbulence, where strong small-scale magnetic fluctuations are expected to be prevalent, the magnetic shear-current effect is a likely candidate for large-scale dynamo in the unstratified regions of ionized accretion disks. Evidence for this is discussed, as well as future research directions and the challenges involved with understanding details of the effect in astrophysically relevant regimes.

  19. 海洋可再生能源发电现状与发展趋势%Current Situation and Development of Marine Renewable Energy Power Generation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵伟国; 刘玉田; 王伟胜

    2015-01-01

    With the rapid growth of fossil energy consumption, pressure of carbon emission reduction becomes higher, and more attention has been paid to marine renewable energy power generation. Offshore wind energy, tidal energy, tidal current energy, wave energy, ocean thermal energy conversion and salinity gradient energy generation are discussed by taxonomic study. The worldwide resource distributions, developmental trajectories and current status are introduced and analyzed respectively. The obstructions hindering their wide scale exploitation and commercialization are also focused on, then some possible solutions, development trends and prospects are put forward. The severe situation of energy shortage, carbon emission and environmental pollution can be effectively alleviated by marine renewable energy power generation technology.%随着化石能源消耗的迅速增长,低碳减排压力不断增加,海洋可再生能源发电日益受到重视。分类介绍海上风能、潮汐能、潮流能、波浪能、海洋温差能和盐度差能等海洋发电方式资源分布、发展历程和现状,分析海洋可再生能源开发所面临的主要问题,提出相关建议,指出发展趋势和前景。正在迅速发展的海洋可再生能源发电技术,不仅能够缓解能源紧张的现状,更可以有效实现低碳减排和环境保护。

  20. Large scale MALDI-TOF MS based taxa identification to identify novel pigment producers in a marine bacterial culture collection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stafsnes, Marit H; Dybwad, Marius; Brunsvik, Anders; Bruheim, Per

    2013-03-01

    A challenge in the rational exploitation of microbial culture collections is to avoid superfluous testing of replicas. MALDI-TOF MS has been shown to be an efficient dereplication tool as it can be used to discriminate between bacterial isolates at the species level. A bacterial culture collection of more than 10,000 heterotrophic marine bacterial isolates from sea-water surface layers of the Norwegian Trondheimsfjord and neighbouring coastal areas has been established. A sub-collection of pigmented isolates was earlier screened for novel carotenoids with UVA-Blue light absorbing properties. This was a comprehensive analytical task and it was observed that a significant number of extracts with identical pigment profile were recovered. Hence, this study was undertaken to explore the use of MALDI-TOF MS as a dereplication tool to quickly characterize the bacterial collection. Furthermore, LC-DAD-MS analysis of pigment profiles was performed to check if pigment profile diversity was maintained among isolates kept after the potential MALDI-TOF MS selection step. Four hundred isolates comprising both pigmented and non-pigmented isolates were used for this study. The resulting MALDI-TOF MS dendrogram clearly identified a diversity of different taxa and these were supported by the pigment profile clustering, thus linking the pigment production as species-specific properties. Although one exception was found, it can be concluded that MALDI-TOF MS dereplication is a promising pre-screening tool for more efficient screening of microbial culture collection containing pigments with potential novel properties.

  1. Reciprocal transplants support a plasticity-first scenario during colonisation of a large hyposaline basin by a marine macro alga.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johansson, Daniel; Pereyra, Ricardo T; Rafajlović, Marina; Johannesson, Kerstin

    2017-04-05

    Establishing populations in ecologically marginal habitats may require substantial phenotypic changes that come about through phenotypic plasticity, local adaptation, or both. West-Eberhard's "plasticity-first" model suggests that plasticity allows for rapid colonisation of a new environment, followed by directional selection that develops local adaptation. Two predictions from this model are that (i) individuals of the original population have high enough plasticity to survive and reproduce in the marginal environment, and (ii) individuals of the marginal population show evidence of local adaptation. Individuals of the macroalga Fucus vesiculosus from the North Sea colonised the hyposaline (≥2-3‰) Baltic Sea less than 8000 years ago. The colonisation involved a switch from fully sexual to facultative asexual recruitment with release of adventitious branches that grow rhizoids and attach to the substratum. To test the predictions from the plasticity-first model we reciprocally transplanted F. vesiculosus from the original population (ambient salinity 24‰) and from the marginal population inside the Baltic Sea (ambient salinity 4‰). We also transplanted individuals of the Baltic endemic sister species F. radicans from 4 to 24‰. We assessed the degree of plasticity and local adaptation in growth and reproductive traits after 6 months by comparing the performance of individuals in 4 and 24‰. Branches of all individuals survived the 6 months period in both salinities, but grew better in their native salinity. Baltic Sea individuals more frequently developed asexual traits while North Sea individuals initiated formation of receptacles for sexual reproduction. Marine individuals of F. vesiculosus are highly plastic with respect to salinity and North Sea populations can survive the extreme hyposaline conditions of the Baltic Sea without selective mortality. Plasticity alone would thus allow for an initial establishment of this species inside the postglacial

  2. Economic Impact of Large-Scale Deployment of Offshore Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology in Oregon Coastal Counties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jimenez, T. [Bureau of Ocean Energy Management (BOEM), Washington, DC (United States); Tegen, S. [Bureau of Ocean Energy Management (BOEM), Washington, DC (United States); Beiter, P. [Bureau of Ocean Energy Management (BOEM), Washington, DC (United States)

    2015-03-01

    To begin understanding the potential economic impacts of large-scale WEC technology, the Bureau of Ocean Energy Management (BOEM) commissioned the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) to conduct an economic impact analysis of largescale WEC deployment for Oregon coastal counties. This report follows a previously published report by BOEM and NREL on the jobs and economic impacts of WEC technology for the entire state (Jimenez and Tegen 2015). As in Jimenez and Tegen (2015), this analysis examined two deployment scenarios in the 2026-2045 timeframe: the first scenario assumed 13,000 megawatts (MW) of WEC technology deployed during the analysis period, and the second assumed 18,000 MW of WEC technology deployed by 2045. Both scenarios require major technology and cost improvements in the WEC devices. The study is on very large-scale deployment so readers can examine and discuss the potential of a successful and very large WEC industry. The 13,000-MW is used as the basis for the county analysis as it is the smaller of the two scenarios. Sensitivity studies examined the effects of a robust in-state WEC supply chain. The region of analysis is comprised of the seven coastal counties in Oregon—Clatsop, Coos, Curry, Douglas, Lane, Lincoln, and Tillamook—so estimates of jobs and other economic impacts are specific to this coastal county area.

  3. Marine electrical practice

    CERN Document Server

    Watson, G O

    1991-01-01

    Marine Engineering Series: Marine Electrical Practice, Sixth Edition focuses on changes in the marine industry, including the application of programmable electronic systems, generators, and motors. The publication first ponders on insulation and temperature ratings of equipment, protection and discrimination, and AC generators. Discussions focus on construction, shaft-drive generators, effect of unbalanced loading, subtransient and transient reactance, protection discrimination, fault current, measurement of ambient air temperature, and basis of machine ratings. The text then examines AC switc

  4. Large clean mesocosms and simulated dust deposition: a new methodology to investigate responses of marine oligotrophic ecosystems to atmospheric inputs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Guieu

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Intense Saharan dust deposition occurs over large oligotrophic areas in the Mediterranean Sea and the Tropical Atlantic and its impact on the biogeochemical functioning of such oligotrophic ecosystems needs to be understood. However, due to the logistical difficulties to investigate in-situ natural dust events and due to the inherent limitations of microcosm laboratory experiments, new experimental approaches need to be developed. In this paper, we present a new experimental set up based on large clean mesocoms deployed in the frame of the DUNE (a DUst experiment in a low-Nutrient, low-chlorophyll Ecosystem project. We demonstrate that these tools are highly relevant and provide a powerful new strategy to in situ study the response of an oligotrophic ecosystem to chemical forcing by atmospheric deposition of African dust. First, we describe how to cope with the large amount of dust aerosol needed to conduct the seeding experiments, by producing an analogue from soil collection in a source area and performing subsequent appropriate physico-chemical treatment in the laboratory including an eventual processing by simulated cloud water. The comparison of physico-chemical characteristics of produced dust analogues with the literature confirms that our experimental simulations are representative of dust, ageing during atmospheric transport, and subsequent deposition to the Mediterranean. Second, we demonstrate the feasibility in coastal area to installing in situ, a series of large (6×52 m3 mesocosms without perturbing the local ecosystem. All the setup, containing no metallic part and with as less as possible induced perturbation during the sampling sequence, allows working with the required conditions for biogeochemical studies in oligotrophic environments where nutrient and micronutrients are at nano- or subnano-molar levels. Two distinct "seeding experiments" were conducted by deploying mesocosms in triplicates: three mesocosms serving

  5. Large clean mesocosms and simulated dust deposition: a new methodology to investigate responses of marine oligotrophic ecosystems to atmospheric inputs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Guieu

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Intense Saharan dust deposition occurs over large oligotrophic areas in the Mediterranean Sea and in the Tropical Atlantic, and its impact on the biogeochemical functioning of such oligotrophic ecosystems needs to be understood. However, due to the logistical difficulties of investigating in situ natural dust events, and due to the inherent limitations of microcosm laboratory experiments, new experimental approaches need to be developed. In this paper, we present a new experimental setup based on large, clean mesocoms deployed in the frame of the DUNE (a DUst experiment in a low-Nutrient, low-chlorophyll Ecosystem project. We demonstrate that these tools are highly relevant and provide a powerful new strategy to in situ studies of the response of an oligotrophic ecosystem to chemical forcing by atmospheric deposition of African dust. First, we describe how to cope with the large amount of dust aerosol needed to conduct the seeding experiments by producing an analogue from soil collected in a source area and by performing subsequent appropriate physico-chemical treatments in the laboratory, including an eventual processing by simulated cloud water. The comparison of the physico-chemical characteristics of produced dust analogues with the literature confirms that our experimental simulations are representative of dust, aging during atmospheric transport, and subsequent deposition to the Mediterranean. Second, we demonstrate the feasibility in coastal areas to installing, in situ, a series of large (6 × 52 m3 mesocosms without perturbing the local ecosystem. The setup, containing no metallic parts and with the least possible induced perturbation during the sampling sequence, provides an approach for working with the required conditions for biogeochemical studies in oligotrophic environments, where nutrient and micronutrients are at nano- or subnano-molar levels. Two, distinct "seeding experiments" were conducted by deploying three

  6. Marine Indole Alkaloids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalie Netz

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Marine indole alkaloids comprise a large and steadily growing group of secondary metabolites. Their diverse biological activities make many compounds of this class attractive starting points for pharmaceutical development. Several marine-derived indoles were found to possess cytotoxic, antineoplastic, antibacterial and antimicrobial activities, in addition to the action on human enzymes and receptors. The newly isolated indole alkaloids of marine origin since the last comprehensive review in 2003 are reported, and biological aspects will be discussed.

  7. Marine Biocatalysts: Enzymatic Features and Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Trincone

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available In several recent reports related to biocatalysis the enormous pool of biodiversity found in marine ecosystems is considered a profitable natural reservoir for acquiring an inventory of useful biocatalysts. These enzymes are characterized by well-known habitat-related features such as salt tolerance, hyperthermostability, barophilicity and cold adaptivity. In addition, their novel chemical and stereochemical characteristics increase the interest of biocatalysis practitioners both in academia and research industry. In this review, starting from the analysis of these featuring habitat-related properties, important examples of marine enzymes in biocatalysis will be reported. Completion of this report is devoted to the analysis of novel chemical and stereochemical biodiversity offered by marine biocatalysts with particular emphasis on current or potential applications of these enzymes in chemical and pharmaceutical fields. The analysis of literature cited here and the many published patent applications concerning the use of marine enzymes supports the view that these biocatalysts are just waiting to be discovered, reflecting the importance of the marine environment. The potential of this habitat should be thoroughly explored and possibly the way to access useful biocatalysts should avoid destructive large-scale collections of marine biomass for enzyme production. These two aspects are day by day increasing in interest and a future increase in the use of marine enzymes in biocatalysis should be expected.

  8. Management of large marine ecosystem based on ecosystem approach%基于生态系统方法的大海洋生态系管理

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    初建松

    2011-01-01

    Large marine ecosystem (LME) is a large area of ocean characterized by distinct ocean-ology and ecology. Its natural characteristics require management based on ecosystem approach. A series of international treaties and regulations definitely or indirectly support that it should adopt ecosystem approach to manage LME to achieve the sustainable utilization of marine resources. In practices, some countries such as Canada, Australia, and USA have adopted ecosystem-based ap-proach to manage their oceans, and some international organizations such as global environment fund committee have carried out a number of LME programs based on ecosystem approach. Aiming at the sustainable development of their fisheries, the regional organizations such as Caribbean Com-munity have established regional fisheries mechanism. However, the adoption of ecosystem ap-proach to manage LME is not only a scientific and legal issue, but also a political matter largely de-pending on the political will and the mutual cooperation degree of related countries.%大海洋生态系是指海洋中具有独特海洋学和生态学特征的一个较大的区域,其自然特性要求采用基于生态系统的方法对其进行管理.一系列的国际条约和章程均明确或间接支持采用基于生态系统方法管理大海洋生态系,实现海洋资源的可持续利用.实践方面,加拿大、澳大利亚、美国等采用了基于生态系统方法对其海洋进行管理,全球环境基金会等国际组织实施了一些基于生态系统方法的大海洋生态系项目,加勒比共同体等区域组织建立了旨在实现其渔业可持续发展的区域渔业机制.而基于生态系统方法的大海洋生态系管理能否最终成功实施,不仅是一个科学和法律问题,而且在很大程度上也是一个政治问题,依赖于相关国 家的政治意愿与相互合作的程度.

  9. Organic biomarker records spanning the last 34,800 years from the southeastern Brazilian upper slope: links between sea surface temperature, displacement of the Brazil Current, and marine productivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lourenço, Rafael André; de Mahiques, Michel Michaelovitch; Wainer, Ilana Elazari Klein Coaracy; Rosell-Melé, Antoni; Bícego, Márcia Caruso

    2016-10-01

    Collective assessment of marine and terrigenous organic biomarkers was performed on a sediment core spanning the last 34,800 years on the upper slope southeast of Brazil to verify the signatures of climatic variations in sea surface temperature (SST), marine productivity, and the flux of terrigenous material in this region. This evaluation is based on marine and terrigenous proxies including alkenones, chlorins, aliphatic hydrocarbons, n-alcohols, and fatty acids. This first report of organic biomarker data for this region confirms a correlation between SST, changes in terrigenous organic matter flow into the ocean, and marine productivity over the last 34.8 ka as a response to the displacement of the Brazil Current. Conditions prevailing during marine isotopic stage (MIS) 3 may be considered intermediate between the last glacial maximum (LGM) and the Late Holocene. For MIS 2, a period of low relative sea level, it was verified that the lowest SSTs were associated with the LGM and higher marine productivity. SST increased by up to 4.4 °C between the LGM and the Holocene. This reveals synchronicity between SST on the southeastern Brazilian upper slope and the North Atlantic Ocean SST records reported in earlier studies.

  10. Osedax borings in fossil marine bird bones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiel, Steffen; Kahl, Wolf-Achim; Goedert, James L.

    2011-01-01

    The bone-eating marine annelid Osedax consumes mainly whale bones on the deep-sea floor, but recent colonization experiments with cow bones and molecular age estimates suggesting a possible Cretaceous origin of Osedax indicate that this worm might be able grow on a wider range of substrates. The suggested Cretaceous origin was thought to imply that Osedax could colonize marine reptile or fish bones, but there is currently no evidence that Osedax consumes bones other than those of mammals. We provide the first evidence that Osedax was, and most likely still is, able to consume non-mammalian bones, namely bird bones. Borings resembling those produced by living Osedax were found in bones of early Oligocene marine flightless diving birds (family Plotopteridae). The species that produced these boreholes had a branching filiform root that grew to a length of at least 3 mm, and lived in densities of up to 40 individuals per square centimeter. The inclusion of bird bones into the diet of Osedax has interesting implications for the recent suggestion of a Cretaceous origin of this worm because marine birds have existed continuously since the Cretaceous. Bird bones could have enabled this worm to survive times in the Earth's history when large marine vertebrates other than fish were rare, specifically after the disappearance of large marine reptiles at the end-Cretaceous mass extinction event and before the rise of whales in the Eocene.

  11. 海流发电用翼型的水动力学模拟%Hydrodynamic Simulation of Hydrofoil Marine Current Turbine Applies

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张玉良; 朱祖超; 崔宝玲; 李昳; 金英子

    2011-01-01

    With the aggravation of energy crisis in world, the energy of ocean current is greatly focused. At present, the most important application is the use of marine current turbine, the performance of which depends on the hydrodynamic performance of hydrofoil mostly. In order to study the influence of ocean current's parameters on hydrodynamic performance of hydrofoil, according to the characteristic of random fluctuation in ocean current, angle of attack, Reynolds Number and turbulence intensity are selected as three factors of orthogonal experiment in this paper, and every factor selects four influence levels to carry out a L16 (43) orthogonal experiment. The hydrodynamic performance of hydrofoil NACA63440 that marine current turbine often applies is numerically simulated under steady flow condition for sixteen schemes, and the influence laws of ocean current's parameters on hydrodynamic performance of hydrofoil are analyzed in detail. The results of numerical simulation show that the influence of turbulence intensity on hydrodynamic performance of hydrofoil is maximal, the angle of attack is next, while Reynolds Number is minimal. The influence of turbulence intensity and angle of attack on lift coefficient and drag coefficient of hydrofoil is more evident. Increasing angle of attack can improve effectively lift-drag ratio, but it has a extremum. If angle of attack exceeds the critical value, the hydrofoil will appear stalling phenomenon. Increasing Reynolds Number can improve moderately lift-drag ratio. The forebody of hydrofoil is the main region that generates lift, and the top region of forebody is most vulnerable to cavitation. Above research conclusions will provide significant referrence for more hydrodynamic performance research of hydrofoil.%为研究海流各个流动参数同时对水翼水动力学性能的影响,根据海流随机波动特点,选取海流的攻角、雷诺数和湍流强度3个因素,每个因素选取4个水平,进行了L16(43)

  12. 3D Point Cloud Data Basis Shape Management for Assembly of Modularized Large and Complicated Marine Structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deok-Hyun Yoon

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available As global competition heats up, in order to improve the productivity, simulation-based methods are becoming increasingly dominant in shipyards. The advancement of the CAD-based production management process even allows verification of installability and functionality before beginning the actual construction. However, whether the ship has been exactly constructed as designed can still and only be manually verified for a limited area. Therefore, significant interblock and intermodule errors are inevitably present in assembly, resulting in costly, time-consuming inspections and modifications. If the construction errors and defects can be investigated and controlled in each shop before assembly of modules, the productivity will be considerably improved. In the installation simulation of large structures, early detection and correction of the errors in junction allow fast and efficient assembly and provide better quality product development even with distributed construction yards. This technique can promote interindustrial collaboration among companies of different sizes, resulting in a significant improvement in overall productivity. In this paper, 3D point cloud data basis shape management framework has been studied with several case studies in a shipyard.

  13. Cultivation of marine sponges

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    QU Yi; ZHANG Wei; LI Hua; YU Xingju; JIN Meifang

    2005-01-01

    Sponges are the most primitive of multicellular animals, and are major pharmaceutical sources of marine secondary metabolites. A wide variety of new compounds have been isolated from sponges. In order to produce sufficient amounts of the compounds of the needed, it is necessary to obtain large amount of sponges.The production of sponge biomass has become a focus of marine biotechnology.

  14. High speed, intermediate resolution, large area laser beam induced current imaging and laser scribing system for photovoltaic devices and modules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Adam B; Song, Zhaoning; DeWitt, Jonathan L; Stone, Jon M; Krantz, Patrick W; Royston, John M; Zeller, Ryan M; Mapes, Meghan R; Roland, Paul J; Dorogi, Mark D; Zafar, Syed; Faykosh, Gary T; Ellingson, Randy J; Heben, Michael J

    2016-09-01

    We have developed a laser beam induced current imaging tool for photovoltaic devices and modules that utilizes diode pumped Q-switched lasers. Power densities on the order of one sun (100 mW/cm(2)) can be produced in a ∼40 μm spot size by operating the lasers at low diode current and high repetition rate. Using galvanostatically controlled mirrors in an overhead configuration and high speed data acquisition, large areas can be scanned in short times. As the beam is rastered, focus is maintained on a flat plane with an electronically controlled lens that is positioned in a coordinated fashion with the movements of the mirrors. The system can also be used in a scribing mode by increasing the diode current and decreasing the repetition rate. In either mode, the instrument can accommodate samples ranging in size from laboratory scale (few cm(2)) to full modules (1 m(2)). Customized LabVIEW programs were developed to control the components and acquire, display, and manipulate the data in imaging mode.

  15. High speed, intermediate resolution, large area laser beam induced current imaging and laser scribing system for photovoltaic devices and modules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Adam B.; Song, Zhaoning; DeWitt, Jonathan L.; Stone, Jon M.; Krantz, Patrick W.; Royston, John M.; Zeller, Ryan M.; Mapes, Meghan R.; Roland, Paul J.; Dorogi, Mark D.; Zafar, Syed; Faykosh, Gary T.; Ellingson, Randy J.; Heben, Michael J.

    2016-09-01

    We have developed a laser beam induced current imaging tool for photovoltaic devices and modules that utilizes diode pumped Q-switched lasers. Power densities on the order of one sun (100 mW/cm2) can be produced in a ˜40 μm spot size by operating the lasers at low diode current and high repetition rate. Using galvanostatically controlled mirrors in an overhead configuration and high speed data acquisition, large areas can be scanned in short times. As the beam is rastered, focus is maintained on a flat plane with an electronically controlled lens that is positioned in a coordinated fashion with the movements of the mirrors. The system can also be used in a scribing mode by increasing the diode current and decreasing the repetition rate. In either mode, the instrument can accommodate samples ranging in size from laboratory scale (few cm2) to full modules (1 m2). Customized LabVIEW programs were developed to control the components and acquire, display, and manipulate the data in imaging mode.

  16. The magnetic shear-current effect: generation of large-scale magnetic fields by the small-scale dynamo

    CERN Document Server

    Squire, Jonathan

    2015-01-01

    A novel large-scale dynamo mechanism, the magnetic shear-current effect, is discussed and explored. The effect relies on the interaction of magnetic fluctuations with a mean shear flow, meaning the saturated state of the small-scale dynamo can drive a large-scale dynamo -- in some sense the inverse of dynamo quenching. The dynamo is nonhelical, with the mean-field $\\alpha$ coefficient zero, and is caused by the interaction between an off-diagonal component of the turbulent resistivity and the stretching of the large-scale field by shear flow. Following up on previous numerical and analytic work, this paper presents further details of the numerical evidence for the effect, as well as an heuristic description of how magnetic fluctuations can interact with shear flow to produce the required electromotive force. The pressure response of the fluid is fundamental to this mechanism, which helps explain why the magnetic effect is stronger than its kinematic cousin, and the basic idea is related to the well-known lack...

  17. Characterizing the relative contributions of large vessels to total ocean noise fields: a case study using the Gerry E. Studds Stellwagen Bank National Marine Sanctuary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatch, Leila; Clark, Christopher; Merrick, Richard; Van Parijs, Sofie; Ponirakis, Dimitri; Schwehr, Kurt; Thompson, Michael; Wiley, David

    2008-11-01

    In 2006, we used the U.S. Coast Guard's Automatic Identification System (AIS) to describe patterns of large commercial ship traffic within a U.S. National Marine Sanctuary located off the coast of Massachusetts. We found that 541 large commercial vessels transited the greater sanctuary 3413 times during the year. Cargo ships, tankers, and tug/tows constituted 78% of the vessels and 82% of the total transits. Cargo ships, tankers, and cruise ships predominantly used the designated Boston Traffic Separation Scheme, while tug/tow traffic was concentrated in the western and northern portions of the sanctuary. We combined AIS data with low-frequency acoustic data from an array of nine autonomous recording units analyzed for 2 months in 2006. Analysis of received sound levels (10-1000 Hz, root-mean-square pressure re 1 microPa +/- SE) averaged 119.5 +/- 0.3 dB at high-traffic locations. High-traffic locations experienced double the acoustic power of less trafficked locations for the majority of the time period analyzed. Average source level estimates (71-141 Hz, root-mean-square pressure re 1 microPa +/- SE) for individual vessels ranged from 158 +/- 2 dB (research vessel) to 186 +/- 2 dB (oil tanker). Tankers were estimated to contribute 2 times more acoustic power to the region than cargo ships, and more than 100 times more than research vessels. Our results indicate that noise produced by large commercial vessels was at levels and within frequencies that warrant concern among managers regarding the ability of endangered whales to maintain acoustic contact within greater sanctuary waters.

  18. Spatial genetic structure in Beta vulgaris subsp. maritima and Beta macrocarpa reveals the effect of contrasting mating system, influence of marine currents, and footprints of postglacial recolonization routes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leys, Marie; Petit, Eric J; El-Bahloul, Yasmina; Liso, Camille; Fournet, Sylvain; Arnaud, Jean-François

    2014-05-01

    Understanding the factors that contribute to population genetic divergence across a species' range is a long-standing goal in evolutionary biology and ecological genetics. We examined the relative importance of historical and ecological features in shaping the present-day spatial patterns of genetic structure in two related plant species, Beta vulgaris subsp. maritima and Beta macrocarpa. Using nuclear and mitochondrial markers, we surveyed 93 populations from Brittany (France) to Morocco - the southern limit of their species' range distribution. Whereas B. macrocarpa showed a genotypic structure and a high level of genetic differentiation indicative of selfing, the population genetic structure of B. vulgaris subsp. maritima was consistent with an outcrossing mating system. We further showed (1) a strong geographic clustering in coastal B. vulgaris subsp. maritima populations that highlighted the influence of marine currents in shaping different lineages and (2) a peculiar genetic structure of inland B. vulgaris subsp. maritima populations that could indicate the admixture of distinct evolutionary lineages and recent expansions associated with anthropogenic disturbances. Spatial patterns of nuclear diversity and differentiation also supported a stepwise recolonization of Europe from Atlantic-Mediterranean refugia after the last glacial period, with leading-edge expansions. However, cytoplasmic diversity was not impacted by postglacial recolonization: stochastic long-distance seed dispersal mediated by major oceanic currents may mitigate the common patterns of reduced cytoplasmic diversity observed for edge populations. Overall, the patterns we documented here challenge the general view of reduced genetic diversity at the edge of a species' range distribution and provide clues for understanding how life-history and major geographic features interact to shape the distribution of genetic diversity.

  19. The status of marine and coastal EBM among a large sample of U.S. federal programs: a social network approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dell'Apa, A.; Fullerton, A.; Schwing, F. B.; Brady, M.

    2016-12-01

    Ecosystem-based management (EBM) is an integrated management approach that considers the entire ecosystem, including humans, across multiple sectors, with the goal to collectively manage natural resources, habitat, and species in a sustainable manner while maintaining ecosystem services to humans on the long-term. In the United States, the National Ocean Council (NOC) established a federal interagency subgroup (National Ocean Policy EBM-Subgroup) to provide policy advice on EBM strategies and technical representation from the federal agencies that are part of the NOC. As part of the NOP EBM-Subgroup effort, this study summarizes the status of EBM for several federal programs within the NOC agencies that implement or support marine and coastal EBM activities. Our objective was to provide an overview of the current state of practice among the many and varied U.S. federal programs employing EBM approaches in the ocean, coastal zone, and the Great Lakes. We used social network analysis techniques to explore similarities among programs in different topic areas (e.g., type of audience, partners, training, EBM best management practices and principles). Results highlight substantial differences in perceived and effective performances across programs, with Management programs showing a higher level of integration of EBM approaches than Non-Management programs. The use of EBM best management practices and principles among programs is unbalanced, with some key elements of EBM strategies less commonly employed in the management planning. This analysis identified gaps in the implementation of EBM strategies that can inform natural resource managers and planners

  20. Divergence between Antarctic and South American marine invertebrates: What molecular biology tells us about Scotia Arc geodynamics and the intensification of the Antarctic Circumpolar Current

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poulin, Elie; González-Wevar, Claudio; Díaz, Angie; Gérard, Karin; Hüne, Mathias

    2014-12-01

    Continental drift processes such as major gateway openings have been historically advocated to explain the distribution of marine benthic taxa in the Southern Ocean (SO). The separation between Antarctic Peninsula and the southern tip of South America together with the onset of the Antarctic Circumpolar Current (ACC) represent the final step for the complete isolation of the Antarctic region. However, there is still controversy concerning the timing and mode of this process, and especially about the role of the Scotia Arc geodynamics in the development of a fully deep and intensified ACC circulation. Based on mitochondrial Cytochrome c Oxidase Subunit I (COI) sequences obtained from different taxa, we performed molecular comparisons between Antarctic and South American relatives to provide independent time estimations of Antarctica's isolation. We include in the analyses congeneric Antarctic and Patagonian near-shore marine benthic invertebrates including indirect developers (Nacella, Yoldia, Sterechinus, and Parbolasia) and brooders (Xymenopsis and Trophonella). Considering the levels of genetic differentiation between relatives from both regions and assuming the molecular clock hypothesis, we estimated the onset of their respective divergence. On one hand, similar levels of genetic distance in broadcast-spawners (7%-8.3%) support the hypothesis that the development of an effective barrier between Antarctica and South America occurred almost simultaneously for these groups. Divergence time estimations based on specific substitution rates indicate that the separation occurred near the Mio-Pliocene transition, long after the physical separation of both continents. Genetic distance and divergence time estimation in direct developers indicate an older separation time, close to the mid-Miocene. Even when the analyzed groups included both broadcast-spawners and brooder organisms, the divergence between Antarctic and South America lineages rather than being related to

  1. Maximum swimming speeds of sailfish and three other large marine predatory fish species based on muscle contraction time and stride length: a myth revisited

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morten B. S. Svendsen

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Billfishes are considered to be among the fastest swimmers in the oceans. Previous studies have estimated maximum speed of sailfish and black marlin at around 35 m s−1 but theoretical work on cavitation predicts that such extreme speed is unlikely. Here we investigated maximum speed of sailfish, and three other large marine pelagic predatory fish species, by measuring the twitch contraction time of anaerobic swimming muscle. The highest estimated maximum swimming speeds were found in sailfish (8.3±1.4 m s−1, followed by barracuda (6.2±1.0 m s−1, little tunny (5.6±0.2 m s−1 and dorado (4.0±0.9 m s−1; although size-corrected performance was highest in little tunny and lowest in sailfish. Contrary to previously reported estimates, our results suggest that sailfish are incapable of exceeding swimming speeds of 10-15 m s−1, which corresponds to the speed at which cavitation is predicted to occur, with destructive consequences for fin tissues.

  2. Maximum swimming speeds of sailfish and three other large marine predatory fish species based on muscle contraction time and stride length: a myth revisited

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svendsen, Morten B. S.; Domenici, Paolo; Marras, Stefano; Krause, Jens; Boswell, Kevin M.; Rodriguez-Pinto, Ivan; Wilson, Alexander D. M.; Kurvers, Ralf H. J. M.; Viblanc, Paul E.; Finger, Jean S.; Steffensen, John F.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Billfishes are considered to be among the fastest swimmers in the oceans. Previous studies have estimated maximum speed of sailfish and black marlin at around 35 m s−1 but theoretical work on cavitation predicts that such extreme speed is unlikely. Here we investigated maximum speed of sailfish, and three other large marine pelagic predatory fish species, by measuring the twitch contraction time of anaerobic swimming muscle. The highest estimated maximum swimming speeds were found in sailfish (8.3±1.4 m s−1), followed by barracuda (6.2±1.0 m s−1), little tunny (5.6±0.2 m s−1) and dorado (4.0±0.9 m s−1); although size-corrected performance was highest in little tunny and lowest in sailfish. Contrary to previously reported estimates, our results suggest that sailfish are incapable of exceeding swimming speeds of 10-15 m s−1, which corresponds to the speed at which cavitation is predicted to occur, with destructive consequences for fin tissues. PMID:27543056

  3. High-speed deposition of RE123 film with large current capacity by hot-wall type PLD system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Igarashi, M., E-mail: m_igarashi@fujikura.co.j [Fujikura Ltd., 1440 Mutsuzaki, Sakura, Chiba 285-8550 (Japan); Kakimoto, K.; Hayashida, T.; Hanada, Y.; Fujita, S.; Morita, K.; Nakamura, N.; Hanyu, S.; Sutoh, Y.; Kutami, H.; Iijima, Y.; Saitoh, T. [Fujikura Ltd., 1440 Mutsuzaki, Sakura, Chiba 285-8550 (Japan)

    2010-11-01

    We have studied a hot-wall heating system to produce GdBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub y} (GdBCO) films with large critical currents (I{sub c}) at a high production rate by a pulsed-laser-deposition (PLD) method. GdBCO films fabricated at a production rate of 30 m/h under the optimized conditions, especially a distance of 95 mm between the target and the substrate (T-S), exhibited high critical current densities (J{sub c}) of about 3 MA/cm{sup 2} and I{sub c} over 300 A at a thickness of 1-2 {mu}m. Furthermore, long GdBCO tapes prepared by repeated depositions at each tape-passing speed of 80 m/h showed uniform I{sub c} distribution along the longitudinal direction, because the hot-wall system enabled to stabilize temperature within a few degrees at 800 deg. C. A 170 m long tape with I{sub c} over 600 A was successfully fabricated at a production rate of 16 m/h using a laser power of 360 W.

  4. Shared marine waters of British Columbia and Washington: A scientific assessment of current status and future trends in resource abundance and environmental quality in the strait of Juan de Fuca, Strait of Georgia, and Puget Sound

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1994-12-31

    The British Columbia/Washington Marine Science Panel was created in 1993 to evaluate the condition of the marine environment in the Strait of Georgia, Strait of Juan de Fuca, and Puget Sound region on both sides of the international boundary. The panel was asked to produce a report on the current condition of, and trends in, the marine waters shared by the province and state. This report describes the principles followed; the region of concern; physical exchange mechanisms in the transboundary region; movements, status, and trends of transboundary biological resource populations; anthropogenic impacts on the ecosystem and humans; ecosystem sensitivity and future scope of anthropogenic impacts; and degree of harm and management priorities.

  5. 海流能增速管纠正偏流的实验研究%Experimental study of a speed-up inlet to rectify yawing angle of marine current energy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王立; 董志勇; 张旭; 韩伟; 俞小伟

    2011-01-01

    Marine current energy,clean and renewable,is one of the most exploitable and flexible ocean energies.Using the marine current technologies to generate electricity can improve the energy structure and reduce environmental pollution and climate change caused by fossil energy consumption.The uncertainty in the flow direction,however,is a difficult issue.This paper presents an experimental test that was conducted in a large perspex flume using the advanced instruments such as high-speed photography and acoustic doppler velocimetry(ADV) and a comprehensive study of the effect of linear speed-up inlet on the rotational speed of turbine and yawing angle under the oncoming yawing angles of 0°,10°,20°,30°,40° and 50°.Range and extent of the yawing angle rectified by area ratio and length of the speed-up inlet were obtained.%海流能是海洋能中最易获得、最具灵活性的一种清洁、可再生能源。利用海流能技术发电,有利于改善能源结构,降低化石能源消耗带来的环境污染和气候变化问题,但其来流方向却具有不确定性。本文在大型玻璃水槽中,应用高速摄影机、声学多普勒测速仪(ADV)等先进测试仪器,通过对线性增速管在缓慢来流偏流角分别为0°、10°、20°、30°、40°、50°情形下对转速的影响进行了较系统的试验研究,得出增速管面积比、管长对偏流的纠正范围及其程度。

  6. A Catalogue of Marine Biodiversity Indicators

    KAUST Repository

    Teixeira, Heliana

    2016-11-04

    A Catalogue of Marine Biodiversity Indicators was developed with the aim of providing the basis for assessing the environmental status of the marine ecosystems. Useful for the implementation of the Marine Strategy Framework Directive (MSFD), this catalogue allows the navigation of a database of indicators mostly related to biological diversity, non-indigenous species, food webs, and seafloor integrity. Over 600 indicators were compiled, which were developed and used in the framework of different initiatives (e.g., EU policies, research projects) and in national and international contexts (e.g., Regional Seas Conventions, and assessments in non-European seas). The catalogue reflects the current scientific capability to address environmental assessment needs by providing a broad coverage of the most relevant indicators for marine biodiversity and ecosystem integrity. The available indicators are reviewed according to their typology, data requirements, development status, geographical coverage, relevance to habitats or biodiversity components, and related human pressures. Through this comprehensive overview, we discuss the potential of the current set of indicators in a wide range of contexts, from large-scale to local environmental programs, and we also address shortcomings in light of current needs. Developed by the DEVOTES Project, the catalogue is freely available through the DEVOTool software application, which provides browsing and query options for the associated metadata. The tool allows extraction of ranked indicator lists best fulfilling selected criteria, enabling users to search for suitable indicators to address a particular biodiversity component, ecosystem feature, habitat, or pressure in a marine area of interest. This tool is useful for EU Member States, Regional Sea Conventions, the European Commission, non-governmental organizations, managers, scientists, and any person interested in marine environmental assessment. It allows users to build

  7. A Catalogue of marine biodiversity indicators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heliana Teixeira

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available A Catalogue of Marine Biodiversity Indicators was developed with the aim of providing the basis for assessing the environmental status of the marine ecosystems. Useful for the implementation of the Marine Strategy Framework Directive (MSFD, this catalogue allows the navigation of a database of indicators mostly related to biological diversity, non-indigenous species, food webs, and seafloor integrity. Over 600 indicators were compiled, which were developed and used in the framework of different initiatives (e.g. EU policies, research projects and in national and international contexts (e.g. Regional Seas Conventions, and assessments in non-European seas. The catalogue reflects the current scientific capability to address environmental assessment needs by providing a broad coverage of the most relevant indicators for marine biodiversity and ecosystem integrity.The available indicators are reviewed according to their typology, data requirements, development status, geographical coverage, relevance to habitats or biodiversity components, and related human pressures. Through this comprehensive overview, we discuss the potential of the current set of indicators in a wide range of contexts, from large-scale to local environmental programs, and we also address shortcomings in light of current needs.Developed by the DEVOTES Project, the catalogue is freely available through the DEVOTool software application, which provides browsing and query options for the associated metadata. The tool allows extraction of ranked indicator lists best fulfilling selected criteria, enabling users to search for suitable indicators to address a particular biodiversity component, ecosystem feature, habitat or pressure in a marine area of interest.This tool is useful for EU Member States, Regional Sea Conventions, the European Commission, non-governmental organizations, managers, scientists and any person interested in marine environmental assessment. It allows users to

  8. Marine Lubricants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, B. H.; Green, D.

    Marine diesel engines are classified by speed, either large (medium speed) or very large (slow speed) with high efficiencies and burning low-quality fuel. Slow-speed engines, up to 200 rpm, are two-stroke with separate combustion chamber and sump connected by a crosshead, with trunk and system oil lubricants for each. Medium-speed diesels, 300-1500 rpm, are of conventional automotive design with one lubricant. Slow-speed engines use heavy fuel oil of much lower quality than conventional diesel with problems of deposit cleanliness, acidity production and oxidation. Lubricants are mainly SAE 30/40/50 monogrades using paraffinic basestocks. The main types of additives are detergents/dispersants, antioxidants, corrosion inhibitors, anti-wear/load-carrying/ep, pour-point depressants and anti-foam compounds. There are no simple systems for classifying marine lubricants, as for automotive, because of the wide range of engine design, ratings and service applications they serve. There are no standard tests; lubricant suppliers use their own tests or the Bolnes 3DNL, with final proof from field tests. Frequent lubricant analyses safeguard engines and require standard sampling procedures before determination of density, viscosity, flash point, insolubles, base number, water and wear metal content.

  9. Visualization of Microfloral Metabolism for Marine Waste Recycling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatsuki Ogura

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Marine biomass including fishery products are precious protein resources for human foods and are an alternative to livestock animals in order to reduce the virtual water problem. However, a large amount of marine waste can be generated from fishery products and it is not currently recycled. We evaluated the metabolism of digested marine waste using integrated analytical methods, under anaerobic conditions and the fertilization of abandoned agricultural soils. Dynamics of fish waste digestion revealed that samples of meat and bony parts had similar dynamics under anaerobic conditions in spite of large chemical variations in input marine wastes. Abandoned agricultural soils fertilized with fish waste accumulated some amino acids derived from fish waste, and accumulation of l-arginine and l-glutamine were higher in plant seedlings. Therefore, we have proposed an analytical method to visualize metabolic dynamics for recycling of fishery waste processes.

  10. Marine Renewable Energy Seascape

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alistair G.L. Borthwick

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Energy production based on fossil fuel reserves is largely responsible for carbon emissions, and hence global warming. The planet needs concerted action to reduce fossil fuel usage and to implement carbon mitigation measures. Ocean energy has huge potential, but there are major interdisciplinary problems to be overcome regarding technology, cost reduction, investment, environmental impact, governance, and so forth. This article briefly reviews ocean energy production from offshore wind, tidal stream, ocean current, tidal range, wave, thermal, salinity gradients, and biomass sources. Future areas of research and development are outlined that could make exploitation of the marine renewable energy (MRE seascape a viable proposition; these areas include energy storage, advanced materials, robotics, and informatics. The article concludes with a sustainability perspective on the MRE seascape encompassing ethics, legislation, the regulatory environment, governance and consenting, economic, social, and environmental constraints. A new generation of engineers is needed with the ingenuity and spirit of adventure to meet the global challenge posed by MRE.

  11. Marine Structures: consuming and producing energy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Preben Terndrup; Jensen, Jørgen Juncher

    2009-01-01

    ; the current global trade could not take place without the use of oceans as a transportation medium. • The oceans have large potential for exploration and future cultivation of living resources in the form of fish and plankton. • The oceans and the ocean floors have large reservoirs of raw materials...... and hydrocarbons. • The oceans receive 70 % of our primary sustainable energy source, i.e. the radiation from the sun; this thermal energy can be harvested in the form of thermal, wind, current or wave energy, salt gradients etc. To exploit these possibilities marine structures are required....

  12. Saturation Ion Current Densities in Inductively Coupled Hydrogen Plasma Produced by Large-Power Radio Frequency Generator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Songbai; Lei, Guangjiu; Bi, Zhenhua; Ghomi, H.; Yang, Size; Liu, Dongping

    2016-09-01

    An experimental investigation of the saturation ion current densities (Jions) in hydrogen inductively coupled plasma (ICP) produced by a large-power (2-32 kW) radio frequency (RF) generator is reported, then some reasonable explanations are given out. With the increase of RF power, the experimental results show three stages: in the first stage (2-14 kW), the electron temperature will rise with the increase of RF power in the ICP, thus, the Jions increases continually as the electron temperature rises in the ICP. In the second stage (14-20 kW), as some H- ions lead to the mutual neutralization (MN), the slope of Jions variation firstly decreases then increases. In the third stage (20-32 kW), both the electronic detachment (ED) and the associative detachment (AD) in the ICP result in the destruction of H- ions, therefore, the increased amplitude of the Jions in the third stage is weaker than the one in the first stage. In addition, with the equivalent transformer model, we successfully explain that the Jions at different radial locations in ICP has the same rule. Finally, it is found that the Jions has nothing to do with the outer/inner puffing gas pressure ratio, which is attributed to the high-speed movement of hydrogen molecules. supported by the National Magnetic Confinement Fusion Science Program of China (Nos. 2011GB108011 and 2010GB103001), the Major International (Regional) Project Cooperation and Exchanges of China (No. 11320101005) and the Startup Fund from Fuzhou University (No. 510071)

  13. Marine Science

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Aims and scope: The Western Indian Ocean Journal of Marine Science ... sustainable coastal development in the region, as well as contributing to the global base of marine science. ..... Gössling S (2003) The political ecology of tourism in Zan-.

  14. Marine Science

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Aims and scope: The Western Indian Ocean Journal of Marine Science provides an ... are not limited to: theoretical studies, oceanography, marine biology and ecology, ... consist of special issues on major events or important thematic issues.

  15. Marine Resiliency Study II

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-07-06

    1S. SUBJECT TERMS Stress, Post Trawna t ic Stress Disorder , Biomarker , Suicide , Combat 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17. LIMITATION 18. NUMBER...Project 2a ( Neuro -cognition Study) deploying Marines from 1/7 were assessed during the allotted 2012 timeframe. In total 570 Marines were available...Project 2 ( Neuro -cognition Study) remain current, as necessary for the data collection as noted above. Task 3: In coordination with HQMC, NIMH

  16. 76 FR 2611 - Olympic Coast National Marine Sanctuary Regulations Revisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-14

    ... Juan de Fuca Eddy Ecosystem and the California Current Large Marine Ecosystem, OCNMS is home to one of... Peninsula. OCNMS is a highly productive, ocean and coastal environment of high ecological integrity that is... significant historical resources including American Indian village sites, ancient canoe runs,...

  17. Implementing Marine XML for Observed CTD Data in a Marine Data Exchange Platform

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JIANG Yongguo; FENG Yuan; CHE Zhaodong; ZHU Tieyi

    2008-01-01

    In order to archive,quality control and disseminate a large variety of marine data in a marine data exchange platform,a marine XML has been developed to encapsulate marine data,which provides an efficient means to store,transfer and display marine data.This paper first presents the details of the main marine XML elements and then gives an example showing how to transform CTD-observed data into Marine XML format,which illustrates the XML encapsulation process of marine observed data.

  18. Data integration for European marine biodiversity research: creating a database on benthos and plankton to study large-scale patterns and long-term changes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vandepitte, L.; Vanhoorne, B.; Kraberg, A.; Craeymeersch, J.A.M.

    2010-01-01

    The general aim of setting up a central database on benthos and plankton was to integrate long-, medium- and short-term datasets on marine biodiversity. Such a database makes it possible to analyse species assemblages and their changes on spatial and temporal scales across Europe. Data collation las

  19. Data integration for European marine biodiversity research: creating a database on benthos and plankton to study large-scale patterns and long-term changes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vandepitte, L.; Vanhoorne, B.; Kraberg, A.; Anisimova, N.; Antoniadou, C.; Araújo, R.; Bartsch, I.; Beker, B.; Benedetti-Cecchi, L.; Bertocci, I.; Cochrane, S.J.; Cooper, K.; Craeymeersch, J.A.; Christou, E.; Crisp, D.J.; Dahle, S.; de Boissier, M.; De Kluijver, M.; Denisenko, S.; De Vito, D.; Duineveld, G.; Escaravage, V.L.; Fleischer, D.; Fraschetti, S.; Giangrande, A.; Heip, C.H.R.; Hummel, H.; Janas, U.; Karez, R.; Kedra, M.; Kingston, P.; Kuhlenkamp, R.; Libes, M.; Martens, P.; Mees, J.; Mieszkowska, N.; Mudrak, S.; Munda, I.; Orfanidis, S.; Orlando-Bonaca, M.; Palerud, R.; Rachor, E.; Reichert, K.; Rumohr, H.; Schiedek, D.; Schubert, P.; Sistermans, W.C.H.; Sousa Pinto, I.S.; Southward, A.J.; Terlizzi, A.; Tsiaga, E.; Van Beusekom, J.E.E.; Vanden Berghe, E.; Warzocha, J.; Wasmund, N.; Weslawski, J.M.; Widdicombe, C.; Wlodarska-Kowalczuk, M.; Zettler, M.L.

    2010-01-01

    The general aim of setting up a central database on benthos and plankton was to integrate long-, medium- and short-term datasets on marine biodiversity. Such a database makes it possible to analyse species assemblages and their changes on spatial and temporal scales across Europe. Data collation

  20. Large-scale mapping of submarine geohazard-related features: example from the Italian Project MAGIC (Marine Geohazards along the Italian Coasts)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ridente, Domenico; Bosman, Alessandro; Casalbore, Daniele; Sposato, Andrea; Chiocci, Francesco L.

    2010-05-01

    In very recent times, the impact of catastrophic tsunami at global (Indonesia, 2004) and local scale (Stromboli, 2002) has made evident the necessity of knowing the worldwide distribution of submarine geological structures responsible for their generation, with particular reference to seismogenic faults, volcanic activity, submarine and coastal landslides. More in general, marine geohazard derives from a vast variety of geological processes owing to the recent/modern seafloor morpho-dynamics, in the framework of the long-term tectono-sedimentary evolution of continental margins. The capability to identify and characterize marine geohazards significantly improved because of the recent developments in seafloor imaging and mapping techniques. As a consequence, many research projects specifically designed for defining marine geohazard relative to human activity and infrastructures can be conceived based on extensive (regional-scale) seafloor mapping. In this view, the Italian Civil Protection Department promoted the national project MAGIC (Marine Geohazards along the Italian Coasts), aimed at acquiring multibeam morpho-bathymetry along the most geologically active margins of Italy; the acquired dataset will then be the basis for interpreting geomorphic features and identifying potential geohazard. Marine geohazards, and their related potential risk have to be defined at different scales and level of detail and accuracy. As a starting point, geohazard mapping relies on the reconnaissance of the geohazard-related geological features, and is essentially regarded as the detection of their presence/absence and state of activity/non-activity; this reconnaissance issues is achieved through the interpretation of the morpho-tectonic and sedimentary dynamics shaping continental margins at diverse temporal and spatial scales. We discuss some general aspects of geohazard reconnaissance and cartographic criteria relative to regional scale multibeam mapping, based on the experience

  1. Global mismatch between fishing dependency and larval supply from marine reserves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrello, Marco; Guilhaumon, François; Albouy, Camille; Parravicini, Valeriano; Scholtens, Joeri; Verley, Philippe; Barange, Manuel; Sumaila, U. Rashid; Manel, Stéphanie; Mouillot, David

    2017-07-01

    Marine reserves are viewed as flagship tools to protect exploited species and to contribute to the effective management of coastal fisheries. Yet, the extent to which marine reserves are globally interconnected and able to effectively seed areas, where fisheries are most critical for food and livelihood security is largely unknown. Using a hydrodynamic model of larval dispersal, we predict that most marine reserves are not interconnected by currents and that their potential benefits to fishing areas are presently limited, since countries with high dependency on coastal fisheries receive very little larval supply from marine reserves. This global mismatch could be reversed, however, by placing new marine reserves in areas sufficiently remote to minimize social and economic costs but sufficiently connected through sea currents to seed the most exploited fisheries and endangered ecosystems.

  2. Marine natural products sourced from marine-derived Penicillium fungi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Hong-Guang; Liu, Qiang; Zhu, Guo-Liang; Liu, Hai-Shan; Zhu, Wei-Ming

    2016-01-01

    Marine micro-organisms have been proven to be a major source of marine natural products (MNPs) in recent years, in which filamentous fungi are a vital source of bioactive natural products for their large metagenomes and more complex genetic backgrounds. This review highlights the 390 new MNPs from marine-derived Penicillium fungi during 1991 to 2014. These new MNPs are categorized based on the environment sources of the fungal hosts and their bioactivities are summarized.

  3. THEMIS multispacecraft observations of a reconnecting magnetosheath current sheet with symmetric boundary conditions and a large guide field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Øieroset, M.; Phan, T. D.; Shay, M. A.; Haggerty, C. C.; Fujimoto, M.; Angelopoulos, V.; Eastwood, J. P.; Mozer, F. S.

    2017-08-01

    We report three spacecraft observations of a reconnecting magnetosheath current sheet with a guide field of unity, with THEMIS D (THD) and THEMIS E (THE)/THEMIS A (THA) observing oppositely directed reconnection exhausts, indicating the presence of an X line between the spacecraft. The near-constant convective speed of the magnetosheath current sheet allowed the direct translation of the observed time series into spatial profiles. THD observed asymmetries in the plasma density and temperature profiles across the exhaust, characteristics of symmetric reconnection with a guide field. The exhausts at THE and THA, on the other hand, were not the expected mirror image of the THD exhaust in terms of the plasma and field profiles. They consisted of a main outflow at the center of the current sheet, flanked by oppositely directed flows at the two edges of the current sheet, suggesting the presence of a second X line, whose outflow wraps around the outflow from the first X line.

  4. Constructing a raster-based spatio-temporal hierarchical data model for marine fisheries application

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    Marine information has been increasing quickly. The traditional database technologies have disadvantages in manipulating large amounts of marine information which relates to the position in 3-D with the time. Recently, greater emphasis has been placed on GIS (geographical information system)to deal with the marine information. The GIS has shown great success for terrestrial applications in the last decades, but its use in marine fields has been far more restricted. One of the main reasons is that most of the GIS systems or their data models are designed for land applications. They cannot do well with the nature of the marine environment and for the marine information. And this becomes a fundamental challenge to the traditional GIS and its data structure. This work designed a data model,the raster-based spatio-temporal hierarchical data model (RSHDM), for the marine information system, or for the knowledge discovery from spatio-temporal data, which bases itself on the nature of the marine data and overcomes the shortages of the current spatio-temporal models when they are used in the field. As an experiment, the marine fishery data warehouse (FDW) for marine fishery management was set up, which was based on the RSHDM. The experiment proved that the RSHDM can do well with the data and can extract easily the aggregations that the management needs at different levels.

  5. Exploring medical student learning in the large group teaching environment: examining current practice to inform curricular development

    OpenAIRE

    Luscombe, Ciara; Montgomery, Julia

    2016-01-01

    Background Lectures continue to be an efficient and standardised way to deliver information to large groups of students. It has been well documented that students prefer interactive lectures, based on active learning principles, to didactic teaching in the large group setting. Despite this, it is often the case than many students do not engage with active learning tasks and attempts at interaction. By exploring student experiences, expectations and how they use lectures in their learning we w...

  6. From Discovery to Production: Biotechnology of Marine Fungi for the Production of New Antibiotics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silber, Johanna; Kramer, Annemarie; Labes, Antje; Tasdemir, Deniz

    2016-07-21

    Filamentous fungi are well known for their capability of producing antibiotic natural products. Recent studies have demonstrated the potential of antimicrobials with vast chemodiversity from marine fungi. Development of such natural products into lead compounds requires sustainable supply. Marine biotechnology can significantly contribute to the production of new antibiotics at various levels of the process chain including discovery, production, downstream processing, and lead development. However, the number of biotechnological processes described for large-scale production from marine fungi is far from the sum of the newly-discovered natural antibiotics. Methods and technologies applied in marine fungal biotechnology largely derive from analogous terrestrial processes and rarely reflect the specific demands of the marine fungi. The current developments in metabolic engineering and marine microbiology are not yet transferred into processes, but offer numerous options for improvement of production processes and establishment of new process chains. This review summarises the current state in biotechnological production of marine fungal antibiotics and points out the enormous potential of biotechnology in all stages of the discovery-to-development pipeline. At the same time, the literature survey reveals that more biotechnology transfer and method developments are needed for a sustainable and innovative production of marine fungal antibiotics.

  7. Marine medicinal glycomics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pomin, Vitor H.

    2014-01-01

    Glycomics is an international initiative aimed to understand the structure and function of the glycans from a given type of cell, tissue, organism, kingdom or even environment, as found under certain conditions. Glycomics is one of the latest areas of intense biological research. Glycans of marine sources are unique in terms of structure and function. They differ considerably from those of terrestrial origin. This review discusses the most known marine glycans of potential therapeutic properties. They are chitin, chitosan, and sulfated polysaccharides named glycosaminoglycans, sulfated fucans, and sulfated galactans. Their medical actions are very broad. When certain structural requirements are found, these glycans can exhibit beneficial effects in inflammation, coagulation, thrombosis, cancer growth/metastasis, and vascular biology. Both structure and therapeutic mechanisms of action of these marine glycans are discussed here in straight context with the current glycomic age through a project suggestively named marine medicinal glycomics. PMID:24524028

  8. Marine Mineral Exploration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    The past 20 years have seen extensive marine exploration work by the major industrialized countries. Studies have, in part, been concentrated on Pacific manganese nodule occurrences and on massive sulfides on mid-oceanic ridges. An international jurisdictional framework of the sea-bed mineral...... in EEZ areas are fairly unknown; many areas need detailed mapping and mineral exploration, and the majority of coastal or island states with large EEZ areas have little experience in exploration for marine hard minerals. This book describes the systematic steps in marine mineral exploration....... Such exploration requires knowledge of mineral deposits and models of their formation, of geophysical and geochemical exploration methods, and of data evaluation and interpretation methods. These topics are described in detail by an international group of authors. A short description is also given of marine...

  9. 一种提高Darrieus型海流能转换装置性能方法的研究%A Study on a Method to Improve the Hydrodynamic Performance of a Darrieus Marine Current Turbine

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孙晓晶; 黄典贵; 吴国庆

    2011-01-01

    Most marine current turbines currently under development can be divided into horizontal axis and vertical axis. A weak self-starting ability and low efficiency of energy conversion are the main obstacles on the way of a commercial application of vertical-axis marine current devices. In this paper, an approach is numerically investigated, which aims to improve the performance of vertical-axis marine current device through the installation of several straight plates around its periphery. The efficiency of a Darrieus-type marine current turbine with and without surrounding plates has been compared and the results indicate that these plates can form a narrow entrance in front of the device and effectively accelerate the water speed to increase the power output. Meanwhile due to its low cost, this approach has great potential to be applied to an actual project.%目前大多数海流能发电装置的设计可分为水平轴和垂直轴两类。起动性能差、能量利用率低是限制垂直轴海流能转换装置进行商业化应用的主要障碍。本文以Darrieus型垂直轴海流能装置为例,通过数值模拟分析,对在其周边以一定角度添加竖直平板来提高其性能的方法进行b 研究。结果表明这些平板可以在装置前方形成一个导流加速的通道,从而可以有效地提高这类装置的能量转换率。同时由于造价低廉,使这种方法在实际工程中具有很大的应用潜力。

  10. Marine cosmeceuticals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Se-Kwon

    2014-03-01

    Recently, a great deal of interest has been expressed in the cosmetic industry regarding marine-derived cosmetic active ingredients due to their numerous beneficial effects on human skin health. Bioactive substances derived from marine resources have diverse functional roles as natural skin care agents, and these properties can be applied to the development of novel cosmetics as well as nutricosmetics (from edible seaweeds and edible marine animals). This contribution focuses on marine-derived cosmeceutical active ingredients and presents an overview of their health beneficial effects on human skin.

  11. University of Washington/ Northwest National Marine Renewable Energy Center Tidal Current Technology Test Protocol, Instrumentation, Design Code, and Oceanographic Modeling Collaboration: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-11-452

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Driscoll, Frederick R. [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2016-11-01

    The University of Washington (UW) - Northwest National Marine Renewable Energy Center (UW-NNMREC) and the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) will collaborate to advance research and development (R&D) of Marine Hydrokinetic (MHK) renewable energy technology, specifically renewable energy captured from ocean tidal currents. UW-NNMREC is endeavoring to establish infrastructure, capabilities and tools to support in-water testing of marine energy technology. NREL is leveraging its experience and capabilities in field testing of wind systems to develop protocols and instrumentation to advance field testing of MHK systems. Under this work, UW-NNMREC and NREL will work together to develop a common instrumentation system and testing methodologies, standards and protocols. UW-NNMREC is also establishing simulation capabilities for MHK turbine and turbine arrays. NREL has extensive experience in wind turbine array modeling and is developing several computer based numerical simulation capabilities for MHK systems. Under this CRADA, UW-NNMREC and NREL will work together to augment single device and array modeling codes. As part of this effort UW NNMREC will also work with NREL to run simulations on NREL's high performance computer system.

  12. Marine’ Character of the United States Marine Band

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-04-01

    Production I Supply Admin ’--- ..........J _._----, l ExecutiveAssistantto Director Woodwind Clarinets String Combo ISection Section Section Section...Saxophones LJ Cellos iH Guitar i Y Bassoons H Harp y Vocalists 1 31 AppendixE Current U.S. Marine Band Fitness Report « z o t3 ill en U.S. Marine Band FITNESS

  13. 13000 a current lead with 1.5 W heat load to 4.5 K for the Large Hadron Collider at CERN

    CERN Document Server

    Good, J A; Martini, L

    2000-01-01

    Cryogenic Ltd. and ENEL S.p.A. have collaborated on the design and construction of prototype current leads for the Large Hadron Collider project at CERN, Geneva. The aim is to deliver a direct current of 13 kA into a 4.5 K liquid helium bath with a total heat load of less than 1.5 W. These hybrid leads transport the current via a resistive heat exchanger cooled by a separate source of helium gas in the high temperature region, and below 50 K via self-cooled high temperature superconductor. (6 refs).

  14. Bridging the gap from ocean models to population dynamics of large marine predators: A model of mid-trophic functional groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehodey, Patrick; Murtugudde, Raghu; Senina, Inna

    2010-01-01

    The modeling of mid-trophic organisms of the pelagic ecosystem is a critical step in linking the coupled physical-biogeochemical models to population dynamics of large pelagic predators. Here, we provide an example of a modeling approach with definitions of several pelagic mid-trophic functional groups. This application includes six different groups characterized by their vertical behavior, i.e., occurrence of diel migration between epipelagic, mesopelagic and bathypelagic layers. Parameterization of the dynamics of these components is based on a temperature-linked time development relationship. Estimated parameters of this relationship are close to those predicted by a model based on a theoretical description of the allocation of metabolic energy at the cellular level, and that predicts a species metabolic rate in terms of its body mass and temperature. Then, a simple energy transfer from primary production is used, justified by the existence of constant slopes in log-log biomass size spectrum relationships. Recruitment, ageing, mortality and passive transport with horizontal currents, taking into account vertical behavior of organisms, are modeled by a system of advection-diffusion-reaction equations. Temperature and currents averaged in each vertical layer are provided independently by an Ocean General Circulation Model and used to drive the mid-trophic level (MTL) model. Simulation outputs are presented for the tropical Pacific Ocean to illustrate how different temperature and oceanic circulation conditions result in spatial and temporal lags between regions of high primary production and regions of aggregation of mid-trophic biomass. Predicted biomasses are compared against available data. Data requirements to evaluate outputs of these types of models are discussed, as well as the prospects that they offer both for ecosystem models of lower and upper trophic levels.

  15. Censusing marine eukaryotic diversity in the twenty-first century.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leray, Matthieu; Knowlton, Nancy

    2016-09-01

    The ocean constitutes one of the vastest and richest biomes on our planet. Most recent estimations, all based on indirect approaches, suggest that there are millions of marine eukaryotic species. Moreover, a large majority of these are small (less than 1 mm), cryptic and still unknown to science. However, this knowledge gap, caused by the lack of diagnostic morphological features in small organisms and the limited sampling of the global ocean, is currently being filled, thanks to new DNA-based approaches. The molecular technique of PCR amplification of homologous gene regions combined with high-throughput sequencing, routinely used to census unculturable prokaryotes, is now also being used to characterize whole communities of marine eukaryotes. Here, we review how this methodological advancement has helped to better quantify the magnitude and patterns of marine eukaryotic diversity, with an emphasis on taxonomic groups previously largely overlooked. We then discuss obstacles remaining to achieve a global understanding of marine eukaryotic diversity. In particular, we argue that 18S variable regions do not provide sufficient taxonomic resolution to census marine life, and suggest combining broad eukaryotic surveys targeting the 18S rRNA region with more taxon-focused analyses of hypervariable regions to improve our understanding of the diversity of species, the functional units of marine ecosystems.This article is part of the themed issue 'From DNA barcodes to biomes'.

  16. Censusing marine eukaryotic diversity in the twenty-first century

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knowlton, Nancy

    2016-01-01

    The ocean constitutes one of the vastest and richest biomes on our planet. Most recent estimations, all based on indirect approaches, suggest that there are millions of marine eukaryotic species. Moreover, a large majority of these are small (less than 1 mm), cryptic and still unknown to science. However, this knowledge gap, caused by the lack of diagnostic morphological features in small organisms and the limited sampling of the global ocean, is currently being filled, thanks to new DNA-based approaches. The molecular technique of PCR amplification of homologous gene regions combined with high-throughput sequencing, routinely used to census unculturable prokaryotes, is now also being used to characterize whole communities of marine eukaryotes. Here, we review how this methodological advancement has helped to better quantify the magnitude and patterns of marine eukaryotic diversity, with an emphasis on taxonomic groups previously largely overlooked. We then discuss obstacles remaining to achieve a global understanding of marine eukaryotic diversity. In particular, we argue that 18S variable regions do not provide sufficient taxonomic resolution to census marine life, and suggest combining broad eukaryotic surveys targeting the 18S rRNA region with more taxon-focused analyses of hypervariable regions to improve our understanding of the diversity of species, the functional units of marine ecosystems. This article is part of the themed issue ‘From DNA barcodes to biomes’. PMID:27481783

  17. Marine Planning for Potential Wave Energy Facility Placement Amongst a Crowded Sea of Existing Resource Uses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feist, B. E.; Fuller, E.; Plummer, M. L.

    2016-12-01

    Conversion to renewable energy sources is a logical response to increasing pressure to reduce greenhouse gas emissions. Ocean wave energy is the least developed renewable energy source, despite having the highest energy per unit area. While many hurdles remain in developing wave energy, assessing potential conflicts and evaluating tradeoffs with existing uses is essential. Marine planning encompasses a broad array of activities that take place in and affect large marine ecosystems, making it an ideal tool for evaluating wave energy resource use conflicts. In this study, we focus on the potential conflicts between wave energy conversion (WEC) facilities and existing marine uses in the context of marine planning, within the California Current Large Marine Ecosystem. First, we evaluated wave energy facility development using the Wave Energy Model (WEM) of the Integrated Valuation of Ecosystem Services and Trade-offs (InVEST) toolkit. Second, we ran spatial analyses on model output to identify conflicts with existing marine uses including AIS based vessel traffic, VMS and observer based measures of commercial fishing effort, and marine conservation areas. We found that regions with the highest wave energy potential were distant from major cities and that infrastructure limitations (cable landing sites) restrict integration with existing power grids. We identified multiple spatial conflicts with existing marine uses; especially shipping vessels and various commercial fishing fleets, and overlap with marine conservation areas varied by conservation designation. While wave energy generation facilities may be economically viable in the California Current, this viability must be considered within the context of the costs associated with conflicts that arise with existing marine uses. Our analyses can be used to better inform placement of WEC devices (as well as other types of renewable energy facilities) in the context of marine planning by accounting for economic tradeoffs

  18. Research on deflection pre-compensation of upper roller for large marine bending machine%大型船用卷板机上辊挠曲变形预补偿研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈兰; 张新洲; 孙字; 杨树田; 常欣

    2011-01-01

    针对大型卷板机上辊挠曲变形的补偿难题,利用ANSYS有限元优化方法,对某21 m大型船用卷板机的上辊支承辊的数量、位置及施加载荷的分布进行了合理优化,进而提出了挠度补偿措施.结合有限元分析方法分别得到了上辊和上梁在优化载荷作用下和整体模型在工作载荷作用下的挠曲变形,并对预补偿后的情况进行了分析,补偿后上辊的最大挠度是0.71 mm,几乎能使上辊趋于水平,结果满足卷板机上辊挠曲变形的补偿要求.%In order to solve the problem of deflection compensation of upper roller for large marine bending machine, using FEA optimization method based on ANSYS, the amount, locations and the imposed loads of bearing rollers of 21 m large marine bending machine were optimized reasonably and the deflection compensation measure was proposed. The deflection of the upper roller and beam in optimizing loads and overall role model in the working load were obtained through finite element analysis method. After compensation, the maximum deflection is 0. 71 mm, the upper roller almost tends to be level. The result of pre-compensation by finite element analysis method shows that it is feasible for deflection compensation of upper roller for large marine bending machine.

  19. Low-voltage large-current ion gel gated polymer transistors fabricated by a "cut and bond" process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Xianyi; Bao, Bei; Zhao, Jiaqing; Tang, Wei; Wang, Shun; Guo, Xiaojun

    2015-03-04

    A "cut and bond" process using a commercial die bonder was developed for fabricating ion gel gated organic thin-film transistors (OTFTs). It addresses the issues of damaging or contaminating the channel layer when depositing the ion gel layer on top in conventional fabrication processes. The formed isolated dielectric regions can help to eliminate possible lateral electric field coupling through the dielectric layer when several devices are integrated to construct functional circuits. The fabricated OTFTs provide mA-level ON current, and an ON/OFF current ratio higher than 10(5) with the gate swing voltage of less than 3 V. With the developed process, the ion gel OTFTs are integrated with inorganic light emitting diodes (LEDs) of different colors on plastic substrate using the same die bonder, and the light emission of the LEDs can be modulated in a wide range from dark to high brightness with change of the gate voltage less than 3 V.

  20. Current-Sensing and Voltage-Feedback Driving Method for Large-Area High-Resolution Active Matrix Organic Light Emitting Diodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    In, Hai‑Jung; Choi, Byong‑Deok; Chung, Ho‑Kyoon; Kwon, Oh‑Kyong

    2006-05-01

    There is the problem of picture quality nonuniformity due to thin film transistor (TFT) characteristic variations throughout a panel of large-area high-resolution active matrix organic light emitting diodes. The current programming method could solve this issue, but it also requires very long charging time of a data line at low gray shades. Therefore, we propose a new driving method and a pixel circuit with emission-current sensing and feedback operation in order to resolve these problems. The proposed driving method and pixel circuit successfully compensate threshold voltage and mobility variations of TFTs and overcome the data line charging problem. Simulation results show that emission current deviations of the proposed driving method are less than 1.7% with ± 10.0% mobility and ± 0.3 V threshold voltage variations of pixel-driving TFTs, which means the proposed driving method is applicable to large-area high-resolution applications.

  1. Marine Biology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dewees, Christopher M.; Hooper, Jon K.

    1976-01-01

    A variety of informational material for a course in marine biology or oceanology at the secondary level is presented. Among the topics discussed are: food webs and pyramids, planktonic blooms, marine life, plankton nets, food chains, phytoplankton, zooplankton, larval plankton and filter feeders. (BT)

  2. Improved Marine Waters Monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palazov, Atanas; Yakushev, Evgeniy; Milkova, Tanya; Slabakova, Violeta; Hristova, Ognyana

    2017-04-01

    IMAMO - Improved Marine Waters Monitoring is a project under the Programme BG02: Improved monitoring of marine waters, managed by Bulgarian Ministry of environment and waters and co-financed by the Financial Mechanism of the European Economic Area (EEA FM) 2009 - 2014. Project Beneficiary is the Institute of oceanology - Bulgarian Academy of Sciences with two partners: Norwegian Institute for Water Research and Bulgarian Black Sea Basin Directorate. The Project aims to improve the monitoring capacity and expertise of the organizations responsible for marine waters monitoring in Bulgaria to meet the requirements of EU and national legislation. The main outcomes are to fill the gaps in information from the Initial assessment of the marine environment and to collect data to assess the current ecological status of marine waters including information as a base for revision of ecological targets established by the monitoring programme prepared in 2014 under Art. 11 of MSFD. Project activities are targeted to ensure data for Descriptors 5, 8 and 9. IMAMO aims to increase the institutional capacity of the Bulgarian partners related to the monitoring and assessment of the Black Sea environment. The main outputs are: establishment of real time monitoring and set up of accredited laboratory facilities for marine waters and sediments chemical analysis to ensure the ability of Bulgarian partners to monitor progress of subsequent measures undertaken.

  3. On radio frequency current drive in the ion cyclotron range of frequencies in DEMO and large ignited plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brambilla, Marco; Bilato, Roberto

    2015-02-01

    To explore the possibility of efficient fast wave current drive in an ignited plasma in the ion cyclotron (IC) range of frequency in spite of competition from absorption by ions, we have added to the full-wave toroidal code TORIC a set of subroutines which evaluate absorption by these particles at IC harmonic resonances, using a realistic ‘slowing-down’ distribution function, and taking into account that their Larmor radius is comparable or even larger than the fast wave wavelength. The thermalized population of α-particles is not a serious competitor for power absorption as long as their number density is compatible with maintenance of ignition. By contrast, the energetic slowing down fraction, in spite of its even greater dilution, can absorb from the waves a substantial amount of power at the cyclotron resonance and its harmonics. An extensive exploration both in frequency and in toroidal wavenumbers using the parameters of one of the European versions of DEMO shows that three frequency windows exist in which damping is nevertheless predominantly on the electrons. Designing an antenna capable of shaping the launched spectrum to optimize current drive, however, will not be straightforward. Only in a narrow range when the first IC harmonic of tritium is deep inside the plasma on the high-field side of the magnetic axis, and that of deuterium and helium is still outside on the low-field side, it appears possible to achieve a satisfactory current drive efficiency with a conventional multi-strap antenna, preferentially located in the upper part of the vessel. Exploiting the other two windows at quite low and quite high frequencies is either impossible on first principles, or will demand novel ideas in antenna design.

  4. Theory and Practice of Marine Regional Management in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shangjie; JI; Qunzhen; QU

    2014-01-01

    With the development of marine economy in coastal provinces and cities,there comes a series of environmental problems. Marine regional management,as a completely new marine management mode,transforms traditional management mode and can protect marine ecosystem. Thus,the marine regional management is feasible and applicable in China. This paper firstly discussed connotation and development of the marine regional management in China and pointed that the marine regional management is integrated management of a certain marine region. Next,it summarized characteristics of the marine regional management at current stage,for example,land-based pollution of trans-geographic system and marine management under regional government cooperative mechanism. Finally,it came up with recommendations including combining theory and practice of the marine regional management,and establishing marine regional management system as soon as possible,to realize benign interaction and sustainable development of marine economy and ecological environment.

  5. Marine antivenoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Currie, Bart J

    2003-01-01

    There is an enormous diversity and complexity of venoms and poisons in marine animals. Fatalities have occurred from envenoming by sea snakes, jellyfish, venomous fish such as stonefish, cone snails, and blue-ringed octopus. Deaths have also followed ingestion of toxins in shellfish, puffer fish (Fugu), and ciguatoxin-containing fish. However antivenoms are generally only available for envenoming by certain sea snakes, the major Australian box jellyfish (Chironex fleckeri) and stonefish. There have been difficulties in characterizing the toxins of C. fleckeri venom, and there are conflicting animals studies on the efficacy of C. fleckeri antivenom. The vast majority of C. fleckeri stings are not life-threatening, with painful skin welts the major finding. However fatalities that do occur usually do so within 5 to 20 minutes of the sting. This unprecedented rapid onset of cardiotoxicity in clinical envenoming suggests that antivenom may need to be given very early (within minutes) and possibly in large doses if a life is to be saved. Forty years of anecdotal experience supports the beneficial effect of stonefish antivenom in relieving the excruciating pain after stonefish spine penetration. It remains uncertain whether stonefish antivenom is efficacious in stings from spines of other venomous fish, and the recommendation of giving the antivenom intramuscularly needs reassessment.

  6. Modelling tide-driven currents and residual eddies in the Gulf of Kachchh and their seasonal variability: A marine environmental planning perspective

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Babu, M.T.; Vethamony, P.; Desa, E.

    Tide-driven currents in the Gulf of Kachchh (GoK) have been studied using MIKE21 hydrodynamic model. The results are validated with measured currents for three different periods characterized by different wind fields. Comparison of model results...

  7. Spawning patterns of shallow-water hake (Merluccius capensis) and deep-water hake (M. paradoxus) in the Benguela Current Large Marine Ecosystem inferred from gonadosomatic indices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jansen, Teunis; Kainge, Paulus Inekela; Singh, Larvika

    2015-01-01

    . In the southern Benguela, peaks in the proportions of spawning M. capensis were observed in two areas off the South African West Coast (31.0-32.5°S and 34.5-36.0°S), whereas spawning females off the South African South Coast (east of 20°E) appeared to be more evenly distributed in space. Seasonality differed....... In the northern Benguela, spawning M. paradoxus were observed as far north as 25°S in August. The proportion of spawning females peaked between 34.5°S and 36.5°S off the West Coast, and between 23.0°E and 26.5 °E off the South Coast. It was suggested that M. paradoxus spawn throughout the year off the South...

  8. Migration, distribution and population (stock) structure of shallow-water hake (Merluccius capensis) in the Benguela Current Large Marine Ecosystem inferred using a geostatistical population model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jansen, Teunis; Kristensen, Kasper; Kainge, Paulus Inekela

    2016-01-01

    /nursery areas, through the juvenile phase and the adults' migration to the spawning areas outside/upstream of the nursery areas. This revealed some previously unknown migration patterns and indicated natal homing and the existence of three primary population components in the region, namely the Walvis (central...... (stock) structure. We combined data from multiple demersal trawl surveys from the entire distribution area to estimate growth rate, mortality and spatial and temporal patterns of M. capensis. Analyses were conducted using the geostatistical model GeoPop. The complexity of the model and the amount of data...

  9. Wideband current transformers for the surveillance of the beam extraction kicker system of the Large Hadron Collider

    CERN Document Server

    Defrance, C; Ducimetière, L; Vossenberg, E

    2007-01-01

    The LHC beam dumping system must protect the LHC machine from damage by reliably and safely extracting and absorbing the circulating beams when requested. Two sets of 15 extraction kicker magnets form the main active part of this system. A separate high voltage pulse generator powers each magnet. Because of the high beam energy and the consequences which could result from significant beam loss due to a malfunctioning of the dump system the magnets and generators are continuously surveyed in order to generate a beam abort as soon as an internal fault is detected. Amongst these surveillance systems, wideband current transformers have been designed to detect any erratic start in one of the generators. Output power should be enough to directly re-trigger all the power trigger units of the remaining 14 generators. The current transformers were developed in collaboration with industry. To minimize losses, high-resistivity cobalt alloy was chosen for the cores. The annealing techniques originally developed for LEP b...

  10. Taxonomic distinctness of demersal fishes of the California current: moving beyond simple measures of diversity for marine ecosystem-based management.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nick Tolimieri

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Large-scale patterns or trends in species diversity have long interested ecologists. The classic pattern is for diversity (e.g., species richness to decrease with increasing latitude. Taxonomic distinctness is a diversity measure based on the relatedness of the species within a sample. Here we examined patterns of taxonomic distinctness in relation to latitude (ca. 32-48 degrees N and depth (ca. 50-1220 m for demersal fishes on the continental shelf and slope of the US Pacific coast. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Both average taxonomic distinctness (AvTD and variation in taxonomic distinctness (VarTD changed with latitude and depth. AvTD was highest at approximately 500 m and lowest at around 200 m bottom depth. Latitudinal trends in AvTD were somewhat weaker and were depth-specific. AvTD increased with latitude on the shelf (50-150 m but tended to decrease with latitude at deeper depths. Variation in taxonomic distinctness (VarTD was highest around 300 m. As with AvTD, latitudinal trends in VarTD were depth-specific. On the shelf (50-150 m, VarTD increased with latitude, while in deeper areas the patterns were more complex. Closer inspection of the data showed that the number and distribution of species within the class Chondrichthyes were the primary drivers of the overall patterns seen in AvTD and VarTD, while the relatedness and distribution of species in the order Scorpaeniformes appeared to cause the relatively low observed values of AvTD at around 200 m. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These trends contrast to some extent the patterns seen in earlier studies for species richness and evenness in demersal fishes along this coast and add to our understanding of diversity of the demersal fishes of the California Current.

  11. Marine actinobacteria: perspectives, challenges, future directions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bull, Alan T; Stach, James E M; Ward, Alan C; Goodfellow, Michael

    2005-01-01

    In this paper we evaluate the current state of research on the biology and biotechnology of marine actinobacteria. The topics covered include the abundance, diversity, novelty and biogeographic distribution of marine actinobacteria, ecosystem function, bioprospecting, and a new approach to the exploration of actinobacterial taxonomic space. An agenda for future marine actinobacterial research is suggested based upon consideration of the above issues.

  12. Large-scale atmospheric circulation and local particulate matter concentrations in Bavaria - from current observations to future projections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beck, Christoph; Weitnauer, Claudia; Brosy, Caroline; Hald, Cornelius; Lochbihler, Kai; Siegmund, Stefan; Jacobeit, Jucundus

    2016-04-01

    Particulate matter with an aerodynamic diameter of 10 μm or less (PM10) may have distinct adverse effects on human health. Spatial and temporal variations in PM10 concentrations reflect local emission rates, but are as well influenced by the local and synoptic-scale atmospheric conditions. Against this background, it can be furthermore argued that potential future climate change and associated variations in large-scale atmospheric circulation and local meteorological parameters will probably provoke corresponding changes in future PM10 concentration levels. The DFG-funded research project „Particulate matter and climate change in Bavaria" aimed at establishing quantitative relationships between daily and monthly PM10 indices at different Bavarian urban stations and the corresponding large-scale atmospheric circulation as well as local meteorological conditions. To this end, several statistical downscaling approaches have been developed for the period 1980 to 2011. PM10 data from 19 stations from the air quality monitoring network (LÜB) of the Bavarian Environmental Agency (LfU) have been utilized as predictands. Large-scale atmospheric gridded data from the NCEP/NCAR reanalysis data base and local meteorological observational data provided by the German Meteorological Service (DWD) served as predictors. The downscaling approaches encompass the synoptic downscaling of daily PM10 concentrations and several multivariate statistical models for the estimation of daily and monthly PM10, i.e.monthly mean and number of days exceeding a certain PM10 concentration threshold. Both techniques utilize objective circulation type classifications, which have been optimized with respect to their synoptic skill for the target variable PM10. All downscaling approaches have been evaluated via cross validation using varying subintervals of the 1980-2011 period as calibration and validation periods respectively. The most suitable - in terms of model skill determined from cross

  13. L'intervention sous-marine : situation actuelle et perspectives d'avenir Underwater Operations and Techniques: Current Situation and Future Outlook

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bertrand A. R. V.

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available A l'occasion de la Conférence Internationale de Paris sur la Pénétration sous-marine(6-8 décembre 1982, cet article fait le point sur les différents moyens d'intervention sous-marine disponibles à ce jour (plongeurs, engins télécommandés, sous-marins à pression atmosphérique et sur un certain nombre de problèmes technologiques communs (matériaux, télémanipulation, navigation, sources d'énergie. Ce domaine est encore en pleine évolution et fait appel aux récentes innovations technologiques. Bien que les engins télécommandés semblent avoir actuellement la faveur des industriels, les autres moyens restent d'avenir prometteur, la complémentarité devant remplacer dans le futur la concurrence La résurrection de l'Argyronète qui doit devenir en 1985 un banc d'essais des nouvelles techniques est le témoignage de l'activité de ce secteur industriel. This article is based on the International Symposium in Paris on Underwater Operations and Techniques 6-9 December 1982. It reviews the different methods now available for underwater operations (divers, remote-controlled vehicles, atmospheric-pressure submarines and various technological problems common to all of them (materials, remote manipulation, navigating, power sources. This field is evolving rapidly and makes use of the most recent technological innovations. Although remote-controlled vehicles now seem to be favored by industrialists, the other methods still have a promising future, and the complementariness of these methods can be expected to replace rivalry among them. The resurrection of the Argyronète project, which should become a test bench for new techniques in 1985, is a good illustration of the activity going on in this industrial sector.

  14. Field-aligned currents observed by MMS in the near-Earth plasma sheet during large-scale substorm dipolarizations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Rumi; Nagai, Tsugunobu; Giles, Barbara; Le Contel, Olivier; Stawarz, Julia; Khotyaintsev, Yuri; Artemyev, Anton

    2017-04-01

    During substorms significant energy conversion has been reported to take place at the sharp dipolarization front in the flow braking region where the probability of observing bursty bulk flows (BBFs) significantly drops. On 10 August 2016, MMS traversed the pre-midnight near-Earth plasma sheet when dipolarization disturbances were detected in an extended nightside local time region by Cluster, Geotail, GOES 13, 14 and 15, and the Van Allen Probes. In an expanding plasma sheet during the dipolarization, MMS detected sub-ion scale field-aligned current layers that are propagating both Earthward (equatorward) as well as tailward (outward). These multi-scale multi-point observations enable a unique investigation of both the meso-scale evolution of the disturbances and the detailed kinetic structures of the fronts and boundaries relevant to the dipolarizations.

  15. Assessment of current state of the art in modeling techniques and analysis methods for large space structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noor, A. K.

    1983-01-01

    Advances in continuum modeling, progress in reduction methods, and analysis and modeling needs for large space structures are covered with specific attention given to repetitive lattice trusses. As far as continuum modeling is concerned, an effective and verified analysis capability exists for linear thermoelastic stress, birfurcation buckling, and free vibration problems of repetitive lattices. However, application of continuum modeling to nonlinear analysis needs more development. Reduction methods are very effective for bifurcation buckling and static (steady-state) nonlinear analysis. However, more work is needed to realize their full potential for nonlinear dynamic and time-dependent problems. As far as analysis and modeling needs are concerned, three areas are identified: loads determination, modeling and nonclassical behavior characteristics, and computational algorithms. The impact of new advances in computer hardware, software, integrated analysis, CAD/CAM stems, and materials technology is also discussed.

  16. Methods of Model Reduction for Large-Scale Biological Systems: A Survey of Current Methods and Trends.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snowden, Thomas J; van der Graaf, Piet H; Tindall, Marcus J

    2017-07-01

    Complex models of biochemical reaction systems have become increasingly common in the systems biology literature. The complexity of such models can present a number of obstacles for their practical use, often making problems difficult to intuit or computationally intractable. Methods of model reduction can be employed to alleviate the issue of complexity by seeking to eliminate those portions of a reaction network that have little or no effect upon the outcomes of interest, hence yielding simplified systems that retain an accurate predictive capacity. This review paper seeks to provide a brief overview of a range of such methods and their application in the context of biochemical reaction network models. To achieve this, we provide a brief mathematical account of the main methods including timescale exploitation approaches, reduction via sensitivity analysis, optimisation methods, lumping, and singular value decomposition-based approaches. Methods are reviewed in the context of large-scale systems biology type models, and future areas of research are briefly discussed.

  17. 基于证据推理的大型海事巡逻救助船船型选择%Ship type selection of large-scale marine patrol and rescue ships based on evidence reasoning

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    高成男; 谢新连; 赵福波; 李猛; 包甜甜

    2014-01-01

    To choose the ship type of large-scale marine patrol and rescue ships scientifically,the evalua-tion index system of ship type selection is established from four aspects of cost,technology,energy con-sumption and appearance. The each index weight in the system is determined by Analytical Hierarchy Process (AHP),and the comprehensive evaluation on each ship type is carried out by the evidence rea-soning and IDS software. Taking the ship type selection of a marine patrol and rescue ship with 3 000 t for example,through evaluating such ship types as round-bilge ships,wave piercing catamarans and tri-marans,the feasibility of the method to ship type selection for large-scale marine patrol and rescue ships is verified.%为科学选择大型海事巡逻救助船船型,从成本、技术、能耗、外观等4个方面构建船型选择评价指标体系,运用层次分析法(Analytical Hierarchy Process,AHP)确定各指标权重,并采用证据推理法,借助IDS软件,对各船型进行综合评价。以3000吨级海事巡逻救助船船型选择为例,通过评价圆舭船型、穿浪双体船型和三体船型,验证该方法在大型海事巡逻救助船船型选择上的可行性。

  18. Marine Renewable Energies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Azzellino, Arianna; Conley, Daniel; Vicinanza, Diego

    2013-01-01

    Countries with coastlines may have valuable renewable energy resources in the form of tides, currents, waves, and offshorewind.The potential to gather energy from the sea has recently gained interest in several nations, so Marine Renewable Energy Installations (hereinafter MREIs) will likely become...

  19. The Strategy Study of Large Hangzhou Marine Sports Tourism Circle Building%大杭州海洋体育旅游圈的构建与发展策略研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    常冬冬

    2013-01-01

    The rich marine tourism resources and the strong economic foundation of Zhejiang Province provide the firm guarantee and support for the development of marine sports tourism. Hangzhou, the core city of marine sports tourism circle, not only has the well-known tourism resources at home and abroad, but also promotes the development of surrounding inland and costal cities’ tourism industry and the notability of travel destinations in politics, economy, culture, transportation, etc. With the strategies of land and sea linkage, government guidance, sound management, brands creating, structural optimization, marketing strengthening, etc., the large Hangzhou marine sports tourism circle constructs a“one core, two wings and three districts”layout which will contribute to the development of Zhejiang sports tourism industry and enhance the international competitiveness of marine leisure sports tourism in Zhejiang.%浙江省有着丰富的海洋旅游资源和雄厚的经济基础,为海洋体育旅游产业的发展提供了有力保证和支撑。以杭州做为海洋体育旅游圈的核心城市,既有国内外知名的旅游资源,又在政治、经济、文化、交通等方面带动周边内陆和沿海城市旅游产业的发展和旅游目的地知名度的提升。实施海陆联动、政府引导、健全管理、创建品牌、优化结构、加强营销等策略,从而实现构建“一核两翼三区”的大杭州海洋体育旅游圈的布局,能够促进浙江省体育旅游产业的发展,提升浙江省海洋体育休闲旅游的国际竞争力。

  20. Concurrent Validity and Feasibility of Short Tests Currently Used to Measure Early Childhood Development in Large Scale Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubio-Codina, Marta; Araujo, M. Caridad; Attanasio, Orazio; Muñoz, Pablo; Grantham-McGregor, Sally

    2016-01-01

    In low- and middle-income countries (LIMCs), measuring early childhood development (ECD) with standard tests in large scale surveys and evaluations of interventions is difficult and expensive. Multi-dimensional screeners and single-domain tests (‘short tests’) are frequently used as alternatives. However, their validity in these circumstances is unknown. We examined the feasibility, reliability, and concurrent validity of three multi-dimensional screeners (Ages and Stages Questionnaires (ASQ-3), Denver Developmental Screening Test (Denver-II), Battelle Developmental Inventory screener (BDI-2)) and two single-domain tests (MacArthur-Bates Short-Forms (SFI and SFII), WHO Motor Milestones (WHO-Motor)) in 1,311 children 6–42 months in Bogota, Colombia. The scores were compared with those on the Bayley Scales of Infant and Toddler Development (Bayley-III), taken as the ‘gold standard’. The Bayley-III was given at a center by psychologists; whereas the short tests were administered in the home by interviewers, as in a survey setting. Findings indicated good internal validity of all short tests except the ASQ-3. The BDI-2 took long to administer and was expensive, while the single-domain tests were quickest and cheapest and the Denver-II and ASQ-3 were intermediate. Concurrent validity of the multi-dimensional tests’ cognitive, language, and fine motor scales with the corresponding Bayley-III scale was low below 19 months. However, it increased with age, becoming moderate-to-high over 30 months. In contrast, gross motor scales’ concurrence was high under 19 months and then decreased. Of the single-domain tests, the WHO-Motor had high validity with gross motor under 16 months, and the SFI and SFII expressive scales showed moderate correlations with language under 30 months. Overall, the Denver-II was the most feasible and valid multi-dimensional test and the ASQ-3 performed poorly under 31 months. By domain, gross motor development had the highest concurrence

  1. Concurrent Validity and Feasibility of Short Tests Currently Used to Measure Early Childhood Development in Large Scale Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubio-Codina, Marta; Araujo, M Caridad; Attanasio, Orazio; Muñoz, Pablo; Grantham-McGregor, Sally

    2016-01-01

    In low- and middle-income countries (LIMCs), measuring early childhood development (ECD) with standard tests in large scale surveys and evaluations of interventions is difficult and expensive. Multi-dimensional screeners and single-domain tests ('short tests') are frequently used as alternatives. However, their validity in these circumstances is unknown. We examined the feasibility, reliability, and concurrent validity of three multi-dimensional screeners (Ages and Stages Questionnaires (ASQ-3), Denver Developmental Screening Test (Denver-II), Battelle Developmental Inventory screener (BDI-2)) and two single-domain tests (MacArthur-Bates Short-Forms (SFI and SFII), WHO Motor Milestones (WHO-Motor)) in 1,311 children 6-42 months in Bogota, Colombia. The scores were compared with those on the Bayley Scales of Infant and Toddler Development (Bayley-III), taken as the 'gold standard'. The Bayley-III was given at a center by psychologists; whereas the short tests were administered in the home by interviewers, as in a survey setting. Findings indicated good internal validity of all short tests except the ASQ-3. The BDI-2 took long to administer and was expensive, while the single-domain tests were quickest and cheapest and the Denver-II and ASQ-3 were intermediate. Concurrent validity of the multi-dimensional tests' cognitive, language, and fine motor scales with the corresponding Bayley-III scale was low below 19 months. However, it increased with age, becoming moderate-to-high over 30 months. In contrast, gross motor scales' concurrence was high under 19 months and then decreased. Of the single-domain tests, the WHO-Motor had high validity with gross motor under 16 months, and the SFI and SFII expressive scales showed moderate correlations with language under 30 months. Overall, the Denver-II was the most feasible and valid multi-dimensional test and the ASQ-3 performed poorly under 31 months. By domain, gross motor development had the highest concurrence below 19

  2. A large-eddy simulation study of wake propagation and power production in an array of tidal-current turbines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Churchfield, Matthew J; Li, Ye; Moriarty, Patrick J

    2013-02-28

    This paper presents our initial work in performing large-eddy simulations of tidal turbine array flows. First, a horizontally periodic precursor simulation is performed to create turbulent flow data. Then those data are used as inflow into a tidal turbine array two rows deep and infinitely wide. The turbines are modelled using rotating actuator lines, and the finite-volume method is used to solve the governing equations. In studying the wakes created by the turbines, we observed that the vertical shear of the inflow combined with wake rotation causes lateral wake asymmetry. Also, various turbine configurations are simulated, and the total power production relative to isolated turbines is examined. We found that staggering consecutive rows of turbines in the simulated configurations allows the greatest efficiency using the least downstream row spacing. Counter-rotating consecutive downstream turbines in a non-staggered array shows a small benefit. This work has identified areas for improvement. For example, using a larger precursor domain would better capture elongated turbulent structures, and including salinity and temperature equations would account for density stratification and its effect on turbulence. Additionally, the wall shear stress modelling could be improved, and more array configurations could be examined.

  3. Large-Eddy Simulation Study of Wake Propagation and Power Production in an Array of Tidal-Current Turbines: Preprint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Churchfield, M. J.; Li, Y.; Moriarty, P. J.

    2012-07-01

    This paper presents our initial work in performing large-eddy simulations of tidal turbine array flows. First, a horizontally-periodic precursor simulation is performed to create turbulent flow data. Then that data is used as inflow into a tidal turbine array two rows deep and infinitely wide. The turbines are modeled using rotating actuator lines, and the finite-volume method is used to solve the governing equations. In studying the wakes created by the turbines, we observed that the vertical shear of the inflow combined with wake rotation causes lateral wake asymmetry. Also, various turbine configurations are simulated, and the total power production relative to isolated turbines is examined. Staggering consecutive rows of turbines in the simulated configurations allows the greatest efficiency using the least downstream row spacing. Counter-rotating consecutive downstream turbines in a non-staggered array shows a small benefit. This work has identified areas for improvement, such as the use of a larger precursor domain to better capture elongated turbulent structures, the inclusion of salinity and temperature equations to account for density stratification and its effect on turbulence, improved wall shear stress modelling, and the examination of more array configurations.

  4. Large-Eddy Simulation Study of Wake Propagation and Power Production in an Array of Tidal-Current Turbines: Preprint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Churchfield, M. J.; Li, Y.; Moriarty, P. J.

    2011-07-01

    This paper presents our initial work in performing large-eddy simulations of tidal turbine array flows. First, a horizontally-periodic precursor simulation is performed to create turbulent flow data. Then that data is used to determine the inflow into a tidal turbine array two rows deep and infinitely wide. The turbines are modeled using rotating actuator lines, and the finite-volume method is used to solve the governing equations. In studying the wakes created by the turbines, we observed that the vertical shear of the inflow combined with wake rotation causes lateral wake asymmetry. Also, various turbine configurations are simulated, and the total power production relative to isolated turbines is examined. Staggering consecutive rows of turbines in the simulated configurations allows the greatest efficiency using the least downstream row spacing. Counter-rotating consecutive downstream turbines in a non-staggered array shows a small benefit. This work has identified areas for improvement, such as the use of a larger precursor domain to better capture elongated turbulent structures, the inclusion of salinity and temperature equations to account for density stratification and its effect on turbulence, improved wall shear stress modeling, and the examination of more array configurations.

  5. Monitoring the impact of litter in large vertebrates in the Mediterranean Sea within the European Marine Strategy Framework Directive (MSFD): constraints, specificities and recommendations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galgani, F; Claro, F; Depledge, M; Fossi, C

    2014-09-01

    In its decision (2010/477/EU) relating to the European Marine Strategy Framework Directive (MSFD, 2008/56/EC), the European Commission identified the following points as focuses for monitoring: (i) 10.1.1: Trends in the amount, source and composition of litter washed ashore and/or deposited on coastlines, (ii) 10.1.2: Trends in the amount and composition of litter in the water column and accumulation on the sea floor, (iii) 10.1.3: Trends in the amount, distribution and composition of micro-particles (mainly microplastics), and (iv) 10.2.1: Trends in the amount and composition of litter ingested by marine animals. Monitoring the impacts of litter will be considered further in 2014. At that time, the strategy will be discussed in the context of the Mediterranean Sea, providing information on constraints, protocols, existing harm and research needed to support monitoring efforts. The definition of targets and acceptable levels of harm must take all factors into account, whether entanglement, ingestion, the transport and release of pollutants, the transport of alien species and socio-economic impacts. It must also reflect on the practical deployment of "ingestion" measures (10.2.1). The analysis of existing data will reveal the potential and suitability of some higher trophic level organisms (fish, turtles, birds and mammals) for monitoring the adverse effects of litter. Sea turtles appear to be useful indicator species, but the definition of an ecological quality objective is still needed, as well as research on alternative potential indicator species.

  6. Developement of a large proton accelerator for innovative researches; development of low energy high current beam transport system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ko, In Soo; Namkung, Won; Cho, M. H.; Kim, K. N.; Kim, J. H.; Bae, Y. S.; Kim, Y.; Kim, K. H.; Shim, K. Y. [Pohang University of Science and Technology, Pohang (Korea)

    2001-04-01

    We have designed the beam transport system to connect the ion source and the RFQ. In this design, we have finalized the positions of solenoids and various beam diagnostic device. We have finalize the physical and mechanical designs of solenoids, and these designs are already adopted to produce the actual solenoids. We have also studied about EPICS, Experimental Physics and Industrial Control System, to control a stepper motor as a tuner of the RFQ designed for KOMACEPICS is a real time control system for a large scale system such as accelerators and tokamaks. The purpose of this thesis is to establish a test system based on the EPICS. A Sun UtraSPARC 5 workstation is used as the Operator Interface(OPI) console, and a VME chassis contained a Motorola MVME162 single board computer is used as the Input/Output Controller(IOC). A stepper motor controller is connected to the IOC via an RS-232C as a field bus. The EPICS base, extensions, and the real time OS vxWorks are installed on the workstation. The real time OS image can be downloaded to the IOC via the FTP when the test station is started. We have installed an IOC application as a device and driver support layer for the serial communication with an RS-232C on the workstation. We have designed the IOC database configuration files and a graphic user interface style OPI panel which was programmed by the MEDM. With this OPI, we can control the stepper motor using EPICS. 17 refs., 33 figs., 9 tabs. (Author)

  7. Marine Science

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Science features state-of-the-art review articles and short communications. ... The last couple of years have been a time of change for the Western Indian Ocean Journal of Marine ...... planning under future sea level predictions, coastal sci-.

  8. Marine Science

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Aims and scope: The Western Indian Ocean Journal of Marine Science provides an avenue for the wide dissem- ination of high .... great barracuda (Sphyraena barracuda), and the giant ...... Smale MJ, Watson G, Hecht T (1995) Otolith atlas of.

  9. Marine Science

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    to optimize nucleic acid extraction protocols from marine gastropods, present an original .... to altering the balance between the coral host and its ... ber of agents, namely, bacteria, viruses, protozoa or .... Normally, WP starts at the base of the.

  10. Marine Science

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    sustainable coastal development in the region, as well as contributing to the global base of marine science. The journal .... 48% maize flour, 3% cassava flour, 3% vitamins (Premix for broilers) ..... resulting in inappropriate dietary energy utiliza-.

  11. Marine Science

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    between humans and the coastal and marine environment. ... dissemination of knowledge generated through research activities at the ... Science (WIOJMS), as a special issue entitled “Coral reefs of Mauritius in a .... tion and damage.

  12. Marine Science

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    between humans and the coastal and marine environment. In addition ... impact on recreational activities, natural resources ..... area affects dispersion of nutrients in the waters off .... Bell P (1992) Eutrophication and coral reefs: some exam-.

  13. Marine Science

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    sustainable coastal development in the region, as well as contributing to the global .... scientific understanding for sustainable use and management of marine resources in a globally chang- .... (2005) Effects of geography, taxa, water flow, and.

  14. Marine geology

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Rao, V.P.; Shankar, R.

    Significant scientific contributions in Marine Geology in India during the Nineties have been highlighted in this paper. Sediment trap data collected in the Arabian Sea and Bay of Bengal have provided much understanding about annual sediment fluxes...

  15. An extended polarization model to study the influence of current collector geometry of large-format lithium-ion pouch cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosch, Stephan; Rheinfeld, Alexander; Erhard, Simon V.; Jossen, Andreas

    2017-02-01

    In this work, depth-of-discharge and temperature distribution of a large-format lithium-ion pouch cell are examined by means of a two-dimensional electro-thermal polarization model. A method of improving the dynamic behavior of the model while maintaining its accuracy under constant current loads by applying intermittent charge and discharge data is given. The model is validated with the aid of experimental data gained from dynamic and constant current discharge profiles applied to a commercial 40 Ah Li-ion pouch cell. Two major design studies are carried out focusing on a variation of geometrical parameters, namely the size and the positioning of the cell tabs. For each design, the influence of current collector thickness on the uniformity of the temperature and depth-of-discharge distribution is investigated during a 4C constant current discharge operation. Simulation results show that reducing the current collector thickness results in a moderate increase of 3 °C in maximum temperature and 1.5% in depth-of-discharge imbalance if the tab size is increased. In consequence, lowering the share of inactive components within a lithium-ion cell by optimizing the thickness of the current collector foils should be further considered to enhance the performance of typical lithium-ion cell designs.

  16. Recent Advances in Marine Enzymes for Biotechnological Processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lima, R N; Porto, A L M

    In the last decade, new trends in the food and pharmaceutical industries have increased concern for the quality and safety of products. The use of biocatalytic processes using marine enzymes has become an important and useful natural product for biotechnological applications. Bioprocesses using biocatalysts like marine enzymes (fungi, bacteria, plants, animals, algae, etc.) offer hyperthermostability, salt tolerance, barophilicity, cold adaptability, chemoselectivity, regioselectivity, and stereoselectivity. Currently, enzymatic methods are used to produce a large variety of products that humans consume, and the specific nature of the enzymes including processing under mild pH and temperature conditions result in fewer unwanted side-effects and by-products. This offers high selectivity in industrial processes. The marine habitat has been become increasingly studied because it represents a huge source potential biocatalysts. Enzymes include oxidoreductases, hydrolases, transferases, isomerases, ligases, and lyases that can be used in food and pharmaceutical applications. Finally, recent advances in biotechnological processes using enzymes of marine organisms (bacterial, fungi, algal, and sponges) are described and also our work on marine organisms from South America, especially marine-derived fungi and bacteria involved in biotransformations and biodegradation of organic compounds.

  17. Spread in Dipole Cable Magnetization and Consequences on the Spread of DC Persistent Currents in the Main Dipole of the Large Hadron Collider

    CERN Document Server

    Bellesia, B; Granata, V; Le Naour, S; Oberli, L R; Sanfilippo, S; Santoni, C; Scandale, Walter; Schwerg, N; Todesco, Ezio; Völlinger, C

    2004-01-01

    The production of more than 60% of superconducting cables for the main dipoles of the Large Hadron Collider has been completed. The results of the measurements of cable magnetization and the dependence on the manufacturer are presented. The strand magnetization produces field errors that have been measured in a large number of dipoles, all tested in cold conditions. We examine here the correlation between the available magnetic measurements and the large database of cable magnetization. The analysis is based on models documented in the literature. Finally, a forecast of the persistent current effects to be expected in the LHC main dipoles is presented, and the more critical parameters for beam dynamics are singled out.

  18. The marine diversity spectrum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reuman, Daniel C.; Gislason, Henrik; Barnes, Carolyn

    2014-01-01

    of taxonomy (all the species in a region regardless of clade) are much less studied but are equally important and will illuminate a different set of ecological and evolutionary processes. We develop and test a mechanistic model of how diversity varies with body mass in marine ecosystems. The model predicts...... the form of the diversity spectrum', which quantifies the distribution of species' asymptotic body masses, is a species analogue of the classic size spectrum of individuals, and which we have found to be a new and widely applicable description of diversity patterns. The marine diversity spectrum...... is predicted to be approximately linear across an asymptotic mass range spanning seven orders of magnitude. Slope -0 center dot 5 is predicted for the global marine diversity spectrum for all combined pelagic zones of continental shelf seas, and slopes for large regions are predicted to lie between -0 center...

  19. Sea-anemone toxin ATX-II elicits A-fiber-dependent pain and enhances resurgent and persistent sodium currents in large sensory neurons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Klinger Alexandra B

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Gain-of-function mutations of the nociceptive voltage-gated sodium channel Nav1.7 lead to inherited pain syndromes, such as paroxysmal extreme pain disorder (PEPD. One characteristic of these mutations is slowed fast-inactivation kinetics, which may give rise to resurgent sodium currents. It is long known that toxins from Anemonia sulcata, such as ATX-II, slow fast inactivation and skin contact for example during diving leads to various symptoms such as pain and itch. Here, we investigated if ATX-II induces resurgent currents in sensory neurons of the dorsal root ganglion (DRGs and how this may translate into human sensations. Results In large A-fiber related DRGs ATX-II (5 nM enhances persistent and resurgent sodium currents, but failed to do so in small C-fiber linked DRGs when investigated using the whole-cell patch-clamp technique. Resurgent currents are thought to depend on the presence of the sodium channel β4-subunit. Using RT-qPCR experiments, we show that small DRGs express significantly less β4 mRNA than large sensory neurons. With the β4-C-terminus peptide in the pipette solution, it was possible to evoke resurgent currents in small DRGs and in Nav1.7 or Nav1.6 expressing HEK293/N1E115 cells, which were enhanced by the presence of extracellular ATX-II. When injected into the skin of healthy volunteers, ATX-II induces painful and itch-like sensations which were abolished by mechanical nerve block. Increase in superficial blood flow of the skin, measured by Laser doppler imaging is limited to the injection site, so no axon reflex erythema as a correlate for C-fiber activation was detected. Conclusion ATX-II enhances persistent and resurgent sodium currents in large diameter DRGs, whereas small DRGs depend on the addition of β4-peptide to the pipette recording solution for ATX-II to affect resurgent currents. Mechanical A-fiber blockade abolishes all ATX-II effects in human skin (e.g. painful and itch

  20. Higher harmonic large-amplitude Fourier transformed alternating current voltammetry: analytical attributes derived from studies of the oxidation of ferrocenemethanol and uric acid at a glassy carbon electrode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Mullane, Anthony P; Zhang, Jie; Brajter-Toth, Anna; Bond, Alan M

    2008-06-15

    An analytical evaluation of the higher ac harmonic components derived from large amplitude Fourier transformed voltammetry is provided for the reversible oxidation of ferrocenemethanol (FcMeOH) and oxidation of uric acid by an EEC mechanism in a pH 7.4 phosphate buffer at a glassy carbon (GC) electrode. The small background current in the analytically optimal fifth harmonic is predominantly attributed to faradaic current associated with the presence of electroactive functional groups on the GC electrode surface, rather than to capacitive current which dominates the background in the dc, and the initial three ac harmonics. The detection limits for the dc and the first to fifth harmonic ac components are 1.9, 5.89, 2.1, 2.5, 0.8, and 0.5 microM for FcMeOH, respectively, using a sine wave modulation of 100 mV at 21.46 Hz and a dc sweep rate of 111.76 mV s (-1). Analytical performance then progressively deteriorates in the sixth and higher harmonics. For the determination of uric acid, the capacitive background current was enhanced and the reproducibility lowered by the presence of surface active uric acid, but the rapid overall 2e (-) rather than 1e (-) electron transfer process gives rise to a significantly enhanced fifth harmonic faradaic current which enabled a detection limit of 0.3 microM to be achieved which is similar to that reported using chemically modified electrodes. Resolution of overlapping voltammetric signals for a mixture of uric acid and dopamine is also achieved using higher fourth or fifth harmonic components, under very low background current conditions. The use of higher fourth and fifth harmonics exhibiting highly favorable faradaic to background (noise) current ratios should therefore be considered in analytical applications under circumstances where the electron transfer rate is fast.

  1. Technology to prevent deposition of marine organisms by means of electrically conductive coating. Discussions on current and potential distribution by using experiments; Doden tomaku ni yoru kaiyo seibutsu fuchaku boshi gijutsu. Denryu den`i bunpu ni kansuru jikken ni yoru kento

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Usami, M.; Masaki, T. [Mitsubishi Heavy Industries, Ltd., Tokyo (Japan); Ueda, K.

    1996-04-10

    Steel structures in sea water and surface of hulls are deposited with such marine organisms as microorganisms, algae and shellfish. The deposition causes a large problem such as occurrence of abnormal local corrosion in the structures, and increase in cruising resistance in ocean vessels. The present study has introduced a simplified equation of estimation for current and potential distribution in parts coated with an electrically conductive film, and verified its reasonability by an experiment. The equation of estimation was introduced by following a model of current flow in the electrically conductive coating. The experiment has the conductive coating applied to the interior of a concrete water tank with a length of 10.8 m, a width of 5 m and a depth of 3 m to measure potential at different locations. The conductive coating was energized from copper foils attached on each applied face, whereas the current was applied to two faces between the conductive films as a pair among the four coating applied faces to measure potential in each location. A simulated calculation revealed that the potential range in the depth direction is made smaller if specific resistance of the conductive film is decreased, and made greater if increased. Effectiveness of the equation of estimation was verified by an experiment. This method has provided a prospect of achieving optimization of the specification for application of the conductive film. 2 refs., 7 figs.

  2. Marine biodiversity in the Caribbean: regional estimates and distribution patterns.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patricia Miloslavich

    Full Text Available This paper provides an analysis of the distribution patterns of marine biodiversity and summarizes the major activities of the Census of Marine Life program in the Caribbean region. The coastal Caribbean region is a large marine ecosystem (LME characterized by coral reefs, mangroves, and seagrasses, but including other environments, such as sandy beaches and rocky shores. These tropical ecosystems incorporate a high diversity of associated flora and fauna, and the nations that border the Caribbean collectively encompass a major global marine biodiversity hot spot. We analyze the state of knowledge of marine biodiversity based on the geographic distribution of georeferenced species records and regional taxonomic lists. A total of 12,046 marine species are reported in this paper for the Caribbean region. These include representatives from 31 animal phyla, two plant phyla, one group of Chromista, and three groups of Protoctista. Sampling effort has been greatest in shallow, nearshore waters, where there is relatively good coverage of species records; offshore and deep environments have been less studied. Additionally, we found that the currently accepted classification of marine ecoregions of the Caribbean did not apply for the benthic distributions of five relatively well known taxonomic groups. Coastal species richness tends to concentrate along the Antillean arc (Cuba to the southernmost Antilles and the northern coast of South America (Venezuela-Colombia, while no pattern can be observed in the deep sea with the available data. Several factors make it impossible to determine the extent to which these distribution patterns accurately reflect the true situation for marine biodiversity in general: (1 highly localized concentrations of collecting effort and a lack of collecting in many areas and ecosystems, (2 high variability among collecting methods, (3 limited taxonomic expertise for many groups, and (4 differing levels of activity in the study

  3. Marine biodiversity in the Caribbean: regional estimates and distribution patterns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miloslavich, Patricia; Díaz, Juan Manuel; Klein, Eduardo; Alvarado, Juan José; Díaz, Cristina; Gobin, Judith; Escobar-Briones, Elva; Cruz-Motta, Juan José; Weil, Ernesto; Cortés, Jorge; Bastidas, Ana Carolina; Robertson, Ross; Zapata, Fernando; Martín, Alberto; Castillo, Julio; Kazandjian, Aniuska; Ortiz, Manuel

    2010-08-02

    This paper provides an analysis of the distribution patterns of marine biodiversity and summarizes the major activities of the Census of Marine Life program in the Caribbean region. The coastal Caribbean region is a large marine ecosystem (LME) characterized by coral reefs, mangroves, and seagrasses, but including other environments, such as sandy beaches and rocky shores. These tropical ecosystems incorporate a high diversity of associated flora and fauna, and the nations that border the Caribbean collectively encompass a major global marine biodiversity hot spot. We analyze the state of knowledge of marine biodiversity based on the geographic distribution of georeferenced species records and regional taxonomic lists. A total of 12,046 marine species are reported in this paper for the Caribbean region. These include representatives from 31 animal phyla, two plant phyla, one group of Chromista, and three groups of Protoctista. Sampling effort has been greatest in shallow, nearshore waters, where there is relatively good coverage of species records; offshore and deep environments have been less studied. Additionally, we found that the currently accepted classification of marine ecoregions of the Caribbean did not apply for the benthic distributions of five relatively well known taxonomic groups. Coastal species richness tends to concentrate along the Antillean arc (Cuba to the southernmost Antilles) and the northern coast of South America (Venezuela-Colombia), while no pattern can be observed in the deep sea with the available data. Several factors make it impossible to determine the extent to which these distribution patterns accurately reflect the true situation for marine biodiversity in general: (1) highly localized concentrations of collecting effort and a lack of collecting in many areas and ecosystems, (2) high variability among collecting methods, (3) limited taxonomic expertise for many groups, and (4) differing levels of activity in the study of different

  4. Marine Biodiversity in the Caribbean: Regional Estimates and Distribution Patterns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miloslavich, Patricia; Díaz, Juan Manuel; Klein, Eduardo; Alvarado, Juan José; Díaz, Cristina; Gobin, Judith; Escobar-Briones, Elva; Cruz-Motta, Juan José; Weil, Ernesto; Cortés, Jorge; Bastidas, Ana Carolina; Robertson, Ross; Zapata, Fernando; Martín, Alberto; Castillo, Julio; Kazandjian, Aniuska; Ortiz, Manuel

    2010-01-01

    This paper provides an analysis of the distribution patterns of marine biodiversity and summarizes the major activities of the Census of Marine Life program in the Caribbean region. The coastal Caribbean region is a large marine ecosystem (LME) characterized by coral reefs, mangroves, and seagrasses, but including other environments, such as sandy beaches and rocky shores. These tropical ecosystems incorporate a high diversity of associated flora and fauna, and the nations that border the Caribbean collectively encompass a major global marine biodiversity hot spot. We analyze the state of knowledge of marine biodiversity based on the geographic distribution of georeferenced species records and regional taxonomic lists. A total of 12,046 marine species are reported in this paper for the Caribbean region. These include representatives from 31 animal phyla, two plant phyla, one group of Chromista, and three groups of Protoctista. Sampling effort has been greatest in shallow, nearshore waters, where there is relatively good coverage of species records; offshore and deep environments have been less studied. Additionally, we found that the currently accepted classification of marine ecoregions of the Caribbean did not apply for the benthic distributions of five relatively well known taxonomic groups. Coastal species richness tends to concentrate along the Antillean arc (Cuba to the southernmost Antilles) and the northern coast of South America (Venezuela – Colombia), while no pattern can be observed in the deep sea with the available data. Several factors make it impossible to determine the extent to which these distribution patterns accurately reflect the true situation for marine biodiversity in general: (1) highly localized concentrations of collecting effort and a lack of collecting in many areas and ecosystems, (2) high variability among collecting methods, (3) limited taxonomic expertise for many groups, and (4) differing levels of activity in the study of

  5. The Marine Mammal Protection Act at 40: status, recovery, and future of U.S. marine mammals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roman, Joe; Altman, Irit; Dunphy-Daly, Meagan M; Campbell, Caitlin; Jasny, Michael; Read, Andrew J

    2013-05-01

    Passed in 1972, the Marine Mammal Protection Act has two fundamental objectives: to maintain U.S. marine mammal stocks at their optimum sustainable populations and to uphold their ecological role in the ocean. The current status of many marine mammal populations is considerably better than in 1972. Take reduction plans have been largely successful in reducing direct fisheries bycatch, although they have not been prepared for all at-risk stocks, and fisheries continue to place marine mammals as risk. Information on population trends is unknown for most (71%) stocks; more stocks with known trends are improving than declining: 19% increasing, 5% stable, and 5% decreasing. Challenges remain, however, and the act has generally been ineffective in treating indirect impacts, such as noise, disease, and prey depletion. Existing conservation measures have not protected large whales from fisheries interactions or ship strikes in the northwestern Atlantic. Despite these limitations, marine mammals within the U.S. Exclusive Economic Zone appear to be faring better than those outside, with fewer species in at-risk categories and more of least concern. © 2013 New York Academy of Sciences.

  6. Study of the underlying electrochemistry of polycrystalline gold electrodes in aqueous solution and electrocatalysis by large amplitude fourier transformed alternating current voltammetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lertanantawong, Benchaporn; O'Mullane, Anthony P; Surareungchai, Werasak; Somasundrum, Mithran; Declan Burke, L; Bond, Alan M

    2008-03-18

    Polycrystalline gold electrodes of the kind that are routinely used in analysis and catalysis in aqueous media are often regarded as exhibiting relatively simple double-layer charging/discharging and monolayer oxide formation/removal in the positive potential region. Application of the large amplitude Fourier transformed alternating current (FT-ac) voltammetric technique that allows the faradaic current contribution of fast electron-transfer processes to be emphasized in the higher harmonic components has revealed the presence of well-defined faradaic (premonolayer oxidation) processes at positive potentials in the double-layer region in acidic and basic media which are enhanced by electrochemical activation. These underlying quasi-reversible interfacial electron-transfer processes may mediate the course of electrocatalytic oxidation reactions of hydrazine, ethylene glycol, and glucose on gold electrodes in aqueous media. The observed responses support key assumptions associated with the incipient hydrous oxide adatom mediator (IHOAM) model of electrocatalysis.

  7. Large-amplitude Fourier transformed high-harmonic alternating current cyclic voltammetry: kinetic discrimination of interfering Faradaic processes at glassy carbon and at boron-doped diamond electrodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jie; Guo, Si-Xuan; Bond, Alan M; Marken, Frank

    2004-07-01

    Significant advantages of Fourier transformed large-amplitude ac higher (second to eighth) harmonics relative to responses obtained with conventional small-amplitude ac or dc cyclic voltammetric methods have been demonstrated with respect to (i) the suppression of capacitive background currents, (ii) the separation of the reversible reduction of [Ru(NH(3))(6)](3+) from the overlapping irreversible oxygen reduction process under conditions where aerobic oxygen remains present in the electrochemical cell, and (iii) the kinetic resolution of the reversible [Ru(NH(3))(6)](3+/2+) process in mixtures of [Fe(CN)(6)](3-) and [Ru(NH(3))(6)](3+) at appropriately treated boron-doped diamond electrodes, even when highly unfavorable [Fe(CN)(6)](3-) to [Ru(NH(3))(6)](3+) concentration ratios are employed. Theoretical support for the basis of kinetic discrimination in large-amplitude higher harmonic ac cyclic voltammetry is provided.

  8. Marine Ecological Environment Management Based on Ecological Compensation Mechanisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qunzhen Qu

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The level of marine environmental management is a key factor in the successful implementation of marine power strategies. The improvement in management levels of marine environments requires innovation in marine management. In other words, the transformation of marine environmental management into marine ecological environment management must be done in order to achieve sustainable development of the marine economy. As an environmental economic policy that combines both administrative and market measures, ecological compensation mechanisms have significant advantages in marine ecological environment management. Based on the study of the current development of ecological compensation mechanisms in China, through the analysis of the connotation of marine ecological civilization, existing marine ecological protection practices and marine environmental management methods, this paper posits that the current marine ecological environment management in China should be established on the basis of ecological compensation mechanisms. At present, a lack of laws and regulations for overall marine ecological environment management is the key factor restricting the practice of marine ecological environment management. Therefore, it is necessary to explore the current path of marine ecological environment management in China from the perspective of the construction of legal system of ecological compensation law, the establishment of ecological compensation fees, ecological taxes and ecological compensation fund systems, and the clear status for a marine ecological management and supervision body.

  9. Otters, Marine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estes, James A.; Bodkin, James L.; Ben-David, M.; Perrin, William F.; Würsing, Bernd; Thewissen, J.G.M.

    2009-01-01

    The otters (Mustelidae; Lutrinae) provide an exceptional perspective into the evolution of marine living by mammals. Most extant marine mammals (e.g. the cetaceans, pinnipeds, and sirenians) have been so highly modified by long periods of selection for life in the sea that they bear little resemblance to their terrestrial ancestors. Marine otters, in contrast, are more recent expatriates from freshwater habitats and some species still live in both environments. Contrasts among species within the otters, and among the otters, terrestrial mammals, and the more highly adapted pinnipeds and cetaceans provide powerful insights into mammalian adaptations to life in the sea (Estes, 1989). Among the marine mammals, sea otters (Enhydra lutris, Fig. 1) provide the clearest understanding of consumer-induced effects on ecosystem function. This is due in part to opportunities provided by history and in part to the relative ease with which shallow coastal systems where sea otters live can be observed and studied. Although more difficult to study than sea otters, other otter species reveal the connectivity among the marine, freshwater, and terrestrial systems. These three qualities of the otters – their comparative biology, their role as predators, and their role as agents of ecosystem connectivity – are what make them interesting to marine mammalogy.The following account provides a broad overview of the comparative biology and ecology of the otters, with particular emphasis on those species or populations that live in the sea. Sea otters are features prominently, in part because they live exclusively in the sea whereas other otters have obligate associations with freshwater and terrestrial environments (Kenyon, 1969; Riedman and Estes, 1990).

  10. Quench characteristics of Ag/AuBi2223 HTS-stainless steel stack used for the hybrid current leads of the large hadron collider

    CERN Document Server

    Al-Mosawi, M K; Beduz, C; Yang, Y; Ballarino, A

    2008-01-01

    The quench characteristics of Ag/Au sheathed Bi2223 tapes have been investigated in an adiabatic condition and in a configuration similar to that used in hybrid high temperature superconducting current leads, namely the 13000A leads used for the Large Hadron Collider at CERN. A specialised rig was designed and constructed to provide a carefully controlled environment. The samples were prepared from HTS tape soldered onto a stainless steel substrate with a number of temperature sensors at various positions along the length of tape. One end of the lead (cold end) was maintained at 6K using G-M cryo-cooler whereas the temperature of the other end (warm end) can be varied and maintained at temperatures up to 100K. The thermal runaway currents (quench currents) at various warm end temperatures (in the range of 40-100K) were determined. The temperature evolutions at various locations along the tape were recorded at different top end temperatures and currents. The effect of the stainless steel mechanical reinforceme...

  11. Numerical investigation of soot formation and oxidation processes under large two-stroke marine diesel engine-like conditions using integrated CFD-chemical kinetics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pang, Kar Mun; Karvounis, Nikolas; Walther, Jens Honore

    2016-01-01

    skeletal model are close to those produced by the larger and more comprehensive chemical mechanisms, apart from those at the low pressure condition. The current study also demonstrates that the variation of averaged soot volume fraction with respect to the change of combustion chamber pressure captured...

  12. A new large egg type from the marine live feed calanoid copepod Acartia tonsa (Dana) – Perspectives for selective breeding of designer feed for hatcheries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Halsen Hammarvold, Stian; Glud, Ronnie N.; Evjemo, Jan Ove

    2015-01-01

    were dormant, as indicated from the relatively low hatching success of 60%, within 48 h, was rejected as no significant difference was found in egg volumespecific respiration rates or histological analysis of the chorion between the two egg types. The nauplii hatched from large eggs were...

  13. A new large egg type from the marine live feed calanoid copepod Acartia tonsa (Dana)-Perspectives for selective breeding of designer feed for hatcheries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hammervold, Stian Halsen; Glud, Ronnie N.; Evjemo, Jan Ove

    2015-01-01

    eggs were dormant, as indicated from the relatively low hatching success of 60%, within 48 h, was rejected as no significant difference was found in egg volume-specific respiration rates or histological analysis of the chorion between the two egg types. The nauplii hatched from large eggs were...

  14. Relationship between marine mammal stranding events and offshore earthquakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grant, Rachel; Savirina, Anna; Hoppit, Will

    2014-05-01

    The causes of marine mammal stranding events are largely unknown, but may relate to ocean currents, severe weather, anthropogenic noise pollution, and other factors. Large stranding events have been suggested to occur as a result of offshore earthquakes but there is little evidence as yet to support this hypothesis. Stranding events occur in hotspots, which are sometimes areas of high seismic activity, such as Taiwan, and other times, in areas that are removed from seismic zones, such as Cape Cod. We analyse a large and robust dataset of marine mammal stranding data collected off the coast of Washington and Oregon from 1999 to 2010, to look for statistical connections to offshore earthquakes. We looked forward, as well as backward in time from significant seismic events, to ascertain whether stranding occurrences, if connected to earthquakes, are a result of the earthquake preparation period or the earthquake itself. Possible mechanisms are discussed.

  15. New pharmaceuticals from marine organisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fenical, W

    1997-09-01

    Definitions of 'marine biotechnology' often refer to the vast potential of the oceans to lead to new cures for human and animal disease; the exploitation of natural drugs has always been the most basic form of biotechnology. Although only initiated in the late 1970s, natural drug discovery from the world's oceans has been accelerated by the chemical uniqueness of marine organisms and by the need to develop drugs for contemporary, difficult to cure, diseases. Current research activities, while primarily within the academic laboratories, have generated convincing evidence that marine drug discovery has an exceedingly bright future.

  16. Discrimination and evaluation of the effects of uncompensated resistance and slow electrode kinetics from the higher harmonic components of a fourier transformed large-amplitude alternating current voltammogram.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jie; Guo, Si-Xuan; Bond, Alan M

    2007-03-15

    The influence of uncompensated resistance (also called the IRu effect, where I is current and Ru is uncompensated resistance) and slow electrode kinetics have been assessed for the dc and first five ac harmonics derived from Fourier transformed large-amplitude ac voltammetry. Resistance and rate constant conditions emphasized correspond to those where separation of effects attributable to either parameter is essentially impossible under conditions of dc cyclic voltammetry. Results derived from simulations and experiments demonstrate that it is relatively easy to discriminate and quantify contributions from these two effects over a wide range of values using the fourth and fifth harmonic ac components derived from single large-amplitude ac voltammetric measurement. Furthermore, these ac components also are essentially devoid of background charging current. Concepts developed initially from simulations are confirmed by experimental studies on the following: (a) the oxidation of ferrocene, in moderately resistive CH3CN and highly resistive CH2Cl2 (represents examples of IRu effect on a reversible electron-transfer process); (b) the reduction of a low 0.2 mM concentration of [Fe(CN)6]3- in the highly conductive 3 M KCl electrolyte media (case of slow kinetics with negligible IRu effect); (c) and reduction of a high 10 mM concentration of [Fe(CN)6]3- in less conductive aqueous 0.5 M KCl electrolyte media (example where the simultaneous effects of both IRu and slow kinetics need to be resolved).

  17. Marine Science

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    between humans and the coastal and marine environment. .... Overall, the forest was composed of small trees (mean height 2.6 m; mean DBH 7.45 cm); height and DBH varied sig- nificantly when ... nerable to degradation, because the population density is high .... areas in the estuary included Xefina Grande and Xefina.

  18. Marine Science

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Aims and scope: The Western Indian Ocean Journal of Marine Science provides an avenue for the wide dissem- ination of high .... tions at global (e.g. sea temperature, hurricanes) and ..... Jameson SC (1976) Early life history of the giant clams.

  19. Marine Science

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Sweden. Cover image: Relief model of the WIO surface that integrates land topography and ocean bathymetry. Amante and ... WIO Journal of Marine Science 14 (1 & 2) 2015 1-9 | L. J. Chauka et al. ... bar, from September 2008 to August 2010.

  20. Marine Science

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    between humans and the coastal and marine environment. ... dissemination of knowledge generated through research activities at the ... Science (WIOJMS), as a special issue entitled “Coral reefs of Mauritius in a changing global climate”. .... C – growth anomaly; D – brown band; E - skeletal eroding band affecting A.

  1. Marine envenomations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balhara, Kamna S; Stolbach, Andrew

    2014-02-01

    This article describes the epidemiology and presentation of human envenomation from marine organisms. Venom pathophysiology, envenomation presentation, and treatment options are discussed for sea snake, stingray, spiny fish, jellyfish, octopus, cone snail, sea urchin, and sponge envenomation. The authors describe the management of common exposures that cause morbidity as well as the keys to recognition and treatment of life-threatening exposures.

  2. Marine Science

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Chief Editor José Paula | Faculty of Sciences of University of Lisbon, ... Aims and scope: The Western Indian Ocean Journal of Marine Science provides an avenue for the wide dissem- .... in the region are some of the poorest in the world,.

  3. Global phylogeography of the dolphinfish (Coryphaena hippurus): the influence of large effective population size and recent dispersal on the divergence of a marine pelagic cosmopolitan species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Díaz-Jaimes, P; Uribe-Alcocer, M; Rocha-Olivares, A; García-de-León, F J; Nortmoon, P; Durand, J D

    2010-12-01

    Pelagic fish that are distributed circumtropically are characterised by a low population structure level as a result of a high capacity for dispersion and large population sizes. Nevertheless, historical and contemporary processes, including past demographic and/or range expansions, secondary contact, dispersal, gene flow, and the achievement of large effective population sizes, may play a part in the detection of divergence signals, especially in the case of tropical pelagic species, whose distribution range depends strongly on the sea surface temperature. The connectivity and historical demography of Atlantic, Indian, Pacific and Mediterranean populations of dolphinfish (Coryphaena hippurus) was studied using partial sequences of the mitochondrial DNA NADH dehydrogenase subunit 1 (ND1). AMOVA analyses revealed significant inter-oceanic divergence with three phylogroups located in the Indo-Pacific, Eastern Atlantic, and Mediterranean Sea, the last one being the most divergent. However, it was not possible to clearly observe any genetic differentiation between the Indo-Pacific and Atlantic populations, as has been reported for most tropical pelagic species of tuna and billfishes. This supports the assumption of recent dispersal among basins facilitated by the actual continuous distribution of dolphinfish populations. Moreover, the lack of a divergence signal for populations separated by the Panamanian Isthmus reveals that genetic drift does not exert a strong influence on tropical pelagic species with large effective population sizes.

  4. Les granulats marins

    OpenAIRE

    Augris, Claude; Cressard, Alain

    1984-01-01

    Urbanization and the protection of sites and ground waters reduce the number of alluvial aggregate exploitation areas. The ocean provides different substitution possibilities. In France, marine aggregates represent a substantial potential in the supply of material from coastal regions. A large number of cruises on the French continental shelf, using different exploration (seismic, drilling, dredging) and identification techniques, enabled the C.N.E.X.O. to make an inventory of the resources a...

  5. Marine Model Trout Farms: developments in marine RAS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Per Bovbjerg

    2011-01-01

    . This development and demonstration unit in commercial scale will during the next four years hopefully provide scientific and practical basis and support for further development in coming generations of Marine Model Trout Farms for large salmonids. The unit consist in the recirculation loop of one large fish tank...

  6. Marine productivity response to Heinrich events: a model-data comparison

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Mariotti, V

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Marine sediments records suggest large changes in marine productivity during glacial periods, with abrupt variations especially during the Heinrich events. Here, we study the response of marine biogeochemistry to such an event by using a...

  7. The VITamin D and OmegA-3 TriaL (VITAL): rationale and design of a large randomized controlled trial of vitamin D and marine omega-3 fatty acid supplements for the primary prevention of cancer and cardiovascular disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manson, Joann E; Bassuk, Shari S; Lee, I-Min; Cook, Nancy R; Albert, Michelle A; Gordon, David; Zaharris, Elaine; Macfadyen, Jean G; Danielson, Eleanor; Lin, Jennifer; Zhang, Shumin M; Buring, Julie E

    2012-01-01

    Data from laboratory studies, observational research, and/or secondary prevention trials suggest that vitamin D and marine omega-3 fatty acids may reduce risk for cancer or cardiovascular disease (CVD), but primary prevention trials with adequate dosing in general populations (i.e., unselected for disease risk) are lacking. The ongoing VITamin D and OmegA-3 TriaL (VITAL) is a large randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, 2 x 2 factorial trial of vitamin D (in the form of vitamin D(3) [cholecalciferol], 2000 IU/day) and marine omega-3 fatty acid (Omacor fish oil, eicosapentaenoic acid [EPA]+docosahexaenoic acid [DHA], 1g/day) supplements in the primary prevention of cancer and CVD among a multi-ethnic population of 20,000 U.S. men aged ≥ 50 and women aged ≥ 55. The mean treatment period will be 5 years. Baseline blood samples will be collected in at least 16,000 participants, with follow-up blood collection in about 6000 participants. Yearly follow-up questionnaires will assess treatment compliance (plasma biomarker measures will also assess compliance in a random sample of participants), use of non-study drugs or supplements, occurrence of endpoints, and cancer and vascular risk factors. Self-reported endpoints will be confirmed by medical record review by physicians blinded to treatment assignment, and deaths will be ascertained through national registries and other sources. Ancillary studies will investigate whether these agents affect risk for diabetes and glucose intolerance; hypertension; cognitive decline; depression; osteoporosis and fracture; physical disability and falls; asthma and other respiratory diseases; infections; and rheumatoid arthritis, systemic lupus erythematosus, thyroid diseases, and other autoimmune disorders.

  8. Salmon aquaculture and antimicrobial resistance in the marine environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buschmann, Alejandro H; Tomova, Alexandra; López, Alejandra; Maldonado, Miguel A; Henríquez, Luis A; Ivanova, Larisa; Moy, Fred; Godfrey, Henry P; Cabello, Felipe C

    2012-01-01

    Antimicrobials used in salmon aquaculture pass into the marine environment. This could have negative impacts on marine environmental biodiversity, and on terrestrial animal and human health as a result of selection for bacteria containing antimicrobial resistance genes. We therefore measured the numbers of culturable bacteria and antimicrobial-resistant bacteria in marine sediments in the Calbuco Archipelago, Chile, over 12-month period at a salmon aquaculture site approximately 20 m from a salmon farm and at a control site 8 km distant without observable aquaculture activities. Three antimicrobials extensively used in Chilean salmon aquaculture (oxytetracycline, oxolinic acid, and florfenicol) were studied. Although none of these antimicrobials was detected in sediments from either site, traces of flumequine, a fluoroquinolone antimicrobial also widely used in Chile, were present in sediments from both sites during this period. There were significant increases in bacterial numbers and antimicrobial-resistant fractions to oxytetracycline, oxolinic acid, and florfenicol in sediments from the aquaculture site compared to those from the control site. Interestingly, there were similar numbers of presumably plasmid-mediated resistance genes for oxytetracycline, oxolinic acid and florfenicol in unselected marine bacteria isolated from both aquaculture and control sites. These preliminary findings in one location may suggest that the current use of large amounts of antimicrobials in Chilean aquaculture has the potential to select for antimicrobial-resistant bacteria in marine sediments.

  9. Salmon Aquaculture and Antimicrobial Resistance in the Marine Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buschmann, Alejandro H.; Tomova, Alexandra; López, Alejandra; Maldonado, Miguel A.; Henríquez, Luis A.; Ivanova, Larisa; Moy, Fred; Godfrey, Henry P.; Cabello, Felipe C.

    2012-01-01

    Antimicrobials used in salmon aquaculture pass into the marine environment. This could have negative impacts on marine environmental biodiversity, and on terrestrial animal and human health as a result of selection for bacteria containing antimicrobial resistance genes. We therefore measured the numbers of culturable bacteria and antimicrobial-resistant bacteria in marine sediments in the Calbuco Archipelago, Chile, over 12-month period at a salmon aquaculture site approximately 20 m from a salmon farm and at a control site 8 km distant without observable aquaculture activities. Three antimicrobials extensively used in Chilean salmon aquaculture (oxytetracycline, oxolinic acid, and florfenicol) were studied. Although none of these antimicrobials was detected in sediments from either site, traces of flumequine, a fluoroquinolone antimicrobial also widely used in Chile, were present in sediments from both sites during this period. There were significant increases in bacterial numbers and antimicrobial-resistant fractions to oxytetracycline, oxolinic acid, and florfenicol in sediments from the aquaculture site compared to those from the control site. Interestingly, there were similar numbers of presumably plasmid-mediated resistance genes for oxytetracycline, oxolinic acid and florfenicol in unselected marine bacteria isolated from both aquaculture and control sites. These preliminary findings in one location may suggest that the current use of large amounts of antimicrobials in Chilean aquaculture has the potential to select for antimicrobial-resistant bacteria in marine sediments. PMID:22905164

  10. Marine organisms: an alternative source of potentially valuable natural products

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alphonse Kelecom

    1991-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper recalls the outcoming of marine natural products research and reviews a selection of marirne bioactive metabolites in current use together with promising trends in marine pharmacology.

  11. Wave refraction in the presence of currents and variations of the marine bottom; Refraccion del oleaje en presencia de corrientes y variaciones del fondo marino

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Diaz Hernandez, G.; Silva Casarin, R. [Instituto de Ingenieria, UNAM, Mexico, D.F. (Mexico)

    2001-03-01

    A method for solving the wave refraction phenomena through a computational model, which solves the wave height and propagation angle from deep to shallow water including wave breaking, is shown. The program considers the shoaling and refraction effects, wave-currents interaction and the non-linearity assumption. The numerical model is based in two principles: the irrotationality of the wave number, which is reduced to the Snell's law for planar bathymetry, and the conservation of wave action, which is reduced to the energy conservation concept when no current interaction occurs. The two-step Lax-Wendroff differential method was used to calculate and solve the entire computational grid. Three different examples that help represent the whole method are shown; the first case is based on an idealized plane and horizontal bathymetry, the second case is the experimental model developed by Berkhoff (1982), and finally the Noda (1974) example is reproduced. [Spanish] Se presenta un modelo numerico para estudiar el fenomeno de la refraccion del oleaje inducida por la presencia de corrientes, cambios batimetricos, rotura y disipacion. El modelo calcula sobre una malla computacional la altura y la direccion local del oleaje. El programa considera los efectos de asomeramiento, refraccion, interaccion oleaje-corriente y su no-linearidad. Los principios que utiliza el modelo son dos; la irrotacionalidad del numero de onda, que para batimetria plana se reduce a la ley de Snell y el principio de conservacion de la accion de ondas, que se simplifica al concepto de la conservacion de la energia cuando no existen corrientes. El metodo diferencial que se utiliza para el calculo e interpolacion de datos sobre la malla de discretizacion es Lax-Wendroff en dos pasos. Se muestran tres casos que ayudan a representar el metodo en su totalidad: el primero se modela con base en una batimetria idealizada, plana y horizontal, el segundo se simula a partir del medolo experimental de

  12. Marine actinomycetes: an ongoing source of novel bioactive metabolites

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Subramani, Ramesh; Aalbersberg, William

    2012-01-01

    ...% are produced by this genus. The ecological role of actinomycetes in the marine ecosystem is largely neglected and various assumptions meant there was little incentive to isolate marine strains for search and discovery of new drugs...

  13. The flora and fauna associated with Himanthalia elongata (L.) S. F. Gray in relation to water current and wave action in the Lough Hyne marine nature reserve*1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitching, J. A.

    1987-12-01

    The growth of epiphytes (plant and animal) was investigated at various stages in the development of the low littoral alga Himanthalia elongata. The vegetative thallus, or button, is very resistant to the settlement of epiphytes on its upper surface, but susceptible to extensive coverage on its lower surface and stalk, especially by Bryozoa and spirorbid worms. The receptacles or straps are invaded by a microforest of filamentous algae, which in turn provides accommondation and in many cases food for many invertebrates, including gastropods, amphipods and larval Diptera. Spirorbid worms on the underbuttons are confined to sites sheltered from strong water currents and wave action, but other epiphytes of the underbuttons show little regard for these features. Microfores and its associated fauna are restricted to sheltered sites. Perspex discs set up as imitation Himanthalia buttons were colonized by the same epiphytes as real Himanthalia buttons, but on both sides, indicating the existence of a special protective mechanism for the upper surfaces of real Himanthalia buttons.

  14. GPU accelerated marine data visualization method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Bo; Chen, Ge; Tian, Fenglin; Shao, Baomin; Ji, Pengbo

    2014-12-01

    The study of marine data visualization is of great value. Marine data, due to its large scale, random variation and multi-resolution in nature, are hard to be visualized and analyzed. Nowadays, constructing an ocean model and visualizing model results have become some of the most important research topics of `Digital Ocean'. In this paper, a spherical ray casting method is developed to improve the traditional ray-casting algorithm and to make efficient use of GPUs. Aiming at the ocean current data, a 3D view-dependent line integral convolution method is used, in which the spatial frequency is adapted according to the distance from a camera. The study is based on a 3D virtual reality and visualization engine, namely the VV-Ocean. Some interactive operations are also provided to highlight the interesting structures and the characteristics of volumetric data. Finally, the marine data gathered in the East China Sea are displayed and analyzed. The results show that the method meets the requirements of real-time and interactive rendering.

  15. Nutraceutical and pharmacological implications of marine carbohydrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pallela, Ramjee

    2014-01-01

    Current day's research has been focusing much on the potential pharmacological or nutraceutical agents of selective health benefits with less toxicity. As a consequence of increased demand of nutritional supplements of great medicinal values, development of therapeutic agents from natural sources, in particular, marine environment are being considered much important. A diverse array of marine natural products containing medicinally useful nutritional substances, i.e., marine nutraceuticals have been focused to the benefit of mankind. Carbohydrates, by being constituted in considerable amount of many marine organisms display several nutraceutical and pharmaceutical behavior to defend from various diseases. Moreover, the carbohydrates from algae as well as from shellfish wastes, like chitosan and its derivatives, showed tremendous applications in biology and biomedicine. In the current chapter, several of marine carbohydrates from various marine flora and fauna have been covered with their applications and prospects in the development of nutraceuticals and pharmaceuticals.

  16. Temporal change in the genetic structure between and within cohorts of a marine fish, Diplodus sargus, induced by a large variance in individual reproductive success.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Planes, S; Lenfant, P

    2002-08-01

    Temporal changes at 16 allozyme loci in the Diplodus sargus population of Banyuls-sur-Mer (Mediterranean Sea, France) were monitored. Temporal genetic variation within a single population was examined over two temporal scales: (i) among three year-classes sampled at the same age, and (ii) within a single year-class sampled three times over a two-year period. We observed a significant change in the genotypic structure within the same cohort during the first two years following settlement and before recruitment into the adult population. In addition, comparison of year-classes showed that cohorts differed significantly one year after settlement, whereas they became similar later on before recruitment into the adult population. The observed changes in the genetic structure within and between year-classes may be the result of complex selective processes or genetic drift. Linkage disequilibrium and genetic relatedness data suggest that these changes are due to large variation in reproductive success, followed by homogenization through adult movement. Overall, these results demonstrated a rapid genetic change within a population.

  17. First results from Acoustic Doppler Current Profiler measurements of meltwater flux in a large supraglacial river in western Greenland compared with downstream proglacial river outflow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitcher, L. H.; Smith, L. C.; Overstreet, B. T.; Chu, V. W.; Rennermalm, A. K.; Cooper, M. G.; Gleason, C. J.; Yang, K.

    2015-12-01

    A vast network of seasonally evolving, thermally eroding supraglacial rivers on the southwestern Greenland Ice Sheet (GrIS) is the preeminent transporter of meltwater across this area of the ablation zone. Supraglacial rivers are important for estimating surface water storage and transport into moulins and into the en-, sub-, and proglacial environments. Yet, little is known about their role in the GrIS cryo-hydrologic system. To that end, supraglacial river discharge in a large river, the "Rio Behar" (67.05°, -49.02°; ~75 km from the Kangerlussuaq International Airport), was measured in situ over 300 times: approximately four times per hour over three consecutive days from July 19 - 22, 2015. The Rio Behar drains a ~ 70 km2 ice catchment and enters a large moulin in the Watson River land-ice watershed in western Greenland. River discharge was measured using a Sontek M9 Acoustic Doppler Current Profiler. Each profile records water temperature, depth-integrated velocity, channel width and channel bathymetry. This novel dataset can be used to assess diurnal variations in river discharge, slope, velocity, stream power, and channel incision in order to enhance process-level understanding of GrIS meltwater routing, storage and transport. Future work will compare supraglacial river discharge in the Rio Behar with in situ estimates of proglacial river outflow upstream of the Watson River bridge in Kangerlussuaq, Greenland.

  18. High current density and longtime stable field electron transfer from large-area densely arrayed graphene nanosheet-carbon nanotube hybrids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Jian-Hua; Cheng, Lin; Wang, Fan-Jie; Li, Guo-Zheng; Li, De-Jun; Cheng, Guo-An

    2014-12-10

    Achieving high current and longtime stable field emission from large area (larger than 1 mm(2)), densely arrayed emitters is of great importance in applications for vacuum electron sources. We report here the preparation of graphene nanosheet-carbon nanotube (GNS-CNT) hybrids by following a process of iron ion prebombardment on Si wafers, catalyst-free growth of GNSs on CNTs, and high-temperature annealing. Structural observations indicate that the iron ion prebombardment influences the growth of CNTs quite limitedly, and the self-assembled GNSs sparsely distributed on the tips of CNTs with their sharp edges unfolded outside. The field emission study indicates that the maximum emission current density (Jmax) is gradually promoted after these treatments, and the composition with GNSs is helpful for decreasing the operation fields of CNTs. An optimal Jmax up to 85.10 mA/cm(2) is achieved from a 4.65 mm(2) GNS-CNT sample, far larger than 7.41 mA/cm(2) for the as-grown CNTs. This great increase of Jmax is ascribed to the reinforced adhesion of GNS-CNT hybrids to substrates. We propose a rough calculation and find that this adhesion is promoted by 7.37 times after the three-step processing. We consider that both the ion prebombardment produced rough surface and the wrapping of CNT foot by catalyst residuals during thermal processing are responsible for this enhanced adhesion. Furthermore, the three-step prepared GNS-CNT hybrids present excellent field emission stability at high emission current densities (larger than 20 mA/cm(2)) after being perfectly aged.

  19. Elevated potassium elicits recurrent surges of large GABAA-receptor-mediated post-synaptic currents in hippocampal CA3 pyramidal neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Damian Seung-Ho; Yu, Wilson; Sutton, Alex; Calos, Megan; Carlen, Peter Louis

    2011-03-01

    Previously, we found that rat hippocampal CA3 interneurons become hyperactive with increasing concentrations of extracellular K(+) up to 10 mM. However, it is unclear how this enhanced interneuronal activity affects pyramidal neurons. Here we voltage-clamped rat hippocampal CA3 pyramidal neurons in vitro at 0 mV to isolate γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA)-activated inhibitory post-synaptic currents (IPSCs) and measured these in artificial cerebrospinal fluid (aCSF) and with 10 mM K(+) bath perfusion. In aCSF, small IPSCs were present with amplitudes of 0.053 ± 0.007 nA and a frequency of 0.27 ± 0.14 Hz. With 10 mM K(+) perfusion, IPSCs increased greatly in frequency and amplitude, culminating in surge events with peak amplitudes of 0.56 ± 0.08 nA, that appeared and disappeared cyclically with durations lasting 2.02 ± 0.37 min repeatedly, up to 10 times over a 30-min bath perfusion of elevated K(+). These large IPSCs were GABA(A)-receptor mediated and did not involve significant desensitization of this receptor. Perfusion of a GABA transporter inhibitor (NO-711), glutamate receptor inhibitors CNQX and APV, or a gap junctional blocker (carbenoxolone) prevented the resurgence of large IPSCs. Pressure ejected sucrose resulted in the abolishment of subsequent surges. No elevated K(+)-mediated surges were observed in CA3 interneurons from the stratum oriens layer. In conclusion, these cyclic large IPSC events observable in CA3 pyramidal neurons in 10 mM KCl may be due to transient GABA depletion from continuously active interneuronal afferents.

  20. Marine Corps expeditionary rifle platoon energy burden

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited In 2009, the Commandant of the Marine Corps declared energy a top priority and created the U.S. Marine Corps (USMC) Expeditionary Energy Office to develop an energy strategy to reduce and optimize energy usage throughout the Marine Corps. This thesis examines the operational tasks and capabilities that drive the current USMC rifle platoon’s energy burdens using an Expeditionary Warrior 2012 war-game scenario. The primary conclusion of ...

  1. A review of marine biodiversity information resources

    OpenAIRE

    Kwangtsao Shao; Han Lee; Yungchang Lin; Kunchi Lai

    2014-01-01

    Although biodiversity of marine remains high, it increasingly suffers from human interference and destruction. The world’s largest open, online, georeferenced database is the Ocean Biogeographic Information System (OBIS); it has information on a total of 120,000 species with 37 million records. The World Register of Marine Species (WoRMS) has collected taxonomic information on 220,000 global marine species. Besides these two large databases, three single-taxa databases were established for ma...

  2. Marine Litter, Eutrophication and Noise Assessment Tools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palazov, Atanas; Velcheva, Maya; Milkova, Tanya; Slabakova, Violeta; Marinova, Veselka

    2017-04-01

    MARLEN - Marine Litter, Eutrophication and Noise Assessment Tools is a project under the Programme BG02.03: Increased capacity for assessing and predicting environmental status in marine and inland waters, managed by Bulgarian Ministry of environment and waters and co-financed by the Financial Mechanism of the European Economic Area (EEA FM) 2009 - 2014. Project Beneficiary is the Institute of oceanology - Bulgarian Academy of Sciences with two partners: Burgas municipality and Bulgarian Black Sea Basin Directorate. Initial assessment of ecological state of Bulgarian marine waters showed lack of data for some descriptors of MSFD. The main goal of MARLEN is to build up tools for assessment of marine environment by implementing new technologies and best practices for addressing three main areas of interest with lack of marine data in particular: a) Marine litter detection and classification in coastal areas; b) Regular near real time surface water eutrophication monitoring on large aquatory; c) Underwater noise monitoring. Developed tools are an important source of real time, near real time and delay mode marine data for Bulgarian Black Sea waters. The partnership within the project increased capacity for environmental assessments and training of personnel and enhances collaboration between scientific institutes, regional and local authorities. Project results supported implementation of MSFD in Bulgarian marine waters for the benefit of coastal population, marine industry, tourism, marine research and marine spatial planning.

  3. New marine community

    Science.gov (United States)

    While exploring the West Florida Escarpment, a steep slope in the Gulf of Mexico several hundred kilometers off the Florida coast, the deep submergence research vessel Alvin chanced upon a well-developed community of marine life akin to that found 7 years ago in the eastern Pacific Ocean.According to the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, which operates the submersible and its new tender, the Atlantis II (Eos, November 1, 1983, p. 619), the marine community contains large clams, mussels, crabs, fish, and tube worms like those found at hydrothermal vents in the eastern Pacific. While the east Pacific communities exist at spreading centers, the newly discovered group, which may stretch for almost 2 km at a depth of roughly 3200 km, lies in a passive continental margin. Also, whereas the water around the Pacific hydrothermal vents is much warmer than the surrounding seawater, the water around the new found community is apparently the same temperature as the ambient waters.

  4. An overview of polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) in the marine environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hyo Jin; Kim, Gi Beum

    2015-06-01

    Polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs), which are used extensively as brominated flame retardants, are found ubiquitously in marine environments worldwide. In this paper, we review all available data on the occurrence and trends of PBDEs in marine environments. PBDE levels in different marine environmental compartments vary from nanograms per gram to micrograms per gram, and differ widely, depending on the exposed species and the collection site. The PBDE congener profiles in biota, which are dominated by the lower brominated congeners, such as BDE-47 and BDE-99, are different from those in sediments, where BDE-209 is dominant. Temporal trends in PBDE levels in sediment cores vary considerably, depending on the region or country studied, with possible correlations with the historic and current use of PBDEs. Low brominated BDE congeners have the potential for bioaccumulation in marine organisms, but BDE- 209 has a very low potential for bioaccumulating within the marine food web. The toxicological effects of PBDEs on marine organisms are largely unknown. However, PBDE isomers may be sufficient to elicit adverse effects in some marine organisms. Here, we discuss naturally occurring brominated diphenyl ethers and recommend further research to improve future monitoring.

  5. Databases of the marine metagenomics

    KAUST Repository

    Mineta, Katsuhiko

    2015-10-28

    The metagenomic data obtained from marine environments is significantly useful for understanding marine microbial communities. In comparison with the conventional amplicon-based approach of metagenomics, the recent shotgun sequencing-based approach has become a powerful tool that provides an efficient way of grasping a diversity of the entire microbial community at a sampling point in the sea. However, this approach accelerates accumulation of the metagenome data as well as increase of data complexity. Moreover, when metagenomic approach is used for monitoring a time change of marine environments at multiple locations of the seawater, accumulation of metagenomics data will become tremendous with an enormous speed. Because this kind of situation has started becoming of reality at many marine research institutions and stations all over the world, it looks obvious that the data management and analysis will be confronted by the so-called Big Data issues such as how the database can be constructed in an efficient way and how useful knowledge should be extracted from a vast amount of the data. In this review, we summarize the outline of all the major databases of marine metagenome that are currently publically available, noting that database exclusively on marine metagenome is none but the number of metagenome databases including marine metagenome data are six, unexpectedly still small. We also extend our explanation to the databases, as reference database we call, that will be useful for constructing a marine metagenome database as well as complementing important information with the database. Then, we would point out a number of challenges to be conquered in constructing the marine metagenome database.

  6. Databases of the marine metagenomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mineta, Katsuhiko; Gojobori, Takashi

    2016-02-01

    The metagenomic data obtained from marine environments is significantly useful for understanding marine microbial communities. In comparison with the conventional amplicon-based approach of metagenomics, the recent shotgun sequencing-based approach has become a powerful tool that provides an efficient way of grasping a diversity of the entire microbial community at a sampling point in the sea. However, this approach accelerates accumulation of the metagenome data as well as increase of data complexity. Moreover, when metagenomic approach is used for monitoring a time change of marine environments at multiple locations of the seawater, accumulation of metagenomics data will become tremendous with an enormous speed. Because this kind of situation has started becoming of reality at many marine research institutions and stations all over the world, it looks obvious that the data management and analysis will be confronted by the so-called Big Data issues such as how the database can be constructed in an efficient way and how useful knowledge should be extracted from a vast amount of the data. In this review, we summarize the outline of all the major databases of marine metagenome that are currently publically available, noting that database exclusively on marine metagenome is none but the number of metagenome databases including marine metagenome data are six, unexpectedly still small. We also extend our explanation to the databases, as reference database we call, that will be useful for constructing a marine metagenome database as well as complementing important information with the database. Then, we would point out a number of challenges to be conquered in constructing the marine metagenome database.

  7. Marine Non-Glycosaminoglycan Sulfated Glycans as Potential Pharmaceuticals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pomin, Vitor H.

    2015-01-01

    Sulfated fucans (SFs) and sulfated galactans (SGs) are currently the marine non-glycosaminoglycan (GAG) sulfated glycans most studied in glycomics. These compounds exhibit therapeutic effects in several pathophysiological systems such as blood coagulation, thrombosis, neovascularization, cancer, inflammation, and microbial infections. As analogs of the largely employed GAGs and due to some limitations of the GAG-based therapies, SFs and SGs comprise new carbohydrate-based therapeutics available for clinical studies. Here, the principal structural features and the major mechanisms of action of the SFs and SGs in the above-mentioned pathophysiological systems are presented. Discussion is also given on the current challenges and the future perspectives in drug development of these marine glycans. PMID:26690451

  8. Efficiency of a Marine Towed Electrical Resistivity Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chih-Wen Chiang

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available In contrast to marine sediments, because of large electrical resistivity anomalies found in sulfide deposits and methane hydrates, resistivity measurements such as marine towed electrical resistivity (MTER might be a feasible method for discovering those natural minerals. To determine the feasibility of the MTER method we examined arrays consisting of a pole electrical dipole (PED, vertical electrical dipole (VED and horizontal electrical dipole (HED. The VED array showed a maximum difference in electric fields of 36 o/o and 105 o/o in the resistive and conductive models, respectively, while the PED and HED arrays yielded worse results of around 13 o/o to 19 o/o, respectively. The VED array showed a higher difference in electric fields than both the HED and PED arrays in the two models. Therefore, we suggest that a VED array with a large electrical current would be most conducive leading to the discovery of such minerals during MTER surveys.

  9. Antiviral Lead Compounds from Marine Sponges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenneth P. Minneman

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Marine sponges are currently one of the richest sources of pharmacologically active compounds found in the marine environment. These bioactive molecules are often secondary metabolites, whose main function is to enable and/or modulate cellular communication and defense. They are usually produced by functional enzyme clusters in sponges and/or their associated symbiotic microorganisms. Natural product lead compounds from sponges have often been found to be promising pharmaceutical agents. Several of them have successfully been approved as antiviral agents for clinical use or have been advanced to the late stages of clinical trials. Most of these drugs are used for the treatment of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV and herpes simplex virus (HSV. The most important antiviral lead of marine origin reported thus far is nucleoside Ara-A (vidarabine isolated from sponge Tethya crypta. It inhibits viral DNA polymerase and DNA synthesis of herpes, vaccinica and varicella zoster viruses. However due to the discovery of new types of viruses and emergence of drug resistant strains, it is necessary to develop new antiviral lead compounds continuously. Several sponge derived antiviral lead compounds which are hopedto be developed as future drugs are discussed in this review. Supply problems are usually the major bottleneck to the development of these compounds as drugs during clinical trials. However advances in the field of metagenomics and high throughput microbial cultivation has raised the possibility that these techniques could lead to the cost-effective large scale production of such compounds. Perspectives on biotechnological methods with respect to marine drug development are also discussed.

  10. Antiviral lead compounds from marine sponges

    KAUST Repository

    Sagar, Sunil

    2010-10-11

    Marine sponges are currently one of the richest sources of pharmacologically active compounds found in the marine environment. These bioactive molecules are often secondary metabolites, whose main function is to enable and/or modulate cellular communication and defense. They are usually produced by functional enzyme clusters in sponges and/or their associated symbiotic microorganisms. Natural product lead compounds from sponges have often been found to be promising pharmaceutical agents. Several of them have successfully been approved as antiviral agents for clinical use or have been advanced to the late stages of clinical trials. Most of these drugs are used for the treatment of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and herpes simplex virus (HSV). The most important antiviral lead of marine origin reported thus far is nucleoside Ara-A (vidarabine) isolated from sponge Tethya crypta. It inhibits viral DNA polymerase and DNA synthesis of herpes, vaccinica and varicella zoster viruses. However due to the discovery of new types of viruses and emergence of drug resistant strains, it is necessary to develop new antiviral lead compounds continuously. Several sponge derived antiviral lead compounds which are hopedto be developed as future drugs are discussed in this review. Supply problems are usually the major bottleneck to the development of these compounds as drugs during clinical trials. However advances in the field of metagenomics and high throughput microbial cultivation has raised the possibility that these techniques could lead to the cost-effective large scale production of such compounds. Perspectives on biotechnological methods with respect to marine drug development are also discussed. 2010 by the authors; licensee MDPI.

  11. Marine Biology

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    A retired soldier and his timid girlfriend. Two teenagers who are underemployed and overaged. A man who knows what he wants but not how to get it and his ex who knows how to get what she wants but not exactly what that is.What do all of these people have in common? They live in Westfield, New York, a town with just as many traffic lights as panoramic views of nearby Lake Erie and with about as many bartenders as schoolteachers. Everyone wants to leave, but nobody knows where to go.Marine Biol...

  12. Marine fungi: A critique

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Raghukumar, S.; Raghukumar, C.

    Obligate marine fungi, those which grow and sporulate exclusively under marine conditions, have received all the attention from marine mycologists. Fungi originating from freshwater, or terrestrial environment and capable of growth and sporulation...

  13. Active Marine Station Metadata

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Active Marine Station Metadata is a daily metadata report for active marine bouy and C-MAN (Coastal Marine Automated Network) platforms from the National Data...

  14. Biomarkers of marine pollution and bioremediation

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Sarkar, A.

    species of marine organisms and their bio-magnification across the food chain leading to serious threat to human health. In recent years, levels of contaminants in the marine environment have increased to a large extent as a consequence of vari- ous...

  15. Mariner 9 science experiments - Preliminary results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinbacher, R. H.; Kliore, A.; Lorell, J.; Hipsher, H.; Barth, C. A.; Masursky, H.; Muench, G.; Pearl, J.; Smith, B.

    1972-01-01

    On the basis of data provided by the IR interferometer spectrometer on the Mariner 9 spacecraft, it is suggested that the composition of the Martian dust corresponds approximately to that of rocks of intermediate silicon dioxide content. The large dynamical pole flattening obtained from satellite observations has been confirmed by the Mariner 9 data.

  16. Intertemporal Choice of Marine Ecosystem Exploitation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ravn-Jonsen, Lars

    The term ``Fishing Down Marine Food Webs'' describes the gradual transition in landing from marine ecosystems towards organisms lower in the food web. To address this issue and the need to manage the marine ecosystem in a broader perspective, Ecosystem Management is recommended. Ecosystem...... the ability of an ecosystem to sustain total volume of harvest. Given the two aspects of intertemporal choice revealed by the model, the conclusion must be that the Fishing Down Marine Food Webs is probably driven by the current management's inability to conduct adequate intertemporal balancing; therefore...

  17. Inhibition of the PI3K/Akt/mTOR signaling pathway in diffuse large B-cell lymphoma: current knowledge and clinical significance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majchrzak, Agata; Witkowska, Magdalena; Smolewski, Piotr

    2014-09-11

    Diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) is one of the most common non-Hodgkin lymphomas in adults. The disease is very heterogeneous in its presentation, that is DLBCL patients may differ from each other not only in regard to histology of tissue infiltration, clinical course or response to treatment, but also in respect to diversity in gene expression profiling. A growing body of knowledge on the biology of DLBCL, including abnormalities in intracellular signaling, has allowed the development of new treatment strategies, specifically directed against lymphoma cells. The phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K)/protein kinase B (Akt)/mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) signaling pathway plays an important role in controlling proliferation and survival of tumor cells in various types of malignancies, including DLBCL, and therefore it may be a promising target for therapeutic intervention. Currently, novel anticancer drugs are undergoing assessment in different phases of clinical trials in aggressive lymphomas, with promising outcomes. In this review we present a state of art review on various classes of small molecule inhibitors selectively involving PI3K/Akt/mTOR pathway and their clinical potential in this disease.

  18. 大电流宽频带热释电红外探测器优化设计%Optimization Design of Large current broadband pyroelectric infrared detector

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王芳; 杨桂勇; 宋艳; 颜延志; 马春旺

    2011-01-01

    本文提出了一种大电流宽频带的热释电红外探测器的优化设计方法.在分析热释电输出电压响应的基础上,结合热辐射探测的特点,提出了新的仿真模型,实际电路与仿真数据基本吻合.通过采用双极型结型场效应管(BJFET)和改变热释电时间常数等方法解决了热释电前置放大器输出信号弱和通频带窄的关键问题.%This paper presents a large current broadband pyroelectric infrared detector optimal design method. The analysis of the pyroelectric response of the output voltage based on the combination of the characteristics of thermal radiation detection, put forword a new simulation model, and the actual circuit is basically consistent with simulation data. Through using bipolar JFET (BJFET) and changing the time constant and so on, we will improve the low - output and narrow bands which were the key issues of pyroelectric preamplifier.

  19. Inhibition of the PI3K/Akt/mTOR Signaling Pathway in Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma: Current Knowledge and Clinical Significance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agata Majchrzak

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL is one of the most common non-Hodgkin lymphomas in adults. The disease is very heterogeneous in its presentation, that is DLBCL patients may differ from each other not only in regard to histology of tissue infiltration, clinical course or response to treatment, but also in respect to diversity in gene expression profiling. A growing body of knowledge on the biology of DLBCL, including abnormalities in intracellular signaling, has allowed the development of new treatment strategies, specifically directed against lymphoma cells. The phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K/protein kinase B (Akt/mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR signaling pathway plays an important role in controlling proliferation and survival of tumor cells in various types of malignancies, including DLBCL, and therefore it may be a promising target for therapeutic intervention. Currently, novel anticancer drugs are undergoing assessment in different phases of clinical trials in aggressive lymphomas, with promising outcomes. In this review we present a state of art review on various classes of small molecule inhibitors selectively involving PI3K/Akt/mTOR pathway and their clinical potential in this disease.

  20. Diversity and biogeography of marine actinobacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, Alan C; Bora, Nagamani

    2006-06-01

    The actinomycetes, although not all the Actinobacteria, are easy to isolate from the marine environment. However, their ecological role in the marine ecosystem is largely neglected and various assumptions meant there was little incentive to isolate strains for search and discovery of new drugs. However, the marine environment has become a prime resource in search and discovery for novel natural products and biological diversity, and marine actinomycetes turn out to be important contributors. Similarly, striking advances have been made in marine microbial ecology using molecular techniques and metagenomics, and actinobacteria emerge as an often significant, sometimes even dominant, environmental clade. Both approaches - cultivation methods and molecular techniques - are leading to new insights into marine actinobacterial biodiversity and biogeography. Very different views of actinobacterial diversity emerge from these, however, and the true extent and biogeography of this are still not clear. These are important for developing natural product search and discovery strategies, and biogeography is a hot topic for microbial ecologists.