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Sample records for curing epilepsy progress

  1. Genetics Home Reference: Lafora progressive myoclonus epilepsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Conditions Lafora progressive myoclonus epilepsy Lafora progressive myoclonus epilepsy Printable PDF Open All Close All Enable Javascript ... the expand/collapse boxes. Description Lafora progressive myoclonus epilepsy is a brain disorder characterized by recurrent seizures ( ...

  2. Curing the Epilepsies: The Promise of Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Been Made About the Causes of the Epilepsies Genetic Mutation Identify Biomarkers of Seizure Onset and Epileptogenesis Develop New Animal Models for Studying Epileptogenesis and for Testing Treatments ...

  3. Genetics Home Reference: spinal muscular atrophy with progressive myoclonic epilepsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... myoclonic epilepsy Spinal muscular atrophy with progressive myoclonic epilepsy Printable PDF Open All Close All Enable Javascript ... boxes. Description Spinal muscular atrophy with progressive myoclonic epilepsy (SMA-PME) is a neurological condition that causes ...

  4. SURGERY: Can This Be a Cure for Epilepsy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGoldrick, Patricia E.

    2010-01-01

    Previous articles have discussed patients with intractable epilepsy who have benefited from epilepsy surgery to remove or disconnect the area of the brain that propagates their seizures. Another group of people who may benefit from epilepsy surgery is those who have generalized seizures--seizures where there is no clear onset in the brain. These…

  5. The evolution of epilepsy theory and practice at the National Hospital for the Relief and Cure of Epilepsy, Queen Square between 1860 and 1910.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shorvon, Simon

    2014-02-01

    In the years between 1860 and 1910, a revolution in epilepsy theory and practice occurred. The National Hospital for the Relief and Cure of the Paralysed and the Epileptic at Queen Square in London was at the center of this revolution. A series of remarkable physicians and surgeons were appointed to the staff. The four greatest were John Hughlings Jackson, Sir David Ferrier, Sir Victor Horsley, and Sir William Gowers. Their lasting contribution to epilepsy is discussed. Other physicians who made notable contributions to epilepsy were Jabez Spence Ramskill, Charles Eduard Brown-Séquard, Charles Bland Radcliffe, Sir John Russell Reynolds, Sir Edward Henry Sieveking, Walter Stacy Colman, and William Aldren Turner. At the hospital in this period, amongst the lasting contributions to epilepsy were the following: the development of a new conceptual basis of epilepsy, the development of a theory of the physiological structure of the nervous system in relation to epilepsy, the demonstration and investigation of cortical localization of epileptic activity, the establishment of the principle of focal epilepsy and the description of focal seizure types, the discovery of the first effective drug treatment for epilepsy (bromide therapy, indeed one of the first effective drug treatments in the whole of neurology), and the performance of the first surgical operation for epilepsy. This paper is based on the 2013 Gowers Memorial Lecture, delivered in May 2013. © 2013. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Genetics Home Reference: PRICKLE1-related progressive myoclonus epilepsy with ataxia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... with ataxia PRICKLE1-related progressive myoclonus epilepsy with ataxia Printable PDF Open All Close All Enable Javascript ... boxes. Description PRICKLE1 -related progressive myoclonus epilepsy with ataxia is a rare inherited condition characterized by recurrent ...

  7. Research Progress on Microwave Curing of Epoxy Resin and Its Composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    XU Xue-hong

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Research progress of microwave curing on epoxy resin and its composites was summarized on the basis of introducing the principle of microwave curing technology and its advantages. The paper focused on the effect of microwave curing on the curing rate of epoxy resin and its composites as well as the mechanical and thermal properties of cured products. Two suitable composite systems for wave curing of powder-strengthened epoxy and fiber-strengthened epoxy and a few key technological problems for industrial application are introduced. The application prospect of microwave curing on epoxy resin and its composites was also presented.

  8. Progressive myoclonus epilepsy in Down syndrome patients with dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    d'Orsi, Giuseppe; Specchio, Luigi M

    2014-08-01

    This study aimed to elucidate the natural history of senile myoclonic epilepsy, a type of myoclonic epilepsy associated with Alzheimer's disease in adult Down syndrome patients. Twelve Down syndrome patients over the age of 40 years with myoclonic epilepsy and Alzheimer's disease underwent clinical, neuropsychological, neurophysiological, and neuroradiological study. The kariotypes, APOE polymorphisms, all exons in the PSEN1 and PSEN2 genes, and exons 16 and 17 in the APP gene were determined for all patients. CSF Aβ42, p-tau181, and t-tauAg were determined for two patients. Three main stages appeared during the course of the syndrome. The first stage was characterized by dementia onset (mean age: 51 ± 6.6 years), diffuse EEG abnormalities during sleep, and cerebral atrophy determined using neuroimaging. During the second stage, myoclonic epilepsy manifested (mean age: 51.4 ± 7.2 years) with myoclonic jerks time-locked to diffuse epileptiform abnormalities upon awakening, which was controlled with antiepileptic drugs. During the third stage (mean age: 54.8 ± 7.6 years), myoclonic seizures were replaced with nonepileptic myoclonus, and cerebellar signs, severe dementia, and photosensitivity developed. All patients showed complete trisomy 21. Mutations were ruled out on the APP, PSEN1, and PSEN2 genes, and APOE analysis revealed ε3/ε3 homozygosity. CSF biomarkers showed a decrease in Aβ42 and an increase in p-tau181. The natural history of senile myoclonic epilepsy is consistent with progressive myoclonus epilepsy. Chromosome 21 is implicated in its pathophysiology; however, other genetic and/or environmental risk factors cannot be excluded. The absence of the APOE type 4 allele could predict its progression.

  9. Natural History of Temporal Lobe Epilepsy: Antecedents and Progression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Garima Shukla

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Temporal lobe epilepsy represents the largest group of patients with treatment resistant/medically intractable epilepsy undergoing epilepsy surgery. The underpinnings of common forms of TLE in many instances begin in early life with the occurrence of an initial precipitating event. The first epileptic seizure often occurs after a variable latency period following this event. The precise natural history and progression following the first seizure to the development of TLE, its subsequent resolution through spontaneous remission or the development of treatment resistant epilepsy remain poorly understood. Our present understanding of the role played by these initial events, the subsequent latency to development of temporal lobe epilepsy, and the emergence of treatment resistance remains incomplete. A critical analysis of published data suggest that TLE is a heterogeneous condition, where the age of onset, presence or absence of a lesion on neuroimaging, the initial precipitating event, association with febrile seizures, febrile status epilepticus, and neurotropic viral infections influence the natural history and outcome. The pathways and processes through which these variables coalesce into a framework will provide the basis for an understanding of the natural history of TLE. The questions raised need to be addressed in future prospective and longitudinal observational studies.

  10. Stereo-electroencephalography (SEEG) in children surgically cured of their epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taussig, Delphine; Lebas, Axel; Chipaux, Mathilde; Jan, Maryvonne; Fohlen, Martine; Bulteau, Christine; Dorison, Nathalie; Ferrand-Sorbets, Sarah; Delalande, Olivier; Dorfmüller, Georg

    2016-02-01

    SEEG in children has a low morbidity and leads to a good surgical outcome, in particular in younger patients. We analysed, in detail, the SEEG data of patients that were subsequently cured by surgery. We selected the 48 children explored between 2009 and 2013 in our centre and surgically cured after SEEG-based resections with at least one-year follow-up. We retrospectively studied demographic and surgical data and paid particular attention to the data acquired during the invasive recording. Moreover, we compared the children younger than 5 years of age (group 1: 17 children) to those older than 5 years of age at the time of exploration (group 2: 31 patients). SEEG was well tolerated. Only one patient had slight intracerebral bleeding seen on the post-operative CT-scan without any clinical consequence and which did not prevent the recording. SEEG explored at least four lobes in 59% of patients, either because of a suspected very widespread epileptogenic zone or because of the lack of a precise hypothesis. Auras were recorded only in group 2 (32% of patients, P=0.0009). Despite these difficulties, SEEG led to tailored resections including multilobar resections in 14% and infralobar resections in 69% of patients. The electrical pattern of seizures had no particularities as compared with adults. Interictal spikes and slow waves outside the resection zone were significantly less frequent in group 1 (P=0.02). In symptomatic epilepsies, the lesion matched the irritative zone in only 11% of patients and the ictal onset zone in 32% respectively. Our study confirms the low morbidity of SEEG in children. SEEG can disclose a limited epileptogenic zone. Our data suggest that the epileptic network is less complex in younger patients, which has to be confirmed by a quantitative analysis of SEEG signals. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  11. Late-onset myoclonic epilepsy in Down syndrome (LOMEDS: A spectrum of progressive myoclonic epilepsy — Case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chandra Mohan Sharma

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Cognitive decline and epilepsy are well recognized complication of Down syndrome (DS. Here, we intend to present a case of 28 year old male who presented with progressive mental regression, gait ataxia and myoclonic jerking especially on awakening in morning. His EEG was normal and karyotyping revealed trisomy of chromosome 21. Very few cases had been described in literature of late-onset myoclonic epilepsy in DS. This is first case report from India and our aim is to propose the inclusion of this entity in the spectrum of progressive myoclonic epilepsies but still more cases are yet to be found.

  12. Common comorbidity of epilepsy: a review of new progress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    YANG Xue

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available A range of medical and neurologic disorders occurs more frequently in people with epilepsy than in the general population and constitutes somatic comorbidity. Common examples include migraine, depression, schizophrenia, attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD, sleep disorder, cognitive damage, developmental abnormality and so on. There are more interesting clinical features in some special types of patients with benign epilepsy of childhood with centrotemporal spikes (BECT, temporal epilepsy and mitochondrial encephalomyopathy. The association between epilepsy and other conditions can be due to a variety of interacting genetic, biologic structural, functional, pharmacological and environmental factors. Co-existence of other disorders in a person with epilepsy can complicate diagnosis, induce adverse prognostic implications and attenuate health?related quality of life. Therefore, recognition and management of comorbidity of epilepsy may facilitate the treatment of epilepsy. In this article, we review recent pathophysiologic and clinical studies to elucidate the etiology, mechanisms, clinical characteristics, differential diagnosis and treatment of common comorbidity of epilepsy.

  13. Part Two: Surgery--Can This Be a Cure for Epilepsy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGoldrick, Patricia E.

    2010-01-01

    In the first installment of this series (Exceptional Parent Magazine, May 2010), the author discussed epilepsy surgery performed in persons whose areas of brain abnormality were initially deemed to be too extensive to safely perform a resection of the involved area. The process leading to surgical remediation for seizures is an involved one, but…

  14. Epilepsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epilepsy is a brain disorder that causes people to have recurring seizures. The seizures happen when clusters ... may have violent muscle spasms or lose consciousness. Epilepsy has many possible causes, including illness, brain injury, ...

  15. Epilepsi

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sabers, Anne; Kjær, Troels W

    2014-01-01

    Epilepsy affects around 33,000 people in Denmark. The classification of the epilepsies is currently under revision and the clinical course of the disease depends on the underlying aetiology. Diagnostic evaluation includes EEG and often long-term video-EEG monitoring to ensure the diagnosis and clas......-sification. More than two thirds of patients with epilepsy can obtain complete seizure control. The remainders, counting around 12.000 patients in Denmark, having medical refractory epilepsy should be considered for other treatment options; epilepsy surgery or other non-pharmacological treatment....

  16. A systematic review of the risks factors associated with the onset and natural progression of epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, Stephanie; Donnan, Jennifer; Fortin, Yannick; Sikora, Lindsey; Morrissey, Andrea; Collins, Kayla; MacDonald, Don

    2017-07-01

    Epilepsy is a neurological condition that affects more than 50 million individuals worldwide. It presents as unpredictable, temporary and recurrent seizures often having negative physical, psychological and social consequences. To inform disease prevention and management strategies, a comprehensive systematic review of the literature on risk factors for the onset and natural progression of epilepsy was conducted. Computerized bibliographic databases for systematic reviews, meta-analyses, observational studies and genetic association studies published between 1990 and 2013 describing etiological risk factors for epilepsy was searched. The quality of systematic reviews was validated using the AMSTAR tool and articles were reviewed by two referees. A total of 16,958 articles went through stage one review of abstracts and titles. A total of 76 articles on genetic and non-genetic risk factors for the onset and progression of epilepsy met the eligibility criteria for data extraction. Dozens of risk factors were significantly associated with onset of epilepsy. Inconsistent levels of evidence for risk of onset included family history of epilepsy, history of febrile seizures, alcohol consumption, CNS and other infections, brain trauma, head injury, perinatal stroke, preterm birth and three genetic markers. Limited evidence showed that symptomatic epilepsy, focal seizures/syndromes, slow waves on EEG, higher seizure frequency, high stress or anxiety, and lack of sleep decreased the odds of seizure remission. High quality studies were rare and while a large body of work exists, relatively few systematic reviews were found. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  17. The efficacy of the modified Atkins diet in North Sea Progressive Myoclonus Epilepsy : an observational prospective open-label study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Egmond, Martje E.; Weijenberg, Amerins; van Rijn, Margreet E.; Elting, Jan Willem J.; Gelauff, Jeannette M.; Zutt, Rodi; Sival, Deborah A.; Lambrechts, Roald A.; Tijssen, Marina A. J.; Brouwer, Oebele F.; de Koning, Tom J.

    2017-01-01

    Background: North Sea Progressive Myoclonus Epilepsy is a rare and severe disorder caused by mutations in the GOSR2 gene. It is clinically characterized by progressive myoclonus, seizures, early-onset ataxia and areflexia. As in other progressive myoclonus epilepsies, the efficacy of antiepileptic

  18. A mutation in the Golgi Qb-SNARE gene GOSR2 causes progressive myoclonus epilepsy with early ataxia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Corbett, M.; Schwake, M.; Bahlo, M.; Dibbens, L.M.; Lin, M.; Gandolfo, L.C.; Vears, D.F.; O'Sullivan, J.D.; Robertson, T.; Bayly, M.A.; Gardner, A.E.; Vlaar, A.M.M.; Korenke, G.C.; Bloem, B.R.; Coo, I.F.M. de; Verhagen, J.M.; Lehesjoki, A.E.; Gecz, J.; Berkovic, S.F.

    2011-01-01

    The progressive myoclonus epilepsies (PMEs) are a group of predominantly recessive disorders that present with action myoclonus, tonic-clonic seizures, and progressive neurological decline. Many PMEs have similar clinical presentations yet are genetically heterogeneous, making accurate diagnosis

  19. Epilepsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... like staring at a computer screen or playing video games for too long) fever certain medications hyperventilation (breathing ... will check for epilepsy or other conditions. In addition to doing a physical examination , the neurologist will ...

  20. Epilepsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... psychological responses to living with epilepsy. Contact: NINDS Brain Resource and Information Network, PO Box 5801 Bethesda, MD 20824, (800) ... Department of Health and Human Services | USA.gov | Grants.gov Page Last Updated ...

  1. 'North Sea' progressive myoclonus epilepsy: phenotype of subjects with GOSR2 mutation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boisse Lomax, L.; Bayly, M.A.; Hjalgrim, H.; Moller, R.S.; Vlaar, A.M.M.; Aaberg, K.M.; Marquardt, I.; Gandolfo, L.C.; Willemsen, M.A.; Kamsteeg, E.J.; O'Sullivan, J.D.; Korenke, G.C.; Bloem, B.R.; Coo, I.F. de; Verhagen, J.M.A.; Said, I.; Prescott, T.; Stray-Pedersen, A.; Rasmussen, M.; Vears, D.F.; Lehesjoki, A.E.; Corbett, M.A.; Bahlo, M.; Gecz, J.; Dibbens, L.M.; Berkovic, S.F.

    2013-01-01

    We previously identified a homozygous mutation in the Golgi SNAP receptor complex 2 gene (GOSR2) in six patients with progressive myoclonus epilepsy. To define the syndrome better we analysed the clinical and electrophysiological phenotype in 12 patients with GOSR2 mutations, including six new

  2. A recurrent de novo mutation in KCNC1 causes progressive myoclonus epilepsy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Muona, M.; Berkovic, S. F.; Dibbens, L. M.

    2015-01-01

    Progressive myoclonus epilepsies (PMEs) are a group of rare, inherited disorders manifesting with action myoclonus, tonicclonic seizures and ataxia. We sequenced the exomes of 84 unrelated individuals with PME of unknown cause and molecularly solved 26 cases (31%). Remarkably, a recurrent de novo...

  3. Epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marson, Anthony G; Maguire, Melissa; Ramaratnam, Sridharan

    2009-01-28

    About 3% of people will be diagnosed with epilepsy during their lifetime, but about 70% of people with epilepsy eventually go into remission. We conducted a systematic review and aimed to answer the following clinical questions: What are the benefits and risks of starting anti-epileptic drug treatment following a single seizure? What are the effects of monotherapy in newly diagnosed partial epilepsy, and in newly diagnosed generalised epilepsy (tonic clonic type)? What are the effects of additional treatments in people with drug-resistant partial epilepsy? Which people in remission from seizures are at risk of relapse on withdrawal of drug treatment? What are the effects of behavioural and psychological treatments for people with epilepsy? What are the effects of surgery in people with drug-resistant temporal lobe epilepsy? We searched: Medline, Embase, The Cochrane Library, and other important databases up to April 2007 (Clinical Evidence reviews are updated periodically; please check our website for the most up-to-date version of this review). We included harms alerts from relevant organisations such as the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the UK Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA). We found 59 systematic reviews, RCTs, or observational studies that met our inclusion criteria. We performed a GRADE evaluation of the quality of evidence for interventions. In this systematic review we present information relating to the effectiveness and safety of the following interventions: addition of second-line drugs (gabapentin, levetiracetam, lamotrigine, oxcarbazepine, tiagabine, topiramate, vigabatrin, or zonisamide), amygdalohippocampectomy, anti-epileptic drug withdrawal for people in remission, anti-epileptic drugs after a single seizure, biofeedback, carbamazepine, cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT), educational programmes, family counselling, hemispherectomy, lesionectomy, phenobarbital, phenytoin, relaxation therapy (alone or plus

  4. The COPD Foundation: Celebrating a Decade of Progress and Looking Ahead to a Cure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomashow, Byron M; Walsh, John W; Malanga, Elisha D F

    2014-05-06

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) affects 15-25 million Americans and over 300 million people around the world. The COPD Foundation is a global organization whose mission is to prevent and cure COPD and to improve the lives of all people affected by it. The year 2014 marks the 10th anniversary of the COPD Foundation. The Foundation works to accomplish its mission through a unique partnership between patients, patient families, health care providers, investigators, academic institutions, government agencies and industry. This partnership has led to real progress in awareness, advocacy, education, and research, but much more needs to be done.

  5. Epilepsy

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    Fisher, R.S.; Frost, J.J. (Johns Hopkins Univ., Baltimore, MD (USA))

    1991-04-01

    As surgical treatments for adult and pediatric forms of epilepsy have become more refined, methods for noninvasive localization of epileptogenic foci have become increasingly important. Detection of focal brain metabolic or flow abnormalities is now well recognized as an essential step in the presurgical evaluation of many patients with epilepsy. Positron emission tomography (PET) scanning is most beneficial when used in the context of the total clinical evaluation of patients, including scalp EEG, invasive EEG, neuropsychologic testing, etc. Metabolic PET studies also give insight into pathophysiologic mechanisms of epilepsy. The dynamic nature of the interictal hypometabolism observed with 18(F)FDG in some patients suggests that excitatory or inhibitory neurotransmitters and their receptors may be involved. An exciting current application of PET scanning is the use of tracers for neurotransmitter receptors in the study of epilepsy patients. Mu and non-mu opiate receptors have been extensively studied and are beginning to give new insights into this disorder. Increased labeling of mu receptors in temporal neocortex using 11C-carfentanil has been demonstrated and, in some patients, supplements the clinical localization information from 18(F)FDG studies. Increased mu opiate receptor number or affinity is thought to play a role in anticonvulsant mechanisms. Specificity of increased mu receptors is supported by the absence of significant changes in non-mu opiate receptors. Other brain receptors are also of interest for future studies, particularly those for excitatory neurotransmitters. Combined studies of flow, metabolism, and neuroreceptors may elucidate the factors responsible for initiation and termination of seizures, thus improving patient treatment.95 references.

  6. 'North Sea' progressive myoclonus epilepsy: phenotype of subjects with GOSR2 mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boissé Lomax, Lysa; Bayly, Marta A; Hjalgrim, Helle; Møller, Rikke S; Vlaar, Annemarie M; Aaberg, Kari M; Marquardt, Iris; Gandolfo, Luke C; Willemsen, Michèl; Kamsteeg, Erik-Jan; O'Sullivan, John D; Korenke, G Christoph; Bloem, Bastiaan R; de Coo, Irenaeus F; Verhagen, Judith M A; Said, Ines; Prescott, Trine; Stray-Pedersen, Asbjørg; Rasmussen, Magnhild; Vears, Danya F; Lehesjoki, Anna-Elina; Corbett, Mark A; Bahlo, Melanie; Gecz, Jozef; Dibbens, Leanne M; Berkovic, Samuel F

    2013-04-01

    We previously identified a homozygous mutation in the Golgi SNAP receptor complex 2 gene (GOSR2) in six patients with progressive myoclonus epilepsy. To define the syndrome better we analysed the clinical and electrophysiological phenotype in 12 patients with GOSR2 mutations, including six new unrelated subjects. Clinical presentation was remarkably similar with early onset ataxia (average 2 years of age), followed by myoclonic seizures at the average age of 6.5 years. Patients developed multiple seizure types, including generalized tonic clonic seizures, absence seizures and drop attacks. All patients developed scoliosis by adolescence, making this an important diagnostic clue. Additional skeletal deformities were present, including pes cavus in four patients and syndactyly in two patients. All patients had elevated serum creatine kinase levels (median 734 IU) in the context of normal muscle biopsies. Electroencephalography revealed pronounced generalized spike and wave discharges with a posterior predominance and photosensitivity in all patients, with focal EEG features seen in seven patients. The disease course showed a relentless decline; patients uniformly became wheelchair bound (mean age 13 years) and four had died during their third or early fourth decade. All 12 cases had the same variant (c.430G>T, G144W) and haplotype analyses confirmed a founder effect. The cases all came from countries bounding the North Sea, extending to the coastal region of Northern Norway. 'North Sea' progressive myoclonus epilepsy has a homogeneous clinical presentation and relentless disease course allowing ready identification from the other progressive myoclonus epilepsies.

  7. Shaken infant syndrome: developmental neuropathology, progressive cortical dysplasia, and epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marín-Padilla, Miguel; Parisi, Joseph E; Armstrong, Dawna L; Sargent, Steve K; Kaplan, James A

    2002-04-01

    This study describes the developmental neuropathology of two infants who survived 7 and 9 years, respectively, an episode of violent shaking (shaken infant syndrome) early in their lives. The shaking injuries include cortical and subcortical contusions, hemorrhages, hypoxic/ischemic and axonal damage, and severe edema. The types, distribution, and resolution of these shaking injuries are detailed by sequential radiographic studies and by pathologic examination at postmortem. Despite their severity and extent, these injuries resolved in a relatively short period of time. By 6 months, the original injuries are repaired and the resultant encephaloclastic encephalopathies (e.g., multicystic encephalomalacia, porencephaly, generalized white matter attenuation, diffuse cortical atrophy, microgyria, ulegyria, and hydrocephalus ex vacuo) are well established. No appreciable pathologic differences are detected when radiographic findings at 6 months of age are compared to postmortem observations. On the other hand, undamaged and/or partially damaged cortical regions survive the original insult and undergo post-injury reorganization that transforms the residual cortex structural and presumably functional organization. Prominent features of this post-injury reorganization include progressive cortical dysplasia with cytoarchitectural disorganization, laminar obliteration, morphologic and functional (synaptic reorganization) transformation of some neurons, preservation of layer 1 intrinsic fibers and Cajal-Retzius cells, and the presence of large (hypertrophic) intrinsic neurons with intense neurofilament immunoreactivity. We propose that this progressive dysplastic process modifies the residual cortex structural and functional organization, influences the child's neurological and psychological maturation, and may play a significant role in the pathogenesis of ensuing neurological and/or psychological sequelae.

  8. Inherited progressive epilepsy of the dog with comparisons to Lafora's disease of man.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hegreberg, G A; Padgett, G A

    1976-04-01

    A familial progressive form of epilepsy in the beagle dog is clinically characterized by intermittent seizures, often of grand mal type. If not properly treated, the seizures may lead to status epilepticus. The seizures are often elicited by external stimuli, especially a change in noise or light in the surroundings. Histologically, intracytoplasmic inclusions, 2-10 mum in diameter, occur in glial and neuronal cells in the brain, especially the thalamus. The inclusions are strongly positive for carbohydrate stains, weakly metachromatic, and lipid negative. They are spherical with a dense core and an often radiating, less dense periphery. Histologic changes in other organs include basophilic myocardial degeneration, degeneration and variation in diameter size of skeletal muscle fibers, and deposition of periodic acid-Schiff positive material in the cytoplasm of reticuloendothelial cells of the liver, spleen, and lymph nodes. Based on clinical and morphologic manifestations, the beagle disorder resembles Lafora's disease of man. This disorder will provide a useful model for comparative studies with progressive myoclonic epilepsy (Lafora's disease) of man and for defining the pathomechanisms of other forms of epilepsy.

  9. The efficacy of the modified Atkins diet in North Sea Progressive Myoclonus Epilepsy: an observational prospective open-label study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Egmond, Martje E; Weijenberg, Amerins; van Rijn, Margreet E; Elting, Jan Willem J; Gelauff, Jeannette M; Zutt, Rodi; Sival, Deborah A; Lambrechts, Roald A; Tijssen, Marina A J; Brouwer, Oebele F; de Koning, Tom J

    2017-03-07

    North Sea Progressive Myoclonus Epilepsy is a rare and severe disorder caused by mutations in the GOSR2 gene. It is clinically characterized by progressive myoclonus, seizures, early-onset ataxia and areflexia. As in other progressive myoclonus epilepsies, the efficacy of antiepileptic drugs is disappointingly limited in North Sea Progressive Myoclonus Epilepsy. The ketogenic diet and the less restrictive modified Atkins diet have been proven to be effective in other drug-resistant epilepsy syndromes, including those with myoclonic seizures. Our aim was to evaluate the efficacy of the modified Atkins diet in patients with North Sea Progressive Myoclonus Epilepsy. Four North Sea Progressive Myoclonus Epilepsy patients (aged 7-20 years) participated in an observational, prospective, open-label study on the efficacy of the modified Atkins diet. Several clinical parameters were assessed at baseline and again after participants had been on the diet for 3 months. The primary outcome measure was health-related quality of life, with seizure frequency and blinded rated myoclonus severity as secondary outcome measures. Ketosis was achieved within 2 weeks and all patients completed the 3 months on the modified Atkins diet. The diet was well tolerated by all four patients. Health-related quality of life improved considerably in one patient and showed sustained improvement during long-term follow-up, despite the progressive nature of the disorder. Health-related quality of life remained broadly unchanged in the other three patients and they did not continue the diet. Seizure frequency remained stable and blinded rating of their myoclonus showed improvement, albeit modest, in all patients. This observational, prospective study shows that some North Sea Progressive Myoclonus Epilepsy patients may benefit from the modified Atkins diet with sustained health-related quality of life improvement. Not all our patients continued on the diet, but nonetheless we show that the modified

  10. Progress Toward HIV Eradication: Case Reports, Current Efforts, and the Challenges Associated with Cure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Alyssa R; Siliciano, Robert F

    2016-01-01

    An estimated 35 million people worldwide are infected with HIV, yet a widely applicable cure strategy remains elusive. Recent case reports have suggested that curing HIV infection is possible, renewing excitement about research efforts. We describe those cases and discuss their relevance to the global HIV epidemic. We also review ongoing cure strategies that are transitioning from the lab to the clinic, and the assays and clinical assessments that can be used to evaluate cure interventions.

  11. K+ CHANNELEPSY: progress in the neurobiology of potassium channels and epilepsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Cristina D'Adamo

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available K+ channels are important determinants of seizure susceptibility. These membrane proteins, encoded by more than 70 genes, make the largest group of ion channels that fine-tune the electrical activity of neuronal and non-neuronal cells in the brain. Their ubiquity and extremely high genetic and functional diversity, unmatched by any other ion channel type, place K+ channels as primary targets of genetic variations or perturbations in K+-dependent homeostasis, even in the absence of a primary channel defect. It is therefore not surprising that numerous inherited or acquired K+ channels dysfunctions have been associated with several neurologic syndromes, including epilepsy, which often generate confusion in the classification of the associated diseases. Therefore, we propose to name the K+ channels defects underlying distinct epilepsies as K+ channelepsies, and introduce a new nomenclature (e.g. Kx.y-channelepsy, following the widely used K+ channel classification, which could be also adopted to easily identify other channelopathies involving Na+ (e.g. Navx.y-phenotype, Ca2+ (e.g. Cavx.y-phenotype, and Cl- channels. Furthermore, we discuss novel genetic defects in K+ channels and associated proteins that underlie distinct epileptic phenotypes in humans, and analyze critically the recent progress in the neurobiology of this disease that has also been provided by investigations on valuable animal models of epilepsy. The abundant and varied lines of evidence discussed here strongly foster assessments for variations in genes encoding for K+ channels and associated proteins in patients with idiopathic epilepsy, provide new avenues for future investigations, and highlight these proteins as critical pharmacological targets.

  12. Epilepsy - children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seizure disorder - children; Convulsion - childhood epilepsy; Medically refractory childhood epilepsy; Anticonvulsant - childhood epilepsy; Antiepileptic drug - childhood epilepsy; AED - childhood epilepsy

  13. Severe 5,10-methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase deficiency and two MTHFR variants in an adolescent with progressive myoclonic epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Aco, Kristin E; Bearden, David; Watkins, David; Hyland, Keith; Rosenblatt, David S; Ficicioglu, Can

    2014-08-01

    5,10-Methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) deficiency is an inborn error of the folate-recycling pathway that affects the remethylation of homocysteine to methionine. The clinical presentation of MTHFR deficiency is highly variable ranging from early neurological deterioration and death in infancy to a mild thrombophilia in adults. We describe an adolescent girl with a history of mild learning disabilities who presented at age 14 years with an epilepsy syndrome initially thought to be juvenile myoclonic epilepsy. She later developed intractable epilepsy with myoclonus, leg weakness, cognitive decline, and ataxia consistent with the syndrome of progressive myoclonic epilepsy. This prompted further evaluation that revealed elevated plasma homocysteine and decreased plasma methionine. The diagnosis of MTHFR deficiency was confirmed based on extremely reduced fibroblast MTHFR activity (0.3 nmol CHO/mg prot/hr) as well as mutation analysis that revealed two variants in the MTHFR gene, a splice site mutation p (IVS5-1G>A), as well as a missense mutation (c.155 G>A; p. Arg52Gln). Therapy with folinic acid, betaine, and methionine has produced significant clinical improvement, including improved strength, less severe ataxia, and decreased seizure frequency, as well as improvements in her electroencephalography and electromyography. This patient demonstrates the importance of considering MTHFR deficiency in the differential diagnosis of progressive myoclonic epilepsy because it is one of the few causes for which specific treatment is available. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Progress towards an HIV cure: update from the 2014 International AIDS Society Symposium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Jenny Louise; Fromentin, Rémi; Corbelli, Giulio Maria; Østergaard, Lars; Ross, Anna Laura

    2015-01-01

    Biomedical research has led to profound advances in the treatment of HIV infection. Combination antiretroviral therapy (ART) now provides the means to readily control viral infection, and people living with HIV who receive timely and effective ART can expect to benefit from a life expectancy comparable to uninfected individuals. Nevertheless, despite effective treatment, ART does not fully restore the immune system and importantly HIV persists indefinitely in latent reservoirs, resulting in the need for life-long treatment. The challenges and limits of life-long treatment have spurred significant scientific interest and global investment into research towards an HIV cure. The International AIDS Society (IAS) 2014 Towards an HIV cure symposium brought together researchers and community to discuss the most recent advances in our understanding of latency and HIV reservoirs, and the clinical approaches towards an HIV cure under current investigation. This report summarizes and reviews some of the major findings discussed during the symposium.

  15. What do temporal lobe epilepsy and progressive mild cognitive impairment have in common?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Höller eYvonne

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE and mild cognitive impairment (MCI are both subject to intensive memory research. Memory problems are a core characteristic of both conditions and we wonder if there are analogies which would enrich the two distinct research communities.In this review we focus on memory decline in both conditions, that is, the most feared psychosocial effect. While it is clear that memory decline in MCI is highly likely and would lead to the more severe diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease, it is a debate if TLE is a dementing disease or not. As such, like for MCI, one can differentiate progressive from stable TLE subtypes, mainly depending on the age of onset.Neuroimaging techniques such as volumetric analysis of the hippocampus, entorhinal, and perirhinal cortex show evidence of pathological changes in TLE and are predictive for memory decline in MCI. Several studies emphasize that it is necessary to extend the region of interest - even whole-brain characteristics can be predictive for conversion from MCI to Alzheimer's disease.Electroencephalography is increasingly subject to computational neuroscience, revealing new approaches for analyzing frequency, spatial synchronization, and information content of the signals. These methods together with event-related designs that assess memory functions are highly promising for understanding the mechanisms of memory decline in both TLE and MCI populations. Finally, there is evidence that the potential of such markers for memory decline is far from being exhausted.Similar structural and neurophysiological characteristics are linked to memory decline in TLE and MCI. We raise the hope that interdisciplinary research and cross-talk between fields such as research on epilepsy and dementia, will shed further light on the dementing characteristics of the pathological basis of MCI and TLE and support the development of new memory enhancing treatment strategies.

  16. Hereditary epilepsy syndromes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Callenbach, PMC; Brouwer, OF

    This paper reviews the present knowledge on the genetics of the epilepsies. Main clinical features, gene localization and pattern of inheritance of the idiopathic epilepsies, the progressive myoclonus epilepsies, and some other genetic disorders often associated with epilepsy, are described. (C)

  17. Advances in the development of biomarkers for epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitkänen, Asla; Löscher, Wolfgang; Vezzani, Annamaria; Becker, Albert J; Simonato, Michele; Lukasiuk, Katarzyna; Gröhn, Olli; Bankstahl, Jens P; Friedman, Alon; Aronica, Eleonora; Gorter, Jan A; Ravizza, Teresa; Sisodiya, Sanjay M; Kokaia, Merab; Beck, Heinz

    2016-07-01

    Over 50 million people worldwide have epilepsy. In nearly 30% of these cases, epilepsy remains unsatisfactorily controlled despite the availability of over 20 antiepileptic drugs. Moreover, no treatments exist to prevent the development of epilepsy in those at risk, despite an increasing understanding of the underlying molecular and cellular pathways. One of the major factors that have impeded rapid progress in these areas is the complex and multifactorial nature of epilepsy, and its heterogeneity. Therefore, the vision of developing targeted treatments for epilepsy relies upon the development of biomarkers that allow individually tailored treatment. Biomarkers for epilepsy typically fall into two broad categories: diagnostic biomarkers, which provide information on the clinical status of, and potentially the sensitivity to, specific treatments, and prognostic biomarkers, which allow prediction of future clinical features, such as the speed of progression, severity of epilepsy, development of comorbidities, or prediction of remission or cure. Prognostic biomarkers are of particular importance because they could be used to identify which patients will develop epilepsy and which might benefit from preventive treatments. Biomarker research faces several challenges; however, biomarkers could substantially improve the management of people with epilepsy and could lead to prevention in the right person at the right time, rather than just symptomatic treatment. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. [Current research situation and prospect of auricular acupuncture for epilepsy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Jingjun; Rong, Peijing; Zhu, Bing

    2015-08-01

    Epilepsy is a group of chronic diseases characterized by recurrent and transient brain dysfunction induced by abrupt and intermittent abnormal discharge of neurons in the brain, which is difficult to be cured. Thee auricular concha are is he zone of visera in TCM auricular points, but also the innervating area of the auricular brach of the vagus nerve. Auricular acupuncture, as a special treatment, has superior therapeutic effect for epilepsy. In recent years, remarkable progress has been made in the theoretical basis and clinic application of auricular acupuncture for epilepsy, and the ear-vagus percutaneous electrical stimulation apparatus (auricular acupuncture apparatus) is developed for clinical trial researches. From the basic study to clinical research of auricular acupuncture for epilepsy, the epilepsy pathogenesis as well as the intervention pathway and clinical efficacy of auricular: experimental support and rich clinical experience for auricular acupuncture apparatus.

  19. Delineating SPTAN1 associated phenotypes: from isolated epilepsy to encephalopathy with progressive brain atrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Syrbe, Steffen; Harms, Frederike L; Parrini, Elena; Montomoli, Martino; Mütze, Ulrike; Helbig, Katherine L; Polster, Tilman; Albrecht, Beate; Bernbeck, Ulrich; van Binsbergen, Ellen; Biskup, Saskia; Burglen, Lydie; Denecke, Jonas; Heron, Bénédicte; Heyne, Henrike O; Hoffmann, Georg F; Hornemann, Frauke; Matsushige, Takeshi; Matsuura, Ryuki; Kato, Mitsuhiro; Korenke, G Christoph; Kuechler, Alma; Lämmer, Constanze; Merkenschlager, Andreas; Mignot, Cyril; Ruf, Susanne; Nakashima, Mitsuko; Saitsu, Hirotomo; Stamberger, Hannah; Pisano, Tiziana; Tohyama, Jun; Weckhuysen, Sarah; Werckx, Wendy; Wickert, Julia; Mari, Francesco; Verbeek, Nienke E; Møller, Rikke S; Koeleman, Bobby; Matsumoto, Naomichi; Dobyns, William B; Battaglia, Domenica; Lemke, Johannes R; Kutsche, Kerstin; Guerrini, Renzo

    2017-09-01

    De novo in-frame deletions and duplications in the SPTAN1 gene, encoding the non-erythrocyte αII spectrin, have been associated with severe West syndrome with hypomyelination and pontocerebellar atrophy. We aimed at comprehensively delineating the phenotypic spectrum associated with SPTAN1 mutations. Using different molecular genetic techniques, we identified 20 patients with a pathogenic or likely pathogenic SPTAN1 variant and reviewed their clinical, genetic and imaging data. SPTAN1 de novo alterations included seven unique missense variants and nine in-frame deletions/duplications of which 12 were novel. The recurrent three-amino acid duplication p.(Asp2303_Leu2305dup) occurred in five patients. Our patient cohort exhibited a broad spectrum of neurodevelopmental phenotypes, comprising six patients with mild to moderate intellectual disability, with or without epilepsy and behavioural disorders, and 14 patients with infantile epileptic encephalopathy, of which 13 had severe neurodevelopmental impairment and four died in early childhood. Imaging studies suggested that the severity of neurological impairment and epilepsy correlates with that of structural abnormalities as well as the mutation type and location. Out of seven patients harbouring mutations outside the α/β spectrin heterodimerization domain, four had normal brain imaging and three exhibited moderately progressive brain and/or cerebellar atrophy. Twelve of 13 patients with mutations located within the spectrin heterodimer contact site exhibited severe and progressive brain, brainstem and cerebellar atrophy, with hypomyelination in most. We used fibroblasts from five patients to study spectrin aggregate formation by Triton-X extraction and immunocytochemistry followed by fluorescence microscopy. αII/βII aggregates and αII spectrin in the insoluble protein fraction were observed in fibroblasts derived from patients with the mutations p.(Glu2207del), p.(Asp2303_Leu2305dup) and p.(Arg2308_Met2309dup

  20. About Epilepsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Health Care » Epilepsy Centers of Excellence » About Epilepsy Epilepsy Centers of Excellence Menu Menu Epilepsy Centers of ... ZIP code here Enter ZIP code here About Epilepsy What is epilepsy? What are seizures? Epilepsy vs ...

  1. Probiotics in Curing Allergic and Inflammatory Conditions - Research Progress and Futuristic Vision.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhama, Kuldeep; Latheef, Shyma K; Munjal, Ashok K; Khandia, Rekha; Samad, Hari A; Iqbal, Hafiz M N; Joshi, Sunil K

    2017-01-01

    Probiotics constitute the viable and beneficial microbes, which offer a dietary means to sustain the balance of gastro-intestinal (GI) microflora. Owing to their multiple health benefits, these have recently gained wide attention among researchers for exploring their potential in safeguarding the health of humans and animals. Probiotics could also modulate host-immune responses, thereby help in counteracting the immunological dysfunctions. Probiotics can inhibit the systemic invasion of pathogens entering through the GI mucosa/ oral cavity and have been found to possess effective prophylactic and therapeutic utilities against various infectious pathogens as well as non-infectious diseases and disorders. The present review expedites the role of probiotics in curing the ailments related to allergic and inflammatory disease conditions. A thorough reviewing of the literature and patents available on probiotics and their role in countering inflammation and allergy was conducted using authentic published resources available on Medline, PubMed, PubMed Central, Science Direct and other scientific databases. The information retrieved has been compiled and analysed pertaining to the theme of the study. Various micro-organisms have been evaluated for their probiotic efficacy, among these, the lactic acid bacteria viz. Lactobacillus sp. and Bifidobacterium sp. have extensively been studied and widely exploited. In the current post-globalized era of self and complementary medicines, the concept of probiotics and their therapeutic as well as prophylactic usage is gaining wide acceptance. As more and more bacterial strains are being proven for their pronounced influence on down regulation of immune regulation, atopic, inflammatory conditions, the use of probiotics is getting increased especially in the developed countries where such indications are high in prevalence. Apart from usage in immune related disorders, probiotics have been found to be effective in treating pouchitis

  2. A gene defect causing a novel progressive epilepsy with mental retardation, EPMR, maps to chromosome 8p

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ranta, S.; Tahvanainen, E.; Karila, E. [Univ. of Helsinki (Finland)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    EPMR (progressive epilepsy with mental retardation) is a newly discovered autosomal recessively inherited disorder which occurs with high frequency in an isolated rural population in Finland. So far 25 patients have been identified, 21 of whom are alive. Twenty-three patients share a common ancestor from the 18th century. The main features of EPMR are: normal early development, tonic-clonic seizures with onset between ages 5 and 10, and mental retardation which begins approximately 2 years after the onset of epilepsy and soon leads to deepening mental retardation. Adult patients do not manage their daily life without help. The EEG is normal at the onset of epilepsy but later progressive slowing of the background activity occurs. The etiology and pathogenesis of EPMR remain known. As this is a novel disease entity without any definitive diagnostic marker we wished to begin its elucidation by first defining its gene locus. A random search for linkage in four multiplex families (only 20 individuals tested) resulted in the finding of linkage to marker D8S264 with a lod score of 4.45 at zero recombination. The EPMR gene resides in a 7 centimorgan interval between marker loci AFM185xb2 and D8S262 with a maximum multipoint lod score of 7.03 at 1.8 centimorgans proximal to D8S264. Physically this region is very distal on 8p. Of the sixteen EPMR chromosomes haplotyped 15 were identical or almost identical. One chromosome, however, had a distinctly different haplotype raising the possibility of there being two different mutations or one very old mutation. These findings are a starting point toward isolating and characterizing the gene and its protein product. Physical mapping has been initiated by isolating nine YACs from the region.

  3. Haiti's progress in achieving its 10-year plan to eliminate cholera: hidden sickness cannot be cured

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koski-Karell V

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Victoria Koski-Karell,1,2 Paul E Farmer,2–4 Benito Isaac,5 Elizabeth M Campa,5 Loune Viaud,5 Paul C Namphy,6 Ralph Ternier,5 Louise C Ivers2–4 1Department of Anthropology, University of Michigan, and University of Michigan Medical School, Ann Arbor, MI, 2Partners In Health, 3Department of Global Health and Social Medicine, Harvard Medical School, 4Department of Medicine, Division of Global Health Equity, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, MA, USA; 5Zanmi Lasante, Cange, 6Direction Nationale de l'Eau Potable et de l'Assainissement, Port-au-Prince, Haiti Abstract: Since the beginning of the cholera epidemic in Haiti 5 years ago, the prevalence of this deadly water-borne disease has fallen far below the initial rates registered during its explosive outset. However, cholera continues to cause extensive suffering and needless deaths across the country, particularly among the poor. The urgent need to eliminate transmission of cholera persists: compared to the same period in 2014, the first 4 months of 2015 saw three times the number of cholera cases. Drawing upon epidemiology, clinical work (and clinical knowledge, policy, ecology, and political economy, and informed by ethnographic data collected in a rural area of Haiti called Bocozel, this paper evaluates the progress of the nation's 10-year Plan for the Elimination of Cholera. Bocozel is a rice-producing region where most people live in extreme poverty. The irrigation network is decrepit, the land is prone to environmental shocks, fertilizer is not affordable, and the government's capacity to assist farmers is undermined by resource constraints. When peasants do have rice to sell, the price of domestically grown rice is twice that of US-imported rice. Canal water is not only used to irrigate thousands of acres of rice paddies and sustain livestock, but also to bathe, wash, and play, while water from wells, hand pumps, and the river is used for drinking, cooking, and bathing. Only one out of

  4. Concomitant fractional anisotropy and volumetric abnormalities in temporal lobe epilepsy: cross-sectional evidence for progressive neurologic injury.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simon S Keller

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: In patients with temporal lobe epilepsy and associated hippocampal sclerosis (TLEhs there are brain abnormalities extending beyond the presumed epileptogenic zone as revealed separately in conventional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI and MR diffusion tensor imaging (DTI studies. However, little is known about the relation between macroscopic atrophy (revealed by volumetric MRI and microstructural degeneration (inferred by DTI. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: For 62 patients with unilateral TLEhs and 68 healthy controls, we determined volumes and mean fractional anisotropy (FA of ipsilateral and contralateral brain structures from T1-weighted and DTI data, respectively. We report significant volume atrophy and FA alterations of temporal lobe, subcortical and callosal regions, which were more diffuse and bilateral in patients with left TLEhs relative to right TLEhs. We observed significant relationships between volume loss and mean FA, particularly of the thalamus and putamen bilaterally. When corrected for age, duration of epilepsy was significantly correlated with FA loss of an anatomically plausible route - including ipsilateral parahippocampal gyrus and temporal lobe white matter, the thalamus bilaterally, and posterior regions of the corpus callosum that contain temporal lobe fibres - that may be suggestive of progressive brain degeneration in response to recurrent seizures. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Chronic TLEhs is associated with interrelated DTI-derived and volume-derived brain degenerative abnormalities that are influenced by the duration of the disorder and the side of seizure onset. This work confirms previously contradictory findings by employing multi-modal imaging techniques in parallel in a large sample of patients.

  5. Disease progression and treatment response of idiopathic epilepsy in Australian Shepherd dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weissl, J; Hülsmeyer, V; Brauer, C; Tipold, A; Koskinen, L L; Kyöstilä, K; Lohi, H; Sauter-Louis, C; Wolf, M; Fischer, A

    2012-01-01

    Idiopathic epilepsy (IE) in Australian Shepherds (ASs) occurs worldwide but there is a lack of description of the epilepsy syndrome in this breed. The ABCB1-1Δ mutation is more prevalent in ASs than in many other dog breeds. Australian Shepherds suffer from a poorly controlled IE syndrome with prevailing severe courses. Seizure control and ABCB1-1Δ mutation might be related in this breed. Fifty ASs diagnosed with IE and 50 unaffected ASs. Predominant study design is a longitudinal cohort study. Pedigrees, medical records, seizure, and treatment data of ASs with IE were analyzed descriptively. Sex, color, and the ABCB1-1Δ genotype were compared between case and control groups and ASs with poorly or well-controlled seizures. Differences in survival times were assessed by logrank tests and Cox regression analysis. Idiopathic epilepsy in ASs is dominated by moderate and severe clinical courses with the occurrence of cluster seizures and status epilepticus and a high seizure frequency. Poor seizure control and a high initial seizure frequency (≥10 seizure days/first 6 months) are associated with shorter survival times (P < .05). Poor seizure control, unrelated to the ABCB1(MDR1) genotype, is evident in 56% of epileptic ASs. Pedigree analysis suggests a genetic basis. Frequent severe clinical courses, poor seizure control unrelated to the ABCB1(MDR1) genotype, and a young age at death compromise animal welfare and warrant further genetic studies to unravel the underlaying molecular mechanisms of IE and seizure control in the breed. Copyright © 2011 by the American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine.

  6. Inherited epilepsy in dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekenstedt, Kari J; Oberbauer, Anita M

    2013-05-01

    Epilepsy is the most common neurologic disease in dogs and many forms are considered to have a genetic basis. In contrast, some seizure disorders are also heritable, but are not technically defined as epilepsy. Investigation of true canine epilepsies has uncovered genetic associations in some cases, however, many remain unexplained. Gene mutations have been described for 2 forms of canine epilepsy: primary epilepsy (PE) and progressive myoclonic epilepsies. To date, 9 genes have been described to underlie progressive myoclonic epilepsies in several dog breeds. Investigations into genetic PE have been less successful, with only 1 causative gene described. Genetic testing as an aid to diagnosis, prognosis, and breeding decisions is available for these 10 forms. Additional studies utilizing genome-wide tools have identified PE loci of interest; however, specific genetic tests are not yet developed. Many studies of dog breeds with PE have failed to identify genes or loci of interest, suggesting that, similar to what is seen in many human genetic epilepsies, inheritance is likely complex, involving several or many genes, and reflective of environmental interactions. An individual dog's response to therapeutic intervention for epilepsy may also be genetically complex. Although the field of inherited epilepsy has faced challenges, particularly with PE, newer technologies contribute to further advances. © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Epilepsy: Is there hope?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos A. M. Guerreiro

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Epilepsy is a highly prevalent chronic neurologic disorder and leads to social, behavioural, health and economic consequences. 'Treatment gap' varies from 10 per cent in developed countries to 75 per cent in low-income countries. Stigma and discrimination related to epilepsy are prevalent worldwide. Electroencephalography (EEG is considered the most important tool for evaluating the patient with epilepsy. Video-EEG monitoring is an important tool for confirming the seizure type and estimating the epileptogenic zone in the brain. Neuroimaging evaluation is important to determine the aetiology of the epilepsies. Genetic testing has increased the probability of identifying the causes of some types of epilepsies. Epilepsy can be treated in an affordable way with low-cost medications. Refractory epilepsies occur in approximately one-third of recently diagnosed patients with epilepsy. For this group of patients, there are options of surgical treatment, diets and neurostimulation to improve seizure control and quality of life. In poorly organized societies, there is a lack of prioritization of epilepsy in national health policies, limited resources for trained personnel and a shortage of basic antiepileptic medications. There is evidence of improvement in the understanding of epilepsy and a clear progress in the management of epileptic seizures in recent times.

  8. Canine epilepsy genetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekenstedt, Kari J; Patterson, Edward E; Mickelson, James R

    2012-02-01

    There has been much interest in utilizing the dog as a genetic model for common human diseases. Both dogs and humans suffer from naturally occurring epilepsies that share many clinical characteristics. Investigations of inherited human epilepsies have led to the discovery of several mutated genes involved in this disease; however, the vast majority of human epilepsies remain unexplained. Mouse models of epilepsy exist, including single-gene spontaneous and knockout models, but, similar to humans, other, polygenic models have been more difficult to discern. This appears to also be the case in canine epilepsy genetics. There are two forms of canine epilepsies for which gene mutations have been described to date: the progressive myoclonic epilepsies (PMEs) and idiopathic epilepsy (IE). Gene discovery in the PMEs has been more successful, with eight known genes; six of these are orthologous to corresponding human disorders, while two are novel genes that can now be used as candidates for human studies. Only one IE gene has been described in dogs, an LGI2 mutation in Lagotto Romagnolos with a focal, juvenile remitting epilepsy. This gene is also a novel candidate for human remitting childhood epilepsy studies. The majority of studies of dog breeds with IE, however, have either failed to identify any genes or loci of interest, or, as in complex mouse and human IEs, have identified multiple QTLs. There is still tremendous promise in the ongoing canine epilepsy studies, but if canine IEs prove to be as genetically complex as human and murine IEs, then deciphering the bases of these canine epilepsies will continue to be challenging.

  9. High frequency oscillations in epilepsy surgery

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van 't Klooster, MA|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/413752623

    2016-01-01

    Epilepsy surgery is the sole treatment to cure patients with focal epilepsy. The chances on seizure freedom after surgery is determined by how well we can pinpoint the epileptic focus and delineate the margins of the disease tissue for resection. Intra-operative invasive EEG, measuring brain signals

  10. Genomic variation in myeloma: design, content, and initial application of the Bank On A Cure SNP Panel to detect associations with progression-free survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Ness, Brian; Ramos, Christine; Haznadar, Majda; Hoering, Antje; Haessler, Jeff; Crowley, John; Jacobus, Susanna; Oken, Martin; Rajkumar, Vincent; Greipp, Philip; Barlogie, Bart; Durie, Brian; Katz, Michael; Atluri, Gowtham; Fang, Gang; Gupta, Rohit; Steinbach, Michael; Kumar, Vipin; Mushlin, Richard; Johnson, David; Morgan, Gareth

    2008-09-08

    We have engaged in an international program designated the Bank On A Cure, which has established DNA banks from multiple cooperative and institutional clinical trials, and a platform for examining the association of genetic variations with disease risk and outcomes in multiple myeloma. We describe the development and content of a novel custom SNP panel that contains 3404 SNPs in 983 genes, representing cellular functions and pathways that may influence disease severity at diagnosis, toxicity, progression or other treatment outcomes. A systematic search of national databases was used to identify non-synonymous coding SNPs and SNPs within transcriptional regulatory regions. To explore SNP associations with PFS we compared SNP profiles of short term (less than 1 year, n = 70) versus long term progression-free survivors (greater than 3 years, n = 73) in two phase III clinical trials. Quality controls were established, demonstrating an accurate and robust screening panel for genetic variations, and some initial racial comparisons of allelic variation were done. A variety of analytical approaches, including machine learning tools for data mining and recursive partitioning analyses, demonstrated predictive value of the SNP panel in survival. While the entire SNP panel showed genotype predictive association with PFS, some SNP subsets were identified within drug response, cellular signaling and cell cycle genes. A targeted gene approach was undertaken to develop an SNP panel that can test for associations with clinical outcomes in myeloma. The initial analysis provided some predictive power, demonstrating that genetic variations in the myeloma patient population may influence PFS.

  11. Evaluation of physical educators' knowledge about epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vancini, Rodrigo Luiz; Lira, Claudio Andre Barbosa de; Gomes da Silva, Sergio; Scorza, Fúlvio Alexandre; Silva, Antonio Carlos da; Vieira, Douglas; Cavalheiro, Esper Abrão; Arida, Ricardo Mario

    2010-06-01

    People with epilepsy suffer from a considerable lack of physical activity. In addition, an important problem of epilepsy management is the lack of qualified professionals. In this study we present data from a survey which aimed to assess physical educators' general knowledge about epilepsy. One hundred and thirty four physical educators of both sexes answered a questionnaire. Sixty percent of the professionals believe that a seizure is an abnormal electrical discharge of the brain, 13% that epilepsy is a cerebral chronic disease that can not be cured or controlled, 84% that people having convulsions will not necessarily present epilepsy and 5% that people with epilepsy have difficulties of learning. Questions concerned previous professional experience with epilepsy showed that 61% have seen a seizure and 53% have access to some information about epilepsy. Thus, 28% of professionals have a friend or relative with epilepsy, 14% have a student with epilepsy, and 29% helped someone during seizures. Our findings reveal a lack of physical educators' appropriate knowledge about epilepsy. Improvement of this might contribute to the improvement of epilepsy care/management.

  12. Genomic variation in myeloma: design, content, and initial application of the Bank On A Cure SNP Panel to detect associations with progression-free survival

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fang Gang

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We have engaged in an international program designated the Bank On A Cure, which has established DNA banks from multiple cooperative and institutional clinical trials, and a platform for examining the association of genetic variations with disease risk and outcomes in multiple myeloma. We describe the development and content of a novel custom SNP panel that contains 3404 SNPs in 983 genes, representing cellular functions and pathways that may influence disease severity at diagnosis, toxicity, progression or other treatment outcomes. A systematic search of national databases was used to identify non-synonymous coding SNPs and SNPs within transcriptional regulatory regions. To explore SNP associations with PFS we compared SNP profiles of short term (less than 1 year, n = 70 versus long term progression-free survivors (greater than 3 years, n = 73 in two phase III clinical trials. Results Quality controls were established, demonstrating an accurate and robust screening panel for genetic variations, and some initial racial comparisons of allelic variation were done. A variety of analytical approaches, including machine learning tools for data mining and recursive partitioning analyses, demonstrated predictive value of the SNP panel in survival. While the entire SNP panel showed genotype predictive association with PFS, some SNP subsets were identified within drug response, cellular signaling and cell cycle genes. Conclusion A targeted gene approach was undertaken to develop an SNP panel that can test for associations with clinical outcomes in myeloma. The initial analysis provided some predictive power, demonstrating that genetic variations in the myeloma patient population may influence PFS.

  13. New presurgical techniques to characterize the focus of epilepsy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zijlmans, G.J.M.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/304819581

    2011-01-01

    Patients with focal epilepsy who do not respond to anti-epileptic medication can be eligible for epilepsy surgery, which might cure this disabling disease. However, the question is which brain tissue is epileptogenic and needs to be removed. Information on the epileptogenic zone can be obtained by

  14. Another Tool in the Fight against Epilepsy: Seizure Response Dogs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hollingsworth, Jan Carter

    2007-01-01

    Epilepsy, a chronic neurological seizure disorder, affects 2.7 million Americans, half of them children, and worldwide, it is the most common brain disorder. While there is not a cure for epilepsy, the goal of treatment is to achieve the greatest freedom from seizures that can be attained with the minimal amount of side effects. These days…

  15. 3D texture analysis reveals imperceptible MRI textural alterations in the thalamus and putamen in progressive myoclonic epilepsy type 1, EPM1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanna Suoranta

    Full Text Available Progressive myoclonic epilepsy type 1 (EPM1 is an autosomal recessively inherited neurodegenerative disorder characterized by young onset age, myoclonus and tonic-clonic epileptic seizures. At the time of diagnosis, the visual assessment of the brain MRI is usually normal, with no major changes found later. Therefore, we utilized texture analysis (TA to characterize and classify the underlying properties of the affected brain tissue by means of 3D texture features. Sixteen genetically verified patients with EPM1 and 16 healthy controls were included in the study. TA was performed upon 3D volumes of interest that were placed bilaterally in the thalamus, amygdala, hippocampus, caudate nucleus and putamen. Compared to the healthy controls, EPM1 patients had significant textural differences especially in the thalamus and right putamen. The most significantly differing texture features included parameters that measure the complexity and heterogeneity of the tissue, such as the co-occurrence matrix-based entropy and angular second moment, and also the run-length matrix-based parameters of gray-level non-uniformity, short run emphasis and long run emphasis. This study demonstrates the usability of 3D TA for extracting additional information from MR images. Textural alterations which suggest complex, coarse and heterogeneous appearance were found bilaterally in the thalamus, supporting the previous literature on thalamic pathology in EPM1. The observed putamenal involvement is a novel finding. Our results encourage further studies on the clinical applications, feasibility, reproducibility and reliability of 3D TA.

  16. Epilepsy - overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... at any age. There may be a family history of seizures or epilepsy. ... if a seizure occurs. People with poorly controlled epilepsy should not drive. Check your state's law about which people with a history of seizures are allowed to drive. DO NOT ...

  17. Epilepsie aktuell

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berendt, Mette; Hüelsmeyer, Velia-Isabel; Bhatti, Sofie F. M.

    2016-01-01

    of the consensus statements “IVETF consensus report on epilepsy definition, classification and terminology in companion animals” and “IVETF’s current understanding of idiopathic epilepsy of genetic or suspected genetic origin in purebred dogs” in German language to inform German veterinarians and professional...... circles about new knowledge and innovations in these fields. In the first part of the article, it is explained, why a new classification system of epilepsy and a common language to describe the disease is necessary. The proposals of the IVETF regarding the classification system and the terminology...... Richtlinien zur Klassifikation und Empfehlungen zu allen Aspekten der Epilepsie bei Hund und Katze in englischer Sprache publiziert (IVETF, 2015a, b). Im vorliegenden Artikel werden die Inhalte der Konsenspapiere „IVETF consensus report on epilepsy definition, classification and terminology in companion...

  18. Long-term outcome of medically treated epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sillanpää, M; Schmidt, D

    2017-01-01

    To review the long-term outcome of epilepsy in population-based studies. Analysis of population-based studies. About two of three patients with new-onset epilepsy will, in the long run, enter five-year terminal remission. Chances for remission are best for those with idiopathic or cryptogenic epilepsy. It is unclear whether the seizure outcome has improved over the last several decades. Social outcome, however, may have become better because of the improved level of knowledge on and public attitudes toward people with epilepsy, and possibly fewer prejudices at home, daycare, school, military and labor market. While we still do not have a cure for epilepsy for all patients, relief of the medical and social consequences is available for many and hope is on the horizon for people with epilepsy. Copyright © 2016 British Epilepsy Association. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Epilepsy (generalised).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maguire, Melissa; Marson, Anthony G; Ramaratnam, Sridharan

    2012-02-20

    About 3% of people will be diagnosed with epilepsy during their lifetime, but about 70% of people with epilepsy eventually go into remission. We conducted a systematic review and aimed to answer the following clinical questions: What are the effects of monotherapy in newly diagnosed generalised epilepsy (tonic clonic type)? What are the effects of additional treatments in people with drug-resistant generalised epilepsy? What are the effects of surgery in people with drug-resistant generalised epilepsy? We searched: Medline, Embase, The Cochrane Library, and other important databases up to August 2011 (Clinical Evidence reviews are updated periodically; please check our website for the most up-to-date version of this review). We included harms alerts from relevant organisations such as the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the UK Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA). We found 8 systematic reviews, RCTs, or observational studies that met our inclusion criteria. We performed a GRADE evaluation of the quality of evidence for interventions. In this systematic review we present information relating to the effectiveness and safety of the following interventions: monotherapy using carbamazepine, gabapentin, lamotrigine, levetiracetam, phenobarbital, phenytoin, sodium valproate, or topiramate; addition of second-line drugs (lamotrigine or levetiracetam) for drug-resistant epilepsy; and hemispherectomy for drug-resistant epilepsy.

  20. Feline Epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnes Heller, Heidi

    2018-01-01

    Seizures occur commonly in cats and can be classified as idiopathic epilepsy, structural epilepsy, or reactive seizures. Pursuit of a diagnosis may include a complete blood count, serum biochemistry, brain MRI, and cerebrospinal fluid analysis as indicated. Antiepileptic drugs should be considered if a cat is having frequent seizures, or any 1 seizure longer than 5 minutes. Phenobarbital is often the drug of choice; however, levetiracetam may be more useful for certain types of epilepsy in cats. Long-term prognosis depends on the underlying diagnosis and response to therapy. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Cingulate Epilepsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alkawadri, Rafeed; So, Norman K.; Van Ness, Paul C.; Alexopoulos, Andreas V.

    2016-01-01

    IMPORTANCE The literature on cingulate gyrus epilepsy in the magnetic resonance imaging era is limited to case reports and small case series. To our knowledge, this is the largest study of surgically confirmed epilepsy arising from the anterior or posterior cingulate region. OBJECTIVE To characterize the clinical and electrophysiological findings of epilepsies arising from the anterior and posterior cingulate gyrus. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS We studied consecutive cingulate gyrus epilepsy cases identified retrospectively from the Cleveland Clinic and University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center epilepsy databases from 1992 to 2009. Participants included 14 consecutive cases of cingulate gyrus epilepsies confirmed by restricted magnetic resonance image lesions and seizure freedom or marked improvement following lesionectomy. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES The main outcome measure was improvement in seizure frequency following surgery. The clinical, video electroencephalography, neuroimaging, pathology, and surgical outcome data were reviewed. RESULTS All 14 patients had cingulate epilepsy confirmed by restricted magnetic resonance image lesions and seizure freedom or marked improvement following lesionectomy. They were divided into 3 groups based on anatomical location of the lesion and corresponding seizure semiology. In the posterior cingulate group, all 4 patients had electroclinical findings suggestive of temporal origin of the epilepsy. The anterior cingulate cases were divided into a typical (Bancaud) group (6 cases with hypermotor seizures and infrequent generalization with the presence of fear, laughter, or severe interictal personality changes) and an atypical group (4 cases presenting with simple motor seizures and a tendency for more frequent generalization and less-favorable long-term surgical outcome). All atypical cases were associated with an underlying infiltrative astrocytoma. CONCLUSIONS AND RELEVANCE Posterior cingulate gyrus epilepsy may

  2. Employees with Epilepsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Resources Home | Accommodation and Compliance Series: Employees with Epilepsy By Melanie Whetzel, M. A. Preface Introduction Information ... SOAR) at http://AskJAN.org/soar. Information about Epilepsy What is Epilepsy? Epilepsy is a chronic, neurological ...

  3. Identification of mutations in cystatin B, the gene responsible for the Unverricht-Lundborg type of progressive myoclonus epilepsy (EPM1)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lalioti, M.D.; Mirotsou, M.; Rossier, C. [Univ. Hospital of Geneva (Switzerland)] [and others

    1997-02-01

    Progressive myoclonus epilepsy (EPM1) is an autosomal recessive disorder, characterized by severe, stimulus-sensitive myoclonus and tonic-clonic seizures. The EPM1 locus was mapped to within 0.3 cM from PFKL in chromosome 21q22.3. The gene for the proteinase inhibitor cystatin B was recently localized in the EPM1 critical region, and mutations were identified in two EPM1 families. We have identified six nucleotide changes in the cystatin B gene of non-Finnish EPM1 families from northern Africa and Europe. The 426G{r_arrow}C change in exon 1 results in a Gly4Arg substitution and is the first missense mutation described that is associated with EPM1. Molecular modeling predicts that this substitution severely affects the contact of cystatin B with papain. Mutations in the invariant AG dinucleotides of the acceptor sites of introns 1 and 2 probably result in abnormal splicing. A deletion of two nucleotides in exon 3 produces a frameshift and truncates the protein. Therefore, these four mutations are all predicted to impair the production of functional protein. These mutations were found in 7 of the 29 unrelated EPM1 patients analyzed, in homozygosity in 1, and in heterozygosity in the others. The remaining two sequence changes, 431G{r_arrow}T and 2575A{r_arrow}G, probably represent polymorphic variants. In addition, a tandem repeat in the 5{prime} UTR (CCCCGCCCCGCG) is present two or three times in normal alleles. It is peculiar that in the majority of patients no mutations exist within the exons and splice sites of the cystatin B gene. 23 refs., 5 figs., 3 tabs.

  4. Targeting Epilepsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and seizures in some developing countries and some immigrant populations in the United States. Environmental Approaches Improving ... increase understanding about this condition and to reduce stigma. Past 3 Percentage of Adults with Active Epilepsy ...

  5. Epilepsy Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to the frontal lobe may affect behavior, including motivation, attention or concentration, as well as impulse control, ... July 17, 2015. Schacter SC. Overview of the management of epilepsy in adults. http://www.uptodate.com/ ...

  6. Epilepsy Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... if the seizure occurs during a bath or swimming Brain damage from prolonged seizures Sudden death, a ... a candidate for epilepsy surgery, your pre-surgical evaluation may include: Baseline electroencephalogram (EEG). In this test, ...

  7. Managing Epilepsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... go to school, drive, and take part in social activities. When seizures are not controlled, it increases the risk of Injury. Depression. Anxiety. In some cases, death. Sometimes even epilepsy treatment can cause problems such as feeling tired. Self- ...

  8. Effect of progressive reduction in crude protein and lysine of heavy pigs diets on some technological properties of green hams destined for PDO dry-cured ham production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallo, Luigi; Dalla Bona, Mirco; Carraro, Luca; Cecchinato, Alessio; Carnier, Paolo; Schiavon, Stefano

    2016-11-01

    In order to investigate the effects of dietary crude protein (CP) and lysine (Lys) content on some technological properties of green hams destined for Protected Designation of Origin (PDO) dry-cured ham, green hams visual appraisal scores, thickness, iodine number and fatty acid composition of subcutaneous fat, and ham weight losses during seasoning (SL) were assessed. The green hams were obtained from 233 pigs fed four diets containing 140 to 110g/kg CP and 6.5 to 5.3g/kg total Lys from 90 to 165kg body weight. A reduction in dietary CP and Lys of up to 20% compared with conventional feeds led to a 15% increase in the thickness of the subcutaneous fat, a 5% decrease in linoleic and polyunsaturated fatty acids in subcutaneous fat and a 7% decrease in SL. A 20% reduction of CP and Lys in diets for finishing pigs has positive effects on the technological properties of green hams destined for PDO dry-cured ham production. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Effect of eslicarbazepine acetate in the corneal kindling progression and the amygdala kindling model of temporal lobe epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potschka, Heidrun; Soerensen, Jonna; Pekcec, Anton; Loureiro, Ana; Soares-da-Silva, Patrício

    2014-02-01

    The present study was aimed at determining the effect of eslicarbazepine acetate (ESL), eslicarbazepine and (R)-licarbazepine administration in the mouse corneal kindling and amygdala kindling models. NMRI mice were kindled by bilateral corneal stimulation twice daily. In amygdala kindling, mice were stimulated once daily via an implanted depth electrode until 10 generalized seizures were elicited. Maximal electroshocks (MES) were administered via corneal electrodes. The average number of stimulations to reach a fully kindled generalized seizure was markedly increased by ESL. Administration of eslicarbazepine also inhibited the acquisition of kindling, whereas administration of R-licarbazepine did not affect the number of stimulations necessary to induce a specific seizure stage, and did not exert any relevant effect on mean seizure severity during kindling progression. ESL dose-dependently increased the focal seizure threshold and reduced seizure severity in amygdala kindling. Whereas eslicarbazepine treatment increased the afterdischarge threshold in a significant manner, (R)-licarbazepine treatment failed to exert a significant effect on thresholds in fully kindled mice. Administration of ESL and of eslicarbazepine significantly protected mice against MES-induced seizures, whereas that of (R)-licarbazepine failed to provide protection. These data provide evidence of the anticonvulsant effect of ESL and its active metabolite eslicarbazepine on partial-onset seizures in corneal and amygdala kindling models. Based on an effect of the parent compound and the active metabolite eslicarbazepine, ESL treatment may not merely suppress seizure activity but may also provide a disease-modifying or antiepileptogenic effect. Future studies will be necessary to further evaluate a putative preventive effect, in particular when considering that re-stimulation following wash-out did not indicate a persistent effect. The findings reported here raise doubts on the contribution of

  10. Complex single gene disorders and epilepsy.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Merwick, Aine

    2012-09-01

    Epilepsy is a heterogeneous group of disorders, often associated with significant comorbidity, such as intellectual disability and skin disorder. The genetic underpinnings of many epilepsies are still being elucidated, and we expect further advances over the coming 5 years, as genetic technology improves and prices fall for whole exome and whole genome sequencing. At present, there are several well-characterized complex epilepsies associated with single gene disorders; we review some of these here. They include well-recognized syndromes such as tuberous sclerosis complex, epilepsy associated with Rett syndrome, some of the progressive myoclonic epilepsies, and novel disorders such as epilepsy associated with mutations in the PCDH 19 gene. These disorders are important in informing genetic testing to confirm a diagnosis and to permit better understanding of the variability in phenotype-genotype correlation.

  11. Revisiting multiple models of progression of β-cell loss of function in type 1 diabetes: Significance for prevention and cure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xia; Cheng, Jin; Zhou, Zhiguang

    2016-07-01

    Type 1 diabetes (T1D) results from a chronic autoimmune process that leads to β-cell destruction and exogenous insulin dependence. The natural history of T1D proposed by Eisenbarth suggested six relatively independent stages over the course of the entire disease process, which was considered to be linear and chronic. Based on this classical theory, immunotherapies aim to prevent or reverse all these periods of β-cell loss. Over the past 30 years, much novel information about the pathogenesis of T1D proved that there are complex metabolic changes occurring throughout the entire disease process. Therefore, new possible models for the natural history of the disease have been proposed; these models, in turn, may help facilitate fresh avenues for the prevention and cure of T1D. Herein, we briefly review recent findings in this field of research, with the aim of providing a better theoretical basis for clinical practice. © 2016 Ruijin Hospital, Shanghai Jiaotong University School of Medicine and John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  12. Intellectual functioning in children with epilepsy: Frontal lobe epilepsy, childhood absence epilepsy and benign epilepsy with centro-temporal spikes

    OpenAIRE

    Lopes, Ana Filipa; Simões, Mário R.; Monteiro, José Paulo; Fonseca, Maria José; Martins, Cristina; Ventosa, Lurdes; Lourenço, Laura; Robalo, Conceição

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of our study is to describe intellectual functioning in three common childhood epilepsy syndromes - frontal lobe epilepsy (FLE), childhood absence epilepsy (CAE) and benign epilepsy with centro-temporal spikes (BECTS). And also to determine the influence of epilepsy related variables, type of epilepsy, age at epilepsy onset, duration and frequency of epilepsy, and treatment on the scores.

  13. Epilepsy in Schools in Cotonou (Benin) Epilepsie en Milieu Scolaire ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background Despite important progress achieved in the knowledge and case management of epilepsy, this disease still remains burdened by secular beliefs in developing countries. This makes the epileptic, an excluded person with difficulties to access education, training and even appropriate health care. Objective

  14. Advances in epilepsy gene discovery and implications for epilepsy diagnosis and treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Symonds, Joseph D; Zuberi, Sameer M; Johnson, Michael R

    2017-04-01

    Epilepsy genetics is shifting from the academic pursuit of gene discovery to a clinical discipline based on molecular diagnosis and stratified medicine. We consider the latest developments in epilepsy genetics and review how gene discovery in epilepsy is influencing the clinical classification of epilepsy and informing new therapeutic approaches and drug discovery. Recent studies highlighting the importance of mutation in GABA receptors, NMDA receptors, potassium channels, G-protein coupled receptors, mammalian target of rapamycin pathway and chromatin remodeling are discussed. Examples of precision medicine in epilepsy targeting gain-of-function mutations in KCNT1, GRIN2A, GRIN2D and SCN8A are presented. Potential reasons for the paucity of examples of precision medicine for loss-of-function mutations or in non-ion channel epilepsy genes are explored. We highlight how systems genetics and gene network analyses have suggested that pathways disrupted in epilepsy overlap with those of other neurodevelopmental traits including human cognition. We review how network-based computational approaches are now being applied to epilepsy drug discovery. We are living in an unparalleled era of epilepsy gene discovery. Advances in clinical care from this progress are already materializing through improved clinical diagnosis and stratified medicine. The application of targeted drug repurposing based on single gene defects has shown promise for epilepsy arising from gain-of-function mutations in ion-channel subunit genes, but important barriers remain to translating these approaches to non-ion channel epilepsy genes and loss-of-function mutations. Gene network analysis offers opportunities to discover new pathways for epilepsy, to decipher epilepsy's relationship to other neurodevelopmental traits and to frame a new approach to epilepsy drug discovery.

  15. American Epilepsy Society

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and Coding Episodes of Care Practice Management Course Quality Measures PRACTICE TOOLS Cognitive Behavior Employment Resources Medications that provoke seizures Transition Tools: Adolescents Women with Epilepsy EPILEPSY MONITORING UNITS EMU FAQs EMU Safety Find an Epilepsy Center ...

  16. Genetics of Childhood Epilepsy

    OpenAIRE

    J Gordon Millichap

    2000-01-01

    Genetic epilepsies are classified according to the mechanism of inheritance in three major groups: 1) Mendelian idiopathic epilepsies; 2) Non-Mendelian or “complex” epilepsies; and 3) Chromosomal disorders.

  17. Epilepsy or seizures - discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000128.htm Epilepsy or seizures - discharge To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. You have epilepsy . People with epilepsy have seizures. A seizure is ...

  18. Tracking Polymer Cure Via Embedded Optical Fibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dean, David L.; Davidson, T. Fred

    1993-01-01

    Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy applied in interior of specimen of material by bringing infrared light through specimen in optical fiber. Light interacts with material via evanescent-wave effect. Spectra obtained in this way at various times during curing process also combined with data from ultrasonic, thermographic, and dielectric-impedance monitoring, and other measurement techniques to obtain more complete characterization of progress of curing process.

  19. The epilepsy of Dostoevsky.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiloh, L G

    1986-01-01

    The evidence in favour of a diagnosis of limbic epilepsy in the case of Dostoevsky is reviewed. Independent records from numerous biographical sources support the widely held view that Dostoevsky had frequent convulsive episodes, that the episodes began in childhood and continued throughout his life and that Dostoevsky himself was able accurately to record the premonitory aura and sequelae of such episodes. In addition the increasing memory impairment he suffered both for recent and remote events from the age of 40 supports the presence of progressive brain damage. This information renders implausible the analytic interpretations of Freud and his followers, that Dostoevsky's epilepsy was hysterical in origin, where epileptiform somatization was presumed to dispose of excessive psychic excitation, and that this process had its roots in Dostoevsky's unconscious hatred of his father and latent homosexuality. Nevertheless, Dostoevsky's neuroticism is clearly supported by his life-long hypochondriasis, obsessionality, paranoid traits, tendency to reactive depressions, and experience of quasi-hallucinatory episodes which were probably not epileptic in origin. Neither his epilepsy nor his neuroticism can explain or detract from the profundity and wisdom of the literary monuments which clearly attest Dostoevsky's ample genius.

  20. Ego functions in epilepsy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, A S; Hansen, H; Høgenhaven, H

    1988-01-01

    Two groups of epilepsy patients (28 patients with temporal lobe epilepsy and 15 patients with primary generalized epilepsy) entered a study of personality traits related to epilepsy, based on a modification of Bellak's semistructured interview for assessment of ego strength. Two groups of subjects...... than 15 years when the disease began. The number of anticonvulsants administered did not influence the results. No difference on adaptive level of ego functioning was found between the group with primary generalized epilepsy and the group with temporal lobe epilepsy. Similarly, the temporal lobe...... epilepsy group with predominantly right-sided and left-sided EEG changes, respectively, showed similar adaptive levels of ego functioning....

  1. Curing of Concrete

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    use it economically. Curing of concrete involves the retention of sufficient free water in the cement paste so that the process of cement hydration may readily proceed. It also involves favorable temperature, humidity, and wind speed. No part of the process of making good concrete is more important than thorough curing.

  2. Epilepsy priorities in Europe: A report of the ILAE-IBE Epilepsy Advocacy Europe Task Force.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baulac, Michel; de Boer, Hanneke; Elger, Christian; Glynn, Mike; Kälviäinen, Reetta; Little, Ann; Mifsud, Janet; Perucca, Emilio; Pitkänen, Asla; Ryvlin, Philippe

    2015-11-01

    The European Forum on Epilepsy Research (ERF2013), which took place in Dublin, Ireland, on May 26-29, 2013, was designed to appraise epilepsy research priorities in Europe through consultation with clinical and basic scientists as well as representatives of lay organizations and health care providers. The ultimate goal was to provide a platform to improve the lives of persons with epilepsy by influencing the political agenda of the EU. The Forum highlighted the epidemiologic, medical, and social importance of epilepsy in Europe, and addressed three separate but closely related concepts. First, possibilities were explored as to how the stigma and social burden associated with epilepsy could be reduced through targeted initiatives at EU national and regional levels. Second, ways to ensure optimal standards of care throughout Europe were specifically discussed. Finally, a need for further funding in epilepsy research within the European Horizon 2020 funding programme was communicated to politicians and policymakers participating to the forum. Research topics discussed specifically included (1) epilepsy in the developing brain; (2) novel targets for innovative diagnostics and treatment of epilepsy; (3) what is required for prevention and cure of epilepsy; and (4) epilepsy and comorbidities, with a special focus on aging and mental health. This report provides a summary of recommendations that emerged at ERF2013 about how to (1) strengthen epilepsy research, (2) reduce the treatment gap, and (3) reduce the burden and stigma associated with epilepsy. Half of the 6 million European citizens with epilepsy feel stigmatized and experience social exclusion, stressing the need for funding trans-European awareness campaigns and monitoring their impact on stigma, in line with the global commitment of the European Commission and with the recommendations made in the 2011 Written Declaration on Epilepsy. Epilepsy care has high rates of misdiagnosis and considerable variability in

  3. [Neuropsychology and epilepsy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campos-Castelló, J; Campos-Soler, S

    The epileptic child has three times more risk of presenting cognitive disorders than other children with no neurological pathology, in accordance with three essential facts: 1. The effect exerted by the actual epilepsy. 2. Any associated previously-existing neuropsychosocial deficits. 3. The side effects of the antiepileptic drug (AED). A certain amount of deterioration is universally accepted, without defining the factors involved in its production, but which are multifactorial according to computer studies. From this point of view, we analyse the relation between neuropsychology and epilepsy in Paediatrics. The relation between epilepsy and behaviour must be seen as an exception and not the rule, unless there are coexisting personality disorders and/or mental deficiency. The cognitive effects of AED depend on the drug, the doses used and on the polypharmacy, and these effects may be both adverse and beneficial. The differences from one drug to another are questionable due to the methodology used in the different studies and it should be remembered that with suitable doses the side effects are generally moderate, and AED monitoring is useful in this case. We recommend the use of MEDDRA assessment to obtain a more reliable definition of side effects, which in turn will allow them to be better evaluated. Scaling time in the introduction of the drug is important, especially with some of the new AED. The mechanisms governing the production of the side effects vary, but both the classical and the new ones, which are well used owing to the greater knowledge we have of their mechanism of action, improve cognitive functioning by controlling the seizures. In infancy, idiopathic cognitive reactions are produced. In childhood, the main disorders are a diminished reaction and information processing time with alterations affecting memory, attention and language. Epilepsy is associated to a number of different, generally mild, cognitive problems. The age of onset of epilepsy

  4. Childhood epilepsy and sleep

    OpenAIRE

    Mohammed A Al-Biltagi

    2014-01-01

    Sleep and epilepsy are two well recognized conditions that interact with each other in a complex bi-directional way. Some types of epilepsies have increased activity during sleep disturbing it; while sleep deprivation aggravates epilepsy due to decreased seizure threshold. Epilepsy can deteriorate the sleep-related disorders and at the same time; the parasomnias can worsen the epilepsy. The secretion of sleep-related hormones can also be affected by the occurrence of seizures and supplementat...

  5. Intellectual functioning in children with epilepsy: Frontal lobe epilepsy, childhood absence epilepsy and benign epilepsy with centro-temporal spikes

    OpenAIRE

    Lopes, Ana Filipa; Simões, Mário Rodrigues; Monteiro, José Paulo; Fonseca, Maria José; Martins, Cristina; Ventosa, Lurdes; Lourenço, Laura; Robalo, Conceição

    2013-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of our study is to describe intellectual functioning in three common childhood epilepsy syndromes – frontal lobe epilepsy (FLE), childhood absence epilepsy (CAE) and benign epilepsy with centro-temporal spikes (BECTS). And also to determine the influence of epilepsy related variables, type of epilepsy, age at epilepsy onset, duration and frequency of epilepsy, and treatment on the scores. Methods Intellectual functioning was examined in a group of 90 children wit...

  6. Genetic Aspects of Epilepsy | Hurst | South African Medical Journal

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Continental, American and South African studies point to a single gene mechanism in epilepsy, carrying with it the hope of chemical cure. Behavioural features should determine the advisability of marriage, rather than genetic considerations, in view of the low penetrance of the gene. S. Afr. Med. J., 48, 603 (1974) ...

  7. High Power UV LED Industrial Curing Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karlicek, Robert, F., Jr; Sargent, Robert

    2012-05-14

    UV curing is a green technology that is largely underutilized because UV radiation sources like Hg Lamps are unreliable and difficult to use. High Power UV LEDs are now efficient enough to replace Hg Lamps, and offer significantly improved performance relative to Hg Lamps. In this study, a modular, scalable high power UV LED curing system was designed and tested, performing well in industrial coating evaluations. In order to achieve mechanical form factors similar to commercial Hg Lamp systems, a new patent pending design was employed enabling high irradiance at long working distances. While high power UV LEDs are currently only available at longer UVA wavelengths, rapid progress on UVC LEDs and the development of new formulations designed specifically for use with UV LED sources will converge to drive more rapid adoption of UV curing technology. An assessment of the environmental impact of replacing Hg Lamp systems with UV LED systems was performed. Since UV curing is used in only a small portion of the industrial printing, painting and coating markets, the ease of use of UV LED systems should increase the use of UV curing technology. Even a small penetration of the significant number of industrial applications still using oven curing and drying will lead to significant reductions in energy consumption and reductions in the emission of green house gases and solvent emissions.

  8. CURING OF POLYMERIC COMPOSITES USING MICROWAVE RESIN TRANSFER MOULDING (RTM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. YUSOFF

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available The main objective of this work is to compare the difference between microwave heating and conventional thermal heating in fabricating carbon/epoxy composites. Two types of epoxy resin systems were used as matrices, LY5052-HY5052 and DGEBA-HY917-DY073. All composite samples were fabricated using resin transfer moulding (RTM technique. The curing of the LY5052-HY5052-carbon and the DGEBA-HY917-DY073-carbon composite systems, were carried out at 100 °C and 120 °C, respectively. Microwave heating showed better temperature control than conventional heating, however, the heating rate of the microwave cured samples were slower than the conventionally cured samples. This was attributed to the lower power (250 W used when heating with microwaves compared to 2000 W used in conventional heating. Study of thermal characteristics as curing progressed showed that the polymerisation reaction occurred at a faster rate during microwave curing than in conventional curing for both the DGEBA and the LY/HY5052 carbon composite systems. The actual cure cycle was reduced from 60 minutes to 40 minutes when using microwaves for curing DGEBA-carbon composites. As for LY/HY5052-carbon composites, the actual cure cycle was reduced from 3 hours to 40 minutes. Both conventional and microwave heating yielded similar glass transition temperatures (120 °C for DGEBA systems and 130 °C for LY/HY5052 systems. Microwave cured composites had higher void contents than conventionally cured composites (2.2-2.8% and 1.8-2.4% for DGEBA and LY/HY5052 microwave cured composites, respectively, compared to 0.2-0.4% for both DGEBA and LY/HY5052 thermally cured composites. C-scan traces showed that all composites, regardless of methods of curing, had minimal defects.

  9. Knowledge about epilepsy among teachers and epileptic patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria F. Valls Tosetti

    1991-09-01

    Full Text Available 223 epileptics patients and their families and 136 teachers from public and private schools were submitted to similar questionnaires related to inheritance, transmission, cure, complilcation rates, care during seizures, need for information on the disease, habits, comparison with other diseases and to the educational and social performances of epileptics. Cure and complication nates accounted for the main differences between those populations. Epileptics could recognize a bigger number of complications but still expected to be cured from the disease. The majority of teachers and patients have never been informed about epilepsy and this finding was related to the big number of equivocal answers obtained from them. Put together, the data showed that social and educational performance of epileptic patients could be disturbed by medical and social parameters. Some, of them could be improved by an educational program towards these aspects of epilepsy.

  10. Clinical characteristics of epilepsy of unknown origin in the Rottweiler breed

    OpenAIRE

    Heske, Linda; Körberg, Izabella Baranowska; Nødtvedt, Ane C. W.; Jæderlund, Karin Hultin

    2015-01-01

    Background Epilepsy is one of the most common neurological conditions in dogs. Despite that epilepsy appears to be common in the Rottweiler breed, published literature about the phenotype of epilepsy in this breed is lacking. The aim of this questionnaire-based study was to describe the clinical characteristics of epilepsy in the Rottweiler breed including; signalment, pedigree, housing conditions and information about the seizures such as age at onset, seizure type, duration, and progression...

  11. Gender Differences in Epilepsy

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Christensen, Jakob; Kjeldsen, Marianne Juel; Andersen, Henning; Friis, Mogens Laue; Sidenius, Per

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to look at gender differences in unselected populations of patients with epilepsy classified according to the 1989 International League Against Epilepsy (ILAE) criteria. Methods...

  12. EPILEPSY AND GENETICS

    OpenAIRE

    Kvernmo, Nadja Anette Myrvik

    2006-01-01

    The genetic component of epilepsy has been known for over two millennia. The most commonly reported types of genetic epilepsy show simple Mendelian inheritance. Autosomal dominant inheritance has been found within many families with epilepsy, often with decreased penetrance. Many specific mutations have been discovered involving different channels and receptors, and some may affect other mechanisms. Still, the specific mutations for most types of epilepsies are not known. The present pape...

  13. Polymerization and polymerization shrinkage stress: fast cure versus conventional cure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strydom, C

    2005-07-01

    Dentists nowadays have a choice of conventional halogen lights, halogen lights with more sophisticated curing cycles (step-cure, rapid-cure, ramp-cure & pulse-cure), fast halogen lights, laser lights, plasma arc lights (PAC) and, lately, LED lights. While the manufacturers of some of the curing units try to improve on the operational reliability of their lights with a slower initial rate of cure, other manufacturers simply wish to offer as fast a curing time as possible. The conventional approach to cure accepts that sufficient light intensity of at least 400 mW/cm2 at a wavelength of 400-500 nm, and an exposure time of at least 40 seconds is needed to cure a 2-mm layer of composite. When a halogen light with higher or very high intensity is used, alternative curing strategies provide for an initial slower cure to allow flow, and after that a higher-intensity cure to improve the degree of cure. In contrast, in the fast-cure or rapid-cure approach it is suggested that a layer of composite can be cured for only 5- 10 seconds at >2000 mW/cm2. Some go so far as to say that an exposure time of 3 seconds per layer may be enough. This contradictory approach is compounded by the fact that this support for fast cure does not seem to consider the negative consequences. Therefore, to address these concerns, this review discusses the possible effects of a fast cure approach compared to a more conventional approach in polymerization and polymerization shrinkage, and the consequences there-off. Other factors that play an influencing role in polymerization shrinkage stress are also included in the discussion.

  14. Memory functioning in children with epilepsy: frontal lobe epilepsy, childhood absence epilepsy, and benign epilepsy with centrotemporal spikes

    OpenAIRE

    Ana Filipa Lopes; José Paulo Monteiro; Maria José Fonseca; Conceição Robalo; Mário Rodrigues Simões

    2014-01-01

    Specific cognitive deficits have been identified in children with epilepsy irrespective of results on intelligence tests. Memory deficits are traditionally attributed to temporal lobe epilepsy, whereas the impact of frontal lobe epilepsy on memory functions has remained controversial. The aim of this study was the examination of memory abilities in other childhood common epilepsy syndromes (frontal lobe epilepsy (FLE), childhood absence epilepsy (CAE), and benign epilepsy with centrotemporal ...

  15. Epilepsy in children with subacute sclerosing panencephalitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jović, Nebojša J

    2013-01-01

    Subacute sclerosing panencephalitis (SSPE) is a rare, progressive, fatal neurodegenerative disease of childhood and early adolescence caused by defective measles virus. The initial symptoms of SSPE usually involve regression in cognitive functioning and behavior or recurrent myoclonic jerks. Seizures revealing SSPE and epilepsy during the clinical course can occur. The aim of the study was to analyze clinical and EEG characteristics of both initially occurred seizures and epilepsy which developed in the course of the disease. Retrospective study was carried out on 19 children (14 boys, 5 girls) with SSPE diagnosed and treated at our Clinic from 1995 to 2010. Seizures revealed SSPE in our patients aged from 6.5 to 11.5 years (mean 8.6 years). SSPE onset ranged from 4.5 to 16.5 years (mean 10.05). Complete vaccination was performed in nine patients. Cognitive and behavioral decline was preceeded by 6-18 months in two children with intractable focal motor seizures with secondary generalization, one child with complex partial seizures and one with atypical absences. During the clinical course of the disease epilepsy developed in 10 (52.6%) cases, including four patients with seizures as the initial SSPE sign. It occurred mainly in the first year, while in three cases seizures appeared between 1 and 5 years of the disease evolution. Myoclonus was present independently from seizures. No significant inter-group differences were found relating to the type of SSPE progression and history of epilepsy. The only child with fulminant SSPE presented with initial seizures. Favorable seizure control was achieved in 60.0% patients. Intractable epilepsy developed in four patients. Atypical SSPE presentation can include mainly focal intractable seizures. Epilepsy developed during clinical course in 52.6% cases. No significant influence was found of the history of epilepsy on the type of SSPE progression.

  16. Epilepsy in children with subacute sclerosing panencephalitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jović Nebojša J.

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Subacute sclerosing panencephalitis (SSPE is a rare, progressive, fatal neurodegenerative disease of childhood and early adolescence caused by defective measles virus. The initial symptoms of SSPE usually involve regression in cognitive functioning and behavior or recurrent myoclonic jerks. Seizures revealing SSPE and epilepsy during the clinical course can occur. Objective. The aim of the study was to analyze clinical and EEG characteristics of both initially occurred seizures and epilepsy which developed in the course of the disease. Methods. Retrospective study was carried out on 19 children (14 boys, 5 girls with SSPE diagnosed and treated at our Clinic from 1995 to 2010. Seizures revealed SSPE in our patients aged from 6.5 to 11.5 years (mean 8.6 years. Results. SSPE onset ranged from 4.5 to 16.5 years (mean 10.05. Complete vaccination was performed in nine patients. Cognitive and behavioral decline was preceeded by 6-18 months in two children with intractable focal motor seizures with secondary generalization, one child with complex partial seizures and one with atypical absences. During the clinical course of the disease epilepsy developed in 10 (52.6% cases, including four patients with seizures as the initial SSPE sign. It occurred mainly in the first year, while in three cases seizures appeared between 1 and 5 years of the disease evolution. Myoclonus was present independently from seizures. No significant inter-group differences were found relating to the type of SSPE progression and history of epilepsy. The only child with fulminant SSPE presented with initial seizures. Favorable seizure control was achieved in 60.0% patients. Intractable epilepsy developed in four patients. Conclusion. Atypical SSPE presentation can include mainly focal intractable seizures. Epilepsy developed during clinical course in 52.6% cases. No significant influence was found of the history of epilepsy on the type of SSPE progression.

  17. Epilepsy and Mood Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sermin Kesebir

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Mood disorders are the most common psychiatric comorbid disorder that affects quality of life and prognosis in epilepsy. The relation between depression and epilepsy is bidirectional. Not only the risk of having a depression among epilepsy cases is more than the healthy control cases, but also the risk of having epilepsy among depressive cases is more than the healthy control cases. People diagnosed with epilepsy are five times more likely than their peers to commit suicide. Moreover it seems that some epilepsy types like temporal lobe epilepsy have a much higher risk (25 times for suicide. Risk of suicide in epilepsy, which is independent from depression, increases more with the presence of depression. The common pathway between epilepsy, depression and suicide is hypofrontality and irregularity of serotonin metabolism. Contrary to depression, data on relationship between bipolar disorder and epilepsy is limited. However, mood disorder, mixed episodes with irritable character and mania are more frequent than assumed. As a matter of fact, both disorders share some common features. Both are episodic and can become chronic. Kindling phenomenon, irregularities in neurotransmitters, irregularities in voltage gate ion channels and irregularities in secondary messenger systems are variables that are presented in the etiologies of both disorders. Anticonvulsant drugs with mood regulatory effects are the common points of treatment. Understanding their mechanisms of action will clarify the pathophysiological processes. In this article, the relationhip between epilepsy and mood disorders, comorbidity, secondary states and treatment options in both cases have been discussed.

  18. Ego functions in epilepsy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, A S; Hansen, H; Høgenhaven, H

    1988-01-01

    Two groups of epilepsy patients (28 patients with temporal lobe epilepsy and 15 patients with primary generalized epilepsy) entered a study of personality traits related to epilepsy, based on a modification of Bellak's semistructured interview for assessment of ego strength. Two groups of subjects...... served as controls: 15 patients with a non-neurological but relapsing disorder, psoriasis, and 15 healthy volunteers. Compared with the group of healthy volunteers, a decreased adaptive level of ego functioning was found in the epilepsy groups, regardless of seizure types and EEG findings, and...... than 15 years when the disease began. The number of anticonvulsants administered did not influence the results. No difference on adaptive level of ego functioning was found between the group with primary generalized epilepsy and the group with temporal lobe epilepsy. Similarly, the temporal lobe...

  19. The Clay that Cures

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 6; Issue 2. Hydrotalcite - The Clay that Cures. N Bejoy. General Article Volume 6 Issue 2 February 2001 pp 57-61. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link: http://www.ias.ac.in/article/fulltext/reso/006/02/0057-0061. Author Affiliations.

  20. Miraculous cures in gynaecology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lammes, F. B.

    1988-01-01

    As a gynaecologist-oncologist one will quite often have been confronted with patients who have informed one of fairly impressive results of methods of alternative medicine. These convincing stories must have been impressive. Very often one may wonder about these 'cures'. There are, however, patients

  1. Curing the queue

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zonderland, Maartje Elisabeth

    2012-01-01

    In this dissertation we study several problems related to the management of healthcare and the cure of disease. In each chapter a hospital capacity distribution problem is analyzed using techniques from operations research, also known as mathematical decision theory. The problems considered are

  2. Curing Children's Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues Cover Story: Leukemia/Lymphoma Curing Children's Cancer Past Issues / Summer 2008 Table of Contents ... transplants a blunt, toxic tool for fragile young children. "They represent ... high-risk leukemias, like Madelen's. But developments have not been fast ...

  3. The gene for human U2 snRNP auxiliary factor small 35-kDa subunit (U2AF1) maps to the progressive myoclonus epilepsy (EPM1) critical region on chromosome 21q22.3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lalioti, M.D.; Rossier, C.; Antonarakis, S.E. [Univ. of Geneva Medical School (Switzerland)] [and others

    1996-04-15

    We used targeted exon trapping to clone portions of genes from human chromosome 21q22.3. One trapped sequence showed complete homology with the cDNA of human U2AF{sup 35} (M96982; HGM-approved nomenclature U2AF1), which encodes for the small 35-kDa subunit of the U2 snRNP auxiliary factor. Using the U2AF1 cDNA as a probe, we mapped this gene to cosmid Q15D2, a P1, and YAC 350F7 of the Chumakov et al. contig, close to the cystathionine-{beta}-synthase gene (CBS) on 21q22.3. This localization was confirmed by PCR using oligonucleotides from the 3{prime} UTR and by FISH. As U2AF1 associated with a number of different factors during mRNA splicing, overexpression in trisomy 21 individuals could contribute to some Down syndrome phenotypes by interfering with the splicing process. Furthermore, because this gene maps in the critical region for the progressive myoclonus epilepsy I locus (EPM1), mutation analysis will be carried out in patients to evaluate the potential role of U2AF1 as a candidate for EPM1. 24 refs., 1 fig.

  4. Animal models of epilepsy: use and limitations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kandratavicius L

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Ludmyla Kandratavicius,1 Priscila Alves Balista,1 Cleiton Lopes-Aguiar,1 Rafael Naime Ruggiero,1 Eduardo Henrique Umeoka,2 Norberto Garcia-Cairasco,2 Lezio Soares Bueno-Junior,1 Joao Pereira Leite11Department of Neurosciences and Behavior, 2Department of Physiology, Ribeirao Preto School of Medicine, University of Sao Paulo, Ribeirao Preto, BrazilAbstract: Epilepsy is a chronic neurological condition characterized by recurrent seizures that affects millions of people worldwide. Comprehension of the complex mechanisms underlying epileptogenesis and seizure generation in temporal lobe epilepsy and other forms of epilepsy cannot be fully acquired in clinical studies with humans. As a result, the use of appropriate animal models is essential. Some of these models replicate the natural history of symptomatic focal epilepsy with an initial epileptogenic insult, which is followed by an apparent latent period and by a subsequent period of chronic spontaneous seizures. Seizures are a combination of electrical and behavioral events that are able to induce chemical, molecular, and anatomic alterations. In this review, we summarize the most frequently used models of chronic epilepsy and models of acute seizures induced by chemoconvulsants, traumatic brain injury, and electrical or sound stimuli. Genetic models of absence seizures and models of seizures and status epilepticus in the immature brain were also examined. Major uses and limitations were highlighted, and neuropathological, behavioral, and neurophysiological similarities and differences between the model and the human equivalent were considered. The quest for seizure mechanisms can provide insights into overall brain functions and consciousness, and animal models of epilepsy will continue to promote the progress of both epilepsy and neurophysiology research.Keywords: epilepsy, animal model, pilocarpine, kindling, neurodevelopment

  5. Myoclonic occipital photosensitive epilepsy with dystonia (MOPED): A familial epilepsy syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadleir, Lynette G; Paterson, Sarah; Smith, Katherine R; Redshaw, Natalie; Ranta, Annemarei; Kalnins, Renate; Berkovic, Samuel F; Bahlo, Melanie; Hildebrand, Michael S; Scheffer, Ingrid E

    2015-08-01

    To describe clinical and EEG phenotypes of a family with an unusual familial epilepsy syndrome characterized by myoclonus and dystonia. Family members underwent electroclinical phenotyping including review of EEGs and MRI. DNA from family members was genotyped using Illumina OmniExpress genotyping arrays. Parametric and nonparametric linkage analyses were performed using MERLIN. The disorder followed autosomal dominant (AD) inheritance and affected seven individuals over two generations. Seizures began at a mean of 14.5 years. Six individuals had spontaneous myoclonic seizures, of which five also had photic-induced myoclonus and four had photic-induced occipital seizures. Six individuals had convulsive seizures; generalized in two and focal in four. Photosensitivity was prominent with generalized spike wave and polyspike wave in four individuals of which two also had occipital spikes. MRI scans were normal in the four individuals tested. Extensive metabolic investigation was normal. Juvenile myoclonic epilepsy (JME) occurred in two; and JME overlapping with idiopathic photosensitive epilepsy (IPOE) in four individuals. All three affected males had a more severe disorder than the four affected females. Two males had a progressive neurological disorder with progressive myoclonus epilepsy and deterioration in their early 30s. They developed episodes of paroxysmal cervical dystonia with cognitive decline during periods of poor seizure control. One plateaued after years of poor seizure control but remained intractable with periods of deterioration. The other deteriorated with episodes of status dystonicus and status epilepticus, ataxia and a progressive ophthalmoplegia before succumbing at 38 years. Parametric linkage analysis identified three peaks achieving a maximum LOD score of 1.21. Nonparametric analysis identified eight peaks achieving LOD scores above 0.80. These were not statistically significant. This is a novel autosomal dominant familial epilepsy syndrome

  6. Epilepsy on the silver screen in the 21st century.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baxendale, Sallie

    2016-04-01

    Epilepsy remains an attractive vehicle for filmmakers in the twenty-first century. This review examines the themes of twenty-one films, released between 2000 and 2014, that feature a character with epilepsy or a pivotal scene involving a seizure. Epilepsy continues to be associated with the supernatural in modern cinematic output. Demonic possession and epilepsy now share a similar cinematic lexicon. Unfortunately, the overlap is more than just visual. Supernatural treatments of narratives that claim to be 'based on a true story' of someone with epilepsy continue to blur the lines between medical and spiritual realms. Although there has been a steady progression away from concealment of the condition, epilepsy continues to signal 'otherness' in movie characters and seldom in a good way. All too often, a character has epilepsy to maximize the unease of the audience with them; it is a device that is used to signal 'this character is not like you'. However, amongst the hackneyed negative stereotypes, accurate portrayals of the condition are beginning to emerge, not least due to active collaborations between filmmakers and epilepsy advocacy groups. Far from being worthy, it is heartening that these films are also those that are the most absorbing and thought-provoking of the cinematic output thus far this century. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled "Epilepsy, Art, and Creativity". Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Epilepsy coexisting with depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Błaszczyk, Barbara; Czuczwar, Stanisław J

    2016-10-01

    Depression episodes in epilepsy is the most common commorbidity, affecting between 11% and 62% of patients with epilepsy. Although researchers have documented a strong association between epilepsy and psychiatric comorbidities, the nature of this relationship is poorly understood. The manifestation of depression in epilepsy is a complex issue having many interacting neurobiological and psychosocial determinants, including clinical features of epilepsy (seizure frequency, type, foci, or lateralization of foci) and neurochemical or iatrogenic mechanisms. Other risk factors are a family history of psychiatric illness, particularly depression, a lack of control over the seizures and iatrogenic causes (pharmacologic and surgical). In addition, treatment with antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) as well as social coping and adaptation skills have also been recognised as risk factors of depression associated with epilepsy. Epilepsy may foster the development of depression through being exposed to chronic stress. The uncertainty and unpredictability of seizures may instigate sadness, loneliness, despair, low self-esteem, and self-reproach in patients with epilepsy and lead to social isolation, stigmatization, or disability. Often, depression is viewed as a reaction to epilepsy's stigma and the associated poor quality of life. Moreover, patients with epilepsy display a 4-5 higher rate of depression and suicide compared with healthy population. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Urban & Partner Sp. z o.o.

  8. Mortality risk in children with epilepsy: the Dutch study of epilepsy in childhood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Callenbach, P M; Westendorp, R G; Geerts, A T; Arts, W F; Peeters, E A; van Donselaar, C A; Peters, A C; Stroink, H; Brouwer, O F

    2001-06-01

    Long-term follow-up studies of patients with epilepsy have revealed an increased mortality risk compared with the general population. Mortality of children who have epilepsy in modern times is as yet unknown. Therefore, the objective of this study was to determine mortality of children who have epilepsy in comparison with the general population. Between August 1988 and August 1992, 472 children, aged 1 month to 16 years, who presented in 1 of the participating hospitals with 2 or more newly diagnosed unprovoked seizures or at least 1 status epilepticus were enrolled in the study. All children were followed for 5 years or until death. The number of deaths observed during follow-up was compared with the expected number of deaths in the same age group in the general population in the Netherlands. Nine children died during follow-up, amounting to a mortality rate of 3.8/1000 person-years, which is sevenfold higher than expected (95% confidence interval = 2.4-11.5). No deaths were observed among the 328 children who had epilepsy of nonsymptomatic cause. All deceased children had epilepsy that was caused by a static or progressive neurologic disorder (mortality risk = 22.9; 95% confidence interval = 7.9-37.9). None of them died from sudden unexpected and unexplained death of epilepsy. In our cohort, we found no indication that children who have nonsymptomatic epilepsy have an increased mortality risk compared with the general population, whereas children who have symptomatic epilepsy have a 20-fold increased mortality risk. These data provide guidance for counseling parents of children who have epilepsy.

  9. Lipolysis in dry-cured ham maturation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vestergaard, C S; Schivazappa, C; Virgili, R

    2000-05-01

    Thirty light Parma hams were tested for muscle lipolytic activity (acid and neutral lipase activity) and free fatty acid (FFA) amounts in M. semimembranosus and biceps femoris, during progressive phases (0, 3, 6, 10 months) of dry-cured ham manufacturing. No correlation was found between the activities of acid and neutral lipases in fresh M. semimembranosus, while during processing the activities were positively related (pham, suggesting that FFA production could be influenced by both raw meat properties and muscle composition during processing.

  10. Epilepsy after Febrile Seizures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Seinfeld, S. A.; Pellock, J M; Kjeldsen, Lone Marianne Juel

    2016-01-01

    Background A history of complex febrile seizures can increase the risk of epilepsy, but the role of genetic factors is unclear. This analysis evaluated the relationship between febrile seizures and epilepsy. Methods Information on the history of seizures was obtained by a questionnaire from twin...... epilepticus. There were 78 twins who developed epilepsy. The highest rate of epilepsy (22.2%) occurred in the febrile status epilepticus group. Concordance was highest in simple group. Conclusion A twin with febrile status epilepticus is at the highest risk of developing epilepsy, but simple febrile seizures...... and emotional burden. It is currently not possible to accurately identify which children will develop recurrent febrile seizures, epilepsy, or neuropsychological comorbidities. © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved....

  11. Personality characteristics and epilepsy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, A S; Hansen, H; Andersen, R

    1989-01-01

    Patients with a long history of temporal lobe epilepsy or primary generalized epilepsy entered a questionnaire study of personality characteristics, based on a modification of the Bear-Fedio inventory for temporal lobe behavioural syndrome. Psoriasis patients and healthy volunteers served as cont...... dysfunction in the epilepsy group, the mere presence of a chronic disorder with potential social stigmatization influences personality.......Patients with a long history of temporal lobe epilepsy or primary generalized epilepsy entered a questionnaire study of personality characteristics, based on a modification of the Bear-Fedio inventory for temporal lobe behavioural syndrome. Psoriasis patients and healthy volunteers served...... as controls. Four clinical meaningful dimensions of included personality traits were identified: ixoide, ideational, obsessive-compulsive and affective features. Analyses based on the Rasch model approved of all dimensions except for affective features. The epilepsy group obtained the highest scores on all 3...

  12. Epilepsy and microRNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jimenez-Mateos, E M; Henshall, D C

    2013-05-15

    MicroRNA (miRNA) is a class of small non-coding RNA which regulates post-transcriptional gene expression by repressing and thereby fine-tuning protein production, mainly via sequence-specific binding within the 3'untranslated region of mRNA transcripts. Although in humans there are only ∼1600 miRNAs, bioinformatics, systems studies and advanced quantitative proteomics reveal miRNA regulation of over half of all protein-coding genes and that each miRNA can regulate multiple proteins. Epilepsy is a common, serious neurologic disorder characterized by recurring unprovoked seizures that result from abnormal firing of populations of neurons in the brain. The brain expresses several unique miRNAs which control dendritic morphology as well as ion channel levels, neuronal migration and glial function. There is an emerging view that the patho-mechanisms underlying the process of epileptogenesis, as well as maintenance and progression of the epileptic state, involve miRNAs that control multiple genes and proteins on a systems level. Expression profiling studies reveal select changes to brain miRNA levels following prolonged seizures (status epilepticus) in animal models. Inflammation, stress signaling and neuronal excitation are among the pathways most impacted. Analysis of miRNA expression in human epilepsy has also been performed, where again neuroinflammatory processes were prominent. These studies suggest that miRNAs may regulate certain key processes but are not necessarily broadly altering all patho-mechanisms in epilepsy. Functional studies employing antagomirs have identified contributions from miR-34a and miR-132 to seizure-induced neuronal death whereas silencing miR-134 potently reduced status epilepticus, seizure-damage and the later occurrence of spontaneous seizures. Efforts to identify the in vivo target(s) of epilepsy-regulated miRNAs, is now a priority. Last, miRNAs are stable, information-carrying (paracrine) signals. Profiling miRNA in biofluids may

  13. THE INTERNATIONAL LEAGUE AGAINST EPILEPSY AT THE THRESHOLD OF ITS SECOND CENTURY: YEAR 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    MOSHÉ, Solomon L.; PERUCCA, EMILIO; WIEBE, SAMUEL; MATHERN, GARY W.

    2010-01-01

    In July 2009, the International League against Epilepsy (ILAE) developed its four-year strategic plan in collaboration with past, current, and future leaders (www.ilae-epilepsy.org). This is the first yearly progress report, prepared by the management committee and the chair of the Strategic Task Force, to highlight progress toward achieving the plan’s goals. PMID:21219305

  14. [New treatments in epilepsy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arroyo, S

    1999-12-01

    In recent years the treatment of epilepsies has significantly evolved. The launching of six new antiepileptic drugs--vigabatrin, lamotrigine, felbamate, gabapentin, topiramate and tiagabin--has considerably increased the available therapeutic options. On the other hand, the use of no pharmacologic treatments such as surgery of epilepsy, the implantation of the vagal stimulator or cetogenic diets has increased. In the next decade new antiepileptic drugs will probably be available with different mechanisms of actions which will improve the treatment of epilepsy.

  15. Identification of Pharmacoresistant Epilepsy

    OpenAIRE

    Berg, Anne T.

    2009-01-01

    There is no single definition of pharmacoresistant (intractable, refractory) epilepsy. Prospective identification of pharmacoresistance is complicated by the variability of its appearance across different types of epilepsy as well as the variability of seizure control within a given patient over time. Failure of informative trials of two appropriate antiepileptic drugs has been recommended as a threshold that should trigger referral for evaluation at a comprehensive epilepsy center. Maximizin...

  16. Imaging of the epilepsies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Urbach, H. [University of Bonn Medical Center, Department of Radiology/Neuroradiology, Bonn (Germany)

    2005-03-01

    Imaging of epilepsy patients is challenging, since epileptogenic lesions (defined as structural lesions causally related to the epilepsy syndrome) may be small and often do not change during life. Prior clinical information about the epilepsy syndrome and the semiology of the seizures is needed in order to plan the examination properly. The effort to detect an epileptogenic lesion is directed to partial (focal) epilepsy syndromes whereas - by definition - no lesion is identified in idiopathic epilepsies. Most patients with partial epilepsies suffer from mesial temporal lobe epilepsies. In these patients, 2- to 3-mm-thick T2-weighted and fluid-attenuated inversion-recovery (FLAIR) fast spin echo slices along or perpendicular to the temporal lobe length axis have the highest diagnostic efficacy. In contrast, in patients with extratemporal lobe epilepsies perpendicular FLAIR slices through the anatomic region, from which, due to clinical and EEG criteria, the seizures are likely to originate, are preferred. The imaging features of common epileptogenic lesions (hippocampal sclerosis, long-term epilepsy-associated tumours, focal cortical dysplasias, vascular malformations, encephalitis including limbic and Rasmussen's encephalitis, gyral scarring including ulegyria) are detailed in the second section of this paper. (orig.)

  17. Epilepsy: Indian perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nandanavana Subbareddy Santhosh

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available There are 50 million people living with epilepsy worldwide, and most of them reside in developing countries. About 10 million persons with epilepsy are there in India. Many people with active epilepsy do not receive appropriate treatment for their condition, leading to large treatment gap. The lack of knowledge of antiepileptic drugs, poverty, cultural beliefs, stigma, poor health infrastructure, and shortage of trained professionals contribute for the treatment gap. Infectious diseases play an important role in seizures and long-term burden causing both new-onset epilepsy and status epilepticus. Proper education and appropriate health care services can make tremendous change in a country like India. There have been many original researches in various aspects of epilepsy across India. Some of the geographically specific epilepsies occur only in certain regions of our country which have been highlighted by authors. Even the pre-surgical evaluation and epilepsy surgery in patients with drug-resistant epilepsy is available in many centers in our country. This article attempts to provide a complete preview of epilepsy in India.

  18. Approaches to refractory epilepsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jerome Engel

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Epilepsy is one of the most common serious neurological conditions, and 30 to 40% of people with epilepsy have seizures that are not controlled by medication. Patients are considered to have refractory epilepsy if disabling seizures continue despite appropriate trials of two antiseizure drugs, either alone or in combination. At this point, patients should be referred to multidisciplinary epilepsy centers that perform specialized diagnostic testing to first determine whether they are, in fact, pharmacoresistant, and then, if so, offer alternative treatments. Apparent pharmacoresistance can result from a variety of situations, including noncompliance, seizures that are not epileptic, misdiagnosis of the seizure type or epilepsy syndrome, inappropriate use of medication, and lifestyle issues. For patients who are pharmacoresistant, surgical treatment offers the best opportunity for complete freedom from seizures. Surgically remediable epilepsy syndromes have been identified, but patients with more complicated epilepsy can also benefit from surgical treatment and require more specialized evaluation, including intracranial EEG monitoring. For patients who are not surgical candidates, or who are unwilling to consider surgery, a variety of other alternative treatments can be considered, including peripheral or central neurostimulation, ketogenic diet, and complementary and alternative approaches. When such alternative treatments are not appropriate or effective, quality of life can still be greatly improved by the psychological and social support services offered by multidisciplinary epilepsy centers. A major obstacle remains the fact that only a small proportion of patients with refractory epilepsy are referred for expert evaluation and treatment.

  19. Benign Epilepsy in Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sook-Cheng Chan

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available The diagnosis of benign epilepsy syndrome should meet the following criteria: age-related and self-limited; good response to medication; and no obvious neurological sequelae after seizure. However, the current concept of benign epilepsy syndrome has been challenged because of the advancements in genetic studies, neuroimaging, and molecular techniques. Many studies have revealed that the prevalence of behavioral problems and learning difficulties as well as subtle cognitive deficits is higher among patients with benign epilepsy, compared with the normal population. Here, we review updated results of these studies to show the latest and broad comprehensive knowledge of benign epilepsy in children.

  20. Personality characteristics and epilepsy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, A S; Hansen, H; Andersen, R

    1989-01-01

    Patients with a long history of temporal lobe epilepsy or primary generalized epilepsy entered a questionnaire study of personality characteristics, based on a modification of the Bear-Fedio inventory for temporal lobe behavioural syndrome. Psoriasis patients and healthy volunteers served...... as controls. Four clinical meaningful dimensions of included personality traits were identified: ixoide, ideational, obsessive-compulsive and affective features. Analyses based on the Rasch model approved of all dimensions except for affective features. The epilepsy group obtained the highest scores on all 3...... dysfunction in the epilepsy group, the mere presence of a chronic disorder with potential social stigmatization influences personality....

  1. Genetic determinants of common epilepsies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2014-01-01

    and insufficient power. We aimed to identify risk loci through meta-analyses of genome-wide association studies for all epilepsy and the two largest clinical subtypes (genetic generalised epilepsy and focal epilepsy). METHODS: We combined genome-wide association data from 12 cohorts of individuals with epilepsy...... and controls from population-based datasets. Controls were ethnically matched with cases. We phenotyped individuals with epilepsy into categories of genetic generalised epilepsy, focal epilepsy, or unclassified epilepsy. After standardised filtering for quality control and imputation to account for different...... genotyping platforms across sites, investigators at each site conducted a linear mixed-model association analysis for each dataset. Combining summary statistics, we conducted fixed-effects meta-analyses of all epilepsy, focal epilepsy, and genetic generalised epilepsy. We set the genome-wide significance...

  2. Epilepsy genetics: clinical beginnings and social consequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, J A; Rees, M I; Smith, P E M

    2009-07-01

    The approach to epilepsy care has transformed in the last 30 years, with more and better anti-epileptic medications, improved cerebral imaging and increased surgical options. Alongside this, developments in neuroscience and molecular genetics have furthered the understanding of epileptogenesis. Future developments in pharmacogenomics hold the promise of antiepileptic drugs matched to specific genotypes. Despite this rapid progress, one-third of epilepsy patients remain refractory to medication, with their seizures impacting upon day-to-day activity, social well-being, independence, economic output and quality of life. International genome collaborations, such as HapMap and the Welcome Trust Case-Control Consortium single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) mapping project have identified common genetic variations in diseases of major public health importance. Such genetic signposts should help to identify at-risk populations with a view to producing more effective pharmaceutical treatments. Neurological disorders, despite comprising one-fifth of UK acute medical hospital admissions, are surprisingly under-represented in these projects. Epilepsy is the commonest serious neurological disorder worldwide. Although physically, psychologically, socially and financially disabling, it rarely receives deserved attention from physicians, scientists and governmental bodies. As outlined in this article, research into epilepsy genetics presents unique challenges. These help to explain why the identification of its complex genetic traits has lagged well behind other disciplines, particularly the efforts made in neuropsychiatric disorders. Clinical beginnings must underpin any genetic understanding in epilepsy. Success in identifying genetic traits in other disorders does not make the automatic case for genome-wide screening in epilepsy, but such is a desired goal. The essential clinical approach of accurately phenotyping, diagnosing and interpreting the dynamic nature of epilepsy

  3. Epilepsy: Asia versus Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhalla, Devender; Tchalla, Achille Edem; Marin, Benoît; Ngoungou, Edgard Brice; Tan, Chong Tin; Preux, Pierre-Marie

    2014-09-01

    Is epilepsy truly an "African ailment"? We aimed to determine this, since international health agencies often refer to epilepsy as an African disease and the scientific literature has spoken the same tone. Various published materials, mainly reports, articles, were used to gather Asian and African evidence on various aspects of epilepsy and many of its risk and associated factors. Our results suggest that in no way can epilepsy be considered as an African ailment and such characterization is most likely based on popular beliefs rather than scientific evidence. In comparison to Africa, Asia has a 5.0% greater burden from all diseases, and is 17.0% more affected from neuropsychiatric disorders (that include epilepsy). Given that more countries in Asia are transitioning, there may be large demographic and lifestyle changes in the near future. However these changes are nowhere close to those expected in Africa. Moreover, 23 million Asians have epilepsy in comparison to 3.3 million Africans and 1.2 million sub-Saharan Africans. In comparison to Africa, Asia has more untreated patients, 55.0% more additional epilepsy cases every year, because of its larger population, with greater treatment cost and possibly higher premature mortality. Of several associated factors discussed herein, many have more importance for Asia than Africa. The current state of epilepsy in Asia is far less than ideal and there is an urgent need to recognize and accept the importance of epilepsy in Asia. In no way can epilepsy be considered as an African ailment. This is most likely based on popular beliefs rather than scientific evidence. A PowerPoint slide summarizing this article is available for download in the Supporting Information section here. Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2014 International League Against Epilepsy.

  4. Epidemiological study of mortality in epilepsy in a Spanish population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chamorro-Muñoz, María Isabel; García-Martín, Guillermina; Pérez-Errazquin, Francisco; Romero-Acebal, Manuel; García-Rodríguez, Antonio; Gutiérrez-Bedmar, Mario

    2017-03-01

    Studies concerning mortality in epilepsy have been performed primarily in Northern-Central Europe and US. The aim of this study was to provide information about mortality in people with epilepsy in Southern European countries. We studied a Spanish prevalence and incidence cohort of 2309 patients aged ≥14 years with epilepsy who were treated in an outpatient epilepsy clinic between 2000 and 2013. The deceased were identified through Civil Registries. Causes of death were determined using death certificates, forensic autopsies, hospital reports, family practitioners, and care-givers' records. Standardised mortality ratios (SMRs) were calculated. In a total of 15,865 person-years of follow-up, 152 patients died, resulting in an SMR of 2.11 (95% CI 1.79-2.47), which was higher for those aged 14-24. There was also a high rate of death for symptomatic epilepsies, progressive causes (SMR=6.12, CI 3.50-9.94), and remote causes (SMR=2.62, CI 2.12-3.21). High SMRs were found for all kinds of epilepsy and for respiratory and tumoural causes. Patients who died of epilepsy itself were 12.5%. Sudden unexpected death in epilepsy incidence was 0.44:1000. Death from status epilepticus incidence was 20:100,000. SMRs for external causes were of no statistical significance. This is the first epidemiological study to examine rate of mortality in epilepsy in a Southern European country. The identified mortality pattern is similar to the one provided by researchers from developed countries. The similarities between our results concerning epilepsy-related deaths and those provided by population-based studies are the result of the scarcely selected character of our study cohort. Copyright © 2017 British Epilepsy Association. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Epilepsy: A Disruptive Force in History.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Rohaid; Connolly, Ian D; Feroze, Abdullah H; Awad, Ahmed J; Choudhri, Omar A; Grant, Gerald A

    2016-06-01

    Since it was first described in a Mesopotamian text in 2000 bc, countless individuals have offered their perspectives on epilepsy's cause, treatment, and even deeper spiritual significance. However, despite the attention the disease has received through the millennia, it has only been within the past half-century that truly effective treatment options have been available. As a result, for the vast majority of recorded history, individuals with epilepsy have not only had to deal with the uncertainty of their next epileptic seizure but also the concomitant stigma and ostracization. Interestingly, these individuals have included several prominent historical figures, including Julius Caesar, Vladimir Lenin, and Fyodor Dostoyevsky. The fact that epilepsy has appeared in the lives of influential historical people means that the disease has played some role in affecting the progress of human civilization. Epilepsy has cut short the lives of key political leaders, affected the output of talented cultural icons, and, especially within the past half century, influenced the collective understanding of neuroscience and the human nervous system. In this article, the authors review how epilepsy throughout history has manifested itself in the lives of prominent figures and how the disease has helped shape the course of humanity's political, cultural, and scientific evolution. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Genes, Seizures & Epilepsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldman, Alica M.

    2006-01-01

    The chance that someone will develop any disease is influenced by heredity and environment. Epilepsy is not an exception. Everybody inherits a unique degree of susceptibility to seizures. About 3 percent of the United States population is prone to seizures and will get epilepsy at some point of their lives (1). Two thirds of the people with…

  7. Surgical management of epilepsy

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    brain, or to disconnect it and thereby prevent spread to other parts of the brain. In cases ... Certain types of epilepsy are better controlled with specific tech- niques, e.g. ... epilepsy.[8] In this procedure a DBS electrode is placed into the anterior.

  8. Management of refractory epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muñana, Karen R

    2013-05-01

    The term refractory epilepsy is utilized in veterinary medicine to describe a condition in which an animal with epilepsy fails to attain satisfactory seizure control or suffers intolerable side effects despite appropriate therapy with conventional antiepileptic drugs. Refractory epilepsy is an important problem in small animal practice as it occurs in approximately one-third of dogs with epilepsy. Consequently, there is much interest in identifying ways to more effectively treat this population of animals. More than a dozen new antiepileptic drugs have been approved for humans over the last 2 decades, and several of these drugs, including gabapentin, zonisamide, levetiracetam, and pregabalin, have been evaluated for the treatment of refractory seizures in veterinary patients. Nonmedical methods to treat poorly controlled epilepsy are also being explored. The 2 alternative forms of therapy that have shown the most promise in humans with epilepsy are electrical stimulation of the brain and dietary modification, both of which have also been evaluated in dogs. This overview summarizes the available data on pharmacologic as well as nonmedical treatment options for dogs and cats with refractory epilepsy. Although many forms of therapy are currently being utilized in clinical practice, our knowledge of the safety and efficacy of these treatments is limited. Additional randomized controlled trials are needed to better evaluate these novel therapies for refractory epilepsy in dogs and cats. © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Epilepsy and pregnancy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hvas, C L; Henriksen, T B; Ostergaard, J R

    2000-01-01

    . SETTING: Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology at Aarhus University Hospital, Denmark. PARTICIPANTS: One hundred and ninety-three singleton pregnancies in women with epilepsy were compared with 24,094 singleton pregnancies in women without epilepsy. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Preterm delivery, small...

  10. Stress and childhood epilepsy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Campen, J.S. van

    2015-01-01

    Epilepsy is one of the most common chronic diseases in childhood, characterized by the enduring predisposition to generate epileptic seizures. Children with epilepsy and their parents often report seizures precipitated by stress. In order to increase our understanding of the pathophysiological

  11. Epilepsy and driving

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matej Mavrič

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Epilepsy poses a risk for all participants in road traffic; therefore people with epilepsy do not meet the criteria for an unlimited driving license. Their driving is affected not only by epileptic seizures causing impaired consciousness and involuntary movements, but also by antiepileptic drugs with their many unwanted affects. The experts have not yet agreed on whether people with epilepsy have an increased risk of experiencing a road traffic accident. However, recent data suggests that the overall risk is lower compared to other medical conditions. Scientific evidence forms the basis of legislation, which by limiting people with epilepsy, enables all participants in road traffic to drive in the safest possible environment. The legislation that governs epilepsy and driving in Slovenia has been recently thoroughly reformed and thus allows a less discriminatory management of people with epilepsy. Although people with epilepsy experience many issues in their daily life, including their personal relationships and employment, they often list the need for driving as a top concern in surveys. General physicians play an important role in managing the issues of people with epilepsy.

  12. The neurobiology of cognitive disorders in temporal lobe epilepsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, Brian; Lin, Jack J.; Seidenberg, Michael; Hermann, Bruce

    2013-01-01

    Cognitive impairment and especially memory disruption is a major complicating feature of the epilepsies. In this review we begin with a focus on the problem of memory impairment in temporal lobe epilepsy. We start with a brief overview of the early development of knowledge regarding the anatomic substrates of memory disorder in temporal lobe epilepsy, followed by discussion of the refinement of that knowledge over time as informed by the outcomes of epilepsy surgery (anterior temporal lobectomy) and the clinical efforts to predict those patients at greatest risk of adverse cognitive outcomes following epilepsy surgery. These efforts also yielded new theoretical insights regarding the function of the human hippocampus and a few examples of these insights are touched on briefly. Finally, the vastly changing view of temporal lobe epilepsy is examined including findings demonstrating that anatomic abnormalities extend far outside the temporal lobe, cognitive impairments extend beyond memory function, with linkage of these distributed cognitive and anatomic abnormalities pointing to a new understanding of the anatomic architecture of cognitive impairment in epilepsy. Challenges remain in understanding the origin of these cognitive and anatomic abnormalities, their progression over time, and most importantly, how to intervene to protect cognitive and brain health in epilepsy. PMID:21304484

  13. [Temporal lobe epilepsy and active neurocysticercosis: two representative case reports].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos-Zúñiga, Rodrigo; Pérez-Gómez, Héctor R; Gaytán-Martínez, Luis A; Vega-Ruiz, Brenda; Soto-Rodríguez, Sofía; Rochín-Mozqueda, Alejandro

    2015-01-01

    There are limited evidences reported of temporal lobe epilepsy associated with active cysticercosis in cystic stage. The objective is to present the correlation between active cysticercosis in topographical zones associated with temporal lobe epilepsy, with neuropsychiatric manifestations and pattern of secondarily generalized partial seizures. Two cases of adult patients with neuropsychiatric manifestations of one year evolution, refractory to antipsychotic drug treatment, and who subsequently appear late onset partial-secondarily generalized seizures. Cysticercosis active presence in the temporal lobe in one patient, and the insula in the other, is identified. A better clinical control after albendazol treatment and subsequently anticonvulsant therapy only remained to evaluate pertinence of pharmacological withdrawal criteria. Active neurocysticercosis, may be the cause of acquired neuropsychiatric disorders and temporal lobe epilepsy of late onset when the topography is in the mesolimbic circuit. Early etiologic diagnosis and appropriate treatment allows adequate control of their symptoms and potentially final cure.

  14. Epilepsy treatment and creativity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zubkov, Sarah; Friedman, Daniel

    2016-04-01

    Creativity can be defined as the ability to understand, develop, and express, in a systematic fashion, novel orderly relationships. It is sometimes difficult to separate cognitive skills requisite for the creative process from the drive that generates unique new ideas and associations. Epilepsy itself may affect the creative process. The treatment of epilepsy and its comorbidities, by altering or disrupting the same neural networks through antiseizure drugs (ASDs), treatment of epilepsy comorbidities, ablative surgery, or neurostimulation may also affect creativity. In this review, we discuss the potential mechanisms by which treatment can influence the creative process and review the literature on the consequences of therapy on different aspects of creativity in people with epilepsy. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled "Epilepsy, Art, and Creativity". Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Sex, epilepsy, and epigenetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qureshi, Irfan A.; Mehler, Mark F.

    2014-01-01

    Epilepsy refers to a heterogeneous group of disorders that are associated with a wide range of pathogenic mechanisms, seizure manifestations, comorbidity profiles, and therapeutic responses. These characteristics are all influenced quite significantly by sex. As with other conditions exhibiting such patterns, sex differences in epilepsy are thought to arise—at the most fundamental level—from the “organizational” and “activational” effects of sex hormones as well as from the direct actions of the sex chromosomes. However, our understanding of the specific molecular, cellular, and network level processes responsible for mediating sex differences in epilepsy remains limited. Because increasing evidence suggests that epigenetic mechanisms are involved both in epilepsy and in brain sexual dimorphism, we make the case here that analyzing epigenetic regulation will provide novel insights into the basis for sex differences in epilepsy. PMID:24998474

  16. Epilepsy after stroke

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, T S; Høgenhaven, H; Thage, O

    1987-01-01

    Development of epilepsy was studied prospectively in a group of 77 consecutive stroke patients. Included were stroke patients less than 75 years old admitted within the first 3 days after the stroke. Excluded were patients with subarachnoid hemorrhage, vertebrobasilar stroke, and patients...... with other severe diseases. Cerebral angiography, CT, and EEG were performed in all patients. The patients were followed clinically for 2 to 4 years. Seven patients (9%) developed epilepsy. Of 23 patients with lesions involving the cortex, 6 (26%) developed epilepsy. Of 54 patients in whom the cortex...... was not involved, only 1 (2%) developed epilepsy. Patients with persisting paresis and cortical involvement seem to be at particularly high risk of developing epilepsy, as 50% of such patients (6 of 12) developed the disease....

  17. Nuclear imaging in epilepsy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chun, Kyung Ah [Yeungnam University Hospital, Daegu (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-04-15

    Correct localization of epileptogenic zone is important for the successful epilepsy surgery. Both ictal perfusion single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) and interictal F-18 fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) can provide useful information in the presurgical localization of intractable partial epilepsy. These imaging modalities have excellent diagnostic sensitivity in medial temporal lobe epilepsy and provide good presurgical information in neocortical epilepsy. Also provide functional information about cellular functions to better understand the neurobiology of epilepsy and to better define the ictal onset zone, symptomatogenic zone, propagation pathways, functional deficit zone and surround inhibition zones. Multimodality imaging and developments in analysis methods of ictal perfusion SPECT and new PET ligand other than FDG help to better define the localization.

  18. Epilepsy and Mitochondrial Dysfunction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Russell P. Saneto DO, PhD

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Epilepsy is a common manifestation of mitochondrial disease. In a large cohort of children and adolescents with mitochondrial disease (n = 180, over 48% of patients developed seizures. The majority (68% of patients were younger than 3 years and medically intractable (90%. The electroencephalographic pattern of multiregional epileptiform discharges over the left and right hemisphere with background slowing occurred in 62%. The epilepsy syndrome, infantile spasms, was seen in 17%. Polymerase γ mutations were the most common genetic etiology of seizures, representing Alpers-Huttenlocher syndrome (14%. The severity of disease in those patients with epilepsy was significant, as 13% of patients experienced early death. Simply the loss of energy production cannot explain the development of seizures or all patients with mitochondrial dysfunction would have epilepsy. Until the various aspects of mitochondrial physiology that are involved in proper brain development are understood, epilepsy and its treatment will remain unsatisfactory.

  19. ADHD in idiopathic epilepsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcos H. C. Duran

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Our aim was to clarify the correlation of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD with epilepsy and behavior problems. This was a cross-sectional study. Sixty children with idiopathic epilepsy were interviewed using the MTA-SNAP IV Teacher and Parent Rating Scale, Vineland Adaptive Behavior Scales and Conners’ Rating Scales. We used the chi-square test to analyze the correlation of epilepsy variables in patients with and without ADHD with a significance level of 0.05. Eight patients had ADHD symptoms (13%, seven had the inattentive ADHD subtype and only three had behavioral problems. When epileptic patients with and without ADHD symptoms were compared we found no significant difference in regard to epilepsy variables. All patients were controlled and 43% were either without AED or undergoing withdrawal. Our study revealed a low comorbidity of ADHD symptoms and epilepsy due to low interference of seizures and drug treatment on the comorbid condition.

  20. Managing Epilepsy in Pregnancy

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O Dwyer, V

    2017-02-01

    Epilepsy is one of the commonest medical conditions affecting women of childbearing age1. In the most recent triennial report into maternal deaths in Ireland and the UK, two thirds of women who died had a medical condition. In this report, 14 maternal deaths during pregnancy and up to 42 days postpartum were attributable to epilepsy or seizures; a rate of 0.4 per 100,000 maternities. In 12 of these women’ the cause was sudden unexplained death in epilepsy. Thus, epilepsy remains a high-risk condition in pregnancy. The gold standard of care is a multidisciplinary approach involving obstetricians, a neurologist and an epilepsy nurse specialist2. Like other units in Ireland this multidisciplinary service is currently provided in the National Maternity Hospital’s maternal medicine clinic, in conjunction with neurology services in Beaumont Hospital.

  1. The biochemistry and epigenetics of epilepsy: focus on adenosine and glycine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Detlev eBoison

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Epilepsy, one of the most prevalent neurological conditions, presents as a complex disorder of network homeostasis characterized by spontaneous non-provoked seizures and associated comorbidities. Currently used antiepileptic drugs have been designed to suppress neuronal hyperexcitability and thereby to suppress epileptic seizures. However, the current armamentarium of antiepileptic drugs is not effective in over 30% of patients, does not affect the comorbidities of epilepsy, and does not prevent the development and progression of epilepsy (epileptogenesis. Prevention of epilepsy and its progression remains the Holy Grail for epilepsy research and therapy development, requiring novel conceptual advances to find a solution to this urgent medical need. The methylation hypothesis of epileptogenesis suggests that changes in DNA methylation are implicated in the progression of the disease. In particular, global DNA hypermethylation appears to be associated with chronic epilepsy. Clinical as well as experimental evidence demonstrates that epilepsy and its progression can be prevented by biochemical manipulations and those that target previously unrecognized epigenetic functions contributing to epilepsy development and maintenance of the epileptic state. This mini-review will discuss epigenetic mechanisms implicated in epileptogenesis and biochemical interactions between adenosine and glycine as a conceptual advance to understand the contribution of maladaptive changes in biochemistry as a major contributing factor to the development of epilepsy. New findings based on biochemical manipulation of the DNA methylome suggest that (i epigenetic mechanisms play a functional role in epileptogenesis, and (ii therapeutic reconstruction of the epigenome is an effective antiepileptogenic therapy.

  2. Mitochondrial disease and epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, Shamima

    2012-05-01

    Mitochondrial respiratory chain disorders are relatively common inborn errors of energy metabolism, with a combined prevalence of one in 5000. These disorders typically affect tissues with high energy requirements, and cerebral involvement occurs frequently in childhood, often manifesting in seizures. Mitochondrial diseases are genetically heterogeneous; to date, mutations have been reported in all 37 mitochondrially encoded genes and more than 80 nuclear genes. The major genetic causes of mitochondrial epilepsy are mitochondrial DNA mutations (including those typically associated with the mitochondrial encephalomyopathy, lactic acidosis, and stroke-like episodes [MELAS] and myoclonic epilepsy with ragged red fibres [MERRF] syndromes); mutations in POLG (classically associated with Alpers syndrome but also presenting as the mitochondrial recessive ataxia syndrome [MIRAS], spinocerebellar ataxia with epilepsy [SCAE], and myoclonus, epilepsy, myopathy, sensory ataxia [MEMSA] syndromes in older individuals) and other disorders of mitochondrial DNA maintenance; complex I deficiency; disorders of coenzyme Q(10) biosynthesis; and disorders of mitochondrial translation such as RARS2 mutations. It is not clear why some genetic defects, but not others, are particularly associated with seizures. Epilepsy may be the presenting feature of mitochondrial disease but is often part of a multisystem clinical presentation. Mitochondrial epilepsy may be very difficult to manage, and is often a poor prognostic feature. At present there are no curative treatments for mitochondrial disease. Individuals with mitochondrial epilepsy are frequently prescribed multiple anticonvulsants, and the role of vitamins and other nutritional supplements and the ketogenic diet remain unproven. © The Author. Developmental Medicine & Child Neurology © 2012 Mac Keith Press.

  3. Art and epilepsy surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ladino, Lady Diana; Hunter, Gary; Téllez-Zenteno, José Francisco

    2013-10-01

    The impact of health and disease has led many artists to depict these themes for thousands of years. Specifically, epilepsy has been the subject of many famous works, likely because of the dramatic and misunderstood nature of the clinical presentation. It often evokes religious and even mythical processes. Epilepsy surgical treatment has revolutionized the care of selected patients and is a relatively recent advance. Epilepsy surgery has been depicted in very few artistic works. The first portrait showing a potential surgical treatment for patients with epilepsy was painted in the 12th century. During the Renaissance, Bosch famously provided artistic commentary on traditional beliefs in "The stone of madness". Several of these works demonstrate a surgeon extracting a stone from a patient's head, at one time believed to be the source of all "folly", including epileptic seizures, psychosis, intellectual disability, depression, and a variety of other illnesses. There are some contemporary art pieces including themes around epilepsy surgery, all of them depicting ancient Inca Empire procedures such as trepanning. This article reviews the most relevant artistic works related with epilepsy surgery and also its historical context at the time the work was produced. We also present a painting from the Mexican artist Eduardo Urbano Merino that represents the patient's journey through refractory epilepsy, investigations, and ultimately recovery. Through this work, the artist intends to communicate hope and reassurance to patients going through this difficult process. © 2013.

  4. Epilepsy is Dancing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuft, Mia; Gjelsvik, Bergljot; Nakken, Karl O

    2015-10-01

    In "Epilepsy is Dancing", in Antony and the Johnsons' album "The Crying Light"(2009), the lyrics and accompanying music video depicts an epileptic seizure in which the person is transferred to another beautiful and magical world. This may be called "enchanted epilepsy"; i.e., the experience of epilepsy as deeply nourishing and (positively) transforming, is conveyed not only in the lyrics but also the visual and auditory qualities of the video. The seizure in the video gives associations to Shakespeare's "A Midsummer Night's dream". If epilepsy appears in music lyrics, the focus is mostly on negative aspects of the illness, such as horror, fear and repulsive sexuality associated with the fits [1,2]. Contradictory to these lyrics, Anthony and the Johnsons' song is an example of a positive portrayal of epilepsy. It is open to a multitude of meanings, emotional valence and appraisal of epilepsy. By widening the experiential range associated with epileptic seizures, these lyrics highlight the inherently construed nature of epileptic experience. The song stands out in several ways. First, it describes epilepsy in positive terms, prioritising the euphoric, ecstatic, potentially empowering and enhancing aspects of epileptic seizures. Second, the lyrics and accompanying video point to divine experiences associated with epileptic seizures. Through the lyrics and the music video we are, as an audience, able to sense a snicket of an epileptic seizure, but also the universal experience of loosing control. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Delayed cure bismaleimide resins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Johnnie E.; Jamieson, Donald R.

    1984-08-07

    Polybismaleimides prepared by delayed curing of bis-imides having the formula ##STR1## wherein R.sub.1 and R.sub.2 each independently is H, C.sub.1-4 -alkyl, C.sub.1-4 -alkoxy, Cl or Br, or R.sub.1 and R.sub.2 together form a fused 6-membered hydrocarbon aromatic ring, with the proviso that R.sub.1 and R.sub.2 are not t-butyl or t-butoxy; X is O, S or Se; n is 1-3; and the --(CH.sub.2).sub.n -- group, optionally, is substituted by 1-3 methyl groups or by fluorine.

  6. Multibunch Instabilities and Cures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fox, John D

    2003-05-23

    The common approach to achieve the high luminosity needed for high precision measurements adopted by the particle factories now under construction consists in storing high current e{sup +}e{sup -} beams distributed in many bunches in separate rings. The beams are brought together to collide at one interaction point. An inconvenience of this strategy is that the performances can be seriously limited by unstable coupled-bunch oscillations excited by transients or noise and sustained by long-lasting parasitic resonating modes (high order modes-HOM) in the vacuum chamber, mainly in the RF cavities. Minimization of the HOM content and broad-band feedback systems together with the reduction of the driving transients are the complementary cures to this kind of disease. This paper introduces the subject with some examples and special emphasis on bunch-by-bunch feedback systems.

  7. Can consumers cure healthcare?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gruber, David

    2009-01-01

    The U.S. healthcare delivery system is in crises. Costs are too high and increasingly becoming unaffordable to federal and state governments, employers and consumers. Americans are dissatisfied with the current system and believe it should be fundamentally altered or rebuilt. A solution needs to be found, and it is not the single-payer system espoused by many in Washington and elsewhere. We believe consumers can cure healthcare if (a) professionals, providers and policy experts shift their mindset from treating diseases and conditions to taking a holistic approach to the caring of people, particularly Baby Boomers and their parents; (b) technology becomes widely available to increase engagement, personalize healthcare, share experiences, make better choices and embrace convenience and (c) a cost-effective and reimbursed primary care navigator (coordinator and/or health manager), consistent with the medical home concept espoused by the American Association of Family Practitioners (AAFP) becomes a central component of public policy.

  8. Epilepsy diagnostic and treatment needs identified with a collaborative database involving tertiary centers in France.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chipaux, Mathilde; Szurhaj, William; Vercueil, Laurent; Milh, Mathieu; Villeneuve, Nathalie; Cances, Claude; Auvin, Stéphane; Chassagnon, Serge; Napuri, Sylvia; Allaire, Catherine; Derambure, Philippe; Marchal, Cécile; Caubel, Isabelle; Ricard-Mousnier, Brigitte; N'Guyen The Tich, Sylvie; Pinard, Jean-Marc; Bahi-Buisson, Nadia; de Baracé, Claire; Kahane, Philippe; Gautier, Agnès; Hamelin, Sophie; Coste-Zeitoun, Delphine; Rosenberg, Sarah-Dominique; Clerson, Pierre; Nabbout, Rima; Kuchenbuch, Mathieu; Picot, Marie-Christine; Kaminska, Anna

    2016-05-01

    To obtain perspective on epilepsy in patients referred to tertiary centers in France, and describe etiology, epilepsy syndromes, and identify factors of drug resistance and comorbidities. We performed a cross-sectional analysis of the characteristics of 5,794 pediatric and adult patients with epilepsy included in a collaborative database in France between 2007 and 2013. Comparisons between groups used Student's t-test or Fisher's exact test for binary or categorical variables. Factors associated with drug resistance and intellectual disability were evaluated in multi-adjusted logistic regression models. Mean age at inclusion was 17.9 years; children accounted for 67%. Epilepsy was unclassified in 20% of patients, and etiology was unknown in 65%, including those with idiopathic epilepsies. Etiologies differed significantly in adult- when compared to pediatric-onset epilepsy; however, among focal structural epilepsies, mesial temporal lobe epilepsy with hippocampal sclerosis began as often in the pediatric as in adult age range. Drug resistance concerned 53% of 4,210 patients evaluable for seizure control and was highest in progressive myoclonic epilepsy (89%), metabolic diseases (84%), focal cortical dysplasia (70%), other cortical malformations (69%), and mesial temporal lobe epilepsy with hippocampal sclerosis (67%). Fifty-nine percent of patients with focal structural epilepsy and 69% with epileptic encephalopathies were drug resistant; however, 40-50% of patients with West syndrome and epileptic encephalopathy with continuous spike-and-waves during sleep were seizure-free. Ages at onset in infancy and in young adults shared the highest risk of drug resistance. Epilepsy onset in infancy comprised the highest risk of intellectual disability, whereas specific cognitive impairment affected 36% of children with idiopathic focal epilepsy. Our study provides a snapshot on epilepsy in patients referred to tertiary centers and discloses needs for diagnosis and treatment

  9. Models of experimental epilepsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatih Ekici

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Epilepsy is the most common serious neurological conditionin the world, with an estimated prevalence of 1% ofthe population. A large number of experimental modelsof seizure and epilepsy have been developed. These experimentalmodels are elicited by chemical convulsants,electrical stimulation, genetic models, structural lesions,physical stimuli (cold, pressure, hyperthermia, electricalin animals. Well-characterized animal models may allowthe understanding of the basic mechanisms underlyingepileptogenesis (it refers to the alteration of a normalneuronal network into a hyperexcitable network in whichrecurrent, spontaneous seizures occur. Moreover, thesemodels might also prove useful in identifying novel therapeuticapproaches to treatment of epilepsy. J Clin ExpInvest 2011; 2(1: 118-123

  10. Epilepsy and the law.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joubert, A F; Verschoor, T; von Rensburg, P H

    1997-01-01

    Epilepsy, and the treatment thereof, has effects on many aspects of life, with far-reaching implications for the patient, his family and the community. Epilepsy causes a great deal of social difficulties and restrictions due to the associated stigma and prejudice. It is not a rare condition and is associated with many other conditions, such as schizophrenia, mental retardation, autism, and terminal Alzheimer's disease. Other associated disorders may include cognitive difficulties, personality disturbances or psychoses of various types and durations. Only by the 1850's was epilepsy defined as a "neurological" disease.

  11. Epilepsy and law.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beran, Roy G

    2008-05-01

    Epilepsy can define who one is rather than the diagnosis one has. It may be considered under the rubric of disability with legislative protection against discrimination. Those seeking remedy should investigate alternative dispute resolution in preference to litigation. Many areas of the life of a person with epilepsy deserve examination when considering epilepsy and law. Just some of these include: duty of care; informed consent; driving; research; social interactions; insurance; recreational pursuits; employment; and privacy. This article examines the legal implications and ramifications of these selected topics, acknowledging that the limited scope of the article has only exposed the tip of the iceberg to encourage further exploration.

  12. The Role of Radionuclide Imaging in Epilepsy, Part 2: Epilepsy Syndromes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Ajay; Chugani, Harry T

    2017-03-01

    PET and SPECT can play an important role in the evaluation of various epileptic syndromes, particularly those with unknown causes, by revealing various underlying abnormalities that may not be fully appreciated from MR imaging studies. In some cases, PET and SPECT provide crucial data that guide surgical resections of the epileptogenic zone for medically refractory epilepsy. In other cases, these neuroimaging modalities preclude a surgical option and can guide genetic studies. Longitudinal PET and SPECT studies may increase our understanding of the etiopathogenesis of epilepsy syndromes and provide a clearer picture of the natural history of neurologic progression. © 2017 by the Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging.

  13. Genetics Home Reference: juvenile myoclonic epilepsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Home Health Conditions Juvenile myoclonic epilepsy Juvenile myoclonic epilepsy Printable PDF Open All Close All Enable Javascript ... view the expand/collapse boxes. Description Juvenile myoclonic epilepsy is a condition characterized by recurrent seizures (epilepsy). ...

  14. Novel techniques for concrete curing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kovler, Konstantin; Jensen, Ole Mejlhede

    2005-01-01

    It is known that some high-strength/high-performance concretes (HSC/HPC) are prone to cracking at an early age unless special precautions are taken. The paper deals with the methods of curing as one of the main strategies to ensure good performance of concrete. Curing by both external (convention...

  15. Memory Functioning in Children with Epilepsy: Frontal Lobe Epilepsy, Childhood Absence Epilepsy, and Benign Epilepsy with Centrotemporal Spikes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Filipa Lopes

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Specific cognitive deficits have been identified in children with epilepsy irrespective of results on intelligence tests. Memory deficits are traditionally attributed to temporal lobe epilepsy, whereas the impact of frontal lobe epilepsy on memory functions has remained controversial. The aim of this study was the examination of memory abilities in other childhood common epilepsy syndromes (frontal lobe epilepsy (FLE, childhood absence epilepsy (CAE, and benign epilepsy with centrotemporal spikes (BECTS and the influence of epilepsy-related variables. Memory was examined in 90 children with epilepsy (each epilepsy group consisted of 30 children, aged 6–15, and compared with 30 control children. Children with FLE showed significant deficits in verbal and visual memory. In addition, type of epilepsy, earlier age at epilepsy onset, and longer active duration of epilepsy were associated with memory problems. Seizure frequency and treatment, however, did not influence memory performance. This study indicates that children with FLE show greater risk of developing memory deficits than children with CAE or BECTS, thus highlighting the importance of assessing also memory functions in frontal lobe epilepsy.

  16. CURING EFFICIENCY OF DUAL-CURE RESIN CEMENT UNDER ZIRCONIA WITH TWO DIFFERENT LIGHT CURING UNITS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pınar GÜLTEKİN

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Adequate polymerization is a crucial factor in obtaining optimal physical properties and a satisfying clinical performance from composite resin materials. The aim of this study was to evaluate the polymerization efficiency of dual-cure resin cement cured with two different light curing units under zirconia structures having differing thicknesses. Materials and Methods: 4 zirconia discs framework in 4 mm diameter and in 0.5 mm, 1 mm and 1.5 mm thickness were prepared using computer-aided design system. One of the 0.5 mm-thick substructures was left as mono-layered whereas others were layered with feldspathic porcelain of same thickness and ceramic samples with 4 different thicknesses (0.5, 1, 1.5 and 2.0 mm were prepared. For each group (n=12 resin cement was light cured in polytetrafluoroethylene molds using Light Emitting Diode (LED or Quartz-Tungsten Halogen (QHT light curing units under each of 4 zirconia based discs (n=96. The values of depth of cure (in mm and the Vickers Hardness Number values (VHN were evaluated for each specimen. Results: The use of LED curing unit produced a greater depth of cure compared to QTH under ceramic discs with 0.5 and 1 mm thickness (p<0.05.At 100μm and 300 μm depth, the LED unit produced significantly greater VHN values compared to the QTH unit (p<0.05. At 500 μm depth, the difference between the VHN values of LED and QTH groups were not statistically significant. Conclusion: Light curing may not result in adequate resin cement polymerization under thick zirconia structures. LED light sources should be preferred over QTH for curing dual-cure resin cements, especially for those under thicker zirconia restorations.

  17. FMRI in Epilepsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Araújo, Dráulio B.; Araújo, David; Rosset, Sara; Wichert-Ana, Lauro; Baffa, Oswaldo; Ceiki Sakamoto, Américo; Pereira Leite, João; Santos, Antônio Carlos

    2004-09-01

    Localization of eloquent areas is of utmost importance in neurosurgical planning, especially in epilepsy surgery. Mass, destructive, or developmental lesions may distort brain anatomy. Functional MRI (fMRI) can localize eloquent areas despite these distortions and provide useful information for the planning of tailored resections. This paper deals with the major issues concerning the use of fMRI in epilepsy surgery, including its limitations. We present results derived from the clinical experience of the Epilepsy Surgery Center at Ribeirão Preto School of Medicine, where typical finger tapping and language fMRI paradigms were applied to 40 patients being considered for resective epilepsy surgery around eloquent cortex. Our results confirmed that although fMRI may not be used as a single tool for surgical planning, in conjunction with other methods it is useful in reducing the surgical time, it improves lesion resection, and prevents functional deficits.

  18. Mesial frontal lobe epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unnwongse, Kanjana; Wehner, Tim; Foldvary-Schaefer, Nancy

    2012-10-01

    Mesial frontal lobe epilepsies can be divided into epilepsies arising from the anterior cingulate gyrus and those of the supplementary sensorimotor area. They provide diagnostic challenges because they often lack lateralizing or localizing features on clinical semiology and interictal and ictal scalp electroencephalographic (EEG) recordings. A number of unique semiologic features have been described over the last decade in patients with mesial frontal lobe epilepsy (FLE). There are few reports of applying advanced neurophysiologic techniques such as electrical source imaging, magnetoencephalography, EEG/functional magnetic resonance imaging, or analysis of high-frequency oscillations in patients with mesial FLE. Despite these diagnostic challenges, it seems that patients with mesial FLE benefit from epilepsy surgery to the same extent or even better than patients with FLE do, as a whole.

  19. Treatment of difficult epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McTague, A; Appleton, R

    2011-02-01

    Most of the epilepsies that occur in children are relatively straightforward to manage, including suppression of the seizures. However, in at least 30% of children, seizures will not be fully controlled by one or two antiepileptic drugs (AEDs); these children may also have additional physical, educational or behavioural problems. This population is often labelled as having a "difficult" or an "intractable" epilepsy. The approach to these children must always begin with ensuring that the diagnosis of epilepsy is accurate, that the correct seizure type or types and epilepsy syndrome have been identified and that an underlying cause has been considered. Treatment must be holistic, considering the child as a person and not just someone having seizures; the AED regimen must be appropriate and not excessive; and surgery must always be considered a viable option.

  20. Nocturnal Frontal Lobe Epilepsy

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ryvlin, Philippe; Rheims, Sylvain; Risse, Gail

    2006-01-01

    Nocturnal frontal lobe epilepsy (NFLE) is a condition primarily characterized by seizures occurring exclusively or predominantly during sleep, the semiology of which suggest a frontal lobe origin and, more specifically, the involvement...

  1. Epilepsy - children - discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... them climb on a jungle gym or perform gymnastics. Ask your child's doctor about your child participating ... Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier; 2016:chap 593. Read More Brain aneurysm repair Brain surgery Epilepsy - overview Seizures Stereotactic ...

  2. Chromosomal Abnormalties with Epilepsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Gordon Millichap

    2005-02-01

    Full Text Available The correlation between specific chromosome abnormalties and various epilepsies was investigated by a study of 76 patients’ records obtained by questionnaires distributed to members of Kyoto Multi-institutional Study Group of Pediatric Neurology.

  3. Personality characteristics and epilepsy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, A S; Hansen, H; Andersen, R

    1989-01-01

    Patients with a long history of temporal lobe epilepsy or primary generalized epilepsy entered a questionnaire study of personality characteristics, based on a modification of the Bear-Fedio inventory for temporal lobe behavioural syndrome. Psoriasis patients and healthy volunteers served...... as controls. Four clinical meaningful dimensions of included personality traits were identified: ixoide, ideational, obsessive-compulsive and affective features. Analyses based on the Rasch model approved of all dimensions except for affective features. The epilepsy group obtained the highest scores on all 3...... dimensions, healthy volunteers the lowest, while the psoriasis group repeatedly held an intermediate position in all sets of assessment (subjects, interviewers and relatives). A logistic regression analysis showed ixoide features being most important when the entire epilepsy group was compared with other...

  4. Temporal lobe epilepsy semiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blair, Robert D G

    2012-01-01

    Epilepsy represents a multifaceted group of disorders divided into two broad categories, partial and generalized, based on the seizure onset zone. The identification of the neuroanatomic site of seizure onset depends on delineation of seizure semiology by a careful history together with video-EEG, and a variety of neuroimaging technologies such as MRI, fMRI, FDG-PET, MEG, or invasive intracranial EEG recording. Temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) is the commonest form of focal epilepsy and represents almost 2/3 of cases of intractable epilepsy managed surgically. A history of febrile seizures (especially complex febrile seizures) is common in TLE and is frequently associated with mesial temporal sclerosis (the commonest form of TLE). Seizure auras occur in many TLE patients and often exhibit features that are relatively specific for TLE but few are of lateralizing value. Automatisms, however, often have lateralizing significance. Careful study of seizure semiology remains invaluable in addressing the search for the seizure onset zone.

  5. Medical Marijuana for Epilepsy?

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kolikonda, Murali K; Srinivasan, Kavitha; Enja, Manasa; Sagi, Vishwanath; Lippmann, Steven

    2016-01-01

    Treatment-refractory epilepsy remains an important clinical problem. There is considerable recent interest by the public and physicians in using medical marijuana or its derivatives to treat seizures...

  6. The effect of light curing units, curing time, and veneering materials on resin cement microhardness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nurcan Ozakar Ilday

    2013-06-01

    Conclusion: Light-curing units, curing time, and veneering materials are important factors for achieving adequate dual cure resin composite microhardness. High-intensity light and longer curing times resulted in the highest microhardness values.

  7. Senile myoclonic epilepsy of Genton: two cases in Down syndrome with dementia and late onset epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crespel, Arielle; Gonzalez, Victoria; Coubes, Philippe; Gelisse, Philippe

    2007-12-01

    Senile myoclonic epilepsy of Genton is a newer epileptic syndrome of the older patients with Down syndrome associated with an Alzheimer-type dementia. We report two observations in whom the clinical and electroencephalographic features are consistent with the description of this syndrome. Both experienced a progressive deterioration of cognitive functions few years before the onset of the epilepsy. The EEG was characteristic with generalized fast spike-waves or polyspikes or polyspike-waves with or without bilateral myoclonic jerks especially at awakenings. One patient had a photoparoxysmal response (11-21Hz) with bilateral myoclonic jerks. Hence, the senile myoclonic epilepsy of Genton is an easily recognizable newer epileptic syndrome of the older Down syndrome patient.

  8. Multiplex families with epilepsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afawi, Zaid; Oliver, Karen L.; Kivity, Sara; Mazarib, Aziz; Blatt, Ilan; Neufeld, Miriam Y.; Helbig, Katherine L.; Goldberg-Stern, Hadassa; Misk, Adel J.; Straussberg, Rachel; Walid, Simri; Mahajnah, Muhammad; Lerman-Sagie, Tally; Ben-Zeev, Bruria; Kahana, Esther; Masalha, Rafik; Kramer, Uri; Ekstein, Dana; Shorer, Zamir; Wallace, Robyn H.; Mangelsdorf, Marie; MacPherson, James N.; Carvill, Gemma L.; Mefford, Heather C.; Jackson, Graeme D.; Scheffer, Ingrid E.; Bahlo, Melanie; Gecz, Jozef; Heron, Sarah E.; Corbett, Mark; Mulley, John C.; Dibbens, Leanne M.; Korczyn, Amos D.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To analyze the clinical syndromes and inheritance patterns of multiplex families with epilepsy toward the ultimate aim of uncovering the underlying molecular genetic basis. Methods: Following the referral of families with 2 or more relatives with epilepsy, individuals were classified into epilepsy syndromes. Families were classified into syndromes where at least 2 family members had a specific diagnosis. Pedigrees were analyzed and molecular genetic studies were performed as appropriate. Results: A total of 211 families were ascertained over an 11-year period in Israel. A total of 169 were classified into broad familial epilepsy syndrome groups: 61 generalized, 22 focal, 24 febrile seizure syndromes, 33 special syndromes, and 29 mixed. A total of 42 families remained unclassified. Pathogenic variants were identified in 49/211 families (23%). The majority were found in established epilepsy genes (e.g., SCN1A, KCNQ2, CSTB), but in 11 families, this cohort contributed to the initial discovery (e.g., KCNT1, PCDH19, TBC1D24). We expand the phenotypic spectrum of established epilepsy genes by reporting a familial LAMC3 homozygous variant, where the predominant phenotype was epilepsy with myoclonic-atonic seizures, and a pathogenic SCN1A variant in a family where in 5 siblings the phenotype was broadly consistent with Dravet syndrome, a disorder that usually occurs sporadically. Conclusion: A total of 80% of families were successfully classified, with pathogenic variants identified in 23%. The successful characterization of familial electroclinical and inheritance patterns has highlighted the value of studying multiplex families and their contribution towards uncovering the genetic basis of the epilepsies. PMID:26802095

  9. Rolandic epilepsy and dyslexia

    OpenAIRE

    Oliveira,Ecila P.; Neri,Marina L.; Capelatto, Lívia L; Guimarães,Catarina A.; Guerreiro, Marilisa M.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Although benign epilepsy with centrotemporal spikes (BECTS) is an idiopathic, age-related epilepsy syndrome with favorable outcome, recent studies have shown impairment in specific neuropsychological tests. The objective of this study was to analyze the comorbidity between dyslexia and BECTS. Method Thirty-one patients with clinical and electroencephalographic diagnosis of BECTS (group A) and 31 paired children (group B) underwent a language and neuropsychological assessment perfo...

  10. Pediatric epilepsy surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorfmüller, Georg; Delalande, Olivier

    2013-01-01

    Whereas there is no specific neurosurgical technique in pediatric epilepsy, the frequency of each type of surgery is very different from epilepsy surgery applied in adults, and reflects the underlying etiologies, which are much more diverse in children, with malformations of cortical development and tumors as the prevailing etiologies. Extensive resective or disconnective procedures for extratemporal epilepsy are more frequently performed in infants and younger children, whereas temporo-mesial resection is by far the most common surgical treatment for adults with epilepsy. More recently, less invasive techniques in children with an extensive epileptogenic zone, such as multilobar disconnection, hemispherotomy and other functional hemispherectomy variants, have been introduced in order to reduce duration of surgery, perioperative morbidity and length of hospital stay. Likewise, minimally invasive techniques are utilized, such as the endoscopic disconnection of hypothalamic hamartomas for gelastic epilepsy. This development has been encouraged with the introduction of image-guided navigation systems for the preoperative planning and during surgery. Historically, epilepsy surgery for children has been established much later than for adults. Apart from the particular aspects in perioperative management of younger infants, surgery-related morbidity as well as seizure outcome is in general similar to those in adults, depending rather on each type of surgery. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Coeliac disease and epilepsy.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Cronin, C C

    2012-02-03

    Whether there is an association between coeliac disease and epilepsy is uncertain. Recently, a syndrome of coeliac disease, occipital lobe epilepsy and cerebral calcification has been described, mostly in Italy. We measured the prevalence of coeliac disease in patients attending a seizure clinic, and investigated whether cerebral calcification occurred in patients with both coeliac disease and epilepsy. Screening for coeliac disease was by IgA endomysial antibody, measured by indirect immunofluorescence using sections of human umbilical cord. Of 177 patients screened, four patients were positive. All had small-bowel histology typical of coeliac disease. The overall frequency of coeliac disease in this mixed patient sample was 1 in 44. In a control group of 488 pregnant patients, two serum samples were positive (1 in 244). Sixteen patients with both coeliac disease and epilepsy, who had previously attended this hospital, were identified. No patient had cerebral calcification on CT scanning. Coeliac disease appears to occur with increased frequency in patients with epilepsy, and a high index of suspicion should be maintained. Cerebral calcification is not a feature of our patients with epilepsy and coeliac disease, and may be an ethnically-or geographically-restricted finding.

  12. [Epilepsy and religion].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakken, Karl O; Brodtkorb, Eylert

    2011-07-01

    Throughout mankind's history, epilepsy has been perceived as a mysterious and supernatural disorder. People with epileptic seizures were seen either as demonic or holy. Here we present a survey of our current knowledge on the association between epilepsy and religion from a medical viewpoint. The article is based on a non-systematic search of the database PubMed, biographies of Wise-Knut, and the authors' own experiences. A number of people with epilepsy, particularly those with temporal lobe epilepsy, have reported experiencing religious feelings during their seizures. Some experience a feeling of perfect harmony, the presence of God or a state of ecstasy. Insula is probably of importance for the seizure semiology. Postictally, some may develop religious delusions that can last for several days. A subgroup have an interictal personality characterized by a preoccupation with philosophical or religious questions, as well as hypergraphia. Wise-Knut, who lived in the 1800 s, is a well known example of this in Norway. There is now some evidence that a number of religious people, including prophets, saints, and cult founders, may have had temporal lobe seizures. Using epilepsy as a model to explain spiritual experiences is controversial. However, temporal lobe epilepsy has probably influenced our religious and literary history more than has been previously acknowledged.

  13. Epilepsy and physical exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pimentel, José; Tojal, Raquel; Morgado, Joana

    2015-02-01

    Epilepsy is one of the commonest neurologic diseases and has always been associated with stigma. In the interest of safety, the activities of persons with epilepsy (PWE) are often restricted. In keeping with this, physical exercise has often been discouraged. The precise nature of a person's seizures (or whether seizures were provoked or unprovoked) may not have been considered. Although there has been a change in attitude over the last few decades, the exact role of exercise in inducing seizures or aggravating epilepsy still remains a matter of discussion among experts in the field. Based mainly on retrospective, but also on prospective, population and animal-based research, the hypothesis that physical exercise is prejudicial has been slowly replaced by the realization that physical exercise might actually be beneficial for PWE. The benefits are related to improvement of physical and mental health parameters and social integration and reduction in markers of stress, epileptiform activity and the number of seizures. Nowadays, the general consensus is that there should be no restrictions to the practice of physical exercise in people with controlled epilepsy, except for scuba diving, skydiving and other sports at heights. Whilst broader restrictions apply for patients with uncontrolled epilepsy, individual risk assessments taking into account the seizure types, frequency, patterns or triggers may allow PWE to enjoy a wide range of physical activities. Copyright © 2014 British Epilepsy Association. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Perception of epilepsy among the urban secondary school children of Bareilly district

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hari Shanker Joshi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: There is a lack of knowledge about epilepsy among the students and the population in general, with consequent prejudice and discrimination toward epileptic patients. Objectives: Knowledge, behavior, attitude and myth toward epilepsy among urban school children in Bareilly district was studied. Materials and Methods: A cross-sectional survey was conducted among students of 10 randomly selected secondary schools of the urban areas in Bareilly district. A structured, pretested questionnaire was used to collect data regarding sociodemographic characteristics and assess the subject′s knowledge, behavior, attitude and myth toward epilepsy. Results: Of the 798 students (533 boys and 265 girls studied, around 98.6% had heard of epilepsy. About 63.7% correctly thought that epilepsy is a brain disorder while 81.8% believed it to be a psychiatric disorder. Other prevalent misconceptions were that epilepsy is an inherited disorder (71.55% and that the disease is transmitted by eating a nonvegetarian diet (49%. Most of them thought that epilepsy can be cured (69.3 and that an epileptic patient needs lifelong treatment (77.2. On witnessing a seizure, about 51.5% of the students would take the person to the hospital. Majority (72.31% of the students thought that children with epilepsy should study in a special school. Conclusions: Although majority of the students had reasonable knowledge of epilepsy, myths and superstitions about the condition still prevail in a significant proportion of the urban school children. It may be worthwhile including awareness programs about epilepsy in school education to dispel misconceptions about epilepsy.

  15. Factors affecting epilepsy development and epilepsy prognosis in cerebral palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mert, Gulen Gul; Incecik, Faruk; Altunbasak, Sakir; Herguner, Ozlem; Mert, Mustafa Kurthan; Kiris, Nurcihan; Unal, Ilker

    2011-08-01

    A study was conducted between November 2006 and October 2009 to determine the factors predicting the presence and prognosis of epilepsy in patients with cerebral palsy. We enrolled 2 groups of patients: 42 with cerebral palsy in group 1 and 56 patients with cerebral palsy and epilepsy in group 2. The subjects in group 2 were considered to have good epilepsy prognosis if they were free of seizures for the previous year; otherwise they were considered to have poor epilepsy prognosis. In group 2, neonatal epilepsy, family history of epilepsy, and moderate to severe mental retardation were significantly higher than in group 1 (P history of epilepsy, and mental retardation were found to be important and independent predictors of development of epilepsy in patients with cerebral palsy. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Relaxed Poisson cure rate models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, Josemar; Cordeiro, Gauss M; Cancho, Vicente G; Balakrishnan, N

    2016-03-01

    The purpose of this article is to make the standard promotion cure rate model (Yakovlev and Tsodikov, ) more flexible by assuming that the number of lesions or altered cells after a treatment follows a fractional Poisson distribution (Laskin, ). It is proved that the well-known Mittag-Leffler relaxation function (Berberan-Santos, ) is a simple way to obtain a new cure rate model that is a compromise between the promotion and geometric cure rate models allowing for superdispersion. So, the relaxed cure rate model developed here can be considered as a natural and less restrictive extension of the popular Poisson cure rate model at the cost of an additional parameter, but a competitor to negative-binomial cure rate models (Rodrigues et al., ). Some mathematical properties of a proper relaxed Poisson density are explored. A simulation study and an illustration of the proposed cure rate model from the Bayesian point of view are finally presented. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  17. Juvenile myoclonic epilepsy--neuroimaging findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koepp, Matthias J; Woermann, Friedrich; Savic, Ivanka; Wandschneider, Britta

    2013-07-01

    Juvenile myoclonic epilepsy (JME) has been classified as a syndrome of idiopathic generalized epilepsy and is characterized by specific types of seizures, showing a lack of pathology using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and computed tomography scanning. However, JME is associated with a particular personality profile, and behavioral and neuropsychological studies have suggested the possible involvement of frontal lobe dysfunction. The development of highly sensitive neuroimaging techniques has provided a means of elucidating the underlying mechanisms of JME. Positron emission tomography demonstrated metabolic and neurotransmitter changes in the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex reflecting the particular cognitive and behavioral profile of JME patients. (1)H-magnetic resonance spectroscopy has shown evidence of thalamic dysfunction, which appears to be progressive. Such techniques provide evidence of multi-focal disease mechanisms, suggesting that JME is a frontal lobe variant of a multi-regional, thalamocortical 'network' epilepsy, rather than a generalized epilepsy syndrome. Quantitative MRI revealed significant abnormalities of cortical gray matter in medial frontal areas close to the supplementary motor area and diffusion abnormalities with increased functional coupling between the motor and prefrontal cognitive systems. This altered structural connectivity of the supplementary motor area provides an explanatory framework for the particular imaging findings, seizure type, and seizure-provoking mechanisms in JME. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. 77 FR 59197 - Epilepsy Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-26

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Health Resources and Services Administration Epilepsy Program AGENCY: Health Resources and Services Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice of Noncompetitive Program Expansion Supplement Award... Program to the Epilepsy Foundation of America (U23MC19824) to support additional evaluation activities...

  19. Socioeconomic outcome of epilepsy surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jennum, Poul; Sabers, Anne; Christensen, Jakob

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE: Epilepsy surgery has been a standard treatment for refractory epilepsies that cannot be controlled by standard medical treatment. We aimed to evaluate the health and social consequences of resective surgery relative to controls from a study of national data. METHODS: Using the Danish...... National Patient Registry we identified all subjects with an epilepsy diagnosis between 1996 and 2009 and compared them with a group of patients with an epilepsy diagnosis who had had neither epilepsy surgery nor a vagus stimulation diagnosis by the index date, and who were matched by gender, index year...... for epilepsy diagnosis, and index year for epilepsy surgery. We considered all the health and social information available in the Danish health, medication and social registers. The duration of follow-up was three years. RESULTS: 254 epilepsy patients and 989 controls were analyzed. Surgery patients were more...

  20. WONOEP appraisal: Biomarkers of epilepsy-associated comorbidities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravizza, Teresa; Onat, Filiz Y; Brooks-Kayal, Amy R; Depaulis, Antoine; Galanopoulou, Aristea S; Mazarati, Andrey; Numis, Adam L; Sankar, Raman; Friedman, Alon

    2017-03-01

    Neurologic and psychiatric comorbidities are common in patients with epilepsy. Diagnostic, predictive, and pharmacodynamic biomarkers of such comorbidities do not exist. They may share pathogenetic mechanisms with epileptogenesis/ictogenesis, and as such are an unmet clinical need. The objectives of the subgroup on biomarkers of comorbidities at the XIII Workshop on the Neurobiology of Epilepsy (WONOEP) were to present the state-of-the-art recent research findings in the field that highlighting potential biomarkers for comorbidities in epilepsy. We review recent progress in the field, including molecular, imaging, and genetic biomarkers of comorbidities as discussed during the WONOEP meeting on August 31-September 4, 2015, in Heybeliada Island (Istanbul, Turkey). We further highlight new directions and concepts from studies on comorbidities and potential new biomarkers for the prediction, diagnosis, and treatment of epilepsy-associated comorbidities. The activation of various molecular signaling pathways such as the "Janus Kinase/Signal Transducer and Activator of Transcription," "mammalian Target of Rapamycin," and oxidative stress have been shown to correlate with the presence and severity of subsequent cognitive abnormalities. Furthermore, dysfunction in serotonergic transmission, hyperactivity of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenocortical axis, the role of the inflammatory cytokines, and the contributions of genetic factors have all recently been regarded as relevant for understanding epilepsy-associated depression and cognitive deficits. Recent evidence supports the utility of imaging studies as potential biomarkers. The role of such biomarker may be far beyond the diagnosis of comorbidities, as accumulating clinical data indicate that comorbidities can predict epilepsy outcomes. Future research is required to reveal whether molecular changes in specific signaling pathways or advanced imaging techniques could be detected in the clinical settings and correlate

  1. Epilepsy and homicide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pandya NS

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Neil S Pandya,1 Mirna Vrbancic,2 Lady Diana Ladino,3,4 José F Téllez-Zenteno31Department of Medicine, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada; 2Department of Clinical Health Psychology, Royal University Hospital, Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada; 3Division of Neurology, Department of Medicine, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada; 4Department of Neurology, College of Medicine, University of Antioquia, Medellin, ColombiaPurpose: We report the rare case of a patient with intractable epilepsy and escalating aggression, resulting in murder, who had complete resolution of her seizures and explosive behavior following a right temporal lobectomy.Patients and methods: We searched the available literature from 1880 to 2013 for cases of epilepsy being used as a court defense for murder and collected information regarding the final sentencing outcomes. We selected 15 papers with a total of 50 homicides.Results: We describe the case of a 47-year-old woman with drug-resistant right temporal epilepsy who developed increasing emotional lability, outbursts of anger and escalating violent behavior culminating in a violent murder. The patient was imprisoned while awaiting trial. In the interim, she underwent a successful temporal lobectomy with full resolution of seizures, interictal rage and aggressive behaviors. After the surgery, her charges were downgraded and she was transferred to a psychiatric facility.Conclusion: The aggressive behavior associated with epilepsy has been described in the literature for over a century. A link between epilepsy and aggression has been disproportionally emphasized. These patients share some common characteristics: they are usually young men with a long history of epilepsy and lower than average intelligence. The violent act is postictal, sudden-onset, more likely to occur after a cluster of seizures and is usually related with alcohol abuse.Keywords: aggression, crime, epilepsy

  2. Epileptogenic networks and drug-resistant epilepsy: Present and future perspectives of epilepsy research-Utility for the epileptologist and the epilepsy surgeon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jyotirmoy Banerjee

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A multidisciplinary approach is required to understand the complex intricacies of drug-resistant epilepsy (DRE. A challenge that neurosurgeons across the world face is accurate localization of epileptogenic zone. A significant number of patients who have undergone resective brain surgery for epilepsy still continue to have seizures. The reason behind this therapy resistance still eludes us. Thus to develop a cure for the difficult to treat epilepsy, we need to comprehensively study epileptogenesis. Till date, most of the studies on DRE is focused on undermining the abnormal functioning of receptors involved in synaptic transmission and reduced levels of antiepileptic drugs around there targets. But recent advances in imaging and electrophysiological techniques have suggested the role epileptogenic networks in the process of epileptogenesis. According to this hypothesis, the local neurons recruit distant neurons through complex oscillatory circuits, which further recruit more distant neurons, thereby generating a hypersynchronus neuronal activity. The epileptogenic networks may be confined to the lesion or could propagate to distant focus. The success of surgery depends on the precision by which the epileptogenic network is determined while planning a surgical intervention. Here, we summarize various modalities of electrophysiological and imaging techniques to determine the functionally active epileptogenic networks. We also review evidence pertaining to the proposed role of epileptogenic network in abnormal synaptic transmission which is one of the major causes of epileptiform activity. Elucidation of current concepts in regulation of synaptic transmission by networks will help develop therapies for epilepsy cases that cannot be managed pharmacologically.

  3. Mental deterioration in childhood epilepsy

    OpenAIRE

    Oka, Eiji; Sanada, Satoshi; Asano, Takashi; Ishida, Takashi

    1997-01-01

    Mental retardation is detected in 20-30% of children with epilepsy at hospitals specializing in treatment of childhood epilepsy. However, the incidence of mental deterioration in childhood epilepsy is not high. In this study, mental deterioration was found in 52 (1.8%) of the 2,880 children with epilepsy at Okayama University Hospital. The patients showing mental deterioration mostly suffered from specific epileptic syndromes, such as West syndrome, Lennox-Gastaut syndrome, severe myoclonic e...

  4. Issues related to symptomatic and disease-modifying treatments affecting cognitive and neuropsychiatric comorbidities of epilepsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooks-Kayal, Amy R.; Bath, Kevin G.; Berg, Anne T.; Galanopoulou, Aristea S.; Holmes, Gregory L.; Jensen, Frances E.; Kanner, Andres M.; O’Brien, Terence J.; Whittemore, Vicky H.; Winawer, Melodie R.; Patel, Manisha; Scharfman, Helen E.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Many symptoms of neurologic or psychiatric illness—such as cognitive impairment, depression, anxiety, attention deficits, and migraine—occur more frequently in people with epilepsy than in the general population. These diverse comorbidities present an underappreciated problem for people with epilepsy and their caregivers because they decrease quality of life, complicate treatment, and increase mortality. In fact, it has been suggested that comorbidities can have a greater effect on quality of life in people with epilepsy than the seizures themselves. There is increasing recognition of the frequency and impact of cognitive and behavioral comorbidities of epilepsy, highlighted in the 2012 Institute of Medicine report on epilepsy. Comorbidities have also been acknowledged, as a National Institutes of Health (NIH) Benchmark area for research in epilepsy. However, relatively little progress has been made in developing new therapies directed specifically at comorbidities. On the other hand, there have been many advances in understanding underlying mechanisms. These advances have made it possible to identify novel targets for therapy and prevention. As part of the International League Against Epilepsy/American Epilepsy Society workshop on preclinical therapy development for epilepsy, our working group considered the current state of understanding related to terminology, models, and strategies for therapy development for the comorbidities of epilepsy. Herein we summarize our findings and suggest ways to accelerate development of new therapies. We also consider important issues to improve research including those related to methodology, nonpharmacologic therapies, biomarkers, and infrastructure. PMID:23909853

  5. Reviewing the history of epilepsy for defeating this chronic and stubborn disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pu HAN

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Human beings have been recognizing and treating epilepsy for more than 3000 years. The cause of this disease was understood as demons in ancient times. A theory of brain disease was firstly proposed by Hippocrates. Although there were many years of case observation and development of anatomy, epilepsy had not been better recognized. Before 1000 years, the word "epilepsy" was firstly called by Avicenna. Afterward scholars of many countries had made elementary progress in classification, signs and symptoms, pathology and treatment of epilepsy. The first monograph of epilepsy was published in 1881 by Gower. Then drug treatment and surgical treatment had been applied and developed. In recent 100 years, due to the establishment of International League Against Epilepsy (ILAE, publishing of Epilepsia and clinical employment of EEG, rapid progress has been made in basic and clinical study of epilepsy under the help of many other relative scientific knowledge. As early as over 3000 years before, there was already treatment of traditional Chinese medicine for epilepsy recorded in China. During the past 30 years, obvious advancement of learning and growing number of specialized personnel have been pushing epilepsy research forward in China. doi: 10.3969/j.issn.1672-6731.2014.11.003

  6. Patterns of depressive symptoms in epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Triantafyllou, Nikolaos I; Gatzonis, Stergios; Kararizou, Evangelia; Papageorgiou, Charalampos C

    2013-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the nature and extent of depressive symptoms among patients with epilepsy. Ninety patients were investigated over a three-month period: 42 were suffering from generalized epilepsy, 29 from focal epilepsy and 19 from undetermined epilepsy. All completed the Zung self-rating scale for assessment of the depressive symptoms. Sixty-seven patients felt stigmatized because of epilepsy (67%): 73.6% in the undetermined epilepsy group, 55.1% in the focal epilepsy group and 88% in the generalized epilepsy group. Moreover, among the 90 epileptic patients studied, symptoms of irritability, indecisiveness, personal devaluation and emptiness showed a constant increasing trend for their presence from the undetermined epilepsy group through the generalized epilepsy group to the focal epilepsy group. These findings indicate that although the focal epilepsy patients felt less stigmatized, they did not differ greatly in terms of depressive symptoms, in relation to the undetermined epilepsy and generalized epilepsy patients.

  7. Knowledge, attitude and practices of students about first aid epilepsy seizures management in a Northern Indian City

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonu Goel

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Knowledge about epilepsy and its management is not satisfactory among school students in developing countries. The present study was planned to ascertain the knowledge, attitude and practices (KAP of students regarding first-aid management of epilepsy seizures in school setting. Materials and Methods: A total of 177 students of government schools of Chandigarh, a city of northern India, were taken. They were administered with a pre-tested semi-structured questionnaire (for knowledge and attitude assessment and an observational checklist after role play (for practice assessment on first-aid management of epilepsy. A scoring system was devised to quantify the knowledge and practices of students. Results: Seventy-one percent of them had either heard or read about epilepsy. Half of the students believed epilepsy as a hindrance to education. Ayurvedic treatment was preferred by more than half of the students; however, many believed that visit to religious places and exorcism as ways to cure epilepsy. Nearly 74% of students would call a doctor as first-aid measure for seizure in a person with epilepsy. Conclusion: We concluded that the knowledge about various aspects of epilepsy was average among school students in Chandigarh. However, there was no significant difference in knowledge, attitude and practice between students who lived in urban, urban slum and rural areas. It is recommended that first-aid management of seizures in epilepsy should be a part of school curriculum.

  8. Intravenous immunoglobulins for epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geng, JinSong; Dong, JianCheng; Li, Youping; Ni, Hengjian; Jiang, Kui; Shi, Li Li; Wang, GuoHua

    2017-07-04

    Epilepsy is a common neurological condition, with an estimated incidence of 50 per 100,000 persons. People with epilepsy may present with various types of immunological abnormalities, such as low serum immunoglobulin A (IgA) levels, lack of the immunoglobulin G (IgG) subclass and identification of certain types of antibodies. Intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIg) treatment may represent a valuable approach and its efficacy has important implications for epilepsy management. This is an updated version of the original Cochrane review published in Issue 1, 2011. To examine the effects of IVIg on the frequency and duration of seizures, quality of life and adverse effects when used as monotherapy or as add-on treatment for people with epilepsy. For the latest update, we searched the Cochrane Epilepsy Group Specialized Register (2 February 2017), the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) via the Cochrane Register of Studies Online (2 February 2017), MEDLINE (Ovid, 1946 to 2 February 2017), Web of Science (1898 to 2 February 2017), ISRCTN registry (2 February 2017), WHO International Clinical Trials Registry Platform (ICTRP, 2 February 2017), the US National Institutes of Health ClinicalTrials.gov (2 February 2017), and reference lists of articles. Randomized or quasi-randomized controlled trials of IVIg as monotherapy or add-on treatment in people with epilepsy. Two review authors independently assessed the trials for inclusion and extracted data. We contacted study authors for additional information. Outcomes included percentage of people rendered seizure-free, 50% or greater reduction in seizure frequency, adverse effects, treatment withdrawal and quality of life. We included one study (61 participants). The included study was a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, multi-centre trial which compared the treatment efficacy of IVIg as an add-on with a placebo add-on in patients with refractory epilepsy. There was no significant difference between

  9. Accelerated Hazards Mixture Cure Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jiajia; Peng, Yingwei

    2010-01-01

    We propose a new cure model for survival data with a surviving or cure fraction. The new model is a mixture cure model where the covariate effects on the proportion of cure and the distribution of the failure time of uncured patients are separately modeled. Unlike the existing mixture cure models, the new model allows covariate effects on the failure time distribution of uncured patients to be negligible at time zero and to increase as time goes by. Such a model is particularly useful in some cancer treatments when the treat effect increases gradually from zero, and the existing models usually cannot handle this situation properly. We develop a rank based semiparametric estimation method to obtain the maximum likelihood estimates of the parameters in the model. We compare it with existing models and methods via a simulation study, and apply the model to a breast cancer data set. The numerical studies show that the new model provides a useful addition to the cure model literature. PMID:19697127

  10. Epilepsy in Dostoevsky.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iniesta, Ivan

    2013-01-01

    Fyodor M. Dostoevsky (Moscow, 1821-Saint Petersburg, 1881) suffered epilepsy throughout his whole literary career. The aim here is to understand his condition in light of his novels, correspondence, and his contemporaries' accounts as well as through the eyes of later generations of neurologists. From Murin (The landlady, 1847) to Smerdyakov (The brothers Karamazov, 1880), Dostoevsky portrayed up to six characters with epilepsy in his literature. The first symptoms of the disease presented in early adulthood, but he was only diagnosed with epilepsy a decade later. In 1863 he went abroad seeking expert advice from the famous neurologists Romberg and Trousseau. Dostoevsky made an intelligent use of epilepsy in his literature (of his experiential auras or dreamy states particularly) and through it found a way to freedom from perpetual military servitude. His case offers an insight into the natural history of epilepsy (a cryptogenic localization related one of either fronto-medial or temporal lobe origin using contemporary medical terms), thus inspiring later generations of writers and neurologists. Furthermore, it illustrates the good use of an ordinary neurological disorder by an extraordinary writer who transformed adversity into opportunity. © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. The beliefs among patients with epilepsy in Saudi Arabia about the causes and treatment of epilepsy and other aspects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alkhamees, Hadeel A; Selai, Caroline E; Shorvon, Simon D

    2015-12-01

    The current survey sought to identify the religious and cultural beliefs about the causes and treatment of epilepsy in people with epilepsy from Saudi Arabia and a number of other aspects relating to the possibility of cure, coping with the condition, and public awareness. Study instruments were developed on the basis of the literature, a focus group of people with epilepsy, and feedback from people in the field with local knowledge. These were then piloted. A survey was then carried out among a total of 110 adults with epilepsy. Participants were asked to complete questionnaires inquiring into their beliefs about the causes and range of treatments used for epilepsy. Each participant was allowed to choose more than one cause and more than one treatment method. The questionnaires were administered face to face by a clinical psychologist (HAA) to improve the quality of the responses. We found that most adults with epilepsy in Saudi Arabia believe that epilepsy is a condition with multifactorial causation and for which more than one treatment method should be applied. A test from God was the most commonly ascribed cause (83% as well as 40% who believed that some cases of the illness were a punishment from God). The belief in the concept of God's will helped many in the cohort to accept their illness as part of their destiny. Ninety-six percent of the patients believed that there were also medical causes (such as an illness, brain insult, inflammation, heredity, contagion), and a similar proportion believed that there were also religious causes. Smaller proportions believed epilepsy could be due to cultural (78%) or psychosocial causes (64%). Thirty-four percent of people believed that there could be sometimes no cause, but only 2% thought that epilepsy never had any identifiable cause. Most patients did not believe that one treatment alone would help. Ninety-three percent of patients believed in medical treatment, 93% in religious treatment, and 64% in traditional

  12. Myoclonic epilepsy in Down syndrome and Alzheimer disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aller-Alvarez, J S; Menéndez-González, M; Ribacoba-Montero, R; Salvado, M; Vega, V; Suárez-Moro, R; Sueiras, M; Toledo, M; Salas-Puig, J; Álvarez-Sabin, J

    2017-03-01

    Patients with Down syndrome (DS) who exhibit Alzheimer disease (AD) are associated with age. Both diseases with a common neuropathological basis have been associated with late-onset myoclonic epilepsy (LOMEDS). This entity presents electroencephalogram features as generalized polyspike-wave discharges. We present a series of 11 patients with the diagnosis of DS or AD who developed myoclonic seizures or generalized tonic-clonic seizures. In all cases, clinical and neuroimaging studies and polygraph EEG monitoring was performed. In all cases, cognitive impairment progressed quickly after the onset of epilepsy causing an increase in the degree of dependence. The most common finding in the EEG was a slowing of brain activity with theta and delta rhythms, plus intercritical generalized polyspike-waves were objectified in eight patients. In neuroimaging studies was found cerebral cortical atrophy. The most effective drug in this series was the levetiracetam. The association of generalized epilepsy with elderly DS represents an epiphenomenon in evolution which is associated with a progressive deterioration of cognitive and motor functions. This epilepsy has some electroclinical characteristics and behaves as progressive myoclonic epilepsy, which is probably related to the structural changes that characterize the evolutionary similarity of DS with AD. Recognition of this syndrome is important, since it has prognostic implications and requires proper treatment. Copyright © 2014 Sociedad Española de Neurología. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  13. Do seizures and epileptic activity worsen epilepsy and deteriorate cognitive function?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avanzini, Giuliano; Depaulis, Antoine; Tassinari, Alberto; de Curtis, Marco

    2013-11-01

    Relevant to the definition of epileptic encephalopathy (EE) is the concept that the epileptic activity itself may contribute to bad outcomes, both in terms of epilepsy and cognition, above and beyond what might be expected from the underlying pathology alone, and that these can worsen over time. The review of the clinical and experimental evidence that seizures or interictal electroencephalography (EEG) discharges themselves can induce a progression toward more severe epilepsy and a regression of brain function leads to the following conclusions: The possibility of seizure-dependent worsening is by no means a general one but is limited to some types of epilepsy, namely mesial temporal lobe epilepsy (MTLE) and EEs. Clinical and experimental data concur in indicating that prolonged seizures/status epilepticus (SE) are a risky initial event that can set in motion an epileptogenic process leading to persistent, possibly drug-refractory epilepsies. The mechanisms for SE-related epileptogenic process are incompletely known; they seem to involve inflammation and/or glutamatergic transmission. The evidence of the role of recurrent individual seizures in sustaining epilepsy progression is ambiguous. The correlation between high seizure frequency and bad outcome does not necessarily demonstrate a cause-effect relationship, rather high seizure frequency and bad outcome can both depend on a particularly aggressive epileptogenic process. The results of EE studies challenge the idea of a common seizure-dependent mechanism for epilepsy progression/intellectual deterioration. Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2013 International League Against Epilepsy.

  14. The Epilepsy Foundation's 4th Biennial Epilepsy Pipeline Update Conference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    French, Jacqueline A; Schachter, Steven C; Sirven, Joseph; Porter, Roger

    2015-05-01

    On June 5 and 6, 2014, the Epilepsy Foundation held its 4th Biennial Epilepsy Pipeline Update Conference, an initiative of the Epilepsy Therapy Project, which showcased the most promising epilepsy innovations from health-care companies and academic laboratories dedicated to pioneering and advancing drugs, biologics, technologies, devices, and diagnostics for epilepsy. Speakers and attendees included emerging biotech and medical technology companies, major pharmaceutical and device companies, as well as investigators and innovators at the cutting-edge of epilepsy. The program included panel discussions on collaboration between small and large companies, how to get products in need of funding to the marketplace, who is currently funding epilepsy and CNS innovation, and how the NIH facilitates early-stage drug development. Finally, the conference featured the third annual "Shark Tank" competition. The presentations are summarized in this paper, which is followed by a compilation of the meeting poster abstracts. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Cold-Curing Structural Epoxy Resins: Analysis of the Curing Reaction as a Function of Curing Time and Thickness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corcione, Carola Esposito; Freuli, Fabrizio; Frigione, Mariaenrica

    2014-09-22

    The curing reaction of a commercial cold-curing structural epoxy resin, specifically formulated for civil engineering applications, was analyzed by thermal analysis as a function of the curing time and the sample thickness. Original and remarkable results regarding the effects of curing time on the glass transition temperature and on the residual heat of reaction of the cold-cured epoxy were obtained. The influence of the sample thickness on the curing reaction of the cold-cured resin was also deeply investigated. A highly exothermal reaction, based on a self-activated frontal polymerization reaction, was supposed and verified trough a suitable temperature signal acquisition system, specifically realized for this measurement. This is one of the first studies carried out on the curing behavior of these peculiar cold-cured epoxy resins as a function of curing time and thickness.

  16. Presentation of adult mitochondrial epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finsterer, Josef; Mahjoub, Sinda Zarrouk

    2013-03-01

    Mitochondrial disorders (MIDs) frequently manifest phenotypically as epilepsy (mitochondrial epilepsy). Mitochondrial epilepsy occurs in early-onset as well as late-onset syndromic and non-syndromic MIDs. We were interested in the types of epilepsy, the prevalence of mitochondrial epilepsy, the type and effectiveness of treatment, and in the outcome of adult MID patients with epilepsy. We retrospectively evaluated adult patients with syndromic or non-syndromic MIDs and epilepsy. MIDs were classified according to the modified Walker criteria as definite, probable, and possible. Epilepsy in adult patients with a MID was classified as "structural/metabolic" in two-thirds of the cases and as "genetic" in one-third of the cases. Although all types of seizures may occur in mitochondrial epilepsy, adult patients most frequently presented with generalised tonic-clonic seizures, partial seizures, convulsive status epilepticus, or non-convulsive status epilepticus. Cerebral imaging was normal in one-third of the patients. Two-thirds of the adult patients with mitochondrial epilepsy who took antiepileptic drugs received monotherapy, one-third combination treatment. The antiepileptic drugs most frequently administered included levetiracetam, lamotrigine, valproic acid, and gabapentin. Antiepileptic drugs were usually well tolerated and the outcome favourable. Adult mitochondrial epilepsy appears to be less frequent than previously believed but the prevalence strongly depends on patient selection. Mitochondrial epilepsy is most frequently "structural/metabolic". AEDs recommended for mitochondrial epilepsy include levetiracetam, lamotrigine, gabapentin and lacosamide. The outcome of mitochondrial epilepsy may be more favourable if mitochondrion-toxic AEDs are avoided. Only if non-mitochondrion-toxic AEDs are ineffective, mitochondrion-toxic AEDs may be used. Copyright © 2012 British Epilepsy Association. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Neuroimaging of epilepsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cendes, Fernando; Theodore, William H.; Brinkmann, Benjamin H.; Sulc, Vlastimil; Cascino, Gregory D.

    2017-01-01

    Imaging is pivotal in the evaluation and management of patients with seizure disorders. Elegant structural neuroimaging with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) may assist in determining the etiology of focal epilepsy and demonstrating the anatomical changes associated with seizure activity. The high diagnostic yield of MRI to identify the common pathological findings in individuals with focal seizures including mesial temporal sclerosis, vascular anomalies, low-grade glial neoplasms and malformations of cortical development has been demonstrated. Positron emission tomography (PET) is the most commonly performed interictal functional neuroimaging technique that may reveal a focal hypometabolic region concordant with seizure onset. Single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) studies may assist performance of ictal neuroimaging in patients with pharmacoresistant focal epilepsy being considered for neurosurgical treatment. This chapter highlights neuroimaging developments and innovations, and provides a comprehensive overview of the imaging strategies used to improve the care and management of people with epilepsy. PMID:27430454

  18. Neocortical Temporal Lobe Epilepsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bercovici, Eduard; Kumar, Balagobal Santosh; Mirsattari, Seyed M.

    2012-01-01

    Complex partial seizures (CPSs) can present with various semiologies, while mesial temporal lobe epilepsy (mTLE) is a well-recognized cause of CPS, neocortical temporal lobe epilepsy (nTLE) albeit being less common is increasingly recognized as separate disease entity. Differentiating the two remains a challenge for epileptologists as many symptoms overlap due to reciprocal connections between the neocortical and the mesial temporal regions. Various studies have attempted to correctly localize the seizure focus in nTLE as patients with this disorder may benefit from surgery. While earlier work predicted poor outcomes in this population, recent work challenges those ideas yielding good outcomes in part due to better localization using improved anatomical and functional techniques. This paper provides a comprehensive review of the diagnostic workup, particularly the application of recent advances in electroencephalography and functional brain imaging, in neocortical temporal lobe epilepsy. PMID:22953057

  19. Understanding complexities of synaptic transmission in medically intractable seizures: A paradigm of epilepsy research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jyotirmoy Banerjee

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Investigating the changes associated with the development of epileptic state in humans is complex and requires a multidisciplinary approach. Understanding the intricacies of medically intractable epilepsy still remains a challenge for neurosurgeons across the world. A significant number of patients who has undergone resective brain surgery for epilepsy still continue to have seizures. The reason behind this therapy resistance still eludes us. Thus to develop a cure for the difficult to treat epilepsy, we need to comprehensively study epileptogenesis. Although various animal models are developed but none of them replicate the pathological conditions in humans. So the ideal way to understand epileptogenecity is to examine the tissue resected for the treatment of intractable epilepsy. Advanced imaging and electrical localization procedures are utilized to establish the epileptogenic zone in epilepsy patients. Further molecular and cytological studies are required for the microscopic analysis of brain samples collected from the epileptogenic focus. As alterations in inhibitory as well as excitatory synaptic transmission are key features of epilepsy, understanding the regulation of neurotransmission in the resected surgery zone is of immense importance. Here we summarize various modalities of in vitro slice analysis from the resected brain specimen to understand the changes in GABAergic and glutamatergic synaptic transmission in epileptogenic zone. We also review evidence pertaining to the proposed role of nicotinic receptors in abnormal synaptic transmission which is one of the major causes of epileptiform activity. Elucidation of current concepts in regulation of synaptic transmission will help develop therapies for epilepsy cases that cannot me managed pharmacologically.

  20. A resurging boom in new drugs for epilepsy and brain disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Younus, Iyan; Reddy, Doodipala Samba

    2018-01-01

    Epilepsy is one of the most common neurological diseases affecting approximately 50 million people worldwide. Despite many advances in epilepsy research, nearly a third of patients with epilepsy have refractory or pharmacoresistant epilepsy. Despite the approval of a dozen antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) over the past decade, there are no agents that halt the development of epilepsy. Thus, newer and better AEDs that can prevent refractory seizures and modify the disease are needed for curing epilepsy. Areas covered: In this article, we highlight the recent advances and emerging trends in new and innovative drugs for epilepsy and seizure disorders. We review in detail top new drugs that are currently in clinical trials or agents that are under development and have novel mechanisms of action. Expert commentary: Among the new agents under clinical investigation, the majority were originally developed for treating other neurological diseases (everolimus, fenfluramine, nalutozan, bumetanide, and valnoctamide); several have mechanisms of action similar to those of conventional AEDs (AP, ganaxolone, and YKP3089); and some new agents represent novel mechanisms of actions (huperzine-A, cannabidiol, tonabersat, and VX-765).

  1. Seizure disorders and epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozuna, J

    2000-01-01

    Seizures are uncontrolled hypersynchronous electrical discharges of neurons in the brain that interfere with normal function. They are a symptom of an underlying disorder. Epilepsy is a condition of recurring seizures that do not have a reversible metabolic cause. Seizures can be confused with a variety of other conditions, so an understanding of seizure manifestations is crucial in making an accurate diagnosis. Drug therapy is the mainstay of epilepsy treatment, but surgery and vagal nerve stimulation are options for selected refractory cases. Psychosocial consequences of recurring seizures are often more significant to patients than the seizures themselves.

  2. Canine epilepsy: an underutilized model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patterson, Edward E

    2014-01-01

    The mainstay of comparative research for epilepsy has been rodent models of induced epilepsy. This rodent basic science is essential, but it does not always translate to similar results in people, likely because induced epilepsy is not always similar enough to naturally occurring epilepsy. A good large animal, intermediate model would be very helpful to potentially bridge this translational gap. Epilepsy is the most common medical neurologic disease of dogs. It has been proposed since the 1970s that dogs with naturally occurring epilepsy could potentially be used as a comparative model for people of the underlying basis and therapy of epilepsy. There have been sporadic studies in the decades since then, with a relative surge in the last 10 years. These canine studies in the areas of genetics, drug therapy, dietary therapy, electroencelphalogram research, and devices for epilepsy show proof of concept that canine epilepsy can be a very good model for comparative research for many, but not all, facets of epilepsy. Results of research in canine epilepsy can and have benefited the improvement of treatment for both people and dogs. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Institute for Laboratory Animal Research. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  3. Cure Schedule for Stycast 2651/Catalyst 11.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kropka, Jamie Michael [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); McCoy, John D. [New Mexico Inst. of Mining and Technology, Socorro, NM (United States)

    2017-11-01

    The Henkel technical data sheet (TDS) for Stycast 2651/Catalyst 11 lists three alternate cure schedules for the material, each of which would result in a different state of reaction and different material properties. Here, a cure schedule that attains full reaction of the material is defined. The use of this cure schedule will eliminate variance in material properties due to changes in the cure state of the material, and the cure schedule will serve as the method to make material prior to characterizing properties. The following recommendation was motivated by (1) a desire to cure at a single temperature for ease of manufacture and (2) a desire to keep the cure temperature low (to minimize residual stress build-up associated with the cooldown from the cure temperature to room temperature) without excessively limiting the cure reaction due to vitrification (i.e., material glass transition temperature, Tg, exceeding cure temperature).

  4. Mixture proportioning for internal curing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bentz, Dale P.; Pietro, Lura; Roberts, John W.

    2005-01-01

    less than that of bulk water, a hydrating cement paste will imbibe water (about 0.07 g water/g cement) from an available source. While in higher w/c concretes, this water can be, and often is, supplied by external (surface) curing, in low w/c concretes, the permeability of the concrete quickly becomes...... of additional internal water that is not part of the mixing water.” The additional internal water is typically supplied by using relatively small amounts of saturated, lightweight, fine aggregates (LWA) or superabsorbent polymer (SAP) particles in the concrete. Benefits of internal curing include increased...... too low to allow the effective transfer of water from the external surface to the concrete interior. This is one justification for internal curing. Additional water that can be distributed somewhat uniformly throughout the concrete will be more readily able to reach unhydrated cement....

  5. Epilepsy and Spinocerebellar Ataxia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Gordon Millichap

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available A large consanguinous family from Saudi Arabia with 4 affected children presenting with an autosomal recessive ataxia, generalized tonic-clonic epilepsy and mental retardation is reported from the Institut de Genetique, Universite Louis Pasteur, Illkirch, France; Division of Pediatric Neurology, King Saud University, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia; and other centers.

  6. Mobile EEG in epilepsy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Askamp, Jessica; van Putten, Michel Johannes Antonius Maria

    2014-01-01

    The sensitivity of routine EEG recordings for interictal epileptiform discharges in epilepsy is limited. In some patients, inpatient video-EEG may be performed to increase the likelihood of finding abnormalities. Although many agree that home EEG recordings may provide a cost-effective alternative

  7. Epilepsy in the Elderly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lu-An Chen

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Elderly people are the largest and continuously fastest growing population among patients with epilepsy. Elderly patients with epilepsy are very different from other age groups in many respects and clinicians shouldn’t treat them in the same way as younger adults. Accurate diagnosis of epilepsy in the elderly is much more difficult and atypical manifestations and misdiagnoses are certainly not the exception. Syncope is probably the most important differential diagnosis. High clinical suspicion and proper investigation are the best tools for prompt diagnosis. Etiologies of late-onset epilepsy are mainly symptomatic and cerebrovascular diseases are the most common causes in this age group, followed by degenerative diseases such as Alzheimer’s disease. It is appropriate to consider starting antiepileptic drug (AED treatment at the first-ever seizure in elderly patients who have remote symptomatic causes such as stroke and dementia. According to the high recurrence rate of seizure and the good response to AEDs in elderly patients, the proper choice from various AEDs for seizure control is very important. Decision-making for AED choice depends on many different factors, including pharmacological properties, efficacy, tolerability from side effects, drug interactions, and medical comorbidities. The newer AEDs with lesser adverse effects and fewer drug interactions appear to be reasonable treatment options for elderly patients. However, more evidence from clinical trials in this specific age group is warranted.

  8. Angelman Syndrome and Epilepsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Gordon Millichap

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available Twenty-six patients with Angelman syndrome (AS, of which 19 had 15ql 1-13 maternal deletion, were studied and followed at the University of San Paulo, Brazil, with particular reference to the prevalence and type of epilepsy and its response to antiepileptic drugs.

  9. Vigabatrin in childhood epilepsy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Uldall, P; Alving, J; Gram, L

    1995-01-01

    In an retrospective uncontrolled long-term study in 30 children with intractable epilepsy, it was found that treatment with vigabatrin resulted in a seizure reduction of more than 50% at 1-year follow-up in 40% of the children. The responders were all children with partial seizures. Side effects...

  10. Epilepsy and brain tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    ENGLOT, DARIO J.; CHANG, EDWARD F.; VECHT, CHARLES J.

    2016-01-01

    Seizures are common in patients with brain tumors, and epilepsy can significantly impact patient quality of life. Therefore, a thorough understanding of rates and predictors of seizures, and the likelihood of seizure freedom after resection, is critical in the treatment of brain tumors. Among all tumor types, seizures are most common with glioneuronal tumors (70–80%), particularly in patients with frontotemporal or insular lesions. Seizures are also common in individuals with glioma, with the highest rates of epilepsy (60–75%) observed in patients with low-grade gliomas located in superficial cortical or insular regions. Approximately 20–50% of patients with meningioma and 20–35% of those with brain metastases also suffer from seizures. After tumor resection, approximately 60–90% are rendered seizure-free, with most favorable seizure outcomes seen in individuals with glioneuronal tumors. Gross total resection, earlier surgical therapy, and a lack of generalized seizures are common predictors of a favorable seizure outcome. With regard to anticonvulsant medication selection, evidence-based guidelines for the treatment of focal epilepsy should be followed, and individual patient factors should also be considered, including patient age, sex, organ dysfunction, comorbidity, or cotherapy. As concomitant chemotherapy commonly forms an essential part of glioma treatment, enzyme-inducing anticonvulsants should be avoided when possible. Seizure freedom is the ultimate goal in the treatment of brain tumor patients with epilepsy, given the adverse effects of seizures on quality of life. PMID:26948360

  11. Hormones and absence epilepsy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Luijtelaar, E.L.J.M. van; Tolmacheva, E.A.; Budziszewska, B.

    2017-01-01

    Hormones have an extremely large impact on seizures and epilepsy. Stress and stress hormones are known to reinforce seizure expression, and gonadal hormones affect the number of seizures and even the seizure type. Moreover, hormonal concentrations change drastically over an individual's lifetime,

  12. Hormones and absence epilepsy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Luijtelaar, E.L.J.M. van; Budziszewska, B.; Tolmacheva, E.A.

    2009-01-01

    Hormones have an extremely large impact on seizures and epilepsy. Stress and stress hormones are known to reinforce seizure expression, and gonadal hormones affect the number of seizures and even the seizure type. Moreover, hormonal concentrations change drastically over an individual's lifetime,

  13. Vigabatrin in childhood epilepsy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Uldall, P; Alving, J; Gram, L

    1995-01-01

    In an retrospective uncontrolled long-term study in 30 children with intractable epilepsy, it was found that treatment with vigabatrin resulted in a seizure reduction of more than 50% at 1-year follow-up in 40% of the children. The responders were all children with partial seizures. Side effects ...

  14. An approach to epilepsy

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The key to understanding and managing epilepsy is to decide whether seizures are genetic/idiopathic or caused by focal brain pathology. ..... Generalised 3 Hz spike and wave. Focal. EEG = electroencephalogram. Table 3. Differences between Generalised Tonic-Clonic and Focal-onset Seizures evolving to Generalised ...

  15. [Juvenile myoclonic epilepsy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Syvertsen, Marte Roa; Markhus, Rune; Selmer, Kaja Kristine; Nakken, Karl O

    2012-08-07

    Juvenile myoclonic epilepsy (JME) is a generalised epilepsy with seizure onset in youth. The aim of this review is to present updated knowledge about the etiology, diagnosis and treatment of JME. The review is based on a judicious selection of original English language articles, meta-analyses, and reviews found in PubMed, and the authors' own experience with the patient group. Seizure onset occurs in adolescence. All have myoclonias, about 90 % have generalized tonic-clonic seizures, and one third have absences. Myoclonic jerks are frequently the debut symptom, while tonic-clonic seizures appear later on. Patients are particularly susceptible to seizures shortly after waking. It is important to ask specifically about myoclonias as most patients do not report jerks spontaneously. The electroencephalograms of 44-81 % of the patients show discharges of 4-6 Hz polyspike waves. Focal EEG abnormalities may be seen in about 30 %. When patients are treated with valproate and seizure-precipitating factors are avoided, especially sleep deprivation, about 80 % become seizure-free. Lamotrigine and levetiracetam are alternative therapies for women of childbearing age. Attempts to taper off the medication after several years of seizure freedom entail a high risk of seizure relapse. As there may be features of focal epilepsy in the seizure semiology and/or the EEGs, it may be difficult to diagnose JME. Thus, many patients are misdiagnosed as having a focal epilepsy and are given antiepileptic drugs that may aggravate the tendency to seizures.

  16. Genetic Aspects of Epilepsy

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Schizophrenia and manic-depressive psychosis, also based upon single gene mechanisms, may similarly, in principle, be counter- acted by drugs specifically directed against the genetically determined enzyme ... work in the sphere of epilepsy has not resulted in the .... in line with the thesis of single dominance of Lennox.

  17. Adenosine dysfunction in epilepsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boison, Detlev

    2011-01-01

    Extracellular levels of the brain’s endogenous anticonvulsant and neuroprotectant adenosine largely depend on an astrocyte-based adenosine cycle, comprised of ATP release, rapid degradation of ATP into adenosine, and metabolic reuptake of adenosine through equilibrative nucleoside transporters and phosphorylation by adenosine kinase (ADK). Changes in ADK expression and activity therefore rapidly translate into changes of extracellular adenosine, which exerts its potent anticonvulsive and neuroprotective effects by activation of pre- and postsynaptic adenosine A1 receptors. Increases in ADK increase neuronal excitability, whereas decreases in ADK render the brain resistant to seizures and injury. Importantly, ADK was found to be overexpressed and associated with astrogliosis and spontaneous seizures in rodent models of epilepsy, as well as in human specimen resected from patients with hippocampal sclerosis and temporal lobe epilepsy. Several lines of evidence indicate that overexpression of astroglial ADK and adenosine deficiency are pathological hallmarks of the epileptic brain. Consequently, adenosine augmentation therapies constitute a powerful approach for seizure prevention, which is effective in models of epilepsy that are resistant to conventional antiepileptic drugs. The adenosine kinase hypothesis of epileptogenesis suggests that adenosine dysfunction in epilepsy undergoes a biphasic response: An acute surge of adenosine that can be triggered by any type of injury might contribute to the development of astrogliosis via adenosine receptor –dependent and –independent mechanisms. Astrogliosis in turn is associated with overexpression of ADK, which was shown to be sufficient to trigger spontaneous recurrent electrographic seizures. Thus, ADK emerges as a promising target for the prediction and prevention of epilepsy. PMID:22700220

  18. [Epilepsy, eponyms and patron saints (history of Western civilization)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janković, S M; Sokić, D V; Lević, Z M; Susić, V; Stojsavljević, N; Drulović, J

    1996-01-01

    From a historic point of view, epilepsy and its eponyms were in an ontogenetic symbiosis throughout their history. Epilepsy is a disease with a history of eponyms presenting the frame of mind of both streetwise as well as skilled "authors" about its origin and nature. From ancient times the names for epilepsy, archetypal Hippocratic disease, just as rich in number as varied in their implication, reflected the local folkways of thinking. In this article we briefly presented more than 50 eponyms and patrons of epilepsy. As the source of information we used both the apocryphal, canonical and hagiographic as well as heretic literature, legends and iconography from the Middle Ages of domestic and foreign origin. Pre- and post-Hippocratic era, apart from stemming from the oldest written medical sources, point to the position that the disease had organic origin located in the brain. The period of Rome adopted the attitudes set by Galen which remained en vogue throughout the emerging Middle Ages and Renaissance. These eras generated new eponyms which reflected a downfall in the manor, stating that the disease is the consequence of supernatural forces. In the "Age of darkness" eponyms for epilepsy reflected more the relation of men to the Nature than to the disease or a sick man; this is evidenced through the generation of number of patrons for the disease. The most famous patron of patients with epilepsy was St. Valentine (after conversion from pagandom he died in Rome as a martyr, c. 270). He was allotted a patronage either due to the phonic resemblance of his name with the (past participle of the) verb "fallen"-as Martin Luther claimed, or due to a cure of epilepsy of the son of a Roman rhetor who built for him a chapel in which he continued to cure the sick. The emergence of a flamboyant personality of Paracelsus on the historic scene of the XVI century represents a less successful attempt to revoke the way of thinking set by the old Greek doctors; however, it brought

  19. Survival of selected foodborne pathogens on dry cured pork loins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morales-Partera, Ángela M; Cardoso-Toset, Fernando; Jurado-Martos, Francisco; Astorga, Rafael J; Huerta, Belén; Luque, Inmaculada; Tarradas, Carmen; Gómez-Laguna, Jaime

    2017-10-03

    The safety of ready-to-eat products such as cured pork loins must be guaranteed by the food industry. In the present study, the efficacy of the dry curing process of pork loins obtained from free-range pigs in the reduction of three of the most important foodborne pathogens is analysed. A total of 28 pork loin segments, with an average weight of 0.57±0.12kg, were divided into four groups with three being inoculated by immersion with 7logCFU/ml of either Salmonella Typhimurium, Campylobacter coli or Listeria innocua and the last one inoculated by immersion with sterile medium (control group). The loin segments were treated with a seasoning mixture of curing agents and spices, packed in a synthetic sausage casing and cured for 64days. Microbiological analysis, pH and water activity (a w ) were assessed at four stages. The values of pH and a w decreased with curing time as expected. S. Typhimurium and C. coli dropped significantly (3.28 and 2.14 log units, respectively), but limited reduction of L. innocua (0.84 log unit) was observed along the curing process. In our study, three factors were considered critical: the initial concentration of the bacteria, the progressive reduction of pH and the reduction of a w values. Our results encourage performing periodic analysis at different stages of the manufacturing of dry cured pork loins to ensure the absence of the three evaluated foodborne pathogens. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Epilepsy Surgery for Individuals with TSC

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Privacy Policy Sitemap Learn Engage Donate About TSC Epilepsy Surgery for Individuals with TSC In this video ... Aria Fallah, MD, discusses the surgical treatment of epilepsy in children with tuberous sclerosis complex. Epilepsy is ...

  1. Genetics Home Reference: pyridoxine-dependent epilepsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Home Health Conditions Pyridoxine-dependent epilepsy Pyridoxine-dependent epilepsy Printable PDF Open All Close All Enable Javascript ... view the expand/collapse boxes. Description Pyridoxine-dependent epilepsy is a condition that involves seizures beginning in ...

  2. Sudden Unexpected Death in Epilepsy (SUDEP)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this? Submit What's this? Submit Button Sudden Unexpected Death in Epilepsy (SUDEP) Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share ... living with epilepsy, the risk of Sudden Unexpected Death in Epilepsy (SUDEP) is an important concern. SUDEP ...

  3. Cure shrinkage in casting resins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spencer, J. Brock [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2015-02-01

    A method is described whereby the shrinkage of a casting resin can be determined. Values for the shrinkage of several resin systems in frequent use by Sandia have been measured. A discussion of possible methods for determining the stresses generated by cure shrinkage and thermal contraction is also included.

  4. Cleaner Vacuum-Bag Curing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clemons, J. M.; Penn, B. G.; Ledbetter, Frank E., III; Daniels, J. G.

    1987-01-01

    Improvement upon recommended procedures saves time and expense. Autoclave molding in vacuum bag cleaner if adhesive-backed covering placed around caul plate as well as on mold plate. Covering easy to remove after curing and leaves caul plate free of resin deposits.

  5. Confronting the stigma of epilepsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanjeev V Thomas

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Stigma and resultant psychosocial issues are major hurdles that people with epilepsy confront in their daily life. People with epilepsy, particularly women, living in economically weak countries are often ill equipped to handle the stigma that they experience at multiple levels. This paper offers a systematic review of the research on stigma from sociology and social psychology and details how stigma linked to epilepsy or similar conditions can result in stereotyping, prejudice and discrimination. We also briefly discuss the strategies that are most commonly utilized to mitigate stigma. Neurologists and other health care providers, social workers, support groups and policy makers working with epilepsy need to have a deep understanding of the social and cultural perceptions of epilepsy and the related stigma. It is necessary that societies establish unique determinants of stigma and set up appropriate strategies to mitigate stigma and facilitate the complete inclusion of people with epilepsy as well as mitigating any existing discrimination.

  6. Assessment of driving outcomes after epilepsy surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dawkins, Ross L; Omar, Nidal B; Agee, Bonita S; Walters, Beverly C; Riley, Kristen O

    2015-11-01

    surprisingly high percentage of patients with epilepsy have experienced driving on a regular basis prior to surgery. We can assume that most patients were not driving immediately prior to surgery, given the fact that they had progressed to requiring surgery for treatment of their epilepsy. Thus, a driving rate of 68% after surgery can be considered good. We found that a patient's preoperative driving history, the use of intracranial EEG before surgical resection, and Engel classification were significant predictors of postoperative driving outcomes. These data provide patients with assistance in preoperative counseling. More investigation needs to be completed in other patient variables - such as seizure types, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings, and patient motivators for driving - as possible predictors of driving outcomes. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. A parent's perspective on dietary treatments for epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Emma; Abrahams, Jim; Maguire, Alison; Harris, Gerry

    2012-07-01

    Four families gave their accounts of the how Dietary Therapies had impacted on their lives and that of their children who suffered with intractable epilepsy. All with very different stories, experiences and outcomes. Niamh was diagnosed with migrating partial epilepsy of infancy with an underlying metabolic problem was fed via her jejunostomy and the parents overcame every obstacle in their path to have as much time with their daughter as possible. Niamh's family now work with the Matthew's Friends organization to promote dietary awareness and make these treatments available for all those who need them. Carson, who with infantile spasms, was able to access the diet as her first line treatment without any medication being taken. Carson is the inspiration behind the Carson Harris Foundation and her family promote dietary awareness in USA. Matthew, with Dravet Syndrome, was refused for the diet for years, suffered brain damage and was put on a whole host of unsuitable medications before finally managing to get the diet. The diet proved his saving but what could have been the outcome if the family had got the diet when it was first asked for? Matthew is the inspiration behind the Matthew's Friends - Dietary Treatments for Epilepsy organization. Charlie, suffered with intractable epilepsy, was put on a whole host of medications that did not work and underwent brain surgery before finally getting to the diet that cured him of his epilepsy. He is the inspiration behind The Charlie Foundation in the USA and his father, Jim Abrahams made the film 'First Do No Harm' which told the true story of a child who was cured of his epilepsy using the Ketogenic Diet, just like Charlie and thousands upon thousands of other children around the world. The Charlie Foundation and Matthew's Friends work side by side in the promotion, education and funding of these treatments and have asked other family organizations to work with them so that families of the future will not have to struggle

  8. Genetic screening and diagnosis in epilepsy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sisodiya, Sanjay M

    2015-04-01

    Genetic discovery has been extremely rapid over the last year, with many new discoveries illuminating novel mechanisms and pathways. In particular, the application of whole exome and whole genome sequencing has identified many new genetic causes of the epilepsies. As such methods become increasingly available, it will be critical for practicing neurologists to be acquainted with them. This review surveys some important developments over the last year. The range of tests available to the clinician is wide, and likely soon to be dominated by whole exome and whole genome sequencing. Both whole exome and whole genome sequencing have usually proven to be more powerful than most existing tests. Many new genes have been implicated in the epilepsies, with emerging evidence of the involvement of particular multigene pathways. For the practicing clinician, it will be important to appreciate progress in the field, and to prepare for the application of novel genetic testing in clinical practice, as genetic data are likely to contribute importantly for many people with epilepsy.

  9. Confronting the stigma of epilepsy

    OpenAIRE

    Thomas, Sanjeev V.; Aparna Nair

    2011-01-01

    Stigma and resultant psychosocial issues are major hurdles that people with epilepsy confront in their daily life. People with epilepsy, particularly women, living in economically weak countries are often ill equipped to handle the stigma that they experience at multiple levels. This paper offers a systematic review of the research on stigma from sociology and social psychology and details how stigma linked to epilepsy or similar conditions can result in stereotyping, prejudice and discrimina...

  10. When antiepileptic drugs aggravate epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genton, P

    2000-03-01

    Paradoxically, an antiepileptic drug (AED) may aggravate epilepsy. The number of AEDs is steadily increasing, and the occurrence of paradoxical aggravation will probably become a frequent problem. The overall status of the patient treated for epilepsy can be altered due to maladjustment to the diagnosis of epilepsy, to unwanted side-effects, to overdosage and to the occurrence of tolerance. However, the main mechanism of aggravation is the occurrence of an inverse pharmacodynamic effect. The specific effect of the AED is such that it controls epilepsy in most cases and increases seizures in other cases. Idiopathic generalised epilepsies (IGE) are particularly prone to pharmacodynamic aggravation: typical absences are constantly increased by carbamazepine (CBZ), vigabatrin, tiagabine, gabapentin, while phenytoin (PHT) is less aggravating. Juvenile myoclonic epilepsy is often aggravated by CBZ, less constantly by PHT and other AEDs. Generalised tonic-clonic seizures found in IGEs may respond to AEDs that aggravate the other seizure types. In symptomatic generalised epilepsies, patients have often several seizure types that respond differently to AEDs: myoclonias are generally aggravated by the same drugs that aggravated IGEs; tonic seizures in the Lennox-Gastaut syndrome respond to CBZ, which may however aggravate atypical absences. In severe myoclonic epilepsy of infancy, there is a nearly constant aggravating effect of lamotrigine. In some patients with benign rolandic epilepsy, a clear aggravation may be produced by CBZ, with occurrence of negative myoclonias, atypical absences, drop attacks, and at the maximum evolution into a state of electrical status epilepticus during sleep. It is much more difficult to pinpoint specific pharmacological sensitivity in other focal epilepsies, but aggravation clearly occurs. When treating epilepsy, the clinician should act according to seizure type, or, better, to epilepsy type. Patients are usually aware of aggravation before

  11. Light curing through glass ceramics: effect of curing mode on micromechanical properties of dual-curing resin cements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flury, Simon; Lussi, Adrian; Hickel, Reinhard; Ilie, Nicoleta

    2014-04-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate micromechanical properties of five dual-curing resin cements after different curing modes including light curing through glass ceramic materials. Vickers hardness (VH) and indentation modulus (Y HU) of Panavia F2.0, RelyX Unicem 2 Automix, SpeedCEM, BisCem, and BeautiCem SA were measured after 1 week of storage (37 °C, 100 % humidity). The resin cements were tested following self-curing or light curing with the second-generation light-emitting diode (LED) curing unit Elipar FreeLight 2 in Standard Mode (1,545 mW/cm(2)) or with the third-generation LED curing unit VALO in High Power Mode (1,869 mW/cm(2)) or in XtraPower Mode (3,505 mW/cm(2)). Light curing was performed directly or through glass ceramic discs of 1.5 or 3 mm thickness of IPS Empress CAD or IPS e.max CAD. VH and Y HU were analysed with Kruskal-Wallis tests followed by pairwise Wilcoxon rank sum tests (α = 0.05). RelyX Unicem 2 Automix resulted in the highest VH and Y HU followed by BeautiCem SA, BisCem, SpeedCEM, and finally Panavia F2.0. Self-curing of RelyX Unicem 2 Automix and SpeedCEM lowered VH and Y HU compared to light curing whereas self-curing of Panavia F2.0, BisCem, and BeautiCem SA led to similar or significantly higher VH and Y HU compared to light curing. Generally, direct light curing resulted in similar or lower VH and Y HU compared to light curing through 1.5-mm-thick ceramic discs. Light curing through 3-mm-thick discs of IPS e.max CAD generally reduced VH and Y HU for all resin cements except SpeedCEM, which was the least affected by light curing through ceramic discs. The resin cements responded heterogeneously to changes in curing mode. The applied irradiances and light curing times adequately cured the resin cements even through 1.5-mm-thick ceramic discs. When light curing resin cements through thick glass ceramic restorations, clinicians should consider to prolong the light curing times even with LED curing units providing high

  12. Epilepsy: A Call for Help

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Venkatraman Sadanand

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Epilepsy is a considerable individual and social economic burden. In properly selected patients, epilepsy surgery can provide significant relief from disease, including remission. However, the surgical treatment of epilepsy lags in terms of knowledge and technology. The problem arises due to its slow adaptation and dissemination. This article explores this issue of a wide treatment gap and its causes. It develops a framework for a rational decision-making process that is appropriate for extant circumstances and will result in the speedy delivery of surgical care for suitable patients with medically intractable epilepsy.

  13. Epilepsy: A Call for Help.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadanand, Venkatraman

    2018-01-28

    Epilepsy is a considerable individual and social economic burden. In properly selected patients, epilepsy surgery can provide significant relief from disease, including remission. However, the surgical treatment of epilepsy lags in terms of knowledge and technology. The problem arises due to its slow adaptation and dissemination. This article explores this issue of a wide treatment gap and its causes. It develops a framework for a rational decision-making process that is appropriate for extant circumstances and will result in the speedy delivery of surgical care for suitable patients with medically intractable epilepsy.

  14. Epilepsy and vaccinations: Italian guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pruna, Dario; Balestri, Paolo; Zamponi, Nelia; Grosso, Salvatore; Gobbi, Giuseppe; Romeo, Antonino; Franzoni, Emilio; Osti, Maria; Capovilla, Giuseppe; Longhi, Riccardo; Verrotti, Alberto

    2013-10-01

    Reports of childhood epilepsies in temporal association with vaccination have had a great impact on the acceptance of vaccination programs by health care providers, but little is known about this possible temporal association and about the types of seizures following vaccinations. For these reasons the Italian League Against Epilepsy (LICE), in collaboration with other Italian scientific societies, has decided to generate Guidelines on Vaccinations and Epilepsy. The aim of Guidelines on Vaccinations and Epilepsy is to present recent unequivocal evidence from published reports on the possible relationship between vaccines and epilepsy in order to provide information about contraindications and risks of vaccinations in patients with epilepsy. The following main issues have been addressed: (1) whether contraindications to vaccinations exist in patients with febrile convulsions, epilepsy, and/or epileptic encephalopathies; and (2) whether any vaccinations can cause febrile seizures, epilepsy, and/or epileptic encephalopathies. Diphtheria-tetanus-pertussis (DTP) vaccination and measles, mumps, and rubella vaccination (MMR) increase significantly the risk of febrile seizures. Recent observations and data about the relationships between vaccination and epileptic encephalopathy show that some cases of apparent vaccine-induced encephalopathy could in fact be caused by an inherent genetic defect with no causal relationship with vaccination. Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2013 International League Against Epilepsy.

  15. Burns and epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berrocal, M

    1997-01-01

    This is a report of the first descriptive analytic study of a group of 183 burn patients, treated in the Burn Unit at the University Hospital of Cartagena, Colombia during the period since January 1985 until December 1990. There is presented experience with the selected group of 24 patients in whom the diagnosis of burn was associated with epilepsy. There is also analysed and described the gravity of the scars sequels, neurological disorders, the complication of the burn and an impact of this problem on the patient, his (her) family and the community. It is very important to report that there was found Neurocisticercosis in 66.6% of the group of burn patients with epilepsy, and it is probably the first risk factor of burn in this group.

  16. Rolandic epilepsy and dyslexia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ecila P. Oliveira

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Objective Although benign epilepsy with centrotemporal spikes (BECTS is an idiopathic, age-related epilepsy syndrome with favorable outcome, recent studies have shown impairment in specific neuropsychological tests. The objective of this study was to analyze the comorbidity between dyslexia and BECTS. Method Thirty-one patients with clinical and electroencephalographic diagnosis of BECTS (group A and 31 paired children (group B underwent a language and neuropsychological assessment performed with several standardized protocols. Our findings were categorized as: a dyslexia; b other difficulties; c without difficulties. Our results were compared and statistically analyzed. Results Our data showed that dyslexia occurred in 19.4% and other difficulties in 74.2% of our patients. This was highly significant when compared with the control group (p<0.001. Phonological awareness, writing, reading, arithmetic, and memory tests showed a statistically significant difference when comparing both groups. Conclusion Our findings show significant evidence of the occurrence of dyslexia in patients with BECTS.

  17. Epilepsy in ancient India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manyam, B V

    1992-01-01

    The ancient Indian medical system, Ayurveda, meaning science of life, is the oldest system of medicine in the world. Epilepsy is defined as Apasmara: apa, meaning negation or loss of; smara, meaning recollection or consciousness. Aura was recognized and was called Apasmara Poorva Roopa. A large number of symptoms indicative of aura were listed. Worthy of mention are subjective sensation of sounds, sensation of darkness, feeling of delusion, and dream-like state. An actual attack of Apasmara includes falling down; shaking of the hands, legs, and body; rolling up of the eyes; grinding of the teeth; and foaming at the mouth. Four major types of epilepsy based on the disturbance of doshas (humors) that govern the physiological and physiochemical activities of the body are mentioned. Apasmara is considered a dangerous disease that is chronic and difficult to treat. Several causes are mentioned. Treatment included correcting the etiological factors and dietary regimen and avoiding dangerous places that may result in injuries.

  18. Impaired Consciousness in Epilepsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blumenfeld, Hal

    2013-01-01

    Consciousness is essential to normal human life. In epileptic seizures consciousness is often transiently lost making it impossible for the individual to experience or respond. This has huge consequences for safety, productivity, emotional health and quality of life. To prevent impaired consciousness in epilepsy it is necessary to understand the mechanisms leading to brain dysfunction during seizures. Normally the “consciousness system”—a specialized set of cortical-subcortical structures—maintains alertness, attention and awareness. Recent advances in neuroimaging, electrophysiology and prospective behavioral testing have shed new light on how epileptic seizures disrupt the consciousness system. Diverse seizure types including absence, generalized tonic-clonic and complex partial seizures converge on the same set of anatomical structures through different mechanisms to disrupt consciousness. Understanding these mechanisms may lead to improved treatment strategies to prevent impaired consciousness and improve quality of life in people with epilepsy. PMID:22898735

  19. Epilepsy and videogames.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bureau, Michelle; Hirsch, Edouard; Vigevano, Federico

    2004-01-01

    Since the first case of videogame (VG) epilepsy was reported in 1981, many cases of seizures triggered by VGs were reported, not only in photosensitive, but also in non-photosensitive children and adolescents with epilepsy. We provide an overview of the literature with overall conclusions and recommendations regarding VG playing. Specific preventive measures concerning the physical characteristics of images included in commercially available VGs (flash rate, choice of colors, patterns, and contrast) can lead in the future to a clear decrease of this problem. In addition to the positive effect of such measures, the collaborative studies performed in France and in the rest of Europe have stressed the importance of a safe distance to the screen of > or = 2 m, and the less provocative role of 100-Hz screens.

  20. Rolandic epilepsy and dyslexia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Ecila P; Neri, Marina L; Capelatto, Lívia L; Guimarães, Catarina A; Guerreiro, Marilisa M

    2014-11-01

    Although benign epilepsy with centrotemporal spikes (BECTS) is an idiopathic, age-related epilepsy syndrome with favorable outcome, recent studies have shown impairment in specific neuropsychological tests. The objective of this study was to analyze the comorbidity between dyslexia and BECTS. Thirty-one patients with clinical and electroencephalographic diagnosis of BECTS (group A) and 31 paired children (group B) underwent a language and neuropsychological assessment performed with several standardized protocols. Our findings were categorized as: a) dyslexia; b) other difficulties; c) without difficulties. Our results were compared and statistically analyzed. Our data showed that dyslexia occurred in 19.4% and other difficulties in 74.2% of our patients. This was highly significant when compared with the control group (pdyslexia in patients with BECTS.

  1. Legal implications of epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beresford, H R

    1988-01-01

    Physicians who care for patients with epilepsy may function as agents or targets of social control. As agents, they may assist in the identification and control of epileptic drivers, may provide information that enables fair and appropriate job placements for epileptic persons, and give testimony that helps the legal system resolve issues relating to the liability of epileptic persons for harm attributed to seizures or interictal behavioral disturbances. As targets, they may be charged with negligent failure to diagnose, treat, or inform about epilepsy or its associated problems, with failure to exercise due care in protecting persons harmed by their patients, or with failure to preserve confidentiality of medical information. Although legislation and judicial decisions have defined some of the physician's legal duties with reasonable clarity, areas of uncertainty remain, particularly regarding the issue of violating medical confidentiality for the benefit of persons other than the patient.

  2. Epigenetics and epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pulido Fontes, L; Quesada Jimenez, P; Mendioroz Iriarte, M

    2015-03-01

    Epigenetics is the study of heritable modifications in gene expression that do not change the DNA nucleotide sequence. Some of the most thoroughly studied epigenetic mechanisms at present are DNA methylation, post-transcriptional modifications of histones, and the effect of non-coding RNA molecules. Gene expression is regulated by means of these mechanisms and disruption of these molecular pathways may elicit development of diseases. We describe the main epigenetic regulatory mechanisms and review the most recent literature about epigenetic mechanisms and how those mechanisms are involved in different epileptic syndromes. Identifying the epigenetic mechanisms involved in epilepsy is a promising line of research that will deliver more in-depth knowledge of epilepsy pathophysiology and treatments. Copyright © 2014 Sociedad Española de Neurología. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  3. WONOEP appraisal: Development of epilepsy biomarkers-What we can learn from our patients?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jozwiak, Sergiusz; Becker, Albert; Cepeda, Carlos; Engel, Jerome; Gnatkovsky, Vadym; Huberfeld, Gilles; Kaya, Mehmet; Kobow, Katja; Simonato, Michele; Loeb, Jeffrey A

    2017-06-01

    Current medications for patients with epilepsy work in only two of three patients. For those medications that do work, they only suppress seizures. They treat the symptoms, but do not modify the underlying disease, forcing patients to take these drugs with significant side effects, often for the rest of their lives. A major limitation in our ability to advance new therapeutics that permanently prevent, reduce the frequency of, or cure epilepsy comes from a lack of understanding of the disease coupled with a lack of reliable biomarkers that can predict who has or who will get epilepsy. The main goal of this report is to present a number of approaches for identifying reliable biomarkers from observing patients with brain disorders that have a high probability of producing epilepsy. A given biomarker, or more likely a profile of biomarkers, will have both a quantity and a time course during epileptogenesis that can be used to predict who will get the disease, to confirm epilepsy as a diagnosis, to identify coexisting pathologies, and to monitor the course of treatments. Additional studies in patients and animal models could identify common and clinically valuable biomarkers to successfully translate animal studies into new and effective clinical trials. Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 International League Against Epilepsy.

  4. Citation classics in epilepsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maryann Wilson

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The impact of a scientific article is proportional to the citations it has received. In this study, we set out to identify the most cited works in epileptology in order to evaluate research trends in this field. METHODS: According to the Web of Science database, articles with more than 400 citations qualify as "citation classics". We conducted a literature search on the ISI Web of Science bibliometric database for scientific articles relevant to epilepsy. RESULTS: We retrieved 67 highly cited articles (400 or more citations, which were published in 31 journals: 17 clinical studies, 42 laboratory studies, 5 reviews and 3 classification articles. Clinical studies consisted of epidemiological analyses (n=3, studies on the clinical phenomenology of epilepsy (n=5 – including behavioral and prognostic aspects – and articles focusing on pharmacological (n=6 and non-pharmacological (n=3 treatment. The laboratory studies dealt with genetics (n=6, animal models (n=27, and neurobiology (n=9 – including both neurophysiology and neuropathology studies. The majority (61% of citation classics on epilepsy were published after 1986, possibly reflecting the expansion of research interest in laboratory studies driven by the development of new methodologies, specifically in the fields of genetics and animal models. Consequently, clinical studies were highly cited both before and after the mid 80s, whilst laboratory researches became widely cited after 1990. CONCLUSIONS: Our study indicates that the main drivers of scientific impact in the field of epileptology have increasingly become genetic and neurobiological studies, along with research on animal models of epilepsy. These articles are able to gain the highest numbers of citations in the time span of a few years and suggest potential directions for future research.

  5. Epilepsy with myoclonic absences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genton, Pierre; Bureau, Michelle

    2006-01-01

    Among the epileptic syndromes that are defined mainly on the basis of a characteristic seizure type, epilepsy with myoclonic absences (EMA) stands out as a somewhat controversial entity. This is because the sound and evident clinical characteristics on which it was identified some 30 years ago have evolved, mostly as a consequence of changes in the practical management of epilepsies and to the description of myoclonic components in a variety of other generalised epilepsies with absences. Myoclonic absences (MA) are described as typical absences with sudden onset and offset that are associated with generalised spike and wave (SW) discharges on the ECG, with distinctive traits. Clinically, absences are associated with axial hypertonia (the subject usually bends forward and slightly raises their shoulders and arms), and jerks synchronous with the SW discharges. Neurophysiologically, axial hypertonia and rhythmic jerks may be recorded on polygraphic surface electromyogram leads in association with the typical SW discharges; as such, despite an ECG, the diagnosis may be missed in the absence of video documentation of the seizure and/or adequate polygraphy. MA need to be distinguished from absences with other types of prominent myoclonic accompaniment (perioral, eyelid, limbs).The prognosis of EMA remains variable. Modern therapeutic combinations, such as valproic acid and ethosuximide, or valproic acid and lamotrigine, are usually effective; however, in a proportion of patients, seizures are resistant to drug treatment. These patients may experience cognitive deterioration and, in some cases, evolution towards a more severe form of epilepsy, including the Lennox-Gastaut syndrome. The more benign cases usually present with MA as the only seizure type, while patients who experience other seizures, especially generalised tonic-clonic seizures, in association with MA may have a less favourable outcome.

  6. Accelerated Cure Project for Multiple Sclerosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... content Accelerating research toward a cure for multiple sclerosis Toggle navigation Search form Search Connect Volunteer Donate ... to accelerate efforts toward a cure for multiple sclerosis by rapidly advancing research that determines its causes ...

  7. [Epilepsy and Driving].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takagi, Shunsuke; Matsuura, Masato

    2017-10-01

    In Japan, the Road Traffic Act was amended in 2013, and the revision was enacted in 2014. This revision includes new rules such as the requirement that a driver declare medical conditions on licensing, with a penalty for false statements. There is also a new voluntary notification system that enables doctors to report unlawful drivers. At the same time, the new Criminal Law Act was enacted. This act provides a penalty for causing death or injury to other persons by driving under the influence of specific drugs or diseases, including epilepsy. There is a prison term of up to 15 years for this violation. These new laws are the result of several tragic motor vehicle accidents caused by patients with epilepsy who were unfit to drive, and severe punishments are involved. Japan still requires a longer seizure-free period for licensing of patients with epilepsy (2 or 5 years), as opposed to the shorter periods required by other developed countries (US, 3 to 12 months; EU, 12 months). It is debatable whether harsh punishments are more effective in reducing accidents. Further reevaluation and discussion are needed on this issue because a restrictive policy for handicapped persons should be based on scientific evidence and should not be biased by prejudice and discrimination.

  8. [Epilepsy and driving].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuura, Masato

    2013-01-01

    The amends to the driving regulations in Japan made in 2002 lifted the absolute ban on driving by persons with epilepsy (PWE) and granted licenses to PWE after a 2-year seizure-free period. In 2010, 3,373 PWE obtained a driving license, 119 had their license withheld for compliance to traffic regulations and to reduce traffic accidents, the Japan Epilepsy Society passed a proposal of more liberal rules for fitness-to-drive on 11th October 2012; according to this proposal, people with a history of epilepsy can be declared fit-to-drive after a one-year seizure-free period. On 25th October 2012, the Japan License Authority introduced new penal regulations for PWE who do not comply with traffic regulations and proposed a voluntary notification system for a physician in charge of a non-compliant PWE. Public acceptance of these new regulations is needed for reconciliation between the attenuation of traffic accidents and the promotion of living rights of PWE in Japan.

  9. Nonpharmacological treatment of epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saxena, V S; Nadkarni, V V

    2011-07-01

    Nonpharmacological treatment of epilepsy includes surgery, vagal nerve stimulation, ketogenic diet, and other alternative/complementary therapies, e.g., yoga, Ayurveda, electroencephalography (EEG) biofeedback technique, aerobic exercise, music therapy, transcranial magnetic stimulation, acupuncture, and herbal remedies (traditional Chinese medicine). Alternative therapies, despite the term, should not be considered as an alternative to antiepileptic medication; they complement accepted drug treatment. Alternative therapies like yoga, through techniques that relax the body and mind, reduce stress, improve seizure control, and also improve quality of life. Ketogenic diet is a safe and effective treatment for intractable epilepsies; it has been recommended since 1921. The diet induces ketosis, which may control seizures. The most successful treatment of epilepsy is with modern antiepileptic drugs, which can achieve control of seizures in 70-80% cases. Patients opt for alternative therapies because they may be dissatisfied with antiepileptic drugs due to their unpleasant side effects, the long duration of treatment, failure to achieve control of seizures, cultural beliefs and, in the case of women, because they wish to get pregnant Surgical treatment may lead to physical and psychological sequelae and is an option only for a minority of patients. This article presents supportive evidence from randomized controlled trials done to assess the benefit of non-pharmacological treatment.

  10. Epilepsia fotosensible Photosensitive epilepsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Desiderio Rafael Pozo Lauzán

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available La epilepsia fotosensible es una forma de epilepsia refleja que ocurre en pacientes con crisis provocadas por la estimulación luminosa intermitente a variados estímulos (televisión, luz solar, videojuegos u otros. El objetivo fundamental de este trabajo es la presentación de 4 pacientes con las características de esta epilepsia. Se describieron las manifestaciones clínicas de cada uno y su tratamiento. Ningún paciente presentó crisis epilépticas espontáneas. En todos los niños la maniobra de la fotoestimulación fue positiva, pero no provocó crisis epilépticas. Se concluyó que lograr la eliminación de los estímulos que provocan las crisis es más importante que su tratamiento medicamentoso.Photosensitive epilepsy is a kind of reflex epilepsy occurring in patients with crises provoked by the intermittent luminous stimulation to different stimuli (television, sunlight, videogames, etc. The main objective of present paper is the presentation of four patients presenting the features of this type of epilepsy. The clinical manifestations of each and its treatment were described. Any patient had spontaneous epileptic crises. In all children the maneuver of photostimulation was positive, but without epileptic crises. We conclude that the achievement the elimination of stimuli provoking crisis is more important than its drug treatment.

  11. Dietary Therapies for Epilepsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric H Kossoff

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Since their introduction in 1921, high-fat, low-carbohydrate "ketogenic" diets have been used worldwide for refractory childhood epilepsy. Approximately half of the children have at least half their seizures reduced, including 15% who are seizure free. The mechanisms of action of dietary therapies are under active investigation and appear to involve mitochondria. Once perceived as a last resort, modifications to initiation and maintenance, as well as the widespread use of pre-made ketogenic formulas have allowed dietary treatment to be used earlier in the course of epilepsy. For infantile spasms (West syndrome specifically, the ketogenic diet is successful about 50% of the time as a first-line treatment. New "alternative" diets such as the modified Atkins diet were created in 2003 and can be started more easily and are less restrictive. They may have particular value for countries in Asia. Side effects include constipation, dyslipidemia, growth slowing, acidosis, and kidney stones. Additionally, neurologists are studying ketogenic diets for conditions other than epilepsy, including Alzheimer's disease, autism, and brain tumors.

  12. Nonpharmacological treatment of epilepsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V S Saxena

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Nonpharmacological treatment of epilepsy includes surgery, vagal nerve stimulation, ketogenic diet, and other alternative/complementary therapies, e.g., yoga, Ayurveda, electroencephalography (EEG biofeedback technique, aerobic exercise, music therapy, transcranial magnetic stimulation, acupuncture, and herbal remedies (traditional Chinese medicine. Alternative therapies, despite the term, should not be considered as an alternative to antiepileptic medication; they complement accepted drug treatment. Alternative therapies like yoga, through techniques that relax the body and mind, reduce stress, improve seizure control, and also improve quality of life. Ketogenic diet is a safe and effective treatment for intractable epilepsies; it has been recommended since 1921. The diet induces ketosis, which may control seizures. The most successful treatment of epilepsy is with modern antiepileptic drugs, which can achieve control of seizures in 70-80% cases. Patients opt for alternative therapies because they may be dissatisfied with antiepileptic drugs due to their unpleasant side effects, the long duration of treatment, failure to achieve control of seizures, cultural beliefs and, in the case of women, because they wish to get pregnant Surgical treatment may lead to physical and psychological sequelae and is an option only for a minority of patients. This article presents supportive evidence from randomized controlled trials done to assess the benefit of non-pharmacological treatment.

  13. WONOEP appraisal: new genetic approaches to study epilepsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossignol, Elsa; Kobow, Katja; Simonato, Michele; Loeb, Jeffrey A.; Grisar, Thierry; Gilby, Krista L.; Vinet, Jonathan; Kadam, Shilpa D.; Becker, Albert J.

    2014-01-01

    Objective New genetic investigation techniques, including next-generation sequencing, epigenetic profiling, cell lineage mapping, targeted genetic manipulation of specific neuronal cell types, stem cell reprogramming and optogenetic manipulations within epileptic networks are progressively unravelling the mysteries of epileptogenesis and ictogenesis. These techniques have opened new avenues to discover the molecular basis of epileptogenesis and to study the physiological impacts of mutations in epilepsy-associated genes on a multilayer level, from cells to circuits. Methods This manuscript reviews recently published applications of these new genetic technologies in the study of epilepsy, as well as work presented by the authors at the genetic session of the XII Workshop on the Neurobiology of Epilepsy in Quebec, Canada. Results Next-generation sequencing is providing investigators with an unbiased means to assess the molecular causes of sporadic forms of epilepsy and have revealed the complexity and genetic heterogeneity of sporadic epilepsy disorders. To assess the functional impact of mutations in these newly identified genes on specific neuronal cell-types during brain development, new modeling strategies in animals, including conditional genetics in mice and in utero knockdown approaches, are enabling functional validation with exquisite cell-type and temporal specificity. In addition, optogenetics, using cell-type specific Cre recombinase driver lines, is enabling investigators to dissect networks involved in epilepsy. Genetically-encoded cell-type labeling is also providing new means to assess the role of the non-neuronal components of epileptic networks such as glial cells. Furthermore, beyond its role in revealing coding variants involved in epileptogenesis, next-generation sequencing can be used to assess the epigenetic modifications that lead to sustained network hyperexcitability in epilepsy, including methylation changes in gene promoters and non

  14. Focal epilepsies in adult patients attending two epilepsy centers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gilioli, Isabella; Vignoli, Aglaia; Visani, Elisa

    2012-01-01

    PURPOSE: To classify the grade of antiepileptic drug (AED) resistance in a cohort of patients with focal epilepsies, to recognize the risk factors for AED resistance, and to estimate the helpfulness of "new-generation" AEDs. METHODS: We included 1,155 adults with focal epilepsies who were observe...

  15. Understanding of Epilepsy by Children and Young People with Epilepsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Ann; Parsons, Sarah

    2008-01-01

    There is a striking dearth of studies focusing sensitively and in depth on the mainstream educational experiences of children with epilepsy, as viewed by those children themselves. The one-year project (2006-7) reported here addresses that gap. Children's perceptions about mainstream teachers' understanding of epilepsy and school-based needs are…

  16. The extratemporal lobe epilepsies in the epilepsy monitoring unit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dash, Deepa; Tripathi, Manjari

    2014-01-01

    Extratemporal lobe epilepsies (ETLE) are characterized by the epileptogenic foci outside the temporal lobe. They have a wide spectrum of semiological presentation depending upon the site of origin. They can arise from frontal, parietal, occipital lobes and from hypothalamic hamartoma. We discuss in this review the semiology of different types of ETLE encountered in the epilepsy monitoring unit. PMID:24791090

  17. Freud's psychoanalysis: a moral cure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eriksson, Johan

    2014-08-01

    That psychoanalytical treatment in its classical Freudian sense is primarily a moral or ethical cure is not a very controversial claim. However, it is far from obvious how we are to understand precisely the moral character of psychoanalysis. It has frequently been proposed that this designation is valid because psychoanalysis strives neither to cure psychological symptoms pharmaceutically, nor to superficially modify the behaviour of the analysand, but to lead the analysand through an interpretive process during which he gradually gains knowledge of the unconscious motives that determine his behaviour, a process that might ideally liberate him to obtain, in relation to his inner desires, the status of a moral agent. There resides something appealing in these claims. But it is the author's belief that there is an even deeper moral dimension applying to psychoanalytical theory and praxis. Freudian psychoanalysis is a moral cure due to its way of thematizing psychological suffering as moral suffering. And this means that the moral subject - the being that can experience moral suffering - is not primarily something that the psychoanalytical treatment strives to realize, but rather the presupposition for the way in which psychoanalysis theorizes psychological problems as such. Copyright © 2014 Institute of Psychoanalysis.

  18. Electroencephalography in dogs with epilepsy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berendt, Martin Ole; Høgenhaven, H; Flagstad, Annette Borgbjerg

    1999-01-01

    To investigate the diagnostic value of electroencephalography (EEG) in dogs with epilepsy, applying human criteria for EEG abnormalities observed with this disorder.......To investigate the diagnostic value of electroencephalography (EEG) in dogs with epilepsy, applying human criteria for EEG abnormalities observed with this disorder....

  19. Epilepsy and Comorbid Mental Retardation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Gordon Millichap

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Preventable and unpreventable causes of childhood-onset epilepsy associated with mental retardation were determined in 692 patients with epilepsy onset between 1977 and 1985 in a Nova Scotia population-based cohort studied in the Department of Pediatrics, Dalhousie University, Halifax, Canada.

  20. Novel approaches to epilepsy treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Andreas T; Kokaia, Merab

    2013-01-01

    The aim of epilepsy treatment is to achieve complete seizure freedom. Nonetheless, numerous side effects and seizure resistance to antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) affecting about 30-40% of all patients are main unmet needs in today's epileptology. For this reason, novel approaches to treat epilepsy ar...

  1. The Music Student with Epilepsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murdock, Matthew C.; Morgan, Joseph A.; Laverghetta, Thomas S.

    2012-01-01

    The teacher-student relationship can afford the music educator an opportunity to be the first to identify behaviors associated with epilepsy. A case of a student with epilepsy, based on the authors' experience, is described in which the music educators were the first and only individuals to become aware of a change in the student's behavior, after…

  2. Submikroskopiske kromosomforandringer disponerer til epilepsi

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Rikke Steensbjerre; Hjalgrim, Helle

    2011-01-01

    Idiopathic generalised epilepsies (IGEs) affect up to 0.3% of the general population. Genetic factors play a predominant role in the aetiology of IGEs. Molecular genetic studies have mainly identified causative gene mutations in rare monogenic forms of idiopathic epilepsies. However, the genetic ...

  3. Intracranial Vascular Malformations and Epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Josephson, Colin B; Rosenow, Felix; Al-Shahi Salman, Rustam

    2015-06-01

    Among the spectrum of intracranial vascular malformations (IVMs), arteriovenous malformations (AVMs), and cavernous malformations (CCMs) are of particular importance for epilepsy. Seizures are a common mode of presentation for both conditions. Seizures may occur de novo or secondary to intracerebral hemorrhage. Timely imaging is thus crucial for patients with seizures and AVMs or CCMs. Patients with a first-ever AVM- or CCM-related seizure can now be considered to have epilepsy according to the International League Against Epilepsy criteria. Observational studies and case series suggest that between 45 to 78% of patients with AVM-related epilepsy and 47 to 60% of patients with CCM-related epilepsy may achieve seizure freedom through antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) alone. Invasive procedures are available although current evidence suggests that epilepsy-specific preintervention evaluations are underused. Randomized controlled trials and population-based studies have demonstrated worse short-term functional outcomes after routine intervention on unruptured AVMs or CCMs when compared with conservative management. The role of invasive therapy for IVM-related epilepsy has yielded mixed results. Case series have reported high estimates of seizure freedom although these results have not been replicated in controlled observational studies. Randomized controlled trials of immediate invasive therapy versus conservative management, in addition to usual care with AEDs and of different types of treatment and their timing, are warranted for AVMs and CCM-related epilepsy. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  4. Partial Epilepsy with Auditory Features

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Gordon Millichap

    2004-07-01

    Full Text Available The clinical characteristics of 53 sporadic (S cases of idiopathic partial epilepsy with auditory features (IPEAF were analyzed and compared to previously reported familial (F cases of autosomal dominant partial epilepsy with auditory features (ADPEAF in a study at the University of Bologna, Italy.

  5. Ethiopian teachers: their knowledge, attitude and practice towards epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gebrewold, Meron Awraris; Enquselassie, Fikre; Teklehaimanot, Redda; Gugssa, Seid Ali

    2016-09-08

    In Ethiopia where the burden of epilepsy is highest among school age children and teenagers, and where people with epilepsy (PWE) and their relatives suffers from high level of perceived stigma, there had not been any study that assessed the knowledge, attitude and practice of teachers towards PWE. This study aims to assess and understand the social and demographic determinants of knowledge, attitude and practice of teachers towards PLW in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia. Multistage cluster sampling procedure was used to identify twenty schools from three sub cities of Addis Ababa, Ethiopia. Standardized self administered questionnaire was used to collect data from 845 volunteer teachers in the pre identified schools. Frequencies were used to characterize the demographic variables while multiple response frequencies were used to characterize the multiple response variable sets. Non-parametric statistical methods were used to describe the association among the demographic variables of interest and the count sums of multiple response variables which were grouped into biologically and culturally plausible responses. The most common biologically plausible responses were: brain diseases (26.5 %) from causes, allow my offspring to play with PWE (19.1 %) from attitude, protect the subject from injury (20.4 %) from first aid measures and seek help from medical doctors (52.2 %) from epilepsy treatment. On the contrary, the most common culturally plausible responses were: psychiatric illness (12.9 %) from causes, epilepsy be cured before attendance to school (21.6 %) from attitude, smelling the smoke of struck match (14.2 %) from first aid measures and Holy water treatment (20.3 %) from epilepsy treatment suggestions. The biologically and culturally plausible responses were negatively correlated. Level of education was positively associated with biologically plausible responses while teaching experience was negatively correlated with culturally plausible responses. A high

  6. Cure Schedule for Stycast 2651/Catalyst 9.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kropka, Jamie Michael [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); McCoy, John D. [New Mexico Inst. of Mining and Technology, Socorro, NM (United States)

    2017-11-01

    The Emerson & Cuming technical data sheet (TDS) for Stycast 2651/Catalyst 9 lists three alternate cure schedules for the material, each of which would result in a different state of reaction and different material properties. Here, a cure schedule that attains full reaction of the material is defined. The use of this cure schedule will eliminate variance in material properties due to changes in the cure state of the material, and the cure schedule will serve as the method to make material prior to characterizing properties. The following recommendation uses one of the schedules within the TDS and adds a “post cure” to obtain full reaction.

  7. Epilepsy, language, and social skills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caplan, Rochelle

    2017-10-04

    Language and social skills are essential for intrapersonal and interpersonal functioning and quality of life. Since epilepsy impacts these important domains of individuals' functioning, understanding the psychosocial and biological factors involved in the relationship among epilepsy, language, and social skills has important theoretical and clinical implications. This review first describes the psychosocial and biological factors involved in the association between language and social behavior in children and in adults and their relevance for epilepsy. It reviews the findings of studies of social skills and the few studies conducted on the inter-relationship of language and social skills in pediatric and adult epilepsy. The paper concludes with suggested future research and clinical directions that will enhance early identification and treatment of epilepsy patients at risk for impaired language and social skills. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. [Definition and classification of epilepsy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jibiki, Itsuki

    2014-05-01

    The concept or definition of epilepsy was mentioned as a chronic disease of the brain consisting of repetitions of EEG paroxysm and clinical seizures caused by excessive discharges of the cerebral neurons, in reference with Gastaut's opinion and the other statements. Further, we referred to diseases to be excluded from epilepsy such as isolated, occasional and subclinical seizures and so on. Next, new classifications of seizures and epilepsies were explained on the basis of revised terminology and concepts for organization of seizures and epilepsies in Report of the ILAE Communication in Classification and Terminology, 2005-09, in comparison with the Classification of Epileptic Seizures in 1981 and the Classification of Epilepsies and Epileptic Syndromes in 1989.

  9. Rationale for treating epilepsy in children

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Guerrini, R; Arzimanoglou, A; Brouwer, O

    2002-01-01

    Growing evidence indicates that the effects of antiepileptic drugs on childhood epilepsies are partly linked to the specific type of epilepsy or epilepsy syndrome. Most (but not all) types of epilepsy can be classified into categories that are conceptually meaningful. It is likewise logical to set

  10. The social and economic consequences of epilepsy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jennum, Poul; Gyllenborg, Jesper; Kjellberg, Jakob

    2011-01-01

    Epilepsy causes a significant burden to patients and to society. We aimed to calculate the factual excess in direct and indirect costs associated with epilepsy.......Epilepsy causes a significant burden to patients and to society. We aimed to calculate the factual excess in direct and indirect costs associated with epilepsy....

  11. 38 CFR 4.122 - Psychomotor epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Psychomotor epilepsy. 4... Psychomotor epilepsy. The term psychomotor epilepsy refers to a condition that is characterized by seizures... psychomotor epilepsy vary from patient to patient and in the same patient from seizure to seizure. (b) A...

  12. Epilepsy, seizures, physical exercise, and sports: A report from the ILAE Task Force on Sports and Epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capovilla, Giuseppe; Kaufman, Kenneth R; Perucca, Emilio; Moshé, Solomon L; Arida, Ricardo M

    2016-01-01

    People with epilepsy (PWEs) are often advised against participating in sports and exercise, mostly because of fear, overprotection, and ignorance about the specific benefits and risks associated with such activities. Available evidence suggests that physical exercise and active participation in sports may favorably affect seizure control, in addition to producing broader health and psychosocial benefits. This consensus paper prepared by the International League Against Epilepsy (ILAE) Task Force on Sports and Epilepsy offers general guidance concerning participation of PWEs in sport activities, and provides suggestions on the issuance of medical fitness certificates related to involvement in different sports. Sports are divided into three categories based on potential risk of injury or death should a seizure occur: group 1, sports with no significant additional risk; group 2, sports with moderate risk to PWEs, but no risk to bystanders; and group 3, sports with major risk. Factors to be considered when advising whether a PWE can participate in specific activities include the type of sport, the probability of a seizure occurring, the type and severity of the seizures, seizure precipitating factors, the usual timing of seizure occurrence, and the person's attitude in accepting some level of risk. The Task Force on Sports and Epilepsy considers this document as a work in progress to be updated as additional data become available. Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2015 International League Against Epilepsy.

  13. Oxidative Stress Associated with Neuronal Apoptosis in Experimental Models of Epilepsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marisela Méndez-Armenta

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Epilepsy is considered one of the most common neurological disorders worldwide. Oxidative stress produced by free radicals may play a role in the initiation and progression of epilepsy; the changes in the mitochondrial and the oxidative stress state can lead mechanism associated with neuronal death pathway. Bioenergetics state failure and impaired mitochondrial function include excessive free radical production with impaired synthesis of antioxidants. This review summarizes evidence that suggest what is the role of oxidative stress on induction of apoptosis in experimental models of epilepsy.

  14. Yoga for epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramaratnam, S; Sridharan, K

    2000-01-01

    Stress is considered an important precipitating factor for seizures. Yoga is believed to induce relaxation and stress reduction. The effect of yoga on the EEG and the autonomic nervous system have been reported. Yoga would be an attractive therapeutic option for epilepsy (if proved effective), in view of its nonpharmacological nature, minimal side effects and international acceptance. To assess the efficacy of yoga in the treatment of patients with epilepsy. We searched the Cochrane Epilepsy Group trial register, the Cochrane Controlled Trials Register (The Cochrane Library Issue 4, 1998), MEDLINE for articles published up to the middle of 1998, and also registries of the research council for complimentary medicine were searched. In addition, we searched the references of all the identified studies. Finally, we contacted the members of the Neurological Society of India, several neurophysiology institutions and yoga institutes to seek any ongoing studies or studies published in nonindexed journals or unpublished studies. Randomized control trials and controlled clinical trials of treatment of epilepsy with yoga. The data were extracted independently by both reviewers and any discrepancies were resolved by discussion. The main outcomes assessed were percentage of patients rendered seizure free, number of patients with more than 50% reduction in seizure frequency or seizure duration and the overall reduction in seizure frequency. Analyses were on an intention to treat basis. Only one study met the selection criteria, and recruited a total of 32 patients, 10 to sahaja yoga and 22 to control treatments. Antiepileptic drugs were continued in all. Randomization was by roll of a dice. The results of this study are as follows: (i) Four patients treated with yoga were seizure free for six months compared to none in the control groups. The Odds Ratio (OR) (95% Confidence Interval (CI)) for yoga versus sham yoga group was 14.5 (0.7, 316.7) and for yoga versus no treatment

  15. [Traditional health practitioners and epilepsies in Ivory Coast].

    Science.gov (United States)

    François, A A; Elisée, B K; Christian, T A; Armel, K H; Any, G; Tchwa, A M; Constance, Y A

    2014-01-01

    We report the results of a descriptive 3-month observational study concerning the experience and knowledge about epilepsy of 30 traditional health practitioners in the Ivory Coast. Most respondents were men over 30 years of age. They had an average of 14.3 years of professional experience. More than half of respondents (54%) had not attended school. All traditional practitioners knew that epilepsy was a brain disease. For 83.3% of them, the disease was supernatural, due to a curse. These traditional healers knew all the clinical manifestations of generalized tonico-clonic seizure. For over 72% of them, noise, presence of a public, nervousness and coffee consumption were factors favoring seizures. Sixty percent of the traditional healers still believed in the contagiousness of epilepsy, and all claimed to cure it by traditional treatment. Most all healers (97%) used plant products, but only 10% released the name of the plants used (Rubiaceae or Lamiaceae families). This survey highlights the urgency of awareness campaigns and the need for training of Ivorian traditional healers and the necessity to improve the collaboration between modern and traditional medicine. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  16. Antiarrhythmic drugs and epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borowicz, Kinga K; Banach, Monika

    2014-08-01

    For a long time it has been suspected that epilepsy and cardiac arrhythmia may have common molecular background. Furthermore, seizures can affect function of the central autonomic control centers leading to short- and long-term alterations of cardiac rhythm. Sudden unexpected death in epilepsy (SUDEP) has most likely a cardiac mechanism. Common elements of pathogenesis create a basis for the assumption that antiarrhythmic drugs (AADs) may affect seizure phenomena and interact with antiepileptic drugs (AEDs). Numerous studies have demonstrated anticonvulsant effects of AADs. Among class I AADs (sodium channel blockers), phenytoin is an established antiepileptic drug. Propafenone exerted low anti-electroshock activity in rats. Lidocaine and mexiletine showed the anticonvulsant activity not only in animal models, but also in patients with partial seizures. Among beta-blockers (class II AADs), propranolol was anticonvulsant in models for generalized tonic-clonic and complex partial seizures, but not for myoclonic convulsions. Metoprolol and pindolol antagonized tonic-clonic seizures in DBA/2 mice. Timolol reversed the epileptiform activity of pentylenetetrazol (PTZ) in the brain. Furthermore, amiodarone, the representative of class III AADs, inhibited PTZ- and caffeine-induced convulsions in mice. In the group of class IV AADs, verapamil protected mice against PTZ-induced seizures and inhibited epileptogenesis in amygdala-kindled rats. Verapamil and diltiazem showed moderate anticonvulsant activity in genetically epilepsy prone rats. Additionally, numerous AADs potentiated the anticonvulsant action of AEDs in both experimental and clinical conditions. It should be mentioned, however, that many AADs showed proconvulsant effects in overdose. Moreover, intravenous esmolol and intra-arterial verapamil induced seizures even at therapeutic dose ranges. Copyright © 2014 Institute of Pharmacology, Polish Academy of Sciences. Published by Elsevier Urban & Partner Sp. z o

  17. Clinical Applications of Genome Editing to HIV Cure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Cathy X; Cannon, Paula M

    2016-12-01

    Despite significant advances in HIV drug treatment regimens, which grant near-normal life expectancies to infected individuals who have good virological control, HIV infection itself remains incurable. In recent years, novel gene- and cell-based therapies have gained increasing attention due to their potential to provide a functional or even sterilizing cure for HIV infection with a one-shot treatment. A functional cure would keep the infection in check and prevent progression to AIDS, while a sterilizing cure would eradicate all HIV viruses from the patient. Genome editing is the most precise form of gene therapy, able to achieve permanent genetic disruption, modification, or insertion at a predesignated genetic locus. The most well-studied candidate for anti-HIV genome editing is CCR5, an essential coreceptor for the majority of HIV strains, and the lack of which confers HIV resistance in naturally occurring homozygous individuals. Genetic disruption of CCR5 to treat HIV has undergone clinical testing, with seven completed or ongoing trials in T cells and hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells, and has shown promising safety and potential efficacy profiles. Here we summarize clinical findings of CCR5 editing for HIV therapy, as well as other genome editing-based approaches under pre-clinical development. The anticipated development of more sophisticated genome editing technologies should continue to benefit HIV cure efforts.

  18. Juvenile myoclonic epilepsy: Under-diagnosed syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Božić Ksenija; Gebauer-Bukurov Ksenija; Slankamenac Petar; Knežević-Pogančev Marija; Sekulić Slobodan

    2011-01-01

    Introduction. Juvenile myoclonic epilepsy is an idiopathic, hereditary form of epilepsy. Although juvenile myoclonic epilepsy is a well defined clinical syndrome, attempts at diagnosing it commonly fail. Etiopathogenesis. The exact cause of juvenile myoclonic epilepsy remains unknown. Clinical, morphological and metabolic data suggest a preferential role for frontal regions in this syndrome. Several major genes for juvenile myoclonic epilepsy have been identified, but these genes accoun...

  19. Epidemiology of epilepsy surgery in India

    OpenAIRE

    Chaturbhuj Rathore; Kurupath Radhakrishnan

    2017-01-01

    Epilepsy surgery in India has seen remarkable advances over the last twenty years. Presently 39 centers are undertaking epilepsy surgeries in India on a regular basis. Out of these, 18 centers have become operational in the last five years. Many of them are well equipped with high end technologies and have expertise to undertake all kinds of epilepsy surgeries. Till July 31st, 2016, approximately 7143 epilepsy surgeries have been performed in India. Presently, 734 epilepsy surgeries are carri...

  20. Epilepsy and anxiety

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marly de Albuquerque

    1993-09-01

    Full Text Available We have analyzed 155 subjects with STAI (State-Trait Anxiety Inventory: 75 epileptic patients and 80 normal subjects used as a control group. A higher trait-anxiety score (chronic anxiety than that of controls was found for the epileptic group. For the epileptic group higher levels of the A-trait occurred in patients with EEG abnormalities with left temporal localization. We have also observed that the shorter the epilepsy lasts (less than two years, the higher the trait-anxiety levels. Convulsions and awareness loss during epileptic seizures do not modify state and trait-anxiety scores.

  1. Guidelines for epilepsy management in India classification of seizures and epilepsy syndromes

    OpenAIRE

    Ramaratnam Sridharan; Satishchandra P

    2010-01-01

    This article is part of the Guidelines for Epilepsy management in India. This article reviews the classification systems used for epileptic seizures and epilepsy and present the recommendations based on current evidence. At present, epilepsy is classified according to seizure type and epilepsy syndrome using the universally accepted International League Against Epilepsy (ILAE) classification of epileptic seizures and epilepsy syndromes. A multi-axial classification system incorporating ictal ...

  2. Epilepsy care in general practice.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Varley, J

    2009-06-01

    Epilepsy care in Ireland is shared between primary, secondary and tertiary care services with the General Practitioner (GP) managing the process. Barriers to effective epilepsy care in Irish general practice remain undocumented although sub-optimal and fragmented services are frequently anecdotally reported. This survey of Irish GPs reports on such barriers to epilepsy care and on the Information & Communication Technology (ICT) issues potentially relevant to the use of an epilepsy specific Electronic Patient Record (EPR). The response rate was 247\\/700 (35.3%). Respondents supported the concept of shared care for epilepsy 237 (96%) however they were very dissatisfied with existing neurology services, including pathways of referral 207 (84%) and access to specialist neurology advice and investigations 232 (94%). They reported that neurology services and investigations may be accessed more expeditiously by patients with private health insurance than those without 178 (72%). Consequently many patients are referred to the emergency department for assessment and treatment 180 (73%). A deficit in epilepsy care expertise among GPs was acknowledged 86 (35%). While computerisation of GP practices appears widespread 230 (93%), just over half the respondents utilise available electronic functionalities specific to chronic disease management. GP specific electronic systems infrequently link or communicate with external electronic sources 133 (54%). While the current pathways of care for epilepsy in Ireland appear fragmented and inadequate, further investigations to determine the quality and cost effectiveness of the current service are required.

  3. Why epilepsy challenges social life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steiger, Bettina K; Jokeit, Hennric

    2017-01-01

    Social bonds are at the center of our daily living and are an essential determinant of our quality of life. In people with epilepsy, numerous factors can impede cognitive and affective functions necessary for smooth social interactions. Psychological and psychiatric complications are common in epilepsy and may hinder the processing of social information. In addition, neuropsychological deficits such as slowed processing speed, memory loss or attentional difficulties may interfere with enjoyable reciprocity of social interactions. We consider societal, psychological, and neuropsychological aspects of social life with particular emphasis on socio-cognitive functions in temporal lobe epilepsy. Deficits in emotion recognition and theory of mind, two main aspects of social cognition, are frequently observed in individuals with mesial temporal lobe epilepsy. Results from behavioural studies targeting these functions will be presented with a focus on their relevance for patients' daily life. Furthermore, we will broach the issue of pitfalls in current diagnostic tools and potential directions for future research. By giving a broad overview of individual and interpersonal determinants of social functioning in epilepsy, we hope to provide a basis for future research to establish social cognition as a key component in the comprehensive assessment and care of those with epilepsy. Copyright © 2016 British Epilepsy Association. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Epilepsy-related brain tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ertürk Çetin, Özdem; İşler, Cihan; Uzan, Mustafa; Özkara, Çiğdem

    2017-01-01

    Seizures are among the most common presentations of brain tumors. Several tumor types can cause seizures in varying rates; neuroglial tumors and the gliomas are the most common ones. Brain tumors are the second most common cause of focal intractable epilepsy in epilepsy surgery series, with the highest frequency being dysembryoplastic neuroepithelial tumors and gangliogliomas. Seizure management is an important part of the treatment of patients with brain tumors. This review discusses clinical features and management of seizures in patients with brain tumors, including, neuroglial tumors, gliomas, meningioma and metastases; with the help of recent literature data. Tumor-related seizures are focal seizures with or without secondary generalization. Seizures may occur either as initial symptom or during the course of the disease. Brain tumors related epilepsy tends to be resistant to antiepileptic drugs and treatment of tumor is main step also for the seizure treatment. Early surgery and extent of the tumor removal are important factors for achieving seizure freedom particularly in neuroglial tumors and low grade gliomas. During selection of the appropriate antiepileptic drug, the general approach to partial epilepsies can be followed. There are several factors influencing epileptogenesis in brain tumor-related epilepsy which also explains clinical heterogeneity of epilepsy among tumor types. Identification of molecular markers may guide future therapeutic approaches and further studies are needed to prove antitumor effects of different antiepileptic drugs. Copyright © 2016 British Epilepsy Association. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Between horror and hope: gladiator's blood as a cure for epileptics in ancient medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moog, Ferdinand Peter; Karenberg, Axel

    2003-06-01

    Between the first and the sixth century a single theological and several medical authors reported on the consumption of gladiator's blood or liver to cure epileptics. The origins of the sacred or apoplectic properties of blood of a slain gladiator, likely lie in Etruscan funeral rites. Although the influence of this religious background faded during the Roman Republic, the magical use of gladiators' blood continued for centuries. After the prohibition of gladiatorial combat in about 400 AD, an executed individual (particularly had he been beheaded) became the "legitimate" successor to the gladiator. Occasional indications in early modern textbooks on medicine as well as reports in the popular literature of the 19th and early 20th century document the existence of this ancient magical practice until modern times. Spontaneous recovery of some forms of epilepsy may be responsible for the illusion of therapeutic effectiveness and for the confirming statements by physicians who have commented on this cure.

  6. SPECT in Focal Epilepsies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roderick Duncan

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Brain perfusion changes during seizures were first observed in the 1930s. Single Photon Emission Computed Tomography (SPECT was developed in the 1970s, and tracers suitable for the imaging of regional cerebral perfusion (rCP became available in the 1980s. The method was first used to study rCP in the interictal phase, and this showed areas of low perfusion in a proportion of cases, mainly in patients with temporal lobe epilepsies. However, the trapping paradigm of tracers such as hexamethyl propyleneamine oxime (HMPAO provided a practicable method of studying changes in rCP during seizures, and a literature was established in the late 1980s and early 1990s showing a typical sequence of changes during and after seizures of mesial temporal lobe origin; the ictal phase was associated with large increases in perfusion throughout the temporal lobe, with first the lateral, then the mesial temporal lobe becoming hypoperfused in the postictal phase. Activation and inhibition of other structures, such as the basal ganglia and frontal cortex, were also seen. Studies of seizures originating elsewhere in the brain have shown a variety of patterns of change, according to the structures involved. These changes have been used practically to aid the process of localisation of the epileptogenic zone so that epilepsy surgery can be planned.

  7. Machado de Assis's epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerreiro, C A

    1992-09-01

    Machado de Assis (1839-1908) is considered the most important Brazilian writer and a great universal literary figure. Little is know about his medical, personal and family history. He hid his "disease" as much as possible. Machado referred to "strange things" having happened to him in his childhood. He described seizures as "nervous phenomena", "absenses", "my illness". Laet observed a seizure and described it as: "... when Machado approached us and spoke to me in disconnected words. I looked at him in surprise and found his features altered. Knowing that from time to time he had nervous problems, ... and only permitted Machado take the Laranjeiras Street car, when I saw that he was completely well". A photographically documented seizure is shown. Alencar wrote, "The preoccupation with health was frequent: either he was having the consequences of a fit or was foreboding one". It is clear that Machado presented localized symptomatic epilepsy with complex partial seizures secondarily generalized of unknown etiology. The seizures which began in infancy or childhood had remission in adolescence and then recurred in his thirties and became more frequent in his later years. His depression got markedly worse with age. In our opinion, the greatest consequence of Machado's epilepsy, was his psychological suffering due to the prejudice of the times. Despite this Machado showed all his genius, which is still actual and universal.

  8. Epilepsy in Irish Wolfhounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casal, Margret L.; Munuve, Richard M.; Janis, M. Anne; Werner, Petra; Henthorn, Paula S.

    2012-01-01

    During the last 15 years, breeders have reported an increase in the proportion of Irish Wolfhounds with seizure disorders. Clinical data and pedigrees from closely related Irish Wolfhounds were collected retrospectively and analyzed. Idiopathic epilepsy was diagnosed, by exclusion of other causes for seizures, in 146 (18.3%) of 796 Irish Wolfhounds from 115 litters. The first seizure occurred by the age of 3 years in 73% of all dogs. Males were more commonly affected than females (61.6% versus 38.4%), with males having a later average age of seizure onset. The life expectancy of affected dogs was decreased by 2 years when compared with the average Irish Wolfhound population. The heritability index for the affected dogs, their littermates, and unaffected parents was 0.87. No simple mode of inheritance explains the pattern of affected dogs in pedigrees. Hallmarks of dominant and sex-linked inheritance were notably absent, and the segregation ratio was less than would be expected for simple autosomal recessive inheritance. Assuming all affected dogs have the same form of epilepsy, the simplest description of the complex pattern of inheritance observed is autosomal recessive, with incomplete penetrance and male dogs at increased risk. PMID:16496932

  9. Epilepsy in Dostoevsky's novels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voskuil, Piet H A

    2013-01-01

    Fyodor Mikhailovich Dostoevsky (1821-1881) suffered from epilepsy. Some type of psychopathology can be found in about 25% of the characters of his novels. Some of them have seizures. In at least five of them Dostoevsky clearly intends them to have epilepsy. Others are more likely to be created as people with hysteria or sometimes, for instance, possession. In this essay an inventory is given by more or less comprehensive quotes of different types of seizures in five novels. The seizures are named in the novels with a varying vocabulary based on the concepts of nosology in the 19th century, the knowledge of Dostoevsky of these concepts, his own experiences, and problems in translation and transliteration. In the discussion, analysis of the role these factors played in the understanding of what Dostoevsky really expressed is given attention. Special attention is given to the so-called ecstatic aura. This element of focal epileptic seizures is so rare that in the past the description of it raised doubts on its existence as such and therefore the embellishment by Dostoevsky, describing his own experience and/or that of his epileptic characters Kirillov and Myshkin. The consequence of this analytic approach, however, should not be losing one's amazement of the genius polyphonic creativity of Dostoevsky to integrate so many profound aspects of the human and especially the Russian soul in the characters of his novels. Copyright © 2013 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  10. [Society, law and epilepsy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villanueva-Gómez, F; Fernández-Miranda, M C

    2002-09-01

    Epilepsy is an important problem from a medical, social and legal point of view. Proof of this is the fact that it constitutes the second most commonly alleged cause for absolution of responsibility in Spain, according to the jurisprudence from the Supreme Court (1976 1995). Throughout history it has been classified as a magical, supernatural disease and has been studied within psychiatry as an endogenous psychosis. It has therefore been considered a form of madness, which has led to court decisions that have taken this concept into account. The supposed dangerousness of suffers from epilepsy must be the exception, and their supposed epileptic characters and personalities that drive them to commit atrocious murders are no longer of any relevance. The problems stemming from epileptic seizures are to be seen in civil, penal, military, canonical and labour law, very often in an exclusive fashion. We think it is worthwhile reviewing these concepts with a view to their undergoing a later modification, which would lead to the full integration of these patients and to their being considered as suffering from a neurological illness.

  11. Epilepsy and sports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Linschoten, R; Backx, F J; Mulder, O G; Meinardi, H

    1990-07-01

    Millions of healthy people participate in sport on a regular basis. Moreover, in the last decade patients with chronic disorders have been encouraged to take part in sporting activities as a part of their rehabilitation. Can epileptic patients freely participate in sport or whether they are restricted to a certain extent by their disorder? An important factor is freedom from seizures. If seizures have been controlled for over 2 years the risk of relapse is the same as the risk of a first seizure. The risk of patients drowning or falling, or their epilepsy worsening because they are engaged in sport is thought to be low. Clinical data suggest that the incidence of seizures during sports and exercise is reduced. In the cooling down period, however, seizures tend to occur more frequently. Physicians should encourage epileptic patients to participate in sporting activities to enhance their physical fitness, self-esteem, and social integration. Before giving advice about the most suitable type of sport, the physician should known the patient's medical history, have a good insight into the different types of sport and be able to judge the role and function of sport to the particular patient. With certain precautions virtually all sports are suitable for most epileptic patients and should therefore be encouraged. However, a small minority of hospitalised patients with severe epilepsy need the supervision of qualified trainers, coaches and volunteers.

  12. Genetics Home Reference: STXBP1 encephalopathy with epilepsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Conditions STXBP1 encephalopathy with epilepsy STXBP1 encephalopathy with epilepsy Printable PDF Open All Close All Enable Javascript ... the expand/collapse boxes. Description STXBP1 encephalopathy with epilepsy is a condition characterized by recurrent seizures (epilepsy), ...

  13. Late onset myoclonic epilepsy in Down syndrome and dementia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annapia Verri

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Specific forms of epilepsy may be found at various ages in Down Syndrome (DS and a sharp increase in the incidence of epilepsy with age has been documented. A specific type of myoclonic epilepsy associated with cognitive decline has been reported as “senile myoclonic epilepsy” or “late onset myoclonic epilepsy in DS” (LOMEDS. We report a new case of LOMEDS, documented by clinical and neurophysiological evaluation and psychometric assessment (DSDS and DMR. MF, male, affected by DS, was referred in 2004 at 40 years of age; he had no personal or familial history of epilepsy. Since one year, the patient presented cognitive deterioration, characterized by regression of language abilities, loss of memory, and loss of sphincters control. A brain TC showed mild brainstem and sub-cortical atrophy. In 2006, myoclonic jerks involving upper limbs occurred mainly after awakening. EEG showed a low voltage 8 Hz background activity with diffuse slow activity, intermingled with spikes or polyspikes, persisting during NREM sleep. MF was initially treated with clonazepam and after with topiramate, resulting in partial seizures control. MRI (2008 demonstrated diffuse brain atrophy, associated with marked ventricular enlargement. At the psychometric evaluation, onset of dementia was evident late in 2004, with transition to the middle stage in 2006. Last assessment (2009 showed the clinical signs of a late stage of deterioration, with loss of verbal abilities and autonomous ambulation. Using levetiracetam till 2,000 mg/die, myoclonic jerks decreased but are still present every day after awakening. On the EEG slow and poorly organized background activity with bilateral polyspike-wave discharges was recorded. Therefore, we documented a parallel progression of dementia and myoclonic epilepsy in a DS subject.

  14. ASRM test report: Autoclave cure process development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nachbar, D. L.; Mitchell, Suzanne

    1992-01-01

    ASRM insulated segments will be autoclave cured following insulation pre-form installation and strip wind operations. Following competitive bidding, Aerojet ASRM Division (AAD) Purchase Order 100142 was awarded to American Fuel Cell and Coated Fabrics Company, Inc. (Amfuel), Magnolia, AR, for subcontracted insulation autoclave cure process development. Autoclave cure process development test requirements were included in Task 3 of TM05514, Manufacturing Process Development Specification for Integrated Insulation Characterization and Stripwind Process Development. The test objective was to establish autoclave cure process parameters for ASRM insulated segments. Six tasks were completed to: (1) evaluate cure parameters that control acceptable vulcanization of ASRM Kevlar-filled EPDM insulation material; (2) identify first and second order impact parameters on the autoclave cure process; and (3) evaluate insulation material flow-out characteristics to support pre-form configuration design.

  15. Antimitochondrial antibodies in patients with epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranua, Jouni; Luoma, Katja; Auvinen, Anssi; Haapala, Anna-Maija; Mäki, Markku; Peltola, Jukka; Raitanen, Jani; Isojärvi, Jouko I

    2005-08-01

    Immune mechanisms have been implicated in the pathogenesis of epilepsy. An increased prevalence of autoantibodies, as well as changes in serum immunoglobulin concentrations, has been reported in patients with epilepsy. The presence of unspecific antimitochondrial antibodies (AMAs) and their possible associations with other immunological markers were evaluated in a cohort of 1386 adult patients with epilepsy and population-based reference subjects. Unspecific AMAs were more frequent in epilepsy patients than in the reference group. Thirty-seven epilepsy patients (3.9%) and eleven control subjects (1.9%) had unspecific AMAs (RR 2.1, CI 1.05-4.1, P=0.03). These antibodies were associated with long duration of epilepsy and old age at the onset of epilepsy among patients with epilepsy. Their presence was independent of other immunological markers, comorbidity, and epilepsy medications.

  16. Systems biology of human epilepsy applied to patients with brain tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mittal, Sandeep; Shah, Aashit K; Barkmeier, Daniel T; Loeb, Jeffrey A

    2013-12-01

    Epilepsy is a disease of recurrent seizures that can be associated with a wide variety of acquired and developmental brain lesions. Current medications for patients with epilepsy can suppress seizures; they do not cure or modify the underlying disease process. On the other hand, surgical removal of focal brain regions that produce seizures can be curative. This surgical procedure can be more precise with the placement of intracranial recording electrodes to identify brain regions that generate seizure activity as well as those that are critical for normal brain function. The detail that goes into these surgeries includes extensive neuroimaging, electrophysiology, and clinical data. Combined with precisely localized tissues removed, these data provide an unparalleled opportunity to learn about the interrelationships of many "systems" in the human brain not possible in just about any other human brain disorder. Herein, we describe a systems biology approach developed to study patients who undergo brain surgery for epilepsy and how we have begun to apply these methods to patients whose seizures are associated with brain tumors. A central goal of this clinical and translational research program is to improve our understanding of epilepsy and brain tumors and to improve diagnosis and treatment outcomes of both. Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2013 International League Against Epilepsy.

  17. Evaluating the efficacy of curing lights.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solomon, C S; Osman, Y I

    1999-08-01

    The use of light curing units has increased tremendously over the past few years with the introduction of photoactivated composite restorative resins. The advantages of light-cured composites are well documented especially the ease of placement of restorations as a result of extended working time and control of setting. Many of the advantages of these composites are dependent on the adequate polymerisation and therefore the source of the visible light, especially the wavelength and the intensity of the light source. The aims of this study were (i) to determine the intensity output of curing lights in state clinics, private dental practices and dental clinics run by trade unions using a radiometer and (ii) to relate their output to various factors that may affect the intensity of the light produced by each unit. The light intensity of each light curing unit was measured using the Efos Cure Rite radiometer (Cure Rite, Efos model #8000; Efos Inc, Mississauga, Canada). Mean readings ranged from a high of 448 to a low of 22 mW/cm2 for curing lights at the time of evaluation. Nineteen (54.3%) of the light curing units were functioning at optimal intensities, followed by 10 (28.6%) functioning at levels between 150 and 300 mW/cm2 and 6 (17.1%) functioning at levels far below that required to achieve adequate photocuring. No statistically significant differences were found when comparing intensity readings with age, last maintenance service and bulb replacement (P > 0.05). All of the clinicians interviewed (100%) expressed subjective satisfaction with the performance of the light curing units, even though 45.7% functioned below optimal intensities (P > 0.05). Not one of the clinicians expressed dissatisfaction with the performance of any of the light curing units. The results of this study showed that the light intensities f light curing units used within private dental practices, state and trade union dental clinics were inadequate for optimum curing.

  18. Stress, the hippocampus, and epilepsy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Joëls, M.

    2009-01-01

    Stress is among the most frequently self-reported precipitants of seizures in patients with epilepsy. This review considers how important stress mediators like corticotropin-releasing hormone, corticosteroids, and neurosteroids could contribute to this phenomenon. Cellular effects of stress

  19. Epilepsy and employment: literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smeets, Vivian M J; van Lierop, Brigitte A G; Vanhoutvin, Jos P G; Aldenkamp, Albert P; Nijhuis, Frans J N

    2007-05-01

    The aim of this review is to increase understanding of the factors that affect the regular employment positions of people with epilepsy by means of the World Health Organization International Classification of Functioning, Disability, and Health (ICF) model. Thirty-four primary research articles describing factors associated with employment for people with epilepsy are reviewed. People with epilepsy may face a number of complex and interacting problems in finding and maintaining employment. Stigma, seizure severity, and psychosocial variables such as low self-esteem, passive coping style, and low self-efficacy have been implicated as factors that play an important role in predicting employment. Findings demonstrate the need for specific employment training programs. We recommend specific training interventions that focus on increasing the self-efficacy and coping skills of people with epilepsy so that these individuals will be able to accept their disorder and make personal and health-related choices that help them to achieve better employment positions in society.

  20. Lamotrigine (Lamictal) in Intractable Epilepsies

    OpenAIRE

    J Gordon Millichap

    1997-01-01

    The efficacy of lamotrigine (LTG) in an open, add-on, prospective study of 56 children with refractory generalized epilepsies is reported from British Columbia’s Children’s Hospital, Vancouver, BC, Canada.

  1. Attitudes towards African traditional medicine and Christian spiritual healing regarding treatment of epilepsy in a rural community of northern Tanzania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winkler, Andrea Sylvia; Mayer, Michael; Ombay, Michael; Mathias, Bartholomayo; Schmutzhard, Erich; Jilek-Aall, Louise

    2009-12-30

    Most people with epilepsy (PWE) live in developing countries with limited access to health care facilities. In sub-Saharan Africa with approximately 12 million PWE, 90% do not receive adequate medical treatment. In this context, traditional medicine, being easily accessible, plays an important role. However, in sub- Saharan Africa, studies on the attitude of people (both affected and not affected by epilepsy) towards traditional medicine for treatment of epilepsy are scarce. In this study, 167 people (59 PWE, 62 relatives, 46 villagers) were interviewed at the hospital and in the community with a semi-structured validated questionnaire regarding the prevailing attitude towards traditional medicine for treatment of epilepsy in a rural area of northern Tanzania. Various traditional healing methods (THM) could be ascertained, i.e. traditional herbal medicine, spiritual healing, scarifications and spitting. 44.3% (n=74/167) of the interviewed people were convinced that epilepsy could be treated successfully with THM. Interestingly, 34.1% (n=57/167) thought that Christian prayers could cure the cause and/or treat symptoms of epilepsy. Significantly more PWE and their relatives were in favour of THM compared to villagers not knowing about epilepsy or not being immediately affected by epilepsy (χ(2)-test, p=0.004). Further factors influencing people's attitudes towards THM were gender, tribe, religion and urbanity of people's dwellings. Our study demonstrates that not only THM but also prayers in the Christian sense seem to play an important role in people's beliefs regarding successful treatment of epilepsy. Factors influencing this belief system have been identified and are discussed.

  2. P-gp Protein Expression and Transport Activity in Rodent Seizure Models and Human Epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartz, Anika M S; Pekcec, Anton; Soldner, Emma L B; Zhong, Yu; Schlichtiger, Juli; Bauer, Bjoern

    2017-04-03

    A cure for epilepsy is currently not available, and seizure genesis, seizure recurrence, and resistance to antiseizure drugs remain serious clinical problems. Studies show that the blood-brain barrier is altered in animal models of epilepsy and in epileptic patients. In this regard, seizures increase expression of blood-brain barrier efflux transporters such as P-glycoprotein (P-gp), which is thought to reduce brain uptake of antiseizure drugs, and thus, contribute to antiseizure drug resistance. The goal of the current study was to assess the viability of combining in vivo and ex vivo preparations of isolated brain capillaries from animal models of seizures and epilepsy as well as from patients with epilepsy to study P-gp at the blood-brain barrier. Exposing isolated rat brain capillaries to glutamate ex vivo upregulated P-gp expression to levels that were similar to those in capillaries isolated from rats that had status epilepticus or chronic epilepsy. Moreover, the fold-increase in P-gp protein expression seen in animal models is consistent with the fold-increase in P-gp observed in human brain capillaries isolated from patients with epilepsy compared to age-matched control individuals. Overall, the in vivo/ex vivo approach presented here allows detailed analysis of the mechanisms underlying seizure-induced changes of P-gp expression and transport activity at the blood-brain barrier. This approach can be extended to other blood-brain barrier proteins that might contribute to drug-resistant epilepsy or other CNS disorders as well.

  3. MYOCLONIC ASTATIC EPILEPSY (DOOSE SYNDROME

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Yu. Mukhin

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The authors proposed a detailed review of literature devoted to myoclonic astatic epilepsy (Doose syndrome. The authors describe the history of study of myoclonic astatic epilepsy, its prevalence, etiology and the role of genetic factors, clinical pictures, including the main type of seizures, diagnostic criteria and nosology. The characteristics of EEG and neuroimaging are prescribed, and also differential diagnosis, approaches to treatment and prognosis.

  4. Curing efficiency of three light emitting diode units at different curing profiles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Priyanka Verma

    2016-01-01

    Conclusions: Reduction of exposure time to 6 s with high-intensity curing light seemed to be clinically acceptable and should be recommended. Curing of metal brackets with single exposure from buccal side showed lower shear bond strength values.

  5. The Managing Epilepsy Well Network:: Advancing Epilepsy Self-Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sajatovic, Martha; Jobst, Barbara C; Shegog, Ross; Bamps, Yvan A; Begley, Charles E; Fraser, Robert T; Johnson, Erica K; Pandey, Dilip K; Quarells, Rakale C; Scal, Peter; Spruill, Tanya M; Thompson, Nancy J; Kobau, Rosemarie

    2017-03-01

    Epilepsy, a complex spectrum of disorders, affects about 2.9 million people in the U.S. Similar to other chronic disorders, people with epilepsy face challenges related to management of the disorder, its treatment, co-occurring depression, disability, social disadvantages, and stigma. Two national conferences on public health and epilepsy (1997, 2003) and a 2012 IOM report on the public health dimensions of epilepsy highlighted important knowledge gaps and emphasized the need for evidence-based, scalable epilepsy self-management programs. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention translated recommendations on self-management research and dissemination into an applied research program through the Prevention Research Centers Managing Epilepsy Well (MEW) Network. MEW Network objectives are to advance epilepsy self-management research by developing effective interventions that can be broadly disseminated for use in people's homes, healthcare providers' offices, or in community settings. The aim of this report is to provide an update on the MEW Network research pipeline, which spans efficacy, effectiveness, and dissemination. Many of the interventions use e-health strategies to eliminate barriers to care (e.g., lack of transportation, functional limitations, and stigma). Strengths of this mature research network are the culture of collaboration, community-based partnerships, e-health methods, and its portfolio of prevention activities, which range from efficacy studies engaging hard-to-reach groups, to initiatives focused on provider training and knowledge translation. The MEW Network works with organizations across the country to expand its capacity, help leverage funding and other resources, and enhance the development, dissemination, and sustainability of MEW Network programs and tools. Guided by national initiatives targeting chronic disease or epilepsy burden since 2007, the MEW Network has been responsible for more than 43 scientific journal articles, two

  6. Myoclonus epilepsy and ataxia due to KCNC1 mutation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Oliver, Karen L; Franceschetti, Silvana; Milligan, Carol J

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To comprehensively describe the new syndrome of myoclonus epilepsy and ataxia due to potassium channel mutation (MEAK), including cellular electrophysiological characterization of observed clinical improvement with fever. METHODS: We analyzed clinical, electroclinical, and neuroimaging.......5), with progressively severe myoclonus and rare tonic-clonic seizures. Ataxia was present early, but quickly became overshadowed by myoclonus; 10 patients were wheelchair-bound by their late teenage years. Mild cognitive decline occurred in half. Early death was not observed. Electroencephalogram (EEG) showed...

  7. Epilepsy in Dante's poetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mula, Marco

    2016-04-01

    Dante Alighieri is the greatest Italian poet and one of the most important writers in Western literature. He is best known for the epic poem "Commedia", later named "La Divina Commedia" that has profoundly influenced not only poetic imagination but also all subsequent allegorical creations of imaginary worlds in literature. This paper examines the poetic description of some episodes of loss of consciousness in Dante's poetry discussing how and why typical elements of epileptic seizures have been used. On the 750th anniversary of Dante's birth, his poetry still remains to be an inspiring source of debate and reflection. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled "Epilepsy, Art, and Creativity". Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Steroids in childhood epilepsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramachandrannair Rajesh

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Treatment of epileptic encephalopathies can be very challenging as most anticonvulsant drugs fail to achieve good seizure control. Steroids are disease modifying as well as anticonvulsant in these conditions. Though steroids are accepted as the first-line treatment for infantile spasms, there are many unanswered questions with regard to the preparation, dose and duration of treatment. In this review a re-exploration of the literature is attempted. Putative mechanism of action of steroids in infantile spasms is also discussed. As steroids are being increasingly used in other epileptic encephalopathies and Rasmussen′s encephalitis, a brief discussion on the role of steroids in these conditions is attempted. The review ends with the discussion on newer neuroactive steroids in the management of epilepsy.

  9. Accelerated cognitive decline in a rodent model for temporal lobe epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schipper, Sandra; Aalbers, Marlien W; Rijkers, Kim; Lagiere, Melanie; Bogaarts, Jan G; Blokland, Arjan; Klinkenberg, Sylvia; Hoogland, Govert; Vles, Johan S H

    2016-12-01

    Cognitive impairment is frequently observed in patients with temporal lobe epilepsy. It is hypothesized that cumulative seizure exposure causes accelerated cognitive decline in patients with epilepsy. We investigated the influence of seizure frequency on cognitive decline in a rodent model for temporal lobe epilepsy. Neurobehavioral assessment was performed before and after surgery, after the induction of self-sustaining limbic status epilepticus (SSLSE), and in the chronic phase in which rats experienced recurrent seizures. Furthermore, we assessed potential confounders of memory performance. Rats showed a deficit in spatial working memory after the induction of the SSLSE, which endured in the chronic phase. A progressive decline in recognition memory developed in SSLSE rats. Confounding factors were absent. Seizure frequency and also the severity of the status epilepticus were not correlated with the severity of cognitive deficits. The effect of the seizure frequency on cognitive comorbidity in epilepsy has long been debated, possibly because of confounders such as antiepileptic medication and the heterogeneity of epileptic etiologies. In an animal model of temporal lobe epilepsy, we showed that a decrease in spatial working memory does not relate to the seizure frequency. This suggests for other mechanisms are responsible for memory decline and potentially a common pathophysiology of cognitive deterioration and the occurrence and development of epileptic seizures. Identifying this common denominator will allow development of more targeted interventions treating cognitive decline in patients with epilepsy. The treatment of interictal symptoms will increase the quality of life of many patients with epilepsy. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Clinical and sociodemographic profile of epilepsy in adults from a reference centre in Colombia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orozco-Hernández, J P; Quintero-Moreno, J F; Marín-Medina, D S; Castaño-Montoya, J P; Hernández-Coral, P; Pineda, M; Vélez, J D; Villada, H C; Martínez, J W; Lizcano, A

    2017-04-27

    To describe the sociodemographic and clinical characteristics of a cohort of patients with epilepsy from a reference centre in Colombia. Cross-sectional study including patients diagnosed with epilepsy who attended our epilepsy centre (Neurocentro) between 2013 and 2016. Data were gathered from patients' medical histories. We gathered data from a total of 354 patients diagnosed with epilepsy. Median age was 37 years; 52% were men. Seizures were focal in 57% of the patients and generalised in 38%; seizure type was not determined in 6% of the sample. The most frequent aetiology was cryptogenic (21%), followed by traumatic (14%). Median time of disease progression and age at onset were 23 and 11 years, respectively. Psychiatric comorbidities were found in 18% of the patients and 40% had some degree of cognitive impairment. Around 40% of our sample reported adverse reactions to antiepileptic drugs at some point during treatment. Antiepileptic drugs were administered in monotherapy in 36% of the patients. Around 37% had drug-resistant epilepsy and 14% underwent surgery. Psychiatric comorbidities, cognitive impairment, adverse drug reactions, and drug-resistant epilepsy are common among epileptic patients in Colombia. Knowledge of the factors with an impact on epilepsy may lay the foundations for improving management of these patients on the administrative level and improving quality of life. Copyright © 2017 Sociedad Española de Neurología. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  11. Burden of epilepsy in Colombia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Méndez-Ayala, Alejandro; Nariño, Daniel; Rosselli, Diego

    2015-01-01

    Epilepsy lays an important burden on healthcare systems and society in general. Disability adjusted life years (DALYs) have been developed to compare the burden of this disease both between conditions and between geographical boundaries. With improving data on disease incidence and prevalence in Colombia, we can refine our DALYs-based estimates. Using different strategies, including the official healthcare provision database and death certificates, as well as extrapolation from published neuroepidemiologic studies, we estimated the incidence and prevalence by age groups, disease duration and attributable mortality. With this information we calculated DALYs for the year 2012. Overall, it was found that epilepsy was responsible for 0.88% of all deaths in Colombia. A total of 5.25 DALYs per 1,000 person-years are lost due to epilepsy in Colombia, 75% of which (3.91 DALYs) are due to premature mortality, with a higher burden in men (6.12 DALYs) than in women (4.41 DALYs). We reported new estimations on epilepsy incidence and prevalence by age groups in Colombia and conclude that DALYs lost due to epilepsy in Colombia are almost double the previous figure, mostly because of the underestimation of attributable mortality. With this figure, epilepsy ranks 12th instead of 19th in the list of the most important causes of DALYs lost. © 2015 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  12. Imaging of intractable paediatric epilepsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanjay Prabhu

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Approximately 20% of paediatric patients with epilepsy are refractory to medical therapies. In this subgroup of patients, neuroimaging plays an important role in identifying an epileptogenic focus. Successful identification of a structural lesion results in a better outcome following epilepsy surgery. Advances in imaging technologies, methods of epileptogenic region localisation and refinement of clinical evaluation of this group of patients in epilepsy centres have helped to widen the spectrum of children who could potentially benefit from surgical treatment. In this review, we discuss ways to optimise imaging techniques, list typical imaging features of common pathologies that can cause epilepsy, and potential pitfalls to be aware of whilst reviewing imaging studies in this challenging group of patients. The importance of multidisciplinary meetings to analyse and synthesise all the non-invasive data is emphasised. Our objectives are: to describe the four phases of evaluation of children with drug-resistant localisation-related epilepsy; to describe optimal imaging techniques that can help maximise detection of epileptogenic foci; to describe a systematic approach to reviewing magnetic resonance imaging of children with intractable epilepsy; to describe the features of common epileptogenic substrates; to list potential pitfalls whilst reviewing imaging studies in these patients; and to highlight the value of multimodality and interdisciplinary approaches to the management of this group of children.

  13. [Benign partial epilepsies of childhood].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palencia, R

    To carry out, by means of a literature review, an update of the entities that can be included within the group of benign partial epilepsies of childhood. Among partial epilepsies with onset in the first stages of life, a group extended in the last years with a favourable course and a trend to reverse, even spontaneously, has been identified. Some of these entities have a genetic origin but we do not know the mechanisms by which these epilepsies show a self limited course, which have given rise to the denomination of epilepsy that comes and goes; nevertheless, an evolution to other more complex forms is also possible. Benign partial epilepsies of childhood constitute a wide group of conditions of varied semiology, usually with a good prognosis even without treatment. Occasionally, these epilepsies may show a more unfavourable course with a worsening, in spite of medication, and the appearance of neurologic and neuropsychologic disorders. All these aspects must be known and considered by the physician in charge of these patients management.

  14. [A survey of school teachers' knowledge and behaviour about epilepsy, in a developing country such as Senegal].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ndour, D; Diop, A G; Ndiaye, M; Niang, C; Sarr, M M; Ndiaye, I P

    2004-03-01

    Epilepsy is one of the most common disorders encountered in children of developing countries. In Senegal, as in many other African countries, the disease is enrobed in superstition, discrimination, and stigma. There is a clear-cut lack of information programs in the developing world about seizures and epilepsy. Academic achievement of children with epilepsy is hampered by social barriers in addition to the burden of the disease and its treatment. The aim of this study was to evaluate teachers'knowledge, awareness, and current attitudes about epilepsy in order to obtain baseline data for the development of a school health education program on epilepsy. The study was carried out in Dakar. It was conducted by sending self-administered and anonymous questionnaires to 400 elementary school teachers; the data were randomly mapped, stratified, and chosen to produce a statistically representative sample of the teacher population of Dakar. The questionnaires contained 22 items related to knowledge of epilepsy, the attitude of teachers towards epilepsy, and their ability to provide first aid in case of seizures. A total of 373 teachers (93p.cent) completed the questionnaires. For 69p.cent, epilepsy arises in the brain, for 28.7p.cent it is a subnatural affliction. Epilepsy was considered to be contagious for 24p.cent and could be cured for 73p.cent. Although 66p.cent would help an epileptic pupil during a seizure, 53p.cent mentioned harmful measures. Eighty-four percent noticed that an epileptic child could go to a normal classroom, while 62.5p.cent would prefer a special school. Eighty-four percent said their knowledge on epilepsy was not sufficient and the majority (99p.cent) desired training on epilepsy. For 25.7p.cent, better collaboration between parents, doctors, and teachers would b helpful to achieve better management of epileptic children. This study demonstrated encouraging knowledge of teachers about epilepsy. However, some of their wrong attitudes may be

  15. Prevention is better than cure

    CERN Multimedia

    Anaïs Schaeffer

    2012-01-01

    Throughout the year, members of the Safety Inspections Services section of HSE Unit devote themselves to ensuring the safety of all infrastructure and equipment that represent a specific hazard within the Organization. They regularly comb through all CERN's infrastructure to forestall any accidents and their potential impact, true to the adage that prevention is better than cure.   This site has a few (!) slight safety problems... Spot the mistakes! (Details of the game below.) Ensuring that an HV electrical installation is properly earthed, that a system under pressure has no weak points, that an item of lifting equipment can be used without risk, that safety valves operate at the right pressure threshold as well as checking that a heavy object that could inflict injury if it fell is not stored on top of a cupboard: such are the types of inspections performed by the Safety Inspection Service (DGS-SEE-SIS). "These checks reassure those in charge of equipment and infrastruct...

  16. Pregabalin monotherapy for epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Qin; Zheng, Jinou; Yu, Lu; Jia, Xiaoyan

    2012-10-17

    Many people with epilepsy suffer from poorly controlled seizures, despite current antiepileptic treatments. Due to high rates of treatment resistance, there is interest in new pharmacological treatment options such as pregabalin. However, it remains unclear whether existing evidence of pregabalin is rigorous enough to support its monotherapy. To determine the efficacy and tolerability of pregabalin in people with epilepsy. We searched the Cochrane Epilepsy Group's Specialized Register (August 2012), the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) (The Cochrane Library 2012, Issue 7 ), MEDLINE (1946 to August week 1, 2012), EMBASE (1974 to August 2012) and the Chinese Biomedical Literature Database (CBM) (1978 to August 2012). No language restrictions were imposed. Randomised controlled trials (RCTs) comparing pregabalin with placebo or another antiepileptic drug monotherapy for epilepsy. Two review authors (QZ and LY) independently extracted trial data and assessed trial quality. We assessed the following outcomes: (1) time to withdrawal after randomisation; (2) time to achieve six-, 12- or 24-month remission; (3) the proportion of participants who remained seizure-free for six or more continuous months; (4) time to first seizure after randomisation; (5) validated quality of life measures; (6) health economic outcomes; (7) adverse effects. We expressed time-to-event outcomes as hazard ratios (HRs) with 95% confidence interval (CI), where an HR > 1 indicates an event is more likely to occur earlier on pregabalin than the comparator. Two short-term studies involving 753 participants met the inclusion criteria. Only one study investigated the effects of pregabalin compared with lamotrigine in patients with newly diagnosed partial seizures, and the other study investigated the effects of pregabalin compared with gabapentin in hospitalised patients with refractory partial epilepsy. There were no studies on generalised-onset tonic-clonic seizures (with or

  17. In vivo measurement of hippocampal GABAA/cBZR density with [18F]-flumazenil PET for the study of disease progression in an animal model of temporal lobe epilepsy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucy Vivash

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: Imbalance of inhibitory GABAergic neurotransmission has been proposed to play a role in the pathogenesis of temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE. This study aimed to investigate whether [(18F]-flumazenil ([(18F]-FMZ PET could be used to non-invasively characterise GABAA/central benzodiazepine receptor (GABAA/cBZR density and affinity in vivo in the post-kainic acid status epilepticus (SE model of TLE. METHODS: Dynamic [(18F]-FMZ -PET scans using a multi-injection protocol were acquired in four male wistar rats for validation of the partial saturation model (PSM. SE was induced in eight male Wistar rats (10 weeks of age by i.p. injection of kainic acid (7.5-25 mg/kg, while control rats (n = 7 received saline injections. Five weeks post-SE, an anatomic MRI scan was acquired and the following week an [(18F]-FMZ PET scan (3.6-4.6 nmol. The PET data was co-registered to the MRI and regions of interest drawn on the MRI for selected structures. A PSM was used to derive receptor density and apparent affinity from the [(18F]-FMZ PET data. KEY FINDINGS: The PSM was found to adequately model [(18F]-FMZ binding in vivo. There was a significant decrease in hippocampal receptor density in the SE group (p<0.01, accompanied by an increase in apparent affinity (p<0.05 compared to controls. No change in cortical receptor binding was observed. Hippocampal volume reduction and cell loss was only seen in a subset of animals. Histological assessment of hippocampal cell loss was significantly correlated with hippocampal volume measured by MRI (p<0.05, but did not correlate with [(18F]-FMZ binding. SIGNIFICANCE: Alterations to hippocampal GABAA/cBZR density and affinity in the post-kainic acid SE model of TLE are detectable in vivo with [(18F]-FMZ PET and a PSM. These changes are independent from hippocampal cell and volume loss. [(18F]-FMZ PET is useful for investigating the role that changes GABAA/cBZR density and binding affinity play in the pathogenesis of TLE.

  18. Hemispherectomy: a basis for mental development in children with epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Schooneveld, Monique M J; Jennekens-Schinkel, Aag; van Rijen, Peter C; Braun, Kees P J; van Nieuwenhuizen, Onno

    2011-03-01

    To detect change in mental development or intelligence over two years following hemispherectomy in children with pharmacologically intractable epilepsy. Seventeen infants and preschoolers (median age at epilepsy onset of 0.0 years and at hemispherectomy 1.5 years; epilepsy duration of 0.2-2.6 years) and 12 older children (median age at onset of 1.0 year and at hemispherectomy 8.3 years; epilepsy duration of 1.1-11.7 years) with pharmacologically intractable seizures due to developmental, acquired or progressive pathology. Prospective study with consecutive inclusion of children, fixed assessment intervals (shortly before and 6, 12 and 24 months after hemispherectomy) and assessment using developmental scales and intelligence scales. Dependent variables included mental developmental index (MDI), mental age (MA) and mental developmental delay (MDD) in younger children and intelligence quotient (IQ) in older children. Mental development had arrested or deteriorated prior to hemispherectomy in 14 children (82%) assessed with developmental scales. In 14 children, it was not possible to more precisely determine MDI than "below the lowest MDI that the test manual provided" either before or after hemispherectomy. MA, however, increased in 16 children. Overall, IQ changed negligibly over two years after hemispherectomy, although an individual approach revealed variability. Children with Rasmussen encephalitis did not recover from the significant presurgical deterioration of intelligence. Removal of the affected hemisphere enables epileptic children, even those with severe mental delay, to further develop mentally.

  19. Translating Genomic Discoveries to Cure Ultrahypermutant ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Translating Genomic Discoveries to Cure Ultrahypermutant Mismatch Repair Deficient Brain Tumours. Malignant brain tumours are the most common cause of death among children with cancer, but there is no known cure. This project will advance research in this important field. Inherited mutations and childhood cancer.

  20. Evaluation of Degreasers as Brine Curing Additives

    Science.gov (United States)

    The length of time needed for brine curing of raw hides and skins, a minimum of 18 h, is a time-consuming and expensive process. In this paper we initially report the results of an investigation of the stratigraphic distribution of sodium chloride and water in fleshed hides cured for varying interv...

  1. Magnetoactive elastomeric composites: Cure, tensile, electrical and ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Cure characteristics, mechanical, electrical and magnetic properties were experimentally determined for different volume fractions of magnetoactive filler. The cure time decreases sharply for initial filler loading and the decrease is marginal for additional loading of filler. The tensile strength and modulus at 100% strain was ...

  2. Composite cements benefit from light-curing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lührs, Anne-Katrin; De Munck, Jan; Geurtsen, Werner; Van Meerbeek, Bart

    2014-03-01

    To investigate the effect of curing of composite cements and a new ceramic silanization pre-treatment on the micro-tensile bond strength (μTBS). Feldspathic ceramic blocks were luted onto dentin using either Optibond XTR/Nexus 3 (XTR/NX3; Kerr), the silane-incorporated 'universal' adhesive Scotchbond Universal/RelyX Ultimate (SBU/RXU; 3M ESPE), or ED Primer II/Panavia F2.0 (ED/PAF; Kuraray Noritake). Besides 'composite cement', experimental variables were 'curing mode' ('AA': complete auto-cure at 21°C; 'AA*': complete auto-cure at 37°C; 'LA': light-curing of adhesive and auto-cure of cement; 'LL': complete light-curing) and 'ceramic surface pre-treatment' ('HF/S/HB': hydrofluoric acid ('HF': IPS Ceramic Etching Gel, Ivoclar-Vivadent), silanization ('S': Monobond Plus, Ivoclar-Vivadent) and application of an adhesive resin ('HB': Heliobond, Ivoclar-Vivadent); 'HF/SBU': 'HF' and application of the 'universal' adhesive Scotchbond Universal ('SBU'; 3M ESPE, only for SBU/RXU)). After water storage (7 days at 37°C), ceramic-dentin sticks were subjected to μTBS testing. Regarding the 'composite cement', the significantly lowest μTBSs were measured for ED/PAF. Regarding 'curing mode', the significantly highest μTBS was recorded when at least the adhesive was light-cured ('LA' and 'LL'). Complete auto-cure ('AA') revealed the significantly lowest μTBS. The higher auto-curing temperature ('AA*') increased the μTBS only for ED/PAF. Regarding 'ceramic surface pre-treatment', only for 'LA' the μTBS was significantly higher for 'HF/S/HB' than for 'HF/SBU'. Complete auto-cure led to inferior μTBS than when either the adhesive (on dentin) or both adhesive and composite cement were light-cured. The use of a silane-incorporated adhesive did not decrease luting effectiveness when also the composite cement was light-cured. Copyright © 2013 Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Cure Chemistry of Phenylethynyl Terminated Oligomers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Karen H.; Orwoll, Robert A.; Young, Philip R.; Jensen, Brian J.; McNair, Harold M.

    1997-01-01

    The ability to process high performance polymers into quality, void-free composites has been significantly advanced using oligomers terminated with reactive groups which cure or crosslink at elevated temperature without the evolution of volatile byproducts. Several matrix resin systems of considerable interest to the aerospace community utilize phenylethynyl-terminated imide (PETI) technology to achieve this advantage. The present paper addresses the cure chemistry of PETI oligomers. The thermal cure of a low molecular weight model compound was studied using a variety of analytical techniques including differential scanning calorimetry, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, and liquid chromatography-mass spectroscopy. The studies indicate an extremely complex cure process. Many stable products were isolated and this paper reports current work on identification of those products. The intent of this research is to provide fundamental insight into the molecular structure of the cured PETI engineering materials so that performance and durability can be more fully assessed.

  4. Pragmatic communication deficits in children with epilepsy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Broeders, Mark; Geurts, Hilde; Jennekens-Schinkel, Aag

    2010-01-01

    Background: Various psychiatric and neurological disorders including epilepsy have been associated with language deficits. Pragmatic language deficits, however, have seldom been the focus of earlier studies in children with epilepsy. Moreover, it is unknown whether these pragmatic deficits are

  5. Epilepsy - what to ask your doctor - adult

    Science.gov (United States)

    What to ask your doctor about epilepsy - adult; Seizures - what to ask your doctor - adult; Seizure - what to ask your doctor ... call to find more information about driving and epilepsy? What should I discuss with my boss at ...

  6. Vagus Nerve Stimulation for Treating Epilepsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and their FAMILIES VAGUS NERVE STIMULATION FOR TREATING EPILEPSY This information sheet is provided to help you ... how vagus nerve stimulation (VNS) may help treat epilepsy. The American Academy of Neurology (AAN) is the ...

  7. Epilepsy - what to ask your doctor - child

    Science.gov (United States)

    What to ask your doctor about epilepsy - child; Seizures - what to ask your doctor - child ... should I discuss with my child's teachers about epilepsy? Will my child need to take medicines during ...

  8. Genetic Testing Can Help Pinpoint Epilepsy Earlier

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_167507.html Genetic Testing Can Help Pinpoint Epilepsy Earlier Faster diagnosis ... 2017 (HealthDay News) -- A new study supports routine genetic testing for epilepsy in young children with seizures. " ...

  9. [A Concept Analysis of Uncertainty in Epilepsy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Juna; Lee, Insook

    2017-08-01

    This concept analysis was done to clarify 'uncertainty in epilepsy'. Walker and Avant's methodology guided the analysis. In addition, the concept was compared with uncertainty in other health problems. 'Uncertainty in epilepsy' was defined as being in the condition as seen from the epilepsy experience where cues were difficult to understand because they changed, were in discord with past ones, or they had two or more contradictory values at the same time. Uncertainty in epilepsy is evolved from appraisal of the epilepsy experience. As a result, uncertainty leads epilepsy patients, their family or health care providers to impaired functioning and proactive/passive coping behavior. Epilepsy patients with uncertainty need to be supported by nursing strategies for proactive, rational coping behavior. This achievement has implications for interventions aimed at changing perception of epilepsy patients, their families or health care providers who must deal with uncertainty.

  10. Acupuncture for epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheuk, Daniel K L; Wong, Virginia

    2014-05-07

    Acupuncture is increasingly used in people with epilepsy. It remains unclear whether existing evidence is rigorous enough to support its use. This is an update of a Cochrane review first published in 2008. To determine the effectiveness and safety of acupuncture in people with epilepsy. We searched the Cochrane Epilepsy Group Specialised Register (June 2013) and the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) in The Cochrane Library (2013, Issue 5), MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL, AMED and other databases (from inception to June 2013). We reviewed reference lists from relevant trials. We did not impose any language restrictions. Randomised controlled trials (RCTs) comparing acupuncture with placebo or sham treatment, antiepileptic drugs or no treatment; or comparing acupuncture plus other treatments with the same other treatments, involving people of any age with any type of epilepsy. We used standard methodological procedures expected by The Cochrane Collaboration. We included 17 RCTs with 1538 participants that had a wide age range and were suffering mainly from generalized epilepsy. The duration of treatment varied from 7.5 weeks to 1 year. All included trials had a high risk of bias with short follow-up. Compared with Chinese herbs, needle acupuncture plus Chinese herbs was not effective in achieving at least 50% reduction in seizure frequency (80% in control group versus 90% in intervention group, RR 1.13, 95% CI 0.97 to 1.31, 2 trials; assumed risk 500 per 1000, corresponding risk 485 to 655 per 1000). Compared with valproate, needle acupuncture plus valproate was not effective in achieving freedom from seizures (44% in control group versus 42.7% in intervention group, RR 0.97, 95% CI 0.72 to 1.30, 2 trials; assumed risk 136 per 1000, corresponding risk 97 to 177 per 1000) or at least 50% reduction in seizure frequency (69.3% in control group versus 81.3% in intervention group, RR 1.34, 95% CI 0.52 to 3.48, 2 trials; assumed risk 556 per 1000

  11. Curing agent for polyepoxides and epoxy resins and composites cured therewith. [preventing carbon fiber release

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serafini, T. T.; Delvigs, P.; Vannucci, R. D. (Inventor)

    1981-01-01

    A curing for a polyepoxide is described which contains a divalent aryl radical such as phenylene a tetravalent aryl radical such as a tetravalent benzene radical. An epoxide is cured by admixture with the curing agent. The cured epoxy product retains the usual properties of cured epoxides and, in addition, has a higher char residue after burning, on the order of 45% by weight. The higher char residue is of value in preventing release to the atmosphere of carbon fibers from carbon fiber-epoxy resin composites in the event of burning of the composite.

  12. Pregnancy Among Women With Epilepsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas S V

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available Problems related to pregnancy and birth defects in the baby are major concerns for women with epilepsy. Hardly any data from this country is available in this regards to provide factual information to people with epilepsy. This study was undertaken to survey the outcome of pregnancies in women with epilepsy in this part of the country. Women with epilepsy (20to55 year of age who had attended this institute between March 1997 and march 1997 were sent a questionnaire by post regarding their martial status, reproductive history and outcome of pregnancies including any birth defects in their children. The data on clinical aspects and treatment were extracted from their medical records. 184 women (mean age 28.5 + 8 years were included in this study. 108 (58.7% of them were married. Women with epilepsy had three times higher rate of abortions (24.1% than general population(8%. Their mean family size (1.6 was lower than that is Kerala State (2.3. The proportion of women without children (13.9% was also higher than that for the state (9.8%. The frequency of birth defects among their children was twice (4% that in the community (2%. Women taking sodium valproate had higher frequency of birth defects in their children (15% as compared to other drugs but this was not statistically significant. There is a tendency for lower fertility among women with epilepsy. There is a slight increase in the frequency of birth defects among children born to mothers with epilepsy.

  13. Epilepsy and restless legs syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geyer, James D; Geyer, Emery E; Fetterman, Zachary; Carney, Paul R

    2017-03-01

    Restless legs syndrome (RLS) is a common neurological movement disorder occurring in approximately 10% of the general population. The prevalence of moderately severe RLS is 2.7% overall (3.7% for women and 1.7% for men). Epilepsy is also a common neurological disorder with significant associated morbidity and impact on quality of life. We evaluated the severity and frequency of primary RLS in patients with localization-related temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) and investigated the role of prodromal RLS symptoms as a warning sign and lateralizing indicator. All epilepsy patients seen in the outpatient clinic were screened for movement disorders from 2005 to 2015. Ninety-eight consecutive patients with localization-related TLE (50 right TLE and 48 left TLE) who met inclusion criteria were seen in the outpatient clinic. The control group consisted of 50 individuals with no history or immediate family history of epilepsy. Each patient was evaluated with the International Restless Legs Study Group (IRLSSG) questionnaire, NIH RLS diagnostic criteria, ferritin level, and comprehensive sleep screening including polysomnography. Furthermore, patients with obstructive sleep apnea or a definite cause of secondary restless legs syndrome such as low serum ferritin or serum iron levels were also excluded from the study. There was a significant association between the type of epilepsy and whether or not patients had RLS χ 2 (1)=10.17, pepilepsy than if they had left temporal epilepsy, serving as a potential lateralizing indicator. A prodromal sensation of worsening RLS occurred in some patients providing the opportunity to intervene at an earlier stage in this subgroup. We identified frequent moderate to severe RLS in patients with epilepsy. The frequency of RLS was much more common than would typically be seen in patients of similar age. The restlessness was typically described as moderately severe. The RLS symptoms were more common and somewhat more severe in the right TLE group

  14. Epidemiology and care of epilepsy in Vietnam

    OpenAIRE

    Tuan, Nguyen Anh

    2010-01-01

    Epilepsy is often considered the most common serious chronic neurological disorder estimated to affect 50 million people globally. Although the majority of these live in developing countries, data on the epidemiology of epilepsy from such countries are scarce. This is true also for Vietnam. The overall objective of this project, Epidemiology and Care of Epilepsy in Ba Vi (EPIBAVI), was therefore to provide essential epidemiological data on epilepsy in Vietnam as a basis for ...

  15. Introduction-Pediatric epilepsy surgery techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rydenhag, Bertil; Cukiert, Arthur

    2017-04-01

    This supplement includes the proceedings from the Pediatric Epilepsy Surgery Techniques Meeting held in Gothenburg (July 4-5, 2014), which focused on presentations and discussions regarding specific surgical technical issues in pediatric epilepsy surgery. Pediatric epilepsy neurosurgeons from all over the world were present and active in very fruitful and live presentations and discussions. These articles represent a synopsis of the areas and subjects dealt with there. Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 International League Against Epilepsy.

  16. History of Neuropsychology Through Epilepsy Eyes

    OpenAIRE

    Loring, David W.

    2010-01-01

    In the 19th century, Hughlings Jackson relied on clinical history, seizure semiology, and the neurologic examination as methods for seizure localization to inform the first epilepsy surgeries. In the 20th century, psychological and neuropsychological tests were first employed as both diagnostic and prognostic measures. The contemporary practice of epilepsy evaluation and management includes neuropsychology as a critical component of epilepsy care and research, and epilepsy and neuropsychology...

  17. Psychopathology in epilepsy and learned helplessness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hermann, B P

    1979-06-01

    It is proposed that epilepsy is a high psychological risk disorder because persons with epilepsy are vulnerable to the powerful behavioral ramifications of exposure to unpredictable, uncontrollable, aversive events. The most commonly reported psychopathologies in persons with epilepsy parallel those noted in humans and infrahuman organisms subjected to unpredictable/uncontrollable aversive events and it is suggested that Seligman's theory of learned helplessness provides a useful framework for interpreting and predicting psychologic dysfunctions in epilepsy.

  18. The success of HCV cure: every rose has its thorn.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salmon-Ceron, Dominique; Mondelli, Mario U; Maticic, Mojca; Arends, Joop E

    2017-11-07

    This review aimed to examine mid-term liver complications and extra-hepatic clinical syndromes in addition to quality of life benefits associated with achieving HCV cure. Also to review the few safety issues that have been associated with the use of oral direct acting antivirals (DAAs) and discuss the potential benefits of the reduction of the burden of HCV infection at the population level. HCV cure is possible with DAAs in more than 95% of the patients treated. The blockage of liver inflammation and halting of fibrosis progression translates in both hepatic and extra-hepatic beneficial improvements and in reduction in the need for liver transplantation secondary to HCV. In addition, a reduction in the frequency of extra-hepatic manifestations like mixed cryoglobulinemia and vasculitis and improvements in quality of life and fatigue have been described. Curing HCV infection also provides a high potential to reduce the burden of HCV infection at the population level. Several modelling studies suggest that dramatic reductions in HCV prevalence and incidence are possible with large scaling-up of HCV treatment. However, obtaining these benefits needs early treatment of HCV-infected individuals preceded by voluntary national policies to improve the screening of HCV and the access to care, particularly in high-risk populations. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  19. Epilepsy-related mortality is low in children: a 30-year population-based study in Olmsted County, MN.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nickels, Katherine C; Grossardt, Brandon R; Wirrell, Elaine C

    2012-12-01

    Epilepsy is a common childhood neurologic disorder, affecting 0.5-1% of children. Increased mortality occurs due to progression of underlying disease, seizure-related accidents, suicide, status epilepticus, aspiration during seizures, and sudden unexplained death in epilepsy (SUDEP). Previous studies show mortality rates of 2.7-6.9 per 1,000 person-years. Potential risk factors include poor seizure control, intractable epilepsy, status epilepticus, tonic-clonic seizures, mental retardation, and remote symptomatic cause of epilepsy. Few population-based studies of mortality and SUDEP in childhood-onset epilepsy have been published. The purpose of this study is to report mortality and SUDEP from a 30-year population-based cohort of children with epilepsy. The Medical Diagnostic Index of the Rochester Epidemiology Project was searched for all codes related to seizure and convulsion in children living in Olmsted County, Minnesota and of ages birth through 17 years from 1980 through 2009. The medical records of these children were reviewed to identify all those with new-onset epilepsy, and to abstract other baseline and follow-up information. Potential risk factors including seizure type, epilepsy syndrome, history of status epilepticus, the presence and severity of neurologic impairment, and epilepsy outcome was reviewed. Epilepsy outcome was characterized by seizure frequency, number of antiseizure medications (antiepileptic drugs, AEDs) used, and number of AEDs failed due to lack of efficacy, and epilepsy intractability at 1 year and 2, 3, 5, 10, 15, and 20 years after epilepsy onset. We followed all children through their most recent visit to determine vital status, cause of death, and whether autopsy was performed. From 1980 to 2009, there were 467 children age birth through 17 years diagnosed with epilepsy while residents of Olmsted County, Minnesota, and who had follow-up beyond the time of epilepsy diagnosis. Children were followed for a median of 7.87 years

  20. Epilepsy in children with cerebral palsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruck Isac

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To describe the prevalence and characteristics of epilepsy in patients with cerebral palsy in a tertiary center. METHODS: a total of 100 consecutive patients with cerebral palsy were retrospectively studied. Criteria for inclusion were follow-up period for at least 2 years. Types and incidence of epilepsy were correlated with the different forms of cerebral palsy. Other factors associated with epilepsy such as age of first seizure, neonatal seizures and family history of epilepsy were also analysed. RESULTS: follow-up ranged between 24 and 151 months (mean 57 months. The overall prevalence of epilepsy was 62%. Incidence of epilepsy was predominant in patients with hemiplegic and tetraplegic palsies: 70.6% and 66.1%, respectively. First seizure occurred during the first year of life in 74.2% of patients with epilepsy. Generalized and partial were the predominant types of epilepsy (61.3% and 27.4%, respectively. Thirty-three (53.2% of 62 patients were seizure free for at least 1 year. Neonatal seizures and family history of epilepsy were associated with a higher incidence of epilepsy. CONCLUSIONS: epilepsy in cerebral palsy can be predicted if seizures occur in the first year of life, in neonatal period and if there is family history of epilepsy.

  1. Epilepsy among elderly Sudanese patients | Hussein | Sudan ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Results: Cerebrovascular accident was found to be the most common cause of secondary epilepsy (31%).Generalize epilepsy was seen in 120 (50%) of patients. Abnormal neurological findings were more common (49%) among patients with partial epilepsy. Fifty percent of our patients showed abnormal EEG. Abnormal CT ...

  2. Neuropsychological Research Approaches in the Epilepsies ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The contributions of electro-encephalography to neurology and neurosurgery have tended to overshadow its value for the neuropsychologist as a tool for the study of instability of brain function in relation to the epilepsies and the borderlands of epilepsy. Studies of criminal behaviour have shown a high incidence of epilepsy ...

  3. Epilepsy. NICHCY Disability Fact Sheet #6

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Dissemination Center for Children with Disabilities, 2010

    2010-01-01

    Epilepsy is a seizure disorder. According to the Epilepsy Foundation of America, a seizure happens when a brief, strong surge of electrical activity affects part or all of the brain. About three million Americans have epilepsy. Of the 200,000 new cases diagnosed each year, nearly 45,000 are children and adolescents. Following a brief story of a…

  4. Evaluation of Children for Epilepsy Surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Gordon Millichap

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available To assess the possibility of streamlining the decision process for epilepsy surgery in children with intractable epilepsy, the value of MRI, video EEG, and SPECT was investigated retrospectively in a study of 353 patients at the Lingfield Epilepsy Centre, Great Ormond Street Hospital, and Institute of Child Health, London, UK.

  5. The concept of symptomatic epilepsy and the complexities of assigning cause in epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shorvon, Simon

    2014-03-01

    The concept of symptomatic epilepsy and the difficulties in assigning cause in epilepsy are described. A historical review is given, emphasizing aspects of the history which are relevant today. The historical review is divided into three approximately semicentenial periods (1860-1910, 1910-1960, 1960-present). A definition of symptomatic epilepsy and this is followed by listing of causes of symptomatic epilepsy. The fact that not all the causes of idiopathic epilepsy are genetic is discussed. A category of provoked epilepsy is proposed. The complexities in assigning cause include the following: the multifactorial nature of epilepsy, the distinction between remote and proximate causes, the role of nongenetic factors in idiopathic epilepsy, the role of investigation in determining the range of causes, the fact that not all symptomatic epilepsy is acquired, the nosological position of provoked epilepsy and the view of epilepsy as a process, and the differentiation of new-onset and established epilepsy. The newly proposed ILAE classification of epilepsy and its changes in terminologies and the difficulties in the concept of acute symptomatic epilepsy are discussed, including the inconsistencies and gray areas and the distinction between idiopathic, symptomatic, and provoked epilepsies. Points to be considered in future work are listed. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Hallmarks in the history of epilepsy: epilepsy in antiquity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magiorkinis, Emmanouil; Sidiropoulou, Kalliopi; Diamantis, Aristidis

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to highlight the hallmarks of epilepsy as a disease and symptom during antiquity and especially during Ancient Greece and Rome. A thorough study of texts, medical books, and reports along with a review of the available literature in PubMed was undertaken. Observations on epilepsy date back to the medical texts of the Assyrians and Babylonians, almost 2000 years B.C. Considered initially as a divine malady or demonic possession, epilepsy was demythologized by the Father of Medicine, Hippocrates, who was the first to set in dispute its divine origin. Physicians in the early post-Hippocratic era did not make any important contribution regarding the mechanisms of epileptic convulsions, but contributed mainly in the field of nosology and systemization of symptoms. 2009 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Hypoxanthine enhances the cured meat taste.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ichimura, Sayaka; Nakamura, Yukinobu; Yoshida, Yuka; Hattori, Akihito

    2017-02-01

    We evaluated the enhancement of cured meat taste during maturation by sensory analysis. We focused on the heat-stable sarcoplasmic fraction (HSSF) to identify the factors related to cured meat taste. Because the dry matter of HSSF contained more than 30% nitrogen, nitrogen compounds such as free amino acids, small peptides and adenosine triphosphate-related compounds seemed to be the important components of HSSF. The samples cured with HSSF for 2 h exhibited the same taste profile as ones cured without HSSF for 168 h. Therefore, the changes in the amount and fractions of nitrogen compounds were examined in HSSF during incubation from 0 to 168 h. The concentration of hypoxanthine (Hx) gradually increased, while inosine-5'-monophosphate decreased during the incubation. The samples cured with pickles containing various concentrations of Hx were subjected to sensory analysis. The addition of Hx, in a dose-dependent fashion, enhanced cured meat taste by maturation for 2 h. It was concluded that Hx is essential for the enhancement of cured meat taste. © 2016 The Authors. Animal Science Journal published by John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd on behalf of Japanese Society of Animal Science.

  8. Hypoxanthine enhances the cured meat taste

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Yukinobu; Yoshida, Yuka; Hattori, Akihito

    2016-01-01

    Abstract We evaluated the enhancement of cured meat taste during maturation by sensory analysis. We focused on the heat‐stable sarcoplasmic fraction (HSSF) to identify the factors related to cured meat taste. Because the dry matter of HSSF contained more than 30% nitrogen, nitrogen compounds such as free amino acids, small peptides and adenosine triphosphate‐related compounds seemed to be the important components of HSSF. The samples cured with HSSF for 2 h exhibited the same taste profile as ones cured without HSSF for 168 h. Therefore, the changes in the amount and fractions of nitrogen compounds were examined in HSSF during incubation from 0 to 168 h. The concentration of hypoxanthine (Hx) gradually increased, while inosine‐5′‐monophosphate decreased during the incubation. The samples cured with pickles containing various concentrations of Hx were subjected to sensory analysis. The addition of Hx, in a dose‐dependent fashion, enhanced cured meat taste by maturation for 2 h. It was concluded that Hx is essential for the enhancement of cured meat taste. PMID:27169902

  9. PENICILLIN EPILEPSY IN RATS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Voja Pavlović

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study is to test, in a model of experimental penicillin epilepsy, a hypothesis of primary and dominant role of cortex in genesis of epileptic discharges, by using recordings of electrocorticograms (EcoG. The experiments were made with around two and a half old male rats. The rats were divided into four groups of five animals each. In the case of the first group, antibiotics were applied intraperitoneally (i.p.. Epileptic generalized discharges of this group were not registered until administering a dosage of antibiotics higher than 1.8 x 106 IU/kg. In the second group, application of a dosage of 1.2 x 106 IU/kg resulted in individual discharges. In the third group, antibiotics were applied intracortically (i.c. in a dosage of 50 IU and caused individual discharges without big seizures. The fourth group needed a dosage of 100 IU/kg of penicillin applied i.c. to develop a big seizure. Discharges in the first three groups were registered first as unilateral with a subsequent development of bilateral synchrony. In the case of the fourth group, immediately and abruptly after the application of penicillin big seizures developed violently and repeated several times. We consider that the very implantation of electrodes provokes occurrence of discharging.

  10. Mobile EEG in epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Askamp, Jessica; van Putten, Michel J A M

    2014-01-01

    The sensitivity of routine EEG recordings for interictal epileptiform discharges in epilepsy is limited. In some patients, inpatient video-EEG may be performed to increase the likelihood of finding abnormalities. Although many agree that home EEG recordings may provide a cost-effective alternative to these recordings, their use is still not introduced everywhere. We surveyed Dutch neurologists and patients and evaluated a novel mobile EEG device (Mobita, TMSi). Key specifications were compared with three other current mobile EEG devices. We shortly discuss algorithms to assist in the review process. Thirty percent (33 out of 109) of Dutch neurologists reported that home EEG recordings are used in their hospital. The majority of neurologists think that mobile EEG can have additional value in investigation of unclear paroxysms, but not in the initial diagnosis after a first seizure. Poor electrode contacts and signal quality, limited recording time and absence of software for reliable and effective assistance in the interpretation of EEGs have been important constraints for usage, but in recent devices discussed here, many of these problems have been solved. The majority of our patients were satisfied with the home EEG procedure and did not think that our EEG device was uncomfortable to wear, but they did feel uneasy wearing it in public. © 2013.

  11. Epilepsy and driving

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moetamedi M

    2000-09-01

    Full Text Available Epilepsy is a disease with high prevalence, which interferes driving and may lead to car accident; This case-control study has been done on 100 epileptic patients and 100 persons as control group, who had history of driving. We gathered our patients with face to face interview and registering their information in special forms which were prepared for this study. There were three times more accidents among epileptic cases comparing with control group and this difference was more considerable in men and in patients under 35 years old. The cause of accident were not seizure attack in more than 60% of the patients and these ordinary accidents were also more in case group. Epileptic patients with history of car accidents during driving had poor drug compliance comparing with the epileptics without history of an accident so drug compliance may be valuable in predicting accident in these patients. We have also found poor drug compliance in whom seizure attacks caused accident for them. 58% of the epileptics had not consulted their physician about driving. 43.3% of seizures during driving were of generalized type and none of the patients had inform police about their disease during getting driving license.

  12. [Lamotrigine in refractory epilepsy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Escrivà, A; López-Hernández, N; Alvarez-Saúco, M; Pampliega-Pérez, A; Oliver-Navarrete, C; Asensio-Asensio, M; Moltó-Jordá, J M; Palao-Sánchez, A

    Lamotrigine (LTG) is a new antiepileptic drug indicated in all kinds of partial and generalised clonic-tonic seizures, both in monotherapy and polytherapy. Between 20 and 30% of epileptic patients have poor control over their seizures despite adequate treatment. We report on our experience regarding the long-term efficacy and tolerability of LTG in refractory seizures. We conducted a consecutive 10-year study of patients who began LTG therapy following poor control of their seizures, in spite of being treated with two or more antiepileptic drugs in monotherapy or in combination. Both their epidemiological and clinical data were collected for study. We studied the efficacy of the treatment, differentiating between remission (absence of seizures), improvement (reduction>50% of the seizures), inefficacy (reductionepilepsy, in 28.5% it was symptomatic and in the remaining 28.5% it was idiopathic. EEG readings and neuroimaging scans were pathological in 53.8% and 43.6%, respectively. After beginning therapy with LTG, 33% remained free of seizures, 43.6% improved, in 18.3% it was seen to be ineffective and 5.1% got worse. Dropout rate was 56.4%:23.1% due to insufficient control over the seizures, 17.9% owing to side effects and 15.4% because of non-compliance. Treatment with LTG offers a high degree of efficacy in the control of seizures in patients with refractory epilepsy, although it is limited by a high dropout rate.

  13. Academic achievement one year after resective epilepsy surgery in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puka, Klajdi; Khattab, Maryam; Kerr, Elizabeth N; Smith, Mary Lou

    2015-06-01

    Few studies have examined the academic functioning of children following pediatric epilepsy surgery. Although intellectual functioning has been more thoroughly investigated, children with epilepsy may experience additional difficulties with academic skills. This study examined the academic outcomes of a cohort of children who underwent pediatric epilepsy surgery on an average 1.2 (standard deviation [SD]: 0.3) years prior. Participants were 136 children (mean age: 14.3 years, [SD]: 3.7 years) who had undergone resective epilepsy surgery. Academic functioning was assessed presurgery and postsurgery using standardized tests of reading, reading comprehension, arithmetic, and spelling. At baseline, 65% of the children displayed low achievement (1 SD below test mean), and 28% had underachievement (1 SD below baseline IQ) in at least one academic domain. Examining change over time revealed that reading, numeral operations, and spelling significantly declined among all patients; seizure freedom at follow-up (attained in 64% of the patients) did not influence this relationship. Reading comprehension and IQ remained unchanged. Similar findings were found when examining patients with a baseline IQ of ≥ 70 and when controlling for IQ. Regression analyses revealed that after controlling for IQ, demographic and seizure-related variables were not significantly associated with academic achievement at follow-up. Results show baseline academic difficulties and deteriorations following surgery that go beyond IQ. Further investigations are required to determine whether the observed deteriorations result from the development of the child, the course of the disorder, or the epilepsy surgery itself. Long-term studies are warranted to identify the progression of academic achievement and whether the observed deteriorations represent a temporal disruption in function. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Epilepsy, physical activity and sports

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carrizosa-Moog, Jaime

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available People with epilepsy are prone to be sedentary compared with the general population. The causes of inactivity are ignorance, prejudice, overprotection, fear and shame. There is no scientific evidence supporting a limitation of physical exercise in persons with epilepsy. The benefits of exercise in these patients are huge. Positive aspects are: physical conditioning, prevention of seizures, emotional wellbeing, social interaction, drug treatment adherence, osteoporosis prevention and better quality of life for patients and their families. Having in mind the individual characteristics, physical exercise should be prescribed and guided. Available evidence underlies the complementary therapeutic effects of physical activity with large positive results at a low cost. Sports or regular physical activity should be a standard indication for persons with epilepsy.

  15. Epilepsia mioclônica progressiva: aspectos clínicos, poligráficos e histopatológicos de um caso Progressive myoclonic epilepsy: clinical, polygraphic and histopathological aspects. A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wilson Luiz Sanvito

    1973-06-01

    Full Text Available É relatado um caso caracterizado clinicamente por crises mioclônicas, crises convulsivas do tipo grande mal e rebaixamento mental progressivo. O estudo histo-patológico revelou a presença de corpúsculos intracitoplasmáticos no sistema nervoso central, com as características dos corpúsculos de Lafora. São feitas considerações clínicas, poligráficas, histopatológicas e etiopatogênicas a propósito da epilepsia mioclônica progressiva.A case with myoclonic jerks, grand mal convulsions and progressive mental retardation is reported. The patient died after 4 years and 10 months of disease, and a sister began with similar simptomatology at this time. By histopathological study there were found intracitoplasmatic bodies in the cerebral cortex, basal ganglia, cerebelum and myocardium. Some considerations are made about clinical, polygraphic histological and etiopathogenic aspects.

  16. Toxoplasma gondii in raw and dry-cured ham: The influence of the curing process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrero, Laura; Gracia, María Jesús; Pérez-Arquillué, Consuelo; Lázaro, Regina; Herrera, Antonio; Bayarri, Susana

    2017-08-01

    The aim of this work was to analyze Toxoplasma gondii in raw hams by mouse bioassay and to evaluate the effect of curing on the viability of the parasite to assess the risk of infection from eating dry-cured ham. After a serology study of 1200 pigs in Aragón (Spain), forty-one naturally infected pigs with different serological titers against T. gondii were selected. Two cured periods (9 and 12 months) were evaluated as well as the influence of the physicochemical composition of hams on T. gondii survival. Although the parasite burden was low, a high number of seropositive pigs with Toxoplasma tissues cysts in raw hams were found (31.6%). Viability of T. gondii was influenced by the curing, with statistically significant differences between fresh and cured hams (p < 0.001). The viability was higher in hams cured for 9 months compared to those cured for 12 months. However, this period of curing resulted in the reduction but not in a complete elimination of the risk. Thus, from a public health point of view, under the conditions of this study it is safer to consume dry-cured ham with periods of curing higher than 12 months. Analysis of physicochemical results did not identify any variable with significant influence on the presence and viability of T. gondii in cured ham, but loss of viability of T. gondii was observed in hams with a lower fat content. Further research is required to validate combinations of salts concentration and time of curing that can be used as preventive measures in the HACCP system of dry-cured ham industry. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Subpial transection surgery for epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnaiah, Balaji; Ramaratnam, Sridharan; Ranganathan, Lakshmi Narasimhan

    2015-12-03

    Nearly 30% of patients with epilepsy continue to have seizures in spite of using several antiepileptic drug (AED) regimens. Such patients are regarded as having refractory, or uncontrolled, epilepsy. No definition of uncontrolled, or medically refractory, epilepsy has been universally accepted, but for the purposes of this review, we will consider seizures as drug resistant if they have failed to respond to a minimum of two AEDs. It is believed that early surgical intervention may prevent seizures at a younger age, which, in turn, may improve the intellectual and social status of children. Many types of surgery are available for treatment of refractory epilepsy; one such procedure is known as subpial transection. To determine the benefits and adverse effects of subpial transection for partial-onset seizures and generalised tonic-clonic seizures in children and adults. We searched the Cochrane Epilepsy Group Specialised Register (29 June 2015), the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL; May 2015, Issue 5) and MEDLINE (1946 to 29 June 2015). We imposed no language restrictions. We considered all randomised and quasi-randomised parallel-group studies, whether blinded or non-blinded. Two review authors (BK and SR) independently screened trials identified by the search. The same two review authors planned to independently assess the methodological quality of studies. When studies were identified for inclusion, one review author would have extracted the data, and the other would have verified the data. We found no relevant studies. We found no evidence to support or refute use of subpial transection surgery for patients with medically refractory epilepsy. Well-designed randomised controlled trials are needed to guide clinical practice.

  18. Alternative approaches to epilepsy treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McElroy-Cox, Caitlin

    2009-07-01

    Complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) is a diverse group of health care practices and products that fall outside the realm of traditional Western medical theory and practice and that are used to complement or replace conventional medical therapies. The use of CAM has increased over the past two decades, and surveys have shown that up to 44% of patients with epilepsy are using some form of CAM treatment. This article reviews the CAM modalities of meditation, yoga, relaxation techniques, biofeedback, nutritional and herbal supplements, dietary measures, chiropractic care, acupuncture, Reiki, and homeopathy and what is known about their potential efficacy in patients with epilepsy.

  19. [Attitudes toward epilepsy in Majorca].

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Mas, A; Rossiñol Far; Tsackos Moratalla, A; Roca Bennasar, M

    1989-01-01

    We created a questionnaire in order to evaluate the attitude toward epilepsy among the general population in Majorca Island, Spain. We made 1,164 interviews, divided fifty per cent between city and rural inhabitants. We studied the level of epilepsy knowledge in the population, and we compared the evolution of positive attitude of our study with others from Spain and the USA. We also studied the relationship between the variables considered and the two basic attitudes (integration-positive and stigmatization-negative). These two patterns were suggested to be associated with several trends of the population.

  20. [Mineral water as a cure].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nocco, Priska Binz

    2008-01-01

    The treatment of diseases with mineral spring water belongs to the oldest medical therapies. The "remedy" mineral water is therefore of importance also within the pharmacy. The present pharmacy historical work examines the impact of the use of mineral waters, as well as of their dried components, as therapeutic agents in the 19th and early 20th centuries, i.e. from approx. 1810 to 1930, as well as the contributions given by pharmacists in the development and analysis of mineral water springs. Beside these aspects, the aim here is also to describe the role played by pharmacists in the production of artificial mineral water as well as in the sale and wholesale of natural and artificial mineral water. In the first part of this work the situation in Switzerland and its surrounding countries, such as Germany, France, Italy and Austria, is discussed. The second part contains a case-study of the particular situation in the Canton Tessin. It is known from the scientific literature published at that time that information on mineral water was frequently reported. Starting from the beginning of the 19th century the number of such publications increased tremendously. The major part of them were publications in scientific journals or contributions to medical and pharmaceutical manuals and reference books. In particular the spa-related literature, such as spa-guides, was of growing interest to a broad public. The inclusion of monographs into the Swiss, the Cantonal as well the foreign pharmacopoeias granted a legal frame for the mineral waters and their dried components. These works are of major importance from a pharmacy historical standpoint and represent a unique proof of historical evidence of the old medicinal drug heritage. The most frequently used therapies based on mineral waters were drinking and bath cures. Several diseases, particularly those of a chronic character, were treated with mineral waters. The positive influence of these cures on the recovery of the patients

  1. Metabolic epilepsies: approaches to a diagnostic challenge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stöckler-Ipsiroglu, Sylvia; Plecko, Barbara

    2009-08-01

    Although inborn errors of metabolism (IEM) are a relatively rare cause of epilepsy in children, their diagnosis is important with respect to treatment, prognosis and genetic counselling. In addition to seizures and epilepsy, IEM may produce a complex clinical picture in which epilepsy is only one of the various neurologic manifestations including developmental delay/regression, mental retardation, movement disorders, micro-/macrocephaly, as well as cerebral grey and white matter changes. Dysmorphic features and cerebral dysgenesis may also be part of a metabolic epilepsy syndrome (e.g. disorders of peroxisomal biogenesis, glutaric aciduria type 2, pyruvate dehydrogenease complex deficiency). Metabolic epilepsies may dominate the clinical presentation (e.g. pyridoxine dependent epilepsy) or may precede further neurologic deterioration (e.g. neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis) and additional organ involvement (e.g. liver failure in Alpers (POLG1) disease). Metabolic epilepsies often present with myoclonic seizures (e.g. Gaucher Disease type 3, mitochondrial syndromes) and, as a rule, patients presenting with predominantly myoclonic seizures should be carefully investigated for these types of metabolic epilepsies. Patients with very early onset of epilepsy are considered at high risk for an underlying IEM as well. In this review we present an overview of metabolic epilepsies based on various criteria such as treatability, age of onset, seizure type, and pathogenetic background. Exemplary disorders will be described in more detail including cerebral glucose transporter (GLUT1) deficiency, pyridoxine dependent epilepsy, neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis, cathepsin D deficiency, Alpers syndrome (POLG deficiency), and guanidinoacetate methyltransferase (GAMT) deficiency.

  2. [Juvenile myoclonic epilepsy: under-diagnosed syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bozić, Ksenija; Bukurov, Ksenija Gebauer; Slankamenac, Petar; Pogancev, Marija Knezević; Sekulić, Slobodan

    2011-01-01

    Juvenile myoclonic epilepsy is an idiopathic, hereditary form of epilepsy. Although juvenile myoclonic epilepsy is a well defined clinical syndrome, attempts at diagnosing it commonly fail. ETIOPATHOGENESIS: The exact cause of juvenile myoclonic epilepsy remains unknown. Clinical, morphological and metabolic data suggest a preferential role for frontal regions in this syndrome. Several major genes for juvenile myoclonic epilepsy have been identified, but these genes account for only a small proportions of juvenile myoclonic epilepsy cases, suggesting multifactorial or complex inheritance in most. Juvenile myoclonic epilepsy is characterized by the triad of myoclonic jerks on awakening (all patients), generalized tonic-clonic seizures (> 90% of patients) and typical absences (about one third of patients). Seizures have an age-related onset, circadian distribution and are frequently precipitated by sleep deprivation, fatigue and alcohol intake. Intelligence is normal. Juvenile myoclonic epilepsy diagnosis is based upon clinical criteria and typical electroencephalographic findings (generalized pattern of spikes and/or polyspikes and waves). All other tests are normal. Both medical treatment and counselling are important in the management of juvenile myoclonic epilepsy. Mono-therapy with valproate is the preferred treatment. Some of the newer antiepileptic drugs have been suggested as possible alternatives. Juvenile myoclonic epilepsy has a good prognosis. Lifelong treatment is usually considered necessary in vast majority of patients due to the increased risk of relapse if treatment is discontinued. Juvenile myoclonic epilepsy is a common, although under-diagnosed epileptic syndrome. The clinician should study the occurrence of myoclonic jerks and should consider atypical presentations.

  3. Parental Infertility, Fertility Treatment, and Childhood Epilepsy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kettner, Laura O.; Ramlau-Hansen, Cecilia H.; Kesmodel, Ulrik S.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: A few studies have indicated an increased risk of epilepsy in children conceived by fertility treatment possibly due to characteristics of the infertile couple rather than the treatment. We therefore aimed to investigate the association between parental infertility, fertility treatment......, and epilepsy in the offspring, including the subtypes of epilepsy; idiopathic generalised epilepsy and focal epilepsy. METHODS: This cohort included all pregnancies resulting in liveborn singletons from the Aarhus Birth Cohort, Denmark (1995-2013). Information on time to pregnancy and fertility treatment....... RESULTS: A total of 60 440 pregnancies were included, and 0.8% of the children developed epilepsy.The primary analyses showed no association between parental infertility or fertility treatment, and the overall risk of childhood epilepsy (hazard rate ratios (HRs); 95% confidence intervals (CIs): 1.08 (0...

  4. Quand la biopsie cutanee peut etiqueter une epilepsie

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taoufiq Harmouch

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available La maladie de Lafora (ML represente une forme rare et grave d�epilepsie myoclonique progressive. C�est une affection a transmission autosomique recessive, heterogene sur le plan genetique. Nous rapportons le cas d�une adolescente de 16 ans, issue de parents consanguins de premier degre, qui presente depuis l�age de 14 ans des crises d�epilepsie et des myoclonies. L'examen neurologique a montre un syndrome cerebelleux et une deterioration intellectuelle. La biopsie cutanee etait indispensable pour orienter le diagnostic. La ML a un pronostic constamment fatal. L�etude histologique confirme le diagnostic et l�etude moleculaire peut aider a etablir un conseil genetique.

  5. Is There a Cure for Cushing's Syndrome?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Pinterest Email Print Is there a cure for Cushing syndrome? Untreated Cushing syndrome can be life-threatening—fortunately, most people ... their previous strength. People who no longer have Cushing syndrome might be more likely to develop diabetes, ...

  6. The prevention of losses in cured fish

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    1981-01-01

    The paper reviews problems of the post-harvest losses in cured fish. The importance of this commodity in the tropics and existing methods of its handling, processing, storage and distribution are discussed...

  7. Acupuncture on experimental epilepsies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, R C; Huang, Y H

    1984-01-01

    The therapeutic effect of acupuncture on epilepsies was evaluated in 4 experimental models. 24 acupuncture points were tried. In electroconvulsive threshold model, square wave electrical stimulus of 0.2 msec and 6 Hz was applied through a pair of cotton electrodes at the cornea of mice for 3 sec. The stimulus intensity to induce stun reaction of the mouse was compared. In 86 control animals, the stimulus threshold was 0.70 +/- 0.22 mA. In the acupuncture treated group (N = 80), the threshold was 0.75 +/- 0.14 mA. In maximal electroshock model, the stimulus parameters were 60 Hz, 0.4 sec and 75 mA. The tonic extensor response of the hindlimbs of the mice was observed. 75.7% of the 115 control mice and 77.5% of the 80 acupuncture treated mice were observed to have tonic extensor response. In the focal cortical penicillin model, penicillin was applied at the subpial space over the exposed cortex of 24 cats. After the appearance of repeated spikes in ECoG, acupuncture was performed. In 175 trials the interictal spikes were decreased in 16 times, increased in 82 times. In 99 trials during seizures, the ictal activity was decreased in 4 times, increased in 79 times. In the intravenous penicillin model, high dose penicillin (1,000,000-1,500,000 U/kg) was given to 20 cats. It induced repetitive spikes and frequently even seizure discharges in EEG. Acupuncture was then tried. In 192 instances, acupuncture reduced the spikes in 13, increased the spikes in 103 times. In 74 trials during seizures, the ictal activity was suppressed in 4 times and aggravated in 66 times.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  8. Fast Curing of Composite Wood Products

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dr. Arthur J. Ragauskas

    2006-04-26

    The overall objective of this program is to develop low temperature curing technologies for UF and PF resins. This will be accomplished by: • Identifying the rate limiting UF and PF curing reactions for current market resins; • Developing new catalysts to accelerate curing reactions at reduced press temperatures and times. In summary, these new curing technologies will improve the strength properties of the composite wood products and minimize the detrimental effects of wood extractives on the final product while significantly reducing energy costs for wood composites. This study is related to the accelerated curing of resins for wood composites such as medium density fiberboard (MDF), particle board (PB) and oriented strandboard (OSB). The latter is frequently manufactured with a phenol-formaldehyde resin whereas ureaformaldehyde (UF) resins are usually used in for the former two grades of composite wood products. One of the reasons that hinder wider use of these resins in the manufacturing of wood composites is the slow curing speed as well as inferior bondability of UF resin. The fast curing of UP and PF resins has been identified as an attractive process development that would allow wood to be bonded at higher moisture contents and at lower press temperatures that currently employed. Several differing additives have been developed to enhance cure rates of PF resins including the use of organic esters, lactones and organic carbonates. A model compound study by Conner, Lorenz and Hirth (2002) employed 2- and 4-hydroxymethylphenol with organic esters to examine the chemical basis for the reported enhanced reactivity. Their studies suggested that the enhance curing in the presence of esters could be due to enhanced quinone methide formation or enhanced intermolecular SN2 reactions. In either case the esters do not function as true catalysts as they are consumed in the reaction and were not found to be incorporated in the polymerized resin product. An

  9. EVALUATION OF DIELECTRIC CURING MONITORING INVESTIGATING LIGHT-CURING DENTAL FILLING COMPOSITES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johannes Steinhaus

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study is the evaluation of a dielectric analysis (DEA method monitoring the curing behaviour of a light curing dental filling material in real-time. The evaluation is to extract the influence of light intensity on the photo-curing process of dental composite filling materials. The intensity change is obtained by measuring the curing process at different sample depth. It could be shown that increasing sample thickness, and therefore exponentially decreasing light intensity, causes a proportional decrease in the initial curing rate. Nevertheless, the results give rise to the assumption that lower illumination intensities over a long period cause higher overall conversion, and thus better mechanical properties. This would allow for predictions of the impact of different curing-rates on the final mechanical properties.

  10. Effect of cure cycle on curing process and hardness for epoxy resin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available A 3-dimensional finite element model is developed to simulate and analyze the temperature and degree of cure field of epoxy casting part during cure process. The present model based on general finite element software ABAQUS is verified by literature example and experimental data. The numerical results show good agreement with literature example and measured data, and are even more accurate than the simulation of literature. After modeling successfully, the influence of temperature cure cycle ramps have on the temperature and degree of cure gradient is investigated. Moreover, the effect of non-uniform temperature and degree of cure field within epoxy casting part on hardness is demonstrated. The present model provides an accurate and novel method that allows further insight into the process of cure for epoxy resin.

  11. Phthalocyanine Tetraamine Epoxy-Curing Agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fohlen, G. M.; Achar, B. N.; Parker, J. A.

    1986-01-01

    Tough fire- and chemical-resistant epoxies produced by using metalphthalocyanine tetraamines (MPT's) of copper, cobalt, or nickel as curing agents. Synthesis of MPT's commercially realizable and gives pure compounds with almost 90-percent yield. Synthesis applicable for metals with atomic radii of about 1.35 angstroms, including Cu, Co, Ni, Zn, Fe, Pt, Al, and V. Possible to use metal phthalocyanines to cure epoxy resins in homogeneous reaction.

  12. [To be cured of breast cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bobin, Jean-Yves; Guiochet, Nicole; Saez, Simone

    2002-06-01

    Can we say the magic word "cured", "cancer free" for breast cancer patients or can we say only survivors? This litterature review was focused on what mean cured of breast cancer with the long term effects on quality of life of locoregional and systemic therapies and the role of breast reconstruction. Finally changes in the intimacy, sex and love live and psychosocial live were stressed.

  13. HIV cure research: a formidable challenge

    OpenAIRE

    Ananworanich, Jintanat; Fauci, Anthony S.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The ultimate goal of HIV cure research is to allow HIV-infected individuals to be free of disease in the absence of antiretroviral therapy. We discuss current directions and future opportunities aimed at achieving sustained virological remission, and possibly eradication. A multidisciplinary approach to HIV cure research will be important, and ethical, social and behavioural research should be conducted in parallel with basic and clinical research.

  14. Attitude towards Epilepsy and Mental Illness in Ekiti State, Nigeria ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Nekky Umera

    Epilepsy can be classified into three major types; grand mal epilepsy, petit mal epilepsy and focal epilepsy. Grandmal ... to poor parenting skills, weak character and inadequate upbringing. Today the majority of these myths have .... Personality and behavioural disorders in adults with epilepsy. In Reynolds E.H. and Trimble ...

  15. Thermal Aging Behaviors of Rubber Vulcanizates Cured with Single and Binary Cure Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Sung Seen; Ha, Sung Ho [Sejong University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Woo, Chang Su [Korea Institute of Machinery and Materials, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2006-03-15

    In general, an accelerated sulfur cure system consists of elemental sulfur, one or two cure accelerators, and cure activators. Crosslink density of a rubber vulcanizate determines the physical properties. By increasing the crosslink density, the modulus, hardness, resilience, and abrasion resistance increase, whereas the elongation at break, heat build-up, and stress relaxation decrease. Sulfur linkages are composed of monosulfide, disulfide, and polysulfides. Sulfur linkages, especially polysulfides, are dissociated by heating and this brings about decrease of the crosslink density.

  16. Cure fraction estimation from the mixture cure models for grouped survival data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Binbing; Tiwari, Ram C; Cronin, Kathleen A; Feuer, Eric J

    2004-06-15

    Mixture cure models are usually used to model failure time data with long-term survivors. These models have been applied to grouped survival data. The models provide simultaneous estimates of the proportion of the patients cured from disease and the distribution of the survival times for uncured patients (latency distribution). However, a crucial issue with mixture cure models is the identifiability of the cure fraction and parameters of kernel distribution. Cure fraction estimates can be quite sensitive to the choice of latency distributions and length of follow-up time. In this paper, sensitivity of parameter estimates under semi-parametric model and several most commonly used parametric models, namely lognormal, loglogistic, Weibull and generalized Gamma distributions, is explored. The cure fraction estimates from the model with generalized Gamma distribution is found to be quite robust. A simulation study was carried out to examine the effect of follow-up time and latency distribution specification on cure fraction estimation. The cure models with generalized Gamma latency distribution are applied to the population-based survival data for several cancer sites from the Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results (SEER) Program. Several cautions on the general use of cure model are advised. Copyright 2004 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  17. Altered DMN functional connectivity and regional homogeneity in partial epilepsy patients: a seventy cases study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Chong-Yu; Gao, Xiaoping; Long, Lili; Long, Xiaoyan; Liu, Chaorong; Chen, Yayu; Xie, Yuanyuan; Liu, Chujuan; Xiao, Bo; Hu, Zhe-Yu

    2017-10-06

    Clinically diagnosed partial epilepsy is hard to be functionally diagnosed by regular electroencephalograph (EEG) and conventional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). By collecting transient brain regional signals, blood oxygenation level-dependent (BOLD) function MRI (BOLD-fMRI) can provide brain function change information with high accuracy. By using resting state BOLD-fMRI technique, we aim to investigate the changes of brain function in partial epilepsy patients. BOLD-fMRI scanning was performed in 70 partial epilepsy and 70 healthy people. BOLD-fMRI data was analyzed by using the Regional Homogeneity (ReHo) method and functional connectivity of Default Mode Network (DMN) methods. The abnormal brain functional connectivity in partial epilepsy patients was detected by Statistical Parametric Mapping 8 (SPM8) analysis. Compared to healthy group, epilepsy patients showed significant decreased ReHo in left inferior parietal lobule/pre- and post-central gyrus, right thalamus/paracentral lobule/Cerebellum anterior and posterior Lobe, bilateral insula. The DMN functional connectivity regions decreased significantly in right uncus, left Inferior parietal lobule, left supramarginal gyrus, left uncus, left parahippocampa gyrus, and left superior temporal gyrus, in epilepsy patients, compared to healthy controls. This study clarified that both ReHo and functional connectivity of DMN decreased in partial epilepsy patients compared to healthy controls. While left inferior parietal lobule was detected in both ReHo and DMN, many other identified regions were different by using these two BOLD-fMRI techniques. We propose that both ReHo and DMN patterns in BOLD-fMRI may suggest networks responsible for partial epilepsy genesis or progression.

  18. of epilepsy in tropical countries

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    OF EPILEPSY IN TROPICAL COUNTRIES. Institut d'Epidémiologie ... country or in different countries (up to 9999 subjects), and .... tal retardation when IQ is between 50 and 70 and severe men- tal retardation when IQ is below 50. The IQ system is not however indispensable and the doctor should do a global eva- luation of ...

  19. ECG changes in epilepsy patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tigaran, S; Rasmussen, V; Dam, M

    1997-01-01

    To investigate the frequency of ECG abnormalities suggestive of myocardial ischaemia in patients with severe drug resistant epilepsy and without any indication of previous cardiac disease, assuming that these changes may be of significance for the group of epileptic patients with sudden unexpected...

  20. Semiology of temporal lobe epilepsies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abou-Khalil, Bassel W

    2003-07-01

    Temporal lobe epilepsies (TLE) represent the majority of the partial symptomatic/cryptogenic epilepsies. Excellent results of epilepsy surgery in well-selected patients have encouraged a search for localizing and lateralizing signs that could assist in the identification of the best surgical candidates. Seizure types in TLE include simple partial, complex partial and secondarily generalized seizures. Temporal lobe seizures most often arise in the amygdalo-hippocampal region. More than 90% of patients with mesial TLE report an aura, most commonly an epigastric sensation that often has a rising character. Other autonomic symptoms, psychic symptoms, and certain sensory phenomena (such as olfactory) also occur. The complex partial seizures of mesial TLE often involve motor arrest, oroalimentary automatisms or non-specific extremity automatisms at onset. Ictal manifestations that have lateralizing value include dystonic posturing (contralateral), early head turning (usually ipsilateral), and adversive head turning in transition to generalization (contralateral). Well-formed ictal language favors right temporal localization. Ictal vomiting, spitting, and drinking tend to be right sided. The duration of TLE complex partial seizures is generally greater than one minute and postictal confusion usually occurs. When postictal aphasia is noted a left-sided lateralization is favored. A lateral temporal onset is less common in TLE, and is most often suggested by an auditory aura. Somatosensory and visual auras are highly unlikely with TLE, and suggest neocortical extratemporal localization. A cephalic aura is non-specific, but is more common in frontal lobe epilepsy.

  1. Imaging of intractable paediatric epilepsy

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2015-12-09

    Dec 9, 2015 ... as refractory and intractable epilepsy. Neuroimaging plays an important role in identifying epileptogenic foci that can be surgically resected. Advances in neuroimaging, including advances in scanner hardware and software, have allowed improved signal-to-noise ratio and achieve faster scan times and ...

  2. Sleep Disorders, Epilepsy, and Autism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malow, Beth A.

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this review article is to describe the clinical data linking autism with sleep and epilepsy and to discuss the impact of treating sleep disorders in children with autism either with or without coexisting epileptic seizures. Studies are presented to support the view that sleep is abnormal in individuals with autistic spectrum…

  3. Neuropsychological Aspects of Epilepsy Surgery

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Alpherts, W.C.J. (Willem Cornelis Johan)

    2003-01-01

    Only a small number of patients with epilepsy undergo a neurosurgical operation in which the area from which epileptic neurons generate seizures is removed. From a neuropsychological perspective several different assessments and outcomes are being looked at. Chapter 2 deals with research on the

  4. APPROACH TO EPILEPSY IN CHILDHOOD

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Enrique

    exclude epilepsy. If the history and/or clinical picture is consistent with a seizure disorder then the child should be managed as such. When to perform neuroimaging. Whenever there are focal features to ... Unusual features in the history or clini- cal presentation ..... with hyperactivity, poor concentration and behavioural ...

  5. Mutations in GRIN2A cause idiopathic focal epilepsy with rolandic spikes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lemke, Johannes R; Lal, Dennis; Reinthaler, Eva M

    2013-01-01

    Idiopathic focal epilepsy (IFE) with rolandic spikes is the most common childhood epilepsy, comprising a phenotypic spectrum from rolandic epilepsy (also benign epilepsy with centrotemporal spikes, BECTS) to atypical benign partial epilepsy (ABPE), Landau-Kleffner syndrome (LKS) and epileptic...

  6. [Epilepsy and disorders of reproduction].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dravecká, I; Lazúrová, I

    2007-01-01

    Epilepsy in women is relatively often linked with reproductive disorders which include polycystic ovarian syndrome, hypothalamic amenorrhea and functional hyperprolactinaemia. These disorders have a significant share in a high incidence of infertility and premature menopause while the polycystic ovarian syndrome, also manifested by the metabolic syndrome, places the affected patients at risk of later consequences such as type 2 diabetes mellitus, cardiovascular diseases including arterial hypertension, gynaecological neoplasias (the breast and the endometrium), and in the case of pregnancy, a higher incidence of pregnancy induced hypertension. Apart from epilepsy as such, also antiepileptic treatment may have negative impact on the female's reproductive functions. In many cases, adverse effects of treatment complicate the patient's life more than the attacks alone. Medication induced weight gain might be responsible for different endocrine diseases (menstruation disorders, polycystic ovarian syndrome, hyperandrogenism). The article analyses the influence of side effects of the different antiepileptic drugs on the development of metabolic and endocrine anomalies. The role of antiepileptic drugs in the development of reproductive and endocrine disorders was first described by Isojarvim in 1993. A high incidence of polycystic ovarian syndrome and/or hyperandrogenism (43%) was observed in women taking valproat, which was clearly higher than in women taking other antiepileptics. Results reported in literature are rather controversial. The article gives an overview of current knowledge with respect to the influence of epilepsy and antiepileptics on the incidence ofpolycystic ovarian syndrome, which is considerably higher in women with epilepsy (10-25%) than in the unaffected population (4-7%), and of the related metabolic syndrome. The article concludes with recommendations for clinical practice in the treatment of epilepsy in women in reproductive age.

  7. Epilepsy in inherited metabolic disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pascual, Juan M; Campistol, Jaume; Gil-Nagel, Antonio

    2008-11-01

    The study of neurometabolic diseases is still in a prolonged preliminary stage. The catalogue of these diseases continues to grow; some known clinical syndromes have been subdivided into a number of variants once the genes that cause them have been identified, and at the same time new metabolic disorders have been discovered that aggravate or contribute to forms of epilepsy not previously classified as cerebral metabolic disorders. This review presents the basic principles underlying the recognition and treatment of epilepsy caused by neurometabolic diseases. These disorders are divided (purely for the sake of convenience) into epilepsy presenting in newborn infants, children, and adolescents and adults, recognizing that there is a significant degree of overlap between these chronological stages. Current analytical methods and therapeutic approaches are summarized both from a general point of view and within the context of each clinical syndrome, acknowledging that each patient presents specific peculiarities and that, in general, antiepileptic drugs provide few benefits compared with more specific types of therapy (eg, special diets or vitamins) when indicated. We also include therapeutic recommendations and a general approach to fulminant epilepsies of neurometabolic origin, emphasizing the importance of identifying all of the proband's relatives who may be potential carriers of a genetic disorder during the diagnostic and genetic counselling process. Particular emphasis is placed on disorders for which there is curative treatment and on the importance of follow-up by expert professionals. It is expected that in a few years' time it will be possible to know the metabolomic profile of these diseases (possibly by non-invasive methods), thus facilitating accurate diagnosis and making it possible to establish the response to treatment and to identify all individuals who are carriers or remain minimally symptomatic in terms of their risk of manifesting or transmitting

  8. Epilepsy and chromosome 18 abnormalities: A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verrotti, Alberto; Carelli, Alessia; di Genova, Lorenza; Striano, Pasquale

    2015-11-01

    To analyze the various types of epilepsy in subjects with chromosome 18 aberrations in order to define epilepsy and its main clinical, electroclinical and prognostic aspects in chromosome 18 anomalies. A careful overview of recent works concerning chromosome 18 aberrations and epilepsy has been carried out considering the major groups of chromosomal 18 aberrations, identified using MEDLINE and EMBASE database from 1980 to 2015. Epilepsy seems to be particularly frequent in patients with trisomy or duplication of chromosome 18 with a prevalence of up to 65%. Approximately, over half of the patients develop epilepsy during the first year of life. Epilepsy can be focal or generalized; infantile spasms have also been reported. Brain imagines showed anatomical abnormalities in 38% of patients. Some antiepileptic drugs as valproic acid and carbamazepine were useful for treating seizures although a large majority of patients need polytherapy. Children with chromosomal 18 abnormalities can present different types of epilepsy, more frequently focal seizures in individuals with 18q- deletion syndrome, while both complex partial seizures and generalized tonic-clonic seizures have been described in patients who suffer for trisomy 18. Outcome in term of seizures frequency and duration seems to be variable and epilepsy is drug resistant in half of the children, especially in children with trisomy 18 and generalized epilepsy. Copyright © 2015 British Epilepsy Association. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Attitudes towards people with epilepsy in Moscow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guekht, Alla; Gersamiya, Anna; Kaimovskiy, Igor; Mizinova, Maria; Yakovlev, Alexander; Shpak, Alexander

    2017-05-01

    To assess the knowledge and attitudes in Moscow towards people with epilepsy (PWE). Data were collected from 1167 adults, permanent residents of Moscow, who were interviewed. A 10-item questionnaire was used addressing three major domains: familiarity with epilepsy (2 questions), understanding of epilepsy (5 questions), and attitude towards the PWE (3 questions). Results were standardized to the Moscow population. The study population was generally well informed about epilepsy. About 80% "has heard" of epilepsy; however, personal acquaintance with PWE was reported by less than half of the study participants. The level of understanding of the disease and its etiology was quite low. About 60% of the survey participants believed that epilepsy was a type of mental retardation. One-third (34%) of respondents were afraid to stay in the proximity of PWE. Only 38% of the survey participants considered epilepsy to be curable; men significantly less frequently than women. Overall, the level of understanding of epilepsy was proportional to the level of education of respondents. Negative attitudes towards PWE were demonstrated in a significant part of the population. Almost half of the respondents would object to their child playing or studying with a child who has epilepsy and more than half (57%) were against the marriage of their daughter or son to a person with epilepsy. Two-fifths of the respondents ranked epilepsy as the "least preferred" of the six chronic diseases for a colleague. This is the first study on awareness and attitudes to PWE in the adult population of Moscow. The study demonstrated that the general public is familiar with epilepsy, but has a rather low level of understanding of essential aspects of the disease. There is an overall high level of negative attitudes towards PWE in Russia, creating a need for targeted interventions. These results reinforced the importance of public education in reducing the stigma of epilepsy. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc

  10. Polymerization of a dual-cured cement through ceramic: LED curing light vs halogen lamp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopes, Lawrence Gonzaga; Franco, Eduardo Batista; Name Neto, Abrão; Herrera, Francyle S; Kurachi, Cristina; Castañeda-Espinosa, Juan C; Lauris, José Roberto Pereira

    2004-12-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of light source, LED unit and halogen lamp (HL), on the effectiveness of Enforce dual-cured cement cured under a ceramic disc. Three exposure times (60, 80 and 120 s) were also evaluated. Two experimental groups, in which the polymerization of the dual-cured cement was performed through a ceramic disc, and two control groups, in which the polymerization of the dual-cured cement was performed directly without presence of ceramic disc were subdivided into three subgroups (three different exposure times), with five specimens each: G1A- HL 60s; G1B- HL 80s; G1C- HL 120s; G2A- LED 60s; G2B- LED 80s; G2C- LED 120s; and control groups: G3A- HL 60s; G3B- HL 80s; G3C- HL 120s; G4A- LED 60s; G4B- LED 80s and G4C- LED 120s. Cement was applied in a steel matrix (4mm diameter, 1.2mm thickness). In the experimental groups, a ceramic disc was placed on top. The cement was light-cured through the ceramic by a HL and LED, however, the control groups were cured without the ceramic disc. The specimens were stored in a light-proof container at 37ºC for 24 hours, then Vickers hardness was determined. A four-way ANOVA and Tukey test (p£ 0.05) were performed. All specimens cured by LED for 60s showed inferior values compared with the halogen groups. In general, light-curing by LED for 80s and 120s was comparable to halogen groups (60s and 80s) and their control groups. LED technology can be viable for light-curing through conventional ceramic indirect restorations, when curing time is increased in relation to HL curing time.

  11. Neurofibrillary tangle pathology and Braak staging in chronic epilepsy in relation to traumatic brain injury and hippocampal sclerosis: a post-mortem study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Joan Y.W.; Thompson, Pam; Phadke, Rahul; Narkiewicz, Marta; Martinian, Lillian; Marsdon, Derek; Koepp, Matthias; Caboclo, Luis; Catarino, Claudia B.; Sisodiya, Sanjay M.

    2011-01-01

    The long-term pathological effects of chronic epilepsy on normal brain ageing are unknown. Previous clinical and epidemiological studies show progressive cognitive decline in subsets of patients and an increased prevalence of Alzheimer's disease in epilepsy. In a post-mortem series of 138 patients with long-term, mainly drug-resistant epilepsy, we carried out Braak staging for Alzheimer's disease neurofibrillary pathology using tau protein immunohistochemistry. The stages were compared with clinicopathological factors, including seizure history and presence of old traumatic brain injury. Overall, 31% of cases were Braak Stage 0, 36% Stage I/II, 31% Stage III/IV and 2% Stage V/VI. The mean age at death was 56.5 years and correlated with Braak stage (P epilepsy series (P type (generalized or complex partial), seizure frequency, age of onset and duration of epilepsy with Braak stage although higher Braak stages were noted with focal more than with generalized epilepsy syndromes (P epilepsy although progression to high Braak stages was infrequent. Traumatic brain injury, but not seizures, was associated with tau protein accumulation in this series. It is likely that Alzheimer's disease pathology is not the sole explanation for cognitive decline associated with epilepsy. PMID:21903728

  12. Determinant of flexible Parametric Estimation of Mixture Cure ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Cure models are survival models basically developed to estimate the proportion of patients cured in a clinical trial. These models estimate the cured proportion and also the probability of survival. Cure models are a special type of survival analysis model where it is assumed that there are a proportion of subjects who will ...

  13. Detection of Toxoplasma gondii in cured meats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warnekulasuriya, M R; Johnson, J D; Holliman, R E

    1998-12-22

    Congenital toxoplasmosis is associated with acute maternal infection acquired during or shortly before the pregnancy. The mother's infection is initiated by the ingestion of one of the life forms of the parasite but the relative importance of the different sources of toxoplasmosis are not established. Recent epidemiological studies have confirmed ingestion of raw meats as a risk factor but also identified consumption of cured meats as being associated with acute toxoplasmosis in pregnancy. There is little existing information concerning the efficiency of commercial curing processes for inactivating Toxoplasma gondii. We sought to detect the presence of T. gondii in ready-to-eat cured meat samples by amplification of the parasite's P30 gene using the polymerase chain reaction (PCR). In addition, tissue culture was used in order to isolate viable parasites. Laboratory inoculated specimens were used to assess the sensitivity of each method. PCR was able to detect parasite contamination down to a level of 5 x 10(3) trophozoites/g while viable toxoplasma could be detected in tissue culture at a level of 10(3) trophozoites/g cured meat. The high salt content of some cured meats limited sensitivity of the PCR assay by inhibition of the polymerase enzyme and reduced the sensitivity of tissue culture due to osmotic pressure causing cytopathic effect. However viable T. gondii was detected in one out of 67 ready-to-eat cured meat samples. Our results highlight the need for improved methods for detecting toxoplasma contamination of food. Health implications of consuming cured meats in pregnancy require careful consideration.

  14. Genetics Home Reference: autosomal dominant nocturnal frontal lobe epilepsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Twitter Home Health Conditions ADNFLE Autosomal dominant nocturnal frontal lobe epilepsy Printable PDF Open All Close All Enable ... the expand/collapse boxes. Description Autosomal dominant nocturnal frontal lobe epilepsy ( ADNFLE ) is an uncommon form of epilepsy ...

  15. Antiphospholipid antibodies in children and adolescents with epilepsy

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Ehab

    prothrombin antibodies in young patients with epilepsy. Epilepsia. 2002; 43(1): 52-9. 7. Commission on Classification and Terminology of the International League Against Epilepsy. Proposal for revised classification of epilepsies and epileptic.

  16. Long-Term Social Outcomes in Childhood Epilepsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Gordon Millichap

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Population-based longitudinal and cross-sectional studies of social outcomes of children with epilepsy in different countries are reviewed by researchers at Dalhousie University, Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada.Epilepsy, Chronic Disease, Idiopathic Epilepsy.

  17. Genetics Home Reference: pyridoxal 5'-phosphate-dependent epilepsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 5'-phosphate-dependent epilepsy Pyridoxal 5'-phosphate-dependent epilepsy Printable PDF Open All Close All Enable Javascript ... expand/collapse boxes. Description Pyridoxal 5'-phosphate-dependent epilepsy is a condition that involves seizures beginning soon ...

  18. Spectrum of Idiopathic Rolandic Epilepsy Syndromes and Behavioral Correlates

    OpenAIRE

    J Gordon Millichap

    2007-01-01

    The natural history of benign childhood epilepsy with centrotemporal spikes (BCECTS), BCECTS Plus syndromes, Rolandic epilepsy-related syndromes, and idiopathic benign childhood epilepsy with occipital spikes (Panayiotopoulos syndrome) is reviewed by researchers at Maggiore Hospital, Bologna, Italy.

  19. Chronotypes in Patients with Epilepsy: Does the Type of Epilepsy Make a Difference?

    OpenAIRE

    Hallie Kendis; Kelly Baron; Schuele, Stephan U.; Bhavita Patel; Hrayr Attarian

    2015-01-01

    Circadian rhythms govern all biological functions. Circadian misalignment has a major impact on health. Late chronotype is a risk factor for circadian misalignment which in turn can affect the control of seizures in epilepsy patients. We compared a group of 87 confirmed epilepsy patients regardless of subtypes with age- and sex-matched healthy controls. We compared generalized epilepsy patients with localization related epilepsy patients and with healthy controls. We found that primary genera...

  20. Accelerated cure of phenol-formaldehyde by the addition of cure accelerators : studies with model compounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linda F. Lorenz; Anthony C. Conner

    2000-01-01

    Fast curing phenol-formaldehyde (PF) resins could potentially allow wood to be bonded at higher moisture contents and at lower press temperatures than those currently used commercially. Recent reports in the literature have shown that the addition of esters, lactones, or organic carbonates increased the curing rate of PF resins. Several mechanisms have been proposed to...

  1. Stigma and quality of life at long-term follow-up after surgery for epilepsy in Uganda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fletcher, Anita; Sims-Williams, Helen; Wabulya, Angela; Boling, Warren

    2015-11-01

    Epilepsy is a worldwide health problem with a 10-fold greater prevalence in the developing world. Commonly, the seizure focus is in the temporal lobe, and seizures in about 30% of people with epilepsy are intractable to medication. For these individuals, surgery for intractable temporal lobe epilepsy (iTLE) is more effective than medication alone and may be the only option for cure. Intractable temporal lobe epilepsy is associated with elevated morbidity and mortality, reduced quality of life (QOL), and associated stigma particularly occurring in the developing world. Individuals with intractable epilepsy who participated in an earlier Uganda pilot study were selected for the current study based on their undergoing previous surgery for iTLE or having comparable seizure type who did not have surgery. At long-term follow-up, 10 who underwent surgery for iTLE in addition to 9 patients with focal dyscognitive type epilepsy who did not have surgery were evaluated in the current study. Tests were administered to look at various outcome parameters: seizure severity, QOL, stigma, and self-esteem. Stigma and self-esteem were additionally evaluated in the parent/caregiver. Seventy-percent of surgical resection patients were seizure-free at 8 years postsurgery. The QOLIE-31 scores were higher in surgical patients. Child/patient and parent/proxy surveys identified lower stigma in seizure-free patients. The results suggest that surgery for iTLE is an effective treatment for epilepsy in the developing world and provides an opportunity to reduce stigma and improve QOL. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Psychosocial, demographic, and treatment-seeking strategic behavior, including faith healing practices, among patients with epilepsy in northwest India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pal, Surender Kumar; Sharma, Krishan; Prabhakar, Sudesh; Pathak, Ashis

    2008-08-01

    The data on sociocultural, demographic, and psychosocial aspects and types of treatment strategies adopted by families of patients with epilepsy in northwestern India were collected by the interview schedule method from 400 patients (200 idiopathic and 200 symptomatic) at the outpatient department of the Neurology and Epilepsy Clinic of the Postgraduate Institute of Medical Education and Research (PGIMER), Chandigarh, India. Epilepsy was classified as idiopathic or symptomatic on the basis of clinical tests (EEG, CT scan, and MRI). It was observed that socioeconomic factors had no bearing on epilepsy in the present sample. Early onset, that is, before 20 years of age, reduced the chances of patients' finding a spouse among those who disclosed the disease information, thereby impacting the nuptial and fertility rates of patients with epilepsy. The present sample of patients was well informed about and sensitized to the efficacy of the modern system of medicine, as 80% of patients sought medical treatment on the very same day as or within a week of onset of seizures. The data were compatible with the framed hypothesis that well-being and safety of the patient would override the stigma burden factor, as 94% of the affected families made no attempt to hide the disease from their neighbors, friends, and colleagues, and teachers of the affected patients. Surprisingly, only 7.5% of the families admitted that they consulted a faith healer. Families did adopt some culturally prevalent methods to control involuntary movements during seizures. It can be concluded that trust in faith healers exists strongly as an undercurrent, but is not overtly admitted by the majority of patients. Some families concurrently visited modern hospitals and occult healers seeking a cure for the disease. The fear of having a child with epilepsy or other abnormalities discouraged married patients from becoming pregnant after developing epilepsy.

  3. History of Neuropsychology Through Epilepsy Eyes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loring, David W.

    2010-01-01

    In the 19th century, Hughlings Jackson relied on clinical history, seizure semiology, and the neurologic examination as methods for seizure localization to inform the first epilepsy surgeries. In the 20th century, psychological and neuropsychological tests were first employed as both diagnostic and prognostic measures. The contemporary practice of epilepsy evaluation and management includes neuropsychology as a critical component of epilepsy care and research, and epilepsy and neuropsychology have enjoyed a very special and synergistic relationship. This paper reviews how epilepsy has shaped the practice of neuropsychology as a clinical service by asking critical questions that only neuropsychologists were in a position to answer, and how clinical care of epilepsy patients has been significantly improved based on neuropsychology's unique contributions. PMID:20395259

  4. Efficacy of the Danish epilepsy surgery programme

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holm, E; Foged, M T; Beniczky, S

    2018-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Despite optimal medical treatment, approximately one-third of patients with epilepsy continue to have seizures. Epilepsy surgery is widely accepted as a therapeutic option in the selected subset of patients with drug-resistant focal epilepsy. Here, we report the results of the Danish...... epilepsy surgery programme from 2009 to 2014. MATERIAL AND METHODS: A total of 169 consecutive patients, operated at Rigshospitalet, were included. Information was gathered from digital patient records. Before 1-year follow-up, two patients were lost to follow-up and three were referred to new surgery...... lobe after ICR were free of disabling seizures. 12% of MTLE patients developed de novo depression after epilepsy surgery despite good surgical outcome. Three patients required rehabilitation due to post-operative hemiplegia. CONCLUSION: The outcomes of the Danish epilepsy surgery programme align...

  5. Focal epilepsy in the Belgian shepherd

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berendt, Mette; Gulløv, Christina Hedal; Fredholm, Merete

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To establish the mode of inheritance and describe the clinical features of epilepsy in the Belgian shepherd, taking the outset in an extended Danish dog family (199 individuals) of Groenendael and Tervueren with accumulated epilepsy. METHODS: Epilepsy positive individuals (living...... and deceased) were ascertained through a telephone interview using a standardised questionnaire regarding seizure history and phenomenology. Living dogs were invited to a detailed clinical evaluation. Litters more than five years of age, or where epilepsy was present in all offspring before the age of five......, were included in the calculations of inheritance. results: Out of 199 family members, 66 dogs suffered from epilepsy. The prevalence of epilepsy in the family was 33%. Fifty-five dogs experienced focal seizures with or without secondary generalisation, while four dogs experienced primary generalised...

  6. History of neuropsychology through epilepsy eyes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loring, David W

    2010-06-01

    In the 19th century, Hughlings Jackson relied on clinical history, seizure semiology, and the neurologic examination as methods for seizure localization to inform the first epilepsy surgeries. In the 20th century, psychological and neuropsychological tests were first employed as both diagnostic and prognostic measures. The contemporary practice of epilepsy evaluation and management includes neuropsychology as a critical component of epilepsy care and research, and epilepsy and neuropsychology have enjoyed a very special and synergistic relationship. This paper reviews how epilepsy has shaped the practice of neuropsychology as a clinical service by asking critical questions that only neuropsychologists were in a position to answer, and how clinical care of epilepsy patients has been significantly improved based on neuropsychology's unique contributions.

  7. Epilepsy, cognition, and neuropsychiatry (Epilepsy, Brain, and Mind, part 2)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korczyn, Amos D.; Schachter, Steven C.; Brodie, Martin J.; Dalal, Sarang S.; Engel, Jerome; Guekht, Alla; Hecimovic, Hrvoje; Jerbi, Karim; Kanner, Andres M.; Landmark, Cecilie Johannessen; Mares, Pavel; Marusic, Petr; Meletti, Stefano; Mula, Marco; Patsalos, Philip N.; Reuber, Markus; Ryvlin, Philippe; Štillová, Klára; Tuchman, Roberto; Rektor, Ivan

    2016-01-01

    Epilepsy is, of course, not one disease but rather a huge number of disorders that can present with seizures. In common, they all reflect brain dysfunction. Moreover, they can affect the mind and, of course, behavior. While animals too may suffer from epilepsy, as far as we know, the electrical discharges are less likely to affect the mind and behavior, which is not surprising. While the epileptic seizures themselves are episodic, the mental and behavioral changes continue, in many cases, interictally. The episodic mental and behavioral manifestations are more dramatic, while the interictal ones are easier to study with anatomical and functional studies. The following extended summaries complement those presented in Part 1. PMID:23764496

  8. Managing Epilepsy Well: Emerging e-Tools for epilepsy self-management

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Shegog, Ross; Bamps, Yvan A.; Patel, Archna; Kakacek, Jody; Escoffery, Cam; Johnson, Erica K.; Ilozumba, Ukwuoma O.

    2013-01-01

    The Managing Epilepsy Well (MEW) Network was established in 2007 by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Epilepsy Program to expand epilepsy self-management research. The network has employed collaborative research strategies to develop, test, and disseminate evidence-based,

  9. International veterinary epilepsy task force consensus proposal : diagnostic approach to epilepsy in dogs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Risio, Luisa; Bhatti, Sofie; Muñana, Karen; Penderis, Jacques; Stein, Veronika; Tipold, Andrea; Berendt, Mette; Farqhuar, Robyn; Fischer, Andrea; Long, Sam; Mandigers, Paul J J; Matiasek, Kaspar; Packer, Rowena M A; Pakozdy, Akos; Patterson, Ned; Platt, Simon; Podell, Michael; Potschka, Heidrun; Batlle, Martí Pumarola; Rusbridge, Clare; Volk, Holger A

    2015-01-01

    This article outlines the consensus proposal on diagnosis of epilepsy in dogs by the International Veterinary Epilepsy Task Force. The aim of this consensus proposal is to improve consistency in the diagnosis of epilepsy in the clinical and research settings. The diagnostic approach to the patient

  10. Chronotypes in Patients with Epilepsy: Does the Type of Epilepsy Make a Difference?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kendis, Hallie; Baron, Kelly; Schuele, Stephan U; Patel, Bhavita; Attarian, Hrayr

    2015-01-01

    Circadian rhythms govern all biological functions. Circadian misalignment has a major impact on health. Late chronotype is a risk factor for circadian misalignment which in turn can affect the control of seizures in epilepsy patients. We compared a group of 87 confirmed epilepsy patients regardless of subtypes with age- and sex-matched healthy controls. We compared generalized epilepsy patients with localization related epilepsy patients and with healthy controls. We found that primary generalized epilepsy patients were 5 times more likely to have a late chronotype than healthy controls. We did not find any significant differences between localization related epilepsy patients and healthy controls or between the overall epilepsy cohort and healthy controls. Generalized epilepsy patients are more likely to be evening types as compared to those with focal epilepsy or subjects without epilepsy. Epilepsy patients do not experience the same age related increase in morningness as do age-matched healthy controls. This is important in regard to timing of AED, identifying and preventing sleep deprivation, and integrating chronotype evaluations and chronotherapy in comprehensive epilepsy care. Further studies, using objective phase markers or the impact of chronotherapy on seizure control, are necessary.

  11. Imaging structural and functional brain networks in temporal lobe epilepsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernhardt, Boris C.; Hong, SeokJun; Bernasconi, Andrea; Bernasconi, Neda

    2013-01-01

    Early imaging studies in temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) focused on the search for mesial temporal sclerosis, as its surgical removal results in clinically meaningful improvement in about 70% of patients. Nevertheless, a considerable subgroup of patients continues to suffer from post-operative seizures. Although the reasons for surgical failure are not fully understood, electrophysiological and imaging data suggest that anomalies extending beyond the temporal lobe may have negative impact on outcome. This hypothesis has revived the concept of human epilepsy as a disorder of distributed brain networks. Recent methodological advances in non-invasive neuroimaging have led to quantify structural and functional networks in vivo. While structural networks can be inferred from diffusion MRI tractography and inter-regional covariance patterns of structural measures such as cortical thickness, functional connectivity is generally computed based on statistical dependencies of neurophysiological time-series, measured through functional MRI or electroencephalographic techniques. This review considers the application of advanced analytical methods in structural and functional connectivity analyses in TLE. We will specifically highlight findings from graph-theoretical analysis that allow assessing the topological organization of brain networks. These studies have provided compelling evidence that TLE is a system disorder with profound alterations in local and distributed networks. In addition, there is emerging evidence for the utility of network properties as clinical diagnostic markers. Nowadays, a network perspective is considered to be essential to the understanding of the development, progression, and management of epilepsy. PMID:24098281

  12. Neurosteroid Replacement Therapy for Catamenial Epilepsy

    OpenAIRE

    Reddy, Doodipala S.; Rogawski, Michael A.

    2009-01-01

    Perimenstural catamenial epilepsy, the cyclical occurrence of seizure exacerbations near the time of menstruation, affects a high proportion of women of reproductive age with drug refractory epilepsy. Enhanced seizure susceptibility in perimenstrual catamenial epilepsy is believed to be due to the withdrawal of the progesterone-derived GABAA receptor modulating neurosteroid allopregnanolone as a result of the fall in progesterone at the time of menstruation. Studies in a rat pseudopregnancy m...

  13. Brain SPECT imaging in temporal lobe epilepsy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krausz, Y.; Yaffe, S.; Atlan, H. (Hadassah Univ. Hospital, Jerusalem (Israel). Dept. of Medical Biophysics and Nuclear Medicine); Cohen, D. (Hadassah Univ. Hospital, Jerusalem (Israel). Dept. of Radiology); Konstantini, S. (Hadassah Univ. Hospital, Jerusalem (Israel). Dept. of Neurosurgery); Meiner, Z. (Hadassah Univ. Hospital, Jerusalem (Israel). Dept. of Neurology)

    1991-06-01

    Temporal lobe epilepsy is diagnosed by clinical symptoms and signs and by localization of an epileptogenic focus. A brain SPECT study of two patients with temporal lobe epilepsy, using {sup 99m}Tc-HMPAO, was used to demonstrate a perfusion abnormality in the temporal lobe, while brain CT and MRI were non-contributory. The electroencephalogram, though abnormal, did not localize the diseased area. The potential role of the SPECT study in diagnosis and localization of temporal lobe epilepsy is discussed. (orig.).

  14. Sleep disordered breathing in patients with epilepsy

    OpenAIRE

    Vengamma B; Vijayabhaskara Rao J; Mohan A

    2016-01-01

    Background:Sleep has long been known to affect epilepsy. Little has been documented regarding the epidemiology of sleep disordered breathing (SDB) in patients with epilepsy from India. Methods:Between April 2009 and September 2011, in the first stage of the study, 452 consecutive patients with epilepsy (cases) and 500 age- and gender-matched normal control subjects were screened using Epworth’s Sleepiness Scale (ESS). Of these, 98 (23%) had an ESS score of 10 or more, suggestive of exce...

  15. International Veterinary Epilepsy Task Force consensus proposal

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bhatti, Sofie F M; De Risio, Luisa; Muñana, Karen

    2015-01-01

    with the initial drug is unsatisfactory, and 4) when treatment changes should be considered. In this consensus proposal, an overview is given on the aim of AED treatment, when to start long-term treatment in canine epilepsy and which veterinary AEDs are currently in use for dogs. The consensus proposal for drug...... for the management of canine idiopathic epilepsy. Furthermore, for the management of structural epilepsy AEDs are inevitable in addition to treating the underlying cause, if possible....

  16. Diverse perspectives on developments in epilepsy surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Sarah J.; Engel, Jerome

    2010-01-01

    The objective of this article is to review the dramatic changes that have occurred in the field of epilepsy surgery since the founding of Epilepsy Action in 1950. We have chosen to consider these advances from the biomedical perspective (the physician and basic scientist), and the behavioral perspective (the psychologist and the patient). Both of these viewpoints are equally important in understanding the evolution of epilepsy surgery over the past 60 years, but may not always be well synchronized. PMID:21093313

  17. Kinetic Analysis of Mica Tape Curing Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radek Polansky

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Curing program of thermoset insulating materials and its responsible setting has the key importance for assurance of high quality and reliability of electrical devices. It is possible to determine parameters of this program (temperature and time of curing by several ways in practise. There is mostly focused on methods based on kinetic analysis. The result comparison of selected methods of kinetic analysis and residual enthalpy measurement is the main aim of the paper. Two insulating tapes were chosen for the purpose of this study. These tapes correspond in their composition (glass fabric, mica and epoxy binder, but they differ in curing agent type. Simultaneous thermal analysis (STA was used during the measurements. Monitored results demonstrate the advantages and disadvantages of particular methods.

  18. Perampanel: An audit of clinical experience using the epilepsy electronic patient record.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Ryan, E

    2016-07-01

    Perampanel is a non-competitive antagonist of AMPA glutamate receptors on post synaptic neurons. The aim of this study was to conduct an audit of the experience of perampanel treatment in Ireland based on the interrogation of the national epilepsy electronic patient record (EPR). A retrospective audit was compiled which reviewed the progress of patients who had been treated across two regional epilepsy centres. The EPR was used to identify patients and collect information relevant to their perampanel therapy. Collected data was entered into a statistical package for social sciences for analysis using descriptive statistics.\\r\

  19. [Characteristics of Geriatric Epilepsy Can Include Dementia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishigaki, Seiichiro; Kawamura, Mitsuru; Ono, Kenjiro

    2017-10-01

    Japan has become a "super-aged" society, in which more than 20% of the population is over the age of 65 years. As the incidence rates of both dementia and epilepsy are high in elderly individuals, the prevalence rates of dementia and epilepsy have both increased in recent years. Dementia and epilepsy are often characterized by ambiguous symptoms, with numerous concomitant symptoms observed in these patients. Moreover, many reports indicate that the forgetfulness observed in dementia patients was actually due to the occurrence of epileptic seizures. Because Japan is currently a super-aged society, it is important to understand the characteristics of and relationships between dementia and epilepsy.

  20. Neurosteroid Replacement Therapy for Catamenial Epilepsy

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Reddy, Doodipala S; Rogawski, Michael A

    2009-01-01

    .... Enhanced seizure susceptibility in perimenstrual catamenial epilepsy is believed to be due to the withdrawal of the progesterone-derived GABAA receptor modulating neurosteroid allopregnanolone...

  1. Structural magnetic resonance imaging in epilepsy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deblaere, Karel [Ghent University Hospital, Department of Neuroradiology, Ghent (Belgium); Ghent University Hospital, MR Department - 1K12, Ghent (Belgium); Achten, Eric [Ghent University Hospital, Department of Neuroradiology, Ghent (Belgium)

    2008-01-15

    Because of its sensitivity and high tissue contrast, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is the technique of choice for structural imaging in epilepsy. In this review the effect of using optimised scanning protocols and the use of high field MR systems on detection sensitivity is discussed. Also, the clinical relevance of adequate imaging in patients with focal epilepsy is highlighted. The most frequently encountered MRI findings in epilepsy are reported and their imaging characteristics depicted. Imaging focus will be on the diagnosis of hippocampal sclerosis and malformations of cortical development, two major causes of medically intractable focal epilepsy. (orig.)

  2. Epilepsy Genetics—Past, Present, and Future

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poduri, Annapurna; Lowenstein, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    Human epilepsy is a common and heterogeneous condition in which genetics play an important etiological role. We begin by reviewing the past history of epilepsy genetics, a field that has traditionally included studies of pedigrees with epilepsy caused by defects in ion channels and neurotransmitters. We highlight important recent discoveries that have expanded the field beyond the realm of channels and neurotransmitters and that have challenged the notion that single genes produce single disorders. Finally, we project toward an exciting future for epilepsy genetics as large-scale collaborative phenotyping studies come face to face with new technologies in genomic medicine. PMID:21277190

  3. WONOEP appraisal: Imaging biomarkers in epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Vliet, Erwin A; Dedeurwaerdere, Stefanie; Cole, Andrew J; Friedman, Alon; Koepp, Matthias J; Potschka, Heidrun; Immonen, Riikka; Pitkänen, Asla; Federico, Paolo

    2017-03-01

    Neuroimaging offers a wide range of opportunities to obtain information about neuronal activity, brain inflammation, blood-brain barrier alterations, and various molecular alterations during epileptogenesis or for the prediction of pharmacoresponsiveness as well as postoperative outcome. Imaging biomarkers were examined during the XIII Workshop on Neurobiology of Epilepsy (XIII WONOEP) organized in 2015 by the Neurobiology Commission of the International League Against Epilepsy (ILAE). Here we present an extended summary of the discussed issues and provide an overview of the current state of knowledge regarding the biomarker potential of different neuroimaging approaches for epilepsy. Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 International League Against Epilepsy.

  4. Resting state networks in temporal lobe epilepsy

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Cataldi, Mauro; Avoli, Massimo; Villers‐Sidani, Etienne

    2013-01-01

    Temporal lobe epilepsy ( TLE ) is typically described as a neurologic disorder affecting a cerebral network comprising the hippocampus proper and several anatomically related extrahippocampal regions...

  5. Temporal Lobe Epilepsy in the Elderly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. E. Morillo

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The incidence of epilepsy has bimodal distribution peaking at the extremes of life. Incidence is greater in younger and older age groups (Hauser et al., 1993, Sidenvall et al., 1993, Forsgren et al., 1996, and Olafsson et al., 2005. As the world population ages more elders with epilepsy will be identified. In the high-income countries with longer life expectancy, the number of elders with epilepsy will be even higher. CPSs account for 40% of all seizure types in the elderly (Hauser et al., 1992; however, the proportion with temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE is uncertain.

  6. Talking Cure Models: A Framework of Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marx, Christopher; Benecke, Cord; Gumz, Antje

    2017-01-01

    Psychotherapy is commonly described as a "talking cure," a treatment method that operates through linguistic action and interaction. The operative specifics of therapeutic language use, however, are insufficiently understood, mainly due to a multitude of disparate approaches that advance different notions of what "talking" means and what "cure" implies in the respective context. Accordingly, a clarification of the basic theoretical structure of "talking cure models," i.e., models that describe therapeutic processes with a focus on language use, is a desideratum of language-oriented psychotherapy research. Against this background the present paper suggests a theoretical framework of analysis which distinguishes four basic components of "talking cure models": (1) a foundational theory (which suggests how linguistic activity can affect and transform human experience), (2) an experiential problem state (which defines the problem or pathology of the patient), (3) a curative linguistic activity (which defines linguistic activities that are supposed to effectuate a curative transformation of the experiential problem state), and (4) a change mechanism (which defines the processes and effects involved in such transformations). The purpose of the framework is to establish a terminological foundation that allows for systematically reconstructing basic properties and operative mechanisms of "talking cure models." To demonstrate the applicability and utility of the framework, five distinct "talking cure models" which spell out the details of curative "talking" processes in terms of (1) catharsis, (2) symbolization, (3) narrative, (4) metaphor, and (5) neurocognitive inhibition are introduced and discussed in terms of the framework components. In summary, we hope that our framework will prove useful for the objective of clarifying the theoretical underpinnings of language-oriented psychotherapy research and help to establish a more comprehensive understanding of how curative

  7. [The neuropsychology of epilepsy: what factors are involved?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campos-Castello, J

    2006-10-10

    The epileptic child is three times more likely to have cognitive problems from other neurological pathologies, depending on three facts: the effect exerted by the epilepsy itself, any associated previously-existing neuropsychosocial deficits, and the side effects of the antiepileptic drug (AED). A certain degree of deterioration is universally accepted, although the factors involved in its production are not specified, but are generally accepted as being due to multiple causes. We analyse the relation between neuropsychology and epilepsy in neuropaediatrics. The relation between epilepsy and behaviour must be seen as the exception rather than the rule, unless there are co-existing personality disorders and/or mental deficiency. The cognitive effects of AED depend on the drug, on the dosages employed and the polypharmacy, and these effects can be both adverse and favourable. The differences observed between one drug and another are open to criticism, although monitored administration of suitable doses generally produces moderate adverse side effects, as evaluated using reliable appraisal methods (MIDDRA). Scaling time in the introduction of the drug is important, especially with some new AED. The mechanisms governing production vary, but an understanding of the mechanism of action improves cognitive functioning thanks to the control over the seizures. In infancy, idiopathic cognitive reactions are produced. The main disorders are a diminished reaction and information processing time with alterations affecting memory, attention and language. Epilepsy is associated to a number of different, generally moderate, cognitive problems. The age of onset, the type of syndrome, its aetiology, the response to treatment and polypharmacy are multifactorial elements conditioning the side effects. There is a need for batteries of tests capable of forecasting the future and controlling the progression of cognition during treatment. The side effects of AED affecting cognition and

  8. Ketogenic diet for epilepsy treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sampaio, Letícia Pereira de Brito

    2016-10-01

    The ketogenic diet (KD), a high-fat, low-carbohydrate, and adequate-protein diet is an established, effective nonpharmacologic treatment option for intractable childhood epilepsy. The KD was developed in 1921 and even though it has been increasingly used worldwide in the past decade, many neurologists are not familiar with this therapeutic approach. In the past few years, alternative and more flexible KD variants have been developed to make the treatment easier and more palatable while reducing side effects and making it available to larger group of refractory epilepsy patients. This review summarizes the history of the KD and the principles and efficacy of the classic ketogenic diet, medium-chain triglyceride(s) (MCT) ketogenic diet, modified Atkins diet, and low glycemic index treatment.

  9. Temporal Lobe Epilepsy in Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nickels, Katherine C.; Wong-Kisiel, Lily C.; Moseley, Brian D.; Wirrell, Elaine C.

    2012-01-01

    The temporal lobe is a common focus for epilepsy. Temporal lobe epilepsy in infants and children differs from the relatively homogeneous syndrome seen in adults in several important clinical and pathological ways. Seizure semiology varies by age, and the ictal EEG pattern may be less clear cut than what is seen in adults. Additionally, the occurrence of intractable seizures in the developing brain may impact neurocognitive function remote from the temporal area. While many children will respond favorably to medical therapy, those with focal imaging abnormalities including cortical dysplasia, hippocampal sclerosis, or low-grade tumors are likely to be intractable. Expedient workup and surgical intervention in these medically intractable cases are needed to maximize long-term developmental outcome. PMID:22957247

  10. Temporal Lobe Epilepsy in Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katherine C. Nickels

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The temporal lobe is a common focus for epilepsy. Temporal lobe epilepsy in infants and children differs from the relatively homogeneous syndrome seen in adults in several important clinical and pathological ways. Seizure semiology varies by age, and the ictal EEG pattern may be less clear cut than what is seen in adults. Additionally, the occurrence of intractable seizures in the developing brain may impact neurocognitive function remote from the temporal area. While many children will respond favorably to medical therapy, those with focal imaging abnormalities including cortical dysplasia, hippocampal sclerosis, or low-grade tumors are likely to be intractable. Expedient workup and surgical intervention in these medically intractable cases are needed to maximize long-term developmental outcome.

  11. Curing mechanism of flexible aqueous polymeric coatings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irfan, Muhammad; Ahmed, Abid Riaz; Kolter, Karl; Bodmeier, Roland; Dashevskiy, Andriy

    2017-06-01

    The objective of this study was to explain curing phenomena for pellets coated with a flexible polymeric coating based on poly(vinyl acetate) (Kollicoat® SR 30D) with regard to the effect of starter cores, thickness of drug layer, adhesion of coating to drug-layered-cores as well as coating properties. In addition, appropriate approaches to eliminate the curing effect were identified. Sugar or MCC cores were layered with the model drugs carbamazepine, theophylline, propranolol HCl, tramadol HCl and metoprolol HCl using HPMC (5 or 25% w/w, based on drug) as a binder. Drug-layered pellets were coated with Kollicoat® SR 30D in a fluidized bed coater using TEC (10% w/w) as plasticizer and talc (35-100% w/w) as anti-tacking agent. Drug release, pellet properties (morphology, water uptake-weight loss and osmolality) and adhesion of the coating to the drug layer were investigated as a function of curing at 60°C or 60°C/75% RH for 24h. The film formation of the aqueous dispersion of Kollicoat® SR 30D was complete, and therefore, a strong curing effect (decrease in drug release) at elevated temperature and humidity (60°C/75% RH) could not be explained by the well-known hydroplasticization and the further gradual coalescence of the colloidal polymer particles. According to the provided mechanistic explanation, the observed curing effect was associated with (1) high flexibility of coating, (2) adhesion between coating and drug layer, (3) water retaining properties of the drug layer, and (4) osmotically active cores. Unwanted curing effects could be minimized/eliminated by the addition of talc or/and pore-forming water soluble polymers in the coating, increasing binder amount or applying an intermediate coating, by increasing the thickness of drug layer or using non-osmotic cores. A new insight into curing phenomena mainly associated with the adhesion between drug layer and coating was provided. Appropriate approaches to avoid unwanted curing effect were identified

  12. HEMICONVULSION-HEMIPLEGIA-EPILEPSY SYNDROME

    OpenAIRE

    Ashrafi, M. R.; J. Tafarroji

    2009-01-01

    ObjectiveHemiconvulsion-Hemiplegia-Epilepsy syndrome (HHE) is an initial phase of unilateral or predominantly unilateral convulsive seizures usually of long duration, with a second phase of hemiplegia (usually permanent), immediately following the hemiconvulsions;and then a third stage, characterized by the appearance of partial epileptic seizures. The causes of the initial convulsions inHHE syndrome are multiple but in many patients no cause in obvious. Neuroimaging studies demonstrate an ac...

  13. [Hemiconvulsion-hemiplegia-epilepsy syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vestergaard, Maiken; Uldall, Peter

    2014-12-22

    Hemiconvulsion-hemiplegia-epilepsy syndrome is a rare consequence of a status epilepticus in the course of a febrile illness in children under the age of four years. Various degrees of hemiplegia and within a variable interval, subsequent epilepsia follows. Neuroimaging show unilateral cytotoxic oedema at the initial convulsive state, followed by severe chronic atrophy of the affected hemisphere. The aetiology remains unclear. Several mechanisms may contribute to this condition. To improve the outcome, further studies are needed and early diagnosis is essential.

  14. RNA Interference Therapies for an HIV-1 Functional Cure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scarborough, Robert J; Gatignol, Anne

    2017-12-27

    HIV-1 drug therapies can prevent disease progression but cannot eliminate HIV-1 viruses from an infected individual. While there is hope that elimination of HIV-1 can be achieved, several approaches to reach a functional cure (control of HIV-1 replication in the absence of drug therapy) are also under investigation. One of these approaches is the transplant of HIV-1 resistant cells expressing anti-HIV-1 RNAs, proteins or peptides. Small RNAs that use RNA interference pathways to target HIV-1 replication have emerged as competitive candidates for cell transplant therapy and have been included in all gene combinations that have so far entered clinical trials. Here, we review RNA interference pathways in mammalian cells and the design of therapeutic small RNAs that use these pathways to target pathogenic RNA sequences. Studies that have been performed to identify anti-HIV-1 RNA interference therapeutics are also reviewed and perspectives on their use in combination gene therapy to functionally cure HIV-1 infection are provided.

  15. Why have we failed to cure Alzheimer's disease?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korczyn, Amos D

    2012-01-01

    There is widespread recognition in the urgency to understand the causes and mechanisms of senile dementia. Attempts to find cures for Alzheimer's disease (AD) have, however, failed so far, in spite of enormous investments, intellectual and financial. We therefore have to reconsider the problem from new angles. AD is regarded as a disease because of its clinical manifestations and underlying pathology. However, this combination does not define a disease but rather a syndrome, just like hepatic cirrhosis in which liver pathology causes metabolic changes, but which can result from many different etiologies. It is unlikely that attacking a downstream phenomenon, like apoptosis or amyloid-β accumulation, can cure AD, or prevent the progression of the disease. It is probable that senile dementia is the result of a combination of several processes, working differently in each person. Epidemiological studies have identified many risk factors for "senile dementia of the Alzheimer type", some genetic but most environmental and therefore modifiable. Thus, a concerted action to fight the dementia epidemic must be made by aggressive action against its risk factors, and this battle must begin in midlife, not in old age.

  16. Efficacy of vagus nerve stimulation for epilepsy by patient age, epilepsy duration, and seizure type.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Englot, Dario J; Chang, Edward F; Auguste, Kurtis I

    2011-10-01

    Medically refractory epilepsy is a morbid condition, and many patients are poor candidates for surgical resection because of multifocal seizure origin or eloquence near epileptic foci. Vagus nerve stimulation (VNS) was approved in 1997 by the US Food and Drug Administration as an adjunctive treatment of intractable epilepsy for individuals aged 12 years and more with partial epilepsy. Controversy persists regarding the efficacy of VNS for epilepsy and about which patient populations respond best to therapy. In this article, the authors retrospectively studied a patient outcome registry and report the largest, to their knowledge, analysis of VNS outcomes in epilepsy. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Excessive masturbation after epilepsy surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozmen, Mine; Erdogan, Ayten; Duvenci, Sirin; Ozyurt, Emin; Ozkara, Cigdem

    2004-02-01

    Sexual behavior changes as well as depression, anxiety, and organic mood/personality disorders have been reported in temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) patients before and after epilepsy surgery. The authors describe a 14-year-old girl with symptoms of excessive masturbation in inappropriate places, social withdrawal, irritability, aggressive behavior, and crying spells after selective amygdalohippocampectomy for medically intractable TLE with hippocampal sclerosis. Since the family members felt extremely embarrassed, they were upset and angry with the patient which, in turn, increased her depressive symptoms. Both her excessive masturbation behavior and depressive symptoms remitted within 2 months of psychoeducative intervention and treatment with citalopram 20mg/day. Excessive masturbation is proposed to be related to the psychosocial changes due to seizure-free status after surgery as well as other possible mechanisms such as Kluver-Bucy syndrome features and neurophysiologic changes associated with the cessation of epileptic discharges. This case demonstrates that psychiatric problems and sexual changes encountered after epilepsy surgery are possibly multifactorial and in adolescence hypersexuality may be manifested as excessive masturbation behavior.

  18. Epilepsy and recommendations for breastfeeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veiby, Gyri; Bjørk, Marte; Engelsen, Bernt A; Gilhus, Nils Erik

    2015-05-01

    The objective of this paper is to provide a synopsis of benefits and potential harmful effects of exposure to antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) via breastmilk, and present recommendations for breastfeeding in women with epilepsy. The article is based on a discretionary selection of English language articles retrieved by a literature search in the PubMed database, the LactMed database, and the authors' clinical experience. Breastfeeding is associated with benefits for the infant, including nutrition, protection against infectious and immunological disease, and promotion of development and psychological attachment. Exposure to AEDs via breastmilk could potentially produce side effects or negatively affect development. Most studies on AED transfer through breastmilk report infant serum levels well below the limit of an expected pharmacological effect. Some drugs have the potential to reach significant serum levels in breastfed infants, such as barbiturates, benzodiazepines, lamotrigine, and ethosuximide. Thus, breastfed infants should be monitored for side effects. Still, adverse symptoms are rarely reported in breastfed infants of mothers taking AEDs, and prospective studies have failed to demonstrate any negative developmental effects in children that have been exposed to AEDs via breastmilk. The nursing infant's degree of drug exposure can be minimized by breastfeeding when drug concentrations in the milk are low, reducing maternal AED dosage to prepregnancy levels, and administering mixed nutrition. Most AEDs are considered safe or moderately safe during breastfeeding. Mothers with epilepsy should be encouraged to breastfeed, provided careful monitoring of the infant. Copyright © 2015 British Epilepsy Association. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Qualitative Dermatoglyphics In Idiopathic Epilepsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ranganath Priya

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Genetic aetiology has been proposed for both idiopathic epilepsy and dermatoglyphics. Hence, the present study has been undertaken to find out the existence of any correlation between dermatoglyphics and idiopathic epilepsy. Material consisted of 100 patients (58 males and 42 females and 100 controls (52 males and 48 females. Patient′s age ranged from 5 to 40 years and controls were between 18 and 25 years. Dermatoglyphics were obtained by painting method. Qualitative parameters observed were percentage frequency of fingerprint patterns (loops, whorls and arches,, patterns in hypothenar area/ interdigital are and flexion creases (Simian crease, sydney line. On comparison with controls, in males, with hands combined, loops (52.24% and arches (7.93% were increased and whorls (39.83% were decreased (p<0.05. In females, with hands combined, arches (13.1% and whorls (36.43% were increased and loops (50.48% were decreased (p< 0.03. Significant differences have not been observed for the patterns in hypothenar area /interdigital area and flexion creases. These dermatoglyphics features could be used as additional markers to evaluate patients of epilepsy.

  20. Epilepsy and music: practical notes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maguire, M

    2017-04-01

    Music processing occurs via a complex network of activity far beyond the auditory cortices. This network may become sensitised to music or may be recruited as part of a temporal lobe seizure, manifesting as either musicogenic epilepsy or ictal musical phenomena. The idea that sound waves may directly affect brain waves has led researchers to explore music as therapy for epilepsy. There is limited and low quality evidence of an antiepileptic effect with the Mozart Sonata K.448. We do not have a pathophysiological explanation for the apparent dichotomous effect of music on seizures. However, clinicians should consider musicality when treating patients with antiepileptic medication or preparing patients for epilepsy surgery. Carbamazepine and oxcarbazepine each may cause a reversible altered appreciation of pitch. Surgical cohort studies suggest that musical memory and perception may be affected, particularly following right temporal lobe surgery, and discussion of this risk should form part of presurgical counselling. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  1. Effect of curing protocol on the polymerization of dual-cured resin cements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Sónia G; Fulgêncio, Rogério; Nunes, Teresa G; Toledano, Manuel; Osorio, Raquel; Carvalho, Ricardo Marins

    2010-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate how curing protocol affects the extent of polymerization of dual-cured resin cements. Four commercial resin cements were used (DuoLink, Panavia F 2.0, Variolink II and Enforce). The extent of polymerization of the resin cements cured under different conditions was measured using a (1)H Stray-Field MRI method, which also enabled to probe molecular mobility in the kHz frequency range. Resin cements show well distinct behaviours concerning chemical cure. Immediate photo-activation appears to be the best choice for higher filler loaded resin cements (Panavia F 2.0 and Variolink). A photo-activation delay (5 min) did not induce any significant difference in the extent of polymerization of all cements. The extent of polymerization of dual-cured resin cements considerably changed among products under various curing protocols. Clinicians should optimize the materials choice taking into account the curing characteristics of the cements. Copyright 2010 Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Comparison of hardness of three temporary filling materials cured by two light-curing devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bodrumlu, E; Koçak, M M; Hazar Bodrumlu, E; Ozcan, S; Koçak, S

    2014-01-01

    Polymerization ability of light-curing devices can affect the light-cured material hardness. The purpose of the present study was to evaluate and compare the hardness of three temporary filling materials that had been light-cured by either a light emitting diode (LED) or a halogen light-curing unit. The temporary filling materials, First Fill, Voco Clip and Bioplic, were placed in wells in a Teflon plate. The 24 specimens of each material were divided into two groups (N.=12/group) for photo-activation by either of the two light-curing units. The LED or halogen device was applied for 40s to the top surface of each specimen. A Knoop hardness test was performed on the top and bottom surface of each specimen, with five measurements per specimen. The highest hardness values for both the LED and halogen treated groups were observed for First Fill and the lowest values were for Voco Clip in top and bottom surfaces. The hardness obtained for the three materials with the halogen unit were significantly higher than the values obtained with the LED unit in both surfaces (Phardness values on the top and bottom surfaces than Voco Clip and Bioplic temporary materials. The hardness of light-cured temporary filling materials can be affected by the type of light-curing unit.

  3. Strength of Geopolymer Cement Curing at Ambient Temperature by Non-Oven Curing Approaches: An Overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wattanachai, Pitiwat; Suwan, Teewara

    2017-06-01

    At the present day, a concept of environmentally friendly construction materials has been intensively studying to reduce the amount of releasing greenhouse gases. Geopolymer is one of the cementitious binders which can be produced by utilising pozzolanic wastes (e.g. fly ash or furnace slag) and also receiving much more attention as a low-CO2 emission material. However, to achieve excellent mechanical properties, heat curing process is needed to apply to geopolymer cement in a range of temperature around 40 to 90°C. To consume less oven-curing energy and be more convenience in practical work, the study on geopolymer curing at ambient temperature (around 20 to 25°C) is therefore widely investigated. In this paper, a core review of factors and approaches for non-oven curing geopolymer has been summarised. The performance, in term of strength, of each non-oven curing method, is also presented and analysed. The main aim of this review paper is to gather the latest study of ambient temperature curing geopolymer and to enlarge a feasibility of non-oven curing geopolymer development. Also, to extend the directions of research work, some approaches or techniques can be combined or applied to the specific properties for in-field applications and embankment stabilization by using soil-cement column.

  4. Curing characteristics of a composite - part 1: cure depth relationship to conversion, hardness and radiant exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erickson, Robert L; Barkmeier, Wayne W; Halvorson, Rolf H

    2014-06-01

    As the first part of a larger study on curing characteristics of a resin-based composite (RBC), the major objectives were to create an energy-hardness relationship (EHR) that relates Knoop hardness (KHN) with radiant exposure (H), and to do the same for degree of conversion (DC) in the form of an energy-conversion relationship (ECR). Both of these are meant to be universal relationships that satisfy reciprocity between irradiance and time for a given H value. RBC specimens were made by curing the material in 6mm diameter, stainless steel molds for 10-40s and allowing the material to cure for 24h. Cure depths were determined by a scrape-back method. KHN and DC values were determined along the central axis of the specimens, and these values were related to the internal H values using a measured transmission relationship, T(d), for the RBC. Suitable EHR and ECR relationships were developed for the RBC material that can be used to describe the curing characteristics under various curing conditions. However, predictive accuracy is affected for incident radiant exposures below about 12J/cm(2) to some extent. A relationship between KHN and DC was established. For the RBC examined, KHN measurements can be used as an alternate method or in conjunction with DC for describing the curing characteristics. Copyright © 2014 Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Curing kinetics of visible light curing dental resin composites investigated by dielectric analysis (DEA).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinhaus, Johannes; Hausnerova, Berenika; Haenel, Thomas; Großgarten, Mandy; Möginger, Bernhard

    2014-03-01

    During the curing process of light curing dental composites the mobility of molecules and molecule segments is reduced leading to a significant increase of the viscosity as well as the ion viscosity. Thus, the kinetics of the curing behavior of 6 different composites was derived from dielectric analysis (DEA) using especially redesigned flat sensors with interdigit comb electrodes allowing for irradiation at the top side and measuring the ion viscosity at the bottom side. As the ion viscosities of dental composites change 1-3 orders of magnitude during the curing process, DEA provides a sensitive approach to evaluate their curing behavior, especially in the phase of undisturbed chain growth. In order to determine quantitative kinetic parameters a kinetic model is presented and examined for the evaluation of the ion viscosity curves. From the obtained results it is seen that DEA might be employed in the investigation of the primary curing process, the quality assurance of ingredients as well as the control of processing stability of the light curing dental composites. Copyright © 2014 Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Light-Cured Self-Etch Adhesives Undergo Hydroxyapatite-Triggered Self-Cure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Y; Bai, X; Liu, Y W; Wang, Y

    2016-03-01

    Light cure is a popular mode of curing for dental adhesives. However, it suffers from inadequate light delivery when the restoration site is less accessible, in which case a self-cure mechanism is desirable to salvage any compromised polymerization. We previously reported a novel self-cure system mediated by ethyl 4-(dimethylamino)-benzoate (4E) and hydroxyapatite (HAp). The present work aims to investigate if such self-cure phenomenon takes place in adhesives that underwent prior inadequate light cure and to elucidate if HAp released from the dental etching process is sufficient to trigger it. Model self-etch adhesives were formulated with various components, including bis[2-methacryloyloxy)ethyl]-phosphate (2MP) as acidic monomer and trimethylbenzoyl-diphenylphosphine oxide (TPO) as photoinitiator. In vitro evolution of degree of conversion (DC) of HAp-incorporated adhesives was monitored by infrared spectroscopy during light irradiation and dark storage. Selected adhesives were allowed to etch and extract HAp from enamel, light-cured in situ, and stored in the dark, after which Raman line mapping was used to obtain spatially resolved DC across the enamel-resin interface. Results showed that TPO+4E adhesives reached DC similar to TPO-only counterparts upon completion of light irradiation but underwent another round of initiation that boosted DC to ~100% regardless of HAp level or prior light exposure. When applied to enamel, TPO-only adhesives had ~80% DC in resin, which gradually descended to ~50% in enamel, whereas TPO+4E adhesives consistently scored ~80% DC across the enamel-resin interface. These observations suggest that polymerization of adhesives that underwent insufficient light cure is salvaged by the novel self-cure mechanism, and such salvaging effect can be triggered by HAp released from dental substrate during the etching process. © International & American Associations for Dental Research 2015.

  7. Light-Cured Self-Etch Adhesives Undergo Hydroxyapatite-Triggered Self-Cure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Y.; Bai, X.; Liu, Y.W.; Wang, Y.

    2015-01-01

    Light cure is a popular mode of curing for dental adhesives. However, it suffers from inadequate light delivery when the restoration site is less accessible, in which case a self-cure mechanism is desirable to salvage any compromised polymerization. We previously reported a novel self-cure system mediated by ethyl 4-(dimethylamino)-benzoate (4E) and hydroxyapatite (HAp). The present work aims to investigate if such self-cure phenomenon takes place in adhesives that underwent prior inadequate light cure and to elucidate if HAp released from the dental etching process is sufficient to trigger it. Model self-etch adhesives were formulated with various components, including bis[2-methacryloyloxy)ethyl]-phosphate (2MP) as acidic monomer and trimethylbenzoyl-diphenylphosphine oxide (TPO) as photoinitiator. In vitro evolution of degree of conversion (DC) of HAp-incorporated adhesives was monitored by infrared spectroscopy during light irradiation and dark storage. Selected adhesives were allowed to etch and extract HAp from enamel, light-cured in situ, and stored in the dark, after which Raman line mapping was used to obtain spatially resolved DC across the enamel-resin interface. Results showed that TPO+4E adhesives reached DC similar to TPO-only counterparts upon completion of light irradiation but underwent another round of initiation that boosted DC to ~100% regardless of HAp level or prior light exposure. When applied to enamel, TPO-only adhesives had ~80% DC in resin, which gradually descended to ~50% in enamel, whereas TPO+4E adhesives consistently scored ~80% DC across the enamel-resin interface. These observations suggest that polymerization of adhesives that underwent insufficient light cure is salvaged by the novel self-cure mechanism, and such salvaging effect can be triggered by HAp released from dental substrate during the etching process. PMID:26635279

  8. Early and late epilepsy surgery in focal epilepsies associated with long-term epilepsy-associated tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelliccia, Veronica; Deleo, Francesco; Gozzo, Francesca; Sartori, Ivana; Mai, Roberto; Cossu, Massimo; Tassi, Laura

    2017-11-01

    OBJECTIVE Epilepsy surgery is an effective means of treating focal epilepsy associated with long-term epilepsy-associated tumors. This study evaluated a large population of surgically treated patients with childhood onset of epilepsy and a histologically confirmed diagnosis of long-term epilepsy-associated tumors. The authors analyzed long-term seizure outcomes to establish whether the time of surgery and patients' ages were determinant factors. METHODS The authors separately investigated several presurgical, surgical, and postsurgical variables in patients operated on before (pediatric group) and at or after (adult group) the age of 18 years. Patients with < 24 months of postsurgical follow-up were excluded from the analysis. RESULTS The patients who underwent surgery before 18 years of age showed better seizure outcomes than those after 18 years of age (80% vs 53.3% Engel Class Ia outcome, respectively; p < 0.001). Multivariate analysis showed that the only variables significantly associated with seizure freedom were complete resection of the lesion, a shorter duration of epilepsy, and temporal lobe resection. CONCLUSIONS The findings of this study indicate that pediatric patients are more responsive to epilepsy surgery and that a shorter duration of epilepsy, complete resection, and a temporal lobe localization are determinant factors for a positive seizure outcome.

  9. [Effects of temporal lobe epilepsy and idiopathic epilepsy on cognitive function and emotion in children].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xiao-Yan; Long, Li-Li; Xiao, Bo

    2016-07-01

    To investigate the effects of temporal lobe epilepsy and idiopathic epilepsy on cognitive function and emotion in children and the risk factors for cognitive impairment. A retrospective analysis was performed for the clinical data of 38 children with temporal lobe epilepsy and 40 children with idiopathic epilepsy. The controls were 42 healthy children. All subjects received the following neuropsychological tests: Montreal Cognitive Assessment (MoCA) scale, verbal fluency test, digit span test, block design test, Social Anxiety Scale for Children (SASC), and Depression Self-rating Scale for Children (DSRSC). Compared with the control group, the temporal lobe epilepsy and idiopathic epilepsy groups showed significantly lower scores of MoCA, verbal fluency, digit span, and block design (Pepilepsy group, the temporal lobe epilepsy group showed significantly lower scores of MoCA, verbal fluency, digit span, and block design (Ptemporal lobe epilepsy group, MoCA score was negatively correlated with SASC score, DSRSC score, and seizure frequency (r=-0.571, -0.529, and -0.545 respectively; Pepilepsy group, MoCA score was also negatively correlated with SASC score, DSRSC score, and seizure frequency (r=-0.542, -0.487, and -0.555 respectively; Ptemporal lobe epilepsy and idiopathic epilepsy show impaired whole cognition, verbal fluency, memory, and executive function and have anxiety and depression, which are more significant in children with temporal lobe epilepsy. High levels of anxiety, depression, and seizure frequency are risk factors for impaired cognitive function.

  10. Translational approach for gene therapy in epilepsy: Model system and unilateral overexpression of neuropeptide Y and Y2 receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ledri, Litsa Nikitidou; Melin, Esbjörn; Christiansen, Søren H; Gøtzsche, Casper R; Cifra, Alessandra; Woldbye, David P D; Kokaia, Mérab

    2016-02-01

    Although novel treatment strategies based on the gene therapy approach for epilepsy has been encouraging, there is still a gap in demonstrating a proof-of-concept in a clinically relevant animal model and study design. In the present study, a conceptually novel framework reflecting a plausible clinical trial for gene therapy of temporal lobe epilepsy was explored: We investigated (i) whether the post intrahippocampal kainate-induced status epilepticus (SE) model of chronic epilepsy in rats could be clinically relevant; and (ii) whether a translationally designed neuropeptide Y (NPY)/Y2 receptor-based gene therapy approach targeting only the seizure-generating focus unilaterally can decrease seizure frequency in this chronic model of epilepsy. Our data suggest that the intrahippocampal kainate model resembles the disease development of human chronic mesial temporal lobe epilepsy (mTLE): (i) spontaneous seizures originate in the sclerotic hippocampus; (ii) only a part of the animals develops chronic epilepsy; (iii) animals show largely variable seizure frequency that (iv) tends to progressively increase over time. Despite significant hippocampal degeneration caused by the kainate injection, the use of MRI allowed targeting the recombinant adeno-associated viral (rAAV) vectors encoding NPY and Y2 receptor genes to the remaining dorsal and ventral hippocampal areas ipsilateral to the kainate injection. Continuous video-EEG monitoring demonstrated not only prevention of the progressive increase in seizure frequency in rAAV-NPY/Y2 treated animals as compared to the controls, but even 45% decrease of seizure frequency in 80% of the epileptic animals. This translationally designed study in a clinically relevant model of epilepsy suggests that simultaneous overexpression of NPY and Y2 receptors unilaterally in the seizure focus is a relevant and promising approach that can be further validated in more extensive preclinical studies to develop a future treatment strategy for

  11. Neuroinflammation in epileptogenesis: Insights and translational perspectives from new models of epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barker-Haliski, Melissa L; Löscher, Wolfgang; White, H Steve; Galanopoulou, Aristea S

    2017-07-01

    Animal models have provided a wealth of information on mechanisms of epileptogenesis and comorbidogenesis, and have significantly advanced our ability to investigate the potential of new therapies. Processes implicating brain inflammation have been increasingly observed in epilepsy research. Herein we discuss the progress on animal models of epilepsy and comorbidities that inform us on the potential role of inflammation in epileptogenesis and comorbidity pathogenesis in rodent models of West syndrome and the Theiler's murine encephalomyelitis virus (TMEV) mouse model of viral encephalitis-induced epilepsy. Rat models of infantile spasms were generated in rat pups after right intracerebral injections of proinflammatory compounds (lipopolysaccharides with or without doxorubicin, or cytokines) and were longitudinally monitored for epileptic spasms and neurodevelopmental and cognitive deficits. Anti-inflammatory treatments were tested after the onset of spasms. The TMEV mouse model was induced with intracerebral administration of TMEV and prospective monitoring for handling-induced seizures or seizure susceptibility, as well as long-term evaluations of behavioral comorbidities of epilepsy. Inflammatory processes are evident in both models and are implicated in the pathogenesis of the observed seizures and comorbidities. A common feature of these models, based on the data so far available, is their pharmacoresistant profile. The presented data support the role of inflammatory pathways in epileptogenesis and comorbidities in two distinct epilepsy models. Pharmacoresistance is a common feature of both inflammation-based models. Utilization of these models may facilitate the identification of age-specific, syndrome- or etiology-specific therapies for the epilepsies and attendant comorbidities, including the drug-resistant forms. Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 International League Against Epilepsy.

  12. Spirituality aspects in patients with epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tedrus, Glória Maria Almeida Souza; Fonseca, Lineu Corrêa; Höehr, Gabriela Chaves

    2014-01-01

    Do epilepsy and spirituality interact? This study aimed to determine whether an easy-to-administer scale, such as the spirituality self-rating scale (SSRS), could detect increased religiousness in people with epilepsy and verify how epilepsy influences spirituality. A total of 196 consecutive patients with epilepsy (epilepsy group, EG) with a mean age and standard deviation of 46.5 ± 14.8 years and 66 subjects with no history of neurological or other chronic disorders (control group, CG) were assessed by the SSRS and neurologically. The SSRS scores of the EG and CG did not differ significantly (22.8 ± 5.1 and 22.0 ± 5.7, respectively). Patients with mesial temporal lobe epilepsy with hippocampal sclerosis (MTLE-HS) had significantly higher SSRS scores than those with other epileptic syndromes and, than in individuals of the CG. Multiple regression showed that the factors significantly associated with greater spirituality (greater SSRS score) for the EG, were lower education level, abnormal background EEG activity, and MTLE-HS. Other relationships with the clinical features of epilepsy and with the presence of psychiatric co-morbidity were not found. The present findings do not confirm a specific role of epilepsy in spirituality or of "epileptic hyperreligiosity," but suggest that spirituality in people with epilepsy is influenced by education level, and may also stem from epilepsy-related factors such as abnormal background EEG activity and the presence of MTLE-HS. Copyright © 2013 British Epilepsy Association. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. ADGRV1 is implicated in myoclonic epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myers, Kenneth A; Nasioulas, Steven; Boys, Amber; McMahon, Jacinta M; Slater, Howard; Lockhart, Paul; Sart, Desirée du; Scheffer, Ingrid E

    2017-12-20

    To investigate the significance of variation in ADGRV1 (also known as GPR98, MASS1, and VLGR1), MEF2C, and other genes at the 5q14.3 chromosomal locus in myoclonic epilepsy. We studied the epilepsy phenotypes of 4 individuals with 5q14.3 deletion and found that all had myoclonic seizures. We then screened 6 contiguous genes at 5q14.3, MEF2C, CETN3, MBLAC2, POLR3G, LYSMD3, and ADGRV1, in a 95-patient cohort with epilepsy and myoclonic seizures. Of these genes, point mutations in MEF2C cause a phenotype involving seizures and intellectual disability. A role for ADGRV1 in epilepsy has been proposed previously, based on a recessive mutation in the Frings mouse model of audiogenic seizures, as well as a shared homologous region with another epilepsy gene, LGI1. Six patients from the myoclonic epilepsy cohort had likely pathogenic ultra-rare ADGRV1 variants, and statistical analysis showed that ultra-rare variants were significantly overrepresented when compared to healthy population data from the Genome Aggregation Database. Of the remaining genes, no definite pathogenic variants were identified. Our data suggest that the ADGRV1 variation contributes to epilepsy with myoclonic seizures, although the inheritance pattern may be complex in many cases. In patients with 5q14.3 deletion and epilepsy, ADGRV1 haploinsufficiency likely contributes to seizure development. The latter is a shift from current thinking, as MEF2C haploinsufficiency has been considered the main cause of epilepsy in 5q14.3 deletion syndrome. In cases of 5q14.3 deletion and epilepsy, seizures likely occur due to haploinsufficiency of one or both of ADGRV1 and MEF2C. Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 International League Against Epilepsy.

  14. Understanding Death in Children With Epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donner, Elizabeth J; Camfield, Peter; Brooks, Linda; Buchhalter, Jeffrey; Camfield, Carol; Loddenkemper, Tobias; Wirrell, Elaine

    2017-05-01

    Death in children with epilepsy is profoundly disturbing, with lasting effects on the family, community, and health care providers. The overall risk of death for children with epilepsy is about ten times that of the general population. However, the risk of premature death for children without associated neurological comorbidities is similar to that of the general population, and most deaths are related to the cause of the epilepsy or associated neurological disability, not seizures. The most common cause of seizure-related death in children with epilepsy is sudden unexpected death in epilepsy (SUDEP). SUDEP is relatively uncommon in childhood, but the risk increases if epilepsy persists into adulthood. Although the direct cause of SUDEP remains unknown, most often death follows a generalized convulsive seizure and the risk of SUDEP is strongly related to drug-resistant epilepsy and frequent generalized tonic-clonic seizures. The most effective SUDEP prevention strategy is to reduce the frequency of seizures, although a number of seizure detection devices are under development and in the future may prove to be useful for seizure detection for those at particularly high risk. There are distinct benefits for health care professionals to discuss mortality with the family soon after the diagnosis of epilepsy. An individual approach is appropriate. When a child with epilepsy dies, particularly if the death was unexpected, family grief may be profound. Physicians and other health care professionals have a critical role in supporting families that lose a child to epilepsy. This review will provide health care providers with information needed to discuss the risk of death in children with epilepsy and support families following a loss. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Predictive factors for epilepsy in moyamoya disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikami, Takeshi; Ochi, Satoko; Houkin, Kiyohiro; Akiyama, Yukinori; Wanibuchi, Masahiko; Mikuni, Nobuhiro

    2015-01-01

    Epilepsy cannot always be recognized in patients with moyamoya disease. In this report, the clinical features of patients with epilepsy were evaluated for assessing the predictive factors of epilepsy in moyamoya disease. A total of 64 consecutive patients with moyamoya disease were included in this study. During their follow-up periods, 7 patients were diagnosed with epilepsy. Then, the patients with epilepsy were compared with the patients without epilepsy regarding their clinical features. Analysis of patient background characteristics revealed a significantly higher incidence of epilepsy in patients with high modified Rankin Scale (mRS) scores, high cerebrovascular attack scores, onset age of 3 years or less, early seizures, cortical involvement, stroke subtype, and diffuse brain atrophy. A logistic analysis of epilepsy data revealed significant differences between the 2 groups in mRS score, cerebrovascular attack score, onset age 3 years or less, early seizure, cortical involvement, stroke subtype, and diffuse brain atrophy. Of these, significant differences were noted in 3 items (mRS score, early seizure, and diffuse brain atrophy) on multivariate analysis. These 3 items were selected as the basis of our new moyamoya disease epilepsy risk scale (MDERS), which we then evaluated. The cutoff value estimated by the receiver operating characteristic curve was set at 1 (sensitivity, .857; specificity, .825) or 2 (sensitivity, .571; specificity, 1.000). Epilepsy in moyamoya disease is associated with clinical factors and is not an independent category. For prediction of epilepsy in moyamoya disease, MDERS is a simple and convenient assessment scale. Copyright © 2015 National Stroke Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. [Television, children and epilepsy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stroink, H; Dekker, E; Trenité, D G A Kasteleijn-Nolst

    2002-06-08

    Two girls and one boy suffered seizures caused by television and other visual stimuli from 11, 12 and 12 years of age onwards, respectively. EEG recording revealed that intermittent photic stimulation (IPS) provoked epileptiform activity. Technological progress (video games, computer, disco, car, train) has considerably increased the risk for visually-induced seizures. A comprehensive clinical history with special attention to the environmental circumstances is important. For correct diagnosis an EEG with standardised IPS is necessary. Treatment consists of avoidance of strong visual stimuli. Patients may need prophylaxis with valproic acid, which should only be withdrawn after clear reduction of the EEG response to IPS. Repeating the EEG after the dosage has been lowered will help avoiding unnecessary recurrence of seizures.

  17. ACID RESISTANCE OF FLYASH BASED GEOPOLYMER MORTAR UNDER AMBIENT CURING AND HEAT CURING

    OpenAIRE

    V.Sreevidya; Anuradha, R.; D. Dinakar; Dr. R.Venkatasubramani

    2012-01-01

    An Experimental study was conducted to assess the Acid resistance of flyash based geopolymer mortar specimens of size 50x50x50mm with a ratio of flyash to sand as 1:3.The ratio between solution(Sodiumhydroxide and Sodium silicate solution) to flyash were 0.376,0.386,0.396 and 0.416. After casting the specimens were subjected to both ambient curing and heat curing. In heat curing the specimens were kept continuously at 60oC for 24 hrs. Durability of specimens was assessed by immersing them in...

  18. Reduced ceramide synthase 2 activity causes progressive myoclonic epilepsy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mosbech, Mai-Britt; Olsen, Anne S B; Neess, Ditte

    2014-01-01

    composition was also reflected in a reduction in cholera toxin B immunofluorescence, indicating that membrane composition and function are altered. INTERPRETATION: We propose that reduced levels of CERS2, and consequently diminished levels of ceramides and SLs containing very long-chain fatty acids, lead...

  19. Translating genomic discoveries to cure ultrahypermutant mismatch ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Translating genomic discoveries to cure ultrahypermutant mismatch repair deficient brain tumours. Les tumeurs malignes au cerveau sont la cause la plus courante de décès chez les enfants atteints du cancer, mais il n'y a pas de traitement connu. Ce projet permettra de faire avancer la recherche dans ce domaine ...

  20. Helping African American Males: The Cure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gill, Walter

    1992-01-01

    Looks at the current plight of the African-American male, exploring the role of the dominant culture, mass media, and low self-esteem. Describes a possible cure, citing five areas for action, calling for year-round school in some urban areas, exploring Afrocentric curricula, and considering rites of passage programs. (JB)

  1. Creep measurements on curing epoxy systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kammer, Charlotte; Szabo, Peter

    1998-01-01

    The chemical curing of a stoichiometric mixture of the diglycidyl ether of bisphenol A and a 1,3-bis-(aminomethyl)-cyclohexane is studied.Creep experiments are combined with measurements in a Differential Scanning Calorimeter (DSC) to determine the change in bulk viscosity due to network formation....

  2. Enhanced microactuation with magnetic field curing of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The incorporation of nanoparticles of iron in a natural rubber matrix leads to flexible magnetorheolog- ical (MR) materials. Rod-shaped MR elastomers based on natural rubber and nanosized iron have been moulded both with and without the application of an external magnetic field during curing. These MR elastomer rods ...

  3. Enhanced microactuation with magnetic field curing of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The incorporation of nanoparticles of iron in a natural rubber matrix leads to flexible magnetorheological (MR) materials. Rod-shaped MR elastomers based on natural rubber and nanosized iron have been moulded both with and without the application of an external magnetic field during curing. These MR elastomer rods ...

  4. Adhesive curing options for photonic packaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Steven C.; Hubert, Manfred; Tam, Robin

    2002-06-01

    Varying the intensity of illumination used to cure photoactivated adhesives has been applied in medical and dental applications to improve the performance of polymer materials. For example, it has been observed that dental polymer composite materials express reduced shrinkage, important for durability of non-amalgam restorations, by introducing a phased time-intensity cure schedule. This work identified that curing conditions could influence the final properties of materials, and suggested the possibility of extending the characteristics that could be influenced beyond shrinkage to humidity resistance, Tg, outgassing and other important material properties. Obviously, these results have important ramifications for the photonic industry, with current efforts focused on improved manufacturing techniques. Improvement in low cost packaging solutions, including adhesives, will have to be made to bring the component cost down to address the needs of Metro and similar markets. However, there are perceived problems with the widespread use of adhesives, the most prevalent of these involving long term durability of the bond. Devices are typically aligned to sub-micron precision using active feedback and then must be locked in position to maintain performance. In contrast to traditional fastening methods, adhesive bonding is a highly attractive option due to the ease of deployment, lower equipment costs, and improved flexibility. Moreover, using methods analogous to those employed in dental applications, materials properties of photonic adhesives may be tailored using a programmed cure approach.

  5. Mechanical characterization and modeling of curing thermosets

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van 't Hof, C.

    2006-01-01

    Chemical shrinkage and simultaneous build-up of mechanical properties in curing thermosets leads to the build-up of residual stresses and strains. Depending on the constraints these may cause interface failure, dimensional inaccuracy or failure in the thermoset or its surrounding structure. The

  6. International Bureau for Epilepsy survey of children, teenagers, and young people with epilepsy: data in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Pei-Min; Ding, Ding; Zhu, Guo-Xing; Hong, Zhen

    2009-09-01

    The goals of this study were to assess the perception of people with or directly involved with childhood and adolescent epilepsy in China, and to gain insight into the real-life effects that epilepsy can have on quality of life, development, and opportunities for the future. Survey questionnaires were developed by the International Bureau for Epilepsy for three groups: teenagers and young adults, parents/caregivers of children with epilepsy, and health care professionals. In total we received 968 responses from 20 cities in China. Nearly two-thirds of teenagers and young adults with epilepsy (64.9%) and two-thirds of parents/caregivers of children with epilepsy (64.0%) who responded to the survey had kept epilepsy a secret from others. When asked specifically about drug-related side effects, more than half of teenagers and young adults with epilepsy reported experiencing side effects, specifically dizziness (23.9%), weight change (22.9%), and headache (14.5%). Health care professionals reported cognitive side effects (94.2%), mood change (56.7%), and skin rash (50%) in their patients with epilepsy. More than two-thirds of the teenagers and young adults with epilepsy (75.7%) expected the condition to hinder their lives in the future, affecting their chances of getting a job (52.6%), continuing their education (35.5%), and getting a boyfriend or girlfriend (33.7%). Among parents/caregivers of children with epilepsy, 85.7% expected the condition to hinder their child's life in the future. This survey documents some of the real-life consequences of epilepsy and highlights the important challenges and issues faced by people with epilepsy and their families in China. Ensuring that people are as free from seizures as possible and minimizing the side effects of treatment must be the primary goals of epilepsy management.

  7. Paroxysmal events during prolonged video-video electroencephalography monitoring in refractory epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanabria-Castro, A; Henríquez-Varela, F; Monge-Bonilla, C; Lara-Maier, S; Sittenfeld-Appel, M

    2017-03-16

    Given that epileptic seizures and non-epileptic paroxysmal events have similar clinical manifestations, using specific diagnostic methods is crucial, especially in patients with drug-resistant epilepsy. Prolonged video electroencephalography monitoring during epileptic seizures reveals epileptiform discharges and has become an essential procedure for epilepsy diagnosis. The main purpose of this study is to characterise paroxysmal events and compare patterns in patients with refractory epilepsy. We conducted a retrospective analysis of medical records from 91 patients diagnosed with refractory epilepsy who underwent prolonged video electroencephalography monitoring during hospitalisation. During prolonged video electroencephalography monitoring, 76.9% of the patients (n=70) had paroxysmal events. The mean number of events was 3.4±2.7; the duration of these events was highly variable. Most patients (80%) experienced seizures during wakefulness. The most common events were focal seizures with altered levels of consciousness, progressive bilateral generalized seizures and psychogenic non-epileptic seizures. Regarding all paroxysmal events, no differences were observed in the number or type of events by sex, in duration by sex or age at onset, or in the number of events by type of event. Psychogenic nonepileptic seizures were predominantly registered during wakefulness, lasted longer, started at older ages, and were more frequent in women. Paroxysmal events recorded during prolonged video electroencephalography monitoring in patients with refractory epilepsy show similar patterns and characteristics to those reported in other latitudes. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  8. EFFICACY AND TOLERABILITY OF LEVETIRACETAM (KEPPRA® IN THE TREATMENT OF EPILEPSY: REVIEW OF LITERATURE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Yu. Mukhin

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In spite of substantial progress in epileptology, complete seizure control cannot be achieved in a considerable proportion of patients (about 30 %; in this regard, the synthesis of new antiepileptic drugs (AEDs and rational combinations of available AEDs in view of their mechanisms of action remains relevant. Of particular interest are drugs with different mechanisms of action in relation to other AEDs (these drugs include levetiracetam, lacosamide, perampanel, etc.. The authors provide a literature review dealing with one of the new drugs – levetiracetam (Keppra that has a different mechanism of action, as compared with other AEDs. Levetiracetam has been approved for use as initial monotherapy for partial-onset epilepsy with or without secondary generalization in patients who are at least 16 years of age, as adjunctive treatment of partial-onset seizures with and without secondary generalization in babies who are at least 1 month old (oral solution or in children who are at least 6 years old (tablets, and in patients who are at least 12 years of age as adjunctive treatment of myoclonic seizures in juvenile myoclonic epilepsy and as therapy for generalized tonic-clonic seizures in idiopathic generalized epilepsy. The review details the mechanism of action of levetiracetam, its pharmacokinetics, and data on its efficacy and tolerability in the treatment of epilepsy. The findings have led to the conclusion that levetiracetam is a well-studied and promising drug used in the monoand polytherapy of different forms of epilepsy

  9. Evaluation of physical educators' knowledge about epilepsy Avaliação do conhecimento de professores de educação física sobre epilepsia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodrigo Luiz Vancini

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available People with epilepsy suffer from a considerable lack of physical activity. In addition, an important problem of epilepsy management is the lack of qualified professionals. In this study we present data from a survey which aimed to assess physical educators' general knowledge about epilepsy. One hundred and thirty four physical educators of both sexes answered a questionnaire. Sixty percent of the professionals believe that a seizure is an abnormal electrical discharge of the brain, 13% that epilepsy is a cerebral chronic disease that can not be cured or controlled, 84% that people having convulsions will not necessarily present epilepsy and 5% that people with epilepsy have difficulties of learning. Questions concerned previous professional experience with epilepsy showed that 61% have seen a seizure and 53% have access to some information about epilepsy. Thus, 28% of professionals have a friend or relative with epilepsy, 14% have a student with epilepsy, and 29% helped someone during seizures. Our findings reveal a lack of physical educators' appropriate knowledge about epilepsy. Improvement of this might contribute to the improvement of epilepsy care/management.Pessoas com epilepsia apresentam baixa participação em atividades físicas. Um importante problema nos cuidados da epilepsia é a falta de profissionais qualificados. Neste estudo apresentamos dados de uma pesquisa para avaliar o conhecimento de professores de educação física sobre a epilepsia. Um questionário foi respondido por 134 educadores físicos de ambos os sexos. Sessenta por cento dos profissionais acreditam que a crise epilética é uma descarga elétrica anormal do cérebro, 13% que a epilepsia é uma doença crônica cerebral que não pode ser curada ou controlada, 84% que pessoas que têm convulsões não necessariamente apresentam epilepsia e 5% que pessoas com epilepsia têm dificuldade de aprendizado. Em relação à experiência prévia do profissional, 61

  10. Talking Cure Models: A Framework of Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher Marx

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Psychotherapy is commonly described as a “talking cure,” a treatment method that operates through linguistic action and interaction. The operative specifics of therapeutic language use, however, are insufficiently understood, mainly due to a multitude of disparate approaches that advance different notions of what “talking” means and what “cure” implies in the respective context. Accordingly, a clarification of the basic theoretical structure of “talking cure models,” i.e., models that describe therapeutic processes with a focus on language use, is a desideratum of language-oriented psychotherapy research. Against this background the present paper suggests a theoretical framework of analysis which distinguishes four basic components of “talking cure models”: (1 a foundational theory (which suggests how linguistic activity can affect and transform human experience, (2 an experiential problem state (which defines the problem or pathology of the patient, (3 a curative linguistic activity (which defines linguistic activities that are supposed to effectuate a curative transformation of the experiential problem state, and (4 a change mechanism (which defines the processes and effects involved in such transformations. The purpose of the framework is to establish a terminological foundation that allows for systematically reconstructing basic properties and operative mechanisms of “talking cure models.” To demonstrate the applicability and utility of the framework, five distinct “talking cure models” which spell out the details of curative “talking” processes in terms of (1 catharsis, (2 symbolization, (3 narrative, (4 metaphor, and (5 neurocognitive inhibition are introduced and discussed in terms of the framework components. In summary, we hope that our framework will prove useful for the objective of clarifying the theoretical underpinnings of language-oriented psychotherapy research and help to establish a more

  11. Talking Cure Models: A Framework of Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marx, Christopher; Benecke, Cord; Gumz, Antje

    2017-01-01

    Psychotherapy is commonly described as a “talking cure,” a treatment method that operates through linguistic action and interaction. The operative specifics of therapeutic language use, however, are insufficiently understood, mainly due to a multitude of disparate approaches that advance different notions of what “talking” means and what “cure” implies in the respective context. Accordingly, a clarification of the basic theoretical structure of “talking cure models,” i.e., models that describe therapeutic processes with a focus on language use, is a desideratum of language-oriented psychotherapy research. Against this background the present paper suggests a theoretical framework of analysis which distinguishes four basic components of “talking cure models”: (1) a foundational theory (which suggests how linguistic activity can affect and transform human experience), (2) an experiential problem state (which defines the problem or pathology of the patient), (3) a curative linguistic activity (which defines linguistic activities that are supposed to effectuate a curative transformation of the experiential problem state), and (4) a change mechanism (which defines the processes and effects involved in such transformations). The purpose of the framework is to establish a terminological foundation that allows for systematically reconstructing basic properties and operative mechanisms of “talking cure models.” To demonstrate the applicability and utility of the framework, five distinct “talking cure models” which spell out the details of curative “talking” processes in terms of (1) catharsis, (2) symbolization, (3) narrative, (4) metaphor, and (5) neurocognitive inhibition are introduced and discussed in terms of the framework components. In summary, we hope that our framework will prove useful for the objective of clarifying the theoretical underpinnings of language-oriented psychotherapy research and help to establish a more comprehensive

  12. Quality of life in children with epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanai, T

    1996-01-01

    To study quality of life in school children with epilepsy, we surveyed families of 443 elementary and junior high school children with epilepsy, as well as their school teachers. Approximately 80% responded. Seizures were controlled in 70% of the children. Of the children with epilepsy, 27% received education for disturbed children. Main family concerns were the future of their child, seizures, and school performance. Main concerns of the children were medication and seizures. The majority of both families and teachers agreed that children should participate in all physical education and school events based on individual considerations. Many teachers expressed the opinion that correct information about epilepsy and close communication between teachers and physicians are necessary. To establish comprehensive medical care that satisfies the needs of children with epilepsy and their families, further training of medical specialists in epilepsy, establishment of more hospitals specializing in epilepsy, and enhancement of the network among relevant organizations are needed. For children with intractable epilepsy, special considerations include associated handicaps and antiepileptic drug side effects.

  13. Sensory modulation disorders in childhood epilepsy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Campen, Jolien S; Jansen, Floor E|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/304815640; Kleinrensink, Nienke J; Joëls, Marian|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/070219249; Braun, Kees Pj|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/207237239; Bruining, Hilgo|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/304811440

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Altered sensory sensitivity is generally linked to seizure-susceptibility in childhood epilepsy but may also be associated to the highly prevalent problems in behavioral adaptation. This association is further suggested by the frequent overlap of childhood epilepsy with autism spectrum

  14. Women with epilepsy: clinically relevant issues

    OpenAIRE

    Bangar, Santosh; Shastri, Abhishek; El-Sayeh, Hany; Cavanna, Andrea E.

    2016-01-01

    Women with epilepsy (WWE) face specific challenges throughout their lifespan due to the effects of seizures and antiepileptic drugs on hormonal function, potentially affecting both sexual and reproductive health. This review article addresses the most common issues of practical relevance to clinicians treating WWE: epidemiology and clinical presentations (including catamenial epilepsy), contraception, reproductive and sexual dysfunction, pregnancy, lactation, menopause-related issues (includi...

  15. What Every Teacher Should Know about Epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spiegel, Gregory L.; And Others

    1996-01-01

    An overview of epilepsy and its possible ramifications is provided. The etiology of epilepsy, its diagnosis, and the different types of seizures (tonic-clonic, tonic, and absence) are explained. Information is also provided on first aid and treatment such as medications and surgery. Educational issues, including social, academic, and parent/school…

  16. Electroencephalographic patterns in Ethiopian patients with epilepsy

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Epilepsy is a common problem throughout sub-Saharan Africa, including Ethiopia. Electroencephalography (EEG) is useful for the diagnosis and proper treatment of this condition. However, the literature is scanty of reports describing EEG patterns in Ethiopian patients with epilepsy. This study attempts to ...

  17. Pragmatic Communication Deficits in Children with Epilepsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broeders, Mark; Geurts, Hilde; Jennekens-Schinkel, Aag

    2010-01-01

    Background: Various psychiatric and neurological disorders including epilepsy have been associated with language deficits. Pragmatic language deficits, however, have seldom been the focus of earlier studies in children with epilepsy. Moreover, it is unknown whether these pragmatic deficits are related to general intellectual functioning. Both…

  18. Epilepsy and Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oguni, Hirokazu

    2013-01-01

    The co-occurrence of epilepsy in people with intellectual disabilities (ID) and other developmental disabilities (DD) has received attention because it has a significant negative impact on health, well-being, and quality of life. The current research investigating the frequency and form of epilepsy in children with ID and DD is reviewed, with…

  19. Effect of Seizure Clustering on Epilepsy Outcome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Gordon Millichap

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available A prospective, long-term population-based study was performed to determine whether seizure clustering (3 or more afebrile seizures during a 24 hour period is associated with drug resistance and increased mortality in childhood-onset epilepsy, in a study at University of Turku, Finland, and the Epilepsy Research Group, Berlin, Germany.

  20. Monocarboxylate transporters in temporal lobe epilepsy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lauritzen, Fredrik; Eid, Tore; Bergersen, Linda H

    2013-01-01

    Epilepsy is a serious neurological disorder that affects approximately 1 % of the general population, making it one of the most common disorders of the central nervous system. Furthermore, up to 40 % of all patients with epilepsy cannot control their seizures with current medications. More effica...

  1. Electroencephalographic patterns in Ethiopian patients with epilepsy

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2mikitser

    2 Assistant Professor of Neurology (Hon), Department of Neurology, School of Medicine, Addis Ababa University, and. Consultant Neurologist ..... epilepsy 105. Ethiop. J. Health Dev. 2012;26(2) including head injury and childhood central nervous system infections. Classification of epilepsy is based on the clinical picture.

  2. The representation of epilepsy in popular music.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baxendale, Sallie

    2008-01-01

    Much can be learned about the contemporary stereotypes associated with epilepsy by studying the representation of the disorder in paintings, literature, and movies. Popular music is arguably the most accessible and ubiquitous of the creative art forms, touching most of us on a daily basis. Reviewed here are the ways in which epilepsy and seizures are used in the lyrics of musicians from a wide variety of musical genres, from hip-hop to rhythm and blues. Many of the ancient associations of epilepsy with madness, horror, and lunacy can be found in these lyrics. However, the language of epilepsy has also been appropriated by some musical artists to represent a state of sexual ecstasy and dance euphoria. The references to these states as "epilepsy" or a "seizure" in numerous songs suggest that this shorthand is widely recognized within some subcultures. Although epilepsy has frequently been associated with female sexual availability in other creative art forms, this novel use of the language of epilepsy represents a contemporary departure in the artistic application of epilepsy-related images and associations in the 21st century.

  3. Living with Epilepsy--Not around It

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apel, Laura

    2008-01-01

    This article presents an interview on Kevin Eggers, a 19-year-old college student from Seattle, Washington, who was diagnosed with epilepsy but had not let it prevent him from accomplishing his goals. As an Epilepsy Advocate, Kevin helps other teens and young adults realize that having a disability does not mean not living a normal and fulfilling…

  4. Vascular determinants of epilepsy: The Rotterdam study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    X. Li (Xinhua); M.M.B. Breteler (Monique); M.C. de Bruyne (Martine); H. Meinardi; W.A. Hauser (W. Allen); A. Hofman (Albert)

    1997-01-01

    textabstractPurpose: To investigate the relation between vascular determinants and epilepsy in an elderly population. Methods: This is a cross-sectional, community-based, case-control study. The total study population was comprised of 4,944 subjects, 65 of whom had epilepsy which conformed to

  5. Sleep Disorders in Children with Epilepsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Gordon Millichap

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Sleep and behavior disorders in 55 children with epilepsy (mean age 10 years; range 4-16 years were compared with those in their non-epileptic siblings of the same ages and sex ratio and correlated with epilepsy-specific factors, in a study at Alberta Children's Hospital, University of Calgary, Alberta, Canada.

  6. Maternal Mortality in Women with Epilepsy

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Holohan, M

    2016-10-01

    It is estimated that, in Ireland, there are 10,000 women with epilepsy of childbearing potential1. In this paper the maternal mortality rate for women with epilepsy attending the Rotunda Hospital Epilepsy Clinic 2004 - 2013 was determined. There were 3 maternal deaths in women with epilepsy during this time, which represents a mortality rate of 0.8%. In those women who died, there were concerns in relation to risks to the foetus by taking Anti-Epileptic Drugs (AED) and also issues with access to neurology services before pregnancy, acceptance of specialist support and lack of consistency in advice from health care professionals outside of Ireland. Implementing the nationally agreed care plan for women with epilepsy will improve the quality of care given and potentially we will see a reduction in maternal mortality in these women.

  7. Video electroencephalogram telemetry in temporal lobe epilepsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jayanti Mani

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE is the most commonly encountered medically refractory epilepsy. It is also the substrate of refractory epilepsy that gives the most gratifying results in any epilepsy surgery program, with a minimum use of resources. Correlation of clinical behavior and the ictal patterns during ictal behavior is mandatory for success at epilepsy surgery. Video electroencephalogram (EEG telemetry achieves this goal and hence plays a pivotal role in pre-surgical assessment. The role of telemetry is continuously evolving with the advent of digital EEG technology, of high-resolution volumetric magnetic resonance imaging and other functional imaging techniques. Most of surgical selection in patients with TLE can be done with a scalp video EEG monitoring. However, the limitations of the scalp EEG technique demand invasive recordings in a selected group of TLE patients. This subset of the patients can be a challenge to the epileptologist.

  8. Translational approach for gene therapy in epilepsy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ledri, Litsa Nikitidou; Melin, Esbjörn; Christiansen, Søren H.

    2016-01-01

    Although novel treatment strategies based on the gene therapy approach for epilepsy has been encouraging, there is still a gap in demonstrating a proof-of-concept in a clinically relevant animal model and study design. In the present study, a conceptually novel framework reflecting a plausible...... clinical trial for gene therapy of temporal lobe epilepsy was explored: We investigated (i) whether the post intrahippocampal kainate-induced status epilepticus (SE) model of chronic epilepsy in rats could be clinically relevant; and (ii) whether a translationally designed neuropeptide Y (NPY)/Y2 receptor......-based gene therapy approach targeting only the seizure-generating focus unilaterally can decrease seizure frequency in this chronic model of epilepsy.Our data suggest that the intrahippocampal kainate model resembles the disease development of human chronic mesial temporal lobe epilepsy (mTLE): (i...

  9. Acupuncture for refractory epilepsy: role of thalamus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Shuping; Wang, Shubin; Rong, Peijing; Liu, Junling; Zhang, Hongqi; Zhang, Jianliang

    2014-01-01

    Neurostimulation procedures like vagus nerve stimulation (VNS) and deep brain stimulation have been used to treat refractory epilepsy and other neurological disorders. While holding promise, they are invasive interventions with serious complications and adverse effects. Moreover, their efficacies are modest with less seizure free. Acupuncture is a simple, safe, and effective traditional healing modality for a wide range of diseases including pain and epilepsy. Thalamus takes critical role in sensory transmission and is highly involved in epilepsy genesis particularly the absence epilepsy. Considering thalamus serves as a convergent structure for both acupuncture and VNS and the thalamic neuronal activities can be modulated by acupuncture, we propose that acupuncture could be a promising therapy or at least a screening tool to select suitable candidates for those invasive modalities in the management of refractory epilepsy.

  10. Acupuncture for Refractory Epilepsy: Role of Thalamus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuping Chen

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Neurostimulation procedures like vagus nerve stimulation (VNS and deep brain stimulation have been used to treat refractory epilepsy and other neurological disorders. While holding promise, they are invasive interventions with serious complications and adverse effects. Moreover, their efficacies are modest with less seizure free. Acupuncture is a simple, safe, and effective traditional healing modality for a wide range of diseases including pain and epilepsy. Thalamus takes critical role in sensory transmission and is highly involved in epilepsy genesis particularly the absence epilepsy. Considering thalamus serves as a convergent structure for both acupuncture and VNS and the thalamic neuronal activities can be modulated by acupuncture, we propose that acupuncture could be a promising therapy or at least a screening tool to select suitable candidates for those invasive modalities in the management of refractory epilepsy.

  11. Dendritic ion channelopathy in acquired epilepsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poolos, Nicholas P.; Johnston, Daniel

    2012-01-01

    Summary Ion channel dysfunction or “channelopathy” is a proven cause of epilepsy in the relatively uncommon genetic epilepsies with Mendelian inheritance. But numerous examples of acquired channelopathy in experimental animal models of epilepsy following brain injury have also been demonstrated. Our understanding of channelopathy has grown due to advances in electrophysiology techniques that have allowed the study of ion channels in the dendrites of pyramidal neurons in cortex and hippocampus. The apical dendrites of pyramidal neurons comprise the vast majority of neuronal surface membrane area, and thus the majority of the neuronal ion channel population. Investigation of dendritic ion channels has demonstrated remarkable plasticity in ion channel localization and biophysical properties in epilepsy, many of which produce hyperexcitability and may contribute to the development and maintenance of the epileptic state. Here we review recent advances in dendritic physiology and cell biology, and their relevance to epilepsy. PMID:23216577

  12. Danish experience with paediatric epilepsy surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Underbjerg, Ebba von Celsing; Hoei-Hansen, Christina E; Madsen, Flemming Find

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Epilepsy surgery is increasingly used to treat children with medically intractable epilepsy. This study investigates the aetiology and seizure outcome in Danish children operated between 1996 and 2010. METHODS: Retrospectively collected data on structural magnetic resonance imaging...... (MRI) diagnoses, surgical procedures and seizure outcomes classified according to the Engel Classification were used. Changes over time grouped as 1996-2000, 2001-2005 and 2006-2010 were analysed. RESULTS: A total of 95 children underwent epilepsy surgery. Sixty-three operations were performed...... of children who undergo epilepsy surgery have a good, worthwhile seizure outcome. The seizure outcome for Danish children corresponds to that of other epilepsy surgery centres. The clinical criteria for selection of patients changed over time. FUNDING: none. TRIAL REGISTRATION: The Danish Data Protection...

  13. International veterinary epilepsy task force consensus proposal

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    De Risio, Luisa; Bhatti, Sofie; Muñana, Karen

    2015-01-01

    This article outlines the consensus proposal on diagnosis of epilepsy in dogs by the International Veterinary Epilepsy Task Force. The aim of this consensus proposal is to improve consistency in the diagnosis of epilepsy in the clinical and research settings. The diagnostic approach to the patient...... paroxysmal events can be challenging. Criteria that can be used to make this differentiation are presented in detail and discussed. Criteria for the diagnosis of idiopathic epilepsy (IE) are described in a three-tier system. Tier I confidence level for the diagnosis of IE is based on a history of two or more...... for the diagnosis of IE is based on the factors listed in tier I and unremarkable fasting and post-prandial bile acids, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the brain (based on an epilepsy-specific brain MRI protocol) and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) analysis. Tier III confidence level for the diagnosis of IE is based...

  14. Incidence and prevalence of epilepsy in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Jakob; Vestergaard, Mogens; Pedersen, Marianne G

    2007-01-01

    PURPOSE: To estimate the occurrence of epilepsy in Denmark between 1977 and 2002, taking gender, age, and secular trends into consideration. METHODS: We used the Danish Civil Registration System to identify all persons born in Denmark and the Danish National Hospital Register to identify persons...... registered with epilepsy between 1977 and 2002. RESULTS: Between 1977 and 2002 the average incidence of epilepsy was 68.8 new epilepsy patients per 100,000 person-years at risk. However, the incidence changed with calendar time and increased steeply from 1990 to 1995, probably due to changes in diagnostic...... declined from a high level in children to a low level between 20 and 40 years of age, and thereafter a gradual increase was seen. The incidence rate was slightly higher in men than in women except for the age range 10-20 years. About 2% of the population was diagnosed with epilepsy at some point during...

  15. Danish experience with paediatric epilepsy surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Underbjerg, Ebba von Celsing; Hoei-Hansen, Christina E; Madsen, Flemming Find

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Epilepsy surgery is increasingly used to treat children with medically intractable epilepsy. This study investigates the aetiology and seizure outcome in Danish children operated between 1996 and 2010. METHODS: Retrospectively collected data on structural magnetic resonance imaging...... of children who undergo epilepsy surgery have a good, worthwhile seizure outcome. The seizure outcome for Danish children corresponds to that of other epilepsy surgery centres. The clinical criteria for selection of patients changed over time. FUNDING: none. TRIAL REGISTRATION: The Danish Data Protection...... (MRI) diagnoses, surgical procedures and seizure outcomes classified according to the Engel Classification were used. Changes over time grouped as 1996-2000, 2001-2005 and 2006-2010 were analysed. RESULTS: A total of 95 children underwent epilepsy surgery. Sixty-three operations were performed...

  16. Perceptions of epilepsy among school teachers in Port Harcourt ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Conclusions: Knowledge of epilepsy amongst the primary school teachers was poor. The attitude of these teachers towards epilepsy was not encouraging as many did not have positive attitude toward children with epilepsy. The perception of epilepsy amongst the teachers may improve if correct and up-to-date information ...

  17. Epilepsy and Sleep Disorders: a Clinical Review | Sunmonu ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Sleep disorders could be misdiagnosed as epilepsy and also worsen epilepsy. We searched Medline and Pubmed between 1962-2012, using the following search terms 'sleep', 'epilepsy', 'parasomnia', 'Obstructive Sleep apnea', 'restless legs' 'idiopathic generalized epilepsy'. One hundred and eighteen relevant studies ...

  18. Cues for Cure; From within

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Editorial

    2016-05-01

    -35. Mimeault M, Batra SK. Recent progress on tissue-resident adult stem cell biology and their therapeutic implications. Stem Cell Rev. 2008; 4(1:27-49.

  19. Cannabidiol in patients with treatment-resistant epilepsy: an open-label interventional trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devinsky, Orrin; Marsh, Eric; Friedman, Daniel; Thiele, Elizabeth; Laux, Linda; Sullivan, Joseph; Miller, Ian; Flamini, Robert; Wilfong, Angus; Filloux, Francis; Wong, Matthew; Tilton, Nicole; Bruno, Patricia; Bluvstein, Judith; Hedlund, Julie; Kamens, Rebecca; Maclean, Jane; Nangia, Srishti; Singhal, Nilika Shah; Wilson, Carey A; Patel, Anup; Cilio, Maria Roberta

    2016-03-01

    =18 [11%]). Five (3%) patients discontinued treatment because of an adverse event. Serious adverse events were reported in 48 (30%) patients, including one death-a sudden unexpected death in epilepsy regarded as unrelated to study drug. 20 (12%) patients had severe adverse events possibly related to cannabidiol use, the most common of which was status epilepticus (n=9 [6%]). The median monthly frequency of motor seizures was 30.0 (IQR 11.0-96.0) at baseline and 15.8 (5.6-57.6) over the 12 week treatment period. The median reduction in monthly motor seizures was 36.5% (IQR 0-64.7). Our findings suggest that cannabidiol might reduce seizure frequency and might have an adequate safety profile in children and young adults with highly treatment-resistant epilepsy. Randomised controlled trials are warranted to characterise the safety profile and true efficacy of this compound. GW Pharmaceuticals, Epilepsy Therapy Project of the Epilepsy Foundation, Finding A Cure for Epilepsy and Seizures. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. APHASIA-EPILEPSY SINDROME LANDAU-KLEFFNER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nada SIKIC

    1997-06-01

    Full Text Available In the few past years the expert team in our institution identified five children with specific disorders in speech development caused by difficulties in understanding of speech.All children had normal psychophysical development up to three to four years of life, when speech disorders, very often entirely nonspecific, started. In some children the changes had been preceded by epileptic attacks either in vigilance or in sleep.Gradually speech expression lags behind, speech stops to be meaningful, it is not the result of child’s creativity but a series of learned schemes, sometimes related to current situation, so that in this period the environment very often does not detect the problem.Progressively behavior disturbance takes place as a result of incomprehension of verbal demands put upon a child. Parents usually start to suspect hearing impairment and this is the main reason for coming to our institution. Additional diagnostics confirmed the existence of non-specific disorder related to syndrome epilepsy-aphasia, whereupon medical treatment and rehabilitation started.