WorldWideScience

Sample records for current evidence linking

  1. Current Evidence Supporting the Link Between Dietary Fatty Acids and Cardiovascular Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammad, Shatha; Pu, Shuaihua; Jones, Peter J

    2016-05-01

    Lack of consensus exists pertaining to the scientific evidence regarding effects of various dietary fatty acids on cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk. The objective of this article is to review current evidence concerning cardiovascular health effects of the main dietary fatty acid types; namely, trans (TFA), saturated (SFA), polyunsaturated (PUFA; n-3 PUFA and n-6 PUFA), and monounsaturated fatty acids (MUFA). Accumulating evidence shows negative health impacts of TFA and SFA; both may increase CVD risk. Policies have been proposed to reduce TFA and SFA consumption to less than 1 and 7 % of energy intake, respectively. Cardiovascular health might be promoted by replacing SFA and TFA with n-6 PUFA, n-3 PUFA, or MUFA; however, the optimal amount of PUFA or MUFA that can be used to replace SFA and TFA has not been defined yet. Evidence suggests of the potential importance of restricting n-6 PUFA up to 10 % of energy and obtaining an n-6/n-3 ratio as close as possible to unity, along with a particular emphasis on consuming adequate amounts of essential fatty acids. The latest evidence shows cardioprotective effects of MUFA-rich diets, especially when MUFA are supplemented with essential fatty acids; namely, docosahexaenoic acid. MUFA has been newly suggested to be involved in regulating fat oxidation, energy metabolism, appetite sensations, weight maintenance, and cholesterol metabolism. These favorable effects might implicate MUFA as the preferable choice to substitute for other fatty acids, especially given the declaration of its safety for up to 20 % of total energy.

  2. Current Leads, Links and Buses

    CERN Document Server

    Ballarino, A

    2014-01-01

    Electrical transfer from a room temperature power source to a superconducting system is done via conventional or superconducting current leads and superconducting buses or links. The principles of optimization of these devices are presented, with emphasis on the cryogenic, electrical, and superconductor related aspects that drive choices for a system.

  3. Collagen cross linking: Current perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Srinivas K Rao

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Keratoconus is a common ectatic disorder occurring in more than 1 in 1,000 individuals. The condition typically starts in adolescence and early adulthood. It is a disease with an uncertain cause and its progression is unpredictable, but in extreme cases, vision deteriorates and can require corneal transplant surgery. Corneal collagen cross-linking (CCL with riboflavin (C3R is a recent treatment option that can enhance the rigidity of the cornea and prevent disease progression. Since its inception, the procedure has evolved with newer instrumentation, surgical techniques, and is also now performed for expanded indications other than keratoconus. With increasing experience, newer guidelines regarding optimization of patient selection, the spectrum of complications and their management, and combination procedures are being described. This article in conjunction with the others in this issue, will try and explore the uses of collagen cross-linking (CXL in its current form.

  4. Policy Reform Efforts and Equal Opportunity – An Evidence-Based Link? An Analysis of Current Sector Reforms in the Austrian School System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Corinna Geppert

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The main focus of the present paper is to answer two different questions: From the perspective of Austrian education policy, which core areas of schooling are linked to the demand for equal opportunity? Can these reform efforts sustain the current state of research, and what are the consequences for schooling? The paper draws on an analysis by Hopmann, Geppert & Bauer (2010. Fifteen official self-presentations (political programmes of Austrian political parties were analysed for statements concerning the improvement of the education system. This resulted in about seventy different statements, which were aggregated into eight core areas.We conducted a systematic analysis of four of these core areas, dealing with the topics of equal opportunity: comprehensive school, all-day schooling, school autonomy and standardisation of students’ achievements. The aim was not to judge the legitimacy or the political content of the claims made. In line with evaluative discourse, we asked whether the combination of political demands and their associated expectations met the current state of research. In many policy programmes, it is assumed that comprehensive schooling, all-day schooling, education standards, standardised general certification for university attendance, school autonomy or language surveys go hand in hand with more equality of opportunity, justice andquality in education, but an analysis of the current state of research could not confirm this. The analysis showed that, with regard to education policy demands, statements having empirically little or nothing to do with each other are often linked.

  5. Current evidence for osteoarthritis treatments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anandacoomarasamy, Ananthila; March, Lyn

    2010-02-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is the most common form of arthritis and the leading cause of chronic disability among older people. The burden of the disease is expected to rise with an aging population and the increasing prevalence of obesity. Despite this, there is as yet no cure for OA. However, in recent years, a number of potential therapeutic advances have been made, in part due to improved understanding of the underlying pathophysiology. This review provides the current evidence for symptomatic management of OA including nonpharmacological, pharmacological and surgical approaches. The current state of evidence for disease-modifying therapy in OA is also reviewed.

  6. More Evidence Linking Obesity to Liver Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... fullstory_161494.html More Evidence Linking Obesity to Liver Cancer And type 2 diabetes more than doubles the ... type 2 diabetes, may raise your risk for liver cancer, a new study suggests. "We found that each ...

  7. Policy Reform Efforts and Equal Opportunity – An Evidence-Based Link? An Analysis of Current Sector Reforms in the Austrian School System

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Corinna Geppert; Sonja Bauer-Hofmann; Stefan Thomas Hopmann

    2012-01-01

    The main focus of the present paper is to answer two different questions: From the perspective of Austrian education policy, which core areas of schooling are linked to the demand for equal opportunity...

  8. The importance of link evidence in Wikipedia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kamps, J.; Koolen, M.

    2008-01-01

    Wikipedia is one of the most popular information sources on the Web. The free encyclopedia is densely linked. The link structure in Wikipedia differs from the Web at large: internal links in Wikipedia are typically based on words naturally occurring in a page, and link to another semantically relate

  9. Fever management: Evidence vs current practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Radhi, A Sahib Mehdi

    2012-12-08

    Fever is a very common complaint in children and is the single most common non-trauma-related reason for a visit to the emergency department. Parents are concerned about fever and it's potential complications. The biological value of fever (i.e., whether it is beneficial or harmful) is disputed and it is being vigorously treated with the belief of preventing complications such as brain injury and febrile seizures. The practice of alternating antipyretics has become widespread at home and on paediatric wards without supporting scientific evidence. There is still a significant contrast between the current concept and practice, and the scientific evidence. Why is that the case in such a common complaint like fever The article will discuss the significant contrast between the current concepts and practice of fever management on one hand, and the scientific evidence against such concepts and practice.

  10. Linking anthropological analysis and epidemiological evidence ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    the formation of internally displaced people's camps, rape, transactional sex and ... HIV transmission remains unclear, as the epidemiological evidence presents an ... the intersection of war and infectious disease transmission and treatment. .... Source: United Nations Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs, 2006 ...

  11. Longitudinal Evidence Linking Processing Speed to the Development of Reasoning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kail, Robert V.; Lervåg, Arne; Hulme, Charles

    2016-01-01

    Age-related change in processing speed has been linked directly to increases in reasoning as well as indirectly via increases in the capacity of working memory (WM). Most of the evidence linking change in speed to reasoning has come from cross-sectional research; in this article we present the findings from a 2½-year longitudinal study of 277 6-…

  12. Current clinical evidence on pioglitazone pharmacogenomics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marina eKawaguchi-Suzuki

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Pioglitazone is the most widely used thiazolidinedione and acts as an insulin-sensitizer through activation of the Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor-γ (PPARγ. Pioglitazone is approved for use in the management of type 2 diabetes mellitus, but its use in other therapeutic areas is increasing due to pleiotropic effects. In this hypothesis article, the current clinical evidence on pioglitazone pharmacogenomics is summarized and related to variability in pioglitazone response. How genetic variation in the human genome affects the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of pioglitazone was examined. For pharmacodynamic effects, hypoglycemic and anti-atherosclerotic effects, risks of fracture or edema, and the increase in body mass index in response to pioglitazone based on genotype were examined. The genes CYP2C8 and PPARG are the most extensively studied to date and selected polymorphisms contribute to respective variability in pioglitazone pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics. We hypothesized that genetic variation in pioglitazone pathway genes contributes meaningfully to the clinically observed variability in drug response. To test the hypothesis that genetic variation in PPARG associates with variability in pioglitazone response, we conducted a meta-analysis to synthesize the currently available data on the PPARG p.Pro12Ala polymorphism. The results showed that PPARG 12Ala carriers had a more favorable change in fasting blood glucose from baseline as compared to patients with the wild-type Pro12Pro genotype (p=0.018. Unfortunately, findings for many other genes lack replication in independent cohorts to confirm association; further studies are needed. Also, the biological functionality of these polymorphisms is unknown. Based on current evidence, we propose that pharmacogenomics may provide an important tool to individualize pioglitazone therapy and better optimize therapy in patients with T2DM or other conditions for which pioglitazone

  13. Zika Virus Infection and Microcephaly: Evidence for a Causal Link.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jin-Na; Ling, Feng

    2016-10-20

    Zika virus (ZIKV) is a flavivirus related to the Dengue, yellow fever and West Nile viruses. Since the explosive outbreaks of ZIKV in Latin America in 2015, a sudden increase in the number of microcephaly cases has been observed in infants of women who were pregnant when they contracted the virus. The severity of this condition raises grave concerns, and extensive studies on the possible link between ZIKV infection and microcephaly have been conducted. There is substantial evidence suggesting that there is a causal link between ZIKV and microcephaly, however, future studies are warranted to solidify this association. To summarize the most recent evidence on this issue and provide perspectives for future studies, we reviewed the literature to identify existing evidence of the causal link between ZIKV infection and microcephaly within research related to the epidemics, laboratory diagnosis, and possible mechanisms.

  14. Zika Virus Infection and Microcephaly: Evidence for a Causal Link

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin-Na Wang

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Zika virus (ZIKV is a flavivirus related to the Dengue, yellow fever and West Nile viruses. Since the explosive outbreaks of ZIKV in Latin America in 2015, a sudden increase in the number of microcephaly cases has been observed in infants of women who were pregnant when they contracted the virus. The severity of this condition raises grave concerns, and extensive studies on the possible link between ZIKV infection and microcephaly have been conducted. There is substantial evidence suggesting that there is a causal link between ZIKV and microcephaly, however, future studies are warranted to solidify this association. To summarize the most recent evidence on this issue and provide perspectives for future studies, we reviewed the literature to identify existing evidence of the causal link between ZIKV infection and microcephaly within research related to the epidemics, laboratory diagnosis, and possible mechanisms.

  15. Genetic evidence linking lung cancer and COPD: a new perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Crapo JD

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Robert P Young1,4, Raewyn J Hopkins1, Gregory D Gamble1, Carol Etzel2, Randa El-Zein2, James D Crapo31Department of Medicine and School of Biological Sciences, University of Auckland, Auckland, New Zealand; 2Department of Epidemiology, UT MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX, USA; 3National Jewish Health, Denver, CO, USA; 4Synergenz Biosciences Ltd, Auckland, New ZealandAbstract: Epidemiological studies indicate that tobacco smoke exposure accounts for nearly 90% of cases of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD and lung cancer. However, genetic factors may explain why 10%–30% of smokers develop these complications. This perspective reviews the evidence suggesting that COPD is closely linked to susceptibility to lung cancer and outlines the potential relevance of this observation. Epidemiological studies show that COPD is the single most important risk factor for lung cancer among smokers and predates lung cancer in up to 80% of cases. Genome-wide association studies of lung cancer, lung function, and COPD have identified a number of overlapping “susceptibility” loci. With stringent phenotyping, it has recently been shown that several of these overlapping loci are independently associated with both COPD and lung cancer. These loci implicate genes underlying pulmonary inflammation and apoptotic processes mediated by the bronchial epithelium, and link COPD with lung cancer at a molecular genetic level. It is currently possible to derive risk models for lung cancer that incorporate lung cancer-specific genetic variants, recently identified “COPD-related” genetic variants, and clinical variables. Early studies suggest that single nucleotide polymorphism-based risk stratification of smokers might help better target novel prevention and early diagnostic strategies in lung cancer.Keywords: lung cancer, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, association study, single nucleotide polymorphism, risk model

  16. The Epidemiologic Evidence Linking Autoimmune Diseases and Psychosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Benros, Michael E; Eaton, William W; Mortensen, Preben B

    2014-01-01

    This review summarizes the epidemiologic evidence linking autoimmune diseases and psychosis. The associations between autoimmune diseases and psychosis have been studied for more than a half century, but research has intensified within the last decades, since psychosis has been associated with ge...

  17. Current evidence supporting "letrozole" for ovulation induction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sujata Kar

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Aromatase inhibitor "letrozole" was first introduced as a potential ovulation induction (OI drug almost a decade back. Large number of studies has been published using letrozole for OI: In polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS women, clomiphene citrate (CC resistant women, for intrauterine insemination and also in various protocols of mild stimulation for in vitro fertilization/intracytoplasmic sperm injection (IVF/ICSI. Letrozole appears to be a good option, with its oral route of administration, cost, shorter half-life and negligible side effects. However, the verdict on efficacy and safety of letrozole is still uncertain. This review explores the current scientific data supporting letrozole for OI.

  18. Current clinical evidence on topiramate pharmacokinetics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jakovljević Mihajlo

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Topiramate is biochemically classified as a fructopyranose sulphamate. Discovered as early as 1979, during middle 1980's it was approved in many countries for the treatment of epilepsies and migraine prevention. More recently, in the experimental stage, possible new indications have been disclosed: treatment of obesity, bipolar disorder, also cessation of smoking, neuropathic pain, cerebral pseudotumour, bulimia, periventricular leucomalatia in preterm infants and alcohol addiction. Most epileptologists consider it to be the first choice antiepileptic drug in severe pharmacoresistant epilepsies. A substantial corpus of evidence in paediatric population has been accumulated that confirms its efficiency in the treatment of generalised tonic-clonic seizures, Lenox-Gestaut syndrome, partial, absence and combined seizures. Having a unique monosaccharide chemical structure among other anticonvulsant drugs, characterizes it with special pharmacokinetic features. This substance exhibits a low interindividual variability in plasma levels and hence it features predictable pharmacokinetics. A steady state plasma concentration of topiramate increases linearly with higher dosages. Serum protein binding is approximately 15%, and biologic half-life in healthy volunteers is considered to range from 20 to 30 hours. Mean expected distribution volume rates from 0.55-0.8 l/kg, and accordingly, the drug shows a low and saturable binding capacity toward erythrocytes. It has not been present at the market for a sufficiently long time that would enable us to speak about a significant accumulation of data on its metabolism based on post-registration 4th stage clinical trials. For this purpose, we have done a literature review in order to summarise so far reported experience on topiramate pharmacokinetics in patients and healthy adults. Deeper understanding of its pharmacokinetic profile could enable a better technological design of the produced drug and the choice of

  19. Dual Purpose Simulation: New Data Link Test and Performance Limit Testing of Currently Deployed Data Link

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Daryl C.

    2002-01-01

    While the results of this paper are similar to those of [I], in this paper technical difficulties present in [I] are eliminated, producing better results, enabling one to more readily see the benefits of Prioritized CSMA (PCSMA). A new analysis section also helps to generalize this research so that it is not limited to exploration of the new concept of PCSMA. Commercially available network simulation software, OPNET version 7.0, simulations are presented involving an important application of the Aeronautical Telecommunications Network (ATN), Controller Pilot Data Link Communications (CPDLC) over the Very High Frequency Data Link Mode 2 (VDL-2). Communication is modeled for essentially all incoming and outgoing nonstop air-traffic for just three United States cities: Cleveland, Cincinnati, and Detroit. The simulation involves 111 Air Traffic Control (ATC) ground stations, 32 airports distributed throughout the U.S., which are either sources or destinations for the air traffic landing or departing from the three cities, and also 1,235 equally equipped aircraft-taking off, flying realistic free-flight trajectories, and landing in a 24-hr period. Collision-less PCSMA is successfully tested and compared with the traditional CSMA typically associated with VDL-2. The performance measures include latency, throughput, and packet loss. As expected, PCSMA is much quicker and more efficient than traditional CSMA. These simulation results show the potency of PCSMA for implementing low latency, high throughput and efficient connectivity. Moreover, since PCSMA outperforms traditional CSMA, by simulating with it, we can determine the limits of performance beyond which traditional CSMA may not pass. So we have the tools to determine the traffic-loading conditions where traditional CSMA will fail, and we are testing a new and better data link that could replace it with relative ease. Work is currently being done to drastically expand the number of flights to make the simulation more

  20. Clinical utility of eslicarbazepine: current evidence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zaccara G

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Gaetano Zaccara,1 Fabio Giovannelli,1,2 Massimo Cincotta,1 Alessia Carelli,3 Alberto Verrotti31Department of Medicine, Unit of Neurology, Florence Health Authority, Florence, Italy; 2Department of Neuroscience, Psychology, Pharmacology and Child Health (NEUROFARBA, University of Florence, Florence, Italy; 3Department of Pediatrics, University of Perugia, Perugia, ItalyAbstract: Eslicarbazepine acetate (ESL is a new antiepileptic drug whose mechanism of action is blockade of the voltage-gated sodium channel (VGSC. However, in respect to carbamazepine and oxcarbazepine, the active ESL metabolite (eslicarbazepine affects slow inactivation of VGSC and has a similar affinity for the inactivated state and a lower affinity for the resting state of the channel. This new antiepileptic drug has been recently approved in Europe (trade name Zebinix and in the United States (trade name Stedesa for adjunctive treatment in adult subjects with partial-onset seizures, with or without secondary generalization. Following oral administration, ESL is rapidly and extensively metabolized by hepatic esterases to eslicarbazepine. This active metabolite has a linear pharmacokinetic profile, a low binding to plasma proteins (<40%, and a half-life of 20–24 hours and is mainly excreted by kidneys in an unchanged form or as glucuronide conjugates. ESL is administered once a day and has a low potential for drug–drug interactions. Efficacy and safety of this drug in patients with focal seizures have been assessed in four randomized clinical trials, and responder rates (percentage of patients with a ≥50% improvement of their seizures ranged between 17% and 43%. Adverse events were usually mild to moderate, and the most common were dizziness, somnolence, diplopia, abnormal coordination, blurred vision, vertigo, headache, fatigue, nausea, and vomiting. ESL may be considered an interesting alternative to current antiepileptic drugs for the treatment of drug-resistant focal

  1. Disaggregating the evidence linking biodiversity and ecosystem services

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ricketts, Taylor H.; Watson, Keri B.; Koh, Insu; Ellis, Alicia M.; Nicholson, Charles C.; Posner, Stephen; Richardson, Leif L.; Sonter, Laura J.

    2016-01-01

    Ecosystem services (ES) are an increasingly popular policy framework for connecting biodiversity with human well-being. These efforts typically assume that biodiversity and ES covary, but the relationship between them remains remarkably unclear. Here we analyse >500 recent papers and show that reported relationships differ among ES, methods of measuring biodiversity and ES, and three different approaches to linking them (spatial correlations, management comparisons and functional experiments). For spatial correlations, biodiversity relates more strongly to measures of ES supply than to resulting human benefits. For management comparisons, biodiversity of ‘service providers' predicts ES more often than biodiversity of functionally unrelated taxa, but the opposite is true for spatial correlations. Functional experiments occur at smaller spatial scales than management and spatial studies, which show contrasting responses to scale. Our results illuminate the varying dynamics relating biodiversity to ES, and show the importance of matching management efforts to the most relevant scientific evidence. PMID:27713429

  2. Disaggregating the evidence linking biodiversity and ecosystem services

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ricketts, Taylor H.; Watson, Keri B.; Koh, Insu; Ellis, Alicia M.; Nicholson, Charles C.; Posner, Stephen; Richardson, Leif L.; Sonter, Laura J.

    2016-10-01

    Ecosystem services (ES) are an increasingly popular policy framework for connecting biodiversity with human well-being. These efforts typically assume that biodiversity and ES covary, but the relationship between them remains remarkably unclear. Here we analyse >500 recent papers and show that reported relationships differ among ES, methods of measuring biodiversity and ES, and three different approaches to linking them (spatial correlations, management comparisons and functional experiments). For spatial correlations, biodiversity relates more strongly to measures of ES supply than to resulting human benefits. For management comparisons, biodiversity of `service providers' predicts ES more often than biodiversity of functionally unrelated taxa, but the opposite is true for spatial correlations. Functional experiments occur at smaller spatial scales than management and spatial studies, which show contrasting responses to scale. Our results illuminate the varying dynamics relating biodiversity to ES, and show the importance of matching management efforts to the most relevant scientific evidence.

  3. Marine proxy evidence linking decadal North Pacific and Atlantic climate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hetzinger, S. [University of Toronto Mississauga, CPS-Department, Mississauga, ON (Canada); Leibniz Institute of Marine Sciences, IFM-GEOMAR, Kiel (Germany); Halfar, J. [University of Toronto Mississauga, CPS-Department, Mississauga, ON (Canada); Mecking, J.V.; Keenlyside, N.S. [Leibniz Institute of Marine Sciences, IFM-GEOMAR, Kiel (Germany); University of Bergen, Geophysical Institute and Bjerknes Centre for Climate Research, Bergen (Norway); Kronz, A. [University of Goettingen, Geowissenschaftliches Zentrum, Goettingen (Germany); Steneck, R.S. [University of Maine, Darling Marine Center, Walpole, ME (United States); Adey, W.H. [Smithsonian Institution, Department of Botany, Washington, DC (United States); Lebednik, P.A. [ARCADIS U.S. Inc., Walnut Creek, CA (United States)

    2012-09-15

    Decadal- to multidecadal variability in the extra-tropical North Pacific is evident in 20th century instrumental records and has significant impacts on Northern Hemisphere climate and marine ecosystems. Several studies have discussed a potential linkage between North Pacific and Atlantic climate on various time scales. On decadal time scales no relationship could be confirmed, potentially due to sparse instrumental observations before 1950. Proxy data are limited and no multi-centennial high-resolution marine geochemical proxy records are available from the subarctic North Pacific. Here we present an annually-resolved record (1818-1967) of Mg/Ca variations from a North Pacific/Bering Sea coralline alga that extends our knowledge in this region beyond available data. It shows for the first time a statistically significant link between decadal fluctuations in sea-level pressure in the North Pacific and North Atlantic. The record is a lagged proxy for decadal-scale variations of the Aleutian Low. It is significantly related to regional sea surface temperature and the North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO) index in late boreal winter on these time scales. Our data show that on decadal time scales a weaker Aleutian Low precedes a negative NAO by several years. This atmospheric link can explain the coherence of decadal North Pacific and Atlantic Multidecadal Variability, as suggested by earlier studies using climate models and limited instrumental data. (orig.)

  4. The epidemiologic evidence linking autoimmune diseases and psychosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benros, Michael E; Eaton, William W; Mortensen, Preben B

    2014-02-15

    This review summarizes the epidemiologic evidence linking autoimmune diseases and psychosis. The associations between autoimmune diseases and psychosis have been studied for more than a half century, but research has intensified within the last decades, since psychosis has been associated with genetic markers of the immune system and with excess autoreactivity and other immune alterations. A range of psychiatric disorders, including psychosis, have been observed to occur more frequently in some autoimmune diseases, such as systemic lupus erythematosus and multiple sclerosis. Many autoimmune diseases involve multiple organs and general dysfunction of the immune system, which could affect the brain and induce psychiatric symptoms. Most studies have been cross-sectional, observing an increased prevalence of a broad number of autoimmune diseases in people with psychotic disorders. Furthermore, there is some evidence of associations of psychosis with a family history of autoimmune disorders and vice versa. Additionally, several autoimmune diseases, individually and in aggregate, have been identified as raising the risk for psychotic disorders in longitudinal studies. The associations have been suspected to be caused by inflammation or brain-reactive antibodies associated with the autoimmune diseases. However, the associations could also be caused by shared genetic factors or common etiologic components such as infections. Infections can induce the development of autoimmune diseases and autoantibodies, possibly affecting the brain. Autoimmune diseases and brain-reactive antibodies should be considered by clinicians in the treatment of individuals with psychotic symptoms, and even if the association is not causal, treatment would probably still improve quality of life and survival.

  5. Current status of accelerated corneal cross-linking

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Mrochen

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Corneal cross-linking with riboflavin is a technique to stabilize or reduce corneal ectasia, in diseases such as keratoconus and post-laser-assisted in situ keratomileusis (LASIK ectasia. There is an interest by patient as well as clinicians to reduce the overall treatment time. Especially, the introduction of corneal cross-linking in combination with corneal laser surgery demands a shorter treatment time to assure a sufficient patient flow. The principles and techniques of accelerated corneal cross-linking is discussed.

  6. Infant Nutrition and Later Health: A Review of Current Evidence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caroline Fall

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available There is a growing recognition of the need for a lifecourse approach to understanding the aetiology of adult disease, and there is now significant evidence that links patterns of infant feeding to differences in health outcomes, both in the short and longer term. Breastfeeding is associated with lower rates of infection in infancy; in high-income populations, it is associated with reductions in blood pressure and total blood cholesterol, and lower risks of obesity and diabetes in adult life. Breastfeeding rates are suboptimal in many countries, and strategies to promote breastfeeding could therefore confer important benefits for health at a population level. However, there are particular challenges in defining nutritional exposures in infancy, including marked social gradients in initiation and duration of breastfeeding. In recent studies of low and middle-income populations of children and young adults, where the influences on infant feeding practice differ, beneficial effects of breastfeeding on blood pressure, BMI and risk of diabetes have not been confirmed, and further information is needed. Little is currently known about the long-term consequences of differences in the timing and nature of the weaning diet. Future progress will depend on new studies that provide detailed prospective data on duration and exclusivity of breastfeeding together with appropriate characterisation of the weaning diet.

  7. Poverty, inequality, and increased consumption of high calorie food: Experimental evidence for a causal link.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bratanova, Boyka; Loughnan, Steve; Klein, Olivier; Claassen, Almudena; Wood, Robert

    2016-05-01

    Rising obesity represents a serious, global problem. It is now well established that obesity is associated with poverty and wealth inequality, suggesting that these factors may promote caloric intake. Whereas previous work has examined these links from an epidemiological perspective, the current paper examined them experimentally. In Study 1 we found that people experimentally induced to view themselves as poor (v. wealthy) exhibited increased calorie intake. In Study 2, participants who believed that they were poorer or wealthier than their interaction partners exhibited higher levels of anxiety compared to those in an equal partners condition; this anxiety in turn led to increased calorie consumption for people who had a strong need to belong. The findings provide causal evidence for the poverty-intake and inequality-intake links. Further, we identify social anxiety and a strong need to belong as important social psychological factors linking inequality to increased calorie intake.

  8. Analytical Method to Calculate the DC Link Current Stress in Voltage Source Converters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gohil, Ghanshyamsinh Vijaysinh; Bede, Lorand; Teodorescu, Remus;

    2014-01-01

    The dc-link capacitor is one of the critical components, which influences the lifetime of the whole voltage source converter unit. For reliable design, the operating temperature of the dc-link capacitor should be known, which is primarily determined by the ambient temperature and the rms value...... of the current flowing through the dc-link capacitor. A simple analytical method to calculate the rms value of the dc-link capacitor current is presented in this paper. The effect of the line current ripple on the rms value of the dc-link capacitor current is considered. This yields accurate results, especially...

  9. The link between infertility and poverty: evidence from Bangladesh.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nahar, Papreen

    2012-03-01

    The link between high fertility and poverty is well established. However, this paper shows how infertility may also generate poverty among childless families in Bangladesh. An ethnographic study was conducted, involving various qualitative research methods that revealed economic consequences to be one of the crucial sequelae of childlessness in Bangladesh. This paper details how the poverty/fertility relationship is dependent on social and institutional characteristics, including patriarchal values, education, urban-rural location and health services. Empirical data show that childlessness generates poverty in various ways, including the deprivation of children's earnings, decline in women's mobility, demoralisation of men to earn an income, marriage devaluation by the husband, disbursements for treatment and denial of microcredit (very small loans to those in poverty, which support them to become self-employed to generate income). The current study shows that the infertility/poverty relationship is mostly contingent upon class and gender. It is therefore the rural poor childless women who are most badly affected economically in Bangladesh rather than the urban middle class childless women. In other words, this study reveal that along with gender, class plays a dominant role in terms of the economic consequences of childlessness in Bangladesh. It sheds light on a different and unusual aspect of poverty and aims to contribute to the gender discussion of livelihood and poverty.

  10. Linking Spatial Distributions of Potential and Current in Viscous Electronics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falkovich, Gregory; Levitov, Leonid

    2017-08-01

    Viscous electronics is an emerging field dealing with systems in which strongly interacting electrons behave as a fluid. Electron viscous flows are governed by a nonlocal current-field relation which renders the spatial patterns of the current and electric field strikingly dissimilar. Notably, driven by the viscous friction force from adjacent layers, current can flow against the electric field, generating negative resistance, vorticity, and vortices. Moreover, different current flows can result in identical potential distributions. This sets a new situation where inferring the electron flow pattern from the measured potentials presents a nontrivial problem. Using the inherent relation between these patterns through complex analysis, here we propose a method for extracting the current flows from potential distributions measured in the presence of a magnetic field.

  11. Past, Current, and Future Challenges in Linking Data to Publications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanson, B.

    2015-12-01

    Data are the currency of science and assure the integrity of published research. As the ability to collect, analyze, and visualize data has grown beyond what could be included in a publication, and as the value of the data become more clear (or the lack of availability of data was criticized), publishers and the scientific community developed several solutions to enhance access to underlying data. Most leading journals now require authors to agree as a condition of submission that underlying data will be included or made available; indeed, publication is the key leverage point in exposing much scholarly data. Most journals allow PDF or other supplements and links to data sets hosted by authors or labs, or better, data repositories such as Dryad, and some have banned "data not shown" or any reference to unpublished work. Many of these solutions have proven problematic and recent studies have found that large fraction of data are undiscoverable even a few years after publication. The best solution has been dedicated domain repositories collectively supported by publishers, funders, and the scientific community and where deposition is required before or at the time of publication. These provide quality control and curation and facilitate reuse. However, expanding these beyond a few key repositories and developing standardized workflows and functionality among repositories and between them and publishers has been problematic. Addressing these and other data challenges requires collaborative efforts among funders, publishers, repositories, societies, and researchers. One example is the Coalition on Publishing Data in the the Earth and space sciences, where most major publishers and repositories have signed a joint statement of commitment (COPDESS.org), and are starting work to direct and link published data to domain repositories. Much work remains to be done. Major challenges include establishing data curation practices into the workflow of science from data collection

  12. Corticosterone mediated costs of reproduction link current to future breeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crossin, Glenn T; Phillips, Richard A; Lattin, Christine R; Romero, L Michael; Williams, Tony D

    2013-11-01

    Life-history theory predicts that costs are associated with reproduction. One possible mediator of costs involves the secretion of glucocorticoid hormones, which in birds can be measured in feathers grown during the breeding period. Glucocorticoids mediate physiological responses to unpredictable environmental or other stressors, but they can also function as metabolic regulators during more predictable events such as reproduction. Here we show that corticosterone ("Cort") in feathers grown during the breeding season reflects reproductive effort in two Antarctic seabird species (giant petrels, Macronectes spp.). In females of both species, but not males, feather Cort ("fCort") was nearly 1.5-fold higher in successful than failed breeders (those that lost their eggs/chicks), suggesting a cost of successful reproduction, i.e., high fCort levels in females reflect the elevated plasma Cort levels required to support high metabolic demands of chick-rearing. Successful breeding also led to delayed moult prior to winter migration. The fCort levels and pre-migration moult score that we measured at the end of current breeding were predictive of subsequent reproductive effort in the following year. Birds with high fCort and a delayed initiation of moult were much more likely to defer breeding in the following year. Cort levels and the timing of moult thus provide a potential mechanism for the tradeoff between current and future reproduction.

  13. Nondissipative currents link graphene and heavy ion physics

    CERN Document Server

    Mizher, Ana Julia; Villavicencio, Cristian

    2013-01-01

    Monolayer graphite films, or graphene, have quasiparticle excitations that can be effectively described by (2+1)-dimensional quantum electrodynamics. Such a theory resembles more to quantum chromodynamics in some aspects, in particular, allowing for a non-trivial topological term in the gauge sector of the corresponding Lagrangian, the Chern-Simons term. In analogy to the chiral magnetic effect, proposed for quantum chromodynamics, we show that the presence of such topological gauge configurations associated to an external -in plane -magnetic field in a planar quantum elecrodynamical system, generates an electrical current along the magnetic field direction. This result is unexpected from the point of view of Maxwell equations and is uniquely due to the interaction of the gauge sector with the fermions.

  14. Management and prevention of neonatal anemia: current evidence and guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Lindern, Jeannette S; Lopriore, Enrico

    2014-04-01

    Neonatal anemia is a common disorder, particularly in (very) preterm neonates. Management of neonatal anemia is based principally on red blood cell (RBC) transfusion. Although the use of blood products is nowadays widespread in neonatal medicine, evidence on the potential benefit is extremely limited. Recent studies suggest that RBC transfusions in newborns may be associated with an increased risk for necrotizing enterocolitis, transfer of infectious agents and negative effects on neurodevelopmental outcome. Whether the benefits of RBC transfusions outweigh the risks is controversial and requires further studies. In this review, we summarize the current evidence on the management of neonatal anemia and compare the various international guidelines. In addition, we discuss the various strategies to prevent neonatal anemia and reduce the need for RBC transfusions and discuss important trials currently enrolling patients to improve the management in neonatal anemia.

  15. Current Evidence on Atypical Odontalgia: Diagnosis and Clinical Management

    OpenAIRE

    Yoshihiro Abiko; Hirofumi Matsuoka; Itsuo Chiba; Akira Toyofuku

    2012-01-01

    Patients with atypical odontalgia (AO) complain of medically unexplained toothache. No evidence-based diagnostic criteria or treatment guidelines are yet available. The present paper addresses seven clinical questions about AO based on current knowledge in the literature and discusses diagnostic criteria and guidelines for treatment and management. The questions are (i) What is the prevalence of AO in the community? (ii) What psychological problems are experienced by patients with AO? (iii) A...

  16. DC Link Current Estimation in Wind-Double Feed Induction Generator Power Conditioning System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MARIAN GAICEANU

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available In this paper the implementation of the DC link current estimator in power conditioning system of the variable speed wind turbine is shown. The wind turbine is connected to double feed induction generator (DFIG. The variable electrical energy parameters delivered by DFIG are fitted with the electrical grid parameters through back-to-back power converter. The bidirectional AC-AC power converter covers a wide speed range from subsynchronous to supersynchronous speeds. The modern control of back-to-back power converter involves power balance concept, therefore its load power should be known in any instant. By using the power balance control, the DC link voltage variation at the load changes can be reduced. In this paper the load power is estimated from the dc link, indirectly, through a second order DC link current estimator. The load current estimator is based on the DC link voltage and on the dc link input current of the rotor side converter. This method presents certain advantages instead of using measured method, which requires a low pass filter: no time delay, the feedforward current component has no ripple, no additional hardware, and more fast control response. Through the numerical simulation the performances of the proposed DC link output current estimator scheme are demonstrated.

  17. The current state of evidence-based pediatric surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ostlie, Daniel J; St Peter, Shawn D

    2010-10-01

    The efficiency of medical care in the United States has become intensely scrutinized with expectations from patients, families, payors, lawmakers, and, currently, the President. The most effective vehicle to bring more efficient care is the employment of evidence-based medicine whenever possible. Evidence-based medicine is dependent on best evidence, and best evidence is generated from prospective trials. To evaluate current state of evidence based practice in pediatric surgery we reviewed the literature for trials conducted in our field the past 10 years. All randomized controlled trials from January 1999 through December 2009 published in the English literature were identified through a literature search using PubMed (www.pubmed.com). We included only those in pediatric general surgery excluding transplant, oncology, and the other nongeneral subspecialties. The search criteria produced 56 manuscripts, of which 51 described appropriate randomization techniques. A definitive trial design with a sample size calculation was utilized in only 19 studies (34%). A statistically significant difference between treatment arms was identified in 29 of the 56 (52%) trials. There were 26 different journals of publication, with the Journal of Pediatric Surgery being most common (20) followed by Pediatric Surgery International (7). The combined total publications from January 1999 through December 2009 for the 26 journals these randomized trials represent 0.04% of all publications. Appendicitis was the most common condition that was studied (n = 10) followed by pyloric stenosis (n = 4). Trials originated in 19 different countries led by the United States (28%), United Kingdom (14%), and Turkey (12%). There was a generally progressive increase in published trials from 1999 to 2009, however, the percentage of prospective articles published in pediatric surgery was similar to a previous review published in 1999. The current state of evidence-based surgery in pediatric surgery has

  18. INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY AND ROMANIAN HIGHER EDUCATION - EVIDENCE ON LINKED DYNAMIC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bogdan Nichifor

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The link between education, in general, and information technologies is one that does not necessarily have to be demonstrated. But it is interesting to see the specific link that is established between these two components of modern society. In recent years, part-time education forms tend to occupy an increasingly important position in the Romanian higher education from the perspective of the total number of students opting for distance learning or traditional part-time learning. This development occurred amid expansion of information technology - more and more households have Internet access and frequency of its use is increasing from year to year – in the context in which forms of part – time learning require the use of this means of information and communication. On this background more and more people over 25 years become interested in further developing their studies, including employed persons opting for further studies, increasing the share of students over 25 years in total students and the share of employed population over 25 years with higher education in total in respective age group.

  19. Image guided robotic surgery: Current evidence for effectiveness in urology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anum Pervez

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Discussion of the evolution of image guided surgery (IGS and its fundamental components and current evidence for effectiveness of IGS in clinical urology. Methods: Literature search for image-guided robotic urology. Results: Current literature in image-guided robotic urology with its use in robot assisted radical prostatectomy and robot assisted partial nephrectomy are shown. Conclusions: Image guided surgery can be a useful aid to improve visualisation of anatomy and subsurface structures during minimally invasive surgery. Soft-tissue deformation makes it difficult to implement IGS in urology but current studies have shown an attempt to address this issue. The feasibility of IGS requires randomised control trials assessing in particular its accuracy and affect on clinical outcome.

  20. PROSPECTS OF HIGH-CURRENT ELECTRON BEAMS APPLICATION TO RADIATION POLYETHYLENE CROSS-LINKING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.G. Gurin

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available A possibility of applying a pulse-periodic high-current induction electron accelerators to radiation polyethylene cross-linking is considered in the article. A comparative analysis with other devices used for irradiation is made.

  1. Linking Essential Tremor to the Cerebellum: Physiological Evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filip, Pavel; Lungu, Ovidiu V; Manto, Mario-Ubaldo; Bareš, Martin

    2016-12-01

    Essential tremor (ET), clinically characterized by postural and kinetic tremors, predominantly in the upper extremities, originates from pathological activity in the dynamic oscillatory network comprising the majority of nodes in the central motor network. Evidence indicates dysfunction in the thalamus, the olivocerebellar loops, and intermittent cortical engagement. Pathology of the cerebellum, a structure with architecture intrinsically predisposed to oscillatory activity, has also been implicated in ET as shown by clinical, neuroimaging, and pathological studies. Despite electrophysiological studies assessing cerebellar impairment in ET being scarce, their impact is tangible, as summarized in this review. The electromyography-magnetoencephalography combination provided the first direct evidence of pathological alteration in cortico-subcortical communication, with a significant emphasis on the cerebellum. Furthermore, complex electromyography studies showed disruptions in the timing of agonist and antagonist muscle activation, a process generally attributed to the cerebellum. Evidence pointing to cerebellar engagement in ET has also been found in electrooculography measurements, cerebellar repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation studies, and, indirectly, in complex analyses of the activity of the ventral intermediate thalamic nucleus (an area primarily receiving inputs from the cerebellum), which is also used in the advanced treatment of ET. In summary, further progress in therapy will require comprehensive electrophysiological and physiological analyses to elucidate the precise mechanisms leading to disease symptoms. The cerebellum, as a major node of this dynamic oscillatory network, requires further study to aid this endeavor.

  2. Cellular phones and their hazards: the current evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munshi, Anusheel; Jalali, Rakesh

    2002-01-01

    The past decade has seen an exponential increase globally in the use of cellular phones (popularly known as mobile or cell phones). These phones are convenient and trendy. Discarding the wire means that the communication is through electromagnetic waves, which could have potential hazards. Alarmist reports in the lay press and high profile lawsuits, particularly in the West, have attracted attention to the possible harmful effects of cellular phones. Adverse effects investigated by various clinical trials include the possible link to increased risk of vehicular accidents, leukaemias, sleep disturbances and the more serious brain tumours. Available level II evidence suggests that the only proven side-effect is an increased risk of vehicular accidents. So far, all studies have consistently negated any association between cellular phones and brain tumours. Yet, the final word remains to be said.

  3. Observational Evidence Linking Interstellar UV Absorption to PAH Molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blasberger, Avi; Behar, Ehud; Perets, Hagai B.; Brosch, Noah; Tielens, Alexander G. G. M.

    2017-02-01

    The 2175 Å UV extinction feature was discovered in the mid-1960s, yet its physical origin remains poorly understood. One suggestion is absorption by polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) molecules, which is supported by theoretical molecular structure computations and by laboratory experiments. PAHs are positively detected by their 3.3, 6.2, 7.7, 8.6, 11.3, and 12.7 μm IR emission bands, which are specified by their modes of vibration. A definitive empirical link between the 2175 Å UV extinction and the IR PAH emission bands, however, is still missing. We present a new sample of hot stars that have both 2175 Å absorption and IR PAH emission. We find significant shifts of the central wavelength of the UV absorption feature, up to 2350 Å, but predominantly in stars that also have IR PAH emission. These UV shifts depend on stellar temperature in a fashion that is similar to the shifts of the 6.2 and 7.7 μm IR PAH bands, that is, the features are increasingly more redshifted as the stellar temperature decreases, but only below ∼15 kK. Above 15 kK both UV and IR features retain their nominal values. Moreover, we find a suggestive correlation between the UV and IR shifts. We hypothesize that these similar dependences of both the UV and IR features on stellar temperature hint at a common origin of the two in PAH molecules and may establish the missing link between the UV and IR observations. We further suggest that the shifts depend on molecular size, and that the critical temperature of ∼15 kK above which no shifts are observed is related to the onset of UV-driven hot-star winds and their associated shocks.

  4. Evidence for current diagnostic criteria of diabetes mellitus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ritesh; Kumar[1; Lakshmana; Perumal; Nandhini[1; Sadishkumar; Kamalanathan[1; Jayaprakash; Sahoo[1; Muthupillai; Vivekanadan[1

    2016-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus is a non-communicable metabolic derangement afflicting several millions of individuals globally. It is associated with several micro and macrovascular complications and is also a leading cause of mortality. The unresolved issue is that of definition of the diagnostic threshold for diabetes. The World Health Organization and the American Diabetes Association (ADA) have laid down several diagnostic criteria for diagnosing diabetes and prediabetes based on the accumulating body of evidence.This review has attempted to analyse the scientific evidence supporting the justification of these differing criteria. The evidence for diagnosing diabetes is strong, and there is a concordance between the two professional bodies.The controversy arises when describing the normal lower limit of fasting plasma glucose (FPG) with little evidence favouring the reduction of the FPG by the ADA. Several studies have also shown the development of complications specific for diabetes in patients with prediabetes as defined by the current criteria though there is a significant overlap of such prevalence in individuals with normoglycemia. Large multinational longitudinal prospective studies involving subjects without diabetes and retinopathy at baseline will ideally help identify the threshold of glycemic measurements for future development of diabetes and its complications.

  5. Current Treatment of Toxoplasma Retinochoroiditis: An Evidence-Based Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meredith Harrell

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To perform an evidence-based review of treatments for Toxoplasma retinochoroiditis (TRC. Methods. A systematic literature search was performed using the PubMed database and the key phrase “ocular toxoplasmosis treatment” and the filter for “controlled clinical trial” and “randomized clinical trial” as well as OVID medline (1946 to May week 2 2014 using the keyword ‘‘ocular toxoplasmosis’’. The included studies were used to evaluate the various treatment modalities of TRC. Results. The electronic search yielded a total of 974 publications of which 44 reported on the treatment of ocular toxoplasmosis. There were 9 randomized controlled studies and an additional 3 comparative studies on the treatment of acute TRC with systemic or intravitreous antibiotics or on reducing the recurrences of TRC. Endpoints of studies included visual acuity improvement, inflammatory response, lesion size changes, recurrences of lesions, and adverse effects of medications. Conclusions. There was conflicting evidence as to the effectiveness of systemic antibiotics for TRC. There is no evidence to support that one antibiotic regimen is superior to another so choice needs to be informed by the safety profile. Intravitreous clindamycin with dexamethasone seems to be as effective as systemic treatments. There is currently level I evidence that intermittent trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole prevents recurrence of the disease.

  6. Evidence for current diagnostic criteria of diabetes mellitus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Ritesh; Nandhini, Lakshmana Perumal; Kamalanathan, Sadishkumar; Sahoo, Jayaprakash; Vivekanadan, Muthupillai

    2016-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus is a non-communicable metabolic derangement afflicting several millions of individuals globally. It is associated with several micro and macrovascular complications and is also a leading cause of mortality. The unresolved issue is that of definition of the diagnostic threshold for diabetes. The World Health Organization and the American Diabetes Association (ADA) have laid down several diagnostic criteria for diagnosing diabetes and prediabetes based on the accumulating body of evidence.This review has attempted to analyse the scientific evidence supporting the justification of these differing criteria. The evidence for diagnosing diabetes is strong, and there is a concordance between the two professional bodies. The controversy arises when describing the normal lower limit of fasting plasma glucose (FPG) with little evidence favouring the reduction of the FPG by the ADA. Several studies have also shown the development of complications specific for diabetes in patients with prediabetes as defined by the current criteria though there is a significant overlap of such prevalence in individuals with normoglycemia. Large multinational longitudinal prospective studies involving subjects without diabetes and retinopathy at baseline will ideally help identify the threshold of glycemic measurements for future development of diabetes and its complications. PMID:27660696

  7. Current evidence and insights about genetics in thoracic aorta disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bisleri, Gianluigi; Bagozzi, Lorenzo; Muneretto, Claudio

    2013-01-01

    Thoracic aortic aneurysms have been historically considered to be caused by etiologic factors similar to those implied in abdominal aortic aneurysms. However, during the past decade, there has been increasing evidence that almost 20% of thoracic aortic aneurysms may be associated with a genetic disease, often within a syndromic or familial disorder. Moreover, the presence of congenital anomalies, such as bicuspid aortic valve, may have a unique common genetic underlying cause. Finally, also sporadic forms have been found to be potentially associated with genetic disorders, as highlighted by the analysis of rare variants and expression of specific microRNAs. We therefore sought to perform a comprehensive review of the role of genetic causes in the development of thoracic aortic aneurysms, by analyzing in detail the current evidence of genetic alterations in syndromes such as Marfan, Loeys-Dietz, and Ehler-Danlos, familial or sporadic forms, or forms associated with bicuspid aortic valve.

  8. Current Evidence and Insights about Genetics in Thoracic Aorta Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gianluigi Bisleri

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Thoracic aortic aneurysms have been historically considered to be caused by etiologic factors similar to those implied in abdominal aortic aneurysms. However, during the past decade, there has been increasing evidence that almost 20% of thoracic aortic aneurysms may be associated with a genetic disease, often within a syndromic or familial disorder. Moreover, the presence of congenital anomalies, such as bicuspid aortic valve, may have a unique common genetic underlying cause. Finally, also sporadic forms have been found to be potentially associated with genetic disorders, as highlighted by the analysis of rare variants and expression of specific microRNAs. We therefore sought to perform a comprehensive review of the role of genetic causes in the development of thoracic aortic aneurysms, by analyzing in detail the current evidence of genetic alterations in syndromes such as Marfan, Loeys-Dietz, and Ehler-Danlos, familial or sporadic forms, or forms associated with bicuspid aortic valve.

  9. Observational Evidence Linking Interstellar UV Absorption to PAH Molecules

    CERN Document Server

    Blasberger, Avi; Perets, Hagai B; Brosch, Noah; Tielens, Alexander G G M

    2016-01-01

    The 2175 \\AA\\ UV extinction feature was discovered in the mid-1960s, yet its physical origin remains poorly understood. One suggestion is absorption by Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAH) molecules, which is supported by theoretical molecular structure computations and by laboratory experiments. PAHs are positively detected by their 3.3, 6.2, 7.7 8.6, 11.3 & 12.7 $\\mu$m IR emission bands, which are specified by their modes of vibration. A definitive empirical link between the 2175 \\AA\\ UV extinction, and the PAH IR emission bands, however, is still missing. We present a new sample of hot stars that have both 2175 \\AA\\ absorption and PAH IR emission. We find significant shifts of the central wavelength of the UV absorption feature, up to 2350 \\AA, but predominantly in stars that also have IR PAH emission. These UV shifts depend on stellar temperature in a fashion that is similar to the shifts of the 6.2 and 7.7$\\mu$m PAH IR bands, namely the features are increasingly more red-shifted as the stellar temp...

  10. Revisiting reflexology: Concept, evidence, current practice, and practitioner training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Embong, Nurul Haswani; Soh, Yee Chang; Ming, Long Chiau; Wong, Tin Wui

    2015-10-01

    Reflexology is basically a study of how one part of the human body relates to another part of the body. Reflexology practitioners rely on the reflexes map of the feet and hands to all the internal organs and other human body parts. They believe that by applying the appropriate pressure and massage certain spots on the feet and hands, all other body parts could be energized and rejuvenated. This review aimed to revisit the concept of reflexology and examine its effectiveness, practices, and the training for reflexology practitioners. PubMed, SCOPUS, Google Scholar, and SpringerLink databases were utilized to search the following medical subject headings or keywords: foot massage, reflexology, foot reflexotherapy, reflexological treatment, and zone therapy. The articles published for the last 10 years were included. Previous systematic reviews failed to show concrete evidence for any specific effect of reflexology in any conditions. Due to its non-invasive, non-pharmacological complementary nature, reflexology is widely accepted and anecdotal evidence of positive effect reflexology in a variety of health conditions are available. Adequate training for practitioners is necessary to ensure the consistency of service provided.

  11. Revisiting reflexology: Concept, evidence, current practice, and practitioner training

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nurul Haswani Embong

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Reflexology is basically a study of how one part of the human body relates to another part of the body. Reflexology practitioners rely on the reflexes map of the feet and hands to all the internal organs and other human body parts. They believe that by applying the appropriate pressure and massage certain spots on the feet and hands, all other body parts could be energized and rejuvenated. This review aimed to revisit the concept of reflexology and examine its effectiveness, practices, and the training for reflexology practitioners. PubMed, SCOPUS, Google Scholar, and SpringerLink databases were utilized to search the following medical subject headings or keywords: foot massage, reflexology, foot reflexotherapy, reflexological treatment, and zone therapy. The articles published for the last 10 years were included. Previous systematic reviews failed to show concrete evidence for any specific effect of reflexology in any conditions. Due to its non-invasive, non-pharmacological complementary nature, reflexology is widely accepted and anecdotal evidence of positive effect reflexology in a variety of health conditions are available. Adequate training for practitioners is necessary to ensure the consistency of service provided.

  12. Gathering Empirical Evidence Concerning Links between Computer Aided Design (CAD) and Creativity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musta'amal, Aede Hatib; Norman, Eddie; Hodgson, Tony

    2009-01-01

    Discussion is often reported concerning potential links between computer-aided designing and creativity, but there is a lack of systematic enquiry to gather empirical evidence concerning such links. This paper reports an indication of findings from other research studies carried out in contexts beyond general education that have sought evidence…

  13. Finding current evidence: search strategies and common databases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillespie, Lesley Diane; Gillespie, William John

    2003-08-01

    With more than 100 orthopaedic, sports medicine, or hand surgery journals indexed in MEDLINE, it is no longer possible to keep abreast of developments in orthopaedic surgery by reading a few journals each month. Electronic resources are easier to search and more current than most print sources. We provide a practical approach to finding useful information to guide orthopaedic practice. We focus first on where to find the information by providing details about many useful databases and web links. Sources for identifying guidelines, systematic reviews, and randomized controlled trials are identified. The second section discusses how to find the information, from the first stage of formulating a question and identifying the concepts of interest, through to writing a simple strategy. Sources for additional self-directed learning are provided.

  14. Experimental evidence links volcanic particle characteristics to pyroclastic flow hazard

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dellino, Pierfrancesco; Büttner, Ralf; Dioguardi, Fabio; Doronzo, Domenico M.; La Volpe, Luigi; Mele, Daniela; Sonder, Ingo; Sulpizio, Roberto; Zimanowski, Bernd

    2010-06-01

    Pyroclastic flows represent the most hazardous events of explosive volcanism, one striking example being the famous historical eruption of Vesuvius that destroyed Pompeii (AD 79). Much of our knowledge of the mechanics of pyroclastic flows comes from theoretical models and numerical simulations. Valuable data are also stored in the geological record of past eruptions, including the particles contained in pyroclastic deposits, but the deposit characteristics are rarely used for quantifying the destructive potential of pyroclastic flows. By means of experiments, we validate a model that is based on data from pyroclastic deposits. The model allows the reconstruction of the current's fluid-dynamic behaviour. Model results are consistent with measured values of dynamic pressure in the experiments, and allow the quantification of the damage potential of pyroclastic flows.

  15. DC link current simulation of voltage source inverter with random space vector pulse width modulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Guoqiang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Aiming at analysis complexity, a simulation model is built and presented to analyze and demonstrate the characteristics of the direct current (DC link current of the three-phase two-level inverter with the random space vector pulse width modulation (SVPWM strategy. The developing procedure and key subsystems of the simulation model are given in detail. Several experiments are done using the simulation model. The results verify the efficiency and convenience of the simulation model and show that the random SVPWM scheme, especially the random switching frequency scheme, can efficiently suppress the harmonic peaks of the DC link current.

  16. Current Evidence on Atypical Odontalgia: Diagnosis and Clinical Management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshihiro Abiko

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Patients with atypical odontalgia (AO complain of medically unexplained toothache. No evidence-based diagnostic criteria or treatment guidelines are yet available. The present paper addresses seven clinical questions about AO based on current knowledge in the literature and discusses diagnostic criteria and guidelines for treatment and management. The questions are (i What is the prevalence of AO in the community?\t(ii What psychological problems are experienced by patients with AO? (iii Are there any comorbidities of AO? (iv Is local anesthesia effective for the relief of pain in AO? (v Are there any characteristic symptoms of AO other than spontaneous pain? (vi Are antidepressants effective for treatment of AO? (vii Are anticonvulsants effective for treatment of AO? Our literature search provided answers for these questions; however, there is insufficient evidence-based data to establish guidelines for the diagnosis and treatment of AO. Overall, some diagnostic criteria for neuropathic pain and persistent dentoalveolar pain disorder may be applied to AO patients. The patient's psychogenic background should always be considered in the treatment and/or management of AO. The clinicians may need to treat AO patients using Patient-Oriented Evidence that Matters approach.

  17. Current Evidence on Atypical Odontalgia: Diagnosis and Clinical Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abiko, Yoshihiro; Matsuoka, Hirofumi; Chiba, Itsuo; Toyofuku, Akira

    2012-01-01

    Patients with atypical odontalgia (AO) complain of medically unexplained toothache. No evidence-based diagnostic criteria or treatment guidelines are yet available. The present paper addresses seven clinical questions about AO based on current knowledge in the literature and discusses diagnostic criteria and guidelines for treatment and management. The questions are (i) What is the prevalence of AO in the community? (ii) What psychological problems are experienced by patients with AO? (iii) Are there any comorbidities of AO? (iv) Is local anesthesia effective for the relief of pain in AO? (v) Are there any characteristic symptoms of AO other than spontaneous pain? (vi) Are antidepressants effective for treatment of AO? (vii) Are anticonvulsants effective for treatment of AO? Our literature search provided answers for these questions; however, there is insufficient evidence-based data to establish guidelines for the diagnosis and treatment of AO. Overall, some diagnostic criteria for neuropathic pain and persistent dentoalveolar pain disorder may be applied to AO patients. The patient's psychogenic background should always be considered in the treatment and/or management of AO. The clinicians may need to treat AO patients using Patient-Oriented Evidence that Matters approach. PMID:22844283

  18. Evidence for non-HFE linked hemochromatosis in Asian Indians

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Panigrahi I

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Hereditary hemochromatosis is commonly due to two HFE1 (Histone Family E1 gene mutations - H63D and C282Y. Mutations in the Asian Indians are less well studied. AIMS: The aim of this preliminary study was to find out the prevalence of HFE gene mutations in nonviral liver cirrhosis patients. SETTINGS AND DESIGN: Unexplained liver cirrhosis cases with transferrin saturation> 45%, attending the gastroenterology clinic in the years 2004 and 2005 were subjects of the prospective study. Asymptomatic individuals with negative family history of hemolytic anemia or liver disease served as controls. MATERIALS AND METHODS: The clinical presentation was recorded in the patients. Transferrin saturation was estimated by standard colorimetric technique. The two common mutations in HFE1 gene and Y250X mutation of TFR (transferrin receptor gene were studied by polymerase chain reaction based methods. RESULTS: A majority of the cases were sporadic, but family history was positive in four patients. In one family with multiple affected members, there was clear evidence of autosomal dominant inheritance. Seven out of 31 (22.6% of unexplained cirrhosis cases were positive for mutations. One was homozygous for H63D. In healthy controls, prevalence was 8.1% (6/74. None of the patients or controls was positive for C282Y mutation of HFE1 or Y250X of TFR gene. CONCLUSIONS: Thus, in a number of cases of hemochromatosis in Indians, a gene with dominant inheritance may be involved in causation of the phenotype. The prevalence of HFE mutations in Indians is comparable to that reported from neighboring countries. It is worth studying other mutations in HFE gene and other iron overload genes in cryptogenic cirrhosis cases.

  19. Micronutrients and Leptospirosis: A Review of the Current Evidence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herman, Heather S.; Mehta, Saurabh; Cárdenas, Washington B.; Stewart-Ibarra, Anna M.

    2016-01-01

    Background Leptospirosis is one of the most widespread zoonoses and represents a major threat to human health. Due to the high burden of disease, limitations in diagnostics, and limited coverage and availability of effective human and veterinary vaccines, leptospirosis remains an important neglected zoonotic disease. Improved surveillance and identification of modifiable risk factors for leptospirosis are urgently needed to inform preventive interventions and reduce the risk and severity of Leptospira infection. Methodology/Principal Findings This review was conducted to examine the evidence that links micronutrient status and Leptospira infection. A total of 56 studies were included in this review: 28 in vitro, 17 animal, and 11 observational human studies. Findings indicated that Leptospira infection is associated with higher iron and calcium concentrations and hypomagnesemia. Conclusions/Significance Few prospective studies and no randomized trials have been conducted to date to examine the potential role of micronutrients in Leptospira infection. The limited literature in this area constrains our ability to make specific recommendations; however, the roles of iron, calcium, and magnesium in leptospirosis represent important areas for future research. The role of micronutrients in leptospirosis risk and severity needs to be elucidated in larger prospective human studies to inform public health interventions. PMID:27387046

  20. HDL and glucose metabolism: current evidence and therapeutic potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siebel, Andrew L; Heywood, Sarah Elizabeth; Kingwell, Bronwyn A

    2015-01-01

    High-density lipoprotein (HDL) and its principal apolipoprotein A-I (ApoA-I) have now been convincingly shown to influence glucose metabolism through multiple mechanisms. The key clinically relevant observations are that both acute HDL elevation via short-term reconstituted HDL (rHDL) infusion and chronically raising HDL via a cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP) inhibitor reduce blood glucose in individuals with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). HDL may mediate effects on glucose metabolism through actions in multiple organs (e.g., pancreas, skeletal muscle, heart, adipose, liver, brain) by three distinct mechanisms: (i) Insulin secretion from pancreatic beta cells, (ii) Insulin-independent glucose uptake, (iii) Insulin sensitivity. The molecular mechanisms appear to involve both direct HDL signaling actions as well as effects secondary to lipid removal from cells. The implications of glucoregulatory mechanisms linked to HDL extend from glycemic control to potential anti-ischemic actions via increased tissue glucose uptake and utilization. Such effects not only have implications for the prevention and management of diabetes, but also for ischemic vascular diseases including angina pectoris, intermittent claudication, cerebral ischemia and even some forms of dementia. This review will discuss the growing evidence for a role of HDL in glucose metabolism and outline related potential for HDL therapies.

  1. Dietary copper and human health: Current evidence and unresolved issues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bost, Muriel; Houdart, Sabine; Oberli, Marion; Kalonji, Esther; Huneau, Jean-François; Margaritis, Irène

    2016-05-01

    Although copper (Cu) is recognized as an essential trace element, uncertainties remain regarding Cu reference values for humans, as illustrated by discrepancies between recommendations issued by different national authorities. This review examines human studies published since 1990 on relationships between Cu intake, Cu balance, biomarkers of Cu status, and health. It points out several gaps and unresolved issues which make it difficult to assess Cu requirements. Results from balance studies suggest that daily intakes below 0.8 mg/day lead to net Cu losses, while net gains are consistently observed above 2.4 mg/day. However, because of an incomplete collection of losses in all studies, a precise estimation of Cu requirements cannot be derived from available data. Data regarding the relationship between Cu intake and potential biomarkers are either too preliminary or inconclusive because of low specificity or low sensitivity to change in dietary Cu over a wide range of intakes. Results from observation and intervention studies do not support a link between Cu and a risk of cardiovascular disease, cognitive decline, arthritis or cancer for intakes ranging from 0.6 to 3mg/day, and limited evidence exists for impaired immune function in healthy subjects with a very low (0.38 mg/day) Cu intake. However, data from observation studies should be regarded with caution because of uncertainties regarding Cu concentration in various foods and water. Further studies that accurately evaluate Cu exposure based on reliable biomarkers of Cu status are needed.

  2. Clostridium difficile infection in children with inflammatory bowel disease: current evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banaszkiewicz, Aleksandra; Pituch, Hanna

    2014-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is a chronic, immune-mediated disease of the gastrointestinal tract that develops in genetically susceptible individuals. Questions about the role of infections in the development and exacerbations of inflammatory bowel disease remain unanswered. Among numerous bacteria that have been linked to IBD, the most frequently associated is Clostridium difficile. Clinical symptoms of C. difficile infection and an exacerbation of inflammatory bowel disease are often indistinguishable. In cases of diarrhea in patients with IBD and C. difficile infection, antibiotic treatment is recommended. This review attempts to summarize C. difficile infection's epidemiology and clinical features and describes current evidence on treatment of C. difficile infection in children with IBD.

  3. Evidences of a coastal current in the Campeche Bank

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomez-Valdes, J.; Ruiz-Castillo, E.; Rioja-Nieto, R.

    2013-12-01

    The Campeche Bank is the largest continental shelf of the Gulf of Mexico. It is located at the north edge of the Yucatan peninsula. In this paper, we present some evidences of a coastal current that flows westward trough the bank. The analysis of the climatology of sea surface temperature obtained from a 23-year record of Advanced Very High Resolution (AVHRR) data unveiled an alongshore cold-water band which origin is in the Yucatan Channel. The cold-water band, which is visible from May to October, is in the coastal zone where turbulence is the dominant mixing mechanism. In addition, shipboard observations were carried out in September 2002, April 2005, August 2007, and July 2009 in order to observe the temporal and spatial variability of the water mass structure in the bank. Under the assumption of geostrophy, a westward flow trough the bank is deduced from the conductivity-temperature-depth (CTD) data. The westward current occurs in the entire water column with a velocity of the order of 20 cm/s at 10 m depth. The most likely forcing mechanism for this coastal current is the wind. The analysis of the climatology of sea surface winds obtained from a 23-year record of cross-calibrated, multiplatform (CCMP) data revealed a strong semiannual fluctuation of the trade winds over the bank. From May to October the trade winds are parallel to the coast and in the rest of the year its direction changes. The relationship between current and wind is examined using coastal continental shelf models. SST mean in the Campeche Bank. Solid lines indicate isobaths.

  4. Current evidence and applications of photodynamic therapy in dermatology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Marilyn T; Lin, Jennifer Y

    2014-01-01

    In photodynamic therapy (PDT) a photosensitizer – a molecule that is activated by light – is administered and exposed to a light source. This leads both to destruction of cells targeted by the particular type of photosensitizer, and immunomodulation. Given the ease with which photosensitizers and light can be delivered to the skin, it should come as no surprise that PDT is an increasingly utilized therapeutic in dermatology. PDT is used commonly to treat precancerous cells, sun-damaged skin, and acne. It has reportedly also been used to treat other conditions including inflammatory disorders and cutaneous infections. This review discusses the principles behind how PDT is used in dermatology, as well as evidence for current applications of PDT. PMID:24899818

  5. DNA evidence: current perspective and future challenges in India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, Sunil K; Goswami, Gajendra K

    2014-08-01

    Since the discovery of DNA fingerprinting technology in 1985 it has been used extensively as evidence in the court of law world-wide to establish the individual identity both in civil and criminal matters. In India, the first case of parentage dispute solved by the use of DNA fingerprinting technology was in 1989. Since then till date, the DNA technology has been used not only to resolve the cases of paternity and maternity disputes, but also for the establishment of individual identity in various criminal cases and for wildlife forensic identification. Since last half a decade, India is exercising to enact legislation on the use of DNA in the judicial realm and the draft 'Human DNA Bill-2012' is pending in the parliament. Largely, the promoters of forensic DNA testing have anticipated that DNA tests are nearly infallible and DNA technology could be the greatest single advance step in search for truth, conviction of the perpetrator, and acquittal of the innocent. The current article provides a comprehensive review on the status of DNA testing in India and elucidates the consequences of the admissibility of DNA as 'evidence' in the judicial dominion. In this backdrop of civil and criminal laws and changing ethical and societal attitudes, it is concluded that the DNA legislation in India and world-wide needs to be designed with utmost care.

  6. Migraine and Risk of Stroke: Review of Current Evidence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sadeghi

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Context Migraine is a kind of primary headache that affects 10% to 20% of people worldwide. Recent studies have shown that migraines can be involved in strokes incidences, especially ischemic strokes.Hence, the current study aimed to review evidence in relation to migraine and risk of stroke. Evidence Acquisition A literature search was done for related articles dated between 1993 and 2013 on PubMed, Science Direct, Embase, Web of Science and Scopus for both English and non-English language articles by entering “migraine”, “migraine with aura”, “headache” and “ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke” as keywords. Results In most evaluated studies, there was a positive association between migraine with aura (MA and strokes incidences, especially ischemic strokes. Moreover, patients with high frequency of migraine attacks had greater odds of having a stroke compared with those who had low frequency of migraine attacks. Also, the association between migraine and stroke was more significant in subjects under 45 years old. Some migraine symptoms such as vomiting and nausea had a protective role in the development of ischemic strokes. Conclusions Migraine, especially MA, is a risk factor for incidences of strokes, especially ischemic strokes. However, due to conflicting results on the association between different types of migraine and stroke, more studies are needed in this field.

  7. Vascular interventional radiology. Current evidence in endovascular surgery. 2. ed.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cowling, Mark G. (ed.) [Univ. Hospital North Staffordshire, Stoke-on-Trent (United Kingdom). Dept. of Radiology

    2012-11-01

    Succinct chapters that will allow readers to identify quickly the information that they need. Ideally sized book for storage and use in the interventional suite. Contains sufficient detail for trainees in endovascular therapy/interventional radiology to gain a thorough grasp of the relevant issues. Fully updated to reflect recent advances. This new edition of Vascular Interventional Radiology: Current Evidence in Endovascular Surgery provides a thorough yet succinct and accessible review of the latest knowledge in the field of endovascular surgery. All chapters have been updated to reflect the advances that have occurred during the past five years, and new chapters are included on carotid artery stenting and day case intervention. The chapter on lower limb veno-occlusive disease has been expanded to include management of deep venous thrombosis. Among the other topics considered are the endovascular treatment options in different arterial territories, aneurysm repair techniques, and the management of venous stenosis and venous insufficiency. The aim throughout is to tackle issues of evidence-based practice in order to assist trainees and experienced practitioners in making and implementing treatment decisions. This book will be an invaluable source of information for both interventional radiologists and vascular surgeons with an interest in endovascular techniques.

  8. Mid to late Holocene Leeuwin Current variability offshore southern Australia linked to ENSO state changes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perner, Kerstin; Moros, Matthias; De Deckker, Patrick; Blanz, Thomas; Siegel, Herbert; Wacker, Lukas; Schneider, Ralph; Jansen, Eystein

    2015-04-01

    The El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO), a key aspect of the Earth's climate, drives regional to global oceanic and climate changes on various time-scales. Differences in the temporal coverage of Holocene records for the more general state in El Niño frequency, however, restrict a comprehensive overview. Oceanic variability offshore southern Australia is linked to the Leeuwin Current (LC), an eastern boundary current, transporting tropical waters from the Indo Pacific Warm Pool region towards higher latitudes. Instrumental data, spanning the last few decades, document that ENSO modulates LC variability. Here we present new, well-dated time series from two marine sediment cores (MD03-2611 and SS0206-GC 15)of past LC variability, based on alkenone-derived sea-surface temperatures (SST) and planktonic foraminifera offshore southern Australia, an area affected by recent El Niño and La Niña events. Our reconstructions of ENSO-state changes cover the last 7,400 years. With transition into the mid Holocene [dates], we find clear evidence that oceanic conditions prevailed under the dominant influence of a persistent La Niña mode. A strong LC produces a stratified water column and establishes a permanent thermocline as seen in the high abundance of the 'tropical fauna' (Globoturborotalita rubescens, Globoturborotalita tenella and Globigerinella sacculifer (including G. trilobus)) and maximum SST offshore southern Australia. During this La Niña-state dominated period, we record at c. 5000 years BP the first short period of a strong El Niño-like-state, by a pronounced drop in abundance of the subtropical species Globigerinoides ruber and a reduced SST gradient between the two core sites. The Late Holocene (from 3,500 years BP onwards) period is characterized by centennial to millennial scale variability in the LC strength, which is accompanied by an overall decrease of SSTs offshore southern Australia. We link this LC variability to Late Holocene centennial

  9. Removal of Direct Current Link Harmonic Ripple in Single Phase Voltage Source Inverter Systems Using Supercapacitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-09-01

    current. In practice , SC bank voltage dropped as low as approximately 5.0 V before the BBC entered DCM and data became invalid. 44 B. LABORATORY...distribution is unlimited 12b. DISTRIBUTION CODE 13. ABSTRACT (maximum 200 words) For an Energy Management System (EMS)-controlled microgrid that... bank as the only DC energy storage device, the DC link voltage ripple causes a second-order harmonic ripple in battery current that leads to a

  10. Sublingual administration of tacrolimus: current trends and available evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doligalski, Christina Teeter; Liu, Esther C; Sammons, Chelsea M; Silverman, Andrew; Logan, Angela Tong

    2014-11-01

    Widespread anecdotal use of sublingual tacrolimus administration has arisen, although little literature exists to guide practice. Given the paucity of data, we conducted a survey to evaluate the practice of sublingual tacrolimus administration at transplant centers across the United States and evaluated the literature that is currently available. A 10-question online survey assessing the current state of sublingual tacrolimus use was distributed to pharmacists at transplant centers that each performed more than 100 solid organ transplantations in 2013. In addition, a literature review was performed by searching the PubMed database to identify available evidence for the sublingual administration of tacrolimus. The online survey was completed by 59 (65.6%) of the 90 targeted transplant centers, representing 51.3% of all solid organ transplantations performed in 2013. Sublingual administration of tacrolimus was used in all solid organ transplant populations, with ~67% of lung transplant centers using this route for tacrolimus. The most common dose conversion was 2 mg oral to 1 mg sublingual, with 92% of centers opening oral capsules and administering the contents sublingually. Home use of sublingual administration and use in the pediatric population was uncommon. Seven peer-reviewed reports and one abstract were identified in the literature review. Seven of the eight publications reported favorably on sublingual administration, although no consistent dose conversion or method of administration was elucidated. The majority of the transplant centers surveyed found sublingual tacrolimus a viable alternative when oral administration is unavailable. A large robust prospective evaluation of sublingual administration of tacrolimus is imperative to provide the most effective care to solid organ transplant recipients and to ensure optimal safety for both patients and providers who administer the drug.

  11. [Hierarchy of evidence: levels of evidence and grades of recommendation from current use].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manterola, Carlos; Asenjo-Lobos, Claudla; Otzen, Tamara

    2014-12-01

    There are multiple proposals and classifications that hierarchize evidence, which may confuse those who are dedicated to generate it both in health technology assessments, as for the development of clinical guidelines, etc. The aim of this manuscript is to describe the most commonly used classifications of levels of evidence and grades of recommendation, analyzing their main differences and applications so that the user can choose the one that better suits your needs and take this health decisions basing their practice on the best available evidence. A systematic literature search was performed in PubMed and MEDLINE databases and in Google, Yahoo and Ixquick search engines. A wealth of information concerning levels of evidence and degrees recommendation was obtained. It was summarized the information of the 11 proposals more currently used (CTFPHC, Sackett, USPSTF, CEBM, GRADE, SIGN, NICE, NHMRC, PCCRP, ADA y ACCF/AHA), between which it emphasizes the GRADE WORKING GROUP, incorporated by around 90 national and international organizations such as the World Health Organization, The Cochrane Library, American College of Physicians, American Thoracic Society, UpToDate, etc.; and locally by the Ministry of Health to create clinical practice guidelines.

  12. Preventing skin cancer through reduction of indoor tanning: current evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Meg; Holman, Dawn M; Fox, Kathleen A; Guy, Gery P; Seidenberg, Andrew B; Sampson, Blake P; Sinclair, Craig; Lazovich, DeAnn

    2013-06-01

    Exposure to ultraviolet radiation from indoor tanning devices (tanning beds, booths, and sun lamps) or from the sun contributes to the risk of skin cancer, including melanoma, which is the type of skin cancer responsible for most deaths. Indoor tanning is common among certain groups, especially among older adolescents and young adults, adolescent girls and young women, and non-Hispanic whites. Increased understanding of the health risks associated with indoor tanning has led to many efforts to reduce use. Most environmental and systems efforts in the U.S. (e.g., age limits or requiring parental consent/accompaniment) have occurred at the state level. At the national level, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration and the Federal Trade Commission regulate indoor tanning devices and advertising, respectively. The current paper provides a brief review of (1) the evidence on indoor tanning as a risk factor for skin cancer; (2) factors that may influence use of indoor tanning devices at the population level; and (3) various environmental and systems options available for consideration when developing strategies to reduce indoor tanning. This information provides the context and background for the companion paper in this issue of the American Journal of Preventive Medicine, which summarizes highlights from an informal expert meeting convened by the CDC in August 2012 to identify opportunities to prevent skin cancer by reducing use of indoor tanning devices.

  13. Current evidence on perinatal home visiting and intimate partner violence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharps, Phyllis W; Campbell, Jacquelyn; Baty, Marguerite L; Walker, Keisha S; Bair-Merritt, Megan H

    2008-01-01

    To describe current evidence on home visiting interventions for pregnant or postpartum women with specific intimate partner violence assessment and content. Online bibliographic databases including PubMed, CINAHL Plus, and Web of Science and a hand search of bibliographies of relevant articles. Original research and intervention studies were included that contained (a) a well-described prenatal and/or postpartum home visitation; (b) an assessment of perinatal intimate partner violence; and (c) quantitative data describing health outcomes for the women and their infants. The search yielded 128 articles, and 8 relevant articles met all of the inclusion criteria. Nonresearch, nonintervention, and international articles were excluded. No perinatal home visiting interventions were designed to address intimate partner violence. Programs that screened for intimate partner violence found high rates, and the presence of intimate partner violence limited the ability of the intervention to improve maternal and child outcomes. Perinatal home visitation programs likely improve pregnancy and infant outcomes. Home visiting interventions addressing intimate partner violence in nonperinatal population groups have been effective in minimizing intimate partner violence and improving outcomes. This suggests that perinatal home visiting programs adding specific intimate partner violence interventions may reduce intimate partner violence and improve maternal and infant health. Continued rigorous research is needed.

  14. Targeted temperature management: Current evidence and practices in critical care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saurabh Saigal

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Targeted temperature management (TTM in today′s modern era, especially in intensive care units represents a promising multifaceted therapy for a variety of conditions. Though hypothermia is being used since Hippocratic era, the renewed interest of late has been since early 21 st century. There have been multiple advancements in this field and varieties of cooling devices are available at present. TTM requires careful titration of its depth, duration and rewarming as it is associated with side-effects. The purpose of this review is to find out the best evidence-based clinical practice criteria of therapeutic hypothermia in critical care settings. TTM is an unique therapeutic modality for salvaging neurological tissue viability in critically ill patients viz. Post-cardiac arrest, traumatic brain injury (TBI, meningitis, acute liver failure and stroke. TTM is standard of care in post-cardiac arrest situations; there has been a lot of controversy of late regarding temperature ranges to be used for the same. In patients with TBI, it reduces intracranial pressure, but has not shown any favorable neurologic outcome. Hypothermia is generally accepted treatment for hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy in newborns. The current available technology to induce and maintain hypothermia allows for precise temperature control. Future studies should focus on optimizing hypothermic treatment to full benefit of our patients and its application in other clinical scenarios.

  15. Medicinal mushroom science: Current perspectives, advances, evidences, and challenges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Solomon P Wasser

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The main target of the present review is to draw attention to the current perspectives, advances, evidences, challenges, and future development of medicinal mushroom science in the 21 st century. Medicinal mushrooms and fungi are thought to possess approximately 130 medicinal functions, including antitumor, immunomodulating, antioxidant, radical scavenging, cardiovascular, anti-hypercholesterolemic, antiviral, antibacterial, anti-parasitic, antifungal, detoxification, hepatoprotective, and antidiabetic effects. Many, if not all, higher Basidiomycetes mushrooms contain biologically active compounds in fruit bodies, cultured mycelium, and cultured broth. Special attention is paid to mushroom polysaccharides. The data on mushroom polysaccharides and different secondary metabolites are summarized for approximately 700 species of higher hetero- and homobasidiomycetes. Numerous bioactive polysaccharides or polysaccharide-protein complexes from the medicinal mushrooms described appear to enhance innate and cell-mediated immune responses, and exhibit antitumor activities in animals and humans. Whilst the mechanism of their antitumor actions is still not completely understood, stimulation and modulation of key host immune responses by these mushroom compounds appear central. Polysaccharides and low-molecular-weight secondary metabolites are particularly important due to their antitumor and immunostimulating properties. Several of the mushroom compounds have been subjected to Phase I, II, and III clinical trials, and are used extensively and successfully in Asia to treat various cancers and other diseases. Special attention is given to many important unsolved problems in the study of medicinal mushrooms.

  16. Application of lipoarabinomannan antigen in tuberculosis diagnostics: current evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarkar, Pronoti; Biswas, Debasis; Sindhwani, Girish; Rawat, Jagdish; Kotwal, Aarti; Kakati, Barnali

    2014-03-01

    Tests based on the detection of mycobacterial lipoarabinomannan (LAM) antigen in urine have emerged as potential point-of-care tests for tuberculosis (TB). We aimed to assimilate the current evidence regarding the diagnostic performance of LAM assays and to ascertain their clinical indication in settings with high and low prevalence of HIV-TB co-infection. Owing to suboptimal sensitivity, the urinary LAM assays are unsuitable as general screening tests for TB. However, unlike traditional diagnostic methods, they demonstrate improved sensitivity in HIV-TB co-infection which further increases with low CD4 counts. Accordingly, these assays are indicated as rule-in tests for TB in patients with advanced HIV-induced immunosuppression, and facilitate the early initiation of antituberculous treatment in them. They also offer incremental sensitivity and specificity when used as adjunct tests to smear microscopy and chest radiography in HIV-TB co-infection. They obviate the biohazards associated with sputum samples and provide an alternative diagnostic tool in sputum-scarce patients. Notwithstanding these advantages, the specificity of these assays is variable, which is mostly attributable to misclassification bias and cross-reactivity with non-tuberculous mycobacteria or other commensal flora. Furthermore, the inability to detect low titres of antigen in HIV-uninfected patients makes these assays unsuitable for use in settings with a low HIV prevalence. Future research targeted towards inclusion of specific monoclonal antibodies and more sensitive immunoassay platforms might help to improve the diagnostic performance of these assays and extend their applicability to the general population of patients with TB.

  17. Mitochondrial dysfunction in psychiatric morbidity: current evidence and therapeutic prospects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toker L

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Lilach Toker,1 Galila Agam2,3 1Department of Psychiatry, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, Canada; 2Department of Clinical Biochemistry and Pharmacology, Ben-Gurion University of the Negev, Beer-Sheva, Israel; 3Mental Health Center, Beer-Sheva, Israel Abstract: Cumulating evidence for the involvement of mitochondrial dysfunction in psychiatric disorders leaves little to no doubt regarding the involvement of this pathology in mood disorders. However, mitochondrial abnormalities are also observed in a wide range of disorders spanning from cancer and diabetes to various neurodegenerative and neurodevelopmental disorders such as Parkinson’s, Alzheimer’s, Huntington’s, autism, and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. The apparent lack of specificity questions the role of mitochondrial dysfunction in psychiatric disorders, in general, and in mood disorders, in particular. Is mitochondrial dysfunction a general phenomenon, simplistically rendering brain cells to be more vulnerable to a variety of disease-specific perturbations? Or is it an epiphenomenon induced by various disease-specific factors? Or possibly, the severity and the anatomical region of the dysfunction are the ones responsible for the distinct features of the disorders. Whichever of the aforementioned ones, if any, is correct, “mitochondrial dysfunction” became more of a cliché than a therapeutic target. In this review, we summarize current studies supporting the involvement of mitochondrial dysfunction in different psychiatric disorders. We address the question of specificity and causality of the different findings and provide an alternative explanation for some of the aforementioned questions. Keywords: bipolar disorder, psychiatric disorders, schizophrenia, Stanley Foundation Brain Collection

  18. The Impact of Educational Mismatch on Firm Productivity: Evidence from Linked Panel Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kampelmann, Stephan; Rycx, Francois

    2012-01-01

    We provide first evidence regarding the direct impact of educational mismatch on firm productivity. To do so, we rely on representative linked employer-employee panel data for Belgium covering the period 1999-2006. Controlling for simultaneity issues, time-invariant unobserved workplace characteristics, cohort effects and dynamics in the…

  19. CATTLE (CAncer treatment treasury with linked evidence): An integrated knowledge base for personalized oncology research and practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soysal, E; Lee, H‐J; Zhang, Y; Huang, L‐C; Chen, X; Wei, Q; Zheng, W; Chang, JT; Cohen, T; Sun, J

    2017-01-01

    Despite the existence of various databases cataloging cancer drugs, there is an emerging need to support the development and application of personalized therapies, where an integrated understanding of the clinical factors and drug mechanism of action and its gene targets is necessary. We have developed CATTLE (CAncer Treatment Treasury with Linked Evidence), a comprehensive cancer drug knowledge base providing information across the complete spectrum of the drug life cycle. The CATTLE system collects relevant data from 22 heterogeneous databases, integrates them into a unified model centralized on drugs, and presents comprehensive drug information via an interactive web portal with a download function. A total of 2,323 unique cancer drugs are currently linked to rich information from these databases in CATTLE. Through two use cases, we demonstrate that CATTLE can be used in supporting both research and practice in personalized oncology. PMID:28296354

  20. Postpartum family planning: current evidence on successful interventions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Blazer C

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Cassandra Blazer, Ndola Prata Bixby Center for Population, Health, and Sustainability, School of Public Health, University of California, Berkeley, CA, USA Abstract: We reviewed existing evidence of the efficacy of postpartum family planning interventions targeting women in the 12 months postpartum period in low- and middle-income countries. We searched for studies from January 1, 2004 to September 19, 2015, using the US Preventive Services Task Force recommendations to assess evidence quality. Our search resulted in 26 studies: 11 based in sub-Saharan Africa, six in the Middle East and North Africa, and nine in Asia. Twenty of the included studies assessed health facility-based interventions. Three were focused on community interventions, two had community and facility components, and one was a workplace program. Overall quality of the evidence was moderate, including evidence for counseling interventions. Male partner involvement, integration with other service delivery platforms, such as prevention of mother-to-child transmission of HIV and immunization, and innovative product delivery programs may increase knowledge and use during the postpartum period. Community-based and workplace strategies need a much stronger base of evidence to prompt recommendations. Keywords: postpartum period, family planning, birth spacing, interventions, systematic review, contraception, less developed countries

  1. Whole dairy matrix or single nutrients in assessment of health effects: current evidence and knowledge gaps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thorning, Tanja Kongerslev; Bertram, Hanne Christine; Bonjour, Jean-Philippe; de Groot, Lisette; Dupont, Didier; Feeney, Emma; Ipsen, Richard; Lecerf, Jean Michel; Mackie, Alan; McKinley, Michelle C; Michalski, Marie-Caroline; Rémond, Didier; Risérus, Ulf; Soedamah-Muthu, Sabita S; Tholstrup, Tine; Weaver, Connie; Astrup, Arne; Givens, Ian

    2017-04-12

    Foods consist of a large number of different nutrients that are contained in a complex structure. The nature of the food structure and the nutrients therein (i.e., the food matrix) will determine the nutrient digestion and absorption, thereby altering the overall nutritional properties of the food. Thus, the food matrix may exhibit a different relation with health indicators compared to single nutrients studied in isolation. The evidence for a dairy matrix effect was presented and discussed by an expert panel at a closed workshop, and the following consensus was reached: 1) Current evidence does not support a positive association between intake of dairy products and risk of cardiovascular disease (i.e., stroke and coronary heart disease) and type 2 diabetes. In contrast, fermented dairy products, such as cheese and yogurt, generally show inverse associations. 2) Intervention studies have indicated that the metabolic effects of whole dairy may be different than those of single dairy constituents when considering the effects on body weight, cardiometabolic disease risk, and bone health. 3) Different dairy products seem to be distinctly linked to health effects and disease risk markers. 4) Different dairy structures and common processing methods may enhance interactions between nutrients in the dairy matrix, which may modify the metabolic effects of dairy consumption. 5) In conclusion, the nutritional values of dairy products should not be considered equivalent to their nutrient contents but, rather, be considered on the basis of the biofunctionality of the nutrients within dairy food structures. 6) Further research on the health effects of whole dairy foods is warranted alongside the more traditional approach of studying the health effects of single nutrients. Future diet assessments and recommendations should carefully consider the evidence of the effects of whole foods alongside the evidence of the effects of individual nutrients. Current knowledge gaps and

  2. High-Performance Long NoC Link Using Delay-Insensitive Current-Mode Signaling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ethiopia Nigussie

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available High-performance long-range NoC link enables efficient implementation of network-on-chip topologies which inherently require high-performance long-distance point-to-point communication such as torus and fat-tree structures. In addition, the performance of other topologies, such as mesh, can be improved by using high-performance link between few selected remote nodes. We presented novel implementation of high-performance long-range NoC link based on multilevel current-mode signaling and delay-insensitive two-phase 1-of-4 encoding. Current-mode signaling reduces the communication latency of long wires significantly compared to voltage-mode signaling, making it possible to achieve high throughput without pipelining and/or using repeaters. The performance of the proposed multilevel current-mode interconnect is analyzed and compared with two reference voltage mode interconnects. These two reference interconnects are designed using two-phase 1-of-4 encoded voltage-mode signaling, one with pipeline stages and the other using optimal repeater insertion. The proposed multilevel current-mode interconnect achieves higher throughput and lower latency than the two reference interconnects. Its throughput at 8 mm wire length is 1.222 GWord/s which is 1.58 and 1.89 times higher than the pipelined and optimal repeater insertion interconnects, respectively. Furthermore, its power consumption is less than the optimal repeater insertion voltage-mode interconnect, at 10 mm wire length its power consumption is 0.75 mW while the reference repeater insertion interconnect is 1.066 mW. The effect of crosstalk is analyzed using four-bit parallel data transfer with the best-case and worst-case switching patterns and a transmission line model which has both capacitive coupling and inductive coupling.

  3. A Theoretical Analysis of Sideband Harmonics on the Inverter DC-link Current for an Electric Railcar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogawa, Tomoyuki; Wakao, Shinji; Taufiq, Jat; Kondo, Keiichiro; Terauchi, Nobuo

    The harmonics of the return current may interfere with the signaling current along with the rails. In this paper, we present the theoretical studies of the return current harmonics in the inverter-controlled DC electric railcar, aiming at contributing future work to improve the compatibility with the signaling current. We theoretically derive sideband harmonics of the DC-link current. Then, in order to verify the theoretical study, we experimentally measure the harmonics and numerically simulate the harmonics. As a result, we concluded the theoretical DC-link current is enough accurate to be utilized for the future improvement of the inverter harmonics current.

  4. Linking restless legs syndrome with Parkinson's disease: clinical, imaging and genetic evidence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peeraully Tasneem

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Restless legs syndrome (RLS and Parkinson's disease (PD are both common neurological disorders. There has been much debate over whether an etiological link between these two diseases exists and whether they share a common pathophysiology. Evidence pointing towards a link includes response to dopaminergic agents in PD and RLS, suggestive of underlying dopamine dysfunction in both conditions. The extrastriatal dopaminergic system, in particular altered spinal dopaminergic modulation, may be variably involved in PD patients with RLS symptoms. In addition, there is now evidence that the nigrostriatal system, primarily involved in PD, is also affected in RLS. Furthermore, an association of RLS with the parkin mutation has been suggested. The prevalence of RLS has also been reported to be increased in other disorders of dopamine regulation. However, clinical association studies and functional imaging have produced mixed findings. Conflicting accounts of emergence of RLS and improvement in RLS symptoms after deep brain stimulation (DBS also contribute to the uncertainty surrounding the issue. Among the strongest arguments against a common pathophysiology is the role of iron in RLS and PD. While elevated iron levels in the substantia nigra contribute to oxidative stress in PD, RLS is a disorder of relative iron deficiency, with symptoms responding to replacement therapy. Recent ultrasonography studies have suggested that, despite overlapping clinical features, the mechanisms underlying idiopathic RLS and RLS associated with PD may differ. In this review, we provide a concise summary of the clinical, imaging and genetic evidence exploring the link between RLS and PD.

  5. Current evidence on dietary pattern and cognitive function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheung, Bernice H K; Ho, Ivan C H; Chan, Ruth S M; Sea, Mandy M M; Woo, Jean

    2014-01-01

    With global aging population, age-related cognitive decline becomes epidemic. Lifestyle-related factor is one of the key preventative measures. Dietary pattern analysis which considers dietary complexity has recently used to examine the linkage between nutrition and cognitive function. A priori approach defines dietary pattern based on existing knowledge. Results of several dietary pattern scores were summarized. The heterogeneity of assessment methods and outcome measurements lead to inconsistent results. Posteriori approach derives a dietary pattern independently of the existing nutrition-disease knowledge. It showed a dietary pattern abundant with plant-based food, oily fish, lower consumption of processed food, saturated fat, and simple sugar which appears to be beneficial to cognitive health. Despite inconclusive evidence from both approaches, diet and exercise, beneficial for other diseases, remains to be the two key modifiable factors for cognitive function. Large-scale prospective studies in multiethics population are required to provide stronger evidence in the future.

  6. Current Evidence and Insights about Genetics in Thoracic Aorta Disease

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    Thoracic aortic aneurysms have been historically considered to be caused by etiologic factors similar to those implied in abdominal aortic aneurysms. However, during the past decade, there has been increasing evidence that almost 20% of thoracic aortic aneurysms may be associated with a genetic disease, often within a syndromic or familial disorder. Moreover, the presence of congenital anomalies, such as bicuspid aortic valve, may have a unique common genetic underlying cause. Finally, also s...

  7. Capnography during cardiopulmonary resuscitation: Current evidence and future directions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhavani Shankar Kodali

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Capnography continues to be an important tool in measuring expired carbon dioxide (CO 2 . Most recent Advanced Cardiac Life Support (ACLS guidelines now recommend using capnography to ascertain the effectiveness of chest compressions and duration of cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR. Based on an extensive review of available published literature, we selected all available peer-reviewed research investigations and case reports. Available evidence suggests that there is significant correlation between partial pressure of end-tidal CO 2 (PETCO 2 and cardiac output that can indicate the return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC. Additional evidence favoring the use of capnography during CPR includes definitive proof of correct placement of the endotracheal tube and possible prediction of patient survival following cardiac arrest, although the latter will require further investigations. There is emerging evidence that PETCO 2 values can guide the initiation of extracorporeal life support (ECLS in refractory cardiac arrest (RCA. There is also increasing recognition of the value of capnography in intensive care settings in intubated patients. Future directions include determining the outcomes based on capnography waveforms PETCO 2 values and determining a reasonable duration of CPR. In the future, given increasing use of capnography during CPR large databases can be analyzed to predict outcomes.

  8. [A review of current concepts in evidence-based radiology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roldán-Valadez, Ernesto; Lee, Angel; Jiménez-Corona, Aída; Vega-González, Iván; Martínez-López, Manuel; Vázquez-LaMadrid, Jorge

    2007-01-01

    It has been noted that "Good doctors use both individual clinical expertise and the best available external evidence, and neither alone is enough. " Evidence-based medicine (EBM) is defined as the process of systematically finding, critically appraising, and using contemporary research published in the medical literature as a basis to make decisions regarding individual patient care and health care policy. In radiology, including its diagnostic and interventional aspects, the principles and practice of EBM have not been thoroughly studied. In this brief review article, we describe key aspects of evidence-based radiology (EBR), concepts and steps followed in EBM and meta-analysis. The skills required to practice EBR are identified, and the roles of EBR in radiologic practice, education, and research are discussed. The application of EBM principles to diagnostic imaging facilitates the interpretation of imaging studies and produces a sound and comprehensive radiologic evaluation. This review could be useful for radiologists and clinicians at any stage of their training or career. It encourages the practice of EBM and EBR especially in developing countries.

  9. The Intertemporal Approach to the Current Account: Evidence for Chile

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergio A. Salas Landeau

    2002-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper studies the existence of "excess" current-account imbalances in Chile in the 1960-1999 period. This phenomenon is modelled using present value tests that allow for variable interest rates and exchange rate fluctuations. Despite its simplicity, most of the observed imbalances in the current account are accounted for by the model. Results suggest that using models where agents behave as forward-looking rational agents, is a valid framework. Moreover, the analysis highlights the rel-evance of variable interest rates and exchange rates. Results also imply that capital controls, that were widely used in the period under study, were not effective.

  10. Analysis of Three-Phase Rectifier Systems with Controlled DC-Link Current Under Unbalanced Grids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kumar, Dinesh; Davari, Pooya; Zare, Firuz

    2017-01-01

    Voltage unbalance is the most common disturbance in distribution networks, which give undesirable effects on many grid connected power electronics systems including Adjustable Speed Drive (ASD). Severe voltage unbalance can force three-phase rectifiers into almost single-phase operation, which...... degrades the grid power quality and also imposes a significant negative impact on the ASD system. This major power quality issue affecting the conventional rectifiers can be attenuated by controlling the DC-link current based on an Electronic Inductor (EI) technique. The purpose of this digest...

  11. Josephson current and Andreev level dynamics in nanoscale superconducting weak links

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brunetti, Aldo

    2014-11-15

    In this thesis we focus on the interplay between proximity induced superconducting correlations and Coulomb interactions in a Josephson junction: i.e., in a system where two superconductors modeled as two s-wave superconductors at a phase difference φ are contacted by means of a weak link, in our case a quantum dot located in the contact. In the first part we study the Josephson current-phase relation for a multi-level quantum dot tunnel-contacted by two conventional s-waves superconductors. We determine in detail the conditions for observing a finite anomalous Josephson current, i.e. a supercurrent flowing at zero phase difference in a two-level dot with spin-orbit interactions, a weak magnetic (Zeeman) field, and in the presence of Coulomb interactions. This leads to an onset behavior I{sub a}∝sgn(B), interpreted as the sign of an incipient spontaneous breakdown of time-reversal symmetry. Moreover, we will provide conditions for realizing spatially separated - but topologically unprotected - Majorana bound states, whose signature in the system will be detectable via the current-phase relation. In the second part of the thesis, we address the Andreev bound state population dynamics in superconducting weak links (a superconducting 'atomic contact'), in which a poisoning mechanism due to the trapping of single quasiparticles can occur. Our motivation is that quantum coherent superconducting circuits are the most promising candidates for future large-scale quantum information processing devices. Moreover, quasiparticle poisoning has recently been observed in devices which contain a short superconducting weak link with few transport channels. We discuss a novel charge imbalance effect in the continuum quasiparticle population, which is due to phase fluctuations of the environment weakly coupled to the superconducting contact. This coupling enters the system as a transition rate connecting continuum quasiparticles and the Andreev bound state system. The

  12. Voice rest after vocal fold surgery: current practice and evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coombs, A C; Carswell, A J; Tierney, P A

    2013-08-01

    Voice rest is commonly recommended after vocal fold surgery, but there is a lack of evidence base and no standard protocol. The aim of this study was to establish common practice regarding voice rest following vocal fold surgery. An online survey was circulated via e-mail invitation to members of the ENT UK Expert Panel between October and November 2011. The survey revealed that 86.5 per cent of respondents agreed that 'complete voice rest' means no sound production at all, but there was variability in how 'relative voice rest' was defined. There was no dominant type of voice rest routinely recommended after surgery for laryngeal papillomatosis or intermediate pathologies. There was considerable variability in the duration of voice rest recommended, with no statistically significant, most popular response (except for malignant lesions). Surgeons with less than 10 years of experience were more likely to recommend fewer days of voice rest. There is a lack of consistency in advice given to patients after vocal fold surgery, in terms of both type and length of voice rest. This may arise from an absence of robust evidence on which to base practice.

  13. Level of evidence and citation index in current neurosurgical publications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rothoerl, Ralf D; Klier, Joerg; Woertgen, Chris; Brawanski, A

    2003-10-01

    Systematic clinical reviews or meta-analyses offer scientifically valid sources of clinical information. They provide information in a concise form and can contribute to clinical quality management. Such studies, however, are only able to reflect the quality of the articles reviewed. The aim of this study was to evaluate the quality of the neurosurgical literature according to evidence-based medicine (EBM) standards. We reviewed all articles published in 1999 in three major neurosurgical journals. These articles were subdivided according to the level of evidence (LOE) scale (from 0 to V), article type, and citation index. Nine hundred eighty-two articles were published in these journals in 1999. Of these, 346 (35%) were clinical studies, 287 (29%) case reports, 153 (16%) experimental studies, 122 (13%) technical reports, and 74 ( 8%) other types. Subdivision according to LOE was: Ia 0.3%, Ib 2.5%, IIa 0.2%, IIb 4.3%, IIc 9.5%, IIIa 0.1%, IIIb 3.9%, IV 22.4%, and V 1.6%. Fifty-five percent of all published studies were case reports, experimental studies, technical reports, or others and thus could not be subdivided according to the EBM standards. The number of articles published with high LOE seems to be rather low in 1999. If these data reflect overall publication practice, it seems unclear whether enough articles with high LOE are published to propose scientifically sound clinical treatment suggestions according to EBM standards.

  14. Ebola Virus Shedding and Transmission: Review of Current Evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vetter, Pauline; Fischer, William A; Schibler, Manuel; Jacobs, Michael; Bausch, Daniel G; Kaiser, Laurent

    2016-10-15

     The magnitude of the 2013-2016 Ebola virus disease outbreak in West Africa was unprecedented, with >28 500 reported cases and >11 000 deaths. Understanding the key elements of Ebola virus transmission is necessary to implement adequate infection prevention and control measures to protect healthcare workers and halt transmission in the community.  We performed an extensive PubMed literature review encompassing the period from discovery of Ebola virus, in 1976, until 1 June 2016 to evaluate the evidence on modes of Ebola virus shedding and transmission.  Ebola virus has been isolated by cell culture from blood, saliva, urine, aqueous humor, semen, and breast milk from infected or convalescent patients. Ebola virus RNA has been noted in the following body fluids days or months after onset of illness: saliva (22 days), conjunctiva/tears (28 days), stool (29 days), vaginal fluid (33 days), sweat (44 days), urine (64 days), amniotic fluid (38 days), aqueous humor (101 days), cerebrospinal fluid (9 months), breast milk (16 months [preliminary data]), and semen (18 months). Nevertheless, the only documented cases of secondary transmission from recovered patients have been through sexual transmission. We did not find strong evidence supporting respiratory or fomite-associated transmission. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press for the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, e-mail journals.permissions@oup.com.

  15. Screening for prostate cancer: the current evidence and guidelines controversy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomella, Leonard G; Liu, Xiaolong S; Trabulsi, Edouard J; Kelly, Wm Kevin; Myers, Ronald; Showalter, Timothy; Dicker, Adam; Wender, Richard

    2011-10-01

    Prostate cancer presents a global public health dilemma. While screening with prostate specific antigen (PSA) has led to more men diagnosed with prostate cancer than in previous years, the potential for negative effects from over-diagnosis and treatment cannot be ignored. We reviewed Medline for recent articles that discuss clinical trials, evidence based recommendations and guidelines from major medical organizations in the United States and worldwide concerning prostate cancer screening. Results from the European Randomized Screening for Prostate Cancer (ERSPC), the Prostate, Lung, Colorectal, and Ovarian (PLCO) Cancer Screening Trial, and Göteborg Swedish trials regarding prostate screening are controversial with the ERSPC and Göteborg showing a reduction in prostate cancer mortality and the PLCO trial showing no benefit. Recommendations from the American Urological Association (AUA), Japanese Urological Association (JUA), and National Comprehensive Cancer Network (NCCN) have recommended that all men obtain a baseline PSA beginning at age 40. The American Cancer Society (ACS) stratifies screening recommendations based on age and risk, but states that screening should take place only after an informed discussion between provider and patient. The United States Preventative Health Service Task Force (USPSTF) states that evidence is insufficient to assess the risks and benefits of prostate cancer screening in men younger than 75 years. Other major international health organizations offer a similar reserved approach or recommend against screening for prostate cancer. Most groups indicate that screening to determine who should undergo prostate biopsy typically includes both a serum PSA and digital rectal examination, with the latest ACS publications noting that the rectal exam is optional. A common theme from all groups is that an informed discussion with the patients is strongly recommended and that screening does increase the number of men diagnosed with non

  16. Climate change and respiratory health: current evidence and knowledge gaps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takaro, Tim K; Knowlton, Kim; Balmes, John R

    2013-08-01

    Climate change is a key driver of the accelerating environmental change affecting populations around the world. Many of these changes and our response to them can affect respiratory health. This is an expert opinion review of recent peer-reviewed literature, focused on more recent medical journals and climate-health relevant modeling results from non-biomedical journals pertaining to climate interactions with air pollution. Global health impacts in low resource countries and migration precipitated by environmental change are addressed. The major findings are of respiratory health effects related to heat, air pollution, shifts in infectious diseases and allergens, flooding, water, food security and migration. The review concludes with knowledge gaps and research need that will support the evidence-base required to address the challenges ahead.

  17. Current Scientific Evidence for a Polarized Cardiovascular Endurance Training Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hydren, Jay R; Cohen, Bruce S

    2015-12-01

    Recent publications have provided new scientific evidence for a modern aerobic or cardiovascular endurance exercise prescription that optimizes the periodization cycle and maximizes potential endurance performance gains in highly trained individuals. The traditional threshold, high volume, and high-intensity training models have displayed limited improvement in actual race pace in (highly) trained individuals while frequently resulting in overreaching or overtraining (physical injury and psychological burnout). A review of evidence for replacing these models with the proven polarized training model seems warranted. This review provides a short history of the training models, summarizes 5 key studies, and provides example training programs for both the pre- and in-season periods. A polarized training program is characterized by an undulating nonlinear periodization model with nearly all the training time spent at a "light" (≤13) and "very hard" (≥17) pace with very limited time at "hard" (14-16) or race pace (6-20 Rating of Perceived Exertion [RPE] scale). To accomplish this, the polarization training model has specific high-intensity workouts separated by one or more long slow distance workouts, with the exercise intensity remaining below ventilatory threshold (VT) 1 and/or blood lactate of less than 2 mM (A.K.A. below race pace). Effect sizes for increasing aerobic endurance performance for the polarized training model are consistently superior to that of the threshold training model. Performing a polarized training program may be best accomplished by: going easy on long slow distance workouts, avoiding "race pace" and getting after it during interval workouts.

  18. Spontaneous fungal peritonitis: Epidemiology, current evidence and future prospective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiore, Marco; Leone, Sebastiano

    2016-09-14

    Spontaneous bacterial peritonitis is a complication of ascitic patients with end-stage liver disease (ESLD); spontaneous fungal peritonitis (SFP) is a complication of ESLD less known and described. ESLD is associated to immunodepression and the resulting increased susceptibility to infections. Recent perspectives of the management of the critically ill patient with ESLD do not specify the rate of isolation of fungi in critically ill patients, not even the antifungals used for the prophylaxis, neither optimal treatment. We reviewed, in order to focus the epidemiology, characteristics, and, considering the high mortality rate of SFP, the use of optimal empirical antifungal therapy the current literature.

  19. Space Vector Modulation for DC-Link Current Ripple Reduction in Back-To-Back Current Source Converters for Microgrid Applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guo, Xiaoqiang; Xu, David; Guerrero, Josep M.

    2015-01-01

    instability. Conventionally, with a given switching frequency and rated voltage, the current ripple can be reduced by increasing the dc-link inductor, but it leads to bulky size, high cost and slow dynamic response. In order to solve this problem, this paper reveals that the current ripple can......Back-to-back converters have been typically used to interconnect the microgrids. For a back-to-back current source converter, the dc-link current ripple is one of the important parameters. A large ripple will cause the electromagnetic interference, undesirable high-frequency losses, and system...

  20. Evidence of current impact of climate change on life: a walk from genes to the biosphere.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peñuelas, Josep; Sardans, Jordi; Estiarte, Marc; Ogaya, Romà; Carnicer, Jofre; Coll, Marta; Barbeta, Adria; Rivas-Ubach, Albert; Llusià, Joan; Garbulsky, Martin; Filella, Iolanda; Jump, Alistair S

    2013-08-01

    We review the evidence of how organisms and populations are currently responding to climate change through phenotypic plasticity, genotypic evolution, changes in distribution and, in some cases, local extinction. Organisms alter their gene expression and metabolism to increase the concentrations of several antistress compounds and to change their physiology, phenology, growth and reproduction in response to climate change. Rapid adaptation and microevolution occur at the population level. Together with these phenotypic and genotypic adaptations, the movement of organisms and the turnover of populations can lead to migration toward habitats with better conditions unless hindered by barriers. Both migration and local extinction of populations have occurred. However, many unknowns for all these processes remain. The roles of phenotypic plasticity and genotypic evolution and their possible trade-offs and links with population structure warrant further research. The application of omic techniques to ecological studies will greatly favor this research. It remains poorly understood how climate change will result in asymmetrical responses of species and how it will interact with other increasing global impacts, such as N eutrophication, changes in environmental N : P ratios and species invasion, among many others. The biogeochemical and biophysical feedbacks on climate of all these changes in vegetation are also poorly understood. We here review the evidence of responses to climate change and discuss the perspectives for increasing our knowledge of the interactions between climate change and life.

  1. Youth Excel: towards a pan-Canadian platform linking evidence and action for prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riley, Barbara L; Manske, Steve; Cameron, Roy

    2011-05-15

    Population-level intervention is required to prevent cancer and other chronic diseases. It also promotes health for those living with established risk factors and illness. In this article, the authors describe a vision and approach for continuously improving population-level programs and policies within and beyond the health sector. The vision and approach are anchored in contemporary thinking about what is required to link evidence and action in the field of population and public health. The authors believe that, as a cancer prevention and control community, organizations and practitioners must be able to use the best available evidence to inform action and continually generate evidence that improves prevention policies and programs on an ongoing basis. These imperatives require leaders in policy, practice, and research fields to work together to jointly plan, conduct, and act on relevant evidence. The Propel Center and colleagues are implementing this approach in Youth Excel-a pan-Canadian initiative that brings together national and provincial organizations from health and education sectors and capitalizes on a history of collaboration. The objective of Youth Excel is to build sustainable capacity for knowledge development and exchange that can guide and redirect prevention efforts in a rapidly evolving social environment. This goal is to contribute to creating health-promoting environments and to accelerate progress in preventing cancer and other diseases among youth and young adults and in the wider population. Although prevention is the aim, health-promoting environments also can support health gains for individuals of all ages and with established illness. In addition, the approach Youth Excel is taking to link evidence and action may be applicable to early intervention and treatment components of cancer control.

  2. Target Therapies for Uterine Carcinosarcomas: Current Evidence and Future Perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salvatore Giovanni Vitale

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Carcinosarcomas (CS in gynecology are very infrequent and represent only 2–5% of uterine cancers. Despite surgical cytoreduction and subsequent chemotherapy being the primary treatment for uterine CS, the overall five-year survival rate is 30 ± 9% and recurrence is extremely common (50–80%. Due to the poor prognosis of CS, new strategies have been developed in the last few decades, targeting known dysfunctional molecular pathways for immunotherapy. In this paper, we aimed to gather the available evidence on the latest therapies for the treatment of CS. We performed a systematic review using the terms “uterine carcinosarcoma”, “uterine Malignant Mixed Müllerian Tumors”, “target therapies”, “angiogenesis therapy”, “cancer stem cell therapy”, “prognostic biomarker”, and “novel antibody-drug”. Based on our results, the differential expression and accessibility of epithelial cell adhesion molecule-1 on metastatic/chemotherapy-resistant CS cells in comparison to normal tissues and Human Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor 2 (HER2 open up new possibilities in the field of target therapy. Nevertheless, future investigations are needed to clarify the impact of these new therapies on survival rate and medium-/long-term outcomes.

  3. Anesthesia and cancer recurrences: The current knowledge and evidence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sukhminder Jit Singh Bajwa

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Surgical removal of solid tumors is of utmost importance as total resection can be curative. The surgical insult however itself may result in tumor micrometastasis coupled with depression of cell-mediated immunity culminating in tumor recurrence. Recent research suggests that few anesthetic agents or procedures can influence pathophysiology of metastasis in the postoperative period. Whereas opioids and volatile anesthetics have been implicated in angiogenesis and immunosuppression, evidences accumulated over the recent years have undoubtedly highlighted the attenuation of immunosuppression by regional anesthetic agents thereby making it superior over general anesthesia in preventing cancer recurrence. As anesthetic drugs are given at that time when patient is at the maximum risk of spread of metastasis, thus an understanding of the effect of anesthesia drugs and their impact on tumor metastasis is important so that appropriate anesthetic strategy can be made to improve long term survival in these patients. The purpose of the present review is therefore to emphasize the pivotal role of various anesthetic agents and anesthesia techniques in preventing tumor recurrence after surgery.

  4. Botulinum toxins: Pharmacology and its current therapeutic evidence for use

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muthane U

    2003-10-01

    Full Text Available Botulinum toxins are, as a group, among the most potent neuromuscular toxins known, yet they are clinically useful in the management of conditions associated with muscular and glandular over-activity. Botulinum toxins act by preventing release of acetylcholine into the neuromuscular junction. While botulinum toxin type A is commonly available, different manufacturers produce specific products, which are not directly interchangeable and should not be considered as generically equivalent formulations. Type B is also available in the market. Each formulation of botulinum toxin is unique with distinct dosing, efficacy and safety profiles for each use to which it is applied. Botulinum toxin type A is the treatment of choice based on its depth of evidence in dystonias and most other conditions. Botulinum toxin type A is established as useful in the management of spasticity, tremors, headache prophylaxis and several other neurological conditions. Active research is underway to determine the parameters for which the type B toxin can be used in these conditions, as covered in this review. Botulinum toxin use has spread to several fields of medicine.

  5. Immunotherapy in prostate cancer: review of the current evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-García, E M; Vera-Badillo, F E; Perez-Valderrama, B; Matos-Pita, A S; Duran, I

    2015-05-01

    Prostate cancer is the most common male malignancy in the Western world. Once it metastasizes, it is incurable. The current gold standard for metastatic disease is the combined docetaxel/prednisone regimen. Prostate cancer shows several characteristics that make it a suitable candidate for immunotherapy, as recently exemplified by the approval of sipuleucel-T, the first vaccine to treat any malignancy. Here, we review different tumor-associated antigen immunotherapy strategies currently being investigated, from a humanized radiolabeled monoclonal antibody (J-591) that targets radiation into tumor cells, moving on to vaccines and through to immunomodulator agents such as anti-CPLA-4 and anti-PD-1 monoclonal antibodies that activate T-cell responses via immune checkpoint inhibition. We explore different opinions on the best approach to integrate immunotherapy into existing standard therapies, such as androgen-deprivation therapy, radiotherapy or chemotherapy, and review different combination sequences, patient types and time points during the course of the disease to achieve a lasting immune response. We present data from recent phase III clinical trials that call for a change in trial endpoint design with immunotherapy agents, from the traditional tumor progression to overall survival and how such trials should include immune response measurements as secondary or intermediate endpoints to help identify patient clinical benefit in the earlier phases of treatment. Finally, we join in the recent questioning on the validity of RECIST criteria to measure response to immunotherapeutic agents, as initial increases in the size of tumors/lymph nodes, which are part of a normal immune response, could be categorized as disease progression under RECIST.

  6. There is no evidence for a temporal link between pathogen arrival and frog extinctions in north-eastern Australia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ben L Phillips

    Full Text Available Pathogen spread can cause population declines and even species extinctions. Nonetheless, in the absence of tailored monitoring schemes, documenting pathogen spread can be difficult. In the case of worldwide amphibian declines the best present understanding is that the chytrid fungus Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis (Bd has recently spread, causing amphibian declines and extinction in the process. However, good evidence demonstrating pathogen arrival followed by amphibian decline is rare, and analysis of putative evidence is often inadequate. Here we attempt to examine the relationship between Bd arrival and amphibian decline across north-eastern Australia, using sites where a wave-like pattern of amphibian decline was first noticed and at which intensive research has since been conducted. We develop an analytical framework that allows rigorous estimation of pathogen arrival date, which can then be used to test for a correlation between the time of pathogen arrival and amphibian decline across sites. Our results show that, with the current dataset, the earliest possible arrival date of Bd in north-eastern Australia is completely unresolved; Bd could have arrived immediately before sampling commenced or may have arrived thousands of years earlier, the present data simply cannot say. The currently available data are thus insufficient to assess the link between timing of pathogen arrival and population decline in this part of the world. This data insufficiency is surprising given that there have been decades of research on chytridiomycosis in Australia and that there is a general belief that the link between Bd arrival and population decline is well resolved in this region. The lack of data on Bd arrival currently acts as a major impediment to determining the role of environmental factors in driving the global amphibian declines, and should be a major focus of future research.

  7. Fatty acid and vitamin interventions in adults with schizophrenia: a systematic review of the current evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chia, Siok Ching; Henry, Jeyakumar; Mok, Yee Ming; Honer, William G; Sim, Kang

    2015-12-01

    Current psychopharmacological approaches to reduce psychotic phenomenology in schizophrenia are associated with adverse effects including extrapyramidal and metabolic side effects. In view of the emerging data on nutritional supplementation interventions in schizophrenia which are not entirely consistent, we aimed to review existent studies focusing on fatty acid and vitamin interventions and summarise current evidence on such nutritional supplementations in schizophrenia. We searched the digital databases (ScienceDirect, Scopus, SpringerLINK, PubMed/Medline) for relevant studies pertaining to fatty acid and vitamin supplementation interventions in the management of psychotic symptoms in schizophrenia up to February 2015. Overall, there were more studies conducted on fatty acid over vitamin supplementations in patients with schizophrenia. There were more positive findings in support of fatty acid supplementation compared with vitamin supplementation in the context of specific intervention features (dose of nutrient supplementation, single versus combination nutritional interventions, specific antipsychotic), subject features (older age, long duration of illness, baseline polyunsaturated fatty acid levels) and clinical outcomes (improvements of psychotic symptoms and/or extrapyramidal side effects from antipsychotics). However, investigations of both supplementation modalities were limited by relatively small study sample sizes, short study duration, which precluded further segmentation of impact on more diverse patient subtypes and symptom profiles. Future studies may consider examining larger samples over a longer time period, recruiting younger subjects with shorter duration of illness, examination of different clinical features including specific cognitive domains, and use of single versus combination nutritional interventions.

  8. Program experience with micronutrient powders and current evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rah, Jee Hyun; dePee, Saskia; Kraemer, Klaus; Steiger, Georg; Bloem, Martin W; Spiegel, Paul; Wilkinson, Caroline; Bilukha, Oleg

    2012-01-01

    The efficacy of micronutrient powders (MNP) in the treatment of anemia in moderately anemic children aged 6-24 mo has been clearly demonstrated. The evidence of the effectiveness of MNP in large-scale programs, however, is scarce. This article describes the program experience and findings of large-scale MNP distribution in refugee camps and in an emergency context in Bangladesh, Nepal, and Kenya. The MNP contained 15-16 micronutrients as per the WHO/World Food Programme/UNICEF joint statement, whereas the iron content was reduced to 2.5 mg from NaFeEDTA in a malaria-endemic area in Kenya. Hundreds of thousands of children aged 6-59 mo and pregnant and lactating women were targeted to consume MNP either daily or every other day over an extended period of time. Extensive social marketing campaigns were undertaken to promote regular use of the product. A number of studies were embedded in the programs to assess the impact of MNP on the nutritional status of target beneficiaries. Some improvements in anemia prevalence estimates were observed in particular subgroups, but other results did not show significant improvements. A significant decrease in the prevalence of stunting was observed in Nepal and Kenya but not in Bangladesh. Diarrhea episodes decreased significantly among children receiving MNP in Nepal. A key challenge is to ensure high MNP acceptance and adherence among beneficiaries. Investigation of non-nutritional causes of anemia is warranted in settings with high compliance but no improvement in hemoglobin status. Further investigation into the most appropriate manner to use MNP in malaria endemic settings is warranted.

  9. Bariatric emergencies: current evidence and strategies of management

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background The demand for bariatric surgery is increasing and the postoperative complications are seen more frequently. The aim of this paper is to review the current outcomes of bariatric surgery emergencies and to formulate a pathway of safe management. Methods The PubMed and Google search for English literatures relevant to emergencies of bariatric surgery was made, 6358 articles were found and 90 papers were selected based on relevance, power of the study, recent papers and laparoscopic workload. The pooled data was collected from these articles that were addressing the complications and emergency treatment of bariatric patients. 830,998 patients were included in this review. Results Bariatric emergencies were increasingly seen in the Accident and Emergency departments, the serious outcomes were reported following complex operations like gastric bypass but also after gastric band and the causes were technical errors, suboptimal evaluation, failure of effective communication with bariatric teams who performed the initial operation, patients factors, and delay in the presentation. The mortality ranged from 0.14%-2.2% and increased for revisional surgery to 6.5% (p = 0.002). Inspite of this, mortality following bariatric surgery is still less than that of control group of obese patients (p = value 0.01). Conclusions Most mortality and catastrophic outcomes following bariatric surgery are preventable. The awareness of bariatric emergencies and its effective management are the gold standards for best outcomes. An algorithm is suggested and needs further evaluation. PMID:24373182

  10. Seabird diversity hotspot linked to ocean productivity in the Canary Current Large Marine Ecosystem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Attrill, Martin J.; Becker, Peter H.; Egevang, Carsten; Furness, Robert W.; Grémillet, David; Kopp, Matthias; Lescroël, Amélie; Matthiopoulos, Jason; Peter, Hans-Ulrich; Phillips, Richard A.

    2016-01-01

    Upwelling regions are highly productive habitats targeted by wide-ranging marine predators and industrial fisheries. In this study, we track the migratory movements of eight seabird species from across the Atlantic; quantify overlap with the Canary Current Large Marine Ecosystem (CCLME) and determine the habitat characteristics that drive this association. Our results indicate the CCLME is a biodiversity hotspot for migratory seabirds; all tracked species and more than 70% of individuals used this upwelling region. Relative species richness peaked in areas where sea surface temperature averaged between 15 and 20°C, and correlated positively with chlorophyll a, revealing the optimum conditions driving bottom-up trophic effects for seabirds. Marine vertebrates are not confined by international boundaries, making conservation challenging. However, by linking diversity to ocean productivity, our research reveals the significance of the CCLME for seabird populations from across the Atlantic, making it a priority for conservation action. PMID:27531154

  11. Evidence for DNA Damage as a Biological Link Between Diabetes and Cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shao Chin Lee; Juliana CN Chan

    2015-01-01

    Objective:This review examines the evidence that:Diabetes is a state of DNA damage;pathophysiological factors in diabetes can cause DNA damage;DNA damage can cause mutations;and DNA mutation is linked to carcinogenesis.Data Sources:We retrieved information from the PubMed database up to January,2014,using various search terms and their combinations including DNA damage,diabetes,cancer,high glucose,hyperglycemia,free fatty acids,palmitic acid,advanced glycation end products,mutation and carcinogenesis.Study Selection:We included data from peer-reviewed journals and a textbook printed in English on relationships between DNA damage and diabetes as well as pathophysiological factors in diabetes.Publications on relationships among DNA damage,mutagenesis,and carcinogenesis,were also reviewed.We organized this information into a conceptual framework to explain the possible causal relationship between DNA damage and carcinogenesis in diabetes.Results:There are a large amount of data supporting the view that DNA mutation is a typical feature in carcinogenesis.Patients with type 2 diabetes have increased production of reactive oxygen species,reduced levels of antioxidant capacity,and increased levels of DNA damage.The pathophysiological factors and metabolic milieu in diabetes can cause DNA damage such as DNA strand break and base modification (i.e.,oxidation).Emerging experimental data suggest that signal pathways (i.e.,Akt/tuberin) link diabetes to DNA damage.This collective evidence indicates that diabetes is a pathophysiological state of oxidative stress and DNA damage which can lead to various types of mutation to cause aberration in cells and thereby increased cancer risk.Conclusions:This review highlights the interrelationships amongst diabetes,DNA damage,DNA mutation and carcinogenesis,which suggests that DNA damage can be a biological link between diabetes and cancer.

  12. Strongly linked current flow in polycrystalline forms of the superconductor MgB2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larbalestier, D C; Cooley, L D; Rikel, M O; Polyanskii, A A; Jiang, J; Patnaik, S; Cai, X Y; Feldmann, D M; Gurevich, A; Squitieri, A A; Naus, M T; Eom, C B; Hellstrom, E E; Cava, R J; Regan, K A; Rogado, N; Hayward, M A; He, T; Slusky, J S; Khalifah, P; Inumaru, K; Haas, M

    2001-03-01

    The discovery of superconductivity at 39 K in magnesium diboride, MgB2, raises many issues, a critical one being whether this material resembles a high-temperature copper oxide superconductor or a low-temperature metallic superconductor in terms of its behaviour in strong magnetic fields. Although the copper oxides exhibit very high transition temperatures, their in-field performance is compromized by their large anisotropy, the result of which is to restrict high bulk current densities to a region much less than the full magnetic-field-temperature (H-T) space over which superconductivity is found. Moreover, the weak coupling across grain boundaries makes transport current densities in untextured polycrystalline samples low and strongly sensitive to magnetic field. Here we report that, despite the multiphase, untextured, microscale, subdivided nature of our MgB2 samples, supercurrents flow throughout the material without exhibiting strong sensitivity to weak magnetic fields. Our combined magnetization, magneto-optical, microscopy and X-ray investigations show that the supercurrent density is mostly determined by flux pinning, rather than by the grain boundary connectivity. Our results therefore suggest that this new superconductor class is not compromized by weak-link problems, a conclusion of significance for practical applications if higher temperature analogues of this compound can be discovered.

  13. Clinical evidence for Japanese population based on prospective studies--linking clinical trials and clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogawa, Hisao; Kojima, Sunao

    2009-10-01

    "Evidence-based medicine (EBM)" implies effective and high quality practice for patients based on well-grounded medical science. The success of clinical trials in Japan is essential to build original evidence specific for Japanese patients. Based on this concept, we have performed several large-scale clinical trials to provide EBM, including the Japanese Antiplatelets Myocardial Infarction Study [JAMIS; clinical improvement in acute myocardial infarction (AMI) patients with antiplatelet therapy], the Japanese beta-Blockers and Calcium Antagonists Myocardial Infarction (JBCMI; comparison of the effects of beta-blockers and calcium antagonists on cardiovascular events in post-AMI patients), a multicenter study for aggressive lipid-lowering strategy by HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors in patients with AMI (MUSASHI; effects of statin therapy on cardiovascular events in patients with AMI), and the Japanese Primary Prevention of Atherosclerosis with Aspirin for Diabetes (JPAD trial; efficacy of low-dose aspirin therapy for primary prevention of atherosclerotic events in type 2 diabetic patients). The results of these prospective studies were directly linked with clinical practice. We have acquired the know-how of large-scale clinical trials; an important point is to have passion for "buildup evidence specific for the Japanese" and to recruit subjects for enrollment after explaining the significance of "clinical trials for the Japanese".

  14. Current Evidence for Developmental, Structural, and Functional Brain Defects following Prenatal Radiation Exposure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tine Verreet

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Ionizing radiation is omnipresent. We are continuously exposed to natural (e.g., radon and cosmic and man-made radiation sources, including those from industry but especially from the medical sector. The increasing use of medical radiation modalities, in particular those employing low-dose radiation such as CT scans, raises concerns regarding the effects of cumulative exposure doses and the inappropriate utilization of these imaging techniques. One of the major goals in the radioprotection field is to better understand the potential health risk posed to the unborn child after radiation exposure to the pregnant mother, of which the first convincing evidence came from epidemiological studies on in utero exposed atomic bomb survivors. In the following years, animal models have proven to be an essential tool to further characterize brain developmental defects and consequent functional deficits. However, the identification of a possible dose threshold is far from complete and a sound link between early defects and persistent anomalies has not yet been established. This review provides an overview of the current knowledge on brain developmental and persistent defects resulting from in utero radiation exposure and addresses the many questions that still remain to be answered.

  15. Current Evidence for Developmental, Structural, and Functional Brain Defects following Prenatal Radiation Exposure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verreet, Tine; Quintens, Roel; Baatout, Sarah; Benotmane, Mohammed A.

    2016-01-01

    Ionizing radiation is omnipresent. We are continuously exposed to natural (e.g., radon and cosmic) and man-made radiation sources, including those from industry but especially from the medical sector. The increasing use of medical radiation modalities, in particular those employing low-dose radiation such as CT scans, raises concerns regarding the effects of cumulative exposure doses and the inappropriate utilization of these imaging techniques. One of the major goals in the radioprotection field is to better understand the potential health risk posed to the unborn child after radiation exposure to the pregnant mother, of which the first convincing evidence came from epidemiological studies on in utero exposed atomic bomb survivors. In the following years, animal models have proven to be an essential tool to further characterize brain developmental defects and consequent functional deficits. However, the identification of a possible dose threshold is far from complete and a sound link between early defects and persistent anomalies has not yet been established. This review provides an overview of the current knowledge on brain developmental and persistent defects resulting from in utero radiation exposure and addresses the many questions that still remain to be answered. PMID:27382490

  16. Percutaneous patent foramen ovale occlusion: current evidence and evolving clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leong, Ming Chern; Uebing, Anselm; Gatzoulis, Michael A

    2013-11-15

    Patent foramen ovale (PFO) has long been implicated with cryptogenic stroke, migraine and decompression illness. PFO is common and its implicated pathologies cause devastating neurological sequelae; and hence have drawn the attention of medical practitioners across disciplines. The pathogenesis is hypothesized to be caused by micro-emboli or neuro-hormones which would otherwise being filtered by the lungs, astraying into the systemic circulation via the atrial communication especially during Valsalva maneuver. Treatment options have been proposed; among others are medical therapy, PFO closure or both. While medical therapy as secondary prevention is being adopted by most centers in the world, PFO closure is performed in selected patients only. The reason being is that most studies linking PFO to these pathologies are observational in nature. And these associations do not equate to a firm cause and effect relationship. For causal relationship to be established, good quality prospective data is required. Recently, there has been emergence of new prospective trials which improve the understanding of PFO closure in these pathologies. This article reviews the associations between PFO and the three main implicated pathologies as well as the evidence for PFO closure in the current era.

  17. Current concepts on posterior meniscal root lesion: A treatment algorithm based on the currently available evidence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guan-Yang Song

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Meniscal root lesion is defined as an avulsion of the tibial insertion of the meniscus or a radial tear close to the meniscal insertion, which is commonly observed at the posterior region in the clinical practice. Although a number of biomechanical and clinical studies have shown the importance of the integrity of the posterior meniscal roots, the appropriate treatment is still controversial. The purposes of this review are to develop a current understanding of how the posterior meniscal root functions and to review the available treatment options for posterior meniscal root lesion.

  18. Music therapy with disorders of consciousness: current evidence and emergent evidence-based practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magee, Wendy L; O'Kelly, Julian

    2015-03-01

    Patients with prolonged disorders of consciousness (PDOC) stemming from acquired brain injury present one of the most challenging clinical populations in neurological rehabilitation. Because of the complex clinical presentation of PDOC patients, treatment teams are confronted with many medicolegal, ethical, philosophical, moral, and religious issues in day-to-day care. Accurate diagnosis is of central concern, relying on creative approaches from skilled clinical professionals using combined behavioral and neurophysiological measures. This paper presents the latest evidence for using music as a diagnostic tool with PDOC, including recent developments in music therapy interventions and measurement. We outline standardized clinical protocols and behavioral measures to produce diagnostic outcomes and examine recent research illustrating a range of benefits of music-based methods at behavioral, cardiorespiratory, and cortical levels using video, electrocardiography, and electroencephalography methods. These latest developments are discussed in the context of evidence-based practice in rehabilitation with clinical populations. © 2014 New York Academy of Sciences.

  19. Evidence against an X-linked visual loss susceptibility locus in Leber hereditary optic neuropathy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chalmers, R.M.; Davis, M.B.; Sweeney, M.G.; Wood, N.W.; Harding, A.E. [Inst. of Neurology, London (United Kingdom)

    1996-07-01

    Pedigree analysis of British families with Leber hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) closely fits a model in which a pathogenic mtDNA mutation interacts with an X-linked visual loss susceptibility locus (VLSL). This model predicts that 60% of affected females will show marked skewing of X inactivation. Linkage analysis in British and Italian families with genetically proven LHON has excluded the presence of such a VLSL over 169 cM of the X chromosome both when all families were analyzed together and when only families with the bp 11778 mutation were studied. Further, there was no excess skewing of X inactivation in affected females. There was no evidence for close linkage to three markers in the pseudoautosomal region of the sex chromosomes. The mechanism of incomplete penetrance and male predominance in LHON remains unclear. 27 refs., 1 fig., 3 tabs.

  20. Krebs cycle metabolon: structural evidence of substrate channeling revealed by cross-linking and mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Fei; Minteer, Shelley

    2015-02-02

    It has been hypothesized that the high metabolic flux in the mitochondria is due to the self-assembly of enzyme supercomplexes (called metabolons) that channel substrates from one enzyme to another, but there has been no experimental confirmation of this structure or the channeling. A structural investigation of enzyme organization within the Krebs cycle metabolon was accomplished by in vivo cross-linking and mass spectrometry. Eight Krebs cycle enzyme components were isolated upon chemical fixation, and interfacial residues between mitochondrial malate dehydrogenase, citrate synthase, and aconitase were identified. Using constraint protein docking, a low-resolution structure for the three-enzyme complex was achieved, as well as the two-fold symmetric octamer. Surface analysis showed formation of electrostatic channeling upon protein-protein association, which is the first structural evidence of substrate channeling in the Krebs cycle metabolon.

  1. Rapid loss of antipredatory behaviour in captive-bred birds is linked to current avian invasions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrete, Martina; Tella, José L

    2015-12-15

    Despite the importance of behaviour in conservation biology, there have been few studies that address behaviour in areas such as invasion ecology. There is an urgent need to identify specific traits that facilitate the establishment and spread of alien species to prevent biological invasions and their impact on biodiversity. Changes in antipredatory behaviour in captivity have been proposed to explain the higher invasiveness of wild-caught exotic species. We experimentally tested this hypothesis by assessing the response of wild-caught and captive-bred cage birds facing an approaching predator and their ability to escape from human capture, using species available in the Spanish pet market. Results showed the loss of antipredatory responses and escape abilities in captive-bred birds compared with wild-caught ones. An intraspecific comparison between wild-caught and the first generation of captive-bred birds pointed to a rapid behavioural loss in captivity (individual lifetime) rather than to differences among species (evolutionary exposure). In the context of current avian invasions, the proportion of individuals showing antipredatory responses within a species was positively related to the likelihood of the species being found escaped and breeding in the wild. These results offer a link between behaviour, fitness, and the invasion syndrome in birds.

  2. Current Trends of High capacity Optical Interconnection Data Link in High Performance Optical Communication Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed Nabih Zaki Rashed

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Optical technologies are ubiquitous in telecommunications networks and systems, providing multiple wavelength channels of transport at 2.5 Gbit/sec to 40 Gbit/sec data rates over single fiber optic cables. Market pressures continue to drive the number of wavelength channels per fiber and the data rate per channel. This trend will continue for many years to come as electronic commerce grows and enterprises demand higher and reliable bandwidth over long distances. Electronic commerce, in turn, is driving the growth curves for single processor and multiprocessor performance in data base transaction and Web based servers. Ironically, the insatiable taste for enterprise network bandwidth, which has driven up the volume and pushed down the price of optical components for telecommunications, is simultaneously stressing computer system bandwidth increasing the need for new interconnection schemes and providing for the first time commercial opportunities for optical components in computer systems. The evolution of integrated circuit technology is causing system designs to move towards communication based architectures. We have presented the current tends of high performance system capacity of optical interconnection data transmission link in high performance optical communication and computing systems over wide range of the affecting parameters.

  3. Quick evidence reviews using Epistemonikos: a thorough, friendly and current approach to evidence in health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriel Rada

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Those who make decisions on healthcare should do so informed by the best scientific evidence at one’s disposal. During the last few years, it has become undeniable that identifying and synthesizing all scientific studies that respond a question constitutes an unapproachable challenge for a clinician. The quantity of information has increased excessively, some facts are not available, investigations are of either bad quality or even fraudulent, and the methods for achieving a combination and synthesis of all studies are each time more sophisticated. Moreover, if this inaccurate process is carried out, there exists a high risk of arriving at a biased conclusion.

  4. Educating physicians in evidence based medicine: current practices and curricular strategies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maggio, L.A.

    2015-01-01

    Evidence based medicine (EBM) is “the conscientious, explicit and judicious use of current best evidence in making decisions about the care of individual patients.” The practice of EBM is an expectation of professional healthcare and requisite component in many medical school curricula. Yet, despite

  5. Educating physicians in evidence based medicine: current practices and curricular strategies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maggio, L.A.

    2015-01-01

    Evidence based medicine (EBM) is “the conscientious, explicit and judicious use of current best evidence in making decisions about the care of individual patients.” The practice of EBM is an expectation of professional healthcare and requisite component in many medical school curricula. Yet, despite

  6. Evidence of the Link between Broad Emission Line Regions and Accretion Disks in Active Galactic Nuclei

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yun Xu; Xin-Wu Cao

    2007-01-01

    There is observational evidence that broad-line regions (BLRs) exist in most active galactic nuclei (AGNs), but their origin is still unclear. One scenario is that the BLRs originate from winds accelerated from the hot coronae of the disks, and the winds are suppressed when the black hole is accreting at low rates. This model predicts a relation between (m) ((m) = (M)/(M)Edd) and the FWHM of broad emission lines. We estimate the central black hole masses for a sample of bright AGNs by using their broad Hβ line-widths and optical luminosities. The dimensionless accretion rates (m) = (M)/(M)Edd are derived from the optical continuum luminosities by using two different models: using an empirical relation between the bolometric luminosity Lbol and the optical luminosity ((m) = Lbol/LEdd, a fixed radiative efficiency is adopted); and calculating the optical spectra of accretion disks as a function of (m). We find a significant correlation between the derived (m) and the observed line width of Hβ,FWHM∝ (m)-0.37, which almost overlaps the disk-corona model calculations, if the viscosity α≈ 0.1 - 0.2 is adopted. Our results provide strong evidence for the physical link between the BLRs and accretion disks in AGNs.

  7. Evidence linking oxidative stress, mitochondrial dysfunction and inflammation in the brain of individuals with autism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel eRossignol

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Autism spectrum disorders (ASDs are a heterogeneous group of neurodevelopmental disorders that are defined solely on the basis of behavioral observations. Therefore, ASD has traditionally been framed as a behavioral disorder. However, evidence is accumulating that ASD is characterized by certain physiological abnormalities, including oxidative stress, mitochondrial dysfunction and immune dysregulation/inflammation. While these abnormalities have been reported in studies that have examined peripheral biomarkers such as blood and urine, more recent studies have also reported these abnormalities in brain tissue derived from individuals diagnosed with ASD as compared to brain tissue derived from control individuals. A majority of these brain tissue studies have been published since 2010. The brain regions found to contain these physiological abnormalities in individuals with ASD are involved in speech and auditory processing, social behavior, memory, and sensory and motor coordination. This manuscript examines the evidence linking oxidative stress, mitochondrial dysfunction and immune dysregulation/inflammation in the brain of ASD individuals, suggesting that ASD has a clear biological basis with features of known medical disorders. This understanding may lead to new testing and treatment strategies in individuals with ASD.

  8. Current Evidence for a Role of the Kynurenine Pathway of Tryptophan Metabolism in Multiple Sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lovelace, Michael D; Varney, Bianca; Sundaram, Gayathri; Franco, Nunzio F; Ng, Mei Li; Pai, Saparna; Lim, Chai K; Guillemin, Gilles J; Brew, Bruce J

    2016-01-01

    The kynurenine pathway (KP) is the major metabolic pathway of the essential amino acid tryptophan (TRP). Stimulation by inflammatory molecules, such as interferon-γ (IFN-γ), is the trigger for induction of the KP, driving a complex cascade of production of both neuroprotective and neurotoxic metabolites, and in turn, regulation of the immune response and responses of brain cells to the KP metabolites. Consequently, substantial evidence has accumulated over the past couple of decades that dysregulation of the KP and the production of neurotoxic metabolites are associated with many neuroinflammatory and neurodegenerative diseases, including Parkinson's disease, AIDS-related dementia, motor neurone disease, schizophrenia, Huntington's disease, and brain cancers. In the past decade, evidence of the link between the KP and multiple sclerosis (MS) has rapidly grown and has implicated the KP in MS pathogenesis. KP enzymes, indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO-1) and tryptophan dioxygenase (highest expression in hepatic cells), are the principal enzymes triggering activation of the KP to produce kynurenine from TRP. This is in preference to other routes such as serotonin and melatonin production. In neurological disease, degradation of the blood-brain barrier, even if transient, allows the entry of blood monocytes into the brain parenchyma. Similar to microglia and macrophages, these cells are highly responsive to IFN-γ, which upregulates the expression of enzymes, including IDO-1, producing neurotoxic KP metabolites such as quinolinic acid. These metabolites circulate systemically or are released locally in the brain and can contribute to the excitotoxic death of oligodendrocytes and neurons in neurological disease principally by virtue of their agonist activity at N-methyl-d-aspartic acid receptors. The latest evidence is presented and discussed. The enzymes that control the checkpoints in the KP represent an attractive therapeutic target, and consequently several KP

  9. Current evidence for a role of the Kynurenine pathway of tryptophan metabolism in Multiple Sclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael D. Lovelace

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The kynurenine pathway (KP is the major metabolic pathway of the essential amino acid tryptophan (TRP. Stimulation by inflammatory molecules such as interferon-γ (IFN-γ is the trigger for induction of the KP, driving a complex cascade of production of both neuroprotective and neurotoxic metabolites and in turn, regulation of the immune response and responses of brain cells to the KP metabolites. Consequently, substantial evidence has accumulated over the past couple of decades that dysregulation of the KP and the production of neurotoxic metabolites are associated with many neuroinflammatory and neurodegenerative diseases, including Parkinson’s disease, AIDS-related dementia, motor neurone disease (MND, schizophrenia, Huntington’s disease and brain cancers. In the past decade, evidence of the link between the KP and multiple sclerosis (MS has rapidly grown and has implicated the KP in MS pathogenesis. KP enzymes indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO-1 and tryptophan dioxygenase (TDO; highest expression in hepatic cells are the principal enzymes triggering activation of the KP to produce kynurenine from TRP. This is in preference to other routes such as serotonin and melatonin production. In neurological disease, degradation of the blood-brain-barrier (BBB, even if transient, allows the entry of blood monocytes into the brain parenchyma. Like microglia and macrophages, these cells are highly responsive to IFN-γ, which upregulates the expression of enzymes including IDO-1, producing neurotoxic KP metabolites such as quinolinic acid (QUIN. These metabolites circulate systemically or are released locally in the brain, and can contribute to the excitotoxic death of oligodendrocytes and neurons in neurological disease principally by virtue of their agonist activity at NMDA receptors. The latest evidence is presented and discussed. The enzymes that control the checkpoints in the KP represent an attractive therapeutic target, and consequently several

  10. Therapeutic use of prebiotics, probiotics, and postbiotics to prevent necrotizing enterocolitis: what is the current evidence?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Ravi Mangal; Denning, Patricia Wei

    2013-03-01

    Necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC) is a leading cause of neonatal morbidity and mortality, and preventive therapies that are both effective and safe are urgently needed. Current evidence from therapeutic trials suggests that probiotics are effective in decreasing NEC in preterm infants, and probiotics are currently the most promising therapy for this devastating disease. However, concerns regarding safety and optimal dosing have limited the widespread adoption of routine clinical use of probiotics in preterm infants. This article summarizes the current evidence regarding the use of probiotics, prebiotics, and postbiotics in the preterm infant, including their therapeutic role in preventing NEC.

  11. B-vitamins and bone in health and disease: the current evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarke, M; Ward, M; Strain, J J; Hoey, L; Dickey, W; McNulty, H

    2014-05-01

    Osteoporosis, a metabolic skeletal disease characterised by decreased bone mass and increased fracture risk, is a growing public health problem. Among the various risk factors for osteoporosis, calcium and vitamin D have well-established protective roles, but it is likely that other nutritional factors are also implicated. This review will explore the emerging evidence supporting a role for certain B-vitamins, homocysteine and the 677 C → T polymorphism in the gene encoding the folate-metabolising enzyme methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase, in bone health and disease. The evidence, however, is not entirely consistent and as yet no clear mechanism has been defined to explain the potential link between B-vitamins and bone health. Coeliac disease, a common condition of malabsorption, induced by gluten ingestion in genetically susceptible individuals, is associated with an increased risk both of osteoporosis and inadequate B-vitamin status. Given the growing body of evidence linking low bone mineral density and/or increased fracture risk with low B-vitamin status and elevated homocysteine, optimal B-vitamin status may play an important protective role against osteoporosis in coeliac disease; to date, no trial has addressed this possible link.

  12. Direct evidence of complement activation in HELLP syndrome: A link to atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaught, Arthur J; Gavriilaki, Eleni; Hueppchen, Nancy; Blakemore, Karin; Yuan, Xuan; Seifert, Sara M; York, Sarah; Brodsky, Robert A

    2016-05-01

    HELLP syndrome (hemolysis, elevated liver enzymes, and low platelets) is a severe variant of pre-eclampsia whose pathogenesis remains unclear. Recent evidence and clinical similarities suggest a link to atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome, a disease of excessive activation of the alternative complement pathway effectively treated with a complement inhibitor, eculizumab. Therefore, we used a functional complement assay, the modified Ham test, to analyze sera of women with classic or atypical HELLP syndrome, pre-eclampsia with severe features, normal pregnancies, and healthy nonpregnant women. Sera were also evaluated using levels of the terminal product of complement activation (C5b-9). We tested the in vitro ability of eculizumab to inhibit complement activation in HELLP serum. Increased complement activation was observed in participants with classic or atypical HELLP compared with those with normal pregnancies and nonpregnant controls. Mixing HELLP serum with eculizumab-containing serum resulted in a significant decrease in cell killing compared with HELLP serum alone. We found that HELLP syndrome is associated with increased complement activation as assessed with the modified Ham test. This assay may aid in the diagnosis of HELLP syndrome and could confirm that its pathophysiology is related to that of atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome.

  13. The epidemiologic evidence linking prenatal and postnatal exposure to endocrine disrupting chemicals with male reproductive disorders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bonde, Jens Peter; Flachs, Esben Meulengracht; Rimborg, Susie

    2016-01-01

    that this increased risk was driven by any specific disorder. WIDER IMPLICATIONS: The current epidemiological evidence is compatible with a small increased risk of male reproductive disorders following prenatal and postnatal exposure to some persistent environmental chemicals classified as endocrine disruptors...... consensus statements and narrative reviews in recent years have divided the scientific community and have elicited a call for systematic transparent reviews. We aimed to fill this gap in knowledge in the field of male reproductive disorders. OBJECTIVE AND RATIONALE: The aim of this study...... was to systematically synthesize published data on the risk of cryptorchidism, hypospadias, low sperm counts and testicular cancer following in utero or infant exposure to chemicals that have been included on the European Commission's list of Category 1 endocrine disrupting chemicals defined as having documented...

  14. Evidence for breathing modes in direct current, pulsed, and high power impulse magnetron sputtering plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Yuchen [State Key Lab for Materials Processing and Die & Mold Technology, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430074 (China); Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Zhou, Xue [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Department of Electrical Engineering, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150000 (China); Liu, Jason X. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Department of Physics, University of California, Berkeley, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Anders, André, E-mail: aanders@lbl.gov [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States)

    2016-01-18

    We present evidence for breathing modes in magnetron sputtering plasmas: periodic axial variations of plasma parameters with characteristic frequencies between 10 and 100 kHz. A set of azimuthally distributed probes shows synchronous oscillations of the floating potential. They appear most clearly when considering the intermediate current regime in which the direction of azimuthal spoke motion changes. Breathing oscillations were found to be superimposed on azimuthal spoke motion. Depending on pressure and current, one can also find a regime of chaotic fluctuations and one of stable discharges, the latter at high current. A pressure-current phase diagram for the different situations is proposed.

  15. Vortex Properties of Nanosized Superconducting Strips with One Central Weak Link Under an Applied Current Drive

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Lin; Cai, Chuanbing

    2016-06-01

    The static and dynamic properties of vortices in a nanosized superconducting strip with one central weak link (weakly superconducting region or normal metal) are investigated in the presence of external magnetic and electric fields. The time-dependent Ginzburg-Landau equations are used to describe the electronic transport and have been solved numerically by a finite element analysis. Anisotropy is included through the spatially dependent anisotropy coefficient ζ in different layers of the sample. Our results show that the energy barrier for vortices to enter a weak link is smaller than that for vortices to enter the superconducting layers. The magnetization shows periodic oscillations. With the introduction of the weak link, the period of oscillations decreases.

  16. Newborn screening for X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy: evidence summary and advisory committee recommendation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kemper, Alex R; Brosco, Jeffrey; Comeau, Anne Marie; Green, Nancy S; Grosse, Scott D; Jones, Elizabeth; Kwon, Jennifer M; Lam, Wendy K K; Ojodu, Jelili; Prosser, Lisa A; Tanksley, Susan

    2017-01-01

    The secretary of the US Department of Health and Human Services in February 2016 recommended that X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy (X-ALD) be added to the recommended uniform screening panel for state newborn screening programs. This decision was informed by data presented on the accuracy of screening from New York, the only state that currently offers X-ALD newborn screening, and published and unpublished data showing health benefits of earlier treatment (hematopoietic stem cell transplantation and adrenal hormone replacement therapy) for the childhood cerebral form of X-ALD. X-ALD newborn screening also identifies individuals with later-onset disease, but poor genotype-phenotype correlation makes predicting health outcomes difficult and might increase the risk of unnecessary treatment. Few data are available regarding the harms of screening and presymptomatic identification. Significant challenges exist for implementing comprehensive X-ALD newborn screening, including incorporation of the test, coordinating follow-up diagnostic and treatment care, and coordination of extended family testing after case identification.Genet Med 19 1, 121-126.

  17. Therapeutic Use of Prebiotics, Probiotics, and Postbiotics to Prevent Necrotizing Enterocolitis: What is the Current Evidence?

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    Necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC) is a leading cause of neonatal morbidity and mortality and preventative therapies that are both effective and safe are urgently needed. Current evidence from therapeutic trials suggests that probiotics are effective in decreasing NEC in preterm infants and probiotics are currently the most promising therapy on the horizon for this devastating disease. However, concerns regarding safety and optimal dosing have limited the widespread adoption of routine clinical ...

  18. Critical currents in ballistic two-dimensional InAs-based superconducting weak links

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heida, J.P.; Wees, B.J. van; Klapwijk, T.M.; Borghs, G.

    1999-01-01

    The critical supercurrent Ic carried by a short (0.3 to 0.8 µm) ballistic two-dimensional InAs-based electron gas between superconducting niobium electrodes is studied. In relating the maximum value to the resistance of the weak link in the normal state Rn a much lower value is found than

  19. Is rumination after bereavement linked with loss avoidance? Evidence from eye-tracking.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maarten C Eisma

    Full Text Available Rumination is a risk factor in adjustment to bereavement. It is associated with and predicts psychopathology after loss. Yet, the function of rumination in bereavement remains unclear. In the past, researchers often assumed rumination to be a maladaptive confrontation process. However, based on cognitive avoidance theories of worry in generalised anxiety disorder (GAD and rumination after post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD, others have suggested that rumination may serve to avoid painful aspects of the loss, thereby contributing to complicated grief. To examine if rumination is linked with loss avoidance, an eye-tracking study was conducted with 54 bereaved individuals (27 high and 27 low ruminators. On 24 trials, participants looked for 10 seconds at a picture of the deceased and a picture of a stranger, randomly combined with negative, neutral or loss-related words. High ruminators were expected to show initial vigilance followed by subsequent disengagement for loss stimuli (i.e., picture deceased with a loss word in the first 1500 ms. Additionally, we expected high ruminators to avoid these loss stimuli and to show attentional preference for non-loss-related negative stimuli (i.e., picture stranger with a negative word on longer exposure durations (1500-10000 ms. Contrary to expectations, we found no evidence for an effect of rumination on vigilance and disengagement of loss stimuli in the first 1500 ms. However, in the 1500-10000 ms interval, high ruminators showed shorter gaze times for loss stimuli and longer gaze times for negative (and neutral non-loss-related stimuli, even when controlling for depression and complicated grief symptom levels. Effects of rumination on average fixation times mirrored these findings. This suggests that rumination and loss avoidance are closely associated. A potential clinical implication is that rumination and grief complications after bereavement may be reduced through the use of exposure and acceptance

  20. Current-induced suppression of superconductivity in a three-dimensional lattice of weakly linked indium grains in opal

    CERN Document Server

    Romanov, S G

    2000-01-01

    The current-voltage characteristics of the metal-dielectric composite have been investigated in the range of the resistive state near the superconducting transition temperature T/sub c/. The composite structure can be represented as a face-centered cubic lattice, which involves a large number of weakly linked indium nanograins and is stabilized in structural cavities of opal. The response to microwave radiation is used to characterize the resistive state of the composite. The comparative investigation into the current-voltage characteristics and the response of the composite to microwave radiation makes it possible to conclude that the weak links are superconducting in the region of the critical current (I/sub c/) of the composite as a whole. The transition of weak links to the resistive state occurs at currents immediately preceding the transition of the composite from the resistive state to the ohmic state. The model of the resistivity of the indium-opal composite is proposed on the basis of morphological e...

  1. Evidence of current impact of climate change on life : A walk from genes to the biosphere

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Penuelas, Josep; Sardans, Jordi; Estiarte, Marc; Ogaya, Roma; Carnicer, Jofre; Coll, Marta; Barbeta, Adria; Rivas-Ubach, Albert; Llusia, Joan; Garbulsky, Martin; Filella, Iolanda; Jump, Alistair S.

    We review the evidence of how organisms and populations are currently responding to climate change through phenotypic plasticity, genotypic evolution, changes in distribution and, in some cases, local extinction. Organisms alter their gene expression and metabolism to increase the concentrations of

  2. No evidence for spontaneous orbital currents in numerical studies of three-band models for the CuO planes of high temperature superconductors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greiter, Martin; Thomale, Ronny

    2007-07-13

    We have numerically evaluated the current-current correlations for three-band models of the CuO planes in high-T(c) superconductors at hole doping x = 1/8. The results show no evidence for the orbital current patterns proposed by Varma. If such patterns exist, the associated energy is estimated to be smaller than 5 meV per link even if [formula: see text]. Assuming that the three-band models are adequate, quantum critical fluctuations of such patterns hence cannot be responsible for phenomena occurring at significantly higher energies, such as superconductivity or the anomalous properties of the strange metal phase.

  3. Link Between Capacity for Current Production and Syntrophic Growth in Geobacter species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amelia-Elena eRotaru

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Electrodes are unnatural electron acceptors, and it is yet unknown how some Geobacter species evolved to use electrodes as terminal electron acceptors. Analysis of different Geobacter species revealed that they varied in their capacity for current production. G. metallireducens and G. hydrogenophilus generated high current densities (ca. 0.05 mA/cm2, comparable to G. sulfurreducens. G. bremensis, G. chapellei, G. humireducens, and G. uranireducens, produced much lower currents (ca. 0.05 mA/cm2 and G. bemidjiensis was previously found to not produce current. There was no correspondence between the effectiveness of current generation and Fe(III oxide reduction rates. Some high-current-density strains (G. metallireducens and G. hydrogenophilus reduced Fe(III-oxides as fast as some low-current-density strains (G. bremensis, G. humireducens, and G. uranireducens whereas other low-current-density strains (G. bemidjiensis and G. chapellei reduced Fe(III oxide as slowly as G. sulfurreducens, a high-current-density strain. However, there was a correspondence between the ability to produce higher currents and the ability to grow syntrophically. G. hydrogenophilius was found to grow in co-culture with Methanosarcina barkeri, which is capable of direct interspecies electron transfer (DIET, but not with Methanospirillium hungatei capable only of H2 or formate transfer. Conductive granular activated carbon (GAC stimulated metabolism of the G. hydrogenophilus - M. barkeri co-culture, consistent with electron exchange via DIET. These findings, coupled with the previous finding that G. metallireducens and G. sulfurreducens are also capable of DIET, suggest that evolution to optimize DIET has fortuitiously conferred the capability for high-density current production to some Geobacter species.

  4. Web Link Counts Correlate with ISI Impact Factors: Evidence from Two Disciplines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaughan, Liwen; Thelwall, Mike

    2002-01-01

    Reports on a study that compared counts of links to the Web home pages of academic journals with the citation based Journal Impact Factor (JIF) for two disciplines: library and information science, and law. Highlights include compiling the lists of journals (which are appended); locating Web pages; and correlations between JIF and link counts.…

  5. Therapeutic Use of Prebiotics, Probiotics, and Postbiotics to Prevent Necrotizing Enterocolitis: What is the Current Evidence?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Ravi Mangal; Denning, Patricia Wei

    2013-01-01

    Synopsis Necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC) is a leading cause of neonatal morbidity and mortality and preventative therapies that are both effective and safe are urgently needed. Current evidence from therapeutic trials suggests that probiotics are effective in decreasing NEC in preterm infants and probiotics are currently the most promising therapy on the horizon for this devastating disease. However, concerns regarding safety and optimal dosing have limited the widespread adoption of routine clinical use of probiotics in preterm infants. In addition, prebiotics and postbiotics may be potential alternatives or adjunctive therapies to the administration of live microorganisms, although studies demonstrating their clinical efficacy in preventing NEC are lacking. This review summarizes the current evidence regarding the use of probiotics, prebiotics and postbiotics in the preterm infant, including its therapeutic role in preventing NEC. PMID:23415261

  6. Link between capacity for current production and syntrophic growth in Geobacter species

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rotaru, Amelia-Elena; Woodard, Trevor; Nevin, Kelly;

    2015-01-01

    -culture with Methanosarcina barkeri, which is capable of direct interspecies electron transfer (DIET), but not with Methanospirillium hungatei capable only of H2 or formate transfer. Conductive granular activated carbon (GAC) stimulated metabolism of the G. hydrogenophilus - M. barkeri co-culture, consistent with electron......Electrodes are unnatural electron acceptors, and it is yet unknown how some Geobacter species evolved to use electrodes as terminal electron acceptors. Analysis of different Geobacter species revealed that they varied in their capacity for current production. G. metallireducens and G....... hydrogenophilus generated high current densities (ca. 0.05 mA/cm2), comparable to G. sulfurreducens. G. bremensis, G. chapellei, G. humireducens, and G. uranireducens, produced much lower currents (ca. 0.05 mA/cm2) and G. bemidjiensis was previously found to not produce current. There was no correspondence...

  7. Bridging Multiple Lines Of Evidence To Quantify Plant Phenology And Assess Links To Dryland Ecosystem Function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Browning, D. M.; Tweedie, C. E.; Vivoni, E. R.; Maynard, J. J.; Karl, J.

    2015-12-01

    The clear and pressing need to reliably identify and predict shifts in plant phenology at landscape scales requires a critical link between mechanistic understanding of climate drivers and broad scale forecasts of plant responses to climate change. A multi-scale phenology study co-located with two eddy covariance towers was initiated on the Jornada Basin LTER in New Mexico in 2010 to bridge phenology patterns at the plant level with those representing aggregated signals at the landscape level. The study integrates phenology observations collected in the field along with those collected via remotely using imagery from phenocams, unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs), and satellite sensors along with estimates of carbon flux. We applied the Breaks for Additive Seasonal and Trend (BFAST) time series algorithm to MODIS 250-m NDVI greenness index values to partition the NDVI signal into components representing the long-term trend, seasonal periodicity, and residuals and identified significant shifts in the NDVI signal (i.e., "breaks"). Previous work verified breaks representing significant deviations from the BFAST seasonal and trend models using field-estimated plant biomass collected between 2000 and 2014. We subsequently examine estimates of fractional cover by functional group derived from UAV images acquired 2010 through 2015. At a mixed grassland site, the BFAST algorithm detected four breaks in the trend model denoting significant increases in NDVI in May 2004, July 2006, and March 2010 and a significant decrease in May 2012. The 2004 and 2006 breaks corresponded to herbaceous vegetation responses to rainfall following prolonged periods of drought. The 2012 decrease in NDVI corresponded to the marked reduction of herbaceous biomass following an exceptionally dry period in late 2010-2011. Seasonal breaks representing changes in the timing and magnitude of NDVI identified in July 2006 and September 2008 coincide with rapid increases in production of annual species in

  8. Body image disturbance in children and adolescents with eating disorders. Current evidence and future directions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Legenbauer, Tanja; Thiemann, Pia; Vocks, Silja

    2014-01-01

    Body image is multifaceted and incorporates perceptual, affective, and cognitive components as well as behavioral features. Only few studies have examined the character of body-image disturbance in children/adolescents with eating disorders. It is unknown whether body-image disturbances in children/adolescent with eating disturbances are comparable to those of adult patients with eating disorders. Body-image disturbance might differ quantitatively and qualitatively according to the cognitive developmental status and the age of the individual. This paper provides an overview of the current evidence for body-image disturbance in children/adolescents with eating disorders, and how they compare with those adults with eating disorders. Current evidence indicates that older adolescent patients show similar deficits as adult patients with eating disorders, in particular for the attitudinal body-image component. However, evidence for a perceptual body-image disturbance in adolescent patients, in particular anorexia nervosa, is not conclusive. Reliable statements for childhood can hardly be made because clinical studies are not available. Investigations of body-image disturbance in children have focused on the predictive value for eating disorders. Limitations of the current evidence are discussed, and future directions for research and therapy are indicated.

  9. Common links between metabolic syndrome and inflammatory bowel disease: Current overview and future perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michalak, Arkadiusz; Mosińska, Paula; Fichna, Jakub

    2016-08-01

    Metabolic syndrome (MS) features a constellation of central obesity, dyslipidemia, impaired glucose metabolism and often hypertension joined by insulin resistance and chronic inflammation. All these elements greatly raise patient's risk of cardiovascular disease and type 2 diabetes, resulting in an increased mortality. Metabolic syndrome affects approximately 20-25% of the world's adult population and thus it is essential to study its pathophysiology and seek new pharmacological targets. There is a thoroughly studied link between MS and inflammatory diseases of the gastrointestinal (GI) system, i.e. steatohepatitis. However, recent findings also indicate similarities in pathophysiological features between MS and inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), including adipose tissue dysregulation, inadequate immune response, and inflammation. In this review we aim to outline the pathophysiology of MS and emphasize the aspects revealed recently, such as mineralocorticoid activity, involvement of sex hormones and an accompanying increase in prolactin secretion. More importantly, we focus on the common links between MS and IBD. Finally, we describe new strategies and drug targets that may be utilized in MS therapy, namely adiponectin mimetics, GLP-1-based multi agonists, ABCA1 agonists and possible role of miRNA. We also discuss the possible utility of selected agents as adjuvants in IBD therapy.

  10. Cognitive behavioral therapy in anxiety disorders: current state of the evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otte, Christian

    2011-01-01

    A plethora of studies have examined the efficacy and effectiveness of cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) for adult anxiety disorders. In recent years, several meta-analyses have been conducted to quantitatively review the evidence of CBT for anxiety disorders, each using different inclusion criteria for studies, such as use of control conditions or type of study environment. This review aims to summarize and to discuss the current state of the evidence regarding CBT treatment for panic disorder, generalized anxiety disorder, social anxiety disorder, obsessive-compulsive disorder, and post-traumatic stress disorder. Overall, CBT demonstrates both efficacy in randomized controlled trials and effectiveness in naturalistic settings in the treatment of adult anxiety disorders. However, due to methodological issues, the magnitude of effect is currently difficult to estimate. In conclusion, CBT appears to be both efficacious and effective in the treatment of anxiety disorders, but more high-quality studies are needed to better estimate the magnitude of the effect.

  11. Evidence for large-area superemission into a high-current glow discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartmann, W.; Dominic, V.; Kirkman, G. F.; Gundersen, M. A.

    1988-10-01

    This letter presents evidence for large-area (≊1 cm2) cathode superemission (˜10 000 A/cm2) into a high-current glow discharge in a pseudospark or back lighted thyratron switch. Cathodes studied with a scannning electron microscope following operation at 6-8 kA, ≊1 μs pulse length, and 105 pulses in a low-pressure H2 discharge show evidence of melting of a thin surface layer within a radius of ˜4 mm, indicating that the discharge is a superdense glow with a cross-sectional area of the order of 1 cm2, rather than an arc. Further supporting evidence is provided by streak camera data. An ion beam present during the avalanche phase of the discharge is responsible for heating the cathode surface resulting in a significant field-enhanced thermionic emission.

  12. Asthma and obesity in children: current evidence and potential systems biology approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frey, U; Latzin, P; Usemann, J; Maccora, J; Zumsteg, U; Kriemler, S

    2015-01-01

    Both obesity and asthma are highly prevalent, complex diseases modified by multiple factors. Genetic, developmental, lung mechanical, immunological and behavioural factors have all been suggested as playing a causal role between the two entities; however, their complex mechanistic interactions are still poorly understood and evidence of causality in children remains scant. Equally lacking is evidence of effective treatment strategies, despite the fact that imbalances at vulnerable phases in childhood can impact long-term health. This review is targeted at both clinicians frequently faced with the dilemma of how to investigate and treat the obese asthmatic child and researchers interested in the topic. Highlighting the breadth of the spectrum of factors involved, this review collates evidence regarding the investigation and treatment of asthma in obese children, particularly in comparison with current approaches in 'difficult-to-treat' childhood asthma. Finally, the authors propose hypotheses for future research from a systems-based perspective.

  13. Current knowledge on evidence-based shockwave treatments for shoulder pathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moya, Daniel; Ramón, Silvia; Guiloff, Leonardo; Gerdesmeyer, Ludger

    2015-12-01

    Shoulder pain is one of the most common musculoskeletal pathologies. Treatment by ESWT (extracorporeal shockwave therapy) has emerged as an alternative when conservative treatment fails in rotator cuff calcific tendinopathy, prior to invasive procedures. The clinical efficacy of ESWT in non-calcific tendinopathy remains controversial. The good results in the treatment of rotator cuff calcifications, have led to indications of ESWT being expanded to other shoulder pathologies. We review the current state of indications and evidence based practice.

  14. Quantized current blockade and hydrodynamic correlations in biopolymer translocation through nanopores: evidence from multiscale simulations

    CERN Document Server

    Bernaschi, Massimo; Succi, Sauro; Fyta, Maria; Kaxiras, Efthimios

    2008-01-01

    We present a detailed description of biopolymer translocation through a nanopore in the presence of a solvent, using an innovative multi-scale methodology which treats the biopolymer at the microscopic scale as combined with a self-consistent mesoscopic description for the solvent fluid dynamics. We report evidence for quantized current blockade depending on the folding configuration and offer detailed information on the role of hydrodynamic correlations in speeding-up the translocation process.

  15. Collapse of the California Current during glacial maxima linked to climate change on land.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herbert, T D; Schuffert, J D; Andreasen, D; Heusser, L; Lyle, M; Mix, A; Ravelo, A C; Stott, L D; Herguera, J C

    2001-07-06

    Time series of alkenone unsaturation indices gathered along the California margin reveal large (4 degrees to 8 degrees C) glacial-interglacial changes in sea surface temperature (SST) over the past 550,000 years. Interglacial times with SSTs equal to or exceeding that of the Holocene contain peak abundances in the pollen of redwood, the distinctive component of the temperate rainforest of the northwest coast of California. In the region now dominated by the California Current, SSTs warmed 10,000 to 15,000 years in advance of deglaciation at each of the past five glacial maxima. SSTs did not rise in advance of deglaciation south of the modern California Current front. Glacial warming along the California margin therefore is a regional signal of the weakening of the California Current during times when large ice sheets reorganized wind systems over the North Pacific. Both the timing and magnitude of the SST estimates suggest that the Devils Hole (Nevada) calcite record represents regional but not global paleotemperatures, and hence does not pose a fundamental challenge to the orbital ("Milankovitch") theory of the Ice Ages.

  16. Evidence for impaired CARD15 signalling in Crohn's disease without disease linked variants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Seidelin, Jakob Benedict; Broom, Oliver Jay; Olsen, Jørgen

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Sensing of muramyl dipeptide (MDP) is impaired in Crohn's disease (CD) patients with disease-linked variants of the CARD15 (caspase activation and recruitment domain 15) gene. Animal studies suggest that normal CARD15 signalling prevents inflammatory bowel disease, and may be important...... for disease development in CD. However, only a small fraction of CD patients carry the disease linked CARD15 variants. The aim of this study was thus to investigate if changes could be found in CARD15 signalling in patients without disease associated CARD15 variants. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: By mapping...... the response to MDP in peripheral monocytes obtained from CD patients in remission not receiving immunosuppresives, an impaired response to MDP was found in patients without disease linked CARD15 variants compared to control monocytes. This impairment was accompanied by a decreased activation of IkappaB kinase...

  17. Direct Evidence for Neutrino Flavor Transformation from Neutral-Current Interactions in the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory

    CERN Document Server

    Ahmad, Q R; Andersen, T C; Anglin, J D; Barton, J C; Beier, E W; Bercovitch, M; Bigu, J; Biller, S D; Black, R A; Blevis, I; Boardman, R J; Boger, J; Bonvin, E; Boulay, M G; Bowler, M G; Bowles, T J; Brice, S J; Browne, M C; Bullard, T V; Buhler, G; Cameron, J; Chan, Y D; Chen, H H; Chen, M; Chen, X; Cleveland, B T; Clifford, E T H; Cowan, J H M; Cowen, D F; Cox, G A; Dai, X; Dalnoki-Veress, F; Davidson, W F; Doe, P J; Doucas, G; Dragowsky, M R; Duba, C A; Duncan, F A; Dunford, M; Dunmore, J A; Earle, E D; Elliott, S R; Evans, H C; Ewan, G T; Farine, J; Fergani, H; Ferraris, A P; Ford, R J; Formaggio, J A; Fowler, M M; Frame, K; Frank, E D; Frati, W; Gagnon, N; Germani, J V; Gil, S; Graham, K; Grant, D R; Hahn, R L; Hallin, A L; Hallman, E D; Hamer, A S; Hamian, A A; Handler, W B; Haq, R U; Hargrove, C K; Harvey, P J; Hazama, R; Heeger, K M; Heintzelman, W J; Heise, J; Helmer, R L; Hepburn, J D; Heron, H; Hewett, J L; Hime, A; Howe, M; Hykawy, J G; Isaac, M C P; Jagam, P; Jelley, N A; Jillings, C; Jonkmans, G; Kazkaz, K; Keener, P T; Klein, J R; Knox, A B; Komar, R J; Kouzes, R; Kutter, T; Kyba, C C M; Law, J; Lawson, I T; Lay, M; Lee, H W; Lesko, K T; Leslie, J R; Levine, I; Locke, W; Luoma, S; Lyon, J; Majerus, S; Mak, H B; Maneira, J; Manor, J; Marino, A D; McCauley, N; McDonald, A B; McDonald, D S; McFarlane, K; McGregor, G; Meijer-Drees, R; Miin, C; Miller, G G; Milton, G; Moffat, B A; Moorhead, M E; Nally, C W; Neubauer, M S; Newcomer, F M; Ng, H S; Noble, A J; Norman, E B; Novikov, V M; O'Neill, M; Okada, C E; Ollerhead, R W; Omori, Mamoru; Orrell, J L; Oser, S M; Poon, A W P; Radcliffe, T J; Roberge, A; Robertson, B C; Robertson, R G H; Rosendahl, S S E; Rowley, J K; Rusu, V L; Saettler, E; Schaffer, K K; Schwendener, M H; Schülke, A; Seifert, H; Shatkay, M; Simpson, J J; Sims, C J; Sinclair, D; Skensved, P; Smith, A R; Smith, M W E; Spreitzer, T; Starinsky, N; Steiger, T D; Stokstad, R G; Stonehill, L C; Storey, R S; Sur, B; Tafirout, R; Tagg, N; Tanner, N W; Taplin, R K; Thorman, M; Thornewell, P M; Trent, P T; Tserkovnyak, Y; Van Berg, R; Van de Water, R G; Virtue, C J; Waltham, C E; Wang, J X; Wark, D L; West, N; Wilhelmy, J B; Wilkerson, J F; Wilson, J R; Wittich, P; Wouters, J M; Yeh, M

    2002-01-01

    Observations of neutral current neutrino interactions on deuterium in the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory are reported. Using the neutral current, elastic scattering, and charged current reactions and assuming the standard 8B shape, the electron-neutrino component of the 8B solar flux is 1.76 +/-0.05(stat.)+/-0.09(syst.) x10^6/(cm^2 s), for a kinetic energy threshold of 5 MeV. The non-electron neutrino component is 3.41+/-0.45(stat.)+0.48,-0.45(syst.) x10^6/(cm^2 s), 5.3 standard deviations greater than zero, providing strong evidence for solar electron neutrino flavor transformation. The total flux measured with the NC reaction is 5.09 +0.44,-0.43(stat.)+0.46,-0.43(syst.)x10^6/(cm^2 s), consistent with solar models.

  18. Linking HR strategy, e-HR goals, architectures, and outcomes: a model and case study evidence.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reddington, Martin; Martin, Graeme; Bondarouk, T.V.; Bondarouk, Tatiana; Ruel, H.; Ruel, Hubertus Johannes Maria; Looise, J.C.; Looise, Jan C.

    2011-01-01

    Building on our earlier model of the links between HR strategy, e-HR goals, architectures, and outcomes, we illustrate the relationship between some of these elements with data from three global organizations. In doing so, we aim to help academics and practitioners understand this increasingly

  19. Linking brain electrical signals elicited by current outcomes with future risk decision-making

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dandan eZhang

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The experience of current outcomes influences future decisions in various ways. The neural mechanism of this phenomenon may help to clarify the determinants of decision-making. In this study, thirty-nine young adults finished a risky gambling task by choosing between a high- and a low-risk option in each trial during electroencephalographic data collection. We found that risk-taking strategies significantly modulated mean amplitudes of the event-related potential (ERP component P3, particularly at the central scalp. The event-related spectral perturbation and the inter-trial coherence measurements of the independent component analysis (ICA data indicated that the stay vs. switch electrophysiological difference associated with subsequent decision-making was mainly due to fronto-central theta and left/right mu independent components. Event-related cross-coherence results suggested that the neural information of action monitoring and updating emerged in the fronto-central cortex and propagated to sensorimotor area for further behavior adjustment. Based on these findings of ERP and event-related oscillation (ERO measures, we proposed a neural model of the influence of current outcomes on future decisions.

  20. Functional limitations linked to high body mass index, age and current pain in obese women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evers Larsson, U; Mattsson, E

    2001-06-01

    To describe functional limitations in obese women. Comparisons of functional limitations in obese women and in a normal-weight reference group regarding mobility, balance and housework transport. A large room with a corridor and staircase nearby. Fifty-seven consecutively selected obese female outpatients, mean age 44 y, body mass index (BMI) 37 kg.m(-2), and 22 voluntary references, mean age 49 y, BMI 22 kg.m(-2). Pain questionnaire (for background data); a new valid and reliable test protocol measuring activities of daily life (ADL), pain and exertion, heart rate, balance and speed. The patients had problems in performing 13 of 16 actions compared with the references (P-values between 0.05 and 0.001). They moved more slowly and had difficulties and /or pain and exertion in flexibility tasks, balancing, activities at floor level (bending and kneeling), climbing stairs and carrying groceries. BMI (P=0.002), age (P=0.02) and current pain (P=0.02) from the lower body predicted functional limitation. The functional test reflected functional limitations in obese women, revealing difficulties and perceived pain in ADL. The test protocol can be used to evaluate the effects of training or dieting. For clinical use we recommend considering BMI, age and current pain for use when individualizing advice on training.

  1. Chest Pain of Suspected Cardiac Origin: Current Evidence-based Recommendations for Prehospital Care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Brian Savino

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: In the United States, emergency medical services (EMS protocols vary widely across jurisdictions. We sought to develop evidence-based recommendations for the prehospital evaluation and treatment of chest pain of suspected cardiac origin and to compare these recommendations against the current protocols used by the 33 EMS agencies in the state of California. Methods: We performed a literature review of the current evidence in the prehospital treatment of chest pain and augmented this review with guidelines from various national and international societies to create our evidence-based recommendations. We then compared the chest pain protocols of each of the 33 EMS agencies for consistency with these recommendations. The specific protocol components that we analyzed were use of supplemental oxygen, aspirin, nitrates, opiates, 12-lead electrocardiogram (ECG, ST segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI regionalization systems, prehospital fibrinolysis and β-blockers. Results: The protocols varied widely in terms of medication and dosing choices, as well as listed contraindications to treatments. Every agency uses oxygen with 54% recommending titrated dosing. All agencies use aspirin (64% recommending 325mg, 24% recommending 162mg and 15% recommending either, as well as nitroglycerin and opiates (58% choosing morphine. Prehospital 12- Lead ECGs are used in 97% of agencies, and all but one agency has some form of regionalized care for their STEMI patients. No agency is currently employing prehospital fibrinolysis or β-blocker use. Conclusion: Protocols for chest pain of suspected cardiac origin vary widely across California. The evidence-based recommendations that we present for the prehospital diagnosis and treatment of this condition may be useful for EMS medical directors tasked with creating and revising these protocols.

  2. Berry{close_quote}s phase and a possible new topological current drive in certain weak link superconducting systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gaitan, F.; Shenoy, S.R. [International Center for Theoretical Physics, P. O. Box 586, Miramare, 34100 Trieste (Italy)

    1996-06-01

    We examine the consequences of Berry{close_quote}s phase for the dynamics of Josephson junctions and junction arrays in which moving vortices are present. For both a large annular Josephson junction and a 2D junction array, Berry{close_quote}s phase produces a new current drive in the superconducting phase dynamics of these weak link systems. This Berry phase effect is shown to be physically inequivalent to a known effect in junction arrays associated with the Aharonov-Casher phase. {copyright} {ital 1996 The American Physical Society.}

  3. Human capital and career success: Evidence from linked employer-employee data

    OpenAIRE

    Frederiksen, Anders; Kato, Takao

    2011-01-01

    Denmark's registry data provide accurate and complete career history data along with detailed personal characteristics (e.g., education, gender, work experience, tenure and others) for the population of Danish workers longitudinally. By using such data from 1992 to 2002, we provide rigorous evidence for the first time for the population of workers in an entire economy (as opposed to case study evidence) on the effects of the nature and scope of human capital on career success (measured by app...

  4. Breast-Feeding Analgesia in Infants: An Update on the Current State of Evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benoit, Britney; Martin-Misener, Ruth; Latimer, Margot; Campbell-Yeo, Marsha

    To provide an updated synthesis of the current state of the evidence for the effectiveness of breast-feeding and expressed breast milk feeding in reducing procedural pain in preterm and full-term born infants. A systematic search of key electronic databases (PubMed, CINAHL, EMBASE) was completed. Of the 1032 abstracts screened, 21 were found eligible for inclusion. Fifteen studies reported on the use of breast-feeding or expressed breast milk in full-term infants and 6 reported on preterm infants. Direct breast-feeding was more effective than maternal holding, maternal skin-to-skin contact, topical anesthetics, and music therapy, and was as or more effective than sweet tasting solutions in full-term infants. Expressed breast milk was not consistently found to reduce pain response in full-term or preterm infants. Studies generally had moderate to high risk of bias. There is sufficient evidence to recommend direct breast-feeding for procedural pain management in full-term infants. Based on current evidence, expressed breast milk alone should not be considered an adequate intervention.

  5. Fish, Mercury, Selenium and Cardiovascular Risk: Current Evidence and Unanswered Questions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dariush Mozaffarian

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Controversy has arisen among the public and in the media regarding the health effects of fish intake in adults. Substantial evidence indicates that fish consumption reduces coronary heart disease mortality, the leading cause of death in developed and most developing nations. Conversely, concerns have grown regarding potential effects of exposure to mercury found in some fish. Seafood species are also rich in selenium, an essential trace element that may protect against both cardiovascular disease and toxic effects of mercury. Such protective effects would have direct implications for recommendations regarding optimal selenium intake and for assessing the potential impact of mercury exposure from fish intake in different populations. Because fish consumption appears to have important health benefits in adults, elucidating the relationships between fish intake, mercury and selenium exposure, and health risk is of considerable scientific and public health relevance. The evidence for health effects of fish consumption in adults is reviewed, focusing on the strength and consistency of evidence and relative magnitudes of effects of omega-3 fatty acids, mercury, and selenium. Given the preponderance of evidence, the focus is on cardiovascular effects, but other potential health effects, as well as potential effects of polychlorinated biphenyls and dioxins in fish, are also briefly reviewed. The relevant current unanswered questions and directions of further research are summarized.

  6. Complementary Medicine, Exercise, Meditation, Diet, and Lifestyle Modification for Anxiety Disorders: A Review of Current Evidence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Sarris

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Use of complementary medicines and therapies (CAM and modification of lifestyle factors such as physical activity, exercise, and diet are being increasingly considered as potential therapeutic options for anxiety disorders. The objective of this metareview was to examine evidence across a broad range of CAM and lifestyle interventions in the treatment of anxiety disorders. In early 2012 we conducted a literature search of PubMed, Scopus, CINAHL, Web of Science, PsycInfo, and the Cochrane Library, for key studies, systematic reviews, and metaanalyses in the area. Our paper found that in respect to treatment of generalized anxiety or specific disorders, CAM evidence revealed current support for the herbal medicine Kava. One isolated study shows benefit for naturopathic medicine, whereas acupuncture, yoga, and Tai chi have tentative supportive evidence, which is hampered by overall poor methodology. The breadth of evidence does not support homeopathy for treating anxiety. Strong support exists for lifestyle modifications including adoption of moderate exercise and mindfulness meditation, whereas dietary improvement, avoidance of caffeine, alcohol, and nicotine offer encouraging preliminary data. In conclusion, certain lifestyle modifications and some CAMs may provide a beneficial role in the treatment of anxiety disorders.

  7. Delivering patient decision aids on the Internet: definitions, theories, current evidence, and emerging research areas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffman, Aubri S; Volk, Robert J; Saarimaki, Anton; Stirling, Christine; Li, Linda C; Härter, Martin; Kamath, Geetanjali R; Llewellyn-Thomas, Hilary

    2013-01-01

    In 2005, the International Patient Decision Aids Standards Collaboration identified twelve quality dimensions to guide assessment of patient decision aids. One dimension-the delivery of patient decision aids on the Internet-is relevant when the Internet is used to provide some or all components of a patient decision aid. Building on the original background chapter, this paper provides an updated definition for this dimension, outlines a theoretical rationale, describes current evidence, and discusses emerging research areas. An international, multidisciplinary panel of authors examined the relevant theoretical literature and empirical evidence through 2012. The updated definition distinguishes Internet-delivery of patient decision aids from online health information and clinical practice guidelines. Theories in cognitive psychology, decision psychology, communication, and education support the value of Internet features for providing interactive information and deliberative support. Dissemination and implementation theories support Internet-delivery for providing the right information (rapidly updated), to the right person (tailored), at the right time (the appropriate point in the decision making process). Additional efforts are needed to integrate the theoretical rationale and empirical evidence from health technology perspectives, such as consumer health informatics, user experience design, and human-computer interaction. As of 2012, the updated theoretical rationale and emerging evidence suggest potential benefits to delivering patient decision aids on the Internet. However, additional research is needed to identify best practices and quality metrics for Internet-based development, evaluation, and dissemination, particularly in the areas of interactivity, multimedia components, socially-generated information, and implementation strategies.

  8. Response inhibition is linked to emotional devaluation: behavioural and electrophysiological evidence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available To study links between the inhibition of motor responses and emotional evaluation, we combined electrophysiological measures of prefrontal response inhibition with behavioural measures of affective evaluation. Participants first performed a Go-Nogo task in response to Asian and Caucasian faces (with race determining their Go or Nogo status, followed by a trustworthiness rating for each face. Faces previously seen as Nogo stimuli were rated as less trustworthy than previous Go stimuli. To study links between the efficiency of response inhibition in the Go-Nogo task and subsequent emotional evaluations, the Nogo N2 component was quantified separately for faces that were later judged to be high versus low in trustworthiness. Nogo N2 amplitudes were larger in response to low-rated as compared to high-rated faces, demonstrating that trial-by-trial variations in the efficiency of response inhibition triggered by Nogo faces, as measured by the Nogo N2 component, co-vary with their subsequent affective evaluation. These results suggest close links between inhibitory processes in top-down motor control and emotional responses.

  9. Membrane-impermeable cross-linking provides evidence for homophilic, isoform-specific binding of desmosomal cadherins in epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nie, Zhuxiang; Merritt, Anita; Rouhi-Parkouhi, Mansour; Tabernero, Lydia; Garrod, David

    2011-01-21

    Desmosomes and adherens junctions are cadherin-based protein complexes responsible for cell-cell adhesion of epithelial cells. Type 1 cadherins of adherens junctions show specific homophilic adhesion that plays a major role in developmental tissue segregation. The desmosomal cadherins, desmocollin and desmoglein, occur as several different isoforms with overlapping expression in some tissues where different isoforms are located in the same desmosomes. Although adhesive binding of desmosomal cadherins has been investigated in a variety of ways, their interaction in desmosome-forming epithelial cells has not been studied. Here, using extracellular homobifunctional cross-linking, we provide evidence for homophilic and isoform-specific binding between the Dsc2, Dsc3, Dsg2, and Dsg3 isoforms in HaCaT keratinocytes and show that it represents trans interaction. Furthermore, the cross-linked adducts are present in the detergent-insoluble fraction, and electron microscopy shows that extracellular cross-linking probably occurs in desmosomes. We found no evidence for either heterophilic or cis interaction, but neither can be completely excluded by our data. Mutation of amino acid residues Trp-2 and Ala-80 that are important for trans interaction in classical cadherin adhesive binding abolished Dsc2 binding, indicating that these residues are also involved in desmosomal adhesion. These interactions of desmosomal cadherins may be of key importance for their ordered arrangement within desmosomes that we believe is essential for desmosomal adhesive strength and the maintenance of tissue integrity.

  10. Omega-3 Fatty Acids in Modern Parenteral Nutrition: A Review of the Current Evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klek, Stanislaw

    2016-03-07

    Intravenous lipid emulsions are an essential component of parenteral nutrition regimens. Originally employed as an efficient non-glucose energy source to reduce the adverse effects of high glucose intake and provide essential fatty acids, lipid emulsions have assumed a larger therapeutic role due to research demonstrating the effects of omega-3 and omega-6 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) on key metabolic functions, including inflammatory and immune response, coagulation, and cell signaling. Indeed, emerging evidence suggests that the effects of omega-3 PUFA on inflammation and immune response result in meaningful therapeutic benefits in surgical, cancer, and critically ill patients as well as patients requiring long-term parenteral nutrition. The present review provides an overview of the mechanisms of action through which omega-3 and omega-6 PUFA modulate the immune-inflammatory response and summarizes the current body of evidence regarding the clinical and pharmacoeconomic benefits of intravenous n-3 fatty acid-containing lipid emulsions in patients requiring parenteral nutrition.

  11. Foot orthoses for pediatric flexible flatfoot: evidence and current practices among Canadian physical therapists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kane, Kyra

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to examine the evidence for flatfoot intervention in children with gross motor delay of neurological origin, and to understand how physical therapists use foot orthoses (FOs) to treat this population. Thirty-four physical therapists employed in Canadian publicly funded pediatric centers were surveyed to explore current practices and beliefs related to FOs. Responses are discussed in the context of the research literature. Objective physical examination and differentiation between developmental and pathological flatfeet can help clinicians to identify suitable FO candidates, monitor foot posture over time, and evaluate treatment effectiveness. An evidence-informed approach to assessment and intervention has the potential to improve clinical outcomes for clients with pediatric flatfoot.

  12. Larger rate dependence of late sodium current in cardiac Purkinje cells: A potential link to arrhythmogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wei; Yu, Ying; Hou, Jian-Wen; Zhou, Zhi-Wen; Guo, Kai; Zhang, Peng-Pai; Wang, Zhi-Quan; Yan, Jian-Hua; Sun, Jian; Zhou, Qing; Wang, Yue-Peng; Li, Yi-Gang

    2017-03-01

    Purkinje cells (PCs) have a steeper rate dependence of repolarization and are more susceptible to arrhythmic activity than do ventricular myocytes (VMs). Late sodium current (INaL) is rate dependent and contributes to rate dependence of repolarization. This study sought to test our hypothesis that PCs have a larger rate dependence of INaL, contributing to their steeper rate dependence of repolarization and higher susceptibility to arrhythmic activity, than do VMs. INaL was recorded in isolated rabbit PCs and VMs with the whole-cell patch clamp technique. Action potential was examined using the microelectrode technique. Compared with VMs, PCs exhibited a significantly larger rate dependence of INaL with a larger INaL to basic cycle length (BCL) slope. Moreover, PCs had a larger rate dependence of INaL decay and slower recovery kinetics. Interestingly, the larger rate dependence of INaL matched to a steeper rate dependence of action potential duration (APD) in PCs. The INaL blocker tetrodotoxin significantly blunted, while the INaL enhancer anemone toxin (ATX-II) significantly increased, the rate dependence of INaL and APD in PCs and VMs. In the presence of ATX-II, the rate dependence of INaL in PCs was markedly larger than that in VMs, causing a much steeper rate dependence of APD in PCs. Accordingly, PCs exhibited greater rate-dependent electrical instability and were more prone to ATX-II-induced early afterdepolarizations, which were completely inhibited by the INaL inhibitor ranolazine. PCs have a significantly larger rate dependence of INaL than do VMs because of distinctive INaL decay and recovery kinetics, which contributes to their larger rate adaptation, and simultaneously predisposes them to a higher risk of arrhythmogenesis. Copyright © 2016 Heart Rhythm Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Fried Food Consumption and Cardiovascular Health: A Review of Current Evidence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taraka V. Gadiraju

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Fried food consumption and its effects on cardiovascular disease are still subjects of debate. The objective of this review was to summarize current evidence on the association between fried food consumption and cardiovascular disease, diabetes, hypertension and obesity and to recommend directions for future research. We used PubMed, Google Scholar and Medline searches to retrieve pertinent publications. Most available data were based on questionnaires as a tool to capture fried food intakes, and study design was limited to case-control and cohort studies. While few studies have reported a positive association between frequencies of fried food intake and risk of coronary artery disease, heart failure, diabetes or hypertension, other investigators have failed to confirm such an association. There is strong evidence suggesting a higher risk of developing chronic disease when fried foods are consumed more frequently (i.e., four or more times per week. Major gaps in the current literature include a lack of detailed information on the type of oils used for frying foods, stratification of the different types of fried food, frying procedure (deep and pan frying, temperature and duration of frying, how often oils were reused and a lack of consideration of overall dietary patterns. Besides addressing these gaps, future research should also develop tools to better define fried food consumption at home versus away from home and to assess their effects on chronic diseases. In summary, the current review provides enough evidence to suggest adverse health effects with higher frequency of fried food consumption. While awaiting confirmation from future studies, it may be advisable to the public to consume fried foods in moderation while emphasizing an overall healthy diet.

  14. Fried Food Consumption and Cardiovascular Health: A Review of Current Evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gadiraju, Taraka V; Patel, Yash; Gaziano, J Michael; Djoussé, Luc

    2015-10-06

    Fried food consumption and its effects on cardiovascular disease are still subjects of debate. The objective of this review was to summarize current evidence on the association between fried food consumption and cardiovascular disease, diabetes, hypertension and obesity and to recommend directions for future research. We used PubMed, Google Scholar and Medline searches to retrieve pertinent publications. Most available data were based on questionnaires as a tool to capture fried food intakes, and study design was limited to case-control and cohort studies. While few studies have reported a positive association between frequencies of fried food intake and risk of coronary artery disease, heart failure, diabetes or hypertension, other investigators have failed to confirm such an association. There is strong evidence suggesting a higher risk of developing chronic disease when fried foods are consumed more frequently (i.e., four or more times per week). Major gaps in the current literature include a lack of detailed information on the type of oils used for frying foods, stratification of the different types of fried food, frying procedure (deep and pan frying), temperature and duration of frying, how often oils were reused and a lack of consideration of overall dietary patterns. Besides addressing these gaps, future research should also develop tools to better define fried food consumption at home versus away from home and to assess their effects on chronic diseases. In summary, the current review provides enough evidence to suggest adverse health effects with higher frequency of fried food consumption. While awaiting confirmation from future studies, it may be advisable to the public to consume fried foods in moderation while emphasizing an overall healthy diet.

  15. Screening for Maternal Thyroid Dysfunction in Pregnancy: A Review of the Clinical Evidence and Current Guidelines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donny L. F. Chang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Observational studies have demonstrated that maternal thyroid dysfunction and thyroid autoimmunity in pregnancy may be associated with adverse obstetric and fetal outcomes. Treatment of overt maternal hyperthyroidism and overt hypothyroidism clearly improves outcomes. To date there is limited evidence that levothyroxine treatment of pregnant women with subclinical hypothyroidism, isolated hypothyroxinemia, or thyroid autoimmunity is beneficial. Therefore, there is ongoing debate regarding the need for universal screening for thyroid dysfunction during pregnancy. Current guidelines differ; some recommend an aggressive case-finding approach, whereas others advocate testing only symptomatic women or those with a personal history of thyroid disease or other associated medical conditions.

  16. [Current state of digestive system robotic surgery in the light of evidence based medicine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortiz Oshiro, Elena; Fernández-Represa, Jesús Alvarez

    2009-03-01

    The incorporation of robotics in minimally invasive surgery has had mixed reception in the different fields of digestive surgery. Nowadays we are exposed to a continuous stream of publications on robotic approach techniques and outcomes, which do not always provide objective criteria and whose value, through scientific evidence analysis, is sometimes arguable. With the aim of shedding light on current knowledge on digestive robotic surgery and giving an update of its possibilities, the authors analyse the abundant literature available on the different digestive robotic surgery procedures, and sum up their own experience.

  17. Cytidine 5'-Diphosphocholine (Citicoline) in Glaucoma: Rationale of Its Use, Current Evidence and Future Perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberti, Gloria; Tanga, Lucia; Michelessi, Manuele; Quaranta, Luciano; Parisi, Vincenzo; Manni, Gianluca; Oddone, Francesco

    2015-11-30

    Cytidine 5'-diphosphocholine or citicoline is an endogenous compound that acts in the biosynthetic pathway of phospholipids of cell membranes, particularly phosphatidylcholine, and it is able to increase neurotrasmitters levels in the central nervous system. Citicoline has shown positive effects in Parkinson's disease and Alzheimer's disease, as well as in amblyopia. Glaucoma is a neurodegenerative disease currently considered a disease involving ocular and visual brain structures. Neuroprotection has been proposed as a valid therapeutic option for those patients progressing despite a well-controlled intraocular pressure, the main risk factor for the progression of the disease. The aim of this review is to critically summarize the current evidence about the effect of citicoline in glaucoma.

  18. Plot-scale evidence of tundra vegetation change and links to recent summer warming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarah C. Elmendorf; Gregory H.R. Henry; Robert D. Hollister; Robert G. Bjork; Noemie Boulanger-Lapointe; Elisabeth J. Cooper; Johannes H.C. Cornelissen; Thomas A. Day; Ellen Dorrepaal; Tatiana G. Elumeeva; Mike Gill; William A. Gould; John Harte; David S. Hik; Annika Hofgaard; David R. Johnson; Jill F. Johnstone; Ingijorg Svala Jonsdottir; Janet C. Jorgenson; Kari Klanderud; Julia A. Klein; Saewan Koh; Gaku Kudo; Mark Lara; Esther Levesque; Borgthor Magnusson; Jeremy L. May; Joel A. Mercado; Anders Michelsen; Ulf Molau; Isla H. Myers-Smith; Steven F. Oberbauer; Vladimir G. Onipchenko; Christian Rixen; Niels Martin Schmidt; Gaius R. Shaver; Marko J. Spasojevic; Pora Ellen Porhallsdottir; Anne Tolvanen; Tiffany Troxler; Craig E. Tweedie; Sandra Villareal; Carl-Henrik Wahren; Xanthe Walker; Patrick J. Webber; Jeffrey M. Welker; Sonja Wipf

    2012-01-01

    Temperature is increasing at unprecedented rates across most of the tundra biome1. Remote-sensing data indicate that contemporary climate warming has already resulted in increased productivity over much of the Arctic2,3, but plot-based evidence for vegetation transformation is not widespread. We analysed change in tundra vegetation surveyed between 1980 and 2010 in 158...

  19. Minimally Invasive Transforaminal Lumbar Interbody Fusion: A Perspective on Current Evidence and Clinical Knowledge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Habib

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper reviews the current published data regarding open transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (TLIF in relation to minimally invasive transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (MI-TLIF. Introduction. MI-TLIF, a modern method for lumbar interbody arthrodesis, has allowed for a minimally invasive method to treat degenerative spinal pathologies. Currently, there is limited literature that compares TLIF directly to MI-TLIF. Thus, we seek to discuss the current literature on these techniques. Methods. Using a PubMed search, we reviewed recent publications of open and MI-TLIF, dating from 2002 to 2012. We discussed these studies and their findings in this paper, focusing on patient-reported outcomes as well as complications. Results. Data found in 14 articles of the literature was analyzed. Using these reports, we found mean follow-up was 20 months. The mean patient study size was 52. Seven of the articles directly compared outcomes of open TLIF with MI-TLIF, such as mean duration of surgery, length of post-operative stay, blood loss, and complications. Conclusion. Although high-class data comparing these two techniques is lacking, the current evidence supports MI-TLIF with outcomes comparable to that of the traditional, open technique. Further prospective, randomized studies will help to further our understanding of this minimally invasive technique.

  20. Putting the five-factor model into context: evidence linking big five traits to narrative identity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raggatt, Peter

    2006-10-01

    The study examined relationships between the Big Five personality traits and thematic content extracted from self-reports of life history data. One hundred and five "mature age" university students (M=30.1 years) completed the NEO PI-R trait measure, and the Personality Web Protocol. The protocol examines constituents of identity by asking participants to describe 24 key "attachments" from their life histories (significant events, people, places, objects, and possessions). Participants sorted these attachments into clusters and provided a self-descriptive label for each cluster (e.g., "adventurous self"). It was predicted that the thematic content of these cluster labels would be systematically related to Big Five trait scores (e.g., that labels referring to strength or positive emotions would be linked to Extraversion). The hypothesized links were obtained for each of the Big Five trait domains except Conscientiousness. Results are discussed with a view to broadening our understanding of the Five-Factor Model in relation to units of personality other than traits.

  1. Current Thoughts on Fat Grafting: Using the Evidence to Determine Fact or Fiction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinno, Sammy; Wilson, Stelios; Brownstone, Nicholas; Levine, Steven M

    2016-03-01

    Autologous fat grafting is an increasingly popular procedure used for facial rejuvenation and body contouring. The purpose of this article is to perform an evidence-based review to determine fact from fiction for the hot topics in autologous fat grafting. A comprehensive literature search was performed. The following key words were then searched: "fat grafting," "autologous fat grafting," "autologous fat transfer," "lipotransfer," "liposculping," and "lipofilling." The authors then assessed each modality individually for the level of evidence that exists and whether the majority of evidence supports or refutes it. A review of the literature demonstrated that there is no standard test for determining fat viability or volume augmentation after grafting. Furthermore, there is no difference in cell viability seen between syringe aspiration and liposuction pump aspiration harvest techniques (Level II). The decision to wash or centrifuge the fat plays very little role in fat graft survival (Level III). There is no difference between cell viability as a function of harvest location (Level IV). Nearly all studies show no significant effect of local anesthesia on adipocyte cells (Level IV). There are excellent data that support the fact that low-shear devices maintain fat structural integrity (Level IV). There is quality evidence that supports longevity of fat grafted to the breast (Level III). Two studies support large-volume fat grafting longevity but fail to prove their results using objective measures or with sufficiently large sample sizes (Level IV). External preexpansion devices improve total graft survival rate (Level IV). There is quality evidence to support that fat should be injected soon after harvesting, as properties of fat begin to change after processing (Level IV). Microneedling (preconditioning) before fat grafting has been demonstrated to improve fat survival (Level III). Currently, the highest levels of evidence derive from human studies of clinical

  2. Bone as an ion exchange system: evidence for a link between mechanotransduction and metabolic needs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubinacci, A; Covini, M; Bisogni, C; Villa, I; Galli, M; Palumbo, C; Ferretti, M; Muglia, M A; Marotti, G

    2002-04-01

    To detect whether the mutual interaction occurring between the osteocytes-bone lining cells system (OBLCS) and the bone extracellular fluid (BECF) is affected by load through a modification of the BECF-extracellular fluid (ECF; systemic extracellular fluid) gradient, mice metatarsal bones immersed in ECF were subjected ex vivo to a 2-min cyclic axial load of different amplitudes and frequencies. The electric (ionic) currents at the bone surface were measured by a vibrating probe after having exposed BECF to ECF through a transcortical hole. The application of different loads and different frequencies increased the ionic current in a dose-dependent manner. The postload current density subsequently decayed following an exponential pattern. Postload increment's amplitude and decay were dependent on bone viability. Dummy and static loads did not induce current density modifications. Because BECF is perturbed by loading, it is conceivable that OBLCS tends to restore BECF preload conditions by controlling ion fluxes at the bone-plasma interface to fulfill metabolic needs. Because the electric current reflects the integrated activity of OBLCS, its evaluation in transgenic mice engineered to possess genetic lesions in channels or matrix constituents could be helpful in the characterization of the mechanical and metabolic functions of bone.

  3. Subcutaneous immunoglobulin therapy for inflammatory neuropathy: current evidence base and future prospects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajabally, Yusuf A

    2014-06-01

    Intravenous immunoglobulin therapy is of proven effect in chronic inflammatory neuropathies, including chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (CIDP) and multifocal motor neuropathy (MMN). In more recent years, there have been a number of anecdotal case reports and small series, followed by a few trials of variable design, of subcutaneous immunoglobulin therapy in these neuropathies. To date, limited evidence suggests that the subcutaneous route may be a more clinically effective, better-tolerated, at least cost-equivalent and a more patient-friendly option than the still more used intravenous alternative. Long-term efficacy is not as yet established in neuropathic indications by randomised controlled clinical trial evidence, and it is likely that the subcutaneous route may not be suitable in all cases with some hints to this effect appearing from the limited data available to date. Further studies are ongoing, including those of dose comparison, and more are likely to be planned in future. The literature on the use of subcutaneous immunoglobulin therapy in chronic inflammatory neuropathy is reviewed here. The current use in clinical practice, day-to-day benefits, including quality of life measures and health economics as published thus far, are evaluated. The limitations of this form of treatment in CIDP and MMN are also analysed in the light of current literature and taking into account the remaining unknowns. Future prospects and research with this mode of immunoglobulin therapy administration are discussed.

  4. Vitamin E in Sarcopenia: Current Evidences on Its Role in Prevention and Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shy Cian Khor

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Sarcopenia is a geriatric syndrome that is characterized by gradual loss of muscle mass and strength with increasing age. Although the underlying mechanism is still unknown, the contribution of increased oxidative stress in advanced age has been recognized as one of the risk factors of sarcopenia. Thus, eliminating reactive oxygen species (ROS can be a strategy to combat sarcopenia. In this review, we discuss the potential role of vitamin E in the prevention and treatment of sarcopenia. Vitamin E is a lipid soluble vitamin, with potent antioxidant properties and current evidence suggesting a role in the modulation of signaling pathways. Previous studies have shown its possible beneficial effects on aging and age-related diseases. Although there are evidences suggesting an association between vitamin E and muscle health, they are still inconclusive compared to other more extensively studied chronic diseases such as neurodegenerative diseases and cardiovascular diseases. Therefore, we reviewed the role of vitamin E and its potential protective mechanisms on muscle health based on previous and current in vitro and in vivo studies.

  5. Vitamin E in Sarcopenia: Current Evidences on Its Role in Prevention and Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdul Karim, Norwahidah; Wan Ngah, Wan Zurinah

    2014-01-01

    Sarcopenia is a geriatric syndrome that is characterized by gradual loss of muscle mass and strength with increasing age. Although the underlying mechanism is still unknown, the contribution of increased oxidative stress in advanced age has been recognized as one of the risk factors of sarcopenia. Thus, eliminating reactive oxygen species (ROS) can be a strategy to combat sarcopenia. In this review, we discuss the potential role of vitamin E in the prevention and treatment of sarcopenia. Vitamin E is a lipid soluble vitamin, with potent antioxidant properties and current evidence suggesting a role in the modulation of signaling pathways. Previous studies have shown its possible beneficial effects on aging and age-related diseases. Although there are evidences suggesting an association between vitamin E and muscle health, they are still inconclusive compared to other more extensively studied chronic diseases such as neurodegenerative diseases and cardiovascular diseases. Therefore, we reviewed the role of vitamin E and its potential protective mechanisms on muscle health based on previous and current in vitro and in vivo studies. PMID:25097722

  6. Oxytocin and Major Depressive Disorder: Experimental and Clinical Evidence for Links to Aetiology and Possible Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Inga D. Neumann

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Affective disorders represent the most common psychiatric diseases, with substantial co-morbidity existing between major depressive disorders (MDD and anxiety disorders. The lack of truly novel acting compounds has led to non-monoaminergic based research and hypotheses in recent years. The large number of brain neuropeptides, characterized by discrete synthesis sites and multiple receptors, represent likely research candidates for novel therapeutic targets. The present review summarises the available preclinical and human evidence regarding the neuropeptide, oxytocin, and its implications in the aetiology and treatment of MDD. While the evidence is not conclusive at present additional studies are warranted to determine whether OXT may be of therapeutic benefit in subsets of MDD patients such as those with comorbid anxiety symptoms and low levels of social attachment.

  7. Evidences linking ENSO and coral growth in the Southwestern-South Atlantic

    OpenAIRE

    2007-01-01

    Physical and biological changes in the marine environment, induced by oceanic-atmospheric processes, can be imprinted in massive coral skeletons. Herein, we present an evidence of potential El Nino impacts at the Southwestern South Atlantic Ocean (SWSA) inferred from the sclerochronology of the reef coral Favia leptophylla. The application of spectral analysis (wavelet decomposition and the iterative regression) to coral growth length and to meteorological-oceanographic parameters (air temper...

  8. Current evidence does not support the use of Kinesio Taping in clinical practice: a systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrícia do Carmo Silva Parreira

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Questions: Is Kinesio Taping more effective than a sham taping/placebo, no treatment or other interventions in people with musculoskeletal conditions? Is the addition of Kinesio Taping to other interventions more effective than other interventions alone in people with musculoskeletal conditions? Design: Systematic review of randomised trials. Participants: People with musculoskeletal conditions. Intervention: Kinesio Taping was compared with sham taping/placebo, no treatment, exercises, manual therapy and conventional physiotherapy. Outcome measures: Pain intensity, disability, quality of life, return to work, and global impression of recovery. Results: Twelve randomised trials involving 495 participants were included in the review. The effectiveness of the Kinesio Taping was tested in participants with: shoulder pain in two trials; knee pain in three trials; chronic low back pain in two trials; neck pain in three trials; plantar fasciitis in one trial; and multiple musculoskeletal conditions in one trial. The methodological quality of eligible trials was moderate, with a mean of 6.1 points on the 10-point PEDro Scale score. Overall, Kinesio Taping was no better than sham taping/placebo and active comparison groups. In all comparisons where Kinesio Taping was better than an active or a sham control group, the effect sizes were small and probably not clinically significant or the trials were of low quality. Conclusion: This review provides the most updated evidence on the effectiveness of the Kinesio Taping for musculoskeletal conditions. The current evidence does not support the use of this intervention in these clinical populations. PROSPERO registration: CRD42012003436. [Parreira PdCS, Costa LdCM, Hespanhol Junior LC, Lopes AD, Costa LOP (2014 Current evidence does not support the use of Kinesio Taping in clinical practice: a systematic review. Journal of Physiotherapy 60: 31–39

  9. Linking ideas in women’s writing: evidence from the Coruña Corpus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabel Moskowich

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper provides an overview of some rhetorical devices found in scientific works by late Modern English women. We will focus on apparently marginal linguistic elements as devices fundamental for the expression of logical reasoning in different disciplines. We have based our study on four subcorpora in the Coruña Corpus of English Scientific Writing, so that the behaviour and distribution of rhetorical devices will be studied at a microscopic level and attending not only to how they appear in each discipline, but also taking into consideration elements such as time and genre. Our conclusions are limited but we observe the effort women made at a moment when their role in society was not related to knowledge. In general there is an overall increase in the frequency of features typical of an abstract style as well as an increase of conjuncts and adverbial subordinators as linking devices.

  10. Linking Mitigation and Adaptation in Carbon Forestry Projects: Evidence from Belize

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kongsager, Rico; Corbera, Esteve

    2015-01-01

    Committed action to deal with climate change requires reducing greenhouse gas emissions, i.e., mitigation, as well as dealing with its ensuing consequences, i.e., adaptation. To date, most policies and projects have promoted mitigation and adaptation separately, and they have very rarely considered...... integrating these two objectives. In this article, we develop a multi-dimensional framework to explore the extent to which climate mitigation forestry projects bring adaptation concerns into their design and implementation phases, using three Belizean projects as case-study material. We demonstrate...... that linking mitigation and adaptation has not been possible, because the mandate of forest carbon markets does not incorporate adaptation concerns. The projects’ contribution to forest ecosystems’ adaptation, for instance, by reducing human encroachments and by increasing ecosystem connectivity, has been...

  11. Neutrophil chemotaxis and arachidonic acid metabolism are not linked: evidence from metal ion probe studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Turner, S.R.; Turner, R.A.; Smith, D.M.; Johnson, J.A.

    1986-03-05

    Heavy metal ions can inhibit arachidonic acid (AA) metabolism protect against ionophore cytotoxicity (ibid) and inhibit neutrophil chemotaxis. In this study they used Au/sup 3 +/, Zn/sup 2 +/, Cr/sup 3 +/, Mn/sup 2 +/ and Cu/sup 2 +/ as probes of the interrelationships among AA metabolism, ionophore-mediated cytotoxicity, and chemotaxis. Phospholipid deacylation was measured in ionophore-treated cells prelabeled with /sup 3/H-AA. Eicosanoid release from ionophore-treated cells was monitored by radioimmunoassay. Cytoprotection was quantitated as ability to exclude trypan blue. Chemotaxis toward f-met-leu-phe was measured by leading front analysis. The results imply that metal ions attenuate ionophore cytotoxicity by blocking phospholipid deacylation and eicosanoid release. In contrast to previous reports, no correlation between AA metabolism and chemotaxis was demonstrated, suggesting that these 2 processes are not linked.

  12. Evidence on a link between the intensity of Schumann resonance and global surface temperature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sekiguchi

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available A correlation is investigated between the intensity of the global electromagnetic oscillations (Schumann resonance with the planetary surface temperature. The electromagnetic signal was monitored at Moshiri (Japan, and temperature data were taken from surface meteorological observations. The series covers the period from November 1998 to May 2002. The Schumann resonance intensity is found to vary coherently with the global ground temperature in the latitude interval from 45° S to 45° N: the relevant cross-correlation coefficient reaches the value of 0.9. It slightly increases when the high-latitude temperature is incorporated. Correspondence among the data decreases when we reduce the latitude interval, which indicates the important role of the middle-latitude lightning in the Schumann resonance oscillations. We apply the principal component (or singular spectral analysis to the electromagnetic and temperature records to extract annual, semiannual, and interannual variations. The principal component analysis (PCA clarifies the links between electromagnetic records and meteorological data.

  13. Coarticulatory nasalization in modern Greek: Evidence for a link between coarticulation and syllable structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diakoumakou, Evanthia

    2005-04-01

    An acoustic analysis of the temporal extent of vowel nasalization in the productions of six native speakers of (Standard) Modern Greek showed that the temporal extent of anticipatory vowel nasalization is limited in all contexts, although it is more extensive before tautosyllabic than heterosyllabic nasals. (On average, in stressed syllables, heterosyllabic anticipatory nasalization was 27 ms long, tautosyllabic anticipatory was 48 ms long, and carryover was 70 ms.) Modern Greek patterns in this aspect with languages like Spanish, Italian, Ikalanga, which also show a tendency toward open syllables, and obstruents are, in general, dispreferred as codas. It is hypothesized that there may be a link between a tendency for open syllables in a language and limited extent of anticipatory nasalization and it is suggested that investigation of the prosodic organization of languages may prove fruitful in determining the factors that lead to cross-language coarticulatory differences regarding vowel nasalization.

  14. No Evidence Linking Cell Phone Use to Risk of Brain Tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Cell Phone Study Health Issues Current Research Results Children and Cell Phones The Line On Cell Phones (video) - Page Last Updated: 07/25/2015 Note: If you need help accessing information in different file formats, see Instructions for Downloading Viewers and Players . Language Assistance Available: ...

  15. Plantar fasciitis – to jab or to support? A systematic review of the current best evidence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uden H

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Hayley Uden1, Eva Boesch1, Saravana Kumar1,21Division of Health Sciences, 2International Centre for Allied Health Evidence, University of South Australia, North Terrace, Adelaide, South Australia, AustraliaBackground: Plantar fasciitis is a common condition routinely managed by podiatrists in the community and is widely treated conservatively. Two commonly used treatments for plantar fasciitis are customized functional foot orthoses and corticosteroid injections. While common to clinical practice, the evidence base underpinning these treatment strategies is unknown. Therefore, the aim of this systematic review was to assess the effectiveness and safety of customized functional foot orthoses and corticosteroid injections in the treatment of plantar fasciitis.Methods: A systematic literature search was conducted. Experimental studies, in English, from 1998 to 2010 were accepted for inclusion in this review. The PEDro quality assessment tool and the National Health and Medical Research Council's hierarchy of evidence were used to assess the quality of the included studies.Results: Six randomized controlled trials which met the selection criteria were included in this review. Four reported on customized functional foot orthoses and 2 on corticosteroid injections. Current best available evidence highlights that both customized functional foot orthoses and corticosteroid injections can lead to a decrease in pain associated with plantar fasciitis. Additionally, customized functional foot orthoses may also provide an additional benefit in terms of increased functional ability in patients with plantar fasciitis. Corticosteroid injections may have side effects, especially pain (from the injection.Conclusion: Both customized functional foot orthoses and corticosteroid injections can lead to reduction in pain associated with plantar fasciitis. While customized functional foot orthoses may increase the functional outcomes in patients with plantar fasciitis

  16. Direct Evidence for Neutrino Flavor Transformation from Neutral-Current Interactions in SNO

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonald, A. B.; Ahmad, Q. R.; Allen, R. C.; Andersen, T. C.; Anglin, J. D.; Barton, J. C.; Beier, E. W.; Bercovitch, M.; Bigu, J.; Biller, S. D.; Black, R. A.; Blevis, I.; Boardman, R. J.; Boger, J.; Bonvin, E.; Boulay, M. G.; Bowler, M. G.; Bowles, T. J.; Brice, S. J.; Browne, M. C.; Bullard, T. V.; Bühler, G.; Cameron, J.; Chan, Y. D.; Chen, H. H.; Chen, M.; Chen, X.; Cleveland, B. T.; Clifford, E. T. H.; Cowan, J. H. M.; Cowen, D. F.; Cox, G. A.; Dai, X.; Dalnoki-Veress, F.; Davidson, W. F.; Doe, P. J.; Doucas, G.; Dragowsky, M. R.; Duba, C. A.; Duncan, F. A.; Dunford, M.; Dunmore, J. A.; Earle, E. D.; Elliott, S. R.; Evans, H. C.; Ewan, G. T.; Farine, J.; Fergani, H.; Ferraris, A. P.; Ford, R. J.; Formaggio, J. A.; Fowler, M. M.; Frame, K.; Frank, E. D.; Frati, W.; Gagnon, N.; Germani, J. V.; Gil, S.; Graham, K.; Grant, D. R.; Hahn, R. L.; Hallin, A. L.; Hallman, E. D.; Hamer, A. S.; Hamian, A. A.; Handler, W. B.; Haq, R. U.; Hargrove, C. K.; Harvey, P. J.; Hazama, R.; Heeger, K. M.; Heintzelman, W. J.; Heise, J.; Helmer, R. L.; Hepburn, J. D.; Heron, H.; Hewett, J.; Hime, A.; Howe, M.; Hykawy, J. G.; Isaac, M. C. P.; Jagam, P.; Jelley, N. A.; Jillings, C.; Jonkmans, G.; Kazkaz, K.; Keener, P. T.; Klein, J. R.; Knox, A. B.; Komar, R. J.; Kouzes, R.; Kutter, T.; Kyba, C. C. M.; Law, J.; Lawson, I. T.; Lay, M.; Lee, H. W.; Lesko, K. T.; Leslie, J. R.; Levine, I.; Locke, W.; Luoma, S.; Lyon, J.; Majerus, S.; Mak, H. B.; Maneira, J.; Manor, J.; Marino, A. D.; McCauley, N.; McDonald, D. S.; McFarlane, K.; McGregor, G.; Meijer Drees, R.; Mifflin, C.; Miller, G. G.; Milton, G.; Moffat, B. A.; Moorhead, M.; Nally, C. W.; Neubauer, M. S.; Newcomer, F. M.; Ng, H. S.; Noble, A. J.; Norman, E. B.; Novikov, V. M.; O'Neill, M.; Okada, C. E.; Ollerhead, R. W.; Omori, M.; Orrell, J. L.; Oser, S. M.; Poon, A. W. P.; Radcliffe, T. J.; Roberge, A.; Robertson, B. C.; Robertson, R. G. H.; Rosendahl, S. S. E.; Rowley, J. K.; Rusu, V. L.; Saettler, E.; Schaffer, K. K.; Schwendener, M. H.; Schülke, A.; Seifert, H.; Shatkay, M.; Simpson, J. J.; Sims, C. J.; Sinclair, D.; Skensved, P.; Smith, A. R.; Smith, M. W. E.; Spreitzer, T.; Starinsky, N.; Steiger, T. D.; Stokstad, R. G.; Stonehill, L. C.; Storey, R. S.; Sur, B.; Tafirout, R.; Tagg, N.; Tanner, N. W.; Taplin, R. K.; Thorman, M.; Thornewell, P. M.; Trent, P. T.; Tserkovnyak, Y. I.; van Berg, R.; van de Water, R. G.; Virtue, C. J.; Waltham, C. E.; Wang, J.-X.; Wark, D. L.; West, N.; Wilhelmy, J. B.; Wilkerson, J. F.; Wilson, J. R.; Wittich, P.; Wouters, J. M.; Yeh, M.

    2002-12-01

    The Sudbury Neutrino Observatory (SNO) is a 1,000 tonne heavy water Cerenkov-based neutrino detector situated 2,000 meters underground in INCO's Creighton Mine near Sudbury, Ontario, Canada. For the neutrinos from 8B decay in the Sun SNO observes the Charged Current neutrino reaction sensitive only to electron neutrinos and others (Neutral Current and Elastic Scattering) sensitive to all active neutrino types and thereby can search for direct evidence of neutrino flavor change. Using these reactions and assuming the standard 8B shape, the ve component of the 8B solar flux is φe = 1.76- 0.05+0.05(stat.)- 0.09+0.09 (syst.) × 106 cm-2s-1 for a kinetic energy threshold of 5 MeV. The non-ve component is fgr μτ = 3.41- 0.45+0.45(stat.)- 0.45+0.48 (syst.) × 106 cm-2s-1, 5.3σ greater than zero, providing strong evidence for solar ve flavor transformation. The total flux measured with the NC reaction is fgr NC = 5.09- 0.43+0.44(stat.)- 0.43+0.46 (syst.) × 106 cm-2s-1, consistent with solar models. For charged current events, assuming an undistorted 8B spectrum, the night minus day rate is 14.0% +/- 6.3%-1.4+1.5% of the average rate. If the total flux of active neutrinos is additionally constrained to have no asymmetry, the ve asymmetry is found to be 7.0% +/- 4.9%-1.2+1.3%. A global solar neutrino analysis in terms of matter-enhanced oscillations of two active flavors strongly favors the Large Mixing Angle (LMA) solution.

  17. Scapulothoracic bursitis and snapping scapula syndrome: a critical review of current evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warth, Ryan J; Spiegl, Ulrich J; Millett, Peter J

    2015-01-01

    Symptomatic scapulothoracic disorders, such as painful scapular crepitus and/or bursitis, are uncommon; however, they can produce significant pain and disability in many patients. To review the current knowledge pertaining to snapping scapula syndrome and to identify areas of further research that may be helpful to improve clinical outcomes and patient satisfaction. Systematic review. We performed a preliminary search of the PubMed and Embase databases using the search terms "snapping scapula," "scapulothoracic bursitis," "partial scapulectomy," and "superomedial angle resection" in September 2013. All nonreview articles related to the topic of snapping scapula syndrome were included. The search identified a total of 167 unique articles, 81 of which were relevant to the topic of snapping scapula syndrome. There were 36 case series of fewer than 10 patients, 16 technique papers, 11 imaging studies, 9 anatomic studies, and 9 level IV outcomes studies. The level of evidence obtained from this literature search was inadequate to perform a formal systematic review or meta-analysis. Therefore, a critical review of current evidence is presented. Snapping scapula syndrome, a likely underdiagnosed condition, can produce significant shoulder dysfunction in many patients. Because the precise origin is typically unknown, specific treatments that are effective for some patients may not be effective for others. Nevertheless, bursectomy with or without partial scapulectomy is currently the most effective primary method of treatment in patients who fail nonoperative therapy. However, many patients experience continued shoulder disability even after surgical intervention. Future studies should focus on identifying the modifiable factors associated with poor outcomes after operative and nonoperative management for snapping scapula syndrome in an effort to improve clinical outcomes and patient satisfaction. © 2014 The Author(s).

  18. Review of current indications for combined very high fluence collagen cross-linking and laser in situ keratomileusis surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anastasios John Kanellopoulos

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In this brief review we will discuss the reasoning and evolution of our current use of combined very high-fluence collagen crosslinking and laser in situ keratomileusis. Several presentations and pertinent publications are reviewed, along with the key steps of the enhanced LASIK procedure. Long term outcome data support the safety and efficacy of LASIK Xtra in stabilizing myopic but also hyperopic LASIK results.In conclusion, we have compelling evidence that LASIK Xtra is a safe and effective adjunct.

  19. Direct Evidence for Neutrino Flavor Transformation from Neutral-Current Interactions in the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Q. R.; Allen, R. C.; Andersen, T. C.; Anglin, J. D.; Barton, J. C.; Beier, E. W.; Bercovitch, M.; Bigu, J.; Biller, S. D.; Black, R. A.; Blevis, I.; Boardman, R. J.; Boger, J.; Bonvin, E.; Boulay, M. G.; Bowler, M. G.; Bowles, T. J.; Brice, S. J.; Browne, M. C.; Bullard, T. V.; Bühler, G.; Cameron, J.; Chan, Y. D.; Chen, H. H.; Chen, M.; Chen, X.; Cleveland, B. T.; Clifford, E. T.; Cowan, J. H.; Cowen, D. F.; Cox, G. A.; Dai, X.; Dalnoki-Veress, F.; Davidson, W. F.; Doe, P. J.; Doucas, G.; Dragowsky, M. R.; Duba, C. A.; Duncan, F. A.; Dunford, M.; Dunmore, J. A.; Earle, E. D.; Elliott, S. R.; Evans, H. C.; Ewan, G. T.; Farine, J.; Fergani, H.; Ferraris, A. P.; Ford, R. J.; Formaggio, J. A.; Fowler, M. M.; Frame, K.; Frank, E. D.; Frati, W.; Gagnon, N.; Germani, J. V.; Gil, S.; Graham, K.; Grant, D. R.; Hahn, R. L.; Hallin, A. L.; Hallman, E. D.; Hamer, A. S.; Hamian, A. A.; Handler, W. B.; Haq, R. U.; Hargrove, C. K.; Harvey, P. J.; Hazama, R.; Heeger, K. M.; Heintzelman, W. J.; Heise, J.; Helmer, R. L.; Hepburn, J. D.; Heron, H.; Hewett, J.; Hime, A.; Howe, M.; Hykawy, J. G.; Isaac, M. C.; Jagam, P.; Jelley, N. A.; Jillings, C.; Jonkmans, G.; Kazkaz, K.; Keener, P. T.; Klein, J. R.; Knox, A. B.; Komar, R. J.; Kouzes, R.; Kutter, T.; Kyba, C. C.; Law, J.; Lawson, I. T.; Lay, M.; Lee, H. W.; Lesko, K. T.; Leslie, J. R.; Levine, I.; Locke, W.; Luoma, S.; Lyon, J.; Majerus, S.; Mak, H. B.; Maneira, J.; Manor, J.; Marino, A. D.; McCauley, N.; McDonald, A. B.; McDonald, D. S.; McFarlane, K.; McGregor, G.; Meijer Drees, R.; Mifflin, C.; Miller, G. G.; Milton, G.; Moffat, B. A.; Moorhead, M.; Nally, C. W.; Neubauer, M. S.; Newcomer, F. M.; Ng, H. S.; Noble, A. J.; Norman, E. B.; Novikov, V. M.; O'Neill, M.; Okada, C. E.; Ollerhead, R. W.; Omori, M.; Orrell, J. L.; Oser, S. M.; Poon, A. W.; Radcliffe, T. J.; Roberge, A.; Robertson, B. C.; Robertson, R. G.; Rosendahl, S. S.; Rowley, J. K.; Rusu, V. L.; Saettler, E.; Schaffer, K. K.; Schwendener, M. H.; Schülke, A.; Seifert, H.; Shatkay, M.; Simpson, J. J.; Sims, C. J.; Sinclair, D.; Skensved, P.; Smith, A. R.; Smith, M. W.; Spreitzer, T.; Starinsky, N.; Steiger, T. D.; Stokstad, R. G.; Stonehill, L. C.; Storey, R. S.; Sur, B.; Tafirout, R.; Tagg, N.; Tanner, N. W.; Taplin, R. K.; Thorman, M.; Thornewell, P. M.; Trent, P. T.; Tserkovnyak, Y. I.; van Berg, R.; van de Water, R. G.; Virtue, C. J.; Waltham, C. E.; Wang, J.-X.; Wark, D. L.; West, N.; Wilhelmy, J. B.; Wilkerson, J. F.; Wilson, J. R.; Wittich, P.; Wouters, J. M.; Yeh, M.

    2002-07-01

    Observations of neutral-current [nu] interactions on deuterium in the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory are reported. Using the neutral current (NC), elastic scattering, and charged current reactions and assuming the standard (sup 8)B shape, the [nu]e component of the (sup 8)B solar flux is [phi]e=1.76(sup +0.05)-0.05( stat)(sup +0.09)-0.09( syst) x10(sup 6) cm(sup -2) s(sup -1) for a kinetic energy threshold of 5 MeV. The non-[nu]e component is [phi][mu][tau]=3.41(sup +0.45)-0.45)(stat(sup +0.48)-0.45)(syst x10(sup 6) cm(sup -2) s(sup -1) , 5.3[sigma] greater than zero, providing strong evidence for solar [nu]e flavor transformation. The total flux measured with the NC reaction is [phi]NC=5.09(sup +0.44)(sub -0.43 )(stat)(sup +0.46)(sub -0.43 )(syst) x10(sup 6) cm(sup -2) s(sup -1) , consistent with solar models.

  20. Direct evidence for neutrino flavor transformation from neutral-current interactions in the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Q R; Allen, R C; Andersen, T C; D Anglin, J; Barton, J C; Beier, E W; Bercovitch, M; Bigu, J; Biller, S D; Black, R A; Blevis, I; Boardman, R J; Boger, J; Bonvin, E; Boulay, M G; Bowler, M G; Bowles, T J; Brice, S J; Browne, M C; Bullard, T V; Bühler, G; Cameron, J; Chan, Y D; Chen, H H; Chen, M; Chen, X; Cleveland, B T; Clifford, E T H; Cowan, J H M; Cowen, D F; Cox, G A; Dai, X; Dalnoki-Veress, F; Davidson, W F; Doe, P J; Doucas, G; Dragowsky, M R; Duba, C A; Duncan, F A; Dunford, M; Dunmore, J A; Earle, E D; Elliott, S R; Evans, H C; Ewan, G T; Farine, J; Fergani, H; Ferraris, A P; Ford, R J; Formaggio, J A; Fowler, M M; Frame, K; Frank, E D; Frati, W; Gagnon, N; Germani, J V; Gil, S; Graham, K; Grant, D R; Hahn, R L; Hallin, A L; Hallman, E D; Hamer, A S; Hamian, A A; Handler, W B; Haq, R U; Hargrove, C K; Harvey, P J; Hazama, R; Heeger, K M; Heintzelman, W J; Heise, J; Helmer, R L; Hepburn, J D; Heron, H; Hewett, J; Hime, A; Howe, M; Hykawy, J G; Isaac, M C P; Jagam, P; Jelley, N A; Jillings, C; Jonkmans, G; Kazkaz, K; Keener, P T; Klein, J R; Knox, A B; Komar, R J; Kouzes, R; Kutter, T; Kyba, C C M; Law, J; Lawson, I T; Lay, M; Lee, H W; Lesko, K T; Leslie, J R; Levine, I; Locke, W; Luoma, S; Lyon, J; Majerus, S; Mak, H B; Maneira, J; Manor, J; Marino, A D; McCauley, N; McDonald, A B; McDonald, D S; McFarlane, K; McGregor, G; Meijer Drees, R; Mifflin, C; Miller, G G; Milton, G; Moffat, B A; Moorhead, M; Nally, C W; Neubauer, M S; Newcomer, F M; Ng, H S; Noble, A J; Norman, E B; Novikov, V M; O'Neill, M; Okada, C E; Ollerhead, R W; Omori, M; Orrell, J L; Oser, S M; Poon, A W P; Radcliffe, T J; Roberge, A; Robertson, B C; Robertson, R G H; Rosendahl, S S E; Rowley, J K; Rusu, V L; Saettler, E; Schaffer, K K; Schwendener, M H; Schülke, A; Seifert, H; Shatkay, M; Simpson, J J; Sims, C J; Sinclair, D; Skensved, P; Smith, A R; Smith, M W E; Spreitzer, T; Starinsky, N; Steiger, T D; Stokstad, R G; Stonehill, L C; Storey, R S; Sur, B; Tafirout, R; Tagg, N; Tanner, N W; Taplin, R K; Thorman, M; Thornewell, P M; Trent, P T; Tserkovnyak, Y I; Van Berg, R; Van de Water, R G; Virtue, C J; Waltham, C E; Wang, J-X; Wark, D L; West, N; Wilhelmy, J B; Wilkerson, J F; Wilson, J R; Wittich, P; Wouters, J M; Yeh, M

    2002-07-01

    Observations of neutral-current nu interactions on deuterium in the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory are reported. Using the neutral current (NC), elastic scattering, and charged current reactions and assuming the standard 8B shape, the nu(e) component of the 8B solar flux is phis(e) = 1.76(+0.05)(-0.05)(stat)(+0.09)(-0.09)(syst) x 10(6) cm(-2) s(-1) for a kinetic energy threshold of 5 MeV. The non-nu(e) component is phi(mu)(tau) = 3.41(+0.45)(-0.45)(stat)(+0.48)(-0.45)(syst) x 10(6) cm(-2) s(-1), 5.3sigma greater than zero, providing strong evidence for solar nu(e) flavor transformation. The total flux measured with the NC reaction is phi(NC) = 5.09(+0.44)(-0.43)(stat)(+0.46)(-0.43)(syst) x 10(6) cm(-2) s(-1), consistent with solar models.

  1. Evidence for cross-linking in tomato cutin using HR-MAS NMR spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deshmukh, Ashish P; Simpson, André J; Hatcher, Patrick G

    2003-11-01

    Cutin is a polyester biopolymer component of plant leaf and fruit cuticles, most often associated with waxes and cuticular polysaccharides, and sometimes with another aliphatic biopolymer called cutan. Insolubility of these cuticular biopolymers has made it difficult to apply traditional analytical techniques for structure determination, because most techniques providing molecular level details require solubility. By using the relatively new technique of one and two-dimensional high-resolution magic angle spinning (HR-MAS) NMR spectroscopy, with added information from solid-state 13C NMR spectroscopy, detailed through-bond connectivities and assignments are made for cutin from Lycopersicon esculentum (tomato) fruit. Based on the data obtained, tomato cutin is found to be predominantly an aliphatic polyester with some olefinic and aromatic moieties, consistent with previous studies that employed various degradative approaches. Aside from esters, there are free primary and secondary alcohol groups, as well as free fatty acids. A significant finding is the presence of alpha-branched fatty acids/esters. Mid-chain hydroxyls appear to be generally unesterified, but esters of mid-chain hydroxyls have been identified. The alpha-branched fatty acids/esters and esters of mid-chain hydroxyls could point towards cross-linking.

  2. WD40-repeat proteins in plant cell wall formation: current evidence and research prospects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gea eGuerriero

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The metabolic complexity of living organisms relies on supramolecular protein structures which ensure vital processes, such as signal transduction, transcription, translation and cell wall synthesis. In eukaryotes WD40-repeat (WDR proteins often function as molecular hubs mediating supramolecular interactions. WDR proteins may display a variety of interacting partners and participate in the assembly of complexes involved in distinct cellular functions. In plants, the formation of lignocellulosic biomass involves extensive synthesis of cell wall polysaccharides, a process that requires the assembly of large transmembrane enzyme complexes, intensive vesicle trafficking, interactions with the cytoskeleton, and coordinated gene expression. Because of their function as supramolecular hubs, WDR proteins could participate in each or any of these steps, although to date only few WDR proteins have been linked to the cell wall by experimental evidence. Nevertheless, several potential cell wall-related WDR proteins were recently identified using in silico aproaches, such as analyses of co-expression, interactome and conserved gene neighbourhood. Notably, some WDR genes are frequently genomic neighbours of genes coding for GT2-family polysaccharide synthases in eukaryotes, and this WDR-GT2 collinear microsynteny is detected in diverse taxa. In angiosperms, two WDR genes are collinear to cellulose synthase genes, CESAs, whereas in ascomycetous fungi several WDR genes are adjacent to chitin synthase genes, chs. In this Perspective we summarize and discuss experimental and in silico studies on the possible involvement of WDR proteins in plant cell wall formation. The prospects of biotechnological engineering for enhanced biomass production are discussed.

  3. PLASMA OXYTOCIN CONCENTRATION AND DEPRESSIVE SYMPTOMS: A REVIEW OF CURRENT EVIDENCE AND DIRECTIONS FOR FUTURE RESEARCH.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massey, Suena H; Backes, Katherine A; Schuette, Stephanie A

    2016-04-01

    There is substantial recent interest in the role of oxytocin in social and affiliative behaviors-animal models of depression have suggested a link between oxytocin and mood. We reviewed literature to date for evidence of a potential relationship between peripheral oxytocin concentration and depressive symptoms in humans. Pubmed(®) and PsychINFO(®) were searched for biomedical and social sciences literature from 1960 to May 19, 2015 for empirical articles in English involving human subjects focused on the relationship between peripheral oxytocin concentration and depressive symptoms, excluding articles on the oxytocin receptor gene, or involving exogenous (i.e. intranasal) administration of oxytocin. Eight studies meeting criteria were identified and formally reviewed. Studies of pregnant women suggested an inverse relationship between oxytocin level and depressive symptom severity. Findings in nonpregnant women were broadly consistent with the role of oxytocin release in response to stress supported by animal studies. The relationship between oxytocin and depression in men appeared to be in the opposite direction, possibly reflecting the influence of gonadal hormones on oxytocinergic functioning found in other mammalian species. Overall, small sample sizes, heterogeneity in study designs, and other methodological limitations may account for inconsistent findings. Future research utilizing reliable oxytocin measurement protocols including measurements across time, larger sample sizes, and sample homogeneity with respect to multiple possible confounders (age, gender, race and ethnicity, ovarian status among women, and psychosocial context) are needed to elucidate the role of oxytocin in the pathogenesis of depression, and could guide the design of novel pharmacologic agents.

  4. Empirical Evidence on the Link Between Compliance with Governance of Best Practice and Firms' Operating Results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tek B. Lama

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available This study provides robust evidence in support of the agency theory argument that corporate governancematters for a firm’s operating performance. Using the corporate governance ratings as the governance proxyfrom Horwath 2006 Corporate Governance Report (mid-sized Australian ASX companies andMid-CapCorporate Governance Report 2007 (The University of Newcastle 2006; 2007, I examine 60 sample firms toreveal that a firm’s governance is positively and significantly related to firm performance as measured by returnon equity, earning yield and return on assets. This study extends the findings of these two reports which founda disturbing trend in the corporate governance practice of Australian mid-cap companies – both a decrease incompanies with excellent corporate governance, and an increase in companies with significant corporategovernance deficiencies. The findings of this study suggest that those mid-size companies who have allowedcorporate governance to deteriorate have adversely affected their shareholder returns.

  5. Evidences linking ENSO and coral growth in the Southwestern-South Atlantic

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Evangelista, H. [LARAMG, Laboratorio de Radioecologia e Mudancas Globais/DBB/UERJ. Pav. HLC, Subsolo, Maracana, RJ (Brazil); Godiva, D. [LARAMG, Laboratorio de Radioecologia e Mudancas Globais/DBB/UERJ. Pav. HLC, Subsolo, Maracana, RJ (Brazil); Universidade Federal Fluminense, Outeiro Sao Joao Batista, s/n, Centro, Departamento de Geoquimica Ambiental, Niteroi, RJ (Brazil); Sifeddine, A. [IRD, Institut de Recherche Pour le Developpement, UR055 Paleotropique, Bondy (France); Universidade Federal Fluminense, Outeiro Sao Joao Batista, s/n, Centro, Departamento de Geoquimica Ambiental, Niteroi, RJ (Brazil); Leao, Z.M.A.N.; Kikuchi, R.K.P. [UFBA/Instituto de Geociencias. Rua Barao de Geremoabo, s/n, Federacao, Salvador, BA (Brazil); Rigozo, N.R. [LARAMG, Laboratorio de Radioecologia e Mudancas Globais/DBB/UERJ. Pav. HLC, Subsolo, Maracana, RJ (Brazil); FAETEC, Faculdade de Educacao e Tecnologia Thereza Porto Marques, Jacarei, SP (Brazil); Segal, B. [UFRJ/Museu Nacional/Setor de Celenterologia/Departamento de Invertebrados, Quinta da Boa Vista s/n, Sao Cristovao, RJ (Brazil); Ambrizzi, T. [USP/Department of Atmospheric Sciences, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Kampel, M. [INPE/Divisao de Sensoriamento Remoto, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Cornec, F. le [Universidade Federal Fluminense, Outeiro Sao Joao Batista, s/n, Centro, Departamento de Geoquimica Ambiental, Niteroi, RJ (Brazil)

    2007-12-15

    Physical and biological changes in the marine environment, induced by oceanic-atmospheric processes, can be imprinted in massive coral skeletons. Herein, we present an evidence of potential El Nino impacts at the Southwestern South Atlantic Ocean (SWSA) inferred from the sclerochronology of the reef coral Favia leptophylla. The application of spectral analysis (wavelet decomposition and the iterative regression) to coral growth length and to meteorological-oceanographic parameters (air temperature, sea surface temperature and precipitation) as well as to Southern Oscillation Index (SOI) and solar irradiation indicated a major significant inverse relationship between SOI and coral growth length at the 4-8 years frequency band. We propose here that coral growth length from the SWSA could be affected by El Nino Southern Oscillation (ENSO) events through an ''atmospheric bridge'', in contrast to its direct effect at the Pacific Ocean, related to the increase in sea surface temperature. (orig.)

  6. The link between bipolar disorders and creativity: evidence from personality and temperament studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, Shefali; Ketter, Terence A

    2010-12-01

    Although extensive literature supports connections between bipolar disorder and creativity, possible mechanisms underlying such relationships are only beginning to emerge. Herein we review evidence supporting one such possible mechanism, namely that personality/temperament contribute to enhanced creativity in individuals with bipolar disorder, a theory supported by studies showing that certain personality/temperamental traits are not only common to bipolar disorder patients and creative individuals but also correlate with measures of creativity. Thus, we suggest based on studies using three important personality/temperament measures-the Neuroticism, Extraversion, and Openness Personality Inventory (NEO); the Myers-Briggs Type Indicator (MBTI); and the Temperament Evaluation of the Memphis, Pisa, Paris, and San Diego Autoquestionnaire (TEMPS-A)-that changeable (increased TEMPS-A-cyclothymia) and at times negative (increased NEO-neuroticism) affect and open-minded (increased NEO-openness) and intuitive (increased MBTI-intuition) cognition may contribute importantly to enhanced creativity in individuals with bipolar disorder.

  7. Complementary medicine and psoriasis: linking the patient's outlook with evidence-based medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben-Arye, E; Ziv, M; Frenkel, M; Lavi, I; Rosenman, D

    2003-01-01

    There is increasing evidence for the extensive use of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) by patients with psoriasis. Clinical research in the arena of CAM and psoriasis treatment is evolving and includes some randomized controlled trials. To study CAM use among patients with psoriasis attending a dermatology clinic in a major university hospital in northern Israel. Prevalence, reasons for CAM use and its relevance to doctor-patient communication were emphasized. Semistructured interviews were conducted with psoriasis patients in a dermatology clinic. Consent was obtained for 78 patients. Post-visit questionnaires were given to 5 physicians. Seventy-eight patients with psoriasis were interviewed and 77 were studied. Sixty-two percent used CAM. Fifty-eight percent of users had seen a CAM practitioner. The study found a trend of CAM use among patients with psoriasis from Arab compared to Jewish descent (p=0.087). CAM users reported on average 2 different CAM modalities. Herbal medicine and nutritional treatments ranked first, followed by homeopathy, traditional Chinese medicine and nutritional supplements. The main reason for CAM use was stated to be to do everything to heal the disease, followed by a quest for improved quality of life. Others mentioned an interest in a less toxic treatment, disappointment with conventional treatment and stress reduction. Well over half of the study participants and their dermatologists did not initiate a discussion about CAM use. The dermatologists' ability to predict CAM use in their patients was relatively low. There is growing evidence of extensive CAM use among patients with psoriasis. Most patients use CAM as a complementary treatment, rather than an alternative to conventional treatment. Teaching CAM should be integrated into the dermatology residency curriculum. Dermatologists need to increase their awareness of CAM use by their patients in order to improve therapeutic communication. Copyright 2003 S. Karger AG

  8. Delivering patient decision aids on the Internet: definitions, theories, current evidence, and emerging research areas

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background In 2005, the International Patient Decision Aids Standards Collaboration identified twelve quality dimensions to guide assessment of patient decision aids. One dimension—the delivery of patient decision aids on the Internet—is relevant when the Internet is used to provide some or all components of a patient decision aid. Building on the original background chapter, this paper provides an updated definition for this dimension, outlines a theoretical rationale, describes current evidence, and discusses emerging research areas. Methods An international, multidisciplinary panel of authors examined the relevant theoretical literature and empirical evidence through 2012. Results The updated definition distinguishes Internet-delivery of patient decision aids from online health information and clinical practice guidelines. Theories in cognitive psychology, decision psychology, communication, and education support the value of Internet features for providing interactive information and deliberative support. Dissemination and implementation theories support Internet-delivery for providing the right information (rapidly updated), to the right person (tailored), at the right time (the appropriate point in the decision making process). Additional efforts are needed to integrate the theoretical rationale and empirical evidence from health technology perspectives, such as consumer health informatics, user experience design, and human-computer interaction. Despite Internet usage ranging from 74% to 85% in developed countries and 80% of users searching for health information, it is unknown how many individuals specifically seek patient decision aids on the Internet. Among the 86 randomized controlled trials in the 2011 Cochrane Collaboration’s review of patient decision aids, only four studies focused on Internet-delivery. Given the limited number of published studies, this paper particularly focused on identifying gaps in the empirical evidence base and

  9. Current state of evidence-based practice education for undergraduate nursing students in Taiwan: A questionnaire study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, Hsiao-Ying; Huang, Yu-Fang; Tsai, Jing-Jane; Chang, Ying-Ju

    2015-12-01

    Evidence-based practice (EBP) has been emphasized as the core competency of undergraduate nursing students and must be cultivated before graduation. However, there is limited information of EBP education for undergraduate nursing students in Taiwan. The purpose of this study was to investigate the current state of EBP education for undergraduate nursing students in Taiwan. A self-developed questionnaire, validated by experienced educators, was designed to explore curriculum design, teaching resources, qualification of teachers, and barriers regarding EBP education. A total of 21 nursing schools and colleges participated. The chair of each recommended a faculty member involved in teaching EBP as the school's representative to fill out the questionnaire. Among the 21 nursing schools and colleges, 18 (85.7%) had implemented EBP education in the curriculum. Among these schools, 22.2% conducted an independent EBP course, 50% incorporated EBP concepts into other courses, and the remainder offered both kinds of EBP courses. Multiple strategies were incorporated to teach the EBP. Less than 35% of the schools had designed or adopted standardized teaching materials and evaluated students' learning outcomes. Although 55.6% of the schools reimbursed faculty for participation in EBP training, 39% of their faculty members who taught EBP did not receive any EBP training. Shortage of qualified faculty and limited opportunity to involve students in evidence-based applications were reported as major obstacles to teaching EBP. EBP education has already gained the attention of nursing schools in Taiwan. However, lack of comprehensive EBP training among teachers and the difficulty of teaching clinical application of EBP require special consideration. In order to promote EBP education in undergraduate nursing curriculums, we suggest that nursing schools reinforce and support faculty to participate in formal EBP training. Also needed is a systematic curriculum design with multiple

  10. Current Evidence on the Use of Antifilarial Agents in the Management of bancroftian Filariasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sumadhya Deepika Fernando

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Many trials have explored the efficacy of individual drugs and drug combinations to treat bancroftian filariasis. This narrative review summarizes the current evidence for drug management of bancroftian filariasis. Diethylcarbamazine (DEC remains the prime antifilarial agent with a well-established microfilaricidal and some macrofilaricidal effects. Ivermectin (IVM is highly microfilaricidal but minimally macrofilaricidal. The role of albendazole (ALB in treatment regimens is not well established though the drug has a microfilaricidal effect. The combination of DEC+ALB has a better long-term impact than IVM+ALB. Recent trials have shown that doxycycline therapy against Wolbachia, an endosymbiotic bacterium of the parasite, is capable of reducing microfilaria rates and adult worm activity. Followup studies on mass drug administration (MDA are yet to show a complete interruption of transmission, though the infection rates are reduced to a very low level.

  11. Evidence for enhancement of critical current by intergrain Ag in YBaCuO-Ag ceramics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dwir, B.; Affronte, M.; Pavuna, D.

    1989-07-24

    We report the evidence for enhancement of critical current density /ital J//sub /ital c// by /similar to/50%, which occurs when /similar to/10 wt. % Ag is added to Y/sub 1/Ba/sub 2/Cu/sub 3/O/sub 7/minus//delta// ceramics. The maximal /ital J//sub /ital c// (/similar to/700 A/cm/sup 2/ at /ital T/=77 K) appears simultaneously with maximum YBaCuO compactness in the samples. The silver fills the intergranular space (holes) without Cu substitution, and the critical temperature /ital T//sub /ital c// is not reduced from the bulk value (/similar to/91 K). Normal-state resistivity of Ag-YBaCuO samples is decreased by an order of magnitude, and samples exhibit improved contact resistance and resistance to water. While the critical density is improved by adding /similar to/10 wt. % Ag, it decreases at higher Ag concentrations.

  12. Troponin elevations in patients with chronic cardiovascular disease: An analysis of current evidence and significance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Archer K; Malhotra, Anita K; Sullivan, Breandan L; Ramakrishna, Harish

    2016-01-01

    Serum troponin elevation above the 99th percentile of the upper reference limit in healthy subjects (troponin laboratory assays) is required to establish the diagnosis the diagnosis of myocardial necrosis in acute cardiovascular syndromes, as well as guide prognosis and therapy. In the perioperative period, for patients with cardiac disease undergoing noncardiac surgery, it is a particularly critical biomarker universally used to assess the myocardial damage. The value of troponin testing and elevation (as well as its significance) in patients with chronic cardiac valvular, vascular, and renal disease is relatively less well understood. This evidence-based review seeks to examine the currently available data assessing the significance of troponin elevation in certain chronic valvular and other disease states.

  13. Cognitive rehabilitation after severe acquired brain injury: current evidence and future directions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Luca, Rosaria; Calabrò, Rocco Salvatore; Bramanti, Placido

    2016-07-25

    Severe acquired brain injury (SABI) is damage to the brain, occurring after birth from traumatic or non-traumatic causes, and often resulting in deterioration of physical, cognitive, and emotional functions. Cognitive rehabilitation (CR) is aimed to help brain-injured or otherwise cognitively impaired individuals to restore normal functioning, or to compensate for cognitive deficits. Over the last years, the development of new technologies in the field of CR has led to a growing use of computer-based cognitive tools in patients with SABI. This review aims to investigate the efficacy of CR in individuals suffering from SABI, and evaluates the role of virtual reality and other innovative technologies in improving behavioural and functional outcomes. The current evidence for CR in the treatment of SABI-related deficits does not allow conclusive results to be achieved and further research is needed to identity the patient and treatment factors that contribute to successful outcomes.

  14. Prevention of Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder After Trauma: Current Evidence and Future Directions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Wei; Gevonden, Martin; Shalev, Arieh

    2016-02-01

    Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is a frequent, tenacious, and disabling consequence of traumatic events. The disorder's identifiable onset and early symptoms provide opportunities for early detection and prevention. Empirical findings and theoretical models have outlined specific risk factors and pathogenic processes leading to PTSD. Controlled studies have shown that theory-driven preventive interventions, such as cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT), or stress hormone-targeted pharmacological interventions, are efficacious in selected samples of survivors. However, the effectiveness of early clinical interventions remains unknown, and results obtained in aggregates (large groups) overlook individual heterogeneity in PTSD pathogenesis. We review current evidence of PTSD prevention and outline the need to improve the disorder's early detection and intervention in individual-specific paths to chronic PTSD.

  15. Genetic link between Asians and native Americans: evidence from HLA genes and haplotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tokunaga, K; Ohashi, J; Bannai, M; Juji, T

    2001-09-01

    We have been studying polymorphisms of HLA class I and II genes in East Asians including Buryat in Siberia, Mongolian, Han Chinese, Man Chinese, Korean Chinese, South Korean, and Taiwan indigenous populations in collaboration with many Asian scientists. Regional populations in Japan, Hondo-Japanese, Ryukyuan, and Ainu, were also studied. HLA-A, -B, and -DRB1 gene frequencies were subjected to the correspondence analysis and calculation of DA distances. The correspondence analysis demonstrated several major clusters of human populations in the world. "Mongoloid" populations were highly diversified, in which several clusters such as Northeast Asians, Southeast Asians, Oceanians, and Native Americans were observed. Interestingly, an indigenous population in North Japan, Ainu, was placed relatively close to Native Americans in the correspondence analysis. Distribution of particular HLA-A, -B, -DRB1 alleles and haplotypes was also analyzed in relation to migration and dispersal routes of ancestral populations. A number of alleles and haplotypes showed characteristic patterns of regional distribution. For example, B39-HR5-DQ7 (B*3901-DRB1*1406-DQB1*0301) was shared by Ainu and Native Americans. A24-Cw8-B48 was commonly observed in Taiwan indigenous populations, Maori in New Zealand, Orochon in Northeast China, Inuit, and Tlingit. These findings further support the genetic link between East Asians and Native Americans. We have proposed that various ancestral populations in East Asia, marked by different HLA haplotypes, had migrated and dispersed through multiple routes. Moreover, relatively small genetic distances and the sharing of several HLA haplotypes between Ainu and Native Americans suggest that these populations are descendants of some Upper Paleolithic populations of East Asia.

  16. Evidence for X-linked introgression between molecular forms of Anopheles gambiae from Angola.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, K S; Townson, H

    2012-06-01

    The M and S molecular forms of the African malaria vector Anopheles gambiae (Diptera: Culicidae) are morphologically identical incipient species in which reproductive isolation is incomplete, enabling low-level gene flow between forms. In an attempt to find differences between the M and S forms, sequence variation was studied at loci along the X chromosome in adult female An. gambiae from Angola. A high proportion of M form specimens from Angola (79% of the 456 X chromosomes sampled) were found to contain a 16-bp insertion in intron 4 of the X-linked GPRCCK1 locus, relative to the AgamP3 release of the An. gambiae PEST genome sequence. The insertion was in Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium in Angolan M form populations. The same insertion was found in all S form specimens examined, regardless of where in Africa they were sampled, but was absent from a sample of M form specimens collected in Ghana, Bioko and Mali. In M form specimens from Angola, there was an association between alleles at the GPRCCK1 locus and those at a microsatellite locus, AGXH678, close to the centromere of the X chromosome, with significant linkage disequilibrium between loci separated by 0.472 Mbp (P < 0.033). We show that the insertion results from introgression from the S form into the M form, rather than from the retention of an ancestral character. Gene flow from the S to M form could allow genes of adaptive value to be transferred, including those conferring insecticide resistance and others influencing ecology and behaviour, and thus malaria transmission and control. We discuss factors that may have led to this introgression event.

  17. Collectivism and coping: current theories, evidence, and measurements of collective coping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuo, Ben C H

    2013-01-01

    A burgeoning body of cultural coping research has begun to identify the prevalence and the functional importance of collective coping behaviors among culturally diverse populations in North America and internationally. These emerging findings are highly significant as they evidence culture's impacts on the stress-coping process via collectivistic values and orientation. They provide a critical counterpoint to the prevailing Western, individualistic stress and coping paradigm. However, current research and understanding about collective coping appear to be piecemeal and not well integrated. To address this issue, this review attempts to comprehensively survey, summarize, and evaluate existing research related to collective coping and its implications for coping research with culturally diverse populations from multiple domains. Specifically, this paper reviews relevant research and knowledge on collective coping in terms of: (a) operational definitions; (b) theories; (c) empirical evidence based on studies of specific cultural groups and broad cultural values/dimensions; (d) measurements; and (e) implications for future cultural coping research. Overall, collective coping behaviors are conceived as a product of the communal/relational norms and values of a cultural group across studies. They also encompass a wide array of stress responses ranging from value-driven to interpersonally based to culturally conditioned emotional/cognitive to religion- and spirituality-grounded coping strategies. In addition, this review highlights: (a) the relevance and the potential of cultural coping theories to guide future collective coping research; (b) growing evidence for the prominence of collective coping behaviors particularly among Asian nationals, Asian Americans/Canadians and African Americans/Canadians; (c) preference for collective coping behaviors as a function of collectivism and interdependent cultural value and orientation; and (d) six cultural coping scales. This

  18. Smoke exposure as a risk factor for asthma in childhood: a review of current evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrante, Giuliana; Antona, Roberta; Malizia, Velia; Montalbano, Laura; Corsello, Giovanni; La Grutta, Stefania

    2014-01-01

    Asthma is a common chronic multifactorial disease that affects >300 million people worldwide. Outdoor and indoor pollution exposure has been associated with respiratory health effects in adults and children. Smoking still represents a huge public health problem and millions of children suffer the detrimental effects of passive smoke exposure. This study was designed to review the current evidences on exposure to passive smoke as a risk factor for asthma onset in childhood. A review of the most recent studies on this topic was undertaken to provide evidence about the magnitude of the effect of passive smoking on the risk of incidence of asthma in children. The effects of passive smoking are different depending on individual and environmental factors. Environmental tobacco smoke (ETS) is one of the most important indoor air pollutants and can interact with other air pollutants in eliciting respiratory outcomes during childhood. The increased risk of respiratory outcomes in children exposed to prenatal and early postnatal passive smoke might be caused by an adverse effect on both the immune system and the structural and functional development of the lung; this may explain the subsequent increased risk of incident asthma. The magnitude of the exposure is quite difficult to precisely quantify because it is significantly influenced by the child's daily activities. Because exposure to ETS is a likely cause for asthma onset in childhood, there is a strong need to prevent infants and children from breathing air contaminated with tobacco smoke.

  19. Role of Environmental Chemicals in Obesity: A Systematic Review on the Current Evidence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roya Kelishadi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this paper is to systematically review the experimental and human studies on obesogenic chemicals and their mechanisms of action to provide a comprehensive view on the multifactorial aspects of obesity. The literatures were searched in available databases. The relevant papers were selected in three phases. After quality assessment, two reviewers extracted the data while another checked their extracted data. In this review, we summarized information regarding environmental chemicals that can be associated with obesity. Most evidence comes from experimental and laboratory studies; however a growing number of human studies also support the role of obesogenic chemicals. The current evidence proposes that the systemic responses to exposure to environmental factors could potentially increase the risk of excess weight. The effects of exposure to these chemicals are of crucial importance during developmental phases of life, when preprogramming for an adipogenic outcome may occur. By considering the adverse transgenerational effects of obesogen chemicals on human health, the global obesity epidemic should be considered as a multifactorial complex disorder necessitating the emphasis of public health interventions for environmental protection.

  20. Effects of exercise training on chronic inflammation in obesity : current evidence and potential mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    You, Tongjian; Arsenis, Nicole C; Disanzo, Beth L; Lamonte, Michael J

    2013-04-01

    Chronic, systemic inflammation is an independent risk factor for several major clinical diseases. In obesity, circulating levels of inflammatory markers are elevated, possibly due to increased production of pro-inflammatory cytokines from several tissues/cells, including macrophages within adipose tissue, vascular endothelial cells and peripheral blood mononuclear cells. Recent evidence supports that adipose tissue hypoxia may be an important mechanism through which enlarged adipose tissue elicits local tissue inflammation and further contributes to systemic inflammation. Current evidence supports that exercise training, such as aerobic and resistance exercise, reduces chronic inflammation, especially in obese individuals with high levels of inflammatory biomarkers undergoing a longer-term intervention. Several studies have reported that this effect is independent of the exercise-induced weight loss. There are several mechanisms through which exercise training reduces chronic inflammation, including its effect on muscle tissue to generate muscle-derived, anti-inflammatory 'myokine', its effect on adipose tissue to improve hypoxia and reduce local adipose tissue inflammation, its effect on endothelial cells to reduce leukocyte adhesion and cytokine production systemically, and its effect on the immune system to lower the number of pro-inflammatory cells and reduce pro-inflammatory cytokine production per cell. Of these potential mechanisms, the effect of exercise training on adipose tissue oxygenation is worth further investigation, as it is very likely that exercise training stimulates adipose tissue angiogenesis and increases blood flow, thereby reducing hypoxia and the associated chronic inflammation in adipose tissue of obese individuals.

  1. Omega-3 Fatty Acids in Modern Parenteral Nutrition: A Review of the Current Evidence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stanislaw Klek

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Intravenous lipid emulsions are an essential component of parenteral nutrition regimens. Originally employed as an efficient non-glucose energy source to reduce the adverse effects of high glucose intake and provide essential fatty acids, lipid emulsions have assumed a larger therapeutic role due to research demonstrating the effects of omega-3 and omega-6 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA on key metabolic functions, including inflammatory and immune response, coagulation, and cell signaling. Indeed, emerging evidence suggests that the effects of omega-3 PUFA on inflammation and immune response result in meaningful therapeutic benefits in surgical, cancer, and critically ill patients as well as patients requiring long-term parenteral nutrition. The present review provides an overview of the mechanisms of action through which omega-3 and omega-6 PUFA modulate the immune-inflammatory response and summarizes the current body of evidence regarding the clinical and pharmacoeconomic benefits of intravenous n-3 fatty acid-containing lipid emulsions in patients requiring parenteral nutrition.

  2. Agomelatine beyond Borders: Current Evidences of Its Efficacy in Disorders Other than Major Depression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Domenico De Berardis

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Agomelatine, a melatonergic antidepressant with a rapid onset of action, is one of the most recent drugs in the antidepressant category. Agomelatine’s antidepressant actions are attributed to its sleep-promoting and chronobiotic actions mediated by MT1 and MT2 receptors present in the suprachiasmatic nucleus, as well as to its effects on the blockade of 5-HT2c receptors. Blockade of 5-HT2c receptors causes release of both noradrenaline and dopamine at the fronto-cortical dopaminergic and noradrenergic pathways. The combined actions of agomelatine on MT1/MT2 and 5-HT2c receptors facilitate the resynchronization of altered circadian rhythms and abnormal sleep patterns. Agomelatine appeared to be effective in treating major depression. Moreover, evidence exists that points out a possible efficacy of such drug in the treatment of bipolar depression, anxiety disorders, alcohol dependence, migraines etc. Thus, the aim of this narrative review was to elucidate current evidences on the role of agomelatine in disorders other than major depression.

  3. The Space Charge Effect on the Discharge Current in Cross-Linked Polyethylene under High AC Voltages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Yoon-Hyeok; Hwangbo, Seung; Lee, June-Ho; Yi, Dong-Young; Han, Min-Koo

    2003-12-01

    The space charge distributions in solid dielectrics have been usually investigated by means of the pulsed electroacoustic (PEA) method. However, most previous studies have been limited to the phenomenological analysis under DC voltages. In our study, the space charge distribution in cross-linked polyethylene (XLPE) has been measured using AC voltages by means of the modified PEA method. Simultaneously, the streamer discharges in an air gap have been measured in order to investigate the relationship between space charge and discharge current, and the relationship has been adapted to the case of dielectric barrier discharge. At high AC voltages, discharge current increases to the critical point, but no further increase is exhibited over the critical voltage and the discharge pattern is resolved by the space charge. This result indicates that the frequency effect and space charge characteristics of dielectric materials are preferred to the voltage effect in the adaptation to dielectric barrier discharge. The results well explain the space charge effect on partial discharge and the dielectric barrier discharge phenomenon.

  4. Chemostratigraphic reconstruction of biofacies: Molecular evidence linking cyst-forming dinoflagellates with pre-Triassic ancestors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moldowan, J. Michael; Dahl, Jeremy; Jacobson, Stephen R.; Huizinga, Bradley J.; Fago, Frederick J.; Shetty, Rupa; Watt, David S.; Peters, Kenneth E.

    1996-02-01

    New data from numerous detailed mass-spectrometric studies have detected triaromatic dinosteroids in Precambrian to Cenozoic rock samples. Triaromatic dinosteroids are organic geochemicals derived from dinosterols, compounds known in modern organisms to be the nearly exclusive widely occurring products of dinoflagellates. We observed the ubiquitous occurrence of these dinosteroids in 49 Late Triassic through Cretaceous marine source rocks and the absence of them in 13 Permian-Carboniferous source rocks synergistic with the dinoflagellate cyst record. However, finding dinosteroids in lower Paleozoic and Precambrian strata presents challenging results for molecular paleontologists, evolutionary biologists, palynologists, and especially for those concerned with the food web at various times of biological crisis. Other than the few species known as parasites and symbionts, many other dinoflagellate species are important as primary producers. The presence of Precambrian to Devonian triaromatic dinosteroids gives chemostratigraphic evidence of dinoflagellates (or other organisms with similar chemosynthetic capabilities) in rocks significantly older than the oldest undisputed dinoflagellate fossils (dinoflagellate cysts from the Middle Triassic, ˜ 240 Ma), and older than the putative Silurian ˜ 420 Ma) dinocyst,Arpylorus antiquus (Calandra) Sargent, from Tunisia. This systematic chemostratigraphic approach can shed light not only on lineages of dinoflagellates and their precursors, but potentially on many other lineages, especially bacteria, algae, plants, and possibly some metazoans.

  5. Evidence linking rapid Arctic warming to mid-latitude weather patterns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francis, Jennifer; Skific, Natasa

    2015-07-13

    The effects of rapid Arctic warming and ice loss on weather patterns in the Northern Hemisphere is a topic of active research, lively scientific debate and high societal impact. The emergence of Arctic amplification--the enhanced sensitivity of high-latitude temperature to global warming--in only the last 10-20 years presents a challenge to identifying statistically robust atmospheric responses using observations. Several recent studies have proposed and demonstrated new mechanisms by which the changing Arctic may be affecting weather patterns in mid-latitudes, and these linkages differ fundamentally from tropics/jet-stream interactions through the transfer of wave energy. In this study, new metrics and evidence are presented that suggest disproportionate Arctic warming-and resulting weakening of the poleward temperature gradient-is causing the Northern Hemisphere circulation to assume a more meridional character (i.e. wavier), although not uniformly in space or by season, and that highly amplified jet-stream patterns are occurring more frequently. Further analysis based on self-organizing maps supports this finding. These changes in circulation are expected to lead to persistent weather patterns that are known to cause extreme weather events. As emissions of greenhouse gases continue unabated, therefore, the continued amplification of Arctic warming should favour an increased occurrence of extreme events caused by prolonged weather conditions.

  6. Validity of Quinpirole Sensitization Rat Model of OCD: Linking Evidence from Animal and Clinical Studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ales Stuchlik

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD is a neuropsychiatric disorder with 1-3% prevalence. OCD is characterized by recurrent thoughts (obsessions and repetitive behaviors (compulsions. The pathophysiology of OCD remains unclear, stressing the importance of pre-clinical studies. The aim of this article is to critically review a proposed animal model of OCD that is characterized by the induction of compulsive checking and behavioral sensitization to the D2/D3 dopamine agonist quinpirole.. Changes in this model have been reported at the level of brain structures, neurotransmitter systems and other neurophysiological aspects. In this review, we consider these alterations in relation to the clinical manifestations in OCD, with the aim to discuss and evaluate axes of validity of this model. Our analysis shows that some axes of validity of quinpirole sensitization model (QSM are strongly supported by clinical findings, such as behavioral phenomenology or roles of brain structures. Evidence on predictive validity is contradictory and ambiguous. It is concluded that this model is useful in the context of searching for the underlying pathophysiological basis of the disorder because of the relatively strong biological similarities with OCD.

  7. No evidence for a parent of origin specific differentially methylated region linked to RASGRF1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Punita ePitamber

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Imprinted genes are expressed from one parental allele in a parent-of-origin manner. This mono-allelic behavior is regulated by allele-specific DNA methylation that is confined to differentially methylated regions (DMRs. To date there are over 80 known human imprinted genes of which only three are known to have paternally methylated DMRs. In mice there exists an additional paternally methylated DMR associated with Rasgrf1. The Rasgrf1 gene forms part of the MAPK signaling pathway and plays a role in long-term memory formation and growth control. The presence of a RASGRF1-associated DMR in humans and its methylation status has not been explored. The primary aim of this study was to determine whether the human RASGRF1 gene contains a DMR and whether this DMR is paternally methylated. Computational assessments were done to identify putative CTCF binding sites, CpG islands (CGIs that could serve as potential RASGRF1 DMRs and tandem repeats within or adjacent to these CGIs. The methylation status of three putative CGIs was assessed using quantitative pyrosequencing technology. None of the putative CTCF binding sites were found to occur in the predicted CGIs. The three putative CGIs linked to RASGRF1 did not display allele-specific methylation in blood DNA nor unique paternal methylation in sperm DNA. While one of the three CGIs was found to be hypomethylated in both blood DNA and sperm DNA, the other two were found to be hypermethylated. The tandem repeats that were identified were associated with only one of the putative CGIs. This CGI is located at the promoter region of RASGRF1 and was found to be hypomethylated both in the peripheral blood and in the sperm samples. The CGIs evaluated in this study did not fit the criteria of being a DMR. The human RASGRF1-associated CpG rich regions do not exhibit differential methylation in a parent-of-origin manner. However, expression studies would need to be performed to confirm the imprint status of

  8. The Cretaceous OAE1a-Submarine Plateau Link: Additional Geochemical Evidence from Marine Sedimentary Sections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duncan, R. A.; Tiraboschi, D.; Erba, E.; Walczak, P.; Clarke, L. J.

    2007-12-01

    We explore the proposed link between submarine plateau volcanism associated with construction of the Ontong Java-Manihiki-Hikurangi plateau (122 Ma) and early Aptian Ocean Anoxic Event 1a (OAE1a) through biostratigraphic data and trace metal abundance anomalies in marine sedimentary sections recovered in cores from DSDP Site 167 (Magellan Rise), ODP Sites 463 and 866 (Mid-Pacific Mountains), and at the Cismon and Piobbico on-land drillsites (Belluno and Umbria-Marche Basins, Italy). Sections were correlated using bio- and magneto-stratigraphic data, and the global d13C isotope anomaly associated with OAE1a. Bulk sediment samples that bracket the OAE1a interval at each site were analyzed by ICP-MS methods. After normalizing element concentrations to Zr to remove the variable contribution of terrigenous material to these sediments, we detected an interval of concentrated metal abundance anomalies that precedes the abrupt positive climb in the d13C isotope excursion, beginning near magnetic chron M0, continuing through the organic-rich interval of anoxic conditions. The metal abundance anomalies (e.g., Sc, Cu, Co, Sn, Cr, Ni, V, Cd, Ag, Bi, Se, W, Mo, Sb, Pb up to 100x background), variable in intensity and pattern of elements, indicate that intermittent hydrothermal activity, in the form of both water/rock exchange and magmatic degassing, introduced large concentrations of trace metals into the Cretaceous ocean at the same time that turnover in plankton communities and increases in isotopically light organic carbon burial occurred. The stratigraphic position of the intervals of trace metal anomalies matches events prior, during and after OAE1a and indicates that intermittent hydrothermal activity on a massive scale triggered abrupt changes in biota, carbon burial and deep ocean oxygen contents. Calcareous nannofossil abundance and composition display major changes in biogenic paleofluxes, temperature and fertility of surface waters, coeval with metal enrichments

  9. Anti-Oxidative and Anti-Inflammatory Effects of Ginger in Health and Physical Activity: Review of Current Evidence

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Nafiseh Shokri Mashhadi; Reza Ghiasvand; Gholamreza Askari; Mitra Hariri; Leila Darvishi; Mohammad Reza Mofid

    2013-01-01

    .... The health-promoting perspective of ginger is attributed to its rich phytochemistry. This study aimed to review the current evidence on ginger effects as an anti-inflammatory and anti-oxidative. Methods...

  10. No evidence of BRCA2 mutations in chromosome 13q-linked Utah high-risk prostate cancer pedigrees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen-Brady, Kristina; Farnham, James M; Camp, Nicola J; Karlins, Eric; Ostrander, Elaine A; Cannon-Albright, Lisa A

    2009-05-28

    Germline mutations in the BRCA2 gene have been suggested to account for about 5% of familial prostate cancer; mutations have been reported in 2% of early onset (i.e., mutation has been identified in Iceland (999del5). However, the role of BRCA2 in high risk prostate cancer pedigrees remains unclear. We examined the potential involvement of BRCA2 in a set offive high-risk prostate cancer pedigrees in which all prostate cases were no more distantly related than two meioses from another case, and the resulting cluster contained at least four prostate cancer cases. We selected these five pedigrees from a larger dataset of 59 high-risk prostate cancer pedigrees analyzed in a genome-wide linkage screen. Selected pedigrees showed at least nominal linkage evidence to the BRCA2 region on chromosome 13q. We mutation screened all coding regions and intron/exon boundaries of the BRCA2 gene in the youngest prostate cancer case who carried the linked 13q segregating haplotype, as well as in a distantly related haplotype carrier to confirm any segregation. We observed no known protein truncating BRCA2 deleterious mutations. We identified one non-segregating BRCA2 variant of uncertain significance, one non-segregating intronic variant not previously reported, and a number of polymorphisms. In this set of high-risk prostate cancer pedigrees with at least nominal linkage evidence to BRCA2, we saw no evidence for segregating BRCA2 protein truncating mutations in heritable prostate cancer.

  11. Implementing a journal club in a palliative care setting: a link in the chain of evidence-based practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Connor, Lera; Bennett, Peter; Gardner, Anne; Hawkins, Mary T; Wellman, David

    2009-01-01

    This paper describes the implementation and evaluation of a journal club in a privately funded palliative care unit. Journal club meetings were initiated as part of a quality improvement process to foster the uptake of evidence-based practice. Nurses were presented with research articles each month and discussions were conducted focussing on methodological considerations of the research and implications of the research for patient care. The maximum number of attendees at any one meeting was nine and the minimum number was four. Overall, evaluations were positive about all aspects of the meetings. Attendees found that the selected articles were relevant, providing new information, stimulated discussion and reflection on clinical practice and encouraged further reading. One of the positive aspects of the meetings identified by participants was the facilitation style that enabled discussion in a safe and supportive environment. An important outcome of the meetings is the potential to explore evidence-based practices relevant to palliative care and to implement new practices or revise existing ones. As part of this process practice changes and clinical guidelines have been implemented. A dedicated facilitator with university links and a supportive organisational culture promoted club meetings as a practical way to provide clinical nurses with the opportunity to explore evidence-based research in the area of palliative care.

  12. Treatment of gastric outlet obstruction that results fromunresectable gastric cancer: Current evidence

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2016-01-01

    Malignant gastric outlet obstruction (GOO) is a commoncondition that results from locally advanced malignanciesin the upper gastrointestinal tract, such aspancreatic, gastric, and other carcinomas. Two typesof procedures for malignant GOO, namely, gastrojejunostomy(GJ) with laparotomy or a laparoscopicapproach and endoscopic stenting (ES), are currentlyavailable. Although numerous previous reports haveclarified the benefits and drawbacks of each procedure,whether GJ or ES should be used in patients with GOOthat results from gastric cancer who may have a longerlife expectancy than patients with other malignancieshas not been determined. In this review, which focuseson gastric cancer-induced GOO, we analyzed the twosystematic reviews and a meta-analysis that comparedGJ and ES and outlined the current status of GOOtreatment. We also provide an updated review thatincludes laparoscopic GJ. Various data from 13 studiesin one review and 6 studies in another review wereanalyzed. Although the main results of the presentreview indicated that both GJ and ES were efficacioustreatments in patients with GOO that resulted fromgastric cancer, current evidence suggests that GJ maybe the preferable procedure given its good performancestatus and improved prognosis in gastric cancer patients.

  13. Direct evidence for local oscillatory current sources and intracortical phase gradients in turtle visual cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prechtl, J C; Bullock, T H; Kleinfeld, D

    2000-01-18

    Visual stimuli induce oscillations in the membrane potential of neurons in cortices of several species. In turtle, these oscillations take the form of linear and circular traveling waves. Such waves may be a consequence of a pacemaker that emits periodic pulses of excitation that propagate across a network of excitable neuronal tissue or may result from continuous and possibly reconfigurable phase shifts along a network with multiple weakly coupled neuronal oscillators. As a means to resolve the origin of wave propagation in turtle visual cortex, we performed simultaneous measurements of the local field potential at a series of depths throughout this cortex. Measurements along a single radial penetration revealed the presence of broadband current sources, with a center frequency near 20 Hz (gamma band), that were activated by visual stimulation. The spectral coherence between sources at two well-separated loci along a rostral-caudal axis revealed the presence of systematic timing differences between localized cortical oscillators. These multiple oscillating current sources and their timing differences in a tangential plane are interpreted as the neuronal activity that underlies the wave motion revealed in previous imaging studies. The present data provide direct evidence for the inference from imaging of bidirectional wave motion that the stimulus-induced electrical waves in turtle visual cortex correspond to phase shifts in a network of coupled neuronal oscillators.

  14. Clinical significance of nutritional status in patients with atrial fibrillation: An overview of current evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anaszewicz, Marzena; Budzyński, Jacek

    2017-05-01

    Obesity is a well-known atherosclerosis risk factor; however, its role and the importance of undernutrition in atrial fibrillation (AF) pathogenesis are still not well understood. The aim of this study was to present the current state of knowledge on this issue in different groups of patients. Systematic review of papers published between 1980 and 2016. The literature shows contradicting views regarding the impact of nutritional status on the risk, course, and complications of AF. On the one hand, it has been revealed that overweight, obesity, and high birth mass increase the risk of AF, and that their reduction is linked to an improved course of AF and reduced all-cause and cardiovascular mortality. On the other hand, a so-called obesity paradox has been found, which shows lower all-cause mortality in overweight patients with AF compared to those of normal weight or who are underweight. It has also been shown, although based on a small number of studies, that the relationship between nutritional status and risk of AF and its complication may be U-shaped, which means that not only patients with obesity, but also individuals with underweight, cachexia, and low birth weight may have an increased risk and poor outcome of AF. The relationship between patients' nutritional status and the course of AF has become clearer but it requires further studies examining the importance of weight reduction on AF course. Copyright © 2016 Japanese College of Cardiology. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Is Africa’s current growth reducing inequality? Evidence from some selected african countries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alege P.O.

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Is Africa’s current growth reducing inequality? What are the implications of growth on output performances in Africa? Does the effect of Africa’s growth on sectorial output have any implication for inequality in Africa? The study investigates the effect of shocks on a set of macroeconomic variables on inequality (measured by life expectancy and the implication of this on sectors that are perceived to provide economic empowerment in form of employment for people living in the African countries in our sample. Studies already find that growth in many African countries has not been accompanied with significant improvement in employment. Therefore inequality is subject to a counter cyclical trend in production levels when export destination countries experience a recession. The study also provides insight on the effect of growth on sectorial output for three major sectors in the African economy with the intent of analyzing the impact of growth on sectorial development. The method used in this study is Panel Vector Autoregressive (PVAR estimation and the obvious advantage of this method lies in the fact that it allows us to capture both static and dynamic interdependencies and to treat the links across units in an unrestricted fashion. Data is obtained from World Bank (WDI Statistics for the period 1985 to 2012 (28 years for 10 African Countries. Our main findings confirm strong negative relationship between GDP growth and life expectancy and also for GDP and the services and manufacturing sector considering the full sample.

  16. Linking memory and language: Evidence for a serial-order learning impairment in dyslexia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogaerts, Louisa; Szmalec, Arnaud; Hachmann, Wibke M; Page, Mike P A; Duyck, Wouter

    2015-01-01

    The present study investigated long-term serial-order learning impairments, operationalized as reduced Hebb repetition learning (HRL), in people with dyslexia. In a first multi-session experiment, we investigated both the persistence of a serial-order learning impairment as well as the long-term retention of serial-order representations, both in a group of Dutch-speaking adults with developmental dyslexia and in a matched control group. In a second experiment, we relied on the assumption that HRL mimics naturalistic word-form acquisition and we investigated the lexicalization of novel word-forms acquired through HRL. First, our results demonstrate that adults with dyslexia are fundamentally impaired in the long-term acquisition of serial-order information. Second, dyslexic and control participants show comparable retention of the long-term serial-order representations in memory over a period of 1 month. Third, the data suggest weaker lexicalization of newly acquired word-forms in the dyslexic group. We discuss the integration of these findings into current theoretical views of dyslexia.

  17. Evidence of a link between fever and microscopic hematuria in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, Rama; Distal, Rotem; Shapiro, Arthur; Waisman, Yehezkel

    2017-06-01

    Despite the common conception that febrile illnesses are associated with microscopic hematuria in children, a review of the literature failed to disclose supportive evidence. The aim of this study was to evaluate this relationship. Background data were collected for a convenience sample of children aged 4-18 years who presented to the emergency department (ED) of a tertiary pediatric medical center. Vital signs were measured and a midstream urine specimen was collected. Specimens positive for the presence of blood (>5 erythrocytes/μl; Combur 10 Test Strips) were examined microscopically. Patients found to have microscopic hematuria (>5 erythrocytes/high power field) were asked to undergo repeated urine testing within 3 weeks or at least 1 week after the fever (if present) resolved. A telephone interview was conducted 9-10 years after the ED visit, for all children with microscopic hematuria. Data were coded and transferred to Microsoft Excel 2007 (Raymond Wa), and then analyzed using SPSS 15 (SPSS Inc., Chicago, IL). Six hundred sixty patients were enrolled in the study; 161 were febrile (mean temperature 39.2 ± .08 °C), and 499 were afebrile (mean temperature 36.7 ± 0.4 °C) (p Microscopic hematuria was found in 12 children, 9 febrile (5.6%), and 3 afebrile (0.6%) (p microscopic hematuria. The findings suggest that fever is associated with transient microscopic hematuria in children. The study is limited by its single-center setting and relatively small sample. What is known: • It is commonly believed that fever increases the incidence of microscopic hematuria. • However, to the best of our knowledge, this assumption has not been proven. What is new: • This study demonstrates a significant association between fever and transient microscopic hematuria in children. • The transient nature of the hematuria may be reassuring for both parents and healthcare providers.

  18. Linking geological evidence from the Eurasian suture zones to a regional Indian Ocean plate tectonic model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibbons, A.; Aitchison, J.; Müller, R.; Whittaker, J.

    2012-12-01

    We present a revised regional plate tectonic model for the Indian Ocean from the Late Jurassic to present, which assimilates both marine geophysical data constraining the seafloor spreading history as well as a variety of geological observations from the Eurasian collision zone. This model includes relative motion between Greater India, Sri Lanka, West Australia, East Antarctica, East Madagascar, the Seychelles and Argoland, a continental sliver which began migrating towards Eurasia in the Late Jurassic, forming the northern margins of Greater India and western Australia. Recently collected data offshore northwest Australia suggest that the majority of Greater India reached only halfway along the West Australian margin in an Early Mesozoic reconstruction, bounded by the Wallaby-Zenith Fracture Zone. The revised geometries and relative motion histories redefine the timing and nature of collisional events, as well as the history of back-arc basins and intra-oceanic arcs, such as the Kohistan-Ladakh intra-oceanic arc in northwest India and Pakistan. Abundant ophiolites have been identified throughout the Yarlung-Tsangpo Suture Zone, between the Indian-Himalaya and Tibet, several have boninitic compositions and almost all date to either the Mid Jurassic or late Early Cretaceous. Further evidence suggests that an intra-oceanic arc collided with Greater India before colliding with Eurasia. Our model features a transform boundary running north of East Africa, which initiated an oceanic arc following short-lived compression between the western and central Mesotethys in the Late Jurassic, coinciding with the initial motion of Argoland. The arc developed through extension and ophiolite generation until at least the mid-Cretaceous and consumed a narrow thinned sliver of West Argoland between ~120-65 Ma. The arc remained active in the same position until its eventual collision with Greater India ~55 Ma. The eastern portion of the intra-oceanic arc accreted to eastern Eurasia

  19. Genetic evidence links invasive monk parakeet populations in the United States to the international pet trade

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Avery Michael L

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Severe ecological and economic impacts caused by some invasive species make it imperative to understand the attributes that permit them to spread. A notorious crop pest across its native range in South America, the monk parakeet (Myiopsitta monachus has become established on four other continents, including growing populations in the United States. As a critical first step to studying mechanisms of invasion success in this species, here we elucidated the geographical and taxonomic history of the North American invasions of the monk parakeet. Specifically, we conducted a genetic assessment of current monk parakeet taxonomy based on mitochondrial DNA control region sequences from 73 museum specimens. These data supported comparative analyses of mtDNA lineage diversity in the native and naturalized ranges of the monk parakeet and allowed for identification of putative source populations. Results There was no molecular character support for the M. m. calita, M. m. cotorra, and M. m. monachus subspecies, while the Bolivian M. m. luchsi was monophyletic and diagnosably distinct. Three haplotypes sampled in the native range were detected within invasive populations in Florida, Connecticut, New Jersey and Rhode Island, the two most common of which were unique to M. m. monachus samples from eastern Argentina and bordering areas in Brazil and Uruguay. Conclusion The lack of discrete morphological character differences in tandem with the results presented here suggest that M. m. calita, M. m. cotorra and M. m. monachus are in need of formal taxonomic revision. The genetic distinctiveness of M. m. luchsi is consistent with previous recommendations of allospecies status for this taxon. The geographic origins of haplotypes sampled in the four U.S. populations are concordant with trapping records from the mid-20th century and suggest that propagule pressure exerted by the international pet bird trade contributed to the establishment of

  20. Genetic evidence links invasive monk parakeet populations in the United States to the international pet trade.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russello, Michael A; Avery, Michael L; Wright, Timothy F

    2008-07-24

    Severe ecological and economic impacts caused by some invasive species make it imperative to understand the attributes that permit them to spread. A notorious crop pest across its native range in South America, the monk parakeet (Myiopsitta monachus) has become established on four other continents, including growing populations in the United States. As a critical first step to studying mechanisms of invasion success in this species, here we elucidated the geographical and taxonomic history of the North American invasions of the monk parakeet. Specifically, we conducted a genetic assessment of current monk parakeet taxonomy based on mitochondrial DNA control region sequences from 73 museum specimens. These data supported comparative analyses of mtDNA lineage diversity in the native and naturalized ranges of the monk parakeet and allowed for identification of putative source populations. There was no molecular character support for the M. m. calita, M. m. cotorra, and M. m. monachus subspecies, while the Bolivian M. m. luchsi was monophyletic and diagnosably distinct. Three haplotypes sampled in the native range were detected within invasive populations in Florida, Connecticut, New Jersey and Rhode Island, the two most common of which were unique to M. m. monachus samples from eastern Argentina and bordering areas in Brazil and Uruguay. The lack of discrete morphological character differences in tandem with the results presented here suggest that M. m. calita, M. m. cotorra and M. m. monachus are in need of formal taxonomic revision. The genetic distinctiveness of M. m. luchsi is consistent with previous recommendations of allospecies status for this taxon. The geographic origins of haplotypes sampled in the four U.S. populations are concordant with trapping records from the mid-20th century and suggest that propagule pressure exerted by the international pet bird trade contributed to the establishment of invasive populations in the United States.

  1. Evidence for a specific link between the personality trait of absorption and idiopathic environmental intolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witthöft, Michael; Rist, Fred; Bailer, Josef

    2008-01-01

    Absorption as a personality trait refers to the predisposition to get deeply immersed in sensory (e.g., smells, sounds, pictures) or mystical experiences, that is, to experience altered states of consciousness. Absorption is markedly related to constructs openness to experiences, hypnotic suggestibility, imagination, and dissociation. Although absorption was hypothesized to be a risk factor for medically unexplained symptoms (MUS), the construct has yet not been investigated in individually suffering from idiopathic environmental intolerance (IEI), formerly better known as multiple chemical sensitivity (MCS). IEI is a complex condition marked by MUS, which patients attribute to various chemical substances that are typically detectable by their odor (e.g., exhaust emissions, cigarette smoke). The current study investigated whether IEI was related to the personality trait of absorption. In a longitudinal study, 54 subjects with IEI were compared to 44 subjects with a somatoform disorder (SFD), but without IEI, and 54 subjects with neither SFD nor IEI (control group, CG). Self-report measures of somatic symptoms, severity of IEI, and level of absorption were collected both at a first examination and 32 mo later. On both assessments, subjects with IEI and individuals with SFD reported similar highly elevated levels of MUS, compared to CG. In contrast to SFD, IEI was specifically related to elevated absorption scores. IEI was specifically associated with a tendency to experience self-altering states of consciousness. Since absorption is related to both openness to unusual experiences and elevated imaginative involvement, absorption might contribute to IEI via two routes by (1) enhancing the susceptibility for IEI-specific convictions and (2) fostering classical conditioning processes of MUS via enhanced cognitive-imaginative representations of assumed IEI triggers.

  2. Geochronologic and petrochemical evidence for the genetic link between the Maomaogou nepheline syenites and the Emeishan large igneous province

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LUO ZhenYu; XU YiGang; HE Bin; SHI YuRuo; HUANG XiaoLong

    2007-01-01

    The Maomaogou nepheline syenite is located at the inner zone of the Emeishan large igneous province and exhibits intrusive contact with the Emeishan basalts. SHRIMP U-Pb dating on zircons from this syenite yields an age of 261.6±4.4 Ma, in agreement with the age of the Panzhihua layered intrusion and the eruption age of the Emeishan basalts as constrained by stratigraphic data. Geochemical data further suggest that the Maomaogou syenite has a source analogue to the Emeishan basalt, and may have been formed by partial melting of gabbroic cumulates underplated in the lower crust. As s result, temporal and spatial relationships and petrogenetic constraints provide evidence for the genetic link between basalts, mafic/ultramafic and intermediate/acidic intrusives in the Panxi area.

  3. Experimental Evidence Linking Elevated CO2, Rhizosphere C/N Stoichiometry and Microbial Efficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrillo, Y.; Dijkstra, F. A.; Pendall, E.; LeCain, D. R.; Morgan, J.

    2012-12-01

    expected to be more efficient in their C use. Decreasing the C/N ratio of roots decreased SOM respiration and increased the efficiency of SOM-consuming microbes. Direct N additions had a similar but stronger effect. Increased C efficiency with greater nutrient availability is consistent with theoretical expectations of C utilization under nutrient limitation. Notably, the response of C use to N treatments occurred only under eCO2 conditions. This functional contrast was supported by differential responses of microbial PLFA profiles to N treatments under CO2 treatments. Together, these results suggest that the eCO2 environment was more conducive to N limitation, via changes in microbial community structure and function. Our results provide direct experimental evidence of plant-mediated alteration of decomposer C efficiency due to changes in atmospheric CO2 and N availability from both plant and soil sources. An increase in SOM-consuming microbes efficiency in an eCO2 world is likely to have important ecosystem-level implications as it could enhance the amount of C that remains in soil relative to the amount released to the atmosphere. The interactive effects of CO2 and N treatments suggest that microbial efficiency will be more sensitive to changes in nutrient status under the future eCO2 atmosphere.

  4. Quantifying and qualifying terroir: Empirical evidence linking climate, vineyards, and people across scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicholas, Kimberly

    2014-05-01

    Climate affects the geographic range, yield, price, and biochemical composition of winegrapes. At the regional scale, historical climate and yield data were successfully used to develop simple models of crop yields using two or three monthly climate parameters for twelve major California crops, including winegrapes. These crop models were used to project the impact of future climate change on crop yields, showing that greater warming would increasingly push highly suitable areas for viticulture outside of their current range. Correlating temperature with price for Pinot noir throughout its growing range in California demonstrated higher prices for grapes grown in cooler climates, whereas prices dropped off rapidly above a ripening temperature threshold, indicating the vulnerability of grape price to climate change. At the vineyard scale, a three-year field study of eleven Pinot noir vineyards in California's North Coast showed that warm temperatures early in the growing season were correlated with increased phenolic compounds (anthocyanins and tannins), which likely benefits wine quality, but warmer periods later in the ripening process appeared to offset these effects. At the microclimate scale, high light intensities were measured on Pinot noir fruit in vertically shoot positioned vineyards, indicating a potential for changing canopy management to provide more optimal ripening conditions. Vineyards are highly managed, and there are many opportunities for viticulturists to shape the micro- and meso-climate that vines experience, thereby influencing the biophysical drivers of terroir through their site selection and vineyard planting and farming choices. An analysis of the precision agriculture and management strategies used by winegrowers in California and Australia showed that growers tend to rely more on short-term farming actions for adapting to environmental stresses; these may have considerable potential to enhance adaptive capacity, and are easier to

  5. The 'antisocial' person: an insight in to biology, classification and current evidence on treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajapakse Senaka

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background This review analyses and summarises the recent advances in understanding the neurobiology of violence and empathy, taxonomical issues on defining personality disorders characterised by disregard for social norms, evidence for efficacy of different treatment modalities and ethical implications in defining 'at-risk' individuals for preventive interventions. Methods PubMed was searched with the keywords 'antisocial personality disorder', 'dissocial personality disorder' and 'psychopathy'. The search was limited to articles published in English over the last 10 years (1999 to 2009 Results Both diagnostic manuals used in modern psychiatry, the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual published by the American Psychiatric Association and the International Classification of Diseases published by the World Health Organization, identify a personality disorder sharing similar traits. It is termed antisocial personality disorder in the diagnostic and statistical manual and dissocial personality disorder in the International Classification of Diseases. However, some authors query the ability of the existing manuals to identify a special category termed 'psychopathy', which in their opinion deserves special attention. On treatment-related issues, many psychological and behavioural therapies have shown success rates ranging from 25% to 62% in different cohorts. Multisystemic therapy and cognitive behaviour therapy have been proven efficacious in many trials. There is no substantial evidence for the efficacy of pharmacological therapy. Currently, the emphasis is on early identification and prevention of antisocial behaviour despite the ethical implications of defining at-risk children. Conclusions Further research is needed in the areas of neuroendocrinological associations of violent behaviour, taxonomic existence of psychopathy and efficacy of treatment modalities.

  6. Assessing the Effect of Waterpipe Smoking on Cancer Outcome - a Systematic Review of Current Evidence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Awan, Kamran Habib; Siddiqi, Kamran; Patil, Shankargouda; Hussain, Quratul Ann

    2017-02-01

    Background: Waterpipe smoking (WPS) is widely believed to be a safe and hazard-free tobacco habit. However, a number of studies have indicated that exposure to several toxicants and carcinogens through WPS is strongly related to serious health hazards. The current paper presents a narrative review on the effects of WPS on cancer outcome. Methods: The addressed focused question was “Is there an association between waterpipe smoking and cancer outcome?” PubMed, Medline, EMBASE, ISI Web of Science and the Cochrane databases were searched until June 2015 using the key words “Waterpipe”, “Hookah”, “Narghileh”, “Shisha”, “Hubbly Bubbly” “cancer” in various combinations. Letters to the Editor, review articles, case-reports and unpublished articles were excluded. Results: A total of 16 studies were included: six on lung cancer, three on oesophageal cancer, two on gastric cancer, two on bladder cancer, and one each on nasopharyngeal, pancreatic and prostate cancers. Our search did not yield any study that evaluated the risk of oral cancer in WPS users. The available evidence showed a significant association of WPS with lung cancer (UOR 6.0, 95% CI 1.78–20.26); however, no association was observed with bladder, nasopharyngeal, pancreatic and prostate cancers. Gastric (OR 3.4, 95% CI 1.7-7.1) and oesophageal cancers (OR 1.85, 95% CI 1.41-2.44) were observed to have weak associations with WPS. Conclusion: Regardless of the limitations, there is sufficient evidence to suggest associations of WPS with cancer, particularly in the lung. Future well-designed studies are required to identify and quantify with confidence all the health effects of this form of smoking. Creative Commons Attribution License

  7. Non-medical prescribing by physiotherapists: issues reported in the current evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, Joanne H; Grimmer, Karen

    2014-02-01

    Physiotherapists should be proactive in preparing themselves to participate in innovative models of health care, which are emerging from the healthcare workforce reforms in Australia. One challenging outcome of workforce change is physiotherapy (non-medical) prescribing (NMP), which is part of the extension of scope of physiotherapy practice. This paper summarises the current evidence base for Australian physiotherapists seeking to obtain prescribing rights. A targeted literature review was undertaken through EBSCO Host, Cochrane, Medline, SportsDiscus, Cinahl, Healthsource and Google.com using broad search terms to identify peer-reviewed and grey literature pertaining to NMP by physiotherapists, nationally and internationally. No critical appraisal was undertaken however literature was structured into the NHMRC hierarchy of evidence. Themes raised in the included literature were reported descriptively. There were six relevant peer-reviewed articles, of hierarchy levels III_3 and IV. There was however, comprehensive and recent grey literature to inform Australian physiotherapy NMP initiatives. Themes included the need for standard National action in relation to legislative and regulatory/registration issues, appropriate education, credentialing and supervisory requirements for physiotherapy prescribing. Many lessons can be learnt from the literature, including the importance of planned, uniform National action (rather than piecemeal state-by-state initiatives). Essential elements include appropriate training and skills-based recognition within the discipline and the broader health team, and the need to overtly demonstrate effectiveness and safety. Regularly-evaluated service-delivery models which support NMP by physiotherapists are further required, to demonstrate efficiency, timeliness, patient centredness and equity. Crown Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Evidence-based guidelines on the therapeutic use of transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lefaucheur, Jean-Pascal; Antal, Andrea; Ayache, Samar S; Benninger, David H; Brunelin, Jérôme; Cogiamanian, Filippo; Cotelli, Maria; De Ridder, Dirk; Ferrucci, Roberta; Langguth, Berthold; Marangolo, Paola; Mylius, Veit; Nitsche, Michael A; Padberg, Frank; Palm, Ulrich; Poulet, Emmanuel; Priori, Alberto; Rossi, Simone; Schecklmann, Martin; Vanneste, Sven; Ziemann, Ulf; Garcia-Larrea, Luis; Paulus, Walter

    2017-01-01

    A group of European experts was commissioned by the European Chapter of the International Federation of Clinical Neurophysiology to gather knowledge about the state of the art of the therapeutic use of transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) from studies published up until September 2016, regarding pain, Parkinson's disease, other movement disorders, motor stroke, poststroke aphasia, multiple sclerosis, epilepsy, consciousness disorders, Alzheimer's disease, tinnitus, depression, schizophrenia, and craving/addiction. The evidence-based analysis included only studies based on repeated tDCS sessions with sham tDCS control procedure; 25 patients or more having received active treatment was required for Class I, while a lower number of 10-24 patients was accepted for Class II studies. Current evidence does not allow making any recommendation of Level A (definite efficacy) for any indication. Level B recommendation (probable efficacy) is proposed for: (i) anodal tDCS of the left primary motor cortex (M1) (with right orbitofrontal cathode) in fibromyalgia; (ii) anodal tDCS of the left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC) (with right orbitofrontal cathode) in major depressive episode without drug resistance; (iii) anodal tDCS of the right DLPFC (with left DLPFC cathode) in addiction/craving. Level C recommendation (possible efficacy) is proposed for anodal tDCS of the left M1 (or contralateral to pain side, with right orbitofrontal cathode) in chronic lower limb neuropathic pain secondary to spinal cord lesion. Conversely, Level B recommendation (probable inefficacy) is conferred on the absence of clinical effects of: (i) anodal tDCS of the left temporal cortex (with right orbitofrontal cathode) in tinnitus; (ii) anodal tDCS of the left DLPFC (with right orbitofrontal cathode) in drug-resistant major depressive episode. It remains to be clarified whether the probable or possible therapeutic effects of tDCS are clinically meaningful and how to optimally perform t

  9. Brain PET imaging in obesity and food addiction: current evidence and hypothesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iozzo, Patricia; Guiducci, Letizia; Guzzardi, Maria Angela; Pagotto, Uberto

    2012-01-01

    The ongoing epidemics of obesity is one main health concern of the present time. Overeating in some obese individuals shares similarities with the loss of control and compulsive behavior observed in drug-addicted subjects, suggesting that obesity may involve food addiction. Here, we review the contributions provided by the use of positron emission tomography to the current understanding of the cerebral control of obesity and food intake in humans. The available studies have shown that multiple areas in the brain are involved with the reward properties of food, such as prefrontal, orbitofrontal, somatosensory cortices, insula, thalamus, hypothalamus, amygdala, and others. This review summarizes the current evidence, supporting the concepts that i) regions involved in the somatosensory response to food sight, taste, and smell are activated by palatable foods and may be hyperresponsive in obese individuals, ii) areas controlling executive drive seem to overreact to the anticipation of pleasure during cue exposure, and iii) those involved in cognitive control and inhibitory behavior may be resistant to the perception of reward after food exposure in obese subjects. All of these features may stimulate, for different reasons, ingestion of highly palatable and energy-rich foods. Though these same regions are similarly involved in drug abusers and game-addicted individuals, any direct resemblance may be an oversimplification, especially as the heterogeneities between studies and the prevalent exclusion of sensitive groups still limit a coherent interpretation of the findings. Further work is required to comprehensively tackle the multifaceted phenotype of obesity and identify the role of food dependency in its pathophysiology. Copyright © 2012 S. Karger GmbH, Freiburg.

  10. Modifiable factors in the management of glaucoma: a systematic review of current evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hecht, Idan; Achiron, Asaf; Man, Vitaly; Burgansky-Eliash, Zvia

    2017-04-01

    Primary open angle glaucoma is a chronic optic neuropathy affecting millions of people worldwide and represents a major public health issue. Environmental factors, behaviors, and diet are intimately related to patient health and may play a role in the pathogenesis and progression of glaucoma. This study aims to review the literature, focusing on the last three years, regarding modifiable lifestyle interventions in the management of primary open angle glaucoma. Electronic databases were searched for studies published between January 2013 and July 2016 on the topic of lifestyle interventions in primary open angle glaucoma. Sleeping with the head elevated and avoiding the worst eye-dependent side during sleep may slightly lower intraocular pressure and reduce visual field loss. Some food supplements and moderate aerobic exercise may also reduce intraocular pressure up to 2.0 and 3.0 mmHg, respectively. Frequency of coffee intake may be associated with disease progression. Potential negative effects are associated with weight-lifting and yoga exercises. Certain lifestyle habits could influence glaucoma progression, yet no specific interventions are currently supported by robust evidence. Awareness of the possible influences of certain habits should help guide clinical advice and is important to help patients avoid adverse outcomes and take an active role in the management of their disease.

  11. Flavanols and Anthocyanins in Cardiovascular Health: A Review of Current Evidence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonia de Pascual-Teresa

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays it is accepted that natural flavonoids present in fruits and plant-derived-foods are relevant, not only for technological reasons and organoleptic properties, but also because of their potential health-promoting effects, as suggested by the available experimental and epidemiological evidence. The beneficial biological effects of these food bioactives may be driven by two of their characteristic properties: their affinity for proteins and their antioxidant activity. Over the last 15 years, numerous publications have demonstrated that besides their in vitro antioxidant capacity, certain phenolic compounds, such as anthocyanins, catechins, proanthocyanidins, and other non coloured flavonoids, may regulate different signaling pathways involved in cell survival, growth and differentiation. In this review we will update the knowledge on the cardiovascular effects of anthocyanins, catechins and proanthocyanidins, as implied by the in vitro and clinical studies on these compounds. We also review the available information on the structure, distribution and bioavailability of flavanols (monomeric catechins and proanthocyanidins and anthocyanins, data necessary in order to understand their role in reducing risk factors and preventing cardiovascular health problems through different aspects of their bioefficacy on vascular parameters (platelet agregation, atherosclerosis, blood pressure, antioxidant status, inflammation-related markers, etc., myocardial conditions, and whole-body metabolism (serum biochemistry, lipid profile, highlighting the need for better-designed clinical studies to improve the current knowledge on the potential health benefits of these flavonoids to cardiovascular and metabolic health.

  12. Clinical utility of trabectedin for the treatment of ovarian cancer: current evidence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mascilini F

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Floriana Mascilini,* Giulia Amadio,* Maria Grazia Di Stefano, Manuela Ludovisi, Alessia Di Legge, Carmine Conte, Rosa De Vincenzo, Caterina Ricci, Valeria Masciullo, Vanda Salutari, Giovanni Scambia, Gabriella FerrandinaGynecologic Oncology Unit, Department of Oncology, Catholic University of Rome, Italy  *These authors contributed equally to this work Abstract: Among the pharmaceutical options available for treatment of ovarian cancer, attention has been increasingly focused on trabectedin (ET-743, a drug which displays a unique mechanism of action and has been shown to be active in several human malignancies. Currently, single agent trabectedin is approved for treatment of patients with advanced soft tissue sarcoma after failure of anthracyclines and ifosfamide, and in association with pegylated liposomal doxorubicin for treatment of patients with relapsed partially platinum-sensitive ovarian cancer. This review aims at summarizing the available evidence about the clinical role of trabectedin in the management of patients with epithelial ovarian cancer. Novel perspectives coming from a better understanding of trabectedin mechanisms of action and definition of patients subgroups likely susceptible to benefit of trabectedin treatment are also presented. Keywords: ET-743, ovarian cancer, clinical trials

  13. Antibiotics versus appendectomy in the management of acute appendicitis: a review of the current evidence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzmaurice, Gerard J.; McWilliams, Billy; Hurreiz, Hisham; Epanomeritakis, Emanuel

    2011-01-01

    Background Acute appendicitis remains the most common cause of the acute abdomen in young adults, and the mainstay of treatment in most centres is an appendectomy. However, treatment for other intra-abdominal inflammatory processes, such as diverticulitis, consists initially of conservative management with antibiotics. The aim of this study was to determine the role of antibiotics in the management of acute appendicitis and to assess if appendectomy remains the gold standard of care. Methods A literature search using MEDLINE and the Cochrane Library identified studies published between 1999 and 2009, and we reviewed all relevant articles. The articles were critiqued using the Public Health Resource Unit (2006) appraisal tools. Results Our search yielded 41 papers, and we identified a total of 13 papers within the criteria specified. All of these papers, while posing pertinent questions and demonstrating the role of antibiotics as a bridge to surgery, failed to adequately justify their findings that antibiotics could be used as a definitive treatment of acute appendicitis. Conclusion Appendectomy remains the gold standard of treatment for acute appendicitis based on the current evidence. PMID:21651835

  14. The Role of Adiponectin in Cancer: A Review of Current Evidence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalamaga, Maria; Diakopoulos, Kalliope N.

    2012-01-01

    Excess body weight is associated not only with an increased risk of type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease (CVD) but also with various types of malignancies. Adiponectin, the most abundant protein secreted by adipose tissue, exhibits insulin-sensitizing, antiinflammatory, antiatherogenic, proapoptotic, and antiproliferative properties. Circulating adiponectin levels, which are determined predominantly by genetic factors, diet, physical activity, and abdominal adiposity, are decreased in patients with diabetes, CVD, and several obesity-associated cancers. Also, adiponectin levels are inversely associated with the risk of developing diabetes, CVD, and several malignancies later in life. Many cancer cell lines express adiponectin receptors, and adiponectin in vitro limits cell proliferation and induces apoptosis. Recent in vitro studies demonstrate the antiangiogenic and tumor growth-limiting properties of adiponectin. Studies in both animals and humans have investigated adiponectin and adiponectin receptor regulation and expression in several cancers. Current evidence supports a role of adiponectin as a novel risk factor and potential diagnostic and prognostic biomarker in cancer. In addition, either adiponectin per se or medications that increase adiponectin levels or up-regulate signaling pathways downstream of adiponectin may prove to be useful anticancer agents. This review presents the role of adiponectin in carcinogenesis and cancer progression and examines the pathophysiological mechanisms that underlie the association between adiponectin and malignancy in the context of a dysfunctional adipose tissue in obesity. Understanding of these mechanisms may be important for the development of preventive and therapeutic strategies against obesity-associated malignancies. PMID:22547160

  15. How Is Working Memory Training Likely to Influence Academic Performance? Current Evidence and Methodological Considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergman Nutley, Sissela; Söderqvist, Stina

    2017-01-01

    Working memory (WM) is one of our core cognitive functions, allowing us to keep information in mind for shorter periods of time and then work with this information. It is the gateway that information has to pass in order to be processed consciously. A well-functioning WM is therefore crucial for a number of everyday activities including learning and academic performance (Gathercole et al., 2003; Bull et al., 2008), which is the focus of this review. Specifically, we will review the research investigating whether improving WM capacity using Cogmed WM training can lead to improvements on academic performance. Emphasis is given to reviewing the theoretical principles upon which such investigations rely, in particular the complex relation between WM and mathematical and reading abilities during development and how these are likely to be influenced by training. We suggest two possible routes in which training can influence academic performance, one through an effect on learning capacity which would thus be evident with time and education, and one through an immediate effect on performance on reading and mathematical tasks. Based on the theoretical complexity described we highlight some methodological issues that are important to take into consideration when designing and interpreting research on WM training and academic performance, but that are nonetheless often overlooked in the current research literature. Finally, we will provide some suggestions for future research for advancing the understanding of WM training and its potential role in supporting academic attainment.

  16. Incretin-based therapies in prediabetes: Current evidence and future perspectives

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Georgios; S; Papaetis

    2014-01-01

    The prevalence of type 2 diabetes(T2D) is evolving globally at an alarming rate. Prediabetes is an intermediate state of glucose metabolism that exists between normal glucose tolerance(NGT) and the clinical entity of T2 D. Relentless β-cell decline and failure is responsible for the progression from NGT to prediabetes and eventually T2 D. The huge burden resulting from the complications of T2 D created the need of therapeutic strategies in an effort to prevent or delay its development. The beneficial effects of incretin-based therapies, dipeptidyl peptidase-4 inhibitors and glucagon-like peptide-1(GLP-1) receptor agonists, on β-cell function in patients with T2 D, together with their strictly glucose-depended mechanism of action, suggested their possible use in individuals with prediabetes when greater β-cell mass and function are preserved and the possibility of β-cell salvage is higher. The present paper summarizes the main molecular intracellular mechanisms through which GLP-1 exerts its activity on β-cells. It also explores the current evidence of incretin based therapies when administered in a prediabetic state, both in animal models and in humans. Finally it discusses the safety of incretin-based therapies as well as their possible role in order to delay or prevent T2 D.

  17. Evidence for improvement of critical current by Ag in YBaCuO-Ag thick films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dwir, B.; Kellett, B.; Mieville, L.; Pavuna, D.

    1991-04-01

    The evidence is reported for enhancement of critical current density J(c) in YBa2Cu3O(7-delta) thick films with the addition of Ag, which is correlated with improvements in structural properties. An improvement of 50 percent in J(c) (up to about 500 A/sq cm at T = 4.2 K) was obtained in films made from YBCO + 60 wt pct Ag powder, fabricated by the spin-on technique on (100) SrTiO3, which is correlated with improvements in structure. The resulting films are 10 microns thick, uniform, partially textured, and show good adherence. The critical temperature Tc is improved by the addition of Ag, and a reduction in the density of microcracks and in the amount of secondary phases in the sintered films was observed. Normal-state resistivity is reduced by almost three orders of magnitude, making these films potentially useful for electronic applications in interconnects and novel hybrid circuits.

  18. Evidence for improvement of critical current by Ag in YBaCuO-Ag thick films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dwir, B.; Kellett, B.; Mieville, L.; Pavuna, D. (Institute of Micro- and Opto-electronics, Department of Physics, Swiss Federal Institute of Technology, CH-1015 Lausanne, Switzerland (CH))

    1991-04-15

    The evidence is reported for enhancement of critical current density {ital J}{sub {ital c}} in YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7{minus}{delta}} thick films with the addition of Ag, which is correlated with improvements in structural properties. An improvement of 50% in {ital J}{sub {ital c}} (up to {similar to}500 A/cm{sup 2} at {ital T}=4.2 K) was obtained in films made from YBCO+60wt % Ag powder, fabricated by the spin-on technique on (100) SrTiO{sub 3}, which is correlated with improvements in structure. The resulting films are 10 {mu}m thick, uniform, partially textured, and show good adherence. The critical temperature {ital T}{sub {ital c}} is improved by the addition of Ag, and a reduction in the density of microcracks and in the amount of secondary phases in the sintered films was observed. Normal-state resistivity is reduced by almost three orders of magnitude, making these films potentially useful for electronic applications in interconnects and novel hybrid circuits.

  19. How Is Working Memory Training Likely to Influence Academic Performance? Current Evidence and Methodological Considerations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergman Nutley, Sissela; Söderqvist, Stina

    2017-01-01

    Working memory (WM) is one of our core cognitive functions, allowing us to keep information in mind for shorter periods of time and then work with this information. It is the gateway that information has to pass in order to be processed consciously. A well-functioning WM is therefore crucial for a number of everyday activities including learning and academic performance (Gathercole et al., 2003; Bull et al., 2008), which is the focus of this review. Specifically, we will review the research investigating whether improving WM capacity using Cogmed WM training can lead to improvements on academic performance. Emphasis is given to reviewing the theoretical principles upon which such investigations rely, in particular the complex relation between WM and mathematical and reading abilities during development and how these are likely to be influenced by training. We suggest two possible routes in which training can influence academic performance, one through an effect on learning capacity which would thus be evident with time and education, and one through an immediate effect on performance on reading and mathematical tasks. Based on the theoretical complexity described we highlight some methodological issues that are important to take into consideration when designing and interpreting research on WM training and academic performance, but that are nonetheless often overlooked in the current research literature. Finally, we will provide some suggestions for future research for advancing the understanding of WM training and its potential role in supporting academic attainment.

  20. No evidence of BRCA2 mutations in chromosome 13q-linked Utah high-risk prostate cancer pedigrees

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Allen-Brady Kristina

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Germline mutations in the BRCA2 gene have been suggested to account for about 5% of familial prostate cancer; mutations have been reported in 2% of early onset (i.e., ≤ 55 years prostate cancer cases and a segregating founder mutation has been identified in Iceland (999del5. However, the role of BRCA2 in high risk prostate cancer pedigrees remains unclear. Findings We examined the potential involvement of BRCA2 in a set offive high-risk prostate cancer pedigrees in which all prostate cases were no more distantly related than two meioses from another case, and the resulting cluster contained at least four prostate cancer cases. We selected these five pedigrees from a larger dataset of 59 high-risk prostate cancer pedigrees analyzed in a genome-wide linkage screen. Selected pedigrees showed at least nominal linkage evidence to the BRCA2 region on chromosome 13q. We mutation screened all coding regions and intron/exon boundaries of the BRCA2 gene in the youngest prostate cancer case who carried the linked 13q segregating haplotype, as well as in a distantly related haplotype carrier to confirm any segregation. We observed no known protein truncating BRCA2 deleterious mutations. We identified one non-segregating BRCA2 variant of uncertain significance, one non-segregating intronic variant not previously reported, and a number of polymorphisms. Conclusion In this set of high-risk prostate cancer pedigrees with at least nominal linkage evidence to BRCA2, we saw no evidence for segregating BRCA2 protein truncating mutations in heritable prostate cancer.

  1. Prehospital Care for the Adult and Pediatric Seizure Patient: Current Evidence-based Recommendations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silverman, Eric C.; Sporer, Karl A.; Lemieux, Justin M.; Brown, John F.; Koenig, Kristi L.; Gausche-Hill, Marianne; Rudnick, Eric M.; Salvucci, Angelo A.; Gilbert, Greg H.

    2017-01-01

    Introduction We sought to develop evidence-based recommendations for the prehospital evaluation and treatment of adult and pediatric patients with a seizure and to compare these recommendations against the current protocol used by the 33 emergency medical services (EMS) agencies in California. Methods We performed a review of the evidence in the prehospital treatment of patients with a seizure, and then compared the seizure protocols of each of the 33 EMS agencies for consistency with these recommendations. We analyzed the type and route of medication administered, number of additional rescue doses permitted, and requirements for glucose testing prior to medication. The treatment for eclampsia and seizures in pediatric patients were analyzed separately. Results Protocols across EMS Agencies in California varied widely. We identified multiple drugs, dosages, routes of administration, re-dosing instructions, and requirement for blood glucose testing prior to medication delivery. Blood glucose testing prior to benzodiazepine administration is required by 61% (20/33) of agencies for adult patients and 76% (25/33) for pediatric patients. All agencies have protocols for giving intramuscular benzodiazepines and 76% (25/33) have protocols for intranasal benzodiazepines. Intramuscular midazolam dosages ranged from 2 to 10 mg per single adult dose, 2 to 8 mg per single pediatric dose, and 0.1 to 0.2 mg/kg as a weight-based dose. Intranasal midazolam dosages ranged from 2 to 10 mg per single adult or pediatric dose, and 0.1 to 0.2 mg/kg as a weight-based dose. Intravenous/intrasosseous midazolam dosages ranged from 1 to 6 mg per single adult dose, 1 to 5 mg per single pediatric dose, and 0.05 to 0.1 mg/kg as a weight-based dose. Eclampsia is specifically addressed by 85% (28/33) of agencies. Forty-two percent (14/33) have a protocol for administering magnesium sulfate, with intravenous dosages ranging from 2 to 6 mg, and 58% (19/33) allow benzodiazepines to be administered

  2. Linking Questions and Evidence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tenenberg, Josh; McCartney, Robert

    2008-01-01

    This special issue features a set of papers recently published in the 3rd International Workshop on Computing Education Research (ICER'07). The papers were selected because they closely meet the publication criteria for ACM/JERIC: stemming from computing education practice, grounded in relevant literature, containing analysis of primary empirical…

  3. Impact of estrogenic compounds on DNA integrity in human spermatozoa: Evidence for cross-linking and redox cycling activities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bennetts, L.E.; De Iuliis, G.N.; Nixon, B.; Kime, M.; Zelski, K. [ARC Centre of Excellence in Biotechnology and Development and Discipline of Biological Sciences, University of Newcastle, NSW (Australia); McVicar, C.M.; Lewis, S.E. [Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Queen' s University, Belfast (United Kingdom); Aitken, R.J. [ARC Centre of Excellence in Biotechnology and Development and Discipline of Biological Sciences, University of Newcastle, NSW (Australia)], E-mail: jaitken@mail.newcastle.edu.au

    2008-05-10

    A great deal of circumstantial evidence has linked DNA damage in human spermatozoa with adverse reproductive outcomes including reduced fertility and high rates of miscarriage. Although oxidative stress is thought to make a significant contribution to DNA damage in the male germ line, the factors responsible for creating this stress have not been elucidated. One group of compounds that are thought to be active in this context are the estrogens, either generated as a result of the endogenous metabolism of androgens within the male reproductive tract or gaining access to the latter as a consequence of environmental exposure. In this study, a wide variety of estrogenic compounds were assessed for their direct effects on human spermatozoa in vitro. DNA integrity was assessed using the Comet and TUNEL assays, lesion frequencies were quantified by QPCR using targets within the mitochondrial and nuclear ({beta}-globin) genomes, DNA adducts were characterized by mass spectrometry and redox activity was monitored using dihydroethidium (DHE) as the probe. Of the estrogenic and estrogen analogue compounds evaluated, catechol estrogens, quercetin, diethylstilbestrol and pyrocatechol stimulated intense redox activity while genistein was only active at the highest doses tested. Other estrogens and estrogen analogues, such as 17{beta}-estradiol, nonylphenol, bisphenol A and 2,3-dihydroxynaphthalene were inactive. Estrogen-induced redox activity was associated with a dramatic loss of motility and, in the case of 2-hydroxyestradiol, the induction of significant DNA fragmentation. Mass spectrometry also indicated that catechol estrogens were capable of forming dimers that can cross-link the densely packed DNA strands in sperm chromatin, impairing nuclear decondensation. These results highlight the potential importance of estrogenic compounds in creating oxidative stress and DNA damage in the male germ line and suggest that further exploration of these compounds in the aetiology of

  4. Evolution of an Evidence Collaboration: From Initial Goals to Current Initiatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giambra, Barbara K; Clark, Eloise; Busch, Melida D; Gerhardt, Wendy Engstrom

    2015-01-01

    Best practices based on evidence are needed by every clinician to provide safe, effective, patient-centered care. Determining best practice for a given situation can be difficult. Ideally, the clinician understands how to critically appraise the relevant research, and integrates high-quality research with interdisciplinary clinical expertise and patient and family values and preferences to choose best care for an individual or family. At our organization, we are taking the integration of research, clinical expertise, and patient/family preferences and values to the next level by aligning the evidence work of multiple functional areas and disciplines to improve the safety and effectiveness of clinical practice. The Evidence Collaboration, an interdisciplinary community of practice, has evolved to meet the challenges of helping novices and experts of all disciplines identify, critically appraise, synthesize, and disseminate evidence to inform best practices for patients and families, staff, and institutional processes. By creating a common language for evidence work, resources such as the Let Evidence Guide Every New Decision system, and templates for dissemination, the Evidence Collaboration has moved the organizational culture toward one that encourages the use of evidence in all decisions. Our progress continues as we strive to include patients and families in the decisions about best practices based on evidence.

  5. Socio-economic determinants of divorce in Lithuania: Evidence from register-based census-linked data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ausra Maslauskaite

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Most existing evidence on the socio-economic predictors of divorce in developed countries comes from the USA and from Western and Northern Europe. This study contributes to the scarce literature about socio-economic determinants of divorce in Central and Eastern Europe by examining the case of Lithuania. Objective: The study explores how the levels of educational attainment and economic activity, as well as the interactions of these two variables, influence the risk of first divorce both in the entire population of Lithuania and in its urban and rural sub-populations. Methods: The study uses a census-linked dataset connecting all records from the 2001 census and all first divorce records between the census and December 2003. The impact of education and employment status on the risk of divorce was estimated by applying Poisson regression models. Results: Lower education is related to elevated risks of divorce only in large cities: in rural areas the relationship is inverted. For both urban and rural males, being out of the labor market destabilizes marriage and significantly increases the risk of marital disruption. This pattern was also found for males residing in large cities, regardless of their education. As expected, a lower divorce risk is observed among both urban and rural housewives and other inactive urban females. Unemployment and disability-related inactivity is associated with higher divorce probabilities among rural females. Conclusions: The study finds evidence of individual socio-economic recourses having substantial differentiating effects on first divorce risk in Lithuania. The direction and size of these effects vary notably by sex and place of residence. This suggests that divorce determinants are complex in post-transitional societies in the region.

  6. Current scientific evidence for integrated community case management (iCCM in Africa: Findings from the iCCM Evidence Symposium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Theresa Diaz

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available In March 2014, over 400 individuals from 35 countries in sub-Saharan Africa and 59 international partner organizations gathered in Accra, Ghana for an integrated Community Case Management (iCCM Evidence Review Symposium. The objective was 2-fold: first, to review the current state of the art of iCCM implementation and second, to assist African countries to integrate lessons learned and best practices presented during the symposium into their programmes. Based on the findings from the symposium this supplement includes a comprehensive set of articles that provide the latest evidence for improving iCCM programs and ways to better monitor and evaluate such programs

  7. Towards Evidence-Based Initial Teacher Education in Singapore: A Review of Current Literature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Low, Ee-Ling; Hui, Chenri; Taylor, Peter G.; Ng, Pak Tee

    2012-01-01

    Initial teacher education (ITE) in Singapore is shifting towards evidence-based practice. Despite a clear policy orientation, ITE in Singapore has not yet produced the evidence base that it is anticipating. This paper presents an analytical review of previous research into ITE in Singapore and makes comparisons to the larger international context.…

  8. Evidence of Effectiveness of Current Therapies to Prevent and Treat Early Childhood Caries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Twetman, Svante; Dhar, Vineet

    2015-01-01

    and Evaluation) system. RESULTS: There was moderate and limited quality of evidence in support of fluoride toothpaste and fluoride varnish for ECC prevention, while the evidence for fluoride tablets/drops was insufficient. The support for the use of silver diamine fluoride, xylitol, chlorhexidine varnish...

  9. Adiponectin and its receptors in the ovary: further evidence for a link between obesity and hyperandrogenism in polycystic ovary syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Comim, Fabio V; Hardy, Kate; Franks, Stephen

    2013-01-01

    Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS), characterized by ovarian androgen excess, is the commonest endocrine disorder in women. Obesity increases androgen synthesis, a phenomenon attributed to the accompanying hyperinsulinemia. Our hypothesis was that adipokines, fat cell-derived hormones, play a direct role in modulating ovarian androgen secretion. Therefore, the aims of this study were to explore the effects of adipokines (in particular, adiponectin) on ovarian steroidogenesis and compare the expression of adiponectin receptors in ovaries from women with and without PCO. Sections of archived human ovaries (nine from women with normal ovaries and 16 with PCOS, classified histologically, with reference to menstrual history and ultrasound) were analysed by quantitative morphometry and the proportion of positive-labelling cells compared. In addition, studies of androgen production in relation to adipokine function in primary bovine theca cell culture were also performed. A significantly lower proportion of theca cells expressed adiponectin receptors 1 and 2 (AdipoR1, AdipoR2) in polycystic ovaries than in normal ovaries. In cultured theca cells, adiponectin suppressed androstenedione production and gene expression of LH receptor and key enzymes in the androgen synthesis pathway. Moreover, knockdown of genes for AdipoR1 and AdipoR2 was associated with increased androstenedione secretion by bovine theca cells. These results provide evidence for a direct link between fat cell metabolism and ovarian steroidogenesis, suggesting that disruption of adiponectin and/or its receptors plays a key role in pathogenesis of hyperandrogenism in PCOS.

  10. Klamath River Water Quality and Acoustic Doppler Current Profiler Data from Link River Dam to Keno Dam, 2007

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sullivan, Annett B.; Deas, Michael L.; Asbill, Jessica; Kirshtein, Julie D.; Butler, Kenna D.; Stewart, Marc A.; Wellman, Roy W.; Vaughn, Jennifer

    2008-01-01

    In 2007, the U.S. Geological Survey, Watercourse Engineering, and the Bureau of Reclamation began a project to construct and calibrate a water quality and hydrodynamic model of the 21-mile reach of the Klamath River from Link River Dam to Keno Dam. To provide a basis for this work, data collection and experimental work were planned for 2007 and 2008. This report documents sampling and analytical methods and presents data from the first year of work. To determine water velocities and discharge, a series of cross-sectional acoustic Doppler current profiler (ADCP) measurements were made on the mainstem and four canals on May 30 and September 19, 2007. Water quality was sampled weekly at five mainstem sites and five tributaries from early April through early November, 2007. Constituents reported here include field parameters (water temperature, pH, dissolved oxygen concentration, specific conductance); total nitrogen and phosphorus; particulate carbon and nitrogen; filtered orthophosphate, nitrite, nitrite plus nitrate, ammonia, organic carbon, iron, silica, and alkalinity; specific UV absorbance at 254 nm; phytoplankton and zooplankton enumeration and species identification; and bacterial abundance and morphological subgroups. The ADCP measurements conducted in good weather conditions in May showed that four major canals accounted for most changes in discharge along the mainstem on that day. Direction of velocity at measured locations was fairly homogeneous across the channel, while velocities were generally lowest near the bottom, and highest near surface, ranging from 0.0 to 0.8 ft/s. Measurements in September, made in windy conditions, raised questions about the effect of wind on flow. Most nutrient and carbon concentrations were lowest in spring, increased and remained elevated in summer, and decreased in fall. Dissolved nitrite plus nitrate and nitrite had a different seasonal cycle and were below detection or at low concentration in summer. Many nutrient and

  11. Observational evidence for remote forcing of the west India coastal current

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Shetye, S.R.; Suresh, I.; Shankar, D.; Sundar, D.; Jayakumar, S.; Mehra, P.; Desai, R.G.P.; Pednekar, P.S.

    remote and local forcing in observations. Using field measurements (current, sea level, and wind) for a month during March-April 2003 off Goa in the near-coast regime of the West India Coastal Current (WICC), we show that the current was driven by local...

  12. Dietary supplementation in patients with alcoholic liver disease:a review on current evidence

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zeinab Ghorbani; Masoomeh Hajizadeh; Azita Hekmatdoost

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Alcoholic liver disease (ALD) is one of the main causes of liver disease worldwide. Although the patho-genesis of ALD has not yet been well elucidated, the oxidative metabolites of ethanol such as acetaldehyde and reactive oxy-gen species play a pivotal role in the clinical and pathological spectrum of the disease. This review summarizes the existing evidences on dietary supplements considered to have antioxi-dant, and/or anti-inlfammatory properties, and their role in the management of ALD and the proposed mechanisms. DATA SOURCES: The present study reviewed all studies pub-lished in PubMed, ScienceDirect and Scopus, from 1959 to 2015, indicating the role of different dietary supplementation in attenuation of many pathophysiological processes involved in development and progression of ALD. Full-texts of citations were used except for those that were published in languages other than English. RESULTS: Signiifcant progress has been made to understand the key events and molecular players for the onset and pro-gression of ALD from both experimental and clinical studies;however, there is no successful treatment currently available. The present review discussed the role of a variety of dietary supplements (e.g. vitamin A, carotenoids, vitamins B3, C and E, in addition to antioxidants and anti-inlfammatory agents) in treating ALD. It has been shown that supplementation with some carotenoids, vitamin B3, vitamin C, silymarin, curcumin, probiotics, zinc, S-adenosylmethionine and garlic may have potential beneifcial effects in animal models of ALD; however, the number of clinical studies is very limited. In addition, sup-plementation should be accompanied with alcohol cessation. CONCLUSIONS: Since oxidative stress and inlfammation are involved in the pathogenesis of ALD, dietary supplements that can modulate these pathologies could be useful in the treat-ment of ALD. In addition to alcohol cessation, these supple-ments have shown beneifcial effects on animal

  13. E-resource knowledge bases and link resolvers: an assessment of the current products and emerging trends

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marshall Breeding

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available This article summarizes the findings of a study on e-resource knowledge bases and OpenURL-based link resolvers sponsored by the National Library of Sweden. The project involved soliciting detailed information from each of the providers of the major products in this genre, reviewing product information available on the web and in published articles, and conducting a survey addressed to libraries using these products. The report identified and presented comparative information on a top tier of products that includes KnowledgeWorks and 360 Link from Serials Solutions; SFX Global KnowledgeBase and the SFX link resolver from Ex Libris; LinkSource and the EBSCO Integrated Knowledge Base from EBSCO and the WorldCat knowledge base from OCLC. A second tier included TOUResolver from TDNet, Gold Rush from the Colorado Alliance of Research Libraries and GODOT from Simon Fraser University. Innovative Interfaces, Inc offers the WebBridge link resolver but does not produce a knowledge base. The library survey revealed relatively narrow differences in the statistical results. Serial Solutions emerged as more favorable in most categories except for end-user functionality where Ex Libris received higher ratings. The Global Open Knowledgebase project (GOKb is noteworthy as a nascent community-based effort to produce a knowledge base. Key trends noted include less emphasis on knowledge bases and link resolvers as stand-alone products as they become integral components of comprehensive discovery and automation products.

  14. Neutral-point current modeling and control for Neutral-Point Clamped three-level converter drive with small DC-link capacitors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maheshwari, Ram Krishan; Munk-Nielsen, Stig; Busquets-Monge, Sergio

    2011-01-01

    A Neutral-Point-Clamped (NPC) three-level inverter with small DC-link capacitors is presented in this paper. This inverter requires zero average neutral-point current for stable neutral-point potential. A simple carrier based modulation strategy is proposed for achieving zero average neutral-poin...

  15. Elimination of DC-Link Current Ripple for Modular Multilevel Converters With Capacitor Voltage-Balancing Pulse-Shifted Carrier PWM

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Deng, Fujin; Chen, Zhe

    2015-01-01

    The modular multilevel converter (MMC) is attractive for medium- and high-power applications because of its high modularity, availability, and power quality. In this paper, the current ripple on the dc link of the three-phase MMC derived from the phase-shifted carrier-based pulse-width modulation...

  16. Difference of Sodium Currents between Pediatric and Adult Human Atrial Myocytes: Evidence for Developmental Changes of Sodium Channels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benzhi Cai, Xiaoqin Mu, Dongmei Gong, Shulin Jiang, Jianping Li, Qingxin Meng, Yunlong Bai, Yanju Liu, Xinyue Wang, Xueying Tan, Baofeng Yang, Yanjie Lu

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Voltage-gated calcium currents and potassium currents were shown to undergo developmental changes in postnatal human and animal cardiomocytes. However, so far, there is no evidence whether sodium currents also presented the developmental changes in postnatal human atrial cells. The aim of this study was to observe age-related changes of sodium currents between pediatric and adult atrial myocytes. Human atrial myocytes were acutely isolated and the whole-cell patch clamp technique was used to record sodium currents isolated from pediatric and adult atrial cardiomocytes. The peak amplitude of sodium currents recorded in adult atrial cells was significantly larger than that in pediatric atrial myocytes. However, there was no significant difference of the activation voltage for peak sodium currents between two kinds of atrial myocytes. The time constants for the activation and inactivation of sodium currents were smaller in adult atria than pediatric atria. The further study revealed that the voltage-dependent inactivation of sodium currents were more slow in adult atrial cardiomyocytes than pediatric atrial cells. A significant difference was also observed in the recovery process of sodium channel from inactivation. In summary, a few significant differences were demonstrated in sodium currents characteristics between pediatric and adult atrial myocytes, which indicates that sodium currents in human atria also undergo developmental changes.

  17. Evident?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Plant, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Quality assurance and evidence in career guidance in Europe are often seen as self-evident approaches, but particular interests lie behind......Quality assurance and evidence in career guidance in Europe are often seen as self-evident approaches, but particular interests lie behind...

  18. How current are leading evidence-based medical textbooks? An analytic survey of four online textbooks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeffery, Rebecca; Navarro, Tamara; Lokker, Cynthia; Haynes, R Brian; Wilczynski, Nancy L; Farjou, George

    2012-12-10

    The consistency of treatment recommendations of evidence-based medical textbooks with more recently published evidence has not been investigated to date. Inconsistencies could affect the quality of medical care. To determine the frequency with which topics in leading online evidence-based medical textbooks report treatment recommendations consistent with more recently published research evidence. Summarized treatment recommendations in 200 clinical topics (ie, disease states) covered in four evidence-based textbooks--UpToDate, Physicians' Information Education Resource (PIER), DynaMed, and Best Practice--were compared with articles identified in an evidence rating service (McMaster Premium Literature Service, PLUS) since the date of the most recent topic updates in each textbook. Textbook treatment recommendations were compared with article results to determine if the articles provided different, new conclusions. From these findings, the proportion of topics which potentially require updating in each textbook was calculated. 478 clinical topics were assessed for inclusion to find 200 topics that were addressed by all four textbooks. The proportion of topics for which there was 1 or more recently published articles found in PLUS with evidence that differed from the textbooks' treatment recommendations was 23% (95% CI 17-29%) for DynaMed, 52% (95% CI 45-59%) for UpToDate, 55% (95% CI 48-61%) for PIER, and 60% (95% CI 53-66%) for Best Practice (χ(2) (3)=65.3, P<.001). The time since the last update for each textbook averaged from 170 days (range 131-209) for DynaMed, to 488 days (range 423-554) for PIER (P<.001 across all textbooks). In online evidence-based textbooks, the proportion of topics with potentially outdated treatment recommendations varies substantially.

  19. Evidence-based practice in Occupational Health Psychology. Current status and further developments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maricutoiu, Laurentiu P.

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available The present paper discusses the status of evidence-based practice in Occupational Health Psychology (OHP. After several searches on large online databases, we have found that OHP papers that discuss interventions are less than 10% of the overall literature. Furthermore, quantitative reviews research that reports interventions on major OHP topics are generally absent. In the last part of the paper, we formulate some reccomendations for increasing the number of papers relevant for evidence-based practice in OHP.

  20. Finding the Link between CSR Reporting and Corporate Financial Performance: Evidence on Czech and Estonian Listed Companies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiří Strouhal

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Despite the fact that obligations to publish reports on corporate social responsibility will come into force in the European Union from 2018, an increasing number of companies are starting to implement corporate social responsibility (CSR policy into their everyday business practices, and as a result the information of this activity is disclosed in CSR reports or within annual reports. As the disclosure of such information is currently voluntarily based, we believe that the growing popularity of CSR leads to a direct link between the sustainability of the company and its financial performance. The purpose of this paper is therefore to determine the linkage between CSR and financial performance within two countries in the CEE region – Czech and Estonia – using data from 2012 - 2013. We compare return on assets and normalized market value added of listed companies. Based on the results, we can state that the implementation of a standalone CSR report does not have any direct linkage with the financial performance of the tested companies.

  1. Evidence for a distinct light-induced calcium-dependent potassium current in Hermissenda crassicornis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blackwell, K T

    2000-01-01

    A model of phototransduction is developed as a first step toward a model for investigating the critical interaction of light and turbulence stimuli within the type B photoreceptor of Hermissenda crassicronis. The model includes equations describing phototransduction, release of calcium from intracellular stores, and other calcium regulatory mechanisms, as well as equations describing ligand-gating of a rhabdomeric sodium current. The model is used to determine the sources of calcium in the soma, whether calcium or IP3 is a plausible ligand of the light-induced sodium current, and whether the light-induced potassium current is equivalent to the calcium-dependent potassium current activated by light-induced calcium release. Simulations show that the early light-induced calcium elevation is due to influx through voltage-dependent channels, whereas the later calcium elevation is due to release from intracellular stores. Simulations suggest that the ligand of the fast, light-induced sodium current is IP3 but that there is a smaller, prolonged component of the light-induced sodium current that is activated by calcium. In the model, the calcium-dependent potassium current, located in the soma, is activated only slightly by light-induced calcium elevation, leading to the prediction that a calcium-dependent potassium current, active at resting potential, is located in the rhabdomere and is responsible for the light-induced potassium current.

  2. Parallel mediation effects by sleep on the parental warmth-problem behavior links: evidence from national probability samples of Georgian and Swiss adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vazsonyi, Alexander T; Harris, Charlene; Terveer, Agnes M; Pagava, Karaman; Phagava, Helen; Michaud, Pierre-Andre

    2015-02-01

    Previous research has documented the importance of parenting on adolescent health and well-being; however, some of the underlying mechanisms that link the quality of parent-child relationship to health, adjustment, and well-being are not clearly understood. The current study seeks to address this gap by examining the extent to which sleep functioning mediates the effects by parental warmth on different measures of adolescent problem behaviors. Specifically, we test whether sleep functioning, operationalized by sleep quality and sleep quantity, mediates the relationship between the parental warmth and three measures of problem behaviors, namely alcohol use, illegal drug use, and deviance, in two nationally representative samples of Georgian (N = 6,992; M = 15.83, 60% females, and Swiss (N = 5,575; M = 17.17, 50% females) adolescents. Based on tests for parallel mediating effects by sleep functioning of parental warmth on problem behaviors in the MEDIATE macro in SPSS, the findings provided evidence that both sleep quality and sleep quantity independently and cumulatively mediated the effects of parental warmth on each of the three problem behaviors in both samples, with one exception. These results highlight the salience of positive parenting on sleep functioning among teens in two different cultural contexts, and, in turn, on measures of problem behaviors.

  3. The epidemiologic evidence linking prenatal and postnatal exposure to endocrine disrupting chemicals with male reproductive disorders: a systematic review and meta-analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonde, Jens Peter; Flachs, Esben Meulengracht; Rimborg, Susie; Glazer, Clara Helene; Giwercman, Aleksander; Ramlau-Hansen, Cecilia Høst; Hougaard, Karin Sørig; Høyer, Birgit Bjerre; Hærvig, Katia Keglberg; Petersen, Sesilje Bondo; Rylander, Lars; Specht, Ina Olmer; Toft, Gunnar; Bräuner, Elvira Vaclavik

    2017-01-01

    compounds, p,p′-DDE, was related to an elevated risk: OR 1.35 (95% CI 1.04–1.74). The data did not indicate that this increased risk was driven by any specific disorder. WIDER IMPLICATIONS The current epidemiological evidence is compatible with a small increased risk of male reproductive disorders following prenatal and postnatal exposure to some persistent environmental chemicals classified as endocrine disruptors but the evidence is limited. Future epidemiological studies may change the weight of the evidence in either direction. No evidence of distortion due to publication bias was found, but exposure–response relationships are not evident. There are insufficient data on rapidly metabolized endocrine disruptors and on specific exposure–outcome relations. A particular data gap is evident with respect to delayed effects on semen quality and testicular cancer. Although high quality epidemiological studies are still sparse, future systematic and transparent reviews may provide pieces of evidence contributing to the narrative and weight of the evidence assessments in the field. PMID:27655588

  4. A Novel Wide-Area Backup Protection Based on Fault Component Current Distribution and Improved Evidence Theory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhe Zhang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In order to solve the problems of the existing wide-area backup protection (WABP algorithms, the paper proposes a novel WABP algorithm based on the distribution characteristics of fault component current and improved Dempster/Shafer (D-S evidence theory. When a fault occurs, slave substations transmit to master station the amplitudes of fault component currents of transmission lines which are the closest to fault element. Then master substation identifies suspicious faulty lines according to the distribution characteristics of fault component current. After that, the master substation will identify the actual faulty line with improved D-S evidence theory based on the action states of traditional protections and direction components of these suspicious faulty lines. The simulation examples based on IEEE 10-generator-39-bus system show that the proposed WABP algorithm has an excellent performance. The algorithm has low requirement of sampling synchronization, small wide-area communication flow, and high fault tolerance.

  5. Removal of direct current link harmonic ripple in single-phase voltage source inverter systems using supercapacitors

    OpenAIRE

    Hernandez, Gabriel D.

    2016-01-01

    Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited For an Energy Management System (EMS)-controlled microgrid that uses a single-phase voltage source inverter (VSI) configuration to supply power for AC loads from DC energy storage devices, the DC link connecting the VSI to the DC energy storage devices experiences a voltage ripple that is a second-order harmonic of the AC frequency. When the EMS has a battery bank as the only DC energy storage device, the DC link voltage ripple causes ...

  6. Managing caries: the need to close the gap between the evidence base and current practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwendicke, F; Doméjean, S; Ricketts, D; Peters, M

    2015-11-13

    Underpinned by a changing knowledge of the aetiology of caries and its sequelae, and assisted by established and advancing dental materials, there is growing evidence supporting less invasive management of dental caries based on the principles of minimal intervention dentistry. This narrative review assesses both the evidence and the adoption of less invasive caries management strategies and describes ways in which the gap between evidence and practice might be overcome. While there is increasing data supporting less invasive management of carious lesions, these are not standard in most dental practices worldwide. Usually, clinical studies focused on efficacy as outcome, and did not take into consideration the views and priorities of other stakeholders, such as primary care dentists, educators, patients and those financing services. Involving these stakeholders into study design and demonstrating the broader advantages of new management strategies might improve translation of research into practice. In theory, clinical dentists can rely on a growing evidence in cariology regarding less invasive management options. In practice, further factors seem to impede adoption of these strategies. Future research should address these factors by involving major stakeholders and investigating their prioritised outcomes to narrow or close the evidence gap.

  7. Interaction of pyroclastic density currents with human settlements: Evidence from ancient Pompeii

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurioli, Lucia; Pareschi, M. Teresa; Zanella, Elena; Lanza, Roberto; Deluca, Enrico; Bisson, Marina

    2005-06-01

    Integrating field observations and rock-magnetic measurements, we report how a turbulent pyroclastic density current interacted with and moved through an urban area. The data are from the most energetic, turbulent pyroclastic density current of the A.D. 79 eruption of Vesuvius, Italy, which partially destroyed the Roman city of Pompeii. Our results show that the urban fabric was able to divide the lower portion of the current into several streams that followed the city walls and the intracity roads. Vortices, revealed by upstream particle orientations and decreases in deposit temperature, formed downflow of obstacles or inside cavities. Although these perturbations affected only the lower part of the current and were localized, they could represent, in certain cases, cooler zones within which chances of human survival are increased. Our integrated field data for pyroclastic density current temperature and flow direction, collected for the first time across an urban environment, enable verification of coupled thermodynamic numerical models and their hazard simulation abilities.

  8. Miocene uplift of the NE Greenland margin linked to plate tectonics: Seismic evidence from the Greenland Fracture Zone, NE Atlantic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Døssing, Arne; Japsen, Peter; Watts, Anthony; Nielsen, Tove; Jokat, Wilfried; Thybo, Hans

    2016-04-01

    Tectonic models predict that, following breakup, rift margins undergo only decaying thermal subsidence during their post-rift evolution. However, post-breakup stratigraphy beneath the NE Atlantic shelves shows evidence of regional-scale unconformities, commonly cited as outer margin responses to inner margin episodic uplift, including the formation of coastal mountains. The origin of these events remains enigmatic. We present a seismic reflection study from the Greenland Fracture Zone - East Greenland Ridge (GFZ-EGR) and the NE Greenland shelf. We document a regional intra-Miocene seismic unconformity (IMU), which marks the termination of syn-rift deposition in the deep-sea basins and onset of: (i) thermo-mechanical coupling across the GFZ, (ii) basin compression, and (iii) contourite deposition, north of the EGR. The onset of coupling across the GFZ is constrained by results of 2-D flexural backstripping. We explain the thermo-mechanical coupling and the deposition of contourites by the formation of a continuous plate boundary along the Mohns and Knipovich ridges, leading to an accelerated widening of the Fram Strait. We demonstrate that the IMU event is linked to onset of uplift and massive shelf-progradation on the NE Greenland margin. Given an estimated middle-to-late Miocene (~15-10 Ma) age of the IMU, we speculate that the event is synchronous with uplift of the East and West Greenland margins. The correlation between margin uplift and plate-motion changes further indicates that the uplift was triggered by plate tectonic forces, induced perhaps by a change in the Iceland plume (a hot pulse) and/or by changes in intra-plate stresses related to global tectonics.

  9. Lack of serologic evidence to link IgA nephropathy with celiac disease or immune reactivity to gluten.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sina Moeller

    Full Text Available IgA nephropathy is the most common form of primary glomerulonephritis worldwide. Mucosal infections and food antigens, including wheat gluten, have been proposed as potential contributing environmental factors. Increased immune reactivity to gluten and/or association with celiac disease, an autoimmune disorder triggered by ingestion of gluten, have been reported in IgA nephropathy. However, studies are inconsistent about this association. We aimed to evaluate the proposed link between IgA nephropathy and celiac disease or immune reactivity to gluten by conducting a comprehensive analysis of associated serologic markers in cohorts of well-characterized patients and controls. Study participants included patients with biopsy-proven IgA nephropathy (n = 99, unaffected controls of similar age, gender, and race (n = 96, and patients with biopsy-proven celiac disease (n = 30. All serum specimens were tested for IgG and IgA antibodies to native gliadin and deamidated gliadin, as well as IgA antibody to transglutaminase 2 (TG2. Anti-TG2 antibody-positive nephropathy patients and unaffected controls were subsequently tested for IgA anti-endomysial antibody and genotyped for celiac disease-associated HLA-DQ2 and -DQ8 alleles. In comparison to unaffected controls, there was not a statistically significant increase in IgA or IgG antibody reactivity to gliadin in individuals with IgA nephropathy. In addition, the levels of celiac disease-specific serologic markers, i.e., antibodies to deamidated gliadin and TG2, did not differ between IgA nephropathy patients and unaffected controls. Results of the additional anti-endomysial antibody testing and HLA genotyping were corroborative. The data from this case-control study do not reveal any evidence to suggest a significant role for celiac disease or immune reactivity to gluten in IgA nephropathy.

  10. Concussions: What a neurosurgeon should know about current scientific evidence and management strategies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neal, Matthew T.; Wilson, Jonathan L.; Hsu, Wesley; Powers, Alexander K.

    2012-01-01

    Background: There has been a tremendous amount of interest focused on the topic of concussions over the past few decades. Neurosurgeons are frequently consulted to manage patients with mild traumatic brain injuries (mTBI) that have radiographic evidence of cerebral injury. These injuries share significant overlap with concussions, injuries that typically do not reveal radiographic evidence of structural injury, in the realms of epidemiology, pathophysiology, outcomes, and management. Further, neurosurgeons often manage patients with extracranial injuries that have concomitant concussions. In these cases, neurosurgeons are often the only “concussion experts” that patients encounter. Results: The literature has been reviewed and data have been synthesized on the topic including sections on historical background, epidemiology, pathophysiology, diagnostic advances, clinical sequelae, and treatment suggestions, with neurosurgeons as the intended target audience. Conclusions: Neurosurgeons should have a fundamental knowledge of the scientific evidence that has developed regarding concussions and be prepared to guide patients with treatment plans. PMID:22439107

  11. Current evidence of extracorporeal shock wave therapy in chronic Achilles tendinopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerdesmeyer, Ludger; Mittermayr, Rainer; Fuerst, Martin; Al Muderis, Munjed; Thiele, Richard; Saxena, Amol; Gollwitzer, Hans

    2015-12-01

    Chronic Achilles tendinopathy has been described as the most common overuse injury in sports medicine. Several treatment modalities such as activity modification, heel lifts, arch supports, stretching exercises, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatories, and eccentric loading are known as standard treatment mostly without proven evidence. After failed conservative therapy, invasive treatment may be considered. Extracorporeal shock wave therapy (ESWT) has been successfully used in soft-tissue pathologies like lateral epicondylitis, plantar fasciitis, tendinopathy of the shoulder and also in bone and skin disorders. Conclusive evidence recommending ESWT as a treatment for Achilles tendinopathy is still lacking. In plantar fasciitis as well as in calcific shoulder tendinopathy shock wave therapy is recently the best evaluated treatment option. This article analysis the evidence based literature of ESWT in chronic Achilles tendinopathy. Recently published data have shown the efficacy of focused and radial extracorporeal shock wave therapy. Copyright © 2015 IJS Publishing Group Limited. All rights reserved.

  12. CURRENT EVIDENCE REGARDING THE EFFICACY OF PROPHYLACTIC ANTIBIOTICS IN THE MANAGEMENT OF FACIAL FRACTURES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anilkumar

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Fractures of the facial region are commonly treated by surgeons operating in the head and neck. Antibiotic prophylaxis is used by these surgeons to decrease the rate of infections, however the role of prophylactic antibiotics remains controversial. Evidence exists for the beneficial use of prophylactic antibiotics for tympanostomy, orthognathic surgery and third molar surgeries. Unfortunately there is little evidence regarding the efficacy of prophylactic antibiotics in the management of facial fractures. In numerous cases no clear benefit of antibiotic prophylaxis has been shown, particularly considering their potential adverse side effects. The aim of this paper is to present the available evidence regarding the efficacy of prophylactic antibiotics in the management of facial fractures.

  13. Electric and Magnetic properties Computed for Valence Bond Structures: Is There a Link between Pauling Resonance Energy and Ring Current?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Havenith, R.W.A.

    2006-01-01

    To establish the link between the aromaticity descriptors based on the Pauling resonance energy and the molecular properties, the electric (polarizability) and magnetic (magnetizability) field response properties haven been calculated using the valence bond approach for various molecules and their i

  14. Is Current Account of Turkey Sustainable ? Evidence from Nonlinear Unit Root Tests

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Serkan Taştan

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, current account sustainability of Turkey is analyzed in a nonlinear framework. Various nonlinear unit root tests have been used to test for structural break, sign and size nonlinearity. We have tested structural break and size nonlinearity separately and structural break-sign and size-sign nonlinearities simultaneously. Only considering the size nonlinearity, we have found that the current account of Turkey is sustainable. Thus, the size nonlinearity, in other words the speed of reversion to equilibrium, is essential for the current account sustainability of Turkey. We have also found that the speed of adjustment towards equilibrium is symmetric, while considering size and sign nonlinearities simultaneously.

  15. Making the links between domestic violence and child safeguarding: an evidence-based pilot training for general practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szilassy, Eszter; Drinkwater, Jess; Hester, Marianne; Larkins, Cath; Stanley, Nicky; Turner, William; Feder, Gene

    2016-10-14

    We describe the development of an evidence-based training intervention on domestic violence and child safeguarding for general practice teams. We aimed - in the context of a pilot study - to improve knowledge, skills, attitudes and self-efficacy of general practice clinicians caring for families affected by domestic violence. Our evidence sources included: a systematic review of training interventions aiming to improve professional responses to children affected by domestic violence; content mapping of relevant current training in England; qualitative assessment of general practice professionals' responses to domestic violence in families; and a two-stage consensus process with a multi-professional stakeholder group. Data were collected between January and December 2013. This paper reports key research findings and their implications for practice and policy; describes how the research findings informed the training development and outlines the principal features of the training intervention. We found lack of cohesion and co-ordination in the approach to domestic violence and child safeguarding. General practice clinicians have insufficient understanding of multi-agency work, a limited competence in gauging thresholds for child protection referral to children's services and little understanding of outcomes for children. While prioritising children's safety, they are more inclined to engage directly with abusive parents than with affected children. Our research reveals uncertainty and confusion surrounding the recording of domestic violence cases in families' medical records. These findings informed the design of the RESPONDS training, which was developed in 2014 to encourage general practice clinicians to overcome barriers and engage more extensively with adults experiencing abuse, as well as responding directly to the needs of children. We conclude that general practice clinicians need more support in managing the complexity of this area of practice. We need to

  16. Current Evidence on Treatment of Patients With Chronic Systolic Heart Failure and Renal Insufficiency

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Damman, Kevin; Tang, W. H. Wilson; Felker, G. Michael; Lassus, Johan; Zannad, Faiez; Krum, Henry; McMurray, John J. V.

    2014-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is increasingly prevalent in patients with chronic systolic heart failure. Therefore, evidence-based therapies are more and more being used in patients with some degree of renal dysfunction. However, most pivotal randomized clinical trials specifically excluded patients

  17. Type 2 Endoleaks Post-EVAR: Current Evidence for Rupture Risk, Intervention and Outcomes of Treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chung, Raymond, E-mail: rchung@doctors.org.uk; Morgan, Robert A., E-mail: Robert.Morgan@stgeorges.nhs.uk [St. George’s Healthcare NHS Trust, Radiology, Ground Floor, St. James Wing (United Kingdom)

    2015-06-15

    Type 2 endoleaks (EL2) are the most commonly encountered endoleaks following EVAR. Despite two decades of experience, there remains considerable variation in the management of EL2 with controversies ranging from if to treat, when to treat and how to treat. Here, we summarise the available evidence, describe the treatment techniques available and offer guidelines for management.

  18. Management of Child and Adolescent Eating Disorders: The Current Evidence Base and Future Directions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gowers, Simon; Bryant-Waugh, Rachel

    2004-01-01

    Although eating disorders in children and adolescents remain a serious cause of morbidity and mortality, the evidence base for effective interventions is surprisingly weak. The adult literature is growing steadily, but this is mainly with regard to psychological therapies for bulimia nervosa and to some extent in the field of pharmacotherapy. This…

  19. Evidence of Effectiveness of Current Therapies to Prevent and Treat Early Childhood Caries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Twetman, Svante; Dhar, Vineet

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE: The purpose of this paper was to systematically review the quality of evidence related to self-applied and professionally applied fluorides, antimicrobial agents, fissure sealants, temporary restorations, and restorative care for the prevention and management of early childhood caries (E...

  20. A review of current evidence for the causal impact of attentional bias on fear and anxiety

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Bockstaele, B.; Verschuere, B.; Tibboel, H.; de Houwer, J.; Crombez, G.; Koster, E.H.W.

    2014-01-01

    Prominent cognitive theories postulate that an attentional bias toward threatening information contributes to the etiology, maintenance, or exacerbation of fear and anxiety. In this review, we investigate to what extent these causal claims are supported by sound empirical evidence. Although differen

  1. Management of Child and Adolescent Eating Disorders: The Current Evidence Base and Future Directions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gowers, Simon; Bryant-Waugh, Rachel

    2004-01-01

    Although eating disorders in children and adolescents remain a serious cause of morbidity and mortality, the evidence base for effective interventions is surprisingly weak. The adult literature is growing steadily, but this is mainly with regard to psychological therapies for bulimia nervosa and to some extent in the field of pharmacotherapy. This…

  2. Reproducibility of current classifications of endometrial endometrioid glandular proliferations : further evidence supporting a simplified classification

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ordi, Jaume; Bergeron, Christine; Hardisson, David; McCluggage, W. Glenn; Hollema, Harry; Felix, Ana; Soslow, Robert A.; Oliva, Esther; Tavassoli, Fattaneh A.; Alvarado-Cabrero, Isabel; Wells, Michael; Nogales, Francisco F.

    2014-01-01

    AimsTo compare the reproducibility of the current (2003) World Health Organization (WHO), endometrial intraepithelial neoplasia (EIN) and European Working Group (EWG) classifications of endometrial endometrioid proliferations. Methods and resultsNine expert gynaecological pathologists from Europe an

  3. Current driven transition from Abrikosov-Josephson to Josephson-like vortex in mesoscopic lateral S/S’/S superconducting weak links

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carapella, G.; Sabatino, P.; Barone, C.; Pagano, S.; Gombos, M.

    2016-01-01

    Vortices are topological defects accounting for many important effects in superconductivity, superfluidity, and magnetism. Here we address the stability of a small number of such excitations driven by strong external forces. We focus on Abrikosov-Josephson vortex that appears in lateral superconducting S/S’/S weak links with suppressed superconductivity in S’. In such a system the vortex is nucleated and confined in the narrow S’ region by means of a small magnetic field and moves under the effect of a force proportional to an applied electrical current with a velocity proportional to the measured voltage. Our numerical simulations show that when a slow moving Abrikosov-Josephson vortex is driven by a strong constant current it becomes unstable with respect to a faster moving excitation: the Josephon-like vortex. Such a current-driven transition explains the structured dissipative branches that we observe in the voltage-current curve of the weak link. When vortex matter is strongly confined phenomena as magnetoresistance oscillations and reentrance of superconductivity can possibly occur. We experimentally observe these phenomena in our weak links. PMID:27752137

  4. Evidence for increased SOX3 dosage as a risk factor for X-linked hypopituitarism and neural tube defects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bauters, M.; Frints, S.G.; Esch, H. van; Spruijt, L.; Baldewijns, M.M.; Die-Smulders, C.E.M. de; Fryns, J.P.; Marynen, P.; Froyen, G.

    2014-01-01

    Genomic duplications of varying lengths at Xq26-q27 involving SOX3 have been described in families with X-linked hypopituitarism. Using array-CGH we detected a 1.1 Mb microduplication at Xq27 in a large family with three males suffering from X-linked hypopituitarism. The duplication was mapped from

  5. Insulin-Like Growth Factor I and the Pathogenesis of Delirium: A Review of Current Evidence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dimitrios Adamis

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Delirium is a frequent complication in medically ill elderly patients that is associated with serious adverse outcomes including increased mortality. Delirium risk is linked to older age, dementia, and illness that involves activation of inflammatory responses. IGF-I is increasingly postulated as a key link between environmental influences on body metabolism with a range of neuronal activities and has been described as the master regulator of the connection between brain and bodily well-being. The relationships between IGF-I and ageing, cognitive impairment and inflammatory illness further support a possible role in delirium pathogenesis. Five studies of IGF-I in delirium were identified by a systematic review. These conflicting findings, with three of the five studies indicating an association between IGF-1 and delirium occurrence, may relate to the considerable methodological differences in these studies. The relevance of IGF-I and related factors to delirium pathogenesis can be clarified by future studies which account for these issues and other confounding factors. Such work can inform therapeutic trials of IGF-I and/or growth hormone administration.

  6. Web 2.0 for health promotion: reviewing the current evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chou, Wen-ying Sylvia; Prestin, Abby; Lyons, Claire; Wen, Kuang-yi

    2013-01-01

    As Web 2.0 and social media make the communication landscape increasingly participatory, empirical evidence is needed regarding their impact on and utility for health promotion. Following Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses guidelines, we searched 4 medical and social science databases for literature (2004-present) on the intersection of Web 2.0 and health. A total of 514 unique publications matched our criteria. We classified references as commentaries and reviews (n = 267), descriptive studies (n = 213), and pilot intervention studies (n = 34). The scarcity of empirical evidence points to the need for more interventions with participatory and user-generated features. Innovative study designs and measurement methods are needed to understand the communication landscape and to critically assess intervention effectiveness. To address health disparities, interventions must consider accessibility for vulnerable populations.

  7. Friend or foe? The current epidemiologic evidence on selenium and human cancer risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinceti, Marco; Crespi, Catherine M; Malagoli, Carlotta; Del Giovane, Cinzia; Krogh, Vittorio

    2013-01-01

    Scientific opinion on the relationship between selenium and the risk of cancer has undergone radical change over the years, with selenium first viewed as a possible carcinogen in the 1940s then as a possible cancer preventive agent in the 1960s-2000s. More recently, randomized controlled trials have found no effect on cancer risk but suggest possible low-dose dermatologic and endocrine toxicity, and animal studies indicate both carcinogenic and cancer-preventive effects. A growing body of evidence from human and laboratory studies indicates dramatically different biological effects of the various inorganic and organic chemical forms of selenium, which may explain apparent inconsistencies across studies. These chemical form-specific effects also have important implications for exposure and health risk assessment. Overall, available epidemiologic evidence suggests no cancer preventive effect of increased selenium intake in healthy individuals and possible increased risk of other diseases and disorders.

  8. Current evidence supporting fertility and pregnancy among young survivors of breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meneses, Karen; Holland, Aimee Chism

    2014-01-01

    Approximately 6% of invasive breast cancer is diagnosed in women younger than age 40 of age childbearing potential. Cancer-directed therapies can cause hormonal and anatomical changes that negatively affect the reproductive potential of young survivors of breast cancer. Recent national guidelines on fertility preservation are widely available. However, gaps in care exist in the interdisciplinary evidence-based management of young survivors of breast cancer with fertility and parenting concerns after cancer treatment.

  9. A review of current evidence for the causal impact of attentional bias on fear and anxiety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Bockstaele, Bram; Verschuere, Bruno; Tibboel, Helen; De Houwer, Jan; Crombez, Geert; Koster, Ernst H W

    2014-05-01

    Prominent cognitive theories postulate that an attentional bias toward threatening information contributes to the etiology, maintenance, or exacerbation of fear and anxiety. In this review, we investigate to what extent these causal claims are supported by sound empirical evidence. Although differences in attentional bias are associated with differences in fear and anxiety, this association does not emerge consistently. Moreover, there is only limited evidence that individual differences in attentional bias are related to individual differences in fear or anxiety. In line with a causal relation, some studies show that attentional bias precedes fear or anxiety in time. However, other studies show that fear and anxiety can precede the onset of attentional bias, suggesting circular or reciprocal causality. Importantly, a recent line of experimental research shows that changes in attentional bias can lead to changes in anxiety. Yet changes in fear and anxiety also lead to changes in attentional bias, which confirms that the relation between attentional bias and fear and anxiety is unlikely to be unidirectional. Finally, a similar causal relation between interpretation bias and anxiety has been documented. In sum, there is evidence in favor of causality, yet a strict unidirectional cause-effect model is unlikely to hold. The relation between attentional bias and fear and anxiety is best described as a bidirectional, maintaining, or mutually reinforcing relation.

  10. Current Evidence regarding Prophylactic Antibiotics in Head and Neck and Maxillofacial Surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kilian Kreutzer

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Antibiotic prophylaxis is commonly used to decrease the rate of infections in head and neck surgery. The aim of this paper is to present the available evidence regarding the application of antibiotic prophylaxis in surgical procedures of the head and neck region in healthy patients. A systemic literature review based on Medline and Embase databases was performed. All reviews and meta-analyses based on RCTs in English from 2000 to 2013 were included. Eight out of 532 studies fulfilled all requirements. Within those, only seven different operative procedures were analyzed. Evidence exists for the beneficial use of prophylactic antibiotics for tympanostomy, orthognathic surgery, and operative tooth extractions. Unfortunately, little high-level evidence exists regarding the use of prophylactic antibiotics in head and neck surgery. In numerous cases, no clear benefit of antibiotic prophylaxis has been shown, particularly considering their potential adverse side effects. Antibiotics are often given unnecessarily and are administered too late and for too long. Furthermore, little research has been performed on the large number of routine cases in the above-mentioned areas of specialization within the last few years, although questions arising with respect to the treatment of high-risk patients or of specific infections are discussed on a broad base.

  11. How to prevent burnout in cardiologists? A review of the current evidence, gaps, and future directions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panagioti, Maria; Geraghty, Keith; Johnson, Judith

    2017-07-04

    Burnout is rising in all physicians, and cardiologists are not an exemption. Cardiology is a very popular specialty among medical students as it is associated with outstanding training standards and high prestige and income. In this review, we critically summarize the evidence on consequences, causes, and evidence-based interventions for burnout with a view toward recommending the best strategies for promoting wellness in cardiologists. Only a handful of studies have examined burnout specifically in cardiologists. Evidence therefore was mainly extrapolated by larger studies in all physicians and other physician specialties. Burnout in cardiologists has serious negative personal and professional consequences and is associated with suboptimal healthcare outcomes for patients. Burnout in cardiologists is primarily driven by professional and healthcare system demands and inefficiencies such as excessive workload and role complexity, training and certification demands, inefficient compensation models and lack of resources, computerization, and loss of autonomy. Moreover, loss of connectedness with patients, difficulties in balancing work and personal life and overvaluing compulsiveness and perfectionism in medical practice further increase the risk for burnout. Burnout among cardiologists may be best mitigated by organizational strategies complemented by individual stress reduction and reflection techniques under the resilience-based approach. Large-scale strategies are needed to mitigate burnout and promote physician wellness as a shared responsibility of healthcare systems and individuals and be committed in creating a new culture in medicine. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Evidence for neutral-current diffractive neutral pion production from hydrogen in neutrino interactions on hydrocarbon

    CERN Document Server

    Wolcott, J; Altinok, O; Bercellie, A; Betancourt, M; Bodek, A; Bravar, A; Budd, H; Cai, T; Carneiro, M F; Chvojka, J; Devan, J; Dytman, S A; Diaz, G A; Eberly, B; Endress, E; Felix, J; Fields, L; Galindo, R; Gallagher, H; Golan, T; Gran, R; Harris, D A; Higuera, A; Hurtado, K; Kiveni, M; Kleykamp, J; Kordosky, M; Le, T; Maher, E; Manly, S; Mann, W A; Marshall, C M; Caicedo, D A Martinez; McFarland, K S; McGivern, C L; McGowan, A M; Messerly, B; Miller, J; Mislivec, A; Morfin, J G; Mousseau, J; Naples, D; Nelson, J K; Norrick, A; Nuruzzaman,; Paolone, V; Park, J; Patrick, C E; Perdue, G N; Rakotondravohitra, L; Ramirez, M A; Ray, H; Ren, L; Rimal, D; Rodrigues, P A; Ruterbories, D; Schellman, H; Schmitz, D W; Salinas, C J Solano; Sanchez, S F; Tagg, N; Tice, B G; Valencia, E; Walton, T; Wospakrik, M; Zhang, D

    2016-01-01

    The MINERvA experiment observes an excess of events containing electromagnetic showers relative to the expectation from Monte Carlo simulations in neutral-current neutrino interactions with mean beam energy of 4.5 GeV on a hydrocarbon target. The excess is characterized and found to be consistent with neutral-current neutral pion production with a broad energy distribution peaking at 7 GeV and a total cross section of 0.26 +- 0.02 (stat) +- 0.08 (sys) x 10^{-39} cm^{2}. The angular distribution, electromagnetic shower energy, and spatial distribution of the energy depositions of the excess are consistent with expectations from neutrino neutral-current diffractive neutral pion production from hydrogen in the hydrocarbon target. These data comprise the first direct experimental observation and constraint for a reaction that poses an important background process in neutrino oscillation experiments searching for muon neutrino to electron neutrino oscillations.

  13. The promise of ketamine for treatment-resistant depression: current evidence and future directions

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeWilde, Kaitlin E.; Levitch, Cara F.; Murrough, James W.; Mathew, Sanjay J.; Iosifescu, Dan V.

    2014-01-01

    Major depressive disorder (MDD) is one of the most disabling diseases worldwide and is a significant public health threat. Current treatments for MDD primarily consist of monoamine-targeting agents and have limited efficacy. However, the glutamate neurotransmitter system has recently come into focus as a promising alternative for novel antidepressant treatments. We review the current data on the glutamate NMDA receptor antagonist ketamine, which has been shown in clinical trials to act as a rapid antidepressant in MDD. We also examine ketamine efficacy on dimensions of psychopathology, including anhedonia, cognition, and suicidality, consistent with the NIMH Research Domain Criteria (RDoC) initiative. Other aspects of ketamine reviewed in this paper include safety and efficacy, different administration methods, and the risks of misuse of ketamine outside of medical settings. Finally, we conclude with a discussion of other glutamatergic agents other than ketamine currently being tested as novel antidepressants. PMID:25649308

  14. Rip current evidence by hydrodynamic simulations, bathymetric surveys and UAV observation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benassai, Guido; Aucelli, Pietro; Budillon, Giorgio; De Stefano, Massimo; Di Luccio, Diana; Di Paola, Gianluigi; Montella, Raffaele; Mucerino, Luigi; Sica, Mario; Pennetta, Micla

    2017-09-01

    The prediction of the formation, spacing and location of rip currents is a scientific challenge that can be achieved by means of different complementary methods. In this paper the analysis of numerical and experimental data, including RPAS (remotely piloted aircraft systems) observations, allowed us to detect the presence of rip currents and rip channels at the mouth of Sele River, in the Gulf of Salerno, southern Italy. The dataset used to analyze these phenomena consisted of two different bathymetric surveys, a detailed sediment analysis and a set of high-resolution wave numerical simulations, completed with Google EarthTM images and RPAS observations. The grain size trend analysis and the numerical simulations allowed us to identify the rip current occurrence, forced by topographically constrained channels incised on the seabed, which were compared with observations.

  15. Conventional and/or laparoscopic rectal cancer surgery: what is the current evidence?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mik Michal

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Despite many years of experience with laparoscopic procedures in rectal cancer, the superiority of minimally invasive approaches has been questioned especially in recent years. This article is a short review of the current knowledge about laparoscopic approaches in comparison to conventional modalities in patients with rectal cancer. To present the current state of the knowledge, we focused on reports that were published in the last few years and compared them to multicenter trials and meta-analyses published last year. Our analysis mainly applied to the primary end-points of these trials. We also included expert opinions that have been published in the last several months.

  16. Novel Anticoagulants for Stroke Prevention in Atrial Fibrillation Current Clinical Evidence and Future Developments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schirmer, Stephan H.; Baumhaekel, Magnus; Neuberger, Hans-Ruprecht; Hohnloser, Stefan H.; van Gelder, Isabelle C.; Lip, Gregory Y. H.; Boehm, Michael

    2010-01-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is the most common cardiac rhythm disorder and a major risk factor for ischemic stroke. Antithrombotic therapy using aspirin or vitamin K antagonists (VKA) is currently prescribed for prevention for ischemic stroke in patients with AF. A narrow therapeutic range and the need

  17. Evidence for two separate heliospheric current sheets of cylindrical shape during MID-2012

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Y.-M. [Space Science Division, Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC 20375 (United States); Young, P. R. [College of Science, George Mason University, Fairfax, VA 22030 (United States); Muglach, K., E-mail: yi.wang@nrl.navy.mil, E-mail: pyoung@ssd5.nrl.navy.mil, E-mail: karin.muglach@nasa.gov [Code 674, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States)

    2014-01-01

    During the reversal of the Sun's polar fields at sunspot maximum, outward extrapolations of magnetograph measurements often predict the presence of two or more current sheets extending into the interplanetary medium, instead of the single heliospheric current sheet (HCS) that forms the basis of the standard 'ballerina skirt' picture. By comparing potential-field source-surface models of the coronal streamer belt with white-light coronagraph observations, we deduce that the HCS was split into two distinct structures with circular cross sections during mid-2012. These cylindrical current sheets were centered near the heliographic equator and separated in longitude by roughly 180°; a corresponding four-sector polarity pattern was observed at Earth. Each cylinder enclosed a negative-polarity coronal hole that was identifiable in extreme ultraviolet images and gave rise to a high-speed stream. The two current sheet systems are shown to be a result of the dominance of the Sun's nonaxisymmetric quadrupole component, as the axial dipole field was undergoing its reversal during solar cycle 24.

  18. Evidence for Two Separate Heliospheric Current Sheets of Cylindrical Shape During Mid-2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Y.-M.; Young, P. R.; Muglach, K.

    2014-01-01

    During the reversal of the Sun's polar fields at sunspot maximum, outward extrapolations of magnetograph measurements often predict the presence of two or more current sheets extending into the interplanetary medium, instead of the single heliospheric current sheet (HCS) that forms the basis of the standard "ballerina skirt" picture. By comparing potential-field source-surface models of the coronal streamer belt with white-light coronagraph observations, we deduce that the HCS was split into two distinct structures with circular cross sections during mid-2012. These cylindrical current sheets were centered near the heliographic equator and separated in longitude by roughly 180° a corresponding four-sector polarity pattern was observed at Earth. Each cylinder enclosed a negative-polarity coronal hole that was identifiable in extreme ultraviolet images and gave rise to a high-speed stream. The two current sheet systems are shown to be a result of the dominance of the Sun's nonaxisymmetric quadrupole component, as the axial dipole field was undergoing its reversal during solar cycle 24.

  19. Is C-50 a superaromat? Evidence from electronic structure and ring current calculations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Matias, Ana Sanz; Havenith, Remco W. A.; Alcami, Manuel; Ceulemans, Arnout

    2016-01-01

    The fullerene-50 is a 'magic number' cage according to the 2(N + 1)(2) rule. For the three lowest isomers of C-50 with trigonal and pentagonal symmetries, we calculate the sphericity index, the spherical parentage of the occupied p-orbitals, and the current density in an applied magnetic field. The

  20. Dietary prevention of allergic disease in children : Are current recommendations really based on good evidence?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brand, Paul L. P.; Vlieg-Boerstra, Berber J.; Dubois, Anthony E. J. .

    2007-01-01

    We provide a critical appraisal of the literature on the effects of dietary prevention of atopic disease in children. In our view, currently available studies suffer from lack of blinding which is a major problem if the primary end point is subjective (Such as the diagnosis of eczema). In addition,

  1. Novel Anticoagulants for Stroke Prevention in Atrial Fibrillation Current Clinical Evidence and Future Developments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schirmer, Stephan H.; Baumhaekel, Magnus; Neuberger, Hans-Ruprecht; Hohnloser, Stefan H.; van Gelder, Isabelle C.; Lip, Gregory Y. H.; Boehm, Michael

    2010-01-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is the most common cardiac rhythm disorder and a major risk factor for ischemic stroke. Antithrombotic therapy using aspirin or vitamin K antagonists (VKA) is currently prescribed for prevention for ischemic stroke in patients with AF. A narrow therapeutic range and the need

  2. Mindfulness-Based Cognitive Therapy: Further Issues in Current Evidence and Future Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, J. Mark G.; Russell, Ian; Russell, Daphne

    2008-01-01

    The authors respond to the article by H. F. Coelho, P. H. Canter, and E. Ernst (2007), which reviewed the current status of mindfulness-based cognitive therapy (MBCT). First, they clarify the randomization procedures in the 2 main MBCT trials. Second, they report posttreatment and follow-up data to show that trial participants allocated to…

  3. Anti-Oxidative and Anti-Inflammatory Effects of Ginger in Health and Physical Activity: Review of Current Evidence

    OpenAIRE

    Nafiseh Shokri Mashhadi; Reza Ghiasvand; Gholamreza Askari; Mitra Hariri; Leila Darvishi; Mohammad Reza Mofid

    2013-01-01

    Background: Ginger (Zingiber officinale Rosc.) belongs to the family Zingiberaceae. The health-promoting perspective of ginger is attributed to its rich phytochemistry. This study aimed to review the current evidence on ginger effects as an anti-inflammatory and anti-oxidative. Methods: We searched MEDLINE for related publications using “ginger” and “anti-oxidative” and “ginger” and “anti-inflammatory” as keywords. This search had considered Papers that had been published between 2000 and 201...

  4. Current evidence on whether perinatal risk factors influence coeliac disease is circumstantial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mårild, Karl; Ludvigsson, Jonas F; Størdal, Ketil

    2016-04-01

    Coeliac disease is triggered by an interplay of environmental and genetic factors and is one of the most prevalent autoimmune diseases in children, occurring in about 1% of Europeans. Over the last few decades, there has been a growing interest in the role of the perinatal environment in coeliac disease and this review discusses the growing body of literature on coeliac disease and perinatal risk factors. There is still only circumstantial evidence that the perinatal environment influences coeliac disease development. Large-scale cohort studies and emerging scientific concepts, such as epigenetics, may help us establish the role of these environmental factors. ©2015 Foundation Acta Paediatrica. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Regional heterogeneity in consumption due to current income shocks: New evidence from the Permanent Income Hypothesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mitze, Timo

    In the light of new theoretical and empirical work on the Permanent Income Hypothesis we tackle earlier findings for German data, which reject its validity given a large fraction of liquidity constrained consumers. Starting from a standard short run approach we do not find evidence for excess...... borrow from the literature on Poolability tests and search for macro regional clusters with similar adjustment paths. The findings show that for the sample of West German states between 1970 and 2006 both for short and long run parameters the assumption of poolability of the data cannot be rejected...

  6. Working conditions and health among employees at information technology - enabled services: A review of current evidence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kesavachandran C

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available Workers in information technology (IT - enabled services like business process outsourcing and call centers working with visual display units are reported to have various health and psycho social disorders. Evidence from previously published studies in peer- reviewed journals and internet sources were examined to explore health disorders and psycho-social problems among personnel employed in IT-based services, for a systematic review on the topic. In addition, authors executed a questionnaire- based pilot study. The available literature and the pilot study, both suggest health disorders and psychosocial problems among workers of Business Process Outsourcing. The details are discussed in the review.

  7. Evidence for compensatory upregulation of expressed X-linked genes in mammals, Caenorhabditis elegans and Drosophila melanogaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Xinxian; Hiatt, Joseph B; Nguyen, Di Kim; Ercan, Sevinc; Sturgill, David; Hillier, LaDeana W; Schlesinger, Felix; Davis, Carrie A; Reinke, Valerie J; Gingeras, Thomas R; Shendure, Jay; Waterston, Robert H; Oliver, Brian; Lieb, Jason D; Disteche, Christine M

    2011-10-23

    Many animal species use a chromosome-based mechanism of sex determination, which has led to the coordinate evolution of dosage-compensation systems. Dosage compensation not only corrects the imbalance in the number of X chromosomes between the sexes but also is hypothesized to correct dosage imbalance within cells that is due to monoallelic X-linked expression and biallelic autosomal expression, by upregulating X-linked genes twofold (termed 'Ohno's hypothesis'). Although this hypothesis is well supported by expression analyses of individual X-linked genes and by microarray-based transcriptome analyses, it was challenged by a recent study using RNA sequencing and proteomics. We obtained new, independent RNA-seq data, measured RNA polymerase distribution and reanalyzed published expression data in mammals, C. elegans and Drosophila. Our analyses, which take into account the skewed gene content of the X chromosome, support the hypothesis of upregulation of expressed X-linked genes to balance expression of the genome.

  8. Orofacial pain and occlusion: is there a link? An overview of current concepts and the clinical implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Racich, Michael J

    2005-02-01

    This paper addresses the current concepts in orofacial pain and occlusion and queries their possible relationship to each other. English-language peer-reviewed articles were identified using Medline (1990-2003), as well as a hand search. The key words occlusion, orofacial pain , and temporomandibular disorders (TMD) were used. Additional references from citations within the articles were obtained, and current textbooks were used as well. The textbooks provided contemporary concept overviews and further additional references.

  9. Current Evidence on the Socket-Shield Technique: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gharpure, Amit Srikant; Bhatavadekar, Neel B

    2016-11-29

    The recently popularised socket shield technique involves intentional retention of a thin buccal section of the remnant root at the time of immediate implant placement to preserve the buccal crestal bone from resorption. The objective of this systematic review was to assess the literature available on the socket-shield technique and weigh its biological plausibility and long-term clinical prognosis. A Systematic Search was performed in PubMed-Medline, Embase, Web of Knowledge, Google Scholar and Cochrane Central for clinical/ animal studies up to May 2016 without restrictions of language, duration, and follow-up. The literature search revealed that 15 out of 16 articles available were case reports and series, with 12 out of 16 having less than 12 months duration. Animal histological evidence demonstrated the formation of PDL and/or cementum on the implant surfaces in contact with/ in proximity to the socket-shield. Some clinical reports indicated stable results at 12 months; however, a few studies also reported infection and resorption of the socket-shield and bone loss. It would be difficult to predict the long -term success of this technique until high-quality evidence becomes available. Given some negative results, clinicians are recommended to use this technique with caution.

  10. Fasting therapy for treating and preventing disease - current state of evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michalsen, Andreas; Li, Chenying

    2013-01-01

    Periods of deliberate fasting with restriction of solid food intake are practiced worldwide, mostly based on traditional, cultural or religious reasons. There is large empirical and observational evidence that medically supervised modified fasting (fasting cure, 200-500 kcal nutritional intake per day) with periods of 7-21 days is efficacious in the treatment of rheumatic diseases, chronic pain syndromes, hypertension, and metabolic syndrome. The beneficial effects of fasting followed by vegetarian diet in rheumatoid arthritis are confirmed by randomized controlled trials. Further beneficial effects of fasting are supported by observational data and abundant evidence from experimental research which found caloric restriction and intermittent fasting being associated with deceleration or prevention of most chronic degenerative and chronic inflammatory diseases. Intermittent fasting may also be useful as an accompanying treatment during chemotherapy of cancer. A further beneficial effect of fasting relates to improvements in sustainable lifestyle modification and adoption of a healthy diet, possibly mediated by fasting-induced mood enhancement. Various identified mechanisms of fasting point to its potential health-promoting effects, e.g., fasting-induced neuroendocrine activation and hormetic stress response, increased production of neurotrophic factors, reduced mitochondrial oxidative stress, general decrease of signals associated with aging, and promotion of autophagy. Fasting therapy might contribute to the prevention and treatment of chronic diseases and should be further evaluated in controlled clinical trials and observational studies.

  11. Central retinal vein occlusion: A review of current Evidence-based treatment options

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amy Patel

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A central retinal vein occlusion (CRVO can induce an ischemic and hypoxic state with resulting sequelae of macular edema and neovascularization. Many treatment options have been studied. Our review aims to investigate the safety and efficacy of the multiple treatment options of CRVO. A PubMed and Cochrane literature search was performed. Well-controlled randomized clinical trials that demonstrated strong level 1 evidence-based on the rating scale developed by the British Centre for Evidence-Based Medicine were included. Seven clinical trials met inclusion criteria to be included in this review. These included studies that investigated the safety and efficacy of retinal photocoagulation (1 study, intravitreal steroid treatment (2 studies, and antivascular endothelial growth factor treatment (4 studies for the treatment of CRVO. In addition, studies evaluating surgical treatment options for CRVO were also included. Many treatment modalities have been demonstrated to be safe and efficacious in the treatment of CRVO. These treatment options offer therapeutic benefits for patients and clinically superior visual acuity and perhaps the quality of life after suffering from a CRVO.

  12. Epigenetics of Posttraumatic Stress Disorder: Current Evidence, Challenges, and Future Directions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zannas, Anthony S; Provençal, Nadine; Binder, Elisabeth B

    2015-09-01

    Posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is a stress-related psychiatric disorder that is thought to emerge from complex interactions among traumatic events and multiple genetic factors. Epigenetic regulation lies at the heart of these interactions and mediates the lasting effects of the environment on gene regulation. An increasing body of evidence in human subjects with PTSD supports a role for epigenetic regulation of distinct genes and pathways in the pathogenesis of PTSD. The role of epigenetic regulation is further supported by studies examining fear conditioning in rodent models. Although this line of research offers an exciting outlook for future epigenetic research in PTSD, important limitations include the tissue specificity of epigenetic modifications, the phenomenologic definition of the disorder, and the challenge of translating molecular evidence across species. These limitations call for studies that combine data from postmortem human brain tissue and animal models, assess longitudinal epigenetic changes in living subjects, and examine dimensional phenotypes in addition to diagnoses. Moreover, examining the environmental, genetic, and epigenetic factors that promote resilience to trauma may lead to important advances in the field. Copyright © 2015 Society of Biological Psychiatry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Low-grade inflammation, diet composition and health: current research evidence and its translation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minihane, Anne M; Vinoy, Sophie; Russell, Wendy R; Baka, Athanasia; Roche, Helen M; Tuohy, Kieran M; Teeling, Jessica L; Blaak, Ellen E; Fenech, Michael; Vauzour, David; McArdle, Harry J; Kremer, Bas H A; Sterkman, Luc; Vafeiadou, Katerina; Benedetti, Massimo Massi; Williams, Christine M; Calder, Philip C

    2015-10-14

    The importance of chronic low-grade inflammation in the pathology of numerous age-related chronic conditions is now clear. An unresolved inflammatory response is likely to be involved from the early stages of disease development. The present position paper is the most recent in a series produced by the International Life Sciences Institute's European Branch (ILSI Europe). It is co-authored by the speakers from a 2013 workshop led by the Obesity and Diabetes Task Force entitled 'Low-grade inflammation, a high-grade challenge: biomarkers and modulation by dietary strategies'. The latest research in the areas of acute and chronic inflammation and cardiometabolic, gut and cognitive health is presented along with the cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying inflammation-health/disease associations. The evidence relating diet composition and early-life nutrition to inflammatory status is reviewed. Human epidemiological and intervention data are thus far heavily reliant on the measurement of inflammatory markers in the circulation, and in particular cytokines in the fasting state, which are recognised as an insensitive and highly variable index of tissue inflammation. Potential novel kinetic and integrated approaches to capture inflammatory status in humans are discussed. Such approaches are likely to provide a more discriminating means of quantifying inflammation-health/disease associations, and the ability of diet to positively modulate inflammation and provide the much needed evidence to develop research portfolios that will inform new product development and associated health claims.

  14. Do current clinical trials meet society's needs?: a critical review of recent evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pocock, Stuart J; Gersh, Bernard J

    2014-10-14

    This paper describes some important controversies regarding the current state of clinical trials research in cardiology. Topics covered include the inadequacy of trial research on medical devices, problems with industry-sponsored trials, the lack of head-to-head trials of new effective treatments, the need for wiser handling of drug safety issues, the credibility (or lack thereof) of trial reports in medical journals, problems with globalization of trials, the role of personalized (stratified) medicine in trials, the need for new trials of old drugs, the need for trials of treatment withdrawal, the importance of pragmatic trials of treatment strategies, and the limitations of observational comparative effectiveness studies. All issues are illustrated by recent topical trials in cardiology. Overall, we explore the extent to which clinical trials, as currently practiced, are successful in meeting society's expectations.

  15. Energy drinks and their adverse health effects: A systematic review of the current evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Fahad; Rehman, Hiba; Babayan, Zaruhi; Stapleton, Dwight; Joshi, Divya-Devi

    2015-04-01

    With the rising consumption of so-called energy drinks over the last few years, there has been a growing body of literature describing significant adverse health events after the ingestion of these beverages. To gain further insight about the clinical spectrum of these adverse events, we conducted a literature review. Using PubMed and Google-Scholar, we searched the literature from January 1980 through May 2014 for articles on the adverse health effects of energy drinks. A total of 2097 publications were found. We then excluded molecular and industry-related studies, popular media reports, and case reports of isolated caffeine toxicity, yielding 43 reports. Energy drink consumption is a health issue primarily of the adolescent and young adult male population. It is linked to increased substance abuse and risk-taking behaviors. The most common adverse events affect the cardiovascular and neurological systems. The most common ingredient in energy drinks is caffeine, and it is believed that the adverse events are related to its effects, as well as potentiating effects of other stimulants in these drinks. Education, regulation, and further studies are required.

  16. Natural history of intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms (IPMN): current evidence and implications for management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bassi, Claudio; Sarr, Michael G; Lillemoe, Keith D; Reber, Howard A

    2008-04-01

    Intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms (IPMNs) show varying degrees of dysplasia throughout the neoplasm that can range from adenoma to invasive carcinoma, with dysplastic changes of borderline neoplasms and carcinoma in situ in between. An understanding of the natural history, and especially the required time to transform into either carcinoma in situ or an invasive adenocarcinoma, is critically important for management policy. This topic serves as the rationale for the present analysis. At the beginning of February 2007, using the key word "IPMN" in PubMed, we initially selected 119 publications using the principal criteria as defined by the WHO classification. We identified 20 appropriate original reports and one consensus paper. Neither randomized control trials (RCT) or systematic reviews of RCTs (level 1 evidence) nor cohort studies or reviews of cohort studies (level 2 evidence) have been published. Only one report fit the criteria for level 3 evidence (case control study). Nineteen papers satisfied criteria for level 4 (cases series) and two for level 5 (expert opinion publication). After additional review and analysis, we considered only six reports to be "cornerstone papers" of merit for the final review. Clues to the natural history of IPMNs can be gained by using several methods to examine the articles: (a) to verify different prognoses between main and side branch duct subtypes; (b) to compare the average age of patients with benign vs. malignant IPMNs; (c) to summarize the findings of nonoperative, observational studies based on follow up by clinical, biochemical, and imaging techniques without operative resection; (d) to determine the prognostic importance of the status of the resection margin; and (e) to follow patients clinically after surgical resection. Although important aspects of the natural history of IPMN are still unknown, the following conclusions can be drawn: (1) Branch-duct IPMNs are less aggressive than main-duct IPMNs. (2

  17. A fractal model for nuclear organization: current evidence and biological implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bancaud, Aurélien; Lavelle, Christophe; Huet, Sébastien; Ellenberg, Jan

    2012-10-01

    Chromatin is a multiscale structure on which transcription, replication, recombination and repair of the genome occur. To fully understand any of these processes at the molecular level under physiological conditions, a clear picture of the polymorphic and dynamic organization of chromatin in the eukaryotic nucleus is required. Recent studies indicate that a fractal model of chromatin architecture is consistent with both the reaction-diffusion properties of chromatin interacting proteins and with structural data on chromatin interminglement. In this study, we provide a critical overview of the experimental evidence that support a fractal organization of chromatin. On this basis, we discuss the functional implications of a fractal chromatin model for biological processes and propose future experiments to probe chromatin organization further that should allow to strongly support or invalidate the fractal hypothesis.

  18. The interactions of anticancer agents with tea catechins: current evidence from preclinical studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shang, Weihu; Lu, Weidong; Han, Mei; Qiao, Jinping

    2014-01-01

    Tea catechins exhibit a broad range of pharmacological activities that impart beneficial effects on human health. Epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG), one of the major tea catechins, has been widely associated with cancer prevention and treatment. In addition, tea catechins in combination with anticancer drugs are being evaluated as a new cancer treatment strategy. However, the interactions of anticancer drugs with tea catechins are largely unknown. Accumulated data indicate significant interactions between anticancer drugs and tea catechins, such as synergistic tumor inhibition or antagonist activity. Therefore, it is critical to understand comprehensively the effects of tea catechins on anticancer drugs. Focusing on evidence from preclinical studies, this paper will review the interactions between anticancer drugs and tea catechins, including pharmacodynamics and pharmacokinetics effects. We hope that by detailing the interactions between anticancer drugs and tea catechins, more attention will be directed to this important therapeutic combination in the future.

  19. Regional heterogeneity in consumption due to current income shocks: New evidence from the Permanent Income Hypothesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mitze, Timo

    In the light of new theoretical and empirical work on the Permanent Income Hypothesis we tackle earlier findings for German data, which reject its validity given a large fraction of liquidity constrained consumers. Starting from a standard short run approach we do not find evidence for excess...... interpret this specification as a solution to a consumer’s optimization problem with habit persistence. Different from earlier findings changes of income growth measuring the excess sensitivity of consumption with respect to income changes and thus the degree of liquidity constrained households turn....... However, we find a clear distinction in the short run path of the East German states since 1991 (which nevertheless converge to the same long run co-integration as the Western counter...

  20. Riboflavin status, MTHFR genotype and blood pressure: current evidence and implications for personalised nutrition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McAuley, E; McNulty, H; Hughes, C; Strain, J J; Ward, M

    2016-08-01

    Clinical deficiency of the B-vitamin riboflavin (vitamin B2) is largely confined to developing countries; however accumulating evidence indicates that suboptimal riboflavin status is a widespread problem across the developed world. Few international data are available on riboflavin status as measured by the functional biomarker, erythrocyte glutathione reductase activation coefficient, considered to be the gold standard index. One important role of riboflavin in the form of flavin dinucleotide is as a co-factor for the folate-metabolising enzyme methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR). Homozygosity for the common C677T polymorphism in MTHFR, affecting over 10 % of the UK and Irish populations and up to 32 % of other populations worldwide, has been associated with an increased risk of CVD, and more recently with hypertension. This review will explore available studies reporting riboflavin status worldwide, the interaction of riboflavin with the MTHFR C677T polymorphism and the potential role of riboflavin in personalised nutrition. Evidence is accumulating for a novel role of riboflavin as an important modulator of blood pressure (BP) specifically in individuals with the MTHFR 677TT genotype, with results from a number of recent randomised controlled trials demonstrating that riboflavin supplementation can significantly reduce systolic BP by 5-13 mmHg in these genetically at risk adults. Studies are however required to investigate the BP-lowering effect of riboflavin in different populations and in response to doses higher than 1·6 mg/d. Furthermore, work focusing on the translation of this research to health professionals and patients is also required.

  1. Electrostatic Solitary Waves in the Solar Wind: Evidence for Instability at Solar Wind Current Sheets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malaspina, David M.; Newman, David L.; Wilson, Lynn Bruce; Goetz, Keith; Kellogg, Paul J.; Kerstin, Kris

    2013-01-01

    A strong spatial association between bipolar electrostatic solitary waves (ESWs) and magnetic current sheets (CSs) in the solar wind is reported here for the first time. This association requires that the plasma instabilities (e.g., Buneman, electron two stream) which generate ESWs are preferentially localized to solar wind CSs. Distributions of CS properties (including shear angle, thickness, solar wind speed, and vector magnetic field change) are examined for differences between CSs associated with ESWs and randomly chosen CSs. Possible mechanisms for producing ESW-generating instabilities at solar wind CSs are considered, including magnetic reconnection.

  2. CANCER IMMUNOLOGY AND IMMUNOTHERAPY – UNDERSTANDING AND ADAPTATION THE CURRENT EVIDENCE TO OPTIMIZE PATIENT THERAPY OUTCOMES.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Orlin Savov

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this publication includes the try to act as intermediary to the readers, which should be able to understand: - The description of the cancer immunotherapy mechanisms in the context of current therapy decisions for the treatment of cancer - The including criteria for those patients with cancer who could be appropriate candidates for immunotherapy - And to optimize patient outcomes by using best practices to manage the adverse events associated with immunotherapy treatment More than 15 promising immunotherapy approaches being tested in clinical trials with appropriate patients and colleagues for enrollment and peer-to-peer education purposes, respectively.

  3. Current trends in the global tourism industry: evidence from the United States

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nejdet Delener

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Tourism is one of the largest U.S. industries, serving millions of international and domestic tourists yearly. Tourists visit the U.S. to see natural wonders, cities, historic landmarks, and entertainment venues. Americans seek similar attractions as well as recreation and vacation areas. Tourism competes in the global market, so it is important to understand current trends in the U.S. travel industry. Therefore, this article offers insight into important trends and suggests strategies for policy makers involved in the travel and tourism industry.

  4. Endovascular Treatment For Acute Anterior Circulation Ischemic Stroke - New Evidence And Current Status

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    KA Salam

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Endovascular mechanical treatment can remove large proximal clots rapidly and result in higher rates of reperfusion than IV rt-PA alone. Three initial trials of endovascular therapies in 2013 did not show a benefit for thrombectomy over IV rt-PA. But in 2015, 5 trials from around the world, namely MR CLEAN, EXTEND-IA, ESCAPE, SWIFT-PRIME, and REVASCAT, advanced the scope of endovascular therapy for acute ischemic stroke. We review these trials and discuss how they have shaped the current status of endovascular therapy in acute ischaemic stroke.

  5. Is vitamin D deficiency associated with heart failure? A review of current evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agarwal, Megha; Phan, Anita; Willix, Robert; Barber, Mickey; Schwarz, Ernst R

    2011-01-01

    An estimated 1 billion people worldwide have deficient or insufficient levels of vitamin D. Even more alarming is the association of vitamin D deficiency with many types of diseases, particularly heart failure (HF). Hypovitaminosis D has been observed to be highly prevalent in the HF community with rates varying from approximately 80% to 95%. Higher rates of deficiency have been linked to winter months, in patients with protracted decompensated HF, darker skin pigmentation, and higher New York Heart Association (NYHA) classes. In fact, some data suggest vitamin D deficiency may even be an independent predictor of mortality in patients with HF. Traditionally obtained through UV exposure and activated in the liver and then the kidneys, vitamin D is classified as a vitamin but functions as a steroid hormone. The hormone acts through the vitamin D receptor (VDR), which is expressed in vascular smooth muscle cells, renal juxtaglomerular cells, and most interestingly, cardiac myocytes. Studies have shown that the association between vitamin D deficiency and HF often manifests in the structural components of cardiac myocytes and/or through alterations of the neurohormonal cascade. In addition, vitamin D may also act rapidly through intracellular nongenomic receptors that alter cardiac contractility. Unfortunately, prospective vitamin D supplementation trials show mixed results. In rat models, successful correction of deficiency was associated with reductions in ventricular hypertrophy. In humans, however, echocardiographic dimensions did not change significantly. These results bring into questions whether vitamin D is a risk factor for HF, a marker of HF disease severity, or has a true pathologic role. This article provides a thorough review of vitamin D deficiency etiology, prevalence, and possible pathophysiologic role in HF. Furthermore, we carefully review prospective trials on vitamin D therapy in HF. We believe more trials on vitamin D therapy in HF need to be

  6. The Role of Transition, Increased Competition and Decentralized Wage Setting in Changing the Czech Wage Structure: Evidence from Linked Employer-Employee Data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eriksson, Tor Viking; Pytlikova, Mariola; Warzynski, Frederic

    In this paper, we look at the evolution of the Czech labor market, and its wage structure in particular, using a linked employer-employee dataset covering a large fraction of the Czech labor market over the period 1998-2006. We find evidence of (slightly) diminishing gender inequality, increased...... a market economy, increased domestic and international competition and an increasingly decentralized wage bargaining to explain these patterns....

  7. Structured exercise interventions for type 2 diabetes mellitus: Strength of current evidence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammed Ejas Hussain

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Exercise, along with medical nutrition therapy and pharmacological interventions, is an important component in the clinical management of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2D. Current clinical guidelines on type 2 diabetes provide no detailed information on the modalities of effective exercise intervention in the treatment of type 2 diabetes. Both endurance and resistance types of exercise seem to be equally effective in improving metabolic control in patients with type 2 diabetes. Determining the best method of providing exercise is clinically relevant to this population. This paper reviews the epidemiology of diabetes and problems of physical function associated with type 2 diabetes and discuss the benefits of exercise therapy on the parameters of glycemic control and function in type 2 diabetes patients, with special reference to Asian Indians. Based on the currently available literature, it is concluded that type 2 diabetes patients should be encouraged to participate in specifically designed exercise intervention programs. Attention should be paid to the avoidance of cardiovascular and musculoskeletal deconditioning. More clinical research is warranted to establish the efficacy of different dosages of exercise intervention in a holistic approach for type 2 diabetes subpopulations within different stages of the disease and various levels of co-morbidity.

  8. Electric and magnetic properties computed for valence bond structures: is there a link between pauling resonance energy and ring current?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Havenith, Remco W A

    2006-04-28

    To establish the link between the aromaticity descriptors based on the Pauling resonance energy and the molecular properties, the electric (polarizability) and magnetic (magnetizability) field response properties have been calculated using the valence bond approach for various molecules and their individual Kekulé resonance structures. The results show that there is no direct relationship between the Pauling resonance energy and the properties; the response properties are weighted averages of the properties of the individual structures. According to the aromaticity criteria based on molecular properties, one-structure benzene would be aromatic; thus, concerning molecular properties, spin-coupled bonds do not behave like localized bonds in Lewis structures, with which they are usually associated.

  9. Subtidal currents over the central California slope: Evidence for offshore veering of the undercurrent and for direct, wind-driven slope currents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noble, M.A.; Ramp, S.R.

    2000-01-01

    In February 1991, an array of six current-meter moorings was deployed for one year across the central California outer shelf and slope. The main line of the array extended 30 km offshore of the shelf break, out to water depths of 1400 m. A more sparsely-instrumented line, displaced 30 km to the northwest, extended 14 km offshore. Though shorter, the northern line spanned similar water depths because the gradient of the topography steepened in the northern region. A poleward flow pattern, typical of the California undercurrent, was seen across both lines in the array over most of the year. The poleward flow was surface intensified. In general, the portion of the undercurrent that crossed the southern line had larger amplitudes and penetrated more deeply into the water column than the portion that crossed the northern line. Transport over the year ranged from 0 to 2.5 Sverdrups (Sv) poleward across the southern line; 0 to 1 Sv poleward across the northern line. We suggest the difference in transport was caused by topographic constraints, which tended to force the poleward flow offshore of the northern measurement sites. The slope of the topography steepened too abruptly to allow the poleward flow to follow isobaths when currents were strong. When current velocities lessened, a more coherent flow pattern was seen across both lines in the array. In general, the poleward flow patterns in the undercurrent were not affected by local winds or by the local alongshore pressure gradient. Nor was a strong seasonal pattern evident. Rather unexpectedly, a small but statistically significant fraction of the current variance over the mid- and outer slope was driven by the surface wind stress. An alongshelf wind stress caused currents to flow along the slope, parallel to the wind field, down to depths of 400 m below the surface and out to distances of 2 Rossby radii past the shelf break. The transfer functions were weak, 3-4 cm/s per dyn cm-2, but comparable to wind-driven current

  10. Using the realist perspective to link theory from qualitative evidence synthesis to quantitative studies: Broadening the matrix approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Grootel, Leonie; van Wesel, Floryt; O'Mara-Eves, Alison; Thomas, James; Hox, Joop; Boeije, Hennie

    2017-09-01

    This study describes an approach for the use of a specific type of qualitative evidence synthesis in the matrix approach, a mixed studies reviewing method. The matrix approach compares quantitative and qualitative data on the review level by juxtaposing concrete recommendations from the qualitative evidence synthesis against interventions in primary quantitative studies. However, types of qualitative evidence syntheses that are associated with theory building generate theoretical models instead of recommendations. Therefore, the output from these types of qualitative evidence syntheses cannot directly be used for the matrix approach but requires transformation. This approach allows for the transformation of these types of output. The approach enables the inference of moderation effects instead of direct effects from the theoretical model developed in a qualitative evidence synthesis. Recommendations for practice are formulated on the basis of interactional relations inferred from the qualitative evidence synthesis. In doing so, we apply the realist perspective to model variables from the qualitative evidence synthesis according to the context-mechanism-outcome configuration. A worked example shows that it is possible to identify recommendations from a theory-building qualitative evidence synthesis using the realist perspective. We created subsets of the interventions from primary quantitative studies based on whether they matched the recommendations or not and compared the weighted mean effect sizes of the subsets. The comparison shows a slight difference in effect sizes between the groups of studies. The study concludes that the approach enhances the applicability of the matrix approach. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  11. Physical therapies in the management of osteoarthritis: current state of the evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennell, Kim L; Buchbinder, Rachelle; Hinman, Rana S

    2015-05-01

    This review considers the role of physical therapies in osteoarthritis management, highlighting key findings from systematic reviews and randomized controlled trials published in the last 2 years. Three new trials question the role of manual therapy for hip and knee osteoarthritis. No between-group differences in outcome were detected between a multimodal programme including manual therapy and home exercise, and placebo in one trial; a second trial found no benefit of adding manual therapy to an exercise programme, while a third trial reported marginal benefits over usual care that were of doubtful importance. Recent trials have also found no or uncertain clinical benefits of transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) or acupuncture, or of valgus braces or lateral wedge insoles for pain and function in knee osteoarthritis. Available evidence suggests a small to moderate effect of exercise in comparison with not exercising for hip or knee osteoarthritis, although optimum exercise prescription and dosage are unclear. One trial also observed a delay in joint replacement in people with hip osteoarthritis. Two trials have reported conflicting findings about the effects of exercise for hand osteoarthritis. Other than exercise, recent data suggest that the role of physical therapies in the treatment of osteoarthritis appears limited.

  12. Sublingual immunotherapy in allergic asthma: Current evidence and needs to meet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Incorvaia Cristoforo

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Allergen-specific immunotherapy is aimed at modifying the natural history of allergy by inducing tolerance to the causative allergen. In its traditional, subcutaneous form, immunotherapy has complete evidence of efficacy in allergic asthma. However, subcutaneous immunotherapy (SCIT has a major flaw in side effects, and especially in possible anaphylactic reactions, and this prompted the search for safer ways of administration of allergen extracts. Sublingual immunotherapy (SLIT has met such need while maintaining a clinical efficacy comparable to SCIT. In fact, the safety profile, as outlined by a systematic revision of the available literature, was substantially free from serious systemic reactions. A number of meta-analyses clearly showed that SLIT is effective in allergic rhinitis by significantly reducing the clinical symptoms and the use of anti-allergic drugs, while the efficacy in allergic asthma is still debated, with some meta-analyses showing clear effectiveness but other giving contrasting results. Besides the efficacy on symptoms, the preventive activity and the cost-effectiveness are important outcomes of SLIT in asthma. The needs to meet include more data on efficacy in house dust mite asthma, optimal techniques of administration and, as previously done with SCIT, introduction of adjuvants able to enhance the immunologic response and use of recombinant allergens.

  13. Techniques of tumour bed boost irradiation in breast conserving therapy: Current evidence and suggested guidelines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jalali, Rakesh; Singh, Suruchi; Budrukkar, Ashwini [Tata Memorial Hospital, Mumbai (India)

    2007-10-15

    Breast conservation surgery followed by external beam radiotherapy to breast has become the standard of care in management of early carcinoma breast. A boost to the tumour bed after whole breast radiotherapy is employed in view of the pattern of tumour bed recurrences in the index quadrant and was particularly considered in patients with some adverse histopathological characteristics such as positive margins, extensive intraductal carcinoma (EIC), lymphovascular invasion (LVI), etc. There is however, now, a conclusive evidence of improvement in local control rates after a boost radiotherapy dose in patients even without such factors and for all age groups. The maximum absolute reduction of local recurrences by the addition of boost is especially seen in young premenopausal patients. At the same time, the addition of boost is associated with increased risk of worsening of cosmesis and no clear cut survival advantage. Radiological modalities such as fluoroscopy, ultrasound and CT scan have aided in accurate delineation of tumour bed with increasing efficacy. A widespread application of these techniques might ultimately translate into improved local control with minimal cosmetic deficit. The present article discusses the role of radiotherapy boost and the means to delineate and deliver the same, identify the high risk group, optimal technique and the doses and fractionations to be used. It also discusses the extent of adverse cosmetic outcome after boost delivery, means to minimise it and relevance of tumour bed in present day scenario of advanced radiotherapy delivery techniques like (IMRT)

  14. Urbanization and non-communicable disease in Southeast Asia: a review of current evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angkurawaranon, C; Jiraporncharoen, W; Chenthanakij, B; Doyle, P; Nitsch, D

    2014-10-01

    Non-communicable diseases (NCDs) have been highlighted as a major public health issue in the Southeast (SE) Asian region. One of the major socio-environmental factors that are considered to be associated with such a rise in NCDs is urbanization. Urbanization is associated with behavioural changes such as eating an unhealthy diet, and a decrease in physical activities, which may result in associated obesity. The SE Asian region also has a substantive burden of infectious disease such as HIV and malaria, which may modify associations between urbanization and development of NCDs. A systematic review was conducted until April 2013. Using four databases: EMBASE, PubMed, GlobalHealth and DigitalJournal, the systematic review pools existing evidence on urban-rural gradients in NCD prevalence/incidence. The study found that in SE Asia, urban exposure was positively associated with coronary heart disease, diabetes and respiratory diseases in children. Urban exposure was negatively associated with rheumatic heart diseases. The stages of economic development may also modify the association between urbanization and NCDs such as diabetes. There was pronounced heterogeneity between associations. It is recommended that future studies examine the major constituents of NCDs separately and also focus on the interplay between lifestyle and infectious risk factors for NCDs. Prospective studies are needed to understand the diverse causal pathways between urbanization and NCDs in SE Asia.

  15. [Non-celiac gluten sensitivity: a critical review of current evidence].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molina-Infante, Javier; Santolaria, Santos; Montoro, Miguel; Esteve, María; Fernández-Bañares, Fernando

    2014-01-01

    Non-celiac gluten sensitivity (NCGS) is an emerging disorder characterized by intestinal and extra-intestinal symptoms related to the ingestion of gluten-containing food in non-celiac patients. Its prevalence has been estimated to be six to ten-times higher than that of celiac disease (CD). A gluten-free diet is the most widely recommended therapy, but the causative agent remains unknown and there are no consensus diagnostic criteria. Recent studies on NCGS have included patients with possibly overlooked minor CD and diarrhea-predominant irritable bowel syndrome without self-reported gluten intolerance, but showing a response to a gluten-free diet. Furthermore, FODMAPs (Fermentable Oligosaccharides, Disaccharides, Monosaccharides And Polyols) have recently been postulated as the culprit component for NCGS in wheat, instead of gluten. This review updates evidence on the pathophysiology of NCGS and the efficacy of different dietary interventions in its treatment, stressing the need for proper screening for CD before a diagnosis of NCGS is made. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L. and AEEH y AEG. All rights reserved.

  16. Current Evidence of Chinese Herbal Constituents with Effects on NMDA Receptor Blockade

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David T. Yew

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available NMDA receptor (NMDA-R is an important molecular entity governing a wide range of functions in the central nervous system. For example, the NMDA-R is involved in memory and cognition, and impairment of both (as in Alzheimer’s Disease is attributed to NMDA-mediated neurotoxicity. With greater understanding of the NMDA-R structure, antagonists with varying degrees of binding-site and subtype selectivity have been developed and put into clinical use. Discovery of target-specific Chinese herbs have also been made in parallel. This article provides an overview of the known active sites on the NMDA-R, followed by a discussion of the relevant herbs and their constituents. Experimental evidence supporting the inhibitory role of the herbal compounds on the NMDA-R is highlighted. For some of the compounds, potential research directions are also proposed to further elucidate the underlying mechanisms of the herbs. It is envisaged that future investigations based on the present data will allow more clinically relevant herbs to be identified.

  17. B-Vitamins and Bone Health–A Review of the Current Evidence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Zhaoli; Koh, Woon-Puay

    2015-01-01

    Because of ongoing global ageing, there is a rapid worldwide increase in incidence of osteoporotic fractures and the resultant morbidity and mortality associated with these fractures are expected to create a substantial economic burden. Dietary modification is one effective approach for prevention of osteoporosis in the general population. Recently, B vitamins have been investigated for their possible roles in bone health in human studies. In this review, we provide different lines of evidence and potential mechanisms of individual B vitamin in influencing bone structure, bone quality, bone mass and fracture risk from published peer-reviewed articles. These data support a possible protective role of B vitamins, particularly, B2, B6, folate and B12, in bone health. However, results from the clinical trials have not been promising in supporting the efficacy of B vitamin supplementation in fracture reduction. Future research should continue to investigate the underlying mechanistic pathways and consider interventional studies using dietary regimens with vitamin B enriched foods to avoid potential adverse effects of high-dose vitamin B supplementation. In addition, observational and interventional studies conducted in Asia are limited and thus require more attention due to a steep rise of osteoporosis and hip fracture incidence projected in this part of the world. PMID:25961321

  18. B-vitamins and bone health--a review of the current evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Zhaoli; Koh, Woon-Puay

    2015-05-07

    Because of ongoing global ageing, there is a rapid worldwide increase in incidence of osteoporotic fractures and the resultant morbidity and mortality associated with these fractures are expected to create a substantial economic burden. Dietary modification is one effective approach for prevention of osteoporosis in the general population. Recently, B vitamins have been investigated for their possible roles in bone health in human studies. In this review, we provide different lines of evidence and potential mechanisms of individual B vitamin in influencing bone structure, bone quality, bone mass and fracture risk from published peer-reviewed articles. These data support a possible protective role of B vitamins, particularly, B2, B6, folate and B12, in bone health. However, results from the clinical trials have not been promising in supporting the efficacy of B vitamin supplementation in fracture reduction. Future research should continue to investigate the underlying mechanistic pathways and consider interventional studies using dietary regimens with vitamin B enriched foods to avoid potential adverse effects of high-dose vitamin B supplementation. In addition, observational and interventional studies conducted in Asia are limited and thus require more attention due to a steep rise of osteoporosis and hip fracture incidence projected in this part of the world.

  19. The relationship between the nucleolus and cancer: Current evidence and emerging paradigms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orsolic, Ines; Jurada, Deana; Pullen, Nick; Oren, Moshe; Eliopoulos, Aristides G; Volarevic, Sinisa

    2016-06-01

    The nucleolus is the most prominent nuclear substructure assigned to produce ribosomes; molecular machines that are responsible for carrying out protein synthesis. To meet the increased demand for proteins during cell growth and proliferation the cell must increase protein synthetic capacity by upregulating ribosome biogenesis. While larger nucleolar size and number have been recognized as hallmark features of many tumor types, recent evidence has suggested that, in addition to overproduction of ribosomes, decreased ribosome biogenesis as well as qualitative changes in this process could also contribute to tumor initiation and cancer progression. Furthermore, the nucleolus has become the focus of intense attention for its involvement in processes that are clearly unrelated to ribosome biogenesis such as sensing and responding to endogenous and exogenous stressors, maintenance of genome stability, regulation of cell-cycle progression, cellular senescence, telomere function, chromatin structure, establishment of nuclear architecture, global regulation of gene expression and biogenesis of multiple ribonucleoprotein particles. The fact that dysregulation of many of these fundamental cellular processes may contribute to the malignant phenotype suggests that normal functioning of the nucleolus safeguards against the development of cancer and indicates its potential as a therapeutic approach. Here we review the recent advances made toward understanding these newly-recognized nucleolar functions and their roles in normal and cancer cells, and discuss possible future research directions.

  20. Does breastfeeding influence the risk of developing diabetes mellitus in children? A review of current evidence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patricia Feliciano Pereira

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to perform a review to investigate the influence of breastfeeding as a protective agent against the onset of diabetes in children. SOURCES: Non-systematic review of SciELO, LILACS, MEDLINE, Scopus, and VHL databases, and selection of the 52 most relevant studies. A total of 21 articles, specifically on the topic, were analyzed (nine related to type 1 diabetes and 12 to type 2 diabetes. DATA SYNTHESIS: The duration and exclusivity of breastfeeding, as well as the early use of cow's milk, have been shown to be important risk factors for developing diabetes. It is believed that human milk contains substances that promote the maturation of the immune system, which protect against the onset of type 1 diabetes. Moreover, human milk has bioactive substances that promote satiety and energy balance, preventing excess weight gain during childhood, thus protecting against the development of type 2 diabetes. Although the above mentioned benefits have not been observed by some researchers, inaccuracies on dietary habit reports during childhood and the presence of interfering factors have been considered responsible for the lack of identification of beneficial effects. CONCLUSION: Given the scientific evidence indicated in most published studies, it is believed that the lack of breastfeeding can be a modifiable risk factor for both type 1 and type 2 diabetes. Strategies aiming at the promotion and support of breastfeeding should be used by trained healthcare professionals in order to prevent the onset of diabetes.

  1. Current evidence for the role of complement in the pathogenesis of Shiga toxin haemolytic uraemic syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keir, Lindsay S; Saleem, Moin A

    2014-10-01

    Shiga toxin-associated haemolytic uraemic syndrome (Stx HUS) is the leading cause of paediatric acute kidney injury. This toxin-mediated disease carries a significant morbidity and mortality but has no direct treatments. Rare familial atypical HUS (aHUS) is now understood to result from over-activation of the alternative complement pathway causing glomerular endothelial damage. By understanding the pathogenic mechanisms of this disease, the monoclonal antibody eculizumab, which blocks the final common pathway of complement, is now being used to treat aHUS. For this reason, clinicians and scientists are studying the role of the alternative complement pathway in Stx HUS with the aim of targeting treatment in a similar way. There is some evidence suggesting that complement plays a role in the pathogenesis of Stx HUS, but other mechanisms may also be important. Clinically, modulating the complement system using plasma exchange provides no proven benefit in Stx HUS, and the use of eculizumab has provided conflicting results. Understanding the local effect of Stx on the glomerulus, in particular regulation of the complement and coagulation systems, may lead to advances in defining the precise pathogenesis of this disease. Then, targeted treatment strategies could be devised and clinical trials undertaken.

  2. Cellulite treatment: evidence and ethics, brief history, and emphasis on current practices including liposuction

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Riese, Cornelia

    2005-04-01

    According to Taber's Cyclopedic Medical Dictionary "cellulite" is defined as: "a non-technical term for subcutaneous deposits of fat, especially in the buttocks, legs, and thighs." These deposits result in puckered, dimply skin and they are a cause for major aesthetic concerns in affected patients. The etiology of this condition is still unclear. Female predilection is witnessed in clinical practice as it is reported in the literature. It remains a subject for further studies whether it is a structural problem of connective tissue or as suggested probably related to hormonal causes. Magnetic resonance imaging may provide some answers to these questions. Not knowing what is causing this nuisance makes it almost impossible to treat. No wonder that there is little scientific validation to support any of the many treatments that are advertised on the Internet or in women's magazines. This review focuses on mechanical and microinvasive interventions that claim to alleviate "cellulite": lipoplasty, liposcultpure, liposuction, subcision, and laser. Among the parameters analyzed are the proposed modes of action of these techniques as well as adverse events and complications that may occur. Of special interest will be the evidence that backs these procedures. Extracting reliable data is hampered by methodical problems with the design of most of the published trials. In essence, at this time there is no "cure" for cellulite. Safe treatment recommendations are related to healthy life style choices that include toning exercises, dietary changes, and weight loss.

  3. Current perspectives on therapeutic ultrasound in the management of chronic wounds: a review of evidence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Conner-Kerr T

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Teresa Conner-Kerr,1 Mary Ellen Oesterle2 1College of Health Sciences & Professions, 2Department of Physical Therapy, University of North Georgia, Dahlonega, GA, USA Abstract: Although therapeutic ultrasound has been in existence since the 1930s, questions remain as to its effectiveness in promoting tissue healing in various injured tissues. These tissues include soft tissues such as skin, tendons, ligaments, bursae, joint capsules and muscles. Limited evidence exists to support a role for therapeutic ultrasound in closed, soft tissue lesions. However, an evolving literature provides support for the role of therapeutic ultrasound in the treatment of chronic wounds, acute injuries such as fractures and split thickness graft donor sites as well as in the modulation of wound-related pain. Modern technology that uses low-frequency (kilohertz, long wave ultrasound appears promising compared to older, higher frequency ultrasound (megahertz devices. These newer devices appear to have positive effects on healing rates in various wound types, pain levels and the modulation of proinflammatory cytokines. Keywords: low-frequency ultrasound, non-contact ultrasound, KHz, acoustic, healing, cavitation

  4. Evidence-based medicine in bovine, equine and canine reproduction: quality of current literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simoneit, C; Heuwieser, W; Arlt, S

    2011-10-01

    The objective was to evaluate deficits and differences of published literature on reproduction in cattle, horses, and dogs. A literature search was conducted in the databases Medline and Veterinary Science. Approximately five times more articles on clinical bovine reproduction (n = 25 910) were found compared to canine (n = 5 015) and equine (n = 5 090) reproduction. For the evaluation of the literature, a checklist was used. A subset of 600 articles published between 1999 and 2008 was randomly selected. After applying exclusion criteria, a total of 268 trials (86 for cattle, 99 for horses, and 83 for dogs) were evaluated and used for further analysis. For the field of canine and equine reproduction, there were fewer clinical trials with a control group compared to bovine reproduction (cattle 66%, horses 41%, and dogs 41%). For all three species investigated, few publications were identified (4%) with the highest level of evidence, i.e., controlled, randomized, and blinded trials, or meta-analyses. In cattle 33% of the publications were graded adequate to draw sound conclusions; however, only 7 and 11% were graded adequate in dogs and horses, respectively. Therefore, the veterinarian should always assess the quality of information before implementing results into practice to provide best available care for the animals. In conclusion, improvement of the quality of well-designed, conducted and reported clinical trails in animal reproduction is required.

  5. Appraisal of biochemical classes of radioprotectors: evidence, current status and guidelines for future development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, Krishnanand; Alsbeih, Ghazi

    2017-10-01

    The search for efficient radioprotective agents to protect from radiation-induced toxicity, due to planned or accidental radiation exposure, is still ongoing worldwide. Despite decades of research and development of widely different biochemical classes of natural and derivative compounds, a safe and effective radioprotector is largely unmet. In this comprehensive review, we evaluated the evidence for the radioprotective performance of classical thiols, vitamins, minerals, dietary antioxidants, phytochemicals, botanical and bacterial preparations, DNA-binding agents, cytokines, and chelators including adaptogens. Where radioprotection was demonstrated, the compounds have shown moderate dose modifying factors ranging from 1.1 to 2.7. To date, only few compounds found way to clinic with limited margin of dose prescription due to side effects. Most of these compounds (amifostine, filgratism, pegfilgrastim, sargramostim, palifermin, recombinant salmonella flagellin, Prussian blue, potassium iodide) act primarily via scavenging of free radicals, modulation of oxidative stress, signal transduction, cell proliferation or enhance radionuclide elimination. However, the gain in radioprotection remains hampered with low margin of tolerance. Future development of more effective radioprotectors requires an appropriate nontoxic compound, a model system and biomarkers of radiation exposure. These are important to test the effectiveness of radioprotection on physiological tissues during radiotherapy and field application in cases of nuclear eventualities.

  6. Prostate-specific antigen: does the current evidence support its use in prostate cancer screening?

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Duffy, Michael J

    2012-02-01

    Although widely used, the value of prostate-specific antigen (PSA) in screening asymptomatic men for prostate cancer is controversial. Reasons for the controversy relate to PSA being less than an ideal marker in detecting early prostate cancer, the possibility that screening for prostate cancer may result in the overdetection and thus overtreatment of indolent disease and the lack of clarity as to the definitive or best treatment for men diagnosed with localized prostate cancer. Although the results from some randomized prospective trials suggest that screening with PSA reduces mortality from prostate cancer, the overall benefit was modest. It is thus currently unclear as to whether the modest benefit of reduced mortality outweighs the harms of overdetection and overtreatment. Thus, prior to undergoing screening for prostate cancer, men should be informed of the risks and benefits of early detection. Newly emerging markers that may complement PSA in the early detection of prostate cancer include specific isoforms of PSA and PCA3.

  7. No evidence for adaptation of current egg drop syndrome 1976 viruses to chickens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsukamoto, K; Kuwabara, M; Kaneko, M; Mase, M; Imai, K

    2004-01-01

    In order to determine whether the current field strains of egg drop syndrome (EDS) 1976 viruses adapt to chickens, we compared the growth efficiency of three Japanese field strains (PA-1/79, AWI/98, Gifu/01) in chicken and duck embryo liver cells. The growth efficiency in chicken or duck embryo liver cells was almost similar in these strains. The fiber protein may carry the type-specific antigen and the hemagglutination activity, and hexon protein may contain the subgroup-specific antigenic determinants. Therefore, the fiber head and hexon loop 1 DNA domain sequences of the six Japanese field strains UPA-1/79, ME/80, 44/81, Kyoto/91, AWI/98, Gifu/01) were compared, but these DNA domains were identical among the six field strains. Our data suggested that the EDS virus was maintained without discernible changes for the last two decades in the field.

  8. Hyponatremia in the neurocritical care patient: An approach based on current evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manzanares, W; Aramendi, I; Langlois, P L; Biestro, A

    2015-05-01

    In the neurocritical care setting, hyponatremia is the commonest electrolyte disorder, which is associated with significant morbimortality. Cerebral salt wasting and syndrome of inappropriate antidiuretic hormone have been classically described as the 2 most frequent entities responsible of hyponatremia in neurocritical care patients. Nevertheless, to distinguish between both syndromes is usually difficult and useless as volume status is difficult to be determined, underlying pathophysiological mechanisms are still not fully understood, fluid restriction is usually contraindicated in these patients, and the first option in the therapeutic strategy is always the same: 3% hypertonic saline solution. Therefore, we definitively agree with the current concept of "cerebral salt wasting", which means that whatever is the etiology of hyponatremia, initially in neurocritical care patients the treatment will be the same: hypertonic saline solution. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and SEMICYUC. All rights reserved.

  9. The flow structure of pyroclastic density currents: evidence from particle models and large-scale experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dellino, Pierfrancesco; Büttner, Ralf; Dioguardi, Fabio; Doronzo, Domenico Maria; La Volpe, Luigi; Mele, Daniela; Sonder, Ingo; Sulpizio, Roberto; Zimanowski, Bernd

    2010-05-01

    Pyroclastic flows are ground hugging, hot, gas-particle flows. They represent the most hazardous events of explosive volcanism, one striking example being the famous historical eruption of Pompeii (AD 79) at Vesuvius. Much of our knowledge on the mechanics of pyroclastic flows comes from theoretical models and numerical simulations. Valuable data are also stored in the geological record of past eruptions, i.e. the particles contained in pyroclastic deposits, but they are rarely used for quantifying the destructive potential of pyroclastic flows. In this paper, by means of experiments, we validate a model that is based on data from pyroclastic deposits. It allows the reconstruction of the current's fluid-dynamic behaviour. We show that our model results in likely values of dynamic pressure and particle volumetric concentration, and allows quantifying the hazard potential of pyroclastic flows.

  10. Proton therapy for head and neck cancer: Rationale, potential indications, practical considerations, and current clinical evidence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mendenhall, Nancy P.; Malyapa, Robert S.; Su, Zhong; Yeung, Daniel; Mendenhall, William M.; Li, Zuofeng (Univ. of Florida Proton Therapy Inst., Jacksonville, Florida (United States)), e-mail: menden@shands.ufl.edu

    2011-08-15

    There is a strong rationale for potential benefits from proton therapy (PT) for selected cancers of the head and neck because of the opportunity to improve the therapeutic ratio by improving radiation dose distributions and because of the significant differences in radiation dose distribution achievable with x-ray-based radiation therapy (RT) and PT. Comparisons of dose distributions between x-ray-based and PT plans in selected cases show specific benefits in dose distribution likely to translate into improved clinical outcomes. However, the use of PT in head and neck cancers requires special considerations in the simulation and treatment planning process, and currently available PT technology may not permit realization of the maximum potential benefits of PT. To date, few clinical data are available, but early clinical experiences in sinonasal tumors in particular suggest significant improvements in both disease control and radiation-related toxicity

  11. Evidence of underground electric current generation during the 2009 L'Aquila earthquake: Real or instrumental?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masci, F.; Thomas, J. N.

    2016-06-01

    We investigate magnetic effects in correspondence of the Mw6.1 L'Aquila earthquake. Magnetic and seismic records are analyzed. Rapid and distinct changes and an offset can be seen in magnetic field components after the main shock. We show that these effects result from electromagnetic induction due to the movement of the sensors through the Earth's magnetic field and from a permanent displacement of the sensors from their original position caused by the passing seismic waves. A transient signal in total field data from an overhauser magnetometer apparently occurs in correspondence with the earthquake. Our analysis shows that the transient was not observed by other sensors that were operating in close proximity to the overhauser. Thus, the transient signal in the total magnetic field data, and the offset in the magnetic field components, cannot be associated with a hypothetical underground electric current generated by the earthquake, as suggested by Nenovski (2015).

  12. Current thinking in qualitative research: evidence-based practice, moral philosophies, and political struggle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papadimitriou, Christina; Magasi, Susan; Frank, Gelya

    2012-01-01

    In this introduction to the special issue on current thinking in qualitative research and occupational therapy and science, the authors focus on the importance of rigorous qualitative research to inform occupational therapy practice. The authors chosen for this special issue reflect a "second generation of qualitative researchers" who are critical, theoretically sophisticated, methodologically productive, and politically relevant to show that working with disabled clients is political work. Three themes emerged across the articles included in this special issue: (1) recognizing and addressing social justice issues; (2) learning from clients' experiences; and (3) critically reframing occupational therapy's role. These themes can inform occupational therapy practice, research, and education to reflect a more client-centered and politically engaging approach. Copyright 2012, SLACK Incorporated.

  13. Intravenous immunoglobulin for the treatment of Alzheimer's disease: current evidence and considerations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schindowski C

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Christina Schindowski,1,* Jürgen Zimmermann,2,* Katharina Schindowski3  1Vivantes Klinikum am Urban Hospital, Department of Psychiatry, Psychotherapy, and Psychosomatic Medicine, Berlin, Germany; 2Thermofisher Scientific, Langenselbold, Germany; 3Institute of Applied Biotechnology, Faculty for Biotechnology, Biberach University of Applied Sciences, Biberach/Riss, Germany *These authors contributed equally to this work Abstract: Alzheimer's disease (AD is a devastating neurodegenerative form of dementia with increasing incidence rates in most countries. AD is characterized by amyloid plaques and neurofibrillary tangles in the brains of AD individuals accompanied by global neuronal loss. The peptide amyloid-β (Aβ aggregates to amyloid plaques in AD brains. As a result, many therapeutic approaches target Aβ. Human plasma and the plasma product intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG contain naturally-occurring anti-Aβ antibodies (Nabs-Aβ that appear to reduce risks of developing AD. IVIG sequesters Aβ and thus interferes with AD progression. This study reviews the role of different Aβ species, Nabs-Aβ, preclinical data, and clinical studies of IVIG as potential AD treatments. The focus of this study is the outcomes of a recent Gammaglobulin Alzheimer's Partnership Phase III trial that did not reach primary endpoints, as well as efforts to compare IVIG with current anti-Aβ monoclonals such as bapineuzumab, solanezumab, and BIIB037. Moreover, this study critically examines current market and ethical consequences of potential off-label uses of IVIG, limits in IVIG supply, and subsequent challenges. Keywords: IVIG, amyloid-beta, Nabs-Aβ, Gammagard®, efficacy, target, market

  14. Radiation as an immunological adjuvant: current evidence on dose and fractionation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra eDemaria

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Ionizing radiation to a cancer site has the ability to convert the irradiated tumor in an immunogenic hub. However, radiation is a complex modifier of the tumor microenvironment and, by itself, is seldom sufficient to induce a therapeutically significant anti-tumor immune response, since it can also activate immune suppressive pathways. While several combinations of local radiation and immunotherapy have been shown in pre-clinical models to induce powerful anti-tumor immunity, the optimal strategy to achieve this effect remains to be defined. When used in vivo, radiation effects on tumors depend on the dose per fraction applied, the number of fractions used, and the total dose. Moreover, the interplay of these three variables is contingent upon the tumor setting studied, both in preclinical and clinical applications. To enable repair of the collateral damage to the normal tissue, radiation is usually given in multiple fractions, usually of 2 Gy. Generally, the use of larger fractions is limited to sterotactic applications, whereby optimal immobilization reduces inter and intra-fraction movement and permits a very conformal delivery of dose to the target, with optimal exclusion of normal tissue. Translation of the partnership of radiation and immunotherapy to the clinic requires a careful consideration of the radiation regimens used. To date, little is known on whether different dose/fractionation regimens have a specific impact on the anti-tumor immune response. Most experiments combining the two modalities were conducted with single fractions of radiotherapy. However, there is at least some evidence that when combined with some specific immunotherapy approaches, the ability of radiation to promote anti-tumor immunity is dependent on the dose and fractionation employed. We critically review the available in vitro and in vivo data on this subject and discuss the potential impact of fractionation on the ability of radiation to synergize with

  15. Donor human milk for preterm infants: current evidence and research directions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arslanoglu, Sertac; Corpeleijn, Willemijn; Moro, Guido; Braegger, Christian; Campoy, Cristina; Colomb, Virginie; Decsi, Tamas; Domellöf, Magnus; Fewtrell, Mary; Hojsak, Iva; Mihatsch, Walter; Mølgaard, Christian; Shamir, Raanan; Turck, Dominique; van Goudoever, Johannes

    2013-10-01

    The Committee on Nutrition of the European Society for Pediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology, and Nutrition aims to document the existing evidence of the benefits and common concerns deriving from the use of donor human milk (DHM) in preterm infants. The comment also outlines gaps in knowledge and gives recommendations for practice and suggestions for future research directions. Protection against necrotizing enterocolitis is the major clinical benefit deriving from the use of DHM when compared with formula. Limited data also suggest unfortified DHM to be associated with improved feeding tolerance and with reduced cardiovascular risk factors during adolescence. Presence of a human milk bank (HMB) does not decrease breast-feeding rates at discharge, but decreases the use of formula during the first weeks of life. This commentary emphasizes that fresh own mother's milk (OMM) is the first choice in preterm infant feeding and strong efforts should be made to promote lactation. When OMM is not available, DHM is the recommended alternative. When neither OMM nor DHM is available, preterm formula should be used. DHM should be provided from an established HMB, which follows specific safety guidelines. Storage and processing of human milk reduces some biological components, which may diminish its health benefits. From a nutritional point of view, DHM, like HM, does not meet the requirements of preterm infants, necessitating a specific fortification regimen to optimize growth. Future research should focus on the improvement of milk processing in HMB, particularly of heat treatment; on the optimization of HM fortification; and on further evaluation of the potential clinical benefits of processed and fortified DHM.

  16. Does breastfeeding influence the risk of developing diabetes mellitus in children? A review of current evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Patrícia Feliciano; Alfenas, Rita de Cássia G; Araújo, Raquel Maria A

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to perform a review to investigate the influence of breastfeeding as a protective agent against the onset of diabetes in children. non-systematic review of SciELO, LILACS, MEDLINE, Scopus, and VHL databases, and selection of the 52 most relevant studies. A total of 21 articles, specifically on the topic, were analyzed (nine related to type 1 diabetes and 12 to type 2 diabetes). The duration and exclusivity of breastfeeding, as well as the early use of cow's milk, have been shown to be important risk factors for developing diabetes. It is believed that human milk contains substances that promote the maturation of the immune system, which protect against the onset of type 1 diabetes. Moreover, human milk has bioactive substances that promote satiety and energy balance, preventing excess weight gain during childhood, thus protecting against the development of type 2 diabetes. Although the above mentioned benefits have not been observed by some researchers, inaccuracies on dietary habit reports during childhood and the presence of interfering factors have been considered responsible for the lack of identification of beneficial effects. Given the scientific evidence indicated in most published studies, it is believed that the lack of breastfeeding can be a modifiable risk factor for both type 1 and type 2 diabetes. Strategies aiming at the promotion and support of breastfeeding should be used by trained healthcare professionals in order to prevent the onset of diabetes. Copyright © 2013 Sociedade Brasileira de Pediatria. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  17. Perioperative management of haemophilia B: A critical appraisal of the evidence and current practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neufeld, E J; Solimeno, L; Quon, D; Walsh, C; Seremetis, S; Cooper, D; Iyer, N N; Hoxer, C S; Giangrande, P

    2017-07-27

    While there is substantial literature addressing the principles of general management of haemophilia, literature on perioperative management of haemostasis is scarce. The aim of this study was to better understand perioperative management among congenital haemophilia B patients (without inhibitors) and to gain insights into real-world surgical practices. A systematic literature review, with an emphasis on haemophilia B, was conducted using EMBASE(®) , Medline(®) and the Cochrane Library. Studies from 1974 to June 2015 were accessed, and 132 studies were eligible for the full-study review. An international expert panel with five haematologists and one surgeon reviewed the resulting literature and provided further insights. The literature review revealed that documented experience in the perioperative management of bleeding risk in haemophilia B patients is relatively scarce. Therefore, the review was amended to provide a comprehensive overview of the perioperative management for haemophilia A and B patients; the expert panel applied a particular focus to haemophilia B. Several gaps were identified in the literature including the lack of consensus on defining surgery in terms of bleeding risk, optimal factor levels during surgery and lack of robust evidence on surgical outcomes. The ensuing discussions with the expert panel provided validation of some of the results from the systematic literature review and proposed future directions for perioperative management. Suggestions included collaboration with haemophilia treatment centres (HTCs) to collect real-world data on perioperative management, establishing the need for optimal factor level monitoring practice, and the appropriate adoption of extended half-life products in clinical settings. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Neurocognitive and Social Cognitive Approaches for Improving Functional Outcome in Early Psychosis: Theoretical Considerations and Current State of Evidence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cali F. Bartholomeusz

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Improving functional outcome, in addition to alleviating psychotic symptoms, is now a major treatment objective in schizophrenia research. Given the large body of evidence suggesting pharmacological treatments generally have minimal effects on indices of functioning, research has turned to psychosocial rehabilitation programs. Among these, neurocognitive and social cognitive interventions are at the forefront of this field and are argued to target core deficits inherent to the schizophrenia illness. However, to date, research trials have primarily focused on chronic schizophrenia populations, neglecting the early psychosis groups who are often as severely impaired in social and occupational functioning. This theoretical paper will outline the rationale for investigating adjunctive cognitive-based interventions in the early phases of psychotic illness, critically examine the current approach strategies used in these interventions, and assess the evidence supporting certain training programs for improving functional outcome in early psychosis. Potential pathways for future research will be discussed.

  19. Autonomic nervous system dysfunction in obesity and Prader-Willi syndrome: current evidence and implications for future obesity therapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haqq, A M; DeLorey, D S; Sharma, A M; Freemark, M; Kreier, F; Mackenzie, M L; Richer, L P

    2011-08-01

    The autonomic nervous system (ANS) controls essential functions like breathing, heart rate, digestion, body temperature and hormone levels. Evidence suggests that ANS dysfunction is associated with adult and childhood obesity and plays a role in the distribution of total body fat and the development of obesity-related complications in humans. This review summarizes our current understanding of ANS involvement in the pathogenesis of obesity and Prader-Willi syndrome. Available evidence of ANS dysfunction in the control of energy balance is limited and, in some cases, contradictory. Further investigation in this area is warranted in order to better understand the important contributions of the ANS to regulation of body fat, development of obesity and its comorbidities. Results from these studies will guide the development of novel obesity therapeutics targeting specific ANS dysfunction.

  20. Personal Values as Mitigating Factors in the Link between Income and Life Satisfaction: Evidence from the European Social Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Georgellis, Yannis; Tsitsianis, Nicholas; Yin, Ya Ping

    2009-01-01

    Using data from the first two rounds of the European Social Survey, we examine the link between income, reference income and life satisfaction across Western Europe. We find that whilst there is a strong positive relationship between income and life satisfaction, reference or comparison income exerts a strong negative influence. Interestingly, our…

  1. Personal Values as Mitigating Factors in the Link between Income and Life Satisfaction: Evidence from the European Social Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Georgellis, Yannis; Tsitsianis, Nicholas; Yin, Ya Ping

    2009-01-01

    Using data from the first two rounds of the European Social Survey, we examine the link between income, reference income and life satisfaction across Western Europe. We find that whilst there is a strong positive relationship between income and life satisfaction, reference or comparison income exerts a strong negative influence. Interestingly, our…

  2. Linking Prenatal Androgens to Gender-Related Attitudes, Identity, and Activities : Evidence From Girls With Congenital Adrenal Hyperplasia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Endendijk, Joyce J.; Beltz, Adriene M.; McHale, Susan M.; Bryk, Kristina; Berenbaum, Sheri A.

    2016-01-01

    Key questions for developmentalists concern the origins of gender attitudes and their implications for behavior. We examined whether prenatal androgen exposure was related to gender attitudes, and whether and how the links between attitudes and gendered activity interest and participation were media

  3. Examining Dynamic Links between Perceived Control and Health: Longitudinal Evidence for Differential Effects in Midlife and Old Age

    Science.gov (United States)

    Infurna, Frank J.; Gerstorf, Denis; Zarit, Steven H.

    2011-01-01

    Perceived control and health are often closely linked in adulthood and old age. Little is known, however, about their time-ordered interplay at various phases of adult life. By applying dynamic models to four waves of data over 15.5 years from the Americans' Changing Lives Study, we examined time-ordered relations between perceived control and…

  4. Clinical utility of ulipristal acetate for the treatment of uterine fibroids: current evidence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trefoux Bourdet A

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Alice Trefoux Bourdet, Dominique Luton, Martin Koskas Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Bichat University Hospital, Paris Diderot University, Paris, France Abstract: Uterine myoma is the most common benign uterine tumor in women of reproductive age and occurs in 20%–25% of the worldwide population. No currently approved medical treatment is able to completely eliminate fibroids. Surgery, particularly hysterectomy, predominates as the treatment strategy of choice, even though it is associated with risks and complications and causes infertility. Until recently, gonadotropin-releasing hormone agonists were the only available drugs for the preoperative treatment of fibroids. However, ulipristal acetate (UPA, an oral selective progesterone receptor modulator, was recently licensed in Europe for the same indication. Recent studies have demonstrated the efficacy and safety of UPA in the medical management of fibroids before surgery, with a better tolerability profile than leuprolide acetate. Analyzing the literature, we identified new management strategies involving UPA and surgery, considering advantages of both medical and surgical therapy. The advent of UPA will undoubtedly modify the surgical approach to fibroids, but the heterogeneity of these possible indications now requires various original clinical studies to identify the optimal indications for UPA in patients with symptomatic fibroid(s. Keywords: uterine fibroids, medical treatment, selective progesterone receptor modulator, ulipristal acetate, surgery

  5. Ayurveda and botanical drugs for epilepsy: Current evidence and future prospects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sriranjini, Sitaram Jaideep; Sandhya, Kumar; Mamta, Vernekar Sanjeeva

    2015-11-01

    The understanding of epilepsy has progressed since its earliest impression as a disease associated with paranormal and superstitious beliefs. Landmark advances have been made in deciphering the pathophysiological substrates involved in the disease process, and treatment advances have contributed significantly to ameliorating the seizures. However, disease-modifying agents are yet to be discovered. Ayurveda is a system of medicine that stresses a holistic approach to disease, and treatment is focused on disease modification and symptom management. Herbs form the core of Ayurveda medicine; though many of them have been studied for their anticonvulsant activity, very few actually mention the reference of these herbs in Ayurveda literature. Other therapeutic interventions used in Ayurveda are relatively unexplored, and future research will need to focus on this. The current manuscript briefly discusses the understanding of epilepsy as per Ayurveda and reviews herbs that have been studied for their anticonvulsant activity mentioned in Ayurveda literature. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled "Botanicals for Epilepsy".

  6. Anti-angiogenesis in hepatocellular carcinoma treatment: Current evidence and future perspectives

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Martin-Walter Welker; Joerg Trojan

    2011-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is among the most common cancer diseases worldwide. Arterial hypervascularisation is an essential step for HCC tumorigenesis and can be targeted by transarterial chemoembolization (TACE). This interventional method is the standard treatment for patients with intermediate stage HCC, but is also applied as "bridging" therapy for patients awaiting liver transplantation in many centers worldwide. Usually the devascularization effect induced by TACE is transient, consequently resulting in repeated cycles of TACE every 4-8 wk. Despite documented survival benefits, TACE can also induce the up-regulation of proangiogenic and growth factors, which might contribute to accelerated progression in patients with incomplete response. In 2007, sorafenib, a multi-tyrosine kinase and angiogenesis inhibitor, was approved as the first systemic treatment for advanced stage HCC. Other active targeted compounds, either inhibitors of angiogenesis and/or growth factors, are currently being investigated in numerous clinical trials. To overcome revascularisation or tumor progression under TACE treatment it seems therefore attractive to combine TACE with systemic targeted agents, which might theoretically block the effects of proangiogenic and growth factors. Over the last 12 mo, several retrospective or prospective cohort studies combining TACE and sorafenib have been published. Nevertheless, robust results of the efficacy and tolerability of such combination strategies as proven by randomized, controlled trials are awaited in the next two years.

  7. Targeting the Glutamatergic System to Treat Pathological Gambling: Current Evidence and Future Perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mauro Pettorruso

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Pathological gambling or gambling disorder has been defined by the DSM-5 as a behavioral addiction. To date, its pathophysiology is not completely understood and there is no FDA-approved treatment for gambling disorders. Glutamate is the principal excitatory neurotransmitter in the nervous system and it has been recently involved in the pathophysiology of addictive behaviors. In this paper, we review the current literature on a class of drugs that act as modulating glutamate system in PG. A total of 19 studies have been included, according to inclusion and exclusion criteria. Clinical trial and case series using glutamatergic drugs (N-acetylcysteine, memantine, amantadine, topiramate, acamprosate, baclofen, gabapentin, pregabalin, and modafinil will be presented to elucidate the effectiveness on gambling behaviors and on the related clinical dimensions (craving, withdrawal, and cognitive symptoms in PG patients. The results have been discussed to gain more insight in the pathophysiology and treatment of PG. In conclusion, manipulation of glutamatergic neurotransmission appears to be promising in developing improved therapeutic agents for the treatment of gambling disorders. Further studies are required. Finally, we propose future directions and challenges in this research area.

  8. Isavuconazole for the treatment of invasive aspergillosis and mucormycosis: current evidence, safety, efficacy, and clinical recommendations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Natesan, Suganthini Krishnan; Chandrasekar, Pranatharthi H

    2016-01-01

    The majority of invasive mold infections diagnosed in immunocompromised cancer patients include invasive aspergillosis (IA) and mucormycosis. Despite timely and effective therapy, mortality remains considerable. Antifungal agents currently available for the management of these serious infections include triazoles, polyenes, and echinocandins. Until recently, posaconazole has been the only triazole with a broad spectrum of anti-mold activity against both Aspergillus sp. and mucorales. Other clinically available triazoles voriconazole and itraconazole, with poor activity against mucorales, have significant drug interactions in addition to a side effect profile inherent for all triazoles. Polyenes including lipid formulations pose a problem with infusion-related side effects, electrolyte imbalance, and nephrotoxicity. Echinocandins are ineffective against mucorales and are approved as salvage therapy for refractory IA. Given that all available antifungal agents have limitations, there has been an unmet need for a broad-spectrum anti-mold agent with a favorable profile. Following phase III clinical trials that started in 2006, isavuconazole (ISZ) seems to fit this profile. It is the first novel triazole agent recently approved by the United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for the treatment of both IA and mucormycosis. This review provides a brief overview of the salient features of ISZ, its favorable profile with regard to spectrum of antifungal activity, pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic parameters, drug interactions and tolerability, clinical efficacy, and side effects. PMID:27994475

  9. Factors Influencing Adult Physical Health after Controlling for Current Health Conditions: Evidence from a British Cohort

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Helen; Furnham, Adrian

    2013-01-01

    This study explored a longitudinal data set of 6875 British adults examining the effects of parental social status (measured at birth), cognitive ability (at age 11 yrs), personality traits, education and occupational attainment on physical health and functioning (all measured at age 50 yrs), after taking account of current health conditions (number of illness). Correlation analysis showed that parental social class, childhood cognitive ability, education and occupation, and two personality traits (Emotional Stability/Neuroticism, and Conscientiousness) were all significantly associated with adult physical health variables. Structural equation modelling showed that health conditions and personality traits were significantly, and inversely, associated with physical health (indicated by good daily physical functioning, relative absence of pain, perceived health, and low level of limitations at work due to physical health). Parental social status, childhood intelligence, educational and occupational attainment were all modestly, but significantly and directly, associated with adult physical health. The effect of childhood intelligence on adult physical health was, in part, mediated through Emotional Stability and Conscientiousness. After controlling for health conditions Emotional Stability was the strongest predictor of physical health. Implications and limitations are discussed. PMID:23826090

  10. Factors influencing adult physical health after controlling for current health conditions: evidence from a british cohort.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helen Cheng

    Full Text Available This study explored a longitudinal data set of 6875 British adults examining the effects of parental social status (measured at birth, cognitive ability (at age 11 yrs, personality traits, education and occupational attainment on physical health and functioning (all measured at age 50 yrs, after taking account of current health conditions (number of illness. Correlation analysis showed that parental social class, childhood cognitive ability, education and occupation, and two personality traits (Emotional Stability/Neuroticism, and Conscientiousness were all significantly associated with adult physical health variables. Structural equation modelling showed that health conditions and personality traits were significantly, and inversely, associated with physical health (indicated by good daily physical functioning, relative absence of pain, perceived health, and low level of limitations at work due to physical health. Parental social status, childhood intelligence, educational and occupational attainment were all modestly, but significantly and directly, associated with adult physical health. The effect of childhood intelligence on adult physical health was, in part, mediated through Emotional Stability and Conscientiousness. After controlling for health conditions Emotional Stability was the strongest predictor of physical health. Implications and limitations are discussed.

  11. School Social Work in the United States: Current Evidence and Future Directions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stone, Susan

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper surveys the historical and school institutional factors that shape current workforce, programmatic, and practice trends related to school social work in America. A key strand developed throughout is that the field of practice appears to be at a crossroads. It is suggested that this field of practice may be enhanced by placing the central focus on schools as organisations and school-community relations as key targets of intervention.Este artículo examina los factores históricos e institucionales que perfilan al personal docente, las tendencias en las programaciones y las prácticas que se desarrollan en la actualidad en el ámbito del trabajo social en la escuela en los Estados Unidos de América. Un aspecto clave derivado de este examen es que la profesión parece estar en una encrucijada. Se sugiere como alternativa a esta situación, centrar la atención y los objetivos fundamentales de intervención en las escuelas como organizaciones, y en las relaciones que se generan entre las escuelas y la comunidad.

  12. Biologic therapy with or without topical treatment in psoriasis: what does the current evidence say?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, J Daniel; Delcambre, Macey Renault; Nguyen, Gloria; Sami, Naveed

    2014-10-01

    Biologic therapy represents a relatively new class of drugs which have revolutionized the treatment of psoriasis and are used with increasing frequency in order to control this chronic, systemic inflammatory disease. However, it is unclear what role there is for combination therapy of biologics with traditional topical agents. The purpose of this article is to assess the literature on the role of topical agents as adjuvants to biological treatments in the treatment of psoriasis and identify areas for further research. A MEDLINE search was performed in order to identify English-language publications from 1996 to 2014 examining combination biologic therapy with topical medications in the treatment of psoriasis. Data from these clinical studies are summarized and the outcomes are discussed. In general, the addition of adjuvant topical therapy to systemic biologic therapy allowed for a reduction in dosage and side effects of both agents, maintenance of initial response to biologics, treatment of recalcitrant lesions in partial responders, and potential acceleration of response to biologic therapies. The current data, though limited, suggest that using topical therapies as adjunct treatment to biologics is a well tolerated and effective means of controlling psoriasis and improving quality of life for patients. However, the treating physician should remain attentive to signs of adverse events and seek opportunities to reduce the dose or treatment frequency during chronic use.

  13. Is Parkinson’s Disease Truly a Prion-Like Disorder? An Appraisal of Current Evidence

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    Aneesha Chauhan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Parkinson’s disease (PD is the world’s second most common neurodegenerative disease and most common movement disorder. Characterised by a loss of dopaminergic neurons and the development of intraneuronal inclusions known as Lewy bodies, it has classically been thought of as a cell-autonomous disease. However, in 2008, two groups reported the startling observation of Lewy bodies within embryonic neuronal grafts transplanted into PD patients little more than a decade previously, suggesting that PD pathology can be propagated to neighbouring cells and calling basic assumptions of our understanding of the disease into question. Subsequent research has largely served to confirm this interpretation, pointing towards a prion-like intercellular transfer of misfolded α-synuclein, the main component of Lewy bodies, as central to PD. This shift in thinking offers a revolutionary approach to PD treatment, potentially enabling a transition from purely symptomatic therapy to direct targeting of the pathology that drives disease progression. In this short review, we appraise current experimental support for PD as a prion-like disease, whilst highlighting areas of controversy or inconsistency which must be resolved. We also offer a brief discussion of the therapeutic implications of these discoveries.

  14. Creativity and psychiatric illness: the search for a missing link--an historical context for current research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thys, E; Sabbe, B; De Hert, M

    2013-01-01

    Creativity is an important human quality upon which many achievements of humankind are based. Defined as the ability to produce something that is novel and useful or meaningful, it is difficult to operationalize for research. This text provides an overview of the historical and cultural context of this research. The assumption that creativity is related to psychiatric vulnerability dates back to antiquity. The modern interest in the subject stems from the romantic era and gained a scientific aura in the 19th century. In the 20th century, a further entanglement of creativity and psychopathology came about through the influence of patient artists on regular art. Psychometric, psychodiagnostic and genetic research supports a connection between creativity and psychiatric illness within the bipolar-psychotic continuum, with schizotypy/thymotypy as prototypes of creativity-related disorders. Evolutionary hypotheses link the schizophrenia paradox to a survival advantage through enhanced creative ability. The relevance of scientific research in this complex and heterogeneous area can be increased if creativity and psychopathology are further operationalized and if underlying art concepts are made explicit and placed in a broader cultural context. There is a continuing need for meaningful definitions and measures, as well as a multidisciplinary collaboration. Copyright © 2012 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  15. Large dunes on the outer shelf off the Zambezi Delta, Mozambique: evidence for the existence of a Mozambique Current

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flemming, Burghard W.; Kudrass, Hermann-Rudolf

    2017-06-01

    studies comparing the application of slippage and non-slippage approaches—they suggest that, when applying partial slippage, a western boundary current can exist simultaneously with the southward migrating eddies. Considering the evidence presented in this paper, it is concluded that a quasi-persistent, though seasonally variable Mozambique Current does exist.

  16. Probiotics as a novel treatment for non-alcoholic Fatty liver disease; a systematic review on the current evidences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelishadi, Roya; Farajian, Sanam; Mirlohi, Maryam

    2013-04-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is a chronic liver disease, with 5-10% of liver having extra fat. Increase in its prevalence in all age groups is linked with obesity and Type II diabetes. The treatment of NAFLD remains controversial. A growing body of evidence suggests a relation between overgrowth of gut microbiota with NAFLD and non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH). The objective of this review is to provide an overview on experimental and clinical studies assessing all positive and negative effects of probiotics. We made a critical appraisal on various types of documents published from 1999 to March 2012 in journals, electronic books, seminars, and symposium contexts including Medline, PubMed, and Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials databases. We used the key words: "non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, probiotics, non-alcoholic steatohepatitis, liver disease, and fatty liver". Probiotics, as biological factors, control the gut microbiota and result in its progression. It is in this sense that they are suggestive of a new and a natural way of promoting liver function. Correspondingly, limited evidence suggests that probiotics could be considered as a new way of treatment for NAFLD. Various experimental studies and clinical trials revealed promising effects of probiotics in improving NAFLD; however given the limited experience in this field, generalization of probiotics as treatment of NAFLD needs substantiation through more trials with a larger sample sizes and with longer-term follow up.

  17. PRESCRIBING OF ANTIHYPERTENSIVE AGENTS IN PUBLIC PRIMARY CARE CLINICS – IS IT IN ACCORDANCE WITH CURRENT EVIDENCE?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SAJARI J

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Large population surveys in Malaysia have consistently shown minimal improvement of blood pressure control rates over the last 10 years. Poor adherence to antihypertensive medication has been recognized as a major reason for poor control of hypertension. This study aimed to describe the prescribing pattern of antihypertensive agents in 2 public primary care clinics and assess its appropriateness in relation to current evidence and guidelines. Methods: A cross-sectional survey to describe the prescribing pattern of antihypertensive agents was carried out in 2 publicprimary care clinics in Selangor from May to June 2009. Hypertensive patients on pharmacological treatment for ≥1 year who attended the clinics within the study period of 7 weeks were selected. Appropriate use of antihypertensive agents was defined based on current evidence and the recommendations by the Malaysian Clinical Practice Guidelines (CPG on the Management of Hypertension, 2008. Data were obtained from patients’ medical records and were analysed using the SPSS software version 16.0. Results: A total of 400 hypertensive patients on treatment were included. Mean age was 59.5 years (SD ±10.9, range 28 to91 years, of which 52.8% were females and 47.2% were males. With regards to pharmacotherapy, 45.7% were on monotherapy,43.3% were on 2 agents and 11.0% were on ≥3 agents. Target blood pressure of <140/90mmHg was achieved in 51.4% of patients on monotherapy, and 33.2% of patients on combination of ≥2 agents. The commonest monotherapy agents being prescribed were β-blockers (atenolol or propranolol, followed by the short-acting calcium channel blocker (nifedipine. The commonest combination of 2-drug therapy prescribed was β-blockers and short-acting calcium channel blocker. Conclusion: This study shows that the prescribing pattern of antihypertensive agents in the 2 primary care clinics was not in accordance with current evidence and guidelines.

  18. Observational evidence of seasonality in the timing of loop current eddy separation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Cody A.; Leben, Robert R.

    2016-12-01

    Observational datasets, reports and analyses over the time period from 1978 through 1992 are reviewed to derive pre-altimetry Loop Current (LC) eddy separation dates. The reanalysis identified 20 separation events in the 15-year record. Separation dates are estimated to be accurate to approximately ± 1.5 months and sufficient to detect statistically significant LC eddy separation seasonality, which was not the case for previously published records because of the misidentification of separation events and their timing. The reanalysis indicates that previously reported LC eddy separation dates, determined for the time period before the advent of continuous altimetric monitoring in the early 1990s, are inaccurate because of extensive reliance on satellite sea surface temperature (SST) imagery. Automated LC tracking techniques are used to derive LC eddy separation dates in three different altimetry-based sea surface height (SSH) datasets over the time period from 1993 through 2012. A total of 28-30 LC eddy separation events were identified in the 20-year record. Variations in the number and dates of eddy separation events are attributed to the different mean sea surfaces and objective-analysis smoothing procedures used to produce the SSH datasets. Significance tests on various altimetry and pre-altimetry/altimetry combined date lists consistently show that the seasonal distribution of separation events is not uniform at the 95% confidence level. Randomization tests further show that the seasonal peak in LC eddy separation events in August and September is highly unlikely to have occurred by chance. The other seasonal peak in February and March is less significant, but possibly indicates two seasons of enhanced probability of eddy separation centered near the spring and fall equinoxes. This is further quantified by objectively dividing the seasonal distribution into two seasons using circular statistical techniques and a k-means clustering algorithm. The estimated

  19. Isavuconazole for the treatment of invasive aspergillosis and mucormycosis: current evidence, safety, efficacy, and clinical recommendations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natesan SK

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Suganthini Krishnan Natesan,1,2 Pranatharthi H Chandrasekar1 1Division of Infectious Diseases, Department of Internal Medicine, Wayne State University, 2John D Dingell VA Medical Center, Detroit, MI, USA Abstract: The majority of invasive mold infections diagnosed in immunocompromised cancer patients include invasive aspergillosis (IA and mucormycosis. Despite timely and effective therapy, mortality remains considerable. Antifungal agents currently available for the management of these serious infections include triazoles, polyenes, and echinocandins. Until recently, posaconazole has been the only triazole with a broad spectrum of anti-mold activity against both Aspergillus sp. and mucorales. Other clinically available triazoles voriconazole and itraconazole, with poor activity against mucorales, have significant drug interactions in addition to a side effect profile inherent for all triazoles. Polyenes including lipid formulations pose a problem with infusion-related side effects, electrolyte imbalance, and nephrotoxicity. Echinocandins are ineffective against mucorales and are approved as salvage therapy for refractory IA. Given that all available antifungal agents have limitations, there has been an unmet need for a broad-spectrum anti-mold agent with a favorable profile. Following phase III clinical trials that started in 2006, isavuconazole (ISZ seems to fit this profile. It is the first novel triazole agent recently approved by the United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA for the treatment of both IA and mucormycosis. This review provides a brief overview of the salient features of ISZ, its favorable profile with regard to spectrum of antifungal activity, pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic parameters, drug interactions and tolerability, clinical efficacy, and side effects. Keywords: isavuconazole, aspergillosis, mucormycosis, efficacy, antifungal therapy, novel azole, tolerability, drug interactions

  20. Investigating stakeholders' perceptions of the link between high STD rates and the current Baltimore City Public Schools' sex education curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolden, Shenell L. T.

    The purpose of this exploratory study was to examine key stakeholders' perceptions of the current Baltimore City Public Schools' (BCPS) sex education curriculum and to gain insight into how they believe the curriculum could be modified to be more effective. A mixed methods approach using qualitative and quantitative data collection consisting of a survey, focus group interview, and individual interviews was conducted to gather information on stakeholders' perceptions. The stakeholders included: (1) former students who received their sex education courses in the Baltimore City Public School system (BCPS); (2) teachers in BCPS who were affiliated with the sex education curriculum; (3) health care professionals who screened and/or treated East Baltimore City residents for a sexually transmitted disease (STD) and; (4) one policy maker who was responsible for creating sex education curriculum at the national level. Analysis of the quantitative data from former Baltimore City Public School students revealed a general satisfaction with the current sex education curriculum. However, qualitative data from the same group of stakeholders revealed several changes they thought should be implemented into the program in an effort to improve the current curriculum. Findings from the other groups after qualitative analysis of the interviews suggest three major themes in support of curriculum change: (1) a blended curriculum that integrates both the cognitive and affective learning domains; (2) knowledge of prevention of STD's and pregnancy; and (3) authentic teaching and learning. Results from this study strongly suggest that the Baltimore City Public School system is apathetic to the sexual health needs of students and, therefore, is inadvertently contributing to the high rate of sexually transmitted diseases among young people. Keywords: Abstinence, Affective domain, Indoctrination, Behavior Modification, Cognitive domain, Sex education curriculum, Sexually Transmitted Diseases.

  1. Extended Lymphadenectomy and "Mesopancreas" Excision during Pancreatoduodenectomy for Cancer; is it worth it? Review of Current Evidence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elissaios Kontis

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Pancreatic cancer is a malignancy with overall poor prognosis. Surgery is the only treatment modality, which could provide cure. Therefore every effort possible should be made for pancreatectomy to achieve R0 resection. However, even after R0 resection, the survival outcomes are still far behind from other solid intrabdominal tumors. Extended lymphadenectomy and “mesopancreas” excision are the two main factors where focus has been given, in order to improve the outcomes of pancreatectomy for pancreatic head cancer. We present an up to date comprehensive review of the current evidence on the topics of extended lymphadenectomy and “mesopancreas” excision during pancreatoduodenectomy for cancer.

  2. The effectiveness of current approaches to workplace stress management in the nursing profession: an evidence based literature review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mimura, C; Griffiths, P

    2003-01-01

    The effectiveness of current approaches to workplace stress management for nurses was assessed through a systematic review. Seven randomised controlled trials and three prospective cohort studies assessing the effectiveness of a stress management programmes were identified and reviewed. The quality of research identified was weak. There is more evidence for the effectiveness of programmes based on providing personal support than environmental management to reduce stressors. However, since the number and quality of studies is low, the question as to which, if any, approach is more effective cannot be answered definitively. Further research is required before clear recommendations for the use of particular interventions for nursing work related stress can be made. PMID:12499451

  3. The Current Status of Nurse-Administered Propofol Sedation in Endoscopy: An Evidence-Based Practice Nurse Fellowship Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivera, Beth

    2015-01-01

    The Society for Gastroenterology Nurses and Associates (SGNA) launched a nurse fellowship program in 2011 to promote evidence-based practice. Each accepted applicant was challenged to select a relevant topic, explore the current research, and translate this information to daily practice. The author, an SGNA Fellow, selected the topic, nurse-administered propofol sedation, that has been a prevailing subject in endoscopy for many years. A significant amount of literature has been written on the drug's safety and efficacy. This article explores a brief history of the practice and the future of this controversial drug for procedural sedation. A review of current literature is explored with an emphasis on the past 5 years as well as a discussion on regulatory limitations that have been placed on the practice of non-anesthesiologist-administered propofol sedation.

  4. Cytidine 5′-Diphosphocholine (Citicoline) in Glaucoma: Rationale of Its Use, Current Evidence and Future Perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberti, Gloria; Tanga, Lucia; Michelessi, Manuele; Quaranta, Luciano; Parisi, Vincenzo; Manni, Gianluca; Oddone, Francesco

    2015-01-01

    Cytidine 5′-diphosphocholine or citicoline is an endogenous compound that acts in the biosynthetic pathway of phospholipids of cell membranes, particularly phosphatidylcholine, and it is able to increase neurotrasmitters levels in the central nervous system. Citicoline has shown positive effects in Parkinson’s disease and Alzheimer’s disease, as well as in amblyopia. Glaucoma is a neurodegenerative disease currently considered a disease involving ocular and visual brain structures. Neuroprotection has been proposed as a valid therapeutic option for those patients progressing despite a well-controlled intraocular pressure, the main risk factor for the progression of the disease. The aim of this review is to critically summarize the current evidence about the effect of citicoline in glaucoma. PMID:26633368

  5. Cytidine 5′-Diphosphocholine (Citicoline in Glaucoma: Rationale of Its Use, Current Evidence and Future Perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gloria Roberti

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Cytidine 5′-diphosphocholine or citicoline is an endogenous compound that acts in the biosynthetic pathway of phospholipids of cell membranes, particularly phosphatidylcholine, and it is able to increase neurotrasmitters levels in the central nervous system. Citicoline has shown positive effects in Parkinson’s disease and Alzheimer’s disease, as well as in amblyopia. Glaucoma is a neurodegenerative disease currently considered a disease involving ocular and visual brain structures. Neuroprotection has been proposed as a valid therapeutic option for those patients progressing despite a well-controlled intraocular pressure, the main risk factor for the progression of the disease. The aim of this review is to critically summarize the current evidence about the effect of citicoline in glaucoma.

  6. Sofosbuvir for the treatment of chronic hepatitis C: between current evidence and future perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Degasperi E

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Elisabetta Degasperi, Alessio AghemoDivision of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, AM and M Migliavacca Center, Fondazione IRCCS Ca' Granda Maggiore Hospital, University of Milan, Milan, ItalyAbstract: In recent years, clinical research in the field of new treatments for chronic hepatitis C (HCV has been devoted to developing regimens based on direct-acting antivirals (DAAs, with the goal of increasing treatment efficacy and improving tolerability and safety. This can be achieved by Peginterferon (PegIFN-free anti-HCV regimens, as PegIFN is responsible for many side effects and limits treatment access due to contraindications in some patient categories. Sofosbuvir (SOF is the first compound to enter the market with IFN-free combination regimens; it belongs to the nucleotide inhibitors of viral polymerase NS5B and acts as a chain terminator during the HCV replication process, exhibiting pan-genotypic antiviral activity with a high barrier to resistance. Clinical trials in HCV genotype 2/3 patients have demonstrated optimal efficacy in HCV-2, where the combination SOF/ribavirin (Rbv for 12 weeks resulted in >90% sustained virological response (SVR rates, while HCV-3 patients with advanced liver fibrosis and previous failure to PegIFN plus Rbv therapy still require individualized and optimized treatment strategies. Historically difficult-to-treat genotypes HCV-1, -4–6 can benefit from reduced duration of PegIFN plus SOF and Rbv, while IFN-free regimens in these patients will be based on SOF in combination with other DAA classes. Due to an optimal tolerability and safety profile with no significant drug-to-drug interactions, SOF is currently undergoing clinical trials in the setting of pre- and post-liver transplantation and HIV-coinfected patients, with the objective to address the until now unmet need for safe and efficient treatment in these populations. This article provides an overview of SOF features and the main clinical trials, discussing

  7. Infections and urolithiasis: current clinical evidence in prophylaxis and antibiotic therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zanetti, Giampaolo; Paparella, Stefano; Trinchieri, Alberto; Prezioso, Domenico; Rocco, Francesco; Naber, Kurt G

    2008-03-01

    Urinary tract infections and urosepsis are complications which can precede or follow a kidney stone treatment. Often the stones themselves are the source of infection, whether they are infection stones or not. Systemic infections are difficult to foresee, and neither a pre-operative negative urine culture nor an antibiotic prophylaxis avoid infectious complications for certain. The primary predictive risk factors of urosepsis are: patient conditions, urinary tract infection or a history of recurrent infections, characteristics of the stone, and anatomy of the urinary tract. Infection stones are still a matter of debate, concerning both the aetiology of the disease and its treatment. Positive cultures are not only found with struvite stones, but also with apatite and calcium oxalate stones. Currently, a long-term antibiotic therapy is advised in patients affected by infection stones. Antibiotic therapy should prevent not only septic complications but also recurrence or re-growth of stones after treatment. Different antibiotic modalities are recommended, sometimes together with urease inhibitors. Mid-stream urine culture is the easiest available pre-treatment parameter notwithstanding its poor predictive value. In case of suspected or proven urinary infection, an appropriate antibiotic therapy should always be administered prior to surgical procedure. There is, however, controversy regarding the antibiotic use, its role, expediency, and duration of prophylaxis in relation to the various surgical procedures, and the way infectious complications are considered and classified. When antibiotic prophylaxis is considered, its duration should be clearly established prior to surgery; duration may vary depending on the type of surgery or the type of antibiotic. Furthermore, prophylaxis should be administered only for a limited amount of time. In infection stones, in immuno-compromised patients or in patients with anatomical anomalies or diabetes, the risk of post

  8. Converging genetic and functional brain imaging evidence links neuronal excitability to working memory, psychiatric disease, and brain activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heck, Angela; Fastenrath, Matthias; Ackermann, Sandra; Auschra, Bianca; Bickel, Horst; Coynel, David; Gschwind, Leo; Jessen, Frank; Kaduszkiewicz, Hanna; Maier, Wolfgang; Milnik, Annette; Pentzek, Michael; Riedel-Heller, Steffi G; Ripke, Stephan; Spalek, Klara; Sullivan, Patrick; Vogler, Christian; Wagner, Michael; Weyerer, Siegfried; Wolfsgruber, Steffen; de Quervain, Dominique J-F; Papassotiropoulos, Andreas

    2014-03-05

    Working memory, the capacity of actively maintaining task-relevant information during a cognitive task, is a heritable trait. Working memory deficits are characteristic for many psychiatric disorders. We performed genome-wide gene set enrichment analyses in multiple independent data sets of young and aged cognitively healthy subjects (n = 2,824) and in a large schizophrenia case-control sample (n = 32,143). The voltage-gated cation channel activity gene set, consisting of genes related to neuronal excitability, was robustly linked to performance in working memory-related tasks across ages and to schizophrenia. Functional brain imaging in 707 healthy participants linked this gene set also to working memory-related activity in the parietal cortex and the cerebellum. Gene set analyses may help to dissect the molecular underpinnings of cognitive dimensions, brain activity, and psychopathology.

  9. Testing the associative-link hypothesis in immediate serial recall: Evidence from word frequency and word imageability effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tse, Chi-Shing; Altarriba, Jeanette

    2007-08-01

    Two immediate serial recall experiments were conducted to test the associative-link hypothesis (Stuart & Hulme, 2000). We manipulated interitem association by varying the intralist latent semantic analysis (LSA) cosines in our 7-item study word lists, each of which consists of high- or low-frequency words in Experiment 1 and high- or low-imageability words in Experiment 2. Whether item recall performance was scored by a serial-recall or free-recall criterion, we found main effects of interitem association, word imageability, and word frequency. The effect of interitem association also interacted with the word frequency effect, but not with the word imageability effect. The LSA-cosinexword frequency interaction occurred in the recency, but not primacy, portion of the serial position curve. The present findings set explanatory boundaries for the associative-link hypothesis and we argue that both item- and associative-based mechanisms are necessary to account for the word frequency effect in immediate serial recall.

  10. Further Evidence on the Link between Pre-Colonial Political Centralization and Comparative Economic Development in Africa

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    We examine the link between pre-colonial statehood and contemporary regional African development, as reflected in satellite images on light density at night. We employ a variety of historical maps to capture the former. Our within-country analysis reveals a strong positive correlation between pre-colonial political centralization and contemporary development (and urbanization). If anything, the association strengthens when we account for measurement error on the historical maps of pre-colonia...

  11. Evidence for increased SOX3 dosage as a risk factor for X-linked hypopituitarism and neural tube defects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauters, Marijke; Frints, Suzanna G; Van Esch, Hilde; Spruijt, Liesbeth; Baldewijns, Marcella M; de Die-Smulders, Christine E M; Fryns, Jean-Pierre; Marynen, Peter; Froyen, Guy

    2014-08-01

    Genomic duplications of varying lengths at Xq26-q27 involving SOX3 have been described in families with X-linked hypopituitarism. Using array-CGH we detected a 1.1 Mb microduplication at Xq27 in a large family with three males suffering from X-linked hypopituitarism. The duplication was mapped from 138.7 to 139.8 Mb, harboring only two annotated genes, SOX3 and ATP11C, and was shown to be a direct tandem copy number gain. Unexpectedly, the microduplication did not fully segregate with the disease in this family suggesting that SOX3 duplications have variable penetrance for X-linked hypopituitarism. In the same family, a female fetus presenting with a neural tube defect was also shown to carry the SOX3 copy number gain. Since we also demonstrated increased SOX3 mRNA levels in amnion cells derived from an unrelated t(X;22)(q27;q11) female fetus with spina bifida, we propose that increased levels of SOX3 could be a risk factor for neural tube defects.

  12. Linking Prenatal Androgens to Gender-Related Attitudes, Identity, and Activities: Evidence From Girls With Congenital Adrenal Hyperplasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Endendijk, Joyce J; Beltz, Adriene M; McHale, Susan M; Bryk, Kristina; Berenbaum, Sheri A

    2016-10-01

    Key questions for developmentalists concern the origins of gender attitudes and their implications for behavior. We examined whether prenatal androgen exposure was related to gender attitudes, and whether and how the links between attitudes and gendered activity interest and participation were mediated by gender identity and moderated by hormones. Gender attitudes (i.e., gender-role attitudes and attitudes about being a girl), gender identity, and gender-typed activities were reported by 54 girls aged 10-13 years varying in degree of prenatal androgen exposure, including 40 girls with classical congenital adrenal hyperplasia (C-CAH) exposed to high prenatal androgens and 14 girls with non-classical (NC) CAH exposed to low, female-typical, prenatal androgens. Both girls with C-CAH and NC-CAH reported positive attitudes about being a girl and egalitarian gender attitudes, consistent with their female-typical gender identity. In contrast, girls with C-CAH had more male-typed activity interest and participation than girls with NC-CAH. Gender attitudes were linked to activities in both groups, with gender identity mediating the links. Specifically, gender-role attitudes and positive attitudes about being a girl were associated with feminine gender identity, which in turn was associated with decreased male-typed activity interests and participation, and increased female-typed activity interests. Our results are consistent with schema theories, with attitudes more closely associated with gender identity than with prenatal androgens.

  13. Hepatitis B Vaccination in Bangladesh: a Suggestion Based on Current Evidence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shafquat Mohammed Rafiq

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available IntroductionThe hepatitis B virus (HBV causes up to a million deaths worldwide and 16 million health care related infections in the tropics each year(1,2, and over 350 million become chronically infected carriers who have no significant liver disease; approximately three quarters of them are in Asia and the western pacific region(3,4. HBV infection is a potentially life threatening condition as many of the affected individuals progress to chronic hepatitis,cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC(3. In infants and children, acute hepatitis B infection is nearly always asymptomatic, whereas in adults it is usually the opposite. But on the other hand, the risk of becoming chronic carriage is much greater in children than in adults; as many as 90% of infants born to Hepatitis B e Antigen (HBeAg positive mothers become carriers themselves and, therefore, in long term are more likely to developchronic liver disease(5. Currently, though several antiviral drugs are used,there is no reliable curative treatment for HBV once it has been acquired and prevention by universal immunization remains the strategy for reducing the number of acute infections, chronic carriage and the long-term burden from diseases such as HCC(4,6. In 1991, in an attempt to reduce the global impact of HBV infection, WHO recommended that hepatitis B vaccination should be integrated into national immunization programs in all countries(7.Some Asian countries, for instance, Thailand, haveadopted the policy of immunizing children universally against the disease as early as 1992, however many others lagged behind(4.The true prevalence of Hepatitis B in Bangladesh is yet to be ascertained by a reliable study. Data available from different studies show that it ranges between 0.8 and 5.4% depending on the study design, samples and laboratory methods used(8-10.These data were based on detection of HBsAg antigen; the rates would have been higher, had they been based on anti-HBc antibody(11

  14. Physical Exercise for the Treatment of Neuropsychiatric Disturbances in Alzheimer's Dementia: Possible Mechanisms, Current Evidence and Future Directions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matura, Silke; Carvalho, André F; Alves, Gilberto S; Pantel, Johannes

    2016-01-01

    Behavioral and psychological symptoms of dementia (BPSD), also known as neuropsychiatric or non-cognitive symptoms are common and often distressing features of Alzheimer's Dementia. BPSD significantly increase patient suffering, early institutionalization and caregiver's burden. The clinical management of BPSD is dominated by a pharmacological approach, although these medications often come with serious adverse side-effects. There are only few nonpharmacological treatment strategies for BPSD. A substantial amount of intervention studies that have investigated non-pharmacological treatment options for BPSD have focused on physical exercise. Although these studies are very heterogeneous in terms of type and severity of dementia, as well as type and duration of the exercise intervention, the overall picture shows a positive effect of physical exercise in alleviating BPSD. There is evidence that numerous mechanisms contribute to the positive effect of physical exercise on BPSD. No attempt has been undertaken so far to give an overview of the existing knowledge regarding these mechanisms. Therefore, the current review aims to integrate the existing evidence on psychological and neurobiological mechanisms that contribute to the beneficial effects of physical exercise in ameliorating BPSD in Alzheimer's dementia. A discussion of psychological mechanisms such as improved sleep and stress reduction will be followed by a discussion of neurobiological mechanisms including the exercise induced change in neurotransmitter concentrations, increased synthesis of neurotrophins and immune activation. The review closes with recommendations for future research to overcome the shortcomings of existing studies and broaden the current knowledge on the positive effects of physical exercise on BPSD.

  15. Efficacy and safety of haloperidol for in-hospital delirium prevention and treatment: A systematic review of current evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schrijver, E J M; de Graaf, K; de Vries, O J; Maier, A B; Nanayakkara, P W B

    2016-01-01

    Haloperidol is generally considered the drug of choice for in-hospital delirium management. We conducted a systematic review to evaluate the evidence for the efficacy and safety of haloperidol for the prevention and treatment of delirium in hospitalized patients. PubMed, Embase, Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health (CINAHL), PsycINFO, and the Cochrane Library were systematically searched up to April 21, 2015. We included English full-text randomized controlled trials using haloperidol for the prevention or treatment of delirium in adult hospitalized patients reporting on delirium incidence, duration, or severity as primary outcome. Quality of evidence was graded. Meta-analysis was not conducted because of between-study heterogeneity. Twelve studies met our inclusion criteria, four prevention and eight treatment trials. Methodological limitations decreased the graded quality of included studies. Results from placebo-controlled prevention studies suggest a haloperidol-induced protective effect for delirium in older patients scheduled for surgery: two studies reported a significant reduction in ICU delirium incidence and one study found a significant reduction in delirium severity and duration. Although placebo-controlled trials are missing, pharmacological treatment of established delirium reduced symptom severity. Haloperidol administration was not associated with treatment-limiting side-effects, but few studies used a systematic approach to identify adverse events. Although results on haloperidol for delirium management seem promising, current prevention trials lack external validity and treatment trials did not include a placebo arm on top of standard nonpharmacological care. We therefore conclude that the current use of haloperidol for in-hospital delirium is not based on robust and generalizable evidence. Copyright © 2015 European Federation of Internal Medicine. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Using the realist perspective to link theory from qualitative evidence synthesis to quantitative studies: broadening the matrix approach.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Grootel, L. van; Wesel, F. van; O'Mara-Eves, A.; Thomas, J.; Hox, J.; Boeije, H.

    2017-01-01

    Background: This study describes an approach for the use of a specific type of qualitative evidence synthesis in the matrix approach, a mixed studies reviewing method. The matrix approach compares quantitative and qualitative data on the review level by juxtaposing concrete recommendations from the

  17. Evidence for mito-nuclear and sex-linked reproductive barriers between the hybrid Italian sparrow and its parent species.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cassandra N Trier

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Studies of reproductive isolation between homoploid hybrid species and their parent species have rarely been carried out. Here we investigate reproductive barriers between a recently recognized hybrid bird species, the Italian sparrow Passer italiae and its parent species, the house sparrow P. domesticus and Spanish sparrow P. hispaniolensis. Reproductive barriers can be difficult to study in hybrid species due to lack of geographical contact between taxa. However, the Italian sparrow lives parapatrically with the house sparrow and both sympatrically and parapatrically with the Spanish sparrow. Through whole-transcriptome sequencing of six individuals of each of the two parent species we identified a set of putatively parent species-diagnostic single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP markers. After filtering for coverage, genotyping success (>97% and multiple SNPs per gene, we retained 86 species-informative, genic, nuclear and mitochondrial SNP markers from 84 genes for analysis of 612 male individuals. We show that a disproportionately large number of sex-linked genes, as well as the mitochondria and nuclear genes with mitochondrial function, exhibit sharp clines at the boundaries between the hybrid and the parent species, suggesting a role for mito-nuclear and sex-linked incompatibilities in forming reproductive barriers. We suggest that genomic conflict via interactions between mitochondria and sex-linked genes with mitochondrial function ("mother's curse" at one boundary and centromeric drive at the other may best explain our findings. Hybrid speciation in the Italian sparrow may therefore be influenced by mechanisms similar to those involved in non-hybrid speciation, but with the formation of two geographically separated species boundaries instead of one. Spanish sparrow alleles at some loci have spread north to form reproductive barriers with house sparrows, while house sparrow alleles at different loci, including some on the same chromosome

  18. X-linked genes and risk of orofacial clefts: evidence from two population-based studies in Scandinavia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Astanand Jugessur

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Orofacial clefts are common birth defects of complex etiology, with an excess of males among babies with cleft lip and palate, and an excess of females among those with cleft palate only. Although genes on the X chromosome have been implicated in clefting, there has been no association analysis of X-linked markers. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We added new functionalities in the HAPLIN statistical software to enable association analysis of X-linked markers and an exploration of various causal scenarios relevant to orofacial clefts. Genotypes for 48 SNPs in 18 candidate genes on the X chromosome were analyzed in two population-based samples from Scandinavia (562 Norwegian and 235 Danish case-parent triads. For haplotype analysis, we used a sliding-window approach and assessed isolated cleft lip with or without cleft palate (iCL/P separately from isolated cleft palate only (iCPO. We tested three statistical models in HAPLIN, allowing for: i the same relative risk in males and females, ii sex-specific relative risks, and iii X-inactivation in females. We found weak but consistent associations with the oral-facial-digital syndrome 1 (OFD1 gene (formerly known as CXORF5 in the Danish iCL/P samples across all models, but not in the Norwegian iCL/P samples. In sex-specific analyses, the association with OFD1 was in male cases only. No analyses showed associations with iCPO in either the Norwegian or the Danish sample. CONCLUSIONS: The association of OFD1 with iCL/P is plausible given the biological relevance of this gene. However, the lack of replication in the Norwegian samples highlights the need to verify these preliminary findings in other large datasets. More generally, the novel analytic methods presented here are widely applicable to investigations of the role of X-linked genes in complex traits.

  19. X-linked genes and risk of orofacial clefts: evidence from two population-based studies in Scandinavia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jugessur, Astanand; Skare, Øivind; Lie, Rolv T; Wilcox, Allen J; Christensen, Kaare; Christiansen, Lene; Nguyen, Truc Trung; Murray, Jeffrey C; Gjessing, Håkon K

    2012-01-01

    Orofacial clefts are common birth defects of complex etiology, with an excess of males among babies with cleft lip and palate, and an excess of females among those with cleft palate only. Although genes on the X chromosome have been implicated in clefting, there has been no association analysis of X-linked markers. We added new functionalities in the HAPLIN statistical software to enable association analysis of X-linked markers and an exploration of various causal scenarios relevant to orofacial clefts. Genotypes for 48 SNPs in 18 candidate genes on the X chromosome were analyzed in two population-based samples from Scandinavia (562 Norwegian and 235 Danish case-parent triads). For haplotype analysis, we used a sliding-window approach and assessed isolated cleft lip with or without cleft palate (iCL/P) separately from isolated cleft palate only (iCPO). We tested three statistical models in HAPLIN, allowing for: i) the same relative risk in males and females, ii) sex-specific relative risks, and iii) X-inactivation in females. We found weak but consistent associations with the oral-facial-digital syndrome 1 (OFD1) gene (formerly known as CXORF5) in the Danish iCL/P samples across all models, but not in the Norwegian iCL/P samples. In sex-specific analyses, the association with OFD1 was in male cases only. No analyses showed associations with iCPO in either the Norwegian or the Danish sample. The association of OFD1 with iCL/P is plausible given the biological relevance of this gene. However, the lack of replication in the Norwegian samples highlights the need to verify these preliminary findings in other large datasets. More generally, the novel analytic methods presented here are widely applicable to investigations of the role of X-linked genes in complex traits.

  20. GLOBAL FINANCIAL CRISIS AND UNIT-LINKED INSURANCE MARKETS EFFICIENCY: EMPIRICAL EVIDENCE FROM CENTRAL AND EASTERN EUROPEAN COUNTRIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Botoş Horia Mircea

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper empirically investigates the impact of the Global financial crisis on the efficiency of four Central and Eastern European emerging unit-linked insurance markets, applying the automatic variance ratio (AVR test of Kim (2009 and variance ratio tests using ranks and signs by Wright (2000 for entire, pre-crisis and crisis periods. This study contributes to the existing literature on efficient market hypothesis with several distinct features: it provides a systematic review of the weak-form market efficiency literature that examines return predictability of the daily ING unit-linked funds prices; also the article aims at monitoring any improvement in the degree of efficiency in time and also examines the relative efficiency of unit-linked insurance markets in pre-crisis and crisis periods. Unit linked insurance are life insurance policies with investment component. In the literature there are few studies investigating the effects of a financial crisis on the potential of predictability and implicitly on the degree of efficiency of financial markets. The occurrence of a market crash or financial crisis is a possible contributing factor of market inefficiency. Most of the studies are focused on the Asian crisis in 1997: Holden et al. (2005 examined the weak-form efficiency of eight emerging Asian stock markets using VR tests before, during and after the Asian crisis; Kim and Shamsuddin (2008 used three different types of multiple VR tests for nine Asian stock markets; the findings reported by Lim et al. (2008 are consistent with those reported by Cheong et al. (2007, in which the highest inefficiency occurs during the crisis period. Todea and Lazar (2010 investigated the effects of the Global crisis on the relative efficiency of ten CEE stock markets, using Generalized Spectral test of Escanciano and Velasco (2006. Wright (2000 proposes the alternative non-parametric variance ratio tests using ranks and signs of return and demonstrates that

  1. Linking forms of inbound open innovation to a driver-based typology of environmental innovation: Evidence from French manufacturing firms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li-Ying, Jason; Mothe, Caroline; Nguyen, Thi Thuc Uyen

    2017-01-01

    types of EI, but over time, persistent R&D cooperation and technology acquisition are associated with EI only at the production stage, according to voluntary/strategic or compliance drivers. Inbound innovation enables quick responses to market demands for EI in the final use stage........ With a problem-solving perspective, we develop links from different forms of inbound innovation to various types of EI and test the related hypotheses with two waves of the French Community Innovation Survey. On a short-term basis, R&D cooperation and technology acquisition correlate positively with all four...

  2. Depressed excitability and ion currents linked to slow exocytotic fusion pore in chromaffin cells of the SOD1(G93A) mouse model of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calvo-Gallardo, Enrique; de Pascual, Ricardo; Fernández-Morales, José-Carlos; Arranz-Tagarro, Juan-Alberto; Maroto, Marcos; Nanclares, Carmen; Gandía, Luis; de Diego, Antonio M G; Padín, Juan-Fernando; García, Antonio G

    2015-01-01

    Altered synaptic transmission with excess glutamate release has been implicated in the loss of motoneurons occurring in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). Hyperexcitability or hypoexcitability of motoneurons from mice carrying the ALS mutation SOD1(G93A) (mSOD1) has also been reported. Here we have investigated the excitability, the ion currents, and the kinetics of the exocytotic fusion pore in chromaffin cells from postnatal day 90 to postnatal day 130 mSOD1 mice, when motor deficits are already established. With respect to wild-type (WT), mSOD1 chromaffin cells had a decrease in the following parameters: 95% in spontaneous action potentials, 70% in nicotinic current for acetylcholine (ACh), 35% in Na(+) current, 40% in Ca(2+)-dependent K(+) current, and 53% in voltage-dependent K(+) current. Ca(2+) current was increased by 37%, but the ACh-evoked elevation of cytosolic Ca(2+) was unchanged. Single exocytotic spike events triggered by ACh had the following differences (mSOD1 vs. WT): 36% lower rise rate, 60% higher decay time, 51% higher half-width, 13% lower amplitude, and 61% higher quantal size. The expression of the α3-subtype of nicotinic receptors and proteins of the exocytotic machinery was unchanged in the brain and adrenal medulla of mSOD1, with respect to WT mice. A slower fusion pore opening, expansion, and closure are likely linked to the pronounced reduction in cell excitability and in the ion currents driving action potentials in mSOD1, compared with WT chromaffin cells.

  3. Links between white matter microstructure and cortisol reactivity to stress in early childhood: Evidence for moderation by parenting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haroon I. Sheikh

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Activity of the hypothalamic–pituitary–adrenal axis (measured via cortisol reactivity may be a biological marker of risk for depression and anxiety, possibly even early in development. However, the structural neural correlates of early cortisol reactivity are not well known, although these would potentially inform broader models of mechanisms of risk, especially if the early environment further shapes these relationships. Therefore, we examined links between white matter architecture and young girls' cortisol reactivity and whether early caregiving moderated these links. We recruited 45 6-year-old girls based on whether they had previously shown high or low cortisol reactivity to a stress task at age 3. White matter integrity was assessed by calculating fractional anisotropy (FA of diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging scans. Parenting styles were measured via a standardized parent–child interaction task. Significant associations were found between FA in white matter regions adjacent to the left thalamus, the right anterior cingulate cortex, and the right superior frontal gyrus (all ps < .001. Further, positive early caregiving moderated the effect of high cortisol reactivity on white matter FA (all ps ≤ .05, with high stress reactive girls who received greater parent positive affect showing white matter structure more similar to that of low stress reactive girls. Results show associations between white matter integrity of various limbic regions of the brain and early cortisol reactivity to stress and provide preliminary support for the notion that parenting may moderate associations.

  4. Evidence for the Existence of Cross-Linked Intermediates during Unfolding and Refolding of CK in UGGE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王希成; 谢成; 杨建; 周海梦

    2001-01-01

    Urea gradient gel electrophoresis (UGGE) is an important technique for studying the conformation changes of proteins during denaturation. This paper reports on an investigation of the unfolding and refolding of creatine kinase (CK) by UGGE. The native and denatured CK underwent electrophoresis in polyacrylamide gels containing a linear 0-8 mol/L gradient of urea perpendicular to the direction of migration. The results showed that unfolding and refolding of CK is a relatively rapid process. The denatured enzyme could refold to a conformation with activity during electrophoresis at low urea concentrations, indicating that denaturation in urea is reversible. More importantly, both the native and denatured CK were separated into multiple parallel bands through UGGE, but the bands decreased significantly when mercaptoethanol was added to the samples.The results suggest that various kinds of unfolding and refolding intermediates were formed during UGGE,which are assumed to be oligomers with disulfide bonds between peptide chains. Urea/SDS (sodium dodecylsulphate) polyacrylamide two-dimensional electrophoresis proved that these unfolding and refolding intermediates formed during UGGE were oligomers which were composed of different number of subunits cross-linked by disulfide bonds. The results indicate that the unfolding and refolding of CK are relatively rapid processes with some cross-linked intermediates with disulfide bonds during unfolding and refolding of the enzyme.

  5. Linking anthropological analysis and epidemiological evidence: formulating a narrative of HIV transmission in Acholiland of northern Uganda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westerhaus, M

    2007-08-01

    For twenty years, a region of northern Uganda known as Acholiland has been heavily affected by war, leading to the formation of internally displaced people's camps, rape, transactional sex and child abductions. While it is clear that the war has had onerous consequences for the health of the Acholi people, the specific impact of the war on HIV transmission remains unclear, as the epidemiological evidence presents an ambiguous picture of HIV prevalence patterns. Other than a few non-governmental organization reports, very little qualitative data exists about the impact of HIV on the Acholi population. Attempting to formulate a clearer narrative of HIV transmission in Acholiland, this paper jointly analyses the historical and political context of the Acholi people and the war, the epidemiologic evidence of HIV prevalence patterns, and the ethnographic perspectives of Acholi healthcare workers and patients living with HIV/AIDS. Juxtaposing these sources of information allows for the emergence of a rich understanding of HIV in Acholiland. It is argued that three specific forms of violence--physical, symbolic and structural--create vulnerability to HIV infection in Acholiland, although to variable degrees dependent on location. The ethnographic evidence presented regarding HIV's impact on Acholiland suggests that an incorporation of historical, political, cultural and social factors must form the backbone of efforts both to understand HIV transmission and design strategies for curbing the epidemic in war settings.

  6. Efficient attentional selection predicts distractor devaluation: event-related potential evidence for a direct link between attention and emotion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiss, Monika; Goolsby, Brian A; Raymond, Jane E; Shapiro, Kimron L; Silvert, Laetitia; Nobre, Anna C; Fragopanagos, Nickolaos; Taylor, John G; Eimer, Martin

    2007-08-01

    Links between attention and emotion were investigated by obtaining electrophysiological measures of attentional selectivity together with behavioral measures of affective evaluation. Participants were asked to rate faces that had just been presented as targets or distractors in a visual search task. Distractors were rated as less trustworthy than targets. To study the association between the efficiency of selective attention during visual search and subsequent emotional responses, the N2pc component was quantified as a function of evaluative judgments. Evaluation of distractor faces (but not target faces) covaried with selective attention. On trials where distractors were later judged negatively, the N2pc emerged earlier, demonstrating that attention was strongly biased toward target events, and distractors were effectively inhibited. When previous distractors were judged positively, the N2pc was delayed, indicating unfocused attention to the target and less distractor suppression. Variations in attentional selectivity across trials can predict subsequent emotional responses, strongly suggesting that attention is closely associated with subsequent affective evaluation.

  7. Linking sight and sound: fMRI evidence of primary auditory cortex activation during visual word recognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haist, F; Song, A W; Wild, K; Faber, T L; Popp, C A; Morris, R D

    2001-03-01

    We describe two studies that used repetition priming paradigms to investigate brain activity during the reading of single words. Functional magnetic resonance images were collected during a visual lexical decision task in which nonword stimuli were manipulated with regard to phonological properties and compared to genuine English words. We observed a region in left-hemisphere primary auditory cortex linked to a repetition priming effect. The priming effect activity was observed only for stimuli that sound like known words; moreover, this region was sensitive to strategic task differences. Thus, a brain region involved in the most basic aspects of auditory processing appears to be engaged in reading even when there is no environmental oral or auditory component. Copyright 2001 Academic Press.

  8. Chrono-nutrition: a review of current evidence from observational studies on global trends in time-of-day of energy intake and its association with obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almoosawi, S; Vingeliene, S; Karagounis, L G; Pot, G K

    2016-11-01

    The importance of the circadian rhythm in regulating human food intake behaviour and metabolism has long been recognised. However, little is known as to how energy intake is distributed over the day in existing populations, and its potential association with obesity. The present review describes global trends in time-of-day of energy intake in the general population based on data from cross-sectional surveys and longitudinal cohorts. Evidence of the association between time-of-day of energy intake and obesity is also summarised. Overall, there were a limited number of cross-sectional surveys and longitudinal cohorts that provided data on time-of-day of energy intake. In the identified studies, a wide variation in time-of-day of energy intake was observed, with patterns of energy distribution varying greatly by country and geographical area. In relation to obesity, eight cross-sectional surveys and two longitudinal cohorts were identified. The association between time-of-day of energy intake and obesity varied widely, with several studies reporting a positive link between evening energy intake and obesity. In conclusion, the current review summarises global trends in time-of-day of energy intake. The large variations across countries and global regions could have important implications to health, emphasising the need to understand the socio-environmental factors guiding such differences in eating patterns. Evidence of the association between time-of-day of energy intake and BMI also varied. Further larger scale collaborations between various countries and regions are needed to sum data from existing surveys and cohorts, and guide our understanding of the role of chrono-nutrition in health.

  9. Survivor-Defined Practice in Domestic Violence Work: Measure Development and Preliminary Evidence of Link to Empowerment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodman, Lisa A; Thomas, Kristie; Cattaneo, Lauren Bennett; Heimel, Deborah; Woulfe, Julie; Chong, Siu Kwan

    2016-01-01

    Survivor-defined practice, characterized by an emphasis on client choice, partnership, and sensitivity to the unique needs, contexts, and coping strategies of individual survivors, is an aspirational goal of the domestic violence (DV) movement, assumed to be a key contributor to empowerment and other positive outcomes among survivors. Despite its central role in DV program philosophy, training, and practice, however, our ability to assess its presence and its presumed link to well-being has been hampered by the absence of a way to measure it from survivors' perspectives. As part of a larger university-community collaboration, this study had two aims: (a) to develop a measure of survivor-defined practice from the perspective of participants, and (b) to assess its relationship to safety-related empowerment after controlling for other contributors to survivor well-being (e.g., financial stability and social support). Results supported the reliability and validity of the Survivor-Defined Practice Scale (SDPS), a nine-item measure that assesses participants' perception of the degree to which their advocates help them achieve goals they set for themselves, facilitate a spirit of partnership, and show sensitivity to their individual needs and styles. The items combined to form one factor indicating that the three theoretical aspects of survivor-defined practice may be different manifestations of one underlying construct. Results also support the hypothesized link between survivor-defined practice and safety-related empowerment. The SDPS offers DV programs a mechanism for process evaluation that is rigorous and rooted in the feminist empowerment philosophy that so many programs espouse.

  10. The Link between Logic, Mathematics and Imagination: Evidence from Children with Developmental Dyscalculia and Mathematically Gifted Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morsanyi, Kinga; Devine, Amy; Nobes, Alison; Szucs, Denes

    2013-01-01

    This study examined performance on transitive inference problems in children with developmental dyscalculia (DD), typically developing controls matched on IQ, working memory and reading skills, and in children with outstanding mathematical abilities. Whereas mainstream approaches currently consider DD as a domain-specific deficit, we hypothesized…

  11. Maternal nutritional status, C(1) metabolism and offspring DNA methylation: a review of current evidence in human subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dominguez-Salas, Paula; Cox, Sharon E; Prentice, Andrew M; Hennig, Branwen J; Moore, Sophie E

    2012-02-01

    Evidence is growing for the long-term effects of environmental factors during early-life on later disease susceptibility. It is believed that epigenetic mechanisms (changes in gene function not mediated by DNA sequence alteration), particularly DNA methylation, play a role in these processes. This paper reviews the current state of knowledge of the involvement of C1 metabolism and methyl donors and cofactors in maternal diet-induced DNA methylation changes in utero as an epigenetic mechanism. Methyl groups for DNA methylation are mostly derived from the diet and supplied through C1 metabolism by way of choline, betaine, methionine or folate, with involvement of riboflavin and vitamins B6 and B12 as cofactors. Mouse models have shown that epigenetic features, for example DNA methylation, can be altered by periconceptional nutritional interventions such as folate supplementation, thereby changing offspring phenotype. Evidence of early nutrient-induced epigenetic change in human subjects is scant, but it is known that during pregnancy C1 metabolism has to cope with high fetal demands for folate and choline needed for neural tube closure and normal development. Retrospective studies investigating the effect of famine or season during pregnancy indicate that variation in early environmental exposure in utero leads to differences in DNA methylation of offspring. This may affect gene expression in the offspring. Further research is needed to examine the real impact of maternal nutrient availability on DNA methylation in the developing fetus.

  12. Reliability of Growth Indicators and Efficiency of Functional Treatment for Skeletal Class II Malocclusion: Current Evidence and Controversies

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-01

    Current evidence on the reliability of growth indicators in the identification of the pubertal growth spurt and efficiency of functional treatment for skeletal Class II malocclusion, the timing of which relies on such indicators, is highly controversial. Regarding growth indicators, the hand and wrist (including the sole middle phalanx of the third finger) maturation method and the standing height recording appear to be most reliable. Other methods are subjected to controversies or were showed to be unreliable. Main sources of controversies include use of single stages instead of ossification events and diagnostic reliability conjecturally based on correlation analyses. Regarding evidence on the efficiency of functional treatment, when treated during the pubertal growth spurt, more favorable response is seen in skeletal Class II patients even though large individual responsiveness remains. Main sources of controversies include design of clinical trials, definition of Class II malocclusion, and lack of inclusion of skeletal maturity among the prognostic factors. While no growth indicator may be considered to have a full diagnostic reliability in the identification of the pubertal growth spurt, their use may still be recommended for increasing efficiency of functional treatment for skeletal Class II malocclusion. PMID:28168195

  13. 'Hurrah for the missing link!': A history of apes, ancestors and a crucial piece of evidence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2011-01-01

    In the nineteenth century the idea of a ‘missing link’ connecting humans with the rest of the animal kingdom was eagerly embraced by professional scientists and popularizers. After the publication of Charles Darwin’s Origin of Species in 1859, many tied the idea and subsequent search for a crucial...... piece of evidence to Darwin and his formulation of the theory of evolution by natural selection. This article demonstrates that the expression was widely used and that the framework for discussions about human’s relation to the apes and gaps in the fossil record were well in place and widely debated...

  14. 'Hurrah for the missing link!': A history of apes, ancestors and a crucial piece of evidence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2011-01-01

    In the nineteenth century the idea of a ‘missing link’ connecting humans with the rest of the animal kingdom was eagerly embraced by professional scientists and popularizers. After the publication of Charles Darwin’s Origin of Species in 1859, many tied the idea and subsequent search for a crucial...... piece of evidence to Darwin and his formulation of the theory of evolution by natural selection. This article demonstrates that the expression was widely used and that the framework for discussions about human’s relation to the apes and gaps in the fossil record were well in place and widely debated...

  15. Miocene uplift of the NE Greenland margin linked to plate tectonics: Seismic evidence from the Greenland Fracture Zone, NE Atlantic

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Døssing Andreasen, Arne; Japsen, Peter; Watts, Anthony B.

    2016-01-01

    Tectonic models predict that, following breakup, rift margins undergo only decaying thermal subsidence during their post-rift evolution. However, post-breakup stratigraphy beneath the NE Atlantic shelves shows evidence of regional-scale unconformities, commonly cited as outer margin responses to ...... by plate tectonic forces, induced perhaps by a change in the Iceland plume (a hot pulse) and/or by changes in intra-plate stresses related to global tectonics.......Tectonic models predict that, following breakup, rift margins undergo only decaying thermal subsidence during their post-rift evolution. However, post-breakup stratigraphy beneath the NE Atlantic shelves shows evidence of regional-scale unconformities, commonly cited as outer margin responses...... to inner margin episodic uplift, including the formation of coastal mountains. The origin of these events remains enigmatic. We present a seismic reflection study from the Greenland Fracture Zone – East Greenland Ridge (GFZ-EGR) and the NE Greenland shelf. We document a regional intra-Miocene seismic...

  16. [The links between research and practice: knowledge transfer, the use of evidence-based data and the renewal of practices].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lefebvre, Hélène; Roy, Odette; Sahtali, Sarah; Rothan-Tondeur, Monique

    2013-09-01

    Nurses in clinical settings still do not fully rely on scientific knowledge to guide their practices and only rarely resort to the literature to find answers to their questions or clinical concerns. The sustainable implementation of projects that use knowledge founded on scientific evidence presents an important challenge that nursing research must address. The goal of this article is to present a strategy adopted by the Réseau infirmier et partenaires de soins (RI-PS) of the Université de Montréal (Québec). The strategy's aim is to promote the optimal and perennial use of scientific knowledge in clinical settings and to incorporate the use of best practices based on scientific evidence to their operating procedure. First, we will present a brief overview of the evolution of nursing research and its impacts, followed by an inventory of the success factors of the use of scientific knowledge in practical settings, and finally the presentation of a model, Implementation Science, on which the RI-PS strategy relies for its projects. We also outline the network and one of its developments, the knowledge transfer portal and healthcare partners (PES).

  17. Trust and management-to-employee communication in Slovenian companies: Some evidence from the current economic crisis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maja Makovec Brenčič

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper analyzes the importance of trust and management-to-employee communication among top Slovenian employers from the Golden Thread Survey. The paper analyzes the changes and impact of the deteriorating external economic situation on (a company-employee relational trust, and on the (b perceived importance of “trust and long-term relationships with the company in the eyes of the customer” by respondent managers. Furthermore, our analysis also looks at the impact of management-to-employee communication on both trust perspectives. The results show a stable level of company-employee relational trust in the face of the current economic crisis, despite a high level of perceived organizational process changes and a sharp decline in financial performance. On the other hand, the perceived importance of “trust and long-term relationships with the company in the eyes of the customer” has increased substantially as the crisis has deepened, supporting our claim that relationships and the external relationship orientation gain importance in the time of crisis. There is also a strong link between the degree of open and frequent management-to-employee communication, and both perspectives of measured trust among top Slovenian employers.

  18. Links between community violence and the family system: evidence from children's feelings of relatedness and perceptions of parent behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynch, Michael; Cicchetti, Dante

    2002-01-01

    In this study, we examined some of the ways in which broader ecological systems may influence the organization of behavior within the family system. Specifically, links between exposure to community violence and children's relationships with maternal caregivers were investigated in a sample of 127 urban children between the ages of 7 and 13 years. Children were asked to indicate whether they had been exposed to a wide variety of violent events. In addition, their feelings of relatedness and separation anxiety, and their perceptions of maternal behavior were assessed. It was expected that exposure to community violence would be associated with feeling less secure with caregivers. Consistent with predictions from ecological-transactional theory, data supported this hypothesis. Children who reported that they had been exposed to high levels of community violence also indicated that they felt less positive affect when with their caregiver, were dissatisfied with how close they felt to her, felt more separation anxiety, and reported more negative maternal behavior than children exposed to less violence. Findings are discussed in terms of how violence may affect the family system and the protective function of human attachment.

  19. Linking online gaming and addictive behavior: Converging evidence for a general reward deficiency in frequent online gamers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tim eHahn

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Millions of people regularly play so-called Massively Multiplayer Online Role Playing Games (MMORPGs. Recently, it has been argued that MMORPG overuse is becoming a significant health problem worldwide. Symptoms such as tolerance, withdrawal and craving have been described. Based on behavioral, resting state and task-related neuroimaging data, we test whether frequent players of the MMORPG World of Warcraft (WoW – similar to drug addicts and individuals with an increased risk for addictions – show a generally deficient reward system. In frequent players of the MMORPG World of Warcraft (WoW-players and in a control group of non-gamers we assessed 1 trait sensitivity to reward, 2 BOLD responses during monetary reward processing in the ventral striatum and 3 ventral-striatal resting state dynamics. We find a decreased neural activation in the ventral striatum during the anticipation of both small and large monetary rewards. Additionally, we show generally altered neurodynamics in this region independent of any specific task for WoW players (resting state. On the behavioral level, we found differences in trait sensitivity to reward, suggesting that the reward processing deficiencies found in this study are not a consequence of gaming, but predisposed to it. These findings empirically support a direct link between frequent online gaming and the broad field of behavioral and drug addiction research, thus opening new avenues for clinical interventions in addicted gamers and potentially improving the assessment of addiction-risk in the vast population of frequent gamers.

  20. Valuing productivity loss due to absenteeism: firm-level evidence from a Canadian linked employer-employee survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wei; Sun, Huiying; Woodcock, Simon; Anis, Aslam H

    2017-12-01

    In health economic evaluation studies, to value productivity loss due to absenteeism, existing methods use wages as a proxy value for marginal productivity. This study is the first to test the equality between wage and marginal productivity losses due to absenteeism separately for team workers and non-team workers. Our estimates are based on linked employer-employee data from Canada. Results indicate that team workers are more productive and earn higher wages than non-team workers. However, the productivity gap between these two groups is considerably larger than the wage gap. In small firms, employee absenteeism results in lower productivity and wages, and the marginal productivity loss due to team worker absenteeism is significantly higher than the wage loss. No similar wage-productivity gap exists for large firms. Our findings suggest that productivity loss or gain is most likely to be underestimated when valued according to wages for team workers. The findings help to value the burden of illness-related absenteeism. This is important for economic evaluations that seek to measure the productivity gain or loss of a health care technology or intervention, which in turn can impact policy makers' funding decisions.

  1. Evolution and protein interactions of AP2 proteins in Brassicaceae:Evidence linking development and environmental responses

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Liping Zeng; Yue Yin; Chenjiang You; Qianli Pan; Duo Xu; Taijie Jin; Bailong Zhang; and Hong Ma

    2016-01-01

    Plants have evolved a large number of transcrip-tion factors (TF), which are enriched among duplicate genes, highlighting their roles in complex regulatory networks. The APETALA2/EREBP-like genes constitute a large plant TF family and participate in development and stress responses. To probe the conservation and divergence of AP2/EREBP genes, we analyzed the duplication patterns of this family in Brassicaceae and identified interacting proteins of represen-tative Arabidopsis AP2/EREBP proteins. We found that many AP2/EREBP duplicates generated early in Brassicaceae history were quickly lost, but many others were retained in all tested Brassicaceae species, suggesting early functional divergence followed by persistent conservation. In addition, the sequences of the AP2 domain and exon numbers were highly conserved in rosids. Furthermore, we used 16 A. thaliana AP2/EREBP proteins as baits in yeast screens and identified 1,970 potential AP2/EREBP-interacting proteins, with a small subset of interactions verified in planta. Many AP2 genes also exhibit reduced expression in an anther- defective mutant, providing a possible link to developmental regulation. The putative AP2-interacting proteins participate in many functions in development and stress responses, including photomorphogenesis, flower development, path-ogenesis, drought and cold responses, abscisic acid and auxin signaling. Our results present the AP2/EREBP evolution patterns in Brassicaceae, and support a proposed interaction network of AP2/EREBP proteins and their putative interacting proteins for further study.

  2. Associations linking parenting styles and offspring personality disorder are moderated by parental personality disorder, evidence from China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Hui Green; Huang, Yueqin; Liu, Zhaorui; Liu, Baohua

    2011-08-30

    The aim of the study is to examine the association linking parenting and personality disorder controlling for parental personality disorder, and whether this association is moderated by parental PD. Data were from community-dwelling high school students aged 18 and above and their parents living in Beijing, China. A total of 181 cases and 2,605 controls were included in this study. Personality disorder in students was assessed via a two-stage approach, Personality Diagnostic Questionnaire as a screening tool and International Personality Disorder Examination as the diagnostic tool. Information about parenting was collected from students using Egna Minnen av. Betraffande Uppfostran. Negative parenting styles, e.g. rejective or over-protective parenting, were found to be associated with the occurrence of personality disorder. Conflictive parenting styles were also found to be associated with personality disorder. Generally stronger associations were found for students with parental personality disorder as compared to students without parental personality disorder. Findings from this study support the role of parenting in the occurrence of PD, especially for children with family history of personality disorder. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Linking online gaming and addictive behavior: converging evidence for a general reward deficiency in frequent online gamers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hahn, Tim; Notebaert, Karolien Hilde; Dresler, Thomas; Kowarsch, Linda; Reif, Andreas; Fallgatter, Andreas J

    2014-01-01

    Millions of people regularly play so-called massively multiplayer online role playing games (MMORPGs). Recently, it has been argued that MMORPG overuse is becoming a significant health problem worldwide. Symptoms such as tolerance, withdrawal, and craving have been described. Based on behavioral, resting state, and task-related neuroimaging data, we test whether frequent players of the MMORPG "World of Warcraft" (WoW) - similar to drug addicts and individuals with an increased risk for addictions - show a generally deficient reward system. In frequent players of the MMORPG "World of Warcraft" (WoW-players) and in a control group of non-gamers we assessed (1) trait sensitivity to reward (SR), (2) BOLD responses during monetary reward processing in the ventral striatum, and (3) ventral-striatal resting-state dynamics. We found a decreased neural activation in the ventral striatum during the anticipation of both small and large monetary rewards. Additionally, we show generally altered neurodynamics in this region independent of any specific task for WoW players (resting state). On the behavioral level, we found differences in trait SR, suggesting that the reward processing deficiencies found in this study are not a consequence of gaming, but predisposed to it. These findings empirically support a direct link between frequent online gaming and the broad field of behavioral and drug addiction research, thus opening new avenues for clinical interventions in addicted gamers and potentially improving the assessment of addiction-risk in the vast population of frequent gamers.

  4. The free-radical damage theory: Accumulating evidence against a simple link of oxidative stress to ageing and lifespan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Speakman, John R; Selman, Colin

    2011-04-01

    Recent work on a small European cave salamander (Proteus anguinus) has revealed that it has exceptional longevity, yet it appears to have unexceptional defences against oxidative damage. This paper comes at the end of a string of other studies that are calling into question the free-radical damage theory of ageing. This theory rose to prominence in the 1990s as the dominant theory for why we age and die. Despite substantial correlative evidence to support it, studies in the last five years have raised doubts over its importance. In particular, these include studies of mice with the major antioxidant genes knocked out (both singly and in combination), which show the expected elevation in oxidative damage but no impact on lifespan. Combined, these findings raise fundamental questions over whether the free-radical damage theory remains useful for understanding the ageing process, and variation in lifespan and life histories.

  5. Analysis of a novel autonomous marine hybrid power generation/energy storage system with a high-voltage direct current link

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, L.; Lee, D. J.; Lee, W. J.

    2008-01-01

    This paper presents both time-domain and frequency-domain simulated results of a novel marine hybrid renewable-energy power generation/energy storage system (PG/ESS) feeding isolated loads through an high-voltage direct current (HVDC) link. The studied marine PG subsystems comprise both offshore......) absorbing a part of generated energy from WTGs and WETGs to generate available hydrogen for fuel cells (FCs) are also included in the PG subsystems. The ES subsystems consist of a flywheel energy storage system(FESS) and a compressed air energy storage (CAES) system to balance the required energy...... in the hybrid PG/ESS. It can be concluded from the simulation results that the proposed hybrid marine PG/ESS feeding isolated loads can stably operate to achieve system power-frequency balance condition....

  6. Linking Online Gaming and Addictive Behavior: Converging Evidence for a General Reward Deficiency in Frequent Online Gamers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hahn, Tim; Notebaert, Karolien Hilde; Dresler, Thomas; Kowarsch, Linda; Reif, Andreas; Fallgatter, Andreas J.

    2014-01-01

    Millions of people regularly play so-called massively multiplayer online role playing games (MMORPGs). Recently, it has been argued that MMORPG overuse is becoming a significant health problem worldwide. Symptoms such as tolerance, withdrawal, and craving have been described. Based on behavioral, resting state, and task-related neuroimaging data, we test whether frequent players of the MMORPG “World of Warcraft” (WoW) – similar to drug addicts and individuals with an increased risk for addictions – show a generally deficient reward system. In frequent players of the MMORPG “World of Warcraft” (WoW-players) and in a control group of non-gamers we assessed (1) trait sensitivity to reward (SR), (2) BOLD responses during monetary reward processing in the ventral striatum, and (3) ventral-striatal resting-state dynamics. We found a decreased neural activation in the ventral striatum during the anticipation of both small and large monetary rewards. Additionally, we show generally altered neurodynamics in this region independent of any specific task for WoW players (resting state). On the behavioral level, we found differences in trait SR, suggesting that the reward processing deficiencies found in this study are not a consequence of gaming, but predisposed to it. These findings empirically support a direct link between frequent online gaming and the broad field of behavioral and drug addiction research, thus opening new avenues for clinical interventions in addicted gamers and potentially improving the assessment of addiction-risk in the vast population of frequent gamers. PMID:25426039

  7. Further evidence for links between facial width-to-height ratio and fighting success: Commentary on Zilioli et al. (2014).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Třebický, Vít; Fialová, Jitka; Kleisner, Karel; Roberts, S Craig; Little, Anthony C; Havlíček, Jan

    2015-01-01

    Recent research has reported an association between facial width-to-height ratio (fWHR) and both fighting performance and judgments of formidability in a sample of mixed martial arts (MMA) combatants. The results provide evidence of fWHR being associated with sporting performance and aggression in men. However, it has been argued that the effect of fWHR might be a by-product of associations between body size and behavioral measures. Here we tested whether fWHR is associated with perceived aggressiveness, fighting ability and success in physical confrontation, while controlling for body size, also in a sample of MMA fighters. We found that perceived fighting ability was predicted by weight but not by fWHR. In contrast, both fWHR and body weight independently predicted perceived aggressiveness. Furthermore, we found positive associations between fWHR and fighting performance which appear to be independent of body size. Our findings provide further support for the proposal that fWHR is associated with fighting ability and perceived aggression, and that these effects are independent of body size. Therefore, fWHR might be considered as a viable and reliable marker for inference of success in male intra-sexual competition. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Linking climate change mitigation and coastal eutrophication management through biogas technology: Evidence from a new Danish bioenergy concept.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaspersen, Bjarke Stoltze; Christensen, Thomas Budde; Fredenslund, Anders Michael; Møller, Henrik Bjarne; Butts, Michael Brian; Jensen, Niels H; Kjaer, Tyge

    2016-01-15

    The interest in sustainable bioenergy solutions has gained great importance in Europe due to the need to reduce GHG emissions and to meet environmental policy targets, not least for the protection of groundwater and surface water quality. In the Municipality of Solrød in Denmark, a novel bioenergy concept for anaerobic co-digestion of food industry residues, manure and beach-cast seaweed has been developed and tested in order to quantify the potential for synergies between climate change mitigation and coastal eutrophication management in the Køge Bay catchment. The biogas plant, currently under construction, was designed to handle an annual input of up to 200,000 t of biomass based on four main fractions: pectin wastes, carrageenan wastes, manure and beach-cast seaweed. This paper describes how this bioenergy concept can contribute to strengthening the linkages between climate change mitigation strategies and Water Framework Directive (WFD) action planning. Our assessments of the projected biogas plant indicate an annual reduction of GHG emissions of approx. 40,000 t CO2 equivalents, corresponding to approx. 1/3 of current total GHG emissions in the Municipality of Solrød. In addition, nitrogen and phosphorous loads to Køge Bay are estimated to be reduced by approx. 63 t yr.(-1) and 9 tyr.(-1), respectively, contributing to the achievement of more than 70% of the nutrient reduction target set for Køge Bay in the first WFD river basin management plan. This study shows that anaerobic co-digestion of the specific food industry residues, pig manure and beach-cast seaweed is feasible and that there is a very significant, cost-effective GHG and nutrient loading mitigation potential for this bioenergy concept. Our research demonstrates how an integrated planning process where considerations about the total environment are integrated into the design and decision processes can support the development of this kind of holistic bioenergy solutions.

  9. Links between tectonism and exhumation in the Spanish Pyrenees: Evidence from apatite fission track analysis and Ar fault dating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahl, J. M.; Haines, S. H.; van der Pluijm, B. A.

    2009-12-01

    Analytical, numerical, and mechanical models of orogenic wedges suggest that the structural and erosional evolution of mountain belts are tightly linked. For example, erosion in the core of a mountain belt may thin a wedge and drive out-of-sequence faulting to reestablish critical taper. To provide a field-based test of these ideas, we present new geochronologic constraints on the deformational and erosional history of the orogenic wedge exposed in the south-central Spanish Pyrenees. Apatite fission-track data from the syn-orogenic sediments of the Sierra de Sis conglomerate reveal generally invariant ages in strata deposited between about 42 and 27 Ma. These data, as well as track-length distributions indicative of rapid cooling, imply the bedrock in the core of the wedge that produced the sediment experienced fast exhumation that began by at least 48 Ma and continued until 42 Ma. Numerical modeling of the detrital data suggests the source region experienced a deceleration in erosion rate from about 1.0 mm/yr to less than 0.5 to 0.2 mm/yr. Published bedrock thermochronometric data collected from the interior of the belt indicate a renewed period of rapid erosional exhumation culminating around 32 Ma. The temporal changes in erosion recorded by thermochronology are correlated with the deformational history of the Pyrenean fold-thrust belt. We present new constraints on fault activity in the Pyrenean foreland through the direct dating of fault gouge by illite age analysis. New fault dates show that tectonic activity youngs towards the interior of the mountain belt, with fault slip correlating to periods of rapid erosion. The relatively outboard Boixols fault has an age of 71 ± 6.4 Ma, reflecting Cretaceous convergence that marks the onset of Pyrenean deformation. Slip on the more inboard Nogueres fault occurred later, at 56 ± 1.4 Ma, consistent with a period of rapid erosion that continued through about 45 Ma inferred from detrital fission-track data. After a long

  10. [Undesired awareness phenomena during general anesthesia: Evidence-based state of knowledge, current discussions and strategies for prevention and management].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bischoff, P; Rundshagen, I; Schneider, G

    2015-10-01

    Patient awareness during general anesthesia and the later recall of what happened during surgery can be experienced by patients as horrifying events that leave lasting mental trauma in the form of posttraumatic stress syndrome (PTSS). Awareness is related to a temporary insufficient depth of anesthesia. This phenomenon has been discussed for more than 20 years. According to randomized controlled studies, in the absence of risk factors awareness phenomena occur in 1-2 per 1000 operations involving general anesthesia (0.1-0.2%) and are classified as occasionally occurring critical events. An astonishing twist occurred elicited by the recent data from the 5th National Audit Project from Great Britain (NAP5) published in the British Journal of Anaesthesia and in Anaesthesia. The NAP5 evaluated patient reports of accidental awareness during general anesthesia (AAGA) in a multicenter manner in more than 2.7 million cases and indicated incidences of awareness of only 1:19,600, a frequency 20 times less than previously reported. These results gave rise to some controversy. It seems likely that, due to the absence of structured interviews, the NAP5 data only demonstrated the tip of the iceberg and may have vastly underestimated the real incidence of intraoperative awareness. The present overview summarizes the current knowledge about awareness. Furthermore, it addresses the question whether the awareness problem has been overestimated by evidence-based criteria or underestimated by the results of the NAP5. The responsibility for sufficient anesthesia in the clinical routine requires knowledge of awareness risks and potential sequelae. A formal recommendation from the German Society of Anesthesia and Intensive Care Medicine (DGAI) concerning awareness is not yet available; however, the recognition of evidence-based strategies in the management of anesthesia may minimize the occurrence of awareness and its sequelae.

  11. More evidence for a planetary wave link with midlatitude E region coherent backscatter and sporadic E layers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Schlegel

    Full Text Available Measurements of midlatitude E region coherent backscatter obtained during four summers with SESCAT, a 50 MHz Doppler system operating in Crete, Greece, and concurrent ionosonde recordings from the same ionospheric volume obtained with a CADI for one of these summers, are used to analyse the long-term variability in echo and Es occurrence. Echo and Es layer occurrences, computed in percent of time over a 12-h nighttime interval, take the form of time sequences. Linear power spectrum analysis shows that there are dominant spectral peaks in the range of 2–9 days, the most commonly observed periods appearing in two preferential bands, of 2–3 days and 4–7 days. No connection with geomagnetic activity was found. The characteristics of these periodicities compare well with similar properties of planetary waves, which suggests the possibility that planetary waves are responsible for the observed long-term periodicities. These findings indicate also a likely close relation between planetary wave (PW activity and the well known but not well understood seasonal Es dependence. To test the PW postulation, we used simultaneous neutral wind data from the mesopause region around 95 km, measured from Collm, Germany. Direct comparison of the long-term periodicities in echo and Es layer occurrence with those in the neutral wind show some reasonable agreement. This new evidence, although not fully conclusive, is the first direct indication in favour of a planetary wave role on the unstable midlatitude E region ionosphere. Our results suggest that planetary waves observation is a viable option and a new element into the physics of midlatitude Es layers that needs to be considered and investigated.Key words: Ionosphere (ionosphere irregularities; mid-latitude ionosphere – Meteorology and atmospheric dynamics (waves and tides

  12. Evidence for a modifier of onset age in Huntington disease linked to the HD gene in 4p16

    Science.gov (United States)

    Djoussé, Luc; Knowlton, Beth; Hayden, Michael R.; Almqvist, Elisabeth W.; Brinkman, Ryan R.; Ross, Christopher A.; Margolis, Russel L.; Rosenblatt, Adam; Durr, Alexandra; Dode, Catherine; Morrison, Patrick J.; Novelletto, Andrea; Frontali, Marina; Trent, Ronald J. A.; McCusker, Elizabeth; Gómez-Tortosa, Estrella; Mayo Cabrero, David; Jones, Randi; Zanko, Andrea; Nance, Martha; Abramson, Ruth K.; Suchowersky, Oksana; Paulsen, Jane S.; Harrison, Madaline B.; Yang, Qiong; Cupples, L. Adrienne; Mysore, Jayalakshmi; Gusella, James F.; MacDonald, Marcy E.

    2007-01-01

    Huntington disease (HD) is a neurodegenerative disorder caused by the abnormal expansion of CAG repeats in the HD gene on chromosome 4p16.3. A recent genome scan for genetic modifiers of age at onset of motor symptoms (AO) in HD suggests that one modifier may reside in the region close to the HD gene itself. We used data from 535 HD participants of the New England Huntington cohort and the HD MAPS cohort to assess whether AO was influenced by any of the three markers in the 4p16 region: MSX1 (Drosophila homeo box homologue 1, formerly known as homeo box 7, HOX7), Δ2642 (within the HD coding sequence), and BJ56 (D4S127). Suggestive evidence for an association was seen between MSX1 alleles and AO, after adjustment for normal CAG repeat, expanded repeat, and their product term (model P value 0.079). Of the variance of AO that was not accounted for by HD and normal CAG repeats, 0.8% could be attributed to the MSX1 genotype. Individuals with MSX1 genotype 3/3 tended to have younger AO. No association was found between Δ2642 (P=0.44) and BJ56 (P=0.73) and AO. This study supports previous studies suggesting that there may be a significant genetic modifier for AO in HD in the 4p16 region. Furthermore, the modifier may be present on both HD and normal chromosomes bearing the 3 allele of the MSX1 marker. PMID:15029481

  13. Current data of targeted therapies for the treatment of triple-negative advanced breast cancer: empiricism or evidence-based?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrelli, Fausto; Cabiddu, Mary; Ghilardi, Mara; Barni, Sandro

    2009-10-01

    Approximately 10 - 15% of breast carcinomas (BCs) are known to be 'triple-negative (TN) receptor' (i.e., not expressing ER or PR and not exhibiting overexpression and/or gene amplification of HER2-neu). Triple-negative BCs comprise approximately 85% of all basal-type tumours. Classically, basal-like BCs have been characterised by low expression of ER, PR, and HER2 neu and high expression of CK5, CK14, caveolin-1, CAIX, p63, and EGFR (HER1), which reflects the mammary gland basal/myoepithelial cell component. Although there is no standard first-line chemotherapy regimen for metastatic TN BCs, anthracycline- and taxane-containing regimens are acceptable treatments. A large number of agents, including DNA-damaging agents, EGFR inhibitors, antiangiogenic agents and novel taxane formulations are currently being tested in clinical trials for first-line and pretreated patients. Limited experiences with platinum salts, poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) inhibitors, cetuximab, bevacizumab and ixabepilone have been published in recent years and will be reported. Novel immunohistochemistry analysis for identification of basal like/TN phenotype are awaited to correctly select this population. The clinical trials investigating new agents have to be designed for a specific (and possibly large) subset of patients with BC. In the future, a gene array platform with greater sensitivity for distinguishing the various BC subtypes, as well as having the power to predict the molecular biology of the disease, will be an indispensible tool for treatment selection. Currently, treatment of TN BC is more empirical than evidence-based. The cornerstone of treatment is chemotherapy, but in the near future, novel target agents will emerge as possible partners.

  14. Genetic evidence for a link between favorable adiposity and lower risk of type 2 diabetes, hypertension and heart disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yaghootkar, Hanieh; Lotta, Luca A.; Tyrrell, Jessica; Smit, Roelof A. J.; Jones, Sam E.; Donnelly, Louise; Beaumont, Robin; Campbell, Archie; Tuke, Marcus A.; Hayward, Caroline; Ruth, Katherine S.; Padmanabhan, Sandosh; Jukema, J. Wouter; Palmer, Colin C.; Hattersley, Andrew; Freathy, Rachel M.; Langenberg, Claudia; Wareham, Nicholas J.; Wood, Andrew R.; Murray, Anna; Weedon, Michael N.; Sattar, Naveed; Pearson, Ewan; Scott, Robert A.; Frayling, Timothy M.

    2017-01-01

    Recent genetic studies have identified some alleles associated with higher BMI but lower risk of type 2 diabetes, hypertension and heart disease. These “favorable adiposity” alleles are collectively associated with lower insulin levels and higher subcutaneous-to-visceral adipose tissue ratio and may protect from disease through higher adipose storage capacity. We aimed to use data from 164,609 individuals from the UK Biobank and five other studies to replicate associations between a genetic score of 11 favorable adiposity variants and adiposity and risk of disease, test for interactions between BMI and favorable adiposity genetics and test effects separately in men and women. In the UK Biobank the 50% of individuals carrying the most favorable adiposity alleles had higher BMIs (0.120 Kg/m2 [0.066,0.174]; p=1E-5) and higher body fat percentage (0.301 % [0.230,0.372]; p=1E-16) compared to the 50% of individuals carrying the fewest alleles. For a given BMI, the 50% of individuals carrying the most favourable adiposity alleles were at: 0.837 OR [0.784,0.894] lower risk of type 2 diabetes (p=1E-7), -0.859 mmHg [-1.099,-0.618] lower systolic (p=3E-12) and -0.394 mmHg [-0.534,-0.254] lower diastolic blood pressure (p=4E-8), 0.935 OR [0.911,0.958] lower risk of hypertension (p=1E-7) and 0.921 OR [0.872,0.973] lower risk of heart disease (p=3E-3). In women, these associations could be explained by the observation that the alleles associated with higher BMI but lower risk of disease were also associated with a favourable body fat distribution, with a lower waist-hip ratio (-0.004 [-0.005,-0.003] 50% vs 50%; p=3E-14) but in men, the favourable adiposity alleles were associated with higher waist circumference (0.454 cm [0.267,0.641] 50% vs 50%; p=2E-6) and higher waist-hip ratio (0.0013 [0.0003,0.0024] 50% vs 50%; p=0.01). Results were strengthened when meta-analysing with five additional studies. There was no evidence of interaction between a genetic score consisting of

  15. Interpreting the epidemiological evidence linking obesity and cancer: A framework for population-attributable risk estimations in Europe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renehan, Andrew G; Soerjomataram, Isabelle; Leitzmann, Michael F

    2010-09-01

    Standard approaches to estimating population-attributable risk (PAR) include modelling estimates of exposure prevalence and relative risk. Here, we examine the associations between body mass index (BMI) and cancer risk and how effect modifications of these associations impact on PAR estimates. In 2008, sex- and population-specific risk estimates were determined for associations with BMI in a standardised meta-analysis for 20 cancer types. Since then, refinements of these estimates have emerged: (i) absence of menopausal hormonal therapy (MHT) is associated with elevated BMI associations in post-menopausal breast, endometrial and ovarian cancers; (ii) current smoking attenuates the BMI associations in oesophageal squamous cell carcinoma, lung and pancreatic cancers; (iii) prostate screening attenuates BMI associations when all prostate cancers are considered together; and (iv) BMI is differentially associated with different histological subtypes within the same cancer group. Using secondary analyses of the aforementioned meta-analysis, we show 2-3-fold shifts in PAR estimations for breast and endometrial cancers depending on the MHT usage in European countries. We also critically examine how to best handle exposures (in this example, BMI distributions) and relative risk estimates in PAR models, and argue in favour of a counterfactual approach based around BMI means. From these observations, we develop a research framework in which to optimally evaluate future trends in numbers of new cancers attributable to excess BMI. Overall, this framework gives conservative estimates for PAR - nonetheless, the numbers of avoidable cancers across Europe through avoidance of excess weight are substantial. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Anti EGFR therapy in the treatment of non-metastatic head and neck squamous cell carcinoma: The current evidence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rony Benson

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC accounts for a large oncologic burden in the developing countries. In patients with locally advanced head and neck cancer multimodality treatment is warranted. Radiation therapy with concurrent chemotherapy has long been considered the standard for patients with disease involving the oropharynx, larynx and hypopharynx. However, addition of chemotherapy to radiotherapy increases treatment related toxicity by many folds and compliance rates decrease. In this context a systemic therapy, which when used concurrent with radiation with favorable toxicity profile is of great importance for improving disease control in locally advanced HNSCC. Anti-epithelial growth factor receptor targeted therapy emerged as a potential treatment option. In recent years many trials were conducted to find the optimum treatment option with the combination of these targeted agents. The initial trials showed excellent results with minimal morbidity and led to great enthusiasm across the globe to incorporate these regimens as a standard of care. However, subsequently many trials failed to maintain such results and now there is little agreement to the initial results achieved with these drugs. Based on the current evidence we cannot recommend the replacement of cisplatin with targeted therapy in concurrent setting. It may be considered in patients with altered renal parameters, hypersensitivity or intolerance to cisplatin. The addition of targeted therapy in addition to chemotherapy in the concurrent setting can’t also be recommended as the benefit is doubtful and is associated with a significant increase in toxicity.

  17. Role of VEGF, Nitric Oxide, and Sympathetic Neurotransmitters in the Pathogenesis of Tendinopathy: A Review of the Current Evidences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasta, Sebastiano; Di Martino, Alberto; Zampogna, Biagio; Torre, Guglielmo; Papalia, Rocco; Denaro, Vincenzo

    2016-01-01

    Chronic tendinopathy is a painful common condition affecting athletes as well as the general population undergoing to tendon overuse. Although its huge prevalence, little is known about tendinopathy pathogenesis, and even cloudier is its treatment. Traditionally, tendinopathy has been defined as a lack of tendon ability to overcome stressing stimuli with appropriate adaptive changes. Histologic studies have demonstrated the absence of inflammatory infiltrates, as a consequence conventional antinflammatory drugs have shown little or no effectiveness in treating tendinopathies. New strategies should be therefore identified to address chronic tendon disorders. Angiofibroblastic changes have been highlighted as the main feature of tendinopathy, and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) has been demonstrated as one of the key molecules involved in vascular hyperplasia. More recently, attention has been focused on new peptides such as Substance P, nitric oxide, and calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP). Those new findings support the idea of a nerve-mediated disregulation of tendon metabolism. Each of those molecules could be a target for new treatment options. This study aimed to systematically review the current available clinical and basic science in order to summarize the latest evidences on the pathophysiology and its effect on treatment of chronic tendinopathy, and to spread suggestions for future research on its treatment.

  18. Role of VEGF, Nitric Oxide and sympathetic neurotransmitters in the pathogenesis of tendinopathy: a review of the current evidences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebastiano Vasta

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Chronic tendinopathy is a painful common condition affecting athletes as well as the general population undergoing to tendon overuse. Although its huge prevalence, little is known about tendinopathy pathogenesis, and even cloudier is its treatment.Traditionally, tendinopathy has been defined as a lack of tendon ability to overcome stressing stimuli with appropriate adaptive changes. Histologic studies have demonstrated the absence of inflammatory infiltrates, as a consequence conventional antinflammatory drugs have shown little or no effectiveness in treating tendinopathies. New strategies should be therefore identified to address chronic tendon disorders. Angiofibroblastic changes have been highlighted as the main feature of tendinopathy, and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF has been demonstrated as one of the key molecules involved in vascular hyperplasia. More recently, attention has been focused on new peptides such as Substance P, nitric oxide and calcitonin gene-related peptide. Those new findings support the idea of a nerve-mediated disregulation of tendon metabolism. Each of those molecules could be a target for new treatment options. This study aimed to systematically review the current available clinical and basic science in order to summarize the latest evidences on the pathophysiology and its effect on treatment of chronic tendinopathy, and to spread suggestions for future research on its treatment.

  19. Current evidence for the use of coffee and caffeine to prevent age-related cognitive decline and Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carman, A J; Dacks, P A; Lane, R F; Shineman, D W; Fillit, H M

    2014-04-01

    Although nothing has been proven conclusively to protect against cognitive aging, Alzheimer's disease or related dementias, decades of research suggest that specific approaches including the consumption of coffee may be effective. While coffee and caffeine are known to enhance short-term memory and cognition, some limited research also suggests that long-term use may protect against cognitive decline or dementia. In vitro and pre-clinical animal models have identified plausible neuroprotective mechanisms of action of both caffeine and other bioactive components of coffee, though epidemiology has produced mixed results. Some studies suggest a protective association while others report no benefit. To our knowledge, no evidence has been gathered from randomized controlled trials. Although moderate consumption of caffeinated coffee is generally safe for healthy people, it may not be for everyone, since comorbidities and personal genetics influence potential benefits and risks. Future studies could include short-term clinical trials with biomarker outcomes to validate findings from pre-clinical models and improved epidemiological studies that incorporate more standardized methods of data collection and analysis. Given the enormous economic and emotional toll threatened by the current epidemic of Alzheimer's disease and other dementias, it is critically important to validate potential prevention strategies such as coffee and caffeine.

  20. Social workers as "experts" in the family court system: is evidence-based practice a missing link or host-created knowledge?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prescott, Dana E

    2013-10-01

    The graduate school curriculum for social workers requires that students learn to critically distinguish between opinion-based knowledge and evidence-based practices, or empirically-supported interventions. Once graduated, licensed social workers are often called upon to offer diagnostic and predictive opinions as experts in a variety of macro-environments. When the family courts are that "host" environment, social workers proffer expert opinions that may categorize and label parents or children for purposes of a judge's allocation of physical or legal custody. In this article, it is suggested that the social work profession, within all three domains of education, practice, and research, should more precisely link the design and fidelity of an evidence-based practice (EBP) with its potential misapplication or warping when proffered as science in "host" environments like family courts. As Foucault and other scholars warn, the failure to verify that an intervention is applied correctly may actually enhance the risk of social injustice by interpreting and translating EBP knowledge in the non-empirical form of authority-by-license. This article, therefore, proposes that the social work profession, from the classroom to the field, has an obligation to thoroughly understand and engage interdisciplinary practices that assure respect for the strengths and limits of social work knowledge.

  1. Developmental outcome of low birth-weight and preterm newborns: a re-view of current evidence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farin Soleimani

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Low birth weight (LBW and preterm birth are one the most important causes of death in the world and therefore are considered as one of the major health problems. Global statistics demonstrates an increase in the prevalence of low birth weight in the developing countries. Low birth weight infants are exposed to complications such as major neurosensory impairements, cerebral palsy, cognitive and language delays, neuromotor developmental delay, blindness and hearing loss, behavioral and psychosocial disorders, learning difficulties and dysfunction in scholastic performances. The majority of infant's death and developmental disorders were due to disorders relating to prematurity and unspecified low birth weight. Infants weighing less than 2500 g, is a major determinant of both neonatal and infant mortality rates and, together with congenital anomalies (e.g., cardiac, central nervous system, and respiratory, contributes significantly to childhood morbidity. Various studies indicate that low birth weight infants are suffering from physiological and psychosocial disabilities, two to three times more than the other children. At school age, preterm and low birth weight infants have poorer physical growth, cognitive function, and school performance. These disadvantages appear to persist into adulthood and therefore have broad implications for society. Although the survival rates have increased dramatically and the incidence of morbidities has decreased, the complications are still considered to be associated with economical and social burdens. Most children with Low birth weight suffer from multiple disabilities. Therefore, they need special and consistent care. On demand of reducing the infant mortality rate, the need to decrease the complications in low birth weight and preterm infants should be considered by the policy makers in health care system. In this review article, we assessed current evidences on developmental outcomes of low birth weight and

  2. Analysis of a novel autonomous marine hybrid power generation/energy storage system with a high-voltage direct current link

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Li; Lee, Dong-Jing; Lee, Wei-Jen; Chen, Zhe

    This paper presents both time-domain and frequency-domain simulated results of a novel marine hybrid renewable-energy power generation/energy storage system (PG/ESS) feeding isolated loads through an high-voltage direct current (HVDC) link. The studied marine PG subsystems comprise both offshore wind turbines and Wells turbines to respectively capture wind energy and wave energy from marine wind and ocean wave. In addition to wind-turbine generators (WTGs) and wave-energy turbine generators (WETGs) employed in the studied system, diesel-engine generators (DEGs) and an aqua electrolyzer (AE) absorbing a part of generated energy from WTGs and WETGs to generate available hydrogen for fuel cells (FCs) are also included in the PG subsystems. The ES subsystems consist of a flywheel energy storage system (FESS) and a compressed air energy storage (CAES) system to balance the required energy in the hybrid PG/ESS. It can be concluded from the simulation results that the proposed hybrid marine PG/ESS feeding isolated loads can stably operate to achieve system power-frequency balance condition.

  3. "Use of Current Best Evidence": Promises and Illusions, Limitations and Contradictions in the Triangle of Research, Policy and Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lassnigg, Lorenz

    2012-01-01

    This paper explores the methodological and epistemological implications of the relationships between R&D, policy and practice. The proposals towards "evidence-based policy and practice" are analysed with respect to this triangle from three angles: (1) meaning; (2) production; and (3) use of evidence. A comprehensive model of the…

  4. Investigation into the Control Methods to Reduce the DC-Link Capacitor Ripple Current in a Back-to-Back Converter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Qin, Zian; Wang, Huai; Blaabjerg, Frede

    2014-01-01

    Three-phase back-to-back converters have a wide range of applications (e.g. wind turbines) in which the reliability and cost-effectiveness are of great concern. Among other components and interconnections, DC-link capacitors are one of the weak links influenced by environmental stresses (e.g. amb......-link or a reduced DC-link size for fulfilling a specified lifetime target. The proposed control strategies have been demonstrated on a study case of a 1.5 kW converter prototype. The experimental verifications are in well agreement with the theoretical analyses....

  5. Linking adult hippocampal neurogenesis with human physiology and disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowers, Megan; Jessberger, Sebastian

    2016-07-01

    We here review the existing evidence linking adult hippocampal neurogenesis and human brain function in physiology and disease. Furthermore, we aim to point out where evidence is missing, highlight current promising avenues of investigation, and suggest future tools and approaches to foster the link between life-long neurogenesis and human brain function. Developmental Dynamics 245:702-709, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Using a Simulated Infobutton Linked to an Evidence-Based Resource to Research Drug-Drug Interactions: A Pilot Study with Third-Year Dental Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dragan, Irina F; Newman, Michael; Stark, Paul; Steffensen, Bjorn; Karimbux, Nadeem

    2015-11-01

    Many health professions students and clinicians are using evidence-based databases that allow for quicker and more accurate clinical decisions. The aims of this pilot study were to compare third-year dental students' speed and accuracy in researching questions about drug-drug interactions (DDI) when using two different methods: a simulated infobutton linked to the evidence-based clinical decision support resource UpToDate versus traditional Internet resources accessed through a computer or smart device. Students researched two simulated cases during two sessions. In the first session, half the students used the infobutton, while the other half used traditional electronic tools only. In the second session, ten days later, a cross-over took place. The sessions were timed, and after researching the case, students answered three questions on the use of antibiotics, analgesics, and local anesthetics. Of the 50 students who volunteered for the study, two were excluded, and 44 participated in both sessions and the exam. The results showed that the students took a similar amount of time to identify DDI whether they used the infobutton (mean=286.5 seconds) or traditional tools (265.2 seconds); the difference was not statistically significant (p=0.429). Their scores using the two research methods were similar in all three content areas: antibiotics (p=0.797), analgesics (p=0.850), and local anesthetics (p=0.850). In a post-intervention survey, students were generally favorable about infobutton and UpToDate, reporting the tool was easy to use (62.5%), provided the answer they were looking for (53.1%), was fast (50%), and they would use it again (68.8%). This pilot study found that the time and accuracy of these students conducting DDI research with the infobutton and UpToDate were about the same as using traditional Internet resources.

  7. Delirium in Hospitalized Patients: Implications of Current Evidence on Clinical Practice and Future Avenues for Research—A Systematic Evidence Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Babar A.; Zawahiri, Mohammed; Campbell, Noll L.; Fox, George C.; Weinstein, Eric J.; Nazir, Arif; Farber, Mark O.; Buckley, John D.; MacLullich, Alasdair; (UK), MRCP; Boustani, Malaz A.

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND Despite the significant burden of delirium among hospitalized adults, critical appraisal of systematic data on delirium diagnosis, pathophysiology, treatment, prevention, and outcomes is lacking. PURPOSE To provide evidence-based recommendations for delirium care to practitioners, and identify gaps in delirium research. DATA SOURCES Medline, PubMed, the Cochrane Library, and the Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature (CINAHL) information systems fromJanuary 1966 to April 2011. STUDY SELECTION All published systematic evidence reviews (SERs) on delirium were evaluated. DATA EXTRACTION Three reviewers independently extracted the data regarding delirium risk factors, diagnosis, prevention, treatment, and outcomes, and critically appraised each SER as good, fair, or poor using the United States Preventive Services Task Force criteria. DATA SYNTHESIS Twenty-two SERs graded as good or fair provided the data. Age, cognitive impairment, depression, anticholinergic drugs, and lorazepam use were associated with an increased risk for developing delirium. The Confusion Assessment Method (CAM) is reliable for delirium diagnosis outside of the intensive care unit. Multicomponent nonpharmacological interventions are effective in reducing delirium incidence in elderly medical patients. Low-dose haloperidol has similar efficacy as atypical antipsychotics for treating delirium. Delirium is associated with poor outcomes independent of age, severity of illness, or dementia. CONCLUSION Delirium is an acute, preventable medical condition with short- and long-term negative effects on a patient’s cognitive and functional states. PMID:22684893

  8. Anomalous low-frequency noise in synthetic antiferromagnets: possible evidence of current-induced domain-wall motion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Herranz, D.; Guerrero, R.; Villar, R.; Aliev, F.G.; Swaving, A.C.; Duine, R.A.; Van Haesendonck, C.; Vavra, I.

    2009-01-01

    We investigate current-driven magnetization dynamics in synthetic [Fe/Cr]10 multilayer antiferromagnets by using low-frequency voltage noise measurements. We observe suppression of the noise above a critical current density of about 2×105 A/cm2. Theoretical estimates suggest that this effect may be

  9. Effects of extracellular potassium on ventricular automaticity and evidence for a pacemaker current in mammalian ventricular myocardium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katzung, B G; Morgenstern, J A

    1977-01-01

    Automaticity was induced in isolated guinea pig and cat papillary muscles by application of depolarizing constant current pulses. Increasing extracellular potassium from 1 to 15 mM caused a shift of pacemaker-like activity to less negative diastolic potentials and a decrease in maximum phase 4 slope. Membrane resistance, estimated from the relation of applied current to maximum diastolic potential, decreased when extracellular potassium was increased. Voltage clamps of cat papillary muscle demonstrated that action potentials activate a time-dependent outward current which has a reversal potential of -79.1 mV (+/- 0.99 SE, n = 20) at an extracellular potassium concentration of 5 mM. The reversal potential of this current varies with extracellular K+ with a slope of 50-60 mV per 10-fold concentration change. The current is activated by voltage clamps or action potential plateaus in the range of -30 to +30 mV. It has a time constant of deactivation which increases from approximately 100 to over 400 msec as clamp potential is increased from -90 to -60 mV. It is proposed that this current is equivalent to Ix1 demonstrated in other cardiac tissues and is responsible, in combination with inward currents, for automaticity in ventricular fibers.

  10. Direct Experimental Evidence for Current-Transfer Mode Operation of Nested Tungsten Wire Arrays at 16 19 MA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuneo, M. E.; Sinars, D. B.; Bliss, D. E.; Waisman, E. M.; Porter, J. L.; Stygar, W. A.; Lebedev, S. V.; Chittenden, J. P.; Sarkisov, G. S.; Afeyan, B. B.

    2005-06-01

    Nested tungsten wire arrays (20-mm on 12-mm diam.) are shown for the first time to operate in a current-transfer mode at 16 19 MA, even for azimuthal interwire gaps of 0.2 mm that are the smallest typically used for any array experiment. After current transfer, the inner wire array shows discrete wire ablation and implosion characteristics identical to that of a single array, such as axially nonuniform ablation, delayed acceleration, and trailing mass and current. The presence of trailing mass from the outer and the inner arrays may play a role in determining nested array performance.

  11. Osteoradionecrosis in cancer patients : the evidence base for treatment-dependent frequency, current management strategies, and future studies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Peterson, Douglas E.; Doerr, Wolfgang; Hovan, Allan; Pinto, Andres; Saunders, Debbie; Elting, Linda S.; Spijkervet, Fred K. L.; Brennan, Michael T.

    The purpose of this study is to review the evidence base from 1990 to 2008 to (1) clarify the impact of cancer therapies on prevalence of osteoradionecrosis (ORN) in head and neck cancer patients, and to (2) evaluate management strategies and their consequences on quality of life and cost of care.

  12. Osteoradionecrosis in cancer patients : the evidence base for treatment-dependent frequency, current management strategies, and future studies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Peterson, Douglas E.; Doerr, Wolfgang; Hovan, Allan; Pinto, Andres; Saunders, Debbie; Elting, Linda S.; Spijkervet, Fred K. L.; Brennan, Michael T.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to review the evidence base from 1990 to 2008 to (1) clarify the impact of cancer therapies on prevalence of osteoradionecrosis (ORN) in head and neck cancer patients, and to (2) evaluate management strategies and their consequences on quality of life and cost of care. A

  13. Manejo da asma aguda em adultos na sala de emergência: evidências atuais Management of acute asthma in adults in the emergency room: current evidence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulo de Tarso Roth Dalcin

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Asma é uma doença com uma alta prevalência em nosso meio e ao redor do mundo. Embora novas opções terapêuticas tenham sido recentemente desenvolvidas, parece haver um aumento mundial na sua morbidade e mortalidade. Em muitas instituições, as exacerbações asmáticas ainda se constituem em uma emergência médica muito comum. As evidências têm demonstrado que o manejo da asma aguda na sala de emergência concentra decisões cruciais que podem determinar o desfecho desta situação clínica. Nesta revisão, enfocaremos a avaliação e o tratamento do paciente com asma aguda na sala de emergência, descrevendo uma estratégia apropriada para o seu manejo. Serão consideradas as seguintes etapas: diagnóstico, avaliação da gravidade, tratamento, avaliação das complicações, decisão sobre onde se realizará o tratamento adicional e orientações por ocasião da alta da emergência. Espera-se que estas recomendações contribuam para que o médico clínico tome as decisões apropriadas durante o manejo da asma aguda na sala de emergência.Asthma is a disease with high prevalence in our country and worldwide. Although new therapeutic approaches have been developed recently, there seems to be a global increase in morbidity and mortality from asthma. In many institutions, asthma exacerbation is still a common medical emergency. Clinical evidence demonstrates that management of acute asthma in the emergency room entails crucial decisions that could determine the clinical outcome. In this review, the authors focus on assessment and treatment of patients with acute asthma and outline an appropriate management strategy. Diagnosis, severity assessment, treatment, complications, decision about where additional treatment will take place and orientations on discharge from the emergency will be considered. It is expected that these recommendations will help physicians to make the appropriate decisions about care of acute asthma in the emergency

  14. Evolution and variation of the Tsushima warm current during the late Quaternary: Evidence from planktonic foraminifera, oxygen and carbon isotopes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI TieGang; SUN RongTao; ZHANG DeYu; LIU ZhenXia; LI Qing; JIANG Bo

    2007-01-01

    The evolution and variation history of the Tsushima warm current during the late Quaternary was reconstructed based on the quantitative census data of planktonic foraminiferal fauna, together with oxygen and carbon isotope records of mixed layer dweller G ruber and thermocline dweller N. dutertrei in piston core CSH1 and core DGKS9603 collected separately from the Tsushima warm current and the Kuroshio dominated area. The result showed that the Tsushima warm current vanished in the Iowstand period during 40-24 cai ka BP, while the Kuroshio still flowed across the Okinawa Trough, arousing strong upwelling in the northern Trough. Meanwhile, the influence of freshwater greatly increased in the northern Okinawa Trough, as the broad East China Sea continental shelf emerged. The freshwater reached its maximum during the last glacial maximum (LGM), when the upwelling obviously weakened for the lowest sea-level and the depression of the Kuroshio. The modern Tsushima warm current began its development since 16 cai ka BP, and the impact of the Kuroshio increased in the middle and northern Okinawa Trough synchronously during the deglaciation and gradually evolved as the main water source of the Tsushima current. The modern Tsushima current finally formed at about 8.5 cai ka BP,since then the circulation structure has been relatively stable. The water of the modern Tsushima current primarily came from the Kuroshio axis. A short-term wiggle of the current occurred at about 3 cai ka BP, probably for the influences from the enhancement of the winter monsoon and the depression of the Kuroshio. The cold water masses greatly strengthened during the wiggle.

  15. Initial evidence for the link between activities and health: Associations between a balance of activities, functioning and serum levels of cytokines and C-reactive protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dür, Mona; Steiner, Günter; Stoffer, Michaela Alexandra; Fialka-Moser, Veronika; Kautzky-Willer, Alexandra; Dejaco, Clemens; Ekmekcioglu, Cem; Prodinger, Birgit; Binder, Alexa; Smolen, Josef; Stamm, Tanja Alexandra

    2016-03-01

    Growing evidence shows interrelations of psychological factors, neurological and immunological processes. Therefore, constructs like a balance of activities, the so called "occupational balance", could also have biological correlates. The aim of this study was to investigate potential associations between occupational balance, functioning, cytokines and C-reactive protein (CRP) in patients suffering from a chronic inflammatory disease like rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and healthy people. Moreover, we wanted to explore potential differences in gender and employment status. A descriptive study in patients with RA and healthy people was conducted using the Occupational Balance-Questionnaire (OB-Quest) and the Short-Form 36 Health Survey (SF-36). Serum levels of cytokines, such as interleukin 6 (IL-6) and 8 (IL-8), interferon alpha (INFα), tumour necrosis factor alpha (TNFα), rheumatoid factor (RF) and of CRP were measured. Descriptive statistics, as well as Mann-Whitney U tests and Spearmen's rank correlation coefficients (rs) were calculated. One-hundred-thirty-two patients with RA and 76 healthy people participated. Occupational balance was associated with functioning, cytokines and CRP. The strongest associations were identified in the unemployed healthy-people sample with cytokines and CRP being within the normal range. For example, the OB-Quest item challenging activities was associated with IL-8 (rs=-0.63, p=0.04) and the SF-36 sub-scale bodily pain was associated with IFNα (rs=-0.69, p=0.02). The items rest and sleep (rs=-0.71, p=0.01) and variety of different activities (rs=-0.74, psocial functioning. Employed and unemployed people differed in their age and CRP levels. Additionally, gender differences were found in two OB-Quest items in that fewer women were able to adapt their activities to changing living conditions and fewer men were overstressed. In conclusion, we found preliminary biological evidence for the link between occupation and health in that the

  16. Reaction of protein chloramines with DNA and nucleosides: evidence for the formation of radicals, protein-DNA cross-links and DNA fragmentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawkins, Clare L; Pattison, David I; Davies, Michael J

    2002-08-01

    Stimulated phagocyte cells produce the oxidant HOCl, via the release of the enzyme myeloperoxidase and hydrogen peroxide. HOCl is important in bacterial cell killing, but excessive or misplaced generation can damage the host tissue and may lead to the development of certain diseases such as cancer. The role of HOCl in the oxidation of isolated proteins, DNA and their components has been investigated extensively, but little work has been performed on the protein-DNA (nucleosome) complexes present in eukaryotic cell nuclei. Neither the selectivity of damage in such complexes nor the possibility of transfer of damage from the protein to DNA or vice versa, has been studied. In the present study, kinetic modelling has been employed to predict that reaction occurs predominantly with the protein and not with the DNA in the nucleosome, using molar HOCl excesses of up to 200-fold. With 50-200-fold excesses, 50-80% of the HOCl is predicted to react with histone lysine and histidine residues to yield chloramines. The yield and stability of such chloramines predicted by these modelling studies agrees well with experimental data. Decomposition of these species gives protein-derived, nitrogen-centred radicals, probably on the lysine side chains, as characterized by the EPR and spin-trapping experiments. It is shown that isolated lysine, histidine, peptide and protein chloramines can react with plasmid DNA to cause strand breaks. The protection against such damage afforded by the radical scavengers Trolox (a water-soluble alpha-tocopherol derivative) and 5,5-dimethyl-1-pyrroline-N-oxide suggests a radical-mediated process. The EPR experiments and product analyses have also provided evidence for the rapid addition of protein radicals, formed on chloramine decomposition, to pyrimidine nucleosides to give nucleobase radicals. Further evidence for the formation of such covalent cross-links has been obtained from experiments performed using (3)H-lysine and (14)C-histidine chloramines

  17. Evolution and variation of the Tsushima warm current during the late Quaternary: Evidence from planktonic foraminifera, oxygen and carbon isotopes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    The evolution and variation history of the Tsushima warm current during the late Quaternary was reconstructed based on the quantitative census data of planktonic foraminiferal fauna, together with oxygen and carbon isotope records of mixed layer dweller G. ruber and thermocline dweller N. dutertrei in piston core CSH1 and core DGKS9603 collected separately from the Tsushima warm current and the Kuroshio dominated area. The result showed that the Tsushima warm current vanished in the lowstand period during 40―24 cal ka BP, while the Kuroshio still flowed across the Okinawa Trough, arousing strong upwelling in the northern Trough. Meanwhile, the influence of freshwater greatly increased in the northern Okinawa Trough, as the broad East China Sea continental shelf emerged. The freshwater reached its maximum during the last glacial maximum (LGM), when the upwelling obviously weakened for the lowest sea-level and the depression of the Kuroshio. The modern Tsushima warm current began its development since 16 cal ka BP, and the impact of the Kuroshio increased in the middle and north- ern Okinawa Trough synchronously during the deglaciation and gradually evolved as the main water source of the Tsushima current. The modern Tsushima current finally formed at about 8.5 cal ka BP, since then the circulation structure has been relatively stable. The water of the modern Tsushima cur- rent primarily came from the Kuroshio axis. A short-term wiggle of the current occurred at about 3 cal ka BP, probably for the influences from the enhancement of the winter monsoon and the depression of the Kuroshio. The cold water masses greatly strengthened during the wiggle.

  18. Testing for causality between the foreign direct investment, current account deficit, GDP and total credit: Evidence from G7

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akbas Yusuf Ekrem

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study, countries were analyzed between 1990 and 2011 in order to determine whether a causal relationship exists among current account deficit, GDP, foreign direct investment, and total credits of G7. Analysis took into account the cross-sectional dependence and was applied to test the causality among the variables form the panel. Firstly, panel unit root tests were used for determining stationary of variables. As a result of the panel unit root tests, it was found that GDP and foreign direct investment have a stationary structure and that total credits and current account deficit contain unit root. In order to see whether there is a long-term relationship among the variables or not, the panel co-integration test was used. As a result of the test, it was concluded that there is a co-integration relationship among the series. The possibility of a causal relationship was analyzed among the variables using the causality test developed by Elena Ivona Dumitrescu and Christophe Hurlin (2012. Results of the analysis showed a unidirectional causal relationship from current account deficit and foreign direct investment to GDP. Bidirectional causality was found between current account deficit and total credits. Finally, a unidirectional relationship was found from foreign direct investment to current account deficit and total credits.

  19. Nutrition (Micronutrients) in Child Growth and Development: A Systematic Review on Current Evidence, Recommendations and Opportunities for Further Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yakoob, Mohammad Yawar; Lo, Clifford W

    2017-10-01

    An important aspect of malnutrition is deficiency of different micronutrients during pregnancy or early childhood. We systematically reviewed the role of nutrition in child growth (weight or height gain) and development. A comprehensive literature search was done on PubMed/Cochrane Library browsing through 38,795 abstracts until December 31, 2016 to select systematic reviews/meta-analyses and individual randomized controlled trials (RCTs) of micronutrient supplementation. Micronutrients studied included iron, iodine, folate, zinc, calcium, magnesium, selenium, vitamin D, vitamin A, vitamin B complex, and multiple micronutrients. We summarize evidence with details and results of RCTs, highlight strengths/weaknesses, and critically interpret findings. Effects of breastfeeding-promotion, food-supplementation (complementary and school feeding), conditional-cash-transfers, and integrated nutrition/psychosocial interventions are discussed. Based on this evidence we make policy and programmatic recommendations for supplementation to mothers and children at high-risk of deficiency.

  20. The current status of evidence for and against postnatal oogenesis in mammals: a case of ovarian optimism versus pessimism?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tilly, Jonathan L; Niikura, Yuichi; Rueda, Bo R

    2009-01-01

    Whether or not oogenesis continues in the ovaries of mammalian females during postnatal life was heavily debated from the late 1800s through the mid-1900s. However, in 1951 Lord Solomon Zuckerman published what many consider to be a landmark paper summarizing his personal views of data existing at the time for and against the possibility of postnatal oogenesis. In Zuckerman's opinion, none of the evidence he considered was inconsistent with Waldeyer's initial proposal in 1870 that female mammals cease production of oocytes at or shortly after birth. This conclusion rapidly became dogma, and remained essentially unchallenged until just recently, despite the fact that Zuckerman did not offer a single experiment proving that adult female mammals are incapable of oogenesis. Instead, 20 years later he reemphasized that his conclusion was based solely on an absence of data he felt would be inconsistent with the idea of a nonrenewable oocyte pool provided at birth. However, in the immortal words of Carl Sagan, an "absence of evidence is not evidence of absence." Indeed, building on the efforts of a few scientists who continued to question this dogma after Zuckerman's treatise in 1951, we reported several data sets in 2004 that were very much inconsistent with the widely held belief that germ cell production in female mammals ceases at birth. Perhaps not surprisingly, given the magnitude of the paradigm shift being proposed, this work reignited a vigorous debate that first began more than a century ago. Our purpose here is to review the experimental evidence offered in recent studies arguing support for and against the possibility that adult mammalian females replenish their oocyte reserve. "Never discourage anyone who continually makes progress, no matter how slow."-Plato (427-347 BC).

  1. Thrombolytic treatment in the oldest-old patient with acute ischemic stroke: an update on current evidence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabiola Maioli

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The incidence of ischemic stroke rises exponentially with age, with a steep increase in the age interval between 75 and 85 years. Thrombolytic therapy restores cerebral blood flow in patients with acute ischemic stroke of any etiology by using drugs that dissolve blood clots. Infusion for 1 h of alteplase at the dose of 0.9 mg/kg within 3 h of the start of the symptoms is associated to a 30% increase in the likelihood of gaining a favorable outcome with respect to placebo. There is strong evidence that selected patients with ischemic stroke may benefit from intravenous thrombolysis when treated within 3 h. The aim of the study was to evaluate available evidence for the efficacy and safety of thrombolytic therapy in patients with ischemic stroke aged 80 years and over. Compared to younger stroke patients treated with thrombolytic therapy, those aged 80 years and over have higher acute mortality due to symptomatic intracranial hemorrhage. However, functional outcome at six months is significantly better for over-80-year-olds than younger patients. There is a need for screening tools that take into account pre-stroke functional and cognitive status that are able to identify those over-80-year-old patients with ischemic stroke who can most benefit from thrombolytic treatment. Available evidence supports further recruitment of oldest-old patients into ongoing trials of thrombolysis.

  2. Current evidence on treatment of patients with chronic systolic heart failure and renal insufficiency: practical considerations from published data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damman, Kevin; Tang, W H Wilson; Felker, G Michael; Lassus, Johan; Zannad, Faiez; Krum, Henry; McMurray, John J V

    2014-03-11

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is increasingly prevalent in patients with chronic systolic heart failure. Therefore, evidence-based therapies are more and more being used in patients with some degree of renal dysfunction. However, most pivotal randomized clinical trials specifically excluded patients with (severe) renal dysfunction. The benefit of these evidence-based therapies in this high-risk patient group is largely unknown. This paper reviews data from randomized clinical trials in systolic heart failure and the interactions between baseline renal dysfunction and the effect of randomized treatment. It highlights that most evidence-based therapies show consistent outcome benefit in patients with moderate renal insufficiency (stage 3 CKD), whereas there are very scarce data on patients with severe (stage 4 to 5 CKD) renal insufficiency. If any, the outcome benefit might be even greater in stage 3 CKD compared with those with relatively preserved renal function. However, prescription of therapies should be individualized with consideration of possible harm and benefit, especially in those with stage 4 to 5 CKD where limited data are available.

  3. Current hormonal contraceptive use predicts female extra-pair and dyadic sexual behavior: evidence based on Czech National Survey data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klapilová, Kateřina; Cobey, Kelly D; Wells, Timothy; Roberts, S Craig; Weiss, Petr; Havlíček, Jan

    2014-01-10

    Data from 1155 Czech women (493 using oral contraception, 662 non-users), obtained from the Czech National Survey of Sexual Behavior, were used to investigate evolutionary-based hypotheses concerning the predictive value of current oral contraceptive (OC) use on extra-pair and dyadic (in-pair) sexual behavior of coupled women. Specifically, the aim was to determine whether current OC use was associated with lower extra-pair and higher in-pair sexual interest and behavior, because OC use suppresses cyclical shifts in mating psychology that occur in normally cycling women. Zero-inflated Poisson (ZIP) regression and negative binomial models were used to test associations between OC use and these sexual measures, controlling for other relevant predictors (e.g., age, parity, in-pair sexual satisfaction, relationship length). The overall incidence of having had an extra-pair partner or one-night stand in the previous year was not related to current OC use (the majority of the sample had not). However, among the women who had engaged in extra-pair sexual behavior, OC users had fewer one-night stands than non-users, and tended to have fewer partners, than non-users. OC users also had more frequent dyadic intercourse than non-users, potentially indicating higher commitment to their current relationship. These results suggest that suppression of fertility through OC use may alter important aspects of female sexual behavior, with potential implications for relationship functioning and stability.

  4. Current Hormonal Contraceptive Use Predicts Female Extra-Pair and Dyadic Sexual Behavior: Evidence Based on Czech National Survey Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kateřina Klapilová

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Data from 1155 Czech women (493 using oral contraception, 662 non-users, obtained from the Czech National Survey of Sexual Behavior, were used to investigate evolutionary-based hypotheses concerning the predictive value of current oral contraceptive (OC use on extra-pair and dyadic (in-pair sexual behavior of coupled women. Specifically, the aim was to determine whether current OC use was associated with lower extra-pair and higher in-pair sexual interest and behavior, because OC use suppresses cyclical shifts in mating psychology that occur in normally cycling women. Zero-inflated Poisson (ZIP regression and negative binomial models were used to test associations between OC use and these sexual measures, controlling for other relevant predictors (e.g., age, parity, in-pair sexual satisfaction, relationship length. The overall incidence of having had an extra-pair partner or one-night stand in the previous year was not related to current OC use (the majority of the sample had not. However, among the women who had engaged in extra-pair sexual behavior, OC users had fewer one-night stands than non-users, and tended to have fewer partners, than non-users. OC users also had more frequent dyadic intercourse than non-users, potentially indicating higher commitment to their current relationship. These results suggest that suppression of fertility through OC use may alter important aspects of female sexual behavior, with potential implications for relationship functioning and stability.

  5. Evidence of the Current Collector Effect: Study of the SOFC Cathode Material Ca3Co4O9+d

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rolle, A.; Thoréton, V.; Rozier, P.; Capoen, E.; Mentré, O.; Boukamp, B.A.; Daviero-Minaud, S.

    2012-01-01

    In the study of the performance of solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) electrodes, the possible influence of the applied current collector is often not mentioned or recognized. In this article, as part of an optimization study of the potentially attractive Ca3Co4O9+δ cathode material (Ca349), special atten

  6. Current evidence for a role of GLP-1 in Roux-en-Y gastric bypass-induced remission of type 2 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rhee, Nicolai Alexander; Vilsbøll, T; Knop, F K

    2012-01-01

    Weight-reducing surgical procedures such as Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB) have proven efficient as means of decreasing excess body weight. Furthermore, some studies report that up to 80% of patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) undergoing RYGB experience complete remission of their T2DM......-induced remission of T2DM are lacking. This article critically evaluates the current evidence for a role of GLP-1 in RYGB-induced remission of T2DM....

  7. The health systems' priority setting criteria for selecting health technologies: A systematic review of the current evidence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mobinizadeh, Mohammadreza; Raeissi, Pouran; Nasiripour, Amir Ashkan; Olyaeemanesh, Alireza; Tabibi, Seyed Jamaleddin

    2016-01-01

    Background: In the recent years, using health technologies to diagnose and treat diseases has had a considerable and accelerated growth. The proper use of these technologies may considerably help in the diagnosis and treatment of different diseases. On the other hand, unlimited and unrestricted entry of these technologies may result in induced demand by service providers. The aim of this study was to determine the appropriate criteria used in health technologies priority-setting models in the world. Methods: Using MESH and free text, we sought and retrieved the relevant articles from the most appropriate medical databases (the Cochrane Library, PubMed and Scopus) through three separate search strategies up to March 2015. The inclusion criteria were as follows: 1) Studies with specific criteria; 2) Articles written in English; 3) Those articles conducted in compliance with priority setting of health technologies. Data were analyzed qualitatively using a thematic synthesis technique. Results: After screening the retrieved papers via PRISMA framework, from the 7,012 papers, 40 studies were included in the final phase. Criteria for selecting health technologies (in pre assessment and in the assessment phase) were categorized into six main themes: 1) Health outcomes; 2) Disease and target population; 3) Technology alternatives; 4) Economic aspects; 5) Evidence; 6) and other factors. "Health effects/benefits" had the maximum frequency in health outcomes (8 studies); "disease severity" had the maximum frequency in disease and target population (12 studies); "the number of alternatives" had the maximum frequency in alternatives (2 studies); "cost-effectiveness" had the maximum frequency in economic aspects (15 studies); "quality of evidence" had the maximum frequency in evidence (4 studies); and "issues concerning the health system" had the maximum frequency in other factors (10 studies). Conclusion: The results revealed an increase in the number of studies on health

  8. Incidental moderate mitral regurgitation in patients undergoing aortic valve replacement for aortic stenosis: review of guidelines and current evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramakrishna, Harish; Kohl, Benjamin A; Jassar, Arminder S; Augoustides, John G T

    2014-04-01

    Recent evidence has shown that moderate mitral regurgitation is common and clinically relevant in patients presenting for surgical and transcatheter aortic valve replacement for aortic stenosis. Prospective multicenter clinical trials are now indicated to resolve the clinical equipoise about whether or not mitral valve intervention also is indicated at the time of aortic valve intervention. Advances in three-dimensional transesophageal echocardiography, transcatheter mitral interventions, and surgical aortic valve replacement, including the advent of sutureless valves, likely will expand the therapeutic possibilities for moderate mitral regurgitation in the setting of aortic valve interventions for severe aortic stenosis.

  9. Scandinavian links

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Matthiessen, Christian Wichmann; Knowles, Richard D.

    2014-01-01

    centres, one joins more thinly populated regions, and the last one links peripheral areas. Two of them (The Great Belt Link and the Oresund Link) have been constructed and are in full operation. The third (the Fehmarnbelt Link) has been decided 2008 on bilateral government level. The three links...

  10. Neuropathological review of 138 cases genetically tested for X-linked hydrocephalus: evidence for closely related clinical entities of unknown molecular bases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adle-Biassette, Homa; Saugier-Veber, Pascale; Fallet-Bianco, Catherine; Delezoide, Anne-Lise; Razavi, Férecheté; Drouot, Nathalie; Bazin, Anne; Beaufrère, Anne-Marie; Bessières, Bettina; Blesson, Sophie; Bucourt, Martine; Carles, Dominique; Devisme, Louise; Dijoud, Frédérique; Fabre, Blandine; Fernandez, Carla; Gaillard, Dominique; Gonzales, Marie; Jossic, Frédérique; Joubert, Madeleine; Laurent, Nicole; Leroy, Brigitte; Loeuillet, Laurence; Loget, Philippe; Marcorelles, Pascale; Martinovic, Jelena; Perez, Marie-José; Satge, Daniel; Sinico, Martine; Tosi, Mario; Benichou, Jacques; Gressens, Pierre; Frebourg, Thierry; Laquerrière, Annie

    2013-09-01

    L1 syndrome results from mutations in the L1CAM gene located at Xq28. It encompasses a wide spectrum of diseases, X-linked hydrocephalus being the most severe phenotype detected in utero, and whose pathophysiology is incompletely understood. The aim of this study was to report detailed neuropathological data from patients with mutations, to delineate the neuropathological criteria required for L1CAM gene screening in foetuses by characterizing the sensitivity, specificity and positive predictive value of the cardinal signs, and to discuss the main differential diagnoses in non-mutated foetuses in order to delineate closely related conditions without L1CAM mutations. Neuropathological data from 138 cases referred to our genetic laboratory for screening of the L1CAM gene were retrospectively reviewed. Fifty-seven cases had deleterious L1CAM mutations. Of these, 100 % had hydrocephalus, 88 % adducted thumbs, 98 % pyramidal tract agenesis/hypoplasia, 90 % stenosis of the aqueduct of Sylvius and 68 % agenesis/hypoplasia of the corpus callosum. Two foetuses had L1CAM mutations of unknown significance. Seventy-nine cases had no L1CAM mutations; these were subdivided into four groups: (1) hydrocephalus sometimes associated with corpus callosum agenesis (44 %); (2) atresia/forking of the aqueduct of Sylvius/rhombencephalosynapsis spectrum (27 %); (3) syndromic hydrocephalus (9 %), and (4) phenocopies with no mutations in the L1CAM gene (20 %) and in whom family history strongly suggested an autosomal recessive mode of transmission. These data underline the existence of closely related clinical entities whose