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Sample records for cured epoxy resins

  1. Cure of epoxy resins determined by simple tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ladaki, M.; Nigh, W. G.

    1968-01-01

    Rapid visual and simple quantitative tests indicate the degree of cure of particular epoxy resin binders in prepreg stock. It is possible that these tests may be extended to a number of different epoxy formulations.

  2. Epoxy foams using multiple resins and curing agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russick, Edward M.; Rand, Peter B.

    2000-01-01

    An epoxy foam comprising a plurality of resins, a plurality of curing agents, at least one blowing agent, at least one surfactant and optionally at least one filler and the process for making. Preferred is an epoxy foam comprising two resins of different reactivities, two curing agents, a blowing agent, a surfactant, and a filler. According to the present invention, an epoxy foam is prepared with tailorable reactivity, exotherm, and pore size by a process of admixing a plurality of resins with a plurality of curing agents, a surfactant and blowing agent, whereby a foamable mixture is formed and heating said foamable mixture at a temperature greater than the boiling temperature of the blowing agent whereby said mixture is foamed and cured.

  3. Health Problems of Epoxy Resins and Amine-curing Agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourne, L. B.; Milner, F. J. M.; Alberman, K. B.

    1959-01-01

    Epoxy resins were first introduced about 10 years ago. Toxic effects, particularly dermatitis, have been frequently described. An investigation into the possible causes of pathological sequelae following the use of epoxy resin/amine mixtures has been undertaken. The cause of most cases of dermatitis and sensitization appears to be uncombined amine which is present in recent mixtures and persists in hardened resin for long periods. The results of experiments with two of the most commonly used resin/amine mixtures confirm this. Cold-cured resins are more dangerous and remain so even when hardened. A simple theory is suggested for the mechanism of the reaction between epoxy resins, amines, and biological systems. This theory leads logically to the handling precautions outlined. Images PMID:13651551

  4. Thermal Study of Anhydrides Cured Tetrafunctional Cardo Epoxy Resin

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    Jignesh P. Patel

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Tetrafunctional cardo epoxy resin (EBCF was cured by using 10 wt% maleic anhydride (MA, pyromellitic dianhydride (PMDA, phthalic anhydride (PA, tetrahydrophthalic anhydride (THPA, tetrabromophthalic anhydride (TBPA, and tetrachlorophthalic anhydride (TCPA as hardeners at 120°C for 40–105 min (gel time and then postcured 1 h at 130°C. Gel time is found to depend on the structure of the anhydrides used. Cured samples were found insoluble in common solvents. Cured and uncured EBCF were characterized by FTIR, DSC, and TGA techniques. Cured and uncured resins followed multistep degradation reactions. Kinetic parameters, namely, order of degradation, energy of activation, frequency factor, and entropy change, were determined according to the Anderson-Freeman method and interpreted in light of the nature of hardeners used for curing purpose. The resins followed integral or fractional order degradation kinetics. Complex degradation reactions are due to different types of linkages in cured resins. Both nature and structure of resin and hardeners affected the curing behavior and the resultant thermal properties of the cured resins.

  5. Modified Castor Oil as an Epoxy Resin Curing Agent

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    B. P. Patel

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available A castor oil, an agricultural product, is an unsaturated material. Hence the castor oil is brominated by bromine liquid. The brominated castor oil (BCO was then reacted with excess of aliphatic diamines viz; ethylene diamine, 1,3-propane diamine and 1,6-hexane diamine. The resultant amino functionalized castor oil (ACO samples were then characterized by elemental analysis, IR spectral study and number of amino groups. All the three ACO samples were then employed for the curing of commercial Brominated epoxy resin. The curing of epoxy resin by ACO was monitored on differential scanning calorimeter (DSC and based on the DSC study their glass fibre reinforced composites (GRC were fabricated. The cured samples (i.e. unreinforced were also subjected to thermo gravimetric analysis (TGA. The chemical, mechanical and electrical properties of the glass fibre reinforced composites (GRC were also evaluated.

  6. Research Progress on Microwave Curing of Epoxy Resin and Its Composites

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    XU Xue-hong

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Research progress of microwave curing on epoxy resin and its composites was summarized on the basis of introducing the principle of microwave curing technology and its advantages. The paper focused on the effect of microwave curing on the curing rate of epoxy resin and its composites as well as the mechanical and thermal properties of cured products. Two suitable composite systems for wave curing of powder-strengthened epoxy and fiber-strengthened epoxy and a few key technological problems for industrial application are introduced. The application prospect of microwave curing on epoxy resin and its composites was also presented.

  7. Cold-Curing Structural Epoxy Resins: Analysis of the Curing Reaction as a Function of Curing Time and Thickness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corcione, Carola Esposito; Freuli, Fabrizio; Frigione, Mariaenrica

    2014-09-22

    The curing reaction of a commercial cold-curing structural epoxy resin, specifically formulated for civil engineering applications, was analyzed by thermal analysis as a function of the curing time and the sample thickness. Original and remarkable results regarding the effects of curing time on the glass transition temperature and on the residual heat of reaction of the cold-cured epoxy were obtained. The influence of the sample thickness on the curing reaction of the cold-cured resin was also deeply investigated. A highly exothermal reaction, based on a self-activated frontal polymerization reaction, was supposed and verified trough a suitable temperature signal acquisition system, specifically realized for this measurement. This is one of the first studies carried out on the curing behavior of these peculiar cold-cured epoxy resins as a function of curing time and thickness.

  8. Thermal expansion and swelling of cured epoxy resin used in graphite/epoxy composite materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adamson, M. J.

    1980-01-01

    The paper presents results of experiments in which the thermal expansion and swelling behavior of an epoxy resin system and two graphite/epoxy composite systems exposed to water were measured. It was found that the cured epoxy resin swells by an amount slightly less than the volume of the absorbed water and that the swelling efficiency of the water varies with the moisture content of the polymer. Additionally, the thermal expansion of cured epoxy resin that is saturated with water is observed to be more than twice that of dry resin. Results also indicate that cured resin that is saturated with 7.1% water at 95 C will rapidly increase in moisture content to 8.5% when placed in 1 C water. The mechanism for this phenomenon, termed reverse thermal effect, is described in terms of a slightly modified free-volume theory in conjunction with the theory of polar molecule interaction. Nearly identical behavior was observed in two graphite/epoxy composite systems, thus establishing that this behavior may be common to all cured epoxy resins.

  9. Electron Beam Cured Epoxy Resin Composites for High Temperature Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janke, Christopher J.; Dorsey, George F.; Havens, Stephen J.; Lopata, Vincent J.; Meador, Michael A.

    1997-01-01

    Electron beam curing of Polymer Matrix Composites (PMC's) is a nonthermal, nonautoclave curing process that has been demonstrated to be a cost effective and advantageous alternative to conventional thermal curing. Advantages of electron beam curing include: reduced manufacturing costs; significantly reduced curing times; improvements in part quality and performance; reduced environmental and health concerns; and improvement in material handling. In 1994 a Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA), sponsored by the Department of Energy Defense Programs and 10 industrial partners, was established to advance the electron beam curing of PMC technology. Over the last several years a significant amount of effort within the CRADA has been devoted to the development and optimization of resin systems and PMCs that match the performance of thermal cured composites. This highly successful materials development effort has resulted in a board family of high performance, electron beam curable cationic epoxy resin systems possessing a wide range of excellent processing and property profiles. Hundreds of resin systems, both toughened and untoughened, offering unlimited formulation and processing flexibility have been developed and evaluated in the CRADA program.

  10. Curing agent for polyepoxides and epoxy resins and composites cured therewith. [preventing carbon fiber release

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serafini, T. T.; Delvigs, P.; Vannucci, R. D. (Inventor)

    1981-01-01

    A curing for a polyepoxide is described which contains a divalent aryl radical such as phenylene a tetravalent aryl radical such as a tetravalent benzene radical. An epoxide is cured by admixture with the curing agent. The cured epoxy product retains the usual properties of cured epoxides and, in addition, has a higher char residue after burning, on the order of 45% by weight. The higher char residue is of value in preventing release to the atmosphere of carbon fibers from carbon fiber-epoxy resin composites in the event of burning of the composite.

  11. Effect of cure cycle on curing process and hardness for epoxy resin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available A 3-dimensional finite element model is developed to simulate and analyze the temperature and degree of cure field of epoxy casting part during cure process. The present model based on general finite element software ABAQUS is verified by literature example and experimental data. The numerical results show good agreement with literature example and measured data, and are even more accurate than the simulation of literature. After modeling successfully, the influence of temperature cure cycle ramps have on the temperature and degree of cure gradient is investigated. Moreover, the effect of non-uniform temperature and degree of cure field within epoxy casting part on hardness is demonstrated. The present model provides an accurate and novel method that allows further insight into the process of cure for epoxy resin.

  12. Solidifying process and flame retardancy of epoxy resin cured with boron-containing phenolic resin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Peng; Shi, Yan; Liu, Yuansen; Liu, Yuan; Wang, Qi

    2018-01-01

    For the sake of improving the charring performance and flame retardancy of epoxy resin (EP), boron-containing phenolic resin (BPR) instead of a conventional curing agent, linear phenolic resin (LPR) was employed to cure EP. Of several possible chemical structures for BPR, the existence of benzyl hydroxy groups in BPR chains has been confirmed using 1H nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. The resonance of these groups may reasonably explain the higher curing reactivity of BPR-cured EP than that of LPR-cured EP. Thermogravimetric analysis, observation of the morphologies of the char residues and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopic were performed to characterize the charring process. Due to the presence of B2O3 produced on the char surface from decomposition of phenyl borates and the facile high self-crosslinking reaction of BPR, a more continuous and stronger char barrier was formed for BPR-cured EP compared to that for the LPR-cured EP system. Therefore the former exhibited much better flame retardancy. In addition, BPR-cured EP also displayed better dynamic mechanical properties, than those observed for LPR-cured EP. It is not subject to the significant lowering the glass transition temperature of the polymer which accompanies curing with LPR. This suggests that BPR cured resin may meet the requirement for utilization at high temperature.

  13. Cure reaction of epoxy resins catalyzed by graphite-based nanofiller

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corcione, C. Esposito; Acocella, Maria Rosaria; Giuri, Antonella; Maffezzoli, Alfonso; Guerra, Gaetano

    2015-12-01

    A significant effort was directed to the synthesis of graphene stacks/epoxy nanocomposites and to the analysis of the effect of a graphene precursor on cure reaction of a model epoxy matrix. A comparative thermal analysis of epoxy resins filled with an exfoliated graphite oxide eGO were conducted. The main aim was to understand the molecular origin of the influence of eGO on the Tg of epoxy resins. The higher Tg values previously observed for low curing temperatures, for epoxy resins with graphite-based nanofillers, were easily rationalized by a catalytic activity of graphitic layers on the reaction between the epoxy and amine groups of the resin, which leads to higher crosslinking density in milder conditions. A kinetic analysis of the cure mechanism of the epoxy resin associated to the catalytical activity of the graphite based filler was performed by isothermal DSC measurements. The DSC results showed that the addition of graphite based filler greatly increased the enthalpy of epoxy reaction and the reaction rate, confirming the presence of a catalytic activity of graphitic layers on the crosslinking reaction between the epoxy resin components (epoxide oligomer and di-amine). A kinetic modelling analysis, arising from an auto-catalyzed reaction mechanism, was finally applied to isothermal DSC data, in order to predict the cure mechanism of the epoxy resin in presence of the graphite based nanofiller.

  14. Cure monitoring of epoxy resin by using fiber bragg grating sensor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jin Hyuk [KEPCO, Naju (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Dae Hyun [Dept. of Mechanical and Automotive Engineering, Seoul National University of Science and Technology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-06-15

    In several industrial fields, epoxy resin is widely used as an adhesive for co-curing and manufacturing various structures. Controlling the manufacturing process is required for ensuring robust bonding performance and the stability of the structures. A fiber optic sensor is suitable for the cure monitoring of epoxy resin owing to the thready shape of the sensor. In this paper, a fiber Bragg grating (FBG) sensor was applied for the cure monitoring of epoxy resin. Based on the experimental results, it was demonstrated that the FBG sensor can monitor the status of epoxy resin curing by measuring the strain caused by volume shrinkage and considering the compensation of temperature. In addition, two types of epoxy resin were used for the cure-monitoring; moreover, when compared to each other, it was found that the two types of epoxy had different cure-processes in terms of the change of strain during the curing. Therefore, the study proved that the FBG sensor is very profitable for the cure-monitoring of epoxy resin.

  15. Electron-beam curing of epoxy resins: effect of alcohols on cationic ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Electron-beam (e-beam) induced polymerization of epoxy resins proceeds via cationic mechanism in presence of suitable photoinitiator. Despite good thermal properties and significant processing advantages, epoxy-based composites manufactured using e-beam curing suffer from low compressive strength, poor ...

  16. Accurate Cure Modeling for Isothermal Processing of Fast Curing Epoxy Resins

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    Alexander Bernath

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available In this work a holistic approach for the characterization and mathematical modeling of the reaction kinetics of a fast epoxy resin is shown. Major composite manufacturing processes like resin transfer molding involve isothermal curing at temperatures far below the ultimate glass transition temperature. Hence, premature vitrification occurs during curing and consequently has to be taken into account by the kinetic model. In order to show the benefit of using a complex kinetic model, the Kamal-Malkin kinetic model is compared to the Grindling kinetic model in terms of prediction quality for isothermal processing. From the selected models, only the Grindling kinetic is capable of taking into account vitrification. Non-isothermal, isothermal and combined differential scanning calorimetry (DSC measurements are conducted and processed for subsequent use for model parametrization. In order to demonstrate which DSC measurements are vital for proper cure modeling, both models are fitted to varying sets of measurements. Special attention is given to the evaluation of isothermal DSC measurements which are subject to deviations arising from unrecorded cross-linking prior to the beginning of the measurement as well as from physical aging effects. It is found that isothermal measurements are vital for accurate modeling of isothermal cure and cannot be neglected. Accurate cure predictions are achieved using the Grindling kinetic model.

  17. Effect of Curing Agent and Temperature on the Rheological Behavior of Epoxy Resin Systems

    OpenAIRE

    Lei Zhao; Chenhui Zhao; Guangcheng Zhang

    2012-01-01

    The effect of curing agent (6610) content and temperature on the rheological behavior of the epoxy resin CYD-128 was studied by DSC analysis and viscosity experiments. The results show that the resin system meets the requirements of processing technology. A complete reaction occurs when the curing agent content (40 parts per hundred resin, phr) is a little higher than the theoretical value (33.33 phr), while the degree of reaction of the resin system is reduced when the curing agent content i...

  18. Analyses on curing process of electron beam radiation in epoxy resins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sui Gang; Zhang Zuoguang; Chen Changqi; Zhong Weihong

    2003-02-17

    Epoxy resins have already been applied in electron beam (EB) curable composites structures extensively. The effects of different initiators and diluents on Shell Epon 828 radiation reaction were discussed in the paper, and the same radiation reaction systems were also explored using a heat treatment. The experimental results indicated cationic photoinitiator can initiate EB radiation curing of epoxy resin and traditionally heat-cured systems are not always suitable for the EB curing. The use of diluents would reduce the curing degree of resin and reactive diluents have less effect. The cationic ring-opening polymerization process including the decomposition of diaryliodonium salts under EB radiation at the initial stage and production of protonic acid that can initiate polyreaction was validated in the experiments. The characteristic of cured field and penetration process of EB in Shell Epon 828 system was also studied, and the whole cured area was found to be consisting of many lamellar structures.

  19. Single-component and fast-curing epoxy resin for liquid composite molding processes

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    Wang Yiru

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Development of single-component and fast-curing epoxy resins is highly desired for many industry applications. In this work, we report an epoxy system based on diglycidyl ether of bisphenol A (DGEBA and 1-(2-cyanoethyl-2-ethyl-4- methylimidazole (1C2E4MIM. The inductive effect of electron-withdrawing cyano group distinctly increases the latency of 1C2E4MIM without sacrificing the curing rate. The results of differential scanning calorimeter (DSC and dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA measurements indicate DGEBA/1C2E4MIM epoxy system can be fully cured in 15 min. The rheological, thermal and mechanical properties of DGEBA/1C2E4MIM epoxy system were studied in detail. The results show that the shelf life of this epoxy system is more than 4 days at room temperature and more than 6 months at -18 °C. The cured epoxy resins show high glass transition temperature (>155 °C, tensile strength (>80 MPa as well as excellent moist heat resistance. Finally, carbon fiber-reinforced polymer composites (CFRPs were fabricated using this epoxy system as matrix via vacuum assisted resin infusion (VARI process. The mechanical properties of CFRPs, including tensile, flexural, compressive and interlaminar shear properties, were investigated.

  20. Tetraglycidyl epoxy resins and graphite fiber composites cured with flexibilized aromatic diamines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delvigs, P.

    1986-01-01

    Studies were performed to synthesize new ether modified, flexibilized aromatic diamine hardeners for curing epoxy resins. The effect of moisture absorption on the glass transition temperatures of a tetraglycidyl epoxy, MY 720, cured with flexibilized hardeners and a conventional aromatic diamine was studied. Unidirectional composites, using epoxy-sized Celion 6000 graphite fiber as the reinforcement, were fabricated. The room temperature and 300 F mechanical properties of the composites, before and after moisture exposure, were determined. The Mode I interlaminar fracture toughness of the composites was characterized using a double cantilever beam technique to calculate the critical strain energy release rate.

  1. Processing-property relationships in autocalve-cured graphite-fiber/epoxy-resin composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, H.T.

    1988-01-01

    Research was conducted to model processing and investigate relationships between processing and physical/mechanical properties in autoclave-cured unidirectional graphite/epoxy composites. Particular attention was given to the cure kinetics, the temperature distribution inside the composite during cure, the chemorheology, the resin flow, and the physical/mechanical properties of the neat resin and its composites. The TGDDM/DDS epoxy system and unidirectional graphite fiber-reinforced composites were chosen for the study. The kinetics of neat resin and its prepreg were evaluated. Changes in temperature distribution in a composite during cure as a function of cure time and position were predicted by solving an energy-balance equation. A modified WLF equation was proposed as a theoretical model to predict changes of the chemoviscosity during cure; experimental data were generated from a cone-and-plate rheometer. Resin flow during cure was characterized by investigating the cross-section area of the composite. Finally, the effect of the curing process on the physical/mechanical properties of neat resin and composite was evaluated. Matrix-dominated failure mode was assessed. Both strength characterization and fracture mechanics test methods were performed.

  2. Curing behavior and thermal properties of trifunctional epoxy resin cured by 4, 4’-diaminodiphenyl sulfone

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    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available A novel trifunctional epoxy resin 4-(3, 3-dihydro-7-hydroxy-2, 4, 4-trimethyl-2H-1-benzopyran-2-yl-1, 3-benzenediol glycidyl (shorted as TMBPBTH-EPOXY was synthesized in our lab to improve thermal performance. Its curing behavior and performance were studied by using 4, 4′-diaminodiphenyl sulfone (DDS as hardener with the mass ratio of 100:41 of TMBPBTH-EPOXY and DDS. The curing activation energy was investigated by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC to be 64.0 kJ/mol estimated by Kissinger’s method and 68.7 kJ/mol estimated by Flynn-Wall-Ozawa method respectively. Thermogravimetric analyzer (TGA was used to investigate the thermal decomposition of cured compounds. It was found that when curing temperature was lower than 180°C, the thermal decomposition temperature increased with the rise of curing temperature and curing time. On the other hand, when the curing temperature was higher than 180°C, the thermal decomposition temperature went down instead with the increase of curing time that might be the over-crosslinking of TMBPBTH-EPOXY and DDS hardener. The glass transition temperature (Tg of cured TMBPBTH-EPOXY/DDS compound determined by dynamic mechanical thermal analysis (DMTA is 290.1°C.

  3. Thermal Expansion and Swelling of Cured Epoxy Resin Used in Graphite/Epoxy Composite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adamson, M. J.

    1979-01-01

    The thermal expansion and swelling of resin material as influenced by variations in temperature during moisture absorption is discussed. Comparison measurements using composites constructed of graphite fibers and each of two epoxy resin matrices are included. Polymer theory relative to these findings is discussed and modifications are proposed.

  4. Use of 2,5-dimethyl-2,5-hexane diamine as a curing agent for epoxy resins. [Patent application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rinde, J.A.; Newey, H.A.

    Primary diamines are prepared for use as a curing agent for epoxy resins. These curing agents can be used to form epoxy resin mixtures useful in filament winding and preimpregnated fiber molding and in formulating film adhesives, powder coatings and molding powders. The epoxy mixtures form for such uses a room temperature non-reacting, intermediate stable state which has a latent cross-linking capability.

  5. Synthesis and characterization of bisimide amines and bisimide amine-cured epoxy resins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scola, D. A.

    1983-01-01

    An attempt is made to develop tough, moisture resistant, high char yield epoxy resins by means of novel bisimide amine (BIA) hardener curing agents and a state-of-the-art epoxy resin system. The BIAs are isolated as mixtures containing monomer, oligomer, and polymeric species, and then characterized by elemental analysis and high pressure liquid chromatography. The bisimide amine-cured epoxies (IMEs) were characterized with respect to moisture absorption, thermal properties, and physical and mechanical properties, as well as in the role of matrices in Celion 6000/IME composites. The relative toughness characteristics of each IME formulation was measured by the 10 deg off-axis tensile test, measuring the uniaxial tensile strength, shear strength, and shear-strain-to-failure of the composite systems.

  6. Synthesis and cure behaviors of diglycidylether of bisphenol-S epoxy resins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, S.J.; Jin, F.L.; Lee, J.R. [Korea Research Institute of Chemical Technology, Taejon (Korea); Shin, J.S. [Chungbuk National University, Chongju (Korea)

    2002-07-01

    In this work, diglycidylether of bisphenol-S (DGEBS) epoxy resin was prepared by alkaline condensation of bisphenol-S (BPS) with epichlorohydrin (ECH) in the presence of NaOH catalyst. The structure of the synthesized DGEBS epoxy resin was confirmed by IR, NMR spectra, and elemental analysis. The curing reaction and glass transition temperature (T{sub g}) of DGEBS epoxy resin cured with phthalic anhydride (PA) and tetrahydrophthalic anhydride (THPA) as curing agents were studied by dynamic differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). The thermal stability of the cured specimen was investigated by thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), As a result, the activation energy (E{sub a}) of DGEBS/PA system was higher than that of DGEBS/THPA system, whereas T{sub g}, initial decomposed temperature (IDT), and decomposition activation energy (E{sub t}) of DGEBS/PA were lower than those of DGEBS/THPA. This was probably due to the fact that the crosslinking density of DGEBS/THPA was increased by ring strain of curing agent. (author). 22 refs., 4 tabs., 8 figs.

  7. New epoxy/episulfide resin system for electronic and coating applications: Curing mechanisms and properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuchida, Katsuyuki

    This work involves research on a new resin system useful for printed circuit board and protective coating applications. The system provides excellent adhesion to copper and corrosion resistance for copper. The research involved detailed studies of the reaction mechanisms, and correlation of these mechanisms with the observed properties. The epoxy/episulfide system, when used with a dicyandiamide (DICY) curing agent, exhibits better adhesion to copper substrate, a better pot life and prepreg storage life, a lower thermal expansion coefficient, a lower heat of reaction, a lower degradation temperature, and higher water absorption as compared with the standard epoxy system. From model compound studies, the sulfur of the opened episulfide ring reacts with copper, resulting in a durable bond between the copper and matrix resin even after water boiling. Since the S- formed by the reaction of the episulfide with the curing agent easily reacts with both the episulfide and the epoxy, a C-S-C bond is formed and more unreacted curing agent remains as compared to the standard epoxy system. The new bond formation causes a lower thermal expansion coefficient and somewhat lower degradation temperature. The unreacted curing agent causes slightly higher water absorption. Since the episulfide ring has less stress than the epoxy ring the epoxy/episulfide system shows lower heat of reaction, i.e., a lower exotherm. and lower shrinkage. The epoxy/episuffide system, when used with a polyamide curing agent, exhibits better corrosion protection for copper substrates, a lower thermal expansion coefficient and a lower degradation temperature. From model compound studies, the curing reactions are changed by changing curing temperature and the presence of copper: the episulfide homopolymerization and the S--epoxy reactions increase in the case of room temperature curing or in the presence of copper. In the presence of copper, the sulfur of the episulfide also reacts with copper, although the

  8. Method of neutralizing the corrosive surface of amine-cured epoxy resins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, S. Y. (Inventor)

    1982-01-01

    The corrosive alkaline surface layer of an epoxy resin product formed by the curing of the epoxy with an aliphatic amine is eliminated by first applying a non-solvent to remove most or all of the free unreacted amine and then applying a layer of a chemical reagent to neutralize the unused amine or amine functional groups by forming a substituted urea. The surface then may be rinsed with acetone and then with alcohol. The non-solvent may be an alcohol. The neutralizing chemical reagent is a mono-isocyanate or a mono-isothiocyanate. Preferred is an aromatic mono-isocyanate such as phenyl isocyanate, nitrophenyl isocyanate and naplthyl isocyanate.

  9. Quantitation of buried contamination by use of solvents. Part 1: Solvent degradation of amine cured epoxy resins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rheineck, A. E.; Heskin, R. A.; Hill, L. W.

    1972-01-01

    The solubility and/or swelling of cured epoxy resins was studied using the solubility parameter method. Determination of solubility parameters were found in order to select solvents for solvent-assisted degradation of cured epoxy polymers used in spacecraft. A method for improving recovery of seeded spores is suggested for assay of buried contaminants. Three commercial epoxy resins were cured using four different alkyl amines. For each resin-amine combination, three levels of amine were used, corresponding to 1/3, 2/3, and all of the amine required to react with the oxirane groups of the resin. The solubility parameters of the 36 resulting model compounds were determined in poorly and moderately hydrogen-bonded solvents. No strongly hydrogen-bonded solvents caused dissolution or swelling. The tolerance of cured resins is discussed in terms of polymer structure.

  10. Effect of Curing Agent and Temperature on the Rheological Behavior of Epoxy Resin Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lei Zhao

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available The effect of curing agent (6610 content and temperature on the rheological behavior of the epoxy resin CYD-128 was studied by DSC analysis and viscosity experiments. The results show that the resin system meets the requirements of processing technology. A complete reaction occurs when the curing agent content (40 parts per hundred resin, phr is a little higher than the theoretical value (33.33 phr, while the degree of reaction of the resin system is reduced when the curing agent content is lower (25.00 phr than theoretical value. However, excessive curing agent (50.00 phr results in a lower reaction rate. Curing agent content has little influence on gel time when curing agent content exceeded 33.33 phr and the temperature was less than 70 °C. The isothermal viscosity-time curves shift towards the –x axis when the temperature rises from 50 °C to 80 °C. Meanwhile, higher temperature results in higher reaction rates.

  11. Effect of curing agent and temperature on the rheological behavior of epoxy resin systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Chenhui; Zhang, Guangcheng; Zhao, Lei

    2012-07-17

    The effect of curing agent (6610) content and temperature on the rheological behavior of the epoxy resin CYD-128 was studied by DSC analysis and viscosity experiments. The results show that the resin system meets the requirements of processing technology. A complete reaction occurs when the curing agent content (40 parts per hundred resin, phr) is a little higher than the theoretical value (33.33 phr), while the degree of reaction of the resin system is reduced when the curing agent content is lower (25.00 phr) than theoretical value. However, excessive curing agent (50.00 phr) results in a lower reaction rate. Curing agent content has little influence on gel time when curing agent content exceeded 33.33 phr and the temperature was less than 70 °C. The isothermal viscosity-time curves shift towards the -x axis when the temperature rises from 50 °C to 80 °C. Meanwhile, higher temperature results in higher reaction rates.

  12. Aminophenoxycyclotriphosphazene cured epoxy resins and the composites, laminates, adhesives and structures thereof

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Devendra (Inventor); Fohlen, George M. (Inventor); Parker, John A. (Inventor)

    1977-01-01

    Aminophenoxy cyclotriphosphazenes such as hexakis (4-aminophenoxy) cyclotriphosphazene and tris (4-aminophenoxy)-tris phenoxy cyclotriphosphazene are used as curing agents for epoxy resins. These 1,2-epoxy resins are selected from di- or polyepoxide containing organic moieties of the formula (CH2-CHO-CH2) m-W-R-W- (CH2CH-CH2O)m where R is diphenyl dimethylmethane, diphenylmethane; W is a nitrogen or oxygen atom; and m is 1 when W is oxygen and 2 when W is nitrogen. The resins are cured thermally in stages at between about 110 to 135 C for between about 1 and 10 min, then at between about 175 to 185 C for between 0.5 to 10 hr and post cured at between about 215 and 235 C for between 0.1 and 2 hr. These resins are useful for making fire resistant elevated temperature stable composites, laminates, molded parts, and adhesives and structures, usually for aircraft secondary structures and for spacecraft construction.

  13. Flame Retardant Epoxy Resins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, C. M.; Smith, J. G., Jr.; Connell, J. W.; Hergenrother, P. M.; Lyon, R. E.

    2004-01-01

    As part of a program to develop fire resistant exterior composite structures for future subsonic commercial aircraft, flame retardant epoxy resins are under investigation. Epoxies and their curing agents (aromatic diamines) containing phosphorus were synthesized and used to prepare epoxy formulations. Phosphorus was incorporated within the backbone of the epoxy resin and not used as an additive. The resulting cured epoxies were characterized by thermogravimetric analysis, propane torch test, elemental analysis and microscale combustion calorimetry. Several formulations showed excellent flame retardation with phosphorous contents as low as 1.5% by weight. The fracture toughness of plaques of several cured formulations was determined on single-edge notched bend specimens. The chemistry and properties of these new epoxy formulations are discussed.

  14. Curing of epoxy resins with 1-/di(2-chloroethoxyphosphinyl)methyl/-2,4- and -2,6-diaminobenzene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikroyannidis, J. A.; Kourtides, D. A.

    1984-01-01

    Fire resistant compositions were prepared using 1-di(2-chloroethoxy-phosphinyl)methyl-2,4- and -2,6-diaminobenzene (DCEPD) as a curing agent for typical epoxy resins such as EPON 828 (Shell), XD 7342 (Dow), and My 720 (Ciba Geigy). In addition, compositions of these three epoxy resins with common curing agents such as m-phenylenediamine (MPD) or 4,4'-diaminodiphenylsulphone (DDS) were studied to compare their reactions with those of DCEPD. The reactivity of the three curing agents toward the epoxy resins, measured by differential calorimetry (DSC), was of the order MPD DCEPD DDS. The relatively lower reactivity of DCEPD toward epoxy resins was attributed to electronic effects.

  15. Curing of epoxy resins with 1-DI(2-chloroethoxyphosphinyl) methyl-2,4 and -2,6-diaminobenzene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikroyannidis, J. A.; Kourtides, D. A.

    1983-01-01

    Fire resistant compositions were prepared using 1-di(2-chloroethoxy-phosphinyl)methyl-2,4- and -2,6-diaminobenzene (DCEPD) as a curing agent for typical epoxy resins such as EPON 828 (Shell), XD 7342 (Dow), and My 720 (Ciba Geigy). In addition, compositions of these three epoxy resins with common curing agents such as m-phenylenediamine (MPD) or 4,4'-diaminodiphenylsulphone (DDS) were studied to compare their reactions with those of DCEPD. The reactivity of the three curing agents toward the epoxy resins, measured by differential calorimetry (DSC), was of the order MPD DCEPD DDS. The relatively lower reactivity of DCEPD toward epoxy resins was attributed to electronic effects.

  16. Use of 2,5-dimethyl-2,5-hexane diamine as a curing agent for epoxy resins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rinde, James A. [Livermore, CA; Newey, Herbert A. [Lafayette, CA

    1981-02-24

    Primary diamines of the formula ##STR1## wherein R is a straight chain saturated hydrocarbon of 2 to 4 carbons, a disubstituted benzene ring, or disubstituted dibenzo methane for use as a curing agent for epoxy resins. These curing agents can be used to form epoxy resin mixtures useful in filament winding and pre-impregnated fiber molding and in formulating film adhesives, powder coatings and molding powders. The epoxy mixtures form for such uses as room temperature non-reacting, intermediate stable state which has a latent cross-linking capability.

  17. The role of the epoxy resin: Curing agent ratio in composite interfacial strength by single fibre microbond test

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Minty, Ross; Thomason, James L.; Petersen, Helga Nørgaard

    2015-01-01

    This paper focuses on an investigation into the role of the epoxy resin: curing agent ratio in composite interfacial shear strength of glass fibre composites. The procedure involved changing the percentage of curing agent (Triethylenetetramine [TETA]) used in the mixture with several different...... percentages used, ranging from 4% up to 30%, including the stoichiometric ratio. It was found by using the microbond test, that there may exist a relationship between the epoxy resin to curing agent ratio and the level of adhesion between the reinforcing fibre and the polymer matrix of the composite....

  18. Microstructure aspects of radiation-cured networks: Cationically polymerized aromatic epoxy resins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kowandy, Christelle; Ranoux, Guillaume; Walo, Marta; Vissouvanadin, Bertrand; Teyssedre, Gilbert; Laurent, Christian; Berquand, Alexandre; Molinari, Michaël; Coqueret, Xavier

    2018-02-01

    The thermo-mechanical properties and nanostructural features of epoxy aromatic resins cationically cured by UV-visible or electron beam radiation have been studied by FT-NIR spectroscopy, dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA), dielectric spectroscopy (DS), and atomic force microscopy (AFM). The influence of formulation (nature and content of onium salt) and of curing parameters (doses, thermal treatment) on the thermophysical have been investigated. The presence of several relaxation domains observed by DMA and DS analysis confirms the presence of heterogeneities in the cured materials. Network formation is described by the percolation of glassy nanoclusters which are evidenced by AFM analyses. AFM probing by quantitative nanomechanical measurements confirms the gradual build-up of the local Young's modulus in good agreement with the macroscopic value.

  19. The stability of new transparent polymeric materials: The epoxy trimethoxyboroxine system. Part 1: The preparation, characterization and curing of epoxy resins and their copolymers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearce, E.; Lin, S. C.

    1981-01-01

    The effects of resin composition, curing conditions fillers, and flame retardant additives on the flammability of diglycidyl ether of bisphenol-A (DGEBA) as measured by the oxygen index is examined. The oxygen index of DGEBA cured with various curing agents was between 0.198 to 0.238. Fillers and flame retardant additives can increase the oxygen index dependent on the material and the amount used. Changes in the basic cured resin properties can be anticipated with the addition of noncompatible additives. High flame resistant epoxy resins with good stability and mechanical properties are investigated.

  20. Synthesis of a Novel Phosphorus-Containing Flame Retardant Curing Agent and Its Application in Epoxy Resins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hongkun; Xu, Miaojun; Li, Bin

    2016-03-01

    A novel phosphorus-containing compound diphenyl-(2,5-dihydroxyphenyl)-phosphine oxide defined as DPDHPPO was synthesized and used as flame retardant and curing agent for epoxy resins (EP). The chemical structure was well characterized by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, 1H, 13C and 31P nuclear magnetic resonance. The flame retardant properties, combusting performances and thermal degradation behaviors of the cured epoxy resins were investigated by limiting oxygen index (LOI), vertical burning tests (UL-94), cone calorimeter and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) tests. The morphologies and chemical compositions of char residues for cured epoxy resins were investigated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), respectively. The water resistant properties were evaluated by putting the samples into distilled water at 70 degrees C for 168 h. The results revealed that the EP/40 wt% DPDHPPO/60 wt% PDA thermosets successfully passed UL-94 V-0 flammability rating and the LOI value was as high as 31.9%. The cone tests results revealed that the incorporation of DPDHPPO efficiently reduced the combustion parameters of epoxy resins thermosets, such as heat release rate (HRR), total heat release (THR) and so on. The TGA results indicated that the introduction of DPDHPPO promoted epoxy resins matrix decomposed ahead of time compared with that of pure EP and led to a higher char yield and thermal stability at high temperature. The morphological structures and analysis of XPS of char residues revealed that DPDHPPO benefited to the formation of a sufficient, compact and homogeneous char layer with rich flame retardant elements on the epoxy resins materials surface during combustion. After water resistance tests, EP/40 wt% DPDHPPO/60 wt% PDA thermosets still remained excellent flame retardancy, the moisture absorption of epoxy resins thermosets decreased with the increase of DPDHPPO contents in the thermosets due to the existing

  1. Influence of aromatic amine hardeners in the cure kinetics of an epoxy resin used in advanced composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michelle Leali Costa

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available Composite structures for aerospace applications are mainly made by the well-known prepreg technology. In order to achieve adequate prepreg processing schedules, and consequently maximum fiber strength utilization, one has to know in deep the cure kinetics of matrix, which held the fibers together. This work describes a procedure to study the cure kinetic and has as example how aromatic amine hardeners influence the cure kinetics of an epoxy resin used in advanced composites. The investigation was carried out by using the DSC technique and it was found that depending on the system used the cure kinetics of the formulation obeys order n or autocatalytic order.

  2. Preparation and Properties of MAP-POSS/Unsaturated Epoxy Resin Hybrid Ultraviolet Light Cured Film

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    HOU Gui-xiang

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The methyl acryloyloxy propyl silsesquioxane(MAP-POSS was prepared by hydrolysis condensation of KH-570, and composing free radical-cationic hybrid UV curing system with the unsaturated epoxy resin. The changes of characteristic absorption peak in the curing process was characterized by using infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR, and the influence of MAP-POSS content on the surface water contact angle, silicon elements distribution, mechanical properties and thermal performance of UV-cured film was investigated. The results show that with the addition of MAP-POSS the crosslinking degree, hydrophobicity, thermal stability and glass transition temperature(Tg of the film are improved. When the content of MAP-POSS is 12% (mass fraction, the same below, Tg is increased by 16.9℃. When the MAP-POSS content is 15%, the water contact angle of film is increased from 58.0° to 94.2°. The impact strength is improved firstly and then decreased with the addition of MAP-POSS.

  3. Critical parameters for electron beam curing of cationic epoxies and property comparison of electron beam cured cationic epoxies versus thermal cured resins and composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Janke, C.J.; Norris, R.E.; Yarborough, K. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States). Oak Ridge Centers for Manufacturing Technology; Havens, S.J. [Oak Ridge Inst. for Science and Education, TN (United States); Lopata, V.J. [Atomic Energy of Canada Ltd., Pinawa, Manitoba (Canada). Whiteshell Labs.

    1997-01-16

    Electron beam curing of composites is a nonthermal, nonautoclave curing process offering the following advantages compared to conventional thermal curing: substantially reduced manufacturing costs and curing times; improvements in part quality and performance; reduced environmental and health concerns; and improvements in material handling. In 1994 a Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA), sponsored by the Department of Energy Defense Programs and 10 industrial partners, was established to advance electron beam curing of composites. The CRADA has successfully developed hundreds of new toughened and untoughened resins, offering unlimited formulation and processing flexibility. Several patent applications have been filed for this work. Composites made from these easily processable, low shrinkage material match the performance of thermal cured composites and exhibit: low void contents comparable to autoclave cured composites (less than 1%); superb low water absorption values in the same range as cyanate esters (less than 1%); glass transition temperatures rivaling those of polyimides (greater than 390 C); mechanical properties comparable to high performance, autoclave cured composites; and excellent property retention after cryogenic and thermal cycling. These materials have been used to manufacture many composite parts using various fabrication processes including hand lay-up, tow placement, filament winding, resin transfer molding and vacuum assisted resin transfer molding.

  4. Epoxy resin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Glenn R.; Salyer, Ival O.; Ball, III, George L.

    1976-07-13

    By mixing one part of a prepolymer containing a polyamine partially polymerized with an organic epoxide and subsequently reacted with a fatty acid containing from 8 to 32 carbon atoms, and then reacting this prepolymer mixture with 3 parts of an organic epoxide, a composition was obtained which made a gas frothable, shear-stable, room temperature curing, low density foam. A particularly advantageous prepolymer was prepared using a polyamine selected from the group consisting of diethylenetriamine, triethylenetetramine, and tetraethylenepentamine, partially polymerized with an organic epoxide having an average molecular weight of about 350 and having an epoxide equivalent of 185 to 192, and reacted with 2-10 weight percent linoleic acid. When one part of this prepolymer was reacted with about three parts of epoxy, and frothed by whipping in air or nitrogen an epoxy foam was produced which could be troweled onto surfaces and into corners or crevices, and subsequently cured, at near ambient temperature, to a strong dimensionally stable foam product.

  5. Study of Curing Kinetics and Thermal Degradation of UV Curable Epoxy Acrylate Resin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amrita Sharma

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Blends of epoxy acrylate resins (acid values 3, 6.5 & 10 mg KOH/gm Solid with monofunctional monomers (ethoxylated phenol monoacrylate were prepared by physical mixing, having weight ratio 50:50. These blends were cured by using UV radiations in presence of photo initiator (Darocure 1173. The thermal degradation kinetics of these resin blends were studied, using thermo gravimetric analysis in nitrogen atmosphere at a heating rate of 10°C/min. by applying Coats-Red fern equation. According to the analysis, all the coating films degrade in two steps. In the first step of degradation kinetics, R2M follows 1.75 order (n=1.75 and all other coating films follow second order (n=2 kinetics. In second step, R2M & R3M follow half order (n=0.5 kinetics and R1M follow first order (n=1 degradation kinetics. Order of the reaction is obtained on the basis of best fit analysis, and all the parameters were confirmed by regression analysis. From the reaction order, value of activation energy (E and pre exponential factor (Z were calculated by the slop and intercept of the plot between X and Y, respectively.

  6. Preparation of hyperbranched poly (amidoamine)-grafted graphene nanolayers as a composite and curing agent for epoxy resin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gholipour-Mahmoudalilou, Meysam; Roghani-Mamaqani, Hossein; Azimi, Reza; Abdollahi, Amin

    2018-01-01

    Thermal properties of epoxy resin were improved by preparation of a curing agent of poly (amidoamine) (PAMAM) dendrimer-grafted graphene oxide (GO). Hyperbranched PAMAM-modified GO (GD) was prepared by a divergent dendrimer synthesis methodology. Modification of GO with (3-Aminopropyl)triethoxysilane (APTES), Michael addition of methacrylic acid, and amidation reaction with ethylenediamine results in the curing agent of GD. Then, epoxy resin was cured in the presence of different amounts of GD and the final products were compared with ethylenediamine-cured epoxy resin (E) in their thermal degradation temperature and char contents. Functionalization of GO with APTES and hyperbranched dendrimer formation at the surface of GO were evaluated by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) results. TGA results showed that the weight loss associated with chemical moieties in GONH2, GOMA, and GD is estimated to be 10.1, 12.2, and 14.1%, respectively. Covalent attachment of dendrimer at the surface of GO increases its thermal stability. TGA also showed that decomposition temperature and char content are higher for composites compared with E. Scanning and transmission electron microscopies show that flat and smooth graphene nanolayers are wrinkled in GO and re-stacking and flattening of nanolayers is observed in GD.

  7. Effects of graphene oxides on the cure behaviors of a tetrafunctional epoxy resin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available The influence of graphene oxides (GOs on the cure behavior and thermal stability of a tetrafunctional tetraglycidyl-4,4’-diaminodiphenylmethane cured with 4,4’-diaminodiphenylsulfone was investigated by using dynamic differential scanning calorimetry (DSC and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA. The dynamic DSC results showed that the initial reaction temperature and exothermal peak temperature decreased with the increase of GO contents. Furthermore, the addition of GO increased the enthalpy of epoxy cure reaction. Results from activation energy method showed that activation energies of GO/epoxy nanocomposites greatly decreased with the GO content in the latter stage, indicating that GOs significantly hindered the occurrence of vitrification. The oxygen functionalities, such as hydroxyl and carboxyl groups, on the surface of GOs acted as catalysts and facilitated the curing reaction and the catalytic effect increased with the GO contents. TGA results revealed that the addition of GOs decreased the thermal stability of epoxy.

  8. Study of the mechanical properties of photo-cured epoxy resin fabricated by stereolithography process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nattapon Chantarapanich

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Stereolithography process enables various freeform geometries to be manufactured, which are beneficial to manyresearch and development fields, particularly on medicine. The mechanical properties of stereolithography models can begenerally but not only influenced by the material characteristics, but also by the method of manufacturing. Since thestereolithography process involves building three dimensional objects by depositing material layer-by-layer as well as thepost-curing by ultraviolet light, it is therefore possible for stereolithography models to exhibit a directional dependence of themechanical properties. The objectives of the study focused on the influence of build orientations and ultraviolet post-curingperiod on the mechanical properties. In the experiments, Watershed 11122 commercial epoxy photo-curable resin was used.The in-house developed stereolithography machine of the National Metal and Materials Technology Center of Thailand wasused to fabricate tensile test specimens (American Society for Testing Materials Standard D638 with different build orientations. Main build orientations included flat and edge. Each main build orientation contained three sub-build orientationswhich were 0 degree, 45 degrees, and 90 degrees to the x-axis. The mechanical properties including elastic modulus, ultimatetensile strength, elongation at ultimate tensile strength, and elongation at break were evaluated by tensile test with a universal testing machine. The results indicated that the mechanical properties of specimens were slightly different among thesub-build orientations. The larger differences of mechanical properties of specimens were found between main build orientations. The mechanical strength of specimens improved corresponding to the increase of UV post-curing period ranged from0 to 4 hours whereas the post-curing period using 4 hours onward, the mechanical properties of specimens were nearlyconstant.

  9. Epoxy hydantoins as matrix resins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, J.

    1983-01-01

    Tensile strength and fracture toughness of castings of the hydantoin resins cured with methylenedianiline are significantly higher than MY 720 control castings. Water absorption of an ethyl, amyl hydantoin formulation is 2.1 percent at equilibrium and Tg's are about 160 C, approximately 15 deg below the final cure temperature. Two series of urethane and ester-extended hydantoin epoxy resins were synthesized to determine the effect of crosslink density and functional groups on properties. Castings cured with methylenedianiline or with hexahydrophthalic anhydride were made from these compounds and evaluated. The glass transition temperatures, tensile strengths and moduli, and fracture toughness values were all much lower than that of the simple hydantoin epoxy resins. Using a methylene bishydantoin epoxy with a more rigid structure gave brittle, low-energy fractures, while a more flexible, ethoxy-extended hydantoin epoxy resin gave a very low Tg.

  10. Ionizing radiation induced curing of epoxy resin for advanced composites matrices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alessi, S. [Dipartimento di Ingegneria Chimica dei Processi e dei Materiali, Universita di Palermo (Italy); Calderaro, E. [Dipartimento di Ingegneria Nucleare, Universita di Palermo (Italy); Centro Interdipartimentale di Ricerca sui Materiali Compositi (CIRMAC), Universita di Palermo Viale delle Scienze, 90128 Palermo (Italy); Parlato, A. [Dipartimento di Ingegneria Nucleare, Universita di Palermo (Italy); Fuochi, P. [Istituto per la Sintesi Organica e Fotoreattivita, CNR, Via P. Godetti 101, 40129 Bologna (Italy); Lavalle, M. [Istituto per la Sintesi Organica e Fotoreattivita, CNR, Via P. Godetti 101, 40129 Bologna (Italy); Corda, U. [Istituto per la Sintesi Organica e Fotoreattivita, CNR, Via P. Godetti 101, 40129 Bologna (Italy); Dispenza, C. [Dipartimento di Ingegneria Chimica dei Processi e dei Materiali, Universita di Palermo (Italy); Centro Interdipartimentale di Ricerca sui Materiali Compositi (CIRMAC), Universita di Palermo Viale delle Scienze, 90128 Palermo (Italy); Spadaro, G. [Dipartimento di Ingegneria Chimica dei Processi e dei Materiali, Universita di Palermo (Italy) and Centro Interdipartimentale di Ricerca sui Materiali Compositi (CIRMAC), Universita di Palermo Viale delle Scienze, 90128 Palermo (Italy)]. E-mail: spadaro@dicpm.unipa.it

    2005-07-01

    The radiation curing of an epoxy monomer in the presence of an iodonium salt, as photo initiator, is studied. Systems with different concentrations of photo initiators have been polymerized via both gamma rays and e-beam, at various dose rates. The aim of this work is to investigate how the photo initiator concentration and the irradiation dose rate affect the temperature of the systems during curing and how the different thermal histories influence the dynamic mechanical thermal properties of the obtained materials.

  11. Strain development in a filled epoxy resin curing under constrained and unconstrained conditions as assessed by Fibre Bragg Grating sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available The influence of adhesion to the mould wall on the released strain of a highly filled anhydride cured epoxy resin (EP, which was hardened in an aluminium mould under constrained and unconstrained condition, was investigated. The shrinkage-induced strain was measured by fibre optical sensing technique. Fibre Bragg Grating (FBG sensors were embedded into the curing EP placed in a cylindrical mould cavity. The cure-induced strain signals were detected in both, vertical and horizontal directions, during isothermal curing at 75 °C for 1000 minutes. A huge difference in the strain signal of both directions could be detected for the different adhesion conditions. Under non-adhering condition the horizontal and vertical strain-time traces were practically identical resulting in a compressive strain at the end of about 3200 ppm, which is a proof of free or isotropic shrinking. However, under constrained condition the horizontal shrinkage in the EP was prevented due to its adhesion to the mould wall. So, the curing material shrunk preferably in vertical direction. This resulted in much higher released compressive strain signals in vertical (10430 ppm than in horizontal (2230 ppm direction. The constrained cured EP resins are under inner stresses. Qualitative information on the residual stress state in the molding was deduced by exploiting the birefringence of the EP.

  12. Room Temperature Curing Resin Systems for Graphite/Epoxy Composite Repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1979-12-01

    SBy______ _____ Di st ribution/ iviliability Codes- 4- Di t Avail and/or D1 specj&I•iii ILLUSTRATIONS Fiu Page I uSC Analysis of Epon 828 /DETA after 72 Hour...Cure at 24C (75F) .........................................********** 8 2 DSC Analysis of Epon 828 /DETA after 72 Hour Cure at 24C (75F) and One Hour...illustrate this a DSC analysis (Figure 1) was made of room tempera- ture cured Epon 828 /DETA, a resin system which has been widely used as an ambient

  13. Paramagnetic epoxy resin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. C. Vazquez Barreiro

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This work illustrates that macrocycles can be used as crosslinking agents for curing epoxy resins, provided that they have appropriate organic functionalities. As macrocycles can complex metal ions in their structure, this curing reaction allows for the introduction of that metal ion into the resin network. As a result, some characteristic physical properties of the metallomacrocycle could be transferred to the new material. The bisphenol A diglycidyl ether (BADGE, n = 0 and hemin (a protoporphyrin IX containing the Fe(III ion, and an additional chloride ligand have been chosen. The new material has been characterized by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC, thermogravimetric analysis (TGA, Fourier Transform Infrared (FT-IR, Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR, Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM, and magnetic susceptibility measurements. Fe(III remains in the high-spin state during the curing process and, consequently, the final material exhibits the magnetic characteristics of hemin. The loss of the chlorine atom ligand during the cure of the resin allows that Fe(III can act as Lewis acid, catalyzing the crosslinking reactions. At high BADGE n = 0/hemin ratios, the formation of ether and ester bonds occurs simultaneously during the process.

  14. Phthalocyanine Tetraamine Epoxy-Curing Agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fohlen, G. M.; Achar, B. N.; Parker, J. A.

    1986-01-01

    Tough fire- and chemical-resistant epoxies produced by using metalphthalocyanine tetraamines (MPT's) of copper, cobalt, or nickel as curing agents. Synthesis of MPT's commercially realizable and gives pure compounds with almost 90-percent yield. Synthesis applicable for metals with atomic radii of about 1.35 angstroms, including Cu, Co, Ni, Zn, Fe, Pt, Al, and V. Possible to use metal phthalocyanines to cure epoxy resins in homogeneous reaction.

  15. Epoxy Resins in Electron Microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finck, Henry

    1960-01-01

    A method of embedding biological specimens in araldite 502 (Ciba) has been developed for materials available in the United States. Araldite-embedded tissues are suitable for electron microscopy, but the cutting qualities of the resin necessitates more than routine attention during microtomy. The rather high viscosity of araldite 502 also seems to be an unnecessary handicap. The less viscous epoxy epon 812 (Shell) produces specimens with improved cutting qualities, and has several features—low shrinkage and absence of specimen damage during cure, minimal compression of sections, relative absence of electron beam-induced section damage, etc.—which recommends it as a routine embedding material. The hardness of the cured resin can be easily adjusted by several methods to suit the materials embedded in it. Several problems and advantages of working with sections of epoxy resins are also discussed. PMID:13822825

  16. Structure, thermal and fracture mechanical properties of benzoxazine-modified amine-cured DGEBA epoxy resins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available First, traditional diamine hardeners of epoxy resins (EP were checked as potential accelerators for the benzoxazine (BOX homopolymerization. It was established that the acceleration effect depends on both the type and amount of the diamine compounds. In the follow-up work amine-curable diglycidyl ether bisphenol A (DGEBA type EP was modified with BOX keeping the EP/BOX ratio constant (75/25 wt.%. The amine hardeners, added in the EP in stoichiometric amounts, were of aliphatic and aromatic nature, viz. diethylenetriamine (DETA, 4,4'-diaminodiphenyl methane (DDM, and their 1/1 mixture. The thermal, viscoelastic, flexural and fracture mechanical properties of the EP/BOX hybrids were determined and compared to those of the reference EPs. Based on dynamic-mechanical thermal analysis and atomic force microscopy the formation of co-network between EP and BOX was concluded. Homopolymerized BOX was built in the network in nanoscaled inclusions and it was associated with internal antiplasticization. Incorporation of BOX improved the charring, enhanced the flexural modulus and strength, and reduced the glass transition of the parent EP. The fracture toughness and energy were not improved by hybridization with BOX.

  17. Flammability of Epoxy Resins Containing Phosphorus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hergenrother, P. M.; Thompson, C. M.; Smith, J. G.; Connell, J. W.; Hinkley, J. A.

    2005-01-01

    As part of a program to develop fire-resistant exterior composite structures for future subsonic commercial and general aviation aircraft, flame-retardant epoxy resins are under investigation. Epoxies and their curing agents (aromatic diamines) containing phosphorus were synthesized and used to prepare epoxy formulations. Phosphorus was incorporated within the backbone of the epoxy resin and not used as an additive. The resulting cured neat epoxy formulations were characterized by thermogravimetric analysis, propane torch test, elemental analysis, microscale combustion calorimetry, and fire calorimetry. Several formulations showed excellent flame retardation with phosphorous contents as low as 1.5% by weight. The fracture toughness and compressive strength of several cured formulations showed no detrimental effect due to phosphorus content. The chemistry and properties of these new epoxy formulations are discussed.

  18. Structure Property Relationships of Biobased Epoxy Resins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maiorana, Anthony Surraht

    The thesis is about the synthesis, characterization, development, and application of epoxy resins derived from sustainable feedstocks such as lingo-cellulose, plant oils, and other non-food feedstocks. The thesis can be divided into two main topics 1) the synthesis and structure property relationship investigation of new biobased epoxy resin families and 2) mixing epoxy resins with reactive diluents, nanoparticles, toughening agents, and understanding co-curing reactions, filler/matrix interactions, and cured epoxy resin thermomechanical, viscoelastic, and dielectric properties. The thesis seeks to bridge the gap between new epoxy resin development, application for composites and advanced materials, processing and manufacturing, and end of life of thermoset polymers. The structures of uncured epoxy resins are characterized through traditional small molecule techniques such as nuclear magnetic resonance, high resolution mass spectrometry, and infrared spectroscopy. The structure of epoxy resin monomers are further understood through the process of curing the resins and cured resins' properties through rheology, chemorheology, dynamic mechanical analysis, tensile testing, fracture toughness, differential scanning calorimetry, scanning electron microscopy, thermogravimetric analysis, and notched izod impact testing. It was found that diphenolate esters are viable alternatives to bisphenol A and that the structure of the ester side chain can have signifi-cant effects on monomer viscosity. The structure of the cured diphenolate based epoxy resins also influence glass transition temperature and dielectric properties. Incorporation of reactive diluents and flexible resins can lower viscosity, extend gel time, and enable processing of high filler content composites and increase fracture toughness. Incorpora-tion of high elastic modulus nanoparticles such as graphene can provide increases in physical properties such as elastic modulus and fracture toughness. The synthesis

  19. Effects of benzoxazine resin on property enhancement of shape memory epoxy: A dual function of benzoxazine resin as a curing agent and a stable network segment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Tanpitaksit

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available An ability of bisphenol-A/aniline based benzoxazine resin (BA-a to simultaneously acts as a curing agent and a stable or rigid network segment for shape memory epoxy, i.e. a two component system, is demonstrated. This significantly simplifies a formulation of present shape memory epoxy systems, i.e. a three or four component system. A suitable content of BA-a in the aliphatic epoxy (NGDE/polybenzoxazine (PBA-a samples for good shape memory performance is in a range of 30 to 50 mol%. The storage modulus of the obtained NGDE/PBA-a shape memory polymers (SMPs was increased from 3.57 GPa for 30 mol% BA-a content to 4.50 GPa for 50 mol% BA-a content. Glass transition temperature of the sample was also substantially increased with increasing BA-a fraction, i.e. from 51°C to 140°C. Flexural modulus and strength at room temperature of the samples at 50 mol% BA-a were found to be as high as 3.97 GPa and 132 MPa compared to the maximum values of 2.54 GPa and 100 MPa of SMP based on cyanate ester-epoxy. All samples exhibited a high value of shape fixity close to 100%. A presence of the BA-a in the samples also imparted a greater recovery stress ranging from 0.25 to 1.59 MPa. Consequently, the obtained NGDE/PBA-a copolymers are highly attractive for shape memory materials to be used in a broader range of applications particularly at elevated temperature and a higher recovery stress value.

  20. Degree of Cure, Heat of Reaction, and Viscosity of 8552 and 977-3 HM Epoxy Resin

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ng, S

    2000-01-01

    The heat of reaction, degree of cure, and viscosity of Hexcel 8552 and Cytec Fiberite 977-3 HM neat resins were measured using a modulated differential scanning calorimeter and a rheometric digital analyzer...

  1. Impact of a novel phosphorus-nitrogen flame retardant curing agent on the properties of epoxy resin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiaoli; Liang, Bing

    2017-12-01

    A phosphorus-nitrogen flame retardant curing agent diethyl phosphonic p-Phenylenediamine diamide (DEPPPD) was synthesized. The chemical structure of the obtained compound was identified by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR), 1H nuclear magnetic resonance (1HNMR), and mass spectroscopies. A series of t hermosetting systems were prepared by conventional epoxy resins (E-44) and DEPPPD. The effects of DEPPPD on flame retardancy, thermal degradation behavior, mechanical properties and the morphologies of char residues of EP/DEPPPD thermosets were investigated. The results demonstrated that when the phosphorus content of 2.88 wt%, EP-3 successfully passed UL-94 V-0 flammability rating, the LOI value was as high as 31.1%, the impact strength and tensile strength of it was 6.50 KJ m‑2 and 48.21 MPa, the adhesive strength could reach 14.61 MPa, respectively. The TGA results indicated that the introduction of DEPPPD promoted EP matrix decomposed at a lower temperature, the rate of the thermal decomposition also decreased compared with EP-0. The residual char ratio of 800 °C was increased whether in nitrogen or in the air. The morphological structures of char residue were more compact and homogeneous which could prevent the heat transmission and diffusion, limit the production of combustible gases and reduced the heat release rate.

  2. High char imide-modified epoxy matrix resins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serafini, T. T.; Delvigs, P.; Vannucci, R. D.

    1979-01-01

    Studies were performed to synthesize a novel class of bis (imide-amine) curing agents for epoxy matrix resins. Glass transition temperatures and char yield data of an epoxy cured with various bis (imide-amines) are presented. The room temperature and 350 F mechanical properties, and char yields of unidirectional graphite fiber laminates prepared with conventional epoxy and imide-modified epoxy resins are presented.

  3. Novel halogen-free flame retardant thermoset from a hybrid hexakis (methoxymethyl melamine/phosphorus-containing epoxy resin cured with phenol formaldehyde novolac

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes the curing behaviours, thermal properties and flame-resistance of a novel halogen-free epoxy hybrid thermoset, prepared by the curing reaction of hexakis (methoxymethyl melamine (HMMM, a phosphorouscontaining epoxy resin (EPN-D with 9, 10-dihydro-9-oxa-10-phosphaphenanthrene 10-oxide (DOPO group and phenol formaldehyde novolac (n-PF. The resultant thermosets showed high glass-transition temperatures (Tg, 123–147°C as determined by thermal mechanical analysis (TMA, excellent thermal stability with high 5 wt% decomposition temperatures (Td,5% ≥308°C and high char yields (Yc ≥39.4 wt% from the thermogravimetric analysis (TGA. All the cured EPND/ HMMM/n-PF hybrid resins achieved the UL 94 V-0 grade with high limited oxygen indices (LOI > 45.7. It is found that phosphorous and nitrogen elements in the cured EPN-D/HMMM/n-PF hybrid resins had a positive synergistic effect on the improvement of the flame retardancy.

  4. High performance UV and thermal cure hybrid epoxy adhesive

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, C. F.; Iwasaki, S.; Kanari, M.; Li, B.; Wang, C.; Lu, D. Q.

    2017-06-01

    New type one component UV and thermal curable hybrid epoxy adhesive was successfully developed. The hybrid epoxy adhesive is complete initiator free composition. Neither photo-initiator nor thermal initiator is contained. The hybrid adhesive is mainly composed of special designed liquid bismaleimide, partially acrylated epoxy resin, acrylic monomer, epoxy resin and latent curing agent. Its UV light and thermal cure behavior was studied by FT-IR spectroscopy and FT-Raman spectroscopy. Adhesive samples cured at UV only, thermal only and UV + thermal cure conditions were investigated. By calculated conversion rate of double bond in both acrylic component and maleimide compound, satisfactory light curability of the hybrid epoxy adhesive was confirmed quantitatively. The investigation results also showed that its UV cure components, acrylic and bismalimide, possess good thermal curability too. The initiator free hybrid epoxy adhesive showed satisfactory UV curability, good thermal curability and high adhesion performance.

  5. Electron-beam curing of epoxy resins: effect of alcohols on cationic ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    beam curable resin systems. This work investigated the effect of hydroxyl containing materials on the reaction mechanism of e-beam induced cationic polymerization of phenyl glycidyl ether (PGE). The alcohols were found to play important roles in polymerization. Compared to hydroxyl group of aliphatic alcohol, phenolic.

  6. Metal (2) 4,4',4",4'" phthalocyanine tetraamines as curing agents for epoxy resins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Achar, B. N.; Fohlen, G. M.; Parker, J. A. (Inventor)

    1985-01-01

    Metal, preferably divalent copper, cobalt or nickel, phthalocyanine tetraamines are used as curing agents for epoxides. The resulting copolymers have high thermal and chemical resistance and are homogeneous. They are useful as binders for laminates, e.g., graphite cloth laminate.

  7. The influence of the processing temperature on gamma curing of epoxy resins for the production of advanced composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alessi, S. [Dipartimento di Ingegneria Chimica dei Processi e dei Materiali, Universita di Palermo, Viale delle Scienze, 90128 Palermo (Italy)]. E-mail: Alessi@dicpm.unipa.it; Parlato, A. [Dipartimento di Ingegneria Nucleare (DIN), Universita di Palermo, Viale delle Scienze, 90128 (Italy); Dispenza, C. [Dipartimento di Ingegneria Chimica dei Processi e dei Materiali, Universita di Palermo, Viale delle Scienze, 90128 Palermo (Italy); Centro Interdipartimentale di Ricerca sui Materiali Compositi (CIRMAC), Universita di Palermo, Viale delle Scienze, 90128 Palermo (Italy); De Maria, M. [Dipartimento di Ingegneria Chimica dei Processi e dei Materiali, Universita di Palermo, Viale delle Scienze, 90128 Palermo (Italy); Spadaro, G. [Dipartimento di Ingegneria Chimica dei Processi e dei Materiali, Universita di Palermo, Viale delle Scienze, 90128 Palermo (Italy); Centro Interdipartimentale di Ricerca sui Materiali Compositi (CIRMAC), Universita di Palermo, Viale delle Scienze, 90128 Palermo (Italy)

    2007-08-15

    Gamma radiation curing of an epoxy monomer, in the presence of an iodonium salt, as initiator, is studied. Systems have been polymerized at the same irradiation dose and dose rate and at different processing temperatures. The experimental results show that all the irradiated materials exhibit a latent reactivity, undergoing toward an increase of crosslinking density if they are thermally cured after irradiation. The results indicate that the processing temperature affects both the crosslinking density after irradiation and the sensibility to the post-irradiation thermal treatment.

  8. Synthesis and electrical characterization of low-temperature thermal-cured epoxy resin/functionalized silica hybrid-thin films for application as gate dielectrics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Na, Moonkyong, E-mail: nmk@keri.re.kr [HVDC Research Division, Korea Electrotechnology Research Institute, Changwon, 642-120 (Korea, Republic of); System on Chip Chemical Process Research Center, Department of Chemical Engineering, Pohang University of Science and Technology (POSTECH), Pohang, 790-784 (Korea, Republic of); Kang, Young Taec [Creative and Fundamental Research Division, Korea Electrotechnology Research Institute, Changwon, 642-120 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Polymer Science and Engineering, Pusan National University, Busan, 609-735 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Sang Cheol [HVDC Research Division, Korea Electrotechnology Research Institute, Changwon, 642-120 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Eun Dong [Creative and Fundamental Research Division, Korea Electrotechnology Research Institute, Changwon, 642-120 (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-07-31

    Thermal-cured hybrid materials were synthesized from homogenous hybrid sols of epoxy resins and organoalkoxysilane-functionalized silica. The chemical structures of raw materials and obtained hybrid materials were characterized using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. The thermal resistance of the hybrids was enhanced by hybridization. The interaction between epoxy matrix and the silica particles, which caused hydrogen bonding and van der Waals force was strengthened by organoalkoxysilane. The degradation temperature of the hybrids was improved by approximately 30 °C over that of the parent epoxy material. The hybrid materials were formed into uniformly coated thin films of about 50 nm-thick using a spin coater. An optimum mixing ratio was used to form smooth-surfaced hybrid films. The electrical property of the hybrid film was characterized, and the leakage current was found to be well below 10{sup −6} A cm{sup −2}. - Highlights: • Preparation of thermal-curable hybrid materials using epoxy resin and silica. • The thermal stability was enhanced through hybridization. • The insulation property of hybrid film was investigated as gate dielectrics.

  9. Curing characteristics of an epoxy resin in the presence of functional graphite oxide with amine-rich surface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Le [The State Key Lab of Polymer Materials Engineering, Polymer Research Institute of Sichuan University, Chengdu 610065 (China); Zeng, Zhong [Safety Environment Quality Surveillance and Inspection Research Institute of CNPC Chuanqing Drilling & Exploration Corporation, Chengdu 618300 (China); Zou, Huawei, E-mail: hwzou@163.com [The State Key Lab of Polymer Materials Engineering, Polymer Research Institute of Sichuan University, Chengdu 610065 (China); Liang, Mei, E-mail: liangmeiww@163.com [The State Key Lab of Polymer Materials Engineering, Polymer Research Institute of Sichuan University, Chengdu 610065 (China)

    2015-08-20

    Highlights: • Functional graphite oxide with amine-rich surface was prepared and characterized. • Kinetic parameters were calculated by Kissinger method and autocatalytic model. • The incorporation of GO and DGO brings in an effect of inhibition on curing. • The inhibition effect weakens for its good compatibility and catalytic effect of DGO. - Abstract: Functional graphite oxide (DGO) with amine-rich surface was successfully prepared through the amidation reaction and characterized by X-ray diffraction analyses (XRD), Fourier transform infrared spectra (FTIR) and Raman spectra. The effects of functional graphite oxide on the curing kinetics of epoxy (EP) were investigated by means of differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). The curing kinetic parameters of EP, EP/graphite oxide (GO) and EP/functional graphite oxide were obtained. There was not much difference in total heat of reaction ΔH and peak temperature T{sub p} with the incorporation of GO or DGO. However, the activation energy, E{sub a}, and the overall order of reaction m + n were enhanced. Comprehensive kinetic analyses indicated that the incorporation of GO sheets brought in an effect of inhibition on curing process. While the inhibition effect weaken when the GO is modified with amine-rich surface. The possible curing mechanism and reaction pathways were proposed to provide a reasonable explanation.

  10. Contact allergy to epoxy resin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bangsgaard, Nannie; Thyssen, Jacob Pontoppidan; Menné, Torkil

    2012-01-01

    Background. Epoxy resin monomers are strong skin sensitizers that are widely used in industrial sectors. In Denmark, the law stipulates that workers must undergo a course on safe handling of epoxy resins prior to occupational exposure, but the effectiveness of this initiative is largely unknown....... Objectives. To evaluate the prevalence of contact allergy to epoxy resin monomer (diglycidyl ether of bisphenol A; MW 340) among patients with suspected contact dermatitis and relate this to occupation and work-related consequences. Patients/methods. The dataset comprised 20 808 consecutive dermatitis...... patients patch tested during 2005-2009. All patients with an epoxy resin-positive patch test were sent a questionnaire. Results. A positive patch test reaction to epoxy resin was found in 275 patients (1.3%), with a higher proportion in men (1.9%) than in women (1.0%). The prevalence of sensitization...

  11. Imide modified epoxy matrix resins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scola, D. A.

    1984-01-01

    The results of a program designed to develop tough imide modified epoxy resins cured by bisimide amine (BIA) hardeners are described. State-of-the-art epoxides MY720 and DER383 were used, and four bismide amines were evaluated. These were the BIA's derived from the 6F anhydride (4,4'-(hexafluoroisopropylidene) bis(phthalic anhydride) and the diamines 3,3'-diaminodiphynyl sulfone, 4,4'-oxygianiline, 4,4'-methylene dianiline, and 1,12-dodecane diamine. A key intermediate, designated 6F anhydride, is required for the synthesis of the bisimide amines. Reaction parameters to synthesize a precursor to the 6F anhydride (6FHC) in high yields were investigated. The catalyst trifluoromethane sulfonic acid was studied. Although small scale runs yielded the 6FHC in 50 percent yield, efforts to ranslate these results to a larger scale synthesis gave the 6FHC in only 9 percent yield. Results show that the concept of using bisimide amine as curing agents to improve the toughness properties of epoxies is valid.

  12. Investigations of toughening mechanisms of epoxy resins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koenig, T.

    1986-01-01

    Composite material technology was applied to the solid rocket booster by the development of a carbon filament-epoxy resin case which yields a net increase of 4000 lbs. in payload in the shuttle. The question of reusability of the new composite tanks has not yet been answered and will depend on the toughness of the matrix resin. The present study was aimed at providing conditions whereby test specimens of the epoxy resin (EPON/85) and curing agents of systematically varied structures could be produced in a controlled manner. Three sets of conditions were found that might allow the isolation of the structural effects on toughness from the cure effects. The kinetic methods leading to the determination of these conditions are described.

  13. Toughened epoxy resin system and a method thereof

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janke, Christopher J.; Dorsey, George F.; Havens, Stephen J.; Lopata, Vincent J.

    1998-01-01

    Mixtures of epoxy resins with cationic initiators are curable under high energy ionizing radiation such as electron beam radiation, X-ray radiation, and gamma radiation. The composition of this process consists of an epoxy resin, a cationic initiator such as a diaryliodonium or triarylsulfonium salt of specific anions, and a toughening agent such as a thermoplastic, hydroxy-containing thermoplastic oligomer, epoxy-containing thermoplastic oligomer, reactive flexibilizer, rubber, elastomer, or mixture thereof. Cured compositions have high glass transition temperatures, good mechanical properties, and good toughness. These properties are comparable to those of similar thermally cured epoxies.

  14. Photosensitive filler minimizes internal stresses in epoxy resins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dillon, J. N.

    1967-01-01

    Photosensitive filler is added to curable epoxy resins to minimize stress from internal shrinkage during curing or polymerization. Cinnamic acid resins and cinnamal ketones may be added in the amount of 1 to 3 percent by weight of the resin mixture.

  15. Occupational exposure to epoxy resins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Terwoert, J.; Kersting, K.

    2014-01-01

    Products based on epoxy resins as a binder have become popular in various settings, among which the construction industry and in windmill blade production, as a result of their excellent technical properties. However, due to the same properties epoxy products are a notorious cause of allergic skin

  16. Modification of (DGEBA epoxy resin with maleated depolymerised natural rubber

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available In this work, diglycidyl ether of bisphenol A (DEGBA type epoxy resin has been modified with maleated depolymerised natural rubber (MDPR. MDPR was prepared by grafting maleic anhydride onto depolymerised natural rubber. MDPR has been characterized by Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR spectroscopy and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. MDPR was blended with epoxy resin at three different ratios (97/3, 98/2 and 99/1, by keeping the epoxy resin component as the major phase and maleated depolymerised natural rubber component as the minor phase. The reaction between the two blend components took place between the acid/anhydride group in the MDPR and the epoxide group of the epoxy resin. The proposed reaction schemes were supported by the FT-IR spectrum of the uncured Epoxy/MDPR blends. The neat epoxy resin and Epoxy/MDPR blends were cured by methylene dianiline (DDM at 100°C for three hours. Thermal, morphological and mechanical properties of the neat epoxy and the blends were investigated. Free volume studies of the cured, neat epoxy and Epoxy/MDPR blends were correlated with the morphological and mechanical properties of the same systems using Positron Annihilation Lifetime Studies.

  17. Curing reaction of bisphenol-A based benzoxazine with cyanate ester resin and the properties of the cured thermosetting resin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Kimura

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Curing reaction of bisphenol-A based benzoxazine with cyanate ester resin and the properties of the cured thermosetting resin were investigated. The cure behavior of benzoxazine with cyanate ester resin was monitored by model reaction using nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR. As a result of the model reaction, the ring opening reaction of benzoxazine ring and thermal self-cyclotrimerization of cyanate ester group occurred, and then the phenolic hydoroxyl group generated by the ring opening reaction of benzoxazine ring co-reacted with cyanate ester group. The properties of the cured thermosetting resin were estimated by mechanical properties, electrical resistivity, water resistance and heat resistance. The cured thermosetting resin from benzoxazine and cyanate ester resin showed good heat resistance, high electrical resistivity and high water resistance, compared with the cured thermosetting resin from benzoxazine and epoxy resin.

  18. Epoxy Nanocomposites—Curing Rheokinetics, Wetting and Adhesion to Fibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilyin, S. O.; Kotomin, S. V.; Kulichikhin, V. G.

    2010-06-01

    Epoxy nanocomposites considered as challenging polymeric matrix for advanced reinforced plastics. Nanofillers change rheokinetics of epoxy resin curing, affect wetting and adhesion to aramid and carbon fibers. In all cases extreme dependence of adhesive strength vs filler content in the binder was observed. New experimental techniques were developed to study wettability and fiber-matrix adhesion interaction, using yarn penetration path length, aramid fiber knot pull-up test and electrical admittance of the fracture surface of CFRP.

  19. Moisture diffusion parameter characteristics for epoxy composites and neat resins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, E. R., Jr.

    1979-01-01

    The moisture absorption characteristics of two graphite/epoxy composites and their corresponding cured neat resins were studied in high humidity and water immersion environments at elevated temperatures. Moisture absorption parameters, such as equilibrium moisture content and diffusion coefficient derived from data taken on samples exposed to high humidity and water soak environments, were compared. Composite swelling in a water immersion environment was measured. Tensile strengths of cured neat resin were measured as a function of their equilibrium moisture content after exposure to different moisture environments. The effects of intermittent moderate tensile loads on the moisture absorption parameters of composite and cured neat resin samples were determined.

  20. Biobased Epoxy Resins from Deconstructed Native Softwood Lignin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van de Pas, Daniel J; Torr, Kirk M

    2017-08-14

    The synthesis of novel epoxy resins from lignin hydrogenolysis products is reported. Native lignin in pine wood was depolymerized by mild hydrogenolysis to give an oil product that was reacted with epichlorohydrin to give epoxy prepolymers. These were blended with bisphenol A diglycidyl ether or glycerol diglycidyl ether and cured with diethylenetriamine or isophorone diamine. The key novelty of this work lies in using the inherent properties of the native lignin in preparing new biobased epoxy resins. The lignin-derived epoxy prepolymers could be used to replace 25-75% of the bisphenol A diglycidyl ether equivalent, leading to increases of up to 52% in the flexural modulus and up to 38% in the flexural strength. Improvements in the flexural strength were attributed to the oligomeric products present in the lignin hydrogenolysis oil. These results indicate lignin hydrogenolysis products have potential as sustainable biobased polyols in the synthesis of high performance epoxy resins.

  1. Cure shrinkage in casting resins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spencer, J. Brock [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2015-02-01

    A method is described whereby the shrinkage of a casting resin can be determined. Values for the shrinkage of several resin systems in frequent use by Sandia have been measured. A discussion of possible methods for determining the stresses generated by cure shrinkage and thermal contraction is also included.

  2. Modeling of complex viscosity changes in the curing of epoxy resins from near-infrared spectroscopy and multivariate regression analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrido, M; Larrechi, M S; Rius, F X

    2004-12-01

    The present study investigates the relationship between the changes in complex viscosity and near-infrared spectra. Principal component regression analysis is applied to a near-infrared data set obtained from the in situ monitoring of the curing of diglycidyl ether of bisphenol A with the diamine 4,4'-diaminodiphenylmethane. The values of complex viscosity obtained by dynamic mechanical analysis during the cure process were used as a reference. The near-infrared spectra recorded throughout the reaction, unlike the univariate data analysis at some wavelengths of the spectra, contain a sufficient amount of information to estimate the complex viscosity. The relationship found was high and the results demonstrate the quality of the fitted model. Also, a simple user-friendly procedure for applying the model, focused on the user, is shown.

  3. A fully coupled diffusion-reaction scheme for moisture sorption-desorption in an anhydride-cured epoxy resin

    KAUST Repository

    El Yagoubi, Jalal

    2012-11-01

    Thermoset materials frequently display non-classical moisture sorption behaviors. In this paper, we investigated this issue from an experimental point of view as well as in terms of modeling the water transport. We used the gravimetric technique to monitor water uptake by epoxy samples, with several thicknesses exposed to different levels of humidity during absorption and desorption tests. Our results revealed that the polymer displays a two-stage behavior with a residual amount of water that is desorbed progressively. We proposed a phenomenological reaction-diffusion scheme to describe this behavior. The model describes water transport as a competition between diffusion and the reaction, during which the local diffusivity and solubility depend on the local advancement of the reaction. We then implemented our model using COMSOL Multiphysics and identified it using a MATLAB-COMSOL optimization tool and the experimental data. We discussed the relation between the hydrophilicity of the product of the reaction and the diffusion behavior. We examined the reaction-induced modification of the water concentration field. It is worth noting that part of the phenomenology can be explained by the presence of hydrolyzable groups. © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Occupational allergic contact dermatitis caused by epoxy diacrylate in ultraviolet-light-cured paint, and bisphenol A in dental composite resin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jolanki, R; Kanerva, L; Estlander, T

    1995-08-01

    Allergic contact dermatitis (ACD) caused by epoxy di(meth)acrylates or bisphenol A is rare. Here 2 such cases are reported. A dental assistant had allergic contact dermatitis (ACD) caused by bisphenol A contained in dental composite resin (DCR) products based on epoxy dimethacrylate. The contact allergy was verified by allergic patch test reactions to bisphenol A and 2 DCRs. The DCRs giving allergic reactions were analyzed, and 0.014-0.015% of bisphenol A was detected. Occupational ACD caused by bisphenol A in dental composite resins has not been described before. The other patient was a male process worker in a paint factory. He was sensitized by an epoxy diacrylate, 2,2-bis[4-(2-hydroxy-3-acryloxypropoxy)phenyl]-propane (BIS-GA), and other acrylate compounds contained in raw materials of ultraviolet-light-curable paint. The epoxy diacrylate gave an allergic patch test reaction down to 0.016% in pet. He also had an allergic patch test reaction to several other acrylate compounds, 2-hydroxyethyl acrylate, 2-hydroxypropyl acrylate, 1,4-butanediol diacrylate, 1,6-hexanediol diacrylate, diethyleneglycol diacrylate, triethylene glycol diacrylate, and tripropylene glycol diacrylate, indicating cross and/or concomitant sensitization.

  5. Cross-reactivity among epoxy acrylates and bisphenol F epoxy resins in patients with bisphenol A epoxy resin sensitivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Han N; Pokorny, Christopher D; Law, Sandra; Pratt, Melanie; Sasseville, Denis; Storrs, Frances J

    2002-09-01

    The study's objective was 2-fold: first, to evaluate the potential cross-reactivity between Bis-A epoxy resins and epoxy acrylates and second, to study the cross reactivity between Bis-A epoxy resins and newer Bis-F epoxy resins in patients with allergic contact dermatitis to epoxy resins and had positive patch test to the standard epoxy resin based on bisphenol A. Forty-one patients were patch tested to 23 chemicals including epoxy acrylates, Bis-A epoxy resins, and Bis-F epoxy resins, as well as reactive diluents and nonbisphenol epoxy resins. Questions concerning exposure to epoxy resins, occupational history, and problems with dental work were completed. All patients included in the study had positive reactions to the standard Bis-A epoxy resin. Twenty percent (8 of 41) of the patients reacted to at least one of the epoxy acrylates; the most common reaction was to Bis-GMA. Five of 8 patients who reacted to the epoxy acrylates had dental work, but only one patient had problems from her dental work. Six of 8 patients (75%) who reacted to epoxy resins and epoxy acrylates did not react to aliphatic acrylates. Thirty-two percent (13 of 41) reacted to tosylamide epoxy resin, and none reacted to triglycidyl isocyanurate resin. In addition, all patients (100%) had positive reactions to at least one of the Bis-F epoxy resins that were tested. Most patients with sensitivity to Bis-A epoxy resins do not cross-react with epoxy acrylates. Patients with positive patch test reactions to epoxy acrylates used in dentistry usually do not have symptoms from their dental work. To our knowledge, this is the largest series of patients with sensitivity to the standard Bis-A epoxy resin that have been patch tested with the more recently introduced Bis-F epoxy resins. There is significant cross-reactivity between Bis-A and Bis-F epoxy resins, which can be explained by their structural similarity. Copyright 2002, Elsevier Science (USA). All rights reserved.

  6. [Delayed asthma bronchiale due to epoxy resin].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Authried, Georg; Al-Asadi, Haifaa; Møller, Ulla; Sherson, David Lee

    2013-10-28

    Epoxy resin is a low molecular weight agent, which can cause both acute and delayed allergic reactions. However, it is known causing skin reactions with direct or airborne contact. Rarely it can cause airway reactions like asthma bronchiale. We describe a case of a windmill worker who developed delayed asthma bronchiale due to airborne contact with epoxy resin.

  7. Effect of Monomer Structure on Curing Behavior, CO2 Solubility, and Gas Permeability of Ionic Liquid-Based Epoxy-Amine Resins and Ion-Gels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McDanel, WM; Cowan, MG; Barton, JA; Gin, DL; Noble, RD

    2015-04-29

    New imidazolium- and pyrrolidinium-based bis(epoxide)-functionalized ionic liquid (IL) monorners were synthesized: and reacted with multifunctional amine monomers to produce cross-linked, epoxy-amine poly(ionic liquid) (PIL) resins and PIL/IL ion-gel membranes. The length and chemical nature (i.e., alkyl versus ether) between the irrildazolium group and epokitie groups were studied to determine their effects on CO2 affinity. The CO2 uptake (millimoles per gram) of the epoxy amine resins (between 0.1 and 1 mmol/g) was found to depend predominately on the epoxide-to-amine ratio and the bis(epoxide) IL molecular weight. The effect of using a primary versus a secondary amine-containing multifunctional monoiner was also assessed for the resin-synthesis. Secondary amines can increase CO2 permeability but also increase the iime required for biS(epoxide) coriversion. When either the epoxide or athine monomer structure is changed, the CO2 solubility and permeability of the resulting PIL resins and ion-sel membranes can be tuned.

  8. Biphenyl liquid crystalline epoxy resin as a low-shrinkage resin-based dental restorative nanocomposite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Sheng-Hao; Chen, Rung-Shu; Chang, Yuan-Ling; Chen, Min-Huey; Cheng, Kuo-Chung; Su, Wei-Fang

    2012-11-01

    Low-shrinkage resin-based photocurable liquid crystalline epoxy nanocomposite has been investigated with regard to its application as a dental restoration material. The nanocomposite consists of an organic matrix and an inorganic reinforcing filler. The organic matrix is made of liquid crystalline biphenyl epoxy resin (BP), an epoxy resin consisting of cyclohexylmethyl-3,4-epoxycyclohexanecarboxylate (ECH), the photoinitiator 4-octylphenyl phenyliodonium hexafluoroantimonate and the photosensitizer champhorquinone. The inorganic filler is silica nanoparticles (∼70-100 nm). The nanoparticles were modified by an epoxy silane of γ-glycidoxypropyltrimethoxysilane to be compatible with the organic matrix and to chemically bond with the organic matrix after photo curing. By incorporating the BP liquid crystalline (LC) epoxy resin into conventional ECH epoxy resin, the nanocomposite has improved hardness, flexural modulus, water absorption and coefficient of thermal expansion. Although the incorporation of silica filler may dilute the reinforcing effect of crystalline BP, a high silica filler content (∼42 vol.%) was found to increase the physical and chemical properties of the nanocomposite due to the formation of unique microstructures. The microstructure of nanoparticle embedded layers was observed in the nanocomposite using scanning and transmission electron microscopy. This unique microstructure indicates that the crystalline BP and nanoparticles support each other and result in outstanding mechanical properties. The crystalline BP in the LC epoxy resin-based nanocomposite was partially melted during exothermic photopolymerization, and the resin expanded via an order-to-disorder transition. Thus, the post-gelation shrinkage of the LC epoxy resin-based nanocomposite is greatly reduced, ∼50.6% less than in commercialized methacrylate resin-based composites. This LC epoxy nanocomposite demonstrates good physical and chemical properties and good biocompatibility

  9. Advanced resin systems for graphite epoxy composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilwee, W. J.; Jayarajan, A.

    1980-01-01

    The value of resin/carbon fiber composites as lightweight structures for aircraft and other vehicle applications is dependent on many properties: environmental stability, strength, toughness, resistance to burning, smoke produced when burning, raw material costs, and complexity of processing. A number of woven carbon fiber and epoxy resin composites were made. The epoxy resin was commercially available tetraglycidylmethylene dianiline. In addition, composites were made using epoxy resin modified with amine and carboxyl terminated butadiene acrylonitrile copolymer. Strength and toughness in flexure as well as oxygen index flammability and NBS smoke chamber tests of the composites are reported.

  10. Dielectric response of epoxy-amine compositions during isothermal curing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodin, D. L.; Stefanovich, S. Yu.; Yablokova, M. Yu.

    2017-04-01

    The change in electric conductivity and dielectric permittivity during the curing of epoxy-amine compositions in a mixture with the thermoplastic Ultem 1000 polyetherimide at 180°C is studied by means of dielectric spectroscopy. TGDDM epoxy resin and DADPS, MDEA, and MIPA amine curing agents are used as the epoxy-amine composition. The times of the gel and glass transition are determined from the time and frequency dependences of the dielectric response of the investigated mixtures. At a certain step of curing of epoxy-amine compositions, the separation of a new phase enriched with the thermoplastic is detected. This separation is accompanied by charge accumulation along the phase boundary and its interaction with the external electric field. In the dielectric spectrum, this effect of phase separation appears as an individual relaxation process with characteristic parameters of dielectric relaxation. It is found that at the final step of isothermal curing, there is a glass transition of the polymer, leading to a sharp drop in the reaction rate and stabilization of the dielectric response with respect to time. The detected steps of the reaction and the corresponding changes in the structure and rheology of the investigated polymer systems are characterized and confirmed by methods of viscometry and optical microscopy.

  11. Curing of epoxy matrix composite in stratosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kondyurin, Alexey; Kondyurina, Irina; Bilek, Marcela

    Large structures for habitats, greenhouses, space bases, space factories are needed for next stage of space exploitation. A new approach enabling large-size constructions in space relies on the use of the polymerization technology of fiber-filled composites with a curable polymer matrix applied in the free space environment. The polymerisation process is proposed for the material exposed to high vacuum, dramatic temperature changes, space plasma, sun irradiation and atomic oxygen (in low Earth orbit), micrometeorite fluence, electric charging and microgravitation. The stratospheric flight experiments are directed to an investigation of the curing polymer matrix under the stratospheric conditions on. The unique combination of low atmospheric pressure, high intensity UV radiation including short wavelength UV and diurnal temperature variations associated with solar irradiation strongly influences the chemical processes in polymeric materials. The first flight experiment with uncured composites was a part of the NASA scientific balloon flight program realised at the NASA stratospheric balloon station in Alice Springs, Australia. A flight cassette installed on payload was lifted with a “zero-pressure” stratospheric balloon filled with Helium. Columbia Scientific Balloon Facility (CSBF) provided the launch, flight telemetry and landing of the balloon and payload. A cassette of uncured composite materials with an epoxy resin matrix was exposed 3 days in the stratosphere (40 km altitude). The second flight experiment was realised in South Australia in 2012, when the cassette was exposed in 27 km altitude. An analysis of the chemical structure of the composites showed, that the space irradiations are responsible for crosslinking of the uncured polymers exposed in the stratosphere. The first prepreg in the world was cured successfully in stratosphere. The investigations were supported by Alexander von Humboldt Foundation, NASA and RFBR (12-08-00970) grants.

  12. Novel processing of epoxy resin systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    May, C.A. (Arroyo Research, Watsonville, CA (United States)); Breitigam, W.; Bauer, R.S.

    1993-01-01

    The laminates that are used to prepare advanced composite parts generally require curing at high temperature and pressure, and their raw material shelf lives are limited. The epoxy resin systems that the authors describe here offer the potential of extended shelf life while curing at relatively low temperatures with a method the authors call rapid thermoset processing (RTP). A laminate is formed by stacking the prepreg in a pre-determined manner as required by the end product configuration. The prepreg is then bagged by placing it in a sealed envelope of a heat-resistant film, which is subsequently bonded to a metal surface (the tool) with a heat-resistant vacuum bag putty. The bag has an access hole through which vacuum can be applied to the prepreg stack, facilitating removal of air and other volatiles. This assembly is then heated under vacuum and pressure in an autoclave, the resin melts, and any excess air or volatile matter bleeds from the configuration, resulting in the required dense, void-free laminate.

  13. Thermoset Blends of an Epoxy Resin and Polydicyclopentadiene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rohde, Brian J.; Le, Kim Mai; Krishnamoorti, Ramanan; Robertson, Megan L.

    2016-12-13

    The mechanical properties of two chemically distinct and complementary thermoset polymers were manipulated through development of thermoset blends. The thermoset blend system was composed of an anhydride-cured diglycidyl ether of bisphenol A (DGEBA)-based epoxy resin, contributing high tensile strength and modulus, and polydicyclopentadiene (PDCPD), which has a higher toughness and impact strength as compared to other thermoset polymers. Ultra-small-angle and small-angle X-ray scattering analysis explored the morphology of concurrently cured thermoset blends, revealing a macroscopically phase separated system with a surface fractal structure across blended systems of varying composition. The epoxy resin rich and PDCPD rich phases exhibited distinct glass transitions (Tg’s): the Tg observed at higher temperature was associated with the epoxy resin rich phase and was largely unaffected by the presence of PDCPD, whereas the PDCPD rich phase Tg systematically decreased with increasing epoxy resin content due to inhibition of dicyclopentadiene ring-opening metathesis polymerization. The mechanical properties of these phase-separated blends were in reasonable agreement with predictions by the rule of mixtures for the blend tensile strength, modulus, and fracture toughness. Scanning electron microscopy analysis of the tensile and fracture specimen fracture surfaces showed an increase in energy dissipation mechanisms, such as crazing, shear banding, and surface roughness, as the fraction of the more ductile component, PDPCD, increased. These results present a facile method to tune the mechanical properties of a toughened thermoset network, in which the high modulus and tensile strength of the epoxy resin can be largely retained at high epoxy resin content in the blend, while increasing the fracture toughness.

  14. Delayed cure bismaleimide resins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Johnnie E.; Jamieson, Donald R.

    1984-08-07

    Polybismaleimides prepared by delayed curing of bis-imides having the formula ##STR1## wherein R.sub.1 and R.sub.2 each independently is H, C.sub.1-4 -alkyl, C.sub.1-4 -alkoxy, Cl or Br, or R.sub.1 and R.sub.2 together form a fused 6-membered hydrocarbon aromatic ring, with the proviso that R.sub.1 and R.sub.2 are not t-butyl or t-butoxy; X is O, S or Se; n is 1-3; and the --(CH.sub.2).sub.n -- group, optionally, is substituted by 1-3 methyl groups or by fluorine.

  15. Epoxy resins in the construction industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spee, Ton; Van Duivenbooden, Cor; Terwoert, Jeroen

    2006-09-01

    Epoxy resins are used as coatings, adhesives, and in wood and concrete repair. However, epoxy resins can be highly irritating to the skin and are strong sensitizers. Some hardeners are carcinogenic. Based on the results of earlier Dutch studies, an international project on "best practices,"--Epoxy Code--with epoxy products was started. Partners were from Denmark, Germany, the Netherlands, and the UK. The "Code" deals with substitution, safe working procedures, safer tools, and skin protection. The feasibility of an internationally agreed "ranking system" for the health risks of epoxy products was studied. Such a ranking system should inform the user of the harmfulness of different epoxies and stimulate research on less harmful products by product developers.

  16. Impact Fracture Study of Filled Epoxy Resins

    OpenAIRE

    Pedro V. Vasconcelos; F. Jorge Lino; António Magalhães; Rui J. Neto

    2004-01-01

    Epoxy-based composites moulds are frequently used for wax and polymer materials injection.Tri-phase materials, composed by an epoxy resin, aluminium particles and milled glass orcarbon fibres were produced with better mechanical and thermal performances than the single materials,increasing the competitiveness of the epoxy rapid tooling processes. Charpy Impact testswere employed to obtain a qualitative indication of the composites toughness. The electronic instrumentationof these tests allows...

  17. Study on Synthesis of Thoreau-modified 3, 5-Dimethyl-Thioltoluenediamine Used as Epoxy Resin Curing Agent and Its Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Yongli; Xiao, Wenzheng

    2017-06-01

    A novel curing agent Thoreau modified 3, 5-Dimethyl-thioltoluenediamine was synthesized and its molecular structure was characterized by FTIR and DSC. The curing kinetics of a high toughness and low volume shrinkage ratio epoxy system (modified DMTDA/DGEBA) was studied by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) under noni so thermal conditions. The data were fitted to an order model and autocatalytic model respectively. The results indicate that in order model deviates significantly from experimental data. Malik’s method was used to prove that the curing kinetics of the system concerned follow single-step autocatalytic model, and a “single-point model-free” approach was employed to calculate meaningful kinetic parameters. The DSC curves derived from autocatalytic model gave satisfactory agreement with that of experiment in the range 5K/min∼25K/min. As the heating rate increased, the predicted DSC curves deviated from experimental curves, and the total exothermic enthalpy declined owing to the transition of competition relationship between kinetics control and diffusion control.

  18. Toughening mechanism in elastomer-modified epoxy resins, part 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yee, A. F.; Pearson, R. A.

    1984-01-01

    The role of matrix ductility on the toughenability and toughening mechanism of elastomer-modified DGEBRA epoxies was investigated. Matrix ductility was varied by using epoxide resins of varying epoxide monomer molecular weights. These epoxide resins were cured using 4,4' diaminodiphenyl sulfone (DDS) and, in some cases, modified with 10% HYCAR(r)CTBN 1300X8. Fracture roughness values for the neat epoxies were found to be almost independent on the monomer molecular weight of the epoxide resin used. However, it was found that the fracture toughness of the elastomer-modified epoxies was very dependent upon the epoxide monomer molecular weight. Tensile dilatometry indicated that the toughening mechanism, when present, is similar to the mechanisms found for the piperidine cured epoxies in Part 1. SEM and OM corroborate this finding. Dynamic mechanical studies were conducted to shed light on the toughenability of the epoxies. The time-dependent small strain behavior of these epoxies were separated into their bulk and shear components. The bulk component is related to brittle fracture, whereas the shear component is related to yielding. It can be shown that the rates of shear and bulk strain energy buildup for a given stress are uniquely determined by the values of Poisson's ratio, nu. It was found that nu increases as the monomer molecular weight of the epoxide resin used increases. This increase in nu can be associated with the low temperature beta relaxation. The effect of increasing cross-link density is to shift the beta relaxation to higher temperatures and to decrease the magnitude of the beta relaxation. Thus, increasing cross-link density decreases nu and increases the tendency towards brittle fracture.

  19. CURING OF POLYMERIC COMPOSITES USING MICROWAVE RESIN TRANSFER MOULDING (RTM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. YUSOFF

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available The main objective of this work is to compare the difference between microwave heating and conventional thermal heating in fabricating carbon/epoxy composites. Two types of epoxy resin systems were used as matrices, LY5052-HY5052 and DGEBA-HY917-DY073. All composite samples were fabricated using resin transfer moulding (RTM technique. The curing of the LY5052-HY5052-carbon and the DGEBA-HY917-DY073-carbon composite systems, were carried out at 100 °C and 120 °C, respectively. Microwave heating showed better temperature control than conventional heating, however, the heating rate of the microwave cured samples were slower than the conventionally cured samples. This was attributed to the lower power (250 W used when heating with microwaves compared to 2000 W used in conventional heating. Study of thermal characteristics as curing progressed showed that the polymerisation reaction occurred at a faster rate during microwave curing than in conventional curing for both the DGEBA and the LY/HY5052 carbon composite systems. The actual cure cycle was reduced from 60 minutes to 40 minutes when using microwaves for curing DGEBA-carbon composites. As for LY/HY5052-carbon composites, the actual cure cycle was reduced from 3 hours to 40 minutes. Both conventional and microwave heating yielded similar glass transition temperatures (120 °C for DGEBA systems and 130 °C for LY/HY5052 systems. Microwave cured composites had higher void contents than conventionally cured composites (2.2-2.8% and 1.8-2.4% for DGEBA and LY/HY5052 microwave cured composites, respectively, compared to 0.2-0.4% for both DGEBA and LY/HY5052 thermally cured composites. C-scan traces showed that all composites, regardless of methods of curing, had minimal defects.

  20. Resin flow and void formation in an autoclave cure cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lionetto, Francesca; Lucia, Massimo; Dell'Anna, Riccardo; Maffezzoli, Alfonso

    2016-05-01

    A finite element (FE) model able to evaluate both the evolution of resin flow, degree of reaction and void formation during autoclave cure cycles was developed. The model was implemented using a commercial epoxy matrix widely used in aeronautic field. The FE model also included a kinetic and rheological model whose input parameters were experimentally determined by Differential Scanning Calorimetry and rheological analysis. The FE model was able to predict the evolution of degree of reaction with very good agreement with the experimental data. Moreover, the predicted resin losses were lower than 3% of the overall composite resin content.

  1. Synthesis and characterizations of melamine-based epoxy resins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ricciotti, Laura; Roviello, Giuseppina; Tarallo, Oreste; Borbone, Fabio; Ferone, Claudio; Colangelo, Francesco; Catauro, Michelina; Cioffi, Raffaele

    2013-09-05

    A new, easy and cost-effective synthetic procedure for the preparation of thermosetting melamine-based epoxy resins is reported. By this innovative synthetic method, different kinds of resins can be obtained just by mixing the reagents in the presence of a catalyst without solvent and with mild curing conditions. Two types of resins were synthesized using melamine and a glycidyl derivative (resins I) or by adding a silane derivative (resin II). The resins were characterized by means of chemical-physical and thermal techniques. Experimental results show that all the prepared resins have a good thermal stability, but differ for their mechanical properties: resin I exhibits remarkable stiffness with a storage modulus value up to 830 MPa at room temperature, while lower storage moduli were found for resin II, indicating that the presence of silane groups could enhance the flexibility of these materials. The resins show a pot life higher than 30 min, which makes these resins good candidates for practical applications. The functionalization with silane terminations can be exploited in the formulation of hybrid organic-inorganic composite materials.

  2. Viscoelastic properties of graphene-based epoxy resins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nobile, Maria Rossella; Fierro, Annalisa; Rosolia, Salvatore; Raimondo, Marialuigia; Lafdi, Khalid; Guadagno, Liberata

    2015-12-01

    In this paper the viscoelastic properties of an epoxy resin filled with graphene-based nanoparticles have been investigated in the liquid state, before curing, by means of a rotational rheometer equipped with a parallel plate geometry. Exfoliated graphite was prepared using traditional acid intercalation followed by a sudden treatment at high temperature (900°C). The percentage of exfoliated graphite was found to be 56%. The epoxy matrix was prepared by mixing a tetrafunctional precursor with a reactive diluent which produces a significant decrease in the viscosity of the epoxy precursor so that the dispersion step of nanofillers in the matrix can easily occur. The hardener agent, the 4,4-diaminodiphenyl sulfone (DDS), was added at a stoichiometric concentration with respect to all the epoxy rings. The inclusion of the partially exfoliated graphite (pEG) in the formulated epoxy mixture significantly modifies the rheological behaviour of the mixture itself. The epoxy mixture, indeed, shows a Newtonian behaviour while, at 3 wt % pEG content, the complex viscosity of the nanocomposite clearly shows a shear thinning behaviour with η* values much higher at the lower frequencies. The increase in complex viscosity with the increasing of the partially exfoliated graphite content was mostly caused by a dramatic increase in the storage modulus. All the graphene-based epoxy mixtures were cured by a two-stage curing cycles: a first isothermal stage was carried out at the lower temperature of 125°C for 1 hour while the second isothermal stage was performed at the higher temperature of 200°C for 3 hours. The mechanical properties of the cured nanocomposites show high values in the storage modulus and glass transition temperature.

  3. Influence of the curing cycles on the fatigue performance of unidirectional glass fiber reinforced epoxy composites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hüther, Jonas; Brøndsted, Povl

    2016-01-01

    During the manufacturing process of fiber reinforced polymers the curing reaction of the resin results in shrinkage of the resin and introduces internal stresses in the composites. When curing at higher temperatures in order to shorten up the processing time, higher curing stresses and thermal...... stresses are built up and frozen, as residual stresses occur. In the present work, a glass fiber reinforced epoxy composite laminate with an unidirectional architecture based on non-crimp fabrics with backing fibers is investigated. Three different curing cycles (time-temperature cycles) are used, leading...

  4. Fluorinated Alkyl Ether Epoxy Resin Compositions and Applications Thereof

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wohl, Christopher J. (Inventor); Connell, John W. (Inventor); Smith, Joseph G. (Inventor); Siochi, Emilie J. (Inventor); Gardner, John M. (Inventor); Palmieri, Frank M. (Inventor)

    2017-01-01

    Epoxy resin compositions prepared using amino terminated fluoro alkyl ethers. The epoxy resin compositions exhibit low surface adhesion properties making them useful as coatings, paints, moldings, adhesives, and fiber reinforced composites.

  5. 40 CFR 721.3135 - Phosphorous modified epoxy resin (generic).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Phosphorous modified epoxy resin... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.3135 Phosphorous modified epoxy resin (generic). (a) Chemical substance... phosphorous modified epoxy resin (PMNs P-00-992 and P-01-471) is subject to reporting under this section for...

  6. 40 CFR 721.2755 - Cycloaliphatic epoxy resin (generic).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Cycloaliphatic epoxy resin (generic... Substances § 721.2755 Cycloaliphatic epoxy resin (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as cycloaliphatic epoxy resin (PMN...

  7. 40 CFR 721.2752 - Epoxy resin containing phosphorus (generic).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Epoxy resin containing phosphorus... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.2752 Epoxy resin containing phosphorus (generic). (a) Chemical substance... epoxy resin containing phosphorus (PMN P-00-912) is subject to reporting under this section for the...

  8. Homogeneous Liquid Phase Transfer of Graphene Oxide into Epoxy Resins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amirova, Lyaysan; Surnova, Albina; Balkaev, Dinar; Musin, Delus; Amirov, Rustem; Dimiev, Ayrat M

    2017-04-05

    The quality of polymer composite materials depends on the distribution of the filler in the polymer matrix. Due to the presence of the oxygen functional groups, graphene oxide (GO) has a strong affinity to epoxy resins, providing potential opportunity for the uniform distribution of GO sheets in the matrix. Another advantage of GO over its nonoxidized counterpart is its ability to exfoliate to single-atomic-layer sheets in water and in some organic solvents. However, these advantages of GO have not yet been fully realized due to the lack of the methods efficiently introducing GO into the epoxy resin. Here we develop a novel homogeneous liquid phase transfer method that affords uniform distribution, and fully exfoliated condition of GO in the polymer matrix. The most pronounced alteration of properties of the cured composites is registered at the 0.10%-0.15% GO content. Addition of as little as 0.10% GO leads to the increase of the Young's modulus by 48%. Moreover, we demonstrate successful introduction of GO into the epoxy matrix containing an active diluent-modifier; this opens new venues for fabrication of improved GO-epoxy-modifier composites with a broad range of predesigned properties. The experiments done on reproducing the two literature methods, using alternative GO introduction techniques, lead to either decrease or insignificant increase of the Young's modulus of the resulting GO-epoxy composites.

  9. Study on epoxy resin modified by polyether ionic liquid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, X. C.; Guo, L. Y.; Deng, L. L.; Wu, H.

    2017-06-01

    Chloride 1-carboxyl polyether-3-methyl imidazole ionic liquid (PIIL) was synthesized. Then blended with epoxy resin(EP) to prepare the composite materials of PIIL/EP, which cured with aniline curing agent. The structure and curing performance of PIIL/EP were determined by FT-IR and DSC. The effects of the content of PIIL on strength of EP were studied. The results show that the PIIL was the target product. The strength was improved significantly with increase of the PIIL content. The obvious rubber elasticity of PIIL/EP after cured was showed when the content of PIIL accounts for 40% and the impact strength was up to 15.95kJ/m2.

  10. Cobalt Ions Improve the Strength of Epoxy Resins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoakley, D. M.; St. Clair, A. K.

    1986-01-01

    Technique developed for improving mechanical strength of epoxy resins by adding cobalt ions in form of tris(acetylacetonato)cobalt (III) complex. Solid cast disks prepared from cobalt ion-containing epoxy resins tested for flexural strength and stiffness. Incorporation of cobalt ions into epoxies increased flexural strength of resins by 10 to 95 percent. Suitable resins for this technique include any liquid or solid TGMDA resins. Improved epoxy formulation proves useful as composite matrix resin, adhesive, or casting resin for applications on commercial and advanced aircraft.

  11. Epoxy resins produce improved plastic scintillators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markley, F. W.

    1967-01-01

    Plastic scintillator produced by the substitution of epoxy resins for the commonly used polystyrene is easy to cast, stable at room temperature, and has the desirable properties of a thermoset or cross-linked system. Such scintillators can be immersed directly in strong solvents, an advantage in many chemical and biological experiments.

  12. Aliphatic amine cured PDMS–epoxy interpenetrating network ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A siliconized epoxy interpenetrating network (IPN) was synthesized from commercially available DGEBA epoxy resin GY250 (Ciba-Geigy, epoxy equivalent = 182–192, viscosity = 9000–12000 cP) and hydroxyl terminated polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS). PDMS and GY250 were thoroughly mixed at 30°C to get the ...

  13. Chromium Ions Improve Moisure Resistance of Epoxy Resins

    Science.gov (United States)

    St. Clair, A. K.; St. Clair, T. L.; Stoakley, D. M.; Singh, J. J.; Sprinkle, D. R.

    1986-01-01

    Broad spectrum of thermosetting epoxy resins used on commercial and military aircraft, primarily as composite matrices and adhesives. In new technique, chromium-ion containing epoxy with improved resistance to moisture produced where chromium ions believed to prevent absorption of water molecules by coordinating themselves to hydroxyl groups on epoxy chain. Anticipated that improved epoxy formulation useful as composite matrix resin, adhesive, or casting resin for applications on commercial and advanced aircraft. Improvement made without sacrifice in mechanical properties of polymer.

  14. High T{sub g} and fast curing epoxy-based anisotropic conductive paste for electronic packaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keeratitham, Waralee, E-mail: waralee.ke@student.chula.ac.th; Somwangthanaroj, Anongnat, E-mail: anongnat.s@chula.ac.th [Department of Chemical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Chulalongkorn University, Bangkok, 10330 (Thailand)

    2016-03-09

    Herein, our main objective is to prepare the fast curing epoxy system with high glass transition temperature (T{sub g}) by incorporating the multifunctional epoxy resin into the mixture of diglycidyl ether of bisphenol A (DGEBA) as a major epoxy component and aromatic diamine as a hardener. Furthermore, the curing behavior as well as thermal and thermomechanical properties were investigated by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA) and thermomechanical analysis (TMA). It was found that T{sub g} obtained from tan δ of DGEBA/aromatic diamine system increased from 100 °C to 205 °C with the presence of 30 percentage by weight of multifunctional epoxy resin. Additionally, the isothermal DSC results showed that the multifunctional epoxy resin can accelerate the curing reaction of DGEBA/aromatic diamine system. Namely, a high degree of curing (∼90%) was achieved after a few minutes of curing at low temperature of 130 °C, owing to a large number of epoxy ring of multifunctional epoxy resin towards the active hydrogen atoms of aromatic diamine.

  15. The Curing Process of Epoxy/Amino-Functionalized MWCNTs: Calorimetry, Molecular Modelling, and Electron Microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. G. Prolongo

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Curing kinetic of an epoxy resin reinforced with amino-functionalized MWCNTs has been studied by DSC and the obtained results were explained through morphological studies carried out by SEM, TEM, FEG-SEM, and molecular simulation tools. The presence of MWCNTs in the curing reaction induces a retardation effect of curing reaction and a decrease of the reaction heat. Both are associated with the adsorption of curing agent molecules inside carbon nanotubes, which was proved through the application of electron microscopic techniques and molecular simulation tools. It has been also demonstrated that there is a chemical reaction between amine groups anchored to the nanotubes and oxirane rings of epoxy monomer, which improves the nanoreinforcement/matrix interfacial adhesion, appearing a chemical interphase. The glass transition temperature (Tg of epoxy matrix increases by the addition of MWCNTs due to the restriction of its mobility.

  16. Epoxy resin synthesis using low molecular weight lignin separated from various lignocellulosic materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asada, Chikako; Basnet, Sunita; Otsuka, Masaya; Sasaki, Chizuru; Nakamura, Yoshitoshi

    2015-03-01

    A low molecular weight lignin from various lignocellulosic materials was used for the synthesis of bio-based epoxy resins. The lignin extracted with methanol from steam-exploded samples (steaming time of 5 min at steam pressure of 3.5 MPa) from different biomasses (i.e., cedar, eucalyptus, and bamboo) were functionalized by the reaction with epichlorohydrin, catalyzed by a water-soluble phase transfer catalyst tetramethylammonium chloride, which was further reacted with 30 wt% aqueous NaOH for ring closure using methyl ethyl ketone as a solvent. The glycidylated products of the lignin with good yields were cured to epoxy polymer networks with bio-based curing agents i.e., lignin itself and a commercial curing agent TD2131. Relatively good thermal properties of the bio-based epoxy network was obtained and thermal decomposition temperature at 5% weight loss (Td5) of cedar-derived epoxy resin was higher than that derived from eucalyptus and bamboo. The bio-based resin satisfies the stability requirement of epoxy resin applicable for electric circuit boards. The methanol-insoluble residues were enzymatically hydrolyzed to produce glucose. This study indicated that the biomass-derived methanol-soluble lignin may be a promising candidate to be used as a substitute for petroleum-based epoxy resin derived from bisphenol A, while insoluble residues may be processed to give a bioethanol precursor i.e., glucose. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Effects of Hygrothermal Cycling on the Chemical, Thermal, and Mechanical Properties of 862/W Epoxy Resin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Sandi G.; Roberts, Gary D.; Copa, Christine C.; Bail, Justin L.; Kohlman, Lee W.; Binienda, Wieslaw K.

    2011-01-01

    The hygrothermal aging characteristics of an epoxy resin were characterized over 1 year, which included 908 temperature and humidity cycles. The epoxy resin quickly showed evidence of aging through color change and increased brittleness. The influence of aging on the material s glass transition temperature (Tg) was evaluated by Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC) and Dynamic Mechanical Analysis (DMA). The Tg remained relatively constant throughout the year long cyclic aging profile. The chemical composition was monitored by Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR) where evidence of chemical aging and advancement of cure was noted. The tensile strength of the resin was tested as it aged. This property was severely affected by the aging process in the form of reduced ductility and embrittlement. Detailed chemical evaluation suggests many aging mechanisms are taking place during exposure to hygrothermal conditions. This paper details the influence of processes such as: advancement of cure, chemical degradation, and physical aging on the chemical and physical properties of the epoxy resin.

  18. Contact allergy to epoxy resin: risk occupations and consequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bangsgaard, Nannie; Thyssen, Jacob Pontoppidan; Menné, Torkil; Andersen, Klaus Ejner; Mortz, Charlotte G; Paulsen, Evy; Sommerlund, Mette; Veien, Niels Kren; Laurberg, Grete; Kaaber, Knud; Thormann, Jens; Andersen, Bo Lasthein; Danielsen, Anne; Avnstorp, Christian; Kristensen, Berit; Kristensen, Ove; Vissing, Susanne; Nielsen, Niels Henrik; Johansen, Jeanne Duus

    2012-08-01

    Epoxy resin monomers are strong skin sensitizers that are widely used in industrial sectors. In Denmark, the law stipulates that workers must undergo a course on safe handling of epoxy resins prior to occupational exposure, but the effectiveness of this initiative is largely unknown. To evaluate the prevalence of contact allergy to epoxy resin monomer (diglycidyl ether of bisphenol A; MW 340) among patients with suspected contact dermatitis and relate this to occupation and work-related consequences. The dataset comprised 20 808 consecutive dermatitis patients patch tested during 2005-2009. All patients with an epoxy resin-positive patch test were sent a questionnaire. A positive patch test reaction to epoxy resin was found in 275 patients (1.3%), with a higher proportion in men (1.9%) than in women (1.0%). The prevalence of sensitization to epoxy resin remained stable over the study period. Of the patients with an epoxy resin-positive patch test, 71% returned a questionnaire; 95 patients had worked with epoxy resin in the occupational setting, and, of these, one-third did not use protective gloves and only 50.5% (48) had participated in an educational programme. The 1% prevalence of epoxy resin contact allergy is equivalent to reports from other countries. The high occurrence of epoxy resin exposure at work, and the limited use of protective measures, indicate that reinforcement of the law is required. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  19. Differences in interfacial bond strengths of graphite fiber-epoxy resin composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Needles, H. L.

    1985-01-01

    The effect of epoxy-size and degree of cure on the interfacial bonding of an epoxy-amine-graphite fiber composite system is examined. The role of the fiber-resin interface in determining the overall mechanical properties of composites is poorly understood. A good interfacial adhesive bond is required to achieve maximum stress transfer to the fibers in composites, but at the same time some form of energy absorbing interfacial interaction is needed to achieve high fracture toughening. The incompatibility of these two processes makes it important to understand the nature and basic factors involved at the fiber-resin interface as stress is applied. The mechanical properties including interlaminar shear values for graphite fiber-resin composites are low compared to glass and boron-resin composites. These differences have been attributed to poor fiber-matrix adhesion. Graphite fibers are commonly subjected to post-treatments including application of organic sizing in order to improve their compatibility with the resin matrix and to protect the fiber tow from damage during processing and lay-up. In such processes, sized graphite fiber tow is impregnated with epoxy resin and then layed-up i nto the appropriate configuration. Following an extended ambient temperature cure, the graphite-resin composite structure is cured at elevated temperature using a programmed temperature sequence to cure and then cool the product.

  20. Formulation and Characterization of Epoxy Resin Copolymer for Graphite Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keck, F. L.

    1983-01-01

    Maximum char yield was obtained with a copolymer containing 25% mol fraction DGEBE and 75% mol fraction DGEBA (Epon 828). To achieve the high values (above 40%), a large quantity of catalyst (trimethoxyboroxine) was necessary. Although a graphite laminate 1/8" thick was successfully fabricated, the limited life of the catalyzed epoxy copolymer system precludes commercial application. Char yields of 45% can be achieved with phenolic cured epoxy systems as indicated by data generated under NAS2-10207 contract. A graphite laminate using this type of resin system was fabricated for comparison purposes. The resultant laminate was easier to process and because the graphite prepreg is more stable, the fabrication process could readily be adapted to commercial applications.

  1. Assessment of cross-reactivity of new less sensitizing epoxy resin monomers in epoxy resin-allergic individuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagvall, Lina; Niklasson, Ida B; Rudbäck, Johanna; O'Boyle, Niamh M; Niklasson, Eva; Luthman, Kristina; Karlberg, Ann-Therese

    2016-09-01

    Measures to prevent occupational exposure to epoxy resins, including education, medical examination, and voluntary agreements between employers and workers, have not been effective enough to protect against skin sensitization. Therefore, alternatives to the major epoxy resin haptens that have been found to be less sensitizing in the local lymph node assay have been developed. To study the cross-reactivity of two newly designed epoxy resin monomers, with decreased skin-sensitizing potency and good technical properties as compared with diglycidyl ether of bisphenol A (DGEBA), in subjects with known contact allergy to epoxy resin of DGEBA type. Eleven individuals with previous positive patch test reactions to epoxy resin of DGEBA participated in the study. The two alternative epoxy resin monomers were synthesized and patch tested in dilution series in parallel with epoxy resin of DGEBA from the baseline series (containing 92% DGEBA). All participants reacted to epoxy resin of DGEBA on retesting. Three participants reacted to monomer 1. No reactions were seen to monomer 2. The alternative monomers studied showed little or no cross-reactivity with epoxy resin of DGEBA. Decreasing the risk of sensitization by using less sensitizing compounds is important, as contact allergy to epoxy resins is common in spite of thorough preventive measures. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Synthesis and properties of a bio-based epoxy resin with high epoxy value and low viscosity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Songqi; Liu, Xiaoqing; Fan, Libo; Jiang, Yanhua; Cao, Lijun; Tang, Zhaobin; Zhu, Jin

    2014-02-01

    A bio-based epoxy resin (denoted TEIA) with high epoxy value (1.16) and low viscosity (0.92 Pa s, 258C) was synthesized from itaconic acid and its chemical structure was confirmed by 1H NMR and 13C NMR spectroscopy. Its curing reaction with poly(propylene glycol) bis(2-aminopropyl ether) (D230) and methyl hexahydrophthalic anhydride (MHHPA) was investigated. For comparison, the commonly used diglycidyl ether of bisphenol A (DGEBA) was also cured with the same curing agents. The results demonstrated that TEIA showed higher curing reactivity towards D230/MHHPA and lower viscosity compared with DGEBA, resulting in the better processability. Owing to its high epoxy value and unique structure, comparable or better glass transition temperature as well as mechanical properties could be obtained for the TEIA-based network relative to the DGEBA-based network. The results indicated that itaconic acid is a promising renewable feedstock for the synthesis of bio-based epoxy resin with high performance.

  3. Thermal investigation of tetrafunctional epoxy resin filled with different carbonaceous nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romano, Vittorio; Naddeo, Carlo; Vertuccio, Luigi; Lafdi, Khalid; Guadagno, Liberata

    2016-05-01

    This paper presents a preliminary investigation of thermal behaviour of epoxy nanocomposites containing different types of nanofillers, such as 1-D Multiwall Carbon Nanotubes (MWCNTs) and 2-D predominant shape of Exfoliated Graphite nanoparticles (EG). The cure behavior of the different epoxy formulations (filled and unfilled) was studied by Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC). The DSC technique is particularly advantageous for studying the cure of reactive epoxy systems because the curing process is accompanied by the liberation of heat. For all the epoxy nanocomposites analyzed in this work, Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC) investigation shows curing degree (DC) values higher than 92% for the curing cycle up to 200°C, reaching up to 100% for the samples filled with Exfoliated Graphite nanoparticles (EG). The calorimetric results also show that Exfoliated Graphite nanoparticles accelerate the curing process of the epoxy resin of about 20°C. Transient Plane Source measurements of thermal conductivity show that this acceleration is directly related to the better heat conduction obtained through the incorporation in the epoxy matrix of carbonaceous nanostructures with predominantly two-dimensional shape (Exfoliated Graphite nanoparticles). The experimental results clearly demonstrate that the use of graphene sheets is very hopeful for obtaining nanocomposites characterized by high performance that are able to meet the ambitious requirements in the aeronautical field.

  4. Epoxy-resin adhesive and method for bonding using such an epoxy resin adhesive

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bhowmik, S.; Poulis, J.A.; Benedictus, R.

    2008-01-01

    The invention relates to an epoxy resin adhesive comprising a dotation of nano-substances, wherein the nano- substances are selected from the group comprising carbon-fibre nanotubes, carbon nano-fibres, silicate nano powders, and wherein the nano-substances are dispersed in the adhesive with a

  5. Non-isothermal cure and exfoliation of tri-functional epoxy-clay nanocomposites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Shiravand

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The non-isothermal cure kinetics of polymer silicate layered nanocomposites based on a tri-functional epoxy resin has been investigated by differential scanning calorimetry. From an analysis of the kinetics as a function of the clay content, it can be concluded that the non-isothermal cure reaction can be considered to consist of four different processes: the reaction of epoxy groups with the diamine curing agent; an intra-gallery homopolymerisation reaction which occurs concurrently with the epoxy-amine reaction; and two extra-gallery homopolymerisation reactions, catalysed by the onium ion of the organically modified clay and by the tertiary amines resulting from the epoxy-amine reaction. The final nanostructure displays a similar quality of exfoliation as that observed for the isothermal cure of the same nanocomposite system. This implies that the intra-gallery reaction, which is responsible for the exfoliation, is not significantly inhibited by the extra-gallery epoxy-amine cross-linking reaction.

  6. Realtime 3D stress measurement in curing epoxy packaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Richter, Jacob; Hyldgård, A.; Birkelund, Karen

    2007-01-01

    This paper presents a novel method to characterize stress in microsystem packaging. A circular p-type piezoresistor is implemented on a (001) silicon chip. We use the circular stress sensor to determine the packaging induced stress in a polystyrene tube filled with epoxy. The epoxy curing process...... is monitored by stress measurements. From the stress measurements we conclude that the epoxy cures in 8 hours at room temperature. We find the difference in in-plane normal stresses to be sigmaxx-sigmayy=6.7 MPa and (sigmaxx+sigmayy-0.4sigmazz)=232 MPa....

  7. The effect of light curing units, curing time, and veneering materials on resin cement microhardness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nurcan Ozakar Ilday

    2013-06-01

    Conclusion: Light-curing units, curing time, and veneering materials are important factors for achieving adequate dual cure resin composite microhardness. High-intensity light and longer curing times resulted in the highest microhardness values.

  8. Epoxy resins used to seal brachytherapy seed

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferreira, Natalia Carolina Camargos; Ferraz, Wilmar Barbosa; Reis, Sergio Carneiro dos; Santos, Ana Maria Matildes dos, E-mail: nccf@cdtn.br, E-mail: ferrazw@cdtn.br, E-mail: reissc@cdtn.br, E-mail: amms@cdtn.br [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN/CNEN-MG), Belo Horizonte, BH (Brazil)

    2013-07-01

    Prostate cancer treatment with brachytherapy is recommended for patients with cancer at an early stage. In this treatment, small radioactive seeds are implanted directly in the prostate gland. These seeds are composed at least of one radionuclide carrier and an X-ray marker enclosed within a metallic tube usually sealed by laser process. This process is expensive and, furthermore, it can provoke a partial volatilization of the radionuclide and change the isotropy in dose distribution around the seed. In this paper, we present a new sealing process using epoxy resin. Three kinds of resins were utilized and characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive X ray (EDS) and by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) after immersion in simulated body fluid (SBF) and in sodium iodine solution (NaI). The sealing process showed excellent potential to replace the sealing laser usually employed. (author)

  9. Curing kinetics, mechanism and chemorheological behavior of methanol etherified amino/novolac epoxy systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. F. Zhao

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The curing kinetics and mechanism of epoxy novolac resin (DEN and modified epoxy novolac resin (MDEN with methanol etherified amino resin were studied by means of differential scanning calorimetry (DSC, Fourier transforminfrared (FT-IR spectroscopy and chemorheological analysis. Their kinetics parameters and models of the curing were examined utilizing isoconversional methods, Flynn-Wall-Ozawa and Friedman methods. For the DEN mixture, its average activation energy (Ea was 71.05 kJ/mol and the autocatalytic model was established to describe the curing reaction. The MDEN mixture exhibited three dominant curing processes, termed as reaction 1, reaction 2 and reaction 3; and their Ea were 70.05, 106.55 and 101.91 kJ/mol, respectively. Besides, Ea of reaction 1 was similar to that of DEN mixture, while Ea of reactions 2 and 3 corresponded to that of the etherification reaction between hydroxyl and epoxide group. Moreover, these three dominant reactions were nth order in nature. Furthermore, their curing mechanisms were proposed from the results of DSC and FTIR. The chemorheological behavior was also investigated to obtain better plastics products via optimizing the processing schedules.

  10. Studies on the Influence of Monomers on the Performance Properties of Epoxy Acrylate Resin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amrita Sharma

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Twelve blend samples were prepared by physical mixing of epoxy acrylate resins with various monomers viz. ethoxylated phenol monoacrylate (EOPA, tripropylene glycol diacrylate (TPGDA and trimethylol propane tri acrylate(TMPTA, having weight ratio of epoxy acrylate resin and monomers are 50:50, 60:40, 70:30, 80:20. These samples were cured under UV radiation using 5% photo initiator by weight. These blends were evaluated for mechanical, chemical & thermal properties. It was found that the sample having mono & tri functional monomers shows better properties than the samples having di functional monomer.

  11. Structural and electronic properties of carbon nanotube-reinforced epoxy resins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suggs, Kelvin; Wang, Xiao-Qian

    2010-03-01

    Nanocomposites of cured epoxy resin reinforced by single-walled carbon nanotubes exhibit a plethora of interesting behaviors at the molecular level. We have employed a combination of force-field-based molecular mechanics and first-principles calculations to study the corresponding binding and charge-transfer behavior. The simulation study of various nanotube species and curing agent configurations provides insight into the optimal structures in lieu of interfacial stability. An analysis of charge distributions of the epoxy functionalized semiconducting and metallic tubes reveals distinct level hybridizations. The implications of these results for understanding dispersion mechanism and future nano reinforced composite developments are discussed.

  12. Toughening mechanism in elastometer-modified epoxy resins: Part 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yee, A. F.; Pearson, R. A.

    1983-01-01

    Several plaques of Epon 828, cured with piperidine, modified with hycar(r) CTBN 1300X8, Hycar(R) CTBN 1300X13, and Hycar(R) CTBN 1300x15, and in some cases modified with biphenol A (BPA), yielded properly toughened epoxies with rubber particle diameters ranging from 0.1 to 10 microns. Fracture toughness experiments indicate that toughness was more a function of rubber content than the rubber particle size. Tensile volumetric behavior of the near resin exhibits two regions: an initial region where the increase in volume strain was due to the Poisson's effect, and a second region where a slower rate of increase in volume strain was due to shear deformation. Tensile volumetric deformation of an elastomer-modified epoxy exhibits the same type of behavior to that of the neat resin at low rates ( 3.2x0.01 sec(-1)). But at very high strain rates, which correspond more closely to the strain rates at the crack tip, there exists an increase in volume strain beyond the Poisson's effect. TEM, SEM and OM studies indicate that the rubber particles had voided. When a thin section from the deformed region is viewed under crossed-polarized light, shear bands are seen connecting voided rubber particles. From this information cavitation and enhanced shear band formation is proposed as the toughening mechanism.

  13. Effect of cure cycle on enthalpy relaxation and post shrinkage in neat epoxy and epoxy composites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Martin; Jakobsen, Johnny

    2016-01-01

    The effect of cure cycle on enthalpy relaxation and warpage is studied for both neat epoxy and glass/epoxy composites. An approach for determining the enthalpy relaxation in the matrix of composite materials combining modulated differential scanning calorimetry and thermogravimetry is presented...

  14. Effect of LED light-curing time for the adhesive resin on the modulus of elasticity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senawongse, Pisol; Harnirattisai, Choltacha; Otsuki, Masayuki; Tagami, Junji

    2007-06-01

    To evaluate the elastic modulus of successive layers where an adhesive resin was cured by different light-curing times. Eighty dentin discs which were 2 mm thick were prepared from 40 sound third molars. The dentin discs were further divided into four groups and bonded with 3M Single Bond 2 and cured with an LED for 5, 10, 15 and 20s. Bonded specimens were restored with a microhybrid resin composite. Specimens were cut perpendicular to the resin dentin interface, embedded in epoxy resin, and polished. Polished specimens were evaluated for the elastic modulus at the layer of dentin, hybrid layer, adhesive resin, and resin composite at 24 hours after preparation. Light-curing times influenced the elastic modulus of hybrid layer and adhesive resin. The significant differences of elastic modulus among successive layers were found. The results suggested that extension of light-curing times of adhesive resin from 5 to 20 seconds increased the mechanical properties of the resin dentin interface.

  15. In situ curing of liquid epoxy via gold-nanoparticle mediated photothermal heating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Ju; Firestone, Gabriel E; Bochinski, J R; Clarke, L I; Gorga, R E

    2017-02-10

    Metal nanoparticles incorporated at low concentration into epoxy systems enable in situ curing via photothermal heating. In the process of nanoparticle-mediated photothermal heating, light interacts specifically with particles embedded within a liquid or solid material and this energy is transformed into heat, resulting in significant temperature increase local to each particle with minimal warming of surroundings. The ability to use such internal heating to transform the mechanical properties of a material (e.g., from liquid to rigid solid) without application of damaging heat to the surrounding environment represents a powerful tool for a variety of scientific applications, particularly within the biomedical sector. Uniform particle dispersion is achieved by placing the nanoparticles within solvent miscible with the desired epoxy resin, demonstrating a strategy utilizable for a wide range of materials without requiring chemical modification of the particles or epoxy. Mechanical and thermal properties (storage modulus, T g , and degradation behavior) of the cured epoxy are equivalent to those obtained under traditional heating methods. Selective curing of a shape is demonstrated within a liquid bath of epoxy, where the solid form is generated by rastering a spatially confined, photothermal-driving light beam. The non-irradiated regions are largely unaffected and the solid part is easily removed from the remaining liquid. Temperature profiles showing minimal heating outside the irradiated zone are presented and discussed.

  16. Persistent photosensitivity after allergic contact dermatitis to epoxy resin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwok, Tiffany; Rosen, Cheryl F; Storrs, Frances J; Lobel, Edmund; DeKoven, Joel G

    2013-01-01

    Persistent photosensitivity after allergic contact dermatitis (ACD) to epoxy resin has rarely been described. The aim of this study was to create awareness that ACD to epoxy may be a trigger for persistent photosensitivity. We present a series of 5 patients who developed ACD to epoxy resin and later a photodistributed eczematous eruption when exposed to sunlight, with a documented decrease in minimal erythema dose to UVA and UVB. The age of patients ranged from 34 to 71 years, and there were 3 men and 2 women. Each patient had occupational exposure to epoxy. Symptoms of epoxy ACD preceded photosensitivity by 5 months to 12 years in 3 cases and occurred simultaneously in 2 cases. Patch testing to epoxy resin was positive in all patients. Phototesting revealed a decreased minimal erythema dose to UVA and UVB in each of the 3 patients who were phototested. Photopatch testing was positive for epoxy resin in 1 of the 2 patients tested. All patients remained photosensitive for at least 2 years after diagnosis, with only 1 case of photosensitivity resolving with extended avoidance of epoxy. There is an association between ACD to epoxy resin and development of persistent photosensitivity. Possible mechanisms to explain the relationship between the 2 phenomena are discussed.

  17. Synthesis and characterisation of epoxy resins reinforced with carbon nanotubes and nanofibers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prolongo, S G; Gude, M R; Ureña, A

    2009-10-01

    Epoxy nanocomposites were fabricated using two kinds of nanofiller, amino-functionalized multi-walled carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and non-treated long carbon nanofibers (CNFs). The non-cured mixtures were analysed through viscosity measurements. The effect of the nanoreinforcement on the curing process was determined by differential scanning calorimetry. Finally, the characterisation of cured nanocomposites was carried out studying their thermo-mechanical and electrical behaviour. At room temperature, the addition of CNTs causes a viscosity increase of epoxy monomer much more marked than the introduction of CNFs due to their higher specific area. It was probed that in that case exists chemical reaction between amino-functionalized CNTs and the oxirane rings of epoxy monomer. The presence of nanoreinforcement induces a decrease of curing reaction rate and modifies the epoxy conversion reached. The glass transition temperature of the nanocomposites decreases with the contents of CNTs and CNFs added, which could be related to plasticization phenomena of the nanoreinforcements. The storage modulus of epoxy resin significantly increases with the addition of CNTs and CNFs. This augment is higher with amino-functionalized CNTs due, between other reasons, to the stronger interaction with the epoxy matrix. The electrical conductivity is greatly increased with the addition of CNTs and CNFs. In fact, the percolation threshold is lower than 0.25 wt% due to the high aspect ratio of the used nanoreinforcements.

  18. Self-lubricating, wear resistant protic ionic liquid-epoxy resin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. D. Aviles

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available A new self-lubricating, wear resistant epoxy resin material (ER+DCi has been obtained by addition of a 9 wt.% of the room-temperature protic ionic liquid (PIL tri-[bis(2-hydroxyethylammonium] citrate (DCi to the mixture of the prepolymer and the hardener composed of a mixture of amines. The highly polar tricationic protic ammonium carboxylate ionic liquid shows a high contact angle on the resin surface and distributes inside the epoxy matrix as spheres of around 50 µm in diameter, with a mean density of approximately 38 mm2. The presence of the ionic liquid fluid phase inside the cavities has been determined by SEM observation of fracture surfaces and FTIR microscopy. The DCi phase reduces the residual curing enthalpy and the glass transition temperature, as determined by DSC, without significantly changing microhardness or electrical resistivity values. DMA analysis shows that DCi reduces storage modulus, loss modulus and tan δ values. The tribological performance of the new material has been compared with that of the neat epoxy resin under pin-on-disc sliding conditions. ER+DCi shows more than 50% reduction of the friction coefficient with respect to neat epoxy resin, and no surface damage, in contrast with the severe wear that takes place in the case of neat epoxy resin. A self-lubrication mechanism by release of the ionic liquid lubricant under load is proposed.

  19. Cure-dependent Viscoelastic Poisson’s Ratio of Epoxy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-01-26

    Poisson’s ratio in creep and stress relaxation of EPON 828 epoxy cured with tri- ethylenetriamine using geometric moiré with gratings of 20 lines per...cure kinetics [23] and cure-dependent viscoelastic properties [24] of this material. A second system was also investigated, EPON 828 /3274, a bisphenol...Table 1. The EPON 828 /3274 specimens were cured for 48 h at room temperature followed by 10 h at 75◦C to ensure the material was fully reacted. After

  20. CURING EFFICIENCY OF DUAL-CURE RESIN CEMENT UNDER ZIRCONIA WITH TWO DIFFERENT LIGHT CURING UNITS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pınar GÜLTEKİN

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Adequate polymerization is a crucial factor in obtaining optimal physical properties and a satisfying clinical performance from composite resin materials. The aim of this study was to evaluate the polymerization efficiency of dual-cure resin cement cured with two different light curing units under zirconia structures having differing thicknesses. Materials and Methods: 4 zirconia discs framework in 4 mm diameter and in 0.5 mm, 1 mm and 1.5 mm thickness were prepared using computer-aided design system. One of the 0.5 mm-thick substructures was left as mono-layered whereas others were layered with feldspathic porcelain of same thickness and ceramic samples with 4 different thicknesses (0.5, 1, 1.5 and 2.0 mm were prepared. For each group (n=12 resin cement was light cured in polytetrafluoroethylene molds using Light Emitting Diode (LED or Quartz-Tungsten Halogen (QHT light curing units under each of 4 zirconia based discs (n=96. The values of depth of cure (in mm and the Vickers Hardness Number values (VHN were evaluated for each specimen. Results: The use of LED curing unit produced a greater depth of cure compared to QTH under ceramic discs with 0.5 and 1 mm thickness (p<0.05.At 100μm and 300 μm depth, the LED unit produced significantly greater VHN values compared to the QTH unit (p<0.05. At 500 μm depth, the difference between the VHN values of LED and QTH groups were not statistically significant. Conclusion: Light curing may not result in adequate resin cement polymerization under thick zirconia structures. LED light sources should be preferred over QTH for curing dual-cure resin cements, especially for those under thicker zirconia restorations.

  1. Modification of epoxy resins with thermoplastic segmented polycarbonate-based polyurethanes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pavličević Jelena

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In this work, epoxy hybrid materials were synthesized by addition of thermoplastic segmented aliphatic polyurethanes with good elastic properties. The modified epoxy samples were obtained by curing of previously homogenized mixture of prepared polyurethane melts, epoxy resin and crosslinking agent Jeffamine D-2000. The influence of different weight content of polyurethanes (5, 10 and 15 wt. % compared to pure epoxy resin as well the influence of different hard segments of elastomers (20, 25 and 30 wt. % on the curing of modified epoxy systems was studied. The curing was followed by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC, in dynamic regime from 30 to 300°C, at three heating rates (5, 10 and 20°C/min. With the increase of hard segments content of polyurethanes added in higher concentration (10 and 15 wt. % into epoxy matrix, the temperature of maximum ratio of curing was shifted to lower values (from 205 to 179°C. Obtained DSC data were analyzed using two integral methods (Ozawa-Flynn-Wall and Kissinger-Akahira-Sunose and one differential kinetic model (Friedman. The significant differences were observed in the second part of the epoxy curing (for the reaction degrees higher than 60 %, where the values of activation energies remarkably increase. The addition of polyurethane elastomers retarded the curing process due to decreased mobility of reactant molecules caused by higher viscosity of reaction mixture. By detailed analysis of determined kinetic parameters, it is concluded that the influence of slow diffusion is more pronounced in the presence of thermoplastic polycarbonate-based polyurethanes, which confirmed their effect on the mechanism of epoxy curing. The highest tensile strength and hardness showed the DGEBA modified with the polyurethane with highest hard segment content. Increasing the hard segment content of polyurethane and its concentration in matrix, the tensile strength of modified epoxy was increased. The elongation at break of

  2. Effects of Different Montmorillonite Nanoclay Loading on Cure Behavior and Properties of Diglycidyl Ether of Bisphenol A Epoxy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alfred Tcherbi-Narteh

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The primary focus of this study was to understand the effects of different amounts of montmorillonite nanoclay (MMT loading on viscosity, cure behavior, reaction mechanism, and properties of diglycidyl ether of bisphenol A (DGEBA epoxy composites. Influence of 1–3 wt.% MMT on rheological and subsequent cure behavior of SC-15 epoxy resin was studied using nonisothermal and isothermal rheometry and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC. Rheological properties were influenced by different amounts of MMT at lower shear rates prior to and during curing. Cure reaction mechanism was unaffected by different MMT concentration; however heat and activation energy of reactions increased with increasing MMT loading. Samples with 2 wt.% MMT showed highest reaction rate constant, indicative of catalytic behavior. X-ray diffraction (XRD and transmission electron microscope (TEM revealed mainly intercalated microstructure throughout the MMT infused epoxy composite samples irrespective of the percent loading.

  3. Comparison of the Effect of Addition of Cyanoacrylate, Epoxy Resin, and Gum Arabic on Surface Hardness of Die Stone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tripathi, Arvind; Gupta, Ashutosh; Bagchi, Soumyojeet; Mishra, Lallan; Gautam, Abhina; Madhok, Riti

    2016-04-01

    To observe the effects of incorporating cyanoacrylate, epoxy resins, and gum arabic on the abrasion resistance of type IV gypsum die materials. Forty specimens were prepared and divided into four groups (10 specimens in each group), namely group A (control), group B (die stone mixed with cyanoacrylate), group C (die stone mixed with epoxy resin), group D (die stone mixed with gum arabic). All the specimens were subjected to abrasion testing, wear volume analysis, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), and scanning electron microscope (SEM) analysis. Abrasion testing showed maximum wear in the control group and minimum wear in the gum arabic group. Intergroup differences were statistically significant (p Epoxy resins are powerful adhesives, but they attain their full efficiency when cured with heat. Cyanoacrylate and epoxy resin displayed poor physical bonding, primarily because of inhomogeneity. © 2015 by the American College of Prosthodontists.

  4. Properties of Graphene Oxide/Epoxy Resin Composites

    OpenAIRE

    Jijun Tang; Haijun Zhou; Yunxia Liang; Xinlan Shi; Xin Yang; Jiaoxia Zhang

    2014-01-01

    The graphene oxide (GO) was obtained by pressurized oxidation method using natural graphite as raw materials. Then the GO/epoxy resin composites were prepared by casting. The mechanical and damping properties of composites were studied. As a result, the impact intensity of GO/epoxy resin composites was prominently improved with the content of the graphene oxide increasing. The glass transition temperature decreased and the damping capacity is improved.

  5. A room temperature cured low dielectric hyperbranched epoxy ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The synthesized hyperbranched epoxy was cured by a combined hardener system consisting of a commercial poly(amido-amine) and a first generation aliphatic poly(amido-amine) dendrimer (PAD) prepared by Michael addition reaction of methyl acrylate and aliphatic amines. The thermoset exhibited high mechanical ...

  6. The Effects of in Situ-Formed Silver Nanoparticles on the Electrical Properties of Epoxy Resin Filled with Silver Nanowires

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gwang-Seok Song

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available A novel method for preparing epoxy/silver nanocomposites was developed via the in situ formation of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs within the epoxy resin matrix while using silver nanowires (AgNWs as a conductive filler. The silver–imidazole complex was synthesized from silver acetate (AgAc and 1-(2-cyanoethyl-2-ethyl-4-methylimidazole (imidazole. AgNPs were generated in situ during the curing of the epoxy resin through the thermal decomposition of the AgAc–imidazole complex, which was capable of reducing Ag+ to Ag by itself. The released imidazole acted as a catalyst to cure the epoxy. Additionally, after the curing process, the in situ-generated AgNPs were stabilized by the formed epoxy network. Therefore, by using the thermal decomposition method, uniformly dispersed AgNPs of approximately 100 nm were formed in situ in the epoxy matrix filled with AgNWs. It was observed that the nanocomposites containing in situ-formed AgNPs exhibited isotropic electrical properties in the epoxy resins in the presence of AgNWs.

  7. Epoxy resin/phosphonium ionic liquid/carbon nanofiller systems: Chemorheology and properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Maka

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Epoxy nanocomposites with commercial carbon nanotubes (CNT or graphene (GN have been prepared using phosphonium ionic liquid [trihexyltetradecylphosphonium bis(2,4,4-trimethylpentyl phosphinate, IL-f]. IL-f served simultaneously as nanofiller dispersing medium and epoxy resin catalytic curing agent. An influence of IL-f/epoxy weight ratio (3, 6 and 9/100, phr, carbon nanofiller type and content on viscosity of epoxy compositions during storage at ambient temperature was evaluated. Curing process was controlled for neat and CNT or GN modified epoxy compositions (0.25-1.0 wt.% load using differential scanning calorimetry and rheometry. Epoxy nanocomposites exhibited slightly increased glass transition temperature values (146 to 149°C whereas tan δ and storage modulus decreased (0.30 to 0.27 and 2087 to 1070 MPa, respectively as compared to reference material. Crosslink density regularly decreased for composites with increasing CNT content (11 094 to 7 020 mol/m3. Electrical volume resistivity of the nanocomposites was improved in case of CNT to 4•101 Ω•m and GN to 2•105 Ω•m (nanofiller content 1 wt.%. Flame retardancy was found for modified epoxy materials with as low GN and phosphorus content as 0.25 and 0.7 wt.%, respectively (increase of limiting oxygen index to 26.5%.

  8. Increasing the electrical discharge endurance of acid anhydride cured DGEBA epoxy resin by dispersion of nanoparticle silica. High Perform. Polym. 11 (1999) pp 281-296 by IOP Publishing Ltd

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henk, Peter O; Kortsen, T.W.; Kvarts, T.

    1999-01-01

    A fluid DGEBA/methyl nadicanhydride epoxy system has been filled with inorganic particles, cast as bubble-free plates and cured. The ability of both the pure network polymer and the polymer/particle composites to withstand partial electrical discharges has been investigated. Three types of particle...... electrode arrangement was applied, the test comprising the establishment of partial discharges running perpendicularly onto one face of a plate specimen for a period measured until breakdown.Our results show that the endurance of the pure polymer is low. Increased loading with Aerosil increases...

  9. Cure shrinkage effects in epoxy and polycyanate matrix composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spellman, G.P.

    1995-12-22

    A relatively new advanced composite matrix, polycyanate ester, was evaluated for cure shrinkage. The chemical cure shrinkage of composites is difficult to model but a number of clever experimental techniques are available to the investigator. In this work the method of curing a prepreg layup on top of a previously cured laminate of identical ply composition is utilized. The polymeric matrices used in advanced composites have been primarily epoxies and therefore a common system of this type, Fiberite 3501-6, was used as a base case material. Three polycyanate matrix systems were selected for the study. These are: Fiberite 954-2A, YLA RS-3, and Bryte Technology BTCy-1. The first three of these systems were unidirectional prepreg with carbon fiber reinforcement. The Bryte Technology material was reinforced with E-glass fabric. The technique used to evaluate cure shrinkage results in distortion of the flatness of an otherwise symmetric laminate. The first laminate is cured in a conventional fashion. An identical layup is cured on this first laminate. During the second cure all constituents are exposed to the same thermal cycles. However, only the new portion of the laminate will experience volumetric changes associate with matrix cure. The additional strain of cure shrinkage results in an unsymmetric distribution of residual stresses and an associated warpage of the laminate. The baseline material, Fiberite 3501-6, exhibited cure shrinkage that was in accordance with expectations. Cure strains were {minus}4.5E-04. The YLA RS-3 material had cure strains somewhat lower at {minus}3.2E-04. The Fiberite 954-2A cure strain was {minus}1.5E-04 that is 70% lower than the baseline material. The glass fabric material with the Bryte BTCy-1 matrix did not result in meaningful results because the processing methods were not fully compatible with the material.

  10. Properties of Two Carbon Composite Materials Using LTM25 Epoxy Resin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruz, Juan R.; Shah, C. H.; Postyn, A. S.

    1996-01-01

    In this report, the properties of two carbon-epoxy prepreg materials are presented. The epoxy resin used in these two materials can yield lower manufacturing costs due to its low initial cure temperature, and the capability of being cured using vacuum pressure only. The two materials selected for this study are MR50/LTM25, and CFS003/LTM25 with Amoco T300 fiber; both prepregs are manufactured by The Advanced Composites Group. MR50/LTM25 is a unidirectional prepreg tape using Mitsubishi MR50 carbon fiber impregnated with LTM25 epoxy resin. CRS003/LTM25 is a 2 by 2 twill fabric using Amoco T300 fiber and impregnated with LTM25 epoxy resin. Among the properties presented in this report are strength, stiffness, bolt bearing, and damage tolerance. Many of these properties were obtained at three environmental conditions: cold temperature/dry (CTD), room temperature/dry (RTD), and elevated temperature/wet (ETW). A few properties were obtained at room temperature/wet (RTW), and elevated temperature/dry (ETD). The cold and elevated temperatures used for testing were -125 F and 180 F, respectively. In addition, several properties related to processing are presented.

  11. Creep measurements on curing epoxy systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kammer, Charlotte; Szabo, Peter

    1998-01-01

    The chemical curing of a stoichiometric mixture of the diglycidyl ether of bisphenol A and a 1,3-bis-(aminomethyl)-cyclohexane is studied.Creep experiments are combined with measurements in a Differential Scanning Calorimeter (DSC) to determine the change in bulk viscosity due to network formation....

  12. Self-Healing Photocurable Epoxy/thiol-ene Systems Using an Aromatic Epoxy Resin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo Acosta Ortiz

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A rapid and efficient method to obtain self-healing epoxy resins is discussed. This method is based on the use of a thiol-disulfide oligomer obtained by partial oxidation of a multifunctional thiol using a hypervalent iodine (III compound as oxidant. The oligomer was characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR, Raman and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopies, and gel permeation chromatography (GPC. The oligomer was a joint component of the thiol-ene system along with a tetra-allyl-functionalized curing agent. The kinetics of the photopolymerization of diglycidylether of bisphenol A (DGEBA revealed that conversions of the epoxy groups as high as 80% were achieved in only 15 minutes by increasing the concentration of the thiol-ene system in the formulation. The disulfide bonds introduced in the copolymer using the thiol-disulfide oligomer allowed the repairing of the test specimens in as little as 10 minutes when the specimens were heated at 80°C or for 500 minutes at room temperature. The analysis of the mechanical properties using dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA showed that the specimens displayed a healing efficiency up to 111% compared with the unhealed specimens, depending on the amount of polythioethers present in the copolymer.

  13. Physical aging of linear and network epoxy resins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, E. S.-W.; Wilkes, G. L.; Mcgrath, J. E.; Banthia, A. K.; Mohajer, Y.; Tant, M. R.

    1981-01-01

    Network and linear epoxy resins principally based on the diglycidyl ether of bisphenol-A and its oligomers are prepared and studied using diamine and anhydride crosslinking agents. Rubber modified epoxies and a carbon fiber reinforced composite are also investigated. All materials display time-dependent changes when stored at temperatures below the glass transition temperature after quenching (sub-T/g/ annealing). Solvent sorption experiments initiated after different sub-T(g) annealing times demonstrate that the rate of solvent uptake can be indirectly related to the free volume of the epoxy resins. Residual thermal stresses and water are found to have little effect on the physical aging process, which affects the sub-T(g) properties of uniaxial carbon fiber reinforced epoxy material. Finally, the importance of the recovery phenomenon which affects the durability of epoxy glasses is considered.

  14. Adhesion strength of norbornene-based self-healing agents to an amine-cured epoxy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Guang Chun; Lee, Jong Keun; Kessler, Michael R.; Yoon, Sungho

    2009-07-01

    Self-healing is triggered by crack propagation through embedded microcapsules in an epoxy matrix, which then release the liquid healing agent into the crack plane. Subsequent exposure of the healing agent to the chemical catalyst initiates ring-opening metathesis polymerization (ROMP) and bonding of the crack faces. In order to improve self-healing functionality, it is necessary to enhance adhesion of polymerized healing agent within the crack to the matrix resin. In this study, shear bond strength between different norbornene-based healing agents and an amine-cured epoxy resin was evaluated using the single lap shear test method (ASTM D3163, modified). The healing agents tested include endodicyclopentadiene (endo-DCPD), 5-ethylidene-2-norbornene (ENB) and DCPD/ENB blends. 5-Norbornene-2-methanol (NBM) was used as an adhesion promoter, containing hydroxyl groups to form hydrogen bonds with the amine-cured epoxy. A custom synthesized norbornene-based crosslinking agent was also added to improve adhesion for ENB by increasing the crosslinking density of the adhesive after ROMP. The healing agents were polymerized with varying loadings of the 1st generation Grubbs' catalyst at different reaction times and temperatures.

  15. Imidazolium Ionic Liquid Modified Graphene Oxide: As a Reinforcing Filler and Catalyst in Epoxy Resin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qing Lyu

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Surface modification of graphene oxide (GO is one of the most important issues to produce high performance GO/epoxy composites. In this paper, the imidazole ionic liquid (IMD-Si was introduced onto the surface of GO sheets by a cheap and simple method, to prepare a reinforcing filler, as well as a catalyst in epoxy resin. The interlayer spacing of GO sheets was obviously increased by the intercalation of IMD-Si, which strongly facilitated the dispersibility of graphene oxide in organic solvents and epoxy matrix. The addition of 0.4 wt % imidazolium ionic liquid modified graphene oxide (IMD-Si@GO, yielded a 12% increase in flexural strength (141.3 MPa, a 26% increase in flexural modulus (4.69 GPa, and a 52% increase in impact strength (18.7 kJ/m2, compared to the neat epoxy. Additionally the IMD-Si@GO sheets could catalyze the curing reaction of epoxy resin-anhydride system significantly. Moreover, the improved thermal conductivities and thermal stabilities of epoxy composites filled with IMD-Si@GO were also demonstrated.

  16. Preparation and characterization of a novel epoxy based nanocomposite using tryptophan as an eco-friendly curing agent

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Motahari, Ahmad, E-mail: motahari@umz.ac.ir [Faculty of Chemistry, University of Mazandaran, P.O. Box 453, Babolsar (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Omrani, Abdollah; Rostami, Abbas Ali [Faculty of Chemistry, University of Mazandaran, P.O. Box 453, Babolsar (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Ehsani, Morteza [Iran Polymer and Petrochemical Institute, P.O. Box 14965-115, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2013-12-20

    Highlights: • Epoxy cured with tryptophan in the presence of 2,4,5-triphenylimidazole. • Kinetic study on the epoxy nanocomposite using advanced isoconversional method. • Structural study and characterization of nanocomposite using SEM, XRD, AFM and DMTA. - Abstract: In this study, kinetics of the curing reaction between DGEBA epoxy resin and tryptophan as an environmentally friendly curing agent in the presence of 2,4,5-triphenylimidazole was reported. The role of silica nanoparticles (SiNP) in changing the mechanism of the curing reaction was also studied. The optimum molar ratio of DGEBA/tryptophan and the optimum content of SiNP were determined by calorimetry analyses. Kinetic analysis using the advanced isoconversional method revealed that the system undergoes the vitrification. Thermogravimetric analysis demonstrated that addition of SiNP does not improve the thermal stability of the tryptophan based thermosets. Impedance spectroscopy and also the standard four-probe method were performed to investigate the effect of curing agent and SiNP loading level on the electrical properties of the cured epoxy. The structure and morphology of the nanocomposite were studied by X-ray diffraction analysis, atomic force microscopy and scanning electron microscopy imaging. Dynamic mechanical thermal analysis revealed that the crosslinking density cannot be significantly affected with the addition of SiNP.

  17. Heat-cured Acrylic Resin versus Light-activated Resin: A Patient ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Context: Although light-activated resins (Eclipse) have been reported to possess superior physical and mechanical properties compared with the heat-cured acrylic resins (Lucitone-199), a few studies have compared overdentures with a locator attachment constructed from heat-cured acrylic resins with those constructed ...

  18. Apical microleakage of epoxy resin and methacrylate resin-based sealer with continuous wave obturation technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haslinda Haslinda

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this research was to determine the microleakage apical sealer based on epoxy resin and methacrylate resin with continuous wave obturation technique.Thirty  permanent  lateral incisors were selected at random and  divided into 3 groups (N=10, namely AH Plus obturator group (epoxy resin, EndoREZ group (methacrylate resin, and negative control. The samples were decoronated, root canal preparation, then kept in incubator of 37°C for 72 hours. Sample were coated with nail varnish then immersed in methylene blue for 48 hours. The samples were washed with distilled water, dried and nail varnish removed. The samples were clearing. Penetration was measured using microscope and given score 0-4. Measurements were analyzed statistically. By using Kruskal Wallis test and Mann Whitney test, there is no significant difference between the apical microleakage of the the epoxy resin root canal sealer with methacrylate root canal sealer based (p>0,05. It means that the apical microleakage of the epoxy resin root canal sealer based comparable with merhacrylate root canal sealer based. It was concluded that the apical microleakage of epoxy resin based sealer does not different to the methacrylate resin based sealer

  19. Design of carbon nanofiber embedded conducting epoxy resin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gantayat, Subhra [Department of Chemistry, Veer Surendra Sai University of Technology, Burla, Sambalpur 768018, Odisha (India); School of Applied Sciences, KIIT University, Bhubaneswar 751024, Odisha (India); Sarkar, Niladri [Department of Chemistry, Veer Surendra Sai University of Technology, Burla, Sambalpur 768018, Odisha (India); Rout, Dibyaranjan [School of Applied Sciences, KIIT University, Bhubaneswar 751024, Odisha (India); Swain, Sarat K., E-mail: swainsk2@yahoo.co.in [Department of Chemistry, Veer Surendra Sai University of Technology, Burla, Sambalpur 768018, Odisha (India)

    2017-01-15

    Acid treated carbon nanofiber (t-CNF) reinforced epoxy nanocomposites were fabricated by hand lay-up method with various wt % of t-CNF loadings. Pristine or unmodified carbon nano fibers (u-CNFs) were made compatible with epoxy matrix by means of mixed acid treatment. Fabricated nanocomposites were characterized with Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), X-ray diffraction (XRD) study, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM). Mechanical and thermal properties of the nanocomposites were measured as a function of t-CNF content. Effect of acid treated CNFs on to the mechanical properties of epoxy nanocomposites was justified by comparing the mechanical properties of epoxy/t-CNF and epoxy/u-CNF nanocomposites with same loading level. The electrical conductivity was achieved by epoxy resin with a threshold at 1 wt % of t-CNF. Substantial improvement in thermal, mechanical and electrical properties of the synthesized epoxy/t-CNF nanocomposites may be suitable for fabricating electronic devices. - Highlights: • Epoxy/t-CNF nanocomposites are characterized by XRD, FTIR, SEM, AFM and TEM. • Electrical conductivity was achieved by epoxy with a threshold at 1 wt% of t-CNF. • Tensile strength is enhanced by 40% due to dispersion of t-CNF. • Synthesized nanocomposites are suitable for fabricating electronic devises.

  20. Effect of mixing sequence on the curing of amine-hardened epoxy/ alumina nanocomposites as assessed by optical refractometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available High performance refractometry has been proven to be a useful tool to elucidate the isothermal curing process of nanocomposites. As a model system an amine-hardening epoxy filled with non-surface-treated alumina nanoparticles was selected. The tremendous resolution of this experimental technique is used to study morphological changes within nanocomposites via the refractive index. It is shown that these morphological changes are not simply due to the curing process but also depend on the sequence of mixing the nanoparticles either first into the resin or first into the hardener. Independent of the resin/hardener composition, the type of the mixing sequence discriminates systematically between two distinct refractive index curves produced by the curing process. The difference between the two refractive index curves increases monotonically with curing time, which underlines the importance of the initial molecular environment of the nanoparticles.

  1. Flexible Epoxy Resin Formed Upon Blending with a Triblock Copolymer through Reaction-Induced Microphase Separation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Wei-Cheng; Lin, Wei-Sheng; Kuo, Shiao-Wei

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we used diglycidyl ether bisphenol A (DGEBA) as a matrix, the ABA block copolymer poly(ethylene oxide–b–propylene oxide–b–ethylene oxide) (Pluronic F127) as an additive, and diphenyl diaminosulfone (DDS) as a curing agent to prepare flexible epoxy resins through reaction-induced microphase separation (RIMPS). Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy confirmed the existence of hydrogen bonding between the poly(ethylene oxide) segment of F127 and the OH groups of the DGEBA resin. Small-angle X-ray scattering, atomic force microscopy, and transmission electron microscopy all revealed evidence for the microphase separation of F127 within the epoxy resin. Glass transition temperature (Tg) phenomena and mechanical properties (modulus) were determined through differential scanning calorimetry and dynamic mechanical analysis, respectively, of samples at various blend compositions. The modulus data provided evidence for the formation of wormlike micelle structures, through a RIMPS mechanism, in the flexible epoxy resin upon blending with the F127 triblock copolymer. PMID:28773571

  2. Can simultaneous contact allergies to phenyl glycidyl ether and epoxy resins of the bisphenol A/F-types be explained by contamination of the epoxy resins?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pontén, Ann; Zimerson, Erik; Bruze, Magnus

    2008-11-01

    Simultaneous contact allergies to epoxy resins based on diglycidyl ether of bisphenol A (DGEBA-R) or epoxy resins of the bisphenol F-type and the reactive diluent phenyl glycidyl ether (PGE) have been reported. The reason might be cross-reactivity, exposure to an epoxy resin system with PGE as a component, or contamination by PGE in the epoxy resin. To study contamination by PGE, 20 commercial epoxy resins were analysed for the presence of PGE. To study contact allergy to PGE and its relation to epoxy resins by inserting PGE in the standard series. Among 2227 patients, 7 reacted to PGE. Of 23 (30%) patients, 7 with contact allergy to DGEBA-R and 7/19 (37%) with contact allergy to an epoxy resin of the bisphenol F-type reacted to PGE. All 7 patients with contact allergy to PGE reacted both to the DGEBA-R and to the epoxy resin of the bisphenol F-type. PGE was found in 90% of the investigated resins. The amounts of PGE ranged between 0.004% w/w and 0.18% w/w. Most probably, the presence of PGE as a contaminant in epoxy resins is of minor importance for the sensitization, but possibly the contamination of PGE might elicit contact dermatitis in individuals with a high reactivity to PGE.

  3. IMPROVEMENTS IN EPOXY RESIN EMBEDDING METHODS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luft, John H.

    1961-01-01

    Epoxy embedding methods of Glauert and Kushida have been modified so as to yield rapid, reproducible, and convenient embedding methods for electron microscopy. The sections are robust and tissue damage is less than with methacrylate embedding. PMID:13764136

  4. Controversial effects of fumed silica on the curing and thermomechanical properties of epoxy composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available The effect of fumed silica on the curing of a trimethylolpropane epoxy resin was investigated by thermal analysis methods like Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC, and Dynamic Mechanical Analysis (DMA. The fumed silica used here is a by-product of the silicon and ferrosilicon industry, consisting of micro and nanosized particles. Both the curing reaction and the properties of the obtained composites were affected by the filler content. Different trends were observed for filler contents above and below the 30 wt%. Up to 30 wt%, the behaviour can be explained as a predominantly agglomeration effect. For 30 wt% and higher filler contents, single particles seem to play a more important role.

  5. The electron beam cure of epoxy paste adhesives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farmer, J.D. [Air Force Advanced Composites Program office, McClellan AFB, CA (United States); Janke, C.J. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States). Oak Ridge Centers for Manufacturing Technology; Lopata, V.J. [Atomic Energy of Canada Ltd., Pinawa, Manitoba (Canada). Whiteshell Labs.

    1998-07-01

    Recently developed epoxy paste adhesives were electron beam cured and experimentally explored to determine their suitability for use in an aerospace-quality aircraft component. There were two major goals for this program. The first was to determine whether the electron beam-curable past adhesives were capable of meeting the requirements of the US Air Force T-38 supersonic jet trainer composite windshield frame. The T-38 windshield frame`s arch is currently manufactured by bonding thin stainless steel plies using an aerospace-grade thermally-cured epoxy film adhesive. The second goal was to develop the lowest cost hand layup and debulk process that could be used to produce laminated steel plies with acceptable properties. The laminate properties examined to determine adhesive suitability include laminate mechanical and physical properties at room, adhesive tack, out-time capability, and the debulk requirements needed to achieve these properties. Eighteen past adhesives and four scrim cloths were experimentally examined using this criteria. One paste adhesive was found to have suitable characteristics in each of these categories and was later chosen for the manufacture of the T-38 windshield frame. This experimental study shows that by using low-cost debulk and layup processes, the electron beam-cured past adhesive mechanical and physical properties meet the specifications of the T-38 composite windshield frame.

  6. Synthesis of nanosized barium titanate/epoxy resin composites and ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Anechoic chamber; barium titanate; electromagnetic interference and compatibility; epoxy resin composites; microwave absorbers; radio frequency absorbers. 1. Introduction. Absorption of unwanted microwave energy or electromag- netic interference (EMI) is a pressing problem due to the proliferation of complex high ...

  7. The study of epoxy polyamide and polyvinyl resins as corrosion ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The corrosion resistance of two commonly used protective coatings (epoxy polyamide and polyvinyl resins) in the Niger Delta area of Nigeria has been assessed. The coatings on low carbon steel were subjected to varying conditions of pH, temperature and exposure time and the corrosion rates calculated. At a pH of 2, 3, 4, ...

  8. Positron Annihilation in a Rubber Modified Epoxy Resin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mogensen, O. E.; Jacobsen, F. M.; Pethrick, R. A.

    1979-01-01

    Positron annihilation data is reported on a rubber-modified epoxy resin. Studies of the temperature dependence of the o-positronium lifetime indicated the existence of three distinct regions; the associated transition temperatures by comparison with dilatometric data can be ascribed respectively...

  9. Studies on blends of cycloaliphatic epoxy resin with varying ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Differential scanning calorimetric (DSC), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) and dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA) of the blends of cycloaliphatic epoxy (CAE) resin toughened with liquid elastomer such as carboxyl terminated butadiene acrylonitrile copolymer (CTBN) have been carried out. Exothermal heat of reaction ...

  10. Study on Concrete Containing Recycled Aggregates Immersed in Epoxy Resin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adnan Suraya Hani

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In recent decades, engineers have sought a more sustainable method to dispose of concrete construction and demolition waste. One solution is to crush this waste concrete into a usable gradation for new concrete mixes. This not only reduces the amount of waste entering landfills but also alleviates the burden on existing sources of quality natural concrete aggregates. There are too many kinds of waste but here constructions waste will be the priority target that should be solved. It could be managed by several ways such as recycling and reusing the concrete components, and the best choice of these components is the aggregate, because of the ease process of recycle it. In addition, recycled aggregates and normal aggregates were immersed in epoxy resin and put in concrete mixtures with 0%, 5%, 10% and 20% which affected the concrete mixtures properties. The strength of the concrete for both normal and recycled aggregates has increased after immersed the aggregates in epoxy resin. The percentage of water absorption and the coefficient of water permeability decreased with the increasing of the normal and the recycled aggregates immersed in epoxy resin. Generally the tests which have been conducted to the concrete mixtures have a significant results after using the epoxy resin with both normal and recycled aggregates.

  11. Epoxy resin monomers with reduced skin sensitizing potency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Boyle, Niamh M; Niklasson, Ida B; Tehrani-Bagha, Ali R; Delaine, Tamara; Holmberg, Krister; Luthman, Kristina; Karlberg, Ann-Therese

    2014-06-16

    Epoxy resin monomers (ERMs), especially diglycidyl ethers of bisphenol A and F (DGEBA and DGEBF), are extensively used as building blocks for thermosetting polymers. However, they are known to commonly cause skin allergy. This research describes a number of alternative ERMs, designed with the aim of reducing the skin sensitizing potency while maintaining the ability to form thermosetting polymers. The compounds were designed, synthesized, and assessed for sensitizing potency using the in vivo murine local lymph node assay (LLNA). All six epoxy resin monomers had decreased sensitizing potencies compared to those of DGEBA and DGEBF. With respect to the LLNA EC3 value, the best of the alternative monomers had a value approximately 2.5 times higher than those of DGEBA and DGEBF. The diepoxides were reacted with triethylenetetramine, and the polymers formed were tested for technical applicability using thermogravimetric analysis and differential scanning calorimetry. Four out of the six alternative ERMs gave polymers with a thermal stability comparable to that obtained with DGEBA and DGEBF. The use of improved epoxy resin monomers with less skin sensitizing effects is a direct way to tackle the problem of contact allergy to epoxy resin systems, particularly in occupational settings, resulting in a reduction in the incidence of allergic contact dermatitis.

  12. Mechanisms of Interactions of Energetic Electrons with Epoxy Resins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, A.; Coulter, D. R.; Tsay, F. D.; Moacanin, J.

    1982-01-01

    The mechanism of deactivation of energy of excitation in a resin system was investigated on optical excitation as well as excitation by high energy electrons. This mechanism involves formation of excited state complexes, known as exciplexes which have a considerable charge transfer character. This mechanism will be used to develop a degradation model for epoxy matrix materials deployed in a space environment.

  13. Nonlinear Inelastic Mechanical Behavior Of Epoxy Resin Polymeric Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yekani Fard, Masoud

    Polymer and polymer matrix composites (PMCs) materials are being used extensively in different civil and mechanical engineering applications. The behavior of the epoxy resin polymers under different types of loading conditions has to be understood before the mechanical behavior of Polymer Matrix Composites (PMCs) can be accurately predicted. In many structural applications, PMC structures are subjected to large flexural loadings, examples include repair of structures against earthquake and engine fan cases. Therefore it is important to characterize and model the flexural mechanical behavior of epoxy resin materials. In this thesis, a comprehensive research effort was undertaken combining experiments and theoretical modeling to investigate the mechanical behavior of epoxy resins subject to different loading conditions. Epoxy resin E 863 was tested at different strain rates. Samples with dog-bone geometry were used in the tension tests. Small sized cubic, prismatic, and cylindrical samples were used in compression tests. Flexural tests were conducted on samples with different sizes and loading conditions. Strains were measured using the digital image correlation (DIC) technique, extensometers, strain gauges, and actuators. Effects of triaxiality state of stress were studied. Cubic, prismatic, and cylindrical compression samples undergo stress drop at yield, but it was found that only cubic samples experience strain hardening before failure. Characteristic points of tensile and compressive stress strain relation and load deflection curve in flexure were measured and their variations with strain rate studied. Two different stress strain models were used to investigate the effect of out-of-plane loading on the uniaxial stress strain response of the epoxy resin material. The first model is a strain softening with plastic flow for tension and compression. The influence of softening localization on material behavior was investigated using the DIC system. It was found that

  14. Development and Characterization of Novel Interpenetrating Network (IPN Foams from Epoxy Ester and Aliphatic Epoxy Resin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kanuprasad Patel

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Diglycidyl ether of bisphenol-A (DGEBA was reacted with acrylate monomer at variable molar ratios. The reaction between glycerine and epichlorohydrine form glycidyl ether of polyol aliphatic epoxy resin. The resultant resins were characterized duly. Both the resins were mixed at different ratios with constant high shear stirring. The obtained mixture and suitable additives were heated at 150oC for one and half hour. The so called Interpenetrating Network (IPN transformed into foams. The performance of foams was evaluated by testing for compression in both parallel and perpendicular to rise direction. The tests were carried out at room temperature and at the elevated temperature. The compression properties showed a decreasing trend for increasing amounts of glycerine resin. The density and thermal properties of epoxy foams were also evaluated. The relation between the composition, density and properties of the foam was analyzed.

  15. Influence of end groups in hyperbranched polyesters used as modifiers in the characteristics of epoxy thermosets cured by adipic dihydrazide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Serra

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Mixtures of diglycidylether of bisphenol A (DGEBA resin and different ratios of aliphatic-aromatic hyperbranched polyester (HBP were cured by a latent curing agent, adipic dihydrazide (AH. The HBPs prepared have hydroxyl groups or 10-undecenoyl or allyl groups as chain ends. The curing mixtures were investigated by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC to study the curing process and to evaluate the kinetic parameters of the different formulations. These studies suggest that HBPs decrease the curing rate of epoxy/AH in the case of vinyl terminated HPB, whereas OH terminated HBP accelerates the first stages and delays the lasts. The thermosets obtained showed an improvement in microhardness and impact strength without any reduction of the Tg and thermal parameters. Microparticle phase separation was observed with the undecenoyl HBP derivatives or when a 10% of allyl HBP derivative was in the formulation.

  16. The Physical Mechanisms Responsible for the Weathering of Epoxy Resins and Glass Fibre Reinforced Expoxy Resins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-10-01

    promise is that in which- the load transferred from resin to fibre is measured photoelastically. A microscope with rectified optics has improved our...an oven and added to the liquid epoxy resin prior to vigorous mixing and subsequent de-gassing under vacuum. The moulds were carefully cleaned and...dried, and warmed to approximately 500 C to aid in filling the mould to the desired level with the viscous resin . After gelling for 2 hours at 1000 C the

  17. A Study of the Curing and Flammability Properties of Bisphenol A Epoxy Diacrylate Resin Utilizing a Novel Flame Retardant Monomer, bis[di-acryloyloxyethyl]-p-tert-butyl-phenyl Phosphate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Syang-Peng Rwei

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available A UV-curable, flame-retardant monomer, DAPP (bis[di-acryloyloxyethyl]-p-tert-butyl-phenyl-phosphate, was synthesized based on BPDCP (4-tert-butylphenyl-dichloro phosphate and HEA (2-hydroxy ethyl acrylate. DAPP was blended with regular bisphenol A epoxy acrylate (BAEA in various ratios to yield various phosphorus contents. The TGA-IR (thermogravimetric analyzer interface with an infrared spectrometer results demonstrate that compounding 30 mol % DAPP with BAEA significantly reduced the amount of released CO gas. In contrast, the peak intensity of CO2 is independent of phosphorus content. The limiting oxygen index (LOI, reaching the saturated value of 26, and the heat release rate (HRR measured using a cone-calorimeter, 156.43 KW/m2, confirm the saturation point when 30 mol % DAPP was compounded into BAEA. A study of the kinetics of pyrolysis reveals that Ea decreases as the phosphorus content increases. Both the TGA-IR and pyrolysis results reveal that the phosphorus compound DAPP is easily decomposed during the initial stage of burning to form an insulating layer, which inhibits further burning of the resin and the consequent release of other flammable gases.

  18. 21 CFR 175.380 - Xylene-formaldehyde resins condensed with 4,4′-isopropylidenediphenol-epichlorohydrin epoxy resins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Xylene-formaldehyde resins condensed with 4,4â²... Xylene-formaldehyde resins condensed with 4,4′-isopropylidenediphenol-epichlorohydrin epoxy resins. The...) The resins are produced by the condensation of xylene-formaldehyde resin and 4,4...

  19. Isoconversional kinetic analysis of the alkyd/melamine resins curing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jovičić Mirjana

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The curing reaction for the mixtures of alkyd resins based on ricinoleic acid, phthalic anhydride and three polyols (glycerin, trimethylolpropane or ethoxylated pentaerythritol with two different commercial melamine resins was investigated by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC. The curing kinetics analysis was performed using the isoconversional methods (Ozawa-Flynn-Wall, Kissinger-Akahira-Sunose and Friedman. Isoconversional methods were carried out with three heating rates (5, 10 and 20°C/min in a scanning temperature range from 40 to 250°C. It was found that the curing activation energy of resin mixtures is influenced by alkyd and melamine resin type due to the catalytic effect of hydroxyl group on the reactions. The dependence of apparent curing degree on time, which was obtained by mathematical transformations of dynamic DSC data using Ozawa-Flynn-Wall method, describes well the isothermal DSC experiments.

  20. Positioning and aligning CNTs by external magnetic field to assist localised epoxy cure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ariu G.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This work focuses on the generation of conductive networks through the localised alignment of nano fillers, such as multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs. The feasibility of alignment and positioning of functionalised MWCNTs by external DC magnetic fields was investigated. The aim of this manipulation is to enhance resin curing through AC induction heating due to hysteresis losses from the nanotubes. Experimental analyses focused on in-depth assessment of the nanotube functionalisation, processing and characterisation of magnetic, rheological and cure kinetics properties of the MWCNT solution. The study has shown that an external magnetic field has great potential for positioning and alignment of CNTs. The study demonstrated potential for creating well-ordered architectures with an unprecedented level of control of network geometry. Magnetic characterisation indicated cobalt-plated nanotubes to be the most suitable candidate for magnetic alignment due to their high magnetic sensitivity. Epoxy/metal-plated CNT nanocomposite systems were validated by thermal analysis as induction heating mediums. The curing process could therefore be optimised by the use of dielectric resins. This study offers a first step towards the proof of concept of this technique as a novel repair technology.

  1. Application of a silver-olefin coordination polymer as a catalytic curing agent for self-healing epoxy polymers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Everitt, D. T.; Coope, T. S.; Trask, R. S.; Wass, D. F.; Bond, I. P.

    2015-05-01

    A silver-olefin based coordination polymer was prepared in a simple, one step process to act as an initiator to facilitate the ring-opening polymerization of epoxides. Thermal analysis found the complex to be capable of curing a range of commercially available epoxy resins used in the manufacture of conventional composite materials. Curing of the oligomeric diglycidyl ether bisphenol A resin, Epon 828, in combination with a non-toxic solvent, ethyl phenylacetate, was studied by differential scanning calorimetry. The mechanical characterization of the resultant cured polymers was conducted by single lap shear tests. Tapered double cantilever beam (TDCB) test specimens containing 2.5 pph of silver-olefin initiator, both with and without embedded microcapsules, were analyzed for their healing performance. Healing efficiency values were found to be strongly dependent on the applied healing temperature. A mean recovery of 74% fracture load was found in TDCB samples after being healed at 70 °C for 48 h.

  2. Light curing through glass ceramics: effect of curing mode on micromechanical properties of dual-curing resin cements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flury, Simon; Lussi, Adrian; Hickel, Reinhard; Ilie, Nicoleta

    2014-04-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate micromechanical properties of five dual-curing resin cements after different curing modes including light curing through glass ceramic materials. Vickers hardness (VH) and indentation modulus (Y HU) of Panavia F2.0, RelyX Unicem 2 Automix, SpeedCEM, BisCem, and BeautiCem SA were measured after 1 week of storage (37 °C, 100 % humidity). The resin cements were tested following self-curing or light curing with the second-generation light-emitting diode (LED) curing unit Elipar FreeLight 2 in Standard Mode (1,545 mW/cm(2)) or with the third-generation LED curing unit VALO in High Power Mode (1,869 mW/cm(2)) or in XtraPower Mode (3,505 mW/cm(2)). Light curing was performed directly or through glass ceramic discs of 1.5 or 3 mm thickness of IPS Empress CAD or IPS e.max CAD. VH and Y HU were analysed with Kruskal-Wallis tests followed by pairwise Wilcoxon rank sum tests (α = 0.05). RelyX Unicem 2 Automix resulted in the highest VH and Y HU followed by BeautiCem SA, BisCem, SpeedCEM, and finally Panavia F2.0. Self-curing of RelyX Unicem 2 Automix and SpeedCEM lowered VH and Y HU compared to light curing whereas self-curing of Panavia F2.0, BisCem, and BeautiCem SA led to similar or significantly higher VH and Y HU compared to light curing. Generally, direct light curing resulted in similar or lower VH and Y HU compared to light curing through 1.5-mm-thick ceramic discs. Light curing through 3-mm-thick discs of IPS e.max CAD generally reduced VH and Y HU for all resin cements except SpeedCEM, which was the least affected by light curing through ceramic discs. The resin cements responded heterogeneously to changes in curing mode. The applied irradiances and light curing times adequately cured the resin cements even through 1.5-mm-thick ceramic discs. When light curing resin cements through thick glass ceramic restorations, clinicians should consider to prolong the light curing times even with LED curing units providing high

  3. Synthesis, properties and applications of interacting blends of acrylated novalac epoxy resin based poly(ester-amides and vinyl ester

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pragnesh N. Dave

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Epoxy resin based unsaturated poly(ester-amide resins (UPEAs were prepared by the reported method. These UPEAs were then treated with acryloyl chloride to afford acrylated UPEAs resin (i.e. AUPEAs. Interacting blends of equal proportional AUPEAs and vinyl ester epoxy (VE resin were prepared. APEAs and AUPEAs were characterized by elemental analysis, molecular weight determined by vapor pressure osmometer and by IR spectral study and by thermogravimetry. The curing of interacting blends was monitored on differential scanning calorimeter (DSC. Based on DSC data in situ glass reinforced composites of the resultant blends have been prepared and characterized for mechanical, electrical and chemical properties. Unreinforced blends were characterized by thermogravimetry (TGA.

  4. Synthesis, characterization and cure kinetics of polyaniline modified MMT clay/epoxy nanocomposites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aykanat, Aydin

    bisphenol-A (DGEBA) epoxy prepolymer crosslinked with tri ethylene tetra amine (TETA) was analyzed by DSC. The tensile, flexural and impact tests of carbon fiber epoxy micro composites showed that PANi coated carbon fiber epoxy systems have higher modulus, toughness and mechanical strengths compared to unmodified carbon fiber epoxy composites. In the second part of the research work, conducting polyaniline (PANi) montmorillonite (MMT) clay nanocomposites were synthesized by using in-situ polymerization. The X-Ray diffraction patterns showed that polyaniline was intercalated between clay galleries in the order of nanoscale. From the SEM micrographs, it was revealed that, in-situ polymerization of aniline took place both in and out of the clay galleries. Polyaniline surface modified clay nanoparticles were then dispersed in diglycidyl ether of bisphenol-A (DGEBA) epoxy prepolymer using high shear mixing and ultrasonication. The viscosity measurements of modified and unmodified clay dispersed in epoxy prepolymer systems showed that PANi modified clay has lower viscosity than the pristine clay that provides easiness during processing. Infrared spectroscopy data proves that reactive secondary and tertiary amine groups on the fully dispersed polyaniline modified clay platelets react with epoxy resin resulting a strong chemical and physical interaction between nanoparticles and polymeric matrix. The effect of PANi surface modified nano particles on the curing reaction and kinetics of epoxy with tri-ethylene tetra amine (TETA) was analyzed by using DSC and explained by modified Avrami equation. The X-Ray diffraction pattern of fully cured 5% (w/w) PANi-MMT clay epoxy nanocomposites showed exfoliation behavior. Thermal analysis showed that for 5% (w/w) PANi-MMT filled epoxy nanocomposites has higher thermal stability than both fully cured pristine epoxy and 5% (w/w) clay epoxy nanocomposite. With the addition and exfoliation of 5% (w/w) PANi modified clay an increase of 8°C in

  5. Contact allergy to reactive diluents and related aliphatic epoxy resins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aalto-Korte, Kristiina; Kuuliala, Outi; Henriks-Eckerman, Maj-Len; Suuronen, Katri

    2015-06-01

    Diglycidyl ether of bisphenol A resin (DGEBA-R) is the most common sensitizer in epoxy systems, but a minority of patients also develop contact allergy to reactive diluents. To analyse the frequency and clinical relevance of allergic reactions to different epoxy reactive diluents and related aliphatic epoxy resins. Test files (January 1991 to June 2014) were screened, and the clinical records of patients with allergic reactions were analysed for occupation, concomitant allergic reactions, and exposure. A total of 67 patients reacted to at least one of the compounds. The largest numbers of allergic reactions were to phenyl glycidyl ether (PGE; n = 41), 1,4-butanediol diglycidyl ether (BDDGE; n = 34), and p-tert-butylphenyl glycidyl ether (PTBPGE; n = 19). Ten of the patients did not have contact allergy to DGEBA-R. The reactions of 5 of these were related to the use of BDDGE-containing products. We found no significant exposure to PGE or PTBPGE in patients sensitized to them, but some of the patients had used cresyl glycidyl ether-containing products. Allergic reactions to reactive diluents and related aliphatic epoxy resins usually occurred together with reactions to DGEBA-R. BDDGE was the clinically most significant compound, and was the sole cause of occupational allergic contact dermatitis in 3 patients. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Effect of toughened epoxy resin on partial discharge at solid-solid interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Manping; Wu, Kai; Zhang, Zhao; Cheng, Yonghong

    2017-02-01

    A series of solid-solid interfaces, consisting of ceramic-epoxy resin interface samples with a tip-plate electrode, were investigated by performing partial discharge tests and real-time electrical tree observations. A toughening agent was added to the epoxy resin at different ratios for comparison. The impact strength, differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and dielectric properties of the cured compositions and ceramic were tested. The electric field strength at the tip was calculated based on Maxwell’s theory. The test results show that the addition of a toughener can improve the impact strength of epoxy resin but it decreases the partial discharge inception voltage (PDIV) of the interface sample. At the same time, toughening leads to complex branches of the electrical tree. The simulation result suggests that this reduction of the PDIV cannot be explained by a change of permittivity due to the addition of a toughening agent. The microstructural change caused by toughening was considered to be the key factor for lower PDIV and complex electrical tree branches. Supported by China Academy of Engineering Physics (Project 2014B05005).

  7. Depth of Cure of New Flowable Composite Resins

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-30

    years, the use of composite resin restorations has been on the rise and in many geographical markets they have replaced amalgam restorations altogether...Lindberg, 2004). Composite restorations are preferred by most patients due to their esthetic appeal (Korkmaz, 2007). However, composite resin... esthetic restorative materials possessing strong fundamental restorative characteristics. Since the 1980’s when light-cured direct composite restorative

  8. Application conditions for ester cured alkaline phenolic resin sand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ren-he Huang

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Five organic esters with different curing speeds: propylene carbonate (i.e. high-speed ester A; 1, 4-butyrolactone; glycerol triacetate (i.e. medium-speed ester B; glycerol diacetate; dibasic ester (DBE (i.e. low-speed ester C, were chosen to react with alkaline phenolic resin to analyze the application conditions of ester cured alkaline phenolic resin. The relationships between the curing performances of the resin (including pH value, gel pH value, gel time of resin solution, heat release rate of the curing reaction and tensile strength of the resin sand and the amount of added organic ester and curing temperature were investigated. The results indicated the following: (1 The optimal added amount of organic ester should be 25wt.%-30wt.% of alkaline phenolic resin and it must be above 20wt.%-50 wt.% of the organic ester hydrolysis amount. (2 High-speed ester A (propylene carbonate has a higher curing speed than 1, 4-butyrolactone, and they were both used as high-speed esters. Glycerol diacetate is not a high-speed ester in alkaline phenolic resin although it was used as a high-speed ester in ester cured sodium silicate sand; glycerol diacetate and glycerol triacetate can be used as medium-speed esters in alkaline phenolic resin. (3 High-speed ester A, medium-speed ester B (glycerol triacetate and low-speed ester C (dibasic ester, i.e., DBE should be used below 15 ìC, 35 ìC and 50 ìC, respectively. High-speed ester A or low-speed ester C should not be used alone but mixed with medium-speed ester B to improve the strength of the resin sand. (4 There should be a suitable solid content (generally 45wt.%-65wt.% of resin, alkali content (generally 10wt.%-15wt.% of resin and viscosity of alkaline phenolic resin (generally 50-300 mPa≤s in the preparation of alkaline phenolic resin. Finally, the technique conditions of alkaline phenolic resin preparation and the application principles of organic ester were discussed.

  9. Effect of curing protocol on the polymerization of dual-cured resin cements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Sónia G; Fulgêncio, Rogério; Nunes, Teresa G; Toledano, Manuel; Osorio, Raquel; Carvalho, Ricardo Marins

    2010-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate how curing protocol affects the extent of polymerization of dual-cured resin cements. Four commercial resin cements were used (DuoLink, Panavia F 2.0, Variolink II and Enforce). The extent of polymerization of the resin cements cured under different conditions was measured using a (1)H Stray-Field MRI method, which also enabled to probe molecular mobility in the kHz frequency range. Resin cements show well distinct behaviours concerning chemical cure. Immediate photo-activation appears to be the best choice for higher filler loaded resin cements (Panavia F 2.0 and Variolink). A photo-activation delay (5 min) did not induce any significant difference in the extent of polymerization of all cements. The extent of polymerization of dual-cured resin cements considerably changed among products under various curing protocols. Clinicians should optimize the materials choice taking into account the curing characteristics of the cements. Copyright 2010 Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. ELECTRON BEAM CURING OF EPOXY ACRYLATE COATINGS ON MEDIUM-DENSITY FIBERBOARD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sugiarto Danu

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Most of the medium-density fiberboard (MDF as an engineered woods need surface coating process before entering final products, such as furniture and building materials. The wood surface should be covered for surface protection from damage during service life as well as to enhance its appearance. Surface coating of MDF was conducted using epoxy acrylate resin either for clear and pigmented coatings. Titanium dioxide was used for white pigmented coatings. Coating was conducted at variation thickness level of 30 to 150 μm. Curing was carried out by using 350 kV electron beam accelerator at 1.35 mA current and 1.6 m/min conveyor speed to get the absorbed dose of 3 Mrad. Effect of coating thickness was evaluated by measuring the physical, mechanical and chemical properties of cured samples, i.e., hardness, gloss, transparency, adhesion, abrasion resistance, and chemical, solvent and stain resistance. Experimental results showed that pendulum hardness and abrasion resistance slightly increased whereas gloss, transparency and adhesion resistance decreased with increasing coating thickness, while chemical, solvent and stain resistance remains similar. In general, clear coating provides better properties than pigmented coating.   Keywords: electron-beam; coating; epoxy-acrylate; pigment; medium-density fiberboard

  11. Syringaresinol: A Renewable and Safer Alternative to Bisphenol A for Epoxy-Amine Resins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janvier, Marine; Hollande, Louis; Jaufurally, Abdus Samad; Pernes, Miguel; Ménard, Raphaël; Grimaldi, Marina; Beaugrand, Johnny; Balaguer, Patrick; Ducrot, Paul-Henri; Allais, Florent

    2017-02-22

    A renewable bisepoxide, SYR-EPO, was prepared from syringaresinol, a naturally occurring bisphenol deriving from sinapic acid, by using a chemo-enzymatic synthetic pathway. Estrogenic activity tests revealed no endocrine disruption for syringaresinol. Its glycidylation afforded SYR-EPO with excellent yield and purity. This biobased, safe epoxy precursor was then cured with conventional and renewable diamines for the preparation of epoxy-amine resins. The resulting thermosets were thermally and mechanically characterized. Thermal analyses of these new resins showed excellent thermal stabilities (Td5 % =279-309 °C) and Tg ranging from 73 to 126 °C, almost reaching the properties of those obtained with the diglycidylether of bisphenol A (DGEBA), extensively used in the polymer industry (Td5 % =319 °C and Tg =150 °C for DGEBA/isophorone diamine resins). Degradation studies in NaOH and HCl aqueous solutions also highlighted the robustness of the syringaresinol-based resins, similar to bisphenol A (BPA). All these results undoubtedly confirmed the potential of syringaresinol as a greener and safer substitute for BPA. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  12. Recyclable epoxy resins: An example of green approach for advanced composite applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cicala, Gianluca; Rosa, Daniela La; Musarra, Marco; Saccullo, Giuseppe; Banatao, Rey; Pastine, Stefan

    2016-05-01

    Automotive composite applications are increasingly growing due to demand for lightweight structures to comply to the requirements for fuel reduction. HP-RTM is gaining relevance as one of the preferred production technologies for high volume applications. The BMW i3 life module being a notable example of HP-RTM application. The key aspects of HP-RTM are the short injection times (i.e. less than 1min) and the fast curing of the thermoset resins (i.e. less than 10min). The choice of using thermosets poses relevant issues for their limited recycling options. The standard recycling solution is the incineration but, this solution poses some concerns in terms of global environmental impact. Novel solutions are presented in this work based on the use of recyclable epoxy systems. In our work the results of experimentation carried out by our group with cleavable ammines by Connora Technologies and bioepoxy resins by Entropy Resins will be discussed. The multiple uses of recycled matrices obtained treating the recyclable epoxy resins are discussed in the framework of a "cradle" to "crave" approach. Finally, Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) is used to evaluate the environmental benefits of the proposed approach.

  13. Monitoring the Cure State of Thermosetting Resins by Ultrasound

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alfonso Maffezzoli

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The propagation of low intensity ultrasound in a curing resin, acting as a high frequency oscillatory excitation, has been recently proposed as an ultrasonic dynamic mechanical analysis (UDMA for cure monitoring. The technique measures sound velocity and attenuation, which are very sensitive to changes in the viscoelastic characteristics of the curing resin, since the velocity is related to the resin storage modulus and density, while the attenuation is related to the energy dissipation and scattering in the curing resin. The paper reviews the results obtained by the authors’ research group in the last decade by means of in-house made ultrasonic set-ups for both contact and air-coupled ultrasonic experiments. The basics of the ultrasonic wave propagation in polymers and examples of measurements of the time-evolution of ultrasonic longitudinal modulus and chemical conversion of different thermosetting resins are presented. The effect of temperature on the cure kinetics, the comparison with rheological, low frequency dynamic mechanical and calorimetric results, and the correlation between ultrasonic modulus and crosslinking density will be also discussed. The paper highlights the reliability of ultrasonic wave propagation for monitoring the physical changes taking place during curing and the potential for online monitoring during polymer and polymer matrix composite processing.

  14. Process for epoxy foam production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Celina, Mathias C [Albuquerque, NM

    2011-08-23

    An epoxy resin mixture with at least one epoxy resin of between approximately 60 wt % and 90 wt %, a maleic anhydride of between approximately 1 wt % and approximately 30 wt %, and an imidazole catalyst of less than approximately 2 wt % where the resin mixture is formed from at least one epoxy resin with a 1-30 wt % maleic anhydride compound and an imidazole catalyst at a temperature sufficient to keep the maleic anhydride compound molten, the resin mixture reacting to form a foaming resin which can then be cured at a temperature greater than 50.degree. C. to form an epoxy foam.

  15. Adhesive Bonding of Aluminium Alloy A5754 by Epoxy Resins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivan Michalec

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Joining thin sheets of aluminium and its alloys is a promising area in the field of joining materials. Nowadays, joining methods that do not melt the material itself are increasingly being utilised. This paper deals with adhesive bonding of aluminium alloy A5754 by two-component epoxy resins. Theresults show that joints bonded by Hysol 9466 have appropriate mechanical properties, but that joints bonded by Hysol 9492 have better thermal stability.

  16. Characterization of fracture toughness of epoxy resin after hygrothermal aging

    KAUST Repository

    Quispe, Gustavo Q.

    2013-07-01

    Characterization of fracture toughness of epoxy resin after hygrothermal ageing Gustavo Quino Quispe The aim of this work is to characterize the e ects of hygrothermal aging in the plain strain fracture toughness of the epoxy system composed by cycloaliphatic epoxy resin and diglycidyl ether of bisphenol-A (DGEBA). For this, after having been under hygrothermal aging in a climatic chamber, epoxy samples were studied using ASTM D5045 fracture toughness test, and micrography and roughness measurements of the fracture surface. It is reported a rapid decrease of GIc and KIc during the rst 2 days. Moreover, a numerical model [13] was used to simulate and see with more detail the water absorption in the aged samples. From that, it was observed the heterogeneous distribution of water. Accordingly, it was proposed that the results should be correlated with the water content at the vicinity of the crack tip. Consequently, it was possible to obtain, by quasi-static simulations, the ideal load-displacement curves of crack propagation in the heterogeneous samples. Finally, another contribution of this work is the study of the fracture surface, that gives a clue of the relationship among the fracture energy, the appearance of microcracks in the fracture surface, and the roughness (Ra).

  17. Hardening of a dual-cure resin cement using QTH and LED curing units

    Science.gov (United States)

    SANTOS, Maria Jacinta Moraes Coelho; PASSOS, Sheila Pestana; da ENCARNAÇÃO, Monalisa Olga Lessa; SANTOS, Gildo Coelho; BOTTINO, Marco Antonio

    2010-01-01

    Objective This study evaluated the surface hardness of a resin cement (RelyX ARC) photoactivated through indirect composite resin (Cristobal) disks of different thicknesses using either a light-emitting diode (LED) or quartz tungsten halogen (QTH) light source. Material and Methods Eighteen resin cement specimens were prepared and divided into 6 groups according to the type of curing unit and the thickness of resin disks interposed between the cement surface and light source. Three indentations (50 g for 15 s) were performed on the top and bottom surface of each specimen and a mean Vickers hardness number (VHN) was calculated for each specimen. The data were analyzed using two-way ANOVA and Tukey-Kramer test was used for post-hoc pairwise comparisons. Results Increased indirect resin disk thickness resulted in decreased mean VHN values. Mean VHN values for the top surfaces of the resin cement specimens ranged from 23.2 to 46.1 (QTH) and 32.3 to 41.7 (LED). The LED curing light source produced higher hardness values compared to the QTH light source for 2- and 3-mm-thick indirect resin disks. The differences were clinically, but not statistically significant. Increased indirect resin disk thickness also resulted in decreased mean VHN values for the bottom surfaces of the resin cement: 5.8 to 19.1 (QTH) and 7.5 to 32.0 (LED). For the bottom surfaces, a statistically significant interaction was also found between the type of curing light source and the indirect resin disk thickness. Conclusions Mean surface hardness values of resin cement specimens decreased with the increase of indirect resin disk thickness. The LED curing light source generally produced higher surface hardness values. PMID:20485920

  18. Hardening of a dual-cure resin cement using QTH and LED curing units

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Jacinta Moraes Coelho Santos

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: This study evaluated the surface hardness of a resin cement (RelyX ARC photoactivated through indirect composite resin (Cristobal disks of different thicknesses using either a light-emitting diode (LED or quartz tungsten halogen (QTH light source. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Eighteen resin cement specimens were prepared and divided into 6 groups according to the type of curing unit and the thickness of resin disks interposed between the cement surface and light source. Three indentations (50 g for 15 s were performed on the top and bottom surface of each specimen and a mean Vickers hardness number (VHN was calculated for each specimen. The data were analyzed using two-way ANOVA and Tukey-Kramer test was used for post-hoc pairwise comparisons. RESULTS: Increased indirect resin disk thickness resulted in decreased mean VHN values. Mean VHN values for the top surfaces of the resin cement specimens ranged from 23.2 to 46.1 (QTH and 32.3 to 41.7 (LED. The LED curing light source produced higher hardness values compared to the QTH light source for 2- and 3-mm-thick indirect resin disks. The differences were clinically, but not statistically significant. Increased indirect resin disk thickness also resulted in decreased mean VHN values for the bottom surfaces of the resin cement: 5.8 to 19.1 (QTH and 7.5 to 32.0 (LED. For the bottom surfaces, a statistically significant interaction was also found between the type of curing light source and the indirect resin disk thickness. CONCLUSION: Mean surface hardness values of resin cement specimens decreased with the increase of indirect resin disk thickness. The LED curing light source generally produced higher surface hardness values.

  19. Bonding of dual-curing resin cements to dentin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asmussen, Erik; Peutzfeldt, Anne

    2006-10-01

    The purpose of the study was three-fold: 1) to determine the strength of the bond between a number of dual-curing resin cements and dentin treated with corresponding adhesive systems, 2) to determine the effect on bond strength of not light curing the cements, and 3) to investigate whether application of a solution of sodium sulfinate or ascorbic acid would increase the bond strength in the cases where the manufacturer's version of an adhesive system resulted in low bond strength with chemically cured cement, ie, cement cured without light. The adhesive systems comprised 5 simplified systems (Adper Scotchbond 1 XT, ED Primer II, Excite DSC, OptiBond Solo Plus, and Prime and Bond NT), and as controls, two three-step etch and rinse systems (Adper Scotchbond Multi-Purpose Plus and Gluma Solid Bond). The corresponding dual-curing resin cements were RelyX ARC, Panavia F 2.0, Variolink II, Nexus 2, Calibra, RelyX ARC, and 2Bond2. The cements were either light and chemically cured or only chemically cured. The adhesive systems were used as recommended by the manufacturers, which for some systems involved inclusion of a so-called activator or catalyst when used with chemically cured cement. Sodium sulfinate and ascorbic acid were applied as a 1% ethanol solution. The bond strengths were measured in shear after storing specimens for 24 h in 37 degree C water. When the dual-curing resin cements had been both light and chemically cured, the bond strengths increased in this order: Gluma Solid Bond cements decreased the bond strengths with OptiBond Solo Plus and Prime and Bond NT. The use of activator in conjunction with OptiBond Solo Plus and Prime and Bond NT increased the bond strength to chemically cured cement, but not to the level obtained when the cement was both light and chemically cured. The use of the catalyst of Adper Scotchbond Multi-Purpose Plus did not increase the bond strength with chemically cured cement. Pretreatment with a solution of sodium sulfinate or

  20. Investigation of the effect of resin material on impact damage to graphite/epoxy composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmer, R. J.

    1981-01-01

    The results of an experimental program are described which establishes the feasibility and guide lines for resin development. The objective was to identify the basic epoxy neat resin properties that improve low velocity impact resistance and toughness to graphite-epoxy laminates and at the same time maintain useful structural laminate mechanical properties. Materials tests from twenty-three toughened epoxy resin matrix systems are included.

  1. Effects of colloidal nanosilica on the rheological properties of epoxy resins filled with organoclay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Dinh Huong; Song, Gwang Seok; Lee, Dai Soo

    2011-05-01

    The rheological properties of epoxy resins filled with organoclay and colloidal nanosilica were investigated by employing a parallel plate rheometer in flow mode at 25 degrees C. Shear thickening and shear thinning behaviors were observed in the epoxy resins filled with a mixture of organoclay and colloidal nanosilica. Minima were observed in the relaxation time of the systems consisting of epoxy resins filled with organoclay and colloidal silica as the content of colloidal nanosilica was increased. It seems that the colloidal nanosilica increased the mobility of the filled epoxy resins and reduced the interactions between the silicate layers in the systems.

  2. Poly(arylene ether-co-imidazole)s as toughness modifiers for epoxy resins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mcdaniel, Patricia D. (Inventor); Connell, John W. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    A toughened epoxy was prepared by reacting an epoxy resin with a poly(arylene ether-co-imidazole)s (PAEI). The epoxy resin comprises N,N,N',N'tetraglycidyl-4,4'- methylenebisbenzenamine and 4-aminophenyl sulfone. The PAEI was prepared by reacting an aromatic bisphenol, a bisphenol imidazole, and an activated aromatic dihalide or dinitro compound in the presence of potassium carbonate in a polar aprotic solvent at an elevated temperature. The epoxies which were modified with these particular PAEI's showed a significant increase in toughness with only a 10 weight percent loading of the PAEI into the epoxy. These toughened epoxies were used to prepare composites and molded parts.

  3. Epoxy Grout With Silica Thickener

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mcclung, C. E.

    1984-01-01

    Grout cures quickly, even in presence of hydraulic oil. Grout is mixture of aggregate particles, finely-divided silica, epoxy resin, and triethylenetetramine curing agent, with mixture containing about 85 percent silica and aggregate particle sand 15 percent resin and curing agent. Silica is thickening agent and keeps grout from sagging.

  4. PEMBUATAN GIGI TIRUAN LEPASAN DENGAN MENGGUNAKAN RESIN VISIBLE LIGHT CURE

    OpenAIRE

    RIADIANTORO, ALFIAN

    2012-01-01

    2011 Dewasa ini perkembangan teknologi dalam ilmu kedokteran gigi semakin canggih, dalam ilmu bahan kedokteran gigi banyak penemuan baru yang ditemukan seperti halnya acrylic resin. Acrylic resin selalu menggunakan Polymethil Acrilate (PMMA) jenis polimerisasi heat cure dengan cara merebus samapai dengan 8-12 jam pada temperatur 74 C, 2 jam 100 c, dan menggunakan oven microwave pada 15-20 menit dengan kekuatan listrik 25 watt. Sekarang diperkenalkan bahan baru yang lebih efektif dan efis...

  5. Photothermal radiometry monitoring of light curing in resins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zambrano-Arjona, M A [Applied Physics Department, Cinvestav-Unidad Merida, A.P. 73 Cordemex, Merida, 97310 (Mexico); Medina-Esquivel, R [Cinvestav-Unidad Queretaro, Libramiento Norponiente 2000 Fracc. Real de Juriquilla, CP 76230, Queretaro (Mexico); Alvarado-Gil, J J [Applied Physics Department, Cinvestav-Unidad Merida, A.P. 73 Cordemex, Merida, 97310 (Mexico)

    2007-10-07

    Real time measurement of thermal diffusivity during the evolution of the light curing process in dental resins is reported using photothermal radiometry. The curing is induced by a non-modulated blue light beam, and at the same time, a modulated red laser beam is sent onto the sample, generating a train of thermal waves that produce modulated infrared radiation. The monitoring of this radiation permits to follow the time evolution of the process. The methodology is applied to two different commercially available light curing resin-based composites. In all cases thermal diffusivity follows a first order kinetics with similar stabilization characteristic times. Analysis of this kinetics permits to exhibit the close relationship of increase in thermal diffusivity with the decrease in monomer concentration and extension of the polymerization in the resin, induced by the curing light. It is also shown that the configuration in which the resin is illuminated by the modulated laser can be the basis for the development of an in situ technique for the determination of the degree of curing.

  6. Cross-Sectional Study of Respiratory Symptoms, Spirometry, and Immunologic Sensitivity in Epoxy Resin Workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hines, Stella E; Barker, Elizabeth A; Robinson, Maura; Knight, Vijaya; Gaitens, Joanna; Sills, Michael; Duvall, Kirby; Rose, Cecile S

    2015-12-01

    An epoxy resin worker developed hypersensitivity pneumonitis requiring lung transplantation and had an abnormal blood lymphocyte proliferation test (LPT) to an epoxy hardener. We assessed the prevalence of symptoms, abnormal spirometry, and abnormal epoxy resin LPT results in epoxy resin workers compared to unexposed workers. Participants completed questionnaires and underwent spirometry. We collected blood for epoxy resin LPT and calculated stimulation indices for five epoxy resin products. We compared 38 exposed to 32 unexposed workers. Higher exposed workers were more likely to report cough (OR 10.86, [1.23-infinity], p = 0.030) or wheeze (OR 4.44, [1.00-22.25], p = 0.049) than unexposed workers, even controlling for smoking. Higher exposed workers were more likely to have abnormal FEV1 than unexposed workers (OR 10.51, [0.86-589.9], p = 0.071), although not statistically significant when adjusted for smoking. There were no differences in proportion of abnormal epoxy resin system LPTs between exposed and unexposed workers. In summary, workers exposed to epoxy resin system chemicals were more likely to report respiratory symptoms and have abnormal FEV1 than unexposed workers. Use of epoxy resin LPT was not helpful as a biomarker of exposure and sensitization. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Cross‐Sectional Study of Respiratory Symptoms, Spirometry, and Immunologic Sensitivity in Epoxy Resin Workers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barker, Elizabeth A.; Robinson, Maura; Knight, Vijaya; Gaitens, Joanna; Sills, Michael; Duvall, Kirby; Rose, Cecile S.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Objectives An epoxy resin worker developed hypersensitivity pneumonitis requiring lung transplantation and had an abnormal blood lymphocyte proliferation test (LPT) to an epoxy hardener. We assessed the prevalence of symptoms, abnormal spirometry, and abnormal epoxy resin LPT results in epoxy resin workers compared to unexposed workers. Methods Participants completed questionnaires and underwent spirometry. We collected blood for epoxy resin LPT and calculated stimulation indices for five epoxy resin products. Results We compared 38 exposed to 32 unexposed workers. Higher exposed workers were more likely to report cough (OR 10.86, [1.23‐infinity], p = 0.030) or wheeze (OR 4.44, [1.00‐22.25], p = 0.049) than unexposed workers, even controlling for smoking. Higher exposed workers were more likely to have abnormal FEV1 than unexposed workers (OR 10.51, [0.86‐589.9], p = 0.071), although not statistically significant when adjusted for smoking. There were no differences in proportion of abnormal epoxy resin system LPTs between exposed and unexposed workers. Conclusions In summary, workers exposed to epoxy resin system chemicals were more likely to report respiratory symptoms and have abnormal FEV1 than unexposed workers. Use of epoxy resin LPT was not helpful as a biomarker of exposure and sensitization. PMID:26553118

  8. Morphology and properties of amine terminated poly(arylene ether ketone) and poly(arylene ether sulfone) modified epoxy resin systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cecere, J. A.; Mcgrath, J. E.; Hedrick, J. L.

    1986-01-01

    Epoxy resin networks cured with DDS were modified by incorporating tough ductile thermoplastics such as the amine terminated polyether sulfones and amine terminated polyether ketones. Both linear copolymers were able to significantly improve the fracture toughness values at the 15 and 30 weight percent concentrations examined. These improvements in fracture toughness were achieved without any significant change in the flexural modulus.

  9. Aliphatic amine cured PDMS–epoxy interpenetrating network ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    PDMS; siloxane; epoxy; siliconized epoxy matrix; interpenetrating network. 1. Introduction. Any insulating material in service is exposed to moisture, oxidation, chemical attack, biological attack, outdoor wea- thering, contamination, electrical, mechanical and thermal stress. Polymers are better insulating materials for high.

  10. Development of epoxy resin-type neutron shielding materials (I)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, Soo Haeng; Kim, Ik Soo; Shin, Young Joon; Do, Jae Bum; Ro, Seung Gy

    1997-12-01

    Because the exposure to radiation in the nuclear facilities can be fatal to human, it is important to reduce the radiation dose level to a tolerable level. The purpose of this study is to develop highly effective neutron shielding materials for the shipping and storage cask of radioactive materials or in the nuclear /radiation facilities. On this study, we developed epoxy resin based neutron shielding materials and their various materials properties, including neutron shielding ability, fire resistance, combustion characteristics, radiation resistance, thermal and mechanical properties were evaluated experimentally. (author). 31 refs., 22 tabs., 17 figs.

  11. Electrical tree growth in epoxy resin under DC voltages

    OpenAIRE

    Iddrissu, Ibrahim; Zheng, Hualong; Rowland, Simon

    2016-01-01

    This work investigates electrical tree propagation in a glassy epoxy resin under constant DC voltages of +60 kV and -60 kV, using samples with classical needle-plane electrodes but having small AC trees (henceforth called `initial trees') incepted prior to the DC tests. The characteristics of DC trees propagating from an initial tree is analysed via a sequence of 2-D projections of trees captured using a CCD camera during the test. The experimental results suggest that DC tree growth rate is ...

  12. Preparation and Characterization of Epoxy Resin Cross-Linked with High Wood Pyrolysis Bio-Oil Substitution by Acetone Pretreatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi Liu

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The use of cost effective solvents may be necessary to store wood pyrolysis bio-oil in order to stabilize and control its viscosity, but this part of the production system has not been explored. Conversely, any rise in viscosity during storage, that would occur without a solvent, will add variance to the production system and render it cost ineffective. The purpose of this study was to modify bio-oil with a common solvent and then react the bio-oil with an epoxy for bonding of wood without any loss in properties. The acetone pretreatment of the bio-oil/epoxy mixture was found to improve the cross-linking potential and substitution rate based on its mechanical, chemical, and thermal properties. Specifically, the bio-oil was blended with epoxy resin at weight ratios ranging from 2:1 to 1:5 and were then cured. A higher bio-oil substitution rate was found to lower the shear bond strength of the bio-oil/epoxy resins. However, when an acetone pretreatment was used, it was possible to replace the bio-oil by as much as 50% while satisfying usage requirements. Extraction of the bio-oil/epoxy mixture with four different solvents demonstrated an improvement in cross-linking after acetone pretreatment. ATR-FTIR analysis confirmed that the polymer achieved a higher cross-linked structure. DSC and TGA curves showed improved thermal stability with the addition of the acetone pretreatment. UV-Vis characterization showed that some functional groups of the bio-oil to epoxy system were unreacted. Finally, when the resin mixture was utilized to bond wood, the acetone pretreatment coupled with precise tuning of the bio-oil:epoxy ratio was an effective method to control cross-linking while ensuring acceptable bond strength.

  13. Two cases of occupational allergic contact dermatitis from a cycloaliphatic epoxy resin in a neat oil

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Charlotte D; Andersen, Klaus E

    2003-01-01

    to a neat oil used in metal processing. Patch testing revealed that the relevant contact allergen was a cycloaliphatic epoxy resin, 1,2-cyclohexanedicarboxylic acid, bis(oxiranylmethyl) ester, added to the oil as a stabilizer. None of the patients had positive reactions to the bisphenol A-based epoxy resin...

  14. Association between positive patch tests to epoxy resin and fragrance mix I ingredients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Klaus Ejner; Christensen, Lars Porskjaer; Vølund, Aage

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Both epoxy resin (diglycidyl ether of bisphenol A) and fragrance mix I are included in the European baseline series of contact allergens. A significant association between positive reactions to epoxy resin and fragrance mix has been reported by others. OBJECTIVE: To investigate and po...

  15. Epoxy-resin patterns speed shell-molding of aluminum parts

    Science.gov (United States)

    1965-01-01

    Half patterns cast from commercial epoxy resin containing aluminum powder are used for shell-molding of aluminum parts. The half patterns are cast in plastic molds of the original wooden pattern. Ten serviceable sand resin molds are made from each epoxy pattern.

  16. Early hardness of self-adhesive resin cements cured under indirect resin composite restorations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giráldez, Isabel; Ceballos, Laura; Garrido, Miguel A; Rodríguez, Jesús

    2011-04-01

    To determine the influence of curing mode on the surface hardness of seven resin cements used to lute indirect composite restorations. Seven commercial dual-curing resin cements were tested: two were total-etch (RelyX ARC [3M ESPE, St. Paul, MN, USA] and Variolink II [Ivoclar Vivadent, Schaan, Liechtenstein]); one was self-etch (Multilink Automix [Ivoclar Vivadent]), and four were self-adhesive (RelyX Unicem [3M ESPE], Maxcem Elite [Kerr Corp., Orange, CA, USA], SmartCem2 [Dentsply, Detrey, GmbH, Konstanz, Germany], and G-Cem [GC CORPORATION, Itabashi-Ku, Tokyo, Japan]). Three specimens (0.5 × 6.5mm) of each material were prepared for each of three experimental groups: Group 1 (cements allowed to self cure); Group 2 (cements light-cured for 40 seconds); and Group 3 (cements light-cured for 80 seconds). All specimens were cured through a 4-mm-thick composite cylinder (Filtek Z250-A3). Surface microhardness numbers were determined at 20 min after preparation. Results were analyzed by two-way analysis of variance and Student-Newman-Keuls tests (pcement tested (pcements studied, and these values increased even further with a doubling of irradiation time. Self-adhesive cements exhibited different behavior according to the curing mode. RelyX Unicem was highly sensitive to light irradiation, showing the lowest mean values in the self-curing mode. After light irradiation for 40 or 80 seconds, Maxcem Elite exhibited the lowest mean hardness values of all the resin cements tested. The microhardness of resin cements is highly dependent on the brand. Dual-curing resin cements should always be light irradiated for longer periods than that recommended by manufacturers. Dual-curing resin cements should always be light-cured for longer irradiation times, as light irradiation for 80 seconds yields the highest microhardness values in comparison with self-curing or light irradiation for 40 seconds. However, some self-adhesive resin cements exhibit low microhardness values when used

  17. Industrially relevant epoxy-acrylate hybrid resin photopolymerizations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ajiboye, Gbenga I.

    Photopolymerization of epoxy-acrylate hybrid resins takes advantages of inherent properties present in the free-radical and cationic reactions to reduce oxygen inhibition problems that plague free-radical reactions. Similarly, the combined reaction mechanisms reduce moisture sensitivity of the cationic reactions. Despite the advantages of epoxy-acrylate hybrid resins, problems persist that need to be addressed. For example, low conversion and polymerization rate of the epoxides are a problem, because the fast acrylate conversion prevents the epoxide from reaching high conversion. Controlling phase separation is challenging, since two moieties with different properties are reacting. The physical properties of the polymer will be impacted by the availability of different moieties. High shrinkage stress results from the acrylate moiety, causing buckling and cracking in film and coating applications. The overall goal of this study is to use the fundamental knowledge of epoxy-acrylate hybrid resins to formulate industrially viable polymers. In order to achieve this goal, the study focuses on the following objectives: (I) determine the apparent activation energy of the hybrid monomer METHB, (II) increase epoxide conversion and polymerization rate of hybrid formulations, and (III) control physical properties in epoxy-acrylate hybrid resins. In order to increase the epoxide conversion and rate of polymerization, the sensitivity of epoxides to alcohol is used to facilitate the activated monomer (AM) mechanism and induce a covalent bond between the epoxide and acrylate polymers through the hydroxyl group. It is hypothesized that if the AM mechanism is facilitated, epoxide conversion will increase. As a result, the resins can be tailored to control phase separation and physical properties, and shrinkage stress can be reduced. In pursuit of these objectives, the hybrid monomer METHB was polymerized at temperatures ranging from 30°C to 70°C to obtain apparent activation

  18. 21 CFR 177.2280 - 4,4′-Isopropyl-idenedi-phenol-epichloro-hydrin thermo-setting epoxy resins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... thermo-setting epoxy resins. 177.2280 Section 177.2280 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION...,4′-Isopropyl-idenedi-phenol-epichloro-hydrin thermo-setting epoxy resins. 4,4′-Isopropylidenediphenol-epichlo-rohydrin thermosetting epoxy resins may be safely used as articles or components of...

  19. Allergic contact dermatitis to epoxy resin in immersion oil for light microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    el-Azhary, Rokea A; Yiannias, James A

    2002-12-01

    Allergic contact dermatitis caused by immersion oil used for microscopy is a recently recognized phenomenon. We report a case with characteristic findings of periorbital erythema and edema in a cytogenetics technician. Positive patch test responses to epoxy resin, epoxy acrylate, and the immersion oil were noted. This case represents yet another contact allergic reaction, possibly airborne, to epoxy resin present in immersion oil used for microscopy.

  20. Epoxy Resin Based Composites, Mechanical and Tribological Properties: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.A. Bello

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available High fuel consumption by automobile and aerospace vehicles built from legacy alloys has been a great challenge to global design and material engineers. This has called for researches into material development for the production of lighter materials of the same or even superior mechanical properties to the existing materials in this area of applications. This forms a part of efforts to achieve the global vision 2025 i.e to reduce the fuel consumption by automobile and aerospace vehicles by at least 75 %. Many researchers have identified advanced composites as suitable materials in this regard. Among the common matrices used for the development of advanced composites, epoxy resin has attained a dominance among its counterparts because of its excellent properties including chemical, thermal and electrical resistance properties, mechanical properties and dimensional stability. This review is a reflection of the extensive study on the currently ongoing research aimed at development of epoxy resin hybrid nanocomposites for engineering applications. In this paper, brief explanation has been given to different terms related to the research work and also, some previous works (in accordance with materials within authors’ reach in the area of the ongoing research have been reported.

  1. Differential scanning calorimetry of the effects of temperature and humidity on phenol-formaldehyde resin cure

    Science.gov (United States)

    X.-M. Wang; B. Riedl; A.W. Christiansen; R.L. Geimer

    1994-01-01

    Phenol-formaldehyde (PF) resin is a widely used adhesive in the manufacture of wood composites. However, curing behaviour of the resin under various environmental conditions is not well known. A differential scanning calorimeter was employed to characterize the degree of resin cure in this study. Resin-impregnated glass cloth samples with varied moisture contents (0,31...

  2. Microhardness of heat cure acrylic resin after treatment with disinfectants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amin, Faiza; Rehman, Abdur; Abbas, Muhammad

    2015-08-01

    To evaluate the effect of disinfectants and distilled water on the micro-hardness of heat cure acrylic resins. The case-control study was conducted at Dr. Ishrat-ul-Ebad Khan Institute of Oral Health Sciences, Dow University of Health Sciences, and Nadirshaw Edulji Dinshaw University of Engineering and Technology, Karachi, from April to October 2011. Specimens were fabricated from heat cure acrylic resin material and they were divided into four equal groups. Group 1 was evaluated at baseline and was taken as the control group. Group 2 was immersed in distilled water for 20 minutes, Group 3 in1% sodium hypochlorite for 20 minutes, and Group 4 in 2% alkaline gluteraldehyde for 10 minutes. All specimens were polished, stored in distilled water for 24 hours prior to experiment. All the specimens were immersed twice daily for a total of 60 days after which they were tested for Vickers micro-hardness test. Statistical analysis was conducted with one-way analysis of variance and Tukey post hoc test (a=0.05). There were 72 specimens divided into four groups of 18(25%) each. Statistically significant differences were found among all groups (pacrylic resins. Group 4 showed the most reduction in the hardness value which was followed by Group 3. The hardness of heat cure acrylic resin was affected by disinfectants.

  3. Morphological and mechanical analyses of laminates manufactured from randomly positioned carbon fibre/epoxy resin prepreg scraps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souza, Christiane S. R.; Cândido, Geraldo M.; Alves, Wellington; Marlet, José Maria F.; Rezende, Mirabel C.

    2017-10-01

    This study aims to contribute to sustainability by proposing the reuse of composite prepreg scrap as an added value from discards. The research evaluates the microstructure and mechanical properties of laminates processed by the reuse of uncured carbon fibre/F155-epoxy resin prepreg scraps, waste from the ply cutting area of an aeronautical industry. The composite scraps were used as collected and were randomly positioned to produce laminates to be cured at an autoclave. The mechanical characterization shows a decrease of 39% for the compression property due to the discontinuous fibres in the laminate and an increase of 34% for the interlaminar shear strength, when compared to continuous fibre laminates. This increase is attributed to the higher crosslink density of the epoxy resin, as a result of the cure temperature used in autoclave (60 °C higher than suggested by supplier) and also to the randomly positioned scraps. Microscopic analyses confirm the consolidation of laminates, although show resin rich areas with different sizes and shapes attributed to the overlapping of the scraps with different sizes and shapes. These resin rich areas may contribute to decrease the mechanical properties of laminates. The correlation between mechanical and morphological results shows potential to be used on non-critical structural application, as composite jigs, contributing to sustainability.

  4. Thermosets of epoxy monomer from Tung oil fatty acids cured in two synergistic ways

    Science.gov (United States)

    A new epoxy monomer from tung oil fatty acids, glycidyl ester of eleostearic acid (GEEA), was synthesized and characterized by 1H-NMR and 13C-NMR spectroscopy. Differential scanning calorimetry analysis (DSC) and FT-IR were utilized to investigate the curing process of GEEA cured by both dienophiles...

  5. Estudio cinético del efecto de polifenilsulfona sobre el curado de una resina epoxi/amina mediante calorimetría diferencial de barrido convencional y modulada con temperatura: parte II Kinetic study on the effect of curing polyphenylsulfone epoxy resin/amina by differential calorimetry scanning conventional and modulated temperature: part II

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asdrúbal J. Cedeño

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available En este trabajo se estudió el efecto de la adición del termoplástico lineal polifenilsulfona (PPSU, sobre la cinética de reacción y las propiedades térmicas de una resina epoxídica basada en diglicidil éter de bisfenol - A (DGEBA, curada con diaminodifenilsulfona (DDS. El estudio cinético y la caracterización se realizaron mediante calorimetría diferencial de barrido, DSC estándar y modulado, bajo condiciones isotérmicas y dinámicas. La cinética del curado se discutió en el marco de tres modelos cinéticos: Kissinger, Flynn-Wall-Ozawa y el modelo cinético de orden n. Para describir la reacción de curado en su última etapa, se usó la relación semiempírica propuesta por Chern y Poehlein para considerar la influencia de la difusión sobre la rapidez de reacción. El mecanismo de curado, para todos los sistemas, se ajustó a una cinética de orden n, a pesar del contenido de PPSU, y se observó que éste se hace muy controlado por la difusión conforme aumenta el contenido de PPSU y conforme la temperatura de curado disminuye. El tiempo de vitrificación de los sistemas exhibió una fuerte dependencia con el contenido de PPSU.In this work we studied the effect of the addition of the linear thermoplastic polyphenyl sulfone (PPSU on the cure kinetics and the thermal properties of a resin based on diglycidyl ether of bisphenol-A (DGEBA, cured with 4,4´-diaminodiphenyl sulfone (DDS. The kinetic study and the characterization process have been carried out by using differential scanning calorimetry, DSC, and temperature modulated DSC (TMDSC, under isothermal and dynamic conditions. The curing kinetics was discussed in the framework of three kinetic models: Kissinger, Flynn-Wall-Ozawa, and the model of reaction of order n. To describe the cured reaction in its last stage, we have used the semiempirical relationship proposed by Chern and Poehlein to take into account the influence of diffusion on the reaction rate. The cure mechanism

  6. Allergic contact dermatitis to bisphenol-A-glycidyldimethacrylate (BIS-GMA) dental resin associated with sensitivity to epoxy resin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carmichael, A J; Gibson, J J; Walls, A W

    1997-10-25

    A patient presented with recurrent facial dermatitis associated with dental work. Dermatology referral identified the cause as allergic contact dermatitis to the epoxy acrylate BIS-GMA. Occupationally-induced allergic contact dermatitis to epoxy resin was also demonstrated. A structurally distinct aliphatic acrylate was successfully substituted. Contact sensitivity to BIS-GMA is reviewed and the potential for epoxy sensitive patients to cross-react to BIS-GMA is discussed.

  7. Surface and buried interfacial structures of epoxy resins used as underfills studied by sum frequency generation vibrational spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vázquez, Anne V; Holden, Brad; Kristalyn, Cornelius; Fuller, Mike; Wilkerson, Brett; Chen, Zhan

    2011-05-01

    Flip chip technology has greatly improved the performance of semiconductor devices, but relies heavily on the performance of epoxy underfill adhesives. Because epoxy underfills are cured in situ in flip chip semiconductor devices, understanding their surface and interfacial structures is critical for understanding their adhesion to various substrates. Here, sum frequency generation (SFG) vibrational spectroscopy was used to study surface and buried interfacial structures of two model epoxy resins used as underfills in flip chip devices, bisphenol A digylcidyl ether (BADGE) and 1,4-butanediol diglycidyl ether (BDDGE). The surface structures of these epoxies were compared before and after cure, and the orientations of their surface functional groups were deduced to understand how surface structural changes during cure may affect adhesion properties. Further, the effect of moisture exposure, a known cause of adhesion failure, on surface structures was studied. It was found that the BADGE surface significantly restructured upon moisture exposure while the BDDGE surface did not, showing that BADGE adhesives may be more prone to moisture-induced delamination. Lastly, although surface structure can give some insight into adhesion, buried interfacial structures more directly correspond to adhesion properties of polymers. SFG was used to study buried interfaces between deuterated polystyrene (d-PS) and the epoxies before and after moisture exposure. It was shown that moisture exposure acted to disorder the buried interfaces, most likely due to swelling. These results correlated with lap shear adhesion testing showing a decrease in adhesion strength after moisture exposure. The presented work showed that surface and interfacial structures can be correlated to adhesive strength and may be helpful in understanding and designing optimized epoxy underfill adhesives.

  8. Surface modification of titanium hydride with epoxy resin via microwave-assisted ball milling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ning, Rong [College of Materials Science and Engineering, Hunan University, Changsha 410082 (China); Chen, Ding, E-mail: ma97chen@hotmail.com [College of Materials Science and Engineering, Hunan University, Changsha 410082 (China); Zhang, Qianxia [College of Materials Science and Engineering, Hunan University, Changsha 410082 (China); Bian, Zhibing; Dai, Haixiong; Zhang, Chi [Jiangsu Jinling Special Paint Co., Ltd., Yangzhou 225212 (China)

    2014-10-15

    Highlights: • TiH{sub 2} was modified with epoxy resin by microwave-assisted ball milling. • The epoxy ring was opened under the coupling effect of microwave and ball milling. • Microwave-assisted ball milling improved the compatibility of TiH{sub 2} with epoxy. - Abstract: Surface modification of titanium hydride with epoxy resin was carried out via microwave-assisted ball milling and the products were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), thermo-gravimetry (TG) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR). A sedimentation test was performed to investigate the compatibility of the modified nano titanium hydride with the epoxy resin. The results show that the epoxy resin molecules were grafted on the surface of nano titanium hydride particles during the microwave-assisted ball milling process, which led to the improvement of compatibility between the nanoparticles and epoxy resin. According to the FT-IR, the grafting site was likely to be located around the epoxy group due to the fact that the epoxy ring was opened. However, compared with microwave-assisted ball milling, the conventional ball milling could not realize the surface modification, indicating that the coupling effect of mechanical force and microwave played a key role during the process.

  9. Screening occupational contact allergy to bisphenol F epoxy resin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aalto-Korte, Kristiina; Suuronen, Katri; Kuuliala, Outi; Henriks-Eckerman, Maj-Len; Jolanki, Riitta

    2014-09-01

    Epoxy resins based on diglycidyl ether of bisphenol F (DGEBF) are widely used as such in applications requiring chemical resistance, and also together with diglycidyl ether of bisphenol A resin (DGEBA-R). Concomitant patch test reactions to DGEBA-R and DGEBF resin (DGEBF-R) are common. Previous studies have yielded conflicting results on the frequency of independent DGEBF-R contact allergies. To report the results of over 11 years of screening with DGEBF-R. An in-house test substance of DGEBF-R (Epikote 862) was tested in the baseline patch test series, first at 1% and later at 0.25%. Test files were screened for allergic reactions to DGEBF-R and DGEBA-R, and the clinical records of positively reacting patients were analysed for occupation and exposure. Among 1972 patients, 66 (3.3%) reacted to DGEBF-R and 96 (4.9%) to DGEBA-R. Independent DGEBF-R allergies were seen in 5 patients only, and independent DGEBA-R allergies in 35. Specific exposure to DGEBF-R was found in 26 patients. The main occupational fields were the aircraft industry, the electrical and sports equipment industry, boat building, painting/floor coating, tile setting, and pipe relining. Independent contact allergies to DGEBF-R were rare, and screening with it was not found to be useful. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Catalytic Activity of Oxidized Carbon Black and Graphene Oxide for the Crosslinking of Epoxy Resins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Rosaria Acocella

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available This article compares the catalytic activities of oxidized carbon black (oCB and graphene oxide (eGO samples on the kinetics of a reaction of diglycidyl ether of bisphenol A (DGEBA with a diamine, leading to crosslinked insoluble networks. The study is mainly conducted by rheometry and Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC. Following the same oxidation procedure, CB samples are more efficiently oxidized than graphite samples. For instance, CB and graphite samples with high specific surface areas (151 and 308 m2/g, as oxidized by the Hummers’ method, exhibit O/C wt/wt ratios of 0.91 and 0.62, respectively. Due to the higher oxidation levels, these oCB samples exhibit a higher catalytic activity toward the curing of epoxy resins than fully exfoliated graphene oxide.

  11. Thermo-mechanical characterization of siliconized E-glass fiber/hematite particles reinforced epoxy resin hybrid composite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arun Prakash, V.R., E-mail: vinprakash101@gmail.com; Rajadurai, A., E-mail: rajadurai@annauniv.edu.in

    2016-10-30

    Highlights: • Particles dimension have reduced using Ball milling process. • Importance of surface modification was explored. • Surface modification has been done to improve adhesion of fiber/particles with epoxy. • Mechanical properties has been increased by adding modified fiber and particles. • Thermal properties have been increased. - Abstract: In this present work hybrid polymer (epoxy) matrix composite has been strengthened with surface modified E-glass fiber and iron(III) oxide particles with varying size. The particle sizes of 200 nm and <100 nm has been prepared by high energy ball milling and sol-gel methods respectively. To enhance better dispersion of particles and improve adhesion of fibers and fillers with epoxy matrix surface modification process has been done on both fiber and filler by an amino functional silane 3-Aminopropyltrimethoxysilane (APTMS). Crystalline and functional groups of siliconized iron(III) oxide particles were characterized by XRD and FTIR spectroscopy analysis. Fixed quantity of surface treated 15 vol% E-glass fiber was laid along with 0.5 and 1.0 vol% of iron(III) oxide particles into the matrix to fabricate hybrid composites. The composites were cured by an aliphatic hardener Triethylenetetramine (TETA). Effectiveness of surface modified particles and fibers addition into the resin matrix were revealed by mechanical testing like tensile testing, flexural testing, impact testing, inter laminar shear strength and hardness. Thermal behavior of composites was evaluated by TGA, DSC and thermal conductivity (Lee’s disc). The scanning electron microscopy was employed to found shape and size of iron(III) oxide particles adhesion quality of fiber with epoxy matrix. Good dispersion of fillers in matrix was achieved with surface modifier APTMS. Tensile, flexural, impact and inter laminar shear strength of composites was improved by reinforcing surface modified fiber and filler. Thermal stability of epoxy resin was improved

  12. Non-occupational contact sensitization to epoxy resin of bisphenol A among general dermatology patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majasuo, Susanna; Liippo, Jussi; Lammintausta, Kaija

    2012-03-01

    Sensitization to epoxy resins often results from occupational exposure in various fields of construction and industry. Non-occupational sensitization sources and environments have remained overlooked. To analyse non-occupational and occupational contact sensitization to epoxy resin of bisphenol A among general dermatology patients. Special attention was paid to patients sensitized from non-occupational sources. During a 10-year period, 6042 general dermatology patients were patch tested with epoxy resin (bisphenol A) in the Dermatology Clinic of Turku University Hospital. The clinical data and the sources of occupational and non-occupational exposure to epoxy resin were analysed in sensitized patients. Epoxy resin sensitization was found in 59 patients. Non-occupational sensitization was found in 21 (35%) patients, whereas the number of occupational cases was 38 (65%). The most common sources of non-occupational epoxy resin sensitization were materials used in domestic renovation and construction projects and in boat repair. Non-occupational sensitization sources account for approximately one-third of epoxy resin sensitization cases, and therefore represent an important risk among hobbies and leisure activities. © 2011 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  13. Novel high glass temperature sugar-based epoxy resins: Characterization and comparison to mineral oil-based aliphatic and aromatic resins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Niedermann

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Curing and rheological behaviour, glass transition temperature, mechanical and thermal properties of two newly synthesized glucopyranoside- (GPTE and glucofuranoside- (GFTE based renewable epoxy resin (EP components were investigated and compared to aromatic and aliphatic EPs. The glucose-based EPs can be successfully cured with amine and anhydride type curing agents, their gel times are suitable for processing and can be well-adopted to the needs of the common composite preparation methods. GPTE showed the highest glass transition temperature (Tg among all investigated resins, followed by GFTE and DGEBA. Below the Tg there was no significant difference between the storage modulus values of the EP systems. The glucose-based EPs had lower tensile and bending strength, but their tensile modulus values are not significantly different from the mineral oil based EPs. The thermal stability of the synthesized GPTE and GFTE is between DGEBA and the aliphatic resins. In applications where bending stresses are dominant over the tensile ones, and outstanding Tg is required, these glucose-based resins offer a feasible renewable option.

  14. Morphology and contact angle studies of poly(styrene-co-acrylonitrile modified epoxy resin blends and their glass fibre reinforced composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available In this study, the surface characteristics of blends and composites of epoxy resin were investigated. Poly(styrene-co-acylonitrile (SAN was used to modify diglycedyl ether of bisphenol-A (DGEBA type epoxy resin cured with diamino diphenyl sulfone (DDS and the modified epoxy resin was used as the matrix for fibre reinforced composites (FRP’s. E-glass fibre was used as the fibre reinforcement. The scanning electron micrographs of the fractured surfaces of the blends and composites were analyzed. Morphological analysis revealed different morphologies such as dispersed, cocontinuous and phase-inverted structures for the blends. Contact angle studies were carried out using water and methylene iodide at room temperature. The solid surface energy was calculated using harmonic mean equations. Blending of epoxy resin increases its contact angle. The surface free energy, work of adhesion, interfacial free energy, spreading coefficient and Girifalco-Good’s interaction parameter were changed significantly in the case of blends and composites. The incorporation of thermoplastic and glass fibre reduces the wetting and hydrophilicity of epoxy resin.

  15. Evidence for kinetic inhomogeneity in the curing of epoxy using the near-infrared multispectral imaging technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, M; Tran, C D

    1999-03-01

    The kinetics of curing of an epoxy resin by amine was studied using a near-infrared (NIR) multispectral imaging spectrometer. This imaging spectrometer is capable of sensitively and rapidly recording NIR spectral images of a sample because it was constructed with an acousto-optic tunable filter and an InGaAs focal plane array NIR camera. The high sensitivity and fast scanning ability of the spectrometer make it suitable for kinetic determination of fast reactions. Additionally, it has features that conventional NIR spectrometers cannot offer, namely, its ability to provide kinetic information at different positions within a sample. Furthermore, the high spatial resolution and sensitivity of the InGaAs camera make it possible to determine the kinetics from data collected by a single pixel in the camera. The kinetics of curing of epoxy by amine, determined by this multispectral imaging instrument, show that the reaction rates within the sample are very inhomogeneous. Because of this kinetic inhomogeneity, differences in the degrees of cure at different positions within the sample can be as high as 37% when data from only a single pixel were used for calculation. The inhomogeneity was not be observed if an average of a large number of pixels were used.

  16. Preparation and Property Study of Graphene Oxide Reinforced Epoxy Resin Insulation Nanocomposites with High Heat Conductivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shan, Xinran; Liu, Yongchang; Wu, Zhixiong; Liu, Huiming; Zhang, Zhong; Huang, Rongjin; Huang, Chuanjun; Liu, Zheng; Li, Laifeng

    2017-02-01

    In this paper, graphene oxide reinforced epoxy resin nanocomposites were successfully prepared. Compared with unmodified epoxy resin, the heat conductivity of the graphene oxide reinforced epoxy resin nanocomposites had been improved while keeping the insulation performance. The tensile strength was investigated at both room temperature (300 K) and liquid nitrogen temperature (77 K). And the fracture surfaces were examined by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Results showed that the materials had excellent mechanical properties, which could be advantages for the applications as insulating layer in low temperature superconducting magnets.

  17. The Electrical Properties for Phenolic Isocyanate-Modified Bisphenol-Based Epoxy Resins Comprising Benzoate Group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Eun Yong; Chae, Il Seok; Park, Dongkyung; Suh, Hongsuk; Kang, Sang Wook

    2016-03-01

    Epoxy resin has been required to have a low dielectric constant (D(k)), low dissipation factor (Df), low coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE), low water absorption, high mechanical, and high adhesion properties for various applications. A series of novel phenolic isocyanate-modified bisphenol-based epoxy resins comprising benzoate group were prepared for practical electronic packaging applications. The developed epoxy resins showed highly reduced dielectric constants (D(k)-3.00 at 1 GHz) and low dissipation values (Df-0.014 at 1 GHz) as well as enhanced thermal properties.

  18. Epoxy Resin Composite Based on Functional Hybrid Fillers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariusz Oleksy

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available A study was carried out involving the filling of epoxy resin (EP with bentonites and silica modified with polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxane (POSS. The method of homogenization and the type of filler affect the functional and canceling properties of the composites was determined. The filler content ranged from 1.5% to 4.5% by mass. The basic mechanical properties of the hybrid composites were found to improve, and, in particular, there was an increase in tensile strength by 44%, and in Charpy impact strength by 93%. The developed hybrid composites had characteristics typical of polymer nanocomposites modified by clays, with a fine plate morphology of brittle fractures observed by SEM, absence of a plate separation peak in Wide Angles X-ray Scattering (WAXS curves, and an exfoliated structure observed by TEM.

  19. High contrast ultrasonic imaging of resin-rich regions in graphite/epoxy composites using entropy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Michael S.; McCarthy, John E.; Bruillard, Paul. J.; Marsh, Jon N.; Wickline, Samuel A.

    2016-02-01

    This study compares different approaches for imaging a near-surface resin-rich defect in a thin graphite/epoxy plate using backscattered ultrasound. The specimen was created by cutting a circular hole in the second ply; this region filled with excess resin from the graphite/epoxy sheets during the curing process. Backscat-tered waveforms were acquired using a 4 in. focal length, 5MHz center frequency broadband transducer, scanned on a 100 × 100 grid of points that were 0.03 × 0.03 in. apart. The specimen was scanned with the defect side closest to the transducer. Consequently, the reflection from the resin-rich region cannot be gated from the large front-wall echo. At each point in the grid 256 waveforms were averaged together and subsequently used to produce peak-to-peak, Signal Energy (sum of squared digitized waveform values), as well as entropy images of two different types (a Renyi entropy, and a joint entropy). As the figure shows, all of the entropy images exhibit better border delineation and defect contrast than the either the peak-to-peak or Signal Energy. The best results are obtained using the joint entropy of the backscattered waveforms with a reference function. Two different references are examined. The first is a reflection of the insonifying pulse from a stainless steel reflector. The second is an approximate optimum obtained from an iterative parametric search. The joint entropy images produced using this reference exhibit three times the contrast obtained in previous studies.

  20. Synthesis of polyoxometalate-loaded epoxy composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Benjamin J

    2014-10-07

    The synthesis of a polyoxometalate-loaded epoxy uses a one-step cure by applying an external stimulus to release the acid from the polyoxometalate and thereby catalyze the cure reaction of the epoxy resin. Such polyoxometalate-loaded epoxy composites afford the cured epoxy unique properties imparted by the intrinsic properties of the polyoxometalate. For example, polyoxometalate-loaded epoxy composites can be used as corrosion resistant epoxy coatings, for encapsulation of electronics with improved dielectric properties, and for structural applications with improved mechanical properties.

  1. Hardness Evaluation of Composite Resins Cured with QTH and LED

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Behnaz Esmaeili

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Background and aims. Today light cured composites are widely used. Physical and mechanical properties of composites are related to the degree of conversion. Light curing unit (LCU is an important factor for composite polymerization. Aim of this study is evaluation of composite resins hardness using halogen and LED light curing units. Materials and methods. In this study, 30 samples of Filtek Z250 and C-Fill composite resins were provided. Samples were light cured with Ultralume2, Valo and Astralis7. Vickers hardness number (VHN was measured in 0, 1, 2 mm depth. Statistical analysis used: Data were analysed by SPSS software and compared with each other by T-test, one-way and twoway ANOVA and Post-hoc Tukey test. Results. In Filtek Z250, at top surface, VHN of Ultralume2 was higher than VHN of Valo (P = 0.02 and Astralis7 (P = 0.04, but in depth of 1, 2 mm, VHN of Ultralume2 and Astralis7 were almost the same and both LCUs were more than Valo which the difference between Ultralume2 and Valo was significant in depth of 1mm (0.05 and 2mm (0.02. In C-Fill composite, at top surface, Astralis7 showed higher VHN, but in depth of 2 mm, performance of all devices were rather similar. Conclusion. In Z250, which contains camphorquinone initiator, light cure LED Ultra-lume2 with narrow wavelength showed higher hardness number than Valo. In C-fill, in top surface, Astralis7 with more exposure time, resulted higher VHN. But In depth of 2 mm, various light curing devices had rather similar hardness number.

  2. Synthesis and Characterization of Hybrid CF/MWCNTS/Epoxy Resin Composite System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fouda, Hany; Guo, Lin; Yue, Yonghai; Chen, Ke; Elsharkawy, Karim

    2017-07-01

    In the present investigation, two methods were used for addition multiwall carbon nanotubes (MWCNTS) into carbon fiber (CF)/epoxy resin composite system. The mechanical properties of the prepared samples were compared to show the best method for addition of MWCNTS from point of view of mechanical properties. The introduction of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) into fiber reinforced polymer composites has been achieved mainly via two routes: mixing CNTs entirely throughout the matrix (matrix modification) or attaching CNTs onto reinforcing fibers (interface modification). In all previous references the addition of CNTs occur through one route from the two routes but in this research, we introduced MWCNTS into CF/epoxy resin composite through the two routes at the same time. Three CF composite samples were prepared CF/epoxy resin composite (C1), CF/1wt% MWCNTS /epoxy resin composite (C2) in which MWCNTS added via one route (epoxy resin system) and the third sample was CF/1wt% MWCNTS / epoxy resin composite (C3) in which MWCNTS added via two routes (epoxy resin and CF fabric). The result shows that the mechanical properties of C3>C2>C1, for example, the flexural strength of C3 higher than C2 by 19% and C2 higher than C1 by 51% respectively. This is because addition MWCNTS via two routes increase the ability of good mixing of CNTS with epoxy resin and good dispersion of CNTs into the CF fabric surface and this leads to improve the interface bonding between the CF and epoxy so improve the mechanical properties.

  3. Literature Review: An Overview of Epoxy Resin Syntactic Foams with Glass Microballoons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keller, Jennie [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2014-03-12

    Syntactic foams are an important category of composite materials that have abundant applications in a wide variety of fields. The bulk phase of syntactic foams is a three-part epoxy resin formulation that consists of a base resin, a curative (curing agent) and a modifier (diluent and/or accelerator) [12]. These thermoset materials [12] are used frequently for their thermal stability [9], low moisture absorption and high compressive strength [10]. The characteristic feature of a syntactic foam is a network of beads that forms pores within the epoxy matrix [3]. In this review, hollow glass beads (known as glass microballoons) are considered, however, solid beads or microballoons made from materials such as ceramic, polymer or metal can also be used [3M, Peter]. The network of hollow beads forms a closed-cell foam; the term closed-cell comes from the fact that the microspheres used in the resin matrix are completely closed and filled with gas (termed hollow). In contrast, the microspheres used in open-cell foams are either not completely closed or broken so that matrix material can fill the spheres [11]. Although closed foams have been found to possess higher densities than open cell foams, their rigid structures give them superior mechanical properties [12]. Past research has extensively studied the effects that changing the volume fraction of microballoons to epoxy will have on the resulting syntactic foam [3,4,9]. In addition, published literature also explores how the microballoon wall thickness affects the final product [4,9,10]. Findings detail that indeed both the mechanical and some thermal properties of syntactic foams can be tailored to a specific application by varying either the volume fraction or the wall thickness of the microballoons used [10]. The major trends in syntactic foam research show that microballoon volume fraction has an inversely proportionate relationship to dynamic properties, while microballoon wall thickness is proportional to those

  4. Curing-light attenuation in filled-resin restorative materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musanje, L; Darvell, B W

    2006-09-01

    To characterize the attenuation of the curing light in filled resin restorative materials (FRRMs) to aid understanding of curing depth. One hundred and eighty materials of various shades from several manufacturers were tested in various ways. One set (66 materials) was used to determine the applicability of Lambert's Law using a quartz-tungsten-halogen curing light (Optilux 400, Demetron Research) by measuring the transmitted light with a dental radiometer (Cure Rite, EFOS) for successive thicknesses of ground 10mm diameter specimens from 3 to 0.5 mm in 0.5 mm steps. A second set (17 materials) were similarly tested with separate specimens from 1 to 5mm in thickness using a transmission densitometer (DT1405, RY Parry) fitted with a curing-light dichroic filter. For a third (overlapping) set (165 materials), the 1 mm pure (reflectance-free) optical density (D1 value) was determined from two specimens, approximately 1 and approximately 2 mm thick using the densitometer as above. From D1 the critical thickness (x(CRIT)), identified as depth of cure (DoC) for an excess surface exposure factor of 2, was calculated. Lambert's Law was found to hold with no evidence of appreciable differential absorption effects. Attenuation coefficient and D1 were significantly correlated (P 0.09), and no systematic effect due to shade letter, but a highly significant (P < 7.5 x 10(-8)), but weak (-0.066 mm/unit), correlation between shade number and D1. Depth of cure can be calculated directly from the D1 value determined via simple optical density measurements on two specimens providing that (a) an irradiation time can be determined for the surface of a specimen to be "sufficiently" cured (i.e. for DoC = 0 precisely), and (b) an excess internal surface exposure ratio can be chosen such that the corresponding DoC is attained in a practicable irradiation time.

  5. Comparative evaluation of surface porosities in conventional heat polymerized acrylic resin cured by water bath and microwave energy with microwavable acrylic resin cured by microwave energy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sunint Singh

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Conventional heat cure poly methyl methacrylate (PMMA is the most commonly used denture base resin despite having some short comings. Lengthy polymerization time being one of them and in order to overcome this fact microwave curing method was recommended. Unavailability of specially designed microwavable acrylic resin made it unpopular. Therefore, in this study, conventional heat cure PMMA was polymerized by microwave energy. Aim and Objectives: This study was designed to evaluate the surface porosities in PMMA cured by conventional water bath and microwave energy and compare it with microwavable acrylic resin cured by microwave energy. Materials and Methods: Wax samples were obtained by pouring molten wax into a metal mold of 25 mm × 12 mm × 3 mm dimensions. These samples were divided into three groups namely C, CM, and M. Group C denotes conventional heat cure PMMA cured by water bath method, CM denotes conventional heat cure PMMA cured by microwave energy, M denotes specially designed microwavable acrylic denture base resin cured by microwave energy. After polymerization, each sample was scanned in three pre-marked areas for surface porosities using the optical microscope. As per the literature available, this instrument is being used for the first time to measure the porosity in acrylic resin. It is a reliable method of measuring area of surface pores. Portion of the sample being scanned is displayed on the computer and with the help of software area of each pore was measured and data were analyzed. Results: Conventional heat cure PMMA samples cured by microwave energy showed maximum porosities than the samples cured by conventional water bath method and microwavable acrylic resin cured by microwave energy. Higher percentage of porosities was statistically significant, but well within the range to be clinically acceptable. Conclusion: Within the limitations of this in-vitro study, conventional heat cure PMMA can be cured by

  6. New curing system for urea-formaldehyde resins with polyhydrazides. I. Curing with poly(methycrylol hydrazide)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katsumasa Miyake; Bunichiro Tomita; Chung-Yun Hse; George E. Myers

    1989-01-01

    A new curing system for urea-formaldehyde (UF) resins was investigated using poly(methacryloyl hydrazide) as the curing reagent. Results were as follows: 1) Gel time and the water-soluble part of cured resins were determined as function of pH and molar ratio [hydrazide group/(free formaldehyde+methylol group)]. It was found that the reaction in this system proceeds for...

  7. Epoxy/carbon composite resins in dentistry: mechanical properties related to fiber reinforcements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viguie, G; Malquarti, G; Vincent, B; Bourgeois, D

    1994-09-01

    Composite carbon/epoxy resin techniques for restorative dentistry have improved with the development of various composite resins classified according to fiber reinforcement, such as short fibers, woven materials, or long unidirectional fibers. This study of the mechanical properties with three-point flexion enabled comparison of the flexural strengths. The modulus of elasticity of different composite resin materials was determined so that the appropriate reinforced composite resin could be selected for specific clinical conditions.

  8. R&D on glass fiber reinforced epoxy resin composites for superconducting Tokamak.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Nannan; Wang, Ke; Ma, Hongming; Pan, Wanjiang; Chen, Qingqing

    2016-01-01

    The glass fiber reinforced epoxy resin composites play an important role in superconducting Tokamak, which are used to insulate the metal components, such as superconducting winding, cooling pipes, metal electrodes and so on. For the components made of metal and glass fiber reinforced epoxy resin composites, thermal shrinkage leads to non-ignorable thermal stress, therefore, much attention should be paid on the thermal shrinkage rate of glass fiber reinforced epoxy resin composites. The structural design of glass fiber reinforced epoxy resin composites should aim at reducing thermal stress. In this paper, the density, glass fiber content and thermal shrinkage rate of five insulation tubes were tested. The testing results will be applied in structural design and mechanical analysis of isolators for superconducting Tokamak.

  9. Enhanced safety in the storage of fissile materials. [Boron-loaded epoxy resin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Williams, G.E.; Alvares, N.J.

    1978-12-15

    An inexpensive boron-loaded liner of epoxy resin for fissile-material storage containers was developed that can be easily fabricated of readily available, low-cost materials. Computer calculations indicate reactivity will be reduced substantially if this neutron-absorbing liner is added to containers in a typical storage array. These calculations compare favorably with neutron-attenuation experiments with thermal and fission neutron spectra, and tests at the Fire Test Facility indicate the epoxy resin will survive extreme environmental and accident conditions. The fire-resistant and insulating properties of the epoxy-resin liner further augment its ability to protect fissile materials. Boron-loaded epoxy resin is adaptable to many tasks but is particularly useful for providing enhanced criticality safety in the packaging and storage of fissile materials.

  10. The thermal properties of a carbon nanotube-enriched epoxy: Thermal conductivity, curing, and degradation kinetics

    KAUST Repository

    Ventura, Isaac Aguilar

    2013-05-31

    Multiwalled carbon nanotube-enriched epoxy polymers were prepared by solvent evaporation based on a commercially available epoxy system and functionalized multiwalled carbon nanotubes (COOH-MWCNTs). Three weight ratio configurations (0.05, 0.5, and 1.0 wt %) of COOH-MWCNTs were considered and compared with neat epoxy and ethanol-treated epoxy to investigate the effects of nano enrichment and processing. Here, the thermal properties of the epoxy polymers, including curing kinetics, thermal conductivity, and degradation kinetics were studied. Introducing the MWCNTs increased the curing activation energy as revealed by differential scanning calorimetry. The final thermal conductivity of the 0.5 and 1.0 wt % MWCNT-enriched epoxy samples measured by laser flash technique increased by up to 15% compared with the neat material. The activation energy of the degradation process, investigated by thermogravimetric analysis, was found to increase with increasing CNT content, suggesting that the addition of MWCNTs improved the thermal stability of the epoxy polymers. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Dissolution behaviour of polyethersulfone in diglycidyl ether of bisphenol-A epoxy resins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, J. L.; Cheng, C.; Zhang, H.; Sun, Z. Y.; Zhu, S.; Yu, M. H.

    2017-06-01

    Polyethersulfone (PES) is considered as an important and useful toughener for epoxy resins (EPs). Generally, PES was first dissolved in EP oligomer to form a homogeneous solution, which considerably affected the properties of cured EPs. Turbidity measurement was carried out to characterize the dissolution behaviour. Different PES/EP systems exhibited the same dissolution behaviour, albeit different swelling rate (R S) and dissolution rate (R D). Compared to molecular weight, the particle size and hydroxyl content of PES exerted considerable effects on dissolution. The smaller epoxy equivalent these diglycidyl ether of bisphenol-A (DGEBA) oligomers possessed, the better dissolubility they had; the more small molecules they contained, the more apparent the swelling observed. Moisture prevented the diffusion of the DGEBA oligomer molecules into PES. With increasing temperature, R S and R D first rapidly increased and then slowly increased, and the optimal dissolution temperature was 120°C. At the final steady, the turbidity increased linearly with increasing PES concentration; in addition, these values can be used as reference for homogeneous solution. Only one glass transition temperature (T g) was observed for PES/EP systems, indicative of the good compatibility between PES and EP.

  12. The influence of montmorillonite content on the kinetics of curing of epoxy nanocomposites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jovičić Mirjana C.

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In this work, the attention was paid at the investigation of montmorillonite dispersion in epoxy/amine systems due to improved final properties of the nanocomposites. The influence of different montmorillonite content on the kinetics of curing of epoxy/Jeffamine D-230 systems was followed by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC. The curing of epoxy nanocomposites was performed using dynamic regime at three different heating rates: 5, 10 and 20°C/min. Three isoconversional methods were applied: two integral (Ozawa-Flynn-Wall and Kissinger-Akahira-Sunose methods and one differential (Friedman method. The presence of montmorillonite (MMT causes the beginning of curing at lower temperatures. The shape of the DSC curves has been changed by the addition of MMT, supporting the hypothesis of a change in the reaction mechanism. For hybrids with 3 and 5 wt.% of MMT, the Eα dependence is very similar to those found for the reference system (epoxy/Jeffamine D-230 for the curing degree less than 60%. The hybrid with 10 wt.% of MMT has lower energy activation in regard to the referent system without montmorillonite. Greater differences are observed in the second part of the reaction, where it is known that the curing process is more controlled by diffusion (α>0.60. The Ea value increases at the end of the reaction (α→1, which was observed for all systems, and is more pronounced in the presence of montmorillonite. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. III45022

  13. Electromagnetic and microwave absorbing properties of iron fibre-epoxy resin composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Mingzhong; He, Huahui; Zhao, Zhensheng; Yao, Xi

    2000-10-01

    In this paper, magnetic iron fibres of diameter down to 2 µm were produced by using the bundle-drawing method, and iron fibre-epoxy resin composites were prepared by mixing epoxy resin with the iron fibres. The electromagnetic parameters of the iron fibre-epoxy resin composites were measured using the transmission/reflection coaxial line method at microwave frequencies. The measured results show that the iron fibre-epoxy resin composites exhibit larger values of µ' and µ'' in the frequency range of 2-18 GHz, and the values of both ɛ' and ɛ'' steeply increase with increase in the fibre concentration. Based on a theoretical calculation of the reflection coefficient, the microwave absorbing properties of the iron fibre-epoxy resin composites were examined. The calculated results indicate that the iron fibre-epoxy resin composites exhibit good absorption performance in the radar band. The optimum absorption can be achieved by optimizing the fibre concentration. The absorption peak frequency can be manipulated easily by changing the thickness of the material layer. The calculated results also indicate that magnetic iron fibres may be useful in producing thin and lightweight radar absorbing materials.

  14. Occupational contact dermatitis caused by aniline epoxy resins in the aircraft industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pesonen, Maria; Suuronen, Katri; Jolanki, Riitta; Aalto-Korte, Kristiina; Kuuliala, Outi; Henriks-Eckerman, Maj-Len; Valtanen, Ilona; Alanko, Kristiina

    2015-08-01

    Tetraglycidyl-4,4'-methylenedianiline (TGMDA) is an aniline epoxy resin used in, for example, resin systems of pre-impregnated composite materials (prepregs) of the aircraft industry. Allergic contact dermatitis caused by TGMDA in prepregs has been described previously. To report on 9 patients with occupational allergic contact dermatitis caused by TGMDA in epoxy glues used in helicopter assembly. The patients were examined with patch testing at the Finnish Institute of Occupational Health in 2004-2009. The first patient was diagnosed by testing both components of two epoxy glues from the workplace, and was also tested with glue ingredients, including TGMDA. The following patients were tested with the glues and TGMDA. The resin parts of the glues were analysed for their epoxy compounds, including TGMDA. All of the patients had a patch test reaction to one or both of the resin parts of the TGMDA-containing glues. Eight of them had a strong allergic reaction to TGMDA, and one had a doubtful reaction to TGMDA. Two of the patients also had an allergic reaction to triglycidyl-p-aminophenol (TGPAP), another aniline epoxy resin, which was not present in the TGMDA-containing glues. In aircraft industry workers with suspected occupational dermatitis, aniline epoxy resins should be considered and patch tested as possible contact allergens. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Influence of curing rate of resin composite on the bond strength to dentin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Benetti, Ana Raquel; Asmussen, E; Peutzfeldt, A

    2007-01-01

    This study determined whether the strength with which resin composite bonds to dentin is influenced by variations in the curing rate of resin composites. Resin composites were bonded to the dentin of extracted human molars. Adhesive (AdheSE, Ivoclar Vivadent) was applied and cured (10 seconds...... @ 1000 mW/cm2) for all groups. A split Teflon mold was clamped to the treated dentin surface and filled with resin composite. The rate of cure was varied, using one of four LED-curing units of different power densities. The rate of cure was also varied using the continuous or pulse-delay mode...... of the four power densities was followed by a one-minute interval, after which light cure was completed (14, 29, 27 or 78 seconds), likewise, giving a total energy density of 16 J/cm2. The specimens produced for each of the eight curing protocols and two resin composites (Tetric EvoCeram, Ivoclar Vivadent...

  16. Testing Penetration of Epoxy Resin and Diamine Hardeners through Protective Glove and Clothing Materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henriks-Eckerman, Maj-Len; Mäkelä, Erja A; Suuronen, Katri

    2015-10-01

    Efficient, comfortable, yet affordable personal protective equipment (PPE) is needed to decrease the high incidence of allergic contact dermatitis arising from epoxy resin systems (ERSs) in industrial countries. The aim of this study was to find affordable, user-friendly glove and clothing materials that provide adequate skin protection against splashes and during the short contact with ERS that often occurs before full cure. We studied the penetration of epoxy resin and diamine hardeners through 12 glove or clothing materials using a newly developed test method. The tests were carried out with two ERS test mixtures that had a high content of epoxy resin and frequently used diamine hardeners of different molar masses. A drop (50 µl) of test mixture was placed on the outer surface of the glove/clothing material, which had a piece of Fixomull tape or Harmony protection sheet attached to the inner surface as the collection medium. The test times were 10 and 30 min. The collecting material was removed after the test was finished and immersed into acetone. The amounts of diglycidyl ether of bisphenol A (DGEBA), isophorone diamine (IPDA), and m-xylylenediamine (XDA) in the acetone solution were determined by gas chromatography with mass spectrometric detection. The limit for acceptable penetration of XDA, IPDA, and DGEBA through glove materials was set at 2 µg cm(-2). Penetration through the glove materials was 1.4 µg cm(-2) or less. The three tested chemical protective gloves showed no detectable penetration (<0.5 µg cm(-2)). Several affordable glove and clothing materials were found to provide adequate protection during short contact with ERS, in the form of, for example, disposable gloves or clothing materials suitable for aprons and as additional protective layers on the most exposed parts of clothing, such as the front of the legs and thighs and under the forearms. Every ERS combination in use should be tested separately to find the best skin protection material

  17. Thermal and Mechanical Characteristics of Polymer Composites Based on Epoxy Resin, Aluminium Nanopowders and Boric Acid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nazarenko, O. B.; Melnikova, T. V.; Visakh, P. M.

    2016-01-01

    The epoxy polymers are characterized by low thermal stability and high flammability. Nanoparticles are considered to be effective fillers of polymer composites for improving their thermal and functional properties. In this work, the epoxy composites were prepared using epoxy resin ED-20, polyethylene polyamine as a hardener, aluminum nanopowder and boric acid fine powder as flame-retardant filler. The thermal characteristics of the obtained samples were studied using thermogravimetric analysis and differential scanning calorimetry. The mechanical characteristics of epoxy composites were also studied. It was found that an addition of all fillers enhances the thermal stability and mechanical characteristics of the epoxy composites. The best thermal stability showed the epoxy composite filled with boric acid. The highest flexural properties showed the epoxy composite based on the combination of boric acid and aluminum nanopowder.

  18. Testing temperature on interfacial shear strength measurements of epoxy resins at different mixing ratios

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Helga Nørgaard; Thomason, James L.; Minty, Ross

    2015-01-01

    The interfacial properties as Interfacial Shear Stress (IFSS) in fibre reinforced polymers are essential for further understanding of the mechanical properties of the composite. In this work a single fibre testing method is used in combination with an epoxy matrix made from Araldite 506 epoxy resin...... and triethylenetetramine (TETA) hardener. The IFSS was measured by a microbond test developed for a Thermal Mechanical Analyzer. The preliminary results indicate that IFSS has an inverse dependency of both testing temperature and the mixing ratio of hardener and epoxy resin. Especially interesting was the decreasing...

  19. Chemical analysis of monomers in epoxy resins based on bisphenols F and A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pontén, A; Zimerson, E; Sörensen, O; Bruze, M

    2004-05-01

    Diglycidyl ether of bisphenol A (DGEBA) is the monomer and most important contact allergen in epoxy resin(s) based on bisphenol A (DGEBA-R). Both thin-layer chromatography (TLC) and high-pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC) methods are available for the analysis of products containing DGEBA-R. With respect to detection and quantification, epoxy resins of the bisphenol F-type, i.e. epoxy resins containing the isomers of diglycidyl ethers of bisphenol F (DGEBF), are not as well investigated as DGEBA-R. The isomers of DGEBF are p,p'-DGEBF, o,p'-DGEBF and o,o'-DGEBF. Both p,p'-DGEBF and o,p'-DGEBF have been shown to be contact allergens in humans, and all 3 isomers are sensitizers in the guinea pig maximization test. We aimed (i). to develop HPLC methods for separation and purification of the individual DGEBF isomers, (ii). to detect and quantify the DGEBF isomers in epoxy resins of the bisphenol F-type and (iii). to evaluate and develop the TLC as a method for the detection of the DGEBF monomers. We found the total content of the DGEBF isomers in the investigated epoxy resins of the bisphenol F-type to vary from 17.0 to 81.7% w/w. Some of them also contained 0.1-2.4% w/w DGEBA. The HPLC method showed a sensitivity that was 2000-20 000x higher than that obtained with the TLC method for the DGEBF monomers. We concluded that the range of the DGEBF isomer content in epoxy resins of the bisphenol F-type is approximately the same as the monomer content in liquid compared to solid DGEBA-R. The relevance of contact allergy to DGEBA-R can remain unrecognized if the suspected product is an epoxy resin of the bisphenol F-type, which is analysed with the TLC method.

  20. Cure Kinetics of Epoxy Nanocomposites Affected by MWCNTs Functionalization: A Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saeb, Mohammad Reza; Bakhshandeh, Ehsan; Khonakdar, Hossein Ali; Mäder, Edith; Scheffler, Christina; Heinrich, Gert

    2013-01-01

    The current paper provides an overview to emphasize the role of functionalization of multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) in manipulating cure kinetics of epoxy nanocomposites, which itself determines ultimate properties of the resulting compound. In this regard, the most commonly used functionalization schemes, that is, carboxylation and amidation, are thoroughly surveyed to highlight the role of functionalized nanotubes in controlling the rate of autocatalytic and vitrification kinetics. The current literature elucidates that the mechanism of curing in epoxy/MWCNTs nanocomposites remains almost unaffected by the functionalization of carbon nanotubes. On the other hand, early stage facilitation of autocatalytic reactions in the presence of MWCNTs bearing amine groups has been addressed by several researchers. When carboxylated nanotubes were used to modify MWCNTs, the rate of such reactions diminished as a consequence of heterogeneous dispersion within the epoxy matrix. At later stages of curing, however, the prolonged vitrification was seen to be dominant. Thus, the type of functional groups covalently located on the surface of MWCNTs directly affects the degree of polymer-nanotube interaction followed by enhancement of curing reaction. Our survey demonstrated that most widespread efforts ever made to represent multifarious surface-treated MWCNTs have not been directed towards preparation of epoxy nanocomposites, but they could result in property synergism. PMID:24348181

  1. Cure Kinetics of Epoxy Nanocomposites Affected by MWCNTs Functionalization: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Reza Saeb

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The current paper provides an overview to emphasize the role of functionalization of multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs in manipulating cure kinetics of epoxy nanocomposites, which itself determines ultimate properties of the resulting compound. In this regard, the most commonly used functionalization schemes, that is, carboxylation and amidation, are thoroughly surveyed to highlight the role of functionalized nanotubes in controlling the rate of autocatalytic and vitrification kinetics. The current literature elucidates that the mechanism of curing in epoxy/MWCNTs nanocomposites remains almost unaffected by the functionalization of carbon nanotubes. On the other hand, early stage facilitation of autocatalytic reactions in the presence of MWCNTs bearing amine groups has been addressed by several researchers. When carboxylated nanotubes were used to modify MWCNTs, the rate of such reactions diminished as a consequence of heterogeneous dispersion within the epoxy matrix. At later stages of curing, however, the prolonged vitrification was seen to be dominant. Thus, the type of functional groups covalently located on the surface of MWCNTs directly affects the degree of polymer-nanotube interaction followed by enhancement of curing reaction. Our survey demonstrated that most widespread efforts ever made to represent multifarious surface-treated MWCNTs have not been directed towards preparation of epoxy nanocomposites, but they could result in property synergism.

  2. Electrical Tracking Formation on Silane Epoxy Resin under Various Contaminants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    NFN Rochmadi

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Contamination at the surface of the insulator becomes a serious problem in power system operation, especially for the tropical area. Humidity and rainfall play an important role in wetness by the water at the surface of the insulator, which result in the presence of contaminant and leakage current flowing at the surface of the insulator. This leakage current will generate heat which occurs at the surface of an insulator, so that dry band area will be formed. This ultimately leads to flashover. This paper presents the influence of contaminants to leakage current and formation of electrical tracking at the surface of epoxy resin compound wit silicon rubber. The test was based on Inclined-Planed Tracking method with NH4Cl as contaminants. The industrial and coastal contaminants are used to explain the effect of contaminant at surface tracking process. The flow rate of contaminant was 0.3 ml/min. The 3.5 kV AC high voltage 50 Hz was applied to the top electrodes. It is found that industrial contamination resulting in the smallest surface leakage current is 327.6 mA. Also it is found that coastal contaminant (1420 mS/cm showed the severest damage at surface of test sample. Therefore, special treatment of the sample are needed under these conditions so that the material performance can be improved, especially against the electrical tracking.

  3. The curing behavior and properties of phthalonitrile resins using ionic liquids as a new class of curing agents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Cheng

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Binary blends composed of 1,3-bis (3,4-dicyanophenoxy benzene (3BOCN and ionic liquids (ILs with different molecular structures were prepared. The curing behavior of these 3BOCN/ILs blends were studied by thermogravimetric analysis (TGA, differential scanning calorimetry (DSC and rheological analysis. The study suggested that the blends possessed a wide processing window and the structures of ILs (anion, cation and alkyl chain length at cation had an effect on curing behavior. The 3BOCN/[EPy]BF4 resins were prepared at elevated temperature. IR spectra of the resins showed that there were triazine and isoindoline formed in curing process. The TGA and dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA revealed that the resins have excellent thermal stability together with high storage modulus and high glass transition temperature (Tg. Dielectric properties, long term oxidative aging and water uptake measurements of the resins suggested the IL brought some unique properties to the resins.

  4. Characterization and Curing Kinetics of Epoxy/Silica Nano-Hybrids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheng-Fu Yang

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The sol-gel technique was used to prepare epoxy/silica nano-hybrids. The thermal characteristics, curing kinetics and structure of epoxy/silica nano-hybrids were studied using differential scanning calorimetry (DSC, 29Si nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR and transmission electron microscopy (TEM. To improve the compatibility between the organic and inorganic phases, a coupling agent was used to modify the diglycidyl ether of bisphenol A (DGEBA epoxy. The sol-gel technique enables the silica to be successfully incorporated into the network of the hybrids, increasing the thermal stability and improving the mechanical properties of the prepared epoxy/silica nano-hybrids. An autocatalytic mechanism of the epoxy/SiO2 nanocomposites was observed. The low reaction rate of epoxy in the nanocomposites is caused by the steric hindrance in the network of hybrids that arises from the consuming of epoxide group in the network of hybrids by the silica. In the nanocomposites, the nano-scale silica particles had an average size of approximately 35 nm, and the particles were well dispersed in the epoxy matrix, according to the TEM images.

  5. Mechanical Properties of Epoxy Resin Mortar with Sand Washing Waste as Filler.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yemam, Dinberu Molla; Kim, Baek-Joong; Moon, Ji-Yeon; Yi, Chongku

    2017-02-28

    The objective of this study was to investigate the potential use of sand washing waste as filler for epoxy resin mortar. The mechanical properties of four series of mortars containing epoxy binder at 10, 15, 20, and 25 wt. % mixed with sand blended with sand washing waste filler in the range of 0-20 wt. % were examined. The compressive and flexural strength increased with the increase in epoxy and filler content; however, above epoxy 20 wt. %, slight change was seen in strength due to increase in epoxy and filler content. Modulus of elasticity also linearly increased with the increase in filler content, but the use of epoxy content beyond 20 wt. % decreased the modulus of elasticity of the mortar. For epoxy content at 10 wt. %, poor bond strength lower than 0.8 MPa was observed, and adding filler at 20 wt. % adversely affected the bond strength, in contrast to the mortars containing epoxy at 15, 20, 25 wt. %. The results indicate that the sand washing waste can be used as potential filler for epoxy resin mortar to obtain better mechanical properties by adding the optimum level of sand washing waste filler.

  6. The effect of curing time and curing method on microleakge of conservative adhesive resin restorations: an in vitro study

    OpenAIRE

    Alireza Heidari; Mehdi Shahrabi; Sara Ghadimi; Shahram Mosharafian; Zohreh Rafiee

    2012-01-01

    Background and Aims: Using the conservative adhesive resin restoration (CAR) in uncooperative children lead to numerous problems because of being time consuming. The purpose of this study was to compare the microleakage of conservative adhesive resin restoration under separate curing and co-curing.Materials and Methods: In this experimental study, 120 intact premolar teeth were collected and 120 vertical grooves were prepared on them. Then the teeth were divided into four groups: group 1, sep...

  7. Influence of curing rate on softening in ethanol, degree of conversion, and wear of resin composite

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Benetti, Ana Raquel; Peutzfeldt, Anne; Asmussen, Erik

    2011-01-01

    PURPOSE: To investigate the effect of curing rate on softening in ethanol, degree of conversion, and wear of resin composites. METHOD: With a given energy density and for each of two different light-curing units (QTH or LED), the curing rate was reduced by modulating the curing mode. Thus......, the irradiation of resin composite specimens (Filtek Z250, Tetric Ceram, Esthet-X) was performed in a continuous curing mode and in a pulse-delay curing mode. Wallace hardness was used to determine the softening of resin composite after storage in ethanol. Degree of conversion was determined by infrared...... spectroscopy (FTIR). Wear was assessed by a three-body test. Data were submitted to Levene's test, one and three-way ANOVA, and Tukey HSD test (alpha = 0.05). Results: Immersion in ethanol, curing mode, and material all had significant effects on Wallace hardness. After ethanol storage, resin composites...

  8. The effect of curing conditions on the dentin bond strength of two dual-cure resin cements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tagami, Atsuko; Takahashi, Rena; Nikaido, Toru; Tagami, Junji

    2017-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of the curing condition (i.e., the curing mode and restoration thickness) on the tensile bond strength of a dual-cure resin cement applied to dentin. Indirect composite resin disks (1, 2, and 3mm in thickness) were prepared. The irradiance of a halogen light curing unit through each disk was measured by a curing radiometer. A measurement was also taken for the condition with no disk. Following this, two dual-cure resin cements, Panavia F2.0 and Panavia V5, were polymerized in either dual-cure mode or self-cure mode to bond the composite resin disk to the flat dentin surface. The specimens were sectioned and subjected to a microtensile bond strength (μTBS) test after 24h of water storage. The data were statistically analyzed by two-way ANOVA followed with multiple comparisons by post-hoc Tukey's test (α=0.05). The irradiance values [mW/cm(2)] measured through indirect composite resin disks were 600 (0mm), 200 (1mm), 90 (2mm), and not detected (3mm). Two-way ANOVA indicated that both the curing condition and the type of resin cement affected the μTBS (pPanavia V5 bonded to dentin were significantly higher than those of Panavia F2.0 bonded to dentin (pPanavia V5, showed higher dentin bonding than Panavia F2.0 in both dual- and self-cure modes. Copyright © 2017 Japan Prosthodontic Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Analysis of wetting, flow and end-use properties of resin transfer molded nanoreinforced epoxy-glass fiber hybrid composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ertekin, Ayca

    In this research, the usage of single wall carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) and nanoclays in the resin transfer molding (RTM) of biaxially stitched micro-fiber reinforced epoxy matrix composites was investigated to evaluate the role of nanoscale reinforcements on the wetting, flow and end-properties of composites through multi-scale effects. The study primarily focused on characterization of the state of dispersion and curing of nanoscale reinforced epoxy polymers, assessment of the relative importance of viscous forces over interfacial forces and the wettability of glass fabrics by the nanoscale reinforced epoxy polymers, analysis of complex flow of nanoreinforced epoxy systems through glass fiber porous media by several flow properties and evaluation of the properties of hybrid epoxy-glass fiber composites enriched with nanoscale particles. The presence of nanoreinforcements retarded the cure kinetics to some degree such that the activation energies increased with the nanoreinforcement content. Both the unsteady-state and steady-state relative tow permeabilities were observed to decrease as the nanoclay amount was increased. The presence of nanoclay was observed to reduce the "tow wet-out" with almost 50 % reduction in the steady-state tow permeability with the addition of 4 wt % nanoclay to the reactive epoxy. Contact angle measurements indicated, approximately 21 % increase in the contact angle with the addition of 4 wt % nanoclay to epoxy. It was found that beyond 0.3 wt % SWNT, RTM of epoxy-60 % biaxially stitched-glass fiber systems was not feasible. It was also observed that an addition of SWNT at only 10 % the level of nanoclay caused almost a 25 % increase in steady-state pressure level along with almost an 18 % decrease in permeability. It is believed that nanoreinforcements affected flow rate somewhat differently along the various fabric capillary paths and thereby leading to preferential flow paths in the mold cavity. It is proposed that nanoparticles

  10. Intrinsic Flame-Retardant and Thermally Stable Epoxy Endowed by a Highly Efficient, Multifunctional Curing Agent

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chunlei Dong

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available It is difficult to realize flame retardancy of epoxy without suffering much detriment in thermal stability. To solve the problem, a super-efficient phosphorus-nitrogen-containing reactive-type flame retardant, 10-(hydroxy(4-hydroxyphenylmethyl-5,10-dihydrophenophosphazinine-10-oxide (HB-DPPA is synthesized and characterized. When it is used as a co-curing agent of 4,4′-methylenedianiline (DDM for curing diglycidyl ether of bisphenol A (DGEBA, the cured epoxy achieves UL-94 V-0 rating with the limiting oxygen index of 29.3%. In this case, the phosphorus content in the system is exceptionally low (0.18 wt %. To the best of our knowledge, it currently has the highest efficiency among similar epoxy systems. Such excellent flame retardancy originates from the exclusive chemical structure of the phenophosphazine moiety, in which the phosphorus element is stabilized by the two adjacent aromatic rings. The action in the condensed phase is enhanced and followed by pressurization of the pyrolytic gases that induces the blowing-out effect during combustion. The cone calorimeter result reveals the formation of a unique intumescent char structure with five discernible layers. Owing to the super-efficient flame retardancy and the rigid molecular structure of HB-DPPA, the flame-retardant epoxy acquires high thermal stability and its initial decomposition temperature only decreases by 4.6 °C as compared with the unmodified one.

  11. Differential scanning calorimetry investigation on vinyl ester resin curing process for polymer nanocomposite fabrication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Zhanhu; Ng, Ho Wai; Yee, Gary L; Hahn, H Thomas

    2009-05-01

    Two different ceramic (cerium oxide and titanium oxide) nanoparticles were introduced into vinyl ester resin for nanocomposite fabrication. The curing process of the vinyl ester resin was investigated by a differential scanning calorimetery (DSC). The incorporation of nanoparticles in the resin affects the curing process due to the physicochemical interaction between the nanoparticles and the polymer matrix. The particle loading has a significant effect on the initial and peak curing temperatures, reaction heat and curing extent. The fully cured vinyl ester resin nanocomposites reinforced with cerium oxide nanoparticles were fabricated after a 24-hour room temperature curing and a one-hour postcuring at 85 degrees C. Particle functionalization favors the composite fabrication with a higher curing extent after room-temperature curing as compared to the as-received nanoparticle filled vinyl ester resin nanocomposites. The nanofiller materials were observed to significantly affect the curing process. In comparison to cerium oxide nanoparticles, titanium oxide nanoparticles prohibit the curing process with a much higher initiating curing temperatures. The fully cured nanocomposites reinforced with titanium oxide nanoparticles were fabricated by one-hour postcuring at 85 degrees C.

  12. Heat stability of cured urea-formaldehyde resins by measuring formaldehyde emission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin-ichiro Tohmura; Chung-Yun Hse; Mitsuo Higuchi

    1999-01-01

    A test method for measuring formaldehyde from urea-formaldehyde (UF) resins at high tempera­tures was developed and used to assess the influence of the reaction pH at synthesis on the formaldehyde emission during cure and heat stability of the cured resins without water. Additionally, 13C-CP/MAS solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR)...

  13. In situ regulating of surface morphologies, anti-corrosion and tribological properties of epoxy resin coatings by heat treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Dan; Zhao, Wenjie; Liu, Shuan; Cen, Qihong; Xue, Qunji

    2017-06-01

    A simple and in situ formation method through controlling curing temperature was used to regulate the surface morphology of epoxy resin (EP) coating. Multi-functional tribology test equipment and an electrochemistry workstation were used to evaluate the tribological and anti-corrosion properties of the EP coating cured with diethylenetriamine at room temperature, 80 °C, 100 °C and 120 °C, respectively. The results indicated that the diameter and depth of pores or pits existing on the surface of EP coatings decreased significantly with the increase of curing temperature. The EP coating cured at 120 °C exhibited the best tribological performance, the friction coefficient and wear trace area were 0.56 and 0.003 02 mm2 under dry conditions, 0.18 and 1.873  ×  10-5 mm2 under seawater conditions, respectively. The excellent tribological performance could be attributed to the surface morphologies and high hardness of EP coatings. The EP coating cured at 80 °C exhibited the best anti-corrosion performance that the impedance modulus at 0.01 Hz was close to 5.0 KΩ cm2 even after being immersed in 3.5 wt% NaCl solution for 24 h, which was closely related to its hydrophobic behavior and surface morphology.

  14. An investigation on the effect of light cure and self cure composite resins on bonding strength of light cure glass ionomer to dentin (In-vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pahlavan A

    2004-02-01

    Full Text Available Composite reins have recently become popular for posterior teeth restorations. Gap"nformation and subsequent microleakage are of the complications resulting from such restorations. One of the"ntechniques to overcome polymerization shrinkage of composite resins is sandwich technique (application of"nglass ionomer as a base beneath the composite resin. Since polymerization patterns in two types of composite"nresins (light cure and self cure differ from each other, various effects on the bond strength between glass"nionomer and dentin are expected."nPurpose: The aim of this in vitro study was to evaluate the effects of self- cure and light- cure composite"nresins in sandwich technique on the bond strength of light cure glass ionomer and dentin."nMaterials and Methods: 40 extracted human premolars were selected and divided into four groups:"nGroup 1: Light cure glass ionomer of 1mm thickness was placed on dentin."nGroup 2: 1mm thickness of light cure glass ionomer plus a mass of self cure composite resin of 2mm"nthickness were placed."nGroup 3: 1mm thickness of light cure glass ionomer plus light cure composite resin as two separate 1mm layer"nwere placed."nGroup 4: 1mm thickness of light cure glass ionomer with 37% phosphoric acid etching followed by two"nseparate layers of light cure composite resin of 1 mm thickness were placed."nSEM was used to determine gap size ai Gl- dentin and Gi- composite interlaces. The findings were analyzed"nby ANOVA and t-student tests."nResults: Groups 1 and 2 showed no gap at Gl-dentm interface and also cracks were not observed in all these"nspecimens. In group 3, there was gap between light cure GI and light cure composite resin and cracks were"nseen in GI, too. Group 4 showed gap at both interfaces and more cracks were seen in GI. Groups I and 2"nshowed the least gap formation and group 4 showed the most. Statistically significant difference was found"nbetween groups 3, 4 and group 1 (control, 2."nConclusion: Base

  15. Allergy to methyltetrahydrophthalic anhydride in epoxy resin workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielsen, J; Welinder, H; Horstmann, V; Skerfving, S

    1992-01-01

    One hundred and forty four current and 26 former workers in a plant producing barrels for rocket guns from an epoxy resin containing methyltetrahydrophthalic anhydride (MTHPA; time weighted average air concentration up to 150 micrograms/m3) were studied. They showed higher frequencies of work related symptoms from the eyes (31 v 0%; p < 0.001), nose (53 v 9%; p < 0.001), pharynx (26 v 6%; p < 0.01), and asthma (11 v 0%; p < 0.05) than 33 controls. Also they had higher rates of positive skin prick test to a conjugate of MTHPA and human serum albumin (16 v 0%; p < 0.01), and more had specific IgE and IgG serum antibodies (18 v 0%; p < 0.01 and 12 v 0%; p < 0.05 respectively). There were statistically significant exposure-response relations between exposure and symptoms from eyes and upper airways, dry cough, positive skin prick test, and specific IgE and IgG antibodies. There was a non-significant difference in reaction to metacholine between exposed workers and non-smoking controls. In workers with and without specific IgE antibodies, differences existed in frequency of nasal secretion (54 v 23%; p < 0.05) and dry cough (38 v 12%; p < 0.05). Workers with specific IgG had more dry cough (38 v 12%; p < 0.05), but less symptoms of non-specific bronchial hyperreactivity (0 v 26%; p < 0.05). Atopic workers sneezed more than non-atopic workers (65 v 30%; p < 0.01). In a prospective study five sensitised workers who left the factory became less reactive to metacholine, and became symptom free. In 41 workers who stayed, there was no improvement, despite a 10-fold reduction in exposure. The results show the extreme sensitising properties of MTHPA. PMID:1463677

  16. The effect of curing time and curing method on microleakge of conservative adhesive resin restorations: an in vitro study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alireza Heidari

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aims: Using the conservative adhesive resin restoration (CAR in uncooperative children lead to numerous problems because of being time consuming. The purpose of this study was to compare the microleakage of conservative adhesive resin restoration under separate curing and co-curing.Materials and Methods: In this experimental study, 120 intact premolar teeth were collected and 120 vertical grooves were prepared on them. Then the teeth were divided into four groups: group 1, separated curing of bonding agent, flowable composite and sealant; group 2, co-curing of all materials for 60 seconds; group 3,co-curing of all materials for 40 seconds and group 4, co-curing of all materials for 20 seconds. Then the specimens were thermocycled and immersed in basic fuchsin solution. The teeth were sectioned horizontally and dye penetration was evaluated with stereomicroscope. Date were analyzed using one-way ANOVA and Scheffe test.Results: Mean value of dye penetration in groups 1, 2, 3, and 4 was 1.53±0.6, 2.06±0.6, 2.5±0.7 and 3.53±0.6, respectively. There was a statistically significant difference between group 1 and the other groups (P=0.0001.Conclusion: Considering the problems caused by microleakage in conservative resin adhesive restorations, co-curing method should not be used. In the case of using co-curing method, 60 second curing time is suggested for sufficient polymerization.

  17. Corrosion Protection Properties of Nano NH₂-Reduced Graphene Oxide/Epoxy Composite Coatings Formed by Self-Curing on Magnesium Alloy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Tao; Han, Yongqin; Bai, Ruiqin; Liu, Xin

    2018-07-01

    Nano NH2-reduced graphene oxide (NGO) and NGO/epoxy resin coatings were prepared, respectively. NGO/epoxy coating was successfully coated on magnesium alloy substrates. X-ray diffraction patterns, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, Scanning electron microscopy techniques were used to characterize the composition and morphology of NGO and composite coatings. The effect of the content of NGO on the corrosion protection performance of coatings was evaluated with electrochemical measurements in 3.5 wt.% NaCl solutions. Tafel and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy analysis revealed that an optimal addition amount of 0.3 wt.% NGO provided the superior corrosion protection properties. The composite coatings exhibited outstanding barrier properties against aggressive species compared to pure epoxy coating. The self-curing reaction of amine and epoxy radicals could produce the compact cross-linking reticular structure. This self-curing reaction was a nucleophilic addition, and amine radical preferred to bond the (b) site of graphene sheets due to the lowest Gibbs free energy. The cross-linking structure and some polar groups could act as a good reservoir for corrosive medium via absorption and fixation.

  18. Comparative investigation of thermal and mechanical properties of cross-linked epoxy polymers with different curing agents by molecular dynamics simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeyranpour, F; Alahyarizadeh, Gh; Arab, B

    2015-11-01

    Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations were carried out to predict the thermal and mechanical properties of the cross-linked epoxy system composed of DGEBA resin and the curing agent TETA. To investigate the effects of curing agents, a comprehensive and comparative study was also performed on the thermal and mechanical properties of DGEBA/TETA and DGEBA/DETDA epoxy systems such as density, glass transition temperature (Tg), coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) and elastic properties of different cross-linking densities and different temperatures. The results indicated that the glass transition temperature of DGEBA/TETA system calculated through density-temperature data, ∼ 385-395 °K, for the epoxy system with the cross-linking density of 62.5% has a better agreement with the experimental value (Tg, ∼ 400 °K) in comparison to the value calculated through the variation of cell volume in terms of temperature, 430-440 °K. They also indicated that CTE related parameters and elastic properties including Young, Bulk, and shear's moduli, and Poisson's ratio have a relative agreement with the experimental results. Comparison between the thermal and mechanical properties of epoxy systems of DGEBA/TETA and DGEBA/DETDA showed that the DGEBA/DETDA has a higher Tg in all cross linking densities than that of DGEBA/TETA, while higher mechanical properties was observed in the case of DGEBA/TETA in almost all cross linking densities. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Study of the reaction between polyethylene glycol and epoxy resins using N,N-dimethylbenzylamine as catalyst;Estudo da reacao entre polietileno glicol e resinas epoxi usando N,N-dimetilbenzilamina como catalisador

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zacharuk, Mario; Coelho, Luiz A.F.; Pezzin, Sergio H., E-mail: pezzin@joinville.udesc.b [Universidade do Estado de Santa Catarina (UDESC), Joinville (Brazil). Centro de Ciencias Tecnologicas; Becker, Daniela [Sociedade Educacional de Santa Catarina (SOCIESC), Joinville (Brazil). Inst. Superior Tupy

    2009-07-01

    In this work the use of N,N-dimethylbenzylamine as a catalyst of the reaction of polyethylene glycol (PEG) and epoxy resin (DGEBA) was studied. The reaction products were evaluated by infra-red spectroscopy (FTIR), nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMR) and viscosity measurements. Samples cured with a polyamine-based hardener were also submitted to tensile tests and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). The results of the viscosity analyses, FTIR and RMN ({sup 1}H) had confirmed the occurrence of the reaction between DGEBA epoxy groups and PEG hydroxyl groups in the presence of N, N-dimethylbenzylamine as catalyst, at 100 deg C. DSC analyses and tensile tests of cured systems showed that the reaction of DGEBA with PEG leads to a reduction of the Tg, generating a more flexible material. (author)

  20. Microhardness of resin composite materials light-cured through fiber reinforced composite.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fennis, W.M.M.; Ray, N.J.; Creugers, N.H.J.; Kreulen, C.M.

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To compare polymerization efficiency of resin composite basing materials when light-cured through resin composite and fiber reinforced composite (FRC) by testing microhardness. METHODS: Simulated indirect restorations were prepared by application of resin composite (Clearfil AP-X) or FRC

  1. Polymerization and curing kinetics of furan resins under conventional and microwave heating

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lopez de Vergara, Unai, E-mail: bergara@gaiker.es [Plastics and Composites Department, Gaiker IK4 Research Centre, Parque Tecnológico, Ed. 202, 48170 Zamudio Spain (Spain); Mechanical Engineering and Industrial Manufacturing Department, Mondragón Unibertsitatea, Loramendi 4, 20500 Mondragón Spain (Spain); Sarrionandia, Mariasun [Mechanical Engineering and Industrial Manufacturing Department, Mondragón Unibertsitatea, Loramendi 4, 20500 Mondragón Spain (Spain); Gondra, Koldo [Plastics and Composites Department, Gaiker IK4 Research Centre, Parque Tecnológico, Ed. 202, 48170 Zamudio Spain (Spain); Aurrekoetxea, Jon [Mechanical Engineering and Industrial Manufacturing Department, Mondragón Unibertsitatea, Loramendi 4, 20500 Mondragón Spain (Spain)

    2014-04-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • The furan resin structure was investigated using IR and RMN techniques. • The polymerization of furan resins was developed based on multistage kinetics. • Vyazovkin numerical analysis was found the most accurate kinetic method. • Microwave curing of furan resins was much faster than thermal curing. - Abstract: The challenge of this work is the microwave curing study of low free-furfuryl alcohol content furan resins. The chemical characterization of the furan resins has been made by infrared spectroscopy and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. The chemical composition of the resin and its reactions with p-toluensulfonic acid are proposed, with the aim of understanding the mechanism responsible for the main reactions. The results show the presence of methyl and ether bridges between the furan rings, and the formation of ketone and conjugated structures. Furthermore, the curing kinetics of the furan resins has been characterized by differential scanning calorimetry. Different methods have been applied in order to obtain and compare the activation energy of the process. Vyazovkin numerical analysis was found the most accurate method. Finally, microwave and conventional curing processes has been compared. The analysis showed that microwave curing of furan resins was twice faster than thermal curing.

  2. Effect of curing mode on the micro-mechanical properties of dual-cured self-adhesive resin cements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilie, Nicoleta; Simon, Alexander

    2012-04-01

    Light supplying to luting resin cements is impeded in several clinical situations, causing us to question whether materials can properly be cured to achieve adequately (or adequate) mechanical properties. The aim of this study was therefore to analyse the effect of light on the micro-mechanical properties of eight popular dual-cured self-adhesive resin cements by comparing them with two conventional, also dual-cured, resin cements. Four different curing procedures were applied: auto-polymerisation (dark curing) and light curing (LED unit, Freelight 2, 20 s) by applying the unit directly on the samples' surface, at a distance of 5 and 10 mm. Twenty minutes after curing, the samples were stored for 1 week at 37°C in a water-saturated atmosphere. The micro-mechanical properties-Vickers hardness, modulus of elasticity, creep and elastic/plastic deformation-were measured. Data were analysed with multivariate ANOVA followed by Tukey's test and partial eta-squared statistics (p cement-conventional or self-adhesive-was generally low. The influence of light on the polymerisation process was material dependent, with four different behaviour patterns to be distinguished. As a material category, significantly higher micro-mechanical properties were measured for the conventional compared to the self-adhesive resin cements, although this difference was low. Within the self-adhesive resin cements group, the variation in micro-mechanical properties was high. The selection of suitable resin cements should be done by considering, besides its adhesive properties, its micro-mechanical properties and curing behaviour also.

  3. Properties of dual-cure, bulk-fill composite resin restorative materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandewalker, Jon Peter; Casey, Jeffery A; Lincoln, Todd A; Vandewalle, Kraig S

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the properties of 2 new dual-cure, bulk-fill restorative composite resins to those of a hybrid composite resin material. Depth of cure, fracture toughness, porosity, microleakage, and volumetric shrinkage properties were examined. With the exception of fracture toughness, significant differences were found among materials. Compared to the incrementally placed hybrid composite, the dual-cure, bulk-fill restorative composites in self-cured mode had unlimited depth of cure, similar fracture toughness and porosity formation, and greater polymerization shrinkage and microleakage.

  4. Light curing of resin-based composites in the LED era.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krämer, Norbert; Lohbauer, Ulrich; García-Godoy, Franklin; Frankenberger, Roland

    2008-06-01

    This review thoroughly accumulated information regarding new technologies for state-of-the-art light curing of resin composite materials. Visible light cured resin-based composites allow the dentist to navigate the initiation of the polymerization step for each layer being applied. Curing technology was regularly subjected to changes during the last decades, but meanwhile the LED era is fully established. Today, four main polymerization types are available, i.e. halogen bulbs, plasma are lamps, argon ion lasers, and light emitting diodes. Additionally, different curing protocols should help to improve photopolymerization in terms of less stress being generated. Conclusions were: (1) with high-power LED units of the latest generation, curing time of 2 mm thick increments of resin composite can be reduced to 20 seconds to obtain durable results; (2) curing depth is fundamentally dependent on the distance of the resin composite to the light source, but only decisive when exceeding 6 mm; (3) polymerization kinetics can be modified for better marginal adaptation by softstart polymerization; however, in the majority of cavities this may not be the case; (4) adhesives should be light-cured separately for at least 10 seconds when resin composite is applied directly; (5) photocuring through indirect restorations such as ceramics is still a problem, therefore, both dual-cured adhesives and dual-cured composites and resin coating in any way are recommended; and (6) heat generation with high-power photopolymerization units should not be underestimated as a biological problem for both gingival and pulpal tissues.

  5. Accelerated cure of phenol-formaldehyde resins : studies with model compounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anthony H. Conner; Linda F. Lorenz; Kolby C. Hirth

    2002-01-01

    2-Hydroxymethylphenol (2-HMP) and 4-hydroxymethylphenol (4-HMP) were used as model compounds to study the reactions that occur during cure of phenol-formaldehyde (PF) resin to which cure accelerators (ethyl formate, propylene carbonate, g-butyrolactone, and triacetin) have been added. The addition of cure accelerators significantly increased the rate of condensation...

  6. Synergistic effect of silicate clay and phosphazene-oxyalkyleneamines on thermal stability of cured epoxies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yu-Min; Liao, Yi-Lin; Lin, Jiang-Jen

    2010-03-01

    Amine substitution of hexachlorocyclophosphazene (HCP) with poly(oxypropylene)diamines (POP) afforded HCP-POP adducts which were subsequently intercalated into a layered silicate clay. The relative thermal stabilities of the epoxies cured with the phosphazene-amines and the intercalated clays were studied. The organoclays, with the confined HCP-POP from 400 and 2000 g/mol M(w) amines, are nongelled products when using 1/6 M ratio of HCP/POP starting materials in tetrahydrofuran solvent. The intercalation of HCP-POP polyamine salts into sodium montmorillonite afforded the HCP-POP-embedded organoclays with an expanded interlayer silicate spacing (2.4-5.1 nm) from the original 1.2 nm spacing (X-ray diffraction). The effect of silicate clays was evaluated by blending the HCP-POP/clay hybrids into a two-component epoxy system (diglycidyl ether of 4,4'-isopropylidenediphenol (BPA) and a diamine) and fully cured to form solid materials. The distribution of the exfoliated silicate platelets in the matrix was analyzed by transmission electronic microscopy (TEM). Thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA) indicated an enhanced thermal stability for the HCP/clay epoxy nanocomposites, with a delayed weight-loss pattern (temperature of weight loss at 10% (T(10 wt.%)) from 360 to 385 degrees C and temperature of weight loss at 85% (T(85 wt.%)) from 598 to 696 degrees C), compared to the pristine epoxies. By comparing these epoxies with different amounts of phosphazene and/or silicates, the TGA revealed a synergistic effect for the presence of both phosphorous and silicate components. Furthermore, the epoxies had improved physical properties such as hardness (from 3H to 5H) and surface adhesion (observed by scanning electron microscope (SEM) on fracture surface). 2009. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Self-Healable and Reprocessable Polysulfide Sealants Prepared from Liquid Polysulfide Oligomer and Epoxy Resin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Wentong; Bie, Mengyao; Liu, Fu; Chang, Pengshan; Quan, Yiwu

    2017-05-10

    Polysulfide sealants have been commercially applied in many industrial fields. In this article, we study the self-healing property of the epoxy resin-cured polysulfide sealants for the first time. The obtained sealants showed a flexible range of ultimate elongation of 157-478% and a tensile strength of 1.02-0.75 MPa corresponding to different polysulfide oligomers. By taking advantage of the dynamic reversible exchange of disulfide bonds, polysulfide sealants exhibited good self-healing ability under a moderate thermal stimulus. A higher molecular weight and a lower degree of cross-linking of polysulfide oligomer were helpful in improving the ultimate elongation and healing efficiency of the polysulfide sealants. After subjecting to a temperature of 75 °C for 60 min, both the tensile strength and ultimate elongation of a fully cut sample, LP55-F, were restored to 91% of the original values, without affecting the sealing property. Furthermore, the sample exhibited excellent reshaping and reprocessing abilities. These outcomes offer a paradigm toward sustainable industrial applications of the polysulfide-based sealants.

  8. Thermoset nanocomposites from waterborne bio-based epoxy resin and cellulose nanowhiskers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Guo-min; Liu, Di; Liu, Gui-feng; Chen, Jian; Huo, Shu-ping; Kong, Zhen-wu

    2015-01-01

    Thermoset nanocomposites were prepared from a waterborne terpene-maleic ester type epoxy resin (WTME) and cellulose nanowhiskers (CNWs). The curing behaviors of WTME/CNWs nanocomposites were measured with rotational rheometer. The results show that the storage modulus (G') of WTME/CNWs nanocomposites increased with the increase of CNWs content. Observations by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) demonstrate that the incorporation of CNWs in WTME matrix caused microphase separation and destroyed the compactness of the matrix. This effect leads to the glass transition temperatures (Tg) of WTME/CNWs nanocomposites slightly decrease with the increase of CNWs content, which were confirmed by both DSC and DMA tests. The mechanical properties of WTME/CNWs nanocomposites were investigated by tensile testing. The Yong's modulus (E) and tensile strength (σb) of the nanocomposites were significantly reinforced by the addition of CNWs. These results indicate that CNWs exhibit excellent reinforcement effect on WTME matrix, due to the formation and increase of interfacial interaction by hydrogen bonds between CNWs nano-filler and the WTME matrix. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Linear and nonlinear mechanical properties of a series of epoxy resins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curliss, D. B.; Caruthers, J. M.

    1987-01-01

    The linear viscoelastic properties have been measured for a series of bisphenol-A-based epoxy resins cured with the diamine DDS. The linear viscoelastic master curves were constructed via time-temperature superposition of frequency dependent G-prime and G-double-prime isotherms. The G-double-prime master curves exhibited two sub-Tg transitions. Superposition of isotherms in the glass-to-rubber transition (i.e., alpha) and the beta transition at -60 C was achieved by simple horizontal shifts in the log frequency axis; however, in the region between alpha and beta, superposition could not be effected by simple horizontal shifts along the log frequency axis. The different temperature dependency of the alpha and beta relaxation mechanisms causes a complex response of G-double-prime in the so called alpha-prime region. A novel numerical procedure has been developed to extract the complete relaxation spectra and its temperature dependence from the G-prime and G-double-prime isothermal data in the alpha-prime region.

  10. The Structural Formation and Physical Behaviour of Cross-Linked Epoxy Resins

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-04-01

    May, Y. Tanaka (Ed): Epoxy Resins, Chemistry and Technology. T.F. Aika Marcel Dekker Inc., New York,p 135f, 239f (1973) 6 W. Fisch J. Polym. Sci., 12...497 (1954) j] W. Hofmann 7 W. Fisch Makromol. Chem., 44-46, 8 (1961) F ~W. Hlofmann 8 E.C. Dearborn J. Polum . Sci., 16, 201 (1955) R.M. Fuoss A.F...1971) J. Mleziva 13 L. Shechter Ind. Eng. Chem., 48, 86 (1956) J. Wynstra H 14 T.F. Mika C.A. May, Y. Tanaka (Ed): Epoxy Resins, Chemistry and

  11. Preparation and Electrochemical Properties of Graphene/Epoxy Resin Composite Coating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Zijun; Zhang, Tianchi; Qiao, Sen; Zhang, Luyihang

    2017-11-01

    The multilayer graphene powder as filler, epoxy modified silicone resin as film-forming agent, anticorrosion composite coating has been created using sand dispersion method, the electrochemical performance was compared with different content of graphene composite coating and pure epoxy resin coating. The open circuit potential (OCP), potentiodynamic polarization curves (Tafel Plot) and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) were tested. The test results showed that the anti-corrosion performance of multilayer graphene added has improved greatly, and the content of the 5% best corrosion performance of graphene composite coating.

  12. Method for epoxy foam production using a liquid anhydride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Celina, Mathias [Albuquerque, NM

    2012-06-05

    An epoxy resin mixture with at least one epoxy resin of between approximately 50 wt % and 100 wt %, an anhydride cure agent of between approximately 0 wt % and approximately 50 wt %, a tert-butoxycarbonyl anhydride foaming agent of between proximately 0.1-20 wt %, a surfactant and an imidazole or similar catalyst of less than approximately 2 wt %, where the resin mixture is formed from at least one epoxy resin with a 1-10 wt % tert-butoxycarbonyl anhydride compound and an imidazole catalyst at a temperature sufficient to keep the resin in a suitable viscosity range, the resin mixture reacting to form a foaming resin which in the presence of an epoxy curative can then be cured at a temperature greater than 50.degree. C. to form an epoxy foam.

  13. Iosipesco shear resistance in composites of carbon and glass fiber with epoxi resin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vanderlei O. Gonçalves

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The main aim of the present work was the determination of the shear modulus (G12 and the maximum shear strength (ô12 using the Iosipescu Shear Test. Tests were carried out on two types of composites, carbon fiber/epoxy and glass fiber/epoxy, used in the aerospace industry, and also a molded epoxy resin matrix. The results indicate the effective contribution of fiber reinforcements to the shear strength (ô12 and shear modulus (G12 compared to the no reinforcement polymer matrix.

  14. Morphological Study on Room-Temperature-Cured PMMA-Grafted Natural Rubber-Toughened Epoxy/Layered Silicate Nanocomposite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Y. Yuhana

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A morphological study was conducted on ternary systems containing epoxy, PMMA-grafted natural rubber, and organic chemically modified montmorillonite (Cloisite 30B. Optical microscopy, transmission electron microscopy (TEM, scanning electron microscopy (SEM, energy dispersive X-ray (EDX, and wide-angle X-ray diffraction (WAXD analysis were used. The following four materials were prepared at room temperature: cured unmodified epoxy, cured toughened epoxy, cured unmodified epoxy/Cloisite 30B nanocomposites, and cured toughened epoxy/Cloisite 30B nanocomposites. Mixing process was performed by mechanical stirring. Poly(etheramine was used as the curing agent. The detailed TEM images revealed co-continuous and dispersed spherical rubber in the epoxy-rubber blend, suggesting a new proposed mechanism of phase separation. High-magnification TEM analysis showed good interactions between rubber and Cloisite 30B in the ternary system. Also, it was found that rubber particles could enhance the separation of silicates layers. Both XRD and TEM analyses confirmed that the intercalation of Cloisite 30B was achieved. No distinct exfoliated silicates were observed by TEM. Aggregates of layered silicates (tactoids were observed by SEM and EDX, in addition to TEM at low magnification. EDX analysis confirmed the presence of organic and inorganic elements in the binary and ternary epoxy systems containing Cloisite 30B.

  15. Experimental Investigation on Fatigue Behavior of Epoxy Resin under Load and Displacement Controls

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahmood Mehrdad Shokrieh

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The mechanical properties of epoxy resin including tensile and flexural modulus, tensile and flexural strength for static conditions are currently studied. The frequency effect as significant parameter at room temperature is investigated and fatigue behavior of the epoxy resin in tension-tension loading conditions for different frequencies of 2, 3 and 5 Hz are obtained. The epoxy resin has been taken under flexural bending fatigue loading and fatigue life is investigated. The results of the experiments show the values of 2.5 and 3 GPa of tensile and flexural modules and 59.98 and 110.02 MPa of tensile and flexural strengths for the resin, respectively. To achieve a linear load-deflection relationship in a three-point bending experiment, a maximum allowable deflection of 5 mm is acquired. The relationship between the frequency and fatigue life shows higher frequency results in lower fatigue life. Loading with frequency of 2 Hz has provided 5.8 times more fatigue life compared with 5 Hz loading. For a tension-tension fatigue loading condition, the variation of tensile module of epoxy resin shows no noticeable change during the fatigue loading condition. This module decreases significantly only in the primary and failure cycles close to the fracture point. In further experiments, fatigue behavior of epoxy resin was tested under flexural bending fatigue loadings with controlled deflection at room temperature. Maximum applied normalized stresses versus the number of cycles to failure curve are illustrated and it can be performed in order to predict the number of cycles to failure for the resin in arbitrary applied normal stresses as well.

  16. Elaboration and characterization of composite material based on epoxy resin and clay fillers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dalila Laouchedi

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The present work aims at investigating the effect of locally produced clay (Algeria, along with the effect of their size and rate on physical and mechanical properties of the composite material. This study is divided into two parts: The first one is devoted to the study of the composite material based on epoxy resin with kaolin, using different size fractions at rates ranging from 2% to 20%. The second part examines epoxy resin-based composite with calcined kaolin (metakaolin with regard to the influence of the structure, the particle size and the charge rate on the properties of the material. It is shown that the clay fillers give the epoxy resin different properties compared to the epoxy resin alone and, additionally, reduce the cost of materials. It was also observed that the fillers enhance the mechanical properties by increasing the rigidity of the material. There is a maximum value of 2.4 GPa to 18% kaolin, or more than 325% increase in the modulus of elasticity with respect to unfilled resin for the finer particle size. It was also found that the modulus of elasticity increases with increasing the loading rate. Indeed, the rigidity increases with increasing the filler rate. Moreover, for both fillers, lower fraction yields better results. Moreover, for both types of added fillers, lower fraction yields better results.

  17. Comparative study of sorption and solubility of heat-cure and self-cure acrylic resins in different solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saini, Rajesh; Kotian, Ravindra; Madhyastha, Prashanthi; Srikant, N

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to compare the sorption and solubility of heat-cure and self-cure acrylic resins in different solutions. One heat-cure acrylic resin (Trevalon) and one self-cure acrylic resin (Rapid Repair) were studied. Five groups of square-shaped specimens (20 mm × 20 mm × 2 mm) were prepared for each acrylic resin and then immersed in five solutions: distilled water, artificial saliva, denture cleansing solution, distilled water, and denture cleaning solution for 12 h alternatively, artificial saliva and denture cleaning solution for 12 h alternatively at 37 ± 2°C, and tested sorption and solubility by weight gain/loss method, respectively, after 1, 6, and 11 weeks. The data were analyzed by one-way analysis of variance followed by post hoc Tukey's test. Water sorption mean values varied from 17.5 ± 0.88 to 27.25 ± 1.04 μg/mm 3 for heat cure and from 12.75 ± 0.55 to 19.75 ± 1.04 μg/mm 3 for self-cure in the different solutions after different interval periods of 1, 6, and 11 weeks. These values were statistically significant (Psolubility mean values varied from 0.25 ± 0.55 to 1.5 ± 0.55 μg/mm 3 for heat cure and from 1.5 ± 0.55 to 6.5 ± 0.55 μg/mm 3 for self-cure in the different solutions after different interval periods of 1, 6, and 11 weeks. These values were statistically not significant (P > 0.05). There was no linear correlation between sorption and solubility values. Overall, analysis of results showed the maximum sorption value in denture cleansing solution followed by alternative soaking in distilled water and artificial saliva. Least sorption was observed with artificial saliva followed by distilled water. Both heat-cure and self-cure acrylic resins showed varying water sorption and solubility. The results of both water sorption and solubility showed compliance with the International Standards Organization specification. No correlation was found between water sorption and solubility. Artificial saliva solution is a

  18. AFM and XRD characterization of silver nanoparticles films deposited on the surface of DGEBA epoxy resin by ion sputtering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Elisandro de Andrade

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In this work, silver atoms were deposited by ion sputtering on the surface of diglycidyl ether of bisphenol A (DGEBA epoxy resin cured at 150 °C for 6 hours in air. The films of DGEBA and its precursors were characterized by Raman spectroscopy to identify the main functional groups and their relationship with the deposited silver atoms. Silver thin films of 5, 10, 15 and 20 nm were deposited on the epoxy resin at room temperature. Both the initial film of DGEBA and the subsequent silver thin film were analyzed by Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM in the non-contact mode. Silver thin films were also analyzed using X-ray diffraction (XRD at room temperature. The AFM results showed the formation of silver crystallites on the surface of DGEBA at very low coverage whereas XRD indicated that most of them had their main axis aligned to the normal of the surface. An increase in the coverage led to an increase in the grain size as indicated by AFM. However, XRD results indicated that the crystallite size remained almost constant while the appearance of peaks corresponding to other crystalline orientations suggests the coalescence of the original crystallites and an increase in size of the more dense planes, namely [111].

  19. AFM and XRD characterization of silver nanoparticles films deposited on the surface of DGEBA epoxy resin by ion sputtering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andrade, Jose Elisandro de; Machado, Rogerio; Macedo, Marcelo Andrade; Cunha, Frederico Guilherme Carvalho [Clinica de Medicina Nuclear e Radiologia de Maceio (MedRadiUS), Radiology and Imaging Diagnosis at Universidade Federal de Alagoas (UFAL), Maceio, AL (Brazil)

    2012-07-01

    In this work, silver atoms were deposited by ion sputtering on the surface of diglycidyl ether of bisphenol A (DGEBA) epoxy resin cured at 150 deg C for 6 hours in air. The films of DGEBA and its precursors were characterized by Raman spectroscopy to identify the main functional groups and their relationship with the deposited silver atoms. Silver thin films of 5, 10, 15 and 20 nm were deposited on the epoxy resin at room temperature. Both the initial film of DGEBA and the subsequent silver thin film were analyzed by Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) in the non-contact mode. Silver thin films were also analyzed using X-ray diffraction (XRD) at room temperature. The AFM results showed the formation of silver crystallites on the surface of DGEBA at very low coverage whereas XRD indicated that most of them had their main axis aligned to the normal of the surface. An increase in the coverage led to an increase in the grain size as indicated by AFM. However, XRD results indicated that the crystallite size remained almost constant while the appearance of peaks corresponding to other crystalline orientations suggests the coalescence of the original crystallites and an increase in size of the more dense planes, namely [111]. (author)

  20. AFM and XRD characterization of silver nanoparticles films deposited on the surface of DGEBA epoxy resin by ion sputtering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andrade, Jose Elisandro de; Machado, Rogerio; Macedo, Marcelo Andrade [Universidade Federal de Sergipe (UFSE), Aracaju, SE (Brazil). Programa de Pos-graduacao em Fisica; Cunha, Frederico Guilherme Carvalho [Universidade Federal de Sergipe (UFSE), Aracaju, SE (Brazil). Programa de Pos-graduacao em Ciencia e Engenharia de Materiais

    2012-07-01

    In this work, silver atoms were deposited by ion sputtering on the surface of diglycidyl ether of bisphenol A (DGEBA) epoxy resin cured at 150 Degree-Sign C for 6 hours in air. The films of DGEBA and its precursors were characterized by Raman spectroscopy to identify the main functional groups and their relationship with the deposited silver atoms. Silver thin films of 5, 10, 15 and 20 nm were deposited on the epoxy resin at room temperature. Both the initial film of DGEBA and the subsequent silver thin film were analyzed by Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) in the non-contact mode. Silver thin films were also analyzed using X-ray diffraction (XRD) at room temperature. The AFM results showed the formation of silver crystallites on the surface of DGEBA at very low coverage whereas XRD indicated that most of them had their main axis aligned to the normal of the surface. An increase in the coverage led to an increase in the grain size as indicated by AFM. However, XRD results indicated that the crystallite size remained almost constant while the appearance of peaks corresponding to other crystalline orientations suggests the coalescence of the original crystallites and an increase in size of the more dense planes, namely [111]. (author)

  1. Analysis of atomic oxygen and ultraviolet exposure effects on cycloaliphatic epoxy resins reinforced with octa-functional POSS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suliga, Agnieszka; Jakubczyk, Ewa M.; Hamerton, Ian; Viquerat, Andrew

    2018-01-01

    In this study, novel nanocomposites were created by incorporation of Silsesquioxane containing eight glycidylether groups (octa-POSS) into a cycloaliphatic epoxy cured by an anhydride. The developed resin system, with different nanoparticle concentrations, was used on the outer layers of an ultra-thin CFRP structure in order to provide better environmental resistance to the environment of low Earth orbit (LEO) which was tested in a ground-simulation facility. The developed resins were subjected to space-like degrading factors and their response to corrosion, radiation and elevated temperatures was monitored by mass loss, together with measuring changes in surface chemistry (ATR-FTIR), functionality development (contact angle measurement and XPS), roughness (scanning laser microscopy) and morphology (SEM). The influence of increasing octa-POSS content on thermo-mechanical properties was measured with DMTA and the strength and modulus of elasticity were determined by flexural test. The addition of octa-POSS in any loading improves the environmental resistance, however, the most significant retention of mass and mechanical and surface properties after space-like exposure was observed in the 20 wt% octa-POSS reinforced cycloaliphatic epoxy. The results presented here may contribute to the development of novel class of nanocomposites which can offer an extended service life in LEO.

  2. Flexural Strength of Cold and Heat Cure Acrylic Resins Reinforced with Different Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bijan Heidari

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Heat-polymerized acrylic resin has been the most commonly used denture base material for over 60 years. However, the mechanical strength of acrylic resin is not adequate for long-term clinical performance of dentures. Consequently, fracture is a com- mon clinical occurrence, which often occurs in the midline of denture base.This study aimed to evaluate the efficacy of cold cure and heat cure acrylic resins, rein- forced with glass fibers, polyethylene fibers, and metal wire for denture base repair.Materials and Methods: Ninety specimens were prepared and allocated to nine groups. Ten specimens were included in the control group, and 80 were allocated to 8 experi- mental groups. In the experimental groups, the specimens were sectioned into two halves from the middle, and were then divided into two main groups: one group was repaired with heat cure acrylic resin, and the other with cold cure acrylic resin. Each group was di- vided into 4 subgroups: unreinforced, reinforced with glass fibers, polyethylene fibers, and metal wire. All specimens were then subjected to a 3-point bending test, and the flexural strength was calculated.Results: The group repaired with heat cure acrylic resin and reinforced with glass fiber showed the highest flexural strength; however, the group repaired with cold cure acrylic resin and reinforced with polyethylene fibers had the lowest flexural strength. There was no significant difference between the groups repaired with heat cure and cold cure acrylic resins without reinforcement.Conclusion: Repairing denture base with heat cure acrylic resin, reinforced with glass fi- bers increases the flexural strength of denture base.

  3. Comparative evaluation of sorption, solubility and microhardness of heat cure polymethylmethacrylate denture base resin & flexible denture base resin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Jay; Bulbule, Nilesh; Kulkarni, Shilpa; Shah, Riddhi; Kakade, Dilip

    2014-08-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate and compare sorption, solubility and microhardness of heat cure polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) denture base resin and flexible (thermoplastic polyamide nylon) denture base resin. Sorption, solubility and microhardness were assessed to determine compliance with ADA Specification no. 12. RESULTs were assessed using statistical and observational analyses. All materials satisfied ADA requirements for sorption, solubility and microhardness. Heat cure PMMA showed more sorption, solubility and microhardness than flexible (thermoplastic polyamide nylon). Flexible (thermoplastic polyamide nylon) resin absorbs less water, is less soluble and is more flexible than PMMA.

  4. [Contact allergy to epoxy resins plastics based on materials collected by the Nofer Institute of Occupational Medicine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kieć-Swierczyńska, Marta; Krecisz, Beata

    2003-01-01

    Of the 5604 patients examined in 1984-2001 for suspected occupational dermatitis, 160 persons (2.8%) showed allergy to epoxy resins plastics. Allergy was more frequent in men (4.9%) than in women (1.2%); in 154 persons, allergy was of occupational etiology (in a group of 160 patients with allergy to epoxy resins, the following proportions were observed: bricklayers, platelayers--17.5%; fitters, turners, machinist millers--13.8%; plastics molders--13.1%; laminators--11.3%; electrical equipment assemblers--10.6%; painters--10.0%). Having compared the frequency of allergy to components of epoxy resins in the years 1984-1993 and 1994-2001, it was found that allergy to resin, reactive diluents and plasticizers was on increase, whereas allergy to amines and acid anhydrides hardeners was on decrease. In a group of 13 chemical compounds entering into the composition of epoxy resins, epoxy resin contributed to the largest number of positive patch tests (77.5% of epoxy-allergic persons). This was followed by triethylenetetramine (23.1%), ethylenediamine (13.1%), phthalic anhydride (8.1%), diethylenetetramine (6.9%) and phenylglycidylether (6.2%). In addition, three patients reacted to both epoxy resin and cycloaliphatic resin.

  5. Curing mechanism of furan resin modified with different agents and their thermal strength

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huang Renhe

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available The curing mechanism of furfuryl alcohol and urea-formaldehyde furan resins was investigated using infrared spectroscopy (IR technique. The curing productions of urea-formaldehyde furan resins modified with different agents (i.e. sorbitol, polyester polyol, phenol and acetone and the productions of incomplete curing were characterized by differential thermal analysis (DTA and thermal gravity analysis (TG. The results indicate that except for polyester polyol, the other modifiers have little effect on the thermal strength of urea-formaldehyde furan resin. Furthermore, the thermal strength can be improved at a temperature of higher than 550℃.

  6. Efficiency of dual-cured resin cement polymerization induced by high-intensity LED curing units through ceramic material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, H; Kazama, Re; Asai, T; Kanaya, F; Ishizaki, H; Fukushima, M; Okiji, T

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the ability of high-intensity light-emitting diode (LED) and other curing units to cure dual-cured resin cement through ceramic material. A halogen curing unit (Jetlite 3000, Morita), a second-generation LED curing unit (Demi, Kerr), and two high-intensity LED curing units (PenCure 2000, Morita; Valo, Ultradent) were tested. Feldspathic ceramic plates (VITABLOCS Mark II, A3; Vita Zahnfabrik) with thicknesses of 1.0, 2.0, and 3.0 mm were prepared. Dual-cured resin cement samples (Clearfil Esthetic Cement, Kuraray Noritake Dental) were irradiated directly or through one of the ceramic plates for different periods (5, 10, 15, or 20 seconds for the high-intensity LED units and 20, 40, 60, or 80 seconds for the others). The Knoop hardness test was used to determine the level of photopolymerization that had been induced in the resin cement. Data were analyzed by one-way analysis of variance and Dunnett's post-hoc test to identify test-control (maximum irradiation without a ceramic plate) differences for each curing unit (punits, the curing conditions had a statistically significant effect on the Knoop hardness numbers (KHNs) of the irradiated cement samples (punits (except for PenCure 2000 at 3.0 mm) were able to achieve control-level KHN values when the irradiation time was extended. At a plate thickness of 3.0 mm, irradiation for 20 seconds with the Valo or for 80 seconds with the Demi were the only methods that produced KHN values equivalent to those produced by direct irradiation. Regardless of the type of curing unit used, indirect irradiation of dual-cured resin cement through a ceramic plate resulted in decreased KHN values compared with direct irradiation. When the irradiation period was extended, only the LED units were able to achieve similar KHN values to those observed under direct irradiation in the presence of plates ≥2.0-mm thick. High-intensity LED units require a shorter irradiation period than halogen and second

  7. Nanopigmented Acrylic Resin Cured Indistinctively by Water Bath or Microwave Energy for Dentures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. S. Acosta-Torres

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The highlight of this study was the synthesis of nanopigmented poly(methyl methacrylate nanoparticles that were further processed using a water bath and/or microwave energy for dentures. The experimental acrylic resins were physicochemically characterized, and the adherence of Candida albicans and biocompatibility were assessed. A nanopigmented acrylic resin cured by a water bath or by microwave energy was obtained. The acrylic specimens possess similar properties to commercial acrylic resins, but the transverse strength and porosity were slightly improved. The acrylic resins cured with microwave energy exhibited reduced C. albicans adherence. These results demonstrate an improved noncytotoxic material for the manufacturing of denture bases in dentistry.

  8. Tailoring of epoxy material properties

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nakka, J.S.

    2010-01-01

    This research work is aimed to understand the effect of resin chemistry on the physical properties (e.g. moduli, viscoelasticity, moisture uptake, coefficient of thermal expansion) of cured aromatic epoxy-amine thermoset resins. This understanding will result into a good first approximation of the

  9. Experimental Investigation of Strain Rate and Temperature Dependent Response of an Epoxy Resin Undergoing Large Deformation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamrakar, Sandeep; Ganesh, Raja; Sockalingam, Subramani; Haque, Bazle Z.; Gillespie, John W.

    2018-01-01

    Experimental investigation of the effect of strain rate and temperature on large inelastic deformation of an epoxy resin is presented. Uniaxial compression tests were conducted on DER 353 epoxy resin at strain rates ranging from 0.001 to 12,000/s. Experimental results showed significant rate sensitivity in yield stress, which increased from 85 MPa at 0.001/s to 220 MPa at 12,000/s strain rate. Thermal softening became more prominent as the strain rate was increased, resulting in complete absence of strain hardening at high strain rates. Rise in temperature under high strain rate, due to adiabatic heating, was estimated to increase above glass transition temperature (T g ). A series of compression tests carried out at temperatures ranging from ambient to T g + 80 °C showed yield stress vanishing at T g . Above T g , the epoxy became completely rubbery elastic at quasi-static loading rate. Epoxy became less sensitive to strain rate as the temperature was increased further above T g . The strain rate and temperature dependent yield behavior of the epoxy resin is predicted using Ree-Eyring model.

  10. Polymerization Mode of Self-Adhesive, Dual-Cured Dental Resin Cements Light Cured Through Various Restorative Materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shim, Ji Suk; Kang, Jeong Kyung; Jha, Nayansi; Ryu, Jae Jun

    2017-05-06

    The aim of this study was to investigate the polymerization mode of self-adhesive, dual-cured resin cements light-cured through overlying materials with different degree of translucency by measuring the degree of conversion (DC). Three kinds of self-adhesive, dual-cured resin cements (G-CEM LinkAceTM , Maxcem EliteTM , and BisCem® ) were light-cured through three different restorative materials that included porcelain-fused metal (PFM), zirconia, and lithium disilicate. Polymerization kinetics were continuously evaluated using infrared spectroscopy after 0, 5, 10, and 30 min and 2 weeks of mixing. Data were statistically analyzed using two-way analysis of variance (ANOVA), one-way ANOVA, and Tukey's multiple-comparison test (α = 0.05). Regardless of the kind of resin cement, the light-cured groups showed higher DC than did the autopolymerization group under PFM at any point of time (p cements to achieve statistically similar DC between the zirconia and lithium disilicate groups increased in the following order: G-CEM LinkAceTM , BisCem® , and Maxcem EliteTM (p adhesive, dual-cured resin cements. The resin cements light-cured through lithium disilicate and zirconia showed higher DC than that shown by cements cured under PFM at any measurement time. The lithium disilicate and zirconia groups showed differences in the early stage of polymerization for G-CEM LinkAceTM and BisCem® ; however, the differences diminished at 2 weeks. Chemical polymerization is not sufficient to cause the resin cement to achieve the highest polymerization not only in early stage, but also in late stage of polymerization. The sensitivity to the intensity of the light was different for each resin cement. Special clinical steps to compensate for the attenuated light intensity seem to be necessary for the resin cements which are susceptible to light intensity. (J Esthet Restor Dent 29:209-214, 2017). © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Assessment of the flexural strength of two heat-curing acrylic resins for artificial eyes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aline Úrsula Rocha Fernandes

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Prosthetic eyes are artificial substitutes for the eyeball, made of heat-curing acrylic resin, serving to improve the esthetic appearance of the mutilated patient and his/her inclusion in society. The aim of this study was to assess the flexural strength of two heat-curing acrylic resins used for manufacturing prosthetic eyes. Thirty-six specimens measuring 64 x 10 x 3.3 mm were obtained and divided into four groups: acrylic resin for artificial sclera N1 (Artigos Odontológicos Clássico, São Paulo, SP, Brazil, heat-cure water technique (GI and microwave-cured (GII; colorless acrylic resin for prosthetic eyes (Artigos Odontológicos Clássico, São Paulo, SP, Brazil, heat-cure water technique (GIII and microwave-cured (GIV. Mechanical tests using three point loads were performed in a test machine (EMIC, São José dos Pinhais, PR, Brazil. The analysis of variance and the Tukey test were used to identify significant differences (p < 0.01. Groups GII and GIV presented, respectively, the highest (98.70 ± 11.90 MPa and lowest means (71.07 ± 8.93 MPa, with a statistically significant difference. The cure method used for the prosthetic eye resins did not interfere in their flexural strength. It was concluded that all the resins assessed presented sufficient flexural strength values to be recommended for the manufacture of prosthetic eyes.

  12. Assessment of the flexural strength of two heat-curing acrylic resins for artificial eyes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandes, Aline Ursula Rocha; Portugal, Aline; Veloso, Letícia Rocha; Goiato, Marcelo Coelho; Santos, Daniela Micheline dos

    2009-01-01

    Prosthetic eyes are artificial substitutes for the eyeball, made of heat-curing acrylic resin, serving to improve the esthetic appearance of the mutilated patient and his/her inclusion in society. The aim of this study was to assess the flexural strength of two heat-curing acrylic resins used for manufacturing prosthetic eyes. Thirty-six specimens measuring 64 x 10 x 3.3 mm were obtained and divided into four groups: acrylic resin for artificial sclera N1 (Artigos Odontológicos Clássico, São Paulo, SP, Brazil), heat-cure water technique (GI) and microwave-cured (GII); colorless acrylic resin for prosthetic eyes (Artigos Odontológicos Clássico, São Paulo, SP, Brazil), heat-cure water technique (GIII) and microwave-cured (GIV). Mechanical tests using three point loads were performed in a test machine (EMIC, São José dos Pinhais, PR, Brazil). The analysis of variance and the Tukey test were used to identify significant differences (p < 0.01). Groups GII and GIV presented, respectively, the highest (98.70 +/- 11.90 MPa) and lowest means (71.07 +/- 8.93 MPa), with a statistically significant difference. The cure method used for the prosthetic eye resins did not interfere in their flexural strength. It was concluded that all the resins assessed presented sufficient flexural strength values to be recommended for the manufacture of prosthetic eyes.

  13. Effect of bench time polymerization on depth of cure of dental composite resin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harahap, K.; Yudhit, A.; Sari, F.

    2017-07-01

    The aim of this research was to investigate the effect of bench time before light cured polymerization on the depth of cure of dental composite resin. Nanofiller composite resin (Filtek Z350 XT,3M, ESPE,China) was used in this study. Sixty samples of nanofiller composite resin were made and divided into control and test groups with bench time for 0, 15, 30, 45, and 60 min. For the test group, composite resins were stored in refrigerator with 4°C temperatures. Meanwhile, for the control groups, the composite resin was stored at room temperature. The samples were prepared using metal mould with size diameter of 6 mm and 4 mm in thickness. Samples were cured for 20 s by using visible blue light curing unit. Part of samples that unpolymerized were removed by using a plastic spatula. The remaining parts of samples were measured by digital caliper and noted as depth of cure (mm). Data were analyzed to one-way ANOVA and LSD tests (p≤0.05). Results showed there was no significance differences between test groups (p=0.5). A 60 minutes bench time group showed the highest depth of cure value among test group, and it was almost similar with control group value. It can be concluded that longer bench time can increase the depth of cure of composite resin.

  14. Catalytic allylation of phenols : chloride-free route towards epoxy resins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rijn, Jimmy Antonius van

    2010-01-01

    An industrially applicable process was developed for the synthesis of epoxy resin components. A catalytic reaction was explored towards allyl phenyl ethers that prevents the use of chloride-containing starting materials and thus formation of chloride-containing side products. The preferred

  15. Association between positive patch tests to epoxy resin and fragrance mix I ingredients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersen, Klaus Ejner; Christensen, Lars Porskjaer; Vølund, Aage; Johansen, Jeanne Duus; Paulsen, Evy

    2009-03-01

    Both epoxy resin (diglycidyl ether of bisphenol A) and fragrance mix I are included in the European baseline series of contact allergens. A significant association between positive reactions to epoxy resin and fragrance mix has been reported by others. To investigate and possibly reproduce this association with the use of TRUE((R)) test data and supplementary tests with fragrance mix ingredients from the Department of Dermatology, Odense University Hospital. Six thousand one hundred and fifteen consecutive eczema patients tested from 1995 to 2007 were included, and test results from all patients tested with fragrance mix ingredients were analysed. One hundred and forty-five (2.4%) were positive to epoxy resin and 282 (4.6%) were positive to fragrance mix I. Nineteen were positive to both giving an odds ratio of 3.3, which is significant (95% CI 2.0-5.4). Analysis of association to individual fragrance mix ingredients showed a significant association to alpha-amyl cinnamal and isoeugenol. The significant association between positive reactions to epoxy resin and fragrance mix I was reproduced. However, the clinical implications are not clarified, and even though the association may be coincidental, the fact that it can be reproduced with a different patch test system and in a different population speaks against a random result. Further studies may help to interpret the association.

  16. A novel polishing technology for epoxy resin based on 355 nm UV laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Xinling; Tao, Luqi; Liu, Zhaolin; Yang, Yi; Ren, Tianling

    2017-06-01

    The electromagnetic shielding film has drawn much attention due to its wide applications in the integrated circuit package, which demands a high surface quality of epoxy resin. However, gaseous Cu will splash and adhere to epoxy resin surface when the Cu layer in PCB receives enough energy in the process of laser cutting, which has a negative effect on the quality of the shielding film. Laser polishing technology can solve this problem and it can effectively improve the quality of epoxy resin surface. The paper studies the mechanism of Cu powder spraying on the compound surface by 355 nm ultraviolet (UV) laser, including the parameters of laser polishing process and the remains of Cu content on compound surface. The results show that minimal Cu content can be realized with a scanning speed of 700 mm/s, a laser frequency of 50 kHz and the distance between laser focus and product top surface of -1.3 mm. This result is important to obtain an epoxy resin surface with high quality. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Nos. 61574083, 61434001), the National Basic Research Program (No. 2015CB352100), the National Key Project of Science and Technology (No. 2011ZX02403-002), the Special Fund for Agroscientic Research in the Public Interest of China (No 201303107), the support of the Independent Research Program of Tsinghua University (No. 2014Z01006), and Advanced Sensor and Integrated System Lab of Tsinghua University Graduate School at Shenzhen (No. ZDSYS20140509172959969).

  17. Synthesis and application of polyepoxide cardanol glycidyl ether as biobased polyepoxide reactive diluent for epoxy resin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polyepoxide cardanol glycidyl ether (PECGE), a novel cardanol derivative, was synthesized and used as reactive diluent for petroleum-based epoxy resin in this work. The synthetic condition was first optimized, and the resultant PECGE diluent was characterized using Fourier transform infrared spectro...

  18. Influence of hematite nanorods on the mechanical properties of epoxy resin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bogdanović Gordana

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The mechanical properties of nanocomposites obtained by incorporation of fairly uniform hematite nanorods (α-Fe2O3 NRs into epoxy resin were studied as a function of the content of the inorganic phase. A thorough microstructural characterization of the α-Fe2O3 NRs and the nanocomposites was performed using transmission electron microscopy (TEM and atomic force microscopy (AFM. The TEM measurements revealed rod-like morphology of the nanofiller with a uniform size distribution (8.5 nm×170 nm, diameter×length. High-magnification TEM and AFM measurements indicated agglomeration of α-Fe2O3 NRs embedded in the epoxy resin. Stress at break, strain at break, elastic modulus and tensile toughness of the nanocomposites were compared with the data obtained for pure epoxy resin. Significant influence of nanofiller on the mechanical properties of epoxy resin, as well as on the glass transition temperature, could be noticed for samples with low contents of the inorganic phase (up to 1 wt. %. [Project of the Serbian Ministry of Education, Science and Technological Development, Grant no. 45020

  19. Allergic Reaction to Polyether Ether Ketone Following Cross-Reactivity to Epoxy Resin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kofler, Lukas; Wambacher, Markus; Schweinzer, Katrin; Scherl, Maritta; Kofler, Heinz

    Polyether ether ketone (PEEK) is a thermoplastic polymer frequently used in engineering but also in medical devices. Only 1 case of allergic reaction to PEEK used as an implanted medical device has been reported so far; however, the route of sensitization remained unclear. Here we report on a 62-year-old male patient with a preknown, severe type IV allergy to epoxy resin. He reported strong pain in his shoulder after implantation of a PEEK-containing device after a rotator cuff injury. For testing, the device was implanted in a small pouch subcutaneously on the abdomen. The patient reported massive pain starting 8 hours after the implantation, strictly limited to the procedural area and showing perifocal erythema. A possible explanation of the sensitization mode is the source material for PEEK and epoxy resin, as both are mainly based on bisphenols. An allergic reaction to PEEK with preknown epoxy resin sensitization has not been reported so far. As epoxy resins are a frequent cause of occupational contact dermatitis and PEEK is widely used for medical and nonmedical devices, we believe that this is of great clinical relevance.

  20. Occupational sensitization to epoxy resins in Northeastern Italy (1996–2010)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prodi, Andrea; Rui, Francesca; Fortina, Anna Belloni; Corradin, Maria Teresa; Filon, Francesca Larese

    2015-01-01

    Background: One of the main health concerns of epoxy resins is their role as skin sensitizer. This sensitization is not uncommon, because the prevalence ranges around 1–12% of the general population. Objectives: Perform a cross sectional study in a patch test population from Northeastern Italy to investigate the prevalence of epoxy resins sensitization among patients with suspected contact dermatitis. Subsequently, relate findings to patients’ occupation and evaluate time trend of prevalence. Methods: The final study database included 19 088 consecutive patients, tested from 1996 to 2010 in Northeastern Italy. Results: The overall prevalence of epoxy resins sensitization was 0·89%. Dermatitis most frequently involved hands (40·25%). In both sexes, we find a significant correlation in mechanics, woodworkers, and chemical industry workers; and in males only, among farmers and fishers, construction workers, and unemployed. We found significant increase of sensitization in construction workers in the analyzed period. Conclusions: The overall prevalence of sensitization to epoxy resins in Northeastern Italy is in line with other European countries, but we found an increased risk of sensitization in some professions and an increasing trend of prevalence in construction workers. Better preventive actions are strongly advised in higher risk professions, with particular attentions towards building sector. PMID:25633931

  1. Occupational sensitization to epoxy resins in Northeastern Italy (1996-2010).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prodi, Andrea; Rui, Francesca; Fortina, Anna Belloni; Corradin, Maria Teresa; Filon, Francesca Larese

    2015-01-01

    One of the main health concerns of epoxy resins is their role as skin sensitizer. This sensitization is not uncommon, because the prevalence ranges around 1-12% of the general population. Perform a cross sectional study in a patch test population from Northeastern Italy to investigate the prevalence of epoxy resins sensitization among patients with suspected contact dermatitis. Subsequently, relate findings to patients' occupation and evaluate time trend of prevalence. The final study database included 19 088 consecutive patients, tested from 1996 to 2010 in Northeastern Italy. The overall prevalence of epoxy resins sensitization was 0·89%. Dermatitis most frequently involved hands (40·25%). In both sexes, we find a significant correlation in mechanics, woodworkers, and chemical industry workers; and in males only, among farmers and fishers, construction workers, and unemployed. We found significant increase of sensitization in construction workers in the analyzed period. The overall prevalence of sensitization to epoxy resins in Northeastern Italy is in line with other European countries, but we found an increased risk of sensitization in some professions and an increasing trend of prevalence in construction workers. Better preventive actions are strongly advised in higher risk professions, with particular attentions towards building sector.

  2. Thermal conductivity of 2D nano-structured graphitic materials and their composites with epoxy resins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mu, Mulan; Wan, Chaoying; McNally, Tony

    2017-12-01

    The outstanding thermal conductivity (λ) of graphene and its derivatives offers a potential route to enhance the thermal conductivity of epoxy resins. Key challenges still need to be overcome to ensure effective dispersion and distribution of 2D graphitic fillers throughout the epoxy matrix. 2D filler type, morphology, surface chemistry and dimensions are all important factors in determining filler thermal conductivity and de facto the thermal conductivity of the composite material. To achieve significant enhancement in the thermal conductivity of epoxy composites, different strategies are required to minimise phonon scattering at the interface between the nano-filler and epoxy matrix, including chemical functionalisation of the filler surfaces such that interactions between filler and matrix are promoted and interfacial thermal resistance (ITR) reduced. The combination of graphitic fillers with dimensions on different length scales can potentially form an interconnected multi-dimensional filler network and, thus contribute to enhanced thermal conduction. In this review, we describe the relevant properties of different 2D nano-structured graphitic materials and the factors which determine the translation of the intrinsic thermal conductivity of these 2D materials to epoxy resins. The key challenges and perspectives with regard achieving epoxy composites with significantly enhanced thermal conductivity on addition of 2D graphitic materials are presented.

  3. The Effect of Curing Temperature on the Fracture Toughness of Fiberglass Epoxy Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, Thomas J.

    The curing reaction in a thermoset polymer matrix composite is often accelerated by the addition of heat in an oven or autoclave. The heat added increases the rate of the polymerization reaction and cross-linking in the material. The cure cycle used (temperature, pressure and time) can therefore alter the final material properties. This research focuses on how the curing temperature (250, 275, 300 °F) affects the yield strength and the mode I interlaminar fracture toughness, GI, of a unidirectional S-2 glass epoxy composite. The test method that was used for the tension test was ASTM D3039 and the test method for the mode I interlaminar fracture toughness, the double cantilever beam (DCB) test, was ASTM D5528. The DCB specimens were fabricated with a non-adhesive insert at the midplane of the composite that serves as the initiatior of the delamination. Opening forces were then applied to the specimen, causing the crack propagation. The results show that increasing the cure temperature by 50 °F increased the tensile strength by 10% (86.54 - 94.73 ksi) and decreased the fracture toughness 20% (506.23 - 381.31 J/m 2). Thus, the curing temperature can cause a trade-off between these two properties, which means that the curing cycle will need to be altered based on the intended use and the required material properties.

  4. Dynamic-mechanical response of graphite/epoxy composite laminates and neat resin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, P.; Carlsson, L.; Sternstein, S. S.

    1983-01-01

    Dynamic mechanical measurement results are presented for the case of carbon fiber-reinforced, epoxy matrix composite laminates subjected to loading perpendicular to the lamination plane, as well as for neat epoxy resin under the same conditions, where temperatures ranged between 20 and 200 C and deformation levels lie within the linear viscoelastic region. In-phase and out-of-phase stiffnesses are found to become superposed, forming master curves that cover a 12-decade frequency range. The application of a master curve scaling procedure shows that the in-phase stiffness has the same shape, and out-of-phase stiffness has the same dispersion, for all laminates irrespective of stacking sequence and are, in turn, nearly identical to those for the neat epoxy resin. An empirical function is found for the relaxation modulus which, when converted to a dynamic modulus, yields good overall agreement for both of the dynamic stiffness components as a function of frequency.

  5. Studies on blends of cycloaliphatic epoxy resin with varying ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Administrator

    mixture was then poured into preheated open iron mold. (8″ × 8″) and cured into hot air oven at 170°C for 1 h and then post cured at 200°C for 2 h for complete crosslink- ing. All the tests were performed by cutting the sample from the cured sheet. 2.3 Characterization of samples. 2.3a Differential scanning calorimetric ...

  6. Effect of epoxy resin sealing on corrosion resistance of arc spraying aluminium coating using cathode electrophoresis method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pang, Xuming; Wang, Runqiu; Wei, Qian; Zhou, Jianxin

    2018-01-01

    Arc-sprayed Al coating was sealed with epoxy resin using the cathode electrophoresis method. The anti-corrosion performance of the coatings sealed with epoxy resin was studied by means of a 3.5 wt.% NaCl solution test at 40 °C. For comparison, the anti-corrosion performance of Al coating sealed with boiling water was also performed under the same conditions. The results show that epoxy resin with a thickness of about 20 microns can entirely cover open pores and decreases the surface roughness of the as-sprayed Al coating, and the epoxy resin even permeates into the gaps among lamellar splats from open pores. After corrosion, the thickness of the epoxy resin layer is unchanged and can still cover the as-sprayed Al coating entirely. However, the thickness of Al coating sealed with boiling water decreases from 100 to 40 microns, which indicates that the arc-sprayed Al coating has much better corrosion resistance than the Al coating sealed with boiling water. Meanwhile, the content of substituted benzene ring in the epoxy resin increases, but aromatic ring decreases according to the fourier transform infrared spectra, which will cause the rigidity of the epoxy resin to increase, but the toughness slightly decreases after corrosion.

  7. [Curing mode of universal adhesives affects the bond strength of resin cements to dentin].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Z R; Tian, F C; Zhang, L; Han, B; Wang, X Y

    2017-02-18

    To determine the effects of curing mode of one-step and two-step universal adhesives on the micro-tensile bond strength (μTBS) of different dual-cure resin cements to dentin. One-step universal adhesive Single Bond Universal (SBU), and two-step universal adhesive OptiBond Versa (VSA) were chosen as the subjects, one-step self-etching adhesive OptiBond All in One (AIO) and two-step self-etching adhesive Clearfil SE Bond (SEB) were control groups, and two dual-cure resin cements RelyX Ultimate (RLX) and Nexus 3 Universal (NX3) were used in this study. In this study, 80 extracted human molars were selected and the dentin surface was exposed using diamond saw. The teeth were divided into 16 groups according to the adhesives (AIO, SBU, SEB, VSA), cure modes of adhesives (light cure, non-light cure) and resin cements (RLX, NX3). The adhesives were applied on the dentin surface following the instruction and whether light cured or not, then the resin cements were applied on the adhesives with 1 mm thickness and light cured (650 mW/cm(2) for 20 s. A resin was built up (5 mm) on the cements and light cured layer by layer. After water storage for 24 h, the specimens were cut into resin-cement-dentin strips with a cross sectional area of 1 mm×1 mm and the μTBS was measured. Regarding one-step universal adhesive (SBU) light cured, the μTBS with RLX [(35.45±7.04) MPa] or NX3 [(26.84±10.39) MPa] were higher than SBU non-light cured with RLX [(17.93±8.93) MPa)] or NX3 [(10.07±5.89) MPa, Padhesive (VSA) and control adhesive (SEB), curing mode did not affect the μTBS when used with either RLX or NX3 (25.98-32.24 MPa, P>0.05). Curing mode of one-step universal adhesive may affect the μTBS between dual-cure resin cements and dentin, while for two-step universal adhesive, the curing mode and the type of resin cements did not influence the μTBS.

  8. Color Stability of Heat‑cure Acrylic Resin Subjected to Simulated ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    heat‑cure acrylic resin (Ivoclar Triplex Hot‑V) specimens are randomly allocated into four ..... subsequently release oxygen and loosens debris by mechanical means. ... of external colorants, i.e., food substances and colorants used in denture ...

  9. Surface flashover performance of epoxy resin microcomposites improved by electron beam irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Yin; Min, Daomin [State Key Laboratory of Electrical Insulation and Power Equipment, Xi' an Jiaotong University, Xi' an 710049 (China); Li, Shengtao, E-mail: stli@mail.xjtu.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Electrical Insulation and Power Equipment, Xi' an Jiaotong University, Xi' an 710049 (China); Li, Zhen; Xie, Dongri [State Key Laboratory of Electrical Insulation and Power Equipment, Xi' an Jiaotong University, Xi' an 710049 (China); Wang, Xuan [Key Laboratory of Engineering Dielectric and its Application, Ministry of Education, Harbin University of Science and Technology, Harbin 150040 (China); Lin, Shengjun [State Key Laboratory of Electrical Insulation and Power Equipment, Xi' an Jiaotong University, Xi' an 710049 (China); Pinggao Group Company Ltd., State Grid High Voltage Switchgear Insulation Materials Laboratory, Pingdingshan 467001 (China)

    2017-06-01

    Highlights: • Epoxy resin microcomposites were irradiated by electron beam with energies of 10 and 20 keV. • Surface flashover voltage increase with the increase of electron beam energy. • Both the untreated and irradiated samples have two trap centers, which are labeled as shallow and deep traps. • Deposition energy in epoxy resin microcomposites increases with electron beam energy, and surface trap properties are determined by deposition energy. • The influence of surface conductivity and trap distribution on flashover voltage is discussed. - Abstract: The influencing mechanism of electron beam irradiation on surface flashover of epoxy resin/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} microcomposite was investigated. Epoxy resin/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} microcomposite samples with a diameter of 50 mm and a thickness of 1 mm were prepared. The samples were irradiated by electron beam with energies of 10 and 20 keV and a beam current of 5 μA for 5 min. Surface potential decay, surface conduction, and surface flashover properties of untreated and irradiated samples were measured. Both the decay rate of surface potential and surface conductivity decrease with an increase in the energy of electron beam. Meanwhile, surface flashover voltage increase. It was found that both the untreated and irradiated samples have two trap centers, which are labeled as shallow and deep traps. The increase in the energy and density of deep surface traps enhance the ability to capture primary emitted electrons. In addition, the decrease in surface conductivity blocks electron emission at the cathode triple junction. Therefore, electron avalanche at the interface between gas and an insulating material would be suppressed, eventually improving surface flashover voltage of epoxy resin microcomposites.

  10. A biomimetic approach to enhancing interfacial interactions: polydopamine-coated clay as reinforcement for epoxy resin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Liping; Phua, Si Lei; Teo, Jun Kai Herman; Toh, Cher Ling; Lau, Soo Khim; Ma, Jan; Lu, Xuehong

    2011-08-01

    A facile biomimetic method was developed to enhance the interfacial interaction in polymer-layered silicate nanocomposites. By mimicking mussel adhesive proteins, a monolayer of polydopamine was constructed on clay surface by a controllable coating method. The modified clay (D-clay) was incorporated into an epoxy resin, it is found that the strong interfacial interactions brought by the polydopamine benefits not only the dispersion of the D-clay in the epoxy but also the effective interfacial stress transfer, leading to greatly improved thermomechanical properties at very low inorganic loadings. Rheological and infrared spectroscopic studies show that the interfacial interactions between the D-clay and epoxy are dominated by the hydrogen bonds between the catechol-enriched polydopamine and the epoxy.

  11. Optical and Thermal Analysis of the Time Evolution of Curing in Resins by Photothermal Techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Torres, P.; Zambrano-Arjona, M.; Aguilar, G.; Alvarado-Gil, J. J.

    2012-11-01

    Four shades of a commercial visible-light curing dental resin are analyzed using photothermal techniques. The thermal effusivities of the dental resin shades before curing are measured using a variant of the conventional photoacoustic technique. The thermal diffusivities before and after curing are measured using infrared photothermal radiometry in the forward emission configuration. The time evolution process of the photocuring resin is monitored by photothermal radiometry in the forward and backward emission configurations. Inversion of the time evolution signal of the different configurations used permits one to obtain the time evolution of the thermal and optical properties during the photocuring. The thermal effusivity and thermal diffusivity exhibit exponential growth, while the optical absorption decreases exponentially due to the curing process. The relationship of these phenomena with the decrease of monomer concentration induced by the curing is discussed.

  12. Nanostructured composites based on carbon nanotubes and epoxy resin for use as radar absorbing materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva, Valdirene Aparecida [Instituto Tecnologico de Aeronautica (ITA), Sao Jose dos Campos, SP (Brazil); Folgueras, Luiza de Castro; Candido, Geraldo Mauricio; Paula, Adriano Luiz de; Rezende, Mirabel Cerqueira, E-mail: mirabelmcr@iae.cta.br [Instituto de Aeronautica e Espaco (IAE), Sao Jose dos Campos, SP (Brazil). Div. de Materiais; Costa, Michelle Leali [Universidade Estadual Paulista Julio de Mesquita Filho (DMT/UNESP), Guaratingueta, SP (Brazil). Dept. de Materiais e Tecnologia

    2013-07-01

    Nanostructured polymer composites have opened up new perspectives for multifunctional materials. In particular, carbon nanotubes (CNTs) present potential applications in order to improve mechanical and electrical performance in composites with aerospace application. The combination of epoxy resin with multi walled carbon nanotubes results in a new functional material with enhanced electromagnetic properties. The objective of this work was the processing of radar absorbing materials based on formulations containing different quantities of carbon nanotubes in an epoxy resin matrix. To reach this objective the adequate concentration of CNTs in the resin matrix was determined. The processed structures were characterized by scanning electron microscopy, rheology, thermal and reflectivity in the frequency range of 8.2 to 12.4 GHz analyses. The microwave attenuation was up to 99.7%, using only 0.5% (w/w) of CNT, showing that these materials present advantages in performance associated with low additive concentrations (author)

  13. Preparation and Characterization of New Geopolymer-Epoxy Resin Hybrid Mortars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raffaele Cioffi

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The preparation and characterization of metakaolin-based geopolymer mortars containing an organic epoxy resin are presented here for the first time. The specimens have been prepared by means of an innovative in situ co-reticulation process, in mild conditions, of commercial epoxy based organic resins and geopolymeric slurry. In this way, geopolymer based hybrid mortars characterized by a different content of normalized sand (up to 66% in weight and by a homogeneous dispersion of the organic resin have been obtained. Once hardened, these new materials show improved compressive strength and toughness in respect to both the neat geopolymer and the hybrid pastes since the organic polymer provides a more cohesive microstructure, with a reduced amount of microcracks. The microstructural characterization allows to point out the presence of an Interfacial Transition Zone similar to that observed in cement based mortars and concretes. A correlation between microstructural features and mechanical properties has been studied too.

  14. Preparation and Characterization of New Geopolymer-Epoxy Resin Hybrid Mortars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colangelo, Francesco; Roviello, Giuseppina; Ricciotti, Laura; Ferone, Claudio; Cioffi, Raffaele

    2013-07-17

    The preparation and characterization of metakaolin-based geopolymer mortars containing an organic epoxy resin are presented here for the first time. The specimens have been prepared by means of an innovative in situ co-reticulation process, in mild conditions, of commercial epoxy based organic resins and geopolymeric slurry. In this way, geopolymer based hybrid mortars characterized by a different content of normalized sand (up to 66% in weight) and by a homogeneous dispersion of the organic resin have been obtained. Once hardened, these new materials show improved compressive strength and toughness in respect to both the neat geopolymer and the hybrid pastes since the organic polymer provides a more cohesive microstructure, with a reduced amount of microcracks. The microstructural characterization allows to point out the presence of an Interfacial Transition Zone similar to that observed in cement based mortars and concretes. A correlation between microstructural features and mechanical properties has been studied too.

  15. Green Preparation of Epoxy/Graphene Oxide Nanocomposites Using a Glycidylamine Epoxy Resin as the Surface Modifier and Phase Transfer Agent of Graphene Oxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Xinlei; Zhou, Yang; Peng, Mao

    2016-01-27

    In studies of epoxy/graphene oxide (GO) nanocomposites, organic solvents are commonly used to disperse GO, and vigorous mechanical processes and complicated modification of GO are usually required, increasing the cost and hindering the development and application of epoxy nanocomposites. Here, we report a green, facile, and efficient method of preparing epoxy/GO nanocomposites. When triglycidyl para-aminophenol (TGPAP), a commercially available glycidyl amine epoxy resin with one tertiary amine group per molecule, is used as both the surface modifier and phase transfer agent of GO, GO can be directly and rapidly transferred from water to diglycidyl ether of bisphenol A and other types of epoxy resins by manual stirring under ambient conditions, whereas GO cannot be transferred to these epoxy resins in the absence of TGPAP. The interaction between TGPAP and GO and the effect of the TGPAP content on the dispersion of GO in the epoxy matrix were investigated systematically. Superior dispersion and exfoliation of GO nanosheets and remarkably improved mechanical properties, including tensile and flexural properties, toughness, storage modulus, and microhardness, of the epoxy/GO nanocomposites with a suitable amount of TGPAP were demonstrated. This method is organic-solvent-free and technically feasible for large-scale preparation of high-performance nanocomposites; it opens up new opportunities for exploiting the unique properties of graphene or even other nanofillers for a wide range of applications.

  16. Preparation and Characterization of Liquid Crystalline Polyurethane/Al2O3/Epoxy Resin Composites for Electronic Packaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shaorong Lu

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Liquid crystalline polyurethane (LCPU/Al2O3/epoxy resin composites were prepared by using LCPU as modifier. The mechanical properties, thermal stability, and electrical properties of the LCPU/Al2O3/epoxy resin composites were investigated systematically. The thermal oxidation analysis indicated that LCPU/Al2O3/epoxy resin composites can sustain higher thermal decomposition temperature. Meanwhile, coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE was also found to decrease with addition of LCPU and nano-Al2O3.

  17. Mechanical and Anticorrosive Properties of Graphene/Epoxy Resin Composites Coating Prepared by in-Situ Method

    OpenAIRE

    Zhiyi Zhang; Wenhui Zhang; Diansen Li; Youyi Sun; Zhuo Wang; Chunling Hou; Lu Chen; Yang Cao; Yaqing Liu

    2015-01-01

    The graphene nanosheets-based epoxy resin coating (0, 0.1, 0.4 and 0.7 wt %) was prepared by a situ-synthesis method. The effect of polyvinylpyrrolidone/reduced graphene oxide (PVP-rGO) on mechanical and thermal properties of epoxy resin coating was investigated using nanoindentation technique and thermogravimetric analysis, respectively. A significant enhancement (ca. 213% and 73 °C) in the Young modulus and thermal stability of epoxy resin coating was obtained at a loading of 0.7 wt %, re...

  18. Effect of Different Thicknesses of Pressable Ceramic Veneers on Polymerization of Light-cured and Dual-cured Resin Cements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Seok-Hwan; Lopez, Arnaldo; Berzins, David W; Prasad, Soni; Ahn, Kwang Woo

    2015-05-01

    This study evaluated the effects of ceramic veneer thicknesses on the polymerization of two different resin cements. A total of 80 ceramic veneer disks were fabricated by using a pressable ceramic material (e.max Press; Ivoclar Vivadent) from a Low Translucency (LT) ingot (A1 shade). These disks were divided into light-cured (LC; NX3 Nexus LC; Kerr) and dual-cured (DC; NX3 Nexus DC; Kerr) and each group was further divided into four subgroups, based on ceramic disk thickness (0.3, 0.6, 0.9, and 1.2 mm). The values of Vickers microhardness (MH) and degree of conversion (DOC) were obtained for each specimen after a 24-hour storage period. Association between ceramic thickness, resin cement type, and light intensity readings (mW/cm(2)) with respect to microhardness and degree of conversion was statistically evaluated by using analysis of variance (ANOVA). For the DOC values, there was no significant difference observed among the LC resin cement subgroups, except in the 1.2 mm subgroup; only the DOC value (14.0 ± 7.4%) of 1.2 mm DC resin cement had significantly difference from that value (28.9 ± 7.5%) of 1.2 mm LC resin cement (p resin cement groups, there was statistically significant difference (p resin cement groups demonstrated higher values than DC resin cement groups. On the other hands, among the DC resin cement subgroups, the MH values of 1.2 mm DC subgroup was significantly lower than the 0.3 mm and 0.6 mm subgroups (p 0.05). The degree of conversion and hardness of the resin cement was unaffected with veneering thicknesses between 0.3 and 0.9 mm. However, the DC resin cement group resulted in a significantly lower DOC and MH values for the 1.2 mm subgroup. While clinically adequate polymerization of LC resin cement can be achieved with a maximum 1.2 mm of porcelain veneer restoration, the increase of curing time or light intensity is clinically needed for DC resin cements at the thickness of more than 0.9 mm.

  19. Multi-step cure kinetic model of ultra-thin glass fiber epoxy prepreg exhibiting both autocatalytic and diffusion-controlled regimes under isothermal and dynamic-heating conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Ye Chan; Min, Hyunsung; Hong, Sungyong; Wang, Mei; Sun, Hanna; Park, In-Kyung; Choi, Hyouk Ryeol; Koo, Ja Choon; Moon, Hyungpil; Kim, Kwang J.; Suhr, Jonghwan; Nam, Jae-Do

    2017-08-01

    As packaging technologies are demanded that reduce the assembly area of substrate, thin composite laminate substrates require the utmost high performance in such material properties as the coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE), and stiffness. Accordingly, thermosetting resin systems, which consist of multiple fillers, monomers and/or catalysts in thermoset-based glass fiber prepregs, are extremely complicated and closely associated with rheological properties, which depend on the temperature cycles for cure. For the process control of these complex systems, it is usually required to obtain a reliable kinetic model that could be used for the complex thermal cycles, which usually includes both the isothermal and dynamic-heating segments. In this study, an ultra-thin prepreg with highly loaded silica beads and glass fibers in the epoxy/amine resin system was investigated as a model system by isothermal/dynamic heating experiments. The maximum degree of cure was obtained as a function of temperature. The curing kinetics of the model prepreg system exhibited a multi-step reaction and a limited conversion as a function of isothermal curing temperatures, which are often observed in epoxy cure system because of the rate-determining diffusion of polymer chain growth. The modified kinetic equation accurately described the isothermal behavior and the beginning of the dynamic-heating behavior by integrating the obtained maximum degree of cure into the kinetic model development.

  20. Turbine superalloy component defect repair with low-temperature curing resin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunt, David W.; Allen, David B.

    2015-09-08

    Voids, cracks or other similar defects in substrates of thermal barrier coated superalloy components, such as turbine blades or vanes, are filled with resin, without need to remove substrate material surrounding the void by grinding or other processes. The resin is cured at a temperature under 200.degree. C., eliminating the need for post void-filling heat treatment. The void-filled substrate and resin are then coated with a thermal barrier coating.

  1. Impact of structure and functionality of core polyol in highly functional biobased epoxy resins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Xiao; Webster, Dean C

    2011-09-01

    Highly functional biobased epoxy resins were prepared using dipentaerythritol (DPE), tripentaerythritol (TPE), and sucrose as core polyols that were substituted with epoxidized soybean oil fatty acids, and the impact of structure and functionality of the core polyol on the properties of the macromolecular resins and their epoxy-anhydride thermosets was explored. The chemical structures, functional groups, molecular weights, and compositions of epoxies were characterized using nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, Fourier-transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, gel permeation chromatography (GPC), and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI MS). The epoxies were also studied for their bulk viscosity, intrinsic viscosity, and density. Crosslinked with dodecenyl succinic anhydride (DDSA), epoxy-anhydride thermosets were evaluated using differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA), tensile tests, and tests of coating properties. Epoxidized soybean oil (ESO) was used as a control. Overall, the sucrose-based thermosets exhibited the highest moduli, having the most rigid and ductile performance while maintaining the highest biobased content. DPE/TPE-based thermosets showed modestly better thermosetting performance than the control ESO thermoset. Copyright © 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  2. Repair bond strength of dual-cured resin composite core buildup materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Deeb, Heba A; Ghalab, Radwa M; Elsayed Akah, Mai M; Mobarak, Enas H

    2016-03-01

    The reparability of dual-cured resin composite core buildup materials using a light-cured one following one week or three months storage, prior to repair was evaluated. Two different dual-cured resin composites; Cosmecore™ DC automix and Clearfil™ DC automix core buildup materials and a light-cured nanofilled resin composite; Filtek™ Z350 XT were used. Substrate specimens were prepared (n = 12/each substrate material) and stored in artificial saliva at 37 °C either for one week or three months. Afterward, all specimens were ground flat, etched using Scotchbond™ phosphoric acid etchant and received Single Bond Universal adhesive system according to the manufacturers' instructions. The light-cured nanofilled resin composite (Filtek™ Z350 XT) was used as a repair material buildup. To determine the cohesive strength of each solid substrate material, additional specimens from each core material (n = 12) were prepared and stored for the same periods. Five sticks (0.8 ± 0.01 mm(2)) were obtained from each specimen (30 sticks/group) for microtensile bond strength (μTBS) testing. Modes of failure were also determined. Two-way ANOVA revealed a significant effect for the core materials but not for the storage periods or their interaction. After one week, dual-cured resin composite core buildup materials (Cosmecore™ DC and Clearfil™ DC) achieved significantly higher repair μTBS than the light-cured nanofilled resin composite (Filtek™ Z350 XT). However, Clearfil™ DC revealed the highest value, then Cosmecore™ DC and Filtek™ Z350 XT, following storage for 3-month. Repair strength values recovered 64-86% of the cohesive strengths of solid substrate materials. The predominant mode of failure was the mixed type. Dual-cured resin composite core buildup materials revealed acceptable repair bond strength values even after 3-month storage.

  3. Measurement of glass transition temperature, residual heat of reaction and mixing ratio of epoxy resins using near infrared spectroscopy: a preliminary study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Houmøller, Lars Plejdrup; Laursen, Peter Clemen

    2003-01-01

    As a measure of the degree of curing of epoxy resins, the glass transition temperature, Tg, and the residual heat of reaction, DeltaHr, are often used. In this study, near infrared spectroscopy and multivariate calibration (partial least squares regression (PLSR)) have been used to monitor the two...... variables, using differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) as the reference method. The epoxy under study was a commercial system consisting of the resin, trimethylolpropanetriglycidylether, and the hardener, 3-aminomethyl-3,5,5,-trimethylcyclohexylamine. Using samples cured under different conditions......, calibrations resulted in root mean square errors of cross-validation (RMSECV) of 18 J/g for DeltaHr (range for Hr: 6.1-231.3 J/g) and 7.2ºC for Tg (range for Tg: 41.5-98.8ºC). Also, a PLSR model for mixing ratio of hardener and resin was obtained, resulting in a RMSECV of 0.0040 (range for mixing ratio: 0.180-0.380)...

  4. Wear Resistance of Bulk-fill Composite Resin Restorative Materials Polymerized under different Curing Intensities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alkhudhairy, Fahad

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the wear resistance of four bulk-fill composite resin restorative materials cured using high- and low-intensity lights. Twenty-four samples were prepared from each composite resin material (Tetric N-Ceram, SonicFill, Smart Dentin Replacement, Filtek Bulk-Fill) resulting in a total of 96 samples; they were placed into a mold in a single increment. All of the 96 samples were cured using the Bluephase N light curing unit for 20 seconds. Half of the total specimens (n = 48) were light cured using high-intensity output (1,200 mW/cm2), while the remaining half (n = 48) were light cured using low-intensity output (650 mW/cm2). Wear was analyzed by a three-dimensional (3D) noncontact optical profilometer (Contour GT-I, Bruker, Germany). Mean and standard deviation (SD) of surface loss (depth) after 120,000 cycles for each test material was calculated and analyzed using one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) with a significance level at p materials with each other without taking the curing light intensity into consideration (p = 0.352). A significant difference in the mean surface loss was observed between SonicFill cured using high-intensity light compared with that cured using low-intensity light (p resistance of the four bulk-fill composite resin restorative materials tested compared with lower curing light intensity (650 mW/cm2). Furthermore, SonicFill cured using low-intensity light was the most wear-resistant material tested, whereas Tetric N-Ceram cured using high-intensity light was the least wear resistant. The wear resistance was better with the newly introduced bulk-fill composite resins under low-intensity light curing.

  5. Thermomagnetic processing of liquid-crystalline epoxy resins and their mechanical characterization using nanoindentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yuzhan; Rios, Orlando; Kessler, Michael R

    2014-11-12

    A thermomagnetic processing method was used to produce a biphenyl-based liquid-crystalline epoxy resin (LCER) with oriented liquid-crystalline (LC) domains. The orientation of the LCER was confirmed and quantified using two-dimensional X-ray diffraction. The effect of molecular alignment on the mechanical and thermomechanical properties of the LCER was investigated using nanoindentation and thermomechanical analysis, respectively. The effect of the orientation on the fracture behavior was also examined. The results showed that macroscopic orientation of the LC domains was achieved, resulting in an epoxy network with an anisotropic modulus, hardness, creep behavior, and thermal expansion.

  6. Polyaniline stabilized magnetite nanoparticle reinforced epoxy nanocomposites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Hongbo; Tadakamalla, Sruthi; Huang, Yudong; Colorado, Henry A; Luo, Zhiping; Haldolaarachchige, Neel; Young, David P; Wei, Suying; Guo, Zhanhu

    2012-10-24

    Magnetic epoxy polymer nanocomposites (PNCs) reinforced with magnetite (Fe(3)O(4)) nanoparticles (NPs) have been prepared at different particle loading levels. The particle surface functionality tuned by conductive polyaniline (PANI) is achieved via a surface initiated polymerization (SIP) approach. The effects of nanoparticle loading, surface functionality, and temperature on both the viscosity and storage/loss modulus of liquid epoxy resin suspensions and the physicochemical properties of the cured solid PNCs are systematically investigated. The glass transition temperature (T(g)) of the cured epoxy filled with the functionalized NPs has shifted to the higher temperature in the dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA) compared with that of the cured pure epoxy. Enhanced mechanical properties of the cured epoxy PNCs filled with the functionalized NPs are observed in the tensile test compared with that of the cured pure epoxy and cured epoxy PNCs filled with as-received NPs. The uniform NP distribution in the cured epoxy PNCs filled with functionalized NPs is observed by scanning electron microscope (SEM). These magnetic epoxy PNCs show the good magnetic properties and can be attached by a permanent magnet. Enhanced interfacial interaction between NPs and epoxy is revealed in the fracture surface analysis. The PNCs formation mechanism is also interpreted from the comprehensive analysis based on the TGA, DSC, and FTIR in this work.

  7. Determination of the cross-linking degree of unmodified epoxy resin by cycloaliphatic polyamine and polyamidamin hardeners by ftir spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zlatković Saša

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Unmodified epoxy resin GY250 was crosslinked by the cycloaliphatic polyamino hardener HY847 and polyamidamine hardener HY848 in the different mass ratios. The degree of crosslinking of the epoxy resin and the quantity of unreacted epoxy groups were determined by a spectroscopic FTIR method. The optimal time of complete crosslinking, as a criterion of the degree, was determined by measuring the film hardness indirectly (JUS H.C8.055. The optimal stoichiometric ratio of 100:18:32 (GY250:HY847:HY848 was defined by correlating parameters which directly depend on the degree of crosslinking and the period of application of the epoxy resins, as a prerequisite for forming 2-component epoxy systems which are comparatively more elastic adhesive and waterproof.

  8. Experimental Investigation and Taguchi Optimisation of Drilling Properties on Teak Wood Reinforced Epoxy Resin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lilly Mercy, J.; Shaqir Tanvir, Mohamed; Swaroopkanth, K.

    2017-05-01

    The drilling properties of teak reinforced epoxy resin composite are explored in this work. The thrust force and temperature during the drilling process was found and optimised. Nine holes were drilled in accordance with L9 orthogonal array on Medium Density Fibre board and Teak wood reinforced epoxy composite board and the thrust force and temperature induced during drilling is measured. Drilling experiments were conducted using CNC Vertical drilling machine and the thrust force was measured using dynamometer and temperature using infra-red thermometer. The experiments were conducted with varying levels of spindle speed and feed rate and optimised using Taguchi optimisation. It was observed that higher thrust and temperature were observed while drilling teak wood composite due to the high mechanical strength of teak wood. The hard and brittle properties of the resin seemed to be more pronounced in the composite. The experimental results were optimised to find the best combination of input parameters for reduced thrust and temperature. When speed increases, thrust force decreases and temperature increases. When feed increases, thrust force increases and temperature decreases. Experimental findings encouragesto use teak wood reinforced epoxy resin as a substitute for the traditionally used Medium Density Fibre Board. The percentage of mixing of teak dust can be increased with various resin combinations to arrive at the best suitable combination for obtaining optimal mechanical properties.

  9. Chronic Dermal Toxicity of Epoxy Resins I. Skin Carcinogenic Potency and General Toxicity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holland, J.M.

    2001-01-16

    Epoxy resins are a diverse class of chemicals that differ in structure, physical properties, and, presumably, biological activity. The purpose of these experiments was to compare the chronic dermal toxicity and carcinogenicity of selected commercial epoxy resins and to determine the potential for positive synergistic carcinogenic interactions between different resins. This work is an extension and continuation of a Department of Energy sponsored program to evaluate epoxy resins for potential occupational health risks. The materials examined were chosen on the basis of their interest to the U.S. government. They are representative of the manufacturer's production at the time, and therefore the data are completely valid only for the specific production period. Results of the experimental exposures will be reported in two parts. This report describes the test materials, their chemical and physical characteristics and the experimental design. General (systemic) toxicity will be evaluated and the skin carcinogenicity of the materials compared. A subsequent report will provide morphological descriptions of skin and significant internal pathology induced by the various treatments.

  10. Thermosetting polymer for dynamic nuclear polarization: Solidification of an epoxy resin mixture including TEMPO

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noda, Yohei, E-mail: noda.yohei@jaea.go.jp [Quantum Beam Science Centre, Sector of Nuclear Science Research, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Shirakata-Shirane, Tokai, Ibaraki 319-1195 (Japan); Kumada, Takayuki [Quantum Beam Science Centre, Sector of Nuclear Science Research, Kansai Photon Science Institute, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Kizugawa, Kyoto 619-0215 (Japan); Yamaguchi, Daisuke; Shamoto, Shin-ichi [Quantum Beam Science Centre, Sector of Nuclear Science Research, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Shirakata-Shirane, Tokai, Ibaraki 319-1195 (Japan)

    2015-03-11

    We investigated the dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) of typical thermosetting polymers (two-component type epoxy resins; Araldite{sup ®} Standard or Araldite{sup ®} Rapid) doped with a (2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidine-1-yl)oxy (TEMPO) radical. The doping process was developed by carefully considering the decomposition of TEMPO during the solidification of the epoxy resin. The TEMPO electron spin in each two-component paste decayed slowly, which was favorable for our study. Furthermore, despite the dissolved TEMPO, the mixture of the two-component paste successfully solidified. With the resulting TEMPO-doped epoxy-resin samples, DNP experiments at 1.2 K and 3.35 T indicated a magnitude of a proton-spin polarization up to 39%. This polarization is similar to that (35%) obtained for TEMPO-doped polystyrene (PS), which is often used as a standard sample for DNP. To combine this solidification of TEMPO-including mixture with a resin-casting technique enables a creation of polymeric target materials with a precise and complex structure.

  11. Epoxy Resins Toughened with Surface Modified Epoxidized Natural Rubber Fibers by One-Step Electrospinning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Joo Ran; Kim, Jung J

    2017-04-27

    Epoxidized natural rubber fibers (ERFs) are developed through one-step electrospinning and directly deposited into epoxy resins without collecting and distributing of fibers. The shape of ERFs shows rough surface due to different evaporation rate of solvent mixture consisting of chloroform and dichloromethane and the average diameter of ERFs is 6.2 µm. The increase of ERFs loading from 0 to 20 wt % into the epoxy resin increases the fracture strain significantly from 1.2% to 13% and toughness from 0.3 MPa to 1.9 MPa by a factor of 7. However, the tensile strength and Young's modulus decrease about 34% from 58 MPa to 34 MPa and from 1.4 GPa to 0.9 GPa, respectively. Due to the crosslinking reactions between oxirane groups of ERFs and amine groups in the resin, surface roughness and the high aspect ratio of ERFs, ERFs result in more effective toughening effect with the minimum loss of tensile properties in epoxy resins.

  12. Epoxy Resins Toughened with Surface Modified Epoxidized Natural Rubber Fibers by One-Step Electrospinning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joo Ran Kim

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Epoxidized natural rubber fibers (ERFs are developed through one-step electrospinning and directly deposited into epoxy resins without collecting and distributing of fibers. The shape of ERFs shows rough surface due to different evaporation rate of solvent mixture consisting of chloroform and dichloromethane and the average diameter of ERFs is 6.2 µm. The increase of ERFs loading from 0 to 20 wt % into the epoxy resin increases the fracture strain significantly from 1.2% to 13% and toughness from 0.3 MPa to 1.9 MPa by a factor of 7. However, the tensile strength and Young’s modulus decrease about 34% from 58 MPa to 34 MPa and from 1.4 GPa to 0.9 GPa, respectively. Due to the crosslinking reactions between oxirane groups of ERFs and amine groups in the resin, surface roughness and the high aspect ratio of ERFs, ERFs result in more effective toughening effect with the minimum loss of tensile properties in epoxy resins.

  13. Development of palm oil-based UV-curable epoxy acrylate and urethane acrylate resins for wood coating application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tajau, Rida; Ibrahim, Mohammad Izzat; Yunus, Nurulhuda Mohd; Mahmood, Mohd Hilmi; Salleh, Mek Zah; Salleh, Nik Ghazali Nik

    2014-02-01

    The trend of using renewable sources such as palm oil as raw material in radiation curing is growing due to the demand from the market to produce a more environmental friendly product. In this study, the radiation curable process was done using epoxy acrylate and urethane acrylate resins which are known as epoxidised palm olein acrylate (EPOLA) and palm oil based urethane acrylate (POBUA), respectively. The purpose of the study was to investigate curing properties and the application of this UV-curable palm oil resins for wood coating. Furthermore, the properties of palm oil based coatings are compared with the petrochemical-based compound such as ebecryl (EB) i.e. EB264 and EB830. From the experiment done, the resins from petrochemical-based compounds resulted higher degree of crosslinking (up to 80%) than the palm oil based compounds (up to 70%), where the different is around 10-15%. The hardness property from this two type coatings can reached until 50% at the lower percentage of the oligomer. However, the coatings from petrochemical-based have a high scratch resistance as it can withstand at least up to 3.0 Newtons (N) compared to the palm oil-based compounds which are difficult to withstand the load up to 1.0 N. Finally, the test on the rubber wood substrate showed that the coatings containing benzophenone photoinitiator give higher adhesion property and their also showed a higher glosiness property on the glass substrate compared to the coatings containing irgacure-819 photoinitiator. This study showed that the palm oil coatings can be a suitable for the replacement of petrochemicals compound for wood coating. The palm oil coatings can be more competitive in the market if the problems of using high percentage palm oil oligomer can be overcome as the palm oil price is cheap enough.

  14. Impact of a heteroatom in a structure-activity relationship study on analogues of phenyl glycidyl ether (PGE) from epoxy resin systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niklasson, Ida B; Delaine, Tamara; Luthman, Kristina; Karlberg, Ann-Therese

    2011-04-18

    Epoxy resins are among the most common causes of occupational contact dermatitis. They are normally used in so-called epoxy resin systems (ERS). These commercial products are combinations of epoxy resins, curing agents, modifiers, and reactive diluents. The most frequently used resins are diglycidyl ethers based on bisphenol A (DGEBA) and bisphenol F (DGEBF). In this study, we have investigated the contact allergenic properties of a series of analogues to the reactive diluent phenyl glycidyl ether (PGE), all with similar basic structures but with varying heteroatoms or with no heteroatom present. The chemical reactivity of the compounds in the test series toward the hexapeptide H-Pro-His-Cys-Lys-Arg-Met-OH was investigated. All epoxides were shown to bind covalently to both cysteine and proline residues. The percent depletion of nonreacted peptide was also studied resulting in ca. 60% depletion when using either PGE, phenyl 2,3-epoxypropyl sulfide (2), or N-(2,3-epoxypropyl)aniline (3), and only 15% when using 1,2-epoxy-4-phenylbutane (4) at the same time point. The skin sensitization potencies of the epoxides using the murine local lymph node assay (LLNA) were evaluated in relation to the observed physicochemical and reactivity properties. To enable determination of statistical significance between structurally closely related compounds, a nonpooled LLNA was performed. It was found that all investigated compounds containing a heteroatom in the α-position to the epoxide were strong sensitizers, congruent with the reactivity data, indicating that the impact of a heteroatom is crucial for the sensitizing capacity for this type of epoxides.

  15. An exponential chemorheological model for viscosity dependence on degree-of-cure of a polyfurfuryl alcohol resin during the post-gel curing stage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dominguez, J.C.; Oliet, M.; Alonso, María Virginia

    2016-01-01

    In the present study, the chemorheological behavior of a bio-based polyfurfuryl alcohol (PFA) resin has been determined by rheological isothermal tests at different curing temperatures for the post-gel curing stage of the resin, using three different amounts of catalyst (2, 4 and 6 wt %). Instead...

  16. Comparison of the Effect of Curing on the Properties of E-Glass/Cyanate modified Epoxy Cross Plied Laminates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nallayan, W. Andrew; Vijayakumar, K. R.; Rasheed, Usama Tariq

    2017-05-01

    High performance polymer composite laminates that are used in Aerospace and Electronics industries requires laminates that are structurally rigid besides exhibiting high stiffness and good di electrical properties. They are required to be transparent to EM waves in order to transmit the signal with almost zero transmission loss. Response of the laminates under different loadings could hence establish a potent material combination with high structural strengths that could be used in sectors dealing with Signal transmissions. The results thus acquired can be used as a database for choosing relatively better materials for Radome and their advanced versions in the coming decades. To augment this, thin laminates with 4 plies with simple stacking configurations of 0/90/0/90 degrees as applicable to a cross plied laminates were fabricated with cyanate ester modified epoxy resin and 1200GSM E glass unidirectional fiber. Flexural and Impact strength were the properties identified for the accessing the structural responses of the Laminate as against room and oven curing conditions. FESEM images were applied to validate the experimental findings.

  17. Electrical properties of epoxy resin based nano-composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tuncer, Enis [High Voltage and Dielectrics, Applied Superconductivity Group, Fusion Energy Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37832-6122 (United States); Sauers, Isidor [High Voltage and Dielectrics, Applied Superconductivity Group, Fusion Energy Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37832-6122 (United States); James, D Randy [High Voltage and Dielectrics, Applied Superconductivity Group, Fusion Energy Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37832-6122 (United States); Ellis, Alvin R [High Voltage and Dielectrics, Applied Superconductivity Group, Fusion Energy Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37832-6122 (United States); Paranthaman, M Parans [Materials Chemistry Group, Chemical Sciences Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37832-6122 (United States); Aytug, Tolga [Materials Chemistry Group, Chemical Sciences Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37832-6122 (United States); Sathyamurthy, Srivatsan [Materials Chemistry Group, Chemical Sciences Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37832-6122 (United States); More, Karren L [Microscopy Microanalysis and Microstructures Group, Materials Science and Technology Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37832-6122 (United States); Li, Jing [Superconductive and Energy Efficient Materials Group, Materials Science and Technology Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States); Goyal, Amit [Superconductive and Energy Efficient Materials Group, Materials Science and Technology Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States)

    2007-01-17

    We investigate the electrical properties of composite materials prepared as nano- and sub-micron-scale metal-oxide particles embedded in a commercial resin. The filler particles are barium titanate and calcium copper titanate. The physical and structural characteristics of the constituents and the fabricated composites are reported. Electrical characterization of the composite samples is performed using time- and frequency-domain dielectric spectroscopy techniques. The electrical breakdown strength of samples with nano- and sub-micron-sized particles have better electrical insulation properties than the unfilled resin.

  18. Fluorinated epoxy resins with high glass transition temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffith, James R.

    1991-01-01

    Easily processed liquid resins of low dielectric constants and high glass transition temperatures are useful for the manufacture of certain composite electronic boards. That combination of properties is difficult to acquire when dielectric constants are below 2.5, glass transition temperatures are above 200 C and processability is of conventional practicality. A recently issued patent (US 4,981,941 of 1 Jan. 1991) teaches practical materials and is the culmination of 23 years of research and effort and 15 patents owned by the Navy in the field of fluorinated resins of several classes. In addition to high fluorine content, practical utility was emphasized.

  19. Effect of fillers in epoxy coatings based on the ED-20 resin on the mechanical properties determined by instrumented microindentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smirnov, S. V.; Veretennikova, I. A.; Smirnova, E. O.; Pestov, A. V.

    2017-12-01

    Epoxy lacquer coatings based on the ED-20 epoxy-diane resin, filled with nanosized TiO2, SiO2 and ZnO oxides and applied on an aluminum-magnesium alloy base, are studied by instrumented indentation. The effect of the duration of loading and the duration of holding under a constant load of 1 N on Martens hardness and the normal elastic modulus, depending on the material of the epoxy lacquer filler, has been established.

  20. The influence of tertiary amine accelerators on the curing behaviors of epoxy/anhydride systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Tao; Zhang, Chongfeng; Zhang, Junying, E-mail: zjybuct@gmail.com; Cheng, Jue

    2014-02-10

    Highlights: • The influences of two types of accelerators (BDMA and DMP-30) on curing reaction of DGEBF/MeHHPA systems were studied comparatively. • The activation energy and kinetic parameters of DGEBF/MeHHPA systems with accelerator content of 0.2 phr and 0.5 phr were calculated, respectively. • The dependence of autocatalytic and non-autocatalytic curing reaction on the loading of accelerators was discussed. • The non-catalytic curing reaction dominated absolutely in the curing process of DGEBF/MeHHPA systems when the accelerator contents were 0.2 phr. - Abstract: Accelerators have significant effects on the curing behaviors of epoxy/anhydride (diglycidyl ether of bisphenol-F/methylhexahydrophthalic anhydride, DGEBF/MeHHPA) systems. Non-isothermal DSC was used to investigate the influence of dimethyl benzylamine (BDMA, 0.2 phr/0.5 phr) and Tris-(dimethyl aminomethyl) phenol (DMP-30, 0.2 phr/0.5 phr) on the curing behaviors of DGEBF/MeHHPA systems, respectively. When the amount of accelerators was kept constant, the activation energy calculated by Kissinger method changed slightly in the presence of either BDMA or DMP-30. And, with increasing the accelerator content from 0.2 phr to 0.5 phr, the value of activation energy decreased from 115 kJ/mol to 85 kJ/mol. Furthermore, the calculation results of Málek method identified that all systems in this study fitted Sesták–Berggren (SB) model and the corresponding model parameters, m and n, were obtained. It was found that the contribution of autocatalytic reaction with low accelerator content (0.2 phr) was far less than that with high accelerator content (0.5 phr)

  1. A Comparative Study on the Thermal Resistance, Flammability and Mechanical Properties of Unsaturated Polyester and Epoxy Resins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Ali Fathizadeh

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Thermal properties, flammability and mechanical properties of three different kinds of unsaturated polyester resins, ortho, iso and vinyl ester and an epoxy resin based on diglycidyl ether of bisphenol-A were investigated. Since these resins are widely used in the composite industry it is vital to recognize their properties. For this purpose, viscosity, burning rate, limiting oxygen index (LOI and flexural properties were measured. Fourier transform infrared (FTIR spectroscopy and thermal gravimetric analysis were also performed. The viscosity of unsaturated polyester resins which was in the range of 300 to 450 cp showed an advantage compared to the viscosity of epoxy resin which was in the range of 600 to 1000 cp. The low viscosity property which is usually seen in unsaturated polyester resins is very important from the processing point of view, which in turn helps to ensure a simple processing. The ortho resin showed the highest conversion and conversion rate among the three unsaturated polyester resins. The vinyl ester resin showed a higher conversion than the iso resin. The results showed that the vinyl ester resin had the highest thermal resistance, flammability and mechanical properties among the unsaturated polyester resins used in this work. On the other hand, although the epoxy resin showed the highest burning rate but it had the highest carbon residue or char yield (12.4% and LOI (20.2%, and consequently the highest thermal resistance. The results of flexural test showed that the epoxy resin had the highest flexural strength (116 MPa and modulus (4.1 GPa and the lowest deflection-at-break (2.8% and toughness in comparison with the unsaturated polyester resins used in this work.

  2. Conventional dual-cure versus self-adhesive resin cements in dentin bond integrity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renata Andreza Talaveira da Silva

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available During post preparation, the root canal is exposed to the oral cavity, and endodontic treatment may fail because of coronal leakage, bacterial infection and sealing inability of the luting cement. OBJECTIVE: this study quantified the interfacial continuity produced with conventional dual-cure and self-adhesive resin cements in the cervical (C, medium (M and apical (A thirds of the root. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Forty single-rooted human teeth were restored using Reforpost # 01 conical glass-fiber posts and different materials (N=10 per group: group AC=Adper™ ScotchBond™ Multi-purpose Plus + AllCem; group ARC=Adper™ ScotchBond™ Multi-purpose Plus + RelyX ARC; group U100=RelyX U100; and group MXC=Maxcem Elite. After being kept in 100% humidity at 37°C for 72 hours, the samples were sectioned parallel to their longitudinal axis and positive epoxy resin replicas were made. The scanning electron micrographs of each third section of the teeth were combined using Image Analyst software and measured with AutoCAD-2002. We obtained percentage values of the interfacial continuity. RESULTS: Interfacial continuity was similar in the apical, medium and cervical thirds of the roots within the groups (Friedman test, p>0.05. Comparison of the different cements in a same root third showed that interfacial continuity was lower in MXC (C=45.5%; M=48.5%; A=47.3% than in AC (C=85.9%, M=81.8% and A=76.0%, ARC (C=83.8%, M=82.4% and A=75.0% and U100 (C=84.1%, M=82.4% and A=77.3% (Kruskal-Wallis test, p<0.05. CONCLUSIONS: Allcem, Rely X ARC and U100 provide the best cementation; cementation was similar among root portions; in practical terms, U100 is the best resin because it combines good cementation and easy application and none of the cements provides complete interfacial continuity.

  3. Mechanical and Anticorrosive Properties of Graphene/Epoxy Resin Composites Coating Prepared by in-Situ Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhiyi Zhang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The graphene nanosheets-based epoxy resin coating (0, 0.1, 0.4 and 0.7 wt % was prepared by a situ-synthesis method. The effect of polyvinylpyrrolidone/reduced graphene oxide (PVP-rGO on mechanical and thermal properties of epoxy resin coating was investigated using nanoindentation technique and thermogravimetric analysis, respectively. A significant enhancement (ca. 213% and 73 °C in the Young modulus and thermal stability of epoxy resin coating was obtained at a loading of 0.7 wt %, respectively. Furthermore, the erosion resistance of graphene nanosheets-based epoxy resin coating was investigated by electrochemical measurement. The results showed also that the Rrcco (ca. 0.3 mm/year of graphene nanosheets-based epoxy resin coating was far lower than neat epoxy resin (1.3 mm/year. Thus, this approach provides a novel route for improving erosion resistance and mechanical-thermal stability of polymers coating, which is expected to be used in mechanical-thermal-corrosion coupling environments.

  4. Mechanical and anticorrosive properties of graphene/epoxy resin composites coating prepared by in-situ method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhiyi; Zhang, Wenhui; Li, Diansen; Sun, Youyi; Wang, Zhuo; Hou, Chunling; Chen, Lu; Cao, Yang; Liu, Yaqing

    2015-01-20

    The graphene nanosheets-based epoxy resin coating (0, 0.1, 0.4 and 0.7 wt %) was prepared by a situ-synthesis method. The effect of polyvinylpyrrolidone/reduced graphene oxide (PVP-rGO) on mechanical and thermal properties of epoxy resin coating was investigated using nanoindentation technique and thermogravimetric analysis, respectively. A significant enhancement (ca. 213% and 73 °C) in the Young modulus and thermal stability of epoxy resin coating was obtained at a loading of 0.7 wt %, respectively. Furthermore, the erosion resistance of graphene nanosheets-based epoxy resin coating was investigated by electrochemical measurement. The results showed also that the Rrcco (ca. 0.3 mm/year) of graphene nanosheets-based epoxy resin coating was far lower than neat epoxy resin (1.3 mm/year). Thus, this approach provides a novel route for improving erosion resistance and mechanical-thermal stability of polymers coating, which is expected to be used in mechanical-thermal-corrosion coupling environments.

  5. Effect of epoxy resin and hardener containing microcapsules on healing efficiency of epoxy adhesive based metal joints

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khan, Nazrul Islam [Department of Mechanical Engineering, National Institute of Technology Silchar, Silchar 788010, Assam (India); Halder, Sudipta, E-mail: shalder@nits.ac.in [Department of Mechanical Engineering, National Institute of Technology Silchar, Silchar 788010, Assam (India); Goyat, M.S. [Department of Physics, University of Petroleum & Energy Studies, Dehradun, Uttarakhand 248007 (India)

    2016-03-01

    Dual component microcapsules of epoxy resin and polyamine hardener with polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) shell were synthesized using a water-oil-water emulsion solvent evaporation method. The high concentration of sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) was used to reduce the thickness of shell wall of dual component microcapsules. The dual microcapsules of 1:1 weight ratio were introduced in the epoxy adhesive to study the healing effect. The morphology, chemical structure and thermal characteristics of the microcapsules were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), respectively. The insertion of dual component microcapsules in epoxy matrix reduced the lap shear strength of adhesive joints, which may be attributed to the generation of stress concentration cites because of micron sized capsules. However, the extension and absorbed failure energy of adhesive joints under uniaxial loading increased with the increase of concentration of dual microcapsules. The viscoelastic nature of the dual microcapsules may be responsible for this enhancement. Significant enhancement in the healing efficiency (90.93%) of the joints was achieved for 10 wt% of dual microcapsules. The crack pinning and crack blunting mechanisms at the vicinity of the crack path adjacent to the microcapsules were found responsible for significant enhancement in the healing efficiency of the adhesive joints. - Highlights: • High SDS concentration was used to control the dual component microcapsules shell wall thickness. • Self-healing performance of dual component microcapsules reinforced epoxy adhesive based single lap joints was studied. • 90.93% of the damage healing was achieved for self-healing adhesive based single lap joints. • Increase in concentration of microcapsules reduces the lap shear properties of the self-healing joints.

  6. Development of highly effective neutron shielding material made of phenol-novolac type epoxy resin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, Soo Haeng; Jeong, Myeong Soo; Hong, Sun Seok; Lee, Won Kyoung; Kim, Ik Soo; Shin, Young Joon; Do, Jae Bum; Ro, Seung Gy; Oh, Seok Jin

    1998-06-01

    Because the exposure to radiation in the nuclear facilities can be fatal to human, it is important to reduce the radiation dose level to a tolerable level. The purpose of this study is to develop highly effective neutron shielding materials for the shipping and storage cask of radioactive materials or in the nuclear/radiation facilities. On this study, we developed epoxy resin based neutron shielding materials and their various material properties, including neutron shielding ability, fire resistance, combustion characteristics, radiation resistance, thermal and mechanical properties were evaluated experimentally. Especially we developed phenol-novolac type epoxy resin based neutron shielding materials and their characteristics were also evaluated. (author). 22 refs., 11 tabs., 21 figs

  7. Hygrothermal Effect on the Impact Response of Carbon Composites with Epoxy Resin Enhanced by Nanoclays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reis, P. N. B.; Silva, A. P.; Santos, P.; Ferreira, J. A. M.

    2013-09-01

    This paper presents the results of the hygrothermal effect on the impact response of carbon/epoxy composites and the benefits gained from doping the epoxy resin with nanoclays previously subjected to a silane treatment appropriate for the resin. The nanoclay reinforcement increased the maximum load and the elastic recovery of the composites. The thermal degradation caused by exposure to 60°C for 10 days was insignificant, while the immersion in water at 60°C for 30 days led to a continuous reduction in the maximum load and the elastic recovery. Multiple impacts resulted in a continuous and nearly linear degradation of the impact response both of dry and environmentally assisted specimens.

  8. Current-Voltage Characteristics of the Composites Based on Epoxy Resin and Carbon Nanotubes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iwona Pełech

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Polymer composites based on epoxy resin were prepared. Multiwalled carbon nanotubes synthesized on iron-cobalt catalyst were applied as a filler in a polymer matrix. Chlorine or hydroxyl groups were incorporated on the carbon nanotubes surface via chlorination or chlorination followed by hydroxylation. The effect of functionalized carbon nanotubes on the epoxy resin matrix is discussed in terms of the state of CNTs dispersion in composites as well as electrical properties. For the obtained materials current-voltage characteristics were determined. They had a nonlinear character and were well described by an exponential-type equation. For all the obtained materials the percolation threshold occurred at a concentration of about 1 wt%. At a higher filler concentration >2 wt%, better conductivity was demonstrated by polymer composites with raw carbon nanotubes. At a lower filler concentration <2 wt%, higher values of electrical conductivity were obtained for polymer composites with modified carbon nanotubes.

  9. Nanostructured composites based on carbon nanotubes and epoxy resin for use as radar absorbing materials

    OpenAIRE

    Silva,Valdirene Aparecida; Folgueras,Luiza de Castro; Candido, Geraldo Mauricio; Paula, Adriano Luiz de; Rezende,Mirabel Cerqueira; Costa, Michelle Leali [UNESP

    2013-01-01

    Nanostructured polymer composites have opened up new perspectives for multifunctional materials. In particular, carbon nanotubes (CNTs) present potential applications in order to improve mechanical and electrical performance in composites with aerospace application. The combination of epoxy resin with multiwalled carbon nanotubes results in a new functional material with enhanced electromagnetic properties. The objective of this work was the processing of radar absorbing materials based on fo...

  10. Comparison of Eight Month Coastal Polluted Porcelain and Epoxy Resin Outdoor Insulators

    OpenAIRE

    Waluyo; Ngapuli I. Sinisuka,; Parouli M. Pakpahan,; Suwarno; Maman A. Djauhari(2)

    2008-01-01

    This study presents the experimental results of eight months naturally coastal polluted outdoor porcelain and epoxy resin insulators. The experiments were leakage current and applied high voltage measurements used a two-channel storage digital oscilloscope, in the hermetically sealed chamber, where temperature, humidity , pressure and applied voltage could be adjusted and measured simultaneously. The leakage current waveforms were analyzed using FFT and the relation t...

  11. Reduced sensitizing capacity of epoxy resin systems: a structure-activity relationship study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niklasson, Ida B; Broo, Kerstin; Jonsson, Charlotte; Luthman, Kristina; Karlberg, Ann-Therese

    2009-11-01

    Epoxy resins can be prepared from numerous chemical compositions. Until recently, alternatives to epoxy resins based on diglycidyl ethers of bisphenol A (DGEBA) or bisphenol F (DGEBF) monomers have not received commercial interest, but are presently doing so, as epoxy resins with various properties are desired. Epoxy resin systems are known to cause allergic contact dermatitis because of contents of uncured monomers, reactive diluents, and hardeners. Reactive diluents, for example, glycidyl ethers, which also contain epoxide moieties, are added to reduce viscosity and improve polymerization. We have investigated the contact allergenic properties of a series of six analogues to phenyl glycidyl ether (PGE), all with similar basic structures but with varying carbon chain lengths and degrees of saturation. The chemical reactivity of the compounds in the test series toward the hexapeptide H-Pro-His-Cys-Lys-Arg-Met-OH was investigated. All epoxides were shown to bind covalently to both cysteine and proline residues. The percent depletion of nonreacted peptide was also studied resulting in 88% depletion when using PGE and 46% when using butyl glycidyl ether (5) at the same time point, thus revealing a large difference between the fastest and the slowest reacting epoxide. The skin sensitization potencies of the epoxides using the murine local lymph node assay (LLNA) were evaluated in relation to the observed physicochemical and reactivity properties. To enable determination of statistical significance between structurally closely related compounds, a nonpooled LLNA was performed. It was found that the compounds investigated ranged from strong to weak sensitizers, congruent with the reactivity data, indicating that even small changes in chemical structure result in significant differences in sensitizing capacity.

  12. Effect of stress on the fluorescence of Kevlar fiber. [With and without epoxy resin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Richardson, J.H.; Haugen, G.R.; Penn, L.S.; Feikert, J.H.; Sherry, R.J.

    1976-10-18

    A preliminary feasibility study was initiated to determine if laser-induced fluorescence might reveal molecular changes due to uniaxial stresses on Kevlar, an aromatic polyamide fiber. The fluorescence spectrum, with a peak at 490 nm (excited by 290 nm), did not shift with stress, but the fluorescence intensity generally increased with stress. The magnitude of the increase was attenuated by epoxy resin. Implications and applications of the results are discussed. (DLC)

  13. Development of sealed radioactive sources immobilized in epoxy resin for verification of detectors used in nuclear medicine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tiezzi, Rodrigo; Rostelato, Maria Elisa C.M.; Nagatomi, Helio R.; Zeituni, Calos A.; Benega, Marcos A.G.; Souza, Daiane B. de; Costa, Osvaldo L. da; Souza, Carla D.; Rodrigues, Bruna T.; Souza, Anderson S. de; Peleias Junior, Fernando S.; Santos, Rafael Melo dos; Melo, Emerson Ronaldo de, E-mail: rktiezzi@gmail.com [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Karan Junior, Dib [Universidade de Sao Paulo (USP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2015-07-01

    The radioactive sealed sources are used in verification ionization chamber detectors, which measure the activity of radioisotopes used in several areas, such as in nuclear medicine. The measurement of the activity of radioisotopes must be made with accuracy, because it is administered to a patient. To ensure the proper functioning of the ionization chamber detectors, standardized tests are set by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) and the National Nuclear Energy Commission using sealed radioactive sources of Barium-133, Cesium-137 and Cobalt-57. The tests assess the accuracy, precision, reproducibility and linearity of response of the equipment. The focus of this work was the study and the development of these radioactive sources with standard Barium-133, Cesium-137 and Cobalt-57,using a polymer, in case commercial epoxy resin of diglycidyl ether of bisphenol A (DGEBA) and a curing agent based on modified polyamine diethylenetriamine (DETA), to immobilize the radioactive material. The polymeric matrix has the main function of fix and immobilize the radioactive contents not allowing them to leak within the technical limits required by the standards of radiological protection in the category of characteristics of a sealed source and additionally have the ability to retain the emanation of any gases that may be formed during the manufacture process and the useful life of this artifact. The manufacturing process of a sealed source standard consists of the potting ,into bottle standardized geometry, in fixed volume of a quantity of a polymeric matrix within which is added and dispersed homogeneously to need and exact amount in activity of the radioactive materials standards. Accordingly, a study was conducted for the choice of epoxy resin, analyzing its characteristics and properties. Studies and tests were performed, examining the maximum solubility of the resin in water (acidic solution, simulating the conditions of radioactive solution), loss of mechanical

  14. Characterization-curing-property studies of HBRF 55A resin formulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearce, E. M.; Mijovic, J.

    1985-01-01

    Characterization curing property investigations on HBRF 55A resin formulations are reported. The initial studies on as received cured samples cut from a full-size FWC are reviewed. Inadequacies of as-received and aged samples are pointed out and additional electron microscopic evidence is offered. Characterization of as-received ingredients of HBRF 55A formulation is described. Specifically, Epon 826, Epon 828, EpiRez 5022, RD-2 and various amines, including Tonox and Tonox 60.40, were characterized. Cure kinetics of various formulations are investigated. Changes in physical/thermal properties (viscosity, specific heat, thermal conductivity and density) during cure are described.

  15. Drinking water contaminants from epoxy resin-coated pipes: A field study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajasärkkä, Johanna; Pernica, Marek; Kuta, Jan; Lašňák, Jonáš; Šimek, Zdenĕk; Bláha, Luděk

    2016-10-15

    Rehabilitation of aged drinking water pipes is an extensive renovation and increasingly topical in many European cities. Spray-on-lining of drinking water pipes is an alternative cost-effective rehabilitation technology in which the insides of pipes are relined with organic polymer. A commonly used polymer is epoxy resin consisting of monomer bisphenol A (BPA). Leaching of BPA from epoxy lining to drinking water has been a concern among public and authorities. Currently epoxy lining is not recommended in some countries. BPA leaching has been demonstrated in laboratory studies but the behavior and ageing process of epoxy lining in situ is not well known. In this study 6 locations with different age epoxy linings of drinking water pipes done using two distinct technologies were studied. While bisphenol F, 4-n-nonylphenol, and 4-t-octylphenol were rarely found and in trace concentrations, BPA was detected in majority of samples. Pipes lined with the older technology (LSE) leached more BPA than those with more recent technology (DonPro): maxima in cold water were 0.25 μg/L and 10 ng/L, respectively. Incubation of water in pipes 8-10 h prior to sampling increased BPA concentration in cold water 1.1-43-fold. Hot water temperature caused even more BPA leaching - at maximum 23.5 μg/L. The influence of ageing of epoxy lining on BPA leaching on could be shown in case of LSE technology: locations with 8-9 years old lining leached 4-20-fold more BPA compared to a location with 2-year-old lining. Analysis of metals showed that epoxy lining can reduce especially iron concentration in water. No significant burden to water could be shown by the analyzed 72 volatile organic compounds, including epichlorhydrin, precursor used in epoxy resin. Estrogenicity was detected in water samples with the highest BPA loads. Comparable responses of two yeast bioreporters (estrogen receptor α and BPA-targeted) indicated that bisphenol-like compounds were the main cause of estrogenicity

  16. The separation of waste printed circuit board by dissolving bromine epoxy resin using organic solvent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, P; Chen, Y; Wang, L Y; Zhou, M; Zhou, J

    2013-02-01

    Separation of waste printed circuit boards (WPCBs) has been a bottleneck in WPCBs resource processing. In this study, the separation of WPCBs was performed using dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) as a solvent. Various parameters, which included solid to liquid ratio, temperature, WPCB sizes, and time, were studied to understand the separation of WPCBs by dissolving bromine epoxy resin using DMSO. Experimental results showed that the concentration of dissolving the bromine epoxy resin increased with increasing various parameters. The optimum condition of complete separation of WPCBs was solid to liquid ratio of 1:7 and WPCB sizes of 16 mm(2) at 145°C for 60 min. The used DMSO was vapored under the decompression, which obtained the regenerated DMSO and dissolved bromine epoxy resin. This clean and non-polluting technology offers a new way to separate valuable materials from WPCBs and prevent the environmental pollution of waste printed circuit boards effectively. Crown Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Production of the Large-area Plastic Scintillator for Beta-ray Detection using Epoxy Resin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nam, Jong Soo; Choi, Yong Seok; Hong, Sang Bum; Seo, Bum Kyung; Moon, Jei Kwon; Choi, Jong Won [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-10-15

    In this study, we prepared a plastic scintillator whose manufacturing process is simple and can be freely shaped. A thin plate of the plastic scintillator was manufactured using epoxy resin as a polymer. The plastic scintillator was made by mixing epoxy resin and organic scintillators under various conditions. The optimal mixture ratio to prepare the plastic scintillator was derived from the above results. Using the derived results, we made the large-area plastic scintillator which can quickly measure the contamination site and evaluated characteristics of the large-area plastic scintillator in the laboratory. A thin plate of a plastic scintillator with a simple preparation process can be freely shaped using epoxy resin and organic scintillators such as PPO and POPOP. PPO emits scintillation of light in the ultraviolet range, and POPOP is a wave shifter for moving the wavelength responsible for the PMT. The mixture ratio of PPO and POPOP was determined using their emission spectra. The optimal weight percentage of PPO and POPOP in an organic scintillator was determined to be 0.2 wt%:0.01 wt%. Based on the above results, the large-area plastic scintillator of the window size of a typical pancake-type αβ surface contamination counter was prepared. We want to evaluate the characteristics of the large-area plastic scintillator. However, there were the difficulties in evaluating characteristics of the large-area plastic scintillator. The cross-sectional area of the large-area plastic scintillator is significantly different to PMT.

  18. Thermally activated, single component epoxy systems

    KAUST Repository

    Unruh, David A.

    2011-08-23

    A single component epoxy system in which the resin and hardener components found in many two-component epoxies are combined onto the same molecule is described. The single molecule precursor to the epoxy resin contains both multiple epoxide moieties and a diamine held latent by thermally degradable carbamate linkages. These bis-carbamate "single molecule epoxies" have an essentially infinite shelf life and access a significant range in curing temperatures related to the structure of the carbamate linkages used. © 2011 American Chemical Society.

  19. Cryogenic properties of epoxy resins applied for matrix or impregnating materials; Epokishikei matorikkusu mataha ganshizai no gokuteion tokusei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kashima, T.; Yamanaka, A.; Takasugi, T. [Toyobo, Ltd., Osaka (Japan); Wake, M.; Nakayama, S. [High Energy Accelerator Research Organization, Tsukuba (Japan); Sugawara, K. [Ship and Ocean Foundation, Tokyo (Japan)

    1999-06-07

    We use the epoxy resin as matrix of the FRP and impregnant for the conductor fixation of superconducting coil used in the very low temperature field. However, we have not always clarified the relationship between low-temperature dependence of the FRP and stability of the coil and impregnation-ness of epoxy and resin composition. We examined impregnation-ness for ultra-high powerful polyethylene fiber and Nb{sub 3}Sn conductor using epoxy of the composition, which differed in this paper variously, and the cold-resistance of the FRP and impregnation conductor was examined. (NEDO)

  20. Depth of cure of resin composites: is the ISO 4049 method suitable for bulk fill materials?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flury, Simon; Hayoz, Stefanie; Peutzfeldt, Anne; Hüsler, Jürg; Lussi, Adrian

    2012-05-01

    To evaluate if depth of cure D(ISO) determined by the ISO 4049 method is accurately reflected with bulk fill materials when compared to depth of cure D(new) determined by Vickers microhardness profiles. D(ISO) was determined according to "ISO 4049; Depth of cure" and resin composite specimens (n=6 per group) were prepared of two control materials (Filtek Supreme Plus, Filtek Silorane) and four bulk fill materials (Surefil SDR, Venus Bulk Fill, Quixfil, Tetric EvoCeram Bulk Fill) and light-cured for either 10s or 20s. For D(new), a mold was filled with one of the six resin composites and light-cured for either 10 s or 20 s (n=22 per group). The mold was placed under a microhardness indentation device and hardness measurements (Vickers hardness, VHN) were made at defined distances, beginning at the resin composite that had been closest to the light-curing unit (i.e. at the "top") and proceeding toward the uncured resin composite (i.e. toward the "bottom"). On the basis of the VHN measurements, Vickers hardness profiles were generated for each group. D(ISO) varied between 1.76 and 6.49 mm with the bulk fill materials showing the highest D(ISO). D(new) varied between 0.2 and 4.0 mm. D(new) was smaller than D(ISO) for all resin composites except Filtek Silorane. For bulk fill materials the ISO 4049 method overestimated depth of cure compared to depth of cure determined by Vickers hardness profiles. Copyright © 2012 Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. New technique of stereolithography to local curing in thermosensitive resins using CO2 laser

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Munhoz, A. L. J.

    1998-04-01

    Full Text Available A theoretical and experimental study of thermosensitive resins used in thermal stereolithography is presented. The process of local curing through the application of infrared radiation, which has proved to be useful in a new technique for the making of prototypes by means of selective heating with CO2 laser (10.6μm, is studied. The ideal composition of the thermosensitive resins has proved to be 10 parts epoxy, 1.4 part diethylene triamine (the curing agent and 0.7 part silica powder. A physical theoretical model is applied for control of the parameters which influence the confinement of the curing in the irradiated bulk. A mathematical model is applied too; it was developed through the resolution of the heat conduction equation dependent on time in cylindrical co-ordinates, which enables to determine the behaviour of curing in terms of irradiation conditions.

    Se presenta un estudio teórico y experimental, sobre resinas termosensibles usadas en estereolitografía térmica. Se estudia el proceso de cura local mediante la aplicación de radiación infrarroja producida por el láser de CO2 (10.6 μm, el cual mostró ser útil en técnicas nuevas, para la fabricación de prototipos por medio de calentamiento selectivo. La composición ideal para cura local de las resinas termosensibles, está en la proporción de 10.0 partes de epoxi, 1.4 partes de dietilentriamina y 0.7 partes de sílice. Para controlar los parámetros que influyen en el confinamiento de la cura a través de la irradiación, se utiliza un modelo teórico-físico. Se utiliza un modelo matemático en coordenadas cilíndricas basado en la ecuación de conducción de calor dependiente del tiempo, que permite determinar el comportamiento de cura en función de las condiciones de irradiación.

  2. Dermatosis profesional por resina epoxi: Presentación de un caso clínico Professional dermatosis for epoxy resin: A clinical case report

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    S Gaviola

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Mostramos un caso de dermatosis profesional originado por plásticos (resinas epoxi y la importancia de la detección precoz. Las resinas epoxi son de gran utilización en todo tipo de industrias (artes graficas, construcción, electrónica, componentes de prótesis traumatológicas, prótesis odontológicas, etc. y sus componentes pueden ser causa de dermatitis de contacto irritativa y por sensibilización.We describe a case of professional dermatosis caused by exposition to plastic products (epoxy resin and importance of early detection. The epoxy resins are widely used in all types of industries (graphics arts, construction, electronics, traumathological and odontological prothesis, etc. and their components may be the cause of contact dermatitis and sensitivity. Risk factors at work with epoxy resins are present during the production base resins, hardening agents, plasticizers and dilutants increase the risk of exposition at work. This requires preventive measures and early diagnosis.

  3. Tensile Properties of Unsaturated Polyester and Epoxy Resin Reinforced with Recycled Carbon-Fiber-Reinforced Plastic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okayasu, Mitsuhiro; Kondo, Yuta

    2017-08-01

    To better understand the mechanical properties of recycled carbon-fiber-reinforced plastic (rCFRP), CFRP crushed into small pieces was mixed randomly in different proportions (0-30 wt%) with two different resins: unsaturated polyester and epoxy resin. Two different sizes of crushed CFRP were used: 0.1 mm × 0.007 mm (milled CFRP) and 30 mm × 2 mm (chopped CFRP). The tensile strength of rCFRP was found to depend on both the proportion and the size of the CFRP pieces. It increased with increasing proportion of chopped CFRP, but decreased with increasing proportion of milled CFRP. There was no clear dependence of the tensile strength on the resin that was used. A low fracture strain was found for rCFRP samples made with chopped CFRP, in contrast to those made with milled CFRP. The fracture strain was found to increase with increasing content of milled CFRP up to 20 wt%, at which point, coalescence of existing microvoids occurred. However, there was a reduction in fracture strain for rCFRP with 30 wt% of milled CFRP, owing to the formation of defects (blow holes). Overall, the fracture strain was higher for rCFRPs based on epoxy resin than for those based on unsaturated polyester with the same CFRP content, because of the high ductility of the epoxy resin. The different tensile properties reflected different failure characteristics, with the use of chopped CFRP leading to a complicated rough fracture surface and with milled CFRP causing ductile failure through the presence of tiny dimple-like fractures. However, for a high content of milled CFRP (30 wt%), large blow holes were observed, leading to low ductility.

  4. Effect of resin chemistry on depth of cure and cytotoxicity of dental resin composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Susila Anand, V. [Rehabilitation Bioengineering Group, Department of Engineering Design, Indian Institute of Technology Madras, Chennai 600036 (India); Department of Conservative Dentistry and Endodontics, Saveetha Dental College, Saveetha University, Chennai 600077 (India); Balasubramanian, Venkatesh, E-mail: chanakya@iitm.ac.in [Rehabilitation Bioengineering Group, Department of Engineering Design, Indian Institute of Technology Madras, Chennai 600036 (India)

    2014-02-15

    Highlights: • Dental composites have differences in polymerization within 2 mm thickness. • Degree of conversion alone may not affect the biocompatibility of composite. • Unreacted double bonds in dental composites may influence biocompatibility. • Magnitude of double bonds depends on the polymerization and chemical composition. • These influence biocompatibility especially if they possess lipophylic properties. -- Abstract: New dental composite restorative materials are being introduced aiming to overcome the disadvantages of contemporary materials. Hence there is a need to analyze the critical properties of these composites to aid in clinical application. This study aims to comparatively analyze the degree of conversion (DC), residual reactivity (DBC/reactivity) and cytotoxicity of 2 composites based on different resin chemistry. Ceram X and Filtek P90 were used in the study to prepare disc shaped samples of 2 mm thickness and 4 mm diameter. The samples for cytotoxicity were cured for 40 s and those of Fourier Transform Infra-red Spectroscopy (FTIR) (DBC/reactivity and DC) for 5 s, 10 s, 20 s and 40 s, at an average intensity of 800 mW/cm{sup 2} with Quartz–Tungsten–Halogen (QTH) light. DC was calculated in 60–100 μm thick and 6 mm diameter samples. Double bonds concentration/reactivity was measured in approximately 80 μm thick sections prepared from the 2 mm thick discs using a hard tissue microtome. The cell viability was scored by Trypan blue exclusion staining technique at 24 h and 48 h. Both composites showed a progressive increase in double bonds/reactivity as the distance from curing probe increased which was inversely proportional to the curing time. The DC of Filtek P90 was 20% and 96% and that of Ceram X 33% and 50% at 5 s and 40 s, respectively. Ceram X showed statistically significantly higher cell viability score at both 24 h and 48 h than Filtek P90. The results were statistically analyzed using non-parametric Kruskal

  5. Thermal properties of epoxy composites filled with boric acid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Visakh, P. M.; Nazarenko, O. B.; Amelkovich, Yu A.; Melnikova, T. V.

    2015-04-01

    The thermal properties of epoxy composites filled with boric acid fine powder at different percentage were studied. Epoxy composites were prepared using epoxy resin ED-20, boric acid as flame-retardant filler, hexamethylenediamine as a curing agent. The prepared samples and starting materials were examined using methods of thermal analysis, scanning electron microscopy and infrared spectroscopy. It was found that the incorporation of boric acid fine powder enhances the thermal stability of epoxy composites.

  6. Experimental design applied optimization of a state in epoxy clay dispersion; Planejamento de experimentos aplicado a otimizacao do estado de dispersao de argilas em epoxi

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paz, Juliana D' Avila; Bertholdi, Jonas; Folgueras, Marilena Valadares; Pezin, Sergio Henrique; Coelho, Luiz Antonio Ferreira, E-mail: julianadpaz@yahoo.com.b [Universidade do Estado de Santa Catarina (UDESC), Joinville, SC (Brazil). Centro de Ciencias Tecnologicas

    2010-07-01

    This paper presents some analysis showed that the exfoliation / intercalation of a montmorillonite clay in epoxy resin such as viscosity, X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and thermogravimetry (TG). Increasing the viscosity of epoxy resin diglycidyl ether bisphenol A with the addition of clay associated with the sonification system at the time of dispersion is a good indication of exfoliation. The X-ray diffraction already cured composite shows a decrease of crystallinity of clay and EDS microanalysis of SEM, non-uniform dispersion of clay in epoxy resin. Thermal analysis TG composite clay / epoxy shows an increase in thermal stability relative to pure epoxy. (author)

  7. Sensitization to reactive diluents and hardeners in epoxy resin systems. IVDK data 2002-2011. Part I: reaction frequencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geier, Johannes; Lessmann, Holger; Hillen, Uwe; Skudlik, Christoph; Jappe, Uta

    2016-02-01

    Epoxy resin systems (ERSs), consisting of resins, reactive diluents, and hardeners, are indispensable in many branches of industry. In order to develop less sensitizing ERS formulations, knowledge of the sensitizing properties of single components is mandatory. To analyse the frequency of sensitization in the patients concerned, as one integral part of a research project on the sensitizing potency of epoxy resin compounds (FP-0324). A retrospective analysis of data from the Information Network of Departments of Dermatology (IVDK), 2002-2011, and a comparison of reaction frequencies with (surrogate) exposure data, were performed. Almost half of the patients sensitized to epoxy resin were additionally sensitized to reactive diluents or hardeners. Among the reactive diluents, 1,6-hexanediol diglycidyl ether was the most frequent allergen, followed by 1,4-butanediol diglycidyl ether, phenyl glycidyl ether, and p-tert-butylphenyl glycidyl ether. Among the hardeners, m-xylylene diamine (MXDA) and isophorone diamine (IPDA) were the most frequent allergens. According to the calculated exposure-related frequency of sensitization, MXDA seems to be a far more important sensitizer than IPDA. Up to 60% of the patients sensitized to hardeners and 15-20% of those sensitized to reactive diluents do not react to epoxy resin. In cases of suspected contact allergy to an ERS, a complete epoxy resin series must be patch tested from the start. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Dielectric spectroscopy of SiO2, ZnO - nanoparticle loaded epoxy resin in the frequency range of 20 Hz to 2 MHz

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thakor, Sanketsinh; Rana, V. A.; Vankar, H. P.

    2017-05-01

    In present work, Bisphenol A-(epichlorhydrin); epoxy resin with hardener N(3-dimethylaminopropyl)-1,3-propylenediamine were used to determine the dielectric properties. Sample of the neat epoxy resin and nanoparticle loaded epoxy resin in the form of disc were prepared of different weight fraction. SiO2 and ZnO nanoparticles were taken as filler in the epoxy resin. Complex permittivity of the prepared samples was measured in the frequency range of 20 Hz to 2 MHz using precision LCR meter at room temperature. The charismatic change in dielectric behavior based on type and concentration of nanoparticle are discussed in detail.

  9. Influence of curing protocol and ceramic composition on the degree of conversion of resin cement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcos Daniel Septimio Lanza

    Full Text Available Abstract Due to increasing of aesthetic demand, ceramic crowns are widely used in different situations. However, to obtain long-term prognosis of restorations, a good conversion of resin cement is necessary. Objective: To evaluate the degree of conversion (DC of one light-cure and two dual-cure resin cements under a simulated clinical cementation of ceramic crowns. Material and Methods: Prepared teeth were randomly split according to the ceramic's material, resin cement and curing protocol. The crowns were cemented as per manufacturer's directions and photoactivated either from occlusal suface only for 60 s; or from the buccal, occlusal and lingual surfaces, with an exposure time of 20 s on each aspect. After cementation, the specimens were stored in deionized water at 37°C for 7 days. Specimens were transversally sectioned from occlusal to cervical surfaces and the DC was determined along the cement line with three measurements taken and averaged from the buccal, lingual and approximal aspects using micro-Raman spectroscopy (Alpha 300R/WITec®. Data were analyzed by 3-way ANOVA and Tukey test at =5%. Results: Statistical analysis showed significant differences among cements, curing protocols and ceramic type (p<0.001. The curing protocol 3x20 resulted in higher DC for all tested conditions; lower DC was observed for Zr ceramic crowns; Duolink resin cement culminated in higher DC regardless ceramic composition and curing protocol. Conclusion: The DC of resin cement layers was dependent on the curing protocol and type of ceramic.

  10. Vickers Hardness of Composite Resins Cured with LED and QTH Units

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alaghemand H

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Statement of Problem: One of the factors affecting the degree of polymerization of light-cured composites is the type of light-curing unit used. In addition, physicomechanical properties of the composite resins depend on the degree of conversion and polymerization. Objectives: Since the type of initiator in new composite resins is not explained by manufacturers, this study is an attempt to compare the depth of hardening, with two LED and QTH light-curing units. Materials and Methods: Fifteen samples prepared from Gradia Direct and Filtek Z250, both of which being universal, were cured with QTH (Astralis 7 and LED (Bluephase C8 light-curing units. All the samples were molded in polyester resin and cut from the middle by a disk. The hardness of the cut area was evaluated at 0, 0.5, 1, 1.5, 2, 2.5, 3, 3.5 and 4-mm depth intervals and also at the same interval as the width of the sample, with Vickers hardness machine, while the samples were placed in a darkroom. Data were statistically analyzed using one-way ANOVA, two-way ANOVA, t-test and post Hoc Tukey’s tests in SPSS, version 16. Results: Filtek Z250 was harder than Gradia Direct at all the depth with both light-curing units. The hardness of Filtek Z250 sample cured with Astralis 7 was higher than that cured with LED, but with Gradia Direct the LED unit resulted in higher hardness. Curing depth was not significantly different between the groups (p = 0.109. Conclusions: Vickers hardness number for both composites used in this study is in an acceptable range for clinical implications. The composites’ composition is important to be considered for selection of light unit. Based on the findings of the present study, LED did not present more curing depth compared with QTH.

  11. Role of Interphase in the Mechanical Behavior of Silica/Epoxy Resin Nanocomposites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi Hua

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available A nanoscale representative volume element has been developed to investigate the effect of interphase geometry and property on the mechanical behavior of silica/epoxy resin nanocomposites. The role of interphase–matrix bonding was also examined. Results suggested that interphase modulus and interfacial bonding conditions had significant influence on the effective stiffness of nanocomposites, while its sensitivities with respect to both the thickness and the gradient property of the interphase was minimal. The stiffer interphase demonstrated a higher load-sharing capacity, which also increased the stress distribution uniformity within the resin nanocomposites. Under the condition of imperfect interfacial bonding, the effective stiffness of nanocomposites was much lower, which was in good agreement with the documented experimental observations. This work could shed some light on the design and manufacturing of resin nanocomposites.

  12. IN VITRO ANTIFUNGAL ACTION OF DIFFERENT SUBSTANCES OVER MICROWAVED-CURED ACRYLIC RESINS

    OpenAIRE

    Montagner, Henrique; Montagner, Francisco; Braun, Katia Olmedo; Peres, Paulo Edelvar Correa; Gomes, Brenda Paula Figueiredo de Almeida

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The presence of Candida albicans on the surfaces of denture-base acrylic resins is strongly related to the development of oral stomatitis. This study evaluated the antifungal action of different agents over microwave-cured acrylic resin without polishing specimens previously contaminated with Candida albicans. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Sixty specimens were immersed in BHI broth previously inoculated with the yeast and stored for 3 h at 37ºC. They were divided into 5 experimental groups...

  13. Investigation of photoviscoelastic material properties of epoxy resin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wei-Chung; Liu, Po-Wen; Tsao, Chun-Sheng

    2010-03-01

    The photoviscoelastic material used in this paper was prepared by mixing the liquid form base material Epon 828, the hardener MHAC-P and the cure accelerator 2E4MZ in a weight ratio of 100:103.6:1. To avoid the solidifying flow lines appear on the surface of the specimen and the unevenness of the specimen, an innovative vertical type mould was designed to accommodate the mixed materials and execute the curing process. Test specimens were prepared by following the ASTM B 557M specifications. The uniaxial tensile relaxation test and constant strain-rate test were performed at eight constant temperatures, 25°C, 70°C, 100°C, 130°C, 145°C, 160°C, 175°C, and 190°C. Both tests were video recorded for later detailed analysis. The master curves of relaxation modulus and relaxation birefringence strain coefficient were obtained by applying the time-temperature superposition principle. Prony series, Langevin equation and Boltzmann equation were used to fit those master curves. It was found that Boltzmann equation gave the most satisfactory results of fitting. After integrating the fitted Boltzmann equation with the photoviscoelastic theory, the time-varying stress field of the viscoelastic material under investigation can be analyzed.

  14. Effects of light intensity and curing time of the newest LED Curing units on the diametral tensile strength of microhybrid composite resins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ariani, D.; Herda, E.; Eriwati, Y. K.

    2017-08-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of light intensity and curing time of the latest LED curing units on the diametral tensile strength of microhybrid composite resins. Sixty-three specimens from three brands (Polofil Supra, Filtek Z250, and Solare X) were divided into two test groups and one control group. The test groups were polymerized with a Flashmax P3 LED curing unit for one or three seconds. The control group was polymerized with a Ledmax 450 curing unit with the curing time based on the resin manufacturer’s instructions. A higher light intensity and shorter curing time did not influence the diametral tensile strength of microhybrid composite resins.

  15. A Study on Tensile Behavior and Water Uptake of Wood Powder-Composites Based on Epoxy and Unsaturated Polyester Resins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amir hossein Pirayeshfar

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available In this study, two kinds of epoxy resins (i.e. high-viscosity and low-viscosity as well as one polyester resin (orthophthalic grade were selected and examined as pure resins and also as a polymeric matrix for producing wood-composites. In this study, tensile properties, water uptake, and degradation of samples in water were also investigated. The results show that addition of wood particles to the thermoset resins strongly impresses on their tensile behavior and water uptake. Tensile studies show that addition of wood powder improves the tensile properties of polyester resin as compared with viscosity epoxy one, although its modulus value is relatively less than that of low viscosity epoxy resin. Water uptake measurements also revealed that pure polyester resin and its related composites possess minimum water uptake and less degradation in water as compared with corresponding epoxy specimens and from which the lowest extent of materials is extracted and migrated to the water even after 50 days immersion in water.

  16. Simulation of Air Entrapment and Resin Curing During Manufacturing of Composite Cab Front by Resin Transfer Moulding Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuppusamy Raghu Raja Pandiyan

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Mould filling and subsequent curing are the significant processing stages involved in the production of a composite component through Resin Transfer Moulding (RTM fabrication technique. Dry spot formation and air entrapment during filling stage caused by improper design of filling conditions and locations that lead to undesired filling patterns resulting in defective RTM parts. Proper placement of inlet ports and exit vents as well as by adjustment of filling conditions can alleviate the problems during the mould filling stage. The temperature profile used to polymerize the resin must be carefully chosen to reduce the cure time. Instead of trial and error methods that are expensive, time consuming, and non-optimal, we propose a simulation-based optimization strategy for a composite cab front component to reduce the air entrapment and cure stage optimization. In order to be effective, the optimization strategy requires an accurate simulation of the process utilizing submodels to describe the raw material characteristics. Cure reaction kinetics and chemo-rheology were the submodels developed empirically for an unsaturated polyester resin using experimental data. The simulations were performed using commercial software PAM RTM 2008, developed by ESI Technologies. Simulation results show that the use of increase in injection pressure at the inlet filling conditions greatly reduce the air entrapped. For the cab front, the alteration of injection pressure with proper timing of vent opening reduced the air entrapped during mould filling stage. Similarly, the curing simulation results show that the use of higher mould temperatures effectively decreases the cure time as expected.

  17. Allergic contact dermatitis from dental composite resins due to aromatic epoxy acrylates and aliphatic acrylates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanerva, L; Estlander, T; Jolanki, R

    1989-03-01

    7 patients were occupationally sensitized to dental composite resin products (DCR): 6 dental nurses and 1 dentist. All had a positive patch test to their DCR. 2 independent types of allergy were seen; (a) aromatic epoxy acrylate, and/or (b) aliphatic acrylates. 4 out of 5 patients reacted to BIS-GMA, the most widely used aromatic epoxy acrylate in DCR, but not the dentist. She and 2 dental nurses were allergic to aliphatic acrylates, including triethylene glycol dimethacrylate (TREGDMA) and triethylene diglycol diacrylate (TREGDA). 4 patients were allergic to epoxy resin (ER) (containing mainly MW 340), possibly an impurity in some DCR. 2 patients were also allergic to methyl methacrylate (MMA): the dentist, had been exposed to MMA, but the nurse's exposure was uncertain. 1 patient was also allergic to rubber gloves, 2 to rubber chemicals but not their gloves, and 5 to disinfectants used. diagnosis was delayed as long as 13 years in spite of previous patch testing. Dermatologists need to use the patients' own DCR and the (meth)acrylate series for patch testing. No dental nurses could continue their occupation, but the dentist could occasionally handle DCR if wearing PVC gloves. Dental personnel need to know about the risks of DCR, and use no-touch techniques and protective gloves.

  18. Graphite Nanoplatelet Modified Epoxy Resin for Carbon Fibre Reinforced Plastics with Enhanced Properties

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    Yan Li

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available A simple approach to deliver graphene or graphite nanoplatelets (GNPs into carbon fibre reinforced plastic (CFRPs to enhance the multifunctional properties of carbon/epoxy laminates was demonstrated. GNPs improved the typically low interlaminar mechanical, thermal, and electrical properties of CFRPs after direct vacuum infusion of GNP doped resin obtained via in situ exfoliation by three-roll milling (TRM. Compared to high shear mixing or probe ultrasonication, TRM produces higher shear rates and stresses to exfoliate and finely disperse GNP particles within an epoxy matrix. This environmentally friendly and industrial scalable process does not require the use of solvents, additives, or chemical treatments. The flexural modulus and interlaminar shear strength (ILSS of CFRPs was increased by 15% and by 18%, respectively, with the addition of 5 wt.% in situ exfoliated GNP in the doped epoxy resin. Out-of-plane electrical and thermal conductivity, at the same filler content, were, respectively, improved by nearly two orders of magnitude and 50%.

  19. Ultrasonic Characterisation of Epoxy Resin/Polyethylene Terephthalate (PET Char Powder Composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Imran ORAL

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available This study is carried out in order to determine the elastic properties of the Epoxy Resin (ER / Polyethylene terephthalate (PET Char Powder Composites by ultrasonic wave velocity measurement method. Plastic waste was recycled as raw material for the preparation of epoxy composite materials. The supplied chars were mixed with epoxy resin matrix at weight percentages of 10 %, 20 % and 30 % for preparing ER/PET Char Powder (PCP composites. The effect of PET char powder on the elastic properties of ER/PCP composites were investigated by ultrasonic pulse-echo method. According to the obtained results, the composition ratio of 80:20 is the most appropriate composition ratio, which gave the highest elastic constants values for ER/PCP composites. On the other hand, the best electrical conductivity value was obtained for 70:30 composition ratio. It was observed that ultrasonic shear wave velocity correlated more perfectly than any other parameters with hardness.DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5755/j01.ms.22.4.12190

  20. Biodeterioration of epoxy resin: a microbial survey through culture-independent and culture-dependent approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pangallo, Domenico; Bučková, Maria; Kraková, Lucia; Puškárová, Andrea; Šaková, Nikoleta; Grivalský, Tomaš; Chovanová, Katarina; Zemánková, Milina

    2015-02-01

    During the 20th century, synthetic polymers were greatly used in the field of art. In particular, the epoxy resins were used for both conservation and for creating sculptures. The biodeterioration of these polymers has not been adequately studied. The aim of this investigation was to examine the microflora responsible for the deterioration of an epoxy statue exposed to outdoor conditions. Fungal and bacterial microflora were isolated from the art object, clustered by fluorescence-ITS (internal transcribed spacer), identified by ITS and 16S rRNA sequencing and tested for their lipolytic abilities by three agar assays. Different algal, bacterial, cyanobacterial and fungal clone libraries were constructed. The surrounding airborne microflora was analyzed using culture-dependent and culture-independent approaches. The results indicated the presence, on the statue surface, of an interesting and differentiate microbial community composed of rock-inhabiting members, algal photobionts (Trebouxia spp., Chloroidium ellipsoideum and Chlorella angustoellipsoidea), Cyanobacteria (Leptolyngbya sp., Phormidium sp., Cylindrospermum stagnale, Hassallia byssoidea and Geitlerinema sp.), black yeasts related to the species Friedmanniomyces endolithicus, Pseudotaeniolina globosa, Phaeococcomyces catenatus and Catenulostroma germanicum and several plant-associated fungi. This investigation provides new information on the potential microfloral inhabitants of epoxy resin discovering a new ecological niche, occupied mainly by several members of rock-colonizing microbial species. © 2014 Society for Applied Microbiology and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Enhanced actuation performance of piezoelectric fiber composites induced by incorporated BaTiO3 nanoparticles in epoxy resin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Mingliang; Yuan, Xi; Luo, Hang; Chen, Haiyan; Chen, Chao; Zhou, Kechao; Zhang, Dou

    2017-05-01

    Piezoelectric fiber composites (PFCs) have attracted much interest owing to their flexibility and toughness compared with conventional monolithic piezoceramic wafers. The free strain values and actuation property of PFCs strongly depend on the active electric field applied in Pb(Zr1 - xTix)O3 (PZT) fibers. Reducing the dielectric constant mismatch between PZT fiber and the assembling epoxy resin would greatly increase the active electric field in PZT fiber. Therefore, BaTiO3 (BT) nanoparticles were introduced into the epoxy resin to enhance the dielectric constant. Homogeneous dispersion of BT nanoparticles and tight adhesion with the epoxy resin were achieved through a surface modification by dopamine. The maximum dielectric constant of dopamine modified BT/epoxy (BT@Dop/epoxy) nanocomposites was 10.38 with 12 wt% BT@Dop content at 1 kHz. The maximum free strain of PFCs reached 1820 ppm with 6 wt% BT@Dop content, while PFCs assembled by pure epoxy showed 790 ppm at the same processing condition. The tip displacement of cantilever beam actuated by PFCs reached the peak of 19 mm at the resonance frequency with 6 wt% BT@Dop, which was improved by 90% comparing to PFCs with pure epoxy.

  2. The effects of alkyd/melamine resin ratio and curing temperature on the properties of the coatings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    RADMILA Z. RADICEVIC

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available Synthetic resins are used as binders in protective coatings. An alkyd/melamine resin mixture is the usual composition for the preparation of a coating called “baking enamel” cured through functional groups of resins. The effects of the alkyd/butylated melamine resin ratio (from 85/15 to 70/30 and curing temperature (from 100°C to 160°C on the crosslinking and properties of the coating are presented in this paper. The degree of curing was determined by differential scanning calorimetry. These data were used for the estimation of the degree of crosslinking. The hardness, elasticity, impact resistance, degree of adherence and gloss were also determined. Optimal coating properties could be achieved with an alkyd/melamine resin ratio of 75/25, a curing temperature of 130 °C and a curing time of 30 min.

  3. Surface modification of an epoxy resin with polyamines and polydopamine: Adhesion toward electroless deposited copper

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schaubroeck, David, E-mail: David.Schaubroeck@elis.ugent.be [Center for Microsystems Technology (CMST), IMEC and Ghent University, Technologiepark 914A, B-9052 Ghent (Belgium); Mader, Lothar [Center for Microsystems Technology (CMST), IMEC and Ghent University, Technologiepark 914A, B-9052 Ghent (Belgium); Dubruel, Peter [Polymer Chemistry and Biomaterials Research Group, Ghent University, Krijgslaan 281 S4 bis, B-9000 Ghent (Belgium); Vanfleteren, Jan [Center for Microsystems Technology (CMST), IMEC and Ghent University, Technologiepark 914A, B-9052 Ghent (Belgium)

    2015-10-30

    Highlights: • Surface modifications of epoxy resins with polydopamine and grafted polyamines can significantly increase the adhesion toward electroless deposited copper. • A clear characterization of the copper/epoxy interphase is provided by SEM analyses of cross sections. • Tailored conditions such as etching time (roughness) and electroless deposition temperature are needed to increase the adhesion of the modified surfaces. - Abstract: In this paper the influence of the epoxy roughness, surface modifications and ELD (electroless copper deposition) temperatures on the adhesive strength of the copper is studied. Good adhesion at low roughness values is targeted due to their applicability in high density electronic circuits. Roughened epoxy surfaces are modified with adsorbed polyamines, polydopamine and polyamines grafted to polydopamine. Next the, adhesive strength of ELD copper is determined with peel strength measurements and the interphases are examined with SEM (scanning electron microscopy). Polydopamine and polyamines grafted to polydopamine can lead to increased adhesive strength at lower roughness values compared to the non-modified samples at specific plating temperatures.

  4. Anhydrides-Cured Bimodal Rubber-Like Epoxy Asphalt Composites: From Thermosetting to Quasi-Thermosetting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Kang

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The present engineering practices show the potential that epoxy asphalt composites (EACs would be a better choice to obtain long life for busy roads. To understand the service performance–related thermorheological properties of prepared bimodal anhydrides-cured rubber-like EACs (REACs, a direct tensile tester, dynamic shear rheometer and mathematical model were used. Tensile tests demonstrate that all the REACs reported here are more flexible than previously reported anhydrides-cured REACs at both 20 and 0 °C. The better flexibility is attributed to the change of bimodal networks, in which cross-linked short chains decreased and cross-linked long chains increased, relatively. Strain sweeps show that all the REACs have linear viscoelastic (LVE properties when their strains are smaller than 1.0% from −35 to 120 °C. Temperature sweeps illustrate that the thermorheological properties of REACs evolve from thermosetting to quasi-thermosetting with asphalt content, and all the REACs retain solid state and show elastic properties in the experimental temperature range. A Cole–Cole plot and Black diagram indicate that all the REACs are thermorheologically simple materials, and the master curves were constructed and well-fitted by the Generalized Logistic Sigmoidal models. This research provides a facile approach to tune the thermorheological properties of the REACs, and the cheaper quasi-thermosetting REAC facilitates their advanced applications.

  5. Complex Cure Kinetics of the Hydroxyl-Epoxide Reaction in DGEBA Epoxy Hardened with Diethanolamine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ancipink, Windy; McCoy, John; Kropka, Jamie; Celina, Mathias

    The curing of a diglycidyl ether of bisphenol-A Epoxy (Epon 828) with diethanolamine (DEA) involves a fast amine-epoxide reaction followed by a slower hydroxyl-epoxide reaction. At curing temperatures below 100°C, the time scales of these two reactions are well separated, and the hydroxyl addition can be studied as an ''isolated'' reaction. The hydroxyl-epoxide reaction is of great interest due to the complex kinetics involved, which are brought about by competing reactions. The reaction kinetics are believed to be tertiary amine catalyzed and are well fit to a modified form of the Kamal-type equation. Here we study the complex long term reaction kinetics at various temperatures, by using isothermal modulated differential scanning calorimetry, micro calorimetry, and infrared spectroscopy. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under Contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  6. Two-year carcinogenicity study on three aromatic epoxy resins applied cutaneously to CF1 mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peristianis, G C; Doak, S M; Cole, P N; Hend, R W

    1988-07-01

    The cutaneous and systemic carcinogenic potentials of pure and two technical diglycidyl ethers of bisphenol A, DGEBPA, EPON 828 and EPIKOTE 828, respectively, have been investigated in six groups each of 50 male and 50 female CF1 mice. Twice weekly over a period of 2 yr, 0.2 ml of a 1 or 10% (w/v) solution of one of the epoxy resins in acetone was applied to the dorsal skin. A group of 50 male and 50 female CF1 mice was similarly treated treated with 2% (w/v) beta-propiolactone in acetone (the positive control) while a group of 100 male and 100 female mice was treated with acetone alone (negative control). Survival of the CF1 mice to 2 yr was unaffected by cutaneous exposure to each epoxy resin. The compounds proved to be mildly irritant to murine skin, the response in males being greater than in females. There was a very low incidence of benign and malignant tumours of the skin and subcutis after exposure to any of these compounds. The number of systemic lymphoreticular/haematopoietic tumours was increased only in females treated with EPIKOTE 828 or DGEBPA. In male mice, treated with 10% EPON 828, there was a slight increase in the number of renal tumours. The incidence of other systemic tumours in either sex was not increased following cutaneous application of the purified or the two technical DGEBPA resins (1 to 10% in acetone). The significance of all these findings is fully discussed.

  7. Curing kinetics of visible light curing dental resin composites investigated by dielectric analysis (DEA).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinhaus, Johannes; Hausnerova, Berenika; Haenel, Thomas; Großgarten, Mandy; Möginger, Bernhard

    2014-03-01

    During the curing process of light curing dental composites the mobility of molecules and molecule segments is reduced leading to a significant increase of the viscosity as well as the ion viscosity. Thus, the kinetics of the curing behavior of 6 different composites was derived from dielectric analysis (DEA) using especially redesigned flat sensors with interdigit comb electrodes allowing for irradiation at the top side and measuring the ion viscosity at the bottom side. As the ion viscosities of dental composites change 1-3 orders of magnitude during the curing process, DEA provides a sensitive approach to evaluate their curing behavior, especially in the phase of undisturbed chain growth. In order to determine quantitative kinetic parameters a kinetic model is presented and examined for the evaluation of the ion viscosity curves. From the obtained results it is seen that DEA might be employed in the investigation of the primary curing process, the quality assurance of ingredients as well as the control of processing stability of the light curing dental composites. Copyright © 2014 Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Basic failure mechanisms in advanced composites. [composed of epoxy resins reinforced with carbon fibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazzio, V. F.; Mehan, R. L.; Mullin, J. V.

    1973-01-01

    The fundamental failure mechanisms which result from the interaction of thermal cycling and mechanical loading of carbon-epoxy composites were studied. This work was confined to epoxy resin uniderictionally reinforced with HTS carbon fibers, and consists of first identifying local fiber, matrix and interface failure mechanisms using the model composite specimen containing a small number of fibers so that optical techniques can be used for characterization. After the local fracture process has been established for both mechanical loading and thermal cycling, engineering composite properties and gross fracture modes are then examined to determine how the local events contribute to real composite performance. Flexural strength in high fiber content specimens shows an increase in strength with increased thermal cycling. Similar behavior is noted for 25 v/o material up to 200 cycles; however, there is a drastic reduction after 200 cycles indicating a major loss of integrity probably through the accumulation of local cleavage cracks in the tensile region.

  9. Color Stability of Heat‑cure Acrylic Resin Subjected to Simulated ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Regular usage of denture cleansers is recommended in complete denture wearers for effective plaque control, and these cleansers alter the physical properties of acrylic resin over a period of time. Thus, an in vitro study was carried out to assess the effect of denture cleansers on the color stability of heat‑cure ...

  10. Structure-to-property Relationships in Addition Cured Polymers 2: Resin Tg Composite Initial Mechanical Properties of Norbornenyl Cured Polyimide Resins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alston, W. B.

    1986-01-01

    PRM (polymerization of monomeric reactants) methodology was used to prepare thirty different polyimide oligomeric resins. Monomeric composition as well as chain length between sites of crosslinks were varied to examine their effects on glass transition temperature (Tg) of the cured/postcured resins. An almost linear correlation of Tg versus molecular distance between the crosslinks was observed. An attempt was made to correlate Tg with initial mechanical properties (flexural strength and interlaminar shear strength) of unidirectional graphite fiber composites prepared with these resins. However, the scatter in mechanical strength data prevented obtaining as clear a correlation as was observed for the structural modification/crosslink distance versus Tg. Instead, only a range of composite mechanical properties was obtained at the test temperatures studied (room temperature, 288 and 316 C). Perhaps more importantly, what did become apparent during the attempted correlation study was: (1) that PMR methodology could be used to prepare composites from resins that contain a wide variety of monomer modifications, and (2) that these composites almost invariably provided satisfactory initial mechanical properties as long as the resins selected were melt processable.

  11. Structure-to-property relationships in addition cured polymers. II - Resin Tg and composite initial mechanical properties of norbornenyl cured polyimide resins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alston, William B.

    1986-01-01

    PRM (polymerization of monomeric reactants) methodology was used to prepare thirty different polyimide oligomeric resins. Monomeric composition as well as chain length between sites of crosslinks were varied to examine their effects on glass transition temperature (Tg) of the cured/postcured resins. An almost linear correlation of Tg versus molecular distance between the crosslinks was observed. An attempt was made to correlate Tg with initial mechanical properties (flexural strength and interlaminar shear strength) of unidirectional graphite fiber composites prepared with these resins. However, the scatter in mechanical strength data prevented obtaining as clear a correlation as was observed for the structural modification/crosslink distance versus Tg. Instead, only a range of composite mechanical properties was obtained at the test temperatures studied (room temperature, 288 and 316 C). Perhaps more importantly, what did become apparent during the attempted correlation study was: (1) that PMR methodology could be used to prepare composites from resins that contain a wide variety of monomer modifications, and (2) that these composites almost invariably provided satisfactory initial mechanical properties as long as the resins selected were melt processable.

  12. Sorption of water, ethanol or ethanol/water solutions by light-cured dental dimethacrylate resins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sideridou, Irini D; Karabela, Maria M

    2011-10-01

    This work is concerned with the study of the sorption and desorption process of water, ethanol or ethanol/water solution 50% (v/v) or 75% (v/v) by the dental resins prepared by light curing of Bis-GMA, Bis-EMA, UDMA, TEGDMA or D₃MA. A thin resin disc is placed in a bath of time to obtain the sorption curve m(t)=f(t). Then the liquid is desorbed until a constant mass for the disc is reached and the desorption curve is recorded. These experimental curves help in the determination of the sorbed/desorbed liquid amount at equilibrium, the percentage of the extracted mass of unreacted monomer known as "solubility", and the sorption/desorption diffusion coefficient which expresses correspondingly the rate of the liquid sorption/desorption. The highest liquid uptake by dental resins was 13.3wt% ethanol for Bis-GMA-resin, 12.0wt% ethanol for UDMA-resin, 10.10wt% ethanol/water solution for TEGDMA-resin, 7.34wt% ethanol for D(3)MA-resin and 6.61wt% ethanol for Bis-EMA-resin. The diffusion coefficient for all resins was higher in water than in ethanol/water solution or ethanol. Bis-GMA-resin showed the highest diffusion coefficient (11.01 × 10⁻⁸cm² s⁻¹) followed by Bis-EMA-resin (7.43 × 10⁻⁸ cm² s⁻¹), UDMA-resin (6.88 × 10⁻⁸cm² s⁻¹), D(3)MA-resin (6.22 × 10⁻⁸ cm² s⁻¹) and finally by TEGDMA-resin (1.52 ×10⁻⁸ cm² s⁻¹). All studied dental resins, except TEGDMA-resin, absorbed higher amount of pure ethanol than water or ethanol water solution. TEGDMA-resin absorbed higher amount of ethanol/water solution (50/50 or 75/25 (v/v)) than water or ethanol. For all studied dental resins the diffusion coefficient was higher in water than in ethanol/water solution or ethanol. Copyright © 2011 Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Study on an amine-containing benzoxazine: Homo- and copolymerization with epoxy resin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Zhang

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available An amine-containing benzoxazine (P-deta based homopolymer and its epoxy (Ep copolymers are investigated in this study. The structure of benzoxazine, prepared from phenol, diethylenetriamine and formalin, is confirmed by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMR. The viscosity of P-deta is much lower than that of commercialized benzoxazine monomers. The curing profiles of P-deta with various Ep ratios are studied by deconvolution and the related mechanism is clarified. Epoxy will not increase the curing temperature of P-deta, instead, it helps P-deta overcome the conversion limitation and promotes the curing rate. The thermal and viscoelastic properties were determined and compared. The copolymer of P-deta/Ep = 50/50 (wt/wt shows the highest glass transition temperature, higher than both individual homopolymers and other copolymers. Increasing benzoxazine fraction enhances modulus at room temperature but deteriorates the crosslink density. It can also enhances the char yield, but deteriorates the thermal stability of the copolymers.

  14. DEVELOPMENT OF A METHOD STATISTICAL ANALYSIS ACCURACY AND PROCESS STABILITY PRODUCTION OF EPOXY RESIN ED-20

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. V. Zhelninskaya

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Statistical methods play an important role in the objective evaluation of quantitative and qualitative characteristics of the process and are one of the most important elements of the quality assurance system production and total quality management process. To produce a quality product, one must know the real accuracy of existing equipment, to determine compliance with the accuracy of a selected technological process specified accuracy products, assess process stability. Most of the random events in life, particularly in manufacturing and scientific research, are characterized by the presence of a large number of random factors, is described by a normal distribution, which is the main in many practical studies. Modern statistical methods is quite difficult to grasp and wide practical use without in-depth mathematical training of all participants in the process. When we know the distribution of a random variable, you can get all the features of this batch of products, to determine the mean value and the variance. Using statistical control methods and quality control in the analysis of accuracy and stability of the technological process of production of epoxy resin ED20. Estimated numerical characteristics of the law of distribution of controlled parameters and determined the percentage of defects of the investigated object products. For sustainability assessment of manufacturing process of epoxy resin ED-20 selected Shewhart control charts, using quantitative data, maps of individual values of X and sliding scale R. Using Pareto charts identify the causes that affect low dynamic viscosity in the largest extent. For the analysis of low values of dynamic viscosity were the causes of defects using Ishikawa diagrams, which shows the most typical factors of the variability of the results of the process. To resolve the problem, it is recommended to modify the polymer composition of carbon fullerenes and to use the developed method for the production of

  15. An amperometric cholesterol biosensor based on epoxy resin membrane bound cholesterol oxidase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pundir, C S; Narang, Jagriti; Chauhan, Nidhi; Sharma, Preety; Sharma, Renu

    2012-10-01

    The use of epoxy resin membrane as a support for immobilization of enzyme has resulted into improved sensitivity and stability of biosensors for uric acid, ascorbic acid and polyphenols. The present work was aimed to prepare an improved amperometric biosensor for determination of serum cholesterol required in the diagnostics and management of certain pathological conditions. Epoxy resin membrane with immobilized cholesterol oxidase was mounted on the cleaned platinum (Pt) electrode with a parafilm to construct a working electrode. This working electrode along with Ag/AgCl as reference and Ag wire as an auxiliary electrode were connected through a three terminal electrometer to construct a cholesterol biosensor. The sensor showed optimum response within 25 sec at pH 7.0 and 45°C. The linear working range of biosensor was 1.0 to 8.0 mM cholesterol. K m and I max for cholesterol were 5.0 mM and 9.09 μA, respectively. The biosensor measured serum cholesterol. The minimum detection limit of the sensor was 1.0 mM. The mean analytical recoveries of added cholesterol in serum (2.84 and 4.13 mM) were 91.4 ± 2.8 and 92.3 ± 3.1 per cent (n=6), respectively. Within and between assay coefficient of variation (CV) were epoxy resin membrane as a support for immobilization of cholesterol oxidase has resulted into an improved amperometric cholesterol biosensor. The present biosensor had an advantage over the existing biosensors as it worked at comparatively lower potential.

  16. Determination of Hydrophobic Contact Angle of Epoxy Resin Compound Silicon Rubber and Silica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Syakur, Abdul; Hermawan; Sutanto, Heri

    2017-04-01

    Epoxy resin is a thermosetting polymeric material which is very good for application of high voltage outdoor insulator in electrical power system. This material has several advantages, i.e. high dielectric strength, light weight, high mechanical strength, easy to blend with additive, and easy maintenance if compared to that of porcelain and glass outdoor insulators which are commonly used. However, this material also has several disadvantages, i.e. hydrophilic property, very sensitive to aging and easily degraded when there is a flow of contaminants on its surface. The research towards improving the performance of epoxy resin insulation materials were carried out to obtain epoxy resin insulating material with high water repellent properties and high surface tracking to aging. In this work, insulating material was made at room temperature vulcanization, with material composition: Diglycidyl Ether Bisphenol A (DGEBA), Metaphenylene Diamine (MPDA) as hardener with stoichiometric value of unity, and nanosilica mixed with Silicon Rubber (SiR) with 10% (RTV21), 20% (RTV22), 30% (RTV23), 40% (RTV24) and 50% (RTV25) variation. The usage of nanosilica and Silicon Rubber (SIR) as filler was expected to provide hydrophobic properties and was able to increase the value of surface tracking of materials. The performance of the insulator observed were contact angle of hydrophobic surface materials. Tests carried out using Inclined Plane Tracking procedure according to IEC 60-587: 1984 with Ammonium Chloride (NH4Cl) as contaminants flowed using peristaltic pumps. The results show that hydrophobic contact angle can be determined from each sample, and RTV25 has maximum contact angle among others.

  17. Analysis of Preparation and Properties on Shape Memory Hydrogenated Epoxy Resin Used for Asphalt Mixtures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Biao Ma

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this investigation is to prepare the shape memory hydrogenated epoxy resin used for asphalt mixtures (SM-HEP-AM and study its properties. The shape memory hydrogenated epoxy resin (SM-HEP is prepared using hydrogenated bisphenol A epoxy resin (AL-3040, polypropylene glycol diglycidylether diacrylate (JH-230, and isophorone diamine (IPDA. The formulations of the SM-HEP-AM are obtained by the linearly fitted method. The thermo-mechanical property, molecular structure, and shape-memory performance of the SM-HEP-AM are studied. The glass-transition temperature (Tg is determined using the differential scanning calorimeter (DSC. The results proved that the Tg level increased when the JH-230 content decreased. The thermo-mechanical property of the SM-HEP-AM is measured by dynamical mechanical analysis (DMA. The storage modulus of the SM-HEP-AM decreased with the increase in the JH-230 content. The above phenomena are attributed to the change in the JH-230 content. The shape memory performance results of the SM-HEP-AM indicate that specimen deformation can completely recover after only several minutes at Tg + 10 °C and Tg + 20 °C. The shape recovery time of the SM-HEP-AM increases with increased JH-230 content, and the change between the shape recovery time and JH-230 content gradually decreased as the temperature increased. The deformation recovery performance of asphalt mixture with and without the SM-HEP-AM (Tg = 40 °C was tested by the deformation recovery test. This was used to prove that the SM-HEP-AM helps to improve the deformation recovery performance of the asphalt mixture.

  18. Flame Retardance and Physical Properties of Novel Cured Blends of Unsaturated Polyester and Furan Resins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baljinder Kaur Kandola

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Novel blends of two furan resins with an unsaturated polyester have been prepared and cured by parallel free radical (for the unsaturated polyester and acid-catalysed crosslinking (for the furan resin to give co-cured composite materials. Although these materials have inferior physical properties, such as low Tg and low storage modulus compared with those of unsaturated polyester and furan resins alone, they show markedly improved flame retardance compared with that of the normally highly flammable unsaturated polyester. This increased flame retardance arises from a condensed phase mechanism in which the furanic component forms a semi-protective char, reducing rates of thermal degradation and total heat release and heat of combustion. The blends also burn with reduced smoke output compared with that from unsaturated polyester alone.

  19. Volume shrinkage and rheological studies of epoxidised and unepoxidised poly(styrene-block-butadiene-block-styrene) triblock copolymer modified epoxy resin-diamino diphenyl methane nanostructured blend systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, Sajeev Martin; Puglia, Debora; Kenny, Josè M; Parameswaranpillai, Jyotishkumar; Vijayan P, Poornima; Pionteck, Jűrgen; Thomas, Sabu

    2015-05-21

    Styrene-block-butadiene-block-styrene (SBS) copolymers epoxidised at different epoxidation degrees were used as modifiers for diglycidyl ether of the bisphenol A-diamino diphenyl methane (DGEBA-DDM) system. Epoxy systems containing modified epoxidised styrene-block-butadiene-block-styrene (eSBS) triblock copolymer with compositions ranging from 0 to 30 wt% were prepared and the curing reaction was monitored in situ using rheometry and pressure-volume-temperature (PVT) analysis. By controlling the mole percent of epoxidation, we could generate vesicles, worm-like micelles and core-shell nanodomains. At the highest mole percent of epoxidation, the fraction of the epoxy miscible component in the triblock copolymer (epoxidised polybutadiene (PB)) was maximum. This gave rise to core-shell nanodomains having a size of 10-15 nm, in which the incompatible polystyrene (PS) becomes the core, the unepoxidised PB becomes the shell and the epoxidised PB interpenetrates with the epoxy phase. On the other hand, the low level of epoxidation gave rise to bigger domains having a size of ∼1 μm and the intermediate epoxidation level resulted in a worm-like structure. This investigation specifically focused on the importance of cure rheology on nanostructure formation, using rheometry. The reaction induced phase separation of the PS phase in the epoxy matrix was carefully explored through rheological measurements. PVT measurements during curing were carried out to understand the volume shrinkage of the blend, confirming that shrinkage behaviour is related to the block copolymer phase separation process during curing. The volume shrinkage was found to be maximum in the case of blends with unmodified SBS, where a heterogeneous morphology was observed, while a decrease in the shrinkage was evidenced in the case of SBS epoxidation. It could be explained by two effects: (1) solubility of the epoxidised block copolymer in the DGEBA leads to the formation of nanoscopic domains upon

  20. Microwave behaviour comparison between different carbon based materials in epoxy resin composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giorcelli, M.; Savi, P.; Guastella, S.; Tagliaferro, A.

    2016-05-01

    Because of their low weight and high performance, polymer composites are important materials for new applications. Their properties (electrical, mechanical, …) can in fact be tuned using different kind of filler and percentage. Carbon fillers are among the most used in composites when tuning electrical proprieties is the target. Different carbon fillers can be used. From cheaper (e.g. carbon black), to eco-friendly (e.g. Biochar) or more sophisticate (e.g. carbon nanotubes). In this work, we studied the microwave performance of these different kinds of carbon filler dispersed in Epoxy resin.

  1. Construction of an amperometric ascorbate biosensor using epoxy resin membrane bound Lagenaria siceraria fruit ascorbate oxidase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pundir, C S; Chauhan, Nidhi; Jyoti

    2011-06-01

    Ascorbate oxidase purified from Lagenaria siceraria fruit was immobilized onto epoxy resin "Araldite" membrane with 79.4% retention of initial activity of free enzyme. The biosensor showed optimum response within 15s at pH 5.8 and 35°C, which was directly proportional to ascorbate concentration ranging from 1-100μM. There was a good correlation (R(2) = 0.99) between serum ascorbic acid values by standard enzymic colorimetric method and the present method. The enzyme electrode was used for 200 times without considerable loss of activity during the span of 90 days when stored at 4°C.

  2. Recent Developments in Halogen Free Flame Retardants for Epoxy Resins for Electrical and Electronic Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rakotomalala, Muriel; Wagner, Sebastian; Döring, Manfred

    2010-01-01

    The recent implementation of new environmental legislations led to a change in the manufacturing of composites that has repercussions on printed wiring boards (PWB). This in turn led to alternate processing methods (e.g., lead-free soldering), which affected the required physical and chemical properties of the additives used to impart flame retardancy. This review will discuss the latest advancements in phosphorus containing flame retardants for electrical and electronic (EE) applications and compare them with commercially available ones. The mechanism of degradation and flame retardancy of phosphorus flame retardants in epoxy resins will also be discussed. PMID:28883331

  3. A study on the characteristics of modified and novolac type epoxy resin based neutron shielding material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, Soo Haeng; Hong, Sun Seok; Oh, Seung Chul; Do, Jae Bum [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea)

    1998-10-01

    Because the exposure to radiation in the nuclear facilities can be fatal to human, it is important to reduce the radiation dose level to a tolerable level. The purpose of this study is to develop highly effective neutron shielding materials for the shipping and storage cask of radioactive materials or in the nuclear/radiation facilities. In this study, we developed modified and novolac type epoxy resin based neutron shielding materials and their various material properties, including neutron shielding ability, prolonged time heat resistance, thermal and mechanical properties were evaluated experimently. (author). 31 refs., 27 figs., 16 tabs.

  4. Surface characterization and stability of an epoxy resin surface modified with polyamines grafted on polydopamine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schaubroeck, David, E-mail: David.Schaubroeck@elis.ugent.be [Center for Microsystems Technology (CMST), imec and Ghent University, Technologiepark 914A, B-9052 Ghent (Belgium); Vercammen, Yannick; Van Vaeck, Luc [Biomolecular and Analytical Mass Spectrometry, University of Antwerp, Universiteitsplein 1, B-2610 Wilrijk (Belgium); Vanderleyden, Els; Dubruel, Peter [Polymer Chemistry and Biomaterials Research Group, Ghent University, Krijgslaan 281 S4 bis, B-9000 Ghent (Belgium); Vanfleteren, Jan [Center for Microsystems Technology (CMST), imec and Ghent University, Technologiepark 914A, B-9052 Ghent (Belgium)

    2014-06-01

    This paper reports on polydopamine and polyamine surface modifications of an etched epoxy cresol novolac (ECN) resin using the ‘grafting to’ method. Three different polyamines are used for the grafting reactions: branched polyethyleneimine (B-PEI), linear polyethyleneimine (L-PEI) and diethylenetriamine (DETA). These modifications are compared to control materials prepared via direct deposition of polyamines. The stability of the modifications toward a concentrated hydrochloric acid (HCl) environment is evaluated. The modified surfaces are characterized with scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and time-of-flight static secondary ion mass spectroscopy (TOF-S-SIMS).

  5. Recent Developments in Halogen Free Flame Retardants for Epoxy Resins for Electrical and Electronic Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manfred Döring

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available The recent implementation of new environmental legislations led to a change in the manufacturing of composites that has repercussions on printed wiring boards (PWB. This in turn led to alternate processing methods (e.g., lead-free soldering, which affected the required physical and chemical properties of the additives used to impart flame retardancy. This review will discuss the latest advancements in phosphorus containing flame retardants for electrical and electronic (EE applications and compare them with commercially available ones. The mechanism of degradation and flame retardancy of phosphorus flame retardants in epoxy resins will also be discussed.

  6. Recent Developments in Halogen Free Flame Retardants for Epoxy Resins for Electrical and Electronic Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rakotomalala, Muriel; Wagner, Sebastian; Döring, Manfred

    2010-08-11

    The recent implementation of new environmental legislations led to a change in the manufacturing of composites that has repercussions on printed wiring boards (PWB). This in turn led to alternate processing methods (e.g., lead-free soldering), which affected the required physical and chemical properties of the additives used to impart flame retardancy. This review will discuss the latest advancements in phosphorus containing flame retardants for electrical and electronic (EE) applications and compare them with commercially available ones. The mechanism of degradation and flame retardancy of phosphorus flame retardants in epoxy resins will also be discussed.

  7. Investigação da cinética de cura por calorimetria diferencial exploratória (DSC de resinas epóxi preparadas a partir de óleo de soja epoxidado com diferentes anidridos e aminas terciárias Investigation of the kinetics of cure by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC of epoxy resins prepared from epoxidized soybean oil with different anhydrides and tertiary amines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana P. O. Costa

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available No presente trabalho, utilizou-se a calorimetria diferencial exploratória (DSC para investigar a cinética da reação de cura de resinas epóxi produzidas a partir da reação do óleo de soja epoxidado (ESO, com os anidridos dodecenilsuccínico (DDS, maleico (MAL, ftálico (FTA, succínico (SUC e hexahidroftálico (CH, atuando como agentes de cura, e na presença de aminas terciárias como a trietilamina (TEA, a N,N'-dimetilanilina (ARO e a 1,4- diazobiciclo [2,2,2] octano (DABCO, atuando como catalisadores. A taxa de aquecimento, a natureza química e a estrutura do anidrido e das aminas influenciaram a reação de cura. Os métodos dinâmicos de Kissinger, Ozawa e de Barrett foram utilizados para calcular a energia de ativação dos sistemas onde se variou o anidrido. Observou-se que os anidridos mais reativos foram o DDS e maleico que apresentaram os menores valores de energias de ativação. No estudo da influência do catalisador, utilizou-se o método de Barrett para determinar as energias de ativação das reações com as diferentes aminas. A amina cicloaliafática (DABCO foi a mais reativa obtendo-se o menor valor de energia de ativação (Ea = 51 kJ.mol-1 e fator pré-exponencial (ln A0 = 9 s-1.In the present work, differential scanning calorimetry (DSC was used to investigate the curing reaction kinetics of epoxy resins produced from reaction of epoxidized soybean oil (ESO with cyclic anhydrides dodecenylsuccinic (DDS, maleic (MAL, phthalic (PA, succinic (SUC and hexahydrophthalic (CH, in the presence of tertiary amines such as triethylamine (TEA, N,N-dimethylaniline (ARO and 1,4-diazabicyclo [2,2,2] octane (DABCO. The heating rate, the nature and structure of anhydrides and amines were found to affect the curing reaction. The dynamic methods of Kissinger, Ozawa and Barrett were used to calculate the activation energy of the reactions where different anhydrides were used. DDS and maleic anhydrides were more reactive than the others

  8. Investigation of Cure Reaction, Rheology, Volume Shrinkage and Thermomechanical Properties of Nano-TiO2 Filled Epoxy/DDS Composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jyotishkumar Parameswaranpillai

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The cure reaction, rheology, volume shrinkage, and thermomechanical behavior of epoxy-TiO2 nanocomposites based on diglycidyl ether of bisphenol A cured with 4,4′-diaminodiphenylsulfone have been investigated. The FTIR results show that, at the initial curing stage, TiO2 acts as a catalyst and facilitates the curing. The catalytic effect of TiO2 was further confirmed by the decrease in maximum exothermal peak temperature (DSC results; however, it was also found that the addition of TiO2 decreases the overall degree of cure, as evidenced by lower total heat of reaction of the cured composites compared to neat epoxy. The importance of cure rheology in the microstructure formation during curing was explored by using rheometry. From the PVT studies, it was found that TiO2 decreases the volume shrinkage behavior of the epoxy matrix. The mechanical properties of the cured epoxy composites, such as tensile strength, tensile modulus, flexural strength, flexural modulus, impact strength, and fracture toughness of the polymer composites, were examined. The nanocomposites exhibited good improvement in dimensional, thermal, and mechanical properties with respect to neat cross-linked epoxy system. FESEM micrographs of fractured surfaces were examined to understand the toughening mechanism.

  9. Delamination on GFRP laminates impacted at room and lower temperatures: Comparison between epoxy and vinylester resins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopresto, Valentina; Langella, Antonio; Papa, Ilaria

    2016-10-01

    Low velocity impact tests at three different impact energy values and three different temperatures, were performed on glass fibre composite laminates made by infusion technology. Two different resins, epoxy and vinylester, were considered to impregnate the fibres: the first is mainly of aeronautical interest whereas the second one is mainly applied in Naval field. The specimens were first completely destroyed to obtain the complete load-displacement curve. The latter allowed the evaluation of the increasing impact energies, 5, 10 and 20J, used to investigate about the start and propagation of the damage inside the laminates. The delamination was investigated by the very commonly used Ultra Sound technique and the results obtained on the different materials at different temperatures were compared. A general better behaviour of vinylester resin was noted.

  10. Characterization of pre-curing behavior of urea-formaldehyde resin affected by different temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Y. Z.; Xiao, H.

    2017-07-01

    Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) was applied to investigate the thermal behavior of pre-curing urea-formaldehyde (UF) resin as affected by different temperatures; the activation energies (Ea) in different stages during the pre-curing course were analyzed by Kissinger method. The results indicated that the curing time was decreased with temperature increasing. Under isothermal temperature, the DSC curves of pre-curing UF resin shifted to shorter time, the conversion increased with increasing temperature. In dynamic scanning, with the pre-curing degree increasing, the DSC curves shifted to lower temperature, while both the onset and peak temperature decreased due to the cross-linking degree increased. The Ea and Z value decreased obviously firstly due to the concentration and reactivity of the reactants increased with water evaporation in the first stage, and then the increasing cross-linking degree and the formation of the network structure lead to both the Ea and Z value increasing in the second stage, indicating that the pre-curing behavior appeared.

  11. Halohydrination of epoxy resins using sodium halides as cationizing agents in MALDI-MS and DIOS-MS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Takehiro; Kawasaki, Hideya; Kimoto, Takashi; Arakawa, Ryuichi

    2008-12-01

    Halohydrination of epoxy resins using sodium halides as cationizing agents in matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) and desorption ionization on porous silicon mass spectrometry (DIOS-MS) were investigated. Different mass spectra were observed when NaClO(4) and NaI were used as the cationizing agents at the highest concentration of 10.0 mM, which is much higher than that normally used in MALDI-MS. MALDI mass spectra of epoxy resins using NaI revealed iodohydrination to occur as epoxy functions of the polymers. The halohydrination also occurred using NaBr, but not NaCl, due to the differences in their nucleophilicities. On the basis of the results of experiments using deuterated CD(3)OD as the solvent, the hydrogen atom source was probably ambient water or residual solvent, rather than being derived from matrices. Halohydrination also occurred with DIOS-MS in which no organic matrix was used; in addition, reduction of epoxy functions was observed with DIOS. NaI is a useful cationizing agent for changing the chemical form of epoxy resins due to iodohydrination and, thus, for identifying the presence of epoxy functions. Copyright (c) 2008 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  12. Fiber-Reinforced Epoxy Composites and Methods of Making Same Without the Use of Oven or Autoclave

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnell, Thomas J. (Inventor); Rauscher, Michael D. (Inventor); Stienecker, Rick D. (Inventor); Nickerson, David M. (Inventor); Tong, Tat H. (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    Method embodiments for producing a fiber-reinforced epoxy composite comprise providing a mold defining a shape for a composite, applying a fiber reinforcement over the mold, covering the mold and fiber reinforcement thereon in a vacuum enclosure, performing a vacuum on the vacuum enclosure to produce a pressure gradient, insulating at least a portion of the vacuum enclosure with thermal insulation, infusing the fiber reinforcement with a reactive mixture of uncured epoxy resin and curing agent under vacuum conditions, wherein the reactive mixture of uncured epoxy resin and curing agent generates exothermic heat, and producing the fiber-reinforced epoxy composite having a glass transition temperature of at least about 100.degree. C. by curing the fiber reinforcement infused with the reactive mixture of uncured epoxy resin and curing agent by utilizing the exothermically generated heat, wherein the curing is conducted inside the thermally insulated vacuum enclosure without utilization of an external heat source or an external radiation source.

  13. The effectiveness of Nigella sativa seed extract in inhibiting Candida albicans on heat cured acrylic resin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hanoem EH

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Indonesia has a variety of plants that can be used for medicines. One of the medicinal plants is Nigella sativa. Nigella sativa has been used for medicinal purposes, both as medicinal herb and as medicinal oil. It contains saponin and atsiri oils that have antifungal, antimicrobial and antibacterial effects. Nigella sativa has been suggested as denture cleansers since it can inhibit the growth of Candida albicans (C. albicans on heat cured acrylic resin. Purpose: The aim of this research is to know the effectiveness of Nigella sativa seed extract in inhibiting the growth of C. albicans on heat cured acrylic resin. Methods: Eighteen acrylic samples were divided into three groups. Group I was control group, only contaminated with C. albicans without immersing in any solution. Group II was acrylic sample immersed in sterile aquades for one hour. Group III was acrylic sample immersed in Nigella sativa seed extract for one hour. Results: There were significant differences of C. albicans (p < 0.05 among the three groups. The number of Candida albicans was significantly higher in Group I, while that in group II was lower than that in group I, and that in group III was the lowest. Conclusion: Nigella sativa seed extract was effective in inhibiting the growth of C. albicans on heat cured acrylic resin.Latar belakang: Indonesia memiliki berbagai tanaman yang dapat dipakai sebagai obat, salah satu tanaman tersebut adalah jinten hitam (Nigella sativa. Pada beberapa negara jinten hitam telah digunakan untuk berbagai tujuan, baik sebagai obat herbal maupun sebagai minyak. kandungan jinten hitam adalah saponin dan minyak atsiri yang mempunyai efek anti jamur dan anti mikroba. Jinten hitam disarankan sebagai pilihan pembersih gigi tiruan yang dapat menghambat pertumbuhan Candida albicans (C. albicans pada resin akrilik heat cured. Tujuan: Tujuan penelitian ini adalah mengetahui efektivitas dari ekstrak biji jinten hitam dalam menghambat pertumbuhan

  14. Influence of light-curing units and restorative materials on the micro hardness of resin cements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuguimiya Rosiane

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of indirect restorative materials (IRMs and light-curing units (LCUs on the micro hardness of dual-cured resin cement. Materials and Methods: A total of 36 cylindrical samples (2 mm thick were prepared with dual-cured resin cement (Relyx ARC photo-activated with either a QTH (Optilight Plus for 40s or a LED (Radii light-curing unit for 65s. Photo-activation was performed through the 2-mm- thick IRMs and the samples were divided into six groups (n=6 according to the combination of veneering materials (without, ceramic and indirect resin and LCUs (QTH and LED. In the control group, the samples were light-cured with a QTH unit without the interposition of any restorative material. Vickers micro hardness test was performed on the top and bottom surfaces of each sample (load of 50 g for 15 secs. The data were statistically analyzed using a three-way ANOVA followed by Tukey x s post-hoc test ( P < 0.05. Results: There were no statistically significant differences on the top surface between the light curing-units ( P > 0.05; however, the LED provided greater hardness on the bottom surface when a ceramic material was used ( P < 0.05. The mean hardness in photo-activated samples, in which there was no interposition of indirect materials, was significantly greater ( P < 0.01. Conclusions: It may be concluded that the interposition of the restorative material decreased the micro hardness in the deeper cement layer. Such decrease, however, was lower when the ceramic was interposed and the cement light-cured with LED.

  15. Effects of 4-META/MMA-TBB Resin at Different Curing Stages on Osteoblasts and Gingival Epithelial Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morotomi, Takahiko; Hirata-Tsuchiya, Shizu; Washio, Ayako; Kitamura, Chiaki

    2016-01-01

    To assess the effects of different curing stages of 4-META/MMA-TBB resin on osteoblasts and gingival keratinocytes. The MC3T3-E1 murine pre-osteoblastic cell line and GE-1 murine gingival epithelial cell line were cultured with mixtures of Super-Bond C&B at different curing stages, and the cell viability was assessed. The alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity of the MC3T3-E1 cells was also assessed. The majority of the MC3T3-E1 cells died and showed no ALP activity when cultured with 4-META/MMA-TBB resin during the initial curing phase (1 min of curing). A later curing phase of the 4-META/MMA-TBB resin (7 min of curing) showed cytotoxicity at day 1, but the toxic effect was temporary and the proliferative capacity and ALP activity in the cells were similar to control cells at day 7. Completely cured 4-META/MMA-TBB resin (after 1 or 12 h of curing) did not affect the cell viability or ALP activity of the MC3T3-E1 cells. In contrast, 4-META/MMA-TBB resin showed no effect on the GE-1 cells at any stage of curing. Although 4-META/MMA-TBB resin during the initial curing phase shows toxic effects on MC3T3-E1 cells, that cytotoxicity is minimal at later curing phases. In contrast, neither the uncured nor cured resins affected the GE-1 cells.

  16. Rheological and electrical properties of hybrid nanocomposites of epoxy resins filled with graphite nanoplatelets and carbon black.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Truong, Quang-Trung; Lee, Seon-Suk; Lee, Dai-Soo

    2011-02-01

    Graphite nanoplatelets (GNP) were prepared by microwave irradiation of natural graphites intercalated with ferric chloride in nitromethane (GIC). Intercalated structure of GIC was confirmed by X-ray diffraction patterns. SEM images of GIC after microwave irradiation showed the exfoliation of GIC, the formation of GNPs. Hybrid nanocomposites of bisphenol-A type epoxy resins filled with GNP and a conductive carbon black (CB) were prepared and rheological and electrical properties of the nanocomposites were investigated. Viscosity and electrical surface resistivity of the nanocomposites showed minima at certain mixtures of GNP and CB in the epoxy resins.

  17. The Thermal Expansion and Tensile Properties of Nanofiber-ZrW2O8 Reinforced Epoxy Resin Nanocomposites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shan, Xinran; Huang, Chuanjun; Yang, Huihui; Wu, Zhixiong; Li, Jingwen; Huang, Rongjin; Li, Laifeng

    Zirconium tungstate/epoxy (ZrW2O8/EP) nanocomposites were prepared and their thermal expansion properties were investigated within the temperature range of 4-300 K. Compared to unmodified epoxy resin, zirconium tungstate/epoxy composites lowers the thermal expansion coefficient (CTEs). The tensile strength was investigated at room temperature (300 K) and liquid nitrogen temperature (77 K). The fracture surfaces were examined by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Results showed that the tensile strength and elongation at break increases with the increasing ZrW2O8 content.

  18. Evaluation of the Effect of Porcelain Laminate Thickness on Degree of Conversion of Light Cure and Dual Cure Resin Cements Using FTIR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoorizad Ganjkar, Maryam; Heshmat, Haleh; Hassan Ahangari, Reza

    2017-03-01

    Increasing the thickness of the veneering porcelain may affect the polymerization of resin cements. Incomplete polymerization of resin cements can lead to compromised quality of restoration and decrease the longevity of indirect restorations. This study sought to assess the effect of IPS Empress porcelain thickness on the degree of conversion of light-cure and dual-cure resin cements using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. In this experimental study, IPS Empress porcelain discs (A2 shade) with 10mm diameter and 0.5, 1 and 1.5 mm thicknesses were fabricated. Choice2 (Bisco, USA) and Nexus3 (Kerr, USA) resin cements were light cured through the three porcelain thicknesses in two groups of 3 samples using a LED light-curing unit (LEDemetron II; Kerr, USA). The control group samples were cured individually with no porcelain disc. The degree of conversion of resin cements was determined using FTIR (Bruker; Equinox55, Germany). The data were analyzed using Dunn's test. The degree of conversion (in percent) beneath the 0.5, 1.5 and 2 mm thicknesses of IPS Empress was 68.67±0.88, 71.06±0.94 and 72.51±0.41 for Choice2 resin cement and 69.60±2.12, 69.64±1.63 and 69.24±2.12 for Nexus3, respectively. Porcelain thickness and type of resin cement had no significant effect on degree of conversion (p≥ 0.05). It seems that increasing the porcelain thickness by up to 1.5 mm has no adverse effect on degree of conversion of both dual cure and light cure resin cements evaluated in this study.

  19. Retention of three fissure sealant resins. The effects of etching agent and curing method. Results over 3 years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rock, W P; Weatherill, S; Anderson, R J

    1990-04-21

    Results are reported of a 3-year blind study comparing three different fissure sealants, using a system of contralateral control teeth. A total of 744 first permanent molars were sealed for 186 children, aged 6-7 years at the start of the study. Resin was applied by a dental therapist and all recall examinations were carried out by the same dentist. Resin was fully retained on 77% of teeth at the end of 3 years. After the same time an unfilled light-cured resin was significantly better retained than a filled light-cured resin. The two light-cured resins in the study were retained better on the right side of the mouth than on the left, but there was no comparable significant difference for retention of the control chemically-cured material. The use of enchant in gel form was as effective as liquid etching.

  20. Light-curing of dental resins with GaN violet laser diode: the effect of photoinitiator on mechanical strength.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kameyama, Atsushi; Hatayama, Hitoshi; Kato, Junji; Haruyama, Akiko; Teraoka, Hiromi; Takase, Yasuaki; Yoshinari, Masao; Tsunoda, Masatake

    2011-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate whether a Gallium Nitride (GaN) -based violet laser diode (VLM500) could be used as a light source for light-cured dental resins. Three experimental unfilled resins containing different photoinitiators (camphorquinone, CQ; phenyl propanedione, PPD; or mono acylphosphineoxide, MAPO) were evaluated. These resins were light-cured with a VLM500 laser diode, and their ultimate micro-tensile strengths (μTS) were compared to those cured with three different LED light sources (Curenos, G-Light Prima-normal mode and G-Light Prima-PL mode). The VLM500 produced high μTS values in all three resins, and we concluded that this violet laser diode can be used as a light source for light-cured dental resin materials.

  1. Depth of cure, flexural properties and volumetric shrinkage of low and high viscosity bulk-fill giomers and resin composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsujimoto, Akimasa; Barkmeier, Wayne W; Takamizawa, Toshiki; Latta, Mark A; Miyazaki, Masashi

    2017-03-31

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the depth of cure, flexural properties and volumetric shrinkage of low and high viscosity bulk-fill giomers and resin composites. Depth of cure and flexural properties were determined according to ISO 4049, and volumetric shrinkage was measured using a dilatometer. The depths of cure of giomers were significantly lower than those of resin composites, regardless of photo polymerization times. No difference in flexural strength and modulus was found among either high or low viscosity bulk fill materials. Volumetric shrinkage of low and high viscosity bulk-fill resin composites was significantly less than low and high viscosity giomers. Depth of cure of both low and high viscosity bulk-fill materials is time dependent. Flexural strength and modulus of high viscosity or low viscosity bulk-fill giomer or resin composite materials are not different for their respective category. Resin composites exhibited less polymerization shrinkage than giomers.

  2. Determination of the gel point of a polyfurfuryl alcohol resin and characterization of its curing rheokinetics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dominguez, Juan Carlos; Madsen, Bo

    2013-01-01

    The determination of the gel point of a resin is a key in order to design and optimize the manufacturing process of composite materials. In this work, the gel point of a biobased polyfurfuryl alcohol (FA) resin has been determined by rheological isothermal tests at different curing temperatures....... The obtained gel times using three different amounts of catalyst (2, 4 and 6 % wt.) were correlated to temperature by the Macosko model; to predict the gel time at any temperature within the studied range. Furthermore, the evolution of the complex viscosity of the FA resin after its gel point has been studied...... of the resin system. The evolution of the viscosity has been modeled using widely used rheokinetic models. Finally, since rheological properties such as viscosity and complex modulus (G*) are highly sensitive to the molecular weight of a polymeric system, and they can be used as indicators of the degree...

  3. INFLUENCE OF IRRADIATION EXPOSURE TIME ON THE DEPTH CURE OF RESTORATIVE RESIN COMPOSITE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesca Fabiano

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available A study was conducted to evaluate the degree of conversion by the hardness measurements of a commercial resin composite. The specimens were prepared according to ISO 4049 and photo-activated for 20s – 40s – 60s with a light-emitting diodes (LEDs. To establish the optimal increment technique mono-layers 1 mm and 2 mm thick were tested. The ratio bottom-to-top was assessed for the mono-layers groups. Vickers hardness profiles were measured for mono-layer, bi-layer and tri-layer along the cross-section. The microhardness map showed difference in the mechanical characteristic of overlying resin confirmed by SEM images analysis of the fracture mechanics. Curing effectiveness of resin composite is not only dependent on the curing light unit but also from thickness of the resin composite and the duration of the exposure. The data suggest that an exposure time of 40 s or higher is required to provide composites with a homogeneous and high hardness, moreover, a 1 mm buildup multi-layering technique results in adequate curing of the bottom layer and better mechanical properties.

  4. In vitro cytotoxicity of self-curing acrylic resins of different colors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Retamoso, Luciana Borges; da Cunha, Taís de Morais Alves; Pithon, Matheus Melo; dos Santos, Rogério Lacerda; Martins, Fernanda Otaviano; Romanos, Maria Teresa Villela; Tanaka, Orlando Motohiro

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the in vitro cytotoxicity of acrylic resins of different colors over time. Specimens were divided into 4 groups (n = 6) according to the color of the acrylic resin (Orto Class, Clássico, Campinas, São Paulo, Brazil): Group 1, clear acrylic resin; Group 2, pink acrylic resin; Group 3, blue acrylic resin; and Group 4, green acrylic resin. All specimens were fabricated according to the mass manipulation technique and submitted to mechanical polishing protocol. The control was performed with an amalgam specimen (C+), a glass specimen (C-) and cell control (CC). Specimens were immersed in Minimum Eagle's Medium (MEM) and incubated for 24 h at 37ºC. The extracts from the experimental material were filtered and mixed with L929 fibroblast. Cytotoxicity was evaluated at four different times, 24, 48, 72 and 168 h. After contact, cells were incubated for 24 h and added to 100 µ of 0.01% neutral red dye. The cells were incubated for 3 h for pigment incorporation and fixed. Cells viability was determined by a spectroscopic (BioTek, Winooski, Vermont, USA) with a 492-nm wavelength λ=492 nm). There were no statistical differences between the experimental groups and the CC and C- groups. Clear, pink, blue and green self-curing acrylic resins fabricated by means of the mass manipulation technique and mechanically polished are not cytotoxic. Neither the pigment added to the self-curing acrylic resin nor the factor of time influenced the cytotoxicity of the material.

  5. In vitro cytotoxicity of self-curing acrylic resins of different colors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciana Borges Retamoso

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to assess the in vitro cytotoxicity of acrylic resins of different colors over time. METHODS: Specimens were divided into 4 groups (n = 6 according to the color of the acrylic resin (Orto Class, Clássico, Campinas, São Paulo, Brazil: Group 1: clear acrylic resin; group 2: pink acrylic resin; group 3: blue acrylic resin and group 4: green acrylic resin. All specimens were fabricated according to the mass manipulation technique and submitted to mechanical polishing protocol. The control was performed with an amalgam specimen (C+, a glass specimen (C- and cell control (CC. Specimens were immersed in Minimum Eagle's Medium (MEM and incubated for 24 h at 37o C. The extracts from the experimental material were filtered and mixed with L929 fibroblast. Cytotoxicity was evaluated at 4 different times, 24, 48, 72 and 168 h. After contact, cells were incubated for 24 h and added to 100 µ of 0.01% neutral red dye. The cells were incubated for 3 h for pigment incorporation and fixed. Cells viability was determined by a spectroscopic (BioTek, Winooski, Vermont, USA with a 492-nm wavelength λ=492 nm. RESULTS: There were no statistical differences between the experimental groups and the CC and C- groups. CONCLUSION: Clear, pink, blue and green self-curing acrylic resins fabricated by means of the mass manipulation technique and mechanically polished are not cytotoxic. Neither the pigment added to the self-curing acrylic resin nor the factor of time influenced the cytotoxicity of the material.

  6. Study on Strength of Hybrid Mortar Synthesis with Epoxy Resin, Fly Ash and Quarry Dust Under Extreme Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sudheer, P.; Muni Reddy, M. G., Dr.; Adiseshu, S., Dr.

    2017-08-01

    Blend and characterization of Bisphenol-A diglycidyl ether based thermosetting polymer mortar comprising an epoxy resin, Fly ash and Quarry dust are presented here for the strength study. The specimens have been prepared by means of an innovative process in Extreme conditions of commercial epoxy resin, Fly ash and Quarry dust based paste. In this way, thermosetting based hybrid mortars characterized by a different contents of normalized Fly ash and Quarry dust by a homogeneous distribution of the resin have been attained. Once hardened, these new composite materials show improved compressive strength and toughness in respect to both the Fly ash and Rock sand pastes since the Resin provides a more cohesive microstructure, with a reduced number of micro cracks. The micro structural characterization allows pointing out the presence of an Interfacial Transition Zone similar to that observed in cement based mortars. A correlation between micro-structural features and mechanical properties of the mortar has also been studied in Extreme conditions.

  7. Effect of epoxy resin on bending momentum in L type corner joins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehmet Nuri Yıldırım

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available In the furniture industry, the joining points of frame and box construction furniture according to the loads to be affected by the use place is important for the security of the user and service life of the furniture element. In this direction, it is aimed to determine the diagonal compression and diagonal tensile moment values of "L" type corner joints of box framed construction furniture prepared from solid wood materials. The Pinus Nigra, Fagus Orientalis L and Populus Nigra were used as solid wood materials. Wood-based biscuit joining elements were used in corner joints of the test construction and epoxy resin was used as glue for materials. The static loads were applied to construction according to ASTM-D1037. The results show that, the highest tensile and compression values were obtained from Fagus Orientalis L and the lowest values were obtained from Populus Nigra specimens. In the statistical study, the difference between the tensile and compressive bending moment values of the biscuit connection element was found to be statistically significant. This study indicates that, it is suggested to use of L type joints prepared from Fagus Orientalis L by using epoxy resin and wood based biscuit joining element in frame constructions.

  8. Thermal conductivity and Kapitza resistance of epoxy resin fiberglass tape at superfluid helium temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baudouy, B.; Polinski, J.

    2009-03-01

    The system of materials composed of fiberglass epoxy resin impregnated tape constitutes in many cases the electrical insulation for "dry"-type superconducting accelerator magnet such as Nb 3Sn magnets. Nb 3Sn magnet technology is still under development in a few programs to reach higher magnetic fields than what NbTi magnets can produce. The European program, Next European Dipole (NED), is one of such programs and it aims to develop and construct a 15 T class Nb 3Sn magnet mainly for upgrading the Large Hardron Collider. Superfluid helium is considered as one possible coolant and since the magnet has been designed with a "dry" insulation, the thermal conductivity and the Kapitza resistance of the electrical insulation are the key properties that must be know for the thermal design of such a magnet. Accordingly, property measurements of the epoxy resin fiberglass tape insulation system developed for the NED project was carried out in superfluid helium. Four sheets with thicknesses varying from 40 to 300 μm have been tested in a steady-state condition. The determined thermal conductivity, k, is [(25.8 ± 2.8) · T - (12.2 ± 4.9)] × 10 -3 W m -1 K -1 and the Kapitza resistance is given by R K = (1462 ± 345) · T(-1.86 ± 0.41) × 10 -6 Km 2 W -1 in the temperature range of 1.55-2.05 K.

  9. Comparison of Eight Month Coastal Polluted Porcelain and Epoxy Resin Outdoor Insulators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Waluyo,

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available This study presents the experimental results of eight months naturally coastal polluted outdoor porcelain and epoxy resin insulators. The experiments were leakage current and applied high voltage measurements used a two-channel storage digital oscilloscope, in the hermetically sealed chamber, where temperature, humidity, pressure and applied voltage could be adjusted and measured simultaneously. The leakage current waveforms were analyzed using FFT and the relation to environmental parameters were analyzed using correlation matrix of multivariate statistical tools. It was also conducted SEM and EDAX tests.Base on the correlation coefficient matrix, the humidity contributed to leakage current amplitude and phase angle on the porcelain insulator were very significant, with the correlation coefficient were 0.60 and -0.68 respectively. Whereas, on polluted epoxy resin insulator, the humidity did not influence to leakage current and phase angle considerably. Generally, the surface became rougher than the new one. The most three chemical elements in pollutants were chlorine, silicon and ferrum.

  10. The electrical properties of epoxy resin composites filled with Cnts and carbon black.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellucci, S; Coderoni, L; Micciulla, F; Rinaldi, G; Sacco, I

    2011-10-01

    This work introduces an experimental activity related to the realization of an epossidic nanostructured material that develops the function of covering for electronic circuits in aeronautical field. This covering meets the demand of protection of these circuits from possible troubles of electromagnetic nature. In order to realize this covering we used an epoxy resin as matrix (Epon 828) loaded with conductive nanofillers or carbon nanotubes (Cnts). To check the efficiency of the coating we have considered the carbon black, filler widely used as a conductive covering for screenings. We have considered different percentages of the different fillers, precisely 0.1%, 0.25% and 0.5% wt (% valued in comparison to the weight of the resin). From every mixture 12 samples have been obtained (the size of every sample is 10 mm x 10 mm x 10 mm). Every sample has been subjected to electrical measurements, that have concerned the measurement of current intensity and resistance (so as to allow the evaluation of the enhancement of the conductivity), through the application of different values of voltage. The results have demonstrated that the epoxy matrix loaded with Cnts yields higher values of electrical conductivity than the same matrix loaded with carbon black.

  11. Non-destructive evaluation by terahertz spectroscopy for penetration of acid solutions into epoxy resin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Kusano

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Epoxy resins are used as high-performance thermosetting linings to protect substrates under corrosive environments. However, in a severe corrosive chemical solution, such protective layers may degrade with long time due to penetrations of solvent and solute molecules into resin network. In this regard, the terahertz time-domain spectroscopy (THz-TDS is a promising tool for non-destructive evaluation of the penetrant amounts due to high transparency of such plastic materials and high sensitivity to the molecular vibrations in terahertz spectral range. In this work, the complex refractive indexes n and κ of epoxy specimens were measured after immersion into sulfuric acid solutions and compared with penetrated mass fractions of water and acid ions. It was found that n and κ depended linearly with water and sulfuric acid mass fraction in specimens, and κ of sulfuric acid immersed specimens was lager at higher frequency. While the calculated Δκ agreed well with THz-TDS measurement by THz-TDS, the calculated Δn was higher than the measurement. The difference may be attributed to the water and sulfuric states in the specimen.

  12. Mechanical properties of composites made of hybrid fabric impregnated with silica nanoparticles and epoxy resin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kordani, N.; Alizadeh, M.; Lohrasby, F.; Khajavi, R.; Baharvandi, H. R.; Rezanejad, M.; Ahmadzadeh, M.

    2017-09-01

    In this study, the mechanical properties of composites will be examined which were made from Kenaf and hybrid fabric with a simple structure that was coated with epoxy resin and nano silica particles. This fabric cotton has a different situation in terms of yarn score and the type of fiber that is used in textiles. Nano silica particles of 200 nm, polyethylene glycol with 200 molecular weights and ethanol with mechanical weight molecular with ratio of 6:1 will be mixed. Suspension of 60% was chosen according to the silica particles. The D6264 standard test for concentrated force was carried out through the cone edge to determine the strength of each of the samples. Increasing of resistance against penetration in the Kenaf samples from the raw until impregnated with the shear thickening fluid is less than the hybrid samples. Slippage of the fibers with the change of round edge indenter to cone edge indenter has changed. Penetration by cone edge to the cloth is done with lower force and it shows the effect of slippage of fibers on the resistance of the penetration. Samples impregnated with the shear thickening fluid in comparison with epoxy resin have lower resistance. Slippage of natural fibers in comparison with synthetic fibers is lower and on the other hand the average of friction between fibers in the natural fibers is more than synthetic fibers.

  13. Study on the Characteristics of a Scintillator for Beta-ray Detection using Epoxy Resin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nam, Jong Soo; Choi, Yong Seok; Hong, Sang Bum; Seo, Bum Kyung; Moon, Jei Kwon; Choi, Jong Won

    2017-09-01

    A thin plate of a plastic scintillator for detecting a beta-ray was developed. The plastic scintillator was made using epoxy resin and organic scintillators such as 2.5-diphenyloxazole (PPO) and 1,4-bis [5-phenyl-2-oxazole] benzene (POPOP). The mixture ratio of epoxy resin and the organic scintillators was determined using their absorbance, transmittance, emission spectra, and transparency. Their optimal weight percentage of PPO and POPOP in the organic scintillators was adjusted to 0.2 wt%:0.01 wt%. The prepared plastic scintillator was used to measure the standard source of Sr-90. The pulse height spectra and total counts of the prepared plastic scintillator were similar to a commercial plastic scintillator. Based on the above results, a large-area plastic scintillator was prepared for rapid investigation of a site contaminated with Sr-90. The prepared large-area plastic scintillator was evaluated for the characteristics in the laboratory. The evaluation results are expected to be usefully utilized in the development of a large-area plastic scintillation detector. The large-area plastic scintillation detector developed on the basis of the evaluation results is expected to be utilized to quickly measure the contamination of Sr-90 in the grounds used as a nuclear power facility.

  14. Dissolution of brominated epoxy resins by dimethyl sulfoxide to separate waste printed circuit boards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Ping; Chen, Yan; Wang, Liangyou; Qian, Guangren; Zhang, Wei Jie; Zhou, Ming; Zhou, Jin

    2013-03-19

    Improved methods are required for the recycling of waste printed circuit boards (WPCBs). In this study, WPCBs (1-1.5 cm(2)) were separated into their components using dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) at 60 °C for 45 min and a metallographic microscope was used to verify their delamination. An increased incubation time of 210 min yielded a complete separation of WPCBs into their components, and copper foils and glass fibers were obtained. The separation time decreased with increasing temperature. When the WPCB size was increased to 2-3 cm(2), the temperature required for complete separation increased to 90 °C. When the temperature was increased to 135 °C, liquid photo solder resists could be removed from the copper foil surfaces. The DMSO was regenerated by rotary decompression evaporation, and residues were obtained. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), thermal analysis, nuclear magnetic resonance, scanning electron microscopy, and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy were used to verify that these residues were brominated epoxy resins. From FT-IR analysis after the dissolution of brominated epoxy resins in DMSO it was deduced that hydrogen bonding may play an important role in the dissolution mechanism. This novel technology offers a method for separating valuable materials and preventing environmental pollution from WPCBs.

  15. Influence of light curing and sample thickness on microhardness of a composite resin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flávio HB Aguiar

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Flávio HB Aguiar1, Kelly RM Andrade1, Débora AN Leite Lima1, Gláucia MB Ambrosano2, José R Lovadino11Department of Restorative Dentistry; 2Department of Social Dentistry/Statistics, Piracicaba Dental School, State University of Campinas, SP, BrazilAbstract: The aim of this in vitro study was to evaluate the influence of light-curing units and different sample thicknesses on the microhardness of a composite resin. Composite resin specimens were randomly prepared and assigned to nine experimental groups (n = 5: considering three light-curing units (conventional quartz tungsten halogen [QTH]: 550 mW/cm2 – 20 s; high irradiance QTH: 1160 mW/cm2 – 10 s; and light-emitting diode [LED]: 360 mW/cm2 – 40 s and three sample thicknesses (0.5 mm, 1 mm, and 2 mm. All samples were polymerized with the light tip 8 mm away from the specimen. Knoop microhardness was then measured on the top and bottom surfaces of each sample. The top surfaces, with some exceptions, were almost similar; however, in relation to the bottom surfaces, statistical differences were found between curing units and thicknesses. In all experimental groups, the 0.5-mm-thick increments showed microhardness values statistically higher than those observed for 1- and -2-mm increments. The conventional and LED units showed higher hardness mean values and were statistically different from the high irradiance unit. In all experimental groups, microhardness mean values obtained for the top surface were higher than those observed for the bottom surface. In conclusion, higher levels of irradiance or thinner increments would help improve hybrid composite resin polymerization.Keywords: photo-polymerization, light-curing distance, light-curing units, composite resin, composite thickness, microhardness

  16. Bond strength of orthodontic light-cured resin-modified glass ionomer cement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Hsiang Yu; Chen, Chien Hsiu; Li, Chuan Li; Tsai, Hung Huey; Chou, Ta Hsiung; Wang, Wei Nan

    2011-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the bond strengths and debonded interfaces achieved with light-cured resin-modified glass ionomer cement (RMGIC) and conventional light-cured composite resin. In addition, the effects of acid etching and water contamination were examined. One hundred human premolars were randomly divided into five equal groups. The mini Dyna-lock upper premolar bracket was selected for testing. The first four groups were treated with light-cured RMGIC with or without 15 per cent phosphoric acid-etching treatment and with or without water contamination preceding bracket bonding. The control samples were treated with the conventional light-cured Transbond composite resin under acid etching and without water contamination. Subsequently, the brackets were debonded by tensile force using an Instron machine. The modified adhesive remnant index (ARI) scores were assigned to the bracket base of the debonded interfaces using a scanning electron microscope. The bond strength and modified ARI scores were determined and analysed statistically by one-way analysis of variance and chi-square test. Under all four conditions, the bond strength of the light-cure RMGIC was equal to or higher than that of the conventional composite resin. The highest bond strength was achieved when using RMGIC with acid etching but without water contamination. The modified ARI scores were 2 for Fuji Ortho LC and 3 for Transbond. No enamel detachment was found in any group. Fifteen per cent phosphoric acid etching without moistening the enamel of Fuji Ortho LC provided the more favourable bond strength. Enamel surfaces, with or without water contamination and with or without acid etching, had the same or a greater bond strength than Transbond.

  17. Modification of graphene with silica nanoparticles for use in hybrid network formation from epoxy, novolac, and epoxidized novolac resins by sol-gel method: Investigation of thermal properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Mousavi

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Thermal stability of hybrid composites prepared from epoxy, novolac, and epoxidized-novolac resins and also modified graphene oxide (SFGO was studied. SFGO was prepared by covering graphene oxide with silica nanoparticles and a bifunctional silane modifier. The first hybrid was prepared from SFGO and silane-modified epoxy resin. The second one was prepared from SFGO, and silane-modified epoxy and novolac resins. The third hybrid was formed from SFGO, silane-modified novolac, and epoxidized novolac resins. Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS, X-ray diffraction (XRD, and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA results showed that modification of graphene oxide was carried out successfully. TGA results show that degradation temperature and char residue of resins were increased through their incorporation into hybrid network with SFGO. In addition, the most increase of char residue was observed for the hybrid composites formed from SFGO and modified novolac and epoxy resins.

  18. Influence of different light curing units on the bond strength of indirect resin composite restorations

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    Veridiana Camilotti

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of different light sources on the bond strength of indirect resin composite restorations cemented with a dual-cure resin cement. The superficial dentin of human third molars was exposed and acid-etched and an adhesive system was applied (Single Bond 2. Four-mm-thick indirect resin composite restorations (Gradia were fabricated and cemented using a dual-cure resin cement (Rely X. Four light sources were used to polymerize the cement: QTH - Optilux 401; LED1 - L.E.Demetron 1; LED2 - Optilight CL; and LED3 - Ultralume 5. The teeth were stored for 24 h and then sectioned, yielding stick-shaped specimens for each group with a bonded area of 1.0 mm². The specimens were then tested in a universal testing machine, at a crosshead speed of 1 mm/min. Data were analyzed using ANOVA. Bond strength mean values were: QTH: 22.5 (± 8.4; LED1: 22.7 (± 9.4; LED2: 21.4 (± 10.2; and LED3: 27.3 (± 13.8. No statistically significant difference was observed among the experimental groups. The bond strength values when the cement was polymerized using different LED lights were equivalent to the values when the QTH light was used. It can be concluded that the variety of light sources used in the present study did not influence the bond strength of indirect resin composite restorations cemented with a dual-cure resin cement.

  19. Enhanced actuation performance of piezoelectric fiber composites induced by incorporated BaTiO{sub 3} nanoparticles in epoxy resin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Mingliang; Yuan, Xi [State Key Laboratory of Powder Metallurgy, Central South University, Changsha, Hunan 410083 (China); Luo, Hang, E-mail: xtluohang@163.com [State Key Laboratory of Powder Metallurgy, Central South University, Changsha, Hunan 410083 (China); College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Central South University, Changsha, Hunan 410083 (China); Chen, Haiyan; Chen, Chao; Zhou, Kechao [State Key Laboratory of Powder Metallurgy, Central South University, Changsha, Hunan 410083 (China); Zhang, Dou, E-mail: dzhang@csu.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Powder Metallurgy, Central South University, Changsha, Hunan 410083 (China)

    2017-05-18

    Piezoelectric fiber composites (PFCs) have attracted much interest owing to their flexibility and toughness compared with conventional monolithic piezoceramic wafers. The free strain values and actuation property of PFCs strongly depend on the active electric field applied in Pb(Zr{sub 1−x}Ti{sub x})O{sub 3} (PZT) fibers. Reducing the dielectric constant mismatch between PZT fiber and the assembling epoxy resin would greatly increase the active electric field in PZT fiber. Therefore, BaTiO{sub 3} (BT) nanoparticles were introduced into the epoxy resin to enhance the dielectric constant. Homogeneous dispersion of BT nanoparticles and tight adhesion with the epoxy resin were achieved through a surface modification by dopamine. The maximum dielectric constant of dopamine modified BT/epoxy (BT@Dop/epoxy) nanocomposites was 10.38 with 12 wt% BT@Dop content at 1 kHz. The maximum free strain of PFCs reached 1820 ppm with 6 wt% BT@Dop content, while PFCs assembled by pure epoxy showed 790 ppm at the same processing condition. The tip displacement of cantilever beam actuated by PFCs reached the peak of 19 mm at the resonance frequency with 6 wt% BT@Dop, which was improved by 90% comparing to PFCs with pure epoxy. - Highlights: • The effect of dielectric mismatch on effective electric field in piezoceramic fibers was explained by a model. • The dispersibility and adhesion of BaTiO{sub 3} nanoparticles in epoxy was improved by the dopamine modification. • The actuation performance increased firstly and then decreased with adding BaTiO{sub 3} nanoparticles. • The maximum free strain and displacement of cantilever beam were up to 1820 ppm and 19 mm, respectively.

  20. The effect of curing intensity on mechanical properties of different bulk-fill composite resins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alkhudhairy FI

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Fahad I Alkhudhairy Restorative Dental Sciences Department, College of Dentistry, King Saud University, Riyadh, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia Objective: The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of two curing light intensities on the mechanical properties (Vickers microhardness, compressive strength, and diametral tensile strength of bulk-fill resin-based composites (RBCs.Materials and methods: Four commercially available bulk-fill RBCs (Tetric® N-Ceram, SonicFill™, Smart Dentin Replacement (SDR™ Posterior Flowable Material, and Filtek™ Posterior Restorative were used in this study. A total of 72 cylindrical specimens of each RBC (n=288 were prepared and subjected to Vickers microhardness, compressive strength, and diametral tensile strength tests at high (1200 mW/cm2 and low (650 mW/cm2 curing light intensities (each n=12. Results were evaluated using independent and paired sample t-tests, one-way analysis of variance, and Tukey’s post hoc test. All tests were performed at a significance level of P<0.05.Results: The highest mean microhardness was observed for SonicFill (58.3 Vickers hardness number [VHN] cured using high-intensity light. Although having the least mean microhardness values, a significant difference was observed between SDR cured using high-intensity light and that cured using low-intensity light (P<0.05. In the total sample, the highest mean compressive strength was obtained for SonicFill (262.6 MPa, followed by SDR (253.2 MPa, both cured using high-intensity light, and the least was measured for Tetric N-Ceram cured using low-intensity light (214.3 MPa. At high and low curing light intensities, diametral tensile strength for all RBCs except SonicFill was significant (P<0.001.Conclusion: A higher curing light intensity (1200 mW/cm2 had a positive influence on the compressive and tensile strength of the four bulk-fill RBCs and microhardness of two materials tested compared with lower curing light intensity

  1. Dynamic measurement of local displacements within curing resin-based dental composite using optical coherence elastography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomlins, Peter H.; Rahman, Mohammed Wahidur; Donnan, Robert S.

    2016-04-01

    This study aimed to determine the feasibility of using optical coherence elastography to measure internal displacements during the curing phase of a light-activated, resin-based composite material. Displacement vectors were spatially mapped over time within a commercial dental composite. Measurements revealed that the orientation of cure-induced displacement vectors varied spatially in a complex manner; however, each vector showed a systematic evolution with time. Precision of individual displacements was estimated to be ˜1 to 2 μm, enabling submicrometer time-varying displacements to be detected.

  2. Color stability of visible light cured composite resin after soft drink immersion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alizatul Khairani Hasan

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Composite resin is a tooth-colored filling material containing Bis-GMA which exhibits water sorption properties. People tend to consume soft drink with various colors. Water sorption properties can alter the color stability of composite resin purpose. Purpose: This study was to determine the influence of immersion durations of composite resin in soft drink on color stability. Methods: The visible-light cured hybrid composite resin and soft drink were used. Ten disk specimens (2.5 mm thickness and 15 mm diameter of composite resin were prepared and light cured for 20 seconds, then stored in distilled water for 24 hours at 37° C. The initial color of specimens were measured by Chromameter. After that, each specimen was immersed in 30 ml of soft drink up to 48, 72, and 96 hours at 37° C. The specimens’ color were measured again after each immersion. The color changes were calculated by CIE L*a*b* system formula. The data was analyzed by One-Way ANOVA and LSD (α = 0.05. Result: The ANOVA showed that the immersion durations of composite resin in soft drinks had significant influence on the color stability (p < 0.05. The LSD0.05 tests showed significant differences among all groups. The least color change was detected from the group of 48 hours immersion, while the greatest color change was from the group of 96 hours immersion. Conclusions: The immersion of composite resin in soft drinks influenced the color stability (began after 48 hours immersion.

  3. Comparative evaluation of few physical properties of epoxy resin, resin-modified gypsum and conventional type IV gypsum die materials: an in vitro study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gujjarlapudi, Manmohan Choudary; Reddy, S Varalakshmi; Madineni, Praveen Kumar; Ealla, Kranti Kiran Reddy; Nunna, Venkata Narayana; Manne, Sanjay Dutt

    2012-01-01

    To compare and evaluate few physical properties of epoxy resin, resin-modified gypsum and conventional type-IV gypsum die material. In the present study, dimensional accuracy, surface detail reproduction and transverse strength of three die materials like epoxy resin (Diemet-E), resin-modified gypsum (Synarock) and conventional type-IV gypsum (Ultrarock) are analyzed. For dimensional accuracy, master die (Bailey's die) is used and calibrations were made with digital microscope. For surface detail reproduction and transverse strength, rectangular stainless steel master die (Duke's die) was used and calibrations were made with Toolmaker's microscope and Instron universal testing machine respectively. One-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) was performed on the means and standard deviation for groups of each test. The results of the study showed statistically significant difference among these materials in dimensional accuracy, surface detail reproduction and transverse strength. Epoxy resin exhibited superiority in dimensional accuracy, surface detail reproduction and transverse strength and is nearest to the standards of accurate die material.

  4. Examination of the chemical changes in cured phenol-formaldehyde resins during storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strzemiecka, B; Zięba-Palus, J; Voelkel, A; Lachowicz, T; Socha, E

    2016-04-08

    Chemical changes occurring within cured phenol-formaldehyde resins (resite and novolak type) during their storage were investigated by FT-NIR, py-GCMS and inverse gas chromatography. It was shown that a mixture of resite with novolak was less stable than resite or novolak itself as regards bulk properties. This aging phenomenon is mainly due to reaction of ammonia (product of hexa decomposition) with CH2OH groups present in resite. FT-NIR technique seems to be the least sensitive method for assessment chemical changes occurring during cured resins storage. Applications of py-GCMS and IGC method made able to indicate that more significant changes were for bulk samples (py-GCMS results) than on their surface (IGC results). Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Development of a low-color, color stable, dual cure dental resin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oei, James D; Mishriky, Maged; Barghi, Nasser; Rawls, H Ralph; Cardenas, H Lee; Aguirre, Rene; Whang, Kyumin

    2013-04-01

    Dual-cure (DC) resins are mainly used as cements due to high initial color (generally yellow) and large color shift (ΔE*) after polymerization as compared to light-cured resins. However, even as cements, this color shift is clinically unacceptable, especially when used to cement thin veneers. To develop a novel DC initiator system with both lower initial color (less yellow, i.e., whiter) and smaller ΔE*. The effect of using an allyl thiourea (T)/cumene hydroperoxide (CH) self-cure (SC) initiator system in combination with a photo-co-initiator, p-octyloxy-phenyl-phenyl iodonium hexafluoroantimonate (OPPI), in a commercial DC resin cement (PermaFlo DC, Ultradent Products, Inc.) was investigated. Initial color and ΔE* were assessed for 6 weeks in vitro under accelerated aging conditions (75°C water bath). Rockwell15T hardness was used to assess degree of cure (DoC) and the three-point bending test was used to assess mechanical properties. PermaFlo DC (control) was significantly harder than all experimental groups without OPPI but had up to three times higher initial color and four times greater color shift (ΔE*=27 vs. 8). With OPPI, hardness in the experimental groups increased significantly and several were comparable to the controls. Initial color and ΔE* increased slightly (ΔE*=9), but was still 3 times less than that of PermaFlo DC. DC samples containing OPPI had comparable modulus and ultimate transverse strengths to those of the controls. DC resins that use the T/CH initiator system are weaker but have extremely low color and ΔE*. The addition of OPPI increases DoC and mechanical properties to clinically acceptable levels and maintains extremely low color and ΔE*. With this novel initiator system, DC resins potentially can now have comparable color and color stability to light-cure resins and be used in broader esthetic dental applications to improve color stability and reduce shrinkage stress in restorative composites. Copyright © 2013 Academy of

  6. Characteristics of epoxy resin/SiO2 nanocomposite insulation: effects of plasma surface treatment on the nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Wei; Phung, B T; Han, Zhao Jun; Ostrikov, Kostya

    2013-05-01

    The present study compares the effects of two different material processing techniques on modifying hydrophilic SiO2 nanoparticles. In one method, the nanoparticles undergo plasma treatment by using a custom-developed atmospheric-pressure non-equilibrium plasma reactor. With the other method, they undergo chemical treatment which grafts silane groups onto their surface and turns them into hydrophobic. The treated nanoparticles are then used to synthesize epoxy resin-based nanocomposites for electrical insulation applications. Their characteristics are investigated and compared with the pure epoxy resin and nanocomposite fabricated with unmodified nanofillers counterparts. The dispersion features of the nanoparticles in the epoxy resin matrix are examined through scanning electron microscopy (SEM) images. All samples show evidence that the agglomerations are smaller than 30 nm in their diameters. This indicates good dispersion uniformity. The Weibull plot of breakdown strength and the recorded partial discharge (PD) events of the epoxy resin/plasma-treated hydrophilic SiO2 nanocomposite (ER/PTI) suggest that the plasma-treated specimen yields higher breakdown strength and lower PD magnitude as compared to the untreated ones. In contrast, surprisingly, lower breakdown strength is found for the nanocomposite made by the chemically treated hydrophobic particles, whereas the PD magnitude and PD numbers remain at a similar level as the plasma-treated ones.

  7. Effect of gamma-irradiation on the colorimetric properties of epoxy-resin films: Potential use in dosimetric application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hosni, F., E-mail: ali_hosni2001@yahoo.fr [Unité de Recherche Maîtrise des Techniques Nucléaires à Caractère Pacifique, Centre National des Sciences et Technologie Nucléaires, 2020 Sidi-Thabet (Tunisia); Academie Militaire de Fondouk Jedid, 8012 Nabeul (Tunisia); Farah, K. [Unité de Recherche Maîtrise des Techniques Nucléaires à Caractère Pacifique, Centre National des Sciences et Technologie Nucléaires, 2020 Sidi-Thabet (Tunisia); Institut Supérieur du Transport et de la Logistique, 12 Rue Abdallah Ibn Ezzoubeier 40000, Université de Sousse (Tunisia); Kaouach, H. [Institut National de Recherche Scientifique et Technique, B.P. 95, Hammam-Lif 2050 (Tunisia); Louati, A. [Academie Militaire de Fondouk Jedid, 8012 Nabeul (Tunisia); Chtourou, R. [Institut National de Recherche Scientifique et Technique, B.P. 95, Hammam-Lif 2050 (Tunisia); Hamzaoui, A.H. [Laboratoire de Valorisation des Matériaux Utiles, Centre National de Recherche en Sciences des Matériaux, Technopôle de Borj Cedria, B.P. 95, Hammam-Lif 2050 (Tunisia)

    2013-09-15

    The present paper reports the results of the colorimetric study of gamma-irradiated epoxy-resin films. Epoxy-resin samples were irradiated by gamma-rays with doses varying from 1 to 50 kGy. Color changes of epoxy-resin were observed and studied by the measurements of the variation of the L{sup ∗}, a{sup ∗}, b{sup ∗} as function of dose and post-irradiation time. Where L{sup ∗} is a measure of the magnitude of brightness from black to white, parameter a{sup ∗} describe the relative amounts of red and green, and parameter b{sup ∗} describes the relative amounts of yellow and blue color. Color changes (ΔE) were also calculated. They indicated a marked dependence of the absorbed doses showing the optical activation of the color centers. It was found that color changes (ΔE) due to absorbed dose increase from 6 to 50. Color change showed a low variability which did not exceed 3% for the measurements carried out between 1 and 72 h. The obtained results revealed that epoxy-resin films can be used as a new routine dosimeter or irradiation indicator in dose range 1–50 kGy.

  8. Perubahan suhu transisi kaca dan massa resin akrilik heat cured akibat kelembaban dan lama penyimpanan (Changes in glass transition temperature and heat cured acrylic resin mass due to moisture and storage time

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sherman Salim

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Acrylic resins, especially poly methyl methacrylate (PMMA was introduced in 1937. Acrylic resin has favorable properties, among others, aesthetic, color and texture similar to that of the gingival aesthetic in the mouth, relatively low water absorption and dimensional changes. However, some studies suggest that the duration of storage of acrylic resin will affect the changes in the glass transition temperature and the mass of acrylic resin. Purpose: The objective of this research was to study the effect of humidity and storage time led to changes in the glass transition temperature and the mass of the acrylic resin. Methods: The research method is experimental laboratory. Acrylic resin specimens are kept in conditions of humidity of 90%, 70%, 40% and 30% for 24 hours, one week, one month and two months. In this study used three methods of curing, namely conventional JIs, 24-hour curing at 70 °C and using the microwave. Results: Low humidity causes changes in the glass transition temperature and the mass of acrylic resin. Longer storage of acrylic resins in low humidity, can affect change greater than the glass transition temperature and the mass of acrylic resin. Conclusion: It can be concluded that the humidity and longer storage of acrylic resins can affect the glass transition temperature and a change in mass.Latar belakang: Resin akrilik terutama poli metil metakrilat (PMMA telah diperkenalkan pada tahun 1937. Resin akrilik memiliki sifat yang menguntungkan antara lain estetis, warna dan tekstur mirip dengan gingiva sehingga estetik di dalam mulut baik, daya serap air relatif rendah dan perubahan dimensi kecil. Akan tetapi, dari beberapa penelitian menyatakan bahwa lamanya waktu penyimpanan resin akrilik akan berpengaruh pada perubahan suhu transisi kaca dan massa resin akrilik. Tujuan: Tujuan dari penelitian ini adalah untuk mempelajari pengaruh kelembaban dan waktu penyimpanan yang menyebabkan perubahan suhu transisi kaca dan

  9. Effect of different light curing units on Knoop hardness and temperature of resin composite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guiraldo Ricardo

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: To evaluate the influence of quartz tungsten halogen and plasma arc curing (PAC lights on Knoop hardness and change in polymerization temperature of resin composite. Materials and Methods: Filtek Z250 and Esthet X composites were used in the shade A3. The temperature increase was registered with Type-k thermocouple connected to a digital thermometer (Iopetherm 46. A self-cured polymerized acrylic resin base was built in order to guide the thermocouple and to support the dentin disk of 1.0 mm thickness obtained from bovine tooth. On the acrylic resin base, elastomer mold of 2.0 mm was adapted. The temperature increase was measured after composite light curing. After 24 h, the specimens were submitted to Knoop hardness test (HMV-2000, Shimadzu, Tokyo, Japan. Data were submitted to ANOVA and Tukey′s test (a = 0.05. Results: For both composites, there were no significant differences (P > 0.05 in the top surface hardness; however, PAC promoted statistically lower (P < 0.05 Knoop hardness number values in the bottom. The mean temperature increase showed no significant statistical differences (P > 0.05. Conclusion: The standardized radiant exposure showed no influence on the temperature increase of the composite, however, showed significant effect on hardness values.

  10. The Fracture of Thermosetting Resins after Exposure to Water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-09-01

    1.0 water. 23 0C uptakeamine-cured 0.6 /* anhydride cured 0.2 bisphenol cured epoxy/glass laminate (VF =0.55) Source: H W Gitschner and G Menges...process, pipe and food storage applications. Like epoxides, these resins withstand water well, except at higher temperatures. The reason for their

  11. E-beam curing of epoxy-based blends in order to produce high-performance composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alessi, S. [Dipartimento di Ingegneria Chimica dei Processi e dei Materiali (DICPM), Universita di Palermo, Viale delle Scienze, 90128 Palermo (Italy)]. E-mail: Alessi@dicpm.unipa.it; Dispenza, C. [Dipartimento di Ingegneria Chimica dei Processi e dei Materiali (DICPM), Universita di Palermo, Viale delle Scienze, 90128 Palermo (Italy); Centro Interdipartimentale di Ricerca sui Materiali Compositi (CIRMAC) Universita di Palermo, Viale delle Scienze, 90128 Palermo (Italy); Fuochi, P.G. [Istituto per la Sintesi Organica e Fotoreattivita (ISOF), CNR, Via. P. Gobetti 101, 40129 Bologna (Italy); Corda, U. [Istituto per la Sintesi Organica e Fotoreattivita (ISOF), CNR, Via. P. Gobetti 101, 40129 Bologna (Italy); Lavalle, M. [Istituto per la Sintesi Organica e Fotoreattivita (ISOF), CNR, Via. P. Gobetti 101, 40129 Bologna (Italy); Spadaro, G. [Dipartimento di Ingegneria Chimica dei Processi e dei Materiali (DICPM), Universita di Palermo, Viale delle Scienze, 90128 Palermo (Italy); Centro Interdipartimentale di Ricerca sui Materiali Compositi (CIRMAC) Universita di Palermo, Viale delle Scienze, 90128 Palermo (Italy)

    2007-08-15

    In this work, blends of a difunctional epoxy monomer and a thermoplastic toughening agent are E-beam irradiated at two different dose rates and two different total absorbed doses. The influence of the processing conditions on the thermal properties and on the morphology of the obtained matrices has been investigated. In particular, it is shown how the increase of the dose rate causes an increase of the temperature during irradiation, thus inducing a simultaneous thermal and radiation curing. On the contrary, at low-dose rate the system mainly undergoes to radiation curing, thus making the cured material very sensible to a post-irradiation thermal treatment with a significant improvement of the thermal properties.

  12. Preparation and Characterization of UV-Curable Cyclohexanone-Formaldehyde Resin and Its Cured Film Properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guang Yang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available UV-curable cyclohexanone-formaldehyde (UVCF resin was prepared with cyclohexanone-formaldehyde (CF resin, isophorone diisocyanate (IPDI, and pentaerythritol triacrylate (PETA as base substance, bridging agent, and functional monomer, respectively. The structure of UVCF was characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR, 1H-nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (1H-NMR, and gel permeation chromatography (GPC. The viscosity and photopolymerization behavior of the UV-curable formulations were studied. The thermal stability and mechanical properties of the cured films were also investigated. The results showed that UVCF resin was successfully prepared, the number of average molecular weight was about 2010, and its molecular weight distribution index was 2.8. With the increase of UVCF resin content, the viscosity of the UV-curable formulations increased. After exposure to UV irradiation for 230 s, the photopolymerization conversion of the UV-curable formulations was above 80%. Moreover, when the UVCF content was 60%, the formulations had high photopolymerization rate, and the cured UVCF films showed good thermal stability and mechanical properties.

  13. Epoxy sheathing

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    1992-01-01

    ... their vessels using polyester resins. In May 1990, several fishermen applied to the Vessel Upgrading Program for assistance to fiberglass their vessels using epoxy resin for the purpose of extending fishing vessel life...

  14. Effect Of Fly Ash Filler To Dielectric Properties Of The Insulator Material Of Silicone Rubber And Epoxy Resin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ikhlas Kitta

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Currently many operated the coal fired power plant to meet the energy needs of the worlds electricity. But the coal fired power plant produces waste that can pollute the environment such as fly ash and bottom ash so requires management to not cause environmental problems because coal fly ash classified as a hazardous waste. Fly ash has a particle size that is very smooth and of some literature research done previously fly ash coal containing silica SiO2 alumina Al2O3 titanium dioxide TiO2 magnesium oxide MgO and zinc oxide ZnO are potentially as filler that are likely to be used as a mixture of silicone rubber and epoxy resin for electrical insulators. So this research theme was engineering insulation materials by utilizing waste coal fly ash. The purpose of this study was to obtain performance characteristics of waste coal fly ash as filler in silicon rubber and epoxy resin. To achieve these objectives the activities that have been done is examined the effects of the use of fly ash as filler in silicone rubber material and epoxy resin. Parameters measured were dielectric strength and relative permittivity. The result of this research is the dielectric strength of silicone rubber rose with increasing quantity of fly ash. Conversely in epoxy resin dielectric strength decreases with increasing quantity of fly ash. Furthermore the measurement results relative permittivity where the value of the relative permittivity of silicon rubber swell if it is filled with fly ash as well as epoxy resin which has a value of permittivity relative to the concentration of fly ash filler material is linear.

  15. On adhesive properties of perlite and sewage sludge ash with epoxy resin bonded single-strap repairs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bulut, Mehmet; Erkliğ, Ahmet; Furkan Doğan, Nurettin

    2017-08-01

    In this study, the tensile properties of epoxy adhesive with the inclusion of micro-scale perlite and sewage sludge ash (SSA) particles were investigated for glass-epoxy laminates adhesively bonded single-strap repairs. Particle fillers were incorporated in the epoxy resin as an additive material at different ratios by weight, namely, 5, 10, 15 wt% for perlite; 5, 10, 15 and 20 wt% for SSA as well as unfilled composites. Composite samples were weakened by opening a circular cutout at the center of them, and then repaired by the circular patches produced from the same material. The repairing performances of samples were explored for two different patch ratios (D/d  =  2 and 3). Results indicated that the inclusion of perlite and SSA particles in the epoxy adhesive contributed to a significant increase in load carrying capacity at a weight content of 10 wt%.

  16. Study on Ultraviolet Light Cured Resin Bond Grind/Lap for Aluminum Oxide Ceramics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Qiuyun

    After the development of ultraviolet (UV) curing technology, a novel method to manufacture abrasive tools using UV light curing technique was proposed. After decades of research activities, the UV-cured resin bond tools have been studied and proven to have substantial advantages. However, very little research has been done to study the mechanism of such abrasive tools. In this study, the mechanism of UV-cured resin bond diamond tools was proposed as a Grind/Lap (G/L) process and an experimental method was used to verify the mechanism. Furthermore, the models of surface roughness (RA) and material removal rate (MRR) in the process of ceramics have been intensively investigated. The traditional way to fabricate abrasive tools is by utilizing the thermosetting method. The mixture of abrasives and bond material is sintered at high temperature under extremely high pressure, and it is a time consuming and costly procedure. However, for the UV-curing technique, after being exposed to UV light with a certain intensity, the abrasive-mixed resin can be solidified in a short time. The process is environmentally friendly and has strong productivity advantages but coupled with low energy consumption. The purpose of this research is to understand fundamental issues in UV-curable resin and face grinding of ceramic materials using UV-cured resin bond wheels, including to study the kinematics of face grinding (grinding with lapping kinematics) and the properties of UV-cured abrasive-mixed resin, verify the mechanism proposed for grind/lap process and investigate the effects of several factors on the performance of UV-cured resin bond wheel for aluminum oxide ceramics. The kinematic relation between the workpiece, workpiece holder and the wheel were investigated. The trajectories generated under different speed combinations were simulated. Based on the trace distribution, a combination of the speed of wheel and holder can be suggested and an explanation of interactional effect of

  17. Effects of postcuring on mechanical properties of pultruded fiber-reinforced epoxy composites and the neat resin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Edward R., Jr.; Long, Sheila Ann T.; Funk, Joan G.; Collins, William D.; Gray, Stephanie L.

    1989-01-01

    The effects of postcuring on mechanical properties of pultruded fiber-reinforced epoxy-resin composites have been investigated. Composites with carbon, glass, and aramid reinforcement fibers were individually studied. The epoxy was a commercially-available resin that was especially developed for pultrusion fabrication. The pultrusions were conducted at 400 F with postcures at 400, 450, 500, and 550 F. Measurements of the flexural, shear, and interlaminar fracture-toughness properties showed that significant postcuring can occur during the pultrusion process. All three mechanical properties were degraded by the higher (500 and 550 F) temperatures; photomicrographs suggest that the degradation was caused at the fiber-resin interface for all three fiber types.

  18. A Twofold Comparison between Dual Cure Resin Modified Cement and Glass Ionomer Cement for Orthodontic Band Cementation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Attar, Hanaa El; Elhiny, Omnia; Salem, Ghada; Abdelrahman, Ahmed; Attia, Mazen

    2016-12-15

    To test the solubility of dual cure resin modified resin cement in a food simulating solution and the shear bond strength compared to conventional Glass ionomer cement. The materials tested were self-adhesive dual cure resin modified cement and Glass Ionomer (GIC). Twenty Teflon moulds were divided into two groups of tens. The first group was injected and packed with the modified resin cement, the second group was packed with GIC. To test the solubility, each mould was weighed before and after being placed in an analytical reagent for 30 days. The solubility was measured as the difference between the initial and final drying mass. To measure the Shear bond strength, 20 freshly extracted wisdom teeth were equally divided into two groups and embedded in self-cure acrylic resin. Four mm sections of stainless steel bands were cemented to the exposed buccal surfaces of teeth under a constant load of 500 g. Shear bond strength was measured using a computer controlled materials testing machine and the load required to deband the samples was recorded in Newtons. GIC showed significantly higher mean weight loss and an insignificant lower Shear bond strength, compared to dual cure resin Cement. It was found that dual cure resin modified cement was less soluble than glass ionomer cement and of comparable bond strength rendering it more useful clinically for orthodontic band cementation.

  19. The influence of different dispersion methods on the size of the aggregate of CNTs in epoxy resin for the manufacturing of carbon fiber reinforced composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barra, Giuseppina; Guadagno, Liberata; Simonet, Bartolome; Santos, Bricio

    2016-05-01

    Different industrial mixing methods and some of their combinations (1) ultrasound; (2) stirring; (3) (4) by roller machine, (5) by gears machine (6) Ultrasound radiation + high stirring were investigated for incorporating Multi walled Carbon nanotubes (MWCNT) into a resin based on an aeronautical epoxy precursor, cured with 4,4' diamine-dibenzylsulfone (DDS). The effect of different parameters, ultrasound intensity, number of cycles, type of blade, gears speed on the nanofiller dispersion were analyzed. The inclusion of the nanofiller in the resin causes a drastic increase in the viscosity, preventing the homogenization of the resin and a drastic increase in temperature in the zones closest to the ultrasound probe. To overcome these challenges, the application of high speed agitation simultaneously with the application of ultrasonic radiation was used. This allows on the one hand a homogeneous dispersion, on the other hand an improvement of the dissipation of heat generated by ultrasonic radiation. A comprehensive study with parameters like viscosity and temperature was performed. It is necessary a balance between viscosity and temperature. Viscosity must be low enough to facilitate the dispersion and homogenization of the nanofillers, whereas the temperature cannot be too high because of re-agglomerations

  20. The influence of different dispersion methods on the size of the aggregate of CNTs in epoxy resin for the manufacturing of carbon fiber reinforced composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barra, Giuseppina; Guadagno, Liberata [Department of Industrial Engineering DIIn, University of Salerno via Giovanni Paolo II, 132 – 84084 Fisciano (Italy); Simonet, Bartolome; Santos, Bricio [Carbures Europe SA Tecnoparque “Bahía de Cádiz”-Road El Puert-Sanlucar km 5.5 N4 Ingeniería Street El Puerto de Santa María PC 11500 Cadiz (Spain)

    2016-05-18

    Different industrial mixing methods and some of their combinations (1) ultrasound; (2) stirring; (3) (4) by roller machine, (5) by gears machine (6) Ultrasound radiation + high stirring were investigated for incorporating Multi walled Carbon nanotubes (MWCNT) into a resin based on an aeronautical epoxy precursor, cured with 4,4′ diamine-dibenzylsulfone (DDS). The effect of different parameters, ultrasound intensity, number of cycles, type of blade, gears speed on the nanofiller dispersion were analyzed. The inclusion of the nanofiller in the resin causes a drastic increase in the viscosity, preventing the homogenization of the resin and a drastic increase in temperature in the zones closest to the ultrasound probe. To overcome these challenges, the application of high speed agitation simultaneously with the application of ultrasonic radiation was used. This allows on the one hand a homogeneous dispersion, on the other hand an improvement of the dissipation of heat generated by ultrasonic radiation. A comprehensive study with parameters like viscosity and temperature was performed. It is necessary a balance between viscosity and temperature. Viscosity must be low enough to facilitate the dispersion and homogenization of the nanofillers, whereas the temperature cannot be too high because of re-agglomerations.

  1. Thermal analysis of bulk filled composite resin polymerization using various light curing modes according to the curing depth and approximation to the cavity wall

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hoon-Sang Chang

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this study was to investigate the polymerization temperature of a bulk filled composite resin light-activated with various light curing modes using infrared thermography according to the curing depth and approximation to the cavity wall. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Composite resin (AeliteFlo, Bisco, Schaumburg, IL, USA was inserted into a Class II cavity prepared in the Teflon blocks and was cured with a LED light curing unit (Dr's Light, GoodDoctors Co., Seoul, Korea using various light curing modes for 20 s. Polymerization temperature was measured with an infrared thermographic camera (Thermovision 900 SW/TE, Agema Infra-red Systems AB, Danderyd, Sweden for 40 s at measurement spots adjacent to the cavity wall and in the middle of the cavity from the surface to a 4 mm depth. Data were analyzed according to the light curing modes with one-way ANOVA, and according to curing depth and approximation to the cavity wall with two-way ANOVA. RESULTS: The peak polymerization temperature of the composite resin was not affected by the light curing modes. According to the curing depth, the peak polymerization temperature at the depth of 1 mm to 3 mm was significantly higher than that at the depth of 4 mm, and on the surface. The peak polymerization temperature of the spots in the middle of the cavity was higher than that measured in spots adjacent to the cavity wall. CONCLUSION: In the photopolymerization of the composite resin, the temperature was higher in the middle of the cavity compared to the outer surface or at the internal walls of the prepared cavity.

  2. Concomitant contact allergy to the resins, reactive diluents and hardener of a bisphenol A/F-based epoxy resin in subway construction workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Chia-Yu; Pontén, Ann; Sun, Chee-Ching; Jee, Shiou-Hwa

    2006-03-01

    An outbreak of suspected contact dermatitis among subway construction workers was suspected to be due to a new bisphenol A/F-based epoxy resin system (ERS). The construction workers used ERSs during the insertion of iron bars into concrete walls. The objective of the study was to determine the components (if any) of the ERS responsible for the contact allergy. Patch testing was performed on 20 of the 22 construction workers who had had contact with the ERS, and to the various subcomponents of component A on 5 of the 7 who reacted to this component. 9 patients (9/22, 40.9%) had clinical symptoms and signs of suspected contact dermatitis at presentation. 7 of these 9, but none of the 11 asymptomatic individuals, were positive to component A, while all were negative to component B. Of the 5 cases receiving further patch testing, all reacted to m-xylylene diamine, 4 to 1,6-hexanediol diglycidyl ether, 3 to epoxy resins of the bisphenol F-type and trimethylolpropane triglycidyl ether 0.25% petrolatum, and only 1 to epoxy resins of the bisphenol A-type. Contact allergy to ERSs may involve hardeners and diluents as well as resins, and patch testing for reaction to all components should be performed.

  3. Low Temperature Mechanical Testing of Carbon-Fiber/Epoxy-Resin Composite Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nettles, Alan T.; Biss, Emily J.

    1996-01-01

    The use of cryogenic fuels (liquid oxygen and liquid hydrogen) in current space transportation vehicles, in combination with the proposed use of composite materials in such applications, requires an understanding of how such materials behave at cryogenic temperatures. In this investigation, tensile intralaminar shear tests were performed at room, dry ice, and liquid nitrogen temperatures to evaluate the effect of temperature on the mechanical response of the IM7/8551-7 carbon-fiber/epoxy-resin system. Quasi-isotropic lay-ups were also tested to represent a more realistic lay-up. It was found that the matrix became both increasingly resistant to microcracking and stiffer with decreasing temperature. A marginal increase in matrix shear strength with decreasing temperature was also observed. Temperature did not appear to affect the integrity of the fiber-matrix bond.

  4. Nuclear characteristics of epoxy resin as a space environment neutron shielding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adeli, Ruhollah [Nuclear Science and Technology Research Institute, Yazd (Iran, Islamic Republic of). Central Iran Research Complex; Shirmardi, Seyed Pezhman [Nuclear Science and Technology Research Institute, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of). Radiation Application Research School; Mazinani, Saideh [Amirkabir Nanotechnology Research Institute, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Ahmadi, Seyed Javad [Nuclear Science and Technology Research Institute, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of). Nuclear Fuel Cycle Research School

    2017-03-15

    In recent years many investigations have been done for choosing applicable light neutron shielding in space environmental applications. In this study, we have considered the neutron radiation-protective characteristics of neat epoxy resin, a thermoplastic polymer material and have compared it with various candidate materials in neutron radiation protection such as Al 6061 alloy and Polyethylene. The aim of this investigation is the effect of type of moderator for fast neutron, notwithstanding neutron absorbers fillers. The nuclear interactions and the effective dose at shields have been studied with the Monte Carlo N-Particle transport code (MCNP), using variance reductions to reduce the relative error. Among the candidates, polymer matrix showed a better performance in attenuating fast neutrons and caused a lower neutron and secondary photon effective dose.

  5. Study of the light production mechanism of epoxy resins in an electric field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santorelli, R., E-mail: roberto.santorelli@ciemat.es; Verdugo, A., E-mail: antonio.verdugo@ciemat.es

    2017-02-11

    During the commissioning of the Double Chooz experiment light signals not related to light leaks were detected by the photomultiplier tubes. A specific study of the so-called light noise has been carried out, and it has been found that an emission of light could be produced by the epoxy covering the photomultiplier base circuit under certain conditions of high voltage and temperature. Several tests have been carried out in laboratory with different resins, which evidenced the emission of light pulses through a corona effect and the relationship of the rate and amplitude of the light pulses with temperature and high voltage across the base circuit. The results of these investigations can be particularly relevant for several other neutrino experiments that are known to use similar optical units and base assembly.

  6. Free volumes and gas transport in polymers: amine-modified epoxy resins as a case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patil, Pushkar N; Roilo, David; Brusa, Roberto S; Miotello, Antonio; Aghion, Stefano; Ferragut, Rafael; Checchetto, Riccardo

    2016-02-07

    The CO2 transport process was studied in a series of amine-modified epoxy resins having different cross-linking densities but the same chemical environment for the penetrant molecules. Positron Annihilation Lifetime Spectroscopy (PALS) was used to monitor the free volume structure of the samples and experimentally evaluate their fractional free volume fh(T) and its temperature evolution. The analysis of the free volume hole size distribution showed that all the holes have a size large enough to accommodate the penetrant molecules at temperatures T above the glass transition temperature Tg. The measured gas diffusion constants at T > Tg have been reproduced in the framework of the free volume theory of diffusion using a novel procedure based on the use of fh(T) as an input experimental parameter.

  7. Influence of light-curing mode on the cytotoxicity of resin-based surface sealants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wegehaupt, Florian J; Tauböck, Tobias T; Attin, Thomas; Belibasakis, Georgios N

    2014-05-06

    Surface sealants have been successfully used in the prevention of erosive tooth wear. However, when multiple tooth surfaces should be sealed, the light-curing procedure is very time-consuming. Therefore, the aim of this study was to investigate whether reduced light-curing time (while maintaining similar energy density) has an influence on resin-based surface sealant cytotoxicity. Bovine dentine discs were treated as follows: group 1: untreated, groups 2-5: Seal&Protect and groups 6-9: experimental sealer. Groups 2 and 6 were light-cured (VALO LED light-curing device) for 40 s (1000 mW/cm2), groups 3 and 7 for 10 s (1000 mW/cm2), groups 4 and 8 for 7 s (1400 mW/cm2) and groups 5 and 9 for 3 s (3200 mW/cm2). Later, materials were extracted in culture medium for 24 h, and released lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) activity as a measure of cytotoxicity was determined photometrically after cells (dental pulp cells and gingival fibroblasts) were exposed to the extracts for 24 h. Three independent experiments, for both sample preparation and cytotoxicity testing, were performed. Overall, lowest cytotoxicity was observed for the unsealed control group. No significant influence of light-curing settings on the cytotoxicity was observed (p = 0.537 and 0.838 for pulp cells and gingival fibroblasts, respectively). No significant difference in the cytotoxicity of the two sealants was observed after light-curing with same light-curing settings (group 2 vs. 6, 3 vs. 7, 4 vs. 8 and 5 vs. 9: p > 0.05, respectively). Shortening the light-curing time, while maintaining constant energy density, resulted in no higher cytotoxicity of the investigated sealants.

  8. Hardness evaluation of cured urea-formaldehyde resins with different formaldehyde/urea mole ratios using nanoindentation method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byung-Dae Park; Charles R. Frihart; Yan Yu; Adya P. Singh

    2013-01-01

    To understand the influence of formaldehyde/urea (F/U) mole ratio on the properties of urea–formaldehyde (UF) resins, this study investigated hardness of cured UF resins with different F/U mole ratios using a nanoindentation method. The traditional Brinell hardness (HB) method was also used...

  9. Characteristics of novel root-end filling material using epoxy resin and Portland cement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sang-Jin; Chung, Jin; Na, Hee-Sam; Park, Eun-Joo; Jeon, Hyo-Jin; Kim, Hyeon-Cheol

    2013-04-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the physical properties and cytotoxicity of a novel root-end filling material (EPC) which is made from epoxy resin and Portland cement as a mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) substitute. EPC, developed as a root-end filling material, was compared with MTA and a mixture of AH Plus sealer and MTA (AMTA) with regard to the setting time, radio-opacity, and microleakage. Setting times were evaluated using Vicat apparatus. Digital radiographs were taken to evaluate the aluminium equivalent radio-opacity using an aluminium step wedge. Extracted single-rooted teeth were used for leakage test using methylene blue dye. After canal shaping and obturation, the apical 3-mm root was resected, and a root-end cavity with a depth of 3 mm was prepared. The root-end cavities were filled with MTA, AMTA, and EPC for 15 specimens in each of three groups. After setting in humid conditions for 24 h, the specimens were tested for apical leakage. For evaluation of the biocompatibility of EPC, cell (human gingival fibroblast) viability was compared for MTA and Portland cement by MTT assay, and cell morphological changes were compared for MTA and AH Plus by fluorescence microscopy using DAPI and F-actin staining. The setting time, radio-opacity, and microleakage were compared using one-way ANOVA and Scheffe's post hoc comparison, and the cytotoxicity was compared using the nonparametric Kruskal-Wallis rank sum test. Statistical significance was set at 95%. EPC had a shorter setting time and less microleakage compared with MTA (p epoxy resin and Portland cement, was found to be a useful material for root-end filling, with favourable radio-opacity, short setting time, low microleakage, and clinically acceptable low cytotoxicity. The novel root-end filling material would be a potentially useful material for a surgical endodontic procedure with favourable properties.

  10. Shear bond strength of three dual-cured resin cements to dentin analyzed by finite element analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jongsma, L.A.; de Jager, N.; Kleverlaan, C.J.; Pallav, P.; Feilzer, A.J.

    2012-01-01

    Objectives To determine the shear bond strength to bovine dentin of dual-cured resin cements cured in different circumstances, the contraction stress and volumetric shrinkage in both polymerization modes, and to review the failure stress distribution at the cement-tooth interface with finite element

  11. Influence of thermo-oxidation on dielectric and mechanical properties of epoxy/amine resins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ernault, Estève; Richaud, Emmanuel; Fayolle, Bruno

    2016-05-01

    This objective of this work is to compare the changes of electrical and mechanical properties during thermo-oxidation of epoxy, in order to improve the choice of end life criterion. The thermal oxidation of DGEBA totally cured with linear aliphatic hardener is investigated under several temperature and oxygen pressure. Chemical changes are followed thanks to infra-red spectroscopy, macromolecular changes thanks to differential scanning calorimetry (changes of Tg). During thermo-oxidation at 110°C in air, volume resistivity and tensile properties in terms of modulus and deformation at break changes are assessed. The results show a formation of polar groups corresponding to oxidation products and a decrease of molecular mobility associated to a crosslinking process. Furthermore, it appears that the oxidation process leads to an embrittlement process whereas electrical properties are not significantly modified.

  12. Effect of pressure and polishing technique on surface roughness of cold cured acrylic resin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sianiwati Goenharto

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available The smoothness of acrylic surface plays an important role in producing removable orthodontic appliances. Int this study, we examine the effect of pressure and polishing technique on surface roughness of cold cured acrylic resin. Forty eight samples were prepared and classified into two groups: acrylic resin polymerization with and without pressure. Each group was classified into four subgroups: being polished with abrasive stone, bur for acrylic, silicone polisher and without being polished as control group. Surface roughness was measured using surface roughness tester. The surface roughness of polymerized acrylic with and without pressure and polished with different technique was analyzed using One-Way ANOVA, continued by Dunnet test. T-test was done to know whether there was the effect of pressure on surface roughness after being polished using certain technique. The result showed that pressure and polishing technique affected surface roughness significantly (p = 0.001. On the group of polymerization with pressure, surface roughness resulted from polishing with bur of acrylic showed significant difference with silicone polisher, whereas on the group without pressure, polishing with bur of acrylic showed significant difference with abrasive stone. Of the three polishing techniques, there was significant difference of surface roughness of cold cured acrylic resin (t = 0.002. It is concluded that pressure and polishing technique affected the surface roughness of cold cured acrylic resin. Polishing technique using bur of acrylic, followed by abrasive paper, rotating felt cone and soft brush showed less surface roughness on the group of polymerization with or without pressure.

  13. Evaluation of temperature rise with different curing methods and units in two composite resins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tabatabaei M

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aim: The majority of commercial curing units in dentistry are of halogen lamp type. The new polymerizing units such as blue LED are introduced in recent years. One of the important side effects of light curing is the temperature rise in composite resin polymerization which can affect the vitality of tooth pulp. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the temperature rise in two different composite resins during polymerization with halogen lamps and blue LED. Materials and Methods: This experimental study investigated the temperature rise in two different composites (Hybrid, Tetric Ceram/Nanofilled, Filteke Supreme of A2 shade polymerized with two halogen lamps (Coltolux 50, 350 mW/cm2 and Optilux 501 in standard, 820 mW/cm2 and Ramp, 100-1030 mW/cm2 operating modes and one blue LED with the intensity of 620 mW/cm2. Five samples for each group were prepared and temperature rise was monitored using a k-type thermocouple. Data were analyzed by one-way ANOVA, two-way ANOVA and Tukey HSD tests with P<0.05 as the limit of significance. Results: Light curing units and composite resins had statistically significant influence on the temperature rise (p<0.05. Significantly, lower temperature rise occurred in case of illumination with Coltolux 50.There was no significant difference between Optilux 501 in standard curing mode and LED. Tetric Ceram showed higher temperature rise. Conclusion: According to the results of this study the high power halogen lamp and LED could produce significant heat which may be harmful to the dental pulp.

  14. Evaluation of thermal conductivity of heat-cured acrylic resin mixed with A1203

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ebadian B.

    2002-08-01

    Full Text Available One of the most important characteristics of denture base is thermal conductivity. This property has a