WorldWideScience

Sample records for curietherapie pulsee imagerie

  1. Expertise report on curietherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peiffert, Didier; Lartigau, Eric; Mazeron, Jean-Jacques; Ardiet, Jean-Michel; Barillot, Isabelle; Bonnet, Jacques; Delannes, Martine; Bossi, Alberto; Haie-Meder, Christine; Brunaud, Claire; Marchesi, Vincent; Cosset, Jean-Marc; Hannoun-Levi, Jean-Michel; Dejean, Catherine; Lapeyre, Michel; Millet, Frederique; Nickers, Philippe; Pommier, Pascal; Thomas, Laurence; Martin, Philippe; Le Du, Dominique

    2011-01-01

    This report proposes a rather detailed overview of the practice of curietherapy in France. After a definition of this therapeutic treatment, it presents where and under which status this technique is provided. Then, after a history of treatment techniques, it presents the equipment used in centres practicing curietherapy, other necessary equipment, and the personnel in charge of treatments and education. It analyses the activity of centres with respect to the used technique: share of curietherapy among radiotherapy treatments, distribution of techniques, evolutions from 1995 to 2009 for the different techniques, activity in 2009, evolution of indications in France between 2000 and 2009, evolution of practices and indications in Europe. It analyses the various pathologies treated in 2009 (gynaecology, prostate, breast, ORL, others). It proposes a cost analysis of some treatments and processes. It describes the needed skills in terms of team and of activity

  2. Curie-therapy of prostate cancer assisted by three-dimensional echography and robot; Curietherapie du cancer de prostate assistee par echographie tridimensionnelle et robot

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bolla, M.; Giraud, J.Y.; Descotes, J.L.; Long, J.A. [CHU, Grenoble (France); Hungr, N.; Baumann, M.; Troccaz, J. [TIMC-Image, CNRS, Grenoble (France); TIMC-Image, Universite joseph-Fourier, Grenoble (France)

    2011-10-15

    The author present and report the first assessments of the Prosper system which is based on the use of a robot coupled to methods of automatic tracking of prostate by three-dimensional ultrasonic imagery. This system aims at solving some difficulties met by curie-therapy. System accuracy has been assessed on a deformable anatomic phantom: a needle can be positioned with accuracy smaller that 2 mm, despite deformations and movements of the prostate embedded in the phantom. Short communication

  3. Curie-therapy of prostate cancer assisted by three-dimensional echography and robot

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bolla, M.; Giraud, J.Y.; Descotes, J.L.; Long, J.A.; Hungr, N.; Baumann, M.; Troccaz, J.

    2011-01-01

    The author present and report the first assessments of the Prosper system which is based on the use of a robot coupled to methods of automatic tracking of prostate by three-dimensional ultrasonic imagery. This system aims at solving some difficulties met by curie-therapy. System accuracy has been assessed on a deformable anatomic phantom: a needle can be positioned with accuracy smaller that 2 mm, despite deformations and movements of the prostate embedded in the phantom. Short communication

  4. Impact of curie-therapy timing in the treatment of cervical cancer; Impact du timing de la curietherapie dans le traitement du cancer du col uterin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kochbati, L.; Bouzid, N.; Saidi, I.; Nasr, C.; Messai, T.; Hentati, D.; Gargouri, W.; Besbes, M.; Maalej, M. [Service de radiotherapie, institut Salah-Azaiz, Tunis (Tunisia)

    2011-10-15

    Curie-therapy conventionally comes before surgery in the treatment of cervical cancer, either alone or after a concomitant chemotherapy. The authors report a study of the impact of a reverse sequence (surgery before curie-therapy) on the exeresis quality and on the evolution of operable tumours. Among women treated between 2004 and 2009, 40 have been identified who had surgery before curie-therapy. Ages, tumour stages, average doses, and treatment procedures are discussed. The notably high rate of vaginal sections could be reduced or avoided by using the conventional protocol (curie-therapy before surgery). Short communication

  5. Interstitial curietherapy with iridium 192 applied to small cancers of the rectum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Papillon, J.; Montbarbon, J.F.; Gerard, J.P.

    1975-01-01

    Intracavity irradiation aimed at curing cancers of the rectum mainly calls on contact radiotherapy but also on interstitial curietherapy. Iridium curietherapy has replaced radium-therapy owing to the better homogeneousness of its action and precise method of assay. It uses a 2 pronged fork containing 2 iridium wires which can be very simply placed in position. It is applied on the one hand to the base of the ulcerated tumour, after abrasion by contactotherapy and on the other hand as a method of prophylactic irradiation after exeresis of a malignant or degenerated polyp where the scar is badly adapted to contactotherapy [fr

  6. Californium-252 neutron curietherapy for advanced cervical cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maruyama, Y; Bell, P R; Yoneda, J; Van Nagell, J R

    1982-01-01

    Low dose rate neutron radiotherapy using fast neutrons emitted by the radionuclide 252Cf was combined with fractionated X- or gamma rays for the radiotherapy of advanced cervicovaginal tumors. Two different implant schedules were tested to determine the response of the tumors to the scheduling of therapy with the 252CF either early or delayed in the fractionated radiotherapy course. A 90% frequency of complete local clearance of pelvic tumors was observed by the early application of 252Cf. Neutron curietherapy applied as a boost treatment at the end of fractionated radiotherapy, resulted in only 40% local control. Improved results were observed by early implantation therapy and is postulated to be the result of more effective hypoxic tumor therapy and reoxygenation of the hypoxic pelvic tumor. The two groups of patients were compared as to their general status and medical condition and were found similar in age, frequency of associated disease, body weight and tumor stage. The failures of local control by early 252Cf neutron therapy, occurred in 2 patients with high-stage tumor and severe vascular disease and suggests that tumor response was partly dependent upon the integrity and elasticity of the small vessel system.

  7. Medicine and ionizing rays: a help sheet in analysing risks in high rate curietherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gauron, C.

    2009-01-01

    This document proposes a synthesis of useful knowledge for radioprotection in the case of high rate curietherapy. Several aspects are considered: the concerned personnel, the course of treatment procedures, the hazards, the identification of the risk associated with ionizing radiation, the risk assessment and the determination of exposure levels, the strategy to control the risks (reduction of risks, technical measures concerning the installation or the personnel, teaching and information, prevention and medical monitoring), and risk control assessment

  8. Medicine and ionizing rays: a help sheet in analysing risks in pulsed rate curietherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gauron, C.

    2009-01-01

    This document proposes a synthesis of useful knowledge for radioprotection in the case of pulsed rate curietherapy. Several aspects are considered: the concerned personnel, the course of treatment procedures, the hazards, the identification of the risk associated with ionizing radiation, the risk assessment and the determination of exposure levels, the strategy to control the risks (reduction of risks, technical measures concerning the installation or the personnel, teaching and information, prevention and medical monitoring), and risk control assessment

  9. The place of high dose rate curie-therapy in cutaneous cancers: experience of the Neufchatel hospital on 140 patients; Place de la curietherapie de haut debit de dose dans les cancers cutanes: experience de l'hopital neuchatelois a propos de 140 patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yanes, B.; Fraija, L.; Guibert, G.; Notter, M. [Hopital neuchatelois, La Chaux-de-Fonds (Switzerland)

    2011-10-15

    The authors report the experience of the Neufchatel hospital in the treatment by curie-therapy of 140 patients exhibiting cutaneous cancers. The apparatus comprised an iridium 192 source and a Leipzig-type applicator. The distributions of carcinoma type and treated localizations are indicated. Results are analyzed in terms of age, tumour size, aesthetic result, local control for the different types of carcinomas. Short communication

  10. Imagery Data Base Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Imagery Data Base Facility supports AFRL and other government organizations by providing imagery interpretation and analysis to users for data selection, imagery...

  11. Everyday imagery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Peters, Chris; Allan, Stuart

    2016-01-01

    the gradual disappearance of media from personal consciousness in a digital age. If ceaselessness is a defining characteristic of the current era, our analysis reveals that the use of smartphone cameras is indicative of people affectively and self-consciously deploying the technology to try to arrest......User-based research into the lived experiences associated with smartphone camera practices – in particular, the taking, storing, curating, and sharing of personal imagery in the digital media sphere – remains scarce, especially in contrast to their increasing ubiquity. Accordingly, this article...

  12. Workstation studies in prostate curie-therapy: example of a prevention approach - Documents for the occupational physician Nr 129 - First quarter 2012

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gagna, G.; Michel, X.; Wassilieff, S.; Padilla, A.; Amabile, J.C.; Laroche, P.; Gauron, C.

    2012-01-01

    This document reports a dosimetric study performed during prostate curie-therapy sessions, illustrates the importance of the workstation study, and proposes a practical example of prevention approach. After having briefly recalled the legal requirements, the authors present the objectives, interests, and modalities of a workstation study, and outline the annual dose legal limits and the arrangements concerning the delimitation of work areas. Then, after a presentation of the adopted methodology, they describe the various equipment used in the dosimetric study to assess efficient dose, equivalent dose at the extremities and at the crystalline level, overall dosimetry, and to determine the radiological zoning. Then, after a description of the surgical technique and of the characteristics of the radioactive sources, they discuss the results for the different concerned workstations (radiotherapist, urologist, radio physician, and so on). General exposure parameters are analysed and results of the dosimetric study are presented and discussed. Recommendations are made regarding radiological zoning, personnel classification, use of individual protection equipment, and radiation protection with respect to patient

  13. Auditory Imagery: Empirical Findings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hubbard, Timothy L.

    2010-01-01

    The empirical literature on auditory imagery is reviewed. Data on (a) imagery for auditory features (pitch, timbre, loudness), (b) imagery for complex nonverbal auditory stimuli (musical contour, melody, harmony, tempo, notational audiation, environmental sounds), (c) imagery for verbal stimuli (speech, text, in dreams, interior monologue), (d)…

  14. NAIP 2015 Imagery Feedback

    Data.gov (United States)

    Farm Service Agency, Department of Agriculture — The NAIP 2015 Imagery Feedback web application allows users to make comments and observations about the quality of the 2015 National Agriculture Imagery Program...

  15. Current Resource Imagery Projects

    Data.gov (United States)

    Farm Service Agency, Department of Agriculture — Map showing coverage of current Resource imagery projects. High resolution/large scale Resource imagery is typically acquired for the U.S. Forest Service and other...

  16. Imagery Integration Team

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calhoun, Tracy; Melendrez, Dave

    2014-01-01

    The Human Exploration Science Office (KX) provides leadership for NASA's Imagery Integration (Integration 2) Team, an affiliation of experts in the use of engineering-class imagery intended to monitor the performance of launch vehicles and crewed spacecraft in flight. Typical engineering imagery assessments include studying and characterizing the liftoff and ascent debris environments; launch vehicle and propulsion element performance; in-flight activities; and entry, landing, and recovery operations. Integration 2 support has been provided not only for U.S. Government spaceflight (e.g., Space Shuttle, Ares I-X) but also for commercial launch providers, such as Space Exploration Technologies Corporation (SpaceX) and Orbital Sciences Corporation, servicing the International Space Station. The NASA Integration 2 Team is composed of imagery integration specialists from JSC, the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC), and the Kennedy Space Center (KSC), who have access to a vast pool of experience and capabilities related to program integration, deployment and management of imagery assets, imagery data management, and photogrammetric analysis. The Integration 2 team is currently providing integration services to commercial demonstration flights, Exploration Flight Test-1 (EFT-1), and the Space Launch System (SLS)-based Exploration Missions (EM)-1 and EM-2. EM-2 will be the first attempt to fly a piloted mission with the Orion spacecraft. The Integration 2 Team provides the customer (both commercial and Government) with access to a wide array of imagery options - ground-based, airborne, seaborne, or vehicle-based - that are available through the Government and commercial vendors. The team guides the customer in assembling the appropriate complement of imagery acquisition assets at the customer's facilities, minimizing costs associated with market research and the risk of purchasing inadequate assets. The NASA Integration 2 capability simplifies the process of securing one

  17. Study of a pulsed discharge in hydrogen using the far ultraviolet emission of an additional element: electron temperature measurement; Etude d'une decharge pulsee dans l'hydrogene a partir de l'emission dans l'ultraviolet lointain d'un element additionnel: mesure de la temperature electronique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schwob, J.L. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Fontenay-aux-Roses (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1967-06-15

    Ionization and excitation of an additional element in a pulsed annular discharge in hydrogen at low pressure (T.A.2000) are described by means of a simple coronal type analytical model. This model allows us to interpret the time variation of the intensity of spectral lines observed in the vacuum ultraviolet region. From this analysis two methods of electron temperature determination are deduced. The first method is based on the apparition time measurement of the intensity maximum for the spectral lines emitted from successive ions of the additional element (nitrogen). In the second method the electron temperature is determined from the intensity ratio of two spectral lines of an alkali-like ion. The transition couples (2s-2p, 2s-3p) and (2s-2p, 3s-3p) of C IV, N V and O VI have been used. The results obtained with these two independent methods are in good agreement. The electron temperature varies from a few electron-volts at the beginning of the discharge, to 70 eV at the time of N V emission (at 55 {mu}s), before the current maximum in the discharge (at 170 {mu}s). (author) [French] On etudie l'ionisation et l'excitation d'un element additionnel dans une decharge annulaire pulsee dans l'hydrogene sous faible pression (T.A.2000) a ralde d'un modele analytique simple du type coronal. Ce modele permet d'interpreter l'evolution de l'intensite des raies spectrales observees dans l'ultraviolet lointain. On deduit de cette etude deux methodes de determination de la temperature electronique. La premiere est basee sur la meaure des temps d'apparition des maximums d'intensite des raies emises par les ions successifs de l'element additionnel (azote). Dans la deuxieme methode la temperature est determinee a partir du rapport d'intensite des deux raies d'un ion alcalinoide. On a utilise les couples de transitions (2s-2p, 2s-3p) et (2e-2p, 3s-3p) des ions C IV, N V et 0 VI. Les resultats obtenus par ces deux

  18. Coastal California Digital Imagery

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This digital ortho-imagery dataset is a survey of coastal California. The project area consists of approximately 3774 square miles. The project design of the digital...

  19. NOAA Emergency Response Imagery

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The imagery posted on this site is in response to natural disasters. The aerial photography missions were conducted by the NOAA Remote Sensing Division. The majority...

  20. Multimodal mental imagery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nanay, Bence

    2017-07-17

    When I am looking at my coffee machine that makes funny noises, this is an instance of multisensory perception - I perceive this event by means of both vision and audition. But very often we only receive sensory stimulation from a multisensory event by means of one sense modality, for example, when I hear the noisy coffee machine in the next room, that is, without seeing it. The aim of this paper is to bring together empirical findings about multimodal perception and empirical findings about (visual, auditory, tactile) mental imagery and argue that on occasions like this, we have multimodal mental imagery: perceptual processing in one sense modality (here: vision) that is triggered by sensory stimulation in another sense modality (here: audition). Multimodal mental imagery is not a rare and obscure phenomenon. The vast majority of what we perceive are multisensory events: events that can be perceived in more than one sense modality - like the noisy coffee machine. And most of the time we are only acquainted with these multisensory events via a subset of the sense modalities involved - all the other aspects of these multisensory events are represented by means of multisensory mental imagery. This means that multisensory mental imagery is a crucial element of almost all instances of everyday perception. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Measuring Creative Imagery Abilities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dorota M. Jankowska

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Over the decades, creativity and imagination research developed in parallel, but they surprisingly rarely intersected. This paper introduces a new theoretical model of creative imagination, which bridges creativity and imagination research, as well as presents a new psychometric instrument, called the Test of Creative Imagery Abilities (TCIA, developed to measure creative imagery abilities understood in accordance with this model. Creative imagination is understood as constituted by three interrelated components: vividness (the ability to create images characterized by a high level of complexity and detail, originality (the ability to produce unique imagery, and transformativeness (the ability to control imagery. TCIA enables valid and reliable measurement of these three groups of abilities, yielding the general score of imagery abilities and at the same time making profile analysis possible. We present the results of eight studies on a total sample of more than 1,700 participants, showing the factor structure of TCIA using confirmatory factor analysis, as well as provide data confirming this instrument’s validity and reliability. The availability of TCIA for interested researchers may result in new insights and possibilities of integrating the fields of creativity and imagination science.

  2. NAIP 2015 Imagery Feedback Map

    Data.gov (United States)

    Farm Service Agency, Department of Agriculture — The NAIP 2015 Imagery Feedback map allows users to make comments and observations about the quality of the 2015 National Agriculture Imagery Program (NAIP)...

  3. NAIP 2017 Imagery Feedback Map

    Data.gov (United States)

    Farm Service Agency, Department of Agriculture — The NAIP 2017 Imagery Feedback map allows users to make comments and observations about the quality of the 2017 National Agriculture Imagery Program (NAIP)...

  4. Solar Imagery - Chromosphere - Calcium

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This dataset consists of full-disk images of the sun in Calcium (Ca) II K wavelength (393.4 nm). Ca II K imagery reveal magnetic structures of the sun from about 500...

  5. Training visual imagery: Improvements of metacognition, but not imagery strength

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosanne Lynn Rademaker

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Visual imagery has been closely linked to brain mechanisms involved in perception. Can visual imagery, like visual perception, improve by means of training? Previous research has demonstrated that people can reliably evaluate the vividness of single episodes of sensory imagination – might the metacognition of imagery also improve over the course of training? We had participants imagine colored Gabor patterns for an hour a day, over the course of five consecutive days, and again two weeks after training. Participants rated the subjective vividness and effort of their mental imagery on each trial. The influence of imagery on subsequent binocular rivalry dominance was taken as our measure of imagery strength. We found no overall effect of training on imagery strength. Training did, however, improve participant’s metacognition of imagery. Trial-by-trial ratings of vividness gained predictive power on subsequent rivalry dominance as a function of training. These data suggest that, while imagery strength might be immune to training in the current context, people’s metacognitive understanding of mental imagery can improve with practice.

  6. Kinesthetic imagery of musical performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lotze, Martin

    2013-01-01

    Musicians use different kinds of imagery. This review focuses on kinesthetic imagery, which has been shown to be an effective complement to actively playing an instrument. However, experience in actual movement performance seems to be a requirement for a recruitment of those brain areas representing movement ideation during imagery. An internal model of movement performance might be more differentiated when training has been more intense or simply performed more often. Therefore, with respect to kinesthetic imagery, these strategies are predominantly found in professional musicians. There are a few possible reasons as to why kinesthetic imagery is used in addition to active training; one example is the need for mental rehearsal of the technically most difficult passages. Another reason for mental practice is that mental rehearsal of the piece helps to improve performance if the instrument is not available for actual training as is the case for professional musicians when they are traveling to various appearances. Overall, mental imagery in musicians is not necessarily specific to motor, somatosensory, auditory, or visual aspects of imagery, but integrates them all. In particular, the audiomotor loop is highly important, since auditory aspects are crucial for guiding motor performance. All these aspects result in a distinctive representation map for the mental imagery of musical performance. This review summarizes behavioral data, and findings from functional brain imaging studies of mental imagery of musical performance.

  7. Reserve Component Contribution to Imagery Intelligence

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Stafford, Ann

    2003-01-01

    .... Because raw imagery has limited value until it has been exploited, the increased volume of raw imagery demands an enhanced ability for combatant commanders and the National Imagery and Mapping Agency (NIMA...

  8. Non-Drug Pain Relief: Imagery

    Science.gov (United States)

    PATIENT EDUCATION patienteducation.osumc.edu Non-Drug Pain Relief: Imagery Relaxation helps lessen tension. One way to help decrease pain is to use imagery. Imagery is using your imagination to create a ...

  9. Benchmark Imagery FY11 Technical Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roberts, R. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Pope, P. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2011-06-14

    This report details the work performed in FY11 under project LL11-GS-PD06, “Benchmark Imagery for Assessing Geospatial Semantic Extraction Algorithms.” The original LCP for the Benchmark Imagery project called for creating a set of benchmark imagery for verifying and validating algorithms that extract semantic content from imagery. More specifically, the first year was slated to deliver real imagery that had been annotated, the second year to deliver real imagery that had composited features, and the final year was to deliver synthetic imagery modeled after the real imagery.

  10. Imagery Rescripting for Personality Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arntz, Arnoud

    2011-01-01

    Imagery rescripting is a powerful technique that can be successfully applied in the treatment of personality disorders. For personality disorders, imagery rescripting is not used to address intrusive images but to change the implicational meaning of schemas and childhood experiences that underlie the patient's problems. Various mechanisms that may…

  11. Polarimetric imagery collection experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romano, Joao M.; Felton, Melvin; Chenault, David; Sohr, Brian

    2010-04-01

    The Spectral and Polarimetric Imagery Collection Experiment (SPICE) is a collaborative effort between the US Army ARDEC and ARL that is focused on the collection of mid-wave and long-wave infrared imagery using hyperspectral, polarimetric, and broadband sensors. The objective of the program is to collect a comprehensive database of the different modalities over the course of 1 to 2 years to capture sensor performance over a wide variety of weather conditions, diurnal, and seasonal changes inherent to Picatinny's northern New Jersey location. Using the Precision Armament Laboratory (PAL) tower at Picatinny Arsenal, the sensors will autonomously collect the desired data around the clock at different ranges where surrogate 2S3 Self-Propelled Howitzer targets are positioned at different viewing perspectives in an open field. The database will allow for: 1) Understanding of signature variability under adverse weather conditions; 2) Development of robust algorithms; 3) Development of new sensors; 4) Evaluation of polarimetric technology; and 5) Evaluation of fusing the different sensor modalities. In this paper, we will present the SPICE data collection objectives, the ongoing effort, the sensors that are currently deployed, and how this work will assist researches on the development and evaluation of sensors, algorithms, and fusion applications.

  12. Spectral imagery collection experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romano, Joao M.; Rosario, Dalton; Farley, Vincent; Sohr, Brian

    2010-04-01

    The Spectral and Polarimetric Imagery Collection Experiment (SPICE) is a collaborative effort between the US Army ARDEC and ARL for the collection of mid-wave and long-wave infrared imagery using hyperspectral, polarimetric, and broadband sensors. The objective of the program is to collect a comprehensive database of the different modalities over the course of 1 to 2 years to capture sensor performance over a wide variety of adverse weather conditions, diurnal, and seasonal changes inherent to Picatinny's northern New Jersey location. Using the Precision Armament Laboratory (PAL) tower at Picatinny Arsenal, the sensors will autonomously collect the desired data around the clock at different ranges where surrogate 2S3 Self-Propelled Howitzer targets are positioned at different viewing perspectives at 549 and 1280m from the sensor location. The collected database will allow for: 1) Understand of signature variability under the different weather conditions; 2) Development of robust algorithms; 3) Development of new sensors; 4) Evaluation of hyperspectral and polarimetric technologies; and 5) Evaluation of fusing the different sensor modalities. In this paper, we will present the SPICE data collection objectives, the ongoing effort, the sensors that are currently deployed, and how this work will assist researches on the development and evaluation of sensors, algorithms, and fusion applications.

  13. Kinesthetic imagery of musical performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin eLotze

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Musicians use different kinds of imagery. This review focuses on kinesthetic imagery, which has been shown to be an effective complement to actively playing an instrument. However, experience in actual movement performance seems to be a requirement for a recruitment of those brain areas representing movement ideation during imagery. An internal model of movement performance might be more differentiated when training has been more intense or simply performed more often. Therefore, with respect to kinesthetic imagery, these strategies are predominantly found in professional musicians. There are a few possible reasons as to why kinesthetic imagery is used in addition to active training; one example is the need for mental rehearsal of the technically most difficult passages. Training difficult passages repeatedly has the potential to induce fatigue in tendons and muscles and can ultimately result in the development of dystonia. Another reason for mental practice is that mental rehearsal of the piece helps to improve performance if the instrument is not available for actual training as is the case for professional musicians when they are travelling to various appearances. Overall, mental imagery in musicians is not necessarily specific to motor, somatosensory, auditory or visual aspects of imagery, but integrates them all. In particular, the audiomotor loop is highly important, since auditory aspects are crucial for guiding motor performance. Furthermore, slight co-movement, for instance of the fingers, usually occurs when imagining musical performance, a situation different to the laboratory condition where movement execution is strictly controlled. All these aspects result in a distinctive representation map for the mental imagery of musical performance. This review summarizes behavioral data, and findings from functional brain imaging studies of mental imagery of musical performance.

  14. Imagery mismatch negativity in musicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herholz, Sibylle C; Lappe, Claudia; Knief, Arne; Pantev, Christo

    2009-07-01

    The present study investigated musical imagery in musicians and nonmusicians by means of magnetoencephalography (MEG). We used a new paradigm in which subjects had to continue familiar melodies in their mind and then judged if a further presented tone was a correct continuation of the melody. Incorrect tones elicited an imagery mismatch negativity (iMMN) in musicians but not in nonmusicians. This finding suggests that the MMN component can be based on an imagined instead of a sensory memory trace and that imagery of music is modulated by musical expertise.

  15. IMAGERIE MENTALE ET PERFORMANCE MOTRICE

    OpenAIRE

    Robin , Nicolas

    2005-01-01

    This work deals with mental imagery and motor performance; Ce présent travail examine la similarité fonctionnelle entre pratique en imagerie et pratique réelle en ce qui concerne le traitement privilégié des modalités sensorielles spécifiques (visuelles et/ou proprioceptives). Les expériences réalisées s’intéressent aux effets de la pratique mentale sur la performance motrice, et plus particulièrement à l’influence des modalités d’imagerie (expériences 1, 3, 4 et 5) et des capacités d’imageri...

  16. [Psychophysiologic research on mental imagery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fontana, A E; Heumann, G A

    1988-06-01

    This paper studies the different types of imagery likely to occur during the sleep/wake cycle in experiment subjects under part sensory deprivation conditions, where they are administered a sound-stimulus- namely an electronically recorded heart-beat which acts as propioceptive inductor. Meanwhile, a polysmonographic register in recorded so that a correlation between the time the imagery appears, and the states of consciousness likely to arouse the images is duly established. The study allows a fresh re-elaboration to be raised as regards imagery matureness and formation in the mind, a semiologic re-statement of imagery types, and a better understanding how the self works during sleep stage, dream state, and hypnagogic-hypnopompic phases as well. Finally, the authors stress up the importance of interpersonal relationship between the subjects and the research team, altogether with the frame of reference the professionals work in since their focusing could modify the sleep recording characteristics.

  17. APFO Historical Availability of Imagery

    Data.gov (United States)

    Farm Service Agency, Department of Agriculture — The APFO Historical Availability ArcGIS Online web map provides an easy to use reference of what historical imagery is available by county from the Aerial...

  18. Soft Copy Imagery Interpretation Capability

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaMonica, Gary L.

    1984-01-01

    The evolution of an interactive automated multisensor soft copy imagery exploitation work-station is described. A brief history of synthetic-aperture radar (SAR) and predecessor equipment/systems is presented along with performance achieved during field training exercises in Central Europe to illustrate the comparative effectiveness of this generic software reconfigurable workstation. The workstation was designed to increase the rate of imagery exploitation while minimizing the personnel skill level and training required for proficiency. Characteristics include real-time screening of scrolling sensor imagery, superpositioning of cue symbols, rapid accessing of collateral data base information, and near real-time computer-assisted reporting. Frame processing enables real-time rotation, warp/dewarp, and roam. Convolution filtering permits edge enhancement and haze reduction.

  19. Concepts are not represented by conscious imagery

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D. Pecher (Diane); S. van Dantzig (Saskia); H.N.J. Schifferstien (Hendrik)

    2009-01-01

    textabstractAccording to theories of grounded cognition, conceptual representation and perception share processing mechanisms. We investigated whether this overlap is due to conscious perceptual imagery. Participants filled out questionnaires to assess the vividness of their imagery (Questionnaire

  20. Agency Video, Audio and Imagery Library

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grubbs, Rodney

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this presentation was to inform the ISS International Partners of the new NASA Agency Video, Audio and Imagery Library (AVAIL) website. AVAIL is a new resource for the public to search for and download NASA-related imagery, and is not intended to replace the current process by which the International Partners receive their Space Station imagery products.

  1. Dissociations between Imagery and Language Processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-08-20

    review of the neuropsychological literature on imagery, Erlichman & Barrett (1983) discovered that in general imagery is not systematically correlated...Arteriography showed a left occipital hematoma, caused by an arteriovenous malformation (AYM). A I Imagery dissociations 5 craniotomy was performed to

  2. Perceptual evaluation of color transformed multispectral imagery

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Toet, A.; Jong, M.J. de; Hogervorst, M.A.; Hooge, I.T.C.

    2014-01-01

    Color remapping can give multispectral imagery a realistic appearance. We assessed the practical value of this technique in two observer experiments using monochrome intensified (II) and long-wave infrared (IR) imagery, and color daylight (REF) and fused multispectral (CF) imagery. First, we

  3. Dialectical Imagery and Postmodern Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davison, Kevin G.

    2006-01-01

    This article suggests utilizing dialectical imagery, as understood by German social philosopher Walter Benjamin, as an additional qualitative data analysis strategy for research into the postmodern condition. The use of images mined from research data may offer epistemological transformative possibilities that will assist in the demystification of…

  4. Music, Hemisphere Preference and Imagery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stratton, Valerie N.; Zalanowski, Annette H.

    Two experiments were conducted to determine a possible relationship between the right hemisphere, music perception, and mental imagery. The first experiment compared two groups of college students, one of which showed a preference for left hemisphere thinking (n=22) and the other a preference for right hemisphere thinking (n=20), in order to test…

  5. Preliminary isodose calculation for gynecological curietherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bridier, A.; Dutreix, A.; Gerbaulet, A.; Chassagne, D.

    1981-01-01

    We present a preliminary method of calculating the dimensions of the reference isodose, based upon the geometrical distribution and length of the sources used, their linear activity and the length of treatment, that does not require use of a computer. Inversely, this method can be used to determine the factors necessary to produce a given shape of isodose, and also to predict the change in shape of the isodose that will be produced by altering the various factors. This method was derived from a systematic computer study of dose distribution in which each factor was varied independently of all others. The dimensions of the isodoses, calculated by this method, were found to be in agreement with those derived from computer calculation to within an error of about 2 mm. The method is only applicable for a limited range of positions of the vaginal sources. The influence of the positions of these sources along the line of the axis of uterine catheter and of their inclination to this line, are currently being studied. The results are presented as mathematical formulae relating each dimension of the isodose curves to the features of the application, but could equally well be expressed in tabular form that would be more convenient for everyday use. An example of the calculation used is given to facilitate understanding of the method [fr

  6. Use of iodine-125 brachytherapy in treatment of choroidal melanomas, technic and preliminary analysis of 78 patients; Traitement conservateur des melanomes choroidiens par curietherapie par l'iode 125, technique et analyse preliminaire d'une serie de 78 patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Quetin, P.; Schumacher, C.; Schraub, S. [Centre Paul-Strauss, Dept. de Radiotherapie, 67 - Strasbourg (France); Meyer, L.; Polto, F.; Sahel, J. [Hopitaux Universitaires de Strasbourg, Clinique Ophtalmologique, 67 (France); Magnenet, P. [Centre Paul-Strauss, Dept. de Radiophysique, 67 - Strasbourg (France); Andres, E. [Hopital de Hautepierre, Medecine Interne, 67 - Strasbourg (France)

    2001-12-01

    Purpose. - Iodine 125 curietherapy is one of the conservative treatments of uveal melanoma. The technique used to achieve these results was simplified through the physical characteristics of the radioelement and the optimized-dosimetry program employed. Patients and methods. - 78 patients with choroidal melanoma were treated with iodine 125. About 100 Gy were delivered to the superior pole of the tumour. The minimal length of follow-up was 17 months and the average, 67 months. Results. -There was 88% local control, leading to lowered visual acuity in 76 % of the cases. Radiation retinopathy, directly related to proximity to the macula, is the principle etiology. Seven patients died of hepatic metastasis, five patients were enucleated. Four patients were further treated with proton-therapy to make up for non-control locally. Conclusion. -One dose of 100 Gy to the superior pole of the tumor seemed to lead to good local control, with the exception of complications related to proximity to the macula and the optic nerve. In this attempt to optimize irradiation, the time lapse between any benefit in local control derived from irradiation and post-therapeutic complications observed remains insufficient to evaluate any relationship. (authors)

  7. Bistatic SAR: Imagery & Image Products.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yocky, David A.; Wahl, Daniel E.; Jakowatz, Charles V,

    2014-10-01

    While typical SAR imaging employs a co-located (monostatic) RADAR transmitter and receiver, bistatic SAR imaging separates the transmitter and receiver locations. The transmitter and receiver geometry determines if the scattered signal is back scatter, forward scatter, or side scatter. The monostatic SAR image is backscatter. Therefore, depending on the transmitter/receiver collection geometry, the captured imagery may be quite different that that sensed at the monostatic SAR. This document presents imagery and image products formed from captured signals during the validation stage of the bistatic SAR research. Image quality and image characteristics are discussed first. Then image products such as two-color multi-view (2CMV) and coherent change detection (CCD) are presented.

  8. Resolution Enhancement of Multilook Imagery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Galbraith, Amy E. [Univ. of Arizona, Tucson, AZ (United States)

    2004-07-01

    This dissertation studies the feasibility of enhancing the spatial resolution of multi-look remotely-sensed imagery using an iterative resolution enhancement algorithm known as Projection Onto Convex Sets (POCS). A multi-angle satellite image modeling tool is implemented, and simulated multi-look imagery is formed to test the resolution enhancement algorithm. Experiments are done to determine the optimal con guration and number of multi-angle low-resolution images needed for a quantitative improvement in the spatial resolution of the high-resolution estimate. The important topic of aliasing is examined in the context of the POCS resolution enhancement algorithm performance. In addition, the extension of the method to multispectral sensor images is discussed and an example is shown using multispectral confocal fluorescence imaging microscope data. Finally, the remote sensing issues of atmospheric path radiance and directional reflectance variations are explored to determine their effect on the resolution enhancement performance.

  9. Imageries of Corporate Social Responsibility

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Höllerer, Markus A.; Jancsary, Dennis; Meyer, Renate E.

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, we explore how corporations use visual artifacts to translate and recontextualize a globally theorized managerial concept (CSR) into a local setting (Austria). In our analysis of the field-level visual discourse, we analyze over 1,600 images in stand-alone CSR reports of publicly...... traded corporations. We borrow from framing analysis and structural linguistics to show how the meaning structure underlying a multifaceted construct like CSR is constituted by no more than a relatively small number of fundamental dimensions and rhetorical standpoints (topoi). We introduce the concept...... of imageries-of-practice to embrace the critical role that shared visual language plays in the construction of meaning and the emergence of field-level logics. In particular, we argue that imageries-of-practice, compared to verbal vocabularies, are just as well equipped to link locally resonating symbolic...

  10. Imagery mnemonics and memory remediation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, J T

    1992-02-01

    This paper evaluates the claim that imagery mnemonic techniques are useful in remediation of memory disorders in brain-damaged patients. Clinical research has confirmed that such techniques can lead to improved performance on formal testing in a number of neurologic disease populations and following lesions of either the left or right hemisphere. However, those patients with more severe forms of amnesia and those with medial or bilateral damage do not improve unless the learning task is highly structured. Even among patients who show improvement on formal testing, there is little evidence that they maintain the use of these techniques in similar learning tasks or generalize the use to new learning situations. Imagery mnemonics also appear to be of little practical value in the daily activities that are of most concern to brain-damaged patients themselves. The effectiveness of imagery mnemonics appears to depend upon the patients' motivation and insight rather than upon their intelligence or educational level. Instead of training patients in specific mnemonic techniques, clinicians should promote the development of "meta-cognitive" skills and the acquisition of knowledge about domains of practical significance.

  11. Loss of form vision impairs spatial imagery

    OpenAIRE

    Occelli, Valeria; Lin, Jonathan B.; Lacey, Simon; Sathian, K.

    2014-01-01

    Previous studies have reported inconsistent results when comparing spatial imagery performance in the blind and the sighted, with some, but not all, studies demonstrating deficits in the blind. Here, we investigated the effect of visual status and individual preferences (“cognitive style”) on performance of a spatial imagery task. Participants with blindness resulting in the loss of form vision at or after age 6, and age- and gender-matched sighted participants, performed a spatial imagery ta...

  12. LOSS OF FORM VISION IMPAIRS SPATIAL IMAGERY

    OpenAIRE

    Valeria eOccelli; Jonathan B. Lin; Simon A Lacey; Krish eSathian; Krish eSathian

    2014-01-01

    Previous studies have reported inconsistent results when comparing spatial imagery performance in the blind and the sighted, with some, but not all, studies demonstrating deficits in the blind. Here, we investigated the effect of visual status and individual preferences (cognitive style) on performance of a spatial imagery task. Participants with blindness resulting in the loss of form vision at or after age 6, and age- and gender-matched sighted participants, performed a spatial imagery task...

  13. Advanced Image Processing of Aerial Imagery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodell, Glenn; Jobson, Daniel J.; Rahman, Zia-ur; Hines, Glenn

    2006-01-01

    Aerial imagery of the Earth is an invaluable tool for the assessment of ground features, especially during times of disaster. Researchers at the NASA Langley Research Center have developed techniques which have proven to be useful for such imagery. Aerial imagery from various sources, including Langley's Boeing 757 Aries aircraft, has been studied extensively. This paper discusses these studies and demonstrates that better-than-observer imagery can be obtained even when visibility is severely compromised. A real-time, multi-spectral experimental system will be described and numerous examples will be shown.

  14. Assessment of motor imagery ability and training

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    André Luiz Felix Rodacki

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to evaluate changes in motor imagery ability in response to a specific dart throwing training. Twelve subjects (17-22 years with no previous experience in dart throwing or imagery agreed to participate. Changes in imagery ability were assessed using the Sports Imagery Questionnaire before (pretreatment and after (post-treatment an imagery training program consisting of 10 sessions. Retention (RET was assessed 2 weeks after training. The program included mental exercises designed to develop vivid images, to control one’s own images, and to increase perception about performance. Comparison of the imagery training conditions (training alone, training accompanied, observing a colleague, and during assessment showed no differences between the pretreatment, post-treatment and RET evaluations. Although imagery ability did not respond to training, significant differences between imagery domains (visual, auditory, kinesthetic, and animic were found (p<0.05, except between the visual and animic domains (p=0.58. These differences might be related to subject’s domain preference subject during the imagery process and to the nature of the task in which the skill technique used seems to be a relevant aspect.

  15. Kinesthetic motor imagery modulates body sway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, E C; Lemos, T; Gouvea, B; Volchan, E; Imbiriba, L A; Vargas, C D

    2010-08-25

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of imagining an action implicating the body axis in the kinesthetic and visual motor imagery modalities upon the balance control system. Body sway analysis (measurement of center of pressure, CoP) together with electromyography (EMG) recording and verbal evaluation of imagery abilities were obtained from subjects during four tasks, performed in the upright position: to execute bilateral plantar flexions; to imagine themselves executing bilateral plantar flexions (kinesthetic modality); to imagine someone else executing the same movement (visual modality), and to imagine themselves singing a song (as a control imagery task). Body sway analysis revealed that kinesthetic imagery leads to a general increase in CoP oscillation, as reflected by an enhanced area of displacement. This effect was also verified for the CoP standard deviation in the medial-lateral direction. An increase in the trembling displacement (equivalent to center of pressure minus center of gravity) restricted to the anterior-posterior direction was also observed to occur during kinesthetic imagery. The visual imagery task did not differ from the control (sing) task for any of the analyzed parameters. No difference in the subjects' ability to perform the imagery tasks was found. No modulation of EMG data were observed across imagery tasks, indicating that there was no actual execution during motor imagination. These results suggest that motor imagery performed in the kinesthetic modality evokes motor representations involved in balance control. Copyright (c)10 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. OrthoImagery Submission for Isabella county, MI

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — This data set contains 1-meter resolution imagery derived from the 2005 National Agriculture Imagery Program (NAIP) statewide aerial imagery acquisition. Data have...

  17. Imagery Intelligence (IMINT) Production Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-01-01

    IkINT instructor teaches his students the ’LST’ principle, whici he sums up in the toll owi ny terms o L - Look at all the imagery. o S - See what is...8217 C)C4-)’~ >-.CC)C 4s- a -C-4 4-’, a)C W 5Wc- eSl C3 LE )A -.-0 E. S C r- C C C - C 0rC C u -S- U S-- S- 41 (n C : 2 F- 2- W 4tio (, C*- S t4- C C E

  18. Thematic mapping from satellite imagery

    CERN Document Server

    Denègre, J

    2013-01-01

    Thematic Mapping from Satellite Imagery: A Guidebook discusses methods in producing maps using satellite images. The book is comprised of five chapters; each chapter covers one stage of the process. Chapter 1 tackles the satellite remote sensing imaging and its cartographic significance. Chapter 2 discusses the production processes for extracting information from satellite data. The next chapter covers the methods for combining satellite-derived information with that obtained from conventional sources. Chapter 4 deals with design and semiology for cartographic representation, and Chapter 5 pre

  19. Motor imagery modulation of body sway is task-dependent and relies on imagery ability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thiago eLemos

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available AbstractIn this study we investigate to what extent the effects of motor imagery on postural sway are constrained by movement features and the subject’s imagery ability. Twenty-three subjects were asked to imagine three movements using the kinesthetic modality: rising on tiptoes, whole-body forward reaching, and whole-body lateral reaching. After each task, subjects reported the level of imagery vividness and were subsequently grouped into a HIGH group (scores ≥3, moderately intense imagery or a LOW group (scores ≤2, mildly intense imagery. An eyes closed trial was used as a control task. Center of gravity (COG coordinates were collected, along with surface EMG of the deltoid (medial and anterior portion and lateral gastrocnemius muscles. COG variability was quantified as the amount of fluctuations in position and velocity in the forward-backward and lateral directions. Changes in COG variability during motor imagery were observed only for the HIGH group. COG variability in the forward-backward direction was increased during the rising on tiptoes imagery, compared with the control task (p=0.01 and the lateral reaching imagery (p=0.02. Conversely, COG variability in the lateral direction was higher in rising on tiptoes and lateral reaching imagery than during the control task (p0.08 or task (p>0.46 for any of the tested muscles. In summary, motor imagery influences body sway dynamics in a task-dependent manner, and relies on the subject’ imagery ability.

  20. Mental Imagery in Creative Problem Solving.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polland, Mark J.

    In order to investigate the relationship between mental imagery and creative problem solving, a study of 44 separate accounts reporting mental imagery experiences associated with creative discoveries were examined. The data included 29 different scientists, among them Albert Einstein and Stephen Hawking, and 9 artists, musicians, and writers,…

  1. Alcohol imagery on New Zealand television

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reeder Anthony I

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To examine the extent and nature of alcohol imagery on New Zealand (NZ television, a content analysis of 98 hours of prime-time television programs and advertising was carried out over 7 consecutive days' viewing in June/July 2004. The main outcome measures were number of scenes in programs, trailers and advertisements depicting alcohol imagery; the extent of critical versus neutral and promotional imagery; and the mean number of scenes with alcohol per hour, and characteristics of scenes in which alcohol featured. Results There were 648 separate depictions of alcohol imagery across the week, with an average of one scene every nine minutes. Scenes depicting uncritical imagery outnumbered scenes showing possible adverse health consequences of drinking by 12 to 1. Conclusion The evidence points to a large amount of alcohol imagery incidental to storylines in programming on NZ television. Alcohol is also used in many advertisements to market non-alcohol goods and services. More attention needs to be paid to the extent of alcohol imagery on television from the industry, the government and public health practitioners. Health education with young people could raise critical awareness of the way alcohol imagery is presented on television.

  2. Imagery, Music, Cognitive Style and Memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stratton, Valerie N.; Zalanowski, Annette

    Paired associate memory was tested with imagery and repetition instructions, with and without background music. Subjects were 64 students enrolled in an introductory psychology course. Music was found to have no effect with imagery instructions, but significantly improved performance with the repetition instructions. Music had different effects on…

  3. Motor imagery development in primary school children.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Caeyenberghs, K.; Tsoupas, J.; Wilson, P.H.; Smits-Engelsman, B.C.M.

    2009-01-01

    Motor imagery provides a unique window on the integrity of movement representation. How this ability unfolds during development remains unknown, however. It was the aim of this cross-sectional study to chart the development of movement imagery over childhood using validated measures, and to examine

  4. Agricultural Imagery in Targum Jonathan and Matthew

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Staalduine - Sulman, E.

    2013-01-01

    To explore the question of whether Tg Jon might function as background to NT texts I compare Tg Jon and the gospel according to Matthew. I restrict this research to agricultural imagery, because the Targum is famous for its explanation of metaphors and similes, and because much imagery in Matthew

  5. Mental Imagery and Visual Working Memory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keogh, Rebecca; Pearson, Joel

    2011-01-01

    Visual working memory provides an essential link between past and future events. Despite recent efforts, capacity limits, their genesis and the underlying neural structures of visual working memory remain unclear. Here we show that performance in visual working memory - but not iconic visual memory - can be predicted by the strength of mental imagery as assessed with binocular rivalry in a given individual. In addition, for individuals with strong imagery, modulating the background luminance diminished performance on visual working memory and imagery tasks, but not working memory for number strings. This suggests that luminance signals were disrupting sensory-based imagery mechanisms and not a general working memory system. Individuals with poor imagery still performed above chance in the visual working memory task, but their performance was not affected by the background luminance, suggesting a dichotomy in strategies for visual working memory: individuals with strong mental imagery rely on sensory-based imagery to support mnemonic performance, while those with poor imagery rely on different strategies. These findings could help reconcile current controversy regarding the mechanism and location of visual mnemonic storage. PMID:22195024

  6. Commercial imagery archive product development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakkas, Alysa

    1999-12-01

    The Lockheed Martin (LM) team had garnered over a decade of operational experience in digital imagery management and analysis for the US Government at numerous worldwide sites. Recently, it set out to create a new commercial product to serve the needs of large-scale imagery archiving and analysis markets worldwide. LM decided to provide a turnkey commercial solution to receive, store, retrieve, process, analyze and disseminate in 'push' or 'pull' modes components and adapted and developed its own algorithms to provide added functionality not commercially available elsewhere. The resultant product, Intelligent Library System, satisfies requirements for (a) a potentially unbounded, data archive automated workflow management for increased user productivity; (c) automatic tracking and management of files stored on shelves; (d) ability to ingest, process and disseminate data involves with bandwidths ranging up to multi-gigabit per second; (e) access through a thin client- to-server network environment; (f) multiple interactive users needing retrieval of filters in seconds from both archived images or in real time, and (g) scalability that maintains information throughput performance as the size of the digital library grows.

  7. Observer perspective imagery with stuttering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowe, Robyn; Menzies, Ross; Packman, Ann; O'Brian, Sue; Onslow, Mark

    2015-01-01

    Adults who stutter are at risk of developing a range of psychological conditions. Social anxiety disorder is the most common anxiety disorder associated with stuttering. Observer perspective imagery is one cognitive process involved in the maintenance of some anxiety disorders. This involves viewing images as if looking at the self from the perspective of another. In contrast, the field perspective involves looking out from the self at the surrounding environment. The purpose of this study was to assess the presence of observer perspective imagery with stuttering. The authors administered the Hackmann, Surawy and Clark (1998) semi-structured interview to 30 adults who stutter and 30 controls. Group images and impressions were compared for frequency, perspective recalled and emotional valence. The stuttering group was significantly more likely than controls to recall images and impressions from an observer rather than a field perspective for anxious situations. It is possible the present results could reflect the same attentional processing bias that occurs with anxiety disorders in the non-stuttering population. These preliminary results provide an explanation for the persistence of conditions such as social anxiety disorder with stuttering. Clinical implications are discussed.

  8. Guided Imagery and Stress in Pregnant Adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flynn, Theresa A; Jones, Brittney A; Ausderau, Karla K

    2016-01-01

    We examined the effects of a guided imagery intervention on perceived stress in pregnant adolescents. Thirty-five pregnant adolescents recruited from a local alternative education program participated in a guided imagery intervention. Participants listened to a pregnancy-specific guided imagery recording on four separate occasions during their pregnancies. Perceived stress was measured immediately before and after each session using the Perceived Stress Measure-9 (PSM-9). Participants' pre- and postsession PSM-9 scores for three of the four sessions demonstrated a significant reduction in stress. Participants' baseline stress levels also decreased significantly across the four listening sessions. The greatest reductions in stress within and between sessions occurred in the early sessions, with effects diminishing over time. Pregnant teens experienced initial short- and long-term stress reduction during a guided imagery intervention, supporting the use of guided imagery to reduce stress in pregnant adolescents. Copyright © 2016 by the American Occupational Therapy Association, Inc.

  9. Mental Imagery: Functional Mechanisms and Clinical Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearson, Joel; Naselaris, Thomas; Holmes, Emily A; Kosslyn, Stephen M

    2015-10-01

    Mental imagery research has weathered both disbelief of the phenomenon and inherent methodological limitations. Here we review recent behavioral, brain imaging, and clinical research that has reshaped our understanding of mental imagery. Research supports the claim that visual mental imagery is a depictive internal representation that functions like a weak form of perception. Brain imaging work has demonstrated that neural representations of mental and perceptual images resemble one another as early as the primary visual cortex (V1). Activity patterns in V1 encode mental images and perceptual images via a common set of low-level depictive visual features. Recent translational and clinical research reveals the pivotal role that imagery plays in many mental disorders and suggests how clinicians can utilize imagery in treatment. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  10. Mental imagery of gravitational motion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gravano, Silvio; Zago, Myrka; Lacquaniti, Francesco

    2017-10-01

    There is considerable evidence that gravitational acceleration is taken into account in the interaction with falling targets through an internal model of Earth gravity. Here we asked whether this internal model is accessed also when target motion is imagined rather than real. In the main experiments, naïve participants grasped an imaginary ball, threw it against the ceiling, and caught it on rebound. In different blocks of trials, they had to imagine that the ball moved under terrestrial gravity (1g condition) or under microgravity (0g) as during a space flight. We measured the speed and timing of the throwing and catching actions, and plotted ball flight duration versus throwing speed. Best-fitting duration-speed curves estimate the laws of ball motion implicit in the participant's performance. Surprisingly, we found duration-speed curves compatible with 0g for both the imaginary 0g condition and the imaginary 1g condition, despite the familiarity with Earth gravity effects and the added realism of performing the throwing and catching actions. In a control experiment, naïve participants were asked to throw the imaginary ball vertically upwards at different heights, without hitting the ceiling, and to catch it on its way down. All participants overestimated ball flight durations relative to the durations predicted by the effects of Earth gravity. Overall, the results indicate that mental imagery of motion does not have access to the internal model of Earth gravity, but resorts to a simulation of visual motion. Because visual processing of accelerating/decelerating motion is poor, visual imagery of motion at constant speed or slowly varying speed appears to be the preferred mode to perform the tasks. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. LOSS OF FORM VISION IMPAIRS SPATIAL IMAGERY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valeria eOccelli

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Previous studies have reported inconsistent results when comparing spatial imagery performance in the blind and the sighted, with some, but not all, studies demonstrating deficits in the blind. Here, we investigated the effect of visual status and individual preferences (cognitive style on performance of a spatial imagery task. Participants with blindness resulting in the loss of form vision at or after age 6, and age- and gender-matched sighted participants, performed a spatial imagery task requiring memorization of a 4x4 lettered matrix and subsequent mental construction of shapes within the matrix from four-letter auditory cues. They also completed the Santa Barbara Sense of Direction Scale (SBSoDS and a self-evaluation of cognitive style. The sighted participants also completed the Object-Spatial Imagery and Verbal Questionnaire (OSIVQ. Visual status affected performance on the spatial imagery task: the blind performed significantly worse than the sighted, independently of the age at which form vision was completely lost. Visual status did not affect the distribution of preferences based on self-reported cognitive style. Across all participants, self-reported verbalizer scores were significantly negatively correlated with accuracy on the spatial imagery task. There was a positive correlation between the SBSoDS score and accuracy on the spatial imagery task, across all participants, indicating that a better sense of direction is related to a more proficient spatial representation and that the imagery task indexes ecologically relevant spatial abilities. Moreover, the older the participants were, the worse their performance was, indicating a detrimental effect of age on spatial imagery performance. Thus, spatial skills represent an important target for rehabilitative approaches to visual impairment, and individual differences, which can modulate performance, should be taken into account in such approaches.

  12. Loss of form vision impairs spatial imagery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Occelli, Valeria; Lin, Jonathan B; Lacey, Simon; Sathian, K

    2014-01-01

    Previous studies have reported inconsistent results when comparing spatial imagery performance in the blind and the sighted, with some, but not all, studies demonstrating deficits in the blind. Here, we investigated the effect of visual status and individual preferences ("cognitive style") on performance of a spatial imagery task. Participants with blindness resulting in the loss of form vision at or after age 6, and age- and gender-matched sighted participants, performed a spatial imagery task requiring memorization of a 4 × 4 lettered matrix and subsequent mental construction of shapes within the matrix from four-letter auditory cues. They also completed the Santa Barbara Sense of Direction Scale (SBSoDS) and a self-evaluation of cognitive style. The sighted participants also completed the Object-Spatial Imagery and Verbal Questionnaire (OSIVQ). Visual status affected performance on the spatial imagery task: the blind performed significantly worse than the sighted, independently of the age at which form vision was completely lost. Visual status did not affect the distribution of preferences based on self-reported cognitive style. Across all participants, self-reported verbalizer scores were significantly negatively correlated with accuracy on the spatial imagery task. There was a positive correlation between the SBSoDS score and accuracy on the spatial imagery task, across all participants, indicating that a better sense of direction is related to a more proficient spatial representation and that the imagery task indexes ecologically relevant spatial abilities. Moreover, the older the participants were, the worse their performance was, indicating a detrimental effect of age on spatial imagery performance. Thus, spatial skills represent an important target for rehabilitative approaches to visual impairment, and individual differences, which can modulate performance, should be taken into account in such approaches.

  13. The Sport Imagery Questionnaire for Children (SIQ-C)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, C. R.; Munroe-Chandler, K. J.; Fishburne, G. J.; Hall, N. D.

    2009-01-01

    Athletes of all ages report using imagery extensively to enhance their sport performance. The Sport Imagery Questionnaire (Hall, Mack, Paivio, & Hausenblas, 1998) was developed to assess cognitive and motivational imagery used by adult athletes. No such instrument currently exists to measure the use of imagery by young athletes. The aim of the…

  14. Performance improvements from imagery:evidence that internal visual imagery is superior to external visual imagery for slalom performance

    OpenAIRE

    Nichola eCallow; Ross eRoberts; Lew eHardy; Dan eJiang; Martin G Edwards

    2013-01-01

    We report three experiments investigating the hypothesis that use of internal visual imagery (IVI) would be superior to external visual imagery (EVI) for the performance of different slalom-based motor tasks. In Experiment 1, three groups of participants (IVI, EVI, and a control group) performed a driving-simulation slalom task. The IVI group achieved significantly quicker lap times than EVI and the control group. In Experiment 2, participants performed a downhill running slalom task under bo...

  15. 2012 Oconee County, Georgia ADS80 Imagery

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — All imagery was collected during the 2012 Spring flying season during leaf-off conditions for deciduous vegetation in the State of Georgia. The sun angle was at...

  16. Mental imagery boosts music compositional creativity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Sarah Shi Hui; Lim, Stephen Wee Hun

    2017-01-01

    We empirically investigated the effect of mental imagery on young children's music compositional creativity. Children aged 5 to 8 years participated in two music composition sessions. In the control session, participants based their composition on a motif that they had created using a sequence of letter names. In the mental imagery session, participants were given a picture of an animal and instructed to imagine the animal's sounds and movements, before incorporating what they had imagined into their composition. Six expert judges independently rated all music compositions on creativity based on subjective criteria (consensual assessment). Reliability analyses indicated that the expert judges demonstrated a high level of agreement in their ratings. The mental imagery compositions received significantly higher creativity ratings by the expert judges than did the control compositions. These results provide evidence for the effectiveness of mental imagery in enhancing young children's music compositional creativity.

  17. SMEX03 Landsat Thematic Mapper Imagery: Alabama

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This data set provides imagery developed from Landsat 5 Thematic Mapper (TM) and Landsat 7 Enhanced Thematic Mapper (ETM+) data for use in studying land cover...

  18. SMEX02 Landsat Thematic Mapper Imagery, Iowa

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This data set provides imagery developed from Landsat 5 and 7 Thematic Mapper (TM) data for use in studying land cover features during the Soil Moisture Experiment...

  19. SMEX03 Landsat Thematic Mapper Imagery: Georgia

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This data set provides imagery developed from Landsat 5 Thematic Mapper (TM) data for use in studying land cover features during the Soil Moisture Experiment 2003...

  20. Using High Spatial Resolution Digital Imagery

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Campbell, Michael V; Fischer, Robert L; Pangburn, Timothy; Hardenberg, Mark J

    2005-01-01

    This document is the culmination of over 3 years worth of applied research. The overall objective of this multi-year investigation was to assess the utility of high spatial resolution digital imagery to Corps civil works operations...

  1. SMEX03 Landsat Thematic Mapper Imagery: Oklahoma

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This data set provides imagery developed from Landsat 5 Thematic Mapper (TM) and Landsat 7 Enhanced Thematic Mapper (ETM+) data for use in studying land cover...

  2. SMEX04 Landsat Thematic Mapper Imagery, Arizona

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This data set provides imagery developed from Landsat 5 Thematic Mapper (TM) data for use in studying land cover features during the Soil Moisture Experiment 2004...

  3. Mental Imagery and Visual Working Memory

    OpenAIRE

    Keogh, Rebecca; Pearson, Joel

    2011-01-01

    Visual working memory provides an essential link between past and future events. Despite recent efforts, capacity limits, their genesis and the underlying neural structures of visual working memory remain unclear. Here we show that performance in visual working memory - but not iconic visual memory - can be predicted by the strength of mental imagery as assessed with binocular rivalry in a given individual. In addition, for individuals with strong imagery, modulating the background luminance ...

  4. Guided Imagery and Music - And Beyond?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bonde, Lars Ole

    4 original research articles, one essay, a classical article and two clinical papers documenting the development of theory, research and clinical practice within the receptive music therapy model [The Bonny Method of] Guided Imagery and Music.......4 original research articles, one essay, a classical article and two clinical papers documenting the development of theory, research and clinical practice within the receptive music therapy model [The Bonny Method of] Guided Imagery and Music....

  5. The imagery of prospective emigrants from Slovenia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tija Jerkič

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The article examines the images that young Slovenian people associate with a decision or intention to emigrate in the future. Through unstructured interviews the author analyzes their imageries as key factors and motivators of future emigration. Beside an imaginary of “somewhere else” the position of the interviewees in the global arena must be taken into account. It turns out that their ambivalent position, on the one hand marked by privilege on the global level and by marginalization in the native country on the other, drives their imageries, which are composed of more than just imagery of somewhere else. These are marked with imageries of space, people, society, time and movement, and have a homogenizing effect on their perception of the “here and now”, and on the “here” in the future. Current location, in this case Slovenia, becomes a single, mostly negative category, opposed to which are the positive qualities that potentially exist elsewhere. “Elsewhere” does not represent only one possible destination, but a multitude of places that have the potential of a better life. And mere potential is enough for the interviewees to imagine emigrating to a destination and living there. Their imagery of ‘abroad’ thus comprises also imagery of the lightness of travel, supported by modern communication and transport networks.

  6. Using a foreign language reduces mental imagery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayakawa, Sayuri; Keysar, Boaz

    2018-04-01

    Mental imagery plays a significant role in guiding how we feel, think, and even behave. These mental simulations are often guided by language, making it important to understand what aspects of language contribute to imagery vividness and consequently to the way we think. Here, we focus on the native-ness of language and present evidence that using a foreign language leads to less vivid mental imagery than using a native tongue. In Experiment 1, participants using a foreign language reported less vivid imagery of sensory experiences such as sight and touch than those using their native tongue. Experiment 2 provided an objective behavioral measure, showing that muted imagery reduced accuracy when judging the similarity of shapes of imagined objects. Lastly, Experiment 3 demonstrated that this reduction in mental imagery partly accounted for the previously observed foreign language effects in moral choice. Together, the findings suggest that our mental images change when using a foreign tongue, leading to downstream consequences for how we make decisions. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Building Detection in SAR Imagery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steinbach, Ryan Matthew [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Koch, Mark William [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Moya, Mary M [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Goold, Jeremy [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2014-08-01

    Current techniques for building detection in Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) imagery can be computationally expensive and/or enforce stringent requirements for data acquisition. The desire is to present a technique that is effective and efficient at determining an approximate building location. This approximate location can be used to extract a portion of the SAR image to then perform a more robust detection. The proposed technique assumes that for the desired image, bright lines and shadows, SAR artifact effects, are approximately labeled. These labels are enhanced and utilized to locate buildings, only if the related bright lines and shadows can be grouped. In order to find which of the bright lines and shadows are related, all of the bright lines are connected to all of the shadows. This allows the problem to be solved from a connected graph viewpoint. Where the nodes are the bright lines and shadows and the arcs are the connections between bright lines and shadows. Constraints based on angle of depression and the relationship between connected bright lines and shadows are applied to remove unrelated arcs. Once the related bright lines and shadows are grouped, their locations are combined to provide an approximate building location. Experimental results are provided showing the outcome of the technique.

  8. Motor imagery ability in stroke patients : the relationship between implicit and explicit motor imagery measures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Vries, Sjoerd; Tepper, Marga; Feenstra, Wya; Oosterveld, Hanneke; Boonstra, Anne M.; Otten, Bert

    2013-01-01

    There is little consensus on how motor imagery ability should be measured in stroke patients. In particular it is unclear how two methods tapping different aspects of the motor imagery process relate to each other. The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between implicit and

  9. The functional equivalence between movement imagery, observation, and execution influences imagery ability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Sarah E; Cumming, Jennifer; Edwards, Martin G

    2011-09-01

    Based on literature identifying movement imagery, observation, and execution to elicit similar areas of neural activity, research has demonstrated that movement imagery and observation successfully prime movement execution. To investigate whether movement and observation could prime ease of imaging from an external visual-imagery perspective, an internal visual-imagery perspective, and kinesthetic modality, 36 participants (M age = 20.58; SD = 3.11; 18 women and 18 men) completed an adapted version of the Movement Imagery Questionnaire-Revised under four modes of delivery (movement prime, external observation prime, internal observation prime, and image-only). The results revealed that ease of imaging was significantly greater during the movement and observation prime conditions compared to the image-only condition (p movement and observation to facilitate ease of imaging, but highlight the importance of considering the visual perspective when using observation.

  10. Imagery in Dance: A Literature Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavlik, Katherine; Nordin-Bates, Sanna

    2016-01-01

    Dance imagery is a consciously created mental representation of an experience, either real or imaginary, that may affect the dancer and her or his movement. In this study, imagery research in dance was reviewed in order to: 1. describe the themes and ideas that the current literature has attempted to illuminate and 2. discover the extent to which this literature fits the Revised Applied Model of Deliberate Imagery Use. A systematic search was performed, and 43 articles from 24 journals were found to fit the inclusion criteria. The articles were reviewed, analyzed, and categorized. The findings from the articles were then reported using the Revised Applied Model as a framework. Detailed descriptions of Who, What, When and Where, Why, How, and Imagery Ability were provided, along with comparisons to the field of sports imagery. Limitations within the field, such as the use of non-dance-specific and study-specific measurements, make comparisons and clear conclusions difficult to formulate. Future research can address these problems through the creation of dance-specific measurements, higher participant rates, and consistent methodologies between studies.

  11. Satellite imagery in safeguards: progress and prospects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niemeyer, I.; Listner, C.

    2013-01-01

    The use of satellite imagery has become very important for the verification of the safeguards implementation under the Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty (NPT). The main applications of satellite imagery are to verify the correctness and completeness of the member states' declarations, and to provide preparatory information for inspections, complimentary access and other technical visits. If the area of interest is not accessible, remote sensing sensors provide one of the few opportunities of gathering data for nuclear monitoring, as for example in Iraq between 1998 and 2002 or currently in North Korea. Satellite data of all available sensor types contains a considerable amount of safeguard-relevant information. Very high-resolution optical satellite imagery provides the most detailed spatial information on nuclear sites and activities up to 0.41 m resolution, together with up to 8 spectral bands from the visible light and near infrared. Thermal infrared (TIR) images can indicate the operational status of nuclear facilities and help to identify undeclared activities. Hyper-spectral imagery allows a quantitative estimation of geophysical, geochemical and biochemical characteristics of the earth's surface and is therefore useful for assessing, for example, surface cover changes due to drilling, mining and milling activities. Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) image data up to 1 m spatial resolution provides an all-weather, day and night monitoring capability. However, the absence (or existence) of nuclear activities can never be confirmed completely based on satellite imagery. (A.C.)

  12. Satellite imagery in a nuclear age

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baines, P.J.

    1998-01-01

    Increasingly, high resolution satellite imaging systems are becoming available from multiple and diverse sources with capabilities useful for answering security questions. With increased supply, data availability and data authenticity may be assured. In a commercial market a supplier can ill afford the loss in market share that would result from any falsification of data. Similarly rising competitors willing to sell imagery of national security sites will decrease the tendency to endure self-imposed restrictions on sales of those sites. International organizations operating in the security interests of all nations might also gain preferential access. Costa for imagery will also fall to the point were individuals can afford purchases of satellite images. International organizations will find utility in exploiting imagery for solving international security problems. Housed within international organizations possessing competent staff, procedures, and 'shared destiny' stakes in resolving compliance discrepancies, the use of satellite imagery may provide a degree of stability in a world in which individuals, non-governmental organizations and governments may choose to exploit the available information for political gain. The use of satellite imagery outside these international organizations might not necessarily be aimed at seeking mutually beneficial solutions for international problems

  13. Reporting and validation of gynaecological Groupe Euopeen de Curietherapie European Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology (ESTRO) brachytherapy recommendations for MR image-based dose volume parameters and clinical outcome with high dose-rate brachytherapy in cervical cancers: a single-institution initial experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahantshetty, Umesh; Swamidas, Jamema; Khanna, Nehal; Engineer, Reena; Merchant, Nikhil H; Deshpande, Deepak D; Shrivastava, Shyamkishore

    2011-08-01

    The objectives are to report the dosimetric analysis, preliminary clinical outcome, and comparison with published data of 3-dimensional magnetic resonance-based high dose rate brachytherapy (BT) in cervical cancer. The data set of 24 patients with cervical cancer treated with high dose-rate brachytherapy applications was analyzed. All patients received radiation with or without chemotherapy (10 patients received concomitant chemoradiation). Point A, International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurement (ICRU) point doses, and Groupe Europeen de Curietherapie-European Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology dose volume parameters, namely, high-risk clinical target volume (HR-CTV), D90 and D100 doses, and dose to D0.1cc and D2cc, for rectum, bladder, and sigmoid, were calculated and correlated. Mean ± SD HR-CTV was 45.2 ± 15.8 cc. The mean ± SD point A dose was 73.4 ± 4.5 Gy (median, 74.3 Gy) total biologically equivalent dose in 2 Gy per fraction (EQD2), whereas mean ± SD D90 doses were 70.9 ± 10.6 GyEQD2 (median, 68). The mean ± SD ICRU rectal and bladder points were 63.5 ± 8.1 and 80.4 ± 34.4 GyEQD2, respectively. The D0.1cc and D2cc for rectum were 66.0 ± 9.9 GyEQD2 (median, 64.5) and 57.8 ± 7.7 GyEQD2 (median, 58.8), for bladder 139.1 ± 54.7 GyEQD2 (median, 131.9) and 93.4 ± 24.6 GyEQD2 (median, 91), and sigmoid were 109.4 ± 45.2 GyEQD2 (median, 91) and 74.6 ± 19.6 GyEQD2 (median, 69.6). With a median follow-up of 24 months, 3 patients had local nodal failure, 1 had right external iliac nodal failure, and 1 had left supraclavicular nodal failure. The 3-D magnetic resonance image-based high dose-rate brachytherapy approach in cervical cancers is feasible. In our experience, the HR-CTV volumes are large, and D0.1cc and D2cc doses to bladder and sigmoid are higher than published literature so far.

  14. Aerial Photography and Imagery, Ortho-Corrected, This data set contains imagery from the National Agriculture Imagery Program (NAIP). NAIP acquires digital ortho imagery during the agricultural growing seasons in the continental U.S. NAIP imagery may contain as much as 10% cloud cover per tile. This fil, Published in 2005, 1:63360 (1in=1mile) scale, University of Georgia.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC Education | GIS Inventory — Aerial Photography and Imagery, Ortho-Corrected dataset current as of 2005. This data set contains imagery from the National Agriculture Imagery Program (NAIP). NAIP...

  15. [Mental Imagery: Neurophysiology and Implications in Psychiatry].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez, Nathalie Tamayo

    2014-03-01

    To provide an explanation about what mental imagery is and some implications in psychiatry. This article is a narrative literature review. There are many terms in which imagery representations are described in different fields of research. They are defined as perceptions in the absence of an external stimulus, and can be created in any sensory modality. Their neurophysiological substrate is almost the same as the one activated during sensory perception. There is no unified theory about its function, but it is possibly the way that our brain uses and manipulates the information to respond to the environment. Mental imagery is an everyday phenomenon, and when it occurs in specific patterns it can be a sign of mental disorders. Copyright © 2014 Asociación Colombiana de Psiquiatría. Publicado por Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  16. Creativity and imagery in men and women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forisha, B L

    1978-12-01

    This study investigated the relationship between creativity, imagery, and sex-role orientation in men and women. Instruments measuring creativity, creative production, imagery, and sex-role orientation were administered to 163 students enrolled in introductory psychology. The results showed that creative ability and vividness of imagery were related in women but not in men, whereas creative ability and creative production were related in men but not in women. Creative ability correlated with femininity whereas creative production correlated with masculinity. The author concluded that: (1) men and women show differing patterns of cognitive functioning in the creative process; and (2) men and women differ in the utilization of their creative capacity possibly due to the influence of sex-role stereotypes.

  17. Aerial Photography and Imagery, Ortho-Corrected - FDOT 2009 Orthophotography

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC Local Govt | GIS Inventory — This Imagery was provided by Florida Department of Transportation to the Volusia County Property Appraiser. 1 Foot Color Pixel Orthophotography. This imagery was...

  18. USDA/FSA Imagery Programs - Public Map Gallery

    Data.gov (United States)

    Farm Service Agency, Department of Agriculture — Imagery programs are an important part of maintaining, creating and updating geospatial data at the USDA Farm Service Agency. Imagery acquisition is provided by the...

  19. Three-dimensional brachytherapy optimization techniques in the treatment of patients with cervix cancer; Apport des techniques de curietherapie optimisee grace a l'imagerie tridimensionnelle dans la prise en charge des patientes atteintes d'un cancer du col uterin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haie-Meder, C.; Mazeron, R.; Verezesan, O.; Monnier, L.; Vieillot, S. [Institut Gustave-Roussy, Service de Curietherapie, 94 - Villejuif (France); Dumas, I. [Institut Gustave-Roussy, Service de Physique, 94 - Villejuif (France); Lhomme, C. [Institut Gustave-Roussy, Service d' Ooncologie Gynecologique, 94 - Villejuif (France); Morice, P. [Institut Gustave-Roussy, Service de Chirurgie Oncologique, 94 - Villejuif (France); Barillot, I. [Centre Regional Universitaire de Cancerologie Henry-S.-Kaplan, Hopital Bretonneau, CHU de Tours, 37 - Tours (France); Universite Francois-Rabelais, 37 - Tours (France)

    2009-10-15

    Traditionally, prescription and treatment planning in intracavitary brachytherapy for cervix cancer have used either reference points (mainly points A and B) or reference isodoses (60 Gy according to ICRU recommendations) to report doses to the target volume. Doses to critical organs were reported at bladder and rectum ICRU points. This practice has been supported by a long-standing clinical experience that has yielded an acceptable therapeutic ratio. The recent development of imaging has contributed to the improvement in target and organs at risk knowledge. In 2005 and 2006, the European group of brachytherapy -European Society for therapeutic radiology and oncology (GEC-E.S.T.R.O.) recommendations publications on 3-D based image brachytherapy have defined the different volumes of interest. These recommendations have been validated with intercomparison delineation studies. With the concomitant development of remote after-loading projectors, provided with miniaturized sources, it is now possible to plan radiation doses by adjusting dwell positions and relative dwell time values. These procedures allow better coverage of the targets while sparing O.A.R.. The recent literature data evidence a significant improvement in local control with no increase in complications. Further studies are needed to better define the dose recommended in both tumour and organs at risk. This is one of the goals of the European study on MRI-guided brachytherapy in locally advanced cervical cancer (E.M.B.R.A.C.E.) protocol (meaning of acronym: an international study on MRI-guided brachytherapy in locally advanced cervical cancer). (authors)

  20. Aspects of skilled imagery in blindfold chess.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saariluoma, P

    1991-08-01

    Blindfold chess is a very good task environment to study skill-based mental images or skilled imagery. Seven experiments providing information on different aspects of skilled imagery in blindfold chess were made. In all experiments very clear skill-related differences in the operation of chess-specific materials could be found. It will also be argued that chess-specific patterns or chunks are important in skilled subjects' construction of images and the operation of these images relies on the cooperation of visual working memory and long-term memory.

  1. Imagery, colour and illness: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carruthers, Helen R

    2011-09-01

    This paper reviews research on the role of colour and imagery in relation to illness and examines how this might improve communication between the sufferer and those treating or caring for them. It describes a method by which colour can be related to situations such as an individual's mood and how this might be used to predict response to treatment. Furthermore, it provides evidence that documenting the imagery of an illness might give insight into the patients' fears and concerns about their condition as well as helping non-sufferers to understand what they are going through.

  2. A Physicist's Anschauungen Concerning Mental Imagery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Arthur I.; Kaiser, Mary K.

    1987-01-01

    This book is an integration of historical and psychological analyses, with the goal of understanding the role of mental imagery in three seminal developments of early 20th-century physics: special relativity (1905), general relativity (1915), and quantum mechanics (1925). The book focuses on the insights that can be gleaned from Gesalt psychology, genetic epistemology, and recent theories of imagery in cognitive science. The book is divided into three sections. The first presents the comparative epistemologies of the scientists whose developments provide the data base for analyses. The second section considers the role of aesthetics and "visuability" in the transformation (and evaluation) of scientific concepts.

  3. Feldenkrais sensory imagery and forward reach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunn, P A; Rogers, D K

    2000-12-01

    To investigate the effect of sensory imagery on subsequent movement, a unilateral Fleldenkrais lesson of imaging a soft bristle brush passing over one half of the body and in which no movement occurred, was given to 12 naive subjects. Forward flexion for each side of the body was measured at a sit-and-reach box. For 8 and 10 subjects who reported the perception of a side as being longer and lighter following the sensory imagery, there was also a significant increase in the forward flexion range on that side.

  4. Lehrbuch Guided Imagery in Music (GIM)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maack, Carola; Geiger, Edith Maria

    Guided Imagery in Music (GIM) ist eine musikpsychotherapeutische Methode, bei welcher der Patient eine Auswahl meist klassischer Musik in einem entspannten Zustand hört und sein Erleben (= Imaginationen) der Therapeutin mitteilt. Theoretische Hintergründe, klinische Anwendung, sowie methodenspezi......Guided Imagery in Music (GIM) ist eine musikpsychotherapeutische Methode, bei welcher der Patient eine Auswahl meist klassischer Musik in einem entspannten Zustand hört und sein Erleben (= Imaginationen) der Therapeutin mitteilt. Theoretische Hintergründe, klinische Anwendung, sowie...

  5. Does counterpain imagery mediate hypnotic analgesia?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hargadon, R; Bowers, K S; Woody, E Z

    1995-08-01

    Sixty-six high hypnotizable individuals received a baseline exposure to pain and 2 counterbalanced hypnotic analgesia conditions. Standard analgesia invoked counterpain imagery, whereas imageless analgesia proscribed imagery. The mean level of pain reduction in these 2 conditions was virtually identical and significantly less than the pain rated in the baseline condition. Furthermore, cognitions experienced as active efforts to cope with the pain occurred far less often and were associated with less pain reduction than cognitions experienced as passive concomitants of pain reduction. The results cast considerable doubt on the widespread assumption that imaginative involvement mediates hypnotic responding.

  6. Olfactory dreams, olfactory interest, and imagery : Relationships to olfactory memory

    OpenAIRE

    Arshamian, Artin

    2007-01-01

    Existing evidence for olfactory imagery is mixed and mainly based on reports from hallucinations and volitional imagery. Using a questionnaire, Stevenson and Case (2005) showed that olfactory dreams provided a good source for olfactory imagery studies. This study applied an extended version of the same questionnaire and examined olfactory dreams and their relation to real-life experienced odors, volitional imagery, and olfactory interest. Results showed that olfactory dreams were similar to r...

  7. The neural substrates for the different modalities of movement imagery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Dan; Edwards, Martin G; Mullins, Paul; Callow, Nichola

    2015-07-01

    Research highlights that internal visual, external visual and kinesthetic imagery differentially effect motor performance (White & Hardy, 1995; Hardy & Callow, 1999). However, patterns of brain activation subserving these different imagery perspectives and modalities have not yet been established. In the current study, we applied the Vividness of Movement Imagery Questionnaire-2 (VMIQ-2) to study the brain activation underpinning these types of imagery. Participants with high imagery ability (using the VMIQ-2) were selected to participate in the study. The experimental conditions involved imagining an action (one item from the VMIQ-2) using internal visual imagery, external visual imagery, kinesthetic imagery and a perceptual control condition involved looking at a fixation cross. The imagery conditions were presented using a block design and the participants' brain activation was recorded using 3T fMRI. A post-experimental questionnaire was administered to test if participants were able to maintain the imagery during the task and if they switched between the imagery perspective/modalities. Four participants failed to adhere to the imagery conditions, and their data was excluded from analysis. As hypothesized, the different perspectives and modalities of imagery elicited both common areas of activation (in the right supplementary motor area, BA6) and dissociated areas of activation. Specifically, internal visual imagery activated occipital, parietal and frontal brain areas (i.e., the dorsal stream) while external visual imagery activated occipital ventral stream areas and kinesthetic imagery activated caudate and cerebellum areas. These results provide the first central evidence for the visual perspectives and modalities delineated in the VMIQ-2, and, initial biological validity for the VMIQ-2. However, given that only one item from the VMIQ-2 was employed, future fMRI research needs to explore all items to further examine these contentions. Copyright © 2015

  8. Level Sets and Voronoi based Feature Extraction from any Imagery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sharma, O.; Anton, François; Mioc, Darka

    2012-01-01

    imagery, and 2D/3D acoustic images (from hydrographic surveys). The application involving satellite imagery shown in this paper is coastline detection, but the methodology can be easily applied to feature extraction on any king of imagery. A prototype application that is developed as part of this research...

  9. Botswana team sport players' perception of cohesion and imagery ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Perception of cohesion and imagery use among 45 elite team sport players in Botswana were assessed with the Group Environment Questionnaire (Carron et al., 1985) and the Sport Imagery Questionnaire (Hall et al., 1998) to determine whether a relationship exists between the variables, and whether imagery use will ...

  10. 7 CFR 611.22 - Availability of satellite imagery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 6 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Availability of satellite imagery. 611.22 Section 611... § 611.22 Availability of satellite imagery. Cloud-free maps of the United States based on imagery received from a satellite are prepared and released to the pubic by NRCS. The maps offer the first image of...

  11. Aerial Photography and Imagery, Ortho-Corrected - 2010 NAIP Imagery - Lafayette County

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC Education | GIS Inventory — This data set contains polygons delineating the seams boundary between acquired imagery used in the creation of DOQQs and compressed county mosaic (CCM). The DOQQ...

  12. Aerial Photography and Imagery, Ortho-Corrected - 2010 NAIP Imagery - Hernando County

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC Education | GIS Inventory — This data set contains polygons delineating the seams boundary between acquired imagery used in the creation of DOQQs and compressed county mosaic (CCM). The DOQQ...

  13. Aerial Photography and Imagery, Ortho-Corrected - 2010 NAIP Imagery - Martin County

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC Education | GIS Inventory — This data set contains polygons delineating the seams boundary between acquired imagery used in the creation of DOQQs and compressed county mosaic (CCM). The DOQQ...

  14. Aerial Photography and Imagery, Ortho-Corrected - 2010 NAIP Imagery - Dixie County

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC Education | GIS Inventory — This data set contains polygons delineating the seams boundary between acquired imagery used in the creation of DOQQs and compressed county mosaic (CCM). The DOQQ...

  15. Aerial Photography and Imagery, Ortho-Corrected - 2010 NAIP Imagery - Marion County

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC Education | GIS Inventory — This data set contains polygons delineating the seams boundary between acquired imagery used in the creation of DOQQs and compressed county mosaic (CCM). The DOQQ...

  16. Aerial Photography and Imagery, Ortho-Corrected - 2010 NAIP Imagery - Santa Rosa County

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC Education | GIS Inventory — This data set contains polygons delineating the seams boundary between acquired imagery used in the creation of DOQQs and compressed county mosaic (CCM). The DOQQ...

  17. Aerial Photography and Imagery, Ortho-Corrected - 2010 NAIP Imagery - Collier County

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC Education | GIS Inventory — This data set contains polygons delineating the seams boundary between acquired imagery used in the creation of DOQQs and compressed county mosaic (CCM). The DOQQ...

  18. Aerial Photography and Imagery, Ortho-Corrected - 2010 NAIP Imagery - Jefferson County

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC Education | GIS Inventory — This data set contains polygons delineating the seams boundary between acquired imagery used in the creation of DOQQs and compressed county mosaic (CCM). The DOQQ...

  19. Aerial Photography and Imagery, Ortho-Corrected - 2010 NAIP Imagery - Levy County

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC Education | GIS Inventory — This data set contains polygons delineating the seams boundary between acquired imagery used in the creation of DOQQs and compressed county mosaic (CCM). The DOQQ...

  20. Aerial Photography and Imagery, Ortho-Corrected - 2010 NAIP Imagery - Clay County

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC Education | GIS Inventory — This data set contains polygons delineating the seams boundary between acquired imagery used in the creation of DOQQs and compressed county mosaic (CCM). The DOQQ...

  1. Aerial Photography and Imagery, Ortho-Corrected - 2010 NAIP Imagery - Pinellas County

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC Education | GIS Inventory — This data set contains polygons delineating the seams boundary between acquired imagery used in the creation of DOQQs and compressed county mosaic (CCM). The DOQQ...

  2. Aerial Photography and Imagery, Ortho-Corrected - 2010 NAIP Imagery - Bay County

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC Education | GIS Inventory — This data set contains polygons delineating the seams boundary between acquired imagery used in the creation of DOQQs and compressed county mosaic (CCM). The DOQQ...

  3. Aerial Photography and Imagery, Ortho-Corrected - 2010 NAIP Imagery - Franklin County

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC Education | GIS Inventory — This data set contains polygons delineating the seams boundary between acquired imagery used in the creation of DOQQs and compressed county mosaic (CCM). The DOQQ...

  4. Aerial Photography and Imagery, Ortho-Corrected - 2010 NAIP Imagery - Flagler County

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC Education | GIS Inventory — This data set contains polygons delineating the seams boundary between acquired imagery used in the creation of DOQQs and compressed county mosaic (CCM). The DOQQ...

  5. Aerial Photography and Imagery, Ortho-Corrected - 2010 NAIP Imagery - Sumter County

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC Education | GIS Inventory — This data set contains polygons delineating the seams boundary between acquired imagery used in the creation of DOQQs and compressed county mosaic (CCM). The DOQQ...

  6. Aerial Photography and Imagery, Ortho-Corrected - 2010 NAIP Imagery - Baker County

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC Education | GIS Inventory — This data set contains polygons delineating the seams boundary between acquired imagery used in the creation of DOQQs and compressed county mosaic (CCM). The DOQQ...

  7. Aerial Photography and Imagery, Ortho-Corrected - 2010 NAIP Imagery - Union County

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC Education | GIS Inventory — This data set contains polygons delineating the seams boundary between acquired imagery used in the creation of DOQQs and compressed county mosaic (CCM). The DOQQ...

  8. Aerial Photography and Imagery, Ortho-Corrected - 2010 NAIP Imagery - Leon County

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC Education | GIS Inventory — This data set contains polygons delineating the seams boundary between acquired imagery used in the creation of DOQQs and compressed county mosaic (CCM). The DOQQ...

  9. Aerial Photography and Imagery, Ortho-Corrected - 2010 NAIP Imagery - Jackson County

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC Education | GIS Inventory — This data set contains polygons delineating the seams boundary between acquired imagery used in the creation of DOQQs and compressed county mosaic (CCM). The DOQQ...

  10. Aerial Photography and Imagery, Ortho-Corrected - 2010 NAIP Imagery - Orange County

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC Education | GIS Inventory — This data set contains polygons delineating the seams boundary between acquired imagery used in the creation of DOQQs and compressed county mosaic (CCM). The DOQQ...

  11. Aerial Photography and Imagery, Ortho-Corrected - 2010 NAIP Imagery - Hamilton County

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC Education | GIS Inventory — This data set contains polygons delineating the seams boundary between acquired imagery used in the creation of DOQQs and compressed county mosaic (CCM). The DOQQ...

  12. Aerial Photography and Imagery, Ortho-Corrected - 2010 NAIP Imagery - St. Johns County

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC Education | GIS Inventory — This data set contains polygons delineating the seams boundary between acquired imagery used in the creation of DOQQs and compressed county mosaic (CCM). The DOQQ...

  13. Aerial Photography and Imagery, Ortho-Corrected - 2010 NAIP Imagery - Gulf County

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC Education | GIS Inventory — This data set contains polygons delineating the seams boundary between acquired imagery used in the creation of DOQQs and compressed county mosaic (CCM). The DOQQ...

  14. Aerial Photography and Imagery, Ortho-Corrected - 2010 NAIP Imagery - Madison County

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC Education | GIS Inventory — This data set contains polygons delineating the seams boundary between acquired imagery used in the creation of DOQQs and compressed county mosaic (CCM). The DOQQ...

  15. Aerial Photography and Imagery, Ortho-Corrected - 2010 NAIP Imagery - Okaloosa County

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC Education | GIS Inventory — This data set contains polygons delineating the seams boundary between acquired imagery used in the creation of DOQQs and compressed county mosaic (CCM). The DOQQ...

  16. Aerial Photography and Imagery, Ortho-Corrected - 2010 NAIP Imagery - Pasco County

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC Education | GIS Inventory — This data set contains polygons delineating the seams boundary between acquired imagery used in the creation of DOQQs and compressed county mosaic (CCM). The DOQQ...

  17. Aerial Photography and Imagery, Ortho-Corrected - 2010 NAIP Imagery - Washington County

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC Education | GIS Inventory — This data set contains polygons delineating the seams boundary between acquired imagery used in the creation of DOQQs and compressed county mosaic (CCM). The DOQQ...

  18. Aerial Photography and Imagery, Ortho-Corrected - 2010 NAIP Imagery - Glades County

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC Education | GIS Inventory — This data set contains polygons delineating the seams boundary between acquired imagery used in the creation of DOQQs and compressed county mosaic (CCM). The DOQQ...

  19. Aerial Photography and Imagery, Ortho-Corrected - 2010 NAIP Imagery - Highlands County

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC Education | GIS Inventory — This data set contains polygons delineating the seams boundary between acquired imagery used in the creation of DOQQs and compressed county mosaic (CCM). The DOQQ...

  20. Aerial Photography and Imagery, Ortho-Corrected - 2010 NAIP Imagery - Alachua County

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC Education | GIS Inventory — This data set contains polygons delineating the seams boundary between acquired imagery used in the creation of DOQQs and compressed county mosaic (CCM). The DOQQ...

  1. Aerial Photography and Imagery, Ortho-Corrected - 2010 NAIP Imagery - Volusia County

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC Education | GIS Inventory — This data set contains polygons delineating the seams boundary between acquired imagery used in the creation of DOQQs and compressed county mosaic (CCM). The DOQQ...

  2. Aerial Photography and Imagery, Ortho-Corrected - 2010 NAIP Imagery - Walton County

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC Education | GIS Inventory — This data set contains polygons delineating the seams boundary between acquired imagery used in the creation of DOQQs and compressed county mosaic (CCM). The DOQQ...

  3. Aerial Photography and Imagery, Ortho-Corrected - 2010 NAIP Imagery - Sarasota County

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC Education | GIS Inventory — This data set contains polygons delineating the seams boundary between acquired imagery used in the creation of DOQQs and compressed county mosaic (CCM). The DOQQ...

  4. Aerial Photography and Imagery, Ortho-Corrected - 2010 NAIP Imagery - Brevard County

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC Education | GIS Inventory — This data set contains polygons delineating the seams boundary between acquired imagery used in the creation of DOQQs and compressed county mosaic (CCM). The DOQQ...

  5. Aerial Photography and Imagery, Ortho-Corrected - 2010 NAIP Imagery - Liberty County

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC Education | GIS Inventory — This data set contains polygons delineating the seams boundary between acquired imagery used in the creation of DOQQs and compressed county mosaic (CCM). The DOQQ...

  6. Aerial Photography and Imagery, Ortho-Corrected - 2010 NAIP Imagery - Wakulla County

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC Education | GIS Inventory — This data set contains polygons delineating the seams boundary between acquired imagery used in the creation of DOQQs and compressed county mosaic (CCM). The DOQQ...

  7. Aerial Photography and Imagery, Ortho-Corrected - 2010 NAIP Imagery - Gilchrist County

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC Education | GIS Inventory — This data set contains polygons delineating the seams boundary between acquired imagery used in the creation of DOQQs and compressed county mosaic (CCM). The DOQQ...

  8. Aerial Photography and Imagery, Ortho-Corrected - 2010 NAIP Imagery - Bradford County

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC Education | GIS Inventory — This data set contains polygons delineating the seams boundary between acquired imagery used in the creation of DOQQs and compressed county mosaic (CCM). The DOQQ...

  9. Aerial Photography and Imagery, Ortho-Corrected - 2010 NAIP Imagery - St. Lucie County

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC Education | GIS Inventory — This data set contains polygons delineating the seams boundary between acquired imagery used in the creation of DOQQs and compressed county mosaic (CCM). The DOQQ...

  10. Aerial Photography and Imagery, Ortho-Corrected - 2010 NAIP Imagery - Taylor County

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC Education | GIS Inventory — This data set contains polygons delineating the seams boundary between acquired imagery used in the creation of DOQQs and compressed county mosaic (CCM). The DOQQ...

  11. Aerial Photography and Imagery, Ortho-Corrected - 2010 NAIP Imagery - Hendry County

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC Education | GIS Inventory — This data set contains polygons delineating the seams boundary between acquired imagery used in the creation of DOQQs and compressed county mosaic (CCM). The DOQQ...

  12. National Geospatial Data Asset (NGDA) National Agriculture Imagery Program (NAIP) Imagery - 2017 Planned Acquisition

    Data.gov (United States)

    Farm Service Agency, Department of Agriculture — NAIP imagery is acquired annually with the total coverage being determined by available funds from FSA and funding partners, considering FSA priorities. The NAIP...

  13. Aerial Photography and Imagery, Ortho-Corrected - 2010 NAIP Imagery - Escambia County

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC Education | GIS Inventory — This data set contains polygons delineating the seams boundary between acquired imagery used in the creation of DOQQs and compressed county mosaic (CCM). The DOQQ...

  14. Aerial Photography and Imagery, Ortho-Corrected - 2010 NAIP Imagery - Monroe County

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC Education | GIS Inventory — This data set contains polygons delineating the seams boundary between acquired imagery used in the creation of DOQQs and compressed county mosaic (CCM). The DOQQ...

  15. Aerial Photography and Imagery, Ortho-Corrected - 2010 NAIP Imagery - Citrus County

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC Education | GIS Inventory — This data set contains polygons delineating the seams boundary between acquired imagery used in the creation of DOQQs and compressed county mosaic (CCM). The DOQQ...

  16. Aerial Photography and Imagery, Ortho-Corrected - 2010 NAIP Imagery - Palm Beach County

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC Education | GIS Inventory — This data set contains polygons delineating the seams boundary between acquired imagery used in the creation of DOQQs and compressed county mosaic (CCM). The DOQQ...

  17. Aerial Photography and Imagery, Ortho-Corrected - 2010 NAIP Imagery - Suwannee County

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC Education | GIS Inventory — This data set contains polygons delineating the seams boundary between acquired imagery used in the creation of DOQQs and compressed county mosaic (CCM). The DOQQ...

  18. Aerial Photography and Imagery, Ortho-Corrected - 2010 NAIP Imagery - Okeechobee County

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC Education | GIS Inventory — This data set contains polygons delineating the seams boundary between acquired imagery used in the creation of DOQQs and compressed county mosaic (CCM). The DOQQ...

  19. Aerial Photography and Imagery, Ortho-Corrected - 2010 NAIP Imagery - Miami-Dade County

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC Education | GIS Inventory — This data set contains polygons delineating the seams boundary between acquired imagery used in the creation of DOQQs and compressed county mosaic (CCM). The DOQQ...

  20. Aerial Photography and Imagery, Ortho-Corrected - 2010 NAIP Imagery - Lee County

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC Education | GIS Inventory — This data set contains polygons delineating the seams boundary between acquired imagery used in the creation of DOQQs and compressed county mosaic (CCM). The DOQQ...

  1. Aerial Photography and Imagery, Ortho-Corrected - 2010 NAIP Imagery - Nassau County

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC Education | GIS Inventory — This data set contains polygons delineating the seams boundary between acquired imagery used in the creation of DOQQs and compressed county mosaic (CCM). The DOQQ...

  2. Aerial Photography and Imagery, Ortho-Corrected - 2010 NAIP Imagery - Duval County

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC Education | GIS Inventory — This data set contains polygons delineating the seams boundary between acquired imagery used in the creation of DOQQs and compressed county mosaic (CCM). The DOQQ...

  3. Aerial Photography and Imagery, Ortho-Corrected - 2010 NAIP Imagery - Lake County

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC Education | GIS Inventory — This data set contains polygons delineating the seams boundary between acquired imagery used in the creation of DOQQs and compressed county mosaic (CCM). The DOQQ...

  4. Aerial Photography and Imagery, Ortho-Corrected - 2010 NAIP Imagery - Indian River County

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC Education | GIS Inventory — This data set contains polygons delineating the seams boundary between acquired imagery used in the creation of DOQQs and compressed county mosaic (CCM). The DOQQ...

  5. Aerial Photography and Imagery, Ortho-Corrected - 2010 NAIP Imagery - Putnam County

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC Education | GIS Inventory — This data set contains polygons delineating the seams boundary between acquired imagery used in the creation of DOQQs and compressed county mosaic (CCM). The DOQQ...

  6. Aerial Photography and Imagery, Ortho-Corrected - 2010 NAIP Imagery - Gadsden County

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC Education | GIS Inventory — This data set contains polygons delineating the seams boundary between acquired imagery used in the creation of DOQQs and compressed county mosaic (CCM). The DOQQ...

  7. Aerial Photography and Imagery, Ortho-Corrected - FL Bay Ortho Imagery Project Spring 2013

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC Education | GIS Inventory — This file references a single orthogonal imagery tile produced from nadir images captured by Pictometry International during the period of December 30th, 2012 and...

  8. Dissociative Experiences and Vividness of Auditory Imagery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Fabello, María José; Campos, Alfredo

    2017-01-01

    The relationship between dissociation and auditory imagery were assessed, 2 variables that sometime influence on artistic creativity. A total of 170 fine arts undergraduates (94 women and 76 men) received 2 dissociation questionnaires--the Dissociative Ability Scale (DAS), and the Dissociative Experiences Scale (DES)--and 2 auditory imagery…

  9. Imagery as a Facilitator of Semantic Integration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weed, Keri; Ryan, Ellen Bouchard

    The relationship between processing style (either auditory or visual) and sentence and imagery strategies was investigated with a sample of 80 second-grade children. Assignment to auditory- and visual-processor groups was based on subjects' recall of 16 pictograph sequences, four of which included visual interference and four of which included…

  10. Imagery Rescripting across Disorders: A Practical Guide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stopa, Lusia

    2011-01-01

    Intrusive images occur in many disorders and, as well as causing distress, they frequently represent important negative meanings about the self, other people, or the world. Imagery rescripting describes a set of therapeutic techniques that are aimed at changing these negative meanings. This special series focuses on when and how to do imagery…

  11. Paris Commune Imagery in China's Mass Media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meiss, Guy T.

    The role of ideology in mass media practices is explored in an analysis of the relation between the Paris Commune of 1871 and the Shanghai Commune of 1967, two attempts to translate the philosophical concept of dictatorship of the proletariat into some political form. A review of the use of Paris Commune imagery by the Chinese to mobilize the…

  12. Natural colour mapping for multiband nightvision imagery

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Toet, A.

    2003-01-01

    We present a method to give (fused) multiband night-time imagery a natural day-time colour appearance. For input, the method requires a false colour RGB image that is produced by mapping three individual bands (or the .rst three principal components) of a multiband nightvision system to the

  13. Imagery Rescripting in Posttraumatic Stress Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hackmann, Anne

    2011-01-01

    This article provides an overview of methods of working with imagery to change meanings and ameliorate posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). It opens with a description of phenomenology in this disorder, usually characterized by a small number of recurrent images of the trauma, each representing a moment that warned of a threat to the physical or…

  14. Dichoptic fusion of thermal and intensified imagery

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Toet, A.; Hogervorst, M.A.; Hoeven, M. van der

    2006-01-01

    Subjects used the dichoptic combination of a monocular image intensifier (NVG) and a monocular uncooled microbolometer (LWIR) to detect and localise both visual targets and camouflaged thermal targets while moving through a dimly lit complex environment. The NVG imagery enabled the subjects to move

  15. Satellite imagery and the Department of Safeguards

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chitumbo, K.; Bunney, J.; Leve, G.; Robb, S.

    2001-01-01

    Full text: The presentation examines some of the challenges the Satellite Imagery and Analysis Laboratory (SIAL) is facing in supporting Strengthened Safeguards. It focuses on the analytical process, starting with specifying initial tasking and continuing through to end products that are a direct result of in-house analysis. In addition it also evaluates the advantages and disadvantages of SIAL's mission and introduces external forces that the agency must consider, but cannot itself, predict or control. Although SIAL's contribution to tasks relating to Article 2a(iii) of the Additional Protocol are known and are presently of great benefit to operations areas, this is only one aspect of its work. SIAL's ability to identify and analyze historical satellite imagery data has the advantage of permitting operations to take a more in depth view of a particular area of interest's (AOI) development, and thus may permit operations to confirm or refute specific assertions relating to the AOI's function or abilities. These assertions may originate in-house or may be open source reports the agency feels it is obligated to explore. SIAL's mission is unique in the world of imagery analysis. Its aim is to support all operations areas equally and in doing so it must maintain global focus. The task is tremendous, but the resultant coverage and concentration of unique expertise will allow SIAL to develop and provide operations with datasets that can be exploited in standalone mode or be incorporated into new cutting edge tools to be developed in SGIT. At present SIAL relies on two remote sensors, IKONOS-2 and EROS-AI, for present high- resolution imagery data and is using numerous sources for historical, pre 1999, data. A multiplicity of sources for high-resolution data is very important to SIAL, but is something that it cannot influence. It is hoped that the planned launch of two new sensors by Summer 2002 will be successful and will offer greater flexibility for image collection

  16. Relating multimodal imagery data in three dimensions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walli, Karl C.

    This research develops and improves the fundamental mathematical approaches and techniques required to relate imagery and imagery derived multimodal products in 3D. Image registration, in a 2D sense, will always be limited by the 3D effects of viewing geometry on the target. Therefore, effects such as occlusion, parallax, shadowing, and terrain/building elevation can often be mitigated with even a modest amounts of 3D target modeling. Additionally, the imaged scene may appear radically different based on the sensed modality of interest; this is evident from the differences in visible, infrared, polarimetric, and radar imagery of the same site. This thesis develops a 'model-centric' approach to relating multimodal imagery in a 3D environment. By correctly modeling a site of interest, both geometrically and physically, it is possible to remove/mitigate some of the most difficult challenges associated with multimodal image registration. In order to accomplish this feat, the mathematical framework necessary to relate imagery to geometric models is thoroughly examined. Since geometric models may need to be generated to apply this 'model-centric' approach, this research develops methods to derive 3D models from imagery and LIDAR data. Of critical note, is the implementation of complimentary techniques for relating multimodal imagery that utilize the geometric model in concert with physics based modeling to simulate scene appearance under diverse imaging scenarios. Finally, the often neglected final phase of mapping localized image registration results back to the world coordinate system model for final data archival are addressed. In short, once a target site is properly modeled, both geometrically and physically, it is possible to orient the 3D model to the same viewing perspective as a captured image to enable proper registration. If done accurately, the synthetic model's physical appearance can simulate the imaged modality of interest while simultaneously removing the

  17. Motion/imagery secure cloud enterprise architecture analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeLay, John L.

    2012-06-01

    Cloud computing with storage virtualization and new service-oriented architectures brings a new perspective to the aspect of a distributed motion imagery and persistent surveillance enterprise. Our existing research is focused mainly on content management, distributed analytics, WAN distributed cloud networking performance issues of cloud based technologies. The potential of leveraging cloud based technologies for hosting motion imagery, imagery and analytics workflows for DOD and security applications is relatively unexplored. This paper will examine technologies for managing, storing, processing and disseminating motion imagery and imagery within a distributed network environment. Finally, we propose areas for future research in the area of distributed cloud content management enterprises.

  18. The differential contributions of visual imagery constructs on autobiographical thinking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aydin, Cagla

    2018-02-01

    There is a growing theoretical and empirical consensus on the central role of visual imagery in autobiographical memory. However, findings from studies that explore how individual differences in visual imagery are reflected on autobiographical thinking do not present a coherent story. One reason for the mixed findings was suggested to be the treatment of visual imagery as an undifferentiated construct while evidence shows that there is more than one type of visual imagery. The present study investigates the relative contributions of different imagery constructs; namely, object and spatial imagery, on autobiographical memory processes. Additionally, it explores whether a similar relation extends to imagining the future. The results indicate that while object imagery was significantly correlated with several phenomenological characteristics, such as the level of sensory and perceptual details for past events - but not for future events - spatial imagery predicted the level of episodic specificity for both past and future events. We interpret these findings as object imagery being recruited in tasks of autobiographical memory that employ reflective processes while spatial imagery is engaged during direct retrieval of event details. Implications for the role of visual imagery in autobiographical thinking processes are discussed.

  19. Mental imagery as an emotional amplifier: application to bipolar disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmes, Emily A; Geddes, John R; Colom, Francesc; Goodwin, Guy M

    2008-12-01

    Cognitions in the form of mental images have a more powerful impact on emotion than their verbal counterparts. This review synthesizes the cognitive science of imagery and emotion with transdiagnostic clinical research, yielding novel predictions for the basis of emotional volatility in bipolar disorder. Anxiety is extremely common in patients with bipolar disorder and is associated with increased dysfunction and suicidality, yet it is poorly understood and rarely treated. Mental imagery is a neglected aspect of bipolar anxiety although in anxiety disorders such as posttraumatic stress disorder and social phobia focusing on imagery has been crucial for the development of cognitive behavior therapy (CBT). In this review we present a cognitive model of imagery and emotion applied to bipolar disorder. Within this model mental imagery amplifies emotion, drawing on Clark's cyclical panic model [(1986). A cognitive approach to panic. Behaviour Research and Therapy, 24, 461-470]. We (1) emphasise imagery's amplification of anxiety (cycle one); (2) suggest that imagery amplifies the defining (hypo-) mania of bipolar disorder (cycle two), whereby the overly positive misinterpretation of triggers leads to mood elevation (escalated by imagery), increasing associated beliefs, goals, and action likelihood (all strengthened by imagery). Imagery suggests a unifying explanation for key unexplained features of bipolar disorder: ubiquitous anxiety, mood instability and creativity. Introducing imagery has novel implications for bipolar treatment innovation--an area where CBT improvements are much-needed.

  20. Mental imagery in music performance: underlying mechanisms and potential benefits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keller, Peter E

    2012-04-01

    This paper examines the role of mental imagery in music performance. Self-reports by musicians, and various other sources of anecdotal evidence, suggest that covert auditory, motor, and/or visual imagery facilitate multiple aspects of music performance. The cognitive and motor mechanisms that underlie such imagery include working memory, action simulation, and internal models. Together these mechanisms support the generation of anticipatory images that enable thorough action planning and movement execution that is characterized by efficiency, temporal precision, and biomechanical economy. In ensemble performance, anticipatory imagery may facilitate interpersonal coordination by enhancing online predictions about others' action timing. Overlap in brain regions subserving auditory imagery and temporal prediction is consistent with this view. It is concluded that individual differences in anticipatory imagery may be a source of variation in expressive performance excellence and the quality of ensemble cohesion. Engaging in effortful musical imagery is therefore justified when artistic perfection is the goal. © 2012 New York Academy of Sciences.

  1. Selective effect of physical fatigue on motor imagery accuracy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Franck Di Rienzo

    Full Text Available While the use of motor imagery (the mental representation of an action without overt execution during actual training sessions is usually recommended, experimental studies examining the effect of physical fatigue on subsequent motor imagery performance are sparse and yielded divergent findings. Here, we investigated whether physical fatigue occurring during an intense sport training session affected motor imagery ability. Twelve swimmers (nine males, mean age 15.5 years conducted a 45 min physically-fatiguing protocol where they swam from 70% to 100% of their maximal aerobic speed. We tested motor imagery ability immediately before and after fatigue state. Participants randomly imagined performing a swim turn using internal and external visual imagery. Self-reports ratings, imagery times and electrodermal responses, an index of alertness from the autonomic nervous system, were the dependent variables. Self-reports ratings indicated that participants did not encounter difficulty when performing motor imagery after fatigue. However, motor imagery times were significantly shortened during posttest compared to both pretest and actual turn times, thus indicating reduced timing accuracy. Looking at the selective effect of physical fatigue on external visual imagery did not reveal any difference before and after fatigue, whereas significantly shorter imagined times and electrodermal responses (respectively 15% and 48% decrease, p<0.001 were observed during the posttest for internal visual imagery. A significant correlation (r=0.64; p<0.05 was observed between motor imagery vividness (estimated through imagery questionnaire and autonomic responses during motor imagery after fatigue. These data support that unlike local muscle fatigue, physical fatigue occurring during intense sport training sessions is likely to affect motor imagery accuracy. These results might be explained by the updating of the internal representation of the motor sequence, due to

  2. Imagery encoding and false recognition errors: Examining the role of imagery process and imagery content on source misattributions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foley, Mary Ann; Foy, Jeffrey; Schlemmer, Emily; Belser-Ehrlich, Janna

    2010-11-01

    Imagery encoding effects on source-monitoring errors were explored using the Deese-Roediger-McDermott paradigm in two experiments. While viewing thematically related lists embedded in mixed picture/word presentations, participants were asked to generate images of objects or words (Experiment 1) or to simply name the items (Experiment 2). An encoding task intended to induce spontaneous images served as a control for the explicit imagery instruction conditions (Experiment 1). On the picture/word source-monitoring tests, participants were much more likely to report "seeing" a picture of an item presented as a word than the converse particularly when images were induced spontaneously. However, this picture misattribution error was reversed after generating images of words (Experiment 1) and was eliminated after simply labelling the items (Experiment 2). Thus source misattributions were sensitive to the processes giving rise to imagery experiences (spontaneous vs deliberate), the kinds of images generated (object vs word images), and the ways in which materials were presented (as pictures vs words).

  3. Performance improvements from imagery:evidence that internal visual imagery is superior to external visual imagery for slalom performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nichola eCallow

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available We report three experiments investigating the hypothesis that use of internal visual imagery (IVI would be superior to external visual imagery (EVI for the performance of different slalom-based motor tasks. In Experiment 1, three groups of participants (IVI, EVI, and a control group performed a driving-simulation slalom task. The IVI group achieved significantly quicker lap times than EVI and the control group. In Experiment 2, participants performed a downhill running slalom task under both IVI and EVI conditions. Performance was again quickest in the IVI compared to EVI condition, with no differences in accuracy. Experiment 3 used the same group design as Experiment 1, but with participants performing a downhill ski-slalom task. Results revealed the IVI group to be significantly more accurate than the control group, with no significant differences in time taken to complete the task. These results support the beneficial effects of IVI for slalom-based tasks, and significantly advances our knowledge related to the differential effects of visual imagery perspectives on motor performance.

  4. Performance improvements from imagery: evidence that internal visual imagery is superior to external visual imagery for slalom performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Callow, Nichola; Roberts, Ross; Hardy, Lew; Jiang, Dan; Edwards, Martin Gareth

    2013-01-01

    We report three experiments investigating the hypothesis that use of internal visual imagery (IVI) would be superior to external visual imagery (EVI) for the performance of different slalom-based motor tasks. In Experiment 1, three groups of participants (IVI, EVI, and a control group) performed a driving-simulation slalom task. The IVI group achieved significantly quicker lap times than EVI and the control group. In Experiment 2, participants performed a downhill running slalom task under both IVI and EVI conditions. Performance was again quickest in the IVI compared to EVI condition, with no differences in accuracy. Experiment 3 used the same group design as Experiment 1, but with participants performing a downhill ski-slalom task. Results revealed the IVI group to be significantly more accurate than the control group, with no significant differences in time taken to complete the task. These results support the beneficial effects of IVI for slalom-based tasks, and significantly advances our knowledge related to the differential effects of visual imagery perspectives on motor performance.

  5. Internal and External Imagery Effects on Tennis Skills Among Novices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dana, Amir; Gozalzadeh, Elmira

    2017-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of internal and external visual imagery perspectives on performance accuracy of open and closed tennis skills (i.e., serve, forehand, and backhand) among novices. Thirty-six young male novices, aged 15-18 years, from a summer tennis program participated. Following initial skill acquisition (12 sessions), baseline assessments of imagery ability and imagery perspective preference were used to assign participants to one of three groups: internal imagery ( n = 12), external imagery ( n = 12), or a no-imagery (mental math exercise) control group ( n = 12). The experimental interventions of 15 minutes of mental imagery (internal or external) or mental math exercises followed by 15 minutes of physical practice were held three times a week for six weeks. The performance accuracy of the groups on the serve, forehand, and backhand strokes was measured at pre- and post-test using videotaping. Results showed significant increases in the performance accuracy of all three tennis strokes in all three groups, but serve accuracy in the internal imagery group and forehand accuracy in the external imagery group showed greater improvements, while backhand accuracy was similarly improved in all three groups. These findings highlight differential efficacy of internal and external visual imagery for performance improvement on complex sport skills in early stage motor learning.

  6. Sunglitter Imagery Of The Ocean Surface Phenomena

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myasoedov, Alexander; Kudryavtsev, Vladimir; Chapron, Bertrand; Johannessen, Johnny

    2010-04-01

    An algorithm for retrieval of spatial variations of the mean square slope (MSS) of the sea surface from sunglint imagery is proposed. The retrieval algorithm is free on a prior suggestion on PDF model. The transfer function, relating the brightness contrast to the MSS contrasts, is found from observed sunglint brightness, where “real” PDF of the sea slopes has built-in. Developed approach was applied for analysis of the sunglint signature of the mesoscale ocean dynamics and internal waves. We found that the ocean currents (eddies, meanders, frontal lines) and internal waves are well visible on the sea surface as the MSS anomalies. Results of this study is further adopted by Kudryavtsev et al. (2010) for development of advanced approach for synergetic use of SAR and optical imagery in studies of meso-scale ocean dynamics.

  7. Neural decoding of visual imagery during sleep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horikawa, T; Tamaki, M; Miyawaki, Y; Kamitani, Y

    2013-05-03

    Visual imagery during sleep has long been a topic of persistent speculation, but its private nature has hampered objective analysis. Here we present a neural decoding approach in which machine-learning models predict the contents of visual imagery during the sleep-onset period, given measured brain activity, by discovering links between human functional magnetic resonance imaging patterns and verbal reports with the assistance of lexical and image databases. Decoding models trained on stimulus-induced brain activity in visual cortical areas showed accurate classification, detection, and identification of contents. Our findings demonstrate that specific visual experience during sleep is represented by brain activity patterns shared by stimulus perception, providing a means to uncover subjective contents of dreaming using objective neural measurement.

  8. Guided Imagery and Music with Cancer Survivors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bonde, Lars Ole; Thomasen, Ellen

    "Receptiv musikterapi med udskrevne cancerpatienter - en effektundersøgelse med fokus på stemning og livskvalitet." Pilot-projekt Fra oktober 2002 til april 2003 gennemføres (med økonomisk støtte af VIFAB) et pilotprojekt med 6 deltagere. Formålet er dels at få et indtryk af musikterapiens potent...... at vise, om receptiv musikterapi (Guided Imagery and Music/ GIM*) kan forbedre udskrevne/færdigbehandlede cancer-patienters stemningsleje (mood) og livskvalitet. Den kvantitative effektundersøgelse skal vise, om GIM-terapien har en målbar effekt, mens den kvalitative, fænomenologisk......-hermeneutiske undersøgelse af deltagernes oplevelser (indre forestillingsbilleder) skal vise, hvordan GIM-terapien påvirker selvopfattelsen, stemningslejet, mestringen af følelser og livskvaliteten. Flere mindre forskningsprojekter i USA og Tyskland har indikeret, at receptiv musikterapi/ Guided Imagery and Music (GIM) kan...

  9. Assessing mental imagery in clinical psychology: A review of imagery measures and a guiding framework

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearson, David G.; Deeprose, Catherine; Wallace-Hadrill, Sophie M.A.; Heyes, Stephanie Burnett; Holmes, Emily A.

    2013-01-01

    Mental imagery is an under-explored field in clinical psychology research but presents a topic of potential interest and relevance across many clinical disorders, including social phobia, schizophrenia, depression, and post-traumatic stress disorder. There is currently a lack of a guiding framework from which clinicians may select the domains or associated measures most likely to be of appropriate use in mental imagery research. We adopt an interdisciplinary approach and present a review of studies across experimental psychology and clinical psychology in order to highlight the key domains and measures most likely to be of relevance. This includes a consideration of methods for experimentally assessing the generation, maintenance, inspection and transformation of mental images; as well as subjective measures of characteristics such as image vividness and clarity. We present a guiding framework in which we propose that cognitive, subjective and clinical aspects of imagery should be explored in future research. The guiding framework aims to assist researchers in the selection of measures for assessing those aspects of mental imagery that are of most relevance to clinical psychology. We propose that a greater understanding of the role of mental imagery in clinical disorders will help drive forward advances in both theory and treatment. PMID:23123567

  10. Assessing mental imagery in clinical psychology: a review of imagery measures and a guiding framework.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearson, David G; Deeprose, Catherine; Wallace-Hadrill, Sophie M A; Burnett Heyes, Stephanie; Holmes, Emily A

    2013-02-01

    Mental imagery is an under-explored field in clinical psychology research but presents a topic of potential interest and relevance across many clinical disorders, including social phobia, schizophrenia, depression, and post-traumatic stress disorder. There is currently a lack of a guiding framework from which clinicians may select the domains or associated measures most likely to be of appropriate use in mental imagery research. We adopt an interdisciplinary approach and present a review of studies across experimental psychology and clinical psychology in order to highlight the key domains and measures most likely to be of relevance. This includes a consideration of methods for experimentally assessing the generation, maintenance, inspection and transformation of mental images; as well as subjective measures of characteristics such as image vividness and clarity. We present a guiding framework in which we propose that cognitive, subjective and clinical aspects of imagery should be explored in future research. The guiding framework aims to assist researchers in the selection of measures for assessing those aspects of mental imagery that are of most relevance to clinical psychology. We propose that a greater understanding of the role of mental imagery in clinical disorders will help drive forward advances in both theory and treatment. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Is motor imagery different in catatonic schizophrenia?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaytseva, Yuliya; Morozova, Alexandra; Bendova, Marie; Garakh, Zhanna

    2017-06-01

    Catatonic schizophrenia, a rare subtype in this disease group, is characterized by motor disturbances. The current study investigated the reactivity of electroencephalographic mu rhythm in a motion imagery task in two single cases of first-episode catatonic schizophrenia, assuming they would show less mu rhythm reduction compared to paranoid schizophrenic patients and healthy controls. © 2017 The Institute of Psychology, Chinese Academy of Sciences and John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  12. Active training paradigm for motor imagery BCI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Junhua; Zhang, Liqing

    2012-06-01

    Brain-computer interface (BCI) allows the use of brain activities for people to directly communicate with the external world or to control external devices without participation of any peripheral nerves and muscles. Motor imagery is one of the most popular modes in the research field of brain-computer interface. Although motor imagery BCI has some advantages compared with other modes of BCI, such as asynchronization, it is necessary to require training sessions before using it. The performance of trained BCI system depends on the quality of training samples or the subject engagement. In order to improve training effect and decrease training time, we proposed a new paradigm where subjects participated in training more actively than in the traditional paradigm. In the traditional paradigm, a cue (to indicate what kind of motor imagery should be imagined during the current trial) is given to the subject at the beginning of a trial or during a trial, and this cue is also used as a label for this trial. It is usually assumed that labels for trials are accurate in the traditional paradigm, although subjects may not have performed the required or correct kind of motor imagery, and trials may thus be mislabeled. And then those mislabeled trials give rise to interference during model training. In our proposed paradigm, the subject is required to reconfirm the label and can correct the label when necessary. This active training paradigm may generate better training samples with fewer inconsistent labels because it overcomes mistakes when subject's motor imagination does not match the given cues. The experiments confirm that our proposed paradigm achieves better performance; the improvement is significant according to statistical analysis.

  13. Wave directional spectrum from SAR imagery

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Fernandes, A.A.; Sarma, Y.V.B.; Menon, H.B.; Vethamony, P.

    with radar imagery. 1. SAR Measurements Digital ERS-1 image mode SAR scenes off Goa, Paradeep and Visakhapatnam were acquired from the National Remote Sensing Agency (NRSA), Hyderabad, India, with the intention of studying the spatial evolution... density and wave direction separately as a function of frequency using the digital band, pass filtering method, the buoy observation at 1050 IST showed (Table 1) that there were two main spectral peaks, both due to "swell" ( waves generated by distant...

  14. Strategies for Defeating Commercial Imagery Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-12-01

    325 Chennault Circle, Maxwell AFB, AL 36112, or on the CSAT web site at http://www.au.af.mil/au/awc/awcgate/awccsat.htm. The fax number is (334...ground sites should receive the downlink and which customers should receive the product.19 Depending on the system, the image downlink may be...creates the products from the image data and licensed distributors can provide them to customers . Potential enemies may get imagery from a licensed

  15. Statistical Processing Methods for Polarimetric Imagery

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-09-01

    everything we have together. Calibration data for the HST imagery was graciously provided by M. Kishi- moto . Some of the data presented in this paper...analytic signal representation of light (plane wave radiation) in a vacuum is given by two orthogonal electric fields, ux(t) and uy(t), that are both...analyzer, is an optical element that absorbs radiation at rate that is dependent on the orientation of the incident electric field. This field

  16. Motor imagery in unipolar major depression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Djamila eBennabi

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Motor imagery is a potential tool to investigate action representation, as it can provide insights into the processes of action planning and preparation. Recent studies suggest that depressed patients present specific impairment in mental rotation. The present study was designed to investigate the influence of unipolar depression on motor imagery ability.Methods: Fourteen right-handed patients meeting DSM-IV criteria for unipolar depression were compared to fourteen matched healthy controls. Imagery ability was accessed by the timing correspondence between executed and imagined movements during a pointing task, involving strong spatiotemporal constraints (speed/accuracy trade off paradigm.Results: Compared to controls, depressed patients showed marked motor slowing on both actual and imagined movements. Furthermore, we observed greater temporal discrepancies between actual and mental movements in depressed patients than in healthy controls. Lastly, depressed patients modulated, to some extent, mental movement durations according to the difficulty of the task, but this modulation was not as strong as that of healthy subjects.Conclusion: These results suggest that unipolar depression significantly affects the higher stages of action planning and point out a selective decline of motor prediction.

  17. Mental representation and motor imagery training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schack, Thomas; Essig, Kai; Frank, Cornelia; Koester, Dirk

    2014-01-01

    Research in sports, dance and rehabilitation has shown that basic action concepts (BACs) are fundamental building blocks of mental action representations. BACs are based on chunked body postures related to common functions for realizing action goals. In this paper, we outline issues in research methodology and an experimental method, the structural dimensional analysis of mental representation (SDA-M), to assess action-relevant representational structures that reflect the organization of BACs. The SDA-M reveals a strong relationship between cognitive representation and performance if complex actions are performed. We show how the SDA-M can improve motor imagery training and how it contributes to our understanding of coaching processes. The SDA-M capitalizes on the objective measurement of individual mental movement representations before training and the integration of these results into the motor imagery training. Such motor imagery training based on mental representations (MTMR) has been applied successfully in professional sports such as golf, volleyball, gymnastics, windsurfing, and recently in the rehabilitation of patients who have suffered a stroke.

  18. Mental Representation and Motor Imagery Training

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas eSchack

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Research in sports, dance and rehabilitation has shown that Basic Action Concepts (BACs are fundamental building blocks of mental action representations. BACs are based on chunked body postures related to common functions for realizing action goals. In this paper, we outline issues in research methodology and an experimental method, SDA-M (structural dimensional analysis of mental representation, to assess action-relevant representational structures that reflect the organization of BACs. The SDA-M reveals a strong relationship between cognitive representation and performance if complex actions are performed. We show how the SDA-M can improve motor imagery training and how it contributes to our understanding of coaching processes. The SDA-M capitalizes on the objective measurement of individual mental movement representations before training and the integration of these results into the motor imagery training. Such motor imagery training based on mental representations has been applied successfully in professional sports such as golf, volleyball, gymnastics, windsurfing, and recently in the rehabilitation of patients who have suffered a stroke.

  19. Mental imagery affects subsequent automatic defense responses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muriel A Hagenaars

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Automatic defense responses promote survival and appropriate action under threat. They have also been associated with the development of threat-related psychiatric syndromes. Targeting such automatic responses during threat may be useful in populations with frequent threat exposure. Here, two experiments explored whether mental imagery as a pre-trauma manipulation could influence fear bradycardia (a core characteristic of freezing during subsequent analogue trauma (affective picture viewing. Image-based interventions have proven successful in the treatment of threat-related disorders, and are easily applicable. In Experiment 1 43 healthy participants were randomly assigned to an imagery script condition. Participants executed a passive viewing task with blocks of neutral, pleasant and unpleasant pictures after listening to an auditory script that was either related (with a positive or a negative outcome or unrelated to the unpleasant pictures from the passive viewing task. Heart rate was assessed during script listening and during passive viewing. Imagining negative related scripts resulted in greater bradycardia (neutral-unpleasant contrast than imagining positive scripts, especially unrelated. This effect was replicated in Experiment 2 (N = 51, again in the neutral-unpleasant contrast. An extra no-script condition showed that bradycardia was not induced by the negative related script, but rather that a positive script attenuated bradycardia. These preliminary results might indicate reduced vigilance after unrelated positive events. Future research should replicate these findings using a larger sample. Either way, the findings show that highly automatic defense behavior can be influenced by relatively simple mental imagery manipulations.

  20. Neural Entrainment to Auditory Imagery of Rhythms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haruki Okawa

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available A method of reconstructing perceived or imagined music by analyzing brain activity has not yet been established. As a first step toward developing such a method, we aimed to reconstruct the imagery of rhythm, which is one element of music. It has been reported that a periodic electroencephalogram (EEG response is elicited while a human imagines a binary or ternary meter on a musical beat. However, it is not clear whether or not brain activity synchronizes with fully imagined beat and meter without auditory stimuli. To investigate neural entrainment to imagined rhythm during auditory imagery of beat and meter, we recorded EEG while nine participants (eight males and one female imagined three types of rhythm without auditory stimuli but with visual timing, and then we analyzed the amplitude spectra of the EEG. We also recorded EEG while the participants only gazed at the visual timing as a control condition to confirm the visual effect. Furthermore, we derived features of the EEG using canonical correlation analysis (CCA and conducted an experiment to individually classify the three types of imagined rhythm from the EEG. The results showed that classification accuracies exceeded the chance level in all participants. These results suggest that auditory imagery of meter elicits a periodic EEG response that changes at the imagined beat and meter frequency even in the fully imagined conditions. This study represents the first step toward the realization of a method for reconstructing the imagined music from brain activity.

  1. JEarth | Analytical Remote Sensing Imagery Application for Researchers and Practitioners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prashad, L.; Christensen, P. R.; Anwar, S.; Dickenshied, S.; Engle, E.; Noss, D.

    2009-12-01

    The ASU 100 Cities Project and the ASU Mars Space Flight Facility (MSFF) present JEarth, a set of analytical Geographic Information System (GIS) tools for viewing and processing Earth-based remote sensing imagery and vectors, including high-resolution and hyperspectral imagery such as TIMS and MASTER. JEarth is useful for a wide range of researchers and practitioners who need to access, view, and analyze remote sensing imagery. JEarth stems from existing MSFF applications: the Java application JMars (Java Mission-planning and Analysis for Remote Sensing) for viewing and analyzing remote sensing imagery and THMPROC, a web-based, interactive tool for processing imagery to create band combinations, stretches, and other imagery products. JEarth users can run the application on their desktops by installing Java-based open source software on Windows, Mac, or Linux operating systems.

  2. Improvement in spatial imagery following sight onset late in childhood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gandhi, Tapan K; Ganesh, Suma; Sinha, Pawan

    2014-03-01

    The factors contributing to the development of spatial imagery skills are not well understood. Here, we consider whether visual experience shapes these skills. Although differences in spatial imagery between sighted and blind individuals have been reported, it is unclear whether these differences are truly due to visual deprivation or instead are due to extraneous factors, such as reduced opportunities for the blind to interact with their environment. A direct way of assessing vision's contribution to the development of spatial imagery is to determine whether spatial imagery skills change soon after the onset of sight in congenitally blind individuals. We tested 10 children who gained sight after several years of congenital blindness and found significant improvements in their spatial imagery skills following sight-restoring surgeries. These results provide evidence of vision's contribution to spatial imagery and also have implications for the nature of internal spatial representations.

  3. GATE: computation code for medical imagery, radiotherapy and dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jan, S.

    2010-01-01

    The author presents the GATE code, a simulation software based on the Geant4 development environment developed by the CERN (the European organization for nuclear research) which enables Monte-Carlo type simulation to be developed for tomography imagery using ionizing radiation, and radiotherapy examinations (conventional and hadron therapy) to be simulated. The authors concentrate on the use of medical imagery in carcinology. They comment some results obtained in nuclear imagery and in radiotherapy

  4. Auditory and motor imagery modulate learning in music performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Rachel M; Palmer, Caroline

    2013-01-01

    Skilled performers such as athletes or musicians can improve their performance by imagining the actions or sensory outcomes associated with their skill. Performers vary widely in their auditory and motor imagery abilities, and these individual differences influence sensorimotor learning. It is unknown whether imagery abilities influence both memory encoding and retrieval. We examined how auditory and motor imagery abilities influence musicians' encoding (during Learning, as they practiced novel melodies), and retrieval (during Recall of those melodies). Pianists learned melodies by listening without performing (auditory learning) or performing without sound (motor learning); following Learning, pianists performed the melodies from memory with auditory feedback (Recall). During either Learning (Experiment 1) or Recall (Experiment 2), pianists experienced either auditory interference, motor interference, or no interference. Pitch accuracy (percentage of correct pitches produced) and temporal regularity (variability of quarter-note interonset intervals) were measured at Recall. Independent tests measured auditory and motor imagery skills. Pianists' pitch accuracy was higher following auditory learning than following motor learning and lower in motor interference conditions (Experiments 1 and 2). Both auditory and motor imagery skills improved pitch accuracy overall. Auditory imagery skills modulated pitch accuracy encoding (Experiment 1): Higher auditory imagery skill corresponded to higher pitch accuracy following auditory learning with auditory or motor interference, and following motor learning with motor or no interference. These findings suggest that auditory imagery abilities decrease vulnerability to interference and compensate for missing auditory feedback at encoding. Auditory imagery skills also influenced temporal regularity at retrieval (Experiment 2): Higher auditory imagery skill predicted greater temporal regularity during Recall in the presence of

  5. Auditory and motor imagery modulate learning in music performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Rachel M.; Palmer, Caroline

    2013-01-01

    Skilled performers such as athletes or musicians can improve their performance by imagining the actions or sensory outcomes associated with their skill. Performers vary widely in their auditory and motor imagery abilities, and these individual differences influence sensorimotor learning. It is unknown whether imagery abilities influence both memory encoding and retrieval. We examined how auditory and motor imagery abilities influence musicians' encoding (during Learning, as they practiced novel melodies), and retrieval (during Recall of those melodies). Pianists learned melodies by listening without performing (auditory learning) or performing without sound (motor learning); following Learning, pianists performed the melodies from memory with auditory feedback (Recall). During either Learning (Experiment 1) or Recall (Experiment 2), pianists experienced either auditory interference, motor interference, or no interference. Pitch accuracy (percentage of correct pitches produced) and temporal regularity (variability of quarter-note interonset intervals) were measured at Recall. Independent tests measured auditory and motor imagery skills. Pianists' pitch accuracy was higher following auditory learning than following motor learning and lower in motor interference conditions (Experiments 1 and 2). Both auditory and motor imagery skills improved pitch accuracy overall. Auditory imagery skills modulated pitch accuracy encoding (Experiment 1): Higher auditory imagery skill corresponded to higher pitch accuracy following auditory learning with auditory or motor interference, and following motor learning with motor or no interference. These findings suggest that auditory imagery abilities decrease vulnerability to interference and compensate for missing auditory feedback at encoding. Auditory imagery skills also influenced temporal regularity at retrieval (Experiment 2): Higher auditory imagery skill predicted greater temporal regularity during Recall in the presence of

  6. Design and analysis of imagery system of laser scanning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Tianze; Wang, Zhenhuan; Zhang, Xia; Hou, Luan; Jiang, Chuan

    2009-08-01

    This paper expounds the operation principle of laser scanning imagery system,after analyzing the light source, transmitter,receivewere and the continuous analogue electric signal which are in the laser scanning imagery system,a laser scanning imagery system is designed, the composition and main parts of the system were expounded. The performance referance date were reviewed.The characteristics of this systerm is that it not only can scanned but also can collect reflecting coefficient information and can do laser ranging.This paper analyze and disguess the scanning imagery system and the key technology of laser weapon, finally the applicating prospects of the system are described.

  7. Investigation of breathing parameters during odor perception and olfactory imagery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleemann, A M; Kopietz, R; Albrecht, J; Schöpf, V; Pollatos, O; Schreder, T; May, J; Linn, J; Brückmann, H; Wiesmann, M

    2009-01-01

    Compared with visual and auditory imagery, little is known about olfactory imagery. There is evidence that respiration may be altered by both olfactory perception and olfactory imagery. In order to investigate this relationship, breathing parameters (respiratory minute volume, respiratory amplitude, and breathing rate) in human subjects during olfactory perception and olfactory imagery were investigated. Fifty-six subjects having normal olfactory function were tested. Nasal respiration was measured using a respiratory pressure sensor. Using an experimental block design, we alternately presented odors or asked the subjects to imagine a given smell. Four different pleasant odors were used: banana, rose, coffee, and lemon odor. We detected a significant increase in respiratory minute volume between olfactory perception and the baseline condition as well as between olfactory imagery and baseline condition. Additionally we found significant differences in the respiratory amplitude between imagery and baseline condition and between odor and imagery condition. Differences in the breathing rate between olfactory perception, olfactory imagery, and baseline were not statistically significant. We conclude from our results that olfactory perception and olfactory imagery both have effects on the human respiratory profile and that these effects are based on a common underlying mechanism.

  8. Closing the mind's eye: incoming luminance signals disrupt visual imagery.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachel Sherwood

    Full Text Available Mental imagery has been associated with many cognitive functions, both high and low-level. Despite recent scientific advances, the contextual and environmental conditions that most affect the mechanisms of visual imagery remain unclear. It has been previously shown that the greater the level of background luminance the weaker the effect of imagery on subsequent perception. However, in these experiments it was unclear whether the luminance was affecting imagery generation or storage of a memory trace. Here, we report that background luminance can attenuate both mental imagery generation and imagery storage during an unrelated cognitive task. However, imagery generation was more sensitive to the degree of luminance. In addition, we show that these findings were not due to differential dark adaptation. These results suggest that afferent visual signals can interfere with both the formation and priming-memory effects associated with visual imagery. It follows that background luminance may be a valuable tool for investigating imagery and its role in various cognitive and sensory processes.

  9. LUNAR TERRAIN AND ALBEDO RECONSTRUCTION FROM APOLLO IMAGERY

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — LUNAR TERRAIN AND ALBEDO RECONSTRUCTION FROM APOLLO IMAGERY ARA V NEFIAN*, TAEMIN KIM, MICHAEL BROXTON, AND ZACH MORATTO Abstract. Generating accurate three...

  10. Corticospinal excitability during observation and imagery of simple and complex hand tasks : Implications for motor rehabilitation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roosink, Meyke; Zijdewind, Inge

    2010-01-01

    Movement observation and imagery are increasingly propagandized for motor rehabilitation. Both observation and imagery are thought to improve motor function through repeated activation of mental motor representations. However, it is unknown what stimulation parameters or imagery conditions are

  11. Establishing a Commercial Reserve Imagery Fleet Obtaining Surge Imagery Capacity from Commercial Remote Sensing Satellite Systems During Crisis

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Rider, Douglas

    2000-01-01

    .... Congress directed the National Reconnaissance Office and National Imagery and Mapping Agency to investigate commercial satellite imaging systems as a supplement to national reconnaissance systems...

  12. Integration of aerial oblique imagery and terrestrial imagery for optimized 3D modeling in urban areas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Bo; Xie, Linfu; Hu, Han; Zhu, Qing; Yau, Eric

    2018-05-01

    Photorealistic three-dimensional (3D) models are fundamental to the spatial data infrastructure of a digital city, and have numerous potential applications in areas such as urban planning, urban management, urban monitoring, and urban environmental studies. Recent developments in aerial oblique photogrammetry based on aircraft or unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) offer promising techniques for 3D modeling. However, 3D models generated from aerial oblique imagery in urban areas with densely distributed high-rise buildings may show geometric defects and blurred textures, especially on building façades, due to problems such as occlusion and large camera tilt angles. Meanwhile, mobile mapping systems (MMSs) can capture terrestrial images of close-range objects from a complementary view on the ground at a high level of detail, but do not offer full coverage. The integration of aerial oblique imagery with terrestrial imagery offers promising opportunities to optimize 3D modeling in urban areas. This paper presents a novel method of integrating these two image types through automatic feature matching and combined bundle adjustment between them, and based on the integrated results to optimize the geometry and texture of the 3D models generated from aerial oblique imagery. Experimental analyses were conducted on two datasets of aerial and terrestrial images collected in Dortmund, Germany and in Hong Kong. The results indicate that the proposed approach effectively integrates images from the two platforms and thereby improves 3D modeling in urban areas.

  13. Mental Imagery for Musical Changes in Loudness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailes, Freya; Bishop, Laura; Stevens, Catherine J.; Dean, Roger T.

    2012-01-01

    Musicians imagine music during mental rehearsal, when reading from a score, and while composing. An important characteristic of music is its temporality. Among the parameters that vary through time is sound intensity, perceived as patterns of loudness. Studies of mental imagery for melodies (i.e., pitch and rhythm) show interference from concurrent musical pitch and verbal tasks, but how we represent musical changes in loudness is unclear. Theories suggest that our perceptions of loudness change relate to our perceptions of force or effort, implying a motor representation. An experiment was conducted to investigate the modalities that contribute to imagery for loudness change. Musicians performed a within-subjects loudness change recall task, comprising 48 trials. First, participants heard a musical scale played with varying patterns of loudness, which they were asked to remember. There followed an empty interval of 8 s (nil distractor control), or the presentation of a series of four sine tones, or four visual letters or three conductor gestures, also to be remembered. Participants then saw an unfolding score of the notes of the scale, during which they were to imagine the corresponding scale in their mind while adjusting a slider to indicate the imagined changes in loudness. Finally, participants performed a recognition task of the tone, letter, or gesture sequence. Based on the motor hypothesis, we predicted that observing and remembering conductor gestures would impair loudness change scale recall, while observing and remembering tone or letter string stimuli would not. Results support this prediction, with loudness change recalled less accurately in the gestures condition than in the control condition. An effect of musical training suggests that auditory and motor imagery ability may be closely related to domain expertise. PMID:23227014

  14. D Surface Generation from Aerial Thermal Imagery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khodaei, B.; Samadzadegan, F.; Dadras Javan, F.; Hasani, H.

    2015-12-01

    Aerial thermal imagery has been recently applied to quantitative analysis of several scenes. For the mapping purpose based on aerial thermal imagery, high accuracy photogrammetric process is necessary. However, due to low geometric resolution and low contrast of thermal imaging sensors, there are some challenges in precise 3D measurement of objects. In this paper the potential of thermal video in 3D surface generation is evaluated. In the pre-processing step, thermal camera is geometrically calibrated using a calibration grid based on emissivity differences between the background and the targets. Then, Digital Surface Model (DSM) generation from thermal video imagery is performed in four steps. Initially, frames are extracted from video, then tie points are generated by Scale-Invariant Feature Transform (SIFT) algorithm. Bundle adjustment is then applied and the camera position and orientation parameters are determined. Finally, multi-resolution dense image matching algorithm is used to create 3D point cloud of the scene. Potential of the proposed method is evaluated based on thermal imaging cover an industrial area. The thermal camera has 640×480 Uncooled Focal Plane Array (UFPA) sensor, equipped with a 25 mm lens which mounted in the Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV). The obtained results show the comparable accuracy of 3D model generated based on thermal images with respect to DSM generated from visible images, however thermal based DSM is somehow smoother with lower level of texture. Comparing the generated DSM with the 9 measured GCPs in the area shows the Root Mean Square Error (RMSE) value is smaller than 5 decimetres in both X and Y directions and 1.6 meters for the Z direction.

  15. Mental imagery for musical changes in loudness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Freya eBailes

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Musicians imagine music during mental rehearsal, when reading from a score, and while composing. An important characteristic of music is its temporality. Among the parameters that vary through time is sound intensity, perceived as patterns of loudness. Studies of mental imagery for melodies (i.e. pitch and rhythm show interference from concurrent musical pitch and verbal tasks, but how we represent musical changes in loudness is unclear. Theories suggest that our perceptions of loudness change relate to our perceptions of force or effort, implying a motor representation. An experiment was conducted to investigate the modalities that contribute to imagery for loudness change. Musicians performed a within-subjects loudness change recall task, comprising 48 trials. First, participants heard a musical scale played with varying patterns of loudness, which they were asked to remember. There followed an empty interval of 8 seconds (nil distractor control, or the presentation of a series of 4 sine tones, or 4 visual letters or 3 conductor gestures, also to be remembered. Participants then saw an unfolding score of the notes of the scale, during which they were to imagine the corresponding scale in their mind while adjusting a slider to indicate the imagined changes in loudness. Finally, participants performed a recognition task of the tone, letter or gesture sequence. Based on the motor hypothesis, we predicted that observing and remembering conductor gestures would impair loudness change scale recall, while observing and remembering tone or letter string stimuli would not. Results support this prediction, with loudness change recalled less accurately in the gestures condition than in the control condition. An effect of musical training suggests that auditory and motor imagery ability may be closely related to domain expertise.

  16. Mental imagery for musical changes in loudness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailes, Freya; Bishop, Laura; Stevens, Catherine J; Dean, Roger T

    2012-01-01

    Musicians imagine music during mental rehearsal, when reading from a score, and while composing. An important characteristic of music is its temporality. Among the parameters that vary through time is sound intensity, perceived as patterns of loudness. Studies of mental imagery for melodies (i.e., pitch and rhythm) show interference from concurrent musical pitch and verbal tasks, but how we represent musical changes in loudness is unclear. Theories suggest that our perceptions of loudness change relate to our perceptions of force or effort, implying a motor representation. An experiment was conducted to investigate the modalities that contribute to imagery for loudness change. Musicians performed a within-subjects loudness change recall task, comprising 48 trials. First, participants heard a musical scale played with varying patterns of loudness, which they were asked to remember. There followed an empty interval of 8 s (nil distractor control), or the presentation of a series of four sine tones, or four visual letters or three conductor gestures, also to be remembered. Participants then saw an unfolding score of the notes of the scale, during which they were to imagine the corresponding scale in their mind while adjusting a slider to indicate the imagined changes in loudness. Finally, participants performed a recognition task of the tone, letter, or gesture sequence. Based on the motor hypothesis, we predicted that observing and remembering conductor gestures would impair loudness change scale recall, while observing and remembering tone or letter string stimuli would not. Results support this prediction, with loudness change recalled less accurately in the gestures condition than in the control condition. An effect of musical training suggests that auditory and motor imagery ability may be closely related to domain expertise.

  17. The role of mental imagery in non-clinical paranoia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bullock, Gemma; Newman-Taylor, Katherine; Stopa, Luisa

    2016-03-01

    Cognitive models of paranoia incorporate many of the processes implicated in the maintenance of anxiety disorders. Despite this, the role of mental imagery in paranoia remains under-researched. The current study examined the impact of a self-imagery manipulation in people with high non-clinical paranoia. We used a mixed design with one between-subjects variable (type of self-imagery) and one within-subjects variable (time--pre and post imagery manipulation). Thirty participants with high trait paranoia were allocated alternately to a positive or negative self-imagery condition. Scripts were used to elicit positive and negative self-imagery. All participants completed self-report state measures of paranoia, mood, self-esteem and self-compassion. Group by time interaction effects were found for each of the dependent variables. Positive imagery led to less state paranoia, anxiety and negative affect, and more positive affect, self-esteem and self-compassion, compared with the negative imagery group. This was a non-blind study, limited by allocation method and a brief time-frame which did not allow us to assess longevity of effects. We recruited a relatively small and predominantly female sample of people with high non-clinical paranoia. The study did not include a neutral control condition, a low paranoia comparison group, or a manipulation check following the imagery task. Self-imagery manipulations may affect paranoia, mood and self-beliefs. If the findings are replicated with clinical groups, and maintained over a longer period, this would suggest that imagery-based interventions targeting persecutory delusions might be usefully examined. Crown Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Brain networks underlying mental imagery of auditory and visual information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zvyagintsev, Mikhail; Clemens, Benjamin; Chechko, Natalya; Mathiak, Krystyna A; Sack, Alexander T; Mathiak, Klaus

    2013-05-01

    Mental imagery is a complex cognitive process that resembles the experience of perceiving an object when this object is not physically present to the senses. It has been shown that, depending on the sensory nature of the object, mental imagery also involves correspondent sensory neural mechanisms. However, it remains unclear which areas of the brain subserve supramodal imagery processes that are independent of the object modality, and which brain areas are involved in modality-specific imagery processes. Here, we conducted a functional magnetic resonance imaging study to reveal supramodal and modality-specific networks of mental imagery for auditory and visual information. A common supramodal brain network independent of imagery modality, two separate modality-specific networks for imagery of auditory and visual information, and a common deactivation network were identified. The supramodal network included brain areas related to attention, memory retrieval, motor preparation and semantic processing, as well as areas considered to be part of the default-mode network and multisensory integration areas. The modality-specific networks comprised brain areas involved in processing of respective modality-specific sensory information. Interestingly, we found that imagery of auditory information led to a relative deactivation within the modality-specific areas for visual imagery, and vice versa. In addition, mental imagery of both auditory and visual information widely suppressed the activity of primary sensory and motor areas, for example deactivation network. These findings have important implications for understanding the mechanisms that are involved in generation of mental imagery. © 2013 Federation of European Neuroscience Societies and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Photogrammetry of the Viking-Lander imagery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, S.S.C.; Schafer, F.J.

    1982-01-01

    We have solved the problem of photogrammetric mapping from the Viking Lander photography in two ways: 1) by converting the azimuth and elevation scanning imagery to the equivalent of a frame picture by means of computerized rectification; and 2) by interfacing a high-speed, general-purpose computer to the AS-11A analytical plotter so that all computations of corrections can be performed in real time during the process of model orientation and map compilation. Examples are presented of photographs and maps of Earth and Mars. -from Authors

  20. Guided Imagery and Music Bibliography and GIM/Related Literature Refworks Database

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bonde, Lars Ole

    2010-01-01

    Bibliografi og database over litteratur om den receptive musikterapimetode Guided Imagery and Music......Bibliografi og database over litteratur om den receptive musikterapimetode Guided Imagery and Music...

  1. The role of mental imagery in depression: Negative mental imagery induces strong implicit and explicit affect in depression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefanie Maria Görgen

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Mental imagery, seeing with the mind’s eyes, can induce stronger positive as well as negative affect compared to verbal processing. Given this emotion-amplifying effect, it appears likely that mental images play an important role in affective disorders. According to the subcomponents model of depression, depressed mood is maintained by both negative imagery (which amplifies negative mood and less efficient positive imagery processes. Empirical research on the link between mental imagery and affect in clinical depression, however, is still sparse. This study aimed at testing the role of mental imagery in depression, using a modified version of the Affect Misattribution Procedure (AMP and the Self-Assessment Manikin (SAM to assess implicit (AMP and explicit (SAM affect elicited by mental images, pictures, and verbal processing in clinically depressed participants (n = 32 compared to healthy controls (n = 32. In individuals with a depressive disorder, compared to healthy controls, negative mental images induced stronger negative affect in the explicit as well as implicit measure. Negative mental imagery did not, however, elicit greater increases in explicitly and implicitly assessed negative affect compared to other processing modalities (verbal processing, pictures in the depressed group. Additionally, a positive imagery deficit in depression was observed in the explicit measure. Interestingly, the two groups did not differ in implicitly assessed affect after positive imagery, indicating that depressed individuals might benefit from positive imagery on an implicit or automatic level. Overall, our findings suggest that mental imagery also plays an important role in depression and confirm the potential of novel treatment approaches for depression such as the promotion of positive imagery.

  2. Seeing Is Believing: Using Imagery to Enhance Your Coaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finch, Laura M.

    2011-01-01

    Imagery is a powerful sport psychology tool easily accessible to coaches. These reminders can help coaches improve their athletes' images and performance: (1) Create vivid and controllable images; (2) Use polysensory images and instructional cues, delivered, ideally, in real time; (3) Use internal and external perspectives; (4) Use imagery during…

  3. Current insights in the development of children's motor imagery ability

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spruijt, S.; Kamp, J. van der; Steenbergen, B.

    2015-01-01

    Over the last two decades, the number of studies on motor imagery in children has witnessed a large expansion. Most studies used the hand laterality judgment paradigm or the mental chronometry paradigm to examine motor imagery ability. The main objective of the current review is to collate these

  4. Current insights in the development of children's motor imagery ability.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spruijt, S.; Kamp, J. van der; Steenbergen, B.

    2015-01-01

    Over the last two decades, the number of studies on motor imagery in children has witnessed a large expansion. Most studies used the hand laterality judgment paradigm or the mental chronometry paradigm to examine motor imagery ability. The main objective of the current review is to collate these

  5. 2015 Florida Panhandle RCD30 4-Band 8 Bit Imagery

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — These files contain imagery data collected with an RCD30 camera as 8-bit RGBN TIFF images. Imagery was required 1000m seaward of the land/water interface or to laser...

  6. 2015 Southwest Florida RCD30 4-Band 8 Bit Imagery

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — These files contain imagery data collected with an RCD30 camera as 8-bit RGBN TIFF images. Imagery was required 1000m seaward of the land/water interface or to laser...

  7. Using Art Criticism To Examine Meaning in Today's Visual Imagery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Mary Ruth

    A method of pedagogical art criticism can be used to examine meaning in one of today's most pervasive forms of visual imagery: the advertising image. It was necessary for the art critical method to accommodate the following components of advertising imagery: (1) history; (2) purpose in a capitalist society; (3) function in society; (4) effects on…

  8. Imagining the Music: Methods for Assessing Musical Imagery Ability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Terry; Williamon, Aaron

    2012-01-01

    Timing profiles of live and imagined performances were compared with the aim of creating a context-specific measure of musicians' imagery ability. Thirty-two advanced musicians completed imagery use and vividness surveys, and then gave two live and two mental performances of a two-minute musical excerpt, tapping along with the beat of the mental…

  9. Mental imagery in rowers during pre-competition periods : research ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A sample of 16 rowers (eight male and eight female) participated in the study. The Sports Imagery Questionnaire was administered seven days, three days, 24 hours, and three hours prior to competition. The study aimed to investigate changes in the use of five types of imagery, over four time-periods preceding a ...

  10. Effects of Pretend Imagery on Learning Dance in Preschool Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sacha, Tori J.; Russ, Sandra W.

    2006-01-01

    Play is important in child development and learning. The intent of this study was to assess the effects of play, using physical movement and pretend imagery, on learning dance. Four preschool dance classes, encompassing 32 children ages 3-6, were randomly divided into pretend imagery groups and traditional teaching groups. The classes were…

  11. Toward a Phenomenology of Dream Imagery and Metaphor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Day, Elmer S., Jr.

    1979-01-01

    The author partially describes a few of the immanent qualities of dreaming imagery and metaphor. The concept of the ineluctable modality is introduced to illustrate the spontaneous synthesizing of cognitive and noncognitive elements. A short dream excerpt is shared to clarify the pervasive contrapuntallike depth of dreaming imagery. (Author/SJL)

  12. Mental imagery and perception in hallucination-prone individuals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aleman, André M.A.; Nieuwenstein, Mark R.M.A.; Böcker, Koen B. E.; de Haan, Edward H.F.

    2000-01-01

    College students screened for hallucination-proneness using the Launay-Slade Hallucination Scale (LSHS) were compared on measures of self-report vividness of imagery and on behavioral measures of imagery and perception (visual and auditory). Specifically, we tested the hypothesis whether

  13. Portable devices for delivering imagery and modelling interventions ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The main objective of this study was to investigate the effectiveness of portable devices (MP4) and a stationary device (DVD and fixed point stationary computer) in delivering imagery and modelling training among female netball players, examining the effect on imagery adherence, performance, self-efficacy, and the relative ...

  14. Implications for Intervention: Categorising the Quantitative Mental Imagery of Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Jonathan Norris; Harkness, Shelly Sheats

    2013-01-01

    Unlike a child's observable, physical interactions with mathematical tools (e.g., physically touching blocks in order to count them), the subtle manifestations of imagery construction can be considerably more challenging to identify and act upon. Although there have been substantive examinations of mental imagery in a variety of mathematical…

  15. Improved VIIRS and MODIS SST Imagery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irina Gladkova

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometers (MODIS and Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS radiometers, flown onboard Terra/Aqua and Suomi National Polar-orbiting Partnership (S-NPP/Joint Polar Satellite System (JPSS satellites, are capable of providing superior sea surface temperature (SST imagery. However, the swath data of these multi-detector sensors are subject to several artifacts including bow-tie distortions and striping, and require special pre-processing steps. VIIRS additionally does two irreversible data reduction steps onboard: pixel aggregation (to reduce resolution changes across the swath and pixel deletion, which complicate both bow-tie correction and destriping. While destriping was addressed elsewhere, this paper describes an algorithm, adopted in the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA Advanced Clear-Sky Processor for Oceans (ACSPO SST system, to minimize the bow-tie artifacts in the SST imagery and facilitate application of the pattern recognition algorithms for improved separation of ocean from cloud and mapping fine SST structure, especially in the dynamic, coastal and high-latitude regions of the ocean. The algorithm is based on a computationally fast re-sampling procedure that ensures a continuity of corresponding latitude and longitude arrays. Potentially, Level 1.5 products may be generated to benefit a wide range of MODIS and VIIRS users in land, ocean, cryosphere, and atmosphere remote sensing.

  16. Standardized rendering from IR surveillance motion imagery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prokoski, F. J.

    2014-06-01

    Government agencies, including defense and law enforcement, increasingly make use of video from surveillance systems and camera phones owned by non-government entities.Making advanced and standardized motion imaging technology available to private and commercial users at cost-effective prices would benefit all parties. In particular, incorporating thermal infrared into commercial surveillance systems offers substantial benefits beyond night vision capability. Face rendering is a process to facilitate exploitation of thermal infrared surveillance imagery from the general area of a crime scene, to assist investigations with and without cooperating eyewitnesses. Face rendering automatically generates greyscale representations similar to police artist sketches for faces in surveillance imagery collected from proximate locations and times to a crime under investigation. Near-realtime generation of face renderings can provide law enforcement with an investigation tool to assess witness memory and credibility, and integrate reports from multiple eyewitnesses, Renderings can be quickly disseminated through social media to warn of a person who may pose an immediate threat, and to solicit the public's help in identifying possible suspects and witnesses. Renderings are pose-standardized so as to not divulge the presence and location of eyewitnesses and surveillance cameras. Incorporation of thermal infrared imaging into commercial surveillance systems will significantly improve system performance, and reduce manual review times, at an incremental cost that will continue to decrease. Benefits to criminal justice would include improved reliability of eyewitness testimony and improved accuracy of distinguishing among minority groups in eyewitness and surveillance identifications.

  17. Anomaly Detection from Hyperspectral Remote Sensing Imagery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiandong Guo

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Hyperspectral remote sensing imagery contains much more information in the spectral domain than does multispectral imagery. The consecutive and abundant spectral signals provide a great potential for classification and anomaly detection. In this study, two real hyperspectral data sets were used for anomaly detection. One data set was an Airborne Visible/Infrared Imaging Spectrometer (AVIRIS data covering the post-attack World Trade Center (WTC and anomalies are fire spots. The other data set called SpecTIR contained fabric panels as anomalies compared to their background. Existing anomaly detection algorithms including the Reed–Xiaoli detector (RXD, the blocked adaptive computation efficient outlier nominator (BACON, the random selection based anomaly detector (RSAD, the weighted-RXD (W-RXD, and the probabilistic anomaly detector (PAD are reviewed here. The RXD generally sets strict assumptions to the background, which cannot be met in many scenarios, while BACON, RSAD, and W-RXD employ strategies to optimize the estimation of background information. The PAD firstly estimates both background information and anomaly information and then uses the information to conduct anomaly detection. Here, the BACON, RSAD, W-RXD, and PAD outperformed the RXD in terms of detection accuracy, and W-RXD and PAD required less time than BACON and RSAD.

  18. Alerts of forest disturbance from MODIS imagery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammer, Dan; Kraft, Robin; Wheeler, David

    2014-12-01

    This paper reports the methodology and computational strategy for a forest cover disturbance alerting system. Analytical techniques from time series econometrics are applied to imagery from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) sensor to detect temporal instability in vegetation indices. The characteristics from each MODIS pixel's spectral history are extracted and compared against historical data on forest cover loss to develop a geographically localized classification rule that can be applied across the humid tropical biome. The final output is a probability of forest disturbance for each 500 m pixel that is updated every 16 days. The primary objective is to provide high-confidence alerts of forest disturbance, while minimizing false positives. We find that the alerts serve this purpose exceedingly well in Pará, Brazil, with high probability alerts garnering a user accuracy of 98 percent over the training period and 93 percent after the training period (2000-2005) when compared against the PRODES deforestation data set, which is used to assess spatial accuracy. Implemented in Clojure and Java on the Hadoop distributed data processing platform, the algorithm is a fast, automated, and open source system for detecting forest disturbance. It is intended to be used in conjunction with higher-resolution imagery and data products that cannot be updated as quickly as MODIS-based data products. By highlighting hotspots of change, the algorithm and associated output can focus high-resolution data acquisition and aid in efforts to enforce local forest conservation efforts.

  19. Visual imaging capacity and imagery control in Fine Arts students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Fabello, Maria José; Campos, Alfredo; Gómez-Juncal, Rocío

    2007-06-01

    This study investigated relationships between visual imaging abilities (imaging capacity and imagery control) and academic performance in 146 Fine Arts students (31 men, 115 women). Mean age was 22.3 yr. (SD= 1.9; range 20-26 yr.). All of the participants who volunteered for the experiment regularly attended classes and were first, second, or third year students. For evaluation of imaging abilities, the Spanish versions of the Gordon Test of Visual Imagery Control, the Vividness of Visual Imagery Questionnaire, the Verbalizer-Visualizer Questionnaire, and Betts' Questionnaire Upon Mental Imagery were used. Academic performance was assessed in four areas, Drawing, Painting, Sculpture, and Complementary Subjects, over a three-year period. The results indicate that imagery control was associated with academic performance in Fine Arts. These findings are discussed in the context of previous studies, and new lines of research are proposed.

  20. Analisa Spektrum Motor Imagery pada Sinyal Aktivitas Otak

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johan Chandra

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Otak merupakan organ vital pada tubuh manusia yang berperan sebagai pusat kendali sistem saraf manusia. Sinyal yang dikeluarkan otak (EEG mengandung berbagai informasi yang dapat dimanfaatkan pada teknologi BCI. Salah satu informasi yang dapat digunakan adalah informasi motorik baik mengenai motor execution maupung motor imagery. Pada penderita stroke yang biasanya mengalami kelumpuhan pada anggota gerak tubuhnya, informasi mengenai motor imagery dapat dimanfaatkan untuk aplikasi Brain Computer Interface terutama dalam rehabilitasi kelumpuhan anggota gerak pasien tersebut. Pada penelitian ini dirancang sebuah alat sistem EEG untuk merekam sinyal EEG pada otak untuk menganalisa spektrum motor imagery pada sinyal aktivitas otak. Sistem terdiri dari rangkaian filter pasif, rangkaian proteksi, penguat isntrumentasi, common mode rejection, amplifier, dan filter. Pengujian dilakukan dengan membandingkan sinyal EEG pada tasking motor imagery dan motor execution. Selanjutnya, informasi motorik baik motor execution dan motor imagery dapat diaplikasikan lebih lanjut pada sistem BCI terutama pada rehabilitasi medik.

  1. Improvement in spatial imagery following sight onset late in childhood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gandhi, Tapan; Ganesh, Suma; Sinha, Pawan

    2015-01-01

    The factors contributing to the development of spatial imagery skills are not well understood. Here we ask whether visual experience shapes these skills. Although differences between sighted and the blind on spatial imagery have been reported, it is unclear whether they are truly due to visual deprivation or extraneous factors such as reduced opportunities for the blind to interact with their environment. A direct way of assessing vision’s contribution to spatial imagery development lies in determining whether these skills change soon after the onset of sight in a congenitally blind individual. We describe our results with ten children who gained sight after several years of congenital blindness. We find significant improvements in their spatial imagery skills following sight-restoring surgeries. These results provide evidence of vision’s contribution to spatial imagery and also have implications for the nature of internal spatial representations. PMID:24406396

  2. Auditory and motor imagery modulate learning in music performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachel M. Brown

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Skilled performers such as athletes or musicians can improve their performance by imagining the actions or sensory outcomes associated with their skill. Performers vary widely in their auditory and motor imagery abilities, and these individual differences influence sensorimotor learning. It is unknown whether imagery abilities influence both memory encoding and retrieval. We examined how auditory and motor imagery abilities influence musicians’ encoding (during Learning, as they practiced novel melodies, and retrieval (during Recall of those melodies. Pianists learned melodies by listening without performing (auditory learning or performing without sound (motor learning; following Learning, pianists performed the melodies from memory with auditory feedback (Recall. During either Learning (Experiment 1 or Recall (Experiment 2, pianists experienced either auditory interference, motor interference, or no interference. Pitch accuracy (percentage of correct pitches produced and temporal regularity (variability of quarter-note interonset intervals were measured at Recall. Independent tests measured auditory and motor imagery skills. Pianists’ pitch accuracy was higher following auditory learning than following motor learning and lower in motor interference conditions (Experiments 1 and 2. Both auditory and motor imagery skills improved pitch accuracy overall. Auditory imagery skills modulated pitch accuracy encoding (Experiment 1: Higher auditory imagery skill corresponded to higher pitch accuracy following auditory learning with auditory or motor interference, and following motor learning with motor or no interference. These findings suggest that auditory imagery abilities decrease vulnerability to interference and compensate for missing auditory feedback at encoding. Auditory imagery skills also influenced temporal regularity at retrieval (Experiment 2: Higher auditory imagery skill predicted greater temporal regularity during Recall in the

  3. Automated Sargassum Detection for Landsat Imagery

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarthy, S.; Gallegos, S. C.; Armstrong, D.

    2016-02-01

    We implemented a system to automatically detect Sargassum, a floating seaweed, in 30-meter LANDSAT-8 Operational Land Imager (OLI) imagery. Our algorithm for Sargassum detection is an extended form of Hu's approach to derive a floating algae index (FAI) [1]. Hu's algorithm was developed for Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) data, but we extended it for use with the OLI bands centered at 655, 865, and 1609 nm, which are comparable to the MODIS bands located at 645, 859, and 1640 nm. We also developed a high resolution true color product to mask cloud pixels in the OLI scene by applying a threshold to top of the atmosphere (TOA) radiances in the red (655 nm), green (561 nm), and blue (443 nm) wavelengths, as well as a method for removing false positive identifications of Sargassum in the imagery. Hu's algorithm derives a FAI for each Sargassum identified pixel. Our algorithm is currently set to only flag the presence of Sargassum in an OLI pixel by classifying any pixel with a FAI > 0.0 as Sargassum. Additionally, our system geo-locates the flagged Sargassum pixels identified in the OLI imagery into the U.S. Navy Global HYCOM model grid. One element of the model grid covers an area 0.125 degrees of latitude by 0.125 degrees of longitude. To resolve the differences in spatial coverage between Landsat and HYCOM, a scheme was developed to calculate the percentage of pixels flagged within the grid element and if above a threshold, it will be flagged as Sargassum. This work is a part of a larger system, sponsored by NASA/Applied Science and Technology Project at J.C. Stennis Space Center, to forecast when and where Sargassum will land on shore. The focus area of this work is currently the Texas coast. Plans call for extending our efforts into the Caribbean. References: [1] Hu, Chuanmin. A novel ocean color index to detect floating algae in the global oceans. Remote Sensing of Environment 113 (2009) 2118-2129.

  4. Thermal Imagery Details Larsen C Iceberg Calving

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shuman, C. A.; Scambos, T. A.; Schmaltz, J. E.; Melocik, K. A.; Klinger, M. J.

    2017-12-01

    The final calving of the 5800 km2 iceberg, initially named A-68, from the Larsen C ice shelf took place in darkness during Antarctica's austral winter. Landsat 8 special acquisitions by the Thermal Infrared Sensor (TIRS) on June 19th and July 21st showed the near-final extent of the rift as well as the iceberg after it had released. Such thermal imagery was a critical tool for seeing changes during this period of winter darkness. The completion of the rift across the Larsen C was first announced by Project MIDAS on 12 July based on thermal imagery from Aqua's Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS). The thermal contrast between the ocean and ice surfaces made it clear that the iceberg had released before Sentinel-1's radar and Landsat 8's thermal data confirmed that later on the same day. In addition to TIRS on Landsat 8 (Band 10) and the MODIS sensors on the Terra and Aqua satellites (Bands 31/32), the Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) on the Suomi National Polar-orbiting Partnership (Suomi-NPP) satellite also acquires thermal imagery at a similar wavelength ( 11.5 microns) with its I5 Band. The advantage to these data relative to MODIS is that they are at a higher resolution, 375 m vs 1 km. This, along with multiple passes per day has enabled a detailed temporal study of the early drift movement of A68, followed by visible-band tracking and structural analysis using MODIS band 1 (Aqua and Terra; 250 m resolution) and Landsat 8 panchromatic band (15 m). Along with constraining the timing of the rift's breakthrough to a small time window on July 11th, these data allow tracking of the major pieces of A-68 as they formed, and of the intact area behind the deep embayment in the Larsen C's ice front. Further, we will track the movement of these large ice masses, and monitor summer melt and effects of further calving and thinning as they move northward in the circulation of the Weddell Gyre.

  5. Reading Pictures for Story Comprehension Requires Mental Imagery Skills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boerma, Inouk E; Mol, Suzanne E; Jolles, Jelle

    2016-01-01

    We examined the role of mental imagery skills on story comprehension in 150 fifth graders (10- to 12-year-olds), when reading a narrative book chapter with alternating words and pictures (i.e., text blocks were alternated by one- or two-page picture spreads). A parallel group design was used, in which we compared our experimental book version, in which pictures were used to replace parts of the corresponding text, to two control versions, i.e., a text-only version and a version with the full story text and all pictures. Analyses showed an interaction between mental imagery and book version: children with higher mental imagery skills outperformed children with lower mental imagery skills on story comprehension after reading the experimental narrative. This was not the case for both control conditions. This suggests that children's mental imagery skills significantly contributed to the mental representation of the story that they created, by successfully integrating information from both words and pictures. The results emphasize the importance of mental imagery skills for explaining individual variability in reading development. Implications for educational practice are that we should find effective ways to instruct children how to "read" pictures and how to develop and use their mental imagery skills. This will probably contribute to their mental models and therefore their story comprehension.

  6. Recovery of Motor Imagery Ability in Stroke Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sjoerd de Vries

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To investigate whether motor imagery ability recovers in stroke patients and to see what the relationship is between different types of imagery and motor functioning after stroke. Methods. 12 unilateral stroke patients were measured at 3 and 6 weeks poststroke on 3 mental imagery tasks. Arm-hand function was evaluated using the Utrecht Arm-Hand task and the Brunnström Fugl-Meyer Scale. Age-matched healthy individuals (N=10 were included as controls. Results. Implicit motor imagery ability and visual motor imagery ability improved significantly at 6 weeks compared to 3 weeks poststroke. Conclusion. Our study shows that motor imagery can recover in the first weeks after stroke. This indicates that a group of patients who might not be initially selected for mental practice can, still later in the rehabilitation process, participate in mental practice programs. Moreover, our study shows that mental imagery modalities can be differently affected in individual patients and over time.

  7. Photogrammetry of the Viking Lander imagery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, S. S. C.; Schafer, F. J.

    1982-01-01

    The problem of photogrammetric mapping which uses Viking Lander photography as its basis is solved in two ways: (1) by converting the azimuth and elevation scanning imagery to the equivalent of a frame picture, using computerized rectification; and (2) by interfacing a high-speed, general-purpose computer to the analytical plotter employed, so that all correction computations can be performed in real time during the model-orientation and map-compilation process. Both the efficiency of the Viking Lander cameras and the validity of the rectification method have been established by a series of pre-mission tests which compared the accuracy of terrestrial maps compiled by this method with maps made from aerial photographs. In addition, 1:10-scale topographic maps of Viking Lander sites 1 and 2 having a contour interval of 1.0 cm have been made to test the rectification method.

  8. Joint Agency Commercial Imagery Evaluation (JACIE)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jucht, Carrie

    2010-01-01

    Remote sensing data are vital to understanding the physical world and to answering many of its needs and problems. The United States Geological Survey's (USGS) Remote Sensing Technologies (RST) Project, working with its partners, is proud to sponsor the annual Joint Agency Commercial Imagery Evaluation (JACIE) Workshop to help understand the quality and usefulness of remote sensing data. The JACIE program was formed in 2001 to leverage U.S. Federal agency resources for the characterization of commercial remote sensing data. These agencies sponsor and co-chair JACIE: U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency (NGA) U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) JACIE is an effort to coordinate data assessments between the participating agencies and partners and communicate the knowledge and results of the quality and utility of the remotely sensed data available for government and private use.

  9. Toward interactive search in remote sensing imagery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Porter, Reid B [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Hush, Do [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Harvey, Neal [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Theile, James [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2010-01-01

    To move from data to information in almost all science and defense applications requires a human-in-the-loop to validate information products, resolve inconsistencies, and account for incomplete and potentially deceptive sources of information. This is a key motivation for visual analytics which aims to develop techniques that complement and empower human users. By contrast, the vast majority of algorithms developed in machine learning aim to replace human users in data exploitation. In this paper we describe a recently introduced machine learning problem, called rare category detection, which may be a better match to visual analytic environments. We describe a new design criteria for this problem, and present comparisons to existing techniques with both synthetic and real-world datasets. We conclude by describing an application in broad-area search of remote sensing imagery.

  10. Apperception and imagery in blindfold chess.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saariluoma, P; Kalakoski, V

    1998-01-01

    Apperception constructs functional and "meaningful" mental representations. These representations are often built on mental images. Hence it is rational to assume that the contents of some parts of images may be functionally more important than others. This means that the cognitive processing of some parts of the image is more effective than for others. To extract this preferential structure, which we call the functional figure in mental images, five experiments were conducted on blindfold chess imagery. We showed that blindfold chess players have much better recall of functionally significant than of functionally insignificant areas of chess positions. Thus, of the various mental representations of chess board areas, the functionally more significant areas are better represented than others.

  11. Thermal imagery for census of ungulates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wride, M. C.; Baker, K.

    1977-01-01

    A Daedalus thermal linescanner mounted in a light single engine aircraft was used to image the entire 270 square kilometers within the fenced perimeter of ElK Island Park, Alberta, Canada. The data were collected during winter, 1976 in morning and midday (overcast conditions) processed and analyzed to obtain a number for total ungulates. Five different ungulate species were present during the survey. Ungulates were easily observed during the analysis of linescanner imagery and the total number of ungulates was established at 2175 compared to figures of 1010 and 1231 for visual method aerial survey results of the same area that year. It was concluded that the scanner was much more accurate and precise for census of ungulates than visual techniques.

  12. Tobacco imagery on prime time UK television.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyons, Ailsa; McNeill, Ann; Britton, John

    2014-05-01

    Smoking in films is a common and well documented cause of youth smoking experimentation and uptake and hence a significant health hazard. The extent of exposure of young people to tobacco imagery in television programming has to date been far less investigated. We have therefore measured the extent to which tobacco content occurs in prime time UK television, and estimated exposure of UK youth. The occurrence of tobacco, categorised as actual tobacco use, implied tobacco use, tobacco paraphernalia, other reference to tobacco, tobacco brand appearances or any of these, occurring in all prime time broadcasting on the five most popularly viewed UK television stations during 3 separate weeks in 2010 were measured by 1-minute interval coding. Youth exposure to tobacco content in the UK was estimated using media viewing figures. Actual tobacco use, predominantly cigarette smoking, occurred in 73 of 613 (12%) programmes, particularly in feature films and reality TV. Brand appearances were rare, occurring in only 18 programmes, of which 12 were news or other factual genres, and 6 were episodes of the same British soap opera. Tobacco occurred with similar frequency before as after 21:00, the UK watershed for programmes suitable for youth. The estimated number of incidences of exposure of the audience aged less than 18 years for any tobacco, actual tobacco use and tobacco branding were 59 million, 16 million and 3 million, respectively on average per week. Television programming is a source of significant exposure of youth to tobacco imagery, before and after the watershed. Tobacco branding is particularly common in Coronation Street, a soap opera popular among youth audiences. More stringent controls on tobacco in prime time television therefore have the potential to reduce the uptake of youth smoking in the UK.

  13. Tobacco imagery on prime time UK television

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyons, Ailsa; McNeill, Ann; Britton, John

    2014-01-01

    Background Smoking in films is a common and well documented cause of youth smoking experimentation and uptake and hence a significant health hazard. The extent of exposure of young people to tobacco imagery in television programming has to date been far less investigated. We have therefore measured the extent to which tobacco content occurs in prime time UK television, and estimated exposure of UK youth. Methods The occurrence of tobacco, categorised as actual tobacco use, implied tobacco use, tobacco paraphernalia, other reference to tobacco, tobacco brand appearances or any of these, occurring in all prime time broadcasting on the five most popularly viewed UK television stations during 3 separate weeks in 2010 were measured by 1-minute interval coding. Youth exposure to tobacco content in the UK was estimated using media viewing figures. Findings Actual tobacco use, predominantly cigarette smoking, occurred in 73 of 613 (12%) programmes, particularly in feature films and reality TV. Brand appearances were rare, occurring in only 18 programmes, of which 12 were news or other factual genres, and 6 were episodes of the same British soap opera. Tobacco occurred with similar frequency before as after 21:00, the UK watershed for programmes suitable for youth. The estimated number of incidences of exposure of the audience aged less than 18 years for any tobacco, actual tobacco use and tobacco branding were 59 million, 16 million and 3 million, respectively on average per week. Conclusions Television programming is a source of significant exposure of youth to tobacco imagery, before and after the watershed. Tobacco branding is particularly common in Coronation Street, a soap opera popular among youth audiences. More stringent controls on tobacco in prime time television therefore have the potential to reduce the uptake of youth smoking in the UK. PMID:23479113

  14. What Do Eye Gaze Metrics Tell Us about Motor Imagery?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elodie Poiroux

    Full Text Available Many of the brain structures involved in performing real movements also have increased activity during imagined movements or during motor observation, and this could be the neural substrate underlying the effects of motor imagery in motor learning or motor rehabilitation. In the absence of any objective physiological method of measurement, it is currently impossible to be sure that the patient is indeed performing the task as instructed. Eye gaze recording during a motor imagery task could be a possible way to "spy" on the activity an individual is really engaged in. The aim of the present study was to compare the pattern of eye movement metrics during motor observation, visual and kinesthetic motor imagery (VI, KI, target fixation, and mental calculation. Twenty-two healthy subjects (16 females and 6 males, were required to perform tests in five conditions using imagery in the Box and Block Test tasks following the procedure described by Liepert et al. Eye movements were analysed by a non-invasive oculometric measure (SMI RED250 system. Two parameters describing gaze pattern were calculated: the index of ocular mobility (saccade duration over saccade + fixation duration and the number of midline crossings (i.e. the number of times the subjects gaze crossed the midline of the screen when performing the different tasks. Both parameters were significantly different between visual imagery and kinesthesic imagery, visual imagery and mental calculation, and visual imagery and target fixation. For the first time we were able to show that eye movement patterns are different during VI and KI tasks. Our results suggest gaze metric parameters could be used as an objective unobtrusive approach to assess engagement in a motor imagery task. Further studies should define how oculomotor parameters could be used as an indicator of the rehabilitation task a patient is engaged in.

  15. North-American Conference Highlights the Treatment of Trauma Utilizing Guided Imagery and Music

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Scott-Montcrieff, Suzannah; Beck, Bolette Daniels; Montgomery, Erin

    2015-01-01

    A report on the 2015 Association for Music and Imagery conference highlights papers that address clinical practice and research using Guided Imagery and Music for the treatment of trauma.......A report on the 2015 Association for Music and Imagery conference highlights papers that address clinical practice and research using Guided Imagery and Music for the treatment of trauma....

  16. Aerial Photography and Imagery, Ortho-Corrected, 2007 Ortho Aerial Imagery collected by Pictometry Inc - includes both ortho and oblique imagery, Published in 2007, 1:1200 (1in=100ft) scale, City of Portage Government.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC Local Govt | GIS Inventory — Aerial Photography and Imagery, Ortho-Corrected dataset current as of 2007. 2007 Ortho Aerial Imagery collected by Pictometry Inc - includes both ortho and oblique...

  17. Mental imagery: a tool to promote creativity in the FL classroom

    OpenAIRE

    Ávila López, Francisco Javier

    2002-01-01

    Recent psychological research suggests that much of our of learning includes imagery as part of the cognitive processes. Mental imagery can lead to significant improvement in learning given proper guidance. One of the most important reasons for that cognitive potential is the close relationship between mental imagery and creativity. Research points to the ability to generate and manipulate mental imagery as one of the main components of creativity; guided mental imagery training can help to a...

  18. Application of digital image processing techniques to astronomical imagery 1977

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorre, J. J.; Lynn, D. J.

    1978-01-01

    Nine specific techniques of combination of techniques developed for applying digital image processing technology to existing astronomical imagery are described. Photoproducts are included to illustrate the results of each of these investigations.

  19. SMEX05 Landsat Thematic Mapper GEOTIFF Imagery: Iowa

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This data set provides imagery developed from Landsat 5 Thematic Mapper (TM) data for use in studying land cover features. Data are provided in Georeferenced Tagged...

  20. OrthoImagery submittal for Switzerland County, Indiana

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Digital orthographic imagery datasets contain georeferenced images of the Earth's surface, collected by a sensor in which object displacement has been removed for...

  1. 2015 Big Windy, Oregon 4-Band 8 Bit Imagery

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — These data are LiDAR orthorectified aerial photographs (8-bit GeoTIFF format) within the Oregon Lidar Consortium Big Windy project area. The imagery coverage is...

  2. USGS Imagery Only Base Map Service from The National Map

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — USGS Imagery Only is a tile cache base map of orthoimagery in The National Map visible to the 1:18,000 scale. Orthoimagery data are typically high resolution images...

  3. Using satellite imagery for crime mapping in South Africa.

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Schmitz, Peter MU

    2002-12-01

    Full Text Available . Increasingly, technologies such as digital orthophotographs, high-resolution satellite imagery and the global positioning system (GPS) are being used for these areas to provide base mapping and application data for geographical information systems (GIS...

  4. The National Agriculture Imagery Program Change 2002-2017

    Data.gov (United States)

    Farm Service Agency, Department of Agriculture — The National Agriculture Imagery Program Change 2002-2017 is a web mapping application hosted on the ArcGIS online FSA Organizational Subscription. This web...

  5. OrthoImagery Submission for TREUTLEN County, GA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — NAIP imagery is available for distribution within 60 days of the end of a flying season and is intended to provide current information of agricultural conditions in...

  6. OrthoImagery Submission for Lanier County, GA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — NAIP imagery is available for distribution within 60 days of the end of a flying season and is intended to provide current information of agricultural conditions in...

  7. OrthoImagery Submission for Albany County, New York

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Digital orthographic imagery datasets contain georeferenced images of the Earth's surface, collected by a sensor in which object displacement has been removed for...

  8. 2014 Metro, Oregon 4-Band 8 Bit Imagery

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — These data are LiDAR orthorectified aerial photographs (8-bit GeoTIFF format) within the Oregon Lidar Consortium Portland project area. The imagery coverage is...

  9. SMEX02 Landsat Thematic Mapper Imagery, Iowa, Version 1

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This data set provides imagery developed from Landsat 5 and 7 Thematic Mapper (TM) data for use in studying land cover features during the Soil Moisture Experiment...

  10. OrthoImagery Submission for Jefferson County, Illinois, USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Digital orthographic imagery datasets contain georeferenced images of the Earth's surface, collected by a sensor in which object displacement has beeen removed for...

  11. OrthoImagery submittal for Wabash County, Indiana

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Digital orthographic imagery datasets contain georeferenced images of the Earth's surface, collected by a sensor in which object displacement has been removed for...

  12. OrthoImagery Submission for Perry County, Illinois, USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Digital orthographic imagery datasets contain georeferenced images of the Earth's surface, collected by a sensor in which object displacement has beeen removed for...

  13. OrthoImagery Submission for Henry County, Illinois, USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Digital orthographic imagery datasets contain georeferenced images of the Earth's surface, collected by a sensor in which object displacement has beeen removed for...

  14. OrthoImagery submittal for Tipton County, Indiana

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Digital orthographic imagery datasets contain georeferenced images of the Earth's surface, collected by a sensor in which object displacement has been removed for...

  15. OrthoImagery submittal for Pike County, Indiana

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Digital orthographic imagery datasets contain georeferenced images of the Earth's surface, collected by a sensor in which object displacement has been removed for...

  16. OrthoImagery submittal for Vermillion County, Indiana

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Digital orthographic imagery datasets contain georeferenced images of the Earth's surface, collected by a sensor in which object displacement has been removed for...

  17. OrthoImagery submittal for Henry County, Indiana

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Digital orthographic imagery datasets contain georeferenced images of the Earth?s surface, collected by a sensor in which object displacement has been removed for...

  18. OrthoImagery Submission for Woodford County, Illinois, USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Digital orthographic imagery datasets contain georeferenced images of the Earth's surface, collected by a sensor in which object displacement has beeen removed for...

  19. OrthoImagery submittal for Orange County, Indiana

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Digital orthographic imagery datasets contain georeferenced images of the Earth's surface, collected by a sensor in which object displacement has been removed for...

  20. OrthoImagery submittal for Owen County, Indiana

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Digital orthographic imagery datasets contain georeferenced images of the Earth's surface, collected by a sensor in which object displacement has been removed for...

  1. OrthoImagery submittal for Pulaski County, Indiana

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Digital orthographic imagery datasets contain georeferenced images of the Earth's surface, collected by a sensor in which object displacement has been removed for...

  2. OrthoImagery Submission for Glascock County, GA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — NAIP imagery is available for distribution within 60 days of the end of a flying season and is intended to provide current information of agricultural conditions in...

  3. OrthoImagery Submission for Emanuel County, GA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — NAIP imagery is available for distribution within 60 days of the end of a flying season and is intended to provide current information of agricultural conditions in...

  4. OrthoImagery Submission for Bulloch County, GA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — NAIP imagery is available for distribution within 60 days of the end of a flying season and is intended to provide current information of agricultural conditions in...

  5. Aerial Photography and Imagery, Ortho-Corrected - VOLUSIA 2006 Orthophotography

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC Local Govt | GIS Inventory — 2006, 6 inch Pixel Color Orthophotography - - Panchromatic, red, green, blue and near infrared imagery was acquired using the Leica ADS40 multi-spectral scanner (see...

  6. OrthoImagery Submission for Stearns County, MN

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — This 1 meter resolution, natural color imagery is derived directly from the original uncompressed TIFF quarter-quad orthophotos as provided by LMIC. The Minnesota...

  7. CLPX-Satellite: Radarsat Synthetic Aperture Radar Imagery

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This data set consists of time-series spaceborne Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) imagery of the three Cold Land Processes Field Experiment (CLPX) Meso-cell Study...

  8. USGS NAIP Imagery Overlay Map Service from The National Map

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The USGS NAIP Imagery service from The National Map (TNM) consists of high resolution images that combine the visual attributes of an aerial photograph with the...

  9. OrthoImagery Submission for Christian County, Illinois, USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Digital orthographic imagery datasets contain georeferenced images of the Earth's surface, collected by a sensor in which object displacement has beeen removed for...

  10. Aerial Photography and Imagery, Ortho-Corrected - USAAIR 2003 Orthophotography

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC Local Govt | GIS Inventory — USA Airphoto Imagery (http://www.airphotousa.com). Used with the Photomapper Application (http://www.airphotousa.com/Products/PhotoMapper/index.html). April, 2003 -...

  11. Fusion of Inertial Navigation and Imagery Data Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The innovations of the Fusion of Inertial Navigation and Imagery Data are the application of the concept to the dynamic entry-interface through near-landing phases,...

  12. OrthoImagery submittal for Clinton County, Indiana

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Digital orthographic imagery datasets contain georeferenced images of the Earth?s surface, collected by a sensor in which object displacement has been removed for...

  13. OrthoImagery Submission for Freeborn County, MN

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — NAIP imagery is available for distribution within 60 days of the end of a flying season and is intended to provide current information of agricultural conditions in...

  14. OrthoImagery Submission for Evans County, GA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — NAIP imagery is available for distribution within 60 days of the end of a flying season and is intended to provide current information of agricultural conditions in...

  15. OrthoImagery Submission for Bacon County, GA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — NAIP imagery is available for distribution within 60 days of the end of a flying season and is intended to provide current information of agricultural conditions in...

  16. OrthoImagery Submission for Telfair County, GA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — NAIP imagery is available for distribution within 60 days of the end of a flying season and is intended to provide current information of agricultural conditions in...

  17. OrthoImagery Submission for Mower County, MN

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — NAIP imagery is available for distribution within 60 days of the end of a flying season and is intended to provide current information of agricultural conditions in...

  18. OrthoImagery Submission for Franklin County, IA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — NAIP imagery is available for distribution within 60 days of the end of a flying season and is intended to provide current information of agricultural conditions in...

  19. OrthoImagery Submission for Johnson County, GA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — NAIP imagery is available for distribution within 60 days of the end of a flying season and is intended to provide current information of agricultural conditions in...

  20. OrthoImagery Submission for Tift County, GA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — NAIP imagery is available for distribution within 60 days of the end of a flying season and is intended to provide current information of agricultural conditions in...

  1. OrthoImagery Submission for Jefferson County, GA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — NAIP imagery is available for distribution within 60 days of the end of a flying season and is intended to provide current information of agricultural conditions in...

  2. OrthoImagery Submission for Wheeler County, GA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — NAIP imagery is available for distribution within 60 days of the end of a flying season and is intended to provide current information of agricultural conditions in...

  3. OrthoImagery Submission for Tattnall County, GA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — NAIP imagery is available for distribution within 60 days of the end of a flying season and is intended to provide current information of agricultural conditions in...

  4. OrthoImagery Submission for Candler County, GA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — NAIP imagery is available for distribution within 60 days of the end of a flying season and is intended to provide current information of agricultural conditions in...

  5. OrthoImagery Submission for Burke County, GA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — NAIP imagery is available for distribution within 60 days of the end of a flying season and is intended to provide current information of agricultural conditions in...

  6. OrthoImagery Submission for Wilcox County, GA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — NAIP imagery is available for distribution within 60 days of the end of a flying season and is intended to provide current information of agricultural conditions in...

  7. OrthoImagery Submission for Laurens County, GA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — NAIP imagery is available for distribution within 60 days of the end of a flying season and is intended to provide current information of agricultural conditions in...

  8. OrthoImagery Submission for Screven County, GA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — NAIP imagery is available for distribution within 60 days of the end of a flying season and is intended to provide current information of agricultural conditions in...

  9. OrthoImagery Submission for Montgomery County, GA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — NAIP imagery is available for distribution within 60 days of the end of a flying season and is intended to provide current information of agricultural conditions in...

  10. OrthoImagery Submission for Cedar County, IA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — NAIP imagery is available for distribution within 60 days of the end of a flying season and is intended to provide current information of agricultural conditions in...

  11. OrthoImagery Submission for Dodge County, GA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — NAIP imagery is available for distribution within 60 days of the end of a flying season and is intended to provide current information of agricultural conditions in...

  12. 2012 Sandy River, Oregon Natural Color 8 Bit Imagery

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — These data are LiDAR orthorectified aerial photographs (8-bit GeoTIFF format) within the Oregon Lidar Consortium Sandy River project area. The imagery coverage is...

  13. OrthoImagery Submission for Piatt County, Illinois, USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Digital orthographic imagery datasets contain georeferenced images of the Earth's surface, collected by a sensor in which object displacement has beeen removed for...

  14. Fusion of Inertial Navigation and Imagery Data, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The innovations of the Fusion of Inertial Navigation and Imagery Data are the application of the concept to the dynamic entry-interface through near-landing phases,...

  15. APPLYING SATELLITE IMAGERY TO TRIAGE ASSESSMENT OF ECOSYSTEM HEALTH

    Science.gov (United States)

    Considerable evidence documents that certain changes in vegetation and soils result in irreversibly degraded rangeland ecosystems. We used Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR)imagery to develop calibration patterns of change in the Normalized Difference Vegetation Ind...

  16. Hurricane Sandy: Rapid Response Imagery of the Surrounding Regions

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The imagery posted on this site is of Hurricane Sandy. The aerial photography missions were conducted by the NOAA Remote Sensing Division. The images were acquired...

  17. Reson 8101 Backscatter imagery of Penguin Bank, Molokai, Hawaii, USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Backscatter imagery extracted from gridded bathymetry of Penguin Bank, Molokai, Hawaii, USA. These data provide almost complete coverage between 0 and 100 meters....

  18. The role of religious imagery in adaptive psychotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langs, Robert

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents the viewpoint of the adaptive approach in respect to manifest allusions to God and other religious themes from patients in psychotherapy and psychoanalysis. Such imagery is understood and interpreted on a par with secular imagery, as reflections of encoded deep unconscious experiences, many of them in response to therapists' interventions. The article also explores the reasons why religious imagery is uncommon in adaptive modes of therapy, discusses encoded evidence that therapists' religious self-revelations and extended personal reactions to patients' religious images are maladaptively countertransference-based, and suggests that particular kinds of encoded nonreligious imagery suggest that the deep unconscious mind should be thought of as an inner god of divine wisdom and pristine morality. The decision as to whether this viewpoint speaks for the existence of a transcendental deity or is properly considered in secular terms lies beyond the province of psychoanalytic observations and thinking.

  19. USGS Imagery Topo Base Map Service from The National Map

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — USGS Imagery Topo is a topographic tile cache base map with orthoimagery as a backdrop, and combines the most current data (Boundaries, Names, Transportation,...

  20. OrthoImagery Submission for Monmouth County, New Jersey

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Digital orthographic imagery datasets contain georeferenced images of the Earth's surface, collected by a sensor in which object displacement has been removed for...

  1. Vectorized Shoreline of Alamagan CNMI 2001, Derived from IKONOS Imagery

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — IKONOS imagery was purchased to support the Pacific Islands Geographic Information System (GIS) project and the National Ocean Service's (NOS) coral mapping...

  2. Vectorized Shoreline of Anatahan CNMI 2001, Derived from IKONOS Imagery

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — IKONOS imagery was purchased to support the Pacific Islands Geographic Information System (GIS) project and the National Ocean Service's (NOS) coral mapping...

  3. Vectorized Shoreline of Guguan CNMI 2001, Derived from IKONOS Imagery

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — IKONOS imagery was purchased to support the Pacific Islands Geographic Information System (GIS) project and the National Ocean Service's (NOS) coral mapping...

  4. Vectorized Shoreline of Pagan CNMI 2001, Derived from IKONOS Imagery

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — IKONOS imagery was purchased to support the Pacific Islands Geographic Information System (GIS) project and the National Ocean Service's (NOS) coral mapping...

  5. Vectorized Shoreline of Agrihan CNMI 2001, Derived from IKONOS Imagery

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — IKONOS imagery was purchased to support the Pacific Islands Geographic Information System (GIS) project and the National Ocean Service's (NOS) coral mapping...

  6. Vectorized Shoreline of Asuncion CNMI 2001, Derived from IKONOS Imagery

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — IKONOS imagery was purchased to support the Pacific Islands Geographic Information System (GIS) project and the National Ocean Service's (NOS) coral mapping...

  7. Massachusetts Bay - Internal wave packets digitized from SAR imagery

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This feature class contains internal wave packets digitized from SAR imagery at 1:350,000 scale in Massachusetts Bay. Internal waves are nonsinusoidal waves that...

  8. The efficacy of imagery mnemonics in memory remediation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, J T

    1995-11-01

    Training and instructions in the use of mental imagery can lead to improved retention in patients with memory impairment as the result of brain injury or disease. The amount of improvement varies inversely with the severity of memory impairment, but it largely unrelated to either the aetiology or the locus of brain damage. It also appears to depend on the patients' motivation rather than their intelligence, education or imagery ability. However, brain-damaged patients may need explicit prompting if they are to use imagery mnemonics successfully and often fail to maintain their use on similar learning materials or to generalise their use to new learning situations. As a result, imagery mnemonics will typically be of little practical value in enabling memory-impaired individuals to respond to the cognitive challenges of everyday life.

  9. A Federated Geospatial and Imagery Exploitation Service (GIXS) Model

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Weber, Derek

    2000-01-01

    In order for the Geospatial and Imagery Exploitation Service (GIXS) architecture to take advantage of distributed processing of image exploitation tasks, it needs to be adapted to suit a federated environment...

  10. San Francisco Bay Interferometric Side Scan Imagery: Area A

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Backscatter imagery data were collected over shallow subtidal areas in the San Francisco Bay estuary system. Bathymetric and acoustic backscatter data were collected...

  11. San Francisco Bay Multi-beam Backscatter Imagery: Area A

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Backscatter imagery data were collected over shallow subtidal areas in the San Francisco Bay estuary system. Bathymetric and acoustic backscatter data were collected...

  12. OrthoImagery Submission for Putnam County, New York

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Digital orthographic imagery datasets contain georeferenced images of the Earth's surface, collected by a sensor in which object displacement has been removed for...

  13. Users, uses, and value of Landsat satellite imagery: results from the 2012 survey of users

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Holly M.; Richardson, Leslie A.; Koontz, Stephen R.; Loomis, John; Koontz, Lynne

    2013-01-01

    Landsat satellites have been operating since 1972, providing a continuous global record of the Earth’s land surface. The imagery is currently available at no cost through the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS). Social scientists at the USGS Fort Collins Science Center conducted an extensive survey in early 2012 to explore who uses Landsat imagery, how they use the imagery, and what the value of the imagery is to them. The survey was sent to all users registered with USGS who had accessed Landsat imagery in the year prior to the survey and over 11,000 current Landsat imagery users responded. The results of the survey revealed that respondents from many sectors use Landsat imagery in myriad project locations and scales, as well as application areas. The value of Landsat imagery to these users was demonstrated by the high importance of and dependence on the imagery, the numerous environmental and societal benefits observed from projects using Landsat imagery, the potential negative impacts on users’ work if Landsat imagery was no longer available, and the substantial aggregated annual economic benefit from the imagery. These results represent only the value of Landsat to users registered with USGS; further research would help to determine what the value of the imagery is to a greater segment of the population, such as downstream users of the imagery and imagery-derived products.

  14. Planning, preparation, execution, and imagery of volitional action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deecke, L

    1996-03-01

    There are different motor sets, which a human subject can be in or act from: he or she can be in a self-initiated voluntary movement set (action) or in a response set (re-action). Also, imagery sets are available that are necessary for the acquisition and practice of skill. Most important are such imagery sets for rehearsal in theatre, dance, music, sports, combat, etc.

  15. Rapid Global Imagery Management and Generation In Action

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, T.; Alarcon, C.; Thompson, C. K.; Roberts, J. T.; Hall, J. R.; Cechini, M. F.; Schmaltz, J. E.; McGann, J. M.; Boller, R. A.; Murphy, K. J.; Bingham, A. W.

    2013-12-01

    NASA's Global Imagery Browse Services (GIBS) project has positioned itself to be the global imagery solution for the Earth Observation System (EOS), delivering global, full-resolution satellite imagery in a highly responsive manner. This is an ambitious goal for supporting a growing a collection of distributed archives consist of heterogeneous near real-time (NRT) and science products with varied and often disparate provenance pertaining to source platforms and instruments, spatial resolutions, processing algorithms, metadata models and packaging specifications. GIBS consists of two major subsystems, OnEarth and The Imagery Exchange (TIE). OnEarth is the Open Geospatial Consortium (OGC)-compliant Web Map Tile Service (WMTS), which efficiently serves multi-resolution imagery to clients (e.g., http://podaac-tools.jpl.nasa.gov/soto/ and http://earthdata.nasa.gov/labs/worldview/). TIE is the GIBS imagery workflow management solution that is a specialization of the horizontally scaled Data Management and Archive System (DMAS) developed at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory. Like DMAS, TIE is an Open Archival Information System (OAIS) responsible for orchestrating the workflow for acquisition, preparation, generation, and archiving of imagery to be served by OnEarth. The workflow collects imagery provenance throughout a product's lifecycle by leveraging the EOS Clearing House (ECHO) and other long-term metadata repositories in order to promote reproducibility and retain lineage with source observational artifacts. This talk focuses on the current TIE development activities and some of the patterns and architectures that have proven successful in building a horizontal-scaling workflow data systems. As a data solution developed using open source technologies. This talk also discusses current activities in getting DMAS and TIE to the open source community.

  16. Very low rate compression of speckled SAR imagery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eichel, P.H. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Ives, R.W. [Navy (United States)

    1998-01-01

    Synthetic aperture radars produce coherent, and speckled, high resolution images of the ground. Because modern systems can generate large amounts of imagery, there is substantial interest in applying image compression techniques to these products. In this paper, the authors examine the properties of speckled imagery relevant to the task of data compression. In particular, they demonstrate the advisability of compressing the speckle mean function rather than the literal image. The theory, methodology, and an example are presented.

  17. AUTOMATIC MAPPING FROM ULTRA-LIGHT UAV IMAGERY

    OpenAIRE

    Strecha, Christoph; Küng, Olivier; Fua, Pascal

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents an affordable, fully automated and accurate mapping solutions based on ultra-light UAV imagery, which is commercialized by Pix4D. We show interesting application in the field of UAV mapping, analyse the accuracy of the automated processing on several datasets. The accuracy highly depends on the ground resolution (flying height) of the input imagery. When chosen appropriately this mapping solution can compete with traditional mapping solutions that capture fewer high-resolu...

  18. Automated Sunspot Detection and Classification Using SOHO/MDI Imagery

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-03-01

    AUTOMATED SUNSPOT DETECTION AND CLASSIFICATION USING SOHO/MDI IMAGERY THESIS Samantha R. Howard, 1st Lieutenant, USAF AFIT-ENP-MS-15-M-078 DEPARTMENT...Government and is not subject to copyright protection in the United States. AFIT-ENP-MS-15-M-078 AUTOMATED SUNSPOT DETECTION AND CLASSIFICATION USING SOHO...MS-15-M-078 AUTOMATED SUNSPOT DETECTION AND CLASSIFICATION USING SOHO/MDI IMAGERY Samantha R. Howard, B.S. 1st Lieutenant, USAF Committee Membership

  19. Mental imagery and the third dimension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinker, S

    1980-09-01

    What sort of medium underlies imagery for three-dimensional scenes? In the present investigation, the time subjects took to scan between objects in a mental image was used to infer the sorts of geometric information that images preserve. Subjects studied an open box in which five objects were suspended, and learned to imagine this display with their eyes closed. In the first experiment, subjects scanned by tracking an imaginary point moving in a straight line between the imagined objects. Scanning times increased linearly with increasing distance between objects in three dimensions. Therefore metric 3-D information must be preserved in images, and images cannot simply be 2-D "snapshots." In a second experiment, subjects scanned across the image by "sighting" objects through an imaginary rifle sight. Here scanning times were found to increase linearly with the two-dimensional separations between objects as they appeared from the original viewing angle. Therefore metric 2-D distance information in the original perspective view must be preserved in images, and images cannot simply be 3-D "scale-models" that are assessed from any and all directions at once. In a third experiment, subjects mentally rotated the display 90 degrees and scanned between objects as they appeared in this new perspective view by tracking an imaginary rifle signt, as before. Scanning times increased linearly with the two-dimensional separations between objects as they would appear from the new relative viewing perspective. Therefore images can display metric 2-D distance information in a perspective view never actually experiences, so mental images cannot simply be "snapshot plus scale model" pairs. These results can be explained by a model in which the three-dimensional structure of objects is encoded in long-term memory in 3-D object-centered coordinate systems. When these objects are imagined, this information is then mapped onto a single 2-D "surface display" in which the perspective

  20. Assessing Deep Sea Communities Through Seabed Imagery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matkin, A. G.; Cross, K.; Milititsky, M.

    2016-02-01

    The deep sea still remains virtually unexplored. Human activity, such as oil and gas exploration and deep sea mining, is expanding further into the deep sea, increasing the need to survey and map extensive areas of this habitat in order to assess ecosystem health and value. The technology needed to explore this remote environment has been advancing. Seabed imagery can cover extensive areas of the seafloor and investigate areas where sampling with traditional coring methodologies is just not possible (e.g. cold water coral reefs). Remotely operated vehicles (ROVs) are an expensive option, so drop or towed camera systems can provide a more viable and affordable alternative, while still allowing for real-time control. Assessment of seabed imagery in terms of presence, abundance and density of particular species can be conducted by bringing together a variety of analytical tools for a holistic approach. Sixteen deep sea transects located offshore West Africa were investigated with a towed digital video telemetry system (DTS). Both digital stills and video footage were acquired. An extensive data set was obtained from over 13,000 usable photographs, allowing for characterisation of the different habitats present in terms of community composition and abundance. All observed fauna were identified to the lowest taxonomic level and enumerated when possible, with densities derived after the seabed area was calculated for each suitable photograph. This methodology allowed for consistent assessment of the different habitat types present, overcoming constraints, such as specific taxa that cannot be enumerated, such as sponges, corals or bryozoans, the presence of mobile and sessile species, or the level of taxonomic detail. Although this methodology will not enable a full characterisation of a deep sea community, in terms of species composition for instance, itt will allow a robust assessment of large areas of the deep sea in terms of sensitive habitats present and community

  1. Emergency Response Imagery Related to Hurricanes Harvey, Irma, and Maria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Worthem, A. V.; Madore, B.; Imahori, G.; Woolard, J.; Sellars, J.; Halbach, A.; Helmricks, D.; Quarrick, J.

    2017-12-01

    NOAA's National Geodetic Survey (NGS) and Remote Sensing Division acquired and rapidly disseminated emergency response imagery related to the three recent hurricanes Harvey, Irma, and Maria. Aerial imagery was collected using a Trimble Digital Sensor System, a high-resolution digital camera, by means of NOAA's King Air 350ER and DeHavilland Twin Otter (DHC-6) Aircraft. The emergency response images are used to assess the before and after effects of the hurricanes' damage. The imagery aids emergency responders, such as FEMA, Coast Guard, and other state and local governments, in developing recovery strategies and efforts by prioritizing areas most affected and distributing appropriate resources. Collected imagery is also used to provide damage assessment for use in long-term recovery and rebuilding efforts. Additionally, the imagery allows for those evacuated persons to see images of their homes and neighborhoods remotely. Each of the individual images are processed through ortho-rectification and merged into a uniform mosaic image. These remotely sensed datasets are publically available, and often used by web-based map servers as well as, federal, state, and local government agencies. This poster will show the imagery collected for these three hurricanes and the processes involved in getting data quickly into the hands of those that need it most.

  2. Intrusive imagery in people with a specific phobia of vomiting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, Katy; Veale, David; Brewin, Chris R

    2012-03-01

    AND OBJECTIVES: Specific phobia of vomiting (SPOV) is a chronic, pervasive and debilitating disorder which is clinically regarded as difficult to treat. Research into its development, maintenance and treatment has been limited. This study explored the prevalence and characteristics of intrusive mental imagery in people with SPOV. It investigated the relationship between presence of imagery and severity of phobia. Thirty-six participants meeting DSM-IV criteria for SPOV were recruited from online support groups and outpatient clinics. A semi-structured quantitative interview was administered. Twenty-nine (81%) participants reported multi-sensory intrusive imagery of adult (52%) and childhood memories (31%) and worst case scenarios ("flashforwards") of vomiting (17%). Extent of imagery was significantly related to severity of phobia. Participants primarily fearing others vomiting had less severe phobic symptoms. No control group was used and a heterogeneous sample of clinical and community participants was recruited. Correlational data comparing extent of imagery with severity of SPOV symptoms were derived from as yet unvalidated measures. Intrusive mental imagery is a clinically important feature of SPOV and may contribute to its maintenance. Causality needs to be demonstrated. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Motor Imagery Impairment in Postacute Stroke Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niclas Braun

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Not much is known about how well stroke patients are able to perform motor imagery (MI and which MI abilities are preserved after stroke. We therefore applied three different MI tasks (one mental chronometry task, one mental rotation task, and one EEG-based neurofeedback task to a sample of postacute stroke patients (n=20 and age-matched healthy controls (n=20 for addressing the following questions: First, which of the MI tasks indicate impairment in stroke patients and are impairments restricted to the paretic side? Second, is there a relationship between MI impairment and sensory loss or paresis severity? And third, do the results of the different MI tasks converge? Significant differences between the stroke and control groups were found in all three MI tasks. However, only the mental chronometry task and EEG analysis revealed paresis side-specific effects. Moreover, sensitivity loss contributed to a performance drop in the mental rotation task. The findings indicate that although MI abilities may be impaired after stroke, most patients retain their ability for MI EEG-based neurofeedback. Interestingly, performance in the different MI measures did not strongly correlate, neither in stroke patients nor in healthy controls. We conclude that one MI measure is not sufficient to fully assess an individual’s MI abilities.

  4. ESTIMATION OF CORK PRODUCTION USINGAERIAL IMAGERY1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Surovy

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Inventory and prediction of cork harvest over time and space is important to forest managers who must plan and organize harvest logistics (transport, storage, etc.. Common field inventory methods including the stem density, diameter and height structure are costly and generally point (plot based. Furthermore, the irregular horizontal structure of cork oak stands makes it difficult, if not impossible, to interpolate between points. We propose a new method to estimate cork production using digital multispectral aerial imagery. We study the spectral response of individual trees in visible and near infrared spectra and then correlate that response with cork production prior to harvest. We use ground measurements of individual trees production to evaluate the model’s predictive capacity. We propose 14 candidate variables to predict cork production based on crown size in combination with different NDVI index derivates. We use Akaike Information Criteria to choose the best among them. The best model is composed of combinations of different NDVI derivates that include red, green, and blue channels. The proposed model is 15% more accurate than a model that includes only a crown projection without any spectral information.

  5. Can hospitals afford digital storage for imagery?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cody, W. F.; Gladney, Henry M.; Heritage, Marcus B.; Hildebrand, D. B.; Reinke, J. D.

    1994-05-01

    Digital medical images (scanned x-ray photographs, computed tomography, magnetic resonance imagery, ...) will consume 2 - 3 orders of magnitude more space then similar numbers of other images managed by digital storage subsystems. We investigate what a hospital will have to pay for a Picture Acquisition and Communication System (PACS). Assuming that tangible displaced costs--the costs of creating, storing, and managing film-- define the upper bound of what hospitals will be willing to pay for workstations, network, and digital storage, we find the EDP solution to be affordable today and attractive in two years. The archival medium currently favored by PACS researchers in optical disk technology. Performance and cost characteristics are likely to make magnetic tape juke box technology a better choice. The published literature teaches much of what is needed for optimal data compression. Uncertainty about liability will persuade some radiologists to save data beyond the noise-determined limits. A practical system will charge for data stored and transmitted and allow each user to balance cost and risk.

  6. Generative Street Addresses from Satellite Imagery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    İlke Demir

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available We describe our automatic generative algorithm to create street addresses from satellite images by learning and labeling roads, regions, and address cells. Currently, 75% of the world’s roads lack adequate street addressing systems. Recent geocoding initiatives tend to convert pure latitude and longitude information into a memorable form for unknown areas. However, settlements are identified by streets, and such addressing schemes are not coherent with the road topology. Instead, we propose a generative address design that maps the globe in accordance with streets. Our algorithm starts with extracting roads from satellite imagery by utilizing deep learning. Then, it uniquely labels the regions, roads, and structures using some graph- and proximity-based algorithms. We also extend our addressing scheme to (i cover inaccessible areas following similar design principles; (ii be inclusive and flexible for changes on the ground; and (iii lead as a pioneer for a unified street-based global geodatabase. We present our results on an example of a developed city and multiple undeveloped cities. We also compare productivity on the basis of current ad hoc and new complete addresses. We conclude by contrasting our generative addresses to current industrial and open solutions.

  7. Music to the inner ears: exploring individual differences in musical imagery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaty, Roger E; Burgin, Chris J; Nusbaum, Emily C; Kwapil, Thomas R; Hodges, Donald A; Silvia, Paul J

    2013-12-01

    In two studies, we explored the frequency and phenomenology of musical imagery. Study 1 used retrospective reports of musical imagery to assess the contribution of individual differences to imagery characteristics. Study 2 used an experience sampling design to assess the phenomenology of musical imagery over the course of one week in a sample of musicians and non-musicians. Both studies found episodes of musical imagery to be common and positive: people rarely wanted such experiences to end and often heard music that was personally meaningful. Several variables predicted musical imagery, including personality, musical preferences, and positive mood. Musicians tended to hear musical imagery more often, but they reported less frequent episodes of deliberately-generated imagery. Taken together, the present research provides new insights into individual differences in musical imagery, and it supports the emerging view that such experiences are common, positive, and more voluntary than previously recognized. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Effects of kinesthetic versus visual imagery practice on two technical dance movements: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girón, Elizabeth Coker; McIsaac, Tara; Nilsen, Dawn

    2012-03-01

    Motor imagery is a type of mental practice that involves imagining the body performing a movement in the absence of motor output. Dance training traditionally incorporates mental practice techniques, but quantitative effects of motor imagery on the performance of dance movements are largely unknown. This pilot study compared the effects of two different imagery modalities, external visual imagery and kinesthetic imagery, on pelvis and hip kinematics during two technical dance movements, plié and sauté. Each of three female dance students (mean age = 19.7 years, mean years of training = 10.7) was assigned to use a type of imagery practice: visual imagery, kinesthetic imagery, or no imagery. Effects of motor imagery on peak external hip rotation varied by both modality and task. Kinesthetic imagery increased peak external hip rotation for pliés, while visual imagery increased peak external hip rotation for sautés. Findings suggest that the success of motor imagery in improving performance may be task-specific. Dancers may benefit from matching imagery modality to technical tasks in order to improve alignment and thereby avoid chronic injury.

  9. Exceptional visuospatial imagery in schizophrenia; implications for madness and creativity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taylor eBenson

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Biographical and historical accounts suggest a link between scientific creativity and schizophrenia. Longitudinal studies of gifted children indicate that visuospatial imagery plays a pivotal role in exceptional achievements in science and mathematics. We asked whether visuospatial imagery is enhanced in individuals with schizophrenia (SZ. We compared SZ and matched healthy controls (HC on five visuospatial tasks tapping parietal and frontoparietal functions. Two aspects of visuospatial transformation, spatial location and mental imagery manipulation were examined with Paper Folding Test and Jigsaw Puzzle Task, respectively. Visuospatial intelligence was assessed with Ravens Progressive Matrices, which is associated with frontoparietal network activity. Hemispatial inattention implicating parietal function was assessed with line bisection task. Mediated by prefrontal cortex, spatial delayed response task was used to index working memory maintenance, which was impaired in SZ compared to HC. In contrast, SZ showed intact visuospatial intelligence and transformation of location. Further, SZ performed significantly better than HC on jigsaw puzzle task indicating enhanced mental imagery manipulation. Spatial working memory maintenance and mental imagery manipulation were strongly associated in HC but dissociated in SZ. Thus, we observed enhanced mental imagery manipulation in SZ but the dissociation of mental imagery from working memory suggests a disrupted frontoparietal network. Finally, while HC showed the expected leftward pseudoneglect, SZ showed increased rightward line bisection bias implicating left hemispatial inattention and impaired right parietal control of spatial attention. The current results chart a unique profile of impaired, spared and enhanced parietal-mediated visuospatial functions implicating parietal abnormalities as a biobehavioral marker for SZ. We discuss these results in relation to creative cognition.

  10. Exceptional visuospatial imagery in schizophrenia; implications for madness and creativity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benson, Taylor L; Park, Sohee

    2013-01-01

    Biographical and historical accounts suggest a link between scientific creativity and schizophrenia. Longitudinal studies of gifted children indicate that visuospatial imagery plays a pivotal role in exceptional achievements in science and mathematics. We asked whether visuospatial imagery is enhanced in individuals with schizophrenia (SZ). We compared SZ and matched healthy controls (HC) on five visuospatial tasks tapping parietal and frontoparietal functions. Two aspects of visuospatial transformation, spatial location and mental imagery manipulation were examined with Paper Folding Test (PFT) and jigsaw puzzle task (JPT), respectively. Visuospatial intelligence was assessed with Ravens Progressive Matrices, which is associated with frontoparietal network activity. Hemispatial inattention implicating parietal function was assessed with line bisection (LB) task. Mediated by prefrontal cortex, spatial delayed response task (DRT) was used to index working memory maintenance, which was impaired in SZ compared to HC. In contrast, SZ showed intact visuospatial intelligence and transformation of location. Further, SZ performed significantly better than HC on JPT indicating enhanced mental imagery manipulation. Spatial working memory (SWM) maintenance and mental imagery manipulation were strongly associated in HC but dissociated in SZ. Thus, we observed enhanced mental imagery manipulation in SZ but the dissociation of mental imagery from working memory suggests a disrupted frontoparietal network. Finally, while HC showed the expected leftward pseudoneglect, SZ showed increased rightward LB bias implicating left hemispatial inattention and impaired right parietal control of spatial attention. The current results chart a unique profile of impaired, spared and enhanced parietal-mediated visuospatial functions implicating parietal abnormalities as a biobehavioral marker for SZ. We discuss these results in relation to creative cognition.

  11. Photogrammetric Processing Using ZY-3 Satellite Imagery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kornus, W.; Magariños, A.; Pla, M.; Soler, E.; Perez, F.

    2015-03-01

    This paper evaluates the stereoscopic capacities of the Chinese sensor ZiYuan-3 (ZY-3) for the generation of photogrammetric products. The satellite was launched on January 9, 2012 and carries three high-resolution panchromatic cameras viewing in forward (22º), nadir (0º) and backward direction (-22º) and an infrared multi-spectral scanner (IRMSS), which is slightly looking forward (6º). The ground sampling distance (GSD) is 2.1m for the nadir image, 3.5m for the two oblique stereo images and 5.8m for the multispectral image. The evaluated ZY-3 imagery consists of a full set of threefold-stereo and a multi-spectral image covering an area of ca. 50km x 50km north-west of Barcelona, Spain. The complete photogrammetric processing chain was executed including image orientation, the generation of a digital surface model (DSM), radiometric image correction, pansharpening, orthoimage generation and digital stereo plotting. All 4 images are oriented by estimating affine transformation parameters between observed and nominal RPC (rational polynomial coefficients) image positions of 17 ground control points (GCP) and a subsequent calculation of refined RPC. From 10 independent check points RMS errors of 2.2m, 2.0m and 2.7m in X, Y and H are obtained. Subsequently, a DSM of 5m grid spacing is generated fully automatically. A comparison with the Lidar data results in an overall DSM accuracy of approximately 3m. In moderate and flat terrain higher accuracies in the order of 2.5m and better are achieved. In a next step orthoimages from the high resolution nadir image and the multispectral image are generated using the refined RPC geometry and the DSM. After radiometric corrections a fused high resolution colour orthoimage with 2.1m pixel size is created using an adaptive HSL method. The pansharpen process is performed after the individual geocorrection due to the different viewing angles between the two images. In a detailed analysis of the colour orthoimage artifacts are

  12. The influence of motor imagery on postural sway: Differential effects of type of body movement and person perspective

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stins, J.F.; Schneider, I.K.; Koole, S.L.; Beek, P.J.

    2015-01-01

    The present study examined the differential effects of kinesthetic imagery (first person perspective) and visual imagery (third person perspective) on postural sway during quiet standing. Based on an embodied cognition perspective, the authors predicted that kinesthetic imagery would lead to

  13. Alcohol imagery on popularly viewed television in the UK.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyons, Ailsa; McNeill, Ann; Britton, John

    2014-09-01

    Exposure to alcohol consumption and product imagery in films is associated with increased alcohol consumption among young people, but the extent to which exposure also occurs through television is not clear. We have measured the occurrence of alcohol imagery in prime-time broadcasting on UK free-to-air television channels. Occurrence of alcohol imagery (actual use, implied use, brand appearances or other reference to alcohol) was measured in all broadcasting on the five most popular UK television stations between 6 and 10 p.m. during 3 weeks in 2010, by 1-min interval coding. Alcohol imagery occurred in over 40% of broadcasts, most commonly soap operas, feature films, sport and comedies, and was equally frequent before and after the 9 p.m. watershed. Brand appearances occurred in 21% of programmes, and over half of all sports programmes, a third of soap operas and comedies and a fifth of advertising/trailers. Three brands, Heineken, Budweiser and Carlsberg together accounted for ∼40% of all brand depictions. Young people are exposed to frequent alcohol imagery, including branding, in UK prime-time television. It is likely that this exposure has an important effect on alcohol consumption in young people. © The Author 2013. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Faculty of Public Health.

  14. Mapping Crop Yield and Sow Date Using High Resolution Imagery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Royal, K.

    2015-12-01

    Keitasha Royal, Meha Jain, Ph.D., David Lobell, Ph.D Mapping Crop Yield and Sow Date Using High Resolution ImageryThe use of satellite imagery in agriculture is becoming increasingly more significant and valuable. Due to the emergence of new satellites, such as Skybox, these satellites provide higher resolution imagery (e.g 1m) therefore improving the ability to map smallholder agriculture. For the smallholder farm dominated area of northern India, Skybox high-resolution satellite imagery can aid in understanding how to improve farm yields. In particular, we are interested in mapping winter wheat in India, as this region produces approximately 80% of the country's wheat crop, which is important given that wheat is a staple crop that provides approximately 20% of household calories. In northeast India, the combination of increased heat stress, limited irrigation access, and the difficulty for farmers to access advanced farming technologies results in farmers only producing about 50% of their potential crop yield. The use of satellite imagery can aid in understanding wheat yields through time and help identify ways to increase crop yields in the wheat belt of India. To translate Skybox satellite data into meaningful information about wheat fields, we examine vegetation indices, such as the normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI), to measure the "greenness" of plants to help determine the health of the crops. We test our ability to predict crop characteristics, like sow date and yield, using vegetation indices of 59 fields for which we have field data in Bihar, India.

  15. An Adaptive Ship Detection Scheme for Spaceborne SAR Imagery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiangguang Leng

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available With the rapid development of spaceborne synthetic aperture radar (SAR and the increasing need of ship detection, research on adaptive ship detection in spaceborne SAR imagery is of great importance. Focusing on practical problems of ship detection, this paper presents a highly adaptive ship detection scheme for spaceborne SAR imagery. It is able to process a wide range of sensors, imaging modes and resolutions. Two main stages are identified in this paper, namely: ship candidate detection and ship discrimination. Firstly, this paper proposes an adaptive land masking method using ship size and pixel size. Secondly, taking into account the imaging mode, incidence angle, and polarization channel of SAR imagery, it implements adaptive ship candidate detection in spaceborne SAR imagery by applying different strategies to different resolution SAR images. Finally, aiming at different types of typical false alarms, this paper proposes a comprehensive ship discrimination method in spaceborne SAR imagery based on confidence level and complexity analysis. Experimental results based on RADARSAT-1, RADARSAT-2, TerraSAR-X, RS-1, and RS-3 images demonstrate that the adaptive scheme proposed in this paper is able to detect ship targets in a fast, efficient and robust way.

  16. A cognitive-psychological perspective on Gillespie's "Lights and lattices": some relations among perception, imagery, and thought.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunt, H

    1989-04-01

    George Gillespie's valuable observations on light and lattice imageries are played in the context of current research and theory on cognitive imagery (Kosslyn, Pylyshyn), ordinary and lucid dreaming, representational geometric imagery in scientific thought, the author's previous writings on altered states of consciousness, and Gibson's views on perception and imagery. Gillespie's reports show categories of imagery deconstruction and abstraction that link these areas and suggest an integrative model of the varieties of symbolic imagery.

  17. Our actions in my mind: Motor imagery of joint action

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vesper, Cordula; Knoblich, Günther; Sebanz, Natalie

    2014-01-01

    How do people imagine performing actions together? The present study investigated motor imagery of joint actions that requires integrating one's own and another's part of an action. In two experiments, individual participants imagined jumping alone or jointly next to an imagined partner. The joint...... condition required coordinating one's own imagined actions with an imagined partner's actions to synchronize landing times. We investigated whether the timing of participants' own imagined jumps would reflect the difference in jump distance to their imagined partner's jumps. The results showed...... that participants' jump imagery was indeed modulated to achieve coordination with an imagined task partner, confirming prior findings from a performance task. Moreover, when manipulating both target distance and target size, the same violation of Fitts' law reported for individual jumping was present in imagery...

  18. AUTOMATIC EXTRACTION OF BUILDING OUTLINE FROM HIGH RESOLUTION AERIAL IMAGERY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Wang

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, a new approach for automated extraction of building boundary from high resolution imagery is proposed. The proposed approach uses both geometric and spectral properties of a building to detect and locate buildings accurately. It consists of automatic generation of high quality point cloud from the imagery, building detection from point cloud, classification of building roof and generation of building outline. Point cloud is generated from the imagery automatically using semi-global image matching technology. Buildings are detected from the differential surface generated from the point cloud. Further classification of building roof is performed in order to generate accurate building outline. Finally classified building roof is converted into vector format. Numerous tests have been done on images in different locations and results are presented in the paper.

  19. Motor imagery enhancement paradigm using moving rubber hand illusion system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minsu Song; Jonghyun Kim

    2017-07-01

    Motor imagery (MI) has been widely used in neurorehabilitation and brain computer interface. The size of event-related desynchronization (ERD) is a key parameter for successful motor imaginary rehabilitation and BCI adaptation. Many studies have used visual guidance for enhancement/ amplification of motor imagery ERD amplitude, but their enhancements were not significant. We propose a novel ERD enhancing paradigm using body-ownership illusion, or also known as rubber hand illusion (RHI). The system was made by motorized, moving rubber hand which can simulate wrist extension. The amplifying effects of the proposed RHI paradigm were evaluated by comparing ERD sizes of the proposed paradigm with motor imagery and actual motor execution paradigms. The comparison result shows that the improvement of ERD size due to the proposed paradigm was statistically significant (pparadigms.

  20. Imagery and spatial processes in blindness and visual impairment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cattaneo, Zaira; Vecchi, Tomaso; Cornoldi, Cesare; Mammarella, Irene; Bonino, Daniela; Ricciardi, Emiliano; Pietrini, Pietro

    2008-10-01

    The objective of this review is to examine and evaluate recent findings on cognitive functioning (in particular imagery processes) in individuals with congenital visual impairments, including total blindness, low-vision and monocular vision. As one might expect, the performance of blind individuals in many behaviours and tasks requiring imagery can be inferior to that of sighted subjects; however, surprisingly often this is not the case. Interestingly, there is evidence that the blind often employ different cognitive mechanisms than sighted subjects, suggesting that compensatory mechanisms can overcome the limitations of sight loss. Taken together, these studies suggest that the nature of perceptual input on which we commonly rely strongly affects the organization of our mental processes. We also review recent neuroimaging studies on the neural correlates of sensory perception and mental imagery in visually impaired individuals that have cast light on the plastic functional reorganization mechanisms associated with visual deprivation.

  1. Towards the objective analysis of clouds from satellite imagery data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coakley, J. A., Jr.; Baldwin, D. G.

    1984-01-01

    It is suspected that clouds play a major role in climate dynamics. However, conclusive studies regarding the effects related to the cloud cover appear difficult because there is a lack of objective data. The present investigation is concerned with an objective scheme for deriving clouds and their properties from satellite imagery data for the oceans. The objective analysis makes use of the spatial coherence method for retrieving cloud cover from satellite imagery data. This method has advantages over other techniques often applied to imagery data. It is not necessary that clouds fill completely the observing instrument's field-of-view, and a priori or satellite derived knowledge of the cloud radiative properties is not needed.

  2. Phenomenology of passive multi-band submillimeter-wave imagery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enestam, Sissi; Kajatkari, Perttu; Kivimäki, Olli; Leivo, Mikko M.; Rautiainen, Anssi; Tamminen, Aleksi A.; Luukanen, Arttu R.

    2016-05-01

    In 2015, Asqella Oy commercialized a passive multi-band submillimeter-wave camera system intended for use in walk-by personnel security screening applications. In this paper we study the imagery acquired with the prototype of the ARGON passive multi-band submm-wave video camera. To challenge the system and test its limits, imagery has been obtained in various environments with varying background surface temperatures, with people of different body types, with different clothing materials and numbers of layers of clothing and with objects of different materials. In addition to the phenomenological study, we discuss the detection statistics of the system, evaluated by running blind trials with human operators. While significant improvements have been made particularly in the software side since the beginning of the testing, the obtained imagery enables a comprehensive evaluation of the capabilities and challenges of the multiband submillimeter-wave imaging system.

  3. The effects of imagery on fast isometric knee extensor torque development

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Ruiter, C.J.; Hutter, R.I.; Icke, C; Groen, B; Gemmink, A; Smilde, H; de Haan, A.

    2012-01-01

    We hypothesized that imagery training would improve fast onset of neuromuscular activation and thereby fast knee extensor isometric torque development. Forty young healthy participants not involved in strength training, were assigned to one of four groups: physical training, imagery training,

  4. Aerial Photography and Imagery, Ortho-Corrected - 2010 Digital Orthophotos - Calhoun County

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC Education | GIS Inventory — This metadata describes the digital ortho imagery covering Calhoun County, FL. This 1"=200' scale imagery is comprised of natural color orthophotography with a GSD...

  5. USGS Imagery Only Large-scale Base Map Service from The National Map

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The USGS Imagery Only Large service from The National Map (TNM) consists of National Agriculture Imagery Program (NAIP) and high resolution orthoimagery (HRO) that...

  6. Aerial Photography and Imagery, Ortho-Corrected - 2013 Digital Orthophotos - Franklin County

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC Education | GIS Inventory — This metadata describes the digital ortho imagery covering Franklin County, FL. This 1"=200' scale imagery is comprised of 24 bit natural color orthophotography with...

  7. Aerial Photography and Imagery, Ortho-Corrected - 2009 Digital Orthophotos - Glades County

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC Education | GIS Inventory — This metadata describes the digital ortho imagery covering Glades County, FL. This 1":200' scale imagery is comprised of natural color orthophotography with a GSD...

  8. Aerial Photography and Imagery, Ortho-Corrected - 2008 Digital Orthophotos - Lake County

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC Education | GIS Inventory — This metadata describes the digital ortho imagery for Lake County, FL. This 1":100' scale imagery is comprised of natural color orthophotography with a GSD (Ground...

  9. Aerial Photography and Imagery, Ortho-Corrected - 2013 Digital Orthophotos - Calhoun County

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC Education | GIS Inventory — This metadata describes the digital ortho imagery covering Calhoun and Gulf Counties, FL. This 1"=200' scale imagery is comprised of natural color orthoimagery with...

  10. Aerial Photography and Imagery, Ortho-Corrected - 2010 Digital Orthophotos - Union County

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC Education | GIS Inventory — This metadata describes the digital ortho imagery covering Union County, FL. This 1"=200' scale imagery is comprised of natural color orthophotography with a GSD...

  11. Aerial Photography and Imagery, Ortho-Corrected - 2008 Digital Orthophotos - Glades County

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC Education | GIS Inventory — This metadata describes the digital ortho imagery covering Glades and Hendry Counties, FL. This 1":200' scale imagery is comprised of natural color orthophotography...

  12. Decision Analysis Model for Refreshment of Geobase Imagery: Basis for Investment Strategy

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Craig, Matthew

    2003-01-01

    .... The accuracy of the imagery directly impacts the effectiveness of GeoBase. The purpose of this thesis was to develop a decision model to be used in determining imagery refreshment in an installation's...

  13. Aerial Photography and Imagery, Ortho-Corrected - 2008 Digital Orthophotos - Hendry County

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC Education | GIS Inventory — This metadata describes the digital ortho imagery covering Glades and Hendry Counties, FL. This 1":200' scale imagery is comprised of natural color orthophotography...

  14. Aerial Photography and Imagery, Ortho-Corrected - 2013 Digital Orthophotos - Liberty County

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC Education | GIS Inventory — This metadata describes the digital ortho imagery covering Liberty County, FL. This 1"=200' scale imagery is comprised of 24 bit natural color orthophotography with...

  15. Aerial Photography and Imagery, Ortho-Corrected - 2009 Digital Orthophotos - Bradford County

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC Education | GIS Inventory — This metadata describes the digital ortho imagery covering Bradford County, FL. This 1"=200' scale imagery is comprised of natural color orthophotography with a GSD...

  16. Aerial Photography and Imagery, Ortho-Corrected - 2010 Digital Orthophotos - Franklin County

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC Education | GIS Inventory — This metadata describes the digital ortho imagery covering Franklin County, FL. This 1"=200' scale imagery is comprised of natural color orthophotography with a GSD...

  17. Aerial Photography and Imagery, Ortho-Corrected - 2013 Digital Orthophotos - Gulf County

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC Education | GIS Inventory — This metadata describes the digital ortho imagery covering Calhoun and Gulf Counties, FL. This 1"=200' scale imagery is comprised of natural color orthoimagery with...

  18. Aerial Photography and Imagery, Ortho-Corrected - 2010 Digital Orthophotos - Liberty County

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC Education | GIS Inventory — This metadata describes the digital ortho imagery covering Liberty County, FL. This 1"=200' scale imagery is comprised of natural color orthophotography with a GSD...

  19. Object-Spatial Imagery and Verbal Cognitive Styles in High School Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haciomeroglu, Erhan Selcuk; LaVenia, Mark

    2017-06-01

    The present study investigated object-spatial imagery and verbal cognitive styles in high school students. We analyzed the relationships between cognitive styles, object imagery ability, spatial visualization ability, verbal-logical reasoning ability, and preferred modes of processing math information. Data were collected from 348 students at six high schools in two school districts. Spatial imagery style was not correlated with object imagery style and was negatively correlated with verbal style. Object imagery style did not correlate significantly with any cognitive ability measure, whereas spatial imagery style significantly correlated with object imagery ability, spatial visualization ability, and verbal-logical reasoning ability. Lastly, spatial imagery style and verbal-logical reasoning ability significantly predicted students' preference for efficient visual methods. The results support the cognitive style model, in which visualizers are characterized as two distinct groups who process visual-spatial information and graphic tasks in different ways.

  20. Using GIS databases for simulated nightlight imagery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zollweg, Joshua D.; Gartley, Michael; Roskovensky, John; Mercier, Jeffery

    2012-06-01

    Proposed is a new technique for simulating nighttime scenes with realistically-modelled urban radiance. While nightlight imagery is commonly used to measure urban sprawl,1 it is uncommon to use urbanization as metric to develop synthetic nighttime scenes. In the developed methodology, the open-source Open Street Map (OSM) Geographic Information System (GIS) database is used. The database is comprised of many nodes, which are used to dene the position of dierent types of streets, buildings, and other features. These nodes are the driver used to model urban nightlights, given several assumptions. The rst assumption is that the spatial distribution of nodes is closely related to the spatial distribution of nightlights. Work by Roychowdhury et al has demonstrated the relationship between urban lights and development. 2 So, the real assumption being made is that the density of nodes corresponds to development, which is reasonable. Secondly, the local density of nodes must relate directly to the upwelled radiance within the given locality. Testing these assumptions using Albuquerque and Indianapolis as example cities revealed that dierent types of nodes produce more realistic results than others. Residential street nodes oered the best performance for any single node type, among the types tested in this investigation. Other node types, however, still provide useful supplementary data. Using streets and buildings dened in the OSM database allowed automated generation of simulated nighttime scenes of Albuquerque and Indianapolis in the Digital Imaging and Remote Sensing Image Generation (DIRSIG) model. The simulation was compared to real data from the recently deployed National Polar-orbiting Operational Environmental Satellite System(NPOESS) Visible Infrared Imager Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) platform. As a result of the comparison, correction functions were used to correct for discrepancies between simulated and observed radiance. Future work will include investigating more

  1. Development of a multispectral imagery device devoted to weed detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vioix, Jean-Baptiste; Douzals, Jean-Paul; Truchetet, Frederic; Navar, Pierre

    2003-04-01

    Multispectral imagery is a large domain with number of practical applications: thermography, quality control in industry, food science and agronomy, etc. The main interest is to obtain spectral information of the objects for which reflectance signal can be associated with physical, chemical and/or biological properties. Agronomic applications of multispectral imagery generally involve the acquisition of several images in the wavelengths of visible and near infrared. This paper will first present different kind of multispectral devices used for agronomic issues and will secondly introduce an original multispectral design based on a single CCD. Third, early results obtained for weed detection are presented.

  2. Autonomy of imagery and production of original verbal images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khatena, J

    1976-08-01

    90 college students (31 men and 59 women) were categorized as moderately autonomous, less autonomous (less highly controlled) and non-autonomous (high controlled) imagers according to the Gordon Test of Visual Imagery Control Moderately autonomous imagers produced significantly more original verbal images than less autonomous and non-autonomous imagers with less autonomous imagers scoring higher than non-autonomous imagers as measured by Onomatopoeia and Images. There were no significant sex main effects of interaction of autonomy of imagery level X sex.

  3. Biomass burning - Combustion emissions, satellite imagery, and biogenic emissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levine, Joel S.; Cofer, Wesley R., III; Winstead, Edward L.; Rhinehart, Robert P.; Cahoon, Donald R., Jr.; Sebacher, Daniel I.; Sebacher, Shirley; Stocks, Brian J.

    1991-01-01

    After detailing a technique for the estimation of the instantaneous emission of trace gases produced by biomass burning, using satellite imagery, attention is given to the recent discovery that burning results in significant enhancement of biogenic emissions of N2O, NO, and CH4. Biomass burning accordingly has an immediate and long-term impact on the production of atmospheric trace gases. It is presently demonstrated that satellite imagery of fires may be used to estimate combustion emissions, and could be used to estimate long-term postburn biogenic emission of trace gases to the atmosphere.

  4. Wedding Imagery and Public Support for Gay Marriage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brewer, Paul R; Wilson, David C; Habegger, Michael

    2016-08-01

    This study uses an experiment embedded in a large, nationally representative survey to test whether exposure to imagery of a gay or lesbian couple's wedding influences support for gay marriage. It also tests whether any such effects depend on the nature of the image (gay or lesbian couple, kissing or not) and viewer characteristics (sex, age, race, education, religion, and ideology). Results show that exposure to imagery of a gay couple kissing reduced support for gay marriage relative to the baseline. Other image treatments (gay couple not kissing, lesbian couple kissing, lesbian couple not kissing) did not significantly influence opinion.

  5. Contrast and Strength of Visual Memory and Imagery Differentially Affect Visual Perception

    OpenAIRE

    Saad, Elyana; Silvanto, Juha

    2013-01-01

    Visual short-term memory (VSTM) and visual imagery have been shown to modulate visual perception. However, how the subjective experience of VSTM/imagery and its contrast modulate this process has not been investigated. We addressed this issue by asking participants to detect brief masked targets while they were engaged either in VSTM or visual imagery. Subjective experience of memory/imagery (strength scale), and the visual contrast of the memory/mental image (contrast scale) were assessed on...

  6. Sport-related differences in type and amount of mental imagery use ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The study also provided evidence of the role of mental imagery ability and social desirability in reported use of mental imagery. The findings are discussed with reference to the existing literature on the use of mental imagery in sport and implications for the practice of sport psychology. South African Journal for Research in ...

  7. Symbolic water imagery in the drama of J. P. Clark-Bekederemo ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Hinged on the theory of imagery, the study observes that Clark-Bekederemo is adept at manipulating locally-derived imagery in his drama, and that water imagery forms the nucleus of that local imagination. The study discovers that the symbolic water images used in the plays are largely conventional, but that in spite of their ...

  8. Visual imagery influences brain responses to visual stimulation in bilateral cortical blindness

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Gelder, Beatrice; Tamietto, M.; Pegna, A.J.; van den Stock, J.B.

    2015-01-01

    Mental imagery is a powerful mechanism that may facilitate visual perception as well as compensate for it. The role of V1 in mental imagery is still a matter of debate. Our goal here was to investigate whether visual imagery was still possible in case of bilateral V1 destruction behaviorally

  9. PHOTOGRAMMETRIC MEASUREMENTS IN FIXED WING UAV IMAGERY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Gülch

    2012-07-01

    usage of GCPs for all projects, independent on the application. The effort is estimated to be even higher as expected, as also self-calibration will be an issue to handle a possibly instable camera calibration. To overcome some of the encountered problems with the very specific features of UAV flights a software UAVision was developed based on Open Source libraries to produce input data for bundle adjustment of UAV images by PAMS. The empirical test results show a considerable improvement in the matching of tie points. The results do, however, show that the Open Source bundle adjustment was not applicable to this type of imagery. This still leaves the possibility to use the improved tie point correspondences in the commercial AT package.

  10. Reading pictures for story comprehension requires mental imagery skills

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boerma, I.E.; Mol, S.E.; Jolles, J.

    2016-01-01

    We examined the role of mental imagery skills on story comprehension in 150 fifth graders (10- to 12-year-olds), when reading a narrative book chapter with alternating words and pictures (i.e., text blocks were alternated by one- or two-page picture spreads). A parallel group design was used, in

  11. Adding Insult to Imagery? Art Education and Censorship

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sweeny, Robert W.

    2007-01-01

    The "Adding Insult to Imagery? Artistic Responses to Censorship and Mass-Media" exhibition opened in January 16, 2006, Kipp Gallery on the Indiana University of Pennsylvania campus. Eleven gallery-based works, 9 videos, and 10 web-based artworks comprised the show; each dealt with the relationship between censorship and mass mediated…

  12. Large scale track analysis for wide area motion imagery surveillance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leeuwen, C.J. van; Huis, J.R. van; Baan, J.

    2016-01-01

    Wide Area Motion Imagery (WAMI) enables image based surveillance of areas that can cover multiple square kilometers. Interpreting and analyzing information from such sources, becomes increasingly time consuming as more data is added from newly developed methods for information extraction. Captured

  13. Trauma, imagery and the therapeutic relationship: Langu's story ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The case narrative provides a source for examining many aspects of the psychological impact of trauma and the path to healing, as well as the dilemmas and challenges faced by therapists working with traumatised individuals. Keywords: acute stress disorder, case narrative, case study, cognitive therapy, guided imagery, ...

  14. Hearing Story Characters' Voices: Auditory Imagery during Reading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunraj, Danielle N.; Klin, Celia M.

    2012-01-01

    Despite the longstanding belief in an inner voice, there is surprisingly little known about the perceptual features of that voice during text processing. This article asked whether readers infer nonlinguistic phonological features, such as speech rate, associated with a character's speech. Previous evidence for this type of auditory imagery has…

  15. The Role of Imagery in the Production of Written Definitions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goetz, Ernest T.; Sadoski, Mark; Stricker, Andrew G.; White, Teresa S.; Wang, Zhongmiao

    2007-01-01

    The effect of word concreteness and imagery on the production of written definitions was investigated using procedures designed to produce more generalizable results than previous investigations. A random sample of words was drawn from the Paivio, Yuille, and Madigan (1968) norms, and college undergraduates were presented with a randomly selected,…

  16. Information from imagery: ISPRS scientific vision and research agenda

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jun; Dowman, Ian; Li, Songnian; Li, Zhilin; Madden, Marguerite; Mills, Jon; Paparoditis, Nicolas; Rottensteiner, Franz; Sester, Monika; Toth, Charles; Trinder, John; Heipke, Christian

    2016-05-01

    With the increased availability of very high-resolution satellite imagery, terrain based imaging and participatory sensing, inexpensive platforms, and advanced information and communication technologies, the application of imagery is now ubiquitous, playing an important role in many aspects of life and work today. As a leading organisation in this field, the International Society for Photogrammetry and Remote Sensing (ISPRS) has been devoted to effectively and efficiently obtaining and utilising information from imagery since its foundation in the year 1910. This paper examines the significant challenges currently facing ISPRS and its communities, such as providing high-quality information, enabling advanced geospatial computing, and supporting collaborative problem solving. The state-of-the-art in ISPRS related research and development is reviewed and the trends and topics for future work are identified. By providing an overarching scientific vision and research agenda, we hope to call on and mobilise all ISPRS scientists, practitioners and other stakeholders to continue improving our understanding and capacity on information from imagery and to deliver advanced geospatial knowledge that enables humankind to better deal with the challenges ahead, posed for example by global change, ubiquitous sensing, and a demand for real-time information generation.

  17. Modeling woody vegetation resources using Landsat TM imagery in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Modeling woody vegetation resources using Landsat TM imagery in northern Namibia. Alex Verlinden, Risto Laamanen. Abstract. In 1995 a forest inventory covering northern Namibia was initiated, based on stratified systematic field sampling of plots with a radius of up to 30 m. In these plots detailed tree parameters were ...

  18. Neural Encoding of Auditory Features during Music Perception and Imagery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Stephanie; Mikutta, Christian; Leonard, Matthew K; Hungate, Dylan; Koelsch, Stefan; Shamma, Shihab; Chang, Edward F; Millán, José Del R; Knight, Robert T; Pasley, Brian N

    2017-10-27

    Despite many behavioral and neuroimaging investigations, it remains unclear how the human cortex represents spectrotemporal sound features during auditory imagery, and how this representation compares to auditory perception. To assess this, we recorded electrocorticographic signals from an epileptic patient with proficient music ability in 2 conditions. First, the participant played 2 piano pieces on an electronic piano with the sound volume of the digital keyboard on. Second, the participant replayed the same piano pieces, but without auditory feedback, and the participant was asked to imagine hearing the music in his mind. In both conditions, the sound output of the keyboard was recorded, thus allowing precise time-locking between the neural activity and the spectrotemporal content of the music imagery. This novel task design provided a unique opportunity to apply receptive field modeling techniques to quantitatively study neural encoding during auditory mental imagery. In both conditions, we built encoding models to predict high gamma neural activity (70-150 Hz) from the spectrogram representation of the recorded sound. We found robust spectrotemporal receptive fields during auditory imagery with substantial, but not complete overlap in frequency tuning and cortical location compared to receptive fields measured during auditory perception. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  19. Figurative and symbolic function of animal imagery in packaging ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper sets out to discuss how the Shona and Ndebele people of Zimbabwe make use of animal imagery to refer to human behaviour and habits in various situations. In this context, animal traits are drawn from both domestic and wild animals. A discussion of such a conception of human behaviour shall demonstrate ...

  20. Cerebral correlates of motor imagery of normal and precision gait

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bakker, M.; Lange, F.P. de; Helmich, R.C.G.; Scheeringa, R.; Bloem, B.R.; Toni, I.

    2008-01-01

    We have examined the cerebral structures involved in motor imagery of normal and precision gait (i.e., gait requiring precise foot placement and increased postural control). We recorded cerebral activity with functional magnetic resonance imaging while subjects imagined walking along paths of two

  1. Tamarisk Mapping and Monitoring Using High Resolution Satellite Imagery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jason W. San Souci; John T. Doyle

    2006-01-01

    QuickBird high resolution multispectral satellite imagery (60 cm GSD, 4 spectral bands) and calibrated products from DigitalGlobe’s AgroWatch program were used as inputs to Visual Learning System’s Feature Analyst automated feature extraction software to map localized occurrences of pervasive and aggressive Tamarisk (Tamarix ramosissima), an invasive...

  2. Fast natural color mapping for night-time imagery

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hogervorst, M.A.; Toet, A.

    2010-01-01

    We present a new method to render multi-band night-time imagery (images from sensors whose sensitive range does not necessarily coincide with the visual part of the electromagnetic spectrum, e.g. image intensifiers, thermal camera's) in natural daytime colors. The color mapping is derived from the

  3. Bilge dump detection from SAR imagery using local binary patterns

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Mdakane, LW

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available 2015: Remote Sensing: Understanding the Earth for a Safer World, Milan, Italy, 26-31 July 2015 Bilge dump detection from SAR imagery using local binary patterns yz L.W. Mdakane,yz W. Kleynhans,yz C.P. Schwegmann yDepartment of Electrical...

  4. Win-win Imageries in a Soap Bubble World

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ekman, Susanne

    2015-01-01

    This article explores the imagery and notions of personhood underlying the willingness to undertake extreme work among creative knowledge workers. The core argument is that extreme work is informed by pervasive win-win fantasies which can be recognized in a number of current organizational trends...

  5. Imagery Rescripting of Early Traumatic Memories in Social Phobia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wild, Jennifer; Clark, David M.

    2011-01-01

    Negative self-images appear to play a role in the maintenance of social phobia and research suggests they are often linked to earlier memories of socially traumatic events. Imagery rescripting is a clinical intervention that aims to update such unpleasant or traumatic memories, and is increasingly being incorporated in cognitive behavioral therapy…

  6. Beyond NDVI: Extraction of biophysical variables from remote sensing imagery

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Clevers, J.G.P.W.

    2014-01-01

    This chapter provides an overview of methods used for the extraction of biophysical vegetation variables from remote sensing imagery. It starts with the description of the main spectral regions in the optical window of the electromagnetic spectrum based on typical spectral signatures of land

  7. Impaired motor imagery in right hemiparetic cerebral palsy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mutsaarts, M.J.H.; Steenbergen, B.; Bekkering, H.

    2007-01-01

    It is generally assumed that movements of a part of the body (e.g., hands) are simulated in motor imagery (MI) tasks. This is evidenced by a linear increase in reaction time as a function of the angular rotation of the stimulus. Under the assumption that MI plays a critical role for anticipatory

  8. Feature Masking in Computer Game Promotes Visual Imagery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Glenn Gordon; Morey, Jim; Tjoe, Edwin

    2007-01-01

    Can learning of mental imagery skills for visualizing shapes be accelerated with feature masking? Chemistry, physics fine arts, military tactics, and laparoscopic surgery often depend on mentally visualizing shapes in their absence. Does working with "spatial feature-masks" (skeletal shapes, missing key identifying portions) encourage people to…

  9. The Evaluation of High Resolution Aerial Imagery for Monitoring of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The Royal Natal National Park and the Rugged Glen Nature Reserve are part of the uKhahlamba Drakensberg Park (UDP) World Heritage Site and have infestations of bracken fern (Pteridium aquilinum [L.] Kuhn). Prior image classification research on bracken fern were constrained by low resolution satellite imagery and ...

  10. Gestalt Imagery: A Critical Factor in Language Comprehension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, Nanci

    1991-01-01

    Lack of gestalt imagery (the ability to create imaged wholes) can contribute to language comprehension disorder characterized by weak reading comprehension, weak oral language comprehension, weak oral language expression, weak written language expression, difficulty following directions, and a weak sense of humor. Sequential stimulation using an…

  11. Reading Pictures for Story Comprehension Requires Mental Imagery Skills

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boerma, Inouk E; Mol, Suzanne E; Jolles, Jelle

    2016-01-01

    We examined the role of mental imagery skills on story comprehension in 150 fifth graders (10- to 12-year-olds), when reading a narrative book chapter with alternating words and pictures (i.e., text blocks were alternated by one- or two-page picture spreads). A parallel group design was used, in

  12. Burn severity mapping using simulation modeling and satellite imagery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eva C. Karau; Robert E. Keane

    2010-01-01

    Although burn severity maps derived from satellite imagery provide a landscape view of fire impacts, fire effects simulation models can provide spatial fire severity estimates and add a biotic context in which to interpret severity. In this project, we evaluated two methods of mapping burn severity in the context of rapid post-fire assessment for four wildfires in...

  13. Satellite Imagery Analysis for Automated Global Food Security Forecasting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moody, D.; Brumby, S. P.; Chartrand, R.; Keisler, R.; Mathis, M.; Beneke, C. M.; Nicholaeff, D.; Skillman, S.; Warren, M. S.; Poehnelt, J.

    2017-12-01

    The recent computing performance revolution has driven improvements in sensor, communication, and storage technology. Multi-decadal remote sensing datasets at the petabyte scale are now available in commercial clouds, with new satellite constellations generating petabytes/year of daily high-resolution global coverage imagery. Cloud computing and storage, combined with recent advances in machine learning, are enabling understanding of the world at a scale and at a level of detail never before feasible. We present results from an ongoing effort to develop satellite imagery analysis tools that aggregate temporal, spatial, and spectral information and that can scale with the high-rate and dimensionality of imagery being collected. We focus on the problem of monitoring food crop productivity across the Middle East and North Africa, and show how an analysis-ready, multi-sensor data platform enables quick prototyping of satellite imagery analysis algorithms, from land use/land cover classification and natural resource mapping, to yearly and monthly vegetative health change trends at the structural field level.

  14. Crowdsourcing earthquake damage assessment using remote sensing imagery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stuart Gill

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes the evolution of recent work on using crowdsourced analysis of remote sensing imagery, particularly high-resolution aerial imagery, to provide rapid, reliable assessments of damage caused by earthquakes and potentially other disasters. The initial effort examined online imagery taken after the 2008 Wenchuan, China, earthquake. A more recent response to the 2010 Haiti earthquake led to the formation of an international consortium: the Global Earth Observation Catastrophe Assessment Network (GEO-CAN. The success of GEO-CAN in contributing to the official damage assessments made by the Government of Haiti, the United Nations, and the World Bank led to further development of a web-based interface. A current initiative in Christchurch, New Zealand, is underway where remote sensing experts are analyzing satellite imagery, geotechnical engineers are marking liquefaction areas, and structural engineers are identifying building damage. The current site includes online training to improve the accuracy of the assessments and make it possible for even novice users to contribute to the crowdsourced solution. The paper discusses lessons learned from these initiatives and presents a way forward for using crowdsourced remote sensing as a tool for rapid assessment of damage caused by natural disasters around the world.

  15. Neural dissociations between action verb understanding and motor imagery

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Willems, R.M.; Toni, I.; Hagoort, P.; Casasanto, D.

    2010-01-01

    According to embodied theories of language, people understand a verb like throw, at least in part, by mentally simulating throwing. This implicit simulation is often assumed to be similar or identical to motor imagery. Here we used fMRI to test whether implicit simulations of actions during language

  16. Neural Dissociations between Action Verb Understanding and Motor Imagery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willems, Roel M.; Toni, Ivan; Hagoort, Peter; Casasanto, Daniel

    2010-01-01

    According to embodied theories of language, people understand a verb like "throw", at least in part, by mentally simulating "throwing". This implicit simulation is often assumed to be similar or identical to motor imagery. Here we used fMRI to test whether implicit simulations of actions during language understanding involve the same cortical…

  17. Neural Dissociations between Action Verb Understanding and Motor Imagery

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Willems, R.M.; Toni, I.; Hagoort, P.; Casasanto, D.

    2010-01-01

    According to embodied theories of language, people understand a verb like throw, at least in part, by mentally simulating throwing. This implicit simulation is often assumed to be similar or identical to motor imagery. Here we used fMRI to test whether implicit simulations of actions during language

  18. Understanding Mnemonic Imagery Effects: A Dozen "Obvious" Outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levin, Joel R.; Pressley, Michael

    Using Atkinson's Keyword Method--an imagery mnemonic for vocabulary learning--as a vehicle, this paper argues that even the most well-reasoned and explainable psychological outcomes need to be validated empirically. The paper provides 12 examples of applications of the keyword method in which an eminently reasonable cognitive outcome was…

  19. Deconstructing visual imagery by the mentally retarded: Implications ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Deconstructing visual imagery by the mentally retarded: Implications for methodology theory. A Mamvuto. Abstract. No Abstract. Zimbabwe Journal of Educational Research Vol. 18 (1) March 2006: 50-89. Full Text: EMAIL FULL TEXT EMAIL FULL TEXT · DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT.

  20. Picture This: A Dissertation Examining Children's Quantitative Mental Imagery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Jonathan Norris

    2010-01-01

    This dissertation examines the manner in which young school-age children construct quantitative mental imagery and act upon these constructions for arithmetic ends. After conducting dyadic teaching experiments with three first grade students who were participating in mathematics intervention, I found the connection between the participants'…

  1. IOT and E of an AWADS Radar Imagery Recorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    1975-05-01

    Attn: DOQ, Scott AFB, IL 62225. MAC ltr, 28 Aug 1975 MAC PROJECT 74C-110U IOT &E OF AN AW ADS RADAR IMAGERY RECORDER IOT &E FINAL REPORT May 1975...Paragraph 1. Introduction 1 2. Purpose of IOT §E 1 3. Method of Accomplishment 2 4. Results and Discussion 3 5. Integration Into Force Structure 23

  2. Encoding and analyzing aerial imagery using geospatial semantic graphs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Watson, Jean-Paul; Strip, David R.; McLendon, William Clarence,; Parekh, Ojas D.; Diegert, Carl F.; Martin, Shawn Bryan; Rintoul, Mark Daniel

    2014-02-01

    While collection capabilities have yielded an ever-increasing volume of aerial imagery, analytic techniques for identifying patterns in and extracting relevant information from this data have seriously lagged. The vast majority of imagery is never examined, due to a combination of the limited bandwidth of human analysts and limitations of existing analysis tools. In this report, we describe an alternative, novel approach to both encoding and analyzing aerial imagery, using the concept of a geospatial semantic graph. The advantages of our approach are twofold. First, intuitive templates can be easily specified in terms of the domain language in which an analyst converses. These templates can be used to automatically and efficiently search large graph databases, for specific patterns of interest. Second, unsupervised machine learning techniques can be applied to automatically identify patterns in the graph databases, exposing recurring motifs in imagery. We illustrate our approach using real-world data for Anne Arundel County, Maryland, and compare the performance of our approach to that of an expert human analyst.

  3. Similarities between explicit and implicit motor imagery in mental rotation of hands: an EEG study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osuagwu, Bethel A; Vuckovic, Aleksandra

    2014-12-01

    Chronometric and imaging studies have shown that motor imagery is used implicitly during mental rotation tasks in which subjects for example judge the laterality of human hand pictures at various orientations. Since explicit motor imagery is known to activate the sensorimotor areas of the cortex, mental rotation is expected to do similar if it involves a form of motor imagery. So far, functional magnetic resonance imaging and positron emission tomography have been used to study mental rotation and less attention has been paid to electroencephalogram (EEG) which offers a high time-frequency resolution. The time-frequency analysis is an established method for studying explicit motor imagery. Although hand mental rotation is claimed to involve motor imagery, the time-frequency characteristics of mental rotation have never been compared with those of explicit motor imagery. In this study, time-frequency responses of EEG recorded during explicit motor imagery and during a mental rotation task, inducing implicit motor imagery, were compared. Fifteen right-handed healthy volunteers performed motor imagery of hands in one condition and hand laterality judgement tasks in another while EEG of the whole head was recorded. The hand laterality judgement was the mental rotation task used to induce implicit motor imagery. The time-frequency analysis and sLORETA localisation of the EEG showed that the activities in the sensorimotor areas had similar spatial and time-frequency characteristics in explicit motor imagery and implicit motor imagery conditions. Furthermore this sensorimotor activity was different for the left and for the right hand in both explicit and implicit motor imagery. This result supports that motor imagery is used during mental rotation and that it can be detected and studied with EEG technology. This result should encourage the use of mental rotation of body parts in rehabilitation programmes in a similar manner as motor imagery. Copyright © 2014. Published

  4. GATE: computation code for medical imagery, radiotherapy and dosimetry; GATE: code de calcul pour l'imagerie medicale, la radiotherapie et la dosimetrie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jan, S. [CEA Direction des Sciences du Vivant, Institut d ' Imagerie Bio-Medicale, Service Hospitalier Frederic Joliot, 4 pl. du Gn. Leclerc 91401 Orsay Cedex (France)

    2010-07-01

    The author presents the GATE code, a simulation software based on the Geant4 development environment developed by the CERN (the European organization for nuclear research) which enables Monte-Carlo type simulation to be developed for tomography imagery using ionizing radiation, and radiotherapy examinations (conventional and hadron therapy) to be simulated. The authors concentrate on the use of medical imagery in carcinology. They comment some results obtained in nuclear imagery and in radiotherapy

  5. IAEA Safeguards: Cost/benefit analysis of commercial satellite imagery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andersson, Christer

    1999-03-01

    A major milestone in the efforts to strengthen the Safeguards System was reached in May 1997 when the Board of Governors approved a 'Model Protocol Additional to Safeguards Agreements'. The Protocol provides the legal basis necessary to enhance the Agency's ability to detect undeclared nuclear material and activities by using information available from open sources to complement the declarations made by Member States. Commercially available high-resolution satellite data has emerged as one potential complementary open information source to support the traditional and extended Safeguard activities of IAEA. This document constitutes a first report from SSC Satellitbild giving the Agency tentative and initial estimates of the potential cost and time-savings possible with the new proposed technology. The initial cost/benefit simulation will be further finalised in the following 'Implementation Blueprint' study. The general foundation and starting point for the cost/benefit calculation is to simulate a new efficient and relatively small 'imagery unit' within the IAEA, capable of performing advanced image processing as a tool for various safeguards tasks. The image processing capacity is suggested to be task- and interpretation-oriented. The study was performed over a period of 1,5 weeks in late 1998, and is based upon interviews of IAEA staff, reviews of existing IAEA documentation as well as from SSC Satellitbild's long-standing experience of satellite imagery and field missions. The cost/benefit analysis is based on a spreadsheet simulation of five potential applications of commercial satellite imagery: Reference information; Confirmation of Agency acquired and Member State supplied data; Change detection and on-going monitoring; Assessing open source information available to the Agency; Detecting undeclared activities and undeclared sites. The study confirms that the proposed concept of a relatively small 'imagery unit' using high-resolution data will be a sound and

  6. IAEA Safeguards: Cost/benefit analysis of commercial satellite imagery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andersson, Christer [SSC Satellitbild AB, Kiruna (Sweden)

    1999-03-01

    A major milestone in the efforts to strengthen the Safeguards System was reached in May 1997 when the Board of Governors approved a `Model Protocol Additional to Safeguards Agreements`. The Protocol provides the legal basis necessary to enhance the Agency`s ability to detect undeclared nuclear material and activities by using information available from open sources to complement the declarations made by Member States. Commercially available high-resolution satellite data has emerged as one potential complementary open information source to support the traditional and extended Safeguard activities of IAEA. This document constitutes a first report from SSC Satellitbild giving the Agency tentative and initial estimates of the potential cost and time-savings possible with the new proposed technology. The initial cost/benefit simulation will be further finalised in the following `Implementation Blueprint` study. The general foundation and starting point for the cost/benefit calculation is to simulate a new efficient and relatively small `imagery unit` within the IAEA, capable of performing advanced image processing as a tool for various safeguards tasks. The image processing capacity is suggested to be task- and interpretation-oriented. The study was performed over a period of 1,5 weeks in late 1998, and is based upon interviews of IAEA staff, reviews of existing IAEA documentation as well as from SSC Satellitbild`s long-standing experience of satellite imagery and field missions. The cost/benefit analysis is based on a spreadsheet simulation of five potential applications of commercial satellite imagery: Reference information; Confirmation of Agency acquired and Member State supplied data; Change detection and on-going monitoring; Assessing open source information available to the Agency; Detecting undeclared activities and undeclared sites. The study confirms that the proposed concept of a relatively small `imagery unit` using high-resolution data will be a sound and

  7. The lagoon a study in imagery The lagoon a study in imagery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmen Gago Alvarez

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this paper is to prove that, through exuberant sensuous imagery - the strange tropical setting, the mystery of elements, light and darkness - Joseph Conrad, in his short-story "The Lagoon" describes and transmits Impressionistically, the dramatic story of a men surprised by his own act of cowardice, a man divided between loyalty to his own blood and love. This man, Arsat suffers a blockaded feeling towards himself because he failed to act when he had the occasion, and he missed it: he left his brother to die in the hands of the enemy while he. Arsat, escaped with his love Diamelen, to live in the "shadows" of "The Lagoon" - his own psychological, subconscious guilty conscience. The story starts with a description of nature, as motionless, and undefined as the plot still is: The forests, somber and dull, stood motionless and silent... In the stillness of the air ... minute blossoms seemed do have been bewitched into an immobility perfect and final. Nothing moved on the river (1 The purpose of this paper is to prove that, through exuberant sensuous imagery - the strange tropical setting, the mystery of elements, light and darkness - Joseph Conrad, in his short-story "The Lagoon" describes and transmits Impressionistically, the dramatic story of a men surprised by his own act of cowardice, a man divided between loyalty to his own blood and love. This man, Arsat suffers a blockaded feeling towards himself because he failed to act when he had the occasion, and he missed it: he left his brother to die in the hands of the enemy while he. Arsat, escaped with his love Diamelen, to live in the "shadows" of "The Lagoon" - his own psychological, subconscious guilty conscience. The story starts with a description of nature, as motionless, and undefined as the plot still is: The forests, somber and dull, stood motionless and silent... In the stillness of the air ... minute blossoms seemed do have been bewitched into an

  8. Assessing the value of Landsat imagery: Results from a 2012 comprehensive user survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, H. M.; Richardson, L.; Loomis, J.; Koontz, S.; Koontz, L.

    2012-12-01

    Landsat satellite imagery has long been recognized as unique among remotely sensed data due to the combination of its extensive archive, global coverage, and relatively high spatial and temporal resolution. Since the imagery became available at no cost in 2008, the number of users registered with the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) has increased tenfold while the number of scenes downloaded annually has increased a hundredfold. It is clear that the imagery is being used extensively, and understanding the benefits provided by this imagery can help inform decisions involving its provision. However, the value of Landsat imagery is difficult to measure for a variety of reasons, one of which stems from the fact that the imagery has characteristics of a public good and does not have a direct market price to reflect its value to society. Further, there is not a clear understanding of the full range of users of the imagery, as well as how these users are distributed across the many different end uses this data is applied to. To assess the value of Landsat imagery, we conducted a survey of users registered with USGS in early 2012. Over 11,000 current users of Landsat imagery responded to the survey. The value of the imagery was measured both qualitatively and quantitatively. To explore the qualitative value of the imagery, users were asked about the importance of the imagery to their work, their dependence on the imagery, and the impacts on their work if there was no Landsat imagery. The majority of users deemed Landsat imagery important to their work and stated they were dependent on Landsat imagery to do their work. Additionally, if Landsat imagery was no longer available, over half of the users would have to discontinue some of their work. On average, these users would discontinue half of their current work if the imagery was no longer available. The focus of this presentation will be the quantitative results of a double-bounded contingent valuation analysis which reveals

  9. Monitoring Areal Snow Cover Using NASA Satellite Imagery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harshburger, Brian J.; Blandford, Troy; Moore, Brandon

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this project is to develop products and tools to assist in the hydrologic modeling process, including tools to help prepare inputs for hydrologic models and improved methods for the visualization of streamflow forecasts. In addition, this project will facilitate the use of NASA satellite imagery (primarily snow cover imagery) by other federal and state agencies with operational streamflow forecasting responsibilities. A GIS software toolkit for monitoring areal snow cover extent and producing streamflow forecasts is being developed. This toolkit will be packaged as multiple extensions for ArcGIS 9.x and an opensource GIS software package. The toolkit will provide users with a means for ingesting NASA EOS satellite imagery (snow cover analysis), preparing hydrologic model inputs, and visualizing streamflow forecasts. Primary products include a software tool for predicting the presence of snow under clouds in satellite images; a software tool for producing gridded temperature and precipitation forecasts; and a suite of tools for visualizing hydrologic model forecasting results. The toolkit will be an expert system designed for operational users that need to generate accurate streamflow forecasts in a timely manner. The Remote Sensing of Snow Cover Toolbar will ingest snow cover imagery from multiple sources, including the MODIS Operational Snowcover Data and convert them to gridded datasets that can be readily used. Statistical techniques will then be applied to the gridded snow cover data to predict the presence of snow under cloud cover. The toolbar has the ability to ingest both binary and fractional snow cover data. Binary mapping techniques use a set of thresholds to determine whether a pixel contains snow or no snow. Fractional mapping techniques provide information regarding the percentage of each pixel that is covered with snow. After the imagery has been ingested, physiographic data is attached to each cell in the snow cover image. This data

  10. Evaluation and comparison of effective connectivity during simple and compound limb motor imagery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Weibo; Zhang, Lixin; Wang, Kun; Xiao, Xiaolin; He, Feng; Zhao, Xin; Qi, Hongzhi; Zhou, Peng; Wan, Baikun; Ming, Dong

    2014-01-01

    Motor imagery (MI) has been demonstrated beneficial in motor rehabilitation in patients with movement disorders. In contrast with simple limb motor imagery, less work was reported about the effective connectivity networks of compound limb motor imagery which involves several parts of limbs. This work aimed to investigate the differences of information flow patterns between simple limb motor imagery and compound limb motor imagery. Ten subjects participated in the experiment involving three tasks of simple limb motor imagery (left hand, right hand, feet) and three tasks of compound limb motor imagery (both hands, left hand combined with right foot, right hand combined with left foot). The causal interactions among different neural regions were evaluated by Short-time Directed Transfer Function (SDTF). Quite different from the networks of simple limb motor imagery, more effective interactions overlying larger brain regions were observed during compound limb motor imagery. These results imply that there exist significant differences in the patterns of EEG activity flow between simple limb motor imagery and compound limb motor imagery, which present more complex networks and could be utilized in motor rehabilitation for more benefit in patients with movement disorders.

  11. Do the physical and environment PETTLEP elements predict sport imagery ability?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anuar, Nurwina; Williams, Sarah E; Cumming, Jennifer

    2017-11-01

    The present study aimed to examine whether physical and environment elements of PETTLEP imagery relate to the ability to image five types of sport imagery (i.e. skill, strategy, goal, affect and mastery). Two hundred and ninety participants (152 males, 148 females; M age  = 20.24 years, SD = 4.36) from various sports completed the Sport Imagery Ability Questionnaire (SIAQ), and a set of items designed specifically for the study to assess how frequently participants incorporate physical (e.g. 'I make small movements or gestures during the imagery') and environment (e.g. 'I image in the real training/competition environment') elements of PETTLEP imagery. Structural equation modelling tested a hypothesised model in which imagery priming (i.e. the best fitting physical and environment elements) significantly and positively predicted imagery ability of the different imagery types (skill, β = 0.38; strategy, β = 0.23; goal, β = 0.21; affect, β = 0.25; mastery, β = 0.22). The model was a good fit to the data: χ 2 (174) = 263.87, p environment elements is associated with better skill, strategy, goal, affect and mastery imagery ability. The findings extend models of imagery use by indicating that how athletes images may influence their imagery ability.

  12. The Study of Object-Oriented Motor Imagery Based on EEG Suppression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lili Li

    Full Text Available Motor imagery is a conventional method for brain computer interface and motor learning. To avoid the great individual difference of the motor imagery ability, object-oriented motor imagery was applied, and the effects were studied. Kinesthetic motor imagery and visual observation were administered to 15 healthy volunteers. The EEG during cue-based simple imagery (SI, object-oriented motor imagery (OI, non-object-oriented motor imagery (NI and visual observation (VO was recorded. Study results showed that OI and NI presented significant contralateral suppression in mu rhythm (p 0.05. Compared with NI, OI showed significant difference (p < 0.05 in mu rhythm and weak significant difference (p = 0.0612 in beta rhythm over the contralateral hemisphere. The ability of motor imagery can be reflected by the suppression degree of mu and beta frequencies which are the motor related rhythms. Thus, greater enhancement of activation in mirror neuron system is involved in response to object-oriented motor imagery. The object-oriented motor imagery is favorable for improvement of motor imagery ability.

  13. Effects of Mental Imagery on Muscular Strength in Healthy and Patient Participants: A Systematic Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maamer Slimani, David Tod, Helmi Chaabene, Bianca Miarka, Karim Chamari

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The aims of the present review were to (i provide a critical overview of the current literature on the effects of mental imagery on muscular strength in healthy participants and patients with immobilization of the upper extremity (i.e., hand and anterior cruciate ligament (ACL, (ii identify potential moderators and mediators of the “mental imagery-strength performance” relationship and (iii determine the relative contribution of electromyography (EMG and brain activities, neural and physiological adaptations in the mental imagery-strength performance relationship. This paper also discusses the theoretical and practical implications of the contemporary literature and suggests possible directions for future research. Overall, the results reveal that the combination of mental imagery and physical practice is more efficient than, or at least comparable to, physical execution with respect to strength performance. Imagery prevention intervention was also effective in reducing of strength loss after short-term muscle immobilization and ACL. The present review also indicates advantageous effects of internal imagery (range from 2.6 to 136.3% for strength performance compared with external imagery (range from 4.8 to 23.2%. Typically, mental imagery with muscular activity was higher in active than passive muscles, and imagining “lifting a heavy object” resulted in more EMG activity compared with imagining “lifting a lighter object”. Thus, in samples of students, novices, or youth male and female athletes, internal mental imagery has a greater effect on muscle strength than external mental imagery does. Imagery ability, motivation, and self-efficacy have been shown to be the variables mediating the effect of mental imagery on strength performance. Finally, the greater effects of internal imagery than those of external imagery could be explained in terms of neural adaptations, stronger brain activation, higher muscle excitation, greater somatic

  14. Alcohol related mental imagery: The effects of a priming dose in at risk drinkers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Yates

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Drug related mental imagery is proposed to play a central role in addictive behaviour. However, little is known about such cognition or how it is pharmacologically modulated. Here, we test theoretical predictions of the ‘elaborated intrusion’ theory by comparing neutral with alcohol related mental imagery, and examine the effects of low dose alcohol on phenomenological aspects of this imagery. Methods: Alcohol related and neutral imagery was assessed after at risk drinkers (n=40 consumed alcohol (0.3g/kg or placebo, in a crossover design. Sensory and visuospatial qualities of imagery, along with associated craving, positive affect and ‘mind wandering’ were assessed. Results: Alcohol related mental imagery was rated as more vivid and sensorially rich, effects that were larger following the priming dose of alcohol. In addition, mind wandering was substantially lower during alcohol versus neutral imagery, especially after alcohol consumption. First person perspective was more prevalent for alcohol imagery after alcohol, although the Drink×Imagery type interaction did not reach statistical significance. However, first person imagery was associated with higher levels of craving during alcohol related imagery. Conclusions: Alcohol related mental imagery differs phenomenologically from neutral imagery on a number of dimensions. Priming with alcohol may enable cognitive elaboration by biasing the output of controlled cognitive processing towards enhanced sensory elaboration and increased attention to alcohol related cognition. These feedforward effects may be involved in focusing cognitive and behavioural resources on alcohol acquisition/consumption through the elaboration and rehearsal of relevant goals and plans. Keywords: Mental imagery, Elaborated intrusion theory, Alcohol, Alcohol priming, Craving, Mind wandering

  15. Spot detection from MODIS imagery using 2P-CFAR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Xianwen; Li, Xiaofeng

    2015-12-01

    Oil spills are one of the major environmental concerns, especially in the coastal zones of the ocean. Satellite remote sensing imagery has proved to be a useful tool for monitoring oil spills in the marine environment. With its two daily acquisitions and the possibility to obtain near-real-time data free of charge, the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) shows interesting potential as such a cost-effective supplementary tool. Several researches on oil spill detection in MODIS imagery has been carried out for the past few years. Basically, oil spills were manually detected from MODIS imagery [1,2]. The disadvantage of the manual detection method is inefficient and subjective. Shi et al. proposed an oil spill detection method from MODIS imagery by using fuzzy cluster and texture feature extraction [3]. It works in an automatic manner and does not require any priori knowledge of occurrence or the spectral attributes of spills. But its efficiency in very near shore regions is limited. Chen and Zhao detected oil spills from the oil-water contrast ratio image by using a thresholding method [4].They found that the oil-water contrast ratio can be enhanced by replacing the original image with the ratio image of two different band ones in 400-800 nm. To obtain the oil-water contrast ratio image from the MODIS imagery, they selected the oil spill area and the background sea area and then calculated the mean radiance or emissivity value in those areas. By doing so, the automation and the accuracy of the method were reduced. Adamo et al. [5] and Kudryavtsev et al. [6] proposed physical methods for oil spill detection from MODIS imagery acquired in sunglint conditions. These two methods take imaging geometry into consideration and have the aid of other models or functions such as the Cox and Munk (1954) model [7],the CMOD4 model [8,9], the ECMWF (European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts) atmospheric model, and the transfer function, which increase the

  16. Motor imagery modulation of postural sway is accompanied by changes in the EMG-COP association.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemos, Thiago; Rodrigues, Erika C; Vargas, Claudia D

    2014-08-08

    Motor imagery (MI) performed in an upright stance promotes increases in postural sway without changes in usual amplitude measures of calf muscle EMG. However, postural muscle activity can also be determined from the temporal association between EMG and center of pressure (COP) displacements. In this study we investigated whether the MI modulation of postural sway is accompanied by changes in EMG-COP association. Surface EMG from the lateral gastrocnemius (LG) muscle and COP coordinates were collected from 12 subjects while they imagined themselves performing a rising on tiptoes movement via kinesthetic or visual imagery. As a control condition subjects were requested to imagine singing a song. The standard deviation of the forward-backward COP sway and the coefficient of variation of the EMG were calculated and compared across tasks. The degree of association between COP sways and LG activity was evaluated through a cross-correlation function. Kinesthetic imagery promoted a larger COP displacement than both visual and control imagery (pCOP association during kinesthetic imagery compared to control imagery (p=0.02), whereas the EMG-COP association in visual imagery was not different from that observed during kinesthetic or control imagery (p>0.19). In conclusion, kinesthetic imagery resulted in a higher EMG-COP temporal association. Subliminal fringe mechanisms may account for the imagery effects on muscle activity and postural sway during upright stance. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Vividness of Visual Imagery Depends on the Neural Overlap with Perception in Visual Areas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dijkstra, Nadine; Bosch, Sander E; van Gerven, Marcel A J

    2017-02-01

    Research into the neural correlates of individual differences in imagery vividness point to an important role of the early visual cortex. However, there is also great fluctuation of vividness within individuals, such that only looking at differences between people necessarily obscures the picture. In this study, we show that variation in moment-to-moment experienced vividness of visual imagery, within human subjects, depends on the activity of a large network of brain areas, including frontal, parietal, and visual areas. Furthermore, using a novel multivariate analysis technique, we show that the neural overlap between imagery and perception in the entire visual system correlates with experienced imagery vividness. This shows that the neural basis of imagery vividness is much more complicated than studies of individual differences seemed to suggest. Visual imagery is the ability to visualize objects that are not in our direct line of sight: something that is important for memory, spatial reasoning, and many other tasks. It is known that the better people are at visual imagery, the better they can perform these tasks. However, the neural correlates of moment-to-moment variation in visual imagery remain unclear. In this study, we show that the more the neural response during imagery is similar to the neural response during perception, the more vivid or perception-like the imagery experience is. Copyright © 2017 the authors 0270-6474/17/371367-07$15.00/0.

  18. Contrast and strength of visual memory and imagery differentially affect visual perception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saad, Elyana; Silvanto, Juha

    2013-01-01

    Visual short-term memory (VSTM) and visual imagery have been shown to modulate visual perception. However, how the subjective experience of VSTM/imagery and its contrast modulate this process has not been investigated. We addressed this issue by asking participants to detect brief masked targets while they were engaged either in VSTM or visual imagery. Subjective experience of memory/imagery (strength scale), and the visual contrast of the memory/mental image (contrast scale) were assessed on a trial-by-trial basis. For both VSTM and imagery, contrast of the memory/mental image was positively associated with reporting target presence. Consequently, at the sensory level, both VSTM and imagery facilitated visual perception. However, subjective strength of VSTM was positively associated with visual detection whereas the opposite pattern was found for imagery. Thus the relationship between subjective strength of memory/imagery and visual detection are qualitatively different for VSTM and visual imagery, although their impact at the sensory level appears similar. Our results furthermore demonstrate that imagery and VSTM are partly dissociable processes.

  19. Effects of practice, visual loss, limb amputation, and disuse on motor imagery vividness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malouin, Francine; Richards, Carol L; Durand, Anne; Descent, Micheline; Poiré, Diane; Frémont, Pierre; Pelet, Stéphane; Gresset, Jacques; Doyon, Julien

    2009-06-01

    The ability to generate vivid images of movements is variable across individuals and likely influenced by sensorimotor inputs. The authors examined (1) the vividness of motor imagery in dancers and in persons with late blindness, with amputation or an immobilization of one lower limb; (2) the effects of prosthesis use on motor imagery; and (3) the temporal characteristics of motor imagery. Eleven dancers, 10 persons with late blindness, 14 with amputation, 6 with immobilization, and 2 groups of age-matched healthy individuals (27 in control group A; 35 in control group B) participated. The Kinesthetic and Visual Imagery Questionnaire served to assess motor imagery vividness. Temporal characteristics were assessed with mental chronometry. The late blindness group and dance group displayed higher imagery scores than respective control groups. In the amputation and immobilization groups, imagery scores were lower on the affected side than the intact side and specifically for imagined foot movements. Imagery scores of the affected limb positively correlated with the time since walking with prosthesis. Movement times during imagination and execution (amputation and immobilization) were longer on the affected side than the intact side, but the temporal congruence between real and imagined movement times was similar to that in the control group. The mental representation of actions is highly modulated by imagery practice and motor activities. The ability to generate vivid images of movements can be specifically weakened by limb loss or disuse, but lack of movement does not affect the temporal characteristics of motor imagery.

  20. The Pitch Imagery Arrow Task: effects of musical training, vividness, and mental control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gelding, Rebecca W; Thompson, William Forde; Johnson, Blake W

    2015-01-01

    Musical imagery is a relatively unexplored area, partly because of deficiencies in existing experimental paradigms, which are often difficult, unreliable, or do not provide objective measures of performance. Here we describe a novel protocol, the Pitch Imagery Arrow Task (PIAT), which induces and trains pitch imagery in both musicians and non-musicians. Given a tonal context and an initial pitch sequence, arrows are displayed to elicit a scale-step sequence of imagined pitches, and participants indicate whether the final imagined tone matches an audible probe. It is a staircase design that accommodates individual differences in musical experience and imagery ability. This new protocol was used to investigate the roles that musical expertise, self-reported auditory vividness and mental control play in imagery performance. Performance on the task was significantly better for participants who employed a musical imagery strategy compared to participants who used an alternative cognitive strategy and positively correlated with scores on the Control subscale from the Bucknell Auditory Imagery Scale (BAIS). Multiple regression analysis revealed that Imagery performance accuracy was best predicted by a combination of strategy use and scores on the Vividness subscale of BAIS. These results confirm that competent performance on the PIAT requires active musical imagery and is very difficult to achieve using alternative cognitive strategies. Auditory vividness and mental control were more important than musical experience in the ability to perform manipulation of pitch imagery.

  1. Comparing multiple turbulence restoration algorithms performance on noisy anisoplanatic imagery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rucci, Michael A.; Hardie, Russell C.; Dapore, Alexander J.

    2017-05-01

    In this paper, we compare the performance of multiple turbulence mitigation algorithms to restore imagery degraded by atmospheric turbulence and camera noise. In order to quantify and compare algorithm performance, imaging scenes were simulated by applying noise and varying levels of turbulence. For the simulation, a Monte-Carlo wave optics approach is used to simulate the spatially and temporally varying turbulence in an image sequence. A Poisson-Gaussian noise mixture model is then used to add noise to the observed turbulence image set. These degraded image sets are processed with three separate restoration algorithms: Lucky Look imaging, bispectral speckle imaging, and a block matching method with restoration filter. These algorithms were chosen because they incorporate different approaches and processing techniques. The results quantitatively show how well the algorithms are able to restore the simulated degraded imagery.

  2. Researching on the process of remote sensing video imagery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, He-rao; Zheng, Xin-qi; Sun, Yi-bo; Jia, Zong-ren; Wang, He-zhan

    Unmanned air vehicle remotely-sensed imagery on the low-altitude has the advantages of higher revolution, easy-shooting, real-time accessing, etc. It's been widely used in mapping , target identification, and other fields in recent years. However, because of conditional limitation, the video images are unstable, the targets move fast, and the shooting background is complex, etc., thus it is difficult to process the video images in this situation. In other fields, especially in the field of computer vision, the researches on video images are more extensive., which is very helpful for processing the remotely-sensed imagery on the low-altitude. Based on this, this paper analyzes and summarizes amounts of video image processing achievement in different fields, including research purposes, data sources, and the pros and cons of technology. Meantime, this paper explores the technology methods more suitable for low-altitude video image processing of remote sensing.

  3. Onboard Algorithms for Data Prioritization and Summarization of Aerial Imagery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chien, Steve A.; Hayden, David; Thompson, David R.; Castano, Rebecca

    2013-01-01

    Many current and future NASA missions are capable of collecting enormous amounts of data, of which only a small portion can be transmitted to Earth. Communications are limited due to distance, visibility constraints, and competing mission downlinks. Long missions and high-resolution, multispectral imaging devices easily produce data exceeding the available bandwidth. To address this situation computationally efficient algorithms were developed for analyzing science imagery onboard the spacecraft. These algorithms autonomously cluster the data into classes of similar imagery, enabling selective downlink of representatives of each class, and a map classifying the terrain imaged rather than the full dataset, reducing the volume of the downlinked data. A range of approaches was examined, including k-means clustering using image features based on color, texture, temporal, and spatial arrangement

  4. Dimensionality Reduction and Channel Selection of Motor Imagery Electroencephalographic Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Naeem

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The performance of spatial filters based on independent components analysis (ICA was evaluated by employing principal component analysis (PCA preprocessing for dimensional reduction. The PCA preprocessing was not found to be a suitable method that could retain motor imagery information in a smaller set of components. In contrast, 6 ICA components selected on the basis of visual inspection performed comparably (61.9% to the full range of 22 components (63.9%. An automated selection of ICA components based on a variance criterion was also carried out. Only 8 components chosen this way performed better (63.1% than visually selected components. A similar analysis on the reduced set of electrodes over mid-central and centro-parietal regions of the brain revealed that common spatial patterns (CSPs and Infomax were able to detect motor imagery activity with a satisfactory accuracy.

  5. Dimensionality Reduction and Channel Selection of Motor Imagery Electroencephalographic Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naeem, Muhammad; Brunner, Clemens; Pfurtscheller, Gert

    2009-01-01

    The performance of spatial filters based on independent components analysis (ICA) was evaluated by employing principal component analysis (PCA) preprocessing for dimensional reduction. The PCA preprocessing was not found to be a suitable method that could retain motor imagery information in a smaller set of components. In contrast, 6 ICA components selected on the basis of visual inspection performed comparably (61.9%) to the full range of 22 components (63.9%). An automated selection of ICA components based on a variance criterion was also carried out. Only 8 components chosen this way performed better (63.1%) than visually selected components. A similar analysis on the reduced set of electrodes over mid-central and centro-parietal regions of the brain revealed that common spatial patterns (CSPs) and Infomax were able to detect motor imagery activity with a satisfactory accuracy. PMID:19536346

  6. Fukunaga-Koontz transform based dimensionality reduction for hyperspectral imagery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ochilov, S.; Alam, M. S.; Bal, A.

    2006-05-01

    Fukunaga-Koontz Transform based technique offers some attractive properties for desired class oriented dimensionality reduction in hyperspectral imagery. In FKT, feature selection is performed by transforming into a new space where feature classes have complimentary eigenvectors. Dimensionality reduction technique based on these complimentary eigenvector analysis can be described under two classes, desired class and background clutter, such that each basis function best represent one class while carrying the least amount of information from the second class. By selecting a few eigenvectors which are most relevant to desired class, one can reduce the dimension of hyperspectral cube. Since the FKT based technique reduces data size, it provides significant advantages for near real time detection applications in hyperspectral imagery. Furthermore, the eigenvector selection approach significantly reduces computation burden via the dimensionality reduction processes. The performance of the proposed dimensionality reduction algorithm has been tested using real-world hyperspectral dataset.

  7. Dimensionality reduction and channel selection of motor imagery electroencephalographic data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naeem, Muhammad; Brunner, Clemens; Pfurtscheller, Gert

    2009-01-01

    The performance of spatial filters based on independent components analysis (ICA) was evaluated by employing principal component analysis (PCA) preprocessing for dimensional reduction. The PCA preprocessing was not found to be a suitable method that could retain motor imagery information in a smaller set of components. In contrast, 6 ICA components selected on the basis of visual inspection performed comparably (61.9%) to the full range of 22 components (63.9%). An automated selection of ICA components based on a variance criterion was also carried out. Only 8 components chosen this way performed better (63.1%) than visually selected components. A similar analysis on the reduced set of electrodes over mid-central and centro-parietal regions of the brain revealed that common spatial patterns (CSPs) and Infomax were able to detect motor imagery activity with a satisfactory accuracy.

  8. Access High Quality Imagery from the NOAA View Portal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pisut, D.; Powell, A. M.; Loomis, T.; Goel, V.; Mills, B.; Cowan, D.

    2013-12-01

    NOAA curates a vast treasure trove of environmental data, but one that is sometimes not easily accessed, especially for education, outreach, and media purposes. Traditional data portals in NOAA require extensive knowledge of the specific names of observation platforms, models, and analyses, along with nomenclature for variable outputs. A new website and web mapping service (WMS) from NOAA attempts to remedy such issues. The NOAA View data imagery portal provides a seamless entry point into data from across the agency: satellite, models, in-situ analysis, etc. The system provides the user with ability to browse, animate, and download high resolution (e.g., 4,000 x 2,000 pixel) imagery, Google Earth, and even proxy data files. The WMS architecture also allows the resources to be ingested into other software systems or applications.

  9. EEG changes during sequences of visual and kinesthetic motor imagery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stecklow, Marcus Vinicius; Infantosi, Antonio Fernando Catelli; Cagy, Maurício

    2010-08-01

    The evoked cerebral electric response when sequences of complex motor imagery (MI) task are executed several times is still unclear. This work aims at investigating the existence of habituation in the cortical response, more specifically in the alpha band peak of parietal and occipital areas (10-20 international system electroencephalogram, EEG, protocol). The EEG signals were acquired during sequences of MI of volleyball spike movement in kinesthetic and visual modalities and also at control condition. Thirty right-handed male subjects (18 to 40 years) were assigned to either an 'athlete' or a 'non-athlete' group, both containing 15 volunteers. Paired Wilcoxon tests (with alpha=0.05) indicates that sequential MI of complex tasks promotes cortical changes, mainly in the power vicinity of the alpha peak. This finding is more pronounced along the initial trials and also for the athletes during the modality of kinesthetic motor imagery.

  10. Automated vehicle detection in forward-looking infrared imagery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Der, Sandor; Chan, Alex; Nasrabadi, Nasser; Kwon, Heesung

    2004-01-10

    We describe an algorithm for the detection and clutter rejection of military vehicles in forward-looking infrared (FLIR) imagery. The detection algorithm is designed to be a prescreener that selects regions for further analysis and uses a spatial anomaly approach that looks for target-sized regions of the image that differ in texture, brightness, edge strength, or other spatial characteristics. The features are linearly combined to form a confidence image that is thresholded to find likely target locations. The clutter rejection portion uses target-specific information extracted from training samples to reduce the false alarms of the detector. The outputs of the clutter rejecter and detector are combined by a higher-level evidence integrator to improve performance over simple concatenation of the detector and clutter rejecter. The algorithm has been applied to a large number of FLIR imagery sets, and some of these results are presented here.

  11. SIMPLIFIED BUILDING MODELS EXTRACTION FROM ULTRA-LIGHT UAV IMAGERY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. Küng

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Generating detailed simplified building models such as the ones present on Google Earth is often a difficult and lengthy manual task, requiring advanced CAD software and a combination of ground imagery, LIDAR data and blueprints. Nowadays, UAVs such as the AscTec Falcon 8 have reached the maturity to offer an affordable, fast and easy way to capture large amounts of oblique images covering all parts of a building. In this paper we present a state-of-the-art photogrammetry and visual reconstruction pipeline provided by Pix4D applied to medium resolution imagery acquired by such UAVs. The key element of simplified building models extraction is the seamless integration of the outputs of such a pipeline for a final manual refinement step in order to minimize the amount of manual work.

  12. Seeing future success: does imagery perspective influence achievement motivation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasquez, Noelia A; Buehler, Roger

    2007-10-01

    Imagining future success can sometimes enhance people's motivation to achieve it. This article examines a phenomenological aspect of positive mental imagery--the visual perspective adopted--that may moderate its motivational impact. The authors hypothesize that people feel more motivated to succeed on a future task when they visualize its successful completion from a third-person rather than a first-person perspective. Actions viewed from the third-person perspective are generally construed at a relatively high level of abstraction--in a manner that highlights their larger meaning and significance--which should heighten their motivational impact. Three studies in the domain of academic motivation support this reasoning. Students experience a greater increase in achievement motivation when they imagine their successful task completion from a third-rather than a first-person perspective. Moreover, mediational analyses reveal that third-person imagery boosts motivation by prompting students to construe their success abstractly and to perceive it as important.

  13. Cultural Artifact Detection in Long Wave Infrared Imagery.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anderson, Dylan Zachary [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Craven, Julia M. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Ramon, Eric [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2017-01-01

    Detection of cultural artifacts from airborne remotely sensed data is an important task in the context of on-site inspections. Airborne artifact detection can reduce the size of the search area the ground based inspection team must visit, thereby improving the efficiency of the inspection process. This report details two algorithms for detection of cultural artifacts in aerial long wave infrared imagery. The first algorithm creates an explicit model for cultural artifacts, and finds data that fits the model. The second algorithm creates a model of the background and finds data that does not fit the model. Both algorithms are applied to orthomosaic imagery generated as part of the MSFE13 data collection campaign under the spectral technology evaluation project.

  14. Methods to Enhance Climate Change Imagery for Communication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simmon, R. B.; Ward, K.; Carlowicz, M. J.; Allen, J.; Riebeek, H.; Przyborski, P.; Scott, M.

    2011-12-01

    One of the commonly used tools used in communicating climate change to non-experts is data visualization. Images of measurements, model results, and physical processes can be powerful for enhancing understanding of complex scientific topics. However, many of the graphics that are used in public communication were designed for scientific peers, and not lay audiences. These graphics can often be improved by applying principles drawn from graphic design and information visualization. This presentation will offer case studies of graphics from NASA press releases and the IPCC Fourth Assessment Report and show how they could have been improved. The revised imagery maintains the content of the originals, but presents it more clearly. I will also show an example of imagery that employs these ideas that we have published on the NASA Earth Observatory web site.

  15. Biomass burning: Combustion emissions, satellite imagery, and biogenic emissions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Levine, J.S.; Cofer, W.R III; Rhinehart, R.P.; Cahoon, D.R. J.; Winstead, E.L.; Sebacher, S.; Sebacher, D.I.; Stocks, B.J.

    1991-01-01

    This chapter deals with two different, but related, aspects of biomass burning. The first part of the chapter deals with a technique to estimate the instantaneous emissions of trace gases produced by biomass burning using satellite imagery. The second part of the chapter concerns the recent discovery that burning results in significantly enhanced biogenic emissions of N 2 O, NO, and CH 4 . Hence, biomass burning has both an immediate and long-term impact on the production of trace gases to the atmosphere. The objective of this research is to better assess and quantify the role of this research is to better assess and quantify the role and impact of biomass as a driver for global change. It will be demonstrated that satellite imagery of fires may be used to estimate combustion emissions and may in the future be used to estimate the long-term postburn biogenic emissions of trace gases to the atmosphere

  16. Imagerie de la maladie de Creutzfeldt Jacob sporadique | Hassani ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Les encéphalopathies spongiformes subaiguës transmissibles (ESST) sont des maladies infectieuses, neurodégénératives et génétiques. Elles sont caractérisées par la présence d'une substance protéique : le prion. L'imagerie par résonance magnétique (IRM) encéphalique peut actuellement contribuer au diagnostic des ...

  17. Social imagery, tobacco independence, and the truthsm campaign.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, W Douglas; Price, Simani; Blahut, Steven; Hersey, James; Niederdeppe, Jeffrey; Ray, Sarah

    2004-01-01

    This study investigated relationships among exposure to the truthsm campaign, differences in social imagery about not smoking and related measures, and smoking behavior. We asked, "How does truthsm work? Through what psychological mechanisms does it affect smoking behavior?" We developed a framework to explain how receptivity to truthsm ads might influence youth cognitive states and subsequent effects on progression to established smoking. The main hypotheses were that social imagery about not smoking and related beliefs and attitudes about tobacco use mediate the relationship between truthsm exposure and smoking status. The study was based on data from the Legacy Media Tracking Survey (LMTS), waves I-III, which were conducted at three time points from 1999 through 2001. A nationally representative sample of 20,058 respondents aged 12-24 from the three time points was used in the analysis. We developed a structural equation model (SEM) based on constructs drawn from the LMTS. We investigated the model and tested our hypotheses about the psychological and behavioral effects of campaign exposure. We tested our constructs and model using a two-stage structural equation modeling approach. We first conducted a confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) to test the measurement model. Our model achieved satisfactory fit, and we conducted the SEM to test our hypotheses. We found that social imagery and perceived tobacco independence mediate the relationship between truthsm exposure and smoking status. We found meaningful differences between paths for segmented samples based on age, gender, and race/ethnicity subgroups and over time. The truthsm campaign operates through individuals'sense of tobacco independence and social imagery about not smoking. This study indicates that the campaign's strategy has worked as predicted and represents an effective model for social marketing to change youth risk behaviors. Future studies should further investigate subgroup differences in campaign

  18. Radio-marking and in vivo imagery of oligonucleotides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuehnast, Bertrand

    2000-01-01

    This research thesis is part of activities aimed at the development of new molecules like oligonucleotides. Its first objective was the development and validation of a marking method with fluorine-18 of oligonucleotides for their in-vivo pharmacological assessment with positron emission tomography (PET). Further investigations addressed the use of iodine-125 for oligonucleotide marking purpose. This radio-marking, and in vivo and ex vivo imagery techniques are described, and their potential is highlighted for the pharmacological assessment of different oligonucleotides

  19. Observer Performance Measured against Hybrid Compressed Video Imagery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-03-01

    reductions on target detection and recognition were measulred. A hybrid DCT/ DPCM compression algorithm was used to manipulate the bit-per-pixel...pulse code modulation ( DPCM ) encoding of the resulting frequency coefficients to achieve intraframe compression. One of the greatest concerns of... DPCM compression algorithm which will be used in the MICNS communi- cations link. This facility was used to compress a subset of the imagery used in the

  20. Supporting elephant conservation in Sri Lanka through MODIS imagery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perera, Kithsiri; Tateishi, Ryutaro

    2012-10-01

    The latest national elephant survey of Sri Lanka (2011) revealed Sri Lanka has 5,879 elephants. The total forest cover for these elephants is about 19,500 sq km (2012 estimation) and estimated forest area is about 30% of the country when smaller green patches are also counted. However, studies have pointed out that a herd of elephants need about a 100 sq km of forest patch to survive. With a high human population density (332 people per sq km, 2010), the pressure for land to feed people and elephants is becoming critical. Resent reports have indicated about 250 elephants are killed annually by farmers and dozens of people are also killed by elephants. Under this context, researchers are investigating various methods to assess the elephant movements to address the issues of Human-Elephant-Conflict (HEC). Apart from various local remedies for the issue, the conservation of elephant population can be supported by satellite imagery based studies. MODIS sensor imagery can be considered as a successful candidate here. Its spatial resolution is low (250m x 250m) but automatically filters out small forest patches in the mapping process. The daily imagery helps to monitor temporal forest cover changes. This study investigated the background information of HEC and used MODIS 250m imagery to suggest applicability of satellite data for Elephant conservations efforts. The elephant movement information was gathered from local authorities and potentials to identify bio-corridors were discussed. Under future research steps, regular forest cover monitoring through MODIS data was emphasized as a valuable tool in elephant conservations efforts.

  1. Estimating pinyon and juniper cover across Utah using NAIP imagery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Darrell B. Roundy

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Expansion of Pinus L. (pinyon and Juniperus L. (juniper (P-J trees into sagebrush (Artemisia L. steppe communities can lead to negative effects on hydrology, loss of wildlife habitat, and a decrease in desirable understory vegetation. Tree reduction treatments are often implemented to mitigate these negative effects. In order to prioritize and effectively plan these treatments, rapid, accurate, and inexpensive methods are needed to estimate tree canopy cover at the landscape scale. We used object based image analysis (OBIA software (Feature AnalystTM for ArcMap 10.1®, ENVI Feature Extraction®, and Trimble eCognition Developer 8.2® to extract tree canopy cover using NAIP (National Agricultural Imagery Program imagery. We then compared our extractions with ground measured tree canopy cover (crown diameter and line point intercept on 309 plots across 44 sites in Utah. Extraction methods did not consistently over- or under-estimate ground measured P-J canopy cover except where tree cover was >45%. Estimates of tree canopy cover using OBIA techniques were strongly correlated with estimates using the crown diameter method (r = 0.93 for ENVI, 0.91 for Feature AnalystTM, and 0.92 for eCognition. Tree cover estimates using OBIA techniques had lower correlations with tree cover measurements using the line-point intercept method (r = 0.85 for ENVI, 0.83 for Feature AnalystTM, and 0.83 for eCognition. All software packages accurately and inexpensively extracted P-J canopy cover from NAIP imagery when the imagery was not blurred, and when P-J cover was not mixed with Amelanchier alnifolia (Utah serviceberry and Quercus gambelii (Gambel’s oak, which had similar spectral values as P-J.

  2. Vehicle classification in WAMI imagery using deep network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Meng; Yang, Fan; Blasch, Erik; Sheaff, Carolyn; Liu, Kui; Chen, Genshe; Ling, Haibin

    2016-05-01

    Humans have always had a keen interest in understanding activities and the surrounding environment for mobility, communication, and survival. Thanks to recent progress in photography and breakthroughs in aviation, we are now able to capture tens of megapixels of ground imagery, namely Wide Area Motion Imagery (WAMI), at multiple frames per second from unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs). WAMI serves as a great source for many applications, including security, urban planning and route planning. These applications require fast and accurate image understanding which is time consuming for humans, due to the large data volume and city-scale area coverage. Therefore, automatic processing and understanding of WAMI imagery has been gaining attention in both industry and the research community. This paper focuses on an essential step in WAMI imagery analysis, namely vehicle classification. That is, deciding whether a certain image patch contains a vehicle or not. We collect a set of positive and negative sample image patches, for training and testing the detector. Positive samples are 64 × 64 image patches centered on annotated vehicles. We generate two sets of negative images. The first set is generated from positive images with some location shift. The second set of negative patches is generated from randomly sampled patches. We also discard those patches if a vehicle accidentally locates at the center. Both positive and negative samples are randomly divided into 9000 training images and 3000 testing images. We propose to train a deep convolution network for classifying these patches. The classifier is based on a pre-trained AlexNet Model in the Caffe library, with an adapted loss function for vehicle classification. The performance of our classifier is compared to several traditional image classifier methods using Support Vector Machine (SVM) and Histogram of Oriented Gradient (HOG) features. While the SVM+HOG method achieves an accuracy of 91.2%, the accuracy of our deep

  3. Capability of geometric features to classify ships in SAR imagery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lang, Haitao; Wu, Siwen; Lai, Quan; Ma, Li

    2016-10-01

    Ship classification in synthetic aperture radar (SAR) imagery has become a new hotspot in remote sensing community for its valuable potential in many maritime applications. Several kinds of ship features, such as geometric features, polarimetric features, and scattering features have been widely applied on ship classification tasks. Compared with polarimetric features and scattering features, which are subject to SAR parameters (e.g., sensor type, incidence angle, polarization, etc.) and environment factors (e.g., sea state, wind, wave, current, etc.), geometric features are relatively independent of SAR and environment factors, and easy to be extracted stably from SAR imagery. In this paper, the capability of geometric features to classify ships in SAR imagery with various resolution has been investigated. Firstly, the relationship between the geometric feature extraction accuracy and the SAR imagery resolution is analyzed. It shows that the minimum bounding rectangle (MBR) of ship can be extracted exactly in terms of absolute precision by the proposed automatic ship-sea segmentation method. Next, six simple but effective geometric features are extracted to build a ship representation for the subsequent classification task. These six geometric features are composed of length (f1), width (f2), area (f3), perimeter (f4), elongatedness (f5) and compactness (f6). Among them, two basic features, length (f1) and width (f2), are directly extracted based on the MBR of ship, the other four are derived from those two basic features. The capability of the utilized geometric features to classify ships are validated on two data set with different image resolutions. The results show that the performance of ship classification solely by geometric features is close to that obtained by the state-of-the-art methods, which obtained by a combination of multiple kinds of features, including scattering features and geometric features after a complex feature selection process.

  4. Dimensionality Reduction and Channel Selection of Motor Imagery Electroencephalographic Data

    OpenAIRE

    Naeem, Muhammad; Brunner, Clemens; Pfurtscheller, Gert

    2009-01-01

    The performance of spatial filters based on independent components analysis (ICA) was evaluated by employing principal component analysis (PCA) preprocessing for dimensional reduction. The PCA preprocessing was not found to be a suitable method that could retain motor imagery information in a smaller set of components. In contrast, 6 ICA components selected on the basis of visual inspection performed comparably (61.9%) to the full range of 22 components (63.9%). An automated selection of ICA ...

  5. Decoding individual natural scene representations during perception and imagery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew Robert Johnson

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available We used a multi-voxel classification analysis of functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI data to determine to what extent item-specific information about complex natural scenes is represented in several category-selective areas of human extrastriate visual cortex during visual perception and visual mental imagery. Participants in the scanner either viewed or were instructed to visualize previously memorized natural scene exemplars, and the neuroimaging data were subsequently subjected to a multi-voxel pattern analysis (MVPA using a support vector machine (SVM classifier. We found that item-specific information was represented in multiple scene-selective areas: the occipital place area (OPA, parahippocampal place area (PPA, retrosplenial cortex (RSC, and a scene-selective portion of the precuneus/intraparietal sulcus region (PCu/IPS. Furthermore, item-specific information from perceived scenes was re-instantiated during mental imagery of the same scenes. These results support findings from previous decoding analyses for other types of visual information and/or brain areas during imagery or working memory, and extend them to the case of visual scenes (and scene-selective cortex. Taken together, such findings support models suggesting that reflective mental processes are subserved by the re-instantiation of perceptual information in high-level visual cortex. We also examined activity in the fusiform face area (FFA and found that it, too, contained significant item-specific scene information during perception, but not during mental imagery. This suggests that although decodable scene-relevant activity occurs in FFA during perception, FFA activity may not be a necessary (or even relevant component of one’s mental representation of visual scenes.

  6. Impact spacecraft imagery and comparative morphology of craters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moutsoulas, M.; Piteri, S.

    1979-01-01

    The use of hard-landing 'simple' missions for wide-scale planetary exploration is considered. As an example of their imagery potentialities, Ranger VII data are used for the study of the morphological characteristics of 16 Mare Cognitum craters. The morphological patterns of lunar craters, expressed in terms of the Depth/Diameter ratios appear to be in most cases independent of the crater location or size. (Auth.)

  7. Automated detection of selective logging using SmallSat imagery

    OpenAIRE

    DESCALS FERRANDO ADRIA; SZANTOI ZOLTAN; BECK PIETER; BRINK ANDREAS; STROBL PETER

    2016-01-01

    We propose an automated processing workflow to detect and classify changes in bi-temporal very high resolution (VHR) SmallSat imagery. The workflow consists of two pre-processing steps, which are an image registration method with a cross-correlation approach, and a radiometric normalization based on regression of automatically detected invariant pixels. The detection of selective logging is performed using the Iteratively Reweighted Multivariate Alteration Detection (IR-MAD), which calculates...

  8. Perspectives on Music Imagery and complex chronic pain

    OpenAIRE

    Sanfi, Ilan; Christensen, Erik

    2017-01-01

    The aim of the article is to examine the concept of chronic pain as a complex phenomenon and to highlight the potential role of music therapy – in particular, music imagery – in the treatment of chronic pain. Theories of pain, along with research on pain pathways and pain control in the nervous system, support the evidence from clinical practice that music interventions can alleviate the sensation of pain whilst also offering a pleasant aesthetic experience. Music therapy provides opportuniti...

  9. TONE AND IMAGERY IN TENNYSON‟S „TITHONUS‟

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Rifqi

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Studying poetry is considered the most difficult by most of the students in my classes in EFL context. This can be understood since poetry in general has a unique form different from other types of literary works. With very limited lines and space provided in poetry, poets are able to put forward their ideas. Such reality enables readers to explore the most possible and acceptable meaning of poetry. However, it seems impossible for readers to find out the poets‘ exact intended meaning through their writings. So, it is notthe readers‘ job to get the poets‘ exact intended meaning but to explore the possible and acceptable meaning by using the clues presented within the poem. In interpreting the poem‘s meaning, readers should consider any poetic devices applied by the poet in expressing his/her ideas. Poets are very intelligent in playing with figures of speech. They use figurative languages more freshly and vividly than common writers. Through this article, I intend to investigate how the tone and imagery are applied in the poem ―Tithonus‖ written by Lord Alfred Tennyson (1809-1892, the most popular poet of Victorian Era. This poem is very rich of imagery. Afterward, the tone will also be scrutinized. As all poetic devices work complementarily and so do tone and imagery to support each other.I will also show how they work intertwiningly together in creating the whole meaning of the poem.

  10. Commercial imagery archive, management, exploitation, and distribution product development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hollinger, Bruce; Sakkas, Alysa

    1999-12-01

    The Lockheed Martin (LM) team had garnered over a decade of operational experience on the U.S. Government's IDEX II (Imagery Dissemination and Exploitation) system. Recently, it set out to create a new commercial product to serve the needs of large-scale imagery archiving and analysis markets worldwide. LM decided to provide a turnkey commercial solution to receive, store, retrieve, process, analyze and disseminate in 'push' or 'pull' modes imagery, data and data products using a variety of sources and formats. LM selected 'best of breed' hardware and software components and adapted and developed its own algorithms to provide added functionality not commercially available elsewhere. The resultant product, Intelligent Library System (ILS)TM, satisfies requirements for (a) a potentially unbounded, data archive (5000 TB range) (b) automated workflow management for increased user productivity; (c) automatic tracking and management of files stored on shelves; (d) ability to ingest, process and disseminate data volumes with bandwidths ranging up to multi- gigabit per second; (e) access through a thin client-to-server network environment; (f) multiple interactive users needing retrieval of files in seconds from both archived images or in real time, and (g) scalability that maintains information throughput performance as the size of the digital library grows.

  11. Commercial imagery archive, management, exploitation, and distribution project development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hollinger, Bruce; Sakkas, Alysa

    1999-10-01

    The Lockheed Martin (LM) team had garnered over a decade of operational experience on the U.S. Government's IDEX II (Imagery Dissemination and Exploitation) system. Recently, it set out to create a new commercial product to serve the needs of large-scale imagery archiving and analysis markets worldwide. LM decided to provide a turnkey commercial solution to receive, store, retrieve, process, analyze and disseminate in 'push' or 'pull' modes imagery, data and data products using a variety of sources and formats. LM selected 'best of breed' hardware and software components and adapted and developed its own algorithms to provide added functionality not commercially available elsewhere. The resultant product, Intelligent Library System (ILS)TM, satisfies requirements for (1) a potentially unbounded, data archive (5000 TB range) (2) automated workflow management for increased user productivity; (3) automatic tracking and management of files stored on shelves; (4) ability to ingest, process and disseminate data volumes with bandwidths ranging up to multi- gigabit per second; (5) access through a thin client-to-server network environment; (6) multiple interactive users needing retrieval of files in seconds from both archived images or in real time, and (7) scalability that maintains information throughput performance as the size of the digital library grows.

  12. Conventional Microscopy vs. Computer Imagery in Chiropractic Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunningham, Christine M; Larzelere, Elizabeth D; Arar, Ilija

    2008-01-01

    As human tissue pathology slides become increasingly difficult to obtain, other methods of teaching microscopy in educational laboratories must be considered. The purpose of this study was to evaluate our students' satisfaction with newly implemented computer imagery based laboratory instruction and to obtain input from their perspective on the advantages and disadvantages of computerized vs. traditional microscope laboratories. This undertaking involved the creation of a new computer laboratory. Robbins and Cotran Pathologic Basis of Disease, 7(th)ed, was chosen as the required text which gave students access to the Robbins Pathology website, including complete content of text, Interactive Case Study Companion, and Virtual Microscope. Students had experience with traditional microscopes in their histology and microbiology laboratory courses. Student satisfaction with computer based learning was assessed using a 28 question survey which was administered to three successive trimesters of pathology students (n=193) using the computer survey website Zoomerang. Answers were given on a scale of 1-5 and statistically analyzed using weighted averages. The survey data indicated that students were satisfied with computer based learning activities during pathology laboratory instruction. The most favorable aspect to computer imagery was 24-7 availability (weighted avg. 4.16), followed by clarification offered by accompanying text and captions (weighted avg. 4.08). Although advantages and disadvantages exist in using conventional microscopy and computer imagery, current pathology teaching environments warrant investigation of replacing traditional microscope exercises with computer applications. Chiropractic students supported the adoption of computer-assisted instruction in pathology laboratories.

  13. On Picturing a Candle: The Prehistory of Imagery Science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacKisack, Matthew; Aldworth, Susan; Macpherson, Fiona; Onians, John; Winlove, Crawford; Zeman, Adam

    2016-01-01

    The past 25 years have seen a rapid growth of knowledge about brain mechanisms involved in visual mental imagery. These advances have largely been made independently of the long history of philosophical - and even psychological - reckoning with imagery and its parent concept 'imagination'. We suggest that the view from these empirical findings can be widened by an appreciation of imagination's intellectual history, and we seek to show how that history both created the conditions for - and presents challenges to - the scientific endeavor. We focus on the neuroscientific literature's most commonly used task - imagining a concrete object - and, after sketching what is known of the neurobiological mechanisms involved, we examine the same basic act of imagining from the perspective of several key positions in the history of philosophy and psychology. We present positions that, firstly, contextualize and inform the neuroscientific account, and secondly, pose conceptual and methodological challenges to the scientific analysis of imagery. We conclude by reflecting on the intellectual history of visualization in the light of contemporary science, and the extent to which such science may resolve long-standing theoretical debates.

  14. Sun position calculator (SPC) for Landsat imagery with geodetic latitudes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seong, Jeong C.

    2015-12-01

    Landsat imagery comes with sun position information such as azimuth and sun elevation, but they are available only at the center of a scene. To aid in the use of Landsat imagery for various solar radiation applications such as topographic correction, solar power, urban heat island, agriculture, climate and vegetation, it is necessary to calculate the sun position information at every pixel. This research developed a PC application that creates sun position data layers in ArcGIS at every pixel in a Landsat scene. The SPC program is composed of two major routines - converting universal transverse Mercator (UTM) projection coordinates to geographic longitudes and latitudes, and calculating sun position information based on the Meeus' routine. For the latter, an innovative method was also implemented to account for the Earth's flattening on an ellipsoid. The Meeus routine implemented in this research showed about 0.2‧ of mean absolute difference from the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) Solar Position Algorithm (SPA) routine when solar zenith and azimuth angles were tested with every 30 min data at four city locations (Fairbanks, Atlanta, Sydney and Rio Grande) on June 30, 2014. The Meeus routine was about ten times faster than the SPA routine. Professionals who need the Sun's position information for Landsat imagery will benefit from the SPC application.

  15. Developing Affective Mental Imagery Stimuli with Multidimensional Scaling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew J. Facciani

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The goal of this paper is to provide an example of how multidimensional scaling (MDS can be used for stimuli development. The study described in this paper illustrates this process by developing affective mental imagery stimuli using the circumplex model of affect as a guide. The circumplex model of affect argues that all emotions can be described in terms of two underlying primary dimensions: valence and arousal (Russel, 1980. We used MDS to determine if affective mental imagery stimuli obtained from verbal prompts could be separated by arousal and valence to create four distinct categories (high –positive, low-positive, high-negative, and low-negative as seen in other stimuli. 60 students from the University of South Carolina participated in the first experiment to evaluate three sets of stimuli. After being analyzed using MDS, selected stimuli were then assessed again in a second experiment to validate their robust valence and arousal distinctions. The second experiment was conducted with 34 subjects to validate 40 of the best stimuli from experiment 1. It was found that mental imagery stimuli can produce a reliable affective response for the dimensions of valence and arousal and that MDS can be an effective tool for stimuli development.

  16. Detection of Hail Storms in Radar Imagery Using Deep Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pullman, Melinda; Gurung, Iksha; Ramachandran, Rahul; Maskey, Manil

    2017-01-01

    In 2016, hail was responsible for 3.5 billion and 23 million dollars in damage to property and crops, respectively, making it the second costliest weather phenomenon in the United States. In an effort to improve hail-prediction techniques and reduce the societal impacts associated with hail storms, we propose a deep learning technique that leverages radar imagery for automatic detection of hail storms. The technique is applied to radar imagery from 2011 to 2016 for the contiguous United States and achieved a precision of 0.848. Hail storms are primarily detected through the visual interpretation of radar imagery (Mrozet al., 2017). With radars providing data every two minutes, the detection of hail storms has become a big data task. As a result, scientists have turned to neural networks that employ computer vision to identify hail-bearing storms (Marzbanet al., 2001). In this study, we propose a deep Convolutional Neural Network (ConvNet) to understand the spatial features and patterns of radar echoes for detecting hailstorms.

  17. [The influence of visual imagery experience on EEG spatial organization].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sviderskaia, N E; Taratynova, G V; Kozhedub, R G

    2005-01-01

    The comparison of EEG spatial organization between groups of 23 students of graphic arts department ("professional" subjects) and 39 subjects of another specialization ("non-professional" subjects) was made in order to find EEG correlates of visual imagery experience. Changes in the spatial organization of biopotentials (spatial synchronization and spatial disorder, spectral power and coherence) were analyzed while subjects mentally composed visual images from two simple elements, right angle and oblique line. The total number of elements presented for the image composition increased with each subsequent task (in total, four tasks were presented) from the number adequate to simultaneous perception and conscious processing (less than 7 +/- 2) to a much higher number. Intergroup differences, especially, in the degree of the spatial disorder (non-linear processes), were most evident under conditions when the subjects operated with a greater number of elements (tasks 3 and 4). This parameter increased more rapidly in "professionals" than in "non-professionals". These changes were most pronounced in the right anterior cortex. In "non-professional" subjects, spatial synchronization (linear processes) increased in the right posterior area. In "professional" subjects, coherence and spectral power increased in a greater number of narrow EEG frequency subbands than in "non-professional" subjects. The findings suggest that the imagery performance in subjects with visual imagery experience involves complicated neurodynamic processes such as non-linear dynamics and numerous EEG spatial resonance systems.

  18. Satellite Imagery Assisted Road-Based Visual Navigation System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volkova, A.; Gibbens, P. W.

    2016-06-01

    There is a growing demand for unmanned aerial systems as autonomous surveillance, exploration and remote sensing solutions. Among the key concerns for robust operation of these systems is the need to reliably navigate the environment without reliance on global navigation satellite system (GNSS). This is of particular concern in Defence circles, but is also a major safety issue for commercial operations. In these circumstances, the aircraft needs to navigate relying only on information from on-board passive sensors such as digital cameras. An autonomous feature-based visual system presented in this work offers a novel integral approach to the modelling and registration of visual features that responds to the specific needs of the navigation system. It detects visual features from Google Earth* build a feature database. The same algorithm then detects features in an on-board cameras video stream. On one level this serves to localise the vehicle relative to the environment using Simultaneous Localisation and Mapping (SLAM). On a second level it correlates them with the database to localise the vehicle with respect to the inertial frame. The performance of the presented visual navigation system was compared using the satellite imagery from different years. Based on comparison results, an analysis of the effects of seasonal, structural and qualitative changes of the imagery source on the performance of the navigation algorithm is presented. * The algorithm is independent of the source of satellite imagery and another provider can be used

  19. Observations on the polarimetric imagery collection experiment database

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woolley, Mark; Michalson, Jacob; Romano, Joao

    2011-10-01

    The Spectral and Polarimetric Imagery Collection Experiment (SPICE) is an ongoing collaborative effort that commenced in February 2010 between the US Army ARDEC and Army Research Laboratory (ARL). SPICE is focused on the collection of mid-wave and long-wave infrared imagery using hyperspectral, polarimetric, and broadband sensors. The overall objective of SPICE is to collect a comprehensive database of the different modalities spanning multiple years to capture sensor performance encompassing a wide variety of meteorological (MET) conditions, diurnal, and seasonal changes inherent to Picatinny's northern New Jersey location. Utilizing the Precision Armament Laboratory (PAL) tower at Picatinny Arsenal, the sensors are autonomously collecting the desired data around the clock at multiple ranges containing surrogate 2S3 Self-Propelled Howitzer targets positioned at different orientations in an open woodland field. This database allows for: 1) Understanding of signature variability under adverse weather conditions; 2) Development of robust algorithms; 3) Development of new sensors; 4) Evaluation of polarimetric technology; and 5) Evaluation of fusing the different sensor modalities. In this paper, we will revisit the SPICE data collection objectives and the sensors deployed. We will present, in a statistical sense, the integrity of the data in the long-wave infrared (LWIR) polarimetric database collected from February through September 2010 and issues and lessons learned associated with a fully autonomous, around the clock data collection. We will also demonstrate sample LWIR polarimetric imagery and the performance of the Stokes parameters under adverse weather conditions.

  20. Using Google Streetview Panoramic Imagery for Geoscience Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Paor, D. G.; Dordevic, M. M.

    2014-12-01

    Google Streetview is a feature of Google Maps and Google Earth that allows viewers to switch from map or satellite view to 360° panoramic imagery recorded close to the ground. Most panoramas are recorded by Google engineers using special cameras mounted on the roofs of cars. Bicycles, snowmobiles, and boats have also been used and sometimes the camera has been mounted on a backpack for off-road use by hikers and skiers or attached to scuba-diving gear for "Underwater Streetview (sic)." Streetview panoramas are linked together so that the viewer can change viewpoint by clicking forward and reverse buttons. They therefore create a 4-D touring effect. As part of the GEODE project ("Google Earth for Onsite and Distance Education"), we are experimenting with the use of Streetview imagery for geoscience education. Our web-based test application allows instructors to select locations for students to study. Students are presented with a set of questions or tasks that they must address by studying the panoramic imagery. Questions include identification of rock types, structures such as faults, and general geological setting. The student view is locked into Streetview mode until they submit their answers, whereupon the map and satellite views become available, allowing students to zoom out and verify their location on Earth. Student learning is scaffolded by automatic computerized feedback. There are lots of existing Streetview panoramas with rich geological content. Additionally, instructors and members of the general public can create panoramas, including 360° Photo Spheres, by stitching images taken with their mobiles devices and submitting them to Google for evaluation and hosting. A multi-thousand-dollar, multi-directional camera and mount can be purchased from DIY-streetview.com. This allows power users to generate their own high-resolution panoramas. A cheaper, 360° video camera is soon to be released according to geonaute.com. Thus there are opportunities for

  1. Anxiety reduction in patients undergoing cardiac catheterization following massage and guided imagery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armstrong, Karen; Dixon, Simon; May, Sara; Patricolo, Gail Elliott

    2014-11-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the effectiveness of massage with or without guided imagery in reducing anxiety prior to cardiac catheterization. A total of 55 inpatients and outpatients received massage, guided imagery, or massage with guided imagery prior to cardiac catheterization. Self-reported anxiety levels and blood pressure (BP) and heart rate (HR) were evaluated in participants and a matched comparison group. Massage with and without guided imagery resulted in significant reductions in self-reported anxiety (p Massage with or without guided imagery immediately reduced self-reported anxiety. This pilot study has certain limitations: a non-randomized, convenience sample and a matched control group that was created retrospectively. However, the study indicates a benefit to providing massage or massage with guided imagery prior to anxiety-inducing medical procedures such as cardiac catheterization. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Imagery-Based Interventions for Music Performance Anxiety: An Integrative Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finch, Katherine; Moscovitch, David A

    2016-12-01

    Many musicians experience debilitating music performance anxiety (MPA). Outside music performance, imagery-based interventions have been incorporated into treatment protocols to help individuals, including athletes and those with social anxiety, manage heightened levels of anxiety in order to excel in performance-based domains. Despite the frequent use of mental imagery in MPA interventions and its importance as a mental rehearsal technique for musicians, no existing reviews have examined the literature on imagery-based interventions for MPA. The primary aim of this review was to analyze the existing MPA literature in order to summarize what is known about the efficacy and mechanisms of pre-performance mental imagery exercises. A literature search yielded eight studies that used imagery-based interventions for MPA, in both student and professional musicians, which included three dissertations and five peer-reviewed journal articles. In extant MPA treatment research, pre-performance imagery is often used in conjunction with other techniques in order to alleviate anxiety. Arousal imagery refers to imagining one's state of arousal during performance and has been incorporated into MPA interventions in various ways that guide musicians to anticipate the heightened arousal that accompanies performance, predominantly through imagery-based relaxation techniques. However, methodological limitations make it impossible to determine whether imagery is itself an active ingredient of treatment that underlies symptom changes, or whether relaxation imagery is the most effective use of pre-performance imagery for all musicians. There is much need for future well-controlled studies to examine whether and how imagery affects MPA independent of the other therapy components and techniques with which it is commonly combined.

  3. Building a Better Urban Picture: Combining Day and Night Remote Sensing Imagery

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Qingling; Li, Bin; Thau, David; Moore, Rebecca

    2015-01-01

    Urban areas play a very important role in global climate change. There is increasing need to understand global urban areas with sufficient spatial details for global climate change mitigation. Remote sensing imagery, such as medium resolution Landsat daytime multispectral imagery and coarse resolution Defense Meteorological Satellite Program/Operational Linescan System (DMSP/OLS) nighttime light imagery, has provided a powerful tool for characterizing and mapping cities, with advantages and d...

  4. A Standardised Vocabulary for Identifying Benthic Biota and Substrata from Underwater Imagery: The CATAMI Classification Scheme

    OpenAIRE

    Althaus, Franziska; Hill, Nicole; Ferrari, Renata; Edwards, Luke; Przeslawski, Rachel; Sch?nberg, Christine H. L.; Stuart-Smith, Rick; Barrett, Neville; Edgar, Graham; Colquhoun, Jamie; Tran, Maggie; Jordan, Alan; Rees, Tony; Gowlett-Holmes, Karen

    2015-01-01

    Imagery collected by still and video cameras is an increasingly important tool for minimal impact, repeatable observations in the marine environment. Data generated from imagery includes identification, annotation and quantification of biological subjects and environmental features within an image. To be long-lived and useful beyond their project-specific initial purpose, and to maximize their utility across studies and disciplines, marine imagery data should use a standardised vocabulary of ...

  5. Problems in the acquisition of imagery mnemonics: three brain-damaged cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crovitz, H F; Harvey, M T; Horn, R W

    1979-06-01

    The literature provides little direction on how to overcome difficulties which some brain-damaged patients have in acquiring imagery mnemonics as a memory aid during the period of anterograde amnesia. For those interested in the therepeutic usefulness of imagery mediation, we provide a detailed account of the acquisition of some mnemonic skill in three brain-damaged patients who initially failed in using visual imagery mediators to recall words lists.

  6. Imagery and retrieval of auditory and visual information: neural correlates of successful and unsuccessful performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huijbers, Willem; Pennartz, Cyriel M A; Rubin, David C; Daselaar, Sander M

    2011-06-01

    Remembering past events - or episodic retrieval - consists of several components. There is evidence that mental imagery plays an important role in retrieval and that the brain regions supporting imagery overlap with those supporting retrieval. An open issue is to what extent these regions support successful vs. unsuccessful imagery and retrieval processes. Previous studies that examined regional overlap between imagery and retrieval used uncontrolled memory conditions, such as autobiographical memory tasks, that cannot distinguish between successful and unsuccessful retrieval. A second issue is that fMRI studies that compared imagery and retrieval have used modality-aspecific cues that are likely to activate auditory and visual processing regions simultaneously. Thus, it is not clear to what extent identified brain regions support modality-specific or modality-independent imagery and retrieval processes. In the current fMRI study, we addressed this issue by comparing imagery to retrieval under controlled memory conditions in both auditory and visual modalities. We also obtained subjective measures of imagery quality allowing us to dissociate regions contributing to successful vs. unsuccessful imagery. Results indicated that auditory and visual regions contribute both to imagery and retrieval in a modality-specific fashion. In addition, we identified four sets of brain regions with distinct patterns of activity that contributed to imagery and retrieval in a modality-independent fashion. The first set of regions, including hippocampus, posterior cingulate cortex, medial prefrontal cortex and angular gyrus, showed a pattern common to imagery/retrieval and consistent with successful performance regardless of task. The second set of regions, including dorsal precuneus, anterior cingulate and dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, also showed a pattern common to imagery and retrieval, but consistent with unsuccessful performance during both tasks. Third, left ventrolateral

  7. The role of executive function in imagery mnemonics: evidence from multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canellopoulou, M; Richardson, J T

    1998-11-01

    The use of imagery in learning and memory involves metacognitive skills that seem to depend upon executive function as well as motivational mechanisms. This implies that the efficacy of imagery mnemonics should be impaired in neurological patients who show either executive dysfunction or affective disorders. This hypothesis was tested in patients with multiple sclerosis. Imagery instructions led to improved recall in three different tasks, although experimenter-generated imagery proved to be more effective than subject-generated imagery and there was little evidence that patients maintained the use of imagery mnemonics on follow-up testing. Three other tasks defined a unitary trait of executive processing efficiency, and this was significantly correlated with the benefit obtained from the use of the Method of Loci in a free-recall tasks, but not with the benefit gained from other imagery mnemonics. The patients' scores, on a widely used depression inventory, were not significantly correlated with the benefit obtained from the use of imagery mnemonics. Nonetheless, it is concluded that executive processing capacity determines the benefit that is derived from the use of more complex forms of imagery mnemonic in verbal-learning tasks.

  8. Economic assessment of pulsed dose-rate (P.D.R.) brachytherapy with optimized dose distribution for cervix carcinoma;Evaluation economique de la curietherapie de debit pulse gynecologique (PDR) avec optimisation de la dose pour les cancers du col uterin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Remonnay, R.; Morelle, M.; Pommier, P.; Carrere, M.O. [Lyon Univ., 69 (France); Remonnay, R.; Morelle, M.; Pommier, P. [Axe Economie de la Sante, GATE, CNRS-UMR 5824, Centre Leon-Berard, 69 - Lyon (France); Pommier, P. [Centre Leon-Berard, 69 - Lyon (France); Haie-Meder, C. [Institut Gustave-Roussy, 94 - Villejuif (France); Quetin, P. [Centre Paul-Strauss, 67 - Strasbourg (France); Kerr, C. [Centre Val-d' Aurelle, parc Euromedecine, 34 - Montpellier (France); Delannes, M. [Institut Claudius-Regaud, 31 - Toulouse (France); Castelain, B. [Centre Oscar-Lambret, 59 - Lille (France); Peignaux, K. [Centre Georges Francois Leclerc, 21 - Dijon (France); Kirova, Y. [Institut Curie, 75 - Paris (France); Romestaing, P. [Centre hospitalier Lyon Sud, 69 - Pierre-Benite (France); Williaume, D. [Centre Eugene-Marquis, 35 - Rennes (France); Krzisch, C. [Hopital Sud, 80 - Amiens (France); Thomas, L. [Institut Bergonie, 33 - Bordeaux (France); Lang, P. [Groupe hospitalier Pitie-Salpetriere, 75 - Paris (France); Baron, M.H. [Hopital Jean-Minjoz, 25 - Besancon (France); Cussac, A. [Centre Rene-Gauducheau, 44 - Nantes-Saint-Herblain (France); Lesaunier, F. [Centre Francois-Baclesse, 14 - Caen (France); Maillard, S. [Institut Jean-Godinot, 51 - Reims (France); Barillot, I. [Hopital Bretonneau, 37 - Tours (France); Charra-Brunaud, C.; Peiffert, D. [Centre Alexis-Vautrin, 54 - Vandoeuvre-les-Nancy (France)

    2010-06-15

    Purpose: Our study aims at evaluating the cost of pulsed dose-rate (P.D.R.) brachytherapy with optimized dose distribution versus traditional treatments (iridium wires, cesium, non-optimized P.D.R.). Issues surrounding reimbursement were also explored. Materials and methods: This prospective, multi-centre, non-randomized study conducted in the framework of a project entitled 'Support Program for Costly Diagnostic and Therapeutic Innovations' involved 21 hospitals. Patients with cervix carcinoma received either classical brachytherapy or the innovation. The direct medical costs of staff and equipment, as well as the costs of radioactive sources, consumables and building renovation were evaluated from a hospital point of view using a micro costing approach. Subsequent costs per brachytherapy were compared between the four strategies. Results: The economic study included 463 patients over two years. The main resources categories associated with P.D.R. brachytherapy (whether optimized or not) were radioactive sources (1053 Euros) and source projectors (735 Euros). Optimized P.D.R. induced higher cost of imagery and dosimetry (respectively 130 Euros and 367 Euros) than non-optimized P.D.R. (47 Euros and 75 Euros). Extra costs of innovation over the less costly strategy (iridium wires) reached more than 2100 Euros per treatment, but could be reduced by half in the hypothesis of 40 patients treated per year (instead of 24 in the study). Conclusion: Aside from staff, imaging and dosimetry, the current hospital reimbursements largely underestimated the cost of innovation related to equipment and sources. (authors)

  9. The Movement Imagery Questionnaire-Revised, Second Edition (MIQ-RS Is a Reliable and Valid Tool for Evaluating Motor Imagery in Stroke Populations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew J. Butler

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Mental imagery can improve motor performance in stroke populations when combined with physical therapy. Valid and reliable instruments to evaluate the imagery ability of stroke survivors are needed to maximize the benefits of mental imagery therapy. The purposes of this study were to: examine and compare the test-retest intra-rate reliability of the Movement Imagery Questionnaire-Revised, Second Edition (MIQ-RS in stroke survivors and able-bodied controls, examine internal consistency of the visual and kinesthetic items of the MIQ-RS, determine if the MIQ-RS includes both the visual and kinesthetic dimensions of mental imagery, correlate impairment and motor imagery scores, and investigate the criterion validity of the MIQ-RS in stroke survivors by comparing the results to the KVIQ-10. Test-retest analysis indicated good levels of reliability (ICC range: .83–.99 and internal consistency (Cronbach α: .95–.98 of the visual and kinesthetic subscales in both groups. The two-factor structure of the MIQ-RS was supported by factor analysis, with the visual and kinesthetic components accounting for 88.6% and 83.4% of the total variance in the able-bodied and stroke groups, respectively. The MIQ-RS is a valid and reliable instrument in the stroke population examined and able-bodied populations and therefore useful as an outcome measure for motor imagery ability.

  10. The Movement Imagery Questionnaire-Revised, Second Edition (MIQ-RS) Is a Reliable and Valid Tool for Evaluating Motor Imagery in Stroke Populations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butler, Andrew J.; Cazeaux, Jennifer; Fidler, Anna; Jansen, Jessica; Lefkove, Nehama; Gregg, Melanie; Hall, Craig; Easley, Kirk A.; Shenvi, Neeta; Wolf, Steven L.

    2012-01-01

    Mental imagery can improve motor performance in stroke populations when combined with physical therapy. Valid and reliable instruments to evaluate the imagery ability of stroke survivors are needed to maximize the benefits of mental imagery therapy. The purposes of this study were to: examine and compare the test-retest intra-rate reliability of the Movement Imagery Questionnaire-Revised, Second Edition (MIQ-RS) in stroke survivors and able-bodied controls, examine internal consistency of the visual and kinesthetic items of the MIQ-RS, determine if the MIQ-RS includes both the visual and kinesthetic dimensions of mental imagery, correlate impairment and motor imagery scores, and investigate the criterion validity of the MIQ-RS in stroke survivors by comparing the results to the KVIQ-10. Test-retest analysis indicated good levels of reliability (ICC range: .83–.99) and internal consistency (Cronbach α: .95–.98) of the visual and kinesthetic subscales in both groups. The two-factor structure of the MIQ-RS was supported by factor analysis, with the visual and kinesthetic components accounting for 88.6% and 83.4% of the total variance in the able-bodied and stroke groups, respectively. The MIQ-RS is a valid and reliable instrument in the stroke population examined and able-bodied populations and therefore useful as an outcome measure for motor imagery ability. PMID:22474504

  11. Assessment of predictive indices for glioblastomas radiation therapy: comparison of perfusion MRI and spectrometric imagery by magnetic resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lemoine, J.M.; Laprie, A.; Moyal Cohen-Jonathan, E.; Ken, S.; Lemoine, J.M.; Laprie, A.; Franceries, X.; Lotterie, J.A.; Celsis, P.; Lubrano, V.; Berry, I.; Ken, S.; Lemoine, J.M.; Franceries, X.; Lotterie, J.A.; Berry, I.; Lubrano, V.

    2010-01-01

    The authors report the comparison of several imagery modalities: anatomic imagery (T1-weighted MRI after gadolinium injection and T2-weighted MRI), metabolic imagery (spectrometric imagery by magnetic resonance) and functional imagery (perfusion MRI). This comparison has been performed within the frame of a prospective clinic test associating a radiosensitizer concomitant with a radiation therapy of glioblastomas. It appears that the integration of data of spectrometric imagery by magnetic resonance and of perfusion MRI is a promising method to overcome the resistance of glioblastomas. Short communication

  12. Effects of Mental Imagery on Muscular Strength in Healthy and Patient Participants: A Systematic Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slimani, Maamer; Tod, David; Chaabene, Helmi; Miarka, Bianca; Chamari, Karim

    2016-01-01

    The aims of the present review were to (i) provide a critical overview of the current literature on the effects of mental imagery on muscular strength in healthy participants and patients with immobilization of the upper extremity (i.e., hand) and anterior cruciate ligament (ACL), (ii) identify potential moderators and mediators of the “mental imagery-strength performance” relationship and (iii) determine the relative contribution of electromyography (EMG) and brain activities, neural and physiological adaptations in the mental imagery-strength performance relationship. This paper also discusses the theoretical and practical implications of the contemporary literature and suggests possible directions for future research. Overall, the results reveal that the combination of mental imagery and physical practice is more efficient than, or at least comparable to, physical execution with respect to strength performance. Imagery prevention intervention was also effective in reducing of strength loss after short-term muscle immobilization and ACL. The present review also indicates advantageous effects of internal imagery (range from 2.6 to 136.3%) for strength performance compared with external imagery (range from 4.8 to 23.2%). Typically, mental imagery with muscular activity was higher in active than passive muscles, and imagining “lifting a heavy object” resulted in more EMG activity compared with imagining “lifting a lighter object”. Thus, in samples of students, novices, or youth male and female athletes, internal mental imagery has a greater effect on muscle strength than external mental imagery does. Imagery ability, motivation, and self-efficacy have been shown to be the variables mediating the effect of mental imagery on strength performance. Finally, the greater effects of internal imagery than those of external imagery could be explained in terms of neural adaptations, stronger brain activation, higher muscle excitation, greater somatic and

  13. Processing near-infrared imagery of hypersonic space shuttle reentries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spisz, Thomas S.; Taylor, Jeff C.; Gibson, David M.; Osei-Wusu, Kwame; Horvath, Thomas J.; Zalameda, Joseph N.; Tomek, Deborah M.; Tietjen, Alan B.; Tack, Steve; Schwartz, Richard J.

    2010-05-01

    High-resolution, calibrated, near-infrared imagery of the Space Shuttle during reentry has been obtained by a US Navy NP-3D Orion aircraft as part of NASA's HYTHIRM (Hypersonic Thermodynamic InfraRed Measurements) project. The long-range optical sensor package is called Cast Glance. Three sets of imagery have been processed thus far: 1) STS- 119 when Shuttle Discovery was at 52 km away at Mach 8.4, 2) STS-125 when Shuttle Atlantis was 71 km away at Mach 14.3, and 3) STS-128 when Shuttle Discovery was at 80 km away at Mach 14.7. The challenges presented in processing a manually-tracked high-angular rate, air-to-air image data collection include management of significant frame-to-frame motions, motion-induced blurring, changing orientations and ranges, daylight conditions, and sky backgrounds (including some cirrus clouds). This paper describes processing the imagery to estimate Shuttle surface temperatures. Our goal is to reduce the detrimental effects due to motions (sensor and Shuttle), vibration, and atmospherics for image quality improvement, without compromising the quantitative integrity of the data, especially local intensity variations. Our approach is to select and utilize only the highest quality images, register many cotemporal image frames to a single image frame, and then add the registered frames to improve image quality and reduce noise. These registered and averaged intensity images are converted to temperatures on the Shuttle's windward surface using a series of steps starting with preflight calibration data. Comparisons with thermocouples at different points along the space Shuttle and between the three reentries will be shown.

  14. Visual perception and imagery: a new molecular hypothesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bókkon, I

    2009-05-01

    Here, we put forward a redox molecular hypothesis about the natural biophysical substrate of visual perception and visual imagery. This hypothesis is based on the redox and bioluminescent processes of neuronal cells in retinotopically organized cytochrome oxidase-rich visual areas. Our hypothesis is in line with the functional roles of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species in living cells that are not part of haphazard process, but rather a very strict mechanism used in signaling pathways. We point out that there is a direct relationship between neuronal activity and the biophoton emission process in the brain. Electrical and biochemical processes in the brain represent sensory information from the external world. During encoding or retrieval of information, electrical signals of neurons can be converted into synchronized biophoton signals by bioluminescent radical and non-radical processes. Therefore, information in the brain appears not only as an electrical (chemical) signal but also as a regulated biophoton (weak optical) signal inside neurons. During visual perception, the topological distribution of photon stimuli on the retina is represented by electrical neuronal activity in retinotopically organized visual areas. These retinotopic electrical signals in visual neurons can be converted into synchronized biophoton signals by radical and non-radical processes in retinotopically organized mitochondria-rich areas. As a result, regulated bioluminescent biophotons can create intrinsic pictures (depictive representation) in retinotopically organized cytochrome oxidase-rich visual areas during visual imagery and visual perception. The long-term visual memory is interpreted as epigenetic information regulated by free radicals and redox processes. This hypothesis does not claim to solve the secret of consciousness, but proposes that the evolution of higher levels of complexity made the intrinsic picture representation of the external visual world possible by regulated

  15. Software tools for assisting the multisource imagery analyst

    Science.gov (United States)

    Privett, Grant J.; Harvey, Peter R. W.; Booth, David M.; Kent, Philip J.; Redding, Nick J.; Evans, Dean; Jones, K. L.

    2003-11-01

    Increasingly demanding military requirements and rapid technological advances are producing reconnaissance sensors with greater spatial, spectral and temporal resolution. This, with the benefits to be gained from deploying multiple sensors co-operatively, is resulting in a so-called data deluge, where recording systems, data-links, and exploitation systems struggle to cope with the required imagery throughput. This paper focuses on the exploitation stage and, in particular, the provision of cueing aids for Imagery Analysts (IAs), who need to integrate a variety of sources in order to gain situational awareness. These sources may include multi-source imagery and intelligence feeds, various types of mapping and collateral data, as well the need for the IAs to add their own expertise in military doctrine etc. This integration task is becoming increasingly difficult as the volume and diversity of the input increases. The first stage in many exploitation tasks is that of image registration. It facilitates change detection and many avenues of multi-source exploitation. Progress is reported on the automating this task, on its current performance characteristics, its integration into a potentially operational system, and hence on its expected utility. We also report on the development of an evolutionary architecture, 'ICARUS' in which feature detectors (or cuers) are constructed incrementally using a genetic algorithm that evolves simple sub-structures before combining, and further evolving them, to form more comprehensive and robust detectors. This approach is shown to help overcome the complexity limit that prevents many machine-learning algorithms from scaling up to the real world.

  16. International Space Station Instmments Collect Imagery of Natural Disasters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, C. A.; Stefanov, W. L.

    2013-01-01

    A new focus for utilization of the International Space Station (ISS) is conducting basic and applied research that directly benefits Earth's citizenry. In the Earth Sciences, one such activity is collecting remotely sensed imagery of disaster areas and making those data immediately available through the USGS Hazards Data Distribution System, especially in response to activations of the International Charter for Space and Major Disasters (known informally as the "International Disaster Charter", or IDC). The ISS, together with other NASA orbital sensor assets, responds to IDC activations following notification by the USGS. Most of the activations are due to natural hazard events, including large floods, impacts of tropical systems, major fires, and volcanic eruptions and earthquakes. Through the ISS Program Science Office, we coordinate with ISS instrument teams for image acquisition using several imaging systems. As of 1 August 2013, we have successfully contributed imagery data in support of 14 Disaster Charter Activations, including regions in both Haiti and the east coast of the US impacted by Hurricane Sandy; flooding events in Russia, Mozambique, India, Germany and western Africa; and forest fires in Algeria and Ecuador. ISS-based sensors contributing data include the Hyperspectral Imager for the Coastal Ocean (HICO), the ISERV (ISS SERVIR Environmental Research and Visualization System) Pathfinder camera mounted in the US Window Observational Research Facility (WORF), the ISS Agricultural Camera (ISSAC), formerly operating from the WORF, and high resolution handheld camera photography collected by crew members (Crew Earth Observations). When orbital parameters and operations support data collection, ISS-based imagery adds to the resources available to disaster response teams and contributes to the publicdomain record of these events for later analyses.

  17. Visualizing UAS-collected imagery using augmented reality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conover, Damon M.; Beidleman, Brittany; McAlinden, Ryan; Borel-Donohue, Christoph C.

    2017-05-01

    One of the areas where augmented reality will have an impact is in the visualization of 3-D data. 3-D data has traditionally been viewed on a 2-D screen, which has limited its utility. Augmented reality head-mounted displays, such as the Microsoft HoloLens, make it possible to view 3-D data overlaid on the real world. This allows a user to view and interact with the data in ways similar to how they would interact with a physical 3-D object, such as moving, rotating, or walking around it. A type of 3-D data that is particularly useful for military applications is geo-specific 3-D terrain data, and the visualization of this data is critical for training, mission planning, intelligence, and improved situational awareness. Advances in Unmanned Aerial Systems (UAS), photogrammetry software, and rendering hardware have drastically reduced the technological and financial obstacles in collecting aerial imagery and in generating 3-D terrain maps from that imagery. Because of this, there is an increased need to develop new tools for the exploitation of 3-D data. We will demonstrate how the HoloLens can be used as a tool for visualizing 3-D terrain data. We will describe: 1) how UAScollected imagery is used to create 3-D terrain maps, 2) how those maps are deployed to the HoloLens, 3) how a user can view and manipulate the maps, and 4) how multiple users can view the same virtual 3-D object at the same time.

  18. International Space Station Instruments Collect Imagery of Natural Disasters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, C. A.; Stefanov, W. L.

    2013-12-01

    A new focus for the International Space Station (ISS) is conducting basic and applied research that directly benefits Earth's citizenry. In the Earth Sciences, one such activity is collecting remotely sensed imagery of disaster areas and making those data immediately available through the USGS Hazards Data Distribution System, especially in response to activations of the International Charter for Space and Major Disasters (known informally as the 'International Disaster Charter', or IDC). The ISS, together with other NASA orbital sensor assets, responds to IDC activations following notification by the USGS. Most of the activations are due to natural hazard events, including large floods, impacts of tropical systems, major fires, and volcanic eruptions and earthquakes. Through the ISS Program Science Office, we coordinate with ISS instrument teams for image acquisition using several imaging systems. As of 1 August 2013, we have successfully contributed imagery data in support of 14 Disaster Charter Activations, including regions in both Haiti and the east coast of the US impacted by Hurricane Sandy; flooding events in Russia, Mozambique, India, Germany and western Africa; and forest fires in Algeria and Ecuador. ISS-based sensors contributing data include the Hyperspectral Imager for the Coastal Ocean (HICO), the ISERV (ISS SERVIR Environmental Research and Visualization System) Pathfinder camera mounted in the US Window Observational Research Facility (WORF), the ISS Agricultural Camera (ISSAC), formerly operating from the WORF, and high resolution handheld camera photography collected by crew members (Crew Earth Observations). When orbital parameters and operations support data collection, ISS-based imagery adds to the resources available to disaster response teams and contributes to the public-domain record of these events for later analyses.

  19. Feasibility of central meditation and imagery therapy for dementia caregivers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Felipe A; Nazarian, Nora; Lavretsky, Helen

    2014-08-01

    Family dementia caregivers are at high risk of depression and burnout. We assessed the feasibility of Central Meditation and Imagery Therapy for Caregivers (CMIT-C), a novel 8-week group meditation and guided imagery group therapy program, for dementia caregivers reporting stress because of caregiving responsibilities. Twelve family dementia caregivers enrolled in CMIT-C. Primary outcomes included depression and anxiety, and secondary outcomes included insomnia, quality of life, and mindfulness. Changes over the study and 3 month follow-up were analyzed with non-parametric related samples tests. Correlations of feeling state changes from meditation diaries at 1 week were made with symptom changes post meditation training. Ten participants completed the study. Completers came to an average of 7 ± 1 sessions out of a possible 8 sessions, and turned in home practice logs of 90 ± 10% of the time. Anxiety, depression, and insomnia symptoms decreased, and mindfulness ratings improved with large effects (all p meditation practice was associated with subsequent home meditation practice, anxiety change at 8 weeks, and endpoint satisfaction with CMIT-C. Central Meditation and Imagery Therapy for Caregivers is a feasible intervention for dementia caregivers. Results suggest that this therapeutic technique can reduce symptoms of anxiety, depression, and insomnia, and increase levels of mindfulness. Early response to meditation practice predicted those with the greatest short-term benefits, and this may inform future studies of meditation. Larger controlled efficacy studies of CMIT-C for dementia caregivers are warranted. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  20. RIGOROUS GEOREFERENCING OF ALSAT-2A PANCHROMATIC AND MULTISPECTRAL IMAGERY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Boukerch

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The exploitation of the full geometric capabilities of the High-Resolution Satellite Imagery (HRSI, require the development of an appropriate sensor orientation model. Several authors studied this problem; generally we have two categories of geometric models: physical and empirical models. Based on the analysis of the metadata provided with ALSAT-2A, a rigorous pushbroom camera model can be developed. This model has been successfully applied to many very high resolution imagery systems. The relation between the image and ground coordinates by the time dependant collinearity involving many coordinates systems has been tested. The interior orientation parameters must be integrated in the model, the interior parameters can be estimated from the viewing angles corresponding to the pointing directions of any detector, these values are derived from cubic polynomials provided in the metadata. The developed model integrates all the necessary elements with 33 unknown. All the approximate values of the 33 unknowns parameters may be derived from the informations contained in the metadata files provided with the imagery technical specifications or they are simply fixed to zero, so the condition equation is linearized and solved using SVD in a least square sense in order to correct the initial values using a suitable number of well-distributed GCPs. Using Alsat-2A images over the town of Toulouse in the south west of France, three experiments are done. The first is about 2D accuracy analysis using several sets of parameters. The second is about GCPs number and distribution. The third experiment is about georeferencing multispectral image by applying the model calculated from panchromatic image.