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Sample records for curious galactic transient

  1. GRB070610 : A Curious Galactic Transient

    CERN Document Server

    Kasliwal, M M; Kulkarni, S R; Cameron, P B; Nakar, E; Ofek, E O; Rau, A; Soderberg, A M; Campana, S; Bloom, J S; Perley, D A; Pollack, L; Barthelmy, S; Cummings, J; Gehrels, N; Krimm, H A; Markwardt, C B; Sato, G; Chandra, P; Frail, D; Fox, D B; Price, P; Berger, E; Grebenev, S A; Krivonos, R A; Sunyaev, R A

    2007-01-01

    GRB070610 is a typical high-energy event with a duration of 5s. Yet within the burst localization we detect a highly unusual X-ray and optical transient, Swift J195509.6+261406. We see high amplitude X-ray and optical variability on very short time scales even at late times. Using near-infrared imaging assisted by a laser guide star and adaptive optics, we have identified a quiescent counterpart to Swift J195509.6+261406. Our spectroscopic observations show that the spectral type of the counterpart is likely a K dwarf/sub-giant. It is possible that GRB070610 and Swift J195509.6+261406 are unrelated sources. However, the absence of a typical X-ray afterglow from GRB070610 in conjunction with the spatial and temporal coincidence of GRB070610 and Swift J195509.6+261406 motivate us to suggest that the sources are related. The closest analog to Swift J195509.6+261406 is V4641 Sgr, an unusual black hole binary. We suggest that Swift J195509.6+261406 along with V4641 Sgr define a sub-class of stellar black holes -- ...

  2. Galactic microquasar transients with AGILE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munar-Adrover, Pere; Piano, Giovanni; Sabatini, S.; Tavani, M.; Lucarelli, F.; Verrecchia, F.; Pittori, C.

    2017-01-01

    The AGILE satellite has been proven to be an excellent tool to study transient gamma-ray sources since it entered in a spinning operational mode in 2009. Thanks to its scanning capabilities it observes the whole sky every few hours. Several new interesting systems were discovered, such as AGL J2241+4454 in 2010, probably associated to the mysterious black-hole high-mass X-ray binary MWC 656. With a state of the art PSF and sensitivity in the 100 MeV - 1 GeV energy range, AGILE studied this system in order to identify new periods of gamma-ray activity that could be associated to the binary, and found a total of 10 flares spanning from 2008 until 2013. AGILE studied also the Cygnus region, finding evidence of a new recent gamma-ray flare from the microquasar Cygnus X-3, with a flux of ˜ 2×10-8 ph cm-2 s, during a state transition phase in the bright high-soft X-ray state. Also Cygnus X-1 was detected in the past by AGILE, although both systems are very different and show different behaviour.

  3. Radio pulsars and transients in the Galactic center

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lazio, Joseph [Naval Research Laboratory, 4555 Overlook Ave. SW, Washington, DC 20375-5351 (United States); Deneva, J S [Astronomy Department and NAIC, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853 (United States); Bower, Geoffrey C [Astronomy Department and Radio Astronomy Laboratory, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Cordes, J M [Astronomy Department and NAIC, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853 (United States); Hyman, Scott D [Department of Physics and Engineering, Sweet Briar College, Sweet Briar, VA 24595 (United States); Backer, D C [Astronomy Department and Radio Astronomy Laboratory, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Bhat, R [Centre for Astrophysics and Supercomputing, Swinburne University, Hawthorn, Victoria 3122 (Australia); Chatterjee, S [National Radio Astronomy Observatory, 520 Edgemont Road, Charlottesville, VA 22903 (United States); Demorest, P [Astronomy Department and Radio Astronomy Laboratory, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Ransom, S M [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Vlemmings, W [Jodrell Bank Observatory, University of Manchester, Macclesfleld, Cheshire, SK11 9DL, UK (United Kingdom)

    2006-12-15

    Radio pulsars and transients provide powerful probes of the star formation history, interstellar medium, and gravitational potential of the Galactic center. Historical radio observations of the Galactic center have not emphasized the time domain aspect of observing this region. We summarize a series of recent searches for and observations of radio transients and pulsars that make use of two advances in technology. The first is the formation of large fields of view ({approx}> 1{sup 0}) at relatively longer wavelengths ({lambda} > 1 m), and the second is the construction of receivers and instruments capable of collecting data on microsecond time scales at relatively short wavelengths ({approx} 3 cm)

  4. The Galactic Transient Sky with Swift

    CERN Document Server

    Kennea, Jamie A

    2015-01-01

    The unique capabilities of Swift that make it ideal for discovery and follow-up of Gamma-Ray bursts also makes it the idea mission for discovery and monitoring of X-ray Transients in the Milky Way and the Large and Small Magellanic Clouds. The Burst Alert Telescope allows for detection of new transient outbursts, the automated follow-up capabilities of Swift allow for rapid observation and localization of the new transient in X-rays and optical/UV bands, and Swift's rapid slewing capabilities allows for low-overhead short observations to be obtained, opening up the possibility of regular, sensitive, long term monitoring of transient outbursts that are not possible with other currently operational X-ray missions. In this paper I describe the methods of discovery of X-ray transients utilizing Swift's BAT and also collaboration with the MAXI telescope. I also detail two examples of X-ray transient science enabled by Swift: Swift discovery and monitoring observations of MAXI J1659-152, a Black Hole candidate Low ...

  5. Low Frequency Radio Transients in the Galactic Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyman, S. D.; Bartleson, A. L.; Lazio, T. J. W.; Kassim, N. E.

    2001-12-01

    We report the detection of a new radio transient source, GCRT J1746-2757, located only 1.1 degrees north of the Galactic center. Consistent with other radio transients toward the Galactic center, this source brightened and faded on a time scale of a few months. No X-ray counterpart was detected, but upper limits suggest that GCRT J1746-2757 may have been a "fast" transient, with a time scale of days. We also report new 0.33 GHz measurements of the radio counterpart to the X-ray transient source, XTE J1748-288, previously detected and monitored at higher radio frequencies. We show that the spectrum of XTE J1748-288 steepened considerably during a period of a few months after its peak. We also discuss the need for a more efficient means of finding additional radio transients. This research is supported by funding from the Jeffress Memorial Trust, Research Corporation, and the Sweet Briar College Faculty Grants program. Basic research in radio astronomy at NRL is supported by the Office of Naval Research.

  6. Transient X-ray Emission from Normal Galactic Nuclei

    CERN Document Server

    Wong, A Y L; Cheng, K S

    2007-01-01

    X-ray transients appeared in optically non-active galactic nuclei have been observed in recent years. The most popular model explaining this kind of phenomena is the conventional tidal disruption model. In this model, when a star moves within the tidal radius of a black hole, part of the star materials will fall into the black hole through an accretion disk, which gives rise to the luminous flare. We propose that the X-ray emission may not necessarily come from radiation of the accretion disk. Instead, it may be related to a jet. As the jet travels in the interstellar medium, a shock is produced and synchrotron radiation is expected. We compared the model light curve and the synchrotron radiation spectrum with the observed data, and find that our model explains the observed light curve and late-time spectrum well. Our model predicts that these transient active galactic nuclei could be sources of the future gamma-ray satellites, e.g. GLAST and the emission region will be expanding with time.

  7. The Curious Case of NG2 Cells: Transient Trend or Game Changer?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean-Marie Mangin

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available It has been 10 years since the seminal work of Dwight Bergles and collaborators demonstrated that NG2 (nerve/glial antigen 2-expressing oligodendrocyte progenitor cells (NG2 cells receive functional glutamatergic synapses from neurons (Bergles et al., 2000, contradicting the old dogma that only neurons possess the complex and specialized molecular machinery necessary to receive synapses. While this surprising discovery may have been initially shunned as a novelty item of undefined functional significance, the study of neuron-to-NG2 cell neurotransmission has since become a very active and exciting field of research. Many laboratories have now confirmed and extended the initial discovery, showing for example that NG2 cells can also receive inhibitory GABAergic synapses (Lin and Bergles, 2004 or that neuron-to-NG2 cell synaptic transmission is a rather ubiquitous phenomenon that has been observed in all brain areas explored so far, including white matter tracts (Kukley et al., 2007; Ziskin et al., 2007; Etxeberria et al., 2010. Thus, while still being in its infancy, this field of research has already brought many surprising and interesting discoveries, and has become part of a continuously growing effort in neuroscience to re-evaluate the long underestimated role of glial cells in brain function (Barres, 2008. However, this area of research is now reaching an important milestone and its long-term significance will be defined by its ability to uncover the still elusive function of NG2 cells and their synapses in the brain, rather than by its sensational but transient successes at upsetting the old order established by neuronal physiology. To participate in the effort to facilitate such a transition, here we propose a critical review of the latest findings in the field of NG2 cell physiology - discussing how they inform us on the possible function(s of NG2 cells in the brain - and we present some personal views on new directions the field could

  8. A Search for Radio Transients and Variables in the Galactic Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neureuther, J. L.; Hyman, S. D.; Lazio, T. J. W.; Nord, M. E.; Kassim, N. E.

    2002-12-01

    We report on a search for radio transients in the Galactic center using a number of 327 MHz VLA observations made during the 1990's, and from a series of monthly VLA observations made during Spring and Summer 2002. A typical yield of compact sources in a given epoch is roughly 200. We have detected at least one new radio transient located only 1.1 degrees north of the Galactic center (AJ, 2002, vol. 123, pg. 1497). Other candidate sources are also presented. We use these observations to constrain the timescale(s) and nature of radio transients and variables in the Galactic center. Basic research in radio astronomy at the NRL is supported by the Office of Naval Research, and at Sweet Briar College by Research Corporation, the Jeffress Memorial Trust, and the National Science Foundation.

  9. Possible near-infrared counterpart to the Galactic transient 1RXH J173523.7-354013

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E.M. Cackett; R. Wijnands; M. Reynolds

    2008-01-01

    Following the recent announcement of an X-ray and optical outburst from a previously unknown Galactic transient possibly associated with 1RXH J173523.7-354013 (Israel et al. 2008, ATel #1528) we obtained near-infrared observations of the source using the PANIC camera on the 6.5-m Magellan Baade tele

  10. Long duration radio transients lacking optical counterparts are possibly Galactic Neutron Stars

    CERN Document Server

    Ofek, E O; Gal-Yam, A; Frail, D; Kasliwal, M M; Kulkarni, S R; Waxman, E

    2009-01-01

    (abridged) Recently, a new class of radio transients in the 5-GHz band was detected by Bower et al. We present new deep near-Infrared (IR) observations of the field containing these transients, and find no counterparts down to a limiting magnitude of K=20.4 mag. We argue that the bright (>1 Jy) radio transients recently reported by Kida et al. are consistent with being additional examples of the Bower et al. transients. We refer to these groups of events as "long-duration radio transients". The main characteristics of this population are: time scales longer than 30 minute but shorter than several days; rate, ~10^3 deg^-2 yr^-1; progenitors sky surface density of >60 deg^-2 (95% C.L.) at Galactic latitude ~40 deg; 1.4-5 GHz spectral slopes, f_\

  11. Transient Events in Archival Very Large Array Observations of the Galactic Center

    CERN Document Server

    Chiti, Anirudh; Wharton, Robert; Cordes, James; Lazio, T Joseph W; Kaplan, David L; Bower, Geoffrey C; Croft, Steve

    2016-01-01

    The Galactic center has some of the highest stellar densities in the Galaxy and a range of interstellar scattering properties that may aid in the detection of new radio-selected transient events. Here we describe a search for radio transients in the Galactic center using over 200 hours of archival data from the Very Large Array (VLA) at 5 and 8.4 GHz. Every observation of SgrA* from 1985$-$2005 has been searched using an automated processing and detection pipeline sensitive to transients with timescales between 30 seconds and five minutes with a typical detection threshold of $\\sim$100 mJy. Eight possible candidates pass tests to filter false-positives from radio-frequency interference, calibration errors, and imaging artifacts. Two events are identified as promising candidates based on the smoothness of their light curves. Despite the high quality of their light curves, these detections remain suspect due to evidence of incomplete subtraction of the complex structure in the Galactic center, and apparent cont...

  12. SIGMA discovery of a transient hard X-ray source in the galactic center region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vargas, M.; Goldwurm, A.; Paul, J.; Denis, M.; Borrel, V.; Bouchet, L.; Roques, J. P.; Jourdain, E.; Trudolyubov, S.; Gilfanov, M.; Churazov, E.; Sunyaev, R.; Khavenson, N.; Dyachkov, A.; Novikov, B.; Chulkov, I.

    1996-09-01

    A new X-ray transient source, GRS 1730-312 (=KS 1730-312), was discovered by the hard X-ray/soft γ-ray coded mask telescope SIGMA/GRANAT in the Galactic Center region during observations performed in September 1994. The flare started on September 22 and lasted approximately 3days, during which the source became the brightest object of the region at energies above 35keV. The average 35-200keV spectrum can be described by a power law with photon index of -2.5 or by a thermal bremsstrahlung model with kT_e_=~70keV. SIGMA data have been found consistent with the spectral shape and with the spectral evolution observed by the TTM/Mir-Kvant telescope at lower energies. This new source belongs to the population of hard X-ray sources already detected by SIGMA in the direction of the Galactic Bulge region.

  13. A model for the optical flares from the Galactic transient SWIFT J195509+261406

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    The Galactic hard X-ray transient SWIFT J195509+261406 was first observed as gamma-ray burst GRB 070610.Within 3 days after the burst,more than forty optical flares had been observed.Here,we propose that this peculiar event should be associated with a white dwarf.The hard X-ray burst itself may be triggered by a collision between two planets orbiting the white dwarf.Some cracked fragments produced in the collision then fell onto the surface of the white dwarf over several days,giving birth to the observed optical flares via cyclotron radiation.Our model can satisfactorily explain the basic features of the observations.

  14. Flares from Galactic Centre pulsars: a new class of X-ray transients?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giannios, Dimitrios; Lorimer, Duncan R.

    2016-06-01

    Despite intensive searches, the only pulsar within 0.1 pc of the central black hole in our Galaxy, Sgr A*, is a radio-loud magnetar. Since magnetars are rare among the Galactic neutron star population, and a large number of massive stars are already known in this region, the Galactic Centre (GC) should harbour a large number of neutron stars. Population syntheses suggest several thousand neutron stars may be present in the GC. Many of these could be highly energetic millisecond pulsars which are also proposed to be responsible for the GC gamma-ray excess. We propose that the presence of a neutron star within 0.03 pc from Sgr A* can be revealed by the shock interactions with the disc around the central black hole. As we demonstrate, these interactions result in observable transient non-thermal X-ray and gamma-ray emission over time-scales of months, provided that the spin-down luminosity of the neutron star is Lsd ˜ 1035 erg s-1. Current limits on the population of normal and millisecond pulsars in the GC region suggest that a number of such pulsars are present with such luminosities.

  15. Flares from Galactic centre pulsars: a new class of X-ray transients?

    CERN Document Server

    Giannios, Dimitrios

    2016-01-01

    Despite intensive searches, the only pulsar within 0.1 pc of the central black hole in our Galaxy, Sgr A*, is a radio-loud magnetar. Since magnetars are rare among the Galactic neutron star population, and a large number of massive stars are already known in this region, the Galactic centre (GC) should harbor a large number of neutron stars. Population syntheses suggest several thousand neutron stars may be present in the GC. Many of these could be highly energetic millisecond pulsars which are also proposed to be responsible for the GC gamma-ray excess. We propose that the presence of a neutron star within 0.03~pc from Sgr~A* can be revealed by the shock interactions with the disk around the central black hole. As we demonstrate, these interactions result in observable transient non-thermal X-ray and gamma-ray emission over timescales of months, provided that the spin down luminosity of the neutron star is L_{sd}~10^{35} erg/s. Current limits on the population of normal and millisecond pulsars in the GC regi...

  16. Fermi LAT Observations of Gamma-Ray Transients Near the Galactic Plane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hays, Elizabeth Anne

    2010-01-01

    The Large Area Telescope (LAT) on the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope provides unprecedented sensitivity for all-sky monitoring of gamma-ray activity from 20 MeV to >300 GeV. The observatory scans the entire sky every three hours and allows a general search for flaring activity on daily timescales. This search is conducted automatically as part of the ground processing and allows a fast response to transient events, typically less than a day. Most flares are spatially associated with known blazars, but in several cases during the first year of observations, gamma-ray flares occurring near the Galactic plane did not reveal any initially compelling counterparts. This prompted follow-up observations in X-ray, optical, and radio to attempt to identify the origin of the emission and probe the possible existence of a class of transient gamma-ray sources in the Galaxy. We will report on the details of these LAT events and the results of the multi-wavelength counterpart searches.

  17. The Galactic center X-ray transients AX J1745.6-2901 and GRS 1741-2853

    CERN Document Server

    Degenaar, N; Reynolds, M T; Miller, J M; Kennea, J; Gehrels, N

    2014-01-01

    AX J1745.6-2901 and GRS 1741-2853 are two transient neutron star low-mass X-ray binaries that are located within ~10' from the Galactic center. Multi-year monitoring observations with the Swift/XRT has exposed several accretion outbursts from these objects. We report on their updated X-ray light curves and renewed activity that occurred in 2010-2013.

  18. Swift/XRT Follow-up of the Fermi-LAT Galactic Plane Transient J0109+6134

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheung, C. C.; Donato, D.; Ajello, M.; Buehler, R.; Vandenbroucke, J.

    2010-02-01

    Following the Fermi-LAT detection of the Galactic Plane gamma-ray transient Fermi J0109+6134 (l, b = 125.121 deg, -1.226 deg) peaking on 1 Feb 2010 (ATEL #2414), we obtained a Swift observation on 3 Feb (from 05:30 -10:00 UTC). This gamma-ray source was confirmed by AGILE (ATEL #2416). In the 5 ksec XRT exposure, a bright X-ray source is detected with count rate (0.3-10 keV) =1.1 (+/- 0.2) e-2 cts/sec.

  19. Early Phase Detection and Coverage of Extragalactic and Galactic Black Hole X-ray Transients with the SKA

    CERN Document Server

    Yu, Wenfei; Yan, Zhen; Zhang, Wenda

    2015-01-01

    SKA's large field of view and high sensitivity at low frequencies will provide almost a complete coverage of the very early rising phase of extragalactic and Galactic transients which undergo a flare or outburst due to an abrupt accretion onto either supermassive (such as tidal disruption events, TDEs) or stellar mass black hole transients (such as black hole LMXB) , when their broadband emission is supposed to be jet-dominated at low luminosities, allowing SKA to be the first facility to make source discoveries and to send out alerts for follow-up ground or space observations as compared with the sensitivity of future X-ray wide-field-view monitoring. On the other hand, due to extremely large rate-of-change in the mass accretion rate during the rising phase of TDE flares or transient outbursts, SKA will be able to cover an extremely large range of the mass accretion rate as well as its rate-of-change not accessible with observations in persistent black hole systems, which will shape our understanding of disk...

  20. INTEGRAL observation of the Galactic transient Swift J174510.8-262411

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vovk, I.; Ferrigno, C.; Bozzo, E.

    2012-01-01

    with time. On the base of the rapid flux increase, the high value of the energy cut-off and the absence of thermonuclear bursts, we argue that Swift J174510.8-262411 might be a new black-hole transient. Further observations at all wavelengths are encouraged to unveil the nature of this source. We thank...

  1. Discovery of a non-blazar $\\gamma$-ray transient near the Galactic plane GRO J1838-04

    CERN Document Server

    Tavani, M; Mattox, J R; Halpern, J; Thompson, D J; Kanbach, G; Hermsen, W; Zhang, S N; Foster, R S

    1997-01-01

    We report the discovery of a remarkable gamma-ray transient source near the Galactic plane, GRO J1838-04. This source was serendipitously discovered by EGRET in June 1995 with a peak intensity of 4 E(-6) ph/cm/cm/s (for photon energies larger than 100 MeV) and a 5.9 sigma significance. At that time, GRO J1838-04 was the second brightest gamma-ray source in the sky. A subsequent EGRET pointing in late September 1995 detected the source at a flux smaller than its peak value by a factor of 7. We determined that no radio-loud spectrally-flat blazar is within the error box of GRO J1838-04. We discuss the origin of the \\ggg-ray transient source and show that interpretations in terms of AGNs or isolated pulsars are highly problematic. GRO J1838-04 provides strong evidence for the existence of a new class of variable gamma-ray sources.

  2. Transient Galactic Cosmic-ray Modulation during Solar Cycle 24: A Comparative Study of Two Prominent Forbush Decrease Events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, L.-L.; Zhang, H.

    2016-08-01

    Forbush decrease (FD) events are of great interest for transient galactic cosmic-ray (GCR) modulation study. In this study, we perform comparative analysis of two prominent Forbush events during cycle 24, occurring on 2012 March 8 (Event 1) and 2015 June 22 (Event 2), utilizing the measurements from the worldwide neutron monitor (NM) network. Despite their comparable magnitudes, the two Forbush events are distinctly different in terms of evolving GCR energy spectrum and energy dependence of the recovery time. The recovery time of Event 1 is strongly dependent on the median energy, compared to the nearly constant recovery time of Event 2 over the studied energy range. Additionally, while the evolutions of the energy spectra during the two FD events exhibit similar variation patterns, the spectrum of Event 2 is significantly harder, especially at the time of deepest depression. These difference are essentially related to their associated solar wind disturbances. Event 1 is associated with a complicated shock-associated interplanetary coronal mass ejection (ICME) disturbance with large radial extent, probably formed by the merging of multiple shocks and transient flows, and which delivered a glancing blow to Earth. Conversely, Event 2 is accompanied by a relatively simple halo ICME with small radial extent that hit Earth more head-on.

  3. Transient galactic cosmic ray modulation during solar cycle 24: A comparative study of two prominent Forbush decrease events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lingling, Zhao; Huai, Zhang; Hongqing, He

    2016-04-01

    Forbush decrease (FD) events are of great interest for transient galactic cosmic ray modulation study. In this study, we perform statistical analysis of two prominent Forbush events during cycle 24, occurred on 8 March 2012 (Event 1) and 22 June 2015 (Event 2), respectively, utilizing the measurements from the worldwide neutron monitor (NM) network. Despite of their comparable magnitudes, the two Forbush events are distinctly different in terms of evolving GCR energy spectrum and energy dependence of the recovery time. The recovery time of Event 1 is strongly dependent on the median energy, compared to the nearly constant recovery time of Event 2 over the studied energy range. Additionally, while the evolution of the energy spectra during the two FD event exhibit similar variation pattern, the spectrum of Event 2 is very harder, especially at the time of deepest depression. These difference are essentially related to their associated solar wind disturbances. Event 1 is associated with a complicated shock-associated ICME structure of IP/Sheath/MC sequence with large radial extend and limited longitudinal extent (narrow and thick), probably merged from multiple shocks and transient flows. Conversely, Event 2 is accompanied by a relatively simple interplanetary disturbance of IP/Sheath/Ejecta sequence with small radial extend and wide longitudinal departure (wide and thin), possibly evolved from an over expanded CME. Such comparative study may help to clarify the occurrence mechanisms of Forbush events related to different types solar wind structures and provide valuable insight into the transient GCR modulation, especially during the unusual solar cycle 24.

  4. The Outer Galactic Halo As Probed By RR Lyr Stars From the Palomar Transient Facility + Keck

    CERN Document Server

    Cohen, Judith G; Banholzer, Sophianna

    2015-01-01

    We present initial results from our study of the outer halo of the Milky Way using a large sample of RR Lyr(ab) variables datamined from the archives of the Palomar Transient Facility. Of the 464 RR Lyr in our sample with distances exceeding 50 kpc, 62 have been observed spectroscopically at the Keck Observatory. Radial velocities and sigma(vr) are given as a function of distance between 50 and 110 kpc, and a very preliminary rather low total mass for the Milky Way out to 110 kpc of ~7 (+-1.5) x 10**11 solar masses is derived from our data.

  5. The New Milky Way: a wide-field survey of optical transients near the Galactic plane

    CERN Document Server

    Sokolovsky, Kirill; Lebedev, Alexandr

    2013-01-01

    Currently, it may take days for a bright nova outburst to be detected. With the few exceptions, little is known about novae behaviour prior to maximum light. A theoretically-predicted population of ultra-fast novae with t2<1d is evading observational discovery because it is not possible to routinely organize fast follow-up observations of nova candidates. With the aim of brining the detection time of novae and other bright (V<13.5) optical transients from days down to hours or less, we develop an automated wide-field (8x6 deg.) system capable of surveying the whole Milky Way area visible from the observing site in one night. The system is built using low-cost mass-produced components and the transient detection pipeline is based on the open source VaST software. We describe the instrument design and report results of the first observations conducted in October-November 2011 and January-April 2012. The results include the discovery of Nova Sagittarii 2012 No. 1 as well as two X-ray emitting cataclysmic v...

  6. Discovery of the Third Transient X-ray Binary in the Galactic Globular Cluster Terzan 5

    CERN Document Server

    Bahramian, Arash; Sivakoff, Gregory R; Altamirano, Diego; Wijnands, Rudy; Homan, Jeroen; Linares, Manuel; Pooley, David; Degenaar, Nathalie; Gladstone, Jeanette C

    2013-01-01

    We report and study the outburst of a new transient X-ray binary (XRB) in Terzan 5, the third detected in this globular cluster, Swift J174805.3-244637 or Terzan 5 X-3. We find clear spectral hardening in Swift/XRT data during the outburst rise to the hard state, thanks to our early coverage (starting at L_X ~ 4x10^{34} ergs/s) of the outburst. This hardening appears to be due to the decline in relative strength of a soft thermal component from the surface of the neutron star (NS) during the rise. We identify a {Type I X-ray burst} in Swift/XRT data with a long (16 s) decay time, indicative of {hydrogen burning on the surface of the} NS. We use Swift/BAT, Maxi/GSC, Chandra/ACIS, and Swift/XRT data to study the spectral changes during the outburst, identifying a clear hard-to-soft state transition. We use a Chandra/ACIS observation during outburst to identify the transient's position. Seven archival Chandra/ACIS observations show evidence for variations in Terzan 5 X-3's non-thermal component, but not the ther...

  7. Discovery of the third transient X-ray binary in the galactic globular cluster Terzan 5

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bahramian, Arash; Heinke, Craig O.; Sivakoff, Gregory R.; Gladstone, Jeanette C. [Department of Physics, University of Alberta, CCIS 4-183, Edmonton, AB T6G 2E1 (Canada); Altamirano, Diego; Wijnands, Rudy [Astronomical Institute " Anton Pannekoek," University of Amsterdam, Science Park 904, 1098 XH Amsterdam (Netherlands); Homan, Jeroen [Kavli Institute for Astrophysics and Space Research, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 70 Vassar Street, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); Linares, Manuel [Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias, c/Vía Láctea s/n, E-38205 La Laguna, Tenerife (Spain); Pooley, David [Department of Physics, Sam Houston State University, Huntsville, TX 77341 (United States); Degenaar, Nathalie, E-mail: bahramia@ualberta.ca [Department of Astronomy, University of Michigan, 500 Church Street, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States)

    2014-01-10

    We report and study the outburst of a new transient X-ray binary (XRB) in Terzan 5, the third detected in this globular cluster, Swift J174805.3-244637 or Terzan 5 X-3. We find clear spectral hardening in Swift/XRT data during the outburst rise to the hard state, thanks to our early coverage (starting at L{sub X} ∼ 4 × 10{sup 34} erg s{sup –1}) of the outburst. This hardening appears to be due to the decline in relative strength of a soft thermal component from the surface of the neutron star (NS) during the rise. We identify a Type I X-ray burst in Swift/XRT data with a long (16 s) decay time, indicative of hydrogen burning on the surface of the NS. We use Swift/BAT, MAXI/GSC, Chandra/ACIS, and Swift/XRT data to study the spectral changes during the outburst, identifying a clear hard-to-soft state transition. We use a Chandra/ACIS observation during outburst to identify the transient's position. Seven archival Chandra/ACIS observations show evidence for variations in Terzan 5 X-3's nonthermal component but not the thermal component during quiescence. The inferred long-term time-averaged mass accretion rate, from the quiescent thermal luminosity, suggests that if this outburst is typical and only slow cooling processes are active in the NS core, such outbursts should recur every ∼10 yr.

  8. Four curious supergravities

    CERN Document Server

    Duff, M J

    2011-01-01

    We consider four supergravities with 16+16, 32+32, 64+64, 128+128 degrees of freedom displaying some curious properties: (1) They exhibit minimal supersymmetry (N=1, 2, 2, 1) but maximal rank (r=7, 6, 4, 0) of the scalar coset in D=4, 5, 7, 11. (2) They couple naturally to supermembranes and admit these membranes as solutions. (3) Although the D=4, 5, 7 supergravities follow from truncating the maximally supersymmetric ones, there nevertheless exist M-theory compactifications with G2, SU(3), SU(2) holonomy having these supergravities as their massless sectors. (4) They reduce to N=1, 2, 4, 8 theories all with maximum rank 7 in D=4 which (5) correspond to 0, 1, 3, 7 lines of the Fano plane and hence admit a division algebra (R,C,H,O) interpretation consistent with the black-hole/qubit correspondence, (6) are generalized self-mirror and hence (7) have vanishing on-shell trace anomaly.

  9. IGR J17454-2919: a new X-ray transient found by INTEGRAL/JEM-X close to the Galactic Center

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chenevez, Jérôme; Brandt, Søren; Budtz-Jørgensen, Carl

    2014-01-01

    % error confidence of 5 arcsec. The XRT 0.3-10 keV PC-mode count-rate is 0.64 ±0.03 cnt/s. Further analysis of the Swift data is on-going. We thank the Swift team for having performed this observation of the new transient source. Multi-wavelength follow-up observations are encouraged to unveil the nature......The JEM-X twin X-ray monitors on board the INTEGRAL satellite have again detected a new X-ray transient during the latest observation of the Galactic Center region. The new source named IGR J17454-2919 is found less than 24 arcmin from the Galactic Center. The source appears in both JEM-X 3-10 ke...

  10. Radio emissions from pulsar companions : a refutable explanation for galactic transients and fast radio bursts

    CERN Document Server

    Mottez, Fabrice

    2014-01-01

    The six known highly dispersed fast radio bursts are attributed to extragalactic radio sources, of unknown origin but extremely energetic. We propose here a new explanation - not requiring an extreme release of energy - involving a body (planet, asteroid, white dwarf) orbiting an extragalactic pulsar. We investigate a theory of radio waves associated to such pulsar-orbiting bodies. We focus our analysis on the waves emitted from the magnetic wake of the body in the pulsar wind. After deriving their properties, we compare them with the observations of various transient radio signals in order to see if they could originate from pulsar-orbiting bodies. The analysis is based on the theory of Alfv\\'en wings: for a body immersed in a pulsar wind, a system of two stationary Alfv\\'en waves is attached to the body, provided that the wind is highly magnetized. When destabilized through plasma instabilities, Alfv\\'en wings can be the locus of strong radio sources convected with the pulsar wind. Assuming a cyclotron mase...

  11. Searching for High-energy, Horizon-scale Emissions from Galactic Black Hole Transients during Quiescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, L. C.-C.; Pu, Hung-Yi; Hirotani, Kouichi; Kong, Albert K. H.; Matsushita, Satoki; Chang, Hsiang-Kuang; Inoue, Makoto; Tam, Pak-Hin T.

    2017-08-01

    We search for the gamma-ray counterparts of stellar-mass black holes using the long-term Fermi archive to investigate the electrostatic acceleration of electrons and positrons in the vicinity of the event horizon. We achieve this by applying the pulsar outer-gap model to their magnetospheres. When a black hole transient (BHT) is in a low-hard or quiescent state, the radiatively inefficient accretion flow cannot emit enough MeV photons that are required to sustain the force-free magnetosphere in the polar funnel via two-photon collisions. In this charge-starved gap region, an electric field arises along the magnetic field lines to accelerate electrons and positrons into ultra-relativistic energies. These relativistic leptons emit copious Gamma-rays via the curvature and inverse-Compton (IC) processes. It is found that these gamma-ray emissions exhibit a flaring activity when the plasma accretion rate typically stays between 0.01% and 0.005% of the Eddington value for rapidly rotating, stellar-mass black holes. By analyzing the detection limit determined from archival Fermi/Large Area Telescope data, we find that the 7-year averaged duty cycle of such flaring activities should be less than 5% and 10% for XTE J1118+480 and 1A 0620-00, respectively, and that the detection limit is comparable to the theoretical prediction for V404 Cyg. It is predicted that the gap emission can be discriminated from the jet emission if we investigate the high-energy spectral behavior or observe nearby BHTs during deep quiescence simultaneously in infrared wavelength and very-high energies.

  12. A new X-ray transient, IGR J17451-3022, discovered by INTEGRAL/JEM-X near the Galactic Centre

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chenevez, Jérôme; Vandbaek Kroer, L.; Budtz-Jørgensen, Carl;

    2014-01-01

    The JEM-X twin X-ray monitors on board the INTEGRAL satellite has detected a new X-ray transient during recent observations of the Galactic Centre and Bulge regions. The new source named IGR J17451-3022 has the following coordinates: R.A. = 266.27 Dec. = -30.38 with a 2arcmin 90% confidence radius...... instrument, only 26 arcsec from the JEM-X position, at the enhanced position : R.A. = 266.27824 Dec. = -30.37876 with a 90% error confidence of 2.1 arcsec. Further analysis of the Swift data is on-going. We thank the Swift team for having performed this observation of the new transient source. Multi...

  13. Curious cases of the enzymes

    OpenAIRE

    Ulusu Nuriye Nuray

    2015-01-01

    J Med Biochem 2015; 34 (3) DOI: 10.2478/jomb-2014-0045 UDK 577. 1 : 61 ISSN 1452-8258 J Med Biochem 34: 271–281, 2015 Review article Pregledni ~lanak CURIOUS CASES OF THE ENZYMES NEOBI^NA ISTORIJA ENZIMA Nuriye Nuray Ulusu Koç University, School of Medicine, Sariyer-Istanbul, Turkey Address for correspondence: N. Nuray Ulusu, PhD Koç University School of Medicine Professor of Biochemistry Rumelifeneri Yolu Sarıyer-Istanbul – Turkey Phone: +90 (212)...

  14. X-ray outbursts of ESO 243-49 HLX-1: comparison with Galactic low-mass X-ray binary transients

    CERN Document Server

    Yan, Zhen; Soria, Roberto; Altamirano, Diego; Yu, Wenfei

    2015-01-01

    We studied the outburst properties of the hyper-luminous X-ray source ESO 243-49 HLX-1, using the full set of Swift monitoring observations. We quantified the increase in the waiting time, recurrence time and e-folding rise timescale along the outburst sequence, and the corresponding decrease in outburst duration, total radiated energy, and e-folding decay timescale, which confirms previous findings. HLX-1 spends less and less time in outburst and more and more time in quiescence, but its peak luminosity remains approximately constant. We compared the HLX-1 outburst properties with those of bright Galactic low-mass X-ray binary transients (LMXBTs). Our spectral analysis strengthens the similarity between state transitions in HLX-1 and those in Galactic LMXBTs. We also found that HLX-1 follows the nearly linear correlations between the hard-to-soft state transition luminosity and the peak luminosity, and between the rate of change of X-ray luminosity during the rise phase and the peak luminosity, which indicat...

  15. SMM observations of gamma-ray transients. 3: A search for a broadened, redshifted positron annihilation line from the direction of the Galactic center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Michael J.; Share, Gerald H.; Leising, Mark D.

    1994-01-01

    We have searched for 1980-1988 Solar Maximum Mission gamma-ray spectrometer data for transient emission on timescales from hours to approximately 12 days of broad gamma-ray lines at energies approximately 400 keV, which were reported by the High Energy Astronomy Observatory (HEAO) 1 and SIGMA experiments from two sources lying toward the Galactic center. The lines have been interpreted as the product of the annihilation of positrons in pair plasmas surrounding the black hole candidate 1E 1740.7-2942 and the X-ray binary 1H 1822-371. Our results from a combined exposure of approximately 1.5 x 10(exp 7)s provide no convincing evidence for transient emission of this line on any timescale between approximately 9 hr and approximately 1 yr. Our 3 sigma upper limits on the line flux during approximately 12 day intervals are characteristically 4.8 x 10(exp -3) photon/sq cm/s, while for approximately 1 day intervals our 3 sigma upper limits are characteristically 4.9 x 10(exp -3) photon/sq cm/s. These results imply a duty cycle of less than 1.3% for the transient line measured from 1H 1822-371 during a approximately 3 week interval in 1977 by HEAO 1, and a duty cycle of less than or = 0.8% for the transient line detected in 1990 and 1992 from 1E 1740.7-2942 on approximately 1 day timescales by SIGMA.

  16. NuSTAR J163433-4738.7: A Fast X-ray Transient in the Galactic Plane

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tomsick, John A.; Gotthelf, Eric V.; Rahoui, Farid

    2014-01-01

    During hard X-ray observations of the Norma spiral arm region by the Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array (NuSTAR) in 2013 February, a new transient source, NuSTAR J163433-4738.7, was detected at a significance level of 8-sigma in the 3-10 keV bandpass. The source is consistent with having a con...

  17. New Curious Bilateral q-Series Identities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frédéric Jouhet

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available By applying a classical method, already employed by Cauchy, to a terminating curious summation by one of the authors, a new curious bilateral q-series identity is derived. We also apply the same method to a quadratic summation by Gessel and Stanton, and to a cubic summation by Gasper, respectively, to derive a bilateral quadratic and a bilateral cubic summation formula.

  18. A VLA (Very Large Array) Search for 5 GHz Radio Transients and Variables at Low Galactic Latitudes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ofek, E. O.; Frail, D. A.; Breslauer, B.; Kulkarni, S. R.; Chandra, P.; Gal-Yam, A.; Kasliwal, M. M.; Gehrels, N.

    2012-01-01

    We present the results of a 5GHz survey with the Very Large Array (VLA) and the expanded VLA, designed to search for short-lived (approx 1.8mJy) = 0.039(exp +0.13,+0.18) (sub .0.032,.0.038) / sq. deg (1, 2 sigma confidence errors). This areal density is consistent with the sky surface density of transients from the Bower et al. survey extrapolated to 1.8mJy. Our observed transient areal density is consistent with a Neutron Stars (NSs) origin for these events. Furthermore, we use the data to measure the sources variability on days to years time scales, and we present the variability structure function of 5GHz sources. The mean structure function shows a fast increase on approximately 1 day time scale, followed by a slower increase on time scales of up to 10 days. On time scales between 10 - 60 days the structure function is roughly constant. We find that approx > 30% of the unresolved sources brighter than 1.8mJy are variable at the > 4-sigma confidence level, presumably due mainly to refractive scintillation.

  19. NuSTAR J163433-473841: A Fast X-ray Transient in the Galactic Plane

    CERN Document Server

    Tomsick, John A; Rahoui, Farid; Assef, Roberto J; Bauer, Franz E; Bodaghee, Arash; Boggs, Steven E; Christensen, Finn E; Craig, William W; Fornasini, Francesca M; Grindlay, Jonathan; Hailey, Charles J; Harrison, Fiona A; Krivonos, Roman; Natalucci, Lorenzo; Stern, Daniel; Zhang, William W

    2014-01-01

    During hard X-ray observations of the Norma spiral arm region by the Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array (NuSTAR) in 2013 February, a new transient source, NuSTAR J163433-473841, was detected at a significance level of 8-sigma in the 3-10 keV bandpass. The source is consistent with having a constant NuSTAR count rate over a period of 40 ks and is also detected simultaneously by Swift at lower significance. The source is not significantly detected by NuSTAR, Swift, or Chandra in the days before or weeks after the discovery of the transient, indicating that the strong X-ray activity lasted for between ~0.5 and 1.5 days. Near-IR imaging observations were carried out before and after the X-ray activity, but we are not able to identify the counterpart. The combined NuSTAR and Swift energy spectrum is consistent with a power-law with a photon index of Gamma = 4.1(+1.5)(-1.0) (90% confidence errors), a blackbody with kT = 1.2+/-0.3 keV, or a bremsstrahlung model with kT = 3.0(+2.1)(-1.2) keV. The reduced-chi2 valu...

  20. NuSTAR J163433-4738.7: A fast X-ray transient in the galactic plane

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tomsick, John A.; Bodaghee, Arash; Boggs, Steven E.; Craig, William W.; Fornasini, Francesca M.; Krivonos, Roman [Space Sciences Laboratory, 7 Gauss Way, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720-7450 (United States); Gotthelf, Eric V.; Hailey, Charles J. [Columbia Astrophysics Laboratory, Columbia University, New York, NY 10027 (United States); Rahoui, Farid [European Southern Observatory, Karl Schwarzschild-Strasse 2, D-85748 Garching bei München (Germany); Assef, Roberto J. [Núcleo de Astronomía de la Facultad de Ingeniería, Universidad Diego Portales, Av. Ejército 441, Santiago (Chile); Bauer, Franz E. [Instituto de Astrofísica, Facultad de Física, Pontifica Universidad Católica de Chile, 306, Santiago 22 (Chile); Christensen, Finn E. [DTU Space, National Space Institute, Technical University of Denmark, Elektrovej 327, DK-2800 Lyngby (Denmark); Grindlay, Jonathan [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Harrison, Fiona A. [Cahill Center for Astronomy and Astrophysics, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Natalucci, Lorenzo [Istituto Nazionale di Astrofisica, INAF-IAPS, via del Fosso del Cavaliere, I-00133 Roma (Italy); Stern, Daniel [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91109 (United States); Zhang, William W., E-mail: jtomsick@ssl.berkeley.edu [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States)

    2014-04-10

    During hard X-ray observations of the Norma spiral arm region by the Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array (NuSTAR) in 2013 February, a new transient source, NuSTAR J163433-4738.7, was detected at a significance level of 8σ in the 3-10 keV bandpass. The source is consistent with having a constant NuSTAR count rate over a period of 40 ks and is also detected simultaneously by Swift at lower significance. The source is not significantly detected by NuSTAR, Swift, or Chandra in the days before or weeks after the discovery of the transient, indicating that the strong X-ray activity lasted between ∼0.5 and 1.5 days. Near-infrared imaging observations were carried out before and after the X-ray activity, but we are not able to identify the counterpart. The combined NuSTAR and Swift energy spectrum is consistent with a power law with a photon index of Γ=4.1{sub −1.0}{sup +1.5} (90% confidence errors), a blackbody with kT = 1.2 ± 0.3 keV, or a Bremsstrahlung model with kT=3.0{sub −1.2}{sup +2.1} keV. The reduced-χ{sup 2} values for the three models are not significantly different, ranging from 1.23 to 1.44 for 8 degrees of freedom. The spectrum is strongly absorbed with N{sub H}=(2.8{sub −1.4}{sup +2.3})×10{sup 23} cm{sup –2}, (9{sub −7}{sup +15})×10{sup 22} cm{sup –2}, and (1.7{sub −0.9}{sup +1.7})×10{sup 23} cm{sup –2}, for the power-law, blackbody, and Bremsstrahlung models, respectively. Although the high column density could be due to material local to the source, it is consistent with absorption from interstellar material along the line of sight at a distance of 11 kpc, which would indicate an X-ray luminosity >10{sup 34} erg s{sup –1}. Although we do not reach a definitive determination of the nature of NuSTAR J163433-4738.7, we suggest that it may be an unusually bright active binary or a magnetar.

  1. NuSTAR J163433-4738.7: A Fast X-Ray Transient in the Galactic Plane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomsick, John A.; Gotthelf, Eric V.; Rahoui, Farid; Assef, Roberto J.; Bauer, Franz E.; Bodaghee, Arash; Boggs, Steven E.; Christensen, Finn E.; Craig, William W.; Fornasini, Francesca M.; Grindlay, Jonathan; Hailey, Charles J.; Harrison, Fiona A.; Krivonos, Roman; Natalucci, Lorenzo; Stern, Daniel; Zhang, William W.

    2014-01-01

    During hard X-ray observations of the Norma spiral arm region by the Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array (NuSTAR) in 2013 February, a new transient source, NuSTAR J163433-4738.7, was detected at a significance level of 8sigma in the 3-10 keV bandpass. The source is consistent with having a constant NuSTAR count rate over a period of 40 ks and is also detected simultaneously by Swift at lower significance. The source is not significantly detected by NuSTAR, Swift, or Chandra in the days before or weeks after the discovery of the transient, indicating that the strong X-ray activity lasted between approx. 0.5 and 1.5 days. Near-infrared imaging observations were carried out before and after the X-ray activity, but we are not able to identify the counterpart. The combined NuSTAR and Swift energy spectrum is consistent with a power law with a photon index of Gamma = 4.1(+1.5/-1.0) (90% confidence errors), a blackbody with kT = 1.2+/-0.3 keV, or a Bremsstrahlung model with kT = 3.0(+2.1/-1.2) keV. The reduced-?2 values for the three models are not significantly different, ranging from 1.23 to 1.44 for 8 degrees of freedom. The spectrum is strongly absorbed with NH = (2.8(+2.3/-1.4) × 10(exp23) cm(exp-2), (9(+15 /-7) ) × 10(exp22) cm(exp-2), and (1.7(+1.7/-0.9)) × 10(exp23) cm(exp-2), for the power-law, blackbody, and Bremsstrahlung models, respectively. Although the high column density could be due to material local to the source, it is consistent with absorption from interstellar material along the line of sight at a distance of 11 kpc, which would indicate an X-ray luminosity greater than 10(exp34) erg s(exp-1). Although we do not reach a definitive determination of the nature of NuSTAR J163433-4738.7, we suggest that it may be an unusually bright active binary or a magnetar.

  2. A study of a curious arithmetic function

    CERN Document Server

    Farhi, Bakir

    2010-01-01

    In this note, we study the arithmetic function $f : \\mathbb{Z}_+^* \\to \\mathbb{Q}_+^*$ defined by $f(2^k \\ell) = \\ell^{1 - k}$ ($\\forall k, \\ell \\in \\mathbb{N}$, $\\ell$ odd). We show several important properties about that function and then we use them to obtain some curious results involving the 2-adic valuation.

  3. Curious Play: Children's Exploration of Nature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurholt, Kirsti Pedersen; Sanderud, Jostein Rønning

    2016-01-01

    This article explores the concept of "curious play" as a theoretical framework to understand and communicate children's experiences of free play in nature. The concept emerged interactively from three sources of inspiration: an ethnographically inspired study of children playing in nature; as a critique of the concept of "risky…

  4. Curious parallels and curious connections--phylogenetic thinking in biology and historical linguistics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atkinson, Quentin D; Gray, Russell D

    2005-08-01

    In The Descent of Man (1871), Darwin observed "curious parallels" between the processes of biological and linguistic evolution. These parallels mean that evolutionary biologists and historical linguists seek answers to similar questions and face similar problems. As a result, the theory and methodology of the two disciplines have evolved in remarkably similar ways. In addition to Darwin's curious parallels of process, there are a number of equally curious parallels and connections between the development of methods in biology and historical linguistics. Here we briefly review the parallels between biological and linguistic evolution and contrast the historical development of phylogenetic methods in the two disciplines. We then look at a number of recent studies that have applied phylogenetic methods to language data and outline some current problems shared by the two fields.

  5. D = 3 Unification of Curious Supergravities

    CERN Document Server

    Duff, M J; Marrani, A

    2016-01-01

    We consider the dimensional reduction to D = 3 of four maximal-rank supergravities which preserve minimal supersymmetry in D = 11, 7, 5 and 4. Such "curious" theories were investigated some time ago, and the four-dimensional one corresponds to an N = 1 supergravity with 7 chiral multiplets spanning the seven-disk manifold. Recently, this latter theory was considered to provide cosmological models for alpha-attractors, which are based on the disk geometry with possible restrictions on the parameter alpha. A unified picture emerges in D = 3, where the Ehlers group of General Relativity merges with the S-, T- and U- dualities of the D = 4 parent theories.

  6. D = 3 Unification of Curious Supergravities

    CERN Document Server

    Duff, M.J.; Marrani, A.

    2017-01-09

    We consider the dimensional reduction to D = 3 of four maximal-rank supergravities which preserve minimal supersymmetry in D = 11, 7, 5 and 4. Such "curious" theories were investigated some time ago, and the four-dimensional one corresponds to an N = 1 supergravity with 7 chiral multiplets spanning the seven-disk manifold. Recently, this latter theory was considered to provide cosmological models for alpha-attractors, which are based on the disk geometry with possible restrictions on the parameter alpha. A unified picture emerges in D = 3, where the Ehlers group of General Relativity merges with the S-, T- and U- dualities of the D = 4 parent theories.

  7. Flexagons yield a curious Catalan number identity

    CERN Document Server

    Callan, David

    2010-01-01

    Hexaflexagons were popularized by the late Martin Gardner in his first Scientific American column in 1956. Oakley and Wisner showed that they can be represented abstractly by certain recursively defined permutations called pats, and deduced that they are counted by the Catalan numbers. Counting pats by number of descents yields the curious identity Sum[1/(2n-2k+1)binom{2n-2k+1}{k}binom{2k}{n-k},k=0..n] = C(n), where only the middle third of the summands are nonzero.

  8. D = 3 Unification of Curious Supergravities

    CERN Document Server

    Duff, M.J.; Marrani, A.

    2017-01-01

    We consider the dimensional reduction to D = 3 of four maximal-rank supergravities which preserve minimal supersymmetry in D = 11, 7, 5 and 4. Such "curious" theories were investigated some time ago, and the four-dimensional one corresponds to an N = 1 supergravity with 7 chiral multiplets spanning the seven-disk manifold. Recently, this latter theory was considered to provide cosmological models for alpha-attractors, which are based on the disk geometry with possible restrictions on the parameter alpha. A unified picture emerges in D = 3, where the Ehlers group of General Relativity merges with the S-, T- and U- dualities of the D = 4 parent theories.

  9. The Curious Case of Benjamin Button

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李群干; 李春

    2010-01-01

    一个奇异的开始,注定了奇异的结束;一个魔幻的故事,谱写着非凡的人生;一个青春活泼的女孩,与传奇老小孩心灵相通,结下了牵挂一生的誓言,演绎了一出生离死别、百转千回的至情至爱的史诗。《返老还童》(The Curious Case of Benjamin Button),一个时空交错的故事,一个垂死弥留之际的人生追忆,一段跌宕冗长、历史沧桑的叙述,让读者嗅到了生命的凄凉,爱的无奈……

  10. Galactic dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Binney, James

    2008-01-01

    Since it was first published in 1987, Galactic Dynamics has become the most widely used advanced textbook on the structure and dynamics of galaxies and one of the most cited references in astrophysics. Now, in this extensively revised and updated edition, James Binney and Scott Tremaine describe the dramatic recent advances in this subject, making Galactic Dynamics the most authoritative introduction to galactic astrophysics available to advanced undergraduate students, graduate students, and researchers. Every part of the book has been thoroughly overhauled, and many section

  11. The Curious Case of Pyridine - Water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mackenzie, Becca; Dewberry, Chris; Smith, CJ; Cornelius, Ryan D.; Leopold, Ken

    2016-06-01

    The rotational spectrum of the pyridine\\cdotswater complex has been observed in the 2-18 GHz region using chirped-pulse and cavity Fourier transform microwave spectroscopy. The water is hydrogen bonded to the nitrogen, as expected, but the hydrogen bond is bent, with the oxygen tilted toward either of the ortho hydrogens of the pyridine. This gives rise to a pair of equivalent configurations and the possibility of a tunneling motion involving an in-plane rocking of the water. DFT calculations support this view. Experimentally, a pair of states with severely perturbed rotational structure has been identified and the spectra assigned. Analysis of the perturbations in the a-type (pure rotation) spectra has enabled an accurate determination of the tunneling splitting, which has been confirmed by direct observation of b-type (rotation-tunneling) transitions. A simultaneous fit of the a- and b- type transitions gives the most accurate value of the tunneling splitting. Results for the H2O, D2O, and D-bound HOD complexes will be presented. The tunneling splittings are as follows: H2O-pyridine (10402.9 MHz), HOD-pyridine (12513.4 MHz, determined only from perturbation analysis), and D2O-pyridine (13582.3 MHz). Curiously, the tunneling splitting increases with increased deuteration. Additional small splittings have been observed in some transitions, indicating the possibility of further internal dynamics. This system offers an interesting test case for theoretical treatments of large amplitude motion.

  12. A Curious History of Sunspot Penumbrae

    CERN Document Server

    Hathaway, D H

    2013-01-01

    Daily records of sunspot group areas compiled by the Royal Observatory, Greenwich, from May of 1874 through 1976 indicate a curious history for the penumbral areas of the smaller sunspot groups. On average, the ratio of penumbral area to umbral area in a sunspot group increases from 5 to 6 as the total sunspot group area increases from 100 to 2000 microHem (a microHem is a millionth the area of a solar hemisphere). This relationship does not vary substantially with sunspot group latitude or with the phase of the sunspot cycle. However, for the sunspot groups with total areas <100 microHem, this ratio changes dramatically and systematically through this historical record. The ratio for these smallest sunspots is near 5.5 from 1874 to 1900. After a rapid rise to more than 7 in 1905 it drops smoothly to less than 3 by 1930 and then rises smoothly back to more than 7 in 1961. It then returns to near 5.5 from 1965 to 1976. The smooth variation from 1905 to 1961 shows no indication of any step-like changes that ...

  13. INTEGRAL Galactic Bulge monitoring: transient activity from KS 1741-293, MXB 1730-335, and IGR J17498-2921

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chenevez, Jérôme; Brandt, Søren; Kuulkers, E.;

    2011-01-01

    marginally detected by JEM-X in the 3-10 keV range at a flux level of 5 +/-3 mCrab and a 6 sigma upper limit of 2 mCrab between 10-25 keV. IBIS/ISGRI does not detect the source with 5 sigma upper limits of about 3 and 10 mCrab in the above quoted energy bands. This indicates the source is fading back......-293 at the following flux levels: JEM-X: 6 +/-3 mCrab (3-10 keV) and 14 +/-6 mCrab (10-25 keV) ISGRI: 11 +/-2 mCrab (18-40 keV) and 13 +/-2 mCrab (40-100 keV) We note that the activity of this source already started two weeks ago as has been reported by Linares et al. (ATel #3632) and Barthelmy et al. (GCN #12319...... sigma upper limit of 10 mCrab (40-100 keV) A series of 15 type II bursts is detected when the source was inside the JEM-X field of view, with an average burst recurrence time of about four minutes. The new transient source IGR J17498-2921 (see, e.g., ATels #3551, #3556, #3558, #3568, #3606) is only...

  14. Vampire Selfie: A Curious Case of an Absent Reflection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grossman, Joshua M.

    2014-01-01

    This article presents a puzzle for the optics section of an introductory course on reflections. A teacher could ask students to explain the phenomenon of the "vampire selfie" or the absent reflection. How could that be? What physics caused this curious phenomenon? The article explains light refraction and its effect on what we see and…

  15. Vampire Selfie: A Curious Case of an Absent Reflection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grossman, Joshua M.

    2014-01-01

    This article presents a puzzle for the optics section of an introductory course on reflections. A teacher could ask students to explain the phenomenon of the "vampire selfie" or the absent reflection. How could that be? What physics caused this curious phenomenon? The article explains light refraction and its effect on what we see and…

  16. The Curious Schools Project: Capturing Nomad Creativity in Teacher Work

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunter, Mary Ann; Emery, Sherridan

    2015-01-01

    The Curious Schools project is a teacher professional learning initiative that aims to provide an insight into--and resource for--creativity in Tasmanian schools. It offers an alternative to conventional models of teacher professional learning by engaging teachers in multi-modal methods of documenting and reflecting on their work as the basis for…

  17. Exoplanets Clue to Sun's Curious Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-11-01

    . "Like our Sun, these stars have been very efficient at destroying the lithium they inherited at birth," says team member Nuno Santos. "Using our unique, large sample, we can also prove that the reason for this lithium reduction is not related to any other property of the star, such as its age." Unlike most other elements lighter than iron, the light nuclei of lithium, beryllium and boron are not produced in significant amounts in stars. Instead, it is thought that lithium, composed of just three protons and four neutrons, was mainly produced just after the Big Bang, 13.7 billion years ago. Most stars will thus have the same amount of lithium, unless this element has been destroyed inside the star. This result also provides the astronomers with a new, cost-effective way to search for planetary systems: by checking the amount of lithium present in a star astronomers can decide which stars are worthy of further significant observing efforts. Now that a link between the presence of planets and curiously low levels of lithium has been established, the physical mechanism behind it has to be investigated. "There are several ways in which a planet can disturb the internal motions of matter in its host star, thereby rearrange the distribution of the various chemical elements and possibly cause the destruction of lithium. It is now up to the theoreticians to figure out which one is the most likely to happen," concludes Mayor. More information This research was presented in a paper that appears in the 12 November 2009 issue of Nature (Enhanced lithium depletion in Sun-like stars with orbiting planets, by G. Israelian et al.). The team is composed of Garik Israelian, Elisa Delgado Mena, Carolina Domínguez Cerdeña, and Rafael Rebolo (Instituto de Astrofisíca de Canarias, La Laguna, Tenerife, Spain), Nuno Santos and Sergio Sousa (Centro de Astrofisica, Universidade de Porto, Portugal), Michel Mayor and Stéphane Udry (Observatoire de Genève, Switzerland), and Sofia Randich (INAF

  18. The Curious Case of High-energy Deuterons in Galactic Cosmic Rays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomassetti, Nicola; Feng, Jie

    2017-02-01

    A new analysis of cosmic ray (CR) data collected by the SOKOL experiment in space found that the deuteron-to-helium ratio at energies between 500 and 2000 GeV/nucleon takes the value d/He ∼ 1.5. As we will show, this result cannot be explained by standard models of secondary CR production in the interstellar medium and points to the existence of a high-energy source of CR deuterons. To account for the deuteron excess in CRs, we argue that the only viable solution is hadronic interaction processes of accelerated particles inside old supernova remnants (SNRs). From this mechanism, however, the B/C ratio is also expected to increase at energies above ∼50 of GeV/nucleon, in conflict with new precision data just released by the AMS-02 experiment. Hence, if this phenomenon is a real physical effect, hadronic production of CR deuterons must occur in SNRs characterized by low metal abundance. In such a scenario, the sources accelerating C–{N}–O nuclei are not the same as those accelerating helium or protons, so that the connection between d/He ratio and B/C ratio is broken, and the latter cannot be used to place constraints on the production of light isotopes or antiparticles.

  19. A curious spacetime entirely free of centrifugal acceleration

    CERN Document Server

    Dadhich, Naresh

    2012-01-01

    In the Einstein gravity, besides the usual gravitational and centrifugal potential there is an additional attractive term that couples these two together. It is fun to enquire whether the latter could fully counteract the centrifugal repulsion everywhere making the spacetime completely free of the centrifugal acceleration. We present here such a curious spacetime metric and it produces a global monopole like stresses going as $~1/r^2$ in an AdS spacetime.

  20. The Black Hole Interior and a Curious Sum Rule

    CERN Document Server

    Giveon, Amit; Troost, Jan

    2013-01-01

    We analyze the Euclidean geometry near non-extremal NS5-branes in string theory, including regions beyond the horizon and beyond the singularity of the black brane. The various regions have an exact description in string theory, in terms of cigar, trumpet and negative level minimal model conformal field theories. We study the worldsheet elliptic genera of these three superconformal theories, and show that their sum vanishes. We speculate on the significance of this curious sum rule for black hole physics.

  1. The black hole interior and a curious sum rule

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Giveon, Amit [Racah Institute of Physics, The Hebrew University,Jerusalem, 91904 (Israel); Itzhaki, Nissan [Physics Department, Tel-Aviv University,Ramat-Aviv, 69978 (Israel); Troost, Jan [Laboratoire de Physique Théorique,Unité Mixte du CRNS et de l’École Normale Supérieure,associée à l’Université Pierre et Marie Curie 6,UMR 8549 École Normale Supérieure,24 Rue Lhomond Paris 75005 (France)

    2014-03-12

    We analyze the Euclidean geometry near non-extremal NS5-branes in string theory, including regions beyond the horizon and beyond the singularity of the black brane. The various regions have an exact description in string theory, in terms of cigar, trumpet and negative level minimal model conformal field theories. We study the worldsheet elliptic genera of these three superconformal theories, and show that their sum vanishes. We speculate on the significance of this curious sum rule for black hole physics.

  2. Grounded Theory and Pragmatism: The Curious Case of Anselm Strauss

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antony Bryant

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Sir Arthur CONAN DOYLE's stories featuring Sherlock Holmes are justly famous the world over. In The Memoirs of Sherlock Holmes (1993 one story entitled Silver Blaze contains an exchange between Holmes and a Scotland Yard detective as follows: Gregory (Scotland Yard detective: "Is there any other point to which you would wish to draw my attention?" Holmes: "To the curious incident of the dog in the night-time." Gregory: "The dog did nothing in the night-time." Holmes: "That was the curious incident." In similar fashion I wish to draw attention to the curious case of Anselm STRAUSS: There is already a good deal of work pointing to the continuities between the Grounded Theory Method (GTM and the Pragmatism of John DEWEY and Charles PEIRCE. This has usually focused on Anselm STRAUSS with his Chicago-influenced Pragmatist background, although STRAUSS himself never articulated the way in which Pragmatism informed or could be brought to bear on the method as it evolved from the 1960s onwards. This paper argues that many of the contentious issues surrounding GTM can be resolved if they are understood against the context of some of the core tenets of Pragmatism, particularly the ways in which some of the more recent Pragmatists such as Richard RORTY have brought them back as a focus of attention. In so doing is raises the question of why, given his intellectual background and formation, Anselm STRAUSS did so little to bring Pragmatist ideas into GTM in its later embodiments and extended statements. That is the "curious incident" to which specific attention is drawn at several points in what follows; it remains a perplexing one, with perhaps no convincing solution, unlike the Sherlock Holmes mystery alluded to above. URN: urn:nbn:de:0114-fqs090325

  3. First results from the INTEGRAL galactic plane scans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Winkler, C.; Gehrels, N.; Schonfelder, V.

    2003-01-01

    Scans of the Galactic plane performed at regular intervals constitute a key element of the guaranteed time observations of the INTEGRAL observing programme. These scans are done for two reasons: frequent monitoring of the Galactic plane in order to detect transient sources, and time resolved...

  4. Galactic bulges

    CERN Document Server

    Peletier, Reynier; Gadotti, Dimitri

    2016-01-01

    This book consists of invited reviews on Galactic Bulges written by experts in the field. A central point of the book is that, while in the standard picture of galaxy formation a significant amount of the baryonic mass is expected to reside in classical bulges, the question what is the fraction of galaxies with no classical bulges in the local Universe has remained open. The most spectacular example of a galaxy with no significant classical bulge is the Milky Way. The reviews of this book attempt to clarify the role of the various types of bulges during the mass build-up of galaxies, based on morphology, kinematics, and stellar populations, and connecting their properties at low and high redshifts. The observed properties are compared with the predictions of the theoretical models, accounting for the many physical processes leading to the central mass concentration and their destruction in galaxies. This book serves as an entry point for PhD students and non-specialists and as a reference work for researchers...

  5. The INTEGRAL Galactic Plane Scanning

    CERN Document Server

    Fiocchi, Mariateresa

    2013-01-01

    After the first nine years of INTEGRAL operational life, the discovery of new sources and source types, a large fraction of which are highly transient or highly absorbed, is certainly one of the most compelling results and legacies of INTEGRAL. Frequent monitoring of the Galactic Plane in AO8 and AO9 campaigns allowed us to detect transient sources, both known and new, confirming that the gamma-ray sky is dominated by the extreme variability of different classes of objects. Regular scans of the Galactic Plane by INTEGRAL provide the most sensitive hard X-ray wide survey to date of our Galaxy, with flux limits of the order of 0.3 mCrab for an exposure time of ~2Ms. Many transient sources have been detected on a wide range of time scales (~hours to months) and identified by triggered followup observations, mainly by Swift/XRT and optical/infrared telescopes. These discoveries are very important to characterize the X-ray binary population in our Galaxy, that is necessary input for evolution studies. The transien...

  6. Skull lichens: a curious chapter in the history of phytotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Modenesi, P

    2009-04-01

    Lichens growing on skulls were known in late medieval times as usnea or moss of a dead man's skull and were recommended as highly beneficial in various diseases. They were, in addition, the main ingredient of Unguentum armariun, a liniment used in a curious medical practice: the magnetic cure of wounds. We can place this chapter of the history of phytotherapy within the wider cultural context of the period, which saw the definition of nature become increasingly more fluid and open to a variety of novel interpretations.

  7. Comparison of metaheuristics for obtaining fuzzy predicates: a curious case

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taymi Ceruto-Cordovés

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a comparative study of three metaheuristics on the problem of obtaining fuzzy predicates with high truth value. According to the No Free Lunch Theorem (NFL cannot establish any general superiority of any metaheuristic over the others. This work demonstrates that even within the same type of problem can be difficult to establish the superiority of a metaheuristic. In this case, each metaheuristic is the best at least in one of the four variants of fuzzy operator employed and normal form of the obtained predicate. This curious case reveals the importance of the experimental comparison of metaheuristics, before assuming the superiority of one over the other.

  8. Galactic Dynamos and Galactic Winds

    CERN Document Server

    Beck, Rainer

    2007-01-01

    Spiral galaxies host dynamically important magnetic fields which can affect gas flows in the disks and halos. Total magnetic fields in spiral galaxies are strongest (up to 30 \\muG) in the spiral arms where they are mostly turbulent or tangled. Polarized synchrotron emission shows that the resolved regular fields are generally strongest in the interarm regions (up to 15 \\muG). Faraday rotation measures of radio polarization vectors in the disks of several spiral galaxies reveal large-scale patterns which are signatures of coherent fields generated by a mean-field dynamo. -- Magnetic fields are also observed in radio halos around edge-on galaxies at heights of a few kpc above the disk. Cosmic-ray driven galactic winds transport gas and magnetic fields from the disk into the halo. The magnetic energy density is larger than the thermal energy density, but smaller than the kinetic energy density of the outflow. The orientation of field lines allows to estimate the wind speed and direction. There is no observation ...

  9. Seismic reflections and electrical conductivity: A case of Holmes's curious dog?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, Frederick A.; Jones, Alan G.

    1995-02-01

    “Is there any other point to which you wish to draw my attention?”“To the curious incident of the dog in the night time.”“The dog did nothing in the night time.”“That was the curious incident,” remarked Sherlock Holmes.—Arthur Conan Doyle

  10. Galactic radio astronomy

    CERN Document Server

    Sofue, Yoshiaki

    2017-01-01

    This book is a concise primer on galactic radio astronomy for undergraduate and graduate students, and provides wide coverage of galactic astronomy and astrophysics such as the physics of interstellar matter and the dynamics and structure of the Milky Way Galaxy and galaxies. Radio astronomy and its technological development have led to significant progress in galactic astronomy and contributed to understanding interstellar matter and galactic structures. The book begins with the fundamental physics of radio-wave radiation, i.e., black body radiation, thermal emission, synchrotron radiation, and HI and molecular line emissions. The author then gives overviews of ingredients of galactic physics, including interstellar matter such as the neutral (HI), molecular hydrogen, and ionized gases, as well as magnetic fields in galaxies. In addition, more advanced topics relevant to the Galaxy and galaxies are also contained here: star formation, supernova remnants, the Galactic Center and black holes, galactic dynamics...

  11. The Curious Case of Arenavirus Entry, and Its Inhibition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joanne York

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Arenaviruses comprise a diverse family of enveloped negative-strand RNA viruses that are endemic to specific rodent hosts worldwide. Several arenaviruses cause severe hemorrhagic fevers in humans, including Junín and Machupo viruses in South America and Lassa fever virus in western Africa. Arenavirus entry into the host cell is mediated by the envelope glycoprotein complex, GPC. The virion is endocytosed on binding to a cell-surface receptor, and membrane fusion is initiated in response to physiological acidification of the endosome. As with other class I virus fusion proteins, GPC-mediated membrane fusion is promoted through a regulated sequence of conformational changes leading to formation of the classical postfusion trimer-of-hairpins structure. GPC is, however, unique among the class I fusion proteins in that the mature complex retains a stable signal peptide (SSP as a third subunit, in addition to the canonical receptor-binding and fusion proteins. We will review the curious properties of the tripartite GPC complex and describe evidence that SSP interacts with the fusion subunit to modulate pH-induced activation of membrane fusion. This unusual solution to maintaining the metastable prefusion state of GPC on the virion and activating the class I fusion cascade at acidic pH provides novel targets for antiviral intervention.

  12. Curious about how the Pension Fund is securing your future?

    CERN Multimedia

    Antonella Del Rosso

    2013-01-01

    Transparency, accuracy and proximity to its members: in recent years the CERN Pension Fund has put a huge effort into creating clear procedures, defining and sharing its strategies, and making its information public. The latest addition is the publication of the Annual Investment Report on the Pension Fund website.   Are you curious about the investments made by the CERN and ESO Pension Fund? Do you want to locate the buildings belonging to the Fund? Or see how the Fund controls its risk level? Help is at hand: the Pension Fund has just released the Annual Investment Report (AIR) on its website. “The online AIR will be updated quarterly to include the latest investment performance of the Fund, shortly after the end of every quarter,” says Théodore Economou, the Pension Fund’s Chief Executive Officer. “This is a significant improvement in the frequency of distribution of information regarding investments. Until now, stakeholders had to wait for the...

  13. Transient heliosheath modulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quenby, J. J.; Webber, W. R.

    2015-10-01

    Voyager 1 has explored the solar wind-interstellar medium interaction region between the terminal shock and heliopause, following the intensity distribution of Galactic cosmic ray protons above 200 MeV energy. Before this component reached the expected galactic flux level at 121.7 au from the Sun, four episodes of rapid intensity change occurred with a behaviour similar to that found in Forbush Decreases in the inner Solar system, rather than that expected from a mechanism related to models for the long-term modulation found closer to the Sun. Because the mean solar wind flow is both expected and observed to be perpendicular to the radial direction close to the heliopause, an explanation is suggested in terms of transient radial flows related to possible heliopause boundary flapping. It is necessary that the radial flows are of the order either of the sound speed found for conditions downstream of the terminal shock or of the fluctuations found near the boundary by the Voyager 1 Low Energy Charged Particle detector and that the relevant cosmic ray diffusion perpendicular to the mean field is controlled by `slab' fluctuations accounting for about 20 per cent of the total power in the field variance. However, additional radial drift motion related to possible north to south gradients in the magnetic field may allow the inclusion of some diffusion according to the predictions of a theory based upon the presence of 2D turbulence. The required field gradients may arise due to field variation in the field carried by solar plasma flow deflected away from the solar equatorial plane. Modulation amounting to a total 30 per cent drop in galactic intensity requires explanation by a combination of transient effects.

  14. The HAWC Galactic Plane Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hui, Michelle

    2016-03-01

    The High Altitude Water Cherenkov (HAWC) Observatory is an all-sky surveying instrument that covers 2/3 of the sky in 24 hours. It is designed with an emphasis on continuous sky coverage for transient events, and on the measurement of extended and large-scale structures. The array is located in Sierra Negra, Mexico at an elevation of 4,100 m and was inaugurated in March 2015. The HAWC array consists of 300 water Cherenkov detectors and is sensitive to extensive air showers triggered by cosmic rays and gamma rays from 100 GeV to >100 TeV. Thanks to its modular design, data taking began in Summer 2013 with 1/3 of the array. Analysis of the first year of data with the partial array shows detections that are coincident with known TeV supernova remnants and pulsar wind nebulae along the Galactic plane. Spectral and morphological analyses are ongoing to study the particle population and acceleration mechanism of these objects. With a growing data set taken with the completed array, source searches are underway for both point-like and extended emission along the Galactic plane, which contain many objects such as pulsar wind nebulae, young star clusters, and binaries.

  15. Active Galactic Nuclei Feedback and Galactic Outflows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Ai-Lei

    Feedback from active galactic nuclei (AGN) is thought to regulate the growth of supermassive black holes (SMBHs) and galaxies. The most direct evidence of AGN feedback is probably galactic outflows. This thesis addresses the link between SMBHs and their host galaxies from four different observational perspectives. First, I study the local correlation between black hole mass and the galactic halo potential (the MBH - Vc relation) based on Very Large Array (VLA) HI observations of galaxy rotation curves. Although there is a correlation, it is no tighter than the well-studied MBH - sigma* relation between the black hole mass and the potential of the galactic bulge, indicating that physical processes, such as feedback, could link the evolution of the black hole to the baryons in the bulge. In what follows, I thus search for galactic outflows as direct evidence of AGN feedback. Second, I use the Atacama Large Millimeter Array (ALMA) to observe a luminous obscured AGN that hosts an ionized galactic outflow and find a compact but massive molecular outflow that can potentially quench the star formation in 10. 6 years.The third study extends the sample of known ionized outflows with new Magellan long-slit observations of 12 luminous obscured AGN. I find that most luminous obscured AGN (Lbol > 1046 ergs s-1) host ionized outflows on 10 kpc scales, and the size of the outflow correlates strongly with the luminosity of the AGN. Lastly, to capitalize on the power of modern photometric surveys, I experiment with a new broadband imaging technique to study the morphology of AGN emission line regions and outflows. With images from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS), this method successfully constructs images of the [OIII]lambda5007 emission line and reveals hundreds of extended emission-line systems. When applied to current and future surveys, such as the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST), this technique could open a new parameter space for the study of AGN outflows. In

  16. Curious discoveries in antiviral drug development: the role of serendipity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Clercq, Erik

    2015-07-01

    Antiviral drug development has often followed a curious meandrous route, guided by serendipity rather than rationality. This will be illustrated by ten examples. The polyanionic compounds (i) polyethylene alanine (PEA) and (ii) suramin were designed as an antiviral agent (PEA) or known as an antitrypanosomal agent (suramin), before they emerged as, respectively, a depilatory agent, or reverse transcriptase inhibitor. The 2',3'-dideoxynucleosides (ddNs analogues) (iii) have been (and are still) used in the "Sanger" DNA sequencing technique, although they are now commercialized as nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTIs) in the treatment of HIV infections. (E)-5-(2-Bromovinyl)-2'-deoxyuridine (iv) was discovered as a selective anti-herpes simplex virus compound and is now primarily used for the treatment of varicella-zoster virus infections. The prototype of the acyclic nucleoside phosphonates (ANPs), (S)-9-(3-hydroxy-2-phosphonylmethoxypropyl)adenine [(S)-HPMPA], (v) was never commercialized, although it gave rise to several marketed products (cidofovir, adefovir, and tenofovir). 1-[2-(Hydroxyethoxy)methyl]-6-(phenylthio)thymine (vi) and TIBO (tetrahydroimidazo[4,5,1-jk][1,4-benzodiazepin-2(1H)]-one and -thione) (vii) paved the way to a number of compounds (i.e., nevirapine, delavirdine, etravirine, and rilpivirine), which are now collectively called non-NRTIs. The bicyclam AMD3100 (viii) was originally described as an anti-HIV agent before it became later marketed as a stem cell mobilizer. The S-adenosylhomocysteine hydrolase inhibitors (ix), while active against a broad range of (-)RNA viruses and poxviruses may be particularly effective against Ebola virus, and for (x) the O-ANP derivatives, the potential application range encompasses virtually all DNA viruses.

  17. Virgin Galactic explores CERN

    CERN Multimedia

    2016-01-01

    Virgin Galactic visited CERN with a group of future astronauts and Sir Richard Branson. During their visit the group was shown around various experiments, including the Globe, SM18, AMS and the CERN Control Centre.

  18. Galactic dust properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paradis, D.

    2011-12-01

    Recent studies have shown evidence for variations in the dust emissivity law with temperature and wavelength. A recent dust emission model, called TLS model (for two-level systems), based on the description of the disordered internal structure of the amorphous dust grains has been developped to interpret observations in the far-infrared/submillimeter (FIR/submm) domain. A recent work focusing on the comparison between data of the diffuse interstellar medium seen by FIRAS-WMAP, as well as Archeops compact sources, with the TLS model allowed us to constrain the model parameters characterizing the general Galactic dust properties. Using the newly available Herschel/Hi-GAL data of the inner Galactic plane, we report a 500 μm emissivity excess in the peripheral parts of the Galactic plane, that can reach up to 20% of the emissivity. Results of the TLS modeling indicate significant changes in the dust properties from the central to peripheral parts of the Galactic plane.

  19. The Curious Case of Palomar 13: The Influence of the Orbital Phase on the Appearance of Galactic Satellites

    CERN Document Server

    Kuepper, A H W; Kroupa, P

    2010-01-01

    We investigate the dynamical status of the low-mass globular cluster Palomar 13 by means of N-body computations to test whether its unusually high mass-to-light ratio of about 40 and its peculiarly shallow surface density profile can be caused by tidal shocking. Alternatively, we test - by varying the assumed proper motion - if the orbital phase of Palomar 13 within its orbit about the Milky Way can influence its appearance and thus may be the origin of these peculiarities, as has been suggested by Kuepper et al. (2010). We find that, of these two scenarios, only the latter can explain the observed mass-to-light ratio and surface density profile. We note, however, that the particular orbit that best reproduces those observed parameters has a proper motion inconsistent with the available literature value. We discuss this discrepancy and suggest that it may be caused by an underestimation of the observational uncertainties in the proper motion determination. We demonstrate that Palomar 13 is most likely near ap...

  20. VERITAS Galactic Observations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hughes, Gareth

    2013-06-15

    We report on recent Galactic results and discoveries made by the VERITAS collaboration. The Very Energetic Radiation Imaging Telescope Array System (VERITAS) is a ground-based gamma-ray observatory, located in southern Arizona, able to detect gamma rays of energies from 100 GeV up to 30 TeV. VERITAS has been fully operational since 2007 and its current sensitivity enables the detection of a 1% Crab Nebula flux at 5 sigma in under 30 hours. The observatory is well placed to view large parts of the galactic plane including its center, resulting in a strong galactic program. Objects routinely observed include Pulsars, Pulsar Wind Nebula, X-ray binaries and sources with unidentified counterparts in other wavelengths.

  1. Exploring the Optical Transient Sky with the Palomar Transient Factory

    CERN Document Server

    Rau, Arne; Law, Nicholas M; Bloom, Joshua S; Ciardi, David; Djorgovski, George S; Fox, Derek B; Gal-Yam, Avishay; Grillmair, Carl C; Kasliwal, Mansi M; Nugent, Peter E; Ofek, Eran O; Quimby, Robert M; Reach, William T; Shara, Michael; Bildsten, Lars; Cenko, S Bradley; Drake, Andrew J; Filippenko, Alexei V; Helfand, David J; Helou, George; Howell, D Andrew; Poznanski, Dovi; Sullivan, Mark

    2009-01-01

    The Palomar Transient Factory (PTF) is a wide-field experiment designed to investigate the optical transient and variable sky on time scales from minutes to years. PTF uses the CFH12k mosaic camera, with a field of view of 7.9 deg^2 and a plate scale of 1 asec/pixel, mounted on the the Palomar Observatory 48-inch Samuel Oschin Telescope. The PTF operation strategy is devised to probe the existing gaps in the transient phase space and to search for theoretically predicted, but not yet detected, phenomena, such as fallback supernovae, macronovae, .Ia supernovae and the orphan afterglows of gamma-ray bursts. PTF will also discover many new members of known source classes, from cataclysmic variables in their various avatars to supernovae and active galactic nuclei, and will provide important insights into understanding galactic dynamics (through RR Lyrae stars) and the Solar system (asteroids and near-Earth objects). The lessons that can be learned from PTF will be essential for the preparation of future large sy...

  2. Another "Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time"?: Intelligence Testing and Coeducation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albisetti, James C.

    2004-01-01

    The title of this essay, comes from the Sherlock Holmes mystery entitled "Silver Blaze," which refers the "curious incident" as to the absence of an expected reaction. In this article, the author discusses an essay that will examine such an absent reaction, or at least a muted one: the limited impact of early intelligence…

  3. An End to the Curious Social Construction of "Expressivism" and the Pragmatist Tradition of Peter Elbow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Donald C.

    Labeling Peter Elbow an "expressivist" is an ironic reduction of his multifaceted thought to a one-dimensional term at a time when postmodernism stresses heteroglossia. This paper outlines the recent history of "expressivism" to demonstrate its curious social construction. The paper then calls for an "end of…

  4. A curious electrovac spacetime as $G = 0$ limit of the NUT space

    CERN Document Server

    Dadhich, N K; Dadhich, Naresh

    2002-01-01

    We take the $G = 0$ limit of the NUT space which yields a non flat space and show that source of its curvature is electromagnetic field generated by the NUT parameter defining the NUT symmetry. This is a very curious electrovac NUT space. Further it is also possible to superpose on it a global monopole.

  5. The Appreciation of the Beauty in the Film:The Curious Case of Benjamin Button

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李家妍

    2014-01-01

    This paper appreciates the beauty in the film The Curious Case of Benjamin Buttonfrom three perspectives: technological beauty in visual ef-fects of the film; philosophical beauty in language, which is discussed in characters’monologues and dialogues in the film; and the eternal beauty of love, life and death.

  6. The Curious Case of the Deaf and Contested Landscapes of Bilingual Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valente, Joseph Michael; Boldt, Gail

    2016-01-01

    In this article, the authors examine deaf education as a "curious case" to prompt thinking about issues of language inequities. The authors argue that tying the fortunes of deaf students to those of other language minority students provides opportunities for new insights into policies and practices of deaf education as well the education…

  7. Nonconformist Television in the Netherlands: Two Curious Cases of Amateur Media as Counter-Technologies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Slootweg, Tom; Aasman, Susan

    2015-01-01

    abstractFor this article, the authors retrieved two curious cases of nonconformist TV from the archives of The Netherlands Institute of Sound and Vision. Being made in the late 1970s and early 1980s, the two cases represent an alternative history of broadcast television in the Netherlands. Whereas N

  8. Democratic Television in the Netherlands : Two Curious Cases of Alternative Media as Counter-Technologies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Slootweg, Tom; Aasman, Susan

    2015-01-01

    For this article, the authors retrieved two curious cases of non-conformist TV from the archives of the Netherlands Institute of Sound and Vision. Being made in the late 1970s and early 1980s, the two cases represent an alternative history of broadcast television in the Netherlands. Whereas Neon (19

  9. Elusive active galactic nuclei

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maiolino, R; Comastri, A; Gilli, R; Nagar, NM; Bianchi, S; Boker, T; Colbert, E; Krabbe, A; Marconi, A; Matt, G; Salvati, M

    2003-01-01

    A fraction of active galactic nuclei do not show the classical Seyfert-type signatures in their optical spectra, i.e. they are optically 'elusive'. X-ray observations are an optimal tool to identify this class of objects. We combine new Chandra observations with archival X-ray data in order to obtai

  10. Galactic Archaeology: Current Surveys

    CERN Document Server

    Wyse, Rosemary F G

    2016-01-01

    I present an overview of the science goals and achievements of ongoing spectroscopic surveys of individual stars in the nearby Universe. I include a brief discussion of the development of the field of Galactic Archaeology - using the fossil record in old stars nearby to infer how our Galaxy evolved and place the Milky Way in cosmological context.

  11. Transient osteoporosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korompilias, Anastasios V; Karantanas, Apostolos H; Lykissas, Marios G; Beris, Alexandros E

    2008-08-01

    Transient osteoporosis is characterized primarily by bone marrow edema. The disease most commonly affects the hip, knee, and ankle in middle-aged men. Its cause remains unknown. The hallmark that separates transient osteoporosis from other conditions presenting with a bone marrow edema pattern is its self-limited nature. Laboratory tests usually do not contribute to the diagnosis. Plain radiographs may reveal regional osseous demineralization. Magnetic resonance imaging is used primarily for early diagnosis and monitoring disease progression. Early differentiation from more aggressive conditions with long-term sequelae is essential to avoid unnecessary treatment. Clinical entities such as transient osteoporosis of the hip and regional migratory osteoporosis are spontaneously resolving conditions. However, early differential diagnosis and surgical treatment are crucial for the patient with osteonecrosis of the hip or knee.

  12. Galactic gamma ray astronomy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schoenfelder, V.

    1982-05-01

    During the last decade the exploration of the sky in the light of gamma rays has begun by means of satellite-and balloon-borne instruments. Like in other ranges of the electromagnetic spectrum the Milky Way clearly stands out against the rest of the sphere. Part of the galactic ..gamma..-ray emission is due to discrete sources, part is diffuse in origin and is produced in interstellar space. Some of the discrete ..gamma..-ray sources are radio pulsars, the nature of the other sources is still unknown. The intensity distribution of the diffuse galactic ..gamma..-ray component is consistent with a decrease of the cosmic-ray intensity towards the outer part of the galaxy. The identification of the cosmic-ray sources will be one of the main objectives of the next generation of ..gamma..-ray telescopes.

  13. Simulations of galactic dynamos

    CERN Document Server

    Brandenburg, Axel

    2014-01-01

    We review our current understanding of galactic dynamo theory, paying particular attention to numerical simulations both of the mean-field equations and the original three-dimensional equations relevant to describing the magnetic field evolution for a turbulent flow. We emphasize the theoretical difficulties in explaining non-axisymmetric magnetic fields in galaxies and discuss the observational basis for such results in terms of rotation measure analysis. Next, we discuss nonlinear theory, the role of magnetic helicity conservation and magnetic helicity fluxes. This leads to the possibility that galactic magnetic fields may be bi-helical, with opposite signs of helicity and large and small length scales. We discuss their observational signatures and close by discussing the possibilities of explaining the origin of primordial magnetic fields.

  14. Galactic oscillator symmetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosensteel, George

    1995-01-01

    Riemann ellipsoids model rotating galaxies when the galactic velocity field is a linear function of the Cartesian coordinates of the galactic masses. In nuclear physics, the kinetic energy in the linear velocity field approximation is known as the collective kinetic energy. But, the linear approximation neglects intrinsic degrees of freedom associated with nonlinear velocity fields. To remove this limitation, the theory of symplectic dynamical symmetry is developed for classical systems. A classical phase space for a self-gravitating symplectic system is a co-adjoint orbit of the noncompact group SP(3,R). The degenerate co-adjoint orbit is the 12 dimensional homogeneous space Sp(3,R)/U(3), where the maximal compact subgroup U(3) is the symmetry group of the harmonic oscillator. The Hamiltonian equations of motion on each orbit form a Lax system X = (X,F), where X and F are elements of the symplectic Lie algebra. The elements of the matrix X are the generators of the symplectic Lie algebra, viz., the one-body collective quadratic functions of the positions and momenta of the galactic masses. The matrix F is composed from the self-gravitating potential energy, the angular velocity, and the hydostatic pressure. Solutions to the hamiltonian dynamical system on Sp(3,R)/U(3) are given by symplectic isospectral deformations. The Casimirs of Sp(3,R), equal to the traces of powers of X, are conserved quantities.

  15. Active galactic nuclei

    CERN Document Server

    Blandford, RD; Woltjer, L

    1990-01-01

    Starting with this volume, the Lecture Notes of the renowned Advanced Courses of the Swiss Society for Astrophysics and Astronomy will be published annually. In each course, three extensive lectures given by leading experts in their respective fields cover different and essential aspects of the subject. The 20th course, held at Les Diablerets in April 1990, dealt with current research on active galactic nuclei; it represents the most up-to-date views on the subject, presented with particular regard for clarity. The previous courses considered a wide variety of subjects, beginning with ""Theory

  16. Supershells and galactic fountains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shustov, B. M.

    1989-03-01

    In the gaseous disk of our Galaxy as well as in other galaxies, HI structures (shells, bubbles, holes, etc.) on scales of 0.1-1 kpc are recognized to be common features; see e.g. the comprehensive review by Tenorio-Tagle and Bodenheimer (1988). The larger ones are usually named with the prefix "super". The estimated energies which are required to produee sueh large objeets are high - up to some 1054 erg. These energetic events must exert a significant influenee upon the gaseous galactic disk and eorona.

  17. The Chandra Galactic Bulge Survey

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hynes, Robert I.; Jonker, P.G.; Bassa, C. G.; Dieball, A.; Greiss, S.; Maccarone, T. J.; Nelemans, G.; Steeghs, D.; Torres, M. A. P.; Britt, C. T.; Clem, J. L.; Gossen, L.; Grindlay, J. E.; Groot, P.J.; Kuiper, L.; Kuulkers, E.; Mendez, M.; Mikles, V. J.; Ratti, E. M.; Rea, N.; van Haaften, L.; Wijnands, R.; in't Zand, J. J. M.

    2011-01-01

    The Chandra Galactic Bulge Survey (CGBS) is a shallow but wide survey of two approximately 6x1 degree strips of the Galactic Bulge about a degree above and below the plane. The survey by design targets regions where extinction and crowding are manageable and optical counterparts are accessible to de

  18. The Chandra Galactic Bulge Survey

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hynes, Robert I.; Jonker, P. G.; Bassa, C. G.; Nelemans, G.; Steeghs, D.; Torres, M. A. P.; Maccarone, T. J.; Greiss, S.; Clem, J.; Dieball, A.; Mikles, V. J.; Britt, C. T.; Gossen, L.; Collazzi, A. C.; Wijnands, R.; In't Zand, J. J. M.; Mendez, M.; Rea, N.; Kuulkers, E.; Ratti, E. M.; van Haaften, L. M.; Heinke, C.; Ozel, F.; Groot, P. J.; Verbunt, F.

    2012-01-01

    The Chandra Galactic Bulge Survey (GBS) is a shallow but wide survey of two approximately 6x1 degree strips of the Galactic Bulge about a degree above and below the plane. The survey by design targets regions where extinction and crowding are manageable and optical counterparts are accessible to det

  19. The Zwicky Transient Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulkarni, Shrinivas R.

    2016-01-01

    The Zwicky Transient Facility (ZTF) has been designed with a singular focus: a systematic exploration of the night sky at a magnitude level well suited for spectral classification and follow up with the existing class of 4-m to 10-m class telescopes. ZTF is the successor to the Palomar Transient Factory (PTF). The discovery engine for ZTF is a 47 square degree camera (realized through 16 e2V monolithic CCDs) that fills the entire focal plane of the 48-inch Oschin telescope of the Palomar Observatory. Single 30-s epoch sensitivity is about 20.5 in g and R bands. The Infarared Processing & Analysis Center (IPAC) is the data center for ZTF. ZTF is a public-private partnership with equal contributions from a consortium of world-wide partners and an NSF MSIP grant. Forty percent of ZTF time is set aside for two major community surveys: a 3-day cadence survey of high latitudes (to mimic LSST) and a time domain survey of the entire Northern Galactic plane. We expect first light in February 2017 and begin a 3-year survey starting summer of 2017. The first year will be spent on building up deep reference images of the sky (a must for transient surveys). During the second year IPAC will deliver near archival quality photometric products within 12 hours of observations. By comparison to reference images photometric alerts will be sent out. Year 3 will see the near real-time release of image differencing products. A Community Science Advisory Committee (CSAC), chaired by S. Ridgway (NOAO), has been set up to both advise the PI and to ensure that the US community's interests are well served. Astronomers interested in getting a head start on ZTF may wish to peruse the data releases from PTF. Young people (or young at heart) may wish to attend the annual summer school on PTF/ZTF (August, Caltech campus). The Principal Investigator (PI) for the project is S. Kulkarni and the Project Scientist is Eric Bellm.For further details please consult http://www.ptf.caltech.edu/ztf

  20. Inquiry Based Learning Model Natural Phenomena to Improve The Curiousity and Mastery of Teh Concept of Junior High School Student

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soleh Hadiryanto

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to analyze the increase curiousity and mastery of the concept of junior high school students after participating in inquiry learning based on the natural phenomenon of motion plant material. The method used is experiment using a randomized design Pretest-Posttest Control Group Design. In the conduct of research, classroom-based inquiry learning experiments using natural phenomena and grade control using conventional learning. The instrument used is the concept mastery tests and questionnaires curiousity students. The results of calculation of N-gain scores showed a rise curiousity and mastery of concepts students both in the experimental and control groups, but the increase in the experimental group was higher than the control group. Through two different test average showed a significant difference curiousity improvement and mastery of concepts students at level α of 0.05 between students who learn by inquiry-based learning and the study of natural phenomena with conventional learning. Increased curiousity and mastery of concepts students learn the natural phenomena based inquiry learning in the experimental group is higher than that of learning through conventional teaching in the control group.

  1. The Galactic Nucleus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melia, Fulvio

    Exciting new broadband observations of the galactic nucleus have placed the heart of the Milky Way under intense scrutiny in recent years. This has been due in part to the growing interest from theorists motivated to study the physics of black hole accretion, magnetized gas dynamics, and unusual star formation. The center of our Galaxy is now known to harbor the most compelling supermassive black hole candidate, weighing in at 3-4 million solar masses. Its nearby environment is comprised of a molecular dusty ring, clusters of evolved and young stars, diffuse hot gas, ionized gas streamers, and several supernova remnants. This chapter will focus on the physical makeup of this dynamic region and the feasibility of actually imaging the black hole's shadow in the coming decade with mm interferometry.

  2. Galactic Diffuse Polarized Emission

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Ettore Carretti

    2011-12-01

    Diffuse polarized emission by synchrotron is a key tool to investigate magnetic fields in the Milky Way, particularly the ordered component of the large scale structure. Key observables are the synchrotron emission itself and the RM is by Faraday rotation. In this paper the main properties of the radio polarized diffuse emission and its use to investigate magnetic fields will be reviewed along with our current understanding of the galactic magnetic field and the data sets available. We will then focus on the future perspective discussing RM-synthesis – the new powerful instrument devised to unlock the information encoded in such an emission – and the surveys currently in progress like S-PASS and GMIMS.

  3. Statistical mechanics of gravitating systems ... and some curious history of Chandra’s rare misses!

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    T Padmanabhan

    2011-07-01

    Chandra’s academic life had several phases each culminating in a monograph describing that subject. I shall deal with aspects of his work in the two earliest phases. I shall describe the overall structure of statistical mechanics of gravitating systems, the relevance of isothermal sphere in the mean-field approximation and issues related to collisional relaxation and dynamical friction in self-gravitating system of particles. There are several curious features in the history of these topics which I comment upon.

  4. Orientation of Galactic Bulge Planetary Nebulae toward the Galactic Center

    CERN Document Server

    Danehkar, A

    2014-01-01

    We have used the Wide Field Spectrograph on the Australian National University 2.3-m telescope to perform the integral field spectroscopy for a sample of the Galactic planetary nebulae. The spatially resolved velocity distributions of the H$\\alpha$ emission line were used to determine the kinematic features and nebular orientations. Our findings show that some bulge planetary nebulae toward the Galactic center have a particular orientation.

  5. The end of the Galactic spectrum

    CERN Document Server

    De Donato, C

    2007-01-01

    We use a diffusion galactic model to analyze the end of the Galactic cosmic ray spectrum and its mixing with the extragalactic cosmic ray flux. We analyze the transition between Galactic and extragalactic components using two different extragalactic models. We compare the sum of the diffusive galactic spectrum and extragalactic spectrum with the available experimental data.

  6. A polarised fast radio burst at low Galactic latitude

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petroff, Emily; SUPERB Collaboration; HESS Collaboration; ANTARES Collaboration

    2017-01-01

    Fast radio bursts (FRBs) are a growing population of transients detected with radio telescopes which are thought to originate outside the Milky Way. Fewer than 20 sources exist in the literature and the majority of bursts have been found away from the plane of the Galaxy or where the Galactic contribution to the total electron column density is low. Here we report on the discovery of a new burst, FRB 150215, discovered with the Parkes radio telescope in real-time in February 2015. The burst was found to be 43±5% linearly polarised with an imprecisely determined rotation measure (RM) consistent with zero. The burst was followed-up with 9 telescopes to search for radio, optical, X-ray, γ-ray and neutrino emission from the location of the burst. No transient or variable emission was found to be associated with the burst and no repeat pulses have been observed in nine hours of Parkes observations. Radio images of the field were obtained following the FRB but would not have been sensitive enough to pick up a signal like the one emanating from WISE J071634.59-190039.2 following FRB150418 if it had been present. The sightline to the burst is close to the Galactic plane and the Galactic RM foreground may approach a null along this sightline, corresponding to a decreased total electron column density from the Milky Way. This might explain why this burst was detectable at low latitude whereas previous searches have been relatively unsuccessful.

  7. Neutral hydrogen in galactic fountains

    CERN Document Server

    Booth, C M

    2007-01-01

    Simulations of an isolated Milky Way-like galaxy, in which supernovae power a galactic fountain, reproduce the observed velocity and 21cm brightness statistics of galactic neutral hydrogen (HI). The simulated galaxy consists of a thin HI disk, similar in extent and brightness to that observed in the Milky Way, and extra-planar neutral gas at a range of velocities due to the galactic fountain. Mock observations of the neutral gas resemble the HI flux measurements from the Leiden-Argentine-Bonn (LAB) HI, survey, including a high-velocity tail which matches well with observations of high-velocity clouds. The simulated high-velocity clouds are typically found close to the galactic disk, with a typical line-of-sight distance of 13kpc from observers on the solar circle. The fountain efficiently cycles matter from the centre of the galaxy to its outskirts at a rate of around 0.5 M_sun/yr

  8. Galactic turbulence and paleoclimate variability

    CERN Document Server

    Bershadskii, A

    2010-01-01

    The wavelet regression detrended fluctuations of the reconstructed temperature for the past three ice ages: approximately 340000 years (Antarctic ice cores isotopic data), exhibit clear evidences of the galactic turbulence modulation up to 2500 years time-scales. The observed strictly Kolmogorov turbulence features indicates the Kolmogorov nature of galactic turbulence, and provide explanation to random-like fluctuations of the global temperature on the millennial time scales.

  9. Transient Ischemic Attack

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available Transient Ischemic Attack TIA , or transient ischemic attack, is a "mini stroke" that occurs when a blood ... The only difference between a stroke and TIA is that with TIA the blockage is transient (temporary). ...

  10. Elusive Active Galactic Nuclei

    CERN Document Server

    Maiolino, R; Gilli, R; Nagar, N M; Bianchi, S; Böker, T; Colbert, E; Krabbe, A; Marconi, A; Matt, G; Salvati, M

    2003-01-01

    A fraction of active galactic nuclei do not show the classical Seyfert-type signatures in their optical spectra, i.e. they are optically "elusive". X-ray observations are an optimal tool to identify this class of objects. We combine new Chandra observations with archival X-ray data in order to obtain a first estimate of the fraction of elusive AGN in local galaxies and to constrain their nature. Our results suggest that elusive AGN have a local density comparable to or even higher than optically classified Seyfert nuclei. Most elusive AGN are heavily absorbed in the X-rays, with gas column densities exceeding 10^24 cm^-2, suggesting that their peculiar nature is associated with obscuration. It is likely that in elusive AGN, the nuclear UV source is completely embedded and the ionizing photons cannot escape, which prevents the formation of a classical Narrow Line Region. Elusive AGN may contribute significantly to the 30 keV bump of the X-ray background.

  11. Galactic Superwinds Circa 2001

    CERN Document Server

    Heckman, T M

    2001-01-01

    In this contribution I summarize our current knowledge of the nature and significance of starburst-driven galactic winds (``superwinds''). Superwinds are complex multiphase outflows of cool, warm, and hot gas, dust, and magnetized relativistic plasma. The observational manifestations of superwinds result from the hydrodynamical interaction between the primary energy-carrying wind fluid and the ambient interstellar medium. Superwinds are ubiquitous in galaxies in which the global star-formation rate per unit area exceeds roughly 10$^{-1}$ M$_{\\odot}$ yr$^{-1}$ kpc$^{-2}$. This criterion is met by local starbursts and the high-z Lyman Break galaxies. Several independent datasets and techniques imply that the total mass and energy outflow rates in a superwind are comparable to the starburst's star-formation-rate and mechanical energy injection rate, respectively. Outflow speeds in interstellar matter entrained in the wind range from $\\sim 10^2$ to $10^3$ km/s, but the primary wind fluid itself may reach velociti...

  12. Galactic planetary science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tinetti, Giovanna

    2014-04-28

    Planetary science beyond the boundaries of our Solar System is today in its infancy. Until a couple of decades ago, the detailed investigation of the planetary properties was restricted to objects orbiting inside the Kuiper Belt. Today, we cannot ignore that the number of known planets has increased by two orders of magnitude nor that these planets resemble anything but the objects present in our own Solar System. Whether this fact is the result of a selection bias induced by the kind of techniques used to discover new planets--mainly radial velocity and transit--or simply the proof that the Solar System is a rarity in the Milky Way, we do not know yet. What is clear, though, is that the Solar System has failed to be the paradigm not only in our Galaxy but even 'just' in the solar neighbourhood. This finding, although unsettling, forces us to reconsider our knowledge of planets under a different light and perhaps question a few of the theoretical pillars on which we base our current 'understanding'. The next decade will be critical to advance in what we should perhaps call Galactic planetary science. In this paper, I review highlights and pitfalls of our current knowledge of this topic and elaborate on how this knowledge might arguably evolve in the next decade. More critically, I identify what should be the mandatory scientific and technical steps to be taken in this fascinating journey of remote exploration of planets in our Galaxy.

  13. The Galactic Pevatron

    CERN Document Server

    Neronov, A; Tchernin, C

    2013-01-01

    We present a self-consistent interpretation of the excess of very-high-energy neutrino emission in the direction of the inner Galaxy reported by IceCube. We demonstrate that an estimate of the neutrino flux in the E>100 TeV energy range lies at the high-energy power-law extrapolation of the spectrum of diffuse gamma-ray emission from the Galaxy, measured by Fermi telescope. This proves that IceCube neutrino and Fermi/LAT gamma-ray fluxes are both produced in interactions of cosmic rays with the interstellar medium. Cosmic rays responsible for the gamma-ray and neutrino flux are characterized by hard spectrum with the slope harder than -2.4 and cut-off energy higher than 10 PeV. Morphology of the IceCube excess is consistent with a possibility that multi-PeV cosmic ray source is located at the edge of Norma arm / tip of the Galactic Bar.

  14. Transient global amnesia mimics: Transient epileptic amnesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicolas Nicastro

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We describe the case of a 79-year-old patient referred for suspected transient global amnesia, after an episode of anterograde amnesia which lasted 90 min. An EEG, performed after the episode, showed bilateral temporal electrographic seizures, orienting the diagnosis toward a transient epileptic amnesia. Transient epileptic amnesia is defined by temporal lobe epilepsy characterized by recurrent transient amnestic episodes of 30–90 min in duration, sometimes associated with olfactory hallucinations or oral automatisms. Response to antiepileptic drugs is excellent. We would like to raise awareness toward this epileptic amnesia when facing atypical or recurrent transient amnestic episodes.

  15. Active galactic nuclei as scaled-up Galactic black holes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McHardy, I M; Koerding, E; Knigge, C; Uttley, P; Fender, R P

    2006-12-07

    A long-standing question is whether active galactic nuclei (AGN) vary like Galactic black hole systems when appropriately scaled up by mass. If so, we can then determine how AGN should behave on cosmological timescales by studying the brighter and much faster varying Galactic systems. As X-ray emission is produced very close to the black holes, it provides one of the best diagnostics of their behaviour. A characteristic timescale--which potentially could tell us about the mass of the black hole--is found in the X-ray variations from both AGN and Galactic black holes, but whether it is physically meaningful to compare the two has been questioned. Here we report that, after correcting for variations in the accretion rate, the timescales can be physically linked, revealing that the accretion process is exactly the same for small and large black holes. Strong support for this linkage comes, perhaps surprisingly, from the permitted optical emission lines in AGN whose widths (in both broad-line AGN and narrow-emission-line Seyfert 1 galaxies) correlate strongly with the characteristic X-ray timescale, exactly as expected from the AGN black hole masses and accretion rates. So AGN really are just scaled-up Galactic black holes.

  16. Galactic Habitable Orbits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahimi, A.; Mao, S.; Kawata, D.

    2014-03-01

    The fossil record shows that the Earth has experienced several mass extinctions over the past 500 million years1, and it has been suggested that there is a periodicity in extinction events on timescales of tens1 and/or hundreds of millions of years. Various hypotheses have been proposed to explain the cause of the mass extinctions, including the suggestion that the Earth's ozone layer may have been destroyed by intense radiation from a nearby supernovae2- 3, exposing the Earth's surface to damaging UV radiation. Recent observations of cores taken from the ocean floor revealed atoms of a very rare isotope of iron (60Fe) believed to have arrived on Earth around 2 million years ago as fallout from a nearby supernovae4. Astronomical evidence for that past supernovae was recently found in the debris of a young cluster of massive stars5, by tracing its past orbit, putting it at the right place at the right time to explain the mild extinction event. Here we report new high-resolution (both in space and time) N-body chemodynamical simulations (carried out with our novel code GCD+6) of the evolution of a model Milky Way Galaxy, tracing the orbit of èsun-like' stars over a 500 million year period, checking the proximity to supernovae throughout the history of the orbit and comparing the times when this occurs with past mass extinctions on Earth. We additionally explain the important effects of the spiral arm pattern, radial migration of stars and Galactic chemistry on habitability.

  17. Postmodern Investigations: The Case of Christopher Boone in "The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciocia, Stefania

    2009-01-01

    Mark Haddon's "The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time", the first novel to be published simultaneously for the UK adult and children's market, exemplifies the phenomenon of crossover literature better perhaps than the "Harry Potter" series, whose appeal to a dual-aged audience had caught the publishing industry by surprise. This article…

  18. Postmodern Investigations: The Case of Christopher Boone in "The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciocia, Stefania

    2009-01-01

    Mark Haddon's "The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time", the first novel to be published simultaneously for the UK adult and children's market, exemplifies the phenomenon of crossover literature better perhaps than the "Harry Potter" series, whose appeal to a dual-aged audience had caught the publishing industry by…

  19. Postmodern Investigations: The Case of Christopher Boone in "The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciocia, Stefania

    2009-01-01

    Mark Haddon's "The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time", the first novel to be published simultaneously for the UK adult and children's market, exemplifies the phenomenon of crossover literature better perhaps than the "Harry Potter" series, whose appeal to a dual-aged audience had caught the publishing industry by…

  20. Arecibo Pulsar and Transient Surveys Using ALFA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cordes, J. M.

    2008-02-01

    A large scale survey for pulsars and transients is being conducted at the Arecibo Observatory using the Arecibo L-band Feed Array (ALFA). Data acquisition so far has been with correlation spectrometers that analyze a 0.1 GHz bandwidth at 1.4 GHz. The 256 frequency channels limit dispersion smearing to 1.2 ms at DMmax = 103 pc cm-3 while the sampling interval of 64 μs equals the dispersion smearing at DM~54 pc cm-3, providing high sensitivity to millisecond pulsars with standard periods out to implied distances of several kpc at low Galactic latitudes. In early 2008, we will use a new set of polyphase filter bank systems that provide the same time and frequency resolutions but over ALFA's full 0.3 GHz bandwidth. Currently the survey covers sky positions within 5° of the Galactic plane that are reachable with Arecibo. Preliminary results are given for some of the discoveries made so far, which include millisecond pulsars, a relativistic binary pulsar, a likely counterpart of a Compton GRO/EGRET gamma-ray source, and transient pulsars (including `RRATs''). We discuss the methodology of the survey, which includes archival of raw survey data at the Cornell Center for Advanced Computing and processing at distributed sites. The survey and follow up observations, which include timing observations, multiwavelength searches for orbital companions in the case of binary pulsars, etc. are organized through the Pulsar-ALFA (PALFA) Consortium. We expect the Galactic plane survey to continue until at least 2010, most likely involving multiple passes on each sky position to optimize detection of variable sources. The ALFA system will also be used to survey intermediate Galactic latitudes for millisecond pulsars, relativistic binaries with large systemic velocities, and runaway pulsars that will escape the Galaxy.

  1. The curious relation between theory of mind and sharing in preschool age children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cowell, Jason M; Samek, Anya; List, John; Decety, Jean

    2015-01-01

    Young children have long been known to act selfishly and gradually appear to become more generous across middle childhood. While this apparent change has been well documented, the underlying mechanisms supporting this remain unclear. The current study examined the role of early theory of mind and executive functioning in facilitating sharing in a large sample (N = 98) of preschoolers. Results reveal a curious relation between early false-belief understanding and sharing behavior. Contrary to many commonsense notions and predominant theories, competence in this ability is actually related to less sharing. Thus, the relation between developing theory of mind and sharing may not be as straightforward as it seems in preschool age children. It is precisely the children who can engage in theory of mind that decide to share less with others.

  2. Swordmanship as Mathematical Science: The Curious Case of Luis Pacheco de Narváez

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Felix Kurt Ernst Schmelzer

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available From the 15th century on, the practitioners of the mechanical arts obtain a new self-confidence and do no longer want to be regarded merely as manual workers. In this context, they frequently underline the mathematical basis of their discipline in order to increase its value from the status of a mechanical to that of a liberal art. In the Spanish golden age period, the military art, amongst others, is conceived as a mathematical discipline. A particularly curious case is the Libro de las grandezas de la espada (1600 whose author, Luis Pacheco de Narváez (1570-1640, propagates the art of swordsmanship, which he names «the true skill», as a science based on the disciplines of the quadrivium. The present article outlines the arguments applied by Pacheco in a preliminary chapter in order to prove the mathematical and scientific status of his discipline.

  3. Superluminal Neutrinos and a Curious Phenomenon in the Relativistic Quantum Hamilton-Jacobi Equation

    CERN Document Server

    Matone, Marco

    2011-01-01

    OPERA's results, if confirmed, pose the question of superluminal neutrinos. We investigate the kinematics defined by the quantum version of the relativistic Hamilton-Jacobi equation, i.e. E^2=p^2c^2+m^2c^4+2mQc^2, with Q the quantum potential of the free particle. The key point is that the quantum version of the Hamilton-Jacobi equation is a third-order differential equation, so that it has integration constants which are missing in the Schr\\"odinger and Klein-Gordon equations. In particular, a non-vanishing imaginary part of an integration constant leads to a quantum correction to the expression of the velocity which is curiously in agreement with OPERA's results.

  4. The curious history of relativity how Einstein's theory of gravity was lost and found again

    CERN Document Server

    Eisenstaedt, Jean

    2006-01-01

    Black holes may obliterate most things that come near them, but they saved the theory of general relativity. Einstein's theory was quickly accepted as the true theory of gravity after its publication in 1915, but soon took a back seat in physics to quantum mechanics and languished for decades on the blackboards of mathematicians. Not until the existence of black holes by Stephen Hawking and Roger Penrose in the 1960s, after Einstein's death, was the theory revived. Almost one hundred years after general relativity replaced Newton's theory of gravitation, The Curious History of Relativity tells the story of both events surrounding general relativity and the techniques employed by Einstein and the relativists to construct, develop, and understand his almost impenetrable theory. Jean Eisenstaedt, one of the world's leading experts on the subject, also discusses the theory's place in the evolution of twentieth-century physics. He describes the main stages in the development of general relativity: its beginnings,...

  5. Nonconformist Television in the Netherlands: Two Curious Cases of Amateur Media as Counter-Technologies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tom Slootweg

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available For this article, the authors retrieved two curious cases of nonconformist TV from the archives of The Netherlands Institute of Sound and Vision. Being made in the late 1970s and early 1980s, the two cases represent an alternative history of broadcast television in the Netherlands. Whereas Neon (1979-1980 aimed to establish a punk-inspired DIY video culture, Ed van der Elsken (1980, 1981 strived for an expressive amateur film culture. The authors propose to regarded these cases as two different experiments of participation in and through media. By conceptualising amateur film and video as counter-technologies, the discursive expectations around their democratic potential can be explored further.

  6. A Neurorobotic Platform to Test the Influence of Neuromodulatory Signaling on Anxious and Curious Behavior

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeffrey L Krichmar

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available The vertebrate neuromodulatory systems are critical for appropriate value-laden responses to environmental challenges. Whereas changes in the overall level of dopamine have an effect on the organism’s reward or curiosity seeking behavior, changes in the level of serotonin can affect its level of anxiety or harm aversion. Moreover, top-down signals from frontal cortex can exert cognitive control on these neuromodulatory systems. The cholinergic and noradrenergic systems affect the ability to filter out noise and irrelevant events. We introduce a neural network for action selection that is based on these principles of neuromodulatory systems. The algorithm tested the hypothesis that high levels of serotonin lead to withdrawn behavior by suppressing dopaminergic action and that high levels of dopamine or low levels of serotonin lead to curious, exploratory behavior. Furthermore, the algorithm tested the idea that top-down signals from the frontal cortex to neuromodulatory areas are critical for an organism to cope with both stressful and novel events. The neural network was implemented on an autonomous robot and tested in an open field paradigm. The open field test is often used to test for models anxiety or exploratory behavior in the rodent and allows for qualitative comparisons with the neurorobot’s behavior. The present neurorobotic experiments can lead to a better understanding of how neuromodulatory signaling affects the balance between anxious and curious behavior. Therefore, this experimental paradigm may also be informative in exploring a wide range of neurological diseases such as anxiety, autism, attention deficit disorders, and obsessive-compulsive disorders.

  7. Where Galactic Snakes Live

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-01-01

    This infrared image from NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope shows what astronomers are referring to as a 'snake' (upper left) and its surrounding stormy environment. The sinuous object is actually the core of a thick, sooty cloud large enough to swallow dozens of solar systems. In fact, astronomers say the 'snake's belly' may be harboring beastly stars in the process of forming. The galactic creepy crawler to the right of the snake is another thick cloud core, in which additional burgeoning massive stars might be lurking. The colorful regions below the two cloud cores are less dense cloud material, in which dust has been heated by starlight and glows with infrared light. Yellow and orange dots throughout the image are monstrous developing stars; the red star on the 'belly' of the snake is 20 to 50 times as massive as our sun. The blue dots are foreground stars. The red ball at the bottom left is a 'supernova remnant,' the remains of massive star that died in a fiery blast. Astronomers speculate that radiation and winds from the star before it died, in addition to a shock wave created when it exploded, might have played a role in creating the snake. Spitzer was able to spot the two black cloud cores using its heat-seeking infrared vision. The objects are hiding in the dusty plane of our Milky Way galaxy, invisible to optical telescopes. Because their heat, or infrared light, can sneak through the dust, they first showed up in infrared images from past missions. The cloud cores are so thick with dust that if you were to somehow transport yourself into the middle of them, you would see nothing but black, not even a star in the sky. Now, that's spooky! Spitzer's new view of the region provides the best look yet at the massive embryonic stars hiding inside the snake. Astronomers say these observations will ultimately help them better understand how massive stars form. By studying the clustering and range of masses of the stellar embryos, they hope to determine if the stars

  8. Where Galactic Snakes Live

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-01-01

    This infrared image from NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope shows what astronomers are referring to as a 'snake' (upper left) and its surrounding stormy environment. The sinuous object is actually the core of a thick, sooty cloud large enough to swallow dozens of solar systems. In fact, astronomers say the 'snake's belly' may be harboring beastly stars in the process of forming. The galactic creepy crawler to the right of the snake is another thick cloud core, in which additional burgeoning massive stars might be lurking. The colorful regions below the two cloud cores are less dense cloud material, in which dust has been heated by starlight and glows with infrared light. Yellow and orange dots throughout the image are monstrous developing stars; the red star on the 'belly' of the snake is 20 to 50 times as massive as our sun. The blue dots are foreground stars. The red ball at the bottom left is a 'supernova remnant,' the remains of massive star that died in a fiery blast. Astronomers speculate that radiation and winds from the star before it died, in addition to a shock wave created when it exploded, might have played a role in creating the snake. Spitzer was able to spot the two black cloud cores using its heat-seeking infrared vision. The objects are hiding in the dusty plane of our Milky Way galaxy, invisible to optical telescopes. Because their heat, or infrared light, can sneak through the dust, they first showed up in infrared images from past missions. The cloud cores are so thick with dust that if you were to somehow transport yourself into the middle of them, you would see nothing but black, not even a star in the sky. Now, that's spooky! Spitzer's new view of the region provides the best look yet at the massive embryonic stars hiding inside the snake. Astronomers say these observations will ultimately help them better understand how massive stars form. By studying the clustering and range of masses of the stellar embryos, they hope to determine if the stars

  9. Galmatheia A Galactic Plasma Explorer

    CERN Document Server

    Edelstein, J D; Korpela, E J

    1998-01-01

    Galmatheia is a broad bandpass (900-1800 Angstrom), far-ultraviolet (FUV) nebular spectrograph (lambda /delta lambda ~ 650) for the study of the evolution of galactic plasma with a temperature of 10^4.5 - 10^6 K. Galmatheia will survey the FUV sky with 5' imaging and conduct hundreds of deep 8 degree x 5' field pointings during its proposed two-year mission. Unprecedented sensitivity is achieved by careful exclusion of FUV-bright stars and airglow background. The emission-line sensitivity for a single-day exposure and for a one-year sky survey 3 degree x 3 degree bin yields 50 sigma and 10-15 sigma detections, respectively, of both the predicted radiation from hot Galactic gas and previously-observed diffuse FUV emission. The continuum sensitivity provides 15-25 sigma detections of the predicted flux from unresolved extra-galactic sources.

  10. The inner Galactic globular clusters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mateo M.

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Galactic globular clusters located towards the inner regions of the Milky Way have been historically neglected, mainly due to the difficulties caused by the presence of an elevated extinction by foreground dust, and high field star densities along the lines of sight where most of them lie. To overcome these difficulties we have developed a new method to map the differential extinction suffered by these clusters, which was successfully applied to a sample of moderately-extincted, luminous, extended, inner Galactic globular clusters observed in the optical, for which we have been able to determine more accurate physical parameters. For the most extincted inner Galactic globular clusters, near-infrared wavelengths provide a more suitable window for their study. The VVV survey, which is currently observing the central regions of the Milky Way at these wavelengths, will provide a comprehensive view, from the inner regions out to their tidal radii and beyond, of most of these globular clusters.

  11. Current interruption transients calculation

    CERN Document Server

    Peelo, David F

    2014-01-01

    Provides an original, detailed and practical description of current interruption transients, origins, and the circuits involved, and how they can be calculated Current Interruption Transients Calculationis a comprehensive resource for the understanding, calculation and analysis of the transient recovery voltages (TRVs) and related re-ignition or re-striking transients associated with fault current interruption and the switching of inductive and capacitive load currents in circuits. This book provides an original, detailed and practical description of current interruption transients, origins,

  12. Statistics of Galactic Supernova Remnants

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jian-Wen Xu; Xi-Zhen Zhang; Jin-Lin Han

    2005-01-01

    We collected the basic parameters of 231 supernova remnants (SNRs) in our Galaxy, namely, distances (d) from the Sun, linear diameters (D), Galactic heights (Z), estimated ages (t), luminosities (L), surface brightness (∑) and flux densities (Si) at 1-GHz frequency and spectral indices (α). We tried to find possible correlations between these parameters. As expected, the linear diameters were found to increase with ages for the shell-type remnants, and also to have a tendency to increase with the Galactic heights. Both the surface brightness and luminosity of SNRs at 1-GHz tend to decrease with the linear diameter and with age. No other relations between the parameters were found.

  13. Star Formation in the Galactic Center

    CERN Document Server

    Kauffmann, Jens

    2016-01-01

    Research on Galactic Center star formation is making great advances, in particular due to new data from interferometers spatially resolving molecular clouds in this environment. These new results are discussed in the context of established knowledge about the Galactic Center. Particular attention is paid to suppressed star formation in the Galactic Center and how it might result from shallow density gradients in molecular clouds.

  14. Evolved stars in galactic plane surveys

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verbeek, K.

    2013-01-01

    For the first time in history the entire Galactic Plane is digitally mapped from La Palma and Chile by the European Galactic Plane surveys EGAPS (UVEX, IPHAS and VPHAS+, see http://www.uvexsurvey.org http://www.iphas.org and http://www.vphasplus.org). The complete Galactic plane (3600 square degrees

  15. PIPER and Polarized Galactic Foregrounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chuss, David

    2009-01-01

    In addition to probing inflationary cosmology, PIPER will measure the polarized dust emission from the Galaxy. PIPER will be capable of full (I,0,U,V) measurement over four frequency bands ' These measurements will provide insight into the physics of dust grains and a probe of the Galactic magnetic field on large and intermediate scales.

  16. Utrecht and Galactic Radio Astronomy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Woerden, H.

    Important roles in early Dutch Galactic radio astronomy were played by several Utrecht astronomers: Van de Hulst, Minnaert and Houtgast. The poster announcing the conference contained a number of pictures referring to scientific achievements of the Astronomical Institute Utrecht. One of these

  17. PIPER and Polarized Galactic Foregrounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chuss, David

    2009-01-01

    In addition to probing inflationary cosmology, PIPER will measure the polarized dust emission from the Galaxy. PIPER will be capable of full (I,0,U,V) measurement over four frequency bands ' These measurements will provide insight into the physics of dust grains and a probe of the Galactic magnetic field on large and intermediate scales.

  18. The Formation of Galactic Bulges

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Peletier, R.; Balcells, M.; Falcon-Barroso, J.; Graham, A.

    2005-01-01

    We summarise some recent results about nearby galactic bulges that are relevant to their formation. We highlight a number of significant advances in our understanding of the surface brightness profiles, stellar populations, and especially the very centers of spiral galaxies. We also view our own Mil

  19. Turbulent diffusion and galactic magnetism

    CERN Document Server

    Brandenburg, Axel

    2009-01-01

    Using the test-field method for nearly irrotational turbulence driven by spherical expansion waves it is shown that the turbulent magnetic diffusivity increases with magnetic Reynolds numbers. Its value levels off at several times the rms velocity of the turbulence multiplied by the typical radius of the expansion waves. This result is discussed in the context of the galactic mean-field dynamo.

  20. INTERPRETATION OF THE DISTURBANCE IN GALACTIC COSMIC RAYS OBSERVED ON VOYAGER 1 BEYOND THE HELIOPAUSE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jokipii, J. R.; Kóta, J. [Department of Planetary Sciences, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 8572 (United States)

    2014-10-10

    We present a possible explanation for the transient increase in the galactic cosmic ray flux observed by Voyager 1 (V1) beyond the heliopause, in 2013 March. We suggest that this disturbance may be caused by a propagating disturbance in the interstellar magnetic field, of heliospheric origin. A model in which a magnetic disturbance, propagating outward from the heliosphere into the very-local interstellar plasma, affects the galactic cosmic rays is presented. We also discuss the possibility that this event is related to the plasma-wave event observed some 25 days later by the PWS experiment on V1.

  1. The 100 year DASCH Transient Search

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, George F.; Grindlay, J. E.; Tang, S.; Los, E.

    2014-01-01

    The Digital Access to a Sky Century at Harvard (DASCH) project is currently digitizing the roughly 500,000 photographic plates maintained by the Harvard College Observatory. The Harvard plate collection covers each point of the sky roughly 500 to 3000 times from 1885 to 1992, with limiting magnitudes ranging from B=14-18 mag and photometric accuracy within ±0.1 mag. Production scanning (up to 400 plates/day) is proceeding in Galactic coordinates from the North Galactic Pole and is currently at roughly 50 degrees galactic latitude. The vastness of these data makes the DASCH project ideal to search for transient behavior. In particular, the large time base of the DASCH collection gives an unprecedented advantage when searching for outbursting systems with recurrence rates of decades or longer. These include recurrent novae, rare WZ Sge Cataclysmic Variables, blazars, X-Ray binaries, and supernovae in the Virgo Supercluster. We report here the discovery of previously unidentified stellar-like objects that underwent abnormally large (Δm=5-9) outbursts discovered with DASCH. We also report the discovery of outbursts from previously quiet AM CVn stars, as well as attempt to characterize their recurrence rates.

  2. Transient drainage summary report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-09-01

    This report summarizes the history of transient drainage issues on the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project. It defines and describes the UMTRA Project disposal cell transient drainage process and chronicles UMTRA Project treatment of the transient drainage phenomenon. Section 4.0 includes a conceptual cross section of each UMTRA Project disposal site and summarizes design and construction information, the ground water protection strategy, and the potential for transient drainage.

  3. Observational Signatures of Galactic Winds Powered by Active Galactic Nuclei

    CERN Document Server

    Nims, Jesse; Faucher-Giguere, Claude-Andre

    2014-01-01

    We predict the observational signatures of galaxy scale outflows powered by active galactic nuclei (AGN). Most of the emission is produced by the forward shock driven into the ambient interstellar medium (ISM) rather than by the reverse shock. AGN powered galactic winds with energetics suggested by phenomenological feedback arguments should produce spatially extended 1-10 keV X-ray emission of 10^(41-44) erg/s, significantly in excess of the spatially extended X-ray emission associated with normal star forming galaxies. The presence of such emission is a direct test of whether AGN outflows significantly interact with the ISM of their host galaxy. We further show that even radio quiet quasars should have a radio luminosity comparable to or in excess of the far infrared-radio correlation of normal star forming galaxies. This radio emission directly constrains the total kinetic energy flux in AGN-powered galactic winds. Radio emission from AGN wind shocks can also explain the recently highlighted correlations be...

  4. Structure of the Galactic Halo towards the North Galactic Pole

    CERN Document Server

    Kinman, T D; Cacciari, C; Buzzoni, A; Spagna, A

    2004-01-01

    We have used RR Lyrae and Blue HB stars as tracers of the old Galactic halo, in order to study the halo structure and the galactic rotation as a function of height above the plane. Our sample includes 40 RR Lyrae and 80 BHB stars that are about 2 to 15 kpc above the plane, in a roughly 250 sq. deg. area around the North Galactic Pole (NGP). We use proper motions (derived from the GSC-II database) and radial velocities to determine the rotation of the halo. From the whole sample the motion appears to be significantly more retrograde than the samples in the solar neighborhood, confirming Majewski (1992) results and our own preliminary results based on 1/3 the present sample (Kinman et al. 2003; Spagna et al. 2003). However, the better statistics has now revealed the likely existence of two components, whose characteristics need an accurate analysis of systematic errors on the proper motions in order to be assessed in detail.

  5. Structure of the Galactic Halo Towards the North Galactic Pole

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinman, T. D.; Bragaglia, A.; Cacciari, C.; Buzzoni, A.; Spagna, A.

    2005-01-01

    We have used RR Lyrae and Blue HB stars as tracers of the old Galactic halo, in order to study the halo structure and the galactic rotation as a function of height above the plane. Our sample includes 40 RR Lyrae and 80 BHB stars that are about 2 to 15 kpc above the plane, in a roughly 250 deg2 area around the North Galactic Pole (NGP). We use proper motions (derived from the GSCII data base) and radial velocities to determine the rotation of the halo. From the whole sample the motion appears to be significantly more retrograde than the samples in the solar neighbourhood, confirming Majewski (1992) results and our own preliminary results based on 1/3 the present sample (Kinman et al. 2003; Spagna et al. 2003). However, the better statistics have now revealed the likely existence of two components, whose characteristics need an accurate analysis of systematic errors on the proper motions in order to be assessed in detail.

  6. Formation of Galactic Prominence in the Galactic Central Region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Chih-Han; Matsumoto, Ryoji

    2017-02-01

    We carried out 2.5-dimensional resistive MHD simulations to study the formation mechanism of molecular loops observed by Fukui et al. in the Galactic central region. Since it is hard to form molecular loops by lifting up dense molecular gas, we study the formation mechanism of molecular gas in rising magnetic arcades. This model is based on the in situ formation model of solar prominences, in which prominences are formed by cooling instability in helical magnetic flux ropes formed by imposing converging and shearing motion at footpoints of the magnetic arch anchored to the solar surface. We extended this model to Galactic center scale (a few hundreds of parsecs). Numerical results indicate that magnetic reconnection taking place in the current sheet that formed inside the rising magnetic arcade creates dense blobs confined by the rising helical magnetic flux ropes. Thermal instability taking place in the flux ropes forms dense molecular filaments floating at high Galactic latitude. The mass of the filament increases with time and can exceed {10}5 {M}ȯ .

  7. Pursuing Darwin's curious parallel: Prospects for a science of cultural evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mesoudi, Alex

    2017-07-24

    In the past few decades, scholars from several disciplines have pursued the curious parallel noted by Darwin between the genetic evolution of species and the cultural evolution of beliefs, skills, knowledge, languages, institutions, and other forms of socially transmitted information. Here, I review current progress in the pursuit of an evolutionary science of culture that is grounded in both biological and evolutionary theory, but also treats culture as more than a proximate mechanism that is directly controlled by genes. Both genetic and cultural evolution can be described as systems of inherited variation that change over time in response to processes such as selection, migration, and drift. Appropriate differences between genetic and cultural change are taken seriously, such as the possibility in the latter of nonrandomly guided variation or transformation, blending inheritance, and one-to-many transmission. The foundation of cultural evolution was laid in the late 20th century with population-genetic style models of cultural microevolution, and the use of phylogenetic methods to reconstruct cultural macroevolution. Since then, there have been major efforts to understand the sociocognitive mechanisms underlying cumulative cultural evolution, the consequences of demography on cultural evolution, the empirical validity of assumed social learning biases, the relative role of transformative and selective processes, and the use of quantitative phylogenetic and multilevel selection models to understand past and present dynamics of society-level change. I conclude by highlighting the interdisciplinary challenges of studying cultural evolution, including its relation to the traditional social sciences and humanities.

  8. The Curious Radial Distributions of Horizontal Branch Stars in NGC 6441

    CERN Document Server

    Krogsrud, David A; Kato, Tadafumi; 10.1088/2041-8205/767/2/L27

    2013-01-01

    NGC 6441 is one of the most massive and most metal-rich globular clusters in the galaxy, and is noted for an unusual extended horizontal branch which reaches past the instability strip. We find evidence that there are two different populations of stars within the heavily-populated red clump. Once a differential reddening correction is applied, a large but compact group of stars is found at the faint red end of the clump in the color magnitude diagram. Brighter, bluer stars in the clump are found to be more centrally concentrated within the cluster at very high level of significance. Curiously, the blue horizontal branch stars show a more complex distribution, and are not more centrally concentrated than the brighter red clump stars. The spatial distributions of clump stars is in agreement with the idea that the the brighter bluer part of the clump is a helium-enriched second generation. The blue horizontal branch stars may be showing evidence that they are being dynamically evaporated.

  9. Preserving guilt in the "age of psychology": The curious career of O. Hobart Mowrer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Page, Corbin

    2017-02-01

    O. Hobart Mowrer had one of the most productive and curious careers of any psychologist in the 20th century, despite struggling with severe mental illness and anxiety about his sexuality. Early in his career, he was one of the country's leading experimental psychologists. During the mid-1940s, he became interested in religion and argued that anxiety was caused by repressed guilt that came from real wrongdoing. By the late 1950s, he had abandoned mainstream psychology, arguing that religion had been corrupted by its embrace of psychology and psychiatry. He claimed that sin was responsible for nearly all psychological problems and that ethical living and confession of wrongdoing could prevent mental illness. During his religious period, Mowrer received an astonishing amount of fawning press attention and was embraced by a public desirous of a path to mental health that did not require jettisoning traditional conceptions of sin, guilt, and human nature. This article examines Mowrer's life and career and situates him among other mid-century skeptics of psychology and psychiatry. Other historians have argued that by the 1950s, the conflict between religion and psychiatry/psychology in the United States had largely abated, with both sides adapting to each other. Mowrer's life and the reception of his work demonstrate that this narrative is overly simplistic; widespread conservative and religious distrust of psychology persisted even into the 1960s. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved).

  10. Observation of curious spiral growth features in Tl doped Hg bearing high temperature superconducting tapes

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Anjana Asthana; O N Srivastava

    2001-12-01

    Synthesis of H(Tl)Ba2Ca2Cu3O8+ superconducting tapes have been accomplished by annealing the precursor tape, Ba2Ca2Cu3O (fabricated by doctor blade tape casting technique) in an environment of H(Tl) vapour. Characterization of superconducting HTSC tape sample was carried out through XRD, TEM, SEM and R–T measurements. Surface morphological investigations of the as-synthesized H(Tl)Ba2Ca2Cu3O8+ HTSC tapes by scanning electron microscope have shown the occurrence of curious growth characteristics resembling spiral like features. These growth spirals encompass nearly the whole grain suggesting that spiral growth led to the formation of small crystal like grains of superconducting material H(Tl)Ba2Ca2Cu3O8+. The likely mechanism for the generation of these screw dislocations has been elucidated in terms of incoherent coalescence of growth fronts formed from H(Tl):1223 and H(Tl):1234 nuclei.

  11. Pursuing Darwin’s curious parallel: Prospects for a science of cultural evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-01

    In the past few decades, scholars from several disciplines have pursued the curious parallel noted by Darwin between the genetic evolution of species and the cultural evolution of beliefs, skills, knowledge, languages, institutions, and other forms of socially transmitted information. Here, I review current progress in the pursuit of an evolutionary science of culture that is grounded in both biological and evolutionary theory, but also treats culture as more than a proximate mechanism that is directly controlled by genes. Both genetic and cultural evolution can be described as systems of inherited variation that change over time in response to processes such as selection, migration, and drift. Appropriate differences between genetic and cultural change are taken seriously, such as the possibility in the latter of nonrandomly guided variation or transformation, blending inheritance, and one-to-many transmission. The foundation of cultural evolution was laid in the late 20th century with population-genetic style models of cultural microevolution, and the use of phylogenetic methods to reconstruct cultural macroevolution. Since then, there have been major efforts to understand the sociocognitive mechanisms underlying cumulative cultural evolution, the consequences of demography on cultural evolution, the empirical validity of assumed social learning biases, the relative role of transformative and selective processes, and the use of quantitative phylogenetic and multilevel selection models to understand past and present dynamics of society-level change. I conclude by highlighting the interdisciplinary challenges of studying cultural evolution, including its relation to the traditional social sciences and humanities. PMID:28739929

  12. CuriousMind photographer: distract the robot from its initial task

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vincent Courboulay

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Mainly present in industry, robots begin to invade our every-day lives for very precise tasks. In order to reach a level where more general robots get involved in our lives, the robots' abilities to communicate and to react to unexpected situations must be improved. This paper introduces an attentive computational model for robots as attention can help both in reacting to unexpected situations and to help improving human-robot communication. We propose to enhance and implement an existing real time computational model. Intensity, color and orientation are usually used but we have added information related to depth and isolation. We have built a robotic system based on LEGO Mindstorm platform and the Kinect RGB-D sensor. This robot, called CuriousMind, is able to take a picture of the most interesting part of the scene and it can also be distracted from its first goal by novel situations mimicking in that way the human (and more precisely small children behaviour.

  13. Discovery in the Galactic Bulge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2015-11-01

    In our efforts to map our galaxys structure, one region has remained very difficult to probe: the galactic center. A new survey, however, uses infrared light to peer through the gas and dust in the galactic plane, searching for variable stars in the bulge of the galaxy. This study has discovered a population of very young stars in a thin disk in the galactic center, providing clues to the star formation history of the Milky Way over the last 100 million years.Obscured CenterThe center of the Milky Way is dominated by a region known as the galactic bulge. Efforts to better understand this region in particular, its star formation history have been hindered by the stars, gas, and dust of the galactic disk, which prevent us from viewing the galactic bulge at low latitudes in visible light.The positions of the 35 classical Cepheids discovered in VVV data, projected onto an image of the galactic plane. Click for a better look! The survey area is bounded by the blue lines, and the galactic bar is marked with a red curve. The bottom panel shows the position of the Cepheids overlaid on the VVV bulge extinction map. [Dkny et al. 2015]Infrared light, however, can be used to probe deeper through the dust than visible-light searches. A new survey called VISTA Variables in the Via Lactea (VVV) uses the VISTA telescope in Chile to search, in infrared, for variable stars in the inner part of the galaxy. The VVV survey area spans the Milky Way bulge and an adjacent section of the mid-plane where star formation activity is high.Led by Istvn Dkny, a researcher at the Millennium Institute of Astrophysics and the Pontifical Catholic University of Chile, a team has now used VVV data to specifically identify classical Cepheid variable stars in the bulge. Why? Cepheids are pulsating stars with a very useful relation between their periods and luminosities that allows them to be used as distance indicators. Moreover, classical Cepheids are indicators of young stellar populations which can

  14. Introduction to Galactic Chemical Evolution

    CERN Document Server

    Matteucci, Francesca

    2016-01-01

    In this lecture I will introduce the concept of galactic chemical evolution, namely the study of how and where the chemical elements formed and how they were distributed in the stars and gas in galaxies. The main ingredients to build models of galactic chemical evolution will be described. They include: initial conditions, star formation history, stellar nucleosynthesis and gas flows in and out of galaxies. Then some simple analytical models and their solutions will be discussed together with the main criticisms associated to them. The yield per stellar generation will be defined and the hypothesis of instantaneous recycling approximation will be critically discussed. Detailed numerical models of chemical evolution of galaxies of different morphological type, able to follow the time evolution of the abundances of single elements, will be discussed and their predictions will be compared to observational data. The comparisons will include stellar abundances as well as interstellar medium ones, measured in galax...

  15. The Chandra Galactic Bulge Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Britt, C. T.; Hynes, R. I.; Jonker, P. G.; Maccarone, T.; Torres, M. A. P.; Steeghs, D.; Nelemans, G.; Johnson, C.; Greiss, S.

    2015-05-01

    The Chandra Galactic Bulge Survey (GBS) is a multi-wavelength survey of two 6×1 degree strips above and below the Galactic plane, including deep r' and i' imaging and time domain photometry from CTIO and shallow, wide-field X-ray imaging with Chandra. Targeting fields above |b|=1 avoids most of the copious extinction along the Galactic plane while maintaining high source density. This results in targets that are accessible to follow up in optical and NIR wavelengths. The X-ray observations are shallow to maximize the number of quiescent Low Mass X-ray Binaries (LMXBs) relative to Cataclysmic Variables (CVs). The goals of the GBS are to conduct a census of Low Mass X-ray Binaries in the Milky Way in order to constrain models of binary evolution, the common envelope phase in particular, and to expand the number of known LMXBs for optical follow up. Mass measurements in particular will help constrain the black hole (BH) mass distribution and the equation of state for neutron stars (NS). Constraining the BH mass distribution will constrain models of their formation in supernovae. The current population of Galactic BHs suffers from selection effects, which the GBS avoids by finding new objects while still in quiescence. We expect to find qLMXBs, magnetic CVs, RS CVn stars, and smaller numbers of other types of sources. After removing duplicates, there are 1640 unique X-ray sources in the 12 square degree survey area, which closely matches the predicted number of 1648. We are currently matching X-ray sources to counterparts in other wavelengths using new photometric and spectroscopic observations as well as in archival data where it exists, and searching for variability and periodicity in the counterparts in photometric data. So far, we have spectroscopically identified 27 interacting binaries including promising candidates for quiescent black holes.

  16. Conformal theory of galactic halos

    CERN Document Server

    Nesbet, R K

    2011-01-01

    Current cosmological theory describes an isolated galaxy as an observable central galaxy, surrounded by a large spherical halo attributed to dark matter. Galaxy formation by condensation of mass-energy out of a primordial uniform background is shown here to leave a scar, observed as a centripetal gravitational field halo in anomalous galactic rotation and in gravitational lensing. Conformal theory accounts for the otherwise counterintuitive centripetal effect.

  17. NuSTAR observations of black hole binary candidates in the Galactic Center and its environs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hailey, Charles James; Mori, Kaya

    2017-08-01

    The recent discovery of a diffuse, hard X-ray emission in the central 10 pc (Perez et al. 2015) interpreted as magnetic cataclysmic variables (Hailey et al. 2017) leaves open the question of whether a sub-dominant population of sources could exist much closer to the supermassive black hole (SMBH), which NuSTAR could not resolve. Here we report the recent NuSTAR observations of two new transient hard X-ray sources within ~ 1 pc of the Galactic Center, which were discovered by Swift. These sources have no known counterparts at other energies. The spectral properties of these sources rule out NS-HMXBs. Continuous monitoring of the Galactic Center by Swift, combined with the known short (report recent results from the NuSTAR Galactic Legacy Survey of a larger region, ~ 0.7 square degrees, focusing on the search for more BHCs.

  18. Simulating Galactic Winds on Supercomputers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Evan

    2017-01-01

    Galactic winds are a ubiquitous feature of rapidly star-forming galaxies. Observations of nearby galaxies have shown that winds are complex, multiphase phenomena, comprised of outflowing gas at a large range of densities, temperatures, and velocities. Describing how starburst-driven outflows originate, evolve, and affect the circumgalactic medium and gas supply of galaxies is an important challenge for theories of galaxy evolution. In this talk, I will discuss how we are using a new hydrodynamics code, Cholla, to improve our understanding of galactic winds. Cholla is a massively parallel, GPU-based code that takes advantage of specialized hardware on the newest generation of supercomputers. With Cholla, we can perform large, three-dimensional simulations of multiphase outflows, allowing us to track the coupling of mass and momentum between gas phases across hundreds of parsecs at sub-parsec resolution. The results of our recent simulations demonstrate that the evolution of cool gas in galactic winds is highly dependent on the initial structure of embedded clouds. In particular, we find that turbulent density structures lead to more efficient mass transfer from cool to hot phases of the wind. I will discuss the implications of our results both for the incorporation of winds into cosmological simulations, and for interpretations of observed multiphase winds and the circumgalatic medium of nearby galaxies.

  19. Constraints on galactic wind models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meiksin, Avery

    2016-09-01

    Observational implications are derived for two standard models of supernovae-driven galactic winds: a freely expanding steady-state wind and a wind sourced by a self-similarly expanding superbubble including thermal heat conduction. It is shown that, for the steady-state wind, matching the measured correlation between the soft X-ray luminosity and star formation rate of starburst galaxies is equivalent to producing a scaled wind mass-loading factor relative to the star formation rate of 0.5-3, in agreement with the amount inferred from metal absorption line measurements. The match requires the asymptotic wind velocity v∞ to scale with the star formation rate dot{M}_{ast } (in M⊙ yr-1) approximately as v_∞ ≃ (700-1000) {{km s^{-1}}} {dot{M}_{ast }}^{1/6}. The implied mass injection rate is close to the amount naturally provided by thermal evaporation from the wall of a superbubble in a galactic disc, suggesting that thermal evaporation may be a major source of mass loading. The predicted mass-loading factors from thermal evaporation within the galactic disc alone, however, are somewhat smaller, 0.2-2, so that a further contribution from cloud ablation or evaporation within the wind may be required. Both models may account for the 1.4 GHz luminosity of unresolved radio sources within starburst galaxies for plausible parameters describing the distribution of relativistic electrons. Further observational tests to distinguish the models are suggested.

  20. The Galactic Nova Rate Revisited

    CERN Document Server

    Shafter, A W

    2016-01-01

    Despite its fundamental importance, a reliable estimate of the Galactic nova rate has remained elusive. Here, the overall Galactic nova rate is estimated by extrapolating the observed rate for novae reaching $m\\leq2$ to include the entire Galaxy using a two component disk plus bulge model for the distribution of stars in the Milky Way. The present analysis improves on previous work by considering important corrections for incompleteness in the observed rate of bright novae. Several models are considered to account for differences in the assumed properties of bulge and disk nova populations. The simplest models, which assume uniform properties between bulge and disk novae, predict Galactic nova rates between $\\sim$50 to as many as $\\sim$100 per year, depending on the assumed incompleteness at bright magnitudes. Models where the disk novae are assumed to be more luminous than bulge novae are explored, and predict nova rates up to 30% lower, in the range of $\\sim$35 to $\\sim$70 per year. An average of the most p...

  1. How supernovae launch galactic winds?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fielding, Drummond; Quataert, Eliot; Martizzi, Davide; Faucher-Giguère, Claude-André

    2017-09-01

    We use idealized three-dimensional hydrodynamic simulations of global galactic discs to study the launching of galactic winds by supernovae (SNe). The simulations resolve the cooling radii of the majority of supernova remnants (SNRs) and thus self-consistently capture how SNe drive galactic winds. We find that SNe launch highly supersonic winds with properties that agree reasonably well with expectations from analytic models. The energy loading (η _E= \\dot{E}_wind/ \\dot{E}_SN) of the winds in our simulations are well converged with spatial resolution while the wind mass loading (η _M= \\dot{M}_wind/\\dot{M}_\\star) decreases with resolution at the resolutions we achieve. We present a simple analytic model based on the concept that SNRs with cooling radii greater than the local scaleheight break out of the disc and power the wind. This model successfully explains the dependence (or lack thereof) of ηE (and by extension ηM) on the gas surface density, star formation efficiency, disc radius and the clustering of SNe. The winds our simulations are weaker than expected in reality, likely due to the fact that we seed SNe preferentially at density peaks. Clustering SNe in time and space substantially increases the wind power.

  2. Atoms-for-Peace: A Galactic Collision in Action

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-01

    European Southern Observatory astronomers have produced a spectacular new image of the famous Atoms-for-Peace galaxy (NGC 7252). This galactic pile-up, formed by the collision of two galaxies, provides an excellent opportunity for astronomers to study how mergers affect the evolution of the Universe. Atoms-for-Peace is the curious name given to a pair of interacting and merging galaxies that lie around 220 million light-years away in the constellation of Aquarius. It is also known as NGC 7252 and Arp 226 and is just bright enough to be seen by amateur astronomers as a very faint small fuzzy blob. This very deep image was produced by ESO's Wide Field Imager on the MPG/ESO 2.2-metre telescope at ESO's La Silla Observatory in Chile. A galaxy collision is one of the most important processes influencing how our Universe evolves, and studying them reveals important clues about galactic ancestry. Luckily, such collisions are long drawn-out events that last hundreds of millions of years, giving astronomers plenty of time to observe them. This picture of Atoms-for-Peace represents a snapshot of its collision, with the chaos in full flow, set against a rich backdrop of distant galaxies. The results of the intricate interplay of gravitational interactions can be seen in the shapes of the tails made from streams of stars, gas and dust. The image also shows the incredible shells that formed as gas and stars were ripped out of the colliding galaxies and wrapped around their joint core. While much material was ejected into space, other regions were compressed, sparking bursts of star formation. The result was the formation of hundreds of very young star clusters, around 50 to 500 million years old, which are speculated to be the progenitors of globular clusters. Atoms-for-Peace may be a harbinger of our own galaxy's fate. Astronomers predict that in three or four billion years the Milky Way and the Andromeda Galaxy will collide, much as has happened with Atoms-for-Peace. But don

  3. SAS-2 galactic gamma ray results, 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, D. J.; Fichtel, C. E.; Hartman, R. C.; Kniffen, D. A.; Bignami, G. F.; Lamb, R. C.; Oegelman, H.; Oezel, M. E.; Tuemer, T.

    1976-01-01

    Continuing analysis of the data from the SAS-2 high energy gamma-ray experiment has produced an improved picture of the sky at photon energies above 35 MeV. On a large scale, the diffuse emission from the galactic plane is the dominant feature observed by SAS-2. This galactic plane emission is most intense between galactic longitude 310 and 45 deg, corresponding to a region within 7kpc of the galactic center. Within the high-intensity region, SAS-2 observes peaks around galactic longitudes 315 deg, 330 deg, 345 deg, 0 deg, and 35 deg. These peaks appear to be correlated with such galactic features and components as molecular hydrogen, atomic hydrogen, magnetic fields, cosmic ray concentrations, and photon fields.

  4. Structure and content of the galaxy and galactic gamma rays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1976-01-01

    The conference included papers on ..gamma..-ray pulsars, galactic diffuse flux and surveys, radio surveys of external galaxies, galactic distribution of pulsars, and galactic gamma emission. Galactic structure drawing on all branches of galactic astronomy is discussed. New and unpublished material is included. (JFP)

  5. Discovery of ten galactic Nova candidates in the VVV disk area

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saito, R. K.; Minniti, D.; Catelan, M.; Angeloni, R.; Beamin, J. C.; Palma, T.; Gutierrez, L. A.; Montenegro, K.

    2016-01-01

    We report the discovery of ten likely Galactic novae by the VVV Survey in its disk area (vvvsurvey.org; Minniti et al. 2010, New Astronomy, 15, 433). A search for high-amplitude transients on the VVV disk data taken during the 2010-2013 seasons detected the presence of ten stellar sources fading in brightness by at least Delta_Ks=3 mag with their light curves following the expected behavior of a nova outburst.

  6. PNV J16521887-3754189 is a New Galactic Nova in Scorpius

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strader, J.; Chomiuk, L.; Bahramian, A.; Britt, C.; Brown, J. S.; Stanek, K. Z.; Holoien, T. W.-S.; Kochanek, C. S.; Shields, J.; Thompson, T. A.; Shappee, B. J.; Prieto, J. L.; Bersier, D.; Dong, Subo; Bose, S.; Chen, Ping; Brimacombe, J.

    2017-02-01

    We report the spectroscopic classification of the transient PNV J16521887-3754189 as a new Galactic nova. A spectrum obtained with the Goodman spectrograph on the SOAR telescope on UT Feb 12.3 shows broad, double-peaked emission predominantly in Balmer lines, He I, and He II. The half-width at zero intensity of the emission is around 2000 km/s.

  7. Transient Voltage Recorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medelius, Pedro J. (Inventor); Simpson, Howard J. (Inventor)

    2002-01-01

    A voltage transient recorder can detect lightning induced transient voltages. The recorder detects a lightning induced transient voltage and adjusts input amplifiers to accurately record transient voltage magnitudes. The recorder stores voltage data from numerous monitored channels, or devices. The data is time stamped and can be output in real time, or stored for later retrieval. The transient recorder, in one embodiment, includes an analog-to-digital converter and a voltage threshold detector. When an input voltage exceeds a pre-determined voltage threshold, the recorder stores the incoming voltage magnitude and time of arrival. The recorder also determines if its input amplifier circuits clip the incoming signal or if the incoming signal is too low. If the input data is clipped or too low, the recorder adjusts the gain of the amplifier circuits to accurately acquire subsequent components of the lightning induced transients.

  8. ATOMIC HYDROGEN IN A GALACTIC CENTER OUTFLOW

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McClure-Griffiths, N. M.; Green, J. A.; Hill, A. S. [Australia Telescope National Facility, CSIRO Astronomy and Space Science, Marsfield, NSW 2122 (Australia); Lockman, F. J. [National Radio Astronomy Observatory, Green Bank, WV 24944 (United States); Dickey, J. M. [School of Physics and Mathematics, University of Tasmania, TAS 7001 (Australia); Gaensler, B. M.; Green, A. J., E-mail: naomi.mcclure-griffiths@csiro.au [Sydney Institute for Astronomy, School of Physics, The University of Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia)

    2013-06-10

    We describe a population of small, high-velocity, atomic hydrogen clouds, loops, and filaments found above and below the disk near the Galactic center. The objects have a mean radius of 15 pc, velocity widths of {approx}14 km s{sup -1}, and are observed at |z| heights up to 700 pc. The velocity distribution of the clouds shows no signature of Galactic rotation. We propose a scenario where the clouds are associated with an outflow from a central star-forming region at the Galactic center. We discuss the clouds as entrained material traveling at {approx}200 km s{sup -1} in a Galactic wind.

  9. TRANSIENT ELECTRONICS CATEGORIZATION

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-08-24

    definitions of what it means to be transient. The purpose of this technical report is to provide a background of the issues related to transient...In this section, we will attempt to identify these parameters and provide preliminary definitions for categories of transience behavior. Transient...programmable lifetimes. Ideally , such materials with expiration dates will deconstruct themselves into harmless and invisible remnants. The technology base

  10. Teaching Young People to Be Curious, to Observe the Environment, to Think Critically

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferraris, M.; Scheurle, C.; Claustre, H.

    2016-02-01

    The Observatoire Océanologique de Villefranche-sur-Mer (OOV) is one of thirty partners participating to the outreach project MEDITES (Méditerranée Diffusion des Techniques et des Sciences). The aim of this innovating project is to bring scientific culture to secondary school students socially or territorially distant from this type of culture, by means of different learning paths conceived and carried out by researchers in collaboration with professionals in the scientific mediation. In particular the OOV staff works in tandem with animators of the association Les Petits Débrouillardsto introduce students to oceanography. Each of the ten sessions of our learning paths includes a scientific part, based on research topics of the OOV, and a hands-on part, consisting of games, experiments or dynamic debates to better understand the scientific topics. Mixing these two approaches is helpful to maintain concentration, to have fun and consequently reduce the gap with science, a real challenge in the case of students with social problems. The ultimate goal of this method is not only to teach oceanography, but rather to teach to observe what surrounds us, to be curious, to ask questions, to think critically, to experiment and test in order to find the answers to these questions by yourself. In particular one session of our learning paths is carried out also in collaboration with the astronomers and the géophysicists of the Observatoire de la Côte d'Azur(OCA), in order to make the students aware of some common points between oceanography, astronomy and geosciences : the observation of the environment with instruments more or less sophisticated, and to the scientific approach. The most interesting aspect of this project is to monitore these classes throughout the year. During this time we have seen them mature in their way of thinking and that we could arouse the curiosity of these young students to make them more resourceful.

  11. Transition from Galactic to extragalactic cosmic rays and cosmic ray anisotropy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sigl G.

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available This talk based on results of ref. [1], where we constrain the energy at which the transition from Galactic to extragalactic cosmic rays occurs by computing the anisotropy at Earth of cosmic rays emitted by Galactic sources. Since the diffusion approximation starts to loose its validity for E/Z ≳ 10(16−17 eV, we propagate individual cosmic rays using Galactic magnetic field models and taking into account both their regular and turbulent components. The turbulent field is generated on a nested grid which allows spatial resolution down to fractions of a parsec. If the primary composition is mostly light or intermediate around E ∼ 1018 eV, the transition at the ankle is ruled out, except in the unlikely case of an extreme Galactic magnetic field with strength >10 μG. Therefore, the fast rising proton contribution suggested by KASCADE-Grande data between 1017 eV and 1018 eV should be of extragalactic origin. In case heavy nuclei dominate the flux at E > 1018 eV, the transition energy can be close to the ankle, if Galactic cosmic rays are produced by sufficiently frequent transients as e.g. magnetars.

  12. The Zwicky Transient Facility

    CERN Document Server

    Bellm, Eric C

    2014-01-01

    The Zwicky Transient Facility (ZTF) is a next-generation optical synoptic survey that builds on the experience and infrastructure of the Palomar Transient Factory (PTF). Using a new 47 deg$^2$ survey camera, ZTF will survey more than an order of magnitude faster than PTF to discover rare transients and variables. I describe the survey and the camera design. Searches for young supernovae, fast transients, counterparts to gravitational-wave detections, and rare variables will benefit from ZTF's high cadence, wide area survey.

  13. The Galactic Habitable Zone I. Galactic Chemical Evolution

    CERN Document Server

    González, G; Ward, P; Gonzalez, Guillermo; Brownlee, Donald; Ward, Peter

    2001-01-01

    We propose the concept of a "Galactic Habitable Zone" (GHZ). Analogous to the Circumstellar Habitable Zone (CHZ), the GHZ is that region in the Milky Way where an Earth-like planet can retain liquid water on its surface and provide a long-term habitat for animal-like aerobic life. In this paper we examine the dependence of the GHZ on Galactic chemical evolution. The single most important factor is likely the dependence of terrestrial planet mass on the metallicity of its birth cloud. We estimate, very approximately, that a metallicity at least half that of the Sun is required to build a habitable terrestrial planet. The mass of a terrestrial planet has important consequences for interior heat loss, volatile inventory, and loss of atmosphere. A key issue is the production of planets that sustain plate tectonics, a critical recycling process that provides feedback to stabilize atmospheric temperatures on planets with oceans and atmospheres. Due to the more recent decline from the early intense star formation ac...

  14. Cosmology and galactic rotation curves

    CERN Document Server

    Mannheim, P D

    1995-01-01

    We explore the possibility that the entire departure of galactic rotational velocities from their luminous Newtonian expectation be cosmological in origin, and show that within the framework of conformal gravity (but not Einstein gravity apparently) every static observer sees the overall Hubble flow as a local universal linear potential which is able to account for available data without any need for dark matter. We find that the Universe is necessarily an open one with 3-space scalar curvature given by k = -3.5\\times 10^{-60}cm^{-2}.

  15. Infrared Classification of Galactic Objects

    CERN Document Server

    Ivezic, Z; Ivezic, Zeljko; Elitzur, Moshe

    2000-01-01

    Unbiased analysis shows that IRAS data reliably differentiate between the early and late stages of stellar evolution because objects at these stages clearly segregate in infrared color-color diagrams. Structure in these diagrams is primarily controlled by the density distribution of circumstellar dust. The density profile around older objects is the steepest, declining as $r^{-2}$, while young objects have profiles that vary as $r^{-3/2}$ and flatter. The different density profiles reflect the different dynamics that govern the different environments. Our analysis also shows that high mass star formation is strongly concentrated within \\about 5 kpc around the Galactic center, in support of other studies.

  16. Study on the Contribution of the Galactic Cosmic Rays to the Galactic Halo Magnetic Field

    CERN Document Server

    Qu, Xiao-bo; Xue, Liang; Liu, Cheng; Hu, Hong-bo

    2011-01-01

    Based on the measured cosmic ray anisotropy, a model was built to calculate the Galactic cosmic ray's contribution to the large scale Galactic magnetic field. The general agreement in the large scale structure of the Galactic magnetic field between the calculation and the observations is obtained. This result shows that the model is in the right approach in understanding the cosmic ray's contribution to the Galactic magnetic field, and in the mean while, it indicates that the observed anisotropy of cosmic rays on the earth is not just a local behavior in solar vicinity but represents a microcosm of the global anisotropy of the Galactic cosmic rays.

  17. Star formation in Galactic flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smilgys, Romas; Bonnell, Ian A.

    2016-06-01

    We investigate the triggering of star formation in clouds that form in Galactic scale flows as the interstellar medium passes through spiral shocks. We use the Lagrangian nature of smoothed particle hydrodynamics simulations to trace how the star-forming gas is gathered into self-gravitating cores that collapse to form stars. Large-scale flows that arise due to Galactic dynamics create shocks of the order of 30 km s-1 that compress the gas and form dense clouds (n > several × 102 cm-3) in which self-gravity becomes relevant. These large-scale flows are necessary for creating the dense physical conditions for gravitational collapse and star formation. Local gravitational collapse requires densities in excess of n > 103 cm-3 which occur on size scales of ≈1 pc for low-mass star-forming regions (M 103 M⊙). Star formation in the 250 pc region lasts throughout the 5 Myr time-scale of the simulation with a star formation rate of ≈10-1 M⊙ yr-1 kpc-2. In the absence of feedback, the efficiency of the star formation per free-fall time varies from our assumed 100 per cent at our sink accretion radius to values of <10-3 at low densities.

  18. Constraints on galactic wind models

    CERN Document Server

    Meiksin, Avery

    2016-01-01

    Observational implications are derived for two standard models of supernovae-driven galactic winds: a freely expanding steady-state wind and a wind sourced by a self-similarly expanding superbubble including thermal heat conduction. It is shown that, for the steady-state wind, matching the measured correlation between the soft x-ray luminosity and star formation rate of starburst galaxies is equivalent to producing a scaled wind mass-loading factor relative to the star-formation rate of 0.5 - 3, in agreement with the amount inferred from metal absorption line measurements. The match requires the asymptotic wind velocity v_inf to scale with the star formation rate SFR (in solar masses per year) approximately as v_inf ~ (700 - 1000) km/s SFR^{1/6}. The corresponding mass injection rate is close to the amount naturally provided by thermal evaporation from the wall of a superbubble in a galactic disc, suggesting thermal evaporation may be a major source of mass-loading. The predicted mass-loading factors from the...

  19. Chemical complexity in galactic nuclei

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin-Pintado, Jesus

    2007-12-01

    In recent years our knowledge of the chemical complexity in the nuclei of galaxies has dramatically changed. Recent observations of the nucleus of the Milky Way, of the starburst galaxy NGC253 and of the ultraluminous infrared galaxy (ULIRG) Arp220 have shown large abundance of complex organic molecules believed to be formed on grains. The Galactic center appears to be the largest repository of complex organic molecule like aldehydes and alcohols in the galaxy. We also measure large abundance of methanol in starburst galaxies and in ULIRGs suggesting that complex organic molecules are also efficiently produced in the central region of galaxies with strong star formation activity. From the systematic observational studies of molecular abundance in regions dominated by different heating processes like shocks, UV radiation, X-rays and cosmic rays in the center of the Milky Way, we are opening the possibility of using chemistry as a diagnostic tool to study the highly obscured regions of galactic centers. The templates found in the nucleus of the Milky Way will be used to establish the main mechanisms driving the heating and the chemistry of the molecular clouds in galaxies with different type of activity. The role of grain chemistry in the chemical complexity observed in the center of galaxies will be also briefly discussed.

  20. Introduction to Galactic Chemical Evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matteucci, Francesca

    2016-04-01

    In this lecture I will introduce the concept of galactic chemical evolution, namely the study of how and where the chemical elements formed and how they were distributed in the stars and gas in galaxies. The main ingredients to build models of galactic chemical evolution will be described. They include: initial conditions, star formation history, stellar nucleosynthesis and gas flows in and out of galaxies. Then some simple analytical models and their solutions will be discussed together with the main criticisms associated to them. The yield per stellar generation will be defined and the hypothesis of instantaneous recycling approximation will be critically discussed. Detailed numerical models of chemical evolution of galaxies of different morphological type, able to follow the time evolution of the abundances of single elements, will be discussed and their predictions will be compared to observational data. The comparisons will include stellar abundances as well as interstellar medium ones, measured in galaxies. I will show how, from these comparisons, one can derive important constraints on stellar nucleosynthesis and galaxy formation mechanisms. Most of the concepts described in this lecture can be found in the monograph by Matteucci (2012).

  1. School encounters with Mark Haddon's novel The Curious Incident of the Dog in the NightTime (2003

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mira Hladnik

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available This article adds additional materials to the already large corpus available for inter preting and teaching Haddon's novel The Curious Incident of the Dog in the NightTime. First, the article adheres to a quite copious method of furnishing questions and possible an swers to prepare students for more detailed reading of the work. Further, it lists ideas for student essay titles or topics, letters, presentations, and role play activities. Some specific assignments are added to check students' understanding of the artistic work. In short, it offers a complex of diverse approaches and activities from which the teacher may freely choose.

  2. The European Galactic Plane Surveys: EGAPS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groot, P.J.; Drew, J.; Greimel, R.; Gaensicke, B.; Knigge, C.; Irwin, M.; Mampaso, A.; Augusteijn, T.; Morales-Rueda, L.; Barlow, M.; Iphas, C.; Uvex, C.; Vphas, C.

    2006-01-01

    Introduction: The European Galactic Plane Surveys (EGAPS) will for the first time ever map the complete galactic plane (10x360 degrees) down to 21st magnitude in u', g', r', i' and H-alpha and partly in He I 5875. It will complete a database of ~1 billion objects. The aim of EGAPS is to study popula

  3. Dust properties in the Galactic bulge

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pottasch, S. R.; Bernard-Salas, J.

    2013-01-01

    Context. It has been suggested that the ratio of total-to-selective extinction RV in dust in the interstellar medium differs in the Galactic bulge from its value in the local neighborhood. Aims: We attempt to test this suggestion. Methods: The mid-infrared hydrogen lines in 16 Galactic bulge PNe mea

  4. Planck 2013 results. XIII. Galactic CO emission

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ade, P. A. R.; Aghanim, N.; Alves, M. I. R.;

    2014-01-01

    Rotational transition lines of CO play a major role in molecular radio astronomy as a mass tracer and in particular in the study of star formation and Galactic structure. Although a wealth of data exists for the Galactic plane and some well-known molecular clouds, there is no available high sensi...

  5. Energy Radiation of the Active Galactic Nuclei

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TANG Zhi-Ming; WANG Yong-Jiu

    2004-01-01

    In the Hellings-Nordtvedt theory, we obtain some expressions of energy radiation and mass defect effect for a kind of the active galactic nuclei, which is meaningful to calculating the energy radiation in the procession of forming this kind of celestial bodies. This calculation can give some interpretation for energy source of the jet from the active galactic nuclei.

  6. Galactic Drips and How to Stop Them

    CERN Document Server

    Mathews, W G

    1996-01-01

    The temperature of hot interstellar gas at large radii in elliptical galaxies can be lower than the mean galactic virial temperature. If so, a nonlinear cooling wave can form in the hot interstellar gas and propagate slowly toward the galactic core. If the cooling wave survives hydrodynamic instabilities, it can intermittently deposit cold gas within about 15 effective radii. For a bright elliptical the total mass deposited in this manner can approach 10^10 solar masses. The cold gas that drips out at large galactic radii may account for the young stellar populations and extended gas at $\\sim 10^4$ K observed in many ellipticals, features that are often attributed to galactic mergers. Galactic drips are expected in relatively isolated (field) ellipticals provided (i) the galactic stellar velocity ellipsoids are radially oriented at large galactic radii and (ii) the current Type Ia supernova rate is sufficiently small to be consistent with interstellar iron abundances found in recent X-ray studies. Galactic dr...

  7. 3-Dimensional dynamics of the galactic bulge

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Soto Vicencio, Mario Humberto

    2010-01-01

    This thesis is part of a project which attempts to unveil the structure of the galactic bulge of our galaxy through the study of the kinematics of stars in low foreground extinction windows.Thus, in order to effectively constraint the phase-space distribution function of the galactic bulge, we have

  8. PGMS: to study the Galactic magnetism out of the Galactic plane

    CERN Document Server

    Carretti, E; McConnell, D; Bernardi, G; Cortiglioni, S; McClure-Griffiths, N M; Poppi, S

    2008-01-01

    The Parkes Galactic Meridian Survey (PGMS) is a 5 deg X 90 deg strip to map the polarized synchrotron emission along a Galactic meridian from the Galactic plane down to the south Galactic pole. The survey is carried out at the Parkes radio telescope at a frequency of 2.3 GHz with 30 adjacent 8-MHz bands which enable Faraday Rotation studies. The scientific goal is twofold: (1) To probe the Galactic magnetism off the Galactic plane of which little is known so far. PGMS gives an insight into the Galactic magnetic field in the thick disc, halo, and disc-halo transition; (2) To study the synchrotron emission as foreground noise of the CMB Polarization, especially for the weak B-Mode which carries the signature of the primordial gravitational wave background left by the Inflation. PGMS observations have been recently concluded. In this contribution we present the survey along with first results.

  9. PGMS: TO STUDY THE GALACTIC MAGNETISM OUT OF THE GALACTIC PLANE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Carretti

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The Parkes Galactic Meridian Survey (PGMS is a 5 X 90 strip to map the polarized synchrotron emission along a Galactic meridian from the Galactic plane down to the south Galactic pole. The survey is carried out at the Parkes radio telescope at a frequency of 2.3 GHz with 30 adjacent 8 MHz bands which enable Faraday Rotation studies. The scienti c goal is twofold: (1 To probe the Galactic magnetism o the Galactic plane of which little is known so far. PGMS gives an insight into the Galactic magnetic eld in the thick disc, halo, and disc-halo transition; (2 To study the synchrotron emission as foreground noise of the CMB Polarization, especially for the weak B-Mode which carries the signature of the primordial gravitational wave background left by the In ation. PGMS observations have been recently concluded. In this contribution we present the survey along with rst results.

  10. Anisotropy and Corotation of Galactic Cosmic Rays

    CERN Document Server

    Amenomori, M; Bi, X J; Chen, D; Cui, S W; Danzengluobu; Ding, L K; Ding, X H; Feng Cun Feng; Zhaoyang Feng; Feng, Z Y; Gao, X Y; Geng, Q X; Guo, H W; He, H H; He, M; Hibino, K; Hotta, N; Haibing, H; Hu, H B; Huang, J; Huang, Q; Jia, H Y; Kajino, F; Kasahara, K; Katayose, Y; Kato, C; Kawata, K; Labaciren; Le, G M; Li, A F; Li, J Y; Lou, Y Q; Lü, H; Lu, S L; Meng, X R; Mizutani, K; Mu, J; Munakata, K; Nagai, A; Nanjo, H; Nishizawa, M; Ohnishi, M; Ohta, I; Onuma, H; Ouchi, T; Ozawa, S; Ren, J R; Saitô, T; Saito, T Y; Sakata, M; Sako, T K; Sasaki, T; Shibata, M; Shiomi, A; Shirai, T; Sugimoto, H; Takita, M; Tan, Y H; Tateyama, N; Torii, S; Tsuchiya, H; Udo, S; Wang, B; Wang, H; Wang, X; Wang, Y G; Wu, H R; Xue Liang; Yamamoto, Y; Yan, C T; Yang, X C; Yasue, S; Ye, Z H; Yu, G C; Yuan, A F; Yuda, T; Zhang, H M; Zhang, J L; Zhang, N J; Zhang, X Y; Zhang, Y; Zhaxisangzhu; Zhou, X X

    2006-01-01

    The intensity of Galactic cosmic rays is nearly isotropic because of the influence of magnetic fields in the Milky Way. Here, we present two-dimensional high-precision anisotropy measurement for energies from a few to several hundred teraelectronvolts (TeV), using the large data sample of the Tibet Air Shower Arrays. Besides revealing finer details of the known anisotropies, a new component of Galactic cosmic ray anisotropy in sidereal time is uncovered around the Cygnus region direction. For cosmic-ray energies up to a few hundred TeV, all components of anisotropies fade away, showing a corotation of Galactic cosmic rays with the local Galactic magnetic environment. These results have broad implications for a comprehensive understanding of cosmic rays, supernovae, magnetic fields, and heliospheric and Galactic dynamic environments.

  11. New knowledge of the Galactic magnetic fields

    CERN Document Server

    Han, J L

    2009-01-01

    The magnetic fields of our Milky Way galaxy are the main agent for cosmic rays to transport. In the last decade, much new knowledge has been gained from measurements of the Galactic magnetic fields. In the Galactic disk, from the RMs of a large number of newly discovered pulsars, the large-scale magnetic fields along the spiral arms have been delineated in a much larger region than ever before, with alternating directions in the arm and interarm regions. The toroidal fields in the Galactic halo were revealed to have opposite directions below and above the Galactic plane, which is an indication of an A0 mode dynamo operating in the halo. The strength of large-scale fields obtained from pulsar RM data has been found to increase exponentially towards the Galactic center. Compared to the steep Kolmogorov spectrum of magnetic energy at small scales, the large-scale magnetic fields show a shallow broken spatial magnetic energy spectrum.

  12. Hunting for X-ray Outbursts from Galactic Nuclei

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandt, W. N.

    2005-09-01

    Transient X-ray outbursts from galactic nuclei are likely caused by inevitable fueling events of nuclear supermassive black holes when a star, planet, or gas cloud is tidally disrupted and partially accreted. We propose to extend current studies of such events by searching for new X-ray outbursts with harder X-ray spectra, lower X-ray luminosities, and higher redshifts. We will pursue a two-pronged strategy utilizing a combination of (1) about 380 fields with moderate-depth coverage by both Chandra and XMM-Newton and (2) deep Chandra surveys, primarily the Chandra Deep Fields. Aside from their innate interest, our results will be useful for planning future missions such as the Black Hole Finder Probe, Lobster, ROSITA, and LISA.

  13. The Curious Case of Fluorination of Conjugated Polymers for Solar Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qianqian; Kelly, Mary Allison; Bauer, Nicole; You, Wei

    2017-09-19

    Organic solar cells (OSCs) have been a rising star in the field of renewable energy since the introduction of the bulk heterojunction (BHJ) in 1992. Recent advances have pushed the efficiencies of OSCs to over 13%, an impressive accomplishment via collaborative efforts in rational materials design and synthesis, careful device engineering, and fundamental understanding of device physics. Throughout these endeavors, several design principles for the conjugated donor polymers used in such solar cells have emerged, including optimizing the conjugated backbone with judicious selection of building blocks, side-chain engineering, and substituents. Among all of the substituents, fluorine is probably the most popular one; improved device characteristics with fluorination have frequently been reported for a wide range of conjugated polymers, in particular, donor-acceptor (D-A)-type polymers. Herein we examine the effect of fluorination on the device performance of solar cells as a function of the position of fluorination (on the acceptor unit or on the donor unit), aiming to outline a clear understanding of the benefits of this curious substituent. As fluorination of the acceptor unit is the most adopted strategy for D-A polymers, we first discuss the effect of fluorination of the acceptor units, highlighting the five most widely utilized acceptor units. While improved device efficiency has been widely observed with fluorinated acceptor units, the underlying reasons vary from case to case and highly depend on the chemical structure of the polymer. Second, the effect of fluorination of the donor unit is addressed. Here we focus on four donor units that have been most studied with fluorination. While device-performance-enhancing effects by fluorination of the donor units have also been observed, it is less clear that fluorine will always benefit the efficiency of the OSC, as there are several cases where the efficiency drops, in particular with "over-fluorination", i.e., when

  14. Interesting Features in the Combined GALEX and Sloan Color Diagrams of Solar-like Galactic Populations

    CERN Document Server

    Smith, Myron; Shiao, Bernard

    2014-01-01

    We report on intriguing photometric properties of Galactic stars observed in the GALEX satellite's far-UV and near-UV bandbasses as well as from the SDSS survey and the Kepler Input Catalog. First, the FUV-NUV color distribution of stars in the Kepler field consists of 2 distinct peaks. Second, curiously, for stars with spectral types G or later the mean FUV-NUV color becomes much bluer, contrary to expectation. we have found in two samples of mid-F through K type stars that ~14-18% of them exhibit FUV-excesses relative to their NUV fluxes and spectral types. Nearly the same fractions are also discovered among members of the Kepler Eclipsing Binary Catalog and in the published list of Kepler Objects of Interest. These UV-excess ("UVe") colors are confirmed by the UV continuum slopes in GALEX spectra. The SDSS spectra of some UVe stars exhibit metallic line weakening especially in the blue. This suggests an enhanced contribution of UV flux relative to photospheric flux of a solar-type single star. We consider ...

  15. Study of solar activity modulation of galactic cosmic rays using the Pierre Auger Observatory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anjos, J.C. dos [Centro Brasileiro de Pesquisas Fisicas (CBPF), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2011-07-01

    Full text: We show that the count rates of low energy secondary cosmic ray particles used for self-calibration of the water- Cherenkov detectors of the surface detector array of the Pierre Auger Observatory are highly sensitive, after correcting for atmospheric effects, to modulations of galactic cosmic rays due to solar activity and to transient events. The technique consists in recording low threshold rates - scalers - with all the surface detectors of the array. Transient events such as Gamma Ray Bursts and solar flares are expected to be seen as a significant change of the counting rates from the expected value. Temporal variations related with the activity of the heliosphere can be determined with high accuracy due to the high total count rates. We will present the available data collected since March 2005 together with an analysis focused on the observation of Forbush decreases, transient events characterized by short-term periods of strong depression of the cosmic ray flux observed at earth caused by the transit of a solar ejecta from a Coronal Mass Ejection from the Sun. A strong correlation with neutron monitor data from the close-by Observatory Los Cerrilos is observed, showing that water-Cherenkov detectors operating in scaler mode are highly sensitive to Forbush decreases and other transient events related to solar activity modulation of galactic cosmic rays. (author)

  16. A Revised View of the Transient Radio Sky

    CERN Document Server

    Frail, D A; Ofek, E O; Bower, G C; Nakar, E

    2011-01-01

    We report on a re-analysis of archival data from the Very Large Array for a sample of ten long duration radio transients reported by Bower and others. These transients have an implied all-sky rate that would make them the most common radio transient in the sky and yet most have no quiescent counterparts at other wavelengths and therefore no known progenitor (other than Galactic neutron stars). We find that more than half of these transients are due to rare data artifacts. The remaining sources have lower signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) than initially reported by 1 to 1.5-sigma. This lowering of SNR matters greatly since the sources are at the threshold. We are unable to decisively account for the differences. By two orthogonal criteria one source appears to be a good detection. Thus the rate of long duration radio transients without optical counterparts is, at best, comparable to that of the class of recently discovered Swift J1644+57 nuclear radio transients. We revisit the known and expected classes of long dur...

  17. A curious gap in one-dimensional geometric random graphs between connectivity and the absence of isolated node

    CERN Document Server

    Zhao, Jun; Gligor, Virgil

    2015-01-01

    One-dimensional geometric random graphs are constructed by distributing $n$ nodes uniformly and independently on a unit interval and then assigning an undirected edge between any two nodes that have a distance at most $r_n$. These graphs have received much interest and been used in various applications including wireless networks. A threshold of $r_n$ for connectivity is known as $r_n^{*} = \\frac{\\ln n}{n}$ in the literature. In this paper, we prove that a threshold of $r_n$ for the absence of isolated node is $\\frac{\\ln n}{2 n}$ (i.e., a half of the threshold $r_n^{*}$). Our result shows there is a curious gap between thresholds of connectivity and the absence of isolated node in one-dimensional geometric random graphs; in particular, when $r_n$ equals $\\frac{c\\ln n}{ n}$ for a constant $c \\in( \\frac{1}{2}, 1)$, a one-dimensional geometric random graph has no isolated node but is not connected. This curious gap in one-dimensional geometric random graphs is in sharp contrast to the prevalent phenomenon in man...

  18. Evolution of active galactic nuclei

    CERN Document Server

    Merloni, Andrea

    2012-01-01

    [Abriged] Supermassive black holes (SMBH) lurk in the nuclei of most massive galaxies, perhaps in all of them. The tight observed scaling relations between SMBH masses and structural properties of their host spheroids likely indicate that the processes fostering the growth of both components are physically linked, despite the many orders of magnitude difference in their physical size. This chapter discusses how we constrain the evolution of SMBH, probed by their actively growing phases, when they shine as active galactic nuclei (AGN) with luminosities often in excess of that of the entire stellar population of their host galaxies. Following loosely the chronological developments of the field, we begin by discussing early evolutionary studies, when AGN represented beacons of light probing the most distant reaches of the universe and were used as tracers of the large scale structure. This early study turned into AGN "Demography", once it was realized that the strong evolution (in luminosity, number density) of ...

  19. PREFACE: Galactic Center Workshop 2006

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schödel, Rainer; Bower, Geoffrey C.; Muno, Michael P.; Nayakshin, Sergei; Ott, Thomas

    2006-12-01

    We are pleased to present the proceedings from the Galactic Center Workshop 2006—From the Center of the Milky Way to Nearby Low-Luminosity Galactic Nuclei. The conference took place in the Physikzentrum, Bad Honnef, Germany, on 18 to 22 April 2006. It is the third workshop of this kind, following the Galactic Center Workshops held 1998 in Tucson, Arizona, and 2002 in Kona, Hawaii. The center of the Milky Way is the only galactic nucleus of a fairly common spiral galaxy that can be observed in great detail. With a distance of roughly 8 kpc, the resolution that can currently be achieved is of the order 40 mpc/8000 AU in the X-ray domain, 2 mpc/400 AU in the near-infrared, and 0.01 mpc/1 AU with VLBI in the millimeter domain. This is two to three orders of magnitude better than for any comparable nearby galaxy, making thus the center of the Milky Way thetemplate object for the general physical interpretation of the phenomena that can be observed in galactic nuclei. We recommend the summary article News from the year 2006 Galactic Centre workshopby Mark Morris and Sergei Nayakshin—who also gave the summary talk of the conference—to the reader in order to obtain a first, concise overview of the results presented at the workshop and some of the currently most exciting—and debated—developments in recent GC research. While the workshops held in 1998 and 2002 were dedicated solely to the center of the Milky Way, the field of view was widened in Bad Honnef to include nearby low-luminosity nuclei. This new feature followed the realization that not only the GC serves as a template for understanding extragalactic nuclei, but that the latter can also provide the context and broader statistical base for understanding the center of our Milky Way. This concerns especially the accretion and emission processes related to the Sagittarius A*, the manifestation of the super massive black hole in the GC, but also the surprising observation of great numbers of massive, young

  20. Transient Ischemic Attack

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... TIA , or transient ischemic attack, is a "mini stroke" that occurs when a blood clot blocks an ... a short time. The only difference between a stroke and TIA is that with TIA the blockage ...

  1. Transient Ischemic Attack

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... TIA , or transient ischemic attack, is a "mini stroke" that occurs when a blood clot blocks an ... a short time. The only difference between a stroke and TIA is that with TIA the blockage ...

  2. Searches for radio transients

    CERN Document Server

    Bhat, N D R

    2011-01-01

    Exploration of the transient Universe is an exciting and fast-emerging area within radio astronomy. Known transient phenomena range in time scales from sub-nanoseconds to years or longer, thus spanning a huge range in time domain and hinting a rich diversity in their underlying physical processes. Transient phenomena are likely locations of explosive or dynamic events and they offer tremendous potential to uncover new physics and astrophysics. A number of upcoming next-generation radio facilities and recent advances in computing and instrumentation have provided a much needed impetus for this field which has remained a relatively uncharted territory for the past several decades. In this paper we focus mainly on the class of phenomena that occur on very short time scales (i.e. from $\\sim$ milliseconds to $\\sim$ nanoseconds), known as {\\it fast transients}, the detections of which involve considerable signal processing and data management challenges, given the high time and frequency resolutions required in the...

  3. Transient Ischemic Attack

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Ischemic Attack TIA , or transient ischemic attack, is a "mini stroke" that occurs when a blood clot blocks an artery for a short time. The only difference between a stroke ...

  4. Transient multivariable sensor evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vilim, Richard B.; Heifetz, Alexander

    2017-02-21

    A method and system for performing transient multivariable sensor evaluation. The method and system includes a computer system for identifying a model form, providing training measurement data, generating a basis vector, monitoring system data from sensor, loading the system data in a non-transient memory, performing an estimation to provide desired data and comparing the system data to the desired data and outputting an alarm for a defective sensor.

  5. Transient multivariable sensor evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vilim, Richard B.; Heifetz, Alexander

    2017-02-21

    A method and system for performing transient multivariable sensor evaluation. The method and system includes a computer system for identifying a model form, providing training measurement data, generating a basis vector, monitoring system data from sensor, loading the system data in a non-transient memory, performing an estimation to provide desired data and comparing the system data to the desired data and outputting an alarm for a defective sensor.

  6. A New High-Frequency Search for Galactic Center Millisecond Pulsars using DSS-43

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemley, Cameron; Prince, Thomas Allen; Majid, Walid A.; Murchikova, Elena

    2016-01-01

    The primary 70-meter Deep Space Network antenna (DSS-43) in Canberra, Australia was equipped with a new high-frequency (18-28 GHz) receiver system in May 2015 for use in a search for Galactic Center (GC) millisecond pulsars. The primary motivation for this search is that a pulsar in the Galactic Center region (especially one that is gravitationally bound to the massive black hole at the GC) would provide unprecedented tests of gravity in the strong-field regime and would offer an entirely new tool for probing the characteristics of the Galactic Center region. Preparation for the GC pulsar search has involved the development of a single-pulse search pipeline that integrates tools from both Fortran and Python as well as the implementation of this pipeline on high performance CPUs. The original version of the search pipeline was developed using Vela Pulsar data from DSS-43, and a more refined version that relies upon chi-squared fitting techniques was ultimately developed using Crab Pulsar data. Future work will involve continued testing of the single-pulse search pipeline using data from the rotating radio transient (RRAT) J1819-1458, the characterization of RRAT pulses using high time resolution data from the new receiver system on DSS-43, and ultimately the analysis of high-frequency data using the existing pipeline to search for millisecond pulsars in the Galactic Center.

  7. Some Aspects of Galactic Cosmic Ray Acceleration

    CERN Document Server

    Butt, Y M

    2003-01-01

    I give a synopsis of two aspects of the Galactic Cosmic Ray (GCR) acceleration problem: the importance of the medium energy gamma-ray window, and several specific astrophysical sources which merit further investigation.

  8. Directional detection of galactic Dark Matter

    CERN Document Server

    Mayet, F; Bernard, G; Bosson, G; Bourrion, O; Grignon, C; Guillaudin, O; Koumeir, C; Richer, J P; Santos, D; Colas, P; Ferer, E; Giomataris, I; Allaoua, A; Lebreton, L

    2010-01-01

    Directional detection of galactic Dark Matter is a promising search strategy for discriminating geniune WIMP events from background ones. We present technical progress on gaseous detectors as well as recent phenomenological studies, allowing the design and construction of competitive experiments.

  9. UHECR propagation in the Galactic Magnetic Field

    CERN Document Server

    Vorobiov, Serguei; Veberič, Darko

    2009-01-01

    Extensive simulations of the ultra-high energy cosmic ray (UHECR) propagation in the Galactic magnetic field (GMF) have been performed, and the results are presented. The use of different available models of the large-scale GMF and/or primary particle assumptions leads to distinctly different deflection patterns of the highest energy cosmic rays (CR). The lensing effects of the Galactic field modify the exposure of an UHECR experiment to the extragalactic sky. To quantify these effects for the Pierre Auger experiment, we performed a correlation analysis of the simulated cosmic ray event samples, backtracked from the Earth to the Galactic border, with the active galactic nuclei (AGN) from the 12th edition of the V\\'eron-Cetty and V\\'eron catalogue. Further forward-tracking studies under plausible UHECR sources scenarios are needed to allow for direct comparison with the observed correlation between the nearby AGN and the highest energy Auger events.

  10. Very fast optical flaring from a possible new Galactic magnetar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stefanescu, A; Kanbach, G; Słowikowska, A; Greiner, J; McBreen, S; Sala, G

    2008-09-25

    Highly luminous rapid flares are characteristic of processes around compact objects like white dwarfs, neutron stars and black holes. In the high-energy regime of X-rays and gamma-rays, outbursts with variabilities on timescales of seconds or less are routinely observed, for example in gamma-ray bursts or soft gamma-ray repeaters. At optical wavelengths, flaring activity on such timescales has not been observed, other than from the prompt phase of one exceptional gamma-ray burst. This is mostly due to the fact that outbursts with strong, fast flaring are usually discovered in the high-energy regime; most optical follow-up observations of such transients use instruments with integration times exceeding tens of seconds, which are therefore unable to resolve fast variability. Here we show the observation of extremely bright and rapid optical flaring in the Galactic transient SWIFT J195509.6+261406. Our optical light curves are phenomenologically similar to high-energy light curves of soft gamma-ray repeaters and anomalous X-ray pulsars, which are thought to be neutron stars with extremely high magnetic fields (magnetars). This suggests that similar processes are in operation, but with strong emission in the optical, unlike in the case of other known magnetars.

  11. Hammurabi: Simulating polarized Galactic synchrotron emission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaffe, Tess; Waelkens, Andre; Reinecke, M.; Kitaura, F. S.; Enßlin, T. A.

    2012-01-01

    The Hammurabi code is a publicly available C++ code for generating mock polarized observations of Galactic synchrotron emission with telescopes such as LOFAR, SKA, Planck, and WMAP, based on model inputs for the Galactic magnetic field (GMF), the cosmic-ray density distribution, and the thermal electron density. The Hammurabi code allows one to perform simulations of several different data sets simultaneously, providing a more reliable constraint of the magnetized ISM.

  12. Magnetic field reversals and galactic dynamos

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    We argue that global magnetic field reversals similar to those observed in the Milky Way occur quite frequently in mean-field galactic dynamo models that have relatively strong, random, seed magnetic fields that are localized in discrete regions. The number of reversals decreases to zero with reduction of the seed strength, efficiency of the galactic dynamo and size of the spots of the seed field. A systematic observational search for magnetic field reversals in a representative sample of spi...

  13. Relativistic Dark Matter at the Galactic Center

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amin, Mustafa A.; /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /KIPAC, Menlo Park; Wizansky, Tommer; /SLAC

    2007-11-16

    In a large region of the supersymmetry parameter space, the annihilation cross section for neutralino dark matter is strongly dependent on the relative velocity of the incoming particles. We explore the consequences of this velocity dependence in the context of indirect detection of dark matter from the galactic center. We find that the increase in the annihilation cross section at high velocities leads to a flattening of the halo density profile near the galactic center and an enhancement of the annihilation signal.

  14. Synergies in extragalactic and Galactic jet research

    CERN Document Server

    Romero, Gustavo E

    2014-01-01

    The discovery of relativistic jets and superluminal sources associated with accreting X-ray binaries in the Galaxy opened new ways of investigating the physics of outflows from compact objects. The short timescales and relatively large angular sizes of Galactic jets allow to probe the physics of relativistic outflows to unprecedented details. In this article I discuss results of recent modelling of Galactic jets, covering both radiative and dynamical aspects, which can shed light on different features of their extragalactic cousins.

  15. The HAWC Gamma-Ray Observatory: Sensitivity to Steady and Transient Sources of Gamma Rays

    CERN Document Server

    Abeysekara, A U; Alvarez, C; Álvarez, J D; Arceo, R; Arteaga-Velázquez, J C; Solares, H A Ayala; Barber, A S; Baughman, B M; Bautista-Elivar, N; Belmont, E; BenZvi, S Y; Berley, D; Rosales, M Bonilla; Braun, J; Caballero-Lopez, R A; Caballero-Mora, K S; Carramiñana, A; Castillo, M; Cotti, U; Cotzomi, J; de la Fuente, E; De León, C; DeYoung, T; Hernandez, R Diaz; Díaz-Vélez, J C; Dingus, B L; DuVernois, M A; Ellsworth, R W; Fernandez, A; Fiorino, D W; Fraija, N; Galindo, A; Garfias, F; González, L X; González, M M; Goodman, J A; Grabski, V; Gussert, M; Hampel-Arias, Z; Hui, C M; Hüntemeyer, P; Imran, A; Iriarte, A; Karn, P; Kieda, D; Kunde, G J; Lara, A; Lauer, R J; Lee, W H; Lennarz, D; Vargas, H León; Linares, E C; Linnemann, J T; Longo, M; Luna-GarcIa, R; Marinelli, A; Martinez, H; Martinez, O; Martínez-Castro, J; Matthews, J A J; Miranda-Romagnoli, P; Moreno, E; Mostafá, M; Nava, J; Nellen, L; Newbold, M; Noriega-Papaqui, R; Oceguera-Becerra, T; Patricelli, B; Pelayo, R; Pérez-Pérez, E G; Pretz, J; Rivière, C; Rosa-González, D; Salazar, H; Salesa, F; Sanchez, F E; Sandoval, A; Santos, E; Schneider, M; Silich, S; Sinnis, G; Smith, A J; Sparks, K; Springer, R W; Taboada, I; Toale, P A; Tollefson, K; Torres, I; Ukwatta, T N; Villaseñor, L; Weisgarber, T; Westerhoff, S; Wisher, I G; Wood, J; Yodh, G B; Younk, P W; Zaborov, D; Zepeda, A; Zhou, H

    2013-01-01

    The High-Altitude Water Cherenkov (HAWC) Gamma-Ray Observatory is designed to record air showers produced by cosmic rays and gamma rays between 100 GeV and 100 TeV. Because of its large field of view and high livetime, HAWC is well-suited to measure gamma rays from extended sources, diffuse emission, and transient sources. We describe the sensitivity of HAWC to emission from the extended Cygnus region as well as other types of galactic diffuse emission; searches for flares from gamma-ray bursts and active galactic nuclei; and the first measurement of the Crab Nebula with HAWC-30.

  16. An analysis of feature relevance in the classification of astronomical transients with machine learning methods

    CERN Document Server

    D'Isanto, Antonio; Brescia, Massimo; Donalek, Ciro; Longo, Giuseppe; Riccio, Giuseppe; Djorgovski, Stanislav G

    2016-01-01

    The exploitation of present and future synoptic (multi-band and multi-epoch) surveys requires an extensive use of automatic methods for data processing and data interpretation. In this work, using data extracted from the Catalina Real Time Transient Survey (CRTS), we investigate the classification performance of some well tested methods: Random Forest, MLPQNA (Multi Layer Perceptron with Quasi Newton Algorithm) and K-Nearest Neighbors, paying special attention to the feature selection phase. In order to do so, several classification experiments were performed. Namely: identification of cataclysmic variables, separation between galactic and extra-galactic objects and identification of supernovae.

  17. Finding Distant Galactic HII Regions

    CERN Document Server

    Anderson, L D; Johnstone, B M; Bania, T M; Balser, Dana S; Wenger, Trey V; Cunningham, V

    2015-01-01

    The WISE Catalog of Galactic HII Regions contains $\\sim2000$ HII region candidates lacking ionized gas spectroscopic observations. All candidates have the characteristic HII region mid-infrared morphology of WISE $12\\,\\,\\mu\\,m$ emission surrounding $22\\,\\mu\\,m$ emission, and additionally have detected radio continuum emission. We here report Green Bank Telescope (GBT) hydrogen radio recombination line (RRL) and radio continuum detections at X-band (9GHz; 3cm) of 302 WISE HII region candidates (out of 324 targets observed) in the zone $225^{\\circ} > l > -20^{\\circ}$, $|b| \\le 6^{\\circ}$. Here we extend the sky coverage of our HII region Discovery Survey (HRDS), which now contains nearly 800 HII regions distributed across the entire northern sky. We provide LSR velocities for the 302 detections and kinematic distances for 131 of these. Of the 302 new detections, five have ($l, b, v$) coordinates consistent with the Outer Scutum-Centaurus Arm (OSC), the most distant molecular spiral arm of the Milky Way. Due to ...

  18. The Formation of Galactic Disks

    CERN Document Server

    Mo, H J; White, S D M; Mao, Shude; White, Simon D.M.

    1997-01-01

    We study the population of galactic disks expected in current hierarchical clustering models for structure formation. A rotationally supported disk with exponential surface density profile is assumed to form with a mass and angular momentum which are fixed fractions of those of its surrounding dark halo. We assume that haloes respond adiabatically to disk formation, and that only stable disks can correspond to real systems. With these assumptions the predicted population can match both present-day disks and the damped Lyman alpha absorbers in QSO spectra. Good agreement is found provided: (i) the masses of disks are a few percent of those of their haloes; (ii) the specific angular momenta of disks are similar to those of their haloes; (iii) present-day disks were assembled recently (at z3kpc/h and about 10% at r>10kpc/h. The cross-section for absorption is strongly weighted towards disks with large angular momentum and so large size for their mass. The galaxy population associated with damped absorbers should...

  19. Radioactivity in the galactic plane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walraven, G. D.; Haymes, R. C.

    1976-01-01

    The paper reports the detection of a large concentration of interstellar radioactivity during balloon-altitude measurements of gamma-ray energy spectra in the band between 0.02 and 12.27 MeV from galactic and extragalactic sources. Enhanced counting rates were observed in three directions towards the plane of the Galaxy; a power-law energy spectrum is computed for one of these directions (designated B 10). A large statistical deviation from the power law in a 1.0-FWHM interval centered near 1.16 MeV is discussed, and the existence of a nuclear gamma-ray line at 1.15 MeV in B 10 is postulated. It is suggested that Ca-44, which emits gamma radiation at 1.156 MeV following the decay of radioactive Sc-44, is a likely candidate for this line, noting that Sc-44 arises from Ti-44 according to explosive models of supernova nucleosynthesis. The 1.16-MeV line flux inferred from the present data is shown to equal the predicted flux for a supernova at a distance of approximately 3 kpc and an age not exceeding about 100 years.

  20. GASKAP -- The Galactic ASKAP Survey

    CERN Document Server

    Dickey, J M; Gibson, S J; Gomez, J F; Imai, H; Jones, P; Stanimirovic, S; van Loon, J Th; Walsh, A; Alberdi, A; Anglada, G; Uscanga, L; Arce, H; Bailey, M; Begum, A; Wakker, B; Bekhti, N Ben; Kalberla, P; Winkel, B; Bekki, K; For, B -Q; Staveley-Smith, L; Westmeier, T; Burton, M; Cunningham, M; Dawson, J; Ellingsen, S; Diamond, P; Green, J A; Hill, A S; Koribalski, B; McConnell, D; Rathborne, J; Voronkov, M; Douglas, K A; English, J; Ford, H A; Foster, T; Gomez, Y; Green, A; Bland-Hawthorn, J; Gulyaev, S; Hoare, M; Joncas, G; Kang, J-H; Kerton, C R; Koo, B-C; Leahy, D; Lo, N; Lockman, F J; Migenes, V; Nakashima, J; Zhang, Y; Nidever, D; Peek, J E G; Tafoya, D; Tian, W; Wu, D

    2012-01-01

    A survey of the Milky Way disk and the Magellanic System at the wavelengths of the 21-cm atomic hydrogen (HI) line and three 18-cm lines of the OH molecule will be carried out with the Australian Square Kilometre Array Pathfinder telescope. The survey will study the distribution of HI emission and absorption with unprecedented angular and velocity resolution, as well as molecular line thermal emission, absorption, and maser lines. The area to be covered includes the Galactic plane (|b|< 10deg) at all declinations south of delta = +40deg, spanning longitudes 167deg through 360deg to 79deg at b=0deg, plus the entire area of the Magellanic Stream and Clouds, a total of 13,020 square degrees. The brightness temperature sensitivity will be very good, typically sigma_T ~ 1 K at resolution 30arcsec and 1 km/s. The survey has a wide spectrum of scientific goals, from studies of galaxy evolution to star formation, with particular contributions to understanding stellar wind kinematics, the thermal phases of the inte...

  1. Cosmic rays: extragalactic and Galactic

    CERN Document Server

    Istomin, Ya N

    2014-01-01

    From the analysis of the flux of high energy particles, $E>3\\cdot 10^{18}eV$, it is shown that the distribution of the power density of extragalactic rays over energy is of the power law, ${\\bar q}(E)\\propto E^{-2.7}$, with the same index of $2.7$ that has the distribution of Galactic cosmic rays before so called 'knee', $E3\\cdot 10^{15}eV$, from the Galaxy because of the dependence of the coefficient of diffusion of cosmic rays on energy, $D\\propto E^{0.7}$. The obtained index of the density distribution of particles over energy, $N(E)\\propto E^{-2.7-0.7/2}=E^{-3.05}$, for $E>3\\cdot 10^{15}eV$ agrees well with the observed one, $N(E)\\propto E^{-3.1}$. Estimated time of termination of the jet in the Galaxy is $4.2\\cdot 10^{4}$ years ago.

  2. Bright PanSTARRS Nuclear Transients – what are they?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Smartt S.

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available We present an initial analysis of 49 bright transients occurring in the nuclei of galaxies with no previous known Active Galactic Nucleus (AGN. They have been discovered as part of the PanSTARRs 3π survey, and followed up with the Liverpool Telescope. Based on colours, light curve shape, and a small number with optical spectra, these transients seem to fall into three groups. Red/fast transients are nuclear supernovae of various types. Some bright nuclear transients are blue and decay on a timescale of a few months; these may be candidates for tidal disruption events. However most of the events we have found are blue and are either still rising or decaying slowly, on a timescale of years; the few spectra we have show AGN at z ∼ 1. We argue that these transients are background AGN microlensed by stars in foreground galaxies by a factor 10–100. Monitoring such events gives us very promising prospects for measuring the structure of AGN and so testing current theories.

  3. GRB Afterglows and Other Transients in the SDSS

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Brian C.; Reichart, Daniel E.

    2003-01-01

    The Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) will image one quarter of the sky centered on the northern galactic cap and produce a 3-D map of galaxies and quasars found in the sample. An additional 225 deg^2 southern survey will be imaged repeatedly on varying timescales. Here we discuss both archival searches in the SDSS catalog (such as SDSS J24602.54+011318.8) and active searches with the SDSS instruments (such as for GRB 010222) for GRB afterglows and other transient objects.

  4. Eyes wide shut: The curious silence of The law of peoples on questions of immigration and citizenship.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert W. Glover

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available In an interdependent world of overlapping political memberships and identities, states and democratic citizens face difficult choices in responding to large-scale migration and the related question of who ought to have access to citizenship. In an influential attempt to provide a normative framework for a more just global order, The Law of Peoples, John Rawls is curiously silent regarding what his framework would mean for the politics of migration. In this piece, I consider the complications Rawls’s inattention to these issues creates for his broader vision of global justice. Yet I also attempt to show how these aspects of Rawls’s theory emerge from an underlying tension which confronts all liberal democratic conceptions of justice, both in theory and in practice. In my conclusion, I sketch an alternative rooted in the insights of agonistic pluralism, which “breaks” the Rawlsian silence and actively theorizes the democratic legitimation of political borders.

  5. Large scale characterization of the stellar velocity distribution in the galactic disk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Romero-Gómez M.

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Test particle simulations of Milky Way type galactic disks are being conducted to map the evolution of the stellar large scale kinematic response to the bar and spiral structure. Second and third order moments of the velocity distribution function prove to be good indicators of both, the velocity ellipsoid misalignment near the arms and the bar, and the degree of kinematic substructure in the UV plane, that is, the presence of moving groups. A large scale analysis all through the galactic disk allows to establish the kinematic behavior near resonances and the correlation between the kinematic parameters and properties of the non-axisymmetric components, such as its transient nature or its mass overdensity. N-body simulaions are being run in order to test these results in self-consistent models.

  6. The Transient High Energy Sky and Early Universe Surveyor

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Brien, P. T.

    2016-04-01

    The Transient High Energy Sky and Early Universe Surveyor is a mission which will be proposed for the ESA M5 call. THESEUS will address multiple components in the Early Universe ESA Cosmic Vision theme:4.1 Early Universe,4.2 The Universe taking shape, and4.3 The evolving violent Universe.THESEUS aims at vastly increasing the discovery space of the high energy transient phenomena over the entire cosmic history. This is achieved via a unique payload providing an unprecedented combination of: (i) wide and deep sky monitoring in a broad energy band(0.3 keV-20 MeV; (ii) focusing capabilities in the soft X-ray band granting large grasp and high angular resolution; and (iii) on board near-IR capabilities for immediate transient identification and first redshift estimate.The THESEUS payload consists of: (i) the Soft X--ray Imager (SXI), a set of Lobster Eye (0.3--6 keV) telescopes with CCD detectors covering a total FOV of 1 sr; (ii) the X--Gamma-rays spectrometer (XGS), a non-imaging spectrometer (XGS) based on SDD+CsI, covering the same FOV than the Lobster telescope extending the THESEUS energy band up to 20 MeV; and (iii) a 70cm class InfraRed Telescope (IRT) observing up to 2 microns with imaging and moderate spectral capabilities.The main scientific goals of THESEUS are to:(a) Explore the Early Universe (cosmic dawn and reionization era) by unveiling the Gamma--Ray Burst (GRBs) population in the first billion years}, determining when did the first stars form, and investigating the re-ionization epoch, the interstellar medium (ISM) and the intergalactic medium (IGM) at high redshifts.(b) Perform an unprecedented deep survey of the soft X-ray transient Universe in order to fill the present gap in the discovery space of new classes of transient; provide a fundamental step forward in the comprehension of the physics of various classes of Galactic and extra--Galactic transients, and provide real time trigger and accurate locations of transients for follow-up with next

  7. The Milky Way's Tiny but Tough Galactic Neighbour

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-10-01

    Today ESO announces the release of a stunning new image of one of our nearest galactic neighbours, Barnard's Galaxy, also known as NGC 6822. The galaxy contains regions of rich star formation and curious nebulae, such as the bubble clearly visible in the upper left of this remarkable vista. Astronomers classify NGC 6822 as an irregular dwarf galaxy because of its odd shape and relatively diminutive size by galactic standards. The strange shapes of these cosmic misfits help researchers understand how galaxies interact, evolve and occasionally "cannibalise" each other, leaving behind radiant, star-filled scraps. In the new ESO image, Barnard's Galaxy glows beneath a sea of foreground stars in the direction of the constellation of Sagittarius (the Archer). At the relatively close distance of about 1.6 million light-years, Barnard's Galaxy is a member of the Local Group, the archipelago of galaxies that includes our home, the Milky Way. The nickname of NGC 6822 comes from its discoverer, the American astronomer Edward Emerson Barnard, who first spied this visually elusive cosmic islet using a 125-millimetre aperture refractor in 1884. Astronomers obtained this latest portrait using the Wide Field Imager (WFI) attached to the 2.2-metre MPG/ESO telescope at ESO's La Silla Observatory in northern Chile. Even though Barnard's Galaxy lacks the majestic spiral arms and glowing, central bulge that grace its big galactic neighbours, the Milky Way, the Andromeda and the Triangulum galaxies, this dwarf galaxy has no shortage of stellar splendour and pyrotechnics. Reddish nebulae in this image reveal regions of active star formation, where young, hot stars heat up nearby gas clouds. Also prominent in the upper left of this new image is a striking bubble-shaped nebula. At the nebula's centre, a clutch of massive, scorching stars send waves of matter smashing into the surrounding interstellar material, generating a glowing structure that appears ring-like from our perspective

  8. Galactic cosmic radiation environment models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badhwar, G. D.; O'Neill, P. M.; Troung, A. G.

    2001-02-01

    Models of the radiation environment in free space and in near earth orbits are required to estimate the radiation dose to the astronauts for Mars, Space Shuttle, and the International Space Station missions, and to estimate the rate of single event upsets and latch-ups in electronic devices. Accurate knowledge of the environment is critical for the design of optimal shielding during both the cruise phase and for a habitat on Mars or the Moon. Measurements of the energy spectra of galactic cosmic rays (GCR) have been made for nearly four decades. In the last decade, models have been constructed that can predict the energy spectra of any GCR nuclei to an accuracy of better than 25%. Fresh and more accurate measurements have been made in the last year. These measurements can lead to more accurate models. Improvements in these models can be made in determining the local interstellar spectra and in predicting the level of solar modulation. It is the coupling of the two that defines a GCR model. This paper reviews of two of the more widely used models, and a comparison of their predictions with new proton and helium data from the Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer (AMS), and spectra of beryllium to iron in the ~40 to 500 MeV/n acquired by the Advanced Composition Explorer (ACE) during the 1997-98 solar minimum. Regressions equations relating the IMP-8 helium count rate to the solar modulation deceleration parameter calculated using the Climax neutron monitor rate have been developed and may lead to improvements in the predictive capacity of the models. .

  9. Masses for Galactic Beat Cepheids

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Cruz, Noella L.; Morgan, Siobahn M.; Böhm-Vitense, Erika

    2000-08-01

    Accurate mass determinations for Cepheids may be used to determine the degree of excess mixing in the interiors of their main-sequence progenitors: the larger the excess mixing, the larger the luminosity of the Cepheid of a given mass, or the smaller the mass of a Cepheid with given luminosity. Dynamical masses determined recently for a few Cepheid binaries indicate excess mixing somewhat stronger than that corresponding to the convective overshoot models by Schaller et al. Beat Cepheids can be used similarly to test main-sequence mixing in stellar interiors. The period ratios for beat Cepheids depend on luminosity, Teff, heavy element abundance, and mass. By comparing pulsational models and the observationally derived luminosity, Teff, metallicities, and period ratios it is possible to obtain masses for these stars, the so-called beat masses. With the old opacities masses much smaller than the evolutionary masses were obtained. With the new OPAL opacities a beat mass close to the dynamical mass was obtained for the binary beat Cepheid Y Carinae, showing that it is now possible to obtain reliable beat masses. In this paper, we determine beat masses for seven Galactic beat Cepheids for which photometric and spectroscopic data are available. We find an average mass around 4.2+/-0.3 Msolar for these stars, though the actual error limits for each star may be larger mainly because of uncertainties in E(B-V) and the heavy element abundances. (As derived spectroscopically, beat Cepheids are in general metal-poor, with -0.4relation between the derived beat masses and the luminosities again indicates excess mixing that is somewhat larger than that corresponding to the models by Schaller et al.

  10. Transient lingual papillitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kornerup, Ida M; Senye, Mireya; Peters, Edmund

    2016-01-01

    A case of recurrent, clinically innocuous, but painful papules involving the tongue dorsum of a 25-year-old man is presented. The lesions were interpreted to represent a transient lingual papillitis. This a poorly understood, but benign and self-limited condition involving the tongue fungiform papillae, which does not appear to be widely recognized.

  11. Transient Heat Conduction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rode, Carsten

    1998-01-01

    Analytical theory of transient heat conduction.Fourier's law. General heat conducation equation. Thermal diffusivity. Biot and Fourier numbers. Lumped analysis and time constant. Semi-infinite body: fixed surface temperature, convective heat transfer at the surface, or constant surface heat flux...

  12. Transient tachypnea - newborn

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... or reabsorbing it. The first few breaths a baby takes after delivery fill the lungs with air and help to ... goes away within 24 to 48 hours after delivery. In most cases, babies who have had transient tachypnea have no further ...

  13. On Detecting Transients

    CERN Document Server

    Belanger, G

    2013-01-01

    Transient phenomena are interesting and potentially highly revealing of details about the processes under observation and study that could otherwise go unnoticed. It is therefore important to maximise the sensitivity of the method used to identify such events. In this article we present a general procedure based on the use of the likelihood function for identifying transients that is particularly suited for real-time applications because it requires no grouping or pre-processing of the data. The method is optimal in the sense that all the information that is available in the data is used in the statistical decision making process, and is suitable for a wide range of applications. We here consider those most common in astrophysics which involve searching for transient sources, events or features in images, time series, energy spectra and power spectra, and demonstrate the use of the method in the cases of a transient in a time series or in a power spectrum. We derive a fit statistic that is ideal for fitting a...

  14. The LOFAR Transients Pipeline

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Swinbank, J.; Staley, T.; Molenaar, G.; Rol, E.; Rowlinson, A.; Scheers, L.H.A.; Spreeuw, H.; Bell, M.E.; Broderick, J.; Carbone, D.; Garsden, H.; Horst, A. van der; Law, C.J.; Wise, M.W.; Breton, R.P.; Cendes, Y.; Corbel, S.; Eisloeffel, J.; Falcke, H.; Fender, R.P.; Griessmeier, J.-M.; Hessels, J.W.T.; Stappers, B.W.; Stewart, A.; Wijers, R.A.M.J.; Wijnands, R.; Zarka, P.

    2015-01-01

    Current and future astronomical survey facilities provide a remarkably rich opportunity for transient astronomy, combining unprecedented fields of view with high sensitivity and the ability to access previously unexplored wavelength regimes. This is particularly true of LOFAR, a recently-commissione

  15. Compressive Transient Imaging

    KAUST Repository

    Sun, Qilin

    2017-04-01

    High resolution transient/3D imaging technology is of high interest in both scientific research and commercial application. Nowadays, all of the transient imaging methods suffer from low resolution or time consuming mechanical scanning. We proposed a new method based on TCSPC and Compressive Sensing to achieve a high resolution transient imaging with a several seconds capturing process. Picosecond laser sends a serious of equal interval pulse while synchronized SPAD camera\\'s detecting gate window has a precise phase delay at each cycle. After capturing enough points, we are able to make up a whole signal. By inserting a DMD device into the system, we are able to modulate all the frames of data using binary random patterns to reconstruct a super resolution transient/3D image later. Because the low fill factor of SPAD sensor will make a compressive sensing scenario ill-conditioned, We designed and fabricated a diffractive microlens array. We proposed a new CS reconstruction algorithm which is able to denoise at the same time for the measurements suffering from Poisson noise. Instead of a single SPAD senor, we chose a SPAD array because it can drastically reduce the requirement for the number of measurements and its reconstruction time. Further more, it not easy to reconstruct a high resolution image with only one single sensor while for an array, it just needs to reconstruct small patches and a few measurements. In this thesis, we evaluated the reconstruction methods using both clean measurements and the version corrupted by Poisson noise. The results show how the integration over the layers influence the image quality and our algorithm works well while the measurements suffer from non-trival Poisson noise. It\\'s a breakthrough in the areas of both transient imaging and compressive sensing.

  16. Galactic TeV-PeV Neutrinos

    CERN Document Server

    Ahlers, Markus; Barger, Vernon; Lu, Ran

    2016-01-01

    We study the contribution of Galactic sources to the flux of astrophysical neutrinos recently observed by the IceCube Collaboration. We show that the Galactic diffuse neutrino emission consistent with $\\gamma$-ray (Fermi-LAT) and cosmic ray data (KASCADE, KASCADE-Grande and CREAM) is expected to account for only 4%$-$8% of the IceCube flux above 60 TeV. Direct neutrino emission from cosmic ray-gas ($pp$) interactions in the sources would require an unusually large average opacity above 0.01. On the other hand, we find that the IceCube events already probe Galactic neutrino scenarios via the distribution of event arrival directions. We show that most Galactic scenarios can only have a limited contribution to the astrophysical signal: diffuse Galactic emission ($\\lesssim50$%), quasi-diffuse emission of neutrino sources ($\\lesssim65$%), extended diffuse emission from the Fermi Bubbles ($\\lesssim25$%) or unidentified TeV $\\gamma$-ray sources ($\\lesssim25$%). Presently, dark matter decay remains unconstrained.

  17. The FLAMINGOS-2 Galactic Center Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raines, Steven N.; Flamingos-2 Galactic Center Survey Team

    2010-03-01

    The FLAMINGOS-2 instrument achieved high-quality first-light observations on the Gemini South telescope in September 2009 and is undergoing further testing and scientific commissioning into early 2010. Based on the results so far, FLAMINGOS-2 (F2) on the Gemini 8-meter telescope is an extremely powerful wide-field near-infrared imager and multi-object spectrograph. In order to take best advantage of the strengths of F2 early in its life cycle, we propose to use 21 nights of Gemini guaranteed time in 3 surveys - the FLAMINGOS-2 Early Science Surveys (F2ESS). The F2ESS will encompass 3 corresponding scientific themes - the Galactic Center, extragalactic astronomy, and star formation. In particular, the Galactic Center Survey will identify the IR couterparts to several hundred new X-ray binaries in the Galactic Center. This will allow us to identify the nature of the mysterious Chandra source population in the Galactic Center and provide tremendous opportunities for multi-wavelength follow-up observations. In addition, the "by-catch" of this survey will be a catalog of several thousand red giant branch stars with accurate spectroscopy -- these can be used to measure the star formation history of the Galactic Center and thus constrain the mass evolution history of the supermassive black hole in Sgr A*. In this poster, I review the plans for carrying out this survey with F2, data analysis plans and software, and the expected scientific impact from this powerful new observational tool.

  18. FIRE simulations: galactic outflows and their consequences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keres, Dusan; FIRE Team

    2016-06-01

    We study gaseous outflows and their consequences in high-resolution galaxy formation simulations with explicit stellar feedback from the Feedback in Realistic Environments project. Collective, galaxy scale, effect of stellar feedback results in episodic ejections of large amount of gas and heavy elements into the circum-galactic medium. Gas ejection episodes follow strong bursts of star formation. Properties of galactic star formation and ejection episodes depend on galaxy mass and redshift and, together with gas infall and recycling, shape the evolution of the circum-galactic medium and galaxies. As a consequence, our simulated galaxies have masses, star formation histories and heavy element content in good agreement with the observed population of galaxies.

  19. The Galactic Magnetic Field and UHECR Optics

    CERN Document Server

    Farrar, Glennys R; Khurana, Deepak; Sutherland, Michael

    2015-01-01

    A good model of the Galactic magnetic field is crucial for estimating the Galactic contribution in dark matter and CMB-cosmology studies, determining the sources of UHECRs, and also modeling the transport of Galactic CRs since the halo field provides an important escape route for by diffusion along its field lines. We briefly review the observational foundations of the Jansson-Farrar 2012 model for the large scale structure of the GMF, underscoring the robust evidence for a N-to-S directed, spiraling halo field. New results on the lensing effect of the GMF on UHECRs are presented, displaying multiple images and dramatic magnification and demagnification that varies with source direction and CR rigidity.

  20. New Constraints on the Galactic Bar

    CERN Document Server

    Minchev, I; Quillen, A C

    2007-01-01

    Previous work has related the Galactic Bar to structure in the local stellar velocity distribution. Here we show that the Bar also influences the spatial gradients of the velocity vector via the Oort constants. By numerical integration of test-particles we simulate measurements of the Oort C value in a gravitational potential including the Galactic Bar. We account for the observed trend that C is increasingly negative for stars with higher velocity dispersion. By comparing measurements of C with our simulations we improve on previous models of the Bar, estimating that the Bar pattern speed is Omega_b/Omega_0=1.87\\pm0.04, where Omega_0 is the local circular frequency, and the Bar angle lies within 20Galactic Bar affects measurements of the Oort constants A and B less than ~2 km/s/kpc for the hot stars.

  1. The Galactic Center Region Imaged by VERITAS

    CERN Document Server

    Beilicke, M

    2011-01-01

    The Galactic Center has long been a region of interest for high-energy and very-high-energy observations. Many potential sources of GeV/TeV gamma-ray emission have been suggested, e.g., the accretion of matter onto the black hole, cosmic rays from a nearby supernova remnant, or the annihilation of dark matter particles. The Galactic Center has been detected at MeV/GeV energies by EGRET and recently by Fermi/LAT. At GeV/TeV energies, the Galactic Center was detected by different ground-based Cherenkov telescopes such as CANGAROO, Whipple 10m, H.E.S.S., and MAGIC. We present the results from 15 hrs of VERITAS observations conducted at large zenith angles, resulting in a >10 standard deviation detection and confirmation of the high-energy spectrum observed by H.E.S.S. The combined Fermi/VERITAS results are compared to astrophysical models.

  2. Destruction of the galactic globular cluster system

    CERN Document Server

    Gnedin, O Y; Gnedin, Oleg Y; Ostriker, Jeremiah P

    1996-01-01

    We investigate the dynamical evolution of the Galactic Globular Cluster System in considerably greater detail than has been done hitherto, finding that destruction rates are significantly larger than given by previous estimates. More than half of the present clusters (52%-58% for the OC galactic model, and 75%-86% for the BSS model) will be destroyed in the next Hubble time. For the evolution of individual clusters we use a Fokker-Planck code including two-body relaxation, tidal truncation of clusters, compressive gravitational shocks while clusters pass through the Galactic disk, and tidal shocks due to passage close to the bulge. Gravitational shocks are treated comprehensively, using a recent result by Kundic & Ostriker (1995) that the shock-induced relaxation term, driving an additional dispersion of energies, is generally more important than the usual energy shift term. We discuss some implications for a past history of the Globular Cluster System, and the initial distribution of the destruction time...

  3. SAS-2 gamma-ray results from the galactic plane and their implications for galactic structure and galactic cosmic-ray dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fichtel, C. E.; Kniffen, D. A.; Thompson, D. J.

    1977-01-01

    The final SAS-2 results related to high energy galactic gamma-ray emission show a strong correlation with galactic structural features seen at other wavelenghts, when the known gamma-ray sources are subtracted. Theoretical considerations and analysis of the gamma-ray data suggest that the galactic cosmic rays are dynamically coupled to the interstellar matter through the magnetic fields, and hence the cosmic ray density is enhanced where the matter density is greatest on the scale of the galactic arms. This concept has been explored in a galactic model that assumes: (1) cosmic rays are galactic and not universal; (2)on the scale of the galactic arms, the cosmic ray column (surface) density is proportional to the total interstellar gas column density; (3)the cosmic ray scale height is significantly larger than the scale height to the matter; and (4) ours is a spiral galaxy characterized by an arm to interarm density ratio of over 2:1.

  4. Galactic black hole binaries: High-energy radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grove, J. E.; Grindlay, J. E.; Harmon, B. A.; Hua, X.-M.; Kazanas, D.; McConnell, M.

    1997-05-01

    Observations of galactic black hole candidates made by the instruments aboard the Compton GRO in the hard X-ray and γ-ray bands have significantly enhanced our knowledge of the phenomenology of the emission from these objects. Understanding these observations presents a formidable challenge to theoretical models of the accretion flow onto the compact object and of the physical mechanisms that generate high-energy radiation. Here we summarize the current state of observations and theoretical interpretation of the emission from black hole candidates above 20 keV. The all-sky monitoring capability of BATSE allows, for the first time, nearly continuous studies of the high-energy emission from more than a dosen black hole candidates. These long-term datasets are particularly well-suited to multi-wavelength comparison studies, from the radio upward in frequency (Zhang et al. 1997a, these proceedings). Energy spectral evolution and/or spectral state transitions have been observed from many of the black hole candidates. Moderately deep searches of the galactic plane suggest a deficit of weak γ-ray transients. Such population studies have implications for the origin of black hole binaries and the nature of accretion events. Observations above 50 keV from OSSE demonstrate that in the γ-ray band there exist two spectral states that appear to be the extensions of the X-ray low (hard) and high (soft), or perhaps very high, states. The former state cuts off with e-folding energy ~100 keV and has its peak luminosity near this energy; thus substantial corrections need to be made to historical estimates of the bolometric luminosity of black holes in the ``low'' state. In contrast, in the X-ray high (soft) state, the luminosity peaks in the soft X-rays and the spectrum extends with an unbroken power law, even up to energies above 500 keV in some cases. COMPTEL has detected emission above 750 keV from Cyg X-1 and the transient GRO J0422+32. In both cases the data suggest that an

  5. Scale Length of the Galactic Thin Disk

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    D. Κ. Ojha

    2000-06-01

    This paper presents an analysis of the first 2MASS (The Two Micron All Sky Survey) sampler data as observed at lower Galactic latitude in our Galaxy. These new near-infrared data provide insight into the structure of the thin disk of our Galaxy, The interpretation of star counts and color distributions of stars in the near-infrared with the synthetic stellar population model, gives strong evidence that the Galactic thin disk density scale length, ℎ, is rather short (2.7 ± 0.1 kpc).

  6. Imprint of Galactic dynamics on Earth's climate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svensmark, Henrik

    2006-01-01

    A connection between climate and the Solar system's motion perpendicular to the Galactic plane during the last 200 Myr years is studied. An imprint of galactic dynamics is found in a long-term record of the Earth's climate that is consistent with variations in the Solar system oscillation around ......(arm)/rho(interarm) approximate to 1.5-1.8), and finally, using current knowledge of spiral arm positions, a pattern speed of Omega(P) = 13.6 +/- 1.4 km s(-1) kpc(-1) is determined....

  7. Cosmic rays from active galactic nuclei

    CERN Document Server

    Berezhko, E G

    2008-01-01

    Cosmic ray (CR) acceleration at the shock created by the expanding cocoons around active galactic nuclei (AGNs) is studied. It is shown that above the energy $10^{18}$ eV the overall energy spectrum of CRs, produced during the AGN evolution and released in the intergalactic space, has the form $N\\propto \\epsilon^{-\\gamma}$, with $\\gamma\\approx 2.6$, which extends up to $\\epsilon_{max}\\sim 10^{20}$ eV. It is concluded that cocoons shocks have to be considered as a main source of extragalactic CRs, which together with Galactic supernova remnants provide the observed CR spectrum.

  8. Asteroseismology for Galactic archaeology: bridging two fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casagrande, Luca; Aguirre, Victor Silva; Serenelli, Aldo M.

    Asteroseismology has the capability of precisely determining stellar properties that would otherwise be inaccessible, such as radii, masses, and thus ages of field stars. When coupling this information with classical determinations of stellar parameters, such as metallicities, effective temperatures, and angular diameters, powerful new diagnostics for Galactic studies can be obtained. An overview of the ongoing Strömgren survey for Asteroseismology and Galactic Archaeology (SAGA) is presented, along with recent results using asteroseismology to investigate the vertical age structure of the Milky Way disc.

  9. Coherent Transient Systems Evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-06-17

    manuscript is submitted for publication with the understanding that the United States Government is authorized to reproduce and distribute reprints...for governmental purposes. 1.0 Introduction The continuous optical correlator presented here is based on the phenomena of coherent transients, also...Gating the Continuous Processor Programming the continuous processor is accomplished by illuminati , n, the material with ,.’ modulated light pulses: a

  10. The Rapid Transient Surveyor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baranec, Christoph; Tonry, John; Wright, Shelley; Tully, R. Brent; Lu, Jessica R.; Takamiya, Marianne Y.; Hunter, Lisa

    2016-01-01

    The next decade of astronomy will be dominated by large area surveys (see the detailed discussion in the Astro-2010 Decadal survey and NRC's recent OIR System Report). Ground-based optical transient surveys, e.g., LSST, ZTF and ATLAS and space-based exoplanet, supernova, and lensing surveys such as TESS and WFIRST will join the Gaia all-sky astrometric survey in producing a flood of data that will enable leaps in our understanding of the universe. There is a critical need for further characterization of these discoveries through high angular resolution images, deeper images, spectra, or observations at different cadences or periods than the main surveys. Such follow-up characterization must be well matched to the particular surveys, and requires sufficient additional observing resources and time to cover the extensive number of targets.We describe plans for the Rapid Transient Surveyor (RTS), a permanently mounted, rapid-response, high-cadence facility for follow-up characterization of transient objects on the U. of Hawai'i 2.2-m telescope on Maunakea. RTS will comprise an improved robotic laser adaptive optics system, based on the prototype Robo-AO system (formerly at the Palomar 1.5-m and now at the Kitt Peak 2.2-m telescope), with simultaneous visible and near-infrared imagers as well as a near-infrared integral field spectrograph (R~100, λ = 850 - 1830 nm, 0.15″ spaxels, 8.7″×6.0″ FoV). RTS will achieve an acuity of ~0.07″ in visible wavelengths and automated detection and characterization of astrophysical transients during a sustained observing campaign will yield the necessary statistics to precisely map dark matter in the local universe.

  11. Transient Astrophysics Probe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camp, Jordan

    2017-08-01

    Transient Astrophysics Probe (TAP), selected by NASA for a funded Concept Study, is a wide-field high-energy transient mission proposed for flight starting in the late 2020s. TAP’s main science goals, called out as Frontier Discovery areas in the 2010 Decadal Survey, are time-domain astrophysics and counterparts of gravitational wave (GW) detections. The mission instruments include unique imaging soft X-ray optics that allow ~500 deg2 FoV in each of four separate modules; a high sensitivity, 1 deg2 FoV soft X-ray telescope based on single crystal silicon optics; a passively cooled, 1 deg2 FoV Infrared telescope with bandpass 0.6-3 micron; and a set of ~8 small NaI gamma-ray detectors. TAP will observe many events per year of X-ray transients related to compact objects, including tidal disruptions of stars, supernova shock breakouts, neutron star bursts and superbursts, and high redshift Gamma-Ray Bursts. Perhaps most exciting is TAP’s capability to observe X-ray and IR counterparts of GWs involving stellar mass black holes detected by LIGO/Virgo, and possibly X-ray counterparts of GWs from supermassive black holes, detected by LISA and Pulsar Timing Arrays.

  12. The Agile Alert System For Gamma-Ray Transients

    CERN Document Server

    Bulgarelli, A; Gianotti, F; Tavani, M; Parmiggiani, N; Fioretti, V; Chen, A W; Vercellone, S; Pittori, C; Verrecchia, F; Lucarelli, F; Santolamazza, P; Fanari, G; Giommi, P; Beneventano, D; Argan, A; Trois, A; Scalise, E; Longo, F; Pellizzoni, A; Pucella, G; Colafrancesco, S; Conforti, V; Tempesta, P; Cerone, M; Sabatini, P; Annoni, G; Valentini, G; Salotti, L

    2014-01-01

    In recent years, a new generation of space missions offered great opportunities of discovery in high-energy astrophysics. In this article we focus on the scientific operations of the Gamma-Ray Imaging Detector (GRID) onboard the AGILE space mission. The AGILE-GRID, sensitive in the energy range of 30 MeV-30 GeV, has detected many gamma-ray transients of galactic and extragalactic origins. This work presents the AGILE innovative approach to fast gamma-ray transient detection, which is a challenging task and a crucial part of the AGILE scientific program. The goals are to describe: (1) the AGILE Gamma-Ray Alert System, (2) a new algorithm for blind search identification of transients within a short processing time, (3) the AGILE procedure for gamma-ray transient alert management, and (4) the likelihood of ratio tests that are necessary to evaluate the post-trial statistical significance of the results. Special algorithms and an optimized sequence of tasks are necessary to reach our goal. Data are automatically ...

  13. What can we say about seed fields for galactic dynamos?

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    We demonstrate that a quasi-uniform cosmological seed field is a much less suitable seed for a galactic dynamo than has often been believed. The age of the Universe is insufficient for a conventional galactic dynamo to generate a contemporary galactic magnetic field starting from such a seed, accepting conventional estimates for physical quantities. We discuss modifications to the scenario for the evolution of galactic magnetic fields implied by this result. We also consider briefly the impli...

  14. A new hard X-ray transient discovered by INTEGRAL: IGR J17559-2612

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Esposito, V.; Ferrigno, C.; Bozzo, E.;

    2012-01-01

    INTEGRAL discovered a new hard X-ray transient, IGR J17559-2612, during the Galactic center observations performed from 2012-08-14 00:02:14 to 2012-08-14 14:45:54 UTC. The source is detected in the IBIS/ISGRI mosaic at a significance level of 8 σ (observation good time: 50 ks) both in the 20-40 k...

  15. Olivine in Almahata Sitta - Curiouser and Curiouser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zolensky, M. E.; Herrin, J.; Mikouchi, T.; Satake, W.; Kurihara, T.; Sandford, S. A.; Milam, S. N.; Hagiya, K.; Ohsumi, K.; Friedrich, J. M.; Jeniskens, P.; Shaddad, M. H.; Le, L.; Robinson, G. A.

    2010-01-01

    Almahata Sitta (hereafter Alma) is an anomalous, polymict ureilite. Anomalous features include low abundance of olivine, large compositional range of silicates, high abundance and large size of pores, crystalline pore wall linings, and overall finegrained texture. Tomography suggests the presence of foliation, which is known from other ureilites. Alma pyroxenes and their interpretation are discussed in two companion abstracts. In this abstract we discuss the composition of olivine in Alma, which is indicative of the complexity of this meteorite.

  16. Latitude survey investigation of galactic cosmic ray solar modulation during 1994-2007

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nuntiyakul, W.; Ruffolo, D.; Sáiz, A. [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Mahidol University, Bangkok 10400 (Thailand); Evenson, P.; Bieber, J. W.; Clem, J.; Pyle, R. [Bartol Research Institute and Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Delaware, Newark, DE 19716 (United States); Duldig, M. L.; Humble, J. E., E-mail: w.nuntiyakul@gmail.com, E-mail: david.ruf@mahidol.ac.th, E-mail: alejandro.sai@mahidol.ac.th, E-mail: evenson@udel.edu, E-mail: jwbieber@bartol.udel.edu, E-mail: clem@bartol.udel.edu, E-mail: pyle@bartol.udel.edu, E-mail: John.Humble@utas.edu.au, E-mail: Marc.Duldig@utas.edu.au [School of Physical Sciences, University of Tasmania, Hobart, Tasmania 7001 (Australia)

    2014-11-01

    The Galactic cosmic ray spectrum exhibits subtle variations over the 22 yr solar magnetic cycle in addition to the more dramatic variations over the 11 yr sunspot cycle. Neutron monitors are large ground-based detectors that provide accurate measurements of variations in the cosmic ray flux at the top of the atmosphere above the detector. At any given location the magnetic field of the Earth excludes particles below a well-defined rigidity (momentum per unit charge) known as the cutoff rigidity, which can be accurately calculated using detailed models of the geomagnetic field. By carrying a neutron monitor to different locations, e.g., on a ship, the Earth itself serves as a magnet spectrometer. By repeating such latitude surveys with identical equipment, a sensitive measurement of changes in the spectrum can be made. In this work, we analyze data from the 1994 through 2007 series of latitude surveys conducted by the Bartol Research Institute, the University of Tasmania, and the Australian Antarctic Division. We confirm the curious 'crossover' in spectra measured near solar minima during epochs of opposite solar magnetic polarity, and show that it is directly related to a sudden change in the spectral behavior of solar modulation at the time of the polarity reversal, as revealed from contemporaneous variations in the survey data and a fixed station. We suggest that the spectral change and crossover result from the interaction of effects due to gradient/curvature drifts with a systematic change in the interplanetary diffusion coefficient caused by turbulent magnetic helicity.

  17. Galactic Collapse of Scalar Field Dark Matter

    CERN Document Server

    Alcubierre, M; Matos, T; Núñez, D; Urena-Lopez, L A; Wiederhold, P; Alcubierre, Miguel; Matos, Tonatiuh; Nunez, Dario; Wiederhold, Petra

    2002-01-01

    We present a scenario for galaxy formation based on the hypothesis of scalar field dark matter. We interpret galaxy formation through the collapse of a scalar field fluctuation. We find that a cosh potential for the self-interaction of the scalar field provides a reasonable scenario for galactic formation, which is in agreement with cosmological observations and phenomenological studies in galaxies.

  18. Galactic Collapse of Scalar Field Dark Matter

    OpenAIRE

    2001-01-01

    We present a scenario for galaxy formation based on the hypothesis of scalar field dark matter. We interpret galaxy formation through the collapse of a scalar field fluctuation. We find that a cosh potential for the self-interaction of the scalar field provides a reasonable scenario for galactic formation, which is in agreement with cosmological observations and phenomenological studies in galaxies.

  19. Terrestrial impact of the galactic historical SNe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iyudin, A. F.

    2002-03-01

    Galactic supernovae (SNe) of the last millennium have left their signatures in many energy domains, with the optical being the best known due to the absence of astronomical instruments before the 17th century being more sophisticated than the human eye. Alongside with these records found in the scriptes of the ancient eastern and western astronomers, quite recently other signatures were recognised as valuable tracers of historical SNe, for example, different ionic and/or molecular depositions in the polar ice, radioactive isotopes depositions, and the /γ-ray emission from the radioactive 44Ti produced in the SN explosion. While the ice depositions are expected to be the result of the supernova flash in the UV and soft X-rays, the 60Fe radioactive isotope deposition into the deep-ocean ferromanganese crust is the result of direct isotope transfer by cosmic rays dust grains originating in the SN blast wave. These and other impacts of the galactic SNe are important from the point of view of their possible influence on the terrestrial environment. In this paper we consider known tracers of historical SNe and compare them to the proposed new tracer based on the atmospheric response to the galactic supernova emission in the UV and X-rays. In addition to using the 44Ti radioactive decay line photons for uncovering hidden galactic supernova remnants by imaging /γ-ray telescopes, all such tracers form an important complement to the historical SNe record.

  20. Pathway to the galactic distribution of planets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Novati, S. Calchi; Gould, A.; Udalski, A.

    2015-01-01

    We present microlens parallax measurements for 21 (apparently) isolated lenses observed toward the Galactic bulge that were imaged simultaneously from Earth and Spitzer, which was ~1 AU West of Earth in projection. We combine these measurements with a kinematic model of the Galaxy to derive...

  1. ARCADE 2 Observations of Galactic Radio Emission

    CERN Document Server

    Kogut, A; Levin, S M; Limon, M; Lubin, P M; Mirel, P; Seiffert, M; Singal, J; Villela, T; Wollack, E; Wünsche, C A

    2009-01-01

    We use absolutely calibrated data from the ARCADE 2 flight in July 2006 to model Galactic emission at frequencies 3, 8, and 10 GHz. The spatial structure in the data is consistent with a superposition of free-free and synchrotron emission. Emission with spatial morphology traced by the Haslam 408 MHz survey has spectral index beta_synch = -2.5 +/- 0.1, with free-free emission contributing 0.10 +/- 0.01 of the total Galactic plane emission in the lowest ARCADE 2 band at 3.15 GHz. We estimate the total Galactic emission toward the polar caps using either a simple plane-parallel model with csc|b| dependence or a model of high-latitude radio emission traced by the COBE/FIRAS map of CII emission. Both methods are consistent with a single power-law over the frequency range 22 MHz to 10 GHz, with total Galactic emission towards the north polar cap T_Gal = 0.498 +/- 0.028 K and spectral index beta = -2.55 +/- 0.03 at reference frequency 1 GHz. The well calibrated ARCADE 2 maps provide a new test for spinning dust emi...

  2. Einstein Observations of Galactic supernova remnants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seward, Frederick D.

    1990-01-01

    This paper summarizes the observations of Galactic supernova remnants with the imaging detectors of the Einstein Observatory. X-ray surface brightness contours of 47 remnants are shown together with gray-scale pictures. Count rates for these remnants have been derived and are listed for the HRI, IPC, and MPC detectors.

  3. Galactic dynamos supported by magnetic helicity fluxes

    CERN Document Server

    Sur, S; Subramanian, K; Sur, Sharanya; Shukurov, Anvar; Subramanian, Kandaswamy

    2006-01-01

    We present a simple semi-analytical model of nonlinear, mean-field galactic dynamos and use it to study the effects of various magnetic helicity fluxes. The dynamo equations are reduced using the `no-$z$' approximation to a nonlinear system of ordinary differential equations in time; we demonstrate that the model reproduces accurately earlier results, including those where nonlinear behaviour is driven by a magnetic helicity flux. We discuss the implications and interplay of two types of magnetic helicity flux, one produced by advection (e.g., due to the galactic fountain or wind) and the other, arising from anisotropy of turbulence as suggested by Vishniac & Cho(2001). We argue that the latter is significant if the galactic differential rotation is strong enough: in our model, for $\\Rw\\la-10$ in terms of the corresponding turbulent magnetic Reynolds number. We confirm that the intensity of gas outflow from the galactic disc optimal for the dynamo action is close to that expected for normal spiral galaxie...

  4. Nuclear obscuration in active galactic nuclei

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almeida, Cristina Ramos; Ricci, Claudio

    2017-10-01

    The material surrounding accreting supermassive black holes connects the active galactic nucleus with its host galaxy and, besides being responsible for feeding the black hole, provides important information on the feedback that nuclear activity produces on the galaxy. In this Review, we summarize our current understanding of the close environment of accreting supermassive black holes obtained from studies of local active galactic nuclei carried out in the infrared and X-ray regimes. The structure of this circumnuclear material is complex, clumpy and dynamic, and its covering factor depends on the accretion properties of the active galactic nucleus. In the infrared, this obscuring material is a transition zone between the broad- and narrow-line regions, and, at least in some galaxies, it consists of two structures: an equatorial disk/torus and a polar component. In the X-ray regime, the obscuration is produced by multiple absorbers across various spatial scales, mostly associated with the torus and the broad-line region. In the coming decade, the new generation of infrared and X-ray facilities will greatly contribute to our understanding of the structure and physical properties of nuclear obscuration in active galactic nuclei.

  5. YSO Clusters on Galactic Infrared Loops

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marton, Gábor; Kiss, Zoltán Tamás; Tóth, L. Viktor; Zahorecz, Sarolta; Pásztor, László; Ueno, Munateka; Kitamura, Yoshimi; Tamura, Motohide; Kawamura, Akiko; Onishi, Toshikazu

    The AKARI all sky survey (Murakami et al. Publ. Astron. Soc. Jpn. 59:369, 2007) was investigated for YSO candidates. Distribution of candidate sources have been analysed and compared to that of galactic CO and medium scale structures. Clustering and other inhomogenities have been found.

  6. A catalogue of 294 Galactic supernova remnants

    CERN Document Server

    Green, D A

    2014-01-01

    A revised catalogue of 294 Galactic supernova remnants (SNRs) is presented, along with some simple statistics. This catalogue has twenty more entries than did the previous version (from 2009), as 21 new remnants have been added, and one object has been removed as it has been identified as an HII region.

  7. Kinematic structures in galactic disc simulations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roca-F� brega, S.; Romero-Gómez, M.; Figueras, F.; Antoja Castelltort, Teresa; Valenzuela, O.; Henney, W.J.; Torres-Peimbert, S.

    2011-01-01

    N-body and test particle simulations have been used to characterize the stellar streams in the galactic discs of Milky Way type galaxies. Tools such as the second and third order moments of the velocity ellipsoid and clustering methods -EM-WEKA and FoF- allow characterizing these kinematic structure

  8. The maximum rotation of a galactic disc

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bottema, R

    1997-01-01

    The observed stellar velocity dispersions of galactic discs show that the maximum rotation of a disc is on average 63% of the observed maximum rotation. This criterion can, however, not be applied to small or low surface brightness (LSB) galaxies because such systems show, in general, a continuously

  9. MAPPING THE GALACTIC HALO. VIII. QUANTIFYING SUBSTRUCTURE

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Starkenburg, Else; Helmi, Amina; Morrison, Heather L.; Harding, Paul; van Woerden, Hugo; Mateo, Mario; Olszewski, Edward W.; Sivarani, Thirupathi; Norris, John E.; Freeman, Kenneth C.; Shectman, Stephen A.; Dohm-Palmer, R. C.; Frey, Lucy; Oravetz, Dan

    2009-01-01

    We have measured the amount of kinematic substructure in the Galactic halo using the final data set from the Spaghetti project, a pencil-beam high-latitude sky survey. Our sample contains 101 photometrically selected and spectroscopically confirmed giants with accurate distance, radial velocity, and

  10. Galactic stellar haloes in the CDM model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cooper, A. P.; Cole, S.; Frenk, C. S.; White, S. D. M.; Helly, J.; Benson, A. J.; De Lucia, G.; Helmi, A.; Jenkins, A.; Navarro, J. F.; Springel, V.; Wang, J.

    2010-01-01

    We present six simulations of galactic stellar haloes formed by the tidal disruption of accreted dwarf galaxies in a fully cosmological setting. Our model is based on the Aquarius project, a suite of high-resolution N-body simulations of individual dark matter haloes. We tag subsets of particles in

  11. Argon and neon in Galactic nebulae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simpson, Janet P.; Bregman, Jesse D.; Dinerstein, H. L.; Lester, Dan F.; Rank, David M.; Witteborn, F. C.; Wooden, D. H.

    1995-01-01

    KAO observations of the 6.98 micron line of (Ar II), and KAO and ground-based observations of the 8.99 micron line of (Ar III) and the 12.8 micron line of (Ne II) are presented for a number of Galactic H II regions and planetary nebulae.

  12. COBE-FIRAS Observations of Galactic Lines

    CERN Document Server

    Fixsen, D J; Mather, J C

    1998-01-01

    The COBE Far InfraRed Absolute Spectrophotometer (FIRAS) observations constitute an unbiased survey over the wavelength range from 100 um to 1 cm over 99% of the sky. Improved calibration of the FIRAS instrument and the inclusion of all of the FIRAS data allow an improved signal to noise determination of the spectral lines by a factor of ~2 over our previous results. The resolution is low (0.45 cm^{-1}) so only the strongest lines are observable. The CO chain from J=1-0 to J=8-7 is observed towards the Galactic center. The line ratios are roughly consistent with a 40 K excitation temperature. The 157.7 um C II and 205.3 um N II lines are observable over most of the sky. In addition the 370.4 um and 609.1 um lines of C I, and the 121.9 um line of N II are observed in the Galactic plane. The line ratios at the Galactic center are consistent with a density of n_0 ~30 cm^{-3} and a UV flux of G_0 ~ 15 uW m^{-2} sr^{-1} (10 Habing units). The 269 um H2O line is observed toward the Galactic center in absorption.

  13. The edge of the young Galactic disc

    CERN Document Server

    Carraro, Giovanni; Costa, Edgardo; Perren, Gabriel; Mointinho, Andre'

    2010-01-01

    In this work we report and discuss the detection of two distant diffuse stellar groups in the third Galactic quadrant. They are composed of young stars, with spectral types ranging from late O to late B, and lie at galactocentric distances between 15 and 20 kpc. These groups are located in the area of two cataloged open clusters (VdB-Hagen~04 and Ruprecht~30), projected towards the Vela-Puppis constellations, and within the core of the Canis Major over-density. Their reddening and distance has been estimated analyzing their color-color and color-magnitude diagrams, derived from deep $UBV$ photometry. The existence of young star aggregates at such extreme distances from the Galactic center challenges the commonly accepted scenario in which the Galactic disc has a sharp cut-off at about 14 kpc from the Galactic center, and indicates that it extends to much greater distances (as also supported by recent detection of CO molecular complexes well beyond this distance). While the groups we find in the area of Ruprec...

  14. The Galactic NH - AV Relation and its Application to Historical Galactic SNRs

    CERN Document Server

    Tian, Wen-Wu; Xiang, F Y

    2013-01-01

    We refine a classic relation between the hydrogen column density (NH) and optical extinction (Av) by employing 39 Galactic Supernova Remnants (SNRs) with X-rays, optical and/or infra-red data available. We find NH = (1.69+/-0.07)*10^21 Av cm^(-2) mag^(-1) . Applying this relation to three Galactic SNRs with good historical records allows us to further constrain either their progenitor's distances or magnitudes, which is independent access to their distances.

  15. A curious interplay in the films of N-heterocyclic carbene PtII complexes upon deposition of alkali metals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makarova, Anna A.; Grachova, Elena V.; Niedzialek, Dorota; Solomatina, Anastasia I.; Sonntag, Simon; Fedorov, Alexander V.; Vilkov, Oleg Yu.; Neudachina, Vera S.; Laubschat, Clemens; Tunik, Sergey P.; Vyalikh, Denis V.

    2016-05-01

    The recently synthesized series of PtII complexes containing cyclometallating (phenylpyridine or benzoquinoline) and N-heterocyclic carbene ligands possess intriguing structures, topologies, and light emitting properties. Here, we report curious physicochemical interactions between in situ PVD-grown films of a typical representative of the aforementioned PtII complex compounds and Li, Na, K and Cs atoms. Based on a combination of detailed core-level photoelectron spectroscopy and quantum-chemical calculations at the density functional theory level, we found that the deposition of alkali atoms onto the molecular film leads to unusual redistribution of electron density: essential modification of nitrogen sites, reduction of the coordination PtII centre to Pt0 and decrease of electron density on the bromine atoms. A possible explanation for this is formation of a supramolecular system “Pt complex-alkali metal ion” the latter is supported by restoration of the system to the initial state upon subsequent oxygen treatment. The discovered properties highlight a considerable potential of the PtII complexes for a variety of biomedical, sensing, chemical, and electronic applications.

  16. A curious interplay in the films of N-heterocyclic carbene Pt(II) complexes upon deposition of alkali metals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makarova, Anna A; Grachova, Elena V; Niedzialek, Dorota; Solomatina, Anastasia I; Sonntag, Simon; Fedorov, Alexander V; Vilkov, Oleg Yu; Neudachina, Vera S; Laubschat, Clemens; Tunik, Sergey P; Vyalikh, Denis V

    2016-05-06

    The recently synthesized series of Pt(II) complexes containing cyclometallating (phenylpyridine or benzoquinoline) and N-heterocyclic carbene ligands possess intriguing structures, topologies, and light emitting properties. Here, we report curious physicochemical interactions between in situ PVD-grown films of a typical representative of the aforementioned Pt(II) complex compounds and Li, Na, K and Cs atoms. Based on a combination of detailed core-level photoelectron spectroscopy and quantum-chemical calculations at the density functional theory level, we found that the deposition of alkali atoms onto the molecular film leads to unusual redistribution of electron density: essential modification of nitrogen sites, reduction of the coordination Pt(II) centre to Pt(0) and decrease of electron density on the bromine atoms. A possible explanation for this is formation of a supramolecular system "Pt complex-alkali metal ion"; the latter is supported by restoration of the system to the initial state upon subsequent oxygen treatment. The discovered properties highlight a considerable potential of the Pt(II) complexes for a variety of biomedical, sensing, chemical, and electronic applications.

  17. Thermal transient anemometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, James L.; Vresk, Josip

    1989-01-01

    A thermal transient anemometer having a thermocouple probe which is utilized to measure the change in temperature over a period of time to provide a measure of fluid flow velocity. The thermocouple probe is located in the fluid flow path and pulsed to heat or cool the probe. The cooling of the heated probe or the heating of the cooled probe from the fluid flow over a period of time is measured to determine the fluid flow velocity. The probe is desired to be locally heated near the tip to increase the efficiency of devices incorporating the probe.

  18. DSN Transient Observatory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuiper, T. B. H.; Monroe, R. M.; White, L. A.; Garcia Miro, C.; Levin, S. M.; Majid, W. A.; Soriano, M.

    2016-11-01

    The Deep Space Network (DSN) Transient Observatory (DTO) is a signal processing facility that can monitor up to four DSN downlink bands for astronomically interesting signals. The monitoring is done commensally with reception of deep space mission telemetry. The initial signal processing is done with two CASPERa ROACH1 boards, each handling one or two baseband signals. Each ROACH1 has a 10 GBe interface with a GPU-equipped Debian Linux workstation for additional processing. The initial science programs include monitoring Mars for electrostatic discharges, radio spectral lines, searches for fast radio bursts and pulsars and SETI. The facility will be available to the scientific community through a peer review process.

  19. The History of Tidal Disruption Events in Galactic Nuclei

    CERN Document Server

    Aharon, Danor; Perets, Hagai B

    2015-01-01

    The tidal disruption of a star by a massive black hole (MBH) is thought to produce a transient luminous event. Such tidal disruption events (TDEs) may play an important role in detecting and characterizing MBHs and probe the properties and dynamics of their nuclear stellar clusters (NSCs) hosts. Previous studies estimated the recent rates of TDEs in the local universe. However, the long-term evolution of the TDEs rate throughout the history of the universe have been hardly explored. Here we consider the TDEs history, using simple evolutionary models for the formation and evolution of galactic nuclei. We use a 1D Fokker-Planck approach to explore the evolution of MBH-hosting NSCs, and obtain the disruption rates of stars during their evolution. We complement these with an analysis of TDEs history based on N-body simulation data, and find them to be comparable. We consider NSCs that are built-up from close-in star formation or from star formation/clusters-dispersal far-out, a few pc from the MBH. We also explor...

  20. Galactic dynamo and helicity losses through fountain flow

    CERN Document Server

    Shukurov, A; Subramanian, K; Brandenburg, A; Shukurov, Anvar; Sokoloff, Dmitry; Subramanian, Kandaswamy; Brandenburg, Axel

    2006-01-01

    Nonlinear behaviour of galactic dynamos is studied, allowing for magnetic helicity removal by the galactic fountain flow. A suitable advection speed is estimated, and a one-dimensional mean-field dynamo model with dynamic alpha-effect is explored. It is shown that the galactic fountain flow is efficient in removing magnetic helicity from galactic discs. This alleviates the constraint on the galactic mean-field dynamo resulting from magnetic helicity conservation and thereby allows the mean magnetic field to saturate at a strength comparable to equipartition with the turbulent kinetic energy.

  1. Three years of Transients with Fermi GBM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson-Hodge, Colleen A.

    2012-01-01

    The Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM) is an all-sky monitoring instrument, sensitive between 8 keV and 40 MeV, with a primary objective of supporting the Large Area Telescope (LAT) in observations of Gamma-Ray Bursts (GRBs). Both instruments are part of the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope. Together, the GBM and LAT instruments have provided ground-breaking measurements of GRBs that have, after 10 years of focus on GRB afterglows, inspired renewed interest in the prompt emission phase of GRBs and the physical mechanisms that fuel them. In addition to GRB science, GBM has made significant contributions to the astrophysics of galactic transient sources including long-term variations in the Crab nebula, spin state transitions in accretion powered pulsars, state transitions in black hole X-ray binaries, and unprecedented time-resolved spectral studies of soft gamma-ray repeater bursts. Closer to home, GBM also contributes to solar flare and terrestrial gamma flash science.

  2. The Galactic Branches as a Possible Evidence for Transient Spiral Arms

    CERN Document Server

    Pérez-Villegas, Angeles; Pichardo, Bárbara

    2015-01-01

    With the use of a background Milky-Way-like potential model, we performed stellar orbital and magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulations. As a first experiment, we studied the gaseous response to a bisymmetric spiral arm potential: the widely employed cosine potential model and a self-gravitating tridimensional density distribution based model called PERLAS. Important differences are noticeable in these simulations, while the simplified cosine potential produces two spiral arms for all cases, the more realistic density based model produces a response of four spiral arms on the gaseous disk, except for weak arms -i.e. close to the linear regime- where a two-armed structure is formed. In order to compare the stellar and gas response to the spiral arms, we have also included a detailed periodic orbit study and explored different structural parameters within observational uncertainties. The four armed response has been explained as the result of ultra harmonic resonances, or as shocks with the massive bisymmetric spir...

  3. Transient regional osteoporosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Trotta

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Transient osteoporosis of the hip and regional migratory osteoporosis are uncommon and probably underdiagnosed bone diseases characterized by pain and functional limitation mainly affecting weight-bearing joints of the lower limbs. These conditions are usually self-limiting and symptoms tend to abate within a few months without sequelae. Routine laboratory investigations are unremarkable. Middle aged men and women during the last months of pregnancy or in the immediate post-partum period are principally affected. Osteopenia with preservation of articular space and transitory edema of the bone marrow provided by magnetic resonance imaging are common to these two conditions, so they are also known by the term regional transitory osteoporosis. The appearance of bone marrow edema is not specific to regional transitory osteoporosis but can be observed in several diseases, i.e. trauma, reflex sympathetic dystrophy, avascular osteonecrosis, infections, tumors from which it must be differentiated. The etiology of this condition is unknown. Pathogenesis is still debated in particular the relationship with reflex sympathetic dystrophy, with which regional transitory osteoporosis is often identified. The purpose of the present review is to remark on the relationship between transient osteoporosis of the hip and regional migratory osteoporosis with particular attention to the bone marrow edema pattern and relative differential diagnosis.

  4. Transient Black Hole Binaries

    CERN Document Server

    Belloni, T M

    2016-01-01

    The last two decades have seen a great improvement in our understand- ing of the complex phenomenology observed in transient black-hole binary systems, especially thanks to the activity of the Rossi X-Ray Timing Explorer satellite, com- plemented by observations from many other X-ray observatories and ground-based radio, optical and infrared facilities. Accretion alone cannot describe accurately the intricate behavior associated with black-hole transients and it is now clear that the role played by different kinds of (often massive) outflows seen at different phases of the outburst evolution of these systems is as fundamental as the one played by the accretion process itself. The spectral-timing states originally identified in the X-rays and fundamentally based on the observed effect of accretion, have acquired new importance as they now allow to describe within a coherent picture the phenomenology observed at other wave- length, where the effects of ejection processes are most evident. With a particular focu...

  5. Characterizing Nanoscale Transient Communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yifan; Anwar, Putri Santi; Huang, Limin; Asvial, Muhamad

    2016-04-01

    We consider the novel paradigm of nanoscale transient communication (NTC), where certain components of the small-scale communication link are physically transient. As such, the transmitter and the receiver may change their properties over a prescribed lifespan due to their time-varying structures. The NTC systems may find important applications in the biomedical, environmental, and military fields, where system degradability allows for benign integration into life and environment. In this paper, we analyze the NTC systems from the channel-modeling and capacity-analysis perspectives and focus on the stochastically meaningful slow transience scenario, where the coherence time of degeneration Td is much longer than the coding delay Tc. We first develop novel and parsimonious models to characterize the NTC channels, where three types of physical layers are considered: electromagnetism-based terahertz (THz) communication, diffusion-based molecular communication (DMC), and nanobots-assisted touchable communication (TouchCom). We then revisit the classical performance measure of ϵ-outage channel capacity and take a fresh look at its formulations in the NTC context. Next, we present the notion of capacity degeneration profile (CDP), which describes the reduction of channel capacity with respect to the degeneration time. Finally, we provide numerical examples to demonstrate the features of CDP. To the best of our knowledge, the current work represents a first attempt to systematically evaluate the quality of nanoscale communication systems deteriorating with time.

  6. Starburst clusters in the Galactic center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Habibi, Maryam

    2014-09-01

    The central region of the Galaxy is the most active site of star formation in the Milky Way, where massive stars have formed very recently and are still forming today. The rich population of massive stars in the Galactic center provide a unique opportunity to study massive stars in their birth environment and probe their initial mass function, which is the spectrum of stellar masses at their birth. The Arches cluster is the youngest among the three massive clusters in the Galactic center, providing a collection of high-mass stars and a very dense core which makes this cluster an excellent site to address questions about massive star formation, the stellar mass function and the dynamical evolution of massive clusters in the Galactic center. In this thesis, I perform an observational study of the Arches cluster using K_{s}-band imaging obtained with NAOS/CONICA at the VLT combined with Subaru/Cisco J-band data to gain a full understanding of the cluster mass distribution out to its tidal radius for the first time. Since the light from the Galactic center reaches us through the Galactic disc, the extinction correction is crucial when studying this region. I use a Bayesian method to construct a realistic extinction map of the cluster. It is shown in this study that the determination of the mass of the most massive star in the Arches cluster, which had been used in previous studies to establish an upper mass limit for the star formation process in the Milky Way, strongly depends on the assumed slope of the extinction law. Assuming the two regimes of widely used infrared extinction laws, I show that the difference can reach up to 30% for individually derived stellar masses and Δ A_{Ks}˜ 1 magnitude in acquired K_{s}-band extinction, while the present-day mass function slope changes by ˜ 0.17 dex. The present-day mass function slope derived assuming the more recent extinction law, which suggests a steeper wavelength dependence for the infrared extinction law, reveals

  7. Calculating transient rates from surveys

    CERN Document Server

    Carbone, Dario; Wijers, Ralph A M J; Rowlinson, Antonia

    2016-01-01

    We have developed a method to determine the transient surface density and transient rate for any given survey, using Monte-Carlo simulations. This method allows us to determine the transient rate as a function of both the flux and the duration of the transients in the whole flux-duration plane rather than one or a few points as currently available methods do. It is applicable to every survey strategy that is monitoring the same part of the sky, regardless the instrument or wavelength of the survey, or the target sources. We have simulated both top-hat and Fast Rise Exponential Decay light curves, highlighting how the shape of the light curve might affect the detectability of transients. Another application for this method is to estimate the number of transients of a given kind that are expected to be detected by a survey, provided that their rate is known.

  8. Calculating transient rates from surveys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carbone, D.; van der Horst, A. J.; Wijers, R. A. M. J.; Rowlinson, A.

    2017-03-01

    We have developed a method to determine the transient surface density and transient rate for any given survey, using Monte Carlo simulations. This method allows us to determine the transient rate as a function of both the flux and the duration of the transients in the whole flux-duration plane rather than one or a few points as currently available methods do. It is applicable to every survey strategy that is monitoring the same part of the sky, regardless the instrument or wavelength of the survey, or the target sources. We have simulated both top-hat and Fast Rise Exponential Decay light curves, highlighting how the shape of the light curve might affect the detectability of transients. Another application for this method is to estimate the number of transients of a given kind that are expected to be detected by a survey, provided that their rate is known.

  9. The joy of transient chaos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tél, Tamás [Institute for Theoretical Physics, Eötvös University, and MTA-ELTE Theoretical Physics Research Group, Pázmány P. s. 1/A, Budapest H-1117 (Hungary)

    2015-09-15

    We intend to show that transient chaos is a very appealing, but still not widely appreciated, subfield of nonlinear dynamics. Besides flashing its basic properties and giving a brief overview of the many applications, a few recent transient-chaos-related subjects are introduced in some detail. These include the dynamics of decision making, dispersion, and sedimentation of volcanic ash, doubly transient chaos of undriven autonomous mechanical systems, and a dynamical systems approach to energy absorption or explosion.

  10. Power spectra of active galactic nuclei

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG TaiShan; WU YuXiang; LIU Yuan

    2009-01-01

    The power spectral densities (PSDs) for a sample of active galactic nuclei (AGNs) are analyzed in both the frequency domain and the time domain. We find for each object that for broadband noise a character timescale-bifurcation timescale of Fourier and time-domain PSD exists in the 103-106 s range,below which the time-domain power spectrum is systematically higher than the corresponding Fourier spectrum. The relationship between bifurcation timescale, AGN mass and luminosity is studied. Compared with the fact that similar phenomena have been found for Galactic black hole candidates (GBHs)with bifurcation timescale ~0.1 s but not for accreting neutron stars, our finding indicates that AGNs and GBHs have common intrinsic nature in rapid X-ray variability with a character time parameter scaled with their masses.

  11. Power spectra of active galactic nuclei

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    The power spectral densities(PSDs)for a sample of active galactic nuclei(AGNs)are analyzed in both the frequency domain and the time domain.We find for each object that for broadband noise a character timescale-bifurcation timescale of Fourier and time-domain PSD exists in the 10 3 -10 6 s range, below which the time-domain power spectrum is systematically higher than the corresponding Fourier spectrum.The relationship between bifurcation timescale,AGN mass and luminosity is studied.Compared with the fact that similar phenomena have been found for Galactic black hole candidates(GBHs) with bifurcation timescale~0.1 s but not for accreting neutron stars,our finding indicates that AGNs and GBHs have common intrinsic nature in rapid X-ray variability with a character time parameter scaled with their masses.

  12. Galactic Wind in NGC 4460: New Observations

    CERN Document Server

    Oparin, D V

    2015-01-01

    NGC4460 is an isolated lenticular galaxy, in which galactic wind has been earlier discovered as a gas outflow associated with circumnuclear regions of star formation. Using the results of observations in the Halpha line with the scanning Fabry-Perot interferometer on the SAO RAS 6-m telescope, we studied the kinematics of the ionized gas in this galaxy. The parameters of gas outflow from the plane of the galactic disk were refined within a simple geometric model. We show that it is impossible to characterize the wind by a fixed velocity value. Characteristic outflow velocities are within 30..80 km/s , and they are insufficient to make the swept-out matter ultimately leave the galaxy.

  13. Young Radio Pulsars in Galactic Globular Clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Boyles, Jason; Turk, Phil J; Mnatsakanov, Robert; Lynch, Ryan S; Ransom, Scott M; Freire, Paulo C; Belczynski, Khris

    2011-01-01

    Currently three isolated radio pulsars and one binary radio pulsar with no evidence of any previous recycling are known in 97 surveyed Galactic globular clusters. As pointed out by Lyne et al., the presence of these pulsars cannot be explained by core-collapse supernovae, as is commonly assumed for their counterparts in the Galactic disk. We apply a Bayesian analysis to the results from surveys for radio pulsars in globular clusters and find the number of potentially observable non-recycled radio pulsars present in all clusters to be -0.6. In this case, the potentially observable population of such young pulsars is 447^{+1420}_{-399} (the error bars give the 95% confidence interval) and their birth rate is 0.012^{+0.037}_{-0.010} pulsars per century. The mostly likely creation scenario to explain these pulsars is the electron capture supernova of a OMgNe white dwarf.

  14. The FLAMINGOS-2 Galactic Center Survey

    CERN Document Server

    Eikenberry, Stephen S

    2008-01-01

    Upon commissioning on Gemini South, FLAMINGOS-2 will be one of the most powerful wide-field near-infrared imagers and multi-object spectrographs ever built for use on 8-meter-class telescopes. In order to take best advantage of the strengths of FLAMINGOS-2 early in its life cycle, the instrument team has proposed to use 21 nights of Gemini guaranteed time in 3 surveys -- the FLAMINGOS-2 Early Science Surveys (F2ESS). The F2ESS will encompass 3 corresponding science themes -- the Galactic Center, galaxy evolution, and star formation. In this paper, I review the design performance and status of FLAMINGOS-2, and describe the planned FLAMINGOS-2 Galactic Center Survey.

  15. Identifying Galactic PeVatrons with Neutrinos

    CERN Document Server

    González-Garciá, M C; Mohapatra, Soumya

    2009-01-01

    We perform a realistic evaluation of the potential of IceCube, a kilometer-scale neutrino detector under construction at the South Pole, to detect neutrinos in the direction of the potential accelerators of the Galactic cosmic rays. We take fully account of the fact that the measurement of the energy of the secondary muons can be used to further discriminate between the signal and the background of atmospheric neutrinos. We conclude that IceCube could identify the sources in the Milagro sky map as the sources of the Galactic cosmic rays at the 3 sigma level in one year and at the 5 sigma level in three years. We discuss the dependence of these expectations on ambiguities, mostly associated with our incomplete knowledge of the astrophysics of the sources.

  16. galpy: A Python Library for Galactic Dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Bovy, Jo

    2014-01-01

    I describe the design, implementation, and usage of galpy, a Python package for galactic-dynamics calculations. At its core, galpy consists of a general framework for representing galactic potentials both in Python and in C (for accelerated computations); galpy functions, objects, and methods can generally take arbitrary combinations of these as arguments. Numerical orbit integration is supported with a variety of Runge-Kutta-type and symplectic integrators. For planar orbits, integration of the phase-space volume is also possible. galpy supports the calculation of action-angle coordinates and orbital frequencies for a given phase-space point for general spherical potentials, using state-of-the-art numerical approximations for axisymmetric potentials, and making use of a recent general approximation for any static potential. A number of different distribution functions (DFs) are also included in the current release; currently these consist of two-dimensional axisymmetric and non-axisymmetric disk DFs, a three...

  17. Does the Galactic Bulge Have Fewer Planets?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-12-01

    The Milky Ways dense central bulge is a very different environment than the surrounding galactic disk in which we live. Do the differences affect the ability of planets to form in the bulge?Exploring Galactic PlanetsSchematic illustrating how gravitational microlensing by an extrasolar planet works. [NASA]Planet formation is a complex process with many aspects that we dont yet understand. Do environmental properties like host star metallicity, the density of nearby stars, or the intensity of the ambient radiation field affect the ability of planets to form? To answer these questions, we will ultimately need to search for planets around stars in a large variety of different environments in our galaxy.One way to detect recently formed, distant planets is by gravitational microlensing. In this process, light from a distant source star is bent by a lens star that is briefly located between us and the source. As the Earth moves, this momentary alignment causes a blip in the sources light curve that we can detect and planets hosted by the lens star can cause an additional observable bump.Artists impression of the Milky Way galaxy. The central bulge is much denserthan the surroundingdisk. [ESO/NASA/JPL-Caltech/M. Kornmesser/R. Hurt]Relative AbundancesMost source stars reside in the galactic bulge, so microlensing events can probe planetary systems at any distance between the Earth and the galactic bulge. This means that planet detections from microlensing could potentially be used to measure the relative abundances of exoplanets in different parts of our galaxy.A team of scientists led by Matthew Penny, a Sagan postdoctoral fellow at Ohio State University, set out to do just that. The group considered a sample of 31 exoplanetary systems detected by microlensing and asked the following question: are the planet abundances in the galactic bulge and the galactic disk the same?A Paucity of PlanetsTo answer this question, Penny and collaborators derived the expected

  18. A Speeding Binary in the Galactic Halo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-04-01

    The recent discovery of a hyper-velocity binary star system in the halo of the Milky Way poses a mystery: how was this system accelerated to its high speed?Accelerating StarsUnlike the uniform motion in the Galactic disk, stars in the Milky Ways halo exhibit a huge diversity of orbits that are usually tilted relative to the disk and have a variety of speeds. One type of halo star, so-called hyper-velocity stars, travel with speeds that can approach the escape velocity of the Galaxy.How do these hyper-velocity stars come about? Assuming they form in the Galactic disk, there are multiple proposed scenarios through which they could be accelerated and injected into the halo, such as:Ejection after a close encounter with the supermassive black hole at the Galactic centerEjection due to a nearby supernova explosionEjection as the result of a dynamical interaction in a dense stellar population.Further observations of hyper-velocity stars are necessary to identify the mechanism responsible for their acceleration.J1211s SurpriseModels of J1211s orbit show it did not originate from the Galactic center (black dot). The solar symbol shows the position of the Sun and the star shows the current position of J1211. The bottom two panels show two depictions(x-y plane and r-z plane) of estimated orbits of J1211 over the past 10 Gyr. [Nmeth et al. 2016]To this end, a team of scientists led by Pter Nmeth (Friedrich Alexander University, Erlangen-Nrnberg) recently studied the candidate halo hyper-velocity star SDSS J121150.27+143716.2. The scientists obtained spectroscopy of J1211 using spectrographs at the Keck Telescope in Hawaii and ESOs Very Large Telescope in Chile. To their surprise, they discovered the signature of a companion in the spectra: J1211 is actually a binary!Nmeth and collaborators found that J1211, located roughly 18,000 light-years away, is moving at a rapid ~570 km/s relative to the galactic rest frame. The binary system consists of a hot (30,600 K) subdwarf and a

  19. Cosmic rays in a galactic breeze

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Andrew M.; Giacinti, Gwenael

    2017-01-01

    Motivated by the discovery of the nonthermal Fermi bubble features both below and above the Galactic plane, we investigate a scenario in which these bubbles are formed through galacto-centric outflow. Cosmic rays (CR) both diffusing and advecting within a galactic breeze outflow, interacting with the ambient gas present, give rise to γ -ray emission, providing an approximately flat surface brightness profile of this emission, as observed. Applying the same outflow profile further out within the disk, the resultant effects on the observable CR spectral properties are determined. A hardening in the spectra due to the competition of advective and diffusive propagation within a particular energy range is noted, even in the limiting case of equal CR diffusion coefficients in the disk and halo. It is postulated that this hardening effect may relate to the observed hardening feature in the CR spectrum at a rigidity of ≈200 GV .

  20. Cosmic Rays in a Galactic Breeze

    CERN Document Server

    Taylor, Andrew M

    2016-01-01

    Motivated by the discovery of the non-thermal Fermi bubble features both below and above the Galactic plane, we investigate a scenario in which these bubbles are formed through Galacto-centric outflow. Cosmic rays (CR) both diffusing and advecting within a Galactic breeze outflow, interacting with the ambient gas present, give rise to gamma-ray emission, providing an approximately flat surface brightness profile of this emission, as observed. Applying the same outflow profile further out within the disk, the resultant effects on the observable CR spectral properties are determined. A hardening in the spectra due to the competition of advective and diffusive propagation within a particular energy range is noted, even in the limiting case of equal CR diffusion coefficients in the disk and halo. It is postulated that this hardening effect may relate to the observed hardening feature in the CR spectrum at a rigidity of $\\approx 200$ GV.

  1. On the Progenitors of Galactic Novae

    CERN Document Server

    Darnley, M J; Bode, M F; Hounsell, R A; Williams, R P

    2011-01-01

    Of the approximately 400 known Galactic classical novae, only ten of them, the recurrent novae, have been seen to erupt more than once. At least eight of these recurrents are known to harbor evolved secondary stars, rather than the main sequence secondaries typical in classical novae. In this paper, we propose a new nova classification system, based solely on the evolutionary state of the secondary, and not (like the current schemes) based on the properties of the outbursts. Using archival optical and near-infrared photometric observations of a sample of thirty eight quiescent Galactic novae we show that the evolutionary state of the secondary star in a quiescent system can predicted and several objects are identified for follow-up observations; CI Aql, V2487 Oph, DI Lac and EU Sct.

  2. Does electromagnetic radiation accelerate galactic cosmic rays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eichler, D.

    1977-01-01

    The 'reactor' theories of Tsytovich and collaborators (1973) of cosmic-ray acceleration by electromagnetic radiation are examined in the context of galactic cosmic rays. It is shown that any isotropic synchrotron or Compton reactors with reasonable astrophysical parameters can yield particles with a maximum relativistic factor of only about 10,000. If they are to produce particles with higher relativistic factors, the losses due to inverse Compton scattering of the electromagnetic radiation in them outweigh the acceleration, and this violates the assumptions of the theory. This is a critical restriction in the context of galactic cosmic rays, which have a power-law spectrum extending up to a relativistic factor of 1 million.

  3. Transient osteoporosis of pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maliha, George; Morgan, Jordan; Vrahas, Mark

    2012-08-01

    Transient osteoporosis of pregnancy (TOP) is a rare yet perhaps under-reported condition that has affected otherwise healthy pregnancies throughout the world. The condition presents suddenly in the third trimester of a usually uneventful pregnancy and progressively immobilizes the mother. Radiographic studies detect drastic loss of bone mass, elevated rates of turnover in the bone, and oedema in the affected portion. Weakness of the bone can lead to fractures during delivery and other complications for the mother. Then, within weeks of labour, symptoms and radiological findings resolve. Aetiology is currently unknown, although neural, vascular, haematological, endocrine, nutrient-deficiency, and other etiologies have been proposed. Several treatments have also been explored, including simple bed rest, steroids, bisphosphonates, calcitonin, induced termination of pregnancy, and surgical intervention. The orthopedist plays an essential role in monitoring the condition (and potential complications) as well as ensuring satisfactory outcomes for both the mother and newborn.

  4. Transient Detection and Classification

    CERN Document Server

    Becker, Andrew C

    2008-01-01

    I provide an incomplete inventory of the astronomical variability that will be found by next-generation time-domain astronomical surveys. These phenomena span the distance range from near-Earth satellites to the farthest Gamma Ray Bursts. The surveys that detect these transients will issue alerts to the greater astronomical community; this decision process must be extremely robust to avoid a slew of ``false'' alerts, and to maintain the community's trust in the surveys. I review the functionality required of both the surveys and the telescope networks that will be following them up, and the role of VOEvents in this process. Finally, I offer some ideas about object and event classification, which will be explored more thoroughly by other articles in these proceedings.

  5. Stability of Ignition Transients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V.E. Zarko

    1991-07-01

    Full Text Available The problem of ignition stability arises in the case of the action of intense external heat stimuli when, resulting from the cut-off of solid substance heating, momentary ignition is followed by extinction. Physical pattern of solid propellant ignition is considered and ignition criteria available in the literature are discussed. It is shown that the above mentioned problem amounts to transient burning at a given arbitrary temperature distribution in the condensed phase. A brief survey of published data on experimental and theoretical studies on ignition stability is offered. The comparison between theory and experiment is shown to prove qualitatively the efficiency of the phenomenological approach in the theory. However, the methods of mathematical simulation as well as those of experimental studying of ignition phenomenon, especially at high fluxes, need to be improved.

  6. Cellular Automation of Galactic Habitable Zone

    CERN Document Server

    Vukotic, Branislav

    2010-01-01

    We present a preliminary results of our Galactic Habitable Zone (GHZ) 2D probabilistic cellular automata models. The relevant time-scales (emergence of life, it's diversification and evolution influenced with the global risk function) are modeled as the probability matrix elements and are chosen in accordance with the Copernican principle to be well-represented by the data inferred from the Earth's fossil record. With Fermi's paradox as a main boundary condition the resulting histories of astrobiological landscape are discussed.

  7. Identification of ten new Galactic HII regions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    We discovered ten large HII regions in the Sino-German λ6 cm polarization survey of the Galactic plane. They have been identified according to their flat spectral indexes and the high ratio between the 60 μm infrared emission and the λ6 cm emission. The integrated flux densities as well as the sizes of these sources are given at 4800 MHz. Cross-identifications are made with other major radio catalogs.

  8. Directional detection of galactic dark matter

    CERN Document Server

    Mayet, F; Santos, D

    2012-01-01

    Directional detection is a promising Dark Matter search strategy. Taking advantage on the rotation of the Solar system around the galactic center through the Dark Matter halo, it allows to show a direction dependence of WIMP events that may be a powerful tool to identify genuine WIMP events as such. Directional detection strategy requires the simultaneous measurement of the energy and the 3D track of low energy recoils, which is a common challenge for all current projects of directional detectors.

  9. Understanding active galactic nuclei: peeling the onion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krolik, J. H.

    A brief review is presented of selected current problems in understanding active galactic nuclei, with special emphasis on the contributions that X-ray observations can make. Questions having to do with: how the character of the host galaxy influences nuclear activity; emission line regions; the border between the nucleus and the stellar portion of the active galaxy; radiation of the nonthermal continuum; and the possible existence of an accretion disk are touched upon.

  10. Hierarchical Star Formation Across Galactic Disks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gouliermis, Dimitrios

    2016-09-01

    Most stars form in clusters. This fact has emerged from the finding that "embedded clusters account for the 70 - 90% fraction of all stars formed in Giant Molecular Clouds (GMCs)." While this is the case at scales of few 10 parsecs, typical for GMCs, a look at star-forming galaxies in the Local Group (LG) shows significant populations of enormous loose complexes of early-type stars extending at scales from few 100 to few 1000 parsecs. The fact that these stellar complexes host extremely large numbers of loosely distributed massive blue stars implies either that stars form also in an unbound fashion or they are immediately dislocated from their original compact birthplaces or both. The Legacy Extra-Galactic UV Survey (LEGUS) has produced remarkable collections of resolved early-type stars in 50 star-forming LG galaxies, suited for testing ideas about recent star formation. I will present results from our ongoing project on star formation across LEGUS disk galaxies. We characterize the global clustering behavior of the massive young stars in order to understand the morphology of star formation over galactic scales. This morphology appears to be self-similar with fractal dimensions comparable to those of the molecular interstellar medium, apparently driven by large-scale turbulence. Our clustering analysis reveals compact stellar systems nested in larger looser concentrations, which themselves are the dense parts of unbound complexes and super-structures, giving evidence of hierarchical star formation up to galactic scales. We investigate the structural and star formation parameters demographics of the star-forming complexes revealed at various levels of compactness. I will discuss the outcome of our correlation and regression analyses on these parameters in an attempt to understand the link between galactic disk dynamics and morphological structure in spiral and ring galaxies of the local universe.

  11. Galactic collapse of scalar field dark matter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alcubierre, Miguel [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Gravitationsphysik, Am Muehlenberg 1, D-14476 Golm (Germany); Guzman, F Siddhartha [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Gravitationsphysik, Am Muehlenberg 1, D-14476 Golm (Germany); Matos, Tonatiuh [Departamento de Fisica, Centro de Investigacion y de Estudios Avanzados del IPN, AP 14-740, 07000 Mexico, DF (Mexico); Nunez, Dario [Centre for Gravitational Physics and Geometry, Penn State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Urena-Lopez, L Arturo [Departamento de Fisica, Centro de Investigacion y de Estudios Avanzados del IPN, AP 14-740, 07000 Mexico, DF (Mexico); Wiederhold, Petra [Departamento de Control Automatico, Centro de Investigacion y de Estudios Avanzados del IPN, AP 14-740, 07000 Mexico, DF (Mexico)

    2002-10-07

    We present a scenario for core galaxy formation based on the hypothesis of scalar field dark matter. We interpret galaxy formation through the collapse of a scalar field fluctuation. We find that a cosh potential for the self-interaction of the scalar field provides a reasonable scenario for the formation of a galactic core plus a remnant halo, which is in agreement with cosmological observations and phenomenological studies in galaxies.

  12. The Galactic Club or Galactic Cliques? Exploring the limits of interstellar hegemony and the Zoo Hypothesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forgan, Duncan H.

    2017-10-01

    The Zoo solution to Fermi's Paradox proposes that extraterrestrial intelligences (ETIs) have agreed to not contact the Earth. The strength of this solution depends on the ability for ETIs to come to agreement, and establish/police treaties as part of a so-called `Galactic Club'. These activities are principally limited by the causal connectivity of a civilization to its neighbours at its inception, i.e. whether it comes to prominence being aware of other ETIs and any treaties or agreements in place. If even one civilization is not causally connected to the other members of a treaty, then they are free to operate beyond it and contact the Earth if wished, which makes the Zoo solution `soft'. We should therefore consider how likely this scenario is, as this will give us a sense of the Zoo solution's softness, or general validity. We implement a simple toy model of ETIs arising in a Galactic Habitable Zone, and calculate the properties of the groups of culturally connected civilizations established therein. We show that for most choices of civilization parameters, the number of culturally connected groups is >1, meaning that the Galaxy is composed of multiple Galactic Cliques rather than a single Galactic Club. We find in our models for a single Galactic Club to establish interstellar hegemony, the number of civilizations must be relatively large, the mean civilization lifetime must be several millions of years, and the inter-arrival time between civilizations must be a few million years or less.

  13. Galactic civilizations - Population dynamics and interstellar diffusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newman, W. I.; Sagan, C.

    1981-01-01

    A model is developed of the interstellar diffusion of galactic civilizations which takes into account the population dynamics of such civilizations. The problem is formulated in terms of potential theory, with a family of nonlinear partial differential and difference equations specifying population growth and diffusion for an organism with advantageous genes that undergoes random dispersal while increasing in population locally, and a population at zero population growth. In the case of nonlinear diffusion with growth and saturation, it is found that the colonization wavefront from the nearest independently arisen galactic civilization can have reached the earth only if its lifetime exceeds 2.6 million years, or 20 million years if discretization can be neglected. For zero population growth, the corresponding lifetime is 13 billion years. It is concluded that the earth is uncolonized not because interstellar spacefaring civilizations are rare, but because there are too many worlds to be colonized in the plausible colonization lifetime of nearby civilizations, and that there exist no very old galactic civilizations with a consistent policy of the conquest of inhabited worlds.

  14. Transition from galactic to extragalactic cosmic rays

    CERN Document Server

    Berezinsky, V

    2007-01-01

    The transition from galactic to extragalactic cosmic rays is discussed. One of critical indications for transition is given by the Standard Model of Galactic cosmic rays, according to which the maximum energy of acceleration for iron nuclei is of order of $E_{\\rm Fe}^{\\rm max} \\approx 1\\times 10^{17}$ eV. At $E > E_{\\rm Fe}^{\\rm max}$ the spectrum is predicted to be very steep and thus the Standard Model favours the transition at energy not much higher than $E_{\\rm Fe}^{\\rm max}$. As observations are concerned there are two signatures of transition: change of energy spectra and elongation rate (depth of shower maximum in the atmosphere $X_{\\rm max}$ as function of energy). Three models of transition are discussed: dip-based model, mixed composition model and ankle model. In the latter model the transition occurs at the observed spectral feature, ankle, which starts at $E_a \\approx 1\\times 10^{19}$ eV and is characterised by change of mass compostion from galactic iron to extragalactic protons. In the dip mode...

  15. Galactic Constraints on Supernova Progenitor Models

    CERN Document Server

    Acharova, I; Mishurov, Yu; Kovtyukh, V

    2013-01-01

    We undertake a statistical analysis of the radial abundance distributions in the Galactic disk within a theoretical framework for Galactic chemical evolution which incorporates the influence of spiral arms. 1) The mean mass of oxygen ejected per core-collapse SNe (CC SNe) event (which are concentrated within spiral arms) is $\\sim$0.27 M$_{\\odot}$; 2) the mean mass of iron ejected by `tardy' Type Ia SNe (SNeIa; progenitors of whom are older/longer-lived stars with ages $\\simgt$100 Myr and up to several Gyr, which do not concentrate within spiral arms) is $\\sim$0.58 M$_{\\odot}$; 3) the upper mass of iron ejected by prompt SNeIa (SNe whose progenitors are younger/shorter-lived stars with ages $\\simlt$100 Myr, which are concentrated within spiral arms) is $\\leq$0.23 M$_{\\odot}$ per event; 4) the corresponding mean mass of iron produced by CC SNe is $\\leq$0.04 M$_{\\odot}$ per event; (v) short-lived SNe (core-collapse or prompt SNeIa) supply $\\sim$85% of the Galactic disk's iron. The inferred low mean mass of oxyge...

  16. Galactic worms. I - Catalog of worm candidates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koo, Bon-Chul; Heiles, Carl; Reach, William T.

    1992-01-01

    A catalog of candidates for the Galactic worms that are possibly the walls surrounding the superbubbles is compiled; 118 isolated structures that appear both in H I and in IR (60 and 100 microns). Fifty-two are possibly associated with H II regions. It is found that the 100-micron emissivity increases systematically toward the Galactic interior, which is consistent with the increase of the general interstellar radiation field. The 100-micron emissivity of the structures associated with the H II regions is larger than that of the structures without associated H II regions. The 60-100-micron ratio is large, 0.28 +/- 0.03, which may indicate that the grains associated with the atomic gas have a relatively large population of small grains. Thirty-five structures appear in the 408-MHz continuum. The IR and the radio continuum properties suggest that the 408-MHz continuum emission in those structures is very likely thermal. The implications of these results on the ionization of gas far from the Galactic plane are discussed.

  17. On the physical origin of galactic conformity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hearin, Andrew P.; Behroozi, Peter S.; van den Bosch, Frank C.

    2016-09-01

    Correlations between the star formation rates (SFRs) of nearby galaxies (so-called galactic conformity) have been observed for projected separations up to 4 Mpc, an effect not predicted by current semi-analytic models. We investigate correlations between the mass accretion rates (dMvir/dt) of nearby haloes as a potential physical origin for this effect. We find that pairs of host haloes `know about' each others' assembly histories even when their present-day separation is greater than thirty times the virial radius of either halo. These distances are far too large for direct interaction between the haloes to explain the correlation in their dMvir/dt. Instead, halo pairs at these distances reside in the same large-scale tidal environment, which regulates dMvir/dt for both haloes. Larger haloes are less affected by external forces, which naturally gives rise to a mass dependence of the halo conformity signal. SDSS measurements of galactic conformity exhibit a qualitatively similar dependence on stellar mass, including how the signal varies with distance. Based on the expectation that halo accretion and galaxy SFR are correlated, we predict the scale-, mass- and redshift-dependence of large-scale galactic conformity, finding that the signal should drop to undetectable levels by z ≳ 1. These predictions are testable with current surveys to z ˜ 1; confirmation would establish a strong correlation between dark matter halo accretion rate and central galaxy SFR.

  18. Stellar and Galactic Astrophysics with SIM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gould, A.

    2001-05-01

    SIM will revolutionize stellar and Galactic astrophysics by tackling new questions that could never previously be addressed and making order of magnitude improvements in key parameters. SIM will measure R0 and Theta0 to measurements of the Milky Way mass and rotation curve. It will probe the Galactic 3-D mass distribution by 2 independent methods. By calibrating the RR Lyrae MV-[Fe/H] relation as well as obtaining direct distances to clusters and halo field objects, SIM will precisely date halo and globular-cluster formation as a function of metallicity. SIM will obtain 1 measurements for 200 stars of all types ranging from brown dwarfs (BD) to O stars from a broad range of metallicities, including both binaries and single stars, and it will yield precision measurements of white dwarf (WD) and black hole (BH) remnants as well. SIM microlensing will take an unbiased census of all objects in the Galactic bulge, both dark (BD WD NS BH) and luminous, and will resolve the nature of the dark-halo (MACHO) candidates currently being detected toward the LMC.

  19. Manifestations of the Galactic Center Magnetic Field

    CERN Document Server

    Morris, Mark R

    2014-01-01

    Several independent lines of evidence reveal that a relatively strong and highly ordered magnetic field is present throughout the Galaxy's central molecular zone (CMZ). The field within dense clouds of the central molecular zone is predominantly parallel to the Galactic plane, probably as a result of the strong tidal shear in that region. A second magnetic field system is present outside of clouds, manifested primarily by a population of vertical, synchrotron-emitting filamentary features aligned with the field. Whether or not the strong vertical field is uniform throughout the CMZ remains undetermined, but is a key central issue for the overall energetics and the impact of the field on the Galactic center arena. The interactions between the two field systems are considered, as they are likely to drive some of the activity within the CMZ. As a proxy for other gas-rich galaxies in the local group and beyond, the Galactic center region reveals that magnetic fields are likely to be an important diagnostic, if no...

  20. Galactic tide and orbital evolution of comets

    CERN Document Server

    Komar, L; Pastor, P

    2009-01-01

    Equation of motion for a comet in the Oort cloud is numerically solved. Orbital evolution of the comet under the action of the gravity of the Sun and the Galaxy is presented for various initial conditions. Oscillations of the Sun with respect to the galactic equatorial plane are taken into account. Real values of physical quantities concerning the gravitational action of the galactic neighbourhood of the Sun are important. The results are compared with currently used more simple models of the galactic tide. It turns out that physically improved models yield results which significantly differ from the results obtained on the basis of the conventional models. E.g., the number of returns of the comets into the inner part of the Solar System are about two times greater than it is in the conventional models. It seems that a comet from the Oort cloud can be a source of the dinosaurs extinction at about 65 Myr ago. A close encounter of a star or an interstellar cloud disturbed a comet of the Oort cloud in the way th...

  1. Revisiting the population of Galactic open clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Piskunov, A E; Röser, S; Schilbach, E; Scholz, R D

    2005-01-01

    We present results of a study of the galactic open cluster population based on the all-sky catalogue ASCC-2.5 (I/280A) compiled from Tycho-2, Hipparcos and other catalogues. The sample of optical clusters from ASCC-2.5 is complete up to about 850 pc from the Sun. The symmetry plane of the clusters' distribution is determined to be at $Z_0=-22\\pm4$ pc, and the scale height of open clusters is only $56\\pm3$ pc. The total surface density and volume density in the symmetry plane are $\\Sigma=$ 114 kpc$^{-2}$ and $D(Z_0)=1015$ kpc$^{-3}$, respectively. We find the total number of open clusters in the Galactic disk to be of order of 10$^5$ at present. Fluctuations in the spatial and velocity distributions are attributed to the existence of four open cluster complexes (OCCs) of different ages containing up to a few tens of clusters. Members in an OCC show the same kinematic behaviour, and a narrow age spread. We find, that the youngest cluster complex, OCC~1 ($\\log t<7.9$), with 19 deg inclination to the Galactic ...

  2. THE CURIOUS CASE OF ELEMENTAL ABUNDANCE DIFFERENCES IN THE DUAL HOT JUPITER HOSTS WASP-94A AND B

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Teske, Johanna K. [Carnegie Department of Terrestrial Magnetism, 5241 Broad Branch Road, NW, Washington, DC 20015 (United States); Khanal, Sandhya; Ramírez, Ivan, E-mail: jteske@carnegiescience.edu [McDonald Observatory and Department of Astronomy, University of Texas at Austin, 2515 Speedway, Stop C1402, Austin, TX 78712-1205 (United States)

    2016-03-01

    Binary stars provide an ideal laboratory for investigating the potential effects of planet formation on stellar composition. Assuming that the stars formed in the same environment/from the same material, any compositional anomalies between binary components might indicate differences in how material was sequestered in planets, or accreted by the star in the process of planet formation. We present here a study of the elemental abundance differences between WASP-94A and B, a pair of stars that each host a hot Jupiter exoplanet. The two stars are very similar in spectral type (F8 and F9), and their ∼2700 au separation suggests that their protoplanetary disks were likely not influenced by stellar interactions, but WASP-94Ab’s orbit—misaligned with the host star spin axis and likely retrograde—points toward a dynamically active formation mechanism, perhaps different from that of WASP-94Bb, which is not misaligned and has a nearly circular orbit. Based on our high-quality spectra and strictly relative abundance analysis, we detect a depletion of volatiles (∼−0.02 dex, on average) and enhancement of refractories (∼0.01 dex) in WASP-94A relative to B (standard errors are ∼0.005 dex). This is different from every other published case of binary host star abundances, in which either no significant abundance differences are reported or there is some degree of enhancement in all elements, including volatiles. Several scenarios that may explain the abundance trend are discussed, but none can be definitively accepted or rejected. Additional high-contrast imaging observations to search for companions that may be dynamically affecting the system, as well as a larger sample of binary host star studies, are needed to better understand the curious abundance trends we observe in WASP-94A and B.

  3. Transient Go: A Mobile App for Transient Astronomy Outreach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crichton, D.; Mahabal, A.; Djorgovski, S. G.; Drake, A.; Early, J.; Ivezic, Z.; Jacoby, S.; Kanbur, S.

    2016-12-01

    Augmented Reality (AR) is set to revolutionize human interaction with the real world as demonstrated by the phenomenal success of `Pokemon Go'. That very technology can be used to rekindle the interest in science at the school level. We are in the process of developing a prototype app based on sky maps that will use AR to introduce different classes of astronomical transients to students as they are discovered i.e. in real-time. This will involve transient streams from surveys such as the Catalina Real-time Transient Survey (CRTS) today and the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST) in the near future. The transient streams will be combined with archival and latest image cut-outs and other auxiliary data as well as historical and statistical perspectives on each of the transient types being served. Such an app could easily be adapted to work with various NASA missions and NSF projects to enrich the student experience.

  4. The MWA Transients Survey (MWATS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, M.; Murphy, T.; Kaplan, D. L.; Croft, S. D.; Hancock, P.; Rowlinson, A.; Wayth, R.; Gaensler, B.; Hurley-Walker, N.; Offringa, A.; Loi, C.; Bannister, K.; Trott, C.; Marquart, J.

    2017-01-01

    We propose the continuation of the MWA transients survey to search for and monitor low frequency transient and variable radio sources in the southern sky. This proposal is aimed at commensally utilising data from the GLEAM-X (G0008) project in semester 2017-A. The aim of this commensal data acquisition is to commission long baseline observations for transient science. In particular this will involve studying the impact of the ionosphere on calibration and imaging, and developing the techniques needed to produce science quality data products. The proposed drift scans with LST locking (see G0008 proposal) are particularly exciting as we can test image subtraction for transient and variable identification. This survey is targeted at studying objects such as AGN (intrinsic and extrinsic variability), long duration synchrotron emitters, pulsars and transients of unknown origin. The maps generated from this survey will be analysed with the Variables and Slow Transients (VAST) detection pipeline. The motivation for this survey is as follows: (i) To obtain temporal data on an extremely large and robust sample of low frequency sources to explore and quantify both intrinsic and extrinsic variability; (ii) To search and find new classes of low frequency radio transients that previously remained undetected and obscured from multi-wavelength discovery; (iii) To place rigorous statistics on the occurrence of both transients and variables prior to the Australian SKA era.

  5. Dynamics and evolution of galactic nuclei (princeton series in astrophysics)

    CERN Document Server

    Merritt, David

    2013-01-01

    Deep within galaxies like the Milky Way, astronomers have found a fascinating legacy of Einstein's general theory of relativity: supermassive black holes. Connected to the evolution of the galaxies that contain these black holes, galactic nuclei are the sites of uniquely energetic events, including quasars, stellar tidal disruptions, and the generation of gravitational waves. This textbook is the first comprehensive introduction to dynamical processes occurring in the vicinity of supermassive black holes in their galactic environment. Filling a critical gap, it is an authoritative resource for astrophysics and physics graduate students, and researchers focusing on galactic nuclei, the astrophysics of massive black holes, galactic dynamics, and gravitational wave detection. It is an ideal text for an advanced graduate-level course on galactic nuclei and as supplementary reading in graduate-level courses on high-energy astrophysics and galactic dynamics. David Merritt summarizes the theoretical work of the las...

  6. SAS-2 galactic gamma-ray results. 1: Diffuse emission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, D. J.; Fichtel, C. E.; Hartman, R. C.; Kniffen, D. A.; Bignami, G. F.; Lamb, R. C.; Oegelman, H.; Oezel, M. E.; Tuemer, T.

    1977-01-01

    Continuing analysis of the data from the SAS-2 high energy gamma ray experiment has produced an improved picture of the sky at photon energies above 35 MeV. On a large scale, the diffuse emission from the galactic plane is the dominant feature observed by SAS-2. This galactic plane emission is most intense between galactic longitudes 310 deg and 45 deg, corresponding to a region within 7 kpc of the galactic center. Within the high-intensity region, SAS-2 observes peaks around galactic longitudes 315, 330, 345, 0, and 35 deg. These peaks appear to be correlated with galactic features and components such as molecular hydrogen, atomic hydrogen, magnetic fields, cosmic-ray concentrations, and photon fields.

  7. Interplay of CR-driven galactic wind, magnetic field, and galactic dynamo in spiral galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Krause, Marita

    2009-01-01

    From our radio observations of the magnetic field strength and large-scale pattern of spiral galaxies of different Hubble types and star formation rates (SFR) we conclude that - though a high SFR in the disk increases the total magnetic field strength in the disk and the halo - the SFR does not change the global field configuration nor influence the global scale heights of the radio emission. The similar scale heights indicate that the total magnetic field regulates the galactic wind velocities. The galactic wind itself may be essential for an effective dynamo action.

  8. Environment effects on galactical and extra-galactical stellar systems: a numerical and observational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leon, S.

    1998-09-01

    This thesis work is dealing in a first part with the influence of our Galaxy on its globular cluster population. First we simulated the gravitational shocks felt by a globular cluster during the crossing of the galactic plane (>). We adapted a code from F. Leeuwin which is devoted to probe very weak perturbations on a stellar system at the equilibrium. It has been possible to describe the transient effects of the disk shocking on the globular cluster structure. It appears that the adiabatic component of the stellar system, defined by Weinberg (1994a), contributes to an important part for the heating of the cluster during the crossing. Some observational tests are proposed to measure these disk shocking effects on the globular cluster. We observed 6 globular clusters in the CO(1 to 0) transition at 115 GHz with the IRAM 30-m telescope (Granada) : it is shown that the disk crossing and the hot gaseous halo are very efficient in the stripping of the molecular gas in the globular clusters, released by the mass loss of the giant stars. The internal dynamics of globular clusters and the influence of the Galaxy lead to a mass loss in these stellar systems varying with time. We performed N-body simulations to study this mass loss in the galactic potential well and enlight various physical processes (rotation, gravitational shocks, mass segregation). A program of wide field study has been conducted on 20 globular clusters from photographic films and plates digitalized at the > (CAI). In order to detect the tidal tails of globular cluster, we used a star-counting technique from a source-extracted catalogue. These stars are selected in the color-magnitude diagram. A wavelet transform is then applied on the star-count because it is particularly suited for different scale structure analysis. It has been found around the clusters large tidal structures revealing their dynamical story in the Galaxy. In one case (NGC 5139) it has been possible to estimate the mass loss of this

  9. INTEGRAL Galactic bulge monitoring observations of GRO J1750-27 (AX J1749.1-2639), H1743-322 and SLX 1746-331

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kuulkers, E.; Beckmann, V.; Shaw, S.;

    2008-01-01

    A new season of the INTEGRAL Galactic Bulge monitoring program (see ATels #438, #874, #1005; Kuulkers et al. 2007, A&A 466, 595) started, with observations on UT 11 Feb 2008, 16:33-18:07. We here report on results from three currently active transient sources. The IBIS/ISGRI and JEM-X1 images sho...... a bright source near GX 3+1, coincident with the position of the transient accreting X-ray pulsar GRO J1750-27 (AX J1749.1-2639)....

  10. Possible existence of wormholes in the galactic halo region

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rahaman, Farook [Jadavpur University, Department of Mathematics, Kolkata, West Bengal (India); Kuhfittig, P.K.F. [Milwaukee School of Engineering, Department of Mathematics, Milwaukee, WI (United States); Ray, Saibal [Government College of Engineering and Ceramic Technology, Department of Physics, Kolkata, West Bengal (India); Islam, Nasarul [Danga High Madrasah, Department of Mathematics, Kolkata, West Bengal (India)

    2014-02-15

    Two observational results, the density profile from simulations performed in the ΛCDM scenario and the observed flat galactic rotation curves, are taken as input with the aim of showing that the galactic halo possesses some of the characteristics needed to support traversable wormholes. This result should be sufficient to provide an incentive for scientists to seek observational evidence for wormholes in the galactic halo region. (orig.)

  11. The Galactic Center compared with nuclei of nearby galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Combes, F

    2016-01-01

    Understanding our Galactic Center is easier with insights from nearby galactic nuclei. Both the star formation activity in nuclear gas disks, driven by bars and nuclear bars, and the fueling of low-luminosity AGN, followed by feedback of jets, driving molecular outflows, were certainly present in our Galactic Center, which appears now quenched. Comparisons and diagnostics are reviewed, in particular of m=2 and m=1 modes, lopsidedness, different disk orientations, and fossil evidences of activity and feedback.

  12. The Galactic Center compared with nuclei of nearby galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Combes, Francoise

    2017-01-01

    Understanding our Galactic Center is easier with insights from nearby galactic nuclei. Both the star formation activity in nuclear gas disks, driven by bars and nuclear bars, and the fueling of low-luminosity AGN, followed by feedback of jets, driving molecular outflows, were certainly present in our Galactic Center, which appears now quenched. Comparisons and diagnostics are reviewed, in particular of m = 2 and m = 1 modes, lopsidedness, different disk orientations, and fossil evidences of activity and feedback.

  13. Transient regional osteoporosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cano-Marquina, Antonio; Tarín, Juan J; García-Pérez, Miguel-Ángel; Cano, Antonio

    2014-04-01

    Transient regional osteoporosis (TRO) is a disease that predisposes to fragility fracture in weight bearing joints of mid-life women and men. Pregnant women may also suffer the process, usually at the hip. The prevalence of TRO is lower than the systemic form, associated with postmenopause and advanced age, but may be falsely diminished by under-diagnosis. The disease may be uni- or bilateral, and may migrate to distinct joints. One main feature of TRO is spontaneous recovery. Pain and progressive limitation in the functionality of the affected joint(s) are key symptoms. In the case of the form associated with pregnancy, difficulties in diagnosis derive from the relatively young age at presentation and from the clinical overlapping with the frequent aches during gestation. Densitometric osteoporosis in the affected region is not always present, but bone marrow edema, with or without joint effusion, is detected by magnetic resonance. There are not treatment guidelines, but the association of antiresorptives to symptomatic treatment seems to be beneficial. Surgery or other orthopedic interventions can be required for specific indications, like hip fracture, intra-medullary decompression, or other.

  14. Applied hydraulic transients

    CERN Document Server

    Chaudhry, M Hanif

    2014-01-01

    This book covers hydraulic transients in a comprehensive and systematic manner from introduction to advanced level and presents various methods of analysis for computer solution. The field of application of the book is very broad and diverse and covers areas such as hydroelectric projects, pumped storage schemes, water-supply systems, cooling-water systems, oil pipelines and industrial piping systems. Strong emphasis is given to practical applications, including several case studies, problems of applied nature, and design criteria. This will help design engineers and introduce students to real-life projects. This book also: ·         Presents modern methods of analysis suitable for computer analysis, such as the method of characteristics, explicit and implicit finite-difference methods and matrix methods ·         Includes case studies of actual projects ·         Provides extensive and complete treatment of governed hydraulic turbines ·         Presents design charts, desi...

  15. The Rapid Transient Surveyor

    CERN Document Server

    Baranec, Christoph; Wright, Shelley A; Tonry, John; Tully, R Brent; Szapudi, István; Takamiya, Marianne; Hunter, Lisa; Riddle, Reed; Chen, Shaojie; Chun, Mark

    2016-01-01

    The Rapid Transient Surveyor (RTS) is a proposed rapid-response, high-cadence adaptive optics (AO) facility for the UH 2.2-m telescope on Maunakea. RTS will uniquely address the need for high-acuity and sensitive near-infrared spectral follow-up observations of tens of thousands of objects in mere months by combining an excellent observing site, unmatched robotic observational efficiency, and an AO system that significantly increases both sensitivity and spatial resolving power. We will initially use RTS to obtain the infrared spectra of ~4,000 Type Ia supernovae identified by the Asteroid Terrestrial-Impact Last Alert System over a two year period that will be crucial to precisely measuring distances and mapping the distribution of dark matter in the z < 0.1 universe. RTS will comprise an upgraded version of the Robo-AO laser AO system and will respond quickly to target-of-opportunity events, minimizing the time between discovery and characterization. RTS will acquire simultaneous-multicolor images with a...

  16. The rapid transient surveyor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baranec, C.; Lu, J. R.; Wright, S. A.; Tonry, J.; Tully, R. B.; Szapudi, I.; Takamiya, M.; Hunter, L.; Riddle, R.; Chen, S.; Chun, M.

    2016-07-01

    The Rapid Transient Surveyor (RTS) is a proposed rapid-response, high-cadence adaptive optics (AO) facility for the UH 2.2-m telescope on Maunakea. RTS will uniquely address the need for high-acuity and sensitive near-infrared spectral follow-up observations of tens of thousands of objects in mere months by combining an excellent observing site, unmatched robotic observational efficiency, and an AO system that significantly increases both sensitivity and spatial resolving power. We will initially use RTS to obtain the infrared spectra of 4,000 Type Ia supernovae identified by the Asteroid Terrestrial-Impact Last Alert System over a two year period that will be crucial to precisely measuring distances and mapping the distribution of dark matter in the z efficiency prism integral field unit spectrograph: R = 70-140 over a total bandpass of 840-1830nm with an 8.7" by 6.0" field of view (0.15" spaxels). The AO correction boosts the infrared point-source sensitivity of the spectrograph against the sky background by a factor of seven for faint targets, giving the UH 2.2-m the H-band sensitivity of a 5.7-m telescope without AO.

  17. Global dynamics and diffusion in triaxial galactic models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papaphilippou, Y.

    We apply the Frequency Map Analysis method to the 3--dimensional logarithmic galactic potential in order to clarify the dynamical behaviour of triaxial power--law galactic models. All the fine dynamical details are displayed in the complete frequency map, a direct representation of the system's Arnol'd web. The influence of resonant lines and the extent of the chaotic zones are directly associated with the physical space of the system. Some new results related with the diffusion of galactic orbits are also discussed. This approach reveals many unknown dynamical features of triaxial galactic potentials and provides strong indications that chaos should be an innate characteristic of triaxial configurations.

  18. Search for EeV Protons of Galactic Origin

    CERN Document Server

    Abbasi, R U; Abu-Zayyad, T; Allen, M; Azuma, R; Barcikowski, E; Belz, J W; Bergman, D R; Blake, S A; Cady, R; Cheon, B G; Chiba, J; Chikawa, M; Fujii, T; Fukushima, M; Goto, T; Hanlon, W; Hayashi, Y; Hayashi, M; Hayashida, N; Hibino, K; Honda, K; Ikeda, D; Inoue, N; Ishii, T; Ishimori, R; Ito, H; Ivanov, D; Jui, C C H; Kadota, K; Kakimoto, F; Kalashev, O; Kasahara, K; Kawai, H; Kawakami, S; Kawana, S; Kawata, K; Kido, E; Kim, H B; Kim, J H; Kim, J H; Kishigami, S; Kitamura, S; Kitamura, Y; Kuzmin, V; Kwon, Y J; Lan, J; Lubsandorzhiev, B; Lundquist, J P; Machida, K; Martens, K; Matsuda, T; Matsuyama, T; Matthews, J N; Minamino, M; Mukai, K; Myers, I; Nagasawa, K; Nagataki, S; Nakamura, T; Nonaka, T; Nozato, A; Ogio, S; Ogura, J; Ohnishi, M; Ohoka, H; Oki, K; Okuda, T; Ono, M; Onogi, R; Oshima, A; Ozawa, S; Park, I H; Pshirkov, M S; Rodriguez, D C; Rubtsov, G; Ryu, D; Sagawa, H; Saito, K; Saito, Y; Sakaki, N; Sakurai, N; Scott, L M; Sekino, K; Shah, P D; Shibata, T; Shibata, F; Shimodaira, H; Shin, B K; Shin, H S; Smith, J D; Sokolsky, P; Stokes, B T; Stratton, S R; Stroman, T A; Suzawa, T; Takahashi, Y; Takamura, M; Takeda, M; Takeishi, R; Taketa, A; Takita, M; Tameda, Y; Tanaka, M; Tanaka, K; Tanaka, H; Thomas, S B; Thomson, G B; Tinyakov, P; Tirone, A H; Tkachev, I; Tokuno, H; Tomida, T; Troitsky, S; Tsunesada, Y; Tsutsumi, K; Uchihori, Y; Udo, S; Urban, F; Wong, T; Yamane, R; Yamaoka, H; Yamazaki, K; Yang, J; Yashiro, K; Yoneda, Y; Yoshida, S; Yoshii, H; Zollinger, R; Zundel, Z

    2016-01-01

    Cosmic rays in the energy range $10^{18.0}$ - $10^{18.5}$ eV are thought to have a light, probably protonic, composition. To study their origin one can search for anisotropy in their arrival directions. Extragalactic cosmic rays should be isotropic, but galactic cosmic rays of this type should be seen mostly along the galactic plane, and there should be a shortage of events coming from directions near the galactic anticenter. This is due to the fact that, under the influence of the galactic magnetic field, the transition from ballistic to diffusive behavior is well advanced, and this qualitative picture persists over the whole energy range. Guided by models of the galactic magnetic field that indicate that the enhancement along the galactic plane should have a standard deviation of about 20$^\\circ$ in galactic latitude, and the deficit in the galactic anticenter direction should have a standard deviation of about 50$^\\circ$ in galactic longitude, we use the data of the Telescope Array surface detector in $10^...

  19. Warm Molecular Hydrogen in the Galactic Wind of M82

    CERN Document Server

    Veilleux, S; Swaters, R

    2009-01-01

    We report the detection of a complex of extraplanar warm H_2 knots and filaments extending more than ~3 kpc above and below the galactic plane of M82, roughly coincident with the well-known galactic wind in this system. Comparisons of these data with published results at other wavelengths provide quantitative constraints on the topology, excitation, heating, and stability against disruption of the wind-entrained molecular ISM in this prototypical galactic wind. Deep H_2 2.12 um observations such as these represent a promising new method to study the elusive but potentially important molecular component of galactic winds.

  20. Science with a wide-field UV transient explorer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sagiv, I.; Gal-Yam, A.; Ofek, E. O.; Waxman, E.; Trakhtenbrot, B.; Topaz, J. [Benoziyo Center for Astrophysics, Weizmann Institute of Science, 76100 Rehovot (Israel); Aharonson, O. [Helen Kimmel Center for Planetary Science, Weizmann Institute of Science, 76100 Rehovot (Israel); Kulkarni, S. R.; Phinney, E. S. [Division of Physics, Mathematics, and Astronomy, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Nakar, E.; Maoz, D. [School of Physics and Astronomy, Tel Aviv University, 93387 Tel Aviv (Israel); Beichman, C. [Division of Geophysics and Planetary Science, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91105 (United States); Murthy, J. [Indian Institute of Astrophysics, Koramangala, Bangalore 560034 (India); Worden, S. P. [NASA Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, CA 94035 (United States)

    2014-04-01

    The time-variable electromagnetic sky has been well-explored at a wide range of wavelengths. In contrast, the ultra-violet (UV) variable sky is relatively poorly explored, even though it offers exciting scientific prospects. Here, we review the potential scientific impact of a wide-field UV survey on the study of explosive and other transient events, as well as known classes of variable objects, such as active galactic nuclei and variable stars. We quantify our predictions using a fiducial set of observational parameters which are similar to those envisaged for the proposed ULTRASAT mission. We show that such a mission would be able to revolutionize our knowledge about massive star explosions by measuring the early UV emission from hundreds of events, revealing key physical parameters of the exploding progenitor stars. Such a mission would also detect the UV emission from many tens of tidal-disruption events of stars by supermassive black holes at galactic nuclei and enable a measurement of the rate of such events. The overlap of such a wide-field UV mission with existing and planned gravitational-wave and high-energy neutrino telescopes makes it especially timely.

  1. Revised Geometric Estimates of the North Galactic Pole and the Sun's Height Above the Galactic Midplane

    CERN Document Server

    Karim, Md Tanveer

    2016-01-01

    Astronomers are entering an era of {\\mu}as-level astrometry utilizing the 5-decade-old IAU Galactic coordinate system that was only originally defined to $\\sim$0{\\deg}.1 accuracy, and where the dynamical centre of the Galaxy (Sgr A*) is located $\\sim$0{\\deg}.07 from the origin. We calculate new independent estimates of the North Galactic Pole (NGP) using recent catalogues of Galactic disc tracer objects such as embedded and open clusters, infrared bubbles, dark clouds, and young massive stars. Using these catalogues, we provide two new estimates of the NGP. Solution 1 is an "unconstrained" NGP determined by the galactic tracer sources, which does not take into account the location of Sgr A*, and which lies 90{\\deg}.120$\\,\\pm\\,$0{\\deg}.029 from Sgr A*, and Solution 2 is a "constrained" NGP which lies exactly 90{\\deg} from Sgr A*. The "unconstrained" NGP has ICRS position: $\\alpha_{NGP}$ = 192{\\deg}.729 $\\,\\pm\\,$ 0{\\deg}.035, $\\delta_{NGP}$ = 27{\\deg}.084 $\\,\\pm\\,$ 0{\\deg}.023 and $\\theta\\,$ = 122{\\deg}.928 $\\,...

  2. VLBI detection of the Galactic black hole binary candidate MAXI J1836-194

    CERN Document Server

    Yang, Jun; Li, Zhixuan; Paragi, Zsolt; Campbell, Robert M; Gurvits, Leonid; Shen, Zhiqiang; Hong, Xiaoyu; Xia, Bo

    2012-01-01

    The X-ray transient MAXI J1836-194 is a newly-identified Galactic black hole binary candidate. As most X-ray transients, it was discovered at the beginning of an X-ray outburst. After the initial canonical X-ray hard state, the outburst evolved into a hard intermediate state and then went back to the hard state. The existing RATAN-600 radio monitoring observations revealed that it was variable on a timescale of days and had a flat or inverted spectrum, consistent with optically thick synchrotron emission, possibly from a self-absorbed jet in the vicinity of the central compact object. We observed the transient in the hard state near the end of the X-ray outburst with the European VLBI Network (EVN) at 5 GHz and the Chinese VLBI Network (CVN) at 2.3 and 8.3 GHz. The 8.3 GHz observations were carried out at a recording rate of 2048 Mbps using the newly-developed Chinese VLBI data acquisition system (CDAS), twice higher than the recording rate used in the other observations. We successfully detected the low-decl...

  3. WATCHDOG: A Comprehensive All-Sky Database of Galactic Black Hole X-ray Binaries

    CERN Document Server

    Tetarenko, B E; Heinke, C O; Gladstone, J C

    2015-01-01

    With the advent of more sensitive all-sky instruments, the transient Universe is being probed in greater depth than ever before. Taking advantage of available resources, we have established a comprehensive database of black hole (and black hole candidate) X-ray binary (BHXB) activity between 1996 and 2015 as revealed by all-sky instruments, scanning surveys, and select narrow-field X-ray instruments aboard the INTErnational Gamma-Ray Astrophysics Laboratory (INTEGRAL), Monitor of All-Sky X-ray Image (MAXI), Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer (RXTE), and Swift telescopes; the Whole-sky Alberta Time-resolved Comprehensive black-Hole Database Of the Galaxy or WATCHDOG. Over the past two decades, we have detected 132 transient outbursts, tracked and classified behavior occurring in 47 transient and 10 persistently accreting BHs, and performed a statistical study on a number of outburst properties across the Galactic population. We find that outbursts undergone by BHXBs that do not reach the thermally dominant accretion ...

  4. Ultrahigh Energy Cosmic Rays: A Galactic Origin?

    CERN Document Server

    Eichler, David; Kumar, Rahul; Gavish, Eyal

    2016-01-01

    It is suggested that essentially all of the UHECRs we detect, including those at the highest energy, originate in our Galaxy. It is shown that even if the density of sources decreases with Galactic radius, then the anisotropy and composition can be understood. Inward anisotropy, as recently reported by the Auger collaboration can be understood as drift along the current sheet of UHECRs originating outside the solar circle, as predicted in Kumar and Eichler (2014), while those originating within the solar circle exit the Galaxy at high latitudes.

  5. UV Spectroscopic Indices of Galactic Globular Clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morales-Hernández, J.; Chávez, M.; Bertone, E.; Buzzoni, A.; Bressan, A.

    2009-03-01

    We present the calculation of a set of 12 mid-ultraviolet (1900-3200 Å) spectroscopic indices for a sample of 15 galactic globular clusters (GGC) observed with the International Ultraviolet Explorer (IUE). We explore the dependence of the indices on age and metal abundance. We found that five indices (BL 2538, Fe II 2609, Mg II 2800, Mg I 2852 and Mg Wide) display a remarkably good correlation with [Fe/H]. With respect to age, only one index (BL 2740) shows a good correlation. Results from theoretical simple stellar populations well reproduce the global trends of indices vs. [Fe/H].

  6. Exotic populations in Galactic Globular Clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Ferraro, F R

    2006-01-01

    Recent high-resolution observations of the central region of Galactic globular clusters have shown the presence of a large variety of exotic stellar objects whose formation and evolution may be strongly affected by dynamical interactions. In this paper I review the main properties of two classes of exotic objects: the so-called Blue Stragglers stars and the recently identified optical companions to Millisecond pulsar. Both these class of objects are invaluable tools to investigate the binary evolution in very dense environments and are powerful tracers of the dynamical history of the parent cluster.

  7. Anomalous Redshift of Some Galactic Objects

    CERN Document Server

    Zheng, Yi-Jia

    2013-01-01

    Anomalous redshifts of some galactic objects such as binary stars, early-type stars in the solar neighborhood, and O stars in a star clusters are discussed. It is shown that all these phenomena have a common characteristic, that is, the redshifts of stars increase as the temperature rises. This characteristic cannot be explained by means of the Doppler Effect but can by means of the soft-photon process proposed by Yijia Zheng (arXiv:1305.0427 [astro-ph.HE]).

  8. Updated galactic radio constraints on Dark Matter

    CERN Document Server

    Cirelli, Marco

    2016-01-01

    We perform a detailed analysis of the synchrotron signals produced by Dark Matter annihilations and decays. We consider different set-ups for the propagation of electrons and positrons, the galactic magnetic field and Dark Matter properties. We then confront these signals with radio and microwave maps, including Planck measurements, from a frequency of 22 MHz up to 70 GHz. We derive two sets of constraints: conservative and progressive, the latter based on a modeling of the astrophysical emission. Radio and microwave constraints are complementary to those obtained with other indirect detection methods, especially for dark matter annihilating into leptonic channels.

  9. Updated galactic radio constraints on Dark Matter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cirelli, Marco [Laboratoire de Physique Théorique et Hautes Energies (LPTHE),UMR 7589 CNRS & UPMC, 4 Place Jussieu, Paris, F-75252 (France); Taoso, Marco [Instituto de Física Teórica (IFT) UAM/CSIC,calle Nicolás Cabrera 13-15, Cantoblanco, Madrid, 28049 (Spain)

    2016-07-25

    We perform a detailed analysis of the synchrotron signals produced by dark matter annihilations and decays. We consider different set-ups for the propagation of electrons and positrons, the galactic magnetic field and dark matter properties. We then confront these signals with radio and microwave maps, including PLANCK measurements, from a frequency of 22 MHz up to 70 GHz. We derive two sets of constraints: conservative and progressive, the latter based on a modeling of the astrophysical emission. Radio and microwave constraints are complementary to those obtained with other indirect detection methods, especially for dark matter annihilating into leptonic channels.

  10. Galactic cosmic ray propagation models using Picard

    CERN Document Server

    Kissmann, Ralf; Strong, Andrew W

    2015-01-01

    We present results obtained from our newly developed Galactic cosmic-ray transport code PICARD, that solves the cosmic-ray transport equation. This code allows for the computation of cosmic-ray spectra and the resulting gamma-ray emission. Relying on contemporary numerical solvers allows for efficient computation of models with deca-parsec resolution. PICARD can handle locally anisotropic spatial diffusion acknowledging a full diffusion tensor. We used this framework to investigate the transition from axisymmetric to spiral-arm cosmic-ray source distributions. Wherever possible we compare model predictions with constraining observables in cosmic-ray astrophysics.

  11. Kinematic Distance of Galactic Planetary Nebulae

    CERN Document Server

    Yang, A Y; Zhu, H; Leahy, D A; Wu, D

    2016-01-01

    We construct \\HI~absorption spectra for 18 planetary nebulae (PNe) and their background sources using the data from the International Galactic Plane Survey. We estimate the kinematic distances of these PNe, among which 15 objects' kinematic distances are obtained for the first time. The distance uncertainties of 13 PNe range from 10% to 50%, which is a significant improvement with uncertainties of a factor two or three smaller than most of previous distance measurements. We confirm that PN G030.2-00.1 is not a PN because of its large distance found here.

  12. Helioseismic Effects of Energetic Transients

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Ashok Ambastha

    2008-03-01

    Photospheric and chromospheric signatures related to large, energetic transients such as flares and CMEs, have been extensively reported during the last several years. In addition, energetic solar transients are expected to cause helioseismic effects. Some of the recent results are reviewed here; in particular, the helioseismic effects of the powerful flares in superactive region, NOAA 10486, including the 4B/X17 superflare of October 28, 2003. We also examine the temporal variations of power in low- modes during the period May 1995–October 2005, and compare with daily, disk-integrated flare- and CME-indices to infer the effect of transients on the scale of whole solar disk.

  13. Electromagnetic transients in power cables

    CERN Document Server

    da Silva, Filipe Faria

    2013-01-01

    From the more basic concepts to the most advanced ones where long and laborious simulation models are required, Electromagnetic Transients in Power Cables provides a thorough insight into the study of electromagnetic transients and underground power cables. Explanations and demonstrations of different electromagnetic transient phenomena are provided, from simple lumped-parameter circuits to complex cable-based high voltage networks, as well as instructions on how to model the cables.Supported throughout by illustrations, circuit diagrams and simulation results, each chapter contains exercises,

  14. SPIRITS: SPitzer InfraRed Intensive Transients Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasliwal, Mansi; Cao, Yi; Surace, Jason; Helou, George; Williams, Robert; Kulkarni, Shri; Smith, Nathan; Armus, Lee; Bond, Howard; Cantiello, Matteo; Gehrz, Robert; Kobulnicky, Chip; Langer, Norbert; Levesque, Emily; Masci, Frank; Mohamed, Shazrene; Ofek, Eran; Parthasarathy, Mudumba; Tang, Sumin; van Dyk, Schuyler; Whitelock, Patricia

    2013-10-01

    The dynamic mid-infrared sky is hitherto largely unexplored. We propose the SPitzer InfraRed Intensive Transients Survey (SPIRITS) --- a systematic search of 242 nearby galaxies within 20 Mpc, on timescales ranging between a day to a year, to a depth of 20 mag. In preparation for SPIRITS, we undertook three pilot programs: searching the WISE data stream for variables in nearby galaxies, mining the Spitzer Heritage Archive, and Spitzer follow-up of optically discovered transients. Our results are encouraging and motivate our design of SPIRITS to fill in missing pieces in our understanding of the end points of stellar evolution. We expect to discover explosive transients (ILRT, LRN, CNe, SNe), eruptive variables (LBV, RSG, YSG, AGB, RSG) and possibly new phenomena. SPIRITS will be the definitive study to ascertain the rate and origin of two new classes of red gap transients, quantify the contribution of classical novae to galactic chemical evolution and uncover supernovae buried in starbursts. SPIRITS will also systematically probe mass loss rates and dust formation in the most massive stars. SPIRITS will yield a census of supergiant variability and asymptotic giant branch variability in diverse galaxy environments. SPIRITS will likely discover the first extragalactic 'Born Again Giant' stars. The SPIRITS team is committed to a concomitant ground-based NIR and optical survey and extensive, panchromatic follow-up: 110 nights of near-IR imaging, 66 nights of optical imaging and 60 nights of spectroscopy annually. Follow-up will serve to maximize the discovery potential of our requested 994 hrs of Spitzer/IRAC observing time. We believe it is time that the Spitzer Great Observatory add another time-domain jewel in its crown.

  15. The agile alert system for gamma-ray transients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bulgarelli, A.; Trifoglio, M.; Gianotti, F.; Fioretti, V. [INAF/IASF-Bologna, Via Gobetti 101, I-40129 Bologna (Italy); Tavani, M.; Argan, A.; Trois, A.; Scalise, E. [INAF/IASF-Roma, Via del Fosso del Cavaliere 100, I-00133 Roma (Italy); Parmiggiani, N.; Beneventano, D. [University of Modena and Reggio Emilia, Dipartimento di Science e Metodi dell' Ingegneria (Italy); Chen, A. W. [INAF/IASF-Milano, Via E. Bassini 15, I-20133 Milano (Italy); Vercellone, S. [School of Physics, University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg Wits 2050 (South Africa); Pittori, C.; Verrecchia, F.; Lucarelli, F.; Santolamazza, P.; Fanari, G.; Giommi, P. [INAF/IASF-Palermo, Via U. La Malfa 153, I-90146 Palermo (Italy); Longo, F. [ASI-ASDC, Via G. Galilei, I-00044 Frascati (Roma) (Italy); Pellizzoni, A. [INFN Trieste, I-34127 Trieste (Italy); and others

    2014-01-20

    In recent years, a new generation of space missions has offered great opportunities for discovery in high-energy astrophysics. In this article we focus on the scientific operations of the Gamma-Ray Imaging Detector (GRID) on board the AGILE space mission. AGILE-GRID, sensitive in the energy range of 30 MeV-30 GeV, has detected many γ-ray transients of both galactic and extragalactic origin. This work presents the AGILE innovative approach to fast γ-ray transient detection, which is a challenging task and a crucial part of the AGILE scientific program. The goals are to describe (1) the AGILE Gamma-Ray Alert System, (2) a new algorithm for blind search identification of transients within a short processing time, (3) the AGILE procedure for γ-ray transient alert management, and (4) the likelihood of ratio tests that are necessary to evaluate the post-trial statistical significance of the results. Special algorithms and an optimized sequence of tasks are necessary to reach our goal. Data are automatically analyzed at every orbital downlink by an alert pipeline operating on different timescales. As proper flux thresholds are exceeded, alerts are automatically generated and sent as SMS messages to cellular telephones, via e-mail, and via push notifications from an application for smartphones and tablets. These alerts are crosschecked with the results of two pipelines, and a manual analysis is performed. Being a small scientific-class mission, AGILE is characterized by optimization of both scientific analysis and ground-segment resources. The system is capable of generating alerts within two to three hours of a data downlink, an unprecedented reaction time in γ-ray astrophysics.

  16. The AGILE Alert System for Gamma-Ray Transients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bulgarelli, A.; Trifoglio, M.; Gianotti, F.; Tavani, M.; Parmiggiani, N.; Fioretti, V.; Chen, A. W.; Vercellone, S.; Pittori, C.; Verrecchia, F.; Lucarelli, F.; Santolamazza, P.; Fanari, G.; Giommi, P.; Beneventano, D.; Argan, A.; Trois, A.; Scalise, E.; Longo, F.; Pellizzoni, A.; Pucella, G.; Colafrancesco, S.; Conforti, V.; Tempesta, P.; Cerone, M.; Sabatini, P.; Annoni, G.; Valentini, G.; Salotti, L.

    2014-01-01

    In recent years, a new generation of space missions has offered great opportunities for discovery in high-energy astrophysics. In this article we focus on the scientific operations of the Gamma-Ray Imaging Detector (GRID) on board the AGILE space mission. AGILE-GRID, sensitive in the energy range of 30 MeV-30 GeV, has detected many γ-ray transients of both galactic and extragalactic origin. This work presents the AGILE innovative approach to fast γ-ray transient detection, which is a challenging task and a crucial part of the AGILE scientific program. The goals are to describe (1) the AGILE Gamma-Ray Alert System, (2) a new algorithm for blind search identification of transients within a short processing time, (3) the AGILE procedure for γ-ray transient alert management, and (4) the likelihood of ratio tests that are necessary to evaluate the post-trial statistical significance of the results. Special algorithms and an optimized sequence of tasks are necessary to reach our goal. Data are automatically analyzed at every orbital downlink by an alert pipeline operating on different timescales. As proper flux thresholds are exceeded, alerts are automatically generated and sent as SMS messages to cellular telephones, via e-mail, and via push notifications from an application for smartphones and tablets. These alerts are crosschecked with the results of two pipelines, and a manual analysis is performed. Being a small scientific-class mission, AGILE is characterized by optimization of both scientific analysis and ground-segment resources. The system is capable of generating alerts within two to three hours of a data downlink, an unprecedented reaction time in γ-ray astrophysics.

  17. The Pierre Auger Observatory scaler mode for the study of solar activity modulation of galactic cosmic rays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abreu, P.; /Lisbon, LIFEP /Lisbon, IST; Aglietta, M.; /Turin Observ. /Turin U. /INFN, Turin; Ahn, E.J.; /Fermilab; Allard, D.; /APC, Paris; Allekotte, I.; /Centro Atomico Bariloche /Balseiro Inst., San Carlos de Bariloche; Allen, J.; /New York U.; Alvarez Castillo, J.; /Mexico U.; Alvarez-Muniz, J.; /Santiago de Compostela U.; Ambrosio, M.; /Naples U. /INFN, Naples; Aminaei, A.; /Nijmegen U., IMAPP; Anchordoqui, L.; /Wisconsin U., Milwaukee /Lisbon, LIFEP /Lisbon, IST

    2011-01-01

    Since data-taking began in January 2004, the Pierre Auger Observatory has been recording the count rates of low energy secondary cosmic ray particles for the self-calibration of the ground detectors of its surface detector array. After correcting for atmospheric effects, modulations of galactic cosmic rays due to solar activity and transient events are observed. Temporal variations related with the activity of the heliosphere can be determined with high accuracy due to the high total count rates. In this study, the available data are presented together with an analysis focused on the observation of Forbush decreases, where a strong correlation with neutron monitor data is found.

  18. The Pierre Auger Observatory scaler mode for the study of solar activity modulation of galactic cosmic rays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2011-01-15

    Since data-taking began in January 2004, the Pierre Auger Observatory has been recording the count rates of low energy secondary cosmic ray particles for the self-calibration of the ground detectors of its surface detector array. After correcting for atmospheric effects, modulations of galactic cosmic rays due to solar activity and transient events are observed. Temporal variations related with the activity of the heliosphere can be determined with high accuracy due to the high total count rates. In this study, the available data are presented together with an analysis focused on the observation of Forbush decreases, where a strong correlation with neutron monitor data is found.

  19. A Complete Survey of the Transient Radio Sky and Implications for Gamma-Ray Bursts, Supernovae, and other Relativistic Explosions

    CERN Document Server

    Gal-Yam, A; Poznanski, D; Levinson, A; Waxman, E; Frail, D A; Soderberg, A M; Nakar, E; Li, W; Filippenko, A V; Gal-Yam, Avishay; Ofek, Eran O.; Poznanski, Dovi; Levinson, Amir; Waxman, Eli; Frail, Dale A.; Soderberg, Alicia M.; Nakar, Ehud; Li, Weidong; Filippenko, Alexei V.

    2006-01-01

    We had previously reported on a survey for radio transients, used to set an upper limit on the number of orphan gamma-ray burst (GRB) radio afterglows, and thus a lower limit on the typical GRB beaming factor. Here we report radio and optical follow-up observations of these possible transients, achieving the first full characterization of the transient radio sky. We find that only two source are likely to be real radio transients, an optically obscured radio supernova (SN) in the nearby galaxy NGC 4216, and a source not associated with a bright host galaxy, which is too radio luminous to be a GRB afterglow. We speculate that this may be a flare from a peculiar active galactic nucleus, or a burst from an unusual Galactic compact object. We place an upper limit of 65 radio transients above 6 mJy over the entire sky at the 95% confidence level. The implications are as follows. First, we derive a limit on the typical beaming of GRBs; we find f_b^{-1} >~ 60, ~5 times higher than our earlier results. Second, we imp...

  20. Transient or permanent fisheye views

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, Mikkel Rønne; Hornbæk, Kasper

    2012-01-01

    , about the benefits and limitations of transient visualizations. We describe an experiment that compares the usability of a fisheye view that participants could call up temporarily, a permanent fisheye view, and a linear view: all interfaces gave access to source code in the editor of a widespread......Transient use of information visualization may support specific tasks without permanently changing the user interface. Transient visualizations provide immediate and transient use of information visualization close to and in the context of the user’s focus of attention. Little is known, however...... programming environment. Fourteen participants performed varied tasks involving navigation and understanding of source code. Participants used the three interfaces for between four and six hours in all. Time and accuracy measures were inconclusive, but subjective data showed a preference for the permanent...

  1. Transient heating of moving objects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E.I. Baida

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available A mathematical model of transient and quasistatic heating of moving objects by various heat sources is considered. The mathematical formulation of the problem is described, examples of thermal calculation given.

  2. Neutrinos: Fast & Curious

    CERN Document Server

    Barenboim, Gabriela

    2016-01-01

    The Standard Model has been effective way beyond expectations in foreseeing the result of almost all the experimental tests done up so far. In it, neutrinos are massless. Nonetheless, in recent years we have collected solid proofs indicating little but non zero masses for the neutrinos (when contrasted with those of the charged leptons). These masses permit neutrinos to change their flavor and oscillate, indeed a unique treat. In these lectures, I discuss the properties and the amazing potential of neutrinos in and beyond the Standard Model.

  3. Cosmology for the curious

    CERN Document Server

    Perlov, Delia

    2017-01-01

    This book is an introductory text for all those wishing to learn about modern views of the cosmos. Our universe originated in a great explosion – the big bang. For nearly a century cosmologists have studied the aftermath of this explosion: how the universe expanded and cooled down, and how galaxies were gradually assembled by gravity. The nature of the bang itself has come into focus only relatively recently. It is the subject of the theory of cosmic inflation, which was developed in the last few decades and has led to a radically new global view of the universe. Students and other interested readers will find here a non-technical but conceptually rigorous account of modern cosmological ideas - describing what we know, and how we know it. One of the book's central themes is the scientific quest to find answers to the ultimate cosmic questions: Is the universe finite or infinite? Has it existed forever? If not, when and how did it come into being? Will it ever end? The book is based on the undergraduate cour...

  4. Curious Repetitions in Magnetars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Archibald, Robert

    2016-07-01

    Magnetars, the slowly spinning branch of the pulsar family with extremely high inferred dipole magnetic fields, often display bizarre spin behaviour rarely seen in their more typical rotation-powered cousins. In this talk, I will tell a tale of two magnetars, 1E 1048.1-5937 and 4U 0142+61 -- both of which seem to be repeating themselves. 1E 1048.1-5937 has, three times, shown flux increases of a factor of ~3 which which decayed over hundreds of days, followed months later by unique order of magnitude torque oscillations. 4U 0142+61, on the other hand, has displayed only short-term, i.e. minutes long, flux increases. In 2006, and now again in 2014, 4U 0142+61 has had typical 1E-7 Hz spin-up glitches which then over-recover on a timescale of weeks, leading to a net spin-down event associated with these short-term flux increases. Both of these sources seem to display a coupling between their X-ray flux and spin-down, but at vastly different timescales. By comparing these repeating events, we will try to shed some new light on the physics driving these extreme objects.

  5. Understanding the kinematics of Galactic centre gas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Binney, James; Gerhard, Ortwin E.; Stark, Antony A.; Bally, John; Uchida, Keven I.

    1991-09-01

    A coherent picture is constructed of the Galaxy's H I, CO and CS emissions in the region l below 10 deg, b below 0.5 deg. The flow of gas at the Galactic center is dominated by a bar that has corotation at r = 2.4 + or - 0.5 kpc, which is viewed at an angle of 16 + or - 2 deg from its major axis. The first CO emission arises where gas is obliged to switch from x(1) orbits to x(2) orbits, in the notation of Contopoulos. This gives rise to a shock and a clear signature in the (l, v) diagram. The great Galactic center molecular clouds such as Sgr B, are on x(2) orbits. From the structure of the H I terminal velocity envelope, it is deduced that the central mass density scales as rho varies with r to the -1.75 power out to at least about 1.2 kpc along the bar's major axis. Consequently, the circular velocity curve is rising significantly through the radius range where naive analysis of the tangent velocity leads to a falling rotation curve. The great ring of molecular material at r of about 3.5 kpc is probably associated with the bar's outer Lindblad resonance, and the region of low gas densities inward from there with corotation.

  6. Galactic cannibalism and CDM density profiles

    CERN Document Server

    Nipoti, C; Ciotti, L; Stiavelli, M

    2004-01-01

    Using N-body simulations we show that the process of formation of the brightest cluster galaxy through dissipationless galactic cannibalism can affect the inner cluster dark matter density profile. In particular, we use as realistic test case the dynamical evolution of the galaxy cluster C0337-2522 at redshift z=0.59, hosting in its centre a group of five elliptical galaxies which are likely to be the progenitor of a central giant elliptical. After the formation of the brightest cluster galaxy, the inner cluster dark matter density profile is significantly flatter (logarithmic slope 0.48galactic cannibalism could be a viable physical mechanism to reconcile - at least at the cluster scale - the flat dark matter haloes inferred observationally in some galaxy clusters with the steep haloes predicted by cosmological simulations.

  7. A New Galactic Center Composite Supernova Remnant?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denn, G. R.; Hyman, S. D.; Lazio, T. J. W.; Kassim, N. E.

    2001-12-01

    We report the possible radio detection of a new supernova remnant located only 1 degree east of the Galactic center. The SNR candidate has both a shell and a core component on 6, 20, and 90 cm VLA images. Preliminary measurements indicate that both components have steep spectra between 6 and 20 cm, and that the spectra flatten and become inverted between 20 and 90 cm, due likely to significant free-free absorption. The source may be a composite-type SNR, which constitute only 10% of known SNRS, and which consist of a steep-spectrum radio shell corresponding to expanding debris from the supernova and a flatter spectrum, significantly polarized, core component corresponding to a central neutron star. Further radio and X-ray observations are planned in order to definitively identify this source. The detection of additional SNRs in or near the Galactic center will help place constraints on the star formation rate in this region, and may also provide clues about the GC environment. This research is supported by funding from the Sweet Briar College Faculty Grants program. Basic research in radio astronomy at NRL is supported by the Office of Naval Research.

  8. A Hadronic Scenario for the Galactic Ridge

    CERN Document Server

    Gaggero, Daniele; Marinelli, Antonio; Urbano, Alfredo; Valli, Mauro

    2015-01-01

    Several observations from Fermi-LAT, up to few hundred GeV, and from H.E.S.S., up to $\\sim$ 10 TeV, reported an intense $\\gamma$-ray emission from the inner part of the Galactic plane. After the subtraction of point-like contributions, the remaining $\\gamma$-ray spectrum can provide important hints about the cosmic-ray (CR) population in that region. In particular, the diffuse spectrum measured by both Fermi-LAT and H.E.S.S. in the Galactic Ridge is significantly harder with respect to the rest of the Galaxy. These results were recently interpreted in terms of a comprehensive CR transport model which, adopting a spatial dependent diffusion coefficient and convective velocity, reproduces Fermi-LAT results on the whole sky as well as local CR spectra. We showed as that model predicts a significantly harder neutrino diffuse emission compared to conventional scenarios: The predicted signal is able to account for a significant fraction of the astrophysical flux measured by IceCube. In this contribution, we use the...

  9. On the Physical Origin of Galactic Conformity

    CERN Document Server

    Hearin, Andrew P; Bosch, Frank C van den

    2015-01-01

    Correlations between the star formation rates (SFRs) of nearby galaxies (so-called galactic conformity) have been observed for projected separations up to 4 Mpc, an effect not predicted by current semi-analytic models. We investigate correlations between the mass accretion rates (dMvir/dt) of nearby halos as a potential physical origin for this effect. We find that pairs of host halos "know about" each others' assembly histories even when their present-day separation is greater than thirty times the virial radius of either halo. These distances are far too large for direct interaction between the halos to explain the correlation in their dMvir/dt. Instead, halo pairs at these distances reside in the same large-scale tidal environment, which regulates dMvir/dt for both halos. Larger halos are less affected by external forces, which naturally gives rise to a mass dependence of the halo conformity signal. SDSS measurements of galactic conformity exhibit a qualitatively similar dependence on stellar mass, includi...

  10. The Galactic Distribution of Contact Eclipsing Binaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castelaz, Michael W.; Dorn, Leah; Breitfeld, Abby; Mies, Regan; Avery, Tess

    2017-01-01

    The number of eclipsing contact binaries in different galactic latitudes and longitudes show peak distributions in the number per square degree in two latitudinal zones (-30 degrees to -25 degrees and +25 degrees to +30 degrees) and large fluctuations in longitude (Huang and Wade 1966, ApJ, 143, 146). Semi-detached or detached binaries are largely concentrated in the galactic plane as shown by Paczynski et al. (MNRAS, 368, 1311), different from the distribution of contact eclipsing binaries. The differences in distributions of different types of eclipsing binaries may be related to either distances or interstellar reddening. We will present a method to calculate photometric distances of W Urase Majoris systems (W UMa; used as a proxy for contact binaries) from 2MASS J and K magnitudes and interstellar reddening models (Schlafly and Finkbeiner 2011, ApJ. 737, 103). We compare the distances to those calculated from the period-luminosity-color relationship described by Rucinski (2004, NewAR, 48, 703). The W UMa systems are taken from the General Catalog of Variable Stars.

  11. A Radio Characterization of Galactic compact Bubbles

    CERN Document Server

    Ingallinera, Adriano; Umana, Grazia; Leto, Paolo; Noriega-Crespo, Alberto; Flagey, Nicolas; Paladini, Roberta; Agliozzo, Claudia; Buemi, Carla

    2013-01-01

    We report the radio observations of a sub-sample of the 428 galactic compact bubbles discovered at 24 $\\mu$m with the MIPSGAL survey. Pervasive through the entire Galactic plane, these objects are thought to be different kinds of evolved stars. The very large majority of the bubbles (~ 70%) are however not yet classified. We conducted radio observations with the EVLA at 6 cm and 20 cm in order to obtain the spectral index of 55 bubbles. We found that at least 70 per cent of the 31 bubbles for which we were effectively able to compute the spectral index (or its lower limit) are likely to be thermal emitters. We were also able to resolve some bubbles, obtaining that the size of the radio nebula is usually similar to the IR size, although our low resolution (with respect to IR images) did not allow further morphological studies. Comparisons between radio flux densities and IR archive data from Spitzer and IRAS suggest that at least 3 unclassified bubbles can be treated as planetary nebula candidates.

  12. Superbubbles, Galactic Dynamos and the Spike Instability

    CERN Document Server

    Kulsrud, Russell M

    2015-01-01

    We draw attention to a problem with the alpha-Omega dynamo when it is applied to the origin of the galactic magnetic field under the assumption of perfect flux freezing. The standard theory involves the expulsion of undesirable flux and, because of flux freezing, the mass anchored on this flux also must be expelled. The strong galactic gravitational field makes this impossible on energetic grounds. It is shown that if only short pieces of the undesirable field lines are expelled, then mass can flow down along these field lines without requiring much energy. This expulsion of only short lines of force can be accomplished by a spike instability associated with gigantic astrophysical superbubbles. The physics of this instability is discussed and the results enable an estimate to be made of the number of spikes in the galaxy. It appears that there are probably enough spikes to cut all the undesirable lines into pieces as short as a couple of kiloparsecs during a dynamo time of a billion years. These cut pieces th...

  13. Inhomogeneous chemical enrichment in the Galactic Halo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Chiaki

    2016-08-01

    In a galaxy, chemical enrichment takes place in an inhomogeneous fashion, and the Galactic Halo is one of the places where the inhomogeneous effects are imprinted and can be constrained from observations. I show this using my chemodynamical simulations of Milky Way type galaxies. The scatter in the elemental abundances originate from radial migration, merging/accretion of satellite galaxies, local variation of star formation and chemical enrichment, and intrinsic variation of nucleosynthesis yields. In the simulated galaxies, there is no strong age-metallicity relation. This means that the most metal-poor stars are not always the oldest stars, and can be formed in chemically unevolved clouds at later times. The long-lifetime sources of chemical enrichment such as asymptotic giant branch stars or neutron star mergers can contribute at low metallicities. The intrinsic variation of yields are important in the early Universe or metal-poor systems such as in the Galactic halo. The carbon enhancement of extremely metal-poor (EMP) stars can be best explained by faint supernovae, the low [α/Fe] ratios in some EMP stars naturally arise from low-mass (~ 13 - 15M ⊙) supernovae, and finally, the [α/Fe] knee in dwarf spheroidal galaxies can be produced by subclasses of Type Ia supernovae such as SN 2002cx-like objects and sub-Chandrasekhar mass explosions.

  14. Planck 2013 results. XIII. Galactic CO emission

    CERN Document Server

    Ade, P A R; Alves, M.I.R.; Armitage-Caplan, C.; Arnaud, M.; Ashdown, M.; Atrio-Barandela, F.; Aumont, J.; Baccigaluppi, C.; Banday, A.J.; Barreiro, R.B.; Bartlett, J.G.; Battaner, E.; Benabed, K.; Benoit, A.; Benoit-Levy, A.; Bernard, J. -P.; Bersanelli, M.; Bielewicz, P.; Bobin, J.; Bock, J.J.; Bonaldi, A.; Bond, J.R.; Borrill, J.; Bouchet, F.R.; Boulanger, F.; Bridges, M.; Bucher, M.; Burigana, C.; Butler, R.C.; Cardoso, J. -F.; Catalano, A.; Chamballu, A.; Chary, R. -R.; Chen, X.; Chiang, L. -Y; Chiang, H.C.; Christensen, P.R.; Church, S.; Clements, D.L.; Colombi, S.; Colombo, L.P.L.; Combet, C.; Couchot, F.; Coulais, A.; Crill, B.P.; Curto, A.; Cuttaia, F.; Danese, L.; Davies, R.D.; de Bernardis, P.; de Rosa, A.; de Zotti, G.; Delabrouille, J.; Delouis, J. -M.; Dempsey, J.T.; Desert, F. -X.; Dickinson, C.; Diego, J.M.; Dole, H.; Donzelli, S.; Dore, O.; Douspis, M.; Dupac, X.; Efstathiou, G.; Enblin, T.A.; Eriksen, H.K.; Falgarone, E.; Finelli, F.; Forni, O.; Frailis, M.; Franceschi, E.; Fukui, Y.; Galeotta, S.; Ganga, K.; Giard, M.; Giraud-Heraud, Y.; Gonzalez-Nuevo, J.; Gorski, K.M.; Gratton, S.; Gregorio, A.; Gruppuso, A.; Handa, T.; Hansen, F.K.; Hanson, D.; Harrison, D.; Henrot-Versille, S.; Hernandez-Monteagudo, C.; Herranz, D.; Hildebrandt, S.R.; Hily-Blant, P.; Hivon, E.; Hobson, M.; Holmes, W.A.; Hornstrup, A.; Hovest, W.; Huffenberger, K.M.; Hurier, G.; Jaffe, T.R.; Jaffe, A.H.; Jewell, J.; Jones, W.C.; Juvela, M.; Keihanen, E.; Keskitalo, R.; Kisner, T.S.; Knoche, J.; Knox, L.; Kunz, M.; Kurki-Suonio, H.; Lagache, G.; Lahteenmaki, A.; Lamarre, J. -M.; Lasenby, A.; Laureijs, R.J.; Lawrence, C.R.; Leonardi, R.; Leon-Tavares, J.; Lesgourgues, J.; Liguori, M.; Lilje, P.B.; Linden-Vornle, M.; Lopez-Caniego, M.; Lubin, P.M.; Macias-Perez, J.F.; Maffei, B.; Mandolesi, N.; Maris, M.; Marshall, D.J.; Martin, P.G.; Martinez-Gonzalez, E.; Masi, S.; Matarrese, S.; Matthai, F.; Mazzotta, P.; McGehee, P.; Melchiorri, A.; Mendes, L.; Mennella, A.; Migliaccio, M.; Mitra, S.; Miville-Deschenes, M. -A.; Moneti, A.; Montier, L.; Moore, T.J.T.; Morgante, G.; Morino, J.; Mortlock, D.; Munshi, D.; Nakajima, T.; Naselsky, P.; Nati, F.; Natoli, P.; Netterfield, C.B.; Norgaard-Nielsen, H.U.; Noviello, F.; Novikov, D.; Novikov, I.; Okuda, T.; Osborne, S.; Oxborrow, C.A.; Paci, F.; Pagano, L.; Pajot, F.; Paladini, R.; Paoletti, D.; Pasian, F.; Patanchon, G.; Perdereau, O.; Perotto, L.; Perrotta, F.; Piacentini, F.; Piat, M.; Pierpaoli, E.; Pietrobon, D.; Plaszczynski, S.; Pointecouteau, E.; Polenta, G.; Ponthieu, N.; Popa, L.; Poutanen, T.; Pratt, G.W.; Preezeau, G.; Prunet, S.; Puget, J. -L.; Rachen, J.P.; Reach, W.T.; Rebolo, R.; Reinecke, M.; Remazeilles, M.; Renault, C.; Ricciardi, S.; Riller, T.; Ristorcelli, I.; Rocha, G.; Rosset, C.; Roudier, G.; Rowan-Robinson, M.; Rubino-Martin, J.A.; Rusholme, B.; Sandri, M.; Santos, D.; Savini, G.; Scott, D.; Seiffert, M.D.; Shellard, E.P.S.; Spencer, L.D.; Starck, J. -L.; Stolyarov, V.; Stompor, R.; Sudiwala, R.; Sunyaev, R.; Sureau, F.; Sutton, D.; Suur-Uski, A. -S.; Sygnet, J. -F.; Tauber, J.A.; Tavagnacco, D.; Terenzi, L.; Thomas, H.S.; Toffolatti, L.; Tomasi, M.; Torii, K.; Tristram, M.; Tucci, M.; Tuovinen, J.; Umana, G.; Valenziano, L.; Valiviita, J.; Van Tent, B.; Vielva, P.; Villa, F.; Vittorio, N.; Wade, L.A.; Wandelt, B.D.; Wehus, I.K.; Yoda, H. Yamamoto T.; Yvon, D.; Zacchei, A.; Zonca, A.

    2014-01-01

    Rotational transition lines of CO play a major role in molecular radio astronomy and in particular in the study of star formation and the Galactic structure. Although a wealth of data exists in the Galactic plane and some well-known molecular clouds, there is no available CO high sensitivity all-sky survey to date. Such all-sky surveys can be constructed using the \\Planck\\ HFI data because the three lowest CO rotational transition lines at 115, 230 and 345 GHz significantly contribute to the signal of the 100, 217 and 353 GHz HFI channels respectively. Two different component separation methods are used to extract the CO maps from Planck HFI data. The maps obtained are then compared to one another and to existing external CO surveys. From these quality checks the best CO maps in terms of signal to noise and/or residual foreground contamination are selected. Three sets of velocity-integrated CO emission maps are produced: Type 1 maps of the CO (1-0), (2-1), and (3-2) rotational transitions with low foreground ...

  15. Theoretical Models of the Galactic Bulge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Juntai; Li, Zhao-Yu

    Near infrared images from the COBE satellite presented the first clear evidence that our Milky Way galaxy contains a boxy shaped bulge. Recent years have witnessed a gradual paradigm shift in the formation and evolution of the Galactic bulge. Bulges were commonly believed to form in the dynamical violence of galaxy mergers. However, it has become increasingly clear that the main body of the Milky Way bulge is not a classical bulge made by previous major mergers, instead it appears to be a bar seen somewhat end-on. The Milky Way bar can form naturally from a precursor disc and thicken vertically by the internal firehose/buckling instability, giving rise to the boxy appearance. This picture is supported by many lines of evidence, including the asymmetric parallelogram shape, the strong cylindrical rotation (i.e., nearly constant rotation regardless of the height above the disc plane), the existence of an intriguing X-shaped structure in the bulge, and perhaps the metallicity gradients. We review the major theoretical models and techniques to understand the Milky Way bulge. Despite the progresses in recent theoretical attempts, a complete bulge formation model that explains the full kinematics and metallicity distribution is still not fully understood. Upcoming large surveys are expected to shed new light on the formation history of the Galactic bulge.

  16. Statistical Tests of Galactic Dynamo Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chamandy, Luke; Shukurov, Anvar; Taylor, A. Russ

    2016-12-01

    Mean-field galactic dynamo theory is the leading theory to explain the prevalence of regular magnetic fields in spiral galaxies, but its systematic comparison with observations is still incomplete and fragmentary. Here we compare predictions of mean-field dynamo models to observational data on magnetic pitch angle and the strength of the mean magnetic field. We demonstrate that a standard {α }2{{Ω }} dynamo model produces pitch angles of the regular magnetic fields of nearby galaxies that are reasonably consistent with available data. The dynamo estimates of the magnetic field strength are generally within a factor of a few of the observational values. Reasonable agreement between theoretical and observed pitch angles generally requires the turbulent correlation time τ to be in the range of 10-20 {Myr}, in agreement with standard estimates. Moreover, good agreement also requires that the ratio of the ionized gas scale height to root-mean-square turbulent velocity increases with radius. Our results thus widen the possibilities to constrain interstellar medium parameters using observations of magnetic fields. This work is a step toward systematic statistical tests of galactic dynamo theory. Such studies are becoming more and more feasible as larger data sets are acquired using current and up-and-coming instruments.

  17. Hydrodynamical description of Galactic dark matter

    CERN Document Server

    Cabral, L G; Sussman, R A; Matos, T

    2003-01-01

    We consider simple hydrodynamical models of galactic dark matter in which the galactic halo is a self-gravitating and self-interacting gas that dominates the dynamics of the galaxy. Modeling this halo as a sphericaly symmetric and static perfect fluid satisfying the field equations of General Relativity, visible barionic matter can be treated as 'test particles' in the geometry of this field. We show that the assumption of an empirical 'universal rotation curve' that fits a wide variety of galaxies is compatible, under suitable approximations, with state variables characteristic of a non-relativistic Maxwell-Boltzmann gas that becomes an isothermal sphere in the Newtonian limit. Consistency criteria lead to a minimal bound for particle masses in the range 30 eV < m < 60 eV and to a constraint between the central temperature and the particles mass. The allowed mass range includes popular supersymmetric particle candidates, such as the neutslino, axino and gravitino, as well as lighter particles (m - keV)...

  18. The Fingerprint of a Galactic Nucleus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nogueras-Lara, Francisco; Schödel, Rainer

    2017-01-01

    Because of the unique observational challenges -extreme crowding and extinction- any existing large-scale near-infrared (NIR) imaging data on the Galactic Center (GC) are limited by either one, or a combination, of the following: saturation, lack of sensitivity, too low angular resolution, or lack of multi-wavelength coverage. To overcome this situation, we are currently carrying out a sensitive, 0.2'' resolution JHK imaging survey of the Galactic Centre with HAWK-I/VLT. Thanks to holographic imaging, we achieve a similar resolution than with HST/WFC, but can cover also the long NIR, beyond 2 micrometers, which is essential to deal with extinction. Our survey is supported by an ESO Large Programme and will provide photometrically accurate (few percent uncertainty for H < 18 stars), high-angular resolution, NIR data for an area of several 1000 pc2, a more than ten-fold increase compared to the current state of affairs. Here we present an overview and first results.

  19. Extra-Galactic Diffuse Interstellar Bands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, N.; Ehrenfreund, Pascale; Kaper, Lex; Spaans, Marco; Foing, Bernard

    Diffuse Interstellar Bands (DIBs) have been observed ubiquitously along many sight-lines probing the interstellar medium of the Milky Way. Despite extensive efforts, their carrier(s) have not yet been identified, although they are very likely of a carbonaceous nature and reside in the gas phase. Possible candidates include, but are not limited to, polycyclic aromatic hydro- carbons (PAHs), fullerenes and carbon chains. To advance our understanding of DIB behaviour and thus DIB carrier properties we need to study environments inherently different from those observed in the Milky Way. Only recent advances in instrumentation and telescope capabilities are providing us with new exciting possibilities for extra-galactic DIB research. We present here a selection of our recent observational results for (extra)-galactic DIBs in the Local Group and beyond. In particular, DIBs in the Magellanic Clouds and in the spiral galaxy NGC1448. These first results show surprising similarities between certain DIB profiles as well as differences in DIB behaviour. Understanding diffuse cloud chemistry, in particular with respect to complex (carbonaceous) molecules, is crucial to any DIB carrier identification. In this respect, external galaxies offer a unique window as they exhibit local interstellar conditions (such as metallicity, UV-field and gas-to-dust ratio) very different from those observed in the Milky Way. We discuss briefly the effect of metallicity and the gas-to-dust ratio on the physi-chemical properties of diffuse clouds and the subsequent effects on the PAH charge state distribution and the DIB carriers.

  20. Cold Dark Matter Substructure and Galactic Disks

    CERN Document Server

    Kazantzidis, Stelios; Bullock, James S

    2008-01-01

    We perform a set of high-resolution, dissipationless N-body simulations to investigate the influence of cold dark matter (CDM) substructure on the dynamical evolution of thin galactic disks. Our method combines cosmological simulations of galaxy-sized CDM halos to derive the properties of substructure populations and controlled numerical experiments of consecutive subhalo impacts onto initially-thin, fully-formed disk galaxies. We demonstrate that close encounters between massive subhalos and galactic disks since z~1 should be common occurrences in LCDM models. In contrast, extremely few satellites in present-day CDM halos are likely to have a significant impact on the disk structure. One typical host halo merger history is used to seed controlled N-body experiments of subhalo-disk encounters. As a result of these accretion events, the disk thickens considerably at all radii with the disk scale height increasing in excess of a factor of 2 in the solar neighborhood. We show that interactions with the subhalo p...

  1. The WISE Catalog of Galactic HII Regions

    CERN Document Server

    Anderson, L D; Balser, Dana S; Cunningham, V; Wenger, T V; Johnstone, B M; Armentrout, W P

    2013-01-01

    Using data from the all-sky Wide-Field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE) satellite, we made a catalog of over 8000 Galactic HII regions and HII region candidates by searching for their characteristic mid-infrared (MIR) morphology. WISE has sufficient sensitivity to detect the MIR emission from HII regions located anywhere in the Galactic disk. We believe this is the most complete catalog yet of regions forming massive stars in the Milky Way. Of the ~8000 cataloged sources, ~1500 have measured radio recombination line (RRL) or H$\\alpha$ emission, and are thus known to be HII regions. This sample improves on previous efforts by resolving HII region complexes into multiple sources and by removing duplicate entries. There are ~2500 candidate HII regions in the catalog that are spatially coincident with radio continuum emission. Our group's previous RRL studies show that ~95% of such targets are HII regions. We find that ~500 of these candidates are also positionally associated with known HII region complexes, so th...

  2. Galactic rotation curves in brane world models

    CERN Document Server

    Gergely, L Á; Dwornik, M; Kupi, G; Keresztes, Z

    2011-01-01

    In the braneworld scenario the four dimensional effective Einstein equation has extra source terms, which arise from the embedding of the 3-brane in the bulk. These non-local effects, generated by the free gravitational field of the bulk, may provide an explanation for the dynamics of the neutral hydrogen clouds at large distances from the galactic center, which is usually explained by postulating the existence of the dark matter. In the present paper we consider the asymptotic behavior of the galactic rotation curves in the brane world models, and we compare the theoretical results with observations of both High Surface Brightness and Low Surface Brightness galaxies. For the chosen sample of galaxies we determine first the baryonic parameters by fitting the photometric data to the adopted galaxy model; then we test the hypothesis of the Weyl fluid acting as dark matter on the chosen sample of spiral galaxies by fitting the tangential velocity equation of the combined baryonic-Weyl model to the rotation curve...

  3. Shape parameters of Galactic open clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Kharchenko, N V; Petrov, M I; Piskunov, A E; Röser, S; Schilbach, E; Scholz, R -D

    2008-01-01

    (abridged) In this paper we derive observed and modelled shape parameters (apparent ellipticity and orientation of the ellipse) of 650 Galactic open clusters identified in the ASCC-2.5 catalogue. We provide the observed shape parameters of Galactic open clusters, computed with the help of a multi-component analysis. For the vast majority of clusters these parameters are determined for the first time. High resolution ("star by star") N-body simulations are carried out with the specially developed $\\phi$GRAPE code providing models of clusters of different initial masses, Galactocentric distances and rotation velocities. The comparison of models and observations of about 150 clusters reveals ellipticities of observed clusters which are too low (0.2 vs. 0.3), and offers the basis to find the main reason for this discrepancy. The models predict that after $\\approx 50$ Myr clusters reach an oblate shape with an axes ratio of $1.65:1.35:1$, and with the major axis tilted by an angle of $q_{XY} \\approx 30^\\circ$ with...

  4. Radio polarimetry of Galactic centre pulsars

    CERN Document Server

    Schnitzeler, D H F M; Ferrière, K; Kramer, M; Lee, K J; Noutsos, A; Shannon, R M

    2016-01-01

    To study the strength and structure of the magnetic field in the Galactic centre (GC) we measured Faraday rotation of the radio emission of pulsars which are seen towards the GC. Three of these pulsars have the largest rotation measures (RMs) observed in any Galactic object with the exception of Sgr A*. Their large dispersion measures, RMs and the large RM variation between these pulsars and other known objects in the GC implies that the pulsars lie in the GC and are not merely seen in projection towards the GC. The large RMs of these pulsars indicate large line-of-sight magnetic field components between ~ 16-33 microgauss; combined with recent model predictions for the strength of the magnetic field in the GC this implies that the large-scale magnetic field has a very small inclination angle with respect to the plane of the sky (~ 12 degrees). Foreground objects like the Radio Arc or possibly an ablated, ionized halo around the molecular cloud G0.11-0.11 could contribute to the large RMs of two of the pulsar...

  5. XTE J1739-302 An Unusual New X-ray Transient

    CERN Document Server

    Smith, D M; Marshall, F; Swank, J H; Heindl, W A; Leventhal, M; in 't Zand, J J M; Heise, J

    1998-01-01

    A new x-ray transient, designated XTE J1739-302, was discovered with the Proportional Counter Array (PCA) on the Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer (RXTE) in data from 12 August 1997. Although it was the brightest source in the Galactic Center region while active (about 3.0 x 10^-9 ergs/cm2/s from 2 to 25 keV), it was only observed on that one day; it was not detectable nine days earlier or two days later. There is no known counterpart at other wavelengths, and its proximity to the Galactic Center will make such an identification difficult due to source confusion and extinction. The x-ray spectrum and intensity suggest a giant outburst of a Be/neutron star binary, although no pulsations were observed and the outburst was shorter than is usual from these systems.

  6. Three-Dimensional Evolution of the Galactic Fountain

    CERN Document Server

    D'Avillez, M A

    1999-01-01

    Gas that escapes from the Galactic disk, rises into the halo, cools and falls back, constitutes a "Galactic Fountain". Three-Dimensional simulations show that such a fountain model reproduces many of the features that have been observed in the Galaxy and other galaxies such as M31 and M33. Here, these results are reported.

  7. AN ABSENCE OF FAST RADIO BURSTS AT INTERMEDIATE GALACTIC LATITUDES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petroff, E.; Van Straten, W.; Bailes, M.; Barr, E. D.; Coster, P.; Flynn, C.; Keane, E. F. [Centre for Astrophysics and Supercomputing, Swinburne University of Technology, P.O. Box 218, Hawthorn, VIC 3122 (Australia); Johnston, S. [CSIRO Astronomy and Space Science, Australia Telescope National Facility, P.O. Box 76, Epping, NSW 1710 (Australia); Bates, S. D.; Keith, M. J.; Kramer, M.; Stappers, B. W. [Jodrell Bank Centre for Astrophysics, University of Manchester, Alan Turing Building, Oxford Road, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom); Bhat, N. D. R. [ARC Centre of Excellence for All-sky Astrophysics (CAASTRO), 44 Rosehill Street, Redfern, NSW 2016 (Australia); Burgay, M.; Possenti, A.; Tiburzi, C. [INAF—Osservatorio Astronomico di Cagliari, Via della Scienza, I-09047 Selargius (Italy); Burke-Spolaor, S. [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, 4800 Oak Grove Drive, Pasadena, CA 91104 (United States); Champion, D.; Ng, C. [Max Planck Institut für Radioastronomie, Auf dem Hügel 69, D-53121 Bonn (Germany); Levin, L., E-mail: epetroff@astro.swin.edu.au [Department of Physics, West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV 26506 (United States); and others

    2014-07-10

    Fast radio bursts (FRBs) are an emerging class of bright, highly dispersed radio pulses. Recent work by Thornton et al. has revealed a population of FRBs in the High Time Resolution Universe (HTRU) survey at high Galactic latitudes. A variety of progenitors have been proposed, including cataclysmic events at cosmological distances, Galactic flare stars, and terrestrial radio frequency interference. Here we report on a search for FRBs at intermediate Galactic latitudes (–15° Galactic models—must be included to ease the discrepancy between the detection rates at high and low Galactic latitudes. A revised rate estimate or another strong and heretofore unknown selection effect in Galactic latitude would provide closer agreement between the surveys' detection rates. The dearth of detections at low Galactic latitude disfavors a Galactic origin for these bursts.

  8. A note on periodicity of long-term variations of optical continuum in active galactic nuclei

    CERN Document Server

    Lu, Kai-Xing; Bi, Shao-Lan; Wang, Jian-Min

    2016-01-01

    Graham et al. found a sample of active galactic nuclei (AGNs) and quasars from the Catalina Real-time Transient Survey (CRTS) that have long-term periodic variations in optical continuum, the nature of the periodicity remains uncertain. We investigate the periodic variability characteristics of the sample by testing the relations of the observed variability periods with AGN optical luminosity, black hole mass and accretion rates, and find no significant correlations. We also test the observed periods in several different aspects related to accretion disks surrounding single black holes, such as the Keplerian rotational periods of 5100~\\AA\\ photon-emission regions and self-gravity dominated regions and the precessing period of warped disks. These tests shed new lights on understanding AGN variability in general. Under the assumption that the periodic behavior is associated with SMBHB systems in particular, we compare the separations ($\\mathscr{D}_{\\bullet}$) against characteristic radii of broad-line regions (...

  9. On the Galactic Spiral Arms Nature as revealed by rotation frequencies

    CERN Document Server

    Roca-Fàbrega, Santi; Figueras, Francesca; Romero-Gómez, Mercè; Velázquez, Hector; Antoja, Teresa; Pichardo, Bárbara

    2013-01-01

    High resolution N-body simulations using different codes and initial condition techniques reveal two different behaviours for the rotation frequency of transient spiral arms like structures. Whereas unbarred disks present spiral arms nearly corotatingwith disk particles, strong barred models (bulged or bulge-less) quickly develop a bar-spiral structure dominant in density, with a pattern speed almost constant in radius. As the bar strength decreases the arm departs from bar rigid rotation and behaves similar to the unbarred case. In strong barred models we detect in the frequency space other subdominant and slower modes at large radii, in agreement with previous studies, however we also detect them in the configuration space. We propose that the distinctive behaviour of the dominant spiral modes can be exploited in order to constraint the nature of Galactic spiral arms by the astrometric survey GAIA and by 2-D spectroscopic surveys like CALIFA and MANGA in external galaxies.

  10. Gaia transient detection efficiency: hunting for nuclear transients

    CERN Document Server

    Blagorodnova, Nadejda; Harrison, Diana L; Koposov, Sergey; Mattila, Seppo; Campbell, Heather; Walton, Nicholas A; Wyrzykowski, Lukasz

    2015-01-01

    We present a study of the detectability of transient events associated with galaxies for the Gaia European Space Agency astrometric mission. We simulated the on-board detections, and on-ground processing for a mock galaxy catalogue to establish the properties required for the discovery of transient events by Gaia, specifically tidal disruption events (TDEs) and supernovae (SNe). Transients may either be discovered by the on-board detection of a new source or by the brightening of a previously known source. We show that Gaia transients can be identified as new detections on-board for offsets from the host galaxy nucleus of 0.1--0.5,arcsec, depending on magnitude and scanning angle. The Gaia detection system shows no significant loss of SNe at close radial distances to the nucleus. We used the detection efficiencies to predict the number of transients events discovered by Gaia. For a limiting magnitude of 19, we expect around 1300 SNe per year: 65% SN Ia, 28% SN II and 7% SN Ibc, and ~20 TDEs per year.

  11. Starbursts Lessons for the Origin and Evolution of Galaxies and the Inter-Galactic Medium

    CERN Document Server

    Heckman, T M

    1997-01-01

    Starbursts are episodes of intense star-formation that occur in the central regions of galaxies, and dominate the integrated emission from the galaxy. They are a significant component of the present- day universe, being the site of for testing our ideas about star-formation, the evolution of high-mass stars, and the physics of the interstellar medium. They serve as local analogs of the processes that were important in the origin and early evolution of galaxies and in the heating and chemical enrichment of the inter-galactic medium. In this contribution I review starbursts from this broad cosmogonical perspective, stressing several key lessons we have learned from starbursts: 1) Violent, transient events play a significant role in the origin and evolution of galaxies. 2) Galaxies do not evolve as `Island Universes': starbursts are triggered by galaxy interactions and produce outflows of hot chemically-enriched gas that `pollute' the inter- galactic medium. 3) Dust dramatically affects of view of high-mass star...

  12. Search for gamma-ray transients using the SMM spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Share, G. H.; Harris, M. J.; Leising, M. D.; Messina, D. C.

    1993-01-01

    Observations for transient radiation made by the Gamma Ray Spectrometer on the SMM satellite are summarized. Spectra were obtained from 215 solar flares and 177 gamma-ray bursts. No narrow or moderately broadened lines were observed in any of the bursts. The rate of bursts is consistent with a constant over the mission but is weakly correlated with solar activity. No evidence was found for bursts of 511 keV line emission, unaccompanied by a strong continuum, at levels not less than 0.05 gamma/sq cm s for bursts lasting not more than 16 s. No evidence was found for broad features near 1 MeV from Cyg X-1, the Galactic center, or the Crab in 12-d integrations at levels not less than 0.006 gamma/sq cm s. No evidence was found for transient celestial narrow-line emission from 300 keV to 7 MeV on min-to-hrs-long time scales from 1984 to 1989.

  13. Recent development of transient electronics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huanyu Cheng

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Transient electronics are an emerging class of electronics with the unique characteristic to completely dissolve within a programmed period of time. Since no harmful byproducts are released, these electronics can be used in the human body as a diagnostic tool, for instance, or they can be used as environmentally friendly alternatives to existing electronics which disintegrate when exposed to water. Thus, the most crucial aspect of transient electronics is their ability to disintegrate in a practical manner and a review of the literature on this topic is essential for understanding the current capabilities of transient electronics and areas of future research. In the past, only partial dissolution of transient electronics was possible, however, total dissolution has been achieved with a recent discovery that silicon nanomembrane undergoes hydrolysis. The use of single- and multi-layered structures has also been explored as a way to extend the lifetime of the electronics. Analytical models have been developed to study the dissolution of various functional materials as well as the devices constructed from this set of functional materials and these models prove to be useful in the design of the transient electronics.

  14. Dynamical evolution of two associated galactic bars

    CERN Document Server

    Garzon, F

    2014-01-01

    We study the dynamical interactions of mass systems in equilibrium under their own gravity that mutually exert and experience gravitational forces. The method we employ is to model the dynamical evolution of two isolated bars, hosted within the same galactic system, under their mutual gravitational interaction. In this study we present an analytical treatment of the secular evolution of two bars that oscillate with respect one another. Two cases of interaction, with and without geometrical deformation, are discussed. In the latter case, the bars are described as modified Jacobi ellipsoids. These triaxial systems are formed by a rotating fluid mass in gravitational equilibrium with its own rotational velocity and the gravitational field of the other bar. The governing equation for the variation of their relative angular separation is then numerically integrated, which also provides the time evolution of the geometrical parameters of the bodies. The case of rigid, non-deformable, bars produces in some cases an ...

  15. Dark Matter Superfluidity and Galactic Dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Berezhiani, Lasha

    2015-01-01

    We propose a unified framework that reconciles the stunning success of MOND on galactic scales with the triumph of the LambdaCDM model on cosmological scales. This is achieved through the physics of superfluidity. Dark matter consists of self-interacting axion-like particles that thermalize and condense to form a superfluid in galaxies, with ~mK critical temperature. The superfluid phonons mediate a MOND acceleration on baryonic matter. Our framework naturally distinguishes between galaxies (where MOND is successful) and galaxy clusters (where MOND is not): dark matter has a higher temperature in clusters, and hence is in a mixture of superfluid and normal phase. The rich and well-studied physics of superfluidity leads to a number of striking observational signatures.

  16. Active Galactic Nuclei Feedback and Clusters

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Biman B. Nath

    2011-12-01

    The Intracluster Medium (ICM) is believed to have been affected by feedback from Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN) and/or supernovae-driven winds. These sources are supposed to have injected entropy into the ICM gas. The recently determined universal pressure profile of the ICM gas has been used and after comparing with the entropy profile of the gas from gravitational effects of the dark matter halo, the additional entropy injected by non-gravitational sources, as a function of the total cluster mass is determined. The current observational data of red-shift evolution of cluster scaling relation is shown that allow models in which the entropy injection decreases at high red-shift.

  17. Correlations of Active Galactic Nuclei with Microquasars

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YE Yong-Chun; ZUO Xue-Qin; WANG Ding-Xiong

    2006-01-01

    Correlations of active galactic nuclei (AGNs) with microquasars are discussed based on the coexistence of the Blandford-Znajek (BZ) and magnetic coupling (MC) processes (CEBZMC) in black hole (BH) accretion disk.The proportions of several quantities of BH systems for both AGNs and microquasars are derived by combining the observational data with CEBZMC. It is shown that the square of the magnetic field at the BH horizon is inversely proportional to the BH mass, while the accretion rate of the disk is proportional to the BH mass. In addition, the very steep emissivity indexes from the recent XMM-Newton observations of the nearby bright Seyfert 1 galaxy MCG-6-30-15 and the microquasars XTE J1650-500 are well fitted by considering the MC effects on the disk radiation. These results suggest strongly the correlations of A GNs with microquasars.

  18. Statistical tests of galactic dynamo theory

    CERN Document Server

    Chamandy, Luke; Taylor, A Russ

    2016-01-01

    Mean-field galactic dynamo theory is the leading theory to explain the prevalence of regular magnetic fields in spiral galaxies, but its systematic comparison with observations is still incomplete and fragmentary. Here we compare predictions of mean-field dynamo models to observational data on magnetic pitch angle and the strength of the mean magnetic field. We demonstrate that a standard $\\alpha^2\\Omega$ dynamo model produces pitch angles of the regular magnetic fields of nearby galaxies that are reasonably consistent with available data. The dynamo estimates of the magnetic field strength are generally within a factor of a few of the observational values. Reasonable agreement between theoretical and observed pitch angles generally requires the turbulent correlation time $\\tau$ to be in the range 10-20 Myr, in agreement with standard estimates. Moreover, good agreement also requires that the ratio of the ionized gas scale height to root-mean-square turbulent velocity increases with radius. Our results thus w...

  19. Galactic cold cores. V. Dust opacity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juvela, M.; Ristorcelli, I.; Marshall, D. J.; Montillaud, J.; Pelkonen, V.-M.; Ysard, N.; McGehee, P.; Paladini, R.; Pagani, L.; Malinen, J.; Rivera-Ingraham, A.; Lefèvre, C.; Tóth, L. V.; Montier, L. A.; Bernard, J.-P.; Martin, P.

    2015-12-01

    Context. The project Galactic Cold Cores has carried out Herschel photometric observations of interstellar clouds where the Planck satellite survey has located cold and compact clumps. The sources represent different stages of cloud evolution from starless clumps to protostellar cores and are located in different Galactic environments. Aims: We examine this sample of 116 Herschel fields to estimate the submillimetre dust opacity and to search for variations that might be attributed to the evolutionary stage of the sources or to environmental factors, including the location within the Galaxy. Methods: The submillimetre dust opacity was derived from Herschel data, and near-infrared observations of the reddening of background stars are converted into near-infrared optical depth. We investigated the systematic errors affecting these parameters and used modelling to correct for the expected biases. The ratio of 250 μm and J band opacities is correlated with the Galactic location and the star formation activity. We searched for local variations in the ratio τ(250 μm)/τ(J) using the correlation plots and opacity ratio maps. Results: We find a median ratio of τ(250 μm) /τ(J) = (1.6 ± 0.2) × 10-3, which is more than three times the mean value reported for the diffuse medium. Assuming an opacity spectral index β = 1.8 instead of β = 2.0, the value would be lower by ~ 30%. No significant systematic variation is detected with Galactocentric distance or with Galactic height. Examination of the τ(250 μm) /τ(J) maps reveals six fields with clear indications of a local increase of submillimetre opacity of up to τ(250 μm) /τ(J) ~ 4 × 10-3 towards the densest clumps. These are all nearby fields with spatially resolved clumps of high column density. Conclusions: We interpret the increase in the far-infrared opacity as a sign of grain growth in the densest and coldest regions of interstellar clouds. Planck (http://www.esa.int/Planck) is a project of the European

  20. Better Galactic mass models through chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanderson, Robyn Ellyn; Wetzel, Andrew; Hopkins, Philip F.; Sharma, Sanjib

    2017-01-01

    With the upcoming release of the Gaia catalog and the many multiplexed spectroscopic surveys on the horizon, we are rapidly moving into a new data-driven era in the study of the Milky Way's stellar halo. When combined, these data sets will give us a many-dimensional view of stars in accreted structures in the halo that includes both dynamical information about their orbits and chemical information about their formation histories. Using simulated data from the state-of-the-art Latte simulations of Milky-Way-like galaxies, which include hydrodynamics, feedback, and chemical evolution in a cosmological setting using the FIRE physics model, we demonstrate that while dynamical information alone can be used to constrain models of the Galactic mass distribution in the halo, including the extra dimensions provided by chemical abundances can improve these constraints as well as assist in untangling different accreted components.

  1. Magnetized galactic halos and velocity lags

    CERN Document Server

    Henriksen, Richard N

    2016-01-01

    We present an analytic model of a magnetized galactic halo surrounding a Mestel gravitating disc. The magnetic field is taken to be in energy equipartition with the pressure dominant rotating halo gas ({\\it not} with the cosmic rays), and the whole system is in a steady state. A more flexible `anisotropic equipartition' model is also explored. A definite pressure law is required to maintain the equilibrium, but the halo density is constant. The velocity/magnetic system is scale-free. The objective is to find the rotational velocity lag in such a halo. The magnetic field is not force-free so that angular momentum may be transported from the halo to the intergalactic medium. We find that the `X'-shaped structure observed for halo magnetic fields can be obtained together with a simple analytic formula for the rate of decline of the velocity with height $z$. The formula also predicts the change in lag with radius, $r$.

  2. Galactic disks as reaction-diffusion systems

    CERN Document Server

    Smolin, L

    1996-01-01

    A model of a galactic disk is presented which extends the homogeneous one zone models by incorporating propagation of material and energy in the disk. For reasonable values of the parameters the homogeneous steady state is unstable to the development of inhomogeneities, leading to the development of spatial and temporal structure. At the linearized level a prediction for the length and time scales of the patterns is found. These instabilities arise for the same reason that pattern formation is seen in non-equilibrium chemical and biological systems, which is that the positive and negative feedback effects which govern the rates of the critical processes act over different distance scales, as in Turing's reaction-diffusion models. This shows that patterns would form in the disk even in the absence of gravitational effects, density waves, rotation, shear and external perturbations. These nonlinear effects may thus explain the spiral structure seen in the star forming regions of isolated flocculent galaxies.

  3. Galactic Archaeology and Minimum Spanning Trees

    CERN Document Server

    Macfarlane, B A; Flynn, C M L

    2015-01-01

    Chemical tagging of stellar debris from disrupted open clusters and associations underpins the science cases for next-generation multi-object spectroscopic surveys. As part of the Galactic Archaeology project TraCD (Tracking Cluster Debris), a preliminary attempt at reconstructing the birth clouds of now phase-mixed thin disk debris is undertaken using a parametric minimum spanning tree (MST) approach. Empirically-motivated chemical abundance pattern uncertainties (for a 10-dimensional chemistry-space) are applied to NBODY6-realised stellar associations dissolved into a background sea of field stars, all evolving in a Milky Way potential. We demonstrate that significant population reconstruction degeneracies appear when the abundance uncertainties approach 0.1 dex and the parameterised MST approach is employed; more sophisticated methodologies will be required to ameliorate these degeneracies.

  4. Dielectronic Recombination In Active Galactic Nuclei

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lukić, D.; Savin, D. W.; Schnell, M.; Brandau, C.; Schmidt, E.; Schippers, S.; Müller, A.; Lestinsky, M.; Sprenger, F.; Wolf, A.; Altun, Z.; Badnell, N. R.

    2006-05-01

    Recent X-ray satelitte observations of active galactic nuclei point out shortcomings in our understanding of low temperature dielectronic recombination (DR) for iron M- shell ions. In order to resolve this issue and to provide reliable iron M-shell DR data for modeling astrophysical plasmas, we are carrying out a series of laboratory measurements using the heavy-ion Test Storage Ring at the Max- Plank-Institute for Nuclear Physics in Heidelberg, Germany. Storage rings are currently the only laboratory method capable of studying low temperature DR. We use our results to produce experimentally- derived DR rate coefficients. We are also providing our data to atomic theorist to benchmark their DR calculations. Here we will report our recent DR results for selected Fe M-shell ions. At temperatures where these ions are predicted to form in photoionized gas, we find a significant discrepancy between our experimental results and previously recommended DR rate coefficients.

  5. Detection of Galactic Dark Matter by GLAST

    CERN Document Server

    Moiseev, A; Arrighi, H; Bloom, Elliott D; Chaput, C; Digel, S W; Engovatov, D; Norris, J; Silvis, J

    1999-01-01

    The mysterious dark matter has been a subject of special interest to high energy physicists, astrophysicists and cosmologists for many years. According to theoretical models, it can make up a significant fraction of the mass of the Universe. One possible form of galactic dark matter, Weakly Interacting Massive Particles (WIMPs), could be detected by their annihilation into monoenergetic gamma-ray line(s). This paper will demonstrate that the Gamma-ray Large Area Space Telescope (GLAST), scheduled for launch in 2005 by NASA, will be capable of searching for these gamma-ray lines in the energy range from 20 GeV to ~500 GeV and will be sufficiently sensitive to test a number of models. The required instrument performance and its capability to reject backgrounds to the required levels are explicitly discussed.

  6. Understanding dwarf galaxies as galactic building blocks

    CERN Document Server

    Tosi, M P

    2003-01-01

    This is a summary of a general discussion held during the third EuroConference on galaxy evolution. Various observational features of the stellar populations in present--day dwarf galaxies were presented to introduce the discussion on the possibility that these systems be the main building blocks of spiral and elliptical galaxies. Many people in the audience turned out to think that the inconsistencies among the observed properties of large and dwarf galaxies are too many to believe that the former are built up only by means of successive accretions of the latter. However, theorists of hierarchical galaxy formation suggested that present--day dwarfs are not representative of the galactic building blocks, which may be completely invisible nowadays. Some of them suggested that, contrary to what is usually assumed in hierarchical modelling, the actual building blocks were still fully gaseous systems when their major mergers occurred. If this is the case, then most of the inconsistencies can be overcome, and the ...

  7. Improving the mass determination of Galactic Cepheids

    CERN Document Server

    Bono, G; Marconi, M; Fouqué, P; Caputo, F

    2001-01-01

    We have selected a sample of Galactic Cepheids for which accurate estimates of radii, distances, and photometric parameters are available. The comparison between their pulsation masses, based on new Period-Mass-Radius (PMR) relations, and their evolutionary masses, based on both optical and NIR Color-Magnitude (CM) diagrams, suggests that pulsation masses are on average of the order of 10% smaller than the evolutionary masses. Current pulsation masses show, at fixed radius, a strongly reduced dispersion when compared with values published in literature.The increased precision in the pulsation masses is due to the fact that our predicted PMR relations based on nonlinear, convective Cepheid models present smaller standard deviations than PMR relations based on linear models. At the same time, the empirical radii of our Cepheid sample are typically accurate at the 5% level. Our evolutionary mass determinations are based on stellar models constructed by neglecting the effect of mass-loss during the He burning pha...

  8. Probing Stellar Dynamics in Galactic Nuclei

    CERN Document Server

    Miller, M Coleman; Amaro-Seoane, Pau; Barth, Aaron J; Cutler, Curt; Gair, Jonathan R; Hopman, Clovis; Merritt, David; Phinney, E Sterl; Richstone, Douglas O

    2009-01-01

    Electromagnetic observations over the last 15 years have yielded a growing appreciation for the importance of supermassive black holes (SMBH) to the evolution of galaxies, and for the intricacies of dynamical interactions in our own Galactic center. Here we show that future low-frequency gravitational wave observations, alone or in combination with electromagnetic data, will open up unique windows to these processes. In particular, gravitational wave detections in the 10^{-5}-10^{-1} Hz range will yield SMBH masses and spins to unprecedented precision and will provide clues to the properties of the otherwise undetectable stellar remnants expected to populate the centers of galaxies. Such observations are therefore keys to understanding the interplay between SMBHs and their environments.

  9. An "archaeological" quest for galactic supernova neutrinos

    CERN Document Server

    Lazauskas, Rimantas; Volpe, Cristina

    2009-01-01

    We explore the possibility to observe the effects of electron neutrinos from past galactic supernovae, through a geochemical measurement of the amount of Technetium 97 produced by neutrino-induced reactions in a Molybdenum ore. The calculations we present take into account the recent advances in our knowledge of neutrino interactions, of neutrino oscillations inside a supernova, of the solar neutrino flux at Earth and of possible failed supernovae. The predicted Technetium 97 abundance is of the order of 10^7 atoms per 10 kilotons of ore, which is close to the current geochemical experimental sensitivity. Of this, 10-20% is from supernovae. Considering the comparable size of uncertainties, more precision in the modeling of neutrino fluxes as well as of neutrino cross sections is required for a meaningful measurement.

  10. Open clusters and the galactic disk

    CERN Document Server

    Roeser, Siegfried; Piskunov, Anatoly E; Schilbach, Elena; Scholz, Ralf-Dieter; Zinnecker, Hans

    2010-01-01

    It is textbook knowledge that open clusters are conspicuous members of the thin disk of our Galaxy, but their role as contributors to the stellar population of the disk was regarded as minor. Starting from a homogenous stellar sky survey, the ASCC-2.5, we revisited the population of open clusters in the solar neighbourhood from scratch. In the course of this enterprise we detected 130 formerly unknown open clusters, constructed volume- and magnitude-limited samples of clusters, re-determined distances, motions, sizes, ages, luminosities and masses of 650 open clusters. We derived the present-day luminosity and mass functions of open clusters (not the stellar mass function in open clusters), the cluster initial mass function CIMF and the formation rate of open clusters. We find that open clusters contributed around 40 percent to the stellar content of the disk during the history of our Galaxy. Hence, open clusters are important building blocks of the Galactic disk.

  11. Dark matter superfluidity and galactic dynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lasha Berezhiani

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available We propose a unified framework that reconciles the stunning success of MOND on galactic scales with the triumph of the ΛCDM model on cosmological scales. This is achieved through the physics of superfluidity. Dark matter consists of self-interacting axion-like particles that thermalize and condense to form a superfluid in galaxies, with ∼mK critical temperature. The superfluid phonons mediate a MOND acceleration on baryonic matter. Our framework naturally distinguishes between galaxies (where MOND is successful and galaxy clusters (where MOND is not: dark matter has a higher temperature in clusters, and hence is in a mixture of superfluid and normal phase. The rich and well-studied physics of superfluidity leads to a number of striking observational signatures.

  12. Galactic rotation curves and brane world models

    CERN Document Server

    Rahaman, F; De Benedictis, A; Usmani, A A; Ray, Saibal

    2008-01-01

    In the present investigation flat rotational curves of the galaxies are considered under the framework of brane-world models where the 4d effective Einstein equation has extra terms which arise from the embedding of the 3-brane in the $5d$ bulk. It has been shown here that these long range bulk gravitational degrees of freedom can act as a mechanism to yield the observed galactic rotation curves without the need for dark matter. The present model has the advantage that the observed rotation curves result solely from well-established non-local effects of gravitation, such as dark radiation and dark pressure under a direct use of the condition of flat rotation curves and does not invoke any exotic matter field.

  13. New Galactic supernova remnants discovered with IPHAS

    CERN Document Server

    Sabin, L; Contreras, M E; Olguín, L; Frew, D J; Stupar, M; Vázquez, R; Wright, N J; Corradi, R L M; Morris, R A H

    2013-01-01

    As part of a systematic search programme of a 10-degree wide strip of the Northern Galactic plane we present preliminary evidence for the discovery of four (and possibly five) new supernova remnants (SNRs). The pilot search area covered the 19-20 hour right ascension zone sampling from +20 to +55 degrees in declination using binned mosaic images from the INT Photometric H-alpha Survey (IPHAS). The optical identification of the candidate SNRs was based mainly on their filamentary and arc-like emission morphologies, their apparently coherent, even if fractured structure and clear disconnection from any diffuse neighbouring HII region type nebulosity. Follow-up optical spectroscopy was undertaken, sampling carefully across prominent features of these faint sources. The resulting spectra revealed typical emission line ratios for shock excited nebulae which are characteristic of SNRs, which, along with the latest diagnostic diagrams, strongly support the likely SNR nature of these sources: G038.7-1.3 (IPHASX J1906...

  14. Galactic orbital motions of star clusters: static versus semicosmological time-dependent Galactic potentials

    CERN Document Server

    Haghi, Hosein; Taghavi, Saeed

    2015-01-01

    In order to understand the orbital history of Galactic halo objects, such as globular clusters, authors usually assume a static potential for our Galaxy with parameters that appear at the present-day. According to the standard paradigm of galaxy formation, galaxies grow through a continuous accretion of fresh gas and a hierarchical merging with smaller galaxies from high redshift to the present day. This implies that the mass and size of disc, bulge, and halo change with time. We investigate the effect of assuming a live Galactic potential on the orbital history of halo objects and its consequences on their internal evolution. We numerically integrate backwards the equations of motion of different test objects located in different Galactocentric distances in both static and time-dependent Galactic potentials in order to see if it is possible to discriminate between them. We show that in a live potential, the birth of the objects, 13 Gyr ago, would have occurred at significantly larger Galactocentric distances...

  15. Form of the galactic globular cluster system and the distance to the Galactic Centre

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frenk, C.S. (Cambridge Univ. (UK). Inst. of Astronomy); White, S.D.M. (California Univ., Berkeley (USA). Dept. of Astronomy)

    1982-01-01

    New quantitative methods are developed for analysing the structure of the galactic globular cluster system. Samples limited in galactic latitude which can be assumed complete are chosen, and the distance independent information contained in the positions of clusters on the sky, and the information contained in the apparent three-dimensional distribution, are considered separately. The cluster system is slightly flattened and there is no significant evidence for any variation in flattening as a function of metallicity. Its density is well described over the range 0.2 < r/Rsub(Sun) < 5 by a Hubble law, rho varies as r/sup -3/, or by a de Vaucouleurs law with rsub(e)/Rsub(Sun) = 0.50. Distance modulus errors of order one magnitude are required to explain the deviation of the apparent distribution of metal-rich clusters from axial symmetry. In addition a systematic difference in distance scale of about 0.5 magnitudes is necessary to reconcile the centroid of this distribution with that of the metal-poor clusters. This shift is in the same sense and of about the size predicted by theoretical pulsation models of RR Lyrae stars. If the standard distance scale is adopted for metal-poor clusters, the estimated distance from the Sun to the Galactic Centre is Rsub(Sun) = 6.8 +- 0.8 kpc.

  16. Galactic Building Blocks Seen Swarming Around Andromeda

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-02-01

    Green Bank, WV - A team of astronomers using the National Science Foundation's Robert C. Byrd Green Bank Telescope (GBT) has made the first conclusive detection of what appear to be the leftover building blocks of galaxy formation -- neutral hydrogen clouds -- swarming around the Andromeda Galaxy, the nearest large spiral galaxy to the Milky Way. This discovery may help scientists understand the structure and evolution of the Milky Way and all spiral galaxies. It also may help explain why certain young stars in mature galaxies are surprisingly bereft of the heavy elements that their contemporaries contain. Andromeda Galaxy This image depicts several long-sought galactic "building blocks" in orbit of the Andromeda Galaxy (M31). The newfound hydrogen clouds are depicted in a shade of orange (GBT), while gas that comprises the massive hydrogen disk of Andromeda is shown at high-resolution in blue (Westerbork Sythesis Radio Telescope). CREDIT: NRAO/AUI/NSF, WSRT (Click on Image for Larger Version) "Giant galaxies, like Andromeda and our own Milky Way, are thought to form through repeated mergers with smaller galaxies and through the accretion of vast numbers of even lower mass 'clouds' -- dark objects that lack stars and even are too small to call galaxies," said David A. Thilker of the Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore, Maryland. "Theoretical studies predict that this process of galactic growth continues today, but astronomers have been unable to detect the expected low mass 'building blocks' falling into nearby galaxies, until now." Thilker's research is published in the Astrophysical Journal Letters. Other contributors include: Robert Braun of the Netherlands Foundation for Research in Astronomy; Rene A.M. Walterbos of New Mexico State University; Edvige Corbelli of the Osservatorio Astrofisico di Arcetri in Italy; Felix J. Lockman and Ronald Maddalena of the National Radio Astronomy Observatory (NRAO) in Green Bank, West Virginia; and Edward Murphy of the

  17. The Galactic Plane Infrared Polarization Survey (GPIPS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clemens, Dan P.; Pinnick, A. F.; Pavel, M. D.; Taylor, B. W.

    2012-06-01

    The scientific motivation, data collection strategy, data reduction, and analysis methods are presented for the Galactic Plane Infrared Polarization Survey (GPIPS). The chief goal for the Survey was to reveal the nature of the magnetic field threading the Galactic disk, in particular through regions of low to moderate extinction (1-20 mag of AV ) and star formation in the cool interstellar medium. The Survey region spans 76 deg2 of the northern Milky Way disk, from l = 18° to 56° and b =-1° to +1°. Linear polarimetric imaging observations began in 2006 in the near-infrared H band (1.6 μm) using the Mimir instrument on the 1.8 m Perkins telescope, located outside Flagstaff, AZ. Mimir used a cold, fixed wire grid and a rotateable cold, compound half-wave plate to obtain "step-and-integrate" polarimetry over its full 10 × 10 arcmin field of view. The GPIPS bright and faint polarimetric limits are approximately 7th and 15th mag, respectively, set by saturation and photon noise. Polarimetric uncertainties track with stellar magnitude, from about 0.1% to 25%, on average, from the brightest to faintest stars. Across the 3237 field GPIPS region, approximately 0.5 million stars are estimated to show detectable linear polarization (P/σ P > 3); most of these have mH < 12. This represents many orders of magnitude improvement in the number of polarization measurements across this region. GPIPS observations are more than 90% complete and should finish in 2012.

  18. Expectation for the X-ray Galactic Halo

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    We present an estimate of the strength and spectrum of the X-ray background from the warm gas associated with the Galactic halo. This investigation is motivated primarily by the recent detection of a spatially variable soft X-ray component towards the north Galactic polar cap by Kuntz et al. (2001), suggesting that the warm gas heated by gravitational shocks of the Galactic halo may produce a significant contribution to the soft X-ray sky. Another purpose of the study is to refine the recent theoretical prediction of the X-ray spectrum from the Galactic alo by Xue (2001) who adopted an ideal and simple isothermal model for the gas and dark matter distributions of the Galactic halo. We use the universal density profile for the dark matter distributions of the Galactic halo to evaluate the Xray properties of the warm gas either in hydrostatic equilibrium with, or tracing the underlying gravitational potential of the Galaxy. It has been shown that our prediction is consistent with the measured soft X-ray component towards the north Galactic polar cap if the gas fraction is taken to be ~ 0.005.

  19. A strategy to unveil transient sources of ultra-high-energy cosmic rays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takami Hajime

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Transient generation of ultra-high-energy cosmic rays (UHECRs has been motivated from promising candidates of UHECR sources such as gamma-ray bursts, flares of active galactic nuclei, and newly born neutron stars and magnetars. Here we propose a strategy to unveil transient sources of UHECRs from UHECR experiments. We demonstrate that the rate of UHECR bursts and/or flares is related to the apparent number density of UHECR sources, which is the number density estimated on the assumption of steady sources, and the time-profile spread of the bursts produced by cosmic magnetic fields. The apparent number density strongly depends on UHECR energies under a given rate of the bursts, which becomes observational evidence of transient sources. It is saturated at the number density of host galaxies of UHECR sources. We also derive constraints on the UHECR burst rate and/or energy budget of UHECRs per source as a function of the apparent source number density by using models of cosmic magnetic fields. In order to obtain a precise constraint of the UHECR burst rate, high event statistics above ∼ 1020 eV for evaluating the apparent source number density at the highest energies and better knowledge on cosmic magnetic fields by future observations and/or simulations to better estimate the time-profile spread of UHECR bursts are required. The estimated rate allows us to constrain transient UHECR sources by being compared with the occurrence rates of known energetic transient phenomena.

  20. Searches for Optical Counterparts to Fermi Unassociated Sources with the Intermediate Palomar Transient Factory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellm, Eric Christopher; Prince, Thomas A.; Kaplan, David L. A.; Kupfer, Thomas; DeCesar, Megan E.; Laher, Russ; Masci, Frank J.; Shupe, David L.; Intermediate Palomar Transient Factory Collaboration

    2017-01-01

    The Intermediate Palomar Transient Factory (iPTF) has accumulated an extensive optical variability dataset across the Northern Sky, including at low Galactic latitudes (|b| < 20 degrees). We are using this dataset to search for optical counterparts to unassociated Fermi gamma-ray sources, particular the companions of eclipsing binary millisecond pulsars. So-called redback binary millisecond pulsars are a key evolutionary stage in the recycling process that spins up millisecond pulsars. The Roche-distorted and irradiated pulsar companion produces a periodic signature at the orbital period that may be readily identified with iPTF. We report on the progress of this search and present interesting candidates found.

  1. Electromagnetic Transients in Power Cables

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Silva, Filipe Faria Da; Bak, Claus Leth

    of electromagnetic phenomena associated to their operation, among them electromagnetic transients, increased as well. Transient phenomena have been studied since the beginning of power systems, at first using only analytical approaches, which limited studies to more basic phenomena; but as computational tools became...... concerning HVAC cables. An important topic that is not covered in this book is measurements protocols/ methods. The protocols used when performing measurements on a cable depend on what is to be measured, the available equipment and accessibility. Readers interested in the topic are referred to search....... The chapter ends by proposing a systematic method that can be used when doing the insulation co-ordination study for a line, as well as the modelling requirements, both modelling depth and modelling detail of the equipment, for the study of the different types of transients followed by a step-by-step generic...

  2. Transient Faults in Computer Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masson, Gerald M.

    1993-01-01

    A powerful technique particularly appropriate for the detection of errors caused by transient faults in computer systems was developed. The technique can be implemented in either software or hardware; the research conducted thus far primarily considered software implementations. The error detection technique developed has the distinct advantage of having provably complete coverage of all errors caused by transient faults that affect the output produced by the execution of a program. In other words, the technique does not have to be tuned to a particular error model to enhance error coverage. Also, the correctness of the technique can be formally verified. The technique uses time and software redundancy. The foundation for an effective, low-overhead, software-based certification trail approach to real-time error detection resulting from transient fault phenomena was developed.

  3. Cohabitation Duration and Transient Domesticity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golub, Andrew; Reid, Megan; Strickler, Jennifer; Dunlap, Eloise

    2013-01-01

    Research finds that many impoverished urban Black adults engage in a pattern of partnering and family formation involving a succession of short cohabitations yielding children, a paradigm referred to as transient domesticity. Researchers have identified socioeconomic status, cultural adaptations, and urbanicity as explanations for aspects of this pattern. We used longitudinal data from the 2001 Survey of Income and Program Participation to analyze variation in cohabitation and marriage duration by race/ethnicity, income, and urban residence. Proportional hazards regression indicated that separation risk is greater among couples that are cohabiting, below 200% of the federal poverty line, and Black but is not greater among urban dwellers. This provides empirical demographic evidence to support the emerging theory of transient domesticity and suggests that both socioeconomic status and race explain this pattern. We discuss the implications of these findings for understanding transient domesticity and make recommendations for using the Survey of Income and Program Participation to further study this family formation paradigm.

  4. Population synthesis of classical low-mass X-ray binaries in the Galactic Bulge

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Haaften, L. M.; Nelemans, G.; Voss, R.; van der Sluys, M. V.; Toonen, S.

    2015-07-01

    Aims: We model the present-day population of classical low-mass X-ray binaries (LMXBs) with neutron star accretors, which have hydrogen-rich donor stars. Their population is compared with that of hydrogen-deficient LMXBs, known as ultracompact X-ray binaries (UCXBs). We model the observable LMXB population and compare it to observations. We model the Galactic Bulge because it contains a well-observed population and it is the target of the Galactic Bulge Survey. Methods: We combine the binary population synthesis code SeBa with detailed LMXB evolutionary tracks to model the size and properties of the present-day LMXB population in the Galactic Bulge. Whether sources are persistent or transient, and what their instantaneous X-ray luminosities are, is predicted using the thermal-viscous disk instability model. Results: We find a population of ~2.1 × 103 LMXBs with neutron star accretors. Of these about 15-40 are expected to be persistent (depending on model assumptions), with luminosities higher than 1035 erg s-1. About 7-20 transient sources are expected to be in outburst at any given time. Within a factor of two these numbers are consistent with the observed population of bright LMXBs in the Bulge. This gives credence to our prediction of the existence of a population of ~1.6 × 103 LMXBs with low donor masses that have gone through the period minimum, and have present-day mass transfer rates below 10-11 M⊙ yr-1. Conclusions: Even though the observed population of hydrogen-rich LMXBs in the Bulge is larger than the observed population of (hydrogen-deficient) UCXBs, the latter have a higher formation rate. While UCXBs may dominate the total LMXB population at the present time, the majority would be very faint or may have become detached and produced millisecond radio pulsars. In that case UCXBs would contribute significantly more to the formation of millisecond radio pulsars than hydrogen-rich LMXBs.

  5. Transient osteoporosis of the hip.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirza, Rabeea; Ishaq, Saliha; Amjad, Hira

    2012-02-01

    Transient Osteoporosis of Hip (TOH) is an uncommon disorder of idiopathic nature, particularly in the Asian population. It has been described to mostly occur in middle aged men and women in their third trimester of pregnancy. A distinctive hallmark of this condition is that it is self limiting and resolves in a few months. The patient presents to the physician with pain on movement and impaired mobility of the affected joint, developing without any history of trauma. MRI is the main diagnostic tool. We report herein a case of a forty five year old male, who developed transient osteoporosis of the hip, and was managed conservatively.

  6. A Curious Source of Extended X-ray Emission in the Outskirts of Globular Cluster GLIMPSE-C01

    CERN Document Server

    Mirabal, N

    2009-01-01

    We report the discovery of an unusual source of extended X-ray emission CXOU J184846.3-013040 (`The Stem') located on the outskirts of the globular cluster GLIMPSE-C01. No point-like source falls within the extended emission which has an X-ray luminosity L_X =10^{32} ergs/s and a physical size of 0.1 pc at the inferred distance to the cluster. These X-ray properties are consistent with the pulsar wind nebula (PWN) of an unseen pulsar located within the 95-percent confidence error contour of unidentified Fermi gamma-ray source 0FGL J1848.6-0138. However, we cannot exclude an alternative interpretation that postulates X-ray emission associated with a bow shock produced from the interaction of the globular cluster and interstellar gas in the Galactic plane. Analysis of the X-ray data reveals that `The Stem' is most significant in the 2-5 keV band, which suggests that the emission may be dominated by non-thermal bremsstrahlung from suprathermal electrons at the bow shock. If the bow shock interpretation is correc...

  7. Semiotic Resources in The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time: The Narrative Power of the Visual in Multimodal Fiction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariana Mussetta

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Multimodal fiction, as recently studied by Hallet (2009, Gibbons (2012, and Maziarczyk (2011; 2012, among others, is the phenomenon shared by those novels which combine various semiotic modes in the development of the narrative. The purpose of the present work is to account for the most salient semiotic resources used in the multimodal novel The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time by Mark Haddon (2004. In view of the work which still needs to be done in the field, and the increasing profusion and diversity of multimodal literary forms in recent years, this study aims at throwing new light upon the diverse and significant ways in which the strategic inclusion of various semiotic resources operates in fiction.

  8. Characterizing the population of active galactic nuclei in dwarf galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldassare, Vivienne F.; Reines, Amy E.; Gallo, Elena; Greene, Jenny E.

    2017-01-01

    Clues to super-massive black hole (BH) formation and growth reside in the population and properties of BHs in local dwarf galaxies. The masses of BHs in these systems are our best observational constraint on the masses of the first BH "seeds" at high redshift. Moreover, present-day dwarf galaxies are unlikely to have undergone major mergers, making them a relatively pristine testbed for studying triggers of BH accretion. However, in order to find BHs in dwarf galaxies outside the Local Group, it is necessary to search for signatures of accretion, i.e., active galactic nuclei (AGN). Until recently, only a handful of dwarf galaxies were known to contain AGN. However, large surveys such as the SDSS have led to the production of samples of over a hundred dwarf galaxies with AGN signatures (see e.g., Reines et al. 2013). My dissertation work has involved in-depth, multi-wavelength follow-up of nearby (z<0.055) dwarf galaxies with optical spectroscopic AGN signatures in SDSS.I analyzed high resolution spectra of dwarf galaxies with narrow-line AGN, which led to the discovery of a 50,000 MSun BH in the nucleus of RGG 118 - the smallest BH yet reported in a galaxy nucleus (Baldassare et al. 2015). I also used multi-epoch optical spectroscopy to study the nature of broad H-alpha emission in dwarf galaxies. A characteristic signature of dense gas orbiting around a BH, broad emission can also be produced by transient stellar processes. I showed that broad H-alpha in star-forming dwarf galaxies fades over a baseline of 5-10 years, and is likely produced by e.g., a Type II SN as opposed to an AGN. However, broad emission in dwarf galaxies with AGN/composite narrow lines is persistent and consistent across observations, suggesting an AGN origin (Baldassare et al. 2016). Finally, I analyzed X-ray and UV observations of dwarf galaxies with broad and narrow-line AGN signatures. All targets had nuclear X-ray detections at levels significantly higher than expected from X-ray binaries

  9. Transient filament stretching rheometer II

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kolte, Mette Irene; Rasmussen, Henrik K.; Hassager, Ole

    1997-01-01

    The Lagrangian sspecification is used to simulate the transient stretching filament rheometer. Simulations are performed for dilute PIB-solutions modeled as a four mode Oldroyd-B fluid and a semidilute PIB-solution modeled as a non-linear single integral equation. The simulations are compared...

  10. Stationary and Transient Response Statistics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Peter Hauge; Krenk, Steen

    1982-01-01

    The covariance functions for the transient response of a linear MDOF-system due to stationary time limited excitation with an arbitrary frequency content are related directly to the covariance functions of the stationary response. For rational spectral density functions closed form expressions...

  11. Dynamic and Transient Infinite Elements

    CERN Document Server

    Zhao, Chongbin

    2009-01-01

    Intends to provide the theory and the application of dynamic and transient infinite elements for simulating the far fields of infinite domains involved in many of scientific and engineering problems, based on the author's own work over the years. This title is suitable for computational geoscientists, geotechnical engineers, and civil engineers.

  12. Audiovisual integration of stimulus transients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Tobias; Mamassian, Pascal

    2008-01-01

    leaving only unsigned stimulus transients as the basis for audiovisual integration. Facilitation of luminance detection occurred even with varying audiovisual stimulus onset asynchrony and even when the sound lagged behind the luminance change by 75 ms supporting the interpretation that perceptual...

  13. Simulation Model of a Transient

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jauch, Clemens; Sørensen, Poul; Bak-Jensen, Birgitte

    2005-01-01

    This paper describes the simulation model of a controller that enables an active-stall wind turbine to ride through transient faults. The simulated wind turbine is connected to a simple model of a power system. Certain fault scenarios are specified and the turbine shall be able to sustain operation...

  14. Arecibo Pulsar Survey Using ALFA. III. Probing Radio Pulsar Intermittency and Transients

    CERN Document Server

    Deneva, J S; McLaughlin, M A; Nice, D J; Lorimer, D R; Crawford, F; Bhat, N D R; Camilo, F; Champion, D J; Freire, P C C; Edel, S; Kondratiev, V I; Hessels, J W T; Jenet, F A; Kasian, L; Kaspi, V M; Krämer, M; Lazarus, P; Van Leeuwen, J; Ransom, S M; Stairs, I H; Stappers, B W; Brazier, A; Venkataraman, A; Zollweg, J A

    2008-01-01

    We present radio transient search algorithms, results, and statistics from the ongoing Arecibo Pulsar ALFA (PALFA) Survey of the Galactic plane. We have discovered seven objects by detecting isolated dispersed pulses and one of the new discoveries has a duty cycle of 0.01%, the smallest known. The impact of selection effects on the detectability and classification of intermittent sources is discussed, and the relative efficiencies of periodicity vs. single pulse searches are compared for various pulsar classes. We find that scintillation, off-axis detection and few rotation periods within an observation may misrepresent normal periodic pulsars as intermittent sources. Finally, we derive constraints on transient pulse rate and flux density from the PALFA survey parameters and results.

  15. Constraining Galactic Magnetic Field Models with Starlight Polarimetry

    CERN Document Server

    Pavel, Michael D

    2011-01-01

    This paper provides testable predictions about starlight polarizations to constrain the geometry of the Galactic magnetic field, in particular the nature of the poloidal component. Galactic dynamo simulations and Galactic dust distributions from the literature are combined with a Stokes radiative transfer model to predict the observed polarizations and position angles of near-infrared starlight, assuming the light is polarized by aligned anisotropic dust grains. S0 and A0 magnetic field models and the role of magnetic pitch angle are all examined. All-sky predictions are made, and particular directions are identified as providing diagnostic power for discriminating among the models. Cumulative distribution functions of the normalized degree of polarization and plots of polarization position angle vs. Galactic latitude are proposed as tools for testing models against observations.

  16. The GALAH Survey and Galactic Archaeology in the next decade

    CERN Document Server

    Martell, Sarah L

    2015-01-01

    The field of Galactic Archaeology aims to understand the origins and evolution of the stellar populations in the Milky Way, as a way to understand galaxy formation and evolution in general. The GALAH (Galactic Archaeology with HERMES) Survey is an ambitious Australian-led project to explore the Galactic history of star formation, chemical evolution, minor mergers and stellar migration. GALAH is using the HERMES spectrograph, a novel, highly multiplexed, four-channel high-resolution optical spectrograph, to collect high-quality R ~ 28,000 spectra for one million stars in the Milky Way. From these data we will determine stellar parameters, radial velocities and abundances for up to 29 elements per star, and carry out a thorough chemical tagging study of the nearby Galaxy. There are clear complementarities between GALAH and other ongoing and planned Galactic Archaeology surveys, and also with ancillary stellar data collected by of major cosmological surveys. Combined, these data sets will provide a revolutionary...

  17. On the galactic rotation curves problem within an axisymmetric approach

    CERN Document Server

    Alvarez, Cesar; Herrera-Aguilar, Alfredo; Nucamendi, Ulises; Santos, Eli

    2013-01-01

    In U. Nucamendi et al. Phys. Rev. D63 (2001) 125016 and K. Lake, Phys. Rev. Lett. 92 (2004) 051101 it has been shown that galactic potentials can be kinematically linked to the observed red/blue shifts of the corresponding galactic rotation curves under a minimal set of assumptions: the emitted photons come from stable timelike circular geodesic orbits of stars in a static spherically symmetric gravitational field, and propagate to us along null geodesics. It is remarkable that this relation can be established without appealing at all to a concrete theory of gravitational interaction. Here we generalize this kinematical spherically symmetric approach to the galactic rotation curves problem to the stationary axisymmetric realm since this is precisely the symmetry that spiral galaxies possess. Thus, by making use of the most general stationary axisymmetric metric, we also consider stable circular orbits of stars that emit signals which travel to a distant observer along null geodesics and express the galactic r...

  18. DHIGLS: DRAO H I Intermediate Galactic Latitude Survey

    CERN Document Server

    Blagrave, K; Joncas, G; Kothes, R; Stil, J; Miville-Deschenes, M -A; Lockman, Felix J; Taylor, A R

    2016-01-01

    Observations of Galactic H I gas for seven intermediate Galactic latitude fields are presented at 1' angular resolution using data from the DRAO Synthesis Telescope (ST) and the Green Bank Telescope (GBT). The DHIGLS data are the most extensive arcminute resolution measurements of the diffuse atomic interstellar medium beyond those in the Galactic plane. The acquisition, reduction, calibration, and mosaicking of the DRAO ST data and the cross calibration and incorporation of the short-spacing information from the GBT are described. The high quality of the DHIGLS data enables a variety of new studies in directions of low Galactic column density. We find evidence for dramatic changes in the structures in channel maps over even small changes in velocity. This narrow line emission has counterparts in absorption spectra against bright background radio sources, quantifying that the gas is cold and dense and can be identified as the cold neutral medium phase. We analyze the angular power spectra of maps of the integ...

  19. An absence of fast radio bursts at intermediate galactic latitudes

    CERN Document Server

    Petroff, E; Johnston, S; Bailes, M; Barr, E D; Bates, S D; Bhat, N D R; Burgay, M; Burke-Spolaor, S; Champion, D; Coster, P; Flynn, C; Keane, E F; Keith, M J; Kramer, M; Levin, L; Ng, C; Possenti, A; Stappers, B W; Tiburzi, C; Thornton, D

    2014-01-01

    Fast radio bursts (FRBs) are an emerging class of bright, highly dispersed radio pulses. Recent work by Thornton et al. (2013) has revealed a population of FRBs in the High Time Resolution Universe (HTRU) survey at high Galactic latitudes. A variety of progenitors have been proposed including cataclysmic events at cosmological distances, Galactic flare stars, and terrestrial radio frequency interference. Here we report on a search for FRBs at intermediate Galactic latitudes ($-15^{\\circ}$ $< b <$ 15$^{\\circ}$) in data taken as part of the HTRU survey. No FRBs were discovered in this region. Several effects such as dispersion, scattering, sky temperature and scintillation decrease the sensitivity by more than 3$\\sigma$ in $\\sim$20\\% of survey pointings. Including all of these effects, we exclude the hypothesis that FRBs are uniformly distributed on the sky with 99\\% confidence. This low probability implies that additional factors -- not accounted for by standard Galactic models -- must be included to eas...

  20. Probing Galactic structure using micro-lensing with EROS-2

    CERN Document Server

    Ansari, R

    1999-01-01

    EROS has been monitoring few million stars in the Magellanic clouds, as well as toward the Galactic bulge and spiral arms since 1996, to search for microlensing events. In this paper, we present briefly the EROS setup and scientific program and discuss the results obtained from our observations in four directions in the Galactic plane, away from the bulge. Seven light curves, out of 9.1 million stars observed in these directions show luminosity variations interpreted as due to microlensing. The averaged estimated optical depth tau = 0.45 +0.24 -0.11 is compatible with expectations from simple Galactic models. Nonetheless a small excess of short time-scale events may be present in the direction closest to the Galactic center.

  1. Swift J174540.7-290015: a new accreting binary in the Galactic Center

    CERN Document Server

    Ponti, G; De Marco, B; Rea, N; Rau, A; Haberl, F; Zelati, F Coti; Bozzo, E; Ferrigno, C; Bower, G C; Demorest, P

    2016-01-01

    We report on the identification of the new Galactic Center (GC) transient Swift J174540.7-290015 as a likely low mass X-ray binary (LMXB) located at only 16 arcsec from Sgr A*. This transient was detected on 2016 February 6th during the Swift GC monitoring, and it showed long-term spectral variations compatible with a hard to soft state transition. We observed the field with XMM-Newton on February 26th for 35 ks, detecting the source in the soft state, characterised by a low level of variability and a soft X-ray thermal spectrum with a high energy tail (detected by INTEGRAL up to ~50 keV), typical of either accreting neutron stars or black holes. We observed: i) a high column density of neutral absorbing material, suggesting that Swift J174540.7-290015 is located near or beyond the GC and; ii) a sub-Solar Iron abundance, therefore we argue that Iron is depleted into dust grains. The lack of detection of FeK absorption lines, eclipses or dipping suggests that the accretion disc is observed at a low inclination...

  2. Population synthesis of classical low-mass X-ray binaries in the Galactic Bulge

    CERN Document Server

    van Haaften, L M; Voss, R; van der Sluys, M V; Toonen, S

    2015-01-01

    Aims. We model the present-day population of 'classical' low-mass X-ray binaries (LMXBs) with neutron star accretors, which have hydrogen-rich donor stars. Their population is compared with that of hydrogen-deficient LMXBs, known as ultracompact X-ray binaries (UCXBs). We model the observable LMXB population and compare it to observations. Methods. We combine the binary population synthesis code SeBa with detailed LMXB evolutionary tracks to model the size and properties of the present-day LMXB population in the Galactic Bulge. Whether sources are persistent or transient, and what their instantaneous X-ray luminosities are, is predicted using the thermal-viscous disk instability model. Results. We find a population of ~2.1 x 10^3 LMXBs with neutron star accretors. Of these about 15 - 40 are expected to be persistent (depending on model assumptions), with luminosities higher than 10^35 erg s^-1. About 7 - 20 transient sources are expected to be in outburst at any given time. Within a factor of two these number...

  3. Manganese abundances in Galactic bulge red giants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbuy, B.; Hill, V.; Zoccali, M.; Minniti, D.; Renzini, A.; Ortolani, S.; Gómez, A.; Trevisan, M.; Dutra, N.

    2013-11-01

    Context. Manganese is mainly produced in type II SNe during explosive silicon burning, in incomplete Si-burning regions, and depends on several nucleosynthesis environment conditions, such as mass cut between the matter ejected and falling back onto the remnant, electron and neutron excesses, mixing fallback, and explosion energy. Manganese is also produced in type Ia SNe. Aims: The aim of this work is the study of abundances of the iron-peak element Mn in 56 bulge giants, among which 13 are red clump stars. Four bulge fields along the minor axis are inspected. The study of abundances of Mn-over-Fe as a function of metallicity in the Galactic bulge may shed light on its production mechanisms. Methods: High-resolution spectra were obtained using the FLAMES+UVES spectrograph on the Very Large Telescope. The spectra were obtained within a program to observe 800 stars using the GIRAFFE spectrograph, together with the present UVES spectra. Results: We aim at identifying the chemical evolution of manganese, as a function of metallicity, in the Galactic bulge. We find [Mn/Fe] ~ -0.7 at [Fe/H] ~ -1.3, increasing to a solar value at metallicities close to solar, and showing a spread around - 0.7 ≲ [Fe/H] ≲ -0.2, in good agreement with other work on Mn in bulge stars. There is also good agreement with chemical evolution models. We find no clear difference in the behaviour of the four bulge fields. Whereas [Mn/Fe] vs. [Fe/H] could be identified with the behaviour of the thick disc stars, [Mn/O] vs. [O/H] has a behaviour running parallel, at higher metallicities, compared to thick disc stars, indicating that the bulge enrichment might have proceeded differently from that of the thick disc. Observations collected at the European Southern Observatory, Paranal, Chile (ESO programmes 71.B-0617A, 73.B0074A, and GTO 71.B-0196).Tables 1-6 and Figs. 1-6 are available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  4. Testing the Dipole and Quadrupole Moments of Galactic Models

    OpenAIRE

    Briggs, Michael S.; Paciesas, William S.; Pendleton, Geoffrey N.; Meegan, Charles A.; Fishman, Gerald J.; Horack, John M.; Kouveliotou, Chryssa; Hartmann, Dieter H.; Hakkila, Jon

    1996-01-01

    If gamma-ray bursts originate in the Galaxy, at some level there should be a galactic pattern in their distribution on the sky. We test published galactic models by comparing their dipole and quadrupole moments with the moments of the BATSE 3B catalog. While many models have moments that are too large, several models are in acceptable or good agreement with the data.

  5. GALACTIC AND EXTRAGALACTIC SUPERNOVA REMNANTS AS SITES OF PARTICLE ACCELERATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manami Sasaki

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Supernova remnants, owing to their strong shock waves, are likely sources of Galactic cosmic rays. Studies of supernova remnants in X-rays and gamma rays provide us with new insights into the acceleration of particles to high energies. This paper reviews the basic physics of supernova remnant shocks and associated particle acceleration and radiation processes. In addition, the study of supernova remnant populations in nearby galaxies and the implications for Galactic cosmic ray distribution are discussed.

  6. The infrared Galactic disk: What have we learned?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Churchwell E.

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available A brief overview is given of some of the new insights we have achieved from the Spitzer/GLIMPSE/MIPSGAL surveys of the Galactic plane. Particular emphasis is given to infrared bubbles, rapidly accreting protostars, infrared dark clouds, and diffuse PAH emission. Large scale galactic structure based on the distribution of red clump giants will be discussed by Robert Benjamin in this volume.

  7. Galactic entropy in extended Kaluza-Klein cosmology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yanar, Hilmi; Salti, Mustafa; Aydogdu, Oktay; Acikgoz, Irfan; Yasar, Erol

    2016-02-01

    We use a Kaluza-Klein model with variable cosmological and gravitational terms to discuss the nature of galactic entropy function. For this purpose, we assume a universe filled with dark fluid and consider five-dimensional (5D) field equations using the Gamma law equation. We mainly discuss the validity of the first and generalized second laws of galactic thermodynamics for viable Kaluza-Klein models.

  8. Is the Galactic Cosmic Ray Spectrum Constant in Time?

    CERN Document Server

    Eichler, David; Pohl, Martin

    2013-01-01

    The hypothesis is considered that the present Galactic cosmic ray spectrum is at present softer than its time average due to source intermittency. Measurements of muogenic nuclides underground could provide an independent measurement of the time averaged spectrum. Source intermittency could also account for the surprising low anisotropy reported by the IceCube collaboration. Predictions for Galactic emission of ultrahigh-energy quanta, such as UHE gamma rays and neutrinos, might be higher or lower than previously estimated.

  9. Stars and Planetary Nebulae in the Galactic Bulge

    CERN Document Server

    Cuisinier, F; Acker, A; Maciel, W J

    2000-01-01

    We compare the populations of Red Giant stars and Planetary Nebulae in the Galactic Bulge, in the light of recent determinations of their abundances patterns. We find both populations to be compatible. From the planetary nebulae, we find evidences that the Bulge did not form stars recently. The whole abundances pattern remains however puzzling, some elements favoring a quick evolution of the Galactic Bulge (Mg and Ti), and others a much slower one (He, O, Si, S, Ar and Ca).

  10. Decameter Pulsars and Transients Survey of the Northern Sky. Status, First Results, Multiparametric Pipeline for Candidate Selection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zakharenko, V. V.; Kravtsov, I. P.; Vasylieva, I. Y.; Mykhailova, S. S.; Ulyanov, O. M.; Shevtsova, A. I.; Skoryk, A. O.; Zarka, P.; Konovalenko, O. O.

    We present the results of processing first 20% of Northern sky pulsars and transients survey using UTR-2 radio telescope. Data processing is done by an automatic pipeline that detects and outputs a large number of transient candidates (usually dispersed bursts). We have developed a multivariate pipeline for visual inspection of these candidates. By adjustment of input parameters of the pipeline the observer can substantially increase signal-to-noise ratio of detected signals as well as discriminate them from residual low-intensity interference with high significance. About 450 transient signals have passed the examination by the multivariate pipeline. Their distributions on the Galactic latitude and dispersion measure have been derived. The shape of the distributions suggests that these signals might be associated with cosmic sources of radio emission.

  11. Evolution of Supernova Remnants near the Galactic Center

    CERN Document Server

    Yalinewich, Almog; Sari, Re'em

    2016-01-01

    Supernovae near the galactic center evolve differently from regular galactic supernovae. This is mainly due to the environment into which the supernova remnants propagate. Instead of a static, uniform density medium, SNRs near the galactic center propagate into a wind swept environment with a velocity away from the galactic center, and a graded density profile. This causes these SNRs to be non - spherical, and to evolve faster than their galactic counterparts. We develop an analytic theory for the evolution of explosions within a stellar wind, and verify it using a hydrodynamic code. We show that such explosions can evolve in one of three possible morphologies. Using these results we discuss the association between the two SNRs (SGR East and SGR A's bipolar radio/X-ray Lobes) and the two neutron stars (the cannonball and SGR J1745-2900) near the galactic center. We show that, given the morphologies of the SNR and positions of the neutron stars, the only possible association is between SGR A's bipolar radio/X-...

  12. The maximum rotation of a galactic disc

    CERN Document Server

    Bottema, R

    1997-01-01

    The observed stellar velocity dispersions of galactic discs show that the maximum rotation of a disc is on average 63% of the observed maximum rotation. This criterion can, however, not be applied to small or low surface brightness (LSB) galaxies because such systems show, in general, a continuously rising rotation curve until the outermost measured radial position. That is why a general relation has been derived, giving the maximum rotation for a disc depending on the luminosity, surface brightness, and colour of the disc. As a physical basis of this relation serves an adopted fixed mass-to-light ratio as a function of colour. That functionality is consistent with results from population synthesis models and its absolute value is determined from the observed stellar velocity dispersions. The derived maximum disc rotation is compared with a number of observed maximum rotations, clearly demonstrating the need for appreciable amounts of dark matter in the disc region and even more so for LSB galaxies. Matters h...

  13. Galactic stellar populations with APOGEE and Kepler

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, J. A.; APOKASC Collaboration

    2016-09-01

    Understanding the history of baryons is key to understanding galaxy formation, as galaxies with very similar stellar mass and/or dark matter halo mass can have markedly different morphologies in their stellar light. Stars are a useful way to study this history, because properties such as their composition, age, and orbital motion can map galaxy formation and evolution. Lightcurves from the Kepler mission, both original and extended, provide asteroseismic parameters, such as Δ ν and ν_max, and rotation periods. The high-resolution near-infrared APOGEE spectroscopic survey is observing an extensive sample of red giants and cool dwarfs in both the Kepler and K2 fields to provide composition and effective temperature measurements. These spectroscopic and seismic parameters can be combined to yield ages, important for dissecting the history of the Milky Way. Results based on this combination have already been published in the first APOKASC catalog. Among the interesting results about stellar populations so far are the presence of a large metallicity spread in the young secondary red clump population at the solar circle, the identification of young, yet α-rich stars, and the detection of a field blue straggler descendant. The K2 fields along the ecliptic will extend the possibilities of these techniques to new lines of sight in the Galaxy and provide a much more representative sample of Galactic populations with seismic and spectroscopic information.

  14. Spheroidal galactic halos and mirror dark matter

    CERN Document Server

    Foot, R

    2004-01-01

    Mirror matter has been proposed as a dark matter candidate. It has several very attractive features, including automatic stability and darkness, the ability to mimic the broad features of cold dark matter while in the linear density perturbation regime, and consistency with all direct dark matter search experiments, both negative (e.g. CDMS II) and positive (DAMA). In this paper we consider an important unsolved problem: Are there plausible reasons to explain why most of the mirror matter in spiral galaxies exists in the form of gaseous {\\it spheroidal} galactic halos around ordinary matter {\\it disks}? We compute an order-of-magnitude estimate that the mirror photon luminosity of a typical spiral galaxy today is around $10^{44}$ erg/s. Interestingly, this rate of energy loss is similar to the power supplied by ordinary supernova explosions. We discuss circumstances under which supernova power can be used to heat the gaseous part of the mirror matter halo and hence prevent its collapse to a disk. The {\\it mac...

  15. The quiescent phase of galactic disc growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aumer, Michael; Binney, James; Schönrich, Ralph

    2016-07-01

    We perform a series of controlled N-body simulations of growing disc galaxies within non-growing, live dark matter haloes of varying mass and concentration. Our initial conditions include either a low-mass disc or a compact bulge. New stellar particles are continuously added on near-circular orbits to the existing disc, so spiral structure is continuously excited. To study the effect of combined spiral and giant molecular cloud (GMC) heating on the discs, we introduce massive, short-lived particles that sample a GMC mass function. An isothermal gas component is introduced for a subset of the models. We perform a resolution study and vary parameters governing the GMC population, the histories of star formation and radial scale growth. Models with GMCs and standard values for the disc mass and halo density provide the right level of self-gravity to explain the age-velocity dispersion relation of the solar neighbourhood (Snhd). GMC heating generates remarkably exponential vertical profiles with scaleheights that are radially constant and agree with observations of galactic thin discs. GMCs are also capable of significantly delaying bar formation. The amount of spiral-induced radial migration agrees with what is required for the metallicity distribution of the Snhd. However, in our standard models, the outward-migrating populations are not hot enough vertically to create thick discs. Thick discs can form in models with high baryon fractions, but the corresponding bars are too long, the young stellar populations too hot and the discs flare considerably.

  16. Virgin galactic the first ten years

    CERN Document Server

    Seedhouse, Erik

    2015-01-01

    Thirty years ago when Sir Richard Branson called up Boeing and asked if they had a spare 747, few would have predicted the brash entrepreneur would so radically transform the placid business of air travel. But today, Branson flies airlines on six continents, employs hundreds of jets and, in 2014, was predicting that his spaceship company – Virgin Galactic – would soon open the space frontier to commercial astronauts, payload specialists, scientists and space tourists. With more than 600 seats sold at $250,000 each, what started off as a dream to send people just for the excitement to look back and marvel at Earth, was on the cusp of finally being turned into a business. Then, on October 21, 2014, tragedy struck. SpaceShipTwo was on its most ambitious test flight to date. Seconds after firing its engine, Virgin Galactic’s spaceship was breaking through the sound barrier. In just the three seconds that it took for the vehicle to climb from Mach 0.94 to Mach 1.02, co-pilot Mike Alsbury made what many close...

  17. FSR0190 - Another old distant galactic cluster

    CERN Document Server

    Fröbrich, D; Davis, C J

    2007-01-01

    We are conducting a large program to classify newly discovered Milky Way star cluster candidates from Froebrich et al. (2007). Here we present NIR follow-up observations of FSR0190 (RA=20h05m31.3s, DEC=33deg34'09" J2000). The cluster is situated close to the Galactic Plane (l=70.7302deg, b=+0.9498deg). It shows a circular shape, a relatively large number of core helium burning stars -- which clearly distinguishes the cluster from the rich field -- but no centrally condensed star density profile. We derive an age of more than 7Gyr, a Galactocentric distance of 10.5kpc, a distance of 10kpc from the Sun, and an extinction of A_K=0.8mag. The estimated mass is at least of the order of 1E5M_sun, and the absolute brightness is M_V<=-4.7mag; both are rather typical properties for Palomar-type globular clusters.

  18. Interstellar HOCN in the Galactic center region

    CERN Document Server

    Bruenken, S; Martin, S; Verheyen, L; Menten, K M

    2010-01-01

    Aims. Our aim is to confirm the interstellar detection of cyanic acid, HOCN, in the Galactic center clouds. It has previously been tentatively detected only in Sgr B2(OH). Methods. We used a complete line survey of the hot cores Sgr B2(N) and (M) in the 3 mm range, complemented by additional observations carried out with the IRAM 30 m telescope at selected frequencies in the 2 mm band and towards four additional positions in the Sgr B2 cloud complex in the 2 and 3 mm bands. The spectral survey was analysed in the local thermodynamical equilibrium approximation (LTE) by modeling the emission of all identified molecules simultaneously. This allowed us to distinguish weak features of HOCN from the rich line spectrum observed in Sgr B2(N) and (M). Lines of the more stable (by 1.1 eV) isomer isocyanic acid, HNCO, in these sources, as well as those of HOCN and HNCO towards the other positions, were analysed in the LTE approximation as well. Results. Four transitions of HOCN were detected in a quiescent molecular cl...

  19. A Versatile Family of Galactic Wind Models

    CERN Document Server

    Bustard, Chad; D'Onghia, Elena

    2015-01-01

    We present a versatile family of model galactic outflows including non-uniform mass and energy source distributions, a gravitational potential from an extended mass source, and radiative losses. The model easily produces steady-state wind solutions for a range of mass-loading factors, energy-loading factors, galaxy mass and galaxy radius. We find that, with radiative losses included, highly mass-loaded winds must be driven at high central temperatures, whereas low mass-loaded winds can be driven at low temperatures just above the peak of the cooling curve, meaning radiative losses can drastically affect the wind solution even for low mass-loading factors. By including radiative losses, we are able to show that subsonic flows can be ignored as a possible mechanism for expelling mass and energy from a galaxy compared to the more efficient transonic solutions. Specifically, the transonic solutions with low mass-loading and high energy-loading are the most efficient. Our model also produces low-temperature, high-...

  20. Hyperaccreting black holes in galactic nuclei

    Science.gov (United States)

    Begelman, Mitchell C.; Volonteri, Marta

    2017-01-01

    The rate at which matter flows into a galactic nucleus during early phases of galaxy evolution can sometimes exceed the Eddington limit of the growing central black hole by several orders of magnitude. We discuss the necessary conditions for the black hole to actually accrete this matter at such a high rate, and consider the observational appearance and detectability of a hyperaccreting black hole. In order to be accreted at a hyper-Eddington rate, the infalling gas must have a sufficiently low angular momentum. Although most of the gas is accreted, a significant fraction accumulates in an optically thick envelope with luminosity ˜LEdd, probably pierced by jets of much higher power. If dot{M} > 10^3 dot{M}_Edd, the envelope spectrum resembles a blackbody with a temperature of a few thousand kelvin, but for lower (but still hyper-Eddington) accretion rates the spectrum becomes a very dilute and hard Wien spectrum. We consider the likelihood of various regimes of hyperaccretion, and discuss its possible observational signatures.

  1. How supernova explosions power galactic winds

    CERN Document Server

    Creasey, Peter; Bower, Richard G

    2012-01-01

    Feedback from supernovae is an essential aspect of galaxy formation. In order to improve subgrid models of feedback we perform a series of numerical experiments to investigate how supernova explosions power galactic winds. We use the Flash hydrodynamic code to model a simplified ISM, including gravity, hydrodynamics, radiative cooling above 10,000 K, and star formation that reproduces the Kennicutt-Schmidt relation. By simulating a small patch of the ISM in a tall box perpendicular to the disk, we obtain sub-parsec resolution allowing us to resolve individual supernova events and we investigate how the wind properties depend on those of the ISM and the galaxy. We find that outflows are more efficient in disks with lower surface densities or gas fractions. A simple model in which the warm cloudy medium is the barrier that limits the expansion of blast waves reproduces the scaling of outflow properties with disk parameters at high star formation rates. The scaling we find sets the investigation of galaxy winds ...

  2. Magnetic Fields and Galactic Star Formation Rates

    CERN Document Server

    Van Loo, Sven; Falle, Sam A E G

    2014-01-01

    The regulation of galactic-scale star formation rates (SFRs) is a basic problem for theories of galaxy formation and evolution: which processes are responsible for making observed star formation rates so inefficient compared to maximal rates of gas content divided by dynamical timescale? Here we study the effect of magnetic fields of different strengths on the evolution of molecular clouds within a kiloparsec patch of a disk galaxy. Including an empirically motivated prescription for star formation from dense gas ($n_{\\rm{H}}>10^5\\:{\\rm{cm}^{-3}}$) at an efficiency of 2\\% per local free fall time, we derive the amount of suppression of star formation by magnetic fields compared to the nonmagnetized case. We find GMC fragmentation, dense clump formation and SFR can be significantly affected by the inclusion of magnetic fields, especially in our strongest investigated $B$-field case of $80\\:{\\rm{\\mu}}$G. However, our chosen kpc scale region, extracted from a global galaxy simulation, happens to contain a starbu...

  3. Radio Recombination Lines in Galactic HII Regions

    CERN Document Server

    Quireza, C; Bania, T M; Rood, R T; Balser, Dana S.; Quireza, Cintia; Rood, Robert T.

    2006-01-01

    We report radio recombination line (RRL) and continuum observations of a sample of 106 Galactic HII regions made with the NRAO 140 Foot radio telescope in Green Bank, WV. We believe this to be the most sensitive RRL survey ever made for a sample this large. Most of our source integration times range between 6 and 90 hours which yield typical r.m.s. noise levels of 1.0--3.5 milliKelvins. Our data result from two different experiments performed, calibrated, and analyzed in similar ways. A CII survey was made at 3.5 cm wavelength to obtain accurate measurements of carbon radio recombination lines. When combined with atomic (CI) and molecular (CO) data, these measurements will constrain the composition, structure, kinematics, and physical properties of the photodissociation regions that lie on the edges of HII regions. A second survey was made at 3.5 cm wavelength to determine the abundance of 3He in the interstellar medium of the Milky Way. Together with measurements of the 3He+ hyperfine line we get high precis...

  4. Active galactic nuclei: what's in a name?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padovani, P.; Alexander, D. M.; Assef, R. J.; De Marco, B.; Giommi, P.; Hickox, R. C.; Richards, G. T.; Smolčić, V.; Hatziminaoglou, E.; Mainieri, V.; Salvato, M.

    2017-08-01

    Active galactic nuclei (AGN) are energetic astrophysical sources powered by accretion onto supermassive black holes in galaxies, and present unique observational signatures that cover the full electromagnetic spectrum over more than twenty orders of magnitude in frequency. The rich phenomenology of AGN has resulted in a large number of different "flavours" in the literature that now comprise a complex and confusing AGN "zoo". It is increasingly clear that these classifications are only partially related to intrinsic differences between AGN and primarily reflect variations in a relatively small number of astrophysical parameters as well the method by which each class of AGN is selected. Taken together, observations in different electromagnetic bands as well as variations over time provide complementary windows on the physics of different sub-structures in the AGN. In this review, we present an overview of AGN multi-wavelength properties with the aim of painting their "big picture" through observations in each electromagnetic band from radio to γ -rays as well as AGN variability. We address what we can learn from each observational method, the impact of selection effects, the physics behind the emission at each wavelength, and the potential for future studies. To conclude, we use these observations to piece together the basic architecture of AGN, discuss our current understanding of unification models, and highlight some open questions that present opportunities for future observational and theoretical progress.

  5. Strong gravitational lensing versus dynamic galactic mass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guimaraes, Antonio C.C.; Sodre Junior, Laerte [Universidade de Sao Paulo (USP), SP (Brazil). Inst. de Astronomia, Geofisica e Ciencias Atmosfericas. Dept. de Astronomia

    2006-07-01

    The mass associated to a galaxy is a fundamental property necessary for its description and for the understating of its structure, formation and evolution. In the cosmological context, the mass and density profile of galaxies and galaxy clusters is relevant for the understanding of dark matter properties and the formation dynamics of structures in the Universe. We find the masses of 15 galaxies from the SLACS Survey through two methods: using the stellar velocity dispersion (dynamic method) and using strong gravitational lensing. We discover a discrepancy between the masses obtained through these two methods and develop several models to explain it. We test the models suggested by calculating {chi}{sup 2} statistics and the Bayesian information criteria. Statistical fluctuation and a constant systematic error are strongly discarded as explanations for the mass discrepancy. Our results show evidence of projection effects on the line of sight that add a contamination mass in the strong lensing galactic mass determination. This effect was already observed in greater detail in weak and strong gravitational lensing measures of cluster of galaxies, but was little explored before in the case of strong lensing by galaxies. (author)

  6. The Iron abundance in Galactic Planetary Nebulae

    CERN Document Server

    Delgado-Inglada, G; Mampaso, A; Viironen, K

    2008-01-01

    We constrain the iron abundance in a sample of 33 low-ionization Galactic planetary nebulae (PNe) using [Fe III] lines and correcting for the contribution of higher ionization states with ionization correction factors (ICFs) that take into account uncertainties in the atomic data. We find very low iron abundances in all the objects, suggesting that more than 90% of their iron atoms are condensed onto dust grains. This number is based on the solar iron abundance and implies a lower limit on the dust-to-gas mass ratio, due solely to iron, of M_dust/M_gas>1.3x10^{-3} for our sample. The depletion factors of different PNe cover about two orders of magnitude, probably reflecting differences in the formation, growth, or destruction of their dust grains. However, we do not find any systematic difference between the gaseous iron abundances calculated for C-rich and O-rich PNe, suggesting similar iron depletion efficiencies in both environments. The iron abundances of our sample PNe are similar to those derived follow...

  7. Hyperaccreting black holes in galactic nuclei

    CERN Document Server

    Begelman, Mitchell C

    2016-01-01

    The rate at which matter flows into a galactic nucleus during early phases of galaxy evolution can sometimes exceed the Eddington limit of the growing central black hole by several orders of magnitude. We discuss the necessary conditions for the black hole to actually accrete this matter at such a high rate, and consider the observational appearance and detectability of a hyperaccreting black hole. In order to be accreted at a hyper-Eddington rate, the infalling gas must have a sufficiently low angular momentum. Although most of the gas is accreted, a significant fraction accumulates in an optically thick envelope with luminosity $\\sim L_{\\rm Edd}$, probably pierced by jets of much higher power. If $\\dot M > 10^3 \\dot M_{\\rm Edd}$, the envelope spectrum resembles a blackbody with a temperature of a few thousand K, but for lower (but still hyper-Eddington) accretion rates the spectrum becomes a very dilute and hard Wien spectrum. We consider the likelihood of various regimes of hyperaccretion, and discuss its ...

  8. Galactic magnetic fields and hierarchical galaxy formation

    CERN Document Server

    Rodrigues, Luiz Felippe S; Fletcher, Andrew; Baugh, Carlton

    2015-01-01

    A framework is introduced for coupling the evolution of galactic magnetic fields sustained by the mean-field dynamo with the formation and evolution of galaxies in the cold dark matter cosmology. Estimates of the steady-state strength of the large-scale and turbulence magnetic fields from mean-field and fluctuation dynamo models are used together with galaxy properties predicted by semi-analytic models of galaxy formation for a population of spiral galaxies. We find that the field strength is mostly controlled by the evolving gas content of the galaxies. Thus, because of the differences in the implementation of the star formation law, feedback from supernovae and ram-pressure stripping, each of the galaxy formation models considered predicts a distribution of field strengths with unique features. The most prominent of them is the difference in typical magnetic fields strengths obtained for the satellite and central galaxies populations as well as the typical strength of the large-scale magnetic field in galax...

  9. Manganese abundances in Galactic bulge red giants

    CERN Document Server

    Barbuy, B; Zoccali, M; Minniti, D; Renzini, A; Ortolani, S; Gomez, A; Trevisan, M; Dutra, N

    2013-01-01

    Manganese is mainly produced in type II SNe during explosive silicon burning, in incomplete Si-burning regions, and depends on several nucleosynthesis environment conditions, such as mass cut beween the matter ejected and falling back onto the remnant, electron and neutron excesses, mixing fallback, and explosion energy. Manganese is also produced in type Ia SNe. The aim of this work is the study of abundances of the iron-peak element Mn in 56 bulge giants, among which 13 are red clump stars. Four bulge fields along the minor axis are inspected. The study of abundances of Mn-over-Fe as a function of metallicity in the Galactic bulge may shed light on its production mechanisms. High-resolution spectra were obtained using the FLAMES+UVES spectrograph on the Very Large Telescope. The spectra were obtained within a program to observe 800 stars using the GIRAFFE spectrograph, together with the present UVES spectra. We aim at identifying the chemical evolution of manganese, as a function of metallicity, in the Gala...

  10. Quantifying Supernovae-driven Multiphase Galactic Outflows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Miao; Bryan, Greg L.; Ostriker, Jeremiah P.

    2017-06-01

    Galactic outflows are observed everywhere in star-forming disk galaxies and are critical for galaxy formation. Supernovae (SNe) play the key role in driving the outflows, but there is no consensus as to how much energy, mass, and metal they can launch out of the disk. We perform 3D, high-resolution hydrodynamic simulations to study SNe-driven outflows from stratified media. Assuming the SN rate scales with gas surface density Σgas as in the Kennicutt-Schmidt relation, we find that the mass loading factor, η m, defined as the mass outflow flux divided by the star formation surface density, decreases with increasing Σgas as {η }{{m}}\\propto {{{Σ }}}{gas}-0.61. Approximately Σgas ≲ 50 M ⊙ pc-2 marks when η m ≳ 1. About 10%-50% of the energy and 40%-80% of the metals produced by SNe end up in the outflows. The tenuous hot phase (T > 3 × 105 K), which fills 60%-80% of the volume at the midplane, carries the majority of the energy and metals in the outflows. We discuss how various physical processes, including the vertical distribution of SNe, photoelectric heating, external gravitational field, and SN rate, affect the loading efficiencies. The relative scale height of gas and SNe is a very important factor in determining the loading efficiencies.

  11. Line shape diagnostics of Galactic 26Al

    CERN Document Server

    Kretschmer, K; Hartmann, D H

    2003-01-01

    The shape of the gamma-ray line from radioactive 26Al, at 1808.7 keV energy in the frame of the decaying isotope, is determined by its kinematics when it decays, typically 10^6 y after its ejection into the interstellar medium from its nucleosynthesis source. Three measurements of the line width exist: HEAO-C's 1982 value of (0+3) keV FWHM, the GRIS 1996 value of (5.4 +/- 1.3) keV FWHM, and the recent RHESSI value of (2.0 +/- 0.8) keV FWHM, suggesting either "cold", "hot", or "warm" 26Al in the ISM. We model the line width as expected from Galactic rotation, expanding supernova ejecta, and/or Wolf-Rayet winds, and predict a value below 1 keV (FWHM) with plausible assumptions about 26Al initial velocities and expansion history. Even though the recent RHESSI measurement reduces the need to explain a broad line corresponding to 540 km/s mean 26Al velocity through extreme assumptions about grain transport of 26Al or huge interstellar cavities, our results suggest that standard 26Al ejection models produce a line ...

  12. Multiline Study of Galactic Star Forming Regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mookerjea, B.; Kramer, C.; Jakob, H.; Stutzki, J.

    We present first results of observations with SMART at KOSMA of selected Galactic star forming regions in mid-J (4-3) and (7-6) rotational transitions of CO and the two fine structure transitions of C I at 492 and 810 GHz. The aim of this study is to understand the interplay of the physical and chemical structure of the interstellar matter and the UV radiation field from the stars within the molecular clouds by observing the Photon Dominated Regions (PDRs). During this ongoing observational programme, regions around Orion BN/KL, W3, S106, S140 have been observed. Here we present the first results of observations of the W3 region (Jakob et al. 2002). These observations will be combined with existing observations of the emission due to low-J transitions of CO and other tracers of PDRs. The database of intensities of different lines from each of these regions will be used to derive a self-consistent interpretation using the PDR model developed by Störzer, Stutzki, & Sternberg (1996).

  13. Quantifying Supernovae-Driven Multiphase Galactic Outflows

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Miao; Ostriker, Jeremiah P

    2016-01-01

    Galactic outflows are ubiquitously observed in star-forming disk galaxies and are critical for galaxy formation. Supernovae (SNe) play the key role in driving the outflows, but there is no consensus as to how much energy, mass and metal they can launch out of the disk. We perform 3D, high-resolution hydrodynamic simulations to study SNe-driven outflows from stratified media. Assuming SN rate scales with gas surface density $\\Sigma_{\\rm{gas}}$ as in the Kennicutt-Schmidt (KS) relation, we find the mass loading factor, defined as the mass outflow flux divided by the star formation surface density, decreases with increasing $\\Sigma_{\\rm{gas}}$ as $\\propto \\Sigma^{-0.61}_{\\rm{gas}}$. Approximately $\\Sigma_{\\rm{gas}} \\lesssim$ 50 $M_\\odot/pc^2$ marks when the mass loading factor $\\gtrsim$1. About 10-50\\% of the energy and 40-80\\% of the metals produced by SNe end up in the outflows. The tenuous hot phase ($T>3\\times 10^5$ K) carries the majority of the energy and metals in outflows. We discuss how various physical...

  14. Cosmic stellar relics in the Galactic halo

    CERN Document Server

    Salvadori, S; Ferrara, A

    2006-01-01

    We study the stellar population history and chemical evolution of the Milky Way (MW) in a hierarchical LCDM model for structure formation. Using a Monte Carlo method based on the semi-analytical EPS formalism, we reconstruct the merger tree of our Galaxy and follow the evolution of gas and stars along the hierarchy. Our approach allows us to compare the observational properties of the MW with model results, exploring different properties of primordial stars, such as their IMF and the critical metallicity for low-mass star formation, Zcr. By matching our predictions to the Metallicity Distribution Function (MDF) of metal-poor stars in the Galactic halo we find that: (i) supernova feedback is required to reproduce the observed properties of the MW; (ii) stars with [Fe/H]0 or the masses of the first stars m_PopIII>0.9Msun; (v) the statistical impact of second generation stars, i.e stars forming out of gas polluted only by metal-free stars, is negligible in current samples; (vi) independently of Zcr, 60% of metal...

  15. HOW GALACTIC ENVIRONMENT REGULATES STAR FORMATION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meidt, Sharon E. [Max-Planck-Institut für Astronomie/Königstuhl 17 D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany)

    2016-02-10

    In a new simple model I reconcile two contradictory views on the factors that determine the rate at which molecular clouds form stars—internal structure versus external, environmental influences—providing a unified picture for the regulation of star formation in galaxies. In the presence of external pressure, the pressure gradient set up within a self-gravitating turbulent (isothermal) cloud leads to a non-uniform density distribution. Thus the local environment of a cloud influences its internal structure. In the simple equilibrium model, the fraction of gas at high density in the cloud interior is determined simply by the cloud surface density, which is itself inherited from the pressure in the immediate surroundings. This idea is tested using measurements of the properties of local clouds, which are found to show remarkable agreement with the simple equilibrium model. The model also naturally predicts the star formation relation observed on cloud scales and at the same time provides a mapping between this relation and the closer-to-linear molecular star formation relation measured on larger scales in galaxies. The key is that pressure regulates not only the molecular content of the ISM but also the cloud surface density. I provide a straightforward prescription for the pressure regulation of star formation that can be directly implemented in numerical models. Predictions for the dense gas fraction and star formation efficiency measured on large-scales within galaxies are also presented, establishing the basis for a new picture of star formation regulated by galactic environment.

  16. Polarization in microlensing towards the Galactic bulge

    CERN Document Server

    Ingrosso, G; De Paolis, F; Jetzer, Ph; Nucita, A A; Strafella, F; Zakharov, A F

    2012-01-01

    Gravitational microlensing, when finite size source effects are relevant, provides an unique tool for the study of source star stellar atmospheres through an enhancement of a characteristic polarization signal. This is due to the differential magnification induced during the crossing of the source star. In this paper we consider a specific set of reported highly magnified, both single and binary exoplanetary systems, microlensing events towards the Galactic bulge and evaluate the expected polarization signal. To this purpose, we consider several polarization models which apply to different types of source stars: hot, late type main sequence and cool giants. As a result we compute the polarization signal P,which goes up to P=0.04% for late type stars and up to a few percent for cool giants, depending on the underlying physical polarization processes and atmosphere model parameters. Given a I band magnitude at maximum magnification of about 12, and a typical duration of the polarization signal up to 1 day, we c...

  17. Mass Segregation in the Galactic Centre

    CERN Document Server

    Hopman, Clovis

    2010-01-01

    Two-body energy exchange between stars orbiting massive black holes (MBHs) leads to the formation of a power-law density distribution n(r)~r^(-a) that diverges towards the MBH. For a single mass population, a=7/4 and the flow of stars is much less than N(Galactic centre (GC) is t_r ~2-3 * 10^(10) yr, a cusp should form in less than a Hubble time. The absence of a visible cusp of old stars in the GC poses a challenge to these models, ...

  18. Analytical halo model of galactic conformity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pahwa, Isha; Paranjape, Aseem

    2017-09-01

    We present a fully analytical halo model of colour-dependent clustering that incorporates the effects of galactic conformity in a halo occupation distribution framework. The model, based on our previous numerical work, describes conformity through a correlation between the colour of a galaxy and the concentration of its parent halo, leading to a correlation between central and satellite galaxy colours at fixed halo mass. The strength of the correlation is set by a tunable 'group quenching efficiency', and the model can separately describe group-level correlations between galaxy colour (1-halo conformity) and large-scale correlations induced by assembly bias (2-halo conformity). We validate our analytical results using clustering measurements in mock galaxy catalogues, finding that the model is accurate at the 10-20 per cent level for a wide range of luminosities and length-scales. We apply the formalism to interpret the colour-dependent clustering of galaxies in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). We find good overall agreement between the data and a model that has 1-halo conformity at a level consistent with previous results based on an SDSS group catalogue, although the clustering data require satellites to be redder than suggested by the group catalogue. Within our modelling uncertainties, however, we do not find strong evidence of 2-halo conformity driven by assembly bias in SDSS clustering.

  19. Is the Galactic Bulge Devoid of Planets?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penny, Matthew T.; Henderson, Calen B.; Clanton, Christian

    2016-10-01

    We consider a sample of 31 exoplanetary systems detected by gravitational microlensing and investigate whether or not the estimated distances to these systems conform to the Galactic distribution of planets expected from models. We derive the expected distribution of distances and relative proper motions from a simulated microlensing survey, correcting for the dominant selection effects that affect the sensitivity of planet detection as a function of distance, and compare it to the observed distribution using Anderson-Darling (AD) hypothesis testing. Taking the relative abundance of planets in the bulge to that in the disk, {f}{bulge}, as a model parameter, we find that our model is consistent with the observed distribution only for {f}{bulge}\\lt 0.54 (for a p-value threshold of 0.01) implying that the bulge may be devoid of planets relative to the disk. Allowing for a dependence of planet abundance on metallicity and host mass, or an additional dependence of planet sensitivity on event timescale, does not restore consistency for {f}{bulge}=1. We examine the distance estimates of some events in detail, and conclude that some parallax-based estimates could be significantly in error. Only by combining the removal of one problematic event from our sample and the inclusion of strong dependences of planet abundance or detection sensitivity on host mass, metallicity, and event timescale are we able to find consistency with the hypothesis that the bulge and disk have equal planet abundance.

  20. Infalling Gas Towards the Galactic Center

    CERN Document Server

    Coil, A L; Coil, Alison L.; Ho, Paul T.P.

    1999-01-01

    VLA maps of ammonia emission were made for the Galactic Center region. The NH3(1,1) and NH3(2,2) transitions were observed in three 2' x 2' fields covering Sgr A* and the region 3' immediately south of it. In the central 3 parsecs surrounding Sgr A* we find emission which appears to be associated with the circumnuclear disk (CND), both morphologically and kinematically. This central emission is connected to a long, narrow 2 pc x 10 pc streamer of clumpy molecular gas located towards the south, which appears to be carrying gas from the nearby 20 km/s giant molecular cloud (GMC) to the circumnuclear region. We find a velocity gradient along the streamer, with progressively higher velocities as the gas approaches Sgr A*. The streamer stops at the location of the CND, where the line width of the NH3 emission increases dramatically. This may be the kinematic signature of accretion onto the CND. The ratio of the NH3(2,2)/NH3(1,1) emission indicates that the gas is heated at the northern tip of the streamer, located...

  1. The Galactic Centre in the Far Infrared

    CERN Document Server

    Etxaluze, M; Tolls, V; Stark, A A; Gonzalez-Alfonso, E

    2011-01-01

    We analyse the far infrared dust emission from the Galactic Centre region, including the Circumnuclear Disk (CND) and other structures, using Herschel PACS and SPIRE photometric observations. These Herschel data are complemented by unpublished observations by the Infrared Space Observatory Long Wavelength Spectrometer (ISO LWS), which used parallel mode scans to obtain photometric images of the region with a larger beam than Herschel but with a complementary wavelength coverage and more frequent sampling with ten detectors observing at ten different wavelengths in the range from 46 to 180 \\mum, where the emission peaks. We also include data from the MSX at 21.3 \\mum for completeness. We model the combined ISO LWS continuum plus Herschel PACS and SPIRE photometric data toward the central 2 pc in Sgr A*, a region that includes the CND. We find that the FIR spectral energy distribution is best represented by a continuum that is the sum of three greybody curves from dust at temperatures of 90, 44.5, and 23 K. We ...

  2. Detecting pulsars in the Galactic Centre

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajwade, K. M.; Lorimer, D. R.; Anderson, L. D.

    2017-10-01

    Although high-sensitivity surveys have revealed a number of highly dispersed pulsars in the inner Galaxy, none have so far been found in the Galactic Centre (GC) region, which we define to be within a projected distance of 1 pc from Sgr A*. This null result is surprising given that several independent lines of evidence predict a sizable population of neutron stars in the region. Here, we present a detailed analysis of both the canonical and millisecond pulsar populations in the GC and consider free-free absorption and multipath scattering to be the two main sources of flux density mitigation. We demonstrate that the sensitivity limits of previous surveys are not sufficient to detect GC pulsar population, and investigate the optimum observing frequency for future surveys. Depending on the degree of scattering and free-free absorption in the GC, current surveys constrain the size of the potentially observable population (i.e. those beaming towards us) to be up to 52 canonical pulsars and 10 000 millisecond pulsars. We find that the optimum frequency for future surveys is in the range of 9-13 GHz. We also predict that future deeper surveys with the Square Kilometre array will probe a significant portion of the existing radio pulsar population in the GC.

  3. Detecting pulsars in the Galactic centre

    CERN Document Server

    Rajwade, Kaustubh; Anderson, Loren

    2016-01-01

    Although high-sensitivity surveys have revealed a number of highly dispersed pulsars in the inner Galaxy, none have so far been found in the Galactic centre (GC) region, which we define to be within a projected distance of 1~pc from Sgr~A*. This null result is surprising given that several independent lines of evidence predict a sizeable population of neutron stars in the region. Here, we present a detailed analysis of both the canonical and millisecond pulsar populations in the GC and consider free-free absorption and multi-path scattering to be the two main sources of flux mitigation. We demonstrate the sensitivity limits of previous surveys are not sufficient to detect GC pulsar population, and investigate the optimum observing frequency for future surveys. Depending on the degree of scattering and free-free absorption in the GC, current surveys constrain the size of the potentially observable population (i.e. those beaming towards us) to be up to 50 canonical pulsars and 1430 millisecond pulsars. We find ...

  4. Ether, Luminosity and Galactic Source Counts

    CERN Document Server

    Tomaschitz, R

    1998-01-01

    An interpretation of the cosmological redshift in terms of a cosmic ether is given. We study a Robertson-Walker cosmology in which the ether is phenomenologically defined by a homogeneous and isotropic permeability tensor. The speed of light becomes so a function of cosmic time like in a dielectric medium. However, the cosmic ether is dispersion free, it does not lead to a broadening of spectral lines. Locally, in Euclidean frames, the scale factors of the permeability tensor get absorbed in the fundamental constants. Mass and charge scale with cosmic time, and so do atomic energy levels. This substantially changes the interpretation of the cosmological redshift as a Doppler shift. Photon frequencies are independent of the expansion factor; their time scaling is determined by the permeability tensor. The impact of the ether on the luminosity-distance, on the distance-redshift relation, and on galactic number counts is discussed. The Hubble constant is related to the scale factors of the metric and the permeab...

  5. Theoretical Models of the Galactic Bulge

    CERN Document Server

    Shen, Juntai

    2015-01-01

    Near infrared images from the COBE satellite presented the first clear evidence that our Milky Way galaxy contains a boxy shaped bulge. Recent years have witnessed a gradual paradigm shift in the formation and evolution of the Galactic bulge. Bulges were commonly believed to form in the dynamical violence of galaxy mergers. However, it has become increasingly clear that the main body of the Milky Way bulge is not a classical bulge made by previous major mergers, instead it appears to be a bar seen somewhat end-on. The Milky Way bar can form naturally from a precursor disk and thicken vertically by the internal firehose/buckling instability, giving rise to the boxy appearance. This picture is supported by many lines of evidence, including the asymmetric parallelogram shape, the strong cylindrical rotation (i.e., nearly constant rotation regardless of the height above the disk plane), the existence of an intriguing X-shaped structure in the bulge, and perhaps the metallicity gradients. We review the major theor...

  6. Calibrating the projection factor for Galactic Cepheids

    CERN Document Server

    Ngeow, Chow-Choong; Nardetto, Nicolas; Marengo, Massimo

    2012-01-01

    The projection factor (p), which converts the radial velocity to pulsational velocity, is an important parameter in the Baade-Wesselink (BW) type analysis and distance scale work. The p-factor is either adopted as a constant or linearly depending on the logarithmic of pulsating periods. The aim of this work is to calibrate the p-factor if a Cepheid has both the BW distance and an independent distance measurement, and examine the p-factor for delta Cephei -- the prototype of classical Cepheids. We calibrated the p-factor for several Galactic Cepheids that have both the latest BW distances and independent distances either from Hipparcos parallaxes or main-sequence fitting distances to Cepheid-hosted stellar clusters. Based on 25 Cepheids, the calibrated p-factor relation is consistent with latest p-factor relation in literature. The calibrated p-factor relation also indicates that this relation may not be linear and may exhibit an intrinsic scatter. We also examined the discrepancy of empirical p-factors for de...

  7. Axions and the Galactic Angular Momentum Distribution

    CERN Document Server

    Banik, N

    2013-01-01

    We analyze the behavior of axion dark matter before it falls into a galactic gravitational potential well. The axions thermalize sufficiently fast by gravitational self-interactions that almost all go to their lowest energy state consistent with the total angular momentum acquired from tidal torquing. That state is a state of rigid rotation on the turnaround sphere. It predicts the occurrence and detailed properties of the caustic rings of dark matter for which observational evidence had been found earlier. We show that the vortices in the axion Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC) are attractive, unlike those in superfluid $^4$He and dilute gases. We expect that a large fraction of the vortices in the axion BEC join into a single big vortex along the rotation axis of the galaxy. The resulting enhancement of caustic rings explains the typical size of the rises in the Milky Way rotation curve attributed to caustic rings. We show that baryons and ordinary cold dark matter particles are entrained by the axion BEC and ...

  8. Galactic rotation in Gaia DR1

    CERN Document Server

    Bovy, Jo

    2016-01-01

    The spatial variations of the velocity field of local stars provide direct evidence of Galactic differential rotation. The local divergence, shear, and vorticity of the velocity field---the traditional Oort constants---can be measured based purely on astrometric measurements and in particular depend linearly on proper motion and parallax. I use data for 304,267 main-sequence stars from the Gaia DR1 Tycho-Gaia Astrometric Solution to perform a local, precise measurement of the Oort constants at a typical heliocentric distance of 230 pc. The pattern of proper motions for these stars clearly displays the expected effects from differential rotation. I measure the Oort constants to be: A = 15.3+/-0.4+/- 0.5 (syst.) km/s/kpc, B = -11.9+/-0.4 km/s/kpc, C = -3.2+/-0.4 km/s/kpc and K = -3.3+/-0.6 km/s/kpc, where the systematic uncertainty in A is due to its uncertain correction for the asymmetric drift. These measurements imply local values for the rotational frequency of \\Omega_0 = 27.1+/-0.5+/- 0.5 (syst.) km/s/kpc,...

  9. Spatial and luminosity distributions of galactic satellites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Quan; Cole, Shaun; Eke, Vincent; Frenk, Carlos; Helly, John

    2013-09-01

    We investigate the luminosity functions and projected number density profiles of galactic satellites around isolated primaries of different luminosity. We measure these quantities for model satellites placed into the Millennium and Millennium II dark matter simulations by the GALFORM semi-analytic galaxy formation model for different bins of primary galaxy magnitude and we investigate their dependence on satellite luminosity. We compare our model predictions to the data of Guo et al. from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 8 (SDSS DR8). First, we use a mock light-cone catalogue to verify that the method we used to count satellites in the SDSS DR8 is unbiased. We find that the radial distributions of model satellites can be fitted by a Navarro-Frenk-White profile similar to those around comparable primary galaxies in the SDSS DR8, with only slight differences at low luminosities and small projected radii. However, when splitting the satellites by colour, the model and SDSS satellite systems no longer resemble one another, with many red model satellites in contrast to the dominant blue fraction at similar luminosity in the SDSS. The few model blue satellites are also significantly less centrally concentrated in the halo of their stacked primary than their SDSS counterparts. We discuss how these discrepancies may reflect inadequacies in the treatment of the processes that determine the star formation histories of small galaxies in the model.

  10. Structures induced by companions in galactic discs

    CERN Document Server

    Kyziropoulos, P; Gravvanis, G; Patsis, P

    2016-01-01

    Using N-body simulations we study the structures induced on a galactic disc by repeated flybys of a companion in decaying eccentric orbit around the disc. Our system is composed by a stellar disc, bulge and live dark matter halo, and we study the system's dynamical response to a sequence of a companion's flybys, when we vary i) the disc's temperature (parameterized by Toomre's Q-parameter) and ii) the companion's mass and initial orbit. We use a new 3D Cartesian grid code: MAIN (Mesh-adaptive Approximate Inverse N-body solver). The main features of MAIN are reviewed, with emphasis on the use of a new Symmetric Factored Approximate Sparse Inverse (SFASI) matrix in conjunction with the multigrid method that allows the efficient solution of Poisson's equation in three space variables. We find that: i) companions need to be assigned initial masses in a rather narrow window of values in order to produce significant and more long-standing non-axisymmetric structures (bars and spirals) in the main galaxy's disc by t...

  11. virgin galactic explores cern SIR RICHARD BRANSON AND VIRGIN GALACTIC PARTICIPANTS ON THEIR FAVOURITE THINGS ABOUT VISITING CERN

    CERN Multimedia

    2016-01-01

    Virgin Galactic visited CERN with a group of future astronauts and Sir Richard Branson. During their visit the group was shown around various experiments, including the Globe, SM18, AMS and the CERN Control Centre.

  12. Planck intermediate results. XLIV. The structure of the Galactic magnetic field from dust polarization maps of the southern Galactic cap

    CERN Document Server

    Aghanim, N; Arzoumanian, D; Aumont, J; Baccigalupi, C; Ballardini, M; Banday, A J; Barreiro, R B; Bartolo, N; Basak, S; Benabed, K; Bernard, J -P; Bersanelli, M; Bielewicz, P; Bonavera, L; Bond, J R; Borrill, J; Bouchet, F R; Boulanger, F; Bracco, A; Bucher, M; Burigana, C; Calabrese, E; Cardoso, J -F; Chiang, H C; Colombo, L P L; Combet, C; Comis, B; Couchot, F; Coulais, A; Crill, B P; Curto, A; Cuttaia, F; Davis, R J; de Bernardis, P; de Rosa, A; de Zotti, G; Delabrouille, J; Delouis, J -M; Di Valentino, E; Dickinson, C; Diego, J M; Doré, O; Douspis, M; Ducout, A; Dupac, X; Dusini, S; Efstathiou, G; Elsner, F; Enßlin, T A; Eriksen, H K; Falgarone, E; Fantaye, Y; Ferrière, K; Finelli, F; Frailis, M; Fraisse, A A; Franceschi, E; Frolov, A; Galeotta, S; Galli, S; Ganga, K; Génova-Santos, R T; Gerbino, M; Ghosh, T; González-Nuevo, J; Górski, K M; Gratton, S; Gregorio, A; Gruppuso, A; Gudmundsson, J E; Guillet, V; Hansen, F K; Helou, G; Henrot-Versillé, S; Herranz, D; Hivon, E; Huang, Z; Jaffe, A H; Jaffe, T R; Jones, W C; Keihänen, E; Keskitalo, R; Kisner, T S; Krachmalnicoff, N; Kunz, M; Kurki-Suonio, H; Lagache, G; Lähteenmäki, A; Lamarre, J -M; Langer, M; Lasenby, A; Lattanzi, M; Jeune, M Le; Levrier, F; Liguori, M; Lilje, P B; López-Caniego, M; Lubin, P M; Macías-Pérez, J F; Maggio, G; Maino, D; Mandolesi, N; Mangilli, A; Maris, M; Martin, P G; Martínez-González, E; Matarrese, S; Mauri, N; McEwen, J D; Melchiorri, A; Mennella, A; Migliaccio, M; Miville-Deschênes, M -A; Molinari, D; Moneti, A; Montier, L; Morgante, G; Moss, A; Naselsky, P; Natoli, P; Neveu, J; Nørgaard-Nielsen, H U; Oppermann, N; Oxborrow, C A; Pagano, L; Paoletti, D; Partridge, B; Perdereau, O; Perotto, L; Pettorino, V; Piacentini, F; Plaszczynski, S; Polenta, G; Rachen, J P; Rebolo, R; Reinecke, M; Remazeilles, M; Renzi, A; Ristorcelli, I; Rocha, G; Rossetti, M; Roudier, G; Ruiz-Granados, B; Salvati, L; Sandri, M; Savelainen, M; Scott, D; Sirignano, C; Soler, J D; Suur-Uski, A -S; Tauber, J A; Tavagnacco, D; Tenti, M; Toffolatti, L; Tomasi, M; Tristram, M; Trombetti, T; Valiviita, J; Vansyngel, F; Van Tent, F; Vielva, P; Villa, F; Wandelt, B D; Wehus, I K; Zacchei, A; Zonca, A

    2016-01-01

    We study the statistical properties of interstellar dust polarization at high Galactic latitude, using the Stokes parameter Planck maps at 353 GHz. Our aim is to advance the understanding of the magnetized interstellar medium (ISM), and to provide a model of the polarized dust foreground for cosmic microwave background component-separation procedures. Focusing on the southern Galactic cap, we examine the statistical distributions of the polarization fraction ($p$) and angle ($\\psi$) to characterize the ordered and turbulent components of the Galactic magnetic field (GMF) in the solar neighbourhood. We relate patterns at large angular scales in polarization to the orientation of the mean (ordered) GMF towards Galactic coordinates $(l_0,b_0)=(70^\\circ \\pm 5^\\circ,24^\\circ \\pm 5^\\circ)$. The histogram of $p$ shows a wide dispersion up to 25 %. The histogram of $\\psi$ has a standard deviation of $12^\\circ$ about the regular pattern expected from the ordered GMF. We use these histograms to build a phenomenological...

  13. Swift J174540.7-290015: a new accreting binary in the Galactic Centre

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponti, G.; Jin, C.; De Marco, B.; Rea, N.; Rau, A.; Haberl, F.; Coti Zelati, F.; Bozzo, E.; Ferrigno, C.; Bower, G. C.; Demorest, P.

    2016-09-01

    We report on the identification of the new Galactic Centre (GC) transient Swift J174540.7-290015 as a likely low-mass X-ray binary located at only 16 arcsec from Sgr A⋆. This transient was detected on 2016 February 6, during the Swift GC monitoring, and it showed long-term spectral variations compatible with a hard- to soft-state transition. We observed the field with XMM-Newton on February 26 for 35 ks, detecting the source in the soft state, characterized by a low level of variability and a soft X-ray thermal spectrum with a high energy tail (detected by INTEGRAL up to ˜50 keV), typical of either accreting neutron stars or black holes. We observed: (i) a high column density of neutral absorbing material, suggesting that Swift J174540.7-290015 is located near or beyond the GC and; (ii) a sub-Solar iron abundance, therefore we argue that iron is depleted into dust grains. The lack of detection of Fe K absorption lines, eclipses or dipping suggests that the accretion disc is observed at a low inclination angle. Radio (Very Large Array) observations did not detect any radio counterpart to Swift J174540.7-290015. No evidence for X-ray or radio periodicity is found. The location of the transient was observed also in the near-infrared (near-IR) with gamma-ray burst optical near-IR detector at MPG/European Southern Observatory La Silla 2.2 m telescope and VLT/NaCo pre- and post-outburst. Within the Chandra error region, we find multiple objects that display no significant variations.

  14. Transient stability of LHC strands

    CERN Document Server

    Baynham, D Elwyn; Coombs, R C; Bauer, P; Wolf, R

    1999-01-01

    The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) machine will operate at 1.9 K in order to achieve the high bending fields required in the dipole magnets. The cable and coil matrix is designed to be 'porous' in order to allow the He II coolant to $9 penetrate within the cable for stability enhancement. This paper describes transient stability measurements and theoretical modelling carried out on single strands from the LHC cable. The experimental work has been carried out at the $9 Rutherford Appleton Laboratory under an agreement with CERN. The aim of the experimental work has been to measure the influence of the strand surface treatment on the quench energy. The surface treatment, oxidized copper, tin-silver, $9 nickel etc., determines the transient heat transfer coefficients to the He II under high heat flux, short timescale (approximately 20 microseconds) conditions. The test equipment, based on an inductive heating technique, is described $9 and quench energy measurements presented. The experimental results are compared ...

  15. Nonlinear Diffusion and Transient Osmosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akira, Igarashi; Lamberto, Rondoni; Antonio, Botrugno; Marco, Pizzi

    2011-08-01

    We investigate both analytically and numerically the concentration dynamics of a solution in two containers connected by a narrow and short channel, in which diffusion obeys a porous medium equation. We also consider the variation of the pressure in the containers due to the flow of matter in the channel. In particular, we identify a phenomenon, which depends on the transport of matter across nano-porous membranes, which we call “transient osmosis". We find that nonlinear diffusion of the porous medium equation type allows numerous different osmotic-like phenomena, which are not present in the case of ordinary Fickian diffusion. Experimental results suggest one possible candidate for transiently osmotic processes.

  16. Transient Ablation of Teflon Hemispheres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arai, Norio; Karashima, Kei-ichi; Sato, Kiyoshi

    1997-01-01

    For high-speed entry of space vehicles into atmospheric environments, ablation is a practical method for alleviating severe aerodynamic heating. Several studies have been undertaken on steady or quasi-steady ablation. However, ablation is a very complicated phenomenon in which a nonequilibrium chemical process is associated with an aerodynamic process that involves changes in body shape with time. Therefore, it seems realistic to consider that ablation is an unsteady phenomenon. In the design of an ablative heat-shield system, since the ultimate purpose of the heat shield is to keep the internal temperature of the space vehicle at a safe level during entry, the transient heat conduction characteristics of the ablator may be critical in the selection of the material and its thickness. This note presents an experimental study of transient ablation of Teflon, with particular emphasis on the change in body shape, the instantaneous internal temperature distribution, and the effect of thermal expansion on ablation rate.

  17. Nonlinear Diffusion and Transient Osmosis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Akira Igarashi; Lamberto Rondon; Antonio Botrugno; Marco Pizzi

    2011-01-01

    We investigate both analytically and numerically the concentration dynamics of a solution in two containers connected by a narrow and short channel, in which diffusion obeys a porous medium equation. We also consider the variation of the pressure in the containers due to the flow of matter in the channel. In particular, we identify a phenomenon, which depends on the transport of matter across nano-porous membranes, which we call "transient osmosis". We find that nonlinear diffusion of the porous medium equation type allows numerous different osmotic-like phenomena, which are not present in the case of ordinary Fickian diffusion. Experimental results suggest one possible candidate for transiently osmotic processes.

  18. Transient stability and emergency control

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    Comparability of emergency control strategies with different instability modes is the key issue to decide which control strategy to be implemented. This paper considers that the essential factor causing instability should be used to form a unified standard to assess the effectiveness of control strategies with different instability modes. Thus a switching control stabilization principle was proposed based on elimination of the unbalanced energy between mechanical and electrical energies of generator sets. Along this way, the difficulty of seeking a Lyapunov function was circumvented. According to the principle, an emergency control algorithm framework was established to handle transient stability assessment, control location selection and control amount evaluation. Within the framework, this paper studied instability mode transition, then proposed an algorithm based on prediction function and a new approach to normalized stability margin stemmed from static EEAC method, which can increase comparability of various control locations. The simulations on the New-England System verified the proposed emergency control method for stabilizing transient stability.

  19. Computer Aided Transient Stability Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nihad M. Al-Rawi

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available A program for handling and improving the transient stability of the Iraqi Super Grid electrical network was developed. The idea was demonstrated by applying it to the outages of the main generating units. The methodology was built upon a state of increasing power transfer through the healthy portion of network during disturbances. There were three parts concerned; the first part was the developing of the load flow program using fast decoupled method and the transient stability program using Modified Euler’s method in the step by step solution, the second part was the engagement between the two programs, the third part was the application of the new program on the Iraqi supper grid network (400 kV.

  20. Spiral structure in the outer Galactic disk. I. The Third Galactic Quadrant

    CERN Document Server

    Vazquez, Ruben A; Carraro, Giovanni; Bronfman, Leonardo; Moitinho, Andre; Baume, Gustavo

    2007-01-01

    We combine optical and radio observations to trace the spiral structure in the Third Quadrant of the Milky Way. The optical observations consist of a large sample of young open clusters and associations, whereas the radio observations consist of a survey of nearby and distant clouds observed in CO. Both the optical and radio samples are the largest ones insofar present in the literature. We use this unique material to analyze the behavior of interstellar extinction and to trace the detailed structure of the Third Galactic Quadrant (TGQ).We find that the Outer (Cygnus) grand design spiral arm is traced by stellar and CO components while the Perseus arm is traced solely by CO and is possibly being disrupted by the crossing of the Local (Orion) arm. The Local arm is traced by CO and young stars toward l = 240 degrees and extends for over 8 kpc along the line of sight reaching the Outer arm. Finally, we characterize the Galactic warp and compare the geometries implied by the young stellar and CO components.