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Sample records for curl virus resistance

  1. Fine mapping of the tomato yellow leaf curl virus resistance gene Ty-2 on chromosome 11 of tomato

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yang, X.; Caro Rios, C.M.; Hutton, S.F.; Scott, J.W.; Guo, Y.; Wang, Xiaoxuan; Rashid, H.; Szinay, D.; Jong, de J.H.S.G.M.; Visser, R.G.F.; Bai, Y.; Du, Y.

    2014-01-01

    Resistances to begomoviruses, including bipartite tomato mottle virus and monopartite tomato yellow leaf curl virus (TYLCV), have been introgressed to cultivated tomato (Solanumlycopersicum) fromwild tomato accessions. A major gene, Ty-2 from S. habrochaites f. glabratum accession ‘‘B6013,’’ that

  2. Fine mapping of the tomato yellow leaf curl virus resistance gene Ty-2 on chromosome 11 of tomato

    OpenAIRE

    Yang, X.; Caro Rios, C.M.; Hutton, S.F.; Scott, J. W.; Guo, Y.; Wang, Xiaoxuan; Rashid, H.; Szinay, D.; de Jong; Visser, R.G.F.; Bai, Y.; Du, Y.

    2014-01-01

    Resistances to begomoviruses, including bipartite tomato mottle virus and monopartite tomato yellow leaf curl virus (TYLCV), have been introgressed to cultivated tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) from wild tomato accessions. A major gene, Ty-2 from S. habrochaites f. glabratum accession “B6013,” that confers resistance to TYLCV was previously mapped to a 19-cM region on the long arm of chromosome 11. In the present study, approximately 11,000 plants were screened and nearly 157 recombination even...

  3. Recessive Resistance Derived from Tomato cv. Tyking-Limits Drastically the Spread of Tomato Yellow Leaf Curl Virus

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    Rita C. Pereira-Carvalho

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The tomato yellow leaf curl disease (TYLCD causes severe damage to tomato (Solanum lycopersicum L. crops throughout tropical and subtropical regions of the world. TYLCD is associated with a complex of single-stranded circular DNA plant viruses of the genus Begomovirus (family Geminiviridae transmitted by the whitefy Bemisia tabaci Gennadius (Hemiptera: Aleyrodidae. The tomato inbred line TX 468-RG is a source of monogenic recessive resistance to begomoviruses derived from the hybrid cv. Tyking F1. A detailed analysis of this germplasm source against tomato yellow leaf curl virus-Israel (TYLCV-IL, a widespread TYLCD-associated virus, showed a significant restriction to systemic virus accumulation even under continuous virus supply. The resistance was effective in limiting the onset of TYLCV-IL in tomato, as significantly lower primary spread of the virus occurred in resistant plants. Also, even if a limited number of resistant plants could result infected, they were less efficient virus sources for secondary spread owing to the impaired TYLCV-IL accumulation. Therefore, the incorporation of this resistance into breeding programs might help TYLCD management by drastically limiting TYLCV-IL spread.

  4. Molecular dissection of Tomato leaf curl virus resistance in tomato line TY172 derived from Solanum peruvianum.

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    Anbinder, Ilana; Reuveni, Moshe; Azari, Raviv; Paran, Ilan; Nahon, Sahadia; Shlomo, Haviva; Chen, Lea; Lapidot, Moshe; Levin, Ilan

    2009-08-01

    Tomato yellow leaf curl virus (TYLCV) is devastating to tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) crops and resistant cultivars are highly effective in controlling the disease. The breeding line TY172, originating from Solanum peruvianum, is highly resistant to TYLCV. To map quantitative trait loci (QTLs) controlling TYLCV resistance in TY172, appropriate segregating populations were analyzed using 69 polymorphic DNA markers spanning the entire tomato genome. Results show that TYLCV resistance in TY172 is controlled by a previously unknown major QTL, originating from the resistant line, and four additional minor QTLs. The major QTL, we term Ty-5, maps to chromosome 4 and accounts for 39.7-46.6% of the variation in symptom severity among segregating plants (LOD score 33-35). The minor QTLs, originated either from the resistant or susceptible parents, were mapped to chromosomes 1, 7, 9 and 11, and contributed 12% to the variation in symptom severity in addition to Ty-5.

  5. Transcriptome profiling to discover defense-related genes associated with resistance line ty-5 against Tomato yellow leaf curl virus in tomato

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    Tomato yellow leaf curl virus (TYLCV), a whitefly-transmitted begomovirus, has caused serious economic losses to tomato crops in the U.S. and around the world. The most effective management would be the use of a TYLCV-resistant tomato cultivar. Several sources of TYLCV resistance genes have been ide...

  6. Fine mapping of the tomato yellow leaf curl virus resistance gene Ty-2 on chromosome 11 of tomato.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xiaohui; Caro, Myluska; Hutton, Samuel F; Scott, John W; Guo, Yanmei; Wang, Xiaoxuan; Rashid, Md Harunur; Szinay, Dora; de Jong, Hans; Visser, Richard G F; Bai, Yuling; Du, Yongchen

    2014-01-01

    Resistances to begomoviruses, including bipartite tomato mottle virus and monopartite tomato yellow leaf curl virus (TYLCV), have been introgressed to cultivated tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) from wild tomato accessions. A major gene, Ty-2 from S. habrochaites f. glabratum accession "B6013," that confers resistance to TYLCV was previously mapped to a 19-cM region on the long arm of chromosome 11. In the present study, approximately 11,000 plants were screened and nearly 157 recombination events were identified between the flanking markers C2_At1g07960 (82.5 cM, physical distance 51.387 Mb) and T0302 (89 cM, 51.878 Mb). Molecular marker analysis of recombinants and TYLCV evaluation of progeny from these recombinants localized Ty-2 to an approximately 300,000-bp interval between markers UP8 (51.344 Mb) and M1 (51.645 Mb). No recombinants were identified between TG36 and C2_At3g52090, a region of at least 115 kb, indicating severe recombination suppression in this region. Due to the small interval, fluorescence in situ hybridization analysis failed to clarify whether recombination suppression is caused by chromosomal rearrangements. Candidate genes predicted based on tomato genome annotation were analyzed by RT-PCR and virus-induced gene silencing. Results indicate that the NBS gene family present in the Ty-2 region is likely not responsible for the Ty-2-conferred resistance and that two candidate genes might play a role in the Ty-2-conferred resistance. Several markers very tightly linked to the Ty-2 locus are presented and useful for marker-assisted selection in breeding programs to introgress Ty-2 for begomovirus resistance.

  7. Tomato yellow leaf curl virus resistance by Ty-1 involves increased cytosine methylation of viral genomes and is compromised by cucumber mosaic virus infection.

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    Butterbach, Patrick; Verlaan, Maarten G; Dullemans, Annette; Lohuis, Dick; Visser, Richard G F; Bai, Yuling; Kormelink, Richard

    2014-09-02

    Tomato yellow leaf curl virus (TYLCV) and related begomoviruses are a major threat to tomato production worldwide and, to protect against these viruses, resistance genes from different wild tomato species are introgressed. Recently, the Ty-1 resistance gene was identified, shown to code for an RNA-dependent RNA polymerase and to be allelic with Ty-3. Here we show that upon TYLCV challenging of resistant lines carrying Ty-1 or Ty-3, low virus titers were detected concomitant with the production of relatively high levels of siRNAs whereas, in contrast, susceptible tomato Moneymaker (MM) revealed higher virus titers but lower amounts of siRNAs. Comparative analysis of the spatial genomic siRNA distribution showed a consistent and subtle enrichment for siRNAs derived from the V1 and C3 genes in Ty-1 and Ty-3. In plants containing Ty-2 resistance the virus was hardly detectable, but the siRNA profile resembled the one observed in TYLCV-challenged susceptible tomato (MM). Furthermore, a relative hypermethylation of the TYLCV V1 promoter region was observed in genomic DNA collected from Ty-1 compared with that from (MM). The resistance conferred by Ty-1 was also effective against the bipartite tomato severe rugose begomovirus, where a similar genome hypermethylation of the V1 promoter region was discerned. However, a mixed infection of TYLCV with cucumber mosaic virus compromised the resistance. The results indicate that Ty-1 confers resistance to geminiviruses by increasing cytosine methylation of viral genomes, suggestive of enhanced transcriptional gene silencing. The mechanism of resistance and its durability toward geminiviruses under natural field conditions is discussed.

  8. The Tomato Yellow Leaf Curl Virus resistance genes Ty-1 and Ty-3 are allelic and code for DFDGD-class RNA-dependent RNA polymerases.

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    Maarten G Verlaan

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Tomato Yellow Leaf Curl Virus Disease incited by Tomato yellow leaf curl virus (TYLCV causes huge losses in tomato production worldwide and is caused by different related begomovirus species. Breeding for TYLCV resistance has been based on the introgression of multiple resistance genes originating from several wild tomato species. In this study we have fine-mapped the widely used Solanum chilense-derived Ty-1 and Ty-3 genes by screening nearly 12,000 plants for recombination events and generating recombinant inbred lines. Multiple molecular markers were developed and used in combination with disease tests to fine-map the genes to a small genomic region (approximately 70 kb. Using a Tobacco Rattle Virus-Virus Induced Gene Silencing approach, the resistance gene was identified. It is shown that Ty-1 and Ty-3 are allelic and that they code for a RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RDR belonging to the RDRγ type, which has an atypical DFDGD motif in the catalytic domain. In contrast to the RDRα type, characterized by a catalytic DLDGD motif, no clear function has yet been described for the RDRγ type, and thus the Ty-1/Ty-3 gene unveils a completely new class of resistance gene. Although speculative, the resistance mechanism of Ty-1/Ty-3 and its specificity towards TYLCV are discussed in light of the function of the related RDRα class in the amplification of the RNAi response in plants and transcriptional silencing of geminiviruses in plants.

  9. Response of resistant breeding lines of tomato germplasm and their progenies with Seedathip3 to Tomato Yellow Leaf Curl Virus, Thailand isolate (TYLCTHV-[2

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    Ornubol Chomdej

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Tomato germplasm accessions; FLA456-4, FLA591-15, H24, CLN2443A, CLN2443B, CLN2443C, TLB111, TLB182-1, TLB111-F6-4-1, TLB130-F6-3-1 and TLB134-F6-8-1 from the Asian Vegetable Research Development Center (AVRDC, Taiwan, were screened for resistance to the Tomato Yellow Leaf Curl Virus, Thailand isolate (TYLCTHV-[2]. The accessions expressing the resistant genotype were then crossed to the TYLCV-susceptible female parent, Seedathip3 (SD3, to produce F1 hybrids. Tomato parents and their F1 progenies were inoculated with TYLCTHV-[2] at 3 weeks of seedling age using viruliferous whitefly (Bemisia tabaci as the inoculation vector. Disease response of the seedling was rated according to the incidence and severity of the development of yellowing and curling symptoms. The presence of TYLCTHV-[2] in the inoculated plants was confirmed by Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay (ELISA. AVRDC tomato parental lines: H24, FLA591-15 and FLA456-4 expressed mild or no symptoms after one month inoculation. Progeny of crosses between the AVRDC donor parental lines and susceptible Thai cultivars showed intermediate tolerance to TYLCTHV-[2] infection. This indicated that resistance was incompletely dominant.

  10. Amplicon based RNA interference targeting V2 gene of cotton leaf curl Kokhran virus-Burewala strain can provide resistance in transgenic cotton plants

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    An RNAi based gene construct designated “C2” was used to target the V2 region of the cotton leaf curl virus (CLCuV) genome which is responsible for virus movement. The construct was transformed into two elite cotton varieties MNH-786 and VH-289. A shoot apex method of plant transformation using Agr...

  11. Whitefly population dynamics and evaluation of whitefly-transmitted tomato yellow leaf curl virus (TYLCV)-resistant tomato genotypes as whitefly and TYLCV reservoirs.

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    Srinivasan, Rajagopalbabu; Riley, David; Diffie, Stan; Sparks, Alton; Adkins, Scott

    2012-08-01

    Sweetpotato whitefly, Bemisia tabaci (Gennadius), and whitefly-transmitted tomato yellow leaf curl virus (TYLCV) are major threats to tomato production in the southeastern United States. TYLCV was introduced to Florida from the Caribbean islands and has spread to other southern states of the United States. In Georgia, in recent years, the incidence of TYLCV has been steadily increasing. Studies were conducted to monitor population dynamics of whiteflies in the vegetable production belt of Georgia, to evaluate TYLCV-resistant genotypes against whiteflies and TYLCV, and to assess the potential role of resistant genotypes in TYLCV epidemiology. Monitoring studies indicated that the peak incidence of whiteflies varied seasonally from year to year. In general, whitefly populations were not uniformly distributed. Tomato genotypes exhibited minor differences in their ability to support whitefly populations. TYLCV symptoms were visually undetectable in all but one resistant genotype. The infection rates (visually) in susceptible genotypes ranged from 40 to 87%. Greenhouse inoculations with viruliferous whiteflies followed by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) indicated that up to 100% of plants of resistant genotypes were infected, although predominantly symptomless. TYLCV acquisition by whiteflies from TYLCV-infected genotypes was tested by PCR; TYLCV acquisition rates from resistant genotypes were less than from susceptible genotypes. Nevertheless, this difference did not influence TYLCV transmission rates from resistant to susceptible genotypes. Results emphasize that resistant genotypes can serve as TYLCV and whitefly reservoirs and potentially influence TYLCV epidemics.

  12. Comparative transcriptome profiling of a resistant vs. susceptible tomato (Solanum lycopersicum cultivar in response to infection by tomato yellow leaf curl virus.

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    Tianzi Chen

    Full Text Available Tomato yellow leaf curl virus (TYLCV threatens tomato production worldwide by causing leaf yellowing, leaf curling, plant stunting and flower abscission. The current understanding of the host plant defense response to this virus is very limited. Using whole transcriptome sequencing, we analyzed the differential gene expression in response to TYLCV infection in the TYLCV-resistant tomato breeding line CLN2777A (R and TYLCV-susceptible tomato breeding line TMXA48-4-0 (S. The mixed inoculated samples from 3, 5 and 7 day post inoculation (dpi were compared to non-inoculated samples at 0 dpi. Of the total of 34831 mapped transcripts, 209 and 809 genes were differentially expressed in the R and S tomato line, respectively. The proportion of up-regulated differentially expressed genes (DEGs in the R tomato line (58.37% was higher than that in the S line (9.17%. Gene ontology (GO analyses revealed that similar GO terms existed in both DEGs of R and S lines; however, some sets of defense related genes and their expression levels were not similar between the two tomato lines. Genes encoding for WRKY transcriptional factors, R genes, protein kinases and receptor (-like kinases which were identified as down-regulated DEGs in the S line were up-regulated or not differentially expressed in the R line. The up-regulated DEGs in the R tomato line revealed the defense response of tomato to TYLCV infection was characterized by the induction and regulation of a series of genes involved in cell wall reorganization, transcriptional regulation, defense response, ubiquitination, metabolite synthesis and so on. The present study provides insights into various reactions underlining the successful establishment of resistance to TYLCV in the R tomato line, and helps in the identification of important defense-related genes in tomato for TYLCV disease management.

  13. Discovering Host Genes Involved in the Infection by the Tomato Yellow Leaf Curl Virus Complex and in the Establishment of Resistance to the Virus Using Tobacco Rattle Virus-based Post Transcriptional Gene Silencing

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    Rosa Lozano-Durán

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The development of high-throughput technologies allows for evaluating gene expression at the whole-genome level. Together with proteomic and metabolomic studies, these analyses have resulted in the identification of plant genes whose function or expression is altered as a consequence of pathogen attacks. Members of the Tomato yellow leaf curl virus (TYLCV complex are among the most important pathogens impairing production of agricultural crops worldwide. To understand how these geminiviruses subjugate plant defenses, and to devise counter-measures, it is essential to identify the host genes affected by infection and to determine their role in susceptible and resistant plants. We have used a reverse genetics approach based on Tobacco rattle virus-induced gene silencing (TRV-VIGS to uncover genes involved in viral infection of susceptible plants, and to identify genes underlying virus resistance. To identify host genes with a role in geminivirus infection, we have engineered a Nicotiana benthamiana line, coined 2IRGFP, which over-expresses GFP upon virus infection. With this system, we have achieved an accurate description of the dynamics of virus replication in space and time. Upon silencing selected N. benthamiana genes previously shown to be related to host response to geminivirus infection, we have identified eighteen genes involved in a wide array of cellular processes. Plant genes involved in geminivirus resistance were studied by comparing two tomato lines: one resistant (R, the other susceptible (S to the virus. Sixty-nine genes preferentially expressed in R tomatoes were identified by screening cDNA libraries from infected and uninfected R and S genotypes. Out of the 25 genes studied so far, the silencing of five led to the total collapse of resistance, suggesting their involvement in the resistance gene network. This review of our results indicates that TRV-VIGS is an exquisite reverse genetics tool that may provide new insights into the

  14. Eugenol confers resistance to Tomato yellow leaf curl virus (TYLCV) by regulating the expression of SlPer1 in tomato plants.

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    Sun, Wei-Jie; Lv, Wen-Jing; Li, Li-Na; Yin, Gan; Hang, Xiaofang; Xue, Yanfeng; Chen, Jian; Shi, Zhiqi

    2016-05-25

    Tomato yellow leaf curl virus (TYLCV) is one of the most devastating plant diseases, and poses a significant agricultural concern because of the lack of an efficient control method. Eugenol is a plant-derived natural compound that has been widely used as a food additive and in medicine. In the present study, we demonstrated the potential of eugenol to enhance the resistance of tomato plants to TYLCV. The anti-TYLCV efficiency of eugenol was significantly higher than that of moroxydine hydrochloride (MH), a widely used commercial antiviral agent. Eugenol application stimulated the production of endogenous nitric oxide (NO) and salicylic acid (SA) in tomato plants. The full-length cDNA of SlPer1, which has been suggested to be a host R gene specific to TYLCV, was isolated from tomato plants. A sequence analysis suggested that SlPer1 might be a nucleobase-ascorbate transporter (NAT) belonging to the permease family. The transcript levels of SlPer1 increased markedly in response to treatment with eugenol or TYLCV inoculation. The results of this study also showed that SlPer1 expression was strongly induced by SA, MeJA (jasmonic acid methyl ester), and NO. Thus, we propose that the increased transcription of SlPer1 contributed to the high anti-TYLCV efficiency of eugenol, which might involve in the generation of endogenous SA and NO. Such findings provide the basis for the development of eugenol as an environmental-friendly agricultural antiviral agent.

  15. Transmission of Sweet Potato Leaf Curl Virus by Bemisia tabaci

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    Sweetpotato, Ipomoea batatas (L.) Lam. (Solanales: Convolvulaceae), is an important world food crop, and Asia is the focal production region. Because it is vegetatively propagated, sweetpotato is especially prone to accumulate infections by several viruses. Sweet potato leaf curl virus (SPLCV) (ss...

  16. Exploitation of Solanum chilense and Solanum peruvianum in tomato breeding for resistance to Tomato yellow leaf curl disease.

    OpenAIRE

    Julián Rodríguez, Olga

    2014-01-01

    Among viral diseases affecting cultivated tomato, Tomato yellow leaf curl disease (TYLCD) is one of the most devastating. This disease is caused by a complex of viruses of which Tomato yellow leaf curl virus (TYLCV) is regarded as the most important species. Current control strategies to fight viral diseases in tomato are mainly based on genetic resistance derived from wild relatives. In the present thesis, resistance derived from S. chilense and S. peruvianum has been exploited in breeding f...

  17. The complete nucleotide sequence of pelargonium leaf curl virus.

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    McGavin, Wendy J; MacFarlane, Stuart A

    2016-05-01

    Investigation of a tombusvirus isolated from tulip plants in Scotland revealed that it was pelargonium leaf curl virus (PLCV) rather than the originally suggested tomato bushy stunt virus. The complete sequence of the PLCV genome was determined for the first time, revealing it to be 4789 nucleotides in size and to have an organization similar to that of the other, previously described tombusviruses. Primers derived from the sequence were used to construct a full-length infectious clone of PLCV that recapitulates the disease symptoms of leaf curling in systemically infected pelargonium plants.

  18. Resistance to tomato yellow leaf curl Thailand virus,TYLCTHV-[2] from Solanum habrochaites accession ‘L06112’ in F1 and BC1F1 generations

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    Julapark Chunwongse4

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Resistance to tomato yellow leaf curl disease caused by Tomato yellow leaf curl Thailand virus (TYLCTHV-[2] inwild tomato, Solanum habrochaites ‘L06112’ was investigated. The ‘L06112’ accession expressing the resistant phenotypewas crossed to the TYLCV-susceptible female parent, Seedathip3, to produce F1 hybrids. Parental polymorphism and hybrididentity were tested using 12 pairs of microsatellite markers for each chromosome. All markers were polymorphic betweenthe parents, but only markers SSR46, SSR115, SSR117 and SSR128 gave results suitable to assess hybrid relationships.Polymorphic bands were sharp, concise and distinguishable between hybrids and selfed plants. The stem cuttings of donorand recurrent parents, their F1 and BC1F1 were inoculated with TYLCTHV-[2] using viruliferous whiteflies. Diseaseresponse of the plants was evaluated by Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay (ELISA at 45 days post inoculation. Thedonor parental line showed complete resistance to TYLCTHV-[2] while the F1 and BC1F1 expressed various ELISA readingsfor TYLCTHV-[2] concentration. BC1F1; 04T105-7, 04T105-1, 04T105-10, 04T109-4 and 04T104-1 developed from thisstudy showed the high level of resistance to TYLCV, Thailand isolate.

  19. Pepper leaf curl Lahore virus requires the DNA B component of Tomato leaf curl New Delhi virus to cause leaf curl symptoms

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    Briddon Rob W

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Begomoviruses are whitefly-transmitted geminiviruses with genomes that consist of either two components (known as DNA A and DNA B or a single component (homologous to the DNA A component of bipartite begomoviruses. Monopartite begomoviruses are often associated with a symptom-modulating DNA satellite (collectively known as betasatellites. Both bipartite and monopartite begomoviruses with associated satellites have previously been identified in chillies showing leaf curl symptoms in Pakistan. Results A chilli plant (Capsicum annum with chilli leaf curl disease symptoms was found to contain a begomovirus, a betasatellite and the DNA B component of Tomato leaf curl New Delhi virus (ToLCNDV. The begomovirus consisted of 2747 nucleotides and had the highest sequence identity (99% with Pepper leaf curl Lahore virus (PepLCLV-[PK: Lah:04], acc. no. AM404179. Agrobacterium-mediated inoculation of the clone to Nicotiana benthamiana, induced very mild symptoms and low levels of viral DNA, detected in systemically infected leaves by PCR. No symptoms were induced in Nicotiana tabacum or chillies either in the presence or absence of a betasatellite. However, inoculation of PepLCLV with the DNA B component of ToLCNDV induced leaf curl symptoms in N. benthamiana, N. tabacum and chillies and viral DNA accumulated to higher levels in comparison to plants infected with just PepLCLV. Conclusions Based on our previous efforts aimed at understanding of diversity of begomoviruses associated with chillies, we propose that PepLCLV was recently mobilized into chillies upon its interaction with DNA B of ToLCNDV. Interestingly, the putative rep-binding iterons found on PepLCLV (GGGGAC differ at two base positions from those of ToLCNDV (GGTGTC. This is the first experimental demonstration of the infectivity for a bipartite begomovirus causing chilli leaf curl disease in chillies from Pakistan and suggests that component capture is contributing to the

  20. Making a friend from a foe: expressing a GroEL gene from the whitefly Bemisia tabaci in the phloem of tomato plants confers resistance to tomato yellow leaf curl virus.

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    Akad, F; Eybishtz, A; Edelbaum, D; Gorovits, R; Dar-Issa, O; Iraki, N; Czosnek, H

    2007-01-01

    Some (perhaps all) plant viruses transmitted in a circulative manner by their insect vectors avoid destruction in the haemolymph by interacting with GroEL homologues, ensuring transmission. We have previously shown that the phloem-limited begomovirus tomato yellow leaf curl virus (TYLCV) interacts in vivo and in vitro with GroEL produced by the whitefly vector Bemisia tabaci. In this study, we have exploited this phenomenon to generate transgenic tomato plants expressing the whitefly GroEL in their phloem. We postulated that following inoculation, TYLCV particles will be trapped by GroEL in the plant phloem, thereby inhibiting virus replication and movement, thereby rendering the plants resistant. A whitefly GroEL gene was cloned in an Agrobacterium vector under the control of an Arabidopsis phloem-specific promoter, which was used to transform two tomato genotypes. During three consecutive generations, plants expressing GroEL exhibited mild or no disease symptoms upon whitefly-mediated inoculation of TYLCV. In vitro assays indicated that the sap of resistant plants contained GroEL-TYLCV complexes. Infected resistant plants served as virus source for whitefly-mediated transmission as effectively as infected non-transgenic tomato. Non-transgenic susceptible tomato plants grafted on resistant GroEL-transgenic scions remained susceptible, although GroEL translocated into the grafted plant and GroEL-TYLCV complexes were detected in the grafted tissues.

  1. Whitefly resistance traits derived from the wild tomato Solanum pimpinellifolium affect the preference and feeding behavior of Bemisia tabaci and reduce the spread of Tomato yellow leaf curl virus.

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    Rodríguez-López, M J; Garzo, E; Bonani, J P; Fereres, A; Fernández-Muñoz, R; Moriones, E

    2011-10-01

    Breeding of tomato genotypes that limit whitefly (Bemisia tabaci) access and feeding might reduce the spread of Tomato yellow leaf curl virus (TYLCV), a begomovirus (genus Begomovirus, family Geminiviridae) that is the causal agent of tomato yellow leaf curl disease. TYLCV is restricted to the phloem and is transmitted in a persistent manner by B. tabaci. The tomato breeding line ABL 14-8 was developed by introgressing type IV leaf glandular trichomes and secretion of acylsucroses from the wild tomato Solanum pimpinellifolium accession TO-937 into the genetic background of the whitefly- and virus-susceptible tomato cultivar Moneymaker. Results of preference bioassays with ABL 14-8 versus Moneymaker indicated that presence of type IV glandular trichomes and the production of acylsucrose deterred the landing and settling of B. tabaci on ABL 14-8. Moreover, electrical penetration graph studies indicated that B. tabaci adults spent more time in nonprobing activities and showed a reduced ability to start probing. Such behavior resulted in a reduced ability to reach the phloem. The superficial type of resistance observed in ABL 14-8 against B. tabaci probing significantly reduced primary and secondary spread of TYLCV.

  2. Molecular Characterization of Tomato leaf curl Palampur virus and Pepper leaf curl betasatellite Naturally Infecting Pumpkin (Cucurbita moschata) in India.

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    Namrata, Jaiswal; Saritha, R K; Datta, D; Singh, M; Dubey, R S; Rai, A B; Rai, M

    2010-10-01

    Pumpkin cultivation in India is affected by severe incidence of a yellow vein mosaic disease. Tomato leaf curl New Delhi virus and Squash leaf curl China virus are known to be associated with this disease in India. We were able to identify a third begomovirus-Tomato leaf curl Palampur virus (ToLCPMV), from pumpkin showing typical symptoms of the disease at Varanasi based on the sequence of complete DNA-A genome of the virus. The complete DNA-A sequence of the virus shared more than 99% sequence identity with other ToLCPMV isolates available in the GenBank and clustered with them in the phylogenetic analysis. This betasatellite amplified from the same infected sample has been identified as Pepper leaf curl betasatellite (PepLCB) which also infects chilli in India. There was 92% sequence identity between the two isolates. This is the first report of natural infection of ToLCPMV on pumpkin and association of PepLCB with yellow vein mosaic disease of pumpkin in India.

  3. Tomato yellow leaf curl Sardinia virus-resistant tomato plants expressing the multifunctional N-terminal domain of the replication-associated protein show transcriptional changes resembling stress-related responses.

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    Lucioli, Alessandra; Berardi, Alessandra; Gatti, Francesca; Tavazza, Raffaela; Pizzichini, Daniele; Tavazza, Mario

    2014-01-01

    The N-terminal domain (amino acids 1-130) of the replication-associated protein (Rep130 ) of Tomato yellow leaf curl Sardinia virus (TYLCSV) retains the ability of full-length Rep to localize to the nucleus and to down-regulate C1 transcription when ectopically expressed in plants, both functions being required to inhibit homologous viral replication. In this study, we analysed the effect of Rep130 expression on virus resistance and the plant transcriptome in the natural and agronomically important host species of TYLCSV, Solanum lycopersicum. Tomato plants accumulating high levels of Rep130 were generated and proved to be resistant to TYLCSV. Using an in vitro assay, we showed that plant-expressed Rep130 also retains the catalytic activity of Rep, thus supporting the notion that this protein domain is fully functional. Interestingly, Rep130 -expressing tomatoes were characterized by an altered transcriptional profile resembling stress-related responses. Notably, the serine-type protease inhibitor (Ser-PI) category was over-represented among the 20 up-regulated genes. The involvement of Rep130 in the alteration of host mRNA steady-state levels was confirmed using a distinct set of virus-resistant transgenic tomato plants expressing the same TYLCSV Rep130 , but from a different, synthetic, gene. Eight genes were found to be up-regulated in both types of transgenic tomato and two encoded Ser-PIs. Four of these eight genes were also up-regulated in TYLCSV-infected wild-type tomato plants. Implications with regard to the ability of this Rep domain to interfere with viral infections and to alter the host transcriptome are discussed.

  4. Evaluating Weeds as Hosts of Tomato yellow leaf curl virus.

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    Smith, Hugh A; Seijo, Teresa E; Vallad, Gary E; Peres, Natalia A; Druffel, Keri L

    2015-08-01

    Bemisia tabaci (Gennadius) biotype B transmits Tomato yellow leaf curl virus (TYLCV), which affects tomato production globally. Prompt destruction of virus reservoirs is a key component of virus management. Identification of weed hosts of TYLCV will be useful for reducing such reservoirs. The status of weeds as alternate hosts of TYLCV in Florida remains unclear. In greenhouse studies, B. tabaci adults from a colony reared on TYLCV-infected tomato were established in cages containing one of four weeds common to horticultural fields in central and south Florida. Cages containing tomato and cotton were also infested with viruliferous whiteflies as a positive control and negative control, respectively. Whitefly adults and plant tissue were tested periodically over 10 wk for the presence of TYLCV using PCR. After 10 wk, virus-susceptible tomato plants were placed in each cage to determine if whiteflies descended from the original adults were still infective. Results indicate that Bidens alba, Emilia fosbergii, and Raphanus raphanistrum are not hosts of TYLCV, and that Amaranthus retroflexus is a host. © The Authors 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Entomological Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  5. Cotton Leaf Curl Virus: lonic Status of Leaves and Symptom Development

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Naeem Iqbal; Muhammad Yasin Ashraf; Farrukh Javed; Muhammad Ashraf; Sohail Hameed

    2006-01-01

    In the present study, the relationship between the nutritional status of leaves and the development of symptoms of cotton leaf curl virus (CLCuV) in two cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.) cultivars (i.e. CIM-240 and S-12) was investigated. The incidence of disease attack was found to be 100% in the S-12 cultivar and 16% in the CIM-240 cultivar. Geminivirus particles in infected leaves were confirmed by transmission electron microscope examination of highly specific geminivirus coat protein antisera-treated cell sap. The CLCuV impaired the accumulation of different nutrients in both cultivars. A marked decrease in the accumulation of Ca2+ and K+ was observed in infected leaves. However, the disease had no effect on leaf concentrations of Na+, N, and P. It was observed that the curling of leaf margins in CLCuV-infected plants was associated with the leaf Ca2+ content; leaf curling was severe in plants with a significant reduction in Ca2+ content.Moreover, leaf K+ content was found to be associated with resistance/susceptibility to CLCuV infection.

  6. Sweet Potato Leaf Curl Virus: Virus Reservoir in Species of Wild Morning Glory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Recent increases in populations of the Sweetpotato leaf curl virus (SPLCV) vector, the sweetpotato whitefly, Bemisia tabaci (Gennadius), led to a dramatic increase in the disease in sweetpotato (Ipomoea batatas). Knowledge of crop or weed species that occur in sweetpotato growing areas and can serv...

  7. Senna leaf curl virus: a novel begomovirus identified in Senna occidentalis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Jitesh; Alok, Anshu; Kumar, Jitendra; Tuli, Rakesh

    2016-09-01

    Begomoviruses are whitefly-transmitted, single-stranded DNA viruses that infect a variety of cultivated (crop) and non-cultivated (weed) plants. The present study identified a novel begomovirus and satellites (alpha- and betasatellite) in Senna occidentalis (syn. Cassia occidentalis) showing leaf curl symptoms. The begomovirus shared a maximum sequence identity of 88.6 % with french bean leaf curl virus (JQ866297), whereas the alphasatellite and the betasatellite shared identities of 98 % and 90 % with ageratum yellow vein India alphasatellite (LK054802) and papaya leaf curl betasatellite (HM143906), respectively. No other begomovirus or satellites were detected in the suspected plants. We propose to name the virus "senna leaf curl virus" (SenLCuV).

  8. 抗番茄黄化卷叶病毒番茄新品种'科大204'%A New Tomato Hybrid'Keda 204'with Resistance to Tomato yellow leaf curl virus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    宋建军; 艾鹏飞; 李振侠; 仇燕; 李敏

    2011-01-01

    '科大204' 番茄是以优良自交系'TP025-2'为母本,'869-1'为父本杂交育成的抗番茄黄化卷叶病毒的新品种.生长势强,无限生长类型,7~8片真叶着生第一花序.果实扁圆形,单果质量200~250g,成熟果粉红色,中等硬度,口感好,品质优良.抗番茄黄化卷叶病毒,兼抗枯萎病、叶霉病和TMV.中早熟,平均产量121.8 t·hm-2,适宜北方保护地早春和秋延后栽培.%‘Keds 204’ is a new pink tomato hybrid resistant to Tomato yellow leaf curl virus (TYLCV), which is developed by crossing ‘TP025-2’ × ‘869-1’ . The hybrid grows strongly with indeterminate plant type and mid-early maturity. The matured fruits are oblate in shape, pink in color with moderate firmness and good quality. The single fruit weight ranges from 200 g to 250 g. Especially, it is resistance to TYLCV, as well as fusarium wilt, leaf mould and TMV. The average yield of ‘Keda 204’was 121.8 t. hm-2 as a result of multiple experiments. The hybrid is suitable for cultivation in early spring and late autumn under greenhouse conditions in northern China.

  9. Novel Synthetic Promoters from the Cestrum Yellow Leaf Curling Virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahoo, Dipak Kumar; Sarkar, Shayan; Maiti, Indu B; Dey, Nrisingha

    2016-01-01

    Constitutive promoters direct gene expression uniformly in most tissues and cells at all stages of plant growth and development; they confer steady levels of transgene expression in plant cells and hence their demand is high in plant biology. The gene silencing due to promoter homology can be avoided by either using diverse promoters isolated from different plant and viral genomes or by designing synthetic promoters. The aim of this chapter was to describe the basic protocols needed to develop and analyze novel, synthetic, nearly constitutive promoters from Cestrum yellow leaf curling virus (CmYLCV) through promoter/leader deletion and activating cis-sequence analysis. We also describe the methods to evaluate the strength of the promoters efficiently in various transient expression systems like agroinfiltration assay, gene-gun method, and assay in tobacco protoplasts. Besides, the detailed methods for developing transgenic plants (tobacco and Arabidopsis) for evaluation of the promoter using the GUS reporter gene are also described. The detailed procedure for electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA) coupled with super-shift EMSA analysis are also described for showing the binding of tobacco transcription factor, TGA1a to cis-elements in the CmYLCV distal promoter region.

  10. First Report of Tomato yellow leaf curl virus in Tomato in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Botermans, M.; Verhoeven, J.Th.J.; Jansen, C.C.C.; Roenhorst, J.W.; Stijger, C.C.M.M.; Pham, K.T.K.

    2009-01-01

    Tomato yellow leaf curl virus (TYLCV) is an economically important virus with tomato (Solanum lycopersicum L.) as its main host. The virus is widely distributed in subtropical areas and is transmitted by the tobacco whitefly (Bemisia tabaci) in a persistent manner. TYLCV has a quarantine status

  11. First Report of Tomato yellow leaf curl virus in Tomato in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Botermans, M.; Verhoeven, J.Th.J.; Jansen, C.C.C.; Roenhorst, J.W.; Stijger, C.C.M.M.; Pham, K.T.K.

    2009-01-01

    Tomato yellow leaf curl virus (TYLCV) is an economically important virus with tomato (Solanum lycopersicum L.) as its main host. The virus is widely distributed in subtropical areas and is transmitted by the tobacco whitefly (Bemisia tabaci) in a persistent manner. TYLCV has a quarantine status (IIA

  12. BIO-EFFICACY OF NEWER INSECTICIDES AGAINST TOMATO LEAF CURL VIRUS DISEASE AND ITS VECTOR WHITEFLY (BEMISIA TABACI) IN TOMATO

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Govindappa, M.R; Bhemanna, M; Arunkumar Hosmani; V.N. Ghante

    2013-01-01

    .... Present investigations on Invitro efficacy of new insecticide molecules on whitefly mortality and leaf curl virus transmission revealed that adult mortality varies with the length of incubation...

  13. Phylogenetic analysis of Melon chlorotic leaf curl virus from Guatemala: Another emergent species in the Squash leaf curl virus clade

    KAUST Repository

    Brown, J.K.

    2011-06-01

    The genome of a new bipartite begomovirus Melon chlorotic leaf curl virus from Guatemala (MCLCuV-GT) was cloned and the genome sequence was determined. The virus causes distinct symptoms on melons that were not previously observed in melon crops in Guatemala or elsewhere. Phylogenetic analysis of MCLCuV-GT and begomoviruses infecting cucurbits and other host plant species indicated that its closest relative was MCLCuV from Costa Rica (MCLCuV-CR). The DNA-A components of two isolates shared 88.8% nucleotide identity, making them strains of the same species. Further, both MCLCuV-GT and MCLCuV-CR grouped with other Western Hemisphere cucurbit-infecting species in the SLCV-clade making them the most southerly cucurbit-infecting members of the clade to date. Although the common region of the cognate components of MCLCuV-GT and MCLCuV-CR, shared similar to 96.3% nucleotide identity. While DNA-A and DNA-B components of MCLCuV-GT were less than 86% nucleotide identity with the respective DNAA and DNA-B common regions of MCLCuV-CR. The late viral genes of the two strains shared the least nt identity (<88%) while their early genes shared the highest nt identity (>90%). The collective evidence suggests that these two strains of MCLCuV are evolutionarily divergent owing in part to recombination, but also due to the accumulation of a substantial number of mutations. In addition they are differentially host-adapted, as has been documented for other cucurbit-infecting, bean-adapted, species in the SLCV clade. (C) 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Evaluation under diverse conditions of a differential host reaction scale to Tomato yellow leaf curl virus in tomato

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana PÉREZ-DE-CASTRO

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Tomato yellow leaf curl virus (TYLCV is the most widespread virus species causing Tomato yellow leaf curl disease. Accurate methods for assessment of resistance are requisite in breeding programs. Researchers at the Volcani Center (Israel developed a scale of differential TYLCV reactions in seven non-segregating tomato host lines, with virus responses ranging from susceptible to highly resistant. In the present work, this scale has been evaluated with inoculation and assessment methods routinely used by two different research groups, in Spain and Cuba. Different TYLCV isolates, inoculation methods, plant ages, and environmental conditions were compared. Symptom scores of the tomato lines were generally lower in the conditions assayed in both locations than those originally described. Reaction ranking order of the standard tomato lines was more similar to the original description in the assays carried out in Spain. However, response of the lines to TYLCV obtained in both locations did not correspond to scale grades for most of the conditions. A large difference between symptom scores in the susceptible and the resistant lines was observed, with the range in the resistant lines being narrow. These results indicate that the number of standard lines used could be reduced, selecting the most susceptible and the most resistant lines, and one with intermediate resistance. All the factors evaluated affected symptom development. This highlights the importance of establishing a standard inoculation method, experimental conditions, evaluation period and appropriate resistance evaluation criteria, to ensure precise evaluation of genotype responses.

  15. Chinese squash leaf curl virus: a new whitefly-transmitted geminivirus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    洪益国; 王小凤; 田波; 蔡健和

    1995-01-01

    Coat protein (CP) gene of the Chinese squash !eaf curl virus (SqLCV-C) was amplified through PC’R, cloned and completely sequenced. Based on the comparisons at the levels of both CP gene nucleotide and CP -deduced amino acid sequences with other geminiviruses, SqLCV-C is confirmed to be distinct from the American squash leaf curl virus (SqLCV-E). It is a new geminivirus transmitted by whitefly Bemisia tabaci, which infects dicotyledonous plants and is more closely related to the Indian cassava mosaic virus (ICMV).

  16. Management of sweet potato leaf curl virus in sweetpotatoes using insecticides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sweetpotato leaf curl virus (SPLCV), which is transmitted by the sweetpotato whitefly, Bemisia tabaci (Gennadius) (Hemiptera: Aleyrodidae), can severely affect yields of commercial sweetpotatoes, Ipomoea batatas (L.) Lam. (Convolvulaceae). This virus occurs every year at the U.S. Vegetable Laborato...

  17. Whitefly transmission of Sweet potato leaf curl virus in sweetpotato germplasm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sweetpotato, Ipomoea batatas (L.) Lam., is among an extensive number of plant species attacked by Bemisia tabaci (Gennadius). Because this important world food crop is vegetatively propagated, it can conveniently accumulate infections by several viruses. Sweet potato leaf curl virus (SPLCV) (ssDNA...

  18. Chinese tomato yelIow Ieaf curl virus- a new species of geminivirus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Y; Cai, J; Li, D; Qin, B; Tian, B

    1998-08-01

    Chine tomato yellow leaf curl virus (TYLCV-CHI) and other geminiviruses were analysed with 20 monoclonaI antibodies. It was shown that TYLCV-CHI is serclogicaIly close to Chinese tabacco Ieaf curl virus (TbLCV-CHI). The fragment of TYLCV-CHI DNA including the common region (CR), N-terminal of coat protein gene and AV1 gene was amplified by PCR and cloned, and its DNA sequence was determined. These raults showed that TYLCV-CHI is different from other known geminiviruses in the world, and is a new whitefly-transmitted gerninivirus.

  19. Phylogenetic lineage of Tobacco leaf curl virus in Korea and estimation of recombination events implicated in their sequence variation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jungan; Lee, Hyejung; Kim, Mi-Kyung; Kwak, Hae-Ryun; Auh, Chung-Kyoon; Lee, Kyeong-Yeoll; Kim, Sunghan; Choi, Hong-Soo; Lee, Sukchan

    2011-08-01

    New strains of Tobacco leaf curl virus (TbLCV) were isolated from tomato plants in four different local communities of Korea, and hence were designated TbLCV-Kr. Phylogenetic analysis of the sequences of the whole genome and of individual ORFs of these viruses indicated that they are closely related to the Tobacco leaf curl Japan virus (TbLCJV) cluster, which includes Honeysuckle yellow vein virus (HYVV), Honeysuckle yellow vein mosaic virus (HYVMV), and TbLCJV isolates. Four putative recombination events were recognized within these virus sequences, suggesting that the sequence variations observed in these viruses may be attributable to intraspecific and interspecific recombination events involving some TbLCV-Kr isolates, Papaya leaf curl virus (PaLCV), and a local isolate of Tomato yellow leaf curl virus (TYLCV).

  20. Relationship between Tomato yellow leaf curl viruses and the whitefly vector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ssekyewa, Charles; Van Damme, Patrick L J; Hofte, Monica

    2007-01-01

    Tomato Yellow Leaf Curl Virus (TYLCV) and Tomato Leaf Curl Virus (ToLCV) are the currently known begomoviruses in Uganda. The relationship with their whiteflies (Bemisia tabaci) vector and its management were not known in Uganda. A direct relationship was expected between these begomoviruses and whiteflies at Buwama in Mpigi district of Uganda. Farmer practices were expected to have limited efficacy. To investigate this, a completely randomised block design was used for all trials with six treatments replicated three times. Treatments evaluated were farmer whitefly pest management practices. These included both chemical pesticide and non-pesticide applications. Data on whitefly population and tomato yellow leaf curl virus disease incidence was recorded weekly, and analysed using SAS and SPSS statistical programmes for ANOVA, and correlations. Ranked means, coefficients of variation and standard errors were noted. Virus-vector relationship field studies established that virus occurrence varied in space and time, and with management practices, crop development stage, and weather conditions. A negative relationship (R = -0.14, p 0.04) was established between number of plants infected with TYLCV (sensu lato) and percentage marketable tomato yield. Tomato maturity was inversely propotional to whitefly infestation (R = -0.5, p 0.0001). Uprooting and application of dimethoate was most effective of the six treatments. Tomato leaf curl virus diseases and whitefly management options were established in Uganda.

  1. Transcript mapping of Cotton leaf curl Burewala virus and its cognate betasatellite, Cotton leaf curl Multan betasatellite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akbar Fazal

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Whitefly-transmitted geminiviruses (family Geminiviridae, genus Begomovirus are major limiting factors for the production of numerous dicotyledonous crops throughout the warmer regions of the world. In the Old World a small number of begomoviruses have genomes consisting of two components whereas the majority have single-component genomes. Most of the monopartite begomoviruses associate with satellite DNA molecules, the most important of which are the betasatellites. Cotton leaf curl disease (CLCuD is one of the major problems for cotton production on the Indian sub-continent. Across Pakistan, CLCuD is currently associated with a single begomovirus (Cotton leaf curl Burewala virus [CLCuBuV] and the cotton-specific betasatellite Cotton leaf curl Multan betasatellite (CLCuMuB, both of which have recombinant origins. Surprisingly, CLCuBuV lacks C2, one of the genes present in all previously characterized begomoviruses. Virus-specific transcripts have only been mapped for few begomoviruses, including one monopartite begomovirus that does not associate with betasatellites. Similarly, the transcripts of only two betasatellites have been mapped so far. The study described has investigated whether the recombination/mutation events involved in the evolution of CLCuBuV and its associated CLCuMuB have affected their transcription strategies. Results The major transcripts of CLCuBuV and its associated betasatellite (CLCuMuB from infected Nicotiana benthamiana plants have been determined. Two complementary-sense transcripts of ~1.7 and ~0.7 kb were identified for CLCuBuV. The ~1.7 kb transcript appears similar in position and size to that of several begomoviruses and likely directs the translation of C1 and C4 proteins. Both complementary-sense transcripts can potentially direct the translation of C2 and C3 proteins. A single virion-sense transcript of ~1 kb, suitable for translation of the V1 and V2 genes was identified. A predominant

  2. There is the second virus that causes tobacco leaf curl disease (not TbLCV-CHI) in the field

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Sequence analysis of virus isolation DNA of tobacco leaf curl disease shows that there is the second geminivirus (not Chinese Tobacco Leaf Curl Virus, TbLCV-CHI) that causes tobacco leaf curl disease in the field in the Guangxi Zhuang Autonomous Region, China. This virus DNA-A contains 2 734 nt. Large intergenic region (LIR) contains 269 nt, the virus sense strand contains 2 open reading frames (ORFs): AV1 (115 aa) and AV2 (coat protein gene, CP, 256 aa), and the complementary sense strand contains 4 ORFs: AC1 (replicase gene, 361 aa), AC2 (transactivator, 134 aa), AC3 (134 aa) and AC4 (97 aa). The virus belongs to one kind of subgroup Ⅲ gemini- viruses from old world, and could be the Chinese tomato yellow leaf curl virus (TYLCV-CHI).

  3. Is the begomovirus, sweet potato leaf curl virus, really seed transmitted in sweetpotato?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sweetpotato is one of the major root crops in the world and is also widely grown in the southern United States. Sweet potato leaf curl virus (SPLCV) is a begomovirus posing a serious threat to sweetpotato production worldwide and is primarily transmitted by whitefly (Bemisia tabaci) or through veget...

  4. Detection and Host Range Study of Virus Associated with Pepper Yellow Leaf Curl Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SRI SULANDARI

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available High incidence of Pepper yellow leaf curl virus (PepYLCV was observed in Indonesia since early 2000. Disease incidence in Yogyakarta, Central and West Java reached 100% on Capsicum frutescens, but only 10-35% on C. annuum. As an exception, the disease incidence on C. annuum cv. TM 999 was in the range of 70-100%. The causal agent of the disease, PepYLCV, was detected by polymerase chain reaction. Viral specific DNA fragment of the size ~1600 bp and ~550 bp was amplified from infected plants using two pairs of geminivirus universal primers pAL1v1978/pAL1c715, and pAv494/pAc1048, respectively. The PepYLCV has an intermediate host range including plants belonging to the family of Solanaceae, Leguminosae, and Compositae. The species belonging to the families of Cucurbitaceae, Malvaceae, Chenopodiaceae, and Amaranthaceae were resistant to the virus. Physalis floridana, is very prospective as a propagation host for the geminivirus infecting pepper. Nicotiana spp., cucumber, watermelon, cotton, and Sida sp. could be used as a differential host. Besides, Capsicum frutescens cv. Cakra, tomato, N. benthamiana, N. glutinosa, and Ageratum conyzoides could be used as indicator plants for the geminivirus infecting pepper.

  5. Discovery and demonstration of small circular DNA molecules derived from Chinese tomato yellow leaf curl virus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Tomato yellow leaf curl viruses belong to Begomoviruses of geminiviruses.In this work, we first found and demonstrated that the small circular DNA molecules were derived from Chinese tomato yellow leaf curl viruses (TYLCV-CHI).These small circular DNA molecules are about 1.3 kb, which are half the full-length of TYLCV-CHI DNA A.It was shown by sequence determination and analysis that there was unknown-origin sequence insertion in the middle of the small molecules.These sequences of unknown-origin were neither homologous to DNA A nor to DNA B, and were formed by recombination of virus DNA and plant DNA.Although various defective molecules contained different unknown-origin sequence insertion, all the molecules contained the intergenic region and part of the AC1(Rep) gene.But they did not contain full ORF.

  6. Molecular characterization and pathogenicity of tomato yellow leaf curl virus in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hui; Gong, Huanran; Zhou, Xueping

    2009-10-01

    Several tomato production regions in China were surveyed for tomato yellow leaf curl disease (TYLCD), and 31 tomato leaf samples showing TYLCD-like symptoms were collected. The partial or full-length genomes of these isolates were sequenced and tomato yellow leaf curl virus (TYLCV) was detected in Shanghai, Zhejiang, Jiangsu Shandong and Hebei provinces of China. The TYLCV isolates found in China share high sequence identity ([98%) and have more than 97% sequence identity with TYLCVIL[ IL:Reo] (X15656). Phylogenetic relationship analysis reveals that although with little genetic variability, they can form two groups and all the TYLCV isolates in China belong to the group I. An infectious clone of TYLCV-[CN:SH2] (AM282874) was constructed and agro-inoculated into Nicotiana benthamiana, N. tabacum Samsun, N. glutinosa, Solanum lycopersicum, Petunia hybrida, Cucumis sativus, Gossypium hirsutum, S. melongena, and Capsicum annuum. TYLCV-[CN:SH2] can induce severe leaf curling and stunting symptoms in these plants except C. sativus, G. hirsutum, S. melongena and C. annuum.We verified that TYLCV can trans-replicate tomato yellow leaf curl China virus DNA-b in N. benthamiana and S. lycopersicum and induced more severe symptoms with distortion and yellow vein.

  7. Tomato yellow leaf curl viruses: ménage à trois between the virus complex, the plant and the whitefly vector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Díaz-Pendón, Juan Antonio; Cañizares, M Carmen; Moriones, Enrique; Bejarano, Eduardo R; Czosnek, Henryk; Navas-Castillo, Jesús

    2010-07-01

    Tomato yellow leaf curl disease (TYLCD) is one of the most devastating viral diseases affecting tomato crops in tropical, subtropical and temperate regions of the world. Here, we focus on the interactions through recombination between the different begomovirus species causing TYLCD, provide an overview of the interactions with the cellular genes involved in viral replication, and highlight recent progress on the relationships between these viruses and their vector, the whitefly Bemisia tabaci. The tomato yellow leaf curl virus-like viruses (TYLCVs) are a complex of begomoviruses (family Geminiviridae, genus Begomovirus) including 10 accepted species: Tomato yellow leaf curl Axarquia virus (TYLCAxV), Tomato yellow leaf curl China virus (TYLCCNV), Tomato yellow leaf curl Guangdong virus (TYLCGuV), Tomato yellow leaf curl Indonesia virus (TYLCIDV), Tomato yellow leaf curl Kanchanaburi virus (TYLVKaV), Tomato yellow leaf curl Malaga virus (TYLCMalV), Tomato yellow leaf curl Mali virus (TYLCMLV), Tomato yellow leaf curl Sardinia virus (TYLCSV), Tomato yellow leaf curl Thailand virus (TYLCTHV), Tomato yellow leaf curl Vietnam virus (TYLCVNV) and Tomato yellow leaf curl virus(TYLCV). We follow the species demarcation criteria of the International Committee on Taxonomy of Viruses (ICTV), the most important of which is an 89% nucleotide identity threshold between full-length DNA-A component nucleotide sequences for begomovirus species. Strains of a species are defined by a 93% nucleotide identity threshold. The primary host of TYLCVs is tomato (Solanum lycopersicum), but they can also naturally infect other crops [common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris), sweet pepper (Capsicum annuum), chilli pepper (C. chinense) and tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum)], a number of ornamentals [petunia (Petuniaxhybrida) and lisianthus (Eustoma grandiflora)], as well as common weeds (Solanum nigrum and Datura stramonium). TYLCVs also infect the experimental host Nicotiana benthamiana. Infected tomato

  8. Tomato Leaf Curl New Delhi Virus: An Emerging Virus Complex Threatening Vegetable and Fiber Crops

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enrique Moriones

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The tomato leaf curl New Delhi virus (ToLCNDV (genus Begomovirus, family Geminiviridae represents an important constraint to tomato production, as it causes the most predominant and economically important disease affecting tomato in the Indian sub-continent. However, in recent years, ToLCNDV has been fast extending its host range and spreading to new geographical regions, including the Middle East and the western Mediterranean Basin. Extensive research on the genome structure, protein functions, molecular biology, and plant–virus interactions of ToLCNDV has been conducted in the last decade. Special emphasis has been given to gene silencing suppression ability in order to counteract host plant defense responses. The importance of the interaction with DNA alphasatellites and betasatellites in the biology of the virus has been demonstrated. ToLCNDV genetic variability has been analyzed, providing new insights into the taxonomy, host adaptation, and evolution of this virus. Recombination and pseudorecombination have been shown as motors of diversification and adaptive evolution. Important progress has also been made in control strategies to reduce disease damage. This review highlights these various achievements in the context of the previous knowledge of begomoviruses and their interactions with plants.

  9. Tomato Leaf Curl New Delhi Virus: An Emerging Virus Complex Threatening Vegetable and Fiber Crops.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moriones, Enrique; Praveen, Shelly; Chakraborty, Supriya

    2017-09-21

    The tomato leaf curl New Delhi virus (ToLCNDV) (genus Begomovirus, family Geminiviridae) represents an important constraint to tomato production, as it causes the most predominant and economically important disease affecting tomato in the Indian sub-continent. However, in recent years, ToLCNDV has been fast extending its host range and spreading to new geographical regions, including the Middle East and the western Mediterranean Basin. Extensive research on the genome structure, protein functions, molecular biology, and plant-virus interactions of ToLCNDV has been conducted in the last decade. Special emphasis has been given to gene silencing suppression ability in order to counteract host plant defense responses. The importance of the interaction with DNA alphasatellites and betasatellites in the biology of the virus has been demonstrated. ToLCNDV genetic variability has been analyzed, providing new insights into the taxonomy, host adaptation, and evolution of this virus. Recombination and pseudorecombination have been shown as motors of diversification and adaptive evolution. Important progress has also been made in control strategies to reduce disease damage. This review highlights these various achievements in the context of the previous knowledge of begomoviruses and their interactions with plants.

  10. Coat protein promoter from cotton leaf curl virus is not a tissue-specifically expressed promoter

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Geminivirus is a kind of single-stranded DNA virus. Experimental results from tomato golden mosaic virus (TGMV) showed that expression pattern of coat protein gene (cp) promoter was phloem specifically expressed. In this note, the studies on cp promoter of cotton leaf curl virus (CLCuV) which is found and identified recently suggest that the promoter is not phloem specifically expressed. The expressing activity of gus gene driven by the promoter exists not only in phloem but also in mesophyll tissues and root tip meristem. Transient expression suggests that cp promoter transactivated by AC2 shows expressing activity in mesophyll and vascular tissue of leaf vein.

  11. Serological and molecular identification of Tomato yellow leaf curl virus in Khuzestan province of Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shahrokh MALEKZADEH

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available A survey was conducted from 2006 to 2007 to identify the causal agent of leaf curling of tomato in eight major tomato-growing areas of Khuzestan province in southwest of Iran. Tomato leaf samples showing leaf curling, yellowing, and stunting were collected and screened for the presence of Tomato yellow leaf curl virus (TYLCV by TAS-ELISA. Further confi rmation was completed using graft transmission onto healthy tomato plants and PCR. Results confi rmed that TYLCV is a causal agent of tomato yellow leaf curl disease (TYLCD and is widely distributed in all the major tomato growing areas in southwest of Iran. The nucleotide sequences of the coat protein (CP gene of four isolates (Dezfoul, Shoush, Behbahan, and Ramhormoz were determined and deposited in GenBank (EF199814-7. Phylogenetic analysis of the CP gene further showed that all four Iranian isolates have very close relationship and formed a Compact cluster together with previously sequenced Iranian TYLCV isolates.

  12. MicroRNA profiling of tomato leaf curl new delhi virus (tolcndv infected tomato leaves indicates that deregulation of mir159/319 and mir172 might be linked with leaf curl disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haq Qazi MR

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Tomato leaf curl virus (ToLCV, a constituent of the genus Begomovirus, infects tomato and other plants with a hallmark disease symptom of upward leaf curling. Since microRNAs (miRs are known to control plants developmental processes, we evaluated the roles of miRNAs in Tomato leaf curl New Delhi virus (ToLCNDV induced leaf curling. Results Microarray analyses of miRNAs, isolated from the leaves of both healthy and ToLCNDV agroinfected tomato cv Pusa Ruby, revealed that ToLCNDV infection significantly deregulated various miRNAs representing ~13 different conserved families (e.g., miR319, miR172, etc.. The precursors of these miRNAs showed similar deregulated patterns, indicating that the transcription regulation of respective miRNA genes was perhaps the cause of deregulation. The expression levels of the miRNA-targeted genes were antagonistic with respect to the amount of corresponding miRNA. Such deregulation was tissue-specific in nature as no analogous misexpression was found in flowers. The accumulation of miR159/319 and miR172 was observed to increase with the days post inoculation (dpi of ToLCNDV agroinfection in tomato cv Pusa Ruby. Similarly, these miRs were also induced in ToLCNDV agroinfected tomato cv JK Asha and chilli plants, both exhibiting leaf curl symptoms. Our results indicate that miR159/319 and miR172 might be associated with leaf curl symptoms. This report raises the possibility of using miRNA(s as potential signature molecules for ToLCNDV infection. Conclusions The expression of several host miRNAs is affected in response to viral infection. The levels of the corresponding pre-miRs and the predicted targets were also deregulated. This change in miRNA expression levels was specific to leaf tissues and observed to be associated with disease progression. Thus, certain host miRs are likely indicator of viral infection and could be potentially employed to develop viral resistance strategies.

  13. Resistance to tomato yellow leaf curl virus-Thailand isolate (TYLCTHV-[2] and markers loci association in BC2F1 population from a cross between Seedathip 3 and a wild tomato, Solanum habrochaites ‘L06112’ clone no.1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uraiwan Pongpayaklers

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available The BC2F1 population from a cross between wild tomato, Solanum habrochaites ‘L06112’ and recurrent susceptiblevariety, Seedathip 3 was investigated for a resistance to Tomato yellow leaf curl Thailand virus (TYLCTHV-[2]. Five stemcuttings from each of the 196 lines were inoculated with TYLCTHV-[2] using viruliferous whiteflies as the inoculation vector.Disease response was recorded weekly intervals and scored for three weeks according to the severity of the symptoms. Thepresence of TYLCTHV-[2] was confirmed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA at three weeks after inoculation.ELISA readings showed a normal distribution for the BC2F1 population ranging from 0.055 (resistant to 0.930 (susceptible.DNA samples from BC2F1 population were analyzed for genes and markers association; Ty-2 on chromosome 11 using AVRDCprimer number 11-090.0 (TG105A, and Ty-3 on chromosome 6 using marker C2_At3g11210. Results showed that Ty-2 waslost during stepwise selection at BC1F1 generation, while Ty-3 showed no relationship to marker C2_At3g11210 and theamount of virus detected from ELISA reading. This indicated that the TYLCTHV-[2] resistant phenotype response in theBC2F1 population neither came from Ty-2 nor linked to the Ty-3 gene.

  14. Replication of Tomato Yellow Leaf Curl Virus in Its Whitefly Vector, Bemisia tabaci.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pakkianathan, Britto Cathrin; Kontsedalov, Svetlana; Lebedev, Galina; Mahadav, Assaf; Zeidan, Muhammad; Czosnek, Henryk; Ghanim, Murad

    2015-10-01

    Tomato yellow leaf curl virus (TYLCV) is a begomovirus transmitted exclusively by the whitefly Bemisia tabaci in a persistent, circulative manner. Replication of TYLCV in its vector remains controversial, and thus far, the virus has been considered to be nonpropagative. Following 8 h of acquisition on TYLCV-infected tomato plants or purified virions and then transfer to non-TYLCV-host cotton plants, the amounts of virus inside whitefly adults significantly increased (>2-fold) during the first few days and then continuously decreased, as measured by the amounts of genes on both virus DNA strands. Reported alterations in insect immune and defense responses upon virus retention led us to hypothesize a role for the immune response in suppressing virus replication. After virus acquisition, stress conditions were imposed on whiteflies, and the levels of three viral gene sequences were measured over time. When whiteflies were exposed to TYLCV and treatment with two different pesticides, the virus levels continuously increased. Upon exposure to heat stress, the virus levels gradually decreased, without any initial accumulation. Switching of whiteflies between pesticide, heat stress, and control treatments caused fluctuating increases and decreases in virus levels. Fluorescence in situ hybridization analysis confirmed these results and showed virus signals inside midgut epithelial cell nuclei. Combining the pesticide and heat treatments with virus acquisition had significant effects on fecundity. Altogether, our results demonstrate for the first time that a single-stranded DNA plant virus can replicate in its hemipteran vector. Plant viruses in agricultural crops are of great concern worldwide. Many of them are transmitted from infected to healthy plants by insects. Persistently transmitted viruses often have a complex association with their vectors; however, most are believed not to replicate within these vectors. Such replication is important, as it contributes to the

  15. A New Tomato Hybrid‘Hangza 3’Resistant to Tomato yellow leaf curl virus%抗番茄黄化曲叶病毒番茄新品种‘航杂3号’

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郑积荣; 王慧俐; 王世恒

    2012-01-01

    ‘Hangza 3’is a new red tomato hybrid resistant to Tomato yellow leaf curl virus(TYLCV) and root knot nematode,which is developed by crossing‘HT1-1-3-2-5-3’ב00-03-19’.The hybrid grows strongly with indeterminate plant type and mid-early maturity. Its first inflorescence is 7–8 leaf,Its average single fruit weight is 136 g. The matured fruits are round in shape,red in color with good quality. Especially,it is resistant to TYLCV and root knot nematode and transportation,The average yield of ‘Hangza 3’was 81.0 t · hm-2 as a result of multiple experiments. The hybrid is suitable for cultivation in early spring and late autumn under greenhouse conditions.%‘航杂3号’番茄是以引自荷兰品种‘9956’分离后代的高代自交系‘9956-3-2-1-1-1’经航天搭载诱变后选出的优良自交系‘HT1-1-3-2-5-3’为母本,以引自西班牙品种‘T00’高代自交系‘00-03-19’为父本,杂交育成的新品种。生长势强,无限生长类型,7~8片真叶着生第一花序。果实圆形,单果质量136g,成熟果大红色,耐贮运,商品性好。抗番茄黄化曲叶病毒,兼抗根结线虫病。中早熟,平均产量81.0t·hm-2,适宜保护地早春和秋延后栽培。

  16. TaqMan real-time PCR for detection and quantitation of squash leaf curl virus in cucurbits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuan, Cheng-Ping; Huang, Hung-Chang; Chang, Chia-Che; Lu, Yi-Lin

    2012-02-01

    A real-time PCR assay based on the TaqMan chemistry was developed for reliable detection and quantitation of the squash leaf curl virus (SLCV) in melon and squash plants. This method was highly specific to SLCV and it was about one thousand times more sensitive than the conventional PCR method. The protocol of the real-time PCR established in this study enabled detection of as little as 10(2) copies of SLCV DNA with CP gene as the target. This TaqMan real-time PCR assay for detection and quantitation of SLCV would be a useful tool for application in quarantine and certification of SLCV in cucurbits as well as in the research of disease resistance and epidemiology.

  17. Natural association of two different betasatellites with Sweet potato leaf curl virus in wild morning glory (Ipomoea purpurea) in India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swapna Geetanjali, A; Shilpi, S; Mandal, Bikash

    2013-08-01

    Wild morning glory (Ipomoea purpurea) was observed to be affected by leaf curl and yellow vein diseases during summer-rainy season of 2009 in New Delhi, India. The virus was experimentally transmitted through whitefly, Bemisia tabaci to I. purpurea that reproduced the two distinct symptoms. Sequence analysis of multiple full-length clones obtained through rolling circle amplification from the leaf curl and yellow vein samples showed 91.8-95.3% sequence identity with Sweet potato leaf curl virus (SPLCV) and the isolates were phylogenetically distinct from those reported from Brazil, China, Japan and USA. Interestingly, two different betasatellites, croton yellow vein mosaic betasatellite and papaya leaf curl betasatellite were found with SPLCV in leaf curl and yellow vein diseases of I. purpurea, respectively. This study is the first report of occurrence of SPLCV in wild morning glory in India. SPLCV was known to infect other species of morning glory; our study revealed that I. purpurea, a new species of morning glory was a natural host of SPLCV. To date, betasatellite associated with SPLCV in Ipomoea spp. is not known. Our study provides evidence of natural association of two different betasatellites with SPLCV in leaf curl and yellow vein diseases of I. purpurea.

  18. Seed Transmission of Tomato yellow leaf curl virus in White Soybean (Glycine max).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kil, Eui-Joon; Park, Jungho; Choi, Hong-Soo; Kim, Chang-Seok; Lee, Sukchan

    2017-08-01

    Tomato yellow leaf curl virus (TYLCV) infection of the common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris) has been reported, but soybean (Glycine max) has not previously been identified as a TYLCV host. Five cultivars of white soybean were agro-inoculated using an infectious TYLCV clone. At 30 days post-inoculation, they showed infection rates of 25% to 100%. Typical TYLCV symptoms were not observed in any inoculated plants. To examine whether TYLCV was transmitted in soybean seeds, DNA was isolated from bundles of five randomly selected seeds from TYLCV-inoculated soybean plants and amplified with a TYLCV-specific primer set. With the exception of one bundle, all bundles of seeds were verified to be TYLCV-infected. Virus dissemination was also confirmed in three of the 14 bunches. Viral replication was also identified in seeds and seedlings. This is the first report demonstrating that soybean is a TYLCV host, and that TYLCV is a seed-transmissible virus in white soybean.

  19. Detection and molecular characterization of tomato yellow leaf curl virus naturally infecting Lycopersicon esculentum in Egypt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabie, M; Ratti, C; Abdel Aleem, E; Fattouh, F

    2017-01-01

    Tomato yellow leaf curl virus (TYLCV) infections of tomato crops in Egypt were widely spread in 2014. Infected symptomatic tomato plants from different governorates were sampled. TYLCV strains Israel and Mild (TYLCV-IL, TYLCV-Mild) were identified by multiplex and real-time PCR. In addition, nucleotide sequence analysis of the V1 and V2 protein genes, revealed ten TYLCV Egyptian isolates (TYLCV from TY1 to 10). Phylogenetic analysis showed their high degree of relatedness with TYLCV-IL Jordan isolate (98%). Here we have showed the complete nucleotide sequence of the TYLCV Egyptian isolate TY10, sampled from El Beheira. A high degree of similarity to other previously reported Egyptian isolates and isolates from Jordan and Japan reflect the importance of phylogenetic analysis in monitoring virus genetic diversity and possibilities for divergence of more virulent strains or genotypes.

  20. A Novel Strain of Tomato Leaf Curl New Delhi Virus Has Spread to the Mediterranean Basin

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    Isabel M. Fortes

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Tomato leaf curl New Delhi virus (ToLCNDV is a whitefly-transmitted bipartite begomovirus (genus Begomovirus, family Geminiviridae that causes damage to multiple cultivated plant species mainly belonging to the Solanaceae and Cucurbitaceae families. ToLCNDV was limited to Asian countries until 2012, when it was first reported in Spain, causing severe epidemics in cucurbit crops. Here, we show that a genetically-uniform ToLCNDV population is present in Spain, compatible with a recent introduction. Analyses of ToLCNDV isolates reported from other parts of the world indicated that this virus has a highly heterogeneous population genetically with no evident geographical, plant host or year-based phylogenetic groups observed. Isolates emerging in Spain belong to a strain that seems to have evolved by recombination. Isolates of this strain seem adapted to infecting cucurbits, but poorly infect tomatoes.

  1. Natural Occurrence of Tomato leaf curl New Delhi virus in Iranian Cucurbit Crops

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    Sara Yazdani-Khameneh

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The main areas for field-grown vegetable production in Iran were surveyed during the years of 2012–2014 to determine the occurrence of begomoviruses infecting these crops. A total of 787 leaf samples were collected from vegetables and some other host plants showing virus-like symptoms and tested by an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA using polyclonal antibodies produced against Tomato yellow leaf curl virus (TYLCV. According to the ELISA results, 81 samples (10.3% positively reacted with the virus antibodies. Begomovirus infections were confirmed by polymerase chain reaction (PCR using previously described TYLCV-specific primer pair TYLCV-Sar/TYLCV-Isr or universal primer pair Begomo-F/Begomo-R. The PCR tests using the primer pair TYLCV-Sar/TYLCV-Isr resulted in the amplification of the expected fragments of ca. 0.67-kb in size for ELISA-positive samples tested from alfalfa, pepper, spinach and tomato plants, confirming the presence of TYLCV. For one melon sample, having a week reaction in ELISA and no reaction in PCR using TYLCV-specific primers, the PCR reaction using the primer pair Begomo-F/Begomo-R resulted in the amplification fragments of the expected size of ca. 2.8 kb. The nucleotide sequences of the DNA amplicons derived from the isolate, Kz-Me198, were determined and compared with other sequences available in GenBank. BLASTN analysis confirmed the begomovirus infection of the sample and showed 99% identities with Tomato leaf curl New Delhi virus (ToLCNDV; phylogenetic analysis supported the results of the database searches. This study reports the natural occurrence of TYLCV in different hosts in Iran. Our results also reveal the emergence of ToLCNDV in Iranian cucurbit crops.

  2. Detection of tomato yellow leaf curl Thailand virus by PCR without DNA extraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ieamkhang, Supaporn; Riangwong, Lumpueng; Chatchawankanphanich, Orawan

    2005-11-01

    We report the simple and rapid method for detection of tomato yellow leaf curl Thailand virus (TYLCTHV) based on the direct capture of virus particles to the surface of a polymerase chain reaction (PCR) tube. This method allowed PCR without the time-consuming procedures of DNA extraction from infected plant tissue. A small amount of tomato tissue (approximately 10 mg) was ground in extraction buffer to release viruses from plant tissues. The constituents of the plant extract that might inhibit PCR activity were discarded by washing the tube with PBST buffer before adding the PCR mixture to the tube. This method was used for detection of TYLCTHV with plant sap solution diluted up to 1:20,000 and was more sensitive than an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) method. In addition, this method can be used for detection of TYLCTHV in viruliferous whiteflies. The PCR tubes with captured TYLCTHV could be used for PCR, after storage at 4 degrees C for 4 wk. The method presented here was used for detection of begomoviruses in cucurbit and pepper. In addition, this method was effectively used to detect papaya ringspot virus in papaya and zucchini yellow mosaic virus in cucumber by reverse transcriptase (RT)-PCR.

  3. Genetic diversity, host range, and distribution of tomato yellow leaf curl virus in Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shirazi, M; Mozafari, J; Rakhshandehroo, F; Shams-Bakhsh, M

    2014-01-01

    Tomato yellow leaf curl virus (TYLCV) is considered one of the most important tomato pathogens in tropical and subtropical regions including Iran. During the years 2007 to 2009, a total number of 510 symptomatic and asymptomatic vegetable, ornamental and weed samples were collected from fields and greenhouses in ten provinces of Iran. Symptoms included stunting, yellowing, leaf curl and flower senescence. PCR with specific primers showed TYLCV infection in 184 samples (36%) such as cucumber, pepper, tomato and several weeds from seven provinces. Based on the geographical origin, host range and symptoms, twenty three representative isolates were selected for phylogenetic analysis. An amplicon with a size about 608 base pair (bp) comprising partial sequence of the coat (CP) and movement protein (MP) coding regions of the viral genome was sequenced and compared with the corresponding selected sequences available in GenBank for Iran and worldwide. Phylogenetic analyses on the basis of the nucleotide sequences indicated two geographically separated clades. Isolates collected from Hormozgan, Khuzestan and Kerman provinces were grouped together with other Iranian isolates including TYLCV-Ir2, TYLCV-Kahnooj, and an isolate from Oman. It was also revealed that isolates collected from Boushehr, Fars, Tehran, and Isfahan placed close to the Iranian isolate TYLCV-Abadeh and isolates from Israel and Egypt. No correlation was found between the genetic variation and the host species, but selected Iranian isolates were grouped on the basis of the geographical origins. Results of this study indicated a high genetic diversity among Iranian TYLCV isolates.

  4. Tomato yellow leaf curl virus can be acquired and transmitted by Bemisia tabaci (Gennadius) from tomato fruits

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Delatte, H.; Dalmon, A.; Rist, D.; Soustrade, I.; Wuster, G.; Lett, J.M.; Goldbach, R.W.; Peterschmitt, M.; Reynaud, B.

    2003-01-01

    The whitefly Bemisia tabaci is an insect pest causing worldwide economic losses, especially as a vector of geminiviruses such as Tomato yellow leaf curl virus (TYLCV). Currently, imported and exported tomato fruit are not monitored for TYLCV infection because they are not considered to represent a

  5. Development and application of triple antibody sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays for begomovirus detection using monoclonal antibodies against Tomato yellow leaf curl Thailand virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seepiban, Channarong; Charoenvilaisiri, Saengsoon; Warin, Nuchnard; Bhunchoth, Anjana; Phironrit, Namthip; Phuangrat, Bencharong; Chatchawankanphanich, Orawan; Attathom, Supat; Gajanandana, Oraprapai

    2017-05-30

    Tomato yellow leaf curl Thailand virus, TYLCTHV, is a begomovirus that causes severe losses of tomato crops in Thailand as well as several countries in Southeast and East Asia. The development of monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) and serological methods for detecting TYLCTHV is essential for epidemiological studies and screening for virus-resistant cultivars. The recombinant coat protein (CP) of TYLCTHV was expressed in Escherichia coli and used to generate MAbs against TYLCTHV through hybridoma technology. The MAbs were characterized and optimized to develop triple antibody sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (TAS-ELISAs) for begomovirus detection. The efficiency of TAS-ELISAs for begomovirus detection was evaluated with tomato, pepper, eggplant, okra and cucurbit plants collected from several provinces in Thailand. Molecular identification of begomoviruses in these samples was also performed through PCR and DNA sequence analysis of the CP gene. Two MAbs (M1 and D2) were generated and used to develop TAS-ELISAs for begomovirus detection. The results of begomovirus detection in 147 field samples indicated that MAb M1 reacted with 2 begomovirus species, TYLCTHV and Tobacco leaf curl Yunnan virus (TbLCYnV), whereas MAb D2 reacted with 4 begomovirus species, TYLCTHV, TbLCYnV, Tomato leaf curl New Delhi virus (ToLCNDV) and Squash leaf curl China virus (SLCCNV). Phylogenetic analyses of CP amino acid sequences from these begomoviruses revealed that the CP sequences of begomoviruses recognized by the narrow-spectrum MAb M1 were highly conserved, sharing 93% identity with each other but only 72-81% identity with MAb M1-negative begomoviruses. The CP sequences of begomoviruses recognized by the broad-spectrum MAb D2 demonstrated a wider range of amino acid sequence identity, sharing 78-96% identity with each other and 72-91% identity with those that were not detected by MAb D2. TAS-ELISAs using the narrow-specificity MAb M1 proved highly efficient for the detection of

  6. Characterization of Cestrum yellow leaf curling virus: a new member of the family Caulimoviridae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stavolone, Livia; Ragozzino, Antonio; Hohn, Thomas

    2003-12-01

    Cestrum yellow leaf curling virus (CmYLCV) has been characterized as the aetiological agent of the Cestrum parqui mosaic disease. The virus genome was cloned and the clone was proven to be infectious to C. parqui. The presence of typical viroplasms in virus-infected plant tissue and the information obtained from the complete genomic sequence confirmed CmYLCV as a member of the Caulimoviridae family. All characteristic domains conserved in plant pararetroviruses were found in CmYLCV. Its genome is 8253 bp long and contains seven open reading frames (ORFs). Phylogenetic analysis of the relationships with other members of the Caulimoviridae revealed that CmYLCV is closely related to the Soybean chlorotic mottle virus (SbCMV)-like genus and particularly to SbCMV. However, in contrast to the other members of this genus, the primer-binding site is located in the intercistronic region following ORF Ib rather than within this ORF, and an ORF corresponding to ORF VII is missing.

  7. The Involvement of Heat Shock Proteins in the Establishment of Tomato Yellow Leaf Curl Virus Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorovits, Rena; Czosnek, Henryk

    2017-01-01

    Tomato yellow leaf curl virus (TYLCV), a begomovirus, induces protein aggregation in infected tomatoes and in its whitefly vector Bemisia tabaci. The interactions between TYLCV and HSP70 and HSP90 in plants and vectors are necessity for virus infection to proceed. In infected host cells, HSP70 and HSP90 are redistributed from a soluble to an aggregated state. These aggregates contain, together with viral DNA/proteins and virions, HSPs and components of the protein quality control system such as ubiquitin, 26S proteasome subunits, and the autophagy protein ATG8. TYLCV CP can form complexes with HSPs in tomato and whitefly. Nonetheless, HSP70 and HSP90 play different roles in the viral cell cycle in the plant host. In the infected host cell, HSP70, but not HSP90, participates in the translocation of CP from the cytoplasm into the nucleus. Viral amounts decrease when HSP70 is inhibited, but increase when HSP90 is downregulated. In the whitefly vector, HSP70 impairs the circulative transmission of TYLCV; its inhibition increases transmission. Hence, the efficiency of virus acquisition by whiteflies depends on the functionality of both plant chaperones and their cross-talk with other protein mechanisms controlling virus-induced aggregation.

  8. Identification of a bi-directional promoter from Tomato yellow leaf curl China virus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    A bi-directional promoter of Tomato yellow leaf curl China virus (TYLCCNV) was obtained with the total DNA from TYLCCNV isolate Y10 infected tobacco leaves as a template. Plant expression vectors were constructed by fusing the amplified DNA fragment with the gus gene and nopaline terminator in different orientations. The vectors containing promoter fragments were transferred into leaf cells and plant stems of Nicotiana benthamiana by Agrobacterium-mediated method. Transient expression results showed that both the complementary and virion-sense promoters could drive the gus gene to express, and the GUS activity of the complementary-sense promoter was stronger than that of the virion-sense. Co-expression of the vector containing βC1 gene of TYLCCNV DNAβ with the vector containing a bi-directional promoter revealed that the βC1 protein has no impact on expression of either the virion- or the complementarysense promoter.

  9. Impact of Wheat streak mosaic virus and Triticum mosaic virus co-infection of wheat on transmission rates by wheat curl mites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wheat streak mosaic virus (WSMV) and Triticum mosaic virus (TriMV) are transmitted by the wheat curl mite (WCM, Aceria tosichella Keifer). Previous work has shown that different mite genotypes transmit TriMV at different rates. The objective of this research was to determine if mite genotypes differ...

  10. Efficient Regeneration and Selection of Virus-free Sweetpotato Plants from Sweet Potato Leaf Curl Virus Infected Materials and Their Effects on Yields in Field Trials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sweet potato leaf curl virus (SPLCV) is an emerging virus disease in sweetpotato (Ipomoea batata) in the U.S. The incidence of SPLCV infection on sweetpotato increased dramatically in recent years due to the explosion of whitefly, Bemisia tabaci (Gennadius) populations. Among several sweetpotato v...

  11. Field Trial and Molecular Characterization of RNAi-Transgenic Tomato Plants That Exhibit Resistance to Tomato Yellow Leaf Curl Geminivirus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuentes, Alejandro; Carlos, Natacha; Ruiz, Yoslaine; Callard, Danay; Sánchez, Yadira; Ochagavía, María Elena; Seguin, Jonathan; Malpica-López, Nachelli; Hohn, Thomas; Lecca, Maria Rita; Pérez, Rosabel; Doreste, Vivian; Rehrauer, Hubert; Farinelli, Laurent; Pujol, Merardo; Pooggin, Mikhail M

    2016-03-01

    RNA interference (RNAi) is a widely used approach to generate virus-resistant transgenic crops. However, issues of agricultural importance like the long-term durability of RNAi-mediated resistance under field conditions and the potential side effects provoked in the plant by the stable RNAi expression remain poorly investigated. Here, we performed field trials and molecular characterization studies of two homozygous transgenic tomato lines, with different selection markers, expressing an intron-hairpin RNA cognate to the Tomato yellow leaf curl virus (TYLCV) C1 gene. The tested F6 and F4 progenies of the respective kanamycin- and basta-resistant plants exhibited unchanged field resistance to TYLCV and stably expressed the transgene-derived short interfering RNA (siRNAs) to represent 6 to 8% of the total plant small RNAs. This value outnumbered the average percentage of viral siRNAs in the nontransformed plants exposed to TYLCV-infested whiteflies. As a result of the RNAi transgene expression, a common set of up- and downregulated genes was revealed in the transcriptome profile of the plants selected from either of the two transgenic events. A previously unidentified geminivirus causing no symptoms of viral disease was detected in some of the transgenic plants. The novel virus acquired V1 and V2 genes from TYLCV and C1, C2, C3, and C4 genes from a distantly related geminivirus and, thereby, it could evade the repressive sequence-specific action of transgene-derived siRNAs. Our findings shed light on the mechanisms of siRNA-directed antiviral silencing in transgenic plants and highlight the applicability limitations of this technology as it may alter the transcriptional pattern of nontarget genes.

  12. Inhibition of Tomato Yellow Leaf Curl Virus (TYLCV using whey proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dawood Abdelgawad

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The antiviral activity of native and esterified whey proteins fractions (α-lactalbumin, β-lactoglobulin, and lactoferrin was studied to inhibit tomato yellow leaf curl virus (TYLCV on infected tomato plants. Whey proteins fractions and their esterified derivatives were sprayed into TYLCV-infected plants. Samples were collected from infected leaves before treatment, 7 and 15 days after treatment for DNA and molecular hybridization analysis. The most evident inhibition of virus replication was observed after 7 and 15 days using α-lactoferrin and α-lactalbumin, respectively. Native and esterified lactoferrin showed complete inhibition after 7 days. On the other hand, native β-lactoglobulin showed inhibition after 7 and 15 days whereas esterified β-lactoglobulin was comparatively more effective after 7 days. The relative amount of viral DNA was less affected by the esterified α-lactalbumin whereas native α-lactalbumin inhibited virus replication completely after 15 days. These results indicate that native or modified whey proteins fractions can be used for controlling the TYLCV-infected plants.

  13. A Rapid and Efficient Method for Construction of an Infectious Clone of Tomato yellow leaf curl virus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bongjun Bang

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Tomato yellow leaf curl virus (TYLCV, a member of the genus Begomovirus, is responsible for one of the most devastating viral diseases in tomato-growing countries and is becoming a serious problem in many subtropical and tropical countries. The climate in Korea is getting warmer and developing subtropical features in response to global warming. These changes are being accompanied by TYLCV, which is now becoming a large problem in the Korean tomato industry. The most effective way to reduce damage caused by TYLCV is to breed resistant varieties of tomatoes. To accomplish this, it is necessary to establish a simple inoculation technique for the efficient evaluation of resistance to TYLCV. Here, we present the rolling circle amplification (RCA method, which employs a bacteriophage using phi-29 DNA polymerase for construction of infectious TYLCV clones. The RCA method is simple, does not require sequence information for cloning, and is less expensive and time consuming than conventional PCR based-methods. Furthermore, RCA-based construction of an infectious clone can be very useful to other emerging and unknown geminiviruses in Korea.

  14. A Rapid and Efficient Method for Construction of an Infectious Clone of Tomato yellow leaf curl virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bang, Bongjun; Lee, Jongyun; Kim, Sunyoung; Park, Jungwook; Nguyen, Thao Thi; Seo, Young-Su

    2014-09-01

    Tomato yellow leaf curl virus (TYLCV), a member of the genus Begomovirus, is responsible for one of the most devastating viral diseases in tomato-growing countries and is becoming a serious problem in many subtropical and tropical countries. The climate in Korea is getting warmer and developing subtropical features in response to global warming. These changes are being accompanied by TYLCV, which is now becoming a large problem in the Korean tomato industry. The most effective way to reduce damage caused by TYLCV is to breed resistant varieties of tomatoes. To accomplish this, it is necessary to establish a simple inoculation technique for the efficient evaluation of resistance to TYLCV. Here, we present the rolling circle amplification (RCA) method, which employs a bacteriophage using phi-29 DNA polymerase for construction of infectious TYLCV clones. The RCA method is simple, does not require sequence information for cloning, and is less expensive and time consuming than conventional PCR based-methods. Furthermore, RCA-based construction of an infectious clone can be very useful to other emerging and unknown geminiviruses in Korea.

  15. Real-time PCR protocols for the quantification of the begomovirus tomato yellow leaf curl Sardinia virus in tomato plants and in its insect vector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noris, Emanuela; Miozzi, Laura

    2015-01-01

    Tomato yellow leaf curl Sardinia virus (TYLCSV) (Geminiviridae) is an important pathogen, transmitted by the whitefly Bemisia tabaci, that severely affects the tomato production in the Mediterranean basin. Here, we describe real-time PCR protocols suitable for relative and absolute quantification of TYLCSV in tomato plants and in whitefly extracts. Using primers and probe specifically designed for TYLCSV, the protocols for relative quantification allow to compare the amount of TYLCSV present in different plant or whitefly samples, normalized to the amount of DNA present in each sample using endogenous tomato or Bemisia genes as internal references. The absolute quantification protocol allows to calculate the number of genomic units of TYLCSV over the genomic units of the plant host (tomato), with a sensitivity of as few as ten viral genome copies per sample. The described protocols are potentially suitable for several applications, such as plant breeding for resistance, analysis of virus replication, and virus-vector interaction studies.

  16. Squash leaf curl virus (SLCV): a serious disease threatening cucurbits production in Palestine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali-Shtayeh, M S; Jamous, R M; Hussein, E Y; Mallah, O B; Abu-Zeitoun, S Y

    2014-04-01

    The incidence of squash leaf curl disease and molecular characterization of the Palestinian isolate of Squash leaf curl virus [SLCV-(PAL)] are described in this study. Symptomatic leaf samples obtained from squash (Cucurbita pepo), watermelon [Citrullus lanatus (Thunb.)], and cucumber (Cucumis sativus L.) plants were tested for SLCV-[PAL] infection by PCR and RCA. SLCV was also found to occur naturally in Chenopodium murale, Convolvulus sp, and Prosporis farcta which showed yellowing. The disease incidence was 85 % in samples collected from Nablus in summer season, while it was 98 % in samples collected from Qalqilia in autumn. On the other hand, SLCV incidence did not exceed 25 % in winter season. The full-length DNA-A and DNA-B genomes of SLCV-[PAL] were amplified and sequenced, and the sequences were deposited in the GenBank. Sequence analysis reveals that SLCV-[PAL] is closely related to other isolates from Lebanon (SLCV-LB2), Jordan (SLCV-JO), Israel (SLCV-IL), and Egypt (SLCV-EG). DNA-A of SLCV-[PAL] showed the highest nucleotide identity (99.4 %) with SLCV-JO, and SLCV-LB2, while DNA-B had the highest nucleotide identity (99.3 %) with SLCV-IL. However, following genome sequencing, it was found that due to two separate point mutations, two viral open reading frames (ORF) were altered in some SLCV Palestinian isolates. The AC2 ORF was extended by 141 nucleotides, while the AC4 ORF was extended by 36 nucleotides.

  17. Rapid detection of squash leaf curl virus by loop-mediated isothermal amplification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuan, Cheng-Ping; Wu, Min-Tze; Lu, Yi-Lin; Huang, Hung-Chang

    2010-10-01

    A loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) assay was employed to develop a simple and efficient system for the detection of squash leaf curl virus (SLCV) in diseased plants of squash (Cucurbita pepo) and melon (Cucumis melo). Completion of LAMP assay required 30-60 min under isothermal conditions at 65 degrees C by employing a set of four primers targeting SLCV. Although the sensitivity of the LAMP assay and the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay was comparable at high virus concentrations, the LAMP assay was by a 10-fold dilution factor more sensitive than the PCR assay for the detection of SLCV in diseased plants. No reaction was detected in the tissues of healthy plants by either the LAMP or the PCR. The LAMP products can be visualized by staining directly in the tube with SYBR Safe DNA gel stain dye. The sensitivity of the SYBR Safe DNA gel stain is similar to analysis by gel electrophoresis. Although both the LAMP and the PCR methods were capable of detecting SLCV in infected tissues of squash and melon, the LAMP method would be more useful than the PCR method for detection of SLCV infection in cucurbitaceous plants because it is more rapid, simple, accurate and sensitive.

  18. Detection and quantitation of the new world Squash leaf curl virus by TaqMan real-time PCR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abrahamian, Peter E; Abou-Jawdah, Yusuf

    2013-07-01

    Squash leaf curl diseases are caused by distinct virus species that are separated into two major phylogenetic groups, western and eastern hemisphere groups. The western group includes the new world Squash leaf curl virus (SLCV) which causes major losses to cucurbit production and induces severe stunting and leaf curl in squash plants. A TaqMan-based real time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) assay has been developed for detection and quantitation of SLCV. Designed primers and probe targeted the AV1 (coat protein) gene and in silico analysis showed that they detect a large number of SLCV isolates. The developed assay could detect the virus in 18fg of total nucleic acid and 30 genomic units. The qPCR assay was about 1000 times more sensitive than PCR and amplified successfully SLCV from a wide range of cucurbit hosts and from viruliferous whiteflies. The developed qPCR assay should be suitable for detection and quantitation purposes for all reported SLCV isolates of the western hemisphere.

  19. Deletional analysis of functional regions of complementary sense promoter from cotton leaf curl virus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    谢迎秋; 刘玉乐; 朱祯

    2000-01-01

    Complementary sense promoter from cotton leaf curl virus (CLCuV) is a novel plant promoter for genetic engineering that could drive high-level foreign gene expression in plant. To determine the optimal promoter sequence for gene expression, CLCuV promoter was deleted from its 5’ end to form promoter fragments with five different lengths, and chimeric gus genes were constructed using the promoterdeletion. These vectors were delivered into Agrobacterium and tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum L cv. Xanthi) plants which were transformed by leaf discs method. GUS activity of transgenic plants was measured. The results showed that GUS activities with the promoter deleted to -287 and -271 from the translation initiation site were respectively about five and three times that of full-length promoter. There exists a c/s-element which is important for the expressing activity in phloem from -271 to -176. Deletion from -176 to -141 resulted in a 20-30-fold reduction in GUS activity in leaves with weak activity in leaves and

  20. Deletional analysis of functional regions of complementary sense promoter from cotton leaf curl virus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Complementary sense promoter from cotton leaf curl virus (CLCuV) is a novel plant promoter for genetic engineering that could drive high-level foreign gene expression in plant. To determine the optimal promoter sequence for gene expression, CLCuV promoter was deleted from its 5' end to form promoter fragments with five different lengths, and chimeric gus genes were constructed using the promoter deletion. These vectors were delivered into Agrobacterium and tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum L. cv. Xanthi) plants which were transformed by leaf discs method. GUS activity of transgenic plants was measured. The results showed that GUS activities with the promoter deleted to -287 and -271 from the translation initiation site were respectively about five and three times that of full-length promoter. There exists a cis-element which is important for the expressing activity in phloem from -271 to -176. Deletion from -176 to -141 resulted in a 20-30-fold reduction in GUS activity in leaves with weak activity in leaves and stems and losing GUS activity in roots. The functional domains of complementary sense gene promoter of CLCuV were firstly analyzed and compared. It was found that the promoter activity with the deletion of negative cis-elements was much stronger than that of full-length promoter and was about twelve times on average that of CaMV 35S promoter, suggesting that the promoter has great application potential. Results also provide novel clues for understanding the mechanisms of geminivirus gene regulation and interaction between virus and plant.

  1. Characterization of a synergistic interaction between two cucurbit-infecting begomoviruses: Squash leaf curl virus and Watermelon chlorotic stunt virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sufrin-Ringwald, Tali; Lapidot, Moshe

    2011-02-01

    Squash leaf curl virus (SLCV) and Watermelon chlorotic stunt virus (WmCSV) are cucurbit-infecting bipartite begomoviruses. Both viruses are found in the eastern Mediterranean basin but the effects of dual infection of both viruses on melon (Cucumis melo L.) have not been described. 'Arava' melon plants were inoculated in the greenhouse, using whiteflies, with either SLCV, WmCSV, or both. Control plants were exposed to nonviruliferous whiteflies or not exposed at all. Following inoculation, plants were transplanted to a 50-mesh insect-proof nethouse and grown until fruit maturity. The experiment was performed in two melon-growing seasons: spring, transplant in May and harvest in July; and summer, transplant in August and harvest in October. Following inoculation, SLCV-infected melon plants showed mild symptoms that disappeared with time, and there was no effect on plant height. WmCSV-infected plants developed disease symptoms that became more obvious with time, and plants were somewhat shorter than control plants in the spring but not in the summer. SLCV had no effect on yield, regardless of season. WmCSV had no statistically significant effect on yield in the spring but, in the summer, reduced yield by 22%, on average. Dual-inoculated plants showed a synergistic interaction between the two viruses. They developed disease symptoms that were more pronounced than WmCSV alone, with plants being shorter than control plants by 20 to 25% regardless of season. Moreover, the yield of dual-inoculated plants was reduced on average by 21% in the spring and 54% in the summer, and fruit appearance was adversely affected. Dual inoculation did not affect WmCSV DNA level but SLCV DNA level was increased several-fold by the presence of WmCSV.

  2. Molecular and biological characterization of a new Tomato mild yellow leaf curl Aragua virus strain producing severe symptoms in tomato.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romay, Gustavo; Chirinos, Dorys T; Geraud-Pouey, Francis; Gillis, Annika; Mahillon, Jacques; Desbiez, Cécile; Bragard, Claude

    2017-06-20

    Tomato mild yellow leaf curl Aragua virus (ToMYLCV) is a begomovirus first reported infecting tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) and milkweed (Euphorbia heterophylla) in Venezuela. In this study, a ToMYLCV isolate (Zulia-219) was completely sequenced and its host range was evaluated. The DNA-A and DNA-B components of isolate Zulia-219 showed 93 and 85% nucleotide sequence identity with the respective counterparts of the ToMYLCV type strain. According to current demarcation criteria for begomovirus species, Zulia-219 is a new strain of ToMYLCV. Interestingly, tomato plants inoculated with ToMYLCV Zulia-219 displayed severe symptoms, including severe chlorotic leaf curling, in contrast to mild symptoms associated with the type strain of this begomovirus. These results indicate potential risks associated with this new ToMYLCV strain for tomato production in Venezuela.

  3. Association of an alphasatellite with tomato yellow leaf curl virus and ageratum yellow vein virus in Japan is suggestive of a recent introduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahid, Muhammad Shafiq; Ikegami, Masato; Waheed, Abdul; Briddon, Rob W; Natsuaki, Keiko T

    2014-01-14

    Samples were collected in 2011 from tomato plants exhibiting typical tomato leaf curl disease symptoms in the vicinity of Komae, Japan. PCR mediated amplification, cloning and sequencing of all begomovirus components from two plants from different fields showed the plants to be infected by Tomato yellow leaf curl virus (TYLCV) and Ageratum yellow vein virus (AYVV). Both viruses have previously been shown to be present in Japan, although this is the first identification of AYVV on mainland Japan; the virus previously having been shown to be present on the Okinawa Islands. The plant harboring AYVV was also shown to contain the betasatellite Tomato leaf curl Java betasatellite (ToLCJaB), a satellite not previously shown to be present in Japan. No betasatellite was associated with the TYLCV infected tomato plants analyzed here, consistent with earlier findings for this virus in Japan. Surprisingly both plants were also found to harbor an alphasatellite; no alphasatellites having previously been reported from Japan. The alphasatellite associated with both viruses was shown to be Sida yellow vein China alphasatellite which has previously only been identified in the Yunnan Province of China and Nepal. The results suggest that further begomoviruses, and their associated satellites, are being introduced to Japan. The significance of these findings is discussed.

  4. Advances of research on Cotton leaf curl virus%棉花曲叶病毒研究进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    丁小兰; 赵竹; 李明福

    2013-01-01

    The Cotton leaf curl virus as a quarantine virus in China is severely harmful to the production of the cotton. It caused destructive damage on cotton production in Pakistan and India. The virus could be transimitted by the whitefly and had a wide host range. In 2006, the Cotton leaf curl virus was found to infect Hibiscus rosa -sinensis in Guangdong. Moreover, in 2010, CLCuV was reported to be associated with cotton leaf curl disease in a experimental field of Nanning, Guangxi province in China. Cotton is an important crop in China, once the virus is spread to the main cotton producing areas, the consequences would be disastrous. In this paper, the variants of the virus, distribution and popular trend, disease epidemiology, the influence of CLCuV on cotton production and quality traits and disease control are analysed. In addition, the interesting issues and effective management measures for CLCuV were discussed also.%棉花曲叶病毒(Cotton leaf curl virus,CLCuV)是我国的进境检疫性有害生物,严重危害棉花生长,在巴基斯坦和印度的棉花产区已造成毁灭性灾害.该病毒主要由烟粉虱传播,寄主范围广泛.2006年在广东首次发现棉花曲叶病毒(CLCuV)入侵我国危害朱槿,2010年有报道证实CLCuV已侵染广西南宁试验田的棉花.我国是棉花生产大国,该病毒一旦扩散传播到棉花主产区,后果将不堪设想.本文对CLCuV的变异、国内外分布和流行趋势、影响棉花曲叶病流行的因素、病毒对棉花的品质和产量的影响及病害治理等方面进行综述,并探讨了棉花曲叶病毒研究存在的问题及有效防止该病毒传播和扩散的措施.

  5. Melon chlorotic leaf curl virus: characterization and differential reassortment with closest relatives reveal adaptive virulence in the squash leaf curl virus clade and host shifting by the host-restricted bean calico mosaic virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Idris, A M; Mills-Lujan, K; Martin, K; Brown, J K

    2008-02-01

    The genome components of the Melon chlorotic leaf curl virus (MCLCuV) were cloned from symptomatic cantaloupe leaves collected in Guatemala during 2002. The MCLCuV DNA-A and DNA-B components shared their closest nucleotide identities among begomoviruses, at approximately 90 and 81%, respectively, with a papaya isolate of MCLCuV from Costa Rica. The closest relatives at the species level were other members of the Squash leaf curl virus (SLCV) clade, which is endemic in the southwestern United States and Mexico. Biolistic inoculation of cantaloupe seedlings with the MCLCuV DNA-A and -B components resulted in the development of characteristic disease symptoms, providing definitive evidence of causality. MCLCuV experimentally infected species within the Cucurbitaceae, Fabaceae, and Solanaceae. The potential for interspecific reassortment was examined for MCLCuV and its closest relatives, including the bean-restricted Bean calico mosaic virus (BCaMV), and three other cucurbit-infecting species, Cucurbit leaf crumple virus (CuLCrV), SLCV, and SMLCV. The cucurbit viruses have distinct but overlapping host ranges. All possible reassortants were established using heterologous combinations of the DNA-A or DNA-B components. Surprisingly, only certain reassortants arising from MCLCuV and BCaMV, or MCLCuV and CuLCrV, were viable in bean, even though it is a host of all of the "wild-type" (parent) viruses. The bean-restricted BCaMV was differentially assisted in systemically infecting the cucurbit test species by the components of the four cucurbit-adapted begomoviruses. In certain heterologous combinations, the BCaMV DNA-A or -B component was able to infect one or more cucurbit species. Generally, the reassortants were less virulent in the test hosts than the respective wild-type (parent) viruses, strongly implicating adaptive modulation of virulence. This is the first illustration of reassortment resulting in the host range expansion of a host-restricted begomovirus.

  6. A New Cherry Tomato'Jinling Tianyu'with Resistance to Tomato Yellow Leaf Curl Virus%抗番茄黄化曲叶病毒病樱桃番茄新品种‘金陵甜玉’

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵统敏; 余文贵; 杨玛丽; 赵丽萍

    2011-01-01

    ‘金陵甜玉’樱桃番茄是以TY-07-5为母本,TY-07-4为父本育成的无限生长类型一代杂种,生长势较强,叶色深绿,果实短椭圆形,成熟果红色,果皮厚,耐贮运,单果质量22g左右,抗番茄黄化曲叶病毒病,抗ToMV和枯萎病。%'Jinling Tianyu'is a new cherry tomato hybrid which developed by crossing TY-07-5 as a female parent with TY-07-4 as a male parent.It is indeterminate growth type,which grows vigorously.The leaf is dark green.The fruit is red,and it has oval-round shape.The average weight of single fruit is 22 g.It is resistant to TYLCV,ToMV and wilt.

  7. Flupyradifurone effectively manages whitefly Bemisia tabaci MED (Hemiptera: Aleyrodidae) and tomato yellow leaf curl virus in tomato.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roditakis, Emmanouil; Stavrakaki, Marianna; Grispou, Maria; Achimastou, Aikaterini; Van Waetermeulen, Xavier; Nauen, Ralf; Tsagkarakou, Anastasia

    2017-08-01

    The cotton whitefly Bemisia tabaci (Gennadius) is among the most important pests of numerous crops and a vector of more than 100 plant viruses, causing significant crop losses worldwide. Managing this pest as well as inhibiting the transmission of major viruses such as tomato yellow leaf curl virus (TYLCV) are of utmost importance for sustainable yields. The efficacy against both whitefly and virus transmission of the novel systemic butenolide insecticide flupyradifurone was investigated in this study. The inhibition of TYLCV transmission by flupyradifurone was compared to that by thiamethoxam, a neonicotinoid insecticide reported to inhibit virus transmission. The experiment was performed under high virus pressure conditions (10 viruliferous insects per plant for 48 h) using a fully characterized field strain of B. tabaci. The insecticides were foliarly applied at recommended label rates under greenhouse conditions. Flupyradifurone suppressed virus transmission by 85% while levels of suppression after thiamethoxam treatments were just 25% and significantly lower. In untreated control plots, 100% of plants were infected by TYLCV. The observed difference in the potential to suppress virus transmission is linked to a strong knockdown effect as well as prolonged feeding inhibition in flupyradifurone treatments. Flupyradifurone is shown to be an extremely useful, fast-acting, new chemical tool in integrated crop management offering simultaneous control of whiteflies and strong suppression of viral infections via its rapid knockdown action and good residual activity. © 2017 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2017 Society of Chemical Industry.

  8. Genome organization of Tobacco leaf curl Zimbabwe virus, a new, distinct monopartite begomovirus associated with subgenomic defective DNA molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paximadis, M; Rey, M E

    2001-12-01

    The complete DNA A of the begomovirus Tobacco leaf curl Zimbabwe virus (TbLCZWV) was sequenced: it comprises 2767 nucleotides with six major open reading frames encoding proteins with molecular masses greater than 9 kDa. Full-length TbLCZWV DNA A tandem dimers, cloned in binary vectors (pBin19 and pBI121) and transformed into Agrobacterium tumefaciens, were systemically infectious upon agroinoculation of tobacco and tomato. Efforts to identify a DNA B component were unsuccessful. These findings suggest that TbLCZWV is a new member of the monopartite group of begomoviruses. Phylogenetic analysis identified TbLCZWV as a distinct begomovirus with its closest relative being Chayote mosaic virus. Abutting primer PCR amplified ca. 1300 bp molecules, and cloning and sequencing of two of these molecules revealed them to be subgenomic defective DNA molecules originating from TbLCZWV DNA A. Variable symptom severity associated with tobacco leaf curl disease and TbLCZWV is discussed.

  9. New insecticides for management of tomato yellow leaf curl, a virus vectored by the silverleaf whitefly, Bemisia tabaci.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, H A; Giurcanu, M C

    2014-01-01

    Greenhouse studies using a randomized complete block design were carried out to evaluate the effect of six insecticides on transmission of Tomato yellow leaf curl virus (TYLCV) by the silverleaf whitefly, Bemisia tabaci biotype B Gennadius (Hemiptera: Aleyrodidae) to tomato, Lycopersicon esculentum (Miller) (Solanales: Solanaceae), seedlings that were inoculated with whiteflies from a TYLCV colony in cages 3, 7, or 14 d after treatment with insecticide. The purpose was to reveal differences in residual efficacy of four materials that are nearing registration for use on tomato-cyazypyr, flupyradifurone, pyrafluquinazon, and sulfoxaflor-and to compare them with two established insecticides, pymetrozine and a zeta-cypermethrin/bifenthrin combination. Differences in efficacy were expected because these six materials represent five distinct modes of action and both contact and systemic materials. Percentage of tomato seedlings expressing virus symptoms tended to be lowest in seedlings treated with flupyradifurone. The zeta-cypermethrin/bifenthrin insecticide demonstrated comparable efficacy to flupyradifurone in some trials at 3 and 7 d after treatment inoculations, but not the 14 d after treatment inoculation. Pyrafluquinazon was not statistically different from cyazypyr or sulfoxaflor in percentage of plants with virus symptoms in any trial. Percentage virus in the cyazypyr and sulfoxaflor treatments was not statistically different in the 3 and 7 d after treatment inoculations. Among seedlings treated with insecticide, percentage with virus symptoms tended to be highest in the seedlings treated with pymetrozine.

  10. Field evaluation of yield effects on the U.S.A. heirloom sweet potato cultivars infected by sweet potato leaf curl virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    The incidence of Sweet potato leaf curl virus (SPLCV), a Begomovirus, infection of sweetpotato Ipomoea batatas (L.) Lam. (Convolvulaceae) in South Carolina, USA has increased rapidly in recent years. This is likely due to the use of infected propagating materials and the increasing population of it...

  11. Engineered plant virus resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galvez, Leny C; Banerjee, Joydeep; Pinar, Hasan; Mitra, Amitava

    2014-11-01

    Virus diseases are among the key limiting factors that cause significant yield loss and continuously threaten crop production. Resistant cultivars coupled with pesticide application are commonly used to circumvent these threats. One of the limitations of the reliance on resistant cultivars is the inevitable breakdown of resistance due to the multitude of variable virus populations. Similarly, chemical applications to control virus transmitting insect vectors are costly to the farmers, cause adverse health and environmental consequences, and often result in the emergence of resistant vector strains. Thus, exploiting strategies that provide durable and broad-spectrum resistance over diverse environments are of paramount importance. The development of plant gene transfer systems has allowed for the introgression of alien genes into plant genomes for novel disease control strategies, thus providing a mechanism for broadening the genetic resources available to plant breeders. Genetic engineering offers various options for introducing transgenic virus resistance into crop plants to provide a wide range of resistance to viral pathogens. This review examines the current strategies of developing virus resistant transgenic plants.

  12. Comparison of transmission of Papaya leaf curl China virus among four cryptic species of the whitefly Bemisia tabaci complex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Tao; Guo, Qi; Cui, Xi-Yun; Liu, Yin-Quan; Hu, Jian; Liu, Shu-Sheng

    2015-01-01

    Begomoviruses are transmitted by cryptic species of the whitefly Bemisia tabaci complex, often in a species-specific manner. Papaya leaf curl China virus (PaLCuCNV) has been recorded to infect several crops including papaya, tomato and tobacco in China. To help assess the risks of spread of this virus, we compared the acquisition, retention and transmission of PaLCuCNV among four species of whiteflies, Middle East-Asia Minor 1 (MEAM1), Mediterranean (MED), Asia 1 and Asia II 7. All four species of whiteflies are able to acquire, retain and transmit the virus, but with different levels of efficiency. Transmission tests using tomato as the host plant showed that MEAM1 transmitted PaLCuCNV with substantially higher efficiency than did MED, Asia 1 and Asia II 7. Furthermore, accumulation of PaLCuCNV in the whiteflies was positively associated with its efficiency of transmitting the virus. Altogether, these findings indicate that MEAM1 is the most efficient vector for PaLCuCNV in the four species of whiteflies, and suggest that risks of PaLCuCNV pandemics are high in regions where MEAM1 occurs. PMID:26486606

  13. Host range and genetic diversity of croton yellow vein mosaic virus, a weed-infecting monopartite begomovirus causing leaf curl disease in tomato.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pramesh, D; Mandal, Bikash; Phaneendra, Chigurupati; Muniyappa, V

    2013-03-01

    Croton yellow vein mosaic virus (CYVMV) is a widely occurring begomovirus in Croton bonplandianum, a common weed in the Indian subcontinent. In this study, CYVMV (genus Begomovirus, family Geminiviridae) was transmitted by whiteflies (Bemisia tabaci) to as many as 35 plant species belonging to 11 families, including many vegetables, tobacco varieties, ornamentals and weeds. CYVMV produced bright yellow vein symptoms in croton, whereas in all the other host species, the virus produced leaf curl symptoms. CYVMV produced leaf curl in 13 tobacco species and 22 cultivars of Nicotiana tabacum and resembled tobacco leaf curl virus (TobLCV) in host reactions. However, CYVMV was distinguished from TobLCV in four differential hosts, Ageratum conyzoides, C. bonplandianum, Euphorbia geniculata and Sonchus bracyotis. The complete genome sequences of four isolates originating from northern, eastern and southern India revealed that a single species of DNA-A and a betasatellite, croton yellow vein mosaic betasatellite (CroYVMB) were associated with the yellow vein mosaic disease of croton. The sequence identity among the isolates of CYVMV DNA-A and CroYVMB occurring in diverse plant species was 91.8-97.9 % and 83.3-100 %, respectively. The CYVMV DNA-A and CroYVMB generated through rolling-circle amplification of the cloned DNAs produced typical symptoms of yellow vein mosaic and leaf curling in croton and tomato, respectively. The progeny virus from both the croton and tomato plants was transmitted successfully by B. tabaci. The present study establishes the etiology of yellow vein mosaic disease of C. bonplandianum and provides molecular evidence that a weed-infecting monopartite begomovirus causes leaf curl in tomato.

  14. Implication of the bacterial endosymbiont Rickettsia spp. in interactions of the whitefly Bemisia tabaci with tomato yellow leaf curl virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kliot, Adi; Cilia, Michelle; Czosnek, Henryk; Ghanim, Murad

    2014-05-01

    Numerous animal and plant viruses are transmitted by arthropod vectors in a persistent, circulative manner. Tomato yellow leaf curl virus (TYLCV) is transmitted by the sweet potato whitefly Bemisia tabaci. We report here that infection with Rickettsia spp., a facultative endosymbiont of whiteflies, altered TYLCV-B. tabaci interactions. A B. tabaci strain infected with Rickettsia acquired more TYLCV from infected plants, retained the virus longer, and exhibited nearly double the transmission efficiency compared to an uninfected B. tabaci strain with the same genetic background. Temporal and spatial antagonistic relationships were discovered between Rickettsia and TYLCV within the whitefly. In different time course experiments, the levels of virus and Rickettsia within the insect were inversely correlated. Fluorescence in situ hybridization analysis of Rickettsia-infected midguts provided evidence for niche exclusion between Rickettsia and TYLCV. In particular, high levels of the bacterium in the midgut resulted in higher virus concentrations in the filter chamber, a favored site for virus translocation along the transmission pathway, whereas low levels of Rickettsia in the midgut resulted in an even distribution of the virus. Taken together, these results indicate that Rickettsia, by infecting the midgut, increases TYLCV transmission efficacy, adding further insights into the complex association between persistent plant viruses, their insect vectors, and microorganism tenants that reside within these insects. Interest in bacterial endosymbionts in arthropods and many aspects of their host biology in agricultural and human health systems has been increasing. A recent and relevant studied example is the influence of Wolbachia on dengue virus transmission by mosquitoes. In parallel with our recently studied whitefly-Rickettsia-TYLCV system, other studies have shown that dengue virus levels in the mosquito vector are inversely correlated with bacterial load. Our work

  15. Harm mechanism and method of prevention and cure of yellow leaf curl virus(TYLCV) in tomato%番茄黄化曲叶病毒的危害机理及防治方法

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    马妙芳

    2015-01-01

    通过对野生番茄的对比研究,发现并找到了番茄抗黄化曲叶病毒6个抗TYLCV的基因。分别是TY-1、TY-2、TY-3,TY-3a、TY-4、TY-5,这些抗TY病毒的基因都是从国外的材料中发现的。目前我国已经育成的抗TY病毒的番茄品种有1000多个。防治番茄黄化曲叶病毒主要措施;一是严把抗性鉴定关,主推抗性强的优良品种;二是加强田间管理,控制病毒传播;三是加强对中心病株的防治。%Through comparative study of wild tom ato, the six resistance gene of tomato yellow leaf curl virus (TYLCV)were found and they were TY-1、TY-2、TY-3,TY-3a、TY-4 and TY-5. These resistant genes were found in the material from abroad. At present our country had bred more than 1 000 tomato varieties with TY virus resistance.The main measures of prevention of tomato yellow leaf curl virus (TYLCV) were strengthening resistance identification, popularizing varieties of strong resistance, strengthening field management, controling the spread of the virus and strengthening the treatment of center infected plant.

  16. Genome-wide analysis of bHLH transcription factor and involvement in the infection by yellow leaf curl virus in tomato (Solanum lycopersicum).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jinyan; Hu, Zhongze; Zhao, Tongmin; Yang, Yuwen; Chen, Tianzi; Yang, Mali; Yu, Wengui; Zhang, Baolong

    2015-02-05

    The basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) proteins are a superfamily of transcription factors that can bind to specific DNA target sites. They have been well characterized in model plants such as Arabidopsis and rice and have been shown to be important regulatory components in many different biological processes. However, no systemic analysis of the bHLH transcription factor family has yet been reported in tomatoes. Tomato yellow leaf curl virus (TYLCV) threatens tomato production worldwide by causing leaf yellowing, leaf curling, plant stunting and flower abscission. A total of 152 bHLH transcription factors were identified from the entire tomato genome. Phylogenetic analysis of bHLH domain sequences from Arabidopsis and tomato facilitated classification of these genes into 26 subfamilies. The evolutionary and possible functional relationships revealed during this analysis are supported by other criteria, including the chromosomal distribution of these genes, the conservation of motifs and exon/intron structural patterns, and the predicted DNA binding activities within subfamilies. Distribution mapping results showed bHLH genes were localized on the 12 tomato chromosomes. Among the 152 bHLH genes from the tomato genome, 96 bHLH genes were detected in the TYLCV-susceptible and resistant tomato breeding line before (0 dpi) and after TYLCV (357 dpi) infection. As anticipated, gene ontology (GO) analysis indicated that most bHLH genes are related to the regulation of macromolecule metabolic processes and gene expression. Only four bHLH genes were differentially expressed between 0 and 357 dpi. Virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS) of one bHLH genes SlybHLH131 in resistant lines can lead to the cell death. In the present study, 152 bHLH transcription factor genes were identified. One of which bHLH genes, SlybHLH131, was found to be involved in the TYLCV infection through qRT-PCR expression analysis and VIGS validation. The isolation and identification of these bHLH transcription

  17. AC2 and AC4 proteins of Tomato yellow leaf curl China virus and Tobacco curly shoot virus mediate suppression of RNA silencing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CUI Xiaofeng; ZHOU Xueping

    2004-01-01

    Tomato yellow leaf curl China virus Y10 isolate (TYLCCNV-Y10) alone could systemically infect host plants such as Nicotiana benthamiana without symptoms. In contrast, Tobacco curly shoot virus Y35 isolate (TbCSV-Y35) alone induces leaf curl symptoms in N. benthamiana. When inoculated into transgenic N. benthamiana plants expressing GFP gene (line 16c), TYLCCNV-Y10 neither reverses the established GFP silencing nor blocks the onset of GFP silencing. In contrast, TbCSV-Y35 can partially reverse the established GFP silencing and block the onset of GFP silencing in new leaves. In the patch co-infiltration assays, the AC2 and AC4 proteins of TYLCCNV-Y10 and TbCSV-Y35 could suppress local GFP silencing and delay systemic GFP silencing, suggesting that they are suppressors of RNA silencing. Comparison of the accumulation levels of GFP mRNA in the co-infiltration patches showed that Y10 AC2 and Y35 AC2 proteins had similar efficiency for suppression of RNA silencing. However, Y35 AC4 protein functioned as a stronger suppressor of RNA silencing than Y10 AC4 protein. Therefore, the pathogenicity difference between TbCSV-Y35 and TYLCCNV-Y10 may be related to the functional difference in their AC4 proteins.

  18. Rapid accumulation and low degradation: key parameters of Tomato yellow leaf curl virus persistence in its insect vector Bemisia tabaci.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, Nathalie; Rimbaud, Loup; Chiroleu, Frédéric; Reynaud, Bernard; Thébaud, Gaël; Lett, Jean-Michel

    2015-12-02

    Of worldwide economic importance, Tomato yellow leaf curl virus (TYLCV, Begomovirus) is responsible for one of the most devastating plant diseases in warm and temperate regions. The DNA begomoviruses (Geminiviridae) are transmitted by the whitefly species complex Bemisia tabaci. Although geminiviruses have long been described as circulative non-propagative viruses, observations such as long persistence of TYLCV in B. tabaci raised the question of their possible replication in the vector. We monitored two major TYLCV strains, Mild (Mld) and Israel (IL), in the invasive B. tabaci Middle East-Asia Minor 1 cryptic species, during and after the viral acquisition, within two timeframes (0-144 hours or 0-20 days). TYLCV DNA was quantified using real-time PCR, and the complementary DNA strand of TYLCV involved in viral replication was specifically quantified using anchored real-time PCR. The DNA of both TYLCV strains accumulated exponentially during acquisition but remained stable after viral acquisition had stopped. Neither replication nor vertical transmission were observed. In conclusion, our quantification of the viral loads and complementary strands of both Mld and IL strains of TYLCV in B. tabaci point to an efficient accumulation and preservation mechanism, rather than to a dynamic equilibrium between replication and degradation.

  19. Functional characterization of a strong bi-directional constitutive plant promoter isolated from cotton leaf curl Burewala virus.

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    Zainul A Khan

    Full Text Available Cotton leaf curl Burewala virus (CLCuBuV, belonging to the genus Begomovirus, possesses single-stranded monopartite DNA genome. The bidirectional promoters representing Rep and coat protein (CP genes of CLCuBuV were characterized and their efficacy was assayed. Rep and CP promoters of CLCuBuV and 35S promoter of Cauliflower mosaic virus (CaMV were fused with β-glucuronidase (GUS and green fluorescent protein (GFP reporter genes. GUS activity in individual plant cells driven by Rep, CP and 35S promoters was estimated using real-time PCR and fluorometric GUS assay. Histochemical staining of GUS in transformed tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum cv. Xanthi leaves showed highest expression driven by Rep promoter followed by 35S promoter and CP promoter. The expression level of GUS driven by Rep promoter in transformed tobacco plants was shown to be two to four-fold higher than that of 35S promoter, while the expression by CP promoter was slightly lower. Further, the expression of GFP was monitored in agroinfiltrated leaves of N. benthamiana, N. tabacum and cotton (Gossypium hirsutum plants using confocal laser scanning microscopy. Rep promoter showed strong consistent transient expression in tobacco and cotton leaves as compared to 35S promoter. The strong constitutive CLCuBuV Rep promoter developed in this study could be very useful for high level expression of transgenes in a wide variety of plant cells.

  20. Functional Characterization of a Bidirectional Plant Promoter from Cotton Leaf Curl Burewala Virus Using an Agrobacterium-Mediated Transient Assay

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    Muhammad Aleem Ashraf

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The C1 promoter expressing the AC1 gene, and V1 promoter expressing the AV1 gene are located in opposite orientations in the large intergenic region of the Cotton leaf curl Burewala virus (CLCuBuV genome. Agro-infiltration was used to transiently express putative promoter constructs in Nicotiana tabacum and Gossypium hirsutum leaves, which was monitored by a GUS reporter gene, and revealed that the bidirectional promoter of CLCuBuV transcriptionally regulates both the AC1 and AV1 genes. The CLCuBuV C1 gene promoter showed a strong, consistent transient expression of the reporter gene (GUS in N. tabacum and G. hirsutum leaves and exhibited GUS activity two- to three-fold higher than the CaMV 35S promoter. The CLCuBuV bidirectional gene promoter is a nearly constitutive promoter that contains basic conserved elements. Many cis-regulatory elements (CREs were also analyzed within the bidirectional plant promoters of CLCuBuV and closely related geminiviruses, which may be helpful in understanding the transcriptional regulation of both the virus and host plant.

  1. Prediction and characterization of Tomato leaf curl New Delhi virus (ToLCNDV) responsive novel microRNAs in Solanum lycopersicum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pradhan, Bhubaneswar; Naqvi, Afsar Raza; Saraf, Shradha; Mukherjee, Sunil Kumar; Dey, Nrisingha

    2015-01-02

    Tomato leaf curl New Delhi virus (ToLCNDV) infects tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) plants and causes severe crop losses. As the microRNAs (miRNAs) are deregulated during stressful events, such as biotic stress, we wanted to study the effect of ToLCNDV infection on tomato miRNAs. We constructed two libraries, isolating small RNAs (sRNAs) from healthy (HT) and ToLCNDV infected (IT) tomato leaves, and sequenced the library-specific sRNAs using the next generation sequencing (NGS) approach. These data helped predict 112 mature miRNA sequences employing the miRDeep-P program. A substantial number (58) of the sequences were 24-mer in size, which was a bit surprising. Based on the calculation of precision values, 53 novel miRNAs were screened from the predicted sequences. Nineteen of these were chosen for expression analysis; a northern blot analysis showed 15 to be positive. Many of the predicted miRNAs were up-regulated following viral infection. The target genes of the miRNAs were also predicted and the expression analysis of selected transcripts showed a typical inverse relation between the accumulation of target transcripts and the abundance of corresponding miRNAs. Furthermore, the cleavage sites of the target transcripts for three novel miRNAs were mapped, confirming the correct annotation of the miRNA-targets. The sRNA deep sequencing clearly revealed that the virus modulated global miRNA expression in the host. The validated miRNAs (Tom_4; Tom_14; Tom_17; Tom_21; Tom_29; Tom_43) could be valuable tools for understanding the ToLCNDV-tomato interaction, ultimately leading to the development of a virus-resistant tomato plant. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Effectiveness of Cyantraniliprole for Managing Bemisia tabaci (Hemiptera: Aleyrodidae) and Interfering with Transmission of Tomato Yellow Leaf Curl Virus on Tomato.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caballero, Rafael; Schuster, David J; Peres, Natalia A; Mangandi, Jozer; Hasing, Tomas; Trexler, Fred; Kalb, Steve; Portillo, Héctor E; Marçon, Paula C; Annan, I B

    2015-06-01

    Cyantraniliprole is the second xylem-systemic active ingredient in the new anthranilic diamide class. Greenhouse (2006), growth chamber (2007), and field studies (2009-2010) were conducted to determine the efficacy of cyantraniliprole for managing Bemisia tabaci (Gennadius) biotype B and in interfering with transmission of tomato yellow leaf curl virus (TYLCV) by this whitefly. Cyantraniliprole applied as soil treatments (200 SC) or foliar sprays (100 OD) provided excellent adult whitefly control, TYLCV suppression, and reduced oviposition and nymph survival, comparable to current standards. The positive results observed in these greenhouse experiments with a high level of insect pressure (10× the field threshold of one adult per plant) and disease pressure (five adults per plant, with a high level of confidence that TYLCV virulent adults were used), indicate a great potential for cyantraniliprole to be used in a whitefly management program. Field evaluations of soil drench treatments confirmed the suppression of TYLCV transmission demonstrated in the greenhouse studies. Field studies in 2009 and 2010 showed that cyantraniliprole (200 SC) provided TYLCV suppression for 2 wk after a drench application, when using a susceptible (2009) or imidacloprid-tolerant (2010) whitefly population. Cyantraniliprole was demonstrated to be a promising tool for management of TYLCV in tomato production, which is very difficult and expensive, and which has limited options. The integration of cyantraniliprole into a resistance management program will help to ensure the continued sustainability of this and current insecticides used for the management of insect vectors, including whiteflies and the TYLCV they spreads.

  3. Rapid spread of tomato yellow leaf curl virus in China is aided differentially by two invasive whiteflies.

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    Huipeng Pan

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Tomato yellow leaf curl virus (TYLCV was introduced into China in 2006, approximately 10 years after the introduction of an invasive whitefly, Bemisia tabaci (Genn. B biotype. Even so the distribution and prevalence of TYLCV remained limited, and the economic damage was minimal. Following the introduction of Q biotype into China in 2003, the prevalence and spread of TYLCV started to accelerate. This has lead to the hypothesis that the two biotypes might not be equally competent vectors of TYLCV. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The infection frequency of TYLCV in the field-collected B. tabaci populations was investigated, the acquisition and transmission capability of TYLCV by B and Q biotypes were compared under the laboratory conditions. Analysis of B. tabaci populations from 55 field sites revealed the existence of 12 B and 43 Q biotypes across 18 provinces in China. The acquisition and transmission experiments showed that both B and Q biotypes can acquire and transmit the virus, however, Q biotype demonstrated superior acquisition and transmission capability than its B counterparts. Specifically, Q biotype acquired significantly more viral DNA than the B biotype, and reached the maximum viral load in a substantially shorter period of time. Although TYLCV was shown to be transmitted horizontally by both biotypes, Q biotype exhibited significantly higher viral transmission frequency than B biotype. Vertical transmission result, on the other hand, indicated that TYLCV DNA can be detected in eggs and nymphs, but not in pupae and adults of the first generation progeny. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These combined results suggested that the epidemiology of TYLCV was aided differentially by the two invasive whiteflies (B and Q biotypes through horizontal but not vertical transmission of the virus. This is consistent with the concomitant eruption of TYLCV in tomato fields following the recent rapid invasion of Q biotype whitefly in China.

  4. Expressing activity of promoter elements of large intergenic region from cotton leaf curl virus in host plant*

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Cotton leaf curl virus (CLCuV) is a type of single-stranded DNAvirus, belonging to geminivirus of subgroup III. In order to determine the function of CLCuV large intergenic region (LIR), total DNA of CLCuV-infected cotton leaves was used as template, and fragment of LIR was obtained by PCR and inserted into clone vector. The fragment of LIR was fused with gus reporter gene and nos terminator in the orientation of transcription of virion sense and complementary sense respectively, and the plant expression vectors were constructed. GUS activity of Agrobacterium-mediated transgenic tobacco was measured. The result indicated that LIR showed strong promoter activity in complementary sense gene orientation. Average GUS activity of the complementary sense promoter was 5-6 times that of CaMV 35S promoter, and the highest GUS activity of individual plant was ten times of that of CaMV 35S promoter. Histochemical localization confirmed its activity in both mesophyll and vascular tissues. Activity of virion sense of LIR was rather low. Thus LIR isolated from CLCuV could be used as a novel strong promoter in plant genetic manipulation.

  5. Correlation of meteorological parameters and remotely sensed normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) with cotton leaf curl virus (CLCV) in Multan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, A.; Akhtar, A.; Khalid, B.; Shamim, A.

    2013-06-01

    Climate change and weather has a profound effect on the spread of Cotton Leaf Curl Virus (CLCV) which is transmitted by whitefly. Climate change is altering temperature and precipitation patterns, resulting in the shift of some insect/pest from small population to large population thus effecting crops yield. To find out the relationship between the weather conditions, outburst of CLCV and changes in Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) values due to the outburst of CLCV, a study was carried out for tehsil Multan. Data was acquired for the months of June, July, August and September for the year 2010. Regression analysis between CLCV and meteorological conditions as well as between CLCV and NDVI was performed. Meteorological parameters included temperature, humidity, precipitation, cloud cover, wind direction, pan evaporation and sunshine hours. NDVI values were calculated from SPOT satellite imagery (1km) using ArcMap10 and WinDisp v5.1. Correlation coefficients obtained in most of the cases were acceptable however the significance F and P-value were higher than their critical value at 95% level of significance. Therefore significant correlation was found only between CLCV and temperature and between CLCV and PAN evaporation during the month of July.

  6. Molecular characterization of sweet potato leaf curl virus isolate from China (SPLCV-CN) and its phylogenetic relationship with other members of the Geminiviridae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luan, Yu Shi; Zhang, Juan; Liu, Dan Mei; Li, Wen Li

    2007-10-01

    A Sweet potato-infecting sweet potato leaf curl virus (SPLCV) isolated in China was detected by Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR). PCR products amplified from DNA-A were cloned and sequenced. The isolates of SPLCV from China(SPLCV-CN)has a genome organization similar to that of monopartite begomoviruses. The DNA-A had two ORFs (AV1 and AV2) in the virion sense and four ORFs (AC1, AC2, AC3, and AC4) in the complementary sense, separated by an intergenic region (IR) containing a conserved stem-loop motif. Three incomplete direct repeat iterons were also found within the IR. The presence of AV2 ORF supports the relationship of SPLCV-CN to the Old World gemimiviruses. Sequence comparisons showed that the DNA-A sequence of SPLCV-CN were closely related to those of sweet potato leaf curl Georgia virus-[16] (SPLCGV-[16]), Ipomoea yellow vein virus (IYVV-SI), and sweet potato leaf curl virus (SPLCV) with nucleotide sequence identity ranging from 88% to 91%. Comparison of individual encoded proteins between SPLCV-CN and that of three other SPLCV isolates showed the coat protein (AV1) shared the highest amino acid sequence identity (93%-96%), suggesting the coat protein of these viruses may have identical ancestor. The relationships between SPLCV-CN and other whitefly-transmitted geminiviruses were investigated by using phylogeny of derived AV1, AC1, and AV2 amino acid sequences. In all phylogenetic trees, SPLCV-CN clustered with three other isolates of SPLCV. The analyses revealed that the four isolates of SPLCV have coat proteins which are unique from its counterparts from both the Old World and New World. The present of AV2 and phylogenic analysis of AC1 suggest that SPLCV is more close to begomoviruses from the Old World but isolates of this virus seems to form a separate subset.

  7. A begomovirus associated with Ageratum yellow vein disease in Indonesia: evidence for natural recombination between tomato leaf curl Java virus and Ageratum yellow vein virus-[Java].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kon, T; Kuwabara, K; Hidayat, S H; Ikegami, M

    2007-01-01

    A begomovirus (2747 nucleotides) and a satellite DNA beta component (1360 nucleotides) have been isolated from Ageratum conyzoides L. plants with yellow vein symptoms growing in Java, Indonesia. The begomovirus is most closely related to Tomato leaf curl Java virus (ToLCJV) (91 and 98% in the total nucleotide and coat protein amino acid sequences, respectively), although the products of ORFs C1 and C4 are more closely related to those of Ageratum yellow vein virus-[Java] (91 and 95% identity, respectively). For this reason, the begomovirus it is considered to be a strain of ToLCJV and is referred to as ToLCJV-Ageratum. The virus probably derives from a recombination event in which nucleotides 2389-2692 of ToLCJV have been replaced with the corresponding region of the AYVV-[Java] genome, which includes the 5' part of the intergenic region and the C1 and C4 ORFs. Infection of A. conyzoides with ToLCJV-Ageratum alone produced no symptoms, but co-infection with DNAbeta induced yellow vein symptoms. Symptoms induced in Nicotiana benthamiana by ToLCJV-Ageratum, ToLCJV and AYVV-[Java] are consistent with the exchange of pathogenicity determinant ORF C4 during recombination.

  8. Identification and application of biocontrol agents against Cotton leaf curl virus disease in Gossypium hirsutum under greenhouse conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Memoona Ramzan

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Biological control is a novel approach in crop protection. Bacteria, such as Bacillus spp. and Pseudomonas spp., are reported for this purpose and some of their products are already commercially available. In this study, the rhizosphere and phyllosphere of healthy cotton plants were used as a source of bacterial isolates with properties of potential biocontrol agents. The isolates were screened for phosphate solubilization activity, indole acetic acid (IAA production and antifungal activity. Two isolates, S1HL3 and S1HL4, showed phosphate solubilization and IAA production simultaneously, while another two, JS2HR4 and JS3HR2, demonstrated potential to inhibit fungal pathogens. These bacteria were identified as Pseudomonas aeruginosa (S1HL3, Burkholderia sp. (S1HL4 and Bacillus sp. (JS2HR4 and JS3HR2 based on biochemical and molecular characteristics. The isolates were tested against Cotton leaf curl virus (CLCuV in greenhouse conditions, both as individual bacterial isolates and consortia. Treated plants were healthy as compared to control plants, where up to 74% of the plants were symptomatic for CLCuV infection. Maximum inhibition of CLCuV was observed in the plants treated with a mixture of bacterial isolates: the viral load in the treated plants was only 0.4% vs. up to 74% in controls. This treatment consortium included P. aeruginosa S1HL3, Burkholderia sp. S1HL4 and Bacillus spp. isolates, JS2HR4 and JS3HR2. The principal-component biplot showed a highly significant correlation between the viral load percentage and the disease incidence.

  9. Tomato yellow leaf curl virus infection of tomato does not affect the performance of the Q and ZHJ2 biotypes of the viral vector Bemisia tabaci

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Meng Li; Jian Liu; Shu-Sheng Liu

    2011-01-01

    To better understand the etiology of begomovirus epidemics in regions under invasion we need to know how indigenous and invasive whitefly vectors respond to virus infection.We investigated both direct and indirect effects of infection with Tomato yellow leaf curl virus(TYLCV)on the performance of the invasive Q biotype and the indigenous Asian ZHJ2 biotype of whitefly Bemisia tabaci.The Q biotype performed better than the ZHJ2 biotype on either uninfected or virus-infected tomato plants.However,virus-infection of host plants did not,or only marginally affected,the performance of either biotype of whiteflies m terms of fecundity,longevity,survival,development and population increase.Likewise,association of the vectors with TYLCV did not affect fecundity and longevity of the Q or ZHJ2 biotypes on cotton,a non-host of TYLCV.These results indicate that the alien Q biotype whitefly,but not the indigenous ZHJ2 biotype,is likely to become the major vector of TYLCV in the field and facilitate virus epidemics.

  10. Clathrin-mediated endocytosis is involved in Tomato yellow leaf curl virus transport across the midgut barrier of its whitefly vector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Li-Long; Chen, Qun-Fang; Zhao, Juan-Juan; Guo, Tao; Wang, Xiao-Wei; Hariton-Shalev, Aliza; Czosnek, Henryk; Liu, Shu-Sheng

    2017-02-01

    Tomato yellow leaf curl virus (TYLCV) is a begomovirus transmitted by the whitefly Bemisia tabaci. The circulative translocation of the virus in the insect is known in its broad line. However, transit of TYLCV from the digestive tract into the haemolymph is poorly understood. We studied the involvement of clathrin in this process by disrupting the clathrin-mediated endocytosis and the endosome network using inhibitor feeding, antibody blocking and dsRNA silencing. We monitored the quantities of TYLCV in the whitefly and virus transmission efficiency. Following endocytosis and endosome network disruption, the quantity of virus was higher in the midgut relative to that of the whole insect body, and the quantity of virus in the haemolymph was reduced. The transmission efficiency of TYLCV by the treated insects was also reduced. These findings indicate that clathrin-mediated endocytosis and endosomes play an important role in the transport of TYLCV across the whitefly midgut. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Recessive resistance to plant viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Truniger, V; Aranda, M A

    2009-01-01

    About half of the approximately 200 known virus resistance genes in plants are recessively inherited, suggesting that this form of resistance is more common for viruses than for other plant pathogens. The use of such genes is therefore a very important tool in breeding programs to control plant diseases caused by pathogenic viruses. Over the last few years, the detailed analysis of many host/virus combinations has substantially advanced basic research on recessive resistance mechanisms in crop species. This type of resistance is preferentially expressed in protoplasts and inoculated leaves, influencing virus multiplication at the single-cell level as well as cell-to-cell movement. Importantly, a growing number of recessive resistance genes have been cloned from crop species, and further analysis has shown them all to encode translation initiation factors of the 4E (eIF4E) and 4G (eIF4G) families. However, not all of the loss-of-susceptibility mutants identified in collections of mutagenized hosts correspond to mutations in eIF4E and eIF4G. This, together with other supporting data, suggests that more extensive characterization of the natural variability of resistance genes may identify new host factors conferring recessive resistance. In this chapter, we discuss the recent work carried out to characterize loss-of-susceptibility and recessive resistance genes in crop and model species. We review actual and probable recessive resistance mechanisms, and bring the chapter to a close by summarizing the current state-of-the-art and offering perspectives on potential future developments.

  12. Comparative Analyses of Tomato yellow leaf curl virus C4 Protein-Interacting Host Proteins in Healthy and Infected Tomato Tissues

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    Namgyu Kim

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Tomato yellow leaf curl virus (TYLCV, a member of the genus Begomovirus, is one of the most important viruses of cultivated tomatoes worldwide, mainly causing yellowing and curling of leaves with stunting in plants. TYLCV causes severe problems in sub-tropical and tropical countries, as well as in Korea. However, the mechanism of TYLCV infection remains unclear, although the function of each viral component has been identified. TYLCV C4 codes for a small protein involved in various cellular functions, including symptom determination, gene silencing, viral movement, and induction of the plant defense response. In this study, through yeast-two hybrid screenings, we identified TYLCV C4-interacting host proteins from both healthy and symptom-exhibiting tomato tissues, to determine the role of TYLCV C4 proteins in the infection processes. Comparative analyses of 28 proteins from healthy tissues and 36 from infected tissues showing interactions with TYLCV C4 indicated that TYLCV C4 mainly interacts with host proteins involved in translation, ubiquitination, and plant defense, and most interacting proteins differed between the two tissues but belong to similar molecular functional categories. Four proteins—two ribosomal proteins, S-adenosyl-L-homocysteine hydrolase, and 14-3-3 family protein—were detected in both tissues. Furthermore, the identified proteins in symptom-exhibiting tissues showed greater involvement in plant defenses. Some are key regulators, such as receptor-like kinases and pathogenesis-related proteins, of plant defenses. Thus, TYLCV C4 may contribute to the suppression of host defense during TYLCV infection and be involved in ubiquitination for viral infection.

  13. The complete genomic sequence of pepper yellow leaf curl virus (PYLCV and its implications for our understanding of evolution dynamics in the genus polerovirus.

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    Aviv Dombrovsky

    Full Text Available We determined the complete sequence and organization of the genome of a putative member of the genus Polerovirus tentatively named Pepper yellow leaf curl virus (PYLCV. PYLCV has a wider host range than Tobacco vein-distorting virus (TVDV and has a close serological relationship with Cucurbit aphid-borne yellows virus (CABYV (both poleroviruses. The extracted viral RNA was subjected to SOLiD next-generation sequence analysis and used as a template for reverse transcription synthesis, which was followed by PCR amplification. The ssRNA genome of PYLCV includes 6,028 nucleotides encoding six open reading frames (ORFs, which is typical of the genus Polerovirus. Comparisons of the deduced amino acid sequences of the PYLCV ORFs 2-4 and ORF5, indicate that there are high levels of similarity between these sequences to ORFs 2-4 of TVDV (84-93% and to ORF5 of CABYV (87%. Both PYLCV and Pepper vein yellowing virus (PeVYV contain sequences that point to a common ancestral polerovirus. The recombination breakpoint which is located at CABYV ORF3, which encodes the viral coat protein (CP, may explain the CABYV-like sequences found in the genomes of the pepper infecting viruses PYLCV and PeVYV. Two additional regions unique to PYLCV (PY1 and PY2 were identified between nucleotides 4,962 and 5,061 (ORF 5 and between positions 5,866 and 6,028 in the 3' NCR. Sequence analysis of the pepper-infecting PeVYV revealed three unique regions (Pe1-Pe3 with no similarity to other members of the genus Polerovirus. Genomic analyses of PYLCV and PeVYV suggest that the speciation of these viruses occurred through putative recombination event(s between poleroviruses co-infecting a common host(s, resulting in the emergence of PYLCV, a novel pathogen with a wider host range.

  14. Global Analysis of the Transcriptional Response of Whitefly to Tomato Yellow Leaf Curl China Virus Reveals the Relationship of Coevolved Adaptations▿ †

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luan, Jun-Bo; Li, Jun-Min; Varela, Nélia; Wang, Yong-Liang; Li, Fang-Fang; Bao, Yan-Yuan; Zhang, Chuan-Xi; Liu, Shu-Sheng; Wang, Xiao-Wei

    2011-01-01

    The begomoviruses are the largest and most economically important group of plant viruses transmitted exclusively by the whitefly Bemisia tabaci in a circulative, persistent manner. The circulation of the viruses within the insect vectors involves complex interactions between virus and vector components; however, the molecular mechanisms of these interactions remain largely unknown. Here we investigated the transcriptional response of the invasive B. tabaci Middle East-Asia Minor 1 species to Tomato yellow leaf curl China virus (TYLCCNV) using Illumina sequencing technology. Results showed that 1,606 genes involved in 157 biochemical pathways were differentially expressed in the viruliferous whiteflies. Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) pathway analysis indicated that TYLCCNV can perturb the cell cycle and primary metabolism in the whitefly, which explains the negative effect of this virus on the longevity and fecundity of B. tabaci. Our data also demonstrated that TYLCCNV can activate whitefly immune responses, such as autophagy and antimicrobial peptide production, which might lead to a gradual decrease of viral particles within the body of the viruliferous whitefly. Furthermore, PCR results showed that TYLCCNV can invade the ovary and fat body tissues of the whitefly, and Lysotracker and Western blot analyses revealed that the invasion of TYLCCNV induced autophagy in both the ovary and fat body tissues. Surprisingly, TYLCCNV also suppressed the whitefly immune responses by downregulating the expression of genes involved in Toll-like signaling and mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathways. Taken together, these results reveal the relationship of coevolved adaptations between begomoviruses and whiteflies and will provide a road map for future investigations into the complex interactions between plant viruses and their insect vectors. PMID:21270146

  15. Global analysis of the transcriptional response of whitefly to tomato yellow leaf curl China virus reveals the relationship of coevolved adaptations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luan, Jun-Bo; Li, Jun-Min; Varela, Nélia; Wang, Yong-Liang; Li, Fang-Fang; Bao, Yan-Yuan; Zhang, Chuan-Xi; Liu, Shu-Sheng; Wang, Xiao-Wei

    2011-04-01

    The begomoviruses are the largest and most economically important group of plant viruses transmitted exclusively by the whitefly Bemisia tabaci in a circulative, persistent manner. The circulation of the viruses within the insect vectors involves complex interactions between virus and vector components; however, the molecular mechanisms of these interactions remain largely unknown. Here we investigated the transcriptional response of the invasive B. tabaci Middle East-Asia Minor 1 species to Tomato yellow leaf curl China virus (TYLCCNV) using Illumina sequencing technology. Results showed that 1,606 genes involved in 157 biochemical pathways were differentially expressed in the viruliferous whiteflies. Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) pathway analysis indicated that TYLCCNV can perturb the cell cycle and primary metabolism in the whitefly, which explains the negative effect of this virus on the longevity and fecundity of B. tabaci. Our data also demonstrated that TYLCCNV can activate whitefly immune responses, such as autophagy and antimicrobial peptide production, which might lead to a gradual decrease of viral particles within the body of the viruliferous whitefly. Furthermore, PCR results showed that TYLCCNV can invade the ovary and fat body tissues of the whitefly, and Lysotracker and Western blot analyses revealed that the invasion of TYLCCNV induced autophagy in both the ovary and fat body tissues. Surprisingly, TYLCCNV also suppressed the whitefly immune responses by downregulating the expression of genes involved in Toll-like signaling and mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathways. Taken together, these results reveal the relationship of coevolved adaptations between begomoviruses and whiteflies and will provide a road map for future investigations into the complex interactions between plant viruses and their insect vectors.

  16. Virion stability is important for the circulative transmission of tomato yellow leaf curl sardinia virus by Bemisia tabaci, but virion access to salivary glands does not guarantee transmissibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caciagli, Piero; Medina Piles, Vicente; Marian, Daniele; Vecchiati, Manuela; Masenga, Vera; Mason, Giovanna; Falcioni, Tania; Noris, Emanuela

    2009-06-01

    The capsid protein (CP) of the monopartite begomovirus Tomato yellow leaf curl Sardinia virus (TYLCSV), family Geminiviridae, is indispensable for plant infection and vector transmission. A region between amino acids 129 and 152 is critical for virion assembly and insect transmissibility. Two previously described mutants, one with a double Q129P Q134H mutation (PNHD) and another with a further D152E change (PNHE), were found nontransmissible (NT). Another NT mutant with a single N130D change (QDQD) was retrieved from a new mutational analysis. In this study, these three NT mutants and the wild-type (wt) virus were compared in their relationships with the whitefly vector Bemisia tabaci and the nonvector Trialeurodes vaporariorum. Retention kinetics of NT mutants were analyzed by quantitative dot blot hybridization in whiteflies fed on infected plants. The QDQD mutant, whose virions appeared nongeminate following purification, was hardly detectable in either whitefly species at any sampling time. The PNHD mutant was acquired and circulated in both whitefly species for up to 10 days, like the wt virus, while PNHE circulated in B. tabaci only. Using immunogold labeling, both PNHD and PNHE CPs were detected in B. tabaci salivary glands (SGs) like the wt virus, while no labeling was found in any whitefly tissue with the QDQD mutant. Significant inhibition of transmission of the wt virus was observed after prior feeding of the insects on plants infected with the PNHE mutant, but not on plants infected with the other mutants. Virion stability and ability to cross the SG barrier are necessary for TYLCSV transmission, but interactions with molecular components inside the SGs are also critical for transmissibility.

  17. Dominant resistance against plant viruses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ronde, de D.; Butterbach, P.B.E.; Kormelink, R.J.M.

    2014-01-01

    To establish a successful infection plant viruses have to overcome a defense system composed of several layers. This review will overview the various strategies plants employ to combat viral infections with main emphasis on the current status of single dominant resistance (R) genes identified agains

  18. The Whitefly Bemisia tabaci Knottin-1 Gene Is Implicated in Regulating the Quantity of Tomato Yellow Leaf Curl Virus Ingested and Transmitted by the Insect

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aliza Hariton Shalev

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The whitefly Bemisia tabaci is a major pest to agricultural crops. It transmits begomoviruses, such as Tomato yellow leaf curl virus (TYLCV, in a circular, persistent fashion. Transcriptome analyses revealed that B. tabaci knottin genes were responsive to various stresses. Upon ingestion of tomato begomoviruses, two of the four knottin genes were upregulated, knot-1 (with the highest expression and knot-3. In this study, we examined the involvement of B. tabaci knottin genes in relation to TYLCV circulative transmission. Knottins were silenced by feeding whiteflies with knottin dsRNA via detached tomato leaves. Large amounts of knot-1 transcripts were present in the abdomen of whiteflies, an obligatory transit site of begomoviruses in their circulative transmission pathway; knot-1 silencing significantly depleted the abdomen from knot-1 transcripts. Knot-1 silencing led to an increase in the amounts of TYLCV ingested by the insects and transmitted to tomato test plants by several orders of magnitude. This effect was not observed following knot-3 silencing. Hence, knot-1 plays a role in restricting the quantity of virions an insect may acquire and transmit. We suggest that knot-1 protects B. tabaci against deleterious effects caused by TYLCV by limiting the amount of virus associated with the whitefly vector.

  19. Initial development of a set of introgression lines from Solanum peruvianum PI 126944 into tomato:exploitation of resistance to viruses

    OpenAIRE

    Julián Rodríguez, Olga; Herraiz García, Francisco Javier; Corella, S.; Lolli Rodríguez, María Iciar Di; Soler Aleixandre, Salvador; Díez Niclós, Mª José Teresa De Jesús; Pérez De Castro, Ana María

    2013-01-01

    Resistance to Tomato yellow leaf curl virus (TYLCV) and Tomato spotted wilt virus (TSWV), among other diseases, has been reported in Solanum peruvianum PI 126944. Introgression lines (ILs) from S. peruvianum PI 126944 into the genetic background of cultivated tomato (S. lycopersicum) are being developed. Several generations were derived from three interspecific hybrids previously obtained.A lot of crosses and embryo rescue were required until the third backcross, due to the high degree of ...

  20. 番茄黄化曲叶病毒病暴发原因分析及防控对策%Analysis on the outbreaks of tomato yellow leaf curl virus and its control strategy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    尹哲; 杨普云; 刘树生; 赵中华; 单绪南

    2010-01-01

    @@ 番茄黄化曲叶病毒(Tomato yellow leaf curl virus,TYLCV)为双生病毒科(Geminniviridae)菜豆金色花叶病毒属(Begomovirus)成员[1].该类病毒通过B型烟粉虱和Q型烟粉虱进行传播.同时可经嫁接传播,但不能经机械摩擦或种子传播[2].

  1. Chromosomal rearrangements between tomato and Solanum chilense hamper mapping and breeding of the TYLCV resistance gene Ty-1

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verlaan, M.G.; Szinay, D.; Hutton, S.F.; Jong, de J.H.; Kormelink, R.J.M.; Visser, R.G.F.; Scott, J.W.; Bai, Y.

    2011-01-01

    Tomato yellow leaf curl disease, a devastating disease of Solanum lycopersicum (tomato), is caused by a complex of begomoviruses generally referred to as Tomato yellow leaf curl virus (TYLCV). Almost all breeding for TYLCV resistance has been based on the introgression of the Ty-1 resistance locus

  2. Cestrum yellow leaf curling virus (CmYLCV) promoter: a new strong constitutive promoter for heterologous gene expression in a wide variety of crops.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stavolone, Livia; Kononova, Maria; Pauli, Sandra; Ragozzino, Antonio; de Haan, Peter; Milligan, Steve; Lawton, Kay; Hohn, Thomas

    2003-11-01

    Appropriately regulated gene expression requires a suitable promoter. A number of promoters have been isolated and shown to be functional in plants, but only a few of them activate transcription of transgenes at high levels constitutively. We report here the cloning and characterization of a novel, constitutively expressed promoter isolated from Cestrum yellow leaf curling virus (CmYLCV), a double-stranded DNA plant pararetrovirus belonging to the Caulimoviridae family. The CmYLCV promoter is highly active in callus, meristems and vegetative and reproductive tissues in Arabidopsis thaliana, Nicotiana tabacum, Lycopersicon esculentum, Zea mays and Oryza sativa. Furthermore, the level of expression is comparable to, or higher than, that from the CaMV 35S, the 'super-promoter' or the maize ubiquitin 1 promoters, three frequently used promoters in agricultural biotechnology. The heritable, strong and constitutive activity in both monocotyledonous and dicotyledonous plants, combined with the extremely narrow CmYLCV host range, makes the CmYLCV promoter an attractive tool for regulating transgene expression in a wide variety of plant species.

  3. Sweet pepper confirmed as a reservoir host for tomato yellow leaf curl virus by both agro-inoculation and whitefly-mediated inoculation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kil, Eui-Joon; Byun, Hee-Seong; Kim, Sunhoo; Kim, Jaedeok; Park, Jungan; Cho, Seungchan; Yang, Dong-Cheol; Lee, Kyeong-Yeoll; Choi, Hong-Soo; Kim, Ji-Kwang; Lee, Sukchan

    2014-09-01

    Tomato yellow leaf curl virus (TYLCV), a member of the genus Begomovirus, has a single-stranded DNA genome. TYLCV can induce severe disease symptoms on tomato plants, but other hosts plants such as cucurbits and peppers are asymptomatic. A full-length DNA clone of a Korean TYLCV isolate was constructed by rolling-circle amplification from TYLCV-infected tomatoes in Korea. To assess relative susceptibility of sweet pepper varieties to TYLCV, 19 cultivars were inoculated with cloned TYLCV by agro-inoculation. All TYLCV-infected sweet peppers were asymptomatic, even though Southern hybridization and polymerase chain reaction analysis showed TYLCV genomic DNA accumulation in roots, stems, and newly produced shoots. Southern hybridization indicated that TYLCV replicated and moved systemically from agro-inoculated apical shoot tips to roots or newly produced shoots of sweet peppers. Whitefly-mediated inoculation experiments showed that TYLCV can be transmitted to tomatoes from TYLCV-infected sweet peppers. Taken together, these results indicate that sweet pepper can be a reservoir for TYLCV in nature.

  4. Development of Gene Expression and Gene Silencing Vectors Based onCotton Leaf Curl Virus for Functional Genomics in Cotton `%基于抗卷叶病毒棉花基因组研究的基因表达和基因沉默载体的构建

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shahid MANSOOR; Muhammad SAQIB; Mazhar HUSSAIN; Rob BRIDDON; Kauser A. MALIK; Yusuf ZAFAR

    2002-01-01

    @@ Cotton leaf curl virus is the first example of a cotton-infecting virus where infectious clones are available. Plant viruses are valuable tools in understanding plant biology as they can be engineered for expression of foreign genes or silencing of genes homologous to cloned genes.

  5. SlMAPK3 enhances tolerance to tomato yellow leaf curl virus (TYLCV) by regulating salicylic acid and jasmonic acid signaling in tomato (Solanum lycopersicum).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yunzhou; Qin, Lei; Zhao, Jingjing; Muhammad, Tayeb; Cao, Hehe; Li, Hailiang; Zhang, Yan; Liang, Yan

    2017-01-01

    Several recent studies have reported on the role of mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK3) in plant immune responses. However, little is known about how MAPK3 functions in tomato (Solanum lycopersicum L.) infected with tomato yellow leaf curl virus (TYLCV). There is also uncertainty about the connection between plant MAPK3 and the salicylic acid (SA) and jasmonic acid (JA) defense-signaling pathways. The results of this study indicated that SlMAPK3 participates in the antiviral response against TYLCV. Tomato seedlings were inoculated with TYLCV to investigate the possible roles of SlMAPK1, SlMAPK2, and SlMAPK3 against this virus. Inoculation with TYLCV strongly induced the expression and the activity of all three genes. Silencing of SlMAPK1, SlMAPK2, and SlMAPK3 reduced tolerance to TYLCV, increased leaf H2O2 concentrations, and attenuated expression of defense-related genes after TYLCV infection, especially in SlMAPK3-silenced plants. Exogenous SA and methyl jasmonic acid (MeJA) both significantly induced SlMAPK3 expression in tomato leaves. Over-expression of SlMAPK3 increased the transcript levels of SA/JA-mediated defense-related genes (PR1, PR1b/SlLapA, SlPI-I, and SlPI-II) and enhanced tolerance to TYLCV. After TYLCV inoculation, the leaves of SlMAPK3 over-expressed plants compared with wild type plants showed less H2O2 accumulation and greater superoxide dismutase (SOD), peroxidase (POD), catalase (CAT), and ascorbate peroxidase (APX) activity. Overall, the results suggested that SlMAPK3 participates in the antiviral response of tomato to TYLCV, and that this process may be through either the SA or JA defense-signaling pathways.

  6. SlMAPK3 enhances tolerance to tomato yellow leaf curl virus (TYLCV) by regulating salicylic acid and jasmonic acid signaling in tomato (Solanum lycopersicum)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yunzhou; Qin, Lei; Zhao, Jingjing; Muhammad, Tayeb; Cao, Hehe; Li, Hailiang; Zhang, Yan; Liang, Yan

    2017-01-01

    Several recent studies have reported on the role of mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK3) in plant immune responses. However, little is known about how MAPK3 functions in tomato (Solanum lycopersicum L.) infected with tomato yellow leaf curl virus (TYLCV). There is also uncertainty about the connection between plant MAPK3 and the salicylic acid (SA) and jasmonic acid (JA) defense-signaling pathways. The results of this study indicated that SlMAPK3 participates in the antiviral response against TYLCV. Tomato seedlings were inoculated with TYLCV to investigate the possible roles of SlMAPK1, SlMAPK2, and SlMAPK3 against this virus. Inoculation with TYLCV strongly induced the expression and the activity of all three genes. Silencing of SlMAPK1, SlMAPK2, and SlMAPK3 reduced tolerance to TYLCV, increased leaf H2O2 concentrations, and attenuated expression of defense-related genes after TYLCV infection, especially in SlMAPK3-silenced plants. Exogenous SA and methyl jasmonic acid (MeJA) both significantly induced SlMAPK3 expression in tomato leaves. Over-expression of SlMAPK3 increased the transcript levels of SA/JA-mediated defense-related genes (PR1, PR1b/SlLapA, SlPI-I, and SlPI-II) and enhanced tolerance to TYLCV. After TYLCV inoculation, the leaves of SlMAPK3 over-expressed plants compared with wild type plants showed less H2O2 accumulation and greater superoxide dismutase (SOD), peroxidase (POD), catalase (CAT), and ascorbate peroxidase (APX) activity. Overall, the results suggested that SlMAPK3 participates in the antiviral response of tomato to TYLCV, and that this process may be through either the SA or JA defense-signaling pathways. PMID:28222174

  7. Fontes de resistência em tomateiro aos begomovírus bissegmentados Tomato yellow spot virus e Tomato severe rugose virus Sources of resistance in tomato to bipartite begomoviruses Tomato yellow spot virus and Tomato severe rugose virus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco D Hurtado

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Os begomovírus causam doenças de grande importância econômica em diversas culturas, principalmente em regiões tropicais e subtropicais. Juntamente com outras famílias de vírus, os begomovírus têm causado grande prejuízo para os produtores de tomate in natura e para processamento industrial. O objetivo deste trabalho foi avaliar o comportamento de 11 genótipos resistentes ao Tomato yellow leaf curl virus (TYLCV frente à infecção pelos begomovírus Tomato yellow spot virus (ToYSV e Tomato severe rugose virus (ToSRV em condições de casa-vegetação. A inoculação das plantas foi realizada via biobalística no estádio de duas folhas verdadeiras. A infecção viral confirmou-se pelo desenvolvimento dos sintomas e pela técnica de hibridização dot blot. Selecionaram-se como promissores os genótipos STY2, STY5, STY6 e L7, por não apresentarem sintomas e por terem concentrações virais muito baixas para os dois vírus. O espectro de resistência dos genes Ty-1 e Ty-2 não resultaram efetivos ante as espécies virais empregadas no estudo. As linhagens TY52, H24 e CLN2116B, portadoras destes genes, foram suscetíveis aos vírus ToYSV e ToSRV.Begomoviruses cause diseases of major economic importance in many crops, especially in tropical and subtropical regions. Together with other families of viruses, the begomoviruses cause great damage for producers of fresh and processed tomatoes. The objective of this study was to evaluate the behavior of 11 resistant genotypes to Tomato yellow leaf curl virus (TYLCV when infected by the begomoviruses Tomato severe rugose virus (ToSRV and Tomato yellow spot virus (ToYSV under greenhouse conditions. Tomato plants were inoculated by biobalistic method when displaying two true leaves. Viral infection was confirmed by visual observation of symptoms and by dot blot hybridization. Genotypes STY2, STY5, STY6 and L7 were selected as promising due to the absence of symptoms and very low viral

  8. Engineering resistance against potato virus Y.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vlugt, van der R.A.A.

    1993-01-01

    Potato virus Y is the type species of the potyvirus genus, the largest genus of the plant virus family Potyviridae. The virus causes serious problems in the cultivation of several Solanaceous crops and although certain poly- and monogenic resistances are available, these can not always be employed,

  9. 棉花曲叶病毒对棉花造成的经济损失评估%The economic losses of Cottone leaf curl virus invading China on cotton

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    饶玉燕; 沈玲丽; 朱水芳; 严进; 黄冠胜

    2011-01-01

    棉花曲叶病毒(Cotton leaf curl virus)是我国进境检疫性病毒,严重危害棉花的生长,给棉花生产带来巨大经济损失.文中分析此病毒可能给棉花生产所造成的损失,包括直接经济损失、间接经济损失和防治费用.估算了棉花曲叶病毒对棉花造成的经济损失值为77.27亿元~498.61亿元.%The Cotton leaf curl virus as a quarantine virus in China severly harmed cotton, and leaded to seriously economical losing. In this paper we analyzed all the possible losses including three parts: direct economic losses,indirect economic losses and the cost of its control on this virus, and estimated the losses would be about 7727 million to 49 861 million yuan RMB.

  10. MicroRNA profiling of the whitefly Bemisia tabaci Middle East-Aisa Minor I following the acquisition of Tomato yellow leaf curl China virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Bi; Wang, Lanlan; Chen, Fangyuan; Yang, Xiuling; Ding, Ming; Zhang, Zhongkai; Liu, Shu-Sheng; Wang, Xiao-Wei; Zhou, Xueping

    2016-02-02

    The begomoviruses are the largest and most economically important group of plant viruses exclusively vectored by whitefly (Bemisia tabaci) in a circulative, persistent manner. During this process, begomoviruses and whitefly vectors have developed close relationships and complex interactions. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying these interactions remain largely unknown, and the microRNA profiles for viruliferous and nonviruliferous whiteflies have not been studied. Sequences of Argonaute 1(Ago1) and Dicer 1 (Dcr1) genes were cloned from B. tabaci MEAM1 cDNAs. Subsequently, deep sequencing of small RNA libraries from uninfected and Tomato yellow leaf curl China virus (TYLCCNV)-infected whiteflies was performed. The conserved and novel miRNAs were identified using the release of miRBase Version 19.0 and the prediction software miRDeep2, respectively. The sequencing results of selected deregulated and novel miRNAs were further confirmed using quantitative reverse transcription-PCR. Moreover, the previously published B. tabaci MEAM1 transcriptome database and the miRNA target prediction algorithm miRanda 3.1 were utilized to predict potential targets for miRNAs. Gene Ontology (GO) analysis was also used to classify the potential enriched functional groups of their putative targets. Ago1 and Dcr1orthologs with conserved domains were identified from B. tabaci MEAM1. BLASTn searches and sequence analysis identified 112 and 136 conserved miRNAs from nonviruliferous and viruliferous whitefly libraries respectively, and a comparison of the conserved miRNAs of viruliferous and nonviruliferous whiteflies revealed 15 up- and 9 down-regulated conserved miRNAs. 7 novel miRNA candidates with secondary pre-miRNA hairpin structures were also identified. Potential targets of conserved and novel miRNAs were predicted using GO analysis, for the targets of up- and down-regulated miRNAs, eight and nine GO terms were significantly enriched. We identified Ago1 and Dcr1 orthologs

  11. Comparative transcriptome analysis in Bemisia tabaci in response to tomato yellow leaf curl virus and development of ribonucleic acid interference to manage whitefly-transmitted viruses

    Science.gov (United States)

    The whitefly, Bemisia tabaci transmits over 300 plant viruses, with the majority of them belonging to the Begomovirus genus. Begomoviruses are obligately transmitted to a wide range of agriculture crops, resulting in the loss of billions of dollars annually, while jeopardizing food security worldwid...

  12. Transcriptome analysis of Bemisia tabaci during tomato yellow leaf curl virus acquisition and ribonucleic acid interference to manage whitefly-transmitted viruses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Over 300 viruses are transmitted by the whitefly, Bemisia tabaci, with 90% of them belonging to the genus, Begomovirus. Begomoviruses are obligately transmitted by whiteflies to a wide range of agriculture crops, resulting in billions of dollars lost annually, while jeopardizing food security worldw...

  13. Insulin resistance, steatosis and hepatitis C virus

    OpenAIRE

    Mangia, Alessandra; Ripoli, Maria

    2013-01-01

    Epidemiological studies have shown an increased occurrence of metabolic disorders such as insulin resistance (IR) and steatosis in patients with hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection. IR is believed to represent one of the central clinical features of the “metabolic syndrome” and the major pathogenetic factor for type 2 diabetes mellitus. In patients with chronic HCV hepatitis, IR may have several dangerous consequences such as accelerated progression of liver fibrosis, resistance to antiviral th...

  14. Engineering resistance to plant viruses: Present status and future prospects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plant viruses cause severe crop losses across the globe. Resistant cultivars together with pesticide application are commonly used to avoid the losses caused by plant viruses. However, very limited success has been achieved at diminishing the impact of plant viruses. Use of virus resistant plant is ...

  15. Diversity, Mutation and Recombination Analysis of Cotton Leaf Curl Geminiviruses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huma Saleem

    Full Text Available The spread of cotton leaf curl disease in China, India and Pakistan is a recent phenomenon. Analysis of available sequence data determined that there is a substantial diversity of cotton-infecting geminiviruses in Pakistan. Phylogenetic analyses indicated that recombination between two major groups of viruses, cotton leaf curl Multan virus (CLCuMuV and cotton leaf curl Kokhran virus (CLCuKoV, led to the emergence of several new viruses. Recombination detection programs and phylogenetic analyses showed that CLCuMuV and CLCuKoV are highly recombinant viruses. Indeed, CLCuKoV appeared to be a major donor virus for the coat protein (CP gene, while CLCuMuV donated the Rep gene in the majority of recombination events. Using recombination free nucleotide datasets the substitution rates for CP and Rep genes were determined. We inferred similar nucleotide substitution rates for the CLCuMuV-Rep gene (4.96X10-4 and CLCuKoV-CP gene (2.706X10-4, whereas relatively higher substitution rates were observed for CLCuMuV-CP and CLCuKoV-Rep genes. The combination of sequences with equal and relatively low substitution rates, seemed to result in the emergence of viral isolates that caused epidemics in Pakistan and India. Our findings also suggest that CLCuMuV is spreading at an alarming rate, which can potentially be a threat to cotton production in the Indian subcontinent.

  16. Study on the Color Analysis of Tomato Yellow Leaf Curl Virus Disease Based on Digital Images%基于数字图像的番茄黄化曲叶病毒病色彩分析研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李俊; 陈振德

    2013-01-01

    为实现番茄黄化曲叶病毒病的快速无损监测,利用计算机图像处理技术对番茄叶片图像进行研究。在3种颜色系统中比较9种颜色参数,发现其中5种色彩参数存在显著差异,通过进一步的分布统计研究,发现了各参数的最优区分区间。其中G、Y、Cb3个值对感病叶片的区分率均达到70%以上,最优区分点分别在135、121和110,可以作为TYLCVD的特征参数应用于识别模型为后续研究识别模型提供重要的参数依据。试验结果表明,基于色彩分析法对番茄黄化曲叶病毒病进行识别是可行的。%In order to achieve rapid non-destructive monitoring of tomato yellow leaf curl virus disease, the author analyzed the images of tomato leaves using computer image processing technology. The author compared 9 color parameters in 3 color systems. The study showed that there were significant differences in 5 color parameters. In a further study on distribution statistics, it was found the optimal distinguish interval of each parameter. Each distinguish rate of G, Yand Cbwas more than 70%. The optimal distinguish interval of each 3 value was 135, 121 and 110. This provided important parameter basis for the follow-up study on identify model. The result showed that it’s feasible to identify tomato yellow leaf curl virus disease based on color analysis.

  17. Molecular Identification and Sequence Analysis of Tobacco Leaf Curl Begomovirus from Jember, East Java, Indonesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SRI HENDRASTUTI HIDAYAT

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Begomovirus had been proved as the causal agent of leaf curl disease in tobacco in Indonesia, or commonly in Indonesia called as penyakit krupuk tembakau. Association of Begomovirus with the disease was further confirmed by sequence analysis. Amplification of the virus was conducted following whitefly (Bemisia tabaci Genn. transmission. Fragment of DNA 1.6 kb was amplified by polymerase chain reaction (PCR located within the replication initiator protein gene and coat protein gene (top region. Conserved sequence of stem loop region was found, included nonanucleotide sequence TAATATTAC present in all geminiviruses. Begomovirus associated with leaf curl disease in tobacco showed the closest relationship with Ageratum yellow vein virus - Zimbabwe, a strain of Tobacco leaf curl virus from Southern Africa. It was also known that Begomovirus associated with leaf curl disease in tobacco from Jember, East Java was different from other Indonesian Begomoviruses reported earlier.

  18. Gene expression profiling of the whitefly(Bemisia tabaci)Middle East-Asia Minor 1 feeding on healthy and Tomato yellow leaf curl China virus-infected tobacco

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jun-Min Li; Yong-Ming Ruan; Fang-Fang Li; Shu-Sheng Liu; Xiao-Wei Wang

    2011-01-01

    Begomoviruses are exclusively transmitted by whitefly(Bemisia tabaci)in a circulative,non-propagative manner.The influences of begomoviruses on whitefly vector are complex with both direct and indirect effects.However,the molecular mechanisms underlying these effects are poorly understood and the transcriptional profiles of whitefly on healthy and virus-infected plants have not yet been studied.Using suppression subtractive hybridization,we investigated the differentially expressed genes in whitefly Middle East-Asia Minor 1 feeding on healthy and Tomato yellow leaf curl China virus(TYLCCNV)infected tobacco.From the forward cDNA library,124 differentially expressed expression sequence tags(ESTs)were obtained which represent up-regulated genes in the whiteflies feeding on the infected tobacco.From the reverse library,112 ESTs were isolated which represent down-regulated genes.Among the up-regulated genes,we identified several genes that are probably involved in direct interaction between whitefly and TYLCCNV,including a 26/29-kDa proteinase that appears to participate in the elimination of foreign proteins,heparan sulfate proteoglycan which mediates the entry of several viruses into host cells and two genes of Rickettsia-a secondary endosymbiotic bacterium of whitefly.In addition,we identified a number of genes involved in metabolism,transcription and translation which might be the result of indirect effects of TYLCCNV on the whitefly via host plants.Collectively,our results suggest that TYLCCNV-infected tobacco changes the gene expression profiles of whitefly via both direct and indirect interactions.This study revealed a number of genes involved in whitefly-TYLCCNV-tobacco interactions and provided useful information for future study on this complex system.

  19. Hepatitis C Virus and Antiviral Drug Resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Seungtaek; Han, Kwang-Hyub; Ahn, Sang Hoon

    2016-01-01

    Since its discovery in 1989, hepatitis C virus (HCV) has been intensively investigated to understand its biology and develop effective antiviral therapies. The efforts of the previous 25 years have resulted in a better understanding of the virus, and this was facilitated by the development of in vitro cell culture systems for HCV replication. Antiviral treatments and sustained virological responses have also improved from the early interferon monotherapy to the current all-oral regimens using direct-acting antivirals. However, antiviral resistance has become a critical issue in the treatment of chronic hepatitis C, similar to other chronic viral infections, and retreatment options following treatment failure have become important questions. Despite the clinical challenges in the management of chronic hepatitis C, substantial progress has been made in understanding HCV, which may facilitate the investigation of other closely related flaviviruses and lead to the development of antiviral agents against these human pathogens. PMID:27784846

  20. Purification of tomato yellow leaf curl geminivirus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luisoni, E; Milne, R G; Vecchiati, M

    1995-07-01

    Attempts were made to find a good purification procedure for tomato yellow leaf curl virus (TYLCV), a dangerous and continuously spreading whitefly-transmitted germinivirus, up to now only partially purified. Electron microscopy, serology and spectrophotometry were used to evaluate different procedures. The scheme finally adopted was the following: collect leaves and stems from Nicotiana benthamiana graft-infected 45-60 days previously (5-10 g/plant); homogenize with 0.5 M phosphate buffer pH 6 containing 2.5 mM NaEDTA, 10 mM Na2SO3, 0.1% 2-mercaptoethanol, 1% Triton X-100 and 0.1% Driselase (3-4 ml of buffer for each g of material); incubate overnight on ice with gentle agitation; filter; emulsify with 15% cold chloroform; centrifuge at low speed; ultracentrifuge supernatant; resuspend pellets in 0.5 M phosphate buffer pH 7 containing 2.5 mM NaEDTA; centrifuge at low speed; repeat resuspension of the pellets and low-speed centrifugation; ultracentrifuge the pooled supernatant on a Cs2SO4 gradient (e.g. for 5 h at 41,000 rpm); collect the virus band and dialyse or ultracentrifuge the virus. The virus yield was 5-10 mg per kg of tissue.

  1. Breeding Beans with Bruchid and Multiple Virus Resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bean common mosaic virus (BCMV) and bean common mosaic necrosis virus (BCMNV) are worldwide threats to dry bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) production. Beans planted in the lowlands of Central America and the Caribbean also need resistance to Bean golden yellow mosaic virus (BGYMV). The common bean weev...

  2. Influenza virus resistance to oseltamivir: what are the implications?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fleming, D.M.; Elliot, A.J.; Meijer, A.; Paget, W.J.

    2009-01-01

    Influenza caused by an oseltamivir-resistant influenza A(H1N1) virus was widespread across Europe during the 2007–08 winter. About 25% of A(H1N1) viruses tested in the European Influenza Surveillance Scheme (EISS) were resistant with an H274Y mutation in the neuraminidase glycoprotein. Early indicat

  3. Influenza virus resistance to oseltamivir: what are the implications?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fleming, D.M.; Elliot, A.J.; Meijer, A.; Paget, W.J.

    2009-01-01

    Influenza caused by an oseltamivir-resistant influenza A(H1N1) virus was widespread across Europe during the 2007–08 winter. About 25% of A(H1N1) viruses tested in the European Influenza Surveillance Scheme (EISS) were resistant with an H274Y mutation in the neuraminidase glycoprotein. Early

  4. The C2 Protein from the Geminivirus Tomato Yellow Leaf Curl Sardinia Virus Decreases Sensitivity to Jasmonates and Suppresses Jasmonate-Mediated Defences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tábata Rosas-Díaz

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available An increasing body of evidence points at a role of the plant hormones jasmonates (JAs in determining the outcome of plant-virus interactions. Geminiviruses, small DNA viruses infecting a wide range of plant species worldwide, encode a multifunctional protein, C2, which is essential for full pathogenicity. The C2 protein has been shown to suppress the JA response, although the current view on the extent of this effect and the underlying molecular mechanisms is incomplete. In this work, we use a combination of exogenous hormone treatments, microarray analysis, and pathogen infections to analyze, in detail, the suppression of the JA response exerted by C2. Our results indicate that C2 specifically affects certain JA-induced responses, namely defence and secondary metabolism, and show that plants expressing C2 are more susceptible to pathogen attack. We propose a model in which C2 might interfere with the JA response at several levels.

  5. Fontes de resistência em tomateiro aos begomovírus bissegmentados Tomato yellow spot virus e Tomato severe rugose virus Sources of resistance in tomato to bipartite begomoviruses Tomato yellow spot virus and Tomato severe rugose virus

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    Os begomovírus causam doenças de grande importância econômica em diversas culturas, principalmente em regiões tropicais e subtropicais. Juntamente com outras famílias de vírus, os begomovírus têm causado grande prejuízo para os produtores de tomate in natura e para processamento industrial. O objetivo deste trabalho foi avaliar o comportamento de 11 genótipos resistentes ao Tomato yellow leaf curl virus (TYLCV) frente à infecção pelos begomovírus Tomato yellow spot virus (ToYSV) e Tomato seve...

  6. Pathogen derived resistance to Potato virus Y: mechanisms and risks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. MÄKI-VALKAMA

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Since the concept of pathogen derived resistance (PDR was proposed in 1985, genetic transformation of plants to express virus-derived sequences has been used to engineer resistance to many viruses. This paper reviews PDR approaches to Potato virus Y (PVY, type member of the genus Potyvirus. PDR to viruses operates often through RNA-mediated resistance mechanisms that do not require protein expression. Studies on the RNA-mediated resistance have led to the discovery of post-transcriptional gene silencing (PTGS, a mechanism that controls gene expression in eukaryotic cells and provides natural protection against virus infections. Viruses, in turn, can suppress the PTGS with some of their proteins, such as the helper component-proteinase protein of PVY. Expression of PVY proteins in transgenic plants entails a risk for heterologous encapsidation or synergism with viruses that infect the PVY-resistant transgenic plant. These risks are avoided using RNA-mediated resistance, but a risk still exists for recombination between the transgene transcript and the RNA genome of the infecting virus, which may create a virus with altered properties. The harmful consequences can be limited to some extent by removing functional motifs from the viral sequence used as a transgene.;

  7. Isolation and characterization of cidofovir resistant vaccinia viruses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prichard Mark N

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The emergence of drug resistant viruses, together with the possibility of increased virulence, is an important concern in the development of new antiviral compounds. Cidofovir (CDV is a phosphonate nucleotide that is approved for use against cytomegalovirus retinitis and for the emergency treatment of smallpox or complications following vaccination. One mode of action for CDV has been demonstrated to be the inhibition of the viral DNA polymerase. Results We have isolated several CDV resistant (CDVR vaccinia viruses through a one step process, two of which have unique single mutations within the DNA polymerase. An additional resistant virus isolate provides evidence of a second site mutation within the genome involved in CDV resistance. The CDVR viruses were 3–7 fold more resistant to the drug than the parental viruses. The virulence of the CDVR viruses was tested in mice inoculated intranasally and all were found to be attenuated. Conclusion Resistance to CDV in vaccinia virus can be conferred individually by at least two different mutations within the DNA polymerase gene. Additional genes may be involved. This one step approach for isolating resistant viruses without serial passage and in the presence of low doses of drug minimizes unintended secondary mutations and is applicable to other potential antiviral agents.

  8. Biology and interactions of two distinct monopartite begomoviruses and betasatellites associated with radish leaf curl disease in India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Singh AK

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Emerging whitefly transmitted begomoviruses are major pathogens of vegetable and fibre crops throughout the world, particularly in tropical and sub-tropical regions. Mutation, pseudorecombination and recombination are driving forces for the emergence and evolution of new crop-infecting begomoviruses. Leaf curl disease of field grown radish plants was noticed in Varanasi and Pataudi region of northern India. We have identified and characterized two distinct monopartite begomoviruses and associated beta satellite DNA causing leaf curl disease of radish (Raphanus sativus in India. Results We demonstrate that RaLCD is caused by a complex of two Old World begomoviruses and their associated betasatellites. Radish leaf curl virus-Varanasi is identified as a new recombinant species, Radish leaf curl virus (RaLCV sharing maximum nucleotide identity of 87.7% with Tomato leaf curl Bangladesh virus-[Bangladesh:2] (Accession number AF188481 while the virus causing radish leaf curl disease-Pataudi is an isolate of Croton yellow vein mosaic virus-[India] (CYVMV-IN (Accession number AJ507777 sharing 95.8% nucleotide identity. Further, RDP analysis revealed that the RaLCV has a hybrid genome, a putative recombinant between Euphorbia leaf curl virus and Papaya leaf curl virus. Cloned DNA of either RaLCV or CYVMV induced mild leaf curl symptoms in radish plants. However, when these clones (RaLCV or CYVMV were individually co-inoculated with their associated cloned DNA betasatellite, symptom severity and viral DNA levels were increased in radish plants and induced typical RaLCD symptoms. To further extend these studies, we carried out an investigation of the interaction of these radish-infecting begomoviruses and their associated satellite, with two tomato infecting begomoviruses (Tomato leaf curl Gujarat virus and Tomato leaf curl New Delhi virus. Both of the tomato-infecting begomoviruses showed a contrasting and differential interaction with

  9. A review of the mechanisms and components that determine the transmission efficiency of Tomato yellow leaf curl virus (Geminiviridae; Begomovirus) by its whitefly vector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghanim, Murad

    2014-06-24

    Begomoviruses are a group of icosahedral single stranded DNA viruses exclusively transmitted by the sweet potato whitefly Bemisia tabaci in a persistent, circulative manner. In this mode of transmission, begomoviruses are acquired by their insect vector as intact virions from the plant phloem, move along the food canal, foregut and esophagus and reach the midgut where they are absorbed into the hemolymph via the filter chamber. The filter chamber is the site where most of the ingested food is filtered, and the first site where the majority of begomoviruses appear to be translocated into the hemolymph via unknown proteins or receptors. Transport from the filter chamber to the hemolymph is aided by a Heat Shock Protein 70. Virus particles not translocated across the filter chamber circulate in the midgut loop but it is not known whether absorption into the hemolymph occurs along this loop. Localization studies have confirmed that begomoviruses are not associated with the hindgut and absorption of virions in this organ is unlikely. In the hemolymph, virions have been shown to interact with a GroEL chaperone produced by the whitefly's endosymbiontic bacteria for ensuring their safe journey to the salivary glands. Virions penetrate the primary salivary glands via unknown proteins or receptors and are transported and secreted outside the whitefly to the plant with salivary secretions. Several recent studies have demonstrated the implications of insect and endosymbiont proteins such as the heat shock protein 70 and the bacterial GroEL protein, in the transmission of begomoviruses by B. tabaci. Additional studies attempting to identify other proteins that aid or interact with begomoviruses along their circulation pathway in the whitefly are reviewed in this paper.

  10. Editing plants for virus resistance using CRISPR-Cas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, J C; Hu, J S

    This minireview summarizes recent advancements using the clustered regularly interspaced palindromic repeats-associated nuclease systems (CRISPR-Cas) derived from prokaryotes to breed plants resistant to DNA and RNA viruses. The CRISPR-Cas system represents a powerful tool able to edit and insert novel traits into plants precisely at chosen loci offering enormous advantages to classical breeding. Approaches to engineering plant virus resistance in both transgenic and non-transgenic plants are discussed. Iterations of the CRISPR-Cas system, FnCas9 and C2c2 capable of editing RNA in eukaryotic cells offer a particular advantage for providing resistance to RNA viruses which represent the great majority of known plant viruses. Scientists have obtained conflicting results using gene silencing technology to produce transgenic plants resistant to geminiviruses. CRISPR-Cas systems engineered in plants to target geminiviruses have consistently reduced virus accumulation providing increased resistance to virus infection. CRISPR-Cas may provide novel and reliable approaches to control geminiviruses and other ssDNA viruses such as Banana bunchy top virus (BBTV).

  11. A Jasmonate-Inducible Defense Trait Transferred from Wild into Cultivated Tomato Establishes Increased Whitefly Resistance and Reduced Viral Disease Incidence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Escobar-Bravo, R.; Alba, J.M.; Pons, C.; Granell, A.; Kant, M.R.; Moriones, E.; Fernández-Muñoz, R.

    2016-01-01

    Whiteflies damage tomatoes mostly via the viruses they transmit. Cultivated tomatoes lack many of the resistances of their wild relatives. In order to increase protection to its major pest, the whitefly Bemisia tabaci and its transmitted Tomato Yellow Leaf Curl Virus (TYLCV), we introgressed a

  12. A Jasmonate-Inducible Defense Trait Transferred from Wild into Cultivated Tomato Establishes Increased Whitefly Resistance and Reduced Viral Disease Incidence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Escobar-Bravo, R.; Alba, J.M.; Pons, C.; Granell, A.; Kant, M.R.; Moriones, E.; Fernández-Muñoz, R.

    2016-01-01

    Whiteflies damage tomatoes mostly via the viruses they transmit. Cultivated tomatoes lack many of the resistances of their wild relatives. In order to increase protection to its major pest, the whitefly Bemisia tabaci and its transmitted Tomato Yellow Leaf Curl Virus (TYLCV), we introgressed a trich

  13. 番茄黄化曲叶病毒对温室白粉虱适合度的影响%Effects of tomato yellow leaf curl virus on the fitness of greenhouse whitefly

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    付雪; 赵奎军; 赵娜; 谭巍; 裴海英; 闫春秀; 叶乐夫

    2015-01-01

    Objectives] The greenhouse whitefly is a major insect pest of multiple horticultural and vegetable crops in Northern China. The sweet potato whitefly species complex is another pest species that has recently spread into parts of Heilongjiang Province as a result of the flower trade and is rapidly replacing native species to become the new dominant species. The tomato yellow leaf curl virus (TYLCV) is a begomovirus transmitted by the sweet potato whitefly that can cause serious damage to plant crops. There has been little recent research on the effect of this virus on the greenhouse whitefly, or on competition between these two whitefly species. [Methods] We observed the population dynamics of both whitefly species on infected and un-infected tomato plants and related these to host plant’s morphological and physical indices. [Results] 1) Tomato plants infested by the sweet potato whitefly became short and thin with more root biomass; 2) Plants infested with the greenhouse whitefly became a little shorter but thicker; 3) Infected plants became shorter and thicker (or thinner), without significant root variance; 4) Compared with infested plants, plants that were both infected with the virus and infested with the greenhouse whitefly became shorter and thinner with a sharp decrease in root biomass, whereas those infested with the sweet potato whitefly showed much reduced symptoms; 5) Different enzymes responded differently to plant infection; higher AchE activity injured plants but higher GST was beneficial. [Conclusion] Infestation by the sweet potato whitefly injured tomato seedlings, but the greenhouse whitefly didn’t directly affect tomato plants; virus infection reduces the plant response to sweet potato whitefly infestation, but enhances the response to infestation by the greenhouse whitefly, that is to say, the growth and development of infected plants infested by the greenhouse whitefly was significantly suppressed. The sweet potato whitefly laid less eggs

  14. Resistance maximization principle for defending networks against virus attack

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Angsheng; Zhang, Xiaohui; Pan, Yicheng

    2017-01-01

    We investigate the defending of networks against virus attack. We define the resistance of a network to be the maximum number of bits required to determine the code of the module that is accessible from random walk, from which random walk cannot escape. We show that for any network G, R(G) =H1(G) -H2(G) , where R(G) is the resistance of G, H1(G) and H2(G) are the one- and two-dimensional structural information of G, respectively, and that resistance maximization is the principle for defending networks against virus attack. By using the theory, we investigate the defending of real world networks and of the networks generated by the preferential attachment and the security models. We show that there exist networks that are defensible by a small number of controllers from cascading failure of any virus attack. Our theory demonstrates that resistance maximization is the principle for defending networks against virus attacks.

  15. Transgenic strategies to confer resistance against viruses in rice plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takahide eSasaya

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Rice (Oryza sativa L. is cultivated in more than 100 countries and supports nearly half of the world’s population. Developing efficient methods to control rice viruses is thus an urgent necessity because viruses cause serious losses in rice yield. Most rice viruses are transmitted by insect vectors, notably planthoppers and leafhoppers. Viruliferous insect vectors can disperse their viruses over relatively long distances, and eradication of the viruses is very difficult once they become widespread. Exploitation of natural genetic sources of resistance is one of the most effective approaches to protect crops from virus infection; however, only a few naturally occurring rice genes confer resistance against rice viruses. In an effort to improve control, many investigators are using genetic engineering of rice plants as a potential strategy to control viral diseases. Using viral genes to confer pathogen-derived resistance against crops is a well-established procedure, and the expression of various viral gene products has proved to be effective in preventing or reducing infection by various plant viruses since the 1990s. RNA-interference (RNAi, also known as RNA silencing, is one of the most efficient methods to confer resistance against plant viruses on their respective crops. In this article, we review the recent progress, mainly conducted by our research group, in transgenic strategies to confer resistance against tenuiviruses and reoviruses in rice plants. Our findings also illustrate that not all RNAi constructs against viral RNAs are equally effective in preventing virus infection and that it is important to identify the viral Achilles’ heel gene to target for RNAi attack when engineering plants.

  16. 植物源抗病毒剂丁香酚防治番茄黄化曲叶病毒病的效果分析%Control Effect of Botanical Virucide Eugenol against Tomato Yellow Leaf Curl Virus Disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张晓艳; 陈浩; 张晓阳; 石志琦

    2013-01-01

    In this study, the field plot experiment was carried out to investigate the control effect of eugenol against tomato yellow leaf curl virus disease.The results showed that the control effect of using 20%eugenol EW for 4 times from tomato seedling stage was the highest (70.96%); the control effect of applying 20% eugenol EW for 3 times from tomato flowering stage was 65.07%;the control effect of first applying 20%guanidine・ copper wettable powder (WP) for 2 times and then using 20%euge-nol EW for 2 times was 60.31%, which was not significantly different from that of applying 20%eugenol EW;the continuous appli-cation of 20%guanidine・ copper WP for 4 times showed the lowest control effect (53.57%), which was significantly lower than that of all the above treatments.%采用田间小区试验的方法,研究丁香酚防治番茄黄化曲叶病毒病的效果,结果表明:从番茄苗期开始,施用4次20%丁香酚水乳剂的防效最高,为70.96%;从花期开始施用3次20%丁香酚水乳剂的防效为65.07%;先施用2次20%吗胍・铜可湿性粉剂,再施用2次20%丁香酚水乳剂的防效为60.31%,与20%丁香酚水乳剂处理没有显著差异;连续施用4次20%吗胍・铜可湿性粉剂的防效最低,为53.57%,显著低于其他处理。

  17. Spatial and temporal diversity of begomoviral complexes in papayas with leaf curl disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh-Pant, P; Pant, P; Mukherjee, S K; Mazumdar-Leighton, S

    2012-07-01

    Old World, monopartite begomoviruses associated with satellite DNA β were observed in papaya showing symptoms of leaf curl disease sampled randomly over five years from within a radius of 250 km in north-central India. Three groups of DNA A sequences were evident. One group resembled chili leaf curl virus infecting tomatoes (ChiLCuV). Another group resembled tomato leaf curl New Delhi virus (ToLCuNDV). The third group was novel (tentatively named papaya leaf crumple virus, PaLCrV), with less than 89% identity to known begomovirus sequences in the GenBank database. At least seven DNA A sequences were putative recombinants. The AC4-encoding regions exhibited highest numbers of non-synonymous substitutions. Most DNA β sequences resembled tomato leaf curl virus-associated DNA βs. A few DNA β sequences were similar to that of croton yellow vein mosaic virus-associated DNA β (CroYVMVβ). One DNA β sequence was novel and showed papayas grown in plantations, kitchen gardens and feral patches in the region are vulnerable to disease outbreak. No geographic or temporal patterns were discernable in the distribution of these viruses.

  18. Characterization of Brown Streak Virus-Resistant Cassava.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anjanappa, Ravi B; Mehta, Devang; Maruthi, M N; Kanju, Edward; Gruissem, Wilhelm; Vanderschuren, Hervé

    2016-07-01

    Cassava brown streak disease (CBSD) has become a major constraint to cassava production in East and Central Africa. The identification of new sources of CBSD resistance is essential to deploy CBSD mitigation strategies, as the disease is progressing westwards to new geographical areas. A stringent infection method based on top cleft-grafting combined with precise virus titer quantitation was utilized to screen 14 cassava cultivars and elite breeding lines. When inoculated with mixed infections of Cassava brown streak virus (CBSV) and Ugandan cassava brown streak virus (UCBSV), the scions of elite breeding lines KBH 2006/18 and KBH 2006/26 remained symptom-free during a 16-week period of virus graft inoculation, while susceptible varieties displayed typical CBSD infection symptoms at 4 weeks after grafting. The identified CBSD resistance was stable under the coinoculation of CBSV and UCBSV with cassava geminiviruses. Double-grafting experiments revealed that transmission of CBSV and UCBSV to CBSD-susceptible top scions was delayed when using intermediate scions of elite breeding lines KBH 2006/18 and KBH 2006/26. Nonetheless, comparison of virus systemic movement using scions from KBH2006/18 and a transgenic CBSD resistant 60444 line (60444-Hp9 line) showed that both CBSV and UCBSV move at undetectable levels through the stems. Further, protoplast-based assays of virus titers showed that the replication of CBSV is inhibited in the resistant line KBH2006/18, suggesting that the identified CBSD resistance is at least partially based on inhibition of virus replication. Our molecular characterization of CBSD resistance in cassava offers a robust virus-host system to further investigate the molecular determinants of CBSD resistance.

  19. Using Resurrected Ancestral Proviral Proteins to Engineer Virus Resistance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asunción Delgado

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Proviral factors are host proteins hijacked by viruses for processes essential for virus propagation such as cellular entry and replication. Pathogens and their hosts co-evolve. It follows that replacing a proviral factor with a functional ancestral form of the same protein could prevent viral propagation without fatally compromising organismal fitness. Here, we provide proof of concept of this notion. Thioredoxins serve as general oxidoreductases in all known cells. We report that several laboratory resurrections of Precambrian thioredoxins display substantial levels of functionality within Escherichia coli. Unlike E. coli thioredoxin, however, these ancestral thioredoxins are not efficiently recruited by the bacteriophage T7 for its replisome and therefore prevent phage propagation in E. coli. These results suggest an approach to the engineering of virus resistance. Diseases caused by viruses may have a devastating effect in agriculture. We discuss how the suggested approach could be applied to the engineering of plant virus resistance.

  20. Analysis of resistance and tolerance to virus infection in Drosophila

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Merkling, S.H.; Rij, R.P. van

    2015-01-01

    Host defense to virus infection involves both resistance mechanisms that reduce viral burden and tolerance mechanisms that limit detrimental effects of infection. The fruit fly, Drosophila melanogaster, has emerged as a model for identifying and characterizing the genetic basis of resistance and tol

  1. Preliminary Functional Studies on AC2, a Novel Trans-acting Factor from Cotton Leaf Curl Virus%棉花曲叶病毒反式作用因子AC2的功能初探

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    谢迎秋; 孟蒙; 朱祯; 吴茜; 徐鸿林; 刘玉乐

    2001-01-01

    Studies on tomato golden mosaic virus and African cassava mosaicvirus suggested that virion sense promoter was trans-activated in transient expression by AC2 encoded by geminivirus. The AC2 gene fragment of cotton leaf curl virus (CLCuV) was obtained from total DNA of CLCuV infected tobacco leaves by polymerase chain reaction, and the amplified DNA fragment was cloned into vector. Transient expression vectors were constructed by fusing the AC2 gene fragment with CaMV 35S promoter and nopaline terminator. These constructs were delivered into tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum L.) and cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.) leaf cells for transient expression by particle bombardment. Results indicated that activity of virion sense promoter was activated by AC2 and increased remarkably. However, the activity of trans-activated virion sense promoter was still lower than that of complementary sense promoter. Expression pattern of trans-activated virion sense promoter was similar to that of complementary sense promoter with the high activity in both mesophyll and vascular of leaf vein. In this paper, the expression behavior of AC2 in Agrobacterium-mediated transgenic plants was also discussed.%有关非洲木薯花叶病毒(ACMV)、番茄金色花叶病毒(TGMV)的研究表明,双生病毒编码的反式作用因子AC2反式激活病毒链基因启动子的瞬时表达。以棉花曲叶病毒(CLCuV)侵染的烟草叶片组织总DNA为模板,通过聚合酶链反应扩增CLCuV的AC2基因片段并插入克隆载体。将AC2置于CaMV35S启动子下构建了瞬时表达载体。通过基因枪法将质粒载体导入烟草(Nicotianatabacum L.)和棉花(Gossypium hirsutum L.)叶片细胞中进行瞬时表达,结果表明,在反式作用因子AC2的激活下,病毒链基因启动子驱动的GUS活性明显增强,然而激活后的病毒链基因启动子的活性仍低于互补链基因方向启动子;其表达方式与互补链基因启动子相似,即在叶肉及叶脉

  2. Transgenic tomato hybrids resistant to tomato spotted wilt virus infection.

    OpenAIRE

    Haan; Ultzen, T.; Prins, M.; Gielen, J.; Goldbach, R.; Grinsven, van, H.

    1996-01-01

    Tomato spotted wilt virus (TSWV) infections cause significant economic losses in the commercial culture of tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum). Culture practices have only been marginally effective in controlling TSWV. The ultimate way to minimize losses caused by TSWV is resistant varieties. These can be obtained by introgression of natural sources of resistance from wild relatives or by expressing viral sequences in transgenic tomato plants. We report high levels of resistance to TSWV obtained...

  3. Transgenic tomato hybrids resistant to tomato spotted wilt virus infection.

    OpenAIRE

    Haan, de, A.; Ultzen, T.; Prins, M.; Gielen, J; Goldbach, R; Grinsven, van, J.J.M.

    1996-01-01

    Tomato spotted wilt virus (TSWV) infections cause significant economic losses in the commercial culture of tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum). Culture practices have only been marginally effective in controlling TSWV. The ultimate way to minimize losses caused by TSWV is resistant varieties. These can be obtained by introgression of natural sources of resistance from wild relatives or by expressing viral sequences in transgenic tomato plants. We report high levels of resistance to TSWV obtained...

  4. The epidemiology and spread of drug resistant human influenza viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurt, Aeron C

    2014-10-01

    Significant changes in the circulation of antiviral-resistant influenza viruses have occurred over the last decade. The emergence and continued circulation of adamantane-resistant A(H3N2) and A(H1N1)pdm09 viruses mean that the adamantanes are no longer recommended for use. Resistance to the newer class of drugs, the neuraminidase inhibitors, is typically associated with poorer viral replication and transmission. But 'permissive' mutations, that compensated for impairment of viral function in A(H1N1) viruses during 2007/2008, enabled them to acquire the H275Y NA resistance mutation without fitness loss, resulting in their rapid global spread. Permissive mutations now appear to be present in A(H1N1)pdm09 viruses thereby increasing the risk that oseltamivir-resistant A(H1N1)pdm09 viruses may also spread globally, a concerning scenario given that oseltamivir is the most widely used influenza antiviral. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Scientists Create Mosquitoes Resistant to Dengue Virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to the dengue virus, which might eventually help control the spread of the disease in humans. The team at Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health in Baltimore genetically modified Aedes aegypti mosquitoes to boost their natural ability to fight ...

  6. 基于微流控芯片电泳的番茄黄化曲叶病毒快速检测%Microfluidic Electrophoresis Detection of Tomato yellow leaf curl virus(TYLCV)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    余明芬; 曾洪梅; 钟润涛; 赵小明; 邱德文

    2014-01-01

    控芯片电泳进行比较,确立了后者在核酸检测方面的应用价值;通过微流控芯片电泳对TYLCV PCR产物的检测,建立了基于微流控芯片电泳的TYLCV快速检测方法,为TYLCV的快速检测提供新的技术支持。%Objective]The objectives of this study are to explore the effect of microfluidic electrophoresis on detection of PCR products, build a detection method for Tomato yellow leaf curl virus (TYLCV) by electrophoresis in microfluidic chip, and to remedy the defect in reagent consumption, long time, lack of safety of agarose gel electrophoresis.[Method]Primers in relatively stable positions of TYLCV genome were designed, some primers in references were taken into account, and these selected primers were verified. TYLCV primers were screened out based on the criterion of specificity, stability, and sensitivity. DNA standardsφX174/BsuR I (HaeⅢ) marker was subjected to agarose gel electrophoresis and microfluidic electrophoresis, and the two methods were compared in supplies, time-consumption and sensitivity to confirm the value of microfluidic electrophoresis in nucleic acid detection. In order to evaluate the value of microfluidic electrophoresis in virus detection, the PCR amplification products of one pair of selected primers on the actual samples were processed by microfluidic electrophoresis.[Result]Fourteen pairs of TYLCV primers were screened out, 2 pairs came from the literatures and the other 12 pairs were designed in this study. Each pair of primers could meet the requirement for microfluidic detection. TYLCV-T was chosen from these primers for the subsequent study. By comparison of agarose gel electrophoresis and microfluidic electrophoresis, the time consumption and reagent consumption of microfluidic electrophoresis were 1/10 and 1/8 of those of agarose gel electrophoresis, respectively. The detection sensitivity of microfluidic electrophoresis was at least 103 times higher than that of agarose gel

  7. Detection and management of antiviral resistance for influenza viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boivin, Guy

    2013-11-01

    Neuraminidase inhibitors (NAIs) are first-line agents for the treatment and prevention of influenza virus infections. As for other antivirals, the development of resistance to NAIs has become an important concern particularly in the case of A(H1N1) viruses and oseltamivir. The most frequently reported change conferring oseltamivir resistance in that viral context is the H275Y neuraminidase mutation (N1 numbering). Recent studies have shown that, in the presence of the appropriate permissive mutations, the H275Y variant can retain virulence and transmissibility in some viral backgrounds. Most oseltamivir-resistant influenza A virus infections can be managed with the use of inhaled or intravenous zanamivir, another NAI. New NAI compounds and non-neuraminidase agents as well as combination therapies are currently in clinical evaluation for the treatment for severe influenza infections. © 2013 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  8. Is modulating virus virulence by induced systemic resistance realistic?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faoro, Franco; Gozzo, Franco

    2015-05-01

    Induction of plant resistance, either achieved by chemicals (systemic acquired resistance, SAR) or by rhizobacteria (induced systemic resistance, ISR) is a possible and/or complementary alternative to manage virus infections in crops. SAR mechanisms operating against viruses are diverse, depending on the pathosystem, and may inhibit virus replication as well as cell-to-cell and long-distance movement. Inhibition is often mediated by salicylic acid with the involvement of alternative oxidase and reactive oxygen species. However, salicylate may also stimulate a separate downstream pathway, leading to the induction of an additional mechanism, based on RNA-dependent RNA polymerase 1-mediated RNA silencing. Thus, SAR and RNA silencing would closely cooperate in the defence against virus infection. Despite tremendous recent progress in the knowledge of SAR mechanisms, only a few compounds, including benzothiadiazole and chitosan have been shown to reduce the severity of systemic virus disease in controlled environment and, more modestly, in open field. Finally, ISR induction, has proved to be a promising strategy to control virus disease, particularly by seed bacterization with a mixture of plant growth-promoting rhizobacteria. However, the use of any of these treatments should be integrated with cultivation practices that reduce vector pressure by the use of insecticides, or by Bt crops.

  9. Genetic control of leaf curl in maize.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Entringer, G C; Guedes, F L; Oliveira, A A; Nascimento, J P; Souza, J C

    2014-03-17

    Among the many implications of climatic change on agriculture, drought is expected to continue to have a major impact on agribusinesses. Leaf curling is an anatomical characteristic that might be potentially used to enhance plant tolerance to water deficit. Hence, we aimed to study the genetic control of leaf curl in maize. From 2 contrasting inbred lines for the trait, generations F1, F2, and the backcrosses were obtained. All of these generations were evaluated in a randomized block design with 2 replicates. Leaf curl samples were collected from 3 leaves above the first ear at the tasseling stage, and quantified by dividing the width of the leaf blade with natural curling against its extended width. The mean and variance components were estimated by the weighted least square method. It was found that the trait studied has predominance of the additive effects, with genetic control being attributed to few genes that favor selection and exhibit minimal influence from the environment.

  10. Cell type mediated resistance of vesicular stomatitis virus and Sendai virus to ribavirin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Nirav R; Sunderland, Amanda; Grdzelishvili, Valery Z

    2010-06-22

    Ribavirin (RBV) is a synthetic nucleoside analog with broad spectrum antiviral activity. Although RBV is approved for the treatment of hepatitis C virus, respiratory syncytial virus, and Lassa fever virus infections, its mechanism of action and therapeutic efficacy remains highly controversial. Recent reports show that the development of cell-based resistance after continuous RBV treatment via decreased RBV uptake can greatly limit its efficacy. Here, we examined whether certain cell types are naturally resistant to RBV even without prior drug exposure. Seven different cell lines from various host species were compared for RBV antiviral activity against two nonsegmented negative-strand RNA viruses, vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV, a rhabdovirus) and Sendai virus (SeV, a paramyxovirus). Our results show striking differences between cell types in their response to RBV, ranging from virtually no antiviral effect to very effective inhibition of viral replication. Despite differences in viral replication kinetics for VSV and SeV in the seven cell lines, the observed pattern of RBV resistance was very similar for both viruses, suggesting that cellular rather than viral determinants play a major role in this resistance. While none of the tested cell lines was defective in RBV uptake, dramatic variations were observed in the long-term accumulation of RBV in different cell types, and it correlated with the antiviral efficacy of RBV. While addition of guanosine neutralized RBV only in cells already highly resistant to RBV, actinomycin D almost completely reversed the RBV effect (but not uptake) in all cell lines. Together, our data suggest that RBV may inhibit the same virus via different mechanisms in different cell types depending on the intracellular RBV metabolism. Our results strongly point out the importance of using multiple cell lines of different origin when antiviral efficacy and potency are examined for new as well as established drugs in vitro.

  11. Cell type mediated resistance of vesicular stomatitis virus and Sendai virus to ribavirin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nirav R Shah

    Full Text Available Ribavirin (RBV is a synthetic nucleoside analog with broad spectrum antiviral activity. Although RBV is approved for the treatment of hepatitis C virus, respiratory syncytial virus, and Lassa fever virus infections, its mechanism of action and therapeutic efficacy remains highly controversial. Recent reports show that the development of cell-based resistance after continuous RBV treatment via decreased RBV uptake can greatly limit its efficacy. Here, we examined whether certain cell types are naturally resistant to RBV even without prior drug exposure. Seven different cell lines from various host species were compared for RBV antiviral activity against two nonsegmented negative-strand RNA viruses, vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV, a rhabdovirus and Sendai virus (SeV, a paramyxovirus. Our results show striking differences between cell types in their response to RBV, ranging from virtually no antiviral effect to very effective inhibition of viral replication. Despite differences in viral replication kinetics for VSV and SeV in the seven cell lines, the observed pattern of RBV resistance was very similar for both viruses, suggesting that cellular rather than viral determinants play a major role in this resistance. While none of the tested cell lines was defective in RBV uptake, dramatic variations were observed in the long-term accumulation of RBV in different cell types, and it correlated with the antiviral efficacy of RBV. While addition of guanosine neutralized RBV only in cells already highly resistant to RBV, actinomycin D almost completely reversed the RBV effect (but not uptake in all cell lines. Together, our data suggest that RBV may inhibit the same virus via different mechanisms in different cell types depending on the intracellular RBV metabolism. Our results strongly point out the importance of using multiple cell lines of different origin when antiviral efficacy and potency are examined for new as well as established drugs in vitro.

  12. Antiviral drug resistance of herpes simplex virus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stranska, Ruzena

    2004-01-01

    Infections with herpes simplex virus (HSV) usually have an asymptomatic or benign course. However, severe infections do occur, particularly in HIV/AIDS patients or transplant recipients, and may be life-threatening unless adequate antiviral therapy is given. Since its introduction in the early 1980

  13. Antiviral drug resistance of herpes simplex virus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stranska, Ruzena

    2004-01-01

    Infections with herpes simplex virus (HSV) usually have an asymptomatic or benign course. However, severe infections do occur, particularly in HIV/AIDS patients or transplant recipients, and may be life-threatening unless adequate antiviral therapy is given. Since its introduction in the early

  14. Suppressors of RNA silencing encoded by tomato leaf curl betasatellites

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Richa Shukla; Sunita Dalal; V G Malathi

    2013-03-01

    Virus encoded RNA-silencing suppressors (RSSs) are the key components evolved by the viruses to counter RNA-silencing defense of plants. Whitefly-transmitted begomoviruses infecting tomato crop code for five different proteins, ORF AC4, ORF AC2 and ORF AV2 in DNA-A component, ORF BV1 in DNA-B and ORF C1 in satellite DNA which are predicted to function as silencing suppressors. In the present study suppressor function of ORF C1 of three betasatellites Tomato leaf curl Bangalore betasatellite ToLCBB-[IN:Hess:08], Cotton leaf curl Multan betasatellite CLCuMB–[IN:Sri:02] and Luffa leaf distortion betasatellite LuLDB-[IN:Lu:04] were examined. Agroinfiltration of GFP-silenced Nicotiana tabaccum cv. Xanthi with the cells expressing C1 protein resulted in reversal of silenced GFP expression. GFP-siRNA level was more than 50-fold lower compared to silenced plants in plants infiltrated with C1 gene from ToLCBB. However, in the case of 35S-C1 CLCuMB and 35S-C1 LuLDB construct, although GFP was expressed, siRNA level was not reduced, indicating that the step at which C1 interfere in RNA-silencing pathway is different.

  15. Suppressors of RNA silencing encoded by tomato leaf curl betasatellites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shukla, Richa; Dalal, Sunita; Malathi, V G

    2013-03-01

    Virus encoded RNA-silencing suppressors (RSSs) are the key components evolved by the viruses to counter RNA-silencing defense of plants. Whitefly-transmitted begomoviruses infecting tomato crop code for five different proteins, ORF AC4, ORF AC2 and ORF AV2 in DNA-A component, ORF BV1 in DNA-B and ORF beta C1 in satellite DNA beta which are predicted to function as silencing suppressors. In the present study suppressor function of ORF beta C1 of three betasatellites Tomato leaf curl Bangalore betasatellite ToLCBB-[IN:Hess:08], Cotton leaf curl Multan betasatellite CLCuMB-[IN:Sri:02] and Luffa leaf distortion betasatellite LuLDB-[IN:Lu:04] were examined. Agroinfiltration of GFP-silenced Nicotiana tabaccum cv. Xanthi with the cells expressing betaC1 protein resulted in reversal of silenced GFP expression. GFP-siRNA level was more than 50-fold lower compared to silenced plants in plants infiltrated with betaC1 gene from ToLCBB. However, in the case of 35S-beta C1 CLCuMB and 35S- beta C1 LuLDB construct, although GFP was expressed, siRNA level was not reduced, indicating that the step at which beta C1 interfere in RNA-silencing pathway is different.

  16. Transgenic tomato hybrids resistant to tomato spotted wilt virus infection.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haan, de P.; Ultzen, T.; Prins, M.; Gielen, J.; Goldbach, R.; Grinsven, van M.

    1996-01-01

    Tomato spotted wilt virus (TSWV) infections cause significant economic losses in the commercial culture of tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum). Culture practices have only been marginally effective in controlling TSWV. The ultimate way to minimize losses caused by TSWV is resistant varieties. These can

  17. Transgenic tomato hybrids resistant to tomato spotted wilt virus infection.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haan, de P.; Ultzen, T.; Prins, M.; Gielen, J.; Goldbach, R.; Grinsven, van M.

    1996-01-01

    Tomato spotted wilt virus (TSWV) infections cause significant economic losses in the commercial culture of tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum). Culture practices have only been marginally effective in controlling TSWV. The ultimate way to minimize losses caused by TSWV is resistant varieties. These can

  18. Hepatitis C Virus Resistance to Carbohydrate-Binding Agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izquierdo, Laure; Oliveira, Catarina; Fournier, Carole; Descamps, Véronique; Morel, Virginie; Dubuisson, Jean; Brochot, Etienne; Francois, Catherine; Castelain, Sandrine; Duverlie, Gilles; Helle, Francois

    2016-01-01

    Carbohydrate binding agents (CBAs), including natural lectins, are more and more considered as broad-spectrum antivirals. These molecules are able to directly inhibit many viruses such as Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV), Hepatitis C Virus (HCV), Dengue Virus, Ebola Virus or Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus through binding to envelope protein N-glycans. In the case of HIV, it has been shown that CBAs select for mutant viruses with N-glycosylation site deletions which are more sensitive to neutralizing antibodies. In this study we aimed at evaluating the HCV resistance to CBAs in vitro. HCV was cultivated in the presence of increasing Galanthus nivalis agglutinin (GNA), Cyanovirin-N, Concanavalin-A or Griffithsin concentrations, during more than eight weeks. At the end of lectin exposure, the genome of the isolated strains was sequenced and several potential resistance mutations in the E1E2 envelope glycoproteins were identified. The effect of these mutations on viral fitness as well as on sensitivity to inhibition by lectins, soluble CD81 or the 3/11 neutralizing antibody was assessed. Surprisingly, none of these mutations, alone or in combination, conferred resistance to CBAs. In contrast, we observed that some mutants were more sensitive to 3/11 or CD81-LEL inhibition. Additionally, several mutations were identified in the Core and the non-structural proteins. Thus, our results suggest that in contrast to HIV, HCV resistance to CBAs is not directly conferred by mutations in the envelope protein genes but could occur through an indirect mechanism involving mutations in other viral proteins. Further investigations are needed to completely elucidate the underlying mechanisms. PMID:26871442

  19. Hepatitis C Virus Resistance to Carbohydrate-Binding Agents.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laure Izquierdo

    Full Text Available Carbohydrate binding agents (CBAs, including natural lectins, are more and more considered as broad-spectrum antivirals. These molecules are able to directly inhibit many viruses such as Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV, Hepatitis C Virus (HCV, Dengue Virus, Ebola Virus or Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus through binding to envelope protein N-glycans. In the case of HIV, it has been shown that CBAs select for mutant viruses with N-glycosylation site deletions which are more sensitive to neutralizing antibodies. In this study we aimed at evaluating the HCV resistance to CBAs in vitro. HCV was cultivated in the presence of increasing Galanthus nivalis agglutinin (GNA, Cyanovirin-N, Concanavalin-A or Griffithsin concentrations, during more than eight weeks. At the end of lectin exposure, the genome of the isolated strains was sequenced and several potential resistance mutations in the E1E2 envelope glycoproteins were identified. The effect of these mutations on viral fitness as well as on sensitivity to inhibition by lectins, soluble CD81 or the 3/11 neutralizing antibody was assessed. Surprisingly, none of these mutations, alone or in combination, conferred resistance to CBAs. In contrast, we observed that some mutants were more sensitive to 3/11 or CD81-LEL inhibition. Additionally, several mutations were identified in the Core and the non-structural proteins. Thus, our results suggest that in contrast to HIV, HCV resistance to CBAs is not directly conferred by mutations in the envelope protein genes but could occur through an indirect mechanism involving mutations in other viral proteins. Further investigations are needed to completely elucidate the underlying mechanisms.

  20. Curl-meter of Electrical Fields In The Ground.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krylov, S. M.; Maibuk, Z.-Ju. Ja.; Nikiforova, N. N.

    A special instrument U curl-meter was designed and manufactured in the Institute of Physics of the Earth of RAS for measuring of variable electric fields during alternation of stressedly-deformed state in rock mass. The instrument consist the four-electrode unit and a circuit of analogue signal processing for separation of E U circulations or according to the StokesSs theorem, Curl E in absence of indirect sources. Four electrodes are laied out in rocks on angles of square and they are affixed by ring-type circuit to uninverting inputs of precision operational amplifiers. First input is connected to electrode N1, the second one is connected to N2 and so on. The independent inputs are grounded to a arbitrary point (the fifth electrode is SzeroT). The transmission factors of the circuit are set by resistors accurate to within 0.25 %. First and third, and also second and fourth outputs of the amplifiers are connected to the grad EX and grad EY calculation circuit (deduction circuits). So, if the vector components have different signs of both two EX values and two values EY, the gradient calculation circuit generates signal extremums. If in this case the signs inside pairs are identical , that means that the signal not- ring-type and it is absent on output (difference of the equal values with equal signs). The signals from outputs of the gradient calculations act into adding device for calculation of Curl E (circulation). Curl-meter differs by high security from clutters and from cues on any of inputs rather of "zero point" (ground) reacting only on a ring-type current, thus it is essential (on the order) the noise level and drift of operational amplifiers is moderated. Curl-meter works in a complex of measuring devices on Obninsk seismological polygon for study of behavior of superlow frequency of tectonic genesis electromagnetic emission. Through four inputs (electrode spacing 7x7 2, resistance between welding rods 0.8 - 1.1 kOm), manufactured from fine- dyspersated

  1. Resistance to hepatitis C virus: potential genetic and immunological determinants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mina, Michael M; Luciani, Fabio; Cameron, Barbara; Bull, Rowena A; Beard, Michael R; Booth, David; Lloyd, Andrew R

    2015-04-01

    Studies of individuals who were highly exposed but seronegative (HESN) for HIV infection led to the discovery that homozygosity for the Δ32 deletion mutation in the CCR5 gene prevents viral entry into target cells, and is associated with resistance to infection. Additionally, evidence for protective immunity has been noted in some HESN groups, such as sex workers in The Gambia. Population studies of individuals at high risk for hepatitis C virus infection suggest that an HESN phenotype exists. The body of evidence, which suggests that protective immunity allows clearance of hepatitis C virus without seroconversion is growing. Furthermore, proof-of-principle evidence from in-vitro studies shows that genetic polymorphisms can confer resistance to establishment of infection. This Review discusses the possibility that genetic mutations confer resistance against hepatitis C virus, and also explores evidence for protective immunity, including via genetically programmed variations in host responses. The data generally strengthens the notion that investigations of naturally arising polymorphisms within the hepatitis C virus interactome, and genetic association studies of well characterised HESN individuals, could identify potential targets for vaccine design and inform novel therapies.

  2. Generation of transgenic watermelon resistant to Zucchini yellow mosaic virus and Papaya ringspot virus type W.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Tsong-Ann; Chiang, Chu-Hui; Wu, Hui-Wen; Li, Chin-Mei; Yang, Ching-Fu; Chen, Jun-Han; Chen, Yu-Wen; Yeh, Shyi-Dong

    2011-03-01

    Zucchini yellow mosaic virus (ZYMV) and Papaya ringspot virus type W (PRSV W) are major limiting factors for production of watermelon worldwide. For the effective control of these two viruses by transgenic resistance, an untranslatable chimeric construct containing truncated ZYMV coat protein (CP) and PRSV W CP genes was transferred to commercial watermelon cultivars by Agrobacterium-mediated transformation. Using our protocol, a total of 27 putative transgenic lines were obtained from three cultivars of 'Feeling' (23 lines), 'China baby' (3 lines), and 'Quality' (1 line). PCR and Southern blot analyses confirmed that the chimeric construct was incorporated into the genomic DNA of the transformants. Greenhouse evaluation of the selected ten transgenic lines of 'Feeling' cultivar revealed that two immune lines conferred complete resistance to ZYMV and PRSV W, from which virus accumulation were not detected by Western blotting 4 weeks after inoculation. The transgenic transcript was not detected, but small interfering RNA (siRNA) was readily detected from the two immune lines and T(1) progeny of line ZW 10 before inoculation, indicating that RNA-mediated post-transcriptional gene silencing (PTGS) is the underlying mechanism for the double-virus resistance. The segregation ratio of T(1) progeny of the immune line ZW10 indicated that the single inserted transgene is nuclearly inherited and associated with the phenotype of double-virus resistance as a dominant trait. The transgenic lines derived from the commercial watermelon cultivars have great potential for control of the two important viruses and can be implemented directly without further breeding.

  3. Coevolution of host and virus: cellular localization of virus in myxoma virus infection of resistant and susceptible European rabbits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Best, S M; Collins, S V; Kerr, P J

    2000-11-10

    The coevolution of myxoma virus and the wild European rabbit in Australia and the development of resistance to myxomatosis in wild rabbits have been well described. However, the mechanism of resistance to myxomatosis in wild rabbits is not understood. To determine the basis of resistance, the pathogenesis of the virulent standard laboratory strain (SLS) and the attenuated Uriarra (Ur) strain of myxoma virus were examined in Australian wild rabbits that have been naturally selected in the field for resistance to myxomatosis and in laboratory rabbits which have never been selected for resistance. Virus was localized in tissue sections by immunofluorescence. In all cases virus antigen was initially present in dendritic cells of the dermis before localizing predominantly to the epidermis by Day 6. Antigen-containing cells were detected in the lymph nodes by 24 h after inoculation. Virus replication occurred predominantly in T lymphocytes of the paracortex but SLS also replicated in germinal centers. SLS replication induced loss of most lymphocytes from the lymph nodes of susceptible rabbits. Apoptosis of lymphocytes within the lymph nodes was a major feature of all infections. These apoptotic cells did not contain detectable viral antigen but were often adjacent to infected cells. Ongoing apoptosis of lymphocytes within lymph nodes was also a feature of the recovery phase when very few or no virus-infected cells could be detected. Differences between virulent and attenuated viruses in the wild and laboratory rabbits were predominantly in the degree of tissue pathology in the draining lymph node and distal lymph node and in the type of inflammatory responses, particularly in the skin. SLS infection of laboratory rabbits was associated with a very mild inflammatory response, often distant from the site of virus replication and comprised predominantly of neutrophils. In contrast, Ur-infected rabbits and SLS-infected wild rabbits had an intense inflammatory response

  4. Resistance breaking tomato spotted wilt virus isolates on resistant pepper varieties in Italy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crescenzi, A; Viggiano, A; Fanigliulo, A

    2013-01-01

    In spring 2012, resistance breaking (RB) isolates of tomato spotted wilt virus (TSWV) that overcome the resistance conferred by the Tsw gene in different pepper hybrids have been recovered in different locations in southern Italy (Campania and Apulia regions) in protected cultivation, about one month after transplant. The percentage of symptomatic plants was 5-10% and, only in particular cases of advanced stage of cultivation, it reached 30-50% at the end of cycle. All TSWV isolates induced similar systemic symptoms in all resistant infected pepper hybrids: yellowing or browning of apical leaves, which later become necrotic, long necrotic streakson stems, extending to the terminal shoots, complete necrosis of younger fruits and large necrotic streaks and spots on fruits formed after infection. On ripe fruits, yellow spots with concentric rings or necrotic streaks could be observed. Leaf extracts of these samples were tested in ELISA for the detection of TSWV, Cucumber mosaic virus (CMV), Tobacco mosaic virus (TMV), Tomato mosaic virus (ToMV), Impatiens necrotic spot virus (INSV), Potato virus Y (PVY), Alfalfa mosaic virus (AMV), Pepper mild mottle virus (PMMoV) and Pepper Mottle Virus (PepMoV). Only TSWV was detected in all the field samples tested. The correspondent virus isolates were inoculated mechanically and by Frankliniella occidentalis on to a set of different pepper and tomato hybrids, as well as on some herbaceous test plants, in order to investigate for their ability to overcome the resistance genes Tsw and Sw5, respectively. Tomato hybrids carrying the Sw5 gene were uninfected by all RB isolates, whereas all resistant pepper hybrids became systemically infected. RB isolates did not differ noticeably in transmission efficiency when they were tested with the thrips F. occidentalis. Obtained results demonstrate that evolved strains of TSWV have emerged, that they are able to overcome the Tsw resistance gene in pepper plants experimentally inoculated both

  5. Fontes de resistência em tomateiro aos begomovírus bissegmentados Tomato yellow spot virus e Tomato severe rugose virus

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    Os begomovírus causam doenças de grande importância econômica em diversas culturas, principalmente em regiões tropicais e subtropicais. Juntamente com outras famílias de vírus, os begomovírus têm causado grande prejuízo para os produtores de tomate in natura e para processamento industrial. O objetivo deste trabalho foi avaliar o comportamento de 11 genótipos resistentes ao Tomato yellow leaf curl virus (TYLCV) frente à infecção pelos begomovírus Tomato yellow spot virus (ToYSV) e Tomato seve...

  6. Development of transgenic watermelon resistant to Cucumber mosaic virus and Watermelon mosaic virus by using a single chimeric transgene construct.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Ching-Yi; Ku, Hsin-Mei; Chiang, Yi-Hua; Ho, Hsiu-Yin; Yu, Tsong-Ann; Jan, Fuh-Jyh

    2012-10-01

    Watermelon, an important fruit crop worldwide, is prone to attack by several viruses that often results in destructive yield loss. To develop a transgenic watermelon resistant to multiple virus infection, a single chimeric transgene comprising a silencer DNA from the partial N gene of Watermelon silver mottle virus (WSMoV) fused to the partial coat protein (CP) gene sequences of Cucumber mosaic virus (CMV), Cucumber green mottle mosaic virus (CGMMV) and Watermelon mosaic virus (WMV) was constructed and transformed into watermelon (cv. Feeling) via Agrobacterium-mediated transformation. Single or multiple transgene copies randomly inserted into various locations in the genome were confirmed by Southern blot analysis. Transgenic watermelon R(0) plants were individually challenged with CMV, CGMMV or WMV, or with a mixture of these three viruses for resistance evaluation. Two lines were identified to exhibit resistance to CMV, CGMMV, WMV individually, and a mixed inoculation of the three viruses. The R(1) progeny of the two resistant R(0) lines showed resistance to CMV and WMV, but not to CGMMV. Low level accumulation of transgene transcripts in resistant plants and small interfering (si) RNAs specific to CMV and WMV were readily detected in the resistant R(1) plants by northern blot analysis, indicating that the resistance was established via RNA-mediated post-transcriptional gene silencing (PTGS). Loss of the CGMMV CP-transgene fragment in R1 progeny might be the reason for the failure to resistant CGMMV infection, as shown by the absence of a hybridization signal and no detectable siRNA specific to CGMMV in Southern and northern blot analyses. In summary, this study demonstrated that fusion of different viral CP gene fragments in transgenic watermelon contributed to multiple virus resistance via PTGS. The construct and resistant watermelon lines developed in this study could be used in a watermelon breeding program for resistance to multiple viruses.

  7. Tracking oseltamivir-resistance in New Zealand influenza viruses during a medicine reclassification in 2007, a resistant-virus importation in 2008 and the 2009 pandemic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Q Sue Huang

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Oseltamivir (Tamiflu® is an important pharmaceutical intervention against the influenza virus. The importance of surveillance for resistance to oseltamivir has been highlighted by two global events: the emergence of an oseltamivir-resistant seasonal influenza A(H1N1 virus in 2008, and emergence of the influenza A(H1N1pdm09 virus in 2009. Oseltamivir is a prescription medicine in New Zealand, but more timely access has been provided since 2007 by allowing pharmacies to directly dispense oseltamivir to patients with influenza-like illness.Objective: To determine the frequency of oseltamivir-resistance in the context of a medicine reclassification in 2007, the importation of an oseltamivir-resistant seasonal influenza virus in 2008, and the emergence of a pandemic in 2009.Methods: A total of 1795 influenza viruses were tested for oseltamivir-resistance using a fluorometric neuraminidase inhibition assay. Viruses were collected as part of a sentinel influenza surveillance programme between the years 2006 and 2010.Results: All influenza B, influenza A(H3N2 and influenza A(H1N1pdm09 viruses tested between 2006 and 2010 were shown to be sensitive to oseltamivir. Seasonal influenza A(H1N1 viruses from 2008 and 2009 were resistant to oseltamivir. Sequencing of the neuraminidase gene showed that the resistant viruses contained an H275Y mutation, and S247N was also identified in the neuraminidase gene of one seasonal influenza A(H1N1 virus that exhibited enhanced resistance.Discussion: No evidence was found to suggest that increased access to oseltamivir has promoted resistance. A probable importation event was documented for the global 2008 oseltamivir-resistant seasonal A(H1N1 virus nine months after it was first reported in Europe in January 2008.

  8. Flange Curling in Cold Formed Profiles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jönsson, Jeppe; Ramonas, Gediminas

    2012-01-01

    The non-linear flange curling phenomenon in cold formed profiles is the tendency of slender flanges to deform towards the neutral axis for increasing flexural curvature. Based on Braziers work, Winter proposed a simple engineering formula for determination of the local flange deformation towards...

  9. Genetic makeup of amantadine-resistant and oseltamivir-resistant human influenza A/H1N1 viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaraket, Hassan; Saito, Reiko; Suzuki, Yasushi; Baranovich, Tatiana; Dapat, Clyde; Caperig-Dapat, Isolde; Suzuki, Hiroshi

    2010-04-01

    The emergence and widespread occurrence of antiviral drug-resistant seasonal human influenza A viruses, especially oseltamivir-resistant A/H1N1 virus, are major concerns. To understand the genetic background of antiviral drug-resistant A/H1N1 viruses, we performed full genome sequencing of prepandemic A/H1N1 strains. Seasonal influenza A/H1N1 viruses, including antiviral-susceptible viruses, amantadine-resistant viruses, and oseltamivir-resistant viruses, obtained from several areas in Japan during the 2007-2008 and 2008-2009 influenza seasons were analyzed. Sequencing of the full genomes of these viruses was performed, and the phylogenetic relationships among the sequences of each individual genome segment were inferred. Reference genome sequences from the Influenza Virus Resource database were included to determine the closest ancestor for each segment. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that the oseltamivir-resistant strain evolved from a reassortant oseltamivir-susceptible strain (clade 2B) which circulated in the 2007-2008 season by acquiring the H275Y resistance-conferring mutation in the NA gene. The oseltamivir-resistant lineage (corresponding to the Northern European resistant lineage) represented 100% of the H1N1 isolates from the 2008-2009 season and further acquired at least one mutation in each of the polymerase basic protein 2 (PB2), polymerase basic protein 1 (PB1), hemagglutinin (HA), and neuraminidase (NA) genes. Therefore, a reassortment event involving two distinct oseltamivir-susceptible lineages, followed by the H275Y substitution in the NA gene and other mutations elsewhere in the genome, contributed to the emergence of the oseltamivir-resistant lineage. In contrast, amantadine-resistant viruses from the 2007-2008 season distinctly clustered in clade 2C and were characterized by extensive amino acid substitutions across their genomes, suggesting that a fitness gap among its genetic components might have driven these mutations to maintain it in the

  10. New strategies against drug resistance to herpes simplex virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Yu-Chen; Feng, Hui; Lin, Yu-Chun; Guo, Xiu-Rong

    2016-01-01

    Herpes simplex virus (HSV), a member of the Herpesviridae family, is a significant human pathogen that results in mucocutaneous lesions in the oral cavity or genital infections. Acyclovir (ACV) and related nucleoside analogues can successfully treat HSV infections, but the emergence of drug resistance to ACV has created a barrier for the treatment of HSV infections, especially in immunocompromised patients. There is an urgent need to explore new and effective tactics to circumvent drug resistance to HSV. This review summarises the current strategies in the development of new targets (the DNA helicase/primase (H/P) complex), new types of molecules (nature products) and new antiviral mechanisms (lethal mutagenesis of Janus-type nucleosides) to fight the drug resistance of HSV. PMID:27025259

  11. New strategies against drug resistance to herpes simplex virus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yu-Chen Jiang; Hui Feng; Yu-Chun Lin; Xiu-Rong Guo

    2016-01-01

    Herpes simplex virus (HSV), a member of the Herpesviridae family, is a significant human pathogen that results in mucocutaneous lesions in the oral cavity or genital infections. Acyclovir (ACV) and related nucleoside analogues can successfully treat HSV infections, but the emergence of drug resistance to ACV has created a barrier for the treatment of HSV infections, especially in immunocompromised patients. There is an urgent need to explore new and effective tactics to circumvent drug resistance to HSV. This review summarises the current strategies in the development of new targets (the DNA helicase/primase (H/P) complex), new types of molecules (nature products) and new antiviral mechanisms (lethal mutagenesis of Janus-type nucleosides) to fight the drug resistance of HSV.

  12. Deformation behavior of curling strips on tearing tubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Ji Won; Kwon, Tae Soo; Jung, Hyun Seung; Kim, Jin Sung [Dept. of Robotics and Virtual Engineering, Korea University of Science and Technology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-15

    This paper discusses the analysis of the curl deformation behavior when a dynamic force is applied to a tearing tube installed on a flat die to predict the energy absorption capacity and deformation behavior. The deformation of the tips of the curling strips was obtained when the curl tips and tube body are in contact with each other, and a formula describing the energy dissipation rate caused by the deformation of the curl tips is proposed. To improve this formula, we focused on the variation of the curl radius and the reduced thickness of the tube. A formula describing the mean curl radius is proposed and verified using the curl radius measurement data of collision test specimens. These improved formulas are added to the theoretical model previously proposed by Huang et al. and verified from the collision test results of a tearing tube.

  13. Mechanisms of virus resistance and antiviral activity of snake venoms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    JVR Rivero

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Viruses depend on cell metabolism for their own propagation. The need to foster an intimate relationship with the host has resulted in the development of various strategies designed to help virus escape from the defense mechanisms present in the host. Over millions of years, the unremitting battle between pathogens and their hosts has led to changes in evolution of the immune system. Snake venoms are biological resources that have antiviral activity, hence substances of significant pharmacological value. The biodiversity in Brazil with respect to snakes is one of the richest on the planet; nevertheless, studies on the antiviral activity of venom from Brazilian snakes are scarce. The antiviral properties of snake venom appear as new promising therapeutic alternative against the defense mechanisms developed by viruses. In the current study, scientific papers published in recent years on the antiviral activity of venom from various species of snakes were reviewed. The objective of this review is to discuss the mechanisms of resistance developed by viruses and the components of snake venoms that present antiviral activity, particularly, enzymes, amino acids, peptides and proteins.

  14. Proteomic analysis of the plant-virus interaction in cucumber mosaic virus (CMV) resistant transgenic tomato.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Carli, Mariasole; Villani, Maria Elena; Bianco, Linda; Lombardi, Raffaele; Perrotta, Gaetano; Benvenuto, Eugenio; Donini, Marcello

    2010-11-05

    Cucumber mosaic virus (CMV), a member of the Cucumovirus genus, is the causal agent of several plant diseases in a wide range of host species, causing important economic losses in agriculture. Because of the lack of natural resistance genes in most crops, different genetic engineering strategies have been adopted to obtain virus-resistant plants. In a previous study, we described the engineering of transgenic tomato plants expressing a single-chain variable fragment antibody (scFv G4) that are specifically protected from CMV infection. In this work, we characterized the leaf proteome expressed during compatible plant-virus interaction in wild type and transgenic tomato. Protein changes in both inoculated and apical leaves were revealed using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE) coupled to differential in gel electrophoresis (DIGE) technology. A total of 2084 spots were detected, and 50 differentially expressed proteins were identified by nanoscale liquid chromatographic-electrospray ionization-ion trap-tandem mass spectrometry (nLC-ESI-IT-MS/MS). The majority of these proteins were related to photosynthesis (38%), primary metabolism (18%), and defense activity (14%) and demonstrated to be actively down regulated by CMV in infected leaves. Moreover, our analysis revealed that asymptomatic apical leaves of transgenic inoculated plants had no protein profile alteration as compared to control wild type uninfected plants demonstrating that virus infection is confined to the inoculated leaves and systemic spread is hindered by the CMV coat protein (CP)-specific scFv G4 molecules. Our work is the first comparative study on compatible plant-virus interactions between engineered immunoprotected and susceptible wild type tomato plants, contributing to the understanding of antibody-mediated disease resistance mechanisms.

  15. Preparation of Curled Micro bers by Electrospinning with Tip Collector

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TANG Cheng-Chun; CHEN Jun-Chi; LONG Yun-Ze; YIN Hong-Xing; SUN Bin; ZHANG Hong-Di

    2011-01-01

    We report on curled polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) microfibers fabricated by a modified electrospinning with a small nail as the tip collector. PVP (45 wt%) ethanol solution is electrospun under different working voltages ranging from 10 to 15, 20, 30 and 40kV. It is found that with the increase of working voltage, the proportion of the curled fibers increases and the uniformity of the curled fibers improves, as well as the repeat distance of the curled structures reducing. Particularly, some curled fibers develop into helical structures under relatively high voltages. Further analyses indicate that the formation mechanism for the curled polymer fibers can be ascribed to electrical driven bending instability and/or mechanical jet buckling when hitting the collector surface. This modified electrospinning technique may be a cost-effective approach for the mass production of curled microfibers.%@@ We report on curled polyvinylpyrrolidone(PVP) microfibers fabricated by a modified electrospinning with a small nail as the tip collector.PVP(45 wt%) ethanol solution is electrospun under different working voltages ranging from 10 to 15,20,30 and 40kV.It is found that with the increase of working voltage,the proportion of the curled fibers increases and the uniformity of the curled fibers improves,as well as the repeat distance of the curled structures reducing.Particularly,some curled fibers develop into helical structures under relatively high voltages.Further analyses indicate that the formation mechanism for the curled polymer fibers can be ascribed to electrical driven bending instability and/or mechanical jet buckling when hitting the collector surface.This modified electrospinning technique may be a cost-effective approach for the mass production of curled microfibers.

  16. Characterization of virus strains resistant to the herpes virus helicase-primase inhibitor ASP2151 (Amenamevir).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chono, Koji; Katsumata, Kiyomitsu; Kontani, Toru; Shiraki, Kimiyasu; Suzuki, Hiroshi

    2012-08-15

    ASP2151 is an antiherpes agent targeting the helicase-primase complex of herpes simplex virus (HSV)-1, HSV-2, and varicella-zoster virus (VZV). We characterized the ASP2151-resistant HSV-1 and HSV-2 variants or mutants based on findings from sequencing analysis, growth, pathogenicity, and susceptibility testing, identifying several single base-pair substitutions resulting in amino acid changes in the helicase and primase subunit of ASP2151-resistant mutants. Amino acid alterations in the helicase subunit were clustered near helicase motif IV in the UL5 helicase gene of both HSV-1 and HSV-2, while the primase subunit substitution associated with reduced susceptibility, R367H, was found in ASP2151-resistant HSV-1 mutants. However, while susceptibility in the ASP2151-resistant HSV mutants to existing antiherpes agents was equivalent to that in wild-type HSV strains, ASP2151-resistant HSV mutants showed attenuated in vitro growth capability and in vivo pathogenicity compared with the parent strains. Taken together, our present findings demonstrated that important amino acid substitutions associated with reduced susceptibilities of HSV-1 and HSV-2 to ASP2151 exist in both the helicase and primase subunits of the helicase-primase complex, and that mutations in this complex against ASP2151 might confer defects in viral replication and pathogenicity.

  17. Biochemical, inhibition and inhibitor resistance studies of xenotropic murine leukemia virus-related virus reverse transcriptase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ndongwe, Tanyaradzwa P; Adedeji, Adeyemi O; Michailidis, Eleftherios; Ong, Yee Tsuey; Hachiya, Atsuko; Marchand, Bruno; Ryan, Emily M; Rai, Devendra K; Kirby, Karen A; Whatley, Angela S; Burke, Donald H; Johnson, Marc; Ding, Shilei; Zheng, Yi-Min; Liu, Shan-Lu; Kodama, Ei-Ichi; Delviks-Frankenberry, Krista A; Pathak, Vinay K; Mitsuya, Hiroaki; Parniak, Michael A; Singh, Kamalendra; Sarafianos, Stefan G

    2012-01-01

    We report key mechanistic differences between the reverse transcriptases (RT) of human immunodeficiency virus type-1 (HIV-1) and of xenotropic murine leukemia virus-related virus (XMRV), a gammaretrovirus that can infect human cells. Steady and pre-steady state kinetics demonstrated that XMRV RT is significantly less efficient in DNA synthesis and in unblocking chain-terminated primers. Surface plasmon resonance experiments showed that the gammaretroviral enzyme has a remarkably higher dissociation rate (k(off)) from DNA, which also results in lower processivity than HIV-1 RT. Transient kinetics of mismatch incorporation revealed that XMRV RT has higher fidelity than HIV-1 RT. We identified RNA aptamers that potently inhibit XMRV, but not HIV-1 RT. XMRV RT is highly susceptible to some nucleoside RT inhibitors, including Translocation Deficient RT inhibitors, but not to non-nucleoside RT inhibitors. We demonstrated that XMRV RT mutants K103R and Q190M, which are equivalent to HIV-1 mutants that are resistant to tenofovir (K65R) and AZT (Q151M), are also resistant to the respective drugs, suggesting that XMRV can acquire resistance to these compounds through the decreased incorporation mechanism reported in HIV-1.

  18. Genetics and Genomics of Cotton Leaf Curl Disease, Its Viral Causal Agents and Whitefly Vector: A Way Forward to Sustain Cotton Fiber Security

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehboob-ur- Rahman

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Cotton leaf curl disease (CLCuD after its first epidemic in 1912 in Nigeria, has spread to different cotton growing countries including United States, Pakistan, India, and China. The disease is of viral origin—transmitted by the whitefly Bemisia tabaci, which is difficult to control because of the prevalence of multiple virulent viral strains or related species. The problem is further complicated as the CLCuD causing virus complex has a higher recombination rate. The availability of alternate host crops like tomato, okra, etc., and practicing mixed type farming system have further exaggerated the situation by adding synergy to the evolution of new viral strains and vectors. Efforts to control this disease using host plant resistance remained successful using two gene based-resistance that was broken by the evolution of new resistance breaking strain called Burewala virus. Development of transgenic cotton using both pathogen and non-pathogenic derived approaches are in progress. In future, screening for new forms of host resistance, use of DNA markers for the rapid incorporation of resistance into adapted cultivars overlaid with transgenics and using genome editing by CRISPR/Cas system would be instrumental in adding multiple layers of defense to control the disease—thus cotton fiber production will be sustained.

  19. Genetics and Genomics of Cotton Leaf Curl Disease, Its Viral Causal Agents and Whitefly Vector: A Way Forward to Sustain Cotton Fiber Security.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, Mehboob-Ur-; Khan, Ali Q; Rahmat, Zainab; Iqbal, Muhammad A; Zafar, Yusuf

    2017-01-01

    Cotton leaf curl disease (CLCuD) after its first epidemic in 1912 in Nigeria, has spread to different cotton growing countries including United States, Pakistan, India, and China. The disease is of viral origin-transmitted by the whitefly Bemisia tabaci, which is difficult to control because of the prevalence of multiple virulent viral strains or related species. The problem is further complicated as the CLCuD causing virus complex has a higher recombination rate. The availability of alternate host crops like tomato, okra, etc., and practicing mixed type farming system have further exaggerated the situation by adding synergy to the evolution of new viral strains and vectors. Efforts to control this disease using host plant resistance remained successful using two gene based-resistance that was broken by the evolution of new resistance breaking strain called Burewala virus. Development of transgenic cotton using both pathogen and non-pathogenic derived approaches are in progress. In future, screening for new forms of host resistance, use of DNA markers for the rapid incorporation of resistance into adapted cultivars overlaid with transgenics and using genome editing by CRISPR/Cas system would be instrumental in adding multiple layers of defense to control the disease-thus cotton fiber production will be sustained.

  20. Recessive Resistance to Plant Viruses: Potential Resistance Genes Beyond Translation Initiation Factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masayoshi Hashimoto

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The ability of plant viruses to propagate their genomes in host cells depends on many host factors. In the absence of an agrochemical that specifically targets plant viral infection cycles, one of the most effective methods for controlling viral diseases in plants is taking advantage of the host plant’s resistance machinery. Recessive resistance is conferred by a recessive gene mutation that encodes a host factor critical for viral infection. It is a branch of the resistance machinery and, as an inherited characteristic, is very durable. Moreover, recessive resistance may be acquired by a deficiency in a negative regulator of plant defense responses, possibly due to the autoactivation of defense signaling. Eukaryotic translation initiation factor (eIF 4E and eIF4G and their isoforms are the most widely exploited recessive resistance genes in several crop species, and they are effective against a subset of viral species. However, the establishment of efficient, recessive resistance-type antiviral control strategies against a wider range of plant viral diseases requires genetic resources other than eIF4Es. In this review, we focus on recent advances related to antiviral recessive resistance genes evaluated in model plants and several crop species. We also address the roles of next-generation sequencing and genome editing technologies in improving plant genetic resources for recessive resistance-based antiviral breeding in various crop species.

  1. Recessive Resistance to Plant Viruses: Potential Resistance Genes Beyond Translation Initiation Factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashimoto, Masayoshi; Neriya, Yutaro; Yamaji, Yasuyuki; Namba, Shigetou

    2016-01-01

    The ability of plant viruses to propagate their genomes in host cells depends on many host factors. In the absence of an agrochemical that specifically targets plant viral infection cycles, one of the most effective methods for controlling viral diseases in plants is taking advantage of the host plant’s resistance machinery. Recessive resistance is conferred by a recessive gene mutation that encodes a host factor critical for viral infection. It is a branch of the resistance machinery and, as an inherited characteristic, is very durable. Moreover, recessive resistance may be acquired by a deficiency in a negative regulator of plant defense responses, possibly due to the autoactivation of defense signaling. Eukaryotic translation initiation factor (eIF) 4E and eIF4G and their isoforms are the most widely exploited recessive resistance genes in several crop species, and they are effective against a subset of viral species. However, the establishment of efficient, recessive resistance-type antiviral control strategies against a wider range of plant viral diseases requires genetic resources other than eIF4Es. In this review, we focus on recent advances related to antiviral recessive resistance genes evaluated in model plants and several crop species. We also address the roles of next-generation sequencing and genome editing technologies in improving plant genetic resources for recessive resistance-based antiviral breeding in various crop species. PMID:27833593

  2. Transgenic virus resistance in crop-wild Cucurbita pepo does not prevent vertical transmission of zucchini yellow mosaic virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    H. E. Simmons; Holly Prendeville; J. P. Dunham; M. J. Ferrari; J. D. Earnest; D. Pilson; G. P. Munkvold; E. C. Holmes; A. G. Stephenson

    2015-01-01

    Zucchini yellow mosaic virus (ZYMV) is an economically important pathogen of cucurbits that is transmitted both horizontally and vertically. Although ZYMV is seed-transmitted in Cucurbita pepo, the potential for seed transmission in virus-resistant transgenic cultivars is not known. We crossed and backcrossed a transgenic...

  3. Prevention and Control of Field Planting with Ditch,Cooling and Moisture Retention on Tomato Yellow Leaf Curl Virus Disease%“沟栽降温保湿法”定植防控番茄黄化曲叶病毒病的研究初报

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郭建武; 姜冬仓; 薛爱利

    2011-01-01

    近几年,我国夏季番茄生产中黄化曲叶病毒病为害日趋严重,北方地区由于夏季极端高温天数不断增多,导致夏秋番茄黄化曲叶病毒病的发病规模迅速扩大,严重为害夏秋淡季番茄的生产。目前该病害尚无有效的根治措施,只能是预防为主。以夏秋茬大棚番茄为试材,采用对比设计,设沟栽降温保湿法(简称为"沟栽法")定植和平畦定植(CK)2种处理方式,研究了沟栽法定植对番茄黄化曲叶病毒病的防控效果。结果表明:当温室大棚内平均最高温度为33~36℃时,利用"沟栽法"定植可使沟内番茄根际5~25 cm地温稳定在28℃以下,较平畦栽植平均降低3.1℃;沟内土壤相对湿度60%~80%时,5 cm地温均可降至28℃以下,降温效果明显。同时,随着根际土壤温度的降低,番茄黄化曲叶病毒病的发生率极显著降低(仅为8.2%),较平畦栽植降幅达89.62%,差异达极显著水平;病情指数降低了27.36%,差异达显著水平。"沟栽降温保湿法"定植能够有效防控番茄黄化曲叶病毒病的发生。在番茄生产上,采取"沟栽降温保湿法"定植可以作为防控番茄黄化曲叶病毒病的关键技术。%In recent years,the tomato yellow leaf curl virus disease in summer was increasingly severe in China.The days of extreme high temperature in summer in northern regions increased,which caused the tomato yellow leaf curl virus disease expanding rapidly and severely damaged the slack season tomato production in summer and autumn.Currently the disease could not effectively controlled,which only be prevented.Using greenhouse tomato in summer and autumn as material,the control effect of field planting with ditch,cooling and moisture retention on tomato yellow leaf curl virus disease was studied.The results showed that when the average maximum temperature in greenhouse was 33-36 ℃,the ground temperature around 5-25 cm of rhizosphere was below 28

  4. Oseltamivir-resistant influenza virus A (H1N1), Europe, 2007/08 season.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meijer, A.; Lackenby, A.; Hungnes, O.; Lina, B.; Werf, S. van der; Schweiger, B.; Opp, M.; Paget, J.; Kassteele, J. van de; Hay, A.; Zambon, M.

    2009-01-01

    In Europe, the 2007/08 winter season was dominated by influenza virus A (H1N1) circulation through week 7, followed by influenza B virus from week 8 onward. Oseltamivir-resistant influenza viruses A (H1N1) (ORVs) with H275Y mutation in the neuraminidase emerged independently of drug use. By country,

  5. From assembly to virus particle budding: pertinence of the detergent resistant membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gosselin-Grenet, Anne-Sophie; Mottet-Osman, Geneviève; Roux, Laurent

    2006-01-20

    Detergent resistant membranes (DRMs) are the site of assembly for a variety of viruses. Here, we make use of Sendai virus mutant proteins that are not packaged into virus particles to determine the involvement of this assembly for the virus particle production. We found that, in the context of an infection, (1) all the Sendai virus proteins associated in part with DRMs, (2) mutant HN and M proteins not packaged into virus particles were similarly part of this association, (3) after M protein suppression resulting in a significant reduction of virus production, the floatation profile of the other viral proteins was not altered and finally (4) cellular cholesterol depletion did not decrease the virus particle production, although it somehow reduced their virus infectivity. These results led us to conclude that the assembly complex found in DRM fractions does not constitute a direct precursor of virus particle budding.

  6. Engineering Resistance Against Mungbean yellow mosaic India virus Using Antisense RNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haq, Q M I; Ali, Arif; Malathi, V G

    2010-06-01

    Yellow mosaic disease of cultivated legumes in South-East Asia, is caused by Mungbean yellow mosaic India virus (MYMIV) and Mungbean yellow mosaic virus (MYMV) belonging to the genus Begomovirus of the family Geminiviridae. Efforts to engineer resistance against the genus Begomovirus are focused mainly on silencing of complementary-sense virus genes involved in virus replication. Here we have targeted a complementary-sense gene (ACI) encoding Replication initiation Protein (Rep) to develop resistance against soybean isolate of Mungbean yellow mosaic India virus-[India:New Delhi:Soybean 2:1999], a bipartite begomovirus prevalent throughout the Indian subcontinent. We show that the legume host plants co-agroinoculated with infectious constructs of soybean isolate of Mungbean yellow mosaic India virus [India:New Delhi:Soybean 2:1999] along with this antisense Rep gene construct show resistance to the virus.

  7. Greenhouse and Field Evaluation of Multiple Virus Resistant Lagenaria siceraria Lines Potentially useful for Watermelon Rootstocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    In previous evaluations we identified numerous lines of bottle gourd (Lagenaria siceraria) with complete or partial resistance to Zucchini yellow mosaic virus (ZYMV). In the present study, we were interested in developing bottle gourd lines with multiple virus resistance that could be useful as roo...

  8. Necrotizing Keratitis Caused by Acyclovir-Resistant Herpes Simplex Virus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koji Toriyama

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: We report a case of necrotizing keratitis caused by acyclovir (ACV-resistant herpes simplex virus (HSV with a clinical appearance similar to a previous fungal keratitis infection. Methods: Observational case report. Results: Penetrating keratoplasty was performed in the left eye with a history of herpetic keratitis that resolved with periodic treatment with ACV ointment and a topical steroid. The left eye was painful and red with an abscess and corneal erosion in the peripheral donor cornea. Examination of the scraped corneal epithelium by light microscopy and culturing identified Candida albicans; polymerase chain reaction (PCR was negative for human herpes viruses. After antifungal treatment, the ocular pain gradually decreased and the lesions slowly improved but recurred with a similar clinical appearance. A second light microscopy examination and cultures were negative for pathogens including C. albicans. PCR was positive for HSV-1 DNA; treatment with 3% topical ACV ointment was unsuccessful. A third examination showed only HSV-1 DNA. Despite antiviral ACV ointment, no clinical improvement occurred based on the HSV DNA copy numbers, which were the same before and after treatment, indicating a possible ACV-resistant strain. When topical trifluorothymidine was substituted for ACV, clinical improvement occurred and the HSV DNA copy numbers decreased. Conclusion: Necrotizing keratitis induced by ACV-resistant HSV occurred independently after fungal keratitis, with a similar clinical appearance in this case, making diagnosis and treatment difficult. Monitoring the HSV DNA load by real-time PCR could be useful for refractory cases even with atypical clinical appearances.

  9. Cotton leaf curl disease - an emerging threat to cotton production worldwide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sattar, M Naeem; Kvarnheden, Anders; Saeed, Muhammad; Briddon, Rob W

    2013-04-01

    Cotton leaf curl disease (CLCuD) is a serious disease of cotton which has characteristic symptoms, the most unusual of which is the formation of leaf-like enations on the undersides of leaves. The disease is caused by whitefly-transmitted geminiviruses (family Geminiviridae, genus Begomovirus) in association with specific, symptom-modulating satellites (betasatellites) and an evolutionarily distinct group of satellite-like molecules known as alphasatellites. CLCuD occurs across Africa as well as in Pakistan and north-western India. Over the past 25 years, Pakistan and India have experienced two epidemics of the disease, the most recent of which involved a virus and satellite that are resistance breaking. Loss of this conventional host-plant resistance, which saved the cotton growers from ruin in the late 1990s, leaves farmers with only relatively poor host plant tolerance to counter the extensive losses the disease causes. There has always been the fear that CLCuD could spread from the relatively limited geographical range it encompasses at present to other cotton-growing areas of the world where, although the disease is not present, the environmental conditions are suitable for its establishment and the whitefly vector occurs. Unfortunately recent events have shown this fear to be well founded, with CLCuD making its first appearance in China. Here, we outline recent advances made in understanding the molecular biology of the components of the disease complex, their interactions with host plants, as well as efforts being made to control CLCuD.

  10. Antiviral therapy and resistance with hepatitis B virus infection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection is still the most common cause of hepatocellular carcinoma and liver cirrhosis world wide. Recently, however, there has been quite dramatic improvement in the understanding of HBV associated liver disease and its treatment. It has become clear that high viral replication is a major risk factor for the development of both cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma. Early studies have shown lamivudine lowers the risk of HBV associated complications. There are currently three nucleos(t)ides licensed, in addition to interferon, and there are more drugs coming to the market soon. Interferon or its pegylated counterpart are still the only options for treatment with defined end points,while nucleos(t)ides therapy is used mostly for long term treatment. Combination therapies have not been shown to be superior to monotherapy in na(i)ve patients, however, the outcome depends on how the end point is defined. Interferon plus lamivudine achieves a higher viral suppression than either treatment alone, even though Hbe-seroconversion was not different after a one year treatment. HBV-genotypes emerge as relevant factors,with genotypes "A" and "B" responding relatively well to interferon, achieving up to 20% HBsAg clearance in the case of genotype "A". In addition to having a defined treatment duration, interferon has the advantage of lacking resistance selection, which is a major drawback for lamivudine and the other nucleos(t)ides. The emergence of resistance against adefovir and entecavir is somewhat slower in na(i)ve compared to lamivudine resistant patients. Adefovir has a low resistance profile with 3%,9%, 18%, and 28% after 2, 3, 4, and 5 years, respectively, while entecavir has rarely produced resistance in na(i)ve patients for up to 3 years.

  11. Engineering Resistance Against Mungbean yellow mosaic India virus Using Antisense RNA

    OpenAIRE

    Haq, Q. M. I.; Ali, Arif; Malathi, V.G.

    2010-01-01

    Yellow mosaic disease of cultivated legumes in South-East Asia, is caused by Mungbean yellow mosaic India virus (MYMIV) and Mungbean yellow mosaic virus (MYMV) belonging to the genus Begomovirus of the family Geminiviridae. Efforts to engineer resistance against the genus Begomovirus are focused mainly on silencing of complementary-sense virus genes involved in virus replication. Here we have targeted a complementary-sense gene (ACI) encoding Replication initiation Protein (Rep) to develop re...

  12. Genetic mapping of turnip mosaic virus resistance in Lactuca sativa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robbins, M A; Witsenboer, H; Michelmore, R W; Laliberte, J F; Fortin, M G

    1994-11-01

    Presence of the dominant Tu gene in Lactuca sativa is sufficient to confer resistance to infection by turnip mosaic virus (TuMV). In order to obtain an immunological assay for the presence of TuMV in inoculated plants, the TuMV coat protein (CP) gene was cloned by amplification of a cDNA corresponding to the viral genome using degenerate primers designed from conserved potyvirus CP sequences. The TuMV CP was overexpressed in Escherichia coli, and polyclonal antibodies were produced. To locate Tu on the L. sativa genetic map, F3 families from a cross between cvs "Cobbham Green" (resistant to TuMV) and "Calmar" (susceptible) were genotyped for Tu. Families known to be recombinant in the region containing Tu were infected with TuMV and tested by the indirect enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) using the anti-CP serum. This assay placed Tu between two random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) markers and 3.2 cM from Dm5/8 (which confers resistance to Bremia lactucae). Also, bulked segregant analysis was used to screen for additional RAPD markers tightly linked to the Tu locus. Five new markers linked to Tu were identified in this region, and their location on the genetic map was determined using informative recombinants in the region. Six markers were identified as being linked within 2.5 cM of Tu.

  13. Oseltamivir-resistant pandemic influenza a (H1N1) 2009 viruses in Spain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ledesma, Juan; Vicente, Diego; Pozo, Francisco; Cilla, Gustavo; Castro, Sonia Pérez; Fernández, Jonathan Suárez; Ruiz, Mercedes Pérez; Navarro, José María; Galán, Juan Carlos; Fernández, Mirian; Reina, Jordi; Larrauri, Amparo; Cuevas, María Teresa; Casas, Inmaculada; Breña, Pilar Pérez

    2011-07-01

    Pandemic influenza A (H1N1) 2009 virus appeared in Spain on April 25, 2009 for the first time. This new virus was adamantane-resistant but it was sensitive to neuraminidase (NA) inhibitors oseltamivir and zanamivir. To detect oseltamivir-resistant pandemic influenza A (H1N1) 2009 viruses by the Spanish Influenza Surveillance System (SISS) and a possible spread of oseltamivir-resistant viruses in Spain since starting of the pandemic situation. A total of 1229 respiratory samples taken from 413 severe and 766 non-severe patients with confirmed viral detection of pandemic influenza A (H1N1) 2009 viruses from different Spanish regions were analyzed for the specific detection of the H275Y mutation in NA between April 2009 and May 2010. H275Y NA substitution was found in 8 patients infected with pandemic influenza A (H1N1) 2009 viruses collected in November and December 2009 and in January 2010. All oseltamivir-resistant viruses were detected in severe patients (8/413, 1.93%) who previously received treatment with oseltamivir. Six of these patients were immunocompromised. In Spain, the number of oseltamivir-resistant pandemic influenza A (H1N1) 2009 viruses is until now very low. No evidence for any spread of oseltamivir-resistant H1N1 viruses is achieved in our Country. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Oseltamivir-resistant influenza A(H1N1pdm09 virus in southern Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Camila Marx

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available The neuraminidase (NA genes of A(H1N1pdm09 influenza virus isolates from 306 infected patients were analysed. The circulation of oseltamivir-resistant viruses in Brazil has not been reported previously. Clinical samples were collected in the state of Rio Grande do Sul (RS from 2009-2011 and two NA inhibitor-resistant mutants were identified, one in 2009 (H275Y and the other in 2011 (S247N. This study revealed a low prevalence of resistant viruses (0.8% with no spread of the resistant mutants throughout RS.

  15. H(curl) Auxiliary Mesh Preconditioning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kolev, T V; Pasciak, J E; Vassilevski, P S

    2006-08-31

    This paper analyzes a two-level preconditioning scheme for H(curl) bilinear forms. The scheme utilizes an auxiliary problem on a related mesh that is more amenable for constructing optimal order multigrid methods. More specifically, we analyze the case when the auxiliary mesh only approximately covers the original domain. The latter assumption is important since it allows for easy construction of nested multilevel spaces on regular auxiliary meshes. Numerical experiments in both two and three space dimensions illustrate the optimal performance of the method.

  16. Novel influenza A(H1N1) 2009 in vitro reassortant viruses with oseltamivir resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ottmann, Michèle; Duchamp, Maude Bouscambert; Casalegno, Jean-Sébastien; Frobert, Emilie; Moulès, Vincent; Ferraris, Olivier; Valette, Martine; Escuret, Vanessa; Lina, Bruno

    2010-01-01

    With the recent emergence of the novel A(H1N1) virus in 2009, the efficacy of available drugs, such as neuraminidase (NA) inhibitors, is of great concern for good patient care. Influenza viruses are known to be able to acquire resistance. In 2007, A(H1N1) viruses related to A/Brisbane/59/2007 (H1N1) (A[H1N1] Brisbane-like virus), which are naturally resistant to oseltamivir, emerged. Resistance to oseltamivir can be acquired either by spontaneous mutation in the NA (H275Y in N1), or by reassortment with a mutated NA. It is therefore crucial to determine the risk of pandemic A(H1N1) 2009 virus acquiring resistance against oseltamivir by reassortment. We estimated the capacity of reassortment between the A(H1N1) 2009 virus and an oseltamivir-resistant A(H1N1) Brisbane-like virus by in vitro coinfections of influenza-permissive cells. The screening and the analysis of reassortant viruses was performed by specific reverse transcriptase PCRs and by sequencing. Out of 50 analysed reassortant viruses, two harboured the haemagglutinin (HA) segment from the pandemic A(H1N1) 2009 virus and the mutated NA originated from the A(H1N1) Brisbane-like virus. The replicating capacities of these viruses were measured, showing no difference as compared to the two parental strains, suggesting that acquisition of the mutated NA segment did not impair viral fitness in vitro. Our results suggest that the novel A(H1N1) 2009 virus can acquire by in vitro genetic reassortment the H275Y mutated NA segment conferring resistance to oseltamivir.

  17. Computed tomography of ball pythons (Python regius) in curled recumbency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hedley, Joanna; Eatwell, Kevin; Schwarz, Tobias

    2014-01-01

    Anesthesia and tube restraint methods are often required for computed tomography (CT) of snakes due to their natural tendency to curl up. However, these restraint methods may cause animal stress. The aim of this study was to determine whether the CT appearance of the lungs differs for ball pythons in a curled position vs. tube restraint. Whole body CT was performed on ten clinically healthy ball pythons, first in curled and then in straight positions restrained in a tube. Curved multiplanar reformatted (MPR) lung images from curled position scans were compared with standard MPR lung images from straight position scans. Lung attenuation and thickness were measured at three locations for each scan. Time for positioning and scanning was 12 ± 5 min shorter for curled snakes compared to tube restraint. Lung parenchyma thickness and attenuation declined from cranial to caudal on both straight and curled position images. Mean lung parenchyma thickness was greater in curled images at locations 1 (P = 0.048) and 3 (P = 0.044). Mean lung parenchyma thickness decreased between location 1 and 2 by 86-87% (straight: curled) and between location 1 and 3 by 51-50% (straight: curled). Mean lung attenuation at location 1 was significantly greater on curled position images than tube restraint images (P = 0.043). Findings indicated that CT evaluation of the lungs is feasible for ball pythons positioned in curled recumbency if curved MPR is available. However, lung parenchyma thickness and attenuation in some locations may vary from those acquired using tube restraint.

  18. Hepatitis C virus cell-cell transmission and resistance to direct-acting antiviral agents.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fei Xiao

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Hepatitis C virus (HCV is transmitted between hepatocytes via classical cell entry but also uses direct cell-cell transfer to infect neighboring hepatocytes. Viral cell-cell transmission has been shown to play an important role in viral persistence allowing evasion from neutralizing antibodies. In contrast, the role of HCV cell-cell transmission for antiviral resistance is unknown. Aiming to address this question we investigated the phenotype of HCV strains exhibiting resistance to direct-acting antivirals (DAAs in state-of-the-art model systems for cell-cell transmission and spread. Using HCV genotype 2 as a model virus, we show that cell-cell transmission is the main route of viral spread of DAA-resistant HCV. Cell-cell transmission of DAA-resistant viruses results in viral persistence and thus hampers viral eradication. We also show that blocking cell-cell transmission using host-targeting entry inhibitors (HTEIs was highly effective in inhibiting viral dissemination of resistant genotype 2 viruses. Combining HTEIs with DAAs prevented antiviral resistance and led to rapid elimination of the virus in cell culture model. In conclusion, our work provides evidence that cell-cell transmission plays an important role in dissemination and maintenance of resistant variants in cell culture models. Blocking virus cell-cell transmission prevents emergence of drug resistance in persistent viral infection including resistance to HCV DAAs.

  19. Genetically engineered virus-resistant plants in developing countries: current status and future prospects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy, D V R; Sudarshana, M R; Fuchs, M; Rao, N C; Thottappilly, G

    2009-01-01

    Plant viruses cause severe crop losses worldwide. Conventional control strategies, such as cultural methods and biocide applications against arthropod, nematode, and plasmodiophorid vectors, have limited success at mitigating the impact of plant viruses. Planting resistant cultivars is the most effective and economical way to control plant virus diseases. Natural sources of resistance have been exploited extensively to develop virus-resistant plants by conventional breeding. Non-conventional methods have also been used successfully to confer virus resistance by transferring primarily virus-derived genes, including viral coat protein, replicase, movement protein, defective interfering RNA, non-coding RNA sequences, and protease, into susceptible plants. Non-viral genes (R genes, microRNAs, ribosome-inactivating proteins, protease inhibitors, dsRNAse, RNA modifying enzymes, and scFvs) have also been used successfully to engineer resistance to viruses in plants. Very few genetically engineered (GE) virus resistant (VR) crops have been released for cultivation and none is available yet in developing countries. However, a number of economically important GEVR crops, transformed with viral genes are of great interest in developing countries. The major issues confronting the production and deregulation of GEVR crops in developing countries are primarily socio-economic and related to intellectual property rights, biosafety regulatory frameworks, expenditure to generate GE crops and opposition by non-governmental activists. Suggestions for satisfactory resolution of these factors, presumably leading to field tests and deregulation of GEVR crops in developing countries, are given.

  20. Method of inhibiting plant virus pathogen infections by crispr/cas9-mediated interference

    KAUST Repository

    Mahfouz, Magdy Mahmoud

    2016-11-24

    A genetically modified tobacco plant or tomato plant resistant to at least one pathogenic geminiviridae virus species is provided. The plant comprises a heterologous CRISPR/Cas9 system and at least one heterologous nucleotide sequence that is capable of hybridizing to a nucleotide sequence of the pathogenic virus and that directs inactivation of the pathogenic virus species or plurality of viral species by the CRISPR/Cas9 system. The heterologous nucleotide sequence can be complementary to, but not limited to an Intergenic Region (IR) of the Tomato Yellow Leaf Curl Virus (TYLCV), Further provided are methods of generating a genetically modified plant that is resistant to a virus pathogen by a heterologous CRISPR/Cas9 system and expression of a gRNA specifically targeting the virus.

  1. Biosafety considerations of RNAi-mediated virus resistance in fruit-tree cultivars and in rootstock.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemgo, Godwin Nana Yaw; Sabbadini, Silvia; Pandolfini, Tiziana; Mezzetti, Bruno

    2013-12-01

    A major application of RNA interference (RNAi) is envisaged for the production of virus-resistant transgenic plants. For fruit trees, this remains the most, if not the only, viable option for the control of plant viral disease outbreaks in cultivated orchards, due to the difficulties associated with the use of traditional and conventional disease-control measures. The use of RNAi might provide an additional benefit for woody crops if silenced rootstock can efficiently transmit the silencing signal to non-transformed scions, as has already been demonstrated in herbaceous plants. This would provide a great opportunity to produce non-transgenic fruit from transgenic rootstock. In this review, we scrutinise some of the concerns that might arise with the use of RNAi for engineering virus-resistant plants, and we speculate that this virus resistance has fewer biosafety concerns. This is mainly because RNAi-eliciting constructs only express small RNA molecules rather than proteins, and because this technology can be applied using plant rootstock that can confer virus resistance to the scion, leaving the scion untransformed. We discuss the main biosafety concerns related to the release of new types of virus-resistant plants and the risk assessment approaches in the application of existing regulatory systems (in particular, those of the European Union, the USA, and Canada) for the evaluation and approval of RNAi-mediated virus-resistant plants, either as transgenic varieties or as plant virus resistance induced by transgenic rootstock.

  2. Hepatitis B virus genotypes and lamivudine resistance mutations in Jordan

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    AIM: To investigate and identify prevalent hepatitis B virus (HBV) genotypes and to explore lamivudine-resistant mutations among treated and untreated patients in Jordan.METHODS: A total of 107 cases with chronic hepatitis B were recruited from different medical centers in Jordan. Serological tests were preformed for all cases using a microparticle enzyme immunoassay. HBV Genotyping was performed for 70 cases using Line probe genotyping assay, The YMDD mutations were explored for 20 cases (4 were lamivudine naive) using the INNO-LiPA HBV DR assay.RESULTS: Genotype D was the only detected genotype. A total of 6 YMDD mutations were detected in 5 treated patients (31%) while one mutation was detected in the naive patients. Seventeen percent of cases were positive for HBeAg and had statistically significant higher levels of serum aminotransferases.CONCLUSION: HBV genotype D appears to be the only circulating type in Jordanian patients. The YMDD mutations were detected in 31% of lamivudine-treated cases with similar patterns to those found in the lit-erature. We also found a relatively low prevalence of HBeAg expression among examined cases (17%). Awareness of these serologic, genotypic and resistance patterns might help in the formulation of management plans and for predicting clinical outcomes. Further larger scale studies are needed to confirm our results and to examine possible associations among clinical, serologic, and genetic patterns of HBV infections in Jordan.

  3. Hepatitis C virus resistance to broadly neutralizing antibodies measured using replication-competent virus and pseudoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wasilewski, Lisa N; Ray, Stuart C; Bailey, Justin R

    2016-11-01

    A better understanding of natural variation in neutralization resistance and fitness of diverse hepatitis C virus (HCV) envelope (E1E2) variants will be critical to guide rational development of an HCV vaccine. This work has been hindered by inadequate genetic diversity in viral panels and by a lack of standardization of HCV entry assays. Neutralization assays generally use lentiviral pseudoparticles expressing HCV envelope proteins (HCVpp) or chimeric full-length viruses that are replication competent in cell culture (HCVcc). There have been few systematic comparisons of specific infectivities of E1E2-matched HCVcc and HCVpp, and to our knowledge, neutralization of E1E2-matched HCVpp and HCVcc has never been compared using a diverse panel of human broadly neutralizing monoclonal antibodies (bNAbs) targeting distinct epitopes. Here, we describe an efficient method for introduction of naturally occurring E1E2 genes into a full-length HCV genome, producing replication-competent chimeric HCVcc. We generated diverse panels of E1E2-matched HCVcc and HCVpp and measured the entry-mediating fitness of E1E2 variants using the two systems. We also compared neutralization of E1E2-matched HCVcc and HCVpp by a diverse panel of human bNAbs targeting epitopes across E1E2. We found no correlation between specific infectivities of E1E2-matched HCVcc versus HCVpp, but found a very strong positive correlation between relative neutralization resistance of these same E1E2-matched HCVcc and HCVpp variants. These results suggest that quantitative comparisons of neutralization resistance of E1E2 variants can be made with confidence using either HCVcc or HCVpp, allowing the use of either or both systems to maximize diversity of neutralization panels.

  4. Hepatitis C virus cell-cell transmission and resistance to direct-acting antiviral agents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xiao, Fei; Fofana, Isabel; Heydmann, Laura

    2014-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) is transmitted between hepatocytes via classical cell entry but also uses direct cell-cell transfer to infect neighboring hepatocytes. Viral cell-cell transmission has been shown to play an important role in viral persistence allowing evasion from neutralizing antibodies......-targeting entry inhibitors (HTEIs) was highly effective in inhibiting viral dissemination of resistant genotype 2 viruses. Combining HTEIs with DAAs prevented antiviral resistance and led to rapid elimination of the virus in cell culture model. In conclusion, our work provides evidence that cell-cell transmission...... plays an important role in dissemination and maintenance of resistant variants in cell culture models. Blocking virus cell-cell transmission prevents emergence of drug resistance in persistent viral infection including resistance to HCV DAAs....

  5. Unusual resistance to ionizing radiation of the viruses of kuru, Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease, and scrapie.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibbs, C J; Gajdusek, D C; Latarjet, R

    1978-01-01

    The titers of several preparations of kuru. Creutzfeldt-Jacob disease, and scrapie viruses were reduced by only 1/10th or less by high doses of gamma radiation of 50 kGy and by only 1/10th-1/1000th or less for 200 kGy. This unusual radiation resistance of the two human viruses further links them with the scrapie virus and suggests that the genetic information of all three viruses is considerably smaller than that of any other known viruses of mammals. PMID:104301

  6. Sources of resistance in accessions of Cucurbita spp. to virus species from the genus Potyvirus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Graziela da Silva Barbosa

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT The identification of source of resistance in cultivated cucurbits species is very important for the development of resistant cultivars to control diseases caused by virus from the genus Potyvirus. The present research had the objective to evaluate the phenotypic reactions and the behavior of pumpkin (Cucurbita spp. accessions to the virus species from the genus Potyvirus: Papaya ringspot virus type Watermelon (PRSV-W, Zucchini yellow mosaic virus (ZYMV and Watermelon mosaic virus (WMV. Twenty-eight accessions of pumpkin from the Cucurbit Germplasm Bank from Embrapa Semiárido, Petrolina, PE, Brazil were evaluated. Twelve young plants from each pumpkin accession were inoculated with each one of the virus species and were maintained at greenhouse for their symptom reaction evaluations. All possible virus infections or absence of infection were confirmed by plate-trapped antigen enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (PTA-ELISA against antisera specific to PRSV-W, ZYMV and WMV at the Plant Virus Laboratory, Universidade Federal do Ceará. Three pumpkin accessions showed extreme resistant to WMV and eight accessions presented mild mosaic when inoculated with PRSV-W. The most severe symptoms were observed on those accessions inoculated with ZYMV and 50% of the accessions showed to be highly susceptible. On the other hand, the pumpkin accessions inoculated with WMV presented the mildest symptoms, indicating that 39% of them were resistant, and 39% were tolerant. The Cucurbita spp. accessions BGC 518, BGC 530, BGC 567, and BGC 683 that showed resistance to one or more than one virus species constitute promising sources of resistance for developing virus resistant pumpkin cultivars or hybrids.

  7. 寿光地区感病辣椒TYLCV的分子鉴定和病毒DNA-A序列分析%Molecular Identification and DNA-A Gene Sequence Analysis of Tomato Yellow Leaf Curl Virus on Pepper( Capsicum annuum )in Shouguang Region

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘春香; 刘彩云; 李会平; 曹京

    2012-01-01

    由于TYLCV的宿主广泛,本试验对山东寿光地区的感病毒病辣椒进行了TYLCV感染的分子鉴定,发现寿光地区的辣椒感染了TYLCV病毒,且感染率较高.通过对病毒基因组DNA-A序列的克隆和序列分析发现,寿光感病辣椒的TYLCV序列与临沂和德州的TYLCV亲缘关系最近,并对具体突变点进行了分析.进化树分析显示,克隆得到的辣椒病毒与墨西哥的TYLCV病毒同源性较高,而与危害辣椒较严重的TYLCSV的遗传距离较远.%Molecular identification were done on tomato yellow leaf curl virus ( TYLCV) isolated from pepper plants showing TYLCV symptoms in Shouguang region because TYLCV have more hosts. The result showed peppers in Shouguang infected TYLCV with high efficiency among detected plants. The isolate was the most close to the TYLCV Linyi isolate and Dezhou isolate, and the detail point mutation of Shouguang TYLCV genome compared with Linyi were analyzed. Phylogenetic tree analysis indicated that TYLCV of mexico were found to show high sequence i-dentity with that we cloned, and with relatively low similarity to TYLCSV strains which damaged pepper seriously.

  8. 侵染云南白肋烟的中国番茄黄化曲叶病毒及伴随卫星DNA分子的基因组特征%Genomic Characterization of DNA-A and Associated Satellite DNA Molecule of an Isolate of Tomato Yellow Leaf Curl China Virus Infecting Nicotiana tabacum White Burley in Yunnan

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李桂新; 范三微; 李正和; 谢艳; 周雪平

    2003-01-01

    从中国云南省大理地区表现曲叶症状的白肋烟(Nicotina tabacum White Burley)上分离到病毒分离物Y43,该病毒可经烟粉虱(Bemisia tabaci)及嫁接传播.用15种粉虱传双生病毒的单抗对病样进行TAS-ELISA检测,结果表明,该病毒属菜豆金色花叶病毒属(Begomovirus)病毒.对DNA-A1.7kb基因组序列测定和分析表明,Y43与中国广西报道的中国番茄黄化曲叶病毒(Tomata yellow leaf curl China virus,TYLCCNV)同源性达89%,其中外壳蛋白(CP)氨基酸同源性达96%,因此Y43应为TYLCCNV的一个新分离物.进一步研究发现,Y43还伴随着一个长1 349 nt的卫星DNA分子(DNAβ).Y43DNAβ与AYVVDNAβ、BYVMVDNAβ和CLCuVDNAβ的同源性较低,而与中国分离的烟草曲叶病毒Y5 DNAβ和Y8 DNA β的亲缘关系较近.DNAβ可能编码7个分子量超过3.5kD的ORF,其中C1推测为有功能的ORF.

  9. Generation of transgenic papaya with double resistance to Papaya ringspot virus and Papaya leaf-distortion mosaic virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kung, Yi-Jung; Bau, Huey-Jiunn; Wu, Yi-Ling; Huang, Chiung-Huei; Chen, Tsui-Miao; Yeh, Shyi-Dong

    2009-11-01

    During the field tests of coat protein (CP)-transgenic papaya lines resistant to Papaya ringspot virus (PRSV), another Potyvirus sp., Papaya leaf-distortion mosaic virus (PLDMV), appeared as an emerging threat to the transgenic papaya. In this investigation, an untranslatable chimeric construct containing the truncated CP coding region of the PLDMV P-TW-WF isolate and the truncated CP coding region with the complete 3' untranslated region of PRSV YK isolate was transferred into papaya (Carica papaya cv. Thailand) via Agrobacterium-mediated transformation to generate transgenic plants with resistance to PLDMV and PRSV. Seventy-five transgenic lines were obtained and challenged with PRSV YK or PLDMV P-TW-WF by mechanical inoculation under greenhouse conditions. Thirty-eight transgenic lines showing no symptoms 1 month after inoculation were regarded as highly resistant lines. Southern and Northern analyses revealed that four weakly resistant lines have one or two inserts of the construct and accumulate detectable amounts of transgene transcript, whereas nine resistant lines contain two or three inserts without significant accumulation of transgene transcript. The results indicated that double virus resistance in transgenic lines resulted from double or more copies of the insert through the mechanism of RNA-mediated posttranscriptional gene silencing. Furthermore, three of nine resistant lines showed high levels of resistance to heterologous PRSV strains originating from Hawaii, Thailand, and Mexico. Our transgenic lines have great potential for controlling a number of PRSV strains and PLDMV in Taiwan and elsewhere.

  10. In vivo fitness and virulence of a drug-resistant herpes simplex virus 1 mutant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pesola, Jean M; Coen, Donald M

    2007-05-01

    Two important issues regarding a virus mutant that is resistant to an antiviral drug are its ability to replicate in animal hosts (in vivo fitness) relative to other genetic variants, including wild type, and its ability to cause disease. These issues have been investigated for a herpes simplex virus 1 mutant that is resistant to thiourea compounds, which inhibit encapsidation of viral DNA. Following corneal inoculation of mice, the mutant virus replicated very similarly to its wild-type parent in the eye, trigeminal ganglion and brain. The mutant virus was as lethal to mice as its wild-type parent following this route of inoculation. Indeed, it exhibited increased virulence. Thus, unlike most drug-resistant virus mutants, this mutant retained in vivo fitness and virulence.

  11. Giardiavirus-resistant Giardia lamblia lacks a virus receptor on the cell membrane surface.

    OpenAIRE

    1994-01-01

    Giardia lamblia virus (GLV) is a small nonenveloped double-stranded RNA virus that infects specifically the parasitic protozoan G. lamblia. Among the many collected strains of G. lamblia, a few turn out to be highly resistant to the virus infection. Two of these strains, Ac and JH, were subjected to electroporation with the RNA from GLV-infected G. lamblia WB strain. Subsequent studies indicated the presence of GLV double-stranded RNA and GLV protein in the electroporated and propagated cells...

  12. Addressing the Challenges of Hepatitis C Virus Resistance and Treatment Failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Che C. Colpitts

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Chronic hepatitis C is a major cause of chronic liver disease, including liver cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma. The development of direct-acting antivirals (DAAs revolutionized hepatitis C virus (HCV treatment by offering genuine prospects for the first comprehensive cure of a chronic viral infection in humans. While antiviral resistance is a significant limitation for interferon-based therapies, resistance and treatment failure still appear to be present in a small fraction of patients even in state-of-the-art DAA combination therapies. Therefore, treatment failure and resistance still remain a clinical challenge for the management of patients not responding to DAAs. In this special issue of Viruses on HCV drug resistance, mechanisms of antiviral resistance for different classes of antiviral drugs are described. Furthermore, the detection and monitoring of resistance in clinical practice, the clinical impact of resistance in different patient groups and strategies to prevent and address resistance and treatment failure using complementary antiviral strategies are reviewed.

  13. Addressing the Challenges of Hepatitis C Virus Resistance and Treatment Failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colpitts, Che C; Baumert, Thomas F

    2016-08-16

    Chronic hepatitis C is a major cause of chronic liver disease, including liver cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma. The development of direct-acting antivirals (DAAs) revolutionized hepatitis C virus (HCV) treatment by offering genuine prospects for the first comprehensive cure of a chronic viral infection in humans. While antiviral resistance is a significant limitation for interferon-based therapies, resistance and treatment failure still appear to be present in a small fraction of patients even in state-of-the-art DAA combination therapies. Therefore, treatment failure and resistance still remain a clinical challenge for the management of patients not responding to DAAs. In this special issue of Viruses on HCV drug resistance, mechanisms of antiviral resistance for different classes of antiviral drugs are described. Furthermore, the detection and monitoring of resistance in clinical practice, the clinical impact of resistance in different patient groups and strategies to prevent and address resistance and treatment failure using complementary antiviral strategies are reviewed.

  14. 21 CFR 866.3950 - In vitro human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) drug resistance genotype assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false In vitro human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) drug... OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents § 866.3950 In vitro human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) drug resistance genotype assay....

  15. Nucleotide sequence and intergeminiviral homologies of the DNA-A of papaya leaf curl geminivirus from India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saxena, S; Hallan, V; Singh, B P; Sane, P V

    1998-06-01

    Coat protein gene, rep protein gene and intergenic region of the genome of a whitefly transmitted geminivirus (WTG) causing severe leaf curl in papaya plants were PCR amplified, cloned and sequenced. Comparison of the amino acid sequence of the putative coat protein product of papaya leaf curl virus (PLCV) with some other mono and bipartite WTGs revealed a maximum of 89.8% homology with Indian cassava mosaic virus. The genomic organization of PLCV-India is similar to other WTGs with bipartite genomes. Comparison of the coat protein N-terminal 70 amino acid sequence (and other biological features) of PLCV with other geminiviruses shows that PLCV is a distinct geminivirus from India and is related to WTGs from the old world.

  16. Robust RNA silencing-mediated resistance to Plum pox virus under variable abiotic and biotic conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Nicola, Elisa; Tavazza, Mario; Lucioli, Alessandra; Salandri, Laura; Ilardi, Vincenza

    2014-10-01

    Some abiotic and biotic conditions are known to have a negative impact on post-transcriptional gene silencing (PTGS), thus representing a potential concern for the production of stable engineered virus resistance traits. However, depending on the strategy followed to achieve PTGS of the transgene, different responses to external conditions can be expected. In the present study, we utilized the Nicotiana benthamiana–Plum pox virus (PPV) pathosystem to evaluate in detail the stability of intron-hairpin(ihp)-mediated virus resistance under conditions known to adversely affect PTGS. The ihp plants grown at low or high temperatures were fully resistant to multiple PPV challenges, different PPV inoculum concentrations and even to a PPV isolate differing from the ihp construct by more than 28% at the nucleotide level. In addition, infections of ihp plants with viruses belonging to Cucumovirus, Potyvirus or Tombusvirus, all known to affect PTGS at different steps, were not able to defeat PPV resistance. Low temperatures did not affect the accumulation of transgenic small interfering RNAs (siRNAs), whereas a clear increase in the amount of siRNAs was observed during infections sustained by Cucumber mosaic virus and Potato virus Y. Our results show that the above stress factors do not represent an important concern for the production,through ihp-PTGS technology, of transgenic plants having robust virus resistance traits.

  17. Counteracting quasispecies adaptability: extinction of a ribavirin-resistant virus mutant by an alternative mutagenic treatment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Celia Perales

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Lethal mutagenesis, or virus extinction promoted by mutagen-induced elevation of mutation rates of viruses, may meet with the problem of selection of mutagen-resistant variants, as extensively documented for standard, non-mutagenic antiviral inhibitors. Previously, we characterized a mutant of foot-and-mouth disease virus that included in its RNA-dependent RNA polymerase replacement M296I that decreased the sensitivity of the virus to the mutagenic nucleoside analogue ribavirin. METHODOLOGY AND PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Replacement M296I in the viral polymerase impedes the extinction of the mutant foot-and-mouth disease virus by elevated concentrations of ribavirin. In contrast, wild type virus was extinguished by the same ribavirin treatment and, interestingly, no mutants resistant to ribavirin were selected from the wild type populations. Decreases of infectivity and viral load of the ribavirin-resistant M296I mutant were attained with a combination of the mutagen 5-fluorouracil and the non-mutagenic inhibitor guanidine hydrocloride. However, extinction was achieved with a sequential treatment, first with ribavirin, and then with a minimal dose of 5-fluorouracil in combination with guanidine hydrochloride. Both, wild type and ribavirin-resistant mutant M296I exhibited equal sensitivity to this combination, indicating that replacement M296I in the polymerase did not confer a significant cross-resistance to 5-fluorouracil. We discuss these results in relation to antiviral designs based on lethal mutagenesis. CONCLUSIONS: (i When dominant in the population, a mutation that confers partial resistance to a mutagenic agent can jeopardize virus extinction by elevated doses of the same mutagen. (ii A wild type virus, subjected to identical high mutagenic treatment, need not select a mutagen-resistant variant, and the population can be extinguished. (iii Extinction of the mutagen-resistant variant can be achieved by a sequential treatment of a

  18. Methodology for the phenotyping resistance to Plum pox virus in peach

    OpenAIRE

    Salava, Jaroslav; POLÁK, JAROSLAV

    2014-01-01

    Sharka disease, which is caused by the Plum pox virus (PPV), is the most economically important virus disease in fruit trees worldwide. Since it is not possible to completely eradicate PPV in the Czech Republic, it is necessary to find another way to control this pathogen. The most promising seems to be the breeding of new cultivars for resistance. This methodology provides a comprehensive protocol for testing PPV resistance in peach. It is based on visual assessment of disease symptoms on le...

  19. Importance of hepatitis C virus-associated insulin resistance:Therapeutic strategies for insulin sensitization

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Takumi; Kawaguchi; Michio; Sata

    2010-01-01

    Insulin resistance is one of the pathological features in patients with hepatitis C virus(HCV) infection.Generally,persistence of insulin resistance leads to an increase in the risk of life-threatening complications such as cardiovascular diseases.However,these complications are not major causes of death in patients with HCV-associated insulin resistance.Indeed,insulin resistance plays a crucial role in the development of various complications and events associated with HCV infection.Mounting evidence indic...

  20. 木尔坦棉花曲叶病毒基因重组和缺失产生DNAβ相关的新型小分子%Novel DNA-β associated molecules produced by sequence recombination and deletion of cotton leaf curl Multan virus complex

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赖艺祯; 谢科; 蔡健和; 秦碧霞; 李战彪; 刘玉乐

    2012-01-01

    [目的]棉花曲叶病是棉花生产上的一种重要的病毒病害,在巴基斯坦和印度等国家地区大面积流行,造成严重的经济损失.近年在中国广西南宁的棉花田间发现了棉花曲叶病害,在广西的黄秋葵中也发生了曲叶病,二者的病原均为木尔坦棉花曲叶病毒(Cotton Leaf Curl Multan Virus,CLCuMV),为了对这2个病害有更深的了解,本文对该双生病毒伴随的DNA小分子进行测序分析.[方法]分别从广西南宁地区感染CLCuMV的3棵棉花和3棵黄秋葵中提取总DNA,用CLCuMV DNAβ的特异引物进行PCR扩增,将产物分离纯化并克隆测序,进行序列比对分析.[结果]从棉花曲叶病害中分离得到了1384 nt的新型重组DNA分子,以及从黄秋葵曲叶病害中分离得到了754 nt的新型缺失型DNA分子.研究结果表明1384 nt重组分子是由CLCuMV GX1的DNA-A和DNAβ重组而成.重组分子大部分来源于CLCuMV的DNA-A,包含基因间隔区,附近的部分AV2和AC1基因,以及反向互补的部分AC3基因.其余部分来源于伴随的DNAβ,包含A-rich区域.分析拼接片段的附近序列,发现接头部分含有2-3个共同碱基,推测为重组作用发生的位点.与以前报道的在实验室中产生的CLCuMV重组分子进行比较显示,DNA-A的基因间隔区和DNAβ的A-rich 区在重组过程中非常保守.另外,754 nt的重组小分子是由CLCuMV Okra1 DNAβ缺失突变产生,缺失了大部分的编码C1蛋白开放阅读框(Open Reading Frame,ORF)以及小部分的A-rich区.[结论]本研究在自然条件下分离到了来源于CLCuMV和卫星DNAβ的重组分子,以及DNAβ缺陷型分子.这2种重组小分子以前未见报道,这也是在中国发现的棉花曲叶病毒中首次发现重组分子.这种基因组变异现象在棉花曲叶病毒的进化和寄主适应过程中可能有重要的意义.%[Objective] Cotton leaf curl disease (CLCuD) is a major constraint to cotton production, causing great economic losses

  1. Characterization of human immunodeficiency viruses resistant to oxathiolane-cytosine nucleosides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schinazi, R F; Lloyd, R M; Nguyen, M H; Cannon, D L; McMillan, A; Ilksoy, N; Chu, C K; Liotta, D C; Bazmi, H Z; Mellors, J W

    1993-04-01

    The (-) enantiomers of 2',3'-dideoxy-5-fluoro-3'-thiacytidine [(-)-FTC] and 2',3'-dideoxy-3'-thiacytidine [(-)-BCH-189] were recently shown to inhibit selectively human immunodeficiency viruses (HIV) and hepatitis B virus in vitro. In the current study, the potential for HIV type 1 (HIV-1) resistance to these compounds was evaluated by serial passage of the virus in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells and MT-2 cells in the presence of increasing drug concentrations. Highly drug-resistant HIV-1 variants dominated the replicating virus population after two or more cycles of infection. The resistant variants were cross-resistant to (-)-FTC, (-)-BCH-189, and their (+) congeners but remained susceptible to 2',3'-dideoxycytidine, 3'-azido-3'-deoxythymidine, 3'-fluoro-3'-deoxythymidine, 2',3'-dideoxyinosine, phosphonoformate, the TIBO compound R82150, and the bis(heteroaryl)piperazine derivative U-87201E. Reverse transcriptase derived from drug-resistant viral particles was 15- to 50-fold less susceptible to the 5'-triphosphates of FTC and BCH-189 compared with enzyme from parental drug-susceptible virus. DNA sequence analysis of the reverse transcriptase gene amplified from resistant viruses consistently identified mutations at codon 184 from Met (ATG) to Val (GTG or GTA) or Ile (ATA). Sequence analysis of amplified reverse transcriptase from a patient who had received (-)-BCH-189 therapy for 4 months demonstrated a mixture of the Met-184-to-Val (GTG) mutation and the parental genotype, indicating that the Met-184 mutation can occur in vivo.

  2. Potential threat of a new pathotype of Papaya leaf distortion mosaic virus infecting transgenic papaya resistant to Papaya ringspot virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bau, H-J; Kung, Y-J; Raja, J A J; Chan, S-J; Chen, K-C; Chen, Y-K; Wu, H-W; Yeh, S-D

    2008-07-01

    A virus identified as a new pathotype of Papaya leaf distortion mosaic virus (PLDMV, P-TW-WF) was isolated from diseased papaya in an isolated test-field in central Taiwan, where transgenic papaya lines resistant to Papaya ringspot virus (PRSV) were evaluated. The infected plants displayed severe mosaic, distortion and shoe-stringing on leaves; stunting in apex; and water-soaking on petioles and stems. This virus, which did not react in enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay with the antiserum to the PRSV coat protein, infected only papaya, but not the other 18 plant species tested. Virions studied under electron microscope exhibited morphology and dimensions of potyvirus particles. Reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction conducted using potyvirus-specific primers generated a 1,927-nucleotide product corresponding to the 3' region of a potyvirus, showing high sequence identity to the CP gene and 3' noncoding region of PLDMV. Search for similar isolates with the antiserum against CP of P-TW-WF revealed scattered occurrence of PLDMV in Taiwan. Phylogenetic analysis of PLDMV isolates of Taiwan and Japan indicated that the Taiwan isolates belong to a separate genetic cluster. Since all the Taiwan isolates infected only papaya, unlike the cucurbit-infecting Japanese P type isolates, the Taiwan isolates are considered a new pathotype of PLDMV. Susceptibility of all our PRSV-resistant transgenic papaya lines to PLDMV indicates that the virus is an emerging threat for the application of PRSV-resistant transgenic papaya in Taiwan and elsewhere.

  3. Coat protein-mediated resistance against an Indian isolate of the Cucumber mosaic virus subgroup IB in Nicotiana benthamiana

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A Srivastava; S K Raj

    2008-06-01

    Coat protein (CP)-mediated resistance against an Indian isolate of the Cucumber mosaic virus (CMV) subgroup IB was demonstrated in transgenic lines of Nicotiana benthamiana through Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated transformation. Out of the fourteen independently transformed lines developed, two lines were tested for resistance against CMV by challenge inoculations. The transgenic lines exhibiting complete resistance remained symptomless throughout life and showed reduced or no virus accumulation in their systemic leaves after virus challenge. These lines also showed virus resistance against two closely related strains of CMV. This is the first report of CP-mediated transgenic resistance against a CMV subgroup IB member isolated from India.

  4. A specific PCR-assay for resistance to Biotypes 1 and 2 of the rosy leaf curling aphid in apple based on an RFLP marker closely linked to the Sd1 gene

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roche, P.; Arkel, van G.; Heusden, van A.W.

    1997-01-01

    This report describes the conversion of a restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) marker (the 2B12a locus), linked to the Sd1 aphid resistance gene, to a polymerase chain reaction (PCR) based marker. A section of the 2B12 probe was sequenced and two primers were designed to amplify this

  5. A specific PCR-assay for resistance to Biotypes 1 and 2 of the rosy leaf curling aphid in apple based on an RFLP marker closely linked to the Sd1 gene

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roche, P.; Arkel, van G.; Heusden, van A.W.

    1997-01-01

    This report describes the conversion of a restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) marker (the 2B12a locus), linked to the Sd1 aphid resistance gene, to a polymerase chain reaction (PCR) based marker. A section of the 2B12 probe was sequenced and two primers were designed to amplify this sequ

  6. THE SPORTS SCIENCE OF CURLING: A PRACTICAL REVIEW

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John L. Bradley

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Curling is a sport played on ice in which two teams each deliver 8 granite stones towards a target, or 'house'. It is the only sport in which the trajectory of the projectile can be influenced after it has been released by the athlete. This is achieved by sweeping the ice in front of the stone to change the stone-ice friction and thereby enable to stone to travel further, curl more or stay straight. Hard sweeping is physically demanding. Different techniques of sweeping can also have different effects on the stone. This paper will review the current research behind sweeping a curling stone, outline the physiological demands of sweeping, the associated performance effects and suggest potential strategies of sweeping that can be used by both coaches and curling teams

  7. Resistance to Cucurbit aphid-borne yellows virus in Melon Accession TGR-1551.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kassem, Mona A; Gosalvez, Blanca; Garzo, Elisa; Fereres, Alberto; Gómez-Guillamón, Maria Luisa; Aranda, Miguel A

    2015-10-01

    The genetic control of resistance to Cucurbit aphid-borne yellows virus (CABYV; genus Polerovirus, family Luteoviridae) in the TGR-1551 melon accession was studied through agroinoculation of a genetic family obtained from the cross between this accession and the susceptible Spanish cultivar 'Bola de Oro'. Segregation analyses were consistent with the hypothesis that one dominant gene and at least two more modifier genes confer resistance; one of these additional genes is likely present in the susceptible parent 'Bola de Oro'. Local and systemic accumulation of the virus was analyzed in a time course experiment, showing that TGR-1551 resistance was expressed systemically as a significant reduction of virus accumulation compared with susceptible controls, but not locally in agroinoculated cotyledons. In aphid transmission experiments, CABYV inoculation by aphids was significantly reduced in TGR-1551 plants, although the virus was acquired at a similar rate from TGR-1551 as from susceptible plants. Results of feeding behavior studies using the DC electrical penetration graph technique suggested that viruliferous aphids can salivate and feed from the phloem of TGR-1551 plants and that the observed reduction in virus transmission efficiency is not related to reduced salivation by Aphis gossypii in phloem sieve elements. Since the virus is able to accumulate to normal levels in agroinoculated tissues, our results suggest that resistance of TGR-1551 plants to CABYV is related to impairment of virus movement or translocation after it reaches the phloem sieve elements.

  8. Sensitivity of drug-resistant mutants of hepatitis B virus to poly-IC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Q; Chen, E; Chen, L; Nong, Y; Cheng, X; He, M; Tang, H

    2014-01-01

    The long-term benefits of antiviral treatment are limited by the resistance of hepatitis B virus (HBV). However, the effect of interferon (IFN)α treatment on drug-resistant HBVs is so far unknown. We, therefore, investigated the effects of IFN-α inducer poly-IC on the replication of HBV mutants resistant to drugs such as lamivudine (LAM), adefovir dipivoxil (ADV) and entecavir (ETV) in mice. HBV DNA and HBV DNA intermediate (RI) were employed as markers of the virus replication and 2',5'-oligoadenylate synthase (OAS) mRNA as a marker of IFN-α/β induction. Poly-IC inhibited wtHBV replication and increased levels of OAS mRNA. Compared to the wt virus, the capacity of virus replication was reduced in most LAMr and ETVr mutants except those with mutations rtM(204V+L180M+V173L), and was similary in the ADVr mutants except rt(A121V+N236T). The virus replication was reduced after poly-IC treatment with LAMr and ADVr mutants similary to the wt virus. In contrast, ETVr mutants were resistant to the poly-IC treatment. In conclusion, the capacity of HBV replication and the sensitivity to IFN therapy are influenced by drug-resistant mutations. The IFN therapy may effectively inhibit HBV replication in particular in patients with LAMr or ADVr mutations but not in patients with ETVr mutations.

  9. Recessive resistance to Cucurbit yellow stunting disorder virus in melon TGR 1551

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cucurbit yellow stunting disorder virus (CYSDV) reduces melon (Cucumis melo L.) fruit quality and yield in many parts of the world. Host plant resistance of melon to CYSDV is a high priority for sustainable melon production in affected production areas. High-level resistance to CYSDV exhibited by TG...

  10. Development of longer pepper resistant lines to Potato Virus Y (PVY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    İbrahim ÇELİK

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Pepper (Capsicum annuum L., is one of the most important vegetable species produced both in the world and in Turkey. Turkey is in third place in pepper production in the world. There are many viruses affecting and limiting pepper production. Potato Y virus (PVY, a member of the genus potyvirus, is one of the most common viruses infecting pepper crops. Improving resistant pepper varieties against the disease is more advantageous and easy way to control disease in production area. There are 4 races such as PVY0, PVY1 and PVY1-2 in the world. The dominant Pvr4 resistance gene in wild type SCM 334 pepper confers a complete resistance to the three pathotypes of potato virus. In this study, resistant genotype SCM 334 and susceptible long pepper inbred line were crossed to improve resistance in breeding lines. To eliminate the undesirable characteristics of the resistant genotypes, resistant line was backcrossed three times with susceptible genotypes. Mechanical inoculation and molecular methods were used to determine the reaction of backcross progenies to the disease. The dominant CAPS markers were used to determine resistant and susceptible plants and results from the mechanical inoculation method were verified with the CAPS marker. This study is a part of “Improvement of F1 Hybrid Vegetable Varieties and Qualified Lines in Turkey” basic project and financed by Scientific and Technological Research Council of Turkey (TUBITAK-KAMAG 109G029.

  11. Evaluation of thrips resistance in pepper to control Tomato spotted wilt virus infection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maris, P.C.

    2004-01-01

    The objective of this study was to analyse the effect of thrips ( F. occidentalis ) resistance in pepper ( Capsicum ) on the spread of Tomato spotted wilt virus (TSWV). Results demonstrate that the rate of primary TSWV-infection is effectively limited in a thrips-resistant (TR) pepper crop compared

  12. Major genes for resistance to beet necrotic yellow vein virus (BNYVV) in Beta vulgaris

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scholten, Olga E.; Jansen, Ritsert C.; Keizer, L.C. Paul; Bock, Theo S.M. de; Lange, Wouter

    1996-01-01

    Inheritance of resistance to beet necrotic yellow vein virus (BNYVV) was studied in segregating F2 and backcross families obtained from crosses between resistant plants of the sugar beet selection Holly-1-4 or the wild beet accession Beta vulgaris subsp. maritima WB42 and susceptible parents.

  13. Influenza A virus hemagglutinin antibody escape promotes neuraminidase antigenic variation and drug resistance.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scott E Hensley

    Full Text Available Drugs inhibiting the influenza A virus (IAV neuraminidase (NA are the cornerstone of anti-IAV chemotherapy and prophylaxis in man. Drug-resistant mutations in NA arise frequently in human isolates, limiting the therapeutic application of NA inhibitors. Here, we show that antibody-driven antigenic variation in one domain of the H1 hemagglutinin Sa site leads to compensatory mutations in NA, resulting in NA antigenic variation and acquisition of drug resistance. These findings indicate that influenza A virus resistance to NA inhibitors can potentially arise from antibody driven HA escape, confounding analysis of influenza NA evolution in nature.

  14. Variations in resistance of viruses from different groups to chemico-physical decontamination methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mahnel, H.

    1979-01-01

    The resistance of a total of 13 different viruses to some important chemico-physical influences was studied under uniform experimental conditions. Stability in tape water, thermostability and sensitivity to anodic oxidation, gamma radiation, some virucidal substances and several commercial disinfectants were tested. In evaluating the results, an attempt is made to rank the viruses investigated according to their sensitivity. On average a bovine parvovirus, and also a reovirus and three enteroviruses, proved most stable. These were followed by infectious canine hepatitis (adenoviruses). Newcastle disease (paramyxoviruses) and vaccinia (poxviruses) demonstrating less resistance. In all the tests an orthomyxovirus (influenza A), a rhabdovirus (pseudorabies) and a togavirus (sindbis) proved to have relatively low resistance.

  15. Breeding black beans for Haiti with multiple virus resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Black bean production in the lowlands of Central America and the Caribbean is threatened by Bean golden yellow mosaic virus (BGYMV) and Bean common mosaic necrosis virus (BCMNV). Therefore, the objective of this research was to develop, test and release tropically-adapted black bean lines with resis...

  16. Strategies and mechanisms of resistance to viruses in photosynthetic aquatic microorganisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rozenn Thomas

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Surviving viral attack is essential for any species to avoid its irreversible removal from the ecosystem, and microbes must involve the resistance or susceptibility of individual cells. The co-existence between viruses and their hosts has led to the evolution of complex viral attack and host defence strategies. We review the state of the art about our understanding of resistance to viruses in aquatic eukaryotic photosynthetic microorganisms for which no synthesis has been provided yet, with comparisons to what is known for (cyanobacteria or archaea. We discuss the cost of viral resistance to host cells, pointing out why it is important to consider its effect in studies of aquatic ecosystems, and how this may lead to a better understanding of population growth, structure, succession and blooms. The evolutionary consequences of resistance in the host-virus interactions are then reviewed, before considering possible perspectives for future research.

  17. Selection of tomato plants resistant to a local Polish isolate of tomato spotted wilt virus (TSWV).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czech, Andrzej S; Szklarczyk, Marek; Gajewski, Zbigniew; Zukowska, Ewa; Michalik, Barbara; Kobyłko, Tadeusz; Strzałka, Kazimierz

    2003-01-01

    We found that the Sw-5 gene confers resistance to one of the Polish isolates of tomato spotted wilt virus (TSWV). A series of tomato breeding accessions was analysed along with standards of resistance and susceptibility to TSWV. The presence of the Sw-5 gene was determined using the available PCR marker. Subsequently plants from these accessions were grown in the presence of the TSWV isolate from Poland. Some of them developed severe symptoms of the TSWV disease. Expression of the virus proteins was also assayed in tissues of the investigated plants. We found general agreement between either lack or presence of the disease symptoms, virus proteins and resistance gene. Some observed discrepancies of these data are also discussed. Our results indicate that marker-assisted selection can be used for breeding of the TSWV-resistant tomato in Poland.

  18. 耐番茄黄化曲叶病毒病新品种‘申粉V-1’的选育%Breeding of a new tomato variety ‘Shenfen V-1' tolerant to tomato yellow leaf curl virus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    朱龙英; 朱为民; 万延慧; 张辉; 于力; 刘娜

    2012-01-01

    'Shenfen V-1',a new medium-early tomato variety,was bred by crossing between two inbred lines 06-2-4-8-11 (female parent)and Z09A39-3 (male parent). It is of indeterminate growth type,and its first inflorescence occurs at the 7th or 8th node.The mature fruit is pink in color without shoulder,averagely weighs 166.6 g,and is 0.75 kg/cm2 in hardness and tolerant to storage and transportation. The fruit is also good in quality,containing 168.0 mg/kg vitamin C,5.07% soluble solids, and 53.4 mg/kg lycopene.Its yield is 87.00 t/hm2 in spring greenhouse culture and 65.25 t/hm2 in autumn greenhouse culture.It has good tolerance to tomato yellow leaf curl virus (TYLCV)and can be cultivated in areas where TYLCV occurs heavily.%‘申粉V-1’是以自交系06-2-4-8-11为母本、自交系Z09A39-3为父本配制而成的中早熟番茄一代杂种.该品种为无限生长类型,第1花序着生于第7~8节,成熟果粉红色,无绿果肩,单果质量166.6 g,果实硬度0.75 kg/cm2,耐贮运,品质优良,Vc含量168.0 mg/kg,可溶性固形物5.07%,番茄红素53.4mg/kg;春大棚栽培产量87.00 t/hm2,秋大棚栽培产量65.25 t/hm2,耐番茄黄化曲叶病毒病,适于该病发生严重的地区栽培.

  19. Mapping of QTLs Conferring the Resistance to Tomato Yellow Leaf Curl Virus(TYLCV)in Solanum lycopersicoides%类番茄茄抗番茄黄花曲叶病毒QTL的定位

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    宗园园; 刘磊; 李涛; Sayed Rashad Ali Shah; 周龙溪; 孙玉燕; 郑峥; 郑启功; 范淑英; 李君明

    2012-01-01

    An introgression line(IL)population,which was derived from a wild relative Solanum lycopersicoides LA2951,was used to screen the involved loci for resistance to TYLCV by the natural inoculation. In total,7 QTLs conferring the resistance to TYLCV were identified after the analysis of different individuals of IL population,which were respectively located on chromosome 1,3,4,5,6, 7 and 12. Among them,QTL involved in chromosome 1 still need to be addressed further.%采用田间自然接种番茄黄花曲叶病毒(TYLCV)的鉴定方法,对来自番茄野生种类番茄茄Solanum.lycopersicoides LA2951的渐渗系(Introgression Line,IL)群体进行了筛选,发现类番茄茄LA2951对TYLCV的抗性受多个位点控制。通过分析不同IL的抗性,共鉴定出7个QTL,分别位于染色体1、3、4、5、6、7和12上,其中位于染色体1上的QTL有待于进一步确定。

  20. Characterization of an infectious pancreatic necrosis (IPN) virus carrier cell culture with resistance to superinfection with heterologous viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García, Inmaculada; Galiana, Antonio; Falcó, Alberto; Estepa, Amparo; Perez, Luis

    2011-04-21

    A state of persistence of a non susceptible fish cell line with infectious pancreatic necrosis virus (IPNV) was established in vitro by experimental infection. The persistently infected culture showed sustained production of infectious virus and could be continuously passaged for months. A distinct feature of this culture is that only a very small fraction of the cells harbours virus replication, in contrast to other reported IPNV-persistently infected cells from salmonid fish, where nearly all the cells express viral antigens. In spite of the small number of detectable IPNV-infected cells, the carrier culture shows resistance to superinfection with homologous as well as heterologous viruses. Temperature shift-up experiments indicate that viral interference is due to continuous replication of IPNV in the culture. Quantitation of Mx gene expression suggested that the interference phenomenon could be mediated by the activation of the interferon (IFN) system. However, conditioned medium from the IPNV-infected cell cultures only marginally protected other cells against VHSV infection, indicating that other type I IFN-independent mechanism may be underlying the resistance of the persistently infected culture to infection with heterologous viruses. Our study defines a novel in vitro model of IPNV persistence and contributes to the understanding of the widespread distribution of aquabirnaviruses in marine and fresh water environments by establishing a carrier state in non susceptible fish species.

  1. Inheritance of resistance to yellow mosaic virus in blackgram (Vigna mungo (L.) Hepper).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, D P

    1980-09-01

    The inheritance of resistance to mungbean yellow mosaic virus (MYMV) was studied in blackgram (Vigna mungo (L.) Hepper). The highly resistant donors Pant U-84 and UPU-2 and a highly susceptible line, UL-2, their F1's, F2's and backcrosses were grown with spreader located every 5 to 6 rows. The resistance was found to be digenic and recessive in all the crosses and free from cytoplasmic effect.

  2. The pandemic (H1N1 2009 influenza virus is resistant to mannose-binding lectin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ushirogawa Hiroshi

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mannose-binding lectin (MBL is an important component of innate immunity because it promotes bacterial clearance and neutralization of human influenza A viruses. Since a majority of humans have no neutralizing antibody against the pandemic (H1N1 2009 influenza (pandemic 2009 virus, innate immunity may be crucial and MBL susceptibility may therefore influence viral pathogenesis. Results We examined MBL susceptibility of influenza A viruses and observed that the pandemic 2009 virus was resistant to MBL, whereas all seasonal influenza A viruses tested were susceptible. The mortality of mice infected with a seasonal H1N1 influenza virus was evidently enhanced on transient blockage of MBL activity by simultaneous inoculation of mannan, whereas mannan inoculation had no effect on mice infected with a pandemic 2009 virus. This indicates that MBL protects mice against infection with the seasonal virus but not against that with the pandemic 2009 virus. Conclusions These results indicate that the pandemic 2009 virus is not susceptible to MBL, an important component of innate immunity.

  3. Resistência ao mosaico Y, combinada com resistência ao mosaico comum, em tomateiro Tomato types combining resistance to tobacco mosaic and potato Y viruses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroshi Nagai

    1972-01-01

    Full Text Available Derivados de tomateiro, que incorporam resistência ao vírus de mosaico Y (PVY e mosaico comum (TMV, foram obtidos do cruzamento entre a var. Ângela, resistente às estirpes locais do vírus de mosaico Y, e T 15-1-6-1, que é altamente resistente às estirpes locais do TMV, por meio de inoculação com dois vírus, retrocruzamentos para Ângela e seleção de gerações avançadas do híbrido. Tipos selecionados do tomateiro são homozigotos para os gens Tm-2ªe rt. Suas características comerciais são semelhantes às da var. Ângela. Espera-se que os novos tipos de tomateiro reduzam perdas causadas pela infecção com PVY e/ou TMV, evitem efeitos sinérgicos entre dois vírus em combinação, eliminem a infecção do tipo "internal browning" e também transmissão do TMV pelas sementes.A tomato variety named Angela, previously described, incorporates resistance to local strains of the potato virus Y group that occur in tomato plantings in São Paulo. This variety is well accepted by tomato growers and is being used as a basis for incorporation of other types of virus disease resistance. Derivatives incorporating resistance to potato Y and tobacco mosaic viruses were obtained from crosses between Ângela and T 15-1-6-1, a tomato type that is highly resistant to tobacco mosaic virus, by inoculation and selection of advance generations of the hybrid or by backcrossing, combined with selfing. The newly selected tomato types are homozygous for the recessive gene rt that controls resistance to potato Y virus and for Tm-2a that conditions tobacco mosaic virus resistance. Their commercial qualities are similar to those of the Ângela parent plant. The new tomato types, resistant to TMV and potato virus Y, are still being tested in a large scale before being released, but it is expected that they will reduce considerably the losses caused by infection with either of the two viruses, avoid injury from the synergistic effect of virus combinations in

  4. Emergence of H7N9 Influenza A Virus Resistant to Neuraminidase Inhibitors in Nonhuman Primates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shichinohe, Shintaro; Nakayama, Misako; Igarashi, Manabu; Ishii, Akihiro; Ishigaki, Hirohito; Ishida, Hideaki; Kitagawa, Naoko; Sasamura, Takako; Shiohara, Masanori; Doi, Michiko; Tsuchiya, Hideaki; Nakamura, Shinichiro; Okamatsu, Masatoshi; Sakoda, Yoshihiro; Kida, Hiroshi

    2015-01-01

    The number of patients infected with H7N9 influenza virus has been increasing since 2013. We examined the efficacy of neuraminidase (NA) inhibitors and the efficacy of a vaccine against an H7N9 influenza virus, A/Anhui/1/2013 (H7N9), isolated from a patient in a cynomolgus macaque model. NA inhibitors (oseltamivir and peramivir) barely reduced the total virus amount because of the emergence of resistant variants with R289K or I219T in NA [residues 289 and 219 in N9 of A/Anhui/1/2013 (H7N9) correspond to 292 and 222 in N2, respectively] in three of the six treated macaques, whereas subcutaneous immunization of an inactivated vaccine derived from A/duck/Mongolia/119/2008 (H7N9) prevented propagation of A/Anhui/1/2013 (H7N9) in all vaccinated macaques. The percentage of macaques in which variant H7N9 viruses with low sensitivity to the NA inhibitors were detected was much higher than that of macaques in which variant H5N1 highly pathogenic influenza virus was detected after treatment with one of the NA inhibitors in our previous study. The virus with R289K in NA was reported in samples from human patients, whereas that with I219T in NA was identified for the first time in this study using macaques, though no variant H7N9 virus was reported in previous studies using mice. Therefore, the macaque model enables prediction of the frequency of emerging H7N9 virus resistant to NA inhibitors in vivo. Since H7N9 strains resistant to NA inhibitors might easily emerge compared to other influenza viruses, monitoring of the emergence of variants is required during treatment of H7N9 influenza virus infection with NA inhibitors. PMID:26055368

  5. First report of a resistance-breaking strain of Tomato spotted wilt virus infecting tomatoes with the Sw-5 tospovirus-resistance gene in California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Management of Tomato spotted wilt virus (TSWV) with the Sw-5 resistance gene in tomato is highly effective. However, in certain regions of the world where resistant tomatoes have been continually planted, resistance-breaking strains of TSWV have emerged. In spring 2016 resistant tomatoes were obse...

  6. Attachment and penetration of acyclovir-resistant herpes simplex virus are inhibited by Melissa officinalis extract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Astani, Akram; Navid, Mojdeh Heidary; Schnitzler, Paul

    2014-10-01

    Medicinal plants are increasingly of interest as novel source of drugs for antiherpetic agents, because herpes simplex virus (HSV) might develop resistance to commonly used antiviral drugs. An aqueous extract of Melissa officinalis and the phenolic compounds caffeic acid, p-coumaric acid and rosmarinic acid were examined for their antiviral activity against herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) acyclovir-sensitive and clinical isolates of acyclovir-resistant strains in vitro. When drugs were added during the intracellular replication of HSV-1 infected cells, no antiviral effect was observed by plaque reduction assay. However, Melissa extract interacted directly with free viral particles of two acyclovir-resistant HSV strains at low IC50 values of 0.13 and 0.23 µg/mL and high selectivity indices of 2692 and 1522, respectively. The Melissa extract and rosmarinic acid inhibited HSV-1 attachment to host cells in a dose-dependent manner for acyclovir-sensitive and acyclovir-resistant strains. These results indicate that mainly rosmarinic acid contributed to the antiviral activity of Melissa extract. Penetration of herpes viruses into cells was inhibited by Melissa extract at 80% and 96% for drug-sensitive and drug-resistant viruses, respectively. Melissa extract exhibits low toxicity and affects attachment and penetration of acyclovir-sensitive and acyclovir-resistant HSVs in vitro. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  7. Hairpin RNA Targeting Multiple Viral Genes Confers Strong Resistance to Rice Black-Streaked Dwarf Virus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fangquan Wang

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Rice black-streaked dwarf virus (RBSDV belongs to the genus Fijivirus in the family of Reoviridae and causes severe yield loss in rice-producing areas in Asia. RNA silencing, as a natural defence mechanism against plant viruses, has been successfully exploited for engineering virus resistance in plants, including rice. In this study, we generated transgenic rice lines harbouring a hairpin RNA (hpRNA construct targeting four RBSDV genes, S1, S2, S6 and S10, encoding the RNA-dependent RNA polymerase, the putative core protein, the RNA silencing suppressor and the outer capsid protein, respectively. Both field nursery and artificial inoculation assays of three generations of the transgenic lines showed that they had strong resistance to RBSDV infection. The RBSDV resistance in the segregating transgenic populations correlated perfectly with the presence of the hpRNA transgene. Furthermore, the hpRNA transgene was expressed in the highly resistant transgenic lines, giving rise to abundant levels of 21–24 nt small interfering RNA (siRNA. By small RNA deep sequencing, the RBSDV-resistant transgenic lines detected siRNAs from all four viral gene sequences in the hpRNA transgene, indicating that the whole chimeric fusion sequence can be efficiently processed by Dicer into siRNAs. Taken together, our results suggest that long hpRNA targeting multiple viral genes can be used to generate stable and durable virus resistance in rice, as well as other plant species.

  8. Oseltamivir-Resistant Pandemic (H1N1) 2009 Virus, Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramirez-Gonzalez, José Ernesto; Gonzalez-Duran, Elizabeth; Alcantara-Perez, Patricia; Wong-Arambula, Claudia; Olivera-Diaz, Hiram; Cortez-Ortiz, Iliana; Barrera-Badillo, Gisela; Nguyen, Ha; Gubareva, Larisa; Lopez-Martinez, Irma; Díaz-Quiñonez, Jose Alberto; Lezana-Fernández, Miguel Angel; Gatell-Ramírez, Hugo Lopez; Villalobos, Jose Angel Cordova; Hernández-Avila, Mauricio

    2011-01-01

    During May 2009–April 2010, we analyzed 692 samples of pandemic (H1N1) 2009 virus from patients in Mexico. We detected the H275Y substitution of the neuraminidase gene in a specimen from an infant with pandemic (H1N1) 2009 who was treated with oseltamivir. This virus was susceptible to zanamivir and resistant to adamantanes and oseltamivir. PMID:21291607

  9. Development of oseltamivir and zanamivir resistance in influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 virus, Denmark, 2014

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Trebbien, Ramona; Pedersen, Svend Stenvang; Vorborg, Kristine

    2017-01-01

    Antiviral treatment of immunocompromised patients with prolonged influenza virus infection can lead to multidrug resistance. This study reveals the selection of antiviral resistance mutations in influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 virus in an immunocompromised patient during a 6-month period. The patient...

  10. Efficient dsRNA-mediated transgenic resistance to Beet necrotic yellow vein virus in sugar beets is not affected by other soilborne and aphid-transmitted viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lennefors, Britt-Louise; van Roggen, Petra M; Yndgaard, Flemming; Savenkov, Eugene I; Valkonen, Jari P T

    2008-04-01

    Rhizomania caused by Beet necrotic yellow vein virus (BNYVV) is one of the most devastating sugar beet diseases. Sugar beet plants engineered to express a 0.4 kb inverted repeat construct based on the BNYVV replicase gene accumulated the transgene mRNA to similar levels in leaves and roots, whereas accumulation of the transgene-homologous siRNA was more pronounced in roots. The roots expressed high levels of resistance to BNYVV transmitted by the vector, Polymyxa betae. Resistance to BNYVV was not decreased following co-infection of the plants with Beet soil borne virus and Beet virus Q that share the same vector with BNYVV. Similarly, co-infection with the aphid-transmitted Beet mild yellowing virus, Beet yellows virus (BYV), or with all of the aforementioned viruses did not affect the resistance to BNYVV, while they accumulated in roots. These viruses are common in most of the sugar beet growing areas in Europe and world wide. However, there was a competitive interaction between BYV and BMYV in sugar beet leaves, as infection with BYV decreased the titres of BMYV. Other interactions between the viruses studied were not observed. The results suggest that the engineered resistance to BNYVV expressed in the sugar beets of this study is efficient in roots and not readily compromised following infection of the plants with heterologous viruses.

  11. Resistance of Hepatitis C Virus to Inhibitors: Complexity and Clinical Implications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Celia Perales

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Selection of inhibitor-resistant viral mutants is universal for viruses that display quasi-species dynamics, and hepatitis C virus (HCV is no exception. Here we review recent results on drug resistance in HCV, with emphasis on resistance to the newly-developed, directly-acting antiviral agents, as they are increasingly employed in the clinic. We put the experimental observations in the context of quasi-species dynamics, in particular what the genetic and phenotypic barriers to resistance mean in terms of exploration of sequence space while HCV replicates in the liver of infected patients or in cell culture. Strategies to diminish the probability of viral breakthrough during treatment are briefly outlined.

  12. Resistance of Hepatitis C Virus to Inhibitors: Complexity and Clinical Implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perales, Celia; Quer, Josep; Gregori, Josep; Esteban, Juan Ignacio; Domingo, Esteban

    2015-01-01

    Selection of inhibitor-resistant viral mutants is universal for viruses that display quasi-species dynamics, and hepatitis C virus (HCV) is no exception. Here we review recent results on drug resistance in HCV, with emphasis on resistance to the newly-developed, directly-acting antiviral agents, as they are increasingly employed in the clinic. We put the experimental observations in the context of quasi-species dynamics, in particular what the genetic and phenotypic barriers to resistance mean in terms of exploration of sequence space while HCV replicates in the liver of infected patients or in cell culture. Strategies to diminish the probability of viral breakthrough during treatment are briefly outlined. PMID:26561827

  13. Plant Resistance to Virus Diseases through Genetic Engineering: Can a Similar Approach Control Plant-parasitic Nematodes?

    OpenAIRE

    Reimann-Philipp, Ulrich; Beachy, Roger N.

    1993-01-01

    Genetically engineered resistance against plant virus diseases has been achieved by transforming plants with gene constructs that encode viral sequences. Several successful field trials of virus-resistant transgenic plants have been carried out. Specific features of virus infection make it possible to interfere with different steps of the infection and disease cycle by accumulating products of chimeric genes introduced into transgenic plants. In this paper we describe the most common methods ...

  14. Recessive resistance to Cucurbit yellow stunting disorder virus in melon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cucurbit yellow stunting disorder virus (CYSDV) reduces melon (Cucumis melo L.) fruit quality and yield in many parts of the world. CYSDV and its vector, sweetpotato whitefly (MEAM1 cryptic species of Bemisia tabaci; SPWF) are a devastating combination in the Sonoran Desert areas of California and A...

  15. mi-siRNAs and plum pox virus resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    The agricultural sector is expecting to derive tangible benefits from the investments that have been made in plant biotechnology. Although plant biotechnology research has been carried out for decades, only a few examples of biotech horticultural crops have reached the market. Plum pox virus (PPV)...

  16. Potato leafroll virus : molecular analysis and genetically engineered resistance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wilk, van der F.

    1995-01-01

    The nucleotide sequence of the genomic RNA of potato leafroll virus (PLRV) was elucidated and its genetic organization deduced (Chapter 2). Six open reading frames (ORFs) were shown to be present on the genome. Both the PLRV coat protein gene and the RNA- dependent RNA polymerase gene were

  17. Development of oseltamivir and zanamivir resistance in influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 virus, Denmark, 2014

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Trebbien, Ramona; Pedersen, Svend Stenvang; Vorborg, Kristine

    2017-01-01

    Antiviral treatment of immunocompromised patients with prolonged influenza virus infection can lead to multidrug resistance. This study reveals the selection of antiviral resistance mutations in influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 virus in an immunocompromised patient during a 6-month period. The patient was ...... for treatment of individual patients as well as for preventive measures to control the development and transmission of antiviral resistant viruses.......Antiviral treatment of immunocompromised patients with prolonged influenza virus infection can lead to multidrug resistance. This study reveals the selection of antiviral resistance mutations in influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 virus in an immunocompromised patient during a 6-month period. The patient...

  18. Multicenter Quality Control of Hepatitis C Virus Protease Inhibitor Resistance Genotyping

    OpenAIRE

    Vallet, Sophie; Larrat, Sylvie; Laperche, Syria; Le Guillou-Guillemette, Hélène; Legrand-Abravanel, Florence; Bouchardeau, Françoise; Pivert, Adeline; Henquell, Cécile; Mirand, Audrey; André-Garnier, Elisabeth; Giordanengo, Valérie; Lagathu, Gisèle; Thibault, Vincent; Scholtes, Caroline; Schvoerer, Evelyne

    2013-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) protease inhibitor resistance-associated substitutions are selected during triple-therapy breakthrough. This multicenter quality control study evaluated the expertise of 23 French laboratories in HCV protease inhibitor resistance genotyping. A panel of 12 well-defined blinded samples comprising two wild-type HCV strains, nine transcripts from synthetic NS3 mutant samples or from clinical strains, and one HCV RNA-negative sample was provided to the participating laborat...

  19. Addressing the Challenges of Hepatitis C Virus Resistance and Treatment Failure

    OpenAIRE

    Che C. Colpitts; Baumert, Thomas F.

    2016-01-01

    Chronic hepatitis C is a major cause of chronic liver disease, including liver cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma. The development of direct-acting antivirals (DAAs) revolutionized hepatitis C virus (HCV) treatment by offering genuine prospects for the first comprehensive cure of a chronic viral infection in humans. While antiviral resistance is a significant limitation for interferon-based therapies, resistance and treatment failure still appear to be present in a small fraction of patie...

  20. Toward a quarter century of pathogen-derived resistance and practical approaches to plant virus disease control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gottula, J; Fuchs, M

    2009-01-01

    The concept of pathogen-derived resistance (PDR) describes the use of genetic elements from a pathogen's own genome to confer resistance in an otherwise susceptible host via genetic engineering [J. Theor. Biol. 113 (1985) 395]. Illustrated with the bacteriophage Qbeta in Escherichia coli, this strategy was conceived as a broadly applicable approach to engineer resistance against pathogens. For plant viruses, the concept of PDR was validated with the creation of tobacco plants expressing the coat protein gene of Tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) and exhibiting resistance to infection by TMV [Science 232 (1986) 738]. Subsequently, virus-resistant horticultural crops were developed through the expression of viral gene constructs. Among the numerous transgenic crops produced and evaluated in the field, papaya resistant to Papaya ringspot virus (PRSV) [Annu. Rev. Phytopathol. 36 (1998) 415] and summer squash resistant to Cucumber mosaic virus (CMV), Zucchini yellow mosaic virus, and/or Watermelon mosaic virus [Biotechnology 13 (1995) 1458] were released for commercial use in the USA. Although cultivated on limited areas, the adoption rate of cultivars derived from these two crops is increasing steadily. Tomato and sweet pepper resistant to CMV and papaya resistant to PRSV were also released in the People's Republic of China. Applying the concept of PDR provides unique opportunities for developing virus-resistant crops and implementing efficient and environmentally sound management approaches to mitigate the impact of virus diseases. Based on the tremendous progress made during the past quarter century, the prospects of further advancing this innovative technology for practical control of virus diseases are very promising.

  1. Sensitivity of a ribavirin resistant mutant of hepatitis C virus to other antiviral drugs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kathleen B Mihalik

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: While ribavirin mono-therapy regimens have minimal effect on patients with chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV infections, they can be efficacious when combined with interferon. Clinical studies show that interferon-free combination therapies containing ribavirin are also efficacious, suggesting that an interferon-free therapy could be adopted in the near future. However, generation of drug resistant mutants and cross resistance to other drugs could impair the efficacy of the treatment. Therefore, understanding the mechanism of HCV resistance to ribavirin and cross resistance to other antiviral drugs could be of major importance. METHODS: We tested the ability of a J6/JFH1 derived HCV ribavirin resistant mutant to grow in tissue cultured Huh7D cells in the presence of the mutagen 5-Fluorouracil and the nucleoside analog 2'-C-Methylcytidine. Virus replication was assessed by detecting HCV antigens by immunofluorescence and by titrating virus present in the supernatants. Recovered viruses were amplified by RT-PCR and sequenced. RESULTS: The sensitivity of HCV-RR relative to parental J6/JFH1 to the tested drugs varied. HCV-RR was more resistant than J6/JFH1 to 5-Fluorouracil but was not more resistant than J6/JFH1 to 2'-C-Methylcytidine. Growth of HCV-RR in 5-Fluorouracil allowed the selection of an HCV-RR derived mutant resistant to 5-Fluorouracil (HCV-5FU. HCV-5FU grows to moderate levels in the presence of high concentrations of 5-Fluorouracil and to parental levels in the absence of the drug. Sequence of its genome shows that HCV-5FU accumulated multiple synonymous and non-synonymous mutations. CONCLUSIONS: These results indicate that determinants of resistance to ribavirin could also confer resistance to other anti-HCV drugs, shedding light toward understanding the mechanism of action of ribavirin and highlighting the importance of combination drug selection for HCV treatment. The results also show that it is possible to select a 5

  2. Bacterial viruses enable their host to acquire antibiotic resistance genes from neighbouring cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haaber, Jakob; Leisner, Jørgen J; Cohn, Marianne T;

    2016-01-01

    Prophages are quiescent viruses located in the chromosomes of bacteria. In the human pathogen, Staphylococcus aureus, prophages are omnipresent and are believed to be responsible for the spread of some antibiotic resistance genes. Here we demonstrate that release of phages from a subpopulation of S...

  3. Prevalence of intrathecal acyclovir resistant virus in herpes simplex encephalitis patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.G. Mitterreiter (Johanna G.); M.J. Titulaer (Maarten); G.P. van Nierop (Gijsbert); J.J.A. van Kampen (Jeroen); G.I. Aron; A.D.M.E. Osterhaus (Albert); G.M.G.M. Verjans (George); W.J.D. Ouwendijk (Werner )

    2016-01-01

    textabstractHerpes simplex encephalitis (HSE) is a life-threatening complication of herpes simplex virus (HSV) infection. Acyclovir (ACV) is the antiviral treatment of choice, but may lead to emergence of ACV-resistant (ACVR) HSV due to mutations in the viral UL23 gene encoding for the ACV-targeted

  4. Bacterial viruses enable their host to acquire antibiotic resistance genes from neighbouring cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haaber, Jakob Krause; Leisner, Jørgen; Cohn, Marianne Thorup;

    2016-01-01

    Prophages are quiescent viruses located in the chromosomes of bacteria. In the human pathogen, Staphylococcus aureus, prophages are omnipresent and are believed to be responsible for the spread of some antibiotic resistance genes. Here we demonstrate that release of phages from a subpopulation of...

  5. USVL-370, A zucchini yellow mosaic virus resistant watermelon breeding line

    Science.gov (United States)

    We report the development of a novel watermelon line ‘USVL-370’ [Citrullus lanatus (Thunb.) Matsum. & Nakai] containing resistance to the zucchini yellow mosaic virus-Florida strain (ZYMV-FL). This breeding line is homozygous for the recessive eukaryotic elongation factor eIF4E allele associated wit...

  6. Characterization of R genes involved in resistance to Cherry leaf roll virus in paradox hybrids

    Science.gov (United States)

    A single dominant ‘R’ gene (clrvR), in black walnuts (Juglans hindsii) or ‘paradox’ hybrids (J. hindsii x J. regia) confers resistance to Cherry leaf roll virus (CLRV), the causal agent of blackline disease. The identification and cloning of the ‘R’ gene is expected to aid the walnut breeding progra...

  7. Virus Resistant Transgenic Papaya: Commercial Development and Regulatory and Environmental Issues

    Science.gov (United States)

    In Hawaii, transgenic papaya resistant to Papaya ringspot virus (PRSV) was developed starting in the 1980s and released commercially in 1998 to combat the wide spread destruction of Hawaii’s papaya industry. This review describes the proactive development of the transgenic papaya and its impact on ...

  8. Heliox reduces respiratory system resistance in respiratory syncytial virus induced respiratory failure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kneyber, Martin C. J.; van Heerde, Marc; Twisk, Jos W. R.; Plotz, Frans B.; Markhors, Dick G.

    2009-01-01

    Introduction Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) lower respiratory tract disease is characterised by narrowing of the airways resulting in increased airway resistance, air-trapping and respiratory acidosis. These problems might be overcome using helium-oxygen gas mixture. However, the effect of

  9. Nanofluidic Devices with Two Pores in Series for Resistive-Pulse Sensing of Single Virus Capsids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harms, Zachary D.; Mogensen, Klaus Bo; Rodrigues de Sousa Nunes, Pedro André;

    2011-01-01

    We report fabrication and characterization of nanochannel devices with two nanopores in series for resistive-pulse sensing of hepatitis B virus (HBV) capsids. The nanochannel and two pores are patterned by electron beam lithography between two microchannels and etched by reactive ion etching. The...

  10. Field Trials of CpGV Virus Isolates Overcoming Resistance to CpGV-M

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    M. Berling; J. -B. Rey; S. -J. Ondet; Y. Tallot; O. Soubabère; A. Bonhomme; B. Sauphanor; M. Lopez-Ferber

    2009-01-01

    The Cydia pomonella granulovirus (CpGV) has been used for many years as biological agent for codling moth control in apple orchards. Resistance to the Mexican strain of CpGV was detected in orchards in Germany, France and Italy. A laboratory insect colony was started from insects collected in a French resistant orchard. It was named RGV. Various virus isolates were identified as active against this resistant insect colony. Field tests were carried out in 2007 to test if the two virus isolates CpGV-I12 and NPP-R1 were effective in the field. Although these virus isolates were not able to reduce insect caused fruit damages, they significantly reduced the overwintering insect populations. NPP-R1 was subjected to eight passages on RGV larvae (NPP-R1.8) that improved its biological activity on RGV larvae. 2008 field trials were set up to test this improved virus strain, compared to CpGV-I12 and Madex plus active on RGV. These tests confirmed the ability to control both in susceptible and resistant insect populations.

  11. Line 63-1: A New Virus-resistant Transgenic Papaya

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tennant, P.; Souza, M.T.; Fitch, M.M.; Manshardt, R.; Slightom, J.L.; Gonsalves, D.

    2005-01-01

    The disease resistance of a transgenic line expressing the coat protein (CP) gene of the mild strain of the papaya ringspot virus (PRSV) from Hawaii was further analyzed against PRSV isolates from Hawaii and other geographical regions. Line 63-1 originated from the same transformation experiment tha

  12. Heliox reduces respiratory system resistance in respiratory syncytial virus induced respiratory failure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kneyber, Martin C. J.; van Heerde, Marc; Twisk, Jos W. R.; Plotz, Frans B.; Markhors, Dick G.

    2009-01-01

    Introduction Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) lower respiratory tract disease is characterised by narrowing of the airways resulting in increased airway resistance, air-trapping and respiratory acidosis. These problems might be overcome using helium-oxygen gas mixture. However, the effect of mechan

  13. Prevalence of intrathecal acyclovir resistant virus in herpes simplex encephalitis patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.G. Mitterreiter (Johanna G.); M.J. Titulaer (Maarten); G.P. van Nierop (Gijsbert); J.J.A. van Kampen (Jeroen); G.I. Aron; A.D.M.E. Osterhaus (Albert); G.M.G.M. Verjans (George); W.J.D. Ouwendijk (Werner )

    2016-01-01

    textabstractHerpes simplex encephalitis (HSE) is a life-threatening complication of herpes simplex virus (HSV) infection. Acyclovir (ACV) is the antiviral treatment of choice, but may lead to emergence of ACV-resistant (ACVR) HSV due to mutations in the viral UL23 gene encoding for the ACV-targeted

  14. The efficiency of RNA interference for conferring stable resistance to Plum Pox Virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plum transformed with an intron hairpin RNA CP (ihRNA-CP) were resistant to PPV infection through the specific process of RNA silencing involving both small interfering -RNA interfering (siRNA) and a methylated virus transgene. This recognition process specifically targeted the triggered PPV genome...

  15. Responses of Varroa-resistant honey bees (Apis mellifera L.) to Deformed wing virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    The negative impact of Deformedwing virus (DWV) on European honey bees Apis mellifera is magnified by Varroa destructor parasitism. This study compared the responses of two Varroa-resistant honey bee stocks, pure Russian honey bees (RHB) and out-crossed Varroa Sensitive Hygienic bees, Pol-line (POL)...

  16. Development and field evaluation of multiple virus-resistant bottle gourd (Lagenaria siceraria)

    Science.gov (United States)

    In an effort to develop bottle gourd (Lagenaria siceraria) as a widely adapted rootstock for watermelon grafting, we were interested in selecting lines with broad resistance to several economically important cucurbit viruses in the United States. Preliminary analysis under greenhouse conditions ind...

  17. Molecular diagnosis and treatment of drug-resistant hepatitis B virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jeong Han; Park, Yong Kwang; Park, Eun-Sook; Kim, Kyun-Hwan

    2014-05-21

    Oral antiviral agents have been developed in the last two decades for the treatment of chronic hepatitis B (CHB). However, antiviral resistance remains an important challenge for long-term CHB therapy. All of the clinically available oral antiviral agents are nucleoside or nucleotide analogues that target the activity of viral reverse transcriptase (RT), and all are reported to have resistant mutations. Since the hepatitis B virus (HBV) RT, like other viral polymerases, lacks proofreading activity, the emergence of drug-resistance occurs readily under selective pressure from the administration of antiviral agents. The molecular diagnosis of drug-resistant HBV is based on sequence variations, and current diagnostic methods include sequencing, restriction fragment polymorphism analysis, and hybridization. Here, we will discuss the currently available molecular diagnosis tools, in vitro phenotypic assays for validation of drug-resistant HBV, and treatment options for drug-resistant HBV.

  18. Field Performance of Transgenic Sugarcane Lines Resistant to Sugarcane Mosaic Virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Wei; Ruan, Miaohong; Qin, Lifang; Yang, Chuanyu; Chen, Rukai; Chen, Baoshan; Zhang, Muqing

    2017-01-01

    Sugarcane mosaic disease is mainly caused by the sugarcane mosaic virus (SCMV), which can significantly reduce stalk yield and sucrose content of sugarcane in the field. Coat protein mediated protection (CPMP) is an effective strategy to improve virus resistance. A 2-year field study was conducted to compare five independent transgenic sugarcane lines carrying the SCMV-CP gene (i.e., B2, B36, B38, B48, and B51) with the wild-type parental clone Badila (WT). Agronomic performance, resistance to SCMV infection, and transgene stability were evaluated and compared with the wild-type parental clone Badila (WT) at four experimental locations in China across two successive seasons, i.e., plant cane (PC) and 1st ratoon cane (1R). All transgenic lines derived from Badila had significantly greater tons of cane per hectare (TCH) and tons of sucrose per hectare (TSH) as well as lower SCMV disease incidence than those from Badila in the PC and 1R crops. The transgenic line B48 was highly resistant to SCMV with less than 3% incidence of infection. The recovery phenotype of transgenic line B36 was infected soon after virus inoculation, but the subsequent leaves showed no symptoms of infection. Most control plants developed symptoms that persisted and spread throughout the plant with more than 50% incidence. B48 recorded an average of 102.72 t/ha, which was 67.2% more than that for Badila. The expression of the transgene was stable over many generations with vegetative propagation. These results show that SCMV-resistant transgenic lines derived from Badila can provide resistant germplasm for sugarcane breeding and can also be used to study virus resistance mechanisms. This is the first report on the development and field performance of transgenic sugarcane plants that are resistant to SCMV infection in China. PMID:28228765

  19. P1-Substituted Symmetry-Based Human Immunodeficiency Virus Protease Inhibitors with Potent Antiviral Activity against Drug-Resistant Viruses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DeGoey, David A.; Grampovnik, David J.; Chen, Hui-Ju; Flosi, William J.; Klein, Larry L.; Dekhtyar, Tatyana; Stoll, Vincent; Mamo, Mulugeta; Molla, Akhteruzzaman; Kempf, Dale J. (Abbott)

    2013-03-07

    Because there is currently no cure for HIV infection, patients must remain on long-term drug therapy, leading to concerns over potential drug side effects and the emergence of drug resistance. For this reason, new and safe antiretroviral agents with improved potency against drug-resistant strains of HIV are needed. A series of HIV protease inhibitors (PIs) with potent activity against both wild-type (WT) virus and drug-resistant strains of HIV was designed and synthesized. The incorporation of substituents with hydrogen bond donor and acceptor groups at the P1 position of our symmetry-based inhibitor series resulted in significant potency improvements against the resistant mutants. By this approach, several compounds, such as 13, 24, and 29, were identified that demonstrated similar or improved potencies compared to 1 against highly mutated strains of HIV derived from patients who previously failed HIV PI therapy. Overall, compound 13 demonstrated the best balance of potency against drug resistant strains of HIV and oral bioavailability in pharmacokinetic studies. X-ray analysis of an HIV PI with an improved resistance profile bound to WT HIV protease is also reported.

  20. Virological response and resistance mutations to NS3/4A inhibitors in hepatitis C virus-human immunodeficiency virus coinfection

    OpenAIRE

    Naqvi, Alissa; Giordanengo, Valérie; Dunais, Brigitte; de Salvador-Guillouet, Francine; Perbost, Isabelle; Durant, Jacques; Pugliese, Pascal; Joulié, Aline; Roger, Pierre Marie; Rosenthal, Eric

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate virological response to telaprevir or boceprevir in combination with pegylated interferon and ribavirin and resistance mutations to NS3/4A inhibitors in hepatitis C virus-human immunodeficiency virus (HCV-HIV) coinfected patients in a real life setting.

  1. Influence of cutting conditions on chip side curl

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    De Chiffre, Leonardo

    2004-01-01

    The paper describes the influence of local variations of contact length, cutting speed and material constraint, showing the effect of lubrication, on the side curl of the chip. The following examples are illustrated by experiments: cutting of a tube vs. cutting of a bar; cutting using a tool...

  2. Influence of cutting conditions on chip side curl

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    De Chiffre, Leonardo

    2004-01-01

    The paper describes the influence of local variations of contact length, cutting speed and material constraint, showing the effect of lubrication, on the side curl of the chip. The following examples are illustrated by experiments: cutting of a tube vs. cutting of a bar; cutting using a tool with...

  3. Computation of Surface Integrals of Curl Vector Fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Chenglie

    2007-01-01

    This article presents a way of computing a surface integral when the vector field of the integrand is a curl field. Presented in some advanced calculus textbooks such as [1], the technique, as the author experienced, is simple and applicable. The computation is based on Stokes' theorem in 3-space calculus, and thus provides not only a means to…

  4. IPR 99 - Dwarf arabica coffee cultivar resistant to coffee ringspot virus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tumoru Sera

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available ‘IPR 99’ was derived from a cross between “Villa Sarchi 971/10” and “Hibrido de Timor 832/2”. It is a dwarf cultivar, resistant to coffee ringspot virus, partially resistant to leaf rust with semi-late ripening. ‘IPR 99’ presents partial resistance to necrosis and mummification of young fruits on field conditions. It presents special cup quality and high yield in lower and higher temperature coffee regions in Paraná State.

  5. Genetically engineered resistance to Plum pox virus infection in herbaceous and stone fruit hosts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilardi, Vincenza; Nicola-Negri, Elisa Di

    2011-01-01

    Plum pox virus (PPV), a Potyvirus, is the causal agent of sharka, the most detrimental viral disease affecting stone fruit trees. This review focuses on research carried out to obtain PPV- resistant transgenic plants and on how biotechnological strategies evolved in light of the scientific advances made during the last several years. Successful RNA silencing strategies that confer high level of resistance to strains of PPV have been developed and tested under laboratory and greenhouse conditions. Moreover, field tests showed that transgene-mediated RNA silencing was effective in protecting plum plants against aphid-mediated PPV infection. The new emerging biotechnological approaches for conferring PPV resistance are discussed.

  6. Molecular Gymnastics: Mechanisms of HIV-1 Resistance to CCR5 Antagonists and Impact on Virus Phenotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roche, Michael; Borm, Katharina; Flynn, Jacqueline K; Lewin, Sharon R; Churchill, Melissa J; Gorry, Paul R

    2016-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) enters host cells through the binding of its envelope glycoproteins (Env) to the host cell receptor CD4 and then subsequent binding to a chemokine coreceptor, either CCR5 or CXCR4. CCR5 antagonists are a relatively recent class addition to the armamentarium of anti-HIV-1 drugs. These compounds act by binding to a hydrophobic pocket formed by the transmembrane helices of CCR5 and altering the conformation of the extracellular domains, such that they are no longer recognized by Env. Maraviroc is the first drug within this class to be licenced for use in HIV-1 therapy regimens. HIV resistance to CCR5 antagonists occurs either through outgrowth of pre-existing CXCR4-using viruses, or through acquisition of the ability of CCR5-using HIV-1 to use the antagonist bound form of CCR5. In the latter scenario, the mechanism underlying resistance is through complex alterations in the way that resistant Envs engage CCR5. These significant changes are unlikely to occur without consequence to the viral entry phenotype and may also open up new avenues to target CCR5 antagonist resistant viruses. This review discusses the mechanism of action of CCR5 antagonists, how HIV resistance to CCR5 antagonists occurs, and the subsequent effects on Env function.

  7. Emergence of resistance to carbocyclic oxetanocin G in herpes simplex virus type 1 and genetic analysis of resistant mutants

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Nan HU; Hiroshi SHIOTA

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To elucidate the potentiality of emergence of drug-resistance to carbocyclic oxetanocin G (C.OXT-G), a new effective antiviral drug for herpetic keratitis during treatment and the mechanism of this drug resistance.METHODS: A C.OXT-G resistant strain (C.OXT-Gr) was established by serially propagating the herpes simplex virus (HSV) -1 in African green monkey kidney (VERO) cells in the presence of C.OXT-G. After the drug sensitivity assay and the thymidine kinase (TK) activity assay, the molecular basis for the drug resistance was studied using polymerase chain reaction-single strand conformation polymorphism (PCR-SSCP) analysis and PCR direct sequencing technology. RESULTS: After the 10th passage in 10 μm C.OXT-G, the ED50 of the C.OXT-Gr was 17.08-fold greater than that of the original strain on the average and the TK activities of these resistant strains were extremely reduced. PCR-SSCP analysis on TK gene of the wild HSV- 1 and the C.OXT-Gr showed altered migration patterns in part 3 and part 4, while PCR-SSCP analysis on DNA polymerase gene showed no difference among the viruses. Sequence analysis revealed a deletion of G at position of 430 that caused frameshift, resulting in premature termination in the TK gene. CONCLUSION: The drug resistance to C.OXT-G may appear during the treatment due to the deficiency of TK activity caused by a single mutation in the TK gene of HSV-1.

  8. Rapid emergence of hepatitis C virus protease inhibitor resistance is expected

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rong, Libin [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Perelson, Alan S [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Ribeiro, Ruy M [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2009-01-01

    Approximately 170 million people worldwide are infected with hepatitis C virus (HCV). Current therapy, consisting of pegylated interferon (PEG-IFN) and ribavirin (RBV), leads to sustained viral elimination in only about 45% of patients treated. Telaprevir (VX-950), a novel HCV NS3-4A serine protease inhibitor, has demonstrated substantial antiviral activity in patients with chronic hepatitis C genotype 1 infection. However, some patients experience viral breakthrough during dosing, with drug resistant variants being 5%-20% of the virus population as early as day 2 after treatment initiation. Why viral variants appear such a short time after the start of dosing is unclear, especially since this has not been seen with monotherapy for either human immunodeficiency virus or hepatitis B virus. Here, using a viral dynamic model, we explain why such rapid emergence of drug resistant variants is expected when potent HCV protease inhibitors are used as monotherapy. Surprisingly, our model also shows that such rapid emergence need not be the case with some potent HCV NS5B polymerase inhibitors. Examining the case of telaprevir therapy in detail, we show the model fits observed dynamics of both wild-type and drug-resistant variants during treatment, and supports combination therapy of direct antiviral drugs with PEG-IFN and/or RBV for hepatitis C.

  9. Influenza A(H1N1) Oseltamivir Resistant Viruses in the Netherlands During the Winter 2007/2008

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dijkstra, Frederika; Jonges, Marcel; van Beek, Ruud; Donker, Gé A; Schellevis, François G; Koopmans, Marion; van der Sande, Marianne A.B; Osterhaus, Albert D.M.E; Boucher, Charles A.B; Rimmelzwaan, Guus F; Meijer, Adam

    2011-01-01

    Background: Antiviral susceptibility surveillance in the Netherlands was intensified after the first reports about the emergence of influenza A(H1N1) oseltamivir resistant viruses in Norway in January, 2008. Methods: Within the existing influenza surveillance an additional questionnaire study was performed to retrospectively assess possible risk factors and establish clinical outcome of all patients with influenza virus A(H1N1) positive specimens. To discriminate resistant and sensitive viruses, fifty percent inhibitory concentrations for the neuramidase inhibitors oseltamivir and zanamivir were determined in a neuraminidase inhibition assay. Mutations previously associated with resistance to neuramidase inhibitors and M2 blockers (amantadine and rimantadine) were searched for by nucleotide sequencing of neuraminidase and M2 genes respectively. Results: Among 171 patients infected with A(H1N1) viruses an overall prevalence of oseltamivir resistance of 27% (95% CI: 20-34%) was found. None of influenza A(H1N1) oseltamivir resistant viruses tested was resistant against amantadine or zanamivir. Patient characteristics, underlying conditions, influenza vaccination, symptoms, complications, and exposure to oseltamivir and other antivirals did not differ significantly between patients infected with resistant and sensitive A(H1N1) viruses. Conclusion: In 2007/2008 a large proportion of influenza A(H1N1) viruses resistant to oseltamivir was detected. There were no clinical differences between patients infected with resistant and sensitive A(H1N1) viruses. Continuous monitoring of the antiviral drug sensitivity profile of influenza viruses is justified, preferably using the existing sentinel surveillance, however, complemented with data from the more severe end of the clinical spectrum. In order to act timely on emergencies of public health importance we suggest setting up a surveillance system that can guarantee rapid access to the latter. PMID:22253652

  10. Development of broad virus resistance in non-transgenic cucumber using CRISPR/Cas9 technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandrasekaran, Jeyabharathy; Brumin, Marina; Wolf, Dalia; Leibman, Diana; Klap, Chen; Pearlsman, Mali; Sherman, Amir; Arazi, Tzahi; Gal-On, Amit

    2016-09-01

    Genome editing in plants has been boosted tremendously by the development of CRISPR/Cas9 (Clustered Regularly Interspaced Short Palindromic Repeats) technology. This powerful tool allows substantial improvement in plant traits in addition to those provided by classical breeding. Here, we demonstrate the development of virus resistance in cucumber (Cucumis sativus L.) using Cas9/subgenomic RNA (sgRNA) technology to disrupt the function of the recessive eIF4E (eukaryotic translation initiation factor 4E) gene. Cas9/sgRNA constructs were targeted to the N' and C' termini of the eIF4E gene. Small deletions and single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were observed in the eIF4E gene targeted sites of transformed T1 generation cucumber plants, but not in putative off-target sites. Non-transgenic heterozygous eif4e mutant plants were selected for the production of non-transgenic homozygous T3 generation plants. Homozygous T3 progeny following Cas9/sgRNA that had been targeted to both eif4e sites exhibited immunity to Cucumber vein yellowing virus (Ipomovirus) infection and resistance to the potyviruses Zucchini yellow mosaic virus and Papaya ring spot mosaic virus-W. In contrast, heterozygous mutant and non-mutant plants were highly susceptible to these viruses. For the first time, virus resistance has been developed in cucumber, non-transgenically, not visibly affecting plant development and without long-term backcrossing, via a new technology that can be expected to be applicable to a wide range of crop plants.

  11. Increased tolerance and resistance to virus infections: a possible factor in the survival of Varroa destructor-resistant honey bees (Apis mellifera.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara Locke

    Full Text Available The honey bee ectoparasitic mite, Varroa destructor, has a world-wide distribution and inflicts more damage than all other known apicultural diseases. However, Varroa-induced colony mortality is more accurately a result of secondary virus infections vectored by the mite. This means that honey bee resistance to Varroa may include resistance or tolerance to virus infections. The aim of this study was to see if this is the case for a unique population of mite-resistant (MR European honey bees on the island of Gotland, Sweden. This population has survived uncontrolled mite infestation for over a decade, developing specific mite-related resistance traits to do so. Using RT-qPCR techniques, we monitored late season virus infections, Varroa mite infestation and honey bee colony population dynamics in the Gotland MR population and compared this to mite-susceptible (MS colonies in a close by apiary. From summer to autumn the deformed wing virus (DWV titres increased similarly between the MR and MS populations, while the black queen cell virus (BQCV and sacbrood virus (SBV titres decreased substantially in the MR population compared to the MS population by several orders of magnitude. The MR colonies all survived the following winter with high mite infestation, high DWV infection, small colony size and low proportions of autumn brood, while the MS colonies all perished. Possible explanations for these changes in virus titres and their relevance to Varroa resistance and colony winter survival are discussed.

  12. Increased tolerance and resistance to virus infections: a possible factor in the survival of Varroa destructor-resistant honey bees (Apis mellifera).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Locke, Barbara; Forsgren, Eva; de Miranda, Joachim R

    2014-01-01

    The honey bee ectoparasitic mite, Varroa destructor, has a world-wide distribution and inflicts more damage than all other known apicultural diseases. However, Varroa-induced colony mortality is more accurately a result of secondary virus infections vectored by the mite. This means that honey bee resistance to Varroa may include resistance or tolerance to virus infections. The aim of this study was to see if this is the case for a unique population of mite-resistant (MR) European honey bees on the island of Gotland, Sweden. This population has survived uncontrolled mite infestation for over a decade, developing specific mite-related resistance traits to do so. Using RT-qPCR techniques, we monitored late season virus infections, Varroa mite infestation and honey bee colony population dynamics in the Gotland MR population and compared this to mite-susceptible (MS) colonies in a close by apiary. From summer to autumn the deformed wing virus (DWV) titres increased similarly between the MR and MS populations, while the black queen cell virus (BQCV) and sacbrood virus (SBV) titres decreased substantially in the MR population compared to the MS population by several orders of magnitude. The MR colonies all survived the following winter with high mite infestation, high DWV infection, small colony size and low proportions of autumn brood, while the MS colonies all perished. Possible explanations for these changes in virus titres and their relevance to Varroa resistance and colony winter survival are discussed.

  13. Identification of virus and nematode resistance genes in the Chilota Potato Genebank of the Universidad Austral de Chile

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marlon López

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Potato Genebank of the Universidad Austral de Chile (UACh is an important gene bank in Chile. The accessions collected all over the country possess high genetic diversity, present interesting agronomic and cooking traits, and show resistance to biotic and abiotic stress. A particularly interesting subgroup of the gene bank includes the accessions collected in the South of Chile, the Chilota Potato Genebank. The focus of this study is the identification of virus and nematode resistant genes in potatoes (Solatium tuberosum L., using the RYSC3 and YES3-3B molecular markers. The Potato virus Y(PVY resistance genes Ry adg and Ry sto were identified. Furthermore, the CP60 marker was used to assess the Rx resistance gene that confers resistance to Potato virus X (PVX. In addition, the HC and GRO1-4 markers were utilized to identify the GpaVvrn_QTL and Gro1-4, resistance genes of Globodera pallida and Globodera rostochiensis, respectively. Both G. pallida and G. rostochiensis are Potato Cyst Nematodes (PCN. The plant material used in this study included leaves from 271 accessions of the gene bank. These samples were collected in the field where natural pathogen pressure of potential viruses and diseases exists. ELISA assays were run for field detection of PVY and PVX. However, there have been no previous reports of nematode presence in the plant material. The results herein presented indicate presence of virus and nematode resistance genes in accessions of the Chilota Potato Genebank. In terms of virus resistance, 99 accessions out of the 271 tested possess the Ry adg resistance gene and 17 accessions of these 271 tested have the Ry sto resistance gene. Also, 10 accessions showed positive amplification of the Rxl resistant gene marker. As to nematode resistance, 99 accessions have possible resistance to G. pallida and 54 accessions show potential resistance to G. rostochiensis as detected using the available molecular markers.

  14. Tsw gene-based resistance is triggered by a functional RNA silencing suppressor protein of the Tomato spotted wilt virus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ronde, de D.; Butterbach, P.B.E.; Lohuis, H.; Hedil, M.; Lent, van J.W.M.; Kormelink, R.J.M.

    2013-01-01

    As a result of contradictory reports, the avirulence (Avr) determinant that triggers Tsw gene-based resistance in Capsicum annuum against the Tomato spotted wilt virus (TSWV) is still unresolved. Here, the N and NSs genes of resistance-inducing (RI) and resistance-breaking (RB) isolates were cloned

  15. Importance of hepatitis C virus-associated insulin resistance: Therapeutic strategies for insulin sensitization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawaguchi, Takumi; Sata, Michio

    2010-01-01

    Insulin resistance is one of the pathological features in patients with hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection. Generally, persistence of insulin resistance leads to an increase in the risk of life-threatening complications such as cardiovascular diseases. However, these complications are not major causes of death in patients with HCV-associated insulin resistance. Indeed, insulin resistance plays a crucial role in the development of various complications and events associated with HCV infection. Mounting evidence indicates that HCV-associated insulin resistance may cause (1) hepatic steatosis; (2) resistance to anti-viral treatment; (3) hepatic fibrosis and esophageal varices; (4) hepatocarcinogenesis and proliferation of hepatocellular carcinoma; and (5) extrahepatic manifestations. Thus, HCV-associated insulin resistance is a therapeutic target at any stage of HCV infection. Although the risk of insulin resistance in HCV-infected patients has been documented, therapeutic guidelines for preventing the distinctive complications of HCV-associated insulin resistance have not yet been established. In addition, mechanisms for the development of HCV-associated insulin resistance differ from lifestyle-associated insulin resistance. In order to ameliorate HCV-associated insulin resistance and its complications, the efficacy of the following interventions is discussed: a late evening snack, coffee consumption, dietary iron restriction, phlebotomy, and zinc supplements. Little is known regarding the effect of anti-diabetic agents on HCV infection, however, a possible association between use of exogenous insulin or a sulfonylurea agent and the development of HCC has recently been reported. On the other hand, insulin-sensitizing agents are reported to improve sustained virologic response rates. In this review, we summarize distinctive complications of, and therapeutic strategies for, HCV-associated insulin resistance. Furthermore, we discuss supplementation with branched

  16. Engineering Plant Immunity: Using CRISPR/Cas9 to Generate Virus Resistance

    KAUST Repository

    Zaidi, Syed Shan-e-Ali

    2016-11-08

    Plant viruses infect many economically important crops, including wheat, cotton, maize, cassava, and other vegetables. These viruses pose a serious threat to agriculture worldwide, as decreases in cropland area per capita may cause production to fall short of that required to feed the increasing world population. Under these circumstances, conventional strategies can fail to control rapidly evolving and emerging plant viruses. Genome-engineering strategies have recently emerged as promising tools to introduce desirable traits in many eukaryotic species, including plants. Among these genome engineering technologies, the CRISPR (clustered regularly interspaced palindromic repeats)/CRISPR-associated 9 (CRISPR/Cas9) system has received special interest because of its simplicity, efficiency, and reproducibility. Recent studies have used CRISPR/Cas9 to engineer virus resistance in plants, either by directly targeting and cleaving the viral genome, or by modifying the host plant genome to introduce viral immunity. Here, we briefly describe the biology of the CRISPR/Cas9 system and plant viruses, and how different genome engineering technologies have been used to target these viruses. We further describe the main findings from recent studies of CRISPR/Cas9-mediated viral interference and discuss how these findings can be applied to improve global agriculture. We conclude by pinpointing the gaps in our knowledge and the outstanding questions regarding CRISPR/Cas9-mediated viral immunity.

  17. Engineering Plant Immunity: Using CRISPR/Cas9 to Generate Virus Resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaidi, Syed Shan-e-Ali; Tashkandi, Manal; Mansoor, Shahid; Mahfouz, Magdy M.

    2016-01-01

    Plant viruses infect many economically important crops, including wheat, cotton, maize, cassava, and other vegetables. These viruses pose a serious threat to agriculture worldwide, as decreases in cropland area per capita may cause production to fall short of that required to feed the increasing world population. Under these circumstances, conventional strategies can fail to control rapidly evolving and emerging plant viruses. Genome-engineering strategies have recently emerged as promising tools to introduce desirable traits in many eukaryotic species, including plants. Among these genome engineering technologies, the CRISPR (clustered regularly interspaced palindromic repeats)/CRISPR-associated 9 (CRISPR/Cas9) system has received special interest because of its simplicity, efficiency, and reproducibility. Recent studies have used CRISPR/Cas9 to engineer virus resistance in plants, either by directly targeting and cleaving the viral genome, or by modifying the host plant genome to introduce viral immunity. Here, we briefly describe the biology of the CRISPR/Cas9 system and plant viruses, and how different genome engineering technologies have been used to target these viruses. We further describe the main findings from recent studies of CRISPR/Cas9-mediated viral interference and discuss how these findings can be applied to improve global agriculture. We conclude by pinpointing the gaps in our knowledge and the outstanding questions regarding CRISPR/Cas9-mediated viral immunity. PMID:27877187

  18. Whitefly-mediated transmission of cotton leaf curl Multan betasatellite: evidence for betasatellite encapsidation in coat protein of helper begomoviruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabein, S; Behjatnia, S A Akbar; Anabestani, A; Izadpanah, K

    2013-01-01

    Cotton leaf curl Multan betasatellite (CLCuMB) is responsible for symptom expression of a devastating disease of cotton in the Indian subcontinent. CLCuMB depends on helper virus replication-associated protein for its replication and on viral coat protein (CP) for its encapsidation. However, no direct evidence of encapsidation of CLCuMB in viral CP has been available. In the present study, non-viruliferous whiteflies were placed on tomato plants that had been agroinoculated with infectious clones of an Iranian isolate of tomato yellow leaf curl virus (TYLCV-[Ab]) and CLCuMB for an acquisition access period of 72 h and then transferred to healthy tomato seedlings at the 3- to 4-leaf stage. Typical symptoms of TYLCV-[Ab] appeared on inoculated seedlings 30-45 days post-inoculation. The presence of TYLCV-[Ab] and CLCuMB DNAs in symptomatic test plants and viruliferous whiteflies was confirmed by PCR analysis using specific primers and DIG Southern blotting. Furthermore, the possibility of CLCuMB DNA encapsidation in TYLCV-[Ab] CP within infected plants was examined by immunocapture PCR. The results showed that CLCuMB DNA was encapsidated in TYLCV-[Ab] CP. Whitefly-mediated transmission of CLCuMB in the presence of helper virus is additional evidence for encapsidation of CLCuMB by TYLCV-[Ab] CP.

  19. Comparison of Thinopyrum intermedium derivatives carrying barley yellow dwarf virus resistance in wheat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayala-Navarrete, L; Tourton, E; Mechanicos, A A; Larkin, P J

    2009-06-01

    Resistance to both barley yellow dwarf virus (BYDV) and cereal yellow dwarf virus (CYDV) has been demonstrated in wheat genetic stocks with Thinopyrum intermedium chromatin. A number of resistance-bearing translocations have been reported on chromosome arm 7DL from two independent Th. intermedium sources; one source is the addition line L1 and the other is the spontaneous substitution line P29. Another source of resistance in wheat cytogenetic stocks is available as a 2Ai(2D) substitution line. We used a set of 38 molecular markers and the available deletion stocks to compare the size of the 7DL translocations more comprehensively than has been done previously. We also compared the efficacy of BYDV resistance of the various genetic stocks both before and after transfer to a common genetic background. TC14 was confirmed as carrying the smallest translocation, replacing about 20% of the distal end of 7DL. TC5 and TC10 had 90% of the chromosome arm replaced by Th. intermedium chromatin; the proximal 10% corresponded to wheat chromatin. YW642 appeared to have the whole 7DL replaced by Th. intermedium chromatin, as confirmed by the co-dominant marker cfd68 mapping on the bin nearest the centromere. Translocation line P961341 had bins 3, 7, and 8 replaced by Th. intermedium chromatin, making this the second smallest translocation with BYDV and CYDV resistance. The translocation sizes reported here differ from some of the previous estimates. The translocated Th. intermedium segments appeared to be bigger than the replaced wheat 7DL fragments. All the resistances derived from the L1 and P29 group 7 chromosomes and the 2Ai#2 chromosome were effective in reducing the number of infected plants and the mean virus titre, regardless of the background. Some evidence is discussed suggesting the long arm of the Th. intermedium group 7 chromosome 7Ai#1 carries two resistances, the distal Bdv2 and a proximal second gene.

  20. Melon RNA interference (RNAi) lines silenced for Cm-eIF4E show broad virus resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Hernández, Ana M; Gosalvez, Blanca; Sempere, Raquel N; Burgos, Lorenzo; Aranda, Miguel A; Truniger, Verónica

    2012-09-01

    Efficient and sustainable control of plant viruses may be achieved using genetically resistant crop varieties, although resistance genes are not always available for each pathogen; in this regard, the identification of new genes that are able to confer broad-spectrum and durable resistance is highly desirable. Recently, the cloning and characterization of recessive resistance genes from different plant species has pointed towards eukaryotic translation initiation factors (eIF) of the 4E family as factors required for the multiplication of many different viruses. Thus, we hypothesized that eIF4E may control the susceptibility of melon (Cucumis melo L.) to a broad range of viruses. To test this hypothesis, Cm-eIF4E knockdown melon plants were generated by the transformation of explants with a construct that was designed to induce the silencing of this gene, and the plants from T2 generations were genetically and phenotypically characterized. In transformed plants, Cm-eIF4E was specifically silenced, as identified by the decreased accumulation of Cm-eIF4E mRNA and the appearance of small interfering RNAs derived from the transgene, whereas the Cm-eIF(iso)4E mRNA levels remained unaffected. We challenged these transgenic melon plants with eight agronomically important melon-infecting viruses, and identified that they were resistant to Cucumber vein yellowing virus (CVYV), Melon necrotic spot virus (MNSV), Moroccan watermelon mosaic virus (MWMV) and Zucchini yellow mosaic virus (ZYMV), indicating that Cm-eIF4E controls melon susceptibility to these four viruses. Therefore, Cm-eIF4E is an efficient target for the identification of new resistance alleles able to confer broad-spectrum virus resistance in melon.

  1. Transcriptome sequencing identifies novel persistent viruses in herbicide resistant wild-grasses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabbadin, Federico; Glover, Rachel; Stafford, Rebecca; Rozado-Aguirre, Zuriñe; Boonham, Neil; Adams, Ian; Mumford, Rick; Edwards, Robert

    2017-01-01

    Herbicide resistance in wild grasses is widespread in the UK, with non-target site resistance (NTSR) to multiple chemistries being particularly problematic in weed control. As a complex trait, NTSR is driven by complex evolutionary pressures and the growing awareness of the role of the phytobiome in plant abiotic stress tolerance, led us to sequence the transcriptomes of herbicide resistant and susceptible populations of black-grass and annual rye-grass for the presence of endophytes. Black-grass (Alopecurus myosuroides; Am) populations, displaying no overt disease symptoms, contained three previously undescribed viruses belonging to the Partititiviridae (AMPV1 and AMPV2) and Rhabdoviridae (AMVV1) families. These infections were widespread in UK black-grass populations and evidence was obtained for similar viruses being present in annual rye grass (Lolium rigidum), perennial rye-grass (Lolium perenne) and meadow fescue (Festuca pratensis). In black-grass, while no direct causative link was established linking viral infection to herbicide resistance, transcriptome sequencing showed a high incidence of infection in the NTSR Peldon population. The widespread infection of these weeds by little characterised and persistent viruses and their potential evolutionary role in enhancing plant stress tolerance mechanisms including NTSR warrants further investigation. PMID:28165016

  2. Transcriptome sequencing identifies novel persistent viruses in herbicide resistant wild-grasses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabbadin, Federico; Glover, Rachel; Stafford, Rebecca; Rozado-Aguirre, Zuriñe; Boonham, Neil; Adams, Ian; Mumford, Rick; Edwards, Robert

    2017-02-06

    Herbicide resistance in wild grasses is widespread in the UK, with non-target site resistance (NTSR) to multiple chemistries being particularly problematic in weed control. As a complex trait, NTSR is driven by complex evolutionary pressures and the growing awareness of the role of the phytobiome in plant abiotic stress tolerance, led us to sequence the transcriptomes of herbicide resistant and susceptible populations of black-grass and annual rye-grass for the presence of endophytes. Black-grass (Alopecurus myosuroides; Am) populations, displaying no overt disease symptoms, contained three previously undescribed viruses belonging to the Partititiviridae (AMPV1 and AMPV2) and Rhabdoviridae (AMVV1) families. These infections were widespread in UK black-grass populations and evidence was obtained for similar viruses being present in annual rye grass (Lolium rigidum), perennial rye-grass (Lolium perenne) and meadow fescue (Festuca pratensis). In black-grass, while no direct causative link was established linking viral infection to herbicide resistance, transcriptome sequencing showed a high incidence of infection in the NTSR Peldon population. The widespread infection of these weeds by little characterised and persistent viruses and their potential evolutionary role in enhancing plant stress tolerance mechanisms including NTSR warrants further investigation.

  3. Molecular characterization of urdbean (Vigna mungo) germplasm related to resistance against urdbean leaf crinkle virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Binyamin, R; Aslam Khan, M; Khan, A I; Azam Khan, M; Awan, F S; Khan, N A

    2011-01-01

    Urdbean (Vigna mungo) is an important pulse crop grown worldwide. Urdbean leaf crinkle virus (ULCV) is a pathogen of urdbean found in Pakistan that causes huge losses in yield. Forty urdbean varieties/lines were screened against the virus under field conditions during spring season 2009. None of the lines appeared to be highly resistant or resistant. On the basis of a 0-5 disease rating scale and disease severity index, genotypes varied significantly in their reaction to ULCV. Four lines (M-6206, IAM-382-15, IAM-133, and Mash-1) were moderately resistant, eight were rated as moderately susceptible, and 21 as susceptible; the remaining seven lines were highly susceptible. RAPD analyses revealed an extensive amount of variation, which could be used for cultivar identification. Genetic differentiation among urdbean genotypes was similar to the field screening data. The varieties 6065-3 and 6206 were highly susceptible and moderately resistant, respectively, to ULCV under field conditions, confirmed by the RAPD analysis. These varieties were the most diverse varieties in the similarity matrix (67.2%), while the varieties IAM-382-9 and 07M003 were the most similar (98.4%). This information will help in the recognition of available resistant germplasms that can resist this disease and will be utilized for urdbean improvement in Pakistan.

  4. An EDS1 orthologue is required for N-mediated resistance against tobacco mosaic virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peart, Jack R; Cook, Graeme; Feys, Bart J; Parker, Jane E; Baulcombe, David C

    2002-03-01

    In Arabidopsis, EDS1 is essential for disease resistance conferred by a structural subset of resistance (R) proteins containing a nucleotide-binding site, leucine-rich-repeats and amino-terminal similarity to animal Toll and Interleukin-1 (so-called TIR-NBS-LRR proteins). EDS1 is not required by NBS-LRR proteins that possess an amino-terminal coiled-coil motif (CC-NBS-LRR proteins). Using virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS) of a Nicotiana benthaminana EDS1 orthologue, we investigated the role of EDS1 in resistance specified by structurally distinct R genes in transgenic N. benthamiana. Resistance against tobacco mosaic virus mediated by tobacco N, a TIR-NBS-LRR protein, was EDS1-dependent. Two other R proteins, Pto (a protein kinase), and Rx (a CC-NBS-LRR protein) recognizing, respectively, a bacterial and viral pathogen did not require EDS1. These data, together with the finding that expression of N. benthamiana and Arabidopsis EDS1 mRNAs are similarly regulated, lead us to conclude that recruitment of EDS1 by TIR-NBS-LRR proteins is evolutionarily conserved between dicotyledenous plant species in resistance against bacterial, oomycete and viral pathogens. We further demonstrate that VIGS is a useful approach to dissect resistance signaling pathways in a genetically intractable plant species.

  5. Naturally selected hepatitis C virus polymorphisms confer broad neutralizing antibody resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, Justin R.; Wasilewski, Lisa N.; Snider, Anna E.; El-Diwany, Ramy; Osburn, William O.; Keck, Zhenyong; Foung, Steven K.H.; Ray, Stuart C.

    2014-01-01

    For hepatitis C virus (HCV) and other highly variable viruses, broadly neutralizing mAbs are an important guide for vaccine development. The development of resistance to anti-HCV mAbs is poorly understood, in part due to a lack of neutralization testing against diverse, representative panels of HCV variants. Here, we developed a neutralization panel expressing diverse, naturally occurring HCV envelopes (E1E2s) and used this panel to characterize neutralizing breadth and resistance mechanisms of 18 previously described broadly neutralizing anti-HCV human mAbs. The observed mAb resistance could not be attributed to polymorphisms in E1E2 at known mAb-binding residues. Additionally, hierarchical clustering analysis of neutralization resistance patterns revealed relationships between mAbs that were not predicted by prior epitope mapping, identifying 3 distinct neutralization clusters. Using this clustering analysis and envelope sequence data, we identified polymorphisms in E2 that confer resistance to multiple broadly neutralizing mAbs. These polymorphisms, which are not at mAb contact residues, also conferred resistance to neutralization by plasma from HCV-infected subjects. Together, our method of neutralization clustering with sequence analysis reveals that polymorphisms at noncontact residues may be a major immune evasion mechanism for HCV, facilitating viral persistence and presenting a challenge for HCV vaccine development. PMID:25500884

  6. Transgenic Sugarcane Resistant to Sorghum mosaic virus Based on Coat Protein Gene Silencing by RNA Interference

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jinlong Guo

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available As one of the critical diseases of sugarcane, sugarcane mosaic disease can lead to serious decline in stalk yield and sucrose content. It is mainly caused by Potyvirus sugarcane mosaic virus (SCMV and/or Sorghum mosaic virus (SrMV, with additional differences in viral strains. RNA interference (RNAi is a novel strategy for producing viral resistant plants. In this study, based on multiple sequence alignment conducted on genomic sequences of different strains and isolates of SrMV, the conserved region of coat protein (CP genes was selected as the target gene and the interference sequence with size of 423 bp in length was obtained through PCR amplification. The RNAi vector pGII00-HACP with an expression cassette containing both hairpin interference sequence and cp4-epsps herbicide-tolerant gene was transferred to sugarcane cultivar ROC22 via Agrobacterium-mediated transformation. After herbicide screening, PCR molecular identification, and artificial inoculation challenge, anti-SrMV positive transgenic lines were successfully obtained. SrMV resistance rate of the transgenic lines with the interference sequence was 87.5% based on SrMV challenge by artificial inoculation. The genetically modified SrMV-resistant lines of cultivar ROC22 provide resistant germplasm for breeding lines and can also serve as resistant lines having the same genetic background for study of resistance mechanisms.

  7. Coevolution and hierarchical interactions of Tomato mosaic virus and the resistance gene Tm-1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazuhiro Ishibashi

    Full Text Available During antagonistic coevolution between viruses and their hosts, viruses have a major advantage by evolving more rapidly. Nevertheless, viruses and their hosts coexist and have coevolved, although the processes remain largely unknown. We previously identified Tm-1 that confers resistance to Tomato mosaic virus (ToMV, and revealed that it encodes a protein that binds ToMV replication proteins and inhibits RNA replication. Tm-1 was introgressed from a wild tomato species Solanum habrochaites into the cultivated tomato species Solanum lycopersicum. In this study, we analyzed Tm-1 alleles in S. habrochaites. Although most part of this gene was under purifying selection, a cluster of nonsynonymous substitutions in a small region important for inhibitory activity was identified, suggesting that the region is under positive selection. We then examined the resistance of S. habrochaites plants to ToMV. Approximately 60% of 149 individuals from 24 accessions were resistant to ToMV, while the others accumulated detectable levels of coat protein after inoculation. Unexpectedly, many S. habrochaites plants were observed in which even multiplication of the Tm-1-resistance-breaking ToMV mutant LT1 was inhibited. An amino acid change in the positively selected region of the Tm-1 protein was responsible for the inhibition of LT1 multiplication. This amino acid change allowed Tm-1 to bind LT1 replication proteins without losing the ability to bind replication proteins of wild-type ToMV. The antiviral spectra and biochemical properties suggest that Tm-1 has evolved by changing the strengths of its inhibitory activity rather than diversifying the recognition spectra. In the LT1-resistant S. habrochaites plants inoculated with LT1, mutant viruses emerged whose multiplication was not inhibited by the Tm-1 allele that confers resistance to LT1. However, the resistance-breaking mutants were less competitive than the parental strains in the absence of Tm-1. Based on

  8. Generation of transgenic wheat resistant to wheat yel-low mosaic virus and identifi-cation of gene silence induced by virus infection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    The plasmid containing the promoter Act1, the coat protein (cp) gene of wheat yellow mosaic virus (WYMV) and the selectable bar gene, was delivered via particle bombardment, directly into immature embryos of a wheat cultivars. PCR and PCR-RFLP were employed to screen the existence of the cp gene in T0 and T1 generations. Seeds from the positive T1 plants were sowed in fields heavily contaminated with WYMV to detect their resistance. In field trial of virus infection, one of the transgenic wheat lines, P8-T2, exhibited highly disease-resistance. Western blot and RT-PCR analysis showed that the expression level of cp gene in the resistant transgenic line was reduced greatly compared to those susceptible to WYMV infection. This provided evidence to presume that the resistance obtained by the transgenic wheat line was stimulated by the mechanism of the virus induced gene silencing.

  9. Genotypic detection of acyclovir-resistant HSV-1: characterization of 67 ACV-sensitive and 14 ACV-resistant viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frobert, Emilie; Cortay, Jean-Claude; Ooka, Tadamasa; Najioullah, Fatiha; Thouvenot, Danielle; Lina, Bruno; Morfin, Florence

    2008-07-01

    Infections due to herpes simplex virus (HSV) resistant to acyclovir (ACV) represent an important clinical concern in immunocompromised patients. In order to switch promptly to an appropriate treatment, rapid viral susceptibility assays are required. We developed herein a genotyping analysis focusing on thymidine kinase gene (TK) mutations in order to detect acyclovir-resistant HSV in clinical specimens. A total of 85 HSV-1 positive specimens collected from 69 patients were analyzed. TK gene could be sequenced directly for 81 clinical specimens (95%) and 68 HSV-1 specimens could be characterized as sensitive or resistant by genotyping (84%). Genetic characterization of 67 susceptible HSV-1 specimens revealed 10 polymorphisms never previously described. Genetic characterization of 14 resistant HSV-1 revealed 12 HSV-1 with either TK gene additions/deletions (8 strains) or substitutions (4 strains) and 2 HSV-1 with no mutation in the TK gene. DNA polymerase gene was afterwards explored. With this rapid PCR-based assay, ACV-resistant HSV could be detected directly in clinical specimens within 24 h.

  10. Modelling Hepatitis B Virus Antiviral Therapy and Drug Resistant Mutant Strains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernal, Julie; Dix, Trevor; Allison, Lloyd; Bartholomeusz, Angeline; Yuen, Lilly

    Despite the existence of vaccines, the Hepatitis B virus (HBV) is still a serious global health concern. HBV targets liver cells. It has an unusual replication process involving an RNA pre-genome that the reverse transcriptase domain of the viral polymerase protein translates into viral DNA. The reverse transcription process is error prone and together with the high replication rates of the virus, allows the virus to exist as a heterogeneous population of mutants, known as a quasispecies, that can adapt and become resistant to antiviral therapy. This study presents an individual-based model of HBV inside an artificial liver, and associated blood serum, undergoing antiviral therapy. This model aims to provide insights into the evolution of the HBV quasispecies and the individual contribution of HBV mutations in the outcome of therapy.

  11. CRISPR/CAS9: A TOOL TO CIRCUMSCRIBE COTTON LEAF CURL DISEASE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zafar eIqbal

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The begomoviruses (family Geminiviridae associated with cotton leaf curl disease (CLCuD pose a major threat to cotton productivity in South-East Asia including Pakistan and India. These viruses have single-stranded, circular DNA genome, of ~2800 nt in size, encapsidated in twinned icosa-hedera, transmitted by ubiquitous whitefly and are associated with satellite molecules referred to as alpha- and betasatellite. To circumvent the proliferation of these viruses numerous techniques, ranging from conventional breeding to molecular approaches have been applied. Such devised strategies worked perfectly well for a short time period and then viruses relapse due to various reasons including multiple infections, where related viruses synergistically interact with each other, virus proliferation and evolution. Another shortcoming is, until now, that all molecular biology approaches are devised to control only helper begomoviruses but not to control associated satellites. Despite the fact that satellites could add various functions to helper begomoviruses, they remain ignored. Such conditions necessitate a very comprehensive technique that can offer best controlling strategy not only against helper begomoviruses but also their associated DNA-satellites. In the current scenario clustered regulatory interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR/CRISPR associated nuclease 9 (Cas9 has proved to be versatile technique that has very recently been deployed successfully to control different geminiviruses. The CRISPR/Cas9 system has been proved to be a comprehensive technique to control different geminiviruses however, like previously used techniques, only a single virus is targeted and hitherto it has not been deployed to control begomovirus complexes associated with DNA-satellites. Here in this article, we proposed an inimitable, unique and broad spectrum controlling method based on multiplexed CRISPR/Cas9 system where a cassette of sgRNA is designed to target

  12. Latent acyclovir-resistant herpes simplex virus type 1 in trigeminal ganglia of immunocompetent individuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Velzen, Monique; van Loenen, Freek B; Meesters, Roland J W; de Graaf, Miranda; Remeijer, Lies; Luider, Theo M; Osterhaus, Albert D M E; Verjans, Georges M G M

    2012-05-15

    Specific mutations within the hypervariable herpes simplex virus (HSV) gene thymidine kinase (TK) gene lead to acyclovir (ACV) resistance. To uncover the existence of latent ACV-resistant (ACV(R)) HSV-1, we determined the genetic and functional variability of the HSV-1 TK gene pool in paired trigeminal ganglia (TG) of 5 immunocompetent individuals. The latent virus pool consisted of a donor-specific HSV-1 quasispecies, including one major ACV-sensitive (ACV(S)) and multiple phylogenetic-related minor ACV(S) and ACV(R) TK variants. Contrary to minor variants, major TK variants were shared between paired TG. The data demonstrate the coexistence of phylogenetic-related ACV(S) and ACV(R) latent HSV-1 in human TG.

  13. Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Protease and the Emergence of Drug Resistance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Nina Rødtness

    in multi-drug-resistant PRs. Computational analysis of a vast number of inhibitor-resistant HIV-1 PR variants can broaden the knowledge of how and why the mutations arise, which would be a great advantage in the design on resistance-evading inhibitors. Here we present a diverse system to select...... in the virus life cycle has made it a major target for drug development and active site competitive inhibitors have been successful in the battle against HIV. Unfortunately, the massive drug pressure along with high-level replication and lack of proofreading by the viral reverse transcriptase have resulted...... for catalytically active HIV-1 PR in the presence of inhibitor. The system is based on the protein AraC, which regulates transcription of the araA, araB and araD genes necessary for arabinose catabolism in Escherichia coli, and its effectiveness was demonstrated by the isolation of both known and unknown inhibitor-resistant...

  14. Bacterial viruses enable their host to acquire antibiotic resistance genes from neighbouring cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haaber, Jakob Krause; Leisner, Jørgen; Cohn, Marianne Thorup

    2016-01-01

    Prophages are quiescent viruses located in the chromosomes of bacteria. In the human pathogen, Staphylococcus aureus, prophages are omnipresent and are believed to be responsible for the spread of some antibiotic resistance genes. Here we demonstrate that release of phages from a subpopulation of S...... of such particles to the prophage-containing population can drive the transfer of genes encoding potentially useful traits such as antibiotic resistance. This process, which can be viewed as ‘auto-transduction’, allows S. aureus to efficiently acquire antibiotic resistance both in vitro and in an in vivo virulence...... model (wax moth larvae) and enables it to proliferate under strong antibiotic selection pressure. Our results may help to explain the rapid exchange of antibiotic resistance genes observed in S. aureus....

  15. Flat acoustic lens by acoustic grating with curled slits

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peng, Pai; Xiao, Bingmu; Wu, Ying, E-mail: ying.wu@kaust.edu.sa

    2014-10-03

    We design a flat sub-wavelength lens that can focus acoustic wave. We analytically study the transmission through an acoustic grating with curled slits, which can serve as a material with tunable impedance and refractive index for acoustic waves. The effective parameters rely on the geometry of the slits and are independent of frequency. A flat acoustic focusing lens by such acoustic grating with gradient effective refractive index is designed. The focusing effect is clearly observed in simulations and well predicted by the theory. We demonstrate that despite the large impedance mismatch between the acoustic lens and the matrix, the intensity at the focal point is still high due to Fabry–Perot resonance. - Highlights: • Expression of transmission coefficient of an acoustic grating with curled slits. • Non-dispersive and tunable effective medium parameters for the acoustic grating. • A flat acoustic focusing lens with gradient index by using the acoustic grating.

  16. Cosmic Shear of the Microwave Background: The Curl Diagnostic

    CERN Document Server

    Cooray, A R; Caldwell, R R; Cooray, Asantha; Kamionkowski, Marc; Caldwell, Robert R.

    2005-01-01

    Weak-lensing distortions of the cosmic-microwave-background (CMB) temperature and polarization patterns can reveal important clues to the intervening large-scale structure. The effect of lensing is to deflect the primary temperature and polarization signal to slightly different locations on the sky. Deflections due to density fluctuations, gradient-type for the gradient of the projected gravitational potential, give a direct measure of the mass distribution. Curl-type deflections can be induced by, for example, a primordial background of gravitational waves from inflation or by second-order effects related to lensing by density perturbations. Whereas gradient-type deflections are expected to dominate, we show that curl-type deflections can provide a useful test of systematics and serve to indicate the presence of confusing secondary and foreground non-Gaussian signals.

  17. Curling Liquid Crystal Microswimmers: A Cascade of Spontaneous Symmetry Breaking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krüger, Carsten; Klös, Gunnar; Bahr, Christian; Maass, Corinna C.

    2016-07-01

    We report curling self-propulsion in aqueous emulsions of common mesogenic compounds. Nematic liquid crystal droplets self-propel in a surfactant solution with concentrations above the critical micelle concentration while undergoing micellar solubilization [Herminghaus et al., Soft Matter 10, 7008 (2014)]. We analyzed trajectories both in a Hele-Shaw geometry and in a 3D setup at variable buoyancy. The coupling between the nematic director field and the convective flow inside the droplet leads to a second symmetry breaking which gives rise to curling motion in 2D. This is demonstrated through a reversible transition to nonhelical persistent swimming by heating to the isotropic phase. Furthermore, autochemotaxis can spontaneously break the inversion symmetry, leading to helical trajectories in 3D.

  18. Development and characterization of a new barley yellow dwarf virus (BYDV)-resistant wheat germplasm

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    聂道泰; 贾旭; 胡适全; 朱立煌; 胡含; 胡含; 周广和; 钱幼亭; 庄家骏

    1996-01-01

    A barley yellow dwarf virus (BYDV)-resistant line HG295 was selected from a cross between cv. 77-5433 and Zhong 5 after extensive investigation in field, greenhouse and ELISA. Cytological analysis revealed that it was an euploid line and genetically stable. The existence of alien DNA in HG295 was identified by RAPD and Southern hybridization analyses showed that the alien DNAs came from Zhong 5 or Th. intermedium. The differences of BYDV resistance between L1 and HG295 are discussed.

  19. Performances and Germplasm Evaluation of Quantitative Resistance to Soybean Mosaic Virus in Soybeans

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHI Hai-jian; GAI Jun-yi

    2004-01-01

    A sample composed of 96 soybean accessions was evaluated for their diseased rate (I),diseased rank (S), latent period (LP) and rate of disease development (R) in order tostudy the quantitative resistance to soybean mosaic virus (SMV) in soybeans. The resultsshowed that the performances of the above four resistance components were significantlydifferent among accessions and that some of the accessions, such as Zhongzihuangdou,Peixian Tianedan, Youbian30 could be infected by four SMV strains, Sa, SC8, N1 and N3,but their I, S, and R were lower and LP longer than most other accessions. These resultsdemonstrated the existence of quantitative resistance to SMV in soybeans. It was foundthat some soybean accessions, such as AGS19 and Lishui Zhongzihuangdou, previouslyidentified as resistant to SMV infection, performed some infection but resistant toexpansion in the present study. In addition, the resistance in Pixian Chadou and HuaiyinQiuheidou might be either qualitative or quantitative. Furthermore, the present studyalso indicated that the resistance spectrum and durability of accessions with quantitativeresistance might be wider and longer than those with qualitative resistance.

  20. Introgression of the Rladg allele of resistance to potato leafroll virus in Solanum tuberosum L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Otávio Luiz Gomes Carneiro

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Genetic resistance to Potato Leafroll Virus (PLRV is polygenic, which hinders the obtainment of resistant cultivars. However, works carried out at the International Potato Center have identified an andigena accession, LOP-868, with high resistance level and low accumulation of PLRV due to the gene of major effect Rladg. We verify the transfer of the Rladg allele to clones of the cross between LOP-868 and UFLA clones, by using the SCAR RGASC850 molecular marker; to evaluate the reaction of these clones to PLRV by inoculating the virus using aphids; and to analyze their agronomic performance of clones. Among the clones inoculated with viruliferous aphids, 49.3% were negative to the serological test, indicating possible resistance. Clones containing the Rladg allele were identified by the RGASC850 molecular marker, which demonstrates the possibility of transferring the Rladg allele of resistance to PLRV from LOP-868 to Solanum tuberosum. Some clones that presented the Rladg allele are also promising for agronomic performance.

  1. [Enzymatic activity of thymidine kinase of herpes simlex virus strain resistant to H-phosphonates of Acv].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gus'kova, A A; Skoblov, M Iu; Andronova, V L; Galegov, G A; Kochetkov, S N; Skoblov, Iu S

    2011-01-01

    Cloned laboratory mutants of herpes simplex virus type I resistant to acycloguanosine H-phosphonate have been investigated. For all clones were shown that mutations resulted to increasing of sensitivity to acting of sidofovir. Thymidine kinase of mutant viruses partially preserves the ability to phosphorilate thymidine, but loses the ability to phosphorilate BVDU.

  2. Molecular signatures associated with Mx-1 mediated resistance to highlyl pathogenic influenza virus infections: mechanisms of survival

    Science.gov (United States)

    Understanding the role of host factors during lethal influenza virus infection is critical to deciphering the events that will determine the fate of the host. One such factor is encoded by the Mx1 gene, which confers resistance to influenza virus infection. Here, we compared pathology and global g...

  3. Oseltamivir resistance among influenza viruses: surveillance in northern Viet Nam, 2009–2012

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nguyen Thi Kim Phuong

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Antiviral resistance has been reported in seasonal influenza A viruses and avian influenza A(H5N1 viruses in Viet Nam, raising concerns about the efficacy of treatment. Methods: We analysed specimens from two sources during the period 2009–2012: influenza-positive samples from influenza-like illness patients at sentinel clinics in northern Viet Nam and isolates from patients with confirmed A(H5N1 infections. Pyrosequencing was used to detect mutations: H275Y [for A(H1N1 and A(H5N1], E119V [for A(H3N2] and I117V [for A(H5N1]. A neuraminidase inhibition assay was used to determine the Inhibitory Concentration 50 (IC50 values for all influenza A and B isolates. Results: There were 341 influenza A positive samples identified; influenza A(H1N1pdm09 was identified most frequently (n = 215. In 2009, oseltamivir resistance was observed in 100% (19 of 19 of seasonal A(H1N1 isolates and 1.4% (3/215 of A(H1N1pdm09 isolates. This H275Y mutation was not found in influenza subtypes A(H5N1 or A(H3N2 isolates. Discussion: In Viet Nam, seasonal and A(H5N1 influenza vaccines are not currently available; thus, effective treatment is required. The presence of oseltamivir-resistant viruses is therefore a concern. Active surveillance for oseltamivir resistance among influenza viruses circulating in Viet Nam should be continued.

  4. Gene Expression Analysis of Plum pox virus (Sharka Susceptibility/Resistance in Apricot (Prunus armeniaca L..

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuel Rubio

    Full Text Available RNA-Seq has proven to be a very powerful tool in the analysis of the Plum pox virus (PPV, sharka disease/Prunus interaction. This technique is an important complementary tool to other means of studying genomics. In this work an analysis of gene expression of resistance/susceptibility to PPV in apricot is performed. RNA-Seq has been applied to analyse the gene expression changes induced by PPV infection in leaves from two full-sib apricot genotypes, "Rojo Pasión" and "Z506-7", resistant and susceptible to PPV, respectively. Transcriptomic analyses revealed the existence of more than 2,000 genes related to the pathogen response and resistance to PPV in apricot. These results showed that the response to infection by the virus in the susceptible genotype is associated with an induction of genes involved in pathogen resistance such as the allene oxide synthase, S-adenosylmethionine synthetase 2 and the major MLP-like protein 423. Over-expression of the Dicer protein 2a may indicate the suppression of a gene silencing mechanism of the plant by PPV HCPro and P1 PPV proteins. On the other hand, there were 164 genes involved in resistance mechanisms that have been identified in apricot, 49 of which are located in the PPVres region (scaffold 1 positions from 8,050,804 to 8,244,925, which is responsible for PPV resistance in apricot. Among these genes in apricot there are several MATH domain-containing genes, although other genes inside (Pleiotropic drug resistance 9 gene or outside (CAP, Cysteine-rich secretory proteins, Antigen 5 and Pathogenesis-related 1 protein; and LEA, Late embryogenesis abundant protein PPVres region could also be involved in the resistance.

  5. Gene Expression Analysis of Plum pox virus (Sharka) Susceptibility/Resistance in Apricot (Prunus armeniaca L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubio, Manuel; Ballester, Ana Rosa; Olivares, Pedro Manuel; Castro de Moura, Manuel; Dicenta, Federico; Martínez-Gómez, Pedro

    2015-01-01

    RNA-Seq has proven to be a very powerful tool in the analysis of the Plum pox virus (PPV, sharka disease)/Prunus interaction. This technique is an important complementary tool to other means of studying genomics. In this work an analysis of gene expression of resistance/susceptibility to PPV in apricot is performed. RNA-Seq has been applied to analyse the gene expression changes induced by PPV infection in leaves from two full-sib apricot genotypes, "Rojo Pasión" and "Z506-7", resistant and susceptible to PPV, respectively. Transcriptomic analyses revealed the existence of more than 2,000 genes related to the pathogen response and resistance to PPV in apricot. These results showed that the response to infection by the virus in the susceptible genotype is associated with an induction of genes involved in pathogen resistance such as the allene oxide synthase, S-adenosylmethionine synthetase 2 and the major MLP-like protein 423. Over-expression of the Dicer protein 2a may indicate the suppression of a gene silencing mechanism of the plant by PPV HCPro and P1 PPV proteins. On the other hand, there were 164 genes involved in resistance mechanisms that have been identified in apricot, 49 of which are located in the PPVres region (scaffold 1 positions from 8,050,804 to 8,244,925), which is responsible for PPV resistance in apricot. Among these genes in apricot there are several MATH domain-containing genes, although other genes inside (Pleiotropic drug resistance 9 gene) or outside (CAP, Cysteine-rich secretory proteins, Antigen 5 and Pathogenesis-related 1 protein; and LEA, Late embryogenesis abundant protein) PPVres region could also be involved in the resistance.

  6. Temporal Effects of a Begomovirus Infection and Host Plant Resistance on the Preference and Development of an Insect Vector, Bemisia tabaci, and Implications for Epidemics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Legarrea, Saioa; Barman, Apurba; Marchant, Wendy; Diffie, Stan; Srinivasan, Rajagopalbabu

    2015-01-01

    Persistent plant viruses, by altering phenotypic and physiological traits of their hosts, could modulate the host preference and fitness of hemipteran vectors. A majority of such modulations increase vector preference for virus-infected plants and improve vector fitness, ultimately favouring virus spread. Nevertheless, it remains unclear how these virus-induced modulations on vectors vary temporally, and whether host resistance to the pathogen influences such effects. This study addressed the two questions using a Begomovirus-whitefly-tomato model pathosystem. Tomato yellow leaf curl virus (TYLCV) -susceptible and TYLCV-resistant tomato genotypes were evaluated by whitefly-mediated transmission assays. Quantitative PCR revealed that virus accumulation decreased after an initial spike in all genotypes. TYLCV accumulation was less in resistant than in susceptible genotypes at 3, 6, and 12 weeks post inoculation (WPI). TYLCV acquisition by whiteflies over time from resistant and susceptible genotypes was also consistent with virus accumulation in the host plant. Furthermore, preference assays indicated that non-viruliferous whiteflies preferred virus-infected plants, whereas viruliferous whiteflies preferred non-infected plants. However, this effect was prominent only with the susceptible genotype at 6 WPI. The development of whiteflies on non-infected susceptible and resistant genotypes was not significantly different. However, developmental time was reduced when a susceptible genotype was infected with TYLCV. Together, these results suggest that vector preference and development could be affected by the timing of infection and by host resistance. These effects could play a crucial role in TYLCV epidemics. PMID:26529402

  7. Risk assessment of genetically engineered crops: fitness effects of virus-resistance transgenes in wild Cucurbita pepo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laughlin, Karen D; Power, Alison G; Snow, Allison A; Spencer, Lawrence J

    2009-07-01

    The development of crops genetically engineered for pathogen resistance has raised concerns that crop-to-wild gene flow could release wild or weedy relatives from regulation by the pathogens targeted by the transgenes that confer resistance. Investigation of these risks has also raised questions about the impact of gene flow from conventional crops into wild plant populations. Viruses in natural plant populations can play important roles in plant fecundity and competitive interactions. Here, we show that virus-resistance transgenes and conventional crop genes can increase fecundity of wild plants under virus pressure. We asked how gene flow from a cultivated squash (Cucurbita pepo) engineered for virus resistance would affect the fecundity of wild squash (C. pepo) in the presence and absence of virus pressure. A transgenic squash cultivar was crossed and backcrossed with wild C. pepo from Arkansas. Wild C. pepo, transgenic backcross plants, and non-transgenic backcross plants were compared in field plots in Ithaca, New York, USA. The second and third generations of backcrosses (BC2 and BC3) were used in 2002 and 2003, respectively. One-half of the plants were inoculated with zucchini yellow mosaic virus (ZYMV), and one-half of the plants were maintained as healthy controls. Virus pressure dramatically decreased the fecundity of wild C. pepo plants and non-transgenic backcross plants relative to transgenic backcross plants, which showed continued functioning of the virus-resistance transgene. In 2002, non-transgenic backcross fecundity was slightly higher than wild C. pepo fecundity under virus pressure, indicating a possible benefit of conventional crop alleles, but they did not differ in 2003 when fecundity was lower in both groups. We detected no fitness costs of the transgene in the absence of the virus. If viruses play a role in the population dynamics of wild C. pepo, we predict that gene flow from transgenic, virus-resistant squash and, to a much lesser

  8. Effect of neck flexion restriction on sternocleidomastoid and abdominal muscle activity during curl-up exercises.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Dong-Kyu; Moon, Dong-Chul; Hong, Ki-Hoon

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of neck flexion restriction on sternocleidomastoid (SCM), rectus abdominis (RA), and external oblique (EO) muscle activity during a traditional curl-up exercise and a curl-up with neck flexion restriction. [Subjects] In total, 13 healthy male subjects volunteered for this study. [Methods] All subjects performed a traditional curl-up exercise and a curl-up exercise in which neck flexion was restricted by the subject's hand. Surface electromyography (EMG) signals were recorded from the SCM, RA, and EO during the curl-up. [Results] There was significantly lower EMG activity of the SCM during the curl-up exercise with neck flexion restriction compared to the traditional curl-up exercise. Conversely, the activity of the RA and EO muscles was significantly higher in the curl-up exercise with neck flexion restriction than in the traditional curl-up exercise. [Conclusion] Neck flexion restriction is recommended to prevent excessive activation of superficial cervical flexors during the curl-up exercise.

  9. Cell death triggering and effector recognition by Sw-5 SD-CNL proteins from resistant and susceptible tomato isolines to Tomato spotted wilt virus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Silva de Oliveira, A.; Koolhaas, Ivo; Boiteux, L.S.; Caldararu, O.; Petrescu, A.J.; Resende, R.; Kormelink, R.J.M.

    2016-01-01

    Only a limited number of dominant resistance genes acting against plant viruses have been cloned, and further functional studies of these have been almost entirely limited to the resistance genes Rx against Potato virus X (PVX) and N against Tobacco mosaic virus (TMV). Recently, the cell-to-cell

  10. Analytical investigation into the resonance frequencies of a curling probe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arshadi, Ali; Brinkmann, Ralf Peter

    2016-08-01

    The term ‘active plasma resonance spectroscopy’ (APRS) denotes a class of closely related plasma diagnostic methods which utilize the natural ability of plasmas to resonate on or near the electron plasma frequency {ω\\text{pe}} ; an electrical radio frequency signal (in the GHz range) is coupled into the plasma via an antenna or a probe, the spectral response is recorded and a mathematical model is employed to determine plasma parameters such as the plasma density and the electron temperature. The curling probe, recently invented by Liang et al (2011 Appl. Phys. Express 4 066101), is a novel realization of the APRS concept which has many practical advantages. In particular, it can be miniaturized and flatly embedded into the chamber wall, thus allowing the monitoring of plasma processes without contamination nor disturbance. Physically, the curling probe can be understood as a ‘coiled’ form of the hairpin probe (Stenzel 1976 Rev. Sci. Instrum. 47 603). Assuming that the spiralization of the probe has little electrical effect, this paper investigates the characteristcs of a ‘straightened’ curling probe by modeling it as an infinite slot-type resonator that is in direct contact with the plasma. The diffraction of an incident plane wave at the slot is calculated by solving the cold plasma model and Maxwell’s equations simultaneously. The resonance frequencies of the probe are derived and are found to be in good agreement with the numerical results of the probe inventors.

  11. Hydro-responsive curling of the resurrection plant Selaginella lepidophylla.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rafsanjani, Ahmad; Brulé, Véronique; Western, Tamara L; Pasini, Damiano

    2015-01-27

    The spirally arranged stems of the spikemoss Selaginella lepidophylla, an ancient resurrection plant, compactly curl into a nest-ball shape upon dehydration. Due to its spiral phyllotaxy, older outer stems on the plant interlace and envelope the younger inner stems forming the plant centre. Stem curling is a morphological mechanism that limits photoinhibitory and thermal damages the plant might experience in arid environments. Here, we investigate the distinct conformational changes of outer and inner stems of S. lepidophylla triggered by dehydration. Outer stems bend into circular rings in a relatively short period of desiccation, whereas inner stems curl slowly into spirals due to hydro-actuated strain gradient along their length. This arrangement eases both the tight packing of the plant during desiccation and its fast opening upon rehydration. The insights gained from this work shed light on the hydro-responsive movements in plants and might contribute to the development of deployable structures with remarkable shape transformations in response to environmental stimuli.

  12. The CURL-CoFoR Collaborative Collection Management Project

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gregory Walker

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available CoFoR originated from an initiative by CURL, the Consortium of Research Libraries in the British Isles. CURL’s Task Force on Resource Management proposed a project, which would develop and test several interrelated aspects of collaborative collection management (CCM, to help in determining the most effective kinds of collaboration between major research collections. The Task Force was concerned that local pressures on libraries were tending to make them take collection management decisions in isolation, and they were looking for a framework within which better informed decisions on libraries’ collections could be taken with greater confidence and a clearer awareness of national provision. CURL was seeking to establish which CCM approaches could be expected to: · offer the most attractive benefits for costs incurred; · be applicable to a wide range of subjects / areas; · and be viable in the longer term. In lat 2002 CURL accepted a proposal from an existing project team to undertake this work.

  13. Adamantane-Resistant Influenza A Viruses in the World (1902–2013): Frequency and Distribution of M2 Gene Mutations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Guoying; Peng, Chao; Luo, Jing; Wang, Chengmin; Han, Le; Wu, Bin; Ji, Guangju; He, Hongxuan

    2015-01-01

    Adamantanes (amantadine and rimantadine) have been used to prevent and treat influenza A virus infections for many years; however, resistance to these drugs has been widely reported in the world. To investigate the frequency and distribution of M2 gene mutations in adamantane-resistant influenza variants circulated in the world between 1902 and 2013, 31251 available M2 protein sequences from different HA-subtype influenza A viruses (H1–H17) were analyzed and adamantane resistance-associated mutations were compared (L26F, V27A, A30T, A30V, S31N, G34E, and L38F). We find that 45.2% (n = 14132) of influenza A (H1–H17) viruses circulating globally were resistant to adamantanes, and the vast majority of resistant viruses (95%) bear S31N mutations. Whereas, only about 1% have V27A mutations and other mutations (L26F, A30T, G34E, and L38F) were extremely rare (their prevalence appeared to be resistance to adamantanes. In contrast, the appearance of adamantane-resistant mutants in H2, H4, H6, H10, and H11 subtypes was rare. However, no adamantane resistance viruses were identified among other HA subtypes (H8, H12–H16). Our findings indicate that the frequency and distribution of adamantane-resistant influenza variants varied among different HA subtypes, host species, years of isolation, and geographical areas. This comprehensive study raises concerns about the increasing prevalence of adamantane-resistant influenza A viruses and highlights the importance of monitoring the emergence and worldwide spread of adamantane-resistant variants. PMID:25768797

  14. A new stochastic model for subgenomic hepatitis C virus replication considers drug resistant mutants.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikita V Ivanisenko

    Full Text Available As an RNA virus, hepatitis C virus (HCV is able to rapidly acquire drug resistance, and for this reason the design of effective anti-HCV drugs is a real challenge. The HCV subgenomic replicon-containing cells are widely used for experimental studies of the HCV genome replication mechanisms, for drug testing in vitro and in studies of HCV drug resistance. The NS3/4A protease is essential for virus replication and, therefore, it is one of the most attractive targets for developing specific antiviral agents against HCV. We have developed a stochastic model of subgenomic HCV replicon replication, in which the emergence and selection of drug resistant mutant viral RNAs in replicon cells is taken into account. Incorporation into the model of key NS3 protease mutations leading to resistance to BILN-2061 (A156T, D168V, R155Q, VX-950 (A156S, A156T, T54A and SCH 503034 (A156T, A156S, T54A inhibitors allows us to describe the long term dynamics of the viral RNA suppression for various inhibitor concentrations. We theoretically showed that the observable difference between the viral RNA kinetics for different inhibitor concentrations can be explained by differences in the replication rate and inhibitor sensitivity of the mutant RNAs. The pre-existing mutants of the NS3 protease contribute more significantly to appearance of new resistant mutants during treatment with inhibitors than wild-type replicon. The model can be used to interpret the results of anti-HCV drug testing on replicon systems, as well as to estimate the efficacy of potential drugs and predict optimal schemes of their usage.

  15. Development of marker-free transgenic lettuce resistant to Mirafiori lettuce big-vein virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawazu, Yoichi; Fujiyama, Ryoi; Imanishi, Shunsuke; Fukuoka, Hiroyuki; Yamaguchi, Hirotaka; Matsumoto, Satoru

    2016-10-01

    Lettuce big-vein disease caused by Mirafiori lettuce big-vein virus (MLBVV) is found in major lettuce production areas worldwide, but highly resistant cultivars have not yet been developed. To produce MLBVV-resistant marker-free transgenic lettuce that would have a transgene with a promoter and terminator of lettuce origin, we constructed a two T-DNA binary vector, in which the first T-DNA contained the selectable marker gene neomycin phosphotransferase II, and the second T-DNA contained the lettuce ubiquitin gene promoter and terminator and inverted repeats of the coat protein (CP) gene of MLBVV. This vector was introduced into lettuce cultivars 'Watson' and 'Fuyuhikari' by Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated transformation. Regenerated plants (T0 generation) that were CP gene-positive by PCR analysis were self-pollinated, and 312 T1 lines were analyzed for resistance to MLBVV. Virus-negative plants were checked for the CP gene and the marker gene, and nine lines were obtained which were marker-free and resistant to MLBVV. Southern blot analysis showed that three of the nine lines had two copies of the CP gene, whereas six lines had a single copy and were used for further analysis. Small interfering RNAs, which are indicative of RNA silencing, were detected in all six lines. MLBVV infection was inhibited in all six lines in resistance tests performed in a growth chamber and a greenhouse, resulting in a high degree of resistance to lettuce big-vein disease. Transgenic lettuce lines produced in this study could be used as resistant cultivars or parental lines for breeding.

  16. Relative resistance of Pacific salmon to infectious salmon anaemia virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rolland, J.B.; Winton, J.R.

    2003-01-01

    Infectious salmon anaemia (ISA) is a major disease of Atlantic salmon, Salmo salar, caused by an orthomyxovirus (ISAV). Increases in global aqua culture and the international movement of fish made it important to determine if Pacific salmon are at risk. Steelhead trout, Oncorhynchus mykiss, and chum, O. keta, Chinook, O. tshawytscha, coho, O. kisutch, and Atlantic salmon were injected intraperitoneally with a high, medium, or low dose of a Norwegian strain of ISAV. In a second challenge, the same species, except chum salmon, were injected with a high dose of either a Canadian or the Norwegian strain. Average cumulative mortality of Atlantic salmon in trial 1 was 12% in the high dose group, 20% in the medium dose group and 16% in the low dose group. The average cumulative mortality of Atlantic salmon in trial 2 was 98%. No signs typical of ISA and no ISAV-related mortality occurred among any of the groups of Oncorhynchus spp. in either experiment, although ISAV was reisolated from some fish sampled at intervals post-challenge. The results indicate that while Oncorhynchus spp. are quite resistant to ISAV relative to Atlantic salmon, the potential for ISAV to adapt to Oncorhynchus spp. should not be ignored.

  17. Antiherpetic properties of acyclovir 5'-hydrogenphosphonate and the mutation analysis of herpes virus resistant strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gus'kova, Anna A; Skoblov, Mikhail Yu; Korovina, Anna N; Yasko, Maxim V; Karpenko, Inna L; Kukhanova, Marina K; Andronova, Valeria L; Galegov, George A; Skoblov, Yuri S

    2009-10-01

    In this study, we continued to study antiherpetic properties of acyclovir 5'-hydrogenphosphonate (Hp-ACV) in cell cultures and animal models. Hp-ACV was shown to inhibit the development of herpetic infection in mice induced by the HSV-1/L(2) strain. The compound suppressed replication of both ACV-sensitive HSV-1/L(2) and ACV-resistant HSV-1/L(2)/R strains in Vero cell culture. Viral population resistant to Hp-ACV (HSV-1/L(2)/R(Hp-ACV)) was developed much slower than ACV-resistant population. The analysis of Hp-ACV-resistant clones isolated from the HSV-1/L(2)/R(Hp-ACV) population demonstrated their partial cross-resistance to ACV. The mutations determining the resistance of HSV-1 clones to Hp-ACV were partly overlapped with mutations defining ACV resistance but did not always coincide. HSV-1/L(2)/R(Hp-ACV) herpes virus thymidine kinase is shortened from the C-terminus by 100 amino acid residues in length.

  18. Selection of diverse and clinically relevant integrase inhibitor-resistant human immunodeficiency virus type 1 mutants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Masanori; Nakahara, Koichiro; Seki, Takahiro; Miki, Shigeru; Kawauchi, Shinobu; Suyama, Akemi; Wakasa-Morimoto, Chiaki; Kodama, Makoto; Endoh, Takeshi; Oosugi, Eiichi; Matsushita, Yoshihiro; Murai, Hitoshi; Fujishita, Toshio; Yoshinaga, Tomokazu; Garvey, Edward; Foster, Scott; Underwood, Mark; Johns, Brian; Sato, Akihiko; Fujiwara, Tamio

    2008-11-01

    Resistance passage studies were conducted with five INIs (integrase inhibitors) that have been tested in clinical trials to date: a new naphthyridinone-type INI S/GSK-364735, raltegravir, elvitegravir, L-870,810 and S-1360. In establishing the passage system and starting from concentrations several fold above the EC(50) value, resistance mutations against S-1360 and related diketoacid-type compounds could be isolated from infected MT-2 cell cultures from day 14 to 28. Q148R and F121Y were the two main pathways of resistance to S/GSK-364735. Q148R/K and N155H, which were found in patients failing raltegravir treatment in Phase IIb studies, were observed during passage with raltegravir with this method. The fold resistance of 40 mutant molecular clones versus wild type virus was compared with these five INIs. The overall resistance pattern of S/GSK-364735 was similar to that of raltegravir and other INIs. However, different fold resistances of particular mutations were noted among different INIs, reflecting a potential to develop INIs with distinctly different resistant profiles.

  19. Transcriptional response of virus-infected cassava and identification of putative sources of resistance for cassava brown streak disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maruthi, M N; Bouvaine, Sophie; Tufan, Hale A; Mohammed, Ibrahim U; Hillocks, Rory J

    2014-01-01

    Cassava (Manihot esculenta) is a major food staple in sub-Saharan Africa, which is severely affected by cassava brown streak disease (CBSD). The aim of this study was to identify resistance for CBSD as well as to understand the mechanism of putative resistance for providing effective control for the disease. Three cassava varieties; Kaleso, Kiroba and Albert were inoculated with cassava brown streak viruses by grafting and also using the natural insect vector the whitefly, Bemisia tabaci. Kaleso expressed mild or no disease symptoms and supported low concentrations of viruses, which is a characteristic of resistant plants. In comparison, Kiroba expressed severe leaf but milder root symptoms, while Albert was susceptible with severe symptoms both on leaves and roots. Real-time PCR was used to estimate virus concentrations in cassava varieties. Virus quantities were higher in Kiroba and Albert compared to Kaleso. The Illumina RNA-sequencing was used to further understand the genetic basis of resistance. More than 700 genes were uniquely overexpressed in Kaleso in response to virus infection compared to Albert. Surprisingly, none of them were similar to known resistant gene orthologs. Some of the overexpressed genes, however, belonged to the hormone signalling pathways and secondary metabolites, both of which are linked to plant resistance. These genes should be further characterised before confirming their role in resistance to CBSD.

  20. Transcriptional response of virus-infected cassava and identification of putative sources of resistance for cassava brown streak disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M N Maruthi

    Full Text Available Cassava (Manihot esculenta is a major food staple in sub-Saharan Africa, which is severely affected by cassava brown streak disease (CBSD. The aim of this study was to identify resistance for CBSD as well as to understand the mechanism of putative resistance for providing effective control for the disease. Three cassava varieties; Kaleso, Kiroba and Albert were inoculated with cassava brown streak viruses by grafting and also using the natural insect vector the whitefly, Bemisia tabaci. Kaleso expressed mild or no disease symptoms and supported low concentrations of viruses, which is a characteristic of resistant plants. In comparison, Kiroba expressed severe leaf but milder root symptoms, while Albert was susceptible with severe symptoms both on leaves and roots. Real-time PCR was used to estimate virus concentrations in cassava varieties. Virus quantities were higher in Kiroba and Albert compared to Kaleso. The Illumina RNA-sequencing was used to further understand the genetic basis of resistance. More than 700 genes were uniquely overexpressed in Kaleso in response to virus infection compared to Albert. Surprisingly, none of them were similar to known resistant gene orthologs. Some of the overexpressed genes, however, belonged to the hormone signalling pathways and secondary metabolites, both of which are linked to plant resistance. These genes should be further characterised before confirming their role in resistance to CBSD.

  1. Virulence and pathogenesis of the MSW and MSD strains of Californian myxoma virus in European rabbits with genetic resistance to myxomatosis compared to rabbits with no genetic resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silvers, L; Inglis, B; Labudovic, A; Janssens, P A; van Leeuwen, B H; Kerr, P J

    2006-04-25

    The pathogenesis of two Californian strains of myxoma virus (MSW and MSD) was examined in European rabbits (Oryctolagus cuniculus) that were either susceptible to myxomatosis (laboratory rabbits) or had undergone natural selection for genetic resistance to myxomatosis (Australian wild rabbits). MSW was highly lethal for both types of rabbits with average survival times of 7.3 and 9.4 days, respectively, and 100% mortality. Classical clinical signs of myxomatosis were not present except in one rabbit that survived for 13 days following infection. Previously described clinical signs of trembling and shaking were observed in laboratory but not wild rabbits. Despite the high resistance of wild rabbits to myxomatosis caused by South American strains of myxoma virus, the MSW strain was of such high virulence that it was able to overcome resistance. The acute nature of the infection, relatively low viral titers in the tissues and destruction of lymphoid tissues, suggested that death was probably due to an acute and overwhelming immunopathological response to the virus. No virus was found in the brain. The MSD strain was attenuated compared to previously published descriptions and therefore was only characterized in laboratory rabbits. It is concluded that Californian MSW strain of myxoma virus is at the extreme end of a continuum of myxoma virus virulence but that the basic pathophysiology of the disease induced is not broadly different to other strains of myxoma virus.

  2. Antibody response against three widespread bovine viruses is not impaired in Holstein cattle carrying bovine leukocyte antigen DRB3.2 alleles associated with bovine leukemia virus resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juliarena, M A; Poli, M; Ceriani, C; Sala, L; Rodríguez, E; Gutierrez, S; Dolcini, G; Odeon, A; Esteban, E N

    2009-01-01

    Due to the wide dissemination of bovine leukemia virus (BLV) infection among dairy cattle, control and eradication programs based on serological detection of infected cattle and subsequent culling face a major economic task. In Argentina, genetic selection of cattle carrying alleles of the bovine leukocyte antigen (BoLA) DRB3.2 gene associated with BLV-infection resistance, like *0902, emerges as the best additional tool toward controlling virus spread. A potential risk in expanding or segregating BoLA selected populations of cattle is that it might increase susceptibility to other common viruses. Special concern raises the strong association found between low proviral load and low antibody titer against major BLV structural proteins. This phenomenon might depend on host genetic factors influencing other viruses requiring, unlike BLV, strong and long-lasting humoral immune response to prevent infection. In this study, we demonstrate that there is no association among neutralizing antibody titers against foot and mouth disease virus, bovine viral diarrhea virus, or bovine herpesvirus type 1 and polymorphism of the BoLA DRB3.2 gene. Conversely, there is strong association between BoLA DRB3.2*0902 and low antibody titers against 2 BLV structural proteins--env gp51 and gag p24--to date, the best BLV resistance marker. There is also significant association between low antibody titers against gp51 and p24 and BoLA DRB3.2*1701 and low antibody titers against p24 and BoLA DRB3.2*1101 or 02. Our data suggest that increasing BoLA-selected BLV-resistant cattle or segregating BoLA-associated alleles to BLV susceptibility would not affect the resistance or the predisposition to bovine viral diarrhea virus, bovine herpesvirus type 1, or foot and mouth disease virus infection.

  3. Tick-borne thogoto virus infection in mice is inhibited by the orthomyxovirus resistance gene product Mx1.

    OpenAIRE

    1995-01-01

    We show that tick-transmitted Thogoto virus is sensitive to interferon-induced nuclear Mx1 protein, which is known for its specific antiviral action against orthomyxoviruses. Influenza virus-susceptible BALB/c mice (lacking a functional Mx1 gene) developed severe disease symptoms and died within days after intracerebral or intraperitoneal infection with a lethal challenge dose of Thogoto virus. In contrast, Mx1-positive congenic, influenza virus-resistant BALB.A2G-Mx1 mice remained healthy an...

  4. Genetic modification of alternative respiration in Nicotiana benthamiana affects basal and salicylic acid-induced resistance to potato virus X

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Verchot-Lubicz Jeanmarie

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Salicylic acid (SA regulates multiple anti-viral mechanisms, including mechanism(s that may be negatively regulated by the mitochondrial enzyme, alternative oxidase (AOX, the sole component of the alternative respiratory pathway. However, studies of this mechanism can be confounded by SA-mediated induction of RNA-dependent RNA polymerase 1, a component of the antiviral RNA silencing pathway. We made transgenic Nicotiana benthamiana plants in which alternative respiratory pathway capacity was either increased by constitutive expression of AOX, or decreased by expression of a dominant-negative mutant protein (AOX-E. N. benthamiana was used because it is a natural mutant that does not express a functional RNA-dependent RNA polymerase 1. Results Antimycin A (an alternative respiratory pathway inducer and also an inducer of resistance to viruses and SA triggered resistance to tobacco mosaic virus (TMV. Resistance to TMV induced by antimycin A, but not by SA, was inhibited in Aox transgenic plants while SA-induced resistance to this virus appeared to be stronger in Aox-E transgenic plants. These effects, which were limited to directly inoculated leaves, were not affected by the presence or absence of a transgene constitutively expressing a functional RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (MtRDR1. Unexpectedly, Aox-transgenic plants infected with potato virus X (PVX showed markedly increased susceptibility to systemic disease induction and virus accumulation in inoculated and systemically infected leaves. SA-induced resistance to PVX was compromised in Aox-transgenic plants but plants expressing AOX-E exhibited enhanced SA-induced resistance to this virus. Conclusions We conclude that AOX-regulated mechanisms not only play a role in SA-induced resistance but also make an important contribution to basal resistance against certain viruses such as PVX.

  5. Aciclovir resistance among indian strains of Herpes simplex virus as determined using a dye uptake assay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abraham A

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Resistance to aciclovir (ACV among Herpes simplex virus (HSV isolates is increasingly being reported in the literature particularly in immunocompromised patients. However, there is only limited data available from India despite widespread use of ACV in our hospital. A cross-sectional study was hence conducted to determine the aciclovir (ACV susceptibility of HSV 1 and 2 isolates using a dye uptake (DU assay. This study showed a 3.0% prevalence of ACV resistance among HSV-1 strains (2/66, median IC 50 0.098 µg/mL while in HSV-2 strains, it was 7.8% (5/64, median IC 50 0.195 µg/mL. The IC 50 for the HSV-1 and HSV-2 strains resistant to ACV was greater than or equal to 6.25 µg/mL.

  6. [Prevalence of transmission of zidovudine-resistant viruses in Switzerland. l'Etude suisse de cohorte VIH].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yerly, S; Rakik, A; Kinloch-de-Loes, S; Erb, P; Vernazza, P; Hirschel, B; Perrin, L

    1996-10-26

    Zidovudine (ZDV) was the most widely used anti-HIV drug between 1987 and 1995, and, as already reported, transmission of ZDV-resistant viruses occurs. Several mutations of the reverse transcriptase gene have been identified; one of them affects the 215 codon and is associated with a high degree of resistance. We have determined, using selective PCR, the prevalence of transmission of 215 mutant isolates in 134 patients with primary HIV infection (PHI) and have identified 8 patients with 215 mutant virus between 1989 and 1995 in Switzerland. Mutant resistant viruses have been isolated from patients treated with most antiviral drugs. A systematic search for mutant viruses may provide useful information for the adaptation of treatment strategies.

  7. Indirect costs of a nontarget pathogen mitigate the direct benefits of a virus-resistant transgene in wild Cucurbita.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasu, Miruna A; Ferrari, Matthew J; Du, Daolin; Winsor, James A; Stephenson, Andrew G

    2009-11-10

    Virus-resistant transgenic squash are grown throughout the United States and much of Mexico and it is likely that the virus-resistant transgene (VRT) has been introduced to wild populations repeatedly. The evolutionary fate of any resistance gene in wild populations and its environmental impacts depend upon trade-offs between the costs and benefits of the resistance gene. In a 3-year field study using a wild gourd and transgenic and nontransgenic introgressives, we measured the effects of the transgene on fitness, on herbivory by cucumber beetles, on the incidence of mosaic viruses, and on the incidence of bacterial wilt disease (a fatal disease vectored by cucumber beetles). In each year, the first incidence of zucchini yellow mosaic virus occurred in mid-July and spread rapidly through the susceptible plants. We found that the transgenic plants had greater reproduction through both male and female function than the susceptible plants, indicating that the VRT has a direct fitness benefit for wild gourds under the conditions of our study. Moreover, the VRT had no effect on resistance to cucumber beetles or the incidence of wilt disease before the spread of the virus. However, as the virus spread through the fields, the cucumber beetles became increasingly concentrated upon the healthy (mostly transgenic) plants, which increased exposure to and the incidence of wilt disease on the transgenic plants. This indirect cost of the VRT (mediated by a nontarget herbivore and pathogen) mitigated the overall beneficial effect of the VRT on fitness.

  8. Published sequences do not support transfer of oseltamivir resistance mutations from avian to human influenza A virus strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norberg, Peter; Lindh, Magnus; Olofsson, Sigvard

    2015-03-28

    Tamiflu (oseltamivir phosphate ester, OE) is a widely used antiviral active against influenza A virus. Its active metabolite, oseltamivir carboxylate (OC), is chemically stable and secreted into wastewater treatment plants. OC contamination of natural habitats of waterfowl might induce OC resistance in influenza viruses persistently infecting waterfowl, and lead to transfer of OC-resistance from avian to human influenza. The aim of this study was to evaluate whether such has occurred. A genomics approach including phylogenetic analysis and probability calculations for homologous recombination was applied on altogether 19,755 neuraminidase (N1 and N2) genes from virus sampled in humans and birds, with and without resistance mutations. No evidence for transfer of OE resistance mutations from avian to human N genes was obtained, and events suggesting recombination between human and avian influenza virus variants could not be traced in the sequence material studied. The results indicate that resistance in influenza viruses infecting humans is due to the selection pressure posed by the global OE administration in humans rather than transfer from avian influenza A virus strains carrying mutations induced by environmental exposure to OC.

  9. Short communication: high prevalence of drug-resistant human immunodeficiency virus type 1 in treatment-naive patients in Greenland

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, T.V.; Lohse, N.; Jensen, E.S.;

    2008-01-01

    was observed. Suboptimal use of nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NRTI) in Greenland was reflected in the high prevalence of NRTI-related resistance in the patients. A combination of phylogeny and genotypic resistance tests enabled us to study the number of transmissions and how the virus...

  10. Introgression of chromosome segments from multiple alien species in wheat breeding lines with wheat streak mosaic virus resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pyramiding of alien-derived Wheat streak mosaic virus (WSMV) resistance and resistance enhancing genes in wheat is a costeffective and environmentally safe strategy for disease control. PCR-based markers and cytogenetic analysis with genomic in situ hybridisation were applied to identify alien chrom...

  11. Resistance to papaya ringspot virus-watermelon strain (PRSV-W) in the desert watermelon Citrullus colocynthis

    Science.gov (United States)

    The bitter desert watermelon (Citrullus colocynthis) is a valuable source for improving disease or pest resistance in watermelon cultivars. The objective of this study was to identify C. colocynthis accessions displaying resistance to the papaya ringspot virus-watermelon strain (PRSV-W) that could ...

  12. Biotechnological strategies and tools for Plum pox virus resistance: trans-, intra-, cis-genesis and beyond

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vincenza eIlardi

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Plum pox virus (PPV is the etiological agent of sharka, the most devastating and economically important viral disease affecting Prunus species. It is widespread in most stone fruits producing countries even though eradication and quarantine programs are in place. The development of resistant cultivars and rootstocks remains the most ecologically and economically suitable approach to achieve long-term control of sharka disease. However, the few PPV resistance genetic resources found in Prunus germplasm along with some intrinsic biological features of stone fruit trees pose limits for efficient and fast breeding programmes. This review focuses on an array of biotechnological strategies and tools, which have been used, or may be exploited to confer PPV resistance. A considerable number of scientific studies clearly indicate that robust and predictable resistance can be achieved by transforming plant species with constructs encoding intron-spliced hairpin RNAs homologous to conserved regions of the PPV genome. In addition, we discuss how recent advances in our understanding of PPV biology can be profitably exploited to develop viral interference strategies. In particular, genetic manipulation of host genes by which PPV accomplishes its infection cycle already permits the creation of intragenic resistant plants. Finally, we review the emerging genome editing technologies based on ZFN, TALEN and CRISPR/Cas9 engineered nucleases and how the knockout of host susceptibility genes will open up next generation of PPV resistant plants.

  13. Biotechnological strategies and tools for Plum pox virus resistance: trans-, intra-, cis-genesis, and beyond.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilardi, Vincenza; Tavazza, Mario

    2015-01-01

    Plum pox virus (PPV) is the etiological agent of sharka, the most devastating and economically important viral disease affecting Prunus species. It is widespread in most stone fruits producing countries even though eradication and quarantine programs are in place. The development of resistant cultivars and rootstocks remains the most ecologically and economically suitable approach to achieve long-term control of sharka disease. However, the few PPV resistance genetic resources found in Prunus germplasm along with some intrinsic biological features of stone fruit trees pose limits for efficient and fast breeding programs. This review focuses on an array of biotechnological strategies and tools, which have been used, or may be exploited to confer PPV resistance. A considerable number of scientific studies clearly indicate that robust and predictable resistance can be achieved by transforming plant species with constructs encoding intron-spliced hairpin RNAs homologous to conserved regions of the PPV genome. In addition, we discuss how recent advances in our understanding of PPV biology can be profitably exploited to develop viral interference strategies. In particular, genetic manipulation of host genes by which PPV accomplishes its infection cycle already permits the creation of intragenic resistant plants. Finally, we review the emerging genome editing technologies based on ZFN, TALEN and CRISPR/Cas9 engineered nucleases and how the knockout of host susceptibility genes will open up next generation of PPV resistant plants.

  14. Biological fitness and natural selection of amantadine resistant variants of avian influenza H5N1 viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdelwhab, E M; Veits, Jutta; Mettenleiter, Thomas C

    2017-01-15

    Outbreaks caused by the highly pathogenic H5N1 avian influenza virus (A/H5N1) devastated the poultry industry in several countries and posed a significant pandemic threat. In addition to culling of infected poultry and vaccination, amantadine has been applied in poultry in some countries to control the spread of the virus. The prevalence of the amantadine resistance marker at position 31 (Ser31Asn) of the M2 protein increased over time. However, little is known about the biological fitness and selection of H5N1 amantadine resistant strains over their sensitive counterparts. Here, using reverse genetics we investigated the biological impact of Ser31Asn in M2 commonly seen in viruses in clade 2.2.1.1 in farmed poultry in Egypt. Findings of the current study indicated that the resistance to amantadine conferred by Asn31 evolved rapidly after the application of amantadine in commercial poultry. Both the resistant and sensitive strains replicated at similar levels in avian cell culture. Asn31 increased virus entry into the cells and cell-to-cell spread and was genetically stable for several passages in cell culture. Moreover, upon co-infection of cell culture resistant strains dominated sensitive viruses even in the absence of selection by amantadine. Together, rapid emergence, stability and domination of amantadine-resistant variants over sensitive strains limit the efficacy of amantadine in poultry.

  15. Computational analysis of HIV-1 resistance based on gene expression profiles and the virus-host interaction network.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tao Huang

    Full Text Available A very small proportion of people remain negative for HIV infection after repeated HIV-1 viral exposure, which is called HIV-1 resistance. Understanding the mechanism of HIV-1 resistance is important for the development of HIV-1 vaccines and Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS therapies. In this study, we analyzed the gene expression profiles of CD4+ T cells from HIV-1-resistant individuals and HIV-susceptible individuals. One hundred eighty-five discriminative HIV-1 resistance genes were identified using the Minimum Redundancy-Maximum Relevance (mRMR and Incremental Feature Selection (IFS methods. The virus protein target enrichment analysis of the 185 HIV-1 resistance genes suggested that the HIV-1 protein nef might play an important role in HIV-1 infection. Moreover, we identified 29 infection information exchanger genes from the 185 HIV-1 resistance genes based on a virus-host interaction network analysis. The infection information exchanger genes are located on the shortest paths between virus-targeted proteins and are important for the coordination of virus infection. These proteins may be useful targets for AIDS prevention or therapy, as intervention in these pathways could disrupt communication with virus-targeted proteins and HIV-1 infection.

  16. New results concerning the plum pox virus epidemiology and resistance of plum cultivars, hybrids and rootstocks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minoiu, N; Maxim, A; Vladianu, D; Platon, I; Balaci, R

    1998-09-01

    Our recent results on the plum pox virus (PPV) epidemiology show that PPV spreads very rapidly in plum tree plantations in the contaminated areas. A clearing of the PPV-infected trees reduces significantly the spread of the virus but does not eliminate the disease. Some plum tree cultivars, hybrids and rootstocks (Scoldus, Alina, Cristi, BN 1/8Fl, BN 2Gr. etc) showing field resistance could not be infected with PPV by natural way. However, they could be infected with PPV by artificial inoculation except for the plum tree cv. Local of Dragasani and the BN 4Kr myrobalan, which proved to be immune to PPV. PPV was not transmitted through seeds in plum tree and myrobalan in the nursery. The Hyalopterus pruni aphids were found PPV-positive by an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA).

  17. Engineering cherry rootstocks with resistance to Prunus necrotic ring spot virus through RNAi-mediated silencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Guo-qing; Sink, Kenneth C; Walworth, Aaron E; Cook, Meridith A; Allison, Richard F; Lang, Gregory A

    2013-08-01

    Prunus necrotic ringspot virus (PNRSV) is a major pollen-disseminated ilarvirus that adversely affects many Prunus species. In this study, an RNA interference (RNAi) vector pART27-PNRSV containing an inverted repeat (IR) region of PNRSV was transformed into two hybrid (triploid) cherry rootstocks, 'Gisela 6' (GI 148-1) and 'Gisela 7'(GI 148-8)', which are tolerant and sensitive, respectively, to PNRSV infection. One year after inoculation with PNRSV plus Prune Dwarf Virus, nontransgenic 'Gisela 6' exhibited no symptoms but a significant PNRSV titre, while the transgenic 'Gisela 6' had no symptoms and minimal PNRSV titre. The nontransgenic 'Gisela 7' trees died, while the transgenic 'Gisela 7' trees survived. These results demonstrate the RNAi strategy is useful for developing viral resistance in fruit rootstocks, and such transgenic rootstocks may have potential to enhance production of standard, nongenetically modified fruit varieties while avoiding concerns about transgene flow and exogenous protein production that are inherent for transformed fruiting genotypes.

  18. Breakage of resistance to Cucumber mosaic virus by co-infection with Zucchini yellow mosaic virus: enhancement of CMV accumulation independent of symptom expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Y; Lee, K C; Gaba, V; Wong, S M; Palukaitis, P; Gal-On, A

    2004-02-01

    Resistance to the cucumovirus Cucumber mosaic virus (CMV) in cucumber cv. Delila was manifested as a very low level of accumulation of viral RNA and capsid protein, and an absence of CMV-induced symptoms. In addition, resistance was observed at the single cell level, with a reduction in accumulation of CMV RNAs, compared to accumulation in cells of the susceptible cucumber cv. Bet Alpha. Resistance to CMV in cv. Delila was broken by co-infection with the potyvirus Zucchini yellow mosaic virus (ZYMV). Resistance breakage in cv. Delila plants was manifested by an increase in the accumulation of (+) and (-) CMV RNA as well as CMV capsid protein, with no increase in the level of accumulation of ZYMV. Resistance breakage in the resistant cultivar by ZYMV also occurred at the single cell level. Thus, synergistic interactions known to occur between a potyvirus and a cucumovirus led to resistance breakage during a double infection. However, resistance breakage was not accompanied by an increase in disease symptoms beyond those induced by ZYMV itself. On co-inoculation with an asymptomatic variant of ZYMV-AG an enhancement of CMV infection occurred without disease manifestation. Consequently, intensification of viral RNA and capsid protein accumulation can occur without a corresponding increase in disease development, suggesting that different host genes regulate viral accumulation and disease development in the CMV-resistant cucumber plants.

  19. PARALLEL AUXILIARY SPACE AMG FOR H(curl) PROBLEMS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tzanio V. Kolev; Panayot S. Vassilevski

    2009-01-01

    In this paper we review a number of auxiliary space based preconditioners for the second order definite and semi-definite Maxwell problems discretized with the lowest order Nedelec finite elements. We discuss the parallel implementation of the most promising of these methods, the ones derived from the recent Hiptmair-Xu (HX) auxiliary space decomposition [Hiptmair and Xu, SIAM J. Numer. Anal., 45 (2007), pp. 2483-2509]. An extensive set of numerical experiments demonstrate the scalability of our implementation on large-scale H(curl) problems.

  20. Multicenter quality control of hepatitis C virus protease inhibitor resistance genotyping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vallet, Sophie; Larrat, Sylvie; Laperche, Syria; Le Guillou-Guillemette, Hélène; Legrand-Abravanel, Florence; Bouchardeau, Françoise; Pivert, Adeline; Henquell, Cécile; Mirand, Audrey; André-Garnier, Elisabeth; Giordanengo, Valérie; Lagathu, Gisèle; Thibault, Vincent; Scholtes, Caroline; Schvoerer, Evelyne; Gaudy-Graffin, Catherine; Maylin, Sarah; Trimoulet, Pascale; Brochot, Etienne; Hantz, Sébastien; Gozlan, Joël; Roque-Afonso, Anne-Marie; Soussan, Patrick; Plantier, Jean-Christophe; Charpentier, Charlotte; Chevaliez, Stéphane; Colson, Philippe; Mackiewicz, Vincent; Aguilera, Lina; Rosec, Sylvain; Gouriou, Stéphanie; Magnat, Nelly; Lunel-Fabiani, Françoise; Izopet, Jacques; Morand, Patrice; Payan, Christopher; Pawlotsky, Jean-Michel

    2013-05-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) protease inhibitor resistance-associated substitutions are selected during triple-therapy breakthrough. This multicenter quality control study evaluated the expertise of 23 French laboratories in HCV protease inhibitor resistance genotyping. A panel of 12 well-defined blinded samples comprising two wild-type HCV strains, nine transcripts from synthetic NS3 mutant samples or from clinical strains, and one HCV RNA-negative sample was provided to the participating laboratories. The results showed that any laboratory with expertise in sequencing techniques should be able to provide reliable HCV protease inhibitor resistance genotyping. Only a 0.7% error rate was reported for the amino acid sites studied. The accuracy of substitution identification ranged from 75% to 100%, depending on the laboratory. Incorrect results were mainly related to the methodology used. The results could be improved by changing the primers and modifying the process in order to avoid cross-contamination. This study underlines the value of quality control programs for viral resistance genotyping, which is required prior to launching observational collaborative multicenter studies on HCV resistance to direct-acting antiviral agents.

  1. Highly reliable heterologous system for evaluating resistance of clinical herpes simplex virus isolates to nucleoside analogues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bestman-Smith, J; Schmit, I; Papadopoulou, B; Boivin, G

    2001-04-01

    Clinical resistance of herpes simplex virus (HSV) types 1 and 2 to acyclovir (ACV) is usually caused by the presence of point mutations within the coding region of the viral thymidine kinase (TK) gene. The distinction between viral TK mutations involved in ACV resistance or part of viral polymorphism can be difficult to evaluate with current methodologies based on transfection and homologous recombination. We have developed and validated a new heterologous system based on the expression of the viral TK gene by the protozoan parasite Leishmania, normally devoid of TK activity. The viral TK genes from 5 ACV-susceptible and 13 ACV-resistant clinical HSV isolates and from the reference strains MS2 (type 2) and KOS (type 1) were transfected as part of an episomal expression vector in Leishmania. The susceptibility of TK-recombinant parasites to ganciclovir (GCV), a closely related nucleoside analogue, was evaluated by a simple measurement of the absorbance of Leishmania cultures grown in the presence of the drug. Expression of the TK gene from ACV-susceptible clinical isolates resulted in Leishmania susceptibility to GCV, whereas expression of a TK gene with frameshift mutations or nucleotide substitutions from ACV-resistant isolates gave rise to parasites with high levels of GCV resistance. The expression of the HSV TK gene in Leishmania provides an easy, reliable, and sensitive assay for evaluating HSV susceptibility to nucleoside analogues and for assessing the role of specific viral TK mutations.

  2. Resistance mechanism of human immunodeficiency virus type-1 protease to inhibitors: A molecular dynamic approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Reza Dayer

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1 protease inhibitors comprise an important class of drugs used in HIV treatments. However, mutations of protease genes accelerated by low fidelity of reverse transcriptase yield drug resistant mutants of reduced affinities for the inhibitors. This problem is considered to be a serious barrier against HIV treatment for the foreseeable future. In this study, molecular dynamic simulation method was used to examine the combinational and additive effects of all known mutations involved in drug resistance against FDA approved inhibitors. Results showed that drug resistant mutations are not randomly distributed along the protease sequence; instead, they are localized on flexible or hot points of the protein chain. Substitution of more hydrophobic residues in flexible points of protease chains tends to increase the folding, lower the flexibility and decrease the active site area of the protease. The reduced affinities of HIV-1 protease for inhibitors seemed to be due to substantial decrease in the size of the active site and flap mobility. A correlation was found between the binding energy of inhibitors and their affinities for each mutant suggesting the distortion of the active site geometry in drug resistance by preventing effective fitting of inhibitors into the enzymes' active site. To overcome the problem of drug resistance of HIV-1 protease, designing inhibitors of variable functional groups and configurations is proposed.

  3. Broad neutralization of hepatitis C virus-resistant variants by Civacir hepatitis C immunoglobulin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tawar, Rajiv G; Heydmann, Laura; Bach, Charlotte; Schüttrumpf, Jörg; Chavan, Shailesh; King, Barnabas J; McClure, C Patrick; Ball, Jonathan K; Pessaux, Patrick; Habersetzer, François; Bartenschlager, Ralf; Zeisel, Mirjam B; Baumert, Thomas F

    2016-11-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV)-induced end-stage liver disease is the major indication for liver transplantation (LT). However, reinfection of the liver graft is still common, especially in patients with detectable viral load at the time of LT. Limited data are available on direct-acting antivirals in the transplant setting for prevention of graft infection. The human hepatitis C immunoglobulin (HCIG) Civacir is an investigational drug that is currently being developed in an ongoing phase 3 clinical trial assessing its safety and efficacy at preventing HCV recurrence after liver transplantation (LT) in the United States. Using well-characterized patient-derived HCV variants selected during LT, we studied the molecular mechanism of action of Civacir. Inhibition of HCV infection was studied using infectious HCV models including HCV pseudoparticles (HCVpp) and cell culture-derived HCV (HCVcc) containing patient-derived viral envelope glycoproteins from 22 HCV variants isolated from patients before and after LT. The human hepatitis C immune globulin Civacir is an investigational drug that is currently being developed in an ongoing phase 3 clinical trial assessing safety and efficacy to prevent HCV recurrence after LT in the United States. Using well-characterized patient-derived HCV variants selected during LT, we studied the molecular mechanism of action of Civacir. Inhibition of HCV infection was studied using infectious HCV models including HCV pseudoparticles and cell culture-derived HCV containing patient-derived viral envelope glycoproteins from 22 HCV variants isolated from patients before and after liver transplantation. Additionally, we studied neutralization of different HCV genotypes and of direct-acting antiviral-resistant viruses. Our results indicate that Civacir potently, broadly, and dose-dependently neutralizes all tested patient variants in HCV pseudoparticles and cell culture-derived HCV assays including variants displaying resistance to host neutralizing

  4. EcoTILLING in Capsicum species: searching for new virus resistances

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    Nuez Fernando

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The EcoTILLING technique allows polymorphisms in target genes of natural populations to be quickly analysed or identified and facilitates the screening of genebank collections for desired traits. We have developed an EcoTILLING platform to exploit Capsicum genetic resources. A perfect example of the utility of this EcoTILLING platform is its application in searching for new virus-resistant alleles in Capsicum genus. Mutations in translation initiation factors (eIF4E, eIF(iso4E, eIF4G and eIF(iso4G break the cycle of several RNA viruses without affecting the plant life cycle, which makes these genes potential targets to screen for resistant germplasm. Results We developed and assayed a cDNA-based EcoTILLING platform with 233 cultivated accessions of the genus Capsicum. High variability in the coding sequences of the eIF4E and eIF(iso4E genes was detected using the cDNA platform. After sequencing, 36 nucleotide changes were detected in the CDS of eIF4E and 26 in eIF(iso4E. A total of 21 eIF4E haplotypes and 15 eIF(iso4E haplotypes were identified. To evaluate the functional relevance of this variability, 31 possible eIF4E/eIF(iso4E combinations were tested against Potato virus Y. The results showed that five new eIF4E variants (pvr210, pvr211, pvr212, pvr213 and pvr214 were related to PVY-resistance responses. Conclusions EcoTILLING was optimised in different Capsicum species to detect allelic variants of target genes. This work is the first to use cDNA instead of genomic DNA in EcoTILLING. This approach avoids intronic sequence problems and reduces the number of reactions. A high level of polymorphism has been identified for initiation factors, showing the high genetic variability present in our collection and its potential use for other traits, such as genes related to biotic or abiotic stresses, quality or production. Moreover, the new eIF4E and eIF(iso4E alleles are an excellent collection for searching for new resistance

  5. Vertical transmission selects for reduced virulence in a plant virus and for increased resistance in the host.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Israel Pagán

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available For the last three decades, evolutionary biologists have sought to understand which factors modulate the evolution of parasite virulence. Although theory has identified several of these modulators, their effect has seldom been analysed experimentally. We investigated the role of two such major factors-the mode of transmission, and host adaptation in response to parasite evolution-in the evolution of virulence of the plant virus Cucumber mosaic virus (CMV in its natural host Arabidopsis thaliana. To do so, we serially passaged three CMV strains under strict vertical and strict horizontal transmission, alternating both modes of transmission. We quantified seed (vertical transmission rate, virus accumulation, effect on plant growth and virulence of evolved and non-evolved viruses in the original plants and in plants derived after five passages of vertical transmission. Our results indicated that vertical passaging led to adaptation of the virus to greater vertical transmission, which was associated with reductions of virus accumulation and virulence. On the other hand, horizontal serial passages did not significantly modify virus accumulation and virulence. The observed increases in CMV seed transmission, and reductions in virus accumulation and virulence in vertically passaged viruses were due also to reciprocal host adaptation during vertical passages, which additionally reduced virulence and multiplication of vertically passaged viruses. This result is consistent with plant-virus co-evolution. Host adaptation to vertically passaged viruses was traded-off against reduced resistance to the non-evolved viruses. Thus, we provide evidence of the key role that the interplay between mode of transmission and host-parasite co-evolution has in determining the evolution of virulence.

  6. Vertical Transmission Selects for Reduced Virulence in a Plant Virus and for Increased Resistance in the Host

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pagán, Israel; Montes, Nuria; Milgroom, Michael G.; García-Arenal, Fernando

    2014-01-01

    For the last three decades, evolutionary biologists have sought to understand which factors modulate the evolution of parasite virulence. Although theory has identified several of these modulators, their effect has seldom been analysed experimentally. We investigated the role of two such major factors—the mode of transmission, and host adaptation in response to parasite evolution—in the evolution of virulence of the plant virus Cucumber mosaic virus (CMV) in its natural host Arabidopsis thaliana. To do so, we serially passaged three CMV strains under strict vertical and strict horizontal transmission, alternating both modes of transmission. We quantified seed (vertical) transmission rate, virus accumulation, effect on plant growth and virulence of evolved and non-evolved viruses in the original plants and in plants derived after five passages of vertical transmission. Our results indicated that vertical passaging led to adaptation of the virus to greater vertical transmission, which was associated with reductions of virus accumulation and virulence. On the other hand, horizontal serial passages did not significantly modify virus accumulation and virulence. The observed increases in CMV seed transmission, and reductions in virus accumulation and virulence in vertically passaged viruses were due also to reciprocal host adaptation during vertical passages, which additionally reduced virulence and multiplication of vertically passaged viruses. This result is consistent with plant-virus co-evolution. Host adaptation to vertically passaged viruses was traded-off against reduced resistance to the non-evolved viruses. Thus, we provide evidence of the key role that the interplay between mode of transmission and host-parasite co-evolution has in determining the evolution of virulence. PMID:25077948

  7. Inhibition of neuraminidase inhibitor-resistant influenza virus by DAS181, a novel sialidase fusion protein.

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    Gallen B Triana-Baltzer

    Full Text Available Antiviral drug resistance for influenza therapies remains a concern due to the high prevalence of H1N1 2009 seasonal influenza isolates which display H274Y associated oseltamivir-resistance. Furthermore, the emergence of novel H1N1 raises the potential that additional reassortments can occur, resulting in drug resistant virus. Thus, additional antiviral approaches are urgently needed. DAS181 (Fludase, a sialidase fusion protein, has been shown to have inhibitory activity against a large number of seasonal influenza strains and a highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI strain (H5N1. Here, we examine the in vitro activity of DAS181 against a panel of 2009 oseltamivir-resistant seasonal H1N1 clinical isolates. The activity of DAS181 against nine 2009, two 2007, and two 2004 clinical isolates of seasonal IFV H1N1 was examined using plaque number reduction assay on MDCK cells. DAS181 strongly inhibited all tested isolates. EC50 values remained constant against isolates from 2004, 2007, and 2009, suggesting that there was no change in DAS181 sensitivity over time. As expected, all 2007 and 2009 isolates were resistant to oseltamivir, consistent with the identification of the H274Y mutation in the NA gene of all these isolates. Interestingly, several of the 2007 and 2009 isolates also exhibited reduced sensitivity to zanamivir, and accompanying HA mutations near the sialic acid binding site were observed. DAS181 inhibits IFV that is resistant to NAIs. Thus, DAS181 may offer an alternative therapeutic option for seasonal or pandemic IFVs that become resistant to currently available antiviral drugs.

  8. Inverted-repeat transgenic maize plants resistant to sugarcane mosaic virus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    RNA silencing is a post-transcriptional genesilencing phenomenon induced by double-stranded RNA (dsRNA).In an attempt to generate dsRNA-mediated transgenic maize plants resistant to sugarcane mosaic virus (SCMV),we cloned SCMV Nib gene-specificsequences and inserted it into the binary vector p3301 in the sense and antisense orientations (named SCMVir-Nib),which could produce RNAs capable of duplex formation in plant cells.Maize immature embryos were co-cultured with Agrobacterium carrying two vectors,one marker-free vector harboring the SCMVirNIb and one vector harboring bar gene as the selective marker.Resistant calli were recovered by selection on medium containing Biolaphos.Among the regenerated plantlets from resistant calli,14 plants have been certified to contain SCMVirNIb by PCR amplification and DNA dot blot.T1 plants derived from the 14 plants were challenged in a greenhouse with SCMV inoculums and the percentages of resistant plants in 11 T1 lines were higher than 60%.One plant in the T1 line was found to carry SCMVirNIb without bar gene by PCR assay.T2 plants derived from T1 SCMV resistant transgenic plants were challenged with SCMV inoculums in field.The percentages of resistant plants from 3 lines,including the line derived from the marker-free transgenic plant,were higher than 85%.The non-transgenic control plants were all susceptible.Further molecular analysis confirmed that the resistant plants from the marker-free transgenic line contained SCMVirNIb but not the bar gene.

  9. Evolutionary analysis of tomato Sw-5 resistance-breaking isolates of Tomato spotted wilt virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López, Carmelo; Aramburu, José; Galipienso, Luis; Soler, Salvador; Nuez, Fernando; Rubio, Luis

    2011-01-01

    Tomato spotted wilt virus (TSWV) causes severe economic losses in many crops worldwide and often overcomes resistant cultivars used for disease control. Comparison of nucleotide and amino acid sequences suggested that tomato resistance conferred by the gene Sw-5 can be overcome by the amino acid substitution C to Y at position 118 (C118Y) or T120N in the TSWV movement protein, NSm. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that substitution C118Y has occurred independently three times in the studied isolates by convergent evolution, whereas the substitution T120N was a unique event. Analysis of rates of non-synonymous and synonymous changes at individual codons showed that substitution C118Y was positively selected.

  10. Hepatitis B virus mutations potentially conferring adefovir/ tenofovir resistance in treatment-naive patients

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Rebecca Pastor; Fran(c)ois Habersetzer; Samira Fafi-Kremer; Michel Doffo(e)l; Thomas F Baumert; Jean-Pierre Gut; Fran(c)oise Stoll-Keller; Evelyne Schvoerer

    2009-01-01

    Anti-hepatitis B virus (HBV) therapy leads to the emergence of mutant viral strains during the treatment of chronic hepatitis B with nucleos(t)ides analogues. The existence of HBV variants with primary antiviral resistance may be important for treatment choice. We studied two patients with chronic HBV infection by sequencing the HBV polymerase gene. They had adefovir- and tenofovir-related mutations in the viral polymerase, although they had never been treated. These mutations were rtV214A/rtN238T in one patient and rtA194T in the other. Thus, mutations in untreated patients deserve cautious surveillance. These data indicate that mutations that can theoretically confer adefovir or tenofovir resistance may emerge in treatmentnaive patients.

  11. Dynamic evolution of hepatitis C virus resistance-associated substitutions in the absence of antiviral treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eltahla, Auda A.; Leung, Preston; Pirozyan, Mehdi R.; Rodrigo, Chaturaka; Grebely, Jason; Applegate, Tanya; Maher, Lisa; Luciani, Fabio; Lloyd, Andrew R.; Bull, Rowena A.

    2017-01-01

    Resistance against new hepatitis C virus (HCV) antivirals is an area of increasing interest. Resistance-associated substitutions (RASs) have been identified in treatment-naïve individuals, but pressures driving treatment-independent RAS emergence are poorly understood. We analysed the longitudinal evolution of RASs in twelve participants with early acute HCV infections. Full-genome deep sequences were analysed for changes in RAS frequency within NS3, NS5A and NS5B-coding regions over the course of the infection. Emergence of RASs relevant only to the polymerase non-nucleoside inhibitors (NNI) was detected, and these lay within CD8+ T-cell epitopes. Conversely, the loss of NNI RASs over time appeared likely to be driven by viral fitness constraints. These results highlight the importance of monitoring CD8+ T cell epitope-associated RASs in populations with dominant HLA types. PMID:28139734

  12. Edge curling that has plagued scrolls for millenniums

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chou, Ming-Han; Shen, Wei-Chao; Wang, Yi-Ping; Hung, Sun-Hsin; Hong, Tzay-Ming; Department of Registration and Conservation, National Palace Museum Collaboration; Department of Physics, National Tsing Hua University Team

    2014-03-01

    Qi-Wa refers to the up curl on the lengths of handscrolls and hanging scrolls, which has troubled Chinese artisans and emperors for as long as the art of painting and calligraphy exists. This warp is unwelcome not only for aesthetic reasons, but its potential damage to the fiber and ink. Although it is generally treated as a part of the cockling and curling due to moisture, consistency of paste, and defects from the mounting procedures, we demonstrate that the spontaneous extrinsic curvature incurred from the storage is in fact more essential to understanding and curing Qi-Wa. In contrast to the former factors whose effects are less predictable, the plastic deformation and strain distribution on a membrane are a well-defined mechanical problem. We study this phenomenon by experiments, theoretical models, and Molecular Dynamics Simulation, and obtain consistent scaling relations for the Qi-Wa height. This knowledge enables us to propose modifications on the traditional mounting techniques, that are tested on real mounted paper to be effective at mitigating Qi-Wa. By experimenting on polymer-based films, we demonstrate possible relevance of our study to the modern development of flexible electronic paper.

  13. Curling Edges: A Problem that Has Plagued Scrolls for Millennia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chou, Ming-Han; Shen, Wei-Chao; Wang, Yi-Ping; Hung, Sun-Hsin; Hong, Tzay-Ming

    2014-01-01

    Qi-Wa refers to the up curl on the lengths of hand scrolls and hanging scrolls, which has troubled Chinese artisans and emperors for as long as the art of painting and calligraphy has existed. This warp is unwelcome not only for aesthetic reasons, but its potential damage to the fiber and ink. Although it is generally treated as a part of the cockling and curling due to moisture, consistency of paste, and defects from the mounting procedures, we demonstrate that the spontaneous extrinsic curvature incurred from the storage is in fact more essential to understanding and curing Qi-Wa. In contrast to the former factors whose effects are less predictable, the plastic deformation and strain distribution on a membrane are a well-defined mechanical problem. We study this phenomenon by experiments, theoretical models, and molecular dynamics simulation, and obtain consistent scaling relations for the Qi-Wa height. This knowledge enables us to propose modifications on the traditional mounting techniques that are tested on real mounted paper to be effective at mitigating Qi-Wa. By experimenting on polymer-based films, we demonstrate the possible relevance of our study to the modern development of flexible electronic paper.

  14. Steatosis and insulin resistance in hepatitis C: A way out for the virus?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    José A Del Campo; Manuel Romero-Gómez

    2009-01-01

    The hepatitis C virus (HCV) induces lipid accumulation in vitro and in vivo. The pathogenesis of steatosis is due to both viral and host factors. Viral steatosis is mostly reported in patients with genotype 3a, whereas metabolic steatosis is often associated with genotype 1 and metabolic syndrome. Several molecular mechanisms responsible for steatosis have been associated with the HCV core protein, which is able to induce gene expression and activity of sterol regulatory element binding protein 1 (SREBP1) and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ), increasing the transcription of genes involved in hepatic fatty acid synthesis. Steatosis has been also implicated in viral replication. In infected cells, HCV core protein is targeted to lipid droplets which serve as intracellular storage organelles. These studies have shown that lipid droplets are essential for virus assembly. Thus, HCV promotes steatosis as an efficient mechanism for stable viral replication. Chronic HCV infection can also induce insulin resistance. In patients with HCV, insulin resistance is more strongly associated with viral load than visceral obesity. HCV seems to lead to insulin resistance through interference of intracellular insulin signalling by HCV proteins, mainly, the serine phosphorylation of insulin receptor-1 (IRS-1) and impairment of the downstream Akt signalling pathway. The HCV core protein interferes with in vitro insulin signalling by genotype-specific mechanisms, where the role of suppressor of cytokine signal 7 (SOCS-7) in genotype 3a and mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) in genotype 1 in IRS-1 downregulation play key roles. Steatosis and insulin resistance have been associated with fibrosis progression and a reduced rate of sustained response to peginterferon plus ribavirin.

  15. Foliar symptoms recovery: developing scoring technique for assessment of soybean resistance to CPMMV (Cowpea Mild Mottle Virus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siti Zubaidah

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Soybean is a commodity that has an important role as the source of protein, but its production is affected by various factors including disease. CpMMV (Cowpea mild mottle virus is one of the most damaging viruses that cause soybean disease. CpMMVs belong to the group of Carlavirus that are transmitted by whitefly (Bemisia tabaci. The use of CpMMV resistant plants as biological control can prevent viral diseases. Indonesia has many soybean germplasm from many regions and introduction from other countries that need to be evaluated for CpMMV. The assessment technique for soybean resistance to CpMMV is not available yet, but it is still based on other virus diseases. The specific assessment of plant resistance is important because some diseases can cause certain symptoms, depends on the resistance and the kinds of plants that are infected. This paper presents the assessment technique for soybean resistance to CpMMV infection, which can be used for various purposes and studies. One of the benefits is to find out soybean resistance to CpMMV or other objectives. This resistance assessment is not only based on leaves symptoms, but also based on the phenomenon of foliar symptoms recovery. Keywords: CpMMV, foliar symptoms recovery, scoring technique, soybean resistance.

  16. Barley yellow mosaic virus is overcoming RYM4 resistance in Belgium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaïanopoulos, C; Legreve, A; Moreau, V; Steyer, S; Maraite, H; Bragard, C

    2007-01-01

    Barley yellow mosaic virus (BaYMV) is the causal agent of a soil-borne systemic mosaic disease on barley. It has been reported in Belgium since the 1980s. The control of this disease is managed almost exclusively through the use of resistant varieties. The resistance of most commercial barley cultivars grown in Europe is conferred mainly by a single recessive gene, rym4. This monogenic resistance provides immunity against BaYMV pathotype 1 and has been mapped on barley chromosome 3HL and shown to be caused by mutations in the translation initiation factor eIF4E. Another pathotype, BaYMV pathotype 2, which appeared in the late 1980s (in Belgium, in the early 1990s), is able to overcome the rym4-controlled resistance. Until recently, this pathotype remained confined to specific locations. During a systematic survey in 2003, mosaic symptoms were observed only on susceptible barley cultivars collected in Belgian fields. BaYMV was detected by ELISA and RT-PCR on the susceptible cultivars and only by RT-PCR on the resistant cultivars. In 2004, mosaic symptoms were observed on susceptible and resistant cultivars. BaYMV was detected by ELISA and RT-PCR on both cultivars. In addition to developing RT-PCR methods for detecting and identifying BaYMV and Barley mild mosaic virus (BaMMV), an RT-PCR targeting the VPg/NIa viral protein part of the genome, known to discriminate the two BaYMV pathotypes, was set up to accurately identify the pathotype(s) now present in Belgium. The sequences from the generated amplicons revealed the single nucleotide substitution resulting in an amino acid change from lysine to asparagine specific to BaYMV pathotype 2. The possible reasons for the change in the BaYMV pathotype situation in Belgium, such as climatic change or a progressive build-up of soil inoculum potential, will be discussed, as well as the use of eIF4E-based resistance.

  17. Molecular mechanisms of serum resistance of human influenza H3N2 virus and their involvement in virus adaptation in a new host.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matrosovich, M; Gao, P; Kawaoka, Y

    1998-08-01

    H3N2 human influenza viruses that are resistant to horse, pig, or rabbit serum possess unique amino acid mutations in their hemagglutinin (HA) protein. To determine the molecular mechanisms of this resistance, we characterized the receptor-binding properties of these mutants by measuring their affinity for total serum protein inhibitors and for soluble receptor analogs. Pig serum-resistant variants displayed a markedly decreased affinity for total pig serum sialylglycoproteins (which contain predominantly 2-6 linkage between sialic acid and galactose residues) and for the sialyloligosaccharide 6'-sialyl(N-acetyllactosamine). These properties correlated with the substitution 186S-->I in HA1. The major inhibitory activity in rabbit serum was found to be a beta inhibitor with characteristics of mannose-binding lectins. Rabbit serum-resistant variants exhibited decreased sensitivity to this inhibitor due to the loss of a glycosylation sequon at positions 246 to 248 of the HA. In addition to a somewhat reduced affinity for 6'-sialyl(N-acetyllactosamine)-containing receptors, horse serum-resistant variants lost the ability to bind the viral neuraminidase-resistant 4-O-acetylated sialic acid moieties of equine alpha2-macroglobulin because of the mutation 145N-->K/D in their HA1. These results indicate that influenza viruses become resistant to serum inhibitors because their affinity for these inhibitors is reduced. To determine whether natural inhibitors play a role in viral evolution during interspecies transmission, we compared the receptor-binding properties of H3N8 avian and equine viruses, including two strains isolated during the 1989 to 1990 equine influenza outbreak, which was caused by an avian virus in China. Avian strains bound 4-O-acetylated sialic acid residues of equine alpha2-macroglobulin, whereas equine strains did not. The earliest avian-like isolate from a horse influenza outbreak bound to this sialic acid with an affinity similar to that of avian

  18. Symbionts commonly provide broad spectrum resistance to viruses in insects: a comparative analysis of Wolbachia strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez, Julien; Longdon, Ben; Bauer, Simone; Chan, Yuk-Sang; Miller, Wolfgang J; Bourtzis, Kostas; Teixeira, Luis; Jiggins, Francis M

    2014-09-01

    In the last decade, bacterial symbionts have been shown to play an important role in protecting hosts against pathogens. Wolbachia, a widespread symbiont in arthropods, can protect Drosophila and mosquito species against viral infections. We have investigated antiviral protection in 19 Wolbachia strains originating from 16 Drosophila species after transfer into the same genotype of Drosophila simulans. We found that approximately half of the strains protected against two RNA viruses. Given that 40% of terrestrial arthropod species are estimated to harbour Wolbachia, as many as a fifth of all arthropods species may benefit from Wolbachia-mediated protection. The level of protection against two distantly related RNA viruses--DCV and FHV--was strongly genetically correlated, which suggests that there is a single mechanism of protection with broad specificity. Furthermore, Wolbachia is making flies resistant to viruses, as increases in survival can be largely explained by reductions in viral titer. Variation in the level of antiviral protection provided by different Wolbachia strains is strongly genetically correlated to the density of the bacteria strains in host tissues. We found no support for two previously proposed mechanisms of Wolbachia-mediated protection--activation of the immune system and upregulation of the methyltransferase Dnmt2. The large variation in Wolbachia's antiviral properties highlights the need to carefully select Wolbachia strains introduced into mosquito populations to prevent the transmission of arboviruses.

  19. Cellular factors promoting resistance to effective treatment of glioma with oncolytic myxoma virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zemp, Franz J; McKenzie, Brienne A; Lun, Xueqing; Reilly, Karlyne M; McFadden, Grant; Yong, V Wee; Forsyth, Peter A

    2014-12-15

    Oncolytic virus therapy is being evaluated in clinical trials for human glioma. While it is widely assumed that the immune response of the patient to the virus infection limits the utility of the therapy, investigations into the specific cell type(s) involved in this response have been performed using nonspecific pharmacologic inhibitors or allogeneic models with compromised immunity. To identify the immune cells that participate in clearing an oncolytic infection in glioma, we used flow cytometry and immunohistochemistry to immunophenotype an orthotopic glioma model in immunocompetent mice after Myxoma virus (MYXV) administration. These studies revealed a large resident microglia and macrophage population in untreated tumors, and robust monocyte, T-, and NK cell infiltration 3 days after MYXV infection. To determine the role on the clinical utility of MYXV therapy for glioma, we used a combination of knockout mouse strains and specific immunocyte ablation techniques. Collectively, our experiments identify an important role for tumor-resident myeloid cells and overlapping roles for recruited NK and T cells in the clearance and efficacy of oncolytic MYXV from gliomas. Using a cyclophosphamide regimen to achieve lymphoablation prior and during MYXV treatment, we prevented treatment-induced peripheral immunocyte recruitment and, surprisingly, largely ablated the tumor-resident macrophage population. Virotherapy of cyclophosphamide-treated animals resulted in sustained viral infection within the glioma as well as a substantial survival advantage. This study demonstrates that resistance to MYXV virotherapy in syngeneic glioma models involves a multifaceted cellular immune response that can be overcome with cyclophosphamide-mediated lymphoablation.

  20. Symbionts commonly provide broad spectrum resistance to viruses in insects: a comparative analysis of Wolbachia strains.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julien Martinez

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available In the last decade, bacterial symbionts have been shown to play an important role in protecting hosts against pathogens. Wolbachia, a widespread symbiont in arthropods, can protect Drosophila and mosquito species against viral infections. We have investigated antiviral protection in 19 Wolbachia strains originating from 16 Drosophila species after transfer into the same genotype of Drosophila simulans. We found that approximately half of the strains protected against two RNA viruses. Given that 40% of terrestrial arthropod species are estimated to harbour Wolbachia, as many as a fifth of all arthropods species may benefit from Wolbachia-mediated protection. The level of protection against two distantly related RNA viruses--DCV and FHV--was strongly genetically correlated, which suggests that there is a single mechanism of protection with broad specificity. Furthermore, Wolbachia is making flies resistant to viruses, as increases in survival can be largely explained by reductions in viral titer. Variation in the level of antiviral protection provided by different Wolbachia strains is strongly genetically correlated to the density of the bacteria strains in host tissues. We found no support for two previously proposed mechanisms of Wolbachia-mediated protection--activation of the immune system and upregulation of the methyltransferase Dnmt2. The large variation in Wolbachia's antiviral properties highlights the need to carefully select Wolbachia strains introduced into mosquito populations to prevent the transmission of arboviruses.

  1. Stability and loss of a virus resistance phenotype over time in transgenic mosquitoes harbouring an antiviral effector gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franz, A W E; Sanchez-Vargas, I; Piper, J; Smith, M R; Khoo, C C H; James, A A; Olson, K E

    2009-10-01

    Transgenic Aedes aegypti were engineered to express a virus-derived, inverted repeat (IR) RNA in the mosquito midgut to trigger RNA interference (RNAi) and generate resistance to dengue virus type 2 (DENV2) in the vector. Here we characterize genotypic and phenotypic stabilities of one line, Carb77, between generations G(9) and G(17). The anti-DENV2 transgene was integrated at a single site within a noncoding region of the mosquito genome. The virus resistance phenotype was strong until G(13) and suppressed replication of different DENV2 genotypes. From G(14)-G(17) the resistance phenotype to DENV2 became weaker and eventually was lost. Although the sequence of the transgene was not mutated, expression of the IR effector RNA was not detected and the Carb77 G(17) mosquitoes lost their ability to silence the DENV2 genome.

  2. Cotton Leaf Curl Multan Betasatellite DNA as a Tool to Deliver and Express the Human B-Cell Lymphoma 2 (Bcl-2) Gene in Plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kharazmi, Sara; Ataie Kachoie, Elham; Behjatnia, Seyed Ali Akbar

    2016-05-01

    The betasatellite DNA associated with Cotton leaf curl Multan virus (CLCuMB) contains a single complementary-sense ORF, βC1, which is a pathogenicity determinant. CLCuMB was able to replicate in plants in the presence of diverse helper geminiviruses, including Tomato leaf curl virus-Australia (TLCV-Au), Iranian isolate of Tomato yellow leaf curl virus (TYLCV-[Ab]), and Beet curly top virus (BCTV-Svr), and can be used as a plant gene delivery vector. To test the hypothesis that CLCuMB has the potential to act as an animal gene delivery vector, a specific insertion construct was produced by the introduction of a human B-cell lymphoma 2 (Bcl-2) cDNA into a mutant DNA of CLCuMB in which the βC1 was deleted (β∆C1). The recombinant βΔC1-Bcl-2 construct was successfully replicated in tomato and tobacco plants in the presence of TLCV-Au, BCTV-Svr and TYLCV-[Ab]. Real-time PCR and Western blot analyses of plants containing the replicative forms of recombinant βΔC1-Bcl-2 DNA showed that Bcl-2 gene was expressed in an acceptable level in these plants, indicating that β∆C1 can be used as a tool to deliver and express animal genes in plants. This CLCuMB-based system, having its own promoter activity, offers the possibility of production of animal recombinant proteins in plants.

  3. Transcriptome Analysis of Capsicum Chlorosis Virus-Induced Hypersensitive Resistance Response in Bell Capsicum.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shirani M K Widana Gamage

    Full Text Available Capsicum chlorosis virus (CaCV is an emerging pathogen of capsicum, tomato and peanut crops in Australia and South-East Asia. Commercial capsicum cultivars with CaCV resistance are not yet available, but CaCV resistance identified in Capsicum chinense is being introgressed into commercial Bell capsicum. However, our knowledge of the molecular mechanisms leading to the resistance response to CaCV infection is limited. Therefore, transcriptome and expression profiling data provide an important resource to better understand CaCV resistance mechanisms.We assembled capsicum transcriptomes and analysed gene expression using Illumina HiSeq platform combined with a tag-based digital gene expression system. Total RNA extracted from CaCV/mock inoculated CaCV resistant (R and susceptible (S capsicum at the time point when R line showed a strong hypersensitive response to CaCV infection was used in transcriptome assembly. Gene expression profiles of R and S capsicum in CaCV- and buffer-inoculated conditions were compared. None of the genes were differentially expressed (DE between R and S cultivars when mock-inoculated, while 2484 genes were DE when inoculated with CaCV. Functional classification revealed that the most highly up-regulated DE genes in R capsicum included pathogenesis-related genes, cell death-associated genes, genes associated with hormone-mediated signalling pathways and genes encoding enzymes involved in synthesis of defense-related secondary metabolites. We selected 15 genes to confirm DE expression levels by real-time quantitative PCR.DE transcript profiling data provided comprehensive gene expression information to gain an understanding of the underlying CaCV resistance mechanisms. Further, we identified candidate CaCV resistance genes in the CaCV-resistant C. annuum x C. chinense breeding line. This knowledge will be useful in future for fine mapping of the CaCV resistance locus and potential genetic engineering of resistance into Ca

  4. Contact transmission of influenza virus between ferrets imposes a looser bottleneck than respiratory droplet transmission allowing propagation of antiviral resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frise, Rebecca; Bradley, Konrad; van Doremalen, Neeltje; Galiano, Monica; Elderfield, Ruth A.; Stilwell, Peter; Ashcroft, Jonathan W.; Fernandez-Alonso, Mirian; Miah, Shahjahan; Lackenby, Angie; Roberts, Kim L.; Donnelly, Christl A.; Barclay, Wendy S.

    2016-01-01

    Influenza viruses cause annual seasonal epidemics and occasional pandemics. It is important to elucidate the stringency of bottlenecks during transmission to shed light on mechanisms that underlie the evolution and propagation of antigenic drift, host range switching or drug resistance. The virus spreads between people by different routes, including through the air in droplets and aerosols, and by direct contact. By housing ferrets under different conditions, it is possible to mimic various routes of transmission. Here, we inoculated donor animals with a mixture of two viruses whose genomes differed by one or two reverse engineered synonymous mutations, and measured the transmission of the mixture to exposed sentinel animals. Transmission through the air imposed a tight bottleneck since most recipient animals became infected by only one virus. In contrast, a direct contact transmission chain propagated a mixture of viruses suggesting the dose transferred by this route was higher. From animals with a mixed infection of viruses that were resistant and sensitive to the antiviral drug oseltamivir, resistance was propagated through contact transmission but not by air. These data imply that transmission events with a looser bottleneck can propagate minority variants and may be an important route for influenza evolution. PMID:27430528

  5. Trichoderma harzianum T-22 induces systemic resistance in tomato infected by Cucumber mosaic virus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonella Vitti

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Understanding the induction of plant defenses against viruses using biocontrol agents is essential for developing new strategies against these pathogens, given the ineffectiveness of chemical treatments. The ability of Trichoderma harzianum, strain T-22 (T22 to control Cucumber mosaic virus (CMV in Solanum lycopersicum var. cerasiforme plants and the changes in the physiology of tomato treated/infected with T22/CMV were examined. Plant growth-promoting effects, photosynthetic performance, reactive oxygen species (ROS scavenging enzymes, and phytohormones were investigated. T22 improved tomato growth in terms of plant height and improved photosynthesis, total chlorophyll content and plant gas exchange. In contrast, CMV induced a negative effect on dry matter accumulation and inhibited the photosynthetic capacity. The analysis of plant hormones demonstrated that treating with T22 before or simultaneously to CMV infection, led to a systemic resistance by jasmonic acid/ethylene and salicylic acid signaling pathways. Conversely, systemic resistance was abscissic acid-dependent when T22 treatment was administered after the CMV infection. In conclusion, the data reported here indicate that the T22-based strategy may be the most effective measure against CMV.

  6. Trichoderma harzianum T-22 Induces Systemic Resistance in Tomato Infected by Cucumber mosaic virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vitti, Antonella; Pellegrini, Elisa; Nali, Cristina; Lovelli, Stella; Sofo, Adriano; Valerio, Maria; Scopa, Antonio; Nuzzaci, Maria

    2016-01-01

    Understanding the induction of plant defenses against viruses using biocontrol agents is essential for developing new strategies against these pathogens, given the ineffectiveness of chemical treatments. The ability of Trichoderma harzianum, strain T-22 (T22) to control Cucumber mosaic virus (CMV) in Solanum lycopersicum var. cerasiforme plants and the changes in the physiology of tomato treated/infected with T22/CMV were examined. Plant growth-promoting effects, photosynthetic performance, reactive oxygen species scavenging enzymes, and phytohormones were investigated. T22 improved tomato growth in terms of plant height and improved photosynthesis, total chlorophyll content and plant gas exchange. In contrast, CMV induced a negative effect on dry matter accumulation and inhibited the photosynthetic capacity. The analysis of plant hormones demonstrated that treating with T22 before or simultaneously to CMV infection, led to a systemic resistance by jasmonic acid/ethylene and salicylic acid signaling pathways. Conversely, systemic resistance was abscissic acid-dependent when T22 treatment was administered after the CMV infection. In conclusion, the data reported here indicate that the T22-based strategy may be the most effective measure against CMV.

  7. Allergenicity assessment of genetically modified cucumber mosaic virus (CMV) resistant tomato (Solanum lycopersicon).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Chih-Hui; Sheu, Fuu; Lin, Hsin-Tang; Pan, Tzu-Ming

    2010-02-24

    Cucumber mosaic virus (CMV) has been identified as the causal agent of several disease epidemics in most countries of the world. Insect-mediated virus diseases, such as those caused by CMV, caused remarkable loss of tomato (Solanum lycopersicon) production in Taiwan. With expression of the CMV coat protein gene (Cmvcp) in a local popular tomato cultivar L4783, transgenic tomato line R8 has showed consistent CMV resistance through T(0) to T(8). In this report, the allergenicity of the CMV coat protein (CMV cp) expressed in transgenic tomato R8 was assessed by investigation of the expression of the transgene source of protein, sequence similarity with known allergens, and resistance to pepsin hydrolysis. There is no known account for either the CMV or its coat protein being an allergen. The result of a bioinformatic search also showed no significant homology between CMV cp and any known allergen. The pepsin-susceptible property of recombinant CMV cp was revealed by a simulated gastric fluid (SGF) assay. Following the most recent FAO/WHO decision tree, all results have indicated that CMV cp was a protein with low possibility to be an allergen and the transgenic tomato R8 should be considered as safe as its host.

  8. RNAi-mediated resistance to Cassava brown streak Uganda virus in transgenic cassava.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yadav, Jitender S; Ogwok, Emmanuel; Wagaba, Henry; Patil, Basavaprabhu L; Bagewadi, Basavaraj; Alicai, Titus; Gaitan-Solis, Eliana; Taylor, Nigel J; Fauquet, Claude M

    2011-09-01

    Cassava brown streak disease (CBSD), caused by Cassava brown streak Uganda virus (CBSUV) and Cassava brown streak virus (CBSV), is of new epidemic importance to cassava (Manihot esculenta Crantz) production in East Africa, and an emerging threat to the crop in Central and West Africa. This study demonstrates that at least one of these two ipomoviruses, CBSUV, can be efficiently controlled using RNA interference (RNAi) technology in cassava. An RNAi construct targeting the near full-length coat protein (FL-CP) of CBSUV was expressed constitutively as a hairpin construct in cassava. Transgenic cassava lines expressing small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) against this sequence showed 100% resistance to CBSUV across replicated graft inoculation experiments. Reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) analysis showed the presence of CBSUV in leaves and some tuberous roots from challenged controls, but not in the same tissues from transgenic plants. This is the first demonstration of RNAi-mediated resistance to the ipomovirus CBSUV in cassava.

  9. Screening of Chinese Herbal Medicines Resistant to Chicken Escherichia coli and Infectious Laryngotracheitis Virus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2012-01-01

    [Objective] This study aimed to screen Chinese herbal medicines resistant to Chicken Escherichia coli and infectious laryngotracheitis virus. [Methed] Conven- tional punch method, test tube method and plate dilution method were adopted for in vitro susceptibility test of chicken E, coil strains O5 and O8 using 13 kinds of Chi- nese herbal medicines including Sanguisorba officinalis, Coptis chinensis, Anemar- rhena asphodeloides, Strobilanthes cusia, Agastache rugosa, etc.; chicken embryo inoculation experiment was adopted to screen Chinese herbal medicines resistant to chicken infectious laryngotracheitis virus. [Result] Sanguisorba officinalis, Fructus mume, Rheum officinale, Coptis chinensis, Herba Taraxaci, Anemarrhena asphode- Ioides, Scutellaria baicalensis and Rhizoma Fagopyri Cymosi had ideal antibacterial effect against chicken E. coil strain O5; Sanguisorba officinalis, Fructus mume, Rheum officinale, Coptis chinensis, Herba taraxaci and Rhizoma Fagopyri Cymosi had ideal antibacterial effect against chicken E. coil strain 08; other Chinese herbal medicines showed relatively poor or no antibacterial effect. Results of chicken embryo inoculation experiment showed that nine kinds of Chinese herbal medicines showed relatively strong anti-lLTV effect, including Forsythia suspensa, Radix Isatidis, Fofium isatidis, Flos Ionicerae, Radix codonopsis, Radix astragali, Atractylodes, Radix gly- cyrrhizae, and Pericarpium granati. [Conclusion] The study laid the foundation for fur- ther development of Chinese herbal compound preparations to treat chicken cofibacil- Iosis, infectious laryngotracheitis and other bacterial, viral diseases.

  10. Trichoderma harzianum T-22 Induces Systemic Resistance in Tomato Infected by Cucumber mosaic virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vitti, Antonella; Pellegrini, Elisa; Nali, Cristina; Lovelli, Stella; Sofo, Adriano; Valerio, Maria; Scopa, Antonio; Nuzzaci, Maria

    2016-01-01

    Understanding the induction of plant defenses against viruses using biocontrol agents is essential for developing new strategies against these pathogens, given the ineffectiveness of chemical treatments. The ability of Trichoderma harzianum, strain T-22 (T22) to control Cucumber mosaic virus (CMV) in Solanum lycopersicum var. cerasiforme plants and the changes in the physiology of tomato treated/infected with T22/CMV were examined. Plant growth-promoting effects, photosynthetic performance, reactive oxygen species scavenging enzymes, and phytohormones were investigated. T22 improved tomato growth in terms of plant height and improved photosynthesis, total chlorophyll content and plant gas exchange. In contrast, CMV induced a negative effect on dry matter accumulation and inhibited the photosynthetic capacity. The analysis of plant hormones demonstrated that treating with T22 before or simultaneously to CMV infection, led to a systemic resistance by jasmonic acid/ethylene and salicylic acid signaling pathways. Conversely, systemic resistance was abscissic acid-dependent when T22 treatment was administered after the CMV infection. In conclusion, the data reported here indicate that the T22-based strategy may be the most effective measure against CMV. PMID:27777581

  11. The compatibility of a nucleopolyhedrosis virus control with resistance management for Bacillus thuringiensis: co-infection and cross-resistance studies with the diamondback moth, Plutella xylostella.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raymond, B; Sayyed, A H; Wright, D J

    2006-10-01

    The use of genetically modified crops expressing Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) toxins can lead to the reduction in application of broad-spectrum pesticides and an increased opportunity for supplementary biological control. Bt microbial sprays are also used by organic growers or as part of integrated pest management programs that rely on the use of natural enemies. In both applications the evolution of resistance to Bt toxins is a potential problem. Natural enemies (pathogens or insects) acting in combination with toxins can accelerate or decelerate the evolution of resistance to Bt. In the present study we investigated whether the use of a nucleopolyhedrovirus (AcMNPV) could potentially affect the evolution of resistance to the Bt toxin Cry1Ac in Plutella xylostella. At low toxin doses there was evidence for antagonistic interactions between AcMNPV and Cry1Ac resistant and susceptible insects. However, this antagonism was much stronger and more widespread for susceptible larvae; interactions were generally not distinguishable from additive for resistant larvae. Selection for resistance to Cry1Ac in two populations of P. xylostella with differing resistance mechanisms did not produce any correlated changes in resistance to AcMNPV. Stronger antagonistic interactions between Bt and AcMNPV on susceptible rather than resistant larvae can decrease the relative fitness between Bt-resistant and susceptible larvae. These interactions and the lack of cross-resistance between virus and toxin suggest that the use of NPV is compatible with resistance management to Bt products.

  12. Lamivudine resistance mutations in patients infected with hepatitis B virus genotype D

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Orhan Y(l)ld(l)z; Bilgehan Aygen; Nese Demirtürk; Tuna Demirdal; Dilara Inan; Taner Y(l)ld(l)rmak; Arzu Kantürk; Ediz Tütüncü

    2011-01-01

    AIM: To determine the distribution of viral genotypes for primary or acquired lamivudine resistance. METHODS: A total of 283 patients with chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection (245 patients with chronic hepatitis B and 38 inactive hepatitis B surface antigen carriers) were included in the study. The HBV genotype was determined by using quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction and sequence analysis, and tyrosine-methionine-aspartate-aspartate (YMDD) motif mutations were determined using the reverse transcriptase hybridization method. RESULTS: Lamivudine resistance was determined in a total of 25 (10.7%) chronic hepatitis B patients. Eight subjects (4%) had primary resistance to lamivudine, and 17 (53.1%) had secondary resistance to lamivudine. Genotype D, which was isolated from 267 of the patients with chronic HBV infection, was the dominant genotype in Turkey.CONCLUSION: Identification of YMDD motif mutations should have a positive impact on the selection of proper antiviral medication for patients, even for those who are nucleoside na(i)ve.

  13. Screening white spot syndrome virus (WSSV)-resistant molecular markers from Fenneropenaeus chinensis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yingying; Meng, Xianhong; Kong, Jie; Luan, Sheng; Luo, Kun; Wang, Qingyin; Zheng, Yongyun

    2017-02-01

    White spot syndrome virus (WSSV)-resistant molecular markers were screened from the selectively bred new variety `Huanghai No. 2' of Fenneropenaeus chinensis using unlabeled-probe high-resolution melting (HRM) technique. After the artificial infection with WSSV, the first 96 dead shrimps and the last 96 surviving shrimps were collected, representing WSSV-susceptible and -resistant populations, respectively. The genotypes at well-developed 39 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) loci were obtained. As revealed in the Chi-square test, 3 SNPs, genotype A/A of contig C364-89AT, genotype A/A of C2635-527CA and genotype C/T of contig C12355-592CT, were positively correlated with disease-resistance traits. Other 2 SNPs, genotype G/G of contig C283-145AG and genotype C/C of contig C12355-592CT, were negatively correlated. Moreover, analysis with BlastX program for disease-resistant SNPs indicated that 3 contigs, Contig283, Contig364 and Contig12355, matched to the functional genes of effector caspase of Penaeus monodon, peptide transporter family 1-like protein, and 40S ribosomal protein S2 of Perca flavescens with high sequence similarity. The results will be helpful to provide theoretical and technical supports for molecular marker-assisted selective breeding of F. chinensis.

  14. Diabetes mellitus, insulin resistance and hepatitis C virus infection: A contemporary review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desbois, Anne-Claire; Cacoub, Patrice

    2017-01-01

    AIM To summarise the literature data on hepatitis C virus (HCV)-infected patients concerning the prevalence of glucose abnormalities and associated risk. METHODS We conducted a PubMed search and selected all studies found with the key words "HCV" or "hepatitis C virus" and "diabetes" or "insulin resistance". We included only comparative studies written in English or in French, published from January 2000 to April 2015. We collected the literature data on HCV-infected patients concerning the prevalence of glucose abnormalities [diabetes mellitus (DM) and insulin resistance (IR)] and associated risk [i.e., severe liver fibrosis, response to antivirals, and the occurrence of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC)]. RESULTS HCV infection is significantly associated with DM/IR compared with healthy volunteers and patients with hepatitis B virus infection. Glucose abnormalities were associated with advanced liver fibrosis, lack of sustained virologic response to interferon alfa-based treatment and with a higher risk of HCC development. As new antiviral therapies may offer a cure for HCV infection, such data should be taken into account, from a therapeutic and preventive point of view, for liver and non-liver consequences of HCV disease. The efficacy of antidiabetic treatment in improving the response to antiviral treatment and in decreasing the risk of HCC has been reported by some studies but not by others. Thus, the effects of glucose abnormalities correction in reducing liver events need further studies. CONCLUSION Glucose abnormalities are strongly associated with HCV infection and show a negative impact on the main liver related outcomes.

  15. Hepatitis C virus RNA elimination and development of resistance in replicon cells treated with BMS-790052.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chunfu; Huang, Haichang; Valera, Lourdes; Sun, Jin-Hua; O'Boyle, Donald R; Nower, Peter T; Jia, Lingling; Qiu, Dike; Huang, Xin; Altaf, Aneela; Gao, Min; Fridell, Robert A

    2012-03-01

    BMS-790052, a first-in-class hepatitis C virus (HCV) replication complex inhibitor, targeting nonstructural protein 5A (NS5A), displays picomolar to nanomolar potency against genotypes 1 to 5. This exceptional potency translated into robust anti-HCV activity in clinical studies with HCV genotype 1-infected subjects. To date, all BMS-790052-associated resistance mutations have mapped to the N-terminal region of NS5A. To further characterize the antiviral activity of BMS-790052, HCV replicon elimination and colony formation assays were performed. Replicon was cleared from genotype 1a and 1b replicon cells in a time- and dose-dependent manner. Elimination of the genotype 1a replicon required longer treatment durations and higher concentrations of BMS-790052 than those for the genotype1b replicon. Single amino acid substitutions that conferred relatively low levels of resistance were observed at early time points and at low doses. Higher doses and longer treatment durations yielded mutations that conferred greater levels of resistance, including linked amino acid substitutions. Replicon cells that survived inhibitor treatment remained fully sensitivity to pegylated alpha interferon (pegIFN-α) and other HCV inhibitors. Moreover, genotype 1a replicon elimination was markedly enhanced when pegIFN-α and BMS-790052 were combined. Resistant variants observed in this study were very similar to those observed in a multiple ascending dose (MAD) monotherapy trial of BMS-790052, validating replicon elimination studies as a model to predict clinical resistance. Insights gained from the in vitro anti-HCV activity and resistance profiles of BMS-790052 will be used to help guide the clinical development of this novel HCV inhibitor.

  16. Genetic variation underlying resistance to infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus in a steelhead trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) population

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brieuc, Marine S. O.; Purcell, Maureen K.; Palmer, Alexander D.; Naish, Kerry A.

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the mechanisms of host resistance to pathogens will allow insights into the response of wild populations to the emergence of new pathogens. Infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus (IHNV) is endemic to the Pacific Northwest and infectious to Pacific salmon and trout (Oncorhynchus spp.). Emergence of the M genogroup of IHNV in steelhead trout O. mykiss in the coastal streams of Washington State, between 2007 and 2011, was geographically heterogeneous. Differences in host resistance due to genetic change were hypothesized to be a factor influencing the IHNV emergence patterns. For example, juvenile steelhead trout losses at the Quinault National Fish Hatchery (QNFH) were much lower than those at a nearby facility that cultures a stock originally derived from the same source population. Using a classical quantitative genetic approach, we determined the potential for the QNFH steelhead trout population to respond to selection caused by the pathogen, by estimating the heritability for 2 traits indicative of IHNV resistance, mortality (h2 = 0.377 (0.226 - 0.550)) and days to death (h2 = 0.093 (0.018 - 0.203)). These results confirm that there is a genetic basis for resistance and that this population has the potential to adapt to IHNV. Additionally, genetic correlation between days to death and fish length suggests a correlated response in these traits to selection. Reduction of genetic variation, as well as the presence or absence of resistant alleles, could affect the ability of populations to adapt to the pathogen. Identification of the genetic basis for IHNV resistance could allow the assessment of the susceptibility of other steelhead populations.

  17. Genetic variation underlying resistance to infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus in a steelhead trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brieuc, Marine S O; Purcell, Maureen K; Palmer, Alexander D; Naish, Kerry A

    2015-11-17

    Understanding the mechanisms of host resistance to pathogens will allow insights into the response of wild populations to the emergence of new pathogens. Infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus (IHNV) is endemic to the Pacific Northwest and infectious to Pacific salmon and trout (Oncorhynchus spp.). Emergence of the M genogroup of IHNV in steelhead trout O. mykiss in the coastal streams of Washington State, between 2007 and 2011, was geographically heterogeneous. Differences in host resistance due to genetic change were hypothesized to be a factor influencing the IHNV emergence patterns. For example, juvenile steelhead trout losses at the Quinault National Fish Hatchery (QNFH) were much lower than those at a nearby facility that cultures a stock originally derived from the same source population. Using a classical quantitative genetic approach, we determined the potential for the QNFH steelhead trout population to respond to selection caused by the pathogen, by estimating the heritability for 2 traits indicative of IHNV resistance, mortality (h² = 0.377 (0.226 - 0.550)) and days to death (h² = 0.093 (0.018 - 0.203)). These results confirm that there is a genetic basis for resistance and that this population has the potential to adapt to IHNV. Additionally, genetic correlation between days to death and fish length suggests a correlated response in these traits to selection. Reduction of genetic variation, as well as the presence or absence of resistant alleles, could affect the ability of populations to adapt to the pathogen. Identification of the genetic basis for IHNV resistance could allow the assessment of the susceptibility of other steelhead populations.

  18. Barriers to Infection of Human Cells by Feline Leukemia Virus: Insights into Resistance to Zoonosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terry, Anne; Kilbey, Anna; Naseer, Asif; Levy, Laura S.; Ahmad, Shamim; Watts, Ciorsdaidh; Mackay, Nancy; Cameron, Ewan; Wilson, Sam

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The human genome displays a rich fossil record of past gammaretrovirus infections, yet no current epidemic is evident, despite environmental exposure to viruses that infect human cells in vitro. Feline leukemia viruses (FeLVs) rank high on this list, but neither domestic nor workplace exposure has been associated with detectable serological responses. Nonspecific inactivation of gammaretroviruses by serum factors appears insufficient to explain these observations. To investigate further, we explored the susceptibilities of primary and established human cell lines to FeLV-B, the most likely zoonotic variant. Fully permissive infection was common in cancer-derived cell lines but was also a feature of nontransformed keratinocytes and lung fibroblasts. Cells of hematopoietic origin were generally less permissive and formed discrete groups on the basis of high or low intracellular protein expression and virion release. Potent repression was observed in primary human blood mononuclear cells and a subset of leukemia cell lines. However, the early steps of reverse transcription and integration appear to be unimpaired in nonpermissive cells. FeLV-B was subject to G→A hypermutation with a predominant APOBEC3G signature in partially permissive cells but was not mutated in permissive cells or in nonpermissive cells that block secondary viral spread. Distinct cellular barriers that protect primary human blood cells are likely to be important in protection against zoonotic infection with FeLV. IMPORTANCE Domestic exposure to gammaretroviruses such as feline leukemia viruses (FeLVs) occurs worldwide, but the basis of human resistance to infection remains incompletely understood. The potential threat is evident from the human genome sequence, which reveals many past epidemics of gammaretrovirus infection, and from recent cross-species jumps of gammaretroviruses from rodents to primates and marsupials. This study examined resistance to infection at the cellular level

  19. Barriers to Infection of Human Cells by Feline Leukemia Virus: Insights into Resistance to Zoonosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terry, Anne; Kilbey, Anna; Naseer, Asif; Levy, Laura S; Ahmad, Shamim; Watts, Ciorsdaidh; Mackay, Nancy; Cameron, Ewan; Wilson, Sam; Neil, James C

    2017-03-01

    The human genome displays a rich fossil record of past gammaretrovirus infections, yet no current epidemic is evident, despite environmental exposure to viruses that infect human cells in vitro Feline leukemia viruses (FeLVs) rank high on this list, but neither domestic nor workplace exposure has been associated with detectable serological responses. Nonspecific inactivation of gammaretroviruses by serum factors appears insufficient to explain these observations. To investigate further, we explored the susceptibilities of primary and established human cell lines to FeLV-B, the most likely zoonotic variant. Fully permissive infection was common in cancer-derived cell lines but was also a feature of nontransformed keratinocytes and lung fibroblasts. Cells of hematopoietic origin were generally less permissive and formed discrete groups on the basis of high or low intracellular protein expression and virion release. Potent repression was observed in primary human blood mononuclear cells and a subset of leukemia cell lines. However, the early steps of reverse transcription and integration appear to be unimpaired in nonpermissive cells. FeLV-B was subject to G→A hypermutation with a predominant APOBEC3G signature in partially permissive cells but was not mutated in permissive cells or in nonpermissive cells that block secondary viral spread. Distinct cellular barriers that protect primary human blood cells are likely to be important in protection against zoonotic infection with FeLV.IMPORTANCE Domestic exposure to gammaretroviruses such as feline leukemia viruses (FeLVs) occurs worldwide, but the basis of human resistance to infection remains incompletely understood. The potential threat is evident from the human genome sequence, which reveals many past epidemics of gammaretrovirus infection, and from recent cross-species jumps of gammaretroviruses from rodents to primates and marsupials. This study examined resistance to infection at the cellular level with the most

  20. Expression of rabbit IL-4 by recombinant myxoma viruses enhances virulence and overcomes genetic resistance to myxomatosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerr, P J; Perkins, H D; Inglis, B; Stagg, R; McLaughlin, E; Collins, S V; Van Leeuwen, B H

    2004-06-20

    Rabbit IL-4 was expressed in the virulent standard laboratory strain (SLS) and the attenuated Uriarra (Ur) strain of myxoma virus with the aim of creating a Th2 cytokine environment and inhibiting the development of an antiviral cell-mediated response to myxomatosis in infected rabbits. This allowed testing of a model for genetic resistance to myxomatosis in wild rabbits that have undergone 50 years of natural selection for resistance to myxomatosis. Expression of IL-4 significantly enhanced virulence of both virulent and attenuated virus strains in susceptible (laboratory) and resistant (wild) rabbits. SLS-IL-4 completely overcame genetic resistance in wild rabbits. The pathogenesis of SLS-IL-4 was compared in susceptible and resistant rabbits. The results support a model for resistance to myxomatosis of an enhanced innate immune response controlling virus replication and allowing an effective antiviral cell-mediated immune response to develop in resistant rabbits. Expression of IL-4 did not overcome immunity to myxomatosis induced by immunization.

  1. RNAseq expression analysis of resistant and susceptible mice after influenza A virus infection identifies novel genes associated with virus replication and important for host resistance to infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilk, Esther; Pandey, Ashutosh K; Leist, Sarah Rebecca; Hatesuer, Bastian; Preusse, Matthias; Pommerenke, Claudia; Wang, Junxi; Schughart, Klaus

    2015-09-02

    The host response to influenza A infections is strongly influenced by host genetic factors. Animal models of genetically diverse mouse strains are well suited to identify host genes involved in severe pathology, viral replication and immune responses. Here, we have utilized a dual RNAseq approach that allowed us to investigate both viral and host gene expression in the same individual mouse after H1N1 infection. We performed a detailed expression analysis to identify (i) correlations between changes in expression of host and virus genes, (ii) host genes involved in viral replication, and (iii) genes showing differential expression between two mouse strains that strongly differ in resistance to influenza infections. These genes may be key players involved in regulating the differences in pathogenesis and host defense mechanisms after influenza A infections. Expression levels of influenza segments correlated well with the viral load and may thus be used as surrogates for conventional viral load measurements. Furthermore, we investigated the functional role of two genes, Reg3g and Irf7, in knock-out mice and found that deletion of the Irf7 gene renders the host highly susceptible to H1N1 infection. Using RNAseq analysis we identified novel genes important for viral replication or the host defense. This study adds further important knowledge to host-pathogen-interactions and suggests additional candidates that are crucial for host susceptibility or survival during influenza A infections.

  2. 40 CFR 174.513 - Potato Leaf Roll Virus Resistance Gene (also known as orf1/orf2 gene); exemption from the...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 23 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Potato Leaf Roll Virus Resistance Gene... Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) PESTICIDE PROGRAMS PROCEDURES AND... Virus Resistance Gene (also known as orf1/orf2 gene); exemption from the requirement of a tolerance....

  3. Development and evaluation of four molecular markers tightly linked to the Potato virus Y resistance gene Rychc in diploid potato populations

    Science.gov (United States)

    In the last 15 years, Potato virus Y (PVY) has been the main pathogen causing seed potato lot rejections in North America. The most efficient and environmentally sound method of limiting incidence and spread of PVY is the use virus resistant potato cultivars. Several genes for extreme resistance to ...

  4. Protection from Severe Influenza Virus Infections in Mice Carrying the Mx1 Influenza Virus Resistance Gene Strongly Depends on Genetic Background.

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Influenza virus infections represent a serious threat to human health. Both extrinsic and intrinsic factors determine the severity of influenza. The MX dynamin-like GTPase 1 (Mx1) gene has been shown to confer strong resistance to influenza A virus infections in mice. Most laboratory mouse strains, including C57BL/6J, carry nonsense or deletion mutations in Mx1 and thus a nonfunctional allele, whereas wild-derived mouse strains carry a wild-type Mx1 allele. Congenic C57BL/6J (B6-Mx1 ...

  5. Overexpression of Histone Deacetylase 6 Enhances Resistance to Porcine Reproductive and Respiratory Syndrome Virus in Pigs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qiuyan; Li, Zhiguo; Wang, Meng; Liu, Lin; Tian, Kegong; Li, Ning

    2017-01-01

    Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) is one of the most economically relevant viral pathogens in pigs and causes substantial losses in the pig industry worldwide each year. At present, PRRSV vaccines do not effectively prevent and control this disease. Consequently, it is necessary to develop new antiviral strategies to compensate for the inefficacy of the available vaccines. Histone deacetylase 6 (HDAC6) is an important member of the histone deacetylase family that is responsible for regulating many important biological processes. Studies have shown that HDAC6 has anti-viral activities during the viral life cycle. However, whether HDAC6 overexpression enhances resistance to PRRSV in pigs remains unknown. In this study, we used a somatic cell cloning method to produce transgenic (TG) pigs that constitutively overexpress porcine HDAC6. These TG pigs showed germ line transmission with continued overexpression of HDAC6. In vitro, virus-challenged porcine alveolar macrophages (PAMs) overexpressed HDAC6, which suppressed viral gene expression and PRRSV production. In vivo, resistance to PRRSV in TG pigs was evaluated by direct or cohabitation mediated infection with a highly pathogenic PRRSV (HP-PRRSV) strain. Compared with non-TG (NTG) siblings, TG pigs showed a significantly lower viral load in the lungs and an extended survival time after infection with HP-PRRSV via intramuscular injection. In the cohabitation study, NTG pigs housed with challenged NTG pigs exhibited significantly worse clinical symptoms than the other three in-contact groups. These results collectively suggest that HDAC6 overexpression enhances resistance to PRRSV infection both in vitro and in vivo. Our findings suggest the potential involvement of HDAC6 in the response to PRRSV, which will facilitate the development of novel therapies for PRRSV. PMID:28052127

  6. Use of serologic tests to predict resistance to Canine distemper virus-induced disease in vaccinated dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Wayne A; Totten, Janet S; Lappin, Michael R; Schultz, Ronald D

    2015-09-01

    The objective of the current study was to determine whether detection of Canine distemper virus (CDV)-specific serum antibodies correlates with resistance to challenge with virulent virus. Virus neutralization (VN) assay results were compared with resistance to viral challenge in 2 unvaccinated Beagle puppies, 9 unvaccinated Beagle dogs (4.4-7.2 years of age), and 9 vaccinated Beagle dogs (3.7-4.7 years of age). Eight of 9 (89%) unvaccinated adult dogs exhibited clinical signs after virus challenge, and 1 (13%) dog died. As compared to adult dogs, the 2 unvaccinated puppies developed more severe clinical signs and either died or were euthanized after challenge. In contrast, no clinical signs were detected after challenge of the 9 adult vaccinated dogs with post-vaccination intervals of up to 4.4 years. In vaccinated dogs, the positive and negative predictive values of VN assay results for resistance to challenge were 100% and 0%, respectively. Results indicate that dogs vaccinated with modified live CDV can be protected from challenge for ≤4.4 years postvaccination and that detection of virus-specific antibodies is predictive of whether dogs are resistant to challenge with virulent virus. Results also indicate that CDV infection in unvaccinated dogs results in age-dependent morbidity and mortality. Knowledge of age-dependent morbidity and mortality, duration of vaccine-induced immunity, and the positive and negative predictive values of detection of virus-specific serum antibodies are useful in development of rational booster vaccination intervals for the prevention of CDV-mediated disease in adult dogs.

  7. Bone marrow transplantation in a child with Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome latently infected with acyclovir-resistant (ACV(r)) herpes simplex virus type 1: emergence of foscarnet-resistant virus originating from the ACV(r) virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saijo, Masayuki; Yasuda, Yukiharu; Yabe, Hiromasa; Kato, Shunichi; Suzutani, Tatsuo; De Clercq, Erik; Niikura, Masahiro; Maeda, Akihiko; Kurane, Ichiro; Morikawa, Shigeru

    2002-09-01

    A human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-matched unrelated bone marrow transplantation (BMT) was performed in a 13-year-old patient with the congenital immunodeficiency syndrome, Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome. The patient had a history of acyclovir (ACV)-resistant (ACV(r)) herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) infections prior to BMT. After BMT, the skin lesions caused by HSV-1 relapsed on the face and genito-anal areas. Ganciclovir (GCV) therapy was initiated, but the mucocutaneous lesions worsened. An HSV-1 isolate recovered from the lesions during this episode was resistant to both ACV and GCV. The ACV(r) isolate was confirmed to have the same mutation in the viral thymidine kinase (TK) gene as that of the previously isolated ACV(r) isolates from the patient. After treatment switch to foscarnet (PFA), there was a satisfactory remission but not a complete recovery. Although the mucocutaneous lesions improved, a PFA-resistant (PFA(r)) HSV-1 was isolated 1 month after the start of PFA therapy. The PFA(r) HSV-1 isolate coded for the same mutation in the viral TK gene as the ACV(r) HSV-1 isolates. Furthermore, the PFA(r) isolate also expressed a mutated viral DNA polymerase (DNA pol) with an amino acid (Gly) substitution for Val at position 715. This is the first report on the clinical course of a BMT-associated ACV(r) HSV-1 infection that subsequently developed resistance to foscarnet as well.

  8. [Virus resistance in a hospital environment: overview of the virucide activity of disinfectants used in liquid form].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soule, H; Duc, D L; Mallaret, M R; Chanzy, B; Charvier, A; Gratacap-Cavallier, B; Morand, P; Seigneurin, J M

    1998-01-01

    Human pathogenic viruses can be detected in the hospital environment, on contaminated surfaces or medical instruments. Their transmission to patients or staff has already been reported. Lipophilic viruses (HIV, HBV, HCV,...) are susceptible to many liquid chemicals, but they can survive during short time on inadequately disinfected surfaces. Hydrophilic viruses, without envelope, are more resistant, but generally not associated with severe illnesses. Viruses survival in environment depends on many factors and is always improved with viral aggregation and low temperature, whereas organic matters and relative humidity effects are contrasted. The mechanism of virucide disinfectants is not yet well established, and their targets are not known with precision. Different disinfection procedures (disinfectant concentration, contact time, temperature, pH) can provide a similar virucidal activity on a given virus. The virucidal activity of a disinfectant is evaluated with a cell culture assay in Afnor guidelines. But, there are three major problems with this method, concerning need of high viruses titers, residual disinfectant cytotoxicity on cell culture, and non cultivable viruses. Non standardized tests are also described in papers, but their results can generally not be compared. Molecular biology improvements may lead to reproducible and sensitive tests. At present, no general disinfection procedure effective for most of the viruses, without risks for staff or materials, and with an acceptable economic cost can be recommended.

  9. Importância, problemas e perspectivas do melhoramento visando resistência a viroses em plantas Importance, problems and perspectives of plant breeding concerning resistance to viruses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosa Lia Barbieri

    1995-01-01

    Full Text Available As viroses são um sério problema para a agricultura, podendo se tomar um fator limitante para o desenvolvimento de determinadas espécies. Medidas de controle, como a eliminação dos vetores, o uso de material sadio, a rotação de culturas e a erradicação de plantas infectadas são apenas soluções temporárias. A mais eficiente estratégia de controle envolve o uso de cultivares melhoradas para resistência ao vírus ou a seu vetor. A reduzida disponibilidade de fontes de resistência pode ser aumentada através da tecnologia do DNA recombinante, que traz novas perspectivas para o melhoramento de plantas resistentes a viroses.Virus diseases are a serious problem to agricuiture, can be a limitant factor to normal development of some crops. Control measures, like vectors elimination, healthy material use, culture rotation and infected plants eradication, are only transient solutions. The more efficient approach for control involves plant breeding resistant to virus or its vector. Reduced availability of resistance source can be increased through recombinant DNA technology, which brings new breeding perspectives to virus resistant crops.

  10. Homoeologous recombination-based transfer and molecular cytogenetic mapping of a wheat streak mosaic virus and Triticum mosaic virus resistance gene Wsm3 from Thinopyrum intermedium to wheat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danilova, Tatiana V; Zhang, Guorong; Liu, Wenxuan; Friebe, Bernd; Gill, Bikram S

    2017-03-01

    Here, we report the production of a wheat- Thinopyrum intermedium recombinant stock conferring resistance to wheat streak mosaic virus and Triticum mosaic virus. Wheat streak mosaic caused by the wheat streak mosaic virus (WSMV) is an important disease of bread wheat (Triticum aestivum) worldwide. To date, only three genes conferring resistance to WSMV have been named and two, Wsm1 and Wsm3, were derived from the distantly related wild relative Thinopyrum intermedium. Wsm3 is only available in the form of a compensating wheat-Th. intermedium whole-arm Robertsonian translocation T7BS·7S#3L. Whole-arm alien transfers usually suffer from linkage drag, which prevents their use in cultivar improvement. Here, we report ph1b-induced homoeologous recombination to shorten the Th. intermedium segment and recover a recombinant chromosome consisting of the short arm of wheat chromosome 7B, part of the long arm of 7B, and the distal 43% of the long arm derived from the Th. intermedium chromosome arm 7S#3L. The recombinant chromosome T7BS·7BL-7S#3L confers resistance to WSMV at 18 and 24 °C and also confers resistance to Triticum mosaic virus, but only at 18 °C. Wsm3 is the only gene conferring resistance to WSMV at a high temperature level of 24 °C. We also developed a user-friendly molecular marker that will allow to monitor the transfer of Wsm3 in breeding programs. Wsm3 is presently being transferred to adapted hard red winter wheat cultivars and can be used directly in wheat improvement.

  11. Heliox reduces respiratory system resistance in respiratory syncytial virus induced respiratory failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kneyber, Martin C J; van Heerde, Marc; Twisk, Jos W R; Plötz, Frans B; Markhors, Dick G

    2009-01-01

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) lower respiratory tract disease is characterised by narrowing of the airways resulting in increased airway resistance, air-trapping and respiratory acidosis. These problems might be overcome using helium-oxygen gas mixture. However, the effect of mechanical ventilation with heliox in these patients is unclear. The objective of this prospective cross-over study was to determine the effects of mechanical ventilation with heliox 60/40 versus conventional gas on respiratory system resistance, air-trapping and CO2 removal. Mechanically ventilated, sedated and paralyzed infants with proven RSV were enrolled within 24 hours after paediatric intensive care unit (PICU)admission. At T = 0, respiratory system mechanics including respiratory system compliance and resistance, and peak expiratory flow rate were measured with the AVEA ventilator. The measurements were repeated at each interval (after 30 minutes of ventilation with heliox, after 30 minutes of ventilation with nitrox and again after 30 minutes of ventilation with heliox). Indices of gas exchange (ventilation and oxygenation index) were calculated at each interval. Air-trapping (defined by relative change in end-expiratory lung volume) was determined by electrical impedance tomography (EIT) at each interval. Thirteen infants were enrolled. In nine, EIT measurements were performed. Mechanical ventilation with heliox significantly decreased respiratory system resistance. This was not accompanied by an improved CO2 elimination, decreased peak expiratory flow rate or decreased end-expiratory lung volume. Importantly, oxygenation remained unaltered throughout the experimental protocol. Respiratory system resistance is significantly decreased by mechanical ventilation with heliox (ISCRTN98152468).

  12. Complete sequence of three different biotypes of tomato spotted wilt virus (wild type, tomato Sw-5 resistance-breaking and pepper Tsw resistance-breaking) from Spain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Debreczeni, Diana E; López, Carmelo; Aramburu, José; Darós, José Antonio; Soler, Salvador; Galipienso, Luis; Falk, Bryce W; Rubio, Luis

    2015-08-01

    Tomato spotted wilt virus (TSWV) occurs worldwide and causes production losses in many important horticultural crops such as tomato and pepper. Breeding resistant cultivars has been the most successful method so far for TSWV disease control, but only two genes have been found to confer resistance against a wide spectrum of TSWV isolates: Sw-5 in tomato and Tsw in pepper. However, TSWV resistance-breaking isolates have emerged in different countries a few years after using resistant cultivars. In this paper, we report the first complete nucleotide sequences of three Spanish TSWV isolates with different biotypes according to their abilities to overcome resistance: LL-N.05 (wild type, WT), Pujol1TL3 (Sw-5 resistance breaking, SBR) and PVR (Tsw resistance-breaking, TBR). The genome of these TSWV isolates consisted of three segments: L (8913-8914 nt), M (4752-4825 nt) and (S 2924-2961 nt). Variations in nucleotide sequences and genomic RNA lengths among the different virus biotypes are reported here. Phylogenetic analysis of the five TSWV open reading frames showed evidence of reassortment between genomic segments of LL-N.05 and Pujol1TL3, which was supported by analysis with different recombination-detecting algorithms.

  13. Mechanistic characterization and molecular modeling of hepatitis B virus polymerase resistance to entecavir.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ann W Walsh

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Entecavir (ETV is a deoxyguanosine analog competitive inhibitor of hepatitis B virus (HBV polymerase that exhibits delayed chain termination of HBV DNA. A high barrier to entecavir-resistance (ETVr is observed clinically, likely due to its potency and a requirement for multiple resistance changes to overcome suppression. Changes in the HBV polymerase reverse-transcriptase (RT domain involve lamivudine-resistance (LVDr substitutions in the conserved YMDD motif (M204V/I +/- L180M, plus an additional ETV-specific change at residues T184, S202 or M250. These substitutions surround the putative dNTP binding site or primer grip regions of the HBV RT. METHODS/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: To determine the mechanistic basis for ETVr, wildtype, lamivudine-resistant (M204V, L180M and ETVr HBVs were studied using in vitro RT enzyme and cell culture assays, as well as molecular modeling. Resistance substitutions significantly reduced ETV incorporation and chain termination in HBV DNA and increased the ETV-TP inhibition constant (K(i for HBV RT. Resistant HBVs exhibited impaired replication in culture and reduced enzyme activity (k(cat in vitro. Molecular modeling of the HBV RT suggested that ETVr residue T184 was adjacent to and stabilized S202 within the LVDr YMDD loop. ETVr arose through steric changes at T184 or S202 or by disruption of hydrogen-bonding between the two, both of which repositioned the loop and reduced the ETV-triphosphate (ETV-TP binding pocket. In contrast to T184 and S202 changes, ETVr at primer grip residue M250 was observed during RNA-directed DNA synthesis only. Experimentally, M250 changes also impacted the dNTP-binding site. Modeling suggested a novel mechanism for M250 resistance, whereby repositioning of the primer-template component of the dNTP-binding site shifted the ETV-TP binding pocket. No structural data are available to confirm the HBV RT modeling, however, results were consistent with phenotypic analysis of

  14. Mechanistic characterization and molecular modeling of hepatitis B virus polymerase resistance to entecavir.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, Ann W; Langley, David R; Colonno, Richard J; Tenney, Daniel J

    2010-02-12

    Entecavir (ETV) is a deoxyguanosine analog competitive inhibitor of hepatitis B virus (HBV) polymerase that exhibits delayed chain termination of HBV DNA. A high barrier to entecavir-resistance (ETVr) is observed clinically, likely due to its potency and a requirement for multiple resistance changes to overcome suppression. Changes in the HBV polymerase reverse-transcriptase (RT) domain involve lamivudine-resistance (LVDr) substitutions in the conserved YMDD motif (M204V/I +/- L180M), plus an additional ETV-specific change at residues T184, S202 or M250. These substitutions surround the putative dNTP binding site or primer grip regions of the HBV RT. To determine the mechanistic basis for ETVr, wildtype, lamivudine-resistant (M204V, L180M) and ETVr HBVs were studied using in vitro RT enzyme and cell culture assays, as well as molecular modeling. Resistance substitutions significantly reduced ETV incorporation and chain termination in HBV DNA and increased the ETV-TP inhibition constant (K(i)) for HBV RT. Resistant HBVs exhibited impaired replication in culture and reduced enzyme activity (k(cat)) in vitro. Molecular modeling of the HBV RT suggested that ETVr residue T184 was adjacent to and stabilized S202 within the LVDr YMDD loop. ETVr arose through steric changes at T184 or S202 or by disruption of hydrogen-bonding between the two, both of which repositioned the loop and reduced the ETV-triphosphate (ETV-TP) binding pocket. In contrast to T184 and S202 changes, ETVr at primer grip residue M250 was observed during RNA-directed DNA synthesis only. Experimentally, M250 changes also impacted the dNTP-binding site. Modeling suggested a novel mechanism for M250 resistance, whereby repositioning of the primer-template component of the dNTP-binding site shifted the ETV-TP binding pocket. No structural data are available to confirm the HBV RT modeling, however, results were consistent with phenotypic analysis of comprehensive substitutions of each ETVr position

  15. Examination of soluble integrin resistant mutants of foot-and-mouth disease virus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lawrence Paul

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV initiates infection via recognition of one of at least four cell-surface integrin molecules αvβ1, αvβ3, αvβ6, or αvβ8 by a highly conserved Arg-Gly-Asp (RGD amino acid sequence motif located in the G-H loop of VP1. Within the animal host, the αvβ6 interaction is believed to be the most relevant. Sub-neutralizing levels of soluble secreted αvβ6 (ssαvβ6 was used as a selective pressure during passages in vitro to explore the plasticity of that interaction. Results Genetically stable soluble integrin resistant (SIR FMDV mutants derived from A24 Cruzeiro were selected after just 3 passages in cell culture in the presence of sub-neutralizing levels of ssαvβ6. SIR mutants were characterized by: replication on selective cell lines, plaque morphology, relative sensitivity to ssαvβ6 neutralization, relative ability to utilize αvβ6 for infection, as well as sequence and structural changes. All SIR mutants maintained an affinity for αvβ6. Some developed the ability to attach to cells expressing heparan sulfate (HS proteoglycan, while others appear to have developed affinity for a still unknown third receptor. Two classes of SIR mutants were selected that were highly or moderately resistant to neutralization by ssαvβ6. Highly resistant mutants displayed a G145D substitution (RGD to RDD, while moderately resistant viruses exhibited a L150P/R substitution at the conserved RGD + 4 position. VP1 G-H loop homology models for the A-type SIR mutants illustrated potential structural changes within the integrin-binding motif by these 2 groups of mutations. Treatment of O1 Campos with ssαvβ6 resulted in 3 SIR mutants with a positively charged VP3 mutation allowing for HS binding. Conclusions These findings illustrate how FMDV particles rapidly gain resistance to soluble receptor prophylactic measures in vitro. Two different serotypes developed distinct capsid mutations to circumvent the

  16. Flat acoustic lens by acoustic grating with curled slits

    KAUST Repository

    Peng, Pai

    2014-10-01

    We design a flat sub-wavelength lens that can focus acoustic wave. We analytically study the transmission through an acoustic grating with curled slits, which can serve as a material with tunable impedance and refractive index for acoustic waves. The effective parameters rely on the geometry of the slits and are independent of frequency. A flat acoustic focusing lens by such acoustic grating with gradient effective refractive index is designed. The focusing effect is clearly observed in simulations and well predicted by the theory. We demonstrate that despite the large impedance mismatch between the acoustic lens and the matrix, the intensity at the focal point is still high due to Fabry-Perot resonance.

  17. A high-resolution linkage map of the citrus tristeza virus resistance gene region in Poncirus trifoliata (L.) Raf.

    OpenAIRE

    Fang, D. Q.; Federici, C T; Roose, M L

    1998-01-01

    Resistance to citrus tristeza virus (CTV) was evaluated in 554 progeny of 10 populations derived from Poncirus trifoliata. A dominant gene (Ctv) controlled CTV resistance in P. trifoliata. Twenty-one dominant PCR-based DNA markers were identified as linked to Ctv by bulked segregant analysis. Of the 11 closest markers to Ctv, only 2 segregated in all populations. Ten of these markers were cloned and sequenced, and codominant RFLP markers were developed. Seven RFLP markers were then evaluated ...

  18. Comparative QTL mapping of resistance to sugarcane mosaic virus in maize based on bioinformatics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiangling L(U); Xinhai LI; Chuanxiao XIE; Zhuanfang HAO; Hailian JI; Liyu SHI; Shihuang ZHANG

    2008-01-01

    The development of genomics and bioinfor-matics offers new tools for comparative gene mapping. In this paper, an integrated QTL map for sugarcane mosaic virus (SCMV) resistance in maize was constructed by compiling a total of 81 QTL loci available, using the Genetic Map IBM2 2005 Neighbors as reference. These 81 QTL loci were scattered on 7 chromosomes of maize, and most of them were clustered on chromosomes 3 and 6. By using the method of meta-analysis, we identified one "consensus QTL" on chromosome 3 covering a genetic distance of 6.44 cM, and two on chromosome 6 covering genetic distances of 16 cM and 27.48 cM, respectively. Four positional candidate resistant genes were identified within the "consensus QTL" on chromosome 3 via the strategy of comparative genomics. These results suggest that application of a combination of meta-analysis within a species with sequence homology comparison in a related model plant is an efficient approach to identify the major QTL and its candidate gene(s) for the target traits. The results of this study provide useful information for iden-tifying and cloning the major gene(s) conferring resistance to SCMV in maize.

  19. Evaluation of the RNAi Constructs ability to Confer Resistance against Yellow Mosaic Viruses by Transient Silencing Assay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Archana Kumari

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Mungbean yellow mosaic India virus (MYMIV, a bipartite legume infecting geminivirus that causes considerable yield losses in South-East Asia. Pathogen derived resistance (PDR in plants is a very effective approach to acquire resistance against viral infections. Extrinsic expression of RNAi constructs targeting viral infective proteins is one of the effective scenarios to silence viral infectivity. In the present study, we tested the efficacy of three intron-spliced hairpin RNAi constructs which prepared by targeting the Coat Protein (CP/AV1, Replication initiation protein (Rep/AC1 and Intergenic region (IR of Soybean isolate of MYMIV (MYMIV-Sb in respect of reducing the virus DNA accumulation. In planta transient assay method were used to introduce the RNAi constructs in cowpea seedlings. This approach gave up to 80 % of protection to cowpea plants against virus infection. Only 15-20 % disease symptoms were observed in RNAi constructs inoculated cowpea plants. Among three constructs, RNAi-Rep construct showed maximum efficacy when compared with RNAi-CP and RNAi-IR. Results obtained in this study confirmed that at transient level, introduction of virus gene in form of hairpin RNAi construct (against the virus emerged as an effective strategy to control spreading the virus.

  20. Autologous HIV-1 neutralizing antibodies: emergence of neutralization-resistant escape virus and subsequent development of escape virus neutralizing antibodies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arendrup, M; Nielsen, C; Hansen, J E;

    1992-01-01

    The capacity of consecutive human sera to neutralize sequentially obtained autologous virus isolates was studied. HIV-1 was isolated three times over a 48-164-week period from three individuals immediately after seroconversion and from two individuals in later stages of infection. Development of ...... escape virus may be part of the explanation of the apparent failure of the immune system to control HIV infection.......The capacity of consecutive human sera to neutralize sequentially obtained autologous virus isolates was studied. HIV-1 was isolated three times over a 48-164-week period from three individuals immediately after seroconversion and from two individuals in later stages of infection. Development...... of neutralizing antibodies to the primary virus isolates was detected 13-45 weeks after seroconversion. Emergence of escape virus with reduced sensitivity to neutralization by autologous sera was demonstrated. The patients subsequently developed neutralizing antibodies against the escape virus but after a delay...

  1. HIV-1 phenotypic reverse transcriptase inhibitor drug resistance test interpretation is not dependent on the subtype of the virus backbone.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michelle Bronze

    Full Text Available To date, the majority of HIV-1 phenotypic resistance testing has been performed with subtype B virus backbones (e.g. HXB2. However, the relevance of using this backbone to determine resistance in non-subtype B HIV-1 viruses still needs to be assessed. From 114 HIV-1 subtype C clinical samples (36 ARV-naïve, 78 ARV-exposed, pol amplicons were produced and analyzed for phenotypic resistance using both a subtype B- and C-backbone in which the pol fragment was deleted. Phenotypic resistance was assessed in resulting recombinant virus stocks (RVS for a series of antiretroviral drugs (ARV's and expressed as fold change (FC, yielding 1660 FC comparisons. These Antivirogram® derived FC values were categorized as having resistant or sensitive susceptibility based on biological cut-off values (BCOs. The concordance between resistance calls obtained for the same clinical sample but derived from two different backbones (i.e. B and C accounted for 86.1% (1429/1660 of the FC comparisons. However, when taking the assay variability into account, 95.8% (1590/1660 of the phenotypic data could be considered as being concordant with respect to their resistance call. No difference in the capacity to detect resistance associated with M184V, K103N and V106M mutations was noted between the two backbones. The following was concluded: (i A high level of concordance was shown between the two backbone phenotypic resistance profiles; (ii Assay variability is largely responsible for discordant results (i.e. for FC values close to BCO; (iii Confidence intervals should be given around the BCO's, when assessing resistance in HIV-1 subtype C; (iv No systematic resistance under- or overcalling of subtype C amplicons in the B-backbone was observed; (v Virus backbone subtype sequence variability outside the pol region does not contribute to phenotypic FC values. In conclusion the HXB2 virus backbone remains an acceptable vector for phenotyping HIV-1 subtype C pol amplicons.

  2. Influenza A(H1N1) oseltamivir resistant viruses in the Netherlands during the winter 2007/2008.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dijkstra, F.; Jonges, M.; Beek, R. van; Donker, G.A.; Schellevis, F.G.; Koopmans, M.; Sande, M.A.B. van der; Osterhaus, A.D.M.E.; Boucher, C.A.B.; Rimmelzwaan, G.F.; Meijer, A.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Antiviral susceptibility surveillance in the Netherlands was intensified after the first reports about the emergence of influenza A(H1N1) oseltamivir resistant viruses in Norway in January, 2008. Methods: Within the existing influenza surveillance an additional questionnaire study was pe

  3. Influenza A(H1N1) oseltamivir resistant viruses in the Netherlands during the winter 2007/2008.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dijkstra, F.; Jonges, M.; Beek, R. van; Donker, G.A.; Schellevis, F.G.; Koopmans, M.; Sande, M.A.B. van der; Osterhaus, A.D.M.E.; Boucher, C.A.B.; Rimmelzwaan, G.F.; Meijer, A.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Antiviral susceptibility surveillance in the Netherlands was intensified after the first reports about the emergence of influenza A(H1N1) oseltamivir resistant viruses in Norway in January, 2008. Methods: Within the existing influenza surveillance an additional questionnaire study was pe

  4. Development and validation of high-throughput single nucleotide polymorphisms for wheat streak mosaic virus resistance gene Wsm2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wheat streak mosaic virus (WSMV) can cause significant yield loss in wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) in the Great Plains of North America. A recently identified WSMV resistance gene, Wsm2, was mapped to chromosome 3BS in germplasm line ‘CO960293–2’. Effective genetic markers tightly linked to the gene ...

  5. Influence of coat protein transgene copy number on resistance in transgenic line 63-1 against Papaya ringspot virus isolates

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Souza, M.T.; Níckel, O.; Gonsalves, D.

    2005-01-01

    Line 63-1 is a 'Sunset'-derived transgenic papaya expressing the coat protein (CP) gene from a mild mutant of a Hawaiian isolate of Papaya ringspot virus (PRSV). Previous work showed that line 63-1 R, plants exhibited a range of resistance to severe PRSV isolates from Hawaii (HA), Jamaica (JA),

  6. 'HoneySweet' (C5), the first genetically engineered Plum pox virus-resistant plum (Prunus domestica L.) cultivar

    Science.gov (United States)

    ‘HoneySweet’ plum was released by the U.S. Department of Agriculture, Agricultural Research Service, to provide U.S. growers and P. domestica plum breeders with a high fruit quality plum cultivar resistant to Plum pox virus (PPV). ‘HoneySweet’ was developed through genetic engineering utilizing the...

  7. Influence of coat protein transgene copy number on resistance in transgenic line 63-1 against Papaya ringspot virus isolates

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Souza, M.T.; Níckel, O.; Gonsalves, D.

    2005-01-01

    Line 63-1 is a 'Sunset'-derived transgenic papaya expressing the coat protein (CP) gene from a mild mutant of a Hawaiian isolate of Papaya ringspot virus (PRSV). Previous work showed that line 63-1 R, plants exhibited a range of resistance to severe PRSV isolates from Hawaii (HA), Jamaica (JA), Thai

  8. Lersivirine, a nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor with activity against drug-resistant human immunodeficiency virus type 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corbau, Romuald; Mori, Julie; Phillips, Chris; Fishburn, Lesley; Martin, Alex; Mowbray, Charles; Panton, Wendy; Smith-Burchnell, Caroline; Thornberry, Adele; Ringrose, Heather; Knöchel, Thorsten; Irving, Steve; Westby, Mike; Wood, Anthony; Perros, Manos

    2010-10-01

    The nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NNRTIs) are key components of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) for the treatment of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1). A major problem with the first approved NNRTIs was the emergence of mutations in the HIV-1 reverse transcriptase (RT), in particular K103N and Y181C, which led to resistance to the entire class. We adopted an iterative strategy to synthesize and test small molecule inhibitors from a chemical series of pyrazoles against wild-type (wt) RT and the most prevalent NNRTI-resistant mutants. The emerging candidate, lersivirine (UK-453,061), binds the RT enzyme in a novel way (resulting in a unique resistance profile), inhibits over 60% of viruses bearing key RT mutations, with 50% effective concentrations (EC(50)s) within 10-fold of those for wt viruses, and has excellent selectivity against a range of human targets. Altogether lersivirine is a highly potent and selective NNRTI, with excellent efficacy against NNRTI-resistant viruses.

  9. Nucleotide sequence-homology-independent breakdown of transgenic resistance by more virulent virus strains and a potential solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kung, Yi-Jung; You, Bang-Jau; Raja, Joseph A J; Chen, Kuan-Chun; Huang, Chiung-Huei; Bau, Huey-Jiunn; Yang, Ching-Fu; Huang, Chung-Hao; Chang, Chung-Ping; Yeh, Shyi-Dong

    2015-04-27

    Controlling plant viruses by genetic engineering, including the globally important Papaya ringspot virus (PRSV), mainly involves coat protein (CP) gene mediated resistance via post-transcriptional gene silencing (PTGS). However, the breakdown of single- or double-virus resistance in CP-gene-transgenic papaya by more virulent PRSV strains has been noted in repeated field trials. Recombination analysis revealed that the gene silencing suppressor HC-Pro or CP of the virulent PRSV strain 5-19 is responsible for overcoming CP-transgenic resistance in a sequence-homology-independent manner. Transient expression assays using agro-infiltration in Nicotiana benthamiana plants indicated that 5-19 HC-Pro exhibits stronger PTGS suppression than the transgene donor strain. To disarm the suppressor from the virulent strain, transgenic papaya lines were generated carrying untranslatable 5-19 HC-Pro, which conferred complete resistance to 5-19 and other geographic PRSV strains. Our study suggested the potential risk of the emergence of more virulent virus strains, spurred by the deployment of CP-gene-transgenic crops, and provides a strategy to combat such strains.

  10. Robust RNAi-based resistance to mixed infection of three viruses in soybean plants expressing separate short hairpins from a single transgene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiuchun; Sato, Shirley; Ye, Xiaohong; Dorrance, Anne E; Morris, T Jack; Clemente, Thomas E; Qu, Feng

    2011-11-01

    Transgenic plants expressing double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) of virus origin have been previously shown to confer resistance to virus infections through the highly conserved RNA-targeting process termed RNA silencing or RNA interference (RNAi). In this study we applied this strategy to soybean plants and achieved robust resistance to multiple viruses with a single dsRNA-expressing transgene. Unlike previous reports that relied on the expression of one long inverted repeat (IR) combining sequences of several viruses, our improved strategy utilized a transgene designed to express several shorter IRs. Each of these short IRs contains highly conserved sequences of one virus, forming dsRNA of less than 150 bp. These short dsRNA stems were interspersed with single-stranded sequences to prevent homologous recombination during the transgene assembly process. Three such short IRs with sequences of unrelated soybean-infecting viruses (Alfalfa mosaic virus, Bean pod mottle virus, and Soybean mosaic virus) were assembled into a single transgene under control of the 35S promoter and terminator of Cauliflower mosaic virus. Three independent transgenic lines were obtained and all of them exhibited strong systemic resistance to the simultaneous infection of the three viruses. These results demonstrate the effectiveness of this very straight forward strategy for engineering RNAi-based virus resistance in a major crop plant. More importantly, our strategy of construct assembly makes it easy to incorporate additional short IRs in the transgene, thus expanding the spectrum of virus resistance. Finally, this strategy could be easily adapted to control virus problems of other crop plants.

  11. Prevalence of Intrathecal Acyclovir Resistant Virus in Herpes Simplex Encephalitis Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitterreiter, Johanna G.; Titulaer, Maarten J.; van Nierop, Gijsbert P.; van Kampen, Jeroen J. A.; Aron, Georgina I.; Osterhaus, Albert D. M. E.; Verjans, Georges M. G. M.; Ouwendijk, Werner J. D.

    2016-01-01

    Herpes simplex encephalitis (HSE) is a life-threatening complication of herpes simplex virus (HSV) infection. Acyclovir (ACV) is the antiviral treatment of choice, but may lead to emergence of ACV-resistant (ACVR) HSV due to mutations in the viral UL23 gene encoding for the ACV-targeted thymidine kinase (TK) protein. Here, we determined the prevalence of intrathecal ACVR–associated HSV TK mutations in HSE patients and compared TK genotypes of sequential HSV isolates in paired cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and blister fluid of mucosal HSV lesions. Clinical samples were obtained from 12 HSE patients, encompassing 4 HSV type 1 (HSV-1) and 8 HSV-2 encephalitis patients. HSV DNA load was determined by real-time PCR and complete HSV TK gene sequences were obtained by nested PCR followed by Sanger sequencing. All HSV-1 HSE patients contained viral TK mutations encompassing 30 unique nucleotide and 13 distinct amino acid mutations. By contrast, a total of 5 unique nucleotide and 4 distinct amino acid changes were detected in 7 of 8 HSV-2 patients. Detected mutations were identified as natural polymorphisms located in non-conserved HSV TK gene regions. ACV therapy did not induce the emergence of ACVR-associated HSV TK mutations in consecutive CSF and mucocutaneous samples of 5 individual patients. Phenotypic susceptibility analysis of these mucocutaneous HSV isolates demonstrated ACV-sensitive virus in 2 HSV-1 HSE patients, whereas in two HSV-2 HSE patients ACVR virus was detected in the absence of known ACVR-associated TK mutations. In conclusion, we did not detect intrathecal ACVR-associated TK mutations in HSV isolates obtained from 12 HSE patients. PMID:27171421

  12. Prevalence of Intrathecal Acyclovir Resistant Virus in Herpes Simplex Encephalitis Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitterreiter, Johanna G; Titulaer, Maarten J; van Nierop, Gijsbert P; van Kampen, Jeroen J A; Aron, Georgina I; Osterhaus, Albert D M E; Verjans, Georges M G M; Ouwendijk, Werner J D

    2016-01-01

    Herpes simplex encephalitis (HSE) is a life-threatening complication of herpes simplex virus (HSV) infection. Acyclovir (ACV) is the antiviral treatment of choice, but may lead to emergence of ACV-resistant (ACVR) HSV due to mutations in the viral UL23 gene encoding for the ACV-targeted thymidine kinase (TK) protein. Here, we determined the prevalence of intrathecal ACVR-associated HSV TK mutations in HSE patients and compared TK genotypes of sequential HSV isolates in paired cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and blister fluid of mucosal HSV lesions. Clinical samples were obtained from 12 HSE patients, encompassing 4 HSV type 1 (HSV-1) and 8 HSV-2 encephalitis patients. HSV DNA load was determined by real-time PCR and complete HSV TK gene sequences were obtained by nested PCR followed by Sanger sequencing. All HSV-1 HSE patients contained viral TK mutations encompassing 30 unique nucleotide and 13 distinct amino acid mutations. By contrast, a total of 5 unique nucleotide and 4 distinct amino acid changes were detected in 7 of 8 HSV-2 patients. Detected mutations were identified as natural polymorphisms located in non-conserved HSV TK gene regions. ACV therapy did not induce the emergence of ACVR-associated HSV TK mutations in consecutive CSF and mucocutaneous samples of 5 individual patients. Phenotypic susceptibility analysis of these mucocutaneous HSV isolates demonstrated ACV-sensitive virus in 2 HSV-1 HSE patients, whereas in two HSV-2 HSE patients ACVR virus was detected in the absence of known ACVR-associated TK mutations. In conclusion, we did not detect intrathecal ACVR-associated TK mutations in HSV isolates obtained from 12 HSE patients.

  13. Adaptation of human and simian immunodeficiency viruses for resistance to tetherin/BST-2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serra-Moreno, Ruth; Evans, David T

    2012-06-01

    Tetherin (BST-2 or CD317) is an interferon-inducible cellular factor that prevents the detachment of enveloped viruses from infected cells. The primate lentiviruses have evolved different countermeasures to tetherin. The majority of SIVs use Nef to antagonize the tetherin proteins of their nonhuman primate hosts. However, due to the absence of sequences in human tetherin required for antagonism by Nef, HIV-1 Vpu and HIV-2 Env evolved to serve this function in humans. We recently identified compensatory changes in the Env cytoplasmic domain of a pathogenic nef-deleted SIV that confers resistance to rhesus macaque tetherin. These observations highlight the extraordinary plasticity of the primate lentiviruses in adapting to the tetherin proteins of their respective hosts, and reveal a prominent role for tetherin in shaping the evolution of the primate lentiviruses.

  14. DNA methylation polymorphism in flue-cured tobacco and candidate markers for tobacco mosaic virus resistance

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jie-hong ZHAO; Ji-shun ZHANG; Yi WANG; Ren-gang WANG; Chun WU; Long-jiang FAN; Xue-liang REN

    2011-01-01

    DNA methylation plays an important role in the epigenetic regulation of gene expression during plant growth,development,and polyploidization.However,there is still no distinct evidence in tobacco regarding the distribution of the methylation pattern and whether it contributes to qualitative characteristics.We studied the levels and patterns of methylation polymorphism at CCGG sites in 48 accessions of allotetraploid flue-cured tobacco,Nicotiana tabacum,using a methylation-sensitive amplified polymorphism (MSAP) technique.The results showed that methylation existed at a high level among tobacco accessions,among which 49.3% sites were methylated and 69.9% allelic sites were polymorphic.A cluster analysis revealed distinct patterns of geography-specific groups.In addition,three polymorphic sites significantly related to tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) resistance were explored.This suggests that tobacco breeders should pay more attention to epigenetic traits.

  15. "Resistance" to PSC-RANTES revisited: two mutations in human immunodeficiency virus type 1 HIV-1 SF162 or simian-human immunodeficiency virus SHIV SF162-p3 do not confer resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nedellec, Rebecca; Coetzer, Mia; Lederman, Michael M; Offord, Robin E; Hartley, Oliver; Mosier, Donald E

    2010-06-01

    Resistance of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) to small-molecule CCR5 inhibitors is well demonstrated, but resistance to macromolecular CCR5 inhibitors (e.g., PSC-RANTES) that act by both CCR5 internalization and receptor blockade had not been reported until recently (3). The report of a single simian-human immunodeficiency virus SHIV(SF162-p3) variant with one V3 and one gp41 sequence change in gp160 that conferred both altered replicative fitness and resistance to PSC-RANTES was therefore surprising. We introduced the same two mutations into both the parental HIV-1(SF162) and the macaque-adapted SHIV(SF162-p3) and found minor differences in entry fitness but no changes in sensitivity to inhibition by either PSC-RANTES or the small-molecule allosteric inhibitor TAK-779. We attribute the earlier finding to confounding fitness effects with inhibitor sensitivity.

  16. Characterization of a New World Monopartite Begomovirus Causing Leaf Curl Disease of Tomato in Ecuador and Peru Reveals a New Direction in Geminivirus Evolution

    OpenAIRE

    Melgarejo, Tomas A.; Kon, Tatsuya; Rojas, Maria R.; Paz-Carrasco, Lenin; Zerbini, F. Murilo; Gilbertson, Robert L.

    2013-01-01

    All characterized whitefly-transmitted geminiviruses (begomoviruses) with origins in the New World (NW) have bipartite genomes composed of a DNA-A and DNA-B component. Recently, an NW begomovirus lacking a DNA-B component was associated with tomato leaf curl disease (ToLCD) in Peru, and it was named Tomato leaf deformation virus (ToLDeV). Here, we show that isolates of ToLDeV associated with ToLCD in Ecuador and Peru have a single, genetically diverse genomic DNA that is most closely related ...

  17. The endosymbiotic bacterium Wolbachia induces resistance to dengue virus in Aedes aegypti.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guowu Bian

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Genetic strategies that reduce or block pathogen transmission by mosquitoes have been proposed as a means of augmenting current control measures to reduce the growing burden of vector-borne diseases. The endosymbiotic bacterium Wolbachia has long been promoted as a potential vehicle for introducing disease-resistance genes into mosquitoes, thereby making them refractory to the human pathogens they transmit. Given the large overlap in tissue distribution and intracellular localization between Wolbachia and dengue virus in mosquitoes, we conducted experiments to characterize their interactions. Our results show that Wolbachia inhibits viral replication and dissemination in the main dengue vector, Aedes aegypti. Moreover, the virus transmission potential of Wolbachia-infected Ae. aegypti was significantly diminished when compared to wild-type mosquitoes that did not harbor Wolbachia. At 14 days post-infection, Wolbachia completely blocked dengue transmission in at least 37.5% of Ae. aegypti mosquitoes. We also observed that this Wolbachia-mediated viral interference was associated with an elevated basal immunity and increased longevity in the mosquitoes. These results underscore the potential usefulness of Wolbachia-based control strategies for population replacement.

  18. Eradicating hepatitis C virus ameliorates insulin resistance without change in adipose depots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milner, K-L; Jenkins, A B; Trenell, M; Tid-Ang, J; Samocha-Bonet, D; Weltman, M; Xu, A; George, J; Chisholm, D J

    2014-05-01

    Chronic hepatitis C (CHC) is associated with lipid-related changes and insulin resistance; the latter predicts response to antiviral therapy, liver disease progression and the risk of diabetes. We sought to determine whether insulin sensitivity improves following CHC viral eradication after antiviral therapy and whether this is accompanied by changes in fat depots or adipokine levels. We compared 8 normoglycaemic men with CHC (genotype 1 or 3) before and at least 6 months post viral eradication and 15 hepatitis C antibody negative controls using an intravenous glucose tolerance test and two-step hyperinsulinaemic-euglycaemic clamp with [6,6-(2) H2 ] glucose to assess peripheral and hepatic insulin sensitivity. Magnetic resonance imaging and spectroscopy quantified abdominal fat compartments, liver and intramyocellular lipid. Peripheral insulin sensitivity improved (glucose infusion rate during high-dose insulin increased from 10.1 ± 1.6 to 12 ± 2.1 mg/kg/min/, P = 0.025), with no change in hepatic insulin response following successful viral eradication, without any accompanying change in muscle, liver or abdominal fat depots. There was corresponding improvement in incremental glycaemic response to intravenous glucose (pretreatment: 62.1 ± 8.3 vs post-treatment: 56.1 ± 8.5 mm, P = 0.008). Insulin sensitivity after viral clearance was comparable to matched controls without CHC. Post therapy, liver enzyme levels decreased but, interestingly, levels of glucagon, fatty acid-binding protein and lipocalin-2 remained elevated. Eradication of the hepatitis C virus improves insulin sensitivity without alteration in fat depots, adipokine or glucagon levels, consistent with a direct link of the virus with insulin resistance. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Building effective partnerships: the role of trust in the Virus Resistant Cassava for Africa project

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ezezika Obidimma C

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Virus Resistant Cassava for Africa (VIRCA is an agricultural biotechnology public-private partnership (PPP comprising the Donald Danforth Plant Sciences Center (DDPSC, National Agricultural Research Organization (NARO of Uganda and Kenya Agricultural Research Institute (KARI. The project seeks to develop virus-resistant cassava for farmers in Kenya and Uganda. Yet, there is much public skepticism about the use of genetically modified (GM crops and private sector involvement in Africa. This case study sought to understand the role of trust in the VIRCA partnership. Methods We conducted semi-structured, face-to-face interviews to obtain stakeholders’ views on the challenges to, and practices for, building trust in the VIRCA partnership. Interviewee responses, together with relevant documents and articles, were analyzed to generate descriptions of how trust is operationalized in this evolving agbiotech PPP. Data were analyzed based on recurring and emergent themes from the interviewee responses. Results Various factors undermine and build trust in agbiotech PPPs. Individual and institutional enthusiasm and detailed collaborative agreements stipulating partner roles and responsibilities are likely to enhance trust among partners. On the other hand, negative perceptions propagated by international partners about the capacities of African institutions and scientists, coupled with slow regulatory processes in Africa, are likely to be impediments to trust building. Conclusions Based on the findings of this study, we have derived four key lessons. First, differences in the capacity of the partner institutions and individuals should be respected. Second, technical and infrastructural capacity support for regulatory processes in Africa must be built. Third, detailed agreements and open and transparent partner practices during project implementation are necessary to dispel perceptions of inequality among partners. Fourth, institutional

  20. Age-dependent resistance to Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus replication in swine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bautista Elida M

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV causes a prolonged, economically devastating infection in pigs, and immune resistance to infection appears variable. Since the porcine adaptive immune system is not fully competent at birth, we hypothesized that age influences the dynamics of PRRSV infection. Thus, young piglets, growing 16-20-week-old finisher pigs, and mature third parity sows were infected with virulent or attenuated PRRSV, and the dynamics of viral infection, disease, and immune response were monitored over time. Results Virulent PRRSV infection and disease were markedly more severe and prolonged in young piglets than in finishers or sows. Attenuated PRRSV in piglets also produced a prolonged viremia that was delayed and reduced in magnitude, and in finishers and sows, about half the animals showed no viremia. Despite marked differences in infection, antibody responses were observed in all animals irrespective of age, with older pigs tending to seroconvert sooner and achieve higher antibody levels than 3-week-old animals. Interferon γ (IFN γ secreting peripheral blood mononuclear cells were more abundant in sows but not specifically increased by PRRSV infection in any age group, and interleukin-10 (IL-10 levels in blood were not correlated with PRRSV infection status. Conclusion These findings show that animal age, perhaps due to increased innate immune resistance, strongly influences the outcome of acute PRRSV infection, whereas an antibody response is triggered at a low threshold of infection that is independent of age. Prolonged infection was not due to IL-10-mediated immunosuppression, and PRRSV did not elicit a specific IFN γ response, especially in non-adult animals. Equivalent antibody responses were elicited in response to virulent and attenuated viruses, indicating that the antigenic mass necessary for an immune response is produced at a low level of infection, and is not predicted by

  1. Analysis of hepatitis B virus genotyping and drug resistance gene mutations based on massively parallel sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Yingxin; Zhang, Yinxin; Mei, Yanhua; Wang, Yuqi; Liu, Tao; Guan, Yanfang; Tan, Deming; Liang, Yu; Yang, Ling; Yi, Xin

    2013-11-01

    Drug resistance to nucleoside analogs is a serious problem worldwide. Both drug resistance gene mutation detection and HBV genotyping are helpful for guiding clinical treatment. Total HBV DNA from 395 patients who were treated with single or multiple drugs including Lamivudine, Adefovir, Entecavir, Telbivudine, Tenofovir and Emtricitabine were sequenced using the HiSeq 2000 sequencing system and validated using the 3730 sequencing system. In addition, a mixed sample of HBV plasmid DNA was used to determine the cutoff value for HiSeq-sequencing, and 52 of the 395 samples were sequenced three times to evaluate the repeatability and stability of this technology. Of the 395 samples sequenced using both HiSeq and 3730 sequencing, the results from 346 were consistent, and the results from 49 were inconsistent. Among the 49 inconsistent results, 13 samples were detected as drug-resistance-positive using HiSeq but negative using 3730, and the other 36 samples showed a higher number of drug-resistance-positive gene mutations using HiSeq 2000 than using 3730. Gene mutations had an apparent frequency of 1% as assessed by the plasmid testing. Therefore, a 1% cutoff value was adopted. Furthermore, the experiment was repeated three times, and the same results were obtained in 49/52 samples using the HiSeq sequencing system. HiSeq sequencing can be used to analyze HBV gene mutations with high sensitivity, high fidelity, high throughput and automation and is a potential method for hepatitis B virus gene mutation detection and genotyping.

  2. Insulin resistance, steatosis, and fibrosis in Egyptian patients with chronic Hepatitis C virus infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahlam M Ahmed

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim: Both nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD and chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV infection are common in Egypt, and their coexistence is expected. There is controversy regarding the influence of NAFLD on chronic HCV disease progression. This study evaluates the effect of NAFLD on the severity of chronic hepatitis C (CHC (necroinflammation and fibrosis and assesses the relative contribution of insulin resistance syndrome to the occurrence of NAFLD in patients with chronic HCV infection. Patients and Methods: Untreated consecutive adults with chronic HCV infection admitted for liver biopsy were included in this study. Before liver biopsy, a questionnaire for risk factors was completed prospectively, and a blood sample was obtained for laboratory analysis. Results: Our study included 92 male patients. Their mean ± SD age and aspartate aminotransferase (AST level were 42 ± 7.7 years (range 20-56 and 68 ± 41.7 U/L (range 16-214, respectively. The mean insulin level and insulin resistance index were 15.6 ± 18.3 mIU/mL (range 5.1-137.4 and 5.9 ± 15.2 (range 0.9-136.2, respectively. Fifty four percent of patients had steatosis and 65% had fibrosis. In multivariate analyses, steatosis was associated with insulin resistance and fibrosis was associated with high AST level, age ≥40 years, and steatosis. Conclusions: Steatosis is a histopathologic feature in >50% of patients with chronic HCV infection. Insulin resistance has an important role in the pathogenesis of steatosis, which represents a significant determinant of fibrosis together with high serum AST level and older age.

  3. Resistance and Protective Immunity in Redfish Lake Sockeye Salmon Exposed to M Type Infectious Hematopoietic Necrosis Virus (IHNV)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurath, Gael; Garver, Kyle; Purcell, Maureen K.; LaPatra, Scott E.

    2010-01-01

    Differential virulence of infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus (IHNV) isolates from the U and M phylogenetic subgroups is clearly evident in the Redfish Lake (RFL) strain of sockeye salmon Oncorhynchus nerka. In these fish, experimental immersion challenges with U isolates cause extremely high mortality and M isolates cause low or no mortality. When survivors of M virus immersion challenges were exposed to a secondary challenge with virulent U type virus they experienced high mortality, indicating that the primary M challenge did not elicit protective immunity. Delivery of a moderate dose (2 × 104 plaque-forming units [PFU]/fish) of virus by intraperitoneal injection challenge did not overcome RFL sockeye salmon resistance to M type IHNV. Injection challenge with a high dose (5 × 106 PFU/fish) of M type virus caused 10% mortality, and in this case survivors did develop protective immunity against a secondary U type virus challenge. Thus, although it is possible for M type IHNV to elicit cross-protective immunity in this disease model, it does not develop after immersion challenge despite entry, transient replication of M virus to low levels, stimulation of innate immune genes, and development of neutralizing antibodies in some fish.

  4. Vat, an amazing gene conferring resistance to aphids and viruses they carry: from molecular structure to field effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nathalie Boissot

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available We review half a century of research on Cucumis melo resistance to Aphis gossypii from molecular to field levels. The Vat gene is unique in conferring resistance to both A. gossypii and the viruses it transmits. This double phenotype is aphid clone-dependent and has been observed in 25 melon accessions, mostly from Asia. It is controlled by a cluster of genes including CC-NLR, which has been characterized in detail. Copy-number polymorphisms (for the whole gene and for a domain that stands out in the LLR region and single-nucleotide polymorphisms have been identified in the Vat cluster. The role of these polymorphisms in plant aphid/interactions remains unclear. The Vat gene structure suggests a functioning with separate recognition and response phases. During the recognition phase, the VAT protein is thought to interact (likely indirectly with an aphid effector introduced during cell puncture by the aphid. A few hours later, several miRNAs are upregulated in Vat plants. Peroxidase activity increases, and callose and lignin are deposited in the walls of the cells adjacent to the stylet path, disturbing aphid behavior. In aphids feeding on Vat plants, Piwi-interacting RNA-like sequences are abundant and the levels of other miRNAs are modified. At the plant level, resistance to aphids is quantitative (aphids escape the plant and display low rates of reproduction. Resistance to viruses is qualitative and local.Durability of NLR genes is highly variable. A. gossypii clones are adapted to Vat resistance, either by introducing a new effector that interferes with the deployment of plant defenses, or by adapting to the defenses it triggered. Viruses transmitted in a non-persistent manner cannot adapt to Vat resistance. At population level, Vat reduces aphid density and genetic diversity. The durability of Vat resistance to A. gossypii populations depends strongly on the agro-ecosystem, including, in particular, the presence of other cucurbit crops

  5. Epidemiology of Cucurbit yellow stunting disorder virus in the US Southwest and development of virus resistant melon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cucurbit yellow stunting disorder virus (CYSDV), emerged in the Southwest USA in 2006, where it is transmitted by the MEAM1 cryptic species of Bemisia tabaci. The virus results in late-season infection of spring melon crops with limited economic impact; however, all summer and fall cucurbits become ...

  6. Fine mapping of the Bsr1 barley stripe mosaic virus resistance gene in the model grass Brachypodium distachyon.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Cui

    Full Text Available The ND18 strain of Barley stripe mosaic virus (BSMV infects several lines of Brachypodium distachyon, a recently developed model system for genomics research in cereals. Among the inbred lines tested, Bd3-1 is highly resistant at 20 to 25 °C, whereas Bd21 is susceptible and infection results in an intense mosaic phenotype accompanied by high levels of replicating virus. We generated an F(6:7 recombinant inbred line (RIL population from a cross between Bd3-1 and Bd21 and used the RILs, and an F(2 population of a second Bd21 × Bd3-1 cross to evaluate the inheritance of resistance. The results indicate that resistance segregates as expected for a single dominant gene, which we have designated Barley stripe mosaic virus resistance 1 (Bsr1. We constructed a genetic linkage map of the RIL population using SNP markers to map this gene to within 705 Kb of the distal end of the top of chromosome 3. Additional CAPS and Indel markers were used to fine map Bsr1 to a 23 Kb interval containing five putative genes. Our study demonstrates the power of using RILs to rapidly map the genetic determinants of BSMV resistance in Brachypodium. Moreover, the RILs and their associated genetic map, when combined with the complete genomic sequence of Brachypodium, provide new resources for genetic analyses of many other traits.

  7. Resistance to cyclosporin A derives from mutations in hepatitis C virus nonstructural proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arai, Masaaki; Tsukiyama-Kohara, Kyoko; Takagi, Asako; Tobita, Yoshimi; Inoue, Kazuaki; Kohara, Michinori

    2014-05-23

    Cyclosporine A (CsA) is an immunosuppressive drug that targets cyclophilins, cellular cofactors that regulate the immune system. Replication of hepatitis C virus (HCV) is suppressed by CsA, but the molecular basis of this suppression is still not fully understood. To investigate this suppression, we cultured HCV replicon cells (Con1, HCV genotype 1b, FLR-N cell) in the presence of CsA and obtained nine CsA-resistant FLR-N cell lines. We determined full-length HCV sequences for all nine clones, and chose two (clones #6 and #7) of the nine clones that have high replication activity in the presence of CsA for further analysis. Both clones showed two consensus mutations, one in NS3 (T1280V) and the other in NS5A (D2292E). Characterization of various mutants indicated that the D2292E mutation conferred resistance to high concentrations of CsA (up to 2 μM). In addition, the missense mutation T1280V contributed to the recovery of colony formation activity. The effects of these mutations are also evident in two established HCV replicon cell lines-HCV-RMT ([1], genotype 1a) and JFH1 (genotype 2a). Moreover, three other missense mutations in NS5A-D2303H, S2362G, and E2414K-enhanced the resistance to CsA conferred by D2292E; these double or all quadruple mutants could resist approximately 8- to 25-fold higher concentrations of CsA than could wild-type Con1. These four mutations, either as single or combinations, also made Con1 strain resistant to two other cyclophilin inhibitors, N-methyl-4-isoleucine-cyclosporin (NIM811) or Debio-025. Interestingly, the changes in IC50 values that resulted from each of these mutations were the lowest in the Debio-025-treated cells, indicating its highest resistant activity against the adaptive mutation. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. The requirement of multiple defense genes in soybean Rsv1-mediated extreme resistance to soybean mosaic virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Chunquan; Grosic, Sehiza; Whitham, Steven A; Hill, John H

    2012-10-01

    Soybean mosaic virus (SMV) is a major viral pathogen of soybean. Among the three SMV resistance genes, Rsv1 mediates extreme resistance (ER) against most SMV strains, including the β-glucuronidase-tagged G2 isolate that was previously used in studies of Rsv1. Using virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS), we screened 82 VIGS constructs to identify genes that play a role in Rsv1-mediated ER to SMV infection. The target genes included putative Rsv1 candidate genes, soybean orthologs to known defense-signaling genes, and 62 WRKY transcription factors. We identified eight VIGS constructs that compromised Rsv1-mediated resistance when the target genes were silenced, including GmEDR1, GmEDS1, GmHSP90, GmJAR1, GmPAD4, and two WRKY transcription factors. Together, our results provide new insight into the soybean signaling network required for ER against SMV.

  9. Seleção de linhagens de melancia resistentes ao Watermelon mosaic virus e ao Papaya ringspot virus Selection of resistant watermelon lines to Watermelon mosaic virus and Papaya ringspot virus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Evando Aguiar Beserra Júnior

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Foram avaliadas 20 linhagens de melancia, provenientes do cruzamento da cultivar comercial suscetível Crimson Sweet e da introdução PI 595201 resistente ao Watermelon mosaic virus (WMV e Papaya ringspot virus (PRSV-W. As linhagens, e os parentais foram inoculados com o WMV ou com o PRSV-W em casa-de-vegetação distintas. Aos 35 e 49 dias após a primeira inoculação (DAI, as plantas foram avaliadas por meio de uma escala de notas, em que 1 (ausência de sintomas a 5 (intenso mosaico e deformações foliares. Pelos resultados infere-se que, aos 35 DAI, as linhagens 1, 2 e 20 apresentaram resistência tanto para o WMV como para o PRSV-W, com médias de 1,95, 1,80 e 2,25 para o WMV, e de 2,50, 2,30 e 2,50 para o PRSV-W, respectivamente. As linhagens 5, 7 e 13 foram resistentes somente ao WMV e as plantas das linhagens 3, 10 e 18 para o PRSV-W. A reação das linhagens permaneceu em geral pouco alterada aos 49 DAI. A existência de linhagens resistentes somente ao WMV e somente ao PRSV-W, ao lado de linhagens resistentes a ambos os vírus, é indicativo de que as resistências ao WMV e ao PRSV-W não são controladas pelos mesmos genes.Twenty advanced watermelon breeding lines, derived from the cross between cv. Crimson Sweet (susceptible and PI 595201 (resistant to WMV and PRSV-W, were screened for resistance to both potyviruses. The twenty lines, among with Crimson Sweet and PI 595201, were inoculated with either WMV or PRSV-W, in two different greenhouse trials. Plants were evaluated for symptoms 35 and 49 days after the first inoculation (DAI, using a scale from 1 (no symptoms to 5 (severe mosaic and foliar distortion. Evaluations at 35 DAI indicated that lines 1, 2 and 20 had good levels of resistance to both WMV and PRSV-W, with ratings of 1,95, 1,80 and 2,25 for WMV, and of 2,50, 2,30 and 2,50 for PRSV-W, respectively. Lines 5, 7 and 13 were resistant to WMV only, whereas lines 3, 10 and 18 were resistant to PRSV-W only. The reaction of

  10. Induction of Systemic Resistance against Cucumber mosaic virus in Arabidopsis thaliana by Trichoderma asperellum SKT-1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohsen Mohamed Elsharkawy

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Trichoderma asperellum SKT-1 is a microbial pesticide that is very effective against various diseases. Our study was undertaken to evaluate T. asperellum SKT-1 for induction of resistance against yellow strain of Cucumber mosaic virus (CMV-Y in Arabidopsis plants. Disease severity was rated at 2 weeks post inoculation (WPI. CMV titre in Arabidopsis leaves was determined by indirect enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA at 2 WPI. Our results demonstrated that among all Arabidopsis plants treated with barley grain inoculum (BGI of SKT-1 NahG and npr1 plants showed no significant reduction in disease severity and CMV titre as compared with control plants. In contrast, disease severity and CMV titre were significantly reduced in all Arabidopsis plants treated with culture filtrate (CF of SKT-1 as compared with control plants. RT-PCR results showed increased expression levels of SA-inducible genes, but not JA/ET-inducible genes, in leaves of BGI treated plants. Moreover, expression levels of SA- and JA/ET-inducible genes were increased in leaves of CF treated plants. In conclusion, BGI treatment induced systemic resistance against CMV through SA signaling cascade in Arabidopsis plants. While, treatment with CF of SKT-1 mediated the expression of a majority of the various pathogen related genes, which led to the increased defense mechanism against CMV infection.

  11. Inhibitors of the Hepatitis C Virus Polymerase; Mode of Action and Resistance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Auda A. Eltahla

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The hepatitis C virus (HCV is a pandemic human pathogen posing a substantial health and economic burden in both developing and developed countries. Controlling the spread of HCV through behavioural prevention strategies has met with limited success and vaccine development remains slow. The development of antiviral therapeutic agents has also been challenging, primarily due to the lack of efficient cell culture and animal models for all HCV genotypes, as well as the large genetic diversity between HCV strains. On the other hand, the use of interferon-α-based treatments in combination with the guanosine analogue, ribavirin, achieved limited success, and widespread use of these therapies has been hampered by prevalent side effects. For more than a decade, the HCV RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp has been targeted for antiviral development, and direct-acting antivirals (DAA have been identified which bind to one of at least six RdRp inhibitor-binding sites, and are now becoming a mainstay of highly effective and well tolerated antiviral treatment for HCV infection. Here we review the different classes of RdRp inhibitors and their mode of action against HCV. Furthermore, the mechanism of antiviral resistance to each class is described, including naturally occurring resistance-associated variants (RAVs in different viral strains and genotypes. Finally, we review the impact of these RAVs on treatment outcomes with the newly developed regimens.

  12. Proteomic analysis of salicylic acid induced resistance to Mungbean Yellow Mosaic India Virus in Vigna mungo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kundu, Subrata; Chakraborty, Dipjyoti; Pal, Amita

    2011-03-01

    The role of salicylic acid (SA) in inducing resistance to MYMIV infection in Vigna mungo has been elucidated by proteomics. Twenty-nine proteins identified by MALDI-TOF/TOF, predicted to be involved in stress responses, metabolism, photosynthesis, transport and signal transduction, showed increased abundance upon SA treatment. Susceptible plants showed characteristic yellow mosaic symptoms upon MYMIV infection. A concentration dependent decrease in physiological symptoms associated with MYMIV was observed upon exogenous SA treatment prior to viral inoculation; and no visible symptom was observed at 100 μM SA. SA treatment stimulated SOD and GPX activity and inhibited CAT activity thus preventing ROS mediated damage. Significant increase in chlorophyll, protein, carbohydrate, phenolic content and H(2)O(2) were observed. Involvement of calmodulin for transmission of defense signal by SA is suggested. A metabolic reprogramming leading to enhanced synthesis of proteins involved in primary and secondary metabolisms is necessary for SA mediated resistance to MYMIV. Identification of proteins showing increased abundance, involved in photosynthetic process is a significant finding which restores virus-induced degradation of the photosynthetic apparatus and provides enhanced metabolites required for repartition of resources towards defense.

  13. Association of Hepatitis C Virus With Insulin Resistance: Evidences From Animal Studies and Clinical Studie

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sadaf Badar

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: HCV infection is strongly associated with development of insulin resistance and type-2 diabetes, however molecular mechanism of these associations is not known. The aim of this review was to conduct a comprehensive literature search to understand the nature of the association between hepatitis C virus (HCV infection and insulin resistance (IR. We also explored the role of HCV core protein and NS5a in modulating the course of the insulin-signaling pathway.Evidence Acquisitions: We searched Directory of Open Access Journals (DOAJ Google Scholar, Pubmed (NLM, LISTA (EBSCO, Web of Science (TS and PakMediNet.Results: Emerging evidence suggests an association between HCV infection and carotid/coronary vascular disease. IR appears to be a dominant underlying cause of accelerated atherosclerosis in patients with chronic hepatitis C (CHC. HCV can induce IR directly through the stimulation of SOCS3 and PPA2, and both of these molecules have been shown to inhibit interferon-α signaling. Improvement of insulin sensitivity may increase the response rate to antiviral treatment and prevent IR complications, including vascular diseases. The results of several clinical trials that have used insulin sensitizers (metformin and PPAR-γ agonists have been inconclusive.Conclusions: Beside the association between HCV and IR, the published data also have showed the possible association of HCV core and NS5A protein with IR.

  14. Association of hepatitis C virus with insulin resistance: evidences from animal studies and clinical studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badar, Sadaf; Khubaib, Bushra; Idrees, Muhammad; Hussain, Abrar; Awan, Zunaira; Butt, Sadia; Afzal, Samia; Akram, Madeeha; Fatima, Zareen; Aftab, Mahwish; Saleem, Sana; Munir, Sara; Rauff, Bisma; Naudhani, Mahrukh; Ali, Liaquat; Ali, Muhammaad; Rehman, Irshadul

    2012-01-01

    HCV infection is strongly associated with development of insulin resistance and type-2 diabetes, however molecular mechanism of these associations is not known. The aim of this review was to conduct a comprehensive literature search to understand the nature of the association between hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection and insulin resistance (IR). We also explored the role of HCV core protein and NS5a in modulating the course of the insulin-signaling pathway. We searched Directory of Open Access Journals (DOAJ) Google Scholar, Pubmed (NLM), LISTA (EBSCO), Web of Science (TS and PakMediNet). Emerging evidence suggests an association between HCV infection and carotid/coronary vascular disease. IR appears to be a dominant underlying cause of accelerated atherosclerosis in patients with chronic hepatitis C (CHC). HCV can induce IR directly through the stimulation of SOCS3 and PPA2, and both of these molecules have been shown to inhibit interferon-α signaling. Improvement of insulin sensitivity may increase the response rate to antiviral treatment and prevent IR complications, including vascular diseases. The results of several clinical trials that have used insulin sensitizers (metformin and PPAR-γ agonists) have been inconclusive. Beside the association between HCV and IR, the published data also have showed the possible association of HCV core and NS5A protein with IR.

  15. Strain-specific V3 and CD4 binding site autologous HIV-1 neutralizing antibodies select neutralization-resistant viruses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moody, M. Anthony; Gao, Feng; Gurley, Thaddeus C.; Amos, Joshua D.; Kumar, Amit; Hora, Bhavna; Marshall, Dawn J.; Whitesides, John F.; Xia, Shi-Mao; Parks, Robert; Lloyd, Krissey E.; Hwang, Kwan-Ki; Lu, Xiaozhi; Bonsignori, Mattia; Finzi, Andrés; Vandergrift, Nathan A.; Alam, S. Munir; Ferrari, Guido; Shen, Xiaoying; Tomaras, Georgia D.; Kamanga, Gift; Cohen, Myron S.; Sam, Noel E.; Kapiga, Saidi; Gray, Elin S.; Tumba, Nancy L.; Morris, Lynn; Zolla-Pazner, Susan; Gorny, Miroslaw K.; Mascola, John R.; Hahn, Beatrice; Shaw, George M.; Sodroski, Joseph G.; Liao, Hua-Xin; Montefiori, David C.; Hraber, Peter T.; Korber, Bette T.; Haynes, Barton F.

    2015-01-01

    Summary The third variable (V3) loop and the CD4 binding site (CD4bs) of the HIV-1 envelope are frequently targeted by neutralizing antibodies (nAbs) in infected individuals. In chronic infection, HIV-1 escape mutants repopulate the plasma, and V3 and CD4bs nAbs emerge that can neutralize heterologous tier 1 easy-to-neutralize, but not tier 2 difficult-to-neutralize HIV-1 isolates. However, neutralization sensitivity of autologous plasma viruses to this type of nAb response has not been studied. We describe the development and evolution in vivo of antibodies distinguished by their target specificity for V3and CD4bs epitopes on autologous tier 2 viruses but not on heterologous tier 2 viruses. A surprisingly high fraction of autologous circulating viruses was sensitive to these antibodies. These findings demonstrate a role for V3 and CD4bs antibodies in constraining the native envelope trimer in vivo to a neutralization-resistant phenotype, explaining why HIV-1 transmission generally occurs by tier 2 neutralization-resistant viruses. PMID:26355218

  16. Wind Stress, METOP ASCAT, 0.25 degrees, Global, Near Real Time, Curl

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NOAA CoastWatch distributes near real time wind stress data in zonal, meridional, modulus, and wind stress curl sets. This data begins with wind velocity...

  17. A Scott bench with ergonomic thorax stabilisation pad improves body posture during preacher arm curl exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biscarini, Andrea; Benvenuti, Paolo; Busti, Daniele; Zanuso, Silvano

    2016-05-01

    We assessed whether the use of an ergonomic thorax stabilisation pad, during the preacher arm curl exercise, could significantly reduce the excessive shoulder protraction and thoracic kyphosis induced by the standard flat pad built into the existing preacher arm curl equipment. A 3D motion capture system and inclinometers were used to measure shoulder protraction and thoracic kyphosis in 15 subjects performing preacher arm curl with a plate-loaded machine provided with the standard flat pad. The same measures were repeated after replacing the flat pad with a new ergonomic pad, specifically designed to accommodate the thorax profile and improve body posture. Pad replacement significantly (p thorax stabilisation pad for the preacher arm curl exercise. The new ergonomic pad improves the poor posture conditions induced by the standard flat pad and may potentially allow a more effective training, prevent musculoskeletal discomfort, improve the breathing function and reduce the risk of injury.

  18. Wind Stress, QuikSCAT SeaWinds, 0.25 degrees, Global, Science Quality, Curl

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NOAA CoastWatch distributes science quality wind stress data in zonal, meridional, modulus, and wind stress curl sets. This data begins with wind velocity...

  19. Wind Stress, METOP ASCAT, 0.25 degrees, Global, Near Real Time, Curl

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NOAA CoastWatch distributes near real time wind stress data in zonal, meridional, modulus, and wind stress curl sets. This data begins with wind velocity...

  20. Wind Stress, QuikSCAT SeaWinds, 0.25 degrees, Global, Science Quality, Curl

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NOAA CoastWatch distributes science quality wind stress data in zonal, meridional, modulus, and wind stress curl sets. This data begins with wind velocity...

  1. Scales of North Atlantic wind stress curl determined from the comprehensive ocean-atmosphere data set

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehret, Laura L.; O'Brien, James J.

    1989-01-01

    Nineteen years of wind data over the North Atlantic are used to calculate a field of wind stress curl. An empirical orthogonal function (EOF) analysis is performed on this field, resulting in spatial patterns of wind stress curl and associated time series. A Monte Carlo technique is used to establish the statistical significance of each spatial pattern, and the associated time series are spectrally analyzed. The first four statistically significant EOF modes represent more than 50 percent of the curl variance, and the spatial patterns of curl associated with these modes exhibit the major elements of North Atlantic climatology. Most of the time series spectral variance is contained in annual and semiannual frequencies. The features observed include the individual annual variation of the subtropical high and the subpolar low, the annual oscillation of intensity between pressure centers, the influence of localized strong SST gradients and associated cyclogenesis regions, and the constant nature of the trades.

  2. Autologous HIV-1 neutralizing antibodies: emergence of neutralization-resistant escape virus and subsequent development of escape virus neutralizing antibodies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arendrup, M; Nielsen, C; Hansen, J E

    1992-01-01

    The capacity of consecutive human sera to neutralize sequentially obtained autologous virus isolates was studied. HIV-1 was isolated three times over a 48-164-week period from three individuals immediately after seroconversion and from two individuals in later stages of infection. Development of ...... escape virus may be part of the explanation of the apparent failure of the immune system to control HIV infection.......The capacity of consecutive human sera to neutralize sequentially obtained autologous virus isolates was studied. HIV-1 was isolated three times over a 48-164-week period from three individuals immediately after seroconversion and from two individuals in later stages of infection. Development...

  3. Influenza A(H7N9) virus gains neuraminidase inhibitor resistance without loss of in vivo virulence or transmissibility

    OpenAIRE

    Hai, Rong; Schmolke, Mirco; Leyva-Grado, Victor H.; Thangavel, Rajagowthamee R; Margine, Irina; Jaffe, Eric L; Krammer, Florian; Solórzano, Alicia; García-Sastre, Adolfo; Palese, Peter; Bouvier, Nicole M.

    2013-01-01

    Without baseline human immunity to the emergent avian influenza A(H7N9) virus, neuraminidase inhibitors are vital for controlling viral replication in severe infections. An amino acid change in the viral neuraminidase associated with drug resistance, NA-R292K (N2 numbering), has been found in some H7N9 clinical isolates. Here we assess the impact of the NA-R292K substitution on antiviral sensitivity and viral replication, pathogenicity and transmissibility of H7N9 viruses. Our data indicate t...

  4. Curling dynamics of naturally curved ribbons from high to low Reynolds numbers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albarran Arriagada, Octavio; Massiera, Gladys; Abkarian, Manouk

    2012-11-01

    Curling deformation of thin elastic sheets appears in numerous structures in nature, such as membranes of red blood cells, epithelial tissues or green algae colonies to cite just a few examples. However, despite its ubiquity, the dynamics of curling propagation in a naturally curved material remains still poorly investigated. Here, we present a coupled experimental and theoretical study of the dynamical curling deformation of naturally curved ribbons. Using thermoplastic and metallic ribbons molded on cylinders of different radii, we tune separately the natural curvature and the geometry to study curling dynamics in air, water and in viscous oils, thus spanning a wide range of Reynolds numbers. Our theoretical and experimental approaches separate the role of elasticity, gravity and hydrodynamic dissipation from inertia and emphasize the fundamental differences between the curling of a naturally curved ribbon and a rod described by the classical Elastica. Our work shows evidence for the propagation of a single instability front, selected by a local buckling condition. We show that depending on gravity, and both the Reynolds and the Cauchy numbers, the curling speed and shape are modified by the large scale drag and the local lubrication forces. This work was supported by the French Ministry of Research, the CNRS Physics-Chemistry-Biology Interdisciplinary Pro- gram, the University Montpellier 2 Interdisciplinary Program and the Region Languedoc-Roussillon.

  5. Molecular signatures associated with Mx1-mediated resistance to highly pathogenic influenza virus infection: mechanisms of survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cilloniz, Cristian; Pantin-Jackwood, Mary J; Ni, Chester; Carter, Victoria S; Korth, Marcus J; Swayne, David E; Tumpey, Terrence M; Katze, Michael G

    2012-03-01

    Understanding the role of host factors during lethal influenza virus infection is critical to deciphering the events that determine the fate of the host. One such factor is encoded by the Mx1 gene, which confers resistance to influenza virus infection. Here, we compared pathology and global gene expression profiles in lung tissue from BALB/c (Mx1(-)) and BALB · A2G-Mx1 mice (Mx1(+/+)) infected with the fully reconstructed 1918 pandemic influenza virus. Mx1(+/+) mice showed less tissue damage than Mx(-) animals, and pathology and mortality were further reduced by treating the mice with interferon prior to infection. Using global transcriptional profiling, we identified distinct molecular signatures associated with partial protection, complete protection, and the contribution of interferon to the host response. In the absence of interferon treatment, partial protection was characterized by the generation of an acute response with the upregulation of genes associated with apoptosis, reactive oxygen species, and cell migration. Complete protection was characterized by the downregulation of cytokine and chemokine genes previously associated with influenza virus pathogenesis. The contribution of interferon treatment to total protection in virus-infected Mx1(+/+) mice was characterized by the altered regulation of cell cycle genes. These genes were upregulated in Mx1(+/+) mice treated with interferon but downregulated in the absence of interferon treatment. Our results suggest that Mx1(+/+) mice generate a protective antiviral response by controlling the expression of key modulator molecules associated with influenza virus lethality.

  6. Quantitative trait loci meta-analysis of Plum pox virus resistance in apricot (Prunus armeniaca L.): new insights on the organization and the identification of genomic resistance factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marandel, Grégoire; Salava, Jaroslav; Abbott, Albert; Candresse, Thierry; Decroocq, Véronique

    2009-05-01

    Plum pox virus (PPV) is responsible for sharka disease, one of the most detrimental stone fruit diseases affecting Prunus trees worldwide. Only a few apricot cultivars have been described as resistant, most originating from North American breeding programmes. Several PPV resistance quantitative trait loci (QTLs) have been mapped in various progenies, consistently highlighting the contribution to the resistance of the upper part of linkage group 1 (LG1). However, to date, no consensus has been reached on the precise number of QTLs linked to the resistance to PPV in apricot and P. davidiana or on their accurate position on the genetic linkage map. In the present study, the quantitative resistance of cultivar 'Harlayne' was analysed over five growth periods in a large F1 population. Four QTLs were identified, three mapping on LG1, explaining between 5% and 39% of the observed phenotypic variance. In an effort to further this analysis of PPV resistance in apricot, these results were merged in a single QTL meta-analysis with those of five other PPV resistance analyses available in the literature. Three consensus QTL regions were identified on LG1 and a putative fourth region on LG3. QTL meta-analysis also revealed the contribution of each resistant cultivar to metaQTLs, providing interesting comparative data on the resistance factors shared between the resistance sources used in the various studies. Finally, it was shown that one of the metaQTLs co-localizes with the eukaryotic translation initiation factor eIF4E, thus providing new hypotheses on the mechanisms of PPV resistance in apricot.

  7. Reassortment and mutations associated with emergence and spread of oseltamivir-resistant seasonal influenza A/H1N1 viruses in 2005-2009.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ji-Rong Yang

    Full Text Available A dramatic increase in the frequency of the H275Y mutation in the neuraminidase (NA, conferring resistance to oseltamivir, has been detected in human seasonal influenza A/H1N1 viruses since the influenza season of 2007-2008. The resistant viruses emerged in the ratio of 14.3% and quickly reached 100% in Taiwan from September to December 2008. To explore the mechanisms responsible for emergence and spread of the resistant viruses, we analyzed the complete genome sequences of 25 viruses collected during 2005-2009 in Taiwan, which were chosen from various clade viruses, 1, 2A, 2B-1, 2B-2, 2C-1 and 2C-2 by the classification of hemagglutinin (HA sequences. Our data revealed that the dominant variant, clade 2B-1, in the 2007-2008 influenza emerged through an intra-subtype 4+4 reassortment between clade 1 and 2 viruses. The dominant variant acquired additional substitutions, including A206T in HA, H275Y and D354G in NA, L30R and H41P in PB1-F2, and V411I and P453S in basic polymerase 2 (PB2 proteins and subsequently caused the 2008-2009 influenza epidemic in Taiwan, accompanying the widespread oseltamivir-resistant viruses. We also characterized another 3+5 reassortant virus which became double resistant to oseltamivir and amantadine. Comparison of oseltamivir-resistant influenza A/H1N1 viruses belonging to various clades in our study highlighted that both reassortment and mutations were associated with emergence and spread of these viruses and the specific mutation, H275Y, conferring to antiviral resistance, was acquired in a hitch-hiking mechanism during the viral evolutionary processes.

  8. Analysis of resistance to Yam mosaic virus, genus Potyvirus in white guinea yam (Dioscorea rotundata Poir. genotypes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Babajide Odu O.

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Resistance to Yam mosaic virus (YMV, genus Potyvirus was studied in 10 populations of selected white Guinea yam (Dioscorea rotundata. Plants of resistant genotypes: TDr 35, TDr 1621, TDr 93-1, TDr 93-32, TDr 95-107, TDr 93-23, and susceptible ones: TDr 87/00211, TDr 87/00571 and TDr 95-127 were screened for their reaction to the pathogen by symptom severity scoring scale of 1-5, and by quantifying virus multiplication by triple antibody sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (TAS-ELISA. Controlled crosses were made among the genotypes within and between the groups according to reactions to the pathogen. The resultant F1 progenies were evaluated for the infection by disease symptom development and by TAS ELISA to detect a symptomless infection in an insect-proof screenhouse for the assessment of inheritance of resistance to YMV. A genetic analysis of the reactions of progenies derived from the D. rotundata genotypes to inoculation with YMV strongly suggests that resistance to the virus is a dominantly inherited trait. Segregation ratios obtained from the famili