WorldWideScience

Sample records for current clinical management

  1. Current and future perspectives in clinical management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Willett, Christopher

    1996-01-01

    In the past several years, there has been significant progress and controversy in the clinical management of patients with rectal cancer as well as important advances in the understanding the biology of these tumors. The panel will highlight relevant biologic and clinical developments. One of major advances has been in the understanding of the molecular basis for the development of colon and rectal cancer with many of the events leading to cancer development having been determined. Although there is much to be learned, there is now a much improved understanding of colon and rectal carcinogenesis with the prospect of being able to define high risk patient populations and the possibility of early detection (before cancer formation) now a real possibility. In addition, the identification of favorable or unfavorable subsets of patients wit rectal cancer based on molecular markers is under active investigation. These exciting developments will be summarized. In the clinical arena, there are a number of controversial issues in the management of patients with rectal cancer. For patients with distal rectal cancer, the goals of therapy have evolved from cure to cure with sphincter preservation. The role of resection with coloanal anastomosis as an alternative to an abdominoperineal resection is also being defined. A wide array of treatment programs of radiation therapy and chemotherapy and sphincter sparing surgery are under active investigation. The relative merits of preoperative chemo-irradiation versus postoperative chemo-irradiation continues to be debated. The utility of total mesorectal excision is being evaluated and the need for adjuvant therapy is being questioned. These clinical issues will be highlighted

  2. Current Status of Operation and Management of Dental School Clinics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinhardt, John W

    2017-08-01

    This article summarizes the current status of the operation and management of dental school clinics as schools strive to provide excellent patient-centered care in an environment that is educationally sound, efficient, and financially strong. Clinical education is a large component of dental education and an area in which many dental schools have an opportunity to enhance revenue. Clinical efficiencies and alternative models of clinical education are evolving in U.S. dental schools, and this article describes some of those evolutionary changes. This article was written as part of the project "Advancing Dental Education in the 21 st Century."

  3. Clinical knowledge management: an overview of current understanding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bali, Rajeev K; Dwivedi, Ashish

    2005-01-01

    This chapter outlines contributions to a workshop for ICMCC 2005. We details some of the central issues surrounding the incorporation of the Knowledge Management (KM) paradigm for the healthcare and clinical sectors. The complex nature of KM is discussed, together with some essential theories and some contemporary applications of the tools and techniques are presented.

  4. Perceptions of dry eye disease management in current clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williamson, Jennifer F; Huynh, Kyle; Weaver, Mark A; Davis, Richard M

    2014-03-01

    To assess the perceptions of eye care providers regarding the clinical management of dry eye. Invitations to complete a 17-question online survey were mailed to 400 members of the North Carolina Ophthalmology and Optometry Associations including community optometrists, comprehensive ophthalmologists, and cornea specialists. The survey was completed by 100 eye care providers (25% response rate). Providers reported burning (46.5%) as the most frequent symptom described by patients, followed by foreign body sensation (30.3%) and tearing (17.2%). Most respondents (80.8%) listed artificial tears as the recommended first-line treatment, even though providers reported high failure rates for both artificial tears and cyclosporine A (Restasis). Rheumatoid arthritis, Sjögren syndrome, affective disorders such as anxiety and depression, history of photorefractive surgery, smoking, and thyroid disease were acknowledged as common comorbid conditions. The survey provided an informative snapshot into the preferences of eye care providers concerning the diagnosis and management of dry eye disease. Overall, burning was the most common symptom reported by patients. Providers relied more on patient history in guiding their clinical decisions than objective signs. The survey underscores the incongruence when comparing subjective symptoms with objective signs, thereby highlighting the urgent need for the development of reliable metrics to better quantify dry eye symptoms and also the development of a more sensitive and specific test that can be used as the gold standard to diagnose dry eye.

  5. Current approach to masked hypertension: From diagnosis to clinical management.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Dolan, Eamon

    2013-11-28

    The term masked hypertension phenomenon was first described by the late Professor Thomas Pickering and is commonly defined as having a normal clinic blood pressure (BP) but an elevated "out of office" reading. In the main these elevated readings have been provided through ambulatory blood pressure monitoring (ABPM) but sometimes home BP monitoring is used. It is now largely accepted that ABPM gives a better classification of risk than clinic BP. Thus the elevated ABPM levels should relate to higher cardiovascular risk and it follows that these people might be regarded as being genuinely hypertensive and at higher cardiovascular risk. The problem for clinical practice is how to identify and manage these subjects. The phenomenon should be suspected in subjects who have had an elevated clinic BP at some time, in young subjects with normal or normal-high clinic BP who have early left ventricular hypertrophy, in subjects with a family history of hypertension in both parents, patients with multiple risks for cardiovascular disease and perhaps diabetic patients. It appears to be more prevalent in subjects of male gender, with younger age, higher heart rate, obesity or high cholesterol levels and in smokers. Those with masked hypertension are at higher risk of events such as stroke and have a higher prevalence of target organ damage, for example, nephropathy. In conclusion most of the debate around this topic relates to its reliable identification. Given the higher ambulatory readings there is an increases cardiovascular risk making this diagnosis important. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  6. Abnormal Uterine Bleeding: Current Classification and Clinical Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bacon, Janice L

    2017-06-01

    Abnormal uterine bleeding is now classified and categorized according to the International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics classification system: PALM-COEIN. This applies to nongravid women during their reproductive years and allows more clear designation of causes, thus aiding clinical care and future research. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Clinical management of achalasia: current state of the art

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krill JT

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Joseph T Krill, Rishi D Naik, Michael F Vaezi Division of Gastroenterology, Hepatology, and Nutrition, Center for Swallowing and Esophageal Disorders, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, TN, USA Abstract: Achalasia is a primary disorder of esophageal motility. It classically presents with dysphagia to both solids and liquids but may be accompanied by regurgitation and chest pain. The gold standard for the diagnosis of achalasia is esophageal motility testing with manometry, which often reveals aperistalsis of the esophageal body and incomplete lower esophageal sphincter relaxation. The diagnosis is aided by complimentary tests, such as esophagogastroduodenoscopy and contrast radiography. Esophagogastroduodenoscopy is indicated to rule out mimickers of the disease known as “pseudoachalasia” (eg, malignancy. Endoscopic appearance of a dilated esophagus with retained food or saliva and a puckered lower esophageal sphincter should raise suspicion for achalasia. Additionally, barium esophagography may reveal a dilated esophagus with a distal tapering giving it a “bird’s beak” appearance. Multiple therapeutic modalities aid in the management of achalasia, the decision of which depends on operative risk factors. Conventional treatments include medical therapy, botulinum toxin injection, pneumatic dilation, and Heller myotomy. The last two are defined as the most definitive treatment options. New emerging therapies include peroral endoscopic myotomy, placement of self-expanding metallic stents, and endoscopic sclerotherapy. Keywords: achalasia, pseudoachalasia, pneumatic dilation, Heller myotomy, botulinum toxin injection, peroral endoscopic myotomy

  8. Clinical management of achalasia: current state of the art

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krill, Joseph T; Naik, Rishi D; Vaezi, Michael F

    2016-01-01

    Achalasia is a primary disorder of esophageal motility. It classically presents with dysphagia to both solids and liquids but may be accompanied by regurgitation and chest pain. The gold standard for the diagnosis of achalasia is esophageal motility testing with manometry, which often reveals aperistalsis of the esophageal body and incomplete lower esophageal sphincter relaxation. The diagnosis is aided by complimentary tests, such as esophagogastroduodenoscopy and contrast radiography. Esophagogastroduodenoscopy is indicated to rule out mimickers of the disease known as “pseudoachalasia” (eg, malignancy). Endoscopic appearance of a dilated esophagus with retained food or saliva and a puckered lower esophageal sphincter should raise suspicion for achalasia. Additionally, barium esophagography may reveal a dilated esophagus with a distal tapering giving it a “bird’s beak” appearance. Multiple therapeutic modalities aid in the management of achalasia, the decision of which depends on operative risk factors. Conventional treatments include medical therapy, botulinum toxin injection, pneumatic dilation, and Heller myotomy. The last two are defined as the most definitive treatment options. New emerging therapies include peroral endoscopic myotomy, placement of self-expanding metallic stents, and endoscopic sclerotherapy. PMID:27110134

  9. Clinical data management: Current status, challenges, and future directions from industry perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhengwu Lu

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Zhengwu Lu1, Jing Su21Smith Hanley Consulting, Houston, Texas; 2Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, MA, USAAbstract: To maintain a competitive position, the biopharmaceutical industry has been facing the challenge of increasing productivity both internally and externally. As the product of the clinical development process, clinical data are recognized to be the key corporate asset and provide critical evidence of a medicine’s efficacy and safety and of its potential economic value to the market. It is also well recognized that using effective technology-enabled methods to manage clinical data can enhance the speed with which the drug is developed and commercialized, hence enhancing the competitive advantage. The effective use of data-capture tools may ensure that high-quality data are available for early review and rapid decision-making. A well-designed, protocol-driven, standardized, site workflow-oriented and documented database, populated via efficient data feed mechanisms, will ensure regulatory and commercial questions receive rapid responses. When information from a sponsor’s clinical database or data warehouse develops into corporate knowledge, the value of the medicine can be realized. Moreover, regulators, payer groups, patients, activist groups, patient advocacy groups, and employers are becoming more educated consumers of medicine, requiring monetary value and quality, and seeking out up-todate medical information supplied by biopharmaceutical companies. All these developments in the current biopharmaceutical arena demand that clinical data management (CDM is at the forefront, leading change, influencing direction, and providing objective evidence. Sustaining an integrated database or data repository for initial product registration and subsequent postmarketing uses is a long-term process to maximize return on investment for organizations. CDM should be the owner of driving clinical data

  10. [Security Management in Clinical Laboratory Departments and Facilities: Current Status and Issues].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishida, Haku; Nakamura, Junji; Yoshida, Hiroshi; Koike, Masaru; Inoue, Yuji

    2014-11-01

    We conducted a questionnaire survey regarding the current activities for protecting patients' privacy and the security of information systems (IS) related to the clinical laboratory departments of university hospitals, certified training facilities for clinical laboratories, and general hospitals in Yamaguchi Prefecture. The response rate was 47% from 215 medical institutions, including three commercial clinical laboratory centers. The results showed that there were some differences in management activities among facilities with respect to continuing education, the documentation or regulation of operational management for paper records, electronic information, remaining samples, genetic testing, and laboratory information for secondary use. They were suggested to be caused by differences in functions between university and general hospitals, differences in the scale of hospitals, or whether or not hospitals have received accreditation or ISO 15189. Regarding the IS, although the majority of facilities had sufficiently employed the access control to IS, there was some room for improvement in the management of special cases such as VIPs and patients with HIV infection. Furthermore, there were issues regarding the login method for computers shared by multiple staff, the showing of the names of personnel in charge of reports, and the risks associated with direct connections to systems and the Internet and the use of portable media such as USB memory sticks. These results indicated that further efforts are necessary for each facility to continue self-assessment and make improvements.

  11. Developing genomic knowledge bases and databases to support clinical management: current perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huser, Vojtech; Sincan, Murat; Cimino, James J

    2014-01-01

    Personalized medicine, the ability to tailor diagnostic and treatment decisions for individual patients, is seen as the evolution of modern medicine. We characterize here the informatics resources available today or envisioned in the near future that can support clinical interpretation of genomic test results. We assume a clinical sequencing scenario (germline whole-exome sequencing) in which a clinical specialist, such as an endocrinologist, needs to tailor patient management decisions within his or her specialty (targeted findings) but relies on a genetic counselor to interpret off-target incidental findings. We characterize the genomic input data and list various types of knowledge bases that provide genomic knowledge for generating clinical decision support. We highlight the need for patient-level databases with detailed lifelong phenotype content in addition to genotype data and provide a list of recommendations for personalized medicine knowledge bases and databases. We conclude that no single knowledge base can currently support all aspects of personalized recommendations and that consolidation of several current resources into larger, more dynamic and collaborative knowledge bases may offer a future path forward.

  12. Consensus of best current management: the starting point for clinical quality assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hanks, G.E.; Kramer, S.

    1984-01-01

    Consensus of best current management developed by a rational and deliberative process can provide the basis for clinical quality assessment. When it is possible to arrive at consensus in a specific disease, this consensus should detail appropriate pretreatment evaluation and the details of the treatment. Committees of experts for each specific disease site can formulate the consensus and must document their decision based on information from the current world literature. The authors have observed that individuals formulating consensus of best current management do not strictly follow their own criteria, and that compliance in various strata of practice throughout the United States shows a greater deviation from consensus than anticipated and indeed this deviation crosses all types of practice. The authors have observed quite different outcomes for two groups of patients with Hodgkin's disease treated with the same processes (i.e., mantle field technology and adequate radiation dose, etc.). They were unable to identify the reason for an increased failure rate in one group of these patients until they looked at each individual mantle port film from the two groups of patients. They identified that one facility was not including the Hodgkin's disease in the treatment portal due to poor technical performance. This program of process verification may be important in evaluating quality for any disease site

  13. Periodic Epileptiform Discharges Clarified for the Nonneurologist Intensivist: Clinical Implications and Current Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lahiri, Shouri; Boro, Alexis D; Shiloh, Ariel L; Milstein, Mark J; Savel, Richard H

    2015-10-01

    Periodic epileptiform discharges (PEDs) are frequently encountered during continuous electroencephalography monitoring in the intensive care unit. Their implications and management are variable and highly dependent on the clinical context. This article is intended for the nonneurologist intensivist, reviews basic terminology and clinical implications (including causes, prognosis, and association with seizures), and suggests an approach to management. Several case vignettes are included to illustrate the clinical variability associated with PEDs. © The Author(s) 2013.

  14. Current management strategies and long-term clinical outcomes of upper extremity venous thrombosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bleker, S. M.; van Es, N.; Kleinjan, A.; Buller, H. R.; Kamphuisen, P. W.; Aggarwal, A.; Beyer-Westendorf, J.; Camporese, G.; Cosmi, B.; Gary, T.; Ghirarduzzi, A.; Kaasjager, K.; Lerede, T.; Marschang, P.; Meijer, Karina; Otten, H. -M.; Porreca, E.; Righini, M.; Verhamme, P.; van Wissen, S.; Di Nisio, M.

    Background: There is scant information on the optimal management and clinical outcome of deep and superficial vein thrombosis of the upper extremity (UEDVT and UESVT). Objectives: To explore treatment strategies and the incidence of recurrent venous thromboembolism (VTE), mortality, postthrombotic

  15. Brain abscess: Current management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hernando Alvis-Miranda

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Brain abscess (BA is defined as a focal infection within the brain parenchyma, which starts as a localized area of cerebritis, which is subsequently converted into a collection of pus within a well-vascularized capsule. BA must be differentiated from parameningeal infections, including epidural abscess and subdural empyema. The BA is a challenge for the neurosurgeon because it is needed good clinical, pharmacological, and surgical skills for providing good clinical outcomes and prognosis to BA patients. Considered an infrequent brain infection, BA could be a devastator entity that easily left the patient into dead. The aim of this work is to review the current concepts regarding epidemiology, pathophysiology, etiology, clinical presentation, diagnosis, and management of BA.

  16. The current state of dyslipidemia in Korean children and adolescents and its management in clinical practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jung Sub Lim

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Cardiovascular disease (CVD is a leading cause of death worldwide including Korea. The risk factors of CVD are known as positive family history of early CVD, obesity, hypertension, diabetes, and dyslipidemia. Among those, dyslipidemia is one of modifiable risk factors. Dyslipidemia starts in childhood and progress to adulthood. Furthermore, dyslipidemia cause atherosclerosis and is closely related to other CVD risks. On the rationale that early identification and control of pediatric dyslipidemia will reduce the risk and severity of CVD in adulthood, the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute guidelines expanded to universal screening for lipid levels. However, there was no guideline for lipid screening and management in Korean children and adolescents yet. This review deals with the rationale of early identification and control of pediatric dyslipidemia along with the current Korean status of pediatric dyslipidemia. This review also deals with how to screen, diagnosis, and treatment of pediatric dyslipidemia.

  17. Current clinical practice: differential management of uveal melanoma in the era of molecular tumor analyses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aaberg Jr TM

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Thomas M Aaberg Jr,1 Robert W Cook,2 Kristen Oelschlager,2 Derek Maetzold,2 P Kumar Rao,3 John O Mason III41Michigan State University Medical School and Retina Specialists of Michigan, Grand Rapids, MI, 2Castle Biosciences, Friendswood, TX, 3Washington University School of Medicine in St Louis, St Louis, MO, 4Retina Consultants of Alabama and University of Alabama Birmingham, Birmingham, AL, USA Objective: Assess current clinical practices for uveal melanoma (UM and the impact of molecular prognostic testing on treatment decisions.Design: Cross-sectional survey and sequential medical records review.Participants: Ophthalmologists who treat UM.Methods: (A Medical records review of all Medicare beneficiaries tested by UM gene expression profile in 2012, conducted under an institutional review board-approved protocol. (B 109 ophthalmologists specializing in the treatment of UM were invited to participate in 24-question survey in 2012; 72 were invited to participate in a 23-question survey in 2014.Main outcome measures: Responses analyzed by descriptive statistics, frequency analyses (percentages, Tukey, histograms, and Fisher’s exact test. Descriptive presentation of essay answers.Results: The review of Medicare medical records included 191 evaluable patients, 88 (46% with documented medical treatment actions or institutional policies related to surveillance plans. Of these 88, all gene expression profiling (GEP Class 1 UM patients were treated with low-intensity surveillance. All GEP Class 2 UM patients were treated with high-intensity surveillance (P<0.0001 versus Class 1. There were 36 (19% with information concerning referrals after initial diagnosis. Of these 36, all 23 Class 2 patients were referred to medical oncology; however, none of the 13 Class 1 patients were referred (P<0.0001 versus Class 1. Only Class 2 patients were recommended for adjunctive treatment regimens. 2012 survey: 50 respondents with an annual median of 35 new UM

  18. [Current management of epilepsy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizobuchi, Masahiro

    2013-09-01

    Epilepsy is one of the most common neurological disorders. Global neurological knowledge is essential for differential diagnosis of epileptic syndromes due to the diversity of ictal semiology, causes and syndromes. Neurologists play an important role in planning the medical care for patients with epilepsy, as medication is the most fundamental therapeutic strategy. Some patients with early-onset epilepsy require joint care by pediatric neurologists, those with intractable epilepsy by neurosurgeons, and those with psychological comorbidity by psychiatrists, and neurologists should play a coordinating role. While there is a great need for neurologists to participate in epilepsy care, neurologists in Japan currently do not participate substantially in the epilepsy management system. It is necessary to train more neurologists who can provide epilepsy care and conduct basic and clinical research on epilepsy by providing continuous education on epilepsy for general neurologists as well as pre- and post-graduate medical students. Most of the patients who require long-term treatment experience many medical problems and social handicaps, such as adverse effects of medication, social stigma, educational disadvantages and difficulties in obtaining driver's license. To improve the quality of life of patients with epilepsy, it is desirable to build broad medical-social networks participated by patients, doctors, neurological nurses, psychologists, social workers, school teachers, managers of employment support facilities and care givers.

  19. Evolution, current structure, and role of a primary care clinical pharmacy service in an integrated managed care organization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heilmann, Rachel M F; Campbell, Stephanie M; Kroner, Beverly A; Proksel, Jenel R; Billups, Sarah J; Witt, Daniel M; Helling, Dennis K

    2013-01-01

    The impact of the declining number of primary care physicians is exacerbated by a growing elderly population in need of chronic disease management. Primary care clinical pharmacy specialists, with their unique knowledge and skill set, are well suited to address this gap. At Kaiser Permanente of Colorado (KPCO), primary care clinical pharmacy specialists have a long history of integration with medical practices and are located in close proximity to physicians, nurses, and other members of the health care team. Since 1992, Primary Care Clinical Pharmacy Services (PCCPS) has expanded from 4 to 30 full-time equivalents (FTEs) to provide services in all KPCO medical office buildings. With this growth in size, PCCPS has evolved to play a vital role in working with primary care medical teams to ensure that drug therapy is effective, safe, and affordable. In addition, PCCPS specialists provide ambulatory teaching sites for pharmacy students and pharmacy residents. There is approximately 1 specialist FTE for every 13,000 adult KPCO members and every 9 clinical FTEs of internal medicine and family medicine physicians. All clinical pharmacy specialists in the pharmacy department are required to have a PharmD degree, to complete postgraduate year 2 residencies, and, as a condition of employment, to become board certified in an applicable specialty. The evolution, current structure, and role of PCCPS at KPCO, including factors facilitating successful integration within the medical team, are highlighted. Patient and nonpatient care responsibilities are described.

  20. Promoting practical clinical management learning: the current situation about Information and Communications Technology capability development in student nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willmer, Marian

    2005-11-01

    This paper is about work-based learning in information management for student nurses. It seeks, through a literature review, to make a case for and promote Information and Communications Technology capability development in student nurses within their clinical environment. The profession of nursing, like many other jobs, is facing the increasing usage of information technology in day-to-day operations. Admission and discharges of patients have been held on computer databases since at least the 1980s. With the new Labour Government in 1997, increasing focus was placed on the effectiveness of the National Health Service and using computers as one way to assist in achieving greater effectiveness. Nurse education therefore needed to reflect this need and support trainee nurses to acquire skills in Information and Communications Technology. This paper is part of an ongoing professional doctorate inquiry into Information and Communications Technology capability development in student nurses. A literature search was conducted on teaching information and technology skills via Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature. Most of the available studies were neither based on the UK nor were they about student nurses. As there is a dearth of published work in this specific area, relevant, related and tangential literature was reviewed. It is argued that current practice and published work on Information and Communications Technology capability development by student nurses hardly exists. The literature confirmed that success in this area requires sound change management, an understanding of National Health Service culture, and effective people leadership skills. Nurse educators and managers need to pay more attention to understand how organizations work, particularly organizations where student nurses carry out their work. As the search revealed a significant gap in the literature in this area, a practical conceptual framework to fully analyse, develop and

  1. Management of Current Psychiatric Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carbonnel, François; David, Michel; Norton, Joanna; Bourrel, Gérard; Boulenger, Jean-Philippe; Capdevielle, Delphine

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Describe and analyse the experience of family physicians in managing current psychiatric disorders to obtain a better understanding of the underlying reasons of under-detection and inadequate prescribing identified in studies. Methods: A qualitative study using in-depth interviews. Sample of 15 practicing family physicians, recruited by telephone from a precedent cohort (Sesame1) with a maximum variation: sex, age, single or group practice, urban or rural. Qualitative method is inspired by the completed grounded theory of a verbatim semiopragmatic analysis from 2 experts in this approach. Results: Family physicians found that current psychiatric disorders were related to psychological symptoms in reaction to life events. Their role was to make patients aware of a psychiatric symptom rather than establish a diagnosis. Their management responsibility was considered in contrasting ways: it was claimed or endured. They defined their position as facilitating compliance to psychiatrist consultations, while assuring a complementary psychotherapeutic approach. Prescribing medication was not a priority for them. Conclusions: The identified under-detection is essentially due to inherent frontline conditions and complexity of clinical forms. The family physician role, facilitating compliance to psychiatrist consultations while assuring a support psychotherapy is the main result of this study. More studies should be conducted to define more accurately the clinical reality, management and course of current psychiatric disorders in primary care.

  2. The neurologist’s dilemma: A comprehensive clinical review of Bell’s palsy, with emphasis on current management trends

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zandian, Anthony; Osiro, Stephen; Hudson, Ryan; Ali, Irfan M.; Matusz, Petru; Tubbs, Shane R.; Loukas, Marios

    2014-01-01

    Background Recent advances in Bell’s palsy (BP) were reviewed to assess the current trends in its management and prognosis. Material/Methods We retrieved the literature on BP using the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, PubMed, and Google Scholar. Key words and phrases used during the search included ‘Bell’s palsy’, ‘Bell’s phenomenon’, ‘facial palsy’, and ‘idiopathic facial paralysis’. Emphasis was placed on articles and randomized controlled trails (RCTs) published within the last 5 years. Results BP is currently considered the leading disorder affecting the facial nerve. The literature is replete with theories of its etiology, but the reactivation of herpes simplex virus isoform 1 (HSV-1) and/or herpes zoster virus (HZV) from the geniculate ganglia is now the most strongly suspected cause. Despite the advancements in neuroimaging techniques, the diagnosis of BP remains one of exclusion. In addition, most patients with BP recover spontaneously within 3 weeks. Conclusions Corticosteroids are currently the drug of choice when medical therapy is needed. Antivirals, in contrast, are not superior to placebo according to most reliable studies. At the time of publication, there is no consensus as to the benefit of acupuncture or surgical decompression of the facial nerve. Long-term therapeutic agents and adjuvant medications for BP are necessary due to recurrence and intractable cases. In the future, large RCTs will be required to determine whether BP is associated with an increased risk of stroke. PMID:24441932

  3. Epidemiology, associated burden, and current clinical practice for the diagnosis and management of Alzheimer's disease in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montgomery, William; Ueda, Kaname; Jorgensen, Margaret; Stathis, Shari; Cheng, Yuanyuan; Nakamura, Tomomi

    2018-01-01

    The burden of dementia in Japan is large and growing. With the world's fastest aging population, it is estimated that one in five elderly people will be living with dementia in Japan by 2025. The most common form of dementia is Alzheimer's disease (AD), accounting for around two-thirds of dementia cases. A systematic review was conducted to examine the epidemiology and associated burden of AD in Japan and to identify how AD is diagnosed and managed in Japan. English and Japanese language databases were searched for articles published between January 2000 and November 2015. Relevant Japanese sources, clinical practice guideline registers, and reference lists were also searched. Systematic reviews and cohort and case-control studies were eligible for inclusion, with a total of 60 studies included. The most recent national survey conducted in six regions of Japan reported the mean prevalence of dementia in people aged ≥65 years to be 15.75% (95% CI: 12.4, 22.2%), which is much higher than the previous estimated rate of 10% in 2010. AD was confirmed as the predominant type of dementia, accounting for 65.8% of all cases. Advancing age and low education were the most consistently reported risk factors for AD dementia. Japanese guidelines for the management of dementia were released in 2010 providing specific guidance for AD about clinical signs, image findings, biochemical markers, and treatment approaches. Pharmacotherapies and non-pharmacotherapies to relieve cognitive symptoms were introduced, as were recommendations to achieve better patient care. No studies reporting treatment patterns were identified. Due to population aging and growing awareness of AD in Japan, health care expenditure and associated burden are expected to soar. This review highlights the importance of early detection, diagnosis, and treatment of AD as strategies to minimize the impact of AD on society in Japan.

  4. Management of primary adrenal insufficiency: Review of current clinical practice in a developed and a developing country

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uzma Khan

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Treatment of primary adrenal insufficiency (PAI requires lifelong hormone replacement with glucocorticoids (GCs and mineralocorticoids. Impaired quality of life and increased standardized mortality ratio in these patients emphasize the importance of tailoring therapy to individual needs. Role of education is paramount in improving patient compliance and in anticipating and preventing adrenal crises. Although discovery of synthetic GCs was a major breakthrough in treatment of patients with this life-threatening condition, management of PAI continues to be challenging. The obstacles for clinicians appear to vary widely across the globe. While optimization and individualization of therapy after diagnosis of PAI remain the main challenges for clinicians in the developed world, doctors in a developing country face problems at almost every stage from the diagnosis to the treatment and follow-up of these patients; cost of therapy, lack of resources, and funding are the main hindrances. Adherence to therapy and patient education are found to be common issues in most parts of the world. This commentary highlights the challenges from both developed and developing country's perspective in treating PAI; it also provides an update on current management scenario and future treatment options.

  5. Management of Primary Adrenal Insufficiency: Review of Current Clinical Practice in a Developed and a Developing Country.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Uzma; Lakhani, Om J

    2017-01-01

    Treatment of primary adrenal insufficiency (PAI) requires lifelong hormone replacement with glucocorticoids (GCs) and mineralocorticoids. Impaired quality of life and increased standardized mortality ratio in these patients emphasize the importance of tailoring therapy to individual needs. Role of education is paramount in improving patient compliance and in anticipating and preventing adrenal crises. Although discovery of synthetic GCs was a major breakthrough in treatment of patients with this life-threatening condition, management of PAI continues to be challenging. The obstacles for clinicians appear to vary widely across the globe. While optimization and individualization of therapy after diagnosis of PAI remain the main challenges for clinicians in the developed world, doctors in a developing country face problems at almost every stage from the diagnosis to the treatment and follow-up of these patients; cost of therapy, lack of resources, and funding are the main hindrances. Adherence to therapy and patient education are found to be common issues in most parts of the world. This commentary highlights the challenges from both developed and developing country's perspective in treating PAI; it also provides an update on current management scenario and future treatment options.

  6. Managing clinical improvement projects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Joanna; Simmonds, Lorraine

    This paper, the second of a three-part series looking at change management tools, provides a practical guide on how to use common project management principles in practice. Much of the literature on project management focuses on the business arena, with little reference to clinical settings. Identifying this literature and understanding its relevance to managing projects in healthcare can be difficult. This article provides a practical guide to identifying the key principles of good project management and applying these in health settings.

  7. Managing clinical trials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenyon Sara

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Managing clinical trials, of whatever size and complexity, requires efficient trial management. Trials fail because tried and tested systems handed down through apprenticeships have not been documented, evaluated or published to guide new trialists starting out in this important field. For the past three decades, trialists have invented and reinvented the trial management wheel. We suggest that to improve the successful, timely delivery of important clinical trials for patient benefit, it is time to produce standard trial management guidelines and develop robust methods of evaluation.

  8. Cranial MRI: Current clinical applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bradley, W.G. Jr.; Kortman, K.E.

    1987-01-01

    Human MR images were first published by the Nottingham group in 1980. Since that time, there have been steady improvements in image quality and significant reductions in imaging time. After initial studies by the Hammersmith group in London, investigators at UCSF published studies comparing CT with MR, clearly demonstrating the higher sensitivity of MR to pathologic intracranial processes. Since that time, several investigators have demonstrated the efficacy of MR in the evaluation of a wide range of intracranial pathologic processes, including neoplasms, demyelinating disease, trauma, and congenital abnormalities. In the authors' studies comparing MR with CT in 400 consecutive cases of suspected CNS pathology, MR detected abnormalities which were not seen on CT in 30 percent of these cases. MR has become established as the imaging modality of choice in the evaluation of a broad range of CNS abnormalities and is rapidly being implemented not only at university medical centers but also in community hospitals and free-standing clinics. This chapter deals with fundamental principles of MR image interpretation and provides insight into current clinical indications for MR in intracranial disorders

  9. The current water quality situation at clinics in the Limpopo Province and subsequent management suggestions / Jan Hendrik Stander

    OpenAIRE

    Stander, Jan Hendrik

    2010-01-01

    South Africa's water resources are, in global terms, scarce and extremely limited (DWAF, 2004). Groundwater is a valuable source of potable water in South Africa. It was found that most of the health facilities in the Limpopo Province depend on groundwater as sole source of potable water. Groundwater quality is to a great extent influenced by the dominant land use in the vicinity of an aquifer. It is therefore important to carefully manage possible pollution sources of anthropogen...

  10. Revisiting current “barefoot doctors” in border areas of China: system of services, financial issue and clinical practice prior to introducing integrated management of childhood illness (IMCI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Xiuyun

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Under-5-years child mortality remains high in rural China. Integrated management of childhood illness (IMCI was introduced to China in 1998, but only a few rural areas have been included. This study aimed at assessing the current situation of the health system of rural health care and evaluating the clinical competency of village doctors in management of childhood illnesses prior to implementing IMCI programme in remote border rural areas. Methods The study was carried out in the border areas of Puer prefecture of Yunnan province. There were 182 village doctors in the list of the health bureau in these border areas. Of these, 154 (84.6% were recruited into the study. The local health system components were investigated using a qualitative approach and analyzed with triangulation of information from different sources. The clinical component was assessed objectively and quantitatively presented using descriptive statistics. Results The study found that the New Rural Cooperative Medical Scheme (NRCMS coordinated the health insurance system and the provider service through 3 tiers: village doctor, township and county hospitals. The 30 RMB per person per year premium did not cover the referral cost, and thereby decreased the number of referrals. In contrast to available treatment facilities and drug supply, the level of basic medical education of village doctors and township doctors was low. Discontent among village doctors was common, especially concerning low rates of return from the service, exceptions being procedures such as injections, which in fact may create moral hazards to the patients. Direct observation on the assessment and management of paediatric patients by village doctors revealed inadequate history taking and physical examination, inability to detect potentially serious complications, overprescription of injection and antibiotics, and underprescription of oral rehydration salts and poor quality of counseling

  11. Current management of hepatocellular carcinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabrizian, Parissa; Roayaie, Sasan; Schwartz, Myron E

    2014-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is the sixth most common cancer worldwide and leading cause of death among patients with cirrhosis. Treatment guidelines are based according to the Barcelona Clinic Liver Cancer staging system. The choice among therapeutic options that include liver resection, liver transplantation, locoregional, and systemic treatments must be individualized for each patient. The aim of this paper is to review the outcomes that can be achieved in the treatment of HCC with the heterogeneous therapeutic options currently available in clinical practice. PMID:25132740

  12. [Current management of thalassemia intermedia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thuret, I

    2014-11-01

    Thalassemia intermedia is a clinical entity where anemia is mild or moderate, requiring no or occasional transfusion. Non-transfusion-dependent thalassemia encompasses 3 main clinical forms: beta-thalassemia intermedia, hemoglobin E/beta-thalassemia and alpha-thalassemia intermedia (HbH disease). Clinical severity of thalassemia intermedia increases with age, with more severe anemia and more frequent complications such as extramedullary hematopoiesis and iron overload mainly related to increased intestinal absorption. Numerous adverse events including pulmonary hypertension and hypercoagulability have been associated with splenectomy, often performed in thalassemia intermedia patients. The potential preventive benefit of transfusion and chelation therapies on the occurrence of numerous complications supports the strategy of an earlier therapeutic intervention. Increasing knowledge about pathophysiological mechanisms involved in thalassemia erythropoiesis and related iron overload is currently translating in novel therapeutic approaches. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  13. Current management of wound healing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gottrup, F; Karlsmark, T

    2009-01-01

    in the next decade. It is the hope that increasing parts of the new knowledge from basic wound healing research will be implemented in daily clinical practice. The development of new treatment products will also continue, and especially new technologies with combined types of dressing materials or dressing......While the understanding of wound pathophysiology has progressed considerably over the past decades the improvements in clinical treatment has occurred to a minor degree. During the last years, however, new trends and initiatives have been launched, and we will continue to attain new information...... containing active substances will be accentuated. Further developments in the management structure and education will also continue and consensus of treatment guidelines, recommendations and organization models will hopefully be achieved....

  14. Current state of clinical lithotripsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lingeman, James E.

    2003-10-01

    Extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy (ESWL) has revolutionized the treatment of urolithiasis. Because of the clinical success of the original lithotriptor, the Dornier HM3, numerous manufacturers introduced different approaches to lithotripsy based on empiricism rather than an understanding of the fundamental mechanisms of this new technology. Our understanding of shock wave physics and the physiologic effects of shock waves has progressed greatly over the last decade resulting in insights that hopefully will be reflected favorably in future lithotriptor designs and lithotripsy techniques.

  15. Current educational issues in the clinical neurosciences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desbiens, R; Elleker, M G; Goldsand, G; Hugenholtz, H; Puddester, D; Toyota, B; Findlay, J M

    2001-11-01

    Canadian training in the clinical neurosciences, neurology and neurosurgery, faces significant challenges. New balances are being set by residents, their associations and the Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons of Canada between clinical service, education and personal time. The nature of hospital-provided medical service has changed significantly over the past decade, impacting importantly on resident training. Finally, future manpower needs are of concern, especially in the field of neurosurgery, where it appears that soon more specialists will be trained than can be absorbed into the Canadian health care system. A special symposium on current challenges in clinical neuroscience training was held at the Canadian Congress of Neurological Sciences in June 2000. Representatives from the Canadian Association of Interns and Residents, the Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons of Canada and English and French neurology and neurosurgery training programs made presentations, which are summarized in this report. Residency training has become less service-oriented, and this trend will continue. In order to manage the increasingly sophisticated hospital services of neurology and neurosurgery, resident-alternatives in the form of physician "moonlighters" or more permanent hospital-based clinicians or "hospitalists" will be necessary in order to operate major neuroclinical units. Health authorities and hospitals will need to recognize and assume this responsibility. As clinical experience diminishes during residency training, inevitably so will the concept of the fully competent "generalist" at the end of specialty training. Additional subspecialty training is being increasingly sought by graduates, particularly in neurosurgery. Training in neurology and neurosurgery, as in all medical specialties, has changed significantly in recent years and continues to change. Programs and hospitals need to adapt to these changes in order to ensure the production of fully

  16. Clinical management of sepsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lam, S M; Lau, A Cw; Lam, R Pk; Yan, W W

    2017-06-01

    Sepsis is a common cause of hospital admission worldwide and contributes significantly to morbidity and mortality. The definition of sepsis has evolved from the 1991 American College of Chest Physicians/Society of Critical Care Medicine definition based on the criteria of systemic inflammatory response syndrome, to the 2016 Sepsis-3 definition that incorporates the Sequential Organ Failure Assessment score. The landmark trial on protocolised early goal-directed therapy was published in 2001, but three subsequent multicentre randomised controlled trials (ProCESS, ARISE, and ProMISe) in 2014-2015 did not confirm a survival benefit with protocolised care. Over the years, there has been considerable improvement in sepsis outcome and management that hinges on early detection; timely source control; prompt, appropriate, and correctly dosed antibiotics; aggressive fluid resuscitation; and shock reversal. These are all directed by repeated bedside assessment. This article summarises recent developments and landmark trials that should guide current sepsis management.

  17. Current clinical evidence on pioglitazone pharmacogenomics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marina eKawaguchi-Suzuki

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Pioglitazone is the most widely used thiazolidinedione and acts as an insulin-sensitizer through activation of the Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor-γ (PPARγ. Pioglitazone is approved for use in the management of type 2 diabetes mellitus, but its use in other therapeutic areas is increasing due to pleiotropic effects. In this hypothesis article, the current clinical evidence on pioglitazone pharmacogenomics is summarized and related to variability in pioglitazone response. How genetic variation in the human genome affects the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of pioglitazone was examined. For pharmacodynamic effects, hypoglycemic and anti-atherosclerotic effects, risks of fracture or edema, and the increase in body mass index in response to pioglitazone based on genotype were examined. The genes CYP2C8 and PPARG are the most extensively studied to date and selected polymorphisms contribute to respective variability in pioglitazone pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics. We hypothesized that genetic variation in pioglitazone pathway genes contributes meaningfully to the clinically observed variability in drug response. To test the hypothesis that genetic variation in PPARG associates with variability in pioglitazone response, we conducted a meta-analysis to synthesize the currently available data on the PPARG p.Pro12Ala polymorphism. The results showed that PPARG 12Ala carriers had a more favorable change in fasting blood glucose from baseline as compared to patients with the wild-type Pro12Pro genotype (p=0.018. Unfortunately, findings for many other genes lack replication in independent cohorts to confirm association; further studies are needed. Also, the biological functionality of these polymorphisms is unknown. Based on current evidence, we propose that pharmacogenomics may provide an important tool to individualize pioglitazone therapy and better optimize therapy in patients with T2DM or other conditions for which pioglitazone

  18. Orofacial pain management: current perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Romero-Reyes M

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Marcela Romero-Reyes, James M Uyanik Orofacial and Head Pain Service, Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Pathology Radiology and Medicine, New York University College of Dentistry, New York, NY, USA Abstract: Some of the most prevalent and debilitating pain conditions arise from the structures innervated by the trigeminal system (head, face, masticatory musculature, temporomandibular joint and associated structures. Orofacial pain (OFP can arise from different regions and etiologies. Temporomandibular disorders (TMD are the most prevalent orofacial pain conditions for which patients seek treatment. Temporomandibular disorders include a number of clinical problems that involve the masticatory musculature, the temporomandibular joint (TMJ or both. Trigeminal neuropathic pain conditions can arise from injury secondary to dental procedures, infection, neoplasias, or disease or dysfunction of the peripheral and/or central nervous system. Neurovascular disorders, such as primary headaches, can present as chronic orofacial pain, such as in the case of facial migraine, where the pain is localized in the second and third division of the trigeminal nerve. Together, these disorders of the trigeminal system impact the quality of life of the sufferer dramatically. A multidisciplinary pain management approach should be considered for the optimal treatment of orofacial pain disorders including both non-pharmacological and pharmacological modalities. Keywords: pain, orofacial, neuropathic, TMD, trigeminal, headache

  19. Orofacial pain management: current perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romero-Reyes, Marcela; Uyanik, James M

    2014-01-01

    Some of the most prevalent and debilitating pain conditions arise from the structures innervated by the trigeminal system (head, face, masticatory musculature, temporomandibular joint and associated structures). Orofacial pain (OFP) can arise from different regions and etiologies. Temporomandibular disorders (TMD) are the most prevalent orofacial pain conditions for which patients seek treatment. Temporomandibular disorders include a number of clinical problems that involve the masticatory musculature, the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) or both. Trigeminal neuropathic pain conditions can arise from injury secondary to dental procedures, infection, neoplasias, or disease or dysfunction of the peripheral and/or central nervous system. Neurovascular disorders, such as primary headaches, can present as chronic orofacial pain, such as in the case of facial migraine, where the pain is localized in the second and third division of the trigeminal nerve. Together, these disorders of the trigeminal system impact the quality of life of the sufferer dramatically. A multidisciplinary pain management approach should be considered for the optimal treatment of orofacial pain disorders including both non-pharmacological and pharmacological modalities.

  20. Current management of overactive bladder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cartwright, Rufus; Renganathan, Arasee; Cardozo, Linda

    2008-10-01

    The concept of overactive bladder has helped us address the problem of urgency and urge incontinence from a symptomatic perspective. In this review, we provide a critical summary of clinically relevant recent publications, focusing in particular on advances in our understanding of assessment methods and therapeutic interventions for overactive bladder in women. According to current definitions, the prevalence of overactive bladder in western nations is now estimated as 13.0%. Although the prevalence increases with age, the symptoms of overactive bladder may follow a relapsing and remitting course. There has been a proliferation of validated symptom and quality of life measures and increasing sophistication in the analysis of bladder diaries. The role of urodynamics in the evaluation of urgency remains uncertain, with many trials showing limited benefit as a preoperative investigation. Fluid restriction and bladder retraining remain important first-line interventions. Many new anticholinergic medications have been licensed, with limited benefits compared with existing preparations. Intravesical botulinum toxin has become a popular alternative for patients who fail oral therapies. Although there have been few important therapeutic innovations, recent publications have led to greater sophistication in assessment methods and a clearer understanding of the role of existing interventions.

  1. Sepsis: Current Definition, Pathophysiology, Diagnosis, and Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taeb, Abdalsamih M; Hooper, Michael H; Marik, Paul E

    2017-06-01

    Sepsis is a clinical syndrome that results from the dysregulated inflammatory response to infection that leads to organ dysfunction. The resulting losses to society in terms of financial burden, morbidity, and mortality are enormous. We provide a review of sepsis, its underlying pathophysiology, and guidance for diagnosis and management of this common disease. Current established treatments include appropriate antimicrobial agents to target the underlying infection, optimization of intravascular volume to improve stroke volume, vasopressors to counteract vasoplegic shock, and high-quality supportive care. Appropriate implementation of established treatments combined with novel therapeutic approaches promises to continue to decrease the impact of this disease.

  2. An observational European study on clinical outcomes associated with current management strategies for non-variceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding (ENERGIB-Turkey).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mungan, Zeynel

    2012-01-01

    This observational, retrospective cohort study assessed outcomes of the current management strategies for nonvariceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding in several European countries (Belgium, Greece, Italy, Norway, Portugal, Spain, and Turkey) (NCT00797641; ENERGIB). Turkey contributed 23 sites to this study. Adult patients (≥18 years old) consecutively admitted to hospital and who underwent endoscopy for overt non-variceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding (hematemesis, melena or hematochezia, with other clinical/laboratory evidence of acute upper GI blood loss) were included in the study. Data were collected from patient medical records regarding bleeding continuation, re-bleeding, pharmacological treatment, surgery, and mortality during a 30-day follow-up period. A total of 423 patients (67.4% men; mean age: 57.8 ± 18.9 years) were enrolled in the Turkish study centers, of whom 96.2% were admitted to hospital with acute non-variceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding. At admission, the most common symptom was melena (76.1%); 28.6% of patients were taking aspirin, 19.9% were on non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, and 7.3% were on proton pump inhibitors. The most common diagnoses were duodenal (45.2%) and gastric (27.7%) ulcers and gastritis/gastric erosions (26.2%). Patients were most often managed in general medical wards (45.4%). A gastrointestinal team was in charge of treatment in 64.8% of cases. Therapeutic procedures were performed in 32.4% of patients during endoscopy. After the endoscopy, most patients (94.6%) received proton pump inhibitors. Mean (SD) hospital stay was 5.36 ± 4.91 days. The cumulative proportions of continued bleeding/re-bleeding, complications and mortality within 30 days of the non-variceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding episode were 9.0%, 5.7% and 2.8%, respectively. In the Turkish sub-group of patients, the significant risk factors for bleeding continuation or re-bleeding were age >65 years, presentation with hematemesis or shock

  3. Current Chemical Risk Management Activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    EPA's existing chemicals programs address pollution prevention, risk assessment, hazard and exposure assessment and/or characterization, and risk management for chemicals substances in commercial use.

  4. Sleep bruxism: Current knowledge and contemporary management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yap, Adrian U.; Chua, Ai Ping

    2016-01-01

    Bruxism is defined as the repetitive jaw muscle activity characterized by the clenching or grinding of teeth. It can be categorized into awake and sleep bruxism (SB). Frequent SB occurs in about 13% of adults. The exact etiology of SB is still unknown and probably multifactorial in nature. Current literature suggests that SB is regulated centrally (pathophysiological and psychosocial factors) and not peripherally (morphological factors). Cited consequences of SB include temporomandibular disorders, headaches, tooth wear/fracture, implant, and other restoration failure. Chairside recognition of SB involves the use of subjective reports, clinical examinations, and trial oral splints. Definitive diagnosis of SB can only be achieved using electrophysiological tools. Pharmacological, psychological, and dental strategies had been employed to manage SB. There is at present, no effective treatment that “cures” or “stops” SB permanently. Management is usually directed toward tooth/restoration protection, reduction of bruxism activity, and pain relief. PMID:27656052

  5. Sleep bruxism: Current knowledge and contemporary management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yap, Adrian U; Chua, Ai Ping

    2016-01-01

    Bruxism is defined as the repetitive jaw muscle activity characterized by the clenching or grinding of teeth. It can be categorized into awake and sleep bruxism (SB). Frequent SB occurs in about 13% of adults. The exact etiology of SB is still unknown and probably multifactorial in nature. Current literature suggests that SB is regulated centrally (pathophysiological and psychosocial factors) and not peripherally (morphological factors). Cited consequences of SB include temporomandibular disorders, headaches, tooth wear/fracture, implant, and other restoration failure. Chairside recognition of SB involves the use of subjective reports, clinical examinations, and trial oral splints. Definitive diagnosis of SB can only be achieved using electrophysiological tools. Pharmacological, psychological, and dental strategies had been employed to manage SB. There is at present, no effective treatment that "cures" or "stops" SB permanently. Management is usually directed toward tooth/restoration protection, reduction of bruxism activity, and pain relief.

  6. Current management of fungal infections.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meis, J.F.G.M.; Verweij, P.E.

    2001-01-01

    The management of superficial fungal infections differs significantly from the management of systemic fungal infections. Most superficial infections are treated with topical antifungal agents, the choice of agent being determined by the site and extent of the infection and by the causative organism,

  7. The applicability of real-time PCR in the diagnostic of cutaneous leishmaniasis and parasite quantification for clinical management: Current status and perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreira, Otacilio C; Yadon, Zaida E; Cupolillo, Elisa

    2017-09-29

    Cutaneous leishmaniasis (CL) is spread worldwide and is the most common manifestation of leishmaniasis. Diagnosis is performed by combining clinical and epidemiological features, and through the detection of Leishmania parasites (or DNA) in tissue specimens or trough parasite isolation in culture medium. Diagnosis of CL is challenging, reflecting the pleomorphic clinical manifestations of this disease. Skin lesions vary in severity, clinical appearance, and duration, and in some cases, they can be indistinguishable from lesions related to other diseases. Over the past few decades, PCR-based methods, including real-time PCR assays, have been developed for Leishmania detection, quantification and species identification, improving the molecular diagnosis of CL. This review provides an overview of many real-time PCR methods reported for the diagnostic evaluation of CL and some recommendations for the application of these methods for quantification purposes for clinical management and epidemiological studies. Furthermore, the use of real-time PCR for Leishmania species identification is also presented. The advantages of real-time PCR protocols are numerous, including increased sensitivity and specificity and simpler standardization of diagnostic procedures. However, despite the numerous assays described, there is still no consensus regarding the methods employed. Furthermore, the analytical and clinical validation of CL molecular diagnosis has not followed international guidelines so far. A consensus methodology comprising a DNA extraction protocol with an exogenous quality control and an internal reference to normalize parasite load is still needed. In addition, the analytical and clinical performance of any consensus methodology must be accurately assessed. This review shows that a standardization initiative is essential to guide researchers and clinical laboratories towards the achievement of a robust and reproducible methodology, which will permit further evaluation

  8. Managing hyperthyroidism in pregnancy: current perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andersen SL

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Stine Linding Andersen,1,2 Peter Laurberg1,3,† 1Department of Endocrinology, Aalborg University Hospital, 2Department of Clinical Biochemistry, Aalborg University Hospital, 3Department of Clinical Medicine, Aalborg University, Aalborg, Denmark †Peter Laurberg passed away on June 20, 2016 Abstract: Hyperthyroidism in women who are of childbearing age is predominantly of autoimmune origin and caused by Graves’ disease. The physiological changes in the maternal immune system during a pregnancy may influence the development of this and other autoimmune diseases. Furthermore, pregnancy-associated physiological changes influence the synthesis and metabolism of thyroid hormones and challenge the interpretation of thyroid function tests in pregnancy. Thyroid hormones are crucial regulators of early development and play an important role in the maintenance of a normal pregnancy and in the development of the fetus, particularly the fetal brain. Untreated or inadequately treated hyperthyroidism is associated with pregnancy complications and may even program the fetus to long-term development of disease. Thus, hyperthyroidism in pregnant women should be carefully managed and controlled, and proper management involves different medical specialties. The treatment of choice in pregnancy is antithyroid drugs (ATDs. These drugs are effective in the control of maternal hyperthyroidism, but they all cross the placenta, and so need careful management and control during the second half of pregnancy considering the risk of fetal hyper- or hypothyroidism. An important aspect in the early pregnancy is that the predominant side effect to the use of ATDs in weeks 6–10 of pregnancy is birth defects that may develop after exposure to available types of ATDs and may be severe. This review focuses on four current perspectives in the management of overt hyperthyroidism in pregnancy, including the etiology and incidence of the disease, how the diagnosis is made, the

  9. LIMS and Clinical Data Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yalan; Lin, Yuxin; Yuan, Xuye; Shen, Bairong

    2016-01-01

    In order to achieve more accurate disease prevention, diagnosis, and treatment, clinical and genetic data need extensive and systematically associated study. As one way to achieve precision medicine, a laboratory information management system (LIMS) can effectively associate clinical data in a macrocosmic aspect and genomic data in a microcosmic aspect. This chapter summarizes the application of the LIMS in a clinical data management and implementation mode. It also discusses the principles of a LIMS in clinical data management, as well as the opportunities and challenges in the context of medical informatics.

  10. Challenges for current University management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro Rodríguez Vargas

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The Ecuadorian university through a change of era, this complex pathway mediated by globalization imposes imminently. The aim of this paper is to present a review of literature on the main aspects of management that are generated for the interaction University - context. This scan was performed on secondary sources, and grounded in scienti?c data abstraction. College education is an information and training process that allows the scientific, technological, economic, political, social and cultural development of a region or country; however, some phenomena such as globalization, technological revolution or multiculturalism are key to this, same that can be considered as a problem or a challenge.

  11. Current management of obsessive and phobic states

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Goljevscek S

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Serena Goljevscek1, Livia A Carvalho21Psychiatric Clinic, University of Udine, Udine, Italy; 2Health Science Research Centre, Department of Life Sciences, Roehampton University, London, UKAbstract: Obsessional states show an average point prevalence of 1%–3% and a lifetime prevalence of 2%–2.5%. Most treatment-seeking patients with obsessions continue to experience significant symptoms after 2 years of prospective follow-up. A significant burden of impairment, distress, and comorbidity characterize the course of the illness, leading to an increased need for a better understanding of the nature and management of this condition. This review aims to give a representation of the current pharmacological and psychotherapeutic strategies used in the treatment of obsessive-compulsive disorder. Antidepressants (clomipramine and selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors are generally the first-line choice used to handle obsessional states, showing good response rates and long-term positive outcomes. About 40% of patients fail to respond to selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors. So far, additional pharmacological treatment strategies have been shown to be effective, ie, administration of high doses of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors, as well as combinations of different drugs, such as dopamine antagonists, are considered efficacious and well tolerated strategies in terms of symptom remission and side effects. Psychotherapy also plays an important role in the management of obsessive-compulsive disorder, being effective for a wide range of symptoms, and many studies have assessed its long-term efficacy, especially when added to appropriate pharmacotherapy. In this paper, we also give a description of the clinical and psychological features likely to characterize patients refractory to treatment for this illness, with the aim of highlighting the need for greater attention to more patient-oriented management of the disease.Keywords: obsessive

  12. Management of chronic spontaneous urticaria in routine clinical practice: A Delphi-method questionnaire among specialists to test agreement with current European guidelines statements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giménez-Arnau, A; Ferrer, M; Bartra, J; Jáuregui, I; Labrador-Horrillo, M; Frutos, J Ortiz de; Silvestre, J F; Sastre, J; Velasco, M; Valero, A

    Chronic spontaneous urticaria (CSU) is a frequent clinical entity that often presents a diagnostic and therapeutic challenge. To explore the degree of agreement that exists among the experts caring for patients with CSU diagnosis, evaluation, and management. An online survey was conducted to explore the opinions of experts in CSU, address controversial issues, and provide recommendations regarding its definition, natural history, diagnosis, and treatment. A modified Delphi method was used for the consensus. The questionnaire was answered by 68 experts (dermatologists, allergologists, and primary care physicians). A consensus was reached on 54 of the 65 items posed (96.4%). The experts concluded that CSU is a difficult-to-control disease of unpredictable evolution. Diagnostic tests should be limited and based on clinical history and should not be indiscriminate. Autoinflammatory syndromes and urticarial vasculitis must be ruled out in the differential diagnosis. A cutaneous biopsy is only recommended when wheals last more than 24h, to rule out urticarial vasculitis. The use of specific scales to assess the severity of the disease and the quality of life is recommended. In patients with severe and resistant CSU, second-generation H1-antihistamines could be used at doses up to four times the standard dose before giving second-line treatments. Omalizumab is a safe and effective treatment for CSU that is refractory to H1-antihistamines treatment. In general, diagnosis and treatment recommendations given for adults could be extrapolated to children. This work offers consensus recommendations that may be useful in the management of CSU. Copyright © 2016 SEICAP. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  13. Current management of peptic ulcer perforations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Menakuru, S.R.

    2004-01-01

    Perforation is a life-threatening complication of peptic ulcer disease. Smoking and use of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs are important risk factors for perforation. Diagnosis is made clinically and confirmed by the presence of pneumoperitoneum on radiographs. Nonoperative management is successful in patients identified to have a spontaneously sealed perforation proven by water-soluble contrast gastroduodenogram. Operative management consists of the time-honoured practice of mental patch closure, but now this can be done by laparoscopic methods. The practice of addition of acid-reducing procedures is currently being debated though it continues to be recommended in good-risk patients. Laparoscopic approaches to closure of duodenal perforation are now being applied widely and may become the gold standard in the future especially in patients with < 10 mm perforation size presenting within the first 24 hours of onset of pain. The role of Helicobacter pylori in duodenal ulcer perforation is controversial and more studies are needed to answer this question though recent indirect evidence suggests that eradicating H pylori may reduce the necessity for adding acid reducing procedures and the associated morbidity. Perforation is a life-threatening complication of peptic ulcer disease. The management of peptic ulcer disease has evolved over the decades, due to advances in operative techniques, bacteriology and pharmacology. While the recognition of the role of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) in peptic ulceration has resulted in a paradigm shift in the management of uncomplicated peptic ulcers, debate continues about the appropriate management of perforated duodenal bulb and prepyloric ulcers. A new dimension has been added to this controversy by the advent of laparoscopic techniques for closing the perforation. A Medline search of all articles dealing with the management of peptic ulcer perforation published after 1985 was undertaken. The short listed articles were

  14. [Clinical Management: Basics and organization].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres, Juan; Mingo, Carlos

    2015-01-01

    Many strategies have been proposed over the last years to ensure the Health Care System sustainability, mainly after the recent global economic crisis. One of the most attractive approaches is clinical management, which is a way of organizing health care units based on active participation of professionals who receive the transference of responsibilities dispoto achieve the objectives with the mission of ensuring a proper patient centered care, taking into consideration the rational use of resources (Efficiency) For the start up of Health Care structures based on clinical management, it is necessary a previous management culture within the departments involved and the center's executive board. Furthermore, to achieve the objectives proposed various tools must be used, such as evidence based medicine, clinical practice variability analysis, process management, in addition of quality and safety strategies. The units involved have to propose a management plan that will result in a management contract with the center's executive board. This agreement will establish some activity, expense and quality objectives that will be quantifiable through various indicators. Risk transference to the unit must include certain budget allocation and incentive decision capacity. Clinical management must not be employed as a savings tool from the part of macro and meso management. There is not a health care structure based on clinical management that have a general character for all health care organizations, existing a great variability in the adoption of various organizational formulas, so that every center must perform its own analysis and decide the most adequate model. In our country there are many clinical management experiences, although there is a long way to go.

  15. Clinical management of achondroplasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, M J; Irving, M D

    2012-02-01

    Achondroplasia, one of the skeletal dysplasias and the commonest form of disproportionate short stature, has a different developmental and growth profile compared to average stature children. In addition, a specific group of complications occur more frequently in children with achondroplasia. These include common but usually relatively minor complications such as recurrent otitis media, and rarer but more severe problems such as cervicomedullary compression. Knowledge of these complications, appropriate surveillance strategies and treatment options is essential for the paediatrician. The authors review the published literature in this area and provide a system based approach to the management of the healthcare needs of the child with achondroplasia.

  16. Clinical utility of alpha-1 proteinase inhibitor in the management of adult patients with severe alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency: a review of the current literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parr DG

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available David G Parr, Beatriz Lara Department of Respiratory Medicine, Cardio-Respiratory Division, University Hospital Coventry, Coventry, UK Abstract: Alpha-1 antitrypsin (AAT functions primarily to inhibit neutrophil elastase, and its deficiency predisposes individuals to the development of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD. The putative protective serum concentration is generally considered to be above a threshold of 11 µM/L, and therapeutic augmentation of AAT above this value is believed to retard the progression of emphysema. Several AAT preparations, all derived from human donor plasma, have been commercialized since approval by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA in 1987. Biochemical efficacy has been demonstrated by augmentation of pulmonary antiprotease activity, but demonstration of clinical efficacy in randomized, placebo-controlled trials has been hampered by the practical difficulties of performing conventional studies in a rare disease with a relatively long natural history. Computed tomography has been applied to measure lung density as a more specific and sensitive surrogate outcome measure of emphysema than physiologic indices, such as forced expiratory volume in 1 second, and studies consistently show a therapeutic reduction in the rate of lung density decline. However, convincing evidence of benefit using traditional clinical measures remains elusive. Intravenous administration of AAT at a dose of 60 mg/kg/week is the commonest regime in use and has well-documented safety and tolerability. International and national guidelines on the management of AAT deficiency recommend intravenous augmentation therapy to supplement optimized usual COPD treatment in patients with severe deficiency and evidence of lung function impairment. Keywords: alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency, augmentation or replacement therapy, computed tomography, emphysema, COPD

  17. Primary aldosteronism. Clinical management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grant, C.S.; Carpenter, P.; van Heerden, J.A.; Hamberger, B.

    1984-01-01

    We retrospectively reviewed the clinical features, methods of diagnosis and localization, and results of treatment in 105 patients with primary aldosteronism seen between 1969 and 1981. Coincident with the use of computed tomography (CT), 131 I-6-beta-iodomethyl norcholesterol scans (NP-59), and postural response studies, the study group was temporally divided into pre-1976 and post-1976 groups, and subdivided into groups with aldosterone-producing adenoma (APA) and idiopathic hyperaldosteronism (IHA) due to bilateral adrenal hyperplasia. Our results indicate that aldosterone postural response studies and CT differentiate and localize APA and IHA reliably. Adrenalectomy is a safe and effective treatment for APA, whereas medical treatment alone is preferable for IHA

  18. Sodium-glucose cotransporter 2 inhibitors combined with dipeptidyl peptidase-4 inhibitors in the management of type 2 diabetes: a review of current clinical evidence and rationale

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yassin SA

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Sayf A Yassin,1 Vanita R Aroda2 1MedStar Union Memorial Hospital, Baltimore, 2MedStar Health Research Institute, Hyattsville, MD, USA Abstract: Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM is a progressive and multifactorial cardiometabolic disorder. Almost half of adults with diabetes fail to achieve their recommended glucose control target. This has prompted some clinicians to advocate the use of more intensive initial therapy, including the use of combination therapy to target multiple physiologic defects in diabetes with the goal of achieving and sustaining glucose control. Numerous options exist for combining the various classes of glucose-lowering agents in the treatment of T2DM. This report reviews the mechanism, rationale, and evidence from clinical trials for combining two of the newer drug classes, namely, dipeptidyl peptidase-4 inhibitors and sodium-glucose cotransporter 2 inhibitors, and considers the possible role of such dual therapy in the management of T2DM. Keywords: sodium-glucose cotransporter 2 inhibitors, dipeptidyl peptidase-4 inhibitors, type 2 diabetes mellitus, combination therapy

  19. [Current clinical significance of anaerobic bacteremia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jirsa, Roman; Marešová, Veronika; Brož, Zdeněk

    2010-10-01

    to estimate tje current clinical significance of anaerobic bacteremia in a group of Czech hospitals. this retrospective analysis comprised 8 444 anaerobic blood cultures in patients admitted to four Czech hospitals between 2004 and 2007. in 16 patients, blood cultures yielded significant anaerobic bacteria. Thus, anaerobic bacteremia accounted for less than 2 % of clinically significant bacteremia. Four patients (18 %) died but none of the deaths could be clearly attributable to anaerobic bacteria in the bloodstream. The most common comorbidities predisposing to anaerobic bacteremia and the most frequent sources of infection were similar to those reported by other authors. The majority of anaerobic bacteremia cases were due to gram-negative bacteria, followed by Clostridium perfringens and, surprisingly, Eubacterium spp. (particularly Eubacterium lentum). anaerobic bacteremia remains rare. The comparison of our data with those by other authors suggests that (despite the reported high mortality) the actual clinical significance of anaerobic bacteremia is rather controversial and that the anaerobic bacteremia might not correspond to more serious pathogenic role of the anaerobic bacteria as the source of infection.

  20. Ketamine use in current clinical practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Mei; Rejaei, Damoon; Liu, Hong

    2016-01-01

    After nearly half a century on the market, ketamine still occupies a unique corner in the medical armamentarium of anesthesiologists or clinicians treating pain. Over the last two decades, much research has been conducted highlighting the drug's mechanisms of action, specifically those of its enantiomers. Nowadays, ketamine is also being utilized for pediatric pain control in emergency department, with its anti-hyperalgesic and anti-inflammatory effects being revealed in acute and chronic pain management. Recently, new insights have been gained on ketamine's potential anti-depressive and antisuicidal effects. This article provides an overview of the drug's pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics while also discussing the potential benefits and risks of ketamine administration in various clinical settings. PMID:27018176

  1. Topical steroids in the current clinical practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. A. Belousova

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The article discusses issues related to current criteria for selection of glucocorticosteroids for external use as the basic therapy for a great number of allergic and inflammatory skin diseases. The authors emphasize that non-fluorinated GCSs having the best efficacy-to-safety ratio must be the drugs of first choice. The article provides data on a positive clinical experience of using a non-halogenated glucocorticosteroid for external use - hydrocortisone 17-butyrate (Laticort - for treatment of steroid-sensitive dermatoses in children and adults. The drug has a high anti-inflammatory action and minimum risk of the development of side effects, which is sufficient for using it in sensitive areas of skin (face, neck, folds, genitals both in children and in adults. The availability of three forms of the drug (solution, cream and ointment ensures the expedience and convenience of its application at any stage of the inflammatory process and for any localization.

  2. Obesity in Nigeria: Current trends and management | Akpa ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The objective of the study is to review the current knowledge on the problems associated with obesity, as well as the measures and strategies that have evolved in its management. A review of the literature on the subject of obesity, its epidemiology, risk factors, clinical complications and treatment (using Medline computer ...

  3. Current Challenges in Social Media Management

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tørning, Kristian; Jaffari, Zeshan Ali; Vatrapu, Ravi

    2015-01-01

    and sales, customer support, product innovation etc. To investigate current social media managerial practices, we conducted a multiple case study, employing structured in-depth interviews with social media managers at some of the leading multi-national companies headquartered in Denmark (LEGO®, Mærsk...

  4. Current management of severe dengue infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Tau Hong; Lee, Linda Kay; Lye, David Chien; Leo, Yee Sin

    2017-01-01

    Traditionally a disease mainly affecting the pediatric population, dengue burden has increased significantly in recent decades and adults with severe disease may become more common. There is currently no effective anti-viral agent available for the treatment of dengue and supportive care is the mainstay of management. Areas covered: We present a review of current literature on dengue severity classification systems and the management of severe dengue in adults. In particular, emphasis was placed on organ impairment in dengue and management of elderly individuals with multiple medical problems. Expert commentary: There is an urgent need to search for an effective anti-viral agent to treat infected individuals. The commercial availability of a dengue vaccine in older children has provided optimism in reducing the disease burden but long term efficacy and safety are unknown. The results from phase III trials of two new candidate vaccines are eagerly awaited.

  5. Cancer pain management-current status

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deepak Thapa

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Cancer pain is still one of the most feared entities in cancer and about 75% of these patients require treatment with opioids for severe pain. The cancer pain relief is difficult to manage in patients with episodic or incidental pain, neuropathic pain, substance abuse and with impaired cognitive or communication skills. This non-systematic review article aims to discuss reasons for under treatment, tools of pain assessment, cancer pain and anxiety and possibly carve new approaches for cancer pain management in future. The current status of World Health Organization analgesic ladder has also been reviewed. A thorough literature search was carried out from 1998 to 2010 for current status in cancer pain management in MEDLINE, WHO guidelines and published literature and relevant articles have been included.

  6. Current and Future Parts Management at NASA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sampson, Michael J.

    2011-01-01

    This presentation provides a high level view of current and future electronic parts management at NASA. It describes a current perspective of the new human space flight direction that NASA is beginning to take and how that could influence parts management in the future. It provides an overview of current NASA electronic parts policy and how that is implemented at the NASA flight Centers. It also describes some of the technical challenges that lie ahead and suggests approaches for their mitigation. These challenges include: advanced packaging, obsolescence and counterfeits, the global supply chain and Commercial Crew, a new direction by which NASA will utilize commercial launch vehicles to get astronauts to the International Space Station.

  7. Status Epilepticus and Beyond: A Clinical Review of Status Epilepticus and an Update on Current Management Strategies in Super-refractory Status Epilepticus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roy Poblete

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Status epilepticus and refractory status epilepticus represent some of the most complex conditions encountered in the neurological intensive care unit. Challenges in management are common as treatment options become limited and prolonged hospital courses are accompanied by complications and worsening patient outcomes. Antiepileptic drug treatments have become increasingly complex. Rational polytherapy should consider the pharmacodynamics and kinetics of medications. When seizures cannot be controlled with medical therapy, alternative treatments, including early surgical evaluation can be considered; however, evidence is limited. This review provides a brief overview of status epilepticus, and a recent update on the management of refractory status epilepticus based on evidence from the literature, evidence-based guidelines, and experiences at our institution.

  8. Challenges of implementing fibromyalgia treatment guidelines in current clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnold, Lesley M; Clauw, Daniel J

    2017-09-01

    The current diagnostic and treatment pathway for patients with fibromyalgia (FM) is lengthy, complex, and characterized by multiple physician visits with an average 2-year wait until diagnosis. It is clear that effective identification and appropriate treatment of FM remain a challenge in current clinical practice. Ideally, FM management involves a multidisciplinary approach with the preferable patient pathway originating in primary care but supported by a range of health care providers, including referral to specialist care when necessary. After the publication of individual clinical studies, high-quality reviews, and meta-analyses, recently published FM treatment guidelines have transitioned from an expert consensus to an evidence-based approach. Evidence-based guidelines provide a framework for ensuring early diagnosis and timely adoption of appropriate treatment. However, for successful outcomes, FM treatments must adopt a more holistic approach, which addresses more than just pain. Impact on the associated symptoms of fatigue and cognitive problems, sleep and mood disturbances, and lowered functional status are also important in judging the success of FM therapy. Recently published guidelines recommend the adoption of a symptom-based approach to guide pharmacologic treatment. Emerging treatment options for FM may be best differentiated on the basis of their effect on comorbid symptoms that are often associated with pain (e.g. sleep disturbance, mood, fatigue). The current review discusses the most recently published Canadian guidelines and the implications of the recent European League Against Rheumatism (EULAR) recommendations, with a focus on the challenges of implementing these guidelines in current clinical practice.

  9. Brainstem tumors: Current management and future directions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pablo F Recinos

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Tumors arising in the brainstem comprise 10-20% of all pediatric central nervous system (CNS tumors and account for a small percentage in adults. The prognosis for these tumors was considered uniformly poor prior to the era of modern neuroimaging and the location was fraught with disaster being considered a ′no man′s land′ for neurosurgeons. Following the introduction of advanced imaging modalities and neurophysiological monitoring, striking progress has occurred in the management of these lesions. Brainstem tumors are presently classified based on their anatomic location, focality, and histopathology. This article reviews the current classification of brainstem tumors, current management options, and future directions in the treatment for these rare tumors.

  10. Endoscopic Ultrasound Elastography: Current Clinical Use in Pancreas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mondal, Utpal; Henkes, Nichole; Patel, Sandeep; Rosenkranz, Laura

    2016-08-01

    Elastography is a newer technique for the assessment of tissue elasticity using ultrasound. Cancerous tissue is known to be stiffer (hence, less elastic) than corresponding healthy tissue, and as a result, could be identified in an elasticity-based imaging. Ultrasound elastography has been used in the breast, thyroid, and cervix to differentiate malignant from benign neoplasms and to guide or avoid unnecessary biopsies. In the liver, elastography has enabled a noninvasive and reliable estimate of fibrosis. Endoscopic ultrasound has become a robust diagnostic and therapeutic tool for the management of pancreatic diseases. The addition of elastography to endoscopic ultrasound enabled further characterization of pancreas lesions, and several European and Asian studies have reported encouraging results. The current clinical role of endoscopic ultrasound elastography in the management of pancreas disorders and related literature are reviewed.

  11. Hyperthermia: Clinical promise and current challenges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kapp, D.S.

    1987-01-01

    Local-regional hyperthermia (HT) when used in conjunction with radiation therapy (XRT), has been shown in numerous clinical trials to result in considerable improvement in response rates and local tumor control rates when compared with treatment by XRT alone. Although considerable progress has been made in understanding the biological basis for hyperthermia induced cytotoxicity and radiosensitization, additional research remains in establishing the optimal treatment schedules for the clinical utilization of HT-XRT. The number of HT treatments; the sequencing of HT and XRT; the frequency of administration of HT; and the ideal temperature-time parameters all remain to be better defined for the clinical setting. The role of tumor blood flow on the thermal distributions also warrants further investigation. In addition, considerable effort is needed to improve hyperthermia equipment in order to provide more uniform therapeutic temperature distributions (temperatures ≥42.5%C). Better heating equipment is particularly needed for the treatment of deep seeted tumors. Pertinent clinical literature will be presented summarizing the clinical promise of hyperthermia and the above mentioned clinical challenges

  12. Management of scalp psoriasis: current perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Blakely K

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Kim Blakely,1 Melinda Gooderham2 1Faculty of Medicine, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, Canada; 2Skin Centre for Dermatology, Peterborough, ON, Canada Abstract: Psoriasis is a chronic inflammatory condition. The age of onset, chronicity, physical, and psychosocial consequences of the disease cause psoriasis to have a significant impact on patient quality of life. Scalp psoriasis is no different, and effective treatment results in an improvement in quality of life. Successful management of scalp psoriasis includes topical therapies that are acceptable to the patient for mild-to-moderate disease, and systemic therapies for recalcitrant or moderate-to-severe disease. The most effective topical therapies are corticosteroid products, or combination products with calcipotriol and corticosteroid. Newer vehicle options provide more attractive and pleasing products for patients and may improve adherence. The current perspectives for management of scalp psoriasis are discussed including available data for systemic therapy of severe disease. Keywords: psoriasis, scalp psoriasis, topical therapies, systemic therapies, biologics

  13. Current possibilities in occlusal caries management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hrvoje Jurić

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Dental caries is a multifactorial disease that affects most populations throughout the world and it is still the primary cause of oral pain and tooth loss. The occlusal surfaces of posterior teeth are the most vulnerable sites for dental caries due to their anatomy. Therefore, the aim of the following article is to summarize current knowledge on occlusal caries development and the possibilities of its prevention. Although the overall caries rate today has fallen for populations in industrialized countries, the rate of occlusal surface caries has not decreased. This may be explained with fact that topically applied fluorides and their mode of action prevent caries better on smooth than on occlusal surfaces. As we know, tooth decay of first permanent molars causes a great deal of different short and long term difficulties for patients. Therefore, there is a continuous need for implementation of programs for caries prevention in permanent teeth. Nowadays, we like to treat our patients by minimally invasive methods. A very important step in our effective preventive treatment is sealing pits and fissures as a cornerstone of occlusal caries management. Reliable assessment of caries activity is also very important for defining treatment needs and plans. A very important decision, which should be made during occlusal caries management, is the selection of restorative material according to the treatment plan. Conclusion. Current possibilities in occlusal caries prevention and management are very effective. Therefore, dentists today do not have any excuse for avoiding the philosophy of Minimally Invasive Dentistry, especially when we talk about caries management of occlusal surfaces in permanent molars.

  14. Managing ankle ligament sprains and tears: current opinion

    OpenAIRE

    McGovern RP; Martin RL

    2016-01-01

    Ryan P McGovern,1 RobRoy L Martin,1,2 1Department of Physical Therapy, Rangos School of Health Sciences, Duquesne University, 2Centers for Sports Medicine – University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA, USA Abstract: The purpose of this paper is to present a current review of pathoanatomical features, differential diagnosis, objective assessment, intervention, and clinical course associated with managing lateral ankle ligament sprains. Proper diagnosis and identification of affected st...

  15. Current Risk Management Practices in Psychotherapy Supervision.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehrtens, Ilayna K; Crapanzano, Kathleen; Tynes, L Lee

    2017-12-01

    Psychotherapy competence is a core skill for psychiatry residents, and psychotherapy supervision is a time-honored approach to teaching this skill. To explore the current supervision practices of psychiatry training programs, a 24-item questionnaire was sent to all program directors of Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME)-approved adult psychiatry programs. The questionnaire included items regarding adherence to recently proposed therapy supervision practices aimed at reducing potential liability risk. The results suggested that current therapy supervision practices do not include sufficient management of the potential liability involved in therapy supervision. Better protections for patients, residents, supervisors and the institutions would be possible with improved credentialing practices and better documentation of informed consent and supervision policies and procedures. © 2017 American Academy of Psychiatry and the Law.

  16. Clinical management of chronic TMD pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, D B

    1998-01-01

    Chronic Pain extracts a "penalty" on society now estimated to be well in excess of $100 million per year. The "penalty" that Chronic Pain extracts from its victims is incalculable. Chronic Pain is a major component of Temporomandibular Disorders. The current neurological theory of the mechanism of chronic TMD pain is explored along with the current modes of treatment. Pharmacological management of Chronic Pain in a clinical setting is outlined. Dentists are involved in pain management on a daily basis. Dentists treat pain both prophylacticly and in response to specific patient symptoms. Most dental treatment involves some type of pain management. We, dentists, have become very adept at managing acute pain. We have much greater difficulty managing chronic pain. The word "pain" derives from the Greek word for penalty, and appeared to them to be a "penalty" inflicted by the gods. In 1984, Bonica estimated that one-third of all Americans suffered from some kind of chronic pain at a "penalty" to society of $65 Billion annually in medical expenses and lost wages and productivity. This figure is certainly much greater now. Chronic pain can be a very complex problem that can require a multidisciplinary approach to treatment. Chronic pain in the dental setting is most frequetly caused by prolonged Temporomandibular Disorders.

  17. Epistaxis management: current understanding amongst junior doctors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, R; Nash, R; Liu, Z-W; Singh, A

    2016-03-01

    Epistaxis is a common and potentially life-threatening emergency. This survey assesses understanding and confidence in epistaxis management amongst current junior doctors. A cross-sectional study was conducted of foundation year one and two doctors based at three National Health Service trusts within a single region of the UK, assessing basic understanding and procedural confidence. A total of 111 foundation doctors completed this survey. The average duration of undergraduate exposure to otolaryngology was 8.1 days. Forty-one per cent of respondents stated that they would apply pressure to the nasal bones to control epistaxis. Seventy-five per cent lacked confidence in their ability to manage epistaxis. Those with two weeks or more of undergraduate exposure to otolaryngology were more confident than those with one week or less of exposure (p epistaxis management, with patient safety implications. Confidence is associated with the duration of undergraduate exposure to otolaryngology. A minimum emergency safe competency should be a priority during foundation training if not achieved in UK medical schools.

  18. Evaluation of leak current of clinical electrometers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lopez G, W.; Campos, X.

    2002-01-01

    The present work shows the evaluation of two electrometers model Victoreen used in radiotherapy. The performance of the electrometers was proven using a source of current, built inside the work frame arcal 34, and using like reference the norm iec 60371. The results of the tests of leakage, displacement of the zero and linealty of the electrometers are presented

  19. Current Perspectives on Desmoid Tumors: The Mayo Clinic Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scott Okuno

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Desmoid tumors are a rare group of locally aggressive, non malignant tumors of fibroblastic origin that can lead to significant morbidity due to local invasion. Despite advances in the understanding of these tumors, their natural history is incompletely understood and the optimal treatment is still a matter of debate. Local control is the main goal of treatment and there has been a change in philosophy regarding the management of these tumors from aggressive surgical resection to function preservation. A multidisciplinary approach is essential to plan local control with acceptable morbidity. The current Mayo Clinic algorithm for the treatment of these tumors is based on institutional experience and the available evidence in the literature: asymptomatic/non progressive lesions away from vital structures are managed with observation and regular imaging; primary or recurrent desmoid tumors which are symptomatic or progressive or near vital structures are managed with wide surgical resection when wide surgical margins are possible with minimal functional and cosmetic loss. When positive or close surgical margins are likely, surgical resection with adjuvant radiotherapy or definitive radiotherapy is preferred. If likely functional or cosmetic deficit is unacceptable, radiotherapy is the treatment of choice. Unresectable lesions are considered for radiotherapy, chemotherapy or newer modalities however an unresectable lesion associated with a painful, functionless, infected extremity is managed with an amputation.

  20. Current Perspectives on Desmoid Tumors: The Mayo Clinic Approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joglekar, Siddharth B.; Rose, Peter S.; Sim, Franklin; Okuno, Scott; Petersen, Ivy

    2011-01-01

    Desmoid tumors are a rare group of locally aggressive, non malignant tumors of fibroblastic origin that can lead to significant morbidity due to local invasion. Despite advances in the understanding of these tumors, their natural history is incompletely understood and the optimal treatment is still a matter of debate. Local control is the main goal of treatment and there has been a change in philosophy regarding the management of these tumors from aggressive surgical resection to function preservation. A multidisciplinary approach is essential to plan local control with acceptable morbidity. The current Mayo Clinic algorithm for the treatment of these tumors is based on institutional experience and the available evidence in the literature: asymptomatic/non progressive lesions away from vital structures are managed with observation and regular imaging; primary or recurrent desmoid tumors which are symptomatic or progressive or near vital structures are managed with wide surgical resection when wide surgical margins are possible with minimal functional and cosmetic loss. When positive or close surgical margins are likely, surgical resection with adjuvant radiotherapy or definitive radiotherapy is preferred. If likely functional or cosmetic deficit is unacceptable, radiotherapy is the treatment of choice. Unresectable lesions are considered for radiotherapy, chemotherapy or newer modalities however an unresectable lesion associated with a painful, functionless, infected extremity is managed with an amputation

  1. Current clinical research in orthodontics: a perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumrind, Sheldon

    2006-10-01

    This essay explores briefly the approach of the Craniofacial Research Instrumentation Laboratory to the systematic and rigorous investigation of the usual outcome of orthodontic treatment in the practices of experienced clinicians. CRIL's goal is to produce a shareable electronic database of reliable, valid, and representative data on clinical practice as an aid in the production of an improved environment for truly evidence-based orthodontic treatment.

  2. Current developments in clinical multiphoton tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    König, Karsten; Weinigel, Martin; Breunig, Hans Georg; Gregory, Axel; Fischer, Peter; Kellner-Höfer, Marcel; Bückle, Rainer

    2010-02-01

    Two-photon microscopy has been introduced in 1990 [1]. 13 years later, CE-marked clinical multiphoton systems for 3D imaging of human skin with subcellular resolution have been launched by the JenLab company with the tomograph DermaInspectTM. In 2010, the second generation of clinical multiphoton tomographs was introduced. The novel mobile multiphoton tomograph MPTflexTM, equipped with a flexible articulated optical arm, provides an increased flexibility and accessibility especially for clinical and cosmetical examinations. The multiphoton excitation of fluorescent biomolecules like NAD(P)H, flavins, porphyrins, elastin, and melanin as well as the second harmonic generation of collagen is induced by picojoule femtosecond laser pulses from an tunable turn-key near infrared laser system. The ability for rapid highquality image acquisition, the user-friendly operation of the system, and the compact and flexible design qualifies this system to be used for melanoma detection, diagnostics of dermatological disorders, cosmetic research, and skin aging measurements as well as in situ drug monitoring and animal research. So far, more than 1,000 patients and volunteers have been investigated with the multiphoton tomographs in Europe, Asia, and Australia.

  3. Managing hyperthyroidism in pregnancy: current perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersen, Stine Linding; Laurberg, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Hyperthyroidism in women who are of childbearing age is predominantly of autoimmune origin and caused by Graves' disease. The physiological changes in the maternal immune system during a pregnancy may influence the development of this and other autoimmune diseases. Furthermore, pregnancy-associated physiological changes influence the synthesis and metabolism of thyroid hormones and challenge the interpretation of thyroid function tests in pregnancy. Thyroid hormones are crucial regulators of early development and play an important role in the maintenance of a normal pregnancy and in the development of the fetus, particularly the fetal brain. Untreated or inadequately treated hyperthyroidism is associated with pregnancy complications and may even program the fetus to long-term development of disease. Thus, hyperthyroidism in pregnant women should be carefully managed and controlled, and proper management involves different medical specialties. The treatment of choice in pregnancy is antithyroid drugs (ATDs). These drugs are effective in the control of maternal hyperthyroidism, but they all cross the placenta, and so need careful management and control during the second half of pregnancy considering the risk of fetal hyper- or hypothyroidism. An important aspect in the early pregnancy is that the predominant side effect to the use of ATDs in weeks 6-10 of pregnancy is birth defects that may develop after exposure to available types of ATDs and may be severe. This review focuses on four current perspectives in the management of overt hyperthyroidism in pregnancy, including the etiology and incidence of the disease, how the diagnosis is made, the consequences of untreated or inadequately treated disease, and finally how to treat overt hyperthyroidism in pregnancy.

  4. Managing hyperthyroidism in pregnancy: current perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersen, Stine Linding; Laurberg, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Hyperthyroidism in women who are of childbearing age is predominantly of autoimmune origin and caused by Graves’ disease. The physiological changes in the maternal immune system during a pregnancy may influence the development of this and other autoimmune diseases. Furthermore, pregnancy-associated physiological changes influence the synthesis and metabolism of thyroid hormones and challenge the interpretation of thyroid function tests in pregnancy. Thyroid hormones are crucial regulators of early development and play an important role in the maintenance of a normal pregnancy and in the development of the fetus, particularly the fetal brain. Untreated or inadequately treated hyperthyroidism is associated with pregnancy complications and may even program the fetus to long-term development of disease. Thus, hyperthyroidism in pregnant women should be carefully managed and controlled, and proper management involves different medical specialties. The treatment of choice in pregnancy is antithyroid drugs (ATDs). These drugs are effective in the control of maternal hyperthyroidism, but they all cross the placenta, and so need careful management and control during the second half of pregnancy considering the risk of fetal hyper- or hypothyroidism. An important aspect in the early pregnancy is that the predominant side effect to the use of ATDs in weeks 6–10 of pregnancy is birth defects that may develop after exposure to available types of ATDs and may be severe. This review focuses on four current perspectives in the management of overt hyperthyroidism in pregnancy, including the etiology and incidence of the disease, how the diagnosis is made, the consequences of untreated or inadequately treated disease, and finally how to treat overt hyperthyroidism in pregnancy. PMID:27698567

  5. Small Bowel Transplantation: Current Clinical Status

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Sigalet

    1991-01-01

    Full Text Available With recent refinements in immunosuppression techniques, the first successful reports of small bowel transplantation in humans have now been made, increasing interest in bowel transplantation among clinicians and patients alike. This article reviews recent developments in understanding of the functional capabilities and requirements for effective immune suppression in bowel transplantation. Both experimental and clinical experience with transplantation are discussed, as are the areas which appear to offer the most promise for future developments. Finally guidelines for consideration of patient selection for this procedure are reviewed.

  6. Current management of surgical oncologic emergencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosscher, Marianne R F; van Leeuwen, Barbara L; Hoekstra, Harald J

    2015-01-01

    For some oncologic emergencies, surgical interventions are necessary for dissolution or temporary relieve. In the absence of guidelines, the most optimal method for decision making would be in a multidisciplinary cancer conference (MCC). In an acute setting, the opportunity for multidisciplinary discussion is often not available. In this study, the management and short term outcome of patients after surgical oncologic emergency consultation was analyzed. A prospective registration and follow up of adult patients with surgical oncologic emergencies between 01-11-2013 and 30-04-2014. The follow up period was 30 days. In total, 207 patients with surgical oncologic emergencies were included. Postoperative wound infections, malignant obstruction, and clinical deterioration due to progressive disease were the most frequent conditions for surgical oncologic emergency consultation. During the follow up period, 40% of patients underwent surgery. The median number of involved medical specialties was two. Only 30% of all patients were discussed in a MCC within 30 days after emergency consultation, and only 41% of the patients who underwent surgery were discussed in a MCC. For 79% of these patients, the surgical procedure was performed before the MCC. Mortality within 30 days was 13%. In most cases, surgery occurred without discussing the patient in a MCC, regardless of the fact that multiple medical specialties were involved in the treatment process. There is a need for prognostic aids and acute oncology pathways with structural multidisciplinary management. These will provide in faster institution of the most appropriate personalized cancer care, and prevent unnecessary investigations or invasive therapy.

  7. Cardiogenic shock. Current concepts in management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balakumaran, K; Hugenholtz, P G

    1986-10-01

    This article presents a categorisation of circulatory shock and discusses the causes, haemodynamics, and clinical recognition of cardiogenic shock. The first step in the management strategy in cardiogenic shock is to guide the patient from the state of shock to one of managed haemodynamic stability. The therapeutic manoeuvres of this first step constitute the management tactics, which can be grouped under 3 general headings: (a) making the most of a malfunctioning heart; (b) improving the state of the heart; and (c) reducing the demands on the heart. In order to make the most of the heart, i.e. to get the highest possible output at the lowest possible cost, clinicians need to use their judgement in stimulating an overtaxed heart on the one hand, and in manipulating the loads on it (the preload and afterload) on the other, for although these methods may be advantageous, they are not without their pitfalls. Efforts to improve the state of the heart often necessitate surgical (e.g. mitral valve replacement) or semisurgical (e.g. coronary angiography and recanalisation) techniques, although intravenous antithrombotic agents may achieve comparable results in a few cases at the bedside. Reducing the demands on the heart is an active process involving the takeover of at least a part of the work of the heart by ancillary devices such as the intra-aortic balloon pump, and of the work of breathing by intubation and artificial ventilation. The individuality of each case of cardiogenic shock emphasises the need for empirical modulation of therapy based on feedback information obtained by haemodynamic monitoring.

  8. Neutralized current acid waste consolidation management plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Powell, W.J.; Brown, R.G.; Galbraith, J.; Jensen, C.; Place, D.E.; Reddick, G.W.; Zuroff, W.; Brothers, A.J.

    1996-01-01

    The scope of this evaluation is to recommend a management plan for the high-heat tank waste, including neutralized current acid waste (NCAW) in AY and AZ Tank Farms, and tank C-106 waste. The movement of solids, liquids and salt cake in the designated tank farms is included. Decision analysis techniques were used to determine a recommended alternative. The recommended course of action was replacement of a 75-hp mixer pump in tank AY-102 and in-tank concentration of tank AZ-102 supernate. The alternative includes transfer fo tank C-106 sludge to tank AY-102, then transfer to tank AY-102 and tank C-106 sludge to tank AZ-101 using the new 75-hp mixer pump installed in tank AY-102. Tank AZ-101 becomes a storage tank for high-level waste (HLW) sludge, with the capacity to mix and transfer sludge as desired

  9. Optimal management of genital herpes: current perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sauerbrei, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    As one of the most common sexually transmitted diseases, genital herpes is a global medical problem with significant physical and psychological morbidity. Genital herpes is caused by herpes simplex virus type 1 or type 2 and can manifest as primary and/or recurrent infection. This manuscript provides an overview about the fundamental knowledge on the virus, its epidemiology, and infection. Furthermore, the current possibilities of antiviral therapeutic interventions and laboratory diagnosis of genital herpes as well as the present situation and perspectives for the treatment by novel antivirals and prevention of disease by vaccination are presented. Since the medical management of patients with genital herpes simplex virus infection is often unsatisfactory, this review aims at all physicians and health professionals who are involved in the care of patients with genital herpes. The information provided would help to improve the counseling of affected patients and to optimize the diagnosis, treatment, and prevention of this particular disease.

  10. Management of infantile hemangiomas: Current trends

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gomathy Sethuraman

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Infantile hemangiomas (IH are common vascular tumours. IH have a characteristic natural course. They proliferate rapidly during the early infantile period followed by a period of gradual regression over several years. Most of the uncomplicated IH undergo spontaneous involution, with a small proportion of cases requiring intervention. These are children with IH in life-threatening locations, local complications like haemorrhage, ulceration and necrosis and functional or cosmetic disfigurements. Systemic corticosteroids have been the first line of treatment for many years. Recently, non-selective beta-blockers, such as oral propranalol and topical timolol, have emerged as promising and safer therapies. Other treatment options include interferon α and vincristine which are reserved for life-threatening haemangiomas that are unresponsive to conventional therapy. This review mainly focuses on the current trends and evidence-based approach in the management of IH.

  11. Management units radio physics hospital clinic: New management model?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iborra Oquendo, M.; Angulo Pain, E.; Castro Ramirez, I.; Quinones Rodriguez, L. A.; Urena Llinares, A.; Richarter Reina, J. M.; Lupiani Castellanos, J.; Ramos Caballero, L. I.

    2011-01-01

    Clinical management in the Andalusian Health Service is a process of organizational design that allows professionals to incorporate the management of resources used in their own clinical practice. In the Clinical Management Units activity develops according to different objectives, among them: encourage the involvement of health professionals in managing the centers, enhance continuity of care between the two levels of care, improve work organization and raise patient satisfaction.

  12. The current management of spinal cord cavernoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velz, Julia; Bozinov, Oliver; Sarnthein, Johannes; Regli, Luca; Bellut, David

    2018-01-04

    Spinal cavernous malformations (SCM) were once thought to be rare lesions of the spinal cord. However, with the broad use of modern imaging techniques the incidence of SCM has significantly increased over the last decades. Management of both symptomatic and incidental findings is therefore of growing importance. However, experience with treatment and follow-up is very limited. We performed a single institution retrospective review of consecutive patients with SCM treated at our Department between 2006-2016 and discuss the clinical features as well as surgical versus conservative outcomes. We further provide a systematic literature search and discuss the best management of SCM, analyzing recent publications on SCM imaging techniques, surgical approaches and natural history. From a total number of 406 consecutive patients with cavernous malformations (CM) treated at our Department between 2006-2016, 29 (7.1 %) were found to be affected by SCM. The localization was cervical in 10 (34.5 %), cervicothoracic in 3 (10.4 %) and thoracic in 16 (55.2 %) patients. In 90 % of patients (n = 26) the diagnosis was made after onset of clinical symptoms. Conservative management was performed for 8 patients, whereas 21 patients underwent surgical removal of the lesion via a posterior approach using (hemi-) laminectomy or laminoplasty. Functional status improved in 15 patients (62. 5%) and remained unchanged in 6 patients (28.5 %) in the operative group, whereas 2 patients (25 %) improved and 6 patients (75 %) remained unchanged in the conservative group during long-term follow-up. Gross-total resection is the only definitive treatment option for symptomatic SCM. Surgical extirpation of the symptomatic SCM lesion through an unilateral laminectomy ( = hemilaminectomy) approach within 3 months of presentation seems to be good treatment option with an acceptable risk of complications and good long-term outcomes. Conservative treatment should be performed in asymptomatic patients and

  13. Clinical Practices in Collegiate Concussion Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baugh, Christine M; Kroshus, Emily; Stamm, Julie M; Daneshvar, Daniel H; Pepin, Michael J; Meehan, William P

    2016-06-01

    In recent years, sports leagues and sports medicine experts have developed guidelines for concussion management. The extent to which current clinical practice is consistent with guideline recommendations is unclear. At the collegiate level, there have been few examinations of concussion management practices and the extent to which meaningful differences across divisions of competition exist. The purposes of this study were to (1) examine current practices in concussion diagnosis and management at National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) member colleges, (2) explore the extent to which current practices reflect current recommendations for concussion diagnosis and management, and (3) determine whether there are differences in management patterns across divisions of competition. Descriptive epidemiology study. An electronic questionnaire was sent to sports medicine clinicians at all NCAA member colleges during September and October 2013. Clinicians were asked about baseline assessments, diagnosis and management practices, return-to-play protocols, the perceived prevalence of underdiagnosis, and basic demographic information. Approximately 30% (n = 866) of contacted clinicians, representing nearly 50% (n = 527) of NCAA member colleges, responded to the questionnaire. Preparticipation baseline examinations were administered at the majority of schools (95%), but most (87.5%) administered baseline assessments only to selected high-risk athletes. Computerized neurocognitive testing and balance assessments were most commonly used as preseason baseline and postinjury assessments. Multimodal examination in line with NCAA and other guidance was used only at a minority of institutions. Athletic trainers most commonly administered and interpreted the preseason baseline examination. Most clinicians reported that their institutions' practices were in line with NCAA guidelines during the first 24 hours of an athlete's concussion diagnosis, with exact percentages varying

  14. Syncope: causes, clinical evaluation, and current therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benditt, D G; Remole, S; Milstein, S; Bailin, S

    1992-01-01

    Syncope is a common clinical problem comprising the sudden loss of both consciousness and postural tone, with a subsequent spontaneous and relatively prompt recovery. Often it is difficult to differentiate a true syncopal spell from other conditions, such as seizure disorders, or from some simple accidents. Even more difficult is the identification of the cause of syncopal episodes. Nonetheless, establishing a definitive diagnosis ia an important task given the high risk of recurrent symptoms. Careful use of noninvasive and invasive cardiovascular studies (including electrophysiologic testing and tilt-table testing) along with selected hematologic, biochemical, and neurologic studies provides, in the majority of cases, the most effective strategy for obtaining a specific diagnosis and for directing therapy.

  15. Current Trends in the Management of Retinoblastoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hayyam Kıratlı

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Retinoblastoma is the most common primary intraocular malignant tumor of early childhood, and 95% of all cases are diagnosed before the age of 5 years. Tumors are evaluated and classified based on laterality, genetic features, the number, location and size of foci. Currently, systemic and intaarterial chemotherapy are the most commonly used management options worldwide. Group A tumors are treated with focal techniques including transpupillary thermotherapy, cryotherapy, or laser photocoagulation. Groups B and C tumors are managed with systemic chemotherapy and focal consolidation techniques. Group D lesions are best treated with systemic chemotherapy, subtenon carboplatin injection or external beam radiotherapy. Alternatively, groups B, C and D tumors can be primarily treated with intraarterial chemotherapy. Intravitreal melphalan injection can be an alternative treatment for eyes with recurrent or persistent vitreous seeding. Group E eyes are often enucleated, however, depending on the fellow eye, systemic or intraarterial chemotherapy may be administered. Systemic chemotherapy is also mandatory if high-risk histopathological features are found after enucleation. (Turk J Ophthalmol 2014; 44: Supplement 22-8

  16. Clinical Trials Management | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Information for researchers about developing, reporting, and managing NCI-funded cancer prevention clinical trials. Protocol Information Office The central clearinghouse for clinical trials management within the Division of Cancer Prevention.Read more about the Protocol Information Office. | Information for researchers about developing, reporting, and managing NCI-funded

  17. Uterine fibroids: clinical manifestations and contemporary management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doherty, Leo; Mutlu, Levent; Sinclair, Donna; Taylor, Hugh

    2014-09-01

    Uterine fibroids (leiomyomata) are extremely common lesions that are associated with detrimental effects including infertility and abnormal uterine bleeding. Fibroids cause molecular changes at the level of endometrium. Abnormal regulation of growth factors and cytokines in fibroid cells may contribute to negative endometrial effects. Understanding of fibroid biology has greatly increased over the last decade. Although the current armamentarium of Food and Drug Administration-approved medical therapies is limited, there are medications approved for use in heavy menstrual bleeding that can be used for the medical management of fibroids. Emergence of the role of growth factors in pathophysiology of fibroids has led researchers to develop novel therapeutics. Despite advances in medical therapies, surgical management remains a mainstay of fibroid treatment. Destruction of fibroids by interventional radiological procedures provides other effective treatments. Further experimental studies and clinical trials are required to determine which therapies will provide the greatest benefits to patients with fibroids. © The Author(s) 2014.

  18. Current management of surgical oncologic emergencies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marianne R F Bosscher

    Full Text Available For some oncologic emergencies, surgical interventions are necessary for dissolution or temporary relieve. In the absence of guidelines, the most optimal method for decision making would be in a multidisciplinary cancer conference (MCC. In an acute setting, the opportunity for multidisciplinary discussion is often not available. In this study, the management and short term outcome of patients after surgical oncologic emergency consultation was analyzed.A prospective registration and follow up of adult patients with surgical oncologic emergencies between 01-11-2013 and 30-04-2014. The follow up period was 30 days.In total, 207 patients with surgical oncologic emergencies were included. Postoperative wound infections, malignant obstruction, and clinical deterioration due to progressive disease were the most frequent conditions for surgical oncologic emergency consultation. During the follow up period, 40% of patients underwent surgery. The median number of involved medical specialties was two. Only 30% of all patients were discussed in a MCC within 30 days after emergency consultation, and only 41% of the patients who underwent surgery were discussed in a MCC. For 79% of these patients, the surgical procedure was performed before the MCC. Mortality within 30 days was 13%.In most cases, surgery occurred without discussing the patient in a MCC, regardless of the fact that multiple medical specialties were involved in the treatment process. There is a need for prognostic aids and acute oncology pathways with structural multidisciplinary management. These will provide in faster institution of the most appropriate personalized cancer care, and prevent unnecessary investigations or invasive therapy.

  19. Addressing unwarranted clinical variation: A rapid review of current evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, Reema; Manias, Elizabeth; Mears, Stephen; Heslop, David; Hinchcliff, Reece; Hay, Liz

    2018-05-15

    Unwarranted clinical variation (UCV) can be described as variation that can only be explained by differences in health system performance. There is a lack of clarity regarding how to define and identify UCV and, once identified, to determine whether it is sufficiently problematic to warrant action. As such, the implementation of systemic approaches to reducing UCV is challenging. A review of approaches to understand, identify, and address UCV was undertaken to determine how conceptual and theoretical frameworks currently attempt to define UCV, the approaches used to identify UCV, and the evidence of their effectiveness. Rapid evidence assessment (REA) methodology was used. A range of text words, synonyms, and subject headings were developed for the major concepts of unwarranted clinical variation, standards (and deviation from these standards), and health care environment. Two electronic databases (Medline and Pubmed) were searched from January 2006 to April 2017, in addition to hand searching of relevant journals, reference lists, and grey literature. Results were merged using reference-management software (Endnote) and duplicates removed. Inclusion criteria were independently applied to potentially relevant articles by 3 reviewers. Findings were presented in a narrative synthesis to highlight key concepts addressed in the published literature. A total of 48 relevant publications were included in the review; 21 articles were identified as eligible from the database search, 4 from hand searching published work and 23 from the grey literature. The search process highlighted the voluminous literature reporting clinical variation internationally; yet, there is a dearth of evidence regarding systematic approaches to identifying or addressing UCV. Wennberg's classification framework is commonly cited in relation to classifying variation, but no single approach is agreed upon to systematically explore and address UCV. The instances of UCV that warrant investigation and

  20. [The relevance of clinical risk management].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gulino, Matteo; Vergallo, Gianluca Montanari; Frati, Paola

    2011-01-01

    Medical activity includes a risk of possible injury or complications for the patients, that should drive the Health Care Institutions to introduce and/ or improve clinical Risk management instruments. Although Italy is still lacking a National project of Clinical Risk Management, a number of efforts have been made by different Italian Regions to introduce instruments of risk management. In addition, most of National Health Care Institutions include actually a Department specifically in charge to manage the clinical risk. Despite the practical difficulties, the results obtained until now suggest that the risk management may represent a useful instrument to contribute to the reduction of errors in clinical conduct. Indeed, the introduction of adequate instruments of prevention and management of clinical risk may help to ameliorate the quality of health care Institution services.

  1. Managing plutonium in Britain. Current options

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-01-01

    This is the report of a two day meeting to discuss issues arising from the reprocessing of plutonium and production of mixed oxide nuclear fuels in Britain. It was held at Charney Manor, near Oxford, on June 25 and 26, 1998, and was attended by 35 participants, including government officials, scientists, policy analysts, representatives of interested NGO's, journalists, a Member of Parliament, and visiting representatives from the US and Irish governments. The topic of managing plutonium has been a consistent thread within ORG's work, and was the subject of one of our previous reports, CDR 12. This particular seminar arose out of discussions earlier in the year between Dr. Frank Barnaby and the Rt. Hon. Michael Meacher MP, Minister for the Environment. With important decisions about the management of plutonium in Britain pending, ORG undertook to hold a seminar at which all aspects of the subject could be aired. A number of on-going events formed the background to this initiative. The first was British Nuclear Fuels' [BNFL] application to the Environment Agency to commission a mixed oxide fuel [MOX] plant at Sellafield. The second was BNFL's application to vary radioactive discharge limits at Sellafield. Thirdly, a House of Lords Select Committee was in process of taking evidence, on the disposal of radioactive waste. Fourthly, the Royal Society, in a recent report entitled Management of Separated Plutonium, recommended that 'the Government should commission a comprehensive review... of the options for the management of plutonium'. Four formal presentations were made to the meeting, on the subjects of Britain's plutonium policy, commercial prospects for plutonium use, problems of plutonium accountancy, and the danger of nuclear terrorism, by experts from outside the nuclear industry. It was hoped that the industry's viewpoint would also be heard, and BNFL were invited to present a paper, but declined on the grounds that they were 'currently involved in a formal

  2. Current management of occult bacteremia in infants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo Mekitarian Filho

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: To summarize the main clinical entities associated with fever without source (FWS in infants, as well as the clinical management of children with occult bacteremia, emphasizing laboratory tests and empirical antibiotics. Sources: A non-systematic review was conducted in the following databases – PubMed, EMBASE, and SciELO, between 2006 and 2015. Summary of the findings: The prevalence of occult bacteremia has been decreasing dramatically in the past few years, due to conjugated vaccination against Streptococcus pneumoniae and Neisseria meningitidis. Additionally, fewer requests for complete blood count and blood cultures have been made for children older than 3 months presenting with FWS. Urinary tract infection is the most prevalent bacterial infection in children with FWS. Some known algorithms, such as Boston and Rochester, can guide the initial risk stratification for occult bacteremia in febrile infants younger than 3 months. Conclusions: There is no single algorithm to estimate the risk of occult bacteremia in febrile infants, but pediatricians should strongly consider outpatient management in fully vaccinated infants older than 3 months with FWS and good general status. Updated data about the incidence of occult bacteremia in this environment after conjugated vaccination are needed. Resumo: Objetivos: Listar as principais entidades clínicas associadas a quadros de febre sem sinais localizatórios (FSSL em lactentes, bem como o manejo dos casos de bacteremia oculta com ênfase na avaliação laboratorial e na antibioticoterapia empírica. Fonte dos dados: Foi realizada revisão não sistemática da literatura nas bases de dados PubMed, EMBASE e Scielo no período de 2006 a 2015. Síntese dos dados: A ocorrência de bacteremia oculta vem diminuindo sensivelmente em lactentes com FSSL, principalmente devido à introdução da vacinação conjugada contra Streptococcus pneumoniae e Neisseria meningitidis nos últimos anos

  3. Current management of oral cancer. A multidisciplinary approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ord, R A; Blanchaert, R H

    2001-11-01

    Recent basic science discoveries have contributed to our understanding of the etiology of oral cancer and allowed us to consider innovative approaches to therapy. The authors evaluated and summarized current approaches to the management of oral cancer, emphasizing the multidisciplinary team approach to coordinate surgery, radiation therapy and chemotherapy. Current concepts in management, including complications of therapy, are described. State-of-the-art surgical techniques can spare patients with oral cancer from much of the morbidity and complications common in the past. The refinement of treatment strategies reduces complications and improves efficacy. Many exciting new clinical trials in the areas of gene therapy and immunomodulation are showing promise. Management of oral cancer has undergone radical change in the past 10 years and continues to evolve rapidly. Discoveries in molecular biology, diagnosis, surgery, radiation therapy and medical oncology have altered many traditional concepts and practices. General dental practitioners need to understand current treatment modalities for oral and pharyngeal cancers to determine to whom they should refer patients for the most appropriate treatment, and to make recommendations regarding complications associated with these cancers.

  4. Croatian radioactive waste management program: Current status

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matanic, R.; Lebegner, J.

    2001-01-01

    Croatia has a responsibility to develop a radioactive waste management program partly due to co-ownership of Krsko nuclear power plant (Slovenia) and partly because of its own medical and industrial radioactive waste. The total amount of generated radioactive waste in Croatia is stored in temporary storages located at two national research institutes, while radioactive waste from Krsko remains in temporary storage on site. National power utility Hrvatska Elektroprivreda (HEP) and Hazardous Waste Management Agency (APO) coordinate the work regarding decommissioning, spent fuel management and low and intermediate level radioactive waste (LILRW) management in Croatia. Since the majority of work has been done in developing the LILRW management program, the paper focuses on this part of radioactive waste management. Issues of site selection, repository design, safety assessment and public acceptance are being discussed. A short description of the national radioactive waste management infrastructure has also been presented. (author)

  5. [Does clinical risk management require a structured conflict management?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neumann, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    A key element of clinical risk management is the analysis of errors causing near misses or patient damage. After analyzing the causes and circumstances, measures for process improvement have to be taken. Process management, human resource development and other established methods are used. If an interpersonal conflict is a contributory factor to the error, there is usually no structured conflict management available which includes selection criteria for various methods of conflict processing. The European University Viadrina in Frankfurt (Oder) has created a process model for introducing a structured conflict management system which is suitable for hospitals and could fill the gap in the methodological spectrum of clinical risk management. There is initial evidence that a structured conflict management reduces staff fluctuation and hidden conflict costs. This article should be understood as an impulse for discussion on to what extent the range of methods of clinical risk management should be complemented by conflict management.

  6. Basic concepts and definitions of clinical management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angélica Román

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Management is leading, administering resources, and achieving the goals and objectives that have been set. In the Chilean health care system, management can be subdivided in three main levels – macro-management, meso-management and micro-management. Managing health care is also about epidemiological changes, information and technology innovations, patient groups demanding better services, but mostly about a huge escalation in costs that is not necessarily substantiated by evidence on more efficiency in health outcomes.Clinical management is more than a management tool. It is a cultural change that will provide new values to professional practice and to the organization as a whole. However, clinical management demands more commitment on behalf of the human teams that need to learn how to lead and to be led. These teams will be called upon to help in the decision-making process for the betterment of the institution.

  7. A Survey of the Current Situation of Clinical Biobanks in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Haiyan; Ni, Mingyu; Wang, Peng; Wang, Xiaomin

    2017-06-01

    The development of biomedical research urgently needs the support of a large number of high-quality clinical biospecimens. Therefore, human biobanks at different levels have been established successively in China and other countries at a significantly increasing pace in recent years. To better understand the general current state of clinical biobanks in China, we surveyed 42 clinical biobanks based in hospitals and collected information involving their management systems, sharing mechanisms, quality control systems, and informational management systems using closed questionnaire methods. Based on our current information, there has not been such a large-scale survey in China. An understanding of the status and challenges current clinical biobanks face will provide valuable insights for the construction and sustainable development of higher quality clinical biobanks.

  8. Current and emerging treatment options in the management of lupus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordan, Natasha; D’Cruz, David

    2016-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a complex autoimmune disease with variable clinical manifestations. While the clearest guidelines for the treatment of SLE exist in the context of lupus nephritis, patients with other lupus manifestations such as neuropsychiatric, hematologic, musculoskeletal, and severe cutaneous lupus frequently require immunosuppression and/or biologic therapy. Conventional immunosuppressive agents such as mycophenolate mofetil, azathioprine, and cyclophosphamide are widely used in the management of SLE with current more rationalized treatment regimens optimizing the use of these agents while minimizing potential toxicity. The advent of biologic therapies has advanced the treatment of SLE particularly in patients with refractory disease. The CD20 monoclonal antibody rituximab and the anti-BLyS agent belimumab are now widely in use in clinical practice. Several other biologic agents are in ongoing clinical trials. While immunosuppressive and biologic agents are the foundation of inflammatory disease control in SLE, the importance of managing comorbidities such as cardiovascular risk factors, bone health, and minimizing susceptibility to infection should not be neglected. PMID:27529058

  9. Dermatological Emergencies: Current Trends in Management

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    opsig

    clinical. In TEN, the disease is more severe with epidermal detachment ... causative agent and referral to a burns unit improves ... antigen on keratinocyte cell membranes, production .... Toxic Epidermal Necrolysis – a retrospective study.

  10. Managing hyperthyroidism in pregnancy: current perspectives

    OpenAIRE

    Andersen, Stine Linding; Laurberg, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Stine Linding Andersen,1,2 Peter Laurberg1,3,† 1Department of Endocrinology, Aalborg University Hospital, 2Department of Clinical Biochemistry, Aalborg University Hospital, 3Department of Clinical Medicine, Aalborg University, Aalborg, Denmark †Peter Laurberg passed away on June 20, 2016 Abstract: Hyperthyroidism in women who are of childbearing age is predominantly of autoimmune origin and caused by Graves’ disease. The physiological changes in the maternal...

  11. Childhood amblyopia: current management and new trends

    OpenAIRE

    Tailor, V.; Bossi, M.; Greenwood, J. A.; Dahlmann-Noor, A.

    2016-01-01

    INTRODUCTION OR BACKGROUND: With a prevalence of 2-5%, amblyopia is the most common vision deficit in children in the UK and the second most common cause of functional low vision in children in low-income countries. SOURCES OF DATA: Pubmed, Cochrane library and clinical trial registries (clinicaltrials.gov, ISRCTN, UKCRN portfolio database). AREAS OF AGREEMENT: Screening and treatment at the age of 4-5 years are cost efficient and clinically effective. Optical treatment (glasses) alone can im...

  12. Current clinical approach to patients with disorders of consciousness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robson Luis Oliveira de Amorim

    Full Text Available Summary In clinical practice, hospital admission of patients with altered level of consciousness, sleepy or in a non-responsive state is extremely common. This clinical condition requires an effective investigation and early treatment. Performing a focused and objective evaluation is critical, with quality history taking and physical examination capable to locate the lesion and define conducts. Imaging and laboratory exams have played an increasingly important role in supporting clinical research. In this review, the main types of changes in consciousness are discussed as well as the essential points that should be evaluated in the clinical management of these patients.

  13. Current concepts in the management of acute pancreatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gautham Srinivasan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Guidelines for the management of acute pancreatitis (AP are based on the Western experience, which may be difficult to extrapolate in India due to socioeconomic constraints. Hence, modifications based on the available resources and referral patterns should be introduced so as to ensure appropriate care. We reviewed the current literature on the management of AP available in English on Medline and proposed guidelines locally applicable. Patients of AP presenting with systemic inflammatory response syndrome are at risk of moderate-severe pancreatitis and hence, should be referred to a tertiary center early. The vast majority of patients with AP have mild disease and can be managed at smaller centers. Early aggressive fluid resuscitation with controlled fluid expansion, early enteral nutrition, and culture-directed antibiotics improve outcomes in AP. Infected pancreatic necrosis should be managed in a tertiary care hospital within a multidisciplinary setup. The “step up” approach involving antibiotics, percutaneous drainage, and minimally invasive necrosectomy instituted sequentially based on clinical response has improved the outcomes in this subgroup of patients.

  14. Clinical operations management in radiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ondategui-Parra, Silvia; Gill, Ileana E; Bhagwat, Jui G; Intrieri, Lisa A; Gogate, Adheet; Zou, Kelly H; Nathanson, Eric; Seltzer, Steven E; Ros, Pablo R

    2004-09-01

    Providing radiology services is a complex and technically demanding enterprise in which the application of operations management (OM) tools can play a substantial role in process management and improvement. This paper considers the benefits of an OM process in a radiology setting. Available techniques and concepts of OM are addressed, along with gains and benefits that can be derived from these processes. A reference framework for the radiology processes is described, distinguishing two phases in the initial assessment of a unit: the diagnostic phase and the redesign phase.

  15. Current Status of On-Site Wastewater Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senn, Charles L.

    1978-01-01

    Wastewater management is becoming an important environmental issue nationally. This article reports the history and current status of wastewater management. Regulatory programs are discussed with specific state examples. Needs assessment is also included. (MA)

  16. Clinical Management of Food Allergy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Benjamin L; Walkner, Madeline; Vickery, Brian P; Gupta, Ruchi S

    2015-12-01

    Food allergies have become a growing public health concern. At present the standard of care focuses on avoidance of trigger foods, education, and treatment of symptoms following accidental ingestions. This article provides a framework for primary care physicians and allergists for the diagnosis, management, and treatment of pediatric food allergy. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Severe hypertriglyceridemia. Clinical characteristics and therapeutic management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masson, Walter; Rossi, Emiliano; Siniawski, Daniel; Damonte, Juan; Halsband, Ana; Barolo, Ramiro; Scaramal, Miguel

    2018-05-19

    The therapeutic management of severe hypertriglyceridaemia represents a clinical challenge. The objectives of this study were 1) to identify the clinical characteristics of patients with severe hypertriglyceridaemia, and 2) to analyse the treatment established by the physicians in each case. A cross-sectional study was carried out using the computerised medical records of all patients>18 years of age with a blood triglyceride level≥1,000mg/dL between 1 January 2011 and 31 December 2016. Clinical and laboratory variables were collected. The behaviour of the physicians in the 6 months after the lipid finding was analysed. A total of 420 patients were included (mean age 49.1±11.4 years, males 78.8%). The median of triglycerides was 1,329mg/dL (interquartile range 1,174-1,658). No secondary causes were found in 34.1% of the patients. The most frequent secondary causes were obesity (38.6%) and diabetes (28.1%). Physical activity was recommended and a nutritionist was referred to in 49.1% and 44.2% of the patients, respectively. Secondary causes were identified and attempts were made to correct them in 40.7% of cases. The most indicated pharmacological treatments were fenofibrate 200mg/day (26.5%) and gemfibrozil 900mg/day (19.3%). Few patients received the indication of omega 3 fatty acids or niacin. This study showed, for the first time in our country, the characteristics of a population with severe hypertriglyceridaemia. The therapeutic measures instituted by the physicians were insufficient. Knowing the characteristics in this particular clinical scenario could improve the current approach of these patients. Copyright © 2018 Sociedad Española de Arteriosclerosis. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  18. Pancreaticoduodenal injuries: Re-evaluating current management ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background. Pancreaticoduodenal injuries are uncommon owing to the protected position of the pancreas and duodenum in the retroperitoneum. Management depends on the extent of injury. This study was undertaken to document outcome of pancreaticoduodenal injuries and to re-evaluate our approach. Patients and ...

  19. Current management of locally recurrent rectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Mette Bak; Laurberg, Søren; Holm, Thorbjörn

    2011-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: A review of the literature was undertaken to provide an overview of the surgical management of locally recurrent rectal cancer (LRRC) after the introduction of total mesorectal excision (TME). Method: A systematic literature search was undertaken using PubMed, Embase, Web...

  20. Spent fuel management: Current status and prospects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-12-01

    The main objective of the Advisory Group on Spent Fuel Management is to review the world-wide situation in Spent Fuel Management, to define the most important directions of national efforts and international cooperation in this area, to exchange information on the present status and progress in performing the back-end of Nuclear Fuel Cycle and to elaborate the general recommendations for future Agency programmes in the field of spent fuel management. This report which is a result of the third IAEA Advisory Group Meeting (the first and second were held in 1984 and 1986) is intended to provide the reader with an overview of the status of spent fuel management programmes in a number of leading countries, with a description of the past and present IAEA activities in this field of Nuclear Fuel Cycle and with the Agency's plans for the next years, based on the proposals and recommendations of Member States. A separate abstract was prepared for each of 14 papers presented at the advisory group meeting. Refs, figs and tabs

  1. Clinical management of patients with hyperthyroidism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cooper, D.S.; Ridgway, E.C.

    1985-01-01

    The clinical management of the hyperthyroid patient is controversial, because there is no perfect treatment. Factors that influence the choice of therapy include the patient's age, sex, and type of hyperthyroidism, as well as patient and physician preference

  2. Clinical management of soft tissue sarcomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pinedo, H.M.; Verweij, J.

    1986-01-01

    This book is concerned with the clinical management of soft tissue sarcomas. Topics covered include: Radiotherapy; Pathology of soft tissue sarcomas; Surgical treatment of soft tissue sarcomas; and Chemotherapy in advanced soft tissue sarcomas

  3. Diagnosis and management of microscopic colitis: current perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bohr J

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Johan Bohr,1,3 Anna Wickbom,1,3 Agnes Hegedus,2 Nils Nyhlin,1,3 Elisabeth Hultgren Hörnquist,3 Curt Tysk1,3 1Division of Gastroenterology, Department of Medicine, 2Department of Laboratory Medicine/Pathology, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, 3School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden Abstract: Collagenous colitis and lymphocytic colitis, together constituting microscopic colitis, are common causes of chronic diarrhea. They are characterized clinically by chronic nonbloody diarrhea and a macroscopically normal colonic mucosa where characteristic histopathological findings are seen. Previously considered rare, they now have emerged as common disorders that need to be considered in the investigation of the patient with chronic diarrhea. The annual incidence of each disorder is five to ten per 100,000 inhabitants, with a peak incidence in 60- to 70-year-old individuals and a predominance of female patients in collagenous colitis. The etiology and pathophysiology are not well understood, and the current view suggests an uncontrolled mucosal immune reaction to various luminal agents in predisposed individuals. Clinical symptoms comprise chronic diarrhea, abdominal pain, fatigue, weight loss, and fecal incontinence that may impair the patient's health-related quality of life. An association is reported with other autoimmune disorders, such as celiac disease, thyroid disorders, diabetes mellitus, and arthritis. The best-documented treatment, both short-term and long-term, is budesonide, which induces clinical remission in up to 80% of patients after 8 weeks' treatment. However, after successful budesonide therapy is ended, recurrence of clinical symptoms is common, and the best possible long-term management deserves further study. The long-term prognosis is good, and the risk of complications, including colonic cancer, is low. We present an update of the epidemiology, pathogenesis, diagnosis, and management of

  4. Current Management of Sickle Cell Anemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGann, Patrick T.; Nero, Alecia C.; Ware, Russell E.

    2013-01-01

    Proper management of sickle cell anemia (SCA) begins with establishing the correct diagnosis early in life, ideally during the newborn period. The identification of affected infants by neonatal screening programs allows early initiation of prophylactic penicillin and pneumococcal immunizations, which help prevent overwhelming sepsis. Ongoing education of families promotes the early recognition of disease-released complications, which allows prompt and appropriate medical evaluation and therapeutic intervention. Periodic evaluation by trained specialists helps provide comprehensive care, including transcranial Doppler examinations to identify children at risk for primary stroke, plus assessments for other parenchymal organ damage as patients become teens and adults. Treatment approaches that previously highlighted acute vaso-occlusive events are now evolving to the concept of preventive therapy. Liberalized use of blood transfusions and early consideration of hydroxyurea treatment represent a new treatment paradigm for SCA management. PMID:23709685

  5. Current management of urethral stricture disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas G Smith

    2016-01-01

    Conclusions: Progress is being made toward consistent terminology, and nomenclature which will, in turn, help to standardize treatment within the field of urology. Treatment for urethral stricture and stenosis remains inconsistent between reconstructive and nonreconstructive urologists due to varying treatment algorithms and approaches to disease management. Tissue engineering appears to be future for reconstructive urethral surgery with reports demonstrating feasibility in the use of different tissue substitutes and grafts.

  6. Organizational change and current trends in management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lect. Dr. Chirimbu Sebastian

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available The challenge is to manage the organization's culture so that you can tap the company's strenghts to chieve superior performance and identify it's weaknesses in time to overcome them before they cause serious damage." Successful adaptation to change is as crucial within an organization as it is in the natural world. Just like plants and animals, organizations and the individuals in them inevitably encounter changing conditions that they are powerless to control.

  7. Medical Management of Uveitis ? Current Trends

    OpenAIRE

    Babu, Kalpana; Mahendradas, Padmamalini

    2013-01-01

    Uveitis is a challenging disease to treat. Corticosteroids have been used in the treatment of uveitis for many years. Immunosuppressives are gaining momentum in recent years in the treatment of uveitis. In this article we present an overview of current treatment of uveitis and the major breakthroughs and advances in drugs and ocular drug delivery systems in the treatment of uveitis.

  8. Clinical proteomics-driven precision medicine for targeted cancer therapy: current overview and future perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Li; Wang, Kui; Li, Qifu; Nice, Edouard C; Zhang, Haiyuan; Huang, Canhua

    2016-01-01

    Cancer is a common disease that is a leading cause of death worldwide. Currently, early detection and novel therapeutic strategies are urgently needed for more effective management of cancer. Importantly, protein profiling using clinical proteomic strategies, with spectacular sensitivity and precision, offer excellent promise for the identification of potential biomarkers that would direct the development of targeted therapeutic anticancer drugs for precision medicine. In particular, clinical sample sources, including tumor tissues and body fluids (blood, feces, urine and saliva), have been widely investigated using modern high-throughput mass spectrometry-based proteomic approaches combined with bioinformatic analysis, to pursue the possibilities of precision medicine for targeted cancer therapy. Discussed in this review are the current advantages and limitations of clinical proteomics, the available strategies of clinical proteomics for the management of precision medicine, as well as the challenges and future perspectives of clinical proteomics-driven precision medicine for targeted cancer therapy.

  9. Clinical pharmacology in Russia-historical development and current state.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zagorodnikova Goryachkina, Ksenia; Burbello, Aleksandra; Sychev, Dmitry; Frolov, Maxim; Kukes, Vladimir; Petrov, Vladimir

    2015-02-01

    Clinical pharmacology in Russia has long history and is currently active, but rather unrecognized internationally. It is governmentally approved as a teaching/scientific specialty since 1983 and as a medical specialty since 1997. Courses of clinical pharmacology are included in the undergraduate curricula in the 5th and/or 6th year of education at all medical schools in the Russian Federation. Postgraduate education includes initial specialization in internal medicine with further residency in clinical pharmacology. Governmental legislation recommends that every healthcare institution has either a department or a single position of clinical pharmacologist. Major routine duties include information about and monitoring of medication use, consultations in difficult clinical situations, pharmacogenetic counseling, therapeutic drug monitoring, pharmacovigilance, and participation in drug and therapeutics (formulary) committees. There are official experts in clinical pharmacology in Russia responsible for coordinating relevant legislative issues. The chief expert clinical pharmacologist represents the discipline directly at the Ministry of Health. Research in clinical pharmacology in Russia is extensive and variable, but only some of it is published internationally. Russia is a participant of international societies of clinical pharmacology and therapeutics and collaboration is actively ongoing. There are still certain problems related to the development of the discipline in Russia-some healthcare institutions do not see the need for clinical pharmacology. However, the number of clinical pharmacologists in Russia is increasing as well as their role in physicians' education, national healthcare, and research.

  10. Clinical characteristics and management of children with ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    reflux (VUR), including the clinical characteristics and management. Summary background data The association ... different clinical characteristics compared with the other two groups of patients with high-grade VUR. .... way ANOVA test; while qualitative data were analyzed using Chi square. The difference was considered.

  11. Clinical exome sequencing reports: current informatics practice and future opportunities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swaminathan, Rajeswari; Huang, Yungui; Astbury, Caroline; Fitzgerald-Butt, Sara; Miller, Katherine; Cole, Justin; Bartlett, Christopher; Lin, Simon

    2017-11-01

    The increased adoption of clinical whole exome sequencing (WES) has improved the diagnostic yield for patients with complex genetic conditions. However, the informatics practice for handling information contained in whole exome reports is still in its infancy, as evidenced by the lack of a common vocabulary within clinical sequencing reports generated across genetic laboratories. Genetic testing results are mostly transmitted using portable document format, which can make secondary analysis and data extraction challenging. This paper reviews a sample of clinical exome reports generated by Clinical Laboratory Improvement Amendments-certified genetic testing laboratories at tertiary-care facilities to assess and identify common data elements. Like structured radiology reports, which enable faster information retrieval and reuse, structuring genetic information within clinical WES reports would help facilitate integration of genetic information into electronic health records and enable retrospective research on the clinical utility of WES. We identify elements listed as mandatory according to practice guidelines but are currently missing from some of the clinical reports, which might help to organize the data when stored within structured databases. We also highlight elements, such as patient consent, that, although they do not appear within any of the current reports, may help in interpreting some of the information within the reports. Integrating genetic and clinical information would assist the adoption of personalized medicine for improved patient care and outcomes. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the American Medical Informatics Association. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  12. Managing peri-implant bone loss: current understanding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aljateeli, Manar; Fu, Jia-Hui; Wang, Hom-Lay

    2012-05-01

    With the improved macro- and micro-designs, dental implants enjoy a high survival rate. However, peri-implant bone loss has recently emerged to be the focus of implant therapy. As such, researchers and clinicians are in need of finding predictable techniques to treat peri-implant bone loss and stop its progression. Literature search on the currently available treatment modalities was performed and a brief description of each modality was provided. Numerous techniques have been proposed and none has been shown to be superior and effective in managing peri-implant bone loss. This may be because of the complex of etiological factors acting on the implant-supported prosthesis hence the treatment approach has to be individually tailored. Due to the lack of high-level clinical evidence on the management of peri-implant bone loss, the authors, through a literature review, attempt to suggest a decision tree or guideline, based on sound periodontal surgical principles, to aid clinicians in managing peri-implantitis associated bone loss. © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Improvised explosive devices: pathophysiology, injury profiles and current medical management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramasamy, A; Hill, A M; Clasper, J C

    2009-12-01

    The improvised explosive device (IED), in all its forms, has become the most significant threat to troops operating in Afghanistan and Iraq. These devices range from rudimentary home made explosives to sophisticated weapon systems containing high-grade explosives. Within this broad definition they may be classified as roadside explosives and blast mines, explosive formed pojectile (EFP) devices and suicide bombings. Each of these groups causeinjury through a number of different mechanisms and can result in vastly different injury profiles. The "Global War on Terror" has meant that incidents which were previously exclusively seen in conflict areas, can occur anywhere, and clinicians who are involved in emergency trauma care may be required to manage casualties from similar terrorist attacks. An understanding of the types of devices and their pathophysiological effects is necessary to allow proper planning of mass casualty events and to allow appropriate management of the complex poly-trauma casualties they invariably cause. The aim of this review article is to firstly describe the physics and injury profile from these different devices and secondly to present the current clinical evidence that underpins their medical management.

  14. Optimal management of chronic osteomyelitis: current perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pande KC

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Ketan C Pande Raja Isteri Pengiran Anak Saleha Hospital, Bandar Seri Begawan, BruneiAbstract: Chronic osteomyelitis is a challenging condition to treat. It is seen mostly after open fractures or in implant-related infections following treatment of fractures and prosthetic joint replacements. Recurrence of infection is well known, and successful treatment requires a multidisciplinary team approach with surgical debridement and appropriate antimicrobial therapy as the cornerstone of treatment. Staging of the disease and identification of the causative microorganism is essential before initiation of treatment. Important surgical steps include radical debridement of necrotic and devitalized tissue, removal of implants, management of resultant dead space, soft-tissue coverage, and skeletal stabilization or management of skeletal defects. The route of administration and duration of antimicrobial therapy continues to be debated. The role of biofilm is now clearly established in the chronicity of bone infection, and newer modalities are being developed to address various issues related to biofilm formation. The present review addresses various aspects of chronic osteomyelitis of long bones seen in adults, with a review of recent developments. Keywords: osteomyelitis, infection, biofilm, bone, therapy, treatment

  15. Current best practice in the management of Turner syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shankar, Roopa Kanakatti; Backeljauw, Philippe F.

    2017-01-01

    Turner syndrome (TS) is characterized by partial or complete loss of the second X-chromosome in phenotypic females resulting in a constellation of clinical findings that may include lymphedema, cardiac anomalies, short stature, primary ovarian failure and neurocognitive difficulties. Optimizing health care delivery is important to enable these individuals achieve their full potential. We review the current best practice management recommendations for individuals with TS focusing on the latest consensus opinion in regard to genetic diagnosis, treatment of short stature, estrogen supplementation, addressing psychosocial issues, as well screening for other comorbidities. A multidisciplinary approach and a well-planned transition to adult follow-up care will improve health care delivery significantly for this population. PMID:29344338

  16. Childhood amblyopia: current management and new trends.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tailor, Vijay; Bossi, Manuela; Greenwood, John A; Dahlmann-Noor, Annegret

    2016-09-01

    With a prevalence of 2-5%, amblyopia is the most common vision deficit in children in the UK and the second most common cause of functional low vision in children in low-income countries. Pubmed, Cochrane library and clinical trial registries (clinicaltrials.gov, ISRCTN, UKCRN portfolio database). Screening and treatment at the age of 4-5 years are cost efficient and clinically effective. Optical treatment (glasses) alone can improve visual acuity, with residual amblyopia treated by part-time occlusion or pharmacological blurring of the better-seeing eye. Treatment after the end of the conventional 'critical period' can improve vision, but in strabismic amblyopia carries a low risk of double vision. It is not clear whether earlier vision screening would be cost efficient and associated with better outcomes. Optimization of treatment by individualized patching regimes or early start of occlusion, and novel binocular treatment approaches may enhance adherence to treatment, provide better outcomes and shorten treatment duration. Binocular treatments for amblyopia. Impact of amblyopia on education and quality of life; optimal screening timing and tests; optimal administration of conventional treatments; development of child-friendly, effective and safe binocular treatments. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  17. Gynecomastia: Clinical evaluation and management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuhaci, Neslihan; Polat, Sefika Burcak; Evranos, Berna; Ersoy, Reyhan; Cakir, Bekir

    2014-01-01

    Gynecomastia is the benign enlargement of male breast glandular tissue and is the most common breast condition in males. At least 30% of males will be affected during their life. Since it causes anxiety, psychosocial discomfort and fear of breast cancer, early diagnostic evaluation is important and patients usually seek medical attention. Gynecomastia was reported to cause an imbalance between estrogen and androgen action or an increased estrogen to androgen ratio, due to increased estrogen production, decreased androgen production or both. Evaluation of gynecomastia must include a detailed medical history, clinical examination, specific blood tests, imaging and tissue sampling. Individual treatment requirements can range from simple reassurance to medical treatment or even surgery. The main aim of any intervention is to relieve the symptoms and exclude other etiological factors. PMID:24741509

  18. Gynecomastia: Clinical evaluation and management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neslihan Cuhaci

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Gynecomastia is the benign enlargement of male breast glandular tissue and is the most common breast condition in males. At least 30% of males will be affected during their life. Since it causes anxiety, psychosocial discomfort and fear of breast cancer, early diagnostic evaluation is important and patients usually seek medical attention. Gynecomastia was reported to cause an imbalance between estrogen and androgen action or an increased estrogen to androgen ratio, due to increased estrogen production, decreased androgen production or both. Evaluation of gynecomastia must include a detailed medical history, clinical examination, specific blood tests, imaging and tissue sampling. Individual treatment requirements can range from simple reassurance to medical treatment or even surgery. The main aim of any intervention is to relieve the symptoms and exclude other etiological factors.

  19. Neurofibromatosis: part 2 – clinical management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pollyanna Barros Batista

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Part 1 of this guideline addressed the differential diagnosis of the neurofibromatoses (NF: neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1, neurofibromatosis type 2 (NF2 and schwannomatosis (SCH. NF shares some features such as the genetic origin of the neural tumors and cutaneous manifestations, and affects nearly 80 thousand Brazilians. Increasing scientific knowledge on NF has allowed better clinical management and reduced rate of complications and morbidity, resulting in higher quality of life for NF patients. Most medical doctors are able to perform NF diagnosis, but the wide range of clinical manifestations and the inability to predict the onset or severity of new features, consequences, or complications make NF management a real clinical challenge, requiring the support of different specialists for proper treatment and genetic counseling, especially in NF2 and SCH. The present text suggests guidelines for the clinical management of NF, with emphasis on NF1.

  20. Current waste management practices at PINSTECH

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ul Haq, E.; Aslam, M.; Orfi, S.D.

    2002-01-01

    The waste being generated at PINSTECH is of the intermediate and low level Category that is in the form of gas, liquid and solids. It is collected, monitored, segregated, treated, packed and immobilized for its final disposal. Basic concepts of delay decay, disposal and containment of radioactive waste are followed to prevent its direct contact with human and its environment. PINSTECH follows shallow ground disposal in the restricted area. The disposal site has favorable characteristics e.g. sun shine dry climate and high evaporation rate. The gaseous waste is directed towards stack, where it passes through charcoal and HEPA filters and then released to the atmosphere. Post disposal monitoring of the disposal area is performed to check leaching/migration of radionuclides from disposal locations to the surrounding environment. No migration of radioactivity has been detected indicating satisfactory performance of the waste management system. (author)

  1. Peculiarities of the risk management system organization in current conditions

    OpenAIRE

    MIKHIN P.O.

    2014-01-01

    Risk-management system organization problem is topical nowadays. The innovation activity is defined as an activity vulnerable to risk and needs more attention. The basic approaches and elements of organization structure development in risk-management system are considered to find out the best structure for business modelling usage. Balance and combination of risk-management system types are required in current conditions.

  2. A Semantic Web-based System for Managing Clinical Archetypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez-Breis, Jesualdo Tomas; Menarguez-Tortosa, Marcos; Martinez-Costa, Catalina; Fernandez-Breis, Eneko; Herrero-Sempere, Jose; Moner, David; Sanchez, Jesus; Valencia-Garcia, Rafael; Robles, Montserrat

    2008-01-01

    Archetypes facilitate the sharing of clinical knowledge and therefore are a basic tool for achieving interoperability between healthcare information systems. In this paper, a Semantic Web System for Managing Archetypes is presented. This system allows for the semantic annotation of archetypes, as well for performing semantic searches. The current system is capable of working with both ISO13606 and OpenEHR archetypes.

  3. Clinical management of aplastic anemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeZern, Amy E; Brodsky, Robert A

    2011-01-01

    Acquired aplastic anemia is a potentially fatal bone marrow failure disorder that is characterized by pancytopenia and a hypocellular bone marrow. Hematopoietic stem-cell transplantation or bone marrow transplantation (BMT) is the treatment of choice for young patients who have a matched sibling donor. Immunosuppression with either anti-thymocyte globulin and cyclosporine or high-dose cyclophosphamide is an effective therapy for patients who are not suitable BMT candidates owing to age or lack of a suitable donor. Results of BMT from unrelated and mismatched donors are improving, but presently this treatment option is best reserved for those patients who do not respond, relapse or develop secondary clonal disorders following immunosuppressive therapy. Efforts are currently underway to both improve immunosuppressive regimens and to expand the application of BMT. PMID:21495931

  4. Current management of symptomatic intracranial stenosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Robert A; Weigele, John B; Kasner, Scott E

    2011-08-01

    Intracranial arterial stenosis (IAS) is the cause of about 10% of all ischemic strokes in the United States, but may account for about 40% of strokes in some populations. After a stroke or transient ischemic attack due to IAS, patients face a 12% annual risk of recurrent stroke on medical therapy, with most strokes occurring in the first year. Warfarin is no better than aspirin in preventing recurrent strokes but poses a higher risk of serious bleeding and death. Groups with the highest risk of recurrent stroke are those with high-grade (≥ 70%) stenosis, those with recent symptom onset, those with symptoms precipitated by hemodynamic maneuvers, and women. Endovascular treatment of IAS is a rapidly evolving therapeutic option. Antiplatelet agents are currently recommended as the primary treatment for symptomatic IAS, with endovascular therapy reserved for appropriate high-risk cases refractory to medical therapy.

  5. Current management of urethral stricture disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Thomas G.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Broadly defined, urethral strictures are narrowing of the urethral lumen that is surrounded by corpus spongiosum, i.e., urethral meatus through the bulbar urethra. Urethral stenosis is narrowing of the posterior urethra, i.e., membranous urethra through bladder neck/prostate junction, which is not enveloped by corpus spongiosum. The disease has significant quality of life ramifications because many times younger patients are affected by this compared to many other urological diseases. Methods: A review of the scientific literature concerning urethral stricture, stenosis, treatment, and outcomes was performed using Medline and PubMed (U.S. National Library of Medicine and the National Institutes of Health). Abstracts from scientific meetings were included in this review. Results: There is level 3 evidence regarding the etiology and epidemiology of urethral strictures, stenoses, and pelvic fracture urethral injuries. Outcomes data from literature regarding intervention for urethral stricture are largely limited to level 3 evidence and expert opinion. There is a single level 1 study comparing urethral dilation and direct vision internal urethrotomy. Urethroplasty outcomes data are limited to level 3 case series. Conclusions: Progress is being made toward consistent terminology, and nomenclature which will, in turn, help to standardize treatment within the field of urology. Treatment for urethral stricture and stenosis remains inconsistent between reconstructive and nonreconstructive urologists due to varying treatment algorithms and approaches to disease management. Tissue engineering appears to be future for reconstructive urethral surgery with reports demonstrating feasibility in the use of different tissue substitutes and grafts. PMID:26941491

  6. Management of Pediatric Migraine: Current Therapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khrizman, Marina; Pakalnis, Ann

    2018-02-01

    Migraine is one of the most common neurologic conditions in pediatrics. It can be a significant stressor, causing absences from school and interruption of parents' work and family schedules. The mainstay of treatment remains educating patients about healthy lifestyle practices and the influences of sleep, stressors, and hydration on triggering migraine attacks. Psychological therapies such as biofeedback or cognitive-behavioral therapy may be beneficial in some patients, especially those with prominent psychological comorbidities. New advances in the pathophysiology of migraine and additional pediatric approval of abortive therapy with triptans have led to significant advances in the management of migraine in children. Some challenges to preventive therapy were recently noted with the negative results obtained in the Childhood and Adolescent Migraine Prevention Study, which compared prescription drugs to placebo. Inherent differences between adult and pediatric headaches, with shorter duration of pediatric migraine and prominent placebo effect, present recurring challenges for clinicians. [Pediatr Ann. 2018;47(2):e55-e60.]. Copyright 2018, SLACK Incorporated.

  7. Current management of gynecologic cancer in pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iavazzo, Christos; Minis, Evelyn Eleni; Gkegkes, Ioannis D

    2018-04-27

    Cancer during pregnancy is a particularly challenging complication. The incidence has increased in recent years due to childbering at an advanced maternal age due to career choices and/or the development of reproductive technology. Approximately two thirds of cancer cases during pregnancy are comprised of invasive cervical cancers and breast cancer. Cancer during gestation is characterized by a need for specialized treatment due to major changes in the hormonal profile (estrogen-progesterone), metabolism (enhancement of anabolism), hemodynamic changes (hyperdynamic circulation), immunologic changes (cell mediated and humoral immunity), increased angiogenesis (increased blood flow towards the uterus). Moreover, the management of such patients is based on the trimester of pregnancy, type and stage of cancer and informed consent of the mother based on her wishes. The optimal treatment of cancer during pregnancy remains elusive, as there are limited data from retrospective studies with small samples. As a result, it is crucial that data regarding survival of the women and long-term follow up of the children from different cancer centres and registries be shared. This need is dictated by the fact that the incidence of cancer during pregnancy will continue to rise as child-bearing age continues to increase.

  8. Skull base osteomyelitis: current microbiology and management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spielmann, P M; Yu, R; Neeff, M

    2013-01-01

    Skull base osteomyelitis typically presents in an immunocompromised patient with severe otalgia and otorrhoea. Pseudomonas aeruginosa is the commonest pathogenic micro-organism, and reports of resistance to fluoroquinolones are now emerging, complicating management. We reviewed our experience of this condition, and of the local pathogenic organisms. A retrospective review from 2004 to 2011 was performed. Patients were identified by their admission diagnostic code, and computerised records examined. Twenty patients were identified. A facial palsy was present in 12 patients (60 per cent). Blood cultures were uniformly negative, and culture of ear canal granulations was non-diagnostic in 71 per cent of cases. Pseudomonas aeruginosa was isolated in only 10 (50 per cent) cases; one strain was resistant to ciprofloxacin but all were sensitive to ceftazidime. Two cases of fungal skull base osteomyelitis were identified. The mortality rate was 15 per cent. The patients' treatment algorithm is presented. Our treatment algorithm reflects the need for multidisciplinary input, early microbial culture of specimens, appropriate imaging, and prolonged and systemic antimicrobial treatment. Resolution of infection must be confirmed by close follow up and imaging.

  9. LIQUIDITY MANAGING A CURRENT JOB OF BANKING MANAGEMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MEDAR LUCIAN-ION

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available A credit institution liquidity managing, concerns on currency flows and operative funding needs, for customer satisfaction. Correlating bank liabilities and assets reflects the overall picture of the liquidity situation. The purpose of an efficient management of bank liquidity is to ensure the normal course of banking intermediation, to protect the interests of customers on one side and of the shareholders on the other side. Through an efficient bank liquidity management, are ensured reserve requirements and especially reasonable banking capacity of deposits reimbursement to customers, correlated with period in which they are or there are not returned to the credit institution, investments in the loans and other assets.

  10. Clinical practice guidelines in patient management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Santosh Kumar

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Efforts have always been made to evolve certain prin-ciples to reduce the variability in the management of patients and make medical care more appropriate. These efforts have become almost a movement since 1980s as evidenced in the development of clinical practice guide-lines in all medical disciplines. This article describes the need for clinical practice guidelines and their de-velopment methods and qualities. Advantages and limi-tations of clinical practice guidelines are enumerated. The salient features of various available clinical prac-tice guidelines in urology are also described.

  11. Organization of managed clinical networking for home parenteral nutrition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baxter, Janet P; McKee, Ruth F

    2006-05-01

    Home parenteral nutrition (HPN) is an established treatment for intestinal failure, and organization of HPN is variable throughout the UK and Europe. Managed clinical networking is the single most important feature of the UK National Health Service strategy for acute services in Scotland and has the potential to improve the management of HPN patients. This review addresses the role of managed clinical networking in HPN and compares outcome data between centres. The Scottish HPN Managed Clinical Network has published the main body of the current literature supporting the concept of managed clinical networking in this context. The Network is responsible for the organization and quality assurance of HPN provision in Scotland, and has been established for 5 years. It has captured significant patient data for the purpose of clinical audit and illustrates that this is an effective model for the management of this patient population. This review provides advice for other areas wishing to improve equity of access, and to smooth the patient journey between primary, secondary and tertiary health care in the context of artificial nutrition support.

  12. Contemporary management of pericardial effusion: practical aspects for clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imazio, Massimo; Gaido, Luca; Battaglia, Alberto; Gaita, Fiorenzo

    2017-03-01

    A pericardial effusion (PE) is a relatively common finding in clinical practice. It may be either isolated or associated with pericarditis with or without an underlying disease. The aetiology is varied and may be either infectious (especially tuberculosis as the most common cause in developing countries) or non-infectious (cancer, systemic inflammatory diseases). The management is essentially guided by the hemodynamic effect (presence or absence of cardiac tamponade), the presence of concomitant pericarditis or underlying disease, and its size and duration. The present paper reviews the current knowledge on the aetiology, classification, diagnosis, management, therapy, and prognosis of PE in clinical practice.

  13. Mineralized Collagen: Rationale, Current Status, and Clinical Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhi-Ye Qiu

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a review of the rationale for the in vitro mineralization process, preparation methods, and clinical applications of mineralized collagen. The rationale for natural mineralized collagen and the related mineralization process has been investigated for decades. Based on the understanding of natural mineralized collagen and its formation process, many attempts have been made to prepare biomimetic materials that resemble natural mineralized collagen in both composition and structure. To date, a number of bone substitute materials have been developed based on the principles of mineralized collagen, and some of them have been commercialized and approved by regulatory agencies. The clinical outcomes of mineralized collagen are of significance to advance the evaluation and improvement of related medical device products. Some representative clinical cases have been reported, and there are more clinical applications and long-term follow-ups that currently being performed by many research groups.

  14. Management of anaphylaxis in Latin America: current situation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victoria Cardona

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Anaphylaxis is a systemic and severe allergic reaction, which can be fatal. The first-line treatment of choice, according to international guidelines, is intramuscular adrenaline. However, different studies show that the performance of health professionals managing anaphylaxis is often inadequate Objective: To assess the current resources available in Latin American countries for the diagnosis and treatment of anaphylaxis. Methods: Online survey promoted by the Latin American Society of Allergy and Immunology to representatives of the national allergy societies of Latin American countries. Results: Responses were received from 10 countries out of the 14 countries invited to participate. Only five of the countries have clinical practice guidelines in anaphylaxis. Adrenaline autoinjectors are available only in two countries, Argentina and Brazil, but are not subsidized by public health systems. In all countries, adrenaline is available in ampoules, which is the presentation usually prescribed to patients for self-administration. The use of adrenaline was estimated to be less than 50 % of cases in five countries, while antihistamines and corticosteroids are almost always used. The determination of serum tryptase is possible in some health centers, often private, in five of the countries surveyed. Conclusion: It is necessary to improve resources related to the diagnosis and management of anaphylaxis in Latin American countries.

  15. Budgeting, funding, and managing clinical research projects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatfield, Elizabeth; Dicks, Elizabeth; Parfrey, Patrick

    2009-01-01

    Large, integrated multidisciplinary teams have become recognized as an efficient means by which to drive innovation and discovery in clinical research. This chapter describes how to budget and fund these large studies and effectively manage the large, often dispersed teams involved. Sources of funding are identified; budget development, justification, reporting, financial governance, and accountability are described; in addition to the creation and management of the multidisciplinary team that will implement the research plan.

  16. Bimodal Programming: A Survey of Current Clinical Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siburt, Hannah W; Holmes, Alice E

    2015-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the current clinical practice in approaches to bimodal programming in the United States. To be specific, if clinicians are recommending bimodal stimulation, who programs the hearing aid in the bimodal condition, and what method is used for programming the hearing aid? An 11-question online survey was created and sent via email to a comprehensive list of cochlear implant programming centers in the United States. The survey was sent to 360 recipients. Respondents in this study represented a diverse group of clinical settings (response rate: 26%). Results indicate little agreement about who programs the hearing aids, when they are programmed, and how they are programmed in the bimodal condition. Analysis of small versus large implant centers indicated small centers are less likely to add a device to the contralateral ear. Although a growing number of cochlear implant recipients choose to wear a hearing aid on the contralateral ear, there is inconsistency in the current clinical approach to bimodal programming. These survey results provide evidence of large variability in the current bimodal programming practices and indicate a need for more structured clinical recommendations and programming approaches.

  17. Managing ankle ligament sprains and tears: current opinion

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGovern, Ryan P; Martin, RobRoy L

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to present a current review of pathoanatomical features, differential diagnosis, objective assessment, intervention, and clinical course associated with managing lateral ankle ligament sprains. Proper diagnosis and identification of affected structures should be obtained through history and objective assessment. From this information, an individualized evidence-based intervention plan can be developed to enable recovery while decreasing the risk of reinjury. An appropriate evaluation is needed not only to determine the correct diagnosis but also to allow for grading and determining the prognosis of the injury in those with an acute lateral ankle sprain. Examination should include an assessment of impairments as well as a measure of activity and participation. Evidence-based interventions for those with an acute lateral ankle sprain should include weight bearing with bracing, manual therapy, progressive therapeutic exercises, and cryotherapy. For those with chronic ankle instability (CAI), interventions should include manual therapy and a comprehensive rehabilitation program. It is essential to understand the normal clinical course for athletes who sustain a lateral ankle sprain as well as risk factors for an acute injury and CAI. Risk factors for both an acute lateral ankle sprain and CAI include not using an external support and not participating in an appropriate exercise program. Incorporating the latest evidence-based rehabilitation techniques provides the best course of treatment for athletes with an acute ankle sprain or CAI. PMID:27042147

  18. Asymptomatic bacteriuria. Clinical significance and management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raz, Raul

    2003-10-01

    The clinical significance and management of asymptomatic bacteriuria (ASB) differs according to different groups of patients. ASB requires antibiotic treatment in pregnant women, children aged 5-6 years and prior to invasive genitourinary procedures. However, there is a consensus that ASB in the elderly, healthy school girls and young women, diabetic women and patients with indwelling catheters or intermittent catheterization has no clinical significance and antibiotic prescription is not indicated.

  19. Current Approaches to the Management of Pediatric Overweight and Obesity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ridolfi, Danielle R.; Hayes, Jacqueline F.; St Paul, Michelle; Wilfley, Denise E.

    2015-01-01

    Opinion Statement Family-based behavioral intervention has been demonstrated to be an effective and safe treatment for childhood obesity and should be considered a first-line treatment option. However, access to such intensive evidence-based treatment is limited and, currently, obesity care is dominated by high intensity behavioral treatment implemented in specialty clinics or less effective, low intensity treatments implemented in primary care. However, capitalizing on the established and ongoing relationship between primary care providers and families, primary care providers hold an invaluable role in early identification of overweight and obesity, and subsequent referral to an evidence-based treatment. key aspects of effective treatment include: early intervention, moderate- to high-intensity intervention of sufficient duration, multi-component intervention targeting dietary modification, physical activity and behavioral strategies, family involvement and goals targeting family members, and follow-up contact during maintenance. The purpose of this review is to present the current empirically supported treatment options for pediatric obesity including primary care-based interventions and diagnostic tools, multi-component behavioral intervention with a focus on family-based behavioral intervention, immersion treatment, and pharmacologic and surgical management. PMID:25205083

  20. Is current clinical practice modified about intraoperative breast irradiation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massa, Michela; Franchelli, Simonetta; Panizza, Renzo; Massa, Tiberio

    2016-04-01

    After the results obtained in the two randomized clinical trial, the ELIOT trial and the TARGIT-A trial, a heated debate is going on concerning the question of applying intraoperative radiotherapy (IORT) instead of postoperative whole breast irradiation (WBI) after breast conservative treatment. Currently, many centers are applying the IORT following the strict selection criteria dictated by the working groups American Society for Radiation Oncology (ASTRO) and Groupe Européen de Curiethérapie-European Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology (GEC-ESTRO) and monitoring the oncological outcome together with radiation toxicity on breast tissue. The clinical experience of the Geneva University Hospital regarding the use of the Intrabeam system is evaluated and compared with current evidences.

  1. Healthcare waste management: current practices in selected healthcare facilities, Botswana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mbongwe, Bontle; Mmereki, Baagi T; Magashula, Andrew

    2008-01-01

    Healthcare waste management continues to present an array of challenges for developing countries, and Botswana is no exception. The possible impact of healthcare waste on public health and the environment has received a lot of attention such that Waste Management dedicated a special issue to the management of healthcare waste (Healthcare Wastes Management, 2005. Waste Management 25(6) 567-665). As the demand for more healthcare facilities increases, there is also an increase on waste generation from these facilities. This situation requires an organised system of healthcare waste management to curb public health risks as well as occupational hazards among healthcare workers as a result of poor waste management. This paper reviews current waste management practices at the healthcare facility level and proposes possible options for improvement in Botswana.

  2. Clinical laboratory waste management in Shiraz, Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Askarian, Mehrdad; Motazedian, Nasrin; Palenik, Charles John

    2012-06-01

    Clinical laboratories are significant generators of infectious waste, including microbiological materials, contaminated sharps, and pathologic wastes such as blood specimens and blood products. Most waste produced in laboratories can be disposed of in the general solid waste stream. However, improper management of infectious waste, including mixing general wastes with infectious wastes and improper handling or storage, could lead to disease transmission. The aim of this study was to assess waste management processes used at clinical laboratories in Shiraz, Iran. One hundred and nine clinical laboratories participated In this cross sectional study, Data collection was by questionnaire and direct observation. Of the total amount of waste generated, 52% (by weight) was noninfectious domestic waste, 43% was non-sharps infectious waste and 5% consisted of sharps. There was no significant relationship between laboratory staff or manager education and the score for quality of waste collection and disposal at clinical laboratories. Improvements in infectious waste management processes should involve clearer, more uniformly accepted definitions of infectious waste and increased staff training.

  3. Congenital clinical malaria: Incidence, management and outcome ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: With paucity of documentation of congenital clinical malaria in the world literature, we therefore aimed to review its rates, presentation, management and out come of this problem in neonates at the Usmanu Danfodiyo University Teaching Hospital, Sokoto. Methodology: This prospective study was carried out in ...

  4. Rectocele repair using biomaterial augmentation: current documentation and clinical experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altman, Daniel; Mellgren, Anders; Zetterström, Jan

    2005-11-01

    Although the etiology of rectocele remains debated, surgical innovations are currently promoted to improve anatomic outcome while avoiding dyspareunia and alleviating rectal emptying difficulties following rectocele surgery. Use of biomaterials in rectocele repair has become widespread in a short time, but the clinical documentation of their effectiveness and complications is limited. Medline and the Cochrane database were searched electronically from 1964 to May 2005 using the Pubmed and Ovid search engines. All English language publications including any of the search terms "rectocele," "implant," "mesh," "biomaterial," "prolapse," "synthetical," "pelvic floor," "biological," and "compatibility" were reviewed. This review outlines the basic principles for use of biomaterials in pelvic reconstructive surgery and provides a condensation of peer-reviewed articles describing clinical use of biomaterials in rectocele surgery. Historical and new concepts in rectocele surgery are discussed. Factors of importance for human in vivo biomaterial compatibility are presented together with current knowledge from clinical studies. Potential risks and problems associated with the use of biomaterials in rectocele and pelvic reconstructive surgery in general are described. Although use of biomaterials in rectocele and other pelvic organ prolapse surgery offers exciting possibilities, it raises treatment costs and may be associated with unknown and potentially severe complications at short and long term. Clinical benefits are currently unknown and need to be proven in clinical studies. Obstetricians & Gynecologists, Family Physicians After completion of this article, the reader should be able to explain that the objective of surgical treatment is to improve anatomic outcome and alleviate rectal emptying difficulties, describe the efficacy of biomaterials in rectocele repair, and summarize the potential risks and problems associated with use of biomaterials in rectocele and pelvic

  5. Treatment of sepsis: current status of clinical immunotherapy.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Callaghan, A

    2012-02-03

    While antibiotics address the root cause of sepsis--that of pathogen infection--they fail to provide an adequate cure for the condition. Currently, 30% to 50% of septic patients die, and this figure is likely to increase in line with the proliferation of multi-drug resistant bacteria. With an increased understanding of the immune response, it has been proposed that modulation of this defence mechanism offers the best hope of cure. Many entry-points in the immune system have been identified and targeted therapies have been developed,but why are these not in routine clinical practice? This review examines the latest evidence for the use of immuno-modulating drugs, obtained from human clinical trials. We discuss cytokine-based therapies, steroids and anti-coagulants. Finally, consideration is given as to why successful therapies in the laboratory, and in vivo models, do not automatically translate into clinical benefit

  6. E-waste: Environmental Problems and Current Management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Aktsoglou

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper the environmental problems related with the discarded electronic appliances, known as e-waste, are reviewed.Moreover, the current and the future production of e-waste, the potential environmental problems associated with theirdisposal and management practices are discussed whereas the existing e-waste management schemes in Greece and othercountries (Japan, Switzerland are also quoted.

  7. Current management of Hirschsprung's disease in Egypt: A survey ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background/purpose Significant progress has been made in the management of Hirschsprung's disease (HD). The choice of the management plan, surgical approach, and operative details is still variable among pediatric surgeons. This survey aims to determine the current preferences of Egyptian pediatric surgeons in the ...

  8. Current management of anorectal malformation in Egypt: a survey of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background/aim: Anorectal malformation (ARM) represents a wide spectrum of anomalies. Its management includes various strategies. This survey aims at detecting the current preferences of Egyptian pediatric surgeons regarding the management of ARM. Materials and methods: A survey was circulated individually to the ...

  9. Analysis of Current Supplier Relationship Management Practices: A Solution Proposal

    OpenAIRE

    Gomes Campelo Filho, Eulalio

    2009-01-01

    The work contributes with the existing literature by investigating current SRM practices. Based on the research, the author has designed an information system framework, which provides companies with an innovative SRM solution to manage their indirect material purchasing process through an environment that supports companies entire plan-to-order activities, including functionalities such as central data management, spend data management, e-sourcing and the usual e-procurement features.

  10. Current management of Parkinson's disease | Salawu | Annals of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Annals of African Medicine. Journal Home · ABOUT THIS JOURNAL · Advanced Search · Current Issue · Archives · Journal Home > Vol 9, No 2 (2010) >. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads. Username, Password, Remember me, or Register. Current management of Parkinson's disease. F Salawu, A ...

  11. DOE waste management program-current and future

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coleman, J.A.

    1993-01-01

    The back end of the nuclear fuel cycle, as well as many operations in the Department of Energy, involves management of radioactive and hazardous waste and spent nuclear fuel. Described herein is the current and anticipated Department's Waste Management Program and general information about the Program for managing and disposing of waste that will illustrate the importance of air cleaning and treatment in assuring protection of the public and our environment. The structure and responsibilities of the Office of Environmental Restoration and Waste Management (EM) are described. The categories of waste managed by the Office of Waste Management (OWM) are defined. The problems of waste management, waste minimization, and waste treatment, storage, and disposal are discussed. 4 figs

  12. [Job satisfaction of nurses in the clinical management units].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez Lara, Concepción; Praena Fernández, Juan Manuel; Gil García, Eugenia

    2013-01-01

    Clinical Management Unit (CMU) is currently set in the Andalusian health institutions as the model reference management. This management model aims to make all healthcare professionals a powerful idea: the best performance of health resources is performed to drive clinical practice using the least number of diagnostic and therapeutic resources. The CMU not only aims at saving money, in the Clinical Management Agreement [1] are measured all the dimensions that make up the UGC: research, training, clinical process, the portfolio of services, objectives, financial management and indicators to control and security. The CMU is to transfer more responsibilities to Health Care Professionals, involving them in the management of the Unit. The CMU sets new approaches that directly affect health professionals and presents advantages and disadvantages for the Doctors and the Nurses, involved in achieving excellence in care work. Nurse Practitioners shows expectant before the changes are generated in health institutions and appears a discussion of skills derived from the CMU. Some Nurses believe that the bur, den of care to which they are subjected in public institutions has increased since the onset of the CMU and yet others believe that they are motivated and rewarded for the results obtained with this model of management. In health institutions, some professionals are more motivated than others and this is found in the outcome of health care activity [2]. Given the positive and negative perceptions that arise in the CMU Professional Nurses, it is considered appropriate to focus the objective of this work in the search for factors that influence job satisfaction of nurses in the CMU. There are few studies about the CMU [3] but are absent when linked with nursing, so the pursuit of scientific knowledge related to nursing management model based on Clinical and Quality Care can lead to establish new concepts around the nursing profession, a profession in which major changes are

  13. Clinical Management of Priapism: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazuyoshi Shigehara

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Priapism is defined as a persistent and painful erection lasting longer than four hours without sexual stimulation. Based on episode history and pathophysiology, priapism is classified into three subtypes: ischemic (low-flow, non-ischemic (high-flow, and stuttering priapism. Ischemic priapism is characterized by a persistent, painful erection with remarkable rigidity of the corpora cavernosa caused by a disorder of venous blood outflow from this tissue mass, and is similar to penile compartment syndrome. Stuttering priapism is characterized by a self-limited, recurrent, and intermittent erection, frequently occurring in patients with sickle cell disease. Non-ischemic priapism is characterized by a painless, persistent nonsexual erection that is not fully rigid and is caused by excess arterial blood flow into the corpora cavernosa. Because ischemic and non-ischemic priapism differ based on emergency status and treatment options, appropriate discrimination of each type of priapism is required to initiate adequate clinical management. The goal of management of priapism is to achieve detumescence of the persistent penile erection and to preserve erectile function after resolution of the priapism. To achieve successful management, urologists should address this emergency clinical condition. In the present article, we review the diagnosis and clinical management of the three types of priapism.

  14. Acute pancreatitis: current perspectives on diagnosis and management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Adarsh P; Mourad, Moustafa M; Bramhall, Simon R

    2018-01-01

    The last two decades have seen the emergence of significant evidence that has altered certain aspects of the management of acute pancreatitis. While most cases of acute pancreatitis are mild, the challenge remains in managing the severe cases and the complications associated with acute pancreatitis. Gallstones are still the most common cause with epidemiological trends indicating a rising incidence. The surgical management of acute gallstone pancreatitis has evolved. In this article, we revisit and review the methods in diagnosing acute pancreatitis. We present the evidence for the supportive management of the condition, and then discuss the management of acute gallstone pancreatitis. Based on the evidence, our local institutional pathways, and clinical experience, we have produced an outline to guide clinicians in the management of acute gallstone pancreatitis. PMID:29563826

  15. Monogenic hyperinsulinemic hypoglycemia: current insights into the pathogenesis and management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lord Katherine

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Hyperinsulinism (HI is the leading cause of persistent hypoglycemia in children, which if unrecognized may lead to development delays and permanent neurologic damage. Prompt recognition and appropriate treatment of HI are essential to avoid these sequelae. Major advances have been made over the past two decades in understanding the molecular basis of hyperinsulinism and mutations in nine genes are currently known to cause HI. Inactivating KATP channel mutations cause the most common and severe type of HI, which occurs in both a focal and a diffuse form. Activating mutations of glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH lead to hyperinsulinism/hyperammonemia syndrome, while activating mutations of glucokinase (GK, the “glucose sensor” of the beta cell, causes hyperinsulinism with a variable clinical phenotype. More recently identified genetic causes include mutations in the genes encoding short-chain 3-hydroxyacyl-CoA (SCHAD, uncoupling protein 2 (UCP2, hepatocyte nuclear factor 4-alpha (HNF-4α, hepatocyte nuclear factor 1-alpha (HNF-1α, and monocarboyxlate transporter 1 (MCT-1, which results in a very rare form of HI triggered by exercise. For a timely diagnosis, a critical sample and a glucagon stimulation test should be done when plasma glucose is ATP channel agonist, suggests a KATP defect, which frequently requires pancreatectomy. Surgery is palliative for children with diffuse KATPHI, but children with focal KATPHI are cured with a limited pancreatectomy. Therefore, distinguishing between diffuse and focal disease and localizing the focal lesion in the pancreas are crucial aspects of HI management. Since 2003, 18 F-DOPA PET scans have been used to differentiate diffuse and focal disease and localize focal lesions with higher sensitivity and specificity than more invasive interventional radiology techniques. Hyperinsulinism remains a challenging disorder, but recent advances in the understanding of its genetic basis and breakthroughs in

  16. Management strategies of enterovirus D68 outbreaks: current perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milhano N

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Natacha Milhano, Kaja Sverdrup Borge, Karoline Bragstad, Susanne G Dudman Domain for Environmental Health and Infectious Disease Control, Norwegian Institute of Public Health, Oslo, Norway Abstract: Following its discovery in California in 1962, enterovirus D68 (EV-D68 was reported only sporadically around the world. In August 2014, a marked increase of EV-D68 cases in young children with severe respiratory infections was reported in the USA and Canada and later in Europe and Asia. Some of these cases were also found to be associated with acute flaccid paralysis, which exacerbated public health concern, and has since triggered international efforts to strengthen both EV-D68 and acute flaccid paralysis surveillance systems. This review summarizes the current knowledge on EV-D68, offering an overview of EV-D68 epidemiology, clinical presentations, diagnostic methodologies, and treatment strategies, as well as surveillance and outbreak management. Keywords: enterovirus D68, AFP, diagnostics, treatment, surveillance, outbreak 

  17. Managing ankle ligament sprains and tears: current opinion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    McGovern RP

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Ryan P McGovern,1 RobRoy L Martin,1,2 1Department of Physical Therapy, Rangos School of Health Sciences, Duquesne University, 2Centers for Sports Medicine – University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA, USA Abstract: The purpose of this paper is to present a current review of pathoanatomical features, differential diagnosis, objective assessment, intervention, and clinical course associated with managing lateral ankle ligament sprains. Proper diagnosis and identification of affected structures should be obtained through history and objective assessment. From this information, an individualized evidence-based intervention plan can be developed to enable recovery while decreasing the risk of reinjury. An appropriate evaluation is needed not only to determine the correct diagnosis but also to allow for grading and determining the prognosis of the injury in those with an acute lateral ankle sprain. Examination should include an assessment of impairments as well as a measure of activity and participation. Evidence-based interventions for those with an acute lateral ankle sprain should include weight bearing with bracing, manual therapy, progressive therapeutic exercises, and cryotherapy. For those with chronic ankle instability (CAI, interventions should include manual therapy and a comprehensive rehabilitation program. It is essential to understand the normal clinical course for athletes who sustain a lateral ankle sprain as well as risk factors for an acute injury and CAI. Risk factors for both an acute lateral ankle sprain and CAI include not using an external support and not participating in an appropriate exercise program. Incorporating the latest evidence-based rehabilitation techniques provides the best course of treatment for athletes with an acute ankle sprain or CAI. Keywords: reinjury, chronic ankle instability, rehabilitation techniques, diagnosis, intervention, athlete

  18. Clinical Management of HIV Drug Resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cortez, Karoll J.; Maldarelli, Frank

    2011-01-01

    Combination antiretroviral therapy for HIV-1 infection has resulted in profound reductions in viremia and is associated with marked improvements in morbidity and mortality. Therapy is not curative, however, and prolonged therapy is complicated by drug toxicity and the emergence of drug resistance. Management of clinical drug resistance requires in depth evaluation, and includes extensive history, physical examination and laboratory studies. Appropriate use of resistance testing provides valuable information useful in constructing regimens for treatment-experienced individuals with viremia during therapy. This review outlines the emergence of drug resistance in vivo, and describes clinical evaluation and therapeutic options of the individual with rebound viremia during therapy. PMID:21994737

  19. Noonan syndrome: clinical features, diagnosis, and management guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romano, Alicia A; Allanson, Judith E; Dahlgren, Jovanna; Gelb, Bruce D; Hall, Bryan; Pierpont, Mary Ella; Roberts, Amy E; Robinson, Wanda; Takemoto, Clifford M; Noonan, Jacqueline A

    2010-10-01

    Noonan syndrome (NS) is a common, clinically and genetically heterogeneous condition characterized by distinctive facial features, short stature, chest deformity, congenital heart disease, and other comorbidities. Gene mutations identified in individuals with the NS phenotype are involved in the Ras/MAPK (mitogen-activated protein kinase) signal transduction pathway and currently explain ∼61% of NS cases. Thus, NS frequently remains a clinical diagnosis. Because of the variability in presentation and the need for multidisciplinary care, it is essential that the condition be identified and managed comprehensively. The Noonan Syndrome Support Group (NSSG) is a nonprofit organization committed to providing support, current information, and understanding to those affected by NS. The NSSG convened a conference of health care providers, all involved in various aspects of NS, to develop these guidelines for use by pediatricians in the diagnosis and management of individuals with NS and to provide updated genetic findings.

  20. Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation: current clinical practice, coding, and reimbursement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuerer, Douglas J E; Kolovos, Nikoleta S; Boyd, Kayla V; Coopersmith, Craig M

    2008-07-01

    Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) is a technique for providing life support for patients experiencing both pulmonary and cardiac failure by maintaining oxygenation and perfusion until native organ function is restored. ECMO is used routinely at many specialized hospitals for infants and less commonly for children with respiratory or cardiac failure from a variety of causes. Its usage is more controversial in adults, but select medical centers have reported favorable findings in patients with ARDS and other causes of severe pulmonary failure. ECMO is also rarely used as a rescue therapy in a small subset of adult patients with cardiac failure. This article will review the current uses and techniques of ECMO in the critical care setting as well as the evidence supporting its usage. In addition, current practice management related to coding and reimbursement for this intensive therapy will be discussed.

  1. OSTEOARTHRITIS: CURRENT CLINICAL CONCEPT AND SOME PROMISING THERAPEUTIC APPROACHES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. E. Karateev

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, there has been a trend toward changing the clinical concept of osteoarthritis (OA. This disease has been considered as an age-related disease and the long-term result of a current pathological process for a very long time. However, many experts are now inclined to consider it necessary to identify the early, pre-X-ray stage of OA, when adequate treatment may not only halt the progression, but also achieve the regression of joint structural changes. This review deals with a number of pathogenetic and clinical aspects of the early stages of OA, which are important for timely diagnosis and pathogenetic therapy choice. It also considers some therapeutic approaches, both a "classic" and recently actively discussed methods for using platelet-rich plasma and autologous chondrocyte transplantation.

  2. Islet cell transplant: Update on current clinical trials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuetz, Christian; Markmann, James F.

    2016-01-01

    In the last 15 years clinical islet transplantation has made the leap from experimental procedure to standard of care for a highly selective group of patients. Due to a risk-benefit calculation involving the required systemic immunosuppression the procedure is only considered in patients with type 1 diabetes, complicated by severe hypoglycemia or end stage renal disease. In this review we summarize current outcomes of the procedure and take a look at ongoing and future improvements and refinements of beta cell therapy. PMID:28451515

  3. Clinical management departments for the neurosciences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matías-Guiu, J; García-Ramos, R; Ramos, M; Soto, J

    2016-01-01

    Neuroscience-related clinical management departments (UGC in Spanish) represent a means of organising hospitals to deliver patient-centred care as well as specific clinical and administrative management models. The authors review the different UGC models in Spain and their implementation processes as well as any functional problems. We pay special attention to departments treating neurological patients. Neuroscience-related specialties may offer a good framework for the units that they contain. This may be due to the inherent variability and costs associated with neurological patients, the vital level of coordination that must be present between units providing care, and probably to the dynamic nature of the neurosciences as well. Difficulties associated with implementing and gaining acceptance for the new model have limited such UGCs until now. Copyright © 2013 Sociedad Española de Neurología. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  4. Evolution in Clinical Knowledge Management Strategy at Intermountain Healthcare

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hulse, Nathan C.; Galland, Joel; Borsato, Emerson P.

    2012-01-01

    In this manuscript, we present an overview of the clinical knowledge management strategy at Intermountain Healthcare in support of our electronic medical record systems. Intermountain first initiated efforts in developing a centralized enterprise knowledge repository in 2001. Applications developed, areas of emphasis served, and key areas of focus are presented. We also detail historical and current areas of emphasis, in response to business needs. PMID:23304309

  5. Smartphone use in dermatology for clinical photography and consultation: Current practice and the law.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbott, Lisa M; Magnusson, Roger S; Gibbs, Emma; Smith, Saxon D

    2018-05-01

    Smartphones are rapidly changing the way doctors capture and communicate clinical information, particularly in highly visual specialties such as dermatology. An understanding of how and why smartphones are currently used in clinical practice is critical in order to evaluate professional and legal risks, and to formulate policies that enable safe use of mobile technologies for the maximal benefit of practitioners and patients. Australian dermatologists and dermatology trainees were surveyed on their current practices relating to clinical smartphone use. Of the 105 respondents, 101 provided useable results. The data show clinical smartphone use is common and frequent, with more than 50% of respondents sending and receiving images on their smartphones at least weekly. Clinical photographs were usually sent via multimedia message or email and were commonly stored on smartphones (46%). Security measures adopted to protect data were limited. There was inadequate documentation of consent for transmission of photographs and advice provided. Only 22% of respondents were aware of clear policies in their workplace regarding smartphone use, and a majority desired further education on digital image management. Given the frequency of use and the degree of importance placed on the ability to send and receive clinical images, clinical smartphone use will persist and will likely increase over time. Current practices are insufficient to comply with professional and legal obligations, and increase practitioners' vulnerability to civil and disciplinary proceedings. Further education, realistic policies and adequate software resources are critical to ensure protection of patients, practitioners and the reputation of the dermatological profession. © 2017 The Australasian College of Dermatologists.

  6. Enhancing outpatient clinics management software by reducing patients’ waiting time

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iman Almomani

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Summary: The Kingdom of Saudi Arabia (KSA gives great attention to improving the quality of services provided by health care sectors including outpatient clinics. One of the main drawbacks in outpatient clinics is long waiting time for patients—which affects the level of patient satisfaction and the quality of services. This article addresses this problem by studying the Outpatient Management Software (OMS and proposing solutions to reduce waiting times. Many hospitals around the world apply solutions to overcome the problem of long waiting times in outpatient clinics such as hospitals in the USA, China, Sri Lanka, and Taiwan. These clinics have succeeded in reducing wait times by 15%, 78%, 60% and 50%, respectively. Such solutions depend mainly on adding more human resources or changing some business or management policies. The solutions presented in this article reduce waiting times by enhancing the software used to manage outpatient clinics services. Both quantitative and qualitative methods have been used to understand current OMS and examine level of patient’s satisfaction. Five main problems that may cause high or unmeasured waiting time have been identified: appointment type, ticket numbering, doctor late arrival, early arriving patient and patients’ distribution list. These problems have been mapped to the corresponding OMS components. Solutions to the above problems have been introduced and evaluated analytically or by simulation experiments. Evaluation of the results shows a reduction in patient waiting time. When late doctor arrival issues are solved, this can reduce the clinic service time by up to 20%. However, solutions for early arriving patients reduces 53.3% of vital time, 20% of the clinic time and overall 30.3% of the total waiting time. Finally, well patient-distribution lists make improvements by 54.2%. Improvements introduced to the patients’ waiting time will consequently affect patients’ satisfaction and improve

  7. Postoperative electrolyte management: Current practice patterns of surgeons and residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angarita, Fernando A; Dueck, Andrew D; Azouz, Solomon M

    2015-07-01

    Managing postoperative electrolyte imbalances often is driven by dogma. To identify areas of improvement, we assessed the practice pattern of postoperative electrolyte management among surgeons and residents. An online survey was distributed among attending surgeons and surgical residents at the University of Toronto. The survey was designed according to a systematic approach for formulating self-administered questionnaires. Questions addressed workload, decision making in hypothetical clinical scenarios, and improvement strategies. Of 232 surveys distributed, 156 were completed (response rate: 67%). The majority stated that junior residents were responsible for managing electrolytes at 13 University of Toronto-affiliated hospitals. Supervision was carried out predominately by senior residents (75%). Thirteen percent reported management went unsupervised. Approximately 59% of residents were unaware how often attending surgeons assessed patients' electrolytes. Despite the majority of residents (53.7%) reporting they were never given tools or trained in electrolyte replacement, they considered themselves moderately or extremely confident. The management of hypothetical clinical scenarios differed between residents and attending surgeons. The majority (50.5%) of respondents considered that an electrolyte replacement protocol is the most appropriate improvement strategy. Electrolyte replacement represents an important component of surgeons' workload. Despite reporting that formal training in electrolyte management is limited, residents consider themselves competent; however, their practice is highly variable and often differs from pharmacologic-directed recommendations. Optimizing how postoperative electrolytes are managed in surgical wards requires building a framework that improves knowledge, training, and limits unnecessary interventions. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Biomedical waste management in Ayurveda hospitals - current practices & future prospectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajan, Renju; Robin, Delvin T; M, Vandanarani

    2018-03-16

    Biomedical waste management is an integral part of traditional and contemporary system of health care. The paper focuses on the identification and classification of biomedical wastes in Ayurvedic hospitals, current practices of its management in Ayurveda hospitals and its future prospective. Databases like PubMed (1975-2017 Feb), Scopus (1960-2017), AYUSH Portal, DOAJ, DHARA and Google scholar were searched. We used the medical subject headings 'biomedical waste' and 'health care waste' for identification and classification. The terms 'biomedical waste management', 'health care waste management' alone and combined with 'Ayurveda' or 'Ayurvedic' for current practices and recent advances in the treatment of these wastes were used. We made a humble attempt to categorize the biomedical wastes from Ayurvedic hospitals as the available data about its grouping is very scarce. Proper biomedical waste management is the mainstay of hospital cleanliness, hospital hygiene and maintenance activities. Current disposal techniques adopted for Ayurveda biomedical wastes are - sewage/drains, incineration and land fill. But these methods are having some merits as well as demerits. Our review has identified a number of interesting areas for future research such as the logical application of bioremediation techniques in biomedical waste management and the usage of effective micro-organisms and solar energy in waste disposal. Copyright © 2017 Transdisciplinary University, Bangalore and World Ayurveda Foundation. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Biomarkers in prostate cancer - Current clinical utility and future perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kretschmer, Alexander; Tilki, Derya

    2017-12-01

    Current tendencies in the treatment course of prostate cancer patients increase the need for reliable biomarkers that help in decision-making in a challenging clinical setting. Within the last decade, several novel biomarkers have been introduced. In the following comprehensive review article, we focus on diagnostic (PHI ® , 4K score, SelectMDx ® , ConfirmMDx ® , PCA3, MiPS, ExoDX ® , mpMRI) and prognostic (OncotypeDX GPS ® , Prolaris ® , ProMark ® , DNA-ploidy, Decipher ® ) biomarkers that are in widespread clinical use and are supported by evidence. Hereby, we focus on multiple clinical situations in which innovative biomarkers may guide decision-making in prostate cancer therapy. In addition, we describe novel liquid biopsy approaches (circulating tumor cells, cell-free DNA) that have been described as predictive biomarkers in metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer and might support an individual patient-centred oncological approach in the nearer future. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Informatics in clinical research in oncology: current state, challenges, and a future perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chahal, Amar P S

    2011-01-01

    The informatics landscape of clinical trials in oncology has changed significantly in the last 10 years. The current state of the infrastructure for clinical trial management, execution, and data management is reviewed. The systems, their functionality, the users, and the standards available to researchers are discussed from the perspective of the oncologist-researcher. Challenges in complexity and in the processing of information are outlined. These challenges include the lack of communication and information-interchange between systems, the lack of simplified standards, and the lack of implementation and adherence to the standards that are available. The clinical toxicology criteria from the National Cancer Institute (CTCAE) are cited as a successful standard in oncology, and HTTP on the Internet is referenced for its simplicity. Differences in the management of information standards between industries are discussed. Possible future advances in oncology clinical research informatics are addressed. These advances include strategic policy review of standards and the implementation of actions to make standards free, ubiquitous, simple, and easily interpretable; the need to change from a local data-capture- or transaction-driven model to a large-scale data-interpretation model that provides higher value to the oncologist and the patient; and the need for information technology investment in a readily available digital educational model for clinical research in oncology that is customizable for individual studies. These new approaches, with changes in information delivery to mobile platforms, will set the stage for the next decade in clinical research informatics.

  11. Prehospital Ultrasound in Trauma: A Review of Current and Potential Future Clinical Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tharwat El Zahran

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Ultrasound (US is an essential tool for evaluating trauma patients in the hospital setting. Many previous in-hospital studies have been extrapolated to out of hospital setting to improve diagnostic accuracy in prehospital and austere environments. This review article presents the role of prehospital US in blunt and penetrating trauma management with emphasis on its current clinical applications, challenges, and future implications of such use.

  12. CURRENT TRENDS IN THE MANAGEMENT OF SICKLE CELL ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    drclement

    level as sickle cell disease. Sickle cell anemia is due to the substitution of thymine for adenine ..... and local instillation of vaso-active drugs, shunting ... oral pseudoephedrine at night as an attempt to ..... Management of Cancer. Pain. Clinical ...

  13. Managing neonatal bowel obstruction: clinical perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Desoky SM

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Sarah M Desoky,1 Ranjit I Kylat,2 Unni Udayasankar,1 Dorothy Gilbertson-Dahdal1 1Department of Medical Imaging, University of Arizona College of Medicine, Tucson, AZ, USA; 2Division of Neonatal-Perinatal Medicine, Department of Pediatrics, University of Arizona College of Medicine, Tucson, AZ, USA Abstract: Neonatal intestinal obstruction is a common surgical emergency and occurs in approximately 1 in 2,000 live births. The causes of obstruction are diverse with varied embryological origins, and some underlying etiologies are not yet well described. Some findings of neonatal bowel obstruction can be detected prenatally on ultrasound imaging. The obstruction is classified as “high” when the level of obstruction is proximal to the ileum, and “low” when the level of obstruction is at the ileum or colon. Early diagnosis of the type of intestinal obstruction and localization of the obstructive bowel segment guides timely and appropriate management of the underlying pathologic entity. Neonatal bowel obstructions are ideally managed at specialized centers with a large volume of neonatal surgery and dedicated pediatric surgical and anesthesia expertise. Although surgical intervention is necessary in most cases, initial management strategies often target underlying metabolic, cardiac, or respiratory abnormalities. Imaging plays a key role in early and accurate diagnosis of the abnormalities. When bowel obstruction is suspected clinically, initial imaging workup usually involves abdominal radiography, which may direct further evaluation with fluoroscopic examination such as upper gastrointestinal (UGI contrast study or contrast enema. This article provides a comprehensive review of clinical and radiological features of common and less common causes of intestinal obstruction in the neonatal age group, including esophageal atresia, enteric duplication cysts, gastric volvulus, congenital microgastria, hypertrophic pyloric stenosis, duodenal atresia

  14. Current management of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy: evidence in pathophysiology, diagnosis and treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quesada Mena, Luis Diego

    2013-01-01

    Available literary evidence is reviewed on the current management of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. The bibliographical search is carried out in physical and online texts, cardiology journals, databases (MEDLINE), original studies, reviews and metaanalysis. Literature in English and Spanish is included from the first descriptions of the disease in the fifties, until the date of the investigation. Clinical management of patients is compared and recommendations published by consensus groups of international associations [es

  15. Clinical waste management in the context of the Kanye community ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Clinical waste management in the context of the Kanye community home-based care programme, Botswana. ... or clinics; poor storage of the healthcare waste at clinics; lack of incinerators for burning clinical waste; and a high risk of contagion to individuals and the environment at all stages of managing the clinical waste.

  16. Molecular Biomarkers in the Clinical Management of Prostate Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Udager, Aaron M; Tomlins, Scott A

    2018-01-08

    Prostate cancer, one of the most common noncutaneous malignancies in men, is a heterogeneous disease with variable clinical outcome. Although the majority of patients harbor indolent tumors that are essentially cured by local therapy, subsets of patients present with aggressive disease or recur/progress after primary treatment. With this in mind, modern clinical approaches to prostate cancer emphasize the need to reduce overdiagnosis and overtreatment via personalized medicine. Advances in our understanding of prostate cancer pathogenesis, coupled with recent technologic innovations, have facilitated the development and validation of numerous molecular biomarkers, representing a range of macromolecules assayed from a variety of patient sample types, to help guide the clinical management of prostate cancer, including early detection, diagnosis, prognostication, and targeted therapeutic selection. Herein, we review the current state of the art regarding prostate cancer molecular biomarkers, emphasizing those with demonstrated utility in clinical practice. Copyright © 2018 Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press; all rights reserved.

  17. Current Standards in the Management of Cerebral Metastases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pablo Goetz

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The last 30 years have seen major changes in attitude toward patients with cerebral metastases. This paper aims to outline the major landmarks in this transition and the therapeutic strategies currently used. The controversies surrounding control of brain disease are discussed, and two emerging management trends are reviewed: tumor bed radiosurgery and salvage radiation.

  18. Clinical governance and operations management methodologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, C; Walley, P

    2000-01-01

    The clinical governance mechanism, introduced since 1998 in the UK National Health Service (NHS), aims to deliver high quality care with efficient, effective and cost-effective patient services. Scally and Donaldson recognised that new approaches are needed, and operations management techniques comprise potentially powerful methodologies in understanding the process of care, which can be applied both within and across professional boundaries. This paper summarises four studies in hospital Trusts which took approaches to improving process that were different from and less structured than business process re-engineering (BPR). The problems were then amenable to change at a relatively low cost and short timescale, producing significant improvement to patient care. This less structured approach to operations management avoided incurring overhead costs of large scale and costly change such as new information technology (IT) systems. The most successful changes were brought about by formal tools to control quantity, content and timing of changes.

  19. Update on contemporary management of clinically localized renal cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jorns, J J; Thiel, D D; Castle, E P

    2012-12-01

    Renal cell carcinoma (RCC) continues to increase in incidence with the largest increase manifesting in small, organ-confined tumors. This review outlines the epidemiology and current data pertaining to the management of clinically-localized RCC. In this manuscript, the current data outlining the benefit of nephron sparing to the overall survival of the patient is described. The data pertaining to minimally invasive nephron sparing is also explained in detail. From laparoscopic and robotic partial nephrectomy to watchful waiting and percutaneous ablation, the urologist is continually assaulted with new data for the management of clinically-localized RCC. The data can be confusing, and much of it is conflicting. The addition of new scoring systems or nomograms may aid in predicting which therapy would be most beneficial in certain patient groups. New scoring systems may also predict the difficulty of surgical resection and predict surgical complications. The limitations of the data pertaining to the management of clinically-localized RCC are also outlined.

  20. [Source data management in clinical researches].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Effie; Yao, Chen; Zhang, Zi-bao; Liu, Yu-xiu

    2015-11-01

    Source data and its source documents are the foundation of clinical research. Proper source data management plays an essential role for compliance with regulatory and GCP requirements. Both paper and electronic source data co-exist in China. Due to the increasing use of electronic technology in pharmaceutical and health care industry, electronic data source becomes an upcoming trend with clear advantages. To face new opportunities and to ensure data integrity, quality and traceability from source data to regulatory submission, this document demonstrates important concepts, principles and best practices during managing source data. It includes but not limited to: (1) important concepts of source data (e.g., source data originator, source data elements, source data identifier for audit trail, etc.); (2) various modalities of source data collection in paper and electronic methods (e.g., paper CRF, EDC, Patient Report Outcomes/eCOA, etc.); (3) seven main principles recommended in the aspect of data collection, traceability, quality standards, access control, quality control, certified copy and security during source data management; (4) a life cycle from source data creation to obsolete is used as an example to illustrate consideration and implementation of source data management.

  1. Immunisation in the current management of cystic fibrosis patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Malfroot, Anne; Adam, Georgios; Ciofu, Oana

    2005-01-01

    for palivizumab in CF as an alternative but expensive prophylaxis. Anti-bacterial vaccinations protecting directly against Pseudomonas aeruginosa colonisation are promising for the future, potential candidates are currently being assessed in phase III clinical trials. More studies are needed to complete...

  2. Figures in clinical trial reports: current practice & scope for improvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pocock, Stuart J; Travison, Thomas G; Wruck, Lisa M

    2007-11-19

    Most clinical trial publications include figures, but there is little guidance on what results should be displayed as figures and how. To evaluate the current use of figures in Trial reports, and to make constructive suggestions for future practice. We surveyed all 77 reports of randomised controlled trials in five general medical journals during November 2006 to January 2007. The numbers and types of figures were determined, and then each Figure was assessed for its style, content, clarity and suitability. As a consequence, guidelines are developed for presenting figures, both in general and for each specific common type of Figure. Most trial reports contained one to three figures, mean 2.3 per article. The four main types were flow diagram, Kaplan Meier plot, Forest plot (for subgroup analyses) and repeated measures over time: these accounted for 92% of all figures published. For each type of figure there is a considerable diversity of practice in both style and content which we illustrate with selected examples of both good and bad practice. Some pointers on what to do, and what to avoid, are derived from our critical evaluation of these articles' use of figures. There is considerable scope for authors to improve their use of figures in clinical trial reports, as regards which figures to choose, their style of presentation and labelling, and their specific content. Particular improvements are needed for the four main types of figures commonly used.

  3. Figures in clinical trial reports: current practice & scope for improvement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Travison Thomas G

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Most clinical trial publications include figures, but there is little guidance on what results should be displayed as figures and how. Purpose To evaluate the current use of figures in Trial reports, and to make constructive suggestions for future practice. Methods We surveyed all 77 reports of randomised controlled trials in five general medical journals during November 2006 to January 2007. The numbers and types of figures were determined, and then each Figure was assessed for its style, content, clarity and suitability. As a consequence, guidelines are developed for presenting figures, both in general and for each specific common type of Figure. Results Most trial reports contained one to three figures, mean 2.3 per article. The four main types were flow diagram, Kaplan Meier plot, Forest plot (for subgroup analyses and repeated measures over time: these accounted for 92% of all figures published. For each type of figure there is a considerable diversity of practice in both style and content which we illustrate with selected examples of both good and bad practice. Some pointers on what to do, and what to avoid, are derived from our critical evaluation of these articles' use of figures. Conclusion There is considerable scope for authors to improve their use of figures in clinical trial reports, as regards which figures to choose, their style of presentation and labelling, and their specific content. Particular improvements are needed for the four main types of figures commonly used.

  4. The importance of clinical and management scripts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levin, Roger P

    2004-07-01

    Simply having excellent clinical skills is not enough to enable you to achieve practice goals. In the end, people will validate the quality of the practice based on the way you and your team communicate. It is amazing to realize how much impact we have on other individuals, based purely on what we say. A well-groomed dentist and staff possessing very attractive features and beautiful teeth almost invariably will work in the practice's favor. However, these traits, powerful as they may be, are incomplete without the ability to say the right thing at the right time. In the practice, the easiest way to ensure consistently excellent communication is to use clinical and management scripts. Nothing you do in your practice will equal the impact of what you say because it affects patient perceptions of quality and overall customer service experiences. Your goal is to have all routine communications in the practice turned into written scripts within 6 months.

  5. Neoplastic stem cells: current concepts and clinical perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulenburg, Axel; Brämswig, Kira; Herrmann, Harald; Karlic, Heidrun; Mirkina, Irina; Hubmann, Rainer; Laffer, Sylvia; Marian, Brigitte; Shehata, Medhat; Krepler, Clemens; Pehamberger, Hubert; Grunt, Thomas; Jäger, Ulrich; Zielinski, Christoph C; Valent, Peter

    2010-11-01

    Neoplastic stem cells have initially been characterized in myeloid leukemias where NOD/SCID mouse-repopulating progenitors supposedly reside within a CD34+/Lin- subset of the malignant clone. These progenitors are considered to be self-renewing cells responsible for the in vivo long-term growth of neoplastic cells in leukemic patients. Therefore, these cells represent an attractive target of therapy. In some lymphoid leukemias, NOD/SCID mouse-repopulating cells were also reported to reside within the CD34+/Lin- subfraction of the clone. More recently, several attempts have been made to transfer the cancer stem cell concept to solid tumors and other non-hematopoietic neoplasms. In several of these tumors, the cell surface antigens AC133 (CD133) and CD44 are considered to indicate the potential of a cell to initiate permanent tumor formation in vivo. However, several questions concerning the phenotype, self-renewal capacity, stroma-dependence, and other properties of cancer- or leukemia-initiating cells remain to be solved. The current article provides a summary of our current knowledge on neoplastic (cancer) stem cells, with special emphasis on clinical implications and therapeutic options as well as a discussion about conceptual and technical limitations. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Cognition in epilepsy: current clinical issues of interest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witt, Juri-Alexander; Helmstaedter, Christoph

    2017-04-01

    This review provides an update and summary of recent neuropsychological findings in epilepsy focusing on three major clinical topics among the many developments in the field. We will critically outline the current state with regard to cognition in new-onset epilepsies, social cognition in epilepsy, and the long-term outcome of epilepsy surgery and the cognitive outcomes of superselective surgical procedures. Current studies indicate that neuropsychological impairments are prevalent already at the onset of epilepsy and even before, social cognition (i.e., emotion recognition and theory of mind) is impaired in different epilepsy populations, the long-term outcome of epilepsy surgery is mostly characterized by a stable or even improved cognitive status, and superselective epilepsy surgeries are associated with a promising neuropsychological outcome. The high prevalence of cognitive deficits around epilepsy onset challenges the assumption that epilepsy is the major cause of cognitive problems and calls for early neuropsychological diagnostics. Social cognition seems to be a relevant domain that is not yet routinely considered in epilepsy. The cognitive long-term outcome of epilepsy surgery is mostly positive. Stereotactic thermocoagulation and gamma knife surgery appear to be cognitively safe procedures.

  7. Waste management in Greenland: current situation and challenges

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eisted, Rasmus; Christensen, Thomas Højlund

    2011-01-01

    Waste management in Greenland (56 000 inhabitants) is characterized by landfilling, incineration and export to Denmark of small quantities of metals and hazardous waste. The annual amount of waste is estimated to about 50 000 tons but actual data are scarce. Data on the waste composition is basic...... are small and equipped with only moderate flue gas cleaning technology. This report summarizes the current waste management situation in Greenland and identifies important challenges in improving the waste management....... is basically lacking. The scattered small towns and settlements, the climate and the long transport distances between towns and also to recycling industries abroad constitute a complex situation with respect to waste management. The landfills have no collection of gas and leachate and the incinerators...

  8. Managing the Services Supply Chain in the Department of Defense: An Empirical Study of Current Management Practices

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Apte, Aruna U; Apte, Uday M; Rendon, Rene G

    2008-01-01

    .... Specifically, we studied the current management practices in such areas as life cycle approach, project management, organization/ management structure, and training provided to services acquisition personnel...

  9. Current DOE direction in low-level waste management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilhite, E.L.; Dolenc, M.R.; Shupe, M.W.; Waldo, L.C.

    1989-01-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is implementing revised DOE Order 5820.2A Radioactive Waste Management. Chapter III of the revised order provides prescriptive requirements for managing low-level waste and is the subject of this paper. The revised order requires that all DOE low-level radioactive and mixed waste be systematically managed, using an approach that considers the combination of waste management practices used in waste generation reduction, segregation, treatment, packaging, storage, and disposal. The Order defines performance objectives for protecting groundwater, for protecting against intrusion, and for maintaining adequate operational practices. A performance assessment will be required to ensure that waste management operations comply with these performance objectives. DOE implementation of the revised Order includes work in the areas of leach testing, waste stabilization, waste certification, facility monitoring, and management of unique waste streams. This paper summarizes the status of this work and the current direction DOE is taking in managing low-level waste under DOE 5820.2A

  10. Management of Candida infections in liver transplant recipients: current perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lingegowda PB

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Pushpalatha B Lingegowda,1–3 Tan Ban Hock1,2,4,5 1Department of Infectious Diseases, Singapore General Hospital, 2DUKE-NUS Graduate Medical School, 3Yong Loo Lin School of Medicine, National University of Singapore, 4SingHealth Internal Medicine Residency Program, 5Faculty of Medicine, National University of Singapore, Singapore Abstract: Liver transplantation has emerged as a widely accepted lifesaving therapeutic option for many patients with a variety of liver diseases. Improved surgical and medical management has led to significant improvements in post-transplant survival rates with a 1 year and 5 year patient survival of 87% and 73%, respectively. A high mortality rate due to infections during the first post-transplant year persists. Invasive candidiasis is recognized as a significant problem associated with high morbidity and mortality. Recent surveillance data has helped to understand the changes in the epidemiology and the evolving trends in the use of antifungal agents for prophylaxis and treatment combined with the challenges of managing these invasive fungal infections, which has led the transplant community to explore the best management strategies. The emergence of resistant fungi and excess costs in managing these invasive fungal infections has added to the complexities of management. In this context, current perspectives in the management of Candida infections in liver transplant recipients will be reviewed. Keywords: Candida infections, management, liver transplant

  11. Pyogenic sacroiliitis: diagnosis, management and clinical outcome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kucera, Tomas; Sponer, Pavel [Charles University in Prague, Faculty of Medicine and University Hospital in Hradec Kralove, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Hradec Kralove (Czech Republic); Brtkova, Jindra [Charles University in Prague, Faculty of Medicine and University Hospital in Hradec Kralove, Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Hradec Kralove (Czech Republic); Ryskova, Lenka [Charles University in Prague, Faculty of Medicine and University Hospital in Hradec Kralove, Department of Clinical Microbiology, Hradec Kralove (Czech Republic); Popper, Eduard [Charles University in Prague, Faculty of Medicine and University Hospital in Hradec Kralove, Department of Rehabilitation, Hradec Kralove (Czech Republic); Frank, Martin [Charles University in Prague, Faculty of Medicine and University Hospital in Hradec Kralove, Department of Surgery, Hradec Kralove (Czech Republic); Kucerova, Marie [Regional Hospital in Pardubice, Department of Neurosurgery, Hradec Kralove (Czech Republic)

    2015-01-15

    The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the role of diagnostic tools and management options for patients with pyogenic sacroiliitis, including potential complications. This retrospective study included 16 patients with pyogenic sacroiliitis who were admitted to a single orthopaedic centre between 2007 and 2012. The following data were collected: demographics, history, radiography, magnetic resonance images (MRI), biological data, type of pathogenic agent, abscess formation, type of management, and clinical outcome. Our study demonstrated that only one-fifth of the patients with lumbogluteal or hip pain had established diagnoses of suspected pyogenic sacroiliitis upon admission. MRIs confirmed this diagnosis in all cases. MRI examinations revealed joint fluid in the sacroiliac joint and significant oedema of the adjacent bone and soft tissues. In 12 of the 16 cases, erosions of the subchondral bone were encountered. Contrast-enhanced MRI revealed that 9 patients had abscesses. All patients received antibiotic therapy. Antibiotic treatment was only successful in 9 cases. The other 7 patients underwent computed tomography (CT)-guided abscess drainage. Drainage was sufficient for 4 patients, but 3 patients required open surgery. One patient required sacroiliac arthrodesis. The clinical outcomes included minimal disability (n = 10), moderate disability (n = 5), and full disability (n = 1) of the spine. Contrast-enhanced MRI is mandatory for a reliable diagnosis. Abscess formation was observed in approximately half of the MRI-diagnosed sacroiliitis cases and required minimally invasive drainage under CT guidance or frequently open surgery. (orig.)

  12. Pyogenic sacroiliitis: diagnosis, management and clinical outcome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kucera, Tomas; Sponer, Pavel; Brtkova, Jindra; Ryskova, Lenka; Popper, Eduard; Frank, Martin; Kucerova, Marie

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the role of diagnostic tools and management options for patients with pyogenic sacroiliitis, including potential complications. This retrospective study included 16 patients with pyogenic sacroiliitis who were admitted to a single orthopaedic centre between 2007 and 2012. The following data were collected: demographics, history, radiography, magnetic resonance images (MRI), biological data, type of pathogenic agent, abscess formation, type of management, and clinical outcome. Our study demonstrated that only one-fifth of the patients with lumbogluteal or hip pain had established diagnoses of suspected pyogenic sacroiliitis upon admission. MRIs confirmed this diagnosis in all cases. MRI examinations revealed joint fluid in the sacroiliac joint and significant oedema of the adjacent bone and soft tissues. In 12 of the 16 cases, erosions of the subchondral bone were encountered. Contrast-enhanced MRI revealed that 9 patients had abscesses. All patients received antibiotic therapy. Antibiotic treatment was only successful in 9 cases. The other 7 patients underwent computed tomography (CT)-guided abscess drainage. Drainage was sufficient for 4 patients, but 3 patients required open surgery. One patient required sacroiliac arthrodesis. The clinical outcomes included minimal disability (n = 10), moderate disability (n = 5), and full disability (n = 1) of the spine. Contrast-enhanced MRI is mandatory for a reliable diagnosis. Abscess formation was observed in approximately half of the MRI-diagnosed sacroiliitis cases and required minimally invasive drainage under CT guidance or frequently open surgery. (orig.)

  13. Individual Performance Management: A Review of Current Practices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ian O’ Boyle

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper provides a review of current practice in relation to individual performance management systems and process within the traditional business environment. There is a consensus that the role of the individual is central to the overall performance of any organization and how individual performances are managed and evaluated can have significant impacts on overall organizational success. Many organizations employ the traditional performance appraisal in order to monitor and assess individual employee performances. However, new approaches, such as 360-degree feedback have also become commonplace within the business environment. An analysis of each approach including benefits and challenges associated with each process is presented within this paper.

  14. Indian Adolescent Living with HIV-AIDS: Current Clinical Scenario.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joshi, Kavita S; Bhaware, Bhushan D; Pazare, Amar R

    2017-07-01

    Statistics suggest that, HIV has now largely become the disease of young patients. Hence, the adolescent HIV/AIDS needs to be handled and managed separately from adult HIV. Relatively fewer Indian data exist to characterize the associations in adolescents and young adults infected with HIV disease. The present study explores the current challenges in the management of HIV infected adolescents. The study was aimed at evaluating, relationship between CD4 count and duration of antiretroviral therapy (ART), effects of ART on body mass index and the adverse effects of antiretroviral drugs in adolescent HIV positive patients. This was a cross-sectional study involving 60 HIV positive adolescent patients attending tertiary care Institute KEM Hospital, Parel over duration of one year conducted at Mumbai. Patients on ART between age group 12 to 19 years. ART naïve patients were excluded from the study. 60 adolescent HIV positive patients attended our OPD including 37 males (61.67%) and 23 females (38.33%).The most common mode of transmission was vertical (80%). Education level was: school dropouts - 15%, primary education - 30%, Completed SSC - 31.7%, higher secondary - 23%. Among ADRs were 12 (63.15%) cases of anaemia due to Zidovudine, 4 (21.05%) hepatitis due to Nevirapine, 2 (10.52%) Tenofovir induced AKI and 1 (5.26%) Nevirapine rash. Wilcoxon matched pairs test showed a highly significant increase in the BMI (p ART under government programme has increased the duration of survival of the adolescent population with HIV. Treatment with HAART showed a favourable response with a statistical significant increase in CD4 count. Longer the duration of HAART, higher was the gain in CD4 count. Indian adolescent receiving long term ART, Lipodystrophy is not a troubling issue. Indian adolescent seems to be more tolerance of ART than the other parts of world.

  15. [The modern microbiology in the clinical managing].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casal Román, Manuel

    2012-01-01

    The tuberculosis is one of the most important and mortal diseases of the world. The microbiological confirmatory diagnosis and the microbiological therapeutic orientation are fundamental nowadays in the tuberculosis in AIDS and in the Resistant tuberculosis. They are described throughout the time by the classic Microbiology: From 1882 to final 20th century (130 years). With the modern current Microbiology: In the beginning of the 21st century (20-30 years). And as will be done with the future Microbiology: From the years 2020-30. The important advances are outlined in the modern and future clinical microbiology, for the control of the Tuberculosis.

  16. FINANCIAL ASPECTS OF CURRENT ASSETS MANAGEMENT IN SERBIAN ECONOMY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jugoslav Aničić

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Efficient current assets management should provide optimum level of company’s net current assets as interrelation between current assets and short-term liabilities. The companies whose short-term liabilities are not proportionate to cashable current assets face the problem of insolvency and all negative consequences caused by insolvency. Rate of return to total assets measures how good is the management’s use of the company property for the purpose of creating operating profit, regardless of the fact how these assets are financed. Serbian economy is burdened by insolvency and significant indebtedness under unfavorable loan terms, so adequate attention has to be dedicated to the matters of the structure of operating property and its financing in order to improve competitiveness and efficiency of business.

  17. Clinical practice guideline: management of acute pancreatitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenberg, Joshua A.; Hsu, Jonathan; Bawazeer, Mohammad; Marshall, John; Friedrich, Jan O.; Nathens, Avery; Coburn, Natalie; May, Gary R.; Pearsall, Emily; McLeod, Robin S.

    2016-01-01

    There has been an increase in the incidence of acute pancreatitis reported worldwide. Despite improvements in access to care, imaging and interventional techniques, acute pancreatitis continues to be associated with significant morbidity and mortality. Despite the availability of clinical practice guidelines for the management of acute pancreatitis, recent studies auditing the clinical management of the condition have shown important areas of noncompliance with evidence-based recommendations. This underscores the importance of creating understandable and implementable recommendations for the diagnosis and management of acute pancreatitis. The purpose of the present guideline is to provide evidence-based recommendations for the management of both mild and severe acute pancreatitis as well as the management of complications of acute pancreatitis and of gall stone–induced pancreatitis. Une hausse de l’incidence de pancréatite aiguë a été constatée à l’échelle mondiale. Malgré l’amélioration de l’accès aux soins et aux techniques d’imagerie et d’intervention, la pancréatite aiguë est toujours associée à une morbidité et une mortalité importantes. Bien qu’il existe des guides de pratique clinique pour la prise en charge de la pancréatite aiguë, des études récentes sur la vérification de la prise en charge clinique de cette affection révèlent des lacunes importantes dans la conformité aux recommandations fondées sur des données probantes. Ces résultats mettent en relief l’importance de formuler des recommandations compréhensibles et applicables pour le diagnostic et la prise en charge de la pancréatite aiguë. La présente ligne directrice vise à fournir des recommandations fondées sur des données probantes pour la prise en charge de la pancréatite aiguë, qu’elle soit bénigne ou grave, ainsi que de ses complications et de celles de la pancréatite causée par un calcul biliaire. PMID:27007094

  18. Current practice in out-of-hospital cardiac arrest management

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Proclemer, Alessandro; Dobreanu, Dan; Pison, Laurent

    2012-01-01

    AIMS: The purpose of this EP wire is to examine clinical practice in the field of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) management, with special focus on in-hospital diagnostic and therapeutic strategies. METHODS AND RESULTS: Fifty-three European centres, all members of the EHRA-EP Research network......, completed the questions of the survey. A dedicated strategy for OHCA management is active in 85% of the centres. Shockable tachyarrhythmias such as initial OHCA rhythm are reported in >70% of the patients in 64% of the centres. In-hospital therapeutic hypothermia was applied in >50% of the patients in 53...... management strategy, including coronary angiography/PCI and implantable cardioverter defibrillator therapy, while therapeutic hypothermia appears to be underused....

  19. [Clinical management of beta-thalassaemia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thuret, Isabelle

    2014-10-01

    Beta-thalassemia syndromes are autosomal recessive disorders related to the inability to produce beta-globin chains. Thalassemia major is by definition a transfusion dependent anemia and iron overload is the leading cause of death and morbidity. Beta-thalassemia is rarely encountered in France where patients mainly originated from Mediterranean countries and South East Asia. Recently, two major advances have substantially improved the disease management: oral iron chelation therapy and the introduction of cardiac MRI for monitoring cardiac iron. Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation remains, in clinical practice, the only curative approach and is proposed to children having an HLA-identical sibling. Diagnosis of thalassemia trait is important in order to propose genetic counseling to couples at risk. Thalassemia intermedia is a clinical entity where anemia is mild or moderate, requiring no or occasional transfusion. Clinical severity increases with age with a more severe anemia, thrombotic complications and extra-medullary hematopoiesis. Iron overload, optimally monitored with liver MRI, occurs in adult patients and is related to increased iron hyper-absorption.

  20. Current UK practices in the management of subacromial impingement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drury, Colin; Tait, Gavin R

    2015-01-01

    Background Controversy presently exists surrounding the management of patients with subacromial impingement. This study aims to highlight current UK practices in the management of these patients. Methods BESS members were invited to complete a questionnaire and responses were received from 157 consultant shoulder surgeons. Results Physiotherapy is an integral part of management for 93% of surgeons with a minimum period of 12 weeks being most popular prior to consideration of arthroscopic subacromial decompression. Subacromial steroid injection is used by 95% and 86% repeat this if the patient has failed to respond to a previous injection by the general practioner. From initial presentation, 77% felt there should be at least 3 months of conservative management before proceeding to surgery. Good but transient response to subacromial injection was considered the best predictor of good surgical outcome by 77%. The coracoacromial ligament is fully released by 78%, although there was greater variation in how aggressive surgeons were with acromioplasty. Most (59%) do not include the nontender acromioclavicular joint to any extent in routine acromioplasty. Hospital physiotherapy protocols are used by 63% for postoperative rehabilitation. Conclusions Variation exists in the management regimes offered to patients with subacromial impingement, but most employ a minimum period of 12 weeks of conservative management incorporating physiotherapy and at least 2 subacromial steriod injections. PMID:27582972

  1. Current UK practices in the management of subacromial impingement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryceland, James K; Drury, Colin; Tait, Gavin R

    2015-07-01

    Controversy presently exists surrounding the management of patients with subacromial impingement. This study aims to highlight current UK practices in the management of these patients. BESS members were invited to complete a questionnaire and responses were received from 157 consultant shoulder surgeons. Physiotherapy is an integral part of management for 93% of surgeons with a minimum period of 12 weeks being most popular prior to consideration of arthroscopic subacromial decompression. Subacromial steroid injection is used by 95% and 86% repeat this if the patient has failed to respond to a previous injection by the general practioner. From initial presentation, 77% felt there should be at least 3 months of conservative management before proceeding to surgery. Good but transient response to subacromial injection was considered the best predictor of good surgical outcome by 77%. The coracoacromial ligament is fully released by 78%, although there was greater variation in how aggressive surgeons were with acromioplasty. Most (59%) do not include the nontender acromioclavicular joint to any extent in routine acromioplasty. Hospital physiotherapy protocols are used by 63% for postoperative rehabilitation. Variation exists in the management regimes offered to patients with subacromial impingement, but most employ a minimum period of 12 weeks of conservative management incorporating physiotherapy and at least 2 subacromial steriod injections.

  2. Evaluation and Management of Hepatic Encephalopathy: Current Status and Future Directions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suraweera, Duminda; Sundaram, Vinay; Saab, Sammy

    2016-01-01

    Hepatic encephalopathy is a spectrum of neurocognitive manifestations often seen in patients with liver injury or rarely in patients with portosystemic shunting without liver injury. It can be divided into minimal (covert) hepatic encephalopathy and overt hepatic encephalopathy, depending on the severity. Patients with hepatic encephalopathy have compromised clinical outcomes, decreased quality of life, and increased healthcare utilization, often resulting in a heavy financial and personal burden on caregivers. The diagnosis remains largely clinical, with the exclusion of possible other causes for the altered mental status. Current treatment strategies include nonabsorbable disaccharides and antibiotics. This review will focus on the diagnosis, management and clinical impact of hepatic encephalopathy. PMID:27377741

  3. Current guidelines for management of children with functional constipation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. P. Bulatov

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Despite the fact that functional constipations are a common and hence relevant problem of pediatrics, there are difficulties in managing this category of patients. The paper presents the current guidelines for the diagnosis and treatment of functional constipation in children, which rely on the principles of evidence-based medicine. Particular attention is given to the age-related aspects of constipation in childhood.

  4. Clinical proteomics: Current status, challenges, and future perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shyh-Horng Chiou

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This account will give an overview and evaluation of the current advances in mass spectrometry (MS-based proteomics platforms and technology. A general review of some background information concerning the application of these methods in the characterization of molecular sizes and related protein expression profiles associated with different types of cells under varied experimental conditions will be presented. It is intended to provide a concise and succinct overview to those clinical researchers first exposed to this foremost powerful methodology in modern life sciences of postgenomic era. Proteomic characterization using highly sophisticated and expensive instrumentation of MS has been used to characterize biological samples of complex protein mixtures with vastly different protein structure and composition. These systems are then used to highlight the versatility and potential of the MS-based proteomic strategies for facilitating protein expression analysis of various disease-related organisms or tissues of interest. Major MS-based strategies reviewed herein include (1 matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-MS and electron-spray ionization proteomics; (2 one-dimensional or two-dimensional gel-based proteomics; (3 gel-free shotgun proteomics in conjunction with liquid chromatography/tandem MS; (4 Multiple reaction monitoring coupled tandem MS quantitative proteomics and; (5 Phosphoproteomics based on immobilized metal affinity chromatography and liquid chromatography-MS/MS.

  5. Using information management to implement a clinical resource management program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenstein, A H

    1997-12-01

    This article provides a consultant's account of a 250-bed community hospital's experience in implementing the Clinical Resource Management (CRM) program, a four-stage process of using information to identify opportunities for improvement, developing an effective resource management team, implementing process improvement activities, and measuring the impact on outcomes of care. CASE STUDY EXAMPLE--CONGESTIVE HEART FAILURE: The chair of the departments of internal medicine and family practice selected congestive heart failure for in-depth study. A task force focused on treatment and patient disposition in the emergency room (ER), where most of the nonelective admissions originated. A set of standardized ER orders was developed that emphasized rapid and effective diuresis through the initiation of a progressive diuretic dosing schedule directly linked to patient response. Factors critical to the success of the CRM program included allocating adequate time to promote and sell the value and importance of the program, as well as securing the support of both information systems and physicians. The main barriers to success involved limitations in the information system infrastructure and delays attributable to committee review. Short-term results from the CRM program were encouraging, with average lengths of stay reduced by 0.5 days and average costs of care reduced by 12% for the ten diagnoses studied with no adverse results. Nonstudy diagnoses showed no notable improvement. Recognizing the growing importance of information management not only for clinical decision support but for accommodating all the necessary internal and external reporting requirements will require a significant commitment and investment in technology and personnel resources.

  6. China's spent nuclear fuel management: Current practices and future strategies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou Yun

    2011-01-01

    Although China's nuclear power industry is relatively young and the management of its spent nuclear fuel is not yet a concern, China's commitment to nuclear energy and its rapid pace of development require detailed analyses of its future spent fuel management policies. The purpose of this study is to provide an overview of China's fuel cycle program and its reprocessing policy, and to suggest strategies for managing its future fuel cycle program. The study is broken into four sections. The first reviews China's current nuclear fuel cycle program and facilities. The second discusses China's current spent fuel management methods and the storage capability of China's 13 operational nuclear power plants. The third estimates China's total accumulated spent fuel, its required spent fuel storage from present day until 2035, when China expects its first commercialized fast neutron reactors to be operational, and its likely demand for uranium resources. The fourth examines several spent fuel management scenarios for the present period up until 2035; the financial cost and proliferation risk of each scenario is evaluated. The study concludes that China can and should maintain a reprocessing operation to meet its R and D activities before its fast reactor program is further developed. - Highlights: → This study provides an overview of China's fuel cycle program and its reprocessing policy.→ This study suggests strategies for managing its future fuel cycle program.→ China will experience no pressure to lessen the burden of spent fuel storage in the next 30 years.→ China should maintain sufficient reprocessing operations to meet its demands for R and D activities.→ China should actively invest on R and D activities of both fuel cycling and fast reactor programs.

  7. HYPOPARATHYROIDISM: ETIOLOGY, CLINICAL MANIFESTATION, CURRENT DIAGNOSTICS AND TREATMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. G. Mokrysheva

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Parathyroid hormone (PTH is the main regulator of calcium and phosphorus metabolism. PTH deficiency or tissue resistance to its effects results in hypoparathyroidism characterized by low serum calcium and elevated serum phosphate levels. The most common is post-operative hypoparathyroidism caused by an inadvertent damage or removal of the parathyroid glands, deterioration of blood supply to the neck region, most often during thyroid surgery. The second common form of the disease is the autoimmune one related with immune destruction of parathyroid cells. Less frequent causes of hypoparathyroidism include a variety of genetic syndromes, mitochondrial genome defects, and hypomagnesemia. The main signs and symptoms of hypoparathyroidism are related to hypocalcaemia and hyperphosphatemia land result in increased neuromuscular irritability and general autonomic reactivity, with finger and toe tingling, muscle cramps, tonic seizures, laryngo- and bronchospasm, and neurosis. These symptoms are closely associated with serum calcium levels; their severity depends on the degree of hypocalcaemia. Laboratory parameters confirming the diagnosis of hypoparathyroidism are hypocalcaemia, hyperphosphatemia, and reduced serum PTH. Treatment of hypoparathyroidism involves management of hypocalcaemic crisis and maintenance therapy. Acute hypocalcaemia, a  potentially life-threatening condition, is treated as an emergency with intravenous calcium combined with oral calcium and active vitamin D. Standard chronic treatment for hypoparathyroidism is based on oral calcium and active metabolites of vitamin  D / vitamin  D analogs and is aimed at the balance between optimal low-normal serum calcium concentrations and normocalciuria. Worsening hypercalciuria is often underestimated by specialists, although it can cause severe renal problems, such as nephrocalcinosis and neprolithiasis. Hypoparathyroidism is one of the few endocrine deficiencies for which replacement

  8. Current referral practices and adolescent transition to Adult clinic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2016-02-02

    Feb 2, 2016 ... of adolescent transition from child to adult care ... from paediatric to adult clinics. Adolescent ... The fate of older adolescent patients in paediatric clinics is either one of ..... fer depends on physical and psychological factors and.

  9. Study of the leakage current of clinical dosimeters for teletherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Damatto, Willian B.; Santos, Gelson P.; Potiens, Maria da Penha A.; Caldas, Linda V.E.; Vivolo, Vitor

    2009-01-01

    This work demonstrates the importance of quality control of clinical dosemeters and therefore the equipment for radiotherapy treatment, exhibiting the necessary care related to answers and sensibilities and the possible defects of the clinical assembly

  10. Current practice in airway management: A descriptive evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kjonegaard, Rebecca; Fields, Willa; King, Major L

    2010-03-01

    Ventilator-associated pneumonia, a common complication of mechanical ventilation, could be reduced if health care workers implemented evidence-based practices that decrease the risk for this complication. To determine current practice and differences in practices between registered nurses and respiratory therapists in managing patients receiving mechanical ventilation. A descriptive comparative design was used. A convenience sample of 41 registered nurses and 25 respiratory therapists who manage critical care patients treated with mechanical ventilation at Sharp Grossmont Hospital, La Mesa, California, completed a survey on suctioning techniques and airway management practices. Descriptive and inferential statistics were used to analyze the data. Significant differences existed between nurses and respiratory therapists for hyperoxygenation before suctioning (P =.03). In the 2 groups, nurses used the ventilator for hyper-oxygenation more often, and respiratory therapists used a bag-valve device more often (P =.03). Respiratory therapists instilled saline (P <.001) and rinsed the closed system with saline after suctioning (P =.003) more often than nurses did. Nurses suctioned oral secretions (P <.001) and the nose of orally intubated patients (P =.01), brushed patients' teeth with a toothbrush (P<.001), and used oral swabs to clean the mouth (P <.001) more frequently than respiratory therapists did. Nurses and respiratory therapists differed significantly in the management of patients receiving mechanical ventilation. To reduce the risk of ventilator-associated pneumonia, both nurses and respiratory therapists must be consistent in using best practices when managing patients treated with mechanical ventilation.

  11. Treasury Financial Management company in the current economic crisis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    FLOAREA GEORGESCU

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract. Any management decision has a direct monetary impact on the structure uses and sources of cash. Cash Management aims to permanently maintain a balance between inflows and outflows of cash and cash to predict the impact of any operational decisions that could affect these flows. The success of any business requires good management of all these flows. The principle of this approach is relatively simple: using a minimum of ores to obtain maximum performance in a given period. Cash management is an extremely complex issue, and balancing receipts and payments flow is a constant struggle for survival of firms. In It work we will focus on how they are oriented in a going concern basis, cash inflows and financing needs of current operations. Managers should understand and know the specific movements of cash within the business system, driven daily decisions on operating, investing or financing, and a variety of external circumstances which affect the company. Such decisions and events can affect the company's ability to pay its obligations to obtain credit from suppliers, banks or credit institutions and to maintain an operational level in line with the company's products and services through investments.

  12. Emergency thoracic ultrasound and clinical risk management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Interrigi MC

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Maria Concetta Interrigi,1 Francesca M Trovato,2,3 Daniela Catalano,3,4 Guglielmo M Trovato3,5 1Accident and Emergency Department, Ospedale Cannizzaro, Catania, 2Accident and Emergency Department, Ospedale Civile, Ragusa, 3Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, The School of Medicine, University of Catania, 4Postgraduate School of Clinical Ultrasound, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Azienda Ospedaliero-Universitaria Policlinico, University of Catania, 5Postgraduate School of e-Learning and ICT in Health Sciences, The School of Medicine, University of Catania, Catania, Italy Purpose: Thoracic ultrasound (TUS has been proposed as an easy-option replacement for chest X-ray (CXR in emergency diagnosis of pneumonia, pleural effusion, and pneumothorax. We investigated CXR unforeseen diagnosis, subsequently investigated by TUS, considering its usefulness in clinical risk assessment and management and also assessing the sustainability of telementoring. Patients and methods: This observational report includes a period of 6 months with proactive concurrent adjunctive TUS diagnosis telementoring, which was done using freely available smartphone applications for transfer of images and movies. Results: Three hundred and seventy emergency TUS scans (excluding trauma patients were performed and telementored. In 310 cases, no significant chest pathology was detected either by CXR, TUS, or the subsequent work-up; in 24 patients, there was full concordance between TUS and CXR (ten isolated pleural effusion; eleven pleural effusion with lung consolidations; and three lung consolidation without pleural effusion; in ten patients with lung consolidations, abnormalities identified by CXR were not detected by TUS. In 26 patients, only TUS diagnosis criteria of disease were present: in 19 patients, CXR was not diagnostic, ie, substantially negative, but TUS detected these conditions correctly, and these were later confirmed by computed

  13. Papilledema: epidemiology, etiology, and clinical management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rigi M

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Mohammed Rigi,1 Sumayya J Almarzouqi,2 Michael L Morgan,2 Andrew G Lee2–4 1Robert Cizik Eye Clinic, University of Texas, 2Department of Ophthalmology, Houston Methodist Hospital, Blanton Eye Institute, 3Baylor College of Medicine, 4Departments of Ophthalmology, Neurology, and Neurosurgery, Weill Cornell Medical College, Houston, UTMB Galveston, UT MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX, The University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics, Iowa City, IA, USA Abstract: Papilledema is optic disc swelling due to high intracranial pressure. Possible conditions causing high intracranial pressure and papilledema include intracerebral mass lesions, cerebral hemorrhage, head trauma, meningitis, hydrocephalus, spinal cord lesions, impairment of cerebral sinus drainage, anomalies of the cranium, and idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH. Irrespective of the cause, visual loss is the feared morbidity of papilledema, and the main mechanism of optic nerve damage is intraneuronal ischemia secondary to axoplasmic flow stasis. Treatment is directed at correcting the underlying cause. In cases where there is no other identifiable cause for intracranial hypertension (ie, IIH the available options include both medical and surgical modalities. Weight loss and diuretics remain the mainstays for treatment of IIH, and surgery is typically reserved for patients who fail, are intolerant to, or non-compliant with maximum medical therapy. Keywords: papilledema, intracranial hypertension, idiopathic intracranial hypertension, epidemiology, papilledema management, papilledema etiology, acetazolamide, optic nerve sheath fenestration, ventriculoperitoneal shunt, lumboperitoneal shunt, venous sinus stenting

  14. Marfan syndrome: clinical diagnosis and management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dean, John C S

    2007-07-01

    Marfan syndrome is a multisystem connective tissue disorder usually associated with mutation in fibrillin, and occasionally with mutation in TGFBR1 or 2. The clinical diagnosis is made using the Ghent nosology, which will unequivocally diagnose or exclude Marfan syndrome in 86% of cases. Use of a care pathway can help implementation of the nosology in the clinic. The penetrance of some features is age dependent, so the nosology must be used with caution in children. Molecular testing may be helpful in this context. The nosology cannot be used in families with isolated aortic dissection, or with related conditions such as Loeys-Dietz syndrome, although it may help identify families for further diagnostic evaluation because they do not fulfill the nosology, despite a history of aneurysm. Prophylactic medical (eg beta-blockade) and surgical intervention is important in reducing the cardiovascular complications of Marfan syndrome. Musculoskeletal symptoms are common, although the pathophysiology is less clear--for example, the correlation between dural ectasia and back pain is uncertain. Symptoms in other systems require specialist review such as ophthalmology assessment of refractive errors and ectopia lentis. Pregnancy is a time of increased cardiovascular risk for women with Marfan syndrome, particularly if the aortic root exceeds 4 cm at the start of pregnancy. High-intensity static exercise should be discouraged although low-moderate intensity dynamic exercise may be beneficial. The diagnosis and management of Marfan syndrome requires a multidisciplinary team approach, in view of its multisystem effects and phenotypic variability.

  15. Current status on performance of CT colonography and clinical indications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laghi, Andrea; Rengo, Marco; Graser, Anno; Iafrate, Franco

    2013-01-01

    CT colonography (CTC) is a robust and reliable imaging test of the colon. Accuracy for the detection of colorectal cancer (CRC) is as high as conventional colonoscopy (CC). Identification of polyp is size dependent, with large lesions (≥10 mm) accurately detected and small lesions (6–9 mm) identified with moderate to good sensitivity. Recent studies show good sensitivity for the identification of nonpolypoid (flat) lesions as well. Current CTC indications include the evaluation of patients who had undergone a previous incomplete CC or those who are unfit for CC (elderly and frail individuals, patients with underlying severe clinical conditions, or with contraindication to sedation). CTC can also be efficiently used in the assessment of diverticular disease (excluding patients with acute diverticulitis, where the exam should be postponed), before laparoscopic surgery for CRC (to have an accurate localization of the lesion), in the evaluation of colonic involvement in the case of deep pelvic endometriosis (replacing barium enema). CTC is also a safe procedure in patients with colostomy. For CRC screening, CTC should be considered an opportunistic screening test (not available for population, or mass screening) to be offered to asymptomatic average-risk individuals, of both genders, starting at age 50. The use in individuals with positive family history should be discussed with the patient first. Absolute contraindication is to propose CTC for surveillance of genetic syndromes and chronic inflammatory bowel diseases (in particular, ulcerative colitis). The use of CTC in the follow-up after surgery for CRC is achieving interesting evidences despite the fact that literature data are still relatively weak in terms of numerosity of the studied populations. In patients who underwent previous polypectomy CTC cannot be recommended as first test because debate is still open. It is desirable that in the future CTC would be the first-line and only diagnostic test for

  16. Current status on performance of CT colonography and clinical indications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laghi, Andrea, E-mail: andrea.laghi@uniroma1.it [Department of Radiological Sciences, Oncology and Pathology Sapienza – Università di Roma, Polo Pontino, I.C.O.T. Hospital, Via Franco Faggiana 43, 04100 Latina (Italy); Rengo, Marco [Department of Radiological Sciences, Oncology and Pathology Sapienza – Università di Roma, Polo Pontino, I.C.O.T. Hospital, Via Franco Faggiana 43, 04100 Latina (Italy); Graser, Anno [InstitutfürKlinische Radiologie, Klinikumder Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität München, Campus Großhadern, Marchioninistr. 15, 81377 München (Germany); Iafrate, Franco [Department of Radiological Sciences, Oncology and Pathology Sapienza – Università di Roma, Policlinico Umberto I, Viale Regina Elena 324, 00161 Rome (Italy)

    2013-08-15

    CT colonography (CTC) is a robust and reliable imaging test of the colon. Accuracy for the detection of colorectal cancer (CRC) is as high as conventional colonoscopy (CC). Identification of polyp is size dependent, with large lesions (≥10 mm) accurately detected and small lesions (6–9 mm) identified with moderate to good sensitivity. Recent studies show good sensitivity for the identification of nonpolypoid (flat) lesions as well. Current CTC indications include the evaluation of patients who had undergone a previous incomplete CC or those who are unfit for CC (elderly and frail individuals, patients with underlying severe clinical conditions, or with contraindication to sedation). CTC can also be efficiently used in the assessment of diverticular disease (excluding patients with acute diverticulitis, where the exam should be postponed), before laparoscopic surgery for CRC (to have an accurate localization of the lesion), in the evaluation of colonic involvement in the case of deep pelvic endometriosis (replacing barium enema). CTC is also a safe procedure in patients with colostomy. For CRC screening, CTC should be considered an opportunistic screening test (not available for population, or mass screening) to be offered to asymptomatic average-risk individuals, of both genders, starting at age 50. The use in individuals with positive family history should be discussed with the patient first. Absolute contraindication is to propose CTC for surveillance of genetic syndromes and chronic inflammatory bowel diseases (in particular, ulcerative colitis). The use of CTC in the follow-up after surgery for CRC is achieving interesting evidences despite the fact that literature data are still relatively weak in terms of numerosity of the studied populations. In patients who underwent previous polypectomy CTC cannot be recommended as first test because debate is still open. It is desirable that in the future CTC would be the first-line and only diagnostic test for

  17. Inhaled therapies in patients with moderate COPD in clinical practice: current thinking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ariel, Amnon; Altraja, Alan; Belevskiy, Andrey; Boros, Piotr W; Danila, Edvardas; Fležar, Matjaz; Koblizek, Vladimir; Fridlender, Zvi G; Kostov, Kosta; Krams, Alvils; Milenkovic, Branislava; Somfay, Attila; Tkacova, Ruzena; Tudoric, Neven; Ulmeanu, Ruxandra; Valipour, Arschang

    2018-01-01

    COPD is a complex, heterogeneous condition. Even in the early clinical stages, COPD carries a significant burden, with breathlessness frequently leading to a reduction in exercise capacity and changes that correlate with long-term patient outcomes and mortality. Implementation of an effective management strategy is required to reduce symptoms, preserve lung function, quality of life, and exercise capacity, and prevent exacerbations. However, current clinical practice frequently differs from published guidelines on the management of COPD. This review focuses on the current scientific evidence and expert opinion on the management of moderate COPD: the symptoms arising from moderate airflow obstruction and the burden these symptoms impose, how physical activity can improve disease outcomes, the benefits of dual bronchodilation in COPD, and the limited evidence for the benefits of inhaled corticosteroids in this disease. We emphasize the importance of maximizing bronchodilation in COPD with inhaled dual-bronchodilator treatment, enhancing patient-related outcomes, and enabling the withdrawal of inhaled corticosteroids in COPD in well-defined patient groups. PMID:29317810

  18. Pancreaticoduodenal injuries: re-evaluating current management approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chinnery, G E; Madiba, T E

    2010-02-01

    Pancreaticoduodenal injuries are uncommon owing to the protected position of the pancreas and duodenum in the retroperitoneum. Management depends on the extent of injury. This study was undertaken to document outcome of pancreaticoduodenal injuries and to re-evaluate our approach. A prospective study of all patients treated for pancreaticoduodenal trauma in one surgical ward at King Edward VIII hospital over a 7-year period (1998 - 2004). Demographic data, clinical presentation, findings at laparotomy and outcome were documented. Prophylactic antibiotics were given at induction of anaesthesia. A total of 488 patients underwent laparotomy over this period, 43 (9%) of whom (all males) had pancreatic and duodenal injuries. Injury mechanisms were gunshot (30), stabbing (10) and blunt trauma (3). Their mean age was 30.1+9.6 years. Delay before laparotomy was 12.8+29.1 hours. Seven were admitted in shock. Mean Injury Severity Score (ISS) was 14+8.6. Management of 20 duodenal injuries was primary repair (14), repair and pyloric exclusion (3) and conservative (3). Management of 15 pancreatic injuries was drainage alone (13), conservative management of pseudocyst (1) and distal pancreatectomy (1). Management of 8 combined pancreaticoduodenal injuries was primary duodenal repair and pancreatic drainage (5) and repair with pyloric exclusion of duodenal injury and pancreatic drainage (3). Twenty-one patients (49%) developed complications, and 28 required ICU admission with a median ICU stay of 4 days. Ten patients died (23%). Mean hospital stay was 18.3+24.4 days. The overall mortality was comparable with that in the world literature. We still recommend adequate exploration of the pancreas and duodenum and conservative operative management where possible.

  19. Halitosis: Current concepts on etiology, diagnosis and management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapoor, Uditi; Sharma, Gaurav; Juneja, Manish; Nagpal, Archna

    2016-01-01

    Halitosis or oral malodor is an offensive odor originating from the oral cavity, leading to anxiety and psychosocial embarrassment. A patient with halitosis is most likely to contact primary care practitioner for the diagnosis and management. With proper diagnosis, identification of the etiology and timely referrals certain steps are taken to create a successful individualized therapeutic approach for each patient seeking assistance. It is significant to highlight the necessity of an interdisciplinary method for the treatment of halitosis to prevent misdiagnosis or unnecessary treatment. The literature on halitosis, especially with randomized clinical trials, is scarce and additional studies are required. This article succinctly focuses on the development of a systematic flow of events to come to the best management of the halitosis from the primary care practitioner's point of view. PMID:27095913

  20. Water management: Current and future challenges and research directions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cosgrove, William J.; Loucks, Daniel P.

    2015-06-01

    Water distinguishes our planet compared to all the others we know about. While the global supply of available freshwater is more than adequate to meet all current and foreseeable water demands, its spatial and temporal distributions are not. There are many regions where our freshwater resources are inadequate to meet domestic, economic development and environmental needs. In such regions, the lack of adequate clean water to meet human drinking water and sanitation needs is indeed a constraint on human health and productivity and hence on economic development as well as on the maintenance of a clean environment and healthy ecosystems. All of us involved in research must find ways to remove these constraints. We face multiple challenges in doing that, especially given a changing and uncertain future climate, and a rapidly growing population that is driving increased social and economic development, globalization, and urbanization. How best to meet these challenges requires research in all aspects of water management. Since 1965, the journal Water Resources Research has played an important role in reporting and disseminating current research related to managing the quantity and quality and cost of this resource. This paper identifies the issues facing water managers today and future research needed to better inform those who strive to create a more sustainable and desirable future.

  1. Current management and prognostic features for gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lamba Gurpreet

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Stromal or mesenchymal neoplasms affecting the gastrointestinal (GI tract have undergone a remarkable evolution in how they are perceived, classified, approached, diagnosed and managed over the last 30 years. Gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GIST account for approximately 1% to 3% of all malignant GI tumors. The clinical features can vary depending on the anatomic location, size and aggressiveness of the tumor. Metastatic GIST represents a successful example of molecular targeted therapy. In this comprehensive review, we discuss the epidemiology, clinical features and diagnostic modalities for GIST. We also describe treatment options for early stage, locally advanced and metastatic GIST. Indications for neoadjuvant and adjuvant therapy along with duration of therapy are also explained. A brief discussion of latest biomarkers and updates from recent meetings is also provided.

  2. Current and future direction in the management of scleroderma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brady, Sean M; Shapiro, Lee; Mousa, Shaker A

    2016-09-01

    Scleroderma is a heterogeneous disease with a complex etiology. As more information is gained about the underlying mechanisms and the improved classifications of scleroderma subtypes, treatments can be better personalized. Improving scleroderma patients' early diagnosis before end organ manifestations occur should improve clinical trial design and outcomes. Two recently FDA-approved antifibrotics for idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis may be effective treatments in patients with pulmonary fibrosis secondary to scleroderma after further investigation. The potential impact of Nanobiotechnology in improving the efficacy and safety of existing antifibrotics and immunomodulators might present an exciting new approach in the management of scleroderma.

  3. [Management of secondary hyperparathyroidism-current impact of parathyroidectomy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zitt, Emanuel; Lhotta, Karl

    2016-05-01

    Parathyroidectomy still presents an adequate and efficient therapeutic option for the management of refractory secondary hyperparathyroidism (sHPT). Dependent on the selected surgical technique it allows the highest rate of "laboratory cure" of sHPT. The question remains as to whether these improvements translate into clinical long-term benefits regarding the sHPT-associated vascular calcification and the increased risk for cardiovascular morbidity and mortality as well as overall mortality. Recent large observational studies point in this direction but definite evidence through prospective randomized controlled trials is still lacking.

  4. Current nutraceuticals in the management of osteoarthritis: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akhtar, Nahid; Haqqi, Tariq M

    2012-06-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is a progressive degenerative joint disease that has a major impact on joint function and quality of life. Nutraceuticals and dietary supplements derived from herbs have long been used in traditional medicine and there is considerable evidence that nutraceuticals may play an important role in inflammation and joint destruction in OA. We review the biological effects of some medicinal fruits and herbs - pomegranate, green tea, cat's claw, devil's claw, ginger, Indian olibaum, turmeric and ananas - in an attempt to understand the pivotal molecular targets involved in inflammation and the joint destruction process and to summarize their toxicities and efficacy for OA management. So far there is insufficient reliable evidence on the effectiveness of ginger, turmeric and ananas. Pomegranate and green tea only have preclinical evidence of efficacy due to the lack of clinical data. In vivo and clinical studies are required to understand their targets and efficacy in OA. Limited in vitro and in vivo evidence is available for cat's claw and Indian olibaum. More extensive studies are required before long-term controlled trials of whole cat's claw and Indian olibaum extracts, or isolated active compounds, are carried out in patients with OA to determine their long-term efficacy and safety. Devil's claw has not been rigorously tested to determine its antiarthritic potential in in vitro and in vivo models. There is strong clinical evidence of the effectiveness of devil's claw in pain reduction. However, high-quality clinical trials are needed to determine its effectiveness. No serious side effects have been reported for any fruits and herbs. Overall, these studies identify and support the use of nutraceuticals to provide symptomatic relief to patients with OA and to be used as adjunct therapy for OA management. More high-quality trials are needed to provide definitive answers to questions related to their efficacy and safety for OA prevention and

  5. Current status and future prospects of hyperthermic intraoperative intraperitoneal chemotherapy (HIPEC) clinical trials in ovarian cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cowan, Renee A; O'Cearbhaill, Roisin E; Zivanovic, Oliver; Chi, Dennis S

    2017-08-01

    The natural history of advanced-stage epithelial ovarian cancer is one of clinical remission after surgery and platinum/taxane-based intravenous (IV) and/or intraperitoneal (IP) chemotherapy followed by early or late recurrence in the majority of patients. Prevention of progression and recurrence remains a major hurdle in the management of ovarian cancer. Recently, many investigators have evaluated the use of normothermic and hyperthermic intraoperative IP drug delivery as a management strategy. This is a narrative review of the current status of clinical trials of hyperthermic intraoperative intraperitoneal chemotherapy (HIPEC) in ovarian cancer and the future directions for this treatment strategy. The existing studies on HIPEC in patients with epithelial ovarian cancer are mostly retrospective in nature, are heterogeneous with regards to combined inclusion of primary and recurrent disease and lack unbiased data. Until data are available from evidence-based trials, it is reasonable to conclude that surgical cytoreduction and HIPEC is a rational and interesting, though still investigative, approach in the management of epithelial ovarian cancer, whose use should be employed within prospective clinical trials.

  6. A review of the current state of digital plate reading of cultures in clinical microbiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhoads, Daniel D; Novak, Susan M; Pantanowitz, Liron

    2015-01-01

    Digital plate reading (DPR) is increasingly being adopted as a means to facilitate the analysis and improve the quality and efficiency within the clinical microbiology laboratory. This review discusses the role of DPR in the context of total laboratory automation and explores some of the platforms currently available or in development for digital image capturing of microbial growth on media. The review focuses on the advantages and challenges of DPR. Peer-reviewed studies describing the utility and quality of these novel DPR systems are largely lacking, and professional guidelines for DPR implementation and quality management are needed. Further development and more widespread adoption of DPR is anticipated.

  7. [Clinical risk management in german hospitals - does size really matter?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohnet-Joschko, S; Jandeck, L M; Zippel, C; Andersen, M; Krummenauer, F

    2011-06-01

    In the last years, German hospitals have implemented different measures to increase patient safety. Special importance has been attached to near miss reporting systems (critical incident reporting system, CIRS) as instruments for risk identification in health care, instruments that promise high potential for organisational learning. To gain insight into the current status of critical incident reporting systems and other instruments for clinical risk management, a survey among 341 hospitals was carried out in 2009. Questions covered a process of six steps: from risk strategy to methods for risk identification, to risk analysis and risk assessment, to risk controlling and risk monitoring. Structured telephone interviews were conducted with 341 German hospitals, featuring in their statutory quality reports certain predefined key terms that indicated the concluded or planned implementation of clinical risk management. The main objective of those interviews was to check the relation between status/organisation of self-reported risk management and both operator (private, public, NPO) and size of hospital. The implementation of near miss reporting systems (CIRS) in German hospitals has been constantly rising since 2004: in 2009, 54 % of the interviewed hospitals reported an implemented CIRS; of these, 72 % reported the system to be hospital-wide. An association between CIRS and private, public or NPO-operator could not be detected (Fisher p = 1.000); however, the degree of CIRS implementation was significantly increasing with the size of the hospital, i.e., the number of beds (Fisher p = 0.008): only 38 % of the hospitals with less than 100 beds reported CIRS implementation against 52 % of those between 100 to 500 beds, and 67 % of those with more than 500 beds. While 62 % of the hospitals interviewed reported the maintenance of a risk management committee, only 14 % reported the implementation of risk analysing techniques. As to clinical risk

  8. Current practice for diagnosis and management of silent atrial fibrillation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dobreanu, Dan; Svendsen, Jesper Hastrup; Lewalter, Thorsten

    2013-01-01

    for the diagnosis and management of silent AF. This survey is based on an electronic questionnaire sent to the European Heart Rhythm Association Research Network partners. Responses were received from 33 centres in 16 countries. The preferred screening methods for silent AF in patients with rhythm control...... for such patients. Most responders preferred rate control over rhythm control in patients with silent AF, although some favoured pulmonary vein isolation in young patients. However, oral anticoagulant therapy in patients at high thromboembolic risk was considered mandatory by most, provided that at least one......Although it is well known that silent atrial fibrillation (AF) is associated with morbidity and mortality rates similar to those of symptomatic AF, no specific strategy for screening and management of this form of AF has been advocated. The purpose of this survey was to identify current practices...

  9. Current European guidelines for management of cardiovascular disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vinther, Johan L; Jacobsen, Rikke K; Jørgensen, Torben

    2018-01-01

    Background Health checks of the general population are widely used to prevent cardiovascular diseases, but are the current clinical guidelines from the European Society of Cardiology (ESC) suitable for screening the general population? Design A cross-sectional, population-based study of 978 men...... and women aged 40-65 years examined in 2010-2011 was used to estimate the proportion of the general Danish population fulfilling the criteria from the clinical guidelines from the ESC on medical treatment and lifestyle intervention to prevent cardiovascular disease. Methods The ESC criteria for medical...... treatment and lifestyle intervention were applied to a general population using information on previous cardiovascular diseases, known diabetes, urinalbumin, smoking, total cholesterol, systolic and diabolic blood pressure, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol and a multifactor risk score (SCORE). Results...

  10. COPD management: role of symptom assessment in routine clinical practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Molen, Thys; Miravitlles, Marc; Kocks, Janwillem WH

    2013-01-01

    Patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) present with a variety of symptoms that significantly impair health-related quality of life. Despite this, COPD treatment and its management are mainly based on lung function assessments. There is increasing evidence that conventional lung function measures alone do not correlate well with COPD symptoms and their associated impact on patients’ everyday lives. Instead, symptoms should be assessed routinely, preferably by using patient-centered questionnaires that provide a more accurate guide to the actual burden of COPD. Numerous questionnaires have been developed in an attempt to find a simple and reliable tool to use in everyday clinical practice. In this paper, we review three such patient-reported questionnaires recommended by the latest Global Initiative for Chronic Obstructive Lung Disease guidelines, ie, the modified Medical Research Council questionnaire, the clinical COPD questionnaire, and the COPD Assessment Test, as well as other symptom-specific questionnaires that are currently being developed. PMID:24143085

  11. Clinical management of acute diabetic Charcot foot in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jansen, Rasmus Bo; Svendsen, Ole Lander; Kirketerp-Møller, Klaus

    2016-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Charcot foot is a severe complication to diabetes mellitus and treatment involves several different clinical specialities. Our objective was to describe the current awareness, knowledge and treatment practices of Charcot foot among doctors who handle diabetic foot disorders. METHODS......: This study is based on a questionnaire survey sent out to healthcare professionals, primarily doctors, working with diabetic foot ulcers and Charcot feet in the public sector of the Danish healthcare system. RESULTS: The survey obtained a 52% response rate. A temperature difference of > 2 °C between the two...... and treatment practices of acute diabetic Charcot foot at diabetes foot clinics in Denmark. The responders seem to follow the international recommendations and guidelines on management of the acute diabetic Charcot foot, despite a lack of Danish guidelines. FUNDING: none. TRIAL REGISTRATION: not relevant....

  12. Clinical presentation and management of congenital ptosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marenco M

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Marco Marenco,1,* Ilaria Macchi,2,* Iacopo Macchi,3 Emilio Galassi,4 Mina Massaro-Giordano,5 Alessandro Lambiase1 1Department of Sense Organs, University of Rome “Sapienza”, 2Department of Ophthalmology, Campus Bio-Medico University of Rome, Rome, 3Department of Ophthalmology, University of Catania, Catania, 4Ophthalmic Clinic, Department of Ophthalmology, University of L’Aquila, L’Aquila, Italy; 5Department of Ophthalmology, Scheie Eye Institute, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA, USA *These authors contributed equally to this work Abstract: Congenital ptosis is a rare condition characterized by lower positioning of the upper eyelid that is present at birth and is a clinical condition that is persistent if not treated. It may be unilateral or bilateral and may be associated with other ocular disorders or systemic conditions, including Marcus Gunn, Horner, and Duane syndromes. It is a benign condition but causes functional, cosmetic, and psychological problems in children. However, not all patients need to undergo surgery, and usually only patients at risk of amblyopia need a prompt surgical correction, while in other cases, surgery can be postponed. The grade of ptosis, the eyelid function, and the amblyopic risk are the parameters that affect the ophthalmologist’s decision on timing of surgery and the surgical technique to be used. In fact, there are several types of surgical techniques to correct a congenital ptosis, although very often more than one is needed to obtain an acceptable result. This paper reviews the causes of congenital ptosis and associated diseases. Particular emphasis is given to surgical management and different procedures available to correct the upper eyelid anomaly and avoid permanent damage to visual function. Keywords: ptosis, extraocular muscle development, neurologic dysfunction, surgical approach

  13. Clinical and Laboratory Features of the Nocardia spp. Based on Current Molecular Taxonomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown-Elliott, Barbara A.; Brown, June M.; Conville, Patricia S.; Wallace, Richard J.

    2006-01-01

    The recent explosion of newly described species of Nocardia results from the impact in the last decade of newer molecular technology, including PCR restriction enzyme analysis and 16S rRNA sequencing. These molecular techniques have revolutionized the identification of the nocardiae by providing rapid and accurate identification of recognized nocardiae and, at the same time, revealing new species and a number of yet-to-be-described species. There are currently more than 30 species of nocardiae of human clinical significance, with the majority of isolates being N. nova complex, N. abscessus, N. transvalensis complex, N. farcinica, N. asteroides type VI (N. cyriacigeorgica), and N. brasiliensis. These species cause a wide variety of diseases and have variable drug susceptibilities. Accurate identification often requires referral to a reference laboratory with molecular capabilities, as many newer species are genetically distinct from established species yet have few or no distinguishing phenotypic characteristics. Correct identification is important in deciding the clinical relevance of a species and in the clinical management and treatment of patients with nocardial disease. This review characterizes the currently known pathogenic species of Nocardia, including clinical disease, drug susceptibility, and methods of identification. PMID:16614249

  14. Footrot and interdigital dermatitis in sheep: farmer satisfaction with current management, their ideal management and sources used to adopt new strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wassink, G J; George, T R N; Kaler, J; Green, L E

    2010-08-01

    The aims of this research were to identify management practices that sheep farmers currently use to treat and prevent footrot in sheep and whether they consider that these are successful management tools and to find out how sheep farmers would ideally like to manage footrot in their flock. Over 90% of lameness in sheep in the UK is caused by Dichelobacter nodosus, which presents clinically as interdigital dermatitis (ID) alone or with separation of hoof horn (FR). A questionnaire was sent to 265 farmers to investigate their current management and their satisfaction with current management of the spectrum of clinical presentations of footrot. Farmers were also asked their ideal management of footrot and their interest in, and sources of information for, change. Approximately 160 farmers responded. Farmers satisfied with current management reported a prevalence of lameness 5%. These farmers practised routine foot trimming, footbathing and vaccination against footrot. Whilst 89% of farmers said they were satisfied with their management of FR over 34% were interested in changing management. Farmers identified veterinarians as the most influential source for new information. Farmers reported that ideally they would control FR by culling/isolating lame sheep, sourcing replacements from non-lame parents, trimming feet less, using antibacterial treatments less and using vaccination more. Footbathing was a commonly used management that was linked with dissatisfaction and that also was listed highly as an ideal management. Consequently, some of the ideal managements are in agreement with our understanding of disease control (culling and isolation, sourcing healthy replacements) but others are in contrast with our current knowledge of management and farmers self-reporting of satisfaction of management of footrot (less use of antibacterial treatment, more footbathing and vaccination). One explanation for this is the theory of cognitive dissonance where belief follows behaviour

  15. Current concepts in the management of necrotizing fasciitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evangelos P. Misiakos

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Necrotizing fasciitis is a severe, rare, potentially lethal soft tissue infection that develops in the scrotum and perineum, the abdominal wall or the extremities. The infection progresses rapidly, and septic shock may ensue; hence, the mortality rate is high (median mortality 32.2%. Prognosis becomes poorer in the presence of co-morbidities, such as diabetes mellitus, immunosuppression, chronic alcohol disease, chronic renal failure and liver cirrhosis. Necrotizing fasciitis is classified into four types, depending on microbiological findings. Most cases are polymicrobial, classed as type I. The clinical status of the patient varies from erythema, swelling and tenderness in the early stage to skin ischemia with blisters and bullae in the advanced stage of infection. In its fulminant form, the patient is critically ill with signs and symptoms of severe septic shock and multiple organ dysfunction. The clinical condition is the most important clue for diagnosis. However, in equivocal cases, the diagnosis and severity of the infection can be secured with laboratory-based scoring systems, such as the LRINEC score or FGSI score, especially in regard to Fournier’s gangrene. Computed tomography or ultrasonography can be helpful, but definitive diagnosis is attained by exploratory surgery at the infected sites.Management of the infection begins with broad spectrum antibiotics, but early and aggressive drainage and meticulous debridement constitute the mainstay of treatment. Postoperative management of the surgical wound is also important for the patient’s survival, along with proper nutrition. The vacuum-assisted closure system has proved to be helpful in wound management, with its combined benefits of continuous cleansing of the wound and the formation of granulation tissue.

  16. Current and emerging treatments for the management of osteogenesis imperfecta

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Monti

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Elena Monti1, Monica Mottes1, Paolo Fraschini2, PierCarlo Brunelli3, Antonella Forlino4, Giacomo Venturi1, Francesco Doro1, Silvia Perlini1, Paolo Cavarzere1, Franco Antoniazzi11Department of Life Sciences and Reproduction, Pediatric Clinic University of Verona, Verona, Italy; 2Istituto Di Ricovero e Cura a Carattere Scientifico, ‘E. Medea’, Associazione La Nostra Famiglia, Bosisio Parini (LC, Italy; 3Divisione di Ortopedia Pediatrica, Spedali Civili, Brescia, Italy; 4Department of Biochemistry “A. Castellani”, University of Pavia, ItalyAbstract: Osteogenesis imperfecta (OI is the most common bone genetic disorder and it is characterized by bone brittleness and various degrees of growth disorder. Clinical severity varies widely; nowadays eight types are distinguished and two new forms have been recently described although not yet classified. The approach to such a variable and heterogeneous disease should be global and therefore multidisciplinary. For simplicity, the objectives of treatment can be reduced to three typical situations: the lethal perinatal form (type II, in which the problem is survival at birth; the severe and moderate forms (types III–IX, in which the objective is ‘autonomy’; and the mild form (type I, in which the aim is to reach ‘normal life’. Three types of treatment are available: non-surgical management (physical therapy, rehabilitation, bracing and splinting, surgical management (intramedullary rod positioning, spinal and basilar impression surgery and medical-pharmacological management (drugs to increase the strength of bone and decrease the number of fractures as bisphosphonates or growth hormone, depending on the type of OI. Suggestions and guidelines for a therapeutic approach are indicated and updated with the most recent findings in OI diagnosis and treatment.Keywords: osteogenesis imperfecta, bone genetic disorder, bone brittleness, “brittle bone disease”, connective tissue malfunction, short

  17. Current and emerging treatments for the management of osteogenesis imperfecta

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monti, Elena; Mottes, Monica; Fraschini, Paolo; Brunelli, PierCarlo; Forlino, Antonella; Venturi, Giacomo; Doro, Francesco; Perlini, Silvia; Cavarzere, Paolo; Antoniazzi, Franco

    2010-01-01

    Osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) is the most common bone genetic disorder and it is characterized by bone brittleness and various degrees of growth disorder. Clinical severity varies widely; nowadays eight types are distinguished and two new forms have been recently described although not yet classified. The approach to such a variable and heterogeneous disease should be global and therefore multidisciplinary. For simplicity, the objectives of treatment can be reduced to three typical situations: the lethal perinatal form (type II), in which the problem is survival at birth; the severe and moderate forms (types III–IX), in which the objective is ‘autonomy’; and the mild form (type I), in which the aim is to reach ‘normal life’. Three types of treatment are available: non-surgical management (physical therapy, rehabilitation, bracing and splinting), surgical management (intramedullary rod positioning, spinal and basilar impression surgery) and medical-pharmacological management (drugs to increase the strength of bone and decrease the number of fractures as bisphosphonates or growth hormone, depending on the type of OI). Suggestions and guidelines for a therapeutic approach are indicated and updated with the most recent findings in OI diagnosis and treatment. PMID:20856683

  18. Radiotherapy for pediatric brain tumors: Standard of care, current clinical trials, and new directions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kun, Larry E.

    1996-01-01

    Objectives: To review the clinical characteristics of childhood brain tumors, including neurologic signs, neuroimaging and neuropathology. To critically assess indications for therapy relevant to presenting characteristics, age, and disease status. To discuss current management strategies including neurosurgery, radiation therapy, and chemotherapy. To analyze current clinical trials and future directions of clinical research. Brain tumors account for 20% of neoplastic diseases in children. The most common tumors include astrocytoma and malignant gliomas, medulloblastoma and supratentorial PNET's, ependymoma, craniopharyngioma, and intracranial germ cell tumors. Tumor type and clinical course are often correlated with age at presentation and anatomic site. The clinical characteristics and disease extent largely determine the relative merits of available 'standard' and investigational therapeutic approaches. Treatment outcome, including disease control and functional integrity, is dependent upon age at presentation, tumor type, and disease extent. An understanding of the clinical, neuroimaging, and histologic characteristics as they relate to decisions regarding therapy is critical to the radiation oncologist. Appropriate radiation therapy is central to curative therapy for a majority of pediatric brain tumor presentations. Technical advances in neurosurgery provide greater safety for 'gross total resection' in a majority of hemispheric astrocytomas and medulloblastomas. The relative roles of 'standard' radiation therapy and evolving chemotherapy for centrally located astrocytomas (e.g., diencephalic, optic pathway) need to be analyzed in the context of initial and overall disease control, neurotoxicities, and potential modifications in the risk:benefit ratio apparent in the introduction of precision radiation techniques. Modifications in radiation delivery are fundamental to current investigations in medulloblastoma; the rationale for contemporary and projected

  19. Management of ulcerative colitis: a clinical update

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabio Vieira Teixeira

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to evaluate the consensus of expert societies and published guidelines on the management of ulcerative colitis, and to compare with the experience of the authors, in order to standardize procedures that would help the reasoning and decision-making process of the physician. A search was performed in scientific literature, specifically in electronic databases: Medline/Pubmed, SciELO, EMBASE and Cochrane, and the following descriptors were used: ulcerative colitis, acute colitis, clinical treatment, surgery and randomized trial. It can be concluded that the goals of therapy in ulcerative colitis are clinical and endoscopic remission, deep, sustained remission without corticosteroids, prevention of hospitalizations and surgeries, and improved quality of life. The surgical indications are reserved for selected cases, ranging from medical intractability, complications (severe refractory acute colitis, toxic megacolon, perforation and hemorrhage and malignancy. Information in this review article must be submitted to evaluation and criticism of the specialist responsible for the conduct to be followed, in the face of his/her reality and the clinical status of each patient.The degree of recommendation and strength of evidence were based using the GRADE system (The Grades of Recommendation, Assessment, Development, and Evaluation described below:1. A: Experimental or observational studies of higher consistency.2. B: Experimental or observational studies of lower consistency.3. C: Case reports (non-controlled studies.4. D: Opinion without critical evaluation, based on consensus, physiological studies or animal models. Resumo: O objetivo deste trabalho foi avaliar os consensos de sociedades de especialistas e guidelines publicados sobre o manejo da retocolite ulcerativa, e confrontar com a experiência dos autores, a fim de padronizar condutas que auxiliem o raciocínio e a tomada de decisão do médico. Foi realizada busca

  20. Clinical manifestations and management of Gaucher disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linari, Silvia; Castaman, Giancarlo

    2015-01-01

    Gaucher disease is a rare multi-systemic metabolic disorder caused by the inherited deficiency of the lysosomal enzyme β-glucocerebrosidase, which leads to the accumulation of its normal substrate, glucocerebroside, in tissue macrophages with damage to haematological, visceral and bone systems. Anaemia, thrombocytopenia, enlargement of liver and/or spleen, skeletal abnormalities (osteopenia, lytic lesions, pathological fractures, chronic bone pain, bone crisis, bone infarcts, osteonecrosis and skeletal deformities) are typical manifestations of the most prevalent form of the disease, the so-called non-neuronopathic type 1. However, severity and coexistence of different symptoms are highly variable. The determination of deficient β-glucocerebrosidase activity in leukocytes or fibroblasts by enzymatic assay is the gold standard for the diagnosis of Gaucher disease. Comprehensive and reproducible evaluation and monitoring of all clinically relevant aspects are fundamental for the effective management of Gaucher disease patients. Enzyme replacement therapy has been shown to be effective in reducing glucocerebroside storage burden and diminishing the deleterious effects caused by its accumulation. Tailored treatment plan for each patient should be directed to symptom relief, general improvement of quality of life, and prevention of irreversible damage.

  1. Ectopic pregnancy: current clinical trends, a fifteen year study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weekes, L R

    1981-09-01

    This paper reviews the clinical recognition, diagnosis, and management of ectopic pregnancy at the Queen of Angels Hospital for the past 15 years. The incidence of ectopic pregnancy to deliveries is 1:195. Pain is the cardinal symptom of ectopic pregnancy, and amenorrhea of some degree was present in all cases. Pelvic inflammatory disease is a factor in the development of tubal pregnancy in some women. A careful history and thorough physical examination are important in making a careful diagnosis. The only laboratory procedures which are of any value are the blood type and the Rh determination. While examination of endometrial tissue obtained by biopsy or curettage has proved useful in ectopic pregnancy diagnosis, it is not totally decisive. Culdocentesis has proved to be the diagnostic procedure of the greatest value in recognizing intraperitoneal hemorrhage and it increases the correct preoperative diagnosis from 65-70% to 95%. Laparoscopy is useful when the physician is in doubt about the nature of the problem and it has produced an increase in the number of ectopic pregnancies diagnosed. Ultrasound is another useful tool in confirming a diagnosis of ectopic pregnancy; its accuracy ranges from 70-92%. A newly developed pregnancy test is more sensitive than conventional pregnancy tests and would be positive for pregnancy. Women who have had a previous ectopic pregnancy have a higher subsequent incidence of persistent infertility, recurrent ectopic pregnancy, and pregnancy wastage; the risk of another ectopic pregnancy increases 30-50 fold. While extopic pregnancy does recur, it is true that about 1/3 of those women do have successful pregnancies. Where previous induced abortion has occurred, there is a 10-fold increased risk of ectopic pregnancy. Women who become pregnant accidentally with an IUD in place have a greater likelihood of experiencing an extrauterine pregnancy. Abdominal pregnancy is often encountered as an aborting ectopic pregnancy during the 1st

  2. Hemicrania continua: clinical review, diagnosis and management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prakash S

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Sanjay Prakash,1 Payal Patel2 1Department of Neurology, Smt. B. K. Shah Medical Institute and Research Centre, Sumandeep Vidyapeeth University, Vadodara, Gujarat, India; 2Department of Neurology, Cleveland Clinic Foundation, Cleveland, OH, USA Abstract: Hemicrania continua (HC is an indomethacin-responsive primary headache disorder which is currently classified under the heading of trigeminal autonomic cephalalgias (TACs. It is a highly misdiagnosed and underreported primary headache. The pooled mean delay of diagnosis of HC is 8.0 ± 7.2 years. It is not rare. We noted more than 1000 cases in the literature. It represents 1.7% of total headache patients attending headache or neurology clinic. Just like other TACs, it is characterized by strictly unilateral pain in the trigeminal distribution, cranial autonomic features in the same area and agitation during exacerbations/attacks. It is different from other TACs in one aspect. While all other TACs are episodic, HC patients have continuous headaches with superimposed severe exacerbations. The central feature of HC is continuous background headache. However, the patients may be worried only for superimposed exacerbations. Focusing only on exacerbations and ignoring continuous background headache are the most important factors for the misdiagnosis of HC. A large number of patients may have migrainous features during exacerbation phase. Up to 70% patients may fulfill the diagnostic criteria for migraine during exacerbations. Besides migraine, its exacerbations can mimic a large number of other primary and secondary headaches. The other specific feature of HC is a remarkable response to indomethacin. However, a large number of patients develop side effects because of the long-term use of indomethacin. A few other medications may also be effective in a subset of patients with HC. Various surgical interventions have been suggested for patients who are intolerant to indomethacin. Several aspects of HC

  3. Advanced and controlled drug delivery systems in clinical disease management

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brouwers, JRBJ

    1996-01-01

    Advanced and controlled drug delivery systems are important for clinical disease management. In this review the most important new systems which have reached clinical application are highlighted. Microbiologically controlled drug delivery is important for gastrointestinal diseases like ulcerative

  4. Management of reprocessed uranium. Current status and future prospects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2007-02-01

    There is worldwide interest in developing advanced and innovative technologies for nuclear fuel cycles, minimizing waste and environmental impacts. As of the beginning of 2003, about 171000 tonnes heavy metal spent nuclear fuel is in storage, while smaller amounts have been reprocessed. In several countries, including France, India, Japan and the Russian Federation, spent fuel has been viewed as a national energy resource. Some countries hold reprocessed uranium as the result of their commercial reprocessing service contracts for reprocessing the spent fuel of others. Reprocessed uranium has a potential value for recycling either directly or after appropriate treatment. This report analyses the existing options, approaches and developments in the management of reprocessed uranium. It includes the technical issues involved in managing reprocessed uranium which are RepU arisings, storage, chemical conversion, re-enrichment, fuel fabrication, transport, reactor irradiation, subsequent reprocessing and disposal options, as well as assessment of holistic environmental impacts. The objective of this document is to overview the information on the current status and future trends in the management of RepU and to identify major issues to be considered for future projects

  5. Hemorrhoids: From basic pathophysiology to clinical management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lohsiriwat, Varut

    2012-01-01

    This review discusses the pathophysiology, epidemiology, risk factors, classification, clinical evaluation, and current non-operative and operative treatment of hemorrhoids. Hemorrhoids are defined as the symptomatic enlargement and distal displacement of the normal anal cushions. The most common symptom of hemorrhoids is rectal bleeding associated with bowel movement. The abnormal dilatation and distortion of the vascular channel, together with destructive changes in the supporting connective tissue within the anal cushion, is a paramount finding of hemorrhoids. It appears that the dysregulation of the vascular tone and vascular hyperplasia might play an important role in hemorrhoidal development, and could be a potential target for medical treatment. In most instances, hemorrhoids are treated conservatively, using many methods such as lifestyle modification, fiber supplement, suppository-delivered anti-inflammatory drugs, and administration of venotonic drugs. Non-operative approaches include sclerotherapy and, preferably, rubber band ligation. An operation is indicated when non-operative approaches have failed or complications have occurred. Several surgical approaches for treating hemorrhoids have been introduced including hemorrhoidectomy and stapled hemorrhoidopexy, but postoperative pain is invariable. Some of the surgical treatments potentially cause appreciable morbidity such as anal stricture and incontinence. The applications and outcomes of each treatment are thoroughly discussed. PMID:22563187

  6. New radiopharmaceuticals currently used in clinical nuclear medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hladik, W.B. III

    1997-01-01

    During 1996 and 1997, six new radiopharmaceuticals have been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration for use in the diagnosis and/or management of patients with various disease states. Four of these new agents are antibody-based diagnostic radiotracers, and one is a therapeutic agent. One radio-pharmaceutical that has been available for several years has been approved for a new, unique indication. Our discussion focuses on the physicochemical and pharmacokinetic properties of these recently released agents as well as their specific role in the management of patients

  7. Hypertensive crisis: an update on clinical approach and management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ipek, Emrah; Oktay, Ahmet Afşin; Krim, Selim R

    2017-07-01

    Here, we review current concepts on hypertensive crisis (HTN-C) with a focus on epidemiology, causes, pathophysiology and prognosis. We also offer a practical approach to the management of HTN-C. HTN-C is characterized by a severe and abrupt increase in blood pressure (BP) with impending or progressive acute end-organ damage (EOD). HTN-C can be divided into hypertensive emergency (HTN-E) and hypertensive urgency (HTN-U) based on the presence or absence of acute EOD, respectively. Recent retrospective studies have demonstrated that emergency department (ED) referrals from an outpatient clinic or rapid BP-lowering strategies in the ED do not lead to improved outcomes in patients with HTN-U. HTN-C can be a de-novo manifestation or a complication of essential or secondary HTN. The presence of acute EOD is a major poor prognostic indicator in HTN-C. The main objectives of the management of HTN-C are distinction of HTN-E from HTN-U and appropriate risk stratification, prevention or regression of acute EOD due to severely elevated BP, prevention of recurrence of HTN-C with an effective long-term management plan and avoidance of rapid lowering of BP except in some special circumstances. The majority of patients with asymptomatic HTN-U can be safely managed in the outpatient setting without exposing them to the risks of aggressive BP lowering. However, patients with HTN-E require hospitalization, prompt treatment and close monitoring.

  8. Radiotherapy for pediatric brain tumors: Standard of care, current clinical trials and new directions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kun, Larry E.

    1997-01-01

    Objectives: To review the clinical characteristics of childhood brain tumors, including neurologic signs, neuroimaging and neuropathology. To critically assess indications for therapy relevant to presenting characteristics, age, and disease status. To discuss current management strategies including neurosurgery, radiation therapy, and chemotherapy. To analyze current clinical trials and future directions of clinical research. Brain tumors account for 20% of neoplastic diseases in children. The most common tumors include astrocytoma and malignant gliomas, medulloblastoma and supratentorial PNET's, ependymoma, craniopharyngioma, and intracranial germ cell tumors. The clinical characteristics and disease extent largely determine the relative merits of available 'standard' and investigational therapeutic approaches. Treatment outcome, including disease control and functional integrity, is dependent upon tumor type and site, age at presentation, and disease extent. An understanding of the clinical, neuroimaging, and histologic characteristics as they relate to decisions regarding therapy is critical to the radiation oncologist. Appropriate radiation therapy is central to curative therapy for a majority of pediatric brain tumor presentations. Technical advances in neurosurgery provide greater safety for 'gross total resection' in a majority of hemispheric astrocytomas and medulloblastomas. The relative roles of radiation therapy and chemotherapy for centrally located astrocytomas (e.g., diencephalic, optic pathway) need to be analyzed in the context of initial and overall disease control, neurotoxicities, and potential modifications in the risk:benefit ratio apparent in the introduction of 3-dimensional radiation techniques. Modifications in radiation delivery are important components of current investigations in medulloblastoma; the rationale for contemporary cooperative group trials will be presented as well as the background data re surgical, radiotherapeutic, and

  9. ANTIFUNGAL SUSCEPTIBILITY TESTING: CURRENT ROLE FROM THE CLINICAL LABORATORY PERSPECTIVE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brunella Posteraro

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Despite availability of many antifungal agents, antifungal clinical resistance occurs, perhaps as a result of an infecting organism found to be resistant in vitro to one or more antifungals tested. Thus, antifungal susceptibility testing (AFST results, if timely generated by the clinical microbiology and communicated to clinicians, can aid them in the therapeutic decision making, especially for difficult-to-treat invasive candidiasis and aspergillosis. Although recently refined AFST methods are commercially available to allow a close antifungal resistance surveillance in many clinical setting, novel assays, relying on short-time antifungal drug exposure of fungal isolates, are upcoming tools for AFST. Based on emerging technologies such as flow cytometry, MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry, and isothermal microcalorimetry, these assays could provide a reliable means for quicker and sensitive assessment of AFST.

  10. [The future of clinical laboratory database management system].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kambe, M; Imidy, D; Matsubara, A; Sugimoto, Y

    1999-09-01

    To assess the present status of the clinical laboratory database management system, the difference between the Clinical Laboratory Information System and Clinical Laboratory System was explained in this study. Although three kinds of database management systems (DBMS) were shown including the relational model, tree model and network model, the relational model was found to be the best DBMS for the clinical laboratory database based on our experience and developments of some clinical laboratory expert systems. As a future clinical laboratory database management system, the IC card system connected to an automatic chemical analyzer was proposed for personal health data management and a microscope/video system was proposed for dynamic data management of leukocytes or bacteria.

  11. Clinical review: Management of difficult airways

    OpenAIRE

    Langeron, Olivier; Amour, Julien; Vivien, Benoît; Aubrun, Frédéric

    2006-01-01

    Difficulties or failure in airway management are still important factors in morbidity and mortality related to anesthesia and intensive care. A patent and secure airway is essential to manage anesthetized or critically ill patients. Oxygenation maintenance during tracheal intubation is the cornerstone of difficult airway management and is always emphasized in guidelines. The occurrence of respiratory adverse events has decreased in claims for injuries due to inadequate airway management mainl...

  12. Current referral practices and adolescent transition to Adult clinic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2016-02-02

    Feb 2, 2016 ... is either one of transfer to adult services, long term retention ... care in the type and level of support, decision-making, ... of Pediatrics (AAP), the American Academy of Family ... cians (ACP) issued a joint statement that defined spe- ... other countries attending Paediatric Association of ..... Diabetes Manage-.

  13. Clinical management of grade III oligodendroglioma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simonetti G

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available G Simonetti, P Gaviani, A Botturi, A Innocenti, E Lamperti, A Silvani Neurooncology Unit, Fondazione IRCCS Istituto Neurologico Carlo Besta, Milan, Italy Abstract: Oligodendrogliomas represent the third most common type of glioma, comprising 4%–15% of all gliomas and can be classified by degree of malignancy into grade II and grade III, according to WHO classification. Only 30% of oligodendroglial tumors have anaplastic characteristics. Anaplastic oligodendroglioma (AO is often localized as a single lesion in the white matter and in the cortex, rarely in brainstem or spinal cord. The management of AO is deeply changed in the recent years. Maximal safe surgical resection followed by radiotherapy (RT was considered as the standard of care since paramount findings regarding molecular aspects, in particular co-deletion of the short arm of chromosome 1 and the long arm of chromosome 19, revealed that these subsets of AO, benefit in terms of overall survival (OS and progression-free survival (PFS, from the addition of chemotherapy to RT. Allelic losses of chromosomes 1p and 19q occur in 50%–70% of both low-grade and anaplastic tumors, representing a strong prognostic factor and a powerful predictor of prolonged survival. Several other molecular markers have potential clinical significance as IDH1 mutations, confirming the strong prognostic role for OS. Malignant brain tumors negatively impacts on patients' quality of life. Seizures, visual impairment, headache, and cognitive disorders can be present. Moreover, chemotherapy and RT have important side effects. For these reasons, “health-related quality of life” is becoming a topic of growing interest, investigating on physical, mental, emotional, and social well-being. Understanding the impact of medical treatment on health-related quality of life will probably have a growing effect both on health care strategies and on patients. Keywords: anaplastic oligodendroglioma, radiotherapy, chemotherapy

  14. Clinical management of grade III oligodendroglioma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simonetti, G; Gaviani, P; Botturi, A; Innocenti, A; Lamperti, E; Silvani, A

    2015-01-01

    Oligodendrogliomas represent the third most common type of glioma, comprising 4%–15% of all gliomas and can be classified by degree of malignancy into grade II and grade III, according to WHO classification. Only 30% of oligodendroglial tumors have anaplastic characteristics. Anaplastic oligodendroglioma (AO) is often localized as a single lesion in the white matter and in the cortex, rarely in brainstem or spinal cord. The management of AO is deeply changed in the recent years. Maximal safe surgical resection followed by radiotherapy (RT) was considered as the standard of care since paramount findings regarding molecular aspects, in particular co-deletion of the short arm of chromosome 1 and the long arm of chromosome 19, revealed that these subsets of AO, benefit in terms of overall survival (OS) and progression-free survival (PFS), from the addition of chemotherapy to RT. Allelic losses of chromosomes 1p and 19q occur in 50%–70% of both low-grade and anaplastic tumors, representing a strong prognostic factor and a powerful predictor of prolonged survival. Several other molecular markers have potential clinical significance as IDH1 mutations, confirming the strong prognostic role for OS. Malignant brain tumors negatively impacts on patients’ quality of life. Seizures, visual impairment, headache, and cognitive disorders can be present. Moreover, chemotherapy and RT have important side effects. For these reasons, “health-related quality of life” is becoming a topic of growing interest, investigating on physical, mental, emotional, and social well-being. Understanding the impact of medical treatment on health-related quality of life will probably have a growing effect both on health care strategies and on patients

  15. The current status of oral contraceptive clinical development in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuwabara, Y

    1989-01-01

    Since the oral contraceptive guideline was issued in April 1987, Japanese pharmaceutical firms have been asking physicians to perform clinical studies of the low-dose OCs. At present, eight products from six companies are under clinical development. Ethinyl estradiol (30-35 micrograms per tablet) as an estrogen component is common to all the test drugs. The progestin component in each OC is norethindrone, levonorgestrel, or desogestrel. Phase I clinical studies on small numbers of healthy volunteers showed that they could tolerate the test drugs without any serious complaints. The effects on endocrine systems, including the inhibition of ovulation, were also examined. Pharmacokinetic parameters of active ingredients were comparable to those of Western women, and no substantial difference seemed to exist between Japanese and Western women. As an example, the results of phase I studies of OJK-777 (Ortho-Novum 7/7/7) are mentioned. Phase III clinical studies, which are "open studies," are now under progress with more than 3,000 women. The major objectives are to examine (1) how well the drugs are tolerated, and the dropout rates; (2) the effects on cycle control, especially bleeding patterns; (3) effects on the cardiovascular system, including coagulation and lipid metabolism; (4) effects on hormone secretions. Although some women have been taking the test drugs for more than 12 cycles, overall statistics are not yet available, because the guideline requires long-term administration (for more than 24 cycles). However, some characteristic features observed thus far are discussed.

  16. Current clinical trials testing combinations of immunotherapy and radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crittenden, Marka; Kohrt, Holbrook; Levy, Ronald; Jones, Jennifer; Camphausen, Kevin; Dicker, Adam; Demaria, Sandra; Formenti, Silvia

    2015-01-01

    Preclinical evidence of successful combinations of ionizing radiation with immunotherapy has inspired testing the translation of these results to the clinic. Interestingly, the preclinical work has consistently predicted the responses encountered in clinical trials. The first example came from a proof-of-principle trial started in 2001 that tested the concept that growth factors acting on antigen-presenting cells improve presentation of tumor antigens released by radiation and induce an abscopal effect. Granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor was administered during radiotherapy to a metastatic site in patients with metastatic solid tumors to translate evidence obtained in a murine model of syngeneic mammary carcinoma treated with cytokine FLT-3L and radiation. Subsequent clinical availability of vaccines and immune checkpoint inhibitors has triggered a wave of enthusiasm for testing them in combination with radiotherapy. Examples of ongoing clinical trials are described in this report. Importantly, most of these trials include careful immune monitoring of the patients enrolled and will generate important data about the proimmunogenic effects of radiation in combination with a variety of immune modulators, in different disease settings. Results of these studies are building a platform of evidence for radiotherapy as an adjuvant to immunotherapy and encourage the growth of this novel field of radiation oncology. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Pharmacogenetics and breast cancer management: current status and perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciccolini, Joseph; Fanciullino, Raphaelle; Serdjebi, Cindy; Milano, Gérard

    2015-05-01

    Breast cancer has benefited from a number of innovative therapeutics over the last decade. Cytotoxics, hormone therapy, targeted therapies and biologics can now be given to ensure optimal management of patients. As life expectancy of breast cancer patients has been significantly stretched and that several lines of treatment are now made available, determining the best drug or drug combinations to be primarily given and the best dosing and scheduling for each patient is critical for ensuring an optimal toxicity/efficacy balance. Defining patient's characteristics at the tumor level (pharmacogenomics) and the constitutional level (pharmacogenetics) is a rising trend in oncology. This review covers the latest strategies based upon the search of relevant biomarkers for efficacy, resistance and toxicity to be undertaken at the bedside to shift towards precision medicine in breast cancer patients. In the expanding era of bioguided medicine, identifying relevant and clinically validated biomarkers from the plethora of published material remains an uneasy task. Sorting the variety of genetic and molecular markers that have been investigated over the last decade on their level of evidence and addressing the issue of drug exposure should help to improve the management of breast cancer therapy.

  18. Management of small fragment wounds in war: current research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowyer, G W; Cooper, G J; Rice, P

    1995-03-01

    The majority of war wounds are caused by antipersonnel fragments from munitions such as mortars and bomblets. Modern munitions aim to incapacitate soldiers with multiple wounds from very small fragments of low available kinetic energy. Many of these fragments may be stopped by helmets and body armour and this has led to a predominance of multiple wounds to limbs in those casualties requiring surgery. The development of an appropriate management strategy for these multiple wounds requires knowledge of the contamination and extent of soft tissue injury; conservative management may be appropriate. The extent of skin and muscle damage associated with a small fragment wound, the way in which these wounds may progress without intervention and their colonisation by bacteria has been determined in an experimental animal model. Results from 12 animals are presented. There was a very small (approximately 1 mm) margin of nonviable skin around the entrance wound. The amount of devitalised muscle in the wound tract was a few hundred milligrams. Some muscles peripheral to the wound track also showed signs of damage 1 h after wounding, but this improved over 24 h; the proportion of fragmented muscle fibres in the tissue around the track decreased as time went on. There was no clinical sign or bacteriological evidence of the track becoming infected up to 24 h after wounding. This preliminary work suggests that, in the absence of infection, the amount of muscle damage caused by small fragment wounds begins to resolve in the first 24 h after injury, even without surgical intervention.

  19. [Basic considerations during outsourcing of clinical data management services].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Tong; Liu, Yan

    2015-11-01

    With worldwide improvements in the regulations of international and domestic clinical trial conductions, the quality of clinical trials and trial data management are receiving a great deal of attention. To ensure the quality of clinical trials, maintain business flexibilities and effectively utilize internal and external resources, the outsourcing model is used in the management of clinical data in operation of pharmaceutical companies. The essential criteria of a successful outsourcing mode in clinical trial are selection of qualified contract research organizations (CRO); establishment of appropriate outsourcing model, and generation of effective quality control systems to ensure the authenticity, integrity and accuracy of the clinical trial data.

  20. Managing clinical education through understanding key principles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunningham, Joanne; Wright, Caroline; Baird, Marilyn

    2015-01-01

    Traditionally, a practicum facilitated the integration of on-campus learning and practical workplace training. Over the past 3 decades, an educative practicum has evolved that promotes clinical reasoning, including analytical and evaluative abilities, through reflective practice. Anecdotal evidence indicates that the delivery of clinical education within medical radiation science entry-level programs continues to vacillate between traditional practicums and the new reflective practicums. To review the literature about clinical education within the medical radiation sciences and identify key principles for practitioners seeking to reflect upon and improve their approach to teaching and supporting students in the clinical environment. A search of 3 major journal databases, Internet searches, and hand searches of reference lists were conducted to identify literature about clinical education in the medical radiation sciences from January 1, 2000, to December 31, 2012. Twenty-two studies were included in this review. The 5 key elements associated with clinical education include the clinical support model and quality, overcoming the theory-practice gap, learning outcomes and reliable and valid assessment, preparing and supporting students, and accommodating differing teaching and learning needs. Many factors influence the quality of clinical education, including the culture of the clinical environment and clinical leadership roles. Several approaches can help students bridge the theory-practice gap, including simulators, role-playing activities, and reflective journals. In addition, clinical educators should use assessment strategies that objectively measure student progress, and they should be positive role models for their students. The successful clinical education of students in the medical radiation sciences depends upon the systems, structures, and people in the clinical environment. Clinical education is accomplished through the collaborative efforts of the

  1. Smartphone applications to aid weight loss and management: current perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sutton EF

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Elizabeth F Sutton, Leanne M Redman Pennington Biomedical Research Center, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, LA, USA Abstract: The development and dissemination of smart devices has cultivated a global environment of hyperconnectivity and increased our access to information. The paralleled launch and success of the Mobile Health industry has created a market of commercially available applications or “apps” along with tools or sensors, which allow the user to receive and collect personal health information. Apps and accompanying tools now allow an individual to “self-digitize” and, pertaining to weight management, monitor their body weight, caloric intake, physical activity, and more. These products possess the ability to improve the scalability of traditional in-person weight management services considering their near ubiquity, affordability, and capability to deliver information directly and personally to the user. However, similar to the dietary supplement market, the anecdotal value of these products has driven their popularity and acceptance by the general public without requirement of scientific validation or, in the area of weight management or diet/exercise, validation of the safety and efficacy by the Food and Drug Administration prior to market launch. By conducting a literature and clinical trial search, we found remarkably few active, completed, or published studies testing the efficacy of smart device applications using randomized controlled trials. Research efforts must be focused on illuminating the efficacy of behavioral interventions and remote self-monitoring for weight loss/maintenance treatment with true, randomized controlled trials. Keywords: smartphone, mobile phone, application, app, weight, weight loss, weight maintenance

  2. Clinical review: Management of difficult airways

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langeron, Olivier; Amour, Julien; Vivien, Benoît; Aubrun, Frédéric

    2006-01-01

    Difficulties or failure in airway management are still important factors in morbidity and mortality related to anesthesia and intensive care. A patent and secure airway is essential to manage anesthetized or critically ill patients. Oxygenation maintenance during tracheal intubation is the cornerstone of difficult airway management and is always emphasized in guidelines. The occurrence of respiratory adverse events has decreased in claims for injuries due to inadequate airway management mainly at induction of anesthesia. Nevertheless, claim reports emphasize that airway emergencies, tracheal extubation and/or recovery of anesthesia phases are still associated with death or brain damage, indicating that additional educational support and management strategies to improve patient safety are required. The present brief review analyses specific problems of airway management related to difficult tracheal intubation and to difficult mask ventilation prediction. The review will focus on basic airway management including preoxygenation, and on some oxygenation and tracheal intubation techniques that may be performed to solve a difficult airway. PMID:17184555

  3. Clinical review: management of difficult airways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langeron, Olivier; Amour, Julien; Vivien, Benoît; Aubrun, Frédéric

    2006-01-01

    Difficulties or failure in airway management are still important factors in morbidity and mortality related to anesthesia and intensive care. A patent and secure airway is essential to manage anesthetized or critically ill patients. Oxygenation maintenance during tracheal intubation is the cornerstone of difficult airway management and is always emphasized in guidelines. The occurrence of respiratory adverse events has decreased in claims for injuries due to inadequate airway management mainly at induction of anesthesia. Nevertheless, claim reports emphasize that airway emergencies, tracheal extubation and/or recovery of anesthesia phases are still associated with death or brain damage, indicating that additional educational support and management strategies to improve patient safety are required. The present brief review analyses specific problems of airway management related to difficult tracheal intubation and to difficult mask ventilation prediction. The review will focus on basic airway management including preoxygenation, and on some oxygenation and tracheal intubation techniques that may be performed to solve a difficult airway.

  4. Local air quality management: some evidence of current practices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beattie, Clare; Newton, Alex; Longhurst, Jim [University of the West of England, Air Quality Research Group, Bristol (United Kingdom)

    1998-12-01

    The recent legislative changes, notably the Environment Act 1995 and resultant National Air Quality Strategy have brought new powers and obligations to local authorities to reach specified air quality standards and objectives. Initially this will involve local authorities carrying out a review and assessment of air quality in their locality by December 1999. This paper will outline a project currently being undertaken within the University of the West of England investigating how this legislation is being put into practice and present the results from a nation-wide questionnaire survey of environmental health officers. The study found that local authorities are still at an early stage of the process. It seems probable that one possible barrier to the implementation of Air Quality Management will be communication and cooperation within local authorities. (Author)

  5. Current management of bronchiectasis: review and 3 case studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silverman, Enid; Ebright, Linda; Kwiatkowski, Marianne; Cullina, Joanne

    2003-01-01

    Bronchiectasis is the abnormal, irreversible dilatation of diseased bronchi. Permanently dilated airways, usually in the medium-sized bronchi, are inflamed and often obstructed with thick, purulent secretions. Known causative factors include postinfection bronchial damage, postinhalation injury, hypersensitivity reactions, and congenital airway obstructive disorders. Typical symptoms include sputum overproduction, fever, pleurisy, dyspnea, and chronic cough. Diagnosis involves radiographic studies and pulmonary function testing. Treatment includes oral, aerosolized, or intravenous antibiotic therapy according to the severity of the exacerbation, and mucus clearance by means of bronchial hygiene assistive devices, chest physiotherapy, postural drainage, and high-frequency chest compression. We present a review of bronchiectasis and offer 3 case studies illustrating current management of different presentations, including use of aerosolized antibiotics for patients infected with Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Although an adjunctive program of pulmonary rehabilitation may be useful for patients with bronchiectasis, no confirming studies have been performed to date, and additional research in this area is warranted.

  6. Cutaneous Scar Prevention and Management; Overview of current therapies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sultan Al-Shaqsi

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Cutaneous scarring is common after trauma, surgery and infection and occurs when normal skin tissue is replaced by fibroblastic tissue during the healing process. The pathophysiology of scar formation is not yet fully understood, although the degree of tension across the wound edges and the speed of cell growth are believed to play central roles. Prevention of scars is essential and can be achieved by attention to surgical techniques and the use of measures to reduce cell growth. Grading and classifying scars is important to determine available treatment strategies. This article presents an overview of the current therapies available for the prevention and treatment of scars. It is intended to be a practical guide for surgeons and other health professionals involved with and interested in scar management.

  7. Clinical Supervision of Substance Abuse Counselors: Current and Preferred Practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Culbreth, John R.

    1999-01-01

    Reports on a national survey of substance abuse counselors (N=134) to learn their current and preferred supervision practices. Results suggests that substance abuse counselor are receiving supervision similar to other counselors. No preference was indicated for the sex of the supervisor, nor for the 12-step recovery experience. Counselors did…

  8. Current management of congenital branchial cleft cysts, sinuses, and fistulae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goff, Christopher J; Allred, Carly; Glade, Robert S

    2012-12-01

    Branchial anomalies comprise approximately 20% of pediatric congenital head and neck lesions. This study reviews current literature detailing the diagnosis and management of first, second, third and fourth branchial cysts, sinuses and fistulae. Branchial anomalies remain classified as first, second, third and fourth cysts, sinuses and fistulae. Management varies on the basis of classification. The imaging study of choice remains controversial. Computed tomography fistulography likely best demonstrates the complete course of the tract if a cutaneous opening is present. Treatment of all lesions has historically been by complete surgical excision of the entire tract. Studies of less invasive procedures for several anomalies are promising including sclerotherapy and endoscopic excision of second branchial cysts, and endoscopic cauterization or sclerotherapy at the piriform opening for third and fourth branchial sinuses. An increased risk of complications in children less than 8 years is reported in children undergoing open excision of third and fourth branchial anomalies. Branchial anomalies are common congenital pediatric head and neck lesions but are comprised by several diverse anomalies. Treatment must be tailored depending on which branchial arch is involved and whether a cyst mass or sinus/fistula tract is present.

  9. Current approaches to the management of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raghu, Ganesh; Richeldi, Luca

    2017-08-01

    Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) is a progressive and ultimately fatal lung disease associated with dyspnoea, cough and impaired quality of life. Currently, the aims of patient care are to improve outcomes for patients by slowing the progression of the disease, extending life, and improving quality of life. A prompt, accurate diagnosis is important to enable patients to receive treatment early in the course of the disease and to be considered for lung transplantation. Two anti-fibrotic drugs, nintedanib and pirfenidone, have been shown to reduce decline in lung function in patients with IPF. In addition to pharmacological therapy, optimal management of IPF includes treatment of comorbidities, symptom relief, pulmonary rehabilitation, and palliative care. Patient education is important to enable patients to make decisions about their care and to help them manage their disease and the side-effects of anti-fibrotic drugs. Research continues into new treatments and combinations of treatments that may improve outcomes for patients with this devastating disease. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  10. Current management of parainfluenza pneumonitis in immunocompromised patients: a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Falsey AR

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Ann R FalseyUniversity of Rochester, Rochester General Hospital, Rochester, NY, USAAbstract: Parainfluenza viruses (PIV are common respiratory viruses that belong to the Paramyxoviridae family. PIV infection can lead to a wide variety of clinical syndromes ranging from mild upper respiratory illness to severe pneumonia. Severe disease can be seen in elderly or chronically ill persons and may be fatal in persons with compromised immune systems, particularly children with severe combined immunodeficiency disease syndrome and hematopathic stem cell transplant recipients. At present, there are no licensed antiviral agents for the treatment of PIV infection. Aerosolized or systemic ribavirin in combination with intravenous gamma globulin has been reported in small, uncontrolled series and case reports of immunocompromised patients. A number of agents show antiviral activity in vitro and in animals, but none are currently approved for human use.Keywords: parainfluenza virus, antiviral agents, immunocompromised host

  11. CSF-1R Inhibitor Development: Current Clinical Status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peyraud, Florent; Cousin, Sophie; Italiano, Antoine

    2017-09-05

    Colony-stimulating factor 1 receptor (CSF-1R) and its ligands, CSF-1 and interleukin 34 (IL-34), regulate the function and survival of tumor-associated macrophages, which are involved in tumorigenesis and in the suppression of antitumor immunity. Moreover, the CSF-1R/CSF-1 axis has been implicated in the pathogenesis of pigmented villonodular synovitis (PVNS), a benign tumor of the synovium. As advanced or metastatic malignant solid tumors and relapsed/refractory PVNS remain unresolved therapeutic problems, new approaches are needed to improve the outcome of patients with these conditions. In solid tumors, targeting CSF-1R via either small molecules or antibodies has shown interesting results in vitro but limited antitumor activity in vivo. Concerning PVNS, clinical trials assessing CSF-1R inhibitors have revealed promising initial outcomes. Blocking CSF-1/CSF-1R signaling represents a promising immunotherapy approach and several new potential combination therapies for future clinical testing.

  12. Current clinical research of immunoglobulin G4-related orbital disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Wang

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Immunoglobulin G4-related disease(IgG4-related diseasehas received lots of attention in medical community as a recently recognized fibro-inflammatory condition. It is characterized by infiltration of IgG4-immunopositive plasmacytes and concentration of elevated serum IgG4. IgG4-related disease shows organ enlargement or nodular/hyperplastic lesions in various organs including the pancreas, hepatobiliary tract and orbit, which is called IgG4-related orbital disease. The diagnostic criteria for IgG4-related disease and IgG4-related orbital disease has recently been established, which is based on clinical, imaging and histopathologic features of the orbital lesions. Besides, attention should be drawn to the differentiation from other diseases. The treatment is empirical including corticosteroids, immunosuppressive drugs, radiotherapy, and rituximab. This article reviews clinical progression of IgG4-related orbital disease.

  13. Guide to clinical PET in oncology: Improving clinical management of cancer patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2008-10-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) has an approximately 50 year-history. It was developed as a tool of medical science to quantitatively measure metabolic rates of bio-substances in vivo and in particular the number of receptors in neuroscience. Until the late 1990s PET was, in most cases, research oriented activity. In 2001, positron emission tomography/X ray computed tomography (PET/CT) hybrid imaging system became commercially available. An era of clinical PET then emerged, in which PET images were utilized for clinical practice in the treatment and diagnosis of cancer patients. PET imaging could recognize areas of abnormal metabolic behaviour of cancers in vivo, and the addition of CT imaging underlines the site of malignancy. More accurate and precise interpretation of cancer lesions can therefore be performed by PET/CT imaging than PET or CT imaging alone. Clinical PET, in particular with fluorine-18-fluorodeoxyglucose ( 18 F-FDG), has already proven itself to have considerable value in oncology. The indications include malignant lymphoma and melanoma, head and neck cancers, oesophageal cancer, breast cancer, lung cancer and colorectal cancer, and it is still being expanded. The roles of clinical PET could be for 1) preoperative staging of cancers, 2) differentiation between residual tumour and scarring, 3) demonstration of suspected recurrences, 4) monitoring response to therapy, 5) prognosis and 6) radiotherapy treatment planning. Clinical PET can be used to illustrate exactly which treatment should be applied for a cancer patient as well as where surgeons should operate and where radiation oncologists should target radiation therapy. An almost exponential rise in the introduction of clinical PET, as well as the installation of PET/CT has been seen throughout the world. Clinical PET is currently viewed as the most powerful diagnostic tool in its field. This IAEA-TECDOC presents an overview of clinical PET for cancer patients and a relevant source of

  14. Clinical observation of cerebrovascular diseases current in Chernobyl accident liquidators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Golovchenko, Yu.Yi.; Usatenko, O.G.; Romanenko, N.Yi.

    1999-01-01

    The results of the clinical follow up study (1993-1997) of cerebrovascular diseases development in the Chernobyl accident liquidators are presented. The syndrome of autonomous nervous system dysfunction following to an exposure to the Chernobyl accident consequences factors promotes to fast development of atherosclerosis and arterial hypertension. On the base of an analysis of the data obtained it was established that the primary diencephalic structures damage resulted in severe changes of different metabolic system, particularly in the cerebrovascular disorders development

  15. Current challenges for clinical trials of cardiovascular medical devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zannad, Faiez; Stough, Wendy Gattis; Piña, Ileana L; Mehran, Roxana; Abraham, William T; Anker, Stefan D; De Ferrari, Gaetano M; Farb, Andrew; Geller, Nancy L; Kieval, Robert S; Linde, Cecilia; Redberg, Rita F; Stein, Kenneth; Vincent, Alphons; Woehrle, Holger; Pocock, Stuart J

    2014-07-15

    Several features of cardiovascular devices raise considerations for clinical trial conduct. Prospective, randomized, controlled trials remain the highest quality evidence for safety and effectiveness assessments, but, for instance, blinding may be challenging. In order to avoid bias and not confound data interpretation, the use of objective endpoints and blinding patients, study staff, core labs, and clinical endpoint committees to treatment assignment are helpful approaches. Anticipation of potential bias should be considered and planned for prospectively in a cardiovascular device trial. Prospective, single-arm studies (often referred to as registry studies) can provide additional data in some cases. They are subject to selection bias even when carefully designed; thus, they are generally not acceptable as the sole basis for pre-market approval of high risk cardiovascular devices. However, they complement the evidence base and fill the gaps unanswered by randomized trials. Registry studies present device safety and effectiveness in day-to-day clinical practice settings and detect rare adverse events in the post-market period. No single research design will be appropriate for every cardiovascular device or target patient population. The type of trial, appropriate control group, and optimal length of follow-up will depend on the specific device, its potential clinical benefits, the target patient population and the existence (or lack) of effective therapies, and its anticipated risks. Continued efforts on the part of investigators, the device industry, and government regulators are needed to reach the optimal approach for evaluating the safety and performance of innovative devices for the treatment of cardiovascular disease. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Current status, opportunities and problems in clinical combined chemoradiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Phillips, T.L.

    1979-01-01

    The clinical experience with combined radiation and chemotherapy has been positive in a number of situations. The enhanced local tumor control and patient cure due to the sterilization of distant metastases have been observed. More widespread clinical applications have been limited by the enhanced effects in normal tissues, necessitating radiation dose reduction which in some situations may be counterproductive. The limitations have been caused by the lack of a wide range of active anti-tumor compounds, particularly for most common solid tumors. The very active combinations of cyclophosphamide and adriamycin or cyclophosphamide and cis-Pt, as well as of the 3 agents, caused the response of a number of the solid tumors previously found to be drug resistant. The introduction of these compounds and a number of others active in slowly proliferating solid tumors will allow new look for improved survival in the tumors not yet amenable to combined radiation and chemotherapy. The experiments designed to elucidate the nature of the interaction of radiation and chemotherapy and in particular the nature of normal tissue response should allow for the safer employment of 2 modalities and should help in the design of prospective clinical trials on a more rational basis. (Yamashita, S.)

  17. Current status of verification practices in clinical biochemistry in Spain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez-Rioja, Rubén; Alvarez, Virtudes; Ventura, Montserrat; Alsina, M Jesús; Barba, Núria; Cortés, Mariano; Llopis, María Antonia; Martínez, Cecilia; Ibarz, Mercè

    2013-09-01

    Verification uses logical algorithms to detect potential errors before laboratory results are released to the clinician. Even though verification is one of the main processes in all laboratories, there is a lack of standardization mainly in the algorithms used and the criteria and verification limits applied. A survey in clinical laboratories in Spain was conducted in order to assess the verification process, particularly the use of autoverification. Questionnaires were sent to the laboratories involved in the External Quality Assurance Program organized by the Spanish Society of Clinical Biochemistry and Molecular Pathology. Seven common biochemical parameters were included (glucose, cholesterol, triglycerides, creatinine, potassium, calcium, and alanine aminotransferase). Completed questionnaires were received from 85 laboratories. Nearly all the laboratories reported using the following seven verification criteria: internal quality control, instrument warnings, sample deterioration, reference limits, clinical data, concordance between parameters, and verification of results. The use of all verification criteria varied according to the type of verification (automatic, technical, or medical). Verification limits for these parameters are similar to biological reference ranges. Delta Check was used in 24% of laboratories. Most laboratories (64%) reported using autoverification systems. Autoverification use was related to laboratory size, ownership, and type of laboratory information system, but amount of use (percentage of test autoverified) was not related to laboratory size. A total of 36% of Spanish laboratories do not use autoverification, despite the general implementation of laboratory information systems, most of them, with autoverification ability. Criteria and rules for seven routine biochemical tests were obtained.

  18. Pleiotropic effects of niacin: Current possibilities for its clinical use

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zeman Miroslav

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Niacin was the first hypolipidemic drug to significantly reduce both major cardiovascular events and mortality in patients with cardiovascular disease. Niacin favorably influences all lipoprotein classes, including lipoprotein[a],and belongs to the most potent hypolipidemic drugs for increasing HDL-C. Moreover, niacin causes favorable changes to the qualitative composition of lipoprotein HDL. In addition to its pronounced hypolipidemic action, niacin exerts many other, non-hypolipidemic effects (e.g., antioxidative, anti-inflammatory, antithrombotic, which favorably influence the development and progression of atherosclerosis. These effects are dependent on activation of the specific receptor HCA2. Recent results published by the two large clinical studies, AIM-HIGH and HPS2-THRIVE, have led to the impugnation of niacin’s role in future clinical practice. However, due to several methodological flaws in the AIM-HIGH and HPS2-THRIVE studies, the pleiotropic effects of niacin now deserve thorough evaluation. This review summarizes the present and possible future use of niacin in clinical practice in light of its newly recognized pleiotropic effects.

  19. Clinical review: Current state and future perspectives in the diagnosis of diabetes insipidus: a clinical review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fenske, Wiebke; Allolio, Bruno

    2012-10-01

    The differential diagnosis of diabetes insipidus (DI) is often challenging but essential, because treatment may vary substantially. This article analyzes the database and performance of currently used differential diagnostic tests for DI and discusses future perspectives for diagnostic improvement. A review of electronic and print data comprising original and review articles retrieved from the PubMed or Cochrane Library database up to January 2012 was conducted. The search term "polyuria polydipsia syndrome" was cross-referenced with underlying forms of disease and associated clinical, diagnostic, and therapeutic MeSH terms. In addition, references from review articles and textbook chapters were screened for papers containing original data. Search results were narrowed to articles containing primary data with a description of criteria for the differential diagnosis of DI. Fifteen articles on differential diagnosis of DI were identified, mainly consisting of small series of patients, and mostly covering only part of the differential diagnostic spectrum of DI. Test protocols differed, and prospective validation of diagnostic criteria was consistently missing. Inconsistent data were reported on the diagnostic superiority of direct plasma arginine vasopressin determination over the indirect water deprivation test. Both test methods revealed limitations, especially in the differentiation of disorders with a milder phenotype. The available data demonstrate limitations of current biochemical tests for the differential diagnosis of DI, potentially leading to incorrect diagnosis and treatment. The newly available assay for copeptin, the C terminus of the vasopressin precursor, holds promise for a higher diagnostic specificity and simplification of the differential diagnostic protocol in DI.

  20. Skin carcinomas: Radiobiological principles, radiotherapeutic techniques and clinical management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmidt-Ullrich, Rupert K.; Johnson, Christopher R.

    1997-01-01

    Purpose/Objective: The course will be divided into three major topics: (1) Review of radiobiological principles as they apply to the radiotherapeutic management of skin carcinomas; (2) review of radiotherapeutic techniques including beam qualities, beam collimation, tissue dose profiles, and the relative indications of external beam irradiation vs. brachytherapy; (3) comprehensive review of the tumor biology of skin malignancies, including malignant melanoma, and of the relative indications for radiotherapeutic and/or surgical management. (1) Review of critical data which have led to currently applied principles of time-dose-volume concepts in the radiotherapeutic management of skin carcinomas. Emphasis will be placed on the relative importance of fraction size and overall treatment time on tumor control probability and acute and late normal tissue toxicity. (2) Considering that radiotherapy in the management of skin carcinomas is often used to minimize patient disfiguration and to preserve critical body functions (e.g. eye lids) the technical aspects of radiotherapy delivery are most critical. Careful evaluation of the extent of the lesions including evaluation of their depth of invasion will determine the quality of the radiation beams, orthovoltage and low energy electrons being the most useful. Beam harding for orthovoltage beams and secondary and tertiary (skin) collimation of appropriate electron beams are critical. For more extensive and deeply invasive lesions contour-shaping through customized bolus material is essential. Equally important is the familiarity with custom shielding of critical structures, such as eyes, ears, oral cavity and central nervous system structures. Brachytherapy applications in the treatment of skin carcinomas is limited but should be considered when implants with high dose uniformity can be constructed. (3) The discussion of clinical management will start with a discussion of properties and routes of spread of the diverse

  1. Professional identity and role transitions in clinical managers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spehar, Ivan; Frich, Jan C; Kjekshus, Lars Erik

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to investigate how clinicians' professional background influences their transition into the managerial role and identity as clinical managers. The authors interviewed and observed 30 clinicians in managerial positions in Norwegian hospitals. A central finding was that doctors experienced difficulties in reconciling the role as health professional with the role as manager. They maintained a health professional identity and reported to find meaning and satisfaction from clinical work. Doctors also emphasized clinical work as a way of gaining legitimacy and respect from medical colleagues. Nurses recounted a faster and more positive transition into the manager role, and were more fully engaged in the managerial aspects of the role. The authors advance that health care organizations need to focus on role, identity and need satisfaction when recruiting and developing clinicians to become clinical managers. The study suggests that the inclusion of aspects from identity and need satisfaction literature expands on and enriches the study of clinical managers.

  2. Angioid streaks, clinical course, complications, and current therapeutic management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilias Georgalas

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Ilias Georgalas1, Dimitris Papaconstantinou2, Chrysanthi Koutsandrea2, George Kalantzis2, Dimitris Karagiannis2, Gerasimos Georgopoulos2, Ioannis Ladas21Department of Ophthalmology, “G. Gennimatas” Hospital of Athens, NHS, Athens, Greece; 2Department of Ophthalmology, “G. Gennimatas” Hospital of Athens, University of Athens, Athens, GreeceAbstract: Angioid streaks are visible irregular crack-like dehiscences in Bruch’s membrane that are associated with atrophic degeneration of the overlying retinal pigmented epithelium. Angioid streaks may be associated with pseudoxanthoma elasticum, Paget’s disease, sickle-cell anemia, acromegaly, Ehlers–Danlos syndrome, and diabetes mellitus, but also appear in patients without any systemic disease. Patients with angioid streaks are generally asymptomatic, unless the lesions extend towards the foveola or develop complications such as traumatic Bruch’s membrane rupture or macular choroidal neovascularization (CNV. The visual prognosis in patients with CNV secondary to angioid streaks if untreated, is poor and most treatment modalities, until recently, have failed to limit the devastating impact of CNV in central vision. However, it is likely that treatment with antivascular endothelial growth factor, especially in treatment-naive eyes to yield favorable results in the future and this has to be investigated in future studies.Keywords: angioid streaks, pseudoxanthoma elasticum, choroidal neovascularization

  3. Current Management of Alcoholic Hepatitis and Future Therapies

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Behnam Saberi; Alia S.Dadabhai; Yoon-Young Jang; Ahmet Gurakar; Esteban Mezey

    2016-01-01

    Alcohol is one of the most common etiologies of liver disease,and alcoholic liver disease overall is the second most common indication for liver transplantation in the United States.It encompasses a spectrum of disease,including fatty liver disease,alcoholic hepatitis (AH),and alcoholic cirrhosis.AH can range from mild to severe disease,with severe disease being defined as:Discriminant Function (DF) ≥ 32,or Model for End-stage Liver Disease (MELD) ≥ 21,or presence of hepatic encephalopathy.Management of the mild disease consists mainly of abstinence and supportive care.Severe AH is associated with significant mortality.Currently,there is no ideal medical treatment for this condition.Besides alcohol cessation,corticosteroids have been used with conflicting results and are associated with an inherent risk of infection.Overall steroids have shown short term benefit when compared to placebo,but they have no obvious long term benefits.Pentoxifylline does not improve survival in patients with severe AH and is no longer recommended based on the results of the STOPAH (Steroid Or Pentoxifylline for Alcoholic Hepatitis) trial.Anti-tumor necrosis factor (TNF) agents are associated with increased risk of life threatening infections and death.Currently,early stage trials are underway,mainly targeting novel pathways based on disease pathogenesis,including modulation of innate immune system,inhibition of gut-liver axis and cell death pathways,and activation of transcription factor farnesyl X receptor (FXR).Future treatment may lie in human induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC)technology,which is currently under investigation for the study of pathogenesis,drug discovery,and stem cell transplantation.Liver transplantation has been reported with good results in highly selected patients but is controversial due to limited organ Suppply.

  4. Managing AVN following internal fixation: treatment options and clinical results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoskinson, Simon; Morison, Zachary; Shahrokhi, Shahram; Schemitsch, Emil H

    2015-03-01

    Avascular necrosis (AVN) after internal fixation of intracapsular hip fractures is a progressive multifactorial disease that ultimately results in local ischemia with ensuing osteocyte necrosis and structural compromise. This disease can cause significant clinical morbidity and affects patients of any age, including young and active patients. Effective treatment of this condition among young adults is challenging due to their high functional demands. The aim of managing AVN is to relieve pain, preserve range of movement and improve function. Treatment methods vary depending on the stage of the disease and can be broadly categorised into two options, hip preserving surgery and hip arthroplasty. Although, hip preserving techniques are attractive in the young adult, they may alter the morphology of the proximal femur and make subsequent arthroplasty more challenging. Conversely, arthroplasty in the young adult may require repeat revision procedures throughout the patient's life. Current evidence suggests that modifications of prevailing treatments, in addition to new technologies, have led to the development of management strategies that may be able to alter the course of femoral head osteonecrosis. This review aims to summarise the options available for treatment of AVN in the young adult and review the clinical results. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Fundamentals of functional imaging I: current clinical techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luna, A; Martín Noguerol, T; Mata, L Alcalá

    2018-05-01

    Imaging techniques can establish a structural, physiological, and molecular phenotype for cancer, which helps enable accurate diagnosis and personalized treatment. In recent years, various imaging techniques that make it possible to study the functional characteristics of tumors quantitatively and reproducibly have been introduced and have become established in routine clinical practice. Perfusion studies enable us to estimate the microcirculation as well as tumor angiogenesis and permeability using ultrafast dynamic acquisitions with ultrasound, computed tomography, or magnetic resonance (MR) imaging. Diffusion-weighted sequences now form part of state-of-the-art MR imaging protocols to evaluate oncologic lesions in any anatomic location. Diffusion-weighted imaging provides information about the occupation of the extracellular and extravascular space and indirectly estimates the cellularity and apoptosis of tumors, having demonstrated its relation with biologic aggressiveness in various tumor lines and its usefulness in the evaluation of the early response to systemic and local targeted therapies. Another tool is hydrogen proton MR spectroscopy, which is used mainly in the study of the metabolic characteristics of brain tumors. However, the complexity of the technique and its lack of reproducibility have limited its clinical use in other anatomic areas, although much experience with the use of this technique in the assessment of prostate and breast cancers as well as liver lesions has also accumulated. This review analyzes the imaging techniques that make it possible to evaluate the physiological and molecular characteristics of cancer that have already been introduced into clinical practice, such as techniques that evaluate angiogenesis through dynamic acquisitions after the administration of contrast material, diffusion-weighted imaging, or hydrogen proton MR spectroscopy, as well as their principal applications in oncology. Copyright © 2018 SERAM. Publicado

  6. [Current situation of clinical research on impacted premolars].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ran-Ran; Tian, Jun

    2018-04-01

    Teeth impaction is a common developmental malformation in oral diseases. Impacted teeth are usually the canines, third molar, central incisors, premolars, and second molars. The prevalence of impaction of maxillary canines and mandibular wisdom teeth is higher than that of other teeth. Most recent studies have focused on the canines and third molars, but research on impacted premolars is limited. In clinical practice, the majority of orthodontic patients require premolar extraction. Thus, impacted premolars play important roles in orthodontic design and prognosis. This article provides an overview of recent research on impacted premolars and summarizes epidemiological features, localizations, and treatments, with the aim of guiding practitioners on orthodontic design and therapy.

  7. Do diabetes-specialty clinics differ in management approach and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objectives: To evaluate management approach and outcome in two endocrinologist-managed clinics using data on treatment adherence, diabetes specific parameters, prescribed medications and self-management practices among ambulatory type 2 diabetes patients. Opinion on cause(s) and perceived fear about ...

  8. Diabetes quality management in care groups and outpatient clinics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Campmans-Kuijpers, M.J.E.

    2015-01-01

    This research project relates to diabetes quality management in Dutch care groups (40-200 GP practices) and outpatient clinics. Improvement of quality management at an organisational level on top of the existing quality management in separate general practices is expected to be associated with

  9. Clinical Parameters and Challenges of Managing Cervicofacial ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Introduction: Necrotizing fasciitis is a severe soft tissue infection. In our environment, patients presenting with this infection are usually financially incapacitated and, therefore, their management can be challenging. This paper aimed to document the pattern and challenges encountered in the management of cervicofacial ...

  10. Development of a CT simulator and its current clinical status

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagata, Yasushi; Hiraoka, Masahiro; Nishidai, Takehiro

    2000-01-01

    A computed tomography (CT) simulator is defined as a radiotherapy treatment planning (RTP) system which consists of an X-ray CT scanner, a treatment planning computer, and a marking projector. The developmental process from the introduction of an X-ray CT to a CT simulator is described in this article. After the development of the first CT simulator, several new developments in CT scanners, marking projector, and data transfer networks were introduced. CT simulator systems have recently become more widely available and are produced by more than 8 commercial companies. The advantages of a CT simulator are a shortening of overall RTP time, increased accuracy of RTP, and the possibility of 3-D conformal therapy. Clinical experience with CT simulators has accumulated over the past 10 years. Site-specific trials have been undertaken, and the clinical usefulness of CT simulators for breast cancer, maxillary cancer, nasopharyngeal cancer, orbital tumor, lung cancer and other tumors has been demonstrated. The use of CT simulators has resulted in a decrease in the complications of radiotherapy. It also appears to be an essential tool for dose escalation studies, which may permit increased local control of certain tumors. In Japan, CT simulators were in use at more than 134 (20%) of 682 radiotherapy institutions as of the end of 1998. In the USA, CT simulators were present in more than 12% of 1,542 radiotherapy centers in 1994. The CT simulator is now an essential RTP system for advanced radiotherapy. (author)

  11. [Clinical neuropsychology in perspective: future challenges based on current developments].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verdejo-García, Antonio; Tirapu-Ustárroz, Javier

    2012-02-01

    New lines of translational, interdisciplinary research are emerging among different fields of the neurosciences, which often point at clinical neuropsychology as the hinge discipline capable of linking the basic findings with their clinical implications and thereby endow them with some meaning for phenomenological experience. To establish the great lines of progress made in the fields of neuroscience and neuropsychology in recent years, so as to be able to foresee the strategic lines and priorities of neuroscience in the near future. To achieve this aim, the first step will be to identify the changes of paradigm that have taken place in the areas of neuroscience and psychology in the last two decades. The next step will be to propose new topics and fields of application that these changes in paradigm offer and demand from neuroscience. The false dichotomies of genes versus environment, mind versus brain, and reason versus emotion are considered, as are the new applications of neuropsychology to the understanding of psychopathological disorders, from the neurodegenerative to neurodevelopment, from 'dirty' drugs to cognitive and affective enhancers.

  12. Current trends in the management of Graves' disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Solomon, B.; Glinoer, D.; Lagasse, R.; Wartofsky, L. (Walter Reed Army Medical Center, Washington, DC (USA))

    1990-06-01

    Members of the American Thyroid Association were invited to participate in a survey of the management of Graves' disease. One primary case and several variations were provided, which differed in respect to age, sex, goiter size, severity, etc. The questionnaire was based on the format used in a similar survey of members of the European Thyroid Association. The aim of the survey was to determine (1) how expert thyroidologist employ diagnostic procedures for this disorder, and (2) the choice of therapy of the three treatment options and its manner of implementation. Questionnaires were sent only to clinically active members. The overall response rate was 62%. Data analysis was possible on 52% of members surveyed and was performed using SPSS and a specific Fortran program. In the laboratory evaluation of the primary case a radioiodine uptake, scan, serum total T4, and basal TSH were requested by 92%, 47%, 83%, and 66%, respectively, with 84% of respondents using an ultrasensitive TSH assay. For management of the primary case, radioiodine treatment was the first choice of 69% of the respondents. Antithyroid drugs were used briefly (3-7 days) before 131I by 28%, whereas 41% said they would employ thioureas after 131I. Of those using 131I, 66% tailored the dose to achieve euthyroidism as the goal of therapy, while 34% aimed for hypothyroidism requiring T4 replacement. Only 30% of respondents chose thioureas as a first line of treatment (72% propylthiouracil; 28% tapazole). The duration of drug therapy was a predetermined fixed interval for 80% of the respondents, with 90% treating for 1-2 yr. Other specific trends in diagnostic approach and therapeutic preferences were identified for the eight variations on the primary case problem.

  13. [Current status and clinical application prospect of Akabane's test].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wenjie; Du, Yanjun

    2016-06-12

    The Akabane's test is one of the meridian diagnostic methods. Compared with the current meridian diagnostic methods, it has the advantages of convenience and efficiency, but it also has several disadvantages such as the accuracy is difficult to control, the outcome interpretation is limited, etc. In this paper, the influence factors of Akabane's test were analyzed one by one, especially proposed personal opinion on outcome interpretation, which could ascertain the location and nature of disease, leading to disease syndrome. With accurate syndrome, the treatment plan could be established. The application prospect of Akabane's test was initially explored, and it was proposed that wearable automation equipment could be one of the development directions.

  14. Health Management Information System in Private Clinics in Ilorin ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This descriptive survey was conducted among private clinics located in Ilorin, Kwara State, Nigeria to determine the awareness and level of involvement of private clinic operators towards the National Health Management Information System. A total of 37 functional clinics responded to the survey. Structured questionnaire ...

  15. Technological advances in perioperative monitoring: Current concepts and clinical perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chilkoti, Geetanjali; Wadhwa, Rachna; Saxena, Ashok Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Minimal mandatory monitoring in the perioperative period recommended by Association of Anesthetists of Great Britain and Ireland and American Society of Anesthesiologists are universally acknowledged and has become an integral part of the anesthesia practice. The technologies in perioperative monitoring have advanced, and the availability and clinical applications have multiplied exponentially. Newer monitoring techniques include depth of anesthesia monitoring, goal-directed fluid therapy, transesophageal echocardiography, advanced neurological monitoring, improved alarm system and technological advancement in objective pain assessment. Various factors that need to be considered with the use of improved monitoring techniques are their validation data, patient outcome, safety profile, cost-effectiveness, awareness of the possible adverse events, knowledge of technical principle and ability of the convenient routine handling. In this review, we will discuss the new monitoring techniques in anesthesia, their advantages, deficiencies, limitations, their comparison to the conventional methods and their effect on patient outcome, if any.

  16. Current management of diabetes mellitus and future directions in care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatterjee, Sudesna; Davies, Melanie J

    2015-11-01

    The last 90 years have seen considerable advances in the management of type 1 and type 2 diabetes. Prof MacLean of Guy's Hospital wrote in the Postgraduate Medical Journal in 1926 about the numerous challenges that faced patients and their healthcare professionals in delivering safe and effective diabetes care at that time. The discovery of insulin in 1922 heralded a new age in enabling long-term glycaemic control, which reduced morbidity and mortality. Thirty years later, the first oral agents for diabetes, the biguanides and sulfonylureas, appeared and freed type 2 patients from having to inject insulin following diagnosis. Improvements in insulin formulations over the decades, including rapid-acting and long-acting insulin analogues that more closely mimic physiological insulin secretion, have increased the flexibility and efficacy of type 1 diabetes management. The last two decades have seen major advances in technology, which has manifested in more accurate glucose monitoring systems and insulin delivery devices ('insulin pump'). Increased understanding of the pathophysiological deficits underlying type 2 diabetes has led to the development of targeted therapeutic approaches such as on the small intestine (glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor analogues and dipeptidyl-peptidase IV inhibitors) and kidneys (sodium-glucose cotransporter-2 inhibitors). A patient-centred approach delivered by a multidisciplinary team is now advocated. Glycaemic targets are set according to individual circumstances, taking into account factors such as weight, hypoglycaemia risk and patient preference. Stepwise treatment guidelines devised by international diabetes organisations standardise and rationalise management. Structured education programmes and psychological support are now well-established as essential for improving patient motivation and self-empowerment. Large multicentre randomised trials have confirmed the effectiveness of intensive glycaemic control on microvascular

  17. Management of Pediatric Delirium in Pediatric Cardiac Intensive Care Patients: An International Survey of Current Practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staveski, Sandra L; Pickler, Rita H; Lin, Li; Shaw, Richard J; Meinzen-Derr, Jareen; Redington, Andrew; Curley, Martha A Q

    2018-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe how pediatric cardiac intensive care clinicians assess and manage delirium in patients following cardiac surgery. Descriptive self-report survey. A web-based survey of pediatric cardiac intensive care clinicians who are members of the Pediatric Cardiac Intensive Care Society. Pediatric cardiac intensive care clinicians (physicians and nurses). None. One-hundred seventy-three clinicians practicing in 71 different institutions located in 13 countries completed the survey. Respondents described their clinical impression of the occurrence of delirium to be approximately 25%. Most respondents (75%) reported that their ICU does not routinely screen for delirium. Over half of the respondents (61%) have never attended a lecture on delirium. The majority of respondents (86%) were not satisfied with current delirium screening, diagnosis, and management practices. Promotion of day/night cycle, exposure to natural light, deintensification of care, sleep hygiene, and reorientation to prevent or manage delirium were among nonpharmacologic interventions reported along with the use of anxiolytic, antipsychotic, and medications for insomnia. Clinicians responding to the survey reported a range of delirium assessment and management practices in postoperative pediatric cardiac surgery patients. Study results highlight the need for improvement in delirium education for pediatric cardiac intensive care clinicians as well as the need for systematic evaluation of current delirium assessment and management practices.

  18. Emergency room management of ureteral calculi: current practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Elizabeth; Kieley, Sam; Johnson, Elizabeth B; Monga, Manoj

    2009-06-01

    To evaluate current practice patterns in U.S. emergency departments (EDs) for the diagnosis, treatment, and counseling of patients with ureteral calculi. Hospital-based ED physicians were invited by e-mail to participate in a Survey-Monkey survey. E-mails were delivered in March 2008 by Direct Medical Data using a listserv provided by the American Medical Association. Of the e-mails sent, 173 e-mails were opened, and 135 physicians responded. Physicians were compensated with a $10 Amazon.com gift card. Ninety percent of ED physicians use noncontrast CT as their initial imaging modality, and 63% use alpha-blockers for medical expulsive therapy. Only 13% of evaluated EDs have guidelines for the management of renal colic, and only 58% of these guidelines that recommend the use of an alpha-blocker. Alpha-blocker use was more common with physicians who have been practicing fewer than 5 years (81%) compared with those with more than 10 years of experience (56%). The majority of physicians used ketorolac and morphine to achieve effective analgesia. Although the average responses concerning the chance of spontaneous stone passage for stones 4 mm (44%) were close to evidence-based values, great variation in the answers was noted (standard deviations: 12% and 22%, respectively). Indeed, 38% of respondents stated that stones 95% chance of passage. Twenty-eight percent of ED physicians would arrange follow-up with a primary care physician, while the remainder would arrange follow-up with a urologist. This study establishes a need for educational opportunities for ED physicians in the management of renal colic. The development of collaborative practice guidelines between urology and emergency medicine associations may be warranted.

  19. Craniofacial fibrous dysplasia - A review of current management techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yadavalli Guruprasad

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Fibrous dysplasia is a pathologic condition of bone of unknown etiology with no apparent familial, hereditary or congenital basis. Lichtenstein first coined the term in 1938 and in 1942 he and Jaffe separated it from other fibro-osseous lesions. It is a bone tumor that, although benign, has the potential to cause significant cosmetic and functional disturbance, particularly in the craniofacial skeleton. Its management poses significant challenges to the surgeon. Craniofacial fibrous dysplasia is 1 of 3 types of fibrous dysplasia that can affect the bones of the craniofacial complex, including the mandible and maxilla. Fibrous dysplasia is a skeletal developmental disorder of the bone-forming mesenchyme that manifests as a defect in osteoblastic differentiation and maturation. It is a lesion of unknown etiology, uncertain pathogenesis, and diverse histopathology. Fibrous dysplasia represents about 2, 5% of all bone tumors and over 7% of all benign tumours. Over the years, we have gained a better understanding of its etiology, clinical behavior, and both surgical and non-surgical treatments.

  20. Current Therapeutic Cannabis Controversies and Clinical Trial Design Issues.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ethan Budd Russo

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available This overview covers a wide range of cannabis topics, initially examining issue in dispensaries and self-administration, plus regulatory requirement for production of cannabis-based medicines, particularly the Food and Drug Administration Botanical Guidance. The remainder pertains to various cannabis controversies that certainly require closer examination if the scientific, consumer and governmental stakeholders are ever to reach consensus on safety issues, specifically: whether botanical cannabis displays herbal synergy of its components, pharmacokinetics of cannabis and dose titration, whether cannabis medicines produce cyclo-oxygenase inhibition, cannabis-drug interactions and cytochrome P450 issues, whether cannabis randomized clinical trials are properly blinded, combatting the placebo effect in those trials via new approaches, the drug abuse liability of cannabis-based medicines and their regulatory scheduling, their effects on cognitive function and psychiatric sequelae, immunological effects, cannabis and driving safety, youth usage, issues related to cannabis smoking and vaporization, cannabis concentrates and vape-pens, and laboratory analysis for contamination with bacteria and heavy metals. Finally, the issue of pesticide usage on cannabis crops is addressed. New and disturbing data on pesticide residues in legal cannabis products in Washington State are presented with the observation of an 84.6% contamination rate including potentially neurotoxic and carcinogenic agents. With ongoing developments in legalization of cannabis in medical and recreational settings, numerous scientific, safety and public health issues remain.

  1. Current Therapeutic Cannabis Controversies and Clinical Trial Design Issues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russo, Ethan B.

    2016-01-01

    This overview covers a wide range of cannabis topics, initially examining issues in dispensaries and self-administration, plus regulatory requirements for production of cannabis-based medicines, particularly the Food and Drug Administration “Botanical Guidance.” The remainder pertains to various cannabis controversies that certainly require closer examination if the scientific, consumer, and governmental stakeholders are ever to reach consensus on safety issues, specifically: whether botanical cannabis displays herbal synergy of its components, pharmacokinetics of cannabis and dose titration, whether cannabis medicines produce cyclo-oxygenase inhibition, cannabis-drug interactions, and cytochrome P450 issues, whether cannabis randomized clinical trials are properly blinded, combatting the placebo effect in those trials via new approaches, the drug abuse liability (DAL) of cannabis-based medicines and their regulatory scheduling, their effects on cognitive function and psychiatric sequelae, immunological effects, cannabis and driving safety, youth usage, issues related to cannabis smoking and vaporization, cannabis concentrates and vape-pens, and laboratory analysis for contamination with bacteria and heavy metals. Finally, the issue of pesticide usage on cannabis crops is addressed. New and disturbing data on pesticide residues in legal cannabis products in Washington State are presented with the observation of an 84.6% contamination rate including potentially neurotoxic and carcinogenic agents. With ongoing developments in legalization of cannabis in medical and recreational settings, numerous scientific, safety, and public health issues remain. PMID:27683558

  2. Current and past strategies for bacterial culture in clinical microbiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lagier, Jean-Christophe; Edouard, Sophie; Pagnier, Isabelle; Mediannikov, Oleg; Drancourt, Michel; Raoult, Didier

    2015-01-01

    A pure bacterial culture remains essential for the study of its virulence, its antibiotic susceptibility, and its genome sequence in order to facilitate the understanding and treatment of caused diseases. The first culture conditions empirically varied incubation time, nutrients, atmosphere, and temperature; culture was then gradually abandoned in favor of molecular methods. The rebirth of culture in clinical microbiology was prompted by microbiologists specializing in intracellular bacteria. The shell vial procedure allowed the culture of new species of Rickettsia. The design of axenic media for growing fastidious bacteria such as Tropheryma whipplei and Coxiella burnetii and the ability of amoebal coculture to discover new bacteria constituted major advances. Strong efforts associating optimized culture media, detection methods, and a microaerophilic atmosphere allowed a dramatic decrease of the time of Mycobacterium tuberculosis culture. The use of a new versatile medium allowed an extension of the repertoire of archaea. Finally, to optimize the culture of anaerobes in routine bacteriology laboratories, the addition of antioxidants in culture media under an aerobic atmosphere allowed the growth of strictly anaerobic species. Nevertheless, among usual bacterial pathogens, the development of axenic media for the culture of Treponema pallidum or Mycobacterium leprae remains an important challenge that the patience and innovations of cultivators will enable them to overcome. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  3. Clinical Characteristics and Current Therapies for Inherited Retinal Degenerations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahel, José-Alain; Marazova, Katia; Audo, Isabelle

    2015-01-01

    Inherited retinal degenerations (IRDs) encompass a large group of clinically and genetically heterogeneous diseases that affect approximately 1 in 3000 people (>2 million people worldwide) (Bessant DA, Ali RR, Bhattacharya SS. 2001. Molecular genetics and prospects for therapy of the inherited retinal dystrophies. Curr Opin Genet Dev 11: 307–316.). IRDs may be inherited as Mendelian traits or through mitochondrial DNA, and may affect the entire retina (e.g., rod–cone dystrophy, also known as retinitis pigmentosa, cone dystrophy, cone–rod dystrophy, choroideremia, Usher syndrome, and Bardet-Bidel syndrome) or be restricted to the macula (e.g., Stargardt disease, Best disease, and Sorsby fundus dystrophy), ultimately leading to blindness. IRDs are a major cause of severe vision loss, with profound impact on patients and society. Although IRDs remain untreatable today, significant progress toward therapeutic strategies for IRDs has marked the past two decades. This progress has been based on better understanding of the pathophysiological pathways of these diseases and on technological advances. PMID:25324231

  4. The relationship between patient data and pooled clinical management decisions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ludbrook, G I; O'Loughlin, E J; Corcoran, T B; Grant, C

    2013-01-01

    A strong relationship between patient data and preoperative clinical decisions could potentially be used to support clinical decisions in preoperative management. The aim of this exploratory study was to determine the relationship between key patient data and pooled clinical opinions on management. In a previous study, panels of anaesthetists compared the quality of computer-assisted patient health assessments with outpatient consultations and made decisions on the need for preoperative tests, no preoperative outpatient assessment, possible postoperative intensive care unit/high dependency unit requirements and aspiration prophylaxis. In the current study, the relationship between patient data and these decisions was examined using binomial logistic regression analysis. Backward stepwise regression was used to identify independent predictors of each decision (at P >0.15), which were then incorporated into a predictive model. The number of factors related to each decision varied: blood picture (four factors), biochemistry (six factors), coagulation studies (three factors), electrocardiography (eight factors), chest X-ray (seven factors), preoperative outpatient assessment (17 factors), intensive care unit requirement (eight factors) and aspiration prophylaxis (one factor). The factor types also varied, but included surgical complexity, age, gender, number of medications or comorbidities, body mass index, hypertension, central nervous system condition, heart disease, sleep apnoea, smoking, persistent pain and stroke. Models based on these relationships usually demonstrated good sensitivity and specificity, with receiver operating characteristics in the following areas under curve: blood picture (0.75), biochemistry (0.86), coagulation studies (0.71), electrocardiography (0.90), chest X-ray (0.85), outpatient assessment (0.85), postoperative intensive care unit requirement (0.88) and aspiration prophylaxis (0.85). These initial results suggest modelling of patient

  5. Sports-related concussions: diagnosis, complications, and current management strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hobbs, Jonathan G; Young, Jacob S; Bailes, Julian E

    2016-04-01

    Sports-related concussions (SRCs) are traumatic events that affect up to 3.8 million athletes per year. The initial diagnosis and management is often instituted on the field of play by coaches, athletic trainers, and team physicians. SRCs are usually transient episodes of neurological dysfunction following a traumatic impact, with most symptoms resolving in 7-10 days; however, a small percentage of patients will suffer protracted symptoms for years after the event and may develop chronic neurodegenerative disease. Rarely, SRCs are associated with complications, such as skull fractures, epidural or subdural hematomas, and edema requiring neurosurgical evaluation. Current standards of care are based on a paradigm of rest and gradual return to play, with decisions driven by subjective and objective information gleaned from a detailed history and physical examination. Advanced imaging techniques such as functional MRI, and detailed understanding of the complex pathophysiological process underlying SRCs and how they affect the athletes acutely and long-term, may change the way physicians treat athletes who suffer a concussion. It is hoped that these advances will allow a more accurate assessment of when an athlete is truly safe to return to play, decreasing the risk of secondary impact injuries, and provide avenues for therapeutic strategies targeting the complex biochemical cascade that results from a traumatic injury to the brain.

  6. Current trends in the cardiovascular clinical trial arena (I

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pater Cornel

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The existence of effective therapies for most cardiovascular disease states, coupled with increased requirements that potential benefits of new drugs be evaluated on clinical rather than surrogate endpoints, makes it increasingly difficult to substantiate any incremental improvements in efficacy that these new drugs might offer. Compounding the problem is the highly controversial issue of comparing new agents with placebos rather than active pharmaceuticals in drug efficacy trials. Despite the recent consensus that placebos may be used ethically in well-defined, justifiable circumstances, the problem persists, in part because of increased scrutiny by ethics committees but also because of considerable lingering disagreement regarding the propriety and scientific value of placebo-controlled trials (and trials of antihypertensive drugs in particular. The disagreement also substantially affects the most viable alternative to placebo-controlled trials: actively controlled equivalence/noninferiority trials. To a great extent, this situation was prompted by numerous previous trials of this type that were marked by fundamental methodological flaws and consequent false claims, inconsistencies, and potential harm to patients. As the development and use of generic drugs continue to escalate, along with concurrent pressure to control medical costs by substituting less-expensive therapies for established ones, any claim that a new drug, intervention, or therapy is "equivalent" to another should not be accepted without close scrutiny. Adherence to proper methods in conducting studies of equivalence will help investigators to avoid false claims and inconsistencies. These matters will be addressed in the third article of this three-part series.

  7. Autoimmune liver serology: current diagnostic and clinical challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogdanos, Dimitrios-P; Invernizzi, Pietro; Mackay, Ian-R; Vergani, Diego

    2008-06-07

    Liver-related autoantibodies are crucial for the correct diagnosis and classification of autoimmune liver diseases (AiLD), namely autoimmune hepatitis types 1 and 2 (AIH-1 and 2), primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC), and the sclerosing cholangitis variants in adults and children. AIH-1 is specified by anti-nuclear antibody (ANA) and smooth muscle antibody (SMA). AIH-2 is specified by antibody to liver kidney microsomal antigen type-1 (anti-LKM1) and anti-liver cytosol type 1 (anti-LC1). SMA, ANA and anti-LKM antibodies can be present in de-novo AIH following liver transplantation. PBC is specified by antimitochondrial antibodies (AMA) reacting with enzymes of the 2-oxo-acid dehydrogenase complexes (chiefly pyruvate dehydrogenase complex E2 subunit) and disease-specific ANA mainly reacting with nuclear pore gp210 and nuclear body sp100. Sclerosing cholangitis presents as at least two variants, first the classical primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC) mostly affecting adult men wherein the only (and non-specific) reactivity is an atypical perinuclear antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibody (p-ANCA), also termed perinuclear anti-neutrophil nuclear antibodies (p-ANNA) and second the childhood disease called autoimmune sclerosing cholangitis (ASC) with serological features resembling those of type 1 AIH. Liver diagnostic serology is a fast-expanding area of investigation as new purified and recombinant autoantigens, and automated technologies such as ELISAs and bead assays, become available to complement (or even compete with) traditional immunofluorescence procedures. We survey for the first time global trends in quality assurance impacting as it does on (1) manufacturers/purveyors of kits and reagents, (2) diagnostic service laboratories that fulfill clinicians' requirements, and (3) the end-user, the physician providing patient care, who must properly interpret test results in the overall clinical context.

  8. Evaluation Apprehension and Impression Management in Clinical Medical Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGaghie, William C

    2018-05-01

    Historically, clinical medical education has relied on subjective evaluations of students and residents to judge their clinical competence. The uncertainty associated with these subjective clinical evaluations has produced evaluation apprehension among learners and attempts to manage one's professional persona (impression management) among peers and supervisors. Such behavior has been documented from antiquity through the Middle Ages to the present, including in two new qualitative studies in this issue of Academic Medicine on the social psychology of clinical medical education. New approaches to medical education, including competency-based education, mastery learning, and assessment methods that unite evaluation and education, are slowly changing the culture of clinical medical education. The author of this Invited Commentary argues that this shift will bring greater transparency and accountability to clinical medical education and gradually reduce evaluation apprehension and the impression management motives it produces.

  9. Clinical manifestations and managements in jellyfish envenomation A systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Negar Taheri

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: The phylum Cnidarians have over nine thousand species that approximately, one hundred species are dangerous for humans. Annually, a large number of deaths were reported due to jellyfish stings. The manifestations depend on their species and kind of venoms, and include the local and systemic manifestations. A number of methods and compounds were used and under investigation for management of injuries with jellyfishes. Due to the lack of an integrated systematic review, the current study was done. Materials and Methods: The PubMed data bank was searched for the term “Jellyfish”. A total of 1677 papers were found. These papers were divided into three categories: medical, biomedical and biotechnological fields. The medical category was further divided into three subcategories comprising systemic manifestations, cutaneous manifestations and treatments for the stings of jellyfishes. The biomedical category was further subdivided into genomics, proteomics, and biology of venoms, mechanisms of actions and products of biomedical significance. In this part of systematic review, the medical aspects of injuries with jellyfishes were evaluated. Results: The clinical manifestations in jellyfish envenomation depend on their species and the nature of venoms. The most common clinical manifestations of jellyfish stings are cutaneous presentations like urticasia, erythema, swelling, vesicles and severe dermonectoric manifestations. Systemic manifestations were seen in the stings of box jellyfishes, Portuguese man-of-war and in Irukandji syndrome. The most common recommendations for jellyfish envenomation managements include decreasing the local effects of venom, prevention of the venomous nematocysts release, and Controlling of systemic reactions. Application of commercial vinegar (4 - 6% acetic acid, hot water immersion (HWI (42 ° C for 20 minutes, ice packs, sea water rinsing for inactivating nematocysts, administration of topical and parenteral

  10. Dengue fever outbreak: a clinical management experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmed, S.; Illyas, M.

    2008-01-01

    To determine the frequency of dengue as a cause of fever and compare the clinical and haematological characteristics of Dengue-probable and Dengue-proven cases. All patients with age above 14 years, who were either hospitalized or treated in medical outdoor clinic due to acute febrile illness, were evaluated for clinical features of Dengue Fever (DF), Dengue haemorrhagic fever (DHF) and Dengue Shock Syndrome (DSS). Patients showing typical clinical features and haematological findings suggestive of Dengue fever (As per WHO criteria) were evaluated in detail for comparison of probable and confirmed cases of Dengue fever. All other cases of acute febrile illness, not showing clinical features or haematological abnormalities of Dengue fever, were excluded. The clinical and laboratory features were recorded on SPSS 11.0 programme and graded where required, for descriptive and statistical analysis. Out of 5200 patients with febrile illness, 107 (2%) presented with typical features of DF, 40/107 (37%) were Dengue-proven while 67/107 (63%) were Dengue-probable. Out of Dengue-proven cases, 38 were of DF and 2 were of DHF. Day 1 temperature ranged from 99-105 degreeC (mean 101 degree C). Chills and rigors were noticed in 86 (80%), myalgia in 67%, headache in 54%, pharyngitis in 35%, rash in 28%, and bleeding manifestations in 2% cases. Hepatomegaly in 1(0.5%), lymphadenopathy in 1 (0.5%) and splenomegaly in 12 (11.2%) cases. Leucopoenia (count 40 U/L in 57% cases. Frequency of clinically suspected dengue virus infection was 107 (2%), while confirmed dengue fever cases were 40 (0.8%) out of 5200 fever cases. Fever with chills and rigors, body aches, headache, myalgia, rash, haemorrhagic manifestations, platelet count, total leukocyte count, and ALT, are parameters to screen the cases of suspected dengue virus infection, the diagnosis cannot be confirmed unless supported by molecular studies or dengue specific IgM. (author)

  11. Current problems regarding abortion, prenatal genetic testing and managing pregnancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Klajn-Tatić Vesna

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Current ethical and legal issues with regard to abortion, prenatal genetic testing and managing pregnancy are discussed in this paper. These problems are considered from the legal theory point of view as well as from the standpoint of the Serbian Law, the European Convention for the Protection of Human Rights and Fundamental Freedoms, European Court of Human Rights, legal regulations of several EU countries, the USA, Japan, and their judicial practice. First, the pregnancy termination standards that exist in Serbia are introduced. Then the following issues are explained separately: the pro life and pro choice approaches to abortion; abortion according to the legal approach as a way of survival; the moral and legal status of the fetus; prenatal genetic testing, and finally matters regarding managing pregnancy today. Moral and legal principals of autonomy, namely freedom of choice of the individual, privacy and self-determination give women the right to terminate unwanted pregnancies. In addition, the basic question is whether the right of the woman to abortion clashes with the rights of others. Firstly, with the right of the "fetus to life". Secondly, with the right of the state to intervene in the interest of protecting "the life of the fetus". Third, with the rights of the woman’s partner. The fetus has the moral right to life, but less in relation to the same right of the woman as well as in relation to her right to control her life and her physical and moral integrity. On the other hand, the value of the life of the fetus increases morally and legally with the maturity of gestation; from the third trimester, the interest of the state prevails in the protection of the "life of the fetus" except when the life or health of the pregnant woman are at risk. As regards the rights of the woman’s partner, namely the husband’s opinion, there is no legal significance. The law does not request his participation in the decision on abortion because

  12. Cervical spondylotic myelopathy: the clinical phenomenon and the current pathobiology of an increasingly prevalent and devastating disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalsi-Ryan, Sukhvinder; Karadimas, Spyridon K; Fehlings, Michael G

    2013-08-01

    Cervical spondylotic myelopathy (CSM) is a common disorder involving chronic progressive compression of the cervical spinal cord due to degenerative disc disease, spondylosis, or other degenerative pathology. CSM is the most common form of spinal cord impairment and causes functional decline leading to reduced independence and quality of life. Despite a sound understanding of the disease process, clinical presentation and management, a universal definition of CSM and a standardized index of severity are not currently used universally. Work is required to develop a definition and establish clinical predictors of progression to improve management of CSM. Despite advances in decompressive and reconstructive surgery, patients are often left with residual disability. Gaps in knowledge of the pathobiology of CSM have limited therapeutic advances to complement surgery. Although the histopathologic and pathophysiologic similarities between CSM and traumatic spinal cord injury have long been acknowledged, the unique pathomechanisms of CSM remain unexplored. Increased efforts to elucidate CSM pathobiology could lead to the discovery of novel therapeutic targets for human CSM and other spinal cord diseases. Here, the natural history of CSM, epidemiology, clinical presentation, and current methods of clinical management are reported, along with the current state of basic scientific research in the field.

  13. Corporate visual identity management: current practices, impact, and assessment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Bosch, A.L.M.

    2005-01-01

    This dissertation is about Corporate Visual Identity (CVI) management. Its purpose is to gain more insight into activities associated with managing CVI and the impact of these activities on the outcome: the degree of consistency in CVI.

  14. Treatment of Thrombotic Antiphospholipid Syndrome: The Rationale of Current Management-An Insight into Future Approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chighizola, Cecilia Beatrice; Ubiali, Tania; Meroni, Pier Luigi

    2015-01-01

    Vascular thrombosis and pregnancy morbidity represent the clinical manifestations of antiphospholipid syndrome (APS), which is serologically characterized by the persistent positivity of antiphospholipid antibodies (aPL). Antiplatelet and anticoagulant agents currently provide the mainstay of APS treatment. However, the debate is still open: controversies involve the intensity and the duration of anticoagulation and the treatment of stroke and refractory cases. Unfortunately, the literature cannot provide definite answers to these controversial issues as it is flawed by many limitations, mainly due to the recruitment of patients not fulfilling laboratory and clinical criteria for APS. The recommended therapeutic management of different aPL-related clinical manifestations is hereby presented, with a critical appraisal of the evidence supporting such approaches. Cutting edge therapeutic strategies are also discussed, presenting the pioneer reports about the efficacy of novel pharmacological agents in APS. Thanks to a better understanding of aPL pathogenic mechanisms, new therapeutic targets will soon be explored. Much work is still to be done to unravel the most controversial issues about APS management: future studies are warranted to define the optimal management according to aPL risk profile and to assess the impact of a strict control of cardiovascular risk factors on disease control.

  15. The clinical management of awake bruxism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldstein, Ronald E; Auclair Clark, Wendy

    2017-06-01

    Awake bruxism is a common clinical condition that often goes undetected, often leading to pain or damaged teeth and restorations. The authors searched electronic databases regarding the treatment and effects of awake bruxism compared with those of sleep bruxism. The authors used the search terms diurnal bruxism and oral parafunction. The authors combined information from relevant literature with clinical experience to establish a recommended protocol for diagnosis and treatment. The authors found articles regarding the diagnosis and treatment of bruxism. The authors combined information from the articles with a review of clinical cases to establish a treatment protocol for awake bruxism. Literature and clinical experience indicate a lack of patient awareness and, thus, underreporting of awake bruxism. As a result, myriad dental consequences can occur from bruxism. The authors propose a need for increased awareness, for both patients and professionals, particularly of the number of conditions related to awake bruxism. Clinicians should look for clinical signs and symptoms of awake bruxism and use minimally invasive treatment modalities. Copyright © 2017 American Dental Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. [Pain care in Austrian health care centers: Questionnaire study on the current status of Austrian pain clinics].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szilagyi, I-S; Bornemann-Cimenti, H; Messerer, B; Vittinghoff, M; Sandner-Kiesling, A

    2015-12-01

    Pain clinics provide interdisciplinary therapy to treat chronic pain patients and to increase the return-to-work rate. In recent years and due to increased economic pressure in health care, a change in the management of pain in Austrian health care centers has been observed. For the analysis of the current situation, two surveys addressing all Austrian pain clinics were performed. In total, 133 heads of Austrian Anesthesia Departments were interviewed online and personally. The data from the first interview were confirmed by an additional telephone survey that was performed by one anesthetist per Austrian state (n = 9). Currently, 44 Austrian pain clinics are active. During the last 5 years, 9 pain clinics closed. Adding the current active pain clinics together, they represent a total of 17.5 full-time-operated clinics. The most common reasons for closing the pain clinics were lack of personnel (47%), lack of time resources (26%), lack of space resources (11%), and financial difficulties (11%). A reduction of >50% of operating hours during the last 3 years was reported by 9 hospitals. The reasons for not running a pain clinic were lack of personnel (36%), lack of time (25%) and department too small (16%). Estimates between actual and required clinics indicate that 49.5 full-time-operating pain clinics are lacking in Austria, resulting in 74% of the Austrian chronic pain patients not receiving interdisciplinary pain management. Our survey confirmed the closure of 9 pain clinics during the last 5 years due to lack of personnel and time. Pain clinics appear to provide the simplest economic saving potential. This development is a major concern. Although running a pain clinic seems to be expensive at the first sight, it reduces pain, sick leave, complications, and potential legal issues against health care centers, while simultaneously increasing the hospital's competitiveness. Our results show that 74% of Austrian chronic pain patients do not have access to an

  17. Transforming Research Management Systems at Mayo Clinic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Steven C.; Gronseth, Darren L.

    2011-01-01

    In order for research programs at academic medical centers and universities to survive and thrive in the increasingly challenging economic, political and regulatory environment, successful transformation is extremely important. Transformation and quality management techniques are increasingly well established in medical practice organizations. In…

  18. Bipolar disorder and complementary medicine: current evidence, safety issues, and clinical considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarris, Jerome; Lake, James; Hoenders, Rogier

    2011-10-01

    Bipolar disorder (BD) is a debilitating syndrome that is often undiagnosed and undertreated. Population surveys show that persons with BD often self-medicate with complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) or integrative therapies in spite of limited research evidence supporting their use. To date, no review has focused specifically on nonconventional treatments of BD. The study objectives were to present a review of nonconventional (complementary and integrative) interventions examined in clinical trials on BD, and to offer provisional guidelines for the judicious integrative use of CAM in the management of BD. PubMed, CINAHL,(®) Web of Science, and Cochrane Library databases were searched for human clinical trials in English during mid-2010 using Bipolar Disorder and CAM therapy and CAM medicine search terms. Effect sizes (Cohen's d) were also calculated where data were available. Several positive high-quality studies on nutrients in combination with conventional mood stabilizers and antipsychotic medications in BD depression were identified, while branched-chain amino acids and magnesium were effective (small studies) in attenuating mania in BD. In the treatment of bipolar depression, evidence was mixed regarding omega-3, while isolated studies provide provisional support for a multinutrient formula, n-acetylcysteine, and l-tryptophan. In one study, acupuncture was found to have favorable but nonsignificant effects on mania and depression outcomes. Current evidence supports the integrative treatment of BD using combinations of mood stabilizers and select nutrients. Other CAM or integrative modalities used to treat BD have not been adequately explored to date; however, some early findings are promising. Select CAM and integrative interventions add to established conventional treatment of BD and may be considered when formulating a treatment plan. It is hoped that the safety issues and clinical considerations addressed in this article may encourage the practice

  19. Landscape of current and emerging cell therapy clinical trials in the UK: current status, comparison to global trends and future perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bisson, Isabelle; Green, Emma; Sharpe, Michaela; Herbert, Chris; Hyllner, Johan; Mount, Natalie

    2015-01-01

    Cell Therapy Clinical Trial and Preclinical Research databases have been established by the Cell Therapy Catapult to document current and future cell therapy clinical trials in the UK. We identified 41 ongoing trials in April 2014, an increase of seven trials from April 2013. In addition, we identified 45 late-stage preclinical research projects. The majority of the clinical trials are early phase, primarily led by academic groups. The leading therapeutic areas are cancer, cardiology and neurology. The trends in the UK are also seen globally. As the field matures, more later phase and commercial studies will emerge and the challenges will likely evolve into how to manufacture sufficient cell quantities, manage complex logistics for multi-center trials and control cost.

  20. PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION: MODERNIZING THE CURRENT MODEL OF STATE MANAGEMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evgenii V. Ohotskii

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Applying the method of retrospective analysis the article deals with the process of forming the scientific fundamentals and the search by the international community of effective and adequate to the current stage of social development public administration system. The author attempts to analyze, in a number of cases in terms of models, features of public administration systems at different stages of historical development, drawing attention to reasons why the Soviet model of public administration did not manage to meet competition, did not provide the required social effect and as a natural result suffered a defeat in the global confrontation between the two social systems. Current models and theoretical concepts of public administration, especially the "new public administration", which became scientific basis for administrative reforms implemented in many countries, are the particular subject of scientific analysis. The author draws attention to major comprehensive characteristics of modern state public administration: making it impossible to absolutize principles of traditional hierarchy system of forced administration; globalization - gradual destruction of boundaries between national and international levels of administration, the growing role of supranational subjects of administration relations; informatization - increasing importance of information and communication technologies and of political networks: development of civil society, especially political parties and non-governmental organizations, growing public involvement in discussion and adoption of the most important administrative decisions; making the state policy more pluralistic and which will result in the formation of nonlinear - humanistic social consciousness as the intellectual basis of modern social governance. The author's position is that Russia is yet to solve the issue of choosing a public administration model that would be effective for further administrative

  1. Subdural Empyema: Clinical Presentations and Management ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2017-12-05

    Dec 5, 2017 ... 2017 Nigerian Journal of Clinical Practice | Published by Wolters Kluwer ‑ Medknow. Original Article. Background: Controversy .... Nigeria – Memfys Hospital for Neurosurgery and. University of Nigeria Teaching ... The surgical evacuation methods used were BAAD of the abscess cavity and craniotomy.

  2. Dengue fever outbreak: a clinical management experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Shahid; Ali, Nadir; Ashraf, Shahzad; Ilyas, Mohammad; Tariq, Waheed-Uz-Zaman; Chotani, Rashid A

    2008-01-01

    To determine the frequency of dengue as a cause of fever and compare the clinical and haematological characteristics of Dengue-probable and Dengue-proven cases. An observational study. The Combined Military Hospital, Malir Cantt., Karachi, from August 2005 to December 2006. All patients with age above 14 years, who were either hospitalized or treated in medical outdoor clinic due to acute febrile illness, were evaluated for clinical features of Dengue Fever (DF), Dengue haemorrhagic fever (DHF) and Dengue Shock Syndrome (DSS). Patients showing typical clinical features and haematological findings suggestive of Dengue fever (As per WHO criteria) were evaluated in detail for comparison of probable and confirmed cases of Dengue fever. All other cases of acute febrile illness, not showing clinical features or haematological abnormalities of Dengue fever, were excluded. The clinical and laboratory features were recorded on SPSS 11.0 programme and graded where required, for descriptive and statistical analysis. Out of 5200 patients with febrile illness, 107(2%) presented with typical features of DF, 40/107(37%) were Dengue-proven while 67/107(63%) were Dengue-probable. Out of Dengue-proven cases, 38 were of DF and 2 were of DHF. Day 1 temperature ranged from 99-1050C (mean 1010C). Chills and rigors were noticed in 86 (80%), myalgia in 67%, headache in 54%, pharyngitis in 35%, rash in 28%, and bleeding manifestations in 2% cases. Hepatomegaly in 1(0.5%), lymphadenopathy in 1(0.5%) and splenomegaly in 12 (11.2%) cases. Leucopoenia (count40 U/L in 57% cases. Frequency of clinically suspected dengue virus infection was 107 (2%), while confirmed dengue fever cases were 40 (0.8%) out of 5200 fever cases. Fever with chills and rigors, body aches, headache, myalgia, rash, haemorrhagic manifestations, platelet count, total leukocyte count, and ALT, are parameters to screen the cases of suspected dengue virus infection; the diagnosis cannot be confirmed unless supported by

  3. Risk factors, pre-presentation management and clinical state of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2017-08-23

    Aug 23, 2017 ... based on provision of clean water sources, basic hygiene. CC –BY ... clinical state at presentation, management, and outcome were documented. Data was entered ... WHBPF = Washes hands before preparing food. WHBF =.

  4. Current management of hepatocellular carcinoma: An Eastern perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yim, Hyung Joon; Suh, Sang Jun; Um, Soon Ho

    2015-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is one of the leading causes of cancer death, especially in Eastern areas. With advancements in diagnosis and treatment modalities for HCC, the survival and prognosis of HCC patients are improving. However, treatment patterns are not uniform between areas despite efforts to promote a common protocol. Although many hepatologists in Asian countries may adopt the principles of the Barcelona Clinic Liver Cancer staging system, they are also independently making an effort to expand the indications of each treatment and to combine therapies for better outcomes. Several expanded criteria for liver transplantation in HCC have been developed in Asian countries. Living donor liver transplantation is much more commonly performed in these countries than deceased donor liver transplantation, and it may be preceded by other treatments such as the down-staging of tumors. Local ablation therapies are often combined with transarterial chemoembolization (TACE) and the outcome is comparable to that of surgical resection. The indications of TACE are expanding, and there are new types of transarterial therapies. Although data on drug-eluting beads, TACE, and radioembolization in Asian countries are still relatively sparse compared with Western countries, these methods are gradually gaining popularity because of better tolerability and the possibility of improved response rates. Hepatic arterial infusion chemotherapy and radiotherapy are not included in Western guidelines, but are currently being used actively in several Asian countries. For more advanced HCCs, appropriate combinations of TACE, radiotherapy, and sorafenib can be considered, and emerging data indicate improved outcomes of combination therapies compared with single therapies. To include these paradigm shifts into newer treatment guidelines, more studies may be needed, but they are certainly in progress. PMID:25852267

  5. Electrical storm: clinical manifestations and management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Littmann, L; Rennyson, S L

    2007-10-01

    Electrical storm is the clustering of hemodynamically destabilizing ventricular tachycardia or ventricular fibrillation that typically requires multiple electrical cardioversions or defibrillations within a 24-hour period. Electrical storm is frequently seen in the acute phase of myocardial infarction, in patients with the genetic arrhythmia syndromes, and in patients with implanted cardioverters-defibrillators. The evaluation and management should focus on the immediate suppression of the arrhythmia, a search for possible reversible causes, and attempts to prevent recurrences. In this review we present the most common conditions associated with electrical storm, therapeutic options for suppression of electrical storm, and new investigational techniques emerging for the treatment of electrical storm in refractory cases. The management of this life threatening arrhythmia typically requires the coordinated efforts of emergency medicine, critical care, cardiology, cardiac electrophysiology, and pacemaker experts.

  6. Chancroid: clinical manifestations, diagnosis, and management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, D A

    2003-02-01

    Chancroid is a sexually transmitted disease (STD) caused by the Gram negative bacterium Haemophilus ducreyi and is characterised by necrotising genital ulceration which may be accompanied by inguinal lymphadenitis or bubo formation. H ducreyi is a fastidious organism which is difficult to culture from genital ulcer material. DNA amplification techniques have shown improved diagnostic sensitivity but are only performed in a few laboratories. The management of chancroid in the tropics tends to be undertaken in the context of syndromic management of genital ulcer disease and treatment is usually with erythromycin. A number of single dose regimens are also available to treat H ducreyi infection. Genital ulceration as a syndrome has been associated with increased transmission of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection in several cross sectional and longitudinal studies. Effective and early treatment of genital ulceration is therefore an important part of any strategy to control the spread of HIV infection in tropical countries.

  7. Clinical management IT system for enhanced recovery

    OpenAIRE

    Yi, Eunjue; Jheon, Sanghoon

    2016-01-01

    Surgical resection has a key role for the treatment of early stage lung cancer along with certain advanced cases, and minimally invasive techniques, representatively video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery (VATS), are becoming standard for lung cancer surgery. Implementation of integrated programs which could manage the whole process of patient treatment including preoperative, intraoperative and postoperative care is thought to be essential partner for successful application of minimally invasi...

  8. Etiology, diagnosis, and clinical management of vulvodynia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sadownik LA

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Leslie A Sadownik University of British Columbia, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Vancouver, BC, Canada Abstract: Chronic vulvar pain or discomfort for which no obvious etiology can be found, ie, vulvodynia, can affect up to 16% of women. It may affect girls and women across all age groups and ethnicities. Vulvodynia is a significant burden to society, the health care system, the affected woman, and her intimate partner. The etiology is multifactorial and may involve local injury or inflammation, and peripheral and or central sensitization of the nervous system. An approach to the diagnosis and management of a woman presenting with chronic vulvar pain should address the biological, psychological, and social/interpersonal factors that contribute to her illness. The gynecologist has a key role in excluding other causes for vulvar pain, screening for psychosexual and pelvic floor dysfunction, and collaborating with other health care providers to manage a woman's pain. An important component of treatment is patient education regarding the pathogenesis of the pain and the negative impact of experiencing pain on a woman's overall quality of life. An individualized, holistic, and often multidisciplinary approach is needed to effectively manage the woman's pain and pain-related distress. Keywords: vulvodynia, diagnosis, treatment, etiology, sexual pain disorder, dyspareunia, vestibulodynia, assessment, treatment, multidisciplinary

  9. COPD management: role of symptom assessment in routine clinical practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    van der Molen T

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Thys van der Molen,1,2 Marc Miravitlles,3 Janwillem WH Kocks1,21Department of General Practice, 2GRIAC (Groningen Research Institute for Asthma and COPD, University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen, Groningen, The Netherlands; 3Pneumology Department, Hospital Universitari Vall d'Hebron, Biomedical Research Networking Centre in Respiratory Diseases (CIBERES, Barcelona, SpainAbstract: Patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD present with a variety of symptoms that significantly impair health-related quality of life. Despite this, COPD treatment and its management are mainly based on lung function assessments. There is increasing evidence that conventional lung function measures alone do not correlate well with COPD symptoms and their associated impact on patients' everyday lives. Instead, symptoms should be assessed routinely, preferably by using patient-centered questionnaires that provide a more accurate guide to the actual burden of COPD. Numerous questionnaires have been developed in an attempt to find a simple and reliable tool to use in everyday clinical practice. In this paper, we review three such patient-reported questionnaires recommended by the latest Global Initiative for Chronic Obstructive Lung Disease guidelines, ie, the modified Medical Research Council questionnaire, the clinical COPD questionnaire, and the COPD Assessment Test, as well as other symptom-specific questionnaires that are currently being developed.Keywords: chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, symptoms, questionnaires

  10. Skin carcinomas: radiobiological principles, radiotherapeutic techniques and clinical management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmidt-Ullrich, Rupert K. A.; Johnson, Christopher R.

    1995-01-01

    Purpose/Objective: The course will be divided into three major topics: (1) Review of radiobiological principles as they apply to the radiotherapeutic management of skin carcinomas; (2) review of radiotherapeutic techniques including beam qualities, beam collimation, tissue dose profiles, and the relative indications of external beam irradiation vs. brachytherapy; (3) comprehensive review of the tumor biology of skin malignancies, including malignant melanoma, and of the relative indications for radiotherapeutic and/or surgical management. (1) Review of critical data which have lead to currently applied principles of time-dose-volume concepts in the radiotherapeutic management of skin carcinomas. Emphasis will be placed on the relative importance of fraction size and overall treatment time on tumor control probability and acute and late normal tissue toxicity. (2) Considering that radiotherapy in the management of skin carcinomas is often used to minimize patient disfiguration and to preserve critical body functions (e.g. eye lids) the technical aspects of radiotherapy delivery are most critical. Careful evaluation of the extent of the lesions including evaluation of their depth of invasion will determine the quality of the radiation beams, orthovoltage and low energy electrons being the most useful. Beam harding for orthovoltage beams and secondary and tertiary (skin) collimation of appropriate electron beams are critical. For more extensive and deeply invasive lesions contour-shaping through customized bolus material is essential. Equally important is the familiarity with custom shielding of critical structures, such as eyes, ears, oral cavity and central nervous system structures. Brachytherapy applications in the treatment of skin carcinomas is limited but should be considered when implants with high dose uniformity can be constructed. (3) The discussion of clinical management will start with a discussion of tumor biological properties of the diverse malignant

  11. Bell palsy: Clinical examination and management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Donika K; Levin, Kerry H

    2015-07-01

    Bell palsy is a common neurologic disorder characterized by acute facial mononeuropathy of unclear cause presenting with unilateral facial weakness. Careful examination and a detailed history are important in making an accurate diagnosis. Early recognition is essential, as treatment with corticosteroids within 72 hours of onset has been shown to hasten recovery. Fortunately, most patients recover spontaneously within 3 weeks, even if untreated. Copyright © 2015 Cleveland Clinic.

  12. A VIEWPOINT ON THE CURRENT STATE OF KNOWLEDGE MANAGEMENT INSTRUMENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ANDREEA PAULA DUMITRU

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Knowledge management is seeking solutions to harmonize the objectives of organizations of the human group, which need to rationalize, to provide policy makers and to implement. This article aims to provide readers with an introduction to knowledge management basic definitions, theories and concepts such as types of knowledge, the differences between data, information and knowledge, etc, are given. But, why we need a knowledge management ? This article justified the need for companies to focus management efforts on their intangible elements and provides the five enabling conditions for knowledge creation.

  13. Current Situation of Highway Daily Maintenance Management in Beijing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pan Feng Ming

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Combined with the industry property, characteristics and management needs of highway maintenance project in Beijing, through investigation and research of the highway daily maintenance management, the present situation of highway repair and maintenance is expounded from the aspects such as the determination of maintenance funds and plan, maintenance management mode, and so on. Then in order to explore the new mechanisms for market management of highway maintenance, the advantages and disadvantages of highway maintenance and minor repairment of Beijing are analyzed.

  14. Nutritional therapy for the management of diabetic gastroparesis: clinical review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sadiya A

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Amena SadiyaLifestyle Clinic, Rashid Centre for Diabetes and Research, Ministry of Health, Ajman, United Arab EmiratesAbstract: Diabetic gastroparesis (DGP, or slow emptying of the stomach, is a well-established complication of diabetes mellitus and is typically considered to occur in individuals with long-standing type 1 and type 2 diabetes mellitus. Clinical consequences of DGP include induction of gastrointestinal (GI symptoms (early satiety, abdominal distension, reflux, stomach spasm, postprandial nausea, vomiting, alteration in drug absorption, and destabilization of glycemic control (due to mismatched postprandial glycemic and insulin peaks. Effective nutritional management not only helps in alleviating the symptoms, but also in facilitating better glycemic control. Although there have been no evidence-based guidelines pertaining to the nutrition care process of the DGP, the current dietary recommendations are based on expert opinions or observational studies. The dietary management of gastroparesis needs to be tailored according to the severity of malnutrition and kind of upper GI symptom by changing the volume, consistency, frequency, fiber, fat, and carbohydrates in the meal. Small frequent meals, using more liquid calories, reducing high fat or high fiber, consuming bezoar forming foods, and adjusting meal carbohydrates based on medications or insulin helps in improving the upper GI symptoms and glycemic control. Enteral nutrition can be an option for patients who fail to stabilize their weight loss, or for those who cannot gain weight with oral feedings, while total parenteral nutrition is rarely necessary for the patient with gastroparesis.Keywords: diabetic gastroparesis, delayed gastric emptying, diabetes mellitus, bezoar, GI symptoms, glycemic control

  15. CURBSIDE CONSULTATION IN FRACTURE MANAGEMENT: 49 CLINICAL QUESTIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Walter W. Virkus

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available DESCRIPTION: A user-friendly, unique resource for the treatment of fractures designed in a casual questions and answers format which provides basic knowledge, current information and evidence based expert advices enhanced by images and diagrams and supported by ref-erences.PURPOSE: Designing this book the editor has aimed to prepare not only a source of current knowledge and opin-ions by experienced authors in fracture management for decision making in daily practice but also a brief refer-ence and useful educational resource in orthopedic trauma surgery.FEATURES: Three Sections are composed of 49 sub-jects in a form of the answers of frequently asked ques-tions richly illustrated by images and diagrams and in-cluding references at the end of each subject.The Section I is “UPPER EXTREMITIES” including: Neck fracture; Humerus shaft fracture; Management of radial nerve palsy associated with humeral fracture; Clavicle fractures; Elbow fractures in children; Fasciot-omy technic of the forearm; Distal radius fracture; Indica-tions of radial head replacement, Femur and humeral shaft fractures; Treatment of posterolateral elbow dislocation; The Section II is “LOWER EXTREMITIES” including : Femur fractures; Pelvic fractures; Life threatening pelvic fractures; Decision for surgical treatment in pelvic frac-tures; Treatment of anterior fracture of femoral head and hip joint incongruity; Management of a displaced femoral neck fracture in young patient in ER; Elder patients with displaced femoral head fracture; Patella and tibial plateau fractures; Criteria for compartment syndromes in the tibia; Tricks in nailing proximal and distal tibial fractures; Surgical management of distal tibia spiral fracture in middle aged women; Pilon fracture; Management of syn-desmotic screws in adult patient; The management of minimally displaced posterior malleol in three malleolar fractures; Postoperative management of bimalleolar frac-tures; Management of minimally

  16. Orbital Cellulitis: Clinical Course and Management Challenges. The ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Orbital Cellulitis: Clinical Course and Management Challenges. The Lagos State University Teaching Hospital Experience. ... The major management challenges were poor financial status of patients precluding necessary diagnostic laboratory and imaging studies. Early recognition, diagnosis and treatment are crucial to ...

  17. Role and Value of Clinical Pharmacy in Heart Failure Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stough, W G; Patterson, J H

    2017-08-01

    Effectively managing heart failure requires a multidisciplinary, holistic approach attuned to many factors: diagnosis of structural and functional cardiac abnormalities; medication, device, or surgical management; concomitant treatment of comorbidities; physical rehabilitation; dietary considerations; and social factors. This practice paper highlights the pharmacist's role in the management of patients with heart failure, the evidence supporting their functions, and steps to ensure the pharmacist resource is available to the broad population of patients with heart failure. © 2017 American Society for Clinical Pharmacology and Therapeutics.

  18. Layout and flow of dermatology clinics: principles from operations management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jordan V

    2018-04-15

    Dermatology is a medical specialty that experiences high patient demand and long patient wait times. Dermatology clinics should look for ways to improve efficiency through the incorporation of principles from operations management. Addressing the layout and flow of a clinic can lead to operational efficiency. An ideal layout may lead to increased patient volume, satisfaction, and retention.

  19. [Development and clinical evaluation of an anesthesia information management system].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Jing-yi; Chen, Hua; Zhu, Sheng-mei

    2010-09-21

    To study the design, implementation and clinical evaluation of an anesthesia information management system. To record, process and store peri-operative patient data automatically, all kinds of bedside monitoring equipments are connected into the system based on information integrating technology; after a statistical analysis of those patient data by data mining technology, patient status can be evaluated automatically based on risk prediction standard and decision support system, and then anesthetist could perform reasonable and safe clinical processes; with clinical processes electronically recorded, standard record tables could be generated, and clinical workflow is optimized, as well. With the system, kinds of patient data could be collected, stored, analyzed and archived, kinds of anesthesia documents could be generated, and patient status could be evaluated to support clinic decision. The anesthesia information management system is useful for improving anesthesia quality, decreasing risk of patient and clinician, and aiding to provide clinical proof.

  20. Diagnosis and clinical management of urinary tract infection

    OpenAIRE

    Heilberg, Ita Pfeferman; Schor, Nestor

    2003-01-01

    A review about recent aspects on diagnosis and clinical management of urinary tract infection (UTI) is presented. There is a wide variation in clinical presentation of UTI which include different forms as cystitis, pyelonephritis, urethral syndrome and the clinical relevance of asymptomatic bacteriuria and low-count bacteriuria that must be distinguished from contamination. Pathogenetic aspects concerning bacterial virulence as well as host factors in susceptibility to UTI as urinary tract ob...

  1. A Canadian Clinical Practice Algorithm for the Management of Patients with Non-Variceal Upper Gastrointestinal Bleeding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alan Barkun

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available AIM: To use current evidence-based recommendations to provide a user-friendly clinical algorithm for the management of upper gastrointestinal bleeding, adapted to the Canadian environment.

  2. Diagnosis and management of feline hyperthyroidism: current perspectives

    OpenAIRE

    Grauer, Gregory F; Schermerhorn,Thomas; Armbrust,Laura; Vaske,Heather

    2014-01-01

    Heather H Vaske, Thomas Schermerhorn, Laura Armbrust, Gregory F Grauer Department of Clinical Sciences, Kansas State University, Manhattan, KS, USA Abstract: Previous and ongoing research has provided insights to the pathophysiology and diagnosis of hyperthyroidism as well as new treatment modalities. This paper reviews the etiology, clinical presentation, and clinicopathologic changes associated with hyperthyroidism, and provides a thorough explanation of confirmatory testing and treatment ...

  3. Active current management for four-rail railguns

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beno, J.H.; Weldon, W.F.

    1991-01-01

    In this paper a system of auxiliary conductors designed to reduce current density peaks in railgun rails for four-rail, round-bore railguns is described. The effects on rail current density and projectile force are discussed. Railgun cross-sectional designs are presented for round-bore, four-rail railguns which operate at lower peak current densities and develop greater projectile forces than conventional two-rail, round-bore railguns

  4. Clinicians’ experiences of becoming a clinical manager: a qualitative study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Spehar Ivan

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There has been an increased interest in recruiting health professionals with a clinical background to management positions in health care. We know little about the factors that influence individuals’ decisions to engage in management. The aim of this study is to explore clinicians’ journeys towards management positions in hospitals, in order to identify potential drivers and barriers to management recruitment and development. Methods We did a qualitative study which included in-depth interviews with 30 clinicians in middle and first-line management positions in Norwegian hospitals. In addition, participant observation was conducted with 20 of the participants. The informants were recruited from medical and surgical departments, and most had professional backgrounds as medical doctors or nurses. Interviews were analyzed by systemic text condensation. Results We found that there were three phases in clinicians’ journey into management; the development of leadership awareness, taking on the manager role and the experience of entering management. Participants’ experiences suggest that there are different journeys into management, in which both external and internal pressure emerged as a recurrent theme. They had not anticipated a career in clinical management, and experienced that they had been persuaded to take the position. Being thrown into the position, without being sufficiently prepared for the task, was a common experience among participants. Being left to themselves, they had to learn management “on the fly”. Some were frustrated in their role due to increasing administrative workloads, without being able to delegate work effectively. Conclusions Path dependency and social pressure seems to influence clinicians’ decisions to enter into management positions. Hospital organizations should formalize pathways into management, in order to identify, attract, and retain the most qualified talents. Top managers

  5. Clinicians' experiences of becoming a clinical manager: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spehar, Ivan; Frich, Jan C; Kjekshus, Lars Erik

    2012-11-22

    There has been an increased interest in recruiting health professionals with a clinical background to management positions in health care. We know little about the factors that influence individuals' decisions to engage in management. The aim of this study is to explore clinicians' journeys towards management positions in hospitals, in order to identify potential drivers and barriers to management recruitment and development. We did a qualitative study which included in-depth interviews with 30 clinicians in middle and first-line management positions in Norwegian hospitals. In addition, participant observation was conducted with 20 of the participants. The informants were recruited from medical and surgical departments, and most had professional backgrounds as medical doctors or nurses. Interviews were analyzed by systemic text condensation. We found that there were three phases in clinicians' journey into management; the development of leadership awareness, taking on the manager role and the experience of entering management. Participants' experiences suggest that there are different journeys into management, in which both external and internal pressure emerged as a recurrent theme. They had not anticipated a career in clinical management, and experienced that they had been persuaded to take the position. Being thrown into the position, without being sufficiently prepared for the task, was a common experience among participants. Being left to themselves, they had to learn management "on the fly". Some were frustrated in their role due to increasing administrative workloads, without being able to delegate work effectively. Path dependency and social pressure seems to influence clinicians' decisions to enter into management positions. Hospital organizations should formalize pathways into management, in order to identify, attract, and retain the most qualified talents. Top managers should make sure that necessary support functions are available locally, especially

  6. Clinicians’ experiences of becoming a clinical manager: a qualitative study

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background There has been an increased interest in recruiting health professionals with a clinical background to management positions in health care. We know little about the factors that influence individuals’ decisions to engage in management. The aim of this study is to explore clinicians’ journeys towards management positions in hospitals, in order to identify potential drivers and barriers to management recruitment and development. Methods We did a qualitative study which included in-depth interviews with 30 clinicians in middle and first-line management positions in Norwegian hospitals. In addition, participant observation was conducted with 20 of the participants. The informants were recruited from medical and surgical departments, and most had professional backgrounds as medical doctors or nurses. Interviews were analyzed by systemic text condensation. Results We found that there were three phases in clinicians’ journey into management; the development of leadership awareness, taking on the manager role and the experience of entering management. Participants’ experiences suggest that there are different journeys into management, in which both external and internal pressure emerged as a recurrent theme. They had not anticipated a career in clinical management, and experienced that they had been persuaded to take the position. Being thrown into the position, without being sufficiently prepared for the task, was a common experience among participants. Being left to themselves, they had to learn management “on the fly”. Some were frustrated in their role due to increasing administrative workloads, without being able to delegate work effectively. Conclusions Path dependency and social pressure seems to influence clinicians’ decisions to enter into management positions. Hospital organizations should formalize pathways into management, in order to identify, attract, and retain the most qualified talents. Top managers should make sure that necessary

  7. Current Trends in the Management of Blunt Solid Organ Injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taviloglu, Korhan; Yanar, Hakan

    2009-04-01

    The management of patients with solid organ injuries has changed since the introduction of technically advanced imaging tools, such as ultrasonography and multiple scan computerized tomography, interventional radiological techniques and modern intensive care units. In spite of this development in the management of these patients, major solid organ traumas can still be challenging. There has been great improvement in the non-operative management (NOM) of intra-abdominal solid organ injury in recent decades. In most cases treatment of injuries has shifted from early surgical treatment to NOM.

  8. Critical success factors in implementing clinical pathways/case management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choo, J

    2001-07-01

    With the advent of casemix reimbursement implementation, rapid technological changes, an ageing population and changing consumer behaviour, the Singapore health care industry is faced with the impetus to provide a cost-effective and efficient care delivery system. One ubiquitous tool used is the establishment of a clinical pathway/case management programme within the hospital. As the concept of clinical pathway for patient care is a relatively new concept in Singapore, several critical factors must be considered to ensure successful implementation of clinical pathway/case management programme. One key success factor lies in continued clinician support and acceptance. Other factors include top management leadership and support and a dedicated team of case managers, nurses and paramedical professionals.

  9. Unmet needs in obesity management: From guidelines to clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ritten, Angela; LaManna, Jacqueline

    2017-10-01

    Despite the rather slow acceptance of obesity as a disease state, several obesity staging systems and weight-management guidelines have been developed and are in use, along with an ever-growing number of treatment options. Many primary care clinicians, including nurse practitioners (NPs), are at the forefront of clinical efforts to assist individuals with obesity, but face challenges due to lack of alignment and consensus among the various staging systems and guidelines. This is further complicated by shortfalls in clinical training related to obesity management and increasing complexities in reimbursement for obesity-related services. Unmet needs in the management of obesity thus stretch from guidelines to clinic. This article examines the principal barriers to effective management of individuals with obesity and considers how concerns might be overcome, with particular emphasis on the role of the NP. ©2017 American Association of Nurse Practitioners.

  10. Current Advances in Thyroid Cancer Management. Are We Ready for the Epidemic Rise of Diagnoses?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dagmara Rusinek

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available A rising incidence of thyroid cancers (TCs mainly small tumors, observed during recent years, lead to many controversies regarding treatment strategies. TCs represent a distinct molecular background and clinical outcome. Although in most cases TCs are characterized by a good prognosis, there are some aggressive forms, which do not respond to standard treatment. There are still some questions, which have to be resolved to avoid dangerous simplifications in the clinical management. In this article, we focused on the current advantages in preoperative molecular diagnostic tests and histopathological examination including noninvasive follicular thyroid neoplasm with papillary-like nuclear features (NIFTP. We discussed the controversies regarding the extent of thyroid surgery and adjuvant radioiodine therapy, as well as new treatment modalities for radioiodine-refractory differentiated thyroid cancer (RR-DTC. Considering medullary thyroid cancer (MTC, we analyzed a clinical management based on histopathology and RET (ret proto-oncogene mutation genotype, disease follow-up with a special attention to serum calcitonin doubling time as an important prognostic marker, and targeted therapy applied in advanced MTC. In addition, we provided some data regarding anaplastic thyroid cancer (ATC, a highly lethal neoplasm, which lead to death in nearly 100% of patients due to the lack of effective treatment options.

  11. Patient centered integrated clinical resource management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofdijk, Jacob

    2011-01-01

    The impact of funding systems on the IT systems of providers has been enormous and have prevented the implementation of designs to focused on the health issue of patients. The paradigm shift the Dutch Ministry of Health has taken in funding health care has a remarkable impact on the orientation of IT systems design. Since 2007 the next step is taken: the application of the funding concept on chronic diseases using clinical standards as the norm. The focus on prevention involves the patient as an active partner in the care plan. The impact of the new dimension in funding has initiated a process directed to the development of systems to support collaborative working and an active involvement of the patient and its informal carers. This national approach will be presented to assess its international potential, as all countries face the long term care crisis lacking resources to meet the health needs of the population.

  12. Clinical management of behavioral insomnia of childhood

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vriend J

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Jennifer Vriend1, Penny Corkum21Clinical Psychology PhD Program, Dalhousie University, Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada; 2Department of Psychology, Dalhousie University, Halifax, Nova Scotia, CanadaAbstract: Behavioral insomnia is highly prevalent, affecting approximately 25% of children. It involves difficulties initiating and maintaining sleep and frequently results in inadequate sleep, leading to an array of negative effects for both the child and the child’s family. In this paper, we describe a variety of empirically supported behavioral interventions for insomnia from infancy through adolescence. We explore how biological, cognitive, and psychosocial developmental changes contribute to behavioral insomnia and how these changes may affect sleep and behavioral interventions. We also discuss barriers that prevent families from accessing interventions, including why many empirically-supported behavioral interventions are overlooked by health care providers.Keywords: sleep, behavioral insomnia, treatment, infants, children, adolescents

  13. Clinical management of the hypereosinophilic syndromes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cogan, Elie; Roufosse, Florence

    2012-06-01

    Hypereosinophilic syndromes (HESs) are rare disorders characterized by marked hypereosinophilia that is directly responsible for organ damage or dysfunction. Different pathogenic mechanisms have been discovered in patient subgroups leading to the characterization of myeloproliferative and lymphocytic disease variants. In the updated terminology, idiopathic HES is now restricted to patients with HES of undetermined etiology. The practical clinical approach of patients with the different HES variants is reviewed herein, focusing on specific diagnostic tools and therapeutic options. Corticosteroids, hydroxyurea and IFN-α remain the classical agents for treatment of most patients with HESs. The specific role of therapeutic compounds that have become available more recently, namely, tyrosine kinase inhibitors and IL-5 antagonists, is discussed.

  14. Data management by using R: big data clinical research series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhongheng

    2015-11-01

    Electronic medical record (EMR) system has been widely used in clinical practice. Instead of traditional record system by hand writing and recording, the EMR makes big data clinical research feasible. The most important feature of big data research is its real-world setting. Furthermore, big data research can provide all aspects of information related to healthcare. However, big data research requires some skills on data management, which however, is always lacking in the curriculum of medical education. This greatly hinders doctors from testing their clinical hypothesis by using EMR. To make ends meet, a series of articles introducing data management techniques are put forward to guide clinicians to big data clinical research. The present educational article firstly introduces some basic knowledge on R language, followed by some data management skills on creating new variables, recoding variables and renaming variables. These are very basic skills and may be used in every project of big data research.

  15. Clinical impact of molecular analysis on thyroid cancer management

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wreesmann, Volkert B.; Singh, Bhuvanesh

    2008-01-01

    Thyroid cancer constitutes a progressive continuum of disease ranging from indolent well-differentiated carcinomas to aggressive poorly differentiated carcinomas and universally fatal anaplastic carcinomas. The wide divergence in clinical behavior is poorly predicted for by current

  16. Clinical Utility of Virtual Reality in Pain Management: A Comprehensive Research Review from 2009 to 2016

    OpenAIRE

    Matsangidou, Maria; Ang, Chee Siang; Sakel, Mohamed

    2017-01-01

    Virtual Reality is a technology that allows users to experience a computer-simulated reality with visual, auditory, tactile and olfactory interactions. In the past decades, there have been considerable interests in using Virtual Reality for clinical purposes, including pain management. This article provides a systematic review of research on Virtual Reality and pain management, with an aim to understand the feasibilities of current Virtual Reality technologies and content design approaches in...

  17. Current management of intracerebral haemorrhage in China: a national, multi-centre, hospital register study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heeley Emma L

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We aimed to examine current practice of the management and secondary prevention of intracerebral haemorrhage (ICH in China where the disease is more common than in Western populations. Methods Data on baseline characteristics, management in-hospital and post-stroke, and outcome of ICH patients are from the ChinaQUEST (QUality Evaluation of Stroke Care and Treatment study, a multi-centre, prospective, 62 hospital registry in China during 2006-07. Results Nearly all ICH patients (n = 1572 received an intravenous haemodiluting agent such as mannitol (96% or a neuroprotectant (72%, and there was high use of intravenous traditional Chinese medicine (TCM (42%. Neurosurgery was undertaken in 137 (9% patients; being overweight, having a low Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS score on admission, and Total Anterior Circulation Syndrome (TACS clinical pattern on admission, were the only baseline factors associated with this intervention in multivariate analyses. Neurosurgery was associated with nearly three times higher risk of death/disability at 3 months post-stroke (odd ratio [OR] 2.60, p Conclusions The management of ICH in China is characterised by high rates of use of intravenous haemodiluting agents, neuroprotectants, and TCM, and of antihypertensives for secondary prevention. The controversial efficacy of these therapies, coupled with the current lack of treatments of proven benefit, is a call for action for more outcomes based research in ICH.

  18. Challenges of Environmental Management Accounting –- Current Accounting Practices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prof. Ph.D. Gheorghe Popescu

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available The goal of our paper is to reduce some of the international confusion generated on such animportant topic by providing a general framework and set of definitions for Environmental ManagementAccounting (EMA.Environmental Management Accounting is a relatively new tool in environmental management definedas the identification, collection, estimation, analysis, internal reporting, and use of materials and energyflow information, environmental cost information, and other cost information for both conventionaland environmental decision-making within an organization.Due to their special role, accountants, since they are the ones with access to the important monetarydata and information systems needed for management accounting activities, must to improve both theirability to verify the quality of such information and the skills to use that information for decision making.

  19. Pain management in primary care – current perspectives | Meyer ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    According to a 1998 World Health Organization Survey of 26 000 primary care ... in pain medicine and continue to follow the biomedical approach, which ... The modern paradigm of pain management has moved from this biomedical to the ...

  20. Systematic implementation of clinical risk management in a large university hospital: the impact of risk managers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sendlhofer, Gerald; Brunner, Gernot; Tax, Christa; Falzberger, Gebhard; Smolle, Josef; Leitgeb, Karina; Kober, Brigitte; Kamolz, Lars Peter

    2015-01-01

    For health care systems in recent years, patient safety has increasingly become a priority issue. National and international strategies have been considered to attempt to overcome the most prominent hazards while patients are receiving health care. Thereby, clinical risk management (CRM) plays a dominant role in enabling the identification, analysis, and management of potential risks. CRM implementation into routine procedures within complex hospital organizations is challenging, as in the past, organizational change strategies using a top-down approach have often failed. Therefore, one of our main objectives was to educate a certain number of risk managers in facilitating CRM using a bottom-up approach. To achieve our primary purpose, five project strands were developed, and consequently followed, introducing CRM: corporate governance, risk management (RM) training, CRM process, information, and involvement. The core part of the CRM process involved the education of risk managers within each organizational unit. To account for the size of the existing organization, we assumed that a minimum of 1 % of the workforce had to be trained in RM to disseminate the continuous improvement of quality and safety. Following a roll-out plan, CRM was introduced in each unit and potential risks were identified. Alongside the changes in the corporate governance, a hospital-wide CRM process was introduced resulting in 158 trained risk managers correlating to 2.0 % of the total workforce. Currently, risk managers are present in every unit and have identified 360 operational risks. Among those, 176 risks were scored as strategic and clustered together into top risks. Effective meeting structures and opportunities to share information and knowledge were introduced. Thus far, 31 units have been externally audited in CRM. The CRM approach is unique with respect to its dimension; members of all health care professions were trained to be able to identify potential risks. A network of risk

  1. The glenoid track: a review of the clinical relevance, method of calculation and current evidence behind this method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Younan, Yara; Wong, Philip K.; Umpierrez, Monica; Gonzalez, Felix; Singer, Adam Daniel [Emory University Hospital, Department of Radiology and Imaging Sciences, Section of Musculoskeletal Imaging, Atlanta, GA (United States); Karas, Spero [Emory University Hospital, Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Atlanta, GA (United States); Jose, Jean [University of Miami, Department of Radiology, Miami, FL (United States)

    2017-12-15

    In the setting of bipolar bone injury, orthopedic surgeons are currently making use of the glenoid track method to guide surgical management. Using preoperative CT or MR imaging, this method allows the identification of patients who are more likely to fail a primary capsuloligamentous Bankart repair. As the glenoid track method becomes increasingly used in preoperative planning, it is important for the radiologist to become familiar with its concept and method of calculation. This review article aims to concisely summarize the current literature and the clinical implications of the glenoid track method. (orig.)

  2. Cancer pain management in China: current status and practice implications based on the ACHEON survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xia Z

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Zhongjun Xia Sun Yat-Sen University Cancer Center, Guangzhou, Guangdong, ChinaPurpose: Cancer pain can seriously impact the quality of life (QoL of patients, and optimal management practices are therefore of paramount importance. The ACHEON survey queried physicians and patients from 10 Asian countries/regions to assess current clinical practices in cancer pain management in Asia. This study presents the data obtained for cancer pain management in mainland China, with an emphasis on practices related to opioid drugs.Materials and methods: In several tertiary hospitals across China, 250 patients experiencing cancer pain and 100 physicians were surveyed on questions designed to assess current cancer pain management practices and cancer pain impact on QoL.Results: The patient survey showed that 88% of patients reported moderate-to-severe cancer pain, with a median duration of 6 months. The physician survey showed that medical school/residency training with regard to cancer pain management was inadequate in ~80% of physicians. A total of 80% of physicians and 67.2% of patients reported that pain scale was used during pain assessment; 84% of physicians expressed that physician-perceived pain severity was not completely consistent with actual pain the patient experienced. Of the 147 patients who recalled the medication received, 83.7% were administered opioid prescriptions. Of the 240 patients who received treatment, 43.8% perceived the inadequacy of controlling pain. The primary barriers from physicians perceived to optimal pain management included patients’ fear of side effects (58%, patients’ fear of addiction (53%, patients’ reluctance to report pain (43%, physicians’ reluctance to prescribe (29%, physicians’ inadequacy of pain assessment (27% and excessive regulation of opioid analgesics (47%.Conclusion: Knowledge of cancer pain management should be strengthened among physicians. Quantitative pain assessment and principle-based pain

  3. Veno occlusive disease: Update on clinical management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senzolo, M; Germani, G; Cholongitas, E; Burra, P; Burroughs, AK

    2007-01-01

    Hepatic veno-occlusive disease is a clinical syndrome characterized by hepatomegaly, ascites, weight gain and jaundice, due to sinusoidal congestion which can be caused by alkaloid ingestion, but the most frequent cause is haematopoietic stem cell transplantation (STC) and is also seen after solid organ transplantation. The incidence of veno occlusive disease (VOD) after STC ranges from 0 to 70%, but is decreasing. Survival is good when VOD is a mild form, but when it is severe and associated with an increase of hepatic venous pressure gradient > 20 mmHg, and mortality is about 90%. Prevention remains the best therapeutic strategy, by using non-myeloablative conditioning regimens before STC. Prophylactic administration of ursodeoxycholic acid, being an antioxidant and antiapoptotic agent, can have some benefit in reducing overall mortality. Defibrotide, which has pro-fibrinolytic and antithrombotic properties, is the most effective therapy; decompression of the sinusoids by a transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt (TIPS) can be tried, especially to treat VOD after liver transplantation and when multiorgan failure (MOF) is not present. Liver transplantation can be the last option, but can not be considered a standard rescue therapy, because usually the concomitant presence of multiorgan failure contraindicates this procedure. PMID:17663504

  4. Management of sarcoidosis in clinical practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florence Jeny

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Sarcoidosis is a systemic disease of unknown cause with very diverse presentation, outcome, severity and need for treatments. While some presentations may be very typical, for many patients, the presentation is nonspecific, with shared associations with other diseases at times being by far more frequent or misleading, which can be a cause of significant delay and often several consultations before a diagnosis of sarcoidosis can be confirmed. This is particularly the case when pulmonary manifestations are in the forefront. The diagnosis relies on three well-known criteria. In clinical practice, these criteria are not easily implemented, particularly by physicians without expertise in sarcoidosis, which can lead to a risk of either under- or over-diagnosis. Qualifying the presentation according to sarcoidosis diagnosis is essential. However, it is often not easy to classify the presentation as typical versus compatible or compatible versus inconsistent. Further investigations are needed before any other hypothesis is to be considered. It is important to detect events and to determine whether or not they are indicative of a flare of sarcoidosis. Eventually, treatment needs to be related to the correct indications. The evaluation of the efficacy and safety of treatments is crucial. To address such issues, we present five emblematic cases that illustrate this.

  5. Dementia Care: Confronting Myths in Clinical Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neitch, Shirley M; Meadows, Charles; Patton-Tackett, Eva; Yingling, Kevin W

    2016-01-01

    Every day, patients with dementia, their families, and their physicians face the enormous challenges of this pervasive life-changing condition. Seeking help, often grasping at straws, victims, and their care providers are confronted with misinformation and myths when they search the internet or other sources. When Persons with Dementia (PWD) and their caregivers believe and/or act on false information, proper treatment may be delayed, and ultimately damage can be done. In this paper, we review commonly misunderstood issues encountered in caring for PWD. Our goal is to equip Primary Care Practitioners (PCPs) with accurate information to share with patients and families, to improve the outcomes of PWD to the greatest extent possible. While there are innumerable myths about dementia and its causes and treatments, we are going to focus on the most common false claims or misunderstandings which we hear in our Internal Medicine practice at Marshall Health. We offer suggestions for busy practitioners approaching some of the more common issues with patients and families in a clinic setting.

  6. Isavuconazole for the treatment of invasive aspergillosis and mucormycosis: current evidence, safety, efficacy, and clinical recommendations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natesan SK

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Suganthini Krishnan Natesan,1,2 Pranatharthi H Chandrasekar1 1Division of Infectious Diseases, Department of Internal Medicine, Wayne State University, 2John D Dingell VA Medical Center, Detroit, MI, USA Abstract: The majority of invasive mold infections diagnosed in immunocompromised cancer patients include invasive aspergillosis (IA and mucormycosis. Despite timely and effective therapy, mortality remains considerable. Antifungal agents currently available for the management of these serious infections include triazoles, polyenes, and echinocandins. Until recently, posaconazole has been the only triazole with a broad spectrum of anti-mold activity against both Aspergillus sp. and mucorales. Other clinically available triazoles voriconazole and itraconazole, with poor activity against mucorales, have significant drug interactions in addition to a side effect profile inherent for all triazoles. Polyenes including lipid formulations pose a problem with infusion-related side effects, electrolyte imbalance, and nephrotoxicity. Echinocandins are ineffective against mucorales and are approved as salvage therapy for refractory IA. Given that all available antifungal agents have limitations, there has been an unmet need for a broad-spectrum anti-mold agent with a favorable profile. Following phase III clinical trials that started in 2006, isavuconazole (ISZ seems to fit this profile. It is the first novel triazole agent recently approved by the United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA for the treatment of both IA and mucormycosis. This review provides a brief overview of the salient features of ISZ, its favorable profile with regard to spectrum of antifungal activity, pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic parameters, drug interactions and tolerability, clinical efficacy, and side effects. Keywords: isavuconazole, aspergillosis, mucormycosis, efficacy, antifungal therapy, novel azole, tolerability, drug interactions

  7. Clinical practice guidelines for the diagnosis and management of melanoma: melanomas that lack classical clinical features.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mar, Victoria J; Chamberlain, Alex J; Kelly, John W; Murray, William K; Thompson, John F

    2017-10-16

    A Cancer Council Australia multidisciplinary working group is currently revising and updating the 2008 evidence-based clinical practice guidelines for the management of cutaneous melanoma. While there have been many recent improvements in treatment options for metastatic melanoma, early diagnosis remains critical to reducing mortality from the disease. Improved awareness of the atypical presentations of this common malignancy is required to achieve this. A chapter of the new guidelines was therefore developed to aid recognition of atypical melanomas. Main recommendations: Because thick, life-threatening melanomas may lack the more classical ABCD (asymmetry, border irregularity, colour variegation, diameter > 6 mm) features of melanoma, a thorough history of the lesion with regard to change in morphology and growth over time is essential. Any lesion that is changing in morphology or growing over a period of more than one month should be excised or referred for prompt expert opinion. Changes in management as a result of the guidelines: These guidelines provide greater emphasis on improved recognition of the atypical presentations of melanoma, in particular nodular, desmoplastic and acral lentiginous subtypes, with particular awareness of hypomelanotic and amelanotic lesions.

  8. An electronic regulatory document management system for a clinical trial network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Wenle; Durkalski, Valerie; Pauls, Keith; Dillon, Catherine; Kim, Jaemyung; Kolk, Deneil; Silbergleit, Robert; Stevenson, Valerie; Palesch, Yuko

    2010-01-01

    A computerized regulatory document management system has been developed as a module in a comprehensive Clinical Trial Management System (CTMS) designed for an NIH-funded clinical trial network in order to more efficiently manage and track regulatory compliance. Within the network, several institutions and investigators are involved in multiple trials, and each trial has regulatory document requirements. Some of these documents are trial specific while others apply across multiple trials. The latter causes a possible redundancy in document collection and management. To address these and other related challenges, a central regulatory document management system was designed. This manuscript shares the design of the system as well as examples of it use in current studies. Copyright (c) 2009 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Prognostics and Health Management of Wind Turbines: Current Status and Future Opportunities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sheng, Shuangwen

    2016-10-04

    This presentation was given at the 2016 Annual Conference of the Prognostics and Health Management Society. It covers the current status and challenges and opportunities of prognostics and health management of wind turbines.

  10. Impression management and food intake. Current directions in research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vartanian, Lenny R

    2015-03-01

    This paper reviews recent research on consumption stereotypes (judgments of others based on what they eat) and impression management (modifying one's eating behavior in order to create a particular impression). A major recent focus in the literature has been on masculinity and meat eating, with research showing that meat is strongly associated with masculinity, and that individuals who follow a meat-based diet are perceived as more masculine than are individuals who follow a vegetarian diet. Although direct evidence for impression management through food intake remains sparse, a number of methodological approaches (including priming techniques and ecological valid assessments) are described that could be used in future research to identify the motives underlying people's eating behavior. Consumption stereotypes and impression management may be important influences on people's eating behavior, but the complexities of how, when, and for whom these factors influence food intake are still not well understood. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Knowledge Management in healthcare libraries: the current picture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopkins, Emily

    2017-06-01

    Knowledge management has seen something of a resurgence in attention amongst health librarians recently. Of course it has never ceased to exist, but now many library staff are becoming more involved in organisational knowledge management, and positioning themselves as key players in the sphere. No single model of knowledge management is proliferating, but approaches that best fit the organisation's size, structure and culture, and a blending of evidence based practice and knowledge sharing. Whatever it is called and whatever models are used, it's clear that for librarians and information professionals, the importance of putting knowledge and evidence into practice, sharing knowledge well and capturing it effectively, are still what we will continue to do. © 2017 Health Libraries Group.

  12. Current management of chronic hepatitis B: review | Cariem | South ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    South African Gastroenterology Review. Journal Home · ABOUT THIS JOURNAL · Advanced Search · Current Issue · Archives · Journal Home > Vol 2, No 2 (2004) >. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads.

  13. [Knowledge management system for laboratory work and clinical decision support].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inada, Masanori; Sato, Mayumi; Yoneyama, Akiko

    2011-05-01

    This paper discusses a knowledge management system for clinical laboratories. In the clinical laboratory of Toranomon Hospital, we receive about 20 questions relevant to laboratory tests per day from medical doctors or co-medical staff. These questions mostly involve the essence to appropriately accomplish laboratory tests. We have to answer them carefully and suitably because an incorrect answer may cause a medical accident. Up to now, no method has been in place to achieve a rapid response and standardized answers. For this reason, the laboratory staff have responded to various questions based on their individual knowledge. We began to develop a knowledge management system to promote the knowledge of staff working for the laboratory. This system is a type of knowledge base for assisting the work, such as inquiry management, laboratory consultation, process management, and clinical support. It consists of several functions: guiding laboratory test information, managing inquiries from medical staff, reporting results of patient consultation, distributing laboratory staffs notes, and recording guidelines for laboratory medicine. The laboratory test information guide has 2,000 records of medical test information registered in the database with flexible retrieval. The inquiry management tool provides a methos to record all questions, answer easily, and retrieve cases. It helps staff to respond appropriately in a short period of time. The consulting report system treats patients' claims regarding medical tests. The laboratory staffs notes enter a file management system so they can be accessed to aid in clinical support. Knowledge sharing using this function can achieve the transition from individual to organizational learning. Storing guidelines for laboratory medicine will support EBM. Finally, it is expected that this system will support intellectual activity concerning laboratory work and contribute to the practice of knowledge management for clinical work support.

  14. Management of opioid addiction with buprenorphine: French history and current management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Poloméni P

    2014-03-01

    pathophysiologic mechanisms of the disease, better knowledge of the pharmacology of opioid substitution treatments, and clear definition of short-, medium- and long-term treatment objectives. Data related to the management of opioid addiction by general practitioners in France have been published in 2005. Since then, the context has changed, other drugs were launched on the market such as generics of buprenorphine, methadone capsule, and Suboxone. Thus, an update seems necessary. This paper provides a description of opioid addiction management objectives and treatment modalities for general practitioners, based on currently available knowledge. Keywords: opioid addiction, withdrawal, opioid substitution treatment, buprenorphine, naloxone, general medicine

  15. Value Tools in Managed Care Decision Making: Current Hurdles and Future Opportunities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schafer, Jeremy; Galante, Dominic; Shafrin, Jason

    2017-06-01

    Organizations such as the National Comprehensive Cancer Network, American Society of Clinical Oncology, Institute for Clinical and Economic Review, and Memorial Sloan Kettering have created distinct tools to help different stakeholders assess the value of oncology treatments. However, the oncology value tools were not necessarily created for payers, and it is unclear whether payers are using these tools as part of their drug management process. To understand what value tools payers are using in oncology management and what benefits and shortcomings the tools may have from the payer perspective. A survey targeting drug coverage decision makers at health plans was conducted in August 2016. Respondents attesting to using 2 or more value tools in drug management were eligible for an additional in-depth interview to understand the respondents' perceived benefits and shortcomings of current value tools. Respondents also were asked to describe desired attributes of a hypothetical payer-centric value tool. A total of 28 respondents representing approximately 160 million commercially insured medical lives completed the survey. Twenty respondents (71%) reported using at least 1 value tool in their drug management process. Twelve respondents (43%) used at least 2 tools, and 4 respondents (14%) used at least 3 tools. A total of 6 respondents were selected for in-depth interviews. Interviewees praised value tools for advancing the discussion on drug value and incorporating clinical evidence. However, interviewees felt available value tools varied on providing firm recommendations and relevant price benchmarks. Respondents most commonly recommended the following attributes of a proposed payer-centric value framework: taking a firm position on product value; product comparisons in lieu of comparative clinical trials; web-based tool access; and tool updates at least quarterly. Interview respondents also expressed some support for allowing manipulation of inputs and inclusion of

  16. The Current Role of Endourologic Management of Renal Transplantation Complications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian D. Duty

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Complications following renal transplantation include ureteral obstruction, urinary leak and fistula, urinary retention, urolithiasis, and vesicoureteral reflux. These complications have traditionally been managed with open surgical correction, but minimally invasive techniques are being utilized frequently. Materials and Methods. A literature review was performed on the use of endourologic techniques for the management of urologic transplant complications. Results. Ureterovesical anastomotic stricture is the most common long-term urologic complication following renal transplantation. Direct vision endoureterotomy is successful in up to 79% of cases. Urinary leak is the most frequent renal transplant complication early in the postoperative period. Up to 62% of patients have been successfully treated with maximal decompression (nephrostomy tube, ureteral stent, and Foley catheter. Excellent outcomes have been reported following transurethral resection of the prostate shortly after transplantation for patients with urinary retention. Vesicoureteral reflux after renal transplant is common. Deflux injection has been shown to resolve reflux in up to 90% of patients with low-grade disease in the absence of high pressure voiding. Donor-gifted and de novo transplant calculi may be managed with shock wave, ureteroscopic, or percutaneous lithotripsy. Conclusions. Recent advances in equipment and technique have allowed many transplant patients with complications to be effectively managed endoscopically.

  17. Current approach to diagnosis and management of osteoarthritis ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    There is extreme variability in presentation at different joint sites and between individuals. Management of OA involves a comprehensive approach consisting of preventative measures and numerous therapeutic modalities which should be tailored to individual needs. The family practitioner plays a vital role in the diagnosis ...

  18. The current status and management of South Africa's ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Chondrichthyans (sharks, skates, rays and chimaeras) are captured in many marine fisheries. Management and research efforts directed at chondrichthyan fishing are often neglected because of low product value, taxonomic uncertainty, low capture rates, and harvesting by multiple fisheries. In South Africa's diverse fishery ...

  19. A review of the current literature on management of halitosis.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Broek, A.M. van den; Feenstra, L.; Baat, C. de

    2008-01-01

    Halitosis is an unpleasant or offensive odour, emanating from the oral cavity. In approximately 80% of all cases, halitosis is caused by microbial degradation of oral organic substrates. Major degradation products are volatile sulphur-containing compounds. In this review, the available management

  20. Current Issues for Higher Education Information Resources Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    CAUSE/EFFECT, 1996

    1996-01-01

    Issues identified as important to the future of information resources management and use in higher education include information policy in a networked environment, distributed computing, integrating information resources and college planning, benchmarking information technology, integrated digital libraries, technology integration in teaching,…

  1. Cancer management in Sudan: Current status and future perspectives

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Introduction: Sudan is one of the developing countries that face a great challenge with cancer management. About 5700 cases had been seen during year 2007 in Radiation and Isotope Center- Khartoum (RICK) and Institute of Nuclear medicine, Molecular biology, and Oncology (INMO) Wadmedani which are the only ...

  2. Talent management : Current theories and future research directions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Al Ariss, A.; Cascio, W.F.; Paauwe, J.

    2014-01-01

    Research on Talent Management (TM) has been lagging behind businesses in offering vision and leadership in this field. After sketching a comprehensive outline of knowledge about TM, theoretical as well as practical, we introduce the papers in this special issue and their important contributions.

  3. Overview of Self-Management Resources Used by Canadian Chronic Kidney Disease Clinics: A National Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donald, Maoliosa; Gil, Sarah; Kahlon, Bhavneet; Beanlands, Heather; Straus, Sharon; Herrington, Gwen; Manns, Braden; Hemmelgarn, Brenda R

    2018-01-01

    the individual clinics. Knowledge of self-management resources currently provided in CKD clinics, along with synthesis of the literature and patient preferred self-management strategies, will inform the design and development of a novel self-management intervention that is patient-centric and adheres to the principles of self-management.

  4. Mrica Reservoir Sedimentation: Current Situation and Future Necessary Management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Puji Utomo

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Mrica Reservoir is one of many reservoirs located in Central Java that experienced a considerably high sedimentation during the last ten years. This condition has caused a rapid decrease in reservoir capacity. Various countermeasures have been introduced to reduce the rate of the reservoir sedimentation through catchment management and reservoir operation by means of flushing and/or dredging. However, the sedimentation remains intensive so that the fulfillment of water demand for electrical power generation was seriously affected. This paper presents the results of evaluation on the dynamics of the purpose of this research is to evaluate the sediment balance of the Mrica Reservoir based on two different scenarios, i.e. the existing condition and another certain type of reservoir management. The study on sediment balance was carried out by estimating the sediment inflow applying sheet erosion method in combination with the analysis of sediment rating curve. The measurement of the deposited sediment rate in the reservoir was conducted through the periodic echo sounding, whereas identification of the number of sediment that has been released from the reservoir was carried out through the observation on both flushing and dredging activities. The results show that during the last decade, the rate of the sediment inflow was approximately 5.869 MCM/year, whereas the released sediment from the reservoir was 4.097 MCM/year. In order to maintain the reservoir capacity, therefore, at least 1.772 MCM/year should be released from the reservoir by means of either flushing or dredging. Sedimentation management may prolong the reservoir’s service life to exceed the design life. Without sediment management, the lifetime of the reservoir would have finished by 2016, whereas with the proper management the lifetime may be extended to 2025.

  5. Management of celiac disease: from evidence to clinical practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tiziana M. Attardo

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Celiac disease (CD is a complex polygenic disorder, which involves genetic factors human leukocyte complex (HLA and non-HLA genes, environmental factors, innate and adoptive immunity, and a robust chronic T-mediated autoimmune component. The main goal of the present monograph is to define a methodological approach for the disease, characterized by frequent late diagnosis, in order for the physician to become aware of the disease management, the diversity of the clinical presentation itself and in different patients. A unique attention is payed to the specific diagnostic tests to define a correct and accurate application of them, and in addition, to disease follow-up and possible complications. Moreover, a dedicated space is assigned to refractory CD, to potential CD and non-celiac gluten sensitivity. Legislative aspects of the celiac disease in Italy are addressed, too. The celiac disease guidelines and their evaluation by means of Appraisal of Guidelines, Research and Evaluation II instrument allow us to classify the different recommendations and to apply them according to the stakeholders’ involvement, pertinence, methodological accuracy, clarity and publishing independence. Finally, the most current scientific evidence is taken into account to create a complete updated monograph.

  6. Management Control Systems and Clinical Experience of Managers in Public Hospitals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rogério Joao Lunkes

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Healthcare authorities are encouraging managers in hospitals to acquire clinical experience and knowledge in order to better carry out and coordinate healthcare service delivery. The main objective of this paper is to analyse how the clinical experience of hospital managers is related to public health institutions’ performance. It is proposed that the effect of the clinical experience on operative and financial organizational performance is indirect through the mediating variables of perceived utility of management information and horizontal management control system. This paper analyses how these variables impact hospital performance through the data from a survey sent to 364 hospital managers in Brazil. The results show that managers’ clinical experience is related to higher perceived utility of historical, financial, short-term, and internal information, but not with horizontal control adoption in hospitals. Furthermore, our results show that, in hospitals, perceived utility of forecasted, non-financial, long-term, and external managerial information positively affects hospitals’ financial performance, while adoption of horizontal control management positively affects operational performance. Through showing evidence that clinical background could explain the differences not only in hospital service management but also in information capabilities and management control processes, this study offer meaningful implications for healthcare authorities and hospital managers involved in the development and implementation of strategies in the health sector.

  7. Management Control Systems and Clinical Experience of Managers in Public Hospitals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naranjo-Gil, David

    2018-01-01

    Healthcare authorities are encouraging managers in hospitals to acquire clinical experience and knowledge in order to better carry out and coordinate healthcare service delivery. The main objective of this paper is to analyse how the clinical experience of hospital managers is related to public health institutions’ performance. It is proposed that the effect of the clinical experience on operative and financial organizational performance is indirect through the mediating variables of perceived utility of management information and horizontal management control system. This paper analyses how these variables impact hospital performance through the data from a survey sent to 364 hospital managers in Brazil. The results show that managers’ clinical experience is related to higher perceived utility of historical, financial, short-term, and internal information, but not with horizontal control adoption in hospitals. Furthermore, our results show that, in hospitals, perceived utility of forecasted, non-financial, long-term, and external managerial information positively affects hospitals’ financial performance, while adoption of horizontal control management positively affects operational performance. Through showing evidence that clinical background could explain the differences not only in hospital service management but also in information capabilities and management control processes, this study offer meaningful implications for healthcare authorities and hospital managers involved in the development and implementation of strategies in the health sector. PMID:29673192

  8. Fanconi anaemia: genetics, molecular biology, and cancer – implications for clinical management in children and adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, M; Chandler, K; Tischkowitz, M; Meyer, S

    2015-07-01

    Fanconi anaemia (FA) is an inherited disease with congenital and developmental abnormalities, cross-linker hypersensitivity and extreme cancer predisposition. With better understanding of the genetic and molecular basis of the disease, and improved clinical management, FA has been transformed from a life-limiting paediatric disease to an uncommon chronic condition that needs lifelong multidisciplinary management, and a paradigm condition for the understanding of the gene-environment interaction in the aetiology of congenital anomalies, haematopoiesis and cancer development. Here we review genetic, molecular and clinical aspects of FA, and discuss current controversies and future prospects. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Managing risk: clinical decision-making in mental health services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muir-Cochrane, Eimear; Gerace, Adam; Mosel, Krista; O'Kane, Debra; Barkway, Patricia; Curren, David; Oster, Candice

    2011-01-01

    Risk assessment and management is a major component of contemporary mental health practice. Risk assessment in health care exists within contemporary perspectives of management and risk aversive practices in health care. This has led to much discussion about the best approach to assessing possible risks posed by people with mental health problems. In addition, researchers and commentators have expressed concern that clinical practice is being dominated by managerial models of risk management at the expense of meeting the patient's health and social care needs. The purpose of the present study is to investigate the risk assessment practices of a multidisciplinary mental health service. Findings indicate that mental health professionals draw on both managerial and therapeutic approaches to risk management, integrating these approaches into their clinical practice. Rather than being dominated by managerial concerns regarding risk, the participants demonstrate professional autonomy and concern for the needs of their clients.

  10. Representing clinical communication knowledge through database management system integration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khairat, Saif; Craven, Catherine; Gong, Yang

    2012-01-01

    Clinical communication failures are considered the leading cause of medical errors [1]. The complexity of the clinical culture and the significant variance in training and education levels form a challenge to enhancing communication within the clinical team. In order to improve communication, a comprehensive understanding of the overall communication process in health care is required. In an attempt to further understand clinical communication, we conducted a thorough methodology literature review to identify strengths and limitations of previous approaches [2]. Our research proposes a new data collection method to study the clinical communication activities among Intensive Care Unit (ICU) clinical teams with a primary focus on the attending physician. In this paper, we present the first ICU communication instrument, and, we introduce the use of database management system to aid in discovering patterns and associations within our ICU communications data repository.

  11. Ensuring on-time quality data management deliverables from global clinical data management teams

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zia Haque

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The growing emphasis on off-site and off-shore clinical data management activities mandates a paramount need for adequate solutions geared toward on-time, quality deliverables. The author has been leading large teams that have been involved in successful global clinical data management endeavors. While each study scenario is unique and has to be approached as such, there are several elements in defining strategy and team structure in global clinical data management that can be applied universally. In this article, key roles, practices, and high-level procedures are laid out as a road map to ensure success with the model.

  12. Are current processes for nuclear emergency management in Europe adequate?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carter, E; French, S [Manchester Business School, University of Manchester, Booth Street West, Manchester M15 6PB (United Kingdom)

    2006-12-15

    We describe the results of process mapping of nuclear emergency management procedures in four European countries. We find clear differences and explore these in relation to their suitability for building a shared understanding across the emergency management team of the evolving situation and a balanced appreciation of the uncertainties. Our findings indicate that there are some issues that cause concern in that the procedures may run smoothly and efficiently but they may also risk underestimating uncertainty or ignore key issues that have only been identified by a minority of experts or models. We are concerned that they do not facilitate the building of shared mental models that the literature such as that on highly reliable organisations has shown is important.

  13. Sustainable supply chain management: current debate and future directions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruno Silvestre

    Full Text Available Abstract This paper is a research brief on sustainable supply chain management and covers some of the key elements of literature’s past debate and trends for future directions. It highlights the growth of this research area and reinforces the importance of a full consideration of all three key dimensions of sustainability when managing sustainable supply chains, i.e., the financial, environmental and social dimensions. Therefore, supply chain decision makers need to unequivocally assess the impact of their decisions on the financial, environmental and social performances of their supply chains. This paper also argues that risks and opportunities are the key drivers for supply chain decision makers to adopt sustainability within their operations, and that barriers to sustainability adoption exist. This research highlights that, depending on the focus adopted, supply chains can evolve and shift from more traditional to more sustainable approaches over time. The paper concludes with some promising avenues for future investigation.

  14. Aquatic Plant Management Program current status and seasonal workplan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burns, E.R.; Bates, A.L.; Webb, D.H.

    1993-07-01

    The objective of the TVA Aquatic Plant Management Program is to support in an environmentally and economically responsible manner, the balanced multiple uses of the water resource of the Tennessee Valley. This is accomplished by following an integrated approach to prevent introduction and spread of noxious species, documenting occurrence and spread of existing species, and suppressing or eliminating problems in designated high use areas. It is not the TVA objective, nor is it biologically feasible and prudent to eliminate all aquatic vegetation. Aerial photography, helicopter reconnaissance, and field surveys are used to assess distributions and abundance of various aquatic macrophytes. Water level fluctuations are supplemented by herbicide applications to control undesirable vegetation. Investigations are conducted to evaluate water level fluctuation schemes, as well as biological, mechanical, and alternative chemical control techniques which offer potential for more environmentally compatible and cost-effective management operations.

  15. Are current processes for nuclear emergency management in Europe adequate?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carter, E; French, S

    2006-01-01

    We describe the results of process mapping of nuclear emergency management procedures in four European countries. We find clear differences and explore these in relation to their suitability for building a shared understanding across the emergency management team of the evolving situation and a balanced appreciation of the uncertainties. Our findings indicate that there are some issues that cause concern in that the procedures may run smoothly and efficiently but they may also risk underestimating uncertainty or ignore key issues that have only been identified by a minority of experts or models. We are concerned that they do not facilitate the building of shared mental models that the literature such as that on highly reliable organisations has shown is important

  16. Current Management Strategy for Active Surveillance in Prostate Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Syed, Jamil S; Javier-Desloges, Juan; Tatzel, Stephanie; Bhagat, Ansh; Nguyen, Kevin A; Hwang, Kevin; Kim, Sarah; Sprenkle, Preston C

    2017-02-01

    Active surveillance has been increasingly utilized as a strategy for the management of favorable-risk, localized prostate cancer. In this review, we describe contemporary management strategies of active surveillance, with a focus on traditional stratification schemes, new prognostic tools, and patient outcomes. Patient selection, follow-up strategy, and indication for delayed intervention for active surveillance remain centered around PSA, digital rectal exam, and biopsy findings. Novel tools which include imaging, biomarkers, and genetic assays have been investigated as potential prognostic adjuncts; however, their role in active surveillance remains institutionally dependent. Although 30-50% of patients on active surveillance ultimately undergo delayed treatment, the vast majority will remain free of metastasis with a low risk of dying from prostate cancer. The optimal method for patient selection into active surveillance is unknown; however, cancer-specific mortality rates remain excellent. New prognostication tools are promising, and long-term prospective, randomized data regarding their use in active surveillance will be beneficial.

  17. A Required Rotation in Clinical Laboratory Management for Pathology Residents

    OpenAIRE

    Arvind Rishi MD; Syed T. Hoda MD; James M. Crawford MD, PhD

    2016-01-01

    Leadership and management training during pathology residency have been identified repeatedly by employers as insufficient. A 1-month rotation in clinical laboratory management (CLM) was created for third-year pathology residents. We report on our experience and assess the value of this rotation. The rotation was one-half observational and one-half active. The observational component involved being a member of department and laboratory service line leadership, both at the departmental and ins...

  18. Clinical management of salivary deficiency: A review article

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    AlSaif, K. M

    1991-01-01

    The physical, chemical and antibacterial properties of saliva provide protection to human dentition against dental diseases, Therefore, salivary deficiency has to be managed carefully. The causes of saliva deficiency are many and varied. It is worth mentioning that saliva flow rate is normally affected by physiologic condition, such as eating, resting, sleeping, cold or hot season etc. In this paper the protective role of saliva, etiologiy of saliva deficiency and its clinical management are discussed. (author

  19. Spent fuel management in China: Current status and prospects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu, J.L.

    1998-01-01

    In this paper, the development of nuclear power in China, its status of operating nuclear power plants and progress of on-going NPP projects are described. With the arising of spent fuel from NPPs, a national policy of a closed nuclear fuel cycle has been determined. Following storage at reactor sites for at least 5 years (generally maximum 10 years), spent fuel will be transferred to an away-from-reactor pool type centralized storage facility. Adjacent to the storage facility, a multi-purpose reprocessing pilot plant will be set up by the end of this century. An industrial scale reprocessing plant would be succeeded around the year 2020. China's spent fuel management activities include at-reactor storage, transportation, away-from-reactor storage and reprocessing. Relatively detailed description of the work done up to now on spent fuel management and plans for the future are described. It should be noted that activities related to the management of high level radioactive waste are not included here. (author)

  20. Current status of managing diabetes mellitus in Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ha, Kyoung Hwa; Kim, Dae Jung

    2016-09-01

    Diabetes mellitus is an increasing global health problem. Guidelines for diabetic care recommend management of lifestyle and risk factors (glucose, blood pressure, and cholesterol), as well as regular screening for complications associated with treatment of the conditions related to diabetes. The prevalence of diabetes increased from 8.6% to 11.0% from 2001 to 2013. According to the diabetes fact sheet 2015, the proportion of patients with diabetes treated with antihypertensive medications increased from 56.0% to 62.5% from 2006 to 2013, and 49.5% of those with diabetes were being treated with lipid-lowering medications in 2013, a 1.8-fold increase since 2006. According to the 2014 Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey data, 45.6% of patients with diabetes achieved a hemoglobin A1c level of diabetes had good control of all three of these parameters. Despite improvements in health promotion efforts, the rates of adherence to medication and risk-factor control are low. Therefore, a systematic approach to managing diabetes, including self-management education, is needed to prevent or delay complications. The government needs to establish a long-term policy to address the growing burden of diabetes.

  1. Improving clinical leadership and management in the NHS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicol ED

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Edward D Nicol1,21Department of Cardiology, Royal Brompton Hospital and Harefield NHS Trust, London, United Kingdom; 2Clinical Leadership Academy, School of Medicine, Keele University, Staffordshire, United KingdomAbstract: The National Health Service (NHS is one of the UKs most cherished but political public institutions, providing healthcare, free at the point of delivery. The English NHS must make £20bn efficiency savings in the next 3 years whilst in the midst of fundamental structural change outlined in the government's Health and Social Care Bill. This paper will explore the history of leadership and management in the NHS; the evolution of clinical leadership; national strategies to improve NHS clinical and managerial leadership and Lord Darzi's pivotal NHS review. It defines the kind of leadership and management required for today's NHS, looking to overcome some of the main challenges such as improving healthcare quality whilst making efficiency savings and engaging grass roots workers to deliver sustainable, long term improvements. Finally this manuscript makes suggestions as to where future investment is required to improve clinical leadership and management in the NHS.Keywords: clinical leadership, healthcare management, national health service

  2. [Clinical trial data management and quality metrics system].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zhao-hua; Huang, Qin; Deng, Ya-zhong; Zhang, Yue; Xu, Yu; Yu, Hao; Liu, Zong-fan

    2015-11-01

    Data quality management system is essential to ensure accurate, complete, consistent, and reliable data collection in clinical research. This paper is devoted to various choices of data quality metrics. They are categorized by study status, e.g. study start up, conduct, and close-out. In each category, metrics for different purposes are listed according to ALCOA+ principles such us completeness, accuracy, timeliness, traceability, etc. Some general quality metrics frequently used are also introduced. This paper contains detail information as much as possible to each metric by providing definition, purpose, evaluation, referenced benchmark, and recommended targets in favor of real practice. It is important that sponsors and data management service providers establish a robust integrated clinical trial data quality management system to ensure sustainable high quality of clinical trial deliverables. It will also support enterprise level of data evaluation and bench marking the quality of data across projects, sponsors, data management service providers by using objective metrics from the real clinical trials. We hope this will be a significant input to accelerate the improvement of clinical trial data quality in the industry.

  3. Pediatric gastroesophageal reflux disease: Current diagnosis and management

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Pol, R.J.

    2014-01-01

    Pediatric gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is a disorder difficult to diagnose and to treat. Due to the current definition of GERD, i.e. gastroesophageal reflux (GER) causing bothersome symptoms and/or complications, diagnosis is subject to broad interpretation. This thesis consists of studies

  4. Current management of Parkinson's disease | Salawu | Annals of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Annals of African Medicine. Journal Home · ABOUT · Advanced Search · Current Issue · Archives · Journal Home > Vol 9, No 2 (2010) >. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads. Username, Password, Remember me, or Register · Download this PDF file. The PDF file you selected should load here if your Web ...

  5. Current causes and management of violence against women in Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aimakhu, C O; Olayemi, O; Iwe, C A B; Oluyemi, F A; Ojoko, I E; Shoretire, K A; Adeniji, R A; Aimakhu, V E

    2004-01-01

    Violence against women is an important health and human rights issue. It carries with it both short- and long-term sequelae for women that can affect both their physical and psychological wellbeing. Every day obstetric providers treat patients who have been assaulted. Timely identification can interrupt the cycle of violence, prevent further injury and initiate the help-seeking process. The objectives of this study were to survey how often Nigerian obstetrician-gynaecologists see these patients in their practice and to describe the demographics and management of their most recent case so as to give an idea of the extent of the problem. This is especially important as abuse is grossly under-reported because the victims are afraid to report it because of male dominance in society and the fear of losing their homes. We used a self-administered questionnaire survey of 138 practising obstetricians and gynaecologists in Nigeria. Questions were asked about the yearly estimation of cases seen and how recently a case was seen. The type of abuse, risk factors and management of their most recent case was also documented. Most (98.6%) obstetricians surveyed had previously managed a case of violence. The mean estimate of abused women seen was 7.0 per year. Details of the last case managed were recollected by 91.3% of respondents. The majority (51.6%) of patients were pregnant. The assailant was the husband in 69.8% of cases and the most common factor for abuse was as a result of women requesting money for the family needs from their husbands. The most common type of abuse was physical (79.4%), with 34.9% of patients sustaining cuts. Treatment and counselling were the forms of management in most cases. The police were informed in 9.5% of cases and one obstetrician had to give evidence in court. Of the pregnant abused women, 73.8% had live births. Better job opportunities and female empowerment can reduce the risk of violence. Obstetricians should screen routinely for battery

  6. Ductal carcinoma in situ of the breast: can biomarkers improve current management?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartlett, John M S; Nofech-Moses, Sharon; Rakovitch, Eileen

    2014-01-01

    Screening for invasive cancer has led to a marked increase in the detection of ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS). DCIS is, if appropriately managed, a low-risk disease which has a small chance of impacting on patient life expectancy. However, despite significant advances in prognostic marker development in invasive breast cancer, there are no validated diagnostic assays to inform treatment choice for women with DCIS. Therefore we are unable to target effective treatment strategies to women at high risk and avoid over-treatment of women at low risk of progression to invasive breast cancer. Paradoxically, one effect of this uncertainty is undertreatment of some women. We review current practice and research in the field to identify key challenges in the management of DCIS. The impact of clinical research, particularly on the over and undertreatment of women with DCIS is assessed. We note slow progress toward development of diagnostic biomarkers and highlight key opportunities to accelerate advances in this area. DCIS is a low-risk disease, its incidence is increasing, and current treatment is effective. However, many women are either over- or undertreated. Despite repeated calls for development of diagnostic biomarkers, progress in this area has been slow, reflecting a relative lack of investment of research effort and funding. Given the low event rate in treated patients and the lateness of recurrences, many previous studies have only limited power to identify independent prognostic and predictive biomarkers. However, the potential for such biomarkers to personalize treatment for DCIS is extremely high.

  7. Updated concepts on the pathophysiology and the clinical management of trauma hemorrhage and coagulopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marc Maegele

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Uncontrolled hemorrhage and subsequent trauma-induced coagulopathy (TIC are still the principle causes for preventable death after trauma and early detection and aggressive management have been associated with reduced mortality. Despite increasing knowledge about trauma resuscitation, best practice to treat this newly defined entity is still under debate. A synopsis of best current knowledge with reference to the updated European trauma guideline on the management of severe trauma hemorrhage and TIC is presented. The implementation of evidence-based local protocols and algorithms including clinical quality and safety management systems together with parameters to assess key measures of bleeding control and outcome is advocated.

  8. The clinical nurse specialist as resuscitation process manager.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneiderhahn, Mary Elizabeth; Fish, Anne Folta

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this article was to describe the history and leadership dimensions of the role of resuscitation process manager and provide specific examples of how this role is implemented at a Midwest medical center. In 1992, a medical center in the Midwest needed a nurse to manage resuscitation care. This role designation meant that this nurse became central to all quality improvement efforts in resuscitation care. The role expanded as clinical resuscitation guidelines were updated and as the medical center grew. The role became known as the critical care clinical nurse specialist as resuscitation process manager. This clinical care nurse specialist was called a manager, but she had no direct line authority, so she accomplished her objectives by forming a multitude of collaborative networks. Based on a framework by Finkelman, the manager role incorporated specific leadership abilities in quality improvement: (1) coordination of medical center-wide resuscitation, (2) use of interprofessional teams, (3) integration of evidence into practice, and (4) staff coaching to develop leadership. The manager coordinates resuscitation care with the goals of prevention of arrests if possible, efficient and effective implementation of resuscitation protocols, high quality of patient and family support during and after the resuscitation event, and creation or revision of resuscitation policies for in-hospital and for ambulatory care areas. The manager designs a comprehensive set of meaningful and measurable process and outcome indicators with input from interprofessional teams. The manager engages staff in learning, reflecting on care given, and using the evidence base for resuscitation care. Finally, the manager role is a balance between leading quality improvement efforts and coaching staff to implement and sustain these quality improvement initiatives. Revisions to clinical guidelines for resuscitation care since the 1990s have resulted in medical centers developing improved

  9. The current municipal solid waste management situation in Tibet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Jianguo; Lou, Zhiying; Ng, Silo; Luobu, Ciren; Ji, Duo

    2009-03-01

    The Tibetan Plateau has an average altitude of more than 4,000 m. The total area of Tibetan Plateau is 2,400,000 km2, which occupies 25% of the area of China. Due to the high altitude, the environment has low atmospheric pressure, low oxygen content, and low temperature, and is also fragile. Investigations concerning MSW generation and characteristics, MSW management, collection and transportation, and treatment and disposal of MSW covered four representative cities, including the urban areas of Lhasa city, Shigatse, Nedong of Lhoka and Bayi of Nyingtri. The results show that MSW generation in the urban areas of Lhasa city and Tibet were 450 t/d and 3,597 t/d, respectively, in 2006. However, accelerated economic development and flourishing tourism caused by the opening of the Qinghai-Tibet Railway (QTR) have greatly increased solid waste generation to a new high. It is predicted that MSW generation in Tibet will reach 4,026 t/d in 2010 and 4,942 t/d in 2020. MSW management and disposal lag behind MSW generation due to a number of factors such as equipment shortage, insufficient maintenance, exhaustion of waste treatment capacity and low recycling efficiency. Still, MSW in most areas is dumped in the open with no controls. Because no appropriate collection and treatment systems for leachate and landfill gas exist, untreated leachate is discharged directly into the environment, causing serious secondary pollution. Some suggestions on improving the MSW management system are presented in this paper.

  10. The current municipal solid waste management situation in Tibet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiang Jianguo; Lou Zhiying; Ng Silo; Luobu Ciren; Ji Duo

    2009-01-01

    The Tibetan Plateau has an average altitude of more than 4,000 m. The total area of Tibetan Plateau is 2,400,000 km 2 , which occupies 25% of the area of China. Due to the high altitude, the environment has low atmospheric pressure, low oxygen content, and low temperature, and is also fragile. Investigations concerning MSW generation and characteristics, MSW management, collection and transportation, and treatment and disposal of MSW covered four representative cities, including the urban areas of Lhasa city, Shigatse, Nedong of Lhoka and Bayi of Nyingtri. The results show that MSW generation in the urban areas of Lhasa city and Tibet were 450 t/d and 3,597 t/d, respectively, in 2006. However, accelerated economic development and flourishing tourism caused by the opening of the Qinghai-Tibet Railway (QTR) have greatly increased solid waste generation to a new high. It is predicted that MSW generation in Tibet will reach 4,026 t/d in 2010 and 4,942 t/d in 2020. MSW management and disposal lag behind MSW generation due to a number of factors such as equipment shortage, insufficient maintenance, exhaustion of waste treatment capacity and low recycling efficiency. Still, MSW in most areas is dumped in the open with no controls. Because no appropriate collection and treatment systems for leachate and landfill gas exist, untreated leachate is discharged directly into the environment, causing serious secondary pollution. Some suggestions on improving the MSW management system are presented in this paper

  11. Current understanding on pharmacokinetics, clinical efficacy and safety of progestins for treating pain associated to endometriosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barra, Fabio; Scala, Carolina; Ferrero, Simone

    2018-04-01

    Endometriosis is a chronic estrogen and progestogen responsive inflammatory disease associated with pain symptoms and infertility. The medical therapy of endometriosis aims to induce decidualization within the hormonally dependent ectopic endometrium, and it is often administered to ameliorate women' pain symptoms or to prevent post-surgical disease recurrence. A variety of progestins have been used in monotherapy for the medical management of women with endometriosis. Areas covered: This review aims to offer the reader a complete overview of pharmacokinetic (PK) and clinical efficacy of progestins for the treatment of endometriosis. Expert opinion: Each progestin has a distinct PK parameters and pharmacodynamics affinity not only for progesterone receptor, but also for other steroid receptors, such as estrogen, androgen, and glucocorticoid. Moreover, progestins can also be delivered in different formulations. All these characteristics influence their final biological effect. Randomized, controlled, non-blinded studies support the use of oral progestin-only treatment for pelvic pain associated with endometriosis. Currently, the only two progestins approved by Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for the treatment of endometriosis are norethindrone acetate (NETA) and depot medroxyprogesterone acetate (DMPA).

  12. Current status of radioactive waste management (RWM) in Thailand

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chantaraprachoom, N.

    2003-01-01

    Radioactive wastes in Thailand are mainly from the nuclear application in medicine, industry, agriculture, education and research reactor operation. The quantities of radioactive waste each year are relatively small. About 90 m 3 of processed waste and 7 m 3 unprocessed wastes are now stored at the waste storage facilities in the OAP. Recently the regulation on radioactive waste management was drafted and proposed to the cabinet for approval and to be promulgated as a ministerial regulation. A new nuclear research center, r which comprises 10 MW Research Reactor, Radioisotope Production and Centralized Waste Processing and Storage Facilities, is to be established at Ongkarak district in Nakornnayok province in the future. (author)

  13. Current contraceptive management in Australian general practice: an analysis of BEACH data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazza, Danielle; Harrison, Christopher; Taft, Angela; Brijnath, Bianca; Britt, Helena; Hobbs, Melissa; Stewart, Kay; Hussainy, Safeera

    2012-07-16

    To determine current contraceptive management by general practitioners in Australia. Analysis of data from a random sample of 3910 Australian GPs who participated in the Bettering the Evaluation and Care of Health (BEACH) survey, a continuous cross-sectional survey of GP activity, between April 2007 and March 2011. Consultations with female patients aged 12-54 years that involved all forms of contraception were analysed. GP and patient characteristics associated with the management of contraception; types of contraception used; rates of encounters involving emergency contraception. Increased age, ethnicity, Indigenous status and holding a Commonwealth Health Care Card were significantly associated with low rates of encounters involving management of contraception. The combined oral contraceptive pill was the most frequently prescribed method of contraception, with moderate prescription of long-acting reversible contraception (LARC), especially among women aged 34-54 years. Rates of consultations concerned with emergency contraception were low, but involved high rates of counselling, advice or education (48%) compared with encounters for general contraception (> 20%). A shift towards prescribing LARC, as recommended in clinical guidelines, has yet to occur in Australian general practice. Better understanding of patient and GP perspectives on contraceptive choices could lead to more effective contraceptive use.

  14. [Current status and prospect of perioperative thrombus management in gastrointestinal cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, X Y

    2016-03-01

    Thanks to the progress of surgical theory and skills, as well as the application of modern medical devices in general surgery, both the occurrence of perioperative complications and mortality of gastrointestinal surgery have significantly reduced recently. However, it is still far from optimal in terms of the perioperative venous thromboembolism (VTE) management in gastrointestinal cancer, and what is responsible for that? This paper aims at finding out the reasons contributing to the current status, giving suggestions for how to make improvement at both disease level and hospital management level. At the same time, while paying attention for the prophylaxis of VTE, there have been more and more patients receiving antithrombotic treatment require elective or emergent surgery in clinical practice, due to aging and increased incidence of cardiovascular disease year by year. How to balance the bleeding and thrombosis risk for these patients during perioperative periods is also a question we are going to discuss. In conclusion, as to the issue of the management of perioperative thrombosis, there will be a long way for Chinese doctors to go. Our peers should pay more attention to this problem and take more efforts, so that the thrombotic complications in surgical patients can be reduced.

  15. MO-B-201-00: Motion Management in Current Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy (SBRT) Practice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2016-06-15

    The motion management in stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) is a key to success for a SBRT program, and still an on-going challenging task. A major factor is that moving structures behave differently than standing structures when examined by imaging modalities, and thus require special considerations and employments. Understanding the motion effects to these different imaging processes is a prerequisite for a decent motion management program. The commonly used motion control techniques to physically restrict tumor motion, if adopted correctly, effectively increase the conformity and accuracy of hypofractionated treatment. The effective application of such requires one to understand the mechanics of the application and the related physiology especially related to respiration. The image-guided radiation beam control, or tumor tracking, further realized the endeavor for precision-targeting. During tumor tracking, the respiratory motion is often constantly monitored by non-ionizing beam sources using the body surface as its surrogate. This then has to synchronize with the actual internal tumor motion. The latter is often accomplished by stereo X-ray imaging or similar techniques. With these advanced technologies, one may drastically reduce the treated volume and increase the clinicians’ confidence for a high fractional ablative radiation dose. However, the challenges in implementing the motion management may not be trivial and is dependent on each clinic case. This session of presentations is intended to provide an overview of the current techniques used in managing the tumor motion in SBRT, specifically for routine lung SBRT, proton based treatments, and newly-developed MR guided RT. Learning Objectives: Through this presentation, the audience will understand basic roles of commonly used imaging modalities for lung cancer studies; familiarize the major advantages and limitations of each discussed motion control methods; familiarize the major advantages and

  16. AIRBORNE CONTACT DERMATITIS – CURRENT PERSPECTIVES IN ETIOPATHOGENESIS AND MANAGEMENT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Handa, Sanjeev; De, Dipankar; Mahajan, Rahul

    2011-01-01

    The increasing recognition of occupational origin of airborne contact dermatitis has brought the focus on the variety of irritants, which can present with this typical morphological picture. At the same time, airborne allergic contact dermatitis secondary to plant antigens, especially to Compositae family, continues to be rampant in many parts of the world, especially in the Indian subcontinent. The recognition of the contactant may be difficult to ascertain and the treatment may be even more difficult. The present review focuses on the epidemiological, clinical and therapeutic issues in airborne contact dermatitis. PMID:22345774

  17. Managers' perceptions of radiographers' skills: current and future needs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akroyd, D; Wold, B

    1996-01-01

    As the healthcare delivery system changes, it is imperative to assess the skills of practitioners to ensure consistency between educational preparation and work place needs. The purpose of this study was to examine radiology managers' perception of selected workplace skills and new radiography graduates' ability to perform them. A random sample of 1,932 members of the American Healthcare Radiology Administrators (AHRA) received a questionnaire containing 35 skills categorized as basic, intermediate or advanced. Skills were ranked by the magnitude of the difference between managers' rating of importance of each skill and their rating of graduates' ability to perform that skill satisfactorily. In the basic skill area, the four top-ranked skills represented problem-solving ability or critical thinking. Of the five highest-ranked intermediate skills, the top three were patient care skills: venipuncture, taking vital signs and monitoring patient equipment. In the advanced skill area, six skills exhibited high values for the difference between importance and ability. Two of those related to patient care, three were non-technical and the sixth was the ability to perform CT in addition to basic radiography. Employers and educators should work together to seek educational methods that produce radiographers who are better prepared for the fast-changing workplace.

  18. Spent fuel management: Current status and prospects 1993

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-02-01

    Spent fuel management has always been one of the most important stages in the nuclear fuel cycle and it is still one of the most vital problems common to all countries with nuclear reactors. It begins with the discharge of spent fuel from a power or a research reactor and ends with its ultimate disposition, either by direct disposal or by reprocessing of the spent fuel. Two options exist at present - an open, once-through cycle with direct disposal of the spent fuel and a closed cycle with reprocessing of the spent fuel and recycling of plutonium and uranium in new mixed oxide fuels. The selection of a spent fuel strategy is a complex procedure in which many factors have to be weighed, including political, economic and safeguards issues as well as protection of the environment. Continuous attention is being given by the IAEA to the collection, analysis and exchange of information on spent fuel management. Its role in this area is to provide a forum for the exchange of information and to co-ordinate and to encourage closer co-operation among Member States in certain research an development activities that are of common interest. Refs, figs and tabs

  19. Clinical Interventions for Hyperacusis in Adults: A Scoping Review to Assess the Current Position and Determine Priorities for Research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kathryn Fackrell

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. There is no universally accepted definition for hyperacusis, but in general it is characterised by decreased sound tolerance to ordinary environmental sounds. Despite hyperacusis being prevalent and having significant clinical implications, much remains unknown about current management strategies. Purpose. To establish the current position of research on hyperacusis and identify research gaps to direct future research. Design and Sample. Using an established methodological framework, electronic and manual searches of databases and journals identified 43 records that met our inclusion criteria. Incorporating content and thematic analysis approaches, the definitions of hyperacusis, management strategies, and outcome measures were catalogued. Results. Only 67% of the studies provided a definition of hyperacusis, such as “reduced tolerance” or “oversensitivity to sound.” Assessments and outcome measures included Loudness Discomfort Levels, the Hyperacusis Questionnaire, and Tinnitus Retraining Therapy (TRT interview. Management strategies reported were Cognitive Behavioural Therapy, TRT, devices, pharmacological therapy, and surgery. Conclusions. Management strategies were typically evaluated in patients reporting hyperacusis as a secondary complaint or as part of a symptom set. As such the outcomes reported only provided an indication of their effectiveness for hyperacusis. Randomised Controlled Trials are needed to evaluate the effectiveness of management strategies for patients experiencing hyperacusis.

  20. Clinical pathways for primary care: current use, interest and perceived usability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waters, Richard C; Toy, Jennifer M; Drechsler, Adam

    2018-02-26

    Translating clinical evidence to daily practice remains a challenge and may improve with clinical pathways. We assessed interest in and usability of clinical pathways by primary care professionals. An online survey was created. Interest in pathways for patient care and learning was assessed at start and finish. Participants completed baseline questions then pathway-associated question sets related to management of 2 chronic diseases. Perceived pathway usability was assessed using the system usability scale. Accuracy and confidence of answers was compared for baseline and pathway-assisted questions. Of 115 participants, 17.4% had used clinical pathways, the lowest of decision support tool types surveyed. Accuracy and confidence in answers significantly improved for all pathways. Interest in using pathways daily or weekly was above 75% for the respondents. There is low utilization of, but high interest in, clinical pathways by primary care clinicians. Pathways improve accuracy and confidence in answering written clinical questions.

  1. National clinical guidelines for management of the palatally ectopic maxillary canine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Husain, J; Burden, D; McSherry, P; Morris, D; Allen, M

    2012-08-01

    This review summarises updated clinical guidelines produced by the Clinical Standards Committee of the Faculty of Dental Surgery, Royal College of Surgeons of England (FDSRCS). This guideline on the management of the palatally ectopic maxillary canine illustrates the information contained in the recently updated online version. The timely recognition of ectopic canines is important for the overall management of the dentition. This review illustrates five management strategies for ectopic permanent canines: interceptive treatment by extraction of the deciduous canine, surgical exposure and orthodontic alignment, surgical removal of the palatally ectopic permanent canine, auto-transplantation and no active treatment/leave and observe. The current available evidence for each of these management options has been evaluated and awarded a grade used by the Scottish Intercollegiate Guidelines Network.

  2. Targeted therapies with companion diagnostics in the management of breast cancer: current perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myers, Meagan B

    2016-01-01

    Breast cancer is a multifaceted disease exhibiting both intertumoral and intratumoral heterogeneity as well as variable disease course. Over 2 decades of research has advanced the understanding of the molecular substructure of breast cancer, directing the development of new therapeutic strategies against these actionable targets. In vitro diagnostics, and specifically companion diagnostics, have been integral in the successful development and implementation of these targeted therapies, such as those directed against the human epidermal growth factor receptor 2. Lately, there has been a surge in the development, commercialization, and marketing of diagnostic assays to assist in breast cancer patient care. More recently, multigene signature assays, such as Oncotype DX, MammaPrint, and Prosigna, have been integrated in the clinical setting in order to tailor decisions on adjuvant endocrine and chemotherapy treatment. This review provides an overview of the current state of breast cancer management and the use of companion diagnostics to direct personalized approaches in the treatment of breast cancer.

  3. Women's Management of Recurrent Bacterial Vaginosis and Experiences of Clinical Care: A Qualitative Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jade Bilardi

    Full Text Available Few data are available on how women manage recurring bacterial vaginosis (BV and their experiences of the clinical care of this condition. This study aimed to explore women's recurrent BV management approaches and clinical care experiences, with a view to informing and improving the clinical management of BV.A descriptive, social constructionist approach was chosen as the framework for the study. Thirty-five women of varying sexual orientation who had experienced recurrent BV in the past 5 years took part in semi-structured interviews.The majority of women reported frustration and dissatisfaction with current treatment regimens and low levels of satisfaction with the clinical management of BV. Overall, women disliked taking antibiotics regularly, commonly experienced adverse side effects from treatment and felt frustrated at having symptoms recur quite quickly after treatment. Issues in clinical care included inconsistency in advice, misdiagnosis and inappropriate diagnostic approaches and insensitive or dismissive attitudes. Women were more inclined to report positive clinical experiences with sexual health physicians than primary care providers. Women's frustrations led most to try their own self-help remedies and lifestyle modifications in an attempt to treat symptoms and prevent recurrences, including well-known risk practices such as douching.In the face of considerable uncertainty about the cause of BV, high rates of recurrence, unacceptable treatment options and often insensitive and inconsistent clinical management, women are trying their own self-help remedies and lifestyle modifications to prevent recurrences, often with little effect. Clinical management of BV could be improved through the use of standardised diagnostic approaches, increased sensitivity and understanding of the impact of BV, and the provision of evidence based advice about known BV related risk factors.

  4. Current industrial practice of managing risks in product development project portfolios

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weng, R.; Oehmen, Josef; Ben-Daya, M.

    2013-01-01

    Managing portfolios of development and engineering projects currently presents significant challenges to companies. This is even more the case in the management of portfolio risks, where both industry and academia currently lack a clear conceptual understanding of what portfolio risks are and what...

  5. Book Review: Current Issues in International Human Resource Management and Strategy Research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gretzinger, Susanne

    2009-01-01

    The article reviews the book "Current Issues in International Human Resource Management and Strategy Research," edited by Marion Festing and Susanne Royer.......The article reviews the book "Current Issues in International Human Resource Management and Strategy Research," edited by Marion Festing and Susanne Royer....

  6. Current Trends on Lean Management – A review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Shabeena Begam

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available All manufacturing industry has put in continuous efforts for its survival in the current impulsive and competitive economy. In order to handle the critical situation, manufacturers are trying to implement new and innovative techniques in their manufacturing process by making it more effective and efficient. A detailed literature survey has been conducted to identify the lean practices in various manufacturing industry. The results revealed that the status of Lean Manufacturing (LM implementation in still in thriving stage. This paper will further assist the organizations to improve its process, align it to the requirements of its customers and relentless contribution to manufacturing sector to enhance productivity, quality and competitiveness is immense.

  7. Avoidable Technical and Clinical Denial Write-Off Management in Hospitals, Physician Offices, and Clinics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terra, Sandra Marlene; Byrne, Amanda

    2016-01-01

    This article reviews the various types of technical and clinical denials that are usually "written off" and proposes strategies to prevent this loss. For purposes of this writing, avoidable technical and clinical denial write-offs are defined as revenue lost from "first-pass" denials rejections. For example, a procedure that requires an authorization is performed without having had an authorization obtained. After appeals and attempts to recoup the revenue, often unsuccessful, the organization ultimately "writes off" the revenue as not collectable. The question to ask is: Are these claims really not collectable or can actionable steps be taken to conserve these dollars and improve the bottom line? Acute care hospitals, physician offices, and clinics. In today's environment, the need to manage costs is ubiquitous. Cost management is on the priority list of all savvy health care executives, even if margins are healthy, revenue is under pressure, and the magnitude of cost reduction needed is greater than what past efforts have achieved. As hospitals and physician clinics prioritize areas for improvement, reduction in lost revenue-especially avoidable lost revenue-should be at the top of the list. Attentively managing claim denial write-offs will significantly reduce lost revenue. There is significant interface between case management and the revenue cycle. Developing core competencies for reducing clinical and technical denials should be a critical imperative in overall cost management strategy. Case managers are well placed to prevent these unnecessary losses through accurate status determination and clinical documentation review. These clinical professionals can also provide insight into work flow and other processes inherent in the preauthorization process.

  8. SELF WOUND MANAGEMENT PRACTICES BEFORE ATTENDING ANTIRABIES VACCINE CLINIC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amit Kumar Mishra, Smita Panda, Prakash Chandra Panda

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: In INDIA almost 20000 people die (40% of world death each year from rabies. Most of these deaths could be prevented by post exposure prophylaxis with wound washing, rabies immunoglobulin & vaccination. Local wound management alone can reduce viral load by up to 80%. Objective: To study self-wound management practices in animal exposure patients before attending a tertiary level ARV clinic. Methodology: Data regarding wound management was collected by individual interview of patients attending the ARV clinic during OCT 2011 to MAR 2012. The data collected in the form of a questionnaire. Analysis of data was done in the Department Of Community Medicine, V.S.S. Medical College, Burla. Results: Total 493 cases of animal exposure were attended during the study period. Most common biting animal was dog (94.5%. 31% of cases were under the age of 10 years & 23% belongs to the age of 10-19 years. Male to female ratio was 3:1. Most of the cases (91% were of category III exposure. Immediate management of wound was practiced by 63-77% of cases before visiting ARV clinic; only 2% wash the wound with running water & soap for 15 minutes. 39% of cases applied Dettol/savlon at the wound side & other 38% applied turmeric, red chilli, kerosene, Band-Aid & ghee locally. Most cases (61% reported to ARV clinic within 24hours.

  9. Strategies to improve clinical management of community-acquired pneumonia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meijvis, S.C.A.

    2012-01-01

    Despite advances during the last few decades in the prevention, diagnosis and treatment of community-acquired pneumonia (CAP), its incidence remains high. In this thesis, strategies are described for improvement of the quality of clinical management in patients with pneumonia and for the reduction

  10. Risk Factors, Clinical Features and Management Of Children With ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In spite of the diarrhoeal disease control Programme of WHO and campaign efforts of the Nigerian government in the prevention and management ofdiarrhoea, the disease still remains a major causes of death among children under 5 years in Nigerian. Hence this study was aimed at assessing the risk factors, clinical ...

  11. The causation and clinical management of pelvic radiation disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schofield, P.; Lupton, E.

    1989-01-01

    This book describes the principles and methods of radiotherapy for pelvic tumours, pathological features and radiological analysis of bowel and urinary tract changes. Topics covered include clinical assessment and management, where the need for a multi-disciplinary approach is emphasized

  12. Molar incisor hypomineralisation: clinical management of the young patient.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Daly, Dympna

    2009-04-01

    Molar incisor hypomineralisation (MIH) is a common developmental condition resulting in enamel defects in first permanent molars and permanent incisors. It presents at eruption of these teeth. Early diagnosis is essential since rapid breakdown of tooth structure may occur, giving rise to acute symptoms and complicated treatment. The purpose of this article is to review MIH and illustrate its clinical management in young children.

  13. Lupus Nephritis in Asia: Clinical Features and Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yap, Desmond Y H; Chan, Tak Mao

    2015-09-01

    Lupus nephritis (LN) is a common and severe organ involvement manifesting itself in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). There is a considerable difference in prevalence, severity, treatment response and outcomes between Asian LN patients and LN patients from other racial backgrounds. Asian SLE patients have a higher prevalence of LN than Caucasian SLE patients and often present with a more severe disease. Increasing data from genetic studies, accompanied by progress in high-throughput genotyping, have advanced our knowledge about genetic predispositions that might partly contribute to the clinical variations observed. Corticosteroids combined with either cyclophosphamide (CYC) or mycophenolic acid (MPA) is the current standard-of-care induction regimen for severe LN irrespective of race or ethnicity. However, the preference for MPA or CYC, and possibly the optimum dose for MPA, is influenced by the patient's origin. Also, there is an insufficient evidence base for reduced-dose intravenous CYC in Asian patients. Health economics and access to prompt diagnosis and treatment are still challenging issues in some Asian regions. The former represents a significant obstacle limiting the access of patients to MPA despite the proven efficacy of the drug as an induction agent and its superiority over azathioprine (AZA) in preventing disease flares when used for long-term maintenance immunosuppression. Calcineurin inhibitors such as tacrolimus deserve further investigation in view of their additional effect on podocytes by reducing proteinuria and the promising data from Asian patients. Despite considerable advances in the clinical management of LN over the past few decades with resultant improvements in patients' outcomes, there are still knowledge gaps and unmet clinical needs. Asia has made substantial contributions to the evidence base that guides clinical management and continues to offer invaluable opportunities for research pursuits. Treatment responses and clinical

  14. Management and employee control in current industrial work

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holt, Helle; Hvid, Helge

    2014-01-01

    This article examines how employee control is affected by the ongoing erosion of boundaries in work organization and established boundaries in the relationship between employees and management. One assumption is that the erosion of boundaries offers potential for increased employee control, meaning...... increased autonomy or self-determination at work (employee control how and when to do what). This assumption is supported by theories on the psychosocial working environment. Another assumption is that the erosion of boundaries threatens the frontiers from where employees can defend their interests......, and consequently reduces employees’ control of their work (what and how much to do). This assumption is supported by “labor process theory.” This article studies control and the erosion of boundaries in two case factories in the food industry. Two perspectives are applied: the psychosocial working environment...

  15. Current status of IAEA activities in spent fuel management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Danker, W.J.

    2003-01-01

    Spent fuel storage is a common issue in all IAEA Member States with nuclear reactors. Whatever strategy is selected for the back-end of the nuclear fuel cycle, the storage of spent fuel will be an increasingly significant consideration. Notwithstanding considerable efforts to increase the efficient use of nuclear fuel and to optimize storage capacity, delays in plans for geological repositories or in implementing reprocessing result in increased spent fuel storage capacity needs in combination with longer storage durations over the foreseeable future. As storage inventories and durations increase, issues associated with long term storage compel more attention...monitoring for potential degradation mechanisms, records retention, maintenance, efficiencies through burnup credit. Since the IAEA contribution to ICNC'99 focused exclusively on IAEA burnup credit activities including requirements and methods, this paper provides a broader perspective on IAEA activities in response to the above trends in spent fuel management, while also describing efforts to disseminate information regarding burnup credit applications. (author)

  16. Management and employee control in current industrial work

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holt, Helle; Hvid, Helge

    2014-01-01

    , and consequently reduces employees’ control of their work (what and how much to do). This assumption is supported by “labor process theory.” This article studies control and the erosion of boundaries in two case factories in the food industry. Two perspectives are applied: the psychosocial working environment......This article examines how employee control is affected by the ongoing erosion of boundaries in work organization and established boundaries in the relationship between employees and management. One assumption is that the erosion of boundaries offers potential for increased employee control, meaning...... increased autonomy or self-determination at work (employee control how and when to do what). This assumption is supported by theories on the psychosocial working environment. Another assumption is that the erosion of boundaries threatens the frontiers from where employees can defend their interests...

  17. Review of the Current Management of Pressure Ulcers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyko, Tatiana V.; Longaker, Michael T.; Yang, George P.

    2018-01-01

    Significance: The incidence of pressure ulcers is increasing due to our aging population and the increase in the elderly living with disability. Learning how to manage pressure ulcers appropriately is increasingly important for all professionals in wound care. Recent Advances: Many new dressings and treatment modalities have been developed over the recent years and the goal of this review is to highlight their benefits and drawbacks to help providers choose their tools appropriately. Critical Issues: Despite an increased number of therapies available on the market, none has demonstrated any clear benefit over the others and pressure ulcer treatment remains frustrating and time-consuming. Future Directions: Additional research is needed to develop products more effective in prevention and treatment of pressure ulcers. PMID:29392094

  18. Multiday Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation Causes Clinically Insignificant Changes in Childhood Dystonia: A Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhanpuri, Nasir H; Bertucco, Matteo; Young, Scott J; Lee, Annie A; Sanger, Terence D

    2015-10-01

    Abnormal motor cortex activity is common in dystonia. Cathodal transcranial direct current stimulation may alter cortical activity by decreasing excitability while anodal stimulation may increase motor learning. Previous results showed that a single session of cathodal transcranial direct current stimulation can improve symptoms in childhood dystonia. Here we performed a 5-day, sham-controlled, double-blind, crossover study, where we measured tracking and muscle overflow in a myocontrol-based task. We applied cathodal and anodal transcranial direct current stimulation (2 mA, 9 minutes per day). For cathodal transcranial direct current stimulation (7 participants), 3 subjects showed improvements whereas 2 showed worsening in overflow or tracking error. The effect size was small (about 1% of maximum voluntary contraction) and not clinically meaningful. For anodal transcranial direct current stimulation (6 participants), none showed improvement, whereas 5 showed worsening. Thus, multiday cathodal transcranial direct current stimulation reduced symptoms in some children but not to a clinically meaningful extent, whereas anodal transcranial direct current stimulation worsened symptoms. Our results do not support transcranial direct current stimulation as clinically viable for treating childhood dystonia. © The Author(s) 2015.

  19. Current and future perspectives on the management of polypharmacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molokhia, Mariam; Majeed, Azeem

    2017-06-06

    Because of ageing populations, the growth in the number of people with multi-morbidity and greater compliance with disease-specific guidelines, polypharmacy is becoming increasingly common. Although the correct drug treatment in patients with complex medical problems can improve clinical outcomes, quality of life and life expectancy, polypharmacy is also associated with an increased risk of adverse drug events, some severe enough to result in hospital admission and even death. Hence, having systems in place to ensure that medications are started only when there is a suitable indication, ensuring patients are fully aware of the benefits and complications that may arise from their treatment, and reviewing patients regularly to ensure their medication regime remains appropriate, are essential. The development and rapid uptake of electronic patient records - particularly in primary care settings where the majority of prescribing takes place - makes monitoring of patients more straightforward than in the past; and allows identification of sub-groups of patients at particularly high risk of adverse drug events and complications. It also facilitates 'deprescribing' the process by which medications are reviewed and stopped if not clinically beneficial. In recent years, we have also seen the development of smartphone 'apps' to improve communication between patients and healthcare professionals, improve people's understanding of their conditions and their treatment, and maintain a record of changes made to patient's medication. In the longer term, developments such as the introduction of artificial intelligence and clinical decision support systems also have the potential to improve prescribing and minimise the risks from polypharmacy. Finally, there is considerable scope to improve the quality of prescribing and reduce risks from poly-pharmacy using non-medical groups such as pharmacists, specialist nurses and physician assistants. Polypharmacy has increased in recent

  20. Current Surgical Options for the Management of Pediatric Glaucoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jose Morales

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Currently, there are numerous choices for the treatment of pediatric glaucoma depending on the type of glaucoma, the age of the patient, and other particularities of the condition discussed in this review. Traditionally, goniotomy and trabeculotomy ab externo have been the preferred choices of treatment for congenital glaucoma, and a variety of adult procedures adapted to children have been utilized for other types of pediatric glaucoma with variable results and complications. More recently, seton implantations of different types have become more popular to use in children, and newer techniques have become available including visualized cannulation and opening of Schlemm’s canal, deep sclerectomy, trabectome, and milder more directed cyclodestructive procedures such as endolaser and transcleral diode laser cyclophotocoagulation. This paper reviews the different surgical techniques currently available, their indications, results, and most common complications to allow the surgeon treating these conditions to make a more informed choice in each particular case. Although the outcome of surgical treatment in pediatric glaucoma has improved significantly, its treatment remains challenging.

  1. Low Anterior Resection Syndrome: Current Management and Future Directions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ridolfi, Timothy J; Berger, Nicholas; Ludwig, Kirk A

    2016-09-01

    Outcomes for rectal cancer surgery have improved significantly over the past 20 years with increasing rates of survival and recurrence, specifically local recurrence. These gains have been realized during a period of time in which there has been an increasing emphasis on sphincter preservation. As we have become increasingly aggressive in avoiding resection of the anus, we have begun accepting bowel dysfunction as a normal outcome. Low anterior resection syndrome, defined as a constellation of symptoms including incontinence, frequency, urgency, or feelings of incomplete emptying, has a significant impact on quality of life and results in many patients opting for a permanent colostomy to avoid these symptoms. In this article, we will highlight the most recent clinical and basic science research on this topic and discuss areas of future investigation.

  2. Current treatment options for the management of patent ductus arteriosus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takeuchi K

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Koh Takeuchi,1 Atsushi Hirota,2 Sachito Minegishi,1 Jotaro Kobayashi,1 Keiji Tsuchiya3 1Division of Cardiovascular Surgery, 2Department of Neonatology, 3Department of Pediatrics, Japanese Red Cross Medical Center, Shibuya, Tokyo, Japan Abstract: Pharmacological and/or surgical closure of a hemodynamically significant patent ductus arteriosus (PDA in the very premature infant has been the standard of care over the past few decades. However, the rationale for closure of PDA has recently been challenged. In this article, three ways of approaching the closure of PDA including pharmacological treatment, catheter intervention, and surgical intervention, are reviewed in detail. In addition, the different treatment strategies applied in clinical care are evaluated with a focus on the discussion of the available evidence of PDA treatment in the literature. Keywords: patent ductus arteriosus, premature infant, treatment option

  3. Disturbingly Weak: The Current State of Financial Management Education in Library and Information Science Curricula

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burger, Robert H.; Kaufman, Paula T.; Atkinson, Amy L.

    2015-01-01

    Financial management skills are necessary for responsible library management. In light of the profession's current emphasis on financial literacy, the authors posed four questions: (1) to what extent are library and information science schools providing courses in financial management for their graduates; (2) what is the quality and quantity of…

  4. Clinical Management of Two Root Resorption Cases in Endodontic Practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jozef Mincik

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Root resorption is a pathological process involving loss of hard dental tissues. It may occur as a consequence of dental trauma, orthodontic treatment, and bleaching, and occasionally it accompanies periodontal disease. Although the mechanism of resorption process is examined in detail, its etiology is not fully understood. Wide open apical foramen is more difficult to manage and the root canal may often overfill. In this report we present two cases of root resorption and describe means for its clinical management. We conclude that useful measure of a success or failure in managing root resorption is the persistence of the resorption process. It is a clear sign of an active ongoing inflammatory process and shows the clinical need for retreatment.

  5. Management of Neuropsychiatric Systemic Lupus Erythematosus: Current Approaches and Future Perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magro-Checa, César; Zirkzee, Elisabeth J; Huizinga, Tom W; Steup-Beekman, Gerda M

    2016-03-01

    Neuropsychiatric systemic lupus erythematosus (NPSLE) is a generic definition referring to a series of neurological and psychiatric symptoms directly related to systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). NPSLE includes heterogeneous and rare neuropsychiatric (NP) manifestations involving both the central and peripheral nervous system. Due to the lack of a gold standard, the attribution of NP symptoms to SLE represents a clinical challenge that obligates the strict exclusion of any other potential cause. In the acute setting, management of these patients does not differ from other non-SLE subjects presenting with the same NP manifestation. Afterwards, an individualized therapeutic strategy, depending on the presenting manifestation and severity of symptoms, must be started. Clinical trials in NPSLE are scarce and most of the data are extracted from case series and case reports. High-dose glucocorticoids and intravenous cyclophosphamide remain the cornerstone for patients with severe symptoms that are thought to reflect inflammation or an underlying autoimmune process. Rituximab, intravenous immunoglobulins, or plasmapheresis may be used if response is not achieved. When patients present with mild to moderate NP manifestations, or when maintenance therapy is warranted, azathioprine and mycophenolate may be considered. When symptoms are thought to reflect a thrombotic underlying process, anticoagulation and antiplatelet agents are the mainstay of therapy, especially if antiphospholipid antibodies or antiphospholipid syndrome are present. Recent trials on SLE using new biologicals, based on newly understood SLE mechanisms, have shown promising results. Based on what we currently know about its pathogenesis, it is tempting to speculate how these new therapies may affect the management of NPSLE patients. This article provides a comprehensive and critical review of the literature on the epidemiology, pathophysiology, diagnosis, and management of NPSLE. We describe the most

  6. Knowledge Creation in Clinical Product Development Management Research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karlsson, Christer; Sköld, Martin

    2012-01-01

    This paper explores the clinical approach to management research and positions it in relation to other similar approaches. It achieves this by pointing out the most important historical milestones in the development of such approaches. The literature on the approach is mapped, including that on t......This paper explores the clinical approach to management research and positions it in relation to other similar approaches. It achieves this by pointing out the most important historical milestones in the development of such approaches. The literature on the approach is mapped, including...... of the approaches, the paper discusses the research issues to which clinical research is relevant and how the research framework should be designed, then practical issues relating to how to approach the study objects, the design of the research instruments, and the conducting of the field research. Finally...

  7. Zika virus and reproduction: facts, questions and current management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epelboin, Sylvie; Dulioust, Emmanuel; Epelboin, Loïc; Benachi, Alexandra; Merlet, Françoise; Patrat, Catherine

    2017-11-01

    Zika virus (ZIKV) is an arthropod-borne virus of the family Flaviviridae, genus Flavivirus. ZIKV is currently the focus of an ongoing pandemic and worldwide public health emergency. Although originally isolated in 1947, its pathogenesis was poorly known and very few documented infections were published until recently. Its route of transmission and its impact on reproduction and pregnancy have only recently begun to be disclosed. This review summarizes the most recent knowledge about ZIKV infection and pathogenesis and focuses on its impacts on male and female genital tracts, including the risks of sexual transmission and to pregnancy. The consequences of ZIKV infection for pregnancy planning and ART are also discussed. The PubMed and EMBASE databases were inter-rogated using specific terms, such as 'ZIKV', 'transmission', 'male', 'female', fertility', 'pregnancy, 'semen', 'testis', 'ovary' and 'genital tract', up to 17 March 2017. ZIKV has long been considered a harmless virus, but increasing evidence suggests that it has adverse effects on the neurological system and on pregnancy outcomes. In mice, ZIKV slows foetal growth and damages the foetal brain. In humans, the virus is able to cross the placental barrier and to induce foetal death and major anomalies, such as microcephaly, brain defects and long-term neurologic sequelae, i.e. the 'congenital Zika syndrome'. In addition to its transmission by mosquitoes, ZIKV may be transmitted sexually. Currently available data indicate that ZIKV RNA can remain detectable in semen for several months, whereas shedding in the female genital tract appears to be rare and of short duration. Current guidance on preventing the sexual transmission of ZIKV is based on the assumption that transmission occurs from a male partner to a receptive partner. Furthermore, in mouse models, the virus can actively replicate in male genital organs and induce severe orchitis, which raises concerns about its possible impact on human male fertility

  8. Molecular pathogenesis and clinical management of Fanconi anemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kee, Younghoon; D’Andrea, Alan D.

    2012-01-01

    Fanconi anemia (FA) is a rare genetic disorder associated with a high frequency of hematological abnormalities and congenital anomalies. Based on multilateral efforts from basic scientists and clinicians, significant advances in our knowledge of FA have been made in recent years. Here we review the clinical features, the diagnostic criteria, and the current and future therapies of FA and describe the current understanding of the molecular basis of the disease. PMID:23114602

  9. Pharmacotherapy for uveitis: current management and emerging therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barry, Robert J; Nguyen, Quan Dong; Lee, Richard W; Murray, Philip I; Denniston, Alastair K

    2014-01-01

    Uveitis, a group of conditions characterized by intraocular inflammation, is a major cause of sight loss in the working population. Most uveitis seen in Western countries is noninfectious and appears to be autoimmune or autoinflammatory in nature, requiring treatment with immunosuppressive and/or anti-inflammatory drugs. In this educational review, we outline the ideal characteristics of drugs for uveitis and review the data to support the use of current and emerging therapies in this context. It is crucial that we continue to develop new therapies for use in uveitis that aim to suppress disease activity, prevent accumulation of damage, and preserve visual function for patients with the minimum possible side effects. PMID:25284976

  10. Nasal juvenile angiofibroma: Current perspectives with emphasis on management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López, Fernando; Triantafyllou, Asterios; Snyderman, Carl H; Hunt, Jennifer L; Suárez, Carlos; Lund, Valerie J; Strojan, Primož; Saba, Nabil F; Nixon, Iain J; Devaney, Kenneth O; Alobid, Isam; Bernal-Sprekelsen, Manuel; Hanna, Ehab Y; Rinaldo, Alessandra; Ferlito, Alfio

    2017-05-01

    Juvenile angiofibroma is an uncommon, benign, locally aggressive vascular tumor. It is found almost exclusively in young men. Common presenting symptoms include nasal obstruction and epistaxis. More advanced tumors may present with facial swelling and visual or neurological disturbances. The evaluation of patients with juvenile angiofibroma relies on diagnostic imaging. Preoperative biopsy is not recommended. The mainstay of treatment is resection combined with preoperative embolization. Endoscopic surgery is the approach of choice in early stages, whereas, in advanced stages, open or endoscopic approaches are feasible in expert hands. Postoperative radiotherapy (RT) or stereotactic radiosurgery seem valuable in long-term control of juvenile angiofibroma, particularly those that extend to anatomically critical areas unsuitable for complete resection. Chemotherapy and hormone therapy are ineffective. The purpose of the present review was to update current aspects of knowledge related to this rare and challenging disease. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Head Neck 39: 1033-1045, 2017. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Current management options for latent tuberculosis: a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Norton BL

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Brianna L Norton, David P HollandDepartment of Medicine, Division of Infectious Diseases, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC, USAAbstract: Tuberculosis remains the world’s second leading infectious cause of death, with nearly one-third of the global population latently infected. Treatment of latent tuberculosis infection is a mainstay of tuberculosis-control efforts in low-to medium-incidence countries. Isoniazid monotherapy has been the standard of care for decades, but its utility is impaired by poor completion rates. However, new, shorter-course regimens using rifamycins improve completion rates and are cost-saving compared with standard isoniazid monotherapy. We review the currently available therapies for latent tuberculosis infection and their toxicities and include a brief economic comparison of the different regimens.Keywords: isoniazid, rifampin, rifapentine, tuberculin skin test, interferon-gamma release assay

  12. Adaptation of an asthma management program to a small clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwong, Kenny Yat-Choi; Redjal, Nasser; Scott, Lyne; Li, Marilyn; Thobani, Salima; Yang, Brian

    2017-07-01

    Asthma management programs, such as the Breathmobile program, have been extremely effective in reducing asthma morbidity and increasing disease control; however, their high start-up costs may preclude their implementation in smaller health systems. In this study, we extended validated asthma disease management principles from the Breathmobile program to a smaller clinic system utilizing existing resources and compared clinical outcomes. Cox-regression analyses were conducted to determine the cumulative probability that a new patient entering the program would achieve improved clinical control of asthma with each subsequent visit to the program. A weekly asthma disease management clinic was initiated in an existing multi-specialty pediatric clinic in collaboration with the Breathmobile program. Existing nursing staff was utilized in conjunction with an asthma specialist provider. Patients were referred from a regional healthcare maintenance organization and patients were evaluated and treated every 2 months. Reduction in emergency department (ED) visits and hospitalizations, and improvements in asthma control were assessed at the end of 1 year. A total of 116 patients were enrolled over a period of 1 year. Mean patient age was 6.4 years at the time of their first visit. Patient ethnicity was self-described predominantly as Hispanic or African American. Initial asthma severity for most patients, classified in accordance with national guidelines, was "moderate persistent." After 1 year of enrollment, there was a 69% and 92% reduction in ED/urgent care visits and hospitalizations, respectively, compared with the year before enrollment. Up to 70% of patients achieved asthma control by the third visit. Thirty-six different patients were seen during 1 year for a total of $15,938.70 in contracted reimbursements. A large-scale successful asthma management program can be adapted to a stationary clinic system and achieve comparable results.

  13. Current status and future prospects of the development of clinical Pharmacy in China: A SWOT analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Yuefeng; Zhao, Qingwei; Zhang, Xiangyi; Yang, Hongyu; Lou, Yan; Zhang, Xingguo

    2016-03-01

    In many industrialized countries, clinical pharmacy has developed into a separate discipline and become a vital part of inpatient care in hospitals. However, as compared to many established branches of medicine, clinical pharmacy is still in its infancy, with much room for growth, improvement, and recognition by both the medical community and patients. In this study, a widely-recognized development strategy analysis tool, Strength, Weakness, Opportunity and Threat (SWOT), was used to systematically address several key issues to the development of clinical pharmacy in China. This analysis aims to provide feasible recommendations for the development of clinical pharmacy in China by identifying current problems and growth opportunities. Full development of clinical pharmacy as a mature clinical discipline will help promote the rational use of drugs by both clinicians and patients and lead to enhanced drug efficacy and safety.

  14. A survey of current practices in management of Hirschsprung′s disease in Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdulrasheed A. Nasir

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Although there are several modalities of treatment for Hirschsprung′s disease (HD, there are presently no clear guidelines on treatment of the condition by paediatric surgeons in Nigeria. This survey determines the current approach to treatment among Nigerian paediatric surgeons and should help in establishing a consensus and guidelines for care in this and similar setting. Materials and Methods: An online questionnaire was designed using survey Monkey ® to determine current clinical and operative management of patients with HD by consultant paediatric surgeons practicing in the Nigeria. The paediatric surgeons were notified by E-mail, which included a link to the survey on survey Monkey ® . The survey was also administered at the 12 th annual meeting of Association of Paediatric Surgeons of Nigeria in September, 2013, to capture those who did not complete the online survey. Thirty-one paediatric surgeons from 21 different tertiary paediatric surgery centres completed the survey. Results: Sixteen (52% respondents see up to 20% of their patients with HD in the neonatal period. Twenty-six (84% respondents do routine barium enema. Twenty six (84% respondents do full thickness rectal biopsy under general anaesthesia (GA. There was no consistency in operative techniques, with transabominal Swenson′s operation being practiced by 17 (57% respondents and 11 (37% transanal endorectal pull through. 14 (45% do pull through at any age. 12 (39% respondents do more than half of their patient as primary pull through. Conclusion: Full thickness rectal biopsy under GA is still the vogue with variations in the surgical technique for management of Hirshsprung′s disease in Nigeria. Primary pull through procedures is becoming increasingly popular. There′s a need for Paediatric Surgeons in Nigeria to come up with a guideline on management of HD, to guide trainees and other surgeons in the care of these patients.

  15. The significance of clinical practice guidelines on adult varicocele detection and management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anand Shridharani

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Varicoceles are the most common correctable etiology of male factor infertility. However, the detection and management of varicoceles have not been standardized. This has led to decades of debate regarding the effect of varicocele on male infertility and subsequently whether repair leads to an improved fertility status. The current body of evidence investigating the role of varicocele and varicocelectomy is weak and conflicting. The stance taken by the AUA and ASRM suggests that there is insufficient outcomes data to support evidenced-based guidelines, citing evidence used to provide current recommendations are generally of a low quality level. On the other hand, the EAU Guidelines give a level 1a of evidence for management of varicoceles that are clinically palpable, associated with subnormal semen analyses and having otherwise unexplained fertility. Besides aiding with clinical varicocele detection and management, clinical practice opinion statements and guidelines aim to direct and strengthen the infrastructure of future studies. We review the current status of opinion statements and guidelines in varicocele and management detection with focus on their application in practice.

  16. The significance of clinical practice guidelines on adult varicocele detection and management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shridharani, Anand; Owen, Ryan C; Elkelany, Osama O; Kim, Edward D

    2016-01-01

    Varicoceles are the most common correctable etiology of male factor infertility. However, the detection and management of varicoceles have not been standardized. This has led to decades of debate regarding the effect of varicocele on male infertility and subsequently whether repair leads to an improved fertility status. The current body of evidence investigating the role of varicocele and varicocelectomy is weak and conflicting. The stance taken by the AUA and ASRM suggests that there is insufficient outcomes data to support evidenced-based guidelines, citing evidence used to provide current recommendations are generally of a low quality level. On the other hand, the EAU Guidelines give a level 1a of evidence for management of varicoceles that are clinically palpable, associated with subnormal semen analyses and having otherwise unexplained fertility. Besides aiding with clinical varicocele detection and management, clinical practice opinion statements and guidelines aim to direct and strengthen the infrastructure of future studies. We review the current status of opinion statements and guidelines in varicocele and management detection with focus on their application in practice.

  17. Assessing diabetes practices in clinical settings: precursor to building community partnerships around disease management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prochaska, John D; Mier, Nelda; Bolin, Jane N; Hora, Kerrie L; Clark, Heather R; Ory, Marcia G

    2009-12-01

    Many recommended best practices exist for clinical and community diabetes management and prevention. However, in many cases, these recommendations are not being fully utilized. It is useful to gain a sense of currently utilized and needed practices when beginning a partnership building effort to ameliorate such practice problems. The purpose of this study was to assess current practices in clinical settings within the Brazos Valley in preparation for beginning a community-based participatory research project on improving diabetes prevention and management in this region. Fifty-seven physicians with admission privileges to a regional health system were faxed a survey related to current diabetes patient loads, knowledge and implementation of diabetes-related best practices, and related topics. Both qualitative and quantitative examination of the data was conducted. Fifteen percent of responding providers indicated they implemented diabetes prevention best practices, with significant differences between primary-care physicians and specialists. Respondents indicated a need for educational and counseling resources, as well as an increased health-care workforce in the region. The utilization of a faxed-based survey proved an effective means for assessing baseline data as well as serving as a catalyst for further discussion around coalition development. Results indicated a strong need for both clinical and community-based services regarding diabetes prevention and management, and provided information and insight to begin focused community dialogue around diabetes prevention and management needs across the region. Other sites seeking to begin similar projects may benefit from a similar process.

  18. Current status of technology for plant life management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roche, B.

    2000-01-01

    In most developed countries of the world, deregulation of electricity markets has been established: competition is fierce, and utilities have to improve the competitiveness of their plants. It is an important challenge for nuclear power plants: a smart way to deal with this problem is life extension of existing units. The financial stakes associated with maintaining or extending the lifetime of nuclear power stations are very high; thus, if their lifetime is shortened by about ten years, dismantling and renewal would be brought forward which would increase their costs by several tens of billions of French francs. Furthermore, every extra year of operation of a 900 MWe unit should save about 500 million French francs per year on financial charges that would be necessary for a new investment, provided that maintenance costs do not become excessive. In order to succeed, utilities must improve their knowledge of ageing mechanisms, demonstrate to safety authorities the feasibility of life extension (especially taking into account critical components), operate existing units in an exemplary way, manage and master the long-term evolution of the safety reference state. (author)

  19. [Current concepts in perioperative management of children : preface and comments].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuratani, Norifumi; Kikuchi, Hirosato

    2007-05-01

    In the past few years, pediatric anesthesia management changed rapidly to more evidence-based and patient-oriented practice. It has been emphasized that "focused and individualized" pre-anesthesia evaluation is preferred to routine screening of laboratory tests and X-rays. Anesthesia induction should be less stressful for children through the use of various approaches, such as preoperative preparation, sedative premedication, and parent-present induction. Cuffed tracheal tube is becoming popular for small children, and its indication should be considered individually. Laryngeal mask airway is frequently used for simple short cases. Perioperative fluid infusion therapy has been a controversial issue. Traditional therapeutic regimen using hypotonic solution with glucose is criticized as a result of the growing evidence of hyponatremia and hyperglycemia. New ventilatory modes and sedative medications are now available for pediatric patients, and lung-protective ventilatory strategy should be considered to protect immature lung from ventilator-induced lung injury. Emergence agitation from general anesthesia is an evolving problem. Sevoflurane is known to be a major risk factor for stormy wake-up. Pediatric anesthesiologists should pursue high quality of anesthesia emergence. All anesthesia residency programs should include pediatric rotation; otherwise anesthesia residents will lose opportunities to learn basic concepts of pediatric anesthesia.

  20. Childhood brain tumors: epidemiology, current management and future directions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pollack, Ian F; Jakacki, Regina I

    2011-07-26

    Brain tumors are the most common solid tumors in children. With the increasingly widespread availability of MRI, the incidence of childhood brain tumors seemed to rise in the 1980s, but has subsequently remained relatively stable. However, management of brain tumors in children has evolved substantially during this time, reflecting refinements in classification of tumors, delineation of risk groups within histological subsets of tumors, and incorporation of molecular techniques to further define tumor subgroups. Although considerable progress has been made in the outcomes of certain tumors, prognosis in other childhood brain tumor types is poor. Among the tumor groups with more-favorable outcomes, attention has been focused on reducing long-term morbidity without sacrificing survival rates. Studies for high-risk groups have examined the use of intensive therapy or novel, molecularly targeted approaches to improve disease control rates. In addition to reviewing the literature and providing an overview of the complexities in diagnosing childhood brain tumors, we will discuss advances in the treatment and categorization of several tumor types in which progress has been most apparent, as well as those in which improvements have been lacking. The latest insights from molecular correlative studies that hold potential for future refinements in therapy will also be discussed.

  1. Spent fuel management in Hungary: Current status and prospects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferenczi, G.

    1996-01-01

    The Paks Nuclear Power Plant Ltd. operates the only NPP of Hungary, consisting of a 4 WWER-440 type units. Since 1989, approximately 40-50 % of the total yearly electricity generation of the country has been supplied by this plant. The fresh fuel is imported from Russia (previously from the Soviet Union) and the spent fuel assemblies are shipped back to Russia for later reprocessing after 5 years of decay storage in the spent fuel pools of the plant. Seeing the political and economical changes that started in Russia, the Paks NPP's management made a decision in 1990 to study the implementation of an independent spent fuel storage facility (ISFSF) at the Paks site and in 1992 to choose the GEC-ALSTHOM's MVDS. On the basis of the Construction License issued by the HAEC, the construction of the ISFSF was started in March 1995. The paper gives general information on the spent fuel arisings, the storage at the site, the shipment to Russia and on the implementation of the ISFSF. (author). 3 refs

  2. Hyperthyroidism in Graves disease. Current trends in management and diagnosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haibach, H.

    1976-01-01

    The radioimmunoassay for T 3 is now widely available and is a useful diagnostic tool for hyperthyroidism, especially in T 3 -thyrotoxicosis. It is an essential tool in the management of hyperthyroidism that persists after treatment with normal T 4 serum levels or, in euthyroid cases, with low T 4 serum levels. In these conditions, it reflects the metabolic state more accurately than serum levels of T 4 . A promising new test is the response of radioimmunoassayable TSH to protirelin relin (TRH) administration. An absent response indicates pituitary suppression and thyroid autonomy as seen in frank hyperthyroidism or euthyroid Graves disease, treated or untreated. It is safer and quicker than the conventional T 3 suppression test of thyroid radioactive iodine uptake and may replace it at least partly in the future. The recently recognized sharp decline in the remission rate of patients subjected to thyroid drug therapy in the last decade has made this treatment much less efficacious. By necessity, it will probably lead to greater reliance on treatment with radioactive iodine in the majority of the patients with the hyperthyroidism of Graves disease

  3. Classification and Current Management of Inner Ear Malformations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Levent Sennaroğlu

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Morphologically congenital sensorineural hearing loss can be investigated under two categories. Majority of the congenital hearing loss (80% are membranous malformations. Here the pathology involves inner ear hair cells. There is no gross bony abnormality and therefore, in these cases, high resolution computerized tomography and MRI of the temporal bone reveal normal findings. Remaining 20% have various malformations involving the bony labyrinth and therefore, can be radiologically demonstrated by CT and MRI. The latter group involves surgical challenges as well as problems in decision making. Some cases may be managed by hearing aid, some need cochlear implantation while some cases are candidates for an auditory brainstem implantation. During cochlear implantation, there may be facial nerve abnormalities, cerebrospinal fluid leakage, electrode misplacement or difficulty in finding the cochlea itself. During the surgery for inner ear malformations, surgeon must be ready to modify the surgical approach or choose special electrodes for surgery. In the present review article inner ear malformations are classified according to the differences observed in the cochlea. Hearing and language outcome after various implantation methods is closely related to the status of cochlear nerve and a practical classification of the cochlear nerve deficiency is also provided

  4. Managing acute abdominal pain in pediatric patients: current perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hijaz NM

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Nadia M Hijaz, Craig A Friesen Division of Gastroenterology, Hepatology, and Nutrition, Children’s Mercy Kansas City, Kansas City, MO, USA Abstract: Acute abdominal pain in pediatric patients has been a challenge for providers because of the nonspecific nature of symptoms and difficulty in the assessment and physical examination in children. Although most children with acute abdominal pain have self-limited benign conditions, pain may be a manifestation of an urgent surgical or medical condition where the biggest challenge is making a timely diagnosis so that appropriate treatment can be initiated without any diagnostic delays that increase morbidity. This is weighed against the need to decrease radiation exposure and avoid unnecessary operations. Across all age groups, there are numerous conditions that present with abdominal pain ranging from a very simple viral illness to a life-threatening surgical condition. It is proposed that the history, physical examination, laboratory tests, and imaging studies should initially be directed at differentiating surgical versus nonsurgical conditions both categorized as urgent versus nonurgent. The features of the history including patient’s age, physical examination focused toward serious conditions, and appropriate tests are highlighted in the context of making these differentiations. Initial testing and management is also discussed with an emphasis on making use of surgeon and radiologist consultation and the need for adequate follow-up and reevaluation of the patient. Keywords: acute abdominal pain, surgical abdomen, ultrasound

  5. Current trends in the management of bladder cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Amit R; Campbell, Steven C

    2009-01-01

    This article provides a review of bladder cancer etiology, diagnosis, and management for WOC nurses. Bladder cancer incidence continues to rise yearly in the United States, and patients with bladder cancer comprise some of the most challenging cases in urologic oncology. Nurses are involved with all aspects of the processes of care for the patient with bladder cancer, from initial diagnosis and treatment to postsurgical care and follow-up. For nonmuscle invasive bladder cancer, treatment includes transurethral resection followed by intravesical chemotherapy or immunotherapy to prevent recurrence or progression. Radical cystectomy along with chemotherapy protocols provides a survival advantage for muscle invasive bladder cancer, although the timing of chemotherapy remains controversial. Numerous factors are considered when determining the type of urinary diversion used at the time of radical cystectomy, but patient, family, surgeon, and nursing input are essential for preserving an optimal health-related quality of life and reducing morbidity. Patients with metastatic bladder cancer are generally treated with a cisplatin-based chemotherapy but continue to have a poor prognosis. Newer therapies involving novel molecular-targeted agents provide hope for the future for patients with metastatic disease.

  6. Expert searcher, teacher, content manager, and patient advocate: an exploratory study of clinical librarian roles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Maria C; Maggio, Lauren A

    2013-01-01

    The research explored the roles of practicing clinical librarians embedded in a patient care team. Six clinical librarians from Canada and one from the United States were interviewed to elicit detailed descriptions of their clinical roles and responsibilities and the context in which these were performed. Participants were embedded in a wide range of clinical service areas, working with a diverse complement of health professionals. As clinical librarians, participants wore many hats, including expert searcher, teacher, content manager, and patient advocate. Unique aspects of how these roles played out included a sense of urgency surrounding searching activities, the broad dissemination of responses to clinical questions, and leverage of the roles of expert searcher, teacher, and content manager to advocate for patients. Detailed role descriptions of clinical librarians embedded in patient care teams suggest possible new practices for existing clinical librarians, provide direction for training new librarians working in patient care environments, and raise awareness of the clinical librarian specialty among current and budding health information professionals.

  7. 17 CFR 274.13 - Form N-8B-3, registration statement of unincorporated management investment companies currently...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... statement of unincorporated management investment companies currently issuing periodic payment plan...-8B-3, registration statement of unincorporated management investment companies currently issuing..., pursuant to section 8(b) of the Investment Company Act of 1940, by unincorporated management investment...

  8. Paediatric fever management: continuing education for clinical nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, Anne M; Edwards, Helen E; Courtney, Mary D; Wilson, Jenny E; Monaghan, Sarah J

    2006-01-01

    This study examined the influence of level of practice, additional paediatric education and length of paediatric and current experience on nurses' knowledge of and beliefs about fever and fever management. Fifty-one nurses from medical wards in an Australian metropolitan paediatric hospital completed a self-report descriptive survey. Knowledge of fever management was mediocre (Mean 12.4, SD 2.18 on 20 items). Nurses practicing at a higher level and those with between one and four years paediatric or current experience were more knowledgeable than novices or more experienced nurses. Negative beliefs that would impact nursing practice were identified. Interestingly, beliefs about fever, antipyretic use in fever management and febrile seizures were similar; they were not influenced by nurses' knowledge, experience, education or level of practice. Paediatric nurses are not expert fever managers. Knowledge deficits and negative attitudes influence their practice irrespective of additional paediatric education, paediatric or current experience or level of practice. Continuing education is therefore needed for all paediatric nurses to ensure the latest clear evidence available in the literature for best practice in fever management is applied.

  9. Current approaches to nuclear power plant life management in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noda, T.; Tajima, K.; Ishikawa, M.; Koyama, M.

    2002-01-01

    extracted additional maintenance measures and incorporated them into their long-term maintenance plans, thereby reinforcing their current maintenance activities. Considering the latest information including domestic and overseas operating experiences and knowledge of academics and experts consigned by the Minister of Economy, Trade and Industry (METI), the Nuclear and Industry Safety Agency (NISA) of the METI reviewed and studied the technical evaluation and long-term maintenance plans of these electric utility companies. This paper describes the outlines of the NISA's report and related activities on current approaches to cope with the ageing of nuclear power plants in Japan. (Note) In 2001, the MITI was reorganized to the Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry (METI). (author)

  10. Support management in schizophrenia: a systematic review of current literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pompili M

    2012-12-01

    techniques have more rapid remission and relapse less frequently than patients treated only pharmacologically.Keywords: schizophrenia, support management, nonpharmacological treatment, cognitive behavioral therapy

  11. Managing inflammatory bowel disease in pregnancy: current perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pinder M

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Matthew Pinder,1 Katie Lummis,1 Christian P Selinger1,2 1Leeds Gastroenterology Institute, Leeds Teaching Hospitals NHS Trust, 2University of Leeds, Leeds, UK Abstract: Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD affects many women of childbearing age. The course of IBD is closely related to pregnancy outcomes with poorly controlled IBD increasing the risk of prematurity, low weight for gestation, and fetal loss. As such, women with IBD face complex decision making weighing the risks of active disease versus those of medical treatments. This review summarizes the current evidence regarding the safety and efficacy of IBD treatments during pregnancy and lactation aiming to provide up-to-date guidance for clinicians. Over 50% of women have poor IBD- and pregnancy-related knowledge, which is associated with views contrary to medical evidence and voluntary childlessness. This review highlights the effects of poor patient knowledge and critically evaluates interventions for improving patient knowledge and outcomes. Keywords: pregnancy, breast feeding, nursing, inflammatory bowel disease, Crohn’s disease, ulcerative colitis

  12. Current interventions in the management of knee osteoarthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dinesh Bhatia

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Osteoarthritis (OA is progressive joint disease characterized by joint inflammation and a reparative bone response and is one of the top five most disabling conditions that affects more than one-third of persons > 65 years of age, with an average estimation of about 30 million Americans currently affected by this disease. Global estimates reveal more than 100 million people are affected by OA. The financial expenditures for the care of persons with OA are estimated at a total annual national cost estimate of $15.5-$28.6 billion per year. As the number of people >65 years increases, so does the prevalence of OA and the need for cost-effective treatment and care. Developing a treatment strategy which encompasses the underlying physiology of degenerative joint disease is crucial, but it should be considerate to the different age ranges and different population needs. This paper focuses on different exercise and treatment protocols (pharmacological and non-pharmacological, the outcomes of a rehabilitation center, clinician-directed program versus an at home directed individual program to view what parameters are best at reducing pain, increasing functional independence, and reducing cost for persons diagnosed with knee OA.

  13. Management of patients with resistant hypertension: current treatment options

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kumar N

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Nilay Kumar,1 David A Calhoun,2 Tanja Dudenbostel21Department of Medicine, 2Division of Cardiovascular Disease, Hypertension and Vascular Biology Program, University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, AL, USAAbstract: Resistant hypertension (RHTN is an increasingly common clinical problem that is often heterogeneous in etiology, risk factors, and comorbidities. It is defined as uncontrolled blood pressure on optimal doses of three antihypertensive agents, ideally one being a diuretic. The definition also includes controlled hypertension with use of four or more antihypertensive agents. Recent observational studies have advanced the characterization of patients with RHTN. Patients with RHTN have higher rates of cardiovascular events and mortality compared with patients with more easily controlled hypertension. Secondary causes of hypertension, including obstructive sleep apnea, primary aldosteronism, renovascular disease, are common in patients with RHTN and often coexist in the same patient. In addition, RHTN is often complicated by metabolic abnormalities. Patients with RHTN require a thorough evaluation to confirm the diagnosis and optimize treatment, which typically includes a combination of lifestyle adjustments, and pharmacologic and interventional treatment. Combination therapy including a diuretic, a long-acting calcium channel blocker, an angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor, a beta blocker, and a mineralocorticoid receptor antagonist where warranted is the classic regimen for patients with treatment-resistant hypertension. Mineralocorticoid receptor antagonists like spironolactone or eplerenone have been shown to be efficacious in patients with RHTN, heart failure, chronic kidney disease, and primary aldosteronism. Novel interventional therapies, including baroreflex activation and renal denervation, have shown that both of these methods may be used to lower blood pressure safely, thereby providing exciting and promising new

  14. High risk bladder cancer: current management and survival

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna M. Leliveld

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: To evaluate the pattern of care in patients with high risk non muscle invasive bladder cancer (NMIBC in the Comprehensive Cancer Center North-Netherlands (CCCN and to assess factors associated with the choice of treatment, recurrence and progression free survival rates. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Retrospective analysis of 412 patients with newly diagnosed high risk NMIBC. Clinical, demographic and follow-up data were obtained from the CCCN Cancer Registry and a detailed medical record review. Uni and multivariate analysis was performed to identify factors related to choice of treatment and 5 year recurrence and progression free survival. RESULTS: 74/412 (18% patients with high risk NMIBC underwent a transurethral resection (TUR as single treatment. Adjuvant treatment after TUR was performed in 90.7% of the patients treated in teaching hospitals versus 71.8 % in non-teaching hospitals (p 80 years OR 0.1 p = 0.001 and treatment in non-teaching hospitals (OR 0.25; p < 0.001 were associated with less adjuvant treatment after TUR. Tumor recurrence occurred in 191/392 (49% and progression in 84 /392 (21.4% patients. The mean 5-years progression free survival was 71.6% (95% CI 65.5-76.8. CONCLUSION: In this pattern of care study in high risk NMIBC, 18% of the patients were treated with TUR as single treatment. Age and treatment in non-teaching hospitals were associated with less adjuvant treatment after TUR. None of the variables sex, age, comorbidity, hospital type, stage and year of treatment was associated with 5 year recurrence or progression rates.

  15. CKD Self-management: Phenotypes and Associations With Clinical Outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schrauben, Sarah J; Hsu, Jesse Y; Rosas, Sylvia E; Jaar, Bernard G; Zhang, Xiaoming; Deo, Rajat; Saab, Georges; Chen, Jing; Lederer, Swati; Kanthety, Radhika; Hamm, L Lee; Ricardo, Ana C; Lash, James P; Feldman, Harold I; Anderson, Amanda H

    2018-03-24

    To slow chronic kidney disease (CKD) progression and its complications, patients need to engage in self-management behaviors. The objective of this study was to classify CKD self-management behaviors into phenotypes and assess the association of these phenotypes with clinical outcomes. Prospective cohort study. Adults with mild to moderate CKD enrolled in the Chronic Renal Insufficiency Cohort (CRIC) Study. 3,939 participants in the CRIC Study recruited between 2003 and 2008 served as the derivation cohort and 1,560 participants recruited between 2013 and 2015 served as the validation cohort. CKD self-management behavior phenotypes. CKD progression, atherosclerotic events, heart failure events, death from any cause. Latent class analysis stratified by diabetes was used to identify CKD self-management phenotypes based on measures of body mass index, diet, physical activity, blood pressure, smoking status, and hemoglobin A 1c concentration (if diabetic); Cox proportional hazards models. 3 identified phenotypes varied according to the extent of implementation of recommended CKD self-management behaviors: phenotype I characterized study participants with the most recommended behaviors; phenotype II, participants with a mixture of recommended and not recommended behaviors; and phenotype III, participants with minimal recommended behaviors. In multivariable-adjusted models for those with and without diabetes, phenotype III was strongly associated with CKD progression (HRs of 1.82 and 1.49), death (HRs of 1.95 and 4.14), and atherosclerotic events (HRs of 2.54 and 1.90; each P diabetes. No consensus definition of CKD self-management; limited to baseline behavior data. There are potentially 3 CKD self-management behavior phenotypes that distinguish risk for clinical outcomes. These phenotypes may inform the development of studies and guidelines regarding optimal self-management. Copyright © 2018 National Kidney Foundation, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights

  16. Application of radiotherapy for hepatocellular carcinoma in current clinical practice guidelines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rim, Chai Hong; Seong, Jin Sil [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Yonsei Cancer Center, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-09-15

    In oncologic practice, treatment guidelines provide appropriate treatment strategies based on evidence. Currently, many guidelines are used, including those of the European Association for the Study of the Liver and European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EASL-EORTC), National Comprehensive Cancer Network (NCCN), Asia-Pacific Primary Liver Cancer Expert (APPLE), and Korean Liver Cancer Study Group and National Cancer Centre (KLCSG-NCC). Although radiotherapy is commonly used in clinical practice, some guidelines do not accept it as a standard treatment modality. In this review, we will investigate the clinical practice guidelines currently used, and discuss the application of radiotherapy.

  17. Application of radiotherapy for hepatocellular carcinoma in current clinical practice guidelines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rim, Chai Hong; Seong, Jin Sil

    2016-01-01

    In oncologic practice, treatment guidelines provide appropriate treatment strategies based on evidence. Currently, many guidelines are used, including those of the European Association for the Study of the Liver and European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EASL-EORTC), National Comprehensive Cancer Network (NCCN), Asia-Pacific Primary Liver Cancer Expert (APPLE), and Korean Liver Cancer Study Group and National Cancer Centre (KLCSG-NCC). Although radiotherapy is commonly used in clinical practice, some guidelines do not accept it as a standard treatment modality. In this review, we will investigate the clinical practice guidelines currently used, and discuss the application of radiotherapy

  18. PCSK9 inhibitors in the current management of atherosclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whayne, Thomas F

    The history of proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin type 9 (PCSK9) in medical science is fascinating and the evolution of knowledge of its function has resulted in new medications of major importance for the cardiovascular (CV) patient. PCSK9 functions as a negative control or feedback for the cell surface receptors for low-density lipoprotein including its component of cholesterol (LDL-C). The initial and key findings were that different abnormalities of PCSK9 can result in an increase or a decrease of LDL-C because of more or less suppression of cell surface receptors. These observations gave hints and awoke interest that it might be possible to prepare monoclonal antibodies to PCSK9 and decrease its activity, after which there should be more active LDL-C cell receptors. The rest is a fascinating story that currently has resulted in two PCSK9 inhibitors, alirocumab and evolocumab, which, on average, decrease LDL-C approximately 50%. Nevertheless, if there are no contraindications, statins remain the standard of prevention for the high-risk CV patient and this includes both secondary and primary prevention. The new inhibitors are for the patient that does not attain the desired target for LDL-C reduction while taking a maximum statin dose or who does not tolerate any statin dose whatsoever. Atherosclerosis can be considered a metabolic disease and the clinician needs to realize this and think more and more of CV prevention. These inhibitors can contribute to both the stabilization and regression of atherosclerotic plaques and thereby avoid or delay major adverse cardiac events. (United States). Copyright © 2016 Instituto Nacional de Cardiología Ignacio Chávez. Publicado por Masson Doyma México S.A. All rights reserved.

  19. Current Management and Future Opportunities for Peritoneal Metastases: Peritoneal Mesothelioma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexander, H Richard; Li, Claire Yue; Kennedy, Timothy J

    2018-02-08

    Diffuse malignant peritoneal mesothelioma (MPM) is a rare and ultimately fatal cancer that was first described just over a century ago. It is a diffuse malignancy arising from the mesothelial lining of the peritoneum; morbidity and mortality from MPM is due to its propensity to progress locoregionally within the abdominal cavity. The purpose of this article is to review the current state-of-the-science related to the diagnosis, staging, and treatment of MPM. The condition afflicts men and women equally and the peak incidence is between 55 and 60 years of age although it can arise in the young and elderly. Patients afflicted with MPM most commonly present with nonspecific abdominal symptoms that usually lead to diagnosis when the condition is relatively advanced. Historically, median overall survival for MPM patients without treatment is < 1 year. The couplet of systemic pemetrexed and cisplatin has an overall response rate of approximately 25% and a median overall survival of approximately 1 year. The available data, almost all retrospective in nature, have shown that in selected patients, operative cytoreduction (CRS) and regional chemotherapy administered as hyperthermic intraoperative peritoneal chemotherapy (HIPEC) or early postoperative intraperitoneal chemotherapy (EPIC) is associated with long-term survival. Studies on the molecular biology of MPM have yielded new insights relating to the potentially important role of the phosphoinsitide-3-kinase/mammalian target of rapamycin (PI3 K/mTOR) pathways and immune checkpoint inhibitors that may translate into new therapeutic options for patients with diffuse MPM.

  20. Dietary intervention in the management of phenylketonuria: current perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rocha JC

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Júlio César Rocha,1-3 Anita MacDonald4 1Centro de Genética Médica, Centro Hospitalar do Porto – CHP, 2Faculdade de Ciências da Saúde, Universidade Fernando Pessoa, 3Center for Health Technology and Services Research (CINTESIS, Porto, Portugal; 4The Children’s Hospital, Birmingham, UK Abstract: Phenylketonuria (PKU is a well-described inborn error of amino acid metabolism that has been treated for >60 years. Enzyme deficiency causes accumulation of phenylalanine (Phe and if left untreated will lead to profound and irreversible intellectual disability in most children. Traditionally, it has been managed with a low-Phe diet supplemented with a Phe-free protein substitute although newer treatment options mainly in combination with diet are available for some subgroups of patients with PKU, for example, sapropterin, large neutral amino acids, and glycomacropeptide. The diet consists of three parts: 1 severe restriction of dietary Phe; 2 replacement of non-Phe L-amino acids with a protein substitute commonly supplemented with essential fatty acids and other micronutrients; and 3 low-protein foods from fruits, some vegetables, sugars, fats and oil, and special low-protein foods (SLPF. The prescription of diet is challenging for health professionals. The high-carbohydrate diet supplied by a limited range of foods may program food preferences and contribute to obesity in later life. Abnormal tasting and satiety-promoting protein substitutes are administered to coincide with peak appetite times to ensure their consumption, but this practice may impede appetite for other important foods. Intermittent dosing of micronutrients when combined with L-amino acid supplements may lead to their poor bioavailability. Much work is required on the ideal nutritional profiling for special SLPF and Phe-free L-amino acid supplements. Although non-diet treatments are being studied, it is important to continue to fully understand all the consequences of diet