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Sample records for currarino syndrome variability

  1. [Semiotics of the Currarino syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pankevych, T L; Lóniushkin, O I; Sitkovskyĭ, M B; Kaplan, V M; Iurchenko, M I; Cherniienko, Iu L

    1993-01-01

    The main criteria for diagnosis of the Currarino syndrome have been defined. Roentgenologic investigation of the lumbar-sacral spine in direct projection is indicated to all the patients with anorectal developmental defects, in particular with congenital anorectal stenosis. In detection of a specific defect of the terminal vertebrae, the performance of computed tomography of the pelvic bottom and nuclear magnetic resonance tomography of the lumbar-sacral spine is necessary. This permits to assess the nature of a presacral tumour and degree of dysplasia of the external and sphincter. Timely diagnosis of the Currarino syndrome in children with the anorectal developmental defects permits to avoid severe septic and functional complications in surgical intervention.

  2. Leiomyomatosis peritonealis disseminata in association with Currarino syndrome?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mignogna Chiara

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Leiomyomatosis peritonealis disseminata (LPD is a rare disease in which multiple smooth muscle or smooth muscle-like nodules develop subperitoneally in any part of the abdominal cavity. No reports of multiple congenital malformations associated with LPD have been found in the English literature. Case presentation A 27 year-old patient referred to our gynaecology unit for pelvic pain, amenorrhoea, stress incontinence, chronic constipation and recurrent intestinal and urinary infections. Multiple congenital malformations had previously been diagnosed. Most of these had required surgical treatment in her early life: anorectal malformation with rectovestibular fistula, ectopic right ureteral orifice, megadolichoureter and hemisacrum. An ultrasound scan and computed tomography performed in our department showed an irregular, polylobate, complex 20 cm mass originating from the right pelvis that reached the right hypochondrium and the epigastrium. The patient underwent laparotomy. The three largest abdominal-pelvic masses and multiple independent nodules within the peritoneum were progressively removed. The histological diagnosis was of LPD. Conclusion The case we report is distinctive in that a rare acquired disease, LPD, coexists with multiple congenital malformations recalling a particular subgroup of caudal regression syndrome: the Currarino syndrome.

  3. Imperfuração anal associada à agenesia parcial do sacro e lipoma pré-sacral: síndrome de Currarino Imperforate anus associated with partial sacral agenesis and presacral lipoma: Currarino syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulo Ricardo G. Zen

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Relatar o caso de uma criança com síndrome de Currarino diagnosticada após avaliação por episódios recorrentes de infecção urinária. DESCRIÇÃO DE CASO: Menina branca de dois anos, única filha de pais hígidos e sem história familiar de defeitos congênitos. A criança nasceu com imperfuração anal e com fístula retovestibular diagnosticadas no primeiro dia de vida. Por volta dos sete meses, começou a apresentar episódios recorrentes de infecção urinária, estabelecendo-se o diagnóstico de bexiga neurogênica. Na mesma ocasião, foi constatada a presença de agenesia parcial do sacro. A avaliação pela tomografia computadorizada e ressonância nuclear magnética de coluna identificou presença de fístula coincidente com a fosseta da transição lombo-sacral, observada ao exame físico; amputação da porção inferior da medula, com diminuição do número de raízes nervosas da cauda equina e massa pré-sacral de aspecto lipomatoso. Esta foi confirmada durante a cirurgia de correção do ânus imperfurado. A criança não apresentava outras dismorfias e a avaliação radiológica dos pais não identificou anormalidades sacrais. COMENTÁRIOS: A síndrome de Currarino é uma doença genética autossômica, dominante e rara caracterizada pela tríade formada por atresia anal, agenesia parcial do sacro e tumoração pré-sacral. Inclui teratomas, meningoceles, cistos entéricos e lipomas, como observado em nossa paciente. Crianças apresentando anormalidades anorretais deveriam ser sempre cuidadosamente avaliadas quanto à presença da síndrome de Currarino. A agenesia parcial do sacro é um forte indicativo da doença.OBJECTIVE: To report a patient with Currarino syndrome diagnosed after evaluation for recurrent urinary infections. CASE DESCRIPTION: This is a Caucasian two-year-old girl, the only daughter of healthy unrelated parents with no family history of congenital defects. The patient was born with imperforate

  4. Complete Familial Currarino Triad in Association with Hirschsprung's Disease: Magnetic Resonance Imaging Features and the Spectrum of Anorectal Malformations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kilickesmez, O.; Hakki Gol, I.; Uzun, M.; Oruk, C. [Diyarbakir Military Hospital (Turkey). Dept. of Radiology

    2006-07-15

    Currarino syndrome, a rare hereditary condition, is defined as a partial sacral agenesis associated with a presacral mass and anorectal malformation. The authors present two siblings with complete Currarino triad and their mother with incomplete triad. The complete Currarino triad in the older sibling was associated with Hirschsprung's disease as the second reported case in the literature. Anorectal malformations, whether suspected of Currarino syndrome or not, should be examined with lumbosacral magnetic resonance imaging.

  5. The Currarino triad: neurosurgical considerations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Emans, P.J.; van Aalst, J.; van Heurn, L.W.E.; Marcelis, C.; Kootstra, G.; Beets-Tan, R.G.H.; Vles, J.S.; Beuls, E.A.

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The Currarino triad, a relatively uncommon hereditary disorder, is often associated with tethered cord and anterior myelomeningocele. Little is known of the implications of these neuroanatomic malformations or of the neurosurgical attitude. The objective of this study is to identify the

  6. Comprehensive review of the duplication 3q syndrome and report of a patient with Currarino syndrome and de novo duplication 3q26.32-q27.2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dworschak, G C; Crétolle, C; Hilger, A; Engels, H; Korsch, E; Reutter, H; Ludwig, M

    2017-05-01

    Partial duplications of the long arm of chromosome 3, dup(3q), are a rare but well-described condition, sharing features of Cornelia de Lange syndrome. Around two thirds of cases are derived from unbalanced translocations, whereas pure dup(3q) have rarely been reported. Here, we provide an extensive review of the literature on dup(3q). This search revealed several patients with caudal malformations and anomalies, suggesting that caudal malformations or anomalies represent an inherent phenotypic feature of dup(3q). In this context, we report a patient with a pure de novo duplication 3q26.32-q27.2. The patient had the clinical diagnosis of Currarino syndrome (CS) (characterized by the triad of sacral anomalies, anorectal malformations and a presacral mass) and additional features, frequently detected in patients with a dup(3q). Mutations within the MNX1 gene were found to be causative in CS but no MNX1 mutation could be detected in our patient. Our comprehensive search for candidate genes located in the critical region of the duplication 3q syndrome, 3q26.3-q27, revealed a so far neglected phenotypic overlap of dup(3q) and the Pierpont syndrome, associated with a mutation of the TBL1XR1 gene on 3q26.32. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Currarino triad associated with malrotation of the colon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Daoud, Fajez S.; AbuRub, Mohammad A.; Hadidy, Azmy M.

    2007-01-01

    Currarino triad is a rare congenital condition characterized by a sacral bony defect, presacral mass, and anorectal malformations. We describe an unusual case of complete Currarino triad in a 22-year-old female with sacral bony defect, anal stenosis, recto-vaginal fistula, and dual pathology meningocele and teratoma in the pre sacral mass associated with malrotation of the colon. This combination has not been reported previously. The clinical presentation, surgical management and review of literature are discussed. (author)

  8. Currarino triad associated with malrotation of the colon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daoud, Fajez S [Dept. of General Surgery, Jordan University Hospital, Amman (Jordan); AbuRub, Mohammad A [Dept. of Neurosurgery, Jordan University Hospital, Amman (Jordan); Hadidy, Azmy M [Dept. of Radiology (Hadidy), Jordan University Hospital, Amman (Jordan)

    2007-07-01

    Currarino triad is a rare congenital condition characterized by a sacral bony defect, presacral mass, and anorectal malformations. We describe an unusual case of complete Currarino triad in a 22-year-old female with sacral bony defect, anal stenosis, recto-vaginal fistula, and dual pathology meningocele and teratoma in the pre sacral mass associated with malrotation of the colon. This combination has not been reported previously. The clinical presentation, surgical management and review of literature are discussed. (author)

  9. MRI and radiographic findings in Currarino's triad

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pfluger, T.; Czekalla, R.; Koletzko, S.; Muensterer, O.; Willemsen, U.F.; Hahn, K.

    1996-01-01

    Currarino's triad is a rare complex of a congential sacral bony abnormality, anorectal malformation and a presacral mass. Intractable constipation since birth is the leading symptom of this triad, which follows an autosomal dominant mode of heredity. We report conventional radiographic and MR findings in one family consisting of a mother and her two daughters. In all three cases, radiography revealed an abnormality of the os sacrum, the so-called scimitar sacrum. MR examination, undertaken next in our institution, was applied with T1-, T2- and proton density weighted sequences in all three orientations before and after i.v. application of gadolinium diethylene-triamine-pentaacetic acid (Gd-DTPA). In two patients we were able to diagnose the complete form of the triad and in one patient an incomplete form. In any case of a radiographically diagnosed scimitar sacrum in combination with constipation. Currarino's triad should be considered. MRI, as the method of choice, should be the next step to detect a presacral mass and any anomalies of the spinal canal. The importance of early recognition lies in the high morbidity and mortality rates resulting from this disorder. (orig.)

  10. Currarino triad: surgical management and follow-up results of four [correction of three] cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isik, Nejat; Elmaci, Ilhan; Gokben, Bekir; Balak, Naci; Tosyali, Nadir

    2010-08-01

    The Currarino syndrome is a rare triad that is a combination of a presacral mass, a congenital sacral bony abnormality and an anorectal malformation. We present 4 children with complete Currarino triad who were diagnosed using MRI. Our aim was to report the neurosurgical management of Currarino syndrome in children. All of the patients had chronic constipation and pain in the lumbosacral region. In the plain radiograph, 3 patients had a sacral scimitar-shaped bony abnormality, and 1 patient had total sacral agenesis. There was a narrow anal canal or narrow ventrally displaced anus in all patients. Their anorectal malformations were characterized as anal stenoses (4 patients), associated with Hirschsprung's disease in 2 cases. In 3 patients, MRI showed tethered cord syndrome in addition to the presacral mass. There was hydrocephalus in 1 patient. Anal stenosis was treated by anal dilatation. In 2 patients, rectal biopsy and temporary colostomy (2 patients) had been performed previously due to Hirschsprung's disease. We performed a posterior procedure via lumbar and sacral partial laminectomy-laminoplasty and transdural ligation of the neck of the meningocele for anterior sacral meningoceles, or alternatively, tumor excision for other types of presacral lesions. Histopathologically, 3 were cases of anterior sacral meningoceles and 1 was a teratoma. One of them also had a spinal abscess. He required reoperation (twice) and appeared at the time to have improved with medical therapy. All patients improved and stabilized. There were no additional neurological deficits and no recurrence of the presacral mass over the follow-up period (6 years, on average). The family pedigree did not reveal any familial transmission pattern. In cases of Currarino triad, MRI can allow the characterization of the presacral masses. If it is an anterior sacral meningocele or a solid tumor without severe anorectal malformation, it can be managed with posterior lumbar and sacral procedures

  11. The currarino triad of anorectal, sacral, and presacral anomalies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Jong Chul; Yeon, Kyung Mo

    1986-01-01

    The Currarino triad is a unique complex of congenital anomalies including anorectal including anorectal malformation, scral bony abnormality, and presacral mass. The usual symptomatology is constipation due to anorectal stenosis. Three patients with this triad confirmed by surgical operation during recent two years in Seoul National University Children's Hospital were presented with a brief review of clinical features, unique radiologic appearance and postulated pathophysiology. The presacral mass was a mature teratoma in the first patient, a lipomyelomeningocele-epidermoid inclusion cyst in the second patients, and myelomeningocele in the third patient. A correct diagnosis of the Currarino triad by radiologists is important, and may help the physicians to investigate detailed family history and associated anomalies and to establish adequate surgical plans.

  12. Radiological findings of Currarino's triad - a case report and review of the literature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Machado Junior, Marcos Alberto; Barbosa, Veronica Aline de Oliveira; Rocha, Josilton Antonio; Ferreira, Eliane Fiuza; Maximo, Marcia Andrade; Castro, Luiz Eduardo; Vieira, Lauro Conceicao

    1998-01-01

    The authors report a child case with congenital malformation Currarino triad characterized by a rare complex of a congenital sacral bony abnormality, anorectal malformation and a presacral mass. A bibliographic review was done, focusing the radiological and tomographic findings. (author)

  13. Currarino triad with dual pathology in the presacral mass: report of a case.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thambidorai, C R; Muin, I; Razman, J; Zulfiqar, A

    2003-07-01

    Currarino triad, which comprises anorectal stenosis, anterior sacral defect, and a presacral mass, is an uncommon cause of constipation in children and adults. The presacral mass in this triad is most often caused by an anterior sacral meningocele, a teratoma, or an enterogenous cyst, but rarely may be caused by dual pathology. A neonate with Currarino triad and dual pathology in the presacral mass is described in this report. A male Chinese neonate, who presented with abdominal distention and constipation on the second day of life, was found to have features of Currarino triad. Colostomy was done in the neonatal period, and the presacral mass was excised by posterior sagittal perineal approach at the age of six months. The excised presacral mass consisted of an anterior meningocele and a teratoma. The patient continued to have constipation during follow-up and required anorectoplasty to correct residual anorectal stenosis. At the time of this report the patient was three years old and growing normally with normal anorectal function. Of a total of about 200 cases of complete Currarino triad found in the literature, in only 22 patients did the presacral mass contain both meningocele and teratoma. The features of these 22 patients and the current views on the surgical management of Currarino triad are discussed.

  14. Currarino triad: characteristic appearances on magnetic resonance imaging and plain radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Low, G.; Irwin, G.J; Maroo, S.V.; Haddock, G.

    2006-01-01

    The Currarino triad is a complex anomaly consisting of an anorectal malformation, a sacral bone defect and a presacral mass. It was first described in 1981 and since then, approximately 250 cases have been reported. Radiology has an important part to play in the diagnosis of this entity, as the imaging features are characteristic. We report a case of Currarino triad in an infant who presented with intractable constipation and discuss relevant MRI and plain radiography findings Copyright (2006) Blackwell Publishing Asia Pty Ltd

  15. EEC syndrome sans clefting: Variable clinical presentations in a family

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    Thakkar Sejal

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Ectrodactyly, ectodermal dysplasia and cleft palate/lip syndrome (EEC is a rare autosomal dominant syndrome with varied presentation and is actually a multiple congenital anomaly syndrome leading to intra- and interfamilial differences in severity because of its variable expression and reduced penetrance. The cardinal features include ectrodactyly, sparse, wiry, hypopigmented hair, peg-shaped teeth with defective enamel and cleft palate/lip. A family comprising father, daughter and son presented to us with split hand-split foot deformity (ectrodactyly, epiphora, hair changes and deafness with variable involvement in each family member.

  16. Sweet's syndrome in association with common variable immunodeficiency.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Regan, G M

    2009-03-01

    Sweet\\'s syndrome (SS), a rare reactive neutrophilic dermatosis, has been reported to occur in association with a variety of systemic disorders, categorized by von den Diesch into idiopathic, paraneoplastic, pregnancy and parainflammatory subgroups. The parainflammatory group has been well defined, and includes a wide spectrum of infectious triggers and disorders of immune dysregulation. To date, however, no cases of SS have been described in the context of common variable immunodeficiency (CVID). We report a case of paediatric-onset SS, previously reported as idiopathic, with a subsequent diagnosis of CVID.

  17. Joubert syndrome: large clinical variability and a unique neuroimaging aspect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leao, Emilia Katiane Embirucu; Lima, Marcilia Martyn; Kok, Fernando; Parizotto, Juliana; Maia Junior, Otacilio de Oliveira

    2010-01-01

    Joubert syndrome (JS) is an autosomal recessive inherited disorder characterized by hypotonia, cerebellar vermis hypoplasia, ocular abnormalities (e.g. pigmentary retinopathy, oculomotor apraxia and nystagmus), renal cysts and hepatic fibrosis. Respiratory abnormalities, as apnoea and hyperpnoea, may be present, as well as mental retardation. At least seven JS loci have been determined and five genes identified. Herein, we report five children, belonging to independent families, with JS: they shared the same typical MRI abnormality, known as molar tooth sign, but had an otherwise quite variable phenotype, regarding mostly their cognitive performance, visual abilities and extra-neurological compromise. (author)

  18. Joubert syndrome: large clinical variability and a unique neuroimaging aspect

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leao, Emilia Katiane Embirucu; Lima, Marcilia Martyn; Kok, Fernando; Parizotto, Juliana [University of Sao Paulo (USP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Clinical Hospital. Dept. of Child Neurology; Maia Junior, Otacilio de Oliveira [University of Sao Paulo (USP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Clinical Hospital. Dept. of Child Ophthalmology

    2010-04-15

    Joubert syndrome (JS) is an autosomal recessive inherited disorder characterized by hypotonia, cerebellar vermis hypoplasia, ocular abnormalities (e.g. pigmentary retinopathy, oculomotor apraxia and nystagmus), renal cysts and hepatic fibrosis. Respiratory abnormalities, as apnoea and hyperpnoea, may be present, as well as mental retardation. At least seven JS loci have been determined and five genes identified. Herein, we report five children, belonging to independent families, with JS: they shared the same typical MRI abnormality, known as molar tooth sign, but had an otherwise quite variable phenotype, regarding mostly their cognitive performance, visual abilities and extra-neurological compromise. (author)

  19. Classification criteria of syndromes by latent variable models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Janne

    2010-01-01

    patient's characteristics. These methods may erroneously reduce multiplicity either by combining markers of different phenotypes or by mixing HALS with other processes such as aging. Latent class models identify homogenous groups of patients based on sets of variables, for example symptoms. As no gold......The thesis has two parts; one clinical part: studying the dimensions of human immunodeficiency virus associated lipodystrophy syndrome (HALS) by latent class models, and a more statistical part: investigating how to predict scores of latent variables so these can be used in subsequent regression...... standard exists for diagnosing HALS the normally applied diagnostic models cannot be used. Latent class models, which have never before been used to diagnose HALS, make it possible, under certain assumptions, to: statistically evaluate the number of phenotypes, test for mixing of HALS with other processes...

  20. [Waardenburg syndrome. A heterogenic disorder with variable penetrance].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apaydin, F; Bereketoglu, M; Turan, O; Hribar, K; Maassen, M M; Günhan, O; Zenner, H-P; Pfister, M

    2004-06-01

    Waardenburg syndrome (WS) is an autosomal dominant disorder characterised by pigmentary anomalies of the skin, hairs, eyes and various defects of other neural crest derived tissues. It accounts for over 2% of congenital hearing impairment. At least four types are recognized on the basis of clinical and genetic criteria. Based on a screening of congenitally hearing impaired children, 12 families with WS type II were detected. Of special interest was the phenotype of these families, in particular the reduced penetrance of hearing impairment within the families. In all cases a high variability of the disease phenotype was detected and the penetrance of the clinical traits varied accordingly. Therefore, it is not possible to predict the clinical phenotype even in a single family. Based on these studies, we plan to identify the pathogenetic cause of the disease in order to perform a detailed genotype/phenotype analysis.

  1. Syndromes, Disorders and Maternal Risk Factors Associated with Neural Tube Defects (II

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chih-Ping Chen

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Fetuses with neural tube defects (NTDs maybe associated with syndromes, disorders, and maternal risk factors. This article provides a comprehensive review of syndromes, disorders, and maternal risk factors associated with NTDs, such as Currarino syndrome, sacral defect with anterior meningocele, Jarcho-Levin syndrome (spondylo-costal dysostosis, lateral meningocele syndrome, neurofibromatosis type I, Marfan syndrome, and hyperthermia. The recurrence risk and the preventive effect of maternal folic acid intake in NTDs associated with syndromes, disorders, and maternal risk factors may be different from those of non-syndromic multifactorial NTDs. Perinatal identification of NTDs should alert one to the syndromes, disorders, and maternal risk factors associated with NTDs, and prompt a thorough etiologic investigation and genetic counseling.

  2. Recurrence and Variability of Germline EPCAM Deletions in Lynch Syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuiper, Roland P.; Vissers, Lisenka E. L. M.; Venkatachalam, Ramprasath; Bodmer, Danielle; Hoenselaar, Eveline; Goossens, Monique; Haufe, Aline; Kamping, Eveline; Niessen, Renee C.; Hogervorst, Frans B. L.; Gille, Johan J. P.; Redeker, Bert; Tops, Carli M. J.; van Gijn, Marielle E.; van den Ouweland, Ans M. W.; Rahner, Nils; Steinke, Verena; Kahl, Philip; Holinski-Feder, Elke; Morak, Monika; Kloor, Matthias; Stemmler, Susanne; Betz, Beate; Hutter, Pierre; Bunyan, David J.; Syngal, Sapna; Culver, Julie O.; Graham, Tracy; Chan, Tsun L.; Nagtegaal, Iris D.; van Krieken, J. Han J. M.; Schackert, Hans K.; Hoogerbrugge, Nicoline; van Kessel, Ad Geurts; Ligtenberg, Marjolijn J. L.

    Recently, we identified 3' end deletions in the EPCAM gene as a novel cause of Lynch syndrome. These truncating EPCAM deletions cause allele-specific epigenetic silencing of the neighboring DNA mismatch repair gene MSH2 in tissues expressing EPCAM. Here we screened a cohort of unexplained Lynch-like

  3. Chest associated to motor physiotherapy improves cardiovascular variables in newborns with respiratory distress syndrome

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    de Abreu Luiz

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We aimed to evaluate the effects of chest and motor physiotherapy treatment on hemodynamic variables in preterm newborns with respiratory distress syndrome. Methods We evaluated heart rate (HR, respiratory rate (RR, systolic (SAP, mean (MAP and diastolic arterial pressure (DAP, temperature and oxygen saturation (SO2% in 44 newborns with respiratory distress syndrome. We compared all variables between before physiotherapy treatment vs. after the last physiotherapy treatment. Newborns were treated during 11 days. Variables were measured 2 minutes before and 5 minutes after each physiotherapy treatment. We applied paired Student t test to compare variables between the two periods. Results HR (148.5 ± 8.5 bpm vs. 137.1 ± 6.8 bpm - p 2%. Conclusions Chest and motor physiotherapy improved cardiovascular parameters in respiratory distress syndrome newborns.

  4. Cushing's syndrome in infancy due to ectopic ACTH secretion by a sacro-coccygeal teratoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rydzewska, Marta; Krawczuk-Rybak, Maryna; Zajkowska, Adrianna; Jurczuk, Natalia; Polnik, Dariusz; Szalecki, Mieczysław; Moszczyńska, Elżbieta; Savage, Martin O; Bossowski, Artur

    2017-04-01

    Adenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH)-dependent Cushing's syndrome in infancy is extremely rare. We describe the case of a sacro-coccygeal ectopic ACTH-secreting immature teratoma in an infant who also presented the triad of defects characteristic of Currarino syndrome. A girl was born with a large immature teratoma in the sacro-coccygeal region associated with anal atresia. At the age of 7 days, the concentration of α-fetoprotein (AFP) was above the age-specific normal range. Two non-radical surgical excisions of the tumour were performed. At the age of 7 months, she developed polyphagia, acne, hirsutism, hypertension and hypokalemia with elevated ACTH and absence of serum cortisol circadian rhythm. Immunostaining of tumour tissue showed ACTH-immunoreactive cells. Due to unsuccessful therapy with ketoconazole and resistance to antihypertensive medications [blood pressure (BP) 210/160 mmHg], metyrapone was administered, which controlled her ACTH and cortisol levels in the normal range. Following further removal of tumour bulk after three operations during the first year of life, there was a decrease of BP to normal values. A rare case of ectopic ACTH syndrome causing Cushing's syndrome in infancy in the context of Currarino syndrome is reported. Radical surgery has resulted in excision of the tumour and current control of Cushing's syndrome.

  5. Classification criteria of syndromes by latent variable models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Janne

    2010-01-01

    , although this is often desired. I have proposed a new method for predicting class membership that, in contrast to methods based on posterior probabilities of class membership, yields consistent estimates when regressed on explanatory variables in a subsequent analysis. There are four different basic models...... analyses. Part 1: HALS engages different phenotypic changes of peripheral lipoatrophy and central lipohypertrophy.  There are several different definitions of HALS and no consensus on the number of phenotypes. Many of the definitions consist of counting fulfilled criteria on markers and do not include...

  6. Metabolic Syndrome and Short-Term Heart Rate Variability in Adults with Intellectual Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Yaw-Wen; Lin, Jin-Ding; Chen, Wei-Liang; Yen, Chia-Feng; Loh, Ching-Hui; Fang, Wen-Hui; Wu, Li-Wei

    2012-01-01

    Metabolic syndrome (MetS) increases the risk of cardiovascular events. Heart rate variability (HRV) represents autonomic functioning, and reduced HRV significantly increases cardiovascular mortality. The aims of the present paper are to assess the prevalence of MetS in adults with intellectual disabilities (ID), the difference in short-term HRV…

  7. Heart rate variability analysed by Poincaré plot in patients with metabolic syndrome

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kubíčková, A.; Kozumplík, J.; Nováková, Z.; Plachý, M.; Jurák, Pavel; Lipoldová, J.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 49, č. 1 (2016), s. 23-28 ISSN 0022-0736 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP102/12/2034 Institutional support: RVO:68081731 Keywords : heart rate variability * metabolic syndrome * Poincaré plot * tilt table test * controlled breathing Subject RIV: JA - Electronics ; Optoelectronics, Electrical Engineering Impact factor: 1.514, year: 2016

  8. Variability of diagnostic criteria and treatment of idiopathic nephrotic syndrome across European countries

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Deschênes, Georges; Vivarelli, Marina; Peruzzi, Licia; Alpay, H.; Alvaro Madrid, A.; Andersen, R.; Bald, M.; Benetti, E.; Berard, E.; Bockenhauer, D.; Boyer, O.; Brackman, D.; Dossier, C.; Ekinci, Z.; Emma, F.; Enneman, B.; Espinosa-Roman, L.; Fila, M.; Ghio, L.; Groothoff, J. W.; Guigonis, V.; Jankauskiene, A.; Kagan, M.; Kovacevic, M.; Kemper, M. J.; Levtchenko, E.; Maringhini, S.; Mir, S.; Mitsioni, A.; Mizerska-Wasiak, M.; Wasiak, K.; Moczulska, A.; Montini, G.; Murer, L.; Nuutinen, M.; Obukhova, V.; Oh, J.; Ozkaya, O.; Papalia, T.; Peco Antic, A.; Pecoraro, C.; Pena-Carrion, A.; Petrossian, E.; Pietrement, C.; Prikhodina, L.; Querfeld, U.; Rittig, S.; Saleem, M. A.; Saraga, M.; Savenkova, N.

    2017-01-01

    The aim of the surveys conducted by the Idiopathic Nephrotic Syndrome Working Group of the ESPN was to study the possible variability of treatment in Europe at different stages of the disease by means of questionnaires sent to members of the Working Group. Four surveys have been completed: treatment

  9. The Influence of Matching Populations on Kinematic and Kinetic Variables in Runners with Iliotibial Band Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grau, Stefan; Maiwald, Christian; Krauss, Inga; Axmann, Detlef; Horstmann, Thomas

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess how participant matching influences biomechanical variables when comparing healthy runners and runners with iliotibial band syndrome (ITBS). We examined 52 healthy runners (CO) and 18 with ITBS, using three-dimensional kinematics and pressure distribution. The study population was matched in three ways and…

  10. Defect in IgV gene somatic hypermutation in common variable immuno-deficiency syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levy, Y; Gupta, N; Le Deist, F; Garcia, C; Fischer, A; Weill, J C; Reynaud, C A

    1998-10-27

    Common Variable Immuno-Deficiency (CVID) is the most common symptomatic primary antibody-deficiency syndrome, but the basic immunologic defects underlying this syndrome are not well defined. We report here that among eight patients studied (six CVID and two hypogammaglobulinemic patients with recurrent infections), there is in two CVID patients a dramatic reduction in Ig V gene somatic hypermutation with 40-75% of IgG transcripts totally devoid of mutations in the circulating memory B cell compartment. Functional assays of the T cell compartment point to an intrinsic B cell defect in the process of antibody affinity maturation in these two cases.

  11. Cystic fibrosis, common variable immunodeficiency and Aspergers syndrome: an immunological and behavioural challenge.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Chotirmall, S H

    2012-02-01

    INTRODUCTION: Cystic fibrosis (CF) is of particular importance in Ireland as the Irish population has both the highest incidence (2.98\\/10,000) and the highest carrier rate (1 in 19) in the world. Primary immunodeficiency has not been previously reported as co-existing with CF. CASE REPORT: We report a unique case of CF associated with a primary immunodeficiency syndrome--common variable immunodeficiency (CVID). DISCUSSION: Our patient has CF, CVID and the additional comorbidity of Aspergers syndrome. The challenges inherent in diagnosing and treating such a case are outlined herein and the successful management of this case is evidenced by the well-preserved lung function of our patient.

  12. Cystic fibrosis, common variable immunodeficiency and Aspergers syndrome: an immunological and behavioural challenge.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Chotirmall, S H

    2009-08-07

    INTRODUCTION: Cystic fibrosis (CF) is of particular importance in Ireland as the Irish population has both the highest incidence (2.98\\/10,000) and the highest carrier rate (1 in 19) in the world. Primary immunodeficiency has not been previously reported as co-existing with CF. CASE REPORT: We report a unique case of CF associated with a primary immunodeficiency syndrome-common variable immunodeficiency (CVID). DISCUSSION: Our patient has CF, CVID and the additional comorbidity of Aspergers syndrome. The challenges inherent in diagnosing and treating such a case are outlined herein and the successful management of this case is evidenced by the well-preserved lung function of our patient.

  13. Variability of the cranial and dental phenotype in Williams syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Axelsson, Stefan

    2005-01-01

    Williams syndrome (WS) is a rare congenital disorder involving the cardiovascular system, connective tissue, and the central nervous system, resulting in mild to moderate mental retardation, a specific cognitive profile, unique personality characteristics, distinctive facial features, and cardiovascular disease. The majority of individuals with a clinical diagnosis of WS have a contiguous gene deletion at chromosome 7 (7q11.23). Physical features include characteristic facial features with full prominent cheeks, wide mouth, long philtrum, small nose with depressed nasal bridge, heavy orbital ridges, medial eyebrow flare, dental abnormalities, hoarse voice, growth retardation, and cardiovascular abnormalities (most commonly supravalvular aortic stenosis and/or peripheral pulmonary artery stenosis). The cognitive profile is distinctive, consisting of strengths in auditory memory, language, and face-processing, but extreme weakness in visuospatial, numerical and problem-solving abilities. Neurological studies have identified a significantly decreased brain volume in adult individuals with WS with relatively normal development of the limbic, frontal and cerebellar structures. The aims were to analyse the neurocranium, the craniofacial region, and the dentition in a well defined Norwegian group of individuals with WS. In order to accomplish this, normative cephalometric standards for the neurocranium, including the cranial base and the sella turcica, were established for Norwegian males and females from 6 to 21 years of age, using lateral radiographic cephalograms from the Oslo University Craniofacial Growth Archive. The study material comprised radiographic lateral cephalograms, orthopantomograms and dental casts from 62 individuals with WS ranging from 4 to 44 years. The lateral cephalograms, orthopantomograms and dental casts were analysed using standard methods reported in the literature. Neurocranium: The results from the cephalometric analyses showed that the size

  14. Mutation screening of USH3 gene (clarin-1) in Spanish patients with Usher syndrome: low prevalence and phenotypic variability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aller, E; Jaijo, T; Oltra, S; Alió, J; Galán, F; Nájera, C; Beneyto, M; Millán, J M

    2004-12-01

    Usher syndrome type III is an autosomal recessive disorder clinically characterized by the association of retinitis pigmentosa (RP), variable presence of vestibular dysfunction and progressive hearing loss, being the progression of the hearing impairment the critical parameter classically used to distinguish this form from Usher syndrome type I and Usher syndrome type II. Usher syndrome type III clinical subtype is the rarest form of Usher syndrome in Spain, accounting only for 6% of all Usher syndrome Spanish cases. The gene responsible for Usher syndrome type III is named clarin-1 and it is thought to be involved in hair cell and photoreceptor cell synapses. Here, we report a screening for mutations in clarin-1 gene among our series of Usher syndrome Spanish patients. Clarin-1 has been found to be responsible for the disease in only two families: the first one is a previously reported family homozygous for Y63X mutation and the second one, described here, is homozygous for C40G. This accounts for 1.7% of Usher syndrome Spanish families. It is noticeable that, whereas C40G family is clinically compatible with Usher syndrome type III due to the progression of the hearing loss, Y63X family could be diagnosed as Usher syndrome type I because the hearing impairment is profound and stable. Thus, we consider that the progression of hearing loss is not the definitive key parameter to distinguish Usher syndrome type III from Usher syndrome type I and Usher syndrome type II.

  15. Intraindividual variability in cognitive performance in persons with chronic fatigue syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuentes, K; Hunter, M A; Strauss, E; Hultsch, D F

    2001-05-01

    Studies of cognitive performance among persons with chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) have yielded inconsistent results. We sought to contribute to findings in this area by examining intraindividual variability as well as level of performance in cognitive functioning. A battery of cognitive measures was administered to 14 CFS patients and 16 healthy individuals on 10 weekly occasions. Analyses comparing the two groups in terms of level of performance defined by latency and accuracy scores revealed that the CFS patients were slower but not less accurate than healthy persons. The CFS group showed greater intraindividual variability (as measured by intraindividual standard deviations and coefficients of variation) than the healthy group, although the results varied by task and time frame. Intraindividual variability was found to be stable across time and correlated across tasks at each testing occasion. Intraindividual variability also uniquely differentiated the groups. The present findings support the proposition that intraindividual variability is a meaningful indicator of cognitive functioning in CFS patients.

  16. Heart rate variability analysis in postural orthostatic tachycardia syndrome: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raffaele Calabrò

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available The authors present a case of 36 year old male patient with idiopathic postural orthostatic tachycardia syndrome (POTS diagnosed during head-up tilt testing. Power spectral analysis of heart rate variability (HRV during the tilt test revealed that the ratio of low and high frequency powers (LF/HF increased with the onset of orthostatic intolerance. This analysis confirmed in our patient a strong activation in sympathetic tone.

  17. Heart rate variability in normal-weight patients with polycystic ovary syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Kilit, Celal; Kilit, T?rkan Pa?al?

    2017-01-01

    Objective: Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is an endocrine disease closely related to several risk factors of cardiovascular disease. Obese women with PCOS show altered autonomic modulation. The results of studies investigating cardiac autonomic functions of normal-weight women with PCOS are conflicting. The aim of the study was to assess the reactivity of cardiac sympathovagal balance in normal-weight women with PCOS by heart rate variability analysis. Methods: We examined the heart rate va...

  18. [Heart rate variability as a method of assessing the autonomic nervous system in polycystic ovary syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Sá, Joceline Cássia Ferezini; Costa, Eduardo Caldas; da Silva, Ester; Azevedo, George Dantas

    2013-09-01

    Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is an endocrine disorder associated with several cardiometabolic risk factors, such as central obesity, insulin resistance, type 2 diabetes, metabolic syndrome, and hypertension. These factors are associated with adrenergic overactivity, which is an important prognostic factor for the development of cardiovascular disorders. Given the common cardiometabolic disturbances occurring in PCOS women, over the last years studies have investigated the cardiac autonomic control of these patients, mainly based on heart rate variability (HRV). Thus, in this review, we will discuss the recent findings of the studies that investigated the HRV of women with PCOS, as well as noninvasive methods of analysis of autonomic control starting from basic indexes related to this methodology.

  19. Clinical variability in hereditary optic neuropathies: Two novel mutations in two patients with dominant optic atrophy and Wolfram syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galvez-Ruiz, Alberto

    2015-01-01

    Dominant optic atrophy (DOA) and Wolfram syndrome share a great deal of clinical variability, including an association with hearing loss and the presence of optic atrophy at similar ages. The objective of this paper was to discuss the phenotypic variability of these syndromes with respect to the presentation of two clinical cases. We present two patients, each with either DOA or Wolfram syndrome, and contribute to the research literature through our findings of two novel mutations. The overlapping of several clinical characteristics in hereditary optic neuropathies can complicate the differential diagnosis. Future studies are needed to better determine the genotype-phenotype correlation for these diseases.

  20. Relation of increased short-term variability of QT interval to congenital long-QT syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hinterseer, Martin; Beckmann, Britt-Maria; Thomsen, Morten B

    2009-01-01

    Apart from clinical symptoms the diagnosis and risk stratification in long-QT syndrome (LQTS) is usually based on the surface electrocardiogram. Studies have indicated that not only prolongation of the QT interval but also an increased short-term variability of QT interval (STV(QT)) is a marker...... that an STV(QT) of 4.9 ms was the optimal cut-off value to predict mutation carriers. When incorporating an STV(QT) >4.9 ms for those whose QTc interval was within the normal limits, sensitivity to distinguish mutation carriers increased to 83% with a specificity of 68%, so that another 15 mutation carriers...

  1. Heart rate variability in normal-weight patients with polycystic ovary syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilit, Celal; Paşalı Kilit, Türkan

    2017-05-01

    Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is an endocrine disease closely related to several risk factors of cardiovascular disease. Obese women with PCOS show altered autonomic modulation. The results of studies investigating cardiac autonomic functions of normal-weight women with PCOS are conflicting. The aim of the study was to assess the reactivity of cardiac sympathovagal balance in normal-weight women with PCOS by heart rate variability analysis. We examined the heart rate variability in 60 normal-weight women with PCOS and compared them with that in 60 age-matched healthy women having a similar metabolic profile. Time and frequency domain parameters of heart rate variability were analyzed based on 5-min-long continuous electrocardiography recordings for the following 3 periods: (1) during rest in supine position, (2) during controlled breathing, and (3) during isometric handgrip exercise. Time and frequency domain parameters of heart rate variability for the 3 periods assessed were similar in the two groups. Although modified Ferriman-Gallwey score and serum testosterone and luteinizing hormone levels were significantly higher in women with PCOS, homeostatic model assessment-insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) was not different the between the PCOS and control groups. There were no significant correlations between serum testosterone levels and heart rate variability parameters among the study population. The findings of this study suggest that the reactivity of cardiac sympathovagal balance is not altered in normal-weight women with PCOS having a normal HOMA-IR.

  2. Variable expressivity of FGF3 mutations associated with deafness and LAMM syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Griffith Andrew J

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recessive mutations of fibroblast growth factor 3 (FGF3 can cause LAMM syndrome (OMIM 610706, characterized by fully penetrant complete labyrinthine aplasia, microtia and microdontia. Methods We performed a prospective molecular genetic and clinical study of families segregating hearing loss linked to FGF3 mutations. Ten affected individuals from three large Pakistani families segregating FGF3 mutations were imaged with CT, MRI, or both to detect inner ear abnormalities. We also modeled the three dimensional structure of FGF3 to better understand the structural consequences of the three missense mutations. Results Two families segregated reported mutations (p.R104X and p.R95W and one family segregated a novel mutation (p.R132GfsX26 of FGF3. All individuals homozygous for p.R104X or p.R132GfsX26 had fully penetrant features of LAMM syndrome. However, recessive p.R95W mutations were associated with nearly normal looking auricles and variable inner ear structural phenotypes, similar to that reported for a Somali family also segregating p.R95W. This suggests that the mild phenotype is not entirely due to genetic background. Molecular modeling result suggests a less drastic effect of p.R95W on FGF3 function compared with known missense mutations detected in fully penetrant LAMM syndrome. Since we detected significant intrafamilial variability of the inner ear structural phenotype in the family segregating p.R95W, we also sequenced FGF10 as a likely candidate for a modifier. However, we did not find any sequence variation, pointing out that a larger sample size will be needed to map and identify a modifier. We also observed a mild to moderate bilateral conductive hearing loss in three carriers of p.R95W, suggesting either a semi-dominant effect of this mutant allele of FGF3, otitis media, or a consequence of genetic background in these three family members. Conclusions We noted a less prominent dental and external ear phenotype in

  3. Inter-individual cognitive variability in children with Asperger’s syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Luz Gonzalez-Gadea

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Multiple studies have tried to establish the distinctive profile of individuals with Asperger’s syndrome (AS. However, recent reports suggest that adults with AS feature heterogeneous cognitive profiles. The present study explores inter-individual variability in children with AS through group comparison and multiple case series analysis. All participants completed an extended battery including measures of fluid and crystallized intelligence, executive functions, theory of mind, and classical neuropsychological tests. Significant group differences were found in theory of mind and other domains related to global information processing. However, the AS group showed high inter-individual variability (both sub- and supra-normal performance on most cognitive tasks. Furthermore, high fluid intelligence correlated with less general cognitive impairment, high cognitive flexibility, and speed motor processing. In light of these findings, we propose that children with AS are characterized by a distinct, uneven pattern of cognitive strengths and weaknesses.

  4. Nocturnal Blood Pressure Variability in Patients with Obstructive Sleep Apnea Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martynowicz, H; Porębska, I; Poręba, R; Mazur, G; Brzecka, A

    2016-01-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is a common respiratory disorder associated with hypertension and cardiovascular complications. Blood pressure variability may be a sign of risk of cardiovascular events. The aim of this study was to investigate the hypothesis that severe OSA syndrome is associated with increased blood pressure variability. Based on respiratory polygraphy, 58 patients were categorized into two groups: severe OSA with apnea/hypopnea index (AHI) greater than 29 episodes per hour (mean 52.2 ± 19.0/h) and mild-to-moderate OSA with AHI between 5 and 30 episodes per hour (mean 20.2 ± 7.8/h). A 24-h noninvasive blood pressure monitoring was performed. The standard deviation of mean blood pressure was used as the indicator of blood pressure variability. In patients with severe, compared with mild-to-moderate OSA, a higher mean nocturnal systolic blood pressure (133.2 ± 17.4 mmHg vs. 117.7 ± 31.2 mmHg, p variability (12.1 ± 6.0 vs. 7.6 ± 4.3, p variability (10.5 ± 6.1 vs. 7.3 ± 4.0 p variability (9.1 ± 4.9 mmHg vs. 6.8 ± 3.5 mmHg) were detected. The findings of the study point to increased nocturnal systolic and diastolic arterial blood pressure and blood pressure variability as risk factors of cardiovascular complications in patients with severe OSA.

  5. Metabolic Syndrome and Importance of Associated Variables in Children and Adolescents in Guabiruba - SC, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nilton Rosini

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Background:The risk factors that characterize metabolic syndrome (MetS may be present in childhood and adolescence, increasing the risk of cardiovascular disease in adulthood.Objective:Evaluate the prevalence of MetS and the importance of its associated variables, including insulin resistance (IR, in children and adolescents in the city of Guabiruba-SC, Brazil.Methods:Cross-sectional study with 1011 students (6–14 years, 52.4% girls, 58.5% children. Blood samples were collected for measurement of biochemical parameters by routine laboratory methods. IR was estimated by the HOMA-IR index, and weight, height, waist circumference and blood pressure were determined. Multivariate logistic regression models were used to examine the associations between risk variables and MetS.Results:The prevalence of MetS, IR, overweight and obesity in the cohort were 14%, 8.5%, 21% and 13%, respectively. Among students with MetS, 27% had IR, 33% were overweight, 45.5% were obese and 22% were eutrophic. IR was more common in overweight (48% and obese (41% students when compared with eutrophic individuals (11%; p = 0.034. The variables with greatest influence on the development of MetS were obesity (OR = 32.7, overweight (OR = 6.1, IR (OR = 4.4; p ≤ 0.0001 for all and age (OR = 1.15; p = 0.014.Conclusion:There was a high prevalence of MetS in children and adolescents evaluated in this study. Students who were obese, overweight or insulin resistant had higher chances of developing the syndrome.

  6. Same MSH2 Gene Mutation But Variable Phenotypes in 2 Families With Lynch Syndrome: Two Case Reports and Review of Genotype-Phenotype Correlation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liccardo, Raffaella; De Rosa, Marina; Duraturo, Francesca

    2018-01-01

    Lynch syndrome is an autosomal dominant syndrome that can be subdivided into Lynch syndrome I, or site-specific colonic cancer, and Lynch syndrome II, or extracolonic cancers, particularly carcinomas of the stomach, endometrium, biliary and pancreatic systems, and urinary tract. Lynch syndrome is associated with point mutations and large rearrangements in DNA MisMatch Repair ( MMR ) genes. This syndrome shows a variable phenotypic expression in people who carry pathogenetic mutations. So far, a correlation in genotype-phenotype has not been definitely established. In this study, we describe 2 Lynch syndrome cases presenting with the same genotype but different phenotypes and discuss possible reasons for this.

  7. Beat-to-beat variability of QT intervals is increased in patients with drug-induced long-QT syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hinterseer, Martin; Thomsen, Morten Bækgaard; Beckmann, Britt-Maria

    2008-01-01

    Torsades de pointes arrhythmias (TdP) occur by definition in the setting of prolonged QT intervals. Animal models of drug induced Long-QT syndrome (dLQTS) have shown higher predictive value for proarrhythmia with beat-to-beat variability of repolarization duration (BVR) when compared with QT inte...... intervals. Here, we evaluate variability of QT intervals in patients with a history of drug-induced long QT syndrome (dLQTS) and TdP in absence of a mutation in any of the major LQTS genes.......Torsades de pointes arrhythmias (TdP) occur by definition in the setting of prolonged QT intervals. Animal models of drug induced Long-QT syndrome (dLQTS) have shown higher predictive value for proarrhythmia with beat-to-beat variability of repolarization duration (BVR) when compared with QT...

  8. Maxillomandibular Advancement in Obstructive Sleep Apnea Syndrome Patients: a Restrospective Study on the Sagittal Cephalometric Variables

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paolo Ronchi

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The present retrospective study analyzes sagittal cephalometric changes in patients affected by obstructive sleep apnea syndrome submitted to maxillomandubular advancement. Material and Methods: 15 adult sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS patients diagnosed by polysomnography (PSG and treated with maxillomandubular advancement (MMA were included in this study. Pre- (T1 and postsurgical (T2 PSG studies assessing the apnea/hypopnea index (AHI and the lowest oxygen saturation (LSAT level were compared. Lateral cephalometric radiographs at T1 and T2 measuring sagittal cephalometric variables (SNA, SNB, and ANB were analyzed, as were the amount of maxillary and mandibular advancement (Co-A and Co-Pog, the distance from the mandibular plane to the most anterior point of the hyoid bone (Mp-H, and the posterior airway space (PAS.Results: Postoperatively, the overall mean AHI dropped from 58.7 ± 16 to 8.1 ± 7.8 events per hour (P < 0.001. The mean preoperative LSAT increased from 71% preoperatively to 90% after surgery (P < 0.001. All the patients in our study were successfully treated (AHI < 20 or reduced by 50%. Cephalometric analysis performed after surgery showed a statistically significant correlation between the mean SNA variation and the decrease in the AHI (P = 0.01. The overall mean SNA increase was 6°.Conclusions: Our findings suggest that the improvement observed in the respiratory symptoms, namely the apnea/hypopnea episodes, is correlated with the SNA increase after surgery. This finding may help maxillofacial surgeons to establish selective criteria for the surgical approach to sleep apnea syndrome patients.

  9. Multidisciplinary Treatment of the Metabolic Syndrome Lowers Blood Pressure Variability Independent of Blood Pressure Control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcus, Yonit; Segev, Elad; Shefer, Gabi; Sack, Jessica; Tal, Brurya; Yaron, Marianna; Carmeli, Eli; Shefer, Lili; Margaliot, Miri; Limor, Rona; Gilad, Suzan; Sofer, Yael; Stern, Naftali

    2016-01-01

    Blood pressure (BP) variability (BPV) contributes to target organ damage independent of BP. The authors examined the effect of a 1-year multidisciplinary intervention on BPV in patients with the metabolic syndrome (MetS) as defined by criteria from the Third Report of the Adult Treatment Panel. Forty-four nondiabetic patients underwent clinical and biochemical profiling, 24-hour ambulatory BP monitoring (ABPM), body composition, carotid intima-media thickness, and carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity (PWV). The intervention targeted all MetS components. BPV was assessed by the standard deviation of daytime systolic BP derived from ABPM. Patients with low and high BPV (lower or higher than the median daytime standard deviation of 11.6 mm Hg) did not differ in regards to systolic and diastolic BP, age, fasting glucose, glycated hemoglobin, and body mass index, but the high-variability group had higher values of low-density lipoprotein and leg fat. The 1-year intervention resulted in weight reduction but not BP-lowering. BPV declined in the high-variability group in association with lowering of PWV, C-reactive protein, glycated hemoglobin, alanine aminotransferase, asymmetric dimethylarginine, and increased high-density lipoprotein cholesterol. A multidisciplinary intervention independent of BP-lowering normalized BPV, lowered PWV, and enhanced metabolic control. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Endothelial dysfunction and reduced heart rate variability in patients with metabolic syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Nikolaevna Smirnova

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available According to experts of the World Health Organization (WHO, metabolic syndrome (MS can be considered as pandemy of the XXI century, because its prevalence among the population of developed countries is about 25-35%. In this study with the purpose of complex investigation of the autonomic nervous system and endothelial function we included 66 patients with MS between the ages of 25 and 61 (46.9±9.9 years. A comparison group of apparently healthy individuals (16 individuals, average age of 45.3±2.3 years; P>0.05 was studied. To evaluate the response of microvascular tone, we used the method of wavelet analysis of skin temperature oscillations during cooling of the limb. All patients underwent the study of heart rate variability. The levels of insulin, endothelin-1, and vascular endothelial growth factor were determined using enzyme immunoassay. Patients with MS had significant differences in all metabolic parameters. Our study showed that in the group of MS there is a decrease of the variability of heart rhythm compared with the healthy group. Conducting cold test revealed signs of endothelial dysfunction in the MS group, which was manifested by the decrease of the index of vasodilation in the endothelial and neurogenic frequency range. In the study group we determined the increase in biochemical markers of endothelial dysfunction, which correlated with parameters of vasodilation. Also, the presence of endothelial dysfunction significantly correlated with signs of reduction of the variability of the heart rhythm.

  11. Variable phenotype of Marfan syndrome in two large Australian pedigrees, one of Australian aboriginal origin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wong, K.K.; Summers, K.M.; West, M.J. [Univ. of Queensland (Australia)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    Marfan syndrome may affect the cardiovascular, ocular and skeletal systems. The gene for this autosomal dominant disease maps to chromosome 15 and codes for the extracellular matrix protein fibrillin. Phenotypic expression is very variable both within and between families, possibly due to the influence of other, unlinked, genetic factors interacting with the fibrillin gene. We report two Australian families which demonstrate the extent of inter- and intra-family phenotypic variability. Eye, cardiac and skeletal assessments were made independently. In the first family, 8 of 12 siblings and 11 of 19 of their children had ectopia lentis with or without other ocular findings. There were few cardiac signs. One child had mitral valve prolapse. He and three other children had mild dilatation of the aorta. Skeletal abnormalities were also found (3 adults and 7 children). Chest wall asymmetry was the most common skeletal finding. This family has less cardiac and skeletal involvement than is usual in Marfan syndrome, although the disease maps to chromosome 15 in the region of the fibrillin gene (LOD=4.8 at {theta}=0 with respect to CYP19). The second family is partly of Australian aboriginal origin. The disease has been traced through 5 generations. To date we have examined 37 of 84 living members. Twenty-three in 3 generations are affected. Five adults and 4 children have moderate to severe aortic dilatation and there has been at least one death due to aortic dissection. However, two adolescents with subluxed lenses and marked skeletal abnormalities have normal aortic diameters, two children have aortic dilatation without other signs and two children have only subluxed lenses. This family shows the range of phenotypic variation which can arise from mutation in the fibrillin gene, which may be influenced by the admixture of Australian aboriginal genes. These two families provide an invaluable resource for studying genetic interactions in this disease.

  12. Clinical variability of neuroacanthocytosis syndromes-a series of six patients with long follow-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dulski, J; Sołtan, W; Schinwelski, M; Rudzińska, M; Wójcik-Pędziwiatr, M; Wictor, L; Schön, F; Puschmann, A; Klempíř, J; Tilley, L; Roth, J; Tacik, P; Fujioka, S; Drozdowski, W; Sitek, E J; Wszolek, Z; Sławek, J

    2016-08-01

    To provide clinical clues to differential diagnosis in patients with chorea and other movement disorders with blood acanthocytes. We present a long-term video accompanied follow-up of six Caucasian patients with neuroacanthocytosis from several centers, three diagnosed with chorea-acanthocytosis (ChAc): 34-y.o.(no.1), 36-y.o.(no.2), 43-y.o.(no.3), two diagnosed with McLeod Syndrome (MLS): 52-y.o.(no.4), 61-y.o.(no.5) and one 63-y.o.(no.6), a brother of no.5, with clinical suspicion of MLS. Additionally we report pathological findings of the mother of two brothers with MLS reported in our series with acanthocytes on peripheral blood smear The patients had an unremarkable family history and were asymptomatic until adulthood. Patients no. 1,2,4,5,6 developed generalized chorea and patient no. 3 had predominant bradykinesia. Patients no. 1,2,3 had phonic and motor tics, additionally patients no. 1 and 2 exhibited peculiar oromandibular dystonia with tongue thrusting. In patients no. 2 and 3 dystonic supination of feet was observed, patient no. 3 subsequently developed bilateral foot drop. Patients no. 2 and 4 had signs of muscle atrophy. Tendon reflexes were decreased or absent and electroneurography demonstrated sensorimotor neuropathy in patients no. 1,2,3,4,5, except no. 6. Generalized seizures were seen in patients no. 2,3,5,6 and myoclonic jerks in patient no. 1. Cognitive deterioration was reported in patients no. 1,2,3,5,6. Serum creatine kinase levels were elevated in all six patients. We highlight the variability of clinical presentation of neuroacanthocytosis syndromes and the long time from the onset to diagnosis with the need to screen the blood smears in uncertain cases, however, as in one of our cases acanthocytes may even be not found. Based on our observations and data from the literature we propose several red flags that should raise the suspicion of an NA syndrome in a patient with a movement disorder: severe orofacial dyskinesia with tongue and lip

  13. Ambulatory blood pressure monitoring-derived short-term blood pressure variability is increased in Cushing's syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rebellato, Andrea; Grillo, Andrea; Dassie, Francesca; Sonino, Nicoletta; Maffei, Pietro; Martini, Chiara; Paoletta, Agostino; Fabris, Bruno; Carretta, Renzo; Fallo, Francesco

    2014-11-01

    Cushing's syndrome is associated with high cardiovascular morbility and mortality. Blood pressure (BP) variability within a 24-h period is increasingly recognized as an independent predictor of cardiovascular risk. The aim of our study was to investigate the short-term BP variability indices in Cushing's syndrome. Twenty-five patients with Cushing's syndrome (mean age 49 ± 13 years, 4 males; 21 Cushing's disease and 4 adrenal adenoma patients) underwent 24-h ambulatory BP monitoring (ABPM) and evaluation of cardiovascular risk factors. Cushing patients were divided into 8 normotensive (NOR-CUSH) and 17 hypertensive (HYP-CUSH) patients and were compared with 20 normotensive (NOR-CTR) and 20 hypertensive (HYP-CTR) age-, sex-, and BMI-matched control subjects. Short-term BP variability was derived from ABPM and calculated as the following: (1) standard deviation (SD) of 24-h, daytime, and nighttime BP; (2) 24-h weighted SD of BP; and (3) average real variability (ARV), i.e., the average of the absolute differences between consecutive BP measurements over 24 h. In comparison with controls, patients with Cushing's syndrome, either normotensive or hypertensive, had higher 24-h and daytime SD of BP, as well as higher 24-h weighted SD and ARV of BP (P = 0.03 to P CUSH or between HYP-CTR and HYP-CUSH subgroups. ABPM-derived short-term BP variability is increased in Cushing's syndrome, independent of BP elevation. It may represent an additional cardiovascular risk factor in this disease. The role of excess cortisol in BP variability has to be further clarified.

  14. Systemic Hemodynamic Atherothrombotic Syndrome and Resonance Hypothesis of Blood Pressure Variability: Triggering Cardiovascular Events.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kario, Kazuomi

    2016-07-01

    Blood pressure (BP) exhibits different variabilities and surges with different time phases, from the shortest beat-by-beat to longest yearly changes. We hypothesized that the synergistic resonance of these BP variabilites generates an extraordinarily large dynamic surge in BP and triggers cardiovascular events (the resonance hypothesis). The power of pulses is transmitted to the peripheral sites without attenuation by the large arteries, in individuals with stiffened arteries. Thus, the effect of a BP surge on cardiovascular risk would be especially exaggerated in high-risk patients with vascular disease. Based on this concept, our group recently proposed a new theory of systemic hemodynamic atherothromboltic syndrome (SHATS), a vicious cycle of hemodynamic stress and vascular disease that advances organ damage and triggers cardiovascular disease. Clinical phenotypes of SHATS are large-artery atherothombotic diseases such as stroke, coronary artery disease, and aortic and pheripheral artery disease; small-artery diseases, and microcirculation-related disease such as vascular cognitive dysfunction, heart failure, and chronic kidney disease. The careful consideration of BP variability and vascular diseases such as SHATS, and the early detection and management of SHATS, will achieve more effective individualized cardiovascular protection. In the near future, information and communication technology-based 'anticipation medicine' predicted by the changes of individual BP values could be a promising approach to achieving zero cardiovascular events.

  15. Evaluation of white spot syndrome virus variable DNA loci as molecular markers of virus spread at intermediate spatiotemporal scales

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bui Thi Minh Dieu,; Marks, H.; Zwart, M.P.; Vlak, J.M.

    2010-01-01

    Variable genomic loci have been employed in a number of molecular epidemiology studies of white spot syndrome virus (WSSV), but it is unknown which loci are suitable molecular markers for determining WSSV spread on different spatiotemporal scales. Although previous work suggests that multiple

  16. Clinical variability of Waardenburg-Shah syndrome in patients with proximal 13q deletion syndrome including the endothelin-B receptor locus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tüysüz, Beyhan; Collin, Anna; Arapoğlu, Müjde; Suyugül, Nezir

    2009-10-01

    Waardenburg-Shah syndrome (Waardenburg syndrome type IV-WS4) is an auditory-pigmentary disorder that combines clinical features of pigmentary abnormalities of the skin, hair and irides, sensorineural hearing loss, and Hirschsprung disease (HSCR). Mutations in the endothelin-B receptor (EDNRB) gene on 13q22 have been found to cause this syndrome. Mutations in both alleles cause the full phenotype, while heterozygous mutations cause isolated HSCR or HSCR with minor pigmentary anomalies and/or sensorineural deafness. We investigated the status of the EDNRB gene, by FISH analysis, in three patients with de novo proximal 13q deletions detected at cytogenetic analysis and examined the clinical variability of WS4 among these patients. Chromosome 13q was screened with locus specific FISH probes and breakpoints were determined at 13q22.1q31.3 in Patients 1 and 3, and at 13q21.1q31.3 in Patient 2. An EDNRB specific FISH probe was deleted in all three patients. All patients had common facial features seen in proximal 13q deletion syndrome and mild mental retardation. However, findings related to WS4 were variable; Patient 1 had hypopigmentation of the irides and HSCR, Patient 2 had prominent bicolored irides and mild bilateral hearing loss, and Patient 3 had only mild unilateral hearing loss. These data contribute new insights into the pathogenesis of WS4.

  17. Glycemic variability in patients with Wolfram syndrome is lower than in type 1 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zmyslowska, A; Fendler, W; Szadkowska, A; Borowiec, M; Mysliwiec, M; Baranowska-Jazwiecka, A; Buraczewska, M; Fulmanska-Anders, M; Mianowska, B; Pietrzak, I; Rzeznik, D; Mlynarski, W

    2015-12-01

    Wolfram syndrome (WFS) is diagnosed as coexistence of diabetes mellitus and optic atrophy, where pancreatic beta cell destruction is associated with neurodegeneration. Typically, WFS necessitates insulin treatment similar to type 1 diabetes (T1D), but the mechanism of beta cell mass reduction leading to hyperglycemia is different. The aim of the study was to assess glycemic variability using the continuous glucose monitoring (CGM) system in seven pediatric patients with genetically confirmed WFS and compare the results with data obtained from 21 propensity score-matched patients with T1D. The "GlyCulator" application was used for the calculation of glycemic variability indices. CGM recordings showed similarities in glycemic variability among WFS patients, but differing from those of the T1D group. Coefficient of variation (%CV), CONGA4h, and GONGA6h were significantly (p < 0.05) lower in WFS patients (28.08 ± 7.37, 54.96 ± 11.92, and 55.99 ± 10.58) than in T1D patients (37.87 ± 14.24, 74.12 ± 28.74, p = 0.02, and 80.26 ± 35.05, respectively). In WFS patients, the percentage of values above 126 mg/dL was 69.79 (52.08-77.43), whereas in patients with T1D, the percentage was significantly lower-47.22 (35.07-62.85, p = 0.018). Curiously, a tendency toward a lower percentage of measurements below 70 mg/dL was noted in the WFS group [0 (0-7.29)] in comparison with the T1D group [6.25 (0-18.06), p = 0.122]. WFS patients had a significantly higher C-peptide level (0.31 ± 0.2 ng/mL) than T1D patients (0.04 ± 0.04 ng/mL; p = 0.006). Patients with WFS show smaller glycemic variability than individuals with T1D, and this may be associated with persistent residual insulin secretion.

  18. Executive function impairments in fibromyalgia syndrome: Relevance of clinical variables and body mass index

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-01-01

    Background Several investigations suggest the presence of deterioration of executive function in fibromyalgia syndrome (FMS). The study quantified executive functions in patients with FMS. A wide array of functions was assessed, including updating, shifting and inhibition, as well as decision making and mental planning. Moreover, clinical variables were investigated as possible mediators of executive dysfunction, including pain severity, psychiatric comorbidity, medication and body mass index (BMI). Methods Fifty-two FMS patients and 32 healthy controls completed a battery of 14 neuropsychological tests. Clinical interviews were conducted and the McGill Pain Questionnaire, Beck Depression Inventory, State-Trait Anxiety Inventory, Fatigue Severity Scale and Oviedo Quality of Sleep Questionnaire were presented. Results Patients performed poorer than controls on the Letter Number Sequencing, Arithmetic and Similarities subtests of the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale, the Spatial Span subtest of the Wechsler Memory Scale, an N-back task, a verbal fluency task, the Ruff Figural Fluency Test, the Inhibition score of the Stroop Test, the Inhibition and Shifting scores of the Five Digits Test, the Key Search Test and the Zoo Map Task. Moreover, patients exhibited less steep learning curves on the Iowa Gambling Task. Among clinical variables, BMI and pain severity explained the largest proportion of performance variance. Conclusions This study demonstrated impairments in executive functions of updating, shifting inhibition, decision making and planning in FMS. While the mediating role of pain in cognitive impairments in FMS had been previously established, the influence of BMI is a novel finding. Overweight and obesity should be considered by FMS researchers, and in the treatment of the condition. PMID:29694417

  19. Screening program for Waardenburg syndrome in Colombia: clinical definition and phenotypic variability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamayo, Marta L; Gelvez, Nancy; Rodriguez, Marcela; Florez, Silvia; Varon, Clara; Medina, David; Bernal, Jaime E

    2008-04-15

    A screening program to detect Waardenburg syndrome (WS) conducted between 2002 and 2005, among 1,763 deaf individuals throughout Columbia identified 95 affected individuals belonging to 95 families, giving a frequency of 5.38% of WS among the institutionalized deaf population. We confirmed the clinical diagnosis of WS in the 95 propositi and, through the family evaluation, we also identified 45 non-institutionalized affected relatives. Audiologic, ophthalmologic, and genetic studies were performed to confirm the diagnosis. Following the classification of the WS consortium, based on the Waardenburg Index (WI), to define the type of WS. We classified 62.1% of the propositi as WS2 and 37.9% as WS1. We present here the results of the study of clinical manifestations, analyzing the presence, severity, and symmetry of clinical findings among this affected population. Overall, among the 95 propositi, in addition to sensorineural deafness in all, the most frequent features were broad nasal root (58.9%), a first degree relative affected (37.9%), heterochromia irides (36.8%), skin hypopigmentation (31.6%), white forelock (28.0%), intense blue iris (27.4%), synophrys (12.6%), premature graying (10.5%), ptosis of the eyelids (9.5%), and hypoplasia alae nasi (1.1%). The majority of individuals had normal psychomotor development (87%), while the remaining 13% had developmental delay. Among the latter, 9.4% corresponded to WS2 and 3.6% to WS1. Our data confirm an interesting inter- and intrafamilial variability in the phenotypic manifestations as well as extremely variable expression. Copyright 2008 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  20. Executive function impairments in fibromyalgia syndrome: Relevance of clinical variables and body mass index.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muñoz Ladrón de Guevara, Cristina; Fernández-Serrano, María José; Reyes Del Paso, Gustavo A; Duschek, Stefan

    2018-01-01

    Several investigations suggest the presence of deterioration of executive function in fibromyalgia syndrome (FMS). The study quantified executive functions in patients with FMS. A wide array of functions was assessed, including updating, shifting and inhibition, as well as decision making and mental planning. Moreover, clinical variables were investigated as possible mediators of executive dysfunction, including pain severity, psychiatric comorbidity, medication and body mass index (BMI). Fifty-two FMS patients and 32 healthy controls completed a battery of 14 neuropsychological tests. Clinical interviews were conducted and the McGill Pain Questionnaire, Beck Depression Inventory, State-Trait Anxiety Inventory, Fatigue Severity Scale and Oviedo Quality of Sleep Questionnaire were presented. Patients performed poorer than controls on the Letter Number Sequencing, Arithmetic and Similarities subtests of the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale, the Spatial Span subtest of the Wechsler Memory Scale, an N-back task, a verbal fluency task, the Ruff Figural Fluency Test, the Inhibition score of the Stroop Test, the Inhibition and Shifting scores of the Five Digits Test, the Key Search Test and the Zoo Map Task. Moreover, patients exhibited less steep learning curves on the Iowa Gambling Task. Among clinical variables, BMI and pain severity explained the largest proportion of performance variance. This study demonstrated impairments in executive functions of updating, shifting inhibition, decision making and planning in FMS. While the mediating role of pain in cognitive impairments in FMS had been previously established, the influence of BMI is a novel finding. Overweight and obesity should be considered by FMS researchers, and in the treatment of the condition.

  1. QT Adaptation and Intrinsic QT Variability in Congenital Long QT Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seethala, Srikanth; Singh, Prabhpreet; Shusterman, Vladimir; Ribe, Margareth; Haugaa, Kristina H; Němec, Jan

    2015-12-16

    Increased variability of QT interval (QTV) has been linked to arrhythmias in animal experiments and multiple clinical situations. Congenital long QT syndrome (LQTS), a pure repolarization disease, may provide important information on the relationship between delayed repolarization and QTV. Twenty-four-hour Holter monitor tracings from 78 genotyped congenital LQTS patients (52 females; 51 LQT1, 23 LQT2, 2 LQT5, 2 JLN, 27 symptomatic; age, 35.2±12.3 years) were evaluated with computer-assisted annotation of RR and QT intervals. Several models of RR-QT relationship were tested in all patients. A model assuming exponential decrease of past RR interval contributions to QT duration with 60-second time constant provided the best data fit. This model was used to calculate QTc and residual "intrinsic" QTV, which cannot be explained by heart rate change. The intrinsic QTV was higher in patients with long QTc (r=0.68; Padaptation to heart rate changes occurs with time constant ≈60 seconds, similar to results reported in control subjects. Intrinsic QTV correlates with the degree of repolarization delay and might reflect action potential instability observed in animal models of LQTS. © 2015 The Authors. Published on behalf of the American Heart Association, Inc., by Wiley Blackwell.

  2. Rectal duplication with Currarino syndrome: report of one case%直肠重复畸形并Currarino综合征1例

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    路涛; 赵高平

    2010-01-01

    @@ 病例 女,19岁,因肛门坠胀疼痛、排便困难半月就诊.外院门诊曾予灌肠后缓解,1周前因大便带血,直肠指检提示直肠后壁有一包块,遂收入院治疗.患者2岁时曾行盆腔内畸胎瘤切除术.体格检查:急性病容,表情痛苦,心肺听诊阴性,下腹正中有一长约20cm陈旧性手术疤痕.腹部无压痛、反跳痛及肌紧张,肠鸣音正常.

  3. [Burnout Syndrome, Family and Work Related Variables on General Practitioners in Bogota. A Strategy of Work Quality].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguirre Roldán, Adriana María; Quijano Barriga, Ana María

    2015-01-01

    The burnout syndrome is a set of work-related symptoms related to weariness and exhaustion, in response to the emotional stress at work and its consequences. The aim of the study was to measure the frequency of burnout in General Practitioners (GPs) from 3 private institutions in Bogotá, Colombia and to determine the associated factors according to the variables taken into account. It is a descriptive cross-sectional study which was used to analyse the Questionnaire for Burnout Syndrome (CESQT). The population was 106 GPs. The level of burnout was at a critical level in 6.6% of the GP population. The variables showed that having a stable partner and children are a protective factor. By contrast, work in emergency rooms is a risk factor. Copyright © 2014 Asociación Colombiana de Psiquiatría. Publicado por Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  4. Heart rate variability and heart rate turbulence in patients with polycystic ovary syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Özkeçeci, Gülay; Ünlü, Bekir Serdar; Dursun, Hüseyin; Akçi, Önder; Köken, Gülengül; Onrat, Ersel; Avşar, Alaettin

    2016-05-01

    Cardiac autonomic dysfunction may develop in patients with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS). Heart rate variability (HRV) and heart rate turbulence (HRT) are used in assessing cardiac autonomic functions. The goal of this study was to compare the cardiac autonomic functions in patients with PCOS and healthy controls. To our knowledge, this is the first study evaluating cardiac autonomic functions in patients with PCOS with respect to both HRV and HRT. Twenty-three patients with PCOS (mean age 22.8±3.9 years) and 25 healthy female volunteers who were matched for age and body mass index (BMI) (mean age 23.5±6.2 years) were enrolled in this as case-control study. Twenty-four hour ambulatory electrocardiogram recordings of all participants were taken using Pathfinder software. The time domain parameters of HRV and HRT, including turbulence onset (TO) and turbulence slope, were calculated. Diagnosis of PCOS was made with physical and laboratory findings of hirsutism or biochemical hyperandrogenism and chronic anovulation. Diabetes mellitus, other hormon disorders or hormon therapy, pregnancy, atrial fibrilation, obesite, chronic diseases, disorders of the autonomic nervous system, a history of drug use affecting the autonomic nervous system were excluded. There were no significant differences in HRV and HRT parameters between the two groups. Cardiovascular risk factors, such as BMI, blood pressure, fasting blood glucose, and lipid parameters, were also similar. Triangular index measure of HRV was negatively correlated with high density lipoprotein cholesterol levels (r=-0.47, p<0.05), while age and BMI were significantly correlated with TO (r=0.31 and 0.47, respectively; p<0.05 for all). Cardiac autonomic functions were not found to be altered in patients with PCOS in comparison with healthy controls. These results may be explained with the absence of concomitant cardiovascular risk factors with the patients being in the early stage of the disease.

  5. Heart Rate Variability Is Associated with Exercise Capacity in Patients with Cardiac Syndrome X.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dai-Yin Lu

    Full Text Available Heart rate variability (HRV reflects the healthiness of autonomic nervous system, which is associated with exercise capacity. We therefore investigated whether HRV could predict the exercise capacity in the adults with cardiac syndrome X (CSX. A total of 238 subjects (57±12 years, 67.8% men, who were diagnosed as CSX by the positive exercise stress test and nearly normal coronary angiogram were enrolled. Power spectrum from the 24-hour recording of heart rate was analyzed in frequency domain using total power (TP and spectral components of the very low frequency (VLF, low frequency (LF and high frequency (HF ranges. Among the study population, 129 subjects with impaired exercise capacity during the treadmill test had significantly lower HRV indices than those with preserved exercise capacity (≥90% of the age predicted maximal heart rate. After accounting for age, sex, and baseline SBP and heart rate, VLF (odds ratio per 1SD and 95% CI: 2.02, 1.19-3.42, LF (1.67, 1.10-2.55, and TP (1.82, 1.17-2.83 remained significantly associated with preserved exercise capacity. In addition, increased HRV indices were also associated with increased exercise duration, rate-pressure product, and heart rate recovery, independent of age, body mass index, and baseline SBP and heart rate. In subgroup analysis, HRV indices demonstrated similar predictive values related to exercise capacity across various subpopulations, especially in the young. In patients with CSX, HRV was independently associated with exercise capacity, especially in young subjects. The healthiness of autonomic nervous system may have a role in modulating the exercise capacity in patients with CSX.

  6. ANKRD11 variants cause variable clinical features associated with KBG syndrome and Coffin–Siris-like syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyatake, Satoko; Okamoto, Nobuhiko; Stark, Zornitza; Nabetani, Makoto; Tsurusaki, Yoshinori; Nakashima, Mitsuko; Miyake, Noriko; Mizuguchi, Takeshi; Ohtake, Akira; Saitsu, Hirotomo; Matsumoto, Naomichi

    2017-01-01

    KBG syndrome (KBGS) is an autosomal dominant multiple congenital anomaly-intellectual disability syndrome, characterized by developmental delay with neurological involvements, macrodontia of the upper central incisors, characteristic facial dysmorphism and skeletal anomalies. Variants in ANKRD11 cause KBGS. We present five individuals from four families with ANKRD11 variants identified by whole-exome sequencing. Four of the five were clinically affected, and their diagnoses were varied. One was typical KBGS, two were Coffin–Siris syndrome-like (CSS), and one was intellectual disability with infantile spasms. One individual showed extremely mild phenotype. All individuals fulfilled the proposed diagnostic criteria for KBGS. Phenotypic features overlap between KBGS and CSS to some extent, and characteristic dental and fifth finger/toe findings can indicate differential diagnosis. These findings indicate that patients with ANKRD11 variants occupy a wide spectrum of intellectual disability, including clinically normal individuals. This is the first report highlighting the clinical overlap between KBGS and CSS and supporting the recently proposed clinical concept, in which transcriptional machineries are disrupted. PMID:28250421

  7. ANKRD11 variants cause variable clinical features associated with KBG syndrome and Coffin-Siris-like syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyatake, Satoko; Okamoto, Nobuhiko; Stark, Zornitza; Nabetani, Makoto; Tsurusaki, Yoshinori; Nakashima, Mitsuko; Miyake, Noriko; Mizuguchi, Takeshi; Ohtake, Akira; Saitsu, Hirotomo; Matsumoto, Naomichi

    2017-08-01

    KBG syndrome (KBGS) is an autosomal dominant multiple congenital anomaly-intellectual disability syndrome, characterized by developmental delay with neurological involvements, macrodontia of the upper central incisors, characteristic facial dysmorphism and skeletal anomalies. Variants in ANKRD11 cause KBGS. We present five individuals from four families with ANKRD11 variants identified by whole-exome sequencing. Four of the five were clinically affected, and their diagnoses were varied. One was typical KBGS, two were Coffin-Siris syndrome-like (CSS), and one was intellectual disability with infantile spasms. One individual showed extremely mild phenotype. All individuals fulfilled the proposed diagnostic criteria for KBGS. Phenotypic features overlap between KBGS and CSS to some extent, and characteristic dental and fifth finger/toe findings can indicate differential diagnosis. These findings indicate that patients with ANKRD11 variants occupy a wide spectrum of intellectual disability, including clinically normal individuals. This is the first report highlighting the clinical overlap between KBGS and CSS and supporting the recently proposed clinical concept, in which transcriptional machineries are disrupted.

  8. Effect of Exercise on Metabolic Syndrome Variables in Breast Cancer Survivors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Gwendolyn A.; Lu, Lingeng; Irwin, Melinda L.

    2013-01-01

    Objective. Breast cancer survivors are highly sedentary, overweight, or obese, which puts them at increased risk for comorbid chronic disease. We examined the prevalence of, and changes in, metabolic syndrome following 6 months of an aerobic exercise versus usual care intervention in a sample of sedentary postmenopausal breast cancer survivors. Design and Methods. 65 participants were randomized to an aerobic exercise intervention (EX) (n = 35) mean BMI 30.8 (±5.9) kg/m2 or usual care (UC) (n = 30) mean BMI 29.4 (±7.4) kg/m2. Metabolic syndrome prevalence was determined, as well as change in criteria and overall metabolic syndrome. Results. At baseline, 55.4% of total women met the criteria for metabolic syndrome. There was no statistically significant change in metabolic syndrome when comparing EX and UC. However, adhering to the exercise intervention (at least 120 mins/week of exercise) resulted in a significant (P = .009) decrease in metabolic syndrome z-score from baseline to 6 months (−0.76 ± 0.36) when compared to those who did not adhere (0.80 ± 0.42). Conclusions. Due to a higher prevalence of metabolic syndrome in breast cancer survivors, lifestyle interventions are needed to prevent chronic diseases associated with obesity. Increasing exercise adherence is a necessary target for further research in obese breast cancer survivors. PMID:24319454

  9. Evaluation of signalment, clinical, and laboratory variables as prognostic indicators in dogs with acute abdominal syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    SIMEONOVA, Galina; DINEV, Dinko; CHAPRAZOV, Tzvetan; ROYDEV, Rumen

    2013-01-01

    The aim of the study was to identify predictors of mortality and to propose a new severity scoring system in dogs with acute abdominal syndrome. A retrospective study was carried out on 58 dogs presented with acute abdominal syndrome with American Society of Anesthesiologists grades III-IV and treated surgically by exploratory laparotomy. Medical records were reviewed and information regarding dog signalment, history, clinical, and laboratory data; surgical findings; and outcome was collected...

  10. Spiritual well-being in individuals with fibromyalgia syndrome: relationships with symptom pattern variability, uncertainty, and psychosocial adaptation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anema, Cheryl; Johnson, Mary; Zeller, Janice M; Fogg, Louis; Zetterlund, Joan

    2009-01-01

    This study examined relationships among symptom pattern variability, uncertainty, spiritual well-being, and psychosocial adaptation in individuals with fibromyalgia syndrome (FMS). A survey design was used with 58 individuals with FMS. The Fibromyalgia Symptom Pattern Questionnaire, Mishel Uncertainty in Illness Scale--Community Form, Spiritual Well-Being Scale, and Psychosocial Adjustment to Illness Scale-Self Report were used to collect data. Positive relationships were found between symptom pattern variability and uncertainty and between uncertainty and poor psychosocial adaptation; spiritual well-being moderated the relationship between uncertainty and psychosocial adaptation. A positive sense of well-being aided adaptation to symptoms and uncertainties of FMS. Spiritual well-being had a greater effect on the relationship between symptom pattern variability and uncertainty than expected.

  11. Variability in Usual Care Mechanical Ventilation for Pediatric Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome: Time for a Decision Support Protocol?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newth, Christopher J L; Sward, Katherine A; Khemani, Robinder G; Page, Kent; Meert, Kathleen L; Carcillo, Joseph A; Shanley, Thomas P; Moler, Frank W; Pollack, Murray M; Dalton, Heidi J; Wessel, David L; Berger, John T; Berg, Robert A; Harrison, Rick E; Holubkov, Richard; Doctor, Allan; Dean, J Michael; Jenkins, Tammara L; Nicholson, Carol E

    2017-11-01

    Although pediatric intensivists philosophically embrace lung protective ventilation for acute lung injury and acute respiratory distress syndrome, we hypothesized that ventilator management varies. We assessed ventilator management by evaluating changes to ventilator settings in response to blood gases, pulse oximetry, or end-tidal CO2. We also assessed the potential impact that a pediatric mechanical ventilation protocol adapted from National Heart Lung and Blood Institute acute respiratory distress syndrome network protocols could have on reducing variability by comparing actual changes in ventilator settings to those recommended by the protocol. Prospective observational study. Eight tertiary care U.S. PICUs, October 2011 to April 2012. One hundred twenty patients (age range 17 d to 18 yr) with acute lung injury/acute respiratory distress syndrome. Two thousand hundred arterial and capillary blood gases, 3,964 oxygen saturation by pulse oximetry, and 2,757 end-tidal CO2 values were associated with 3,983 ventilator settings. Ventilation mode at study onset was pressure control 60%, volume control 19%, pressure-regulated volume control 18%, and high-frequency oscillatory ventilation 3%. Clinicians changed FIO2 by ±5 or ±10% increments every 8 hours. Positive end-expiratory pressure was limited at ~10 cm H2O as oxygenation worsened, lower than would have been recommended by the protocol. In the first 72 hours of mechanical ventilation, maximum tidal volume/kg using predicted versus actual body weight was 10.3 (8.5-12.9) (median [interquartile range]) versus 9.2 mL/kg (7.6-12.0) (p Ventilator management varies substantially in children with acute respiratory distress syndrome. Opportunities exist to minimize variability and potentially injurious ventilator settings by using a pediatric mechanical ventilation protocol offering adequately explicit instructions for given clinical situations. An accepted protocol could also reduce confounding by mechanical

  12. Intra-Individual Variability in ADHD, Autism Spectrum Disorders and Tourette's Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geurts, Hilde M.; Grasman, Raoul P. P. P.; Verte, Sylvie; Oosterlaan, Jaap; Roeyers, Herbert; van Kammen, Serena M.; Sergeant, Joseph A.

    2008-01-01

    The potential for response variability to serve as an endophenotype for attention deficit hyperactivity disorders (ADHD) rests, in part, upon the development of reliable and valid methods to decompose variability. This study investigated the specificity of intra-individual variability (IIV) in 53 children with ADHD by comparing them with 25…

  13. HEART RATE VARIABILITY AND LIPID PROFILE IN NON OBESE YOUNG INDIAN WOMEN WITH POLYCYSTIC OVARY SYNDROME

    OpenAIRE

    Malathi; Balamurugan; Gomathi

    2015-01-01

    CONTEXT (BACKGROUND): Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is one of the most common endocrinopathy of premenopausal women and is a most frequent cause of infertility. There are more stringent reports of cardiovascular events and infrequent investigations of lipid levels in lean PCOS. AIMS: To assess the cardiac autonomicity using Heart Rate Variabi...

  14. Bartsocas-Papas syndrome with variable expressivity in an Egyptian family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaki, M S; Kamel, A K; Effat, L K; El-Ruby, M O

    2012-01-01

    Bartsocas-Papas syndrome (BPS) is an autosomal recessively inherited sublethal popliteal pterygium condition characterized by intrauterine or neonatal death, severe popliteal webbing, oligosyndactyly, ankyloblepharon, orofacial clefts, intraoral filiform bands and genital anomalies. Internal organ involvement has seldom been identified. We report on a 3 years old female patient of healthy first cousin parents with BPS. She presented with orofacial clefting, severe popliteal webs, club feet, oligosyndactyly of the toes, hypogenitalism and normal hands and internal organs. Ankyloblepharon and filiform bands between the alveolar ridges were evident at birth. Pedigree analysis revealed a more severely affected female sib, who died a few minutes after birth with additional manifestations including near complete lip fusion without oral cleft, complete syndactyly in both hands and an omphalocele. Linkage was excluded to the IRF6 gene; a candidate gene implicated in the Van der Woude and popliteal pterygium syndromes, with overlapping features with BPS. To our knowledge, this is the 5th surviving patient with this syndrome in the literature. In this report, we also discuss the proposed pathogenetic mechanisms for BPS and compare our patients with similarly described cases as well as overlapping spectrum of other popliteal pterygium syndromes. Our findings provide further evidence of intrafamilial clinical heterogeneity in families with BPS.

  15. Mechanisms of angina pectoris in syndrome X assessed by myocardial perfusion dynamics and heart rate variability

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meeder, JG; Blanksma, PK; Crijns, HJGM; Anthonio, RL; Pruim, J; Brouwer, J; DeJong, RM; VanderWall, EE; Vaalburg, W; Lie, KI

    1995-01-01

    The fundamental abnormality in syndrome X (angina pectoris, ischaemia-like stress ECG despite angiographically normal coronary arteries) might be patchily distributed increased tone in pre-arteriolar coronary vessels with compensatory release of adenosine. The aim of this study was to confirm this

  16. Korsakoff Syndrome in Non-alcoholic Psychiatric Patients. Variable Cognitive Presentation and Impaired Frontotemporal Connectivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Georgios Nikolakaros

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: Non-alcoholic Wernicke's encephalopathy and Korsakoff syndrome are greatly underdiagnosed. There are very few reported cases of neuropsychologically documented non-alcoholic Korsakoff syndrome, and diffusion tensor imaging (DTI data are scarce.Methods: We report clinical characteristics and neuropsychological as well as radiological findings from three psychiatric patients (one woman and two men with a history of probable undiagnosed non-alcoholic Wernicke's encephalopathy and subsequent chronic memory problems.Results: All patients had abnormal neuropsychological test results, predominantly in memory. Thus, the neuropsychological findings were compatible with Korsakoff syndrome. However, the neuropsychological findings were not uniform. The impairment of delayed verbal memory of the first patient was evident only when the results of the memory tests were compared to her general cognitive level. In addition, the logical memory test and the verbal working memory test were abnormal, but the word list memory test was normal. The second patient had impaired attention and psychomotor speed in addition to impaired memory. In the third patient, the word list memory test was abnormal, but the logical memory test was normal. All patients had intrusions in the neuropsychological examination. Executive functions were preserved, except for planning and foresight, which were impaired in two patients. Conventional MRI examination was normal. DTI showed reduced fractional anisotropy values in the uncinate fasciculus in two patients, and in the corpus callosum and in the subgenual cingulum in one patient.Conclusions: Non-alcoholic Korsakoff syndrome can have diverse neuropsychological findings. This may partly explain its marked underdiagnosis. Therefore, a strong index of suspicion is needed. The presence of intrusions in the neuropsychological examination supports the diagnosis. Damage in frontotemporal white matter tracts, particularly in the

  17. Korsakoff Syndrome in Non-alcoholic Psychiatric Patients. Variable Cognitive Presentation and Impaired Frontotemporal Connectivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikolakaros, Georgios; Kurki, Timo; Paju, Janina; Papageorgiou, Sokratis G; Vataja, Risto; Ilonen, Tuula

    2018-01-01

    Background: Non-alcoholic Wernicke's encephalopathy and Korsakoff syndrome are greatly underdiagnosed. There are very few reported cases of neuropsychologically documented non-alcoholic Korsakoff syndrome, and diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) data are scarce. Methods: We report clinical characteristics and neuropsychological as well as radiological findings from three psychiatric patients (one woman and two men) with a history of probable undiagnosed non-alcoholic Wernicke's encephalopathy and subsequent chronic memory problems. Results: All patients had abnormal neuropsychological test results, predominantly in memory. Thus, the neuropsychological findings were compatible with Korsakoff syndrome. However, the neuropsychological findings were not uniform. The impairment of delayed verbal memory of the first patient was evident only when the results of the memory tests were compared to her general cognitive level. In addition, the logical memory test and the verbal working memory test were abnormal, but the word list memory test was normal. The second patient had impaired attention and psychomotor speed in addition to impaired memory. In the third patient, the word list memory test was abnormal, but the logical memory test was normal. All patients had intrusions in the neuropsychological examination. Executive functions were preserved, except for planning and foresight, which were impaired in two patients. Conventional MRI examination was normal. DTI showed reduced fractional anisotropy values in the uncinate fasciculus in two patients, and in the corpus callosum and in the subgenual cingulum in one patient. Conclusions: Non-alcoholic Korsakoff syndrome can have diverse neuropsychological findings. This may partly explain its marked underdiagnosis. Therefore, a strong index of suspicion is needed. The presence of intrusions in the neuropsychological examination supports the diagnosis. Damage in frontotemporal white matter tracts, particularly in the uncinate

  18. Assessment of prevalence study of 40 variables related to painful dysfunction syndrome of masticatory muscles in patients referred to faculty of dentistry in Mashhad, Northeast of Iran

    OpenAIRE

    Hamed Mortazavi; Abbas Javadzadeh; Zahra Delavarian; Zare Mahmoodabadi

    2010-01-01

    Introduction: Painful dysfunction syndrome of masticatory muscles is one of the most important causes of pain in orofacial region. Therefore, the aim of this study was to evaluate the prevalency of 40 variables related to this disorder. Materials and Methods: A total 39 patients (32 females, 7 males) with painful dysfunction syndrome of masticatory muscles were studied. Patients were evaluated for prevalence of age, sex, job, marriage status, masticatory muscles tenderness, maximum mouth open...

  19. Are depression and frailty overlapping syndromes in mid- and late-life? A latent variable analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mezuk, Briana; Lohman, Matthew; Dumenci, Levent; Lapane, Kate L

    2013-06-01

    Depression and frailty both predict disability and morbidity in later life. However, it is unclear to what extent these common geriatric syndromes represent overlapping constructs. To examine the joint relationship between the constructs of depression and frailty. Data come from 2004-2005 wave of the Baltimore Epidemiologic Catchment Area Study, and the analysis is limited to participants 40 years and older, with complete data on frailty and depression indicators (N = 683). Depression was measured using the Diagnostic Interview Schedule, and frailty was indexed by modified Fried criteria. A series of confirmatory latent class analyses were used to assess the degree to which depression and frailty syndromes identify the same populations. A latent kappa coefficient (κl) was also estimated between the constructs. Confirmatory latent class analyses indicated that depression and frailty represent distinct syndromes rather than a single construct. The joint modeling of the two constructs supported a three-class solution for depression and two-class solution for frailty, with 2.9% categorized as severely depressed, 19.4% as mildly depressed, and 77.7% as not depressed, and 21.1% categorized as frail and 78.9% as not frail. The chance-corrected agreement statistic indicated moderate correspondence between the depression and frailty constructs (κl: 66, 95% confidence interval: 0.58-0.74). Results suggest that depression and frailty are interrelated concepts, yet their operational criteria identify substantively overlapping subpopulations. These findings have implications for understanding factors that contribute to the etiology and prognosis of depression and frailty in later life. Copyright © 2013 American Association for Geriatric Psychiatry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Clinical Variability in a Family with an Ectodermal Dysplasia Syndrome and a Nonsense Mutation in the TP63 Gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eisenkraft, Arik; Pode-Shakked, Ben; Goldstein, Nurit; Shpirer, Zvi; van Bokhoven, Hans; Anikster, Yair

    2015-01-01

    Mutations in the TP63 gene have been associated with a variety of ectodermal dysplasia syndromes, among which the clinically overlapping Ankyloblepharon-Ectodermal defects-Cleft lip/palate (AEC) and the Rapp-Hodgkin syndromes. We report a multiplex nonconsanguineous family of Ashkenazi-Jewish descent, in which the index patient presented with a persistent scalp skin lesion, dystrophic nails and light thin hair. Further evaluation revealed over 10 affected individuals in the kindred, over four generations, exhibiting varying degrees of ectodermal involvement. Analysis of the TP63 gene from four of the patients and from two healthy individuals of the same family was performed. Gene sequencing of the patients revealed a nonsense mutation leading to a premature termination codon (PTC) (p.Gln16X). The same mutation was found in all tested affected individuals in the family, but gave rise to marked phenotypic variability with minor clinical manifestations in some individuals, underscoring the clinical heterogeneity associated with the recently described PTC-causing mutations.

  1. Phenotypic variability of the kyphoscoliotic type of Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (EDS VIA): clinical, molecular and biochemical delineation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background The kyphoscoliotic type of Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (EDS VIA) (OMIM 225400) is a rare inheritable connective tissue disorder characterized by a deficiency of collagen lysyl hydroxylase 1 (LH1; EC 1.14.11.4) due to mutations in PLOD1. Biochemically this results in underhydroxylation of collagen lysyl residues and, hence, an abnormal pattern of lysyl pyridinoline (LP) and hydroxylysyl pyridinoline (HP) crosslinks excreted in the urine. Clinically the disorder is characterized by hypotonia and kyphoscoliosis at birth, joint hypermobility, and skin hyperelasticity and fragility. Severe hypotonia usually leads to delay in gross motor development, whereas cognitive development is reported to be normal. Methods We describe the clinical, biochemical and molecular characterisation, as well as electron microscopy findings of skin, in 15 patients newly diagnosed with this rare type of Ehlers-Danlos syndrome. Results Age at diagnosis ranged from 5 months to 27 years, with only 1/3 of the patients been diagnosed correctly in the first year of life. A similar disease frequency was found in females and males, however a broad disease severity spectrum (intra- and interfamilial), independent of molecular background or biochemical phenotype, was observed. Kyphoscoliosis, one of the main clinical features was not present at birth in 4 patients. Importantly we also noted the occurrence of vascular rupture antenatally and postnatally, as well as developmental delay in 5 patients. Conclusion In view of these findings we propose that EDS VIA is a highly variable clinical entity, presenting with a broad clinical spectrum, which may also be associated with cognitive delay and an increased risk for vascular events. Genotype/phenotype association studies and additional molecular investigations in more extended EDS VIA populations will be necessary to further elucidate the cause of the variability of the disease severity. PMID:21699693

  2. Phenotypic variability of the kyphoscoliotic type of Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (EDS VIA: clinical, molecular and biochemical delineation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kariminejad Ariana

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The kyphoscoliotic type of Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (EDS VIA (OMIM 225400 is a rare inheritable connective tissue disorder characterized by a deficiency of collagen lysyl hydroxylase 1 (LH1; EC 1.14.11.4 due to mutations in PLOD1. Biochemically this results in underhydroxylation of collagen lysyl residues and, hence, an abnormal pattern of lysyl pyridinoline (LP and hydroxylysyl pyridinoline (HP crosslinks excreted in the urine. Clinically the disorder is characterized by hypotonia and kyphoscoliosis at birth, joint hypermobility, and skin hyperelasticity and fragility. Severe hypotonia usually leads to delay in gross motor development, whereas cognitive development is reported to be normal. Methods We describe the clinical, biochemical and molecular characterisation, as well as electron microscopy findings of skin, in 15 patients newly diagnosed with this rare type of Ehlers-Danlos syndrome. Results Age at diagnosis ranged from 5 months to 27 years, with only 1/3 of the patients been diagnosed correctly in the first year of life. A similar disease frequency was found in females and males, however a broad disease severity spectrum (intra- and interfamilial, independent of molecular background or biochemical phenotype, was observed. Kyphoscoliosis, one of the main clinical features was not present at birth in 4 patients. Importantly we also noted the occurrence of vascular rupture antenatally and postnatally, as well as developmental delay in 5 patients. Conclusion In view of these findings we propose that EDS VIA is a highly variable clinical entity, presenting with a broad clinical spectrum, which may also be associated with cognitive delay and an increased risk for vascular events. Genotype/phenotype association studies and additional molecular investigations in more extended EDS VIA populations will be necessary to further elucidate the cause of the variability of the disease severity.

  3. Heart rate variability measured early in patients with evolving acute coronary syndrome and 1-year outcomes of rehospitalization and mortality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Patricia R E; Stein, Phyllis K; Fung, Gordon L; Drew, Barbara J

    2014-01-01

    This study sought to examine the prognostic value of heart rate variability (HRV) measurement initiated immediately after emergency department presentation for patients with acute coronary syndrome (ACS). Altered HRV has been associated with adverse outcomes in heart disease, but the value of HRV measured during the earliest phases of ACS related to risk of 1-year rehospitalization and death has not been established. Twenty-four-hour Holter recordings of 279 patients with ACS were initiated within 45 minutes of emergency department arrival; recordings with ≥18 hours of sinus rhythm were selected for HRV analysis (number [N] =193). Time domain, frequency domain, and nonlinear HRV were examined. Survival analysis was performed. During the 1-year follow-up, 94 patients were event-free, 82 were readmitted, and 17 died. HRV was altered in relation to outcomes. Predictors of rehospitalization included increased normalized high frequency power, decreased normalized low frequency power, and decreased low/high frequency ratio. Normalized high frequency >42 ms(2) predicted rehospitalization while controlling for clinical variables (hazard ratio [HR] =2.3; 95% confidence interval [CI] =1.4-3.8, P=0.001). Variables significantly associated with death included natural logs of total power and ultra low frequency power. A model with ultra low frequency power 0.3 ng/mL (HR =4.0; 95% CI =1.3-12.1; P=0.016) revealed that each contributed independently in predicting mortality. Nonlinear HRV variables were significant predictors of both outcomes. HRV measured close to the ACS onset may assist in risk stratification. HRV cut-points may provide additional, incremental prognostic information to established assessment guidelines, and may be worthy of additional study.

  4. Heart rate variability analysed by Poincaré plot in patients with metabolic syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubičková, Alena; Kozumplík, Jiří; Nováková, Zuzana; Plachý, Martin; Jurák, Pavel; Lipoldová, Jolana

    2016-01-01

    The SD1 and SD2 indexes (standard deviations in two orthogonal directions of the Poincaré plot) carry similar information to the spectral density power of the high and low frequency bands but have the advantage of easier calculation and lesser stationarity dependence. ECG signals from metabolic syndrome (MetS) and control group patients during tilt table test under controlled breathing (20 breaths/minute) were obtained. SD1, SD2, SDRR (standard deviation of RR intervals) and RMSSD (root mean square of successive differences of RR intervals) were evaluated for 31 control group and 33 MetS subjects. Statistically significant lower values were observed in MetS patients in supine position (SD1: p=0.03, SD2: p=0.002, SDRR: p=0.006, RMSSD: p=0.01) and during tilt (SD2: p=0.004, SDRR: p=0.007). SD1 and SD2 combining the advantages of time and frequency domain methods, distinguish successfully between MetS and control subjects. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Effects of inspiratory muscle exercise in the pulmonary function, autonomic modulation, and hemodynamic variables in older women with metabolic syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feriani, Daniele Jardim; Coelho, Hélio José; Scapini, Kátia Bilhar; de Moraes, Oscar Albuquerque; Mostarda, Cristiano; Ruberti, Olivia Moraes; Uchida, Marco Carlos; Caperuto, Érico Chagas; Irigoyen, Maria Cláudia; Rodrigues, Bruno

    2017-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the effects of inspiratory muscle exercise (IME) on metabolic and hemodynamic parameters, cardiac autonomic modulation and respiratory function of older women with metabolic syndrome (MS). For this, sixteen older women with MS and 12 aged-matched controls participated of the present study. Two days before and 2 days after the main experiment, fasting blood samples (i.e., total cholesterol, triglycerides and blood glucose), cardiac autonomic modulation (i.e., heart rate variability), and respiratory muscle function were obtained and evaluated. The sessions of physical exercise was based on a IME, which was performed during 7 days. Each session of IME was performed during 20 min, at 30% of maximal static inspiratory pressure. In the results, MS group presented higher levels of triglycerides, blood glucose, and systolic blood pressure when compared to control group. IME was not able to change these variables. However, although MS group showed impaired respiratory muscle strength and function, as well as cardiac autonomic modulation, IME was able to improve these parameters. Thus, the data showed that seven days of IME are capable to improve respiratory function and cardiac autonomic modulation of older women with MS. These results indicate that IME can be a profitable therapy to counteracting the clinical markers of MS, once repeated sessions of acute IME can cause chronical alterations on respiratory function and cardiac autonomic modulation. PMID:28503537

  6. The role of COMT and plasma proline in the variable penetrance of autistic spectrum symptoms in 22q11.2 deletion syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hidding, E.; Swaab, H.; de Sonneville, L. M J; van Engeland, H.; Vorstman, J. A S

    2016-01-01

    This paper examines how COMT158 genotypes and plasma proline levels are associated with variable penetrance of social behavioural and social cognitive problems in 22q11.2 deletion syndrome (22q11DS). Severity of autistic spectrum symptoms of 45 participants with 22q11DS was assessed using the Autism

  7. Low numbers of repeat units in variable number of tandem repeats (VNTR) regions of white spot syndrome virus are correlated with disease outbreaks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tran Thi Tuyet, H.; Zwart, M.P.; Phuong, N.T.; Jong, de M.C.M.; Vlak, J.M.

    2012-01-01

    White spot syndrome virus (WSSV) is the most important pathogen in shrimp farming systems worldwide including the Mekong Delta, Vietnam. The genome of WSSV is characterized by the presence of two major 'indel regions' found at ORF14/15 and ORF23/24 (WSSV-Thailand) and three regions with variable

  8. Hibernating little brown myotis (Myotis lucifugus) show variable immunological responses to white-nose syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Marianne S; Reichard, Jonathan D; Murtha, Timothy D; Nabhan, Morgan L; Pian, Rachel E; Ferreira, Jennifer S; Kunz, Thomas H

    2013-01-01

    White-nose syndrome (WNS) is an emerging infectious disease devastating hibernating North American bat populations that is caused by the psychrophilic fungus Geomyces destructans. Previous histopathological analysis demonstrated little evidence of inflammatory responses in infected bats, however few studies have compared other aspects of immune function between WNS-affected and unaffected bats. We collected bats from confirmed WNS-affected and unaffected sites during the winter of 2008-2009 and compared estimates of their circulating levels of total leukocytes, total immunoglobulins, cytokines and total antioxidants. Bats from affected and unaffected sites did not differ in their total circulating immunoglobulin levels, but significantly higher leukocyte counts were observed in bats from affected sites and particularly in affected bats with elevated body temperatures (above 20°C). Bats from WNS-affected sites exhibited significantly lower antioxidant activity and levels of interleukin-4 (IL-4), a cytokine that induces T cell differentiation. Within affected sites only, bats exhibiting visible fungal infections had significantly lower antioxidant activity and levels of IL-4 compared to bats without visible fungal infections. Overall, bats hibernating in WNS-affected sites showed immunological changes that may be evident of attempted defense against G. destructans. Observed changes, specifically elevated circulating leukocytes, may also be related to the documented changes in thermoregulatory behaviors of affected bats (i.e. increased frequencies in arousal from torpor). Alterations in immune function may reflect expensive energetic costs associated with these processes and intrinsic qualities of the immunocapability of hibernating bats to clear fungal infections. Additionally, lowered antioxidant activity indicates a possible imbalance in the pro- versus antioxidant system, may reflect oxidative tissue damage, and should be investigated as a contributor to WNS

  9. Hibernating little brown myotis (Myotis lucifugus show variable immunological responses to white-nose syndrome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marianne S Moore

    Full Text Available White-nose syndrome (WNS is an emerging infectious disease devastating hibernating North American bat populations that is caused by the psychrophilic fungus Geomyces destructans. Previous histopathological analysis demonstrated little evidence of inflammatory responses in infected bats, however few studies have compared other aspects of immune function between WNS-affected and unaffected bats. We collected bats from confirmed WNS-affected and unaffected sites during the winter of 2008-2009 and compared estimates of their circulating levels of total leukocytes, total immunoglobulins, cytokines and total antioxidants. Bats from affected and unaffected sites did not differ in their total circulating immunoglobulin levels, but significantly higher leukocyte counts were observed in bats from affected sites and particularly in affected bats with elevated body temperatures (above 20°C. Bats from WNS-affected sites exhibited significantly lower antioxidant activity and levels of interleukin-4 (IL-4, a cytokine that induces T cell differentiation. Within affected sites only, bats exhibiting visible fungal infections had significantly lower antioxidant activity and levels of IL-4 compared to bats without visible fungal infections. Overall, bats hibernating in WNS-affected sites showed immunological changes that may be evident of attempted defense against G. destructans. Observed changes, specifically elevated circulating leukocytes, may also be related to the documented changes in thermoregulatory behaviors of affected bats (i.e. increased frequencies in arousal from torpor. Alterations in immune function may reflect expensive energetic costs associated with these processes and intrinsic qualities of the immunocapability of hibernating bats to clear fungal infections. Additionally, lowered antioxidant activity indicates a possible imbalance in the pro- versus antioxidant system, may reflect oxidative tissue damage, and should be investigated as a

  10. Lesch-Nyhan variant syndrome: variable presentation in 3 affected family members.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarafoglou, Kyriakie; Grosse-Redlinger, Krista; Boys, Christopher J; Charnas, Laurence; Otten, Noelle; Broock, Robyn; Nyhan, William L

    2010-06-01

    Lesch-Nyhan disease is an inborn error of purine metabolism that results from deficiency of the activity of hypoxanthine phosphoribosyltransferase (HPRT). The heterogeneity of clinical phenotypes seen in HPRT deficiency corresponds to an inverse relationship between HPRT enzyme activity and clinical severity. With rare exception, each mutation produces a stereotypical pattern of clinical disease; onset of neurologic symptoms occurs during infancy and is thought to be nonprogressive. To document a family in which a single HPRT gene mutation has led to 3 different clinical and enzymatic phenotypes. Case report. Settings A university-based outpatient metabolic clinic and a biochemical genetics laboratory. Patients Three males (2 infants and their grandfather) from the same family with Lesch-Nyhan variant, including one of the oldest patients with Lesch-Nyhan variant at diagnosis (65 years). Clinical and biochemical observations. Sequencing of 5 family members revealed a novel mutation c.550G>T in exon 7 of the HPRT gene. The considerably variable clinical phenotype corresponded with the variable enzymatic activity in the 3 males, with the grandfather being the most severely affected. The different phenotypes encountered in the enzymatic analysis of cultured fibroblasts from a single mutation in the same family is unprecedented. The significant decrease in the grandfather's HPRT enzymatic activity compared with that of his grandchildren could be a function of the Hayflick Limit Theory of cell senescence.

  11. Low- and high-anxious hypermobile Ehlers-Danlos syndrome patients: comparison of psychosocial and health variables.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baeza-Velasco, Carolina; Bourdon, Caroline; Montalescot, Lucile; de Cazotte, Cécile; Pailhez, Guillem; Bulbena, Antonio; Hamonet, Claude

    2018-05-01

    Despite the frequent co-ocurrence of hypermobile Ehler-Danlos syndrome (hEDS) and pathological anxiety, little is known about the psychosocial and health implications of such comorbidity. Our aim was to explore the association between high levels of anxiety and psychosocial (catastrophizing, kinesiophobia, somatosensory amplification, social support and functioning), health (pain, fatigue, BMI, tobacco/alcohol use, depression, diagnosis delay, general health), and sociodemographic factors in people with hEDS. In this cross-sectional study, 80 hEDS patients were divided into two groups according to self-reported anxiety levels: low and high. Psychosocial, sociodemographic and health variables were compared between the groups. Forty-one participants reported a high level of anxiety (51.2%). No differences were found in the sociodemographic variables between high-anxious and low-anxious patients. The percentage of participants with severe fatigue and high depressive symptomatology was significantly higher in the high-anxious group (80.5 vs 56.4; 26.8 vs 12.8%, respectively). High-anxious hEDS patients also showed significantly higher levels of pain catastrophizing, somatosensory amplification as well as a poorer social functioning and general health. Multivariate analyses showed that somatosensory amplification, pain catastrophizing and poor social functioning are variables that increase the probability of belonging to the high-anxious group. Despite limitations, this first study comparing high-anxious versus low-anxious hEDS patients with respect to health aspects, highlight the importance of considering the psychosocial factors (many susceptible to modification), to improve the adjustment to this chronic condition and provide support to those affected through a biopsychosocial approach.

  12. Variable RNA expression from recently acquired, endogenous viral elements (EVE) of white spot syndrome virus (WSSV) in shrimp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Utari, Heny Budi; Soowannayan, Chumporn; Flegel, Timothy W; Whityachumnarnkul, Boonsirm; Kruatrachue, Maleeya

    2017-11-01

    The viral accommodation hypothesis proposes that endogenous viral elements (EVE) from both RNA and DNA viruses are being continually integrated into the shrimp genome by natural host processes and that they can result in tolerance to viral infection by fortuitous production of antisense, immunospecific RNA (imRNA). Thus, we hypothesized that previously reported microarray results for the presence of white spot syndrome virus (WSSV) open reading frames (ORFs) formerly called 151, 366 and 427 in a domesticated giant tiger shrimp (Penaeus monodon) breeding stock might have represented expression from EVE, since the stock had shown uninterrupted freedom from white spot disease (WSD) for many generations. To test this hypothesis, 128 specimens from a current stock generation were confirmed for freedom from WSSV infection using two nested PCR detection methods. Subsequent nested-PCR testing revealed 33/128 specimens (26%) positive for at least one of the ORF at very high sequence identity (95-99%) to extant WSSV. Positive results for ORF 366 (now known to be a fragment of the WSSV capsid protein gene) dominated (28/33 = 84.8%), so 9 arbitrarily selected 366-positive specimens were tested by strand-specific, nested RT-PCR using DNase-treated RNA templates. This revealed variable RNA expression in individual shrimp including no RNA transcripts (n = 1), sense transcripts only (n = 1), antisense transcripts only (n = 2) or transcripts of both sense (n = 5). The latter 7 expression products indicated specimens producing putative imRNA. The variable types and numbers of the EVE and the variable RNA expression (including potential imRNA) support predictions of the viral accommodation hypothesis that EVE are randomly produced and expressed. Positive nested PCR test results for EVE of ORF 366 using DNA templates derived from shrimp sperm (germ cells), indicated that they were heritable. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Heart rate variability measured early in patients with evolving acute coronary syndrome and 1-year outcomes of rehospitalization and mortality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harris PR

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Patricia R E Harris,1 Phyllis K Stein,2 Gordon L Fung,3 Barbara J Drew4 1Electrocardiographic Monitoring Research Laboratory, School of Nursing, Department of Physiological Nursing, University of California, San Francisco, CA, USA; 2Heart Rate Variability Laboratory, School of Medicine, Division of Cardiology, Washington University, St Louis, MO, USA; 3Cardiology Services, Mount Zion, Department of Medicine, Division of Cardiology, University of California, San Francisco, CA, USA; 4School of Nursing, Department of Physiological Nursing, Division of Cardiology, University of California, San Francisco, CA, USA Objective: This study sought to examine the prognostic value of heart rate variability (HRV measurement initiated immediately after emergency department presentation for patients with acute coronary syndrome (ACS. Background: Altered HRV has been associated with adverse outcomes in heart disease, but the value of HRV measured during the earliest phases of ACS related to risk of 1-year rehospitalization and death has not been established. Methods: Twenty-four-hour Holter recordings of 279 patients with ACS were initiated within 45 minutes of emergency department arrival; recordings with ≥18 hours of sinus rhythm were selected for HRV analysis (number [N] =193. Time domain, frequency domain, and nonlinear HRV were examined. Survival analysis was performed. Results: During the 1-year follow-up, 94 patients were event-free, 82 were readmitted, and 17 died. HRV was altered in relation to outcomes. Predictors of rehospitalization included increased normalized high frequency power, decreased normalized low frequency power, and decreased low/high frequency ratio. Normalized high frequency >42 ms2 predicted rehospitalization while controlling for clinical variables (hazard ratio [HR] =2.3; 95% confidence interval [CI] =1.4–3.8, P=0.001. Variables significantly associated with death included natural logs of total power and ultra low frequency

  14. Variability of cognitive development in children with Down syndrome: relevance of good reasons for using the cluster procedure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsao, R; Kindelberger, C

    2009-01-01

    The main goal of this cross-sectional study was to demonstrate that, in addition to a main change during childhood, the cognitive development of children with Down syndrome (DS) is characterized by interindividual variability in their cognitive functioning. Eighty-eight French children with DS took part in this experiment. They were divided into six chronological age groups: 6 years (N=9), 7 years (N=19), 8 years (N=18), 9 years (N=19), 10 years (N=14) and 11 years (N=9). They were assessed by means of the Differential Scales of Intellectual Efficiency. This test, composed of six independent scales, measures verbal abilities and nonverbal reasoning abilities. Initial analyses of the verbal and nonverbal subtest scores indicated a main change in cognitive skills. We then used a clustering approach to identify four cognitive profiles that distinguished the children with DS independently of age and gender. The results confirm that there is a growth in the cognitive skills of DS children. They also suggest that the cognitive functioning of DS children is characterized by different individual profiles. Implications for more fine-tuned research and intervention efforts are discussed.

  15. Saturated Fat Intake Is Related to Heart Rate Variability in Women with Polycystic Ovary Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graff, Scheila K; Mario, Fernanda M; Magalhães, Jose A; Moraes, Ruy S; Spritzer, Poli Mara

    2017-01-01

    There is a heightened risk for cardiovascular diseases in women with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS). Alterations in heart rate variability (HRV) may reflect subclinical cardiovascular disease, with a putative association between HRV and dietary fat. This study evaluated HRV in PCOS and control women based on the dietary intake of saturated fatty acid (SFA). Biochemical/hormonal profile, resting metabolic rate, physical activity, HRV in response to the Stroop test, and dietary intake were assessed in 84 PCOS and 54 control women stratified by median SFA intake in the PCOS group (8.5% of daily energy intake). Body mass index (p = 0.041), blood pressure (p PCOS vs. PCOS women had higher testosterone (p = 0.001), dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate (p = 0.012), and free androgen index (p = 0.001), and lower sex hormone-binding globulin levels than controls (p = 0.001). In both groups, the clinical profile and calorie intake were similar between SFA categories. In PCOS, testosterone was lower when SFA intake PCOS women with SFA PCOS, age and SFA intake were independent predictors of HRV. Lower SFA intake is related to improved cardiovascular autonomic function in PCOS. © 2017 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  16. Clinical Variability in Cardiovascular Disease Risk Factor Screening and Management in Adolescent and Young Adult Women with Polycystic Ovary Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baer, Tamara E; Milliren, Carly E; Walls, Courtney; DiVasta, Amy D

    2015-10-01

    To review the clinical presentation, evaluation, and management of normal-weight (NW), overweight (OW), and obese (OB) adolescent and young adult women with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) during a 2-year follow-up. Retrospective chart review. One hundred seventy-three adolescent and young adult women, aged 12-22 years, diagnosed with PCOS. Demographic, health data, and laboratory measures were abstracted from 3 clinic visits: baseline and 1- and 2-year follow-up. Subjects were classified as NW, OW, or OB. Longitudinal data were analyzed using repeated-measures analysis of variance. Body mass index, self-reported concerns, and lifestyle changes. Most patients (73%) were OW or OB. Family history of type 2 diabetes was greater in OW (38%) and OB (53%) patients compared with NW (22%) patients (P = .002). Acanthosis nigricans was identified in OW (62%) and OB (21%) patients but not in NW patients (0%; P insulin (P PCOS were OW or OB. Substantial clinical variability existed in cardiovascular disease (CVD) screening; among those screened, OW and OB patients had greater CVD risk factors. Despite self-reported concerns about weight and diabetes risk among OW and OB patients, no clinically significant change in body mass index percentile occurred. Evidence-based interventions and recommendations for screening tests are needed to address CVD risk in adolescents and young adults with PCOS. Copyright © 2015 North American Society for Pediatric and Adolescent Gynecology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Defining constant versus variable phenotypic features of women with polycystic ovary syndrome using different ethnic groups and populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welt, C K; Arason, G; Gudmundsson, J A; Adams, J; Palsdóttir, H; Gudlaugsdóttir, G; Ingadóttir, G; Crowley, W F

    2006-11-01

    The phenotype of women with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is variable, depending on the ethnic background. The phenotypes of women with PCOS in Iceland and Boston were compared. The study was observational with a parallel design. Subjects were studied in an outpatient setting. Women, aged 18-45 yr, with PCOS defined by hyperandrogenism and fewer than nine menses per year, were examined in Iceland (n = 105) and Boston (n = 262). PCOS subjects underwent a physical exam, fasting blood samples for androgens, gonadotropins, metabolic parameters, and a transvaginal ultrasound. The phenotype of women with PCOS was compared between Caucasian women in Iceland and Boston and among Caucasian, African-American, Hispanic, and Asian women in Boston. Androstenedione (4.0 +/- 1.3 vs. 3.5 +/- 1.2 ng/ml; P PCOS. There were no differences in fasting blood glucose, insulin, or homeostasis model assessment in body mass index-matched Caucasian subjects from Iceland or Boston or in different ethnic groups in Boston. Polycystic ovary morphology was demonstrated in 93-100% of women with PCOS in all ethnic groups. The data demonstrate differences in the reproductive features of PCOS without differences in glucose and insulin in body mass index-matched populations. These studies also suggest that measuring androstenedione is important for the documentation of hyperandrogenism in Icelandic women. Finally, polycystic ovary morphology by ultrasound is an almost universal finding in women with PCOS as defined by hyperandrogenism and irregular menses.

  18. Negative Affectivity, Depression, and Resting Heart Rate Variability (HRV as Possible Moderators of Endogenous Pain Modulation in Functional Somatic Syndromes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maaike Van Den Houte

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Several studies have shown that patients with functional somatic syndromes (FSS have, on average, deficient endogenous pain modulation (EPM, as well as elevated levels of negative affectivity (NA and high comorbidity with depression and reduced resting heart rate variability (HRV compared to healthy controls (HC. The goals of this study were (1 to replicate these findings and (2 to investigate the moderating role of NA, depression, and resting HRV in EPM efficiency within a patient group with fibromyalgia and/or chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS. Resting HRV was quantified as the root mean square of successive differences between inter-beat intervals (RMSSD in rest, a vagally mediated time domain measure of HRV.Methods: Seventy-eight patients with fibromyalgia and/or CFS and 33 HC completed a counter-irritation paradigm as a measure of EPM efficiency. Participants rated the painfulness of electrocutaneous stimuli (of individually calibrated intensity on the ankle before (baseline phase, during (counter-irritation phase and after (recovery phase the application of a cold pain stimulus on the forearm. A larger reduction in pain in the counter-irritation phase compared to the baseline phase reflects a more efficient EPM.Results: In contrast to our expectations, there was no difference between pain ratings in the baseline compared to counter-irritation phase for both patients and HC. Therefore, reliable conclusions on the moderating effect of NA, depression, and RMSSD could not be made. Surprisingly, patients reported more pain in the recovery compared to the counter-irritation and baseline phase, while HC did not. This latter effect was more pronounced in patients with comorbid depression, patients who rated the painfulness of the counter-irritation stimulus as high and patients who rated the painfulness of the electrocutaneous stimuli as low. We did not manage to successfully replicate the counter-irritation effect in HC or FSS patients

  19. Otofaciocervical syndrome and metachondromatosis in a girl: Presentation of a novel association and remarks on clinical variability of branchial-arch disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salinas-Torres, Victor M; Salinas-Torres, Rafael A

    2016-06-01

    Otofaciocervical syndrome (OFCS) is a rare disorder characterized by facial, ear, branchial, and musculoskeletal anomalies, along with hearing loss and mild intellectual disability. Clinically, its distinction from branchiootorenal syndrome can be difficult. To date, the coexistence of OFCS and metachondromatosis has not been reported. Here, we describe a sporadic patient with both OFCS and metachondromatosis. This novel association prompts us to do some remarks on the clinical variability of branchial-arch disorders; in fact, our observations are consistent with the highly variable expressivity of OFCS and illustrate the need of a more accurate characterization of these branchial-arch disorders. In the meantime, involvement of clavicles, scapulae and shoulders remains a distinctive feature of OFCS. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Clinical Variability in a Family with an Ectodermal Dysplasia Syndrome and a Nonsense Mutation in the TP63 Gene

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eisenkraft, A.; Pode-Shakked, B.; Goldstein, N.; Shpirer, Z.; Bokhoven, H. van; Anikster, Y.

    2015-01-01

    Mutations in the TP63 gene have been associated with a variety of ectodermal dysplasia syndromes, among which the clinically overlapping Ankyloblepharon-Ectodermal defects-Cleft lip/palate (AEC) and the Rapp-Hodgkin syndromes. We report a multiplex nonconsanguineous family of Ashkenazi-Jewish

  1. GENERAL OVERGROWTH IN THE FRAGILE-X SYNDROME - VARIABILITY IN THE PHENOTYPIC-EXPRESSION OF THE FMR1 GENE MUTATION

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    DEVRIES, BBA; ROBINSON, H; STOLTEDIJKSTRA, [No Value; GI, CVTP; DIJKSTRA, PF; VANDOOM, J; HALLEY, DJJ; OOSTRA, BA; TURNER, G; NIERMEIJER, MF

    1995-01-01

    The fragile X syndrome, which often presents in childhood with overgrowth, may in some cases show some diagnostic overlap with classical Sotos syndrome. We describe four fragile X patients with general overgrowth, all of whom are from families with other affected relatives who show the classic

  2. Heart rate variability measurement and clinical depression in acute coronary syndrome patients: narrative review of recent literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harris PR

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Patricia RE Harris,1 Claire E Sommargren,2 Phyllis K Stein,3 Gordon L Fung,4,5 Barbara J Drew6,7 1ECG Monitoring Research Lab, 2Department of Physiological Nursing, School of Nursing, University of California, San Francisco, CA, USA; 3Heart Rate Variability Laboratory, School of Medicine, Washington University, St Louis, MO, USA; 4Asian Heart & Vascular Center at Mount Zion, Division of Cardiology, University of California, 5Cardiology Consultation Service, Cardiac Noninvasive Laboratory, and The Enhanced External Counterpulsation Unit, Department of Medicine, University of California, San Francisco Medical Center, 6Division of Cardiology, 7Department of Physiological Nursing, School of Nursing, University of California, San Francisco, CA, USA Aim: We aimed to explore links between heart rate variability (HRV and clinical depression in patients with acute coronary syndrome (ACS, through a review of recent clinical research literature. Background: Patients with ACS are at risk for both cardiac autonomic dysfunction and clinical depression. Both conditions can negatively impact the ability to recover from an acute physiological insult, such as unstable angina or myocardial infarction, increasing the risk for adverse cardiovascular outcomes. HRV is recognized as a reflection of autonomic function. Methods: A narrative review was undertaken to evaluate state-of-the-art clinical research, using the PubMed database, January 2013. The search terms “heart rate variability” and “depression” were used in conjunction with “acute coronary syndrome”, “unstable angina”, or “myocardial infarction” to find clinical studies published within the past 10 years related to HRV and clinical depression, in patients with an ACS episode. Studies were included if HRV measurement and depression screening were undertaken during an ACS hospitalization or within 2 months of hospital discharge. Results: Nine clinical studies met the inclusion criteria. The

  3. Improvement of the Dynamic Responses of Heart Rate Variability Patterns after Needle and Laser Acupuncture Treatment in Patients with Burnout Syndrome: A Transcontinental Comparative Study

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    Gerhard Litscher

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We investigated manual needle and laser needle acupuncture as a complementary therapy for patients with burnout syndrome. Twenty patients with a mean age ± SD of 38.7 ± 8.4 years were assigned to two groups, each consisting of ten patients. One group was treated with manual needle acupuncture and the other with laser needle acupuncture. Heart rate, heart rate variability (HRV, and a new score called dynamic acupuncture treatment score (DATS served as evaluation parameters. The study documented significant effects on heart rate after needle acupuncture treatment and significant effects on HRV caused by both needle and laser needle acupuncture. Based on new neurovegetative acupuncture treatment evaluation scores, it can be stated that both noninvasive laser needle acupuncture and manual needle acupuncture have the potential to be a powerful approach for evidence-based complementary treatment of patients with burnout syndrome. Further transcontinental studies to verify or refute the preliminary findings are in progress.

  4. Variable clinical expressivity of STAT3 mutation in hyperimmunoglobulin E syndrome: genetic and clinical studies of six patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wolach, Ofir; Kuijpers, Taco; Ben-Ari, Josef; Gavrieli, Ronit; Feinstein-Goren, Neta; Alders, Marielle; Garty, Ben Zion; Wolach, Baruch

    2014-01-01

    Autosomal dominant Hyper IgE syndrome (AD-HIES) is a rare and complex primary immunodeficiency that affects multiple systems. Mutations in signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) gene cause AD-HIES. These mutations have a dominant-negative effect and the presence of such mutations

  5. A new mouse model for marfan syndrome presents phenotypic variability associated with the genetic background and overall levels of Fbn1 expression.

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    Bruno L Lima

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Marfan syndrome is an autosomal dominant disease of connective tissue caused by mutations in the fibrillin-1 encoding gene FBN1. Patients present cardiovascular, ocular and skeletal manifestations, and although being fully penetrant, MFS is characterized by a wide clinical variability both within and between families. Here we describe a new mouse model of MFS that recapitulates the clinical heterogeneity of the syndrome in humans. Heterozygotes for the mutant Fbn1 allele mgΔloxPneo, carrying the same internal deletion of exons 19-24 as the mgΔ mouse model, present defective microfibrillar deposition, emphysema, deterioration of aortic wall and kyphosis. However, the onset of a clinical phenotypes is earlier in the 129/Sv than in C57BL/6 background, indicating the existence of genetic modifiers of MFS between these two mouse strains. In addition, we characterized a wide clinical variability within the 129/Sv congenic heterozygotes, suggesting involvement of epigenetic factors in disease severity. Finally, we show a strong negative correlation between overall levels of Fbn1 expression and the severity of the phenotypes, corroborating the suggested protective role of normal fibrillin-1 in MFS pathogenesis, and supporting the development of therapies based on increasing Fbn1 expression.

  6. [CARDIOREABILITATION PECULIARITIES AND CORRECTION OF VIOLATIONS OF SISTOLIC, DIASOLIC FUNCTION AND HEART RATE VARIABILITY IN PATIENTS WITH ACUTE CORONARY SYNDROME AND CORONARY ARTERY REVASCULARIZATION].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shved, M; Tsuglevych, L; Kyrychok, I; Levytska, L; Boiko, T; Kitsak, Ya

    2017-04-01

    In patients with acute coronary syndrome (ACS) who underwent coronary arteries revascularization, violations of hemodynamics, metabolism and heart rate variability often develop in the postoperative period, therefore, the goal of the study was to establish the features of disturbances and the effectiveness of correction of left ventricular systolic and diastolic dysfunction and heart rate variability in stages of cardiorehabilitation in patients with acute coronary syndrome who underwent coronary arteries revascularization. The experimental group included 40 patients with ACS in the postoperative period who underwent balloon angioplasty and stenting of the coronary arteries (25 patients with ST-segment elevation ACS and 15 patients without ST-segment elevation ACS). The age of examined patients was 37 to 74 years, an average of 52.6±6.7 years. The control group consisted of 20 patients, comparable in age and clinico-laboratory manifestations of ACS, who underwent drug treatment with direct anticoagulants, double antiplatelet therapy, β-blockers, ACE inhibitors and statins. Clinical efficacy of cardiorespiratory process in patients of both groups was assessed by the dynamics of general clinical symptoms and parameters of natriuretic propeptide, systolic and diastolic function of the left ventricle and heart rate variability. In the initial state, clinical and laboratory-instrumental signs of myocardial ischemia disappear in patients with ACS undergoing surgical revascularization of the coronary arteries, but clinical and subclinical manifestations of heart failure were diagnosed. The use of the accelerated program of cardiac rehabilitation already during the first month of studies leads to a decreasement of the signs of systolic and diastolic dysfunction, the level of NT-proBNP and improve in the variability of the heart rhythm wich significantly improves the life quality of patients with ACS. To monitor the effectiveness and safety of cardiac rehabilitation in

  7. Novel mutations in the CDKL5 gene in complex genotypes associated with West syndrome with variable phenotype: First description of somatic mosaic state.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jdila, Marwa Ben; Issa, Abir Ben; Khabou, Boudour; Rhouma, Bochra Ben; Kamoun, Fatma; Ammar-Keskes, Leila; Triki, Chahnez; Fakhfakh, Faiza

    2017-10-01

    West syndrome is a rare epileptic encephalopathy of early infancy, characterized by epileptic spasms, hypsarrhythmia, and psychomotor retardation beginning in the first year of life. The present study reports the clinical, molecular and bioinformatic investigation in the three studied West patients. The results revealed a complex genotype with more than one mutation in each patient including the known mutations c.1910C>G (P2, P3); c.2372A>C in P3 and c.2395C>G in P1 and novel variants including c.616G>A, shared by the three patients P1, P2 and P3; c.1403G>C shared by P2 and P3 and c.2288A>G in patient P1. All the mutations were at somatic mosaic state and were de novo in the patients except ones (c.2372A>C). To our knowledge; the somatic mosaic state is described for the first time in patients with West syndrome. Five identified mutations were located in the C-terminal domain of the protein, while the novel mutation (c.616G>A) was in the catalytic domain. Bioinformatic tools predicted that this latter is the most pathogenic substitution affecting 3D protein structure and the secondary mRNA structure. Complex genotype composed of different combinations of mutations in each patient seems to be related to the phenotype variability. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  8. Síndrome de Waardenburg. Variabilidad en una familia en Sandino, Pinar del Río, Cuba Waardenburg syndrome: variability in a Sandino family

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    Fidel Castro Pérez

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available El síndrome de Waardenburg es una enfermedad infrecuente, autosómica y dominante que cursa con cierto grado de discapacidad cuando aparece la hipoacusia neurosensorial, sin embargo, se ha detectado en Sandino, Pinar del Río, Cuba, una familia con 26 individuos vivos portadores del síndrome. Se describe por primera vez el estudio general de la familia desde el primer portador, y se demuestra la variabilidad individual en los portadores.Waardenburg Syndrome (WS is a non-frequent autosomal dominant disease, showing a certain degree of disability when neurosensitive hypoacusia appears; however, in Sandino, Pinar de Río, Cuba a family, from whom 26 alive relatives show WS. The general study of this family from the first ill relative, and the individual variability is showed.

  9. Two females with mutations in USP9X highlight the variable expressivity of the intellectual disability syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Au, P Y B; Huang, L; Broley, S; Gallagher, L; Creede, E; Lahey, D; Ordorica, S; Mina, K; Boycott, K M; Baynam, G; Dyment, D A

    2017-07-01

    The genetic causes of intellectual disability (ID) are heterogeneous and include both chromosomal and monogenic etiologies. The X-chromosome is known to contain many ID-related genes and males show a marked predominance for intellectual disability. Here we report two females with syndromic intellectual disability. The first individual was relatively mild in her presentation with mild-moderate intellectual disability, hydronephrosis and altered pigmentation along the lines of Blaschko without additional congenital anomalies. A second female presented shortly after birth with dysmorphic facial features, post-axial polydactyly and, on follow-up assessment, demonstrated moderate intellectual disability. Chromosomal studies for Individual 1 identified an X-chromosome deletion due to a de novo pericentric inversion; the inversion breakpoint was associated with deletion of the 5'UTR of the USP9X, a gene which has been implicated in a syndromic intellectual disability affecting females. The second individual had a de novo frameshift mutation detected by whole-exome sequencing that was predicted to be deleterious, NM_001039590.2 (USP9X): c.4104_4105del (p.(Arg1368Serfs*2)). Haploinsufficiency of USP9X in females has been associated with ID and congenital malformations that include heart defects, scoliosis, dental abnormalities, anal atresia, polydactyly, Dandy Walker malformation and hypoplastic corpus callosum. The extent of the congenital malformations observed in Individual 1 was less striking than Individual 2 and other individuals previously reported in the literature, and suggests that USP9X mutations in females can have a wider spectrum of presentation than previously appreciated. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  10. Fungus Causing White-Nose Syndrome in Bats Accumulates Genetic Variability in North America with No Sign of Recombination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trivedi, Jigar; Lachapelle, Josianne; Vanderwolf, Karen J; Misra, Vikram; Willis, Craig K R; Ratcliffe, John M; Ness, Rob W; Anderson, James B; Kohn, Linda M

    2017-01-01

    Emerging fungal diseases of wildlife are on the rise worldwide, and the white-nose syndrome (WNS) epidemic in North American bats is a catastrophic example. The causal agent of WNS is a single clone of the fungus Pseudogymnoascus destructans . Early evolutionary change in this clonal population has major implications for disease ecology and conservation. Accumulation of variation in the fungus through mutation, and shuffling of variation through recombination, could affect the virulence and transmissibility of the fungus and the durability of what appears to be resistance arising in some bat populations. Our genome-wide analysis shows that the clonal population of P. destructans has expanded in size from a single genotype, has begun to accumulate variation through mutation, and presents no evidence as yet of genetic exchange among individuals. IMPORTANCE Since its discovery in 2006, the emerging infectious disease known as white-nose syndrome has killed millions of bats in North America, making it one of the most devastating wildlife epidemics in recorded history. We demonstrate that there has been as yet only spontaneous mutation across the North American population of P. destructans , and we find no indication of recombination. Thus, selective forces, which might otherwise impact pathogenic virulence, have so far had essentially no genetic variation on which to act. Our study confirmed the time of origin for the first and, thus far, only introduction of P. destructans to North America. This system provides an unprecedented opportunity to follow the evolution of a host-pathogen interaction unfolding in real time.

  11. Exome sequencing reveals a de novo POLD1 mutation causing phenotypic variability in mandibular hypoplasia, deafness, progeroid features, and lipodystrophy syndrome (MDPL).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elouej, Sahar; Beleza-Meireles, Ana; Caswell, Richard; Colclough, Kevin; Ellard, Sian; Desvignes, Jean Pierre; Béroud, Christophe; Lévy, Nicolas; Mohammed, Shehla; De Sandre-Giovannoli, Annachiara

    2017-06-01

    of POLD1 exon 15 revealed the recurrent in-frame deletion (c.1812_1814del, p.S605del). Our work highlights that mutations in different POLD1 domains can lead to phenotypic variability, ranging from dominantly inherited cancer predisposition syndromes, to mild MDPL phenotypes without lifespan reduction, to very severe MDPL syndromes with major premature aging features. These results also suggest that POLD1 gene testing should be considered in patients presenting with severe progeroid features. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Abdominoplasty in prune belly syndrome: Modifications in Monfort technique to address variable patterns of abdominal wall weakness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Edwin A; Srinivasan, Arun; Scherz, Hal C; Tracey, Anthony J; Broecker, Bruce; Kirsch, Andrew J

    2017-10-01

    Abdominoplasty is an important component of the management of children with prune belly syndrome (PBS). While there are features of the abdominal defect in PBS which are common to all patients, there will be differences unique to each patient that should be taken into consideration in surgical planning. Specifically, we have come to realize that although the Monfort procedure assumes a symmetric pattern of abdominal wall laxity, this symmetry is rarely present. The aim of this report is to describe our modifications and review our outcomes for the Monfort procedure which more completely address correction of the abdominal wall laxity including both common and uncommon features while positioning the umbilicus to a more anatomically correct position (Figure). Sixteen male patients with PBS and one female pseudoprune belly syndrome patient, aged 2-9 years, were treated at our institution between 2003 and 2014. Modifications incorporated into the abdominoplasty procedure for PBS applied to this study group included: 1) use of diagnostic laparoscopy to define the topography of the abdominal wall defect, 2) initial midline rather than elliptical skin incision to defer retailoring of the skin coverage until the final step of the procedure, 3) varying the width of the central plate to correct side to side asymmetry in redundancy, 4) plication of the central plate to reduce vertical redundancy and reposition the umbilicus, and 5) plication of focal areas of fascial weakness, most often in the flank region. All patients have improved abdominal wall contour with a more uniform correction of areas of weakness at a mean follow-up of 5.5 years (range 18 months-11.5 years). All patients and parents indicate that they are very satisfied with the outcome of their procedures without any revisions being performed. This study is descriptive in nature and retrospective, with the patient population treated in a relatively uniform fashion that does not allow direct comparison with other

  13. Rothmund-Thomson Syndrome: Insights from New Patients on the Genetic Variability Underpinning Clinical Presentation and Cancer Outcome

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    Elisa A. Colombo

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Biallelic mutations in RECQL4 gene, a caretaker of the genome, cause Rothmund-Thomson type-II syndrome (RTS-II and confer increased cancer risk if they damage the helicase domain. We describe five families exemplifying clinical and allelic heterogeneity of RTS-II, and report the effect of pathogenic RECQL4 variants by in silico predictions and transcripts analyses. Complete phenotype of patients #39 and #42 whose affected siblings developed osteosarcoma correlates with their c.[1048_1049del], c.[1878+32_1878+55del] and c.[1568G>C;1573delT], c.[3021_3022del] variants which damage the helicase domain. Literature survey highlights enrichment of these variants affecting the helicase domain in patients with cancer outcome raising the issue of strict oncological surveillance. Conversely, patients #29 and #19 have a mild phenotype and carry, respectively, the unreported homozygous c.3265G>T and c.3054A>G variants, both sparing the helicase domain. Finally, despite matching several criteria for RTS clinical diagnosis, patient #38 is heterozygous for c.2412_2414del; no pathogenic CNVs out of those evidenced by high-resolution CGH-array, emerged as contributors to her phenotype.

  14. A novel mutation in SMOC1 and variable phenotypic expression in two patients with Waardenburg anophthalmia syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jamshidi, Javad; Abdollahi, Shokoufeh; Ghaedi, Hamid; Alehabib, Elham; Tafakhori, Abbas; Alinaghi, Somayeh; Chapi, Marjan; Johari, Amir Hossein; Darvish, Hossein

    2017-11-01

    Waardenburg anophthalmia syndrome (WAS) is a rare disorder that mostly affects the eyes and distal limbs. In the current study we reported two Iranian patients with WAS. The first case was a 26-year-old girl with unilateral anophthalmia, bilateral camptodactyly and clinodactyly in her hands, oligodactly in her left foot and syndactyly of the second to fifth toes in her right foot. She also had severe hearing loss in both ears. The second case was a 12-year-old boy with bilateral anophthalmia, camptodactyly in his right hand, oligodactyly in his foot, clubfoot, and cryptorchidism. Both patients were mentally normal. To detect the causative mutation all exons and exon-intron boundaries of SMOC1 gene were sequenced in patients and other normal family members. We found a homozygous missense mutation (NM_001034852.2(SMOC1):c.367T > C) in exon 3 of SMOC1 gene in both patients. As the mutation segregated with the disease in the family, it should be the causative mutation. Our study extended the mutation spectrum of SMOC1 gene related to WAS. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  15. Hydrops fetalis and pulmonary lymphangiectasia due to FOXC2 mutation: an autosomal dominant hereditary lymphedema syndrome with variable expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Bruyn, Gwendolyn; Casaer, Alexandra; Devolder, Katrien; Van Acker, Geert; Logghe, Hilde; Devriendt, Koen; Cornette, Luc

    2012-03-01

    Non-immune hydrops fetalis may find its origin within genetically determined lymphedema syndromes, caused by mutations in FOXC2 and SOX-18. We describe a newborn girl, diagnosed with non-immune hydrops fetalis at a gestational age of 30 weeks. Family history revealed the presence of an autosomal dominant late-onset form of lymphedema of the lower limbs in her father, associated with an aberrant implantation of the eyelashes in some individuals. The newborn, hydropic girl suffered from severe pulmonary lymphangiectasia, resulting in terminal respiratory failure at the age of 3 months. Genetic analysis in both the father and the newborn girl demonstrated a heterozygous FOXC2 mutation, i.e., c.939C>A, p.Tyr313X. Her two older sisters are currently asymptomatic and the parents decided not to test them for the FOXC2 mutation. Patients with a mutation in the FOXC2 transcription factor usually show lower limb lymphedema with onset at or after puberty, together with distichiasis. However, the eye manifestations can be very mild and easily overlooked. The association between FOXC2 mutation and neonatal hydrops resulting in terminal respiratory failure is not reported so far. Therefore, in sporadic patients diagnosed with non-immune hydrops fetalis, lymphangiogenic genes should be systematically screened for mutations. In addition, all cases of fetal edema must prompt a thorough analysis of the familial pedigree, in order to detect familial patterns and to facilitate adequate antenatal counseling.

  16. Variable developmental delays and characteristic facial features-A novel 7p22.3p22.2 microdeletion syndrome?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Andrea C; Zambrano, Regina M; Cristian, Ingrid; Price, Sue; Bernhard, Birgitta; Zucker, Marc; Venkateswaran, Sunita; McGowan-Jordan, Jean; Armour, Christine M

    2017-06-01

    Isolated 7p22.3p22.2 deletions are rarely described with only two reports in the literature. Most other reported cases either involve a much larger region of the 7p arm or have an additional copy number variation. Here, we report five patients with overlapping microdeletions at 7p22.3p22.2. The patients presented with variable developmental delays, exhibiting relative weaknesses in expressive language skills and relative strengths in gross, and fine motor skills. The most consistent facial features seen in these patients included a broad nasal root, a prominent forehead a prominent glabella and arched eyebrows. Additional variable features amongst the patients included microcephaly, metopic ridging or craniosynostosis, cleft palate, cardiac defects, and mild hypotonia. Although the patients' deletions varied in size, there was a 0.47 Mb region of overlap which contained 7 OMIM genes: EIP3B, CHST12, LFNG, BRAT1, TTYH3, AMZ1, and GNA12. We propose that monosomy of this region represents a novel microdeletion syndrome. We recommend that individuals with 7p22.3p22.2 deletions should receive a developmental assessment and a thorough cardiac exam, with consideration of an echocardiogram, as part of their initial evaluation. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. The role of COMT and plasma proline in the variable penetrance of autistic spectrum symptoms in 22q11.2 deletion syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hidding, E; Swaab, H; de Sonneville, L M J; van Engeland, H; Vorstman, J A S

    2016-11-01

    This paper examines how COMT 158 genotypes and plasma proline levels are associated with variable penetrance of social behavioural and social cognitive problems in 22q11.2 deletion syndrome (22q11DS). Severity of autistic spectrum symptoms of 45 participants with 22q11DS was assessed using the Autism Diagnostic Interview Revised. Face and facial emotion recognition was evaluated using standardized computer-based test-paradigms. Associations with COMT 158 genotypes and proline levels were examined. High proline levels and poor face recognition in individuals with the COMT MET allele, and poor facial emotion recognition, explained almost 50% of the variance in severity of autism symptomatology in individuals with 22q11DS. High proline levels and a decreased capacity to break down dopamine as a result of the COMT MET variant are both relevant in the expression of the social phenotype in patients. This epistatic interaction effect between the COMT 158 genotype and proline on the expression of social deficits in 22q11DS shows how factors other than the direct effects of the deletion itself can modulate the penetrance of associated cognitive and behavioural outcomes. These findings are not only relevant to our insight into 22q11DS, but also provide a model to better understand the phenomenon of variable penetrance in other pathogenic genetic variants. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Goldenhar syndrome

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    Neeraj Sharma

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Goldenhar syndrome is a syndrome of complex structures developing from first and second branchial arches during blastogenesis. The etiology of this rare disease is not fully understood, as it has shown itself variable genetically and of unclear causes. The disorder is characterized by a wide spectrum of symptoms and physical features that may vary greatly in range and severity from case to case. Here we present a unique case of Goldenhar syndrome with absence of left condyle, hypoplasia of the zygomatic bone, no pneumatization of the mastoid process, underdeveloped mandible, bifid tongue and the skin tags in the preauricular area.

  19. Cowden syndrome

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    Ravi Prakash S

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Cowden syndrome or multiple hamartoma syndrome is an autosomal dominant condition with variable expressions that result mainly from mutation in the PTEN gene on arm 10q. It is characterized by multiple hamartomatous neoplasms of the skin, oral mucosa, gastrointestinal tract, bones, CNS, eyes, and genitourinary tract. Mucocutaneous features include trichilemmomas, oral mucosal papillomatosis, acral keratosis, and palmoplantar keratosis. Here we present a case of Cowden syndrome in a 14-year-old female patient with the chief complaint of multiple oral papillomatous lesions.

  20. Impairment of different protein domains causes variable clinical presentation within Pitt-Hopkins syndrome and suggests intragenic molecular syndromology of TCF4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bedeschi, Maria Francesca; Marangi, Giuseppe; Calvello, Maria Rosaria; Ricciardi, Stefania; Leone, Francesca Pia Chiara; Baccarin, Marco; Guerneri, Silvana; Orteschi, Daniela; Murdolo, Marina; Lattante, Serena; Frangella, Silvia; Keena, Beth; Harr, Margaret H; Zackai, Elaine; Zollino, Marcella

    2017-11-01

    Pitt-Hopkins syndrome is a neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by severe intellectual disability and a distinctive facial gestalt. It is caused by haploinsufficiency of the TCF4 gene. The TCF4 protein has different functional domains, with the NLS (nuclear localization signal) domain coded by exons 7-8 and the bHLH (basic Helix-Loop-Helix) domain coded by exon 18. Several alternatively spliced TCF4 variants have been described, allowing for translation of variable protein isoforms. Typical PTHS patients have impairment of at least the bHLH domain. To which extent impairment of the remaining domains contributes to the final phenotype is not clear. There is recent evidence that certain loss-of-function variants disrupting TCF4 are associated with mild ID, but not with typical PTHS. We describe a frameshift-causing partial gene deletion encompassing exons 4-6 of TCF4 in an adult patient with mild ID and nonspecific facial dysmorphisms but without the typical features of PTHS, and a c.520C > T nonsense variant within exon 8 in a child presenting with a severe phenotype largely mimicking PTHS, but lacking the typical facial dysmorphism. Investigation on mRNA, along with literature review, led us to suggest a preliminary phenotypic map of loss-of-function variants affecting TCF4. An intragenic phenotypic map of loss-of-function variants in TCF4 is suggested here for the first time: variants within exons 1-4 and exons 4-6 give rise to a recurrent phenotype with mild ID not in the spectrum of Pitt-Hopkins syndrome (biallelic preservation of both the NLS and bHLH domains); variants within exons 7-8 cause a severe phenotype resembling PTHS but in absence of the typical facial dysmorphism (impairment limited to the NLS domain); variants within exons 9-19 cause typical Pitt-Hopkins syndrome (impairment of at least the bHLH domain). Understanding the TCF4 molecular syndromology can allow for proper nosology in the current era of whole genomic investigations. Copyright

  1. Waardenburg syndrome

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    Tagra Sunita

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Waardenburg syndrome is a rare inherited and genetically heterogenous disorder of neural crest cell development. Four distinct subtypes showing marked interfamilial and intrafamilial variability have been described. We report a girl showing constellation of congenital hearing impairment with 110 dB and 105 dB loss in right and left ear respectively, hypoplastic blue iridis, white forelock, dystopia canthorum and broad nasal root. Other affected relatives of the family, with variable features of the syndrome, have been depicted in the pedigree.

  2. Intravenous immunoglobulin treatment of the post-polio syndrome: sustained effects on quality of life variables and cytokine expression after one year follow up

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gonzalez Henrik

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Expression of inflammatory cytokines in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF has led to the hypothesis of intrathecal chronic inflammation to explain the denervation observed in post-polio syndrome (PPS. It has been shown that therapy with intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG improves physical performance and dampens down the inflammatory process at 6 months in PPS patients. We here examined the effects of IVIG on cytokine expression and clinical outcome one year after IVIG treatment. Methods From a previous study with 135 PPS patients included, 41 patients were further evaluated before un-blinding for one year (21 placebo and 20 treated with IVIG, Xepol® 50 mg/ml, and were assessed for clinical variables by performing the Short Form-36 survey (SF-36 questionnaire assessment, the 6 minute walk distance test (6MWT and registering pain level by Visual Analogue Scale (VAS after IVIG treatment. A separate cohort of 37 PPS patients went through lumbar puncture (LP at baseline and 20 patients, treated with IVIG, repeated the LP one year later. Thirty patients affected with other neurological diseases (OND were used as control group. Inflammatory cytokines TNF, TGFβ, IFNγ, IL-23, IL-13 and IL-10 were measured in blood cells and CSF cells with RT-PCR. Results Scores of the physical components of SF-36 were significantly higher at the one year follow up time-point in the IVIG-treated patients when compared to baseline as well as to the control subjects. Pain VAS score and 6MWT improved significantly in the IVIG-treated patients when compared with baseline Relative expression of TNF and IFN-γ in both PBMCs and CSF from PPS patients were increased compared to OND subjects at baseline (p  Conclusions IVIG has effects on relevant QoL variables and inflammatory cytokines up to one year in patients with PPS. This gives a basis for scheduling IVIG in upcoming trials with this therapy.

  3. Low numbers of repeat units in variable number of tandem repeats (VNTR) regions of white spot syndrome virus are correlated with disease outbreaks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoa, T T T; Zwart, M P; Phuong, N T; de Jong, M C M; Vlak, J M

    2012-11-01

    White spot syndrome virus (WSSV) is the most important pathogen in shrimp farming systems worldwide including the Mekong Delta, Vietnam. The genome of WSSV is characterized by the presence of two major 'indel regions' found at ORF14/15 and ORF23/24 (WSSV-Thailand) and three regions with variable number tandem repeats (VNTR) located in ORF75, ORF94 and ORF125. In the current study, we investigated whether or not the number of repeat units in the VNTRs correlates with virus outbreak status and/or shrimp farming practice. We analysed 662 WSSV samples from individual WSSV-infected Penaeus monodon shrimp from 104 ponds collected from two important shrimp farming regions of the Mekong Delta: Ca Mau and Bac Lieu. Using this large data set and statistical analysis, we found that for ORF94 and ORF125, the mean number of repeat units (RUs) in VNTRs was significantly lower in disease outbreak ponds than in non-outbreak ponds. Although a higher mean RU number was observed in the improved-extensive system than in the rice-shrimp or semi-intensive systems, these differences were not significant. VNTR sequences are thus not only useful markers for studying WSSV genotypes and populations, but specific VNTR variants also correlate with disease outbreaks in shrimp farming systems. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  4. Metabolic syndrome and related variables, insulin resistance, leptin levels, and PPAR-γ2 and leptin gene polymorphisms in a pedigree of subjects with bipolar disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trino Baptista

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective:Evidence points to a high prevalence of metabolic dysfunction in bipolar disorder (BD, but few studies have evaluated the relatives of subjects with BD. We conducted a cross-sectional study in an extended family of patients with BD type I.Methods:The available relatives of the same family were interviewed (DSM-IV-R and assessed in fasting conditions for body mass index, constituent variables of the metabolic syndrome (MS, leptin levels, insulin resistance index, and single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs for the leptin receptor and promoter and PPAR-γ2 genes. The frequency of MS was compared with that recorded in the local general population.Results:Ninety-three relatives of three adults with BD were evaluated (30 aged 18 years. The frequency of MS was similar to that of the general population. Significantly higher frequencies of abnormal glucose, total and low density cholesterol (LDL-c levels (all p < 0.05, waist circumference (p = 0.057, and leptin and insulin resistance values (in adults only were observed in the family. Adults with the QQ genotype of the leptin receptor displayed higher LDL-c levels than carriers of the R allele.Conclusions:The associations among BD consanguinity, familial hypercholesterolemia, and leptin receptor SNPs reported herein should be replicated and extended in other pedigrees.

  5. Proteus syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Debi Basanti

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Proteus syndrome is a variable and complex disorder characterized by multifocal overgrowths affecting any tissue or structure of the body. We present a girl aged 3 years and 8 months with an epidermal nevus, port-wine stain, macrodactyly with gigantism of the feet, lymphohemagiomas and multiple lipomas.

  6. Frequency analysis of heart rate variability: a useful assessment tool of linearly polarized near-infrared irradiation to stellate ganglion area for burning mouth syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Momota, Yukihiro; Takano, Hideyuki; Kani, Koichi; Matsumoto, Fumihiro; Motegi, Katsumi; Aota, Keiko; Yamamura, Yoshiko; Omori, Mayuko; Tomioka, Shigemasa; Azuma, Masayuki

    2013-03-01

    Burning mouth syndrome (BMS) is characterized by the following subjective complaints without distinct organic changes: burning sensation in mouth or chronic pain of tongue. BMS is also known as glossodynia; both terms are used equivalently in Japan. Although the real cause of BMS is still unknown, it has been pointed out that BMS is related to some autonomic abnormality, and that stellate ganglion near-infrared irradiation (SGR) corrects the autonomic abnormality. Frequency analysis of heart rate variability (HRV) is expected to be useful for assessing autonomic abnormality. This study investigated whether frequency analysis of HRV could reveal autonomic abnormality associated with BMS, and whether autonomic changes were corrected after SGR. Eight subjects received SGR; the response to SGR was assessed by frequency analysis of HRV. No significant difference of autonomic activity concerning low-frequency (LF) norm, high-frequency (HF) norm, and low-frequency/high-frequency (LF/HF) was found between SGR effective and ineffective groups. Therefore, we proposed new parameters: differential normalized low frequency (D LF norm), differential normalized high frequency (D HF norm), and differential low-frequency/high-frequency (D LF/HF), which were defined as differentials between original parameters just before and after SGR. These parameters as indexes of responsiveness of autonomic nervous system (ANS) revealed autonomic changes in BMS, and BMS seems to be related to autonomic instability rather than autonomic imbalance. Frequency analysis of HRV revealed the autonomic instability associated with BMS and enabled tracing of autonomic changes corrected with SGR. It is suggested that frequency analysis of HRV is very useful in follow up of BMS and for determination of the therapeutic efficacy of SGR. Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Investigation of the relationship between anxiety and heart rate variability in fibromyalgia: A new quantitative approach to evaluate anxiety level in fibromyalgia syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilgin, Suleyman; Arslan, Evren; Elmas, Onur; Yildiz, Sedat; Colak, Omer H; Bilgin, Gurkan; Koyuncuoglu, Hasan Rifat; Akkus, Selami; Comlekci, Selcuk; Koklukaya, Etem

    2015-12-01

    Fibromyalgia syndrome (FMS) is identified by widespread musculoskeletal pain, sleep disturbance, nonrestorative sleep, fatigue, morning stiffness and anxiety. Anxiety is very common in Fibromyalgia and generally leads to a misdiagnosis. Self-rated Beck Anxiety Inventory (BAI) and doctor-rated Hamilton Anxiety Inventory (HAM-A) are frequently used by specialists to determine anxiety that accompanies fibromyalgia. However, these semi-quantitative anxiety tests are still subjective as the tests are scored using doctor-rated or self-rated scales. In this study, we investigated the relationship between heart rate variability (HRV) frequency subbands and anxiety tests. The study was conducted with 56 FMS patients and 34 healthy controls. BAI and HAM-A test scores were determined for each participant. ECG signals were then recruited and 71 HRV subbands were obtained from these ECG signals using Wavelet Packet Transform (WPT). The subbands and anxiety tests scores were analyzed and compared using multilayer perceptron neural networks (MLPNN). The results show that a HRV high frequency (HF) subband in the range of 0.15235Hz to 0.40235Hz, is correlated with BAI scores and another HRV HF subband, frequency range of 0.15235Hz to 0.28907Hz is correlated with HAM-A scores. The overall accuracy is 91.11% for HAM-A and 90% for BAI with MLPNN analysis. Doctor-rated or self-rated anxiety tests should be supported with quantitative and more objective methods. Our results show that the HRV parameters will be able to support the anxiety tests in the clinical evaluation of fibromyalgia. In other words, HRV parameters can potentially be used as an auxiliary diagnostic method in conjunction with anxiety tests. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Longitudinal associations of burnout with heart rate variability in patients following acute coronary syndrome: A one-year follow-up study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Min; Liu, Ling; Shi, Yunke; Yang, Yanfei; Yu, Xiaoju; Angerer, Peter; Kristensen, Tage S; Li, Jian

    2018-05-25

    To investigate longitudinal associations of burnout with heart rate variability (HRV) in patients after their first acute coronary syndrome (ACS). Two hundred eight patients participated in this one-year follow-up study. On the day before discharge, their personal burnout level was assessed by the Copenhagen Burnout Inventory. HRV signals were collected at four time points: the day before discharge, one month, six month and one year after discharge. HRV was measured by 24-h ambulatory electrocardiography and analyzed in time and frequency domains. Generalized estimating equations were applied to analyze the associations of burnout at baseline with longitudinal tracking of HRV during follow-up. After adjusting for relevant confounding factors, high burnout at baseline was significantly associated with low SDNN, a time domain measure of HRV [regression coefficient = -0.087, 95% CI = (-0.136, -0.038) by an increase per SD in burnout score, p = 0.001]. Also, baseline burnout was inversely associated with five frequency domain measures, i.e., HF [coefficient = -0.179, 95% CI = (-0.352, -0.006), p = 0.043], LF [coefficient = -0.171, 95% CI = (-0.319, -0.023), p = 0.024], VLF [coefficient = -0.367, 95% CI = (-0.483, -0.250), p burnout is longitudinally associated with decreased HRV during one-year period among patients after first ACS. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Joubert syndrome: large clinical variability and a unique neuroimaging aspect Síndrome de Joubert: grande variabilidade clínica e uma neuroimagem característica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emília Katiane Embiruçu Leão

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Joubert syndrome (JS is an autosomal recessive inherited disorder characterized by hypotonia, cerebellar vermis hypoplasia, ocular abnormalities (e.g, pigmentary retinopathy, oculomotor apraxia and nystagmus, renal cysts and hepatic fibrosis. Respiratory abnormalities, as apnea and hyperpnea, may be present, as well as mental retardation. At least seven JS loci have been determined and five genes identified. Herein, we report five children, belonging to independent families, with JS: they shared the same typical MRI abnormality, known as molar tooth sign, but had an otherwise quite variable phenotype, regarding mostly their cognitive performance, visual abilities and extra-neurological compromise.A síndrome de Joubert (SJ é uma doença hereditária, autossômica recessiva, caracterizada por hipotonia, hipoplasia do vermis cerebelar, anormalidades oculares (p.ex., retinite pigmentar, apraxia oculomotora e nistagmo, cistos renais e fibrose hepática. Anormalidades respiratórias tais como apnéia e hiperpnéia podem estar presentes, assim como deficiência mental. Pelo menos sete loci e cinco genes diferentes associados à SJ já foram identificados. Este artigo relata cinco crianças com SJ, pertencentes a diferentes famílias. Todos os pacientes compartilham a mesma anormalidade típica da RM, conhecida como sinal do dente molar, e apresentam ampla variabilidade clínica em relação ao desempenho cognitivo, comprometimento visual e alterações extra-neurológicas.

  10. Blastocystis Isolates from Patients with Irritable Bowel Syndrome and from Asymptomatic Carriers Exhibit Similar Parasitological Loads, but Significantly Different Generation Times and Genetic Variability across Multiple Subtypes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gie-Bele Vargas-Sanchez

    Full Text Available Blastocystis spp is a common intestinal parasite of humans and animals that has been associated to the etiology of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS; however, some studies have not found this association. Furthermore, many biological features of Blastocystis are little known. The objective of present study was to assess the generation times of Blastocystis cultures, from IBS patients and from asymptomatic carriers. A total of 100 isolates were obtained from 50 IBS patients and from 50 asymptomatic carriers. Up to 50 mg of feces from each participant were cultured in Barret's and in Pavlova's media during 48 h. Initial and final parasitological load were measured by microscopy and by quantitative PCR. Amplicons were purified, sequenced and submitted to GenBank; sequences were analysed for genetic diversity and a Bayesian inference allowed identifying genetic subtypes (ST. Generation times for Blastocystis isolates in both media, based on microscopic measures and molecular assays, were calculated. The clinical symptoms of IBS patients and distribution of Blastocystis ST 1, 2 and 3 in both groups was comparable to previous reports. Interestingly, the group of cases showed scarce mean nucleotide diversity (π as compared to the control group (0.011±0.016 and 0.118±0.177, respectively, whilst high gene flow and small genetic differentiation indexes between different ST were found. Besides, Tajima's D test showed negative values for ST1-ST3. No statistical differences regarding parasitological load between cases and controls in both media, as searched by microscopy and by qPCR, were detected except that parasites grew faster in Barret's than in Pavlova's medium. Interestingly, slow growth of isolates recovered from cases in comparison to those of controls was observed (p<0.05. We propose that generation times of Blastocystis might be easily affected by intestinal environmental changes due to IBS probably because virulent strains with slow growth may be

  11. Mobius syndrome redefined: a syndrome of rhombencephalic maldevelopment.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verzijl, H.T.F.M.; Zwaag, A. van der; Cruysberg, J.R.M.; Padberg, G.W.A.M.

    2003-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate the variable clinical picture of Mobius syndrome (MIM no. 157900) and to further understand the pathogenesis of the disorder. METHODS: A standardized questionnaire was submitted to 37 Dutch patients with Mobius syndrome. All underwent standardized neurologic examination

  12. Common variable immune deficiency syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed A. El-Masry

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available A male patient 40 years old, non smoker, presented with fever, cough and expectoration of greenish sputum and diarrhea of 1 week duration. The condition started 3 years ago, by cough and expectoration of about ¼ cup/day of greenish sputum, not related to posture, along with fever up to 39 °C with loss of weight about 12 kg in one month and associated with diarrhea and mucus shedding. The patient sought medical advice and received empirical antibiotics and symptomatic treatments with partial clinical improvement. The patient showed multiple relapses of same respiratory and gastro-enterology symptoms every 3–4 weeks with 4 hospital admissions. CT-chest was done and revealed emphysematous changes with basal inflammatory reaction (Fig. 1; sputum workup showed no acid fast bacilli and growth of normal flora, fasting blood glucose was 102 mg/dl. A second CT-chest was done after one year and showed right sided pneumonic consolidation, bilateral pneumonic reaction with multiple mediastinal lymphadenopathy, bilateral pleural thickening and right encysted pleural effusion (Fig. 2.

  13. Superior Mesenteric Artery Syndrome or Wilkie Syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castano Llano, Rodrigo; Chams Anturi, Abraham; Arango Vargas, Paula

    2009-01-01

    We described three cases of superior mesenteric artery (SMA) syndrome, also known as Wilkie's syndrome, chronic duodenal ileus, or cast syndrome. This syndrome occurs when the third portion of the duodenum is compressed between the SMA and the aorta. The major risk factors for development of SMA syndrome are rapid weight loss and surgical correction of spinal deformities. The clinical presentation of SMA syndrome is variable and nonspecific, including nausea, vomiting, abdominal pain, and weight loss. The diagnosis is based on endoscopic, radiographic and tomographic findings of duodenal compression by the SMA. The treatment of SMA syndrome is aimed at the precipitating factor, which usually is related to weight loss. Therefore, conservative therapy with nutritional supplementation is the initial approach, and surgery is reserved for those who do not respond to nutritional therapy.

  14. [Poland's syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slezak, R; Sasiadek, M

    2000-08-01

    Poland's syndrome consists of the variable clinical features, but always includes unilateral aplasia of the chest wall muscles and ipsilateral anomalies of upper extremity. The incidence of Poland's syndrome, reported by different authors ranges from 1:10,000 to 1:100,000 and is observed more frequently in males than in females with the right side of the body affected more often than the left. The etiology of this syndrome is still discussed. However most of described cases were sporadic, rare familial incidence of Poland's syndrome were also presented. Therefore different etiologic factors of the Poland's syndrome are taken into account: genetic, vascular compromise during early stages of embriogenesis but also teratogenic effect of environmental xenobiotics (e.g. cigarette smoking by pregnant women). The authors present also the case of 20-years old man with inherited bilateral syndactyly with the right side aplasia of major pectoralis muscle and face asymmetry. The familial history was negative in respect to the features, associated with Poland's syndrome.

  15. MID1 and MID2 homo- and heterodimerise to tether the rapamycin-sensitive PP2A regulatory subunit, Alpha 4, to microtubules: implications for the clinical variability of X-linked Opitz GBBB syndrome and other developmental disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cox Timothy C

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Patients with Opitz GBBB syndrome present with a variable array of developmental defects including craniofacial, cardiac, and genital anomalies. Mutations in the X-linked MID1 gene, which encodes a microtubule-binding protein, have been found in ~50% of Opitz GBBB syndrome patients consistent with the genetically heterogeneous nature of the disorder. A protein highly related to MID1, called MID2, has also been described that similarly associates with microtubules. Results To identify protein partners of MID1 and MID2 we undertook two separate yeast two-hybrid screens. Using this system we identified Alpha 4, a regulatory subunit of PP2-type phosphatases and a key component of the rapamycin-sensitive signaling pathway, as a strong interactor of both proteins. Analysis of domain-specific deletions has shown that the B-boxes of both MID1 and MID2 mediate the interaction with Alpha 4, the first demonstration in an RBCC protein of a specific role for the B-box region. In addition, we show that the MID1/2 coiled-coil motifs mediate both homo- and hetero-dimerisation, and that dimerisation is a prerequisite for association of the MID-Alpha 4 complex with microtubules. Conclusions Our findings not only implicate Alpha 4 in the pathogenesis of Opitz GBBB syndrome but also support our earlier hypothesis that MID2 is a modifier of the X-linked phenotype. Of further note is the observation that Alpha 4 maps to Xq13 within the region showing linkage to FG (Opitz-Kaveggia syndrome. Overlap in the clinical features of FG and Opitz GBBB syndromes warrants investigation of Alpha 4 as a candidate for causing FG syndrome.

  16. Serotonin syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyperserotonemia; Serotonergic syndrome; Serotonin toxicity; SSRI - serotonin syndrome; MAO - serotonin syndrome ... brain area. For example, you can develop this syndrome if you take migraine medicines called triptans together ...

  17. Gorlin-Goltz Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Padma Pandeshwar

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The Gorlin-Goltz syndrome (GGS (the nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome—NBCCS is a rare autosomal dominant syndrome caused due to mutations in the PTCH (patched gene found on chromosome arm 9q. The syndrome, characterized by increased predisposition to develop basal cell carcinoma and associated multiorgan anomalies, has a high level of penetrance and variable expressiveness. GGS is a multidisciplinary problem, early diagnosis of which allows introduction of secondary prophylaxis and following an appropriate treatment to delay the progress of the syndrome. The following report emphasizes the need for awareness of the diagnostic criteria of this syndrome in cases with no typical skin lesions.

  18. Diabetes and Technology for Increased Activity (DaTA Study: The effects of exercise and technology on heart rate variability and metabolic syndrome risk factors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melanie I Stuckey

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available This study tested the hypothesis that an eight-week exercise intervention supported by mobile health (mHealth technology would improve metabolic syndrome (MetS risk factors and heart rate variability (HRV in a population with MetS risk factors. Participants (n=12; 3 male; aged 56.9±7.0y reported to the laboratory for assessment of MetS risk factors and fitness (VO2max at baseline (V0 and after eight-weeks (V2 of intervention. Participants received an individualized exercise prescription and a mHealth technology kit for remote monitoring of blood pressure (BP, blood glucose, physical activity and body weight via smartphone. Participants underwent 24-h ambulatory monitoring of R-R intervals following V0 and V2. Low and high frequency powers of HRV were assessed from the recording and the ratio of low-to-high frequency powers and low and high frequency power in normalized units were calculated. One-way repeated measures analysis of variance showed that waist circumference (V0: 113.1±11.0cm, V2: 108.1±14.7cm; p=0.004 and diastolic BP (V0: 81±6mmHg, V2: 76±11mmHg; p=0.04 were reduced and VO2max increased (V0: 31.3ml/kg/min, V2: 34.8ml/kg/min; p=0.02 with no changes in other MetS risk factors. Low and high frequency powers in normalized units were reduced (V0: 75.5±12.0, V2: 72.0±12.1; p=0.03 and increased (V0: 24.5±12.0, V2: 28.0±12.1; p=0.03, respectively, with no other changes in HRV. Over the intervention period, changes in systolic BP were correlated negatively with the changes in R-R interval (r=-0.600; p=0.04 and positively with the changes in heart rate (r=0.611; p=0.03, with no other associations between MetS risk factors and HRV parameters. Thus, this eight-week mHealth supported exercise intervention improved MetS risk factors and HRV parameters, but only changes in systolic BP were associated with improved autonomic function.

  19. Low-Pass Filtering Approach via Empirical Mode Decomposition Improves Short-Scale Entropy-Based Complexity Estimation of QT Interval Variability in Long QT Syndrome Type 1 Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vlasta Bari

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Entropy-based complexity of cardiovascular variability at short time scales is largely dependent on the noise and/or action of neural circuits operating at high frequencies. This study proposes a technique for canceling fast variations from cardiovascular variability, thus limiting the effect of these overwhelming influences on entropy-based complexity. The low-pass filtering approach is based on the computation of the fastest intrinsic mode function via empirical mode decomposition (EMD and its subtraction from the original variability. Sample entropy was exploited to estimate complexity. The procedure was applied to heart period (HP and QT (interval from Q-wave onset to T-wave end variability derived from 24-hour Holter recordings in 14 non-mutation carriers (NMCs and 34 mutation carriers (MCs subdivided into 11 asymptomatic MCs (AMCs and 23 symptomatic MCs (SMCs. All individuals belonged to the same family developing long QT syndrome type 1 (LQT1 via KCNQ1-A341V mutation. We found that complexity indexes computed over EMD-filtered QT variability differentiated AMCs from NMCs and detected the effect of beta-blocker therapy, while complexity indexes calculated over EMD-filtered HP variability separated AMCs from SMCs. The EMD-based filtering method enhanced features of the cardiovascular control that otherwise would have remained hidden by the dominant presence of noise and/or fast physiological variations, thus improving classification in LQT1.

  20. Beals Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the syndrome. How does Beals syndrome compare with Marfan syndrome? People with Beals syndrome have many of the ... bone) and aortic enlargement problems as people with Marfan syndrome, and treatments for these problems are the same. ...

  1. Griscelli syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kumar T

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Partial albinism with immunodeficiency is a rare and fatal immunologic disorder characterized by pigmentary dilution and variable cellular immunodeficiency. It was initially described in 1978. Primary abnormalities included silvery grayish sheen to the hair, large pigment agglomerations in hair shafts and an abundance of mature melanosomes in melanocytes, with reduced pigmentation of adjacent keratinocytes. We describe a child with Griscelli syndrome who presented with hepatitis, pancytopenia and silvery hair. The diagnosis was confirmed by microscopic skin and hair examination.

  2. Paradoxical dissociation between heart rate and heart rate variability following different modalities of exercise in individuals with metabolic syndrome: The RESOLVE study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boudet, Gil; Walther, Guillaume; Courteix, Daniel; Obert, Philippe; Lesourd, Bruno; Pereira, Bruno; Chapier, Robert; Vinet, Agnès; Chamoux, Alain; Naughton, Geraldine; Poirier, Paul; Dutheil, Frédéric

    2017-02-01

    Aims To analyse the effects of different modalities of exercise training on heart rate variability (HRV) in individuals with metabolic syndrome (MetS). Methods and results Eighty MetS participants (aged 50-70 years) were housed and managed in an inpatient medical centre for 21 days, including weekends. Physical activity and food intake/diet were intensively monitored. Participants were randomly assigned into three training groups, differing only by intensity of exercise: moderate-endurance-moderate-resistance ( re), high-resistance-moderate-endurance ( Re), and moderate-resistance-high-endurance ( rE). HRV was recorded before and after the intervention by 24-hour Holter electrocardiogram. Although mean 24-hour heart rate decreased more in Re than re (-11.6 ± 1.6 vs. -4.8 ± 2.1%; P = 0.010), low frequency/high frequency decreased more in re than Re (-20.4 ± 5.5% vs. + 20.4 ± 9.1%; P = 0.002) and rE (-20.4 ± 5.5% vs. -0.3 ± 11.1%; P = 0.003). Very low frequency increased more in Re than re (+121.2 ± 35.7 vs. 42.9 ± 11.3%; P = 0.004). For all HRV parameters, rE ranged between re and Re values. Low frequency/high frequency changes were linked with visceral fat loss only in re (coefficient 5.9, 95% CI 1.9-10.0; P = 0.004). By day 21, HRV parameters of MetS groups (heart rate -8.6 ± 1.0%, standard deviation of R-R intervals + 34.0 ± 6.6%, total power + 63.3 ± 11.1%; P < 0.001) became closer to values of 50 aged-matched healthy controls. Conclusions A 3-week residential programme with intensive volumes of physical activity (15-20 hours per week) enhanced HRV in individuals with MetS. Participants with moderate intensity of training had greater improvements in sympathovagal balance, whereas those with high intensity in resistance training had greater decreases in heart rate and greater increases in very low frequency. Modality-specific relationships were observed between enhanced HRV

  3. Ehlers-Danlos' Syndrom

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leganger, Julie; Søborg, Marie-Louise Kulas; Farholt, Stense

    2016-01-01

    Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (EDS) comprises a group of diseases characterized by connective tissue fragility. The clinical symptoms primarily involve the skin, joints, blood vessels and internal organs. Diagnosing EDS is complicated because of the clinical variability, imprecise diagnostic criteria...

  4. Cushing syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hypercortisolism; Cortisol excess; Glucocorticoid excess - Cushing syndrome ... The most common cause of Cushing syndrome is taking too much ... Cushing syndrome . Prednisone, dexamethasone, and prednisolone ...

  5. LEOPARD syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Multiple lentigines syndrome; Noonan syndrome with multiple lentigines ... Genetics Home Reference -- ghr.nlm.nih.gov/condition/noonan-syndrome-with-multiple-lentigines National Organization for Rare Disorders -- ...

  6. Análisis bayesiano de variables relacionadas con el desarrollo del sindrome de Burnout en profesionales sanitarios (Bayesian analysis of variables related to the developmentof Burnout syndrome in health professionals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guillermo A. Cañadas

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Burnout syndrome has a high incidence among professional healthcare and social workers. This leads to deterioration in the quality of their working life and affects their health, the organization where they work and, via their clients, society itself. Given these serious effects, many studies have investigated this construct and identified groups at increased risk of the syndrome. The present work has 2 main aims: to compare burnout levels in potential risk groups among professional healthcare workers; and to compare them using standard and Bayesian statistical analysis. The sample consisted of 108 psycho-social care workers based at 2 centers run by the Granada Council in Spain. All participants, anonymously and individually, filled in a booklet that included questions on personal information and the Spanish adaptation of the Maslach Burnout Inventory (MBI. Standard and Bayesian analysis of variance were used to identify the risk factors associated with different levels of burnout. It was found that the information provided by the Bayesian procedure complemented that provided by the standard procedure.

  7. Gorlin-goltz syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B V Shobha

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Gorlin-Goltz syndrome also known as nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome (NBCCS is an infrequent multisystemic disease inherited in a dominant autosomal way, which shows a high level of penetrance and variable expressiveness. It is characterized by keratocystic odontogenic tumors (KCOT in the jaw, multiple basal cell carcinomas and skeletal abnormalities. This syndrome may be diagnosed early by a dentist by routine radiographic examination in the first decade of life, as KCOTs are usually one of the first manifestations of the NBCCS syndrome. This article reports the case of a 12-year-old girl with Gorlin-Goltz syndrome, emphasizing its clinical and radiographic manifestation. This study highlights the importance of health professionals in the early diagnosis of this syndrome and a multidisciplinary approach to provide a better diagnosis and prognosis.

  8. Fanconi syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Toni-Fanconi syndrome ... Fanconi syndrome can be caused by faulty genes, or it may result later in life due to kidney damage. Sometimes the cause of Fanconi syndrome is unknown. Common causes of Fanconi syndrome in ...

  9. Duane Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Frequently Asked Questions Español Condiciones Chinese Conditions Duane Syndrome En Español Read in Chinese What is Duane Syndrome? Duane syndrome, also called Duane retraction syndrome (DRS), ...

  10. Hamartomatous polyposis syndromes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jelsig, Anne Marie; Qvist, Niels; Brusgaard, Klaus

    2014-01-01

    Hamartomatous Polyposis Syndromes (HPS) are genetic syndromes, which include Peutz-Jeghers syndrome, Juvenile polyposis syndrome, PTEN hamartoma tumour syndrome (Cowden Syndrom, Bannayan-Riley-Ruvalcaba and Proteus Syndrome) as well as hereditary mixed polyposis syndrome. Other syndromes such as ......Hamartomatous Polyposis Syndromes (HPS) are genetic syndromes, which include Peutz-Jeghers syndrome, Juvenile polyposis syndrome, PTEN hamartoma tumour syndrome (Cowden Syndrom, Bannayan-Riley-Ruvalcaba and Proteus Syndrome) as well as hereditary mixed polyposis syndrome. Other syndromes...

  11. Increased chromosomal breakage in Tourette syndrome predicts the possibility of variable multiple gene involvement in spectrum phenotypes: Preliminary findings and hypothesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gericke, G.S.; Simonic, I.; Cloete, E.; Buckle, C. [Univ. of Pretoria (South Africa)] [and others

    1995-10-09

    Increased chromosomal breakage was found in 12 patients with DSM-IV Tourette syndrome (TS) as compared with 10 non-TS control individuals with respect to untreated, modified RPM1-, and BrdU treated lymphocyte cultures (P < 0.001 in each category). A hypothesis is proposed that a major TS gene is probably connected to genetic instability, and associated chromosomal marker sites may be indicative of the localization of secondary genes whose altered expression could be responsible for associated comorbid conditions. This concept implies that genes influencing higher brain functions may be situated at or near highly recombigenic areas allowing enhanced amplification, duplication and recombination following chromosomal strand breakage. Further studies on a larger sample size are required to confirm the findings relating to chromosomal breakage and to analyze the possible implications for a paradigmatic shift in linkage strategy for complex disorders by focusing on areas at or near unstable chromosomal marker sites. 32 refs., 1 tab.

  12. Anserine syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helfenstein, Milton; Kuromoto, Jorge

    2010-01-01

    Knee pain is a common complaint in clinical practice, and pes anserinus tendino-bursitis syndrome (PATB) has been frequently diagnosed based only on clinical features that may cause equivocal interpretations. Patients complain of characteristic spontaneous medial knee pain with tenderness in the inferomedial aspect of the joint. Studies with different imaging modalities have been undertaken during the last years to identify whether these patients suffer from bursitis, tendinitis, or both. Nevertheless, little is known regarding the structural defect responsible for this disturbance. Due to these problems and some controversies, we suggest the term "anserine syndrome" for this condition. Diabetes Mellitus is a known predisposing factor for this syndrome. Overweight and osteoarthritis seem to represent additional risk factors; however, their role in the pathophysiology of the disease is not yet understood. Treatment includes non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, physiotherapy, and injections of corticosteroid, with highly variable responses, from 10 days to 36 months to achieve recovery. The lack of knowledge about its epidemiological, etiological, and pathophysiological aspects requires future studies for this common and intriguing disorder.

  13. Astronaut Preflight Cardiovascular Variables Associated with Vascular Compliance are Highly Correlated with Post-Flight Eye Outcome Measures in the Visual Impairment Intracranial Pressure (VIIP) Syndrome Following Long Duration Spaceflight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otto, Christian; Ploutz-Snyder, R.

    2015-01-01

    The detection of the first VIIP case occurred in 2005, and adequate eye outcome measures were available for 31 (67.4%) of the 46 long duration US crewmembers who had flown on the ISS since its first crewed mission in 2000. Therefore, this analysis is limited to a subgroup (22 males and 9 females). A "cardiovascular profile" for each astronaut was compiled by examining twelve individual parameters; eleven of these were preflight variables: systolic blood pressure, pulse pressure, body mass index, percentage body fat, LDL, HDL, triglycerides, use of anti-lipid medication, fasting serum glucose, and maximal oxygen uptake in ml/kg. Each of these variables was averaged across three preflight annual physical exams. Astronaut age prior to the long duration mission, and inflight salt intake was also included in the analysis. The group of cardiovascular variables for each crew member was compared with seven VIIP eye outcome variables collected during the immediate post-flight period: anterior-posterior axial length of the globe measured by ultrasound and optical biometry; optic nerve sheath diameter, optic nerve diameter, and optic nerve to sheath ratio- each measured by ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), intraocular pressure (IOP), change in manifest refraction, mean retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) on optical coherence tomography (OCT), and RNFL of the inferior and superior retinal quadrants. Since most of the VIIP eye outcome measures were added sequentially beginning in 2005, as knowledge of the syndrome improved, data were unavailable for 22.0% of the outcome measurements. To address the missing data, we employed multivariate multiple imputation techniques with predictive mean matching methods to accumulate 200 separate imputed datasets for analysis. We were able to impute data for the 22.0% of missing VIIP eye outcomes. We then applied Rubin's rules for collapsing the statistical results across our 200 multiply imputed data sets to assess the canonical

  14. Sotos syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cormier-Daire Valérie

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Sotos syndrome is an overgrowth condition characterized by cardinal features including excessive growth during childhood, macrocephaly, distinctive facial gestalt and various degrees of learning difficulty, and associated with variable minor features. The exact prevalence remains unknown but hundreds of cases have been reported. The diagnosis is usually suspected after birth because of excessive height and occipitofrontal circumference (OFC, advanced bone age, neonatal complications including hypotonia and feeding difficulties, and facial gestalt. Other inconstant clinical abnormalities include scoliosis, cardiac and genitourinary anomalies, seizures and brisk deep tendon reflexes. Variable delays in cognitive and motor development are also observed. The syndrome may also be associated with an increased risk of tumors. Mutations and deletions of the NSD1 gene (located at chromosome 5q35 and coding for a histone methyltransferase implicated in transcriptional regulation are responsible for more than 75% of cases. FISH analysis, MLPA or multiplex quantitative PCR allow the detection of total/partial NSD1 deletions, and direct sequencing allows detection of NSD1 mutations. The large majority of NSD1 abnormalities occur de novo and there are very few familial cases. Although most cases are sporadic, several reports of autosomal dominant inheritance have been described. Germline mosaicism has never been reported and the recurrence risk for normal parents is very low (

  15. Phenotypic variability in Waardenburg syndrome resulting from a 22q12.3-q13.1 microdeletion involving SOX10.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jelena, Brezo; Christina, Lam; Eric, Vilain; Fabiola, Quintero-Rivera

    2014-06-01

    Waardenburg syndrome (WS) is a neurocristopathy characterized by pigmentation abnormalities of the skin, hair, and iris, as well as sensorineural hearing loss. Contiguous gene deletions encompassing SOX10 are rare, which limits conclusions about genotype-phenotype correlation regarding patient prognosis and management. This study adds to the existing body of knowledge by characterizing a 2.4 Mb deletion [arr[hg19] 22q12.3-q13.1 (36467502-38878207)x1] encompassing SOX10 and 53 additional RefSeq genes in a 15-year-old female with atypical WS. The patient presented with developmental delay, profound bilateral sensorineural hearing loss, heterochromia iridis, hypotonia, and bilateral finger contractures. Published genomic and phenotypic profiles of patients with SOX10-encompassing deletions point toward several plausible candidate gene that could account for the considerable clinical heterogeneity. These studies suggest the existence of modifiers among the co-deleted, dosage-sensitive genes (e.g., MYH9) and among genes whose effect may depend on the unmasking of recessive mutations (e.g., PLA2G6). Finally, we highlight evidence illustrating extensive interconnectivity of SOX10-hypothesizing that haploinsufficiency of SOX10 may "unmask" subtler effects on expression or epistasis associated with variants in SOX10 targets (e.g., DHH), in its partners (e.g., PAX3, EGR2), and in genes with functional overlap (e.g., SOX8, SOX9). © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. X-Linked Lymphoproliferative Syndrome and Common Variable Immunodeficiency May Not Be Differentiated by SH2D1A and XIAP/BIRC4 Genes Sequence Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nesrin Gulez

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The X-linked lymphoproliferative syndrome (XLP is a rare, inherited immunodeficiency characterized by recurrent episodes of hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis, hypogammaglobulinemia, and/or lymphomas. Recently, X-linked inhibitor of apoptosis (XIAP/BIRC4 gene defects, in families with XLP but without SH2D1A gene defects, has been defined. The distinction from primary immunodeficiencies with a defined genetic cause is mandatory. A six-year-old male patient was admitted with the complaints of persistent general lymphadenopathy, for two years had fever, bilateral cervical multiple microlymphadenopathy, hepatic/splenic enlargement with laboratory findings as decreased serum immunoglobulins, negative EBV VCA IgM (viral capsid antigen and anti-EBV EA (antibody to early D antigen, positive EBV VCA IgG (viral capsid antigen and EBV EBNA (antibody to nuclear antigen. SH2D1A gene analysis was negative. XIAP/BIRC4 sequencing revealed two novel single nucleotide variants (exon 7, 1978G > A, and 1996T > A in the 3′UTR of the gene in both patient and mother which were not disease causing. XIAP protein expression was found to be normal. The clinical and laboratory resemblance, no gene mutations, and normal XIAP protein expression led us to think that there may be another responsible gene for XLP. The patient will to be followed up as CVID until he presents new diagnostic signs or until the identification of a new gene.

  17. Shah-Waardenburg syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahmoudi, Abdelhalim; Rami, Mohamed; Khattala, Khalid; Elmadi, Aziz; Afifi, My Abderrahmane; Youssef, Bouabdallah

    2013-01-01

    Shah-Waardenburg syndrome (SWS) is a neurocristopathy and is characterized by Hirschsprung's disease (HD), deafness, and depigmentation of hairs, skin, and iris. Is a very rare congenital disorder with variable clinical expression. This report describes a 4-day-old male newborn with Waardenburg's syndrome associated with aganglionosis of the colon and terminal ileum, and review the relevant literature for draws attention to the causal relationship between these two entities.

  18. Gorlin-Goltz syndrome:

    OpenAIRE

    Binić, Ivana; Jovanović, Dragan L.; Ljubenović, Dragiša; Ljubenović, Milanka; Stanojević, Milenko

    2007-01-01

    Gorlin-Goltz syndrome is an inherited autosomal dominant disorder with complete penetrance and extreme variable expressivity. The authors present a case of an 11-year-old girl with typical features of Gorlin-Goltz syndrome with special respect to medical and dental problems which include multiple bony cage deformities like spina bifida with scoliosis having convexity to the left side, presence of an infantile uterus and multiple odonogenic keratocysts in the maxillofacial region.

  19. A novel DFNB31 mutation associated with Usher type 2 syndrome showing variable degrees of auditory loss in a consanguineous Portuguese family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Audo, Isabelle; Bujakowska, Kinga; Mohand-Saïd, Saddek; Tronche, Sophie; Lancelot, Marie-Elise; Antonio, Aline; Germain, Aurore; Lonjou, Christine; Carpentier, Wassila; Sahel, José-Alain; Bhattacharya, Shomi; Zeitz, Christina

    2011-01-01

    To identify the genetic defect of a consanguineous Portuguese family with rod-cone dystrophy and varying degrees of decreased audition. A detailed ophthalmic and auditory examination was performed on a Portuguese patient with severe autosomal recessive rod-cone dystrophy. Known genetic defects were excluded by performing autosomal recessive retinitis pigmentosa (arRP) genotyping microarray analysis and by Sanger sequencing of the coding exons and flanking intronic regions of eyes shut homolog-drosophila (EYS) and chromosome 2 open reading frame 71 (C2orf71). Subsequently, genome-wide homozygosity mapping was performed in DNA samples from available family members using a 700K single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) microarray. Candidate genes present in the significantly large homozygous regions were screened for mutations using Sanger sequencing. The largest homozygous region (~11 Mb) in the affected family members was mapped to chromosome 9, which harbors deafness, autosomal recessive 31 (DFNB31; a gene previously associated with Usher syndrome). Mutation analysis of DFNB31 in the index patient identified a novel one-base-pair deletion (c.737delC), which is predicted to lead to a truncated protein (p.Pro246HisfsX13) and co-segregated with the disease in the family. Ophthalmic examination of the index patient and the affected siblings showed severe rod-cone dystrophy. Pure tone audiometry revealed a moderate hearing loss in the index patient, whereas the affected siblings were reported with more profound and early onset hearing impairment. We report a novel truncating mutation in DFNB31 associated with severe rod-cone dystrophy and varying degrees of hearing impairment in a consanguineous family of Portuguese origin. This is the second report of DFNB31 implication in Usher type 2.

  20. Marfan Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marfan syndrome is a disorder that affects connective tissue. Connective tissues are proteins that support skin, bones, blood vessels, ... A problem with the fibrillin gene causes Marfan syndrome. Marfan syndrome can be mild to severe, and ...

  1. Aarskog syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aarskog disease; Aarskog-Scott syndrome; AAS; Faciodigitogenital syndrome; Gaciogenital dysplasia ... Aarskog syndrome is a genetic disorder that is linked to the X chromosome. It affects mainly males, but females ...

  2. Williams syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams-Beuren syndrome ... Williams syndrome is caused by not having a copy of several genes. It may be passed down in families. ... history of the condition. However, people with Williams syndrome have a 50% chance of passing the disorder ...

  3. Cushing's Syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    宗, 友厚; 伊藤, 勇; 諏訪, 哲也; 武田, 純; MUNE, Tomoatsu

    2003-01-01

    Sixteen cases of verified Cushing's syndrome, and twelve cases of probable Cushing's syndrome were reviewed and data on them were compared with various reports on Cushing's syndrome in the literature.

  4. Tourette syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilles de la Tourette syndrome; Tic disorders - Tourette syndrome ... Tourette syndrome is named for Georges Gilles de la Tourette, who first described this disorder in 1885. The disorder is likely passed down through families. ...

  5. Hepatorenal syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 2016:chap 153. Nevah MI, Fallon MB. Hepatic encephalopathy, hepatorenal syndrome, hepatopulmonary syndrome, and other systemic complications of liver disease. In: Feldman M, Friedman LS, Brandt LJ, ...

  6. Gorlin syndrome: A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patil K

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Gorlin syndrome is an autosomal dominant inherited condition that exhibits high penetrance and variable expressivity. It is characterized mainly by Basal cell carcinomas, Odontogenic keratocysts and skeletal anomalies. However, medical literature documents both common and lesser known manifestations of the disorder involving the skin, central nervous system, skeletal system etc. Diagnosis of the syndrome in childhood is basically through oral abnormalities. A case of Gorlin syndrome has been reported here, with review of literature.

  7. Impact of resistance training on body composition and metabolic syndrome variables during androgen deprivation therapy for prostate cancer: a pilot randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dawson, Jacqueline K; Dorff, Tanya B; Todd Schroeder, E; Lane, Christianne J; Gross, Mitchell E; Dieli-Conwright, Christina M

    2018-04-03

    Prostate cancer patients on androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) experience adverse effects such as lean mass loss, known as sarcopenia, fat gain, and changes in cardiometabolic factors that increase risk of metabolic syndrome (MetS). Resistance training can increase lean mass, reduce body fat, and improve physical function and quality of life, but no exercise interventions in prostate cancer patients on ADT have concomitantly improved body composition and MetS. This pilot trial investigated 12 weeks of resistance training on body composition and MetS changes in prostate cancer patients on ADT. An exploratory aim examined if a combined approach of training and protein supplementation would elicit greater changes in body composition. Prostate cancer patients on ADT were randomized to resistance training and protein supplementation (TRAINPRO), resistance training (TRAIN), protein supplementation (PRO), or control stretching (STRETCH). Exercise groups (EXE = TRAINPRO, TRAIN) performed supervised exercise 3 days per week for 12 weeks, while non-exercise groups (NoEXE = PRO, STRETCH) performed a home-based stretching program. TRAINPRO and PRO received 50 g⋅day - 1 of whey protein. The primary outcome was change in lean mass assessed through dual energy x-ray absorptiometry. Secondary outcomes examined changes in sarcopenia, assessed through appendicular skeletal mass (ASM) index (kg/m 2 ), body fat %, strength, physical function, quality of life, MetS score and the MetS components of waist circumference, blood pressure, glucose, high-density lipoprotein-cholesterol, and triglyceride levels. A total of 37 participants were randomized; 32 participated in the intervention (EXE n = 13; NoEXE n = 19). At baseline, 43.8% of participants were sarcopenic and 40.6% met the criteria for MetS. Post-intervention, EXE significantly improved lean mass (d = 0.9), sarcopenia prevalence (d = 0.8), body fat % (d = 1.1), strength (d = 0.8-3.0), and

  8. Mucocutaneous manifestations of Cowden's syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kundoor Vinay Kumar Reddy

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Cowden's syndrome is an autosomal dominant genodermatosis with variable orofacial and systemic manifestations. Here we present one such classical case of Cowden's syndrome in a 45-year-old female patient with features such as multiple cutaneous papillomatosis, oral fibromas, and fibromas involving multiple organs such as gastrointestinal tract (multiple polyps, thyroid disorders, and breast cancer.

  9. LEOPARD syndrome is not linked to the Marfan syndrome and the Watson syndrome loci

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rass-Rothchild, A.: Abeliovitch, D.; Kornstein, A. [Tel Aviv Univ. (Israel)]|[Hebrew Univ., Jerusalem (Israel)

    1994-09-01

    The acronym LEOPARD stands for a syndromic association of Lentigines, Eletrocardiographic changes, Ocular hypertelorism, Pulmonic stenosis, Abnormal genitalia, Retardation of growth and sensorineural Deafness. Inheritance is autosomal dominant with high penetrance and variable expressivity. In 1990 Torok et al. reported on the association of LEOPARD and Marfan syndrome. In addition a clinical similarity (cardiac and cutaneous involvement) exists with the Watson syndrome (neurofibromatosis and pulmonic stenosis) which is linked to the marker D17S33 on chromosome 17. We studied possible linkage of LEOPARD syndrome to the Marfan syndrome locus on chromosome 15 (D15S1, MF13, and (TAAAA)n repeats) and to the NF-1 locus on chromosome 17 in a family with 9 cases of LEOPARD syndrome. Close linkage between LEOPARD syndrome and both the Marfan locus on chromosome 15 and the NF-1 locus on chromosome 17 was excluded (lod score <-2.0 through {theta} = 0.1).

  10. [Syndrome X vs metabolic syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morales Villegas, Enrique

    2006-01-01

    Himsworth in 1939 postulated that Diabetes Mellitus type 2 (DM2) was not only an insulin deficiency state but also a cellular insulin insensitivity disease. Thirty years later, DeFronzo and Reaven demonstrated that insulin resistance (IR) preceded and predisposed for DM2 and atherosclerotic-cardiovascular-disease (ACVD). Reaven was the first to point out the relationship between IR and with hyperglycemia, dyslipidosis, and hypertension as mediators for ACVD, creating the concept of Syndrome X (SX) in 1988. WHO and, thereafter, other medical societies and medical groups, mainly ATP-III, in 2002, based on the difficulty of diagnosing IR in a simple, reliable, and inexpensive way, proposed and published the Metabolic Syndrome (MS) concept, as a group of five variables, i.e., obesity, hyperglycemia, hypertriglyceridemia, low HDL, and hypertension, as an easy clinical approximation to suspect and treat an increased cardiometabolic risk. Nowadays, there are deep and extensive controversies on this issue; however, these controversies do not really exist since all discordant points of view are rather quantitative and not qualitative in nature. This article is aimed at differentiating and harmonizing the complementary concepts of SX and MS, at analyzing why MS is a good "clinical window" to look for IR and its underlying manifestations, and finally to accept that the MS concept complements, but does not substitute or antagonize, traditional scales used to asses cardiovascular risk, such as the Framingham scale.

  11. 47,XXY Klinefelter syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aksglaede, Lise; Link, Katarina; Giwercman, Aleksander

    2013-01-01

    47,XXY (Klinefelter syndrome) is the most frequent sex chromosomal disorder and affects approximately one in 660 newborn boys. The syndrome is characterized by varying degrees of cognitive, social, behavioral, and learning difficulties and in adulthood additionally primary testicular failure...... with small testes, hypergonadotropic hypogonadism, tall stature, and eunuchoid body proportions. The phenotype is variable ranging from "near-normal" to a significantly affected individual. In addition, newborns with Klinefelter syndrome generally present with a normal male phenotype and the only consistent...... clinical finding in KS is small testes, that are most often not identified until after puberty. Decreased awareness of this syndrome among health professionals and a general perception that all patients with 47,XXY exhibit the classic textbook phenotype results in a highly under-diagnosed condition with up...

  12. Nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kannan Karthiga

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Binkley and Johnson first reported this syndrome in 1951. But it was in 1960, Gorlin-Goltz established the association of basal cell epithelioma, jaw cyst and bifid ribs, a combination which is now frequently known as Gorlin-Goltz syndrome as well as Nevoid Basal Cell Carcinoma Syndrome (NBCCS. NBCCS is inherited as an autosomal dominant trait with high penetrance and variable expressivity. NBCCS is characterized by variety of cutaneous, dental, osseous, opthalmic, neurologic and sexual abnormalities. One such case of Gorlin-Goltz syndrome is reported here with good illustrations.

  13. Chronic intestinal pseudoobstruction syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yeon, Kyung Mo; Seo, Jeong Kee; Lee, Yong Seok [Seoul National University Children' s Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1992-03-15

    Chronic intestinal pseudoobstruction syndrome is a rare clinical condition in which impaired intestinal peristalsis causes recurrent symptoms of bowel obstruction in the absence of a mechanical occlusion. This syndrome may involve variable segments of small or large bowel, and may be associated with urinary bladder retention. This study included 6 children(3 boys and 3 girls) of chronic intestinal obstruction. Four were symptomatic at birth and two were of the ages of one month and one year. All had abdominal distension and deflection difficulty. Five had urinary bladder distension. Despite parenteral nutrition and surgical intervention(ileostomy or colostomy), bowel obstruction persisted and four patients expired from sepses within one year. All had gaseous distension of small and large bowel on abdominal films. In small bowel series, consistent findings were variable degree of dilatation, decreased peristalsis(prolonged transit time) and microcolon or microrectum. This disease entity must be differentiated from congenital megacolon, ileal atresia and megacystis syndrome.

  14. Polycystic ovary syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aziz, M; Naver, Klara; Wissing, Marie Louise Muff

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: The primary objective of this multicenter study is to evaluate the relative impact of insulin resistance (IR) and body mass index (BMI) in women with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) on (1) Key hemodynamic/thrombogenic variables, (2) Oocyte quality and early embryo development, (3...

  15. Wolfram syndrome 1 and Wolfram syndrome 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rigoli, Luciana; Di Bella, Chiara

    2012-08-01

    Wolfram syndrome 1 (WS1) is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by diabetes insipidus, diabetes mellitus, optic atrophy, and deafness (DI DM OA D syndrome) associated with other variable clinical manifestations. The causative gene for WS1 (WFS1) encoding wolframin maps to chromosome 4p16.1. Wolframin has an important function in maintaining the homeostasis of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) in pancreatic β cells. Recently, another causative gene, CISD2, has been identified in patients with a type of Wolfram syndrome (WS2) resulting in early optic atrophy, diabetes mellitus, deafness, decreased lifespan, but not diabetes insipidus. The CISD2-encoded protein ERIS (endoplasmic reticulum intermembrane small protein) also localizes to ER, but does not interact directly with wolframin. ERIS maps to chromosome 4q22. Numerous studies have shown an interesting similarity between WFS1 and CISD2 genes. Experimental studies demonstrated that the Cisd2 knockout (Cisd2) mouse shows premature aging and typical symptoms of Wolfram syndrome. These researches provide interesting insight into the relation of neurodegenerative diseases, mitochondrial disorders, and autophagy and are useful for the pathophysiological understanding of both Wolfram syndrome and mitochondrial-mediated premature aging. The knowledge of WS1 and WS2 pathogenesis, and of the interactions between WFS1 and CISD2 genes, is useful for accurate diagnostic classification and for diagnosis of presymptomatic individuals.

  16. Bardet-Biedl syndrome and Usher syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koenig, Rainer

    2003-01-01

    Bardet-Biedl syndrome (BBS) and Usher syndrome (USH) are the most prevalent syndromic forms of retinitis pigmentosa (RP), together they make up almost a quarter of the patients with RP. BBS is defined by the association of retinopathy, obesity, hypogonadism, renal dysfunction, postaxial polydactyly and mental retardation. This clinically complex syndrome is genetically heterogeneous with linkage to more than 6 loci, and 4 genes have been cloned so far. Recent molecular data present evidence that, in some instances, the clinical manifestation of BBS requires recessive mutations in 1 of the 6 BBS loci plus one or two additional mutations in a second BBS locus (tri- or tetra-allelic inheritance). USH is characterized by the combination of congenital or early-onset sensorineural deafness, RP, and variable degrees of vestibular dysfunction. Each of the three clinical types is genetically heterogeneous: 7 loci have been mapped for type 1, three loci for type 2, and two loci for type 3. Currently, 6 USH genes (MYO7A, USH1C, CDH23, PCDH15, USH2A, USH3) have been identified. Pathogenetically, mutations of the USH1 genes seem to result in defects of auditory and retinal sensory cells, the USH 2 phenotype is caused by defects of extracellular matrix or cell surface receptor proteins, and USH3 may be due to synaptic disturbances. The considerable contribution of syndromic forms of RP requires interdisciplinary approaches to the clinical and diagnostic management of RP patients.

  17. Variability Bugs:

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Melo, Jean

    . Although many researchers suggest that preprocessor-based variability amplifies maintenance problems, there is little to no hard evidence on how actually variability affects programs and programmers. Specifically, how does variability affect programmers during maintenance tasks (bug finding in particular......)? How much harder is it to debug a program as variability increases? How do developers debug programs with variability? In what ways does variability affect bugs? In this Ph.D. thesis, I set off to address such issues through different perspectives using empirical research (based on controlled...... experiments) in order to understand quantitatively and qualitatively the impact of variability on programmers at bug finding and on buggy programs. From the program (and bug) perspective, the results show that variability is ubiquitous. There appears to be no specific nature of variability bugs that could...

  18. Cushing's Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cushing's syndrome is a hormonal disorder. The cause is long-term exposure to too much cortisol, a hormone that ... your body to make too much cortisol. Cushing's syndrome is rare. Some symptoms are Upper body obesity ...

  19. Usher Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Usher syndrome is an inherited disease that causes serious hearing loss and retinitis pigmentosa, an eye disorder that causes ... and vision. There are three types of Usher syndrome: People with type I are deaf from birth ...

  20. Metabolic Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metabolic syndrome is a group of conditions that put you at risk for heart disease and diabetes. These conditions ... agree on the definition or cause of metabolic syndrome. The cause might be insulin resistance. Insulin is ...

  1. Reye Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reye syndrome is a rare illness that can affect the blood, liver, and brain of someone who has recently ... a viral illness, seek medical attention immediately. Reye syndrome can lead to a coma and brain death, ...

  2. Rett Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rett syndrome is a rare genetic disease that causes developmental and nervous system problems, mostly in girls. It's related to autism spectrum disorder. Babies with Rett syndrome seem to grow and develop normally at first. ...

  3. Caplan syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... enable JavaScript. Rheumatoid pneumoconiosis (RP; also known as Caplan syndrome) is swelling (inflammation) and scarring of the ... avoid exposure to inorganic dust. Alternative Names RP; Caplan syndrome; Pneumoconiosis - rheumatoid; Silicosis - rheumatoid pneumoconiosis; Coal worker's ...

  4. Turner Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner syndrome is a genetic disorder that affects a girl's development. The cause is a missing or incomplete ... t work properly. Other physical features typical of Turner syndrome are Short, "webbed" neck with folds of skin ...

  5. Gardner's syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sobrado Junior, C.W.; Bresser, A.; Cerri, G.G.; Habr-Gama, A.; Pinotti, H.W.; Magalhaes, A.

    1988-01-01

    A case of familiar poliposis of colon related to a right mandibular osteoma is reported (this association is usually called Gardner's syndrome). Radiologic pictures ae shown and some commentaries about this syndrome concerning the treatment are made. (author) [pt

  6. Sotos Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Clinical Trials Organizations Publications Definition Sotos syndrome (cerebral gigantism) is a rare genetic disorder caused by mutation ... have also been reported. × Definition Sotos syndrome (cerebral gigantism) is a rare genetic disorder caused by mutation ...

  7. Felty syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seropositive rheumatoid arthritis (RA); Felty's syndrome ... The cause of Felty syndrome is unknown. It is more common in people who have had rheumatoid arthritis (RA) for a long time. People with ...

  8. Bartter syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000308.htm Bartter syndrome To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Bartter syndrome is a group of rare conditions that affect ...

  9. Pendred Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... other possible long-term consequences of the syndrome. Children with Pendred syndrome should start early treatment to gain communication skills, such as learning sign language or cued speech or learning to ...

  10. Dravet Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and supports a broad program of basic and clinical research on all types of epilepsy, including Dravet syndrome. Study of the genetic defects responsible for Dravet syndrome and related ... Publications Definition Dravet ...

  11. Divorce in families of children with Down Syndrome or Rett Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lederman, Vivian Renne Gerber; Alves, Bianca dos Santos; Negrão, Juliana; Maria, Juliana Negrão; Schwartzman, José Salomão; D'Antino, Maria Eloisa Famá; Brunoni, Decio

    2015-05-01

    This study evaluates the impact in the stability and management of the marriage of parents of a child with Down or Rett Syndrome. Morbidity of the syndromes and the marital status of the couples before and after the birth of the affected children were considered variables. The divorce rate in families with Down syndrome was 10%, similar to the Brazilian rate population. In Rett Syndrome, the divorce rate was significantly higher, 23.5%. The higher morbidity of Rett Syndrome, and the moment of diagnosis could be relevant factors for the increased divorce rate related to this syndrome.

  12. α-Glucosidase inhibitor miglitol attenuates glucose fluctuation, heart rate variability and sympathetic activity in patients with type 2 diabetes and acute coronary syndrome: a multicenter randomized controlled (MACS) study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimabukuro, Michio; Tanaka, Atsushi; Sata, Masataka; Dai, Kazuoki; Shibata, Yoshisato; Inoue, Yohei; Ikenaga, Hiroki; Kishimoto, Shinji; Ogasawara, Kozue; Takashima, Akira; Niki, Toshiyuki; Arasaki, Osamu; Oshiro, Koichi; Mori, Yutaka; Ishihara, Masaharu; Node, Koichi

    2017-07-06

    Little is known about clinical associations between glucose fluctuations including hypoglycemia, heart rate variability (HRV), and the activity of the sympathetic nervous system (SNS) in patients with acute phase of acute coronary syndrome (ACS). This pilot study aimed to evaluate the short-term effects of glucose fluctuations on HRV and SNS activity in type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) patients with recent ACS. We also examined the effect of suppressing glucose fluctuations with miglitol on these variables. This prospective, randomized, open-label, blinded-endpoint, multicenter, parallel-group comparative study included 39 T2DM patients with recent ACS, who were randomly assigned to either a miglitol group (n = 19) or a control group (n = 20). After initial 24-h Holter electrocardiogram (ECG) (Day 1), miglitol was commenced and another 24-h Holter ECG (Day 2) was recorded. In addition, continuous glucose monitoring (CGM) was performed throughout the Holter ECG. Although frequent episodes of subclinical hypoglycemia (≤4.44 mmo/L) during CGM were observed on Day 1 in the both groups (35% of patients in the control group and 31% in the miglitol group), glucose fluctuations were decreased and the minimum glucose level was increased with substantial reduction in the episodes of subclinical hypoglycemia to 7.7% in the miglitol group on Day 2. Holter ECG showed that the mean and maximum heart rate and mean LF/HF were increased on Day 2 in the control group, and these increases were attenuated by miglitol. When divided 24-h time periods into day-time (0700-1800 h), night-time (1800-0000 h), and bed-time (0000-0700 h), we found increased SNS activity during day-time, increased maximum heart rate during night-time, and glucose fluctuations during bed-time, which were attenuated by miglitol treatment. In T2DM patients with recent ACS, glucose fluctuations with subclinical hypoglycemia were associated with alterations of HRV and SNS activity, which were mitigated by

  13. Down Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Down syndrome increases as a woman gets older. Down syndrome cannot be cured. Early treatment programs can help improve skills. They may include ... occupational, and/or educational therapy. With support and treatment, many ... Down syndrome live happy, productive lives. NIH: National Institute of ...

  14. Rowell syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramesh Y Bhat

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Rowell syndrome is a rare disease consisting of erythema multiforme-like lesions associated with lupus erythematosus. The syndrome occurs mostly in middle-aged women. The authors describe the syndrome in a 15-year-old boy who responded well to systemic steroids and hydroxychloroquine.

  15. Aicardi Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... from Aicardi-Goutieres syndrome, which is an inherited encephalopathy that affects newborn infants.) × Definition Aicardi syndrome is a rare genetic ... from Aicardi-Goutieres syndrome, which is an inherited encephalopathy that affects newborn infants.) View Full Definition Treatment There is no ...

  16. Dravets syndrom

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Lars Kjaersgård; Rasmussen, Niels Henrik; Ousager, Lilian Bomme

    2010-01-01

    Dravet syndrome is an epileptic syndrome of infancy and early childhood. Most cases of Dravet syndrome seem to be due to a genetic defect causing the sodium channel to malfunction. We describe the main features of the syndrome. This epilepsy is medically intractable, but we call attention...... to the fact that some medications are of benefit and some could exacerbate the condition. Early recognition of the syndrome including by genetic testing could possibly improve outcome and reduce the need for other specialized investigations. Udgivelsesdato: 2010-Feb-22...

  17. Meckel Gruber Syndrome: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Celal Devecioglu

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Meckel-Gruber syndrome is an autosomal recessive disordercharacterized by a combination of renal cysts and variably associatedfeatures including developmental anomalies of the central nervous system(typically encephalocele, hepatic ductal dysplasia and cysts, andpolydactyly. n this cases AFP levels are increases. Alternative names areMeckel Syndrome, Dysencephalia Splanchnocystica, Gruber Syndrome andMeckel – Gruber Syndrome. This study is presented to draw attention to theMeckel Gruber Syndrome which seen rarely, have high risk of reccurenceand antenathal determination of AFP levels and early diagnosis byultrasonographic screening can be confident.

  18. Pulsating variables

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-01-01

    The study of stellar pulsations is a major route to the understanding of stellar structure and evolution. At the South African Astronomical Observatory (SAAO) the following stellar pulsation studies were undertaken: rapidly oscillating Ap stars; solar-like oscillations in stars; 8-Scuti type variability in a classical Am star; Beta Cephei variables; a pulsating white dwarf and its companion; RR Lyrae variables and galactic Cepheids. 4 figs

  19. Cognitive Variability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siegler, Robert S.

    2007-01-01

    Children's thinking is highly variable at every level of analysis, from neural and associative levels to the level of strategies, theories, and other aspects of high-level cognition. This variability exists within people as well as between them; individual children often rely on different strategies or representations on closely related problems…

  20. ASSOCIATION OF A LYMPHOTOXIN-α VARIABLE SITE rs1041981 WITH DEVELOPMENT OF LONG-TERM UNFAVORABLE OUTCOMES IN PATIENTS WITH ACUTE CORONARY SYNDROME WITHOUT ST-SEGMENT ELEVATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. A. Shmidt

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Lymphotoxin-α (LTA is a major pro-inflammatory cytokine produced at the early stages of vascular inflammation, taking part in the formation of arterial atherosclerosis and development of coronary heart disease. Functional changes in the gene encoding LTA production may influence the development of coronary heart disease with unfavorable progression. However, studies for associations between rs1041981 (C-804A LTA gene variant and development of acute cerebrovascular accidents, myocardial infarction, and severity of coronary atherosclerosis have yielded contradictory results. The purpose of our study was to investigate an association of rs1041981 gene LTA with risk of adverse events within five years of follow-up in the patients with acute coronary syndrome without ST elevation ST (nonST-ACS. 178 patients with nonST-ACS from the Kemerovo Cardiology Center Registry were included into the study. Genotyping of rs1041981 site variable LTA gene was performed by TaqMan technique using an “iCycler iQ” device (BIO-RAD, USA. Results: we have found that the A allele and A/A genotype polymorphism in LTA gene (rs1041981 have been associated with development of adverse cardiovascular events over five years of observation (respective p levels were 0.02 and 0.036. In patients with A/A genotype, the rs1041981 polymorphism in LTA gene was associated with 3.8-fold increase in adverse cardiovascular events, compared to patients having A/C or C/C genotype. Carriage of A allele in LTA gene (rs1041981 doubles the risk of adverse cardiovascular events in patients with nonST-ACS at long observation terms. By means of Kaplan-Meier method, we have determined that survival to the first endpoint occurred more often in carriers of the genotype A/A of LTA gene (rs1041981. The A/A genotype of LTA gene (rs1041981 proved to be more significant (p = 0.016 for development of adverse outcomes, when combining the patients with A/C and C/C genotypes. One may draw a conclusion

  1. Posterior microphthalmos pigmentary retinopathy syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pehere, Niranjan; Jalali, Subhadra; Deshmukh, Himanshu; Kannabiran, Chitra

    2011-04-01

    Posterior Microphthalmos Pigmentary Retinopathy Syndrome (PMPRS). Posterior microphthalmos (PM) is a relatively infrequent type of microphthalmos where posterior segment is predominantly affected with normal anterior segment measurements. Herein, we report two siblings with posterior microphthalmos retinopathy syndrome with postulated autosomal recessive mode of inheritance. A 13-year-old child had PM and retinitis pigmentosa (RP) and his 7-year-old sister had PM, RP, and foveoschisis. The genetics of this syndrome and variable phenotype is discussed. Importance of being aware of posterior microphthalmos and its posterior segment associations is highlighted.

  2. The Greig cephalopolysyndactyly syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Biesecker Leslie G

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The Greig cephalopolysyndactyly syndrome (GCPS is a pleiotropic, multiple congenital anomaly syndrome. It is rare, but precise estimates of incidence are difficult to determine, as ascertainment is erratic (estimated range 1–9/1,000,000. The primary findings include hypertelorism, macrocephaly with frontal bossing, and polysyndactyly. The polydactyly is most commonly preaxial of the feet and postaxial in the hands, with variable cutaneous syndactyly, but the limb findings vary significantly. Other low frequency findings include central nervous system (CNS anomalies, hernias, and cognitive impairment. GCPS is caused by loss of function mutations in the GLI3 transcription factor gene and is inherited in an autosomal dominant pattern. The disorder is allelic to the Pallister-Hall syndrome and one form of the acrocallosal syndrome. Clinical diagnosis is challenging because the findings of GCPS are relatively non-specific, and no specific and sensitive clinical have been delineated. For this reason, we have proposed a combined clinical-molecular definition for the syndrome. A presumptive diagnosis of GCPS can be made if the patient has the classic triad of preaxial polydactyly with cutaneous syndactyly of at least one limb, hypertelorism, and macrocephaly. Patients with a phenotype consistent with GCPS (but which may not manifest all three attributes listed above and a GLI3 mutation may be diagnosed definitively with GCPS. In addition, persons with a GCPS-consistent phenotype who are related to a definitively diagnosed family member in a pattern consistent with autosomal dominant inheritance may be diagnosed definitively as well. Antenatal molecular diagnosis is technically straightforward to perform. Differential diagnoses include preaxial polydactyly type 4, the GCPS contiguous gene syndrome, acrocallosal syndrome, Gorlin syndrome, Carpenter syndrome, and Teebi syndrome. Treatment of the disorder is symptomatic, with plastic or

  3. Urofacial syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamal F Akl

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The urofacial syndrome is characterized by functional obstructive uropathy asso-ciated with an inverted smile. The importance of the subject is that it sheds light, not only on the muscles of facial expression, but also on the inheritance of voiding disorders and lower urinary tract malformations. We report a 10-year-old-male patient who had the urofacial syndrome. Early diagnosis of the urofacial syndrome is important to avoid upper urinary tract damage and renal failure.

  4. Refeeding syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Tripathy, Swagata; Mishra, Padmini; Dash, S. C.

    2008-01-01

    Refeeding syndrome is a potentially fatal medical condition that may affect malnourished patients in response to an inappropriately rapid overfeeding. This commonly occurs following the institution of nutritional support, especially parenteral or enteral nutrition. The most characteristic pathophysiology of refeeding syndrome relates to the rapid consumption of phosphate after glucose intake and subsequent hypophosphatemia. Refeeding syndrome can manifest as either metabolic changes (hypokala...

  5. Revesz syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dayane Cristine Issaho

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Revesz syndrome is a rare variant of dyskeratosis congenita and is characterized by bilateral exudative retinopathy, alterations in the anterior ocular segment, intrauterine growth retardation, fine sparse hair, reticulate skin pigmentation, bone marrow failure, cerebral calcification, cerebellar hypoplasia and psychomotor retardation. Few patients with this syndrome have been reported, and significant clinical variations exist among patients. This report describes the first Brazilian case of Revesz syndrome and its ocular and clinical features.

  6. Reye's Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... that contain aspirin. Some hospitals and medical facilities conduct newborn screenings for fatty acid oxidation disorders to determine which children are at greater risk of developing Reye's syndrome. ...

  7. Marfan Syndrome (For Teens)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... genetic disorder called Marfan syndrome. What Is Marfan Syndrome? Marfan syndrome is named after Antoine Marfan, the French ... immediately. What's Life Like for Teens With Marfan Syndrome? Marfan syndrome affects people differently, so life is not ...

  8. Learning about Marfan Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Additional Resources for Marfan Syndrome What is Marfan syndrome? Marfan syndrome is one of the most common inherited ... FAQ Top of page Additional Resources For Marfan Syndrome Marfan syndrome [nlm.nih.gov] From Medline Plus Marfan ...

  9. Russell-Silver syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silver-Russell syndrome; Silver syndrome; RSS; Russell-Silver syndrome ... One in 10 children with this syndrome has a problem involving chromosome 7. In other people with the syndrome, it may affect chromosome 11. Most of the time, it ...

  10. What Is Usher Syndrome?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Action You are here Home › Retinal Diseases Listen Usher Syndrome What is Usher syndrome? How is Usher syndrome ... available? Are there any related diseases? What is Usher Syndrome? Usher syndrome is an inherited condition characterized by ...

  11. Asociación entre variables hormonales y clínicas y el resultado del ultrasonido ginecológico en mujeres con síndrome metabólico. Association among hormonal and clinical variables and the result of the gynecological ultrasound in females with metabolic syndrome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gisel Ovies Carballo

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: determinar la asociación entre el resultado de ultrasonido y los valores de progesterona, índice LH/FSH, testosterona, antecedentes de infertilidad e hirsutismo en mujeres con síndrome metabólico. MÉTODOS: se realizó un estudio descriptivo-transversal con 90 mujeres, entre 18 y 45 años de edad, con diagnóstico de síndrome metabólico. Se les realizó: FSH (3-5 días del ciclo menstrual si menstruaba, LH (3-5 días del ciclo menstrual si menstruaba, prolactina (3-5 días del ciclo menstrual si menstruaba, andrógenos (testosterona total, 3-5 días del ciclo menstrual si menstruaba, de lo contrario en cualquier momento y progesterona (21-23 días del ciclo menstrual si menstruaba, ultrasonido ginecológico transvaginal en la fase folicular temprana si menstruaban, y si estaban en amenorrea en cualquier momento. Además se les realizó una historia clínica que exploraba historia obstétrica, fórmula menstrual, antecedentes de infertilidad y examen físico. Se exploraron asociaciones entre las variables clínicas y hormonales y el resultado ultrasonográfico. RESULTADOS: el 83,1 % de las pacientes anovuladoras mostraron imágenes sugestivas de poliquistosis ovárica. Cuando se asociaron los niveles de testosterona con el ultrasonido, en el 80 % de las que tuvieron testosterona elevada el ultrasonido mostró imágenes de poliquistosis ovárica, sin embargo cuando la testosterona fue normal solo el 42,5 % mostró dichas imágenes. De las 39 pacientes con un índice LH/FSH ³ 2, 32 (82,1 % tenían por imagen ultrasonográfica una poliquistosis ovárica, sin embargo cuando este fue OBJECTIVE: to determine the association between the result of the ultrasound and the progesterone values, LH/FSH level, testosterone, history of infertility and hirsutism in females with metabolic syndrome. METHODS: a descriptive cross-sectional study was undertaken among 90 females aged 18-45 with diagnosis of metabolic syndrome. FSH (3-5 days of the

  12. [Mania associated with Usher syndrome type II].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Praharaj, Samir Kumar; Acharya, Mahima; Sarvanan, Arul; Kongasseri, Sreejayan; Behere, Rishikesh V; Sharma, P S V N

    2012-01-01

    Usher syndrome (or Hallgren syndrome) is an autosomal recessive genetic disorder characterized by sensorineural deafness, retinitis pigmentosa, and variable vestibular deficit; Usher syndrome type II is the most common form. Various neuropsychiatric disorders have been reported to occur in those with Usher syndrome, including schizophrenia-like disorder, atypical psychosis, recurrent depressive illness, neurotic disorder, and mental retardation; however, bipolar disorder is not common in those with Usher syndrome. Herein we describe a 30-year-old male with Usher syndrome type II that developed features indicative of a probable manic episode. The patient had complete remission of symptoms in response to treatment with olanzapine 20 mg d-1. In persons with dual sensory impairment there are inherent problems with assessment and diagnosis is difficult due to their limited communication abilities. The diagnosis of Usher syndrome depends heavily on behavioral observation and disturbances in vegetative functions.

  13. Seckel syndrome: an overdiagnosed syndrome.

    OpenAIRE

    Thompson, E; Pembrey, M

    1985-01-01

    Five children in whom a diagnosis of Seckel syndrome had previously been made were re-examined in the genetic unit. One child had classical Seckel syndrome, a sib pair had the features of the syndrome with less severe short stature, and in two children the diagnosis was not confirmed. Seckel syndrome is only one of a group of low birth weight microcephalic dwarfism and careful attention should be paid to fulfillment of the major criteria defined by Seckel before the diagnosis is made. There r...

  14. Adult polysplenia syndrome. A case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Usamentiaga, E.; Garcia-Valtuille, R.; Abascal, F.; Artiz, A.

    1997-01-01

    Polysplenia syndrome is a rare combination of congenital anomalies. It includes in a variable range: abdominal heterotaxy with multiples splenic nodules on the right side, cardiopulmonary anomalies and incomplete development of the inferior vena cava. We present the findings of a case of polysplenia syndrome performed by CT in an Adult asyntomatic patient. 11 refs

  15. Waardenburg syndrome in four Mexican patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguilar Caso, Sandra I; Ortiz Nieva, Gabriela

    2009-01-01

    Waardenburg syndrome is a hereditary auditory-pigmentary syndrome. The major features include pigmentary disturbances and congenital deafness. Clinical findings are extremely variable, not only at the authors' institution but also in the literature. The authors describe four patients who presented with various clinical features and different genetic pedigree penetration.

  16. Burnout Syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Panova, Gordana; Panov, Nenad; Stojanov, H; Sumanov, Gorgi; Panova, Blagica; Stojanovski, Angel; Nikolovska, Lence; Jovevska, Svetlana; Trajanovski, D; Asanova, D

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: Increasing work responsibilities, allocation of duties, loss of energy and motivation in everyday activities, emotional exhaustion, lack of time for themselves, insuffi cient time for rest and recreation, dissatisfaction in private life. All these symptoms can be cause of Burnout Syndrome. Aim: To see the importance of this syndrome, the consequences of job dissatisfaction, the environment, family and expression in drastic chan...

  17. Tourette Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    If you have Tourette syndrome, you make unusual movements or sounds, called tics. You have little or no control over them. Common tics are throat- ... spin, or, rarely, blurt out swear words. Tourette syndrome is a disorder of the nervous system. It ...

  18. Fahr's Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... or 50s, although it can occur at any time in childhood or adolescence. × Definition Fahr's Syndrome is a rare, genetically dominant, inherited ... or 50s, although it can occur at any time in childhood or adolescence. View Full Definition Treatment There is no cure for Fahr's Syndrome, ...

  19. Lemierre's syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johannesen, Katrine; Bødtger, Uffe; Heltberg, Ole

    2014-01-01

    Lemierre's syndrome is an often un-diagnosed disease seen in previously healthy young subjects, presenting with symptoms of pharyngitis, fever and elevated markers of inflammation. The syndrome is characterised by infectious thrombosis of the jugular vein due to infection with Fusobacteria, causing...

  20. Ambras syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sudhir Malwade

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Ambras syndrome, a form of congenital hypertrichosis lanuginosa, is extremely rare in neonates. It is characterized by typical pattern of hair distribution, dysmorphic facial features and a familial pattern of inheritance. We report a case of Ambras syndrome in a preterm neonate with history of consanguinity and positive family history.

  1. Antiphospholipid syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cervera, Ricard; Piette, Jean-Charles; Font, Josep

    2002-01-01

    To analyze the clinical and immunologic manifestations of antiphospholipid syndrome (APS) in a large cohort of patients and to define patterns of disease expression.......To analyze the clinical and immunologic manifestations of antiphospholipid syndrome (APS) in a large cohort of patients and to define patterns of disease expression....

  2. Noonan syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Roberts, Amy E; Allanson, Judith E; Tartaglia, Marco; Gelb, Bruce D

    2013-01-01

    Noonan syndrome is a genetic multisystem disorder characterised by distinctive facial features, developmental delay, learning difficulties, short stature, congenital heart disease, renal anomalies, lymphatic malformations, and bleeding difficulties. Mutations that cause Noonan syndrome alter genes encoding proteins with roles in the RAS–MAPK pathway, leading to pathway dysregulation. Management guidelines have been developed. Several clinically relevant genotype–phenotype correlations aid ris...

  3. Gorlin‑Goltz Syndrome | Mehta | Annals of Medical and Health ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The Gorlin‑Goltz syndrome (GGS) (the nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome) is a rare autosomal dominant syndrome caused due to mutations in the patched gene found on chromosome arm 9 q. It shows high penetrance and variable expressivity; is characterized by basal cell carcinomas, odontogenic keratocysts, palmar ...

  4. TAFRO Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Igawa, Takuro; Sato, Yasuharu

    2018-02-01

    TAFRO syndrome is a newly recognized variant of idiopathic multicentric Castleman disease (iMCD) that involves a constellation of syndromes: thrombocytopenia (T), anasarca (A), fever (F), reticulin fibrosis (R), and organomegaly (O). Thrombocytopenia and severe anasarca accompanied by relatively low serum immunoglobulin levels are characteristic clinical findings of TAFRO syndrome that are not present in iMCD-not otherwise specified (iMCD-NOS). Lymph node biopsy is recommended to exclude other diseases and to diagnose TAFRO syndrome, which reveals characteristic histopathological findings similar to hyaline vascular-type CD. TAFRO syndrome follows a more aggressive course, compared with iMCD-NOS, and there is no standard treatment. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Wiedemann-Rautenstrauch syndrome: A phenotype analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Paolacci, Stefano; Bertola, Debora; Franco, José; Mohammed, Shehla; Tartaglia, Marco; Wollnik, Bernd; Hennekam, Raoul C.

    2017-01-01

    Wiedemann-Rautenstrauch syndrome (WRS) is a neonatal progeroid disorder characterized by growth retardation, lipodystrophy, a distinctive face, and dental anomalies. Patients reported to date demonstrate a remarkable variability in phenotype, which hampers diagnostics. We performed a literature

  6. Barth syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clarke Sarah LN

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract First described in 1983, Barth syndrome (BTHS is widely regarded as a rare X-linked genetic disease characterised by cardiomyopathy (CM, skeletal myopathy, growth delay, neutropenia and increased urinary excretion of 3-methylglutaconic acid (3-MGCA. Fewer than 200 living males are known worldwide, but evidence is accumulating that the disorder is substantially under-diagnosed. Clinical features include variable combinations of the following wide spectrum: dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM, hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM, endocardial fibroelastosis (EFE, left ventricular non-compaction (LVNC, ventricular arrhythmia, sudden cardiac death, prolonged QTc interval, delayed motor milestones, proximal myopathy, lethargy and fatigue, neutropenia (absent to severe; persistent, intermittent or perfectly cyclical, compensatory monocytosis, recurrent bacterial infection, hypoglycaemia, lactic acidosis, growth and pubertal delay, feeding problems, failure to thrive, episodic diarrhoea, characteristic facies, and X-linked family history. Historically regarded as a cardiac disease, BTHS is now considered a multi-system disorder which may be first seen by many different specialists or generalists. Phenotypic breadth and variability present a major challenge to the diagnostician: some children with BTHS have never been neutropenic, whereas others lack increased 3-MGCA and a minority has occult or absent CM. Furthermore, BTHS was first described in 2010 as an unrecognised cause of fetal death. Disabling mutations or deletions of the tafazzin (TAZ gene, located at Xq28, cause the disorder by reducing remodeling of cardiolipin, a principal phospholipid of the inner mitochondrial membrane. A definitive biochemical test, based on detecting abnormal ratios of different cardiolipin species, was first described in 2008. Key areas of differential diagnosis include metabolic and viral cardiomyopathies, mitochondrial diseases, and many causes of neutropenia and

  7. Phenotypic variability in 49 cases of ESCO2 mutations, including novel missense and codon deletion in the acetyltransferase domain, correlates with ESCO2 expression and establishes the clinical criteria for Roberts syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vega, H; Trainer, A H; Gordillo, M

    2010-01-01

    Roberts syndrome (RBS) and SC phocomelia are caused by mutations in ESCO2, which codes for an acetyltransferase involved in the regulation of sister chromatid cohesion. Of 26 mutations described to date, only one missense mutation has been reported and all others are predicted to be truncating...

  8. Phenotypic variability in 49 cases of ESCO2 mutations, including novel missense and codon deletion in the acetyltransferase domain, correlates with ESCO2 expression and establishes the clinical criteria for Roberts syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vega, H.; Trainer, A.H.; Gordillo, M.; Crosier, M.; Kayserili, H.; Skovby, F.; Uzielli, M.L.G.; Schnur, R.E.; Manouvrier, S.; Blair, E.; Hurst, J.A.; Forzano, F.; Meins, M.; Simola, K.O.J.; Raas-Rothschild, A; Hennekam, R.C.M.; Jabs, E.W.

    2010-01-01

    Background Roberts syndrome (RBS) and SC phocomelia are caused by mutations in ESCO2, which codes for an acetyltransferase involved in the regulation of sister chromatid cohesion. Of 26 mutations described to date, only one missense mutation has been reported and all others are predicted to be

  9. Complex variables

    CERN Document Server

    Fisher, Stephen D

    1999-01-01

    The most important topics in the theory and application of complex variables receive a thorough, coherent treatment in this introductory text. Intended for undergraduates or graduate students in science, mathematics, and engineering, this volume features hundreds of solved examples, exercises, and applications designed to foster a complete understanding of complex variables as well as an appreciation of their mathematical beauty and elegance. Prerequisites are minimal; a three-semester course in calculus will suffice to prepare students for discussions of these topics: the complex plane, basic

  10. Nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome (Gorlin-Goltz syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N K Kiran

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The Gorlin-Goltz syndrome, also known as nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome (NBCCS, is an infrequent multisystemic disease inherited in a dominant autosomal way, which shows a high level of penetrance and variable expressiveness. It is characterized by odontogenic keratocysts in the jaw, multiple basal cell nevi carcinomas and skeletal abnormalities. This syndrome may be diagnosed early by a dentist by routine radiographic exams in the first decade of life, since the odontogenic keratocysts are usually one of the first manifestations of the syndrome. This case report presents a patient diagnosed as NBCCS by clinical, radiographic and histological findings in a 13-year-old boy. This paper highlights the importance of early diagnosis of NBCCS which can help in preventive multidisciplinary approach to provide a better prognosis for the patient.

  11. Nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome (Gorlin-Goltz syndrome).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiran, N K; Tilak Raj, T N; Mukunda, K S; Rajashekar Reddy, V

    2012-10-01

    The Gorlin-Goltz syndrome, also known as nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome (NBCCS), is an infrequent multisystemic disease inherited in a dominant autosomal way, which shows a high level of penetrance and variable expressiveness. It is characterized by odontogenic keratocysts in the jaw, multiple basal cell nevi carcinomas and skeletal abnormalities. This syndrome may be diagnosed early by a dentist by routine radiographic exams in the first decade of life, since the odontogenic keratocysts are usually one of the first manifestations of the syndrome. This case report presents a patient diagnosed as NBCCS by clinical, radiographic and histological findings in a 13-year-old boy. This paper highlights the importance of early diagnosis of NBCCS which can help in preventive multidisciplinary approach to provide a better prognosis for the patient.

  12. Variable stars

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feast, M.W.; Wenzel, W.; Fernie, J.D.; Percy, J.R.; Smak, J.; Gascoigne, S.C.B.; Grindley, J.E.; Lovell, B.; Sawyer Hogg, H.B.; Baker, N.; Fitch, W.S.; Rosino, L.; Gursky, H.

    1976-01-01

    A critical review of variable stars is presented. A fairly complete summary of major developments and discoveries during the period 1973-1975 is given. The broad developments and new trends are outlined. Essential problems for future research are identified. (B.R.H. )

  13. The association between the metabolic syndrome and metabolic syndrome score and pulmonary function in non-smoking adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Hyun; Gi, Mi Young; Cha, Ju Ae; Yoo, Chan Uk; Park, Sang Muk

    2018-03-01

    This study assessed the association of metabolic syndrome and metabolic syndrome score with the predicted forced vital capacity and predicted forced expiratory volume in 1 s (predicted forced expiratory volume in 1 s) values in Korean non-smoking adults. We analysed data obtained from 6684 adults during the 2013-2015 Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey. After adjustment for related variables, metabolic syndrome ( p metabolic syndrome score ( p metabolic syndrome score with metabolic syndrome score 0 as a reference group showed no significance for metabolic syndrome score 1 [1.061 (95% confidence interval, 0.755-1.490)] and metabolic syndrome score 2 [1.247 (95% confidence interval, 0.890-1.747)], but showed significant for metabolic syndrome score 3 [1.433 (95% confidence interval, 1.010-2.033)] and metabolic syndrome score ⩾ 4 [1.760 (95% confidence interval, 1.216-2.550)]. In addition, the odds ratio of restrictive pulmonary disease of the metabolic syndrome [1.360 (95% confidence interval, 1.118-1.655)] was significantly higher than those of non-metabolic syndrome. Metabolic syndrome and metabolic syndrome score were inversely associated with the predicted forced vital capacity and forced expiratory volume in 1 s values in Korean non-smoking adults. In addition, metabolic syndrome and metabolic syndrome score were positively associated with the restrictive pulmonary disease.

  14. Costello syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Madhukara J

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Costello syndrome is a rare, distinctive, multiple congenital anomaly syndrome, characterized by soft, loose skin with deep palmar and plantar creases, loose joints, distinctive coarse facial features and skeletal and cardiac abnormalities. The affected patients have a predisposition to develop malignancy, developmental delays and mental retardation. Recently, a 7-year-old male child born to normal nonconsanguineous parents presented to us with abnormal facial features, arrhythmia, mitral valve dysfunction and growth retardation. His cutaneous examination revealed lax and pigmented skin over hands and feet with deep creases, acanthosis nigricans and short curly hairs. Its differentiation from other syndromes with similar clinical features is discussed in this article.

  15. [Organizational climate and burnout syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lubrańska, Anna

    2011-01-01

    The paper addresses the issue of organizational climate and burnout syndrome. It has been assumed that burnout syndrome is dependent on work climate (organizational climate), therefore, two concepts were analyzed: by D. Kolb (organizational climate) and by Ch. Maslach (burnout syndrome). The research involved 239 persons (122 woman, 117 men), aged 21-66. In the study Maslach Burnout Inventory (MBI) and Inventory of Organizational Climate were used. The results of statistical methods (correlation analysis, one-variable analysis of variance and regression analysis) evidenced a strong relationship between organizational climate and burnout dimension. As depicted by the results, there are important differences in the level of burnout between the study participants who work in different types of organizational climate. The results of the statistical analyses indicate that the organizational climate determines burnout syndrome. Therefore, creating supportive conditions at the workplace might reduce the risk of burnout.

  16. Radiologic study of basal cell nevus syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Tae Won [Dept. of Oral Radiology, College of Dentistry, Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1988-11-15

    Several cases of jaw cyst-basal cell nevus-bifid rib syndrome are presented. This syndrome consists principally of multiple jaw cysts, basal cell nevi, and bifid ribs but no one component is present in all patients. The purpose of this paper is to review the multiple characteristics of this syndrome and present three cases in a family and additional 4 cases. The many malformations associated with the syndrome have variable expressively. In the cases, multiple jaw cysts, pal mar and plantar pittings, bridging of sella, temporoparietal bossing, hypertelorism, cleft palate, and dystopia canthoru m have been observed.

  17. Radiologic study of basal cell nevus syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Tae Won

    1988-01-01

    Several cases of jaw cyst-basal cell nevus-bifid rib syndrome are presented. This syndrome consists principally of multiple jaw cysts, basal cell nevi, and bifid ribs but no one component is present in all patients. The purpose of this paper is to review the multiple characteristics of this syndrome and present three cases in a family and additional 4 cases. The many malformations associated with the syndrome have variable expressively. In the cases, multiple jaw cysts, pal mar and plantar pittings, bridging of sella, temporoparietal bossing, hypertelorism, cleft palate, and dystopia canthoru m have been observed.

  18. Tietz syndrome (hypopigmentation/deafness) caused by mutation of MITF

    OpenAIRE

    Smith, S.; Kelley, P.; Kenyon, J.; Hoover, D.

    2000-01-01

    Patients with Tietz syndrome have congenital profound deafness and generalised hypopigmentation, inherited in a fully penetrant autosomal dominant fashion. The pigmentary features and complete penetrance make this syndrome distinct among syndromes with pigmentary anomalies and deafness, which characteristically have patchy depigmentation and variable penetrance. Only one family has been reported with the exact features described in the original report of this syndrome. This family was reascer...

  19. Reye Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Legacy Society Make Gifts of Stock Donate Your Car Personal Fundraising Partnership & Support Share Your Story Spread the Word Give While You Shop Contact Us Donate Now What Is Reye’s Syndrome? ...

  20. Alagille Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Legacy Society Make Gifts of Stock Donate Your Car Personal Fundraising Partnership & Support Share Your Story Spread the Word Give While You Shop Contact Us Donate Now Alagille Syndrome Back Alagille ...

  1. Turner Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Failure to begin sexual changes expected during puberty Sexual development that "stalls" during teenage years Early end to menstrual cycles not due to pregnancy For most women with Turner syndrome, inability to ...

  2. [Refeeding syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ševela, Stanislav; Novák, František; Kazda, Antonín; Brodská, Helena

    Despite being known more than 60 years, refeeding syndrome (RS) still bears many uncertainties. For example, its definition is not clear and definite, and the attitude to it varies from the complete neglect to over-prevention.The term "refeeding syndrome" refers to electrolyte and metabolic changes occurring in malnourished patients after the readministration of nutrition. These changes concern especially to phosphates and ions. Potassium, magnesium, naturism and fluids balance are involved. The changes lead to cell energetic metabolism and electric potential disturbances, with related clinical symptoms.Fully developed refeeding syndrome is quite rare; nevertheless it can be fatal for the patient. However, even its development can lead to many complications increasing the patient's morbidity and the length of stay in the hospital. Yet the refeeding syndrome is more or less predictable and if kept in mind also preventable.The aim of this article is to get the reader to know more about this metabolic phenomenon and possible attitudes towards it.

  3. Cockayne syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karikkineth, Ajoy C; Scheibye-Knudsen, Morten; Fivenson, Elayne

    2017-01-01

    Cockayne syndrome (CS) is a disorder characterized by a variety of clinical features including cachectic dwarfism, severe neurological manifestations including microcephaly and cognitive deficits, pigmentary retinopathy, cataracts, sensorineural deafness, and ambulatory and feeding difficulties...

  4. Alagille Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Liver Function Tests Clinical Trials Liver Transplant FAQs Medical Terminology Diseases of the Liver Alagille Syndrome Alcohol-Related ... the Liver The Progression of Liver Disease FAQs Medical Terminology HOW YOU CAN HELP Sponsorship Ways to Give ...

  5. Reye Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Liver Function Tests Clinical Trials Liver Transplant FAQs Medical Terminology Diseases of the Liver Alagille Syndrome Alcohol-Related ... the Liver The Progression of Liver Disease FAQs Medical Terminology HOW YOU CAN HELP Sponsorship Ways to Give ...

  6. Turner Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... crowding, and osteoporosis (brittle bones). Because of their physical conditions, health concerns, and infertility, some girls and women with TS may have low self- esteem, anxiety, or depression. How is Turner syndrome diagnosed? Physical features may ...

  7. Cushing's Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... person cured of Cushing’s syndrome might have some memory loss and slight mental decline. But the change is ... Categories: Family Health, Infants and Toddlers, Kids and Teens, Men, Seniors, WomenTags: acth, adenomas, hormone, sickness September ...

  8. Levator Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Abscess Anorectal Fistula Foreign Objects in the Rectum Hemorrhoids Levator Syndrome Pilonidal Disease Proctitis Rectal Prolapse (See ... out other painful rectal conditions (such as thrombosed hemorrhoids , fissures , or abscesses ). The physical examination is often ...

  9. Alport Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... signs and symptoms may differ, based on age, gender and inherited type of Alport syndrome. For example, ... prevention and treatment of kidney disease. The Better Business Bureau Wise Giving Alliance Charity Seal provides the ...

  10. Gilbert's Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... not know you have the condition until it's discovered by accident, such as when a blood test ... chemotherapy drug Some protease inhibitors used to treat HIV If you have Gilbert's syndrome, talk to your ...

  11. Potter syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potter phenotype ... In Potter syndrome, the primary problem is kidney failure. The kidneys fail to develop properly as the baby is ... kidneys normally produce the amniotic fluid (as urine). Potter phenotype refers to a typical facial appearance that ...

  12. Moebius Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... delays; high or cleft palate; hearing problems and speech difficulties. Children with Moebius syndrome are unable to move their eyes back and forth. Decreased numbers of muscle fibers have been reported. Deformities of the tongue, jaw, and limbs, such ...

  13. Fraser syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barisic, Ingeborg; Odak, Ljubica; Loane, Maria

    2013-01-01

    Fraser syndrome is a rare autosomal recessive disorder characterized by cryptophthalmos, cutaneous syndactyly, laryngeal, and urogenital malformations. We present a population-based epidemiological study using data provided by the European Surveillance of Congenital Anomalies (EUROCAT) network of...

  14. Angelman Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... therapy for seizures is usually necessary. Physical and occupational therapies, communication therapy, and behavioral therapies are important in allowing individuals with Angelman syndrome to reach their maximum developmental potential. × Treatment There ...

  15. Joubert Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... CEP290 . View Full Definition Treatment Treatment for Joubert syndrome is symptomatic and supportive. Infant stimulation and physical, occupational, and speech therapy may benefit some children. Infants with abnormal breathing ...

  16. Zellweger Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... swallow. Some babies will be born with glaucoma, retinal degeneration, and impaired hearing. Jaundice and gastrointestinal bleeding also may occur. Treatment There is no cure for Zellweger syndrome, nor ...

  17. Nephrotic Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... your blood — typically with an artificial kidney machine (dialyzer). Chronic kidney disease. Nephrotic syndrome may cause your ... opportunities Reprint Permissions A single copy of these materials may be reprinted for noncommercial personal use only. " ...

  18. Ohtahara Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... are more often affected than girls. View Full Definition Treatment Antiepileptic drugs are used to control seizures, but are unfortunately ... Other therapies are symptomatic and supportive. × ... Definition Ohtahara syndrome is a neurological disorder characterized by ...

  19. Usher Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to abnormal development of the vestibular hair cells, sensory cells that detect gravity and head movement. RP ... 3 Ben-Rebeh, I., et al. (2016). Genetic analysis of Tunisian families with Usher syndrome type 1: ...

  20. Eagle's Syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Pinheiro,Thaís Gonçalves; Soares,Vítor Yamashiro Rocha; Ferreira,Denise Bastos Lage; Raymundo,Igor Teixeira; Nascimento,Luiz Augusto; Oliveira,Carlos Augusto Costa Pires de

    2013-01-01

    Summary Introduction:?Eagle's syndrome is characterized by cervicopharyngeal signs and symptoms associated with elongation of the styloid apophysis. This elongation may occur through ossification of the stylohyoid ligament, or through growth of the apophysis due to osteogenesis triggered by a factor such as trauma. Elongation of the styloid apophysis may give rise to intense facial pain, headache, dysphagia, otalgia, buzzing sensations, and trismus. Precise diagnosis of the syndrome is diffic...

  1. Barth Syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Saric, Ana; Andreau, Karine; Armand, Anne-Sophie

    2016-01-01

    Mutations in the gene encoding the enzyme tafazzin, TAZ, cause Barth syndrome (BTHS). Individuals with this X-linked multisystem disorder present cardiomyopathy (CM) (often dilated), skeletal muscle weakness, neutropenia, growth retardation, and 3-methylglutaconic aciduria. Biopsies of the heart......, liver and skeletal muscle of patients have revealed mitochondrial malformations and dysfunctions. It is the purpose of this review to summarize recent results of studies on various animal or cell models of Barth syndrome, which have characterized biochemically the strong cellular defects associated...

  2. Pendred's syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hashmi, M.I.; Cheema, I.A.; Qasim, G.

    2003-01-01

    This report describes Pendred's syndrome in three siblings of a consanguineous marriage, belonging to Rahimyar Khan. The children presented with deafmutism and goiters. The investigations included scintigram, perchlorate discharge test and audiometery. The perchlorate discharge was positive in index case. Bilateral sensorineural hearing defect was detected on Pure Tone Average (PTA) audiometry. Meticulous clinical and laboratory evaluation is mandatory for the detection of rare disorders like Pendred's syndrome. (author)

  3. Intrafamilial variation in Cohen syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, I D; Moore, J R

    1987-01-01

    Three sibs with Cohen syndrome are presented. Abnormalities present in all three children include mental retardation, hypotonia, and short philtrum with open mouth and prominent lips. The older two sibs have a similar facies and an engaging personality. The youngest child shows a different facial appearance and marked behavioural problems, thereby illustrating the intrafamilial variability which may occur in this disorder. Images PMID:3656371

  4. Intrafamilial variation in Cohen syndrome.

    OpenAIRE

    Young, I D; Moore, J R

    1987-01-01

    Three sibs with Cohen syndrome are presented. Abnormalities present in all three children include mental retardation, hypotonia, and short philtrum with open mouth and prominent lips. The older two sibs have a similar facies and an engaging personality. The youngest child shows a different facial appearance and marked behavioural problems, thereby illustrating the intrafamilial variability which may occur in this disorder.

  5. What is Metabolic Syndrome?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Intramural Research Home / Metabolic Syndrome Metabolic Syndrome Also known as What Is Metabolic syndrome ... metabolic risk factors to be diagnosed with metabolic syndrome. Metabolic Risk Factors A Large Waistline Having a large ...

  6. Loeys-Dietz Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to the signs and symptoms of Loeys-Dietz syndrome. Marfan syndrome is different from Loeys-Dietz syndrome in that the gene mutation which causes Marfan syndrome is in fibrillin-1 (FBN-1), a protein ...

  7. Milk-alkali syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calcium-alkali syndrome; Cope syndrome; Burnett syndrome; Hypercalcemia; Calcium metabolism disorder ... Milk-alkali syndrome is almost always caused by taking too many calcium supplements, usually in the form of calcium carbonate. Calcium ...

  8. Exogenous Cushing syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cushing syndrome - corticosteroid induced; Corticosteroid-induced Cushing syndrome; Iatrogenic Cushing syndrome ... Cushing syndrome is a disorder that occurs when your body has a higher than normal level of the hormone ...

  9. Turner Syndrome: Other FAQs

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Other FAQs Share Facebook Twitter Pinterest Email Print Turner Syndrome: Other FAQs Basic information for topics, such as " ... been diagnosed with Turner syndrome. Now what? Is Turner syndrome inherited? Turner syndrome is usually not inherited, but ...

  10. Complex variables

    CERN Document Server

    Flanigan, Francis J

    2010-01-01

    A caution to mathematics professors: Complex Variables does not follow conventional outlines of course material. One reviewer noting its originality wrote: ""A standard text is often preferred [to a superior text like this] because the professor knows the order of topics and the problems, and doesn't really have to pay attention to the text. He can go to class without preparation."" Not so here-Dr. Flanigan treats this most important field of contemporary mathematics in a most unusual way. While all the material for an advanced undergraduate or first-year graduate course is covered, discussion

  11. Autosomal dominant syndrome resembling Coffin-Siris syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flynn, Maureen A; Milunsky, Jeff M

    2006-06-15

    Coffin-Siris syndrome is a multiple congenital anomaly/mental retardation syndrome with phenotypic variability [OMIM 135900]. The diagnosis is based solely on clinical findings, as there is currently no molecular, biochemical, or cytogenetic analysis available to confirm a diagnosis. Although typically described as an autosomal recessive disorder, autosomal dominant inheritance has also been infrequently reported. We describe a mother and her two daughters who all have features that resemble Coffin-Siris syndrome. However, this is not a completely convincing diagnosis given that hypertelorism is not a feature of Coffin-Siris syndrome and the family is relatively mildly affected. Yet, this family provides further evidence of an autosomal dominant mode of inheritance for a likely variant of Coffin-Siris syndrome (at least in some families). In addition, Sibling 1 had premature thelarche. She is the second reported individual within the spectrum of Coffin-Siris syndrome to have premature thelarche, indicating that it may be a rare clinical feature. Copyright 2006 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  12. Nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome (Gorlin syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lo Muzio Lorenzo

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome (NBCCS, also known as Gorlin syndrome, is a hereditary condition characterized by a wide range of developmental abnormalities and a predisposition to neoplasms. The estimated prevalence varies from 1/57,000 to 1/256,000, with a male-to-female ratio of 1:1. Main clinical manifestations include multiple basal cell carcinomas (BCCs, odontogenic keratocysts of the jaws, hyperkeratosis of palms and soles, skeletal abnormalities, intracranial ectopic calcifications, and facial dysmorphism (macrocephaly, cleft lip/palate and severe eye anomalies. Intellectual deficit is present in up to 5% of cases. BCCs (varying clinically from flesh-colored papules to ulcerating plaques and in diameter from 1 to 10 mm are most commonly located on the face, back and chest. The number of BBCs varies from a few to several thousand. Recurrent jaw cysts occur in 90% of patients. Skeletal abnormalities (affecting the shape of the ribs, vertebral column bones, and the skull are frequent. Ocular, genitourinary and cardiovascular disorders may occur. About 5–10% of NBCCS patients develop the brain malignancy medulloblastoma, which may be a potential cause of early death. NBCCS is caused by mutations in the PTCH1 gene and is transmitted as an autosomal dominant trait with complete penetrance and variable expressivity. Clinical diagnosis relies on specific criteria. Gene mutation analysis confirms the diagnosis. Genetic counseling is mandatory. Antenatal diagnosis is feasible by means of ultrasound scans and analysis of DNA extracted from fetal cells (obtained by amniocentesis or chorionic villus sampling. Main differential diagnoses include Bazex syndrome, trichoepithelioma papulosum multiplex and Torre's syndrome (Muir-Torre's syndrome. Management requires a multidisciplinary approach. Keratocysts are treated by surgical removal. Surgery for BBCs is indicated when the number of lesions is limited; other treatments include laser

  13. Open angle glaucoma as a manifestation of Waardenburg′s syndrome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gupta Viney

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Waardenburg′s syndrome is a rare, autosomal dominant disorder, with several clinical signs, each with variable penetrance. We report this case of Waardenburg′s syndrome with bilateral open-angle glaucoma with unique gonioscopic findings.

  14. A Feingold syndrome case with previously undescribed features and a new mutation.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kocak, H.; Ozaydin, E.; Kose, G.; Marcelis, C.L.M.; Kamsteeg, E.J.; Ceylaner, S.

    2009-01-01

    Feingold syndrome (FS) is a dominantly inherited combination of microcephaly with or without learning disabilities, hand and foot abnormalities, short palpebral fissures and esophageal/duodenal atresia. The syndrome has autosomal dominant inheritance with full penetrance, and variable expressivity.

  15. Pfeiffer syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fryns Jean-Pierre

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Pfeiffer syndrome is a rare autosomal dominantly inherited disorder that associates craniosynostosis, broad and deviated thumbs and big toes, and partial syndactyly on hands and feet. Hydrocephaly may be found occasionally, along with severe ocular proptosis, ankylosed elbows, abnormal viscera, and slow development. Based on the severity of the phenotype, Pfeiffer syndrome is divided into three clinical subtypes. Type 1 "classic" Pfeiffer syndrome involves individuals with mild manifestations including brachycephaly, midface hypoplasia and finger and toe abnormalities; it is associated with normal intelligence and generally good outcome. Type 2 consists of cloverleaf skull, extreme proptosis, finger and toe abnormalities, elbow ankylosis or synostosis, developmental delay and neurological complications. Type 3 is similar to type 2 but without a cloverleaf skull. Clinical overlap between the three types may occur. Pfeiffer syndrome affects about 1 in 100,000 individuals. The disorder can be caused by mutations in the fibroblast growth factor receptor genes FGFR-1 or FGFR-2. Pfeiffer syndrome can be diagnosed prenatally by sonography showing craniosynostosis, hypertelorism with proptosis, and broad thumb, or molecularly if it concerns a recurrence and the causative mutation was found. Molecular genetic testing is important to confirm the diagnosis. Management includes multiple-staged surgery of craniosynostosis. Midfacial surgery is performed to reduce the exophthalmos and the midfacial hypoplasia.

  16. Nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    NBCC syndrome; Gorlin-Goltz syndrome; Basal cell nevus syndrome; BCNS; Basal cell cancer - nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome ... Nevoid basal cell carcinoma nevus syndrome is a rare genetic ... syndrome is known as PTCH ("patched"). The gene is passed down ...

  17. Ehlers-Danlos syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farhana Tahseen Taj

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (EDS is a generalized disorder of one element of connective tissue manifesting clinically by fragility and hyperelasticity of the skin and joint laxity. It is a hereditary disorder, the inheritance being usually autosomal dominant with low penetrance. Autosomal recessive and X-linked recessive varieties are also known. First described by Hippocrates in 4 th century B.C., the various clinical types with variable penetrance have been described lately. The number of cases EDS reported in the literature is very meagre. With the available information only about six publications of classic EDS in siblings had been reported in Indian literature.

  18. Nutcracker syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jolley, Ingrid

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this case study is to highlight the symptoms of the Nutcracker Syndrome (NCS), the methods of clinical investigations and the importance of differential diagnosis. Introduction: The NCS refers to left renal vein entrapment caused by abnormal branching patterns of the superior mesenteric artery from the aorta. 1,2 Clinical case presentation: A 27 years old female presented to the emergency department with complaints of abdominal discomfort, bloating, loose bowel motions and irregular micro-haematuria. The radiologist's report indicated the findings from computed tomography examination to be consistent with anterior NCS. Discussion: In most of the NCS cases the clinical symptoms are non-specific. 3 The syndrome is caused by a vascular disorder, but its clinical manifestation can relate to a wide range of abdominal, urological, endovascular or gynaecological pathologies. 4 Conclusion: Nutcracker Syndrome is a relatively rare disease and underdiagnosed may lead to left renal vein thrombosis

  19. Compartment syndromes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mubarak, S. J.; Pedowitz, R. A.; Hargens, A. R.

    1989-01-01

    The compartment syndrome is defined as a condition in which high pressure within a closed fascial space (muscle compartment) reduces capillary blood perfusion below the level necessary for tissue viability'. This condition occurs in acute and chronic (exertional) forms, and may be secondary to a variety of causes. The end-result of an extended period of elevated intramuscular pressure may be the development of irreversible tissue injury and Volkmann's contracture. The goal of treatment of the compartment syndrome is the reduction of intracompartmental pressure thus facilitating reperfusion of ischaemic tissue and this goal may be achieved by decompressive fasciotomy. Controversy exists regarding the critical pressure-time thresholds for surgical decompression and the optimal diagnostic methods of measuring intracompartmental pressures. This paper will update and review some current knowledge regarding the pathophysiology, aetiology, diagnosis, and treatment of the acute compartment syndrome.

  20. Usher Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Fakin

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Usher syndrome is an autosomal recessive disease with prevalence of 3–6/100.000 and is the most common syndrome that affects vision and hearing. Three subtypes are distinguished on the basis of different degree of hearing loss. All patients develop retinitis pigmentosa with night vision difficulties and constriction of visual field, and ultimately a decline in visual acuity and color vision. Future holds promise for gene therapy. We present a patient with typical clinical picture of Usher syndrome, who started noticing night vision problems at age 13. At age 25 he was operated on for posterior cortical cataracts. At age 34 he has only 5–10° of visual field remaining with 1.0 visual acuity in both eyes. Fundus autofluorescence imaging revealed a typical hyperautofluorescent ring on the border between normal and affected retina.

  1. Metabolic Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sevil Ikinci

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Metabolic Syndrome is a combination of risk factors including common etiopathogenesis. These risk factors play different roles in occurence of atherosclerotic diseases, type 2 diabetes, and cancers. Although a compromise can not be achieved on differential diagnosis for MS, the existence of any three criterias enable to diagnose MS. These are abdominal obesity, dislipidemia (hypertrigliceridemia, hypercholesterolemia, and reduced high density lipoprotein hypertension, and elevated fasting blood glucose. According to the results of Metabolic Syndrome Research (METSAR, the overall prevalence of MS in Turkey is 34%; in females 40%, and in males it is 28%. As a result of “Western” diet, and increased frequency of obesity, MS is observed in children and in adolescents both in the world and in Turkey. Resulting in chronic diseases, it is thought that the syndrome can be prevented by healthy lifestyle behaviours. [TAF Prev Med Bull 2010; 9(5.000: 535-540

  2. Eagle's Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinheiro, Thaís Gonçalves; Soares, Vítor Yamashiro Rocha; Ferreira, Denise Bastos Lage; Raymundo, Igor Teixeira; Nascimento, Luiz Augusto; Oliveira, Carlos Augusto Costa Pires de

    2013-01-01

    Summary Introduction: Eagle's syndrome is characterized by cervicopharyngeal signs and symptoms associated with elongation of the styloid apophysis. This elongation may occur through ossification of the stylohyoid ligament, or through growth of the apophysis due to osteogenesis triggered by a factor such as trauma. Elongation of the styloid apophysis may give rise to intense facial pain, headache, dysphagia, otalgia, buzzing sensations, and trismus. Precise diagnosis of the syndrome is difficult, and it is generally confounded by other manifestations of cervicopharyngeal pain. Objective: To describe a case of Eagle's syndrome. Case Report: A 53-year-old man reported lateral pain in his neck that had been present for 30 years. Computed tomography (CT) of the neck showed elongation and ossification of the styloid processes of the temporal bone, which was compatible with Eagle's syndrome. Surgery was performed for bilateral resection of the stylohyoid ligament by using a transoral and endoscopic access route. The patient continued to present pain laterally in the neck, predominantly on his left side. CT was performed again, which showed elongation of the styloid processes. The patient then underwent lateral cervicotomy with resection of the stylohyoid process, which partially resolved his painful condition. Final Comments: Patients with Eagle's syndrome generally have a history of chronic pain. Appropriate knowledge of this disease is necessary for adequate treatment to be provided. The importance of diagnosing this uncommon and often unsuspected disease should be emphasized, given that correct clinical-surgical treatment is frequently delayed. The diagnosis of Eagle's syndrome is clinical and radiographic, and the definitive treatment in cases of difficult-to-control pain is surgical. PMID:25992033

  3. Eagle's Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pinheiro, Thaís Gonçalves

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Eagle's syndrome is characterized by cervicopharyngeal signs and symptoms associated with elongation of the styloid apophysis. This elongation may occur through ossification of the stylohyoid ligament, or through growth of the apophysis due to osteogenesis triggered by a factor such as trauma. Elongation of the styloid apophysis may give rise to intense facial pain, headache, dysphagia, otalgia, buzzing sensations, and trismus. Precise diagnosis of the syndrome is difficult, and it is generally confounded by other manifestations of cervicopharyngeal pain. Objective: To describe a case of Eagle's syndrome. Case Report: A 53-year-old man reported lateral pain in his neck that had been present for 30 years. Computed tomography (CT of the neck showed elongation and ossification of the styloid processes of the temporal bone, which was compatible with Eagle's syndrome. Surgery was performed for bilateral resection of the stylohyoid ligament by using a transoral and endoscopic access route. The patient continued to present pain laterally in the neck, predominantly on his left side. CT was performed again, which showed elongation of the styloid processes. The patient then underwent lateral cervicotomy with resection of the stylohyoid process, which partially resolved his painful condition. Final Comments: Patients with Eagle's syndrome generally have a history of chronic pain. Appropriate knowledge of this disease is necessary for adequate treatment to be provided. The importance of diagnosing this uncommon and often unsuspected disease should be emphasized, given that correct clinical-surgical treatment is frequently delayed. The diagnosis of Eagle's syndrome is clinical and radiographic, and the definitive treatment in cases of difficult-to-control pain is surgical.

  4. Rapunzel syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Wadan, Ali H.; Al-Saai, Azan S.; Abdoulgafour, Mohamed; Al-Absi, Mohamed

    2006-01-01

    An 18-year-old single female patient, presented with non specific gastrointestinal symptoms of anorexia, abdominal pain, and change in bowel habit. Clinically she was anemic, cachectic, and depressed. Abdominal examination revealed mobile epigastric mass. The scalp alopecia and endoscopy coupled by computed tomography scan, confirmed the diagnoses of trichobezoar, but it was not diagnosed as Rapunzel syndrome except after laparotomy, gastrotomy, and enterotomy. There are less than 16 cases of Rapunzel syndrome described worldwide, and this is the first case to be described in the middle east. (author)

  5. Olmsted syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kumar Pramod

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Olmsted syndrome is a rare disorder characterized by the combination of periorificial, keratotic plaques and bilateral palmoplantar keratoderma. New associated features are being reported. Olmsted syndrome is particularly rare in a female patient, and we report such a case in a six year-old Indian girl, who presented with keratoderma of her soles since birth and on her palms since the age of two years along with perioral and perinasal hyperkeratosis. She had sparse, light brown, thin hair. Although the psychomotor development of the child was normal until 18 months of age, the keratoderma plaques had restricted the child′s mobility after that stage.

  6. Eagle syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raina, Deepika; Gothi, Rajesh; Rajan, Sriram

    2009-01-01

    Eagle syndrome occurs due to elongation of the styloid process or calcification of the stylohyoid ligament, which then may produce a pain sensation due the pressure exerted on various structures in the head and neck. When suspected, imaging helps in identifying the abnormally elongated styloid process or the calcified ligament. In recent years, three-dimensional CT (3DCT) has proved to be valuable in these cases. We report the case of a 62-year-old man with this syndrome in whom imaging with 3DCT conclusively established the diagnosis

  7. Turner Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramachandran Sudarshan

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Turner syndrome is a genetic disorder that affects mostly females. Affected females have characteristic features such as short stature, premature ovarian failure, and several other features. Oral manifestations of this condition are not much discussed in the literature. But reported literature includes teeth, palate, periodontal and salivary changes. So the aim of this review is to illustrate the general manifestations, and especially the oral manifestations of Turner syndrome and evaluate their possible management. [Archives Medical Review Journal 2012; 21(4.000: 246-252

  8. Fenton's syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rimondi, E.; Albasini, V.

    1989-01-01

    The authors report two recent cases of Fenton's syndrome, a very rare carpal fracture-dislocation. After some anatomophysiopathological considerations and a review of the literature, a wider nosographic frame is proposed in which the entity of the dislocation of the head of capitate bone is not essential. According to both the literature and personal findings, the authors remark that this syndrome is always found in the presence of two morphological variants of the distal radioulnar joint. Finally, the authors stress the importance of a corect diagnosis of this lesion to avoid unnecessary attempts of reduction

  9. Reiter's Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savant, S S; Fernandez, J C; Dhurandhar, M W; Fernandez, R J

    1979-01-01

    A case of Reiter's syndrome occurring in a young mate aged 20 years having extensive skin lesions of keratoderina blenoffhagica is presented along with a review of literature. Although urethritis was absent, other clinical and histopathological features of the cutaneous lesions led us to the diagnosis. The-possible relationship of postural psoriasis to Reiter's syndrome is discussed. Failure of the patient to respond satisfactorily to steroids, antibiotics etc, prompted the use of rnethotrexate in the case. The result was dramatic, as the patient completely recovered within ten days of starting treatment.

  10. Larsen syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammed Mahbubul Islam

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Larsen syndrome is a rare inherited disorder characterized by congenital dislocation of multiple joints along with other anomalies of heart, face, hands and bones. Larsen syndrome was first described in 1950 by Larsen, Schottstaedt and Bost. In the present report, we describe a 10 year old girl who presented with mid facial hypoplasia with depressed nasal bridge, high arched palate, bilateral talipes equinovarus and high arched feet. On examination, she had short stature (HAZ -3.5 SD with hyperextension of knee joint, fixed flexion of elbow joint. Awareness of this condition and associated complications may help in management and follow up of these patients. 

  11. Joubert syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Villanua, J.A.; Lopez, J.M.; Recondo, J.A.; Garcia, J.M.; Gaztanaga, R.

    1998-01-01

    Joubert syndrome is a rare malformation of the posterior fossa, mainly affecting the cerebellar vermis, which generally appears as a dysplastic lesion. Other structures of the cervico medullary junction may be involved, with accompanying brainstem hypoplasia according to neuroimaging studies. The diagnosis is usually reached during, childhood, based on a constellation of changes in the child's neurological development that are supported by the results of imaging studied. Respiratory problems are the most common signs in newborns,leading to the suspicion of the presence of this syndrome. (Author) 11 refs

  12. Lemierre's syndrome.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Dwyer, D N

    2012-02-01

    Lemierre\\'s syndrome is a rare disease that results in an oropharyngeal infection, which precipitates an internal jugular vein thrombosis and metastatic infection. Fusobacterium necrophorum is an anaerobic Gram-negative bacillus and has been identified as the causative agent. We describe the case of a young girl whose presentation and diagnosis were confounded by a history of valvular heart disease. Infection of heart valves can produce many of the signs and symptoms associated with Lemierre\\'s syndrome. We describe the diagnosis, investigation and optimal management of this rare disorder.

  13. Meigs' Syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baloch, S.; Khaskheli, M.; Farooq, S.

    2006-01-01

    Meigs' syndrome is a rare clinical condition commonly considered to be associated with malignant ovarian tumour. A case of unmarried female is presented who came with a slowly increasing abdominal mass. Clinical and ultrasonic investigations revealed a mobile, solid right adenexal tumour in the lower abdomen, along with ascites and pleural effusion of the right lung. The level of CA 125 was also raised. Diagnosis of Meigs' syndrome was confirmed after surgical intervention. The tumour was successfully removed and pleural effusion disappeared 15 days after the intervention. Cytomorphologic study of both the tumour and ascitic fluid was negative for malignancy. (author)

  14. [Elsberg syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielsen, Kristine Esbjerg; Knudsen, Troels Bygum

    2013-12-16

    A syndrome involving acute urinary retention in combination with sacral radiculitis and cerebrospinal fluid pleocytosis was first described by the American neurosurgeon Charles Elsberg in 1931. In many instances the aetiology is herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2) reactivation from sensory neurons. In this case report we present a 34-year-old pregnant woman with previous undiagnosed sensory lumbosacral symptoms. She was hospitalized with HSV-2 meningitis and lumbosacral radiculitis but no genital rash. A week after the onset of symptoms she developed acute urinary retention, thus indicating Elsberg syndrome.

  15. Variabilidade fenotípica na síndrome do cromossomo supernumerário der(22t(11;22 (síndrome de Emanuel Phenotypical variability in supernumerary chromosome der(22t(11;22 syndrome (Emanuel syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafael Fabiano M. Rosa

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Relatar dois pacientes com a síndrome de Emanuel (SE ou cromossomo supernumerário der(22t(11;22, secundária a translocações balanceadas familiares, apresentando fenótipos distintos. DESCRIÇÃO DE CASO: O primeiro paciente é uma menina branca de cinco anos de idade, apresentando hipotonia, atraso no desenvolvimento neuropsicomotor, movimentos estereotipados, microcefalia, ptose palpebral, orelhas proeminentes, fossetas e apêndices pré-auriculares, e imperfuração anal. As avaliações adicionais identificaram hipoplasia cerebral e estenose da válvula pulmonar. Possuía história também de laringotraqueomalácia e fenda palatina. O segundo paciente é um menino branco de seis meses de idade com hipotonia, movimentos coreoatetóticos, déficit de crescimento, microcefalia, microssomia hemifacial, fenda palatina, microtia, apêndices pré-auriculares e polegares proximalmente implantados. A ecocardiografia demonstrou estenose da válvula pulmonar, comunicação interatrial e interventricular, persistência do canal arterial e da veia cava superior esquerda. A radiografia de tórax identificou uma costela cervical. O cariótipo por bandas GTG mostrou a presença, em ambos os pacientes, de um cromossomo adicional der(22t(11;22, secundário a uma translocação balanceada materna no primeiro caso e paterna no segundo caso. COMENTÁRIOS: Apesar de a primeira paciente apresentar achados frequentes da SE, o caso adicional representa a segunda descrição da literatura com um fenótipo de espectro óculo-aurículo-vertebral (EOAV. Assim, ambos salientam a variabilidade clínica observada na SE e a importância da avaliação cariotípica em indivíduos com fenótipo de EOAV.OBEJECTIVE: To report two patients with Emanuel syndrome (ES or supernumerary chromosome der(22t(11;22, secondary to familial balanced translocations, presenting distinct phenotypes. CASES DESCRIPTION: The first patient was a five-year-old white girl presenting

  16. Comparison of metabolic syndrome with growing epidemic syndrome Z in terms of risk factors and gender differences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uyar, Meral; Davutoğlu, Vedat; Aydın, Neriman; Filiz, Ayten

    2013-05-01

    The aim of this study is to compare metabolic syndrome with syndrome Z growing epidemic in terms of risk factors, demographic variables, and gender differences in our large cohort at southeastern area in Turkey. Data of patients admitted to sleep clinic in University of Gaziantep from January 2006 to January 2011 were retrospectively evaluated. ATP III and JNC 7 were used for defining metabolic syndrome and hypertension. Data of 761 patients were evaluated. Hypertension, diabetes mellitus, coronary artery disease, pulmonary hypertension, and left ventricular hypertrophy were more common in patients with syndrome Z than in patients without metabolic syndrome. Age, waist/neck circumferences, BMI, triglyceride, glucose, and Epworth sleepiness scale score were detected higher, whereas the minimum oxygen saturation during sleep was lower in patients with syndrome Z. Metabolic syndrome was more common in sleep apneic subjects than in controls (58 versus 30 %). Female sleep apneics showed higher rate of metabolic syndrome than those of males (74 versus 52 %). Hypertension, diabetes mellitus, coronary artery disease, and left ventricular hypertrophy were detected higher in males with syndrome Z than in males without metabolic syndrome. Snoring and excessive daytime sleepiness were detected higher in females with syndrome Z than in females without metabolic syndrome. Systemic/pulmonary hypertension, diabetes mellitus, and left ventricular hypertrophy were more common in females with syndrome Z than in females without metabolic syndrome. Complaints of headache and systemic/pulmonary hypertension were more common among females than males with syndrome Z. Female syndrome Z patients had lower minimum oxygen saturation than male patients with syndrome Z. Metabolic syndrome in sleep apneic patients is more prevalent than in controls. All metabolic syndrome parameters were significantly different among obstructive sleep apneic patients with respect to gender with more severe

  17. Marfan syndrome masked by Down syndrome?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vis, J.C.; Engelen, K. van; Timmermans, J.; Hamel, B.C.J.; Mulder, B.J.

    2009-01-01

    Down syndrome is the most common chromosomal abnormality. A simultaneous occurrence with Marfan syndrome is extremely rare. We present a case of a 28-year-old female with Down syndrome and a mutation in the fibrillin-1 gene. The patient showed strikingly few manifestations of Marfan syndrome.

  18. Lemierre's syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johannesen, Katrine M; Bodtger, Uffe

    2016-01-01

    This is a systematic review of cases with Lemierre's syndrome (LS) in the past 5 years. LS is characterized by sepsis often evolving after a sore throat or tonsillitis and then complicated by various septic emboli and thrombosis of the internal jugular vein. Symptoms include sepsis, pain, and/or ...... LS in this day and age appears to be low, however the syndrome is difficult to recognize, and still requires the full attention of the clinician.......This is a systematic review of cases with Lemierre's syndrome (LS) in the past 5 years. LS is characterized by sepsis often evolving after a sore throat or tonsillitis and then complicated by various septic emboli and thrombosis of the internal jugular vein. Symptoms include sepsis, pain, and....../or swelling in the throat or neck, as well as respiratory symptoms. Laboratory findings show elevated infectious parameters and radiological findings show thrombosis of the internal jugular vein and emboli in the lungs or other organs. The syndrome is often associated with an infection with Fusobacterium...

  19. Sjogren syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brito-Zeron, Pilar; Baldini, Chiara; Bootsma, Hendrika; Bowman, Simon J.; Jonsson, Roland; Mariette, Xavier; Sivils, Kathy; Theander, Elke; Tzioufas, Athanasios; Ramos-Casals, Manuel

    2016-01-01

    Sjogren syndrome (SjS) is a systemic autoimmune disease that primarily affects the exocrine glands (mainly the salivary and lacrimal glands) and results in the severe dryness of mucosal surfaces, principally in the mouth and eyes. This disease predominantly affects middle-aged women, but can also be

  20. Rett Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... loss of interest in normal play Delayed speech development or loss of previously acquired speech abilities Problem behavior or marked mood swings Any clear loss of previously gained milestones in gross motor or fine motor skills Causes Rett syndrome is a rare genetic disorder. ...

  1. Nodding Syndrome

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2013-12-19

    Dr. Scott Dowell, a CDC director, discusses the rare illness, nodding syndrome, in children in Africa.  Created: 12/19/2013 by National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases (NCEZID).   Date Released: 1/27/2014.

  2. Piriformis Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... can usually resume their normal activities. In some cases, exercise regimens may need to be modified in order to reduce the likelihood of recurrence or worsening. Clinical Trials Throughout the U.S. ... Definition Piriformis syndrome is a rare neuromuscular disorder that ...

  3. Hellp syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chaudhry, A.A.

    2002-01-01

    A 24 years old female presented with hypertension, haemolysis, elevated liver enzymes and thrombocytopenia in an unconscious state after undergoing an emergency caesarian section. A diagnosis of HELLP syndrome was made on the above findings. Patient made an uneventful recovery with conservative management. A brief review of the literature is included along with the case report. (author)

  4. Kartagener's Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhar, D K; Ganguly, K C; Alam, S; Hossain, A; Sarker, U K; Das, B K; Haque, M J

    2009-01-01

    Kartagener's Syndrome or Immotile Cilia Syndrome, a variant of Primary Ciliary Dyskinesia (PCD), is a rare autosomal recessive genetic disorder caused by defect in the tiny hair like structure, the cilia lining the respiratory tract (upper and lower), sinuses, eustachian tubes, middle ear and fallopian tubes. Here electron microscopy shows abnormal arrangement of ciliary tubules and patients with Kartagener's syndrome has an absence of dynein arms at the base of the cilia. The inability of cilia to move results in inadequate clearance of bacteria from the air passages, resulting in an increased risk of infection and causing bronchiectasis. Another result of ciliary immobility is infertility. A 60 years old lady was diagnosed as a case of Kartagener's syndrome. She had history of chronic cough for 20 years, irregular fever for 20 years and occasional shortness of breath for 5 years. Relevant investigations revealed dextrocardia, situs inversus, bilateral maxillary sinusitis with non pneumatised frontal sinus and bronchiectasis. She was treated with low concentration oxygen inhalation, antibiotic, bronchodilator, chest physiotherapy including postural drainage, vitamins and other supportive treatment.

  5. Carraro syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wendler, H.; Schwarz, R.

    1980-07-01

    The report concerns a girl aged 9 1/2 years who was deaf and dumb and had marked shortening of the calves with deformities of the feet and bilateral, congenital hypoplasia of the tibiae. This syndrome was first described by Carraro in 1931, but there have been no further reports since then.

  6. Rett Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Culbert, Linda A.

    This pamphlet reviews the historical process involved in initially recognizing Rett Syndrome as a specific disorder in girls. Its etiology is unknown, but studies have considered factors as hyperammonemia, a two-step mutation, a fragile X chromosome, metabolic disorder, environmental causation, dopamine deficiency, and an inactive X chromosome.…

  7. Alagille Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 3] Kamath BM, Loomes KM, Piccoli DA. Medical management of Alagille syndrome. Journal of Pediatric Gastroenterology and Nutrition. 2010;50(6): ... 30 a.m. to 5 p.m. eastern time, M-F Follow Us NIH… Turning Discovery Into ... Disease Urologic Diseases Endocrine Diseases Diet & Nutrition ...

  8. Kounis syndrome

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    neoplastic agents), exposure to radiological contrast media, poison ivy, bee stings, shellfish and coronary stents. In addition to coronary arterial involvement, Kounis syndrome com prises other arterial systems with similar physiologies, such as mesenteric and cerebral circulation resulting in ischaemia/infarction of the vital ...

  9. Crest syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koch, B.; Roedl, W.

    1988-01-01

    If a patient has peri- and intra-articular calcinosis, as well as acro-osteolysis and esophageal hypomotility, and rheumatic symptoms, Crest syndrome should be considered as a manifestation of progressive systemic sclerosis. In connection with relevant symptoms on the skin and visceral involvement, radiological studies offer the possibility of classifying progressive systemic sclerosis more accurately. (orig.) [de

  10. Gitelman syndrome.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Knoers, N.V.A.M.; Levtchenko, E.N.

    2008-01-01

    Gitelman syndrome (GS), also referred to as familial hypokalemia-hypomagnesemia, is characterized by hypokalemic metabolic alkalosis in combination with significant hypomagnesemia and low urinary calcium excretion. The prevalence is estimated at approximately 1:40,000 and accordingly, the prevalence

  11. Marfan Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... can treat many of its symptoms. Thanks to new research and treatments, people with Marfan syndrome who are diagnosed early ... This helps doctors stay on top of any new problems. Doctors might also ... or kids with amblyopia or strabismus will probably need to wear glasses. ...

  12. Kartagener's Syndrome

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    GB

    presenting with recurrent upper and lower respiratory tract infections, sinusitis or bronchiectasis. Inability to diagnose this condition may subject the patient to unnecessary and repeated hospital admissions, investigations and treatment failure. KEY WORDS: Kartagener's syndrome, primary cilliary dyskinesia, situs inversus, ...

  13. Gorlin–Goltz syndrome: An often missed diagnosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Ninan; Vinod, Sankar V.; George, Arun; Varghese, Aabu

    2016-01-01

    Gorlin-Goltz syndrome due to its high variability in expression are often not diagnosed as the syndrome and often managed same as that of odontogenic keratocyst. But a more careful approach for the syndrome is needed as there is high chance of malignant changes owing to improper management of the syndrome. In this manuscript a case report of Gorlin-Goltz syndrome with the diagnostic features of the same in Indian population along with the difference in treatment protocol from treating an odontogenic keratocyst is described with review of literature PMID:27563620

  14. Gorlin-Goltz syndrome: An often missed diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Ninan; Vinod, Sankar V; George, Arun; Varghese, Aabu

    2016-01-01

    Gorlin-Goltz syndrome due to its high variability in expression are often not diagnosed as the syndrome and often managed same as that of odontogenic keratocyst. But a more careful approach for the syndrome is needed as there is high chance of malignant changes owing to improper management of the syndrome. In this manuscript a case report of Gorlin-Goltz syndrome with the diagnostic features of the same in Indian population along with the difference in treatment protocol from treating an odontogenic keratocyst is described with review of literature.

  15. Variable collimator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Richey, J.B.; McBride, T.R.; Covic, J.

    1979-01-01

    This invention describes an automatic variable collimator which controls the width and thickness of X-ray beams in X-ray diagnostic medical equipment, and which is particularly adapted for use with computerized axial tomographic scanners. A two-part collimator is provided which shapes an X-ray beam both prior to its entering an object subject to radiographic analysis and after the attenuated beam has passed through the object. Interposed between a source of radiation and the object subject to radiographic analysis is a first or source collimator. The source collimator causes the X-ray beam emitted by the source of radiation to be split into a plurality of generally rectangular shaped beams. Disposed within the source collimator is a movable aperture plate which may be used to selectively vary the thickness of the plurality of generally rectangular shaped beams transmitted through the source collimator. A second or receiver collimator is interposed between the object subject to radiographic analysis and a series of radiation detectors. The receiver collimator is disposed to receive the attenuated X-ray beams passing through the object subject to radiographic analysis. Located within the receiver collimator are a plurality of movable aperture plates adapted to be displaced relative to a plurality of fixed aperture plates for the purpose of varying the width and thickness of the attenuated X-ray beams transmitted through the object subject to radiographic analysis. The movable aperture plates of the source and receiver collimators are automatically controlled by circuitry which is provided to allow remote operation of the movable aperture plates

  16. [Asthma-COPD overlap syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odler, Balázs; Müller, Veronika

    2016-08-01

    Obstructive lung diseases represent a major health problem worldwide due to their high prevalence associated with elevated socioeconomic costs. Bronchial asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease are chronic obstructive ventilatory disorders with airway inflammation, however they are separate nosological entities based on thedifferent development, diagnostic and therapeutic approaches, and prognostic features. However, these diseases may coexist and can be defined as the coexistence of increased variability of airflow in a patient with incompletely reversible airway obstruction. This phenotype is called asthma - chronic obstructive pulmonary disease overlap syndrome. The syndrome is a clinical and scientific challenge as the majority of these patients have been excluded from the clinical and pharmacological trials, thus well-defined clinical characteristics and therapeutic approaches are lacking. The aim of this review is to summarize the currently available literature focusing on pathophysiological and clinical features, and discuss possible therapeutic approaches of patients with asthma - chronic obstructive pulmonary disease overlap syndrome. Orv. Hetil., 2016, 157(33), 1304-1313.

  17. Cardiovascular risk in Turner syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donato, Beatriz; Ferreira, Maria João

    2018-06-01

    Turner syndrome is a relatively common genetic disorder of female development, characterized by partial or complete absence of an X chromosome, with a variable clinical presentation. Congenital or acquired cardiovascular disease is highly prevalent and a major cause of early death in this syndrome. The most feared complication is aortic dissection, which can occur at a very young age and requires careful assessment of its risk factors. A systematic literature search identified sixty relevant publications. These were reviewed with regard to the increased risk of cardiovascular disease in women with Turner syndrome, especially in pregnancy. The most common congenital cardiovascular defects are presented and illustrated with appropriate iconography. The current recommendations regarding the screening and monitoring of cardiovascular disease in these patients are discussed. Copyright © 2018 Sociedade Portuguesa de Cardiologia. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  18. Ellis-van Creveld Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K Rajendra

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Ellis-van Creveld syndrome also known as chondroectodermal dysplasia is a rare genetic disorder of the skeletal dysplasia type, first described by Richard WS Ellis and Simon van Creveld in 1940. The syndrome manifests with several skeletal anomalies, oral mucosal and dental anomalies, congenital cardiac defects, nail dysplasia and polydactyly of one or both limbs. It is caused by mutation of EVC1 and EVC2 genes located in a head-to-head configuration on chromosome 4p16, which has been identified as the causative. The EVC phenotype is variable and affects multiple organs. The presence of oral mucosal and dental alterations, like the presence of numerous frenulum, oligodontia, bellshaped anterior teeth, hypoplastic erupted teeth with high-caries index, will confirm the diagnosis of Ellis-van Creveld syndrome and hence its importance to dentists.

  19. Clinicopathological comparison of colorectal and endometrial carcinomas in patients with Lynch-like syndrome versus patients with Lynch syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mas-Moya, Jenny; Dudley, Beth; Brand, Randall E; Thull, Darcy; Bahary, Nathan; Nikiforova, Marina N; Pai, Reetesh K

    2015-11-01

    Screening for DNA mismatch repair (MMR) deficiency in colorectal and endometrial carcinomas identifies patients at risk for Lynch syndrome. Some patients with MMR-deficient tumors have no evidence of a germline mutation and have been described as having Lynch-like syndrome. We compared the clinicopathological features of colorectal and endometrial carcinomas in patients with Lynch-like syndrome and Lynch syndrome. Universal screening identified 356 (10.6%) of 3352 patients with colorectal carcinoma and 72 (33%) of 215 patients with endometrial carcinoma with deficient DNA MMR. Sixty-six patients underwent germline mutation analysis with 45 patients (68%) having evidence of a germline MMR gene mutation confirming Lynch syndrome and 21 patients (32%) having Lynch-like syndrome with no evidence of a germline mutation. Most patients with Lynch-like syndrome had carcinoma involving the right colon compared to patients with Lynch syndrome (93% versus 45%; P Lynch syndrome confirmed by germline mutation analysis. Synchronous or metachronous Lynch syndrome-associated carcinoma was more frequently identified in patients with Lynch syndrome compared to Lynch-like syndrome (38% versus 7%; P = .04). There were no significant differences in clinicopathological variables between patients with Lynch-like syndrome and Lynch syndrome with endometrial carcinoma. In summary, 32% of patients with MMR deficiency concerning Lynch syndrome will have Lynch-like syndrome. Our results demonstrate that patients with Lynch-like syndrome are more likely to have right-sided colorectal carcinoma, less likely to have synchronous or metachronous Lynch syndrome-associated carcinoma, and less likely to demonstrate isolated loss of MSH6 expression within their tumor. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Genetic mutations in Gorlin-Goltz syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Daneswari, Muthumula; Reddy, Mutjumula Swamy Ranga

    2013-01-01

    Gorlin-Goltz syndrome is a rare multisystemic disease inherited in a dominant autosomal at a high level of penetrance and variable expressiveness. It is mainly characterized by basal cell carcinoma, odontogenic keratocyst and skeletal anomalies. Diagnosis is based upon established major and minor clinical and radiographic criteria and gene mutation analysis. This article presents a case of Gorlin-Goltz syndrome, its genetic predisposition, diagnosis and management.

  1. Genetic mutations in Gorlin-Goltz syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daneswari, Muthumula; Reddy, Mutjumula Swamy Ranga

    2013-07-01

    Gorlin-Goltz syndrome is a rare multisystemic disease inherited in a dominant autosomal at a high level of penetrance and variable expressiveness. It is mainly characterized by basal cell carcinoma, odontogenic keratocyst and skeletal anomalies. Diagnosis is based upon established major and minor clinical and radiographic criteria and gene mutation analysis. This article presents a case of Gorlin-Goltz syndrome, its genetic predisposition, diagnosis and management.

  2. Hepatorenal Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ebru Yilmaz

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Hepatorenal syndrome (HRS is functional renal failure that occurs with advanced liver failure. HRS is considered the most severe complication of cirrhosis. Type 1 HRS develops due to severe reduction of effective circulating volume results in hemodynamic dysfunction. Type 1 HRS is characterized by acute renal failure and rapid deterioration in the function of other organs. It can ocur spontaneously or in the setting of a precipitating event. Type 2 hepatorenal syndrome (HRS, which is characterized by slowly progressive renal failure and refractory ascites. Liver transplantation is the only definitive treatment for both type. The most suitable and ldquo;bridge treatments and rdquo; or treatment for patients ineligible for a liver transplant include terlipressin plus albumin. [J Contemp Med 2014; 4(2.000: 106-113

  3. Dravet syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Incorpora Gemma

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract "Dravet syndrome" (DS previously named severe myoclonic epilepsy of infancy (SMEI, or epilepsy with polymorphic seizures, is a rare disorder characterized by an early, severe, generalized, epileptic encephalopathy. DS is characterized by febrile and afebrile seizures beginning in the 1st year of life followed by different types of seizures (either focal or generalized, which are typically resistant to antiepileptic drugs. A developmental delay from the 2nd to 3rd year of life becomes evident, together with motor disturbances and personality disorders. Beside the classic syndrome, there are milder cases which have been called severe myoclonic epilepsy borderline (SMEB. DS is caused by a mutation in the neuronal sodium channel gene, SCN1A , that is also mutated in generalized epilepsy with FS+ (GEFS+.

  4. Apert syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Premalatha

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Apert syndrome (acrocephalosyndactyly is a rare developmental malformation characterized by craniosynostosis, mid-face hypoplasia, symmetrical syndactyly of hands and feet. The prodromal characteristics for the typical cranio-facial appearance are early craniosynostosis of the coronal suture, cranial base and agenesis of the sagittal suture. The purpose of this paper is to report a case of Apert syndrome with emphasis on craniofacial and oral features in an eighteen-month-old male child. The patient presented with several craniofacial deformities, including brachycephaly, midface hypoplasia, flat face, hypertelorism, ocular proptosis, downslanting palpebral fissures. Syndactylies with osseous fusion of the hands and feet were also observed. Intraoral findings included delayed eruption of teeth, high arched palate with pseudo cleft in the posterior one third.

  5. Paraneoplastic syndromes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weller, R.E.

    1994-03-01

    Paraneoplastic syndromes (PNS) comprise a diverse group of disorders that are associated with cancer but unrelated to the size, location, metastases, or physiologic activities of the mature tissue of origin. They are remote effects of tumors that may appear as signs, symptoms, or syndromes which can mimic other disease conditions encountered in veterinary medicine. Recognition of PNS is valuable for several reasons: the observed abnormalities may represent tumor cell markers and facilitate early diagnosis of the tumor; they may allow assessment of premalignant states; they may aid in the search metastases; they may help quantify and monitor response to therapy; and, they may provide insight into the study of malignant transformation and oncogene expression. This review will concentrate on the pathophysiology, diagnosis, and treatment of some of the common PNS encountered in veterinary medicine.

  6. Paraneoplastiske syndromer

    OpenAIRE

    Røsbekk, Stein Helge

    2007-01-01

    During the last 50 years it has become clear that malignant tumours can induce symptoms unrelated to the mechanical effects of the primary tumour itself or its metastasis. Today, the name Paraneoplastic syndrome is given to those symptom complexes that may affect the blood cells, electrolytes, coagulation system, muscle, skin, nerve and the endocrine system. Endocrine symptoms were first recognised, and different hormones were isolated from the tumour tissue. However, tumour derived hormones ...

  7. Caroli's syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Numan, F; Cokyueksel, O; Camuscu, S; Demir, K; Dueren, M

    1986-07-01

    In 1958 Caroli described the syndrome of congenital, either segmental or involving the entire bile duct system, saccular extensions of the intrahepatic bile ducts. He differentiated between two types of this disease pattern. The first form concerns pure cystic dilatations of the intrahepatic bile ducts, whereas the second one is combined with hepatic fibrosis and portal hypertension. Both types are characterised by cystic dilatations in the kidneys and in the extrahepatic bile ducts, pancreas and spleen.

  8. Waardenburg syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Mehta, Manish; Kavadu, Paresh; Chougule, Sachin

    2004-01-01

    We report a case of Waardenburg syndrome in a female child aged 2yrs. Petrus Johannes Waardenburg(1) , a Dutch Ophthalmologist in 1951 described individuals with retinal pigmentary differences who had varying degrees of hearing loss and dystopia canthorum (i.e., latral displacement of inner canthi of eyes). The disease runs in families with a dominant inheritance pattern with varying degree of clinical presentation. Patient usually present with heterochromic iris, pigmentary abnormalities of ...

  9. [PHACES syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morcillo Azcárate, J; Bernabeu-Wittel, J; Fernández-Pineda, I; Conejo-Mir, M D; Tuduri Limousin, I; Aspiazu Salinas, D A; de Agustín Asensio, J C

    2010-04-01

    PHACES syndrome associates a segmental facial hemangioma with cerebral malformations, aortic branches/cranial arteries anomalies, cardiac defects, eye anomalies or ventral wall defects. The aim of this study is to analyze our experience with this syndrome. Retrospective study of the cases seen at our unit in the last year. We treat 4 cases; 3 girls and 1 child. Besides the segmental hemangioma they presented: 3 vascular cerebral malformations; 2 structural cardiopathies; 2 cerebral malformations, 1 microftalmia. We did not find ventral wall defects. A case received treatment with two cycles of metilprednisolone i.v. and oral prednisone, with favourable course; two cases received initial treatment with oral prednisone continued of oral propanolol in rising pattern up to 2 mg/kg/day, Obtaining both the detention of the tumour growth and regression of the lesion, with very good tolerance. A 7-year-old patient has been treated with colouring pulse laser for her residual lesions. When we see a segmental facial hemangioma we must perform a wide diagnostic study in order to discard a PHACES syndrome. Multidisciplinar approach to the patient by a wide expert's group gets an earlier diagnose and improves the outcome. Propranolol is a promising therapeutic alternative.

  10. Neonatal respiratory distress syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyaline membrane disease (HMD); Infant respiratory distress syndrome; Respiratory distress syndrome in infants; RDS - infants ... improves slowly after that. Some infants with severe respiratory distress syndrome will die. This most often occurs ...

  11. Toxic shock syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staphylococcal toxic shock syndrome; Toxic shock-like syndrome; TSLS ... Toxic shock syndrome is caused by a toxin produced by some types of staphylococcus bacteria. A similar problem, called toxic shock- ...

  12. Prune belly syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eagle-Barrett syndrome; Triad syndrome ... The exact causes of prune belly syndrome are unknown. The condition affects mostly boys. While in the womb, the developing baby's abdomen swells with fluid. Often, the cause is ...

  13. What Causes Cushing's Syndrome?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Share Facebook Twitter Pinterest Email Print What causes Cushing syndrome? Cushing syndrome can develop for two reasons: Medication ... uhs ), thyroid, or thymus How Tumors Can Cause Cushing Syndrome Normally, the pituitary gland in the brain controls ...

  14. Does wastewater discharge have relations with increase of Turner syndrome and Down syndrome?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Intae Choi

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study is to examine whether water and air pollutants have a relationship with an increase in the genetic disorders Turner syndrome and Down syndrome, which are caused by congenital chromosomal abnormalities, and to generate a hypothesis about the genetic health effects of environmental pollutants. A panel regression based on random effect was conducted on Korea’s metropolitan councils from 2012 to 2014. The dependent variable was the number of Turner syndrome and Down syndrome cases, and the main independent variables were those regarding the water and air pollution. Air pollutants did not have a significant impact on the number of Turner syndrome and Down syndrome cases; however, the increase in number of wastewater discharge companies did have a significant relationship with the number of cases. The more the number of wastewater discharge companies, the more the number Turner syndrome and Down syndrome cases were observed. Therefore, scientific investigation on water and air pollutants in relation with genetic health effects needs to be performed.

  15. Does wastewater discharge have relations with increase of Turner syndrome and Down syndrome?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Intae

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to examine whether water and air pollutants have a relationship with an increase in the genetic disorders Turner syndrome and Down syndrome, which are caused by congenital chromosomal abnormalities, and to generate a hypothesis about the genetic health effects of environmental pollutants. A panel regression based on random effect was conducted on Korea's metropolitan councils from 2012 to 2014. The dependent variable was the number of Turner syndrome and Down syndrome cases, and the main independent variables were those regarding the water and air pollution. Air pollutants did not have a significant impact on the number of Turner syndrome and Down syndrome cases; however, the increase in number of wastewater discharge companies did have a significant relationship with the number of cases. The more the number of wastewater discharge companies, the more the number Turner syndrome and Down syndrome cases were observed. Therefore, scientific investigation on water and air pollutants in relation with genetic health effects needs to be performed.

  16. Genetics Home Reference: antiphospholipid syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Share: Email Facebook Twitter Home Health Conditions Antiphospholipid syndrome Antiphospholipid syndrome Printable PDF Open All Close All Enable ... area? Other Names for This Condition anti-phospholipid syndrome antiphospholipid antibody syndrome Hughes syndrome Related Information How are ...

  17. Genetics Home Reference: Costello syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... other genetic conditions, cardiofaciocutaneous syndrome (CFC syndrome) and Noonan syndrome . In affected infants, it can be difficult to ... These individuals may actually have CFC syndrome or Noonan syndrome , which are caused by mutations in related genes. ...

  18. The validity of the PAM-RL device for evaluating periodic limb movements in sleep and an investigation on night-to-night variability of periodic limb movements during sleep in patients with restless legs syndrome or periodic limb movement disorder using this system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Mina; Namba, Kazuyoshi; Ito, Eiki; Nishida, Shingo; Nakamura, Masaki; Ueki, Yoichiro; Furudate, Naomichi; Kagimura, Tatsuo; Usui, Akira; Inoue, Yuichi

    2014-01-01

    The status of night-to-night variability for periodic limb movements in sleep (PLMS) has not been clarified. With this in mind, we investigated the validity of PLMS measurement by actigraphy with the PAM-RL device in Japanese patients with suspected restless legs syndrome (RLS) or periodic limb movement disorder (PLMD) and the night-to-night variability of PLMS among the subjects. Forty-one subjects (mean age, 52.1±16.1 years) underwent polysomnography (PSG) and PAM-RL measurement simultaneously. Thereafter, subjects used the PAM-RL at home on four more consecutive nights. The correlation between PLMS index on PSG (PLMSI-PSG) and PLM index on PAM-RL (PLMI-PAM) was 0.781 (PPAM-RL. PAM-RL is thought to be valuable for assessing PLMS even in Japanese subjects. Recording of PAM-RL for three or more consecutive nights may be required to ensure the screening reliability of a patient with suspected pathologically frequent PLMS. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Lemierre syndrome: two cases and a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Syed, Mohammed Iqbal; Baring, David; Addidle, Michael; Murray, Craig; Adams, Calum

    2007-09-01

    Lemierre syndrome is usually caused by an acute oropharyngeal infection in previously healthy young adults, resulting in thrombophlebitis of the internal jugular vein, leading to metastatic septic embolization and bacteraemia. The usual organism is Fusobacterium necrophorum. Lemierre syndrome, not so long ago labeled as the "forgotten disease," is on the rise. Today with increasing antibiotic-resistant organisms, and decreasing awareness of the syndrome, subsequent re-emergence of this "forgotten disease" is becoming more common in clinical settings. Lemierre syndrome has significant morbidity. Cranial nerve complications associated with the condition have been increasingly diagnosed in the last few years. Looking back at literature on Lemierre syndrome, there have been review articles in medical and microbiology journals but rarely in otolaryngology journals. By presenting our cases we demonstrate the diverse presentations and severity of the illness. A review of the literature and a case report on two cases seen in our institution in the last year are presented. Each of these had varied presentations and neurologic complications-one developed 9th to 12th cranial nerve palsies and Horner syndrome, which have not been described in previous literature, and the other developed polyneuropathy and a frontal lobe infarct among other multisystem complications. Diagnosis of Lemierre syndrome is not always straightforward as clinical features are variable and blood cultures are often negative. Awareness of the syndrome and a high degree of suspicion are needed.

  20. Executive functions in persons with metabolic syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Subotić Tatjana

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Modern man lyfestyle contributes to the increasing incidence of metabolic syndrome in the developed world. Prevalence of the metabolic syndrome in adults ranges from 20 to 25%, and it tends to increase. Each year, 3.2 million people around the world die from complications associated with this syndrome. Treatment involves cooperation of medical doctors of various specialties, but the decisive factor is patient motivation, given that the treatment requires significant lifestyle changes. Our hypothesis is that metabolic syndrome patients have reduced ability to plan, convert plan into action and effectively implement planned activities, showing signs of dysexecutive syndrome. The term executive functions comes from the English word 'executive', which also means the controlling, in neuropsychology reserved for high-level abilities that influence more basic abilities such as attention, perception, memory, thinking and speaking. The main objective of this study was to determine characteristics of executive functioning in patients with metabolic syndrome. The sample consisted of 61 subjects of both sexes, aged 20 to 60 years, divided into two groups - those with a diagnosis of metabolic syndrome and those without this diagnosis. The results suggest that people with metabolic syndrome showed significantly poorer performance in almost all indicators of executive functions, represented by Wisconsin Card Sorting Test (Wisconsin Card Sorting Test variables.

  1. Acute nephritic syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glomerulonephritis - acute; Acute glomerulonephritis; Nephritis syndrome - acute ... Acute nephritic syndrome is often caused by an immune response triggered by an infection or other disease. Common causes in children ...

  2. Shah-Waardenburg syndrome and PCWH associated with SOX10 mutations : A case report and review of the literature

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verheij, Johanna B G M; Sival, Deborah A; van der Hoeven, Johannes H; Vos, Yvonne J; Meiners, Linda C; Brouwer, Oebele F; van Essen, Anthonie J

    Shah-Waardenburg syndrome is a rare congenital disorder with variable clinical expression, characterised by aganglionosis of the rectosigmoid (Hirschsprung disease), and abnormal melanocyte migration, resulting in pigmentary abnormalities and sensorineural deafness (Waardenburg syndrome). Mutations

  3. Postural tachycardia syndrome and other forms of orthostatic intolerance in Ehlers-Danlos syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roma, Maria; Marden, Colleen L; De Wandele, Inge; Francomano, Clair A; Rowe, Peter C

    2018-03-05

    To review the association between orthostatic intolerance syndromes and both joint hypermobility and Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, and to propose reasons for identifying hereditary connective tissue disorders in those with orthostatic intolerance in the context of both clinical care and research. We searched the published peer-reviewed medical literature for papers reporting an association between joint hypermobility or Ehlers-Danlos syndrome and orthostatic intolerance. We identified 10 relevant papers. Although methodological variability between studies introduces some limitations, the published literature consistently identifies a significantly higher prevalence of orthostatic intolerance symptoms in patients with joint hypermobility or Ehlers-Danlos syndrome than in healthy controls, and a significantly higher prevalence of cardiovascular and autonomic abnormalities both at rest and during orthostatic challenge. Postural tachycardia syndrome is the most commonly recognized circulatory disorder. The severity of orthostatic symptoms in those with EDS correlates with impairments in quality of life. There is a strong association between several forms of cardiovascular dysfunction, most notably postural tachycardia syndrome, and joint hypermobility or Ehlers-Danlos syndrome. We propose that recognition of joint hypermobility and Ehlers-Danlos syndrome among those with orthostatic intolerance syndromes has the potential to improve clinical care and the validity of research findings. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Cushing’s syndrome: Epidemiology and developments in disease management

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S.T. Sharma; L.K. Nieman; R.A. Feelders (Richard)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractCushing’s syndrome is a rare disorder resulting from prolonged exposure to excess glucocorticoids. Early diagnosis and treatment of Cushing’s syndrome is associated with a decrease in morbidity and mortality. Clinical presentation can be highly variable, and establishing the diagnosis

  5. Developmental and Psychological Aspects of the Savant Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wehmeyer, Michael L.

    1992-01-01

    This literature review examines the psychological aspects of the savant syndrome in people with intellectual disabilities, focusing on the means by which such abilities as calendar calculation are accomplished and highlighting variables (such as intense motivation in one area) postulated as important for development of the syndrome. (Author/DB)

  6. Morvan Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maskery, Mark; Chhetri, Suresh K.; Dayanandan, Rejith; Gall, Claire

    2016-01-01

    A 74-year-old gentleman was admitted to the regional neurosciences center with encephalopathy, myokymia, and dysautonomia. Chest imaging had previously identified an incidental mass in the anterior mediastinum, consistent with a primary thymic tumor. Antivoltage-gated potassium channel (anti-VGKC) antibodies were positive (titer 1273 pmol/L) and he was hypokalemic. Electromyogram and nerve conduction studies were in keeping with peripheral nerve hyperexcitability syndrome, and an electroencephalogram was consistent with encephalopathy. A diagnosis of Morvan syndrome was made, for which he was initially treated with high-dose steroids, followed by a 5-day course of intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG) therapy. He also underwent thymectomy, followed by a postexcision flare of his symptoms requiring intensive care management. Further steroids, plasmapheresis, and IVIG achieved stabilization of his clinical condition, enabling transfer for inpatient neurorehabilitation. He was commenced on azathioprine and a prolonged oral steroid taper. A subsequent presumed incipient relapse responded well to further IVIG treatment. This case report documents a thymoma-associated presentation of anti-VGKC-positive Morvan syndrome supplemented by patient and carer narrative and video, both of which provide valuable further insights into this rare disorder. There are a limited number of publications surrounding this rare condition available in the English literature. This, combined with the heterogenous presentation, association with underlying malignancy, response to treatment, and prognosis, provides a diagnostic challenge. However, the association with anti-VGKC antibody-associated complexes and 2 recent case series have provided some scope for both accurate diagnosis and management. PMID:26740856

  7. Jacobsen syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grossfeld Paul

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Jacobsen syndrome is a MCA/MR contiguous gene syndrome caused by partial deletion of the long arm of chromosome 11. To date, over 200 cases have been reported. The prevalence has been estimated at 1/100,000 births, with a female/male ratio 2:1. The most common clinical features include pre- and postnatal physical growth retardation, psychomotor retardation, and characteristic facial dysmorphism (skull deformities, hypertelorism, ptosis, coloboma, downslanting palpebral fissures, epicanthal folds, broad nasal bridge, short nose, v-shaped mouth, small ears, low set posteriorly rotated ears. Abnormal platelet function, thrombocytopenia or pancytopenia are usually present at birth. Patients commonly have malformations of the heart, kidney, gastrointestinal tract, genitalia, central nervous system and skeleton. Ocular, hearing, immunological and hormonal problems may be also present. The deletion size ranges from ~7 to 20 Mb, with the proximal breakpoint within or telomeric to subband 11q23.3 and the deletion extending usually to the telomere. The deletion is de novo in 85% of reported cases, and in 15% of cases it results from an unbalanced segregation of a familial balanced translocation or from other chromosome rearrangements. In a minority of cases the breakpoint is at the FRA11B fragile site. Diagnosis is based on clinical findings (intellectual deficit, facial dysmorphic features and thrombocytopenia and confirmed by cytogenetics analysis. Differential diagnoses include Turner and Noonan syndromes, and acquired thrombocytopenia due to sepsis. Prenatal diagnosis of 11q deletion is possible by amniocentesis or chorionic villus sampling and cytogenetic analysis. Management is multi-disciplinary and requires evaluation by general pediatrician, pediatric cardiologist, neurologist, ophthalmologist. Auditory tests, blood tests, endocrine and immunological assessment and follow-up should be offered to all patients. Cardiac malformations can be

  8. Robinow syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suresh S

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Robinow syndrome is a rare autosomal recessive mesomelic dwarfism with just more than 100 cases reported in the literature so far. The lower extremity is spared with skeletal deformity usually confined to the forearm, hand, and the dorsal spine. Diagnosis is made easily in the early childhood by the typical "fetal facies" appearance, which disappears to a certain extent as the patient grows. The author reports two cases of this entity with vertebral segmentation defects, rib fusion, and typical severe brachymelia and facial features.

  9. Trichorhinophalangeal syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tuzovic, S.; Fiebach, B.J.O.; Magnus, L.; Sauerbrei, H.U.

    1982-11-01

    This article reports on 14 cases of a trichorhinophalangeal syndrome in five successive generations. Besides the well-known characteristics of the TRPS the following symptoms observed in this family are new: Teething was considerably delayed, intelligence was reduced, and there were skin manifestations resembling eczema. Besides, struma colli and colitis ulcerosa were also observed. Subsequent observations have to clarify whether these symptoms are a facultative part of the TRPS pattern. The constant appearance of carriers of these characteristics during five generation points to dominant heredity.

  10. Olmsted Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sirka C

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available A 20-year-old Sikh man had palmoplantar keratoderma, flexion deformity of digits, universal alopecia, keratotic plaques at the angles of mouth, gluteal cleft, knees and dorsal aspects of the metacarpophalangeal joints of the hand; features of Olmsted syndrome. He had normal nails, teeth, oral mucosa and normal joint movements. Treatment with acitretin, 25mg/day for three and a half months, followed by 25mg once daily alternating with 50mg once daily for 3 months resulted in significant improvement.

  11. Phenotype and genotype in 17 patients with Goltz-Gorlin syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maas, S. M.; Lombardi, M. P.; van Essen, A. J.; Wakeling, E. L.; Castle, B.; Temple, I. K.; Kumar, V. K. A.; Writzl, K.; Hennekam, Raoul C. M.

    2009-01-01

    Background: Goltz-Gorlin syndrome or focal dermal hypoplasia is a highly variable, X-linked dominant syndrome with abnormalities of ectodermal and mesodermal origin. In 2007, mutations in the PORCN gene were found to be causative in Goltz-Gorlin syndrome. Method: A series of 17 patients with

  12. OCULO-CEREBRO-RENAL SYNDROME (LOWE'S SYNDROME)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1991-01-01

    Oculo-cerebro-renal syndrome (Lowe's syndrome) is characterized by mental and motor retardation, cataract, glaucoma and renal abnormalities. It is an X-linked recessive metabolic disease. Two brothers suffering from Lowe's syndrome are reported. Their mother with lenticular opacities and peculiar facial appearance is in concordance with the obligate carrier. The ocular changes and heridity are discussed.

  13. Marfan syndrome: Report of two cases with review of literature

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2011-06-10

    Jun 10, 2011 ... Marfan syndrome is a variable autosomal dominant disorder with characteristic cardiovascular, eye and skeletal features. Progressive aortic ... Outward bowing of the legs was noticed along with dry scaly skin. The first toe was ...

  14. A restricted spectrum of NRAS mutations causes Noonan syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cirstea, Ion C.; Kutsche, Kerstin; Dvorsky, Radovan; Gremer, Lothar; Carta, Claudio; Horn, Denise; Roberts, Amy E.; Lepri, Francesca; Merbitz-Zahradnik, Torsten; Koenig, Rainer; Kratz, Christian P.; Pantaleoni, Francesca; Dentici, Maria L.; Joshi, Victoria A.; Kucherlapati, Raju S.; Mazzanti, Laura; Mundlos, Stefan; Patton, Michael A.; Silengo, Margherita Cirillo; Rossi, Cesare; Zampino, Giuseppe; Digilio, Cristina; Stuppia, Liborio; Seemanova, Eva; Pennacchio, Len A.; Gelb, Bruce D.; Dallapiccola, Bruno; Wittinghofer, Alfred; Ahmadian, Mohammad R.; Tartaglia, Marco; Zenker, Martin

    Noonan syndrome, a developmental disorder characterized by congenital heart defects, reduced growth, facial dysmorphism and variable cognitive deficits, is caused by constitutional dysregulation of the RAS-MAPK signaling pathway. Here we report that germline NRAS mutations conferring enhanced

  15. Adult Phenotypes in Angelman- and Rett-Like Syndromes.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Willemsen, M.H.; Rensen, J.H.; Schrojenstein Lantman-de Valk, H.M. van; Hamel, B.C.J.; Kleefstra, T.

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Angelman- and Rett-like syndromes share a range of clinical characteristics, including intellectual disability (ID) with or without regression, epilepsy, infantile encephalopathy, postnatal microcephaly, features of autism spectrum disorder, and variable other neurological symptoms. The

  16. 5p13 microduplication syndrome: a new case and better clinical definition of the syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novara, Francesca; Alfei, Enrico; D'Arrigo, Stefano; Pantaleoni, Chiara; Beri, Silvana; Achille, Valentina; Sciacca, Francesca L; Giorda, Roberto; Zuffardi, Orsetta; Ciccone, Roberto

    2013-01-01

    Chromosome 5p13 duplication syndrome (OMIM #613174), a contiguous gene syndrome involving duplication of several genes on chromosome 5p13 including NIPBL (OMIM 608667), has been described in rare patients with developmental delay and learning disability, behavioral problems and peculiar facial dysmorphisms. 5p13 duplications described so far present with variable sizes, from 0.25 to 13.6 Mb, and contain a variable number of genes. Here we report another patient with 5p13 duplication syndrome including NIPBL gene only. Proband's phenotype overlapped that reported in patients with 5p13 microduplication syndrome and especially that of subjects with smaller duplications. Moreover, we better define genotype-phenotype relationship associated with this duplication and confirmed that NIPBL was likely the major dosage sensitive gene for the 5p13 microduplication phenotype. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  17. Cardiorenal syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabry Omar

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of death in patients with chronic kidney disease.  Heart failure may lead to acute kidney injury and vice versa. Chronic kidney disease may affect the clinical outcomes in patients with cardiovascular disorders. Renal impairment with any degree of albuminuria has been increasingly recognized as an independent risk factor for cardiovascular events and heart failure hospitalizations, while chronic heart failure may cause chronic kidney disease. The bidirectional nature of these disorders contributes to the complexity and the composite definitions of cardiorenal syndromes. However, the most important clinical trials in heart failure tend to exclude patients with significant renal dysfunction. The mechanisms whereby renal insufficiency worsens the outcome in heart failure are not known, and several pathways could contribute to the ‘‘vicious heart/kidney circle.’’ Traditionally, renal impairment has been attributed to the renal hypoperfusion due to reduced cardiac output and decreased systemic pressure. The hypovolemia leads to sympathetic activity, increased renin-angiotensin aldosterone pathway, and arginine-vasopressin release. These mechanisms cause fluid and sodium retention, peripheral vasoconstriction, and volume overload. Therapy to improve renal dysfunction, reduce neurohormonal activation and ameliorate renal blood flow could lead to a reduction in mortality and hospitalization in patients with cardiorenal syndrome.

  18. Lowe syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Loi Mario

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Lowe syndrome (the oculocerebrorenal syndrome of Lowe, OCRL is a multisystem disorder characterised by anomalies affecting the eye, the nervous system and the kidney. It is a uncommon, panethnic, X-linked disease, with estimated prevalence in the general population of approximately 1 in 500,000. Bilateral cataract and severe hypotonia are present at birth. In the subsequent weeks or months, a proximal renal tubulopathy (Fanconi-type becomes evident and the ocular picture may be complicated by glaucoma and cheloids. Psychomotor retardation is evident in childhood, while behavioural problems prevail and renal complications arise in adolescence. The mutation of the gene OCRL1 localized at Xq26.1, coding for the enzyme phosphatidylinositol (4,5 bisphosphate 5 phosphatase, PtdIns (4,5P2, in the trans-Golgi network is responsible for the disease. Both enzymatic and molecular testing are available for confirmation of the diagnosis and for prenatal detection of the disease. The treatment includes: cataract extraction, glaucoma control, physical and speech therapy, use of drugs to address behavioural problems, and correction of the tubular acidosis and the bone disease with the use of bicarbonate, phosphate, potassium and water. Life span rarely exceeds 40 years.

  19. Cotard Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dieguez, Sebastian

    2018-01-01

    Cotard's syndrome is often described as the delusional belief that one is dead or non-existent. However, Jules Cotard's initial description (1880) of the "delusion of negations" was much richer and also involved delusions and claims of immortality and enormity, feelings of damnation, and illusions of bodily dissolution and transformation. Alternatively conceived as an extreme case of depression, hypochondria, or psychosis, the condition is considered rare and remains poorly understood. Cotard himself provided a taxonomy and several explanations for the condition, focusing on its distinction from classical persecutory delusions and suggesting that it could be a kind of reversed grandiosity. He proposed a psychosensory basis in the dissolution of mental imagery, which he then extended to a more general psychomotor impairment of volition. Other early authors highlighted a disorder of the bodily self, and more recent theories postulated an impairment of right hemispheric functions, leading to perceptual and somatosensory feelings of unreality, which coupled with reasoning impairments and an internalized attributional style led in turn to beliefs of non-existence. However, despite its striking presentation and its relevance to our understanding of self-awareness, Cotard's syndrome remains an elusive condition, rarely reported and poorly researched. © 2018 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  20. KBG syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brancati Francesco

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract KBG syndrome is a rare condition characterised by a typical facial dysmorphism, macrodontia of the upper central incisors, skeletal (mainly costovertebral anomalies and developmental delay. To date, KBG syndrome has been reported in 45 patients. Clinical features observed in more than half of patients that may support the diagnosis are short stature, electroencephalogram (EEG anomalies (with or without seizures and abnormal hair implantation. Cutaneous syndactyly, webbed short neck, cryptorchidism, hearing loss, palatal defects, strabismus and congenital heart defects are less common findings. Autosomal dominant transmission has been observed in some families, and it is predominantly the mother, often showing a milder clinical picture, that transmits the disease. The diagnosis is currently based solely on clinical findings as the aetiology is unknown. The final diagnosis is generally achieved after the eruption of upper permanent central incisors at 7–8 years of age when the management of possible congenital anomalies should have been already planned. A full developmental assessment should be done at diagnosis and, if delays are noted, an infant stimulation program should be initiated. Subsequent management and follow-up should include an EEG, complete orthodontic evaluation, skeletal investigation with particular regard to spine curvatures and limb asymmetry, hearing testing and ophthalmologic assessment.

  1. Elsberg syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savoldi, Filippo; Kaufmann, Timothy J.; Flanagan, Eoin P.; Toledano, Michel

    2017-01-01

    Objective: Elsberg syndrome (ES) is an established but often unrecognized cause of acute lumbosacral radiculitis with myelitis related to recent herpes virus infection. We defined ES, determined its frequency in patients with cauda equina syndrome (CES) with myelitis, and evaluated its clinical, radiologic, and microbiologic features and outcomes. Methods: We searched the Mayo Clinic medical records for ES and subsequently for combinations of index terms to identify patients with suspected CES and myelitis. Results: Our search yielded 30 patients, 2 diagnosed with ES and an additional 28 with clinical or radiologic evidence of CES retrospectively suspected of having ES. We classified patients in 5 groups according to diagnostic certainty. MRI and EMG confirmed that 2 had only myelitis, 5 only radiculitis, and 16 both. Two had preceding sacral herpes infection and 1 oral herpes simplex. Spinal cord lesions were commonly multiple, discontinuous, not expansile, and centrally or ventrally positioned. Lesions generally spared the distal conus. Nerve root enhancement was occasionally prominent and was smooth rather than nodular. Lymphocytic CSF pleocytosis was common. Thirteen patients (43%) had viral isolation studies, which were commonly delayed; the delay may have accounted for the low rate of viral detection. Acyclovir was administered to 6 patients. Most patients recovered with sequelae; 1 patient experienced encephalomyelitis and died. Conclusion: ES is a definable condition likely responsible for 10% of patients with combined CES and myelitis. Radiologic findings are not entirely specific but may help in differentiating ES from some competing diagnostic considerations. We propose criteria to facilitate diagnosis. PMID:28534040

  2. Marfan Syndrome (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... en español Síndrome de Marfan What Is Marfan Syndrome? Marfan syndrome is a genetic disorder of the body's ... bones , blood vessels, and organs. What Causes Marfan Syndrome? Marfan syndrome happens because of an abnormality in one ...

  3. Burnout Syndrome of Teachers

    OpenAIRE

    Semrádová, Michaela

    2013-01-01

    The bachelor's thesis covers burnout syndrome of teachers. Defines burnout syndrome, describes its causes and symptoms. Describes teaching as helping profession and focousing on stressful situations at school. In the last chapter described different prevention strategies burnout syndrome. Key words: burnout syndrome, teaching, teacher, helping professions, beginning teacher, stress

  4. Turner Syndrome (For Teens)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Staying Safe Videos for Educators Search English Español Turner Syndrome KidsHealth / For Teens / Turner Syndrome What's in this ... en español El síndrome de Turner What Is Turner Syndrome? Turner syndrome (TS) is a genetic condition found ...

  5. Posttreatment Lyme disease syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aucott, John N

    2015-06-01

    The prognosis following appropriate antibiotic treatment of early or late Lyme disease is favorable but can be complicated by persistent symptoms of unknown cause termed posttreatment Lyme disease syndrome (PTLDS), characterized by fatigue, musculoskeletal pain, and cognitive complaints that persist for 6 months or longer after completion of antibiotic therapy. Risk factors include delayed diagnosis, increased severity of symptoms, and presence of neurologic symptoms at time of initial treatment. Two-tier serologic testing is neither sensitive nor specific for diagnosis of PTLDS because of variability in convalescent serologic responses after treatment of early Lyme disease. Optimal treatment of PTLDS awaits more precise understanding of the pathophysiologic mechanisms involved in this illness and future treatment trials. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Gingival fibromatosis with hypertrichosis syndrome: Case series of rare syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Preetha Balaji

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Gingival fibromatosis with hypertrichosis syndrome is an extremely rare genetic condition characterized by profound overgrowth of hair and gums, as well as other variable features. Gingival fibromatosis is characterized by a large increase in the gingival dimension which extends above the dental crowns, covering them partially or completely. They were found to have a genetic origin, may also occur in isolation or be part of a syndrome, or acquired origin, due to specific drugs administered systemically. Congenital generalized hypertrichosis is a heterogeneous group of diseases with continuing excessive growth of terminal hair without androgenic stimulation. It has informally been called werewolf syndrome because the appearance is similar to that of a werewolf. Various syndromes have been associated with these features such as epilepsy, mental retardation, cardiomegaly, or osteochondrodysplasia. As so far very few cases have been reported in literature, we are reporting a series of three cases with management of the same. The excess gingival tissues, in these cases, were removed by conventional gingivectomy under general anesthesia. The postoperative result was uneventful and the patient's appearance improved significantly. Good esthetic result was achieved to allow patient to practice oral hygiene measures. Though this is not a serious condition clinically, psychosocial trauma cannot be neglected owing to the cosmetic disfigurement it produces.

  7. Understanding Bartter syndrome and Gitelman syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fremont, Oliver T; Chan, James C M

    2012-02-01

    We aim to review the clinical features of two renal tubular disorders characterized by sodium and potassium wasting: Bartter syndrome and Gitelman syndrome. Selected key references concerning these syndromes were analyzed, together with a PubMed search of the literature from 2000 to 2011. The clinical features common to both conditions and those which are distinct to each syndrome were presented. The new findings on the genetics of the five types of Bartter syndrome and the discrete mutations in Gitelman syndrome were reviewed, together with the diagnostic workup and treatment for each condition. Patients with Bartter syndrome types 1, 2 and 4 present at a younger age than classic Bartter syndrome type 3. They present with symptoms, often quite severe in the neonatal period. Patients with classic Bartter syndrome type 3 present later in life and may be sporadically asymptomatic or mildly symptomatic. The severe, steady-state hypokalemia in Bartter syndrome and Gitelman syndrome may abruptly become life-threatening under certain aggravating conditions. Clinicians need to be cognizant of such renal tubular disorders, and promptly treat at-risk patients.

  8. Mowat-Wilson syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garavelli, Livia; Mainardi, Paola Cerruti

    2007-01-01

    Mowat-Wilson syndrome (MWS) is a multiple congenital anomaly syndrome characterized by a distinct facial phenotype (high forehead, frontal bossing, large eyebrows, medially flaring and sparse in the middle part, hypertelorism, deep set but large eyes, large and uplifted ear lobes, with a central depression, saddle nose with prominent rounded nasal tip, prominent columella, open mouth, with M-shaped upper lip, frequent smiling, and a prominent but narrow and triangular pointed chin), moderate-to-severe intellectual deficiency, epilepsy and variable congenital malformations including Hirschsprung disease (HSCR), genitourinary anomalies (in particular hypospadias in males), congenital heart defects, agenesis of the corpus callosum and eye anomalies. The prevalence of MWS is currently unknown, but 171 patients have been reported so far. It seems probable that MWS is under-diagnosed, particularly in patients without HSCR. MWS is caused by heterozygous mutations or deletions in the Zinc finger E-box-binding homeobox 2 gene, ZEB2, previously called ZFHX1B (SIP1). To date, over 100 deletions/mutations have been reported in patients with a typical phenotype; they are frequently whole gene deletions or truncating mutations, suggesting that haploinsufficiency is the main pathological mechanism. Studies of genotype-phenotype analysis show that facial gestalt and delayed psychomotor development are constant clinical features, while the frequent and severe congenital malformations are variable. In a small number of patients, unusual mutations can lead to an atypical phenotype. The facial phenotype is particularly important for the initial clinical diagnosis and provides the hallmark warranting ZEB2 mutational analysis, even in the absence of HSCR. The majority of MWS cases reported so far were sporadic, therefore the recurrence risk is low. Nevertheless, rare cases of sibling recurrence have been observed. Congenital malformations and seizures require precocious clinical

  9. Mowat-Wilson syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mainardi Paola

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Mowat-Wilson syndrome (MWS is a multiple congenital anomaly syndrome characterized by a distinct facial phenotype (high forehead, frontal bossing, large eyebrows, medially flaring and sparse in the middle part, hypertelorism, deep set but large eyes, large and uplifted ear lobes, with a central depression, saddle nose with prominent rounded nasal tip, prominent columella, open mouth, with M-shaped upper lip, frequent smiling, and a prominent but narrow and triangular pointed chin, moderate-to-severe intellectual deficiency, epilepsy and variable congenital malformations including Hirschsprung disease (HSCR, genitourinary anomalies (in particular hypospadias in males, congenital heart defects, agenesis of the corpus callosum and eye anomalies. The prevalence of MWS is currently unknown, but 171 patients have been reported so far. It seems probable that MWS is under-diagnosed, particularly in patients without HSCR. MWS is caused by heterozygous mutations or deletions in the Zinc finger E-box-binding homeobox 2 gene, ZEB2, previously called ZFHX1B (SIP1. To date, over 100 deletions/mutations have been reported in patients with a typical phenotype; they are frequently whole gene deletions or truncating mutations, suggesting that haploinsufficiency is the main pathological mechanism. Studies of genotype-phenotype analysis show that facial gestalt and delayed psychomotor development are constant clinical features, while the frequent and severe congenital malformations are variable. In a small number of patients, unusual mutations can lead to an atypical phenotype. The facial phenotype is particularly important for the initial clinical diagnosis and provides the hallmark warranting ZEB2 mutational analysis, even in the absence of HSCR. The majority of MWS cases reported so far were sporadic, therefore the recurrence risk is low. Nevertheless, rare cases of sibling recurrence have been observed. Congenital malformations and seizures require

  10. Metabolic Syndrome: Polycystic Ovary Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mortada, Rami; Williams, Tracy

    2015-08-01

    Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is a heterogeneous condition characterized by androgen excess, ovulatory dysfunction, and polycystic ovaries. It is the most common endocrinopathy among women of reproductive age, affecting between 6.5% and 8% of women, and is the most common cause of infertility. Insulin resistance is almost always present in women with PCOS, regardless of weight, and they often develop diabetes and metabolic syndrome. The Rotterdam criteria are widely used for diagnosis. These criteria require that patients have at least two of the following conditions: hyperandrogenism, ovulatory dysfunction, and polycystic ovaries. The diagnosis of PCOS also requires exclusion of other potential etiologies of hyperandrogenism and ovulatory dysfunction. The approach to PCOS management differs according to the presenting symptoms and treatment goals, particularly the patient's desire for pregnancy. Weight loss through dietary modifications and exercise is recommended for patients with PCOS who are overweight. Oral contraceptives are the first-line treatment for regulating menstrual cycles and reducing manifestations of hyperandrogenism, such as acne and hirsutism. Clomiphene is the first-line drug for management of anovulatory infertility. Metformin is recommended for metabolic abnormalities such as prediabetes, and a statin should be prescribed for cardioprotection if the patient meets standard criteria for statin therapy. Written permission from the American Academy of Family Physicians is required for reproduction of this material in whole or in part in any form or medium.

  11. Kleine–Levin Syndrome: A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taís Figueiredo de Araújo Lima

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The Kleine–Levin Syndrome is a differential diagnosis for patients with diurnal excessive sleepiness and a suspicion of narcolepsy. It is characterized by paroxysmal attacks of diurnal excessive sleepiness, associated with one or more symptoms of hyperphagia, hypersexuality, coprolalia and copropraxia. During crisis intervals, there are no symptoms. This pathology predominantly manifests itself in teenagers, being more frequent among males. The course of this disease is unpredictable, with variable duration and frequency. The most accepted physiopathology is that of a hypothalamic dysfunction, although and recently, there has appeared a hypothesis of a post-infectious autoimmune disorder. These patients show an elevated body mass index, which can predispose to association with comorbidities such as the sleep obstructive apnea syndrome. Treatment involves medications with different effects, but there is no specific and effective therapy. Our article shows a classic case of Kleine–Levin Syndrome associated with sleep obstructive apnea syndrome, a rare association in the literature.

  12. A Case Report of Gorlin-goltz Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shima Nafarzadeh

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome (Gorlin syndrome is an autosomal dominant inherited condition that exhibits high penetrance and variable expressivity. The syndrome is caused by mutations in patched (PTCH, a tumor suppressor gene that has been mapped to chromosome 9q22.3-q31. Gorlin-goltz syndrome (GGS is characterised by the presence of multiple odontogenic keratocysts in the jaws, basal cell carcinomas, palmar and plantar pits and intracranial calcifications. Here, we present a case of familial GGS, characterised by multiple odontogenic keratocysts, broad nasal ridge, hypertelorism, enlarged head circumference and dermoid cysts.

  13. Oral Rehabilitation for Amniotic Band Syndrome: An Unusual Presentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hotwani, Kavita; Sharma, Krishna

    2015-01-01

    Amniotic band syndrome (ABS) is a congenital disorder caused by entrapment of fetal parts in fibrous amniotic bands while in utero. The syndrome is underdiagnosed and its presentation is variable. The syndrome has been well described in the pediatric, orthopedic and obstetric literature; however, despite the discernable craniomaxillofacial involvement, ABS has not been reported in the dental literature very often. The present report describes a case of a patient with ABS and concomitant dental findings. How to cite this article: Hotwani K, Sharma K. Oral Rehabilitation for Amniotic Band Syndrome: An Unusual Presentation. Int J Clin Pediatr Dent 2015;8(1):55-57.

  14. Case report: Noonan-like multiple central giant cell granuloma syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bitton, Natalie; Alexander, Stanley; Ruggiero, Salvatore; Parameswaran, Ashish; Russo, Antonino; Ferguson, Fred

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this report was to: summarize the care of a child between the ages of 12 to 16 years old born with Noonan-like central giant cell syndrome and unrelated common variable immune deficiency; provide information on the dental management of patients with Noonan's syndrome; and present a brief discussion of the recent associated genetic findings. A review of the common features of Noonan syndrome and Noonan-like central giant cell syndrome is also provided.

  15. Syndromes with supernumerary teeth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lubinsky, Mark; Kantaputra, Piranit Nik

    2016-10-01

    While most supernumerary teeth are idiopathic, they can be associated with a number of Mendelian syndromes. However, this can also be a coincidental finding, since supernumerary teeth occur in 6% or more of the normal population. To better define this relationship, we analyzed the evidence for specific associations. We excluded conditions with a single affected patient reported, supernumerary teeth adjacent to clefts or other forms of alveolar disruption (as secondary rather than primary findings), and natal teeth, which can involve premature eruption of a normal tooth. Since, the cause of supernumerary teeth shows considerable heterogeneity, certain findings are less likely to be coincidental, such as five or more supernumerary teeth in a single patient, or locations outside of the premaxilla. We found only eight genetic syndromes with strong evidence for an association: cleidocranial dysplasia; familial adenomatous polyposis; trichorhinophalangeal syndrome, type I; Rubinstein-Taybi syndrome; Nance-Horan syndrome; Opitz BBB/G syndrome; oculofaciocardiodental syndrome; and autosomal dominant Robinow syndrome. There is also suggestive evidence of an association with two uncommon disorders, Kreiborg-Pakistani syndrome (craniosynostosis and dental anomalies), and insulin-resistant diabetes mellitus with acanthosisnigricans. An association of a Mendelian disorder with a low frequency manifestation of supernumerary teeth is difficult to exclude without large numbers, but several commonly cited syndromes lacked evidence for clear association, including Hallermann-Streiff syndrome, Fabry disease, Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, Apert and Crouzon syndromes, Zimmermann-Laband syndrome, and Ellis-van Creveld syndrome. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Gorlin's syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramsden, R T; Barrett, A

    1975-06-01

    The uncommon familial syndrome of multiple odontogenic keratocysts, basal cell naevi and skeletal anomalies is reviewed, and seven cases are described, including one patient who developed squamous cell carcinoma in a previous odontogenic keratocyst of the maxilla. We wish to thank Consultants from the Royal National Throat, Nose and Ear Hospital, The Middlesex Hospital and the Eastman Dental Hospital, who allowed us access to their patients; Mr. D. Garfield Davies, Dr. M. F. Spittle, Mr. D. Winstock, Mr. H. P. Cook, Professor H. C. Killey and Mr. L. W. Kay. We are grateful to Professor L. Michaels and Mr. D. J. Connolly for preparation of the illustrations and to Mrs. A. Matthews for the typescript.

  17. HEPATORENAL SYNDROME

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matjaž Hafner

    2001-12-01

    Full Text Available Background. Hepatorenal syndrome (HRS is acommon complication of advanced hepatic disease characterizedby marked abnormalities in arterial circulation and byrenal failure. An extreme arteriolar vasodilatation located inthe splanchnic circulation results in a reduction of total systemicvascular resistence and arterial hypotension. Vasoconstrictionoccurs in the renal circulation as in all other extrasplanchnicvascular territories. In the kidney, marked renalvasoconstriction results in a low glomerular filtration rate.Conclusions. The diagnosis of HRS is currently based on exclusionof other causes of renal failure. Prognosis of patientswith HRS is very poor. Liver transplantation is the best therapeuticoption, but it is seldom applicable due to the short survivalexpectancy of most patients with HRS, particularly thosewith the rapidly progressive type of HRS. New therapies developedduring the last few years, such as the use of systemicvasoconstrictors or transjugular intrahepatic portosystemicshunts (TIPS appear promising. Such treatments are of interestnot only as a bridge to liver transplantation but also as atherapy for patients who are not candidates for transplantation.

  18. Noonan syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    van der Burgt Ineke

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Noonan Syndrome (NS is characterised by short stature, typical facial dysmorphology and congenital heart defects. The incidence of NS is estimated to be between 1:1000 and 1:2500 live births. The main facial features of NS are hypertelorism with down-slanting palpebral fissures, ptosis and low-set posteriorly rotated ears with a thickened helix. The cardiovascular defects most commonly associated with this condition are pulmonary stenosis and hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. Other associated features are webbed neck, chest deformity, mild intellectual deficit, cryptorchidism, poor feeding in infancy, bleeding tendency and lymphatic dysplasias. The syndrome is transmitted as an autosomal dominant trait. In approximately 50% of cases, the disease is caused by missense mutations in the PTPN11 gene on chromosome 12, resulting in a gain of function of the non-receptor protein tyrosine phosphatase SHP-2 protein. Recently, mutations in the KRAS gene have been identified in a small proportion of patients with NS. A DNA test for mutation analysis can be carried out on blood, chorionic villi and amniotic fluid samples. NS should be considered in all foetuses with polyhydramnion, pleural effusions, oedema and increased nuchal fluid with a normal karyotype. With special care and counselling, the majority of children with NS will grow up and function normally in the adult world. Management should address feeding problems in early childhood, evaluation of cardiac function and assessment of growth and motor development. Physiotherapy and/or speech therapy should be offered if indicated. A complete eye examination and hearing evaluation should be performed during the first few years of schooling. Preoperative coagulation studies are indicated. Signs and symptoms lessen with age and most adults with NS do not require special medical care.

  19. [Evaluation of the primary caregiver syndrome when caring for elderly adults with immobility syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morales-Cariño, Elizabeth María; Jiménez-Herrera, Blanca L; Serrano-Miranda, Tirzo A

    2012-01-01

    Caregiver syndrome may develop in caregivers of elderly adults. To evaluate the repercussions of the immobility syndrome present in elderly adults on their primary caregivers as well as to determine the clinical and socio-demographic characteristics of the elderly adult and caregiver. The study population included patients over 65 recruited in the Geriatric Rehabilitation Department, with the diagnosis of immobility syndrome and that required a primary caregiver. A questionnaire including socio-demographic variables was applied to all patients and caregivers, and the Zarit scale was also applied to caregivers in order to determine the presence of caregiver syndrome. Analysis was performed with descriptive statistical methods; Student's t test and Fisher's test were used for comparisons between strata. 75 patients and their caregivers were evaluated; patient average age was 75.9 years and 85.3% were female. 50.7% (38 cases) had mild immobility. The average caregiver's age was 50.6%, 70.7% were female and 57.3% were the patient's daughter. Caregiver syndrome was detected in 60% of them: 57.7% had mild symptoms and in 42.2%, symptoms were moderate to severe. No statistically significant association was established between the development of caregiver syndrome and the degree of patient immobility. Caregivers of patients with immobility syndrome are at high risk of developing caregiver syndrome, thus underscoring the need to include primary caregiver support programs.

  20. Demens hos personer med Downs syndrom

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Salem, Lise Cronberg; Jørgensen, Kasper

    2014-01-01

    In developed countries the population of elderly people with Down syndrome expands resulting in an increasing incidence of age-related diseases, including dementia. The assessment of dementia in individuals with intellectual disability is often complicated due to large intra-individual variability...

  1. Anosmia Predicts Hypogonadotropic Hypogonadism in CHARGE Syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bergman, Jorieke E. H.; Bocca, Gianni; Hoefsloot, Lies H.; Meiners, Linda C.; van Ravenswaaij-Arts, Conny M. A.

    Objective To test the hypothesis that a smell test could predict the occurrence of hypogonadotropic hypogonadism (HH) in patients with CHARGE syndrome, which is a variable combination of ocular coloboma, heart defects, choanal atresia, retardation of growth/development, genital hypoplasia, and ear

  2. Emotion Regulation in Children with Down Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Maureen C.; Walden, Tedra A.

    This study presents a preliminary exploration of emotion regulation in a sample of 20 children (ages 3-18 years) with Down Syndrome. Three aspects of emotion regulation (modulation, organization, flexibility) were predicted from emotion variables (affect intensity, affective expression, and autonomy-curiosity and motivation) in backward regression…

  3. [Subcortical laminar heterotopia 'double cortex syndrome'].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teplyshova, A M; Gaskin, V V; Kustov, G V; Gudkova, A A; Luzin, R V; Trifonov, I S; Lebedeva, A V

    2017-01-01

    This article presents a clinical case of a 29-year-old patient with 'Double cortex syndrome' with epilepsy, intellectual and mental disorders. Subcortical band heterotopia is a rare disorder of neuronal migration. Such patients typically present with epilepsy and variable degrees of mental retardation and behavioral and intellectual disturbances. The main diagnostic method is magnetic resonance imaging (MRI).

  4. Gastrointestinal and Hepatic Disease in Sjogren Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popov, Yevgeniy; Salomon-Escoto, Karen

    2018-02-01

    Sjogren syndrome (SS) is a lymphocyte-mediated, infiltrative autoimmune disorder characterized by destruction of exocrine glands leading to secretory dysfunction. The typical manifestations include xerostomia and xerophthalmia; however, extensive gastrointestinal involvement is increasingly being recognized, emphasizing the variable and systemic nature of SS. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. The Peters' plus syndrome: a review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maillette de Buy Wenniger-Prick, Liesbeth J. J. M.; Hennekam, Raoul C. M.

    2002-01-01

    Peters' plus syndrome is an infrequently described entity that combines anomalies in the anterior chamber of the eye with other multiple congenital anomalies, and a developmental delay. Major symptoms are extremely variable anterior chamber anomalies, cupid bow of the upper lip, cleft lip and

  6. Genetics of syndromic and non-syndromic mitral valve prolapse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Tourneau, Thierry; Mérot, Jean; Rimbert, Antoine; Le Scouarnec, Solena; Probst, Vincent; Le Marec, Hervé; Levine, Robert A; Schott, Jean-Jacques

    2018-01-19

    Mitral valve prolapse (MVP) is a common condition that affects 2%-3% of the general population. MVP is thought to include syndromic forms such as Marfan syndrome and non-syndromic MVP, which is the most frequent form. Myxomatous degeneration and fibroelastic deficiency (FED) are regarded as two different forms of non-syndromic MVP. While FED is still considered a degenerative disease associated with ageing, frequent familial clustering has been demonstrated for myxomatous MVP. Familial and genetic studies led to the recognition of reduced penetrance and large phenotypic variability, and to the identification of prodromal or atypical forms as a part of the complex spectrum of the disease. Whereas autosomal dominant mode is the common inheritance pattern, an X linked form of non-syndromic MVP was recognised initially, related to Filamin-A gene, encoding for a cytoskeleton protein involved in mechanotransduction. This identification allowed a comprehensive description of a new subtype of MVP with a unique association of leaflet prolapse and paradoxical restricted motion in diastole. In autosomal dominant forms, three loci have been mapped to chromosomes 16p11-p12, 11p15.4 and 13q31-32. Although deciphering the underlying genetic defects is still a work in progress, DCHS1 mutations have been identified (11p15.4) in typical myxomatous disease, highlighting new molecular pathways and pathophysiological mechanisms leading to the development of MVP. Finally, a large international genome-wide association study demonstrated the implication of frequent variants in MVP development and opened new directions for future research. Hence, this review focuses on phenotypic, genetic and pathophysiological aspects of MVP. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2018. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  7. Goldenhar Syndrome in Association with Duane Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    U D Shrestha

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Goldenhar syndrome (GHS is also known as Oculo-Auriculo-Vertebral (OAV syndrome or Branchial arch syndrome. Duane retraction syndrome (DRS is a congenital disorder of ocular motility characterized by limited abduction, adduction or both. It is unilateral in 80% of cases. The important and interesting part of this eight months old child is presence of GHS with DRS. She has bilateral invol-vement, which is seen in only 5-8% of GHS, as compared to high incidence of unilateral involve-ment. This child also had refractive error of + 6.00/ - 1.5 * 180. At four year of age her vision with glass was 6/9. Children with GHS and DRS should have early eye examination done to treat the problem of refractive error. Keywords: Duane retraction syndrome; goldenhar syndrome, refractive error.

  8. Gitelman syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Levtchenko Elena N

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Gitelman syndrome (GS, also referred to as familial hypokalemia-hypomagnesemia, is characterized by hypokalemic metabolic alkalosis in combination with significant hypomagnesemia and low urinary calcium excretion. The prevalence is estimated at approximately 1:40,000 and accordingly, the prevalence of heterozygotes is approximately 1% in Caucasian populations, making it one of the most frequent inherited renal tubular disorders. In the majority of cases, symptoms do not appear before the age of six years and the disease is usually diagnosed during adolescence or adulthood. Transient periods of muscle weakness and tetany, sometimes accompanied by abdominal pain, vomiting and fever are often seen in GS patients. Paresthesias, especially in the face, frequently occur. Remarkably, some patients are completely asymptomatic except for the appearance at adult age of chondrocalcinosis that causes swelling, local heat, and tenderness over the affected joints. Blood pressure is lower than that in the general population. Sudden cardiac arrest has been reported occasionally. In general, growth is normal but can be delayed in those GS patients with severe hypokalemia and hypomagnesemia. GS is transmitted as an autosomal recessive trait. Mutations in the solute carrier family12, member 3 gene, SLC12A3, which encodes the thiazide-sensitive NaCl cotransporter (NCC, are found in the majority of GS patients. At present, more than 140 different NCC mutations throughout the whole protein have been identified. In a small minority of GS patients, mutations in the CLCNKB gene, encoding the chloride channel ClC-Kb have been identified. Diagnosis is based on the clinical symptoms and biochemical abnormalities (hypokalemia, metabolic alkalosis, hypomagnesemia and hypocalciuria. Bartter syndrome (especially type III is the most important genetic disorder to consider in the differential diagnosis of GS. Genetic counseling is important. Antenatal diagnosis for GS

  9. Burning Mouth Syndrome and "Burning Mouth Syndrome".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rifkind, Jacob Bernard

    2016-03-01

    Burning mouth syndrome is distressing to both the patient and practitioner unable to determine the cause of the patient's symptoms. Burning mouth syndrome is a diagnosis of exclusion, which is used only after nutritional deficiencies, mucosal disease, fungal infections, hormonal disturbances and contact stomatitis have been ruled out. This article will explore the many causes and treatment of patients who present with a chief complaint of "my mouth burns," including symptomatic treatment for those with burning mouth syndrome.

  10. Ellis-Van Creveld syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Le Merrer Martine

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Ellis-van Creveld syndrome (EVC is a chondral and ectodermal dysplasia characterized by short ribs, polydactyly, growth retardation, and ectodermal and heart defects. It is a rare disease with approximately 150 cases reported worldwide. The exact prevalence is unknown, but the syndrome seems more common among the Amish community. Prenatal abnormalities (that may be detected by ultrasound examination include narrow thorax, shortening of long bones, hexadactyly and cardiac defects. After birth, cardinal features are short stature, short ribs, polydactyly, and dysplastic fingernails and teeth. Heart defects, especially abnormalities of atrial septation, occur in about 60% of cases. Cognitive and motor development is normal. This rare condition is inherited as an autosomal recessive trait with variable expression. Mutations of the EVC1 and EVC2 genes, located in a head to head configuration on chromosome 4p16, have been identified as causative. EVC belongs to the short rib-polydactyly group (SRP and these SRPs, especially type III (Verma-Naumoff syndrome, are discussed in the prenatal differential diagnosis. Postnatally, the essential differential diagnoses include Jeune dystrophy, McKusick-Kaufman syndrome and Weyers syndrome. The management of EVC is multidisciplinary. Management during the neonatal period is mostly symptomatic, involving treatment of the respiratory distress due to narrow chest and heart failure. Orthopedic follow-up is required to manage the bones deformities. Professional dental care should be considered for management of the oral manifestations. Prognosis is linked to the respiratory difficulties in the first months of life due to thoracic narrowness and possible heart defects. Prognosis of the final body height is difficult to predict.

  11. Diagnosis of shoulder impingement syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hodler, J.

    1996-01-01

    This article reviews the pathogenesis and clinical and imaging findings in shoulder impingement syndrome. Different stages of impingement syndrome are described. Stage I relates to edema and hemorrhage of the supraspinatus tendon. Stage II is characterized by bursal inflammation and fibrosis, as well as tendinopathy. In stage III there is a tear of the rotator cuff. Clinical signs many overlap. Moreover, calcifying tendinitis, fractures and pain originating from the cervical spine may mimic shoulder impingement syndrome. Imaging is important for the exact diagnosis. Standard radiographs are the basis of imaging in shoulder impingement syndrome. They may demonstrate subchondral sclerosis of the major tuberosity, subacromial spurs, and form anomalies of the acromion. They are also important in the differential diagnosis of shoulder impingement syndrome and demonstrate calcifying tendinitis, fractures and neoplasm. Ultrasonography has found acceptance as a screening tool and even as a final diagnostic method by many authors. However, there is a high interobserver variability in the demonstration of rotator cuff tears. Its usefulness has therefore been questioned. MR imaging is probably the method of choice in the evaluation of the rotator cuff and surrounding structures. Several investigations have demonstrated that differentiation of early findings, such as tendinopathy versus partial tears, may be difficult with MR imaging. However, reproducibility for fullthickness tears appears to be higher than for sonography. Moreover, specificity appears to be superior to sonography. MR arthrography is not universally accepted. However, it allows for more exact differentiation of discrete findings and may be indicated in preoperative planning. Standard arthrography and CT have a limited role in the current assessment of the rotator cuff. (orig.) [de

  12. Challenging behavior: Behavioral phenotypes of some genetic syndromes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Buha Nataša

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Challenging behavior in individuals with mental retardation (MR is relatively frequent, and represents a significant obstacle to adaptive skills. The frequency of specific forms and manifestations of challenging behavior can depend on a variety of personal and environmental factors. There are several prominent theoretical models regarding the etiology of challenging behavior and psychopathology in persons with MR: behavioral, developmental, socio-cultural and biological. The biological model emphasizes the physiological, biochemical and genetic factors as the potential source of challenging behavior. The progress in the field of genetics and neuroscience has opened the opportunity to study and discover the neurobiological basis of phenotypic characteristics. Genetic syndromes associated with MR can be followed by a specific set of problems and disorders which constitutes their behavioral phenotype. The aim of this paper was to present challenging behaviors that manifest in the most frequently studied syndromes: Down syndrome, Fragile X syndrome, Williams syndrome, Prader-Willi syndrome and Angelman syndrome. The concept of behavioral phenotype implies a higher probability of manifesting specific developmental characteristics and specific behaviors in individuals with a certain genetic syndrome. Although the specific set of (possible problems and disorders is distinctive for the described genetic syndromes, the connection between genetics and behavior should be viewed through probabilistic dimension. The probabilistic concept takes into consideration the possibility of intra-syndrome variability in the occurrence, intensity and time onset of behavioral characteristics, at which the higher variability the lower is the specificity of the genetic syndrome. Identifying the specific pattern of behavior can be most important for the process of early diagnosis and prognosis. In addition, having knowledge about behavioral phenotype can be a landmark in

  13. Hepatorenal Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pınar Zeyneloğlu

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Renal failure is a common major complication in patients with advanced cirrhosis and generally indicates a poor prognosis when combined with liver failure. Hepatorenal syndrome (HRS is characterised by a combination of disturbances in circulatory and kidney function. Arterial pressure is decreased in the systemic circulation due to reduced total systemic vascular resistance. Kidney dysfunction is caused by reduction in renal blood flow. The diagnosis of HRS is based on exclusion of other disorders that cause acute kidney injury in cirrhosis as there are no specific tests. There are two types of HRS with different characteristics and prognostics. Liver transplantation is the treatment of choice for all patients without contraindication. The best approach to the pharmacologic management is the administration vasoconstrictor drugs based on the pathogenesis. Many vasoconstrictors including vasopressin analogues (terlipressin, ornipressin and vasopressin, somatostatin analogues (octreotide and alpha-adrenergic analogues (midodrine and norepinephrine have been studied. In most of the studies intravenous albumin therapy was coadministered with vasoconstrictor drugs and suggested that albumin should be considered as the component of pharmacologic intervention in patients with HRS. Renal replacement therapy in the form of hemodialysis or continuous venovenous hemofiltration has been used in the management of HRS patients awaiting transplantation or in those with acute potentially reversible conditions. The artificial hepatic support systems require further investigation. (Journal of the Turkish Society Intensive Care 2012; 10: 37-44

  14. Pseudohypopituitary syndromes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinze, E; Holl, R W

    1992-07-01

    In a child with short stature, the finding of normal or elevated GH levels in the presence of low concentrations of IGF-I raises the following possibilities. (1) A modification of the GH molecule, which is still detected by RIA, but inactive biologically. Therefore, an RRA or bioassay for hGH should result in considerably lower GH measurements compared with RIA determinations in the same sample. As both bioassays as well as RRAs are not widely available and are hampered by several difficulties, few children with this presumptive diagnosis have been described. So far, it has not been possible to define a specific molecular defect in one of these patients. (2) Abnormalities of the GH receptor or postreceptor mechanisms lead to a GH insensitivity syndrome. Laron-type dwarfism is usually due to a deletion in the gene for hepatic GH receptors: the serum binding protein for GH is absent. In three additional populations, the Pygmies of Zaire, the little women of Loja in Ecuador and the Mountain Ok people in Papua New Guinea, alterations of GH receptor function have been described. Finally, some reports describe patients with normal or elevated serum levels of both growth hormone and IGF-I in whom resistance to IGF has been implied in the pathogenesis of small stature.

  15. Hepatorenal syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papper, S

    1980-01-01

    Renal failure without apparent cause (the hepatorenal syndrome) may develop in the course of cirrhosis of the liver. While the development of renal failure bears a poor prognosis, spontaneous recovery can occur. The data suggest that for the most part patients die in rather than of renal failure. The latter seems to be only part of a broader more fundamental disturbance. The pathogenesis of HRS is unknown, but the evidence supports an impairment of effective renal perfusion. The two major hypotheses concerning the nature of the impaired perfusion are that it is a physiologic response to alterations in the extrarenal circulation, and that there is an unidentified humoral agent(s) produced by or inadequately inactivated by or bypassing the diseased liver and causing circulatory changes in the kidney as well as in other organs. It is possible that both mechanisms are operative. Treatment is unsatisfactory and emphasis is presently best placed upon searching for more treatable causes of renal functional impairment in individual patients.

  16. Differences in manifestations of Marfan syndrome, Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, and Loeys-Dietz syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meester, Josephina A N; Verstraeten, Aline; Schepers, Dorien; Alaerts, Maaike; Van Laer, Lut; Loeys, Bart L

    2017-11-01

    Many different heritable connective tissue disorders (HCTD) have been described over the past decades. These syndromes often affect the connective tissue of various organ systems, including heart, blood vessels, skin, joints, bone, eyes, and lungs. The discovery of these HCTD was followed by the identification of mutations in a wide range of genes encoding structural proteins, modifying enzymes, or components of the TGFβ-signaling pathway. Three typical examples of HCTD are Marfan syndrome (MFS), Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (EDS), and Loeys-Dietz syndrome (LDS). These syndromes show some degree of phenotypical overlap of cardiovascular, skeletal, and cutaneous features. MFS is typically characterized by cardiovascular, ocular, and skeletal manifestations and is caused by heterozygous mutations in FBN1 , coding for the extracellular matrix (ECM) protein fibrillin-1. The most common cardiovascular phenotype involves aortic aneurysm and dissection at the sinuses of Valsalva. LDS is caused by mutations in TGBR1/2 , SMAD2/3 , or TGFB2/3 , all coding for components of the TGFβ-signaling pathway. LDS can be distinguished from MFS by the unique presence of hypertelorism, bifid uvula or cleft palate, and widespread aortic and arterial aneurysm and tortuosity. Compared to MFS, LDS cardiovascular manifestations tend to be more severe. In contrast, no association is reported between LDS and the presence of ectopia lentis, a key distinguishing feature of MFS. Overlapping features between MFS and LDS include scoliosis, pes planus, anterior chest deformity, spontaneous pneumothorax, and dural ectasia. EDS refers to a group of clinically and genetically heterogeneous connective tissue disorders and all subtypes are characterized by variable abnormalities of skin, ligaments and joints, blood vessels, and internal organs. Typical presenting features include joint hypermobility, skin hyperextensibility, and tissue fragility. Up to one quarter of the EDS patients show aortic aneurysmal

  17. Differences in manifestations of Marfan syndrome, Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, and Loeys-Dietz syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meester, Josephina A. N.; Verstraeten, Aline; Schepers, Dorien; Alaerts, Maaike; Van Laer, Lut

    2017-01-01

    Many different heritable connective tissue disorders (HCTD) have been described over the past decades. These syndromes often affect the connective tissue of various organ systems, including heart, blood vessels, skin, joints, bone, eyes, and lungs. The discovery of these HCTD was followed by the identification of mutations in a wide range of genes encoding structural proteins, modifying enzymes, or components of the TGFβ-signaling pathway. Three typical examples of HCTD are Marfan syndrome (MFS), Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (EDS), and Loeys-Dietz syndrome (LDS). These syndromes show some degree of phenotypical overlap of cardiovascular, skeletal, and cutaneous features. MFS is typically characterized by cardiovascular, ocular, and skeletal manifestations and is caused by heterozygous mutations in FBN1, coding for the extracellular matrix (ECM) protein fibrillin-1. The most common cardiovascular phenotype involves aortic aneurysm and dissection at the sinuses of Valsalva. LDS is caused by mutations in TGBR1/2, SMAD2/3, or TGFB2/3, all coding for components of the TGFβ-signaling pathway. LDS can be distinguished from MFS by the unique presence of hypertelorism, bifid uvula or cleft palate, and widespread aortic and arterial aneurysm and tortuosity. Compared to MFS, LDS cardiovascular manifestations tend to be more severe. In contrast, no association is reported between LDS and the presence of ectopia lentis, a key distinguishing feature of MFS. Overlapping features between MFS and LDS include scoliosis, pes planus, anterior chest deformity, spontaneous pneumothorax, and dural ectasia. EDS refers to a group of clinically and genetically heterogeneous connective tissue disorders and all subtypes are characterized by variable abnormalities of skin, ligaments and joints, blood vessels, and internal organs. Typical presenting features include joint hypermobility, skin hyperextensibility, and tissue fragility. Up to one quarter of the EDS patients show aortic aneurysmal

  18. Malignancy in Noonan syndrome and related disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smpokou, P; Zand, D J; Rosenbaum, K N; Summar, M L

    2015-12-01

    Noonan syndrome (NS) and related disorders, such as NS with multiple lentigines (formerly called LEOPARD syndrome), cardiofaciocutaneous syndrome, and Costello syndrome, constitute an important group of developmental malformation syndromes with variable clinical and molecular features. Their underlying pathophysiologic mechanism involves dysregulation of the Ras/mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling pathway, an essential mediator of developmental and growth processes in the prenatal and postnatal setting. Malignant tumor development is an important complication encountered in other RASopathies, such as neurofibromatosis type 1, but the neoplastic risks and incidence of malignant tumors are less clearly defined in NS and related disorders of the Noonan spectrum. Malignant tumor development remains an important complication variably seen in the RASopathies and, thus, a clear understanding of the underlying risks is essential for appropriate clinical care in this patient population. This review discusses previously published reports of malignancies in individuals with RASopathies of the Noonan spectrum. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Terlipressin for hepatorenal syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gluud, Lise Lotte; Christensen, Kurt; Christensen, Erik

    2012-01-01

    Clinical trials suggest that terlipressin improves renal function in hepatorenal syndrome, but the evidence concerning mortality is equivocal.......Clinical trials suggest that terlipressin improves renal function in hepatorenal syndrome, but the evidence concerning mortality is equivocal....

  20. Chinese restaurant syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chinese restaurant syndrome is a set of symptoms that some people have after eating Chinese food. A food additive ... Chinese restaurant syndrome is most often diagnosed based on the symptoms. The health care provider may ask the following ...

  1. Obesity hypoventilation syndrome (OHS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000085.htm Obesity hypoventilation syndrome (OHS) To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Obesity hypoventilation syndrome (OHS) is a condition in some ...

  2. Hermansky-Pudlak syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Preena A

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Hermansky-Pudlak syndrome is a rare autosomal recessive multisystem disease, with oculocutneous albinism, pulmonary fibrosis and bleeding diathesis. Here we report a case of Hermansky-Pudlak syndrome who presented with dyspnea, oculocutaneous albinism and nystagmus.

  3. Marfan syndrome (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marfan syndrome is a disorder of connective tissue which causes skeletal defects typically recognized in a tall, lanky person. A person with Marfan syndrome may exhibit long limbs and spider-like fingers, ...

  4. Acute respiratory distress syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000103.htm Acute respiratory distress syndrome To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is a life-threatening lung ...

  5. Oculoauriculovertebral dysplasia (Goldenhar's syndrome).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nkrumah, F K

    1971-03-01

    A case of Goldenhar's Syndrome or Oculoauriculovertebral dysplasia in a Ghanaian infant is described. Significant were the additional findings of congenital esophageal atresia and arthrogryposis which have so far not been reported in association with the syndrome.

  6. Guillain-Barre Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guillain-Barre syndrome is a rare disorder that causes your immune system to attack your peripheral nervous system (PNS). The PNS ... your brain. No one knows what causes the syndrome. Sometimes it is triggered by an infection, surgery, ...

  7. Carpal Tunnel Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... a passing cramp? It could be carpal tunnel syndrome. The carpal tunnel is a narrow passageway of ... three times more likely to have carpal tunnel syndrome than men. Early diagnosis and treatment are important ...

  8. Polycystic Ovary Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) happens when a woman's ovaries or adrenal glands produce more male hormones than normal. PCOS causes cysts ( ... PCOS are at higher risk of diabetes, metabolic syndrome, heart disease, and high blood pressure. PCOS is ...

  9. Hyperimmunoglobulin E syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/001311.htm Hyperimmunoglobulin E syndrome To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Hyperimmunoglobulin E syndrome is a rare, inherited disease. It causes ...

  10. Holmes-Adie Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... other diseases of the nervous system, such as Sjogren’s syndrome or migraine. It is most often seen in ... other diseases of the nervous system, such as Sjogren’s syndrome or migraine. It is most often seen in ...

  11. The obstetric antiphospholipid syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Derksen, R. H. W. M.; de Grootb, Ph. G.

    The association of persistent presence of circulating antiphospholipid antibodies and thromboembolic events, (recurrent) pregnancy loss or both is termed antiphospholipid syndrome. Pregnancies in women with the syndrome should be regarded as at high-risk for complications. Optimal management

  12. Tics and Tourette Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... for Nausea and Vomiting Home Diseases and Conditions Tics and Tourette Syndrome Condition Tics and Tourette Syndrome Share Print Table of Contents1. ... little or no control over. These are called tics. Several different tics can happen at the same ...

  13. Down Syndrome (For Kids)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Changed What's Life Like for Kids With Down Syndrome? Print en español El síndrome de Down You have probably seen people who have Down syndrome. They have certain physical features, such as a ...

  14. Hantavirus Pulmonary Syndrome (HPS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to Yosemite FAQ: Non-U.S. Visitors to Yosemite History of HPS Related Links Prevent Rodent Infestations Cleaning Up After Rodents Diseases From Rodent Hantavirus Pulmonary Syndrome (HPS) Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Hantavirus Pulmonary Syndrome (HPS) is ...

  15. Ramsay Hunt syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunt syndrome; Herpes zoster oticus; Geniculate ganglion zoster; Geniculate herpes; Herpetic geniculate ganglionitis ... The varicella-zoster virus that causes Ramsay Hunt syndrome is the same virus that causes chickenpox and ...

  16. Moebius Syndrome Foundation

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... craniofacial/neurological disorder. Individuals with Moebius syndrome cannot smile or frown, and do not have lateral eye ... the organization to ensure that they are in line with the mission of the Moebius Syndrome Foundation. ...

  17. Burning Mouth Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Care Home Health Info Health Topics Burning Mouth Burning Mouth Syndrome (BMS) is a painful, complex condition often described ... or other symptoms. Read More Publications Cover image Burning Mouth Syndrome Publication files Download Language English PDF — Number of ...

  18. Neuroleptic Malignant Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... such as neuroleptic malignant syndrome. Much of this research focuses on finding ways to prevent and treat the disorder. Show More Show Less Search Disorders SEARCH SEARCH Definition Treatment Prognosis Clinical Trials Organizations Publications Definition Neuroleptic malignant syndrome is ...

  19. Skin Peeling Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharma Rajeev

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Peeling of the skin is an uncommonly encountered disorder. Occurrence of vesicles and bullae in peeling skin syndrome is very rare. We report a case of idiopathic peeling skin syndrome with vesicular lesions.

  20. Variable importance in latent variable regression models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kvalheim, O.M.; Arneberg, R.; Bleie, O.; Rajalahti, T.; Smilde, A.K.; Westerhuis, J.A.

    2014-01-01

    The quality and practical usefulness of a regression model are a function of both interpretability and prediction performance. This work presents some new graphical tools for improved interpretation of latent variable regression models that can also assist in improved algorithms for variable

  1. Parenting style and the vulnerable child syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duncan, Andrea Freeman; Caughy, Margaret O'Brien

    2009-11-01

    Vulnerable child syndrome (VCS) refers to the combination of the parental view that their child is at increased risk for death despite the child's objective health and the resulting behavior problems in the child. Although risk factors for the development of the syndrome have been outlined, the variability in the development of VCS has not been explained. A theoretical explanation for the variability in the development of VCS utilizing Susan Calkins' model is explored. By considering the development of VCS in light of Calkins' model, variability may be explained and preventative interventions may be instituted. Relevant literature pertaining to child development and VCS was reviewed. By recognizing the risk of the role that parenting sensitivity plays in the development of VCS, team-based interventions involving a developmental approach may be employed, and the long-term behavioral sequelae of the disorder may be prevented or alleviated.

  2. [The Capgras syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anikina, M A; Levin, O S

    2013-01-01

    The Capgras syndrome is one of delusional-like misidentification syndrome in which a person holds a delusion that one or several his/her friends or relatives have been replaced by an identical-looking impostor. As any other delusional disorder, the Capgras syndrome is characterized by stability despite the indisputable arguments against fault views. Initially, this syndrome was considered as a presentation of schizophrenia but later it has been described in brain organic disorders, primarily in elderly patients with dementia.

  3. The wellness syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mik-Meyer, Nanna

    2015-01-01

    Klumme. Wellness er blevet et syndrom, og dets symptomer er angst, selvbebrejdelser og skyldfølelse. Kommentar med udgangspunkt i: Carl Cederström & Andre Spicer, "The Wellness Syndrome" (Polity Books, 2015. 200 p.).......Klumme. Wellness er blevet et syndrom, og dets symptomer er angst, selvbebrejdelser og skyldfølelse. Kommentar med udgangspunkt i: Carl Cederström & Andre Spicer, "The Wellness Syndrome" (Polity Books, 2015. 200 p.)....

  4. Marfan syndrome: clinical diagnosis and management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dean, John C S

    2007-07-01

    Marfan syndrome is a multisystem connective tissue disorder usually associated with mutation in fibrillin, and occasionally with mutation in TGFBR1 or 2. The clinical diagnosis is made using the Ghent nosology, which will unequivocally diagnose or exclude Marfan syndrome in 86% of cases. Use of a care pathway can help implementation of the nosology in the clinic. The penetrance of some features is age dependent, so the nosology must be used with caution in children. Molecular testing may be helpful in this context. The nosology cannot be used in families with isolated aortic dissection, or with related conditions such as Loeys-Dietz syndrome, although it may help identify families for further diagnostic evaluation because they do not fulfill the nosology, despite a history of aneurysm. Prophylactic medical (eg beta-blockade) and surgical intervention is important in reducing the cardiovascular complications of Marfan syndrome. Musculoskeletal symptoms are common, although the pathophysiology is less clear--for example, the correlation between dural ectasia and back pain is uncertain. Symptoms in other systems require specialist review such as ophthalmology assessment of refractive errors and ectopia lentis. Pregnancy is a time of increased cardiovascular risk for women with Marfan syndrome, particularly if the aortic root exceeds 4 cm at the start of pregnancy. High-intensity static exercise should be discouraged although low-moderate intensity dynamic exercise may be beneficial. The diagnosis and management of Marfan syndrome requires a multidisciplinary team approach, in view of its multisystem effects and phenotypic variability.

  5. Tropical diabetic hand syndrome: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeika, Eugene Vernyuy; Tchoumi Tantchou, Jacques Cabral; Foryoung, Joyce Bei; Tolefac, Paul Nkemtendong; Efie, Derrick Tembi; Choukem, Siméon Pierre

    2017-02-13

    Tropical diabetic hand syndrome describes a complex hand sepsis affecting patients with diabetes across the tropics and often results from a trivial hand trauma. The clinical presentation of this syndrome is variable and ranges from localised swelling and cellulitis, with or without ulceration of the hand to progressive fulminant hand sepsis, and gangrene affecting the entire limb which may be fatal. Tropical diabetic hand syndrome could lead to permanent disability and death as a result of delay in presentation, late diagnosis and late medical and surgical intervention. This indexed case acts as an eye opener for physicians to the existence of this hand sepsis. We report the case of a 57 year-old black African female diabetic who was referred to our centre for the management of a suppurating ulcer and swelling of the left hand of two weeks duration. On examination and work-up, the patient was found to have Lawal Group III left diabetic hand syndrome and was managed with parenteral antibiotics, radical debridement and the hand was eventually amputated. She died 7 days following amputation from overwhelming sepsis. Though tropical diabetic hand syndrome is a relatively rare complication of diabetes, it can be fatal as in this case report. Early diagnosis and proper management would yield better outcome. Initial management should include aggressive intravenous broad-spectrum antibiotics with anaerobic coverage. Classification of tropical diabetic hand syndrome will assist physicians and surgeons in decision making, proper management and easy communication.

  6. Fibromyalgia and chronic fatigue syndrome in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Itoh, Yasuhiko; Shigemori, Tomoko; Igarashi, Tohru; Fukunaga, Yoshitaka

    2012-04-01

    Fibromyalgia (FM) is characterized by widespread persistent pain and the presence of multiple discrete tender points. Chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) is a syndrome characterized by debilitating fatigue associated with a variable number of non-specific complaints. Because neither condition had necessarily been recognized in children until recently, those patients have been treated as having school refusal without being diagnosed as having either syndrome. There is a considerable overlap of clinical symptoms between these two syndromes. It is therefore controversial as to whether these syndromes have the same pathogenesis or not. The aim of the present study was to clarify the relationship between these syndromes in children. Fifteen patients with FM and 21 patients with CFS were investigated both clinically and immunologically. Immunological assessments included thorough analysis of autoantibodies using several techniques. Anti-nuclear antibody titers were higher and the prevalence of anti-Sa antibody was far more frequent in CFS patients than in FM patients. CFS and FM are different from each other at least in childhood, from an immunological aspect, although some patients could have both conditions. © 2011 The Authors. Pediatrics International © 2011 Japan Pediatric Society.

  7. Phenotypic Variations in Wolfhirschhorn Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Sukarova-Angelovska

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Wolf-Hirschhorn syndrome (WHS is a rare chromosomal disorder caused by terminal deletion of the short arm of chromosome 4. The clinical picture includes growth retardation, severe mental retardation, characteristic “Greek helmet” like face, seizures and midline defects in the brain, heart, palate and genitalia. Recently-used molecular techniques increase the number of diagnosed cases due to the detection of smaller deletions. The severity of the clinical presentation is variable depending on the haploinsufficiency of genes in a deleted region.

  8. PRES syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Georgiev, R.; Novakova, M.; Balev, B.; Baleva, D.; Nedelchev, K.

    2010-01-01

    Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES) is a clinicoradiological entity characterized by headache, confusion, visual disturbances, seizures and posterior transient changes on neuroimaging. PRES has been described in several conditions including hypertensive encephalopathy, preeclampsia, eclampsia, infections, electrolyte imbalance, hypercalcaemia and use of several drugs. It occurs due to elevated blood pressure which exceeds the autoregulatory capacity of brain vasculature. The posterior circulation supplied by vertibro-basilar system has poor sympathetic innervation and, therefore, is frequently involved. The role of neuroimaging is to establish the initial diagnosis and to exclude other causes of neurological symptoms and signs. NCCT is sufficient to make the diagnosis in a proper clinical setting. MRI features are characteristic and has diagnostic and prognostic value. Diffusion weighted imaging (DWI) can differentiate this condition from ischemia/cytotoxic edema. Differential diagnosis of PRES includes PCA territory infarcts, venous thrombosis, demyelinating disorders, vasculitis and encephalitis. The diagnosis has important implications because the reversibility of the clinico-radiological abnormalities is contingent on the prompt control of blood pressure and/or withdrawing of the offending drug. We describe here a case of PRES in a 12 years old girl with acute lymphoblasts leukaemia, treated with cytostatics-vincristine, pharmorubycin and methotrexate. After 39 days from the beginning of the treatment there are good results in the myelogram and the flowcytometric examination, but the patient made two tonic-clonic seizures. CT and MRI were made and signs of leucoencephalopathy were diagnosed. Several control MRI examinations after cessation of the therapy and disappearance of the neurologic symptoms were made. The normal findings and the clinical course were the reasons for the PRES diagnosis

  9. Postthrombotic syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pesavento, Raffaele; Bernardi, Enrico; Concolato, Alessia; Dalla Valle, Fabio; Pagnan, Antonio; Prandoni, Paolo

    2006-10-01

    Despite considerable progress in the diagnosis and treatment of deep vein thrombosis (DVT) of the lower extremities, one of every three patients will develop postthrombotic sequelae within 2 years; these sequelae are severe in approximately 20% of cases and produce considerable socioeconomic consequences. Among factors potentially related to the development of the postthrombotic syndrome (PTS) are older age, obesity, insufficient oral anticoagulant therapy, and recurrent ipsilateral thrombosis. Whether the extent and location of the initial thrombosis are associated with the development of PTS is controversial. Based on recent findings, the lack of vein recanalization within the first 6 months appears to be an important predictor of PTS, whereas the development of transpopliteal venous reflux is not. The diagnosis of PTS can be made on clinical grounds for patients with a history of DVT. The combination of a standardized clinical evaluation with the results of compression ultrasonography and Doppler ultrasound helps diagnose or exclude a previous proximal vein thrombosis. According to the results of recent clinical studies, the prompt administration of adequate compression elastic stockings in patients with symptomatic DVT has the potential to reduce the frequency of late PTS development by half. The management of this condition is demanding and often frustrating. However, when carefully supervised and instructed to wear proper elastic stockings, more than 50% of patients will either remain stable or improve during long-term follow-up. Clinical presentation helps predict the prognosis; the outcome of patients who refer with initially severe manifestations is more favorable than that of patients whose symptoms deteriorate progressively over time.

  10. Cardio-renal syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Gnanaraj, Joseph; Radhakrishnan, Jai

    2016-01-01

    Cardio-renal syndrome is a commonly encountered problem in clinical practice. Its pathogenesis is not fully understood. The purpose of this article is to highlight the interaction between the cardiovascular system and the renal system and how their interaction results in the complex syndrome of cardio-renal dysfunction. Additionally, we outline the available therapeutic strategies to manage this complex syndrome.

  11. Facts about Down Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... monitor children with Down syndrome for these conditions. Treatments Down syndrome is a lifelong condition. Services early in life ... of these services focus on helping children with Down syndrome develop to their ... therapy, and they are typically offered through early intervention ...

  12. Gorlin-goltz syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmed, N.; Salman, M.; Mansoor, M.A.

    2007-01-01

    Multiple jaw cysts are a characteristic manifestation of basal cell nevus (Gorlin) syndrome. Gorlin-Goltz syndrome is characterized by symptoms primarily involving the skin, central nervous system, and skeletal system. In 90% of the patients, nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome is associated with recurring odontogenic keratocysts. This patient showed recurrent jaw and maxillary cysts, for which he was followed for 2 years. (author)

  13. Sjogren-Larsson Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Or In Memory Of Obituaries Contact Us Donate Sjogren-Larsson Syndrome What causes SLS? SLS is caused by mutations ... methods of diagnosing SLS. Other Clinical Names for Sjogren-Larsson Syndrome Other clinical names of Sjogren-Larsson Syndrome include: ...

  14. Cushing's syndrome during pregnancy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mulder, W. J.; Berghout, A.; Wiersinga, W. M.

    1990-01-01

    Two cases of Cushing's syndrome during pregnancy are reported, both due to an adrenal adenoma. The association of pregnancy and Cushing's syndrome has up to now been described in 48 patients (including our two cases); Cushing's syndrome was ACTH-independent in 59%, ACTH-dependent in 33%, and of

  15. Polycystic Ovary Syndrome FAQ

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Ovary Syndrome (PCOS) • What are common signs and symptoms of polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS)? • What causes PCOS? • What is insulin resistance? • ... with PCOS? •Glossary What are common signs and symptoms of polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS)? Common PCOS signs and symptoms include the ...

  16. Diagnostik af Dravet syndrom

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Lars Kjaersgård; Rasmussen, Niels Henrik; Ousager, Lilian Bomme

    2010-01-01

    Dravet syndrome is an epileptic syndrome of infancy. We describe the features of two cases with genetically verified SCNA1 mutations. The diagnosis was established rather late in one case. The epilepsies were medically intractable and the symptoms characteristic of Dravet syndrome. The children...

  17. The acute radiation syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Souhami Filho, L.

    1985-01-01

    Symptoms and signs from medical aspects resulting from whole body exposure, or in the main part, to ionizing radiation are described. The dose-response relationship is studied and the exposure is divided in three parts: central nervous system syndrome, gastrointestinal syndrome and hematopoietic syndrome. Brief comments about the treatment are reported. (M.A.C.) [pt

  18. DIDMOAD (Wolfram Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masoud Nashibi

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Wolfram syndrome was first described by physician D J Wolfram and Wagener in 1938. This autosomal recessive syndrome is also referred to as DIDMOAD syndrome which stands for Diabetes Insipidus, Insulin Dependent Diabetes Mellitus, Optic Atrophy and Deafness

  19. Bladder pain syndrome/interstitial cystitis in a Danish population

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Richter, Benedikte; Hesse, Ulrik; Hansen, Alastair B

    2010-01-01

    To characterize and evaluate a Danish patient population with bladder pain syndrome/interstitial cystitis (BPS/IC), using a working definition for BPS/IC incorporating six variables, and a set of criteria defined by the European Society for the Study of Interstitial Cystitis (ESSIC); to describe...... the clinical course and treatment intensity in relation to these variables....

  20. Neuropsychological phenotype and psychopathology in seven adult patients with Phelan-McDermid syndrome : implications for treatment strategy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Egger, J. I. M.; Zwanenburg, R. J.; van Ravenswaaij-Arts, C. M. A.; Kleefstra, T.; Verhoeven, W. M. A.

    Phelan-McDermid syndrome presents with specific deficits in neurocognition, cerebellar regulatory functioning and enhanced vulnerability for the development of atypical bipolar disorder. Phelan-McDermid syndrome (PMS) or 22q13.3 deletion syndrome is characterized by a variable degree of intellectual

  1. CDH23 mutation and phenotype heterogeneity: a profile of 107 diverse families with Usher syndrome and nonsyndromic deafness.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Astuto, L.M.; Bork, J.M.; Weston, M.D.; Askew, J.W.; Fields, R.R.; Orten, D.J.; Ohliger, S.J.; Riazuddin, S.; Morell, R.J.; Khan, S.; Kremer, J.M.J.; Hauwe, P. van; Moller, C.G.; Cremers, C.W.R.J.; Ayuso, C.; Heckenlively, J.R.; Rohrschneider, K.; Spandau, U.; Greenberg, J.; Ramesar, R.S.; Reardon, W.; Bitoun, P.; Millan, J.; Legge, R.; Friedman, T.B.; Kimberling, W.J.

    2002-01-01

    Usher syndrome type I is characterized by congenital hearing loss, retinitis pigmentosa (RP), and variable vestibular areflexia. Usher syndrome type ID, one of seven Usher syndrome type I genetic localizations, have been mapped to a chromosomal interval that overlaps with a nonsyndromic-deafness

  2. Language and Learning in Boys with Fragile X Syndrome: Syntactic Processing and the Role of Phonological Memory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kover, Sara T.

    2012-01-01

    Fragile X syndrome is the leading inherited cause of intellectual disability. Most boys with fragile X syndrome have impaired cognition and language deficits, with significant within-syndrome variability. Syntax may be especially delayed relative to nonverbal cognition; however, little is known about the specificity of delay, the sources of that…

  3. Nevoid Basal Cell Carcinoma Syndrome (Gorlin Syndrome).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bresler, Scott C; Padwa, Bonnie L; Granter, Scott R

    2016-06-01

    Nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome, or basal cell nevus syndrome (Gorlin syndrome), is a rare autosomal dominantly inherited disorder that is characterized by development of basal cell carcinomas from a young age. Other distinguishing clinical features are seen in a majority of patients, and include keratocystic odontogenic tumors (formerly odontogenic keratocysts) as well as dyskeratotic palmar and plantar pitting. A range of skeletal and other developmental abnormalities are also often seen. The disorder is caused by defects in hedgehog signaling which result in constitutive pathway activity and tumor cell proliferation. As sporadic basal cell carcinomas also commonly harbor hedgehog pathway aberrations, therapeutic agents targeting key signaling constituents have been developed and tested against advanced sporadically occurring tumors or syndromic disease, leading in 2013 to FDA approval of the first hedgehog pathway-targeted small molecule, vismodegib. The elucidation of the molecular pathogenesis of nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome has resulted in further understanding of the most common human malignancy.

  4. Heart rate variability in infants with West syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Michelle Mai; Høgenhaven, Hans; Uldall, Peter

    2015-01-01

    -Whitney's U-Test) in the awake state, indicating an abnormal autonomic output to the heart. Comparing the initial to the final examination demonstrated a significant increase in the HRV parameters SDNN (31.3ms) and total power (757ms(2); p=0.001 and p=0.013, Wilcoxon Signed Ranked Test). In addition......, when hypsarrhythmia was no longer present. RESULTS: Compared to controls, patients with WS during hypsarrhythmia had significantly lower SDNN (the standard deviation of the NN interval, i.e. the square root of variance) (19.2ms; p=0.007, Mann-Whitney's U-Test) and total power (242ms(2); p=0.044, Mann...

  5. Fraser syndrome: Phenotypic variability and unusual findings in four ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Ebtesam M. Abdalla

    2015-11-25

    Nov 25, 2015 ... a Department of Human Genetics, Medical Research Institute, Alexandria University, Egypt .... centin1 (HMCN1), Furin, and Fibulin 1, that interact in base- ... The first child of this couple [case 2-1], who was born at term and ...

  6. Abdominal compartment syndrome with acute reperfusion syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maleeva, A.

    2017-01-01

    Abdominal compartment syndrome was recognized clinically in the 19th century when Marey and Burt observed its association with declines in respiratory function. Abdominal compartment syndrome is first used as a medical terminology from Fietsman in a case of ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm. A condition caused by abnormally increased pressure within the abdomen. Causes of abdominal compartment syndrome include trauma, surgery, or infection. Common symptoms: abdominal distension, fast heart rate, insufficient urine production, or low blood pressure Medical procedure: nasogastric intubation Surgery: laparotomy Specialists: radiologist, primary care provider (PCP), surgeon, and emergency medicine doctor [6, 10]. Keywords: Stomach. Gastroparesis . Diabetes Mellitus [bg

  7. Cardiorenal Syndrome in Acute Heart Failure Syndromes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Sarraf

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Impaired cardiac function leads to activation of the neurohumoral axis, sodium and water retention, congestion and ultimately impaired kidney function. This sequence of events has been termed the Cardiorenal Syndrome. This is different from the increase in cardiovascular complications which occur with primary kidney disease, that is, the so-called Renocardiac Syndrome. The present review discusses the pathogenesis of the Cardiorenal Syndrome followed by the benefits and potential deleterious effects of pharmacological agents that have been used in this setting. The agents discussed are diuretics, aquaretics, natriuretic peptides, vasodilators, inotropes and adenosine α1 receptor antagonists. The potential role of ultrafiltration is also briefly discussed.

  8. CDH23 Mutation and Phenotype Heterogeneity: A Profile of 107 Diverse Families with Usher Syndrome and Nonsyndromic Deafness

    OpenAIRE

    Astuto, L. M.; Bork, J. M.; Weston, M. D.; Askew, J. W.; Fields, R. R.; Orten, D. J.; Ohliger, S. J.; Riazuddin, S.; Morell, R. J.; Khan, S.; Riazuddin, S.; Kremer, H.; van Hauwe, P.; Moller, C. G.; Cremers, C. W. R. J.

    2002-01-01

    Usher syndrome type I is characterized by congenital hearing loss, retinitis pigmentosa (RP), and variable vestibular areflexia. Usher syndrome type ID, one of seven Usher syndrome type I genetic localizations, have been mapped to a chromosomal interval that overlaps with a nonsyndromic-deafness localization, DFNB12. Mutations in CDH23, a gene that encodes a putative cell-adhesion protein with multiple cadherin-like domains, are responsible for both Usher syndrome and DFNB12 nonsyndromic deaf...

  9. Metabolic Syndrome in Nurses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Escasany

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: To estimate the prevalence of metabolic syndrome (MS in female nurses in the Hospital Juan A. Fernandez (HJAF, Buenos Aires, Argentina, and to determine whether work, rest, diet, and health, are predictive of it.Materials and methods: For the first objective, a descriptive, observational and cross-sectional study was conducted, and for the second, a multivariate cross-sectional observational multivariate analysis was made comparing independent samples. A total of 192 nurses were studied between October 2008 and March 2009. They completed a questionnaire that include indicators that could be predictors of MS. Anthropometric measurements, including blood pressure were taken, was well as a blood sample to analyze fasting glucose, HDL-C and plasma triglycerides.Results: It was found that 35% and 41% of nurses were overweight and obese, respectively. A total of 92% had centro-abdominal obesity. The prevalence of MS found was 33.3% (95%CI, 26.7 to 40.5. Those who had this disease were between 53±9 years. Statistically significant differences were found in the bivariate analysis between MS and the variables, age, length of service, time worked during night shift, and academic studies.Conclusions: The prevalence of MS was 64/192 in HJAF nurses (33.3% I 95%CI, 26.7-40.5. There were no statistically significant differences with the indicators of, age, “time worked during night shift”, and “studies”. These results suggest that age is the most important variable in predicting the onset of MS in the population of nurses.

  10. Safety and efficacy of angioplasty with intracoronary stenting in patients with unstable coronary syndromes. Comparison with stable coronary syndromes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luís C. L. Correia

    2000-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To assess safety and efficacy of coronary angioplasty with stent implantation in unstable coronary syndromes. METHODS: Retrospective analysis of in-hospital and late evolution of 74 patients with unstable coronary syndromes (unstable angina or infarction without elevation of the ST segment undergoing coronary angioplasty with stent placement. These 74 patients were compared with 31 patients with stable coronary syndromes (stable angina or stable silent ischemia undergoing the same procedure. RESULTS: No death and no need for revascularization of the culprit artery occurred in the in-hospital phase. The incidences of acute non-Q-wave myocardial infarction were 1.4% and 3.2% (p=0.6 in the unstable and stable coronary syndrome groups, respectively. In the late follow-up (11.2±7.5 months, the incidences of these events combined were 5.7% in the unstable coronary syndrome group and 6.9% (p=0.8 in the stable coronary syndrome group. In the multivariate analysis, the only variable with a tendency to significance as an event predictor was diabetes mellitus (p=0.07; OR=5.2; 95% CI=0.9-29.9. CONCLUSION: The in-hospital and late evolutions of patients with unstable coronary syndrome undergoing angioplasty with intracoronary stent implantation are similar to those of the stable coronary syndrome group, suggesting that this procedure is safe and efficacious when performed in unstable coronary syndrome patients.

  11. Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome in Orthopaedics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shirley, Eric D.; DeMaio, Marlene; Bodurtha, Joanne

    2012-01-01

    Ehlers-Danlos syndrome is a heterogeneous connective tissue condition characterized by varying degrees of skin hyperextensibility, joint hypermobility, and vascular fragility. Joint dislocations, musculoskeletal pain, atrophic scars, easy bleeding, vessel/viscera rupture, severe scoliosis, and obstetric complications may occur. These manifestations are secondary to abnormal collagen, with specific molecular defects in types I, III, and V collagen; they may also be related to tenascin-X, which has been identified in some patients. Ehlers-Danlos syndrome has been classified into 6 types, with variable degrees of joint instability, skin hyperextensibility, wound healing difficulty, and vascular fragility. Diagnosis begins with recognition of the signs and symptoms of global hypermobility and referring appropriate patients for genetic consultation. It is important to accurately identify patients with Ehlers-Danlos syndrome to initiate appropriate musculoskeletal treatment, optimize anesthetic and postoperative management, perform appropriate vascular screening, and help families address their concerns with other families and advocacy groups. PMID:23016112

  12. Gorlin Goltz syndrome: A clinicopathological case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shobha C Bijjaragi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The Gorlin-Goltz syndrome is an infrequent multisystemic disease, which is inherited in an autosomal dominant manner. This shows a high level of penetrance and variable expressiveness, characterized by multiple basal cell nevi or carcinomas, odontogenic keratocysts, palmar and / or plantar pits, calcification of the falx cerebri, and is occasionally associated with internal malignancies. It is fundamental to know the major and minor criteria for the diagnosis and early preventive treatment of this syndrome. Here we report a case of a 30-year-old male with major and minor features of the Gorlin-Goltz syndrome, such as, strabismus, barrel-shaped chest, with drooping shoulders and mild kyphosis, polydactyly, hypertelorism, multiple basal cell carcinomas, calcification of the falx cerebri, C5-C7 bifida spine, and fusion of T1 and T2.

  13. [Marfan syndrome in childhood and adolescence].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magotteaux, S; Bulk, S; Farhat, N; Sakalihasan, N; Defraigne, J-O; Seghaye, M-Ch

    2016-07-01

    The Marfan syndrome is a systemic connective tissue disorder with autosomal dominant inheritance. A mutation of the fibrillin-1 gene, a glycoprotein which is the main constituent of the extracellular matrix, is the cause of the disease. The cardinal features involve the skeletal, ocular and cardiovascular systems. The expression of the Marfan syndrome varies from the severe neonatal presentation to the classical manifestations of the child and young adult, but also comprises isolated features. In children, phenotypical manifestations are age dependent. For these reasons, the diagnosis of Marfan syndrome might be lately revealed by its cardiovascular complications. We report the case of 2 siblings: it illustrates the phenotypic variability that might be observed in a same family, the phenotype evolution with age and the diagnosis challenge in childhood.

  14. Pfeiffer syndrome type 2: case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Kiyoko Oyamada

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To report on a case of Pfeiffer Syndrome, with a discussion of the diagnostic characteristics and features of disease types and the differential diagnosis. DESCRIPTION: The authors describe a newborn with cloverleaf skull, extreme bilateral exorbitism and choanal atresia, partial syndactyly of the second and third toes and broad medially-deviated big toes. The case reported was Pfeiffer Syndrome type 2, which usually has a poor prognosis. COMMENTS: Pfeiffer Syndrome is a clinically variable disorder and consists of an autosomal dominantly-inherited osteochondrodysplasia with craniosynostosis. It has been divided into three types. Type 1 is commonly associated with normal intelligence and generally good outcome. Types 2 and 3 generally have severe neurological compromise, poor prognosis, early death and sporadic occurrence. Potential for prolonged useful survival outcome can be achieved in some cases with early aggressive medical and surgical management according to recent literature.

  15. Amplification factor variable amplifier

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Akitsugu, Oshita; Nauta, Bram

    2007-01-01

    PROBLEM TO BE SOLVED: To provide an amplification factor variable amplifier capable of achieving temperature compensation of an amplification factor over a wide variable amplification factor range. ; SOLUTION: A Gilbert type amplification factor variable amplifier 11 amplifies an input signal and

  16. Amplification factor variable amplifier

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Akitsugu, Oshita; Nauta, Bram

    2010-01-01

    PROBLEM TO BE SOLVED: To provide an amplification factor variable amplifier capable of achieving temperature compensation of an amplification factor over a wide variable amplification factor range. ;SOLUTION: A Gilbert type amplification factor variable amplifier 11 amplifies an input signal and can

  17. Cardiac Cachexia Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teresa Raposo André

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Heart failure is a chronic, progressive, and incurable disease. Cardiac cachexia is a strong predictor of poor prognosis, regardless of other important variables. This review intends to gather evidence to enable recognition of cardiac cachexia, identification of early stages of muscle waste and sarcopenia, and improve identification of patients with terminal heart failure in need of palliative care, whose symptoms are no longer controlled by usual medical measures. The pathophysiology is complex and multifactorial. There are many treatment options to prevent or revert muscle waste and sarcopenia; although, these strategies are less effective in advanced stages of cardiac cachexia. In these final stages, symptomatic palliation plays an important role, focussing on the patient’s comfort and avoiding the ‘acute model’ treatment of aggressive, disproportionate, and inefficient care. In order to provide adequate care and attempt to prevent this syndrome, thus reducing its impact on healthcare, there should be improved communication between general practitioners, internal medicine physicians, cardiologists, and palliative care specialists since heart failure has an unforeseeable course and is associated with an increasing number of deaths and different levels of suffering.

  18. Acute respiratory distress syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Confalonieri

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Since its first description, the acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS has been acknowledged to be a major clinical problem in respiratory medicine. From July 2015 to July 2016 almost 300 indexed articles were published on ARDS. This review summarises only eight of them as an arbitrary overview of clinical relevance: definition and epidemiology, risk factors, prevention and treatment. A strict application of definition criteria is crucial, but the diverse resource-setting scenarios foster geographic variability and contrasting outcome data. A large international multicentre prospective cohort study including 50 countries across five continents reported that ARDS is underdiagnosed, and there is potential for improvement in its management. Furthermore, epidemiological data from low-income countries suggest that a revision of the current definition of ARDS is needed in order to improve its recognition and global clinical outcome. In addition to the well-known risk-factors for ARDS, exposure to high ozone levels and low vitamin D plasma concentrations were found to be predisposing circumstances. Drug-based preventive strategies remain a major challenge, since two recent trials on aspirin and statins failed to reduce the incidence in at-risk patients. A new disease-modifying therapy is awaited: some recent studies promised to improve the prognosis of ARDS, but mortality and disabling complications are still high in survivors in intensive care.

  19. Meige's Syndrome: Rare Neurological Disorder Presenting as Conversion Disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Debadatta, Mohapatra; Mishra, Ajay K

    2013-07-01

    Meige's syndrome is a rare neurological syndrome characterized by oromandibular dystonia and blepharospasm. Its pathophysiology is not clearly determined. A 35-year-old female presented to psychiatric department with blepharospasm and oromandibular dystonia with clinical provisional diagnosis of psychiatric disorder (Conversion Disorder). After thorough physical examination including detailed neurological exam and psychiatric evaluation no formal medical or psychiatric diagnosis could be made. The other differential diagnoses of extra pyramidal symptom, tardive dyskinesia, conversion disorder, anxiety disorder were ruled out by formal diagnostic criteria. Consequently with suspicion of Meige's syndrome she was referred to the department of Neurology and the diagnosis was confirmed. Hence, Meige's syndrome could be misdiagnosed as a psychiatric disorder such as conversion disorder or anxiety disorder because clinical features of Meige's syndrome are highly variable and affected by psychological factors and also can be inhibited voluntarily to some extent.

  20. Genetics Home Reference: Marfan syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Share: Email Facebook Twitter Home Health Conditions Marfan syndrome Marfan syndrome Printable PDF Open All Close All Enable Javascript ... Marfan syndrome KidsHealth from Nemours Foundation MalaCards: marfan syndrome Orphanet: Marfan syndrome Your Genes Your Health from Cold Spring ...

  1. Meckel-Gruber syndrome: Report of two cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C Panduranga

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Meckel-Gruber syndrome (MKS is an autosomal recessive disorder, characterized by a combination of renal cysts and variably associated with features including developmental anomalies of the central nervous system (typically encephalocele, hepatic ductal dysplasia, cysts, and polydactyly. It is a rare syndrome with highest incidence in Gujarati Indians and Finnish population. We report two such cases of MKS in non-Gujarati Indian which were diagnosed by neonatal autopsy.

  2. Marshall syndrome in a young child, a reality

    OpenAIRE

    Trandafir, Laura Mihaela; Chiriac, Madalina Ionela; Diaconescu, Smaranda; Ioniuc, Ileana; Miron, Ingrith; Rusu, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: Recurrent fever syndrome, known as the Marshall syndrome (MS), is a clinical entity that includes several clinical features, such as: fever (39?40?C) that occurs repeatedly at variable intervals (3?8 weeks) and in episodes of 3 to 6 days, cervical adenopathy, pharyngitis, and aphthous stomatitis. The diagnosis of MS is one of exclusions; laboratory data is nonspecific and no abnormalities correlated with MS have been detected thus far. Methods: The authors report the case...

  3. Tetra-amelia and splenogonadal fusion in Roberts syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ravel, T.J.L. de; Seftel, M.D.; Wright, C.A. [Univ. of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg (South Africa)

    1997-01-20

    Roberts-SC phocomelia syndrome comprises limb deficiencies of variable severity, facial clefts, and other anomalies. Tetra-amelia may also be associated with facial clefts and similar anomalies. We report on a female infant with severe tetra-amelia, micrognathia, cleft palate, splenogonadal fusion, and premature centromere separation. We propose that this represents the severe expression of the Roberts-SC phocomelia syndrome. 18 refs., 6 figs.

  4. Variable mechanical ventilation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fontela, Paula Caitano; Prestes, Renata Bernardy; Forgiarini, Luiz Alberto; Friedman, Gilberto

    2017-01-01

    To review the literature on the use of variable mechanical ventilation and the main outcomes of this technique. Search, selection, and analysis of all original articles on variable ventilation, without restriction on the period of publication and language, available in the electronic databases LILACS, MEDLINE®, and PubMed, by searching the terms "variable ventilation" OR "noisy ventilation" OR "biologically variable ventilation". A total of 36 studies were selected. Of these, 24 were original studies, including 21 experimental studies and three clinical studies. Several experimental studies reported the beneficial effects of distinct variable ventilation strategies on lung function using different models of lung injury and healthy lungs. Variable ventilation seems to be a viable strategy for improving gas exchange and respiratory mechanics and preventing lung injury associated with mechanical ventilation. However, further clinical studies are necessary to assess the potential of variable ventilation strategies for the clinical improvement of patients undergoing mechanical ventilation.

  5. Diagnosis and Treatment of Polycystic Ovary Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Tracy; Mortada, Rami; Porter, Samuel

    2016-07-15

    Polycystic ovary syndrome is the most common endocrinopathy among reproductive-aged women in the United States, affecting approximately 7% of female patients. Although the pathophysiology of the syndrome is complex and there is no single defect from which it is known to result, it is hypothesized that insulin resistance is a key factor. Metabolic syndrome is twice as common in patients with polycystic ovary syndrome compared with the general population, and patients with polycystic ovary syndrome are four times more likely than the general population to develop type 2 diabetes mellitus. Patient presentation is variable, ranging from asymptomatic to having multiple gynecologic, dermatologic, or metabolic manifestations. Guidelines from the Endocrine Society recommend using the Rotterdam criteria for diagnosis, which mandate the presence of two of the following three findings- hyperandrogenism, ovulatory dysfunction, and polycystic ovaries-plus the exclusion of other diagnoses that could result in hyperandrogenism or ovulatory dysfunction. It is reasonable to delay evaluation for polycystic ovary syndrome in adolescent patients until two years after menarche. For this age group, it is also recommended that all three Rotterdam criteria be met before the diagnosis is made. Patients who have marked virilization or rapid onset of symptoms require immediate evaluation for a potential androgen-secreting tumor. Treatment of polycystic ovary syndrome is individualized based on the patient's presentation and desire for pregnancy. For patients who are overweight, weight loss is recommended. Clomiphene and letrozole are first-line medications for infertility. Metformin is the first-line medication for metabolic manifestations, such as hyperglycemia. Hormonal contraceptives are first-line therapy for irregular menses and dermatologic manifestations.

  6. Mobius syndrome: MRI features

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Markarian, Maria F.; Villarroel, Gonzalo M.; Nagel, Jorge R.

    2003-01-01

    Purpose: Mobius Syndrome or congenital facial diplegia is associated with paralysis of the lateral gaze movements. This syndrome may include other cranial nerve palsies and be associated to musculoskeletal anomalies. Our objective is to show the MRI findings in Mobius Syndrome. Material and methods: MRI study was performed in 3 patients with clinic diagnosis of Mobius Syndrome. RMI (1.5T); exams included axial FSE (T1 and T2), FLAIR, SE/EPI, GRE/20, sagittal FSE T2 , coronal T1, diffusion, angio MRI and Spectroscopy sequences. Results: The common features of this syndrome found in MRI were: depression or straightening of the floor of the fourth ventricle, brainstem anteroposterior diameter diminution, morphologic alteration of the pons and medulla oblongata and of the hypoglossal nuclei as well as severe micrognathia. Conclusion: The morphologic alterations of Mobius Syndrome can be clearly identified by MRI; this method has proved to be a useful diagnostic examination. (author)

  7. [Menopause and metabolic syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meirelles, Ricardo M R

    2014-03-01

    The incidence of cardiovascular disease increases considerably after the menopause. One reason for the increased cardiovascular risk seems to be determined by metabolic syndrome, in which all components (visceral obesity, dyslipidemia, hypertension, and glucose metabolism disorder) are associated with higher incidence of coronary artery disease. After menopause, metabolic syndrome is more prevalent than in premenopausal women, and may plays an important role in the occurrence of myocardial infarction and other atherosclerotic and cardiovascular morbidities. Obesity, an essential component of the metabolic syndrome, is also associated with increased incidence of breast, endometrial, bowel, esophagus, and kidney cancer. The treatment of metabolic syndrome is based on the change in lifestyle and, when necessary, the use of medication directed to its components. In the presence of symptoms of the climacteric syndrome, hormonal therapy, when indicated, will also contribute to the improvement of the metabolic syndrome.

  8. Gorlin-Goltz syndrome with situs oppositus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guruprasad, Yadavalli; Prabhu, Prashanth R

    2010-01-01

    Gorlin-Goltz syndrome, also known as nevoid basal cell carcicoma syndrome, is caused due to a genetic alteration produced by a mutation in the "Patched" tumor suppressor gene, and it is inherited in a dominant autosomal way, though sporadic cases have been found. This syndrome shows a high penetrance and variable expressiveness. It is a multisystemic process that is characterized by the presence of multiple pigmented basocellular carcinomas, keratocysts in the jaws, palmar and/or plantar pits and calcification of the falx cerebri. Together with these major features, a great number of processes considered as minor features have also been described. The latter include numerous skeletal, dermatology related and neurological anomalies, among others. In some occasions, the presence of very aggressive basocellular carcinomas has been described as well as other malignant neoplasia. Due to the importance of oral maxillofacial manifestations of this syndrome, it is fundamental to know its characteristics in order to make a diagnosis, to provide an early preventive treatment and to establish right genetic advice. We report a rare association of Gorlin-Goltz syndrome with situs oppositus.

  9. Neonatal Marfan syndrome: Report of two cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jurko, Tomas; Jurko, Alexander; Minarik, Milan; Micieta, Vladimir; Tonhajzerova, Ingrid; Kolarovszka, Hana; Zibolen, Mirko

    2017-07-01

    Marfan syndrome is rarely diagnosed in the neonatal period because of variable expression and age-dependent appearance of clinical signs. The prognosis is usually poor due to high probability of congestive heart failure, mitral and tricuspid regurgitations with suboptimal response to medical therapy and difficulties in surgical management. The authors have studied two cases of Marfan syndrome in the newborn period. Two cases of neonatal Marfan syndrome, one male and one female, were diagnosed by characteristic physical appearance. Both infants had significant cardiovascular abnormalities diagnosed by ultrasonography. Genetic DNA analysis in the second case confirmed the mutations in the fibrillin-1 gene located on chromosome 15q21 which is responsible for the development of Marfan syndrome. The boy died at six weeks of age with signs of rapidly progressive left ventricular failure associated with pneumonia. The second infant was having only mild signs of congestive heart failure and has been treated with beta blockers. At the age of 4 years her symptoms of congestive heart failure had worsened due to progression of mitral and tricuspid insufficiency and development of significant cardiomegaly. Mitral and tricuspid valvuloplasy had to be done at that time. Early diagnosis of Marfan syndrome in the newborn period can allow treatment in the early stages of cardiovascular abnormalities and may improve the prognosis. It also helps to explain to the family the serious health problem of their child.

  10. Hearing impairment in genotyped Wolfram syndrome patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plantinga, Rutger F; Pennings, Ronald J E; Huygen, Patrick L M; Bruno, Rocco; Eller, Philipp; Barrett, Timothy G; Vialettes, Bernard; Paquis-Fluklinger, Veronique; Lombardo, Fortunato; Cremers, Cor W R J

    2008-07-01

    Wolfram syndrome is a progressive neurodegenerative syndrome characterized by the features "DIDMOAD" (diabetes insipidus, diabetes mellitus, optic atrophy, and deafness). We sought to study the audiometric data of genotyped Wolfram syndrome patients with sensorineural hearing impairment. Pure tone threshold data of 23 Wolfram syndrome patients were used for cross-sectional analysis in subgroups (age less than 16 years or between 19 and 25 years, gender, and origin). All subgroups, with 1 exception, showed a fairly similar type of hearing impairment with, on average, thresholds of about 25 dB (range, 0 to 65 dB) at 0.25 to 1 kHz, gently sloping downward to about 60 dB (range, 25 to 95 dB) at 8 kHz. The subgroup of Dutch women, which was excluded from the calculations of the average hearing thresholds, showed a higher degree of hearing impairment. Only the latter subgroup showed progression; however, contrary to the previous longitudinal analysis, progression was not significant in the present cross-sectional analysis, presumably because of the high degree of cross-subject variability. This unique collection of audiometric data from genotyped Wolfram syndrome patients shows no substantial progression in sensorineural hearing impairment with advancing age, no relation to the types of WFS1 mutations identified, and, with exclusion of the subgroup of Dutch female patients, no significant sex-related differences.

  11. Variable pulmonary manifestations in hemodialysis patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Yoo Kyung; Shim, Sung Shine; Shin, Jung Hee; Choi, Gyu Bock; Lee, Kyung Soo; Yi, Chin A; Oh, Yu Whan

    2003-01-01

    A wide variety of pulmonary disorders related to hemodialysis or pre-existing renal disease occurs in hemodialysis patients. The disorders may be classified as 1) pulmonary abnormalities associated with chronic renal failures; 2) pulmonary complications arising during hemodialysis; 3) pulmonary infection; or 4) pulmonary-renal syndrome. An awareness of the various possible pulmonary disorders arising in hemodialysis patients may be helpful for the proper and timely management of such patients. We describe and illustrate various radiographic and CT findings of variable pulmonary disorders in hemodialysis patients

  12. Noonan syndrome and clinically related disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tartaglia, Marco; Gelb, Bruce D.; Zenker, Martin

    2010-01-01

    Noonan syndrome is a relatively common, clinically variable developmental disorder. Cardinal features include postnatally reduced growth, distinctive facial dysmorphism, congenital heart defects and hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, variable cognitive deficit and skeletal, ectodermal and hematologic anomalies. Noonan syndrome is transmitted as an autosomal dominant trait, and is genetically heterogeneous. So far, heterozygous mutations in nine genes (PTPN11, SOS1, KRAS, NRAS, RAF1, BRAF, SHOC2, MEK1 and CBL) have been documented to underlie this disorder or clinically related phenotypes. Based on these recent discoveries, the diagnosis can now be confirmed molecularly in approximately 75% of affected individuals. Affected genes encode for proteins participating in the RAS-mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPK) signal transduction pathway, which is implicated in several developmental processes controlling morphology determination, organogenesis, synaptic plasticity and growth. Here, we provide an overview of clinical aspects of this disorder and closely related conditions, the molecular mechanisms underlying pathogenesis, and major genotype-phenotype correlations. PMID:21396583

  13. Orofacial syndromes: A review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N Shyam Sunder

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available A syndrome is a set of signs and symptoms that tend to occur together and reflect the presence of a particular disease or an increased chance of developing to a particular disease. There are numerous orofacial syndromes and a thorough knowledge of their manifestations and implications is pertinent in good oral health care delivery. The aim of this review is to describe collective esoteric knowledge, about various malformations and syndromes associated with orofacial region.

  14. Steele Richardson Olszewski syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vijayashree S Gokhale

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Parkinson′s disease and its plus syndromes are an important cause of morbidity in the geriatric age group. Its plus syndromes show a myriad of clinical features characterized by progressive symptoms. Here we present a 65-year-old woman with progressive "Parkinsonian-like features," i.e., mask-like face, slowness of all movements and tendency to fall, and difficulty in eye movements, leading to the diagnosis of Steele Richardson Olszewski Syndrome or progressive supranuclear palsy.

  15. Metabolic syndrome and menopause

    OpenAIRE

    Jouyandeh, Zahra; Nayebzadeh, Farnaz; Qorbani, Mostafa; Asadi, Mojgan

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Background The metabolic syndrome is defined as an assemblage of risk factors for cardiovascular diseases, and menopause is associated with an increase in metabolic syndrome prevalence. The aim of this study was to assess the prevalence of metabolic syndrome and its components among postmenopausal women in Tehran, Iran. Methods In this cross-sectional study in menopause clinic in Tehran, 118 postmenopausal women were investigated. We used the adult treatment panel 3 (ATP3) criteria t...

  16. Post cardiac injury syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, S L; Nielsen, F E

    1991-01-01

    The post-pericardiotomy syndrome is a symptom complex which is similar in many respects to the post-myocardial infarction syndrome and these are summarized under the diagnosis of the Post Cardiac Injury Syndrome (PCIS). This condition, which is observed most frequently after open heart surgery, i...... on the coronary vessels, with cardiac tamponade and chronic pericardial exudate. In the lighter cases, PCIS may be treated with NSAID and, in the more severe cases, with systemic glucocorticoid which has a prompt effect....

  17. A seizuring alagille syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jomon Mathew John

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Alagille syndrome is a rare autosomal dominant inherited disorder with incidence of one in 100,000 live births. This syndrome with seizure as a presentation has been rarely reported in Indian studies. We present a 3-month-old infant who presented to us with seizures was found to have a dysmorphic face, jaundice, hepatomegaly, and soft systolic murmur. Infant was stabilized and remained seizure free. A detailed clinical evaluation of a common presentation may reveal a rare syndrome.

  18. Genetics Home Reference: Waardenburg syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Email Facebook Twitter Home Health Conditions Waardenburg syndrome Waardenburg syndrome Printable PDF Open All Close All Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. Description Waardenburg syndrome is a group of genetic conditions that can ...

  19. What Is Antiphospholipid Antibody Syndrome?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Back To Health Topics / Antiphospholipid Antibody Syndrome Antiphospholipid Antibody Syndrome Also known as What Is Antiphospholipid (AN-te-fos-fo-LIP-id) antibody syndrome (APS) is an autoimmune disorder. Autoimmune disorders ...

  20. What Is Respiratory Distress Syndrome?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Home / Respiratory Distress Syndrome Respiratory Distress Syndrome Also known as What Is Respiratory ... This condition is called apnea (AP-ne-ah). Respiratory Distress Syndrome Complications Depending on the severity of ...

  1. Genetics Home Reference: Turner syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Email Facebook Twitter Home Health Conditions Turner syndrome Turner syndrome Printable PDF Open All Close All Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. Description Turner syndrome is a chromosomal condition that affects development in ...

  2. Guide to Understanding Pfeiffer Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... syndrome occurs more often in children with older fathers. if I have pfeiffer syndrome what are the odds of passing it to my children? p feiffer syndrome is a rare, autosomal dominant disorder, meaning it requires only one parent to ...

  3. Genetics Home Reference: Cockayne syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Cockayne syndrome type II is also known as cerebro-oculo-facio-skeletal (COFS) syndrome, and while some ... link) National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke: Cerebro-Oculo-Facio-Skeletal Syndrome Educational Resources (8 links) ...

  4. Genetics Home Reference: MEGDEL syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Leigh-like syndrome 3-methylglutaconic aciduria with deafness, encephalopathy, and Leigh-like syndrome MEGDHEL syndrome SERAC1 ... Topic: Newborn Screening Genetic and Rare Diseases Information Center (1 ...

  5. Genetics Home Reference: Usher syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Email Facebook Twitter Home Health Conditions Usher syndrome Usher syndrome Printable PDF Open All Close All Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. Description Usher syndrome is a condition characterized by partial or total ...

  6. Genetics Home Reference: Bartter syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Email Facebook Twitter Home Health Conditions Bartter syndrome Bartter syndrome Printable PDF Open All Close All Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. Description Bartter syndrome is a group of very similar kidney disorders ...

  7. Lesch-Nyhan Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... National Organization for Rare Disorders (NORD) Purine Research Society See all related organizations Publications Order NINDS Publications Definition Lesch-Nyhan syndrome (LNS) is a rare, inherited ...

  8. SNEDDON’S SYNDROME

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valentin Valtchev

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Sneddon’s syndrome is usually characterized by the association of an ischemic cerebrovascular disease and a widespread livedo reticularis. The incidence of Sneddon syndrome is 4/1000 000. We present 42-year-old woman with livedo reticularis, recurrence ischaemic cerebrovascular accidents, two repetitive miscarriages and positive anti-2GPi antibodies. Skin biopsy specimens reveal inflammatory changes of small- to medium-sized arteries and subendothelial proliferation and fibrosis. The diagnosis Sneddon syndrome is confirmed by skin biopsy, and MR evidence. We suggest that anti-2GPi antibodies may be pathophysiologically related to the clinical manifestation observed in some patients with Sneddon syndrome.

  9. Fragile X syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... problems, or intellectual disability may not be present. Symptoms Behavior problems associated with fragile X syndrome include: Autism spectrum disorder Delay in crawling, walking, or twisting Hand flapping ...

  10. [Neurobiology of Tourette Syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ünal, Dilek; Akdemir, Devrim

    2016-01-01

    Tourette Syndrome (TS) is a neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by chronic motor and vocal tics. Although it is a common disorder in childhood, the etiology of Tourette Syndrome has not been fully elucidated yet. Studies, -conducted so far- have revealed differences in neurobiological structures of individuals who suffer from Tourette Syndrome. The objective of this review is to assess etiological and pathophysiological studies in the Tourette Syndrome literature. An electronical search was conducted in PubMed database using the keywords tic disorders, Tourette Syndrome, neurobiology, genetics, neuroimaging and animal models. Research and review studies published between 1985 and 2015, with a selection preference towards recent publications, were reviewed. According to the studies, genetic predisposition hypothesis is considered as a priority. However, a precise genetic disorder associated with Tourette Syndrome has not been found. The evidence from postmortem and neuroimaging studies in heterogenous patient groups and animal studies supports the pathological involvement of cortico-striato-thalamo-cortical (CSTC) circuits in Tourette Syndrome. Consequently, the most emphasized hypothesis in the pathophysiology is the dopaminergic dysfunction in these circuits. Furthermore, these findings of the animal, postmortem and neuroimaging studies have confirmed the neurodevelopmental hypothesis of Tourette Syndrome. In conclusion, more studies are needed to understand the etiology of the disorder. The data obtained from neurobiological studies of the disorder will not only shed light on the way of Tourette Syndrome, but also guide studies on its treatment options.

  11. Cushing's syndrome in pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nassi, Rossella; Ladu, Cristina; Vezzosi, Chiara; Mannelli, Massimo

    2015-02-01

    Cushing's syndrome is a rare condition in the general population and is even less common during pregnancy with only a few cases reported in literature. The diagnosis of Cushing's syndrome may be difficult during pregnancy because the typical features of the disorder and pregnancy may overlap. However, Cushing's syndrome results in increased fetal and maternal complications, and diagnosis and treatment are critical. This report describes a case of 26-year-old female at the 19th week of pregnancy with symptoms and signs of hypercortisolism, where ACTH-independent Cushing's syndrome was diagnosed and treated by robotic laparoscopic adrenalectomy at the 21th week of gestation.

  12. Central Pain Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... such as neurontin (gabapentin) can be useful. Lowering stress levels appears to reduce pain. View Full Treatment Information Definition Central pain syndrome is a neurological condition caused ...

  13. Demens hos personer med Downs syndrom

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Salem, Lise Cronberg; Jørgensen, Kasper

    2014-01-01

    In developed countries the population of elderly people with Down syndrome expands resulting in an increasing incidence of age-related diseases, including dementia. The assessment of dementia in individuals with intellectual disability is often complicated due to large intra-individual variability...... in cognitive functioning prior to dementia and to lack of standardised measures to detect dementia. Structured observations of symptoms of dementia and assessment techniques tailored for people with intellectual disability are increasingly needed....

  14. Laugier-Hunziker Syndrome: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Demet Kartal

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Laugier-Hunziker syndrome (LHS is a rare, acquired mucocutaneous hyperpigmentation often associated with longitudinal melanonychia. It is important to differentiate this condition from the pigmentary disorders of the oral mucosa. The correct clinical identification avoids the need for invasive investigations. A 32-year-old female presented with a number of variably sized, hyperpigmented macules over the oral mucosa and longitudinal melanonychia. Herein, we report a case of LHS and discuss the conditions related with pigmented mucocutaneous lesions.

  15. Neural Correlates of Amusia in Williams Syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Lense, Miriam D.; Dankner, Nathan; Pryweller, Jennifer R.; Thornton-Wells, Tricia A.; Dykens, Elisabeth M.

    2014-01-01

    Congenital amusia is defined by marked deficits in pitch perception and production. Though historically examined only in otherwise typically developing (TD) populations, amusia has recently been documented in Williams syndrome (WS), a genetic, neurodevelopmental disorder with a unique auditory phenotype including auditory sensitivities and increased emotional responsiveness to music but variable musical skill. The current study used structural T1-weighted magnetic resonance imaging and diffus...

  16. Waardenburg syndrome--a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bansal, Yuvika; Jain, Parul; Goyal, Gaurav; Singh, Malvika; Mishra, Chittranjan

    2013-02-01

    Waardenburg syndrome is a rare genetic disorder characterized by varying degree of deafness associated with pigmentary anomaly and defects of neural crest cell derived structures. Four subtypes (I-IV) with variable penetrance and gene expression of different clinical features have been described. We report a patient showing constellation of complete heterochromia, dystopia canthorum, white forelock, and synophrys. Other affected family relatives with heterochromia have been depicted in pedigree. Copyright © 2012 British Contact Lens Association. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Cataclysmic Variable Stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hellier, Coel

    2001-01-01

    Cataclysmic variable stars are the most variable stars in the night sky, fluctuating in brightness continually on timescales from seconds to hours to weeks to years. The changes can be recorded using amateur telescopes, yet are also the subject of intensive study by professional astronomers. That study has led to an understanding of cataclysmic variables as binary stars, orbiting so closely that material transfers from one star to the other. The resulting process of accretion is one of the most important in astrophysics. This book presents the first account of cataclysmic variables at an introductory level. Assuming no previous knowledge of the field, it explains the basic principles underlying the variability, while providing an extensive compilation of cataclysmic variable light curves. Aimed at amateur astronomers, undergraduates, and researchers, the main text is accessible to those with no mathematical background, while supplementary boxes present technical details and equations.

  18. Understanding Brown Dwarf Variability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marley, Mark S.

    2013-01-01

    Surveys of brown dwarf variability continue to find that roughly half of all brown dwarfs are variable. While variability is observed amongst all types of brown dwarfs, amplitudes are typically greatest for L-T transition objects. In my talk I will discuss the possible physical mechanisms that are responsible for the observed variability. I will particularly focus on comparing and contrasting the effects of changes in atmospheric thermal profile and cloud opacity. The two different mechanisms will produce different variability signatures and I will discuss the extent to which the current datasets constrain both mechanisms. By combining constraints from studies of variability with existing spectral and photometric datasets we can begin to construct and test self-consistent models of brown dwarf atmospheres. These models not only aid in the interpretation of existing objects but also inform studies of directly imaged giant planets.

  19. Metabolic syndrome in acute coronary syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhalli, M.A.; Aamir, M.; Mustafa, G.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To determine the frequency of metabolic syndrome in male patients presenting with acute coronary syndrome Study design: A Descriptive study Place and duration of study: Armed Forces Institute of Cardiology and National Institute of Heart Diseases, Rawalpindi, from October 2007 to September 2008 Patients and Methods: Male patients with acute coronary syndrome (ACS) were included. Patients having angioplasty (PCI), coronary artery bypass surgery in the past and other co-morbid diseases were excluded. All patients were assessed for the presence of five components of metabolic syndrome including hypertension, HDL-Cholesterol and triglycerides, glucose intolerance and abdominal obesity. Systolic, diastolic blood pressures, waist circumference (WC) and body mass index (BMI) were measured. ECG, cardiac enzymes, fasting glucose and lipid profile were also done. Results: A total of 135 male patients of ACS were studied with a mean age of 54.26 +- 11 years. Metabolic syndrome (MS) was present in 55 (40.7%) patients. MS with all five components was documented in 4 (7.27%) while MS with four and three components was seen in 23 (41.81%) and 28 (50.90%) patients respectively. Only 24 (43.63%) patients with MS had diabetes mellitus, remaining 31(56.36%) were non diabetic. Frequencies of diabetes, hypertension and family history of CAD were significantly higher (p<0.05) in patients with metabolic syndrome as compared to patients with normal metabolic status. Conclusion: Metabolic syndrome is fairly common and important risk factor in patients of IHD. Other risk factors like smoking, dyslipidemia, hypertension and diabetes were also frequently found. Public awareness to control the risk factors can reduce the prevalence of CAD in our country. (author)

  20. Metabolic syndrome in acute coronary syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bhalli, M A; Aamir, M; Mustafa, G [Combined Military Hospital, Abbottabad (Pakistan)

    2011-06-15

    Objective: To determine the frequency of metabolic syndrome in male patients presenting with acute coronary syndrome Study design: A Descriptive study Place and duration of study: Armed Forces Institute of Cardiology and National Institute of Heart Diseases, Rawalpindi, from October 2007 to September 2008 Patients and Methods: Male patients with acute coronary syndrome (ACS) were included. Patients having angioplasty (PCI), coronary artery bypass surgery in the past and other co-morbid diseases were excluded. All patients were assessed for the presence of five components of metabolic syndrome including hypertension, HDL-Cholesterol and triglycerides, glucose intolerance and abdominal obesity. Systolic, diastolic blood pressures, waist circumference (WC) and body mass index (BMI) were measured. ECG, cardiac enzymes, fasting glucose and lipid profile were also done. Results: A total of 135 male patients of ACS were studied with a mean age of 54.26 +- 11 years. Metabolic syndrome (MS) was present in 55 (40.7%) patients. MS with all five components was documented in 4 (7.27%) while MS with four and three components was seen in 23 (41.81%) and 28 (50.90%) patients respectively. Only 24 (43.63%) patients with MS had diabetes mellitus, remaining 31(56.36%) were non diabetic. Frequencies of diabetes, hypertension and family history of CAD were significantly higher (p<0.05) in patients with metabolic syndrome as compared to patients with normal metabolic status. Conclusion: Metabolic syndrome is fairly common and important risk factor in patients of IHD. Other risk factors like smoking, dyslipidemia, hypertension and diabetes were also frequently found. Public awareness to control the risk factors can reduce the prevalence of CAD in our country. (author)