WorldWideScience

Sample records for current density electron

  1. Program Calculates Current Densities Of Electronic Designs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, Brian

    1996-01-01

    PDENSITY computer program calculates current densities for use in calculating power densities of electronic designs. Reads parts-list file for given design, file containing current required for each part, and file containing size of each part. For each part in design, program calculates current density in units of milliamperes per square inch. Written by use of AWK utility for Sun4-series computers running SunOS 4.x and IBM PC-series and compatible computers running MS-DOS. Sun version of program (NPO-19588). PC version of program (NPO-19171).

  2. High current density sheet-like electron beam generator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chow-Miller, Cora; Korevaar, Eric; Schuster, John

    Sheet electron beams are very desirable for coupling to the evanescent waves in small millimeter wave slow-wave circuits to achieve higher powers. In particular, they are critical for operation of the free-electron-laser-like Orotron. The program was a systematic effort to establish a solid technology base for such a sheet-like electron emitter system that will facilitate the detailed studies of beam propagation stability. Specifically, the effort involved the design and test of a novel electron gun using Lanthanum hexaboride (LaB6) as the thermionic cathode material. Three sets of experiments were performed to measure beam propagation as a function of collector current, beam voltage, and heating power. The design demonstrated its reliability by delivering 386.5 hours of operation throughout the weeks of experimentation. In addition, the cathode survived two venting and pump down cycles without being poisoned or losing its emission characteristics. A current density of 10.7 A/sq cm. was measured while operating at 50 W of ohmic heating power. Preliminary results indicate that the nearby presence of a metal plate can stabilize the beam.

  3. First test of BNL electron beam ion source with high current density electron beam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pikin, Alexander; Alessi, James G.; Beebe, Edward N.; Shornikov, Andrey; Mertzig, Robert; Wenander, Fredrik; Scrivens, Richard

    2015-01-01

    A new electron gun with electrostatic compression has been installed at the Electron Beam Ion Source (EBIS) Test Stand at BNL. This is a collaborative effort by BNL and CERN teams with a common goal to study an EBIS with electron beam current up to 10 A, current density up to 10,000 A/cm2 and energy more than 50 keV. Intensive and pure beams of heavy highly charged ions with mass-to-charge ratio heavy ion research facilities including NASA Space Radiation Laboratory (NSRL) at BNL and HIE-ISOLDE at CERN. With a multiampere electron gun, the EBIS should be capable of delivering highly charged ions for both RHIC facility applications at BNL and for ISOLDE experiments at CERN. Details of the electron gun simulations and design, and the Test EBIS electrostatic and magnetostatic structures with the new electron gun are presented. The experimental results of the electron beam transmission are given.

  4. First test of BNL electron beam ion source with high current density electron beam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pikin, Alexander, E-mail: pikin@bnl.gov; Alessi, James G., E-mail: pikin@bnl.gov; Beebe, Edward N., E-mail: pikin@bnl.gov [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973 (United States); Shornikov, Andrey; Mertzig, Robert; Wenander, Fredrik; Scrivens, Richard [CERN, CH-1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland)

    2015-01-09

    A new electron gun with electrostatic compression has been installed at the Electron Beam Ion Source (EBIS) Test Stand at BNL. This is a collaborative effort by BNL and CERN teams with a common goal to study an EBIS with electron beam current up to 10 A, current density up to 10,000 A/cm{sup 2} and energy more than 50 keV. Intensive and pure beams of heavy highly charged ions with mass-to-charge ratio < 4.5 are requested by many heavy ion research facilities including NASA Space Radiation Laboratory (NSRL) at BNL and HIE-ISOLDE at CERN. With a multiampere electron gun, the EBIS should be capable of delivering highly charged ions for both RHIC facility applications at BNL and for ISOLDE experiments at CERN. Details of the electron gun simulations and design, and the Test EBIS electrostatic and magnetostatic structures with the new electron gun are presented. The experimental results of the electron beam transmission are given.

  5. Effects of Electron Flow Current Density on Flow Impedance of Magnetically Insulated Transmission Lines

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HE Yong; ZOU Wen-Kang; SONG Sheng-Yi

    2011-01-01

    @@ In modern pulsed power systems, magnetically insulated transmission lines (MITLs) are used to couple power between the driver and the load.The circuit parameters of MITLs are well understood by employing the concept of Sow impedance derived from Maxwell's equations and pressure balance across the flow.However, the electron density in an MITL is always taken as constant in the application of flow impedance.Thus effects of electron flow current density (product of electron density and drift velocity) in an MITL are neglected.We calculate the flow impedances of an MITL and compare them under three classical MITL theories, in which the electron density profile and electron flow current density are different from each other.It is found that the assumption of constant electron density profile in the calculation of the Sow impedance is not always valid.The electron density profile and the electron flow current density have significant effects on flow impedance of the MITL.The details of the electron flow current density and its effects on the operation impedance of the MITL should be addressed more explicitly experiments and theories in the future.

  6. Fast electron current density profile and diffusion studies during LHCD in PBX-M

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, S.E.; Kesner, J.; Luckhardt, S.; Paoletti, F. [Massachusetts Inst. of Tech., Cambridge, MA (United States). Plasma Fusion Center; von Goeler, S.; Bernabei, S.; Kaita, R. [Princeton Univ., NJ (United States). Plasma Physics Lab.; Rimini, F. [JET Joint Undertaking, Abingdon (United Kingdom)

    1993-08-01

    Successful current profile control experiments using lower hybrid current drive (LCHD) clearly require knowledge of (1) the location of the driven fast electrons and (2) the ability to maintain that location from spreading due to radial diffusion. These issues can be addressed by examining the data from the hard x-ray camera on PBX-M, a unique diagnostic producing two-dimensional, time resolved tangential images of fast electron bremsstrahlung. Using modeling, these line-of-sight images are inverted to extract a radial fast electron current density profile. We note that ``hollow`` profiles have been observed, indicative of off-axis current drive. These profiles can then be used to calculate an upper bound for an effective fast electron diffusion constant: assuming an extremely radially narrow lower hybrid absorption profile and a transport model based on Rax and Moreau, a model fast electron current density profile is calculated and compared to the experimentally derived profile. The model diffusion constant is adjusted until a good match is found. Applied to steady-state quiescent modes on PBX-M, we obtain an upper limit for an effective diffusion constant of about D*=1.1 m{sup 2}/sec.

  7. Amplification of current density modulation in a FEL with an infinite electron beam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, G.; Litvinenko, V.N.; Webb, S.D.

    2011-03-28

    We show that the paraxial field equation for a free electron laser (FEL) in an infinitely wide electron beam with {kappa}-2 energy distribution can be reduced to a fourth ordinary differential equation (ODE). Its solution for arbitrary initial phase space density modulation has been derived in the wave-vector domain. For initial current modulation with Gaussian profile, close form solutions are obtained in space-time domain. In developing an analytical model for a FEL-based coherent electron cooling system, an infinite electron beam has been assumed for the modulation and correction processes. While the assumption has its limitation, it allows for an analytical close form solution to be obtained, which is essential for investigating the underlying scaling law, benchmarking the simulation codes and understanding the fundamental physics. 1D theory was previously applied to model a CeC FEL amplifier. However, the theory ignores diffraction effects and does not provide the transverse profile of the amplified electron density modulation. On the other hand, 3D theories developed for a finite electron beam usually have solutions expanded over infinite number of modes determined by the specific transverse boundary conditions. Unless the mode with the largest growth rate substantially dominates other modes, both evaluation and extracting scaling laws can be complicated. Furthermore, it is also preferable to have an analytical FEL model with assumptions consistent with the other two sections of a CeC system. Recently, we developed the FEL theory in an infinitely wide electron beam with {kappa}-1 (Lorentzian) energy distribution. Close form solutions have been obtained for the amplified current modulation initiated by an external electric field with various spatial-profiles. In this work, we extend the theory into {kappa}-2 energy distribution and study the evolution of current density induced by an initial density modulation.

  8. Structural transitions in electron beam deposited Co–carbonyl suspended nanowires at high electrical current densities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gian Carlo Gazzadi

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Suspended nanowires (SNWs have been deposited from Co–carbonyl precursor (Co2(CO8 by focused electron beam induced deposition (FEBID. The SNWs dimensions are about 30–50 nm in diameter and 600–850 nm in length. The as-deposited material has a nanogranular structure of mixed face-centered cubic (FCC and hexagonal close-packed (HCP Co phases, and a composition of 80 atom % Co, 15 atom % O and 5 atom % C, as revealed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM analysis and by energy-dispersive X-ray (EDX spectroscopy, respectively. Current (I–voltage (V measurements with current densities up to 107 A/cm2 determine different structural transitions in the SNWs, depending on the I–V history. A single measurement with a sudden current burst leads to a polycrystalline FCC Co structure extended over the whole wire. Repeated measurements at increasing currents produce wires with a split structure: one half is polycrystalline FCC Co and the other half is graphitized C. The breakdown current density is found at 2.1 × 107 A/cm2. The role played by resistive heating and electromigration in these transitions is discussed.

  9. Structural transitions in electron beam deposited Co-carbonyl suspended nanowires at high electrical current densities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gazzadi, Gian Carlo; Frabboni, Stefano

    2015-01-01

    Suspended nanowires (SNWs) have been deposited from Co-carbonyl precursor (Co2(CO)8) by focused electron beam induced deposition (FEBID). The SNWs dimensions are about 30-50 nm in diameter and 600-850 nm in length. The as-deposited material has a nanogranular structure of mixed face-centered cubic (FCC) and hexagonal close-packed (HCP) Co phases, and a composition of 80 atom % Co, 15 atom % O and 5 atom % C, as revealed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) analysis and by energy-dispersive X-ray (EDX) spectroscopy, respectively. Current (I)-voltage (V) measurements with current densities up to 10(7) A/cm(2) determine different structural transitions in the SNWs, depending on the I-V history. A single measurement with a sudden current burst leads to a polycrystalline FCC Co structure extended over the whole wire. Repeated measurements at increasing currents produce wires with a split structure: one half is polycrystalline FCC Co and the other half is graphitized C. The breakdown current density is found at 2.1 × 10(7) A/cm(2). The role played by resistive heating and electromigration in these transitions is discussed.

  10. Determination of Defect Densities in High Electron Mobility Transistors Using Current Transient DLTS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palma, John; Mil'shtein, Samson

    2011-12-01

    Since its introduction, Deep Level Transient Spectroscopy (DLTS) has become the preferred tool for investigating semiconductor defects. The limitations of measuring the small changes in gate capacitance in transistors led to the advent of current transient DLTS where the defects manifest themselves as a small change in drain current. However, this method was introduced at a time when heterostructure devices, such as High Electron Mobility Transistors (HEMTs), were non-existent and fails in determining defect concentrations in these modern devices. This study establishes a method by which defect concentrations can be determined in HEMT structures using current transient DLTS. First, the relationship between the change in the trap charge and the transistor drain current is established. Then, a computer aided technique is described which determines the volume within the device where the Fermi level crosses the trap energy. The result is that trap densities and their locations can be determined. DLTS measurements revealed two traps with ET = 0.43 and Nt = 1.1×1017cm-3, and ET = 0.19 and Nt = 3.1×1017 cm-3 for a tested HEMT.

  11. Current density distributions and sputter marks in electron cyclotron resonance ion sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panitzsch, Lauri; Peleikis, Thies; Böttcher, Stephan; Stalder, Michael; Wimmer-Schweingruber, Robert F

    2013-01-01

    Most electron cyclotron resonance ion sources use hexapolar magnetic fields for the radial confinement of the plasma. The geometry of this magnetic structure is then--induced by charged particles--mapped onto the inner side of the plasma electrode via sputtering and deposition. The resulting structures usually show two different patterns: a sharp triangular one in the central region which in some cases is even sputtered deep into the material (referred to as thin groove or sharp structure), and a blurred but still triangular-like one in the surroundings (referred to as broad halo). Therefore, both patterns seem to have different sources. To investigate their origins we replaced the standard plasma electrode by a custom-built plasma electrode acting as a planar, multi-segment current-detector. For different biased disc voltages, detector positions, and source biases (referred to the detector) we measured the electrical current density distributions in the plane of the plasma electrode. The results show a strong and sharply confined electron population with triangular shape surrounded by less intense and spatially less confined ions. Observed sputter- and deposition marks are related to the analysis of the results. Our measurements suggest that the two different patterns (thin and broad) indeed originate from different particle populations. The thin structures seem to be caused by the hot electron population while the broad marks seem to stem from the medium to highly charged ions. In this paper we present our measurements together with theoretical considerations and substantiate the conclusions drawn above. The validity of these results is also discussed.

  12. Spatial profiles of interelectrode electron density in direct current superposed dual-frequency capacitively coupled plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohya, Yoshinobu; Ishikawa, Kenji; Komuro, Tatsuya; Yamaguchi, Tsuyoshi; Takeda, Keigo; Kondo, Hiroki; Sekine, Makoto; Hori, Masaru

    2017-04-01

    We present experimentally determined spatial profiles of the interelectrode electron density (n e) in dual-frequency capacitively coupled plasmas in which the negative direct current (dc) bias voltage (V dc) is superposed; in the experiment, 13 MHz (P low) was applied to the lower electrode and 60 MHz (P high) to the upper electrode. The bulk n e increased substantially with increases in the external power, P high, P low, and with increases in V dc. When P low was insufficient, the bulk n e decreased as the V dc bias increased. The bulk n e increased due to its dependence on V dc, especially for |V dc|  >  500 V. This may correspond to the sheath voltages (V s) of the lower electrode. The n e values in front of the upper electrode were coupled with the V dc: the V dc dependence first decreased and then increased. The dc currents (I dc) of the upper electrode were collected when a large P low was applied. The value of I dc at the threshold value of V dc  ≈  V s (e.g.  ‑500 V) increased with an increase in n e. When |V dc| exceeded the threshold, the spatial n e profile and the I dc dependence were changed relative to the electrical characteristics of the dc superposition; this led to a change in the location of the maximum n e, the width of the area of n e depletion in front of the electrodes, and a transition in the electron heating modes.

  13. The study of dynamics of electrons in the presence of large current densities; Etude de la dynamique des electrons en presence de fortes densites de courant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia, G

    2007-11-15

    The runaway electron effect is considered in different fields: nuclear fusion, or the heating of the solar corona. In this thesis, we are interested in runaway electrons in the ionosphere. We consider the issue of electrons moving through an ionospheric gas of positive ions and neutrals under the influence of a parallel electric field. We develop a kinetic model of collisions including electrons/electrons, electrons/ions and electrons/neutrals collisions. We use a Fokker-Planck approach to describe binary collisions between charged particles with a long-range interaction. A computational example is given illustrating the approach to equilibrium and the impact of the different terms. Then, a static electric field is applied in a new sample run. In this run, the electrons move in the z direction, parallel to the electric field. The first results show that all the electron distribution functions are non-Maxwellian. Furthermore, runaway electrons can carry a significant part of the total current density up to 20% of the total current density. Nevertheless, we note that the divergence free of the current density is not conserved. We introduce major changes in order to take into account the variation of the different moments of the ion distribution functions. We observe that the electron distribution functions are still non-Maxwellian. Runaway electrons are created and carry the current density. The core distribution stay at rest. As these electrons undergo less collisions, they increase the plasma conductivity. We make a parametric study. We fit the electron distribution function by two Maxwellian. We show that the time to reach the maximal current density is a key point. Thus, when we increase this time, we modify the temperatures. The current density plays a primary role. When the current density increases, all the moments of the distributions increase: electron density and mean velocity of the suprathermal distribution and the electron temperature of the core and

  14. Charge and current density profiles of a degenerate magnetized free-electron gas near a hard wall

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.M. Kettenis; L.G. Suttorp

    1998-01-01

    The charge and current densities of a completely degenerate free-electron gas in a uniform magnetic field are found to have a damped oscillatory spatial dependence near a wall that is parallel to the magnetic field. For large distances from the wall the behaviour of the associated profile functions

  15. Influence of the initial parameters of the magnetic field and plasma on the spatial structure of the electric current and electron density in current sheets formed in helium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ostrovskaya, G. V., E-mail: galya-ostr@mail.ru [Russian Academy of Sciences, Ioffe Physical Technical Institute (Russian Federation); Markov, V. S.; Frank, A. G., E-mail: annfrank@fpl.gpi.ru [Russian Academy of Sciences, Prokhorov General Physics Institute (Russian Federation)

    2016-01-15

    The influence of the initial parameters of the magnetic field and plasma on the spatial structure of the electric current and electron density in current sheets formed in helium plasma in 2D and 3D magnetic configurations with X-type singular lines is studied by the methods of holographic interferometry and magnetic measurements. Significant differences in the structures of plasma and current sheets formed at close parameters of the initial plasma and similar configurations of the initial magnetic fields are revealed.

  16. Linear Theory Analysis of Self-Amplified Parametric X-ray Radiation from High Current Density Electron Bunches

    CERN Document Server

    Lobach, Ihar; Feranchuk, Ilya

    2015-01-01

    Linear theory of the parametric beam instability or the self-amplification of parametric x-ray radiation (PXR) from relativistic electrons in a crystal is considered taking into account finite emittance of the electron beam and absorption of the radiation. It is shown that these factors change essentially the estimation of threshold parameters of the electron bunches for the coherent X-ray generation. The boundary conditions for the linear theory of the effect is analyzed in details and it is shown that the grazing incidence diffraction geometry is optimal for the growth of instability. Numerical estimations of amplification and coherent photon yield in dependence on the electron current density are presented for the case of mm-thickness Si crystal and 100 MeV electrons. Possible improvements of the experimental scheme for optimization of the coherent radiation intensity are discussed.

  17. Determination of the ReA Electron Beam Ion Trap electron beam radius and current density with an X-ray pinhole camera

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baumann, Thomas M., E-mail: baumannt@nscl.msu.edu; Lapierre, Alain, E-mail: lapierre@nscl.msu.edu; Kittimanapun, Kritsada; Schwarz, Stefan; Leitner, Daniela; Bollen, Georg [National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory (NSCL), Michigan State University (MSU), 640 S. Shaw Lane, East Lansing, Michigan, 48824 (United States)

    2014-07-15

    The Electron Beam Ion Trap (EBIT) of the National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory at Michigan State University is used as a charge booster and injector for the currently commissioned rare isotope re-accelerator facility ReA. This EBIT charge breeder is equipped with a unique superconducting magnet configuration, a combination of a solenoid and a pair of Helmholtz coils, allowing for a direct observation of the ion cloud while maintaining the advantages of a long ion trapping region. The current density of its electron beam is a key factor for efficient capture and fast charge breeding of continuously injected, short-lived isotope beams. It depends on the radius of the magnetically compressed electron beam. This radius is measured by imaging the highly charged ion cloud trapped within the electron beam with a pinhole camera, which is sensitive to X-rays emitted by the ions with photon energies between 2 keV and 10 keV. The 80%-radius of a cylindrical 800 mA electron beam with an energy of 15 keV is determined to be r{sub 80%}=(212±19)μm in a 4 T magnetic field. From this, a current density of j = (454 ± 83)A/cm{sup 2} is derived. These results are in good agreement with electron beam trajectory simulations performed with TriComp and serve as a test for future electron gun design developments.

  18. High-current-density, high brightness cathodes for free electron laser applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Green, M.C. (Varian Associates, Palo Alto, CA (USA). Palo Alto Microwave Tube Div.)

    1987-06-01

    This report discusses the following topics: brightness and emittance of electron beams and cathodes; general requirements for cathodes in high brightness electron guns; candidate cathode types; plasma and field emission cathodes; true field emission cathodes; oxide cathodes; lanthanum hexaborides cathodes; laser driven thermionic cathodes; laser driven photocathodes; impregnated porous tungsten dispenser cathodes; and choice of best performing cathode types.

  19. Comparison of SAR and induced current densities in adults and children exposed to electromagnetic fields from electronic article surveillance devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Búrdalo, M.; Sanchis, A.; Martín, A.; Villar, R.

    2010-02-01

    Electronic article surveillance (EAS) devices are widely used in most stores as anti-theft systems. In this work, the compliance with international guidelines in the human exposure to these devices is analysed by using the finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) method. Two sets of high resolution numerical phantoms of different size (REMCOM/Hershey and Virtual Family), simulating adult and child bodies, are exposed to a 10 MHz pass-by panel-type EAS consisting of two overlapping current-carrying coils. Two different relative positions between the EAS and the body (frontal and lateral exposures), which imply the exposure of different parts of the body at different distances, have been considered. In all cases, induced current densities in tissues of the central nervous system and specific absorption rates (SARs) are calculated to be compared with the limits from the guidelines. Results show that induced current densities are lower in the case of adult models as compared with those of children in both lateral and frontal exposures. Maximum SAR values calculated in lateral exposure are significantly lower than those calculated in frontal exposure, where the EAS-body distance is shorter. Nevertheless, in all studied cases, with an EAS driving current of 4 A rms, maximum induced current and SAR values are below basic restrictions.

  20. AVERAGE GEOMETRICAL FEATURES OF THE ELECTRON WAVE PACKAGES DISTRIBUTION IN METALLIC CONDUCTORS WITH PULSED AXIAL CURRENT OF HIGH DENSITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. I. Baranov

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. Calculation and experimental determination of average geometrical features of distributing of macroscopic electron wave packages (EWP in round cylindrical metallic conductors with the pulsed axial current of high density. Methodology. Theoretical bases of the electrical engineering, bases of atomic and quantum physics, electrophysics bases of technique of high voltage and high pulsed currents. Results. The results of the conducted calculation and experimental researches are resulted on close determination of average geometrical features of distribution of longitudinal and radial EWP of macroscopic sizes in the indicated conductors. These descriptions are included by the average widths of «hot» and «cold» longitudinal and radial areas of conductor, and also average steps of division into the periods of similar areas. Results of the executed calculations and high temperature experiments for average geometrical features of longitudinal EWP in the zincked steel wire of diameter of 1.6 mm and length of 320 mm with the aperiodic impulse of current of temporal form 9 ms/160 ms and by amplitude 745 A coincide within the limits of 19 %. Originality. First with the use of methods of atomic and quantum physics the features of the stochastic distributing and mean values of basic geometrical sizes are analysed macroscopic longitudinal and radial EWP in round cylindrical metallic conductors with the pulsed axial current of high density. Practical value. Drawing on the got results in practice will allow more reliably to forecast geometrical sizes and places of localization of arising up in the probed metallic conductors with pulsed axial current of high density longitudinal and radial EWP.

  1. Initial measurements of plasma current and electron density profiles using a polarimeter/interferometer (POINT) for long pulse operation in EAST (invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, H. Q.; Qian, J. P.; Jie, Y. X.; Ding, W. X.; Brower, D. L.; Zou, Z. Y.; Li, W. M.; Lian, H.; Wang, S. X.; Yang, Y.; Zeng, L.; Lan, T.; Yao, Y.; Hu, L. Q.; Zhang, X. D.; Wan, B. N.

    2016-11-01

    A double-pass, radially viewing, far-infrared laser-based POlarimeter-INTerferometer (POINT) system utilizing the three-wave technique has been implemented for diagnosing the plasma current and electron density profiles in the Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak (EAST). POINT has been operated routinely during the most recent experimental campaign and provides continuous 11 chord line-integrated Faraday effect and density measurement throughout the entire plasma discharge for all heating schemes and all plasma conditions (including ITER relevant scenario development). Reliability of both the polarimetric and interferometric measurements is demonstrated in 25 s plasmas with H-mode and 102 s long-pulse discharges. Current density, safety factor (q), and electron density profiles are reconstructed using equilibrium fitting code (EFIT) with POINT constraints for the plasma core.

  2. Electron density and currents of AlN/GaN high electron mobility transistors with thin GaN/AlN buffer layer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bairamis, A.; Zervos, Ch.; Georgakilas, A., E-mail: alexandr@physics.uoc.gr [Microelectronics Research Group, IESL, Foundation for Research and Technology-Hellas (FORTH), P.O. Box 1385, GR-71110 Heraklion, Crete (Greece); Department of Physics, University of Crete, P.O. Box 2208, GR-71003 Heraklion, Crete (Greece); Adikimenakis, A.; Kostopoulos, A.; Kayambaki, M.; Tsagaraki, K.; Konstantinidis, G. [Microelectronics Research Group, IESL, Foundation for Research and Technology-Hellas (FORTH), P.O. Box 1385, GR-71110 Heraklion, Crete (Greece)

    2014-09-15

    AlN/GaN high electron mobility transistor (HEMT) structures with thin GaN/AlN buffer layer have been analyzed theoretically and experimentally, and the effects of the AlN barrier and GaN buffer layer thicknesses on two-dimensional electron gas (2DEG) density and transport properties have been evaluated. HEMT structures consisting of [300 nm GaN/ 200 nm AlN] buffer layer on sapphire were grown by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy and exhibited a remarkable agreement with the theoretical calculations, suggesting a negligible influence of the crystalline defects that increase near the heteroepitaxial interface. The 2DEG density varied from 6.8 × 10{sup 12} to 2.1 × 10{sup 13} cm{sup −2} as the AlN barrier thickness increased from 2.2 to 4.5 nm, while a 4.5 nm AlN barrier would result to 3.1 × 10{sup 13} cm{sup −2} on a GaN buffer layer. The 3.0 nm AlN barrier structure exhibited the highest 2DEG mobility of 900 cm{sup 2}/Vs for a density of 1.3 × 10{sup 13} cm{sup −2}. The results were also confirmed by the performance of 1 μm gate-length transistors. The scaling of AlN barrier thickness from 1.5 nm to 4.5 nm could modify the drain-source saturation current, for zero gate-source voltage, from zero (normally off condition) to 0.63 A/mm. The maximum drain-source current was 1.1 A/mm for AlN barrier thickness of 3.0 nm and 3.7 nm, and the maximum extrinsic transconductance was 320 mS/mm for 3.0 nm AlN barrier.

  3. Immobilization of bilirubin oxidase on graphene oxide flakes with different negative charge density for oxygen reduction. The effect of GO charge density on enzyme coverage, electron transfer rate and current density.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filip, Jaroslav; Andicsová-Eckstein, Anita; Vikartovská, Alica; Tkac, Jan

    2017-03-15

    Previously we showed that an effective bilirubin oxidase (BOD)-based biocathode using graphene oxide (GO) could be prepared in 2 steps: 1. electrostatic adsorption of BOD on GO; 2. electrochemical reduction of the BOD-GO composite to form a BOD-ErGO (electrochemically reduced GO) film on the electrode. In order to identify an optimal charge density of GO for BOD-ErGO composite preparation, several GO fractions differing in an average flake size and ζ-potential were prepared using centrifugation and consequently employed for BOD-ErGO biocathode preparation. A simple way to express surface charge density of these particular GO nanosheets was developed. The values obtained were then correlated with biocatalytic and electrochemical parameters of the prepared biocathodes, i.e. electrocatalytically active BOD surface coverage (Γ), heterogeneous electron transfer rate (kS) and a maximum biocatalytic current density. The highest bioelectrocatalytic current density of (597±25)μAcm(-2) and the highest Γ of (23.6±0.9)pmolcm(-2) were obtained on BOD-GO composite having the same moderate negative charge density, but the highest kS of (79.4±4.6)s(-1) was observed on BOD-GO composite having different negative charge density. This study is a solid foundation for others to consider the influence of a charge density of GO on direct bioelectrochemistry/bioelectrocatalysis of other redox enzymes applicable for construction of biosensors, bioanodes, biocathodes or biofuel cells. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Minimax Current Density Coil Design

    CERN Document Server

    Poole, Michael; Lopez, Hector Sanchez; Ng, Michael; Crozier, Stuart; 10.1088/0022-3727/43/9/095001

    2010-01-01

    'Coil design' is an inverse problem in which arrangements of wire are designed to generate a prescribed magnetic field when energized with electric current. The design of gradient and shim coils for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are important examples of coil design. The magnetic fields that these coils generate are usually required to be both strong and accurate. Other electromagnetic properties of the coils, such as inductance, may be considered in the design process, which becomes an optimization problem. The maximum current density is additionally optimized in this work and the resultant coils are investigated for performance and practicality. Coils with minimax current density were found to exhibit maximally spread wires and may help disperse localized regions of Joule heating. They also produce the highest possible magnetic field strength per unit current for any given surface and wire size. Three different flavours of boundary element method that employ different basis functions (triangular elements...

  5. Kernel current source density method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potworowski, Jan; Jakuczun, Wit; Lȩski, Szymon; Wójcik, Daniel

    2012-02-01

    Local field potentials (LFP), the low-frequency part of extracellular electrical recordings, are a measure of the neural activity reflecting dendritic processing of synaptic inputs to neuronal populations. To localize synaptic dynamics, it is convenient, whenever possible, to estimate the density of transmembrane current sources (CSD) generating the LFP. In this work, we propose a new framework, the kernel current source density method (kCSD), for nonparametric estimation of CSD from LFP recorded from arbitrarily distributed electrodes using kernel methods. We test specific implementations of this framework on model data measured with one-, two-, and three-dimensional multielectrode setups. We compare these methods with the traditional approach through numerical approximation of the Laplacian and with the recently developed inverse current source density methods (iCSD). We show that iCSD is a special case of kCSD. The proposed method opens up new experimental possibilities for CSD analysis from existing or new recordings on arbitrarily distributed electrodes (not necessarily on a grid), which can be obtained in extracellular recordings of single unit activity with multiple electrodes.

  6. High current density and longtime stable field electron transfer from large-area densely arrayed graphene nanosheet-carbon nanotube hybrids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Jian-Hua; Cheng, Lin; Wang, Fan-Jie; Li, Guo-Zheng; Li, De-Jun; Cheng, Guo-An

    2014-12-10

    Achieving high current and longtime stable field emission from large area (larger than 1 mm(2)), densely arrayed emitters is of great importance in applications for vacuum electron sources. We report here the preparation of graphene nanosheet-carbon nanotube (GNS-CNT) hybrids by following a process of iron ion prebombardment on Si wafers, catalyst-free growth of GNSs on CNTs, and high-temperature annealing. Structural observations indicate that the iron ion prebombardment influences the growth of CNTs quite limitedly, and the self-assembled GNSs sparsely distributed on the tips of CNTs with their sharp edges unfolded outside. The field emission study indicates that the maximum emission current density (Jmax) is gradually promoted after these treatments, and the composition with GNSs is helpful for decreasing the operation fields of CNTs. An optimal Jmax up to 85.10 mA/cm(2) is achieved from a 4.65 mm(2) GNS-CNT sample, far larger than 7.41 mA/cm(2) for the as-grown CNTs. This great increase of Jmax is ascribed to the reinforced adhesion of GNS-CNT hybrids to substrates. We propose a rough calculation and find that this adhesion is promoted by 7.37 times after the three-step processing. We consider that both the ion prebombardment produced rough surface and the wrapping of CNT foot by catalyst residuals during thermal processing are responsible for this enhanced adhesion. Furthermore, the three-step prepared GNS-CNT hybrids present excellent field emission stability at high emission current densities (larger than 20 mA/cm(2)) after being perfectly aged.

  7. Current Developments in Nuclear Density Functional Methods

    CERN Document Server

    Dobaczewski, J

    2010-01-01

    Density functional theory (DFT) became a universal approach to compute ground-state and excited configurations of many-electron systems held together by an external one-body potential in condensed-matter, atomic, and molecular physics. At present, the DFT strategy is also intensely studied and applied in the area of nuclear structure. The nuclear DFT, a natural extension of the self-consistent mean-field theory, is a tool of choice for computations of ground-state properties and low-lying excitations of medium-mass and heavy nuclei. Over the past thirty-odd years, a lot of experience was accumulated in implementing, adjusting, and using the density-functional methods in nuclei. This research direction is still extremely actively pursued. In particular, current developments concentrate on (i) attempts to improve the performance and precision delivered by the nuclear density-functional methods, (ii) derivations of density functionals from first principles rooted in the low-energy chromodynamics and effective th...

  8. Enhancing critical current density of cuprate superconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaudhari, Praveen

    2015-06-16

    The present invention concerns the enhancement of critical current densities in cuprate superconductors. Such enhancement of critical current densities include using wave function symmetry and restricting movement of Abrikosov (A) vortices, Josephson (J) vortices, or Abrikosov-Josephson (A-J) vortices by using the half integer vortices associated with d-wave symmetry present in the grain boundary.

  9. Electronic Flux Density beyond the Born-Oppenheimer Approximation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schild, Axel; Agostini, Federica; Gross, E K U

    2016-05-19

    In the Born-Oppenheimer approximation, the electronic wave function is typically real-valued and hence the electronic flux density (current density) seems to vanish. This is unfortunate for chemistry, because it precludes the possibility to monitor the electronic motion associated with the nuclear motion during chemical rearrangements from a Born-Oppenheimer simulation of the process. We study an electronic flux density obtained from a correction to the electronic wave function. This correction is derived via nuclear velocity perturbation theory applied in the framework of the exact factorization of electrons and nuclei. To compute the correction, only the ground state potential energy surface and the electronic wave function are needed. For a model system, we demonstrate that this electronic flux density approximates the true one very well, for coherent tunneling dynamics as well as for over-the-barrier scattering, and already for mass ratios between electrons and nuclei that are much larger than the true mass ratios.

  10. Effect of current density on the morphology of Zn electrodeposits

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ailing Fan; Wenhuai Tian; M. Kurosaki

    2004-01-01

    The effect of current density on the morphology of Zn electrodeposits prepared by a flow-channel cell was investigated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). It was found that the morphology of Zn electrodeposits evolves from thin-layered hexagonal η-phase crystals to pyramidal η-phase particles with increasing the current density. The morphological evolution at various flow rates was also examined and the results show that the morphological evolution at a lower flow rate is more remarkable than that at a higher flow rate with increasing the current density. To reveal the mechanism of the morphological evolution in detail, the atomic configuration on both (0001)η and { 1100 }η planes under different current densities was investigated, it was noted that a specify current density could provide a good condition for the layered epitaxial growth of hexagonal η-phase.

  11. Critical current densities in superconducting materials

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    P Chaddah

    2003-02-01

    We discuss recent research in the area of critical current densities $(J_C)$ in superconductors. This shall cover recent work on newly discovered superconductors, as well as on the magnetic-field dependence of $J_C$.

  12. Burnout current density of bismuth nanowires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornelius, T. W.; Picht, O.; Müller, S.; Neumann, R.; Völklein, F.; Karim, S.; Duan, J. L.

    2008-05-01

    Single bismuth nanowires with diameters ranging from 100nmto1μm were electrochemically deposited in ion track-etched single-pore polycarbonate membranes. The maximum current density the wires are able to carry was investigated by ramping up the current until failure occurred. It increases by three to four orders of magnitude for nanowires embedded in the template compared to bulk bismuth and rises with diminishing diameter. Simulations show that the wires are heated up electrically to the melting temperature. Since the surface-to-volume ratio rises with diminishing diameter, thinner wires dissipate the heat more efficiently to the surrounding polymer matrix and, thus, can tolerate larger current densities.

  13. The mapping of electronic energy distributions using experimental electron density.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsirelson, Vladimir G

    2002-08-01

    It is demonstrated that the approximate kinetic energy density calculated using the second-order gradient expansion with parameters of the multipole model fitted to experimental structure factors reproduces the main features of this quantity in a molecular or crystal position space. The use of the local virial theorem provides an appropriate derivation of approximate potential energy density and electronic energy density from the experimental (model) electron density and its derivatives. Consideration of these functions is not restricted by the critical points in the electron density and provides a comprehensive characterization of bonding in molecules and crystals.

  14. Current-driven electron drift solitons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahmad, Ali, E-mail: aliahmad79@hotmail.com [National Centre for Physics (NCP), Shahdara Valley Road, 44000 Islamabad (Pakistan); Department of Physics, COMSATS Institute of Information Technology (CIIT) Islamabad (Pakistan); Saleem, H. [National Centre for Physics (NCP), Shahdara Valley Road, 44000 Islamabad (Pakistan); Department of Physics, COMSATS Institute of Information Technology (CIIT) Islamabad (Pakistan)

    2013-12-09

    The soliton formation by the current-driven drift-like wave is investigated for heavier ion (such as barium) plasma experiments planned to be performed in future. It is pointed out that the sheared flow of electrons can give rise to short scale solitary structures in the presence of stationary heavier ions. The nonlinearity appears due to convective term in the parallel equation of motion and not because of temperature gradient unlike the case of low frequency usual drift wave soliton. This higher frequency drift-like wave requires sheared flow of electrons and not the density gradient to exist.

  15. Surface current density K: an introduction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McAllister, Iain Wilson

    1991-01-01

    The author discusses the vector surface of current density K used in electrical insulation studies. K is related to the vector tangential electric field Kt at the surface of a body by the vector equation K=ΓE t where Γ represents the surface conductivity. The author derives a surface continuity...... equation that represents the boundary condition which the potential distributions in the adjoining media must fulfill. The volume current may be small in comparison to the surface current, and consequently in deriving the potential solutions the first term in this equation can sometimes be neglected....

  16. History and modern applications of nano-composite materials carrying GA/cm2 current density due to a Bose-Einstein Condensate at room temperature produced by Focused Electron Beam Induced Processing for many extraordinary novel technical applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koops, Hans W. P.

    2015-12-01

    The discovery of Focused Electron Beam Induced Processing and early applications of this technology led to the possible use of a novel nanogranular material “Koops-GranMat®” using Pt/C and Au/C material. which carries at room temperature a current density > 50 times the current density which high TC superconductors can carry. The explanation for the characteristics of this novel material is given. This fact allows producing novel products for many applications using Dual Beam system having a gas supply and X.Y.T stream data programming and not using GDSII layout pattern control software. Novel products are possible for energy transportation. -distribution.-switching, photon-detection above 65 meV energy for very efficient energy harvesting, for bright field emission electron sources used for vacuum electronic devices like amplifiers for HF electronics, micro-tubes, 30 GHz to 6 THz switching amplifiers with signal to noise ratio >10(!), THz power sources up to 1 Watt, in combination with miniaturized vacuum pumps, vacuum gauges, IR to THz detectors, EUV- and X-Ray sources. Since focusing electron beam induced deposition works also at low energy, selfcloning multibeam-production machines for field emitter lamps, displays, multi-beam - lithography, - imaging, and - inspection, energy harvesting, and power distribution with switches controlling field-emitter arrays for KA of currents but with < 100 V switching voltage are possible. Finally the replacement of HTC superconductors and its applications by the Koops-GranMat® having Koops-Pairs at room temperature will allow the investigation devices similar to Josephson Junctions and its applications now called QUIDART (Quantum interference devices at Room Temperature). All these possibilities will support a revolution in the optical, electric, power, and electronic technology.

  17. High dislocation density of tin induced by electric current

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liao, Yi-Han; Liang, Chien-Lung; Lin, Kwang-Lung, E-mail: matkllin@mail.ncku.edu.tw [Department of Material Science and Engineering, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan 70101, Taiwan, R. O. C (China); Wu, Albert T. [Department of Chemical and Material Engineering, National Central University, Jhongli 32001, Taiwan, R. O. C (China)

    2015-12-15

    A dislocation density of as high as 10{sup 17} /m{sup 2} in a tin strip, as revealed by high resolution transmission electron microscope, was induced by current stressing at 6.5 x 10{sup 3} A/ cm{sup 2}. The dislocations exist in terms of dislocation line, dislocation loop, and dislocation aggregates. Electron Backscattered Diffraction images reflect that the high dislocation density induced the formation of low deflection angle subgrains, high deflection angle Widmanstätten grains, and recrystallization. The recrystallization gave rise to grain refining.

  18. Rf Gun with High-Current Density Field Emission Cathode

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jay L. Hirshfield

    2005-12-19

    High current-density field emission from an array of carbon nanotubes, with field-emission-transistor control, and with secondary electron channel multiplication in a ceramic facing structure, have been combined in a cold cathode for rf guns and diode guns. Electrodynamic and space-charge flow simulations were conducted to specify the cathode configuration and range of emission current density from the field emission cold cathode. Design of this cathode has been made for installation and testing in an existing S-band 2-1/2 cell rf gun. With emission control and modulation, and with current density in the range of 0.1-1 kA/cm2, this cathode could provide performance and long-life not enjoyed by other currently-available cathodes

  19. Theoretical Study of Lithium Ionic Conductors by Electronic Stress Tensor Density and Electronic Kinetic Energy Density

    CERN Document Server

    Nozaki, Hiroo; Ichikawa, Kazuhide; Watanabe, Taku; Aihara, Yuichi; Tachibana, Akitomo

    2016-01-01

    We analyze the electronic structure of lithium ionic conductors, ${\\rm Li_3PO_4}$ and ${\\rm Li_3PS_4}$, using the electronic stress tensor density and kinetic energy density with special focus on the ionic bonds among them. We find that, as long as we examine the pattern of the eigenvalues of the electronic stress tensor density, we cannot distinguish between the ionic bonds and bonds among metalloid atoms. We then show that they can be distinguished by looking at the morphology of the electronic interface, the zero surface of the electronic kinetic energy density.

  20. Current drive at plasma densities required for thermonuclear reactors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cesario, R; Amicucci, L; Cardinali, A; Castaldo, C; Marinucci, M; Panaccione, L; Santini, F; Tudisco, O; Apicella, M L; Calabrò, G; Cianfarani, C; Frigione, D; Galli, A; Mazzitelli, G; Mazzotta, C; Pericoli, V; Schettini, G; Tuccillo, A A

    2010-08-10

    Progress in thermonuclear fusion energy research based on deuterium plasmas magnetically confined in toroidal tokamak devices requires the development of efficient current drive methods. Previous experiments have shown that plasma current can be driven effectively by externally launched radio frequency power coupled to lower hybrid plasma waves. However, at the high plasma densities required for fusion power plants, the coupled radio frequency power does not penetrate into the plasma core, possibly because of strong wave interactions with the plasma edge. Here we show experiments performed on FTU (Frascati Tokamak Upgrade) based on theoretical predictions that nonlinear interactions diminish when the peripheral plasma electron temperature is high, allowing significant wave penetration at high density. The results show that the coupled radio frequency power can penetrate into high-density plasmas due to weaker plasma edge effects, thus extending the effective range of lower hybrid current drive towards the domain relevant for fusion reactors.

  1. Does spacecraft potential depend on the ambient electron density?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, S. T.; Martinez-Sanchez, M.; Cahoy, K.; Thomsen, M. F.; Shprits, Y.; Lohmeyer, W. Q.; Wong, F.

    2014-12-01

    In a Maxwellian space plasma model, the onset of spacecraft charging at geosynchronous altitudes is due to the ambient electron, ambient ions, and secondary electrons. By using current balance, one can show that the onset of spacecraft charging depends not on the ambient electron density but instead on the critical temperature of the ambient electrons. If the ambient plasma deviates significantly from equilibrium, a non-Maxwellian electron distribution results. For a kappa distribution, the onset of spacecraft charging remains independent of ambient electron density. However, for double Maxwellian distributions, the densities do have a role in the onset of spacecraft charging. For a dielectric spacecraft in sunlight, the trapping of photoelectrons on the sunlit side enhances the local electron density. Using the coordinated environmental satellite data from the Los Alamos National Laboratory geosynchronous satellites, we have obtained results that confirm that the observed spacecraft potential is independent of the ambient electron density during eclipse and that in sunlight charging the low-energy population around the sunlit side of the spacecraft is enhanced by photoelectrons trapped inside the potential barrier.

  2. Comparison of current density profiles based on particle orbit-driven current in steady-state plasma on QUEST

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alam, Md Mahbub, E-mail: m.alam@triam.kyushu-u.ac.jp [IGSES, Kyushu University, 6-1 Kasuga-koen, Kasuga, Fukuoka 816-8580 (Japan); Nakamura, Kazuo [RIAM, Kyushu University, 6-1 Kasuga-koen, Kasuga, Fukuoka 816-8580 (Japan); Xia, Fan [CFS, SWIP, P.O. Box 432, 610041 Chengdu (China); Mitarai, Osamu [Tokai University, Kumamoto 862-8652 (Japan); Hasegawa, Makoto; Tokunaga, Kazutoshi; Araki, Kuniaki; Zushi, Hideki; Hanada, Kazuaki; Fujisawa, Akihide; Idei, Hiroshi; Nagashima, Yoshihiko; Kawasaki, Shoji; Nakashima, Hisatoshi; Higashijima, Aki; Nagata, Takahiro [RIAM, Kyushu University, 6-1 Kasuga-koen, Kasuga, Fukuoka 816-8580 (Japan)

    2016-11-01

    Highlights: • Electron cyclotron resonance heating (ECRH) of QUEST. • Particle guiding center orbit calculation. • Orbit-driven current density profile. • Hollow current density. • Equilibrium condition for steady-state operation of QUEST. - Abstract: In the present RF-driven divertor plasma of QUEST, it has been observed that orbit-driven current flows in the open magnetic surfaces outside of the closed magnetic surfaces. To observe this phenomenon and the characteristics of the orbit-driven current, current density profiles have been calculated on two different equilibrium conditions. We calculated current density profiles from particle guiding center orbits both for the fundamental and the second harmonic resonances for the 8.2 GHz electron cyclotron current drive. From this calculation, hollow current density profiles have been obtained with significant characteristics on both conditions. Only positive current distribution has been observed in the open magnetic surfaces outside of the closed magnetic surfaces.

  3. Development of high current electron beam generator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Byeong Cheol; Lee, Jong Min; Kim, Sun Kook [and others

    1997-05-01

    A high-current electron beam generator has been developed. The energy and the average current of the electron beam are 2 MeV and 50 mA, respectively. The electron beam generator is composed of an electron gun, RF acceleration cavities, a 260-kW RF generator, electron beam optics components, and control system, etc. The electron beam generator will be used for the development of a millimeter-wave free-electron laser and a high average power infrared free-electron laser. The machine will also be used as a user facility in nuclear industry, environment industry, semiconductor industry, chemical industry, etc. (author). 15 tabs., 85 figs.

  4. A Scanning Electron Microscope Study of the Effects of Anode Velocity and Current Density on the Corrosion of Ship Hull Zinc in Synthetic Seawater

    Science.gov (United States)

    1976-06-01

    electrolytic (conductive) solution such as seawater constitutes the ex- istence of a galvanic cell . Here current can flow from one metal to the other via the...particular ar- rangement is the basic mechanism inherent to all cathodic protection concepts. Given two dissimilar metals in a galvanic cell , and bar- ring...whatever the situation, the material needing protection must inevitably be made the cathodic electrode when a galvanic cell exists and thus it must be

  5. Density matrix theory for reductive electron transfer in DNA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kleinekathoefer, Ulrich [Institut fuer Physik, Technische Universitaet Chemnitz, 09107 Chemnitz (Germany)]. E-mail: kleinekathoefer@physik.tu-chemnitz.de; Li Guangqi [Institut fuer Physik, Technische Universitaet Chemnitz, 09107 Chemnitz (Germany); Schreiber, Michael [Institut fuer Physik, Technische Universitaet Chemnitz, 09107 Chemnitz (Germany)

    2006-07-15

    Reductive electron transfer in DNA is investigated using the reduced density matrix formalism. For reductive electron transfer in DNA an electron donor is attached to the DNA. The photo-excitation of this donor by ultrashort laser pulses is described explicitly in the current investigation, as well as the transfer of the electron from the donor to the acceptor. In addition, the effect of an additional bridge molecule is studied. All these studies are performed using three different quantum master equations: a Markovian one and two non-Markovian ones derived from either a time-local or a time-nonlocal formalism. The deviations caused by these three different approaches are discussed.

  6. Teaching Chemistry with Electron Density Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shusterman, Gwendolyn P.; Shusterman, Alan J.

    1997-07-01

    Linus Pauling once said that a topic must satisfy two criteria before it can be taught to students. First, students must be able to assimilate the topic within a reasonable amount of time. Second, the topic must be relevant to the educational needs and interests of the students. Unfortunately, the standard general chemistry textbook presentation of "electronic structure theory", set as it is in the language of molecular orbitals, has a difficult time satisfying either criterion. Many of the quantum mechanical aspects of molecular orbitals are too difficult for most beginning students to appreciate, much less master, and the few applications that are presented in the typical textbook are too limited in scope to excite much student interest. This article describes a powerful new method for teaching students about electronic structure and its relevance to chemical phenomena. This method, which we have developed and used for several years in general chemistry (G.P.S.) and organic chemistry (A.J.S.) courses, relies on computer-generated three-dimensional models of electron density distributions, and largely satisfies Pauling's two criteria. Students find electron density models easy to understand and use, and because these models are easily applied to a broad range of topics, they successfully convey to students the importance of electronic structure. In addition, when students finally learn about orbital concepts they are better prepared because they already have a well-developed three-dimensional picture of electronic structure to fall back on. We note in this regard that the types of models we use have found widespread, rigorous application in chemical research (1, 2), so students who understand and use electron density models do not need to "unlearn" anything before progressing to more advanced theories.

  7. Critical current density: Measurements vs. reality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, A. V.; Golovchanskiy, I. A.; Fedoseev, S. A.

    2013-07-01

    Different experimental techniques are employed to evaluate the critical current density (Jc), namely transport current measurements and two different magnetisation measurements forming quasi-equilibrium and dynamic critical states. Our technique-dependent results for superconducting YBa2Cu3O7 (YBCO) film and MgB2 bulk samples show an extremely high sensitivity of Jc and associated interpretations, such as irreversibility fields and Kramer plots, which lose meaning without a universal approach. We propose such approach for YBCO films based on their unique pinning features. This approach allows us to accurately recalculate the magnetic-field-dependent Jc obtained by any technique into the Jc behaviour, which would have been measured by any other method without performing the corresponding experiments. We also discovered low-frequency-dependent phenomena, governing flux dynamics, but contradicting the considered ones in the literature. The understanding of these phenomena, relevant to applications with moving superconductors, can clarify their dramatic impact on the electric-field criterion through flux diffusivity and corresponding measurements.

  8. Electronic measurements of ionization currents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hutyra, F.; Knapp, K.; Gregor, J. (Tesla, Premysleni (Czechoslovakia). Vyzkumny Ustav Pristroju Jaderne Techniky)

    1982-02-01

    Measurements are discussed of very low currents from ionization chambers. The currents range between 10/sup -15/ and 10/sup -9/ A. Two methods are discussed. A description is given of a dynamic and a semiconductor electrometers. Both meters are parts of dosimetric instruments for monitoring the dose rate (NB 9201) and the neutron-gamma mixed radiation dose rate (NDK 601).

  9. Electron correlation by polarization of interacting densities

    CERN Document Server

    Whitten, Jerry L

    2016-01-01

    Coulomb interactions that occur in electronic structure calculations are correlated by allowing basis function components of the interacting densities to polarize, thereby reducing the magnitude of the interaction. Exchange integrals of molecular orbitals are not correlated. The modified Coulomb interactions are used in single-determinant or configuration interaction calculations. The objective is to account for dynamical correlation effects without explicitly introducing higher spherical harmonic functions into the molecular orbital basis. Molecular orbital densities are decomposed into a distribution of spherical components that conserve the charge and each of the interacting components is considered as a two-electron wavefunction embedded in the system acted on by an average field Hamiltonian plus . A method of avoiding redundancy is described. Applications to atoms, negative ions and molecules representing different types of bonding and spin states are discussed.

  10. Fast electronic resistance switching involving hidden charge density wave states

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaskivskyi, I.; Mihailovic, I. A.; Brazovskii, S.; Gospodaric, J.; Mertelj, T.; Svetin, D.; Sutar, P.; Mihailovic, D.

    2016-05-01

    The functionality of computer memory elements is currently based on multi-stability, driven either by locally manipulating the density of electrons in transistors or by switching magnetic or ferroelectric order. Another possibility is switching between metallic and insulating phases by the motion of ions, but their speed is limited by slow nucleation and inhomogeneous percolative growth. Here we demonstrate fast resistance switching in a charge density wave system caused by pulsed current injection. As a charge pulse travels through the material, it converts a commensurately ordered polaronic Mott insulating state in 1T-TaS2 to a metastable electronic state with textured domain walls, accompanied with a conversion of polarons to band states, and concurrent rapid switching from an insulator to a metal. The large resistance change, high switching speed (30 ps) and ultralow energy per bit opens the way to new concepts in non-volatile memory devices manipulating all-electronic states.

  11. Electron cyclotron heating and current drive

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Westerhof, E.

    1996-01-01

    Plasma heating and non-inductive current drive by waves in the electron cyclotron range of frequencies are reviewed. Both theoretical aspects concerning wave properties, heating and current drive mechanisms, as well as the major experimental results are summarized.

  12. Particle Image Velocimetry Study of Density Current Fronts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Juan Ezequiel

    2009-01-01

    Gravity currents are flows that occur when a horizontal density difference causes fluid to move under the action of gravity; density currents are a particular case, for which the scalar causing the density difference is conserved. Flows with a strong effect of the horizontal density difference, even if only partially driven by it--such as the…

  13. High current density cathode for electrorefining in molten electrolyte

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shelly X.

    2010-06-29

    A high current density cathode for electrorefining in a molten electrolyte for the continuous production and collection of loose dendritic or powdery deposits. The high current density cathode eliminates the requirement for mechanical scraping and electrochemical stripping of the deposits from the cathode in an anode/cathode module. The high current density cathode comprises a perforated electrical insulated material coating such that the current density is up to 3 A/cm.sup.2.

  14. Observation of electron density using reflectometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Itakura, A.; Goto, N.; Katoh, M. [University of Tsukuba, Plasma Research Center, Tsukuba, Ibaraki (JP)] [and others

    2001-05-01

    Two types of microwave reflectometer are installed in the GAMMA 10 device for electron density measurement. One is an ultrashort-pulse reflectometer in an ordinary wave mode. An impulse generator, 65 ps full-width at half maximum is used as its microwave source. The five-channel receiver system measures the time-of-flight. Their center frequencies are 7, 8, 9, 10 and 11 GHz. Location of reflected point is calculated from the time-of-flight. An electron density profile is reconstructed. The other is a fast frequency-sweep reflectometer in an extraordinary wave mode. A hyperabrupt varactor-tuned oscillator is used and is swept from 11.5 GHz to 18 GHz. Beat frequency between the injected wave and the reflected wave depends on the path length and the sweep frequency. It is adjusted not to match the ICRF heating frequency. A density profile is also reconstructed from the phase difference. This system has a rather simple receiving system. (author)

  15. Physics of electron cyclotron current drive on DIII-D

    CERN Document Server

    Petty, C C; Harvey, R W; Kinsey, J E; Lao, L L; Lohr, J; Luce, T C; Makowski, M A; Prater, R

    2002-01-01

    OAK A271 PHYSICS OF ELECTRON CYCLOTRON CURRENT DRIVE ON DIII-D. Recent experiments on the DIII-D tokamak have focused on determining the effect of trapped particles on the electron cyclotron current drive (ECCD) efficiency. The measured ECCD efficiency increases as the deposition location is moved towards the inboard midplane or towards smaller minor radius for both co and counter injection. The measured ECCD efficiency also increases with increasing electron density and/or temperature. The experimental ECCD is compared to both the linear theory (Toray-GA) as well as a quasilinear Fokker-Planck model (CQL3D). The experimental ECCD is found to be in better agreement with the more complete Fokker-Planck calculation, especially for cases of high rf power density and/or loop voltage. The narrow width of the measured ECCD profile is consistent with only low levels of radial transport for the current carrying electrons.

  16. Magnetohydrodynamically stable plasma with supercritical current density at the axis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burdakov, A. V. [Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics, 11 Lavrentjev Avenue, 630090 Novosibirsk (Russian Federation); Novosibirsk State Technical University, 20 Karl Marks Avenue, 630092 Novosibirsk (Russian Federation); Postupaev, V. V., E-mail: V.V.Postupaev@inp.nsk.su; Sudnikov, A. V. [Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics, 11 Lavrentjev Avenue, 630090 Novosibirsk (Russian Federation); Novosibirsk State University, 2 Pirogova st., 630090 Novosibirsk (Russian Federation)

    2014-05-15

    In this work, an analysis of magnetic perturbations in the GOL-3 experiment is given. In GOL-3, plasma is collectively heated in a multiple-mirror trap by a high-power electron beam. During the beam injection, the beam-plasma interaction maintains a high-level microturbulence. This provides an unusual radial profile of the net current (that consists of the beam current, current of the preliminary discharge, and the return current). The plasma core carries supercritical current density with the safety factor well below unity, but as a whole, the plasma is stable with q(a) ≈ 4. The net plasma current is counter-directed to the beam current; helicities of the magnetic field in the core and at the edge are of different signs. This forms a system with a strong magnetic shear that stabilizes the plasma core in good confinement regimes. We have found that the most pronounced magnetic perturbation is the well-known n = 1, m = 1 mode for both stable and disruptive regimes.

  17. Fermion N-representability for prescribed density and paramagnetic current density

    OpenAIRE

    Tellgren, Erik I; Kvaal, Simen; Helgaker, Trygve

    2014-01-01

    The $N$-representability problem is the problem of determining whether or not there exists $N$-particle states with some prescribed property. Here we report an affirmative solution to the fermion $N$-representability problem when both the density and paramagnetic current density are prescribed. This problem arises in current-density functional theory and is a generalization of the well-studied corresponding problem (only the density prescribed) in density functional theory. Given any density ...

  18. Charge Exchange Effect on Space-Charge-Limited Current Densities in Ion Diode

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    石磊

    2002-01-01

    The article theoretically studied the charge-exchange effects on space charge limited electron and ion current densities of non-relativistic one-dimensional slab ion diode, and compared with those of without charge exchange.

  19. Current-voltage curve of a bipolar membrane at high current density

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aritomi, T.; Boomgaard, van den Th.; Strathmann, H.

    1996-01-01

    The potential drop across a bipolar membrane was measured as a function of the applied current density. As a result, an inflection point was observed in the obtained current-voltage curve at high current density. This inflection point indicates that at high current densities water supply from outsid

  20. Current-voltage curve of a bipolar membrane at high current density

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aritomi, T.; van den Boomgaard, Anthonie; Strathmann, H.

    1996-01-01

    The potential drop across a bipolar membrane was measured as a function of the applied current density. As a result, an inflection point was observed in the obtained current-voltage curve at high current density. This inflection point indicates that at high current densities water supply from

  1. Influence of Jet Angle and Ion Density of Cathode Side on Low Current Vacuum Arc Characteristics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Lijun; JIA Shenli; SHI Zongqian

    2008-01-01

    In this study, the influence of the initial jet angles (IJAs) and ion number densities (INDs) at the cathode side on the low current vacuum arc (LCVA) characteristics is simulated and analysed. The results show that the ion temperature, electron temperature, ion number density, axial current density and plasma pressure all decrease with the increase of the cathode IJAs. It is also shown that LCVA can cause a current constriction for lower cathode IND, and the anode sheath potential is more nonuniform, which is mainly related to the nonuniform distribution of the axial current density at the anode side.

  2. Bifurcation of Vortex Density Current in Trapped Bose Condensates

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU Tao; ZHANG ShengLi

    2002-01-01

    Vortex density current in the Gross-Pitaevskii theory is studied. It is shown that the inner structure of the topological vortices can be classified by Brouwer degrees and Hopf indices of φ-mapping. The dynamical equations of vortex density current have been given. The bifurcation behavior at the critical points of the current is discussed in detail.

  3. ELECTRON TRANSPORT BEHAVIOURS IN THE NITROGEN DIRECT CURRENT GLOW DISCHARGE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG LIAN-ZHU; YU WEI; WANG JIU-LI; HAN LI; FU GUANG-SHENG

    2001-01-01

    A Monte Carlo simulation is presented to describe the electron transport behaviours in the nitrogen direct current glow discharge. The energy and angular distributions of the electrons at different positions of the cathode dark space are calculated; their energy and density distribution features throughout the entire discharge are discussed. The influence of molecular vibrational excitation, typical for electron-molecule collisions, has been studied and the elementary process of active species generation has been illustrated. The simulated results reveal that, in the cathode dark space, the high-energy electrons are mainly forward scattering and behave as a high-energy ‘electron beam'. The sharp increase of the number of secondary electrons plays an important role in producing active species at the interface between the cathode dark space and the negative glow region. The vibrational excitation enhances the energy loss of electrons in the negative glow region.

  4. Partial Reflection D-region Electron Densities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manson, A. H.; Meek, C. E.

    1984-01-01

    The differential absorption technique of measuring electron densities as a function of height in the D region is discussed. In the basic experiment, pulses of medium or high frequency, usually at a fixed frequency (2 to MHz), are radiated upwards with known wave polarizatin (usually linear or circular) from a transmitter at ground level. Partial reflections, from ionospheric scatterers at heights below the E region, are received at the ground, and are resolved into two characteristic components, the ordinary (0) and extraordinary (E) modes whose amplitude ration A(x)/A(o) is then measured as a function of height, h. The heights of these are determined by delay times, the group retardation being minimal in the undisturbed D-region. The electronic system can be very simple. Power splitters and quadrature networks to separate the A(x) and A(o) components are commercially available at low prices and an A-D converter, height-gate system, and microcomputer allows the real-time calculation of mean amplitudes. The ratio of the coefficients of reflection of the two modes, as they originate at each reflection height is then calculable.

  5. Heat transfer in high density electronics packaging

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    In order to get an insight into the thermal characteristic and to evaluate the thermal reliability of the "System in Packaging"(SIP), a new solution of electronics packaging, a heat transfer model of SIP was developed to predict the heat dissipation capacity and to investigate the effect of different factors on the temperature distribution in the electronics. The affecting parameters under consideration include the thermophysical properties of the substrates, the coefficient of convection heat transfer, the thickness of the chip, and the density of power dissipation. ALGOR, a kind of finite element analysis software,was used to do the model simulation. Based on the sinulation and analysis of the heat conduction and convection resistance, criteria for the thermal design were established and possible measurement for enhancing power dissipation was provided, The results show that the heat transfer model provides a new and effective way to the thermal design and thermal analysis of SIP and to the mechanical analysis for the further investigation of SIP.

  6. Orbital functionals in density-matrix- and current-density-functional theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Helbig, N.

    2006-05-15

    Density-Functional Theory (DFT), although widely used and very successful in the calculation of several observables, fails to correctly describe strongly correlated materials. In the first part of this work we, therefore, introduce reduced-densitymatrix- functional theory (RDMFT) which is one possible way to treat electron correlation beyond DFT. Within this theory the one-body reduced density matrix (1- RDM) is used as the basic variable. Our main interest is the calculation of the fundamental gap which proves very problematic within DFT. In order to calculate the fundamental gap we generalize RDMFT to fractional particle numbers M by describing the system as an ensemble of an N and an N+1 particle system (with N{<=}M{<=}N+1). For each fixed particle number, M, the total energy is minimized with respect to the natural orbitals and their occupation numbers. This leads to the total energy as a function of M. The derivative of this function with respect to the particle number has a discontinuity at integer particle number which is identical to the gap. In addition, we investigate the necessary and sufficient conditions for the 1- RDM of a system with fractional particle number to be N-representable. Numerical results are presented for alkali atoms, small molecules, and periodic systems. Another problem within DFT is the description of non-relativistic many-electron systems in the presence of magnetic fields. It requires the paramagnetic current density and the spin magnetization to be used as basic variables besides the electron density. However, electron-gas-based functionals of current-spin-density-functional Theory (CSDFT) exhibit derivative discontinuities as a function of the magnetic field whenever a new Landau level is occupied, which makes them difficult to use in practice. Since the appearance of Landau levels is, intrinsically, an orbital effect it is appealing to use orbital-dependent functionals. We have developed a CSDFT version of the optimized

  7. Theoretical study of atoms by the electronic kinetic energy density and stress tensor density

    CERN Document Server

    Nozaki, Hiroo; Tachibana, Akitomo

    2016-01-01

    We analyze the electronic structure of atoms in the first, second and third periods using the electronic kinetic energy density and stress tensor density, which are local quantities motivated by quantum field theoretic consideration, specifically the rigged quantum electrodynamics. We compute the zero surfaces of the electronic kinetic energy density, which we call the electronic interfaces, of the atoms. We find that their sizes exhibit clear periodicity and are comparable to the conventional atomic and ionic radii. We also compute the electronic stress tensor density and its divergence, tension density, of the atoms, and discuss how their electronic structures are characterized by them.

  8. Current density and conductivity through modified gravity in the graphene with defects

    CERN Document Server

    Sepehri, Alireza; Bamba, Kazuharu; Capozziello, Salvatore; Saridakis, Emmanuel N

    2016-01-01

    We propose a model describing the evolution of the free electron current density in graphene. Based on the concept of Mp-branes, we perform the analysis using the difference between curvatures of parallel and antiparallel spins. In such a framework an effective graviton emerges in the form of gauge field exchange between electrons. In a plain graphene system, the curvatures produced by both kinds of spins neutralize each other. However, in the presence of defects, the inequality between curvatures leads to the emergence of current density, modified gravity and conductivity. Depending on the type of the defects, the resulting current density can be negative or positive.

  9. Current Source Density Estimation for Single Neurons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dorottya Cserpán

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Recent developments of multielectrode technology made it possible to measure the extracellular potential generated in the neural tissue with spatial precision on the order of tens of micrometers and on submillisecond time scale. Combining such measurements with imaging of single neurons within the studied tissue opens up new experimental possibilities for estimating distribution of current sources along a dendritic tree. In this work we show that if we are able to relate part of the recording of extracellular potential to a specific cell of known morphology we can estimate the spatiotemporal distribution of transmembrane currents along it. We present here an extension of the kernel CSD method (Potworowski et al., 2012 applicable in such case. We test it on several model neurons of progressively complicated morphologies from ball-and-stick to realistic, up to analysis of simulated neuron activity embedded in a substantial working network (Traub et al, 2005. We discuss the caveats and possibilities of this new approach.

  10. Time-resolved electron density and electron temperature measurements in nanosecond pulse discharges in helium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roettgen, A.; Shkurenkov, I.; Simeni Simeni, M.; Petrishchev, V.; Adamovich, I. V.; Lempert, W. R.

    2016-10-01

     ≈  4.25 eV, attained after the surface ionization wave reaches the grounded electrode. The sensitivity of the present diagnostics is too low to measure electron density in the plasma during surface ionization wave propagation (estimated to be below n e  ≈  1013 cm-3). After peaking during the primary current pulse, the electron density decays due to dissociative recombination. Electron temperature decreases rapidly over ~150 ns after the primary current pulse rise, to T e  ≈  0.5 eV, followed by a much more gradual electron cooling between the primary and the secondary discharge pulses, due to superelastic collisions providing moderate electron heating in the afterglow.

  11. Hot electron transport and current sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abraham, Mathew Cheeran

    The effect of hot electrons on momentum scattering rates in a two-dimensional electron gas is critically examined. It is shown that with hot electrons it is possible to explore the temperature dependence of individual scattering mechanisms not easily probed under equilibrium conditions; both the Bloch-Gruneisen (BG) phonon scattering phenomena and the reduction in impurity scattering are clearly observed. The theoretical calculations are consistent with the results obtained from hot electrons experiments. As a function of bias current, a resistance peak is formed in a 2DEG if the low temperature impurity limited mobilities muI( T = 0) is comparable to muph(TBG ) the phonon limited mobility at the critical BG temperature. In this case, as the bias current is increased, the electron temperature Te rises due to Joule heating and the rapid increase in phonon scattering can be detected before the effect of the reduction in impurity scattering sets in. If muI(T = 0) wire defined in a 2DEG. Concurrently, an appropriate current imaging technique to detect this transition is sought. A rigorous evaluation of magnetic force microscopy (MFM) as a possible candidate to detect Poiseuille electronic flow was conducted, and a method that exploits the mechanical resonance of the MFM cantilever was implemented to significantly improve its current sensitivity.

  12. Secondary electron current loss in electron cooling devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharapa, A. N.; Shemyakin, A. V.

    1994-12-01

    The efficiency of secondary electron capture in a recuperator with a longitudinal magnetic field is evaluated. To characterize this efficiency, the value of the collector secondary emission coefficient is introduced, for the calculation of which a simple formula is proposed. The effects determining the difference between the current losses in straight systems and devices with bending magnets are analyzed. It is experimentally shown that there is no unambiguous relation between the efficiency of the secondary electron capture by the collector and the current loss. The mechanism which determines the current loss in straight systems is suggested.

  13. Electronic properties of solids excited with intermediate laser power densities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sirotti, Fausto; Tempo Beamline Team

    Intermediate laser power density up to about 100 GW/cm2 is below the surface damage threshold is currently used to induce modification in the physical properties on short time scales. The absorption of a short laser pulse induces non-equilibrium electronic distributions followed by lattice-mediated equilibrium taking place only in the picosecond range. The role of the hot electrons is particularly important in several domains as for example fast magnetization and demagnetization processes, laser induced phase transitions, charge density waves. Angular resolved photoelectron spectroscopy measuring directly energy and momentum of electrons is the most adapted tool to study the electronic excitations at short time scales during and after fast laser excitations. The main technical problem is the space charge created by the pumping laser pulse. I will present angular resolved multiphoton photoemission results obtained with 800 nm laser pulses showing how space charge electrons emitted during fast demagnetization processes can be measured. Unable enter Affiliation: CNRS-SOLEIL Synchrotron L'Orme des Merisiers , Saint Aubin 91192 Gif sur Yvette France.

  14. Existence of time-dependent density-functional theory for open electronic systems: time-dependent holographic electron density theorem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Xiao; Yam, ChiYung; Wang, Fan; Chen, GuanHua

    2011-08-28

    We present the time-dependent holographic electron density theorem (TD-HEDT), which lays the foundation of time-dependent density-functional theory (TDDFT) for open electronic systems. For any finite electronic system, the TD-HEDT formally establishes a one-to-one correspondence between the electron density inside any finite subsystem and the time-dependent external potential. As a result, any electronic property of an open system in principle can be determined uniquely by the electron density function inside the open region. Implications of the TD-HEDT on the practicality of TDDFT are also discussed.

  15. Driving Plasmaspheric Electron Density Simulations During Geomagnetic Storms

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Pascuale, S.; Kletzing, C.; Jordanova, V.; Goldstein, J.; Wygant, J. R.; Thaller, S. A.

    2015-12-01

    We test global convection electric field models driving plasmaspheric electron density simulations (RAM-CPL) during geomagnetic storms with in situ measurements provided by the Van Allen Probes (RBSP). RAM-CPL is the cold plasma component of the ring-current atmosphere interactions suite (RAM-SCB) and describes the evolution of plasma density in the magnetic equatorial plane near Earth. Geomagnetic events observed by the RBSP satellites in different magnetic local time (MLT) sectors enable a comparison of local asymmetries in the input electric field and output densities of these simulations. Using a fluid MHD approach, RAM-CPL reproduces core plasmaspheric densities (L<4) to less than 1 order of magnitude difference. Approximately 80% of plasmapause crossings, defined by a low-density threshold, are reproduced to within a mean radial difference of 0.6 L. RAM-CPL, in conjunction with a best-fit driver, can be used in other studies as an asset to predict density conditions in locations distant from RBSP orbits of interest.

  16. Comparison of Ti/Pd/Ag, Pd/Ti/Pd/Ag and Pd/Ge/Ti/Pd/Ag contacts to n-type GaAs for electronic devices handling high current densities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huo, Pengyun; Galiana, Beatriz; Rey-Stolle, Ignacio

    2017-04-01

    In the quest for metal contacts for electronic devices handling high current densities, we report the results of Pd/Ti/Pd/Ag and Pd/Ge/Ti/Pd/Ag contacts to n-GaAs and compare them to Ti/Pd/Ag and AuGe/Ni/Au. These metal systems have been designed with the goal of producing an electrical contact with (a) low metal–semiconductor specific contact resistance, (b) very high sheet conductance, (c) good bondability, (d) long-term durability and (e) cost-effectiveness. The structure of the contacts consists of an interfacial layer (either Pd or Pd/Ge) intended to produce a low metal–semiconductor specific contact resistance; a diffusion barrier (Ti/Pd) and a thick top layer of Ag to provide the desired high sheet conductance, limited cost and good bondability. The results show that both systems can achieve very low metal resistivity (ρ M ∼ 2 × 10‑6 Ω cm), reaching values close to that of pure bulk silver. This fact is attributed to the Ti/Pd bilayer acting as an efficient diffusion barrier, and thus the metal sheet resistance can be controlled by the thickness of the deposited silver layer. Moreover, the use of Pd as interfacial layer produces contacts with moderate specific contact resistance (ρ C ∼ 10‑4 Ω cm2) whilst the use of Pd/Ge decreases the specific contact resistance to ρ C ∼ 1.5 × 10‑7 Ω cm2, as a result of the formation of a Pd4(GaAs, Ge2) compound at the GaAs interface.

  17. SOL plasma measurements during high density and long duration current drive on TRIAM-1M

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takemura, Takeharu; Kawasaki, Shoji; Jotaki, Eriko; Makino, Ken-ichi; Sakamoto, Mizuki; Nakamura, Kazuo; Nakamura, Yukio; Itoh, Sanae; Itoh, Satoshi [Kyushu Univ., Kasuga, Fukuoka (Japan). Research Inst. for Applied Mechanics

    1997-02-01

    In the superconducting, strong magnetic field tokamak, TRIAM-1M, for the purpose of maintaining high density plasma for long time, the current drive experiment using 8.2 GHz lower hybrid wave has been carried out. For maintaining high density plasma for long time, it is indispensable to control gas puff and recycling from wall, as these are closely related to the structure and characteristics of boundary plasma including scrape-off layer (SOL). In this study, in the high density, long time current drive using 8.2 GHz lower hybrid wave, the electron density and electron temperature of SOL plasma were measured by using double probe, and the z-direction distribution and the toroidal magnetic field dependence of the electron density and electron temperature of SOL plasma were examined and compared with OH discharge. Also the dependence of the electron density of SOL plasma on the phase difference in a adjoining waveguide tubes was examined. The experimental setup and the double probe theory are explained. The experimental results of the change with time lapse, the z-direction distribution and the magnetic field dependence of the electron density and electron temperature of SOL plasma are reported. (K.I.)

  18. Electronic health records: current and future use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, Steve G; Khan, Munawwar A

    2014-09-01

    This paper provides an overview of the current state of the electronic medical record, including benefits and shortcomings, and presents key factors likely to drive development in the next decade and beyond. The current electronic medical record to a large extent represents a digital version of the traditional paper legal record, owned and maintained by the practitioner. The future electronic health record is expected to be a shared tool, engaging patients in decision making, wellness and disease management and providing data for individual decision support, population management and analytics. Many drivers will determine this path, including payment model reform, proliferation of mobile platforms, telemedicine, genomics and individualized medicine and advances in 'big data' technologies.

  19. Electron Cyclotron Current Drive at High Electron Temperature on DIII-D

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petty, C. C.; Austin, M. E.; Harvey, R. W.; Lohr, J.; Luce, T. C.; Makowski, M. A.; Prater, R.

    2007-09-01

    Experiments on DIII-D have measured the electron cyclotron current drive (ECCD) efficiency for co- and counter-injection in low density plasmas with radiation temperatures from electron cyclotron emission (ECE) above 20 keV. The radiation temperature is generally higher than the Thomson scattering temperature, indicating that there is a significant population of non-thermal electrons. The experimental ECCD profile measured with motional Stark effect (MSE) polarimetry is found to agree with quasi-linear theory except for the highest power density cases (QEC/ne2≫1). Radial transport of the energetic electrons with diffusion coefficients of ˜0.4 m2/s is needed to model the broadened ECCD profile at high power density.

  20. A carbon nanotube field emission cathode with high current density and long-term stability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calderón-Colón, Xiomara; Geng, Huaizhi; Gao, Bo; An, Lei; Cao, Guohua; Zhou, Otto

    2009-08-01

    Carbon nanotube (CNT) field emitters are now being evaluated for a wide range of vacuum electronic applications. However, problems including short lifetime at high current density, instability under high voltage, poor emission uniformity, and pixel-to-pixel inconsistency are still major obstacles for device applications. We developed an electrophoretic process to fabricate composite CNT films with controlled nanotube orientation and surface density, and enhanced adhesion. The cathodes have significantly enhanced macroscopic field emission current density and long-term stability under high operating voltages. The application of this CNT electron source for high-resolution x-ray imaging is demonstrated.

  1. Electron cyclotron resonance heating and current drive

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fidone, I.; Castejon, F.

    1992-07-01

    A brief summary of the theory and experiments on electron- cyclotron heating and current drive is presented. The general relativistic formulation of wave propagation and linear absorption is considered in some detail. The O-mode and the X-mode for normal and oblique propagation are investigated and illustrated by several examples. The experimental verification of the theory in T-10 and D- III-D is briefly discussed. Quasilinear evolution of the momentum distribution and related applications as, for instance, non linear wave, damping and current drive, are also considered for special cases of wave frequencies, polarization and propagation. In the concluding section we present the general formulation of the wave damping and current drive in the absence of electron trapping for arbitrary values of the wave frequency. (Author) 13 refs.

  2. Probing Electron Dynamics with the Laplacian of the Momentum Density

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sukumar, N.; MacDougall, Preston J. [Middle Tennessee State University; Levit, M. Creon [Nasa Ames Research Center

    2012-09-24

    This chapter in the above-titled monograph presents topological analysis of the Laplacian of the electron momentum density in organic molecules. It relates topological features in this distribution to chemical and physical properties, particularly aromaticity and electron transport.

  3. Definition of current density in the presence of a non-local potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Changsheng; Wan, Langhui; Wei, Yadong; Wang, Jian

    2008-04-16

    In the presence of a non-local potential arising from electron-electron interaction, the conventional definition of current density J(c) = (e/2m)([(p-eA)ψ](*)ψ-ψ(*)[(p-eA)ψ]) cannot satisfy the condition of current conservation, i.e., [Formula: see text] in the steady state. In order to solve this problem, we give a new definition of current density including the contribution due to the non-local potential. We show that the current calculated based on the new definition of current density conserves the current and is the same as that obtained from the Landauer-Büttiker formula. Examples are given to demonstrate our results.

  4. Identifying Distinguishing Characteristics of Secondary Pyroclastic Density Currents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isom, S. L.; Brand, B. D.

    2014-12-01

    Pyroclastic density currents (PDCs) are ground-hugging mixtures of volcanic particles and gas that travel down the slopes of erupting volcanoes. The combination of high velocities, high bulk densities (due to particles in the current) and high temperatures make PDCs the most dangerous and deadly hazard associated with explosive volcanism. Secondary explosive phenomenon associated with PDCs, such as inland-directed surges (e.g., Montserrat, 2003) and phreatic explosions (e.g., Mt St Helens 1980) can increase the area affected and duration of the hazard. However, little work has been done on distinguishing the deposits of secondary explosive phenomenon from primary phenomenon. Samples have been acquired from the 1980 Mt St Helens phreatic explosion crater deposits and the 2003 eruptive event at Montserrat where a PDC flowed into the ocean, causing an inland-directed surge (Edmonds and Herd, 2005. Geology 33.4:245-248). The samples will be analyzed via depositional characteristics, granulometry, componentry, microscopic analysis and scanning electron microscope imaging. We hypothesize that thermal cracking or vesicle distortion (e.g., compression or hindered expansion) may occur in hot pyroclasts that enter a body of water, leading to a difference between the ash textures of primary PDCs, phreatic surges and inland-directed surge deposits. Analyzing granulometry and componentry from parent flows and secondary flows may also reveal distinguishing characteristics that will allow us to constrain differences in segregation mechanisms of particles for each phenomenon. Determining distinguishing depositional characteristics of these secondary phenomena is important for assessing their occurrence during past eruptions and identifying conditions conducive to the formation of secondary explosions. This will result in the ability to make more accurate hazard maps for volcanoes prone to explosive activity.

  5. High current density contacts for photoconductive semiconductor switches

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baca, A.G.; Hjalmarson, H.P.; Loubriel, G.M.; McLaughlin, D.L.; Zutavern, F.J.

    1993-08-01

    The current densities implied by current filaments in GaAs photoconductive semiconductor switches (PCSS) are in excess of 1 MA/cm{sup 2}. As the lateral switches are tested repeatedly, damage accumulates at the contacts until electrical breakdown occurs across the surface of the insulating region. In order to improve the switch lifetime, the incorporation of n- and p-type ohmic contacts in lateral switches as well as surface geometry modifications have been investigated. By using p-type AuBe ohmic contacts at the anode and n-type AuGe ohmic contacts at the cathode, contact lifetime improvements of 5--10x were observed compared to switches with n-type contacts at both anode and cathode. Failure analysis on samples operated for 1--1,000 shots show that extensive damage still exists for at least one contact on all switches observed and that temperatures approaching 500{degrees}C are can be reached. However, the n-type AuGe cathode is often found to have no damage observable by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The observed patterns of contact degradation indicate directions for future contact improvements in lateral switches.

  6. Electronic DC transformer with high power density

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pavlovský, M.

    2006-01-01

    This thesis is concerned with the possibilities of increasing the power density of high-power dc-dc converters with galvanic isolation. Three cornerstones for reaching high power densities are identified as: size reduction of passive components, reduction of losses particularly in active components

  7. Combined Digital Electronic Current and Voltage Transducer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    段雄英; 邹积岩; 等

    2002-01-01

    A high-performance current and voltage measurement system has been developed in power system.The system is composed of two parts:one current measurement element and one voltage measurement element.A Rogowski coil and a capacitive voltage divider are used respectively for the line current and voltage measurements.Active electronic components are used to modulate signal,and power supply for these components is drawn from power line via an auxiliary current transformer,Measurement signal is transmitted y optical fibers,which is resistant to electromagnetic induction and noise,With careful design and the use of digital signal processing technology,the whole system can meet 0.5% accuracy for metering and provides large dynamic range coupled with good accuracy for protective relaying use.

  8. Electron transmission and quantum current distribution of C70 molecule

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    KATSUNORI; Tagami3; MASARU; Tsukada

    2008-01-01

    The characteristics of electron transmission through C70 molecule bridge in which two atomic chain leads are connected to long-axis carbon atoms are investigated theoretically by using tight-binding approach based on the Green’s function with only one π orbital electron per carbon atom. Electron transmission through C70 molecule from the input to the output terminal is obtained. From the spectrum, the switching feature of the electron transmission through C70 is found, and the oscil-lation property based on the quantized level is explained. The quantum current distributions inside C70 molecule bridge are calculated and simulated by the quan-tum current density theory based on Fisher-Lee formula at the energy point E = -0.2 eV, where the transmission spectrum shows a peak. The maximum and the mini-mum bond quantum currents are presented, and the reason why the currents are distributed nonuniformly is explained by the phase difference of the atomic orbits. The result shows that the currents at each atomic site agree with Kirchhoff quan-tum current conservation law.

  9. High current density nanofilament cathodes for microwave amplifiers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schnell, J-P.; Minoux, E.; Gangloff, L.; Vincent, P.; Legagneux, P.; Dieumegard, D.; David, J.-F.; Peauger, F.; Hudanski, L.; Teo, K.B.K.; Lacerda, R.; Chhowalla, M.; Hasko, D.G.; Ahmed, H.; Amaratunga, G.A.J.; Milne, W.I.; Vila, L.; Dauginet-De Pra, L.; Demoustier-Champagne, S.; Ferain, E.; Legras, R.; Piraux, L.; Gröening, O.; Raedt, H. De; Michielsen, K.

    2004-01-01

    We study high current density nanofilament cathodes for microwave amplifiers. Two different types of aligned nanofilament array have been studied: first, metallic nanowires grown by electrodeposition into nanoporous templates at very low temperature (T

  10. Determining the Limiting Current Density of Vanadium Redox Flow Batteries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jen-Yu Chen

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available All-vanadium redox flow batteries (VRFBs are used as energy storage systems for intermittent renewable power sources. The performance of VRFBs depends on materials of key components and operating conditions, such as current density, electrolyte flow rate and electrolyte composition. Mass transfer overpotential is affected by the electrolyte flow rate and electrolyte composition, which is related to the limiting current density. In order to investigate the effect of operating conditions on mass transport overpotential, this study established a relationship between the limiting current density and operating conditions. First, electrolyte solutions with different states of charge were prepared and used for a single cell to obtain discharging polarization curves under various operating conditions. The experimental results were then analyzed and are discussed in this paper. Finally, this paper proposes a limiting current density as a function of operating conditions. The result helps predict the effect of operating condition on the cell performance in a mathematical model.

  11. Solid Oxide Electrolysis Cells: Degradation at High Current Densities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knibbe, Ruth; Traulsen, Marie Lund; Hauch, Anne;

    2010-01-01

    The degradation of Ni/yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ)-based solid oxide electrolysis cells operated at high current densities was studied. The degradation was examined at 850°C, at current densities of −1.0, −1.5, and −2.0 A/cm2, with a 50:50 (H2O:H2) gas supplied to the Ni/YSZ hydrogen electrode...

  12. DISCONTINUOUS FLOW OF TURBID DENSITY CURRENTS Ⅱ. INTERNAL HYDRAULIC JUMP

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jiahua FAN

    2005-01-01

    Traveling and stationary internal hydraulic jumps in density currents with positive or negative entrainment coefficients were analyzed based on simple assumptions. An expression of internal hydraulic jumps with entrainment coefficients was derived. Experimental data, published in literature, of stationary internal hydraulic jumps in turbid, thermal and saline density currents including measured values of water entrainment were used to compare with theory. Comparison was also made of traveling internal hydraulic jumps between measured data and theory.

  13. On the possibility of kinetic energy density evaluation from the experimental electron-density distribution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abramov, Yu.A. [National Inst. for Research in Inorganic Materials, Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan)

    1997-05-01

    A simple new approach for the evaluation of the electronic kinetic energy density, G(r), from the experimental (multipole-fitted) electron density is proposed. It allows a quantitative and semi-quantitative description of the G(r) behavior at the bond critical points of compounds with closed-shell and shared interactions, respectively. This can provide information on the values of the kinetic electron energy densities at the bond critical points, which appears to be useful for quantum-topological studies of chemical interactions using experimental electron densities. (orig.).

  14. The topology of the Coulomb potential density. A comparison with the electron density, the virial energy density, and the Ehrenfest force density.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, Lizé-Mari; Eaby, Alan; Dillen, Jan

    2017-09-30

    The topology of the Coulomb potential density has been studied within the context of the theory of Atoms in Molecules and has been compared with the topologies of the electron density, the virial energy density and the Ehrenfest force density. The Coulomb potential density is found to be mainly structurally homeomorphic with the electron density. The Coulomb potential density reproduces the non-nuclear attractor which is observed experimentally in the molecular graph of the electron density of a Mg dimer, thus, for the first time ever providing an alternative and energetic foundation for the existence of this critical point. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Collimation of fast electrons in critical density plasma channel

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    Significantly collimated fast electron beam with a divergence angle 10° (FWHM) is generated through the interaction of ultra-intense laser light with a uniform critical density plasma in experiments and 2D PIC simulations. In the experiment, the uniform critical density plasma is created by ionizing an ultra-low density foam target. The spacial distribution of the fast electron is observed by Imaging Plate. 2D PIC simulation and post process analysis reveal magnetic collimation of energetic e...

  16. Effects of Electron Screening on Electron Capture Rates in High Density Presupernova Core

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    蒋广飞; 彭秋和; 邹志刚

    2003-01-01

    Considering that the electron capture rate can be greatly reduced by the electron screening effect in the regime of high temperature and high density, we calculate the effect of electron screening on the electron capture rate for two important elements 56Ni and 55Co in the high density condition of a pre-supernova star. The effect of electron screening is so effective that the electron capture rate may be reduced to about 20%.

  17. A high current density DC magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) micropump

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Homsy, Alexandra; Koster, Sander; Eijkel, Jan C.T.; Berg, van den Albert; Lucklum, F.; Verpoorte, E.; Rooij, de Nico F.

    2005-01-01

    This paper describes the working principle of a DC magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) micropump that can be operated at high DC current densities (J) in 75-µm-deep microfluidic channels without introducing gas bubbles into the pumping channel. The main design feature for current generation is a micromachined

  18. A high current density DC magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) micropump

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Homsy, A; Koster, Sander; Eijkel, JCT; van den Berg, A; Lucklum, F; Verpoorte, E; de Rooij, NF

    2005-01-01

    This paper describes the working principle of a DC magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) micropump that can be operated at high DC current densities (J) in 75-mu m-deep microfluidic channels without introducing gas bubbles into the pumping channel. The main design feature for current generation is a micromachin

  19. Estimation of current density distribution under electrodes for external defibrillation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Papazov Sava P

    2002-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Transthoracic defibrillation is the most common life-saving technique for the restoration of the heart rhythm of cardiac arrest victims. The procedure requires adequate application of large electrodes on the patient chest, to ensure low-resistance electrical contact. The current density distribution under the electrodes is non-uniform, leading to muscle contraction and pain, or risks of burning. The recent introduction of automatic external defibrillators and even wearable defibrillators, presents new demanding requirements for the structure of electrodes. Method and Results Using the pseudo-elliptic differential equation of Laplace type with appropriate boundary conditions and applying finite element method modeling, electrodes of various shapes and structure were studied. The non-uniformity of the current density distribution was shown to be moderately improved by adding a low resistivity layer between the metal and tissue and by a ring around the electrode perimeter. The inclusion of openings in long-term wearable electrodes additionally disturbs the current density profile. However, a number of small-size perforations may result in acceptable current density distribution. Conclusion The current density distribution non-uniformity of circular electrodes is about 30% less than that of square-shaped electrodes. The use of an interface layer of intermediate resistivity, comparable to that of the underlying tissues, and a high-resistivity perimeter ring, can further improve the distribution. The inclusion of skin aeration openings disturbs the current paths, but an appropriate selection of number and size provides a reasonable compromise.

  20. Casimir effect for scalar current densities in topologically nontrivial spaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellucci, S.; Saharian, A. A.; Saharyan, N. A.

    2015-08-01

    We evaluate the Hadamard function and the vacuum expectation value (VEV) of the current density for a charged scalar field, induced by flat boundaries in spacetimes with an arbitrary number of toroidally compactified spatial dimensions. The field operator obeys the Robin conditions on the boundaries and quasiperiodicity conditions with general phases along compact dimensions. In addition, the presence of a constant gauge field is assumed. The latter induces Aharonov-Bohm-type effect on the VEVs. There is a region in the space of the parameters in Robin boundary conditions where the vacuum state becomes unstable. The stability condition depends on the lengths of compact dimensions and is less restrictive than that for background with trivial topology. The vacuum current density is a periodic function of the magnetic flux, enclosed by compact dimensions, with the period equal to the flux quantum. It is explicitly decomposed into the boundary-free and boundary-induced contributions. In sharp contrast to the VEVs of the field squared and the energy-momentum tensor, the current density does not contain surface divergences. Moreover, for Dirichlet condition it vanishes on the boundaries. The normal derivative of the current density on the boundaries vanish for both Dirichlet and Neumann conditions and is nonzero for general Robin conditions. When the separation between the plates is smaller than other length scales, the behavior of the current density is essentially different for non-Neumann and Neumann boundary conditions. In the former case, the total current density in the region between the plates tends to zero. For Neumann boundary condition on both plates, the current density is dominated by the interference part and is inversely proportional to the separation.

  1. Electromigration in Sn–Ag solder thin films under high current density

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhu, X. [School of Computing and Mathematical Sciences, University of Greenwich, 30 Park Row, London SE10 9LS (United Kingdom); Kotadia, H. [Physics Department, School of Natural and Mathematical Sciences, King' s College London, Strand, London WC2R 2LS (United Kingdom); Xu, S. [Department of Electronic Engineering, City University of Hong Kong, 83 Tat Chee Avenue, Kow-loon Tong, Hong Kong (China); Lu, H. [School of Computing and Mathematical Sciences, University of Greenwich, 30 Park Row, London SE10 9LS (United Kingdom); Mannan, S.H. [Physics Department, School of Natural and Mathematical Sciences, King' s College London, Strand, London WC2R 2LS (United Kingdom); Bailey, C. [School of Computing and Mathematical Sciences, University of Greenwich, 30 Park Row, London SE10 9LS (United Kingdom); Chan, Y.C. [Department of Electronic Engineering, City University of Hong Kong, 83 Tat Chee Avenue, Kow-loon Tong, Hong Kong (China)

    2014-08-28

    The electro-migration behavior of a Sn–Ag solder thin film stripe that is deposited on a glass substrate has been investigated under a high current density in the absence ofthermo-migration. The distribution of voids and hillocks at current densities of 4.4–6.0 × 10{sup 4} A/cm{sup 2} has been analyzed optically and using electron microscopy. The voids mainly formed at the cathode side of the stripe where maximum current density was predicted but voids also formed along a line that crosses the stripe. This was explained in terms of the initial voids forming at locations of maximum current density concentration, altering these locations, and then expanding into them. The movement of the maximum current density location is caused by redistribution of current as the voids form. An atomic migration model has been developed and used in this work. It was found that if thermal gradients were completely neglected, the model was unable to account for the divergence of atomic flux density which is necessary for void nucleation. However, the temperature dependence of the diffusivity of atoms is sufficient to account for void nucleation within the timescale of the experiments. - Highlights: • Experimental and computational study of electron migration in a SnAg film • The calculated atomic flux divergence has been used to predict void formation. • Voids caused by electromigration observed at current crowding sites and in other regions.

  2. Electronic Voltage and Current Transformers Testing Device

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yong Xiao

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A method for testing electronic instrument transformers is described, including electronic voltage and current transformers (EVTs, ECTs with both analog and digital outputs. A testing device prototype is developed. It is based on digital signal processing of the signals that are measured at the secondary outputs of the tested transformer and the reference transformer when the same excitation signal is fed to their primaries. The test that estimates the performance of the prototype has been carried out at the National Centre for High Voltage Measurement and the prototype is approved for testing transformers with precision class up to 0.2 at the industrial frequency (50 Hz or 60 Hz. The device is suitable for on-site testing due to its high accuracy, simple structure and low-cost hardware.

  3. Influence of current density on surface morphology and properties of pulse plated tin films from citrate electrolyte

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharma, Ashutosh; Bhattacharya, Sumit; Das, Siddhartha; Das, Karabi, E-mail: karabi@metal.iitkgp.ernet.in

    2014-01-30

    Bulk polycrystalline tin films have been processed by pulse electrodeposition technique from a simple solution containing triammonium citrate and stannous chloride. The cathodic investigations have been carried out by galvanostatic methods. As deposited samples are characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). XRD analysis of the deposited films shows microcrystalline grains having β-Sn form. The surface morphology is very rough at lower current density, but becomes smooth at higher current density, and exhibits pyramid type morphology at all the current densities. The effect of current density on microhardness, melting behavior, and electrical resistivity are also reported here.

  4. Superconducting toroidal field coil current densities for the TFCX

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kalsi, S.S.; Hooper, R.J.

    1985-04-01

    A major goal of the Tokamak Fusion Core Experiment (TFCX) study was to minimize the size of the device and achieve lowest cost. Two key factors influencing the size of the device employing superconducting magnets are toroidal field (TF) winding current density and its nuclear heat load withstand capability. Lower winding current density requires larger radial build of the winding pack. Likewise, lower allowable nuclear heating in the winding requires larger shield thickness between the plasma and coil. In order to achieve a low-cost device, it is essential to maximize the winding's current density and nuclear heating withhstand capability. To meet the above objective, the TFCX design specification adopted as goals a nominal winding current density of 3500 A/cm/sup 2/ with 10-T peak field at the winding and peak nuclear heat load limits of 1 MW/cm/sup 3/ for the nominal design and 50 MW/cm/sup 3/ for an advanced design. This study developed justification for these current density and nuclear heat load limits.

  5. Ionospheric midlatitude electric current density inferred from multiple magnetic satellites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shore, R. M.; Whaler, K. A.; Macmillan, S.; Beggan, C.; Olsen, N.; Spain, T.; Aruliah, A.

    2013-09-01

    A method for inferring zonal electric current density in the mid-to-low latitude F region ionosphere is presented. We describe a method of using near-simultaneous overflights of the Ørsted and CHAMP satellites to define a closed circuit for an application of Ampère's integral law to magnetic data. Zonal current density from sources in only the region between the two satellites is estimated for the first time. Six years of mutually available vector magnetic data allows overlaps spanning the full 24 h range of local time twice. Solutions are computed on an event-by-event basis after correcting for estimates of main and crustal magnetic fields. Current density in the range ±0.1 μA/m2 is resolved, with the distribution of electric current largely matching known features such as the Appleton anomaly. The currents appear unmodulated at times of either high-negative Dst or high F10.7, which has implications for any future efforts to model their effects. We resolve persistent current intensifications between geomagnetic latitudes of 30 and 50° in the postmidnight, predawn sector, a region typically thought to be relatively free of electric currents. The cause of these unexpected intensifications remains an open issue. We compare our results with current density predictions made by the Coupled Thermosphere-Ionosphere-Plasmasphere model, a self-consistent, first-principles, three-dimensional numerical dynamic model of ionospheric composition and temperatures. This independent validation of our current density estimates highlights good agreement in the broad spatiotemporal trends we identify, which increases confidence in our results.

  6. Ionospheric Electron Density during Magnetically Active Times over Istanbul

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naz Erbaş, Bute; Kaymaz, Zerefsan; Ceren Moral, Aysegul; Emine Ceren Kalafatoglu Eyiguler, R. A..

    2016-07-01

    In this study, we analyze electron density variations over Istanbul using Dynasonde observations during the magnetically active times. In order to perform statistical analyses, we first determined magnetic storms and magnetospheric substorm intervals from October 2012 to October 2015 using Kyoto's magnetic index data. Corresponding ionospheric parameters, such as critical frequency of F2 region (foF2), maximum electron density height (hmF2), total electron density (TEC) etc. were retrieved from Dynasonde data base at Istanbul Technical University's Space Weather Laboratory. To understand the behavior of electron density during the magnetically active times, we remove the background quiet time variations first and then quantify the anomalies. In this presentation, we will report results from our preliminary analyses from the selected cases corresponding to the strong magnetic storms. Initial results show lower electron densities at noon times and higher electron densities in the late afternoon toward sunset times when compared to the electron densities of magnetically quiet times. We also compare the results with IRI and TIEGCM ionospheric models in order to understand the physical and dynamical causes of these variations. During the presentation we will also discuss the role of these changes during the magnetically active times on the GPS communications through ionosphere.

  7. High current density stability of ohmic contacts to silicon carbide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Downey, Brian P.

    The materials properties of SiC, such as wide bandgap, high breakdown electric field, and good thermal conductivity, make it an appealing option for high temperature and high power applications. The replacement of Si devices with SiC components could lead to a reduction in device size, weight, complexity, and cooling requirements along with an increase in device efficiency. One area of concern under high temperature or high current operation is the stability of the ohmic contacts. Ohmic contact degradation can cause an increase in parasitic resistance, which can diminish device performance. While contact studies have primarily focused on the high temperature stability of ohmic contacts to SiC, different failure mechanisms may arise under high current density stressing due to the influence of electromigration. In addition, preferential degradation may occur at the anode or cathode due to the directionality of current flow, known as a polarity effect. The failure mechanisms of ohmic contacts to p-type SiC under high current density stressing are explored. Complementary materials characterization techniques were used to analyze contact degradation, particularly the use of cross-sections prepared by focused ion beam for imaging using field emission scanning electron microscopy and elemental analysis using Auger electron spectroscopy. Initially the degradation of commonly studied Ni and Al-based contacts was investigated under continuous DC current. The contact metallization included a bond pad consisting of a TiW diffusion barrier and thick Au overlayer. The Ni contacts were found to degrade due to the growth of voids within the ohmic contact layer, which were initially produced during the high temperature Ni/SiC ohmic contact anneal. The Al-based contacts degraded due to the movement of Al from the ohmic contact layer to the surface of the Au bond pad, and the movement of Au into the ohmic contact layer from the bond pad. The inequality of Al and Au fluxes generated

  8. The Effect of Ion Current Density on Target Etching in Radio Frequency-Magnetron Sputtering Process

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王庆; 王永富; 巴德纯; 岳向吉

    2012-01-01

    The effect of ion current density of argon plasma on target sputtering in magnetron sputtering process was investigated. Using home-made ion probe with computer-based data acquisition system, the ion current density as functions of discharge power, gas pressure and positions was measured. A double-hump shape was found in ion current density curve after the analysis of the effects of power and pressure. The data demonstrate that ion current density increases with the increase in gas pressure in spite of slightly at the double-hump site, sharply at wave-trough and side positions. Simultaneously, the ion current density increases upon increase in power. Es- pecially, the ion current density steeply increases at the double-hump site. The highest energy of the secondary electrons arising from Larmor precession was found at the double-hump position, which results in high ion density. The target was etched seriously at the double-hump position due to the high ion density there. The data indicates that the increase in power can lead to a high sputtering speed rate.

  9. Influence of current density on microstructure of pulse electrodeposited tin coatings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharma, Ashutosh; Bhattacharya, Sumit; Sen, Ranjan; Reddy, B.S.B. [Department of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology-Kharagpur, Kharagpur-721302 (India); Fecht, H.-J. [Institut fuer Mikro- und Nanomaterialien, Universitaet Ulm, D-89081 Ulm (Germany); Das, Karabi, E-mail: karabi@metal.iitkgp.ernet.in [Department of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology-Kharagpur, Kharagpur-721302 (India); Das, Siddhartha [Department of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology-Kharagpur, Kharagpur-721302 (India)

    2012-06-15

    Pulse electrodeposited tin coatings on copper substrate have been synthesized from an aqueous solution containing sodium stannate (Na{sub 2}SnO{sub 3}.3H{sub 2}O) and sodium hydroxide (NaOH). The effect of current density on surface morphology of the deposits has been investigated. As deposited coatings are characterized by X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, electron backscatter diffraction, and line profile analysis. The X-ray diffraction analysis shows that the deposits consist of tetragonal ({beta}-Sn) structure with microcrystalline grains. The deposits plated at lower current density exhibit (110) texture which decreases with increasing current densities. The effects of current density on Cu-Sn diffusion and whisker growth of the electrodeposited tin coatings are also reported here. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Pulse electrodeposition of Sn from aqueous alkaline solution without adding any organic additive. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Effect of current density on morphology and whisker growth in tin coatings aged for 1 year. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Solution bath is stable and can be operated over a wide range of current density.

  10. Scaling rules for critical current density in anisotropic biaxial superconductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Yingxu, E-mail: yingxuli@swjtu.edu.cn [Applied Mechanics and Structure Safety Key Laboratory of Sichuan Province, School of Mechanics and Engineering, Southwest Jiaotong University, Chengdu, Sichuan 610031 (China); Kang, Guozheng [Applied Mechanics and Structure Safety Key Laboratory of Sichuan Province, School of Mechanics and Engineering, Southwest Jiaotong University, Chengdu, Sichuan 610031 (China); Gao, Yuanwen, E-mail: ywgao@lzu.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Mechanics on Environment and Disaster in Western China, The Ministry of Education of China, Lanzhou, Gansu 730000 (China); Department of Mechanics and Engineering Science, College of Civil Engineering and Mechanics, Lanzhou University, Lanzhou, Gansu 730000 (China)

    2016-06-15

    Recent researches highlight the additional anisotropic crystallographic axis within the superconducting plane of high temperature superconductors (HTS), demonstrating the superconducting anisotropy of HTS is better understood in the biaxial frame than the previous uniaxial coordinates within the superconducting layer. To quantitatively evaluate the anisotropy of flux pinning and critical current density in HTS, we extend the scaling rule for single-vortex collective pinning in uniaxial superconductors to account for flux-bundle collective pinning in biaxial superconductors. The scaling results show that in a system of random uncorrected point defects, the field dependence of the critical current density is described by a unified function with the scaled magnetic field of the isotropic superconductor. The obtained angular dependence of the critical current density depicts the main features of experimental observations, considering possible corrections due to the strong-pinning interaction.

  11. The electron and the ion density characteristic near the F ring by Cassini/RPWS/LP

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morooka, Michiko; Wahlund, Jan-Erik; Andrews, David; Ye, Sheng-Yi; Kurth, William

    2017-04-01

    Cassini observations revealed that there are a large amount of nm and μm sized dust grains and their electrical interaction with the surrounding plasma near the moon Enceladus and the E ring. In this region, the small grains are negatively charged by attaching the electrons, resulting the unbalance in the ion and the electron densities (the ion density higher than the electron density). Similar type observations are expected near the faint F and G ring that are composed of small grains. During the grand finale, from December 2016, Cassini has been orbiting Saturn with closest approach just outside the F ring. We will show the electron and ion densities of those orbits obtained by the Langmuir probe onboard Cassini (RPWS/LP). Preliminary results showed: 1) both the electron and the ion density enhancement occurred near the equator (Z = ±0.5RS). 2) The electron densities at the equator are about the order of 1 cm-3 (varies from 2 to 8), while the ion densities are an order of magnitude larger than the electrons up to 300 cm-3. 3) The electron density depletion has been observed centered at the equator around ±0.05 RS in Z. Coincide this region, the LP sweep current noise due to the dust grain's hitting the probe were observed. On the other hand, the peak of the electron density seems to be located slightly northward above the equator at ˜0.05 RS. 4) One of the events showed a local electron density enhancement near the L-shell at L = 3. The obtained characteristics are similar to what have been found in the E ring near the Enceladus orbit. In the E ring, the electron density enhancement region was centered at the equator in Z ±˜0.5RS, the electron bite out occurred at Z = ±0.045RS, and the electron density peaks were somewhat higher in the northern hemisphere. A possible explanation for the location differences in the charged dust density peak and the plasma density peak can be due to that the magnetic equator is located slightly north (+0.04RS) of the equator

  12. High-density turbidity currents: Are they sandy debris flows?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shanmugam, G. [Mobil Exploration and Producing Technical Center, Dallas, TX (United States)

    1996-01-01

    Conventionally, turbidity currents are considered as fluidal flows in which sediment is supported by fluid turbulence, whereas debris flows are plastic flows in which sediment is supported by matrix strength, dispersive pressure, and buoyant lift. The concept of high-density turbidity current refers to high-concentration, commonly non-turbulent, flows of fluids in which sediment is supported mainly by matrix strength, dispersive pressure, and buoyant lift. The conventional wisdom that traction carpets with entrained turbulent clouds on top represent high-density turbidity currents is a misnomer because traction carpets are neither fluidal nor turbulent. Debris flows may also have entrained turbulent clouds on top. The traction carpet/debris flow and the overriding turbulent clouds are two separate entities in terms of flow rheology and sediment-support mechanism. In experimental and theoretical studies, which has linked massive sands and floating clasts to high-density turbidity currents, the term high-density turbidity current has actually been used for laminar flows. In alleviating this conceptual problem, sandy debris flow is suggested as a substitute for high-density turbidity current. Sandy debris flows represent a continuous spectrum of processes between cohesive and cohesionless debris flows. Commonly they are rheologically plastic. They may occur with or without entrained turbulent clouds on top. Their sediment-support mechanisms include matrix strength, dispersive pressure, and buoyant lift. They are characterized by laminar flow conditions, a moderate to high grain concentration, and a low to moderate mud content. Although flows evolve and transform during the course of transport in density-stratified flows, the preserved features in a deposit are useful to decipher only the final stages of deposition. At present, there are no established criteria to decipher transport mechanism from the depositional record.

  13. Anodic Oxidation of Carbon Steel at High Current Densities and Investigation of Its Corrosion Behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fattah-Alhosseini, Arash; Khan, Hamid Yazdani

    2017-02-01

    This work aims at studying the influence of high current densities on the anodization of carbon steel. Anodic protective coatings were prepared on carbon steel at current densities of 100, 125, and 150 A/dm2 followed by a final heat treatment. Coatings microstructures and morphologies were analyzed using X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscope (SEM). The corrosion resistance of the uncoated carbon steel substrate and the anodic coatings were evaluated in 3.5 wt pct NaCl solution through electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and potentiodynamic polarization measurements. The results showed that the anodic oxide coatings which were prepared at higher current densities had thicker coatings as a result of a higher anodic forming voltage. Therefore, the anodized coatings showed better anti-corrosion properties compared to those obtained at lower current densities and the base metal.

  14. Engineering Critical Current Density Improvement in Ag- Bi-2223 Tapes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, W. G.; Seifi, Behrouz; Eriksen, Morten;

    2000-01-01

    Ag alloy sheathed Bi-2223 multifilament tapes were produced by the powder-in-tube method. Engineering critical current density improvement has been achieved through both enhancement of critical current density by control of the thermal behavior of oxide powder and by an increase of the filling...... the superconductor composite sustaining large proportional oxide ceramics in the composite during drawing and rolling process. By optimization of the thermal and mechanical process, a Je of 12 kA/cm2 has been achieved in a 0.183.1 mm2 size tape which carried 67 A...

  15. Current Density Measurements of an Annular-Geometry Ion Engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shastry, Rohit; Patterson, Michael J.; Herman, Daniel A.; Foster, John E.

    2012-01-01

    The concept of the annular-geometry ion engine, or AGI-Engine, has been shown to have many potential benefits when scaling electric propulsion technologies to higher power. However, the necessary asymmetric location of the discharge cathode away from thruster centerline could potentially lead to non-uniformities in the discharge not present in conventional geometry ion thrusters. In an effort to characterize the degree of this potential nonuniformity, a number of current density measurements were taken on a breadboard AGI-Engine. Fourteen button probes were used to measure the ion current density of the discharge along a perforated electrode that replaced the ion optics during conditions of simulated beam extraction. Three Faraday probes spaced apart in the vertical direction were also used in a separate test to interrogate the plume of the AGI-Engine during true beam extraction. It was determined that both the discharge and the plume of the AGI-Engine are highly uniform, with variations under most conditions limited to 10% of the average current density in the discharge and 5% of the average current density in the plume. Beam flatness parameter measured 30 mm from the ion optics ranged from 0.85 0.95, and overall uniformity was shown to generally increase with increasing discharge and beam currents. These measurements indicate that the plasma is highly uniform despite the asymmetric location of the discharge cathode.

  16. QTAIM electron density study of natural chalcones

    Science.gov (United States)

    González Moa, María J.; Mandado, Marcos; Cordeiro, M. Natália D. S.; Mosquera, Ricardo A.

    2007-09-01

    QTAIM atomic and bond properties, ionization potential, and O-H bond dissociation energies calculated at the B3LYP/6-311++G(2d,2p) level indicate the natural chalcones bear a significant radical scavenging activity. However, their ionization potentials indicate they decrease the electron-transfer rate between antioxidant and oxygen that yields the pro-oxidative cations less than other natural antioxidants. Rings A and B display slight and similar positive charges, whereas ring B is involved in exocycle delocalization at a larger extension.

  17. Current Density Imaging through Acoustically Encoded Magnetometry: A Theoretical Exploration

    CERN Document Server

    Sheltraw, Daniel J

    2014-01-01

    The problem of determining a current density confined to a volume from measurements of the magnetic field it produces exterior to that volume is known to have non-unique solutions. To uniquely determine the current density, or the non-silent components of it, additional spatial encoding of the electric current is needed. In biological systems such as the brain and heart, which generate electric current associated with normal function, a reliable means of generating such additional encoding, on a spatial and temporal scale meaningful to the study of such systems, would be a boon for research. This paper explores a speculative method by which the required additional encoding might be accomplished, on the time scale associated with the propagation of sound across the volume of interest, by means of the application of a radially encoding pulsed acoustic spherical wave.

  18. Tailoring of electron flow current in magnetically insulated transmission lines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. P. Martin

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available It is desirable to optimize (minimizing both the inductance and electron flow the magnetically insulated vacuum sections of low impedance pulsed-power drivers. The goal of low inductance is understandable from basic efficiency arguments. The goal of low electron flow results from two observations: (1 flowing electrons generally do not deliver energy to (or even reach most loads, and thus constitute a loss mechanism; (2 energetic electrons deposited in a small area can cause anode damage and anode plasma formation. Low inductance and low electron flow are competing goals; an optimized system requires a balance of the two. While magnetically insulated systems are generally forgiving, there are times when optimization is crucial. For example, in large pulsed-power drivers used to energize high energy density physics loads, the electron flow as a fraction of total current is small, but that flow often reaches the anode in relatively small regions. If the anode temperature becomes high enough to desorb gas, the resulting plasma initiates a gap closure process that can impact system performance. Magnetic-pressure driven (z pinches and material equation of state loads behave like a fixed inductor for much of the drive pulse. It is clear that neither fixed gap nor constant-impedance transmission lines are optimal for driving inductive loads. This work shows a technique for developing the optimal impedance profile for the magnetically insulated section of a high-current driver. Particle-in-cell calculations are used to validate the impedance profiles developed in a radial disk magnetically insulated transmission line geometry. The input parameters are the spacing and location of the minimum gap, the effective load inductance, and the desired electron flow profile. The radial electron flow profiles from these simulations are in good agreement with theoretical predictions when driven at relatively high voltage (i.e., V≥2  MV.

  19. Heating and Current Drive by Electron Cyclotron Waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prater, R.

    2003-10-01

    The physics model of electron cyclotron heating (ECH) and current drive (ECCD) is becoming well validated through systematic comparisons of theory and experiment. Work has shown that ECCD can be highly localized and robustly controlled, leading to applications including stabilization of MHD instabilities like neoclassical tearing modes, control and sustainment of desired profiles of current density and plasma pressure, and studies of localized transport. These physics applications and the study of the basic physics of ECH and ECCD were enabled by the advent of the gyrotron in the 1980s and of the diamond window for megawatt gyrotrons in the 1990s. The experimental work stimulated a broad base of theory based on first principles which is encapsulated in linear ray tracing codes and fully relativistic quasilinear Fokker-Planck codes. Recent experiments use measurements of the local poloidal magnetic field through the motional Stark effect to determine the magnitude and profile of the locally driven current. The subtle balance between wave-induced diffusion and Coulomb relaxation in velocity space provides an understanding of the effects of trapping of current-carrying electrons in the magnetic well, an effect which can be used to advantage. Strong quasilinear effects and radial transport of electrons which may broaden the driven current profile have also been observed under some conditions and appear to be consistent with theory, but in large devices these are usually insignificant. Additional advantages of ECH compared with other rf heating methods are that the antenna can be far removed from the plasma and the power density can be very high. The agreement of theory and experiment, the broad base of established applications, and the technical advantages of ECH support the application of ECH in next-step tokamaks and stellarators.

  20. Waves in relativistic electron beam in low-density plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheinman, I.; Sheinman (Chernenco, J.

    2016-11-01

    Waves in electron beam in low-density plasma are analyzed. The analysis is based on complete electrodynamics consideration. Dependencies of dispersion laws from system parameters are investigated. It is shown that when relativistic electron beam is passed through low-density plasma surface waves of two types may exist. The first type is a high frequency wave on a boundary between the beam and neutralization area and the second type wave is on the boundary between neutralization area and stationary plasma.

  1. 3 dimensional ionospheric electron density reconstruction based on GPS measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stolle, C.; Schlüter, S.; Jacobi, C.; Jakowski, N.

    When radio waves as sended by the naviagtion system GPS are passing through the ionosphere they are subject to delays in phase, travel time and polarisation which is an effect of the free electrons. The measured integrated value of Total Electron Content can be utilised for three-dimensional reconstruction of electron density patterns in the ionosphere. Here a tomographic approach is represented. Scince the distribution of data is very sparse and patchy we decided for an algebraic iterative algorithm. The ground based GPS data collected by IGS receivers can be combined by space based GPS of radio limb sounding, incoherent scatter radar and ionosondes data. Hereby, radio occultation data improve beside the amount of available data especially the vertical resolution of electron density distribution. Ionosonde peack electron densities are taken as stop criteria determination for iteration. Reconstructed ionospheric scenarios and validations of the system by independent measurements are presented.

  2. Current functional theory for multi-electron configuration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bang, Jens N.; Bohr, Henrik

    2010-01-01

    The density functional theory (DFT) formalism is reformulated into a framework of currents so as to give the energy a parameter dependent behaviour, e.g., time. This “current” method is aimed at describing the transition of electrons from one orbital to another and especially from the ground state...... to an excited state and extended to the relativistic region in order to include magnetic fields which is relevant especially for heavy metallic compounds. The formalism leads to a set of coupled first order partial differential equations to describe the time evolution of atoms and molecules. The application...

  3. Path to Efficient Lower Hybrid Current Drive at High Density

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baek, S. G.; Bonoli, P. T.; Brunner, D.; Faust, I.; Labombard, B. L.; Parker, R. R.; Shiraiwa, S.; Wallace, G. M.; Wukitch, S.

    2015-11-01

    Recovery of lower hybrid current drive (LHCD) efficiency at high density was demonstrated on Alcator C-Mod by modifying the scrape-off layer (SOL) plasma. RF probe measurements around the C-Mod tokamak indicate that the LH wave amplitude at the high field side wall significantly attenuates with plasma density. This is interpreted as enhanced collisional loss due to the increase in the SOL density and width. By taking advantage of the narrower SOL width by doubling plasma current to 1.1 MA, it is found that the LH wave amplitude maintains its strength, and an effective current drive is extended to above 1x10e20 m-3. An order of magnitude increase in non-thermal Bremsstrahlung emission is consistent with ray-tracing results which take into account the change of SOL profiles with current. In the coming campaign, a further investigation on the role of the SOL plasma is planned by raising plasma current above 1.1 MA. This will be aided with newly developed RF magnetic loop antennas mounted on a radially movable probe head. This system is expected to intercept the LH resonance cone on the first pass, allowing us to measure radial profiles of both the wave amplitude and dominant parallel wavenumber in the SOL for the first time. These data will be compared with the GENRAY ray-tracing code. Work supported by USDoE awards DE-FC02-99ER54512.

  4. Ionospheric midlatitude electric current density inferred from multiple magnetic satellites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shore, R. M.; Whaler, K. A.; Macmillan, S.

    2013-01-01

    A method for inferring zonal electric current density in the mid-to-low latitude F region ionosphere is presented. We describe a method of using near-simultaneous overflights of the Ørsted and CHAMP satellites to define a closed circuit for an application of Ampère's integral law to magnetic data....... Zonal current density from sources in only the region between the two satellites is estimated for the first time. Six years of mutually available vector magnetic data allows overlaps spanning the full 24 h range of local time twice. Solutions are computed on an event-by-event basis after correcting...... for estimates of main and crustal magnetic fields. Current density in the range ±0.1 μA/m2 is resolved, with the distribution of electric current largely matching known features such as the Appleton anomaly. The currents appear unmodulated at times of either high-negative Dst or high F10.7, which has...

  5. The density matrix picture of laser coherent control current

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHOU Qian; ZHANG Haichao; LIU Luning; LIN Weizhu

    2004-01-01

    The physical substance of the coherent control current and the optical rectification have been analyzed based on density matrix perturbation theory. The analytical results demonstrate that they arise from the real and virtual manifestations of the same nonlinear process associated with diagonal and non-diagonal density matrix.And in terms of polarization, they respectively arise from the intraband and interband polarizations. Both the evolution of the coherent control current exited by ultrafast laser pulse and its dependence on frequency have been studied in time and frequency domains. In order to get an explicit knowledge of intraband polarization and the origination of the coherent control current, we have investigated the initial photo-carriers momentum distribution. The ultrafast decay of the polar momentum population in order of tens of femtosends is given to illustrate its instantaneous optical response.

  6. A Tale of Two Electrons: Correlation at High Density

    CERN Document Server

    Loos, Pierre-François

    2010-01-01

    We review our recent progress in the determination of the high-density correlation energy $\\Ec$ in two-electron systems. Several two-electron systems are considered, such as the well known helium-like ions (helium), and the Hooke's law atom (hookium). We also present results regarding two electrons on the surface of a sphere (spherium), and two electrons trapped in a spherical box (ballium). We also show that, in the large-dimension limit, the high-density correlation energy of two opposite-spin electrons interacting {\\em via} a Coulomb potential is given by $\\Ec \\sim -1/(8D^2)$ for any radial external potential $V(r)$, where $D$ is the dimensionality of the space. This result explains the similarity of $\\Ec$ in the previous two-electron systems for $D=3$.

  7. Nanoscale Imaging of Current Density with a Single-Spin Magnetometer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, K; Eichler, A; Rhensius, J; Lorenzelli, L; Degen, C L

    2017-03-24

    Charge transport in nanostructures and thin films is fundamental to many phenomena and processes in science and technology, ranging from quantum effects and electronic correlations in mesoscopic physics, to integrated charge- or spin-based electronic circuits, to photoactive layers in energy research. Direct visualization of the charge flow in such structures is challenging due to their nanometer size and the itinerant nature of currents. In this work, we demonstrate noninvasive magnetic imaging of current density in two-dimensional conductor networks including metallic nanowires and carbon nanotubes. Our sensor is the electronic spin of a diamond nitrogen-vacancy center attached to a scanning tip and operated under ambient conditions. Using a differential measurement technique, we detect DC currents down to a few μA with a current density noise floor of ∼2 × 10(4) A/cm(2). Reconstructed images have a spatial resolution of typically 50 nm, with a best-effort value of 22 nm. Current density imaging offers a new route for studying electronic transport and conductance variations in two-dimensional materials and devices, with many exciting applications in condensed matter physics and materials science.

  8. Multistate Density Functional Theory for Effective Diabatic Electronic Coupling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Haisheng; Provorse, Makenzie R; Bao, Peng; Qu, Zexing; Gao, Jiali

    2016-06-16

    Multistate density functional theory (MSDFT) is presented to estimate the effective transfer integral associated with electron and hole transfer reactions. In this approach, the charge-localized diabatic states are defined by block localization of Kohn-Sham orbitals, which constrain the electron density for each diabatic state in orbital space. This differs from the procedure used in constrained density functional theory that partitions the density within specific spatial regions. For a series of model systems, the computed transfer integrals are consistent with experimental data and show the expected exponential attenuation with the donor-acceptor separation. The present method can be used to model charge transfer reactions including processes involving coupled electron and proton transfer.

  9. Ionospheric topside models compared with experimental electron density profiles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. M. Radicella

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Recently an increasing number of topside electron density profiles has been made available to the scientific community on the Internet. These data are important for ionospheric modeling purposes, since the experimental information on the electron density above the ionosphere maximum of ionization is very scarce. The present work compares NeQuick and IRI models with the topside electron density profiles available in the databases of the ISIS2, IK19 and Cosmos 1809 satellites. Experimental electron content from the F2 peak up to satellite height and electron densities at fixed heights above the peak have been compared under a wide range of different conditions. The analysis performed points out the behavior of the models and the improvements needed to be assessed to have a better reproduction of the experimental results. NeQuick topside is a modified Epstein layer, with thickness parameter determined by an empirical relation. It appears that its performance is strongly affected by this parameter, indicating the need for improvements of its formulation. IRI topside is based on Booker's approach to consider two parts with constant height gradients. It appears that this formulation leads to an overestimation of the electron density in the upper part of the profiles, and overestimation of TEC.

  10. Lower hybrid current drive favoured by electron cyclotron radiofrequency heating

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cesario, R.; Cardinali, A.; Castaldo, C.; Marinucci, M.; Tuccillo, A. A. [Associazione EURATOM/ENEA sulla Fusione, Centro Ricerche Frascati, 00044, Frascati (Italy); Amicucci, L.; Galli, A. [Università di Roma Sapienza, Dipartimento Ingegneria Elettronica, Rome (Italy); Giruzzi, G. [CEA, IRFM, F-13108 Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France); Napoli, F.; Schettini, G. [Università di Roma Tre, Dipartimento Ingegneria Elettronica, Rome (Italy)

    2014-02-12

    The important goal of adding to the bootstrap a fraction of non-inductive plasma current, which would be controlled for obtaining and optimizing steady-state profiles, can be reached by using the Current Drive produced by Lower Hybrid waves (LHCD). FTU (Frascati Tokamak Upgrade) experiments demonstrated, indeed, that LHCD is effective at reactor-graded high plasma density, and the LH spectral broadening is reduced, operating with higher electron temperature in the outer region of plasma column (T{sub e-periphery}). This method was obtained following the guidelines of theoretical predictions indicating that the broadening of launched spectrum produced by parametric instability (PI) should be reduced, and the LHCD effect at high density consequently enabled, under higher (T{sub e-periphery}). In FTU, the temperature increase in the outer plasma region was obtained by operating with reduced particle recycling, lithized walls and deep gas fuelling by means of fast pellet. Heating plasma periphery with electron cyclotron resonant waves (ECRH) will provide a further tool for achieving steady-state operations. New FTU experimental results are presented here, demonstrating that temperature effect at the plasma periphery, affecting LH penetration, occurs in a range of plasma parameters broader than in previous work. New information is also shown on the modelling assessing frequencies and growth rates of the PI coupled modes responsible of spectral broadening. Finally, we present the design of an experiment scheduled on FTU next campaign, where ECRH power is used to slightly increase the electron temperature in the outer plasma region of a high-density discharge aiming at restoring LHCD. Consequent to model results, by operating with a toroidal magnetic field of 6.3 T, useful for locating the electron cyclotron resonant layer at the periphery of the plasma column (r/a∼0.8, f{sub 0}=144 GHz), an increase of T{sub e} in the outer plasma (from 40 eV to 80 eV at r/a∼0.8) is

  11. Stabilization of electron-scale turbulence by electron density gradient in national spherical torus experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruiz Ruiz, J.; White, A. E. [MIT-Plasma Science and Fusion Center, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States); Ren, Y.; Guttenfelder, W.; Kaye, S. M.; Leblanc, B. P.; Mazzucato, E. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton, New Jersey 08543 (United States); Lee, K. C. [National Fusion Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Domier, C. W. [University of California at Davis, Davis, California 95616 (United States); Smith, D. R. [University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, Wisconsin 53706 (United States); Yuh, H. [Nova Photonics, Inc., Princeton, New Jersey 08540 (United States)

    2015-12-15

    Theory and experiments have shown that electron temperature gradient (ETG) turbulence on the electron gyro-scale, k{sub ⊥}ρ{sub e} ≲ 1, can be responsible for anomalous electron thermal transport in NSTX. Electron scale (high-k) turbulence is diagnosed in NSTX with a high-k microwave scattering system [D. R. Smith et al., Rev. Sci. Instrum. 79, 123501 (2008)]. Here we report on stabilization effects of the electron density gradient on electron-scale density fluctuations in a set of neutral beam injection heated H-mode plasmas. We found that the absence of high-k density fluctuations from measurements is correlated with large equilibrium density gradient, which is shown to be consistent with linear stabilization of ETG modes due to the density gradient using the analytical ETG linear threshold in F. Jenko et al. [Phys. Plasmas 8, 4096 (2001)] and linear gyrokinetic simulations with GS2 [M. Kotschenreuther et al., Comput. Phys. Commun. 88, 128 (1995)]. We also found that the observed power of electron-scale turbulence (when it exists) is anti-correlated with the equilibrium density gradient, suggesting density gradient as a nonlinear stabilizing mechanism. Higher density gradients give rise to lower values of the plasma frame frequency, calculated based on the Doppler shift of the measured density fluctuations. Linear gyrokinetic simulations show that higher values of the electron density gradient reduce the value of the real frequency, in agreement with experimental observation. Nonlinear electron-scale gyrokinetic simulations show that high electron density gradient reduces electron heat flux and stiffness, and increases the ETG nonlinear threshold, consistent with experimental observations.

  12. Role of density gradient driven trapped electron mode turbulence in the H-mode inner core with electron heating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ernst, D. R.; Burrell, K. H.; Guttenfelder, W.; Rhodes, T. L.; Dimits, A. M.; Bravenec, R.; Grierson, B. A.; Holland, C.; Lohr, J.; Marinoni, A.; McKee, G. R.; Petty, C. C.; Rost, J. C.; Schmitz, L.; Wang, G.; Zemedkun, S.; Zeng, L.

    2016-05-01

    A series of DIII-D [J. L. Luxon, Nucl. Fusion 42, 614 (2002)] low torque quiescent H-mode experiments show that density gradient driven trapped electron mode (DGTEM) turbulence dominates the inner core of H-mode plasmas during strong electron cyclotron heating (ECH). Adding 3.4 MW ECH doubles Te/Ti from 0.5 to 1.0, which halves the linear DGTEM critical density gradient, locally reducing density peaking, while transport in all channels displays extreme stiffness in the density gradient. This suggests that fusion α-heating may degrade inner core confinement in H-mode plasmas with moderate density peaking and low collisionality, with equal electron and ion temperatures, key conditions expected in burning plasmas. Gyrokinetic simulations using GYRO [J. Candy and R. E. Waltz, J. Comput. Phys. 186, 545 (2003)] (and GENE [Jenko et al., Phys. Plasmas 7, 1904 (2000)]) closely match not only particle, energy, and momentum fluxes but also density fluctuation spectra from Doppler backscattering (DBS), with and without ECH. Inner core DBS density fluctuations display discrete frequencies with adjacent toroidal mode numbers, which we identify as DGTEMs. GS2 [Dorland et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 85, 5579 (2000)] predictions show the DGTEM can be suppressed, to avoid degradation with electron heating, by broadening the current density profile to attain q0>qmin>1 .

  13. Current functional theory for multi-electron configuration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bang, Jens N.; Bohr, Henrik

    2010-01-01

    The density functional theory (DFT) formalism is reformulated into a framework of currents so as to give the energy a parameter dependent behaviour, e.g., time. This “current” method is aimed at describing the transition of electrons from one orbital to another and especially from the ground state...... to an excited state and extended to the relativistic region in order to include magnetic fields which is relevant especially for heavy metallic compounds. The formalism leads to a set of coupled first order partial differential equations to describe the time evolution of atoms and molecules. The application...... of the method to ZnO and H2O to calculate the occupation probabilities of the orbitals lead to the results that compare favorably with those obtained from DFT. Furthermore, evolution equations for electrons in both atoms and molecules can be derived. Applications to specific examples of small molecules (being...

  14. Slow electron energy balance for hybrid models of direct-current glow discharges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eliseev, S. I.; Bogdanov, E. A.; Kudryavtsev, A. A.

    2017-09-01

    In this paper, we present the formulation of slow electron energy balance for hybrid models of direct current (DC) glow discharge. Electrons originating from non-local ionization (secondary) contribute significantly to the energy balance of slow electrons. An approach towards calculating effective energy brought by a secondary electron to the group of slow electrons by means of Coulomb collisions is suggested. The value of effective energy shows a considerable dependence on external parameters of a discharge, such as gas pressure, type, and geometric parameters. The slow electron energy balance was implemented into a simple hybrid model that uses analytical formulation for the description of non-local ionization by fast electrons. Simulations of short (without positive column) DC glow discharge in argon are carried out for a range of gas pressures. Comparison with experimental data showed generally good agreement in terms of current-voltage characteristics, electron density, and electron temperature. Simulations also capture the trend of increasing electron density with decreasing pressure observed in the experiment. Analysis shows that for considered conditions, the product of maximum electron density ne and electron temperature Te in negative glow is independent of gas pressure and depends on the gas type, cathode material, and discharge current. Decreasing gas pressure reduces the heating rate of slow electrons during Coulomb collisions with secondary electrons, which leads to lower values of Te and, in turn, higher maximum ne.

  15. Faraday-effect polarimeter-interferometer system for current density measurement on EAST.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, H Q; Jie, Y X; Ding, W X; Brower, D L; Zou, Z Y; Li, W M; Wang, Z X; Qian, J P; Yang, Y; Zeng, L; Lan, T; Wei, X C; Li, G S; Hu, L Q; Wan, B N

    2014-11-01

    A multichannel far-infrared laser-based POlarimeter-INTerferometer (POINT) system utilizing the three-wave technique is under development for current density and electron density profile measurements in the EAST tokamak. Novel molybdenum retro-reflectors are mounted in the inside wall for the double-pass optical arrangement. A Digital Phase Detector with 250 kHz bandwidth, which will provide real-time Faraday rotation angle and density phase shift output, have been developed for use on the POINT system. Initial calibration indicates the electron line-integrated density resolution is less than 5 × 10(16) m(-2) (∼2°), and the Faraday rotation angle rms phase noise is <0.1°.

  16. Lower hybrid current drive for edge current density modification in DIII-D: Final status report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fenstermacher, M.E. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Porkolab, M. [Massachusetts Inst. of Tech., Cambridge, MA (United States). Plasma Fusion Center

    1993-08-04

    Application of Lower Hybrid (LH) Current Drive (CD) in the DIII-D tokamak has been studied at LLNL, off and on, for several years. The latest effort began in February 1992 in response to a letter from ASDEX indicating that the 2.45 GHz, 3 MW system there was available to be used on another device. An initial assessment of the possible uses for such a system on DIII-D was made and documented in September 1992. Multiple meetings with GA personnel and members of the LH community nationwide have occurred since that time. The work continued through the submission of the 1995 Field Work Proposals in March 1993 and was then put on hold due to budget limitations. The purpose of this document is to record the status of the work in such a way that it could fairly easily be restarted at a future date. This document will take the form of a collection of Appendices giving both background and the latest results from the FY 1993 work, connected by brief descriptive text. Section 2 will describe the final workshop on LHCD in DIII-D held at GA in February 1993. This was an open meeting with attendees from GA, LLNL, MIT and PPPL. Summary documents from the meeting and subsequent papers describing the results will be included in Appendices. Section 3 will describe the status of work on the use of low frequency (2.45 GHZ) LH power and Parametric Decay Instabilities (PDI) for the special case of high dielectric in the edge regions of the DIII-D plasma. This was one of the critical issues identified at the workshop. Other potential issues for LHCD in the DIII-D scenarios are: (1) damping of the waves on fast ions from neutral beam injection, (2) runaway electrons in the low density edge plasma, (3) the validity of the WKB approximation used in the ray-tracing models in the steep edge density gradients.

  17. Casimir effect for scalar current densities in topologically nontrivial spaces

    CERN Document Server

    Bellucci, S; Saharyan, N A

    2015-01-01

    We evaluate the Hadamard function and the vacuum expectation value (VEV) of the current density for a charged scalar field, induced by flat boundaries in spacetimes with an arbitrary number of toroidally compactified spatial dimensions. The field operator obeys the Robin conditions on the boundaries and quasiperiodicity conditions with general phases along compact dimensions. In addition, the presence of a constant gauge field is assumed. The latter induces Aharonov-Bohm-type effect on the VEVs. There is a region in the space of the parameters in Robin boundary conditions where the vacuum state becomes unstable. The stability condition depends on the lengths of compact dimensions and is less restrictive than that for background with trivial topology. The vacuum current density is a periodic function of the magnetic flux, enclosed by compact dimensions, with the period equal to the flux quantum. It is explicitly decomposed into the boundary-free and boundary-induced contributions. In sharp contrast to the VEVs...

  18. Numerical Simulation of Density Current Evolution in a Diverging Channel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mitra Javan

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available When a buoyant inflow of higher density enters a reservoir, it sinks below the ambient water and forms an underflow. Downstream of the plunge point, the flow becomes progressively diluted due to the fluid entrainment. This study seeks to explore the ability of 2D width-averaged unsteady Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS simulation approach for resolving density currents in an inclined diverging channel. 2D width-averaged unsteady RANS equations closed by a buoyancy-modified − turbulence model are integrated in time with a second-order fractional step approach coupled with a direct implicit method and discretized in space on a staggered mesh using a second-order accurate finite volume approach incorporating a high-resolution semi-Lagrangian technique for the convective terms. A series of 2D width-averaged unsteady simulations is carried out for density currents. Comparisons with the experimental measurements and the other numerical simulations show that the predictions of velocity and density field are with reasonable accuracy.

  19. Electron density and gas density measurements in a millimeter-wave discharge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schaub, S. C., E-mail: sschaub@mit.edu; Hummelt, J. S.; Guss, W. C.; Shapiro, M. A.; Temkin, R. J. [Plasma Science and Fusion Center, Massachusetts Institute of Technology 167 Albany St., Bldg. NW16, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States)

    2016-08-15

    Electron density and neutral gas density have been measured in a non-equilibrium air breakdown plasma using optical emission spectroscopy and two-dimensional laser interferometry, respectively. A plasma was created with a focused high frequency microwave beam in air. Experiments were run with 110 GHz and 124.5 GHz microwaves at powers up to 1.2 MW. Microwave pulses were 3 μs long at 110 GHz and 2.2 μs long at 124.5 GHz. Electron density was measured over a pressure range of 25 to 700 Torr as the input microwave power was varied. Electron density was found to be close to the critical density, where the collisional plasma frequency is equal to the microwave frequency, over the pressure range studied and to vary weakly with input power. Neutral gas density was measured over a pressure range from 150 to 750 Torr at power levels high above the threshold for initiating breakdown. The two-dimensional structure of the neutral gas density was resolved. Intense, localized heating was found to occur hundreds of nanoseconds after visible plasma formed. This heating led to neutral gas density reductions of greater than 80% where peak plasma densities occurred. Spatial structure and temporal dynamics of gas heating at atmospheric pressure were found to agree well with published numerical simulations.

  20. High-current electron gun with a planar magnetron integrated with an explosive-emission cathode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiziridi, P. P.; Ozur, G. E.

    2017-05-01

    A new high-current electron gun with plasma anode and explosive-emission cathode integrated with planar pulsed powered magnetron is described. Five hundred twelve copper wires 1 mm in diameter and 15 mm in height serve as emitters. These emitters are installed on stainless steel disc (substrate) with 3-mm distance between them. Magnetron discharge plasma provides increased ion density on the periphery of plasma anode formed by high-current Penning discharge ignited within several milliseconds after starting of the magnetron discharge. The increased on the periphery ion density improves the uniformity of high-current electron beam produced in such an electron gun.

  1. Magnetic topology and current channels in plasmas with toroidal current density inversions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciro, D.; Caldas, I. L.

    2013-10-01

    The equilibrium magnetic field inside axisymmetric plasmas with inversions on the toroidal current density is considered. Previous works have shown that internal regions with negative current density lead to non-nested magnetic surfaces inside the plasma. Following these results, we derive a general expression relating the positive and negative currents inside the non-nested surfaces. This is done in terms of an anisotropy parameter that is model-independent and is based in very general properties of the magnetic field. We demonstrate that the positive currents in axisymmetric islands screen the negative one in the plasma center by reaching about twice its magnitude. Further, we illustrate these results by developing a family of analytical local solutions for the poloidal magnetic field in a region of interest that contains the inverted current. These local solutions exhibit non-nested magnetic surfaces with a combined current of at least twice the magnitude of the negative one, as prescribed from the topological arguments, and allow to study topological transitions driven by geometrical changes in the current profile. To conclude, we discuss the signatures of internal current density inversions in a confinement device and show that magnetic pitch measurements may be inappropriate to differentiate current reversals and small current holes in plasmas.

  2. Morphology and Density Structure of Post-CME Current Sheets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vrsnak, B.; Poletto, G.; Vujic, E.; Vourlidas, A.

    2009-01-01

    Eruption of a coronal mass ejection (CME) is believed to drag and open the coronal magnetic field, presumably leading to the formation of a large-scale current sheet and field relaxation by magnetic reconnection. This paper analyzes the physical characteristics of ray-like coronal features formed in the aftermath of CMEs, to confirm whether interpreting such phenomena in terms of a reconnecting current sheet is consistent with observations. Methods: The study focuses on UVCS/SOHO and LASCO/SOHO measurements of the ray width, density excess, and coronal velocity field as a function of the radial distance. The morphology of the rays implies that they are produced by Petschek-like reconnection in the large-scale current sheet formed in the wake of CME. The hypothesis is supported by the flow pattern, often showing outflows along the ray, and sometimes also inflows into the ray. The inferred inflow velocities range from 3 to 30 km/s, and are consistent with the narrow opening-angle of rays, which add up to a few degrees. The density of rays is an order of magnitude higher than in the ambient corona. The model results are consistent with the observations, revealing that the main cause of the density excess in rays is a transport of the dense plasma from lower to higher heights by the reconnection outflow.

  3. Electron-Acoustic Compressive Soliton and Electron Density Hole in Aurora

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王德焴

    2003-01-01

    Electron-acoustic solitary waves have been studied in an electron-beam plasma system. It is found that the solution of compressive soliton only exists within a limited range of soliton velocity around the electron beam velocity. A compressive electron-acoustic soliton always accompanies with a cold electron density hole. This theoretical model is used to explain the ‘fast solitary wave' event observed by the FAST satellite in the midaltitude auroral zone.

  4. Determination of coronal temperatures from electron density profiles

    CERN Document Server

    Lemaire, J F

    2011-01-01

    The most popular method for determining coronal temperatures is the scale-height-method (shm). It is based on electron density profiles inferred from White Light (WL) brightness measurements of the corona during solar eclipses. This method has been applied to several published coronal electron density models. The calculated temperature distributions reach a maximum at r > 1.3 RS, and therefore do not satisfy one of the conditions for applying the shm method. Another method is the hydrostatic equilibrium method (hst), which enables coronal temperature distributions to be determined, providing solutions to the hydrostatic equilibrium equation. The temperature maximas using the hst method are almost equal to those obtained using the shm method, but the temperature peak is always at significantly lower altitude when the hst-method is used than when the shm-method is used. A third and more recently developed method, dyn, can be used for the same published electron density profiles. The temperature distributions ob...

  5. Three-dimensional structure of the seismo-electromagnetic ionospheric electron density disturbances

    CERN Document Server

    Karpov, M I; Zolotov, O V

    2012-01-01

    The paper presents the three-dimensional structure of the ionospheric electron density disturbances triggered by the vertical electric currents flowing between the Earth and ionosphere over the faults before the strong earthquakes. The results were obtained using the global numerical Earth's Upper Atmosphere Model (UAM). The vertical electric currents flowing between the Earth and ionosphere over the faults were used as lower boundary conditions for the UAM electric potential equation. The UAM calculated 3D structure of the ionospheric electron density disturbances demonstrates an importance of all three ionospheric plasma drift directions (movements) - vertical, meridional and zonal but not only vertical one.

  6. Effects of Current Density on Microstructure of Titania Coatings by Micro-arc Oxidation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yue Yang; Hua Wu

    2012-01-01

    In the present study, titania coatings were prepared under different current density conditions in micro-arc oxidation (MAO) process on titanium alloy in NaAlO2 solution. The aim of this work was to study the effects of current density on the microstructure of titania coatings. The morphology and phase composition of the coatings were investigated by field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Raman spectra. The thickness and surface roughness of the coatings were characterized by confocal laser Scanning Microscopy (CLSM). The results showed that the coatings were composed of crystalline anatase and rutile phases of TiO2, and contain a network of evenly distributed small pores. It has also shown that an increase in current density leads to an increase in rutile content.

  7. Electron density and plasma dynamics of a colliding plasma experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wiechula, J., E-mail: wiechula@physik.uni-frankfurt.de; Schönlein, A.; Iberler, M.; Hock, C.; Manegold, T.; Bohlender, B.; Jacoby, J. [Plasma Physics Group, Institute of Applied Physics, Goethe University, 60438 Frankfurt am Main (Germany)

    2016-07-15

    We present experimental results of two head-on colliding plasma sheaths accelerated by pulsed-power-driven coaxial plasma accelerators. The measurements have been performed in a small vacuum chamber with a neutral-gas prefill of ArH{sub 2} at gas pressures between 17 Pa and 400 Pa and load voltages between 4 kV and 9 kV. As the plasma sheaths collide, the electron density is significantly increased. The electron density reaches maximum values of ≈8 ⋅ 10{sup 15} cm{sup −3} for a single accelerated plasma and a maximum value of ≈2.6 ⋅ 10{sup 16} cm{sup −3} for the plasma collision. Overall a raise of the plasma density by a factor of 1.3 to 3.8 has been achieved. A scaling behavior has been derived from the values of the electron density which shows a disproportionately high increase of the electron density of the collisional case for higher applied voltages in comparison to a single accelerated plasma. Sequences of the plasma collision have been taken, using a fast framing camera to study the plasma dynamics. These sequences indicate a maximum collision velocity of 34 km/s.

  8. C library for topological study of the electronic charge density.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vega, David; Aray, Yosslen; Rodríguez, Jesús

    2012-12-05

    The topological study of the electronic charge density is useful to obtain information about the kinds of bonds (ionic or covalent) and the atom charges on a molecule or crystal. For this study, it is necessary to calculate, at every space point, the electronic density and its electronic density derivatives values up to second order. In this work, a grid-based method for these calculations is described. The library, implemented for three dimensions, is based on a multidimensional Lagrange interpolation in a regular grid; by differentiating the resulting polynomial, the gradient vector, the Hessian matrix and the Laplacian formulas were obtained for every space point. More complex functions such as the Newton-Raphson method (to find the critical points, where the gradient is null) and the Cash-Karp Runge-Kutta method (used to make the gradient paths) were programmed. As in some crystals, the unit cell has angles different from 90°, the described library includes linear transformations to correct the gradient and Hessian when the grid is distorted (inclined). Functions were also developed to handle grid containing files (grd from DMol® program, CUBE from Gaussian® program and CHGCAR from VASP® program). Each one of these files contains the data for a molecular or crystal electronic property (such as charge density, spin density, electrostatic potential, and others) in a three-dimensional (3D) grid. The library can be adapted to make the topological study in any regular 3D grid by modifying the code of these functions.

  9. The Structure of the Local Interstellar Medium V: Electron Densities

    CERN Document Server

    Redfield, Seth

    2008-01-01

    We present a comprehensive survey of CII* absorption detections toward stars within 100 pc in order to measure the distribution of electron densities present in the local interstellar medium (LISM). Using high spectral resolution observations of nearby stars obtained by GHRS and STIS onboard the Hubble Space Telescope, we identify 13 sight lines with 23 individual CII* absorption components, which provide electron density measurements, the vast majority of which are new. We employ several strategies to determine more accurate CII column densities from the saturated CII resonance line, including, constraints of the line width from the optically thin CII* line, constraints from independent temperature measurements of the LISM gas based on line widths of other ions, and third, using measured SII column densities as a proxy for CII column densities. The sample of electron densities appears consistent with a log-normal distribution and an unweighted mean value of n_e(CII_SII) = 0.11^+0.10_-0.05 cm^-3. Seven indivi...

  10. Stochastic Time-Dependent Current-Density Functional Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Agosta, Roberto

    2008-03-01

    Static and dynamical density functional methods have been applied with a certain degree of success to a variety of closed quantum mechanical systems, i.e., systems that can be described via a Hamiltonian dynamics. However, the relevance of open quantum systems - those coupled to external environments, e.g., baths or reservoirs - cannot be overestimated. To investigate open quantum systems with DFT methods we have introduced a new theory, we have named Stochastic Time-Dependent Current Density Functional theory (S-TDCDFT) [1]: starting from a suitable description of the system dynamics via a stochastic Schrödinger equation [2], we have proven that given an initial quantum state and the coupling between the system and the environment, there is a one-to-one correspondence between the ensemble-averaged current density and the external vector potential applied to the system.In this talk, I will introduce the stochastic formalism needed for the description of open quantum systems, discuss in details the theorem of Stochastic TD-CDFT, and provide few examples of its applicability like the dissipative dynamics of excited systems, quantum-measurement theory and other applications relevant to charge and energy transport in nanoscale systems.[1] M. Di Ventra and R. D'Agosta, Physical Review Letters 98, 226403 (2007)[2] N.G. van Kampen, Stochastic processes in Physics and Chemistry, (North Holland, 2001), 2nd ed.

  11. Current-density functional theory study of the H2 molecule evolving under a strong ultrashort magnetic field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vikas, Hash(0xb7f6e60)

    2012-01-01

    Hydrogen molecule in a strong ultrashort magnetic field is investigated through a current-density functional theory (CDFT) and quantum fluid dynamics (QFD) based approach employing current-density dependent vector exchange-correlation potential and energy density functional derived with a vorticity variable. The numerical computations through the CDFT based approach are performed for the H2 molecule, starting initially from its field-free ground state, in a parallel internuclear axis and magnetic field-axis configuration with the internuclear separation R ranging from 0.1 a.u. to 14.0 a.u., and the strength of the time-dependent (TD) magnetic field varying between 0-1011 G over a few femtoseconds. The numerical results are compared with that obtained using an approach based on the current-density independent approximation under similar computational constraints but employing only scalar exchange-correlation potential dependent on the electronic charge-density alone. The current-density based approach yields exchange- and correlation energy as well as electronic charge-density of the H2 molecule drastically different from that obtained using current-independent approach, in particular, at TD magnetic field-strengths >109 G during a typical time-period of the field when the magnetic-field had attained maximum applied field-strength and is switched to a decreasing ramp function. This nonadiabatic behavior of the TD electronic charge-density is traced to the TD vorticity-dependent vector exchange-correlation potential of the CDFT based approach. The interesting electron dynamics of the H2 molecule in strong TD magnetic field is further elucidated by treating electronic charge-density as an `electron-fluid'. The present work also reveals interesting real-time dynamics on the attosecond time-scale in the electronic charge-density distribution of the hydrogen molecule.

  12. Charge, density and electron temperature in a molecular ultracold plasma

    CERN Document Server

    Rennick, C J; Ortega-Arroyo, J; Godin, P J; Grant, E R

    2009-01-01

    A Rydberg gas of NO entrained in a supersonic molecular beam releases electrons as it evolves to form an ultracold plasma. The size of this signal, compared with that extracted by the subsequent application of a pulsed electric field, determines the absolute magnitude of the plasma charge. This information, combined with the number density of ions, supports a simple thermochemical model that explains the evolution of the plasma to an ultracold electron temperature.

  13. Calculations of current densities for neutral and doubly charged persubstituted benzenes using effective core potentials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rauhalahti, Markus; Taubert, Stefan; Sundholm, Dage; Liégeois, Vincent

    2017-03-08

    Magnetically induced current density susceptibilities and ring-current strengths have been calculated for neutral and doubly charged persubstituted benzenes C6X6 and C6X6(2+) with X = F, Cl, Br, I, At, SeH, SeMe, TeH, TeMe, and SbH2. The current densities have been calculated using the gauge-including magnetically induced current (GIMIC) method, which has been interfaced to the Gaussian electronic structure code rendering current density calculations using effective core potentials (ECP) feasible. Relativistic effects on the ring-current strengths have been assessed by employing ECP calculations of the current densities. Comparison of the ring-current strengths obtained in calculations on C6At6 and C6At6(2+) using relativistic and non-relativistic ECPs show that scalar relativistic effects have only a small influence on the ring-current strengths. Comparisons of the ring-current strengths and ring-current profiles show that the C6I6(2+), C6At6(2+), C6(SeH)6(2+), C6(SeMe)6(2+), C6(TeH)6(2+), C6(TeMe)6(2+), and C6(SbH2)6(2+) dications are doubly aromatic sustaining spatially separated ring currents in the carbon ring and in the exterior of the molecule. The C6I6(+) radical cation is also found to be doubly aromatic with a weaker ring current than obtained for the dication.

  14. High Current Density 2D/3D Esaki Tunnel Diodes

    CERN Document Server

    Krishnamoorthy, Sriram; Lee, Choong Hee; Zhang, Yuewei; McCulloch, William D; Johnson, Jared M; Hwang, Jinwoo; Wu, Yiying; Rajan, Siddharth

    2016-01-01

    The integration of two-dimensional materials such as transition metal dichalcogenides with bulk semiconductors offer interesting opportunities for 2D/3D heterojunction-based novel device structures without any constraints of lattice matching. By exploiting the favorable band alignment at the GaN/MoS2 heterojunction, an Esaki interband tunnel diode is demonstrated by transferring large area, Nb-doped, p-type MoS2 onto heavily n-doped GaN. A peak current density of 446 A/cm2 with repeatable room temperature negative differential resistance, peak to valley current ratio of 1.2, and minimal hysteresis was measured in the MoS2/GaN non-epitaxial tunnel diode. A high current density of 1 kA/cm2 was measured in the Zener mode (reverse bias) at -1 V bias. The GaN/MoS2 tunnel junction was also modeled by treating MoS2 as a bulk semiconductor, and the electrostatics at the 2D/3D interface was found to be crucial in explaining the experimentally observed device characteristics.

  15. Emergent loop current order from pair density wave superconductivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kashyap, Manoj; Melchert, Drew; Agterberg, Daniel

    2015-03-01

    In addition to charge density wave (CDW) order, there is evidence that the pseudogap phase in the cuprates breaks time reversal symmetry. Here we show that pair density wave (PDW) states give rise to a translational invariant non-superconducting order parameter that breaks time reversal and parity symmetries, but preserves their product. This secondary order parameter has a different origin, but shares the same symmetry properties as a magnetoelectric loop current order that has been proposed earlier in the context of the cuprates to explain the appearance of intra-cell magnetic order. We further show that, due to fluctuations, this secondary loop current order, which represents the breaking of discrete symmetries, can preempt PDW order, which breaks both continuous and discrete symmetries. In such a phase, the emergent loop current order coexists with spatial short range CDW and short range superconducting order. Finally, we propose a PDW phase that accounts for intra-cell magnetic order and the Kerr effect, has CDW order consistent with x-ray scattering and nuclear magnetic resonance observations, and quasi-particle properties consistent with angle resolved photoemission scattering. We acknowledge support from NSF Grant No. DMR-1335215

  16. Effect of Applied Current Density on Morphological and Structural Properties of Electrodeposited Fe-Cu Films

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Umut Sarac; M. Celalettin Baykul

    2012-01-01

    A detailed study has been carried out to investigate the effect of applied current density on the composition, crystallographic structure, grain size, and surface morphology of Fe-Cu films. X-ray diffraction (XRD) results show that the films consist of a mixture of face-centered cubic (fcc) Cu and body centered cubic (bcc) ~-Fe phases. The average crystalline size of both Fe and Cu particles decreases as the applied current density becomes more negative. Compositional analysis of Fe-Cu films indicates that the Fe content within the films increases with decreasing current density towards more negative values. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM) have been used to investigate the surface morphology of Fe-Cu films. It is observed that the surface morphology of the films changes from dendritic structure to a cauliflower structure as the applied current density becomes more negative. The surface roughness and grain size of the Fe-Cu films decrease with decreasing applied current density towards more negative values.

  17. Generalization of the Kohn-Sham system enabling representing arbitary one electron density matrices

    CERN Document Server

    van Dam, Hubertus J J

    2015-01-01

    Density functional theory is currently the most widely applied method in electronic structure theory. The Kohn-Sham method, based on a fictitious system of non-interacting particles, is the work horse of the theory. The particular form of the Kohn-Sham wavefunction admits only idem-potent one electron density matrices whereas wavefunctions of correlated electrons in post-Hartree-Fock methods invariably have fractional occupation numbers. Here we show that by generalizing the orbital concept, and introducing a suitable dot-product as well as a probability density a non-interacting system can be chosen that can represent the one-electron density matrix of any system, even one with fractional occupation numbers. This fictitious system ensures that the exact electron density is accessible within density functional theory. It can also serve as the basis for reduced density matrix functional theory. Moreover, to aid the analysis of the results the orbitals may be assigned energies from a mean-field Hamiltonian. Thi...

  18. Analysis of the IMAGE RPI electron density data and CHAMP plasmasphere electron density reconstructions with focus on plasmasphere modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerzen, T.; Feltens, J.; Jakowski, N.; Galkin, I.; Reinisch, B.; Zandbergen, R.

    2016-09-01

    The electron density of the topside ionosphere and the plasmasphere contributes essentially to the overall Total Electron Content (TEC) budget affecting Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSS) signals. The plasmasphere can cause half or even more of the GNSS range error budget due to ionospheric propagation errors. This paper presents a comparative study of different plasmasphere and topside ionosphere data aiming at establishing an appropriate database for plasmasphere modelling. We analyze electron density profiles along the geomagnetic field lines derived from the Imager for Magnetopause-to-Aurora Global Exploration (IMAGE) satellite/Radio Plasma Imager (RPI) records of remote plasma sounding with radio waves. We compare these RPI profiles with 2D reconstructions of the topside ionosphere and plasmasphere electron density derived from GNSS based TEC measurements onboard the Challenging Minisatellite Payload (CHAMP) satellite. Most of the coincidences between IMAGE profiles and CHAMP reconstructions are detected in the region with L-shell between 2 and 5. In general the CHAMP reconstructed electron densities are below the IMAGE profile densities, with median of the CHAMP minus IMAGE residuals around -588 cm-3. Additionally, a comparison is made with electron densities derived from passive radio wave RPI measurements onboard the IMAGE satellite. Over the available 2001-2005 period of IMAGE measurements, the considered combined data from the active and passive RPI operations cover the region within a latitude range of ±60°N, all longitudes, and an L-shell ranging from 1.2 to 15. In the coincidence regions (mainly 2 ⩽ L ⩽ 4), we check the agreement between available active and passive RPI data. The comparison shows that the measurements are well correlated, with a median residual of ∼52 cm-3. The RMS and STD values of the relative residuals are around 22% and 21% respectively. In summary, the results encourage the application of IMAGE RPI data for

  19. Time-dependent density functional theory for many-electron systems interacting with cavity photons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tokatly, I V

    2013-06-07

    Time-dependent (current) density functional theory for many-electron systems strongly coupled to quantized electromagnetic modes of a microcavity is proposed. It is shown that the electron-photon wave function is a unique functional of the electronic (current) density and the expectation values of photonic coordinates. The Kohn-Sham system is constructed, which allows us to calculate the above basic variables by solving self-consistent equations for noninteracting particles. We suggest possible approximations for the exchange-correlation potentials and discuss implications of this approach for the theory of open quantum systems. In particular we show that it naturally leads to time-dependent density functional theory for systems coupled to the Caldeira-Leggett bath.

  20. The current density in quantum electrodynamics in external potentials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schlemmer, Jan, E-mail: jan.schlemmer@univie.ac.at [Fakultät für Physik, Universität Wien, Boltzmanngasse 5, 1090 Wien (Austria); Zahn, Jochen, E-mail: jochen.zahn@itp.uni-leipzig.de [Institut für Theoretische Physik, Universität Leipzig, Brüderstr. 16, 04103 Leipzig (Germany)

    2015-08-15

    We review different definitions of the current density for quantized fermions in the presence of an external electromagnetic field. Several deficiencies in the popular prescription due to Schwinger and the mode sum formula for static external potentials are pointed out. We argue that Dirac’s method, which is the analog of the Hadamard point-splitting employed in quantum field theory in curved space–times, is conceptually the most satisfactory. As a concrete example, we discuss vacuum polarization and the stress–energy tensor for massless fermions in 1+1 dimension. Also a general formula for the vacuum polarization in static external potentials in 3+1 dimensions is derived.

  1. Discretizing Transient Current Densities in the Maxwell Equations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stowell, M L

    2008-11-25

    We will briefly discuss a technique for applying transient volumetric current sources in full-wave, time-domain electromagnetic simulations which avoids the need for divergence cleaning. The method involves both 'edge-elements' and 'face-elements' in conjunction with a particle-in-cell scheme to track the charge density. Results from a realistic, 6.7 million element, 3D simulation are shown. While the author may have a finite element bias the technique should be applicable to finite difference methods as well.

  2. Measurement of D-region electron density by partial reflections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olsen, R. O.; Mott, D. L.; Gammill, B. G.

    1978-01-01

    Measurements of electron density in the lower ionosphere were made at White Sands Missile Range throughout the STRATCOM VIII launch day using a partial-reflection sounder. Information regarding the sounder's antenna pattern was gained from the passage of the balloon over the array.

  3. Extreme atmospheric electron densities created by extensive air showers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rutjes, Casper; Camporeale, Enrico; Ebert, Ute; Buitink, Stijn; Scholten, Olaf; Trinh, Gia

    2016-04-01

    A sufficient density of free electrons and strong electric fields are the basic requirements to start any electrical discharge. In the context of thunderstorm discharges it has become clear that in addition droplets and or ice particles are required to enhance the electric field to values above breakdown. In our recent study [1] we have shown that these three ingredients have to interplay to allow for lightning inception, triggered by an extensive air shower event. The extensive air showers are a very stochastic natural phenomenon, creating highly coherent bursts of extreme electron density in our atmosphere. Predicting these electron density bursts accurately one has to take the uncertainty of the input variables into account. To this end we use uncertainty quantification methods, like in [2], to post-process our detailed Monte Carlo extensive air shower simulations, done with the CORSIKA [3] software package, which provides an efficient and elegant way to determine the distribution of the atmospheric electron density enhancements. We will present the latest results. [1] Dubinova, A., Rutjes, C., Ebert, E., Buitink, S., Scholten, O., and Trinh, G. T. N. "Prediction of Lightning Inception by Large Ice Particles and Extensive Air Showers." PRL 115 015002 (2015) [2] G.J.A. Loeven, J.A.S. Witteveen, H. Bijl, Probabilistic collocation: an efficient nonintrusive approach for arbitrarily distributed parametric uncertainties, 45th AIAA Aerospace Sciences Meeting, Reno, Nevada, 2007, AIAA-2007-317 [3] Heck, Dieter, et al. CORSIKA: A Monte Carlo code to simulate extensive air showers. No. FZKA-6019. 1998.

  4. Covariance and correlation estimation in electron-density maps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altomare, Angela; Cuocci, Corrado; Giacovazzo, Carmelo; Moliterni, Anna; Rizzi, Rosanna

    2012-03-01

    Quite recently two papers have been published [Giacovazzo & Mazzone (2011). Acta Cryst. A67, 210-218; Giacovazzo et al. (2011). Acta Cryst. A67, 368-382] which calculate the variance in any point of an electron-density map at any stage of the phasing process. The main aim of the papers was to associate a standard deviation to each pixel of the map, in order to obtain a better estimate of the map reliability. This paper deals with the covariance estimate between points of an electron-density map in any space group, centrosymmetric or non-centrosymmetric, no matter the correlation between the model and target structures. The aim is as follows: to verify if the electron density in one point of the map is amplified or depressed as an effect of the electron density in one or more other points of the map. High values of the covariances are usually connected with undesired features of the map. The phases are the primitive random variables of our probabilistic model; the covariance changes with the quality of the model and therefore with the quality of the phases. The conclusive formulas show that the covariance is also influenced by the Patterson map. Uncertainty on measurements may influence the covariance, particularly in the final stages of the structure refinement; a general formula is obtained taking into account both phase and measurement uncertainty, valid at any stage of the crystal structure solution.

  5. Relations among several nuclear and electronic density functional reactivity indexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torrent-Sucarrat, Miquel; Luis, Josep M.; Duran, Miquel; Toro-Labbé, Alejandro; Solà, Miquel

    2003-11-01

    An expansion of the energy functional in terms of the total number of electrons and the normal coordinates within the canonical ensemble is presented. A comparison of this expansion with the expansion of the energy in terms of the total number of electrons and the external potential leads to new relations among common density functional reactivity descriptors. The formulas obtained provide explicit links between important quantities related to the chemical reactivity of a system. In particular, the relation between the nuclear and the electronic Fukui functions is recovered. The connection between the derivatives of the electronic energy and the nuclear repulsion energy with respect to the external potential offers a proof for the "Quantum Chemical le Chatelier Principle." Finally, the nuclear linear response function is defined and the relation of this function with the electronic linear response function is given.

  6. On the theory of the electric field and current density in a superconductor carrying transport current

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carr, W.J. [LEI 700 Technology Dr., Pittsburgh, PA 15219 (United States)]. E-mail: wjamescarrjr@att.net

    2005-09-15

    A theory is given to explain the physics behind the flow of low-frequency ac transport current around a closed superconducting circuit, where the circuit consists of two long, straight, parallel, uniform conductors, connected to each other at one end and to an applied emf at the other end. Thus one conductor is the return path for the other. A question of interest is what drives the current at any given point in the circuit. The answer given here is a surface charge, where the purpose of the surface charge is to spread the local emf around the circuit, so that at each point in the conductor it produces, together with the electric field of the vector potential, the electric field necessary for the current to flow. But it is then necessary to explain how the surface charge gets there, which is the central problem of the present analysis. The conclusion is that the total current density consists of the superposition of a large transport current and a very much smaller current system of a different symmetry. The transport current density is defined as a two-dimensional current density with no divergence. It flows uniformly along the conductor length, but can vary over the cross-section. The small additional current density has a much different symmetry, being three-dimensional and diverging at the surface of the conductor. Based on a slightly modified Bean model the transport current is treated as supercurrent having the value {+-}J {sub c}, while the small additional system of current is like normal current, with a density given by the electric field divided by a resistivity. The electric field is computed from the sum of the negative time derivative of the vector potential and the negative gradient of the scalar potential due to the surface charge. It has components parallel and perpendicular to the long axis of the conductor. Thus the small normal current density has a perpendicular component which flows into or out of the surface thereby creating the surface charge

  7. Electron Momentum Density and Phase Transition in ZnS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Munjal

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The electron momentum density distribution and phase transition in ZnS are reported in this paper. The calculations are performed on the basis of density functional theory (DFT based on the linear combination of atomic orbitals (LCAO method. To compare the theoretical Compton profile, the measurement on polycrystalline ZnS has been made using a Compton spectrometer employing 59.54 keV gamma rays. The spherically averaged theoretical Compton profile is in agreement with the measurement. On the basis of equal valence-electron-density Compton profiles, it is found that ZnS is less covalent as compared to ZnSe. The present study suggests zincblende (ZB to rocksalt (RS phase transition at 13.7 GPa. The calculated transition pressure is found in good agreement with the previous investigations.

  8. Doubled critical current density in Bi-2212 round wires by reduction of the residual bubble density

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, J.; Starch, W. L.; Hannion, M.; Kametani, F.; Trociewitz, U. P.; Hellstrom, E. E.; Larbalestier, D. C.

    2011-08-01

    We have recently shown that the gas present in the only ~ 70% dense filaments of as-drawn Bi-2212 wire agglomerates into large bubbles that fill the entire filament diameter during the melt phase of the heat treatment. Once formed, these bubbles never disappear, although they can be bridged by 2212 grains formed on cooling. In order to test the effect of these bubbles on the critical current Ic, we increased the density of the filaments after drawing using 2 GPa of cold isostatic pressure, finding that the bubble density and size were greatly reduced and that Ic could be at least doubled. We conclude that enhancement of the filament packing density is of great importance for making major Ic improvements in this very useful, round superconducting wire.

  9. High current densities enable exoelectrogens to outcompete aerobic heterotrophs for substrate

    KAUST Repository

    Ren, Lijiao

    2014-08-05

    © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Chemical oxygen demand (COD) removal rates could be described by first-order kinetics with respect to COD concentration at different current densities, even under open circuit conditions with no current generation. The COD concentration was reduced more quickly with current generation due to the greater consumption of substrate by exoelectrogens, and less substrate was lost to aerobic heterotrophs. Higher current densities enabled exoelectrogens to outcompete aerobic heterotrophs for substrate, allowing for increased coulombic efficiencies with current densities. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. In mixed-culture microbial fuel cells (MFCs), exoelectrogens and other microorganisms compete for substrate. It has previously been assumed that substrate losses to other terminal electron acceptors over a fed-batch cycle, such as dissolved oxygen, are constant. However, a constant rate of substrate loss would only explain small increases in coulombic efficiencies (CEs, the fraction of substrate recovered as electrical current) with shorter cycle times, but not the large increases in CE that are usually observed with higher current densities and reduced cycle times. To better understand changes in CEs, COD concentrations were measured over time in fed-batch, single-chamber, air-cathode MFCs at different current densities (external resistances). COD degradation rates were all found to be first-order with respect to COD concentration, even under open circuit conditions with no current generation (first-order rate constant of 0.14±0.01h-1). The rate of COD removal increased when there was current generation, with the highest rate constant (0.33±0.02h-1) obtained at the lowest external resistance (100Ω). Therefore, as the substrate concentration was reduced more quickly due to current generation, the rate of loss of substrate to non-exoelectrogens decreased due to this first-order substrate-concentration dependence. As a result, coulombic

  10. He 2++ molecular ion in a strong time-dependent magnetic field: a current-density functional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vikas

    2011-08-01

    The He 2++ molecular ion exposed to a strong ultrashort time-dependent (TD) magnetic field of the order of 10(9) G is investigated through a quantum fluid dynamics (QFD) and current-density functional theory (CDFT) based approach using vector exchange-correlation (XC) potential and energy density functional that depend not only on the electronic charge-density but also on the current density. The TD-QFD-CDFT computations are performed in a parallel internuclear-axis and magnetic field-axis configuration at the field-free equilibrium internuclear separation R = 1.3 au with the field-strength varying between 0 and 10(11) G. The TD behavior of the exchange- and correlation energy of the He 2++ is analyzed and compared with that obtained using a [B-TD-QFD-density functional theory (DFT)] approach based on the conventional TD-DFT under similar computational constraints but using only scalar XC potential and energy density functional dependent on the electronic charge-density alone. The CDFT based approach yields TD exchange- and correlation energy and TD electronic charge-density significantly different from that obtained using the conventional TD-DFT based approach, particularly, at typical magnetic field strengths and during a typical time period of the TD field. This peculiar behavior of the CDFT-based approach is traced to the TD current-density dependent vector XC potential, which can induce nonadiabatic effects causing retardation of the oscillating electronic charge density. Such dissipative electron dynamics of the He 2++ molecular ion is elucidated by treating electronic charge density as an electron-"fluid" in the terminology of QFD.

  11. Lower hybrid counter current drive for edge current density modification in DIII-D

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fenstermacher, M.E.; Nevins, W.M. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (US); Porkolab, M.; Bonoli, P.T. [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology, Cambridge, MA (US). Plasma Fusion Center; Harvey, R.W. [General Atomics, San Diego, CA (US)

    1993-07-01

    Each of the Advanced Tokamak operating modes in DIII-D is thought to have a distinctive current density profile. So far these modes have only been achieved transiently through experiments which ramp the plasma current and shape. Extension of these modes to steady state requires non-inductive current profile control, e.g. with lower hybrid current drive (LHCD). Calculations of LHCD have been done for DIII-D using the ACCOME and CQL3D codes, showing that counter driven current at the plasma edge can cancel some of the undesirable edge bootstrap current and potentially extend the VH-mode. Results are presented for scenarios using 2.45 GHz LH waves launched from both the midplane and off-axis ports. The sensitivity of the results to injected power, n{sub e} and T{sub e}, and launched wave spectrum is also shown.

  12. Tokamak equilibria with strong toroidal current density reversal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ludwig, G. O.; Rodrigues, Paulo; Bizarro, João P. S.

    2013-05-01

    The equilibrium of large magnetic islands in the core of a tokamak under conditions of strong toroidal current density reversal is investigated by a new method. The method uses distinct spectral representations to describe each simply connected region as well as the containing shell geometry. This ideal conducting shell may substitute for the plasma edge region or take a virtual character representing the external equilibrium field effect. The internal equilibrium of the islands is solved within the framework of the variational moment method. Equivalent surface current densities are defined on the boundaries of the islands and on the thin containing shell, giving a straightforward formulation to the interaction between regions. The equilibrium of the island-shell system is determined by matching moments of the Dirichlet boundary conditions. Finally, the macroscopic stability against a class of tilting displacements is examined by means of an energy principle. It is found out that the up-down symmetric islands are stable to this particular perturbation and geometry but the asymmetric system presents a bifurcation in the equilibrium.

  13. Particle dynamics in the electron current layer in collisionless magnetic reconnection

    CERN Document Server

    Zenitani, Seiji

    2016-01-01

    Particle dynamics in the electron current layer in collisionless magnetic reconnection is investigated by using a particle-in-cell simulation. Electron motion and velocity distribution functions are studied by tracking self-consistent trajectories. New classes of electron orbits are discovered: figure-eight-shaped regular orbits inside the electron jet, noncrossing regular orbits on the jet flanks, noncrossing Speiser orbits, and nongyrotropic electrons in the downstream of the jet termination region. Properties of a super-Alfv\\'{e}nic outflow jet are attributed to an ensemble of electrons traveling through Speiser orbits. Noncrossing orbits are mediated by the polarization electric field near the electron current layer, and it turns out that they are non-negligible in number density. The impact of these new orbits to electron mixing, spatial distribution of energetic electrons, and observational signatures, is presented.

  14. The importance of current contributions to shielding constants in density-functional theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reimann, Sarah; Ekström, Ulf; Stopkowicz, Stella; Teale, Andrew M; Borgoo, Alex; Helgaker, Trygve

    2015-07-28

    The sources of error in the calculation of nuclear-magnetic-resonance shielding constants determined by density-functional theory are examined. Highly accurate Kohn-Sham wave functions are obtained from coupled-cluster electron density functions and used to define accurate-but current independent-density-functional shielding constants. These new reference values, in tandem with high-accuracy coupled-cluster shielding constants, provide a benchmark for the assessment of errors in common density-functional approximations. In particular the role of errors arising in the diamagnetic and paramagnetic terms is investigated, with particular emphasis on the role of current-dependence in the latter. For carbon and nitrogen the current correction is found to be, in some cases, larger than 10 ppm. This indicates that the absence of this correction in general purpose exchange-correlation functionals is one of the main sources of error in shielding calculations using density functional theory. It is shown that the current correction improves the shielding performance of many popular approximate DFT functionals.

  15. Ion Current Density Calculation of the Inductive Radio Frequency Ion Source

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V.I. Voznyi

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available A radio-frequency (RF inductive ion source at 27.12 MHz is investigated. With a global model of the argon discharge, plasma density, electron temperature and ion current density of the ion source is calculated in relation to absorbed RF power and gas pressure as a discharge chamber size changes. It is found that ion beam current density grows as the discharge chamber size decreases. Calculations show that in the RF source with a discharge chamber 30 mm in diameter and 35 mm long the ion current density is 40 mA/cm2 at 100 W of absorbed RF power and 7 mTorr of pressure, and agrees well with experimentally measured value of 43 mA/cm2. With decreasing discharge chamber diameter to 15 mm ion current density can reach 85 mA/cm2 at absorbed RF power of 100 W.

  16. Electron Density Determination, Bonding and Properties of Tetragonal Ferromagnetic Intermetallics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wiezorek, Jorg [Univ. of Pittsburgh, PA (United States)

    2016-09-01

    The project developed quantitative convergent-beam electron diffraction (QCBED) methods by energy-filtered transmission electron microscopy (EFTEM) and used them in combination with density functional theory (DFT) calculations to study the electron density distribution in metallic and intermetallic phases with different cubic and non-cubic crystal structures that comprise elements with d-electron shells. The experimental methods developed here focus on the bonding charge distribution as one of the quantum mechanical characteristics central for understanding of intrinsic properties and validation of DFT calculations. Multiple structure and temperature factors have been measured simultaneously from nano-scale volumes of high-quality crystal with sufficient accuracy and precision for comparison with electron density distribution calculations by DFT. The often anisotropic temperature factors for the different atoms and atom sites in chemically ordered phases can differ significantly from those known for relevant pure element crystals due to bonding effects. Thus they have been measured from the same crystal volumes from which the structure factors have been determined. The ferromagnetic ordered intermetallic phases FePd and FePt are selected as model systems for 3d-4d and 3d-5d electron interactions, while the intermetallic phases NiAl and TiAl are used to probe 3d-3p electron interactions. Additionally, pure transition metal elements with d-electrons have been studied. FCC metals exhibit well defined delocalized bonding charge in tetrahedral sites, while less directional, more distributed bonding charge attains in BCC metals. Agreement between DFT calculated and QCBED results degrades as d-electron levels fill in the elements, and for intermetallics as d-d interactions become prominent over p-d interactions. Utilizing the LDA+U approach enabled inclusion of onsite Coulomb-repulsion effects in DFT calculations, which can afford improved agreements with QCBED results

  17. Maps for electron cloud density in Large Hadron Collider dipoles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Demma

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available The generation of a quasistationary electron cloud inside the beam pipe through beam-induced multipacting processes has become an area of intensive study. The analyses performed so far have been based on heavy computer simulations taking into account photoelectron production, secondary emission, electron dynamics, and space charge effects, providing a detailed description of the electron-cloud evolution. Iriso and Peggs [U. Iriso and S. Peggs, Phys. Rev. ST Accel. Beams 8, 024403 (2005PRABFM1098-440210.1103/PhysRevSTAB.8.024403] have shown that, for the typical parameters of RHIC, the bunch-to-bunch evolution of the average electron-cloud density at a point can be represented by a cubic map. Simulations based on this map formalism are orders of magnitude faster compared to those based on standard particle tracking codes. In this communication we show that the map formalism is also applicable to the case of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC, and that, in particular, it reproduces the average electron-cloud densities computed using a reference code to within ∼15% for general LHC bunch filling patterns. We also illustrate the dependence of the polynomial map coefficients on the physical parameters affecting the electron cloud (secondary emission yield, bunch charge, bunch spacing, etc..

  18. Coupled-channels quantum theory of electronic flux density in electronically adiabatic processes: fundamentals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diestler, D J

    2012-03-22

    The Born-Oppenheimer (BO) description of electronically adiabatic molecular processes predicts a vanishing electronic flux density (j(e)), =1/2∫dR[Δ(b) (x;R) - Δ(a) (x;R)] even though the electrons certainly move in response to the movement of the nuclei. This article, the first of a pair, proposes a quantum-mechanical "coupled-channels" (CC) theory that allows the approximate extraction of j(e) from the electronically adiabatic BO wave function . The CC theory is detailed for H(2)(+), in which case j(e) can be resolved into components associated with two channels α (=a,b), each of which corresponds to the "collision" of an "internal" atom α (proton a or b plus electron) with the other nucleus β (proton b or a). The dynamical role of the electron, which accommodates itself instantaneously to the motion of the nuclei, is submerged in effective electronic probability (population) densities, Δ(α), associated with each channel (α). The Δ(α) densities are determined by the (time-independent) BO electronic energy eigenfunction, which depends parametrically on the configuration of the nuclei, the motion of which is governed by the usual BO nuclear Schrödinger equation. Intuitively appealing formal expressions for the electronic flux density are derived for H(2)(+).

  19. Electron surfing acceleration in a current sheet of flares

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    A model of electron acceleration in a current sheet of flares is studied by the analytical approximation solution and the test particle simulation. The electron can be trapped in a potential of propagating electrostatic wave. The trapped electron moving with the phase velocity vp of wave may be effectively accelerated by evc p× Bz force along the outflow direction in the current sheet, if a criterion condition K > 0 for electron surfing acceleration is satisfied. The electron will be accelerated continuously until the electron detrap from the wave potential at the turning point S.

  20. Magnetization of a Current-Carrying Superconducting Disk with B-Dependent Critical Current Density

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sohrabi, Mahdi; Babaei-Brojeny, Ali A.

    2010-11-01

    In the frame work of the critical state model (CSM), the magnetic response of a thin type-II superconducting disk that carries a radial transport current and is subjected to an applied magnetic field have been studied. To this end, we have studied the process of the magnetic flux-penetration. For a disk initially containing no magnetic flux but carrying a radial current, when a perpendicular magnetic field is applied, magnetic flux-penetration occurs in three stages: (1) the magnetic flux gradually penetrates from the edges of the disk until an instability occurs, (2) there is a rapid inflow of magnetic flux into the disk’s central region, which becomes resistive, and (3) magnetic flux continues to enter the disk, while persistent azimuthal currents flow in an outer annular region where the net current density is equal to J c . Also the behavior of a current-carrying disk subjected to an AC magnetic field is calculated. The magnetic flux, the current profiles and the magnetization hysteresis loops are calculated for several commonly used J c ( B) dependences. Finally, the results of the applications of the local field-dependent of the critical current density J c ( B) are compared with those obtained from the Bean model.

  1. 76 FR 65212 - Henkel Corporation, Currently Known as Henkel Electronic Materials, LLC, Electronic Adhesives...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-20

    ... Employment and Training Administration Henkel Corporation, Currently Known as Henkel Electronic Materials..., Massachusetts location to combine the legacy Henkel Electronic Materials business and The National Starch Electronic Materials business following a company purchase in April 2008. Workers separated from...

  2. The electron density of Saturn's magnetosphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. W. Morooka

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available We have investigated statistically the electron density below 5 cm−3 in the magnetosphere of Saturn (7–80 RS, Saturn radii using 44 orbits of the floating potential data from the RPWS Langmuir probe (LP onboard Cassini. The density distribution shows a clear dependence on the distance from the Saturnian rotation axis (√X2+Y2 as well as on the distance from the equatorial plane (|Z|, indicating a disc-like structure. From the characteristics of the density distribution, we have identified three regions: the extension of the plasma disc, the magnetodisc region, and the lobe regions. The plasma disc region is at L<15, where L is the radial distance to the equatorial crossing of the dipole magnetic field line, and confined to |Z|<5 RS. The magnetodisc is located beyond L=15, and its density has a large variability. The variability has quasi-periodic characteristics with a periodicity corresponding to the planetary rotation. For Z>15 RS, the magnetospheric density distribution becomes constant in Z. However, the density still varies quasi-periodically with the planetary rotation also in this region. In fact, the quasi-periodic variation has been observed all over the magnetosphere beyond L=15. The region above Z=15 RS is identified as the lobe region. We also found that the magnetosphere can occasionally move latitudinally under the control of the density in the magnetosphere and the solar wind. From the empirical distributions of the electron densities obtained in this study, we have constructed an electron density model of the Saturnian nightside magnetosphere beyond 7 RS. The obtained model can well reproduce the observed density distribution, and can thus be useful for magnetospheric modelling studies.

  3. Hydraulic jumps within pyroclastic density currents and their sedimentary record

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douillet, G.; Mueller, S.; Kueppers, U.; Dingwell, D. B.

    2013-12-01

    This contribution presents a complete and comprehensive formulation of the hydraulic jump phenomenon and reviews sedimentary structures that may be associated with them. Beginning from the general fluid phenomenon, we then focus on examples from pyroclastic density currents in order to infer dynamic parameters on the parent flows. A hydraulic jump is a fluid dynamics phenomenon that corresponds to the sudden increase of the thickness of a flow accompanied by a decrease of its velocity and/or density. A hydraulic jump is the expression of the transition of the flow from two different flow regimes: supercritical to subcritical. This entrains a change in the energy balance between kinetic energy and gravity potential energy. Recently, the terms of 'pneumatic jumps' have been used for similar phenomenon driven within a gas phase, and granular jumps for dense granular flows. It is thought that such strong changes in the flow conditions may leave characteristic structures in the sedimentary record. Indeed, the main variables influencing the sedimentation rate are the flow velocity, particle concentration and turbulence level, all of them strongly affected by a hydraulic jump. Structures deposited by hydraulic/pneumatic jumps have been called cyclic steps and chute and pool structures. Chute and pools represent the record of a single supercritical to subcritical transition, whereas cyclic steps are produced by stable trains of hydraulic jumps and subsequent re-accelerations. Pyroclastic density currents (PDCs) are gas and pyroclasts flows. As such, they can be subjected to granular and pneumatic jumps and their deposit have often been interpreted as containing records of jumps. Steep sided truncations covered by lensoidal layers have been interpreted as the record of internal jumps within density stratified flows. Fines-depleted breccias at breaks in slope are thought to result from the enhanced turbulence at a jump of the entire flow. Sudden increases in thickness of

  4. High-current-density gun with a LaB6 cathode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebihara, K.; Hiramatsu, S.

    1996-08-01

    To develop a high-current electron gun for an induction linac, a prototype of a Pierce-type electron gun using planar 12-mm-diam lanthanum hexaboride (LaB6) is studied as a thermionic emitter at high current densities. The cathode is heated up to temperatures of 1750 °C by electron bombardment and thermal radiation from a tungsten heater. The heater that has the highest temperature in the gun is thermally isolated from the outer vacuum chamber with heat shields. The bombardment voltage of ˜1 kV is typically applied to a gap between the cathode and the heater. The gun has been operated up to voltages of 55 kV, obtaining a maximum current density of 20 A/cm2 with a pulse width of 250 ns at a cathode temperature of 1600 °C. High-voltage pulsing results show that the gun, with applied voltages of over 40 kV, is operated in space-charge-limited region at temperatures of over 1600 °C; also it is operated in a temperature-limited region at temperatures of less than 1500 °C. An effective work function of 2.68 eV is obtained. The cathode, when heated up to 1600 °C, emits over 7 A of electrons with a ˜20% reduction after 850 h of continuous operation. These measurements were made between vacuum pressures of 10-6 and 10-7 Torr.

  5. Closure of the single fluid magnetohydrodynamic equations in presence of electron cyclotron current drive

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Westerhof, E.; Pratt, J.

    2014-01-01

    In the presence of electron cyclotron current drive (ECCD), the Ohm's law of single fluid magnetohydrodynamics is modified as E + v × B = η(J – J EC). This paper presents a new closure relation for the EC driven current density appearing in this modified Ohm's law. The new relation faithfu

  6. Electron-radiation effects on the ac and dc electrical properties and unpaired electron densities of three aerospace polymers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Sheila Ann T.; Long, Edward R., Jr.; Ries, Heidi R.; Harries, Wynford L.

    1986-12-01

    The effects of gigarad-level total absorbed doses from 1-MeV electrons on the post-irradiation alternating-current (ac) and direct-current (dc) electrical properties and the unpaired electron densities have been studied for Kapton, Ultem, and Mylar. The unpaired electron densities (determined from electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy) and the dc electrical conductivities of the irradiated materials were monitored as functions of time following the exposures to determine their decay characteristics at room temperature. The elevated-temperature ac electrical dissipations of the Ultem and Mylar were affected by the radiation. The dc conductivity of the Kapton increased by five orders of magnitude, while the dc conductivities of the Ultem and Mylar increased by less than an order of magnitude, due to the radiation. The observed radiation-generated changes in the ac electrical dissipations are explained in terms of known radiation-generated changes in the molecular structures of the three materials. A preliminary model relating the dc electrical conductivity and the unpaired electron density in the Kapton is proposed.

  7. Electron-radiation effects on the ac and dc electrical properties and unpaired electron densities of three aerospace polymers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Sheila Ann T.; Long, Edward R., Jr.; Ries, Heidi R.; Harries, Wynford L.

    1986-01-01

    The effects of gigarad-level total absorbed doses from 1-MeV electrons on the post-irradiation alternating-current (ac) and direct-current (dc) electrical properties and the unpaired electron densities have been studied for Kapton, Ultem, and Mylar. The unpaired electron densities (determined from electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy) and the dc electrical conductivities of the irradiated materials were monitored as functions of time following the exposures to determine their decay characteristics at room temperature. The elevated-temperature ac electrical dissipations of the Ultem and Mylar were affected by the radiation. The dc conductivity of the Kapton increased by five orders of magnitude, while the dc conductivities of the Ultem and Mylar increased by less than an order of magnitude, due to the radiation. The observed radiation-generated changes in the ac electrical dissipations are explained in terms of known radiation-generated changes in the molecular structures of the three materials. A preliminary model relating the dc electrical conductivity and the unpaired electron density in the Kapton is proposed.

  8. Cardiac activation mapping using ultrasound current source density imaging (UCSDI).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olafsson, Ragnar; Witte, Russell S; Jia, Congxian; Huang, Sheng-Wen; Kim, Kang; O'Donnell, Matthew

    2009-03-01

    We describe the first mapping of biological current in a live heart using ultrasound current source density imaging (UCSDI). Ablation procedures that treat severe heart arrhythmias require detailed maps of the cardiac activation wave. The conventional procedure is time-consuming and limited by its poor spatial resolution (5-10 mm). UCSDI can potentially improve on existing mapping procedures. It is based on a pressure-induced change in resistivity known as the acousto-electric (AE) effect, which is spatially confined to the ultrasound focus. Data from 2 experiments are presented. A 540 kHz ultrasonic transducer (f/# = 1, focal length = 90 mm, pulse repetition frequency = 1600 Hz) was scanned over an isolated rabbit heart perfused with an excitation-contraction decoupler to reduce motion significantly while retaining electric function. Tungsten electrodes inserted in the left ventricle recorded simultaneously the AE signal and the low-frequency electrocardiogram (ECG). UCSDI displayed spatial and temporal patterns consistent with the spreading activation wave. The propagation velocity estimated from UCSDI was 0.25 +/- 0.05 mm/ms, comparable to the values obtained with the ECG signals. The maximum AE signal-to-noise ratio after filtering was 18 dB, with an equivalent detection threshold of 0.1 mA/ cm(2). This study demonstrates that UCSDI is a potentially powerful technique for mapping current flow and biopotentials in the heart.

  9. Crystal structure and electron density distribution in niobium carbide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Will, G.; Platzbecker, R. [Bonn Univ. (Germany). Abt. fuer Mineralogie und Kristallographie

    2001-09-01

    In this paper the bonding properties, e. g. the charge distribution between the atoms and the deformation of niobium carbide densities have been studied. The crystal studied had the composition NbC{sub 0.98}. Careful and redundant data collection (74 unique reflections out of 2087 reflections measured) gave the basis for a detailed study. IAM models (independent atom model), high order and multipole refinements were made resulting in R values of R=0.4% and R=0.07%. In the corresponding deformation density maps electron accumulations between the niobium atoms were detected, but no bonding to the carbon atoms. (orig.)

  10. High temperature and current density induced degradation of multi-layer graphene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Baoming; Haque, M. A., E-mail: mah37@psu.edu [Mechanical and Nuclear Engineering, The Pennsylvania State University, 314, Leonhard Building, University Park, Pennsylvania 16802 (United States); Mag-isa, Alexander E.; Kim, Jae-Hyun [Korea Institute of Machinery and Materials, 156 Gajungbuk-ro, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-343 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Hak-Joo [Korea Institute of Machinery and Materials, 156 Gajungbuk-ro, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-343 (Korea, Republic of); Center for Advanced Meta-Materials (CAMM), 156 Gajungbuk-ro, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-343 (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-19

    We present evidence of moderate current density, when accompanied with high temperature, promoting migration of foreign atoms on the surface of multi-layer graphene. Our in situ transmission electron microscope experiments show migration of silicon atoms at temperatures above 800 °C and current density around 4.2 × 10{sup 7} A/cm{sup 2}. Originating from the micro-machined silicon structures that clamp the freestanding specimen, the atoms are observed to react with the carbon atoms in the multi-layer graphene to produce silicon carbide at temperatures of 900–1000 °C. In the absence of electrical current, there is no migration of silicon and only pyrolysis of polymeric residue is observed.

  11. Effects of current density on preparation of grainy electrolytic manganese dioxide

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GUO Hua-jun; ZHU Bing-quan; LI Xin-hai; ZHANG Xin-ming; WANG Zhi-xing; PENG Wen-jie; LIU Lu-ping

    2005-01-01

    Grainy electrolytic manganese dioxide was prepared by electrodeposition in a 0.9 mol/L MnSO4 and 2.5 mol/L H2SO4 solution. The structure, particle size and appearance of the grainy electrolytic manganese dioxide were determined by powder X-ray diffraction, laser particle size analysis and scanning electron micrographs measurements. Current density has important effects on cell voltage, anodic current efficiency and particle size of the grainy electrolytic manganese dioxide, and the optimum current density is 30 A/dm 2. The grainy electrolytic manganese dioxide electrodeposited under the optimum conditions consists of γ-MnO2 with an orthorhombic lattice structure; the grainy electrolytic manganese dioxide has a spherical or sphere-like appearance and a narrow particle size distribution with an average particle diameter of 7.237 μm.

  12. Two color interferometric electron density measurement in an axially blown arc

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoller, Patrick; Carstensen, Jan; Galletti, Bernardo; Doiron, Charles; Sokolov, Alexey; Salzmann, René; Simon, Sandor; Jabs, Philipp

    2016-09-01

    High voltage circuit breakers protect the power grid by interrupting the current in case of a short circuit. To do so an arc is ignited between two contacts as they separate; transonic gas flow is used to cool and ultimately extinguish the arc at a current-zero crossing of the alternating current. A detailed understanding of the arc interruption process is needed to improve circuit breaker design. The conductivity of the partially ionized gas remaining after the current-zero crossing, a key parameter in determining whether the arc will be interrupted or not, is a function of the electron density. The electron density, in turn, is a function of the detailed dynamics of the arc cooling process, which does not necessarily occur under local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE) conditions. In this work, we measure the spatially resolved line-integrated index of refraction in a near-current-zero arc stabilized in an axial flow of synthetic air with two nanosecond pulsed lasers at wavelengths of 532 nm and 671 nm. Generating a stable, cylindrically symmetric arc enables us to determine the three-dimensional index of refraction distribution using Abel inversion. Due to the wavelength dependence of the component of the index of refraction related to the free electrons, the information at two different wavelengths can be used to determine the electron density. This information allows us to determine how important it is to take into account non-equilibrium effects for accurate modeling of the physics of decaying arcs.

  13. Current drive by electron cyclotron waves in stellarators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Castejon, F.; Alejaldre, C.; Coarasa, J. A.

    1992-07-01

    In this paper we propose a method to estimate the induced current by Electron Cyclotron waves fast enough, from the numerical point of view, to be included in a ray-tracing code, and yet accounting for the complicated geometry of stellarators. Since trapped particle effects are particularly important in this Current Drive method and in stellarator magnetic configuration, they are considered by the modification they introduce in the current drive efficiency. Basically, the method consists of integrating the Fisch and Boozer relativistic efficiency, corrected with the effect of trapped particles, times the absorbed power per momentum interval. This one is calculated for a Maxwellian distribution function, assuming a nearly linear regime. The influence of impurities and of species which are not protons is studied, calculating the efficiency for plasmas with Zeff) - Finally, a numerical analysis particularized to TJ-II stellarator is presented. The absorbed power density is calculated by the ray tracing code RAYS, taking into account the actual microwave beam structure. (Author) 23 refs.

  14. Transport at low electron density in the two-dimensional electron gas of silicon MOSFETs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heemskerk, Richard

    1998-01-01

    his thesis contains the result of an experimental study on the transport properties of high quality Si MOSFETs at low temperatures. A metalinsulator transition is found at a critical electron density. The electrons in the inversion layer of a silicon MOSFET are trapped in a potential well at the Si-

  15. Simulation of Electron Beam Dynamics in a Nonmagnetized High-Current Vacuum Diode

    CERN Document Server

    Anishchenko, Sergey

    2016-01-01

    The electron beam dynamics in a nonmagnetized high-current vacuum diode is analyzed for different cathode-anode gap geometries. The conditions enabling to achieve the minimal {initial} momentum spread in the electron beam are found out. A drastic rise of current density in a vacuum diode with a ring-type cathode is described. The effect is shown to be caused by electrostatic repulsion.

  16. Influence of electron screening on electron capture rate under high density of stellar interior

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    罗志全; 彭秋和

    1996-01-01

    The influence of electron screening on electron capture rate in strong screening is investigated, in which the Gamow-Teller resonance transition is considered and the matrix elements for the resonance transition are calculated on the basis of a shell model. The effect of electron screening on electron capture by 56Co is discussed. It is shown that the screening decreases evidently the capture rates in lower temperature and higher density. The effect of electron screening on other nuclear capture rates is estimated. The conclusion derived may influence the research for late stellar evolution and supernova explosion.

  17. Superconductor Digital Electronics: -- Current Status, Future Prospects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukhanov, Oleg

    2011-03-01

    Two major applications of superconductor electronics: communications and supercomputing will be presented. These areas hold a significant promise of a large impact on electronics state-of-the-art for the defense and commercial markets stemming from the fundamental advantages of superconductivity: simultaneous high speed and low power, lossless interconnect, natural quantization, and high sensitivity. The availability of relatively small cryocoolers lowered the foremost market barrier for cryogenically-cooled superconductor electronic systems. These fundamental advantages enabled a novel Digital-RF architecture - a disruptive technological approach changing wireless communications, radar, and surveillance system architectures dramatically. Practical results were achieved for Digital-RF systems in which wide-band, multi-band radio frequency signals are directly digitized and digital domain is expanded throughout the entire system. Digital-RF systems combine digital and mixed signal integrated circuits based on Rapid Single Flux Quantum (RSFQ) technology, superconductor analog filter circuits, and semiconductor post-processing circuits. The demonstrated cryocooled Digital-RF systems are the world's first and fastest directly digitizing receivers operating with live satellite signals, enabling multi-net data links, and performing signal acquisition from HF to L-band with 30 GHz clock frequencies. In supercomputing, superconductivity leads to the highest energy efficiencies per operation. Superconductor technology based on manipulation and ballistic transfer of magnetic flux quanta provides a superior low-power alternative to CMOS and other charge-transfer based device technologies. The fundamental energy consumption in SFQ circuits defined by flux quanta energy 2 x 10-19 J. Recently, a novel energy-efficient zero-static-power SFQ technology, eSFQ/ERSFQ was invented, which retains all advantages of standard RSFQ circuits: high-speed, dc power, internal memory. The

  18. Critical state model with anisotropic critical current density

    CERN Document Server

    Bhagwat, K V; Ravikumar, G

    2003-01-01

    Analytical solutions of Bean's critical state model with critical current density J sub c being anisotropic are obtained for superconducting cylindrical samples of arbitrary cross section in a parallel geometry. We present a method for calculating the flux fronts and magnetization curves. Results are presented for cylinders with elliptical cross section with a specific form of the anisotropy. We find that over a certain range of the anisotropy parameter the flux fronts have shapes similar to those for an isotropic sample. However, in general, the presence of anisotropy significantly modifies the shape of the flux fronts. The field for full flux penetration also depends on the anisotropy parameter. The method is extended to the case of anisotropic J sub c that also depends on the local field B, and magnetization hysteresis curves are presented for typical values of the anisotropy parameter for the case of |J sub c | that decreases exponentially with |B|.

  19. Development of high temperature superconductors having high critical current density

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hong, Gye Wong; Kim, C. J.; Lee, H.G.; Kwon, S. C.; Lee, H. J.; Kim, K. B.; Park, J. Y.; Jung, C. H

    2000-08-01

    Fabrication of high T{sub c} superconductors and its applications for electric power device were carried out for developing superconductor application technologies. High quality YBCO superconductors was fabricated by melt texture growth, top-seeded melt growth process and multi-seeded melt growth process and the properties was compared. The critical current density of the melt processed YBCO superconductors was about few 10,000 A/cm{sup 2} and the levitation force was 50 N. The processing time needed for the growth of the 123 single grain was greatly reduced by applying multi-seeding without no significant degradation of the levitation force. The multi-seeded melt growth process was confirmed as a time-saving and cost-effective method for the fabrication of bulk superconductors with controlled crystallographic orientation.

  20. Critical current densities in Bi-2223 sinter forgings.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balachandran, U.; Fisher, B. L.; Goretta, K. C.; Harris, N. C.; Murayama, N.

    1999-07-23

    (Bi,Pb){sub 2}Sr{sub 2}Ca{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub x} (Bi-2223) bars, prepared by sinter forging, exhibited good phase purity and strong textures with the c axes of the Bi-2223 grains parallel to the forging direction. The initial zero-field critical current density (J{sub c}) of the bars was 10{sup 3} A/cm{sup 2}, but because the forged bars were uncoated, this value decreased with repeated thermal cycling. J{sub c} as a function of applied magnetic field magnitude and direction roughly followed the dependencies exhibited by Ag-sheathed Bi-2223 tapes, but the forged bars were more strongly dependent on field strength and less strongly dependent on field angle.

  1. Ultra-high current density thin-film Si diode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qi

    2008-04-22

    A combination of a thin-film .mu.c-Si and a-Si:H containing diode structure characterized by an ultra-high current density that exceeds 1000 A/cm.sup.2, comprising: a substrate; a bottom metal layer disposed on the substrate; an n-layer of .mu.c-Si deposited the bottom metal layer; an i-layer of .mu.c-Si deposited on the n-layer; a buffer layer of a-Si:H deposited on the i-layer, a p-layer of .mu.c-Si deposited on the buffer layer; and a top metal layer deposited on the p-layer.

  2. Effect of electrolysis parameters on the morphologies of copper powder obtained at high current densities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Orhan Gökhan

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The effects of copper ion concentrations and electrolyte temperature on the morphologies and on the apparent densities of electrolytic copper powders at high current densities under galvanostatic regime were examined. These parameters were evaluated by the current efficiency of hydrogen evolution. In addition, scanning electron microscopy was used for analyzing the morphology of the copper powders. It was found that the morphology was dependent over the copper ion concentration and electrolyte temperature under same current density (CD conditions. At 150 mA cm-2 and the potential of 1000±20 mV (vs. SCE, porous and disperse copper powders were obtained at low concentrations of Cu ions (0.120 M Cu2+ in 0.50 M H2SO4. Under this condition, high rate of hydrogen evolution reaction took place parallel to copper electrodeposition. The morphology was changed from porous, disperse and cauliflower-like to coral-like, shrub-like and stalk-stock like morphology with the increasing of Cu ion concentrations towards 0.120 M, 0.155 M, 0.315 M, 0.475 M and 0.630 M Cu2+ in 0.5 M H2SO4 respectively at the same CD. Similarly, as the temperature was increased, powder morphology and apparent density were observed to be changed. The apparent density values of copper powders were found to be suitable for many of the powder metallurgy applications.

  3. Analysis of homogeneity of 2D electron gas at decreasing of electron density

    OpenAIRE

    Sherstobitov, A. A.; Minkov, G. M.; Germanenko, A. V.; Rut, O. E.; Soldatov, I. V.; Zvonkov, B. N.

    2010-01-01

    We investigate the gate voltage dependence of capacitance of a system gate - 2D electron gas (C-Vg). The abrupt drop of capacitance at decreasing concentration was found. The possible reasons of this drop, namely inhomogeneity of electron density distribution and serial resistance of 2D electron gas are discussed. Simultaneous analysis of gate voltage dependences of capacitance and resistance has shown that in heavily doped 2D systems the main role in the drop of capacitance at decreasing con...

  4. Excitations and benchmark ensemble density functional theory for two electrons

    CERN Document Server

    Pribram-Jones, Aurora; Trail, John R; Burke, Kieron; Needs, Richard J; Ullrich, Carsten A

    2014-01-01

    A new method for extracting ensemble Kohn-Sham potentials from accurate excited state densities is applied to a variety of two electron systems, exploring the behavior of exact ensemble density functional theory. The issue of separating the Hartree energy and the choice of degenerate eigenstates is explored. A new approximation, spin eigenstate Hartree-exchange (SEHX), is derived. Exact conditions that are proven include the signs of the correlation energy components, the virial theorem for both exchange and correlation, and the asymptotic behavior of the potential for small weights of the excited states. Many energy components are given as a function of the weights for two electrons in a one-dimensional flat box, in a box with a large barrier to create charge transfer excitations, in a three-dimensional harmonic well (Hooke's atom), and for the He atom singlet-triplet ensemble, singlet-triplet-singlet ensemble, and triplet bi-ensemble.

  5. Excitations and benchmark ensemble density functional theory for two electrons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pribram-Jones, Aurora; Burke, Kieron [Department of Chemistry, University of California-Irvine, Irvine, California 92697 (United States); Yang, Zeng-hui; Ullrich, Carsten A. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Missouri, Columbia, Missouri 65211 (United States); Trail, John R.; Needs, Richard J. [Theory of Condensed Matter Group, Cavendish Laboratory, University of Cambridge, Cambridge CB3 0HE (United Kingdom)

    2014-05-14

    A new method for extracting ensemble Kohn-Sham potentials from accurate excited state densities is applied to a variety of two-electron systems, exploring the behavior of exact ensemble density functional theory. The issue of separating the Hartree energy and the choice of degenerate eigenstates is explored. A new approximation, spin eigenstate Hartree-exchange, is derived. Exact conditions that are proven include the signs of the correlation energy components and the asymptotic behavior of the potential for small weights of the excited states. Many energy components are given as a function of the weights for two electrons in a one-dimensional flat box, in a box with a large barrier to create charge transfer excitations, in a three-dimensional harmonic well (Hooke's atom), and for the He atom singlet-triplet ensemble, singlet-triplet-singlet ensemble, and triplet bi-ensemble.

  6. A CMOS Wideband Linear Current Attenuator with Electronically Variable Gain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wiegerink, Remco J.

    1993-01-01

    A CMOS highly linear current attenuator is described. The circuit is suited for both differential and single input currents. The current gain is electronically variable between -1 and +1 by means of two controlling currents. A simple additional circuit is described to obtain a gain that is linearly

  7. A CMOS Wideband Linear Current Attenuator with Electronically Variable Gain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wiegerink, Remco J.

    1993-01-01

    A CMOS highly linear current attenuator is described. The circuit is suited for both differential and single input currents. The current gain is electronically variable between -1 and +1 by means of two controlling currents. A simple additional circuit is described to obtain a gain that is linearly

  8. Plasma actuator electron density measurement using microwave perturbation method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mirhosseini, Farid; Colpitts, Bruce [Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of New Brunswick, Fredericton, New Brunswick E3B 5A3 (Canada)

    2014-07-21

    A cylindrical dielectric barrier discharge plasma under five different pressures is generated in an evacuated glass tube. This plasma volume is located at the center of a rectangular copper waveguide cavity, where the electric field is maximum for the first mode and the magnetic field is very close to zero. The microwave perturbation method is used to measure electron density and plasma frequency for these five pressures. Simulations by a commercial microwave simulator are comparable to the experimental results.

  9. Temporal evolution of electron density and temperature in capillary discharge plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Seong Y.; Uhm, Han S.; Kang, Hoonsoo; Lee, In W.; Suk, Hyyong

    2010-05-01

    Time-resolved spectroscopic measurements of a capillary discharge plasma of helium gas were carried out to obtain detailed information about dynamics of the discharge plasma column, where the fast plasma dynamics is determined by the electron density and temperature. Our measurements show that the electron density of the capillary plasma column increases sharply after gas breakdown and reaches its peak of the order of 1018 cm-3 within less than 100 ns, and then it decreases as time goes by. The result indicates that a peak electron density of 2.3×1018 cm-3 occurs about 65 ns after formation of the discharge current, which is ideal for laser wakefield acceleration experiments reported by Karsch et al. [New J. Phys. 9, 415 (2007)].

  10. Role of Density Gradient Driven Trapped Electron Modes in the H-Mode Inner Core with Electron Heating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ernst, D.

    2015-11-01

    We present new experiments and nonlinear gyrokinetic simulations showing that density gradient driven TEM (DGTEM) turbulence dominates the inner core of H-Mode plasmas during strong electron heating. Thus α-heating may degrade inner core confinement in H-Mode plasmas with moderate density peaking. These DIII-D low torque quiescent H-mode experiments were designed to study DGTEM turbulence. Gyrokinetic simulations using GYRO (and GENE) closely match not only particle, energy, and momentum fluxes, but also density fluctuation spectra, with and without ECH. Adding 3.4 MW ECH doubles Te /Ti from 0.5 to 1.0, which halves the linear TEM critical density gradient, locally flattening the density profile. Density fluctuations from Doppler backscattering (DBS) intensify near ρ = 0.3 during ECH, displaying a band of coherent fluctuations with adjacent toroidal mode numbers. GYRO closely reproduces the DBS spectrum and its change in shape and intensity with ECH, identifying these as coherent TEMs. Prior to ECH, parallel flow shear lowers the effective nonlinear DGTEM critical density gradient 50%, but is negligible during ECH, when transport displays extreme stiffness in the density gradient. GS2 predictions show the DGTEM can be suppressed, to avoid degradation with electron heating, by broadening the current density profile to attain q0 >qmin > 1 . A related experiment in the same regime varied the electron temperature gradient in the outer half-radius (ρ ~ 0 . 65) using ECH, revealing spatially coherent 2D mode structures in the Te fluctuations measured by ECE imaging. Fourier analysis with modulated ECH finds a threshold in Te profile stiffness. Supported by the US DOE under DE-FC02-08ER54966 and DE-FC02-04ER54698.

  11. Model Predictive Control with Integral Action for Current Density Profile Tracking in NSTX-U

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilhan, Z. O.; Wehner, W. P.; Schuster, E.; Boyer, M. D.

    2016-10-01

    Active control of the toroidal current density profile may play a critical role in non-inductively sustained long-pulse, high-beta scenarios in a spherical torus (ST) configuration, which is among the missions of the NSTX-U facility. In this work, a previously developed physics-based control-oriented model is embedded in a feedback control scheme based on a model predictive control (MPC) strategy to track a desired current density profile evolution specified indirectly by a desired rotational transform profile. An integrator is embedded into the standard MPC formulation to reject various modeling uncertainties and external disturbances. Neutral beam powers, electron density, and total plasma current are used as actuators. The proposed MPC strategy incorporates various state and actuator constraints directly into the control design process by solving a constrained optimization problem in real-time to determine the optimal actuator requests. The effectiveness of the proposed controller in regulating the current density profile in NSTX-U is demonstrated in closed-loop nonlinear simulations. Supported by the US DOE under DE-AC02-09CH11466.

  12. Influence of electropolishing current densities on sulfur generation at niobium surface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tyagi, P.V., E-mail: tyagipv@ornl.gov [The Graduate University for Advanced Studies, Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan); Nishiwaki, M.; Noguchi, T.; Sawabe, M.; Saeki, T.; Hayano, H.; Kato, S. [KEK, High Energy Accelerator Research Organization, Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan)

    2013-11-15

    We report the effect of different current densities on sulfur generation at Nb surface in the electropolishing (EP) with aged electrolyte. In this regard, we conducted a series of electropolishing (EP) experiments in aged EP electrolyte with high (≈50 mA/cm{sup 2}) and low (≈30 mA/cm{sup 2}) current densities on Nb surfaces. The experiments were carried out both for laboratory coupons and a real Nb single cell cavity with six witness samples located at three typical positions (equator, iris and beam pipe). Sample's surfaces were investigated by XPS (X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy), SEM (scanning electron microscope) and EDX (energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy). The surface analysis showed that the EP with a high current density produced a huge amount of sulfate/sulfite particles at Nb surface whereas the EP with a low current density was very helpful to mitigate sulfate/sulfite at Nb surface in both the experiments.

  13. A Reexamination of Electron Density Diagnostics for Ionized Gaseous Nebulae

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, W; Zhang, Y; Barlow, M J

    2004-01-01

    We present a comparison of electron densities derived from optical forbidden line diagnostic ratios for a sample of over a hundred nebulae. We consider four density indicators, the [O II] $\\lambda3729/\\lambda3726$, [S II] $\\lambda6716/\\lambda6731$, [Cl III] $\\lambda5517/\\lambda5537$ and [Ar IV] $\\lambda4711/\\lambda4740$ doublet ratios. Except for a few H II regions for which data from the literature were used, diagnostic line ratios were derived from our own high quality spectra. For the [O II] doublet ratio, we find that our default atomic data set, consisting of transition probabilities (Aij) from Zeippen (1982} and collision strengths from Pradhan (1976), fit the observations well, although at high electron densities, the [O II]doublet ratio yields densities systematically lower than those given by the [S II] doublet ratio, suggesting that the ratio of Aij of the [O II] doublet,$A(\\lambda3729)/A(\\lambda3726)$, given by Zeippen (1982) may need to be revised upwards by ~6%. Our analysis also shows that the m...

  14. Laboratory study of magnetic reconnection with a density asymmetry across the current sheet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoo, Jongsoo; Yamada, Masaaki; Ji, Hantao; Jara-Almonte, Jonathan; Myers, Clayton E; Chen, Li-Jen

    2014-08-29

    The effects of a density asymmetry across the current sheet on anti-parallel magnetic reconnection are studied systematically in a laboratory plasma. Despite a significant density ratio of up to 10, the in-plane magnetic field profile is not significantly changed. On the other hand, the out-of-plane Hall magnetic field profile is considerably modified; it is almost bipolar in structure with the density asymmetry, as compared to quadrupolar in structure with the symmetric configuration. Moreover, the ion stagnation point is shifted to the low-density side, and the electrostatic potential profile also becomes asymmetric with a deeper potential well on the low-density side. Nonclassical bulk electron heating together with electromagnetic fluctuations in the lower hybrid frequency range is observed near the low-density-side separatrix. The dependence of the ion outflow and reconnection electric field on the density asymmetry is measured and compared with theoretical expectations. The measured ion outflow speeds are about 40% of the theoretical values.

  15. Energy transportation via MITL by the linear current flow density up to 7 MA/cm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korolev, V. D.; Bakshaev, Yu. L.; Bartov, A. V.; Blinov, P. I.; Bryzgunov, V. A.; Chernenko, A. S.; Dan'ko, S. A.; Kalinin, Yu. G.; Kingsep, A. S.; Kazakov, E. D.; Smirnov, V. P.; Smirnova, E. A.; Ustroev, G. I.

    2006-10-01

    The transmission properties of the magnetically self-insulated vacuum transporting line (MITL) were studied on the S-300 pulsed power machine (3 MA, 100 ns) at the high linear current flow density up to dI/db = 7 MA/cm. Experiments were carried out with the short line sections with 10 ÷ 15 mm length and 3 ÷ 5 mm vacuum gap. For measuring of the plasma parameters, the frame ICT photography with the nanosecond temporal resolution in the SXR range and ICT (Image Converter Tube) chronography in visible range were used. The X-ray radiation in various ranges was recorded by the XRD with thin filters (SXR) and by the semiconductor detectors (HXR). The information about current transmission efficiency was obtained by means of magnetic loops and low-inductance shunt. It was determined that dense plasma arose on both anode and cathode when the linear current flow density was low enough, dI/db ≤ 1 MA/cm. A dense plasma moves across the vacuum gap with the velocity (1 ÷ 2) × 106 cm/s. By recording the current and hard X-ray radiation it was found that electron losses in the current front did not exceed 10 ÷ 100 kA. Under strong magnetization of electrons r H = mvc/eB Conceptual Project of fusion reactor on the base of fast Z-pinch has been brought about.

  16. A real-space stochastic density matrix approach for density functional electronic structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beck, Thomas L

    2015-12-21

    The recent development of real-space grid methods has led to more efficient, accurate, and adaptable approaches for large-scale electrostatics and density functional electronic structure modeling. With the incorporation of multiscale techniques, linear-scaling real-space solvers are possible for density functional problems if localized orbitals are used to represent the Kohn-Sham energy functional. These methods still suffer from high computational and storage overheads, however, due to extensive matrix operations related to the underlying wave function grid representation. In this paper, an alternative stochastic method is outlined that aims to solve directly for the one-electron density matrix in real space. In order to illustrate aspects of the method, model calculations are performed for simple one-dimensional problems that display some features of the more general problem, such as spatial nodes in the density matrix. This orbital-free approach may prove helpful considering a future involving increasingly parallel computing architectures. Its primary advantage is the near-locality of the random walks, allowing for simultaneous updates of the density matrix in different regions of space partitioned across the processors. In addition, it allows for testing and enforcement of the particle number and idempotency constraints through stabilization of a Feynman-Kac functional integral as opposed to the extensive matrix operations in traditional approaches.

  17. Electronic density of states in sequence dependent DNA molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Oliveira, B. P. W.; Albuquerque, E. L.; Vasconcelos, M. S.

    2006-09-01

    We report in this work a numerical study of the electronic density of states (DOS) in π-stacked arrays of DNA single-strand segments made up from the nucleotides guanine G, adenine A, cytosine C and thymine T, forming a Rudin-Shapiro (RS) as well as a Fibonacci (FB) polyGC quasiperiodic sequences. Both structures are constructed starting from a G nucleotide as seed and following their respective inflation rules. Our theoretical method uses Dyson's equation together with a transfer-matrix treatment, within an electronic tight-binding Hamiltonian model, suitable to describe the DNA segments modelled by the quasiperiodic chains. We compared the DOS spectra found for the quasiperiodic structure to those using a sequence of natural DNA, as part of the human chromosome Ch22, with a remarkable concordance, as far as the RS structure is concerned. The electronic spectrum shows several peaks, corresponding to localized states, as well as a striking self-similar aspect.

  18. Electron density and temperature in NIO1 RF source operated in oxygen and argon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbisan, M.; Zaniol, B.; Cavenago, M.; Pasqualotto, R.; Serianni, G.; Zanini, M.

    2017-08-01

    The NIO1 experiment, built and operated at Consorzio RFX, hosts an RF negative ion source, from which it is possible to produce a beam of maximum 130 mA in H- ions, accelerated up to 60 kV. For the preliminary tests of the extraction system the source has been operated in oxygen, whose high electronegativity allows to reach useful levels of extracted beam current. The efficiency of negative ions extraction is strongly influenced by the electron density and temperature close to the Plasma Grid, i.e. the grid of the acceleration system which faces the source. To support the tests, these parameters have been measured by means of the Optical Emission Spectroscopy diagnostic. This technique has involved the use of an oxygen-argon mixture to produce the plasma in the source. The intensities of specific Ar I and Ar II lines have been measured along lines of sight close to the Plasma Grid, and have been interpreted with the ADAS package to get the desired information. This work will describe the diagnostic hardware, the analysis method and the measured values of electron density and temperature, as function of the main source parameters (RF power, pressure, bias voltage and magnetic filter field). The main results show that not only electron density but also electron temperature increase with RF power; both decrease with increasing magnetic filter field. Variations of source pressure and plasma grid bias voltage appear to affect only electron temperature and electron density, respectively.

  19. Quasi-classical theory of electronic flux density in electronically adiabatic molecular processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diestler, D J

    2012-11-26

    The standard Born-Oppenheimer (BO) description of electronically adiabatic molecular processes predicts a vanishing electronic flux density (EFD). A previously proposed "coupled-channels" theory permits the extraction of the EFD from the BO wave function for one-electron diatomic systems, but attempts at generalization to many-electron polyatomic systems are frustrated by technical barriers. An alternative "quasi-classical" approach, which eliminates the explicit quantum dynamics of the electrons within a classical framework, yet retains the quantum character of the nuclear motion, appears capable of yielding EFDs for arbitrarily complex systems. Quasi-classical formulas for the EFD in simple systems agree with corresponding coupled-channels formulas. Results of the application of the new quasi-classical formula for the EFD to a model triatomic system indicate the potential of the quasi-classical scheme to elucidate the dynamical role of electrons in electronically adiabatic processes in more complex multiparticle systems.

  20. Rocket-borne measurements of electron temperature and density with the Electron Retarding Potential Analyzer instrument

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, I. J.; Widholm, M.; Lessard, M. R.; Riley, P.; Heavisides, J.; Moen, J. I.; Clausen, L. B. N.; Bekkeng, T. A.

    2016-07-01

    Determining electron temperature in the ionosphere is a fundamentally important measurement for space science. Obtaining measurements of electron temperatures at high altitudes (>700 km) is difficult because of limitations on ground-based radar and classic spacecraft instrumentation. In light of these limitations, the rocket-borne Electron Retarding Potential Analyzer (ERPA) was developed to allow for accurate in situ measurement of ionospheric electron temperature with a simple and low-resource instrument. The compact ERPA, a traditional retarding potential analyzer with multiple baffle collimators, allows for a straightforward calculation of electron temperature. Since its first mission in 2004, it has amassed significant flight heritage and obtained data used in multiple studies investigating a myriad of phenomena related to magnetosphere-ionosphere coupling. In addition to highlighting the scientific contributions of the ERPA instrument, this paper outlines its theory and operation, the methodology used to obtain electron temperature measurements, and a comparative study suggesting that the ERPA can also provide electron density measurements.

  1. Differential modulation of corticospinal excitability by different current densities of anodal transcranial direct current stimulation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andisheh Bastani

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Novel non-invasive brain stimulation techniques such as transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS have been developed in recent years. TDCS-induced corticospinal excitability changes depend on two important factors current intensity and stimulation duration. Despite clinical success with existing tDCS parameters, optimal protocols are still not entirely set. OBJECTIVE/HYPOTHESIS: The current study aimed to investigate the effects of four different anodal tDCS (a-tDCS current densities on corticospinal excitability. METHODS: Four current intensities of 0.3, 0.7, 1.4 and 2 mA resulting in current densities (CDs of 0.013, 0.029, 0.058 and 0.083 mA/cm(2 were applied on twelve right-handed (mean age 34.5±10.32 yrs healthy individuals in different sessions at least 48 hours apart. a-tDCS was applied continuously for 10 minute, with constant active and reference electrode sizes of 24 and 35 cm(2 respectively. The corticospinal excitability of the extensor carpi radialis muscle (ECR was measured before and immediately after the intervention and at 10, 20 and 30 minutes thereafter. RESULTS: Post hoc comparisons showed significant differences in corticospinal excitability changes for CDs of 0.013 mA/cm(2 and 0.029 mA/cm(2 (P = 0.003. There were no significant differences between excitability changes for the 0.013 mA/cm(2 and 0.058 mA/cm(2 (P = 0.080 or 0.013 mA/cm(2 and 0.083 mA/cm(2 (P = 0.484 conditions. CONCLUSION: This study found that a-tDCS with a current density of 0.013 mA/cm(2 induces significantly larger corticospinal excitability changes than CDs of 0.029 mA/cm(2. The implication is that might help to avoid applying unwanted amount of current to the cortical areas.

  2. Density-dependent electron transport and precise modeling of GaN high electron mobility transistors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bajaj, Sanyam, E-mail: bajaj.10@osu.edu; Shoron, Omor F.; Park, Pil Sung; Krishnamoorthy, Sriram; Akyol, Fatih; Hung, Ting-Hsiang [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, The Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio 43210 (United States); Reza, Shahed; Chumbes, Eduardo M. [Raytheon Integrated Defense Systems, Andover, Massachusetts 01810 (United States); Khurgin, Jacob [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland 21218 (United States); Rajan, Siddharth [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, The Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio 43210 (United States); Department of Material Science and Engineering, The Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio 43210 (United States)

    2015-10-12

    We report on the direct measurement of two-dimensional sheet charge density dependence of electron transport in AlGaN/GaN high electron mobility transistors (HEMTs). Pulsed IV measurements established increasing electron velocities with decreasing sheet charge densities, resulting in saturation velocity of 1.9 × 10{sup 7 }cm/s at a low sheet charge density of 7.8 × 10{sup 11 }cm{sup −2}. An optical phonon emission-based electron velocity model for GaN is also presented. It accommodates stimulated longitudinal optical (LO) phonon emission which clamps the electron velocity with strong electron-phonon interaction and long LO phonon lifetime in GaN. A comparison with the measured density-dependent saturation velocity shows that it captures the dependence rather well. Finally, the experimental result is applied in TCAD-based device simulator to predict DC and small signal characteristics of a reported GaN HEMT. Good agreement between the simulated and reported experimental results validated the measurement presented in this report and established accurate modeling of GaN HEMTs.

  3. Hard X-ray emitting energetic electrons and photospheric electric currents

    CERN Document Server

    Musset, Sophie; Bommier, Véronique

    2015-01-01

    The energy released during solar flares is believed to be stored in non-potential magnetic fields associated with electric currents flowing in the corona. While no measurements of coronal electric currents are presently available, maps of photospheric electric currents can now be derived from SDO/HMI observations. Photospheric electric currents have been shown to be the tracers of the coronal electric currents. Particle acceleration can result from electric fields associated with coronal electric currents. We revisit here some aspects of the relationship between particle acceleration in solar flares and electric currents in the active region. We study the relation between the energetic electron interaction sites in the solar atmosphere, and the magnitudes and changes of vertical electric current densities measured at the photospheric level, during the X2.2 flare on February 15 2011 in AR NOAA 11158. X-ray images from RHESSI are overlaid on magnetic field and electric current density maps calculated from the s...

  4. Correlation of Critical Current Density with Cu3+ Concentration and Density in YBa2Cu3O7-x

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dou, S. X.; Liu, H. K.; Zhou, J. P.; Bourdillon, A. J.; Savvides, N.; Apperley, M.; Gouch, A.; Sorrell, C. C.

    Superconducting YBa2Cu3O7 wires and tapes were fabricated by cold drawing, rolling and extrusion processes. It was found that the critical current density, after O2 equilibration, correlates both with density and Cu3+ concentration. Full density was achieved by using a special heat treatment, but the critical current density was low owing to the low Cu3+ concentration present in this heavily twinned material. The best critical current density results were obtained for material with density of 92-95% of the theoretical value. The low critical current density of the porous specimens is attributed not only to a poor connectivity between grains but also to a low Cu3+ concentration due to the instability of Cu3+ at crystallite surfaces which increase in area with specimen porosity.

  5. The current density in quantum electrodynamics in time-dependent external potentials and the Schwinger effect

    CERN Document Server

    Zahn, Jochen

    2015-01-01

    In the framework of quantum electrodynamics (QED) in external potentials, we introduce a method to compute the time-dependence of the expectation value of the current density for time-dependent homogeneous external electric fields. We apply it to the so-called Sauter pulse. For late times, our results agree with the asymptotic value due to electron-positron pair production. For sub-critical peak field strengths, or results agree very well with the general expression derived by Serber for the linearization in the external field. In particular, the expectation value of the current density at intermediate times can be much greater than at asymptotic times. We comment on consequences of these findings for recent proposals to test the Schwinger effect with high intensity lasers using processes at intermediate times.

  6. Leakage Current Simulation of Insulating Thin Film Irradiated by a Nonpenetrating Electron Beam

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Hai-Bo; LI Wei-Qin; CAO Meng

    2012-01-01

    We perform numerical simulations of the leakage current characteristics of an insulating thin film of SiO2 negatively charged by a low-energy nonpenetrating focused electron beam. For the formation of leakage current, electrons are demonstrated to turn from diffusion to drift after clearing the minimum potential barrier due to electron-hole separation. In the equilibrium state, the leakage current increases approximately linearly with the increasing primary beam current and energy. It also increases with the increasing film thickness and trap density, and with the decreasing electron mobility, in which the film thickness has a greater influence. Validated by some existing experiments, the simulation results provide a new perspective for the negative charging effects of insulating samples due to the low-energy focused electron beam.%We perform numerical simulations of the leakage current characteristics of an insulating thin film of SiO2 negatively charged by a low-energy nonpenetrating focused electron beam.For the formation of leakage current,electrons are demonstrated to turn from diffusion to drift after clearing the minimum potential barrier due to electron-hole separation.In the equilibrium state,the leakage current increases approximately linearly with the increasing primary beam current and energy.It also increases with the increasing film thickness and trap density,and with the decreasing electron mobility,in which the film thickness has a greater influence.Validated by some existing experiments,the simulation results provide a new perspective for the negative charging effects of insulating samples due to the low-energy focused electron beam.

  7. Electron densities and alkali atoms in exoplanet atmospheres

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lavvas, P. [GSMA, Université de Reims Champagne Ardenne, CNRS UMR 7331, Reims, 51687 France (France); Koskinen, T.; Yelle, R. V., E-mail: panayotis.lavvas@univ-reims.fr [Lunar and Planetary Laboratory, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85719 (United States)

    2014-11-20

    We describe a detailed study on the properties of alkali atoms in extrasolar giant planets, and specifically focus on their role in generating the atmospheric free electron densities, as well as their impact on the transit depth observations. We focus our study on the case of HD 209458b, and we show that photoionization produces a large electron density in the middle atmosphere that is about two orders of magnitude larger than the density anticipated from thermal ionization. Our purely photochemical calculations, though, result in a much larger transit depth for K than observed for this planet. This result does not change even if the roles of molecular chemistry and excited state chemistry are considered for the alkali atoms. In contrast, the model results for the case of exoplanet XO-2b are in good agreement with the available observations. Given these results we discuss other possible scenarios, such as changes in the elemental abundances, changes in the temperature profiles, and the possible presence of clouds, which could potentially explain the observed HD 209458b alkali properties. We find that most of these scenarios cannot explain the observations, with the exception of a heterogeneous source (i.e., clouds or aerosols) under specific conditions, but we also note the discrepancies among the available observations.

  8. HIGH-CURRENT ERL-BASED ELECTRON COOLING FOR RHIC.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    BEN-ZVI, I.

    2005-09-18

    The design of an electron cooler must take into account both electron beam dynamics issues as well as the electron cooling physics. Research towards high-energy electron cooling of RHIC is in its 3rd year at Brookhaven National Laboratory. The luminosity upgrade of RHIC calls for electron cooling of various stored ion beams, such as 100 GeV/A gold ions at collision energies. The necessary electron energy of 54 MeV is clearly out of reach for DC accelerator system of any kind. The high energy also necessitates a bunched beam, with a high electron bunch charge, low emittance and small energy spread. The Collider-Accelerator Department adopted the Energy Recovery Linac (ERL) for generating the high-current, high-energy and high-quality electron beam. The RHIC electron cooler ERL will use four Superconducting RF (SRF) 5-cell cavities, designed to operate at ampere-class average currents with high bunch charges. The electron source will be a superconducting, 705.75 MHz laser-photocathode RF gun, followed up by a superconducting Energy Recovery Linac (ERL). An R&D ERL is under construction to demonstrate the ERL at the unprecedented average current of 0.5 amperes. Beam dynamics performance and luminosity enhancement are described for the case of magnetized and non-magnetized electron cooling of RHIC.

  9. High-density matter: current status and future challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stone, J. R.

    2015-05-01

    There are many fascinating processes in the Universe which we observe in more and more in detail thanks to increasingly sophisticated technology. One of the most interesting phenomena is the life cycle of stars, their birth, evolution and death. If the stars are massive enough, they end their lives in the core-collapse supernova explosion, the one of the most violent events in the Universe. As the result, the densest objects in the Universe, neutron stars and/or black holes are created. Naturally, the physical basis of these events should be understood in line with observation. The current status of our knowledge of processes in the life of stars is far from adequate for their true understanding. We show that although many models have been constructed their detailed ability to describe observations is limited or non-existent. Furthermore the general failure of all models means that we cannot tell which are heading in the right direction. A possible way forward in modeling of high-density matter is outlined, exemplified by the quark-meson-coupling model (QMC). This model has a natural explanation for the saturation of nuclear forces and depends on very few adjustable parameters, strongly constrained by the underlying physics. Latest QMC results for compact objects and finite nuclei are presented.

  10. High-density matter: current status and future challenges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stone J. R.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available There are many fascinating processes in the Universe which we observe in more and more in detail thanks to increasingly sophisticated technology. One of the most interesting phenomena is the life cycle of stars, their birth, evolution and death. If the stars are massive enough, they end their lives in the core-collapse supernova explosion, the one of the most violent events in the Universe. As the result, the densest objects in the Universe, neutron stars and/or black holes are created. Naturally, the physical basis of these events should be understood in line with observation. The current status of our knowledge of processes in the life of stars is far from adequate for their true understanding. We show that although many models have been constructed their detailed ability to describe observations is limited or non-existent. Furthermore the general failure of all models means that we cannot tell which are heading in the right direction. A possible way forward in modeling of high-density matter is outlined, exemplified by the quark-meson-coupling model (QMC. This model has a natural explanation for the saturation of nuclear forces and depends on very few adjustable parameters, strongly constrained by the underlying physics. Latest QMC results for compact objects and finite nuclei are presented.

  11. Vibration effect on magnetization and critical current density of superconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golovchanskiy, Igor A.; Pan, Alexey V.; George, Jonathan; Wells, Frederick S.; Fedoseev, Sergey A.; Rozenfeld, Anatoly

    2016-07-01

    In this work the effect of vibrations on critical current density (J c ) of superconductors has been studied. The vibrations are shown to affect J c of all types of superconductors during their measurements, employing a vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM). Increasing vibration frequency (f) and/or amplitude (A) leads to progressive reduction of J c as a function of magnetic field (B a ). The effect of vibrations is substantially stronger in thin films. It leads to development of unexpected kinks on {J}c({B}a) curves. Analysis of magnetization loops and relaxation of magnetization in YBCO films revealed that the vibration effect can be treated as the effective reduction of pinning potential. The asymmetry of the vibration effect in ascending and descending B a is observed, indicating differences in free energy of the corresponding vortex structures. Thermal effects induced by vibrations with large f and A are shown to have rather insignificant influence, while the vibrational vortex dynamics exhibit a strong impact. The irreversibility field ({B}{{irr}}) is shown to be instrumentally defined, and its value depends on VSM settings. In addition, the practical importance of {B}{{irr}} for J c modeling is demonstrated.

  12. Investigation of heavy current discharges with high initial gas density

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Budin, A.; Bogomaz, A.; Kolikov, V.; Kuprin, A.; Leontiev, V.; Rutberg, P.; Shirokov, N. [Institute of Problems of Electrophysics of Russian Academy of Sciences, Dvortsovayanab., 18, St. Petersburg, 191065 (Russia)

    1996-05-01

    Piezoelectric pressure transducers, with noise immunity and time resolution of 0,5 {mu}s were used to measure pulse pressures of 430 MPa along the axis of an electrical discharge channel. Initial concentration of He was 2,7{center_dot}10{sup 21}cm{sup {minus}3}, dI/dt=6{center_dot}10{sup 11}A/s, and I{sub max}=560kA. Shock waves with amplitudes exceeding the pressure along the axis, were detected by a pressure transducer on the wall of the discharge chamber. Typical shock velocities were 2{center_dot}4km/s. Average pressure measurements along the discharge axis at different radii were used to estimate the current density distribution along the canal radius. The presence of the shock waves, promoting the additional hydrogen heating in the discharge chamber, has been registered during the discharge in hydrogen for I{sub max}{approximately}1MA and an initial concentration of 10{sup 21}cm{sup {minus}3}. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  13. Current Issues in Finite-T Density-Functional Theory and Warm-Correlated Matter †

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. W. C. Dharma-wardana

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Finite-temperature density functional theory (DFT has become of topical interest, partly due to the increasing ability to create novel states of warm-correlated matter (WCM.Warm-dense matter (WDM, ultra-fast matter (UFM, and high-energy density matter (HEDM may all be regarded as subclasses of WCM. Strong electron-electron, ion-ion and electron-ion correlation effects and partial degeneracies are found in these systems where the electron temperature Te is comparable to the electron Fermi energy EF. Thus, many electrons are in continuum states which are partially occupied. The ion subsystem may be solid, liquid or plasma, with many states of ionization with ionic charge Zj. Quasi-equilibria with the ion temperature Ti ≠ Te are common. The ion subsystem in WCM can no longer be treated as a passive “external potential”, as is customary in T = 0 DFT dominated by solid-state theory or quantum chemistry. Many basic questions arise in trying to implement DFT for WCM. Hohenberg-Kohn-Mermin theory can be adapted for treating these systems if suitable finite-T exchange-correlation (XC functionals can be constructed. They are functionals of both the one-body electron density ne and the one-body ion densities ρj. Here, j counts many species of nuclei or charge states. A method of approximately but accurately mapping the quantum electrons to a classical Coulomb gas enables one to treat electron-ion systems entirely classically at any temperature and arbitrary spin polarization, using exchange-correlation effects calculated in situ, directly from the pair-distribution functions. This eliminates the need for any XC-functionals. This classical map has been used to calculate the equation of state of WDM systems, and construct a finite-T XC functional that is found to be in close agreement with recent quantum path-integral simulation data. In this review, current developments and concerns in finite-T DFT, especially in the context of non-relativistic warm

  14. Linking Spatial Distributions of Potential and Current in Viscous Electronics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falkovich, Gregory; Levitov, Leonid

    2017-08-01

    Viscous electronics is an emerging field dealing with systems in which strongly interacting electrons behave as a fluid. Electron viscous flows are governed by a nonlocal current-field relation which renders the spatial patterns of the current and electric field strikingly dissimilar. Notably, driven by the viscous friction force from adjacent layers, current can flow against the electric field, generating negative resistance, vorticity, and vortices. Moreover, different current flows can result in identical potential distributions. This sets a new situation where inferring the electron flow pattern from the measured potentials presents a nontrivial problem. Using the inherent relation between these patterns through complex analysis, here we propose a method for extracting the current flows from potential distributions measured in the presence of a magnetic field.

  15. Calculation of the electron density distribution in silicon by the density-functional method. Comparison with X-ray results

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Velders, G.J.M.; Feil, D.

    1989-01-01

    Quantum-chemical density-functional theory (DFT) calculations, using the local-density approximation (LDA), have been performed for hydrogen-bounded silicon clusters to determine the electron density distribution of the Si-Si bond. The density distribution in the bonding region is compared with calc

  16. Time evolution of secondary electron emission and trapped charge accumulation in polyimide film under various primary electron irradiation currents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Bai-Peng; Zhou, Run-Dong; Su, Guo-Qiang; Mu, Hai-Bao; Zhang, Guan-Jun; Bu, Ren-An

    2016-12-01

    Time-resolved evolution of secondary electron emission and trapped charge accumulation in polyimide film is investigated during two interval electrons bombardment, derived from the measurement of displacement current and secondary current via a hemispherical detector with the shielded grid. Under various irradiation current, secondary electron yield (SEY σ) at a certain injected energy decreases exponentially from initial amplitude σ0 to self-consistent steady value σ∞ close to 0.93. The time constant τ of charging process is characterized as a function of incident current Ip, and the results indicate that the formula Ip × τ is fitted by a hyperbolical law. The influence of Ip on the amount of trapped charge is studied and no significant change in its saturation value is observed. The evolution of SEY σ and trapped charge is dependent on incident dose Qp but not the incident rate Ip. Furthermore, the trap density and capture cross section are discussed.

  17. Simultaneous measurement of electron temperature and density by a line pair method in the RFP plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Masayuki; Shimizu, S.; Ogawa, H.; Shinohara, T.

    2009-11-01

    A line-pair-method has been applied for a simultaneous measurement of the electron temperature and density in ATRAS RFP plasma. Three helium spectrum lines (668nm, 706nm, 728nm) were measured during the discharge at the same time and the electron temperature and density is estimated by using a Collision-Radiation model. To get the signal of the helium impunity line from the RFP discharge, the RFP plasma in the hydrogen gas with a few mixed helium gas was formed. In the typical ATRAS RFP discharge of the plasma current of 60kA, the electron temperature was approximately 50-150 eV and the electron density is the order of 10^18 m-3. During the discharge, the change of the temperature and density are mutually related and this correlation was the almost reverse phase. The periodically change of the temperature and density were also observed. This change synchronizes with a periodically increase of the averaged toroidal magnetic field, which is caused by the toroidal rotation of the increase of the toroidal magnetic field. This rotation, which is deeply related with dynamo effect, makes the plasma energy lose and particles also diffuse toward the plasma edge. As a result, the recycling of the particle and energy are occurred at the same time.

  18. Measurements of the Electron Cloud Density in the PEP-II Low Energy Ring

    CERN Document Server

    Byrd, J; Sonnad, K; Caspers, Friedhelm; Kroyer, T; Krasnykh, A; Pivi, M

    2009-01-01

    Clouds of low energy electrons in the vacuum beam pipes of accelerators of positively charged particle beams present a serious limitation for operation of these machines at high currents. Because of the size of these accelerators, it is difficult to probe the low energy electron clouds over substantial lengths of the beam pipe. We have developed a novel technique to directly measure the electron cloud density via the phase shift induced in a TE wave that is independently excited and transmitted over a section of the accelerator. We infer the absolute phase shift with relatively high accuracy from the phase modulation of the transmission due to the modulation of the electron cloud density from a gap in the positively charged beam. We have used this technique for the first time to measure the average electron cloud density over a 50 m straight section in the positron ring of the PEP-II collider at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center. We have also measured the variation of the density by using low field solen...

  19. Advanced High Energy Density Secondary Batteries with Multi-Electron Reaction Materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Renjie; Luo, Rui; Huang, Yongxin; Wu, Feng; Li, Li

    2016-10-01

    Secondary batteries have become important for smart grid and electric vehicle applications, and massive effort has been dedicated to optimizing the current generation and improving their energy density. Multi-electron chemistry has paved a new path for the breaking of the barriers that exist in traditional battery research and applications, and provided new ideas for developing new battery systems that meet energy density requirements. An in-depth understanding of multi-electron chemistries in terms of the charge transfer mechanisms occuring during their electrochemical processes is necessary and urgent for the modification of secondary battery materials and development of secondary battery systems. In this Review, multi-electron chemistry for high energy density electrode materials and the corresponding secondary battery systems are discussed. Specifically, four battery systems based on multi-electron reactions are classified in this review: lithium- and sodium-ion batteries based on monovalent cations; rechargeable batteries based on the insertion of polyvalent cations beyond those of alkali metals; metal-air batteries, and Li-S batteries. It is noted that challenges still exist in the development of multi-electron chemistries that must be overcome to meet the energy density requirements of different battery systems, and much effort has more effort to be devoted to this.

  20. Investigation of sounding rocket observations of field-aligned currents and electron temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, I. J.; Lessard, M.; Zettergren, M. D.; Moen, J.; Lynch, K. A.; Heavisides, J. M.

    2014-12-01

    Strangeway et al. [2005] and other authors have concluded that the establishment of the ambipolar field by the deposition of energy from soft electron precipitation is a significant driver of type-2 ion upflows. Likewise, Clemmons et al. [2008] and Zhang et al. [2012] proposed processes by which soft electron precipitation may play a role in heating neutrals and contribute to neutral upwelling. In both situations the thermal ionospheric electron population plays a crucial role in both generation of the ambipolar field and in collisional energy exchange with the atmosphere through a variety of processes. In this study we examine the dynamics of the electron population, specifically the temperature, in a slightly different context - focusing on the auroral downward current region (DCR). In many cases auroral DCRs may be depleted of plasma, which sets up interesting conditions involving thermoelectric heat fluxes (which flow upward - in the opposite direction from the current), adiabatic expansion due to the high (upward) speed of the electrons carrying the downward current, heat exchange from ions which have elevated temperatures due to frictional heating, and direct frictional heating of the electrons. A detailed understanding of the electron temperature in auroral DCRs is necessary to make quantitative statements about recombination, upflow, cavitation and a host of other processes relevant to ion outflow. In this study, we compare in situ rocket observations of electron temperature, density, and current densities with predictions from the Zettergren and Semeter [2012] model in an attempt to better understand the dynamics and relationships between these parameters in DCRs.

  1. Diagnosis of Unmagnetized Plasma Electron Number Density and Electron-neutral Collision Frequency by Using Microwave

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yuan Zhongcai; Shi Jiaming; Xu Bo

    2005-01-01

    The plasma diagnostic method using the transmission attenuation of microwaves at double frequencies (PDMUTAMDF) indicates that the frequency and the electron-neutral collision frequency of the plasma can be deduced by utilizing the transmission attenuation of microwaves at two neighboring frequencies in a non-magnetized plasma. Then the electron density can be obtained from the plasma frequency. The PDMUTAMDF is a simple method to diagnose the plasma indirectly. In this paper, the interaction of electromagnetic waves and the plasma is analyzed. Then, based on the attenuation and the phase shift of a microwave in the plasma, the principle of the PDMUTAMDF is presented. With the diagnostic method, the spatially mean electron density and electron collision frequency of the plasma can be obtained. This method is suitable for the elementary diagnosis of the atmospheric-pressure plasma.

  2. Communication: Investigation of the electron momentum density distribution of nanodiamonds by electron energy-loss spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feng, Zhenbao; Yang, Bing; Lin, Yangming; Su, Dangsheng, E-mail: dssu@imr.ac.cn [Shenyang National Laboratory of Materials Science, Institute of Metal Research, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Wenhua Road 72, Shenyang 110016 (China)

    2015-12-07

    The electron momentum distribution of detonation nanodiamonds (DND) was investigated by recording electron energy-loss spectra at large momentum transfer in the transmission electron microscope (TEM), which is known as electron Compton scattering from solid (ECOSS). Compton profile of diamond film obtained by ECOSS was found in good agreement with prior photon experimental measurement and theoretical calculation that for bulk diamond. Compared to the diamond film, the valence Compton profile of DND was found to be narrower, which indicates a more delocalization of the ground-state charge density for the latter. Combining with other TEM characterizations such as high-resolution transmission electron spectroscopy, diffraction, and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy measurements, ECOSS was shown to be a great potential technique to study ground-state electronic properties of nanomaterials.

  3. Electron density and electron temperature measurements in nanosecond pulse discharges over liquid water surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simeni Simeni, M.; Roettgen, A.; Petrishchev, V.; Frederickson, K.; Adamovich, I. V.

    2016-12-01

    Time-resolved electron density, electron temperature, and gas temperature in nanosecond pulse discharges in helium and O2-He mixtures near liquid water surface are measured using Thomson/pure rotational Raman scattering, in two different geometries, (a) ‘diffuse filament’ discharge between a spherical high-voltage electrode and a grounded pin electrode placed in a reservoir filled with distilled water, with the tip exposed, and (b) dielectric barrier discharge between the high-voltage electrode and the liquid water surface. A diffuse plasma filament generated between the electrodes in helium during the primary discharge pulse exhibits noticeable constriction during the secondary discharge pulse several hundred ns later. Adding oxygen to the mixture reduces the plasma filament diameter and enhances constriction during the secondary pulse. In the dielectric barrier discharge, diffuse volumetric plasma occupies nearly the entire space between the high voltage electrode and the liquid surface, and extends radially along the surface. In the filament discharge in helium, adding water to the container results in considerable reduction of plasma lifetime compared to the discharge in dry helium, by about an order of magnitude, indicating rapid electron recombination with water cluster ions. Peak electron density during the pulse is also reduced, by about a factor of two, likely due to dissociative attachment to water vapor during the discharge pulse. These trends become more pronounced as oxygen is added to the mixture, which increases net rate of dissociative attachment. Gas temperature during the primary discharge pulse remains near room temperature, after which it increases up to T ~ 500 K over 5 µs and decays back to near room temperature before the next discharge pulse several tens of ms later. As expected, electron density and electron temperature in diffuse DBD plasmas are considerably lower compared to peak values in the filament discharge. Use of Thomson

  4. Accuracy of cutoff probe for measuring electron density: simulation and experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Dae-Woong; You, Shin-Jae; Kim, Si-June; Lee, Jang-Jae; Kim, Jung-Hyung; Oh, Wang-Yuhl

    2016-09-01

    The electron density has been used for characterizing the plasma for basic research as well as industrial application. To measure the exact electron density, various type of microwave probe has been developed and improved. The cutoff probe is a promising technique inferring the electron density from the plasma resonance peak on the transmission spectrum. In this study, we present the accuracy of electron density inferred from cutoff probe. The accuracy was investigated by electromagnetic simulation and experiment. The discrepancy between the electron densities from the cutoff probe and other sophisticated microwave probes were investigated and discussed. We found that the cutoff probe has good accuracy in inferred electron density. corresponding author.

  5. Electron star birth: a continuous phase transition at nonzero density.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartnoll, Sean A; Petrov, Pavel

    2011-03-25

    We show that charged black holes in anti-de Sitter spacetime can undergo a third-order phase transition at a critical temperature in the presence of charged fermions. In the low temperature phase, a fraction of the charge is carried by a fermion fluid located a finite distance from the black hole. In the zero temperature limit, the black hole is no longer present and all charge is sourced by the fermions. The solutions exhibit the low temperature entropy density scaling s~T(2/z) anticipated from the emergent IR criticality of recently discussed electron stars.

  6. Electronic Density Approaches to the Energetics of Noncovalent Interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Politzer

    2004-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: We present an overview of procedures that have been developed to compute several energetic quantities associated with noncovalent interactions. These formulations involve numerical integration over appropriate electronic densities. Our focus is upon the electrostatic interaction between two unperturbed molecules, the effect of the polarization of each charge distribution by the other, and the total energy of interaction. The expression for the latter is based upon the Hellmann-Feynman theorem. Applications to a number of systems are discussed; among them are dimers of uracil and interacting pairs of molecules in the crystal lattice of the energetic compound RDX.

  7. Electron temperature and density probe for small aeronomy satellites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oyama, K.-I. [Plasma and Space Science Center, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan, Taiwan (China); Institute of Space and Plasma Sciences, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan, Taiwan (China); International Center for Space Weather Study and education, Kyushu University, Fukuoka (Japan); Hsu, Y. W.; Jiang, G. S.; Chen, W. H.; Liu, W. T. [Plasma and Space Science Center, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan, Taiwan (China); Cheng, C. Z.; Fang, H. K. [Plasma and Space Science Center, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan, Taiwan (China); Institute of Space and Plasma Sciences, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan, Taiwan (China)

    2015-08-15

    A compact and low power consumption instrument for measuring the electron density and temperature in the ionosphere has been developed by modifying the previously developed Electron Temperature Probe (ETP). A circuit block which controls frequency of the sinusoidal signal is added to the ETP so that the instrument can measure both T{sub e} in low frequency mode and N{sub e} in high frequency mode from the floating potential shift of the electrode. The floating potential shift shows a minimum at the upper hybrid resonance frequency (f{sub UHR}). The instrument which is named “TeNeP” can be used for tiny satellites which do not have enough conductive surface area for conventional DC Langmuir probe measurements. The instrument also eliminates the serious problems associated with the contamination of satellite surface as well as the sensor electrode.

  8. Electron temperature and density probe for small aeronomy satellites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oyama, K.-I.; Hsu, Y. W.; Jiang, G. S.; Chen, W. H.; Cheng, C. Z.; Fang, H. K.; Liu, W. T.

    2015-08-01

    A compact and low power consumption instrument for measuring the electron density and temperature in the ionosphere has been developed by modifying the previously developed Electron Temperature Probe (ETP). A circuit block which controls frequency of the sinusoidal signal is added to the ETP so that the instrument can measure both Te in low frequency mode and Ne in high frequency mode from the floating potential shift of the electrode. The floating potential shift shows a minimum at the upper hybrid resonance frequency (fUHR). The instrument which is named "TeNeP" can be used for tiny satellites which do not have enough conductive surface area for conventional DC Langmuir probe measurements. The instrument also eliminates the serious problems associated with the contamination of satellite surface as well as the sensor electrode.

  9. Electron currents supporting the near-Earth magnetotail during current sheet thinning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Artemyev, A. V.; Angelopoulos, V.; Liu, J.; Runov, A.

    2017-01-01

    Formation of intense, thin current sheets (i.e., current sheet thinning) is a critical process for magnetospheric substorms, but the kinetic physics of this process remains poorly understood. Using a triangular configuration of the three Time History of Events and Macroscale Interactions during Substorms (THEMIS) spacecraft at the end of 2015 we investigate field-aligned and transverse currents in the magnetotail current sheet around 12 Earth radii downtail. Combining the curlometer technique with direct measurements of ion and electron velocities, we demonstrate that intense, thin current sheets supported by strong electron currents form in this region. Electron field-aligned currents maximize near the neutral plane Bx˜0, attaining magnitudes of ˜20 nA/m2. Carried by hot (>1 keV) electrons, they generate strong magnetic shear, which contributes up to 20% of the vertical (along the normal direction to the equatorial plane) pressure balance. Electron transverse currents, on the other hand, are carried by the curvature drift of anisotropic, colder (<1 keV) electrons and gradually increase during the current sheet thinning. In the events under consideration the thinning process was abruptly terminated by earthward reconnection fronts which have been previously associated with tail reconnection further downtail. It is likely that the thin current sheet properties described herein are similar to conditions further downtail and are linked to the loss of stability and onset of reconnection there. Our findings are likely applicable to thin current sheets in other geophysical and astrophysical settings.

  10. Modulator simulations for coherent electron cooling using a variable density electron beam

    CERN Document Server

    Bell, George I; Schwartz, Brian T; Bruhwiler, David L; Litvinenko, Vladimir; Wang, Gang; Hao, Yue

    2014-01-01

    Increasing the luminosity of relativistic hadron beams is critical for the advancement of nuclear physics. Coherent electron cooling (CEC) promises to cool such beams significantly faster than alternative methods. We present simulations of 40 GeV/nucleon Au+79 ions through the first (modulator) section of a coherent electron cooler. In the modulator, the electron beam copropagates with the ion beam, which perturbs the electron beam density and velocity via anisotropic Debye shielding. In contrast to previous simulations, where the electron density was constant in time and space, here the electron beam has a finite transverse extent, and undergoes focusing by quadrupoles as it passes through the modulator. The peak density in the modulator increases by a factor of 3, as specified by the beam Twiss parameters. The inherently 3D particle and field dynamics is modeled with the parallel VSim framework using a $\\delta$f PIC algorithm. Physical parameters are taken from the CEC proof-of-principle experiment under de...

  11. Quasi-1D van der Waals materials as high current-density local interconnects (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stolyarov, Maxim; Aytan, Ece; Bloodgood, Matthew; Salguero, Tina T.; Balandin, Alexander A.

    2016-09-01

    The continuous downscaling of interconnect dimensions in combination with the introduction of low-k dielectrics has increased the number of heat dissipation, integration and reliability challenges in modern electronics. As a result, there is a strong need for new materials that have high current-carrying capacity for applications as nanoscale interconnects. In this presentation, we show that quasi-one-dimensional (1D) van der Waals metals such as TaSe3 have excellent breakdown current density exceeding that of 5 MA/cm2. This value is above that currently achievable in conventional copper or aluminum wires. The quasi-1D van der Waals materials are characterized by strong bonds along one dimension and weak van der Waals bonds along two other dimensions. The material for this study was grown by the chemical vapor transport (CVT) method. Both mechanical and chemical exfoliation methods were used to fabricate nanowires with lateral dimensions below 100 nm. The dimensions of the quasi-1D nanowires were verified with scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM). The metal (Ti/Au) contacts for the electrical characterization were deposited using electron beam evaporation (EBE). The measurements were conducted on a number of prototype interconnects with multiple electric contacts to ensure reproducibility. The obtained results suggest that quasi-1D van der Waals metals present a feasible alternative to conventional copper interconnects in terms of the current-carrying capacity and the breakdown current-density. This work was supported, in part, by the SRC and DARPA through STARnet Center for Function Accelerated nanoMaterial Engineering (FAME).

  12. Microwave Transmission Measurement of the Electron Cloud Density in the Positron Ring of PEP-II

    CERN Document Server

    Pivi, M T F; Byrd, J; De Santis, S; Sonnad, K G; Caspers, Friedhelm; Kroyer, T; Roncarolo, F

    2008-01-01

    Clouds of electrons in the vacuum chambers of accelerators of positively charged particle beams present a serious limitation for operation of these machines at high currents. Because of the size of these accelerators, it is difficult to probe the low energy electron clouds over substantial lengths of the beam pipe. We applied a novel technique to directly measure the electron cloud density via the phase shift induced in a TE wave which is independently excited and transmitted over a straight section of the accelerator. The modulation in the wave transmission which appear to increase in depth when the clearing solenoids are switched off, seem to be directly correlated to the electron cloud density in the section. Furthermore, we expect a larger phase shift of a wave transmitted through magnetic dipole field regions if the transmitted wave couples with the gyration motion of the electrons. We have used this technique to measure the average electron cloud density (ECD) specifically for the first time in magnetic...

  13. Realizing life-scalable experimental pyroclastic density currents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cronin, S. J.; Lube, G.; Breard, E.; Jones, J.; Valentine, G.; Freundt, A.; Hort, M. K.; Bursik, M. I.

    2013-12-01

    Pyroclastic Density Currents (PDCs) - the most deadly threat from volcanoes - are extremely hot, ground-hugging currents of rock fragments and gas that descend slopes at hundreds of kilometers per hour. These hostile flows are impossible to internally measure, thus volcanologists are persistently blocked in efforts to realistically forecast their internal mechanics and hazards. Attempts to fill this gap via laboratory-scale experiments continue to prove difficult, because they usually mismatch the dynamic and kinematic scaling of real-world flows by several orders of magnitude. In a multi-institutional effort, the first large-scale pyroclastic flow generator that can synthesize repeatable hot high-energy gas-particle mixture flows in safety has been commissioned in New Zealand. The final apparatus stands 15 m high, consisting of a tower/elevator system; an instrumented hopper that can hold >6000 kg (or 3.2 m3) of natural volcanic materials, which can be discharged at a range of controlled rates onto an instrumented, variably inclinable (6-25°) glass-sided chute for examining the vertical profiles of PDCs in motion. The use of rhyolitic pyroclastic material from the 1800 AD Taupo Eruption (with its natural grain-size, sorting and shape characteristics) and gas ensures natural coupling between the solids and fluid phases. PDC analogues with runout of >15 meters and flow depths of 1.5-6 meters are created by generating variably heated falling columns of natural volcanic particles (50-1300 kg/s), dispersed and aerated to controlled particle densities between 3 and 60 vol.% at the base of the elevated hopper. The descending columns rapidly generate high-velocity flows (up to 14 m/s) once impacting on the inclined channel, reproducing many features of natural flows, including segregation into dense and dilute regimes, progressive aggradational and en masse deposition of particles and the development of high internal gas-pore-pressures during flow. The PDC starting

  14. Development of a practical multicomponent density functional for electron-proton correlation to produce accurate proton densities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yang; Brorsen, Kurt R.; Culpitt, Tanner; Pak, Michael V.; Hammes-Schiffer, Sharon

    2017-09-01

    Multicomponent density functional theory (DFT) enables the consistent quantum mechanical treatment of both electrons and protons. A major challenge has been the design of electron-proton correlation (epc) functionals that produce even qualitatively accurate proton densities. Herein an electron-proton correlation functional, epc17, is derived analogously to the Colle-Salvetti formalism for electron correlation and is implemented within the nuclear-electronic orbital (NEO) framework. The NEO-DFT/epc17 method produces accurate proton densities efficiently and is promising for diverse applications.

  15. Electronically Tunable Current-Mode Quadrature Oscillator Using Single MCDTA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Li

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a modified current differencing transconductance amlpifier (MCDTA and the MCDTA based quadrature oscillator. The oscillator is current-mode and provides current output from high output impedance terminals. The circuit uses only one MCDTA and two grounded capacitors, and is easy to be integrated. Its oscillation frequency can be tuned electronically by tuning bias currents of MCDTA. Finally, frequency error is analyzed. The results of circuit simulations are in agreement with theory.

  16. Quasi-ballistic carbon nanotube array transistors with current density exceeding Si and GaAs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brady, Gerald J; Way, Austin J; Safron, Nathaniel S; Evensen, Harold T; Gopalan, Padma; Arnold, Michael S

    2016-09-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are tantalizing candidates for semiconductor electronics because of their exceptional charge transport properties and one-dimensional electrostatics. Ballistic transport approaching the quantum conductance limit of 2G 0 = 4e (2)/h has been achieved in field-effect transistors (FETs) containing one CNT. However, constraints in CNT sorting, processing, alignment, and contacts give rise to nonidealities when CNTs are implemented in densely packed parallel arrays such as those needed for technology, resulting in a conductance per CNT far from 2G 0. The consequence has been that, whereas CNTs are ultimately expected to yield FETs that are more conductive than conventional semiconductors, CNTs, instead, have underperformed channel materials, such as Si, by sixfold or more. We report quasi-ballistic CNT array FETs at a density of 47 CNTs μm(-1), fabricated through a combination of CNT purification, solution-based assembly, and CNT treatment. The conductance is as high as 0.46 G 0 per CNT. In parallel, the conductance of the arrays reaches 1.7 mS μm(-1), which is seven times higher than the previous state-of-the-art CNT array FETs made by other methods. The saturated on-state current density is as high as 900 μA μm(-1) and is similar to or exceeds that of Si FETs when compared at and equivalent gate oxide thickness and at the same off-state current density. The on-state current density exceeds that of GaAs FETs as well. This breakthrough in CNT array performance is a critical advance toward the exploitation of CNTs in logic, high-speed communications, and other semiconductor electronics technologies.

  17. Quasi-ballistic carbon nanotube array transistors with current density exceeding Si and GaAs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brady, Gerald J.; Way, Austin J.; Safron, Nathaniel S.; Evensen, Harold T.; Gopalan, Padma; Arnold, Michael S.

    2016-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are tantalizing candidates for semiconductor electronics because of their exceptional charge transport properties and one-dimensional electrostatics. Ballistic transport approaching the quantum conductance limit of 2G0 = 4e2/h has been achieved in field-effect transistors (FETs) containing one CNT. However, constraints in CNT sorting, processing, alignment, and contacts give rise to nonidealities when CNTs are implemented in densely packed parallel arrays such as those needed for technology, resulting in a conductance per CNT far from 2G0. The consequence has been that, whereas CNTs are ultimately expected to yield FETs that are more conductive than conventional semiconductors, CNTs, instead, have underperformed channel materials, such as Si, by sixfold or more. We report quasi-ballistic CNT array FETs at a density of 47 CNTs μm−1, fabricated through a combination of CNT purification, solution-based assembly, and CNT treatment. The conductance is as high as 0.46 G0 per CNT. In parallel, the conductance of the arrays reaches 1.7 mS μm−1, which is seven times higher than the previous state-of-the-art CNT array FETs made by other methods. The saturated on-state current density is as high as 900 μA μm−1 and is similar to or exceeds that of Si FETs when compared at and equivalent gate oxide thickness and at the same off-state current density. The on-state current density exceeds that of GaAs FETs as well. This breakthrough in CNT array performance is a critical advance toward the exploitation of CNTs in logic, high-speed communications, and other semiconductor electronics technologies. PMID:27617293

  18. Development of a high average current polarized electron source with long cathode operational lifetime

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    C. K. Sinclair; P. A. Adderley; B. M. Dunham; J. C. Hansknecht; P. Hartmann; M. Poelker; J. S. Price; P. M. Rutt; W. J. Schneider; M. Steigerwald

    2007-02-01

    Substantially more than half of the electromagnetic nuclear physics experiments conducted at the Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility of the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (Jefferson Laboratory) require highly polarized electron beams, often at high average current. Spin-polarized electrons are produced by photoemission from various GaAs-based semiconductor photocathodes, using circularly polarized laser light with photon energy slightly larger than the semiconductor band gap. The photocathodes are prepared by activation of the clean semiconductor surface to negative electron affinity using cesium and oxidation. Historically, in many laboratories worldwide, these photocathodes have had short operational lifetimes at high average current, and have often deteriorated fairly quickly in ultrahigh vacuum even without electron beam delivery. At Jefferson Lab, we have developed a polarized electron source in which the photocathodes degrade exceptionally slowly without electron emission, and in which ion back bombardment is the predominant mechanism limiting the operational lifetime of the cathodes during electron emission. We have reproducibly obtained cathode 1/e dark lifetimes over two years, and 1/e charge density and charge lifetimes during electron beam delivery of over 2?105???C/cm2 and 200 C, respectively. This source is able to support uninterrupted high average current polarized beam delivery to three experimental halls simultaneously for many months at a time. Many of the techniques we report here are directly applicable to the development of GaAs photoemission electron guns to deliver high average current, high brightness unpolarized beams.

  19. Current distribution and enhancement of the engineering critical current density in multifilament Bi-2223 tapes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, W.G.; Jensen, M.B.; Kindl, B.;

    2000-01-01

    The spatial distribution of the critical current density (Jc) and engineering critical current density (Je) along the tape width direction was studied by a cutting technique on Bi-2223 multifilamentary tapes. In general, an increase of Jc towards the centre of the tape was measured. We attribute...... this tendency to the stress-strain experienced in the tape during the rolling process. Jc of 50 kA/cm2 and Jeof 18 kA/cm2 was measured at the centre part (185 μm wide and 200 μm thick) of a tape cut from a 500 meters long tape (average Je of 8 kA/cm2). The low Jc of the edge part is a result of the porous...... microstructure with a great amount of secondary phases. Local variation of Jc was measured within the centre segment of the tape. This indicates the influence of other factors on Jc, such as filament shape, connectivity of the filaments, and sausaging. Enhancement of Je has been pursued in which average Je of 12...

  20. Temperature-dependence of Threshold Current Density-Length Product in Metallization Lines: A Revisit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saptono Duryat, Rahmat; Kim, Choong-Un

    2016-04-01

    One of the important phenomena in Electromigration (EM) is Blech Effect. The existence of Threshold Current Density-Length Product or EM Threshold has such fundamental and technological consequences in the design, manufacture, and testing of electronics. Temperature-dependence of Blech Product had been thermodynamically established and the real behavior of such interconnect materials have been extensively studied. The present paper reviewed the temperature-dependence of EM threshold in metallization lines of different materials and structure as found in relevant published articles. It is expected that the reader can see a big picture from the compiled data, which might be overlooked when it was examined in pieces.

  1. Thomson scattering from near-solid density plasmas using soft x-ray free electron lasers

    CERN Document Server

    Höll, A

    2006-01-01

    We propose a collective Thomson scattering experiment at the VUV free electron laser facility at DESY (FLASH) which aims to diagnose warm dense matter at near-solid density. The plasma region of interest marks the transition from an ideal plasma to a correlated and degenerate many-particle system and is of current interest, e.g. in ICF experiments or laboratory astrophysics. Plasma diagnostic of such plasmas is a longstanding issue. The collective electron plasma mode (plasmon) is revealed in a pump-probe scattering experiment using the high-brilliant radiation to probe the plasma. The distinctive scattering features allow to infer basic plasma properties. For plasmas in thermal equilibrium the electron density and temperature is determined from scattering off the plasmon mode.

  2. Thomson scattering from near-solid density plasmas using soft x-ray free electron lasers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holl, A; Bornath, T; Cao, L; Doppner, T; Dusterer, S; Forster, E; Fortmann, C; Glenzer, S H; Gregori, G; Laarmann, T; Meiwes-Broer, K H; Przystawik, A; Radcliffe, P; Redmer, R; Reinholz, H; Ropke, G; Thiele, R; Tiggesbaumker, J; Toleikis, S; Truong, N X; Tschentscher, T; Uschmann, I; Zastrau, U

    2006-11-21

    We propose a collective Thomson scattering experiment at the VUV free electron laser facility at DESY (FLASH) which aims to diagnose warm dense matter at near-solid density. The plasma region of interest marks the transition from an ideal plasma to a correlated and degenerate many-particle system and is of current interest, e.g. in ICF experiments or laboratory astrophysics. Plasma diagnostic of such plasmas is a longstanding issue. The collective electron plasma mode (plasmon) is revealed in a pump-probe scattering experiment using the high-brilliant radiation to probe the plasma. The distinctive scattering features allow to infer basic plasma properties. For plasmas in thermal equilibrium the electron density and temperature is determined from scattering off the plasmon mode.

  3. The Most Intense Electron-Scale Current Sheets in the Solar Wind

    Science.gov (United States)

    Podesta, John J.

    2017-04-01

    Previous analysis of magnetohydrodynamic-scale currents in high-speed solar wind near 1 AU suggests that the most intense current-carrying structures occur at electron scales and are characterized by average current densities on the order of 1 pA/cm2. Here, this prediction is verified by examining the effects of the measurement bandwidth and/or measurement resolution on the analysis of synthetic solar wind signals. Assuming Taylor's hypothesis holds for the energetically dominant fluctuations at kinetic scales, the results show that when νc≫ νb, where νc is the measurement bandwidth and νb ≈ 1/3 Hz is the break frequency, the average scale of the most intense fluctuations in the current density proxy is approximately 1/νc, and the average peak current density is a weakly increasing function that scales approximately like νc^{0.1}.

  4. Effective atomic numbers and electron density of dosimetric material

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaginelli S

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available A novel method for determination of mass attenuation coefficient of x-rays employing NaI (Tl detector system and radioactive sources is described.in this paper. A rigid geometry arrangement and gating of the spectrometer at FWHM position and selection of absorber foils are all done following detailed investigation, to minimize the effect of small angle scattering and multiple scattering on the mass attenuation coefficient, m/r, value. Firstly, for standardization purposes the mass attenuation coefficients of elemental foils such as Aluminum, Copper, Molybdenum, Tantalum and Lead are measured and then, this method is utilized for dosimetric interested material (sulfates. The experimental mass attenuation coefficient values are compared with the theoretical values to find good agreement between the theory and experiment within one to two per cent. The effective atomic numbers of the biological substitute material are calculated by sum rule and from the graph. The electron density of dosimetric material is calculated using the effective atomic number. The study has discussed in detail the attenuation coefficient, effective atomic number and electron density of dosimetric material/biological substitutes.

  5. Inversion of Ionospheric Electron Density from GPS Beacon Observations

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZouYu-hua; XuJi-sheng

    2003-01-01

    This paper studies the mathematical foundation of time-dependent three-dimensional (3-D) computerized ionospheric tomography (CIT) for reconstructing ionospheric electron density, N~, from ground-based GPS beacon observations. After simplifying the relation between N. and time,the time-dependent 3-D inversion in consideration is reduced to a 3-D tomography with incomplete projections. To see clearly the effects of the incompleteness on the quality of reconstruction under 3-D condition, the formula of 3-D parallelbeam tomogtTaphy is deduced theoretically. After establishing the mathematical foundation, simulations based on actual GPS ray paths with the help of the IRI-90 model are performed,and reasonable time-dependent 3-D distribution images of Ne are obtained when taking proper layout of the network and allowing variable resolutions. The quality of the reconstruction is rather good when compared with the images from the IRI-90 model directly. Therefore, results in this paper demonstrate that imaging of the ionospheric electron density distribution from GPS beacon observations is reasonable in theor yand feasible in practice.

  6. Inversion of Ionospheric Electron Density from GPS Beacon Observations

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zou Yu-hua; Xu Ji-sheng

    2003-01-01

    This paper studies the mathematical foundation of time-dependent three-dimensional (3-D) computerized ionospheric tomography (CIT) for reconstructing ionospheric electron density, Ne, from ground-based GPS beacon observations. After simplifying the relation between Ne and time,the time-dependent 3-D inversion in consideration is reduced to a 3-D tomography with incomplete projections.To see clearly the effects of the incompleteness on the quality of reconstruction under 3-D condition, the formula of 3-D parallel-beam tomography is deduced theoretically. After establishing the mathematical foundation, simulations based on actual GPS ray paths with the help of the IRI-90 model are performed,and reasonable time-dependent 3-D distribution images of Neare obtained when taking proper layout of the network and allowing variable resolutions. The quality of the reconstruction is rather good when compared with the images from the IRI-90 model directly. Therefore, results in this paper demon-strate that imaging of the ionospheric electron density distri-bution from GPS beacon observations is reasonable in theory and feasible in practice.

  7. Structure of the electron momentum density of atomic systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Romera, E.; Dehesa, J.S. [Granada Univ. (Spain). Dept. de Fisica Moderna; Koga, T. [Department of Applied Chemistry, Muroran Institute of Technology, Muroran, Hokkaido 050 (Japan)

    1997-12-01

    The present paper addresses the controversial problem on the nonmonotonic behavior of the spherically-averaged momentum density {gamma}(p) observed previously for some ground-state atoms based on the Roothaan-Hartree-Fock (RHF) wave functions of Clementi and Roetti. Highly accurate RHF wave functions of Koga et al. are used to study the existence of extrema in the momentum density {gamma}(p) of all the neutral atoms from hydrogen to xenon. Three groups of atoms are clearly identified according to the nonmonotonicity parameter {mu}, whose value is either equal to, larger, or smaller than unity. Additionally, it is found that the function p{sup -{alpha}} {gamma}(p) is (i) monotonically decreasing from the origin for {alpha}{>=}0.75, (ii) convex for {alpha}{>=}1.35, and (iii) logarithmically convex for {alpha}{>=}3.64 for all the neutral atoms with nuclear charges Z = 1-54. Finally, these monotonicity properties are applied to derive simple yet general inequalities which involve three momentum moments left angle p{sup t} right angle. These inequalities not only generalize similar inequalities reported so far but also allow us to correlate some fundamental atomic quantities, such as the electron-electron repulsion energy and the peak height of Compton profile, in a simple manner. (orig.) 40 refs.

  8. Effects on magnetic reconnection of a density asymmetry across the current sheet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. G. Tanaka

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available The magnetopause (MP reconnection is characterized by a density asymmetry across the current sheet. The asymmetry is expected to produce characteristic features in the reconnection layer. Here we present a comparison between the Cluster MP crossing reported by Retinò et al. (2006 and virtual observations in two-dimensional particle-in-cell simulation results. The simulation, which includes the density asymmetry but has zero guide field in the initial condition, has reproduced well the observed features as follows: (1 The prominent density dip region is detected at the separatrix region (SR on the magnetospheric (MSP side of the MP. (2 The intense electric field normal to the MP is pointing to the center of the MP at the location where the density dip is detected. (3 The ion bulk outflow due to the magnetic reconnection is seen to be biased towards the MSP side. (4 The out-of-plane magnetic field (the Hall magnetic field has bipolar rather than quadrupolar structure, the latter of which is seen for a density symmetric case. The simulation also showed rich electron dynamics (formation of field-aligned beams in the proximity of the separatrices, which was not fully resolved in the observations. Stepping beyond the simulation-observation comparison, we have also analyzed the electron acceleration and the field line structure in the simulation results. It is found that the bipolar Hall magnetic field structure is produced by the substantial drift of the reconnected field lines at the MSP SR due to the enhanced normal electric field. The field-aligned electrons at the same MSP SR are identified as the gun smokes of the electron acceleration in the close proximity of the X-line. We have also analyzed the X-line structure obtained in the simulation to find that the density asymmetry leads to a steep density gradient in the in-flow region, which may lead to a non-stationary behavior of the X-line when three-dimensional freedom is taken into account.

  9. Influence of current density on microstructure and properties of electrodeposited nickel-alumina composite coatings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Góral, Anna, E-mail: a.goral@imim.pl [Institute of Metallurgy and Materials Science, Polish Academy of Sciences, 25 Reymonta St., 30-059 Krakow (Poland); Nowak, Marek [Institute of Non-Ferrous Metals Gliwice, Light Metals Division Skawina, 19 Pilsudskiego St., 32-050 Skawina (Poland); Berent, Katarzyna; Kania, Bogusz [Institute of Metallurgy and Materials Science, Polish Academy of Sciences, 25 Reymonta St., 30-059 Krakow (Poland)

    2014-12-05

    Highlights: • Current density of the electrodeposition affects the incorporation of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} in Ni matrix. • Ni/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} composite coatings exhibit changes in crystallographic texture. • The pitting corrosion effects were observed in Ni/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} coatings. • Residual stresses were decreased with increasing current density and coating thickness. - Abstract: Electrodeposition process is a very promising method for producing metal matrix composites reinforced with ceramic particles. In this method insoluble particles suspended in an electrolytic bath are embedded in a growing metal layer. This paper is focused on the investigations of the nickel matrix nanocomposite coatings with hard α-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} nano-particles, electrochemically deposited from modified Watts-type baths on steel substrates. The influence of various current densities on the microstructure, residual stresses, texture, hardness and corrosion resistance of the deposited nickel/alumina coatings was investigated. The surface morphology, cross sections of the coatings and distribution of the ceramic particles in the metal matrix were examined by scanning electron microscopy. The phase composition, residual stresses and preferred grain orientation of the coatings were characterized using X-ray diffraction techniques. The coating morphology revealed that α-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} particles show a distinct tendency to form agglomerates, approximately uniformly distributed into the nickel matrix.

  10. Measurements of the Electron Cloud Density in the PEP-II Low Energy Ring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Byrd, John; De Santis, Stefano; Sonnad, Kiran; Caspers, Fritz; Kroyer, Tom; Krasnykh, Anatoly; Pivi, Mauro

    2008-06-01

    Clouds of low energy electronsin the vacuum beam pipes of accelerators of positively charged particle beams present a serious limitation for operation of these machines at high currents. Because of the size of these accelerators, it is difficult to probe the low energyelectron clouds over substantial lengths of the beam pipe. We have developed a novel technique to directly measure the electron cloud density via the phase shift induced in a TE wave that is independently excited and transmitted over a section of the accelerator. We infer the absolute phase shift with relatively high accuracy from the phase modulation of the transmission due to the modulation of the electron cloud density from a gap in the positively charged beam. We have used this technique for the first time to measure the average electron cloud density over a 50 m straight section in the positron ring of the PEP-II collider at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center. We have also measured the variation of the density by using low field solenoid magnets to control the electrons.

  11. Persistent current and Drude weight of one-dimensional interacting fermions on imperfect ring from current lattice density functional theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akande, Akinlolu; Sanvito, Stefano

    2016-11-01

    We perform a numerical study of interacting one-dimensional Hubbard rings with a single impurity potential and pierced by a magnetic flux. Our calculations are carried out at the level of current lattice density functional theory (CLDFT) for the Hubbard model and compared to known results obtained in the thermodynamical limit from the Bethe ansatz. In particular, we investigate the effects of disorder and Coulomb interaction on the persistent current (PC) and the Drude weight. It is found that CLDFT is able to accurately describe qualitative and quantitative features of these ground state properties in the presence of disorder and electronic interaction. When the impurity potential is switched off, the CLDFT approach describes well the velocity of the Luttinger liquid excitations as a function of both interaction strength and electron filling. Then, when the impurity scattering potential is finite, we find the PC to vanish as {{L}-{{α\\text{B}}-1}} for large L and independent on the strength of the scattering potential, in good agreement with Luttinger liquid theory.

  12. The Electron Density Structure of Mars Magnetosphere by MAVEN/LPW

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morooka, M.; Andersson, L.; Ergun, R. E.; Fowler, C. M.; Delory, G. T.; Weber, T. D.; Woodson, A. K.; Andrews, D. J.; Eriksson, A. I.; Mitchell, D. L.; Connerney, J. E. P.; Gruesbeck, J.; Halekas, J. S.; Edberg, N. J. T.; McFadden, J. P.

    2015-12-01

    The Langmuir probe (LP) is primarily designed to characterize the plasma by direct analysis of the collected plasma particle current in a dense and cold plasma regime. On the other hand in the tenuous plasma the floating potential of the spacecraft is anti-correlated with the flux of the ambient electrons, and therefore provides a qualitative and sensitive indication of variations in the ambient plasma. The advantage of this measurement is that the obtained density yields the overall ambient plasma density irrespective of the particle energy range and sensitive to low-density plasma. Langmuir Probe sensors onboard two spacecraft (Phobos-2 and Rosetta) have identified the plasma regions around Mars magnetosphere using the LP measured spacecraft potentials. However, the examples of such observation are few. A set of Langmuir Probe onboard MAVEN makes possible to monitor the spacecraft potentials around Martian magnetosphere statistically. In most of the cases MAVEN/LPW identifies sharp density jumps near the location previously reported as the magnetic pile-up boundary. We will show the electron density characteristics and its comparison to the characteristics of thermal electron/ion as well as the magnetic field activities and discuss their relation to the Solar wind conditions and Martian magnetic field.

  13. Clast comminution during pyroclastic density current transport: Mt St Helens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dawson, B.; Brand, B. D.; Dufek, J.

    2011-12-01

    Volcanic clasts within pyroclastic density currents (PDCs) tend to be more rounded than those in fall deposits. This rounding reflects degrees of comminution during transport, which produces an increase in fine-grained ash with distance from source (Manga, M., Patel, A., Dufek., J. 2011. Bull Volcanol 73: 321-333). The amount of ash produced due to comminution can potentially affect runout distance, deposit sorting, the volume of ash lofted into the upper atmosphere, and increase internal pore pressure (e.g., Wohletz, K., Sheridan, M. F., Brown, W.K. 1989. J Geophy Res, 94, 15703-15721). For example, increased pore pressure has been shown to produce longer runout distances than non-comminuted PDC flows (e.g., Dufek, J., and M. Manga, 2008. J. Geophy Res, 113). We build on the work of Manga et al., (2011) by completing a pumice abrasion study for two well-exposed flow units from the May 18th, 1980 eruption of Mt St Helens (MSH). To quantify differences in comminution from source, sampling and the image analysis technique developed in Manga et al., 2010 was completed at distances proximal, medial, and distal from source. Within the units observed, data was taken from the base, middle, and pumice lobes within the outcrops. Our study is unique in that in addition to quantifying the degree of pumice rounding with distance from source, we also determine the possible range of ash sizes produced during comminution by analyzing bubble wall thickness of the pumice through petrographic and SEM analysis. The proportion of this ash size is then measured relative to the grain size of larger ash with distance from source. This allows us to correlate ash production with degree of rounding with distance from source, and determine the fraction of the fine ash produced due to comminution versus vent-fragmentation mechanisms. In addition we test the error in 2D analysis by completing a 3D image analysis of selected pumice samples using a Camsizer. We find that the roundness of PDC

  14. Limiting current of intense electron beams in a decelerating gap

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nusinovich, G. S.; Beaudoin, B. L.; Thompson, C.; Karakkad, J. A.; Antonsen, T. M.

    2016-02-01

    For numerous applications, it is desirable to develop electron beam driven efficient sources of electromagnetic radiation that are capable of producing the required power at beam voltages as low as possible. This trend is limited by space charge effects that cause the reduction of electron kinetic energy and can lead to electron reflection. So far, this effect was analyzed for intense beams propagating in uniform metallic pipes. In the present study, the limiting currents of intense electron beams are analyzed for the case of beam propagation in the tubes with gaps. A general treatment is illustrated by an example evaluating the limiting current in a high-power, tunable 1-10 MHz inductive output tube (IOT), which is currently under development for ionospheric modification. Results of the analytical theory are compared to results of numerical simulations. The results obtained allow one to estimate the interaction efficiency of IOTs.

  15. Enhanced current and power density of micro-scale microbial fuel cells with ultramicroelectrode anodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Hao; Rangaswami, Sriram; Lee, Hyung-Sool; Chae, Junseok

    2016-09-01

    We present a micro-scale microbial fuel cell (MFC) with an ultramicroelectrode (UME) anode, with the aim of creating a miniaturized high-current/power-density converter using carbon-neutral and renewable energy sources. Micro-scale MFCs have been studied for more than a decade, yet their current and power densities are still an order of magnitude lower than those of their macro-scale counterparts. In order to enhance the current/power densities, we engineer a concentric ring-shaped UME, with a width of 20 μm, to facilitate the diffusion of ions in the vicinity of the micro-organisms that form biofilm on the UME. The biofilm extends approximately 15 μm from the edge of the UME, suggesting the effective biofilm area increases. Measured current/power densities per the effective area and the original anode area are 7.08  ±  0.01 A m-2 & 3.09  ±  0.04 W m-2 and 17.7  ±  0.03 A m-2 & 7.72  ±  0.09 W m-2, respectively. This is substantially higher than any prior work in micro-scale MFCs, and very close, or even higher, to that of macro-scale MFCs. A Coulombic efficiency, a measure of how efficiently an MFC harvests electrons from donor substrate, of 70%, and an energy conversion efficiency of 17% are marked, highlighting the micro-scale MFC as an attractive alternative within the existing energy conversion portfolio.

  16. Time-dependent density-functional theory simulation of local currents in pristine and single-defect zigzag graphene nanoribbons

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Shenglai; Russakoff, Arthur; Li, Yonghui; Varga, Kálmán

    2016-07-01

    The spatial current distribution in H-terminated zigzag graphene nanoribbons (ZGNRs) under electrical bias is investigated using time-dependent density-functional theory solved on a real-space grid. A projected complex absorbing potential is used to minimize the effect of reflection at simulation cell boundary. The calculations show that the current flows mainly along the edge atoms in the hydrogen terminated pristine ZGNRs. When a vacancy is introduced to the ZGNRs, loop currents emerge at the ribbon edge due to electrons hopping between carbon atoms of the same sublattice. The loop currents hinder the flow of the edge current, explaining the poor electric conductance observed in recent experiments.

  17. Existence of a virtual cathode close to a strongly electron emissive wall in low density plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tierno, S. P., E-mail: sp.tierno@upm.es; Donoso, J. M.; Domenech-Garret, J. L.; Conde, L. [Department of Applied Physics, E.T.S.I. Aeronáutica y del Espacio. Universidad Politécnica de Madrid, 28040 Madrid (Spain)

    2016-01-15

    The interaction between an electron emissive wall, electrically biased in a plasma, is revisited through a simple fluid model. We search for realistic conditions of the existence of a non-monotonic plasma potential profile with a virtual cathode as it is observed in several experiments. We mainly focus our attention on thermionic emission related to the operation of emissive probes for plasma diagnostics, although most conclusions also apply to other electron emission processes. An extended Bohm criterion is derived involving the ratio between the two different electron densities at the potential minimum and at the background plasma. The model allows a phase-diagram analysis, which confirms the existence of the non-monotonic potential profiles with a virtual cathode. This analysis shows that the formation of the potential well critically depends on the emitted electron current and on the velocity at the sheath edge of cold ions flowing from the bulk plasma. As a consequence, a threshold value of the governing parameter is required, in accordance to the physical nature of the electron emission process. The latter is a threshold wall temperature in the case of thermionic electrons. Experimental evidence supports our numerical calculations of this threshold temperature. Besides this, the potential well becomes deeper with increasing electron emission, retaining a fraction of the released current which limits the extent of the bulk plasma perturbation. This noninvasive property would explain the reliable measurements of plasma potential by using the floating potential method of emissive probes operating in the so-called strong emission regime.

  18. Electronic properties of graphene nanoribbons: A density functional investigation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumar, Sandeep, E-mail: skumar198712@gmail.com; Sharma, Hitesh, E-mail: dr.hitesh.phys@gmail.com [Department of Physics, Punjab Technical University Kapurthala, Punjab-144601 (India)

    2015-05-15

    Density functional theory calculations have been performed on graphene nano ribbons (GNRs) to investigate the electronic properties as a function of chirality, size and hydrogenation on the edges. The calculations were performed on GNRs with armchair and zigzag configurations with 28, 34, 36, 40, 50, 56, 62, 66 carbon atoms. The structural stability of AGNR and ZGNR increases with the size of nanoribbon where as hydrogenation of GNR tends to lowers their structural stability. All GNRs considered have shown semiconducting behavior with HOMO-LUMO gap decreasing with the increase in the GNR size. The hydrogenation of GNR decreases its HOMO-LUMO gap significantly. The results are in agreement with the available experimental and theoretical results.

  19. Excitation of a cylindrical cavity by a helical current and an axial electron beam current

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davidovich, M. V.; Bushuev, N. A.

    2013-07-01

    The explicit expressions (in the Vainshtein and Markov forms) are derived for the excitation of a cylindrical cavity with perfectly conducting walls and with impedance end faces. Excitation of a cylindrical cavity and a cylindrical waveguide with a preset nonuniform axial electron-beam current and a helical current with a variable pitch, which is excited by a concentrated voltage source and is loaded by a preset pointlike matched load, is considered. For the helical current, the integro-differential equation is formulated. The traveling-wave tube (TWT) is simulated in the preset beam current approximation taking into account the nonuniform winding of the spiral coil, nonuniform electron beam, and losses.

  20. Ultra-Stretchable Interconnects for High-Density Stretchable Electronics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salman Shafqat

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The exciting field of stretchable electronics (SE promises numerous novel applications, particularly in-body and medical diagnostics devices. However, future advanced SE miniature devices will require high-density, extremely stretchable interconnects with micron-scale footprints, which calls for proven standardized (complementary metal-oxide semiconductor (CMOS-type process recipes using bulk integrated circuit (IC microfabrication tools and fine-pitch photolithography patterning. Here, we address this combined challenge of microfabrication with extreme stretchability for high-density SE devices by introducing CMOS-enabled, free-standing, miniaturized interconnect structures that fully exploit their 3D kinematic freedom through an interplay of buckling, torsion, and bending to maximize stretchability. Integration with standard CMOS-type batch processing is assured by utilizing the Flex-to-Rigid (F2R post-processing technology to make the back-end-of-line interconnect structures free-standing, thus enabling the routine microfabrication of highly-stretchable interconnects. The performance and reproducibility of these free-standing structures is promising: an elastic stretch beyond 2000% and ultimate (plastic stretch beyond 3000%, with <0.3% resistance change, and >10 million cycles at 1000% stretch with <1% resistance change. This generic technology provides a new route to exciting highly-stretchable miniature devices.

  1. An Assessment of Reservoir Density Currents and Inflow Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-07-01

    are defined once where used in the main text and appendices and, for convience , are listed and redefined in Appendix D. Unless specifically stated...techniques are described hereafter and sample applications are presented in Appendix B. Overflows 118. Overflows occur when the inflowing water density is

  2. Fourier transform magnetic resonance current density imaging (FT-MRCDI) from one component of magnetic flux density.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ider, Yusuf Ziya; Birgul, Ozlem; Oran, Omer Faruk; Arikan, Orhan; Hamamura, Mark J; Muftuler, L Tugan

    2010-06-01

    Fourier transform (FT)-based algorithms for magnetic resonance current density imaging (MRCDI) from one component of magnetic flux density have been developed for 2D and 3D problems. For 2D problems, where current is confined to the xy-plane and z-component of the magnetic flux density is measured also on the xy-plane inside the object, an iterative FT-MRCDI algorithm is developed by which both the current distribution inside the object and the z-component of the magnetic flux density on the xy-plane outside the object are reconstructed. The method is applied to simulated as well as actual data from phantoms. The effect of measurement error on the spatial resolution of the current density reconstruction is also investigated. For 3D objects an iterative FT-based algorithm is developed whereby the projected current is reconstructed on any slice using as data the Laplacian of the z-component of magnetic flux density measured for that slice. In an injected current MRCDI scenario, the current is not divergence free on the boundary of the object. The method developed in this study also handles this situation.

  3. A High-Efficiency Electron Momentum Spectrometer for Direct Imaging of Orbital Electron Density

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    REN Xue-Guang; NING Chuan-Gang; DENG Jing-Kang; ZHANG Shu-Feng; SU Guo-Lin; LI Bin; CHEN Xue-Jun

    2005-01-01

    @@ Direct three-dimensional images for orbital electron density are obtained by using our newly developed electron momentum spectrometer with simultaneous detection in energy and momentum, and the instruments resolutions of Aθ = ±0.7°, △φ = ±1.9°, △E = 1.2 eV, and △T = 2.0ns. The detection efficiency is about 100 times higher than conventional spectrometers. The design and performance of the apparatus are reported together with the experimental results on argon to show the extensive improvements in experimental resolutions, detection efficiency and versatility.

  4. Reconstruction of conductivity and current density images using only one component of magnetic field measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, Jin Keun; Yoon, Jeong-Rock; Woo, Eung Je; Kwon, Ohin

    2003-09-01

    Magnetic resonance current density imaging (MRCDI) is to provide current density images of a subject using a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scanner with a current injection apparatus. The injection current generates a magnetic field that we can measure from MR phase images. We obtain internal current density images from the measured magnetic flux densities via Ampere's law. However, we must rotate the subject to acquire all of the three components of the induced magnetic flux density. This subject rotation is impractical in clinical MRI scanners when the subject is a human body. In this paper, we propose a way to eliminate the requirement of subject rotation by careful mathematical analysis of the MRCDI problem. In our new MRCDI technique, we need to measure only one component of the induced magnetic flux density and reconstruct both cross-sectional conductivity and current density images without any subject rotation.

  5. Effects of the current boundary conditions at the plasma-gun gap on density in SSPX

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolesnikov, Roman; Lodestro, L. L.; Meyer, W. H.

    2012-10-01

    The Sustained Spheromak Physics Experiment (SSPX) was a toroidal magnetic-confinement device without toroidal magnetic-field coils or a central transformer but which generated core-plasma currents by dynamo processes driven by coaxial plasma-gun injection into a flux-conserving vessel. Record electron temperatures in a spheromak (Te˜500eV) were achieved, and final results of the SSPX program were reported in [1]. Plasma density, which depended strongly on wall conditions, was an important parameter in SSPX. It was observed that density rises with Igun and that confinement improved as the density was lowered. Shortly after the last experiments, a new feature was added to the Corsica code's solver used to reconstruct SSPX equilibria. Motivated by n=0 fields observed in NIMROD simulations of SSPX, an insulating boundary condition was implemented at the plasma-gun gap. Using this option we will perform new reconstructions of SSPX equilibria and look for correlations between the location of the separatrix (which moves up the gun wall and onto the insulating gap as Igun increases) and plasma density and magnetic-flux amplification [2].[4pt] [1] H. S. McLean, APS, DPP, Dallas, TX, 2008.[0pt] [2] E. B. Hooper et al., Nucl. Fusion 47, 1064 (2007).

  6. Weak Values from Displacement Currents in Multiterminal Electron Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marian, D.; Zanghı, N.; Oriols, X.

    2016-03-01

    Weak values allow the measurement of observables associated with noncommuting operators. Up to now, position-momentum weak values have been mainly developed for (relativistic) photons. In this Letter, a proposal for the measurement of such weak values in typical electronic devices is presented. Inspired by the Ramo-Shockley-Pellegrini theorem that provides a relation between current and electron velocity, it is shown that the displacement current measured in multiterminal configurations can provide either a weak measurement of the momentum or strong measurement of position. This proposal opens new opportunities for fundamental and applied physics with state-of-the-art electronic technology. As an example, a setup for the measurement of the Bohmian velocity of (nonrelativistic) electrons is presented and tested with numerical experiments.

  7. Reduced density matrix hybrid approach: application to electronic energy transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berkelbach, Timothy C; Markland, Thomas E; Reichman, David R

    2012-02-28

    Electronic energy transfer in the condensed phase, such as that occurring in photosynthetic complexes, frequently occurs in regimes where the energy scales of the system and environment are similar. This situation provides a challenge to theoretical investigation since most approaches are accurate only when a certain energetic parameter is small compared to others in the problem. Here we show that in these difficult regimes, the Ehrenfest approach provides a good starting point for a dynamical description of the energy transfer process due to its ability to accurately treat coupling to slow environmental modes. To further improve on the accuracy of the Ehrenfest approach, we use our reduced density matrix hybrid framework to treat the faster environmental modes quantum mechanically, at the level of a perturbative master equation. This combined approach is shown to provide an efficient and quantitative description of electronic energy transfer in a model dimer and the Fenna-Matthews-Olson complex and is used to investigate the effect of environmental preparation on the resulting dynamics.

  8. Comparison of exact-exchange calculations for solids in current-spin-density- and spin-density-functional theory

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sharma, S.; Pittalis, S.; Kurth, S.;

    2007-01-01

    The relative merits of current-spin-density- and spin-density-functional theory are investigated for solids treated within the exact-exchange-only approximation. Spin-orbit splittings and orbital magnetic moments are determined at zero external magnetic field. We find that for magnetic (Fe, Co...

  9. Grad-B drift transport of high current electron beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, J.R.; Backstrom, R.C.; Halbleib, J.A.; Wright, T.P.

    1983-01-01

    Grad-B transport, bunching and focusing of relativistic electron beams has been proposed as a method of increasing the power delivered to an ICF target by an order of magnitude. Recent experiments have demonstrated the efficient transport of high current electron beams over 1.0 m distances in the 1/r azimuthal magnetic field of a current-carrying wire. The electron drift velocity was measured as a function of wire current and found to be in good agreement with theory. Measurements of x-ray production in a tantalum target were used as a diagnostic tool to study transport efficiency. A theoretical model of the experiment was developed to calculate bremsstrahlung production in the target, assuming 100 percent transport efficiency. This model predicted radial x-ray dose profiles in the experimental converter assembly which were in good agreement with the measurements.

  10. Gradient B drift transport of high current electron beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, J.R.; Backstrom, R.C.; Halbleib, J.A.; Quintenz, J.P.; Wright, T.P.

    1984-12-01

    A 1-MeV, 200-kA electron beam was transported 89 cm in a low pressure background gas via gradient B drift in the 1/r azimuthal magnetic field of a current carrying wire. The electron drift velocity was measured and found to be in good agreement with theory. Measurements of x-ray production in the target indicated high transport efficiency.

  11. Current-sheet formation in incompressible electron magnetohydrodynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruban, V P

    2002-04-01

    The nonlinear dynamics of axisymmetric, as well as helical, frozen-in vortex structures is investigated by the Hamiltonian method in the framework of ideal incompressible electron magnetohydrodynamics. For description of current-sheet formation from a smooth initial magnetic field, local and nonlocal nonlinear approximations are introduced and partially analyzed that are generalizations of the previously known exactly solvable local model neglecting electron inertia.

  12. Macroscopic Transport of Mega-ampere Electron Currents in Aligned Carbon-Nanotube Arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatterjee, Gourab; Singh, Prashant Kumar; Ahmed, Saima; Robinson, A. P. L.; Lad, Amit D.; Mondal, Sudipta; Narayanan, V.; Srivastava, Iti; Koratkar, Nikhil; Pasley, John; Sood, A. K.; Kumar, G. Ravindra

    2012-06-01

    We demonstrate that aligned carbon-nanotube arrays are efficient transporters of laser-generated mega-ampere electron currents over distances as large as a millimeter. A direct polarimetric measurement of the temporal and the spatial evolution of the megagauss magnetic fields (as high as 120 MG) at the target rear at an intensity of (1018-1019)W/cm2 was corroborated by the rear-side hot electron spectra. Simulations show that such high magnetic flux densities can only be generated by a very well collimated fast electron bunch.

  13. DOCCⅡ-based electronically tunable current-mode biquadratic filters

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Weidong

    2005-01-01

    A complete state variable current-mode biquadratic filter built by duo-output CCⅡ (DOCCⅡ) with variable current gain is presented. All the coefficients of the filter can be independently tuned through the variable current gain factors of the DOCCⅡ. Based on the principles upon which the general biquadratic filter was constructed, a universal electronically tunable current-mode filter is proposed which implements the low-pass, high-pass, band-pass, band-suppress and all-pass second order transfer functions simultaneously. The PSPICE simulations of frequency responses of second-order filter of are also given.

  14. Theoretical Modeling of Internal Hydraulic Jump in Density Currents

    CERN Document Server

    Firoozabadi, Bahar; Aryanfar, Asghar; Afshin, Hossein

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, we propose an analytical framework for internal hydraulic jumps. Density jumps or internal hydraulic jumps occur when a supper critical flow of water discharges into a stagnant layer of water with slightly different density. The approach used here is control volume method which is also used to analyze ordinary hydraulic jumps. The important difference here is that entrainment is taken into account. Using conservation equations with the aid of some simplifying assumptions we come to an equation that gives jump downstream height as function of jump upstream characteristics and the entrainment. To determine the magnitude of downstream height we use an experimental equation for calculating the entrainment. Finally we verify our framework by comparing the height that we gain from the derived equation with some experimental data.

  15. A high current, high gradient, laser excited, pulsed electron gun

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Batchelor, K.; Farrell, J.P.; Dudnikova, G. [Brookhaven Technology Group, Inc., Stony Brook, NY (United States); Ben-Zvi, I.; Srinivasan-Rao, T.; Smedley, J.; Yakimenko, V. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)

    1998-06-01

    This paper describes a pulsed electron gun that can be used as an FEL, as an injector for electron linear accelerators or for rf power generation. It comprises a 1 to 5 MeV, 1 to 2 ns pulsed power supply feeding a single diode, photoexcited acceleration gap. Beam quality of a {approximately}1nC charge in {approximately}1 GV/m field was studied. Computations of the beam parameters as a function of electrode configuration and peak electron current are presented together with descriptions of the power supply, laser and beam diagnostics systems.

  16. Current-sheet formation in incompressible electron magnetohydrodynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ruban, Victor P.

    2002-01-01

    The nonlinear dynamics of axisymmetric, as well as helical, frozen-in vortex structures is investigated by the Hamiltonian method in the framework of ideal incompressible electron magnetohydrodynamics. For description of current-sheet formation from a smooth initial magnetic field, local and nonl......The nonlinear dynamics of axisymmetric, as well as helical, frozen-in vortex structures is investigated by the Hamiltonian method in the framework of ideal incompressible electron magnetohydrodynamics. For description of current-sheet formation from a smooth initial magnetic field, local...

  17. Analysis of recoverable current from one component of magnetic flux density in MREIT and MRCDI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Chunjae; Lee, Byung Il; Kwon, Oh In

    2007-06-01

    Magnetic resonance current density imaging (MRCDI) provides a current density image by measuring the induced magnetic flux density within the subject with a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scanner. Magnetic resonance electrical impedance tomography (MREIT) has been focused on extracting some useful information of the current density and conductivity distribution in the subject Omega using measured B(z), one component of the magnetic flux density B. In this paper, we analyze the map Tau from current density vector field J to one component of magnetic flux density B(z) without any assumption on the conductivity. The map Tau provides an orthogonal decomposition J = J(P) + J(N) of the current J where J(N) belongs to the null space of the map Tau. We explicitly describe the projected current density J(P) from measured B(z). Based on the decomposition, we prove that B(z) data due to one injection current guarantee a unique determination of the isotropic conductivity under assumptions that the current is two-dimensional and the conductivity value on the surface is known. For a two-dimensional dominating current case, the projected current density J(P) provides a good approximation of the true current J without accumulating noise effects. Numerical simulations show that J(P) from measured B(z) is quite similar to the target J. Biological tissue phantom experiments compare J(P) with the reconstructed J via the reconstructed isotropic conductivity using the harmonic B(z) algorithm.

  18. Ultrahigh-current-density metal-ion implantation and diamondlike-hydrocarbon films for tribological applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilbur, P. J.

    1993-09-01

    The metal-ion-implantation system used to implant metals into substrates are described. The metal vapor required for operation is supplied by drawing sufficient electron current from the plasma discharge to an anode-potential crucible so a solid, pure metal placed in the crucible will be heated to the point of vaporization. The ion-producing, plasma discharge is initiated within a graphite-ion-source body, which operates at high temperature, by using an argon flow that is turned off once the metal vapor is present. Extraction of ion beams several cm in diameter at current densities ranging to several hundred micro-A/sq cm on a target 50 cm downstream of the ion source were demonstrated using Mg, Ag, Cr, Cu, Si, Ti, V, B, and Zr. These metals were implanted into over 100 substrates (discs, pins, flats, wires). A model describing thermal stresses induced in materials (e.g. ceramic plates) during high-current-density implantation is presented. Tribological and microstructural characteristics of iron and 304-stainless-steel samples implanted with Ti or B are examined. Diamondlike-hydrocarbon coatings were applied to steel surfaces and found to exhibit good tribological performance.

  19. First-order density matrix as a functional of the ground-state electron density for harmonic confinement of two electrons which also interact harmonically

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    March, N.H

    2002-12-30

    The first-order density matrix {gamma}(r{sub 1},r{sub 2}) for the ground-state of a model two-electron atom is explicitly constructed from the electron density {rho}(r). The model has harmonic confinement plus interparticle harmonic interactions. {gamma}(r{sub 1},r{sub 2}) and {rho}(r) are related non-locally, even though no density gradients and no quadratures appear.

  20. DISCONTINUOUS FLOW OF TURBID DENSITY CURRENTS I. CHANNEL EXPANSION AND CONTRACTION

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jiahua FAN

    2005-01-01

    Laboratory experiments on turbid density currents were conducted to observe the flow features of these currents with abrupt contracted and expanded reaches. Experimental data were used to determine water entrainment coefficients for both channel expansion and contraction. Expressions for turbid density currents with water entrainment coefficients in abrupt contracted and expanded reaches were derived,and compared with experimental data.

  1. Pauling bond strength, bond length and electron density distribution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gibbs, Gerald V.; Ross, Nancy L.; Cox, David F.; Rosso, Kevin M.; Iversen, Bo B.; Spackman, M. A.

    2014-01-18

    A power law regression equation, = 1.46(<ρ(rc)>/r)-0.19, connecting the average experimental bond lengths, , with the average accumulation of the electron density at the bond critical point, <ρ(rc)>, between bonded metal M and oxygen atoms, determined at ambient conditions for oxide crystals, where r is the row number of the M atom, is similar to the regression equation R(M-O) = 1.39(ρ(rc)/r)-0.21 determined for three perovskite crystals for pressures as high as 80 GPa. The two equations are also comparable with those, = 1.43(/r)-0.21, determined for a large number of oxide crystals at ambient conditions and = 1.39(/r)-0.22, determined for geometry optimized hydroxyacid molecules, that connect the bond lengths to the average Pauling electrostatic bond strength, , for the M-O bonded interactions. On the basis of the correspondence between the two sets of equations connecting ρ(rc) and the Pauling bond strength s with bond length, it appears that Pauling’s simple definition of bond strength closely mimics the accumulation of the electron density between bonded pairs of atoms. The similarity of the expressions for the crystals and molecules is compelling evidence that the M-O bonded interactions for the crystals and molecules 2 containing the same bonded interactions are comparable. Similar expressions, connecting bond lengths and bond strength, have also been found to hold for fluoride, nitride and sulfide molecules and crystals. The Brown-Shannon bond valence, σ, power law expression σ = [R1/(R(M-O)]N that has found wide use in crystal chemistry, is shown to be connected to a more universal expression determined for oxides and the perovskites, <ρ(rc)> = r[(1.41)/]4.76, demonstrating that the bond valence for a bonded interaction is likewise closely connected to the accumulation of the electron density between the bonded atoms. Unlike the Brown-Shannon expression, it is universal in that it holds for the M

  2. Projected current density comparison in tDCS block and smooth FE modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Indahlastari, Aprinda; Chauhan, Munish; Sadleir, Rosalind J

    2016-08-01

    Current density distribution and projected current density calculation following transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) forward model in a human head were compared between two modeling pipelines: block and smooth. Block model was directly constructed from MRI voxel resolution and simulated in C. Smooth models underwent a boundary smoothing process by applying recursive Gaussian filters and simulated in COMSOL. Three smoothing levels were added to determine their effects on current density distribution compared to block models. Median current density percentage differences were calculated in anterior superior temporal gyrus (ASTG), hippocampus (HIP), inferior frontal gyrus (IFG), occipital lobes (OCC) and precentral gyrus (PRC) and normalized against a baseline value. A maximum of + 20% difference in median current density was found for three standard electrode montages: F3-RS, T7-T8 and Cz-Oz. Furthermore, median current density percentage differences in each montage target brain structures were found to be within + 7%. Higher levels of smoothing increased median current density percentage differences in T7-T8 and Cz-Oz target structures. However, while demonstrating similar trends in each montage, additional smoothing levels showed no clear relationship between their smoothing effects and calculated median current density in the five cortical structures. Finally, relative L2 error in reconstructed projected current density was found to be 17% and 21% for block and smooth pipelines, respectively. Overall, a block model workflow may be a more attractive alternative for simulating tDCS stimulation because involves a shorter modeling time and independence from commercial modeling platforms.

  3. Method for determining transport critical current densities and flux penetration depth in bulk superconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Israelsson, Ulf E. (Inventor); Strayer, Donald M. (Inventor)

    1992-01-01

    A contact-less method for determining transport critical current density and flux penetration depth in bulk superconductor material. A compressor having a hollow interior and a plunger for selectively reducing the free space area for distribution of the magnetic flux therein are formed of superconductor material. Analytical relationships, based upon the critical state model, Maxwell's equations and geometrical relationships define transport critical current density and flux penetration depth in terms of the initial trapped magnetic flux density and the ratio between initial and final magnetic flux densities whereby data may be reliably determined by means of the simple test apparatus for evaluating the current density and flux penetration depth.

  4. High-Current Energy-Recovering Electron Linacs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nikolitsa Merminga; David Douglas; Geoffrey Krafft

    2003-12-01

    The use of energy recovery provides a potentially powerful new paradigm for generation of the charged particle beams used in synchrotron radiation sources, high-energy electron cooling devices, electron-ion colliders, and other applications in photon science and nuclear and high-energy physics. Energy-recovering electron linear accelerators (called energy-recovering linacs, or ERLs) share many characteristics with ordinary linacs, as their six-dimensional beam phase space is largely determined by electron source properties. However, in common with classic storage rings, ERLs possess a high average-current-carrying capability enabled by the energy recovery process, and thus promise similar efficiencies. The authors discuss the concept of energy recovery and its technical challenges and describe the Jefferson Lab (JLab) Infrared Demonstration Free-Electron Laser (IR Demo FEL), originally driven by a 3548-MeV, 5-mA superconducting radiofrequency (srf) ERL, which provided the most substantial demonstration of energy recovery to date: a beam of 250 kW average power. They present an overview of envisioned ERL applications and a development path to achieving the required performance. They use experimental data obtained at the JLab IR Demo FEL and recent experimental results from CEBAF-ERL GeV-scale, comparatively low-current energy-recovery demonstration at JLab to evaluate the feasibility of the new applications of high-current ERLs, as well as ERLs' limitations and ultimate performance.

  5. Pair 2-electron reduced density matrix theory using localized orbitals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Head-Marsden, Kade; Mazziotti, David A.

    2017-08-01

    Full configuration interaction (FCI) restricted to a pairing space yields size-extensive correlation energies but its cost scales exponentially with molecular size. Restricting the variational two-electron reduced-density-matrix (2-RDM) method to represent the same pairing space yields an accurate lower bound to the pair FCI energy at a mean-field-like computational scaling of O (r3) where r is the number of orbitals. In this paper, we show that localized molecular orbitals can be employed to generate an efficient, approximately size-extensive pair 2-RDM method. The use of localized orbitals eliminates the substantial cost of optimizing iteratively the orbitals defining the pairing space without compromising accuracy. In contrast to the localized orbitals, the use of canonical Hartree-Fock molecular orbitals is shown to be both inaccurate and non-size-extensive. The pair 2-RDM has the flexibility to describe the spectra of one-electron RDM occupation numbers from all quantum states that are invariant to time-reversal symmetry. Applications are made to hydrogen chains and their dissociation, n-acene from naphthalene through octacene, and cadmium telluride 2-, 3-, and 4-unit polymers. For the hydrogen chains, the pair 2-RDM method recovers the majority of the energy obtained from similar calculations that iteratively optimize the orbitals. The localized-orbital pair 2-RDM method with its mean-field-like computational scaling and its ability to describe multi-reference correlation has important applications to a range of strongly correlated phenomena in chemistry and physics.

  6. Electron cyclotron heating and current drive in toroidal geometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kritz, A.H.

    1991-11-01

    The Principal Investigator has continued to work on problems associated both with the deposition and with the emission of electron cyclotron power in toroidal plasmas. We have investigated the use of electron cyclotron resonance heating for bringing compact tokamaks (BPX) to ignition-like parameters. This requires that we continue to refine the modeling capability of the TORCH code linked with the BALDUR 1 {1/2} D transport code. Using this computational tool, we have examined the dependence of ignition on heating and transport employing both theoretical (multi-mode) and empirically based transport models. The work on current drive focused on the suppression of tearing modes near the q = 2 surface and sawteeth near the q = 1 surface. Electron cyclotron current drive in CIT near the q =2 surface was evaluated for a launch scenario where electron cyclotron power was launched near the equatorial plane. The work on suppression of sawteeth has been oriented toward understanding the suppression that has been observed in a number of tokamaks, in particular, in the WT-3 tokamak in Kyoto. To evaluate the changes in current profile (shear) near the q =1 surface, simulations have been carried out using the linked BALDUR-TORCH code. We consider effects on shear resulting both from wave-induced current as well as from changes in conductivity associated with changes in local temperature. Abstracts and a paper relating to this work is included in Appendix A.

  7. Dependence of the critical current density on the first matching field density

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Obaidat, I.M. [Department of Physics, United Arab Emirates University, Al-Ain 17551 (United Arab Emirates)], E-mail: iobaidat@uaeu.ac.ae; Benkraouda, M.; Khawaja, U. Al [Department of Physics, United Arab Emirates University, Al-Ain 17551 (United Arab Emirates)

    2008-10-01

    Molecular dynamic simulations were carried out to investigate the properties of the critical depinning force in high temperature superconductors at several vortex densities at the first matching field. The study was conducted on samples with periodic square arrays of vortices and pinning sites. The variables in the simulations were the vortex density, the pinning sites density, the temperature, the pinning strength, the size of pinning sites. The critical depinning force is found to decrease with temperature for all first matching field densities. The rate of this decrease was found to be slower as the pinning strength and size of pinning site gets larger. At low temperatures and for large pinning strengths, the critical depinning force was found to decrease with increasing the first matching field density. But very interesting results were obtained at moderate temperatures where the critical depinning force was found to increase as the first matching field density increases. The same behavior of the critical depinning force was found at low temperatures, for small pinning strengths. These unexpected results were attributed to a vortex structural phase transition from a disordered state to an ordered state.

  8. Control of ion density distribution by magnetic traps for plasma electrons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baranov, Oleg; Romanov, Maxim [Plasma Laboratory, National Aerospace University ' KhAI,' Kharkov 61070 (Ukraine); Fang Jinghua [Plasma Nanoscience Centre Australia (PNCA), CSIRO Materials Science and Engineering, P.O. Box 218, Lindfield, New South Wales 2070 (Australia); School of Physics, University of Melbourne, Parkville, VIC 3010 (Australia); Cvelbar, Uros [Jozef Stefan Institute, Jamova cesta 39, SI-1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Ostrikov, Kostya [Plasma Nanoscience Centre Australia (PNCA), CSIRO Materials Science and Engineering, P.O. Box 218, Lindfield, New South Wales 2070 (Australia); University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia)

    2012-10-01

    The effect of a magnetic field of two magnetic coils on the ion current density distribution in the setup for low-temperature plasma deposition is investigated. The substrate of 400 mm diameter is placed at a distance of 325 mm from the plasma duct exit, with the two magnetic coils mounted symmetrically under the substrate at a distance of 140 mm relative to the substrate centre. A planar probe is used to measure the ion current density distribution along the plasma flux cross-sections at distances of 150, 230, and 325 mm from the plasma duct exit. It is shown that the magnetic field strongly affects the ion current density distribution. Transparent plastic films are used to investigate qualitatively the ion density distribution profiles and the effect of the magnetic field. A theoretical model is developed to describe the interaction of the ion fluxes with the negative space charge regions associated with the magnetic trapping of the plasma electrons. Theoretical results are compared with the experimental measurements, and a reasonable agreement is demonstrated.

  9. Radial gradients of phase space density in the inner electron radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kyung-Chan; Shprits, Yuri

    2012-12-01

    While the outer radiation belt (3.5 inner radiation belt (1.2 inner electron belt in recent years. It has been generally accepted that the equilibrium structure of radiation belt electrons is explained by the slow inward radial diffusion from a source in the outer belt and losses by Coulomb collision and wave-particle interaction. In this study, we examine this well accepted theory using the radial profiles of the phase space density (PSD), inferred from in situ measurements made by three different satellites: S3-3, CRRES, and POLAR. Our results show that electron PSD in the inner electron belt has a clear prominent local peak and negative radial gradient in the outer portion of the inner zone, i.e., decreasing PSD with increasingL-value. A likely explanation for the peaks in PSD is acceleration due to energy diffusion produced by lightning-generated and anthropogenic whistlers. These results indicate that either additional local acceleration mechanism is responsible for the formation of the inner electron belt or inner electron belt is formed by sporadic injections of electrons into the inner zone. The currently well accepted model of slow diffusion and losses will be further examined by the upcoming Radiation Belt Storm Probes (RBSP) mission.

  10. Engineering Critical Current Density Improvement in Ag- Bi-2223 Tapes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, W. G.; Seifi, Behrouz; Eriksen, Morten

    2000-01-01

    round wire as a preform prior to the flat rolling that achieved more homogenous filament distribution. Filament geometry and density were simulated by Finite Element Modeling. The tapes with large filling factor up to 45 % have been produced with a hard metal outer sheath, which facilitates...... the superconductor composite sustaining large proportional oxide ceramics in the composite during drawing and rolling process. By optimization of the thermal and mechanical process, a Je of 12 kA/cm2 has been achieved in a 0.183.1 mm2 size tape which carried 67 A...... factor of the tapes. Phase evolution at initial sintering stage has been studied by a quench experiment in Ag-Bi-2223 tapes. The content, texture, and microstructure of various phases were determined by XRD and SEM. A novel process approach has been invented in which square wire was chosen rather than...

  11. Phase-change recording medium that enables ultrahigh-density electron-beam data storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibson, G. A.; Chaiken, A.; Nauka, K.; Yang, C. C.; Davidson, R.; Holden, A.; Bicknell, R.; Yeh, B. S.; Chen, J.; Liao, H.; Subramanian, S.; Schut, D.; Jasinski, J.; Liliental-Weber, Z.

    2005-01-01

    An ultrahigh-density electron-beam-based data storage medium is described that consists of a diode formed by growing an InSe/GaSe phase-change bilayer film epitaxially on silicon. Bits are recorded as amorphous regions in the InSe layer and are detected via the current induced in the diode by a scanned electron beam. This signal current is modulated by differences in the electrical properties of the amorphous and crystalline states. The success of this recording scheme results from the remarkable ability of layered III-VI materials, such as InSe, to maintain useful electrical properties at their surfaces after repeated cycles of amorphization and recrystallization.

  12. Influences of current density on tribological characteristics of ceramic coatings on ZK60 Mg alloy by plasma electrolytic oxidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Xiaohong; Su, Peibo; Jiang, Zhaohua; Meng, Song

    2010-03-01

    Current density is a key factor of plasma electrolytic oxidation process. Its influences on structure, mechanical, and tribological characteristics of ceramic coatings on ZK60 Mg alloy by pulsed bipolar microplasma oxidation in Na(3)PO(4) solution were studied in this paper. Thickness, structure, composition, mechanical property, and tribological characteristics of the coatings were studied by eddy current coating thickness gauge, scanning electron microscope (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), nanoindentation measurements, and ball-on-disk friction testing. The results show that all the coatings prepared under different current densities are composed of MgO phase. The amount of MgO phase, thickness and friction coefficient of the coatings increased with the increasing current density. Among three ceramic coatings produced under three current densities, the coating produced under the current density of 7 A/dm(2) got the highest nanohardness and lowest wear rate with the value of 1.7 GPa and 1.27 x 10(-5) mm(3)/Nm.

  13. Peltier effect in multilayered nanopillars under high density charge current

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gravier, L.; Fukushima, A.; Kubota, H.; Yamamoto, A.; Yuasa, S.

    2006-12-01

    From the basic equations of thermoelectricity, we model the thermal regimes that develop in multilayered nanopillar elements experiencing continuous charge currents. The energy conservation principle was applied to all layer-layer and layer-electrode junctions. The obtained set of equations was solved to derive the temperature of each junction. The contribution of the Peltier effect is included in an effective resistance. This model gives satisfactory fits to experimental data obtained on a series of reference nanopillar elements.

  14. Peltier effect in multilayered nanopillars under high density charge current

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gravier, L [Institut de Physique des Nanostructures, Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne (EPFL), EPFL-SB-IPN station 3, 1015 Lausanne (Switzerland); Fukushima, A [National Institute of Advances Industrial Science and Technology (AIST) 1-1-1 Umezono, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8568 (Japan); Kubota, H [National Institute of Advances Industrial Science and Technology (AIST) 1-1-1 Umezono, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8568 (Japan); Yamamoto, A [National Institute of Advances Industrial Science and Technology (AIST) 1-1-1 Umezono, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8568 (Japan); Yuasa, S [National Institute of Advances Industrial Science and Technology (AIST) 1-1-1 Umezono, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8568 (Japan)

    2006-12-21

    From the basic equations of thermoelectricity, we model the thermal regimes that develop in multilayered nanopillar elements experiencing continuous charge currents. The energy conservation principle was applied to all layer-layer and layer-electrode junctions. The obtained set of equations was solved to derive the temperature of each junction. The contribution of the Peltier effect is included in an effective resistance. This model gives satisfactory fits to experimental data obtained on a series of reference nanopillar elements.

  15. Efficient Density Functional Approximation for Electronic Properties of Conjugated Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caldas, Marília J.; Pinheiro, José Maximiano, Jr.; Blum, Volker; Rinke, Patrick

    2014-03-01

    There is on-going discussion about reliable prediction of electronic properties of conjugated oligomers and polymers, such as ionization potential IP and energy gap. Several exchange-correlation (XC) functionals are being used by the density functional theory community, with different success for different properties. In this work we follow a recent proposal: a fraction α of exact exchange is added to the semi-local PBE XC aiming consistency, for a given property, with the results obtained by many-body perturbation theory within the G0W0 approximation. We focus the IP, taken as the negative of the highest occupied molecular orbital energy. We choose α from a study of the prototype family trans-acetylene, and apply this same α to a set of oligomers for which there is experimental data available (acenes, phenylenes and others). Our results indicate we can have excellent estimates, within 0,2eV mean ave. dev. from the experimental values, better than through complete EN - 1 -EN calculations from the starting PBE functional. We also obtain good estimates for the electrical gap and orbital energies close to the band edge. Work supported by FAPESP, CNPq, and CAPES, Brazil, and DAAD, Germany.

  16. Low Starting Electron Beam Current in Degenerate Band Edge Oscillators

    CERN Document Server

    Othman, Mohamed A K; Figotin, Alexander; Capolino, Filippo

    2016-01-01

    We propose a new principle of operation in vacuum electron-beam-based oscillators that leads to a low beam current for starting oscillations. The principle is based on super synchronous operation of an electron beam interacting with four degenerate electromagnetic modes in a slow-wave structure (SWS). The four mode super synchronous regime is associated with a very special degeneracy condition in the dispersion diagram of a cold periodic SWS called degenerate band edge (DBE). This regime features a giant group delay in the finitelength SWS and low starting-oscillation beam current. The starting beam current is at least an order of magnitude smaller compared to a conventional backward wave oscillator (BWO) of the same length. As a representative example we consider a SWS conceived by a periodically-loaded metallic waveguide supporting a DBE, and investigate starting-oscillation conditions using Pierce theory generalized to coupled transmission lines (CTL). The proposed super synchronism regime can be straightf...

  17. A statistical study of magnetospheric electron density using the Cluster spacecraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandhu, J. K.; Yeoman, T. K.; Fear, R. C.; Dandouras, I.

    2016-11-01

    Observations from the WHISPER (Waves of High frequency and Sounder for Probing of Electron density by Relaxation) instrument on board Cluster, for the interval spanning 2001-2012, are utilized to determine an empirical model describing the total electron density along closed geomagnetic field lines. The model, representing field lines in the region of 4.5≤L Experiment and Electric Field and Waves observations. The model was determined by modeling variations in the electron density along the field lines, which is observed to follow a power law distribution along the geomagnetic field at high latitudes, with power law index values ranging from approximately 0.0 to 1.2. However, a localized peak in electron density close to the magnetic equator is observed, which is described using a Gaussian peak function, with the electron density peak ranging as high as 10 cm-3 above the background power law dependence. The resulting model illustrates some key features of the electron density spatial distribution. The role of the number density distribution, represented by the empirical electron density model, in determining the total plasma mass density is also explored. By combining the empirical electron density model with an empirical average ion mass model, the total plasma mass density distribution is inferred, which includes contributions of both the number density and ion composition of the plasma in the region.

  18. Equilibria and Stability of JET Discharges with Zero Core Current Density

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    B.C. Stratton; N.C. Hawkes; G.T.A. Huysmans; J.A. Breslau; L.E. Zakharov; B. Alper; R.V. Budny; C.D. Challis; R. Deangelis; V. Drozdov; C. Fenzi; C. Giroud; T.C. Hender; J. Hobirk; S.C. Jardin; E. Joffrin; P.J. Lomas; P. Lotte; J. Mailloux; W. Park; E. Rachlew; S. Reyes-Cortes; E. Solano; T. Tala; K-D. Zastrow; JET-EFDA Contributors

    2002-10-15

    Injection of Lower Hybrid Heating and Current Drive (LHCD) into the current ramp-up phase of JET [Joint European Torus] discharges can produce extremely reversed q-profiles characterized by a core region of near zero current density (within Motional Stark Effect diagnostic measurement errors). Non-inductive, off-axis co-current drive induces a back electromotive force inside the non-inductive current radius that drives a negative current in the plasma core. The core current density does not go negative, although current diffusion calculations indicate that there is sufficient LHCD to cause this. The clamping of the core current density near zero is consistent with n=0 reconnection events redistributing the core current soon after it goes negative. This is seen in reduced MHD simulations and in nonlinear resistive MHD simulations which predict that these discharges undergo n=0 reconnection events that clamp the core current near zero.

  19. Ultrahigh Density Data Storage on Phase-Change Media Using Electron Beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibson, Gary A.

    2004-03-01

    The unique, microfabricated, electron-beam-based data storage device described here is capable of providing large signals at MHz data rates from nanoscale bits. This device consists of three main components: a microfabricated array of electron-beam sources that are used to read and write bits, a medium containing a phase-changeable data storage layer, and an xy-stage capable of moving the storage medium relative to the electron sources with sub-nanometer precision. The storage medium consists of a pn-junction diode formed by growing the layered III-VI semiconductor InSe epitaxially on Si(111) with a thin intermediate layer of GaSe. Data bits are reversibly recorded as amorphous regions in the InSe layer. These bits are detected by monitoring the current induced in the diode by a scanned electron beam. Differences in the electronic properties of the amorphous and crystalline states of InSe modulate this current. The success of this approach results from the remarkable ability of layered chalcogenides to maintain exceptionally good electrical properties near their surfaces after repeated cycles of amorphization and recrystallization. The micromachined xy-stage utilizes an area-efficient design that allows 50% of the die to contain scanned data. This device is compatible with the integration of CMOS electronics and achieves a scan range of ± 25 μm using biases of only ± 15 V. Each electron-beam source is comprised of multiple nanostructured silicon field-emission tips with individual extractors and lenses. These sources show promise in delivering the high current densities and low noise required for this data storage application.

  20. High Current Density Effect on In-situ Atomic Migration Characteristics of a BiTe Thin Film System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Seunghyun; Park, Yong-Jin; Joo, Young-Chang; Park, Young-Bae

    2013-10-01

    Understanding fundamental atomic migration characteristics of multicomponent chalcogenide materials such as GeSbTe (GST) and BiTe are important in order to investigate the failure mechanism related to the electrical reliability of thermoelectric materials under high current density. In this work, high current density effect on the in-situ atomic migration characteristics of the BiTe thermoelectric thin films was conducted by real-time observation inside an scanning electron microscope chamber. Under the high current density conditions ranging from 0.83×106 to 1.0×106 A/cm2 at 100 °C, Te migrated toward the cathode, and Bi migrated toward the anode because the electrostatic force was dominant by very high Joule heating effect.

  1. Investigations on the time evolution of the plasma density in argon electron-beam plasma at intermediate pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiaoyan, BAI; Chen, CHEN; Hong, LI; Wandong, LIU

    2017-03-01

    The time evolution of the argon electron-beam plasma at intermediate pressure and low electron beam intensity was presented. By applying the amplitude modulation with the frequency of 20 Hz on the stable beam current, the plasma evolution was studied. A Faraday cup was used for the measurement of the electron beam current and a single electrostatic probe was used for the measurement of the ion current. Experimental results indicated that the ion current was in phase with the electron beam current in the pressure range from 200 Pa to 3000 Pa and in the beam current range lower than 20 mA, the residual density increased approximately linearly with the maximum density in the log-log plot and the fitting coefficient was irrelative to the pressure. And then three kinds of kinetic models were developed and the simulated results given by the kinetic model, without the consideration of the excited atoms, mostly approached to the experimental results. This indicated that the effect of the excited atoms on the plasma density can be ignored at intermediate pressure and low electron beam current intensity, which can greatly simplify the kinetic model. In the end, the decrease of the plasma density when the beam current was suddenly off was studied based on the simplified model and it was found that the decease characteristic at intermediate pressure was approximate to the one at high pressure at low electron beam intensity, which was in good accordance with the experimental results. Supported by National Natural Science Foundations of China (No. 11375187) and the Foundation of State key Laboratory of China (No. SKLIPR1510).

  2. Current density distribution mapping in PEM fuel cells as an instrument for operational measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geske, M.; Heuer, M.; Heideck, G.; Styczynski, Z. A. [Otto-von-Guericke University Magdeburg, Chair Electric Power Networks and Renewable Energy Sources, Magdeburg (Germany)

    2010-07-01

    A newly developed measurement system for current density distribution mapping has enabled a new approach for operational measurements in proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFC). Taking into account previously constructed measurement systems, a method based on a multi layer printed circuit board was chosen for the development of the new system. This type of system consists of a sensor, a special electronic device and the control and visualization PC. For the acquisition of the current density distribution values, a sensor device was designed and installed within a multilayer printed circuit board with integrated shunt resistors. Varying shunt values can be taken into consideration with a newly developed and evaluated calibration method. The sensor device was integrated in a PEM fuel cell stack to prove the functionality of the whole measurement system. A software application was implemented to visualize and save the measurement values. Its functionality was verified by operational measurements within a PEMFC system. Measurement accuracy and possible negative reactions of the sensor device during PEMFC operation are discussed in detail in this paper. The developed system enables operational measurements for different operating phases of PEM fuel cells. Additionally, this can be seen as a basis for new opportunities of optimization for fuel cell design and operation modes. (author)

  3. Current Density Distribution Mapping in PEM Fuel Cells as An Instrument for Operational Measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Geske

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available A newly developed measurement system for current density distribution mapping has enabled a new approach for operational measurements in proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFC. Taking into account previously constructed measurement systems, a method based on a multi layer printed circuit board was chosen for the development of the new system. This type of system consists of a sensor, a special electronic device and the control and visualization PC. For the acquisition of the current density distribution values, a sensor device was designed and installed within a multilayer printed circuit board with integrated shunt resistors. Varying shunt values can be taken into consideration with a newly developed and evaluated calibration method. The sensor device was integrated in a PEM fuel cell stack to prove the functionality of the whole measurement system. A software application was implemented to visualize and save the measurement values. Its functionality was verified by operational measurements within a PEMFC system. Measurement accuracy and possible negative reactions of the sensor device during PEMFC operation are discussed in detail in this paper. The developed system enables operational measurements for different operating phases of PEM fuel cells. Additionally, this can be seen as a basis for new opportunities of optimization for fuel cell design and operation modes.

  4. [Investigation on the electron density of a micro-plasma jet operated at atmospheric pressure].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xue-chen; Zhao, Na; Liu, Wei-yuan; Liu, Zhi-qiang

    2010-07-01

    In the present paper, a micro-hollow cathode discharge setup was used to generate micro-plasma jet in flowing mixture of Ar and N2 at atmospheric pressure. The characteristics of the micro-plasma jet were investigated by means of optical method and electrical one. It has been found that breakdown occurs in the gas between the two electrodes when the input power of electric source is increased to a certain value. Plasma appears along the gas flow direction when the mixed gas flows from the aperture of the micro-hollow cathode, and the length of plasma reaches 4 mm. The discharge current is quasi-continuous, and the duration of discharge pulse is about 0.1 micros. Electron density was studied by using Einstein equation and Stark broadening of spectral lines from the emission spectrum respectively. It was found that the results of electron density calculated by the two methods are consistent with the order of 10(15) x cm(-3). It was also found that the electron density is almost independent of power. A qualitative explanation to the phenomenon is given based on the gas discharge theory.

  5. Improved critical current density of MgB2--carbon nanotubes composite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shekhar, Chandra; Giri, Rajiv; Malik, S K; Srivastav, O N

    2007-06-01

    In the present study, we report a systematic study of doping/admixing of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) in different concentrations in MgB2. The composite material corresponding to MgB2-x at.% CNTs (35 at.% > or = x > or = 0 at.%) have been prepared by solid-state reaction at ambient pressure. All the samples in the present investigation have been subjected to structural/microstructural characterization employing XRD, Scanning electron microscopic (SEM), and Transmission electron microscopic (TEM) techniques. The magnetization measurements were performed by Physical property measurement system (PPMS) and electrical transport measurements have been done by the four-probe technique. The microstructural investigations reveal the formation of MgB2-carbon nanotube composites. A CNT connecting the MgB2 grains may enhance critical current density due to its size (approximately 5-20 nm diameter) compatible with coherence length of MgB2 (approximately 5-6 nm) and ballistic transport current carrying capability along the tube axis. The transport critical current density (Jct) of MgB2 samples with varying CNTs concentration have been found to vary significantly e.g., Jct of the MgB2 sample with 10 at.% CNT addition is approximately 2.3 x 10(3) A/cm2 and its value for MgB2 sample without CNT addition is approximately 7.2 x 102 A/cm2 at 20 K. In order to study the flux pinning effect of CNTs doping/ admixing in MgB2, the evaluation of intragrain critical current density (JJ) has been carried out through magnetic measurements on the fine powdered version of the as synthesized samples. The optimum result on Jc is obtained for 10 at.% CNTs admixed MgB2 sample at 5 K, the Jc reaches approximately 5.2 x 10(6) A/cm2 in self field, -1.6 x 10(6) A/cm2 at 1 T, approximately 2.9 x 10(5) A/cm2 at 2.6 T, and approximately 3.9 x 10(4) A/cm2 at 4 T. The high value of intragrain Jc in 10 at.% CNTs admixed MgB2 superconductor has been attributed to the incorporation of CNTs into the crystal matrix of

  6. Particle-in-cell simulations of electron beam control using an inductive current divider

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Swanekamp, S. B.; Angus, J. R.; Cooperstein, G.; Ottinger, P. F.; Richardson, A. S.; Schumer, J. W.; Weber, B. V. [Plasma Physics Division, Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, District of Columbia 20375 (United States)

    2015-11-15

    Kinetic, time-dependent, electromagnetic, particle-in-cell simulations of the inductive current divider are presented. The inductive current divider is a passive method for controlling the trajectory of an intense, hollow electron beam using a vacuum structure that inductively splits the beam's return current. The current divider concept was proposed and studied theoretically in a previous publication [Swanekamp et al., Phys. Plasmas 22, 023107 (2015)]. A central post carries a portion of the return current (I{sub 1}), while the outer conductor carries the remainder (I{sub 2}) with the injected beam current given by I{sub b} = I{sub 1} + I{sub 2}. The simulations are in agreement with the theory which predicts that the total force on the beam trajectory is proportional to (I{sub 2}−I{sub 1}) and the force on the beam envelope is proportional to I{sub b}. Independent control over both the current density and the beam angle at the target is possible by choosing the appropriate current-divider geometry. The root-mean-square (RMS) beam emittance (ε{sub RMS}) varies as the beam propagates through the current divider to the target. For applications where control of the beam trajectory is desired and the current density at the target is similar to the current density at the entrance foil, there is a modest 20% increase in ε{sub RMS} at the target. For other applications where the beam is pinched to a current density ∼5 times larger at the target, ε{sub RMS} is 2–3 times larger at the target.

  7. Analysis of the magnetically induced current density of molecules consisting of annelated aromatic and antiaromatic hydrocarbon rings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sundholm, Dage; Berger, Raphael J F; Fliegl, Heike

    2016-06-21

    Magnetically induced current susceptibilities and current pathways have been calculated for molecules consisting of two pentalene groups annelated with a benzene (1) or naphthalene (2) moiety. Current strength susceptibilities have been obtained by numerically integrating separately the diatropic and paratropic contributions to the current flow passing planes through chosen bonds of the molecules. The current density calculations provide novel and unambiguous current pathways for the unusual molecules with annelated aromatic and antiaromatic hydrocarbon moieties. The calculations show that the benzene and naphthalene moieties annelated with two pentalene units as in molecules 1 and 2, respectively, are unexpectedly antiaromatic sustaining only a local paratropic ring current around the ring, whereas a weak diatropic current flows around the C-H moiety of the benzene ring. For 1 and 2, the individual five-membered rings of the pentalenes are antiaromatic and a slightly weaker semilocal paratropic current flows around the two pentalene rings. Molecules 1 and 2 do not sustain any net global ring current. The naphthalene moiety of the molecule consisting of a naphthalene annelated with two pentalene units (3) does not sustain any strong ring current that is typical for naphthalene. Instead, half of the diatropic current passing the naphthalene moiety forms a zig-zag pattern along the C-C bonds of the naphthalene moiety that are not shared with the pentalene moieties and one third of the current continues around the whole molecule partially cancelling the very strong paratropic semilocal ring current of the pentalenes. For molecule 3, the pentalene moieties and the individual five-membered rings of the pentalenes are more antiaromatic than for 1 and 2. The calculated current patterns elucidate why the compounds with formally [4n + 2] π-electrons have unusual aromatic properties violating the Hückel π-electron count rule. The current density calculations also provide

  8. High-Current Gain Two-Dimensional MoS 2 -Base Hot-Electron Transistors

    KAUST Repository

    Torres, Carlos M.

    2015-12-09

    The vertical transport of nonequilibrium charge carriers through semiconductor heterostructures has led to milestones in electronics with the development of the hot-electron transistor. Recently, significant advances have been made with atomically sharp heterostructures implementing various two-dimensional materials. Although graphene-base hot-electron transistors show great promise for electronic switching at high frequencies, they are limited by their low current gain. Here we show that, by choosing MoS2 and HfO2 for the filter barrier interface and using a noncrystalline semiconductor such as ITO for the collector, we can achieve an unprecedentedly high-current gain (α ∼ 0.95) in our hot-electron transistors operating at room temperature. Furthermore, the current gain can be tuned over 2 orders of magnitude with the collector-base voltage albeit this feature currently presents a drawback in the transistor performance metrics such as poor output resistance and poor intrinsic voltage gain. We anticipate our transistors will pave the way toward the realization of novel flexible 2D material-based high-density, low-energy, and high-frequency hot-carrier electronic applications. © 2015 American Chemical Society.

  9. Development of a high average current polarized electron source with long cathode operational lifetime

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. K. Sinclair

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available Substantially more than half of the electromagnetic nuclear physics experiments conducted at the Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility of the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (Jefferson Laboratory require highly polarized electron beams, often at high average current. Spin-polarized electrons are produced by photoemission from various GaAs-based semiconductor photocathodes, using circularly polarized laser light with photon energy slightly larger than the semiconductor band gap. The photocathodes are prepared by activation of the clean semiconductor surface to negative electron affinity using cesium and oxidation. Historically, in many laboratories worldwide, these photocathodes have had short operational lifetimes at high average current, and have often deteriorated fairly quickly in ultrahigh vacuum even without electron beam delivery. At Jefferson Lab, we have developed a polarized electron source in which the photocathodes degrade exceptionally slowly without electron emission, and in which ion back bombardment is the predominant mechanism limiting the operational lifetime of the cathodes during electron emission. We have reproducibly obtained cathode 1/e dark lifetimes over two years, and 1/e charge density and charge lifetimes during electron beam delivery of over 2×10^{5}   C/cm^{2} and 200 C, respectively. This source is able to support uninterrupted high average current polarized beam delivery to three experimental halls simultaneously for many months at a time. Many of the techniques we report here are directly applicable to the development of GaAs photoemission electron guns to deliver high average current, high brightness unpolarized beams.

  10. Fluid equations in the presence of electron cyclotron current drive

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jenkins, Thomas G.; Kruger, Scott E. [Tech-X Corporation, 5621 Arapahoe Avenue, Boulder, Colorado 80303 (United States)

    2012-12-15

    Two-fluid equations, which include the physics imparted by an externally applied radiofrequency source near electron cyclotron resonance, are derived in their extended magnetohydrodynamic forms using the formalism of Hegna and Callen [Phys. Plasmas 16, 112501 (2009)]. The equations are compatible with the closed fluid/drift-kinetic model developed by Ramos [Phys. Plasmas 17, 082502 (2010); 18, 102506 (2011)] for fusion-relevant regimes with low collisionality and slow dynamics, and they facilitate the development of advanced computational models for electron cyclotron current drive-induced suppression of neoclassical tearing modes.

  11. Electronic Current Transducer (ECT) for high voltage dc lines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houston, J. M.; Peters, P. H., Jr.; Summerayes, H. R., Jr.; Carlson, G. J.; Itani, A. M.

    1980-02-01

    The development of a bipolar electronic current transducer (ECT) for measuring the current in a high voltage dc (HVDC) power line at line potential is discussed. The design and construction of a free standing ECT for use on a 400 kV line having a nominal line current of 2000 A is described. Line current is measured by a 0.0001 ohm shunt whose voltage output is sampled by a 14 bit digital data link. The high voltage interface between line and ground is traversed by optical fibers which carry digital light signals as far as 300 m to a control room where the digital signal is converted back to an analog representation of the shunt voltage. Two redundant electronic and optical data links are used in the prototype. Power to operate digital and optical electronics and temperature controlling heaters at the line is supplied by a resistively and capacitively graded 10 stage cascade of ferrite core transformers located inside the hollow, SF6 filled, porcelain support insulator. The cascade is driven by a silicon controlled rectifier inverter which supplies about 100 W of power at 30 kHz.

  12. Density-Driven Currents and Deposition of Fine Materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Saremi, Sina

    Dredging is a key element in river, ports, coastal and offshore development. In general dredging is conducted for excavation at the river,lake or seabed, relocation of the material, maintenance of the navigation channels, mining underwater deposits, land reclamation or cleaning up the environment....... Dredging activities always make changes to the environment, such as alteration of the coastal or river morphology, currents and wave climates, and water quality. Such changes may be considered improving or degrading to the environment. The type of material being dredged, type of the dredging equipment...... and type of sediments change along and into the seabed. Variations in the material entering the hopper have been studied by assuming fluctuating inflow concentrations. The fluctuations impose a mean net change on the overflow concentrations. In the third part of this study, the above described CFD model...

  13. Electronically swept millimeter-wave interferometer for spatially resolved measurement of plasma electron density.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howard, John; Oliver, David

    2006-12-01

    We report the development and initial implementation of what we believe to be a new rapid- spatial-scan millimeter-wave interferometer for plasma density measurements. The fast scan is effected by electronic frequency sweeping of a wideband (180-280 GHz) backward-wave oscillator whose output is focused onto a fixed blazed diffraction grating. The system, which augments the rotating-grating scanned multiview H-1 heliac interferometer, can sweep the plasma cross section in a period of less than 1 ms with a beam diameter in the plasma of 20 mm and phase noise of the order of 0.01 rad.

  14. Shack-Hartmann Electron Densitometer (SHED): An Optical System for Diagnosing Free Electron Density in Laser-Produced Plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-11-01

    the free electron density in USPL-created plasmas are limited in the number of space-time dimensions that can be measured simultaneously. One...profile, and c) parabolic density profile 2.1 Cylindrical Geometry This geometry is a first -order approximation of that created in the...Free Electron Density in Laser-Produced Plasmas by Anthony R Valenzuela Approved for public release; distribution is

  15. Temperature dependence of Hall electron density of GaN-based heterostructures

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhang Jin-Feng; Zhang Jin-Cheng; Hao Yue

    2004-01-01

    The theoretic calculation and analysis of the temperature dependence of Hall electron density of a sample AlGaN/GaN heterostructure has been carried out in the temperature range from 77 to 300K. The densities of the twodimensional electron gas and the bulk electrons are solved by self-consistent calculation of one-dimensional Schrodinger and Poisson equations at different temperatures, which allow for the variation of energy gap and structure strain, and are used for evaluation of the temperature dependence of Hall electron density. The calculated Hall electron density agrees with the measured one quite well with the appropriate bulk mobility data. Analysis revealed that for the temper ature range considered, even in the heterostructures with a small bulk conductance the factors that determine the Hall mobility and electron density could be of different sources, and not just the two-dimensional electron gas as generally supposed.

  16. Exploring the temporally resolved electron density evolution in EUV induced plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    van der Horst, R M; Beckers, J; Kroesen, G M W

    2014-01-01

    We measured for the first time the electron density in an Extreme Ultra-Violet induced plasma. This is achieved in a low-pressure argon plasma by using a method called microwave cavity resonance spectroscopy. Good agreement is found between the measured electron density at the end of the EUV pulse and a theoretical prediction. The plasma (i.e. electron density) decays in tens of microseconds.

  17. High current precision long pulse electron beam position monitor

    CERN Document Server

    Nelson, S D; Fessenden, T J; Holmes, C

    2000-01-01

    Precision high current long pulse electron beam position monitoring has typically experienced problems with high Q sensors, sensors damped to the point of lack of precision, or sensors that interact substantially with any beam halo thus obscuring the desired signal. As part of the effort to develop a multi-axis electron beam transport system using transverse electromagnetic stripline kicker technology, it is necessary to precisely determine the position and extent of long high energy beams for accurate beam position control (6 - 40 MeV, 1 - 4 kA, 2 μs beam pulse, sub millimeter beam position accuracy.) The kicker positioning system utilizes shot-to-shot adjustments for reduction of relatively slow (< 20 MHz) motion of the beam centroid. The electron beams passing through the diagnostic systems have the potential for large halo effects that tend to corrupt position measurements.

  18. Power electronic converters PWM strategies and current control techniques

    CERN Document Server

    Monmasson, Eric

    2013-01-01

    A voltage converter changes the voltage of an electrical power source and is usually combined with other components to create a power supply. This title is devoted to the control of static converters, which deals with pulse-width modulation (PWM) techniques, and also discusses methods for current control. Various application cases are treated. The book is ideal for professionals in power engineering, power electronics, and electric drives industries, as well as practicing engineers, university professors, postdoctoral fellows, and graduate students.

  19. Non-perturbative calculation of molecular magnetic properties within current-density functional theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tellgren, E I; Teale, A M; Furness, J W; Lange, K K; Ekström, U; Helgaker, T

    2014-01-21

    We present a novel implementation of Kohn-Sham density-functional theory utilizing London atomic orbitals as basis functions. External magnetic fields are treated non-perturbatively, which enable the study of both magnetic response properties and the effects of strong fields, using either standard density functionals or current-density functionals-the implementation is the first fully self-consistent implementation of the latter for molecules. Pilot applications are presented for the finite-field calculation of molecular magnetizabilities, hypermagnetizabilities, and nuclear magnetic resonance shielding constants, focusing on the impact of current-density functionals on the accuracy of the results. Existing current-density functionals based on the gauge-invariant vorticity are tested and found to be sensitive to numerical details of their implementation. Furthermore, when appropriately regularized, the resulting magnetic properties show no improvement over standard density-functional results. An advantage of the present implementation is the ability to apply density-functional theory to molecules in very strong magnetic fields, where the perturbative approach breaks down. Comparison with high accuracy full-configuration-interaction results show that the inadequacies of current-density approximations are exacerbated with increasing magnetic field strength. Standard density-functionals remain well behaved but fail to deliver high accuracy. The need for improved current-dependent density-functionals, and how they may be tested using the presented implementation, is discussed in light of our findings.

  20. Non-perturbative calculation of molecular magnetic properties within current-density functional theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tellgren, E. I., E-mail: erik.tellgren@kjemi.uio.no; Lange, K. K.; Ekström, U.; Helgaker, T. [Centre for Theoretical and Computational Chemistry, Department of Chemistry, University of Oslo, P.O. Box 1033 Blindern, N-0315 Oslo (Norway); Teale, A. M., E-mail: andrew.teale@nottingham.ac.uk [Centre for Theoretical and Computational Chemistry, Department of Chemistry, University of Oslo, P.O. Box 1033 Blindern, N-0315 Oslo (Norway); School of Chemistry, University of Nottingham, University Park, Nottingham NG7 2RD (United Kingdom); Furness, J. W. [School of Chemistry, University of Nottingham, University Park, Nottingham NG7 2RD (United Kingdom)

    2014-01-21

    We present a novel implementation of Kohn–Sham density-functional theory utilizing London atomic orbitals as basis functions. External magnetic fields are treated non-perturbatively, which enable the study of both magnetic response properties and the effects of strong fields, using either standard density functionals or current-density functionals—the implementation is the first fully self-consistent implementation of the latter for molecules. Pilot applications are presented for the finite-field calculation of molecular magnetizabilities, hypermagnetizabilities, and nuclear magnetic resonance shielding constants, focusing on the impact of current-density functionals on the accuracy of the results. Existing current-density functionals based on the gauge-invariant vorticity are tested and found to be sensitive to numerical details of their implementation. Furthermore, when appropriately regularized, the resulting magnetic properties show no improvement over standard density-functional results. An advantage of the present implementation is the ability to apply density-functional theory to molecules in very strong magnetic fields, where the perturbative approach breaks down. Comparison with high accuracy full-configuration-interaction results show that the inadequacies of current-density approximations are exacerbated with increasing magnetic field strength. Standard density-functionals remain well behaved but fail to deliver high accuracy. The need for improved current-dependent density-functionals, and how they may be tested using the presented implementation, is discussed in light of our findings.

  1. First principles study of the electron density distribution in a pair of bare metallic electrodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ma, Chun-Lan [Suzhou University of Science and Technology, School of Mathematics and Physics, Suzhou (China); Chen, Yu-Chang; Nghiem, Diu; Tseng, Allen; Huang, Pao-Chieh [National Chiao Tung University, Department of Electrophysics, Hsinchu (China)

    2011-07-15

    Self-consistent calculations of electron density distribution from first principles for a series of semi-infinite metals show that the electron density almost drops to zero at 8.5 a.u. away from a metal surface. The electron densities in a series of bimetallic-electrode systems with a distance between the two electrodes of 21.7 a.u. are further investigated. Spin-polarized calculations of electron density for nonmagnetic and magnetic bimetallic-electrode systems are compared. Our work is helpful for first principles investigation of spin-dependent metal-molecule-metal tunneling junctions. (orig.)

  2. Spin current and polarization in impure two-dimensional electron systems with spin-orbit coupling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishchenko, E G; Shytov, A V; Halperin, B I

    2004-11-26

    We derive the transport equations for two-dimensional electron systems with Rashba spin-orbit interaction and short-range spin-independent disorder. In the limit of slow spatial variations, we obtain coupled diffusion equations for the electron density and spin. Using these equations we calculate electric-field induced spin accumulation and spin current in a finite-size sample for an arbitrary ratio between spin-orbit energy splitting Delta and elastic scattering rate tau(-1). We demonstrate that the spin-Hall conductivity vanishes in an infinite system independent of this ratio.

  3. Variation of Eddy Current Density Distribution and its Effect on Crack Signal in Eddy Current Non-Destructive of Testing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ladislav Janousek

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper deals with variation of eddy current density distribution along material depth and investigates an effect of the variation on a crack signal in eddy current non-destructive testing. Four coaxial rectangular tangential coils are used to induce eddy currents in a tested conductive object. The exciting coils are driven independently by phase-shifted AC currents; a ratio of amplitudes of the exciting currents is continuously changed to vary the distribution of eddy current density along material depth under a circular pick-up coil positioned in centre between the exciting coils. Dependences of a crack signal amplitude and its phase on the ratio are evaluated and special features are extracted. It is revealed that the dependences are strongly influenced by depth of a crack, and thus the extracted features can enhance evaluation of a detected crack.

  4. Electron Cyclotron Resonance Heating of a High-Density Plasma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, F. Ramskov

    1986-01-01

    Various schemes for electron cyclotron resonance heating of tokamak plasmas with the ratio of electron plasma frequency to electron cyclotron frequency, "»pe/^ce* larger than 1 on axis, are investigated. In particular, a mode conversion scheme is investigated using ordinary waves at the fundamental...

  5. HIGH-CURRENT COLD CATHODE FIELD EMISSION ARRAY FOR ELECTRON LENS APPLICATION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hirshfield, Jay L

    2012-12-28

    During Phase I, the following goals were achieved: (1) design and fabrication of a novel, nano-dimensional CNT field emitter assembly for high current density application, with high durability; (2) fabrication of a ceramic based micro channel plate (MCP) and characterization of its secondary electron emission; and (3) characterizing the CNT/MCP cathode for high field emission and durability. As a result of these achievements, a relatively high current density of ~ 1.2 A/cm2 from a CNT cathode and single channel MCP were measured. The emission current was also extremely stable with a peak-to-peak variation of only 1.8%. The emission current could be further enhanced to meet requirements for electron lens applications by increasing the number of MCP channels. A calculation for maximum possible current density with a 1200 channel/cm2 MCP, placed over a cathode with 1200 uniformly functioning CNTs, would be ~1.46 kA/cm2, neglecting space charge limitations. Clearly this level of emission is far greater than what is needed for the electron lens application, but it does offer a highly comforting margin to account for sub-standard emitters and/or to allow the lesser challenge of building a cathode with fewer channels/cm2. A satisfactory goal for the electron lens application would be a controllable emission of 2-4 mA per channel in an ensemble of 800-1200 uniformly-functioning channels/cm2, and a cathode with overall area of about 1 cm2.

  6. Influence of High-Current-Density Impulses on the Compression Behavior: Experiments with Iron and a Nickel-Based Alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demler, E.; Gerstein, G.; Dalinger, A.; Epishin, A.; Rodman, D.; Nürnberger, F.

    2017-01-01

    Difficulties of processing of high strength and/or brittle materials by plastic deformation, e.g., by forging, require to develop new industrial technologies. In particular, the feasible deformation rates are limited for low-ductile metallic materials. For this reason, processes were investigated to improve the deformability in which electrical impulses are to be applied to lower the yield strength. However, owing to the impulse duration and low current densities, concomitant effects always occur, e.g., as a result of Joule heating. Current developments in power electronics allow now to transmit high currents as short pulses. By reducing the impulse duration and increasing the current density, the plasticity of metallic materials can be correspondingly increased. Using the examples of polycrystalline iron and a single-crystal, nickel-based alloy (PWA 1480), current advances in the development of methods for forming materials by means of high-current-density impulses are demonstrated. For this purpose, appropriate specimens were loaded in compression and, using novel testing equipment, subjected to a current strength of 10 kA with an impulse duration of 2 ms. For a pre-defined strain, the test results show a significant decrease in the compressive stress during the compression test and a significant change in the dislocation distribution following the current impulse treatment.

  7. New insights into aromatic pathways of carbachlorins and carbaporphyrins based on calculations of magnetically induced current densities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benkyi, Isaac; Fliegl, Heike; Valiev, Rashid R; Sundholm, Dage

    2016-04-28

    Magnetically induced current densities have been calculated and analyzed for a number of synthesized carbachlorins and carbaporphyrins using density functional theory and the gauge including magnetically induced current (GIMIC) method. Aromatic properties have been determined by using accurate numerical integration of the current flow yielding reliable current strengths and pathways that are related to the degree of aromaticity and the aromatic character of the studied molecules. All investigated compounds are found to be aromatic. However, the obtained aromatic pathways differ from those previously deduced from spectroscopic data and magnetic shielding calculations. For all studied compounds, the ring current divides into an outer and an inner branch at each pyrrolic subring, showing that all π-electrons of the pyrrolic rings take part in the delocalization pathway. The calculations do not support the common notion that the main share of the current takes the inner route at the pyrrolic rings without an inner hydrogen and follows an 18π aromatic pathway. The aromatic pathways of the investigated carbaporphyrins and carbachlorins are very similar, since the current strength via the Cβ[double bond, length as m-dash]Cβ' bond of the cyclopentadienyl ring of the carbaporphyrins is almost as weak as the current density passing the corresponding saturated Cβ-Cβ' bond of the carbachlorins.

  8. Influence of High-Current-Density Impulses on the Compression Behavior: Experiments with Iron and a Nickel-Based Alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demler, E.; Gerstein, G.; Dalinger, A.; Epishin, A.; Rodman, D.; Nürnberger, F.

    2016-12-01

    Difficulties of processing of high strength and/or brittle materials by plastic deformation, e.g., by forging, require to develop new industrial technologies. In particular, the feasible deformation rates are limited for low-ductile metallic materials. For this reason, processes were investigated to improve the deformability in which electrical impulses are to be applied to lower the yield strength. However, owing to the impulse duration and low current densities, concomitant effects always occur, e.g., as a result of Joule heating. Current developments in power electronics allow now to transmit high currents as short pulses. By reducing the impulse duration and increasing the current density, the plasticity of metallic materials can be correspondingly increased. Using the examples of polycrystalline iron and a single-crystal, nickel-based alloy (PWA 1480), current advances in the development of methods for forming materials by means of high-current-density impulses are demonstrated. For this purpose, appropriate specimens were loaded in compression and, using novel testing equipment, subjected to a current strength of 10 kA with an impulse duration of 2 ms. For a pre-defined strain, the test results show a significant decrease in the compressive stress during the compression test and a significant change in the dislocation distribution following the current impulse treatment.

  9. Effect of current annealing on electronic properties of multilayer graphene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tanaka, S; Goto, H; Tomori, H; Kanda, A [Institute of Physics, University of Tsukuba, Tsukuba 305-8571 (Japan); Ootuka, Y [Tsukuba Research Center for Interdisciplinary Materials Science (TIMS), University of Tsukuba, Tsukuba 305-8571 (Japan); Tsukagoshi, K, E-mail: tanaka@lt.px.tsukuba.ac.j [MANA, NIMS, Namiki, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0047 (Japan)

    2010-06-01

    While ideal graphene has high mobility due to the relativistic nature of carriers, it is known that the carrier transport in actual graphene samples is dominated by the influence of scattering from charged impurities, which almost conceals the intrinsic splendid properties of this novel material. The common techniques to improve the graphene mobility include the annealing in hydrogen atmosphere and the local annealing by imposing a large biasing current. Although annealing is quite important technique for the experimental study of graphene, detailed evaluation of the annealing effect is lacking at present. In this paper, we study the effect of the current annealing in multilayer graphene devices quantitatively by investigating the change in the mobility and the carrier density at the charge neutrality point. We find that the current annealing sometimes causes degradation of the transport properties.

  10. Experimental core electron density of cubic boron nitride

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wahlberg, Nanna; Bindzus, Niels; Bjerg, Lasse

    candidate because of its many similarities with diamond: bonding pattern in the extended network structure, hardness, and the quality of the crystallites.3 However, some degree ionic interaction is a part of the bonding in boron nitride, which is not present in diamond. By investigating the core density...... beyond multipolar modeling of the valence density. As was recently shown in a benchmark study of diamond by Bindzus et al.1 The next step is to investigate more complicated chemical bonding motives, to determine the effect of bonding on the core density. Cubic boron nitride2 lends itself as a perfect...... in boron nitride we may obtain a deeper understanding of the effect of bonding on the total density. We report here a thorough investigation of the charge density of cubic boron nitride with a detailed modelling of the inner atom charge density. By combining high resolution powder X-ray diffraction data...

  11. High short-circuit current density CdTe solar cells using all-electrodeposited semiconductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Echendu, O.K., E-mail: oechendu@yahoo.com; Fauzi, F.; Weerasinghe, A.R.; Dharmadasa, I.M.

    2014-04-01

    CdS/CdTe and ZnS/CdTe n–n heterojunction solar cells have been fabricated using all-electrodeposited semiconductors. The best devices show remarkable high short-circuit current densities of 38.5 mAcm{sup −2} and 47.8 mAcm{sup −2}, open-circuit voltages of 630 mV and 646 mV and conversion efficiencies of 8.0% and 12.0% respectively. The major strength of these device structures lies in the combination of n–n heterojunction with a large Schottky barrier at the n-CdTe/metal back contact which provides the required band bending for the separation of photo-generated charge carriers. This is in addition to the use of a high quality n-type CdTe absorber layer with high electron mobility. The potential barrier heights estimated for these devices from the current–voltage characteristics exceed 1.09 eV and 1.13 eV for CdS/CdTe and ZnS/CdTe cells respectively. The diode rectification factors of both devices are in excess of four orders of magnitude with reverse saturation current densities of 1.0 × 10{sup −7} Acm{sup −2} and 4.0 × 10{sup −7} Acm{sup −2} respectively. These all-electrodeposited solar cell device structures are currently being studied and developed as an alternative to the well-known p–n junction structures which utilise chemical bath-deposited CdS. The preliminary material growth, device fabrication and assessment results are presented in this paper. - Highlights: • Two-electrode deposition. • High J{sub sc} Schottky barrier solar cells. • CdCl{sub 2} + CdF{sub 2} treatment.

  12. Energy Quantization and Probability Density of Electron in Intense-Field-Atom Interactions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    敖淑艳; 程太旺; 李晓峰; 吴令安; 付盘铭

    2003-01-01

    We find that, due to the quantum correlation between the electron and the field, the electronic energy becomes quantized also, manifesting the particle aspect of light in the electron-light interaction. The probability amplitude of finding electron with a given energy is given by a generalized Bessel function, which can be represented as a coherent superposition of contributions from a few electronic quantum trajectories. This concept is illustrated by comparing the spectral density of the electron with the laser assisted recombination spectrum.

  13. Generalized density-functional theory: Conquering the -representability problem with exact functionals for the electron pair density and the second-order reduced density matrix

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Paul W Ayers; Mel Levy

    2005-09-01

    Using the constrained search and Legendre-transform formalisms, one can derive ``generalized” density-functional theories, in which the fundamental variable is either the electron pair density or the second-order reduced density matrix. In both approaches, the -representability problem is solved by the functional, and the variational principle is with respect to all pair densities (density matrices) that are nonnegative and appropriately normalized. The Legendre-transform formulation provides a lower bound on the constrained-search functional. Noting that experience in density-functional and density-matrix theories suggests that it is easier to approximate functionals than it is to approximate the set of -representable densities sheds some light on the significance of this work.

  14. Electronic money in russia: current state and problems of development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. G. Bondarenko

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Article is devoted to urgent problems of non-cash methods of calculation development by using electronic money – as one of the modern economically developed state strategic tasks. On modern economic science strong influence appears informatization process. The control expansion tendency, influence and distribution of commerce due to informatization of society led to emergence of the new phenomenon – information economy. Information economy brought new economic events which owing to their novelty are insufficiently studied to life. It is possible to carry electronic money to such phenomena of modern network economy Relevance and, in our opinion, timeliness of this scientific work, consisting in novelty of this non-cash payment method, its prospects and innovation within non-cash methods of calculations. Authors set as the purpose – studying of problems and the prospects of development of electronic money in the Russian Federation. In article theoretical bases of electronic money functioning are described. Determinations and classifications dismissed non-cash a method, and also the principles of electronic money functioning are considered, the questions of their historical development are raised.Authors analyzed statistical data on development of electronic services and channels of their using. Features, benefits and shortcomings of the current state of the market of electronic money are studied. The emphasis on that fact that in modern conditions considerable number of economic actors perform the activities, both in the real environment of economy, and within the virtual environment that promotes expansion of methods of their customer interaction by means of technical devices of personal computers, mobile phones is placed. In article common problems and tendencies of payments with using an electronic money are designated, the research on assessment of the current state and the prospects of electronic money

  15. Effect of Secondary Electron Emission on Electron Cross-Field Current in E×B Discharges

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yevgeny Raitses, Igor D. Kaganovich, Alexander Khrabrov, Dmytro Sydorenko, Nathaniel J. Fisch and Andrei Smolyakov

    2011-02-10

    This paper reviews and discusses recent experimental, theoretical, and numerical studies of plasma-wall interaction in a weakly collisional magnetized plasma bounded with channel walls made from different materials. A lowpressure ExB plasma discharge of the Hall thruster was used to characterize the electron current across the magnetic field and its dependence on the applied voltage and electron-induced secondary electron emission (SEE) from the channel wall. The presence of a depleted, anisotropic electron energy distribution function with beams of secondary electrons was predicted to explain the enhancement of the electron cross-field current observed in experiments. Without the SEE, the electron crossfield transport can be reduced from anomalously high to nearly classical collisional level. The suppression of SEE was achieved using an engineered carbon velvet material for the channel walls. Both theoretically and experimentally, it is shown that the electron emission from the walls can limit the maximum achievable electric field in the magnetized plasma. With nonemitting walls, the maximum electric field in the thruster can approach a fundamental limit for a quasineutral plasma.

  16. Retrieval of mesospheric electron densities using an optimal estimation inverse method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grant, J.; Grainger, R. G.; Lawrence, B. N.; Fraser, G. J.; von Biel, H. A.; Heuff, D. N.; Plank, G. E.

    2004-03-01

    We present a new method to determine mesospheric electron densities from partially reflected medium frequency radar pulses. The technique uses an optimal estimation inverse method and retrieves both an electron density profile and a gradient electron density profile. As well as accounting for the absorption of the two magnetoionic modes formed by ionospheric birefringence of each radar pulse, the forward model of the retrieval parameterises possible Fresnel scatter of each mode by fine electronic structure, phase changes of each mode due to Faraday rotation and the dependence of the amplitudes of the backscattered modes upon pulse width. Validation results indicate that known profiles can be retrieved and that χ2 tests upon retrieval parameters satisfy validity criteria. Application to measurements shows that retrieved electron density profiles are consistent with accepted ideas about seasonal variability of electron densities and their dependence upon nitric oxide production and transport.

  17. High current density ion beam obtained by a transition to a highly focused state in extremely low-energy region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirano, Y; Kiyama, S; Fujiwara, Y; Koguchi, H; Sakakita, H

    2015-11-01

    A high current density (≈3 mA/cm(2)) hydrogen ion beam source operating in an extremely low-energy region (E(ib) ≈ 150-200 eV) has been realized by using a transition to a highly focused state, where the beam is extracted from the ion source chamber through three concave electrodes with nominal focal lengths of ≈350 mm. The transition occurs when the beam energy exceeds a threshold value between 145 and 170 eV. Low-level hysteresis is observed in the transition when E(ib) is being reduced. The radial profiles of the ion beam current density and the low temperature ion current density can be obtained separately using a Faraday cup with a grid in front. The measured profiles confirm that more than a half of the extracted beam ions reaches the target plate with a good focusing profile with a full width at half maximum of ≈3 cm. Estimation of the particle balances in beam ions, the slow ions, and the electrons indicates the possibility that the secondary electron emission from the target plate and electron impact ionization of hydrogen may play roles as particle sources in this extremely low-energy beam after the compensation of beam ion space charge.

  18. Sounding Rocket Experiments to Investigate Thermal Electron Heating in the Sq Current Focus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abe, T.; Ishisaka, K.; Kumamoto, A.; Yoshikawa, A.; Takahashi, T.; Tanaka, M.

    2015-12-01

    Sounding rocket observations in the southern part of Japan suggest that the electron temperature profile occasionally exhibits the local increase by several hundred K at 100-110 km altitudes at 1100-1200 LT in winter. Detailed study of the temperature profiles indicates that such an increase is closely related to the existence of Sq current focus, because it becomes more significant when the measurement is made near the center of Sq focus. In order to understand a general feature of this unusual phenomena occurring in the Sq current focus, the sounding rocket experiment was conducted in Uchinoura of Japan. In this experiment, we launched "S-310-37" rocket equipped with a total of eight science instruments at 11:20 JST on January 16, 2007 after being convinced that the Sq current was approaching to the planned rocket trajectory. The geomagnetic activity had been successively quiet on that day so that we can estimate the position of Sq current focus. Our analysis of the obtained data indicates that the electron temperature was certainly increased by about 500-600 K at the altitude of 97-101 km with respect to the background. Strong electron density perturbation was also observed to exist above 97 km altitude, which corresponds to the lower boundary of the high electron temperatures. It is also noticeable that both the electric field and magnetic field data include unusual variation in the same altitude region as the temperature increase was observed, suggesting a possible connection between the thermal electron heating and variation of the electric and/or magnetic field. Thus, the first experiment in 2007 revealed a general feature of such unusual phenomena in the Sq current focus, and thereby our interest to the generation mechanism for increasing the electron temperature was more and more increased. We will conduct the second rocket experiment to investigate such unusual phenomena in the Sq current focus in January 2016. In this experiment, we will try to measure

  19. Doppler Velocimetry of Current Driven Spin Helices in a Two-Dimensional Electron Gas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Luyi

    Spins in semiconductors provide a pathway towards the development of spin-based electronics. The appeal of spin logic devices lies in the fact that the spin current is even under time reversal symmetry, yielding non-dissipative coupling to the electric field. To exploit the energy-saving potential of spin current it is essential to be able to control it. While recent demonstrations of electrical-gate control in spin-transistor configurations show great promise, operation at room temperature remains elusive. Further progress requires a deeper understanding of the propagation of spin polarization, particularly in the high mobility semiconductors used for devices. This thesis presents the demonstration and application of a powerful new optical technique, Doppler spin velocimetry, for probing the motion of spin polarization at the level of 1 nm on a picosecond time scale. We discuss experiments in which this technique is used to measure the motion of spin helices in high mobility n-GaAs quantum wells as a function of temperature, in-plane electric field, and photoinduced spin polarization amplitude. We find that the spin helix velocity changes sign as a function of wave vector and is zero at the wave vector that yields the largest spin lifetime. This observation is quite striking, but can be explained by the random walk model that we have developed. We discover that coherent spin precession within a propagating spin density wave is lost at temperatures near 150 K. This finding is critical to understanding why room temperature operation of devices based on electrical gate control of spin current has so far remained elusive. We report that, at all temperatures, electron spin polarization co-propagates with the high-mobility electron sea, even when this requires an unusual form of separation of spin density from photoinjected electron density. Furthermore, although the spin packet co-propagates with the two-dimensional electron gas, spin diffusion is strongly suppressed

  20. High Current Density, Long Life Cathodes for High Power RF Sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ives, Robert Lawrence [Calabazas Creek Research,, Inc.; Collins, George [Calabazas Creek Research, Inc.; Falce, Lou [Consultant; Schwartzkopf, Steve [Ron Witherspoon, Inc.; Busbaher, Daniel [Semicon Associates

    2014-01-22

    This program was tasked with improving the quality and expanding applications for Controlled Porosity Reservoir (CPR) cathodes. Calabazas Creek Research, Inc. (CCR) initially developed CPR cathodes on a DOE-funded SBIR program to improve cathodes for magnetron injection guns. Subsequent funding was received from the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency. The program developed design requirements for implementation of the technology into high current density cathodes for high frequency applications. During Phase I of this program, CCR was awarded the prestigious 2011 R&D100 award for this technology. Subsequently, the technology was presented at numerous technical conferences. A patent was issued for the technology in 2009. These cathodes are now marketed by Semicon Associates, Inc. in Lexington, KY. They are the world’s largest producer of cathodes for vacuum electron devices. During this program, CCR teamed with Semicon Associates, Inc. and Ron Witherspoon, Inc. to improve the fabrication processes and expand applications for the cathodes. Specific fabrications issues included the quality of the wire winding that provides the basic structure and the sintering to bond the wires into a robust, cohesive structure. The program also developed improved techniques for integrating the resulting material into cathodes for electron guns.

  1. Critical current and electronic properties of YBCO-Ag compounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dwir, B.; Affronte, M.; Pavuna, D. (Physics Dept., Swiss Federal Inst. of Tech., Lausanne (Switzerland))

    1989-12-01

    We have found that in YBCO-Ag ceramic compounds Ag fills the intergranular space (''holes'') without affecting Tc. Normal-state resistivity is decreased by {approx equal} x 100 when adding up to 50 wt% Ag. Percolation analysis shows that the critical indices t,s are in agreement with 3D theoretical values, but p{sub c} is higher than expected. The critical current density J{sub c} is enhanced by up to 50% in the samples containing {approx equal} 10 wt% Ag, this enhancement corresponds to a maximum YBCO compactness in the samples. (orig.).

  2. Conversion of electronic to magnonic spin current at a heavy-metal magnetic-insulator interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xi-guang; Li, Zhi-xiong; Zhou, Zhen-wei; Nie, Yao-zhuang; Xia, Qing-lin; Zeng, Zhong-ming; Chotorlishvili, L.; Berakdar, J.; Guo, Guang-hua

    2017-01-01

    Electronic spin current is convertible to magnonic spin current via the creation or annihilation of thermal magnons at the interface of a magnetic insulator and a metal with a strong spin-orbital coupling. So far this phenomenon was evidenced in the linear regime. Based on analytical and full-fledged numerical results for the nonlinear regime we demonstrate that the generated thermal magnons or magnonic spin current in the insulator is asymmetric with respect to the charge current direction in the metal and exhibits a nonlinear dependence on the charge current density, which is explained by the tuning effect of the spin Hall torque and the magnetization damping. The results are also discussed in light of, and are in line with, recent experiments pointing to a new way of nonlinear manipulation of spin with electrical means.

  3. Various categories of defects after surface alloying induced by high current pulsed electron beam irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luo, Dian [State Key Laboratory of Advanced Welding and Joining, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001 (China); Tang, Guangze, E-mail: oaktang@hit.edu.cn [School of Material Science & Engineering, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001 (China); Ma, Xinxin [State Key Laboratory of Advanced Welding and Joining, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001 (China); Gu, Le [School of Mechatronics Engineering, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001 (China); Sun, Mingren [School of Material Science & Engineering, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001 (China); Wang, Liqin [School of Mechatronics Engineering, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001 (China)

    2015-10-01

    Highlights: • Four kinds of defects are found during surface alloying by high current electron beam. • Exploring the mechanism how these defects appear after irradiation. • Increasing pulsing cycles will help to get good surface quality. • Choosing proper energy density will increase surface quality. - Abstract: High current pulsed electron beam (HCPEB) is an attractive advanced materials processing method which could highly increase the mechanical properties and corrosion resistance. However, how to eliminate different kinds of defects during irradiation by HCPEB especially in condition of adding new elements is a challenging task. In the present research, the titanium and TaNb-TiW composite films was deposited on the carburizing steel (SAE9310 steel) by DC magnetron sputtering before irradiation. The process of surface alloying was induced by HCPEB with pulse duration of 2.5 μs and energy density ranging from 3 to 9 J/cm{sup 2}. Investigation of the microstructure indicated that there were several forms of defects after irradiation, such as surface unwetting, surface eruption, micro-cracks and layering. How the defects formed was explained by the results of electron microscopy and energy dispersive spectroscopy. The results also revealed that proper energy density (∼6 J/cm{sup 2}) and multi-number of irradiation (≥50 times) contributed to high quality of alloyed layers after irradiation.

  4. Vortex-lattice pinning and critical current density in anisotropic high-temperature superconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yingxu; Li, Xiangyu; Kang, Guozheng; Gao, Yuanwen

    2016-10-01

    The anisotropy of critical current density is an impressive manifestation in the physics of high-temperature superconductors. We develop an analytical characterization of anisotropic flux-lattice pinning and critical current density in a system of random point defects. The effect of superconducting anisotropy on the pinning force and critical current density is formulated. The in-plane/out-of-plane anisotropy and microscopic characteristic lengths are incorporated in the field and angular dependence of the critical current density. This is helpful in understanding the physical essence of the scaling behavior in the experiments for critical current anisotropy. We discuss the role of strong and weak point defects in the anisotropic flux-lattice pinning. Relevance of the theory to the critical-state model is dictated as well.

  5. Measurements of electron density profiles using an angular filter refractometer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haberberger, D., E-mail: dhab@lle.rochester.edu; Ivancic, S.; Hu, S. X.; Boni, R.; Barczys, M.; Craxton, R. S.; Froula, D. H. [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14636 (United States)

    2014-05-15

    A novel diagnostic technique, angular filter refractometry (AFR), has been developed to characterize high-density, long-scale-length plasmas relevant to high-energy-density physics experiments. AFR measures plasma densities up to 10{sup 21} cm{sup −3} with a 263-nm probe laser and is used to study the plasma expansion from CH foil and spherical targets that are irradiated with ∼9 kJ of ultraviolet (351-nm) laser energy in a 2-ns pulse. The data elucidate the temporal evolution of the plasma profile for the CH planar targets and the dependence of the plasma profile on target radius for CH spheres.

  6. Laboratory Investigations of Current Sheets at the Electron Skin Depth Scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vincena, S.; Gekelman, W.

    2005-12-01

    Laboratory Investigations of Current Sheets at the Electron Skin Depth Scale. Theoretical investigations, in situ spacecraft and rocket missions, and laboratory studies form an essential triad for understanding the variety of current sheet phenomena found in space plasmas. In the Large Plasma Device (LAPD) at UCLA, the formation dynamics, equilibrium state, and wave-mediated disruptions of current sheets can be studied with great spatial and temporal resolution using a variety of probes as well as non-invasive laser induced fluorescence and other optical diagnostics. The LAPD is aptly suited for studying current sheets flowing in a magnetized background plasma which is capable of supporting Alfvén waves. The cylindrical device is 20m long and one meter in diameter with a solenoidal magnetic field as high as 3000 Gauss. For the parameters in this experiment, the plasma column is ten shear Alfvén wavelengths along the field and 100 electron inertial lengths (δe) (or 200 ρi) in the perpendicular direction. An electron current sheet is created in the plasma by placing a thin copper plate in the plasma column at one end of the device and pulsing this plate positive with respect to the chamber wall. The current sheet extends for the length of the device and has an initial cross-field size of roughly 45 δe by 0.5δe. A parallel flow of ions is observed with similar dimensions and moves in the same direction as the electrons in the current sheet with a velocity of 0.2 times the ion sound speed. A much weaker sheared perpendicular flow is also measured. Cross-sections of the ion flow are measured at several axial locations over a distance of six meters. Second, as the ion flow increases in magnitude, a much broader (8ρi) density depletion (n=0.25nO) develops around the flow. The gradient scale length of the depletion shortens until the spontaneous growth of drift waves occurs. This disrupts the electron current and ion flow, and leads to cross-field transport of

  7. Guiding and collimating the fast electrons by using a low-density-core target with buried high density layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lv, Chong; Wan, Feng; Hou, Ya-Juan; Jia, Mo-Ran; Sang, Hai-Bo; Xie, Bai-Song; Liu, Shi-Bing

    2017-02-01

    A low-density-core target with buried high density layers is proposed to improve the transport of fast electrons and involved problems are investigated by using two-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations. It is demonstrated that this target can collimate the fast electrons efficiently and lead to a better beam quality. The enhancement is attributed to the weakening of the two stream instability and the better collimation by the self-generated multilayer megagauss magnetic field as well as the baroclinic magnetic field. Comparing this to that without buried high density layers, the energy flux of fast electrons is increased by a factor of about 1.8 and has a narrower transverse distribution in space. Besides, the dependence of the efficiency on the target parameters is examined, and the optimal target parameters are also obtained. Such a target can be useful to many applications, such as fast ignition in inertial fusion.

  8. High current racetrack microtron as a free electron laser driver

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurakin, V. G.

    1994-03-01

    A racetrack microtron combines the best features of a linac and a classical microtron. It might serve as a basis for free electron lasers to make these promising devices more compact and relatively cheap and thus available for many laboratories. At the same time it is known that stable acceleration in a racetrack is broken up at high intensity by automodulation of the beam current. It is shown in this paper that such modulation originates from positive feedback arising at some frequencies between the system rf cavity and the electron beam. The beam-cavity interaction equations followed by a stability analysis are presented. A linear approximation is used to derive stability conditions, the latter being represented in an analytical form followed by numerical calculations and a stability diagram. Comparing the results obtained with experimentally measured values shows the validity of the approach used. The physical meaning of observed intensity modulation as well as some measures of their suppression are discussed.

  9. Estimation of current density distribution of PAFC by analysis of cell exhaust gas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kato, S.; Seya, A. [Fuji Electric Co., Ltd., Ichihara-shi (Japan); Asano, A. [Fuji Electric Corporate, Ltd., Yokosuka-shi (Japan)

    1996-12-31

    To estimate distributions of Current densities, voltages, gas concentrations, etc., in phosphoric acid fuel cell (PAFC) stacks, is very important for getting fuel cells with higher quality. In this work, we leave developed a numerical simulation tool to map out the distribution in a PAFC stack. And especially to Study Current density distribution in the reaction area of the cell, we analyzed gas composition in several positions inside a gas outlet manifold of the PAFC stack. Comparing these measured data with calculated data, the current density distribution in a cell plane calculated by the simulation, was certified.

  10. Depairing current density through a low-angle grain boundary in a superconducting film

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feng Xue

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, the effect of a grain boundary (GB on the depairing current density of a high-temperature superconducting film is investigated. The modified effective free energy is proposed by considering the interaction of the superconducting condensate with the deformation of the superconductor due to the dislocations which constitute a grain boundary. After the elastic strain field of the dislocation is obtained, we analyzed the depress effect of the GB on the depairing current density of a superconducting film. The results are qualitatively agreement with the classic exponential relationship with the misorientation angles of the critical current density of high-temperature superconductors.

  11. Relationship between mass density, electron density, and elemental composition of body tissues for Monte Carlo simulation in radiation treatment planning

    CERN Document Server

    Kanematsu, Nobuyuki

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: For Monte Carlo simulation of radiotherapy, x-ray CT number of every system needs to be calibrated and converted to mass density and elemental composition. This study aims to formulate material properties of body tissues for practical two-step conversion from CT number. Methods: We used the latest compilation on body tissues that constitute reference adult male and female. We formulated the relations among mass, electron, and elemental densities into polylines to connect representative tissues, for which we took mass-weighted mean for the tissues in limited density regions. We compared the polyline functions of mass density with a bi-line for electron density and broken lines for elemental densities, which were derived from preceding studies. Results: There was generally high correlation between mass density and the other densities except of C, N, and O for light spongiosa tissues occupying 1% of body mass. The polylines fitted to the dominant tissues and were generally consistent with the bi-line an...

  12. Density matrix renormalization group with efficient dynamical electron correlation through range separation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hedegård, Erik Donovan, E-mail: erik.hedegard@phys.chem.ethz.ch; Knecht, Stefan; Reiher, Markus, E-mail: markus.reiher@phys.chem.ethz.ch [Laboratorium für Physikalische Chemie, ETH Zürich, Vladimir-Prelog-Weg 2, CH-8093 Zürich (Switzerland); Kielberg, Jesper Skau; Jensen, Hans Jørgen Aagaard, E-mail: hjj@sdu.dk [Department of Physics, Chemistry and Pharmacy, University of Southern Denmark, Campusvej 55, Odense (Denmark)

    2015-06-14

    We present a new hybrid multiconfigurational method based on the concept of range-separation that combines the density matrix renormalization group approach with density functional theory. This new method is designed for the simultaneous description of dynamical and static electron-correlation effects in multiconfigurational electronic structure problems.

  13. Density Matrix Renormalization Group with Efficient Dynamical Electron Correlation Through Range Separation

    CERN Document Server

    Hedegård, Erik Donovan; Kielberg, Jesper Skau; Jensen, Hans Jørgen Aagaard; Reiher, Markus

    2015-01-01

    We present a new hybrid multiconfigurational method based on the concept of range-separation that combines the density matrix renormalization group approach with density functional theory. This new method is designed for the simultaneous description of dynamical and static electron-correlation effects in multiconfigurational electronic structure problems.

  14. Quantum fluid dynamics based current-density functional study of a helium atom in a strong time-dependent magnetic field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vikas, Hash(0x125f4490)

    2011-02-01

    Evolution of the helium atom in a strong time-dependent (TD) magnetic field ( B) of strength up to 1011 G is investigated through a quantum fluid dynamics (QFD) based current-density functional theory (CDFT). The TD-QFD-CDFT computations are performed through numerical solution of a single generalized nonlinear Schrödinger equation employing vector exchange-correlation potentials and scalar exchange-correlation density functionals that depend both on the electronic charge-density and the current-density. The results are compared with that obtained from a B-TD-QFD-DFT approach (based on conventional TD-DFT) under similar numerical constraints but employing only scalar exchange-correlation potential dependent on electronic charge-density only. The B-TD-QFD-DFT approach, at a particular TD magnetic field-strength, yields electronic charge- and current-densities as well as exchange-correlation potential resembling with that obtained from the time-independent studies involving static (time-independent) magnetic fields. However, TD-QFD-CDFT electronic charge- and current-densities along with the exchange-correlation potential and energy differ significantly from that obtained using B-TD-QFD-DFT approach, particularly at field-strengths >109 G, representing dynamical effects of a TD field. The work concludes that when a helium atom is subjected to a strong TD magnetic field of order >109 G, the conventional TD-DFT based approach differs "dynamically" from the CDFT based approach under similar computational constraints.

  15. Critical current densities in Ag-added bulk MgB{sub 2}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muralidhar, M., E-mail: miryala1@shibaura-it.ac.jp [Superconducting Materials Laboratory, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Shibaura Institute of Technology, 3-7-5 Toyosu, Koto-ku, Tokyo 135-8548 (Japan); Inoue, K. [Superconducting Materials Laboratory, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Shibaura Institute of Technology, 3-7-5 Toyosu, Koto-ku, Tokyo 135-8548 (Japan); Koblischka, M.R. [Experimental Physics, Saarland University, Campus C 6 3, 66123 Saarbrücken (Germany); Murakami, M. [Superconducting Materials Laboratory, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Shibaura Institute of Technology, 3-7-5 Toyosu, Koto-ku, Tokyo 135-8548 (Japan)

    2015-11-15

    Highlights: • Bulk MgB{sub 2} samples with Ag contents of 0–10 wt% were sintered at 775 °C for 3 h. • Magnetization measurements showed a sharp superconducting transition with T{sub c} (onset) around 38.5–38.7 K. • Atomic force microscopy indicated that Ag-based MgB{sub 2} particles are of nanometer size. • The sample with 4 wt% Ag addition exhibited the highest J{sub c} of 400 kA/cm{sup 2} at 10 K and self field. - Abstract: In previous studies, we found that bulk MgB{sub 2} contained numerous voids in various shapes and sizes. With the aim of improving the critical current density as well as the mechanical performance of the disk-shaped MgB{sub 2} bulk superconductors, we added Ag and optimized the processing conditions. The samples with varied Ag content from 0, 2, 4, 6, to 10 wt% were synthesized in pure Ar atmosphere. Microstructural observation by scanning electron microscopy confirmed that metallic Ag particles are embedded in the void regions. Furthermore, atomic force microscopy indicated that silver-based MgB{sub 2} particles are of nanometer size. As a result, the critical current density (J{sub c}) values were improved with Ag addition as compared to pure MgB{sub 2} bulk. The sample with 4 wt% Ag addition exhibited the highest J{sub c} of 293 kA/cm{sup 2} at 20 K and self field. The respective J{sub c} values at 10 K were 400 kA/cm{sup 2}, 300 kA/cm{sup 2}, and 100 kA/cm{sup 2} in self field, 1 T and 2 T. These values are the highest record values so far reported in bulk MgB{sub 2} materials.

  16. High critical current density and enhanced irreversibility field in superconducting MgB2 thin films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eom, C B; Lee, M K; Choi, J H; Belenky, L J; Song, X; Cooley, L D; Naus, M T; Patnaik, S; Jiang, J; Rikel, M; Polyanskii, A; Gurevich, A; Cai, X Y; Bu, S D; Babcock, S E; Hellstrom, E E; Larbalestier, D C; Rogado, N; Regan, K A; Hayward, M A; He, T; Slusky, J S; Inumaru, K; Haas, M K; Cava, R J

    2001-05-31

    The discovery of superconductivity at 39 K in magnesium diboride offers the possibility of a new class of low-cost, high-performance superconducting materials for magnets and electronic applications. This compound has twice the transition temperature of Nb3Sn and four times that of Nb-Ti alloy, and the vital prerequisite of strongly linked current flow has already been demonstrated. One possible drawback, however, is that the magnetic field at which superconductivity is destroyed is modest. Furthermore, the field which limits the range of practical applications-the irreversibility field H*(T)-is approximately 7 T at liquid helium temperature (4.2 K), significantly lower than about 10 T for Nb-Ti (ref. 6) and approximately 20 T for Nb3Sn (ref. 7). Here we show that MgB2 thin films that are alloyed with oxygen can exhibit a much steeper temperature dependence of H*(T) than is observed in bulk materials, yielding an H* value at 4.2 K greater than 14 T. In addition, very high critical current densities at 4.2 K are achieved: 1 MA cm-2 at 1 T and 105 A cm-2 at 10 T. These results demonstrate that MgB2 has potential for high-field superconducting applications.

  17. Depairing current density of Nd{sub 2−x}Ce{sub x}CuO{sub 4−δ} superconducting films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kunchur, Milind N., E-mail: kunchur@sc.edu [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of South Carolina, Columbia, SC 29208 (United States); Dean, Charles; Liang, Manlai; Moghaddam, Nahid S. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of South Carolina, Columbia, SC 29208 (United States); Guarino, Anita; Nigro, Angela; Grimaldi, Gaia; Leo, Antonio [CNR-SPIN UOS Salerno, Dipartimento di Fisica “E.R. Caianiello”, Universit di Salerno, I-84084 Fisciano (Salerno) (Italy)

    2013-12-15

    Highlights: •Depairing critical current density of electron-doped Nd{sub 2−x}Ce{sub x}CuO{sub 4−δ} (NCCO). •Independent confirmation of unusually low superfluid density. •Alternative determination of the absolute value of the penetration depth λ(0). -- Abstract: We report a measurement of the depairing critical current density in the electron-doped Nd{sub 2−x}Ce{sub x}CuO{sub 4−δ} cuprate superconductor. Resistance-versus-temperature transition curves measured at high pulsed current densities show the classic proportionality between the transition-temperature shift and the two-thirds power of the applied current. The measurement provides an alternative method for obtaining the penetration depth purely through transport measurements that is not affected by the large paramagnetic background that arises from the Nd{sup 3+} ions, which affects inductive investigations of this quantity.

  18. Electronic Health Record (EHR and Cloud Security: The Current Issues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emmanuel Kusi Achampong

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available With the advent of the cloud computing and its associated challenges, building a secured electronic health record (EHR in a cloud computing environment has attracted a lot of attention in both healthcare industry and academic community. Cloud computing concept is becoming a popular information technology (IT infrastructure for facilitating EHR sharing and integration. In this study we discuss security concepts related to EHR sharing and integration in healthcare clouds and analyse the arising security and privacy issues in access and management of EHRs. This paper focus on the current challenges that comes with the use of the cloud computing for EHR purposes.

  19. Description of heteroaromaticity on the basis of π-electron density anisotropy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Firouzi, Rohoullah; Sharifi Ardani, Sahar

    2014-06-21

    It is demonstrated that there is a direct connection between aromaticity and the anisotropy of the π-electron density on planes parallel to the molecular ring. The electron density anisotropy on the plane is measured through the ratio of the in-plane Hessian eigenvalues associated with the eigenvectors lying in the plane. Computations on a wide-ranging set of well-characterized monocyclic systems containing heteroatoms validate the correlation between this one-electron density-based descriptor and aromaticity; in aromatic compounds, the in-plane Hessian eigenvalues are degenerate (or near degenerate) and the anisotropy of the π-electron density is undirected, whereas the results for antiaromatic rings are reversed and the degeneracy of the eigenvalues completely disappears. This finding is in line with our very recent study on [n]annulenes and provides further evidence that the anisotropy of the π-electron density should be considered as a new manifestation of aromaticity.

  20. Picture change error in quasirelativistic electron/spin density, Laplacian and bond critical points

    KAUST Repository

    Bučinský, Lukáš

    2014-06-01

    The change of picture of the quasirelativistic Hartree-Fock wave functions is considered for electron/spin densities, the negative Laplacian of electron density and the appropriate bond critical point characteristics from the Quantum Theory of Atoms In Molecules (QTAIM). [OsCl5(Hpz)]- and [RuCl5(NO)]2- transition metal complexes are considered. Both, scalar relativistic and spin-orbit effects have been accounted for using the Infinite Order Two Component (IOTC) Hamiltonian. Picture change error (PCE) correction in the electron and spin densities and the Laplacian of electron density are treated analytically. Generally, PCE is found significant only in the core region of the atoms for the electron/spin density as well as Laplacian.©2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Studies of challenge in lower hybrid current drive capability at high density regime in experimental advanced superconducting tokamak

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, B. J.; Li, M. H.; Li, Y. C.; Wang, M.; Liu, F. K.; Shan, J. F.; Li, J. G.; Wan, B. N.; Wan

    2017-02-01

    Aiming at a fusion reactor, two issues must be solved for the lower hybrid current drive (LHCD), namely good lower hybrid wave (LHW)-plasma coupling and effective current drive at high density. For this goal, efforts have been made to improve LHW-plasma coupling and current drive capability at high density in experimental advanced superconducting tokamak (EAST). LHW-plasma coupling is improved by means of local gas puffing and gas puffing from the electron side is taken as a routine way for EAST to operate with LHCD. Studies of high density experiments suggest that low recycling and high lower hybrid (LH) frequency are preferred for LHCD experiments at high density, consistent with previous results in other machines. With the combination of 2.45 GHz and 4.6 GHz LH waves, a repeatable high confinement mode plasma with maximum density up to 19~\\text{m}-3$ was obtained by LHCD in EAST. In addition, in the first stage of LHCD cyclic operation, an alternative candidate for more economical fusion reactors has been demonstrated in EAST and further work will be continued.

  2. Materials for high-density electronic packaging and interconnection

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-01-01

    Electronic packaging and interconnections are the elements that today limit the ultimate performance of advanced electronic systems. Materials in use today and those becoming available are critically examined to ascertain what actions are needed for U.S. industry to compete favorably in the world market for advanced electronics. Materials and processes are discussed in terms of the final properties achievable and systems design compatibility. Weak points in the domestic industrial capability, including technical, industrial philosophy, and political, are identified. Recommendations are presented for actions that could help U.S. industry regain its former leadership position in advanced semiconductor systems production.

  3. Electron density and temperature measurements in a magnetized expanding hydrogen plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leyte-González, R.; Palomares, J. M.; Schram, D. C.; Engeln, R.

    2016-08-01

    We report measurements of electron densities, ne, and temperatures, Te, in a magnetized expanding hydrogen plasma performed using Thomson scattering. The effects of applying an axial magnetic field and changing the background pressure in the plasma vessel on ne and Te along the expansion axis are reported. Magnetic field strengths (B field) up to 170 mT were applied, which are one order of magnitude larger than previously reported. The main effect of the applied B field is the plasma confinement, which leads to higher ne. At B fields larger than 88 mT the electron density along the expansion axis does not depend strongly on the magnetic field strength. However, Te is susceptible to the B field and reaches at 170 mT a maximum of 2.5 eV at a distance of 1.5 cm from the exit of the cascaded arc. To determine also the effect of the arc current through the arc, measurements were performed with arc currents of 45, 60, and 75 A at background pressures of 9.7 and 88.3 Pa. At constant magnetic field ne decreases from the exit of the arc along the expansion axis when the arc current is decreased. At 88.3 Pa ne shows a higher value close to the exit of the arc, but a faster decay along the expansion axis with respect to the 9.7 Pa case. Te is overall higher at lower pressure reaching a maximum of 3.2 eV at the lower arc current of 45 A. The results of this study complement our understanding and the characterization of expanding hydrogen plasmas.

  4. The electron density of a-Oxalic acid dihydrate at 100 K by X-ray diffraction: a contribution to the IUCr Commission on Charge, Spin and Momentum Densities project on the accurate determination of electron densities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dam, J.; Harkema, S.; Feil, D.

    1983-01-01

    The results of the determination of the electron density of u-oxalic acid dihydrate at 100 K by means of X-ray diffraction are reported as part of the project on the accurate determination of electron densities which was initiated by the International Union of Crystallography. An extensive data set,

  5. High current density PQQ-dependent alcohol and aldehyde dehydrogenase bioanodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aquino Neto, Sidney; Hickey, David P; Milton, Ross D; De Andrade, Adalgisa R; Minteer, Shelley D

    2015-10-15

    In this paper, we explore the bioelectrooxidation of ethanol using pyrroloquinoline quinone (PQQ)-dependent alcohol and aldehyde dehydrogenase (ADH and AldDH) enzymes for biofuel cell applications. The bioanode architectures were designed with both direct electron transfer (DET) and mediated electron transfer (MET) mechanisms employing high surface area materials such as multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) and MWCNT-decorated gold nanoparticles, along with different immobilization techniques. Three different polymeric matrices were tested (tetrabutyl ammonium bromide (TBAB)-modified Nafion; octyl-modified linear polyethyleneimine (C8-LPEI); and cellulose) in the DET studies. The modified Nafion membrane provided the best electrical communication between enzymes and the electrode surface, with catalytic currents as high as 16.8 ± 2.1 µA cm(-2). Then, a series of ferrocene redox polymers were evaluated for MET. The redox polymer 1,1'-dimethylferrocene-modified linear polyethyleneimine (FcMe2-C3-LPEI) provided the best electrochemical response. Using this polymer, the electrochemical assays conducted in the presence of MWCNTs and MWCNTs-Au indicated a Jmax of 781 ± 59 µA cm(-2) and 925 ± 68 µA cm(-2), respectively. Overall, from the results obtained here, DET using the PQQ-dependent ADH and AldDH still lacks high current density, while the bioanodes that operate via MET employing ferrocene-modified LPEI redox polymers show efficient energy conversion capability in ethanol/air biofuel cells. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Density-Gradient-Driven trapped-electron-modes in improved-confinement RFP plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duff, James

    2016-10-01

    Short wavelength density fluctuations in improved-confinement MST plasmas exhibit multiple features characteristic of the trapped-electron-mode (TEM), strong evidence that drift wave turbulence emerges in RFP plasmas when transport associated with MHD tearing is reduced. Core transport in the RFP is normally governed by magnetic stochasticity stemming from long wavelength tearing modes that arise from current profile peaking. Using inductive control, the tearing modes are reduced and global confinement is increased to values expected for a comparable tokamak plasma. The improved confinement is associated with a large increase in the pressure gradient that can destabilize drift waves. The measured density fluctuations have frequencies >50 kHz, wavenumbers k_phi*rho_sglobal tearing modes. Their amplitude increases with the local density gradient, and they exhibit a density-gradient threshold at R/L_n 15, higher than in tokamak plasmas by R/a. the GENE code, modified for RFP equilibria, predicts the onset of microinstability for these strong-gradient plasma conditions. The density-gradient-driven TEM is the dominant instability in the region where the measured density fluctuations are largest, and the experimental threshold-gradient is close to the predicted critical gradient for linear stability. While nonlinear analysis shows a large Dimits shift associated with predicted strong zonal flows, the inclusion of residual magnetic fluctuations causes a collapse of the zonal flows and an increase in the predicted transport to a level close to the experimentally measured heat flux. Similar circumstances could occur in the edge region of tokamak plasmas when resonant magnetic perturbations are applied for the control of ELMs. Work supported by US DOE.

  7. Effective mass in bilayer graphene at low carrier densities: The role of potential disorder and electron-electron interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, J.; Tan, L. Z.; Zou, K.; Stabile, A. A.; Seiwell, D. J.; Watanabe, K.; Taniguchi, T.; Louie, Steven G.; Zhu, J.

    2016-10-01

    In a two-dimensional electron gas, the electron-electron interaction generally becomes stronger at lower carrier densities and renormalizes the Fermi-liquid parameters, such as the effective mass of carriers. We combine experiment and theory to study the effective masses of electrons and holes me* and mh* in bilayer graphene in the low carrier density regime on the order of 1 ×1011c m-2 . Measurements use temperature-dependent low-field Shubnikov-de Haas oscillations observed in high-mobility hexagonal boron nitride supported samples. We find that while me* follows a tight-binding description in the whole density range, mh* starts to drop rapidly below the tight-binding description at a carrier density of n =6 ×1011c m-2 and exhibits a strong suppression of 30% when n reaches 2 ×1011c m-2 . Contributions from the electron-electron interaction alone, evaluated using several different approximations, cannot explain the experimental trend. Instead, the effect of the potential fluctuation and the resulting electron-hole puddles play a crucial role. Calculations including both the electron-electron interaction and disorder effects explain the experimental data qualitatively and quantitatively. This Rapid Communication reveals an unusual disorder effect unique to two-dimensional semimetallic systems.

  8. Exact and LDA entanglement of tailored densities in an interacting one-dimensional electron system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coe, J P; D' Amico, I, E-mail: jpc503@york.ac.u, E-mail: ida500@york.ac.u [Department of Physics, University of York, York YO10 5DD (United Kingdom)

    2010-01-01

    We calculate the 'exact' potential corresponding to a one-dimensional interacting system of two electrons with a specific, tailored density. We use one-dimensional density-functional theory with a local-density approximation (LDA) on the same system and calculate densities and energies, which are compared with the 'exact' ones. The 'interacting-LDA system'[4] corresponding to the LDA density is then found and its potential compared with the original one. Finally we calculate and compare the spatial entanglement of the electronic systems corresponding to the interacting-LDA and original interacting system.

  9. The negative energy density for a three-single-electron state in the Dirac field

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shu Wei-Xing; Yu Hong-Wei; Wu Pu-Xun

    2004-01-01

    We examine the energy density produced by a state vector which is the superposition of three single electron states in the Dirac field in the four-dimensional Minkowski spacetime. We derive the conditions on which the energy density can be negative. We then show that the energy density satisfies two quantum inequalities in the ultrarelativistic limit.

  10. Ion density and dielectric breakdown in the afterglow of a high-current arc discharge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rutgers, W.R.; Verhagen, F.C.M.; De Zeeuw, W.A.

    1984-01-01

    The ion density in the afterglow of a high-current atmospheric arc-discharge and electrical breakdown have been investigated in atomic (argon), molecular (nitrogen) and electronegative (carbon dioxide) media. From the decay with time of the ion density, effective recombination coefficients can be calculated. When the ion density is reduced to values below 2 x 10/sup 17/m/sup -3/, the afterglow plasma changes from a resistive into a dielectric medium. (J.C.R.)

  11. Universal correlations of one-dimensional electrons at low density

    OpenAIRE

    Göhmann, F.

    2000-01-01

    We summarize results on the asymptotics of the two-particle Green functions of interacting electrons in one dimension. Below a critical value of the chemical potential the Fermi surface vanishes, and the system can no longer be described as a Luttinger liquid. Instead, the non-relativistic Fermi gas with infinite point-like repulsion becomes the universal model for the long-wavelength, low temperature physics of the one-dimensional electrons. This model, which we call the impenetrable electro...

  12. A statistical study of the THEMIS satellite data for plasma sheet electrons carrying auroral upward field-aligned currents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, S.; Shiokawa, K.; McFadden, J. P.

    2010-12-01

    The magnetospheric electron precipitation along the upward field-aligned currents without the potential difference causes diffuse aurora, and the magnetospheric electrons accelerated by a field-aligned potential difference cause the intense and bright type of aurora, namely discrete aurora. In this study, we are trying to find out when and where the aurora can be caused with or without electron acceleration. We statistically investigate electron density, temperature, thermal current, and conductivity in the plasma sheet using the data from the electrostatic analyzer (ESA) onboard the THEMIS-D satellite launched in 2007. According to Knight (Planet. Space Sci., 1973) and Lyons (JGR, 1980), the thermal current, jth(∝ nT^(1/2) where n is electron density and T is electron temperature in the plasma sheet), represents the upper limit to field aligned current that can be carried by magnetospheric electrons without field-aligned potential difference. The conductivity, K(∝ nT^(-1/2)), represents the efficiency of the upward field-aligned current (j) that the field-aligned potential difference (V) can produce (j=KV). Therefore, estimating jth and K in the plasma sheet is important in understanding the ability of plasma sheet electrons to carry the field-aligned current which is driven by various magnetospheric processes such as flow shear and azimuthal pressure gradient. Similar study was done by Shiokawa et al. (2000) based on the auroral electron data obtained by the DMSP satellites above the auroral oval and the AMPTE/IRM satellite in the near Earth plasma sheet at 10-18 Re on February-June 1985 and March-June 1986 during the solar minimum. The purpose of our study is to examine auroral electrons with pitch angle information inside 12 Re where Shiokawa et al. (2000) did not investigate well. For preliminary result, we found that in the dawn side inner magnetosphere (source of the region 2 current), electrons can make sufficient thermal current without field

  13. Laboratory Study Of Magnetic Reconnection With A Density Asymmetry Across The Current Sheet

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoo, Joseph; Yamada, Massaaki; Ji, Hantao; Meyers,, Clayton E.; Jara-Almonte,; Chen, Li-Jen

    2014-04-18

    The effects of an upstream density asymmetry on magnetic reconnection are studied systematically in a laboratory plasma. Despite a significant upstream density asymmetry of up to 10, the reconnecting magnetic field pro file is not signifi cantly changed. On the other hand, the out-of-plane magnetic field profile is considerably modified; it is almost bipolar in structure with the density asymmetry, as compared to the quadrupolar structure in the symmetric configuration. The in-plane ion flow pattern and the electrostatic potential pro file are also affected by the density asymmetry. Strong bulk electron heating is observed near the low-density-side separatrix together with electromagnetic fluctuations in the lower hybrid frequency range. The dependence of the ion outflow and reconnection electric field on the density asymmetry is measured and compared with theoretical expectations.

  14. A Galvanostatic Modeling for Preparation of Electrodeposited Nanocrystalline Coatings by Control of Current Density

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ali Mohammad Rashidi

    2012-01-01

    The correlation between the grain size of electrodeposited coatings and the current densities was modeled by considering galvanostatic conditions. In order to test the model by experimental results, nanocrystalline (NC) nickel samples were deposited at different current densities using a Watts bath. The grain size of the deposits was evaluated by X-ray diffraction (XRD) technique. Model predictions were validated by finding a curve being the best-fit to the experimental results which were gathered from literature for different NC coatings in addition to those data measured in this research for NC nickel coatings. According to our model, the variation of grain size with the reciprocal of the current density follows a power law. A good agreement between the experimental results and model predictions was observed which indicated that the derived analytical model is applicable for producting the nanocrystalline electrodeposits with the desired grain size by controling current density.

  15. Flux quantum tunneling effect and its influence on the experimental critical current density

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    闻海虎; 赵忠贤; GriessenR.

    1995-01-01

    By using magnetic sweeping method, the temperature and magnetic field dependencies of the experimental current density and the normalized relaxation rate have been obtained. The true critical current density corresponding to the zero activation energy has been carried out based on the collective-pinning and the thermally-activated flux motion models, and therefore the influences of the quantum tunneling effect and the thermal activation effect on the experimental critical current density are distinguished. It is found that, with temperature lower than 10 K, the relaxation rate will not drop to zero when T approaches zero K because of the occurrence of the flux quantum tunneling. This additional flux motion further reduces the experimental critical current density j making it saturated with lowering temperature.

  16. Fresh water-salt water density currents, a major cause of siltation in estuaries

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Schultz, E.A; Simmons, H.B

    1957-01-01

    ... the effects of changing the upland discharge into estuaries, rivers, and harbours where the fresh water-salt water density currents are present in some degree, and in some cases are the major cause of siltation; and 4...

  17. Effect of coating current density on the wettability of electrodeposited copper thin film on aluminum substrate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arun Augustin

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Copper is the only one solid metal registered by the US Environmental Protection Agency as an antimicrobial touch surface. In touch surface applications, wettability of the surface has high significance. The killing rate of the harmful microbes depends on the wetting of pathogenic solution. Compared to the bulk copper, coated one on aluminum has the advantage of economic competitiveness and the possibility of manufacturing complex shapes. In the present work, the copper coating on the aluminum surface has successfully carried out by electrodeposition using non cyanide alkaline bath. To ensure good adhesion strength, the substrate has been pre-zincated prior to copper deposition. The coating current density is one of the important parameters which determine the nucleation density of the copper on the substrate. To understand the effect of current density on wettability, the coating has done at different current densities in the range of 3 A dm−2 to 9 A dm−2 for fixed time interval. The grain size has been measured from TEM micrographs and showed that as current density increases, grain size reduces from 62 nm to 35 nm. Since the grain size reduces, grain boundary volume has increases. As a result the value of strain energy (calculated by Williamson–Hall method has increased. The density of nodular morphology observed in SEM analysis has been increased with coating current density. Further, wettability studies with respect to double distilled water on the electrodeposited copper coatings which are coated at different current densities are carried out. At higher current density the coating is more wettable by water because at these conditions grain size of the coating decreases and morphology of grain changes to a favorable dense nodularity.

  18. Benchmarking of codes for electron cyclotron heating and electron cyclotron current drive under ITER conditions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Prater, R.; Farina, D.; Gribov, Y.; Harvey, R. W.; Ram, A. K.; Lin-Liu, Y. R.; Poli, E.; Smirnov, A. P.; Volpe, F.; Westerhof, E.; Zvonkovo, A.

    2008-01-01

    Optimal design and use of electron cyclotron heating requires that accurate and relatively quick computer codes be available for prediction of wave coupling, propagation, damping and current drive at realistic levels of EC power. To this end, a number of codes have been developed in laboratories wor

  19. Solar cell evaluation using electron beam induced current with the large chamber scanning electron microscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wink, Tara; Kintzel, Edward; Marienhoff, Peter; Klein, Martin

    2012-02-01

    An initial study using electron beam induced current (EBIC) to evaluate solar cells has been carried out with the large chamber scanning electron microscope (LC-SEM) at the Western Kentucky University Nondestructive Analysis Center. EBIC is a scanning electron microscope technique used for the characterization of semiconductors. To facilitate our studies, we developed a Solar Amplification System (SASY) for analyzing current distribution and defects within a solar cell module. Preliminary qualitative results will be shown for a solar cell module that demonstrates the viability of the technique using the LC-SEM. Quantitative EBIC experiments will be carried out to analyze defects and minority carrier properties. Additionally, a well-focused spot of light from an LED mounted at the side of the SEM column will scan the same area of the solar cell using the LC-SEM positioning system. SASY will then output the solar efficiency to be compared with the minority carrier properties found using EBIC.

  20. BioMEA: a versatile high-density 3D microelectrode array system using integrated electronics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charvet, Guillaume; Rousseau, Lionel; Billoint, Olivier; Gharbi, Sadok; Rostaing, Jean-Pierre; Joucla, Sébastien; Trevisiol, Michel; Bourgerette, Alain; Chauvet, Philippe; Moulin, Céline; Goy, François; Mercier, Bruno; Colin, Mikael; Spirkovitch, Serge; Fanet, Hervé; Meyrand, Pierre; Guillemaud, Régis; Yvert, Blaise

    2010-04-15

    Microelectrode arrays (MEAs) offer a powerful tool to both record activity and deliver electrical microstimulations to neural networks either in vitro or in vivo. Microelectronics microfabrication technologies now allow building high-density MEAs containing several hundreds of microelectrodes. However, dense arrays of 3D micro-needle electrodes, providing closer contact with the neural tissue than planar electrodes, are not achievable using conventional isotropic etching processes. Moreover, increasing the number of electrodes using conventional electronics is difficult to achieve into compact devices addressing all channels independently for simultaneous recording and stimulation. Here, we present a full modular and versatile 256-channel MEA system based on integrated electronics. First, transparent high-density arrays of 3D-shaped microelectrodes were realized by deep reactive ion etching techniques of a silicon substrate reported on glass. This approach allowed achieving high electrode aspect ratios, and different shapes of tip electrodes. Next, we developed a dedicated analog 64-channel Application Specific Integrated Circuit (ASIC) including one amplification stage and one current generator per channel, and analog output multiplexing. A full modular system, called BIOMEA, has been designed, allowing connecting different types of MEAs (64, 128, or 256 electrodes) to different numbers of ASICs for simultaneous recording and/or stimulation on all channels. Finally, this system has been validated experimentally by recording and electrically eliciting low-amplitude spontaneous rhythmic activity (both LFPs and spikes) in the developing mouse CNS. The availability of high-density MEA systems with integrated electronics will offer new possibilities for both in vitro and in vivo studies of large neural networks.

  1. The electron-propagator approach to conceptual density-functional theory

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Junia Melin; Paul W Ayers; J V Ortiz

    2005-09-01

    Both electron propagator theory and density-functional theory provide conceptually useful information about chemical reactivity and, most especially, charge transfer. This paper elucidates thequalitative and quantitative links between the two theories, with emphasis on how the reactivity indicators of conceptual density-functional theory can be derived from electron propagator theory. Electron propagator theory could be used to compute reactivity indices with high accuracy at reasonable computational cost.

  2. Doppler Velocimetry of Current Driven Spin Helices in a Two-Dimensional Electron Gas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Luyi [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2013-05-17

    Spins in semiconductors provide a pathway towards the development of spin-based electronics. The appeal of spin logic devices lies in the fact that the spin current is even under time reversal symmetry, yielding non-dissipative coupling to the electric field. To exploit the energy-saving potential of spin current it is essential to be able to control it. While recent demonstrations of electrical-gate control in spin-transistor configurations show great promise, operation at room temperature remains elusive. Further progress requires a deeper understanding of the propagation of spin polarization, particularly in the high mobility semiconductors used for devices. This dissertation presents the demonstration and application of a powerful new optical technique, Doppler spin velocimetry, for probing the motion of spin polarization at the level of 1 nm on a picosecond time scale. We discuss experiments in which this technique is used to measure the motion of spin helices in high mobility n-GaAs quantum wells as a function of temperature, in-plane electric field, and photoinduced spin polarization amplitude. We find that the spin helix velocity changes sign as a function of wave vector and is zero at the wave vector that yields the largest spin lifetime. This observation is quite striking, but can be explained by the random walk model that we have developed. We discover that coherent spin precession within a propagating spin density wave is lost at temperatures near 150 K. This finding is critical to understanding why room temperature operation of devices based on electrical gate control of spin current has so far remained elusive. We report that, at all temperatures, electron spin polarization co-propagates with the high-mobility electron sea, even when this requires an unusual form of separation of spin density from photoinjected electron density. Furthermore, although the spin packet co-propagates with the two-dimensional electron gas, spin diffusion is strongly

  3. 4-Component relativistic calculation of the magnetically induced current density in the group 15 heteroaromatic compounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bast, Radovan; Juselius, Jonas [Centre for Theoretical and Computational Chemistry (CTCC), Department of Chemistry, University of Tromso, N-9037 Tromso (Norway); Saue, Trond [Institut de Chimie de Strasbourg, CNRS et Universite Louis Pasteur, Laboratoire de Chimie Quantique, 4, rue Blaise Pascal, BP 1032, F-67070 Strasbourg (France)], E-mail: tsaue@chimie.u-strasbg.fr

    2009-02-17

    We present a 4-component relativistic implementation for calculating the magnetically induced current density within Hartree-Fock and Kohn-Sham linear response theory using a common gauge origin. We demonstrate how the current density can be decomposed into paramagnetic and diamagnetic contributions by calculating separately the contributions from rotations between positive-energy orbitals and contributions from rotations between the occupied positive-energy orbitals and the virtual negative-energy orbitals, respectively. This methodology is applied to the study of the magnetically induced current density in benzene and the group 15 heteroaromatic compounds C{sub 5}H{sub 5}E (E = N, P, As, Sb, Bi). Quantitative values for the magnetically induced ring currents are obtained by numerical integration over the current flow. We have found that the diatropic ring current is sustained for the entire series of the group 15 heteroaromatic compounds-the induced ring current susceptibility of bismabenzene being 76% of the benzene result. Having employed two hybrid and two nonhybrid generalized gradient approximation functionals, the results are found to be rather insensitive to the choice of the density functional approximation. The relativistic effect is relatively small, reaching its maximum of 8% for bismabenzene. The presented 4-component relativistic methodology opens up the possibility to visualize magnetically induced current densities of aromatic heavy-element systems with both scalar relativistic and spin-orbit effects included.

  4. Switching current density reduction in perpendicular magnetic anisotropy spin transfer torque magnetic tunneling junctions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    You, Chun-Yeol [Department of Physics, Inha University, Incheon 402-751 (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-01-28

    We investigate the switching current density reduction of perpendicular magnetic anisotropy spin transfer torque magnetic tunneling junctions using micromagnetic simulations. We find that the switching current density can be reduced with elongated lateral shapes of the magnetic tunnel junctions, and additional reduction can be achieved by using a noncollinear polarizer layer. The reduction is closely related to the details of spin configurations during switching processes with the additional in-plane anisotropy.

  5. Physical and Mechanical Characterization of Electrodeposited Nickel Nanowires -- Influence of Current Density and External Magnetic Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samykano, Mahendran

    Magnetic 1-D nanostructures have received great interest due to their various applications including high-density magnetic storage, sensors, drug delivery, and NEMS/MEMS systems. Among different 1-D nanostructures, magnetic nickel (Ni) nanowires with their ferromagnetic properties are of interest in such applications due to their lower cost, and they can be consistently synthesized via electrodeposition. While physical properties are influenced by processing parameters during electrodeposition of Ni nanowires, understanding of their influence on the mechanical properties is still not available. This is primarily due to the following challenges: tediousness involved in experimental techniques for mechanical characterization at nanoscale; sophisticated and careful experimentation required to be performed with advanced microscopy systems (SEM, AFM); robust nanoscale manipulators needed to place a single nanowire within the device; and difficulty in correctly loading and obtaining data for stress-strain within high powered microscopy environments. All of these factors pose significant challenges, limiting the current state of the art in mechanical characterization to its infancy, with wide differences in characterization curves and reported properties in this field. The present research and dissertation focuses on: 1. Experimental synthesis of electrodeposited Ni nanowires at different current densities and external magnetic fields, 2. Physical properties characterization of the synthesized nanowires to understand their morphology, structural and crystallographic properties, 3. Mechanical properties characterization of synthesized Ni nanowires through careful experiments within scanning electron microscope (SEM) based on uni-axial MEMS tensile loading device, 4. Data analysis to understand the process, physical and mechanical property interrelationship and to obtain insights on tensile deformation and failure modes observed in the Ni nanowires studied. Key research

  6. Experimental study of the velocity of density currents in convergent and divergent channels

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hasan Torabi POUDEH; Samad EMAMGHOLIZADEH; Manoocher Fathi-MOGHADAM

    2014-01-01

    The head velocity of the density current in the convergent and divergent channel is a key parameter for evaluating the extent to which suspended material travels, and for determining the type and distribution of sediment in the water body. This study experimentally evaluated the effects of the reach degree of convergence and divergence on the head velocity of the density current. Experiments were conducted in the flume with 6.0 m long, 0.72 m width and 0.6 m height. The head velocity was measured at three convergent degrees (-8o;-12o;-26o), at three divergent degrees (8o; 12o; 26o) and two slopes (0.009, 0.016) for various discharges. The measured head velocity of the density current is compared with the head velocity of the density current in the constant cross section channel. Based on non-dimensional and statistical analysis, relations as linear multiple regression are offered for predicting head velocity of the density current in the convergent, divergent and constant cross section channel. Also the results of this research show that for the same slope and discharge, the head velocity of the density current in the convergent and divergent channel are greater and less than the head velocity of the constant cross section, respectively.

  7. Numerical Simulation of Current Density Distribution in Keyhole Double-Sided Arc Welding

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Junsheng SUN; Chuansong WU; Min ZHANG; Houxiao WANG

    2004-01-01

    In the double-sided arc welding system (DSAW) composing of PAW+TIG arcs, the PAW arc is guided by the TIG arc so that the current mostly flows through the direction of the workpiece thickness and the penetration is greatly improved. To analyze the current density distribution in DSAW is beneficial to understanding of this process.Considering all kinds of dynamic factors acting on the weldpool, this paper discusses firstly the surface deformation of the weldpool and the keyhole formation in PAW+TIG DSAW process on the basis of the magnetohydrodynamic theory and variation principles. Hence, a model of the current density distribution is developed. Through numerical simulation, the current density distribution in PAW+TIG DSAW process is quantitatively analyzed. It shows that the minimal radius of keyhole formed in PAW+TIG DSAW process is 0.5 mm and 89.5 percent of current flows through the keyhole.

  8. Interaction of pyroclastic density currents with human settlements: Evidence from ancient Pompeii

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurioli, Lucia; Pareschi, M. Teresa; Zanella, Elena; Lanza, Roberto; Deluca, Enrico; Bisson, Marina

    2005-06-01

    Integrating field observations and rock-magnetic measurements, we report how a turbulent pyroclastic density current interacted with and moved through an urban area. The data are from the most energetic, turbulent pyroclastic density current of the A.D. 79 eruption of Vesuvius, Italy, which partially destroyed the Roman city of Pompeii. Our results show that the urban fabric was able to divide the lower portion of the current into several streams that followed the city walls and the intracity roads. Vortices, revealed by upstream particle orientations and decreases in deposit temperature, formed downflow of obstacles or inside cavities. Although these perturbations affected only the lower part of the current and were localized, they could represent, in certain cases, cooler zones within which chances of human survival are increased. Our integrated field data for pyroclastic density current temperature and flow direction, collected for the first time across an urban environment, enable verification of coupled thermodynamic numerical models and their hazard simulation abilities.

  9. Microscopic heterodyne interferometry for determination of electron density in high-pressure microplasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urabe, Keiichiro; Muneoka, Hitoshi; Stauss, Sven; Terashima, Kazuo

    2014-12-01

    Electron density is paramount for understanding plasma characteristics and for control in plasma applications. To determine the electron density in a plasma by the use of interferometry, the phase shift of a probing electromagnetic (EM) wave induced by interaction with the plasma is measured. In this paper, for the determination of electron density in microplasmas generated under conditions of fluid density higher than that of ambient air, we discuss appropriate wavelength ranges for the probing EM wave (laser beam) in interferometry with consideration of the plasma parameters in the tested plasma source. On the basis of the discussion, we develop an interferometry system using a near-infrared diode laser in combination with a reflection system and a microscope for microplasma diagnostics, and measure the electron density in a 200 ns short-pulse microdischarge generated in a 0.3 MPa helium supercritical fluid.

  10. Molecular Electron Density Theory: A Modern View of Reactivity in Organic Chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domingo, Luis R

    2016-09-30

    A new theory for the study of the reactivity in Organic Chemistry, named Molecular Electron Density Theory (MEDT), is proposed herein. MEDT is based on the idea that while the electron density distribution at the ground state is responsible for physical and chemical molecular properties, as proposed by the Density Functional Theory (DFT), the capability for changes in electron density is responsible for molecular reactivity. Within MEDT, the reactivity in Organic Chemistry is studied through a rigorous quantum chemical analysis of the changes of the electron density as well as the energies associated with these changes along the reaction path in order to understand experimental outcomes. Studies performed using MEDT allow establishing a modern rationalisation and to gain insight into molecular mechanisms and reactivity in Organic Chemistry.

  11. Molecular Electron Density Theory: A Modern View of Reactivity in Organic Chemistry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis R. Domingo

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available A new theory for the study of the reactivity in Organic Chemistry, named Molecular Electron Density Theory (MEDT, is proposed herein. MEDT is based on the idea that while the electron density distribution at the ground state is responsible for physical and chemical molecular properties, as proposed by the Density Functional Theory (DFT, the capability for changes in electron density is responsible for molecular reactivity. Within MEDT, the reactivity in Organic Chemistry is studied through a rigorous quantum chemical analysis of the changes of the electron density as well as the energies associated with these changes along the reaction path in order to understand experimental outcomes. Studies performed using MEDT allow establishing a modern rationalisation and to gain insight into molecular mechanisms and reactivity in Organic Chemistry.

  12. Excitation energies with time-dependent density matrix functional theory: Singlet two-electron systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giesbertz, K J H; Pernal, K; Gritsenko, O V; Baerends, E J

    2009-03-21

    Time-dependent density functional theory in its current adiabatic implementations exhibits three striking failures: (a) Totally wrong behavior of the excited state surface along a bond-breaking coordinate, (b) lack of doubly excited configurations, affecting again excited state surfaces, and (c) much too low charge transfer excitation energies. We address these problems with time-dependent density matrix functional theory (TDDMFT). For two-electron systems the exact exchange-correlation functional is known in DMFT, hence exact response equations can be formulated. This affords a study of the performance of TDDMFT in the TDDFT failure cases mentioned (which are all strikingly exhibited by prototype two-electron systems such as dissociating H(2) and HeH(+)). At the same time, adiabatic approximations, which will eventually be necessary, can be tested without being obscured by approximations in the functional. We find the following: (a) In the fully nonadiabatic (omega-dependent, exact) formulation of linear response TDDMFT, it can be shown that linear response (LR)-TDDMFT is able to provide exact excitation energies, in particular, the first order (linear response) formulation does not prohibit the correct representation of doubly excited states; (b) within previously formulated simple adiabatic approximations the bonding-to-antibonding excited state surface as well as charge transfer excitations are described without problems, but not the double excitations; (c) an adiabatic approximation is formulated in which also the double excitations are fully accounted for.

  13. Electron-positron momentum density in TTF-TCNQ

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ishibashi, S.; Manuel, A.A.; Hoffmann, L.;

    1997-01-01

    We present measurements of the positron two-dimensional angular correlation of annihilation radiation (2D-ACAR) in TTF-TCNQ. We report also theoretical simulations of the 2D-ACAR in which the electron wave functions were expressed as TTF or TCNQ molecular orbitals obtained from self-consistent qu...

  14. Trapped electron effects on ICRF Current Drive Predictions in TFTR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, John C.; Phillips, Cynthia K.; Bonoli, Paul T.

    1996-11-01

    Most 2D RF modeling codes use a parameterization^1 of current drive efficiencies to calculate fast wave driven currents. Because this parameterization is derived from a ray--tracing model, there are difficulties in applying it to a spectrum of waves. In addition, one cannot account for multiple resonances and coherency effects between the electrons and the waves. These difficulties may be avoided by a direct calculation of the quasilinear diffusion coefficient in an inhomogenous geometry coupled with a full wave code for the field polarizations. Current profiles are then calculated using the adjoint formulation^2, with the magnetic equilibrium specified consistently in both the adjoint routine and the full wave code. This approach has been implemented in the FISIC code^3. Results are benchmarked by comparing a power deposition calculation from conductivity to one from the quasilinear expression. It is shown that the two expressions agree. We quantify differences seen based upon aspect ratio and elongation. The largest discrepancies are seen in the regime of small aspect ratio, and little loss in accuracy for moderate aspect ratios ~>3. This work supported by DoE contract No. DE--AC02--76--CH03073. ^1 D. A. Ehst and C. F. F. Karney, Nucl. Fusion 31, 1933 (1991). ^2 C. F. F. Karney, Computer Physics Reports 4, 183 (1986). ^3 M. Brambilla and T. Krücken, Nucl. Fusion 28, 1813 (1988).

  15. Adiabatic electronic flux density: a Born-Oppenheimer Broken Symmetry ansatz

    CERN Document Server

    Pohl, Vincent

    2016-01-01

    The Born-Oppenheimer approximation leads to the counterintuitive result of a vanishing electronic flux density upon vibrational dynamics in the electronic ground state. To circumvent this long known issue, we propose using pairwise anti-symmetrically translated vibronic densities to generate a symmetric electronic density that can be forced to satisfy the continuity equation approximately. The so-called Born-Oppenheimer broken symmetry ansatz yields all components of the flux density simultaneously while requiring only knowledge about the nuclear quantum dynamics on the electronic adiabatic ground state potential energy surface. The underlying minimization procedure is transparent and computationally inexpensive, and the solution can be computed from the standard output of any quantum chemistry program. Taylor series expansion reveals that the implicit electron dynamics originates from non-adiabatic coupling to the explicit Born-Oppenheimer nuclear dynamics. The new approach is applied to the ${\\rm H}_2^+$ mo...

  16. Current fluctuation of electron and hole carriers in multilayer WSe{sub 2} field effect transistors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ko, Seung-Pil; Shin, Jong Mok; Jang, Ho-Kyun; Jin, Jun Eon; Kim, Gyu-Tae, E-mail: gtkim@korea.ac.kr [School of Electrical Engineering, Korea University, Seoul 02481 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Yong Jin; Kim, Young Keun [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Korea University, Seoul 02481 (Korea, Republic of); Shin, Minju [School of Electrical Engineering, Korea University, Seoul 02481 (Korea, Republic of); IMEP-LAHC, Grenoble INP-MINATEC, 3 Parvis Louis Neel, 38016 Grenoble (France)

    2015-12-14

    Two-dimensional materials have outstanding scalability due to their structural and electrical properties for the logic devices. Here, we report the current fluctuation in multilayer WSe{sub 2} field effect transistors (FETs). In order to demonstrate the impact on carrier types, n-type and p-type WSe{sub 2} FETs are fabricated with different work function metals. Each device has similar electrical characteristics except for the threshold voltage. In the low frequency noise analysis, drain current power spectral density (S{sub I}) is inversely proportional to frequency, indicating typical 1/f noise behaviors. The curves of the normalized drain current power spectral density (NS{sub I}) as a function of drain current at the 10 Hz of frequency indicate that our devices follow the carrier number fluctuation with correlated mobility fluctuation model. This means that current fluctuation depends on the trapping-detrapping motion of the charge carriers near the channel interface. No significant difference is observed in the current fluctuation according to the charge carrier type, electrons and holes that occurred in the junction and channel region.

  17. Superconducting gap symmetry determined by the electron density

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perez, Luis A. [Instituto de Fisica, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico (UNAM), A.P. 20-364, C.P. 01000, Mexico D.F. (Mexico)]. E-mail: lperez@fisica.unam.mx; Millan, J. Samuel [Facultad de Ingenieria, UNACAR, C.P. 24180, Cd. del Carmen, Campeche, Mexico. (Mexico); Wang Chumin [Instituto de Investigaciones en Materiales, UNAM, A.P. 70-360, C.P. 04510, Mexico D.F. (Mexico)

    2006-05-01

    In this work, a comparative study of pairing and superconducting states in square lattices with s-, p- and d-symmetries is performed within the BCS formalism and a generalized Hubbard model, in which correlated-hopping interactions are considered in addition to the repulsive Coulomb interactions. The two-particle analysis reveals the importance of the van Hove singularity in the formation of pairs and then the two-particle states with different pairing symmetry have their maximum binding energies at the same hopping strength. This feature is confirmed by the superconducting critical temperature (T {sub c}) calculation at the low-density regime. However, a different picture is found for the high-density regime, i.e., the maxima of the s- and d-channel T {sub c} split from the expected value and no p-wave superconducting state is found. This study suggests that the three superconducting symmetries can be analyzed within a single framework.

  18. High Power Density Power Electronic Converters for Large Wind Turbines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Senturk, Osman Selcuk

    In large wind turbines (in MW and multi-MW ranges), which are extensively utilized in wind power plants, full-scale medium voltage (MV) multi-level (ML) voltage source converters (VSCs) are being more preferably employed nowadays for interfacing these wind turbines with electricity grids...... assessments of these specific VSCs so that their power densities and reliabilities are quantitatively determined, which requires extensive utilization of the electro-thermal models of the VSCs under investigation. In this thesis, the three-level neutral-point-clamped VSCs (3L-NPC-VSCs), which are classified......-HB-VSCs). As the switch technology for realizing these 3L-VSCs, press-pack IGBTs are chosen to ensure high power density and reliability. Based on the selected 3L-VSCs and switch technology, the converter electro-thermal models are developed comprehensively, implemented practically, and validated via a full-scale 3L...

  19. Density Functional Theory Based on the Electron Distribution on the Energy Coordinate

    CERN Document Server

    Takahashi, Hideaki

    2016-01-01

    We introduced a new electron density n({\\epsilon}) by projecting the spatial electron density n(r) onto the energy coordinate {\\epsilon} defined with the external potential \\upsion (r) of interest. Then, a density functional theory (DFT) was formulated, where n({\\epsilon}) serves as a fundamental variable for the electronic energy. It was demonstrated that the Kohn-Sham equation can also be adapted to the DFT that employs the density n({\\epsilon}) as an argument to the exchange energy functional. An important attribute of the energy density is that it involves the spatially non-local population of the spin-adapted density n(r) at the bond dissociation. By taking advantage of this property we developed a prototype of the static correlation functional employing no empirical parameters, which realized a reasonable dissociation curve for H2 molecule.

  20. Density measurement of thin layers by electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Jürgen; Ramm, Jürgen; Gemming, Thomas

    2013-07-01

    A method to measure the density of thin layers is presented which utilizes electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) techniques within a transmission electron microscope. The method is based on the acquisition of energy filtered images in the low loss region as well as of an element distribution map using core loss edges. After correction of multiple inelastic scattering effects, the intensity of the element distribution map is proportional to density and thickness. The dependence of the intensities of images with low energy loss electrons on the density is different from that. This difference allows the calculation of the relative density pixel by pixel and to determine lateral density gradients or fluctuations in thin films without relying on a constant specimen thickness. The method is demonstrated at thin carbon layers produced with density gradients.

  1. Current density imaging using directly measured harmonic Bz data in MREIT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Chunjae; Kwon, Oh In

    2013-01-01

    Magnetic resonance electrical impedance tomography (MREIT) measures magnetic flux density signals through the use of a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in order to visualize the internal conductivity and/or current density. Understanding the reconstruction procedure for the internal current density, we directly measure the second derivative of Bz data from the measured k-space data, from which we can avoid a tedious phase unwrapping to obtain the phase signal of Bz . We determine optimal weighting factors to combine the derivatives of magnetic flux density data, [Symbol: see text](2) Bz , measured using the multi-echo train. The proposed method reconstructs the internal current density using the relationships between the induced internal current and the measured [Symbol: see text](2) Bz data. Results from a phantom experiment demonstrate that the proposed method reduces the scanning time and provides the internal current density, while suppressing the background field inhomogeneity. To implement the real experiment, we use a phantom with a saline solution including a balloon, which excludes other artifacts by any concentration gradient in the phantom.

  2. Current Density Limitations in a Fast-Pulsed High-Voltage Diode

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-06-01

    based on mass x acceleration - charge x E-field) - - -= qT (x)=-e rT(X) (19) dt M c M c where y ,ŕ /•/ 2/c ••V/c; t * time (S) e I electron charge I... Plasmaphysik IPP 4/250, September 1991. 6. Parker, R.K., Explosive Electron Emission and the Characteristics of High-Current Electron Flow, Air Force

  3. Average OH density in alternating current dielectric barrier discharge by laser-induced fluorescence technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Hongliang; Feng, Chunlei; Gao, Liang; Ding, Hongbin

    2015-10-01

    The average OH density in atmospheric He-H2O(0.4%) needle-plate dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) was measured by the asynchronous laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) technique and the fluctuation of OH radical density was measured simultaneously to prove that the average OH density can be obtained by the asynchronous LIF technique. The evolution of the average OH density in four different discharge patterns, namely, negative barrier corona discharge, glow discharge, multi glow discharge, and streamer discharge, was studied, and it was found that the average OH density has an observable increase from corona discharge to streamer discharge. The main mechanism of OH production in the four different discharge patterns was analyzed. It was shown that the main mechanism of OH production in negative barrier corona discharge is electron direct collision dissociation, whereas in the other three discharge patterns the He metastable Penning ionization is the main process.

  4. An adaptive finite element approach to modelling sediment laden density currents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parkinson, S.; Hill, J.; Allison, P. A.; Piggott, M. D.

    2012-04-01

    Modelling sediment-laden density currents at real-world scales is a challenging task. Here we present Fluidity, which uses dynamic adaptive re-meshing to reduce computational costs whilst maintaining sufficient resolution where and when it is required. This allows small-scale processes to be captured in large scale simulations. Density currents, also known as gravity or buoyancy currents, occur wherever two fluids with different densities meet. They can occur at scales of up to hundred kilometres in the ocean when continental shelves collapse. This process releases large quantities of sediment into the ocean which increase the bulk density of the fluid to form a density current. These currents can carry sediment hundreds of kilometres, at speeds of up to a hundred kilometres per hour, over the sea bed. They can be tsunamigenic and they have the potential to cause significant damage to submarine infrastructure, such as submarine telecommunications cables or oil and gas infrastructure. They are also a key process for movement of organic material into the depths of the ocean. Due to this, they play an important role in the global carbon cycle on the Earth, forming a significant component of the stratigraphic record, and their deposits can form useful sources of important hydrocarbons. Modelling large scale sediment laden density currents is a very challenging problem. Particles within the current are suspended by turbulence that occurs at length scales that are several orders of magnitude smaller than the size of the current. Models that resolve the vertical structure of the flow require a very large, highly resolved mesh, and substantial computing power to solve. Here, we verify our adaptive model by comparison with a set of laboratory experiments by Gladstone et al. [1998] on the propagation and sediment deposition of bidisperse gravity currents. Comparisons are also made with fixed mesh solutions, and it is shown that accuracy can be maintained with fewer elements

  5. Switching processes in TGS crystals irradiated by high-current electron beam

    CERN Document Server

    Efimov, V V; Klevtsova, E A; Tyutyunnikov, S I

    2002-01-01

    The relaxation processes study of the dielectric permittivity epsilon during commutation of the external electric field in triglycine sulphate (NH sub 2 CH sub 2 COOH) sub 3 centre dot H sub 2 SO sub 4 (TGS) single crystal plates before and after irradiation by a high-current pulsed electron beam with different doses at various temperatures is presented. The parameters of the electron beam produced by the accelerator facility as a source were: energy E = 250 keV, current density I = 1000 A/cm sup 2 , fluence F = 15 J/cm sup 2 , pulse duration tau = 300 ns, beam density 5 centre dot sup 1 5 electrons/cm sup 2 per pulse. It was shown that the dependences of epsilon (t) are described by the Kohlrausch law: epsilon (t) approx exp (-t/tau) supalpha, where alpha is the average relaxation time of the all volume samples, 0 < alpha <1. Besides, it was found that switching processes in the irradiated crystals were much more intensive than those in the non-irradiated ones. The relaxation times decrease with rising...

  6. Measurement of induced magnetic flux density using injection current nonlinear encoding (ICNE) in MREIT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Chunjae; Lee, Byung Il; Kwon, Ohin; Woo, Eung Je

    2007-02-01

    Magnetic resonance electrical impedance tomography (MREIT) measures induced magnetic flux densities subject to externally injected currents in order to visualize conductivity distributions inside an electrically conducting object. Injection currents induce magnetic flux densities that appear in phase parts of acquired MR image data. In the conventional current injection method, we inject currents during the time segment between the end of the first RF pulse and the beginning of the reading gradient in order to ensure the gradient linearity. Noting that longer current injections can accumulate more phase changes, we propose a new pulse sequence called injection current nonlinear encoding (ICNE) where the duration of the injection current pulse is extended until the end of the reading gradient. Since the current injection during the reading gradient disturbs the gradient linearity, we first analyze the MR signal produced by the ICNE pulse sequence and suggest a novel algorithm to extract the induced magnetic flux density from the acquired MR signal. Numerical simulations and phantom experiments show that the new method is clearly advantageous in terms of the reduced noise level in measured magnetic flux density data. The amount of noise reduction depends on the choice of the data acquisition time and it was about 24% when we used a prolonged data acquisition time of 10.8 ms. The ICNE method will enhance the clinical applicability of the MREIT technique when it is combined with an appropriate phase artefact minimization method.

  7. Can the current density map topology be extracted from the nucleus independent chemical shifts?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Damme, Sofie; Acke, Guillaume; Havenith, Remco W. A.; Bultinck, Patrick

    2016-01-01

    Aromatic compounds are characterised by the presence of a ring current when in a magnetic field. As a consequence, current density maps are used to assess (the degree of) aromaticity of a compound. However, often a more discrete set of so-called Nucleus Independent Chemical Shift (NICS) values is us

  8. Theoretical discussion for electron-density distribution in multicusp ion source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhan, Hualin; Hu, Chundong; Xie, Yahong; Wu, Bin; Wang, Jinfang; Liang, Lizheng; Wei, Jianglong

    2011-03-01

    By introducing some ideas of magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) and kinetic theories, some useful solutions for electron-density distribution in the radial direction in multicusp ion source are obtained. Therefore, some conclusions are made in this perspective: 1, the electron-density distributions in a specific region in the sheath are the same with or without magnetic field; 2, the influence of magnetic field on the electron density obeys exponential law, which should take into account the collision term as well if the magnetic field is strong; 3, the result derived from the Boltzmann equation is qualitatively consistent with some given experimental results.

  9. Electron density profiles in the background of LF absorption during Forbush-decrease and PSE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satori, G.

    1989-01-01

    Based on the simulation of different Forbush decrease and particle precipitation effects in the D region, electron density profiles in the mid-latitudes the ionospheric absorption of low frequency (LF) radio waves was determined. The absorption variations at different frequenceis are strongly affected by the shape of the electron density profile. A structure appears which sometimes resembles the letter S (in a sloping form). Both the height (around 70 to 72 km) and the depth of the local minimum in the electron density contribute to the computed absorption changes of various degree at different frequencies. In this way several observed special absorption events can be interpreted.

  10. PMSE observations with the EISCAT VHF- and UHF-radars: Ice particles and their effect on ambient electron densities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qiang; Rapp, Markus

    2013-11-01

    It is now well understood that the occurrence of PMSE is closely connected to the presence of ice particles. These ice particles modify the ambient electron density by electron attachment which occasionally leads to large electron density depletions which have also been called ‘biteouts’. There has been some debate in the literature regarding the relative depth of such depletions which is usually expressed by the parameter Λ=|ZA|NA/ne. Here, |ZA|NA is the charge number density of ice particles and ne is the electron density. In this paper, we present, for the first time, the statistical distribution of Λ using measurements with the EISCAT VHF- and UHF-radars. Based on 25 h of simultaneous observations, we derived a total of 757 Λ values based on 15 min of data each. In each of these cases, PMSE were observed with the EISCAT VHF-radar but not with the UHF-radar and the UHF-measurement were hence used to determine the electron density profile. From these 757 cases, there are 699 cases with Λ⪡1, and only 33 cases with Λ>0.5 (21 cases with Λ>1). A correlation analysis of Λ versus PMSE volume reflectivities further reveals that there is no strong dependence between the two parameters. This is in accordance with current PMSE-theory based on turbulence in combination with a large Schmidt-number. The maxima of Λ from each profile show a negative relationship with the undisturbed electron densities deduced at the same altitudes. This reveals that the variability of Λ mainly depends on the variability of the electron densities. In addition, variations of aerosol number densities may also play a role. Although part of the observations were conducted during the HF heating experiments, the so-called overshoot effects did not significantly bias our statistical results. In order to avoid missing biteouts because of a superposition of coherent and incoherent scatter in the UHF-data, we finally calculated spectral parameters n by applying a simple fit to auto

  11. Melting Point Of Metals In Relation Io Electron Charge Density

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boczkal G.

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The concept of spatial criterion of the electron charge concentration is applied to determine the metal melting point. Based on the model proposed for bcc metals, a model for hcp metals and general form for others has been developed. To calculate the melting point, only structural data and atomic number are required. The obtained results show good consistency with the experimental data for metals with atomic number Z < 70.

  12. Effect of the current density on electrodepositing alpha-lead dioxide coating on aluminum substrate

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Burning CHEN; Zhongcheng GUO; Hui HUANG; Xianwan YANG; Yuandong CAO

    2009-01-01

    The α-PbO_2 electrodes are prepared by anodic electrodeposition on Al/conductive coating electrode from alkaline plumbite solutions in order to investigate the effect of the different current densities on the properties of α-PbO_2 electrodes. The physic-ochemical properties of the α-PbO_2 electrodes are analyzed by using SEM, EDS, XRD, Tafel plot, linear sweep voltammetry (LSV) and A.C. Impedance. A compact and uniform layer of lead dioxide was obtained at the current density of 3 mA-cm~(-2) . A further increase in current density results in smaller particles with high porosity. EDS and XRD analyses have shown that the PbO_2 deposited in alkaline conditions is highly non stoichiometric, and the PbO impurities are formed on the surface layer besides the α-PbO_2. The corrosion resistance of α-PbO_2 at the low current density is superior to that of the high current density. It can be attributed to a porous layer of deposited films at high current densities. When used as anodes for oxygen evolution in aqueous Zn~(2+) 50 g·L~(-1), H_2SO_4 150 g·L~(-1), the Al/conductive coating/α-PbO_2 exhibits lower potential compared to Pb electrode. Al/conductive coating/α-PbO_2 electrode with the best electrocatalytic activity was obtained at current density of 1 mA·cm~(-2). The lowest roughness factor was obtained at 1 mA·cm~(-2).

  13. Transport critical-current density of superconducting films with hysteretic ferromagnetic dots

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nuria Del-Valle

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Superconductor-ferromagnet hybrids present a rich and complex phenomenology. Particularly, a hysteretic behavior on the transport critical-current density, as a function of a uniform perpendicular applied field, has been experimentally found in superconducting films with some embedded ferromagnets. Here we analyze the interaction superconductor-ferromagnets by means of an iterative model based on the critical-state model with field-dependent internal critical-current density and compare the results with actual transport measurements. By using arguments of field compensation, we show how the change in the magnetization of the ferromagnetic inclusions is responsible for the observed hysteresis on the transport critical current.

  14. High critical current densities in bulk MgB{sub 2} fabricated using amorphous boron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muralidhar, Miryala; Kenta, Nozaki; Murakami, Masato [Superconducting Materials Laboratory, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Shibaura Institute of Technology, Tokyo 135-8548 (Japan); Koblischka, Michael R. [Institute of Experimental Physics, Saarland University, P.O. Box 151150, 66041 Saarbruecken (Germany)

    2015-10-15

    We prepared bulk MgB{sub 2} from high-purity commercial powders of Mg metal (99.9% purity) and amorphous B (99% purity) powders using a single-step solid state reaction at 775 C for varying sintering duration from 1 to 10 h in pure argon atmosphere. X-ray diffraction analysis showed that all the samples were single phase MgB{sub 2}. The magnetization measurements confirmed a sharp superconducting transition with T{sub c,onset} at around 38.2-38.8 K. The critical current density (J{sub c}) values for the MgB{sub 2} samples produced at 1 h sintering time is the highest one in all processed materials here. Scanning electron microscopy analyses indicated that the sintering time has a crucial influence on the grain size. As a result, the highest J{sub c} value of 270 kA cm{sup -2} at 20 K and self-field was achieved in the sample produced at 775 C for 1 h. Our results clearly demonstrate that the optimization of the sintering conditions is essential to improve the bulk MgB{sub 2} performance. (copyright 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  15. Photoelectrolysis of water at high current density - Use of ultraviolet laser excitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bocarsly, A. B.; Bolts, J. M.; Cummins, P. G.; Wrighton, M. S.

    1977-01-01

    The behavior of TiO2 and SrTiO3 photoanodes in cells for the photoelectrolysis of H2O has been investigated for high-intensity 351-,364-nm excitation from an Ar ion laser. Intensities up to 380 W/sq cm have been used. For TiO2 a small amount of surface decomposition is found after irradiation at high intensity, whereas SrTiO3 undergoes no detectable changes. Current-voltage properties for both electrodes are essentially independent of light intensity up to the level of 380 W/sq cm, and there is little if any change in quantum efficiency for electron flow. Photocurrent densities have been shown to exceed 5 A/sq cm for O2 evolution. Data show that the energy storage rate associated with the SrTiO3 photoelectrolysis can exceed 30 W/sq cm; this represents the highest demonstrated rate of sustained optical-to-chemical energy conversion.

  16. Selective regulation of current densities underlies spontaneous changes in the activity of cultured neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turrigiano, G; LeMasson, G; Marder, E

    1995-05-01

    We study the electrical activity patterns and the expression of conductances in adult stomatogastric ganglion (STG) neurons as a function of time in primary cell culture. When first plated in culture, these neurons had few active properties. After 1 d in culture they produced small action potentials that rapidly inactivated during maintained depolarization. After 2 d in culture they fired large action potentials tonically when depolarized, and their properties resembled very closely the properties of STG neurons pharmacologically isolated in the ganglion. After 3-4 d in culture, however, their electrical properties changed and they fired in bursts when depolarized. We characterized the currents expressed by these neurons in culture. They included two TTX-sensitive sodium currents, a calcium current, a delayed-rectifier-like current, a calcium-dependent potassium current, and two A-type currents. The changes in firing properties with time in culture were accompanied by an increase in inward and decrease in outward current densities. A single-compartment conductance-based model of an STG neuron was constructed by fitting the currents measured in the biological neurons. When the current densities in the model neuron were matched to those measured for the biological neurons in each activity state, the model neuron closely reproduced each state, indicating that the changes in current densities are sufficient to account for the changes in intrinsic properties. These data indicate that STG neurons isolated in culture change their intrinsic electrical properties by selectively adjusting the magnitudes of their ionic conductances.

  17. Gauge-Origin Independent Calculations of the Anisotropy of the Magnetically Induced Current Densities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fliegl, Heike; Jusélius, Jonas; Sundholm, Dage

    2016-07-21

    Gauge-origin independent current density susceptibility tensors have been computed using the gauge-including magnetically induced current (GIMIC) method. The anisotropy of the magnetically induced current density (ACID) functions constructed from the current density susceptibility tensors are therefore gauge-origin independent. The ability of the gauge-origin independent ACID function to provide quantitative information about the current flow along chemical bonds has been assessed by integrating the cross-section area of the ACID function in the middle of chemical bonds. Analogously, the current strength susceptibility passing a given plane through the molecule is obtained by numerical integration of the current flow parallel to the normal vector of the integration plane. The cross-section area of the ACID function is found to be strongly dependent on the exact location of the integration plane, which is in sheer contrast to the calculated ring-current strength susceptibilities that are practically independent of the chosen position of the integration plane. The gauge-origin independent ACID functions plotted for different isosurface values show that a visual assessment of the current flow and degree of aromaticity depends on the chosen isosurface. The present study shows that ACID functions are not an unambiguous means to estimate the degree of molecular aromaticity according to the magnetic criterion and to determine the current pathway of complex molecular rings.

  18. Huge Critical Current Density and Tailored Superconducting Anisotropy in SmFeAsO(0.8)F(0.15) by Low Density Columnar-Defect Incorporation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welp, U.; Fang, L.; Jia, Y.; Mishra, V.; Chaparro, C.; Vlasko-Vlasov, V. K.; Koshelev, A. E.; Crabtree, G. W.; Zhu, S. F.; Zhigadlo, N. D.; Katrych, S.; Karpinski, J.; Kwok, W. K.

    2014-03-01

    SmFeAsO(0.8)F(0.15) is of great interest because it has the highest transition temperature of all the iron-based superconductors. We find that the introduction of a low density of correlated nano-scale defects enhances the critical current density up to 2 × 107A/cm2 at 5 K without any suppression in the high superconducting transition temperature of 50 K and amounting to 20 % of the theoretical depairing current density. We also observed a surprising reduction in the thermodynamic superconducting anisotropy from 8 to 4 upon irradiation. A model based on anisotropic electron scattering predicts that the superconducting anisotropy can be tailored via correlated defects in semi-metallic, fully gapped type II superconductors. - We acknowledge support by the Center for Emergent Superconductivity, an EFRC funded by the US DOE, Office of Basic Energy Sciences (LF, YJ, VM, AEK, WKK, GWC), by the DOE, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, under Contract No. DE-AC02-06CH11357 (CC, VKV, UW), by the EC Research Council project SuperIron (JK, SK), and by the Swiss National Science Foundation and the National Center of Competence in Research MaNEP (NDZ).

  19. Wavefront-sensor-based electron density measurements for laser-plasma accelerators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Plateau, Guillaume; Matlis, Nicholas; Geddes, Cameron; Gonsalves, Anthony; Shiraishi, Satomi; Lin, Chen; van Mourik, Reinier; Leemans, Wim

    2010-02-20

    Characterization of the electron density in laser produced plasmas is presented using direct wavefront analysis of a probe laser beam. The performance of a laser-driven plasma-wakefield accelerator depends on the plasma wavelength, hence on the electron density. Density measurements using a conventional folded-wave interferometer and using a commercial wavefront sensor are compared for different regimes of the laser-plasma accelerator. It is shown that direct wavefront measurements agree with interferometric measurements and, because of the robustness of the compact commercial device, have greater phase sensitivity, straightforward analysis, improving shot-to-shot plasma-density diagnostics.

  20. Direct mapping of local redox current density on a monolith electrode by laser scanning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Seung-Woo; Lopez, Jeffrey; Saraf, Ravi F

    2013-09-15

    An optical method of mapping local redox reaction over a monolith electrode using simple laser scanning is described. As the optical signal is linearly proportional to the maximum redox current that is measured concomitantly by voltammetry, the optical signal quantitatively maps the local redox current density distribution. The method is demonstrated on two types of reactions: (1) a reversible reaction where the redox moieties are ionic, and (2) an irreversible reaction on two different types of enzymes immobilized on the electrode where the reaction moieties are nonionic. To demonstrate the scanning capability, the local redox behavior on a "V-shaped" electrode is studied where the local length scale and, hence, the local current density, is nonuniform. The ability to measure the current density distribution by this method will pave the way for multianalyte analysis on a monolith electrode using a standard three-electrode configuration. The method is called Scanning Electrometer for Electrical Double-layer (SEED).

  1. Measurement of local current density of all-vanadium redox flow batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsieh, Wen-Yen; Leu, Chih-Hsing; Wu, Chun-Hsing; Chen, Yong-Song

    2014-12-01

    This article presents a preliminary study of the measurement of local current density in all-vanadium redox flow batteries. Two batteries are designed and manufactured in this study, and the experimental results are compared. In the first cell, the current collector is divided into 25 segments, and the flow field plate is not segmented, whereas in the other cell, the flow field plate is segmented. The effects of the electrolyte flow rate on the battery efficiencies and the local current density variation are investigated. The experimental results show that the current density near the outlet significantly decreases when the discharge capacity approaches zero. In addition, the battery has a larger discharge depth at a higher electrolyte flow rate.

  2. The Current Collapse in AlGaN/GaN High-Electron Mobility Transistors Can Originate from the Energy Relaxation of Channel Electrons?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Ling-Feng; Ning, Huan-Sheng; Wang, Jin-Yan

    2015-01-01

    Influence of the energy relaxation of the channel electrons on the performance of AlGaN/GaN high-electron mobility transistors (HEMTs) has been investigated using self-consistent solution to the coupled Schrödinger equation and Poisson equation. The first quantized energy level in the inversion layer rises and the average channel electron density decreases when the channel electric field increases from 20 kV/cm to 120 kV/cm. This research also demonstrates that the energy relaxation of the channel electrons can lead to current collapse and suggests that the energy relaxation should be considered in modeling the performance of AlGaN/GaN HEMTs such as, the gate leakage current, threshold voltage, source-drain current, capacitance-voltage curve, etc. PMID:26039589

  3. Ballistic rectification in an asymmetric Si/SiGe cross junction with modulated electron density

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salloch, Daniel; Wieser, Ulrich; Kunze, Ulrich [Werkstoffe und Nanoelektronik, Ruhr-Universitaet Bochum (Germany); Hackbarth, Thomas [DaimlerChrysler Forschungszentrum Ulm (Germany)

    2010-07-01

    We demonstrate a substantial efficiency increase in an injection-type ballistic rectifier due to a modulated electron density in its active region. The rectifier is a nanoscale four-terminal {psi}-shaped cross junction fabricated from a high-mobility Si/SiGe heterostructure. Two nanoscale Schottky gates are locally deposited on top of the central stem above and below the cross junction. In addition to the inertial-ballistic rectified voltage, which will develop between the upper and lower end of the central stem if a current is injected between the branches, a hot-electron thermopower voltage establishes across the saddle-point potential formed below the local gate for negative gate-voltages. At T=4.2 K we observe an increase of the rectified signal due to the superposed hot-electron thermopower for negative gate voltages. Depending on the position of the constriction in the stem, a sign reversal of the output signal is also demonstrated. Both signals are experimentally separated in a modified device geometry.

  4. Collisionless stopping of electron current in an inhomogeneous electron magnetohydrodynamics plasma

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Amita Das; Sharad K Yadav; Predhiman Kaw; Sudip Sengupta

    2011-11-01

    A brief review of a recent work on a novel collisionless scheme for stopping electron current pulse in plasma is presented. This scheme relies on the inhomogeneity of the plasma medium. This mechanism can be used for heating an overdense regime of plasma where lasers cannot penetrate. The method can ensure efficient localized heating at a desired location. The suitability of the scheme to the frontline fast ignition laser fusion experiment has been illustrated.

  5. A novel hybrid FEM-BEM method for 3D eddy current field calculation using current density J

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU; Zhizhen(刘志珍); WANG; Yanzhang(王衍章); JIA; Zhiping(贾智平); SUN; Yingming(孙英明)

    2003-01-01

    This paper introduces a novel hybrid FEM-BEM method for calculating 3D eddy current field. In the eddy current region, the eddy current density J is solved by the finite element method (FEM) which is discretized by brick finite element mesh, while in the eddy current free region, the magnetic field intensity H is solved by the boundary element method (BEM) which is discretized by rectangular boundary element mesh. Under the boundary conditions, an algebraic equation group is obtained that only includes J by eliminating H. This method has many advantages over traditional ones, such as fewer variables, more convenient coupling between the FEM and the BEM and wider application to multiply-connected regions. The calculated values of two models are in good agreement with experimental results. This shows the validity of our method.

  6. LORETA current source density for duration mismatch negativity and neuropsychological assessment in early schizophrenia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomohiro Miyanishi

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Patients with schizophrenia elicit cognitive decline from the early phase of the illness. Mismatch negativity (MMN has been shown to be associated with cognitive function. We investigated the current source density of duration mismatch negativity (dMMN, by using low-resolution brain electromagnetic tomography (LORETA, and neuropsychological performance in subjects with early schizophrenia. METHODS: Data were obtained from 20 patients meeting DSM-IV criteria for schizophrenia or schizophreniform disorder, and 20 healthy control (HC subjects. An auditory odd-ball paradigm was used to measure dMMN. Neuropsychological performance was evaluated by the brief assessment of cognition in schizophrenia Japanese version (BACS-J. RESULTS: Patients showed smaller dMMN amplitudes than those in the HC subjects. LORETA current density for dMMN was significantly lower in patients compared to HC subjects, especially in the temporal lobes. dMMN current density in the frontal lobe was positively correlated with working memory performance in patients. CONCLUSIONS: This is the first study to identify brain regions showing smaller dMMN current density in early schizophrenia. Further, poor working memory was associated with decreased dMMN current density in patients. These results are likely to help understand the neural basis for cognitive impairment of schizophrenia.

  7. Induced fermionic charge and current densities in two-dimensional rings

    CERN Document Server

    Bellucci, S; Grigoryan, A Kh

    2016-01-01

    For a massive quantum fermionic field, we investigate the vacuum expectation values (VEVs) of the charge and current densities induced by an external magnetic flux in a two-dimensional circular ring. Both the irreducible representations of the Clifford algebra are considered. On the ring edges the bag (infinite mass) boundary conditions are imposed for the field operator. This leads to the Casimir type effect on the vacuum characteristics. The radial current vanishes. The charge and the azimuthal current are decomposed into the boundary-free and boundary-induced contributions. Both these contributions are odd periodic functions of the magnetic flux with the period equal to the flux quantum. An important feature that distinguishes the VEVs of the charge and current densities from the VEV of the energy density, is their finiteness on the ring edges. The current density is equal to the charge density for the outer edge and has the opposite sign on the inner edge. The VEVs are peaked near the inner edge and, as f...

  8. High Field Emission Current Density from Patterned Carbon Nanotube Field Emitter Arrays with Random Growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khaneja, Mamta; Ghosh, Santanu; Gautam, Seema; Kumar, Prashant; Rawat, J S; Chaudhury, P K; Vankar, V D; Kumar, Vikram

    2015-05-01

    High field emission (FE) current density from carbon nanotube (CNT) arrays grown on lithographically patterned silicon substrates is reported. A typical patterned field emitter array consists of bundles of nanotubes separated by a fixed gap and spread over the entire emission area. Emission performance from such an array having randomly oriented nanotube growth within each bundle is reported for different bundle sizes and separations. One typical sample with aligned CNTs within the bundle is also examined for comparison. It is seen that the current density from an array having random nanotube growth within the bundles is appreciably higher as compared to its aligned counterpart. The influence of structure on FE current densities as revealed by Raman spectroscopy is also seen. It is also observed that current density depends on edge length and increases with the same for all samples under study. Highest current density of -100 mA cm(-2) at an applied field of 5 V/μm is achieved from the random growth patterned sample with a bundle size of 2 μm and spacing of 4 μm between the bundles.

  9. Communication: Near-locality of exchange and correlation density functionals for 1- and 2-electron systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Jianwei; Perdew, John P.; Yang, Zenghui; Peng, Haowei

    2016-05-01

    The uniform electron gas and the hydrogen atom play fundamental roles in condensed matter physics and quantum chemistry. The former has an infinite number of electrons uniformly distributed over the neutralizing positively charged background, and the latter only one electron bound to the proton. The uniform electron gas was used to derive the local spin density approximation to the exchange-correlation functional that undergirds the development of the Kohn-Sham density functional theory. We show here that the ground-state exchange-correlation energies of the hydrogen atom and many other 1- and 2-electron systems are modeled surprisingly well by a different local spin density approximation (LSDA0). LSDA0 is constructed to satisfy exact constraints but agrees surprisingly well with the exact results for a uniform two-electron density in a finite, curved three-dimensional space. We also apply LSDA0 to excited or noded 1-electron densities, where it works less well. Furthermore, we show that the localization of the exact exchange hole for a 1- or 2-electron ground state can be measured by the ratio of the exact exchange energy to its optimal lower bound.

  10. A simple and straightforward expression for curling probe electron density diagnosis in reactive plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arshadi, Ali; Brinkmann, Ralf Peter; Hotta, Masaya; Nakamura, Keiji

    2017-04-01

    Active plasma resonance spectroscopy (APRS) refers to the family of plasma diagnostic methods which utilize the ability of plasmas to resonate at frequencies close to the plasma frequency. APRS operates by exciting the plasma with a weak RF signal by means of a small electric probe. The response of the plasma is recorded by a network analyzer (NA). A mathematical model is applied to derive characteristics like the electron density and the electron temperature. The curling probe is a promising realization of APRS. The curling probe is well-qualified for the local measurement of the electron density in reactive plasmas. This spiral probe resonates in plasma at a larger density dependent frequency than the plasma frequency. This manuscript represents a simple and straightforward expression relating this resonance frequency to the electron density of the plasma. A good agreement is observed between the proposed expression and the results obtained from previous studies and numerical simulations.

  11. Automated determination of electron density from electric field measurements on the Van Allen Probes spacecraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhelavskaya, Irina; Kurth, William; Spasojevic, Maria; Shprits, Yuri

    2016-07-01

    We present the Neural-network-based Upper-hybrid Resonance Determination (NURD) algorithm for automatic inference of the electron number density from plasma wave measurements made onboard NASA's Van Allen Probes mission. A feedforward neural network is developed to determine the upper hybrid resonance frequency, f_{uhr}, from electric field measurements, which is then used to calculate the electron number density. In previous missions, the plasma resonance bands were manually identified, and there have been few attempts to do robust, routine automated detections. We describe the design and implementation of the algorithm and perform an initial analysis of the resulting electron number density distribution obtained by applying NURD to 2.5 years of data collected with the EMFISIS instrumentation suite of the Van Allen Probes mission. Densities obtained by NURD are compared to those obtained by another recently developed automated technique and also to an existing empirical plasmasphere and trough density model.

  12. Variation of fractional electron density fluctuations inside 40 R(sub 0) observed by Ulysses ranging measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woo, Richard; Armstrong, J. W.; Bird, M. K.; Patzold, M.

    1995-01-01

    The first measurements of fractional electron density fluctuations delta-n(sub e)/n(sub e), where delta-n(sub e) is rms electron density fluctuation and n(sub e) is the mean electron density, have been carried out inside 40 R(sub 0) using 1991 Ulysses dual-frequency S- and X-band (13 and 3.6 cm) ranging (time delay) measurements. In the frequency band of approximately 6 x 10(exp -5) - 8 x 10(exp -4) Hz (periods of 20 min to 5 hr), delta-n(sub e)/n(sub e) varies from a high near 20% in the slow wind close to the neutral line to a low of 1% in the fast wind far from the neutral line. For spatial wavenumber K approximately = 1.4 x 10(exp -6)/km (period of 5 hr at 250 km/s), delta-n(sub e)/n(sub e) is essentially independent of heliocentric distance over 0.03-1.0 AU in the slow wind; it is a factor of 30 lower in the fast wind than in the slow wind inside 0.1 AU, but exhibits dramatic growth with heliocentric distance inside 0.3 AU. This latter result reinforces current views of the evolution of MHD turbulence and the association of Alfven waves with high speed streams based on in situ fields and particles measurements beyond 0.3 AU. That regions of enhanced density fluctuations near or above the neutral line coincide with regions of enhanced density confirms previous conclusions that they are the interplanetary manifestation of the heliospheric current sheet and extensions of coronal streamers. While the regions of enhanced density fluctuations lie within those of enhanced density, they have boundaries that are distinctly more abrupt, suggesting the separation of plasma of different nature and origin.

  13. Multipole electron-density modelling of synchrotron powder diffraction data: the case of diamond

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svendsen, H.; Overgaard, J.; Busselez, R.;

    2010-01-01

    Accurate structure factors are extracted from synchrotron powder diffraction data measured on crystalline diamond based on a novel multipole model division of overlapping reflection intensities. The approach limits the spherical-atom bias in structure factors extracted from overlapping powder data...... parameter. This directly exposes a correlation between electron density and thermal parameters even for a light atom such as carbon, and it also underlines that in organic systems proper deconvolution of thermal motion is important for obtaining correct static electron densities....

  14. Critical point representations of electron density maps for the comparison of benzodiazepine-type ligands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leherte, L; Meurice, N; Vercauteren, D P

    2000-01-01

    A procedure for the comparison of three-dimensional electron density distributions is proposed for similarity searches between pharmacological ligands at various levels of crystallographic resolution. First, a graph representation of molecular electron density distributions is generated using a critical point analysis approach. Pairwise as well as multiple comparisons between the obtained graphs of critical points are then carried out using a Monte Carlo/simulated annealing technique, and results are compared with genetic algorithm solutions.

  15. Simulative Design of Pad Structure for High Density Electronic Interconnection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mingyu LI; Chunqing WANG

    2005-01-01

    Solder bridge is a serious defect of solder joints in ultrafine pitch electronic device assemblies. Generation of the solder bridge is closely related to forming process of the solder joints. A three-dimensional model to simulate the formation of the solder bridge of QFP256 (quad flat packaging with 256 leads) is established and numerically calculated to predict the formation shape of the solder joints using surface evolver program. Based on the model, influence of structure of pads printed on circuit board on solder bridging is investigated. The results show that there is a critical solder volume Vc for solder joints to avoid solder bridging, and parameters of the pad size influence the critical solder volume.

  16. A New Measurement of the Electron Density in the Local Interstellar Medium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Brian E.; Linsky, Jeffrey L.

    1997-01-01

    Using the echelle-A grating of the Goddard High-Resolution Spectrograph, we have observed the C II λλ1335, 1336 emission lines of the nearby (d = 13.3 pc) star system Capella (G8 III + G1 III). Interstellar C II absorption features are detected within both stellar emission lines. The ground-state and excited-state C II column densities derived from these absorption lines imply an electron density of ne = 0.11+0.12-0.06 cm-3 in the local interstellar medium (LISM). Unlike previous derivations of ne from Mg II/Mg I ratios, the density suggested by the C II lines is independent of assumptions about ionization equilibrium. Current estimates of the H I density in the LISM are in the range 0.1-0.2 cm-3. The He I/H I ratio toward the white dwarf G191-B2B, which is only 7° from Capella, has been measured to be He I/H I = 0.068-0.082 from the Extreme-Ultraviolet Explorer data. These results indicate hydrogen and helium ionization fractions toward Capella of X(H) = 0.45 +/- 0.25 and X(He) = 0.57 +/- 0.23, respectively, confirming that hydrogen and helium are substantially ionized in the LISM. Based on observations with the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope, obtained at the Space Telescope Science Institute, which is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy Inc., under NASA contract NAS5-26555.

  17. Towards the definition of AMS facies in the deposits of pyroclastic density currents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ort, M.H.; Newkirk, T.T.; Vilas, J.F.; Vazquez, J.A.; Ort, M.H.; Porreca, Massimiliano; Geissman, J.W.

    2014-01-01

    Anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility (AMS) provides a statistically robust technique to characterize the fabrics of deposits of pyroclastic density currents (PDCs). AMS fabrics in two types of pyroclastic deposits (small-volume phreatomagmatic currents in the Hopi Buttes volcanic field, Arizona, USA, and large-volume caldera-forming currents, Caviahue Caldera, Neuquén, Argentina) show similar patterns. Near the vent and in areas of high topographical roughness, AMS depositional fabrics are poorly grouped, with weak lineations and foliations. In a densely welded proximal ignimbrite, this fabric is overprinted by a foliation formed as the rock compacted and deformed. Medial deposits have moderate–strong AMS lineations and foliations. The most distal deposits have strong foliations but weak lineations. Based on these facies and existing models for pyroclastic density currents, deposition in the medial areas occurs from the strongly sheared, high-particle-concentration base of a density-stratified current. In proximal areas and where topography mixes this denser base upwards into the current, deposition occurs rapidly from a current with little uniformity to the shear, in which particles fall and collide in a chaotic fashion. Distal deposits are emplaced by a slowing or stalled current so that the dominant particle motion is vertical, leading to weak lineation and strong foliation.

  18. A novel three-dimensional variant of the watershed transform for segmentation of electron density maps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volkmann, Niels

    2002-01-01

    Electron density maps at moderate resolution are often difficult to interpret due to the lack of recognizable features. This is especially true for electron tomograms that suffer in addition to the resolution limitation from low signal-to-noise ratios. Reliable segmentation of such maps into smaller, manageable units can greatly facilitate interpretation. Here, we present a segmentation approach targeting three-dimensional electron density maps derived by electron microscopy. The approach consists of a novel three-dimensional variant of the immersion-based watershed algorithm. We tested the algorithm on calculated data and applied it to a wide variety of electron density maps ranging from reconstructions of single macromolecules to tomograms of subcellular structures. The results indicate that the algorithm is reliable, efficient, accurate, and applicable to a wide variety of biological problems.

  19. Effects of discharge current and voltage on the high density of metastable helium atoms

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FengXian-Ping; DAndruczyk; BWJames; KTakiyama; SNamba; TOda

    2003-01-01

    Both hollow-cathode and Penning-type discharges were adopted toexcite helium atoms to a metastable state. Experimental data indicate that Penning discharge is more suitable for generating high fractions of metastables in a low-density helium hean for laser-induced fluorescence technique in measuring electric fields at the edge of a plasma. The metastable density increases with increasing helium gas pressure in the range of 1.33×10-2-66.7Pa. The highest metastable density of 3.8×1016m-3 is observed at a static gas pressure of 66.7Pa. An approximately linear relationship between the density of metastable helium atoms and the plasma discharge current is observed. Magnetic field plays a very important role in producing a high density of metastable atoms in Penning discharge.

  20. Effects of discharge current and voltage on the high density of metastable helium atoms

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Feng Xian-Ping(冯贤平); D Andruczyk; B W James; K Takiyama; S Namba; T Oda

    2003-01-01

    Both hollow-cathode and Penning-type discharges were adopted to excite helium atoms to a metastable state.Experimental data indicate that Penning discharge is more suitable for generating high fractions of metastables in a low-density helium beam for laser-induced fluorescence technique in measuring electric fields at the edge of a plasma.The metastable density increases with increasing helium gas pressure in the range of 1.33× 10-2-66.7Pa. The highest metastable density of 3.8 × 1016m-3 is observed at a static gas pressure of 66.7Pa. An approximately linear relationship between the density of metastable helium atoms and the plasma discharge current is observed. Magnetic field plays a very important role in producing a high density of metastable atoms in Penning discharge.

  1. Microstructure characterisation of solid oxide electrolysis cells operated at high current density

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bowen, Jacob R.; Bentzen, Janet Jonna; Chen, Ming;

    High temperature solid oxide cells can be operated either as fuel cells or electrolysis cells for efficient power generation or production of hydrogen from steam or synthesis gas (H2 + CO) from steam and CO2 respectively. When operated under harsh conditions, they often exhibit microstructural......, microstructure evolution of the Ni-yttria stabilized zirconia (YSZ) is followed as a function of galvanostatic steam electrolysis testing at current densities between -0.5 and -1.0 A cm-2 for periods of up to 750 hours at 800 °C. The volume fraction and size of the percolating Ni particles was statistically...... quantified using the mean linear intercept method as a function of current density and correlated to increases in serial resistance. The above structural changes are then compared in terms of electrode degradation observed during the co-electrolysis of steam and CO2 at current densities up to -1.5 A cm-2...

  2. Effect of strain on the critical current density of Bi-2223 thick films sandwiched between Ag sheets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jia, J.H. (Academia Sinica, Hefei (China). Inst. of Solid State Physics); Kong, Q.P. (Academia Sinica, Hefei (China). Inst. of Solid State Physics); Wang, S.X. (Academia Sinica, Hefei, Anhui (China). Inst. of Plasma Physics); Han, H.M. (Academia Sinica, Hefei, Anhui (China). Inst. of Plasma Physics)

    1994-08-16

    The tapes of (Bi, Pb)[sub 2]Sr[sub 2]Ca[sub 2]Cu[sub 3]O[sub x] (Bi-2223) thick film sandwiched between Ag sheets are known to have very high J[sub c]. In this note, the stress-strain behaviour and the strain dependence of critical current density of the Ag/Bi-2223/Ag tapes are investigated. The microstructure of superconducting thick films subjected to various amounts of deformation was examined with a scanning electron microscope (SEM). (orig.)

  3. On the exact formulation of multi-configuration density-functional theory: electron density versus orbitals occupation

    CERN Document Server

    Fromager, Emmanuel

    2014-01-01

    The exact formulation of multi-configuration density-functional theory (DFT) is discussed in this work. As an alternative to range-separated methods, where electron correlation effects are split in the coordinate space, the combination of Configuration Interaction methods with orbital occupation functionals is explored at the formal level through the separation of correlation effects in the orbital space. When applied to model Hamiltonians, this approach leads to an exact Site-Occupation Embedding Theory (SOET). An adiabatic connection expression is derived for the complementary bath functional and a comparison with Density Matrix Embedding Theory (DMET) is made. Illustrative results are given for the simple two-site Hubbard model. SOET is then applied to a quantum chemical Hamiltonian, thus leading to an exact Complete Active Space Site-Occupation Functional Theory (CASSOFT) where active electrons are correlated explicitly within the CAS and the remaining contributions to the correlation energy are described...

  4. Excitation energies with linear response density matrix functional theory along the dissociation coordinate of an electron-pair bond in N-electron systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Meer, R; Gritsenko, O V; Baerends, E J

    2014-01-14

    Time dependent density matrix functional theory in its adiabatic linear response formulation delivers exact excitation energies ωα and oscillator strengths fα for two-electron systems if extended to the so-called phase including natural orbital (PINO) theory. The Löwdin-Shull expression for the energy of two-electron systems in terms of the natural orbitals and their phases affords in this case an exact phase-including natural orbital functional (PILS), which is non-primitive (contains other than just J and K integrals). In this paper, the extension of the PILS functional to N-electron systems is investigated. With the example of an elementary primitive NO functional (BBC1) it is shown that current density matrix functional theory ground state functionals, which were designed to produce decent approximations to the total energy, fail to deliver a qualitatively correct structure of the (inverse) response function, due to essential deficiencies in the reconstruction of the two-body reduced density matrix (2RDM). We now deduce essential features of an N-electron functional from a wavefunction Ansatz: The extension of the two-electron Löwdin-Shull wavefunction to the N-electron case informs about the phase information. In this paper, applications of this extended Löwdin-Shull (ELS) functional are considered for the simplest case, ELS(1): one (dissociating) two-electron bond in the field of occupied (including core) orbitals. ELS(1) produces high quality ωα(R) curves along the bond dissociation coordinate R for the molecules LiH, Li2, and BH with the two outer valence electrons correlated. All of these results indicate that response properties are much more sensitive to deficiencies in the reconstruction of the 2RDM than the ground state energy, since derivatives of the functional with respect to both the NOs and the occupation numbers need to be accurate.

  5. Excitation energies with linear response density matrix functional theory along the dissociation coordinate of an electron-pair bond in N-electron systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meer, R. van; Gritsenko, O. V. [Faculty of Exact Sciences, Theoretical Chemistry, VU University, Amsterdam (Netherlands); WCU Program, Dep. of Chemistry, Pohang Univ. of Science and Techn., Pohang (Korea, Republic of); Baerends, E. J. [Faculty of Exact Sciences, Theoretical Chemistry, VU University, Amsterdam (Netherlands); WCU Program, Dep. of Chemistry, Pohang Univ. of Science and Techn., Pohang (Korea, Republic of); Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, King Abdulaziz University, Jeddah 21589 (Saudi Arabia)

    2014-01-14

    Time dependent density matrix functional theory in its adiabatic linear response formulation delivers exact excitation energies ω{sub α} and oscillator strengths f{sub α} for two-electron systems if extended to the so-called phase including natural orbital (PINO) theory. The Löwdin-Shull expression for the energy of two-electron systems in terms of the natural orbitals and their phases affords in this case an exact phase-including natural orbital functional (PILS), which is non-primitive (contains other than just J and K integrals). In this paper, the extension of the PILS functional to N-electron systems is investigated. With the example of an elementary primitive NO functional (BBC1) it is shown that current density matrix functional theory ground state functionals, which were designed to produce decent approximations to the total energy, fail to deliver a qualitatively correct structure of the (inverse) response function, due to essential deficiencies in the reconstruction of the two-body reduced density matrix (2RDM). We now deduce essential features of an N-electron functional from a wavefunction Ansatz: The extension of the two-electron Löwdin-Shull wavefunction to the N-electron case informs about the phase information. In this paper, applications of this extended Löwdin-Shull (ELS) functional are considered for the simplest case, ELS(1): one (dissociating) two-electron bond in the field of occupied (including core) orbitals. ELS(1) produces high quality ω{sub α}(R) curves along the bond dissociation coordinate R for the molecules LiH, Li{sub 2}, and BH with the two outer valence electrons correlated. All of these results indicate that response properties are much more sensitive to deficiencies in the reconstruction of the 2RDM than the ground state energy, since derivatives of the functional with respect to both the NOs and the occupation numbers need to be accurate.

  6. Effect of preionization, fluorine concentration, and current density on the discharge uniformity in F2 excimer laser gas mixtures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathew, D.; Bastiaens, H. M. J.; Boller, K. J.; Peters, P. J. M.

    2007-08-01

    The discharge homogeneity in F2-based excimer laser gas mixtures and its dependence on various key parameters, such as the degree of preionization, preionization delay time, F2 concentration and current density, is investigated in a small x-ray preionized discharge chamber. The spatial and temporal evolution of the discharges is monitored by taking photographs of the discharge fluorescence with a fast intensified CCD camera. It is found that a preionization electron density of about 107 cm-3 bar-1 is sufficient to initiate a streamer-free homogeneous discharge in gas mixtures of helium and fluorine with multiatmospheric gas pressure. The accompanying optimum time delay between the application of the x-ray pulse and voltage across the discharge electrodes is determined to be about 20 ns. It is shown that in spite of these optimum initial conditions, a homogeneous glow discharge eventually transforms into an inhomogeneous discharge containing numerous filaments. Our experiments show that the higher the initial F2 concentration, the initial current density or the pump power density, the shorter the time interval over which the discharge stays homogeneous. By a quantitative characterization and defining a detailed measure of the observed discharge inhomogeneity we find that halogen depletion, as suggested from the theory, is responsible for the temporal instability of discharges in such laser gas mixtures, as the experimental results are in good agreement with the theory on the halogen depletion instability mechanism.

  7. Path Integrals for Electronic Densities, Reactivity Indices, and Localization Functions in Quantum Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mihai V. Putz

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available The density matrix theory, the ancestor of density functional theory, provides the immediate framework for Path Integral (PI development, allowing the canonical density be extended for the many-electronic systems through the density functional closure relationship. Yet, the use of path integral formalism for electronic density prescription presents several advantages: assures the inner quantum mechanical description of the system by parameterized paths; averages the quantum fluctuations; behaves as the propagator for time-space evolution of quantum information; resembles Schrödinger equation; allows quantum statistical description of the system through partition function computing. In this framework, four levels of path integral formalism were presented: the Feynman quantum mechanical, the semiclassical, the Feynman-Kleinert effective classical, and the Fokker-Planck non-equilibrium ones. In each case the density matrix or/and the canonical density were rigorously defined and presented. The practical specializations for quantum free and harmonic motions, for statistical high and low temperature limits, the smearing justification for the Bohr’s quantum stability postulate with the paradigmatic Hydrogen atomic excursion, along the quantum chemical calculation of semiclassical electronegativity and hardness, of chemical action and Mulliken electronegativity, as well as by the Markovian generalizations of Becke-Edgecombe electronic focalization functions – all advocate for the reliability of assuming PI formalism of quantum mechanics as a versatile one, suited for analytically and/or computationally modeling of a variety of fundamental physical and chemical reactivity concepts characterizing the (density driving many-electronic systems.

  8. Density Gradient Stabilization of Electron Temperature Gradient Driven Turbulence in a Spherical Tokamak

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ren, Y; Mazzucato, E; Guttenfelder, W; Bell, R E; Domier, C W; LeBlanc, B P; Lee, K C; Luhmann Jr, N C; Smith, D R

    2011-03-21

    In this letter we report the first clear experimental observation of density gradient stabilization of electron temperature gradient driven turbulence in a fusion plasma. It is observed that longer wavelength modes, k⊥ρs ≤10, are most stabilized by density gradient, and the stabilization is accompanied by about a factor of two decrease in the plasma effective thermal diffusivity.

  9. Synthesis of thoria nano-particles at low temperature through base electrogeneration on steel 316L surface: Effect of current density

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yousefi, Taher; Torab-Mostaedi, Meisam; Mobtaker, Hossein Ghasemi; Keshtkar, Ali Reza

    2016-10-01

    The strategy developed in this study, offers significant advantages (simplicity and cleanness of method and also a product purity and new morphology of the product) over the conventional routes for the synthesis of ThO2 nanostructure. The effect of current density on morphology was studied. The synthesized powder was characterized by means of Powder X-ray Diffraction (PXRD), Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM, Phillips EM 2085) Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) and Fourier Transform Infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy. The results show that the current density has a great effect on the morphology of the samples. The average size of the particles decreases as the applied current density increases and the average size of the samples decreases from 50 to 15 nm when the current density increases from 2 to 5 mA cm-2.

  10. Corrosion current density prediction in reinforced concrete by imperialist competitive algorithm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadowski, Lukasz; Nikoo, Mehdi

    2014-01-01

    This study attempted to predict corrosion current density in concrete using artificial neural networks (ANN) combined with imperialist competitive algorithm (ICA) used to optimize weights of ANN. For that reason, temperature, AC resistivity over the steel bar, AC resistivity remote from the steel bar, and the DC resistivity over the steel bar are considered as input parameters and corrosion current density as output parameter. The ICA-ANN model has been compared with the genetic algorithm to evaluate its accuracy in three phases of training, testing, and prediction. The results showed that the ICA-ANN model enjoys more ability, flexibility, and accuracy.

  11. Limitations of absolute current densities derived from the Semel & Skumanich method

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    Semel and Skumanich proposed a method to obtain the absolute electric current density, |Jz|, without disambiguation of 180° in the transverse field directions. The advantage of the method is that the uncertainty in the determination of the ambiguity in the magnetic azimuth is removed. Here, we investigate the limits of the calculation when applied to a numerical MHD model. We have found that the combination of changes in the magnetic azimuth with vanishing horizontal field component leads to errors, where electric current densities are often strong. Where errors occur, the calculation gives |Jz| too small by factors typically 1.2 - 2.0.

  12. Assessment studies on the inversion of satellite to satellite electron content to obtain electron density profiles in the ionosphere

    CERN Document Server

    Hochegger, G P

    2000-01-01

    The electron content data, obtained by satellite-to-satellite occultations of radio signals can lead to height profiles of electron density by discrete inversion. Since there is no possibility to verify such profiles by means of other measurements (practically never measurements at the same time and same location) it was necessary to simulate occultation scenarios by means of an ionosphere model to obtain a large number of comparisons sufficient for investigations on a statistical basis. The obtained electron contents were inverted and compared with electron density height profiles, obtained with the same ionospheric model for the occultation point. The differences between these profiles were investigated (difference between the F2-peak maxima, the height of the maxima, the shape of the topside and bottom side ionosphere). Since simulations were done for chosen locations (250 randomly spread on the globe) for every month and every second hour and for two solar activity levels (HSA and LSA), a whole year was '...

  13. Modelling of Current Density Redistribution in Hollow Needle to Plate Electrical Discharge Designed for Ozone Generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kriha, Vitezslav

    2003-10-01

    Non-thermal plasma of atmospheric pressure electrical discharges in flowing air can be used to generation of ozone. We have been observed two modes of discharge burning in a hollow needle to plane electrodes configuration studied in the ozone generation experiments: A low current diffuse mode is characterized by increasing of the ozone production with the discharge current; a high current filamentary mode is disadvantageous for the ozone generation(the ozone production decreases when the discharge current increases). A possible interpretation of this effect is following: The filamentary mode discharge current density is redistributed and high current densities in filaments cores lead to degradation of the ozone generation. Local fields in the discharge can be modified by charged metallic and/or dielectric components (passive modulators) in the discharge space. An interactive numerical model has been developed for this purpose. This model is based on Ferguson's polynomial objects for both the discharge chamber scene modelling and the discharge fields analyzing. This approach allows intuitive modifications of modulators shapes and positions in 3D scene followed by quantitative comparison of the current density distribution with previous configurations.

  14. The electrical current density vector in the inner penumbra of a Sunspot

    CERN Document Server

    Puschmann, K G; Pillet, V Martínez

    2010-01-01

    We determine the entire electrical current density vector in a geometrical 3D volume of the inner penumbra of a sunspot from an inversion of spectropolarimetric data obtained with Hinode/SP. Significant currents are seen to wrap around the hotter, more elevated regions with lower and more horizontal magnetic field that harbor strong upflows and radial outflows (the intraspines). The horizontal component of the current density vector is 3-4 times larger than the vertical; nearly all previous studies only obtain the vertical component and thus strongly underestimate the current density. The current density and the magnetic field vectors form an angle of about 20 degrees. The plasma beta at the 0 km level is larger than 1 in the intraspines and is one order of magnitude lower in the background component of the penumbra (spines). At the 200 km level, the plasma beta is below 0.3 nearly everywhere. The plasma beta surface as well as the surface optical depth unity are very corrugated. At the borders of intraspines...

  15. first-principle calculation of electrons charge density in the diamond ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    DR. AMINU

    In a typical modern electronic structure calculation, the charge density is obtained from a certain ... normalized Slater atomic orbital for multi-electron atoms and ions. Since the spherical .... are used as a first approximation (John and Stefan, 2003). 124 ..... Dalton, and Thomas R. Kochler (Plenum Press, New. York) p. 183.

  16. Description of correlated densities for few-electron atoms by simple functional forms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Porras, I.; Arias de Saavedra, F. [Univ. de Granada (Spain). Dept. de Fisica Moderna

    1999-02-20

    Simple analytical functional forms for the electron density of two- and three-electron atoms which reproduce fairly the correlated (exact) values are presented. The procedure is based on the fitting of an auxiliary f(r) function which has adequate properties for this purpose and can be extended to more complex atoms.

  17. Influence of carrier density on the electronic cooling channels of bilayer graphene

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Limmer, T.; Houtepen, A.J.; Niggebaum, A.; Tautz, R.; Da Como, E.

    2011-01-01

    We study the electronic cooling dynamics in a single flake of bilayer graphene by femtosecond transient absorption probing the photon-energy range 0.25–1.3 eV. From the transients, we extract the carrier cooling curves for different initial temperatures and densities of the photoexcited electrons an

  18. Large Eddy Simulations of Compositional Density Currents Flowing Over a Mobile Bed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kyrousi, Foteini; Zordan, Jessica; Leonardi, Alessandro; Juez, Carmelo; Zanello, Francesca; Armenio, Vincenzo; Franca, Mário J.

    2017-04-01

    Density currents are a ubiquitous phenomenon caused by natural events or anthropogenic activities, and play an important role in the global sediment cycle; they are agents of long distance sediment transport in lakes, seas and oceans. Density gradients induced by salinity, temperature differences, or by the presence of suspended material are all possible triggers of a current. Such flows can travel long distances while eroding or depositing bed materials. This can provoke rapid topological changes, which makes the estimation of their transport capacity of prime interest for environmental engineering. Despite their relevance, field data regarding their dynamics is limited due to density currents scattered and unpredictable occurrence in nature. For this reason, laboratory experiments and numerical simulations have been a preferred way to investigate sediment transport processes associated to density currents. The study of entrainment and deposition processes requires detailed data of velocities spatial and temporal distributions in the boundary layer and bed shear stress, which are troublesome to obtain in laboratory. Motivated by this, we present 3D wall-resolved Large Eddy Simulations (LES) of density currents generated by lock-exchange. The currents travel over a smooth flat bed, which includes a section composed by erodible fine sediment susceptible of eroding. Several sediment sizes and initial density gradients are considered. The grid is set to resolve the velocity field within the boundary layer of the current (a tiny fraction of the total height), which in turn allows to obtain predictions of the bed shear stress. The numerical outcomes are compared with experimental data obtained with an analogous laboratory setting. In laboratory experiments salinity was chosen for generating the initial density gradient in order to facilitate the identification of entrained particles, since salt does not hinder the possibility to track suspended particles. Under these

  19. Microstructures and properties of zirconium-702 irradiated by high current pulsed electron beam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Shen [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Jiangsu University, Zhenjiang 212013 (China); Cai, Jie [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Jiangsu University, Zhenjiang 212013 (China); Engineering Institute of Advanced Manufacturing and Modern Equipment Technology, Jiangsu University, Zhenjiang 212013 (China); Lv, Peng; Zhang, Conglin; Huang, Wei [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Jiangsu University, Zhenjiang 212013 (China); Guan, Qingfeng, E-mail: guanqf@mail.ujs.edu.cn [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Jiangsu University, Zhenjiang 212013 (China)

    2015-09-01

    Highlights: • Zirconium-702 irradiated by high current pulsed electron beam was investigated. • Irradiated surface was melted and martensitic phase transformation occurred. • High density dislocations and deformation twins were formed in melted layer. • Micropores and ultrafine structures were also obtained on the irradiated surface. • Microhardness and corrosion resistance were improved after HCPEB irradiation. - Abstract: The microstructure, hardness and corrosion resistance of zirconium-702 before and after high-current pulsed electron beam (HCPEB) irradiation have been investigated. The microstructure evolution and surface morphologies of the samples were characterized by using X-ray diffraction (XRD), optical microscopy (OM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The experimental results indicate that the sample surface was melted after HCPEB irradiation, and martensitic phase transformation occurred. Besides, two kinds of craters as well as ultrafine structures were obtained in the melted layer. TEM observations suggest that high density dislocations and deformation twins were formed after HCPEB irradiation. With the increasing of pulses, microhardness of the irradiated samples was increased from the initial 178 Hv to 254 Hv. The corrosion resistance was tested by using electrode impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and potentiodynamic polarization curves. Electrochemical results show that, after HCPEB irradiation, all the samples had better corrosion resistance in 1 mol HNO{sub 3} solution compared to the initial one, among which the 5-pulsed sample owned the best corrosion resistance. Ultrafine structures, martensitic phase transformation, surface porosities, dislocations and deformation twins are believed to be the dominant reasons for the improvement of the hardness and corrosion resistance.

  20. Determination of the electronics transfer function for current transient measurements

    CERN Document Server

    Scharf, Christian

    2014-01-01

    We describe a straight-forward method for determining the transfer function of the readout of a sensor for the situation in which the current transient of the sensor can be precisely simulated. The method relies on the convolution theorem of Fourier transforms. The specific example is a planar silicon pad diode connected with a 50 $\\Omega $ cable to an amplifier followed by a 5 GS/s sampling oscilloscope. The charge carriers in the sensor were produced by picosecond lasers with light of wavelengths of 675 and 1060 nm. The transfer function is determined from the 1060 nm data with the pad diode biased at 1000 V. It is shown that the simulated sensor response convoluted with this transfer function provides an excellent description of the measured transients for the laser light of both wavelengths, at voltages 50 V above the depletion voltage of about 90 V up to the maximum applied voltage of 1000 V. The method has been developed for the precise measurement of the dependence of the drift velocity of electrons an...

  1. A high current, short pulse electron source for wakefield accelerators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ho, Ching-Hung

    1992-12-31

    Design studies for the generation of a high current, short pulse electron source for the Argonne Wakefield Accelerator are presented. An L-band laser photocathode rf gun cavity is designed using the computer code URMEL to maximize the electric field on the cathode surface for fixed frequency and rf input power. A new technique using a curved incoming laser wavefront to minimize the space charge effect near the photocathode is studied. A preaccelerator with large iris to minimize wakefield effects is used to boost the drive beam to a useful energy of around 20 MeV for wakefield acceleration experiments. Focusing in the photocathode gun and the preaccelerator is accomplished with solenoids. Beam dynamics simulations throughout the preaccelerator are performed using particle simulation codes TBCI-SF and PARMELA. An example providing a useful set of operation parameters for the Argonne Wakefield Accelerator is given. The effects of the sagitta of the curved beam and laser amplitude and timing jitter effects are discussed. Measurement results of low rf power level bench tests and a high power test for the gun cavity are presented and discussed.

  2. A high current, short pulse electron source for wakefield accelerators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ho, Ching-Hung.

    1992-01-01

    Design studies for the generation of a high current, short pulse electron source for the Argonne Wakefield Accelerator are presented. An L-band laser photocathode rf gun cavity is designed using the computer code URMEL to maximize the electric field on the cathode surface for fixed frequency and rf input power. A new technique using a curved incoming laser wavefront to minimize the space charge effect near the photocathode is studied. A preaccelerator with large iris to minimize wakefield effects is used to boost the drive beam to a useful energy of around 20 MeV for wakefield acceleration experiments. Focusing in the photocathode gun and the preaccelerator is accomplished with solenoids. Beam dynamics simulations throughout the preaccelerator are performed using particle simulation codes TBCI-SF and PARMELA. An example providing a useful set of operation parameters for the Argonne Wakefield Accelerator is given. The effects of the sagitta of the curved beam and laser amplitude and timing jitter effects are discussed. Measurement results of low rf power level bench tests and a high power test for the gun cavity are presented and discussed.

  3. On extending Kohn-Sham density functionals to systems with fractional number of electrons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chen; Lu, Jianfeng; Yang, Weitao

    2017-06-07

    We analyze four ways of formulating the Kohn-Sham (KS) density functionals with a fractional number of electrons, through extending the constrained search space from the Kohn-Sham and the generalized Kohn-Sham (GKS) non-interacting v-representable density domain for integer systems to four different sets of densities for fractional systems. In particular, these density sets are (I) ensemble interacting N-representable densities, (II) ensemble non-interacting N-representable densities, (III) non-interacting densities by the Janak construction, and (IV) non-interacting densities whose composing orbitals satisfy the Aufbau occupation principle. By proving the equivalence of the underlying first order reduced density matrices associated with these densities, we show that sets (I), (II), and (III) are equivalent, and all reduce to the Janak construction. Moreover, for functionals with the ensemble v-representable assumption at the minimizer, (III) reduces to (IV) and thus justifies the previous use of the Aufbau protocol within the (G)KS framework in the study of the ground state of fractional electron systems, as defined in the grand canonical ensemble at zero temperature. By further analyzing the Aufbau solution for different density functional approximations (DFAs) in the (G)KS scheme, we rigorously prove that there can be one and only one fractional occupation for the Hartree Fock functional, while there can be multiple fractional occupations for general DFAs in the presence of degeneracy. This has been confirmed by numerical calculations using the local density approximation as a representative of general DFAs. This work thus clarifies important issues on density functional theory calculations for fractional electron systems.

  4. Effect of q-nonextensive parameter and saturation time on electron density steepening in electron-positron-ion plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashemzadeh, M.

    2015-11-01

    The effect of q-nonextensive parameter and saturation time on the electron density steepening in electron-positron-ion plasmas is studied by particle in cell method. Phase space diagrams show that the size of the holes, and consequently, the number of trapped particles strongly depends on the q-parameter and saturation time. Furthermore, the mechanism of the instability and exchange of energy between electron-positron and electric field is explained by the profiles of the energy density. Moreover, it is found that the q-parameter, saturation time, and electron and positron velocities affect the nonlinear evolution of the electron density which leads to the steepening of its structure. The q-nonextensive parameter or degree of nonextensivity is the relation between temperature gradient and potential energy of the system. Therefore, the deviation of q-parameter from unity indicates the degree of inhomogeneity of temperature or deviation from equilibrium. Finally, using the kinetic theory, a generalized q-dispersion relation is presented for electron-positron-ion plasma systems. It is found that the simulation results in the linear regime are in good agreement with the growth rate results obtained by the kinetic theory.

  5. Validation of Ionosonde Electron Density Reconstruction Algorithms with IONOLAB-RAY in Central Europe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gok, Gokhan; Mosna, Zbysek; Arikan, Feza; Arikan, Orhan; Erdem, Esra

    2016-07-01

    Ionospheric observation is essentially accomplished by specialized radar systems called ionosondes. The time delay between the transmitted and received signals versus frequency is measured by the ionosondes and the received signals are processed to generate ionogram plots, which show the time delay or reflection height of signals with respect to transmitted frequency. The critical frequencies of ionospheric layers and virtual heights, that provide useful information about ionospheric structurecan be extracted from ionograms . Ionograms also indicate the amount of variability or disturbances in the ionosphere. With special inversion algorithms and tomographical methods, electron density profiles can also be estimated from the ionograms. Although structural pictures of ionosphere in the vertical direction can be observed from ionosonde measurements, some errors may arise due to inaccuracies that arise from signal propagation, modeling, data processing and tomographic reconstruction algorithms. Recently IONOLAB group (www.ionolab.org) developed a new algorithm for effective and accurate extraction of ionospheric parameters and reconstruction of electron density profile from ionograms. The electron density reconstruction algorithm applies advanced optimization techniques to calculate parameters of any existing analytical function which defines electron density with respect to height using ionogram measurement data. The process of reconstructing electron density with respect to height is known as the ionogram scaling or true height analysis. IONOLAB-RAY algorithm is a tool to investigate the propagation path and parameters of HF wave in the ionosphere. The algorithm models the wave propagation using ray representation under geometrical optics approximation. In the algorithm , the structural ionospheric characteristics arerepresented as realistically as possible including anisotropicity, inhomogenity and time dependence in 3-D voxel structure. The algorithm is also used

  6. A unifying probabilistic Bayesian approach to derive electron density from MRI for radiation therapy treatment planning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sudhan Reddy Gudur, Madhu; Hara, Wendy; Le, Quynh-Thu; Wang, Lei; Xing, Lei; Li, Ruijiang

    2014-11-01

    MRI significantly improves the accuracy and reliability of target delineation in radiation therapy for certain tumors due to its superior soft tissue contrast compared to CT. A treatment planning process with MRI as the sole imaging modality will eliminate systematic CT/MRI co-registration errors, reduce cost and radiation exposure, and simplify clinical workflow. However, MRI lacks the key electron density information necessary for accurate dose calculation and generating reference images for patient setup. The purpose of this work is to develop a unifying method to derive electron density from standard T1-weighted MRI. We propose to combine both intensity and geometry information into a unifying probabilistic Bayesian framework for electron density mapping. For each voxel, we compute two conditional probability density functions (PDFs) of electron density given its: (1) T1-weighted MRI intensity, and (2) geometry in a reference anatomy, obtained by deformable image registration between the MRI of the atlas and test patient. The two conditional PDFs containing intensity and geometry information are combined into a unifying posterior PDF, whose mean value corresponds to the optimal electron density value under the mean-square error criterion. We evaluated the algorithm’s accuracy of electron density mapping and its ability to detect bone in the head for eight patients, using an additional patient as the atlas or template. Mean absolute HU error between the estimated and true CT, as well as receiver operating characteristics for bone detection (HU > 200) were calculated. The performance was compared with a global intensity approach based on T1 and no density correction (set whole head to water). The proposed technique significantly reduced the errors in electron density estimation, with a mean absolute HU error of 126, compared with 139 for deformable registration (p = 2  ×  10-4), 283 for the intensity approach (p = 2  ×  10-6) and 282 without density

  7. A unifying probabilistic Bayesian approach to derive electron density from MRI for radiation therapy treatment planning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gudur, Madhu Sudhan Reddy; Hara, Wendy; Le, Quynh-Thu; Wang, Lei; Xing, Lei; Li, Ruijiang

    2014-11-07

    MRI significantly improves the accuracy and reliability of target delineation in radiation therapy for certain tumors due to its superior soft tissue contrast compared to CT. A treatment planning process with MRI as the sole imaging modality will eliminate systematic CT/MRI co-registration errors, reduce cost and radiation exposure, and simplify clinical workflow. However, MRI lacks the key electron density information necessary for accurate dose calculation and generating reference images for patient setup. The purpose of this work is to develop a unifying method to derive electron density from standard T1-weighted MRI. We propose to combine both intensity and geometry information into a unifying probabilistic Bayesian framework for electron density mapping. For each voxel, we compute two conditional probability density functions (PDFs) of electron density given its: (1) T1-weighted MRI intensity, and (2) geometry in a reference anatomy, obtained by deformable image registration between the MRI of the atlas and test patient. The two conditional PDFs containing intensity and geometry information are combined into a unifying posterior PDF, whose mean value corresponds to the optimal electron density value under the mean-square error criterion. We evaluated the algorithm's accuracy of electron density mapping and its ability to detect bone in the head for eight patients, using an additional patient as the atlas or template. Mean absolute HU error between the estimated and true CT, as well as receiver operating characteristics for bone detection (HU > 200) were calculated. The performance was compared with a global intensity approach based on T1 and no density correction (set whole head to water). The proposed technique significantly reduced the errors in electron density estimation, with a mean absolute HU error of 126, compared with 139 for deformable registration (p = 2  ×  10(-4)), 283 for the intensity approach (p = 2  ×  10(-6)) and 282 without density

  8. Expanding the reduced-current approach for thermoelectric generators to achieve higher volumetric power density

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wijesooriyage, Waruna Dissanayaka; Rosendahl, Lasse

    2015-01-01

    Thermoelectrics are candidate niche electrical generator devices for energy management. At present, scientists are more focused on thermoelectric (TE) material development, but the TE module design procedure is still in a relatively virgin state. One of the most well-known methods is the reduced...... current approach (RCA) for TE module design, where the same current is induced through the p and n legs of the thermoelectric generator (TEG). The current density of each element is manipulated by changing the area of both legs. This technique leads to a TE module architecture based on the most efficient...... configuration of both p and n legs. In the current paper, we apply an extended version of this technique, to show how a TE module with a higher volumetric power density can be designed, compared to the original RCA. Our studies indicate that for some combinations of p and n material properties, optima yielding...

  9. Effect of current density on distribution coefficient of solute at solid-liquid interface

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    常国威; 王自东; 吴春京; 胡汉起

    2003-01-01

    When current passes through the solid-liquid interface, the growth rate of crystal, solid-liquid interfaceenergy and radius of curvature at dendritic tip will change. Based on this fact, the theoretical relation between thedistribution of solute at solid-liquid interface and current density was established, and the effect of current on thedistribution coefficient of solute through effecting the rate of crystal growth, the solid-liquid interface energy and theradius of curvature at the dendritic tip was discussed. The results show that as the current density increases, thedistribution coefficient of solute tends to rise in a whole, and when the former is larger than about 400 A/cm2 , thelatter varies significantly.

  10. The effect of electron beam pitch angle and density gradient on solar type III radio bursts

    CERN Document Server

    Pechhacker, Roman

    2012-01-01

    1.5D Particle-In-Cell simulations of a hot, low density electron beam injected into magnetized, maxwellian plasma were used to further explore the alternative non-gyrotropic beam driven electromagnetic emission mechanism, first studied in Tsiklauri (2011). Variation of beam injection angle and background density gradient showed that the emission process is caused by the perpendicular component of the beam injection current, whereas the parallel component only produces Langmuir waves, which play no role in the generation of EM waves in our mechanism. Particular emphasis was put on the case, where the beam is injected perpendicularly to the background magnetic field, as this turned off any electrostatic wave generation along the field and left a purely electromagnetic signal in the perpendicular components. The simulations establish the following key findings: i) Initially waves at a few w_ce/gamma are excited, mode converted and emitted at w_pe ii) The emission intensity along the beam axis is proportional to ...

  11. [Heart current density as the most important biological parameter of electrocution in the bathtub].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fechner, G; Brinkmann, B; Heckmann, M

    1990-01-01

    The most important factor during electrocution in a bathtub is the amount of current flowing through a body, not the amount of voltage. A method of measurement is introduced which--under simulation of various electrical situations--provides the possibility to measure the current flowing through the heart and to determine it's direction and density in the tissue. Hereby a ranking of the different factors influencing electrocution can be set up.

  12. Dependence of critical current density on crystalline direction in thin YBCO films

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Paturi, P.; Peurla, M.; Raittila, J.

    2005-01-01

    The dependence of critical current density (J(c)) on the angle between the current direction and the (100) direction in the ab-plane of thin YBCO films deposited on (001)-SrTiO3 from natiocrystalline and microcrystalline targets is studied using magneto-optical microscopy. In the films made from ...... indicating that in addition to linear defects also the twin boundaries are very important flux pinning sites. (c) 2005 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved....

  13. A mathematical model of the current density distribution in electrochemical cells - AUTHORS’ REVIEW

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    PREDRAG M. ŽIVKOVIĆ

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available An approach based on the equations of electrochemical kinetics for the estimation of the current density distribution in electrochemical cells is presented. This approach was employed for a theoretical explanation of the phenomena of the edge and corner effects. The effects of the geometry of the system, the kinetic parameters of the cathode reactions and the resistivity of the solution are also discussed. A procedure for a complete analysis of the current distribution in electrochemical cells is presented.

  14. Investigation of the Electronic Structure of Solid Density Plasmas by X-Ray Scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gregori, G; Glenzer, S H; Forest, F J; Kuhlbrodt, S; Redmer, R; Faussurier, G; Blancard, C; Renaudin, P; Landen, O L

    2003-05-19

    We present an improved analytical expression for the x-ray dynamic structure factor from a dense plasma which includes the effects of weakly bound electrons. This result can be applied to describe scattering from low to moderate Z plasmas, and it covers the entire range of plasma conditions that can be found in inertial confinement fusion experiments, from ideal to degenerate up to moderately coupled systems. We use our theory to interpret x-ray scattering experiments from solid density carbon plasma and to extract accurate measurements of electron temperature, electron density and charge state. We use our experimental results to validate various equation-of-state models for carbon plasmas.

  15. Electronic Structure Measurement of Solid Density Plasmas using X-Ray Scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gregori, G; Glenzer, S H; Rogers, F J; Landen, O L; Blancard, C; Faussurier, G; Renaudin, P; Kuhlbrodt, S; Redmer, R

    2003-08-23

    We present an improved analytical expression for the x-ray dynamic structure factor from a dense plasma which includes the effects of weakly bound electrons. This result can be applied to describe scattering from low to moderate Z plasmas, and it covers the entire range of plasma conditions that can be found in inertial confinement fusion experiments, from ideal to degenerate up to moderately coupled systems. We use our theory to interpret x-ray scattering experiments from solid density carbon plasma and to extract accurate measurements of electron temperature, electron density and charge state. We use our experimental results to validate various equation-of-state models for carbon plasmas.

  16. Density of unoccupied electronic states of vapor-deposited films of dioctyl-substituted and diphenyl-substituted perylenedicarboximides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komolov, A. S.; Lazneva, E. F.; Gerasimova, N. B.; Panina, Yu. A.; Baramygin, A. V.; Zashikhin, G. D.; Pshenichnyuk, S. A.

    2017-02-01

    The results of the investigation of the density of unoccupied electronic states (DOUS) in the energy range from 5 to 20 eV above the Fermi level ( E F) in dioctyl-substituted perylenedicarboximide (PTCDI-C8) and diphenyl-substituted perylenedicarboximide (PTCDI-Ph) ultrathin films have been presented. The experimental results have been obtained from measurements of the secondary low-energy electron current with the use of the total current spectroscopy (TCS) technique. A theoretical analysis has been performed, including the density functional theory calculation of the energies and spatial distribution of the orbitals of the molecules under investigation and the subsequent scaling of the calculated orbital energies according to the procedure well-proven previously in studies of small conjugated organic molecules. It has been found that, for each of the two types of the studied films, at energies below 8 eV above the Fermi level E F, there are two main maxima of the density of unoccupied electronic states predominantly formed by the π*-orbitals of the molecules. The higher-lying maxima have essentially a σ*-character. The influence of dioctyl- and diphenyl-substituent groups on the density of unoccupied electronic states has been analyzed in comparison with the results obtained for the studied types of films. In the case of the π*-maxima, the relative shift has been observed at an energy of approximately 1 eV. In the region of σ*-electronic states, there is a small transformation of the structure of the maxima.

  17. Microsecond resolved electron density measurements with a hairpin resonator probe in a pulsed ICP discharge

    CERN Document Server

    Peterson, David; Larson, Lynda; Shannon, Steven

    2016-01-01

    Time resolved electron density measurements in pulsed RF discharges are shown using a hairpin resonance probe using low cost electronics, on par with normal Langmuir probe boxcar mode operation. Time resolution of less than one microsecond has been demonstrated. A signal generator produces the applied microwave frequency; the reflected waveform is passed through a directional coupler and filtered to remove the RF component. The signal is heterodyned with a frequency mixer and read by an oscilloscope. At certain points during the pulse, the plasma density is such that the applied frequency is the same as the resonance frequency of the probe/plasma system, creating a dip in the reflected signal. The applied microwave frequency is shifted in small increments in a frequency boxcar routine to determine the density as a function of time. The system uses a grounded probe to produce low cost, high fidelity, and highly reproducible electron density measurements that can work in harsh chemical environments. Measurement...

  18. A theoretical-electron-density databank using a model of real and virtual spherical atoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nassour, Ayoub; Domagala, Slawomir; Guillot, Benoit; Leduc, Theo; Lecomte, Claude; Jelsch, Christian

    2017-08-01

    A database describing the electron density of common chemical groups using combinations of real and virtual spherical atoms is proposed, as an alternative to the multipolar atom modelling of the molecular charge density. Theoretical structure factors were computed from periodic density functional theory calculations on 38 crystal structures of small molecules and the charge density was subsequently refined using a density model based on real spherical atoms and additional dummy charges on the covalent bonds and on electron lone-pair sites. The electron-density parameters of real and dummy atoms present in a similar chemical environment were averaged on all the molecules studied to build a database of transferable spherical atoms. Compared with the now-popular databases of transferable multipolar parameters, the spherical charge modelling needs fewer parameters to describe the molecular electron density and can be more easily incorporated in molecular modelling software for the computation of electrostatic properties. The construction method of the database is described. In order to analyse to what extent this modelling method can be used to derive meaningful molecular properties, it has been applied to the urea molecule and to biotin/streptavidin, a protein/ligand complex.

  19. Down-regulation of endogenous KLHL1 decreases voltage-gated calcium current density.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perissinotti, Paula P; Ethington, Elizabeth G; Cribbs, Leanne; Koob, Michael D; Martin, Jody; Piedras-Rentería, Erika S

    2014-05-01

    The actin-binding protein Kelch-like 1 (KLHL1) can modulate voltage-gated calcium channels in vitro. KLHL1 interacts with actin and with the pore-forming subunits of Cav2.1 and CaV3.2 calcium channels, resulting in up-regulation of P/Q and T-type current density. Here we tested whether endogenous KLHL1 modulates voltage gated calcium currents in cultured hippocampal neurons by down-regulating the expression of KLHL1 via adenoviral delivery of shRNA targeted against KLHL1 (shKLHL1). Control adenoviruses did not affect any of the neuronal properties measured, yet down-regulation of KLHL1 resulted in HVA current densities ~68% smaller and LVA current densities 44% smaller than uninfected controls, with a concomitant reduction in α(1A) and α(1H) protein levels. Biophysical analysis and western blot experiments suggest Ca(V)3.1 and 3.3 currents are also present in shKLHL1-infected neurons. Synapsin I levels, miniature postsynaptic current frequency, and excitatory and inhibitory synapse number were reduced in KLHL1 knockdown. This study corroborates the physiological role of KLHL1 as a calcium channel modulator and demonstrates a novel, presynaptic role.

  20. Development of Ti-sheathed MgB{sub 2} wires with high critical current density

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liang, G [Department of Physics, Sam Houston State University, Huntsville, TX 77341 (United States); Fang, H [Department of Physics, Sam Houston State University, Huntsville, TX 77341 (United States); Hanna, M [Department of Mechanical Engineering and Texas Center for Superconductivity, University of Houston, Houston, TX 77204-4006 (United States); Yen, F [Texas Center for Superconductivity, University of Houston, Houston, TX 77204-4006 (United States); Lv, B [Department of Chemistry, University of Houston, Houston, TX 77204-5003 (United States); Alessandrini, M [Department of Mechanical Engineering and Texas Center for Superconductivity, University of Houston, Houston, TX 77204-4006 (United States); Keith, S [Department of Physics, Sam Houston State University, Huntsville, TX 77341 (United States); Hoyt, C [Department of Physics, Sam Houston State University, Huntsville, TX 77341 (United States); Tang, Z [Department of Chemistry, University of Houston, Houston, TX 77204-5003 (United States); Salama, K [Department of Mechanical Engineering and Texas Center for Superconductivity, University of Houston, Houston, TX 77204-4006 (United States)

    2006-11-15

    Working towards developing lightweight superconducting magnets for future space and other applications, we have successfully fabricated mono-core Ti-sheathed MgB{sub 2} wires by the powder-in-tube method. The wires were characterized by magnetization, electrical resistivity, x-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, and energy dispersive spectrometry measurements. The results indicate that the Ti sheath does not react with the magnesium and boron, and the present wire rolling process can produce MgB{sub 2} wires with a superconducting volume fraction of at least 64% in the core. Using the Bean model, it was found that at 5 K, the magnetic critical current densities, J{sub c}, measured in magnetic fields of 0, 5, and 8 T are about 4.2 x 10{sup 5}, 3.6 x 10{sup 4}, and 1.4 x 10{sup 4} A cm{sup -2}, respectively. At 20 K and 0 T, the magnetic J{sub c} is about 2.4 x 10{sup 5} A cm{sup -2}. These results show that at zero and low fields, the values of the magnetic J{sub c} for Ti-sheathed MgB{sub 2} wires are comparable with the best results available for the Fe-sheathed MgB{sub 2} wires. At high fields, however, the J{sub c} for Ti-sheathed MgB{sub 2} wires appears higher than that for the Fe-sheathed MgB{sub 2} wires.