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Sample records for curlew eskimo numenius

  1. Slender-billed Curlew (Numenius tenuirostris in the Czech Republic: the historical occurrence of this species in Bohemia and its return on the checklist

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hudeček Jiří J.

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The Slender-billed Curlew (Numenius tenuirostris is a higly endangered, almost extinct shorebird species in Europe. This paper describes little-known evidence about its occurrence in the Bohemian territory, which could help to get this species back on the checklist of birds in the Czech Republic.

  2. THE ECOLOGY AND BEHAVIOR OF THE LONG BILLED CURLEW (NUMENIUS AMERICANUS) IN SOUTHEASTERN WASHINGTON

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Julia N. Fitzner

    1978-06-01

    The primary objective of this study was to examine in depth the nesting ecology and behavior of the Long-billed Curlew on a breeding area relatively free of disruptive human activity. Two surruners of field work were devoted to that end; a post-breeding season survey in 1976 of the major National Wildlife Refuges in Washington, Southern Idaho, Utah, Nevada California, and Oregon enlarged the scope by including unpublished records of Long-billed Curlews in these areas.

  3. Coelomic implantation of satellite transmitters in the bar-tailed godwit (Limosa lapponica) and the bristle-thighed curlew (Numenius tahitiensis) using propofol, bupivacaine, and lidocaine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulcahy, Daniel M.; Gartrell, Brett D.; Gill, Robert E.; Tibbitts, T. Lee; Ruthrauff, Daniel R.

    2011-01-01

    Intravenous propofol was used as a general anesthetic with a 2∶1 (mg∶mg) adjunctive mixture of lidocaine and bupivacaine as local anesthetics infiltrated into the surgical sites for implantation of satellite transmitters into the right abdominal air sac of 39 female and 4 male bar-tailed godwits (Limosa lapponica baueri and Limosa lapponica menzbeiri) and 11 female and 12 male bristle-thighed curlews (Numenius tahitiensis). The birds were captured on nesting grounds in Alaska, USA, and on overwintering areas in New Zealand and Australia from 2005 through 2008. As it was developed, the mass of the transmitter used changed yearly from a low of 22.4 ± 0.2 g to a high of 27.1 ± 0.2 g and weighed 25.1 ± 0.2 g in the final year. The mean load ratios ranged from 5.2% to 7.7% for godwits and from 5.7% to 7.5% for curlews and exceeded 5% for all years, locations, and genders of both species. The maximum load ratio was 8.3% for a female bar-tailed godwit implanted in Australia in 2008. Three godwits and no curlews died during surgery. Most birds were hyperthermic upon induction but improved during surgery. Two godwits (one in New Zealand and one in Australia) could not stand upon release, likely due to capture myopathy. These birds failed to respond to treatment and were euthanized. The implanted transmitters were used to follow godwits through their southern and northern migrations, and curlews were followed on their southern migration.

  4. Spatial genetic structure of bristle-thighed curlews (Numenius tahitiensis): breeding area differentiation not reflected on the non-breeding grounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonsthagen, Sarah A.; Tibbitts, T. Lee; Gill, Robert E.; Williams, Ian S.; Talbot, Sandra L.

    2015-01-01

    Migratory birds occupy geographically and ecologically disparate areas during their annual cycle with conditions on breeding and non-breeding grounds playing separate and important roles in population dynamics. We used data from nuclear microsatellite and mitochondrial DNA control region loci to assess the breeding and non-breeding spatial genetic structure of a transoceanic migrant shorebird, the bristle-thighed curlew. We found spatial variance in the distribution of allelic and haplotypic frequencies between the curlew's two breeding areas in Alaska but did not observe this spatial structure throughout its non-breeding range on low-lying tropical and subtropical islands in the Central Pacific (Oceania). This suggests that the two breeding populations do not spatially segregate during the non-breeding season. Lack of migratory connectivity is likely attributable to the species' behavior, as bristle-thighed curlews exhibit differential timing of migration and some individuals move among islands during non-breeding months. Given the detrimental impact of many past and current human activities on island ecosystems, admixture of breeding populations in Oceania may render the bristle-thighed curlew less vulnerable to perturbations there, as neither breeding population will be disproportionally affected by local habitat losses or by stochastic events. Furthermore, lack of migratory connectivity may enable bristle-thighed curlews to respond to changing island ecosystems by altering their non-breeding distribution. However, availability of suitable non-breeding habitat for curlews in Oceania is increasingly limited on both low-lying and high islands by habitat loss, sea level rise, and invasive mammalian predators that pose a threat to flightless and flight-compromised curlews during the molting period.

  5. 76 FR 36491 - Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and Plants; Eskimo Curlew; Initiation of 5-Year Status Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-22

    ... following summary of their life history is based on Gollop et al. (1986), unless another citation is... curlew migrated annually between breeding grounds in North America and wintering grounds in South America...), before continuing south 4000-5000 km (2500-3000 mi) over the Atlantic Ocean to South America. They...

  6. Selfcoelum lamothei n. sp. (Digenea: Cyclocoelidae: Cyclocoelinae from the air sacs of the long-billed curlew, Numenius americanus (Scolopacidae, from the Galveston, Texas area, USA Selfcoelum lamothei, n. sp. (Digenea: Cyclocoelidae: Cyclocoelinae de los sacos aéreos del playero de pico largo, Numenius americanus (Scolopacidae, del área del condado de Galveston, Texas, EUA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charles K. Blend

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Fourteen specimens of a new species of cyclocoelid, Selfcoelum lamothei n. sp. (Digenea: Cyclocoelidae: Cyclocoelinae, from the air sacs of a long-billed curlew, Numenius americanus Bechstein (Scolopacidae, collected from the Galveston area, Galveston County, Texas, USA, were examined. The new species has an intertesticular ovary that forms a triangle with the testes, placing it in Cyclocoelinae Stossich, 1902. The new species is most similar to Selfcoelum capellum (Khan, 1935 n. comb., but differs from this species by lacking an oral sucker and by having a somewhat larger ovary, larger testes, a smaller posttesticular space, a larger cirrus sac, larger eggs, and the vitelline follicles of S. lamothei n. sp. are more bulky making the vitelline fields more laterally extensive, and more anteriorly distributed (reaching anteriorly to the level of the pharynx compared to the level of the cecal bifurcation than those of S. capellum. The new species can be distinguished from the 2 species currently assigned to Selfcoelum Dronen, Gardner and Jiménez, 2006, S. brasilianum (Stossich, 1902 and S. limnodromi Dronen, Gardner and Jiménez, 2006, by having an intercecal uterus rather than having uterine loops that overreach the ceca laterally. The genus Selfcoelum should be emended to include those species where the uterus is either intercecal or where the uterine loops overreach the ceca laterally and those species with or without an oral sucker.Se examinaron 14 ejemplares de una nueva especie de ciclocélido, Selfcoelum lamothei n. sp. (Digenea: Cyclocoelidae: Cyclocoelinae que es parásito de los sacos aéreos del playero de pico largo, Numenius americanus Bechstein (Scolopacidae, recolectados en el condado de Galveston, Texas, EUA. La especie nueva se caracteriza por presentar el ovario en posición intertesticular, formando un triángulo con relación a los testículos. Este rasgo sitúa a la nueva especie entre los Cyclocoelinae Stossich, 1902

  7. Bristle-thighed Curlew Capture Data from James Campbell National Wildlife Refuge, O'ahu, Hawaii, 2012-2014

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This data set contains banding, morphology, and satellite telemetry information for Bristle-thighed curlews (Numenius tahitiensis) that were captured between 2012...

  8. Antipredator strategies in breeding Bristle-thighed Curlews

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCaffery, Brian J.; Gill, Robert E.

    1992-01-01

    Each fall the world’s breeding population of Bristle-thighed Curlews (Numenius tahitiensis) arrives on the central Pacific wintering grounds following a migration that entails a non- stop flight of over 5000 kilometers. Sun-drenched, palm-shrouded atolls will be their home for the ensuing eight months. Even in the avian world, however, such apparant luxury is not without costs. For the Bristle-thighed Curlew these costs are incurred on the breeding grounds. From the time they arrive there in early May until they depart again for the wintering grounds in August and September, curlews are exposed to a host of predators. Gyrfalcons (Falco rusticolus), Golden Eagles (Aquila chrysaetos), Rough-legged Hawks (Buteo lagopus), Northern Harriers (Circus cyaneus), Parasitic Jaegers (Stercorarius parasiticus), Short-eared Owls (Asio flammeus), Common Ravens (Corvus corax) and Red Foxes (Vulpes vulpes) are potential predators of curlews and their offspring. To combat these threats, the Bristle-thighed Curlew has evolved an elaborate suite of antipredator defenses. Depending on the threat and the phase of the breeding cycle, Bristle-thighed Curlews may respond to potential predators by fleeing or flocking, by camouflage or combat. Given the variety of predators on the tundra, a variety of options is critical.

  9. Preliminary investigations of the winter ecology of Long-billed Curlews in coastal Texas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodin, Marc C.; Skoruppa, Mary Kay; Edwardson, Jeremy W.; Austin, Jane E.

    2012-01-01

    Since the early 1900s, the distribution of the Long-billed Curlew (Numenius americanus) has contracted dramatically in the eastern one-half of its historic range. The species has been designated as a "Bird of Conservation Concern" and focal species by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, a species of concern by several states, and a "Highly Imperiled" species in the U.S. Shorebird Conservation Plan. The uncertain outlook for this species has contributed to a plethora of research on Long-billed Curlews, most of which have focused on breeding and nesting ecology of the species. Gaps remain in information about factors affecting population dynamics on the winter grounds and the linkages between Long-billed Curlew populations on the breeding range, migration routes, and winter range. To begin filling those gaps, a pilot study was done to evaluate (1) curlew use of nocturnal roost sites, (2) use of public outreach to locate curlews and contribute to preliminary assessment of foraging habitat use, (3) six different methods to capture curlews, and (4) movements by curlews on wintering areas. The study area includes the lower Texas coast, which harbors the eastern-most dense populations of Long-billed Curlews in North America.

  10. 1993 study of long-billed curlews on the Yakima Training Center

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    Hand, K.D.; Cadwell, L.L.

    1994-04-01

    Pacific Northwest Laboratory conducted a study for the US Department of the Army on long-billed curlews (Numenius americanus) on the Yakima Training Center (YTC) in the spring and summer of 1993. Long-billed curlews are a Class IIIc federal candidate species and are listed as a ``species of special concern`` by the Washington Department of Wildlife. The objectives of this study were to (1) locate major nesting areas, (2) locate brood rearing areas, (3) evaluate habitat requirements, (4) determine diet, (5) evaluate response to troop activities, (6) estimate population size, (7) estimate recruitment rates, and (8) establish a relative abundance survey method.

  11. Long-billed curlews on the Yakima Training Center: Information for base realignment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hand, K.D.; Cadwell, L.L.; Eberhardt, L.E.

    1994-02-01

    This report summarizes and discusses the results obtained during 1992 from the study of long-billed curlews on the Yakima Training Center (YTC), which Pacific Northwest Laboratory conducted for the US Department of the Army. This study was initiated to provide basic ecological information on YTC long-billed curlews (Numenius americanus). The long-billed curlew is a relatively common spring and summer resident on the YTC. However, other than casual observations, very little is known about the distribution, density, reproductive success, and habitat requirements for this species on the YTC. Until recently the long-billed curlew was a US Fish and Wildlife Service candidate for listing as threatened or endangered; however, on November 21, 1991 it was down-listed to Class IIIc. The Washington Department of Wildlife lists the long-billed curlew as a ``species of special concern.`` Specific objectives of this study were to (1) locate nesting areas, (2) locate brood-rearing areas, (3) evaluate habitat requirements, (4) determine diet, (5) evaluate response to troop activities, (6) evaluate the impact of livestock grazing, (7) estimate the population size, and (8) estimate recruitment rates. Six curlews (four females and two males) were captured and fitted with radio transmitters. These birds were relocated to obtain nesting, habitat use, and feeding information. Road surveys conducted over most of the YTC provided information on the bird`s general distribution, habitat requirements, and nesting and brood-rearing areas.

  12. The Eskimos

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    秦静波

    2002-01-01

    The Eskimos live in frozen regions near the North Pole. They live by hunting and fishing. They know little ,about farming,because in their world of ice and snow it is impossible to grow plants for food.The only plants that grow in this frozen land are a few kinds of grass and moss(苔藓).

  13. Annual migratory patterns of long-billed curlews in the American west

    Science.gov (United States)

    Page, Gary W.; Warnock, Nils; Tibbitts, T. Lee; Jorgensen, Dennis; Hartman, C. Alex; Stenzel, Lynne E.

    2014-01-01

    Effective conservation of migratory species requires comprehensive knowledge of annual movement patterns. Such information is sparse for the Long-billed Curlew (Numenius americanus), a North American endemic shorebird of conservation concern. To test hypotheses about individual and area differences in migratory patterns across western North America, we tagged 29 curlews with satellite transmitters at breeding sites in Oregon, Nevada, and Montana. Transmissions from 28 birds for up to 4 years demonstrated that all wintered within the species’ known winter range, including 9 from Oregon tracked to agricultural areas of California’s Central Valley; 5 from Nevada tracked to the Central Valley, northern Gulf of California, or west coast of Baja California, Mexico; and 14 from Montana that wintered inland, from the Texas Panhandle south to the Mexican Plateau, or near the Gulf of Mexico. Montana breeders migrated east of the Rocky Mountains and traveled more than twice the distance of Oregon and Nevada breeders. Montana birds also stopped more often and longer during most passages. As a group, curlews arrived on their Oregon breeding grounds earlier than in Montana, while males preceded females in Montana and possibly Oregon. No consistent pattern emerged between sexes in departure from breeding areas, although within pairs males departed later than their mates. Individuals exhibited strong fidelity to breeding and wintering sites, and many birds showed a strong propensity for agricultural regions during winter. Our results underscore the importance of studying

  14. Ventricular candidiasis in stone curlews (Burhinus oedicnemus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caliendo, Valentina; Bull, Andrew

    2011-09-01

    Ventricular candidiasis is consistently one of the most prominent pathologic conditions diagnosed in stone curlews (Burhinus oedicnemus) in the United Arab Emirates, predominately affecting the captive population. Predisposing factors are a humid environment, stress, immunosuppression, inadequate nutrition, and an extended use of oral antibiotics. In this report, we describe the clinical signs, diagnosis, and pathologic result in stone curlews with ventricular candidiasis.

  15. The North American Indian and the Eskimo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    San Francisco Unified School District, CA.

    This is a selected bibliography of some good and some outstanding audio-visual educational materials in the library of the Educational Materials Bureau, Audio-Visual Education Section, that may be considered of particular interest in the study of the North American Indian, the Eskimo, and in the fields of ethnology and anthropology. The…

  16. Indians, Eskimos and Aleuts of Alaska.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bureau of Indian Affairs (Dept. of Interior), Washington, DC.

    Brief descriptions of the historical and cultural background of the Eskimo, Aleut, Athapascan, Tlingit, and Haida Indian groups of Alaska are presented. Further information is given concerning the educational, health, employment, and economic opportunities available to the natives today. A list is included of activities and points of interest in…

  17. Relationships between Eskimos, Amerindians, and Aleuts: old data, new perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ousley, S D

    1995-06-01

    Eskimos and Aleuts have long shown uncertain anthropological relationships to each other and to Amerindians. Various researchers, using different samples, data, and methods, have derived diverse relationships among them. Despite supervising the collection of anthropometric data during various expeditions around the turn of the century, Franz Boas did not use these data to formulate or support his Eskimo wedge theory. The perception of Eskimo biological uniqueness has persisted (Greenberg et al. 1986; Laughlin et al. 1979; Laughlin and Harper 1988), although it has been challenged by Szathmary and Ossenberg (1978), Szathmary (1979), and Ossenberg (1992). Genetic analyses, whether using nuclear or mitochondrial DNA, have not revealed consistent relationships for various reasons. A widely known multidisciplinary study (Greenberg et al. 1986) has failed to show agreement among data sets. As a result, Boas's theory has not been adequately tested to this day. A modern analysis of anthropometric data collected under Boas casts doubt on an Eskimo wedge and the assumed close relationship between language and biology. Compared with other north Pacific populations, the Siberian, Labrador, and MacKenzie Delta Eskimo samples are anthropometrically closest to northeast Siberians, whereas the Aleuts are closest to some Northwest Coast Amerindians. An analysis with additional data collected by Hrdlicka (1930) reflects ethnohistorical relationships and a geographic pattern of population affinities: The Eskimos of southwestern Alaska are similar to Aleuts and selected Amerindian tribes on the Northwest Coast. Despite linguistic similarities, Eskimo and Aleut populations are diverse, with some being more similar to populations from opposite sides of the north Pacific.

  18. Some aspects of the relationship of Eskimos and waterfowl

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — A report by David R. Klein of the Alaska Cooperative Wildlife Unit contains the first quantitative data on Eskimo waterfowl harvest that has ever been compiled....

  19. INTERNAL PROPER MOTIONS IN THE ESKIMO NEBULA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    García-Díaz, Ma. T.; Gutiérrez, L.; Steffen, W.; López, J. A. [Instituto de Astronomía, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Km 103 Carretera Tijuana-Ensenada, 22860 Ensenada, B.C. (Mexico); Beckman, J., E-mail: tere@astro.unam.mx, E-mail: leonel@astro.unam.mx, E-mail: wsteffen@astro.unam.mx, E-mail: jal@astro.unam.mx, E-mail: jeb@iac.es [Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias, La Laguna, Tenerife (Spain)

    2015-01-10

    We present measurements of internal proper motions at more than 500 positions of NGC 2392, the Eskimo Nebula, based on images acquired with WFPC2 on board the Hubble Space Telescope at two epochs separated by 7.695 yr. Comparisons of the two observations clearly show the expansion of the nebula. We measured the amplitude and direction of the motion of local structures in the nebula by determining their relative shift during that interval. In order to assess the potential uncertainties in the determination of proper motions in this object, in general, the measurements were performed using two different methods, used previously in the literature. We compare the results from the two methods, and to perform the scientific analysis of the results we choose one, the cross-correlation method, because it is more reliable. We go on to perform a ''criss-cross'' mapping analysis on the proper motion vectors, which helps in the interpretation of the velocity pattern. By combining our results of the proper motions with radial velocity measurements obtained from high resolution spectroscopic observations, and employing an existing 3D model, we estimate the distance to the nebula to be 1.3 kpc.

  20. Living with the Eskimos. Young Discovery Library Series: 12.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Planche, Bernard

    Part of an international series of amply illustrated, colorful, small size books for children ages 5 to 10, this volume describes daily Eskimo life in Greenland: hunting, fishing, what they eat, how they combat the cold, their dogs, and igloos. The book also talks about the animals of the Arctic area: polar bears, seals, and birds. The document…

  1. Blood pressure among the Inuit (Eskimo) populations in the Arctic

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjerregaard, Peter; Dewailly, Eric; Young, T Kue

    2003-01-01

    Studies of blood pressure among various Inuit (Eskimo) populations in the Arctic have given inconsistent results. Most studies reported lower blood pressure among the Inuit as compared with the predominantly white national populations. This has been attributed to traditional subsistence practices...

  2. Growth, behaviour of broods and weather-related variation in breeding productivity of Curlew Sandpipers Calidris ferruginea

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schekkerman, H; Van Roomen, MWJ; Underhill, LG

    1998-01-01

    Growth and survival of chicks and movements of broods were studied in Curlew Sandpipers in N.E. Taimyr, Siberia, in 1991. Breeding was synchronised, 73% of 30 clutches hatching during 10-15 July. Nests were distributed clumped in dry frost-heaved tundra. Broods were tended by females only and moved

  3. Growth, behaviour of broods and weather-related variation in breeding productivity of curlew sandpipers Calidris ferruginea

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schekkerman, H.; Roomen, van M.J.W.; Underhill, L.G.

    1998-01-01

    Growth and survival of chicks and movements of broods were studied in Curlew Sandpipers in N.E. Taimyr, Siberia, in 1991. Breeding was synchronised, 73% of 30 clutches hatching during 10-15 July. Nests were distributed clumped in dry frost-heaved tundra. Broods were tended by females only and moved

  4. An outbreak of cryptosporidiosis in a collection of Stone curlews (Burhinus oedicnemus) in Dubai.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zylan, Kasamyra; Bailey, Tom; Smith, Huw V; Silvanose, Christudas; Kinne, Joerg; Schuster, Rolf K; Hyland, Kevin

    2008-10-01

    We describe an outbreak of cryptosporidiosis in Stone curlews kept in a mixed-species rearing unit in Dubai. Cryptosporidium was the predominant intestinal pathogen detected, although microbiological investigations revealed a concurrent Salmonella infantis infection in two of the 29 Stone curlew chicks that died. Nineteen of 29 birds had catarrhal enteritis associated with histopathological findings of numerous Cryptosporidium developmental stages at the mucosal surface. Catarrhal enteritis was present without associated Cryptosporidium oocysts in five cases. Histology of the intestine, faecal examination by direct microscopy and antigenic detection by immunochromatography revealed the presence of Cryptosporidium spp. associated with catarrhal enteritis in intestinal sections and faeces. Clinical and histopathological outcomes of infection were severe, including disruption of intestinal epithelial integrity, the presence of numerous endogenous Cryptosporidium stages in intestinal epithelia and the excretion of large numbers of sporulated oocysts. The application of polymerase chain reaction and restriction fragment length polymorphism techniques at two 18S rRNA and one Cryptosporidium oocyst wall protein gene locus confirmed the presence of Cryptosporidium parvum DNA in faecal samples.

  5. Writing in the Eskimo Classroom. Cahiers linguistiques d'Ottawa (Ottawa Linguistics Papers), Vol. 7, No. 3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofmann, T. R.

    There are several practical reasons for preferring syllabic writing in teaching the Eskimo language to non-Eskimos: (1) the use of syllabic writing avoids the Roman letters t, l, n, s, g, and r, which stimulate the pronunciation habits of French or English; (2) syllabic writing is well-suited to Eskimo because of its small number of vowels; (3)…

  6. Population dynamics, movement and home range of black-tailed jackrabbits (Lepus californicus) in Curlew Valley, northern Utah. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stoddart, L.C.

    1978-12-01

    The long-term objective of the jackrabbit study in Curlew Valley, Utah and on the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory was to describe observed changes in rabbit density in terms of mortality and natality rates and to relate changes in these two population parameters to variation in environmental factors. Fall rabbit density in Curlew Valley has been observed to change by a factor of 17; changes appear to be largely determined by variation in mortality rates, as shown with K-factor analysis. Mortality of the population from fall--spring is correlated with the coyote/rabbit ratio. Spring--fall adult mortality and birth-fall loss of juveniles are correlated with coyote numbers. Coyote numbers in the relationships are modified to reflect variation in coyote feeding behavior with changes in rabbit and rodent numbers as indicated by coyote food habits studies in Curlew Valley. Coyote predation rates have varied markedly between years as a result of functional and numerical responses in the coyote population. Proposed coyote predation models, which account for the entire observed jackrabbit cycle, are consistent with existing predation theory.

  7. Physical growth of St. Lawrence Island Eskimos: body size, proportion, and composition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, F E; Laughlin, W S; Harper, A B; Ensroth, A E

    1982-08-01

    Growth patterns of body size, proportion, and composition were analyzed in 57 male and 56 female Eskimos from St. Lawrence Island in the Bering Sea, ranging in age from 1.23 through 19.82 years. Age-groups means for whites and blacks of the U.S. Health Examination Survey served as reference data. Relative to HES data, the Eskimo sample were shorter with lower values for leg length, while there were no differences from the reference values for sitting height. The Eskimos also had higher values of Quetelet's Index, the sitting height/height ratio, and the upper arm muscle circumference, while there were no differences in body weight or triceps skinfold thickness. Differences from the reference data were more pronounced in males than in females. The growth patterns for size and body proportion are in conformity with known relationships between morphology and climate.

  8. Place of the Pretend People: Gifts from a Yup'ik Eskimo Village.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kremers, Carolyn

    In 1986, Colorado native Carolyn Kremers accepted an invitation to teach music and English at a school in Tununak, a remote Yup'ik Eskimo village on Nelson Island, Alaska. This memoir recounts her experiences as a teacher, and also her reflections on music, the outdoors, teaching, Alaska, and how she came to understand Yup'ik and Inupiat Eskimo…

  9. A Study of English Vocabulary Comparing Eskimo and Caucasian Children. Final Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orvik, James M.

    The purpose of this study is to assess the English vocabulary of Eskimo pupils entering a bilingual education program by establishing a normative criterion based on the vocabulary levels of children whose first language is English. The tests used, "Raven's Coloured Progressive Matrices" and "English Receptive Vocabulary," bear out the anticipated…

  10. Paleo-Eskimo mtDNA Genome Reveals Matrilineal Discontinuity in Greenland

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gilbert, M Thomas P; Kivisild, Toomas; Grønnow, Bjarne

    2008-01-01

    The Paleo-Eskimo Saqqaq and Independence I cultures, documented from archaeological remains in Northern Canada and Greenland, represent the earliest human expansion into the New World's northern extremes. However, their origin and genetic relationship to later cultures is unknown. We sequenced a ...

  11. Paleo-Eskimo mtDNA Genome Reveals Matrilineal Discontinuity in Greenland

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gilbert, M Thomas P; Kivisild, Toomas; Grønnow, Bjarne;

    2008-01-01

    The Paleo-Eskimo Saqqaq and Independence I cultures, documented from archaeological remains in Northern Canada and Greenland, represent the earliest human expansion into the New World's northern extremes. However, their origin and genetic relationship to later cultures is unknown. We sequenced a ...

  12. Paleo-Eskimo kitchen midden preservation in permafrost under future climate conditions at Qajaa, West Greenland

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Elberling, Bo; Matthiesen, Henning; Jørgensen, Christian Juncher;

    2011-01-01

    Remains from Paleo-Eskimo cultures are well-documented, but complete preservation is rare. Two kitchen middens in Greenland are known to hold extremely well-preserved organic artefacts. Here, we assess the fate of the Qajaa site in Western Greenland under future climate conditions based on site...... characteristics measured in situ and from permafrost cores. Measurements of thermal properties, heat generation, oxygen consumption and CO2 production show that the kitchen midden can be characterized as peat but produces 4–7 times more heat than natural sediment. An analytical model from permafrost research has...

  13. Ethnic Groups: Negroes, Spanish Speaking, American Indians, and Eskimos. Part 4 of a Bibliographic Series on Meeting Special Educational Needs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poliakoff, Lorraine, Comp.

    This bibliography on ethnic groups cites 117 documents acquired and processed by the ERIC Clearinghouse on Teacher Education from July 1968 to December 1969. Organization is in three sections: Negroes--58 items; Spanish Speaking People--33 items; and American Indians and Eskimos--26 items. Each section is further broken down by document type:…

  14. PCR typing of DNA fragments of the short tandem repeat (STR) system HUMTH01 in Danes and Greenland Eskimos

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nellemann, L J; Møller, A; Morling, N

    1994-01-01

    DNA from the short tandem repeat (STR) system HUMTH01 was amplified by the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and analyzed by vertical electrophoresis in polyacrylamide gels followed by silver staining. DNA samples from 100 unrelated Danes, 147 unrelated Greenland Eskimos, and 89 Danish mother/child...

  15. Give Me My Father's Body: The Life of Minik the New York Eskimo, by Kenn Harper, Steerforth Press, South Royalton, VT, 2000

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melody Herr

    2001-05-01

    Full Text Available When Arctic explorer Robert Peary came home in September 1897, he brought with him a thirty-ton meteorite, an ethnological collection, and a group of Polar Eskimos for the American Museum of Natural History, which were immediately put on display. No matter that four of the six Eskimos died: the Museum just removed them from temporary exhibits and catalogued in them permanent collections. Of the two surviving, one returned to Greenland the following summer, the other remained in the household of a Museum administrator, William Wallace. This little orphan named Minik became the "New York Eskimo" of the title, and the phrase aptly summarizes his oxymoronic life.

  16. Paleo-Eskimo kitchen midden preservation in permafrost under future climate conditions at Qajaa, West Greenland

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Elberling, Bo; Matthiesen, Henning; Jørgensen, Christian Juncher

    2011-01-01

    Remains from Paleo-Eskimo cultures are well-documented, but complete preservation is rare. Two kitchen middens in Greenland are known to hold extremely well-preserved organic artefacts. Here, we assess the fate of the Qajaa site in Western Greenland under future climate conditions based on site...... characteristics measured in situ and from permafrost cores. Measurements of thermal properties, heat generation, oxygen consumption and CO2 production show that the kitchen midden can be characterized as peat but produces 4–7 times more heat than natural sediment. An analytical model from permafrost research has...... been applied to assess future thawing of the midden. Results show that the preservation conditions are controlled by freezing temperatures and a high water/ice content limiting the subsurface oxygen availability. Threats to the future preservation are related to thawing followed by drainage...

  17. ABH secretion polymorphism in Icelanders, Aland Islanders, Finns, Finnish Lapps, Komi and Greenland Eskimos: a review and new data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eriksson, A W; Partanen, K; Frants, R R; Pronk, J C; Kostense, P J

    1986-01-01

    The secretion of the ABH antigens in saliva was tested in indigenous individuals of several populations: Icelanders in Reykjavik and Husavik (northeastern Iceland), Aland Islanders, Finno-Ugrians (Finns, Finnish Lapps, Komi) and Eskimos (Augpilagtok, northwestern Greenland). The frequencies of ABH non-secretors among the Icelanders (28-36%) were among the highest ever noted in Europeans. Among Alanders and Swedes on the Finnish mainland the frequency (around 20%) was comparable to Swedish values but considerably higher than among Finns (13-14%). The values among northeastern Finns and Komi (about 9%) were intermediate between values among Lapps (below 5%) and Scandinavians (15-26%), excluding Icelanders (28-41%). The average frequency of non-secretors among Lapps in Finland (2.2 +/- 0.5%) was the lowest observed among white populations. Like many other arctic populations of the Mongolian race, the Greenland Eskimos had a very low frequency of non-secretors. It is probable that the non-secretor allele ABH*se was absent from the ancient Lapps and Greenland Eskimos but introduced by invading populations. It is concluded that the ABH*se allele frequencies vary much more among northern European populations than hitherto appreciated. Recent studies indicate that the non-secretor status of the ABH blood group substances in mucous body fluids is associated with pathological conditions of the mucous membranes of the embryologically related digestive and respiratory systems, particularly with duodenal ulcer and gastric (pre)malignancies but probably also with pulmonary dysfunction. In view of these disadvantages of the ABH non-secretor status the high frequency of ABH*se in Icelanders is a paradoxical phenomenon. The frequency of ABH non-secretors among the founders (Vikings) of Iceland may have been considerably higher than among the present populations in northwestern Europe. The increase in northwestern direction of the ABH*se allele frequencies supports this hypothesis

  18. ESKIMO1 disruption in Arabidopsis alters vascular tissue and impairs water transport.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valérie Lefebvre

    Full Text Available Water economy in agricultural practices is an issue that is being addressed through studies aimed at understanding both plant water-use efficiency (WUE, i.e. biomass produced per water consumed, and responses to water shortage. In the model species Arabidopsis thaliana, the ESKIMO1 (ESK1 gene has been described as involved in freezing, cold and salt tolerance as well as in water economy: esk1 mutants have very low evapo-transpiration rates and high water-use efficiency. In order to establish ESK1 function, detailed characterization of esk1 mutants has been carried out. The stress hormone ABA (abscisic acid was present at high levels in esk1 compared to wild type, nevertheless, the weak water loss of esk1 was independent of stomata closure through ABA biosynthesis, as combining mutant in this pathway with esk1 led to additive phenotypes. Measurement of root hydraulic conductivity suggests that the esk1 vegetative apparatus suffers water deficit due to a defect in water transport. ESK1 promoter-driven reporter gene expression was observed in xylem and fibers, the vascular tissue responsible for the transport of water and mineral nutrients from the soil to the shoots, via the roots. Moreover, in cross sections of hypocotyls, roots and stems, esk1 xylem vessels were collapsed. Finally, using Fourier-Transform Infrared (FTIR spectroscopy, severe chemical modifications of xylem cell wall composition were highlighted in the esk1 mutants. Taken together our findings show that ESK1 is necessary for the production of functional xylem vessels, through its implication in the laying down of secondary cell wall components.

  19. Stable carbon and nitrogen isotopic measurements of the wild animals hunted by the Norse and the Neo-Eskimo people of Greenland

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nelson, D. Erle; Møhl, Jeppe; Heinemeier, Jan

    2012-01-01

    Isotopic measurements of the terrestrial and marine wild animal species of greatest importance to Greenlandic Norse and Neo-Eskimo people were obtained to provide a solid basis for undertaking isotopic dietary analyses of these two human groups. The samples studied were animal bones from archaeol......Isotopic measurements of the terrestrial and marine wild animal species of greatest importance to Greenlandic Norse and Neo-Eskimo people were obtained to provide a solid basis for undertaking isotopic dietary analyses of these two human groups. The samples studied were animal bones from...

  20. Birds and mammals observed along the Hulahula River, Alaska, 5-10 June 1984: Trip report

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Notes on 52 bird species and 9 mammal species observed during unsuccessful attempt to confirm reported sighting of Eskimo Curlew the prior summer.

  1. Genomic study of the Ket: a Paleo-Eskimo-related ethnic group with significant ancient North Eurasian ancestry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flegontov, Pavel; Changmai, Piya; Zidkova, Anastassiya; Logacheva, Maria D; Altınışık, N Ezgi; Flegontova, Olga; Gelfand, Mikhail S; Gerasimov, Evgeny S; Khrameeva, Ekaterina E; Konovalova, Olga P; Neretina, Tatiana; Nikolsky, Yuri V; Starostin, George; Stepanova, Vita V; Travinsky, Igor V; Tříska, Martin; Tříska, Petr; Tatarinova, Tatiana V

    2016-02-11

    The Kets, an ethnic group in the Yenisei River basin, Russia, are considered the last nomadic hunter-gatherers of Siberia, and Ket language has no transparent affiliation with any language family. We investigated connections between the Kets and Siberian and North American populations, with emphasis on the Mal'ta and Paleo-Eskimo ancient genomes, using original data from 46 unrelated samples of Kets and 42 samples of their neighboring ethnic groups (Uralic-speaking Nganasans, Enets, and Selkups). We genotyped over 130,000 autosomal SNPs, identified mitochondrial and Y-chromosomal haplogroups, and performed high-coverage genome sequencing of two Ket individuals. We established that Nganasans, Kets, Selkups, and Yukaghirs form a cluster of populations most closely related to Paleo-Eskimos in Siberia (not considering indigenous populations of Chukotka and Kamchatka). Kets are closely related to modern Selkups and to some Bronze and Iron Age populations of the Altai region, with all these groups sharing a high degree of Mal'ta ancestry. Implications of these findings for the linguistic hypothesis uniting Ket and Na-Dene languages into a language macrofamily are discussed.

  2. Genomic study of the Ket: a Paleo-Eskimo-related ethnic group with significant ancient North Eurasian ancestry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flegontov, Pavel; Changmai, Piya; Zidkova, Anastassiya; Logacheva, Maria D.; Altınışık, N. Ezgi; Flegontova, Olga; Gelfand, Mikhail S.; Gerasimov, Evgeny S.; Khrameeva, Ekaterina E.; Konovalova, Olga P.; Neretina, Tatiana; Nikolsky, Yuri V.; Starostin, George; Stepanova, Vita V.; Travinsky, Igor V.; Tříska, Martin; Tříska, Petr; Tatarinova, Tatiana V.

    2016-01-01

    The Kets, an ethnic group in the Yenisei River basin, Russia, are considered the last nomadic hunter-gatherers of Siberia, and Ket language has no transparent affiliation with any language family. We investigated connections between the Kets and Siberian and North American populations, with emphasis on the Mal’ta and Paleo-Eskimo ancient genomes, using original data from 46 unrelated samples of Kets and 42 samples of their neighboring ethnic groups (Uralic-speaking Nganasans, Enets, and Selkups). We genotyped over 130,000 autosomal SNPs, identified mitochondrial and Y-chromosomal haplogroups, and performed high-coverage genome sequencing of two Ket individuals. We established that Nganasans, Kets, Selkups, and Yukaghirs form a cluster of populations most closely related to Paleo-Eskimos in Siberia (not considering indigenous populations of Chukotka and Kamchatka). Kets are closely related to modern Selkups and to some Bronze and Iron Age populations of the Altai region, with all these groups sharing a high degree of Mal’ta ancestry. Implications of these findings for the linguistic hypothesis uniting Ket and Na-Dene languages into a language macrofamily are discussed. PMID:26865217

  3. Distribution of albumin variants Naskapi amd Mexico among Aleuts, Frobisher Bay Eskimos, and Micmac, Naskapi, Mohawk, Omaha, and Apache Indians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schell, L M; Agarwal, S S; Blumberg, B S; Levy, H; Bennett, P H; Laughlin, W S; Martin, J P

    1978-07-01

    In order to help define the boundaries of the distribution of the albumin variants Naskapi and Mexico which are polymorphic among several American Indian groups, we examined sera from Micmac, Mohawk, Northwest River Naskapi, Omaha and Apache Indians, and from Aleuts and Eskimos. Sera from a total of 1,524 individuals were examined. Using a cellulose acetate membrane electrophoretic system with Tris-Citric acid at pH 5.4 we were able to distinguish normal albumin and both variants in the same run. Naskapi and Mexico variants were absent from Aleut, Eskimo, Micmac, Mohawk and Omaha samples. The albumin Naskapi variant was present in an allele frequency of 0.03 in the Naskapi Indian sample. Albumin variants Naskapi and Mexico were found in the Apache sample at frequencies of 0.016 and 0.037, respectively. This report supersedes that previously published by Schell and Agarwal ('76). Generally, within an area there is a correspondence between changes in the frequency of albumin variants and changes in the ethnic background and history of the area's populations. At the same time, when viewing widely separated areas, relationships between distant groups based on linguistic and cultural similarities are paralleled on a biologic level by the distribution of normal albumin and variant albumins.

  4. Arctic passages: liminality, Iñupiat Eskimo mothers and NW Alaska communities in transition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwarzburg, Lisa Llewellyn

    2013-01-01

    While the primary goal of the NW Alaska Native maternal transport is safe deliveries for mothers from remote villages, little has been done to question the impact of transport on the mothers and communities involved. This study explores how presence of Iñupiat values influences the desire of indigenous women of differing eras and NW Alaska villages to participate in biomedical birth, largely made available by a tribal health-sponsored transport system. This paper portrays how important it is (and why) for Alaska Native families and women of different generations from various areas of Iñupiat villages of NW Alaska to get to the hospital to give birth. This research asks: How does a community's presence of Iñupiat values influence women of different eras and locations to participate in a more biomedical mode of birth? Theoretical frameworks of medical anthropology and maternal identity work are used to track the differences in regard to the maternal transport operation for Iñupiat mothers of the area. Presence of Iñupiat values in each of the communities is compared by birth era and location for each village. Content analysis is conducted to determine common themes in an inductive, recursive fashion. A connection is shown between a community's manifestation of Iñupiat cultural expression and mothers' acceptance of maternal transport in this study. For this group of Iñupiat Eskimo mothers, there is interplay between community expression of Iñupiat values and desire and lengths gone to by women of different eras and locations. The more openly manifested the Iñupiat values of the community, the more likely alternative birthing practices sought, lessening the reliance on the existing transport policy. Conversely, the more openly western values are manifested in the village of origin, the less likely alternative measures are sought. For this study group, mothers from study villages with openly manifested western values are more likely to easily acquiesce to

  5. Arctic passages: liminality, Iñupiat Eskimo mothers and NW Alaska communities in transition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisa Llewellyn Schwarzburg

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Background. While the primary goal of the NW Alaska Native maternal transport is safe deliveries for mothers from remote villages, little has been done to question the impact of transport on the mothers and communities involved. This study explores how presence of Iñupiat values influences the desire of indigenous women of differing eras and NW Alaska villages to participate in biomedical birth, largely made available by a tribal health-sponsored transport system. Objective. This paper portrays how important it is (and why for Alaska Native families and women of different generations from various areas of Iñupiat villages of NW Alaska to get to the hospital to give birth. This research asks: How does a community’s presence of Iñupiat values influence women of different eras and locations to participate in a more biomedical mode of birth? Design. Theoretical frameworks of medical anthropology and maternal identity work are used to track the differences in regard to the maternal transport operation for Iñupiat mothers of the area. Presence of Iñupiat values in each of the communities is compared by birth era and location for each village. Content analysis is conducted to determine common themes in an inductive, recursive fashion. Results. A connection is shown between a community’s manifestation of Iñupiat cultural expression and mothers’ acceptance of maternal transport in this study. For this group of Iñupiat Eskimo mothers, there is interplay between community expression of Iñupiat values and desire and lengths gone to by women of different eras and locations. Conclusions. The more openly manifested the Iñupiat values of the community, the more likely alternative birthing practices sought, lessening the reliance on the existing transport policy. Conversely, the more openly western values are manifested in the village of origin, the less likely alternative measures are sought. For this study group, mothers from study villages with

  6. PCR typing of DNA fragments of the two short tandem repeat (STR) systems upstream of the human myelin basic protein (MBP) gene in Danes and Greenland Eskimos

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nellemann, L J; Frederiksen, J; Morling, N

    1996-01-01

    -A and MBP-B were analyzed by vertical electrophoresis in polyacrylamide gels followed by silver staining. DNA samples from 112 unrelated Danes, 140 unrelated Greenland Eskimos, and 88 Danish mother/child pairs were analyzed. The distributions of MBP phenotypes were in Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium in both...... in Eskimos (0.225) than in Danes (0.06). Strong gametic associations were found between fragments from MBP-A and MBP-B series in both Danes and Eskimos. Some of the associations were different in Danes and Eskimos. In the 88 Danish mother/child pairs, the segregation of the MBP genotypes were in accordance...... with a genetic model of co-dominant inheritance and no mutation was found. Two MBP STR regions with irregular structures were sequenced. One fragment had a single base G to A transition at position 124 in the primer binding region between the MBP-A and MBP-B regions. In the other fragment, a deletion starting...

  7. ESKIMO1 is a key gene involved in water economy as well as cold acclimation and salt tolerance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Agnes

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Drought is a major social and economic problem resulting in huge yield reduction in the field. Today's challenge is to develop plants with reduced water requirements and stable yields in fluctuating environmental conditions. Arabidopsis thaliana is an excellent model for identifying potential targets for plant breeding. Drought tolerance in the field was successfully conferred to crops by transferring genes from this model species. While involved in a plant genomics programme, which aims to identify new genes responsible for plant response to abiotic stress, we identified ESKIMO1 as a key gene involved in plant water economy as well as cold acclimation and salt tolerance. Results All esk1 mutants were more tolerant to freezing, after acclimation, than their wild type counterpart. esk1 mutants also showed increased tolerance to mild water deficit for all traits measured. The mutant's improved tolerance to reduced water supply may be explained by its lower transpiration rate and better water use efficiency (WUE, which was assessed by carbon isotope discrimination and gas exchange measurements. esk1 alleles were also shown to be more tolerant to salt stress. Transcriptomic analysis of one mutant line and its wild-type background was carried out. Under control watering conditions a number of genes were differentially expressed between the mutant and the wild type whereas under mild drought stress this list of genes was reduced. Among the genes that were differentially expressed between the wild type and mutant, two functional categories related to the response to stress or biotic and abiotic stimulus were over-represented. Under salt stress conditions, all gene functional categories were represented equally in both the mutant and wild type. Based on this transcriptome analysis we hypothesise that in control conditions the esk1 mutant behaves as if it was exposed to drought stress. Conclusion Overall our findings suggest that the

  8. Eskimo plasma constituents, dihomo-gamma-linolenic acid, eicosapentaenoic acid and docosahexaenoic acid inhibit the release of atherogenic mitogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, D L; Willis, A L; Nguyen, N; Conner, D; Zahedi, S; Fulks, J

    1989-01-01

    Studies in man and laboratory animals suggest that omega 3 polyunsaturated fatty acid constituents of fish oils have antiatherosclerotic properties. We have studied the effects of several such polyunsaturated fatty acids for ability to modify the in vitro release of mitogens from human platelets. Such mitogens may produce the fibro-proliferative component of atherosclerotic plaques. Both 5,8,11,14,17-eicosapentaenoic acid (20:5 omega 3) and 4,7,10,13,16,19-docosahexaenoic acid (22:6 omega 3), major constituents of fish oils, inhibited adenosine diphosphate-induced aggregation of platelets and the accompanying release of mitogens. These effects are dose dependent. Linolenic acid (18:3 omega 3), the biosynthetic precursor of eicosapentaenoic acid, also inhibited platelet aggregation and mitogen release. Eicosapentaenoic acid also inhibited mitogen release from human monocyte-derived macrophages, which, in vivo, are an additional source of mitogens during atherogenesis. Potent inhibition of human platelet aggregation and mitogen release was also seen with dihomo-gamma-linolenic acid (8,11,14-eicosatrienoic acid 20:3 omega 6), whose levels are reportedly elevated in Eskimos subsisting on marine diets. We conclude that diets that elevate plasma and/or tissue levels of eicosapentaenoic acid, docosahexaenoic acid and dihomo-gamma-linolenic acid precursor gamma-linolenic acid (18:3 omega 6) may exert antiatherosclerotic effects by inhibiting the release of mitogens from platelets and other cells.

  9. West Greenlandic Eskimo

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Trondhjem, Naja Blytmann; Fortescue, Michael David

    the principal economic activity. Research projects and language initiatives currently in progress within Greenland will be touched upon, as will the possibilities of communication with North American Inuit. West Greenlandic is unique among the native languages of the North American Arctic and Sub...

  10. The American Ornithologists' Union and bird conservation: recommitment to the revolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    John W. Fitzpatrick

    2005-01-01

    Exactly one hundred years ago, with North America in full-fledged environmental crisis, prominent members of the American Ornithologists' Union (AOU) participated in major political and social upheaval. A century of unrestrained exploitation had reached catastrophic proportions, with Passenger Pigeons and Eskimo Curlews representing only the tip of an iceberg....

  11. XMM-Newton Detection of Hot Gas in Two Evolved Elliptical Planetary Nebulae: the Eskimo Nebula and the Ghost of Jupiter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerrero, M. A.; Chu, Y.-H.; Gruendl, R. A.; Meixner, M.

    2004-12-01

    Planetary nebulae (PNe) consist of the stellar material ejected by low- and intermediate-mass stars (1-8 M⊙) at the end of the asymptotic giant branch phase (AGB). As such a star evolves off the AGB phase, the copious mass-loss strips off the stellar envelope and exposes the hot stellar core that ionizes the nebular material. The central stars of PNe present fast stellar winds with terminal velocities 1000-4000 km s-1, while fast collimated outflows with velocities up to 1000 km s-1 are also observed in PNe. The interactions of the fast stellar wind and/or collimated outflows with nebular material can give rise to diffuse X-ray emission from PNe. Diffuse X-ray emission has been detected only in young PNe previously. To investigate the evolution of hot gas in PN interiors, we obtained XMM-Newton observations of NGC 2392 (the Eskimo Nebula) and NGC 3242 (the Ghost of Jupiter), two evolved elliptical PNe. Diffuse X-ray emission is detected in both nebulae. In both cases, the hot gas is confined within the innermost shell, the X-ray spectrum can be described by a thin plasma emission model with temperature ˜2×106 K, and the X-ray luminosity is ˜1×1031 ergs s-1. Furthermore, the X-ray spectrum of NGC 3242 shows evidence of enhanced nitrogen abundance, while the X-ray morphology of NGC 2392 hints a possible association with its fast collimated outflows.

  12. Population studies of the human V kappa A18 gene polymorphism in Caucasians, blacks and Eskimos. New functional alleles and evidence for evolutionary selection of a more restricted antibody repertoire

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juul, L; Hougs, L; Andersen, V

    1997-01-01

    and sequenced four apparently functional alleles and determined the gene frequencies in three well-defined populations: Danish Caucasians, eastern Greenland Eskimos and Mozambican blacks. The A18b allele that was recently described in Native American Navajos by Atkinson et al. was found in all three populations...... and somatically hypermutated A18b messenger RNA present in the blood lymphocytes of individuals carrying this allele. The expression clearly exceeded that of a known functional V gene, A2, indicating that functional A18 alleles contribute significantly to the available antibody repertoire. In this context...

  13. Polar bears, eskimos and indie music

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Otte, Andreas Roed

    2013-01-01

    Visse kunstnere og bands fra Grønland gør brug af et grønlandsk nation-brand i forsøg på at differentiere sig på det internationale musikmarked. Ved at se på forskellige strategier til at co-brande musik sammen med Grønland som nation, undersøger denne artikel hvordan grupperne Nive Nielsen and t...

  14. Demography of a breeding population of whimbrel (Numenius phaeopus) near Churchill, Manitoba, Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perz, Johanna

    I used a GIS raster layer of an area in the Churchill, Manitoba region to investigate the effect of breeding habitat on demography and density of Whimbrel from 2010 through 2013. Program MARK was used to quantify adult and daily nest survival. Apparent annual survival of 0.73 +/- 0.06 SE (95% CI = 0.60-0.83) did not significantly differ between sexes or habitats and was lower than expected based on longevity records and estimates for other large-bodied shorebirds. Nest success, corrected for exposure days, was highly variable, ranging from a low of 3% (95% CI = 0-12%) in 2011 to a high of 71% (95% CI = 54-83%) in 2013. The highest rate of nest survival occurred in the spring with the warmest mean temperature. I developed a generalized linear model (GLM) with a negative-binomial distribution from random plots that were surveyed for abundance to extrapolate a local breeding population size of 410 +/- 230 SE and density of 3.2 birds per square km +/- 1.8 SE. The result of my study suggests that other aspects of habitat not captured by the land cover categories may be more important to population dynamics.

  15. Ancient Human Genome Sequence of an Extinct Palaeo-Eskimo

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Morten; Li, Yingrui; Lindgreen, Stinus;

    2010-01-01

    We report here the genome sequence of an ancient human. Obtained from approximately 4,000-year-old permafrost-preserved hair, the genome represents a male individual from the first known culture to settle in Greenland. Sequenced to an average depth of 20x, we recover 79% of the diploid genome, an...... for a migration from Siberia into the New World some 5,500 years ago, independent of that giving rise to the modern Native Americans and Inuit....

  16. The Effects of Habitat Type and Volcanic Eruptions on the Breeding Demography of Icelandic Whimbrels Numenius phaeopus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katrínardóttir, Borgný; Alves, José A; Sigurjónsdóttir, Hrefna; Hersteinsson, Páll; Gunnarsson, Tómas G

    2015-01-01

    Distinct preference of species for habitats is most often driven by long term differences in demographic rates between habitats. Estimating variation in those rates is key for developing successful conservation strategies. Stochastic events can interact with underlying variation in habitat quality in regulating demography but the opportunities to explore such interactions are rare. Whimbrels in Iceland show a strong preference for sparsely vegetated riverplains. Such habitats in Iceland face various threats, e.g., climate change, river regulation and spread of alien plant species. In this study we compared demographic parameters of breeding Whimbrels between riverplains and other habitats before, during and after volcanic eruption events to estimate the importance of the habitats for the species and the effect of ash deposit on breeding success. We found that an estimated minimum of 23% of the Icelandic population of Whimbrels and c. 10% of the world population of the species breed in riverplain habitats in Iceland. Whimbrels bred consistently at much higher densities in riverplain habitats than in other habitats and riverplains also had higher densities of pairs with fledglings although the proportion of successful breeders was similar between habitats. Predation by livestock may have had a considerable negative effect on breeding success on our study sites. Breeding was negatively affected by the volcanic activity, probably through the effects of ash on the invertebrate food supply, with breeding success being gradually worse closer to the eruption. Breeding success was equally affected by volcanism across habitats which differed in underlying habitat quality. This study gives an example of how populations can be regulated by factors which operate at different spatial scales, such as local variation in habitat quality and stochastic events which impact larger areas.

  17. Distribution study on migratory bird (Scolopacidae: Numenius) in Surabaya, Indonesia: Estimating the effect of habitat and climate change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desmawati, Iska; Indah Trisnawati D., T.; Kurnia, Ory; Hamdani, Albi; Fahmi, Mahsun; Fahmi, Mirza

    2017-06-01

    Migratory Birds are responding to recent climate change in variety of ways. Distribution study of migratory birds will help to understand climate change effect in ecosystem area. Its supported by natural resources all around Indonesia. One of this place is Surabaya city specially Wonorejo area. Wonorejo is one of the Important Bird Area (IBA), specifically for bird conserved by Indonesian law and migratory birds. This research aims to know that distribution study on migratory bird enhances the knowledge of climate change effect. The distribution study use mapping method and the environment variables study analyzed by multivariate analysis. The description about how to analize the climate change effect in this area will be described by map and ilustration model. The result show that migratory bird (Scolopacidae) use different area of preference habitat in Wonorejo during migratory season on 2010-2016. In particular, the details of population and scale is likely to characterize global change biodiversity of migratory birds research need to improve in future.

  18. Polymorphic microsatellite loci identified through development and cross-species amplification within shorebirds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, I.; Guzzetti, B.M.; Gust, Judy R.; Sage, G.K.; Gill, R.E.; Tibbitts, T.L.; Sonsthagen, S.A.; Talbot, S.L.

    2012-01-01

    We developed microsatellite loci for demographic assessments of shorebirds, a group with limited markers. First, we isolated five dinucleotide repeat microsatellite loci from the Black Oystercatcher (Haematopodidae: Haematopus bachmani), and three from the Bristle-thighed Curlew (Scolopacidae: Numenius tahitiensis); both species are of conservation concern. All eight loci were polymorphic in their respective target species. Hbaμ loci were characterized by two to three alleles with observed heterozygosity ranging from 0.07 to 0.33, and two to nine alleles were detected for Nut loci with observed heterozygosity ranging from 0.08 to 0.72. No linkage disequilibrium or departures from Hardy–Weinberg equilibrium were observed. The eight loci were also tested for cross-species amplification in 12 other species within Charadriidae and Scolopacidae, and the results demonstrated transferability across several genera. We further tested all 14 species at 12 additional microsatellite markers developed for other shorebirds: Dunlin (Calidris alpina; four loci) and Ruff (Philomachus pugnax; eight loci). Two markers (Hbaμ4 and Ruff6) were polymorphic in 13 species, while two (Calp6 and Ruff9) were monomorphic. The remaining eight markers revealed polymorphism in one to nine species each. Our results provide further evidence that locus Ruff10 is sex-linked, contrary to the initial description. These markers can be used to enhance our understanding of shorebird biology by, for example, helping to determine migratory connectivity among breeding and wintering populations and detecting relatedness among individuals.

  19. Nesting ecology of waterbirds at Grays Lake, Idaho

    Science.gov (United States)

    Austin, J.E.; Pyle, W.H.

    2004-01-01

    Montane wetlands provide valuable habitat for nesting waterfowl and other waterbirds in the western United States, but relatively little information is available about the nesting ecology of their waterbird communities. We describe the general nesting ecology of breeding waterbirds at a large, shallow montane wetland in southeast Idaho during 1997-2000. Habitats included upland grasslands and intermittently to semipermanently flooded wetland habitats. We located a total of 1207 nests of 23 bird species: eared grebe (Podiceps nigricollis), Canada goose (Branta canadensis), mallard (Anas platyrhynchos), gadwall (A. strepera), American wigeon (A. americana), green-winged teal (A. crecca), blue-winged teal (A. discors), cinnamon teal (A. cyanoptera), northern shoveler (A. clypeata), northern pintail (A. acuta), redhead (Aythya americana), canvasback (A. valisineria), lesser scaup (A. affinis), ruddy duck (Oxyuris jamaicensis), northern harrier (Circus cyaneus), American coot (Fulica americana), Virginia rail (Rallus limicola), greater sandhill crane (Grus canadensis tabida), American avocet (Recurvirostra americana), long-billed curlew (Numenius americanus), Wilsons snipe (Gallinago delicta), Wilsons phalarope (Phalaropus tricolor), and short-eared owl (Asio flammeus). Most nests were initiated in May-early June and were terminated (hatched or destroyed) by the third week of June. Mean daily survival rate (DSR) for Canada goose nests was 0.954 0.005 (SE) (n = 127 nests), equivalent to Mayfield nest success of 21%. Mean DSR for dabbling duck nests over all four years was 0.938 0.006 (n = 141), equivalent to Mayfield nest success of 11%. For all other species where we found >10 nests each year (eared grebe, redhead, canvasback, coot, sandhill crane, American avocet, and Wilsons snipe), >50% of nests found hatched at least one young. Success rates for geese, cranes, and ducks were lower than reported for Grays Lake during 1949-1951 and lower than most other wetlands in

  20. Cultures in the North: Aleut; Athabascan Indian; Eskimo; Haida Indian; Tlingit Indian; Tsimpshian Indian. Multi-Media Resource List.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isto, Sarah A., Comp.

    The wide variety of books and informational resources presently available about the American Indian people of Alaska reflect their cultural diversity. Intended to assist the teacher in identifying, collecting, and assessing useful materials on the Alaska Native cultures, this publication cites approximately 406 books, periodicals, films,…

  1. ESKIMO1 is a key gene involved in water economy as well as cold acclimation and salt tolerance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bouchabke-Coussa, O.; Quashie, M.L.; Seoane, Jose Miguel

    2008-01-01

    Background: Drought is a major social and economic problem resulting in huge yield reduction in the field. Today's challenge is to develop plants with reduced water requirements and stable yields in fluctuating environmental conditions. Arabidopsis thaliana is an excellent model for identifying p...

  2. Results of the 1982 survey of spring waterfowl hunter by eskimos on the Yukon-Kuskokwim Delta, Alaska

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The Yukon-Kuskokwim Delta is an essentially flat, tundra-covered plain across which the Yukon and Kuskokwim Rivers flow on their way to the Bering Sea. The Delta's...

  3. Qajaq: Kayaks of Siberia and Alaska.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmerly, David W.

    Featuring line and construction drawings, historic photographs, and artwork, this book examines the Arctic kayak, its uses, and its importance to the Aleut, Pacific Eskimo, Yupik Eskimo, Inupiat Eskimo, and Siberian peoples. The kayak's role in these societies is explored through the observations of explorers who first viewed this unique…

  4. Ooperimärkmeid padja kõrvalt, esmajoones Brittenist ja Tulvest / Kristel Pappel

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Pappel, Kristel, 1961-

    2004-01-01

    Helena Tulve kammerooperi "Läheb nii pimedaks" ("It is Getting so Dark") (lavastaja Anu Lamp, videokujundus Tarvo Hanno Varres) ja Benjamin Britteni lühiooperi "Koovitaja jõgi" ("Curlew River") lavastustest Tallinna Linnateatri Taevalaval

  5. Ooperimärkmeid padja kõrvalt, esmajoones Brittenist ja Tulvest / Kristel Pappel

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Pappel, Kristel, 1961-

    2004-01-01

    Helena Tulve kammerooperi "Läheb nii pimedaks" ("It is Getting so Dark") (lavastaja Anu Lamp, videokujundus Tarvo Hanno Varres) ja Benjamin Britteni lühiooperi "Koovitaja jõgi" ("Curlew River") lavastustest Tallinna Linnateatri Taevalaval

  6. 50 CFR 300.65 - Catch sharing plan and domestic management measures in waters in and off Alaska.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... Municipality Golovin Municipality Goodnews Bay Municipality Hooper Bay Municipality King Salmon Census... Chuloonawick Native VillageEmmonak Village Golovin Chinik Eskimo Community Goodnews Bay Native Village...

  7. An outbreak of low pathogenic avian influenza in a mixed-species aviculture unit in Dubai in 2005.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kent, Jo; Bailey, Tom; Silvanose, Christu-Das; McKeown, Sean; Wernery, Ulrich; Kinne, Joerg; Manvell, Ruth

    2006-09-01

    This case describes an outbreak of low pathogenic hemagglutinin 9 neuraminidase 2 avian influenza virus (AIV) in two white-bellied bustards (Eupodotis senegalensis), one stone curlew (Burhinus oedicnemius), and a blacksmith plover (Antibyx armatus) in a private zoologic collection in Dubai, United Arab Emirates. The four birds showed signs of respiratory disease, and all died as a result of disease or euthanasia. Attention has been paid to the diagnostic process and common differential diagnosis for upper respiratory tract disease in bustards, curlews, and plovers. To the knowledge of the authors, AIV has not been previously described in these species.

  8. Clown Face Nebula (NGC 2392)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murdin, P.

    2000-11-01

    A planetary nebula, also known as the Eskimo Nebula, in the constellation Gemini, position RA 07 h 29.2 m, dec. +20° 55'. It is bluish, 13'' in diameter, and of ninth magnitude, with a tenth-magnitude central star. The blue-green nebula's hazy outer regions are thought to resemble an Eskimo's hood or clown's ruff....

  9. Sõna sai muusikaks, muusikast tuleb sõna : Anu Lamp toob koduteatri lavale Tulve lühiooperi / Immo Mihkelson

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Mihkelson, Immo, 1959-

    2004-01-01

    Eesti Filharmoonia Kammerkoor lõpetab hooaja orienditeemaliste kammerooperitega Tallinna Linnateatri Taevalaval - B. Britteni ooper "Curlew River" (lavastaja M. Koldits) ja H. Tulve "It is getting so Dark" (lavastaja A. Lamp), kunstnik I. Hermeliin ja videokunstnik T. H. Varres, dirigent P. Hillier. Esietendus 16. juunil

  10. Sõna sai muusikaks, muusikast tuleb sõna : Anu Lamp toob koduteatri lavale Tulve lühiooperi / Immo Mihkelson

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Mihkelson, Immo, 1959-

    2004-01-01

    Eesti Filharmoonia Kammerkoor lõpetab hooaja orienditeemaliste kammerooperitega Tallinna Linnateatri Taevalaval - B. Britteni ooper "Curlew River" (lavastaja M. Koldits) ja H. Tulve "It is getting so Dark" (lavastaja A. Lamp), kunstnik I. Hermeliin ja videokunstnik T. H. Varres, dirigent P. Hillier. Esietendus 16. juunil

  11. Britten kui Tulve (tehis)kaaslane / Anneli Remme

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Remme, Anneli, 1968-

    2004-01-01

    Eesti Filharmoonia Kammerkoor lõpetab hooaja orienditeemaliste kammerooperitega Tallinna Linnateatri Taevalaval - B. Britteni ooper "Curlew River" (lavastaja M. Koldits) ja H. Tulve "It's getting so Dark" (lavastaja A. Lamp), kunstnik I. Hermeliin ja videokunstnik T. H. Varres, dirigent P. Hillier. Esietendus 16. juunil

  12. Sosinad ja karjed Linnateatri Taevalaval / Anu Aun

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Aun, Anu

    2004-01-01

    Eesti Filharmoonia Kammerkoor lõpetab hooaja orienditeemaliste kammerooperitega Tallinna Linnateatri Taevalaval - B. Britteni ooper "Curlew River" (lavastaja M. Koldits) ja H. Tulve "It is getting so Dark" (lavastaja A. Lamp), kunstnik I. Hermeliin ja videokunstnik T. H. Varres, dirigent P. Hillier. Esietendus 16. juunil

  13. Linnateatris on tulekul uued lühiooperid

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    2004-01-01

    Eesti Filharmoonia Kammerkoor lõpetab hooaja orienditeemaliste kammerooperitega Tallinna Linnateatri Taevalaval - B. Britteni ooper "Curlew River" (lavastaja M. Koldits) ja H. Tulve "It is getting so Dark" (lavastaja A. Lamp), kunstnik Iir Hermeliin ja videokunstnik T. H. Varres, dirigent P. Hillier

  14. Habitat use and diet selection of northward migrating waders in the Sivash (Ukraine) : The use of Brine Shrimp Artemia salina in a variably saline lagoon complex

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verkuil, Y.I.; Van der Have, TM; Van der Winden, J; Chernichko, [No Value

    2003-01-01

    Wader species migrating through the Sivash (Ukraine) use hypersaline and brackish lagoons. We studied the use of the two habitat types, and focused on the profitability of Brine Shrimp Artemia salina, prey species in hypersaline lagoons for Dunlins Calidris alpina, Curlew Sandpipers Calidris ferrugi

  15. Habitat use and diet selection of northward migrating waders in the Sivash (Ukraine): the use of brine shrimp Artemia salina in a variably saline lagoon complex.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verkuil, Y.; Have, van der T.M.; Winden, van der J.; Chernichko, I.I.

    2003-01-01

    Wader species migrating through the Sivash (Ukraine) use hypersaline and brackish lagoons. We studied the use of the two habitat types, and focused on the profitability of Brine Shrimp Artemia salina, prey species in hypersaline lagoons for Dunlins Calidris alpina, Curlew Sandpipers Calidris ferrugi

  16. Sosinad ja karjed Linnateatri Taevalaval / Anu Aun

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Aun, Anu

    2004-01-01

    Eesti Filharmoonia Kammerkoor lõpetab hooaja orienditeemaliste kammerooperitega Tallinna Linnateatri Taevalaval - B. Britteni ooper "Curlew River" (lavastaja M. Koldits) ja H. Tulve "It is getting so Dark" (lavastaja A. Lamp), kunstnik I. Hermeliin ja videokunstnik T. H. Varres, dirigent P. Hillier. Esietendus 16. juunil

  17. Linnateatris on tulekul uued lühiooperid

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    2004-01-01

    Eesti Filharmoonia Kammerkoor lõpetab hooaja orienditeemaliste kammerooperitega Tallinna Linnateatri Taevalaval - B. Britteni ooper "Curlew River" (lavastaja M. Koldits) ja H. Tulve "It is getting so Dark" (lavastaja A. Lamp), kunstnik Iir Hermeliin ja videokunstnik T. H. Varres, dirigent P. Hillier

  18. Britten kui Tulve (tehis)kaaslane / Anneli Remme

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Remme, Anneli, 1968-

    2004-01-01

    Eesti Filharmoonia Kammerkoor lõpetab hooaja orienditeemaliste kammerooperitega Tallinna Linnateatri Taevalaval - B. Britteni ooper "Curlew River" (lavastaja M. Koldits) ja H. Tulve "It's getting so Dark" (lavastaja A. Lamp), kunstnik I. Hermeliin ja videokunstnik T. H. Varres, dirigent P. Hillier. Esietendus 16. juunil

  19. Native Language Dictionaries and Grammars of Alaska, Northern Canada, and Greenland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goniwiecha, Mark C.; Hales, David A.

    1988-01-01

    Describes recent political and social activities aimed at preserving the culture of Native Americans in Alaska, Northern Canada, and Greenland. An annotated bibliography of sources for the Eskimo Aleut, Tsimshian, Haida, Athabascan (Athapascan), Eyak and Tlingit languages is provided. (CLB)

  20. Notes on village economies and wildlife utilization in arctic Alaska

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Visits were made to 12 Eskimo villages in Arctic Alaska during the spring of 1954. At each settlement information was collected regarding the economy and the...

  1. Archaeology on the Alaska Peninsula: The Ugashik Drainage

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — As part of a lengthy research project focusing on the prehistoric development and distribution of Eskimo peoples on the Alaska Peninsula (Fig. 1), the Ugashik River...

  2. 1982 spring walrus harvest, Little Diomede, Alaska: Field report

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and the Eskimo Walrus Commission worked cooperatively in the collection of biological harvest data, teeth, female reproductive...

  3. Grassland birds wintering at U.S. Navy facilities in southern Texas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodin, Marc C.; Skoruppa, Mary Kay; Bryan, Pearce D.; Ruddy, Amanda J.; Hickman, Graham C.

    2010-01-01

    transects during the study were Species of Conservation Concern: Le Conte’s Sparrow, Sedge Wren (Cistothorus platensis), Grasshopper Sparrow (Ammodramus savannarum), Long-billed Curlew (Numenius americanus), Sprague’s Pipit (Anthus spragueii), Cassin’s Sparrow (Aimophila cassinii), and Loggerhead Shrike (Lanius ludovicianus). Native grasslands consistently supported greater bird species richness than exotic grasslands. In one winter, exotic grasslands supported more birds than native grasslands.Native grasslands were determined to have more forb cover, more bare ground, and greater plant species richness than exotic grasslands, whereas exotic grasslands were characterized by more grass cover and relatively greater vegetation density during dry years. Not only did these individual measures differ between native and exotic grasslands, but components of variation also differed. In native grasslands, grass density and cover contributed more to variation, whereas in exotic grasslands, non-grass vegetation was a greater component of variation. Total bird numbers and bird species richness in native grasslands were related to the principal component that contained a measure of litter cover. Total bird numbers and bird species richness in exotic grasslands indicated no significant relationships with any of the principal components of variation.The two most common insect orders in native grasslands were Hymenoptera and Coleoptera, which accounted for 42 percent of all insects. The two most common insect orders in exotic grasslands were Hemiptera and Homoptera, which accounted for about 80 percent of all insects. Insect family richness was greater in exotic grasslands than in native grasslands in two of four seasons. Proportions of arachnid families were similar in native and exotic grasslands, but arachnid family richness was greater in exotic grasslands than in native grasslands.Abundance of seeds was greater in exotic than in native grasslands. However, seed diversity was

  4. At studere sig selv

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beedholm, Kirsten; Frederiksen, Kirsten

    1999-01-01

    Hvad ville der ske, hvis alle eskimoer begyndte at studere eskimologi på bekostning af at leve som en 'rigtig' eskimo? Det spørger forfatterne om i denne artikel. De underviser begge på sygeplejeskoler og finder det en tankevækkende tendens, at det i sygeplejerskernes grunduddannelse er faget sel......, der studeres frem for det, som faget retter sig imod ­ nemlig patienterne....

  5. Prospective varieties of Narcissus hybridus hort. suitable for mass growing in piedmont Crimea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Repetskaya Anna Igorevna

    2016-12-01

    The evaluation determined six (6 unpromising, thirteen (13 average promising and eleven (11 highly promising varieties. The highly promising varieties are 'Ice Follies', 'Kissрroof', 'Pink Charm', 'Salome', 'Serola', (Large-cupped Daffodils, 'Curlew', 'Pipit' (Jonquilla Daffodils, 'Tahiti' (Double Daffodils, 'Mount Hood' (Trumpet Daffodils, 'Jetfire' (Cyclamineus Daffodils and 'Lemon Beauty' (Split Corona Daffodils. They are recommended for use in landscaping practice within the piedmont Crimea.

  6. The genetic prehistory of the New World Arctic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raghavan, Maanasa; DeGiorgio, Michael; Albrechtsen, Anders; Moltke, Ida; Skoglund, Pontus; Korneliussen, Thorfinn S; Grønnow, Bjarne; Appelt, Martin; Gulløv, Hans Christian; Friesen, T Max; Fitzhugh, William; Malmström, Helena; Rasmussen, Simon; Olsen, Jesper; Melchior, Linea; Fuller, Benjamin T; Fahrni, Simon M; Stafford, Thomas; Grimes, Vaughan; Renouf, M A Priscilla; Cybulski, Jerome; Lynnerup, Niels; Lahr, Marta Mirazon; Britton, Kate; Knecht, Rick; Arneborg, Jette; Metspalu, Mait; Cornejo, Omar E; Malaspinas, Anna-Sapfo; Wang, Yong; Rasmussen, Morten; Raghavan, Vibha; Hansen, Thomas V O; Khusnutdinova, Elza; Pierre, Tracey; Dneprovsky, Kirill; Andreasen, Claus; Lange, Hans; Hayes, M Geoffrey; Coltrain, Joan; Spitsyn, Victor A; Götherström, Anders; Orlando, Ludovic; Kivisild, Toomas; Villems, Richard; Crawford, Michael H; Nielsen, Finn C; Dissing, Jørgen; Heinemeier, Jan; Meldgaard, Morten; Bustamante, Carlos; O'Rourke, Dennis H; Jakobsson, Mattias; Gilbert, M Thomas P; Nielsen, Rasmus; Willerslev, Eske

    2014-08-29

    The New World Arctic, the last region of the Americas to be populated by humans, has a relatively well-researched archaeology, but an understanding of its genetic history is lacking. We present genome-wide sequence data from ancient and present-day humans from Greenland, Arctic Canada, Alaska, Aleutian Islands, and Siberia. We show that Paleo-Eskimos (~3000 BCE to 1300 CE) represent a migration pulse into the Americas independent of both Native American and Inuit expansions. Furthermore, the genetic continuity characterizing the Paleo-Eskimo period was interrupted by the arrival of a new population, representing the ancestors of present-day Inuit, with evidence of past gene flow between these lineages. Despite periodic abandonment of major Arctic regions, a single Paleo-Eskimo metapopulation likely survived in near-isolation for more than 4000 years, only to vanish around 700 years ago.

  7. Mitochondrial genome diversity at the Bering Strait area highlights prehistoric human migrations from Siberia to northern North America.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dryomov, Stanislav V; Nazhmidenova, Azhar M; Shalaurova, Sophia A; Morozov, Igor V; Tabarev, Andrei V; Starikovskaya, Elena B; Sukernik, Rem I

    2015-10-01

    The patterns of prehistoric migrations across the Bering Land Bridge are far from being completely understood: there still exists a significant gap in our knowledge of the population history of former Beringia. Here, through comprehensive survey of mitochondrial DNA genomes retained in 'relic' populations, the Maritime Chukchi, Siberian Eskimos, and Commander Aleuts, we explore genetic contribution of prehistoric Siberians/Asians to northwestern Native Americans. Overall, 201 complete mitochondrial sequences (52 new and 149 published) were selected in the reconstruction of trees encompassing mtDNA lineages that are restricted to Coastal Chukotka and Alaska, the Canadian Arctic, Greenland, and the Aleutian chain. Phylogeography of the resulting mtDNA genomes (mitogenomes) considerably extends the range and intrinsic diversity of haplogroups (eg, A2a, A2b, D2a, and D4b1a2a1) that emerged and diversified in postglacial central Beringia, defining independent origins of Neo-Eskimos versus Paleo-Eskimos, Aleuts, and Tlingit (Na-Dene). Specifically, Neo-Eskimos, ancestral to modern Inuit, not only appear to be of the High Arctic origin but also to harbor Altai/Sayan-related ancestry. The occurrence of the haplogroup D2a1b haplotypes in Chukotka (Sireniki) introduces the possibility that the traces of Paleo-Eskimos have not been fully erased by spread of the Neo-Eskimos or their descendants. Our findings are consistent with the recurrent gene flow model of multiple streams of expansions to northern North America from northeastern Eurasia in late Pleistocene-early Holocene.

  8. 76 FR 37274 - Outer Continental Shelf Air Regulations Consistency Update for Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-27

    ... not designed expressly to prevent exploration and development of the OCS, and that they are applicable... not posted on EPA Region 10's OCS webpage. Comment: The Alaska Eskimo Whaling Commission requested a... standards, and/or designed to prevent exploration and development on the OCS. (See also 40 CFR 55.1 and...

  9. 25 CFR 310.1 - Penalties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... ALASKAN ESKIMO HAND-MADE PRODUCTS § 310.1 Penalties. The use of Government trade-marks in an unauthorized... 5 of the said act (49 Stat. 892; 25 U.S.C., 305d), which provides: Any person who shall counterfeit..., or shall knowingly, willfully, and corruptly affix any reproduction, counterfeit, copy, or colorable...

  10. Kuula. Kuu artist Lenny Kravitz / Mart Juur

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Juur, Mart, 1964-

    2008-01-01

    Ameerika rockmuusikust. Heliplaatidest: Liisi Koikson "Väikeste asjade võlu", Nelly Furtado "Loose the Concert", "My Blueberry Nights", OneRepublic "Dreaming Out Loud", Margus Kappel "Kauneimad vene meloodiad", Eskimo "PSST!" Pole sõnu sõnumiks tarvis!"

  11. Kuula. Kuu artist Lenny Kravitz / Mart Juur

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Juur, Mart, 1964-

    2008-01-01

    Ameerika rockmuusikust. Heliplaatidest: Liisi Koikson "Väikeste asjade võlu", Nelly Furtado "Loose the Concert", "My Blueberry Nights", OneRepublic "Dreaming Out Loud", Margus Kappel "Kauneimad vene meloodiad", Eskimo "PSST!" Pole sõnu sõnumiks tarvis!"

  12. "Faces, Voices & Dreams: A Celebration of the Centennial of the Sheldon Jackson Museum, 1888-1988," Edited by Peter L. Corey. "The Raven's Tail," by Cheryl Samuel. Book Reviews.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jonaitis, Aldona

    1987-01-01

    Reviews: a volume of 11 essays on the history of Sheldon Jackson Museum and its Eskimo, Aleut, Athabaskan, Tlingit, and Haida collections; and a book analyzing the geometric design, technique, and imagery of 15 "raven's tail robes," early Northwest Coast textiles predating the more familiar Chilkat blankets. (SV)

  13. Children of the Midnight Sun: Young Native Voices of Alaska.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Tricia

    For Native children, growing up in Alaska today means dwelling in a place where traditional customs sometimes mix oddly with modern conveniences. Through their own words, this book explores the lives of eight Alaska Native children, each representing a unique and ancient culture: Eskimo--Yupik and Inupiat; Aleut; and Indian--Athabascan, Tlingit,…

  14. The Influence of Television on Measured Cognitive Abilities: A Study with Native Alaskan Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lonner, Walter J; And Others

    1985-01-01

    Presents results of a study in rural Alaska to assess effects of commercial television, installed in 1977, on the Inupiat Eskimo group and the Tlingit and Haida Indians. Predictor variables included age, sex, culture area, and amount of television watched. Results indicated no major effects of television by itself on cognitive abilities. (SA)

  15. Project NECESSITIES, Phase III. Volume III: Case Studies in Teacher Training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abt Associates, Inc., Cambridge, MA.

    The staff of Project NECESSITIES conducted 2 workshops for educators concerned with curriculum for American Indian (including Eskimo) students. The purpose of these sessions was to familiarize participants with techniques pertinent to development of curriculum for Indian students at both the elementary and secondary school levels. The practica…

  16. Current Ethnomusicology in Alaska.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, Thomas F.

    The systematic study of Eskimo, Indian, and Aleut musical sound and behavior in Alaska, though conceded to be an important part of white efforts to foster understanding between different cultural groups and to maintain the native cultural heritage, has received little attention from Alaskan educators. Most existing ethnomusical studies lack one or…

  17. 76 FR 58781 - Notice of Intent To Prepare an Environmental Impact Statement for the Establishment of Annual...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-22

    ... Arctic bowhead whales by Alaska Natives from 2013 through 2017. Background Eskimos have hunted bowhead... to a cooperative agreement between the AEWC and NOAA. In order to comprehensively assess the effects... in only minor impacts on the western Arctic bowhead whale stock. In light of the stability of the...

  18. North Slope Inupiaq Grammar, Second Year (Preliminary Edition for Student Use Only).

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacLean, Edna Ahgeak

    The second-year grammar of Inupiaq, an Eskimo language spoken in northwestern Alaska, contains six chapters on these grammatical constructions: contemporative I mood; operative-imperative and negative contemporative moods; demonstrative adverbs in locative, vialis, ablative, and terminalis; transitive "present" and "past" tense…

  19. Understanding the Complex Dimensions of the Digital Divide: Lessons Learned in the Alaskan Arctic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subramony, Deepak Prem

    2007-01-01

    An ethnographic case study of Inupiat Eskimo in the Alaskan Arctic has provided insights into the complex nature of the sociological issues surrounding equitable access to technology tools and skills, which are referred to as the digital divide. These people can overcome the digital divide if they get the basic ready access to hardware and…

  20. Plaadid / Veiko Pesur, Tiiu Laks, Mart Normet

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Pesur, Veiko

    2008-01-01

    Uutest heliplaatidest Shower, Nice Try ja Jim Arrow & The Anachrones "Eesti Rock Antoloogia", Eskimo "Psst! pole sõnu sõnumiks tarvis", Tanel Padar & The Sun "Veidi valjem kui vaikus II", Liisi Koikson "Väikeste asjade võlu"

  1. High serum coenzyme Q10, positively correlated with age, selenium and cholesterol, in Inuit of Greenland. A pilot study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, H S; Mortensen, S A; Rohde, M

    1999-01-01

    Greenlanders (Eskimos) have low prevalence of ischaemic heart disease, partly explained by a lower extent of atherosclerosis and a low n-6/n-3 ratio of polyunsaturated fatty acids. As atherosclerosis is also a result of oxidative stress, the total antioxidative readiness could have a substantial ...

  2. Native Radio Broadcasting in North America: An Overview of Systems in the United States and Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Bruce L.; Brigham, Jerry C.

    1992-01-01

    Describes a study that examined the development of Native American (i.e., Indian, Inuit or Eskimo, and Aleut) radio broadcasting in Canada and the United States. Underlying cultural concerns are discussed, funding sources are explored, and further research is suggested. A directory of Native American radio stations in the United States is…

  3. How the accusative became the relative

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fortescue, Michael David

    2016-01-01

    correlate of the ubiquitous Eskimo-Aleut (EA) relative case marker -m in Uralic; the other is the lack of an m-initial first person singular morpheme in EA to correlate with that of the Uralic languages. That the EA singular genitive/relative marker -m — as well as the instrumental/accusative singular -mək...

  4. Plaadid / Veiko Pesur, Tiiu Laks, Mart Normet

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Pesur, Veiko

    2008-01-01

    Uutest heliplaatidest Shower, Nice Try ja Jim Arrow & The Anachrones "Eesti Rock Antoloogia", Eskimo "Psst! pole sõnu sõnumiks tarvis", Tanel Padar & The Sun "Veidi valjem kui vaikus II", Liisi Koikson "Väikeste asjade võlu"

  5. Enhancing Well-Being During Breast Cancer Recurrence

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-07-01

    b -fkeen the CARES and the CARES-SF, we will use a CAREYS’., coff core-of .615. b. Depression. Depression , E’be•ssessed’y a score above 16 on the...3 - Native American 4 - Eskimo 5 -Aleut 6 - Chinese 7 - Filipino 8 - Hawaiian 9 - Korean 10 - Vietnamese 11 - Japanese 12 - Asian Indian 13 - Samoan

  6. 42 CFR 136.302 - Definitions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... the natural child or grandchild of any such member, or (2) is an Eskimo or Aleut or other Alaska... Services. (o) School of nursing means a collegiate, associate degree, or diploma school of nursing, as those terms are defined below: (1) The term collegiate school of nursing means a department, division...

  7. Landscape Unbounded: Space, Place, and Orientation in [palatal click]Akhoe Hai//om and Beyond

    Science.gov (United States)

    Widlok, Thomas

    2008-01-01

    Even before it became a common place to assume that "the Eskimo have a hundred words for snow" the languages of hunting and gathering people have played an important role in debates about linguistic relativity concerning geographical ontologies. Evidence from languages of hunter-gatherers has been used in radical relativist challenges to…

  8. 10 CFR 800.003 - Definitions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ..., Puerto Rican, American Indian, Eskimo, Oriental, or Aleut, or is a Spanish speaking individual of Spanish... Federal Government-owned or Federal Government-leased sites, where the programs being conducted are... Government-owned facilities located on contractor-owned or leased sites where the programs being...

  9. Some Contact Languages and Pidgin and Creole Languages in the Siberian Region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wurm, Stephen A.

    1992-01-01

    Discusses the role of Russian colonization of the Siberian region and the impact of demographic changes on languages in the region. Topics addressed include intercommunication through contact languages based on one-way bilingualism, pidgin and creole languages in the Siberian region, and Eskimo Pidgin. (33 references) (Author/JP)

  10. Role Playing: Rehearsal for Language Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salisbury, Lee

    1970-01-01

    Argues that in teaching standard English to groups which, like Eskimos and speakers of Hawaiian Pidgin, are quite removed from mainstream American culture, role playing, as natural human behavior, can provide the bridge between classroom drill and real-life utilization of new language patterns. (FB)

  11. 40 CFR 33.103 - What do the terms in this part mean?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... substance into a water supply. Disabled American means, with respect to an individual, permanent or... Administration regulations at 13 CFR part 124) exceeds 50% of the total enrollment. Native American means any individual who is an American Indian, Eskimo, Aleut, or Native Hawaiian. Recipient means an entity that...

  12. Landscape Unbounded: Space, Place, and Orientation in [palatal click]Akhoe Hai//om and Beyond

    Science.gov (United States)

    Widlok, Thomas

    2008-01-01

    Even before it became a common place to assume that "the Eskimo have a hundred words for snow" the languages of hunting and gathering people have played an important role in debates about linguistic relativity concerning geographical ontologies. Evidence from languages of hunter-gatherers has been used in radical relativist challenges to the…

  13. The Archaeology of Old Nuulliit

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Mikkel

    ¬aeo-Eskimo culture groups in Alaska. Knuth never published his findings in detail, which be¬came a mystery in Arctic archaeology circles. New investigations by the author of the material shows that the site was settled repeatedly by the first immigrants between 2500 BC and 1900 BC, and in addition that a total...

  14. The Relationships between Morphological Characteristics and Foraging Behavior in Four Selected Species of Shorebirds and Water Birds Utilizing Tropical Mudflats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norazlimi, Nor Atiqah; Ramli, Rosli

    2015-01-01

    A study was conducted to investigate the relationship between the physical morphology of shorebirds and water birds (i.e., Lesser adjutant (Leptoptilos javanicus), Common redshank (Tringa totanus), Whimbrel (Numenius phaeopus), and Little heron (Butorides striata)) and their foraging behavior in the mudflats area of Selangor, Peninsular Malaysia, from August 2013 to July 2014 by using direct observation techniques (using binoculars and a video recorder). The actively foraging bird species were watched, and their foraging activities were recorded for at least 30 seconds for up to a maximum of five minutes. A Spearman Rank Correlation highlighted a significant relationship between bill size and foraging time (R = 0.443, p birds (mm) and species (H = 15.96, p = 0.0012). Three foraging techniques were recorded: pause-travel, visual-feeding, and tactile-hunting. Thus, morphological characteristics of bird do influence their foraging behavior and strategies used when foraging.

  15. History of Sea Ice Changes in the Canadian Arctic and the Impact on Humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mudie, P. J.; Rochon, A.; Levac, E.

    2004-05-01

    The discontinuous chronology of archaeological records from the Canadian Arctic suggests that major climatic changes caused the abrupt abandonment of settlements and life style shifts in Paleo- and Neo-Eskimo societies. The centennial-scale resolution of previous paleoclimate reconstructions, however, does not permit detailed examination of this idea. Climate warming of more than 1.5C during the past 3 decades has caused reduction of sea ice and loss of marine mammals, forcing catastrophic changes on the Inuit people. Computer models forecast continued Arctic warming up to 4C but the 150-year database for the models covers only a fraction of the warm-cold cyclicity data in Holocene geological records. We therefore examine the decadal-scale paleoclimatic changes recorded by quantitative palynological data in a 6,500 year-long record from Coburg Polynya (Core LSSL 2001-006 75 35' N, 78 41'W) near the Palaeo- and Neo-Eskimo occupations of the North Devon Lowlands and in cores Hu 91-039-008 and 007 from the central North Water Polynya (NOW) between Ellesmere Island and Thule, Greenland (77 16.0'N, 74 19.9'W). Palaeotransfer function data from dinoflagellate cyst assemblages in the cores provide quantitative estimates of changes in sea surface temperature (SST) and sea ice cover (SIC) with the same accuracy as historical shipboard oceanographic measurements. Both sites record abrupt temperature changes of 2 - 4C that can be related to the archaeological record of major changes in hunting modes of Paleo- and Neo-Eskimo peoples and to detailed occupation-abandonment cycles on Devon and Ellesmere Islands. The paleoceanographic reconstructions show that from 6500 to 2600 BP, there were large oscillations in summer SST from 2-4C cooler than now to 6C warmer, and that annual variations in SIC ranged from 2 months more of heavy (more than 50 percent) ice to a 4-month extension of open water. This interval corresponds to the period of pre-Dorset Palaeo-Eskimo cultures that

  16. The professional ecstatic in his social and ritual position

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Birgitte Sonne

    1982-01-01

    Full Text Available The professional ecstatic is a religious specialist, who has become recognized as a person able to carry out an ecstatic ritual, corresponding with the local cultural expectations in force. The ecstatic ritual per se comprises a number of persons, i.e. it is a collective ritual. Part of the criteria that may be employed as a measure of the professional ecstatic's social status, is covered by the determining designation, social and cultic position. What ecstatic ritual duties does he have, and how large a part in the whole range of collective rituals within his society will his duties comprise? This question is examined through the social and ritual position among the Eskimos in their traditional, and thus relatively stable, societal cultures. The professional ecstatics among the Eskimos may be defined as shamans. However, the shamans were only part-time specialists among the Eskimos. They did have ritual tasks in the economic rituals of their society, and most of them had to pass a special ritual of initiation to obtain recognition as a shaman. The Eskimos have no juridical institutions, and as their informal leaders have no juridical authority, the shaman must exercise a considerable control of social morality. The shaman can here function simultaneously as informal leader, which is an impossible combination in societies with some degree of political organization. A shaman never became a leader due to his shaman powers in isolation. In societies where hunting demanded organized cooperation under a single man's leadership, he should also have organisatorial gifts. If a shaman, apart from his recognized shaman powers, possessed these qualities, he could attain a leader's status. His advice as a shaman, in common situations of crisis, combined with his authority as a leader, would endow him with particularly great authority.

  17. Ookpik: The Ogling Owl at 50

    OpenAIRE

    Susan Rowley

    2013-01-01

    Fifty years ago the Canadian Government selected Ookpik to represent the country at the 1964 trade fair in Philadelphia. An overnight sensation, the Canadian Government moved quickly to trademark Ookpik for the Fort Chimo Eskimo Co-operative. The Ookpik Advisory Committee oversaw the trademark making decisions regarding books, comics, songs, clothing balloons, and mass-produced dolls. By 1968 the market was saturated and despite the introduction of Sikusi, Ookpik's friend and Mrs Ookpik, reve...

  18. Linitis plastica in a 16-year-old. 1975.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurlburt, Ward B

    2006-01-01

    Gastric cancer is uncommon in the young. Occasional reports are found in the literature and reviewed here. This article reports a case of a 16-year-old Eskimo girl unusual because of her young age, the presentation with a perforation and the presence of a linitis plastica type involvement. Management was somewhat unique because of the prolonged use of outpatient total parenteral alimentation during her final months of life.

  19. Wind effects on prey availability: How northward migrating waders use brackish and hypersaline lagoons in the sivash, Ukraine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verkuil, Yvonne; Koolhaas, Anita; Van Der Winden, Jan

    Large numbers of waders migrating northward in spring use the Sivash, a large system of shallow, brackish and hypersaline lagoons in the Black Sea and Azov Sea region (Ukraine). The bottoms of these lagoons are often uncovered by the wind. Hence, for waders the time and space available for feeding depend on wind conditions. In hypersaline lagoons the benthic and pelagic fauna was very poor, consisting mainly of chironomid larvae (0.19 g AFDM·m -2) and brine shrimps Artemia salina, respectively. Brine shrimp abundance was correlated with salinity, wind force, wind direction and water depth. Dunlin Calidris alpina and curlew sandpiper Calidris ferruginea were the only species feeding on brine shrimp. As brine shrimp densities are higher in deeper water, smaller waders such as broad-billed sandpipers Limicola falcinellus are too short-legged to reach exploitable densities of brine shrimp. In brackish lagoons the benthic and pelagic fauna was rich, consisting of polychaetes, bivalves, gastropods, chironomid larvae, isopods and amphipods (8.9 to 30.5 g AFDM·m -2), but there were no brine shrimps. Prey biomass increased with the distance from the coast, being highest on the site that was most frequently inundated. Dunlin, broad-billed sandpiper and grey plover Pluvialis squatarola were the most abundant birds in the brackish lagoon. Due to the effects of wind-tides only a small area was usually available as a feeding site. Gammarus insensibilis was the alternative prey resource in the water layer, and their density varied with wind direction in the same way as brine shrimp. Curlew sandpipers and dunlins in the hypersaline lagoons and broad-billed sandpipers in the brackish lagoons often changed feeding sites, probably following the variation in prey availability. Only because of the large size and variety of lagoons are waders in the Sivash always able to find good feeding sites.

  20. Intense predation cannot always be detected experimentally: A case study of shorebird predation on nereid polychaetes in South Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalejta, B.

    The effect of predation by curlew sandpipers Calidris ferruginea L. and grey plovers Pluvialis squatarola (L.) on populations of nereid worms Ceratonereis keiskama (Day) and C. erythraeensis (Fauvel) was studied at the Berg River estuary, South Africa, by comparing observations of shorebird-foraging intensity with the results of a population study of two species of nereid worms within and outside bird exclosures. The study was carried out during the four-month period prior to northward migration of shorebirds. Population structure of the two nereid species differed considerably. Ceratonereis keiskama reproduced earlier than C. erythraeensis and only young individuals were present during the study. By contrast, old C. erythraeensis were available to the birds at the start of the experiment and young animals entered the population during the experiment. Despite selective predation on certain size classes of nereids by the birds, no significant changes in the population structure of either nereid were detected by the cage experiment. Numbers and biomass of both Ceratonereis spp. in paired controls and cages tracked each other and did not diverge as predicted. A consistent difference in the depth stratification of the two nereids may, however, have been due to predation pressure. Curlew sandpipers were calculated to remove 3112 nereids per m 2 during the three months, equivalent to 4.4. g (dry weight) per m 2. This represents 58% of the initial numbers and 77% of the initial biomass of nereids. Although predation on nereids by waders was exceptionally high at the Berg River estuary, any depletion in numbers or biomass of nereids caused by these predators was masked by the reproduction of the nereids. The fact that the predators' high energy requirements prior to northward migration coincide with the period of peak production of invertebrate prey makes the Berg River estuary an exceptionally favourable wintering area.

  1. [Advantages and limitations of interspecies associations in northern migratory sandpipers (Charadrii, Aves)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gavrilov, V V

    2014-01-01

    Investigations were carried out at two stations of Ornithological Unit, IBPN FEB RAS, located in Nizhnekolymsk District, Yakutia, starting from May 15-20 in 1984, 1985, 1987, 1988, and 1990; at the northern coast of Pukhovoy Bay, Southern Island of Novaya Zemlya starting from June 1 in 1994; at Cape Beliy Nos, the Yugorsky Peninsula, starting from June 1 in 1995-1997. Classic associations are detected in interspecies flocks of sandpipers between the following species: the Pacific golden plover and the curlew sandpiper, the pectoral sandpiper and the long-billed dowitcher, the pectoral sandpiper and the dunlin, the grey plover and the dunlin. However, total amount of birds that form associations is not large. In species of group "A" (the grey plover, the Pacific golden plover, the pectoral sandpiper), no difference has been observed in migratory birds behavior within inter- or conspecific flocks. Species of group "B" (the dunlin, the curlew sandpiper, the long-billed dowitcher), on the contrary, change their behavior sharply depending on whether they belong to an association or not. Species of group "A" do not get any advantages when forming an association. Unlike them, species of group "B" profit from associating: a part of time spent in foraging substantially increases; more time is spent on rest and less time is spent on reconnaissance and vigilance (readiness for actions); safety of birds is enhanced. On the other hand, in species of group "B" there are also disadvantages related with associating: i.e., interspecies competition for food; foraging in suboptimal habitats which, in turn, may lead to notable increase of time spent by birds in foraging. An assumption is put forward that in species of group "B" advantages and limitations of associating cancel each other to a certain extent, and this explains rather small number of birds forming associations.

  2. Origins of linguistic diversity in the Aleutian Islands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berge, Anna

    2010-12-01

    The Aleut language, currently spoken along the Aleutian chain and the Pribilof and Commander islands, is the only language in its branch of the Eskimo-Aleut language family, and traditional methods of linguistic reconstruction have neither satisfactorily explained its relationship with languages on the Asian continent nor its development from Proto-Eskimo-Aleut. Linguistic reconstruction has always been important in understanding the prehistory and history of the Aleuts, and new approaches in comparative linguistics, more comprehensive information on typological features of neighboring languages, and continuing language documentation allow us to propose a rich and continuous history of contact with various groups of people. I evaluate evidence that the Aleut language may have been shaped by contact with neighbors in Asia and Alaska, eventually giving rise to its differentiation from the Eskimo languages. I look at dialect differentiation along the Aleutian chain and what this differentiation reveals about the migration trends of the Aleut along the chain. I look at the colonial expansion of the Aleut-speaking area and resulting additional varieties of Aleut in the historical period. Finally, I review the effects of the Russian and American colonial periods on the Aleut language and the severe endangerment that the language faces today as a result. I conclude that there is evidence of possible Aleut contact with both neighboring peoples; however, much of this evidence has not yet been subjected to systematic comparative reconstructions. Linguistic evidence supports theories of at least two westward expansions of Aleuts along the island chain, but it is not yet clear what motivated the dialect differentiations. Finally, I offer some thoughts on directions for future dialect studies and the continuing documentation of Aleut.

  3. The Relationships between Morphological Characteristics and Foraging Behavior in Four Selected Species of Shorebirds and Water Birds Utilizing Tropical Mudflats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nor Atiqah Norazlimi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A study was conducted to investigate the relationship between the physical morphology of shorebirds and water birds (i.e., Lesser adjutant (Leptoptilos javanicus, Common redshank (Tringa totanus, Whimbrel (Numenius phaeopus, and Little heron (Butorides striata and their foraging behavior in the mudflats area of Selangor, Peninsular Malaysia, from August 2013 to July 2014 by using direct observation techniques (using binoculars and a video recorder. The actively foraging bird species were watched, and their foraging activities were recorded for at least 30 seconds for up to a maximum of five minutes. A Spearman Rank Correlation highlighted a significant relationship between bill size and foraging time (R=0.443, p<0.05, bill size and prey size (R=-0.052, p<0.05, bill size and probing depth (R=0.42, p=0.003, and leg length and water/mud depth (R=0.706, p<0.005. A Kruskal-Wallis Analysis showed a significant difference between average estimates of real probing depth of the birds (mm and species (H=15.96, p=0.0012. Three foraging techniques were recorded: pause-travel, visual-feeding, and tactile-hunting. Thus, morphological characteristics of bird do influence their foraging behavior and strategies used when foraging.

  4. Very rapid long-distance sea crossing by a migratory bird

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alves, José A.; Dias, Maria P.; Méndez, Verónica; Katrínardóttir, Borgný; Gunnarsson, Tómas G.

    2016-11-01

    Landbirds undertaking within-continent migrations have the possibility to stop en route, but most long-distance migrants must also undertake large non-stop sea crossings, the length of which can vary greatly. For shorebirds migrating from Iceland to West Africa, the shortest route would involve one of the longest continuous sea crossings while alternative, mostly overland, routes are available. Using geolocators to track the migration of Icelandic whimbrels (Numenius phaeopus), we show that they can complete a round-trip of 11,000 km making two non-stop sea crossings and flying at speeds of up to 24 m s‑1 the fastest recorded for shorebirds flying over the ocean. Although wind support could reduce flight energetic costs, whimbrels faced headwinds up to twice their ground speed, indicating that unfavourable and potentially fatal weather conditions are not uncommon. Such apparently high risk migrations might be more common than previously thought, with potential fitness gains outweighing the costs.

  5. Genetics and epidemiology of haematological disorders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jensson, O.

    1980-01-01

    Two main types of hereditary haemolytic anaemias have been studied in Iceland for the last 20 years, hereditary elliptocytosis and hereditary spherocytosis. The findings as to the number of families involved and the individuals diagnosed and their ethnic orgin are summarized. Three families with hereditary elliptocytosis containing over 90 affected individuals have been examined more closely. The largest of these, with over 80 affected members, is Icelandic, another is of Algerian origin, and the third, which is currently under investigation for a gene for elliptocytosis, is from one of three possible sources, Icelandic, Danish or Eskimo.

  6. Reference: 544 [Arabidopsis Phenome Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available o et al. 2007 Mar. Plant J. 49(5):786-99. The eskimo1 (esk1) mutation of Arabidopsis resulted in a 5.5 degrees C improvement in fre...ezing tolerance in the absence of cold acclimation. Here we show that the increase in fre...ezing tolerance is not associated with any increase in the ability to survive drought or salt stre...sses, which are similar to freezing in their induction of cellular dehydration. Genome-...wide comparisons of gene expression between esk1-1 and wild type indicate that mutations at esk1 result in altered expre

  7. Minimally destructive DNA extraction from archaeological artefacts made from whale baleen

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sinding, Mikkel Holger Strander; Gilbert, M. Thomas P.; Grønnow, Bjarne

    2012-01-01

    Here we demonstrate the successful extraction and amplification of target species DNA from artefacts made of whale baleen collected from excavations of past palaeo-Eskimo and Inuit cultures in Greenland. DNA was successfully extracted and amplified from a single baleen bristle of 1.5 cm length...... dated based on archaeological context to the period of the Saqqaq culture, more than 4000 years ago and following decades of storage at room temperature at the National Museum. The results reveal ancient baleen in archaeological material as a potential source of DNA that can be used for population...

  8. Founder mitochondrial haplotypes in Amerindian populations.

    OpenAIRE

    Bailliet, G.; Rothhammer, F; Carnese, F. R.; Bravi, C M; Bianchi, N O

    1994-01-01

    It had been proposed that the colonization of the New World took place by three successive migrations from northeastern Asia. The first one gave rise to Amerindians (Paleo-Indians), the second and third ones to Nadene and Aleut-Eskimo, respectively. Variation in mtDNA has been used to infer the demographic structure of the Amerindian ancestors. The study of RFLP all along the mtDNA and the analysis of nucleotide substitutions in the D-loop region of the mitochondrial genome apparently indicat...

  9. Genome-wide nucleosome map and cytosine methylation levels of an ancient human genome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Jakob Skou; Valen, Eivind; Velazquez, Amhed Missael Vargas;

    2014-01-01

    data generated from hair shafts of a 4000-yr-old Paleo-Eskimo belonging to the Saqqaq culture, we generate the first ancient nucleosome map coupled with a genome-wide survey of cytosine methylation levels. The validity of both nucleosome map and methylation levels were confirmed by the recovery...... of the expected signals at promoter regions, exon/intron boundaries, and CTCF sites. The top-scoring nucleosome calls revealed distinct DNA positioning biases, attesting to nucleotide-level accuracy. The ancient methylation levels exhibited high conservation over time, clustering closely with modern hair tissues...

  10. Focal epithelial hyperplasia: report of six cases from Ghana, West Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nartey, N O; Newman, Merley A; Nyako, E A

    2002-01-01

    Focal epithelial hyperplasia is a proliferative growth of the oral mucosa with distinct clinical and histopathological features. Although focal epithelial hyperplasia is frequently reported in children of American Indian and Eskimo descent, it is rarely seen in Africans. This report presents six new cases of focal epithelial hyperplasia observed in African children. The age of the patients ranged from 4 to 12 years, and all except one were females. Clinical variants, the papillary and the papular types were noted in the same patient. There was spontaneous regression of focal epithelial hyperplasia in four patients during the study period. However, the lesions still persist in two patients three years after the initial presentation.

  11. Focal epithelial hyperplasia (Heck’s disease)

    OpenAIRE

    Parichehr Gheliani; Atefe Tavangar; Nakissa Torabinia; Laleh Maleki; Tahereh Nosratzehi

    2013-01-01

    Focal epithelial hyperplasia (Heck) is a rare lesion caused by human papilloma virus subtype 13 or 32 and presents as multiple small white or pink papules on the mucosal surface of lips, buccal mucosa and tongue usually seen in children and adolescent of American Indian and Eskimo background. This disease has a genetic basis. The site of new lesions and recurrence are unpredictable. Continued follow up of the patient is often necessary. In this report, a 50-year-old woman is described with be...

  12. Focal epithelial hyperplasia (Heck's disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parichehr Gheliani

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Focal epithelial hyperplasia (Heck is a rare lesion caused by human papilloma virus subtype 13 or 32 and presents as multiple small white or pink papules on the mucosal surface of lips, buccal mucosa and tongue usually seen in children and adolescent of American Indian and Eskimo background. This disease has a genetic basis. The site of new lesions and recurrence are unpredictable. Continued follow up of the patient is often necessary. In this report, a 50-year-old woman is described with benign papillomatous lesions on dorsal surface of tongue for 15 years

  13. [Focal epithelial hyperplasia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vera-Iglesias, E; García-Arpa, M; Sánchez-Caminero, P; Romero-Aguilera, G; Cortina de la Calle, P

    2007-11-01

    Focal epithelial hyperplasia is a rare disease of the oral mucosa caused by the human papilloma virus (HPV). It appears as a benign epithelial growth, usually in the mucosa of the lower lip. It is mainly associated with HPV serotypes 13 and 32 and there is a clear racial predilection for the disease in Native Americans and Eskimos. We describe the case of a 17-year-old girl from Ecuador with multiple papular lesions in both lips that were clinically and histologically consistent with focal epithelial hyperplasia. Analysis by polymerase chain reaction detected HPV serotype 13.

  14. Pre-Columbian origins of Native American dog breeds, with only limited replacement by European dogs, confirmed by mtDNA analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Asch, Barbara; Zhang, Ai-bing; Oskarsson, Mattias C. R.; Klütsch, Cornelya F. C.; Amorim, António; Savolainen, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Dogs were present in pre-Columbian America, presumably brought by early human migrants from Asia. Studies of free-ranging village/street dogs have indicated almost total replacement of these original dogs by European dogs, but the extent to which Arctic, North and South American breeds are descendants of the original population remains to be assessed. Using a comprehensive phylogeographic analysis, we traced the origin of the mitochondrial DNA lineages for Inuit, Eskimo and Greenland dogs, Alaskan Malamute, Chihuahua, xoloitzcuintli and perro sín pelo del Peru, by comparing to extensive samples of East Asian (n = 984) and European dogs (n = 639), and previously published pre-Columbian sequences. Evidence for a pre-Columbian origin was found for all these breeds, except Alaskan Malamute for which results were ambigous. No European influence was indicated for the Arctic breeds Inuit, Eskimo and Greenland dog, and North/South American breeds had at most 30% European female lineages, suggesting marginal replacement by European dogs. Genetic continuity through time was shown by the sharing of a unique haplotype between the Mexican breed Chihuahua and ancient Mexican samples. We also analysed free-ranging dogs, confirming limited pre-Columbian ancestry overall, but also identifying pockets of remaining populations with high proportion of indigenous ancestry, and we provide the first DNA-based evidence that the Carolina dog, a free-ranging population in the USA, may have an ancient Asian origin. PMID:23843389

  15. Vaccination coverage levels among Alaska Native children aged 19-35 months--National Immunization Survey, United States, 2000-2001.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-08-01

    In 2000, a total of 118,846 persons indicated that their race/ethnicity was Alaska Native (AN), either alone or in combination with one or more other racial/ethnic groups. AN groups comprise 19% of the population of Alaska and 0.4% of the total U.S. population. The AN grouping includes Eskimos, Aleuts, and Alaska Indians (members of the Alaska Athabaskan, Tlingit, Haida, or other AN tribes). Eskimo represented the largest AN tribal grouping, followed by Tlingit/Haida, Alaska Athabascan, and Aleut. Vaccination coverage levels among AN children have not been reported previously. This report presents data from the National Immunization Survey (NIS) for 2000-2001, which indicate that vaccination coverage levels among AN children aged 19-35 months exceeded the national health objective for 2010 (objective no. 14-22) for the majority of vaccines. This achievement indicates the effectiveness of using multiple strategies to increase vaccination coverage. Similar efforts might increase vaccination coverage in other rural regions with American Indian (AI)/AN populations.

  16. Les “Esquimaux des Lumières”: archéologie d’un regard entravé

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giulia Bogliolo Bruna

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The present paper retraces, in an ethno-historical perspective, the genesis of the oriented, elliptic, simplistic and reductive representation of the Eskimos in the Diderot & d’Alembert’s Encyclopaedia. Adopting an inter-disciplinary approach (historical, anthropological and textual, as well, the paper wonders upon the mechanisms which have governed the construction of the Eskimos’ image, and deciphers them considering the philosophical challenges and the ideological conditioning of the Century of Lights. The Eskimos’ image conveyed by the Encyclopaedia emphasizes their bestiality and primitivism, to stick them as the prototype of the savagery, the personification of a degenerated and shy humanity of the borders. The image of the Inuit - stereotyped, preformed and caricatured - is built through bias, omissions, and generalizations. It is intended to present them as fully antonymic to civilisation. In the Diderot and Chevalier de Jaucourt’s writing, the fierce and anthropophagic Inuit are the archetypal symbol of an extreme and terrifying anthropological difference which is the outcome of a geographical and climatic determinism. Far away the highly idealized and aesthetically-oriented image of the Good Savage, the Eskimos show-up in the writing of the Century of Lights‟ scholars a borderline humanity, deprived of any culture mark, but, nevertheless belonging to the human family.

  17. [Genetic history of Aleuts of the Komandor islands from results of analyzing variability of class II HLA genes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volod'ko, N V; Derbeneva, O A; Uinuk-ool, T S; Sukernik, R I

    2003-12-01

    Variability of the HLA class II genes (alleles of the DRB1, DQA1, and DQB1 loci) was investigated in a sample of Aleuts of the Commanders (n = 31), whose ancestors inhabited the Commander Islands for many thousand years. Among 19 haplotypes revealed in Aleuts of the Commanders, at most eight were inherited from the native inhabitants of the Commander Islands. Five of these haplotypes (DRB1*0401-DQA1*0301-DQB1*0301, DRB1*1401-DQA1*0101-DQB1*0503, DRB1*0802-DQA1*0401-DQB1*0402, DRB1*1101-DQA1*0501-DQB1*0301, and DRB1*1201-DQA1*0501-DQB1*0301) were typical of Beringian Mongoloids, i.e., Coastal Chukchi and Koryaks, as well as Siberian and Alaskan Eskimos. Genetic contribution of the immigrants to the genetic pool of proper Aleuts constituted about 52%. Phylogenetic analysis based on Transberingian distribution of the DRB1 allele frequencies favored the hypothesis on the common origin of Paleo-Aleuts, Paleo-Eskimos, and the Indians from the northwestern North America, whose direct ancestors survived in Beringian/southwestern Alaskan coastal refugia during the late Ice Age.

  18. Pre-Columbian origins of Native American dog breeds, with only limited replacement by European dogs, confirmed by mtDNA analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Asch, Barbara; Zhang, Ai-bing; Oskarsson, Mattias C R; Klütsch, Cornelya F C; Amorim, António; Savolainen, Peter

    2013-09-07

    Dogs were present in pre-Columbian America, presumably brought by early human migrants from Asia. Studies of free-ranging village/street dogs have indicated almost total replacement of these original dogs by European dogs, but the extent to which Arctic, North and South American breeds are descendants of the original population remains to be assessed. Using a comprehensive phylogeographic analysis, we traced the origin of the mitochondrial DNA lineages for Inuit, Eskimo and Greenland dogs, Alaskan Malamute, Chihuahua, xoloitzcuintli and perro sín pelo del Peru, by comparing to extensive samples of East Asian (n = 984) and European dogs (n = 639), and previously published pre-Columbian sequences. Evidence for a pre-Columbian origin was found for all these breeds, except Alaskan Malamute for which results were ambigous. No European influence was indicated for the Arctic breeds Inuit, Eskimo and Greenland dog, and North/South American breeds had at most 30% European female lineages, suggesting marginal replacement by European dogs. Genetic continuity through time was shown by the sharing of a unique haplotype between the Mexican breed Chihuahua and ancient Mexican samples. We also analysed free-ranging dogs, confirming limited pre-Columbian ancestry overall, but also identifying pockets of remaining populations with high proportion of indigenous ancestry, and we provide the first DNA-based evidence that the Carolina dog, a free-ranging population in the USA, may have an ancient Asian origin.

  19. How do macrobenthic resources concentrate foraging waders in large megatidal sandflats?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponsero, Alain; Sturbois, Anthony; Desroy, Nicolas; Le Mao, Patrick; Jones, Auriane; Fournier, Jérôme

    2016-09-01

    The relationship between foraging shorebirds, macrobenthos and sedimentary parameters has been widely studied across Western Europe. Megatidal areas have large zones uncovered when the water retreats. Consequently, in such cases, the tide also influences foraging activities. This paper examines the use of an intertidal space by waders to define how macrobenthic resource concentrates foraging activity of birds in a large megatidal sandflat. This approach combines accurate spatial distribution of waders (Oystercatcher, Eurasian curlew, Bar-tailed Godwit and Redknot) according to their activity with ecological/biological parameters. A differential exploitation of the flat is clearly shown, with macrobenthic biomass appearing as one of the main explanatory factor for the four species considered on the western part of the bay and altitude (shore elevation) in the eastern part. The novelty of this study relates to the large area, also presumed to be a functional unit, while considering at the same time the singularities of the different parts of the flat. This multi-scale approach identifies important factors influencing the differential distribution patterns observed. The different selected parameters present an important variability in their contribution, underlining the complexity of explaining the distribution of foraging birds. Consequently, the study of such complex phenomena needs to consider additional variables to improve the relevance of explanatory models.

  20. Ecological baseline study of the Yakima Firing Center proposed land acquisition: A status report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rogers, L.E.; Beedlow, P.A.; Eberhardt, L.E.; Dauble, D.D.; Fitzner, R.E.

    1989-01-01

    This report provides baseline environmental information for the property identified for possible expansion of the Yakima Firing Center. Results from this work provide general descriptions of the animals and major plant communities present. A vegetation map derived from a combination of on-site surveillance and remotely sensed imagery is provided as part of this report. Twenty-seven wildlife species of special interest (protected, sensitive, furbearer, game animal, etc.), and waterfowl, were observed on the proposed expansion area. Bird censuses revealed 13 raptorial species (including four of special interest: bald eagle, golden eagle, osprey, and prairie falcon); five upland game bird species (sage grouse, California quail, chukar, gray partridge, and ring-necked pheasant); common loons (a species proposed for state listing as threatened); and five other species of special interest (sage thrasher, loggerhead shrike, mourning dove, sage sparrow, and long-billed curlew). Estimates of waterfowl abundance are included for the Priest Rapids Pool of the Columbia River. Six small mammal species were captured during this study; one, the sagebrush vole, is a species of special interest. Two large animal species, mule deer and elk, were noted on the site. Five species of furbearing animals were observed (coyote, beaver, raccoon, mink, and striped skunk). Four species of reptiles and one amphibian were noted. Fisheries surveys were conducted to document the presence of gamefish, and sensitive-classified fish and aquatic invertebrates. Rainbow trout were the only fish collected within the boundaries of the proposed northern expansion area. 22 refs., 10 figs., 4 tabs.

  1. Morfometría y fecundidad de Profilicollis bullocki Mateo, Córdova & Guzmán 1982 (Acanthocephala: Polymorphidae en especies simpátricas de aves costeras de Chile Morphometry and fecundity of Profilicollis bullocki Mateo, Córdova & Guzmán 1982 (Acanthocephala: Polymorphidae in sympatric coastal bird species of Chile

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    CLAUDIA RIQUELME

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Se describe y se compara la morfología y fecundidad de individuos adultos del acantocéfalo Profilicollis bullocki Mateo, Córdova & Guzmán 1982 (Acanthocephala: Polymorphidae extraídos del intestino de cuatro especies de aves costeras Larus dominicanus Lichtenstein 1823, Larus pipixcan Wagler 1831, Podiceps occipitalis Garnot 1826 y Numenius phaeopus Linné 1758, capturadas en Caleta Lenga (36º45' S, 73º10' O, Chile. Los resultados señalan que la identidad de la especie hospedadora es un factor relevante para entender las variaciones de la morfología y de la fecundidad del parásito. Los acantocéfalos recolectados desde L. dominicanus y L. pipixcan eran los de mayor tamaño corporal. Además, la fecundidad de los parásitos aumentaba con su tamaño corporal. Sin embargo, el análisis de los residuos de la regresión entre la fecundidad y la longitud total del cuerpo de P. bullocki mostró que la fecundidad del parásito en L. dominicanus es similar a la encontrada en L. pipixcan y que en estas especies es significativamente mayor que la encontrada en los parásitos recolectados de P. occipitalis. Se discute que para establecer qué hospedadores son de mejor calidad para este parásito, aparte de su desempeño reproductivo del parásito en cada especie hospedadora, es necesario también considerar la abundancia de los hospedadores y la magnitud que alcanzan las poblaciones del parásito en cada una de ellasWe describe and compare the variations in morphology and fecundity of Profilicollis bullocki Mateo, Córdova & Guzmán 1982 (Acanthocephala: Polymorphidae adults collected from 4 alternative sympatric and definitive marine coastal bird host species (Larus dominicanus Lichtenstein 1823, Larus pipixcan Wagler 1831, Podiceps occipitalis Garnot 1826 and Numenius phaeopus Linné 1758, sampled at Caleta Lenga, Chile (36º45' S, 73º10' W. Results show that the specific identity of the host species is a relevant factor to explain morphometric

  2. Bringing Climate Into the Classroom: Inside a Teaching Retreat Around Naomi Klein’s This Changes Everything

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bill Bigelow

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Jill Howdyshell lives and teaches 5th grade in Togiak, a small Yu’pik fishing village in southwestern Alaska. In Togiak, harvesting berries is a practice that goes back countless generations. The berries are the key ingredient in akutaq, called eskimo ice cream. In her classes, Howdyshell’s students write identity poems with lines proclaiming “I am from akutaq,” and describing cherished excursions with parents and grandparents. In 2014, residents discovered that there would be no berries that year: the tundra had not frozen for a sufficient length of time for the berries to regenerate. With a dramatic rise in temperatures, Yu’pik people can no longer rely on digging deep into the permafrost to store food in makeshift freezers. And most distressing: as a result of rising seas, during the next few years, Yu’pik people will be forced to relocate large parts of their community.

  3. The brief family relationship scale: a brief measure of the relationship dimension in family functioning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fok, Carlotta Ching Ting; Allen, James; Henry, David

    2014-02-01

    The Relationship dimension of the Family Environment Scale, which consists of the Cohesion, Expressiveness, and Conflict subscales, measures a person's perception of the quality of his or her family relationship functioning. This study investigates an adaptation of the Relationship dimension of the Family Environment Scale for Alaska Native youth. The authors tested the adapted measure, the Brief Family Relationship Scale, for psychometric properties and internal structure with 284 12- to 18-year-old predominately Yup'ik Eskimo Alaska Native adolescents from rural, remote communities. This non-Western cultural group is hypothesized to display higher levels of collectivism traditionally organized around an extended kinship family structure. Results demonstrate a subset of the adapted items function satisfactorily, a three-response alternative format provided meaningful information, and the subscale's underlying structure is best described through three distinct first-order factors, organized under one higher order factor. Convergent and discriminant validity of the Brief Family Relationship Scale was assessed through correlational analysis.

  4. One year in an Alaskan arthritis clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Templin, D

    1999-10-01

    During 1997 visits were made by 852 individuals to an arthritis clinic in Alaska serving predominantly Alaska Natives. Three hundred twenty- seven of these were seen for the first time. The ratio of women to men was 3:1. Rheumatoid Arthritis was the most common arthritic condition seen, followed by Degenerative Joint Disease and Spondyloarthropathies. Three hundred five Tlingit and 246 Eskimo made up 65% of the patients seen that year. Methotrexate was the most frequently used Disease Modifying Antirheumatic Drug but the other such drugs were prescribed as well. Recording demographic and clinical information on a portable computer at the time of visit provided record linkage and the data for this report and was used in Health Care Planning.

  5. HLA-B27 subtypes among the Chukotka native groups

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krylov, M.Y.; Alexeeva, L.I.; Erdesz, S.; Benevolenskaya, L.I. [Akademiya Meditsinskikh Nauk SSSR, Moscow (Russian Federation). Inst. Revmatizma; Reveille, J.D.; Arnett, F.C. [Texas Univ., Houston, TX (United States). Health Science Center

    1995-12-31

    The purpose of this study was to assess the relative frequency of the known HLA-B27 subtypes in HLA-B27 positive Chukotka natives, which have higher frequencies of HLA-B27 (to 40%) and spondylarthropathies (to 2%) than the Russian Caucasian population. Using oligotyping of the polymerase-chain reaction amplified second and third exons of the HLA-B27 gene in 86 DNA samples from HLA-B27 positive individuals were successfully typed. All had HLA-B*2705, including 4 patients with Reiter`s syndrome and 5 with ankylosing spondyloarthritis, except one Eskimo who had HLA-B*2702. None had HLA-B*2704, a frequent subtype in Orientals. With respect to HLA-B27 subtypes the indigenous populations from the eastern part of the Chukotka Peninsula are genetically more closely related to Caucasians than to Orientals. (author). 18 refs, 1 fig., 2 tabs.

  6. Focal epithelial hyperplasia in an HIV positive man. An illustrated case and review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marvan, E; Firth, N

    1998-10-01

    Focal epithelial hyperplasia (FEH) is a rare but distinctive entity of viral aetiology with characteristic clinical and histopathological features. It is usually seen in children and adolescents of American Indian and Eskimo background; however, it has recently been described in adults who are HIV positive. Suppression of the immune system leaves the individual vulnerable to opportunistic infections. With improved management of immunocompromised patients it is increasingly possible that the general dental practitioner will encounter secondary oral infections such as FEH and must therefore be able to recognize, diagnose and treat these lesions. The following report presents a case of FEH in an HIV-infected man, and is followed by a review of the literature.

  7. Focal epithelial hyperplasia (Heck's disease): report of a case in a girl of Brazilian Indian descent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martins, W D; de Lima, A A S; Vieira, S

    2006-01-01

    Summary. Background. This report describes the case of a patient with focal epithelial hyperplasia (FEH), a rare but distinctive entity of viral aetiology with characteristic clinical and histopathological features. Case report. The condition is usually seen in children and adolescents of American Indian and Eskimo background. Surgical removal of papillomatous lesions is the treatment of choice, either for aesthetic reasons, or when the lesions interfere with function or are readily traumatized. Recurrence and the site of new lesions are unpredictable, and continued review of the patient is often necessary. The patient described here has been followed for 24 months without recurrences or changes in the aspect of the remaining lesions. Conclusion. This case highlights a possible genetic predilection for FEH, since the patient is a descent of a Brazilian Xavante Indian.

  8. Oral focal epithelial hyperplasia: report of three cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghalayani, Parichehr; Tavakoli, Payam; Eftekhari, Mehdi; Haghighi, Mohammad Akhondzadeh

    2015-01-01

    Focal epithelial hyperplasia or Heck's disease is an infrequent asymptomatic condition caused by human papillomavirus types 13 or 32 affecting the mucous membrane of the mouth and is commonly seen in young individuals. Firstly, it was described in Indians and Eskimos, but it exists in various populations. We present three cases of Heck's disease in an Afghan immigrant family group living in Iran that seem to have familial predominance. The disease was identified as oral focal epithelial hyperplasia on the basis of histopathologic and clinical findings. The lesions were reduced significantly after 4 months of good oral hygiene. Dentists should be familiar with the clinical manifestations of these types of lesions that affect the oral cavity. In fact, histopathologic assessment and clinical observation are necessary to establish the diagnosis.

  9. Pros and cons of methylation-based enrichment methods for ancient DNA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Seguin-Orlando, Andaine; Gamba, Cristina; Der Sarkissian, Clio;

    2015-01-01

    The recent discovery that DNA methylation survives in fossil material provides an opportunity for novel molecular approaches in palaeogenomics. Here, we apply to ancient DNA extracts the probe-independent Methylated Binding Domains (MBD)-based enrichment method, which targets DNA molecules...... containing methylated CpGs. Using remains of a Palaeo-Eskimo Saqqaq individual, woolly mammoths, polar bears and two equine species, we confirm that DNA methylation survives in a variety of tissues, environmental contexts and over a large temporal range (4,000 to over 45,000 years before present). MBD...... enrichment, however, appears principally biased towards the recovery of CpG-rich and long DNA templates and is limited by the fast post-mortem cytosine deamination rates of methylated epialleles. This method, thus, appears only appropriate for the analysis of ancient methylomes from very well preserved...

  10. Low forager fertility: demographic characteristic or methodological artifact?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Early, J D

    1985-09-01

    Anthropological literature has long held that traditional foraging populations have low fertility levels. This research examines the number of live births per woman for 9 non-western forager groups who have been investigated in the last 20 years. Data are derived from 1) birth registration systems, 2) surveys conducted during short stays with the group, and 3) surveys conducted as part of longer ethnographic studies. Fertility rates for the groups are 1) 3.5 for the Kiunga area of Papula, New Guinea, 2) 4.2 for Northern Territory Australian aborigines, 3) 5.0 for Cayapo groups in Brazil, 4) 5.3 for Hiowe people of New Guinea, 5) 5.7 for 3 Xavante groups in Brazil, 6) 6.0 for West Alaskan Eskimos, 7) 6.9 for Nunamiut Eskimos of Alaska, 8) 7.6 for the Bisman-Asmat group of Indonesian New Guinea, and 9) 8.4 for the Winikina Warao of Venezuela. Since fertility rates are highest when ethnographic studies, which allow for question clarification, memory recall, and cross-checking, are used, the author believes that high fertility rates most accurately represent forager societies. Research on the Dobe ]Kung (fertility rate - 4.7), may contradict these findings, but the author believes that the ]Kung fertility rates are higher than reported because of infanticide practices, sexual abstinence during lactation, and disease related fertility problems. In summary, the study finds high fertility (7-9 births) in traditional foraging societies. Although the study examines small populations, correlation strength and overall consistency help verify the results.

  11. mtDNA sequences suggest a recent evolutionary divergence for Beringian and Northern American populations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shields, G.F.; Schmiechen, A.M.; Reed, J.K. (Univ. of Alaska, Fairbanks, AK (United States)); Frazier, B.L.; Redd, A.; Ward, R.H. (Univ. of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT (United States)); Voevoda, M.I. (Institute of Internal Medicine, Novosibirsk (Russian Federation))

    1993-09-01

    Conventional descriptions of the pattern and process of human entry into the New World from Asia are incomplete and controversial. In order to gain an evolutionary insight into this process, the authors have sequenced the control region of mtDNA in samples of contemporary tribal populations of eastern Siberia, Alaska, and Greenland and have compared them with those of Amerind speakers of the Pacific Northwest and with those of the Altai of central Siberia. Specifically, they have analyzed sequence diversity in 33 mitochondiral lineages identified in 90 individuals belonging to five Circumpolar populations of Beringia, North America, and Greenland: Chukchi from Siberia, Inupiaq Eskimos and Athapaskans from Alaska, Eskimos from West Greenland, and Haida from Canada. Hereafter, these five populations are referred to as Circumarctic peoples'. These data were then compared with the sequence diversity in 47 mitochondrial lineages identified in a sample of 145 individuals from three Amerind-speaking tribes (Bella Coola, Nuu-Chah-Nulth, and Yakima) of the Pacific Northwest, plus 16 mitrochondrial lineages identified in a sample of 17 Altai from central Siberia. Sequence diversity within and among Circumarctic populations is considerably less than the sequence diversity observed within and among the three Amerind tribes. The similarity of sequences found among the geographically dispersed Circumarctic groups, plus the small values of mean pairwise sequence differences within Circumarctic populations, suggest a recent and rapid evolutionary radiation of these populations. In addition, Circumarctic populations lack the 9-bp deletion which has been used to trace various migrations out of Asia, while populations of southeastern Siberia possess this deletion. On the basis of these observations, while the evolutionary affinities of Native Americans extend west to the Circumarctic populations of eastern Siberia, they do not include the Altai of central Siberia.

  12. Thermal Water of Utah Topical Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goode, Harry D.

    1978-11-01

    Western and central Utah has 16 areas whose wells or springs yield hot water (35 C or higher), warm water (20-34.5 C), and slightly warm water (15.5-19.5 C). These areas and the highest recorded water temperature for each are: Lower Bear River Area, 105 C; Bonneville Salt Flats, 88 C; Cove Fort-Sulphurdale, 77 C; Curlew Valley, 43 C; East Shore Area, 60 C; Escalante Desert, 149 C; Escalante Valley (Roosevelt, 269 C, and Thermo, 85C); Fish Springs, 60.5 C; Grouse Creek Valley, 42 C; Heber Valley (Midway, 45 C); Jordan Valley, 58.5 C; Pavant Valley-Black Rock Desert, 67 C; Sevier Desert ( Abraham-Crater Hot Springs, 82 C); Sevier Valley (Monroe-Red Hill, 76.5 C, and Joseph Hot Spring, 64 C); Utah Valley, 46 C; and Central Virgin River Basin, 42 C. The only hot water in eastern Utah comes from the oil wells of the Ashley Valley Oil Field, which in 1977 yielded 4400 acre-feet of water at 43 C to 55 C. Many other areas yield warm water (20 to 34.5 C) and slightly warm water (15.5 to 19.5 C). With the possible exception of the Roosevelt KGRA, Crater Hot Springs in the Sevier Desert, Escalante Desert, Pavant-Black Rock, Cove Fort-Sulphurdale, and Coyote Spring in Curlew Valley, which may derive their heat from buried igneous bodies, the heat that warms the thermal water is derived from the geothermal gradient. Meteoric water circulates through fractures or permeable rocks deep within the earth, where it is warmed; it then rises by convection or artesian pressure and issues at the surface as springs or is tapped by wells. Most thermal springs thus rise along faults, but some thermal water is trapped in confined aquifers so that it spreads laterally as it mixes with and warms cooler near-surface water. This spreading of thermal waters is evident in Cache Valley, in Jordan Valley, and in southern Utah Valley; likely the spreading occurs in many other artesian basins where it has not yet been recognized. In the East Shore Area thermal water trapped in confined aquifers warms

  13. Coastal single-beam bathymetry data collected in 2015 from the Chandeleur Islands, Louisiana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stalk, Chelsea A.; DeWitt, Nancy T.; Bernier, Julie C.; Kindinger, Jack G.; Flocks, James G.; Miselis, Jennifer L.; Locker, Stanley D.; Kelso, Kyle W.; Tuten, Thomas M.

    2017-02-23

    As part of the Louisiana Coastal Protection and Restoration Authority (CPRA) Barrier Island Comprehensive Monitoring Program, scientists from the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) St. Petersburg Coastal and Marine Science Center conducted a single-beam bathymetry survey around the Chandeleur Islands, Louisiana, in June 2015. The goal of the program is to provide long-term data on Louisiana’s barrier islands and use this data to plan, design, evaluate, and maintain current and future barrier island restoration projects. The data described in this report, along with (1) USGS bathymetry data collected in 2013 as a part of the Barrier Island Evolution Research project covering the northern Chandeleur Islands, and (2) data collected in 2014 in collaboration with the Louisiana CPRA Barrier Island Comprehensive Monitoring Program around Breton Island, will be used to assess bathymetric change since 2006‒2007 as well as serve as a bathymetric control in supporting modeling of future changes in response to restoration and storm impacts. The survey area encompasses approximately 435 square kilometers of nearshore and back-barrier environments around Hewes Point, the Chandeleur Islands, and Curlew and Grand Gosier Shoals. This Data Series serves as an archive of processed single-beam bathymetry data, collected in the nearshore of the Chandeleur Islands, Louisiana, from June 17‒24, 2015, during USGS Field Activity Number 2015-317-FA. Geographic information system data products include a 200-meter-cell-size interpolated bathymetry grid, trackline maps, and xyz point data files. Additional files include error analysis maps, Field Activity Collection System logs, and formal Federal Geographic Data Committee metadata.

  14. Bird associations with shrubsteppe plant communities at the proposed reference repository location in southeastern Washington

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schuler, C.A.; Rickard, W.H.; Sargeant, G.A.

    1988-03-01

    This report provides information on te seasonal use of shrubsteppe vegetation by bird species at the RRL. Bird abundance and distribution were studied at the RRL to ensure that the DOE monitored migratory bird species pursuant to the Migratory Bird Treaty Act and to assess potential impacts of site characterization activities on bird populations. Birds were counted on two transects that together sampled an areas of 1.39 km/sup 2/. The relative abundance of birds, species richness, seasonal distribution, and the association of breeding shrubsteppe birds with major vegetation types were determined from Janurary through December 1987. Only 38 species were counted during 82 surveys. Total bird density during the nesting season (March-June) was 42.96 birdskm/sup 2/ and the density for the entire year was 26.74 birdskm/sup 2/. The characteristic nesting birds in shrubsteppe habitats were western meadowlark, sage sparrow, burrowing owl, mourning dove, horned lark, long-billed curlew, lark sparrow, and loggerhead shrike. Western meadowlark and sage sparrows were the most abundant breeding birds with an average density of 11.25 and 7.76 birdskm/sup 2/, respectively. Seasonal distribution of birds varied with species, but most species were present from March to September. Distribution and abunandance of nesting birds were correlated with habitat type. About 63% of the habitat surveyed was sagebrush, 26% was cheatgrass, and 11% was spiny hopsage. Sagebrush habitat supproted a greeater total bird density than cheatgrass or hopsage habitats. Sage sparrows were closely associated with sagebrush habitats, while western meadowlarks showed no strong habitat affinities. 22 refs., 9 figs., 6 tabs

  15. Windturbines and meadow birds in Germany - results of a 7 years BACI-study and a literature review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reichenbach, Marc; Steinborn, Hanjo

    2011-07-01

    Full text: In many parts of Germany meadow birds - either breeding or staging - are the species most affected by wind farms planned in open agricultural areas. A 7 year BACI-study (before-after-control-impact) in the south of East Frisia, Lower Saxony, investigated the influence of wind turbines on several meadow bird species. The parameters analysed comprised population trends, spatial distribution and behaviour in relation to turbine distance, breeding success as well as the influence of certain habitat parameters like type of agricultural use and the distance to woods and hedges. The results show, that breeding birds are generally less sensitive to wind turbines than staging birds. Significant reductions of breeding lapwing density occurred only up to a distance of 100 m. Curlews however showed a reduction of resting and grooming behaviour up to a distance of 250 m. Other species like meadow pipit, skylark and stonechat showed no indications of displacement. An impact of wind turbines on breeding success could not be detected. Breeding lapwings showed a strong preference for certain types of crops, which led to spatial aggregations irrespective of turbine proximity. In staging birds a much more obvious displacement up to about 400 m could be detected. The results are consistent with a number of other German studies on possible displacement effects in different bird species. Lapwing and skylark are among the best studied species whereas staging geese tend to be the most sensitive ones. In conclusion the siting of wind farms must not only be guided by occurrence of endangered species named on national or regional Red Lists but also by the species-specific sensitivity against the disturbance effects of wind turbines. (Author)

  16. Trophic resource partitioning within a shorebird community feeding on intertidal mudflat habitats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bocher, Pierrick; Robin, Frédéric; Kojadinovic, Jessica; Delaporte, Philippe; Rousseau, Pierre; Dupuy, Christine; Bustamante, Paco

    2014-09-01

    In ecological systems, it is necessary to describe the trophic niches of species and their segregation or overlap to understand the distribution of species in the community. In oceanic systems, the community structure of top predators such as seabird communities has been well documented with many studies in several biogeographical areas. But for coastal habitats, very few investigations on the trophic structure have been carried out in avian communities. In this study, the trophic resource partitioning was investigated on eight of the most abundant species of a shorebird community on the central Atlantic coast of France. Our work comprised a comprehensive sample of birds with different ecomorphogical patterns and data on their main prey to encompass potential sources of overlap and segregation in this community. We examined the stable carbon (δ13C) and nitrogen (δ15N) isotopic composition of blood to investigate the trophic structure (1) on a temporal scale by comparing migration and wintering periods; (2) on a spatial scale through inter-site comparisons; and (3) on the community level within groups of phylogenetically related species. Diets appeared different in several cases between periods, between sites and between juveniles and adults for the same sites. A clear trophic partitioning was established with four functional groups of predators in winter inside the community. The Grey Plover, the Bar-tailed Godwit, the Curlew and a majority of the dunlins were worm-eaters mainly feeding on Nereis diversicolor or Nephtys hombergii. Two species were predominantly deposit-suspensivorous mollusc-eaters, including the Red Knot and the Black-tailed Godwit feeding mainly on Macoma balthica. The Oystercatcher fed mainly on suspensivorous molluscs like Cerastodrema edule and two species including the Redshank and some dunlins adopted opportunistic behaviours feeding on mudflat and/or in marshes.

  17. Kosmiline jaht. Põhja-Ameerika müüdi Siberi variandid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juri Berezkin

    2005-01-01

    possibility of their late spread. Unlike both these versions, the circum-Arctic one(s (hunter or game are associated with Orion or the Pleiades are represented by neighbouring traditions which form almost a continuous chain from the Lapps to the Polar Inuit. This version is not recorded among the Yupik Eskimo and could have been brought across the American Arctic with the spread of Tule Eskimo after 1000 AD.

  18. ALTAY LANGUAGES IN NOSTRATIK LANGUAGES THEORY NOSTRATİK DİL TEORİSİ İÇERİSİNDE ALTAY DİLLERİ

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ekrem ARIKOĞLU

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Nostratic language of the theory of names Holger Pedersen his paternity, İlliç Svıtiç theory developed by the Afro-Asiatic, Kartvel, Elam-Dravid, Indo-European, Ural-Yukagir, Eskimo-Aleut, Altai, Korea, the Japanese language group of the common historical roots a defense theory. According to the theory of our day with each other within the same family or language group are not considered languages, at an earlier date (14 -10 thousands BC was based on the same origin. 8 thousand years ago, was separated from the main group of the Altaic language group. But today, many elements of restructuring through leksic history helps to establish ties. Altaic languages or language groups, with the above-mentioned links between the evaluation of the studies, examples are given in words. These links have been limited to elements leksical notice. Nostratik dil teorisi, isim babalığını Holger Pedersen’in yaptığı ve İlliç Svitıç tarafından geliştirilen; Afro-Asyatik, Kartvel, Elam-Dravit, Hint-Avrupa, Ural-Yukagir, Eskimo-Aleut, Altay, Kore ve Japon dillerinin aynı kökene dayandığını savunan bir teoridir.Bu teoriye göre, günümüzdeki pek çok dil ailesi MÖ 14-10 bin yıllarında aynı kökene dayanıyordu. 8 bin yıl önce Altay dil grubu ana gruptan ayrıldı. Fakat günümüzde pek çok leksik unsur tarihî bağların tespit edilmesine yardımcı olmaktadır. Altay dilleri veya dil grubunun diğer dil aileleriyle olan bağları, örnek kelimelerle gösterilmektedir. Bu bağlantılar daha çok leksik unsurlarla sınırlı tutulmuştur.

  19. THE BIODIVERSITY AT SANDI BIRD SANCTUARY, HARDOI WITH SPECIAL REFERENCE TO MIGRATORY BIRDS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashok Kumar

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Indian subcontinent plays host to a number of migratory birds in summers as well as winters. It is estimated that over hundred species of migratory birds fly to India, either in search of feeding grounds or to escape the severe winter of their native habitat. Sandi bird sanctuary was created in 1990 in order to protect and conserve the natural habitation and surroundings and also the marine vegetation for the migratory birds, as well as for the local people of the region. The term migration is used to describe movements of populations of birds or other animals. There are three types of migrants. One way to look at migration is to consider the distances traveled. The pattern of migration can vary within each category, but is most variable in short and medium distance migrants. The origin of migration is related to the distance traveled. The birds migrating through the area, take shelter on the river front before going to the Sandi Bird sanctuary. The birds generally migrate in the winter months of October-November-December. Bird sanctuary is a popular tourist location. Sandi particularly attracts ornithologists and bird watchers, as many rare migratory birds take refuge in the sanctuary. The bird watching camps arranged to observe the migratory birds at Sandi Bird Sanctuary in the month of October and November 2012. The migratory birds at Sandi Bird Sanctuary include great crested grebe, white storks, black lbis, glossy lbis, spoonbill, ruddy shelduck, pin tail, sholveller, spot bill duck, mallard, gadwall, wigeon, tufted pochard, gargancey teal, common teal, cotton teal, grey lag goose, coot, black tailed godwit, painted stock pin tail snipe, marsh sand piper, common tern, river tern, magpie robin, white wagtail, pied wagtail, common snipe, starlings, white lbis, red crested pochard, common pochard, painted stock, black lbis, curlew, Indian skimmer etc. The resident birds at Sandi Bird Sanctuary include little grebe, darter, purple heron, grey

  20. Incorporating grazing into an eco-hydrologic model: Simulating coupled human and natural systems in rangelands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reyes, J. J.; Liu, M.; Tague, C.; Choate, J. S.; Evans, R. D.; Johnson, K. A.; Adam, J. C.

    2013-12-01

    Rangelands provide an opportunity to investigate the coupled feedbacks between human activities and natural ecosystems. These areas comprise at least one-third of the Earth's surface and provide ecological support for birds, insects, wildlife and agricultural animals including grazing lands for livestock. Capturing the interactions among water, carbon, and nitrogen cycles within the context of regional scale patterns of climate and management is important to understand interactions, responses, and feedbacks between rangeland systems and humans, as well as provide relevant information to stakeholders and policymakers. The overarching objective of this research is to understand the full consequences, intended and unintended, of human activities and climate over time in rangelands by incorporating dynamics related to rangeland management into an eco-hydrologic model that also incorporates biogeochemical and soil processes. Here we evaluate our model over ungrazed and grazed sites for different rangeland ecosystems. The Regional Hydro-ecologic Simulation System (RHESSys) is a process-based, watershed-scale model that couples water with carbon and nitrogen cycles. Climate, soil, vegetation, and management effects within the watershed are represented in a nested landscape hierarchy to account for heterogeneity and the lateral movement of water and nutrients. We incorporated a daily time-series of plant biomass loss from rangeland to represent grazing. The TRY Plant Trait Database was used to parameterize genera of shrubs and grasses in different rangeland types, such as tallgrass prairie, Intermountain West cold desert, and shortgrass steppe. In addition, other model parameters captured the reallocation of carbon and nutrients after grass defoliation. Initial simulations were conducted at the Curlew Valley site in northern Utah, a former International Geosphere-Biosphere Programme Desert Biome site. We found that grasses were most sensitive to model parameters affecting

  1. Contrary to nature : Inuit conception of witchcraft

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Merkur

    1987-01-01

    Full Text Available The present contribution to the phenomenology of witchcraft will depend for its data on the traditional conceptions, rites, and folklore of witchcraft among the Inuit (Eskimo of Čanada and Greenland. A phenomenological definition of witchcraft may be obtained through recognition of its position within Inuit religion. Like many native North Americans, the Inuit epitomized their religion in the concept of balance. The Polar Inuit understood religion to have the function "to keep a right balance between mankind and the rest of the world". Without exception, the rites of Inuit witchcraft were rites of Inuit religion that were made unnatural, through the alteration of one or more features. Because counterclockwise ritual motions were specific to witchcraft, the expression "contrary to nature" may be understood to epitomize the Inuit's own appreciation of witchcraft. Whether witchcraft depended on deliberate violations of traditional observances, on malicious uses of magic formulae and songs, and/or on ritual motions, witchcraft proceeded "contrary to nature". Thus, witchcraft can be defined as special practices, which together with the beliefs and folklore surrounding them, are believed to be innately disruptive of the balance between mankind and the numina. Because it is contrary to nature, witchcraft is innately anti-social. The disruption of the balance of mankind with the numina is not the private act of the witch against a victim, but a danger for the entire community.

  2. HLA genes in Lamas Peruvian-Amazonian Amerindians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moscoso, Juan; Seclen, Segundo; Serrano-Vela, Juan I; Villena, A; Martinez-Laso, Jorge; Zamora, Jorge; Moreno, Almudena; Ira-Cachafeiro, Juan; Arnaiz-Villena, Antonio

    2006-04-01

    The Lamas Amerindians are the Chancas descents who established before 1532 a.d. (Spanish conquest) at Lamas City, Wayku quarter in a Peruvian-Amazonian province (San Martin). The Lamas HLA profile shows significant differences with other Amerindians HLA profile, i.e.: (a) a higher number of newly found haplotypes compared to other studied Amerindian populations, particularly HLA-A*02-B*48-DRB1*0403-DQB1*0302, A*02-B*48-DRB1*0804-DQB1*0402 and A*02-B*40-DRB1*0407-DQB1*0302; (b) a relative high frequency of HLA-DRB1*0901 (a high frequency southern Asian allele) and HLA-B*48 (a Na-Dene, Siberian and Eskimo allele); both alleles are also found frequently in Quechuas and Aymaras, but not in many other (particularly Meso American) Amerindians and (c) correspondence and neighbor-joining dendrogram analyses show that Lamas (Chancas) may have an origin close to Amazonian Indians that later reached the Andean altiplano.

  3. A Hero in the Friendly Arctic: Deconstructing Vilhjalmur Stefansson's Rhetorical Maneuver

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silje Gaupseth

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available The article deals with Arctic explorer and anthropologist Vilhjalmur Stefansson's self-presentation in the expedition account The Friendly Arctic: The Story of Five Years in Polar Regions (1921, which tells the story of his travels and trials in the Canadian High Arctic in the years between 1913-1918. The account has been considered a key text to Stefansson's Arctic career, and provides a textbook example of his characteristic theory of living off the country in the so-called Eskimo way. Against the background of Stefansson's debated position as Arctic expert and visionary, I ask if it is possible to read the kind of criticism with which Stefansson frequently was met as rooted in some of the narrative aspects of his account. The narrative persona or implied author is a central element in the literature of exploration, as several literary scholars have pointed out. My reading is centred around the implied author of The Friendly Arctic, which I argue must be read in light of the sometimes conflicting roles given to Stefansson as protagonist and narrator in his own story. Close-readings of passages from the account raise the dilemma of how it is possible to present oneself as a hero in an essentially friendly Arctic.

  4. ADH and ALDH polymorphisms among Alaska Natives entering treatment for alcoholism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segal, B

    1999-01-01

    The alcohol dehydrogenase (ADHs) and aldehyde dehydrogenases (ALDHs) involved in alcohol metabolism are polymorphic. Different alleles encode subunits of the enzymes that are related to differences in alcohol metabolism with different ethnic groups. This study examined the allele frequencies at the ADH1, ADH2, ADH3 and ALDH2 loci in Alaska Natives entering treatment for alcoholism to determine if allele frequencies at these loci differ among five distinct Alaska Native groups: Yupik and Inupiat Eskimos, Athabascan, Tlingit and Aleut. It was found that all persons were homozygous for the ADH1*1, ADH2*1 and ALDH2*1 alleles. Variations, however, were found for the allele distribution of the ADH3 genotype. Comparison with a general population sample found no differences in allele distributions for ADHs and ALDH2*1, but differences were found when comparisons were made with four Asian Groups. The study's findings suggest that the Alaska Natives are not protected from the risk of alcoholism in the same way that Asians who possess the ALDH2*2 genotype are considered to have a negative risk factor. Nor, does there appear to be any generalized differences between Alaska Native alcoholics and members of the general population with respect to the ALDH and ADH polymorphisms studied herein.

  5. The distribution of alcohol among the natives of Russian America.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grinëv, Andrei V

    2010-01-01

    The study of archival materials and published historical and ethnographic sources shows that alcohol played an insignificant role in contacts with the aboriginal population during the Russian colonization of Alaska. The Russian-American Company (RAC) tried to fight alcoholism and limited access of spirits to the natives of the Russian colonies partially for moral and partially for economic reasons. The only Alaskan natives to whom agents of the RAC supplied rum in large quantities were the Tlingit and Kaigani Haida in 1830–1842, and among them excessive drinking became a widespread problem. The chief suppliers of alcohol for these Native Americans were the British and American traders at the end of the eighteenth century. In the mid-nineteenth century traders and whalers began to supply it to the Bering Sea Eskimos as well. Russian colonization was marked by efforts to limit drunkenness in the native populations. In that sense, Russian colonization was favorable in comparison with subsequent American colonization of Alaska.

  6. Achieveing Organizational Excellence Through

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehdi Abzari

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available AbstractToday, In order to create motivation and desirable behavior in employees, to obtain organizational goals,to increase human resources productivity and finally to achieve organizational excellence, top managers oforganizations apply new and effective strategies. One of these strategies to achieve organizational excellenceis creating desirable corporate culture. This research has been conducted to identify the path to reachorganizational excellence by creating corporate culture according to the standards and criteria oforganizational excellence. The result of the so-called research is this paper in which researchers foundtwenty models and components of corporate culture and based on the Industry, organizational goals andEFQM model developed a model called "The Eskimo model of Culture-Excellence". The method of theresearch is survey and field study and the questionnaires were distributed among 116 managers andemployees. To assess the reliability of questionnaires, Cronbach alpha was measured to be 95% in the idealsituation and 0/97 in the current situation. Systematic sampling was done and in the pre-test stage 45questionnaires were distributed. A comparison between the current and the ideal corporate culture based onthe views of managers and employees was done and finally it has been concluded that corporate culture isthe main factor to facilitate corporate excellence and success in order to achieve organizational effectiveness.The contribution of this paper is that it proposes a localized –applicable model of corporate excellencethrough reinforcing corporate culture.

  7. Reconstructing Native American population history.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reich, David; Patterson, Nick; Campbell, Desmond; Tandon, Arti; Mazieres, Stéphane; Ray, Nicolas; Parra, Maria V; Rojas, Winston; Duque, Constanza; Mesa, Natalia; García, Luis F; Triana, Omar; Blair, Silvia; Maestre, Amanda; Dib, Juan C; Bravi, Claudio M; Bailliet, Graciela; Corach, Daniel; Hünemeier, Tábita; Bortolini, Maria Cátira; Salzano, Francisco M; Petzl-Erler, María Luiza; Acuña-Alonzo, Victor; Aguilar-Salinas, Carlos; Canizales-Quinteros, Samuel; Tusié-Luna, Teresa; Riba, Laura; Rodríguez-Cruz, Maricela; Lopez-Alarcón, Mardia; Coral-Vazquez, Ramón; Canto-Cetina, Thelma; Silva-Zolezzi, Irma; Fernandez-Lopez, Juan Carlos; Contreras, Alejandra V; Jimenez-Sanchez, Gerardo; Gómez-Vázquez, Maria José; Molina, Julio; Carracedo, Angel; Salas, Antonio; Gallo, Carla; Poletti, Giovanni; Witonsky, David B; Alkorta-Aranburu, Gorka; Sukernik, Rem I; Osipova, Ludmila; Fedorova, Sardana A; Vasquez, René; Villena, Mercedes; Moreau, Claudia; Barrantes, Ramiro; Pauls, David; Excoffier, Laurent; Bedoya, Gabriel; Rothhammer, Francisco; Dugoujon, Jean-Michel; Larrouy, Georges; Klitz, William; Labuda, Damian; Kidd, Judith; Kidd, Kenneth; Di Rienzo, Anna; Freimer, Nelson B; Price, Alkes L; Ruiz-Linares, Andrés

    2012-08-16

    The peopling of the Americas has been the subject of extensive genetic, archaeological and linguistic research; however, central questions remain unresolved. One contentious issue is whether the settlement occurred by means of a single migration or multiple streams of migration from Siberia. The pattern of dispersals within the Americas is also poorly understood. To address these questions at a higher resolution than was previously possible, we assembled data from 52 Native American and 17 Siberian groups genotyped at 364,470 single nucleotide polymorphisms. Here we show that Native Americans descend from at least three streams of Asian gene flow. Most descend entirely from a single ancestral population that we call 'First American'. However, speakers of Eskimo-Aleut languages from the Arctic inherit almost half their ancestry from a second stream of Asian gene flow, and the Na-Dene-speaking Chipewyan from Canada inherit roughly one-tenth of their ancestry from a third stream. We show that the initial peopling followed a southward expansion facilitated by the coast, with sequential population splits and little gene flow after divergence, especially in South America. A major exception is in Chibchan speakers on both sides of the Panama isthmus, who have ancestry from both North and South America.

  8. Dimensional and discrete dental trait asymmetry relationships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayhall, J T; Saunders, S R

    1986-03-01

    Inuit (Eskimos) from the Foxe Basin region of the Northwest Territories, Canada, were studied to ascertain the amount of dimensional and morphological asymmetry in their dentitions. The results indicate that dimensional asymmetry does not appear to be greater on either the maxillary or mandibular teeth. Both types of asymmetry show partial conformity to the model of tooth fields with an increasing amount of asymmetry as one goes distally in each tooth group. The morphological asymmetry exception, the mandibular incisors, follows Dahlberg's "Field Concept." Rank-order correlations between the amount of dimensional asymmetry and morphological asymmetry reveal no detectable patterns. There appear to be no associations between the presence or absence of morphological asymmetry and the size of the tooth. This lack of association might be explained by differences in developmental timing of tooth dimensions and morphological traits; however, such a hypothesis requires experimental testing. In this population and those for which published results are available, it is practically impossible to overcome the "noise" level and test recent hypotheses regarding random dental asymmetry.

  9. Founder mitochondrial haplotypes in Amerindian populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailliet, G; Rothhammer, F; Carnese, F R; Bravi, C M; Bianchi, N O

    1994-07-01

    It had been proposed that the colonization of the New World took place by three successive migrations from northeastern Asia. The first one gave rise to Amerindians (Paleo-Indians), the second and third ones to Nadene and Aleut-Eskimo, respectively. Variation in mtDNA has been used to infer the demographic structure of the Amerindian ancestors. The study of RFLP all along the mtDNA and the analysis of nucleotide substitutions in the D-loop region of the mitochondrial genome apparently indicate that most or all full-blooded Amerindians cluster in one of four different mitochondrial haplotypes that are considered to represent the founder maternal lineages of Paleo-Indians. We have studied the mtDNA diversity in 109 Amerindians belonging to 3 different tribes, and we have reanalyzed the published data on 482 individuals from 18 other tribes. Our study confirms the existence of four major Amerindian haplotypes. However, we also found evidence supporting the existence of several other potential founder haplotypes or haplotype subsets in addition to the four ancestral lineages reported. Confirmation of a relatively high number of founder haplotypes would indicate that early migration into America was not accompanied by a severe genetic bottleneck.

  10. Advances in the dental search for Native American origins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, C G

    1984-01-01

    The Sinodont dental morphology pattern of NE Asia is today more complex and was so by 20,000 years ago, than the simplified Sundadonty of SE Asia-Oceania, and the very simplified pattern that evolved greater than 20,000 B.P. All Native Americans are Sinodonts. Intra--and inter-hemispheric statistical analyses of 28 dental traits in greater than 6000 N & S American and greater than 1100 NE Asian crania reveal three temporally stable American sub-patterns, suggesting prior evolution in Sino-Siberia. The hypothesized biocultural associations and migration episodes are: (1) "Upper Cave" Sinodonts with the generalized Chinese Microlithic Tradition reach the Arctic steppe via the Lena basin to become Paleo--and most later Indians. (2) Smaller-game-hunting Siberian Diuktaians cross to Alaska at forest-forming terminal land bridge times to become Paleo-Arctic and subsequent Na-Dene-speaking NW forest Indians. (3) Lower Amur basin-N Japan blade-makingfolk evolve a coastal culture on the way to the land bridge's SE terminus at Anangula-Umnak where the oldest skeletons of the dentally distinctive but variable Aleut-Eskimos have been found.

  11. Historical overview of n-3 fatty acids and coronary heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leaf, Alexander

    2008-06-01

    The first evidence that fish oil fatty acids might have a beneficial effect on coronary heart disease came from the discovery that Greenland Eskimos, who have a diet high in n-3 fatty acids, have a lower mortality from coronary heart disease than do Danes and Americans. Long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids are essential in our diets and can be classified in 2 groups: n-6 fatty acids found in plant seeds and n-3 fatty acids found in marine vertebrates. Further evidence of n-3 benefits to human health include a 1989 study demonstrating a 29% reduction in fatal cardiac arrhythmias among subjects with a recent myocardial infarction who had been advised to consume fish oil. The GISSI-Prevenzione Trial found a significant reduction in relative reduction of death, cardiac death, nonfatal myocardial infarction, and stroke in subjects consuming n-3 fatty acids. In a recent study, subjects with implanted cardiac defibrillators (ICDs) at high risk for fatal ventricular arrhythmias were randomly assigned to four 1-g capsules of either an ethyl ester concentrate of n-3 fatty acids or olive oil daily for 12 mo. Subjects receiving n-3 who thus had significantly higher levels of eicosapentaenoic acid and docosahexaenoic acid in their red blood cell membranes showed a longer time to first ICD events and had a significantly lower relative risk of having an ICD event or probable event (P = 0.033). These studies demonstrate that fish oil fatty acids have beneficial effects on coronary heart disease.

  12. Modulation of enzymatic activities by n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids to support cardiovascular health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siddiqui, Rafat A; Harvey, Kevin A; Zaloga, Gary P

    2008-07-01

    Epidemiological evidence from Greenland Eskimos and Japanese fishing villages suggests that eating fish oil and marine animals can prevent coronary heart disease. Dietary studies from various laboratories have similarly indicated that regular fish oil intake affects several humoral and cellular factors involved in atherogenesis and may prevent atherosclerosis, arrhythmia, thrombosis, cardiac hypertrophy and sudden cardiac death. The beneficial effects of fish oil are attributed to their n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA; also known as omega-3 fatty acids) content, particularly eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA; 20:5, n-3) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA; 22:6, n-3). Dietary supplementation of DHA and EPA influences the fatty acid composition of plasma phospholipids that, in turn, may affect cardiac cell functions in vivo. Recent studies have demonstrated that long-chain omega-3 fatty acids may exert beneficial effects by affecting a wide variety of cellular signaling mechanisms. Pathways involved in calcium homeostasis in the heart may be of particular importance. L-type calcium channels, the Na+-Ca2+ exchanger and mobilization of calcium from intracellular stores are the most obvious key signaling pathways affecting the cardiovascular system; however, recent studies now suggest that other signaling pathways involving activation of phospholipases, synthesis of eicosanoids, regulation of receptor-associated enzymes and protein kinases also play very important roles in mediating n-3 PUFA effects on cardiovascular health. This review is therefore focused on the molecular targets and signaling pathways that are regulated by n-3 PUFAs in relation to their cardioprotective effects.

  13. Denmark.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-11-01

    Denmark is predominantly a low, flat land with such resources as oil, gas and arable land. The Danish are comprised of Scandinavian, Eskimo, Faroese and German peoples, and the languages spoken include Danish, Farese, Greenlandic and some German. The Danish enjoy a literacy rate of nearly 100%, and school attendance is 100%. The Danes are a homogeneous Gothic-Germanic people who have lived in Denmark since the prehistoric period. The Evangelical Lutheran Church is supported by 97% of the population; however, other religions are present. The government of Denmark is a constitutional monarchy with an executive, legislative and judicial branch. The political life is democratic, and compromise is a very important component of the political life of Denmark as many parties and factions must work together. Support for cultural growth comes from the Ministry of Cultural Affairs which subsidizes projects, training other cultural activities. The infant mortality rate is 8.2/1000. Life expectancy for men is 71.5 and for women 77.5.

  14. DHA derivatives of fish oil as dietary supplements: a nutrition-based drug discovery approach for therapies to prevent metabolic cardiotoxicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Yonggang; Lindsey, Merry L.; Halade, Ganesh V.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction During the early 1970s, Danish physicians Jorn Dyerberg and colleagues observed that Greenland Eskimos consuming fatty fishes exhibited low incidences of heart disease. Fish oil is now one of the most commonly consumed dietary supplements. In 2004, concentrated fish oil was approved as a drug by the FDA for the treatment of hyperlipidemia. Fish oil contains two major omega-3 fatty acids: eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA). With advancements in lipid concentration and purification techniques, EPA- or DHA-enriched products are now commercially available, and the availability of these components in isolation allows their individual effects to be examined. Newly synthesized derivatives and endogenously discovered metabolites of DHA exhibit therapeutic utility for obesity, metabolic syndrome and cardiovascular disease. Areas covered This review summarizes our current knowledge on the distinct effects of EPA and DHA to prevent metabolic syndrome and reduce cardiotoxicity risk. Since EPA is an integral component of fish oil, we will briefly review EPA effects, but our main theme will be to summarize effects of the DHA derivatives that are available today. We focus on using nutrition-based drug discovery to explore the potential of DHA derivatives for the treatment of obesity, metabolic syndrome and cardiovascular diseases. Expert opinion The safety and efficacy evaluation of DHA derivatives will provide novel biomolecules for the drug discovery arsenal. Novel nutritional-based drug discoveries of DHA derivatives or metabolites may provide realistic and alternative strategies for the treatment of metabolic and cardiovascular disease. PMID:22724444

  15. Reconstructing Native American Population History

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reich, David; Patterson, Nick; Campbell, Desmond; Tandon, Arti; Mazieres, Stéphane; Ray, Nicolas; Parra, Maria V.; Rojas, Winston; Duque, Constanza; Mesa, Natalia; García, Luis F.; Triana, Omar; Blair, Silvia; Maestre, Amanda; Dib, Juan C.; Bravi, Claudio M.; Bailliet, Graciela; Corach, Daniel; Hünemeier, Tábita; Bortolini, Maria-Cátira; Salzano, Francisco M.; Petzl-Erler, María Luiza; Acuña-Alonzo, Victor; Aguilar-Salinas, Carlos; Canizales-Quinteros, Samuel; Tusié-Luna, Teresa; Riba, Laura; Rodríguez-Cruz, Maricela; Lopez-Alarcón, Mardia; Coral-Vazquez, Ramón; Canto-Cetina, Thelma; Silva-Zolezzi, Irma; Fernandez-Lopez, Juan Carlos; Contreras, Alejandra V.; Jimenez-Sanchez, Gerardo; Gómez-Vázquez, María José; Molina, Julio; Carracedo, Ángel; Salas, Antonio; Gallo, Carla; Poletti, Giovanni; Witonsky, David B.; Alkorta-Aranburu, Gorka; Sukernik, Rem I.; Osipova, Ludmila; Fedorova, Sardana; Vasquez, René; Villena, Mercedes; Moreau, Claudia; Barrantes, Ramiro; Pauls, David; Excoffier, Laurent; Bedoya, Gabriel; Rothhammer, Francisco; Dugoujon, Jean Michel; Larrouy, Georges; Klitz, William; Labuda, Damian; Kidd, Judith; Kidd, Kenneth; Rienzo, Anna Di; Freimer, Nelson B.; Price, Alkes L.; Ruiz-Linares, Andrés

    2013-01-01

    The peopling of the Americas has been the subject of extensive genetic, archaeological and linguistic research; however, central questions remain unresolved1–5. One contentious issue is whether the settlement occurred via a single6–8 or multiple streams of migration from Siberia9–15. The pattern of dispersals within the Americas is also poorly understood. To address these questions at higher resolution than was previously possible, we assembled data from 52 Native American and 17 Siberian groups genotyped at 364,470 single nucleotide polymorphisms. We show that Native Americans descend from at least three streams of Asian gene flow. Most descend entirely from a single ancestral population that we call “First American”. However, speakers of Eskimo-Aleut languages from the Arctic inherit almost half their ancestry from a second stream of Asian gene flow, and the Na-Dene-speaking Chipewyan from Canada inherit roughly one-tenth of their ancestry from a third stream. We show that the initial peopling followed a southward expansion facilitated by the coast, with sequential population splits and little gene flow after divergence, especially in South America. A major exception is in Chibchan-speakers on both sides of the Panama Isthmus, who have ancestry from both North and South America. PMID:22801491

  16. Multifocal epithelial hyperplasia: A potentially precancerous disease? (Review)

    Science.gov (United States)

    BASCONES-MARTÍNEZ, A.; COK, S.; BASCONES-ILUNDÁIN, C.; ARIAS-HERRERA, S.; GOMEZ-FONT, R.; BASCONES-ILUNDÁIN, J.

    2012-01-01

    Multifocal epithelial hyperplasia (MEH), also known as Heck’s disease, manifests as a papulonodular lesion in the oral mucosa and has been associated with the human papillomavirus, a virus related to various precancerous diseases in the oral cavity. It has a predisposition for the female gender and for children. Although the majority of reported cases have been among American Indians and Eskimos, it has been described in multiple ethnic groups in various geographical locations. The objective of this review was to report on the clinical characteristics and epidemiology of MEH and its possible correlation with oral cancer. It is based on a search of articles in international journals published prior to April 2011, using the PubMed database and selecting articles related to the epidemiology and clinical characteristics of MEH. The review revealed a higher number of cases in individuals of American Indian origin and a predilection of the disease for the female gender and for patients between the 1st and 2nd decades of life. The most frequent lesion site was the lower lip. The disease has been associated with socio-economic and genetic factors, among others. No cases of malignant transformation have been reported. PMID:22740890

  17. Chapter 50: Geology and tectonic development of the Amerasia and Canada Basins, Arctic Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grantz, A.; Hart, P.E.; Childers, V.A.

    2011-01-01

    Amerasia Basin is the product of two phases of counterclockwise rotational opening about a pole in the lower Mackenzie Valley of NW Canada. Phase 1 opening brought ocean-continent transition crust (serpentinized peridotite?) to near the seafloor of the proto-Amerasia Basin, created detachment on the Eskimo Lakes Fault Zone of the Canadian Arctic margin and thinned the continental crust between the fault zone and the proto-Amerasia Basin to the west, beginning about 195 Ma and ending prior to perhaps about 160 Ma. The symmetry of the proto-Amerasia Basin was disrupted by clockwise rotation of the Chukchi Microcontinent into the basin from an original position along the Eurasia margin about a pole near 72??N, 165 Wabout 145.5-140 Ma. Phase 2 opening enlarged the proto-Amerasia Basin by intrusion of mid-ocean ridge basalt along its axis between about 131 and 127.5 Ma. Following intrusion of the Phase 2 crust an oceanic volcanic plateau, the Alpha-Mendeleev Ridge LIP (large igneous province), was extruded over the northern Amerasia Basin from about 127 to 89-75 Ma. Emplacement of the LIP halved the area of the Amerasia Basin, and the area lying south of the LIP became the Canada Basin. ?? 2011 The Geological Society of London.

  18. Chapter 50 Geology and tectonic development of the Amerasia and Canada Basins, Arctic Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grantz, Arthur; Hart, Patrick E.; Childers, Vicki A

    2011-01-01

    Amerasia Basin is the product of two phases of counterclockwise rotational opening about a pole in the lower Mackenzie Valley of NW Canada. Phase 1 opening brought ocean–continent transition crust (serpentinized peridotite?) to near the seafloor of the proto-Amerasia Basin, created detachment on the Eskimo Lakes Fault Zone of the Canadian Arctic margin and thinned the continental crust between the fault zone and the proto-Amerasia Basin to the west, beginning about 195 Ma and ending prior to perhaps about 160 Ma. The symmetry of the proto-Amerasia Basin was disrupted by clockwise rotation of the Chukchi Microcontinent into the basin from an original position along the Eurasia margin about a pole near 72°N, 165 W about 145.5–140 Ma. Phase 2 opening enlarged the proto-Amerasia Basin by intrusion of mid-ocean ridge basalt along its axis between about 131 and 127.5 Ma. Following intrusion of the Phase 2 crust an oceanic volcanic plateau, the Alpha–Mendeleev Ridge LIP (large igneous province), was extruded over the northern Amerasia Basin from about 127 to 89–75 Ma. Emplacement of the LIP halved the area of the Amerasia Basin, and the area lying south of the LIP became the Canada Basin.

  19. Suppression of Dwarf and irregular xylem Phenotypes Generates Low-Acetylated Biomass Lines in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bensussan, Matthieu; Lefebvre, Valérie; Ducamp, Aloïse; Trouverie, Jacques; Gineau, Emilie; Fortabat, Marie-Noëlle; Guillebaux, Alexia; Baldy, Aurélie; Naquin, Delphine; Herbette, Stéphane; Lapierre, Catherine; Mouille, Gregory; Horlow, Christine; Durand-Tardif, Mylène

    2015-06-01

    eskimo1-5 (esk1-5) is a dwarf Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) mutant that has a constitutive drought syndrome and collapsed xylem vessels, along with low acetylation levels in xylan and mannan. ESK1 has xylan O-acetyltransferase activity in vitro. We used a suppressor strategy on esk1-5 to screen for variants with wild-type growth and low acetylation levels, a favorable combination for ethanol production. We found a recessive mutation in the KAKTUS (KAK) gene that suppressed dwarfism and the collapsed xylem character, the cause of decreased hydraulic conductivity in the esk1-5 mutant. Backcrosses between esk1-5 and two independent knockout kak mutants confirmed suppression of the esk1-5 effect. kak single mutants showed larger stem diameters than the wild type. The KAK promoter fused with a reporter gene showed activity in the vascular cambium, phloem, and primary xylem in the stem and hypocotyl. However, suppression of the collapsed xylem phenotype in esk1 kak double mutants was not associated with the recovery of cell wall O-acetylation or any major cell wall modifications. Therefore, our results indicate that, in addition to its described activity as a repressor of endoreduplication, KAK may play a role in vascular development. Furthermore, orthologous esk1 kak double mutants may hold promise for ethanol production in crop plants. © 2015 American Society of Plant Biologists. All Rights Reserved.

  20. Omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids for cardiovascular diseases: present, past and future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Yasuhiro; Tatsuno, Ichiro

    2017-08-01

    Large-scale epidemiological studies on Greenlandic, Canadian and Alaskan Eskimos have examined the health benefits of omega-3 fatty acids consumed as part of the diet, and found statistically significant relative reduction in cardiovascular risk in people consuming omega-3 fatty acids. Areas covered: This article reviews studies on omega-3 fatty acids during the last 50 years, and identifies issues relevant to future studies on cardiovascular (CV) risk. Expert commentary: Although a meta-analysis of large-scale prospective cohort studies and randomized studies reported that fish and fish oil consumption reduced coronary heart disease-related mortality and sudden cardiac death, omega-3 fatty acids have not yet been shown to be effective in secondary prevention trials on patients with multiple cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors. The ongoing long-term CV interventional outcome studies investigate high-dose, prescription-strength omega-3 fatty acids. The results are expected to clarify the potential role of omega-3 fatty acids in reducing CV risk. The anti-inflammatory properties of omega-3 fatty acids are also important. Future clinical trials should also focus on the role of these anti-inflammatory mediators in human arteriosclerotic diseases as well as inflammatory diseases.

  1. The Archival Sources for the Histoty of the Liquorstrade in the North-East of Russia in the Late XIX – Early XX Centuries (Funds of the National Archives of the Republic of Sakha (Yakutia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oxana P. Kolomiets

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available In the article the complex documents of the end XIX - the first quarter of the twentieth centuries is researched which are stored in the collections of the National Archives of the Republic of Sakha (Yakutia (NARS (Ya and concerned the sale of alcoholic beverages to indigenous people of the North-East of Russia. Documents have different safety and value of source, some of them shed light on the problem of the liquor trade in the late XIX - early XX centuries. Yakut and Kolyma merchants, American entrepreneurs were active in trade with the aboriginal population of the North-East of Russia including the Chukchi, Yukagirs, Eskimos. Legislation of the Russian Empire prohibited alcohol trade in resettlement sites of the indigenous population but the facts of illegal trade were repeatedly documented and analyzed by the administrative authorities. Using of the described above historical documents and taking into account available materials allow more deeply reveal the questions on the role of Russian merchants in the liquor trade, on the administrative regulation of wine and liquor market, on the specific actions of the authorities to solve the problem of indigenous alcohol takers including the Chukchi population. With the introduction of the new documentary sources in the research process it will be possible to explore the problem of liquor trade in the North-East of Russia in the late XIX - early XX centuries.

  2. ¿Convergencia o polifiletismo en la evidencia mitocondrial del poblamiento americano?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bravi, Claudio

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available El ADN mitocondrial es quizás el locus más frecuentemente utilizado en estudios de filogeografía humana. Más de 2000 secuencias de la Región Hipervariable I se han obtenido en poblaciones indígenas o criollas americanas, distribuidas en 5 grupos de linajes maternos, los haplogrupos ABCD y X. El análisis de otras ~800 secuencias mitocondriales (casicompletas ha permitido establecer una filogenia absoluta del árbol mitocondrial humano. El análisis de la información disponible ha permitido establecer que, contra las interpretaciones prevalentes, las secuencias americanas atribuibles al haplogrupo D pertenecen a cuatro grupos monofiléticos de distribución recíprocamente disyunta: dos linajes sólo se hallan en poblaciones Na-Denes y Eskimo-Aleutianas, mientras que los otros dos están restringidos a las amerindias.En esta contribución se discute el hallazgo de un grupo de linajes mitocondriales que bien puede ser tan sólo una diferenciación regional de uno de los cuatro grupos mencionados antes o bien constituír un quinto linaje fundador para el haplogrupo D en América.

  3. Pacific Northwest Laboratory Annual Report for 1978 to the DOE Assistant Secretary for Environment Part 2. Ecological Sciences.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hanson, W.C.; Eberhardt, L.E.

    1979-07-01

    The objective of this research is to provide an integrated program of investigation for the definition of the ecological consequences of resource developments in northern Alaska. Qualitative and quantitative results are obtained that describe environmental costs incurred by petroleum resource extraction and transportation, including interaction of industrial activities with arctic foxes (Alopex lagopus), small mammals, and tundra-nesting birds in the Prudhoe Bay field and along the Trans-Alaska pipeline and haul road; similar information from the Colville River delta for comparative purposes; baseline information on moose (Alces alces) populations, caribou (Rangifer tarandus) range quality and use, and lichen communities that are or will be impacted by resource developments; field experiments to determine lichen sensitivities to sulfur oxide concentrations likely to be encountered near pipeline pumping stations; food chain transfers of stable and radioactive elements that utilize a data base of some 19 years for comparative purposes; and evaluation of oil field development activities on rabies and other physiological phenomena in foxes. A significant fraction of the research is coordinated through university contracts that utilize academic researchers in specific areas of expertise. During 1978 research continued to emphasize investigations on the ecological consequences of petroleum resource development in northern Alaska. Studies were conducted this year on arctic foxes, tundra-nesting birds, small mammals, caribou, lichens, and fallout radionuclides in the lichen-caribou-Eskimo food web.

  4. Canoe-Kayak Club

    CERN Multimedia

    Canoe-Kayak Club

    2011-01-01

    Higgs, antimatter, the Tour de France and white water After it was founded in 2007 the CERN canoe and kayak club has been expanding activities in many different aspects of water sports. Now in 2011 the club offers a wide range of activities to our members, including beginners training on flat water, dragonboating, Canadian style canoe/camping, white water slalom and river-running, flat water endurance paddling and “Eskimo roll” training in swimming pool. For the second year running the club organised a trip to the Haute-Alpes, renowned world wide for first class white water. Altogether 13 paddling enthusiasts travelled to L’Argentiere la Bessee, for a week of white water slalom, river running and other mountain sports. L’Argentiere, home to a world cup slalom course offers easy access the regions of Briancon, Guillestre and the Ubaye valley with their wide range of classic white water rivers. With little water from the snowmelt (due to the mild winter) and a long ...

  5. Revisiting the Diego Blood Group System in Amerindians: Evidence for Gene-Culture Comigration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bégat, Christophe; Bailly, Pascal; Chiaroni, Jacques; Mazières, Stéphane

    2015-01-01

    Six decades ago the DI*A allele of the Diego blood group system was instrumental in proving Native American populations originated from Siberia. Since then, it has received scant attention. The present study was undertaken to reappraise distribution of the DI*A allele in 144 Native American populations based on current knowledge. Using analysis of variance tests, frequency distribution was studied according to geographical, environmental, and cultural parameters. Frequencies were highest in Amazonian populations. In contrast, DI*A was undetectable in subarctic, Fuegian, Panamanian, Chaco and Yanomama populations. Closer study revealed a correlation that this unequal distribution was correlated with language, suggesting that linguistic divergence was a driving force in the expansion of DI*A among Native Americans. The absence of DI*A in circumpolar Eskimo-Aleut and Na-Dene speakers was consistent with a late migratory event confined to North America. Distribution of DI*A in subtropical areas indicated that gene and culture exchanges were more intense within than between ecozones. Bolstering the utility of classical genetic markers in biological anthropology, the present study of the expansion of Diego blood group genetic polymorphism in Native Americans shows strong evidence of gene-culture comigration.

  6. Revisiting the Diego Blood Group System in Amerindians: Evidence for Gene-Culture Comigration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bégat, Christophe; Bailly, Pascal; Chiaroni, Jacques; Mazières, Stéphane

    2015-01-01

    Six decades ago the DI*A allele of the Diego blood group system was instrumental in proving Native American populations originated from Siberia. Since then, it has received scant attention. The present study was undertaken to reappraise distribution of the DI*A allele in 144 Native American populations based on current knowledge. Using analysis of variance tests, frequency distribution was studied according to geographical, environmental, and cultural parameters. Frequencies were highest in Amazonian populations. In contrast, DI*A was undetectable in subarctic, Fuegian, Panamanian, Chaco and Yanomama populations. Closer study revealed a correlation that this unequal distribution was correlated with language, suggesting that linguistic divergence was a driving force in the expansion of DI*A among Native Americans. The absence of DI*A in circumpolar Eskimo-Aleut and Na-Dene speakers was consistent with a late migratory event confined to North America. Distribution of DI*A in subtropical areas indicated that gene and culture exchanges were more intense within than between ecozones. Bolstering the utility of classical genetic markers in biological anthropology, the present study of the expansion of Diego blood group genetic polymorphism in Native Americans shows strong evidence of gene-culture comigration. PMID:26148209

  7. Czy jesteśmy „ludzkim zoo”?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katarzyna Wrzesińska

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Are we "human zoo"? Review: The Invention of Race. Scientific and Popular Representation, N. Bancel, T. David, D. Thomas (ed., Routlege: New York-Abington, 2014, ss. 320. The book under review is a collection of articles presenting the functioning of the idea of the human race in the scientific, social and cultural backgrounds. The main purpose is to demonstrate how the concept of race have circulated from the late 18th century in scholarship as well as in popular reception. Thus the authors focus their attention on the so-called ethnological expositions (such as Negro or Eskimo Villages organized on the occasion of world‘s fairs, today known as “human zoo.” On the social level, this helped support the conviction of the supremacy of the white race.     Czy jesteśmy  „ludzkim zoo”? Recenzja: The Invention of Race. Scientific and Popular Representation, N. Bancel, T. David, D. Thomas (ed., Routlege: New York-Abington, 2014, ss. 320. Recenzowana praca zawiera zbiór artykułów poświęconych przedstawieniu funkcjonowania koncepcji podziału ludzkości na rasy na szerokim tle: naukowym, społecznym i kulturowym. Główny cel stanowi zobrazowanie procesu cyrkulacji idei rasy – od ujęć naukowych począwszy od końca XVIII w. aż do ukazania problemu na płaszczyźnie odbioru masowego. Tu obiektem zainteresowań badawczych stały się tzw. ekspozycje etnologiczne (np. wioski murzyńskie, eskimoskie organizowane przy okazji wystaw światowych, określane dzisiaj mianem „ludzkich zoo”. Płaszczyzna ta przyczyniła się do utrwalenia w świadomości społecznej poczucia supremacji białej rasy.

  8. Sleep Paralysis in Brazilian Folklore and Other Cultures: A Brief Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Sá, José F. R.; Mota-Rolim, Sérgio A.

    2016-01-01

    Sleep paralysis (SP) is a dissociative state that occurs mainly during awakening. SP is characterized by altered motor, perceptual, emotional and cognitive functions, such as inability to perform voluntary movements, visual hallucinations, feelings of chest pressure, delusions about a frightening presence and, in some cases, fear of impending death. Most people experience SP rarely, but typically when sleeping in supine position; however, SP is considered a disease (parasomnia) when recurrent and/or associated to emotional burden. Interestingly, throughout human history, different peoples interpreted SP under a supernatural view. For example, Canadian Eskimos attribute SP to spells of shamans, who hinder the ability to move, and provoke hallucinations of a shapeless presence. In the Japanese tradition, SP is due to a vengeful spirit who suffocates his enemies while sleeping. In Nigerian culture, a female demon attacks during dreaming and provokes paralysis. A modern manifestation of SP is the report of “alien abductions”, experienced as inability to move during awakening associated with visual hallucinations of aliens. In all, SP is a significant example of how a specific biological phenomenon can be interpreted and shaped by different cultural contexts. In order to further explore the ethnopsychology of SP, in this review we present the “Pisadeira”, a character of Brazilian folklore originated in the country’s Southeast, but also found in other regions with variant names. Pisadeira is described as a crone with long fingernails who lurks on roofs at night and tramples on the chest of those who sleep on a full stomach with the belly up. This legend is mentioned in many anthropological accounts; however, we found no comprehensive reference on the Pisadeira from the perspective of sleep science. Here, we aim to fill this gap. We first review the neuropsychological aspects of SP, and then present the folk tale of the Pisadeira. Finally, we summarize the many

  9. Sleep Paralysis in Brazilian Folklore and Other Cultures: A Brief Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Sá, José F R; Mota-Rolim, Sérgio A

    2016-01-01

    Sleep paralysis (SP) is a dissociative state that occurs mainly during awakening. SP is characterized by altered motor, perceptual, emotional and cognitive functions, such as inability to perform voluntary movements, visual hallucinations, feelings of chest pressure, delusions about a frightening presence and, in some cases, fear of impending death. Most people experience SP rarely, but typically when sleeping in supine position; however, SP is considered a disease (parasomnia) when recurrent and/or associated to emotional burden. Interestingly, throughout human history, different peoples interpreted SP under a supernatural view. For example, Canadian Eskimos attribute SP to spells of shamans, who hinder the ability to move, and provoke hallucinations of a shapeless presence. In the Japanese tradition, SP is due to a vengeful spirit who suffocates his enemies while sleeping. In Nigerian culture, a female demon attacks during dreaming and provokes paralysis. A modern manifestation of SP is the report of "alien abductions", experienced as inability to move during awakening associated with visual hallucinations of aliens. In all, SP is a significant example of how a specific biological phenomenon can be interpreted and shaped by different cultural contexts. In order to further explore the ethnopsychology of SP, in this review we present the "Pisadeira", a character of Brazilian folklore originated in the country's Southeast, but also found in other regions with variant names. Pisadeira is described as a crone with long fingernails who lurks on roofs at night and tramples on the chest of those who sleep on a full stomach with the belly up. This legend is mentioned in many anthropological accounts; however, we found no comprehensive reference on the Pisadeira from the perspective of sleep science. Here, we aim to fill this gap. We first review the neuropsychological aspects of SP, and then present the folk tale of the Pisadeira. Finally, we summarize the many historical

  10. Cancer mortality in the indigenous population of coastal Chukotka, 1961–1990

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexey A. Dudarev

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. The general aim was to assess the pattern and trend in cancer mortality among the indigenous people of coastal Chukotka during the period 1961–1990. Methods. All cases of cancer deaths of indigenous residents of the Chukotsky district in the north-easternmost coast of Chukotka Autonomous Okrug were copied from personal death certificates. There were a total of 219 cancer deaths during the study period. The average annual number of cases, percent, crude, and age-standardized cancer mortality rates (ASMR per 100,000 among men and women for all sites combined and selected sites were calculated. Data were aggregated into six 5-year periods to assess temporal trends. Direct age-standardization was performed with the Segi-Doll world standard population used by the International Agency for Research on Cancer. Results. The indigenous Chukchi and Eskimo people living in Chukotsky district were at higher risk of death from cancer during the 30-year period between 1961 and 1990, with ASMR among men twice that of Russia, and among women 3.5 times higher. The excess can be attributed to the extremely high mortality from oesophageal cancer and lung cancer. Conclusions. The indigenous people of coastal Chukotka were at very high risk of death from cancer relative to the Russian population nationally. The mortality data from this study correspond to the pattern of incidence reported among other indigenous people of the Russian Arctic. Little information is available since 1990, and the feasibility of ethnic-specific health data is now severely limited.

  11. Dietary exposure to persistent organic pollutants and metals among Inuit and Chukchi in Russian Arctic Chukotka

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexey A. Dudarev

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. The general aim was to assess dietary exposure to selected persistent organic pollutants (POPs and metals among Eskimo (Inuit and Chukchi of the Chukotka Peninsula of the Russian Arctic, and to establish recommendations for exposure risk reduction. Study design. A cross-sectional evaluation of nutritional patterns of coastal and inland indigenous peoples of the Chukotka Autonomous Okrug (in 2001–2003; assessment of the levels of persistent toxic substances (PTSs in traditional foods and their comparison to Russian food safety limits; the identification of local sources of food contamination; and the recommendation and implementation of risk management measures. Methods. Community-based dietary survey of self reported food frequencies (453 persons, chemical analyses (POPs and metals of local foods and indoor matters (397 samples, substantiation of recommendations for daily (weekly, monthly intakes of traditional food. Results. POPs in traditional food items are generally below the Russian food safety limits except marine mammal fat, while Hg and Cd are high mainly in mammal viscera. Lead is relatively low in tissues of all animals studied. For the Chukotka coastal communities, seals constitute the principal source of the whole suite of PTSs considered. Consumption restrictions are recommended for marine and freshwater fish, some wild meats (waterfowl and seal, fats (whale and seal, liver (most animals and kidney (reindeer, walrus and seal. Evidence is presented that contamination of foodstuffs may be significantly increased during storing/processing/cooking of food due to indoor and outdoor environmental conditions. Conclusions. Based on the analytical findings and the local PTSs sources identified, guidelines on food safety are suggested, as well as measures to reduce food contamination and domestic and local sources. Important and urgent remedial actions are recommended to minimize PTSs environmental and domestic contamination

  12. Radioluminescent lighting program description

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1987-11-01

    For more than 30 years the Department of Energy (DOE) and its predecessor agencies have conducted research and development aimed at beneficial uses of products derived from its nuclear activities. An important and promising element of radiation technology is the Program for Radioluminescent (RL) development. For years simple RL devices, such as aircraft exit signs, have served necessary functions in society. Electrons exciting phosphors and producing light is a fundamental concept to which the layman can immediately relate, while gaining a balanced perspective concerning risk and safety. DOE`s RL lighting development program has advanced the technology with infrared RL markers for helipads which are not detectable without the aid of special viewers. These devices were used to aid in the evacuation of wounded from Grenada. Visible RL airfield lighting has been used to promote aviation safety in remote Eskimo communities in Alaska, and non-electric taxiway signs and markers in the corrosive saline soils of Florida airports. The current plan is to consolidate past accomplishments and develop RL devices and systems using advanced technology for new applications. The potential for improved performance that solid-matrix RL techniques offer has stimulated interest in a variety of innovative applications for which electric lighting has long been the only practical alternative. The program described in this document is intended to provide for an optimum development and application of RL technology while supporting the transfer of this technology to the private sector and providing an institutional perspective from which the longer range applications and ramifications of this technology can be anticipated.

  13. Stable Nitrogen and Carbon Isotope Ratios Indicate Traditional and Market Food Intake in an Indigenous Circumpolar Population123

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nash, Sarah H.; Bersamin, Andrea; Kristal, Alan R.; Hopkins, Scarlett E.; Church, Rebecca S.; Pasker, Renee L.; Luick, Bret R.; Mohatt, Gerald V.; Boyer, Bert B.; O’Brien, Diane M.

    2012-01-01

    The transition of a society from traditional to market-based diets (termed the nutrition transition) has been associated with profound changes in culture and health. We are developing biomarkers to track the nutrition transition in the Yup’ik Eskimo population of Southwest Alaska based on naturally occurring variations in the relative abundances of carbon and nitrogen stable isotopes (δ15N and δ13C values). Here, we provide three pieces of evidence toward the validation of these biomarkers. First, we analyzed the δ15N and δ13C values of a comprehensive sample of Yup’ik foods. We found that δ15N values were elevated in fish and marine mammals and that δ13C values were elevated in market foods containing corn or sugar cane carbon. Second, we evaluated the associations between RBC δ15N and δ13C values and self-reported measures of traditional and market food intake (n = 230). RBC δ15N values were correlated with intake of fish and marine mammals (r = 0.52; P < 0.0001). RBC δ13C values were correlated with intake of market foods made from corn and sugar cane (r = 0.46; P < 0.0001) and total market food intake (r = 0.46; P < 0.0001). Finally, we assessed whether stable isotope ratios captured population-level patterns of traditional and market intake (n = 1003). Isotopic biomarkers of traditional and market intake were associated with age, community location, sex, and cultural identity. Self-report methods showed variations by age and cultural identity only. Thus, stable isotopes show potential as biomarkers for monitoring dietary change in indigenous circumpolar populations. PMID:22157543

  14. Coastal Vulnerability to Sea Level Rise and Erosion in Northwest Alaska (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorokhovich, Y.; Leiserowitz, A.

    2009-12-01

    Northwest Alaska is experiencing significant climate change and human impacts. The study area includes the coastal zone of Kotzebue Sound and the Chukchi Sea and provides the local population (predominantly Inupiaq Eskimo) with critical subsistence resources of meat, fish, berries, herbs, and wood. The geomorphology of the coast includes barrier islands, inlets, estuaries, deltas, cliffs, bluffs, and beaches that host modern settlements and infrastructure. Coastal dynamics and sea-level rise are contributing to erosion, intermittent erosion/accretion patterns, landslides, slumps and coastal retreat. These factors are causing the sedimentation of deltas and lagoons, and changing local bathymetry, morphological parameters of beaches and underwater slopes, rates of coastal dynamics, and turbidity and nutrient cycling in coastal waters. This study is constructing vulnerability maps to help local people and federal officials understand the potential consequences of sea-level rise and coastal erosion on local infrastructure, subsistence resources, and culturally important sites. A lack of complete and uniform data (in terms of methods of collection, geographic scale and spatial resolution) creates an additional level of uncertainty that complicates geographic analysis. These difficulties were overcome by spatial modeling with selected spatial resolution using extrapolation methods. Data include subsistence resource maps obtained using Participatory GIS with local hunters and elders, geological and geographic data on coastal dynamics from satellite imagery, aerial photos, bathymetry and topographic maps, and digital elevation models. These data were classified and ranked according to the level of coastal vulnerability (Figure 1). The resulting qualitative multicriteria model helps to identify the coastal areas with the greatest vulnerability to coastal erosion and of the potential loss of subsistence resources. Acknowldgements: Dr. Ron Abileah (private consultant, j

  15. Heart Rate is Associated with Red Blood Cell Fatty Acid Concentration: the GOCADAN Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebbesson, Sven O.E.; Devereux, Richard B.; Cole, Shelley; Ebbesson, Lars O.E.; Fabsitz, Richard R.; Haack, Karin; Harris, William S.; Howard, Wm. James; Laston, Sandra; Lopez-Alvarenga, Juan Carlos; MacCluer, Jean W.; Okin, Peter M.; Tejero, M. Elizabeth; Voruganti, V. Saroja; Wenger, Charlotte R.; Howard, Barbara V.; Comuzzie, Anthony G.

    2010-01-01

    Background Consumption of omega-3 fatty acids (FAs) is associated with a reduction in deaths from coronary heart disease, arrhythmia, and sudden death. Although these FAs were originally thought to be anti-atherosclerotic, recent evidence suggests that their benefits are related to reducing risk for ventricular arrhythmia, and that this may be mediated by a slowed heart rate (HR). Methods The study was conducted in Alaskan Eskimos participating in the Genetics of Coronary Artery Disease in Alaska Natives (GOCADAN) Study, a population experiencing a dietary shift from unsaturated to saturated fats. We compared HR with red blood cell (RBC) FA content in 316 men and 391 women ages 35–74 years. Results Multivariate linear regression analyses of individual FAs with HR as the dependent variable and specific FAs as covariates revealed negative associations between HR and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA; 22:6n-3; p= 0.004) and eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA; 20:5n-3; p=0.009) and positive associations between HR and palmitoleic acid (16:1n-7; p=0.021), eicosenoic acid (20:1n9; p=0.007), and dihomo-gamma-linolenic acid (DGLA; 20:3n-6; p=0.021). Factor analysis revealed that the omega-3 FAs were negatively associated with HR (p=0.003), while a cluster of other, non-omega-3 unsaturated FAs (16:1, 20:1, and 20:3) was positively associated. Conclusions Marine omega 3 FAs are associated with lower HR, whereas palmitoleic and DGLA, previously identified as associated with saturated FA consumption and directly related to cardiovascular mortality, are associated with higher HR. These relations may at least partially explain the relations between omega-3 FAs, ventricular arrhythmia, and sudden death. PMID:20569715

  16. Sleep paralysis in Brazilian folklore and other cultures: a brief review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Felipe Rodriguez de Sá

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Sleep paralysis (SP is a dissociative state that occurs mainly during awakening. SP is characterized by altered motor, perceptual, emotional and cognitive functions, such as inability to perform voluntary movements, visual hallucinations, feelings of chest pressure, delusions about a frightening presence and, in some cases, fear of impending death. Most people experience SP rarely, but typically when sleeping in supine position; however, SP is considered a disease (parasomnia when recurrent and/or associated to emotional burden. Interestingly, throughout human history, different peoples interpreted SP under a supernatural view. For example, Canadian Eskimos attribute SP to spells of shamans, who hinder the ability to move, and provoke hallucinations of a shapeless presence. In the Japanese tradition, SP is due to a vengeful spirit who suffocates his enemies while sleeping. In Nigerian culture, a female demon attacks during dreaming and provokes paralysis. A modern manifestation of SP is the report of alien abductions, experienced as inability to move during awakening associated with visual hallucinations of aliens. Furthermore, SP is a significant example of how a specific biological phenomenon can be interpreted and shaped by different cultural contexts. In order to further explore the ethnopsychology of SP, the Pisadeira, a character of Brazilian folklore originated in the country’s Southeast, but also found in other regions with variant names, has been reviewed. Pisadeira is described as a crone with long fingernails who lurks on roofs at night and tramples on the chest of those who sleep on a full stomach with the belly up. This legend is mentioned in many anthropological accounts; however, we found no comprehensive reference on the Pisadeira from the perspective of sleep science. Here we aim to fill this gap. We first review the neuropsychological aspects of SP, and then present the folk tale of the Pisadeira. Finally, we summarize the

  17. Polar Gateways Arctic Circle Sunrise Conference 2008, Barrow, Alaska: IHY-IPY Outreach on Exploration of Polar and Icy Worlds in the Solar System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, John F.; Kauristie, Kirsti; Weatherwax, Allan T.; Sheehan, Glenn W.; Smith, Roger W.; Sandahl, Ingrid; Ostgaard, Nikolai; Chernouss, Sergey; Thompson, Barbara J.; Peticolas, Laura; Moore, Marla H.; Senske, David A.; Tamppari, Leslie K.; Lewis, Elaine M.

    2008-01-01

    Polar, heliophysical, and planetary science topics related to the International Heliophysical and Polar Years 2007-2009 were addressed during this circumpolar video conference hosted January 23-29, 2808 at the new Barrow Arctic Research Center of the Barrow Arctic Science Consortium in Barrow, Alaska. This conference was planned as an IHY-IPY event science outreach event bringing together scientists and educational specialists for the first week of sunrise at subzero Arctic temperatures in Barrow. Science presentations spanned the solar system from the polar Sun to Earth, Moon, Mars, Jupiter, Saturn, and the Kuiper Belt. On-site participants experienced look and feel of icy worlds like Europa and Titan by being in the Barrow tundra and sea ice environment and by going "on the ice" during snowmobile expeditions to the near-shore sea ice environment and to Point Barrow, closest geographic point in the U.S. to the North Pole. Many science presentations were made remotely via video conference or teleconference from Sweden, Norway, Russia, Canada, Antarctica, and the United States, spanning up to thirteen time zones (Alaska to Russia) at various times. Extensive educational outreach activities were conducted with the local Barrow and Alaska North Slope communities and through the NASA Digital Learning Network live from the "top of the world" at Barrow. The Sun- Earth Day team from Goddard, and a videographer from the Passport to Knowledge project, carried out extensive educational interviews with many participants and native Inupiaq Eskimo residents of Barrow. Video and podcast recordings of selected interviews are available at http://sunearthday.nasa.gov/2008/multimedidpodcasts.php. Excerpts from these and other interviews will be included in a new high definition video documentary called "From the Sun to the Stars: The New Science of Heliophysics" from Passport to Knowledge that will later broadcast on NASA TV and other educational networks. Full conference

  18. Impact of Holocene climate variability on lacustrine records and human settlements in South Greenland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Guillemot

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Due to its sensitivity to climate changes, south Greenland is a particularly suitable area to study past global climate changes and their influence on locale Human settlements. A paleohydrological investigation was therefore carried out on two river-fed lakes: Lake Qallimiut and Little Kangerluluup, both located close to the Labrador Sea in the historic farming center of Greenland. Two sediment cores (QAL-2011 and LKG-2011, spanning the last four millennia, were retrieved and showed similar thin laminae, described by high magnetic susceptibility and density, high titanium and TOC / TN atomic ratio, and coarse grain size. They are also characterized either by inverse grading followed by normal grading or by normal grading only and a prevalence of red amorphous particles and lignocellulosic fragments, typical of flood deposits. Flood events showed similar trend in both records: they mainly occurred during cooler and wetter periods characterized by weaker Greenlandic paleo-temperatures, substantial glacier advances, and a high precipitation on the Greenlandic Ice Sheet and North Atlantic ice-rafting events. They can therefore be interpreted as a result of ice and snow-melting episodes. They occurred especially during rapid climate changes (RCC such as the Middle to Late Holocene transition around 2250 BC, the Sub-boreal/Sub-atlantic transition around 700 BC and the Little Ice Age (LIA between AD 1300 and AD 1900, separated by cycles of 1500 years and driven by solar forcing. These global RCC revealed by QAL-2011 and LKG-2011 flood events may have influenced Human settlements in south Greenland, especially the paleo-Eskimo cultures and the Norse settlement, and have been mainly responsible for their demise.

  19. Immunoglobulin (GM and KM) allotypes and relation to population history in native peoples of British Columbia: Haida and Bella Coola.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Field, L L; Gofton, J P; Kinsella, T D

    1988-06-01

    Differences in the frequencies of GM haplotypes among native peoples of the Americas support the hypothesis that there were three distinct waves of migration from northeast Asia into the Americas: Paleo-Indian, Na-Dene, and Inuit (Eskimo)-Aleut (Salzano and Steinberg: Am. J. Hum. Genet. 17:273-279, 1965; Sukernik and Osipova: Hum. Genet. 61:148-153, 1982; Williams et al.:Am. J. Phys. Anthropol. 66:1-19, 1985; Szathmary: In R Kirk and E Szathmary (eds): Out of Asia: Peopling of the Americas and the Pacific. Canberra: The Journal of Pacific History, Canberra Australian National University, pp. 79-104, 1985). We studied GM allotypes in two linguistically unique populations of Canadian west coast native peoples, the Haida and the Bella Coola, and compared them to GM frequencies in populations that are supposed descendants of the three migrations, in order to investigate the possible genetic relationships of these British Columbia (BC) groups to other native populations. We also estimated the amount of European admixture from the frequency of the Caucasian haplotype, Gm3;5. Results showed that the frequencies in both BC populations of the three common native haplotypes (Gm1,17;21, Gm1,2,17;21, and Gm1,17;15,16), were intermediate between the frequencies in supposed descendants of Paleo-Indian and Na-Dene. These genetic findings are consistent with the controversial hypothesis of archeologist C. Borden (Science 203:963-971, 1979) that, following deglaciation about 13,000 years ago, British Columbia was repopulated by peoples from the north (?Na-Dene) and by culturally distinct peoples from the south (?Paleo-Indian). Caucasian admixture estimates suggested that the Haida and Bella Coola have also experienced moderate amounts (12-20%) of genetic input from European-originating peoples.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  20. Reconciling migration models to the Americas with the variation of North American native mitogenomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Achilli, Alessandro; Perego, Ugo A.; Lancioni, Hovirag; Olivieri, Anna; Gandini, Francesca; Hooshiar Kashani, Baharak; Battaglia, Vincenza; Grugni, Viola; Angerhofer, Norman; Rogers, Mary P.; Herrera, Rene J.; Woodward, Scott R.; Labuda, Damian; Smith, David Glenn; Cybulski, Jerome S.; Semino, Ornella; Malhi, Ripan S.; Torroni, Antonio

    2013-01-01

    In this study we evaluated migration models to the Americas by using the information contained in native mitochondrial genomes (mitogenomes) from North America. Molecular and phylogeographic analyses of B2a mitogenomes, which are absent in Eskimo–Aleut and northern Na-Dene speakers, revealed that this haplogroup arose in North America ∼11–13 ka from one of the founder Paleo-Indian B2 mitogenomes. In contrast, haplogroup A2a, which is typical of Eskimo–Aleuts and Na-Dene, but also present in the easternmost Siberian groups, originated only 4–7 ka in Alaska, led to the first Paleo-Eskimo settlement of northern Canada and Greenland, and contributed to the formation of the Na-Dene gene pool. However, mitogenomes also show that Amerindians from northern North America, without any distinction between Na-Dene and non–Na-Dene, were heavily affected by an additional and distinctive Beringian genetic input. In conclusion, most mtDNA variation (along the double-continent) stems from the first wave from Beringia, which followed the Pacific coastal route. This was accompanied or followed by a second inland migratory event, marked by haplogroups X2a and C4c, which affected all Amerindian groups of Northern North America. Much later, the ancestral A2a carriers spread from Alaska, undertaking both a westward migration to Asia and an eastward expansion into the circumpolar regions of Canada. Thus, the first American founders left the greatest genetic mark but the original maternal makeup of North American Natives was subsequently reshaped by additional streams of gene flow and local population dynamics, making a three-wave view too simplistic. PMID:23940335

  1. Detection of ancestry informative HLA alleles confirms the admixed origins of Japanese population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakaoka, Hirofumi; Mitsunaga, Shigeki; Hosomichi, Kazuyoshi; Shyh-Yuh, Liou; Sawamoto, Taiji; Fujiwara, Tsutomu; Tsutsui, Naohisa; Suematsu, Koji; Shinagawa, Akira; Inoko, Hidetoshi; Inoue, Ituro

    2013-01-01

    The polymorphisms in the human leukocyte antigen (HLA) region are powerful tool for studying human evolutionary processes. We investigated genetic structure of Japanese by using five-locus HLA genotypes (HLA-A, -B, -C, -DRB1, and -DPB1) of 2,005 individuals from 10 regions of Japan. We found a significant level of population substructure in Japanese; particularly the differentiation between Okinawa Island and mainland Japanese. By using a plot of the principal component scores, we identified ancestry informative alleles associated with the underlying population substructure. We examined extent of linkage disequilibrium (LD) between pairs of HLA alleles on the haplotypes that were differentiated among regions. The LDs were strong and weak for pairs of HLA alleles characterized by low and high frequencies in Okinawa Island, respectively. The five-locus haplotypes whose alleles exhibit strong LD were unique to Japanese and South Korean, suggesting that these haplotypes had been recently derived from the Korean Peninsula. The alleles characterized by high frequency in Japanese compared to South Korean formed segmented three-locus haplotype that was commonly found in Aleuts, Eskimos, and North- and Meso-Americans but not observed in Korean and Chinese. The serologically equivalent haplotype was found in Orchid Island in Taiwan, Mongol, Siberia, and Arctic regions. It suggests that early Japanese who existed prior to the migration wave from the Korean Peninsula shared ancestry with northern Asian who moved to the New World via the Bering Strait land bridge. These results may support the admixture model for peopling of Japanese Archipelago.

  2. Aboriginal new world epidemiolgy and medical care, and the impact of Old World disease imports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newman, M T

    1976-11-01

    Various workers, including T. D. Stewart, claim that the aboriginal Americas were relatively disease-free because of the bering Strait cold-screen, eliminating many pathogens, and the paucity of zoonotic infections because of few domestic animals. Evidence of varying validity suggests that precontact Americns had their own strains of treponemic infections, bacillary and amoebic dysenteries, influenza and viral penumonia and other respiratory diseases, salmonellosis and perhaps other food poisoning, various arthritides, some endoparasites such as the ascarids, and several geographically circumscribed diseases such as the rickettsial verruca (Carrion's disease) and New World leishmaniasis and trypanosomiasis. Questionably aboriginal are tuberculosis and typhus. Accordingly, virtually all the "crowd-type" ecopathogenic diseases such as smallpox, yellow fever, typhoid, malaria, measles, pertussis, polio, etc., appear to have been absent from the New World, and were only brought in by White conquerors and their Black slaves. My hypothesis is that native American medical care systems--especially in the more culturally advanced areas--were sufficiently sophisticated to deal with native disease entities with reasonable competence. But native medical systems could not cope with the "crowd-type" disease imports that struck Indian and Eskimos as "virgin-field" populations. Reanalysis of native population losses through a genocidal combination of diease, war, slavery and attendant cultural disruption by Dobyns, Cook and others strongly suggest that traditiona estimates underplayed the death toll by a factor of the general order of ten. This would make for an immediately pre-contact Indian population of some 90-111 million instead of the tradition 8-11 million. Evidence is growing that Indians may have been no more susceptible to new pathogens that are other "virgin soil" populations, and thus their immune systems need not be considered less effective than those in other people

  3. Exploration history and place names of northern East Greenland: Colophon, abstract, introduction, official place names in Greenland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Higgins, Anthony K.

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available The first recorded landing by Europeans on the coast of northern East Greenland (north of 69°N was that of William Scoresby Jr., a British whaler, in 1822. This volume includes a chronological summary of the pioneer 19th century exploration voyages made by British, Danish, Norwegian, Swedish, French and German expeditions – all of whom reported that the region had previously been occupied by the Inuit or Eskimo; also included are brief outlines of the increasing number of government and privately sponsored expeditions throughout the 20th century, whose objectives included cartography, geology, zoology, botany, trapping and the ascent of the highest mountain summits. In 1934 the Place Name Committee for Greenland was established, the tasks of which included a review of all place names hitherto recorded on published maps of Greenland, their formal adoption in danicised form, and the approval or rejection of new name proposals. In northern East Greenland, by far the largest numbers of new place names were those proposed by scientists associated with Lauge Koch’s geological expeditions that lasted from 1926 until 1958. This volume records the location and origin of more than 3000 officially approved place names as well as about 2650 unapproved names.The author’s interest in the exploration history and place names of northern East Greenland started in 1968, when the Geological Survey of Greenland initiated a major five-year geological mapping programme in the Scoresby Sund region. Systematic compilation of names began about 1970, initially with the names given by William Scoresby Jr., and subsequently broadened in scope to include the names proposed by all expeditions to northern East Greenland. The author has participated in 16 summer mapping expeditions with the Survey to northern East Greenland. Publication of this volume represents the culmination of a lifetime working in the Arctic.

  4. Book Reviews

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.G. Oosten

    1980-10-01

    Full Text Available - M.A. van Bakel, Frederic L. Pryor, The origins of the economy. A comparative study of distribution in primitive and peasant economies. Academic Press, New York 1977. XVIII + 475 blz. - H.J. de Graaf, W. Ph. Coolhaas, Generale missiven van Gouverneurs-Generaal en Raden aan heren XVII der Verenigde Oost-Indische Compagnie. Deel VII. 1713-1725. ‘s-Gravenhage 1979. Rijks geschiedkundige publicatiën. Grote Serie 164. - F.G.P. Jaquet, P. Sutikno, J. Bastin, Nineteenth century prints and illustrated books of Indonesia; with particular reference to the print collection of the Tropenmuseum, Amsterdam; a descriptive bibliography. Utrecht etc., Het Spectrum, 1979. XIV, 386 pp. Ills., B. Brommer (eds. - S. Kooijman, Adrienne L. Kaeppler, “Artificial curiosities” being an exposition of native manufactures collected on the three Pacific voyages of Captain James Cook, R.N. at the Bernice Pauahi Bishop Museum January 18, 1978 - August 31, 1978 on the occasion of the Bicentennial of the European discovery of the Hawaiian islands by Captain Cook - January 18, 1778. Bernice P. Bishop Museum special publication 65, Honolulu, Hawaii, 1978. - J.G. Oosten, Marcel Mauss, Seasonal variations of the Eskimo. A study in social morphology. Marcel Mauss in collaboration with Henri Beuchat. Translated, with a foreword by James J. Fox. Routledge & Kegan Paul, London, Boston and Henley 1979. - Jérôme Rousseau, W.F. Schneeberger, Contributions to the ethnology of central Northeast Borneo (parts of Kalimantan, Sarawak and Sabah. The University of Berne, Institute of Ethnology, Berne 1979. Series: Studia ethnologica Bernensia, no. 2. 143 pages. Maps, figures, plates.

  5. Y-chromosome analysis reveals genetic divergence and new founding native lineages in Athapaskan- and Eskimoan-speaking populations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dulik, Matthew C.; Owings, Amanda C.; Gaieski, Jill B.; Vilar, Miguel G.; Andre, Alestine; Lennie, Crystal; Mackenzie, Mary Adele; Kritsch, Ingrid; Snowshoe, Sharon; Wright, Ruth; Martin, James; Gibson, Nancy; Andrews, Thomas D.; Schurr, Theodore G.; Adhikarla, Syama; Adler, Christina J.; Balanovska, Elena; Balanovsky, Oleg; Bertranpetit, Jaume; Clarke, Andrew C.; Comas, David; Cooper, Alan; Der Sarkissian, Clio S. I.; GaneshPrasad, ArunKumar; Haak, Wolfgang; Haber, Marc; Hobbs, Angela; Javed, Asif; Jin, Li; Kaplan, Matthew E.; Li, Shilin; Martínez-Cruz, Begoña; Matisoo-Smith, Elizabeth A.; Melé, Marta; Merchant, Nirav C.; Mitchell, R. John; Parida, Laxmi; Pitchappan, Ramasamy; Platt, Daniel E.; Quintana-Murci, Lluis; Renfrew, Colin; Lacerda, Daniela R.; Royyuru, Ajay K.; Santos, Fabrício R.; Soodyall, Himla; Soria Hernanz, David F.; Swamikrishnan, Pandikumar; Tyler-Smith, Chris; Santhakumari, Arun Varatharajan; Vieira, Pedro Paulo; Wells, R. Spencer; Zalloua, Pierre A.; Ziegle, Janet S.

    2012-01-01

    For decades, the peopling of the Americas has been explored through the analysis of uniparentally inherited genetic systems in Native American populations and the comparison of these genetic data with current linguistic groupings. In northern North America, two language families predominate: Eskimo-Aleut and Na-Dene. Although the genetic evidence from nuclear and mtDNA loci suggest that speakers of these language families share a distinct biological origin, this model has not been examined using data from paternally inherited Y chromosomes. To test this hypothesis and elucidate the migration histories of Eskimoan- and Athapaskan-speaking populations, we analyzed Y-chromosomal data from Inuvialuit, Gwich’in, and Tłįchǫ populations living in the Northwest Territories of Canada. Over 100 biallelic markers and 19 chromosome short tandem repeats (STRs) were genotyped to produce a high-resolution dataset of Y chromosomes from these groups. Among these markers is an SNP discovered in the Inuvialuit that differentiates them from other Aboriginal and Native American populations. The data suggest that Canadian Eskimoan- and Athapaskan-speaking populations are genetically distinct from one another and that the formation of these groups was the result of two population expansions that occurred after the initial movement of people into the Americas. In addition, the population history of Athapaskan speakers is complex, with the Tłįchǫ being distinct from other Athapaskan groups. The high-resolution biallelic data also make clear that Y-chromosomal diversity among the first Native Americans was greater than previously recognized. PMID:22586127

  6. Evaluation of management practices in wetland meadows at Grays Lake National Wildlife Refuge, Idaho, 1997-2000

    Science.gov (United States)

    Austin, J.E.; Pyle, W.H.; Keough, J.R.; Johnson, D.H.

    2002-01-01

    We assessed the relative values of 4 management practices (idle, late season grazing, fall prescribed burning, and rotation of idle and summer grazing) to biotic resources of the grassland-wetland meadow ecosystem at Grays Lake during 1997-2000. Three replicates of each treatment were randomly assigned to 12 experimental units that bordered the deep emergent marsh. Biotic factors examined included the breeding bird community and abundance, nesting activity and nest success, small mammal abundance, plant community, and annual plant biomass production. Fall burns achieved treatment objectives, removing most residual vegetation across a range of cover types. Objectives for grazing treatments were mostly attained; however, vegetation use levels were insufficient for consistent attainment of treatment objectives. Savannah sparrow, American coot, Canada goose, sandhill crane, mallard, and yellow-headed blackbird were the most common bird species present. Densities of 2 bird species (savannah sparrow and red-winged blackbird) were related to year effect only. The effect of unit on densities of redhead, lesser scaup, ruddy duck, sora, long-billed curlew, and common snipe likely reflects habitat differences among units. Densities of 6 species (eared grebe, canvasback, American coot, American avocet, willet, and common yellowthroat) were related to both year and unit effects. Treatment affected densities of 6 of the 29 species examined (mallard, northern shoveler, cinnamon teal, blue-winged teal, American crow, and yellow-headed blackbird); we found no common trend in response to treatments among those species. Overall, idled habitat did not stand out to be a valuable treatment, whereas grazing tended to have positive responses for a number of species. Burning was more likely to result in reduced bird densities than other treatments. We also describe the distribution of species observations among 8 different habitat types. Of the 23 nesting species sampled in the

  7. Relative validation of the KiGGS Food Frequency Questionnaire among adolescents in Germany

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Truthmann Julia

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The aim of this study was to determine the relative validity of the self-administered Food Frequency Questionnaire (FFQ "What do you eat?", which was used in the German National Health Interview and Examination Survey for Children and Adolescents (KiGGS 2003-2006. Methods The validation was conducted in the EsKiMo Nutrition Module, a subsample of KiGGS. The study population included 1,213 adolescents aged between 12 and 17. A modified diet history interview DISHES (Dietary Interview Software for Health Examination Studies was used as the reference method. In order to compare the food groups, the data assessed with both instruments were aggregated to 40 similar food groups. The statistical analysis included calculating and comparing Spearman's correlation coefficients, calculating the mean difference between both methods, and ranking participants (quartiles according to food group consumption, including weighted kappa coefficients. Correlations were also evaluated for relative body weight and socioeconomic status subgroups. Results In the total study population the Spearman correlation coefficients ranged from 0.22 for pasta/rice to 0.69 for margarine; most values were 0.50 and higher. The mean difference ranged between 1.4% for milk and 100.3% for pasta/rice. The 2.5 percentiles and 97.5 percentiles indicated a wide range of differences. Classifications in the same and adjacent quartile varied between 70.1% for pasta/rice and 90.8% for coffee. For most groups, Cohen's weighted kappa showed values between 0.21 and 0.60. Only for white bread and pasta/rice were values less than 0.20. Most of the 40 food groups showed acceptable to good correlations in all investigated subgroups concerning age, sex, body weight and socio-economic status. Conclusions The KiGGS FFQ showed fair to moderate ranking validity except for pasta/rice and white bread. However, the ability to assess absolute intakes is limited. The correlation coefficients

  8. Polar Gateways Arctic Circle Sunrise 2008 Conference at the Top of the World

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, John F.; Kauristie, Kirsti; Weatherwax, Allan T.; Sandahl, Ingrid; Ostgaard, Nikolai; Sheehan, Glenn W.; Smith, Roger W.; Lewis, Elaine M.; Cline, Troy D.; Haines-Stiles, Geoff

    2008-01-01

    The Polar Gateways conference was hosted during January 23-29, 2008, the first week of polar sunrise at Barrow, Alaska, at the new Barrow Arctic Research Center of the Barrow Arctic Science consortium (BASC). The dawn week of polar day, the highly variable low temperatures, and the ice-covered shore tundra and adjacent sea ice conditions provided an appropriate locale for a conference dedicated in the spirit of the International Polar and Heliophysical Years 2007-2009 to the educational exploration of polar and icy world science of Earth and the solar system. The many scientific, educational, and cultural interactions with the local community of four thousand residents, sixty percent native Inupiat Eskimo, further provided an unforgettable experience of what life might be someday be like on other remote polar and icy worlds to be explored and eventually inhabited. Over one hundred active participants, more than half participating remotely, contributed science presentations and educational activities during this unique circumpolar and very "green" conference. Most remote contributions came via videoconference from the Swedish Institute of Space Physics (IRF) at Kisuna, Sweden, the EISCAT Svalbard Radar Facility at Spitzbergen, Norway, the University of Alaska at Fairbanks, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center and the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, the University of California at Berkeley, and the University of Arizona. A few contributors participated via teleconference, including one from the Polar Geophysical Institute at Apatity in Russia. These active contributions spanned up to thirteen time zones (Alaska to Russia) at various tirnes during the conference. Primary videoconferencing support between Barrow and other sites was ably provided by the University of Alaska at Fairbanks, and local operators at each remote site collectively made this conference possible. Science presentations spanned the solar system from the polar Sun and heliospheric environment to Earth, Moon

  9. Aboriginal health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacMillan, H L; MacMillan, A B; Offord, D R; Dingle, J L

    1996-12-01

    To inform health care workers about the health status of Canada's native people. A MEDLINE search for articles published from Jan. 1, 1989, to Nov. 31, 1995, with the use of subject headings "Eskimos" and "Indians, North American," excluding specific subject headings related to genetics and history. Case reports were excluded. Material was also identified from a review of standard references and bibliographies and from consultation with experts. Review and research articles containing original data concerning epidemiologic aspects of native health. Studies of Canadian populations were preferred, but population-based studies of US native peoples were included if limited Canadian information was available. Information about target population, methods and conclusions was extracted from each study. Mortality and morbidity rates are higher in the native population than in the general Canadian population. The infant mortality rates averaged for the years 1986 to 1990 were 13.8 per 1000 live births among Indian infants, 16.3 per 1000 among Inuit infants, and only 7.3 per 1000 among all Canadian infants. Age-standardized all-cause mortality rates among residents of reserves averaged for the years 1979 to 1983 were 561.0 per 100,000 population among men and 334.6 per 100,000 among women, compared with 340.2 per 100,000 among all Canadian men and 173.4 per 100,000 among all Canadian women. Compared with the general Canadian population, specific native populations have an increased risk of death from alcoholism, homicide, suicide and pneumonia. Of the aboriginal population of Canada 15 years of age and older, 31% have been informed that they have a chronic health problem. Diabetes mellitus affects 6% of aboriginal adults, compared with 2% of all Canadian adults. Social problems identified by aboriginal people as a concern in their community include substance abuse, suicide, unemployment and family violence. Subgroups of aboriginal people are at a greater-than-normal risk of

  10. Bowhead whale body condition and links to summer sea ice and upwelling in the Beaufort Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, John C.; Druckenmiller, Matthew L.; Laidre, Kristin L.; Suydam, Robert; Person, Brian

    2015-08-01

    We examined the response of bowhead whale (Balaena mysticetus) body condition to summer sea ice conditions and upwelling-favorable winds. We used a long-term dataset collected from whales of the Bering-Chukchi-Beaufort Seas (BCB) stock to estimate various body condition indices (BCI's) for individual whales that were harvested by Alaskan Eskimos. A series of offshore regions frequented by bowhead whales in summer were delineated and used to quantify interannual summertime environmental conditions including: (a) mean open water fraction, (b) duration of melt season, (c) date of continuous freeze-up, and (d) mean upwelling-favorable wind stress. Body condition was analyzed relative to these metrics for both the preceding summer feeding season and the previous three seasons combined. Our analysis indicates a significant increase in the long-term trend in an axillary girth-based body condition index (BCIG) over the study period (1989-2011). The increase in BCIG is likely associated with the trend in overall reduction of sea ice, including increased duration of open water, changes in upwelling potential (wind stress), and possibly higher primary production in the Pacific Arctic marine ecosystem favoring water-column invertebrates. We found strong significant positive correlations between BCIG and late summer open water fraction in the Beaufort Sea and smaller nearshore areas off the Mackenzie Delta and west of Banks Island. Additionally, BCIG was positively and significantly correlated with duration of melt season, later date of freeze-up in the Beaufort Sea, and upwelling-favorable winds on the Mackenzie shelf and west of Banks Island. A strong seasonal difference in BCI's was noted for subadult bowheads, presumably associated with summer feeding; however, yearlings were found to drop in BCI over at least the first summer after weaning. Our results indicate an overall increase in bowhead whale body condition and a positive correlation with summer sea ice loss over the

  11. Contemporary Inuit Traditional Beliefs Concerning Meteorites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mardon, A. A.; Mardon, E. G.; Williams, J. S.

    1992-07-01

    Inuit religious mythology and the importance of meteorites as "messages" from the Creator of all things is only now being recognized. Field investigations near Resolute, Cornwallis Island in the high Canadian Arctic in 1988 are the bases for this paper. Through interpreters, several elders of the local Inuit described in detail the Inuit belief, recognition, and wonder at the falling meteors & meteorites during the long Polar Night and Polar Day. Such events are passed on in the oral tradition from generation to generation by the elders and especially those elders who fulfill the shamanistic roles. The Inuit have come across rocks that they immediately recognize as not being "natural" and in the cases of a fall that was observed and the rock recovered the meteorite is kept either on the person or in some hidden niche known only to that person. In one story recounted a meteorite fell and was recovered at the birth of one very old elder and the belief was that if the rock was somehow damaged or taken from his possession he would die. Some indirect indication also was conveyed that the discovery and possession of meteorites allow shaman to have "supernatural" power. This belief in the supernatural power of meteorites can be seen historically in many societies, including Islam and the "black rock" (Kaaba) of Mecca. It should also be noted, however, that metallic meteorites were clearly once the major source of iron for Eskimo society as is indicated from the recovery of meteoritical iron arrow heads and harpoon heads from excavated pre-Viking contact sites. The one evident thing that became clear to the author is that the Inuit distinctly believe that these meteorites are religious objects of the highest order and it brings into question the current academic practice of sending meteorites south to research institutes. Any seeming conflict with the traditional use of meteoric iron is more apparent than real--the animals, the hunt, and the act of survival--all being

  12. Peopling of the North Circumpolar Region--insights from Y chromosome STR and SNP typing of Greenlanders.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jill Katharina Olofsson

    Full Text Available The human population in Greenland is characterized by migration events of Paleo- and Neo-Eskimos, as well as admixture with Europeans. In this study, the Y-chromosomal variation in male Greenlanders was investigated in detail by typing 73 Y-chromosomal single nucleotide polymorphisms (Y-SNPs and 17 Y-chromosomal short tandem repeats (Y-STRs. Approximately 40% of the analyzed Greenlandic Y chromosomes were of European origin (I-M170, R1a-M513 and R1b-M343. Y chromosomes of European origin were mainly found in individuals from the west and south coasts of Greenland, which is in agreement with the historic records of the geographic placements of European settlements in Greenland. Two Inuit Y-chromosomal lineages, Q-M3 (xM19, M194, L663, SA01 and L766 and Q-NWT01 (xM265 were found in 23% and 31% of the male Greenlanders, respectively. The time to the most recent common ancestor (TMRCA of the Q-M3 lineage of the Greenlanders was estimated to be between 4,400 and 10,900 years ago (y. a. using two different methods. This is in agreement with the theory that the North Circumpolar Region was populated via a second expansion of humans in the North American continent. The TMRCA of the Q-NWT01 (xM265 lineage in Greenland was estimated to be between 7,000 and 14,300 y. a. using two different methods, which is older than the previously reported TMRCA of this lineage in other Inuit populations. Our results indicate that Inuit individuals carrying the Q-NWT01 (xM265 lineage may have their origin in the northeastern parts of North America and could be descendants of the Dorset culture. This in turn points to the possibility that the current Inuit population in Greenland is comprised of individuals of both Thule and Dorset descent.

  13. GM allotypes in Native Americans: evidence for three distinct migrations across the Bering land bridge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, R C; Steinberg, A G; Gershowitz, H; Bennett, P H; Knowler, W C; Pettitt, D J; Butler, W; Baird, R; Dowda-Rea, L; Burch, T A

    1985-01-01

    We report the results of typings, for immunoglobulin G allotypes, of 5392 Native Americans from ten samples, the typings having been performed over the last 20 years. Four cultural groups are represented: the Pimans-Pima and Papago; the Puebloans-Zuni and Hopi; the Pai-Walapai; and the Athabascans-Apache and Navajo. The haplotype Gm1;21 has the highest frequency in each population while Gm1,2;21 is polymorphic in all except the Hopi. The Mongoloid marker Gm1;11,13 is found primarily in the Athabascans. The Caucasian haplotype Gm3;5,11,13 is found at polymorphic frequencies in several of the populations but its frequency is very low or absent among nonadmixed individuals. Although Nei's standard genetic distance analysis demonstrates genetic similarity at the Gm and Km loci, the heterogeneity that does exist is consistent both with what is known about the prehistory of Native Americans and traditional cultural categories. When the current Gm distributions are analyzed with respect to the three-migration hypothesis, there are three distinct Gm distributions for the postulated migrants: Gm1;21 and Gm1,2;21 for the Paleo-Indians 16,000 to 40,000 years ago; Gm1;21, Gm1,2;21, and Gm1;11,13 for the second wave of Na-Dene hunters 12,000 to 14,000 years ago; and Gm1;21 and Gm1;11,13 for the Eskimo-Aleut migration 9,000 years ago. The Pimans, Puebloans, and the Pai are descendents of the Paleo-Indians while the Apache and Navajo are the contemporary populations related to the Na-Dene. Finally, the Gm distribution in Amerindians is found to be consistent with a hypothesis of one migration of Paleo-Indians to South American, while the most likely homeland for the three ancestral populations is found to be in northeastern Asia.

  14. 食用油中脂肪伴随物的营养与功能%Nutrition and Function of Accompaniments of Fats in Edible Oil

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    金青哲; 王兴国; 刘国艳

    2012-01-01

    我国油脂营养和食用油消费领域存在片面强调脂肪酸平衡而忽视脂肪伴随物营养与功能的误区.本文从法国悖论、地中海式饮食、爱斯基摩人膳食的角度出发,阐述了脂肪伴随物与人体健康的密切关系.并且采用饱和脂肪与心血管病之间关系、脂肪摄入与乳腺癌的相关性、高脂膳食氧化应激与抗氧化剂的干预作用等营养学的最新研究结果,表明饱和脂肪酸与心血管疾病之间不存在显著的相关性,摄入富含有益脂肪伴随物、营养全面的食用油是油脂营养的关键所在.%In China, there is a misunderstanding about oil nutrition and edible oil consumption , which emphasizes only the balance of fatty acid in oil nutrition, rather than the nutrition and functionalities of accompaniments of fats. In this paper, the relationship between accompaniments of fats in edible oil and human health was systematically elaborated from the view of French paradox, Mediterranean diet, Eskimo diet. Furthermore, it revealed that there are no remarkable correlation between saturated fatty acid and cardiovascular diseases and the richness of accompaniments of fats and its comprehensive nutrients in edible oil are the key to fat nutrition, which were based on the latest nutrition research results on the relationship between saturated fat and cardiovascular disease, correlation of fat intake and breast cancer, oxidative stress induced by high -fat diet and intervention of antioxidant.

  15. Polar Gateways Arctic Circle Sunrise 2008 Conference at the Top of the World

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, J. F.; Kauristie, K.; Weatherwax, A. T.; Sheehan, G. W.; Smith, R. W.; Cline, T. D.; Lewis, E. M.; Haines-Stiles, G.

    2008-12-01

    The Polar Gateways conference was hosted during January 23-29, 2008, the first week of polar sunrise at Barrow, Alaska, at the new Barrow Arctic Research Center of the Barrow Arctic Science Consortium (BASC). The dawn week of polar day, the highly variable low temperatures, and the ice-covered shore tundra and adjacent sea ice conditions provided an appropriate locale for a conference dedicated in the spirit of the International Polar and Heliophysical Years 2007-2009 to the educational exploration of polar and icy world science of Earth and the solar system. The many scientific, educational, and cultural interactions with the local community of four thousand residents, sixty percent native Inupiat Eskimo, further provided an unforgettable experience of what life might be someday be like on other remote polar and icy worlds to be explored and eventually inhabited. Over one hundred active participants, more than half participating remotely, contributed science presentations and educational activities during this unique circumpolar and very "green" conference. Most remote contributions came via videoconference from the Swedish Institute of Space Physics (IRF) at Kiruna, Sweden, the EISCAT Svalbard Radar Facility at Spitzbergen, Norway, the University of Alaska at Fairbanks, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center and the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, the University of California at Berkeley, and the University of Arizona. A few contributors participated via teleconference, including one from the Polar Geophysical Institute at Apatity in Russia. These active contributions spanned up to thirteen time zones (Alaska to Russia) at various times during the conference. Primary videoconferencing support between Barrow and other sites was ably provided by the University of Alaska at Fairbanks, and local operators at each remote site collectively made this conference possible. Science presentations spanned the solar system from the polar Sun and heliospheric environment to Earth, Moon

  16. Hiperplasia epitelial focal (doença de Heck em descendente de índios brasileiros: relato de caso Focal epithelial hyperplasia (Heck's disease in Brazilian indian descent: report of a case

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro Paulo de Andrade Santos

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available A hiperplasia epitelial focal, ou doença de Heck, é uma enfermidade rara, benigna, que afeta a mucosa oral de crianças e adultos jovens de diversas regiões do mundo e em diferentes grupos étnicos, como indígenas e esquimós. Apresenta correlação com o papilomavírus humano (HPV no qual os tipos 13 e 32 têm sido consistentemente detectados nessas lesões. Este artigo relata um caso de uma paciente de 18 anos de idade, descendente de índios potiguares, que compareceu ao serviço de estomatologia da Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Norte (UFRN, exibindo lesões bem definidas, arredondadas, planas, localizadas em cavidade oral, com tempo de evolução de aproximadamente dois anos. As lesões foram submetidas a biópsias incisionais, constatado-se no exame histopatológico alterações epiteliais, como acantose, cristas epiteliais em forma de "taco de golfe" além de células mitosóides. Esses achados histopatológicos foram compatíveis com a hipótese clínica de hiperplasia epitelial focal (doença de Heck.The focal epithelial hyperplasia or Heck's disease is a benign rare pathology, that affects children and young adults oral mucosal in many world regions, and different ethnic groups, for example Indians and Eskimos. Presents correlation with the subtypes 13 and 32 of human papillomavirus (HPV. This article report a case of an 18-year-old patient, descent of potiguar indian, attended in stomatology service of Federal University of Rio Grande do Norte (UFRN, presenting well defined lesions, round, plane, localized in oral cavity with an evolution of two years. The lesions were submitted to incisional biopsies, verifying in histopathologic exam, epithelial alterations, like acanthosis, epithelial projections in "parquet block of golf" beyond mitosoid cells. These histopathological findings were compatible with clinical hypothesis of focal epithelial hyperplasia (Heck's disease.

  17. 爱斯基摩男孩——阿拉托克

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王保来

    2006-01-01

    今天是爱斯基摩男孩阿拉托克一个重要的日子。他很快吃完了早饭。要独自一人去猎取海豹,这还是他有生以来第一次。阿拉托克在日出以前就来到他要打猎的地方。他沿着海岸走着,寻找海豹。阿拉托克一面在冰雪上走着,一面不停地环顾左右。突然他停住了脚步。他看见冰上有个黑色的东西。这会是只海豹吗?他悄悄往前走去,当他靠近一些的时候,他看清楚了。真是一只海豹!他立即趴在地上,慢慢地在冰上爬行。海豹都是近视眼,如果阿拉托克非常小心的话,海豹会把他误认为另一只海豹。这只海豹抬起头来四处张望,阿拉托克也抬头四处张望——就象那只海豹一样。随后他停了下来,学着海豹有时做的动作,开始抓扒冰雪。那只海豹似乎放心了,不再移动了。阿拉托克继续爬近海豹,接着他把枪举到肩高,仔细瞄准,扣动了板机。海豹倒在了冰上。阿拉托克站起来朝海豹跑去。多大的一只海豹啊!它的肉可以够吃好多顿,而且还有毛皮和脂肪。 It is an important day for Alatook, an Eskimo 1 boy. He eats his breakfast quickly. For the first time he is going to hunt seals ...

  18. 山西城市汉族体型特点%Somatotype of Han in urban areas of Shanxi province

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李咏兰; 陆舜华; 国海; 陈琛; 曹瑜; 郑思平

    2011-01-01

    reached the highest value in 30 to 39 age group, ectomorphy reached the highest value in 20 to 29 age group.City females the of Endomorph and Mesomorph increased with age , reached the highest value in over 60 age group, Ectomorph reached the highest value in 20 to 29 age group.The somatotype of urban males was close to those of Uzhek , Ewenki, Canadian and Eskimos , far away from Zhuang , Mulao , Dong , Nu.The somatotype of urban females was close to those of Uzhek, Ewenki, Monggol, Eskimos, and far away from Zhuang, Gelao nationality and Mulao.Conclusion The somatotype of rural adults of Han is close to that of Oroqen.

  19. Book Reviews

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N.J. Gubser

    1968-01-01

    Holthoon, P. Pierson-Mathy, La politique raciale de la République d’Afrique du Sud. Chronique de Politique Étrangère vol. XVII. Institut Royal des Relations Internationales, Brussel. 1964. - G.J.F. Bouritius, Sidonius Schoenaker, Die ideologischen Hintergründe im Gemeinschaftsleben der Pogoro. Acta Ethnologica et Linguistica Nr. 7. Wien 1965. 176 pp. - G. van den Steenhoven, N.J. Gubser, The Nunamiut Eskimos: Hunters of Caribou. Yale University Press, New Haven & London 1965. 384 pp. - J. Huizinga, R. Herrera Fritot, Nueva Tecnica para calcular la capacidad craneana. Academia de Ciencas de Cuba. Departamento de Antropologia. La Habana, 1965. 30 pag. - R.A.N. van Zantwijk, Frank Cancian, Economics and prestige in a Maya community, The religious cargo system in Zinacantan. Stanford University Press, Stanford. California, U.S.A. 1965. IX + 238 blz., geïllustreerd. - K.E. de Haan, Luc de Heusch, A la découverte des Tsiganes, Une expédition de reconnaissance (1961. Institut de Sociologie, Bruxelles 1966. 207 p., 9 zwart/wit foto’s. - C.H.M. Nooy-Palm, Margrit de la Sablonière, Staphorst; Het levenspatroon van een creatief-traditionele geneenschap. Wereld-bibliotheek, Amsterdam-Antwerpen 1966. 77 bladzijden, met kaarten, foto’s en tekstfiguren. - Richard Franke, The journal of the Papua & New Guinea Society, Vol. 1, No. 1. Port Moresby, Summer 1966-67. 82 pp.

  20. Somatotype characteristics in Heilongjiang Oroqen adults%黑龙江鄂伦春族成人的体型

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张健; 温有锋; 刘素伟

    2012-01-01

    目的 了解黑龙江鄂伦春族成人的体型特点.方法 用Heath-Carter体型法对157例(男75例,女82例)黑龙江鄂伦春族成人进行体型分析.结果 鄂伦春族男性平均体型值4.3-5.1-1.7,属偏内胚层的中胚层体型,女生平均体型值为6.3-5.0-0.9,属偏中胚层的内胚层体型.鄂伦春族男、女性体型分布集中,主要在偏中胚层的内胚层体型、内胚层-中胚层均衡体型、偏内胚层的中胚层体型.男性较女性外因子高、内因子低,因此男性的身材相对修长,女性的皮下脂肪更发达,体态丰满.男女体型无差异.与国内外其他群体相比,鄂伦春族体型内因子和中因子较高,外因子较低,男性与加拿大人、女性与美国爱斯基摩人体型最接近,与辽宁汉族体型较近,与壮族和马努斯人相距较远.结论 鄂伦春族成人体型偏胖,骨骼肌肉发达,线性度相对较差,身材较为粗壮魁梧.%Objective To study somatotype characteristics in Heilongjiang Oroqen adults. Methods The somatotypes of 157 Oroqen adults ( male 75 , female 82 cases) were evaluated using the Heath-Carter anthropometric method. Results The mean somatotype in males was endomorph-mesomorph category(4.3-5. 1-1. 7),and was meso-endomorph category ( 6. 3-5. 0-0. 9 ) in females. Concentrated distribution of the somatotype appeared in the male and female. They were mainly in meso-endomorph, endomorph-mesomorph and endo-mesorph. Ectomorphy factor of the male was slender and the females had more body fat . The somatotypes of Oroqen males were the same to that of females. Compared with other groups from overseas, the endomorphy factor and mesomorphy factor of somatotypes of the Oroqen were higher and ectomorphy factor was lower . The somatotypes of the male were close with Canadian, and those of the female were close with the US Eskimos and Han nationality in Liaoning, but far from Zhuang and Manus people . Conclusion Oroqen adults have a strong physique, skeletal

  1. 辽宁农村汉族成人的Heath-Carter法体型分析%Somatotype of rural adults of Han in Liaoning province with Heath-Carter method

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张海龙; 席焕久; 阎文柱; 刘素伟; 姜东; 温有锋

    2011-01-01

    目的 探讨辽宁农村汉族成人的体型特点.方法用Heath-Carter体型法对978名(男488名,女490名)辽宁农村汉族成人进行体型分析.结果探讨辽宁农村汉族成人男性平均体型值为4.5-4.7-1.4,属内胚层-中胚层均衡体型,女性平均体型值为6.0-4.3-0.9,属偏中胚层的内胚层体型.辽宁农村汉族成人体型的性别差异:女性的内因子值占优势,而中、外因子值男性大于女性,男性较女性外因子高、内因子低,因此男性的身体相对瘦高,身材相对修长,女性的皮下脂肪更发达,体态丰满.辽宁农村汉族成人体型与其他群体的比较:辽宁农村汉族男性体型与鄂温克族、回族、墨西哥和美国爱斯基摩人的差异非常显著,与美国东北和中西部人群相接近,女性与回族和墨西哥人的差异非常显著,与印度和蒙古族相接近.结论辽宁农村汉族成人皮下脂肪较厚,骨骼、肌肉系统较发达,身体线性度中等.女性皮下脂肪发达,体态丰满.男性骨骼和肌肉发育良好,体型稍显修长.%Objective To understand the somatotype of rural Liaoning adults of Han nationality. Methods Heath-Carter shape was performed on 978 ( men 488 and women 490 ) Liaoning rural adult body shape analysis. Results Liaoning rural average-sized adult male is 4. 5-4. 7-1.4, it belongs to endodermal-mesoderm and balanced body, women average-size is 6. 0-4. 3-0. 9, it is of endodermal figure. Liaoning rural Han adult body: gender differences in femaledominated, in factor value, the value of external factor is greater than the female, the male males than females external factor is high, low, and therefore within the factor male body with a high degree of relative slip , is relatively thin, women of subcutaneous fat more developed, buxom. Liaoning rural adult body and other Han group comparison: Liaoning rural males figure and Ewenki, Hui, Mexico and the United States have very different Eskimos, the distinctiveness a nd

  2. IPY to Mark Expansion of Research Facilities on the North Slope of Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zak, B. D.; Eicken, H.; Sheehan, G. W.; Glenn, R.

    2004-12-01

    than 50 years, and now is available to the larger research community through BASC. It has been protected from development by the NSB Assembly as a Scientific Research District. Since 1981, the remains of the old NARL infrastructure sustained the scientific enterprise on the North Slope. But now, as a result of the rapid ongoing changes in the Arctic, these old inadequate facilities are about to be replaced. The new Barrow facility, although smaller than the old NARL, will serve the needs of modern researchers with first class laboratories, information technology and lodging. It is being designed by the arctic research community itself through a series of workshops held over this past year, and through ongoing feedback (http://scifac.arcticscience.org). Research on the North Slope capitalizes on the history of collaboration between the Native Inupiat Eskimo people and scientists going back to the first IPY. Local native people have served in many support capacities for scientists in the past, and currently serve as managers and technicians for projects like ARM. It is this history of collaboration with scientists that inspired the creation of BASC, of the BEO, and that made the new facility possible. This paper reviews the status of planning for the new Barrow facility. Feedback can be provided through the web site and through the authors, who serve BASC respectively as chairs of advisory committees, Executive Director and President.

  3. N-3 fatty acids in glucose metabolism and insulin sensitivity Ácidos grasos n-3 en el metabolismo de la glucosa y la sensibilidad a la insulina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Martín de Santa Olalla

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA of the n-3 series are essential for normal growth and development. The health effects of these fatty acids include reduction of cardiovascular risk due to antiarrhythmic, antiinflammatory, anti-thrombotic and lipid lowering actions. An increase in unsaturation of the muscle membrane fatty acids is associated with improved insulin sensitivity. Higher proportion of n-3 fatty acids may have beneficial roles, such as antiobesity effects and protection against the metabolic syndrome and type 2 diabetes mellitus through a number of metabolic effects. However, controversy exists on the different effects of n-6 and n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids as well as on the interacting effect of dietary saturated and monounsaturated fat. In addition, some adverse effects have been described concerning the use of fish oil supplements containing high doses of n-3 fatty acids. Several studies show Eskimos diabetes risk, while results of nutritional interventions on the influence of consuming diets rich in oily fish or other food rich in n-3 fatty acids is very limited. This article reviews the possible mechanisms through which n-3 PUFA are involved in glucose level control and insulin sensitivity. Intervention and epidemiological studies together with recent findings on the nutrigenomic field related with this subject are also briefly reviewed.Los ácidos grasos poliinsaturados (AGP de la serie n-3 son esenciales para el crecimiento normal y el desarrollo. Los efectos de estos ácidos grasos en la salud incluyen reducción del riesgo cardiovascular debido a acciones antiarrítmicas, antiinflamatorias, antitrombóticas e hipolipemiantes. Un aumento en la insaturación de los ácidos grasos de la membrana muscular se asocia con mejora en la sensibilidad a la insulina. Una mayor proporción de ácidos grasos n-3 puede desempeñar papeles beneficios, tales como efectos antiobesidad y protección frente al síndrome metabólico y la

  4. Evolution of Hepatitis B Genotype D in the Middle East and South Asia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William F.Carman

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Hepatitis B virus (HBV has been classified into 8 genotypes, from A to H and there are some hints that the outcome of the disease and the response to therapy might be correlated to these genomic groups (although not as serious as hepatitis C virus [HCV].Hepatitis B virus genotypes show a characteristic geographic distribution with a proposed association with human migration. Several scientific fields are employed for the study of human population history, including archaeology, linguistics, anthropology and, recently, genetics. Thanks to the introduction of modern technology into genetics in the past two decades, humans have been facing some very interesting findings about their history. Besides mitochondrial DNA sequence analysis, persistent viruses have opened a new window into this area, especially HBV. But why?It is of interest that the prevalence of HBV genotypes throughout the world is clearly linked to migration. For example, the ancestors of Eskimos migrated from South East (SE Asia to the North and passed through the Behring channel to Alaska, which partially explains why there was as high a prevalence of hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg positivity in this area as in SE Asia (1.Second, in some studies (2-5 from South America, genotypes E and A, which are the dominant types in Africans, were found in an area with genotype F/H dominancy. They derived from those with African descent who came into South America during the slave trading period a few hundred years ago. In our own research (6 in the Pacific region (which is an endemic area with genotype C dominancy we compared HBV surface and core genes with the ones from SE Asian patients and from international databases. The gradient of nucleotide and amino acid variations from west to east in our study were most consistent with the hypothesis of migration of Polynesian people from Southern China through Melanesia and Fiji and their radiation across the Pacific to fill the Polynesian

  5. Similitudes, diferencias y agonismos en los efectos pleiotrópicos de las estatinas y los ácidos grasos omega-3 Similarities, differences and agonisms of pleiotropic effects of statins and omega-3 fatty acids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.ª E. Villalobos

    2010-12-01

    grupos de compuestos en el tratamiento de CVD y se concluye que pueden obtenerse claros beneficios.This paper compares the pleiotropic effects of statins and omega-3 fatty acids (n-3 PUFA in treating and preventing cardiovascular disease (CVD and deals with the possible interactions of those compounds. Statins represent one of the most important discoveries to have been made in the field of cardiovascular medicine in recent decades. Their beneficial cardiovascular effects, which have reduced the number of fatal events in patients with atherosclerosis, encompass more than their ability to lower cholesterol levels. The pleiotropic effects of statins involve their anti-inflammatory and antiplatelet properties and their ability to normalize endothelial function. In addition, these drugs may display antiarrhythmic activity, improve insulin sensitivity and counteract hypertension and obesity. The low rate of coronary disease documented in Eskimos corroborates the cardioprotective effects of the n-3 PUFA eicosapentaenoic (EPA and docosahexaenoic acids beyond their hypolipemic effects. The reduction of CVD-related deaths attributable to the action of α-linolenic fatty acid appears to be related to its strong antiarrhythmic properties. In addition, as a precursor of EPA and this last fatty acid of thromboxane A3, prostacyclin I3, serie-3 prostaglandines and serie 5-leukotrines and inhibitor/modulator of thromboxane A2, prostacyclin I2, serie-2 prostaglandines and serie 4-leukotrienes formation, the α-linolenic acid may reduce inflammation and thrombogenesis. As results of some studies suggest that the combined use of statins and n-3 PUFA improves cardiovascular protection and reduces the CVD-related mortality rate; the paper also reviews the possible synergism between both groups of compounds on CVD treatment and concludes that clear benefits may be obtained.

  6. Hiperplasia Epitelial Focal: ¿por qué Enfermedad de Heck? Focal epithelial hyperplasia: why Heck's disease?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LN Rosa

    2003-10-01

    entidad. Los autores también relatan un caso de hiperplasia focal del epitelio en paciente del sexo masculino, 13 años, leucodemia.The focal epithelial hyperplasia is characterized by the presence of papular and nodular elevations, flat or rough multiple sessiles, with the same color of the mucous membrane (Neville et al., 1998. Estrada (1956 described the presence of intra-oral warts and papillary lesions in Caramantas natives in Colombia, in 1956. IN 1960, the same author identified the presence of the same lesions in Kátios natives, from Colombia. Reyes (1962 noticed the same clinical conditions in Guatemala. Soneira and Fonseca (1964 have described the lesion with its clinical variations, from a single papula to multiple papillary lesions in the oral mucosa, lips, and other oral regions. These authors studied 160 native girls in Venezuela and noticed the disease in 54 of them (33.75%. They also suggest that the disease has a viral etiology. In spite of the fact the disease was described by other Latin American authors before 1965, it was worldwide recognized only in this year, due to Aechard, Heck and Stanley. These authors have reported isolated cases in 15 North American natives in the State of New Mexico; one Xavante in the state of Mato Grosso (Brazil and a Eskimo boy in Alaska, and named the disease as Focal Epithelial Hyperplasia. The eponym "Heck Disease" is derived from Dr. Heck, who identified one patient with this disease in Gallup, New Mexico in 1961. Praetorius-Clausen and WiIlis (1971 were the first to show HPV particles in the focal epithelial hyperplasia. Concerning the publishing prior to Archard, Heck and Stanley (1965, the authors suggest to discard that the eponym "Heck Disease", since this denomination does not add any relation to the nature and characteristics of the disease, and also does not recognize the authors who had described it before 1965. The authors also report a focal epithelial hyperplasia in a male 13 year old patient, leukoderma.