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Sample records for curcumin attenuates inflammatory

  1. Curcumin attenuates collagen-induced inflammatory response through the "gut-brain axis".

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    Dou, Yannong; Luo, Jinque; Wu, Xin; Wei, Zhifeng; Tong, Bei; Yu, Juntao; Wang, Ting; Zhang, Xinyu; Yang, Yan; Yuan, Xusheng; Zhao, Peng; Xia, Yufeng; Hu, Huijuan; Dai, Yue

    2018-01-06

    Previous studies have demonstrated that oral administration of curcumin exhibited an anti-arthritic effect despite its poor bioavailability. The present study aimed to explore whether the gut-brain axis is involved in the therapeutic effect of curcumin. The collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) rat model was induced by immunization with an emulsion of collagen II and complete Freund's adjuvant. Sympathetic and parasympathetic tones were measured by electrocardiographic recordings. Unilateral cervical vagotomy (VGX) was performed before the induction of CIA. The ChAT, AChE activities, and serum cytokine levels were determined by ELISA. The expression of the high-affinity choline transporter 1 (CHT1), ChAT, and vesicular acetylcholine transporter (VAChT) were determined by real-time PCR and immunohistochemical staining. The neuronal excitability of the vagus nerve was determined by whole-cell patch clamp recording. Oral administration of curcumin restored the imbalance between the sympathetic and parasympathetic tones in CIA rats and increased ChAT activity and expression of ChAT and VAChT in the gut, brain, and synovium. Additionally, VGX eliminated the effects of curcumin on arthritis and ACh biosynthesis and transport. Electrophysiological data showed that curcumin markedly increased neuronal excitability of the vagus nerve. Furthermore, selective α7 nAChR antagonists abolished the effects of curcumin on CIA. Our results demonstrate that curcumin attenuates CIA through the "gut-brain axis" by modulating the function of the cholinergic system. These findings provide a novel approach for mechanistic studies of anti-arthritic compounds with low oral absorption and bioavailability.

  2. Curcumin attenuates inflammatory responses by suppressing TLR4-mediated NF-κB signaling pathway in lipopolysaccharide-induced mastitis in mice.

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    Fu, Yunhe; Gao, Ruifeng; Cao, Yongguo; Guo, Mengyao; Wei, Zhengkai; Zhou, Ershun; Li, Yimeng; Yao, Minjun; Yang, Zhengtao; Zhang, Naisheng

    2014-05-01

    Curcumin, the main constituent of the spice turmeric, has been reported to have potent anti-inflammatory properties. However, the effect of curcumin on lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced mice mastitis has not been investigated. The aim of this study was to investigate whether curcumin could ameliorate the inflammation response in LPS-induced mice mastitis and to clarify the possible mechanism. The mouse model of mastitis was induced by injection of LPS through the duct of the mammary gland. Curcumin was applied 1h before and 12h after LPS treatment. The results showed that curcumin attenuated the infiltration of inflammatory cells, the activity of myeloperoxidase (MPO), and the expression of tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), interleukin-6 (IL-6) and interleukin-1β (IL-1β) in a dose-dependent manner. Additionally, Western blotting results showed that curcumin inhibited the phosphorylation of IκB-α and NF-κB p65 and the expression of TLR4. These results indicated that curcumin has protective effect on mice mastitis and the anti-inflammatory mechanism of curcumin on LPS-induced mastitis in mice may be due to its ability to inhibit TLR4-mediated NF-κB signaling pathways. Curcumin may be a potential therapeutic agent against mastitis. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Curcumin attenuated paracetamol overdose induced hepatitis

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    Somanawat, Kanjana; Thong-Ngam, Duangporn; Klaikeaw, Naruemon

    2013-01-01

    AIM: To investigate whether curcumin could attenuate hepatitis in mice with paracetamol overdose. METHODS: Male mice were divided into four groups. Group 1 (control, n = 8); was fed with distilled water; Group 2 [N-acetyl-P-aminophenol (APAP), n = 8]; was fed with a single dose of 400 mg/kg APAP dissolved in distilled water; Group 3 [APAP + curcumin (CUR) 200, n = 8], was fed with a single dose of 400 mg/kg APAP and 200 mg/kg CUR; Group 4 (APAP + CUR 600, n = 8), was fed with a single dose of 400 mg/kg APAP and 600 mg/kg CUR. Twenty-four hours later, the liver was removed to examine hepatic glutathione (GSH), hepatic malondialdehyde (MDA), and histopathologically. Then whole blood was withdrawn from heart to determine transaminase (serum glutamic oxaloacetic transaminase and serum glutamic pyruvic transaminase) and inflammatory cytokines [interleukin (IL)-12 and IL-18] levels by enzyme linked immunosorbent assay. RESULTS: Serum transaminase, hepatic MDA, and inflammatory cytokines increased significantly in the APAP compared with the control group. Curcumin supplementation in APAP + CUR 200 and APAP + CUR 600 groups significantly decreased these parameters compared with the APAP group. The level of GSH decreased significantly in the APAP compared with the control group. Curcumin supplementation in APAP + CUR 200 and APAP + CUR 600 groups significantly increased these parameters compared with the APAP group. The histological appearance of the liver in the control group showed normal. In the APAP-treated group, the liver showed extensive hemorrhagic hepatic necrosis at all zones. Curcumin supplementation in APAP + CUR 200 and APAP + CUR 600 groups, caused the liver histopathology to improve. In the APAP + CUR 200 group, the liver showed focal necrosis and but the normal architecture was well preserved in APAP + CUR 600 group. CONCLUSION: APAP overdose can cause liver injury. Results indicate that curcumin prevents APAP-induced hepatitis through the improvement of

  4. Curcumin and turmeric attenuate arsenic-induced angiogenesis in ovo.

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    Pantazis, Panayotis; Varman, Aarthi; Simpson-Durand, Cindy; Thorpe, Jessica; Ramalingam, Satish; Subramaniam, Dharmalingam; Houchen, Courtney; Ihnat, Michael; Anant, Shrikant; Ramanujam, Rama P

    2010-01-01

    Trivalent arsenic [As(III)] is currently approved by the FDA for the treatment of chronic and acute leukemias. However, As(III) has also demonstrated damaging effects on human health, including development of cardiovascular disease, diabetes, and cancer. Further, As(III) is a potent angiogenic agent. In this context, curcumin, an active ingredient in the dietary agent turmeric, has demonstrated potent antiproliferative, antiinflammatory, and antiangiogenic properties. In this report, we have shown that both curcumin and turmeric inhibit expression of vascular endothelial growth factor in HCT-116 human colon cancer cells exposed to As(III). Further, in the chicken chorioallantoic membrane assay model, treatment with low As(III) concentrations results in extensive increase in blood vessel density, which, however, is reduced in the presence of curcumin or turmeric. Collectively, the findings reported here strongly suggest that turmeric and curcumin can dramatically attenuate the process of angiogenesis induced by low As(III) concentrations.

  5. Curcumin supplementation likely attenuates delayed onset muscle soreness (DOMS).

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    Nicol, Lesley M; Rowlands, David S; Fazakerly, Ruth; Kellett, John

    2015-08-01

    Oral curcumin decreases inflammatory cytokines and increases muscle regeneration in mice. To determine effects of curcumin on muscle damage, inflammation and delayed onset muscle soreness (DOMS) in humans. Seventeen men completed a double-blind randomized-controlled crossover trial to estimate the effects of oral curcumin supplementation (2.5 g twice daily) versus placebo on single-leg jump performance and DOMS following unaccustomed heavy eccentric exercise. Curcumin or placebo was taken 2 d before to 3 d after eccentric single-leg press exercise, separated by 14-d washout. Measurements were made at baseline, and 0, 24 and 48-h post-exercise comprising: (a) limb pain (1-10 cm visual analogue scale; VAS), (b) muscle swelling, (c) single-leg jump height, and (d) serum markers of muscle damage and inflammation. Standardized magnitude-based inference was used to define outcomes. At 24 and 48-h post-exercise, curcumin caused moderate-large reductions in pain during single-leg squat (VAS scale -1.4 to -1.7; 90 %CL: ±1.0), gluteal stretch (-1.0 to -1.9; ±0.9), squat jump (-1.5 to -1.1; ± 1.2) and small reductions in creatine kinase activity (-22-29 %; ±21-22 %). Associated with the pain reduction was a small increase in single-leg jump performance (15 %; 90 %CL ± 12 %). Curcumin increased interleukin-6 concentrations at 0-h (31 %; ±29 %) and 48-h (32 %; ±29 %) relative to baseline, but decreased IL-6 at 24-h relative to post-exercise (-20 %; ±18 %). Oral curcumin likely reduces pain associated with DOMS with some evidence for enhanced recovery of muscle performance. Further study is required on mechanisms and translational effects on sport or vocational performance.

  6. Structure-Activity Relationship of Curcumin: Role of the Methoxy Group in Anti-inflammatory and Anticolitis Effects of Curcumin.

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    Yang, Haixia; Du, Zheyuan; Wang, Weicang; Song, Mingyue; Sanidad, Katherine; Sukamtoh, Elvira; Zheng, Jennifer; Tian, Li; Xiao, Hang; Liu, Zhenhua; Zhang, Guodong

    2017-06-07

    Curcumin, a dietary compound from turmeric, has beneficial effects on inflammatory diseases such as inflammatory bowel disease. Most previous studies have focused on the structure-activity relationship of the thiol-reactive α,β-unsaturated carbonyl groups of curcumin, so little is known about the roles of methoxy groups in biological activities of curcumin. Here we synthesized a series of curcumin analogues with different substitution groups (R = H-, Br-, Cl-, F-, NO 2 -, CH 3 -, and OH-) to replace the methoxy group and evaluated their biological effects in vitro and in vivo. Curcumin, Cur-OH, and Cur-Br (25 μM) suppressed 74.91 ± 0.88, 77.75 ± 0.89, and 71.75 ± 0.90% of LPS-induced NO production, respectively (P 0.05). In the dextran sulfate sodium (DSS)-induced colitis mouse model, the Cur-Br analogue also showed a beneficial effect the same as curcumin (P 0.05). Together, the analogues have dramatically different effects on inflammation, supporting that the substitution group on the methoxy position plays an important role in the anti-inflammatory effects of curcumin. The methoxy group is a potential structural candidate for modification to design curcumin-based drugs for inflammatory diseases.

  7. Tetrachloro-p-benzoquinone induces hepatic oxidative damage and inflammatory response, but not apoptosis in mouse: The prevention of curcumin

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    Xu, Demei; Hu, Lihua; Su, Chuanyang; Xia, Xiaomin; Zhang, Pu; Fu, Juanli; Wang, Wenchao; Xu, Duo; Du, Hong; Hu, Qiuling; Song, Erqun; Song, Yang, E-mail: songyangwenrong@hotmail.com

    2014-10-15

    This study investigated the protective effects of curcumin on tetrachloro-p-benzoquinone (TCBQ)-induced hepatotoxicity in mice. TCBQ-treatment causes significant liver injury (the elevation of serum AST and ALT activities, histopathological changes in liver section including centrilobular necrosis and inflammatory cells), oxidative stress (the elevation of TBAR level and the inhibition of SOD and catalase activities) and inflammation (up-regulation of iNOS, COX-2, IL-1β, IL-6, TNF-α and NF-κB). However, these changes were alleviated upon pretreatment with curcumin. Interestingly, TCBQ has no effect on caspase family genes or B-cell lymphoma 2 (Bcl-2)/Bcl-2 associated X (Bax) protein expressions, which implied that TCBQ-induced hepatotoxicity is independent of apoptosis. Moreover, curcumin was shown to induce phase II detoxifying/antioxidant enzymes HO-1 and NQO1 through the activation of nuclear factor erythroid-derived 2-like 2 (Nrf2). In summary, the protective mechanisms of curcumin against TCBQ-induced hepatoxicity may be related to the attenuation of oxidative stress, along with the inhibition of inflammatory response via the activation of Nrf2 signaling. - Highlights: • TCBQ-intoxication significantly increased AST and ALT activities. • TCBQ-intoxication induced oxidative stress in mice liver. • TCBQ-intoxication induced inflammatory response in mice liver. • TCBQ-intoxication induced hepatotoxicity is independent of apoptosis. • Curcumin relieved TCBQ-induced liver damage remarkably.

  8. Tetrachloro-p-benzoquinone induces hepatic oxidative damage and inflammatory response, but not apoptosis in mouse: The prevention of curcumin

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    Xu, Demei; Hu, Lihua; Su, Chuanyang; Xia, Xiaomin; Zhang, Pu; Fu, Juanli; Wang, Wenchao; Xu, Duo; Du, Hong; Hu, Qiuling; Song, Erqun; Song, Yang

    2014-01-01

    This study investigated the protective effects of curcumin on tetrachloro-p-benzoquinone (TCBQ)-induced hepatotoxicity in mice. TCBQ-treatment causes significant liver injury (the elevation of serum AST and ALT activities, histopathological changes in liver section including centrilobular necrosis and inflammatory cells), oxidative stress (the elevation of TBAR level and the inhibition of SOD and catalase activities) and inflammation (up-regulation of iNOS, COX-2, IL-1β, IL-6, TNF-α and NF-κB). However, these changes were alleviated upon pretreatment with curcumin. Interestingly, TCBQ has no effect on caspase family genes or B-cell lymphoma 2 (Bcl-2)/Bcl-2 associated X (Bax) protein expressions, which implied that TCBQ-induced hepatotoxicity is independent of apoptosis. Moreover, curcumin was shown to induce phase II detoxifying/antioxidant enzymes HO-1 and NQO1 through the activation of nuclear factor erythroid-derived 2-like 2 (Nrf2). In summary, the protective mechanisms of curcumin against TCBQ-induced hepatoxicity may be related to the attenuation of oxidative stress, along with the inhibition of inflammatory response via the activation of Nrf2 signaling. - Highlights: • TCBQ-intoxication significantly increased AST and ALT activities. • TCBQ-intoxication induced oxidative stress in mice liver. • TCBQ-intoxication induced inflammatory response in mice liver. • TCBQ-intoxication induced hepatotoxicity is independent of apoptosis. • Curcumin relieved TCBQ-induced liver damage remarkably

  9. Curcumin attenuates the scurfy-induced immune disorder, a model of IPEX syndrome, with inhibiting Th1/Th2/Th17 responses in mice.

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    Lee, Gihyun; Chung, Hwan-Suck; Lee, Kyeseok; Lee, Hyeonhoon; Kim, Minhwan; Bae, Hyunsu

    2017-09-15

    Immunodysregulation polyendocrinopathy enteropathy X-linked syndrome (IPEX) is a lethal autoimmune disease caused by mutations in the Foxp3 gene scurfin (scurfy). Immunosuppressive therapy for IPEX patients has been generally ineffective and has caused severe side effects, however curcumin has shown immune regulation properties for inflammatory diseases, such as rheumatoid arthritis, psoriasis, and inflammatory bowel diseases without side effects. The aim of this study was to investigate whether curcumin would attenuate symptoms of IPEX in mouse model and would prolong its survival period. C57BL/6 mice were separated into scurfy or wild-type litter mate groups by genotyping, and each group subsequently was separated into 2 subgroups that were fed a 1% curcumin containing or normal diet from the last day of breast-feeding. After weaning, pups were fed either a 1% curcumin containing or normal diet until all scurfy mice die for survival data. To elucidate immune cell proportions in spleen and lymph nodes, cells were analyzed by flowcytometry. Cellular cytokine production was accessed to investigate the effects of curcumin in T cell differentiation in vitro. Scurfy mice fed a 1% curcumin diet survived 4.0-fold longer compared to scurfy (92.5 days) mice fed a normal diet (23 days). A curcumin diet decreased all of the Th1/Th2/Th17 cell populations and attenuated diverse symptoms such as splenomegaly in scurfy mice. In vitro experiments showed that curcumin treatment directly decreased the Th1/Th2/Th17 cytokine production of IFN-γ, IL-4, and IL-17A in CD4 + T cells. Curcumin diet attenuated the scurfy-induced immune disorder, a model of IPEX syndrome, by inhibiting Th1/Th2/Th17 responses in mice. These results have implications for improving clinical therapy for patients with IPEX and other T cell related autoimmune diseases. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  10. Curcumin Alters Neural Plasticity and Viability of Intact Hippocampal Circuits and Attenuates Behavioral Despair and COX-2 Expression in Chronically Stressed Rats

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    Ga-Young Choi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Curcumin is a major diarylheptanoid component of Curcuma longa with traditional usage for anxiety and depression. It has been known for the anti-inflammatory, antistress, and neurotropic effects. Here we examined curcumin effect in neural plasticity and cell viability. 60-channel multielectrode array was applied on organotypic hippocampal slice cultures (OHSCs to monitor the effect of 10 μM curcumin in long-term depression (LTD through low-frequency stimulation (LFS to the Schaffer collaterals and commissural pathways. Cell viability was assayed by propidium iodide uptake test in OHSCs. In addition, the influence of oral curcumin administration on rat behavior was assessed with the forced swim test (FST. Finally, protein expression levels of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2 were measured by Western blot in chronically stressed rats. Our results demonstrated that 10 μM curcumin attenuated LTD and reduced cell death. It also recovered the behavior immobility of FST, rescued the attenuated BDNF expression, and inhibited the enhancement of COX-2 expression in stressed animals. These findings indicate that curcumin can enhance postsynaptic electrical reactivity and cell viability in intact neural circuits with antidepressant-like effects, possibly through the upregulation of BDNF and reduction of inflammatory factors in the brain.

  11. Curcumin attenuates surgery-induced cognitive dysfunction in aged mice.

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    Wu, Xiang; Chen, Huixin; Huang, Chunhui; Gu, Xinmei; Wang, Jialing; Xu, Dilin; Yu, Xin; Shuai, Chu; Chen, Liping; Li, Shun; Xu, Yiguo; Gao, Tao; Ye, Mingrui; Su, Wei; Liu, Haixiong; Zhang, Jinrong; Wang, Chuang; Chen, Junping; Wang, Qinwen; Cui, Wei

    2017-06-01

    Post-operative cognitive dysfunction (POCD) is associated with elderly patients undergoing surgery. However, pharmacological treatments for POCD are limited. In this study, we found that curcumin, an active compound derived from Curcuma longa, ameliorated the cognitive dysfunction following abdominal surgery in aged mice. Further, curcumin prevented surgery-induced anti-oxidant enzyme activity. Curcumin also increased brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF)-positive area and expression of pAkt in the brain, suggesting that curcumin activated BDNF signaling in aged mice. Furthermore, curcumin neutralized cholinergic dysfunction involving choline acetyltransferase expression induced by surgery. These results strongly suggested that curcumin prevented cognitive impairments via multiple targets, possibly by increasing the activity of anti-oxidant enzymes, activation of BDNF signaling, and neutralization of cholinergic dysfunction, concurrently. Based on these novel findings, curcumin might be a potential agent in POCD prophylaxis and treatment.

  12. Curcumin Anti-Apoptotic Action in a Model of Intestinal Epithelial Inflammatory Damage.

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    Loganes, Claudia; Lega, Sara; Bramuzzo, Matteo; Vecchi Brumatti, Liza; Piscianz, Elisa; Valencic, Erica; Tommasini, Alberto; Marcuzzi, Annalisa

    2017-06-06

    The purpose of this study is to determine if a preventive treatment with curcumin can protect intestinal epithelial cells from inflammatory damage induced by IFNγ. To achieve this goal we have used a human intestinal epithelial cell line (HT29) treated with IFNγ to undergo apoptotic changes that can reproduce the damage of intestinal epithelia exposed to inflammatory cytokines. In this model, we measured the effect of curcumin (curcuminoid from Curcuma Longa ) added as a pre-treatment at different time intervals before stimulation with IFNγ. Curcumin administration to HT29 culture before the inflammatory stimulus IFNγ reduced the cell apoptosis rate. This effect gradually declined with the reduction of the curcumin pre-incubation time. This anti-apoptotic action by curcumin pre-treatment was paralleled by a reduction of secreted IL7 in the HT29 culture media, while there was no relevant change in the other cytokine levels. Even though curcumin pre-administration did not impact the activation of the NF-κB pathway, a slight effect on the phosphorylation of proteins in this inflammatory signaling pathway was observed. In conclusion, curcumin pre-treatment can protect intestinal cells from inflammatory damage. These results can be the basis for studying the preventive role of curcumin in inflammatory bowel diseases.

  13. Curcumin attenuates lipopolysaccharide/d-galactosamine-induced acute liver injury by activating Nrf2 nuclear translocation and inhibiting NF-kB activation.

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    Xie, Yi-Lian; Chu, Jin-Guo; Jian, Xiao-Min; Dong, Jin-Zhong; Wang, Li-Ping; Li, Guo-Xiang; Yang, Nai-Bin

    2017-07-01

    Curcumin, a polyphenol in curry spice isolated from the rhizome of turmeric, has been reported to possess versatile biological properties including anti-inflammatory, anti-oxidant, antifibrotic, and anticancer activities. In this study, the hepatoprotective effect of curcumin was investigated in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)/d-galactosamine (d-GalN)-induced acute liver injury (ALI) in rats. Experimental ALI was induced with an intraperitoneal (ip) injection of sterile 0.9% sodium chloride (NaCl) solution containing 8μg LPS and 800mg/kg d-GalN. Curcumin was administered once daily starting three days prior to LPS/d-GalN treatment. Results indicated that curcumin could attenuate hepatic pathological damage, decrease serum ALT and AST levels, and reduce malondialdehyde (MDA) content in experimental ALI rats. Moreover, higher dosages of curcumin pretreatment inhibited NF-κB activation and reduced serum TNF-α and liver TNF-α levels induced by LPS/d-GalN ip injection. Furthermore, we found that curcumin up-regulated the expression of nuclear Nrf2 and Nrf2-dependent antioxidant defense genes including heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1), glutamate-cysteine ligase (GCLC), NAD(P)H dehydrogenase, and quinone (NQO-1) in a dose-dependent manner. Our results showed that curcumin protected experimental animals against LPS/d-GalN-induced ALI through activation of Nrf2 nuclear translocation and inhibition of NF-κB activation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  14. Curcumin attenuates insulin resistance in hepatocytes by inducing Nrf2 nuclear translocation.

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    Zhao, Shu-Guang; Li, Qiang; Liu, Zhen-Xiong; Wang, Jing-Jie; Wang, Xv-Xia; Qin, Ming; Wen, Qin-Sheng

    2011-01-01

    NF-E2-Related Factor-2 (Nrf2) is a transcription factor that plays a crucial role in the cellular protection against oxidative stress. Curcumin has been reported to induce Nrf2 nuclear translocation and upregulate the expression of numerous reactive oxygen species (ROS) detoxifying and antioxidant genes in hepatocytes. This study was designed to investigate whether curcumin-induced Nrf2 nuclear translocation could reduce ROS-mediated insulin resistance in cultured LO2 hepatocytes. Human LO2 hepatocytes were incubated with curcumine and glucose oxidase (GO) in the presence/absence of wortmannin (a phosphatidyinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) inhibitor), oxidative stress, cellular damage, Nrf2 nuclear translocation and insulin resistance were measured. GO exposure significantly increased intracellular ROS, glutathione (GSH) depletion, malondialdehyde (MDA) formation, and increased activities of cellular lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) and aspartate amino transferase (AST), as well as causing insulin resistance. Curcumin pretreatment significantly attenuated these disturbances in intracellular ROS, liver enzyme activity and significantly antagonized the lipid peroxidation, GSH depletion and insulin resistance induced by GO in LO2 hepatocytes. These effects paralleled Nrf2 nuclear translocation induced by curcumin. Wortmannin partially blocked curcumin-induced Nrf2 nuclear translocation. In addition, wortmannin prevented curcumin-induced improvements in intracellular ROS, MDA formation, GSH depletion, liver enzyme activity and insulin resistance in cultured LO2 hepatocytes. These findings suggest that curcumin could reduce ROS-mediated insulin resistance in hepatocytes, at least in part through nuclear translocation of Nrf2.

  15. Curcumin attenuates BPA-induced insulin resistance in HepG2 cells through suppression of JNK/p38 pathways.

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    Geng, Shanshan; Wang, Shijia; Zhu, Weiwei; Xie, Chunfeng; Li, Xiaoting; Wu, Jieshu; Zhu, Jianyun; Jiang, Ye; Yang, Xue; Li, Yuan; Chen, Yue; Wang, Xiaoqian; Meng, Yu; Zhu, Mingming; Wu, Rui; Huang, Cong; Zhong, Caiyun

    2017-04-15

    Bisphenol A (BPA) is an artificial environmental endocrine disrupting chemicals. Accumulating evidence indicates that exposure to BPA contributes to insulin resistance through diverse mechanism including inflammation and oxidative stress. Previous studies have suggested curcumin as a safe phytochemical which can improve obesity-related insulin resistance, inflammation and oxidative stress. The present study aimed to investigate the ability of curcumin to prevent BPA-induced insulin resistance in vitro and the underlying mechanism. Following the establishmet of in vitro insulin resistance via BPA treatment in human liver HepG2 cells, the protective effects of curcumin were determiend. We showed that treatment of HepG2 cells with 100nM BPA for 5days induced significantly decreased glucose consumption, impaired insulin signaling, elevation of pro-inflammatory cytokines and oxidative stress, and activation of signaling pathways; inhibition of JNK and p38 pathways, but not ERK nor NF-κB pathways, improved glucose consumption and insulin signaling in BPA-treated HepG2 cells. Moreover, we revealed that curcumin effectively attenuated the spectrum of effects of BPA-triggered insulin resistance, whereas pretreatment with JNK and p38 agonist anisomycin could significantly compensate the effects caused by curcumin. These data illustrated the role of JNK/p38 activation in BPA-induced insulin resistance and suggested curcumin as a promising candidate for the intervention of BPA-induced insulin resistance. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Curcumin Attenuates Hepatotoxicity Induced by Zinc Oxide Nanoparticles in Rats

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    Layasadat Khorsandi

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Zinc oxide nanoparticles (NZnO are increasingly used in modern life. Most metal nanoparticles have adverse effects on the liver. Aims: To explore the protective action of curcumin (Cur against hepatotoxicity induced by NZnO in rats. Study Design: Animal experimentation. Methods: Control group animals received normal saline, while the Cur group animals were treated with 200 mg/kg of Cur orally for 21 days. NZnO-intoxicated rats received 50 mg/kg of NZnO for 14 days by gavage method. In the NZnO+Cur group, rats were pretreated with Cur for 7 days before NZnO administration. Plasma activities of Alanine aminotransferase (ALT, aspartate aminotransferase (AST and alkaline phosphatase (ALP were measured as biomarkers of hepatotoxicity. Hepatic levels of malondialdehyde (MDA and superoxide dismutase (SOD and glutathione peroxidase (GPx activities were measured for detection of oxidative stress in liver tissue. Histological changes and apoptosis in liver tissue were studied by using Hematoxylin-eosin staining and the transferase dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL method. Results: NZnO induced a significant increase in plasma AST (2.8-fold, ALT (2.7-fold and ALP (1.97-fold activity in comparison to the control group (p<0.01. NZnO increased MDA content and reduced SOD and GPx activities. NZnO caused liver damage including centrilobular necrosis and microvesicular steatosis. The percentage of apoptosis in hepatocytes was increased in NZnO-treated rats (p<0.01. Pre-treatment of Cur significantly reduced lipid peroxidation (39%, increased SOD (156% and GPx (26% activities, and attenuated ALT (47%, AST (41% and ALP (30% activities. Pre-treatment with Cur also decreased the histology changes and apoptotic index of hepatocytes (p<0.05. Conclusion: These findings indicate that Cur effectively protects against NZnO-induced hepatotoxicity in rats. However, future studies are required to propose Cur as a potential protective agent against hepatotoxicity

  17. Modulation of gut microbiota contributes to curcumin-mediated attenuation of hepatic steatosis in rats.

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    Feng, Wenhuan; Wang, Hongdong; Zhang, Pengzi; Gao, Caixia; Tao, Junxian; Ge, Zhijuan; Zhu, Dalong; Bi, Yan

    2017-07-01

    Structural disruption of gut microbiota contributes to the development of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) and modulating the gut microbiota represents a novel strategy for NAFLD prevention. Although previous studies have demonstrated that curcumin alleviates hepatic steatosis, its effect on the gut microbiota modulation has not been investigated. Next generation sequencing and multivariate analysis were utilized to evaluate the structural changes of gut microbiota in a NAFLD rat model induced by high fat-diet (HFD) feeding. We found that curcumin attenuated hepatic ectopic fat deposition, improved intestinal barrier integrity, and alleviated metabolic endotoxemia in HFD-fed rats. More importantly, curcumin dramatically shifted the overall structure of the HFD-disrupted gut microbiota toward that of lean rats fed a normal diet and altered the gut microbial composition. The abundances of 110 operational taxonomic units (OTUs) were altered by curcumin. Seventy-six altered OTUs were significantly correlated with one or more hepatic steatosis associated parameters and designated 'functionally relevant phylotypes'. Thirty-six of the 47 functionally relevant OTUs that were positively correlated with hepatic steatosis associated parameters were reduced by curcumin. These results indicate that curcumin alleviates hepatic steatosis in part through stain-specific impacts on hepatic steatosis associated phylotypes of gut microbiota in rats. Compounds with antimicrobial activities should be further investigated as novel adjunctive therapies for NAFLD. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. New nanomicelle curcumin formulation for ocular delivery: improved stability, solubility, and ocular anti-inflammatory treatment.

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    Li, Mengshuang; Xin, Meng; Guo, Chuanlong; Lin, Guiming; Wu, Xianggen

    2017-11-01

    A stable topical ophthalmic curcumin formulation with high solubility, stability, and efficacy is needed for pharmaceutical use in clinics. The objective of this article was to describe a novel curcumin containing a nanomicelle formulation using a polyvinyl caprolactam-polyvinyl acetate-polyethylene glycol (PVCL-PVA-PEG) graft copolymer. Nanomicelle curcumin was formulated and optimized and then further evaluated for in vitro cytotoxicity/in vivo ocular irritation, in vitro cellular uptake/in vivo corneal permeation, and in vitro antioxidant activity/in vivo anti-inflammatory efficacy. The solubility, chemical stability, and antioxidant activity were greatly improved after the encapsulation of the PVCL-PVA-PEG nanomicelles. The nanomicelle curcumin ophthalmic solution was simple to prepare and the nanomicelles are stable to the storage conditions, and it had good cellular tolerance. Nanomicelle curcumin also had excellent ocular tolerance in rabbits. The use of nanomicelles significantly improved in vitro cellular uptake and in vivo corneal permeation as well as improved anti-inflammatory efficacy when compared with a free curcumin solution. These findings indicate that nanomicelles could be promising topical delivery systems for the ocular administration of curcumin.

  19. Curcumin Mediated Attenuation of Carbofuran Induced Oxidative Stress in Rat Brain

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    Sunil Kumar Jaiswal

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The indiscriminate use of carbofuran to improve crop productivity causes adverse effects in nontargets including mammalian systems. The objective of this study was to evaluate carbofuran induced oxidative stress in rat brain stem and its attenuation by curcumin, a herbal product. Out of 6 groups of rats, 2 groups received two different doses of carbofuran, that is, 15 and 30% of LD50, respectively, for 30 days. Out of these, 2 groups receiving same doses of carbofuran were pretreated with curcumin (100 mg/kg body weight. The levels of antioxidants, TBARS, GSH, SOD, catalase, and GST were determined in rat brain stem. The 2 remaining groups served as placebo and curcumin treated, respectively. The data suggested that carbofuran at different doses caused significant alterations in the levels of TBARS and GSH in dose dependent manner. The TBARS and GSH contents were elevated. The activities of SOD, catalase, and GST were significantly inhibited at both doses of carbofuran. The ratio of P/A was also found to be sharply increased. The pretreatment of curcumin exhibited significant protection from carbofuran induced toxicity. The results suggested that carbofuran at sublethal doses was able to induce oxidative stress in rat brain which could be attenuated by curcumin.

  20. Synthesis and biological evaluation of curcumin derivatives containing NSAIDs for their anti-inflammatory activity.

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    Liu, Wenfeng; Li, Yonlian; Yue, Yuan; Zhang, Kun; Chen, Qian; Wang, Huaqian; Lu, Yujing; Huang, Mou-Tuan; Zheng, Xi; Du, Zhiyun

    2015-08-01

    Oral administration of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) was frequently associated with serious adverse effects. Inspired by curcumin-a naturally traditional Chinese medicine, a series of curcumin derivatives containing NSAIDs, used for transdermal application, were synthesized and screened for their anti-inflammatory activities in vitro and in vivo. Compared with curcumin and parent NSAID (salicylic acid and salsalate), topical application of A11 and B13 onto mouse ear edema, prior to TPA treatment markedly suppressed the expression of IL-1β, IL-6 and TNF-α, respectively. Mechanistically, A11 and B13 blocked the phosphorylation of IκBα and suppressed the activation of p65 and IκBα. It was found that A11 and B13 may be potent anti-inflammatory agents for the treatment of inflammatory diseases. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Attenuation of arsenic neurotoxicity by curcumin in rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yadav, Rajesh S.; Sankhwar, Madhu Lata; Shukla, Rajendra K.; Chandra, Ramesh; Pant, Aditya B.; Islam, Fakhrul; Khanna, Vinay K.

    2009-01-01

    In view of continued exposure to arsenic and associated human health risk including neurotoxicity, neuroprotective efficacy of curcumin, a polyphenolic antioxidant, has been investigated in rats. A significant decrease in locomotor activity, grip strength (26%) and rota-rod performance (82%) was observed in rats treated with arsenic (sodium arsenite, 20 mg/kg body weight, p.o., 28 days) as compared to controls. The arsenic treated rats also exhibited a decrease in the binding of striatal dopamine receptors (32%) and tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) immunoreactivity (19%) in striatum. Increased arsenic levels in corpus striatum (6.5 fold), frontal cortex (6.3 fold) and hippocampus (7.0 fold) associated with enhanced oxidative stress in these brain regions, as evident by an increase in lipid perioxidation, protein carbonyl and a decrease in the levels of glutathione and activity of superoxide dismutase, catalase and glutathione peroxidase with differential effects were observed in arsenic treated rats compared to controls. Simultaneous treatment with arsenic (sodium arsenite, 20 mg/kg body weight, p.o., 28 days) and curcumin (100 mg/kg body weight, p.o., 28 days) caused an increase in locomotor activity and grip strength and improved the rota-rod performance in comparison to arsenic treated rats. Binding of striatal dopamine receptors and TH expression increased while arsenic levels and oxidative stress decreased in these brain regions in co-treated rats as compared to those treated with arsenic alone. No significant effect on any of these parameters was observed in rats treated with curcumin (100 mg/kg body weight, p.o., 28 days) alone compared to controls. A significant protection in behavioral, neurochemical and immunohistochemical parameters in rats simultaneously treated with arsenic and curcumin suggest the neuroprotective efficacy of curcumin.

  2. Prediction of the anti-inflammatory mechanisms of curcumin by module-based protein interaction network analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gan, Yanxiong; Zheng, Shichao; Baak, Jan P A; Zhao, Silei; Zheng, Yongfeng; Luo, Nini; Liao, Wan; Fu, Chaomei

    2015-11-01

    Curcumin, the medically active component from Curcuma longa (Turmeric), is widely used to treat inflammatory diseases. Protein interaction network (PIN) analysis was used to predict its mechanisms of molecular action. Targets of curcumin were obtained based on ChEMBL and STITCH databases. Protein-protein interactions (PPIs) were extracted from the String database. The PIN of curcumin was constructed by Cytoscape and the function modules identified by gene ontology (GO) enrichment analysis based on molecular complex detection (MCODE). A PIN of curcumin with 482 nodes and 1688 interactions was constructed, which has scale-free, small world and modular properties. Based on analysis of these function modules, the mechanism of curcumin is proposed. Two modules were found to be intimately associated with inflammation. With function modules analysis, the anti-inflammatory effects of curcumin were related to SMAD, ERG and mediation by the TLR family. TLR9 may be a potential target of curcumin to treat inflammation.

  3. Prediction of the anti-inflammatory mechanisms of curcumin by module-based protein interaction network analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanxiong Gan

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Curcumin, the medically active component from Curcuma longa (Turmeric, is widely used to treat inflammatory diseases. Protein interaction network (PIN analysis was used to predict its mechanisms of molecular action. Targets of curcumin were obtained based on ChEMBL and STITCH databases. Protein–protein interactions (PPIs were extracted from the String database. The PIN of curcumin was constructed by Cytoscape and the function modules identified by gene ontology (GO enrichment analysis based on molecular complex detection (MCODE. A PIN of curcumin with 482 nodes and 1688 interactions was constructed, which has scale-free, small world and modular properties. Based on analysis of these function modules, the mechanism of curcumin is proposed. Two modules were found to be intimately associated with inflammation. With function modules analysis, the anti-inflammatory effects of curcumin were related to SMAD, ERG and mediation by the TLR family. TLR9 may be a potential target of curcumin to treat inflammation.

  4. Anti-inflammatory properties of curcumin, a major constituent of Curcuma longa: a review of preclinical and clinical research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jurenka, Julie S

    2009-06-01

    Curcuma longa (turmeric) has a long history of use in Ayurvedic medicine as a treatment for inflammatory conditions. Turmeric constituents include the three curcuminoids: curcumin (diferuloylmethane; the primary constituent and the one responsible for its vibrant yellow color), demethoxycurcumin, and bisdemethoxycurcumin, as well as volatile oils (tumerone, atlantone, and zingiberone), sugars, proteins, and resins. While numerous pharmacological activities, including antioxidant and antimicrobial properties, have been attributed to curcumin, this article focuses on curcumin's anti-inflammatory properties and its use for inflammatory conditions. Curcumin's effect on cancer (from an anti-inflammatory perspective) will also be discussed; however, an exhaustive review of its many anticancer mechanisms is outside the scope of this article. Research has shown curcumin to be a highly pleiotropic molecule capable of interacting with numerous molecular targets involved in inflammation. Based on early cell culture and animal research, clinical trials indicate curcumin may have potential as a therapeutic agent in diseases such as inflammatory bowel disease, pancreatitis, arthritis, and chronic anterior uveitis, as well as certain types of cancer. Because of curcumin's rapid plasma clearance and conjugation, its therapeutic usefulness has been somewhat limited, leading researchers to investigate the benefits of complexing curcumin with other substances to increase systemic bioavailability. Numerous in-progress clinical trials should provide an even deeper understanding of the mechanisms and therapeutic potential of curcumin.

  5. Curcumin Attenuates Opioid Tolerance and Dependence by Inhibiting Ca2+/Calmodulin-Dependent Protein Kinase II α Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Xiaoyu; Huang, Fang; Szymusiak, Magdalena

    2015-01-01

    Chronic use of opioid analgesics has been hindered by the development of opioid addiction and tolerance. We have reported that curcumin, a natural flavonoid from the rhizome of Curcuma longa, attenuated opioid tolerance, although the underlying mechanism remains unclear. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that curcumin may inhibit Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II α (CaMKIIα), a protein kinase that has been previously proposed to be critical for opioid tolerance and dependence. In this study, we used state-of-the-art polymeric formulation technology to produce poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA)-curcumin nanoparticles (nanocurcumin) to overcome the drug’s poor solubility and bioavailability, which has made it extremely difficult for studying in vivo pharmacological actions of curcumin. We found that PLGA-curcumin nanoparticles reduced the dose requirement by 11- to 33-fold. Pretreatment with PLGA-curcumin (by mouth) prevented the development of opioid tolerance and dependence in a dose-dependent manner, with ED50 values of 3.9 and 3.2 mg/kg, respectively. PLGA-curcumin dose-dependently attenuated already-established opioid tolerance (ED50 = 12.6 mg/kg p.o.) and dependence (ED50 = 3.1 mg/kg p.o.). Curcumin or PLGA-curcumin did not produce antinociception by itself or affect morphine (1–10 mg/kg) antinociception. Moreover, we found that the behavioral effects of curcumin on opioid tolerance and dependence correlated with its inhibition of morphine-induced CaMKIIα activation in the brain. These results suggest that curcumin may attenuate opioid tolerance and dependence by suppressing CaMKIIα activity. PMID:25515789

  6. Curcumin: An Anti-Inflammatory Molecule from a Curry Spice on the Path to Cancer Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Purusotam Basnet

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Oxidative damage and inflammation have been pointed out in preclinical studies as the root cause of cancer and other chronic diseases such as diabetes, hypertension, Alzheimer’s disease, etc. Epidemiological and clinical studies have suggested that cancer could be prevented or significantly reduced by treatment with anti-oxidant and anti-inflammatory drugs, therefore, curcumin, a principal component of turmeric (a curry spice showing strong anti-oxidant and anti-inflammatory activities, might be a potential candidate for the prevention and/or treatment of cancer and other chronic diseases. However, curcumin, a highly pleiotropic molecule with an excellent safety profile targeting multiple diseases with strong evidence on the molecular level, could not achieve its optimum therapeutic outcome in past clinical trials, largely due to its low solubility and poor bioavailability. Curcumin can be developed as a therapeutic drug through improvement in formulation properties or delivery systems, enabling its enhanced absorption and cellular uptake. This review mainly focuses on the anti-inflammatory potential of curcumin and recent developments in dosage form and nanoparticulate delivery systems with the possibilities of therapeutic application of curcumin for the prevention and/or treatment of cancer.

  7. Curcumin: an anti-inflammatory molecule from a curry spice on the path to cancer treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basnet, Purusotam; Skalko-Basnet, Natasa

    2011-06-03

    Oxidative damage and inflammation have been pointed out in preclinical studies as the root cause of cancer and other chronic diseases such as diabetes, hypertension, Alzheimer's disease, etc. Epidemiological and clinical studies have suggested that cancer could be prevented or significantly reduced by treatment with anti-oxidant and anti-inflammatory drugs, therefore, curcumin, a principal component of turmeric (a curry spice) showing strong anti-oxidant and anti-inflammatory activities, might be a potential candidate for the prevention and/or treatment of cancer and other chronic diseases. However, curcumin, a highly pleiotropic molecule with an excellent safety profile targeting multiple diseases with strong evidence on the molecular level, could not achieve its optimum therapeutic outcome in past clinical trials, largely due to its low solubility and poor bioavailability. Curcumin can be developed as a therapeutic drug through improvement in formulation properties or delivery systems, enabling its enhanced absorption and cellular uptake. This review mainly focuses on the anti-inflammatory potential of curcumin and recent developments in dosage form and nanoparticulate delivery systems with the possibilities of therapeutic application of curcumin for the prevention and/or treatment of cancer.

  8. Curcumin and Inflammatory Bowel Disease: Potential and Limits of Innovative Treatments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liza Vecchi Brumatti

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Curcumin belongs to the family of natural compounds collectively called curcuminoids and it possesses remarkable beneficial anti-oxidant, anti-inflammatory, anti-cancer, and neuroprotective properties. Moreover it is commonly assumed that curcumin has also been suggested as a remedy for digestive diseases such as inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD, a chronic immune disorder affecting the gastrointestinal tract and that can be divided in two major subgroups: Crohn’s disease (CD and Ulcerative Colitis (UC, depending mainly on the intestine tract affected by the inflammatory events. The chronic and intermittent nature of IBD imposes, where applicable, long-term treatments conducted in most of the cases combining different types of drugs. In more severe cases and where there has been no good response to the drugs, a surgery therapy is carried out. Currently, IBD-pharmacological treatments are generally not curative and often present serious side effects; for this reason, being known the relationship between nutrition and IBD, it is worthy of interesting the study and the development of new dietary strategy. The curcumin principal mechanism is the suppression of IBD inflammatory compounds (NF-κB modulating immune response. This review summarizes literature data of curcumin as anti-inflammatory and anti-oxidant in IBD, trying to understand the different effects in CD e UC.

  9. Anti-Inflammatory Effects of Novel Standardized Solid Lipid Curcumin Formulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nahar, Pragati P.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Inflammation and the presence of pro-inflammatory cytokines are associated with numerous chronic diseases such as type-2 diabetes mellitus, cardiovascular disease, Alzheimer's disease, and cancer. An overwhelming amount of data indicates that curcumin, a polyphenol obtained from the Indian spice turmeric, Curcuma longa, is a potential chemopreventive agent for treating certain cancers and other chronic inflammatory diseases. However, the low bioavailability of curcumin, partly due to its low solubility and stability in the digestive tract, limits its therapeutic applications. Recent studies have demonstrated increased bioavailability and health-promoting effects of a novel solid lipid particle formulation of curcumin (Curcumin SLCP, Longvida®). The goal of this study was to evaluate the aqueous solubility and in vitro anti-inflammatory effects of solid lipid curcumin particle (SLCP) formulations using lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated RAW 264.7 cultured murine macrophages. SLCPs treatment significantly decreased nitric oxide (NO) and prostaglandin-E2 (PGE2) levels at concentrations ranging from 10 to 50 μg/mL, and reduced interleukin-6 (IL-6) levels in a concentration-dependent manner. Transient transfection experiments using a nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) reporter construct indicate that SLCPs significantly inhibit the transcriptional activity of NF-κB in macrophages. Taken together, these results show that in RAW 264.7 murine macrophages, SLCPs have improved solubility over unformulated curcumin, and significantly decrease the LPS-induced pro-inflammatory mediators NO, PGE2, and IL-6 by inhibiting the activation of NF-κB. PMID:25490740

  10. Anti-Inflammatory Effects of Curcumin on Insulin Resistance Index, Levels of Interleukin-6, C-Reactive Protein, and Liver Histology in Polycystic Ovary Syndrome-Induced Rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammadi, Shima; Karimzadeh Bardei, Latifeh; Hojati, Vida; Ghorbani, Azita; Nabiuni, Mohammad

    2017-01-01

    Objective Curcumin protects the liver against injury and fibrosis through suppressing hepatic inflammation, attenuating hepatic oxidative stress (OS), and inhibiting hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) activation. Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) and polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) are considered as common metabolic disorders. Low-grade chronic inflammation with different markers, such as elevated C-reactive protein (CRP) and interleukin-6 (IL-6) levels, play a crucial role in PCOS. This study aimed to evaluate the therapeutic effects of curcumin on IL-6 and CRP levels as well as insulin resistance (IR) index on liver function in PCOS rats. Materials and Methods In this experimental study, 90 adult Wistar rats were divided into control (n=18), sham (n=18), PCOS (n=18) and curcumin-treated PCOS groups (n=36). PCOS group was injected subcutaneously with 2 mg estradio-valerate (E2V). After 60 days, PCOS group was treated with curcumin [100 and 300 mg/kg body weight (BW)] for 14 days and anesthetized by chloroform. Blood and liver samples were collected for histological and serological analyses. Data were analyzed using In-Stat 3 via one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA). Results Histological and serological analyses showed a reduction in number of necrotic cells, IR index, as well as IL-6 and CRP levels in PCOS rats that were treated with various concentrations of curcumin. Conclusion In this study, curcumin decreased liver inflammation by induction of insulin sensitivity and reduction of hepatic necrosis. Therefore, curcumin may be considered as protective factor against inflammatory state of PCOS. PMID:28836404

  11. 4-methoxycarbonyl curcumin: a unique inhibitor of both inflammatory mediators and periodontal inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Ying; Lee, Hsi-Ming; Napolitano, Nicole; Clemens, McKenzie; Zhang, Yazhou; Sorsa, Timo; Zhang, Yu; Johnson, Francis; Golub, Lorne M

    2013-01-01

    Chronic inflammatory diseases such as periodontitis have been associated with increased risk for various medical conditions including diabetes and cardiovascular disease. Endotoxin (lipopolysaccharide, LPS), derived from gram-negative periodonto-pathogens, can induce the local accumulation of mononuclear cells in the inflammatory lesion, increasing proinflammatory cytokines and matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs). This ultimately results in the destruction of periodontal connective tissues including alveolar bone. Curcumin is the principal dyestuff in the popular Indian spice turmeric and has significant regulatory effects on inflammatory mediators but is characterized by poor solubility and low bioactivity. Recently, we developed a series of chemically modified curcumins (CMCs) with increased solubility and zinc-binding activity, while retaining, or further enhancing, their therapeutic effects. In the current study, we demonstrate that a novel CMC (CMC 2.5: 4-methoxycarbonyl curcumin) has significant inhibitory effects, better than the parent compound curcumin, on proinflammatory cytokines and MMPs in in vitro, in cell culture, and in an animal model of periodontal inflammation. The therapeutic potential of CMC 2.5 and its congeners may help to prevent tissue damage during various chronic inflammatory diseases including periodontitis and may reduce the risks of systemic diseases associated with this local disorder.

  12. 4-Methoxycarbonyl Curcumin: A Unique Inhibitor of Both Inflammatory Mediators and Periodontal Inflammation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying Gu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Chronic inflammatory diseases such as periodontitis have been associated with increased risk for various medical conditions including diabetes and cardiovascular disease. Endotoxin (lipopolysaccharide, LPS, derived from gram-negative periodonto-pathogens, can induce the local accumulation of mononuclear cells in the inflammatory lesion, increasing proinflammatory cytokines and matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs. This ultimately results in the destruction of periodontal connective tissues including alveolar bone. Curcumin is the principal dyestuff in the popular Indian spice turmeric and has significant regulatory effects on inflammatory mediators but is characterized by poor solubility and low bioactivity. Recently, we developed a series of chemically modified curcumins (CMCs with increased solubility and zinc-binding activity, while retaining, or further enhancing, their therapeutic effects. In the current study, we demonstrate that a novel CMC (CMC 2.5: 4-methoxycarbonyl curcumin has significant inhibitory effects, better than the parent compound curcumin, on proinflammatory cytokines and MMPs in in vitro, in cell culture, and in an animal model of periodontal inflammation. The therapeutic potential of CMC 2.5 and its congeners may help to prevent tissue damage during various chronic inflammatory diseases including periodontitis and may reduce the risks of systemic diseases associated with this local disorder.

  13. Curcumin Attenuated Bupivacaine-Induced Neurotoxicity in SH-SY5Y Cells Via Activation of the Akt Signaling Pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, You-Ling; Li, Heng-Chang; Zhao, Wei; Peng, Hui-Hua; Huang, Fang; Jiang, Wei-Hang; Xu, Shi-Yuan

    2016-09-01

    Bupivacaine is widely used for regional anesthesia, spinal anesthesia, and pain management. However, bupivacaine could cause neuronal injury. Curcumin, a low molecular weight polyphenol, has a variety of bioactivities and may exert neuroprotective effects against damage induced by some stimuli. In the present study, we tested whether curcumin could attenuate bupivacaine-induced neurotoxicity in SH-SY5Y cells. Cell injury was evaluated by examining cell viability, mitochondrial damage and apoptosis. We also investigated the levels of activation of the Akt signaling pathway and the effect of Akt inhibition by triciribine on cell injury following bupivacaine and curcumin treatment. Our findings showed that the bupivacaine treatment could induce neurotoxicity. Pretreatment of the SH-SY5Y cells with curcumin significantly attenuated bupivacaine-induced neurotoxicity. Interestingly, the curcumin treatment increased the levels of Akt phosphorylation. More significantly, the pharmacological inhibition of Akt abolished the cytoprotective effect of curcumin against bupivacaine-induced cell injury. Our data suggest that pretreating SH-SY5Y cells with curcumin provides a protective effect on bupivacaine-induced neuronal injury via activation of the Akt signaling pathway.

  14. Curcumin attenuates skeletal muscle mitochondrial impairment in COPD rats: PGC-1α/SIRT3 pathway involved.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ming; Tang, Jingjing; Li, Yali; Xie, Yingying; Shan, Hu; Chen, Mingxia; Zhang, Jie; Yang, Xia; Zhang, Qiuhong; Yang, Xudong

    2017-11-01

    Curcumin has been widely used to treat numerous diseases due to its antioxidant property. The aim of the present study is to investigate the effect of curcumin on skeletal muscle mitochondria in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and its underlying mechanism. The rat model of COPD was established by cigarette smoke exposure combined with intratracheal administration of lipopolysaccharide. Airway inflammation and emphysema were notably ameliorated by the treatment with curcumin. Oral administration of curcumin significantly improved muscle fiber atrophy, myofibril disorganization, interstitial fibrosis and mitochondrial structure damage in the skeletal muscle of COPD rats. Mitochondrial enzyme activities of cytochrome c oxidase, succinate dehydrogenase, Na + /K + -ATPase and Ca 2+ -ATPase in skeletal muscle mitochondria from COPD rats were significantly increased after treatment with curcumin. Moreover, curcumin significantly decreased oxidative stress and inflammation by determining the levels of malondialdehyde, manganese superoxide dismutase, glutathione peroxidase, catalase, IL-6 and TNF-α in skeletal muscle of COPD rats. Furthermore, curcumin significantly increased the mRNA and protein expression of PGC-1α and SIRT3 in the skeletal muscle tissues of COPD rats. These results suggested that curcumin can attenuate skeletal muscle mitochondrial impairment in COPD rats possibly by the up-regulation of PGC-1α/SIRT3 signaling pathway. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Curcumin, a polyphenolic antioxidant, attenuates chronic fatigue syndrome in murine water immersion stress model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Amit; Vij, Garima; Sharma, Sameer; Tirkey, Naveen; Rishi, Praveen; Chopra, Kanwaljit

    2009-01-01

    Chronic fatigue syndrome, infection and oxidative stress are interrelated in epidemiological case studies. However, data demonstrating scientific validation of epidemiological claims regarding effectiveness of nutritional supplements for chronic fatigue syndrome are lacking. This study is designed to evaluate the effect of natural polyphenol, curcumin, in a mouse model of immunologically induced fatigue, where purified lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and Brucella abortus (BA) antigens were used as immunogens. The assessment of chronic fatigue syndrome was based on chronic water-immersion stress test for 10 min daily for 19 days and the immobility time was taken as the marker of fatigue. Mice challenged with LPS or BA for 19 days showed significant increase in the immobility time and hyperalgesia on day 19, as well as marked increase in serum tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) levels. Concurrent treatment with curcumin resulted in significantly decreased immobility time as well as hyperalgesia. There was significant attenuation of oxidative stress as well as TNF-alpha levels. These findings strongly suggest that during immunological activation, there is significant increase in oxidative stress and curcumin can be a valuable option in the treatment of chronic fatigue syndrome.

  16. Pretreatment with curcumin attenuates anxiety while strengthens memory performance after one short stress experience in male rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haider, Saida; Naqvi, Fizza; Batool, Zehra; Tabassum, Saiqa; Sadir, Sadia; Liaquat, Laraib; Naqvi, Faizan; Zuberi, Nudrat Anwer; Shakeel, Hina; Perveen, Tahira

    2015-06-01

    It is observed that memories are more strengthened in a stressful condition. Studies have also demonstrated an association between stressful events and the onset of depression and anxiety. Considering the nootropic, anxiolytic and antidepressant-like properties of curcumin in various experimental approaches, we appraised the beneficial effects of this herb on acute immobilization stress-induced behavioral and neurochemical alterations. Rats in test group were administrated with curcumin (200mg/kg/day), dissolved in neutral oil, for 1 week. Both control and curcumin-treated rats were divided into unstressed and stressed groups. Rats in the stressed group were subjected to immobilization stress for 2h. After stress, the animals were subjected to behavioral tests. Immobilization stress induced an anxiogenic behavior in rats subjected to elevated plus maze test (EPM). Locomotor activity was also significantly increased following the acute immobilization stress. Pre-administration of curcumin prevented the stress-induced behavioral deficits. Highest memory performance was observed in stressed rats that were pre-treated with curcumin in Morris water maze (MWM). Brain malondialdehyde (MDA) levels, catalase (CAT), glutathione peroxidase (GPx), superoxide dismutase (SOD), and acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activities were also estimated. Present study suggests a role of antioxidant enzymes in the attenuation of acute stress induced anxiety by curcumin. The findings therefore suggest that supplementation of curcumin may be beneficial in the treatment of acute stress induced anxiety and enhancement of memory function. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Anti-inflammatory effect of curcumin on mast cell-mediated allergic responses in ovalbumin-induced allergic rhinitis mouse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ning; Li, Hong; Jia, Jihui; He, Mingqiang

    2015-01-01

    Curcumin has commonly been used for the treatment of various allergic diseases. However, its precise anti-allergic rhinitis effect and mechanism remain unknown. In the present study, the effect of curcumin on allergic responses in ovalbumin (OVA)-induced allergic rhinitis mouse was investigated. We explored the effect of curcumin on the release of allergic inflammatory mediators, such as histamine, OVA-specific IgE, and inflammatory cytokines. Also, we found that curcumin improved rhinitis symptoms, inhibited the histopathological changes of nasal mucosa, and decreased the serum levels of histamine, OVA-specific IgE and TNF-α in OVA-induced allergic rhinitis mice. In addition, curcumin suppressed the production of inflammatory cytokines, such as TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-6 and IL-8. Moreover, curcumin significantly inhibited PMA-induced p-ERK, p-p38, p-JNK, p-Iκ-Bα and NF-κB. These findings suggest that curcumin has an anti-allergic effect through modulating mast cell-mediated allergic responses in allergic rhinitis, at least partly by inhibiting MAPK/NF-κB pathway. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Curcumin activates autophagy and attenuates oxidative damage in EA.hy926 cells via the Akt/mTOR pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Shouyu; Long, Mingzhi; Li, Xiuzhen; Zhu, Shushu; Zhang, Min; Yang, Zhijian

    2016-03-01

    Curcumin, which is the effective component of turmeric (Curcuma longa), has previously been shown to exert potent antioxidant, antitumor and anti‑inflammatory activities in vitro and in vivo. However, the mechanism underlying the protective effects of curcumin against oxidative damage in endothelial cells remains unclear. The present study aimed to examine the effects of curcumin on hydrogen peroxide (H2O2)‑induced apoptosis and autophagy in EA.hy926 cells, and to determine the underlying molecular mechanism. Cultured EA.hy926 cells were treated with curcumin (5‑20 µmol/l) 4 h prior to and for 4 h during exposure to H2O2 (200 µmol/l). Oxidative stress resulted in a significant increase in the rate of cell apoptosis, which was accompanied by an increase in the expression levels of caspase‑3 and B‑cell lymphoma 2 (Bcl‑2)‑associated X protein (Bax), and a decrease in the expression levels of Bcl‑2. Treatment with curcumin (5 or 20 µmol/l) significantly inhibited apoptosis, and reversed the alterations in caspase‑3, Bcl‑2 and Bax expression. Furthermore, curcumin induced autophagy and microtubule‑associated protein 1A/1B‑light chain 3‑Ⅱ expression, and suppressed the phosphorylation of Akt and mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR). These results indicated that curcumin may protect cells against oxidative stress‑induced damage through inhibiting apoptosis and inducing autophagy via the Akt/mTOR pathway.

  19. Curcumin pretreatment attenuates brain lesion size and improves neurological function following traumatic brain injury in the rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samini, Fariborz; Samarghandian, Saeed; Borji, Abasalt; Mohammadi, Gholamreza; bakaian, Mahdi

    2013-09-01

    Turmeric has been in use since ancient times as a condiment and due to its medicinal properties. Curcumin, the yellow coloring principle in turmeric, is a polyphenolic and a major active constituent. Besides anti-inflammatory, thrombolytic and anti-carcinogenic activities, curcumin also possesses strong antioxidant property. The neuroprotective effects of curcumin were evaluated in a weight drop model of cortical contusion trauma in rat. Male Wistar rats (350-400 g, n=9) were anesthetized with sodium pentobarbital (60 mg/kg i.p.) and subjected to head injury. Five days before injury, animals randomly received an i.p. bolus of either curcumin (50 and 100 mg/kg/day, n=9) or vehicle (n=9). Two weeks after the injury and drug treatment, animals were sacrificed and a series of brain sections, stained with hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) were evaluated for quantitative brain lesion volume. Two weeks after the injury, oxidative stress parameter (malondialdehyde) was also measured in the brain. Curcumin (100 mg/kg) significantly reduced the size of brain injury-induced lesions (Pcurcumin (100 mg/kg). Curcumin treatment significantly improved the neurological status evaluated during 2 weeks after brain injury. The study demonstrates the protective efficacy of curcumin in rat traumatic brain injury model. © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Curcumin attenuates glutamate neurotoxicity in the hippocampus by suppression of ER stress-associated TXNIP/NLRP3 inflammasome activation in a manner dependent on AMPK

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Ying; Li, Jia; Li, Shanshan; Li, Yi; Wang, Xiangxiang; Liu, Baolin [Department of Pharmacology of Chinese Materia Medica, China Pharmaceutical University, Nanjing, 639, Longmian Road, Nanjing 211198 (China); Jiangsu Provincial Key Laboratory for TCM Evaluation and Translational Research, China Pharmaceutical University, 639, Longmian Road, Nanjing 211198 (China); Fu, Qiang, E-mail: fuqiang@cpu.edu.cn [Department of Pharmacology of Chinese Materia Medica, China Pharmaceutical University, Nanjing, 639, Longmian Road, Nanjing 211198 (China); Jiangsu Provincial Key Laboratory for TCM Evaluation and Translational Research, China Pharmaceutical University, 639, Longmian Road, Nanjing 211198 (China); Ma, Shiping, E-mail: spma@cpu.edu.cn [Department of Pharmacology of Chinese Materia Medica, China Pharmaceutical University, Nanjing, 639, Longmian Road, Nanjing 211198 (China); Jiangsu Provincial Key Laboratory for TCM Evaluation and Translational Research, China Pharmaceutical University, 639, Longmian Road, Nanjing 211198 (China)

    2015-07-01

    Curcumin is a natural polyphenolic compound in Curcuma longa with beneficial effects on neuronal protection. This study aims to investigate the action of curcumin in the hippocampus subjected to glutamate neurotoxicity. Glutamate stimulation induced reactive oxygen species (ROS), endoplasmic reticulum stress (ER stress) and TXNIP/NLRP3 inflammasome activation, leading to damage in the hippocampus. Curcumin treatment in the hippocampus or SH-SY5Y cells inhibited IRE1α and PERK phosphorylation with suppression of intracellular ROS production. Curcumin increased AMPK activity and knockdown of AMPKα with specific siRNA abrogated its inhibitory effects on IRE1α and PERK phosphorylation, indicating that AMPK activity was essential for the suppression of ER stress. As a result, curcumin reduced TXNIP expression and inhibited NLRP3 inflammasome activation by downregulation of NLRP3 and cleaved caspase-1 induction, and thus reduced IL-1β secretion. Specific fluorescent probe and flow cytometry analysis showed that curcumin prevented mitochondrial malfunction and protected cell survival from glutamate neurotoxicity. Moreover, oral administration of curcumin reduced brain infarct volume and attenuated neuronal damage in rats subjected to middle cerebral artery occlusion. Immunohistochemistry showed that curcumin inhibited p-IRE1α, p-PERK and NLRP3 expression in hippocampus CA1 region. Together, these results showed that curcumin attenuated glutamate neurotoxicity by inhibiting ER stress-associated TXNIP/NLRP3 inflammasome activation via the regulation of AMPK, and thereby protected the hippocampus from ischemic insult. - Highlights: • Curcumin attenuates glutamate neurotoxicity in the hippocampus. • Curcumin suppresses ER stress in glutamate-induced hippocampus slices. • Curcumin inhibits TXNIP/NLRP3 inflammasome activation. • Regulation of AMPK by curcumin contributes to suppressing ER stress.

  1. Curcumin attenuates glutamate neurotoxicity in the hippocampus by suppression of ER stress-associated TXNIP/NLRP3 inflammasome activation in a manner dependent on AMPK

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Ying; Li, Jia; Li, Shanshan; Li, Yi; Wang, Xiangxiang; Liu, Baolin; Fu, Qiang; Ma, Shiping

    2015-01-01

    Curcumin is a natural polyphenolic compound in Curcuma longa with beneficial effects on neuronal protection. This study aims to investigate the action of curcumin in the hippocampus subjected to glutamate neurotoxicity. Glutamate stimulation induced reactive oxygen species (ROS), endoplasmic reticulum stress (ER stress) and TXNIP/NLRP3 inflammasome activation, leading to damage in the hippocampus. Curcumin treatment in the hippocampus or SH-SY5Y cells inhibited IRE1α and PERK phosphorylation with suppression of intracellular ROS production. Curcumin increased AMPK activity and knockdown of AMPKα with specific siRNA abrogated its inhibitory effects on IRE1α and PERK phosphorylation, indicating that AMPK activity was essential for the suppression of ER stress. As a result, curcumin reduced TXNIP expression and inhibited NLRP3 inflammasome activation by downregulation of NLRP3 and cleaved caspase-1 induction, and thus reduced IL-1β secretion. Specific fluorescent probe and flow cytometry analysis showed that curcumin prevented mitochondrial malfunction and protected cell survival from glutamate neurotoxicity. Moreover, oral administration of curcumin reduced brain infarct volume and attenuated neuronal damage in rats subjected to middle cerebral artery occlusion. Immunohistochemistry showed that curcumin inhibited p-IRE1α, p-PERK and NLRP3 expression in hippocampus CA1 region. Together, these results showed that curcumin attenuated glutamate neurotoxicity by inhibiting ER stress-associated TXNIP/NLRP3 inflammasome activation via the regulation of AMPK, and thereby protected the hippocampus from ischemic insult. - Highlights: • Curcumin attenuates glutamate neurotoxicity in the hippocampus. • Curcumin suppresses ER stress in glutamate-induced hippocampus slices. • Curcumin inhibits TXNIP/NLRP3 inflammasome activation. • Regulation of AMPK by curcumin contributes to suppressing ER stress

  2. Curcumin inhibits epigen and amphiregulin upregulated by 2,4,6-trinitrochlorobenzene associated with attenuation of skin swelling.

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    Sakai, Hiroyasu; Sato, Ken; Sato, Fumiaki; Kai, Yuki; Mandokoro, Kazutaka; Matsumoto, Kenjiro; Kato, Shinichi; Yumoto, Tetsuro; Narita, Minoru; Chiba, Yoshihiko

    2017-08-01

    Contact dermatitis model involving repeated application of hapten is used as a tool to assess dermatitis, as characterized by thickening. Involvement of cell proliferation, elicited by repeated hapten-stimulation, in this swelling has been unclear. Curcumin is reported to reduce inflammation. We examined involvement of cell proliferation and the role of extracellular regulated kinase (ERK) in 2,4,6-trinitrochlorobenzene (TNCB) challenge-induced ear swelling. We also examined the effects of curcumin in this model. Mice were sensitized with TNCB to the abdominal skin. Then, they were challenged with TNCB to the ear three times. The ERK activation inhibitor U0126 or curcumin was applied 30 min before each TNCB challenge. TNCB challenge-induced increased epidermal cell number and dermal thickening. Gene expressions of epithelial mitogen (EPGN), amphiregulin (AREG) and heparin-binding-epidermal growth factor (HB-EGF) were increased in the ears after the last TNCB challenge. Ki-67 immunoreactivity was increased in the dermis in TNCB-challenged ears. TNCB-induced swelling was inhibited by U0126 and curcumin. Curcumin also attenuated TNCB-induced ERK phosphorylation and expression of EPGN and AREG genes. Ear swelling induced by TNCB challenge might be mediated, in part, by the EPGN- and AREG-ERK proliferation pathway and was inhibited by curcumin.

  3. Attenuation of cisplatin ototoxicity by otoprotective effects of nanoencapsulated curcumin and dexamethasone in a guinea pig model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salehi, Pezhman; Akinpelu, Olubunmi Victoria; Waissbluth, Sofia; Peleva, Emilia; Meehan, Brian; Rak, Janusz; Daniel, Sam J

    2014-08-01

    Cisplatin, one of the most effective and widely used chemotherapeutic agents in the treatment of head and neck malignancies, has severe dose-limiting side effects including ototoxicity. This study evaluates the effectiveness of nanoencapsulated curcumin and dexamethasone in preventing degenerative changes in inner ear cells caused by cisplatin. Prospective study, animal experiment. Cultured auditory cells [House Ear Institute Organ of Corti-1 (HEI-OC1)] and a guinea pig model were used for in vitro and in vivo experiments, respectively. Cell viability assays were conducted to compare the direct toxicity of cisplatin against auditory cells in the presence or absence of pretreatment with nanoencapsulated curcumin and dexamethasone. To recapitulate these effects in vivo, 68 guinea pigs received cisplatin either alone, or along with dexamethasone, nanoencapsulated curcumin, or the combination of both products. Outcome measures included auditory brainstem response, cochlear morphology under both light and scanning electron microscopy, and antioxidant enzyme assays. Pretreatment of auditory cells with naonoencapsulated curcumin and dexamethasone resulted in significant attenuation of cisplatin toxicity. Similarly, in the corresponding animal model (guinea pig), cisplatin caused an average hearing loss of 50 dB, which was attenuated by nanoencapsulated curcumin and dexamethasone across all of the hearing frequencies. There was also greater preservation of histologic structures in this group. Superoxide dismutase and catalase activities were increased in cisplatin-treated animals, whereas the nanoencapsulated curcumin with dexamethasone led to a diminution of this effect. Nanoencapsulated curcumin administered in combination with dexamethasone provides a partial but marked protection against cisplatin-induced hearing loss, likely because of reduced toxic damage to auditory cells.

  4. Attenuation of Morphine Withdrawal Syndrome by Various Dosages of Curcumin in Comparison with Clonidine in Mouse: Possible Mechanism

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    Majid Motaghinejad

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Herbal medical compounds and their major constituent have been used in the management and treatment of opioid withdrawal syndrome and pain. This study was carried out to clarify the effect of curcumin, the major compound of turmeric, on morphine withdrawal syndrome in mouse model and its possible mechanisms of pain relieving activity by assessing in writhing test as a model of visceral pain. Methods: Due to two separate protocols (withdrawal syndrome and pain, 144 male albino mice were divided in two major groups. In withdrawal syndrome group, test effect of various dosages of curcumin (10, 20, and 40 mg/kg was assessed on withdrawal signs and compared with positive and negative control and standard treatment (clonidine 0.4 mg/kg groups. In pain groups, to determine the mechanism of pain relieving activity of curcumin, various dosages of curcumin (10, 20, and 40 mg/kg in three separated groups, were used against acetic acid induced writhing (which is a constriction test. The most effective dose (40 mg/kg was used in writhing test and compared with groups pretreated with antagonist of major neurotransmitters involved in pain; and compared with group pretreated with vehicle (DMSO, 0.05% as control. Results: Curcumin attenuates withdrawal syndrome in a dose dependent manner in comparison with the dependent positive control group (P<0.05. It also indicated that pretreatment with naloxone and cyproheptadine significantly attenuate antinociception effect of curcumin (P<0.05. Conclusion: This study advocate that antinociception of curcumin was mediated by opioidergic and adrenergic system.

  5. Curcumin attenuates morphine antinociceptive tolerance through suppressing up-regulation of spinal Toll-like receptor 4 in rats

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    Fei GAO

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective To investigate the effects of curcumin (Cur on activation of spinal Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4 and on the chronic antinociceptive tolerance of morphine. Methods Sixty male Sprague-Dawley rats with successful intrathecal catheterization were randomly divided into four groups (n=15: saline (NS group; morphine (MOR group; curcumin (Cur group and morphine plus curcumin (MOR+Cur group. A morphine tolerance model of rats was induced by intrathecal injection of morphine 15μg, once a day for 7 consecutive days in MOR and MOR+Cur group; 100μg curcumin was administered intrathecally once a day for 7 consecutive days in Cur and MOR+Cur group, 10μl saline was administered intrathecally once a day for 7 consecutive days in NS group. The effect of curcumin intrathecal catheterization on morphine antinociceptive tolerance was explored by the tail flick latency (TFL method and mechanical withdrawal threshold (MWT, and then the maximum possible potential effect (MPE was calculated. The immunofluorescence staining method was applied to detect the effect of curcumin on the activation of lumbar spinal microglia. Real-time PCR and Western blotting were used to evaluate the effect of curcumin on the expression of mRNA and protein of spinal TLR4. Results The %MPE TFL and %MPE MWT increased significantly in MOR+Cur group than in MOR group (P0.05. The lumbar spinal microglia increased markedly and the expressions of polyclonal antibody IBA-1 and TLR4 were significantly up-regulated in MOR group than in NS group (P0.05. Conclusion Curcumin may attenuate chronic morphine antinociceptive tolerance through inhibiting spinal TLR4 up-regulation. DOI: 10.11855/j.issn.0577-7402.2017.12.06

  6. Curcumin Attenuates Gentamicin-Induced Kidney Mitochondrial Alterations: Possible Role of a Mitochondrial Biogenesis Mechanism

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    Mario Negrette-Guzmán

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available It has been shown that curcumin (CUR, a polyphenol derived from Curcuma longa, exerts a protective effect against gentamicin- (GM- induced nephrotoxicity in rats, associated with a preservation of the antioxidant status. Although mitochondrial dysfunction is a hallmark in the GM-induced renal injury, the role of CUR in mitochondrial protection has not been studied. In this work, LLC-PK1 cells were preincubated 24 h with CUR and then coincubated 48 h with CUR and 8 mM GM. Treatment with CUR attenuated GM-induced drop in cell viability and led to an increase in nuclear factor (erythroid-2-related factor 2 (Nrf2 nuclear accumulation and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma coactivator-1 alpha (PGC-1α cell expression attenuating GM-induced losses in these proteins. In vivo, Wistar rats were injected subcutaneously with GM (75 mg/Kg/12 h during 7 days to develop kidney mitochondrial alterations. CUR (400 mg/Kg/day was administered orally 5 days before and during the GM exposure. The GM-induced mitochondrial alterations in ultrastructure and bioenergetics as well as decrease in activities of respiratory complexes I and IV and induction of calcium-dependent permeability transition were mostly attenuated by CUR. Protection of CUR against GM-induced nephrotoxicity could be in part mediated by maintenance of mitochondrial functions and biogenesis with some participation of the nuclear factor Nrf2.

  7. Curcumin attenuates lipolysis stimulated by tumor necrosis factor-α or isoproterenol in 3T3-L1 adipocytes.

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    Xie, Xiao-yun; Kong, Po-Ren; Wu, Jin-feng; Li, Ying; Li, Yan-xiang

    2012-12-15

    Curcumin, an active component derived from dietary spice turmeric (Curcuma longa), has been demonstrated antihyperglycemic, antiinflammatory and hypocholesterolemic activities in obesity and diabetes. These effects are associated with decreased level of circulating free fatty acids (FFA), however the mechanism has not yet been elucidated. The flux of FFA and glycerol from adipose tissue to the blood stream primarily depends on the lipolysis of triacylglycerols in the adipocytes. Adipocyte lipolysis is physiologically stimulated by catecholamine hormones. Tumor necrosis factor-α (TNFα) stimulates chronic lipolysis in obesity and type 2 diabetes. In this study, we examined the role of curcumin in inhibiting lipolytic action upon various stimulations in 3T3-L1 adipocytes. Glycerol release from TNFα or isoproterenol-stimulated 3T3-L1 adipocytes in the absence or presence of curcumin was determined using a colorimetric assay (GPO-Trinder). Western blotting was used to investigate the TNFα-induced phosphorylation of MAPK and perilipin expression. Fatcake and cytosolic fractions were prepared to examine the isoproterenol-stimulated hormone-sensitive lipase translocation. Treatment with curcumin attenuated TNFα-mediated lipolysis by suppressing phosphorylation of extracellular signal-related kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2) and reversing the downregulation of perilipin protein in TNFα-stimulated adipocytes (p<0.05). The acute lipolytic response to adrenergic stimulation of isoproterenol was also restricted by curcumin (10-20 μM, p<0.05), which was compatible with reduced perilipin phosphorylation(29%, p<0.05) and hormone-sensitive lipase translocation(20%, p<0.05). This study provides evidence that curcumin acts on adipocytes to suppress the lipolysis response to TNFα and catecholamines. The antilipolytic effect could be a cellular basis for curcumin decreasing plasma FFA levels and improving insulin sensitivity. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  8. Oral administration of nano-emulsion curcumin in mice suppresses inflammatory-induced NFκB signaling and macrophage migration.

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    Nicholas A Young

    Full Text Available Despite the widespread use of curcumin for centuries in Eastern medicine as an anti-inflammatory agent, its molecular actions and therapeutic viability have only recently been explored. While curcumin does have potential therapeutic efficacy, both solubility and bioavailability must be improved before it can be more successfully translated to clinical care. We have previously reported a novel formulation of nano-emulsion curcumin (NEC that achieves significantly greater plasma concentrations in mice after oral administration. Here, we confirm the immunosuppressive effects of NEC in vivo and further examine its molecular mechanisms to better understand therapeutic potential. Using transgenic mice harboring an NFκB-luciferase reporter gene, we demonstrate a novel application of this in vivo inflammatory model to test the efficacy of NEC administration by bioluminescent imaging and show that LPS-induced NFκB activity was suppressed with NEC compared to an equivalent amount of curcumin in aqueous suspension. Administration of NEC by oral gavage resulted in a reduction of blood monocytes, decreased levels of both TLR4 and RAGE expression, and inhibited secretion of MCP-1. Mechanistically, curcumin blocked LPS-induced phosphorylation of the p65 subunit of NFκB and IκBα in murine macrophages. In a mouse model of peritonitis, NEC significantly reduced macrophage recruitment, but not T-cell or B-cell levels. In addition, curcumin treatment of monocyte derived cell lines and primary human macrophages in vitro significantly inhibited cell migration. These data demonstrate that curcumin can suppress inflammation by inhibiting macrophage migration via NFκB and MCP-1 inhibition and establish that NEC is an effective therapeutic formulation to increase the bioavailability of curcumin in order to facilitate this response.

  9. Nanoencapsulated curcumin and praziquantel treatment reduces periductal fibrosis and attenuates bile canalicular abnormalities in Opisthorchis viverrini-infected hamsters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charoensuk, Lakhanawan; Pinlaor, Porntip; Wanichwecharungruang, Supason; Intuyod, Kitti; Vaeteewoottacharn, Kulthida; Chaidee, Apisit; Yongvanit, Puangrat; Pairojkul, Chawalit; Suwannateep, Natthakitta; Pinlaor, Somchai

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated the effects of nanoencapsulated curcumin (NEC) and praziquantel (PZQ) treatment on the resolution of periductal fibrosis (PDF) and bile canalicular (BC) abnormalities in Opisthorchis viverrini infected hamsters. Chronic O. viverrini infection (OV) was initially treated with either PZQ (OP) and subsequently treated with NEC (OP+NEC), curcumin (OP+Cur) or unloaded carriers (OP+carrier) daily for one month. OP+NEC treatment reduced the PDF by suppression of fibrotic markers (hydroxyproline content, α-SMA, CTGF, fibronectin, collagen I and III), cytokines (TGF-β and TNF-α) and TIMP-1, 2, 3 expression and upregulation of MMP-7, 13 genes. Higher activity of NEC in reducing fibrosis compared to curcumin was also demonstrated in in vitro studies. Moreover, OP+NEC also prevented BC abnormalities and upregulated several genes involved in bile acid metabolism. These results demonstrate that NEC and PZQ treatment reduces PDF and attenuates BC defect in experimental opisthorchiasis. From the Clinical Editor: Infection by Opisthorchis viverrini leads to liver fibrosis and affects population in SE Asia. Currently, praziquantel (PZQ) is the drug of choice but this drug has significant side effects. In this study, the authors combined curcumin (NEC) and praziquantel in a nanocarrier to test the anti-oxidative effect of curcumin in an animal model. The encouraging results may pave a way for better treatment in the future. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Attenuation of hind-limb suspension-induced bone loss by curcumin is associated with reduced oxidative stress and increased vitamin D receptor expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xin, M; Yang, Y; Zhang, D; Wang, J; Chen, S; Zhou, D

    2015-11-01

    Treatment with curcumin attenuated modeled microgravity-induced bone loss, possibly through abating oxidative stress and activating vitamin D receptor. Curcumin might be an effective countermeasure for microgravity-induced bone loss but remains to be tested in humans. Bone loss is one of the most important complications for human crewmembers who are exposed to long-term microgravity in space and also for bedridden people. The aim of the current study was to elucidate whether treatment with curcumin attenuated bone loss induced by microgravity. We used hind-limb suspension (HLS) and rotary wall vessel bioreactor (RWVB) to model microgravity in vivo and in vitro, respectively. We investigated the effects of curcumin consumption (40 mg kg(-1) body weight day(-1), via daily oral gavages) on Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats exposed to HLS for 6 weeks. Then, we investigated the effects of incubation with curcumin (4 μM) on MC3T3-E1 and RAW264.7 cells cultured in RWVB. Curcumin alleviated HLS-induced reduction of bone mineral density in tibiae and preserved bone structure in tibiae and mechanical strength in femurs. Curcumin alleviated HLS-induced oxidative stress marked by reduced malondialdehyde content and increased total sulfhydryl content in femurs. In cultured MC3T3-E1 cells, curcumin inhibited modeled microgravity-induced reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation and enhanced osteoblastic differentiation. In cultured RAW264.7 cells, curcumin reduced modeled microgravity-induced ROS formation and attenuated osteoclastogenesis. In addition, curcumin upregulated vitamin D receptor (VDR) expression in femurs of rats exposed to HLS and MC3T3-E1 cells exposed to modeled microgravity. Curcumin alleviated HLS-induced bone loss in rats, possibly via suppressing oxidative stress and upregulating VDR expression.

  11. Curcumin, resveratrol and flavonoids as anti-inflammatory, cyto- and DNA-protective dietary compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bisht, Kavita; Wagner, Karl-Heinz; Bulmer, Andrew C.

    2010-01-01

    Numerous dietary compounds, ubiquitous in fruits, vegetables and spices have been isolated and evaluated during recent years for their therapeutic potential. These compounds include flavonoid and non-flavonoid polyphenols, which describe beneficial effects against a variety of ailments. The notion that these plant products have health promoting effects emerged because their intake was related to a reduced incidence of cancer, cardiovascular, neurological, respiratory, and age-related diseases. Exposure of the body to a stressful environment challenges cell survival and increases the risk of chronic disease developing. The polyphenols afford protection against various stress-induced toxicities through modulating intercellular cascades which inhibit inflammatory molecule synthesis, the formation of free radicals, nuclear damage and induce antioxidant enzyme expression. These responses have the potential to increase life expectancy. The present review article focuses on curcumin, resveratrol, and flavonoids and seeks to summarize their anti-inflammatory, cytoprotective and DNA-protective properties.

  12. Curcumin Attenuates on Carbon Tetrachloride-Induced Acute Liver Injury in Mice via Modulation of the Nrf2/HO-1 and TGF-β1/Smad3 Pathway

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    Xinyan Peng

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to investigate the protective effect of curcumin against carbon tetrachloride (CCl4-induced acute liver injury in a mouse model, and to explain the underlying mechanism. Curcumin at doses of 50, 100 and 200 mg/kg/day were administered orally once daily for seven days prior to CCl4 exposure. At 24 h, curcumin-attenuated CCl4 induced elevated serum transaminase activities and histopathological damage in the mouse’s liver. Curcumin pre-treatment at 50, 100 and 200 mg/kg significantly ameliorated CCl4-induced oxidative stress, characterized by decreased malondialdehyde (MDA formations, and increased superoxide dismutase (SOD, catalase (CAT activities and glutathione (GSH content, followed by a decrease in caspase-9 and -3 activities. Curcumin pre-treatment significantly decreased CCl4-induced inflammation. Furthermore, curcumin pre-treatment significantly down-regulated the expression of TGF-β1 and Smad3 mRNAs (both p < 0.01, and up-regulated the expression of nuclear-factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2 and HO-1 mRNA (both p < 0.01 in the liver. Inhibition of HO-1 attenuated the protective effect of curcumin on CCl4-induced acute liver injury. Given these outcomes, curcumin could protect against CCl4-induced acute liver injury by inhibiting oxidative stress and inflammation, which may partly involve the activation of Nrf2/HO-1 and inhibition of TGF-β1/Smad3 pathways.

  13. Curcumin inhibits glyoxalase 1: a possible link to its anti-inflammatory and anti-tumor activity.

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    Thore Santel

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Glyoxalases (Glo1 and Glo2 are involved in the glycolytic pathway by detoxifying the reactive methylglyoxal (MGO into D-lactate in a two-step reaction using glutathione (GSH as cofactor. Inhibitors of glyoxalases are considered as anti-inflammatory and anti-carcinogenic agents. The recent finding that various polyphenols modulate Glo1 activity has prompted us to assess curcumin's potency as an Glo1 inhibitor. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Cultures of whole blood cells and tumor cell lines (PC-3, JIM-1, MDA-MD 231 and 1321N1 were set up to investigate the effect of selected polyphenols, including curcumin, on the LPS-induced cytokine production (cytometric bead-based array, cell proliferation (WST-1 assay, cytosolic Glo1 and Glo2 enzymatic activity, apoptosis/necrosis (annexin V-FITC/propidium iodide staining; flow cytometric analysis as well as GSH and ATP content. Results of enzyme kinetics revealed that curcumin, compared to the polyphenols quercetin, myricetin, kaempferol, luteolin and rutin, elicited a stronger competitive inhibitory effect on Glo1 (K(i = 5.1+/-1.4 microM. Applying a whole blood assay, IC(50 values of pro-inflammatory cytokine release (TNF-alpha, IL-6, IL-8, IL-1beta were found to be positively correlated with the K(i-values of the aforementioned polyphenols. Moreover, whereas curcumin was found to hamper the growth of breast cancer (JIMT-1, MDA-MB-231, prostate cancer PC-3 and brain astrocytoma 1321N1 cells, no effect on growth or vitality of human primary hepatocytes was elucidated. Curcumin decreased D-lactate release by tumor cells, another clue for inhibition of intracellular Glo1. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The results described herein provide new insights into curcumin's biological activities as they indicate that inhibition of Glo1 by curcumin may result in non-tolerable levels of MGO and GSH, which, in turn, modulate various metabolic cellular pathways including depletion of cellular ATP and GSH content

  14. Curcumin: an orally bioavailable blocker of TNF and other pro-inflammatory biomarkers

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    Aggarwal, Bharat B; Gupta, Subash C; Sung, Bokyung

    2013-01-01

    TNFs are major mediators of inflammation and inflammation-related diseases, hence, the United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has approved the use of blockers of the cytokine, TNF-α, for the treatment of osteoarthritis, inflammatory bowel disease, psoriasis and ankylosis. These drugs include the chimeric TNF antibody (infliximab), humanized TNF-α antibody (Humira) and soluble TNF receptor-II (Enbrel) and are associated with a total cumulative market value of more than $20 billion a year. As well as being expensive ($15 000–20 000 per person per year), these drugs have to be injected and have enough adverse effects to be given a black label warning by the FDA. In the current report, we describe an alternative, curcumin (diferuloylmethane), a component of turmeric (Curcuma longa) that is very inexpensive, orally bioavailable and highly safe in humans, yet can block TNF-α action and production in in vitro models, in animal models and in humans. In addition, we provide evidence for curcumin's activities against all of the diseases for which TNF blockers are currently being used. Mechanisms by which curcumin inhibits the production and the cell signalling pathways activated by this cytokine are also discussed. With health-care costs and safety being major issues today, this golden spice may help provide the solution. Linked Articles This article is part of a themed section on Emerging Therapeutic Aspects in Oncology. To view the other articles in this section visit http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bph.2013.169.issue-8 PMID:23425071

  15. Curcumin attenuates oxidative stress induced NFκB mediated inflammation and endoplasmic reticulum dependent apoptosis of splenocytes in diabetes.

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    Rashid, Kahkashan; Chowdhury, Sayantani; Ghosh, Sumit; Sil, Parames C

    2017-11-01

    The present study was aimed to determine the curative role of curcumin against diabetes induced oxidative stress and its associated splenic complications. Diabetes was induced in the experimental rats via the intraperitoneal administration of a single dose of STZ (65mgkg -1 body weight). Increased blood glucose and intracellular ROS levels along with decreased body weight, the activity of cellular antioxidant enzymes and GSH/GSSG ratio were observed in the diabetic animals. Histological assessment showed white pulp depletion and damaged spleen anatomy in these animals. Oral administration of curcumin at a dose of 100mgkg -1 body weight daily for 8weeks, however, restored these alterations. Investigation of the mechanism of hyperglycemia induced oxidative stress mediated inflammation showed upregulation of inflammatory cytokines, chemokines, adhesion molecules and increased translocation of NFκB into the nucleus. Moreover, ER stress dependent cell death showed induction of eIF2α and CHOP mediated signalling pathways as well as increment in the expression of GRP78, Caspase-12, Calpain-1, phospho JNK, phospho p38 and phospho p53 in the diabetic group. Alteration of Bax/Bcl-2 ratio; disruption of mitochondrial membrane potential, release of cytochrome-C from mitochondria and upregulation of caspase 3 along with the formation of characteristic DNA ladder in the diabetic animals suggest the involvement of mitochondria dependent apoptotic pathway in the splenic cells. Treatment with curcumin could, however, protect cells from inflammatory damage and ER as well as mitochondrial apoptotic death by restoring the alterations of these parameters. Our results suggest that curcumin has the potential to act as an anti-diabetic, anti-oxidant, anti-inflammatory and anti-apoptotic therapeutic against diabetes mediated splenic damage. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Synthesis and Evaluation of the Anti-Oxidant Capacity of Curcumin Glucuronides, the Major Curcumin Metabolites

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    Ambar K. Choudhury

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Curcumin metabolites namely curcumin monoglucuronide and curcumin diglucuronide were synthesized using an alternative synthetic approach. The anti-oxidant potential of these curcumin glucuronides was compared with that of curcumin using DPPH scavenging method and Oxygen Radical Absorbance Capacity (ORAC assay. The results show that curcumin monoglucuronide exhibits 10 fold less anti-oxidant activity (DPPH method and the anti-oxidant capacity of curcumin diglucuronide is highly attenuated compared to the anti-oxidant activity of curcumin.

  17. Bisphenol-A Mediated Inhibition of Hippocampal Neurogenesis Attenuated by Curcumin via Canonical Wnt Pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiwari, Shashi Kant; Agarwal, Swati; Tripathi, Anurag; Chaturvedi, Rajnish Kumar

    2016-07-01

    Bisphenol A (BPA) is an environmental xenoestrogenic endocrine disruptor, utilized for production of consumer products, and exerts adverse effects on the developing nervous system. Recently, we found that BPA impairs the finely tuned dynamic processes of neurogenesis (generation of new neurons) in the hippocampus of the developing rat brain. Curcumin is a natural polyphenolic compound, which provides neuroprotection against various environmental neurotoxicants and in the cellular and animal models of neurodegenerative disorders. Here, we have assessed the neuroprotective efficacy of curcumin against BPA-mediated reduced neurogenesis and the underlying cellular and molecular mechanism(s). Both in vitro and in vivo studies showed that curcumin protects against BPA-induced hippocampal neurotoxicity. Curcumin protects against BPA-mediated reduced neural stem cells (NSC) proliferation and neuronal differentiation and enhanced neurodegeneration. Curcumin also enhances the expression/levels of neurogenic and the Wnt pathway genes/proteins, which were reduced due to BPA exposure in the hippocampus. Curcumin-mediated neuroprotection against BPA-induced neurotoxicity involved activation of the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway, which was confirmed by the use of Wnt specific activators (LiCl and GSK-3β siRNA) and inhibitor (Dkk-1). BPA-mediated increased β-catenin phosphorylation, decreased GSK-3β levels, and β-catenin nuclear translocation were significantly reversed by curcumin, leading to enhanced neurogenesis. Curcumin-induced protective effects on neurogenesis were blocked by Dkk-1 in NSC culture treated with BPA. Curcumin-mediated enhanced neurogenesis was correlated well with improved learning and memory in BPA-treated rats. Overall, our results conclude that curcumin provides neuroprotection against BPA-mediated impaired neurogenesis via activation of the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway.

  18. Curcumin protects against cytotoxic and inflammatory effects of quartz particles but causes oxidative DNA damage in a rat lung epithelial cell line

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Hui; Berlo, Damien van; Shi Tingming; Speit, Guenter; Knaapen, Ad M.; Borm, Paul J.A.; Albrecht, Catrin; Schins, Roel P.F.

    2008-01-01

    Chronic inhalation of high concentrations of respirable quartz particles has been implicated in various lung diseases including lung fibrosis and cancer. Generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and oxidative stress is considered a major mechanism of quartz toxicity. Curcumin, a yellow pigment from Curcuma longa, has been considered as nutraceutical because of its strong anti-inflammatory, antitumour and antioxidant properties. The aim of our present study was to investigate whether curcumin can protect lung epithelial cells from the cytotoxic, genotoxic and inflammatory effects associated with quartz (DQ12) exposure. Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) measurements using the spin-trap DMPO demonstrated that curcumin reduces hydrogen peroxide-dependent hydroxyl-radical formation by quartz. Curcumin was also found to reduce quartz-induced cytotoxicity and cyclooxygenase 2 (COX-2) mRNA expression in RLE-6TN rat lung epithelial cells (RLE). Curcumin also inhibited the release of macrophage inflammatory protein-2 (MIP-2) from RLE cells as observed upon treatment with interleukin-1 beta (IL-1β) and tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNFα). However, curcumin failed to protect the RLE cells from oxidative DNA damage induced by quartz, as shown by formamidopyrimidine glycosylase (FPG)-modified comet assay and by immunocytochemistry for 8-hydroxydeoxyguanosine. In contrast, curcumin was found to be a strong inducer of oxidative DNA damage itself at non-cytotoxic and anti-inflammatory concentrations. In line with this, curcumin also enhanced the mRNA expression of the oxidative stress response gene heme oxygenase-1 (ho-1). Curcumin also caused oxidative DNA damage in NR8383 rat alveolar macrophages and A549 human lung epithelial cells. Taken together, these observations indicate that one should be cautious in considering the potential use of curcumin in the prevention or treatment of lung diseases associated with quartz exposure

  19. Effect of inhaled hydrosoluble curcumin on inflammatory markers in broncho-alveolar lavage fluid of horses with LPS-induced lung neutrophilia

    OpenAIRE

    Sandersen, Charlotte; Bienzle, Dorothee; Cerri, Simona; Franck, Thierry; Derochette, Sandrine; Neven, Philippe; Mouytis-Mickalad, Ange; Serteyn, Didier

    2015-01-01

    Background Horses commonly suffer from chronic respiratory disease and are also used in large animal models of spontaneous or induced airway inflammation. The anti-inflammatory properties of curcumin are largely described but its low bioavailability precludes its clinical use. NDS27, a lysin salt of curcumin incorporated in beta-cyclodextrine, has high bioavailability and can be administered by inhalation. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of inhaled NDS27 on inflammatory c...

  20. Potential Therapeutic Effects of Curcumin, the Anti-inflammatory Agent, Against Neurodegenerative, Cardiovascular, Pulmonary, Metabolic, Autoimmune and Neoplastic Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aggarwal, Bharat B.; Harikumar, Kuzhuvelil B.

    2009-01-01

    Although safe in most cases, ancient treatments are ignored because neither their active component nor their molecular targets are well defined. This is not the case, however, with curcumin, a yellow-pigment substance and component of turmeric (Curcuma longa), which was identified more than a century ago. For centuries it has been known that turmeric exhibits anti-inflammatory activity, but extensive research performed within the past two decades has shown that the this activity of turmeric is due to curcumin, a diferuloylmethane. This agent has been shown to regulate numerous transcription factors, cytokines, protein kinases, adhesion molecules, redox status and enzymes that have been linked to inflammation. The process of inflammation has been shown to play a major role in most chronic illnesses, including neurodegenerative, cardiovascular, pulmonary, metabolic, autoimmune and neoplastic diseases. In the current review, we provide evidence for the potential role of curcumin in the prevention and treatment of various pro-inflammatory chronic diseases. These features, combined with the pharmacological safety and negligible cost, render curcumin an attractive agent to explore further. PMID:18662800

  1. Oral administration of curcumin emulsified in carboxymethyl cellulose has a potent anti-inflammatory effect in the IL-10 gene-deficient mouse model of IBD.

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    Ung, Victoria Y L; Foshaug, Rae R; MacFarlane, Sarah M; Churchill, Thomas A; Doyle, Jason S G; Sydora, Beate C; Fedorak, Richard N

    2010-05-01

    Curcumin is a tumeric-derived, water-insoluble polyphenol with potential beneficial health effects for humans. It has been shown to have preventive as well as therapeutic effects in chemically induced murine models of colitis. To investigate whether curcumin exerts a similar effect on the spontaneous colitis in interleukin (IL)-10 gene-deficient mice, we gavaged these mice daily for 2 weeks with 200 mg/kg per day curcumin emulsified in carboxymethyl cellulose, a food additive generally used as a viscosity modifier. Mice fed the curcumin/carboxymethyl cellulose mixture and those receiving carboxymethyl cellulose alone demonstrated similar reductions in histological injury score and colon weight/length ratio compared to water-fed controls. However, significant reductions in pro-inflammatory cytokine release in intestinal explant cultures were only seen in mice treated with the curcumin mixture. Our data demonstrate that in IL-10 gene-deficient mice, both oral curcumin and carboxymethyl cellulose, appear to have modifying effects on colitis. However, curcumin has additional anti-inflammatory effects mediated through a reduced production of potent pro-inflammatory mucosal cytokines.

  2. Curcumin-induced HDAC inhibition and attenuation of medulloblastoma growth in vitro and in vivo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Seung Joon; Krauthauser, Candice; Maduskuie, Victoria; Fawcett, Paul T; Olson, James M; Rajasekaran, Sigrid A

    2011-01-01

    Medulloblastoma is the most common brain tumor in children, and its prognosis is worse than for many other common pediatric cancers. Survivors undergoing treatment suffer from serious therapy-related side effects. Thus, it is imperative to identify safer, effective treatments for medulloblastoma. In this study we evaluated the anti-cancer potential of curcumin in medulloblastoma by testing its ability to induce apoptosis and inhibit tumor growth in vitro and in vivo using established medulloblastoma models. Using cultured medulloblastoma cells, tumor xenografts, and the Smo/Smo transgenic medulloblastoma mouse model, the antitumor effects of curcumin were tested in vitro and in vivo. Curcumin induced apoptosis and cell cycle arrest at the G2/M phase in medulloblastoma cells. These effects were accompanied by reduced histone deacetylase (HDAC) 4 expression and activity and increased tubulin acetylation, ultimately leading to mitotic catastrophe. In in vivo medulloblastoma xenografts, curcumin reduced tumor growth and significantly increased survival in the Smo/Smo transgenic medulloblastoma mouse model. The in vitro and in vivo data suggest that curcumin has the potential to be developed as a therapeutic agent for medulloblastoma

  3. Curcumin-induced HDAC inhibition and attenuation of medulloblastoma growth in vitro and in vivo

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    Olson James M

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Medulloblastoma is the most common brain tumor in children, and its prognosis is worse than for many other common pediatric cancers. Survivors undergoing treatment suffer from serious therapy-related side effects. Thus, it is imperative to identify safer, effective treatments for medulloblastoma. In this study we evaluated the anti-cancer potential of curcumin in medulloblastoma by testing its ability to induce apoptosis and inhibit tumor growth in vitro and in vivo using established medulloblastoma models. Methods Using cultured medulloblastoma cells, tumor xenografts, and the Smo/Smo transgenic medulloblastoma mouse model, the antitumor effects of curcumin were tested in vitro and in vivo. Results Curcumin induced apoptosis and cell cycle arrest at the G2/M phase in medulloblastoma cells. These effects were accompanied by reduced histone deacetylase (HDAC 4 expression and activity and increased tubulin acetylation, ultimately leading to mitotic catastrophe. In in vivo medulloblastoma xenografts, curcumin reduced tumor growth and significantly increased survival in the Smo/Smo transgenic medulloblastoma mouse model. Conclusions The in vitro and in vivo data suggest that curcumin has the potential to be developed as a therapeutic agent for medulloblastoma.

  4. Synthesis and Evaluation of the Anti-Oxidant Capacity of Curcumin Glucuronides, the Major Curcumin Metabolites

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    Choudhury, Ambar K.; Raja, Suganya; Mahapatra, Sanjata; Nagabhushanam, Kalyanam; Majeed, Muhammed

    2015-01-01

    Curcumin metabolites namely curcumin monoglucuronide and curcumin diglucuronide were synthesized using an alternative synthetic approach. The anti-oxidant potential of these curcumin glucuronides was compared with that of curcumin using DPPH scavenging method and Oxygen Radical Absorbance Capacity (ORAC) assay. The results show that curcumin monoglucuronide exhibits 10 fold less anti-oxidant activity (DPPH method) and the anti-oxidant capacity of curcumin diglucuronide is highly attenuated co...

  5. Curcumin arrests endometriosis by downregulation of matrix metalloproteinase-9 activity.

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    Swarnakar, Snehasikta; Paul, Sumit

    2009-02-01

    Curcumin, a polyphenol derived from turmeric (Curcuma longa) possesses diverse pharmacological properties including antioxidant, anti-inflammatory and antiproliferative activities. Endometriosis is a gyneocological disorder characterized by growth of endometrial tissues outside uterus that involves aberrant matrix remodeling. In this study the effect of curcumin was studied on surgically developed endometriosis in mice. Endometriosis with varying severity was developed in mice by peritoneal implantation of uterine fragments. The changes in matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-9 and tissue inhibitor of metalloprotease (TIMP)-1 were investigated in endometriotic tissues following curcumin pre- and posttreatment. Results showed that MMP-9 activity increased gradually in endometriotic tissues with severity and curcumin treatment reversed the MMP-9 activity near to control value. Curcumin administered either post- or pre-endometriosis arrested endometriosis in a dose-dependent manner. It inhibited both MMP-9 activity and its expression at the level of secretion, during regression of endometriotic lesion. In addition, the attenuated activity of MMP-9 was associated with decreased expression of tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) during healing, suggesting the anti-inflammatory property of curcumin. Moreover, curcumin pretreatment prevented lipid peroxidation and protein oxidation in endometriotic tissues. We reported here for the first time the anti-endometriotic property of curcumin via MMP-9 dependent pathway that may lead to new therapeutic intervention.

  6. Curcumin protects intestinal mucosal barrier function of rat enteritis via activation of MKP-1 and attenuation of p38 and NF-κB activation.

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    Wei-Bing Song

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Intestinal mucosa barrier (IMB dysfunction results in many notorious diseases for which there are currently few effective treatments. We studied curcumin's protective effect on IMB and examined its mechanism by using methotrexate (MTX induced rat enteritis model and lipopolysaccharide (LPS treated cell death model. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Curcumin was intragastrically administrated from the first day, models were made for 7 days. Cells were treated with curcumin for 30 min before exposure to LPS. Rat intestinal mucosa was collected for evaluation of pathological changes. We detected the activities of D-lactate and diamine oxidase (DAO according to previous research and measured the levels of myeloperoxidase (MPO and superoxide dismutase (SOD by colorimetric method. Intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1, tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α and interleukin 1β (IL-1β were determined by RT-PCR and IL-10 production was determined by ELISA. We found Curcumin decreased the levels of D-lactate, DAO, MPO, ICAM-1, IL-1β and TNF-α, but increased the levels of IL-10 and SOD in rat models. We further confirmed mitogen-activated protein kinase phosphatase-1 (MKP-1 was activated but phospho-p38 was inhibited by curcumin by western blot assay. Finally, NF-κB translocation was monitored by immunofluorescent staining. We showed that curcumin repressed I-κB and interfered with the translocation of NF-κB into nucleus. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The effect of curcumin is mediated by the MKP-1-dependent inactivation of p38 and inhibition of NF-κB-mediated transcription. Curcumin, with anti-inflammatory and anti-oxidant activities may be used as an effective reagent for protecting intestinal mucosa barrier and other related intestinal diseases.

  7. Curcumin protects against radiation-induced acute and chronic cutaneous toxicity in mice and decreases mRNA expression of inflammatory and fibrogenic cytokines

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    Okunieff, Paul; Xu Jianhua; Hu Dongping; Liu Weimin; Zhang Lurong; Morrow, Gary; Pentland, Alice; Ryan, Julie L.; Ding, Ivan M.D.

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: To determine whether curcumin ameliorates acute and chronic radiation skin toxicity and to examine the expression of inflammatory cytokines (interleukin [IL]-1, IL-6, IL-18, IL-1Ra, tumor necrosis factor [TNF]-α, and lymphotoxin-β) or fibrogenic cytokines (transforming growth factor [TGF]-β) during the same acute and chronic phases. Methods and Materials: Curcumin was given intragastrically or intraperitoneally to C3H/HeN mice either: 5 days before radiation; 5 days after radiation; or both 5 days before and 5 days after radiation. The cutaneous damage was assessed at 15-21 days (acute) and 90 days (chronic) after a single 50 Gy radiation dose was given to the hind leg. Skin and muscle tissues were collected for measurement of cytokine mRNA. Results: Curcumin, administered before or after radiation, markedly reduced acute and chronic skin toxicity in mice (p < 0.05). Additionally, curcumin significantly decreased mRNA expression of early responding cytokines (IL-1 IL-6, IL-18, TNF-α, and lymphotoxin-β) and the fibrogenic cytokine, TGF-β, in cutaneous tissues at 21 days postradiation. Conclusion: Curcumin has a protective effect on radiation-induced cutaneous damage in mice, which is characterized by a downregulation of both inflammatory and fibrogenic cytokines in irradiated skin and muscle, particularly in the early phase after radiation. These results may provide the molecular basis for the application of curcumin in clinical radiation therapy

  8. Curcumin attenuates Cr(VI)-induced ascites and changes in the activity of aconitase and F(1)F(0) ATPase and the ATP content in rat liver mitochondria.

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    García-Niño, Wylly Ramsés; Zazueta, Cecilia; Tapia, Edilia; Pedraza-Chaverri, José

    2014-11-01

    Occupational and environmental exposure to potassium dichromate (K2Cr2O7), a hexavalent chromium compound, can result in liver damage associated with oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunction. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of the antioxidant curcumin (400 mg/kg b.w.) on the K2Cr2O7-induced injury, with special emphasis on ascitic fluid accumulation and oxidative phosphorylation mitochondrial enzymes and the adenosine triphosphate (ATP) levels in isolated mitochondria from livers of rats treated with K2Cr2O7 (15 mg/kg b.w.). Thus, curcumin attenuated the ascites generation, prevented the decrease in the activities of aconitase and F1F0 ATPase, and maintained the ATP levels. The activity of complex II was not completely reestablished by curcumin, whereas complexes III and IV activities were unchanged. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Curcumin modulates leukocyte and platelet adhesion in murine sepsis.

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    Vachharajani, Vidula; Wang, Si-Wei; Mishra, Nilamadhab; El Gazzar, Mohamed; Yoza, Barbara; McCall, Charles

    2010-08-01

    Circulating cell-endothelial cell interaction in sepsis is a rate-determining factor in organ dysfunction, and interventions targeting this process have a potential therapeutic value. In this project, we examined whether curcumin, an active ingredient of turmeric and an anti-inflammatory agent, could disrupt interactions between circulating blood cells and endothelium and improve survival in a murine model of sepsis. Mice were subjected to cecal ligation and puncture (CLP) to induce sepsis vs. sham surgery. We studied leukocyte and platelet adhesion in cerebral microcirculation using intravital fluorescent video microscopy technique, blood-brain barrier (BBB) dysfunction using Evans Blue (EB) leakage method, P-selectin expression using dual radiolabeling technique, and survival in mice subjected to Sham, CLP, and CLP with curcumin pre-treatment (CLP + curcumin). Curcumin significantly attenuated leukocyte and platelet adhesion in cerebral microcirculation, EB leakage in the brain tissue, and improved survival in mice with CLP. P-selectin expression in mice with CLP + curcumin was significantly attenuated compared with CLP in various microcirculatory beds, including brain. Reduction in platelet adhesion was predominantly via modulation of endothelium by curcumin. Curcumin pre-treatment modulates leukocyte and platelet adhesion and BBB dysfunction in mice with CLP via P-selectin expression and improves survival in mice with CLP.

  10. Curcumin attenuates TNF-α-induced expression of intercellular adhesion molecule-1, vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 and proinflammatory cytokines in human endometriotic stromal cells.

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    Kim, Ki-Hyung; Lee, Eun Na; Park, Jin Kyeong; Lee, Ja-Rang; Kim, Ji-Hyun; Choi, Hak-Jong; Kim, Bong-Seon; Lee, Hee-Woo; Lee, Kyu-Sup; Yoon, Sik

    2012-07-01

    Curcumin, a naturally occurring polyphenolic compound from Curcuma longa, has long been used in folk medicine as an antiinflammatory remedy in Asian countries. Endometriosis is a chronic gynecological inflammatory disorder in which immune system deregulation may play a role in its initiation and progression. A number of mediators, including cell adhesion molecules such as intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) and vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1); proinflammatory cytokines such as tumour necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), interleukin-1 (IL-1), IL-6 and IL-8; and chemokines such as monocyte chemotactic protein-1 (MCP-1), play key roles in the pathogenesis of endometriosis. The aim of our study was to explore the effect of curcumin on the expression of these critical molecules in human ectopic endometriotic stromal cells isolated from women with endometriosis. Endometriotic stromal cells treated with curcumin showed marked suppression of TNF-α-induced mRNA expression of ICAM-1 and VCAM-1. Curcumin treatment also significantly decreased the TNF-α-induced cell surface and total protein expression of ICAM-1 and VCAM-1 in a dose-dependent manner. In addition, treatment of endometriotic stromal cells with curcumin markedly inhibited TNF-α-induced secretion of IL-6, IL-8 and MCP-1. Furthermore, curcumin inhibited the activation of transcription factor NF-κB, a key regulator of inflammation, in human endometriotic stromal cells. These findings suggest that curcumin may have potential therapeutic uses in the prevention and treatment of endometriosis. Copyright © 2011 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  11. Nanoparticle curcumin ameliorates experimental colitis via modulation of gut microbiota and induction of regulatory T cells.

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    Masashi Ohno

    Full Text Available Curcumin is a hydrophobic polyphenol derived from turmeric, a traditional Indian spice. Curcumin exhibits various biological functions, but its clinical application is limited due to its poor absorbability after oral administration. A newly developed nanoparticle curcumin shows improved absorbability in vivo. In this study, we examined the effects of nanoparticle curcumin (named Theracurmin on experimental colitis in mice.BALB/c mice were fed with 3% dextran sulfate sodium (DSS in water. Mucosal cytokine expression and lymphocyte subpopulation were analyzed by real-time PCR and flow cytometry, respectively. The profile of the gut microbiota was analyzed by real-time PCR.Treatment with nanoparticle curcumin significantly attenuated body weight loss, disease activity index, histological colitis score and significantly improved mucosal permeability. Immunoblot analysis showed that NF-κB activation in colonic epithelial cells was significantly suppressed by treatment with nanoparticle curcumin. Mucosal mRNA expression of inflammatory mediators was significantly suppressed by treatment with nanoparticle curcumin. Treatment with nanoparticle curcumin increased the abundance of butyrate-producing bacteria and fecal butyrate level. This was accompanied by increased expansion of CD4+ Foxp3+ regulatory T cells and CD103+ CD8α- regulatory dendritic cells in the colonic mucosa.Treatment with nanoparticle curcumin suppressed the development of DSS-induced colitis potentially via modulation of gut microbial structure. These responses were associated with induction of mucosal immune cells with regulatory properties. Nanoparticle curcumin is one of the promising candidates as a therapeutic option for the treatment of IBD.

  12. A combined omics approach to evaluate the effects of dietary curcumin on colon inflammation in the Mdr1a(-/-) mouse model of inflammatory bowel disease.

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    Cooney, Janine M; Barnett, Matthew P G; Dommels, Yvonne E M; Brewster, Diane; Butts, Christine A; McNabb, Warren C; Laing, William A; Roy, Nicole C

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to provide insight into how curcumin reduces colon inflammation in the Mdr1a(-/-) mouse model of human inflammatory bowel disease using a combined transcriptomics and proteomics approach. Mdr1a(-/-) and FVB control mice were randomly assigned to an AIN-76A (control) diet or AIN-76A+0.2% curcumin. At 21 or 24weeks of age, colonic histological injury score (HIS) was determined, colon mRNA transcript levels were assessed using microarrays and colon protein expression was measured using 2D gel electrophoresis and LCMS protein identification. Colonic HIS of Mdr1a(-/-) mice fed the AIN-76A diet was higher (P<.001) than FVB mice fed the same diet; the curcumin-supplemented diet reduced colonic HIS (P<.05) in Mdr1a(-/-) mice. Microarray and proteomics analyses combined with new data analysis tools, such as the Ingenuity Pathways Analysis regulator effects analysis, showed that curcumin's antiinflammatory activity in Mdr1a(-/-) mouse colon may be mediated by activation of α-catenin, which has not previously been reported. We also show evidence to support curcumin's action via multiple molecular pathways including reduced immune response, increased xenobiotic metabolism, resolution of inflammation through decreased neutrophil migration and increased barrier remodeling. Key transcription factors and other regulatory molecules (ERK, FN1, TNFSF12 and PI3K complex) activated in inflammation were down-regulated by dietary intervention with curcumin. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Attenuation of myocardial fibrosis with curcumin is mediated by modulating expression of angiotensin II AT1/AT2 receptors and ACE2 in rats

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    Pang XF

    2015-11-01

    inhibited, and tissue fibrosis was attenuated, as demonstrated by less extensive collagen-rich fibrosis. Furthermore, curcumin increased protein level of ACE2 and enhanced its expression in the intermyocardium relative to the Ang II group. These results suggest that curcumin could be considered as an add-on therapeutic agent in the treatment of fibrosis-derived heart failure patient who is intolerant of ACE inhibitor therapy. Keywords: angiotensin II receptors, angiotensin-converting enzyme 2, curcumin, collagen, myocardial fibrosis

  14. [Neuroprotective effects of curcumin].

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    Li, Yong; Wang, Pengwen

    2009-12-01

    Traditionally, turmeric has been put to use as a food additive and herbal medicine in Asia. Curcumin is an active principle of the perennial herb curcuma longa (commonly known as turmeric). Recent evidence suggests that curcumin has activities with potential for neuroprotective efficacy, including anti-inflammatory, antioxidant, and antiprotein-aggregate activities. In the current review, we provide the newly evidence for the potential role of curcumin in the neuroprotective effects of neurodegenerative diseases like Alzheimer's disease (AD).

  15. Astrocyte production of the chemokine macrophage inflammatory protein-2 is inhibited by the spice principle curcumin at the level of gene transcription

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    Santoro Thomas J

    2005-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In neuropathological processes associated with neutrophilic infiltrates, such as experimental allergic encephalitis and traumatic injury of the brain, the CXC chemokine, macrophage inflammatory protein-2 (MIP-2 is thought to play a pivotal role in the induction and perpetuation of inflammation in the central nervous system (CNS. The origin of MIP-2 in inflammatory disorders of the brain has not been fully defined but astrocytes appear to be a dominant source of this chemokine. Curcumin is a spice principle in, and constitutes approximately 4 percent of, turmeric. Curcumin's immunomodulating and antioxidant activities suggest that it might be a useful adjunct in the treatment of neurodegenerative illnesses characterized by inflammation. Relatively unexplored, but relevant to its potential therapeutic efficacy in neuroinflammatory syndromes is the effect of curcumin on chemokine production. To examine the possibility that curcumin may influence CNS inflammation by mechanisms distinct from its known anti-oxidant activities, we studied the effect of this spice principle on the synthesis of MIP-2 by astrocytes. Methods Primary astrocytes were prepared from neonatal brains of CBA/CaJ mice. The cells were stimulated with lipopolysaccharide in the presence or absence of various amount of curcumin or epigallocatechin gallate. MIP-2 mRNA was analyzed using semi-quantitative PCR and MIP-2 protein production in the culture supernatants was quantified by ELISA. Astrocytes were transfected with a MIP-2 promoter construct, pGL3-MIP-2, and stimulated with lipopolysaccharide in the presence or absence of curcumin. Results The induction of MIP-2 gene expression and the production of MIP-2 protein were inhibited by curcumin. Curcumin also inhibited lipopolysaccharide-induced transcription of the MIP-2 promoter reporter gene construct in primary astrocytes. However MIP-2 gene induction by lipopolysaccharide was not inhibited by another anti

  16. Astrocyte production of the chemokine macrophage inflammatory protein-2 is inhibited by the spice principle curcumin at the level of gene transcription.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomita, Michiyo; Holman, Brita J; Santoro, Christopher P; Santoro, Thomas J

    2005-02-25

    BACKGROUND: In neuropathological processes associated with neutrophilic infiltrates, such as experimental allergic encephalitis and traumatic injury of the brain, the CXC chemokine, macrophage inflammatory protein-2 (MIP-2) is thought to play a pivotal role in the induction and perpetuation of inflammation in the central nervous system (CNS). The origin of MIP-2 in inflammatory disorders of the brain has not been fully defined but astrocytes appear to be a dominant source of this chemokine.Curcumin is a spice principle in, and constitutes approximately 4 percent of, turmeric. Curcumin's immunomodulating and antioxidant activities suggest that it might be a useful adjunct in the treatment of neurodegenerative illnesses characterized by inflammation. Relatively unexplored, but relevant to its potential therapeutic efficacy in neuroinflammatory syndromes is the effect of curcumin on chemokine production. To examine the possibility that curcumin may influence CNS inflammation by mechanisms distinct from its known anti-oxidant activities, we studied the effect of this spice principle on the synthesis of MIP-2 by astrocytes. METHODS: Primary astrocytes were prepared from neonatal brains of CBA/CaJ mice. The cells were stimulated with lipopolysaccharide in the presence or absence of various amount of curcumin or epigallocatechin gallate. MIP-2 mRNA was analyzed using semi-quantitative PCR and MIP-2 protein production in the culture supernatants was quantified by ELISA. Astrocytes were transfected with a MIP-2 promoter construct, pGL3-MIP-2, and stimulated with lipopolysaccharide in the presence or absence of curcumin. RESULTS: The induction of MIP-2 gene expression and the production of MIP-2 protein were inhibited by curcumin. Curcumin also inhibited lipopolysaccharide-induced transcription of the MIP-2 promoter reporter gene construct in primary astrocytes. However MIP-2 gene induction by lipopolysaccharide was not inhibited by another anti-oxidant, epigallocatechin

  17. Pilose antler peptide attenuates LPS-induced inflammatory reaction.

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    Dong, Yu; Liu, Li; Shan, Xin; Tang, Juanjuan; Xia, Baomei; Cheng, Xiaolan; Chen, Yanyan; Tao, Weiwei

    2018-03-01

    The present study was designed to study the effects of pilose antler peptide (PAP) on primary culture of nucleus pulposus cells in intervertebral disc. We demonstrated that PAP significantly inhibited lipopolysaccharides (LPS) induced over-production of inflammatory factors including interleukin-1β (IL-1β), tumor necrosis Factor-α (TNF-α) and interleukin-6 (IL-6) in nucleus pulposus cells. PAP also attenuated increase of malondialdehyde (MDA) and decrease of superoxide dismutase (SOD) induced by LPS challenge in a concentration-dependent manner. Moreover, the expression of the protein levels of mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK)/nuclear transcription factor-κB(NF-κB) were increased accompanying with the LPS challenge, which were significantly reversed after PAP treatment. Our results demonstrated the ability of PAP to antagonize LPS-mediated inflammation in primary culture of nucleus pulposus in intervertebral disc, suggesting a beneficial potential for its clinical application. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Preventive action of curcumin in experimental acute pancreatitis in mouse.

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    Yu, Wen-Guang; Xu, Gang; Ren, Gui-Jie; Xu, Xia; Yuan, Hui-Qing; Qi, Xiao-Li; Tian, Ke-Li

    2011-11-01

    Curcuma longa (turmeric) has a long history of use in Ayurvedic medicine as a treatment for inflammatory conditions. The purpose of the present study was to investigate the preventive effects of curcumin against acute pancreatitis (AP) induced by caerulein in mouse and to elucidate possible mechanism of curcumin action. Curcumin (50 mg/kg/day) was intraperitoneally injected to Kun Ming male mice for 6 days, followed by injection of caerulein to induce AP. GW9662 (0.3 mg/kg), a specific peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARγ) antagonist, was intravenously injected along with curcumin. Murine macrophage RAW264.7 cells were treated with 100 μmol/l curcumin for 2 h, and then stimulated with 0.1 μ g/ml lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Serum amylase and transaminase levels were measured at 10 h after AP. TNF-α level in mouse serum and cell culture medium were detected by ELISA. Expression of PPARγ and NF-κB were analyzed by RT-PCR and Western blot. Curcumin significantly decreased the pancreas injury and reversed the elevation of serum amylase, ALT and AST activities and TNF-α level in mice with AP. Curcumin treatment inhibited the elevation of NF-κB-p65 in the nucleus of mouse pancreas AP group and RAW264.7 cells, but significantly increased the expression of PPARγ. GW9662 could abolish the effects of curcumin on serum levels of amylase, ALT, AST, TNF-α, and NF-κB level. Our results suggest that curcumin could attenuate pancreas tissue and other organ injury by inhibiting the release of inflammatory cytokine TNF-α. These effects may involve upregulation of PPARγ and subsequent downregulation of NF-κB.

  19. Immune response modulation by curcumin in a latex allergy model

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    Raju Raghavan

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There has been a worldwide increase in allergy and asthma over the last few decades, particularly in industrially developed nations. This resulted in a renewed interest to understand the pathogenesis of allergy in recent years. The progress made in the pathogenesis of allergic disease has led to the exploration of novel alternative therapies, which include herbal medicines as well. Curcumin, present in turmeric, a frequently used spice in Asia has been shown to have anti-allergic and inflammatory potential. Methods We used a murine model of latex allergy to investigate the role of curcumin as an immunomodulator. BALB/c mice were exposed to latex allergens and developed latex allergy with a Th2 type of immune response. These animals were treated with curcumin and the immunological and inflammatory responses were evaluated. Results Animals exposed to latex showed enhanced serum IgE, latex specific IgG1, IL-4, IL-5, IL-13, eosinophils and inflammation in the lungs. Intragastric treatment of latex-sensitized mice with curcumin demonstrated a diminished Th2 response with a concurrent reduction in lung inflammation. Eosinophilia in curcumin-treated mice was markedly reduced, co-stimulatory molecule expression (CD80, CD86, and OX40L on antigen-presenting cells was decreased, and expression of MMP-9, OAT, and TSLP genes was also attenuated. Conclusion These results suggest that curcumin has potential therapeutic value for controlling allergic responses resulting from exposure to allergens.

  20. Multifunctional Curcumin Mediate Multitherapeutic Effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shehzad, Adeeb; Qureshi, Munibah; Anwar, Muhammad Nabeel; Lee, Young Sup

    2017-09-01

    Inflammation can promote the development of arthritis, obesity, cardiovascular, type II diabetes, pancreatitis, metabolic and neurodegenerative diseases, and certain types of cancer. Compounds isolated from plants have been practiced since ancient times for curing various ailments including inflammatory disorders and to support normal physiological functions. Curcumin (diferuloylmethane) is a yellow coloring agent, extracted from turmeric that has been used for the prevention and treatment of various inflammatory diseases. Numerous studies have shown that curcumin modulate multiple molecular targets and can be translated to the clinics for multiple therapeutic processes. There is compelling evidence that curcumin can block cell proliferation, invasion, and angiogenesis as well as reduced the prolonged survival of cancer cells. Curcumin mediates anti-inflammatory effect through downregulation of inflammatory cytokines, transcription factors, protein kinases, and enzymes that promote inflammation and development of chronic diseases. In addition, curcumin induces apoptosis through mitochondrial and receptor-mediated pathways by activating caspase cascades. Curcumin is a safe and nontoxic drug that has been reported to be well tolerated. Available clinical trials support the potential role of curcumin for treatment of various inflammatory disorders. However, curcumin's efficacy is hindered by poor absorption and low bioavailability, which limit its translation into clinics. This review outlines the potential pharmacological and clinical role of curcumin, which provide a gateway for the beneficial role of plant isolated compounds in treatment of various inflammatory diseases and cancer. © 2017 Institute of Food Technologists®.

  1. Renoprotective effect of the antioxidant curcumin: Recent findings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joyce Trujillo

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available For years, there have been studies based on the use of natural compounds plant-derived as potential therapeutic agents for various diseases in humans. Curcumin is a phenolic compound extracted from Curcuma longa rhizome commonly used in Asia as a spice, pigment and additive. In traditional medicine of India and China, curcumin is considered as a therapeutic agent used in several foods. Numerous studies have shown that curcumin has broad biological functions particularly antioxidant and antiinflammatory. In fact, it has been established that curcumin is a bifunctional antioxidant; it exerts antioxidant activity in a direct and an indirect way by scavenging reactive oxygen species and inducing an antioxidant response, respectively. The renoprotective effect of curcumin has been evaluated in several experimental models including diabetic nephropathy, chronic renal failure, ischemia and reperfusion and nephrotoxicity induced by compounds such as gentamicin, adriamycin, chloroquine, iron nitrilotriacetate, sodium fluoride, hexavalent chromium and cisplatin. It has been shown recently in a model of chronic renal failure that curcumin exerts a therapeutic effect; in fact it reverts not only systemic alterations but also glomerular hemodynamic changes. Another recent finding shows that the renoprotective effect of curcumin is associated to preservation of function and redox balance of mitochondria. Taking together, these studies attribute the protective effect of curcumin in the kidney to the induction of the master regulator of antioxidant response nuclear factor erythroid-derived 2 (Nrf2, inhibition of mitochondrial dysfunction, attenuation of inflammatory response, preservation of antioxidant enzymes and prevention of oxidative stress. The information presented in this paper identifies curcumin as a promising renoprotective molecule against renal injury.

  2. Effect on Pro-inflammatory and Antioxidant Genes and Bioavailable Distribution of Whole Turmeric vs Curcumin: Similar Root but Different Effects

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    Martin, Robert CG; Aiyer, Harini S; Malik, Daniel; Li, Yan

    2011-01-01

    Curcuma longa is a perennial member of the Zingiberaceae family, and cultivated mainly in India, and Southeast Asia. The hypothesis for this study is that turmeric will have distinctive effects from curcumin due to the presence of other bioactive compounds. Thirty Eight-week old Sprague-Dawley rats were separated into 3 oral feeding groups. Group 1, standard rat chow, Control diet - AIN 93M, group 2 Curcumin- 700 ppm or 0.7 g/kg diet, and group 3 - Turmeric -14,000 ppm or 14 g/kg diet for a total of 3 weeks. One group of rats were feed all three diets only and another group underwent esophagoduodenal anastomosis to evaluate the effects of bioavailability. Curcumin diet did not increase the transcription of mRNA of TNF-alpha, IL-6, iNOS and COX-2. The average fold change in the mRNAs level was not significant. Whereas turmeric diet increases the levels of IL-6 (1.9 fold, p=0.05) iNOS (4.39 fold, p=0.02), IL-8 (3.11 fold, p=0.04) and COX-2 (2.02 fold, p=0.05), suggesting that turmeric either was more bioavailabile or had more affect on pro-inflammatory genes compare to curcumin diet. We have demonstrated the molecular effects of curcumin and turmeric in the role as an anti-inflammatory therapy. However, significant bioavailable differences do occur and must be considered in further chemopreventative investigative trials the setting of reflux esophagitis, Barrett’s esophagus, and other upper gastrointestinal cancers. PMID:22079310

  3. Curcumin ameliorates skeletal muscle atrophy in type 1 diabetic mice by inhibiting protein ubiquitination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ono, Taisuke; Takada, Shingo; Kinugawa, Shintaro; Tsutsui, Hiroyuki

    2015-09-01

    What is the central question of this study? We sought to examine whether curcumin could ameliorate skeletal muscle atrophy in diabetic mice by inhibiting protein ubiquitination, inflammatory cytokines and oxidative stress. What is the main finding and its importance? We found that curcumin ameliorated skeletal muscle atrophy in streptozotocin-induced diabetic mice by inhibiting protein ubiquitination without affecting protein synthesis. This favourable effect of curcumin was possibly due to the inhibition of inflammatory cytokines and oxidative stress. Curcumin may be beneficial for the treatment of muscle atrophy in type 1 diabetes mellitus. Skeletal muscle atrophy develops in patients with diabetes mellitus (DM), especially in type 1 DM, which is associated with chronic inflammation. Curcumin, the active ingredient of turmeric, has various biological actions, including anti-inflammatory and antioxidant properties. We hypothesized that curcumin could ameliorate skeletal muscle atrophy in mice with streptozotocin-induced type 1 DM. C57BL/6 J mice were injected with streptozotocin (200 mg kg(-1) i.p.; DM group) or vehicle (control group). Each group of mice was randomly subdivided into two groups of 10 mice each and fed a diet with or without curcumin (1500 mg kg(-1) day(-1)) for 2 weeks. There were significant decreases in body weight, skeletal muscle weight and cellular cross-sectional area of the skeletal muscle in DM mice compared with control mice, and these changes were significantly attenuated in DM+Curcumin mice without affecting plasma glucose and insulin concentrations. Ubiquitination of protein was increased in skeletal muscle from DM mice and decreased in DM+Curcumin mice. Gene expressions of muscle-specific ubiquitin E3 ligase atrogin-1/MAFbx and MuRF1 were increased in DM and inhibited in DM+Curcumin mice. Moreover, nuclear factor-κB activation, concentrations of the inflammatory cytokines tumour necrosis factor-α and interleukin-1β and oxidative

  4. Thermal stability, antioxidant, and anti-inflammatory activity of curcumin and its degradation product 4-vinyl guaiacol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esatbeyoglu, Tuba; Ulbrich, Katrin; Rehberg, Clemens; Rohn, Sascha; Rimbach, Gerald

    2015-03-01

    Curcumin is a secondary plant metabolite present in Curcuma longa L. Since curcumin is widely used as a food colorant in thermally processed food it may undergo substantial chemical changes which in turn could affect its biological activity. In the current study, curcumin was roasted at 180 °C up to 70 minutes and its kinetic of degradation was analyzed by means of HPLC-PDA and LC-MS, respectively. Roasting of curcumin resulted in the formation of the degradation products vanillin, ferulic acid, and 4-vinyl guaiacol. In cultured hepatocytes roasted curcumin as well as 4-vinyl guaiacol enhanced the transactivation of the redox-regulated transcription factor Nrf2, known to be centrally involved in cellular stress response and antioxidant defense mechanisms. The antioxidant enzyme paraoxonase 1 was induced by roasted curcumin and 4-vinyl guaiacol. Furthermore, roasted curcumin and 4-vinyl guaiacol decreased interleukin-6 gene expression in lipopolysaccharide stimulated murine macrophages. Current data suggest that curcumin undergoes degradation due to roasting and its degradation product exhibit significant biological activity in cultured cells.

  5. Salicornia bigelovii Torr Attenuates Neuro-Inflammatory Responses ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    BV- microglial cells were stimulated with LPS to study the protein expression and production of inflammatory mediators, determined by Western blot analysis. Results: SBE significantly inhibited the DPPH-generated free radicals showing maximum inhibition at 40 μg/mL (p < 0.001). SBE alone did not exhibit any signs of ...

  6. Cortistatin attenuates inflammatory pain via spinal and peripheral actions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morell, María; Camprubí-Robles, María; Culler, Michael D; de Lecea, Luis; Delgado, Mario

    2014-03-01

    Clinical pain, as a consequence of inflammation or injury of peripheral organs (inflammatory pain) or nerve injury (neuropathic pain), represents a serious public health issue. Treatment of pain-related suffering requires knowledge of how pain signals are initially interpreted and subsequently transmitted and perpetuated. To limit duration and intensity of pain, inhibitory signals participate in pain perception. Cortistatin is a cyclic-neuropeptide that exerts potent inhibitory actions on cortical neurons and immune cells. Here, we found that cortistatin is a natural analgesic component of the peripheral nociceptive system produced by peptidergic nociceptive neurons of the dorsal root ganglia in response to inflammatory and noxious stimuli. Moreover, cortistatin is produced by GABAergic interneurons of deep layers of dorsal horn of spinal cord. By using cortistatin-deficient mice, we demonstrated that endogenous cortistatin critically tunes pain perception in physiological and pathological states. Furthermore, peripheral and spinal injection of cortistatin potently reduced nocifensive behavior, heat hyperalgesia and tactile allodynia in experimental models of clinical pain evoked by chronic inflammation, surgery and arthritis. The analgesic effects of cortistatin were independent of its anti-inflammatory activity and directly exerted on peripheral and central nociceptive terminals via Gαi-coupled somatostatin-receptors (mainly sstr2) and blocking intracellular signaling that drives neuronal plasticity including protein kinase A-, calcium- and Akt/ERK-mediated release of nociceptive peptides. Moreover, cortistatin could modulate, through its binding to ghrelin-receptor (GHSR1), pain-induced sensitization of secondary neurons in spinal cord. Therefore, cortistatin emerges as an anti-inflammatory factor with potent analgesic effects that offers a new approach to clinical pain therapy, especially in inflammatory states. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights

  7. Curcumin attenuates cardiomyocyte hypertrophy induced by high glucose and insulin via the PPARγ/Akt/NO signaling pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Rongchun; Peng, Xiaofeng; Du, Weimin; Wu, Yang; Huang, Bo; Xue, Lai; Wu, Qin; Qiu, Hongmei; Jiang, Qingsong

    2015-05-01

    To investigate the potential effect of curcumin on cardiomyocyte hypertrophy and a possible mechanism involving the PPARγ/Akt/NO signaling pathway in diabetes. The cardiomyocyte hypertrophy induced by high glucose (25.5mmol/L) and insulin (0.1μmol/L) (HGI) and the antihypertrophic effect of curcumin were evaluated in primary culture by measuring the cell surface area, protein content and atrial natriuretic factor (ANF) mRNA expression. The mRNA and protein expressions were assayed by reverse transcription PCR and Western blotting, whereas the NO concentration and endothelial NO synthase (eNOS) activity were determined using nitrate reduction and ELISA methods, respectively. The cardiomyocyte hypertrophy induced by HGI was characterized by increasing ANF mRNA expression, total protein content, and cell surface area, with downregulated mRNA and protein expressions of both PPARγ and Akt, which paralleled the declining eNOS mRNA expression, eNOS content, and NO concentration. The effects of HGI were inhibited by curcumin (1, 3, 10μmol/L) in a concentration-dependent manner. GW9662 (10μmol/L), a selective PPARγ antagonist, could abolish the effects of curcumin. LY294002 (20μmol/L), an Akt blocker, and N(G)-nitro-l-arginine-methyl ester (100μmol/L), a NOS inhibitor, could also diminish the effects of curcumin. The results suggested that curcumin supplementation can improve HGI-induced cardiomyocytes hypertrophy in vitro through the activation of PPARγ/Akt/NO signaling pathway. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Curcumin Attenuates β-catenin Signaling in Prostate Cancer Cells through Activation of Protein Kinase D1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sundram, Vasudha; Chauhan, Subhash C.; Ebeling, Mara; Jaggi, Meena

    2012-01-01

    Prostate cancer is the most commonly diagnosed cancer affecting 1 in 6 males in the US. Understanding the molecular basis of prostate cancer progression can serve as a tool for early diagnosis and development of novel treatment strategies for this disease. Protein Kinase D1 (PKD1) is a multifunctional kinase that is highly expressed in normal prostate. The decreased expression of PKD1 has been associated with the progression of prostate cancer. Therefore, synthetic or natural products that regulate this signaling pathway can serve as novel therapeutic modalities for prostate cancer prevention and treatment. Curcumin, the active ingredient of turmeric, has shown anti-cancer properties via modulation of a number of different molecular pathways. Herein, we have demonstrated that curcumin activates PKD1, resulting in changes in β-catenin signaling by inhibiting nuclear β-catenin transcription activity and enhancing the levels of membrane β-catenin in prostate cancer cells. Modulation of these cellular events by curcumin correlated with decreased cell proliferation, colony formation and cell motility and enhanced cell-cell aggregation in prostate cancer cells. In addition, we have also revealed that inhibition of cell motility by curcumin is mediated by decreasing the levels of active cofilin, a downstream target of PKD1. The potent anti-cancer effects of curcumin in vitro were also reflected in a prostate cancer xenograft mouse model. The in vivo inhibition of tumor growth also correlated with enhanced membrane localization of β-catenin. Overall, our findings herein have revealed a novel molecular mechanism of curcumin action via the activation of PKD1 in prostate cancer cells. PMID:22523587

  9. Curcumin attenuates β-catenin signaling in prostate cancer cells through activation of protein kinase D1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vasudha Sundram

    Full Text Available Prostate cancer is the most commonly diagnosed cancer affecting 1 in 6 males in the US. Understanding the molecular basis of prostate cancer progression can serve as a tool for early diagnosis and development of novel treatment strategies for this disease. Protein Kinase D1 (PKD1 is a multifunctional kinase that is highly expressed in normal prostate. The decreased expression of PKD1 has been associated with the progression of prostate cancer. Therefore, synthetic or natural products that regulate this signaling pathway can serve as novel therapeutic modalities for prostate cancer prevention and treatment. Curcumin, the active ingredient of turmeric, has shown anti-cancer properties via modulation of a number of different molecular pathways. Herein, we have demonstrated that curcumin activates PKD1, resulting in changes in β-catenin signaling by inhibiting nuclear β-catenin transcription activity and enhancing the levels of membrane β-catenin in prostate cancer cells. Modulation of these cellular events by curcumin correlated with decreased cell proliferation, colony formation and cell motility and enhanced cell-cell aggregation in prostate cancer cells. In addition, we have also revealed that inhibition of cell motility by curcumin is mediated by decreasing the levels of active cofilin, a downstream target of PKD1. The potent anti-cancer effects of curcumin in vitro were also reflected in a prostate cancer xenograft mouse model. The in vivo inhibition of tumor growth also correlated with enhanced membrane localization of β-catenin. Overall, our findings herein have revealed a novel molecular mechanism of curcumin action via the activation of PKD1 in prostate cancer cells.

  10. Koumine Attenuates Neuroglia Activation and Inflammatory Response to Neuropathic Pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gui-Lin Jin

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Despite decades of studies, the currently available drugs largely fail to control neuropathic pain. Koumine—an alkaloidal constituent derived from the medicinal plant Gelsemium elegans Benth.—has been shown to possess analgesic and anti-inflammatory properties; however, the underlying mechanisms remain unclear. In this study, we aimed to investigate the analgesic and anti-inflammatory effects and the possible underlying mechanisms of koumine. The analgesic and anti-inflammatory effects of koumine were explored by using chronic constriction injury of the sciatic nerve (CCI neuropathic pain model in vivo and LPS-induced injury in microglia BV2 cells in vitro. Immunofluorescence staining and Western blot analysis were used to assess the modulator effect of koumine on microglia and astrocyte activation after CCI surgery. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA was used to evaluate the levels of proinflammatory cytokines. Western blot analysis and quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR were used to examine the modulator effect of koumine on microglial M1 polarization. We found that single or repeated treatment of koumine can significantly reduce neuropathic pain after nerve injury. Moreover, koumine showed inhibitory effects on CCI-evoked microglia and astrocyte activation and reduced proinflammatory cytokine production in the spinal cord in rat CCI models. In BV2 cells, koumine significantly inhibited microglia M1 polarization. Furthermore, the analgesic effect of koumine was inhibited by a TSPO antagonist PK11195. These findings suggest that the analgesic effects of koumine on CCI-induced neuropathic pain may result from the inhibition of microglia activation and M1 polarization as well as the activation of astrocytes while sparing the anti-inflammatory responses to neuropathic pain.

  11. Targets of curcumin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Hongyu; Beevers, Christopher S.; Huang, Shile

    2010-01-01

    Curcumin (diferuloylmethane), an orange-yellow component of turmeric or curry powder, is a polyphenol natural product isolated from the rhizome of the plant Curcuma longa. For centuries, curcumin has been used in some medicinal preparation or used as a food-coloring agent. In recent years, extensive in vitro and in vivo studies suggested curcumin has anticancer, antiviral, antiarthritic, anti-amyloid, antioxidant, and anti-inflammatory properties. The underlying mechanisms of these effects are diverse and appear to involve the regulation of various molecular targets, including transcription factors (such as nuclear factor-κB), growth factors (such as vascular endothelial cell growth factor), inflammatory cytokines (such as tumor necrosis factor, interleukin 1 and interleukin 6), protein kinases (such as mammalian target of rapamycin, mitogen-activated protein kinases, and Akt) and other enzymes (such as cyclooxygenase 2 and 5 lipoxygenase). Thus, due to its efficacy and regulation of multiple targets, as well as its safety for human use, curcumin has received considerable interest as a potential therapeutic agent for the prevention and/or treatment of various malignant diseases, arthritis, allergies, Alzheimer’s disease, and other inflammatory illnesses. This review summarizes various in vitro and in vivo pharmacological aspects of curcumin as well as the underlying action mechanisms. The recently identified molecular targets and signaling pathways modulated by curcumin are also discussed here. PMID:20955148

  12. Advances in clinical study of curcumin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Chunfen; Su, Xun; Liu, Anchang; Zhang, Lin; Yu, Aihua; Xi, Yanwei; Zhai, Guangxi

    2013-01-01

    Curcumin has been estimated as a potential agent for many diseases and attracted great attention owing to its various pharmacological activities, including anti-cancer, and anti-inflammatory. Now curcumin is being applied to a number of patients with breast cancer, rheumatoid arthritis, Alzheimer's disease, colorectal cancer, psoriatic, etc. Several clinical trials have stated that curcumin is safe enough and effective. The objective of this article was to summarize the clinical studies of curcumin, and give a reference for future studies.

  13. Inflammatory arthritis and systemic bone loss are attenuated by gastrointestinal helminth parasites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarter, Kerstin; Kulagin, Manuel; Schett, Georg; Harris, Nicola L; Zaiss, Mario M

    2017-05-01

    Infections with different helminth species have been observed to ameliorate a variety of chronic inflammatory diseases. Herein, we show that the natural murine helminth species, Heligmosomoides polygyrus bakeri (Hp) is capable of attenuating disease severity in two different inflammatory arthritis models. Furthermore, we show that excretory-secretory (ES) products from Hp directly suppress osteoclast differentiation in vitro. Taken together, these results demonstrate that helminth infections can dampen autoimmune diseases and highlight a previously unrecognized and important role for ES products, by directly impacting on bone destruction.

  14. The Anti-Inflammatory Compound Curcumin Enhances Locomotor and Sensory Recovery after Spinal Cord Injury in Rats by Immunomodulation.

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Machová-Urdzíková, Lucia; Kárová, Kristýna; Růžička, Jiří; Kloudová, Anna; Shannon, C.; Dubišová, Jana; Murali, R.; Kubinová, Šárka; Syková, Eva; Jhanwar-Uniyal, M.; Jendelová, Pavla

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 17, č. 1 (2016) ISSN 1661-6596 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GP13-15031P; GA ČR(CZ) GA13-00939S; GA MŠk(CZ) LH12024; GA MŠk(CZ) 7F14057; GA MŠk(CZ) ED1.1.00/02.0109 Institutional support: RVO:68378041 Keywords : spinal cord injury * curcumin * inflammation * inflammation * cytokines Subject RIV: FH - Neurology

  15. Wound trauma mediated inflammatory signaling attenuates a tissue regenerative response in MRL/MpJ mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elster Eric A

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Severe trauma can induce pathophysiological responses that have marked inflammatory components. The development of systemic inflammation following severe thermal injury has been implicated in immune dysfunction, delayed wound healing, multi-system organ failure and increased mortality. Methods In this study, we examined the impact of thermal injury-induced systemic inflammation on the healing response of a secondary wound in the MRL/MpJ mouse model, which was anatomically remote from the primary site of trauma, a wound that typically undergoes scarless healing in this specific strain. Ear-hole wounds in MRL/MpJ mice have previously displayed accelerated healing and tissue regeneration in the absence of a secondary insult. Results Severe thermal injury in addition to distal ear-hole wounds induced marked local and systemic inflammatory responses in the lungs and significantly augmented the expression of inflammatory mediators in the ear tissue. By day 14, 61% of the ear-hole wounds from thermally injured mice demonstrated extensive inflammation with marked inflammatory cell infiltration, extensive ulceration, and various level of necrosis to the point where a large percentage (38% had to be euthanized early during the study due to extensive necrosis, inflammation and ear deformation. By day 35, ear-hole wounds in mice not subjected to thermal injury were completely closed, while the ear-hole wounds in thermally injured mice exhibited less inflammation and necrosis and only closed partially (62%. Thermal injury resulted in marked increases in serum levels of IL-6, TNFα, KC (CXCL1, and MIP-2α (CXCL2. Interestingly, attenuated early ear wound healing in the thermally injured mouse resulted in incomplete tissue regeneration in addition to a marked inflammatory response, as evidenced by the histological appearance of the wound and increased transcription of potent inflammatory mediators. Conclusion These findings suggest that the

  16. Curcuma DMSO extracts and curcumin exhibit an anti-inflammatory and anti-catabolic effect on human intervertebral disc cells, possibly by influencing TLR2 expression and JNK activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klawitter, Marina; Quero, Lilian; Klasen, Juergen; Gloess, Alexia N; Klopprogge, Babette; Hausmann, Oliver; Boos, Norbert; Wuertz, Karin

    2012-08-21

    As proinflammatory cytokines seem to play a role in discogenic back pain, substances exhibiting anti-inflammatory effects on intervertebral disc cells may be used as minimal-invasive therapeutics for intradiscal/epidural injection. The purpose of this study was to investigate the anti-inflammatory and anti-catabolic potential of curcuma, which has been used in the Indian Ayurvedic medicine to treat multiple ailments for a long time. Human disc cells were treated with IL-1β to induce an inflammatory/catabolic cascade. Different extracts of curcuma as well as curcumin (= a component selected based on results with curcuma extracts and HPLC/MS analysis) were tested for their ability to reduce mRNA expression of proinflammatory cytokines and matrix degrading enzymes after 6 hours (real-time RT-PCR), followed by analysis of typical inflammatory signaling mechanisms such as NF-κB (Western Blot, Transcription Factor Assay), MAP kinases (Western Blot) and Toll-like receptors (real-time RT-PCR). Quantitative data was statistically analyzed using a Mann Whitney U test with a significance level of p curcuma DMSO extract significantly reduced levels of IL-6, MMP1, MMP3 and MMP13. The DMSO-soluble component curcumin, whose occurrence within the DMSO extract was verified by HPLC/MS, reduced levels of IL-1β, IL-6, IL-8, MMP1, MMP3 and MMP13 and both caused an up-regulation of TNF-α. Pathway analysis indicated that curcumin did not show involvement of NF-κB, but down-regulated TLR2 expression and inhibited the MAP kinase JNK while activating p38 and ERK. Based on its anti-inflammatory and anti-catabolic effects, intradiscal injection of curcumin may be an attractive treatment alternative. However, whether the anti-inflammatory properties in vitro lead to analgesia in vivo will need to be confirmed in an appropriate animal model.

  17. Curcuma DMSO extracts and curcumin exhibit an anti-inflammatory and anti-catabolic effect on human intervertebral disc cells, possibly by influencing TLR2 expression and JNK activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background As proinflammatory cytokines seem to play a role in discogenic back pain, substances exhibiting anti-inflammatory effects on intervertebral disc cells may be used as minimal-invasive therapeutics for intradiscal/epidural injection. The purpose of this study was to investigate the anti-inflammatory and anti-catabolic potential of curcuma, which has been used in the Indian Ayurvedic medicine to treat multiple ailments for a long time. Methods Human disc cells were treated with IL-1β to induce an inflammatory/catabolic cascade. Different extracts of curcuma as well as curcumin (= a component selected based on results with curcuma extracts and HPLC/MS analysis) were tested for their ability to reduce mRNA expression of proinflammatory cytokines and matrix degrading enzymes after 6 hours (real-time RT-PCR), followed by analysis of typical inflammatory signaling mechanisms such as NF-κB (Western Blot, Transcription Factor Assay), MAP kinases (Western Blot) and Toll-like receptors (real-time RT-PCR). Quantitative data was statistically analyzed using a Mann Whitney U test with a significance level of p curcuma DMSO extract significantly reduced levels of IL-6, MMP1, MMP3 and MMP13. The DMSO-soluble component curcumin, whose occurrence within the DMSO extract was verified by HPLC/MS, reduced levels of IL-1β, IL-6, IL-8, MMP1, MMP3 and MMP13 and both caused an up-regulation of TNF-α. Pathway analysis indicated that curcumin did not show involvement of NF-κB, but down-regulated TLR2 expression and inhibited the MAP kinase JNK while activating p38 and ERK. Conclusions Based on its anti-inflammatory and anti-catabolic effects, intradiscal injection of curcumin may be an attractive treatment alternative. However, whether the anti-inflammatory properties in vitro lead to analgesia in vivo will need to be confirmed in an appropriate animal model. PMID:22909087

  18. LXW7 ameliorates focal cerebral ischemia injury and attenuates inflammatory responses in activated microglia in rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fang, T.; Zhou, D.; Lu, L.; Tong, X.; Wu, J.; Yi, L. [Department of Neurology, Shenzhen Hospital, Peking University, Shenzhen (China)

    2016-08-01

    Inflammation plays a pivotal role in ischemic stroke, when activated microglia release excessive pro-inflammatory mediators. The inhibition of integrin αvβ3 improves outcomes in rat focal cerebral ischemia models. However, the mechanisms by which microglia are neuroprotective remain unclear. This study evaluated whether post-ischemic treatment with another integrin αvβ3 inhibitor, the cyclic arginine-glycine-aspartic acid (RGD) peptide-cGRGDdvc (LXW7), alleviates cerebral ischemic injury. The anti-inflammatory effect of LXW7 in activated microglia within rat focal cerebral ischemia models was examined. A total of 108 Sprague-Dawley rats (250–280 g) were subjected to middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO). After 2 h, the rats were given an intravenous injection of LXW7 (100 μg/kg) or phosphate-buffered saline (PBS). Neurological scores, infarct volumes, brain water content (BWC) and histology alterations were determined. The expressions of pro-inflammatory cytokines [tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) and interleukin-1 beta (IL-1β)], and Iba1-positive activated microglia, within peri-ischemic brain tissue, were assessed with ELISA, western blot and immunofluorescence staining. Infarct volumes and BWC were significantly lower in LXW7-treated rats compared to those in the MCAO + PBS (control) group. The LXW7 treatment lowered the expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines. There was a reduction of Iba1-positive activated microglia, and the TNF-α and IL-1β expressions were attenuated. However, there was no difference in the Zea Longa scores between the ischemia and LXW7 groups. The results suggest that LXW7 protected against focal cerebral ischemia and attenuated inflammation in activated microglia. LXW7 may be neuroprotective during acute MCAO-induced brain damage and microglia-related neurodegenerative diseases.

  19. LXW7 ameliorates focal cerebral ischemia injury and attenuates inflammatory responses in activated microglia in rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fang, T.; Zhou, D.; Lu, L.; Tong, X.; Wu, J.; Yi, L.

    2016-01-01

    Inflammation plays a pivotal role in ischemic stroke, when activated microglia release excessive pro-inflammatory mediators. The inhibition of integrin αvβ3 improves outcomes in rat focal cerebral ischemia models. However, the mechanisms by which microglia are neuroprotective remain unclear. This study evaluated whether post-ischemic treatment with another integrin αvβ3 inhibitor, the cyclic arginine-glycine-aspartic acid (RGD) peptide-cGRGDdvc (LXW7), alleviates cerebral ischemic injury. The anti-inflammatory effect of LXW7 in activated microglia within rat focal cerebral ischemia models was examined. A total of 108 Sprague-Dawley rats (250–280 g) were subjected to middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO). After 2 h, the rats were given an intravenous injection of LXW7 (100 μg/kg) or phosphate-buffered saline (PBS). Neurological scores, infarct volumes, brain water content (BWC) and histology alterations were determined. The expressions of pro-inflammatory cytokines [tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) and interleukin-1 beta (IL-1β)], and Iba1-positive activated microglia, within peri-ischemic brain tissue, were assessed with ELISA, western blot and immunofluorescence staining. Infarct volumes and BWC were significantly lower in LXW7-treated rats compared to those in the MCAO + PBS (control) group. The LXW7 treatment lowered the expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines. There was a reduction of Iba1-positive activated microglia, and the TNF-α and IL-1β expressions were attenuated. However, there was no difference in the Zea Longa scores between the ischemia and LXW7 groups. The results suggest that LXW7 protected against focal cerebral ischemia and attenuated inflammation in activated microglia. LXW7 may be neuroprotective during acute MCAO-induced brain damage and microglia-related neurodegenerative diseases

  20. Melatonin attenuates oxidative stress and modulates inflammatory response after experimental burn trauma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Minka Hristova

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Thermal injury activates an inflammatory response. Melatonin possesses anti-oxidant and anti-inflammatory properties. The objective of the present work was to study melatonin effects on the inflammatory response under conditions of oxidative stress during the early stage of thermal injury. Materials and methods. We used 24 white male rats of Wistar breed, randomly divided into three experimental groups. Group one was the control, group two was inflicted with burn trauma, and group three was inflicted with burn trauma, with melatonin application following the thermal injury. Melatonin was applied twice in doses of 10 g/kg b.m. immediately after the burn trauma and again at 12 hours. Plasma levels of tumor necrosis-factor-α (TNF-α, a pro-inflammatory mediator, and of interleukin-10 (Il-10, an anti-inflammatory mediator, were examined and their ratio was calculated. The levels of malondialdehyde (MDA, an oxidative stress marker, were also estimated. Results. Thermal trauma significantly increased plasma TNF-α levels (ð<0.01 and TNF-α /IL10 ratio but did not change IL-10 ones. Plasma MDA concentrations were significantly elevated as well (ð<0.0001. Melatonin application significantly reduced TNF-α (ð<0.05, increased IL-10 (ð<0.05, down-regulated TNF-α/IL-10 ratio and changed MDA concentrations (ð<0.01. In conclusion, our results show that local alteration induces oxidative stress and inflammatory response with TNF-α /IL-10 disbalance. Melatonin modulates this response and attenuates oxidative stress in experimental burn injury.

  1. Curcumin attenuates palmitate-induced apoptosis in MIN6 pancreatic β-cells through PI3K/Akt/FoxO1 and mitochondrial survival pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Feng; Kang, Jinsen; Cao, Yajun; Fan, Shengjun; Yang, Haopeng; An, Yu; Pan, Yan; Tie, Lu; Li, Xuejun

    2015-11-01

    Lipotoxicity plays a vital role in development and progression of type 2 diabetes. Prolonged elevation of free fatty acids especially the palmitate leads to pancreatic β-cell dysfunction and apoptosis. Curcumin (diferuloylmethane), a polyphenol from the curry spice turmeric, is considered to be a broadly cytoprotective agent. The present study was designed to determine the protective effect of curcumin on palmitate-induced apoptosis in β-cells and investigate underlying mechanisms. Our results showed that curcumin improved cell viability and enhanced glucose-induced insulin secretory function in MIN6 pancreatic β-cells. Palmitate incubation evoked chromatin condensation, DNA nick end labeling and activation of caspase-3 and -9. Curcumin treatment inhibited palmitate-induced apoptosis, relieved mitochondrial depolarization and up-regulated Bcl-2/Bax ratio. Palmitate induced the generation of reactive oxygen species and inhibited activities of antioxidant enzymes, which could be neutralized by curcumin treatment. Moreover, curcumin could promote rapid phosphorylation of Akt and nuclear exclusion of FoxO1 in MIN6 cells under lipotoxic condition. Phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase and Akt specific inhibitors abolished the anti-lipotoxic effect of curcumin and stimulated FoxO1 nuclear translocation. These findings suggested that curcumin protected MIN6 pancreatic β-Cells against apoptosis through activation of Akt, inhibition of nuclear translocation of FoxO1 and mitochondrial survival pathway.

  2. Curcumin ameliorates liver damage and progression of NASH in NASH-HCC mouse model possibly by modulating HMGB1-NF-κB translocation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afrin, Rejina; Arumugam, Somasundaram; Rahman, Azizur; Wahed, Mir Imam Ibne; Karuppagounder, Vengadeshprabhu; Harima, Meilei; Suzuki, Hiroshi; Miyashita, Shizuka; Suzuki, Kenji; Yoneyama, Hiroyuki; Ueno, Kazuyuki; Watanabe, Kenichi

    2017-03-01

    Curcumin, a phenolic compound, has a wide spectrum of therapeutic effects such as antitumor, anti-inflammatory, anti-cancer and so on. The study aimed to investigate the underlying mechanisms of curcumin to protect liver damage and progression of non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) in a novel NASH-hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) mouse model. To induce this model neonatal C57BL/6J male mice were exposed to low-dose streptozotocin and were fed a high-fat diet (HFD) from the age of 4weeks to 14weeks. Curcumin was given at 100mg/kg dose daily by oral gavage started at the age of 10weeks and continued until 14weeks along with HFD feeding. We found that curcumin improved the histopathological changes of the NASH liver via reducing the level of steatosis, fibrosis associated with decreasing serum aminotransferases. In addition, curcumin treatment markedly reduced the hepatic protein expression of oxidative stress, pro-inflammatory cytokines, and chemokines including interferon (IFN) γ, interleukin-1β and IFNγ-inducible protein 10, in NASH mice. Furthermore, curcumin treatment significantly reduced the cytoplasmic translocation of high mobility group box 1 (HMGB1) and the protein expression of toll like receptor 4. Nuclear translocation of nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) was also dramatically attenuated by the curcumin in NASH liver. Curcumin treatment effectively reduced the progression of NASH to HCC by suppressing the protein expression of glypican-3, vascular endothelial growth factor, and prothrombin in the NASH liver. Our data suggest that curcumin reduces the progression of NASH and liver damage, which may act via inhibiting HMGB1-NF-κB translocation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Curcumin suppresses the production of interleukin-6 in Prevotella intermedia lipopolysaccharide-activated RAW 264.7 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sung-Jo

    2011-06-01

    Curcumin is known to exert numerous biological effects including anti-inflammatory activity. In this study, we investigated the effects of curcumin on the production of interleukin-6 (IL-6) by murine macrophage-like RAW 264.7 cells stimulated with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) from Prevotella intermedia, a major cause of inflammatory periodontal disease, and sought to determine the underlying mechanisms of action. LPS was prepared from lyophilized P. intermedia ATCC 25611 cells by the standard hot phenol-water method. Culture supernatants were collected and assayed for IL-6. We used real-time polymerase chain reaction to detect IL-6 mRNA expression. IκB-α degradation, nuclear translocation of NF-κB subunits, and STAT1 phosphorylation were characterized via immunoblotting. DNA-binding of NF-κB was also analyzed. Curcumin strongly suppressed the production of IL-6 at both gene transcription and translation levels in P. intermedia LPS-activated RAW 264.7 cells. Curcumin did not inhibit the degradation of IκB-α induced by P. intermedia LPS. Curcumin blocked NF-κB signaling through the inhibition of nuclear translocation of NF-κB p50 subunit. Curcumin also attenuated DNA binding activity of p50 and p65 subunits and suppressed STAT1 phosphorylation. Although further study is required to explore the detailed mechanism of action, curcumin may contribute to blockade of the host-destructive processes mediated by IL-6 and appears to have potential therapeutic values in the treatment of inflammatory periodontal disease.

  4. Molecular understanding of curcumin in diabetic nephropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soetikno, Vivian; Suzuki, Kenji; Veeraveedu, Punniyakoti T; Arumugam, Somasundaram; Lakshmanan, Arun P; Sone, Hirohito; Watanabe, Kenichi

    2013-08-01

    Diabetic nephropathy is characterized by a plethora of signaling abnormalities. Recent trials have suggested that intensive glucose-lowering treatment leads to hypoglycemic events, which can be dangerous. Curcumin is the active ingredient of turmeric, which has been widely used in many countries for centuries to treat numerous diseases. The preventive and therapeutic properties of curcumin are associated with its antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties. Here, we highlight the renoprotective role of curcumin in diabetes mellitus (DM) with an emphasis on the molecular basis of this effect. We also briefly discuss the numerous approaches that have been undertaken to improve the pharmacokinetics of curcumin. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Anti-hyperglycemic and insulin sensitizer effects of turmeric and its principle constituent curcumin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghorbani, Zeinab; Hekmatdoost, Azita; Mirmiran, Parvin

    2014-10-01

    Turmeric is obtained from the plant Curcuma longa L; its major constituent, curcumin, is a polyphenol with multiple effects which can modulate some signaling pathways. Insulin resistance is a major risk factor for chronic diseases such as type 2 diabetes, atherosclerotic, metabolic syndrome and cardiovascular disease. In addition, Insulin resistance in peripheral tissue is one of the most important reasons of hyperglycemia which can cause global or systemic effects. The present study reviewed studies published in PubMed from 1998 to 2013, indicating the role of curcumin in attenuation of many pathophysiological processes involved in development and progression of hyperglycemia and insulin resistance. Curcumin can reduce blood glucose level by reducing the hepatic glucose production, suppression of hyperglycemia-induced inflammatory state, stimulation of glucose uptake by up-regulation of GLUT4, GLUT2 and GLUT3 genes expressions, activation of AMP kinase, promoting the PPAR ligand-binding activity, stimulation of insulin secretion from pancreatic tissues, improvement in pancreatic cell function, and reduction of insulin resistance. Curcumin has antihyperglycemic and insulin sensitizer effects. Thereby, more studies evaluating the effects of curcumin on hyperglycemic state and insulin resistance in related disorders such as diabetes are recommended.

  6. Agmatine attenuates intestinal ischemia and reperfusion injury by reducing oxidative stress and inflammatory reaction in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turan, Inci; Ozacmak, Hale Sayan; Ozacmak, V Haktan; Barut, Figen; Araslı, Mehmet

    2017-11-15

    Oxidative stress and inflammatory response are major factors causing several tissue injuries in intestinal ischemia and reperfusion (I/R). Agmatine has been reported to attenuate I/R injury of various organs. The present study aims to analyze the possible protective effects of agmatine on intestinal I/R injury in rats. Four groups were designed: sham control, agmatine-treated control, I/R control, and agmatine-treated I/R groups. IR injury of small intestine was induced by the occlusion of the superior mesenteric artery for half an hour to be followed by a 3-hour-long reperfusion. Agmatine (10mg/kg) was administered intraperitoneally before reperfusion period. After 180min of reperfusion period, the contractile responses to both carbachol and potassium chloride (KCl) were subsequently examined in an isolated-organ bath. Malondialdehyde (MDA), reduced glutathione (GSH), and the activity of myeloperoxidase (MPO) were measured in intestinal tissue. Plasma cytokine levels were determined. The expression of the intestinal inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) was also assessed by immunohistochemistry. The treatment with agmatine appeared to be significantly effective in reducing the MDA content and MPO activity besides restoring the content of GSH. The treatment also attenuated the histological injury. The increases in the I/R induced expressions of iNOS, IFN-γ, and IL-1α were brought back to the sham control levels by the treatment as well. Our findings indicate that the agmatine pretreatment may ameliorate reperfusion induced injury in small intestine mainly due to reducing inflammatory response and oxidative stress. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Curcumin as "Curecumin": from kitchen to clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goel, Ajay; Kunnumakkara, Ajaikumar B; Aggarwal, Bharat B

    2008-02-15

    Although turmeric (Curcuma longa; an Indian spice) has been described in Ayurveda, as a treatment for inflammatory diseases and is referred by different names in different cultures, the active principle called curcumin or diferuloylmethane, a yellow pigment present in turmeric (curry powder) has been shown to exhibit numerous activities. Extensive research over the last half century has revealed several important functions of curcumin. It binds to a variety of proteins and inhibits the activity of various kinases. By modulating the activation of various transcription factors, curcumin regulates the expression of inflammatory enzymes, cytokines, adhesion molecules, and cell survival proteins. Curcumin also downregulates cyclin D1, cyclin E and MDM2; and upregulates p21, p27, and p53. Various preclinical cell culture and animal studies suggest that curcumin has potential as an antiproliferative, anti-invasive, and antiangiogenic agent; as a mediator of chemoresistance and radioresistance; as a chemopreventive agent; and as a therapeutic agent in wound healing, diabetes, Alzheimer disease, Parkinson disease, cardiovascular disease, pulmonary disease, and arthritis. Pilot phase I clinical trials have shown curcumin to be safe even when consumed at a daily dose of 12g for 3 months. Other clinical trials suggest a potential therapeutic role for curcumin in diseases such as familial adenomatous polyposis, inflammatory bowel disease, ulcerative colitis, colon cancer, pancreatic cancer, hypercholesteremia, atherosclerosis, pancreatitis, psoriasis, chronic anterior uveitis and arthritis. Thus, curcumin, a spice once relegated to the kitchen shelf, has moved into the clinic and may prove to be "Curecumin".

  8. A novel inhibitor of active protein kinase G attenuates chronic inflammatory and osteoarthritic pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sung, Ying-Ju; Sofoluke, Nelson; Nkamany, Mary; Deng, Shixian; Xie, Yuli; Greenwood, Jeremy; Farid, Ramy; Landry, Donald W; Ambron, Richard T

    2017-05-01

    Activating PKG-1α induces a long-term hyperexcitability (LTH) in nociceptive neurons. Since the LTH correlates directly with chronic pain in many animal models, we tested the hypothesis that inhibiting PKG-1α would attenuate LTH-mediated pain. We first synthesized and characterized compound N46 (N-((3R,4R)-4-(4-(2-fluoro-3-methoxy-6-propoxybenzoyl)benzamido)pyrrolidin-3-yl)-1H-indazole-5-carboxamide). N46 inhibits PKG-1α with an IC50 of 7.5 nmol, was highly selective when tested against a panel of 274 kinases, and tissue distribution studies indicate that it does not enter the CNS. To evaluate its antinociceptive potential, we used 2 animal models in which the pain involves both activated PKG-1α and LTH. Injecting complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA) into the rat hind paw causes a thermal hyperalgesia that was significantly attenuated 24 hours after a single intravenous injection of N46. Next, we used a rat model of osteoarthritic knee joint pain and found that a single intra-articular injection of N46 alleviated the pain 14 days after the pain was established and the relief lasted for 7 days. Thermal hyperalgesia and osteoarthritic pain are also associated with the activation of the capsaicin-activated transient receptor protein vanilloid-1 (TRPV1) channel. We show that capsaicin activates PKG-1α in nerves and that a subcutaneous delivery of N46 attenuated the mechanical and thermal hypersensitivity elicited by exposure to capsaicin. Thus, PKG-1α appears to be downstream of the transient receptor protein vanilloid-1. Our studies provide proof of concept in animal models that a PKG-1α antagonist has a powerful antinociceptive effect on persistent, already existing inflammatory pain. They further suggest that N46 is a valid chemotype for the further development of such antagonists.

  9. trans-Lycopene from tomato juice attenuates inflammatory biomarkers in human plasma samples: An intervention trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colmán-Martínez, Mariel; Martínez-Huélamo, Miriam; Valderas-Martínez, Palmira; Arranz-Martínez, Sara; Almanza-Aguilera, Enrique; Corella, Dolores; Estruch, Ramón; Lamuela-Raventós, Rosa M

    2017-11-01

    The effect of carotenoids from tomato juice (TJ) on inflammatory biomarkers was evaluated by performing a 4-week dose-response nutritional trial in a population at high cardiovascular risk. An open, prospective, randomized, cross-over, and controlled clinical trial was carried out with 28 volunteers (mean age 69.7 ± 3.1 years; mean BMI 31.5 ± 3.6 kg/m 2 ) at high cardiovascular risk, which were assigned to consume daily for 4 weeks in random order: 200 mL (LD) or 400 mL (HD) of TJ, or water as a control (C), with a 21-day wash-out period between each intervention. Blood samples were collected at baseline (B) and after each intervention. Endpoints included significant changes in plasmatic carotenoids, and adhesion molecules ICAM-1, and VCAM-1, as well as a tendency to decrease the chemokine IL-8. Compared to C, concentration of ICAM-1, and VCAM-1 were significantly lower (p ˂ 0.001), after each TJ intervention. Decreases were correlated remarkably with the trans-lycopene, while the other carotenoids present in TJ have presented a minor association or no association with changes in these molecules. trans-Lycopene from TJ may attenuate the risk of cardiovascular disease by reducing the concentration of important inflammatory molecules related to atherosclerosis. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  10. Dietary L-arginine supplementation attenuates lipopolysaccharide-induced inflammatory response in broiler chickens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Jianzhuang; Liu, Shasha; Guo, Yuming; Applegate, Todd J; Eicher, Susan D

    2014-04-28

    In the present study, two experiments were conducted to investigate the effect of dietary L-arginine (Arg) supplementation on the inflammatory response and innate immunity of broiler chickens. Expt 1 was designed as a 2 × 3 factorial arrangement (n 8 cages/treatment; n 6 birds/cage) with three dietary Arg concentrations (1.05, 1.42 and 1.90%) and two immune treatments (injection of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) or saline) given at an interval of 48 h between 14 and 21 d of age. In Expt 2, correlation between dietary Arg concentration (0.99, 1.39, 1.76, 2.13 or 2.53%) and percentage of circulating B cells (percentage of circulating lymphocytes) was determined. In Expt 1, LPS injection decreased body-weight gain and feed intake and increased feed conversion ratio of the challenged broilers (14-21 d; Psupplementation linearly decreased the percentages of CD11+, CD14+ and B cells in the spleen (Psupplementation decreased (Psupplementation attenuated the overexpression of pro-inflammatory cytokines probably through the suppression of the TLR4 pathway and CD14+ cell percentage. Furthermore, excessive Arg supplementation (1.76%) suppressed the percentages of circulating and splenic B cells.

  11. Repeated Excessive Exercise Attenuates the Anti-Inflammatory Effects of Exercise in Older Men

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ronni E. Sahl

    2017-06-01

    increased insulin resistance as estimated by the Quicki Index.Conclusion: The regular prolonged exercise did not influence abdominal adipose tissue inflammation, but the higher plasma IL-6 concentration concurrent with a trend toward higher insulin resistance and decreased VO2peak implies that the excessive amount of exercise probably attenuated the possible potential anti-inflammatory effects of exercise.

  12. Curcumin, a Curcuma longa constituent, acts on MAPK p38 pathway modulating COX-2 and iNOS expression in chronic experimental colitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camacho-Barquero, Laura; Villegas, Isabel; Sánchez-Calvo, Juan Manuel; Talero, Elena; Sánchez-Fidalgo, Susana; Motilva, Virginia; Alarcón de la Lastra, Catalina

    2007-03-01

    Ulcerative colitis (UC) is a nonspecific inflammatory disorder characterized by oxidative and nitrosative stress, leucocyte infiltration and up-regulation of pro-inflammatory cytokines. Mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs), such as the p38 and the c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) modulate the transcription of many genes involved in the inflammatory process. Curcumin is a polyphenol derived from Curcuma longa, which is known to have anti-inflammatory activity. The aim of this study was to study the effects and mechanisms of action of curcumin, on chronic colitis in rats. Inflammation response was assessed by histology and myeloperoxidase activity (MPO). We determined the production of Th1 and Th2 cytokines and nitrites in colon mucosa, as well as the expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), cyclo-oxygenase(COX)-1 and-2 by western blotting and inmmunohistochemistry. Finally, we studied the involvement of MAPKs signaling in the protective effect of curcumin in chronic colonic inflammation. Curcumin (50-100 mg/kg/day) were administered by oral gavage 24 h after trinitrobenzensulfonic acid (TNBS) instillation, and daily during 2 weeks before sacrifice. Curcumin significantly attenuated the damage and caused substantial reductions of the rise in MPO activity and tumour necrosis factor alpha (TNF)-alpha. Also curcumine was able to reduce nitrites colonic levels and induced down-regulation of COX-2 and iNOS expression, and a reduction in the activation of p38 MAPK; however, no changes in the activation of JNK could be observed. In conclusion, we suggest that inhibition of p38 MAPK signaling by curcumin could explain the reduced COX-2 and iNOS immunosignals and the nitrite production in colonic mucosa reducing the development of chronic experimental colitis.

  13. Anti-angiogenic effect of curcumin, curcumin ethylenediamine derivative and curcumin ethylenediamine manganese complex

    OpenAIRE

    SUNTORNSUK, Leena; Koizumi, Keiichi; Saitoh, Yurika; Nakamura, ElianeShizuka; KAMMASUD, Naparat; VAJARAGUPTA, Opa; Saiki, Ikuo

    2004-01-01

    We investigated the anti-angiogenic effect of curcumin, curcumin ethylenediamine derivative (curcumin ED) and curcumin ethylenediamine manganese complex (curcumin EDMn) through the inhibition of the formation of tube-like structures by human umbilical vascular endothelial cells (HUVEC). Curcumin, curcumin ED, curcumin EDMn did not show cytotoxicity to HUVEC at concentrations equal and lower than 10 μM. At the concentration of 10 μM,curcumin, curcumin ED and curcumin EDMn inhibited the tube fo...

  14. Molecular mechanisms of curcumin action: gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shishodia, Shishir

    2013-01-01

    Curcumin derived from the tropical plant Curcuma longa has a long history of use as a dietary agent, food preservative, and in traditional Asian medicine. It has been used for centuries to treat biliary disorders, anorexia, cough, diabetic wounds, hepatic disorders, rheumatism, and sinusitis. The preventive and therapeutic properties of curcumin are associated with its antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, and anticancer properties. Extensive research over several decades has attempted to identify the molecular mechanisms of curcumin action. Curcumin modulates numerous molecular targets by altering their gene expression, signaling pathways, or through direct interaction. Curcumin regulates the expression of inflammatory cytokines (e.g., TNF, IL-1), growth factors (e.g., VEGF, EGF, FGF), growth factor receptors (e.g., EGFR, HER-2, AR), enzymes (e.g., COX-2, LOX, MMP9, MAPK, mTOR, Akt), adhesion molecules (e.g., ELAM-1, ICAM-1, VCAM-1), apoptosis related proteins (e.g., Bcl-2, caspases, DR, Fas), and cell cycle proteins (e.g., cyclin D1). Curcumin modulates the activity of several transcription factors (e.g., NF-κB, AP-1, STAT) and their signaling pathways. Based on its ability to affect multiple targets, curcumin has the potential for the prevention and treatment of various diseases including cancers, arthritis, allergies, atherosclerosis, aging, neurodegenerative disease, hepatic disorders, obesity, diabetes, psoriasis, and autoimmune diseases. This review summarizes the molecular mechanisms of modulation of gene expression by curcumin. Copyright © 2012 International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  15. Curcuma DMSO extracts and curcumin exhibit an anti-inflammatory and anti-catabolic effect on human intervertebral disc cells, possibly by influencing TLR2 expression and JNK activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Klawitter Marina

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background As proinflammatory cytokines seem to play a role in discogenic back pain, substances exhibiting anti-inflammatory effects on intervertebral disc cells may be used as minimal-invasive therapeutics for intradiscal/epidural injection. The purpose of this study was to investigate the anti-inflammatory and anti-catabolic potential of curcuma, which has been used in the Indian Ayurvedic medicine to treat multiple ailments for a long time. Methods Human disc cells were treated with IL-1β to induce an inflammatory/catabolic cascade. Different extracts of curcuma as well as curcumin (= a component selected based on results with curcuma extracts and HPLC/MS analysis were tested for their ability to reduce mRNA expression of proinflammatory cytokines and matrix degrading enzymes after 6 hours (real-time RT-PCR, followed by analysis of typical inflammatory signaling mechanisms such as NF-κB (Western Blot, Transcription Factor Assay, MAP kinases (Western Blot and Toll-like receptors (real-time RT-PCR. Quantitative data was statistically analyzed using a Mann Whitney U test with a significance level of p  Results Results indicate that the curcuma DMSO extract significantly reduced levels of IL-6, MMP1, MMP3 and MMP13. The DMSO-soluble component curcumin, whose occurrence within the DMSO extract was verified by HPLC/MS, reduced levels of IL-1β, IL-6, IL-8, MMP1, MMP3 and MMP13 and both caused an up-regulation of TNF-α. Pathway analysis indicated that curcumin did not show involvement of NF-κB, but down-regulated TLR2 expression and inhibited the MAP kinase JNK while activating p38 and ERK. Conclusions Based on its anti-inflammatory and anti-catabolic effects, intradiscal injection of curcumin may be an attractive treatment alternative. However, whether the anti-inflammatory properties in vitro lead to analgesia in vivo will need to be confirmed in an appropriate animal model.

  16. Betahistine attenuates murine collagen-induced arthritis by suppressing both inflammatory and Th17 cell responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Kuo-Tung; Chao, Ya-Hsuan; Chen, Der-Yuan; Lim, Yun-Ping; Chen, Yi-Ming; Li, Yi-Rong; Yang, Deng-Ho; Lin, Chi-Chen

    2016-10-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the potential therapeutic effects of betahistine dihydrochloride (betahistine) in a collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) mouse model. CIA was induced in DBA/1 male mice by primary immunization with 100μl of emulsion containing 2mg/ml chicken type II collagen (CII) mixed with complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA) in an 1:1 ratio, and booster immunization with 100μl of emulsion containing 2mg/ml CII mixed with incomplete Freund's adjuvant (IFA) in an 1:1 ratio. Immunization was performed subcutaneously at the base of the tail. After being boosted on day 21, betahistine (1 and 5mg/kg) was orally administered daily for 2weeks. The severity of CIA was determined by arthritic scores and assessment of histopathological joint destruction. Expression of cytokines in the paw and anti-CII antibodies in the serum was evaluated by ELISA. The proliferative response against CII in the lymph node cells was measured by (3)H-thymidine incorporation assay. The frequencies of different CII specific CD4(+) T cell subsets in the lymph node were determined by flow-cytometric analysis. Betahistine treatment attenuated the severity of arthritis and reduced the levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines, including TNF-α, IL-6, IL-23 and IL-17A, in the paw tissues of CIA mice. Lymph node cells from betahistine-treated mice showed a decrease in proliferation, as well as a lower frequency of Th17 cells. In vitro, betahistine suppressed CD4(+) T cell differentiation into Th17 cells. These results indicate that betahistine is effective in suppressing both inflammatory and Th17 responses in mouse CIA and that it may have therapeutic value as an adjunct treatment for rheumatoid arthritis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Regulation of COX and LOX by curcumin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Chinthalapally V

    2007-01-01

    Turmeric (Curcuma longa) is extensively used as a household remedy for various diseases. For the last few decades, work has been done to establish the biological activities and pharmacological actions of curcumin, the principle constituent of turmeric. Curcumin has proven to be beneficial in the prevention and treatment of a number of inflammatory diseases due to its anti-inflammatory activity. Arachidonic acid-derived lipid mediators that are intimately involved in inflammation are biosynthesized by pathways dependent on cyclooxygenase (COX) and lipoxygenase (LOX) enzymes. The role of LOX and COX isoforms, particularly COX-2, in the inflammation has been well established. At cellular and molecular levels, curcumin has been shown to regulate a number of signaling pathways, including the eicosanoid pathway involving COX and LOX. A number of studies have been conducted that support curcumin-mediated regulation of COX and LOX pathways, which is an important mechanism by which curcumin prevents a number of disease processes, including the cancer. The specific regulation of 5-LOX and COX-2 by curcumin is not fully established; however, existing evidence indicates that curcumin regulates LOX and COX-2 predominately at the transcriptional level and, to a certain extent, the posttranslational level. Thus, the curcumin-selective transcriptional regulatory action of COX-2, and dual COX/LOX inhibitory potential of this naturally occurring agent provides distinctive advantages over synthetic COX/LOX inhibitors, such as nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. In this review, we discuss evidence that supports the regulation of COX and LOX enzymes by curcumin as the key mechanism for its beneficial effects in preventing various inflammatory diseases.

  18. Cannabidiol attenuates high glucose-induced endothelial cell inflammatory response and barrier disruption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajesh, Mohanraj; Mukhopadhyay, Partha; Bátkai, Sándor; Haskó, György; Liaudet, Lucas; Drel, Viktor R.; Obrosova, Irina G.; Pacher, Pál

    2008-01-01

    A nonpsychoactive cannabinoid cannabidiol (CBD) has been shown to exert potent anti-inflammatory and antioxidant effects and has recently been reported to lower the incidence of diabetes in nonobese diabetic mice and to preserve the blood-retinal barrier in experimental diabetes. In this study we have investigated the effects of CBD on high glucose (HG)-induced, mitochondrial superoxide generation, NF-κB activation, nitrotyrosine formation, inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and adhesion molecules ICAM-1 and VCAM-1 expression, monocyte-endothelial adhesion, transendothelial migration of monocytes, and disruption of endothelial barrier function in human coronary artery endothelial cells (HCAECs). HG markedly increased mitochondrial superoxide generation (measured by flow cytometry using MitoSOX), NF-κB activation, nitrotyrosine formation, upregulation of iNOS and adhesion molecules ICAM-1 and VCAM-1, transendothelial migration of monocytes, and monocyte-endothelial adhesion in HCAECs. HG also decreased endothelial barrier function measured by increased permeability and diminished expression of vascular endothelial cadherin in HCAECs. Remarkably, all the above mentioned effects of HG were attenuated by CBD pretreatment. Since a disruption of the endothelial function and integrity by HG is a crucial early event underlying the development of various diabetic complications, our results suggest that CBD, which has recently been approved for the treatment of inflammation, pain, and spasticity associated with multiple sclerosis in humans, may have significant therapeutic benefits against diabetic complications and atherosclerosis. PMID:17384130

  19. Simvastatin attenuates the cerebral vascular endothelial inflammatory response in a rat traumatic brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Kuo-Wei; Chen, Han-Jung; Lu, Kang; Liliang, Po-Chou; Liang, Cheng-Loong; Tsai, Yu-Duan; Cho, Chung-Lung

    2014-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) leads to important and deleterious inflammation, as evidenced by edema, cytokine production, induction of nitric oxide synthase, and leukocyte infiltration. After TBI, the activation of cerebral vascular endothelial cells plays a crucial role in the pathogenesis of inflammation. In this study, we hypothesized that the activation of cerebral vascular endothelial cells plays a crucial role in the pathogenesis of inflammation and outcome after TBI. It may represent a key cellular target for statin therapy. In our study, cortical contusions were induced, and the effect of continuous treatment of simvastatin on behavior and inflammation in adult rats following experimental TBI was evaluated. The treatment group received 15 mg/kg of simvastatin daily for 3 days. Neurological function was assessed with the grip test. The results showed that the non-treatment control group had a significantly greater increase in ICAM-1 expression from pre-injury to the post-injury 72 h time point as compared to the expression in treatment group. The treatment group had better neurological function as evidenced in a grip test performed from baseline to 72 h. The analysis of a western blot test and pathology also demonstrated reduced ICAM-1 expression and a smaller area of damage and tissue loss. Our findings suggest that simvastatin could attenuate the activation of cerebral vascular endothelial inflammatory response and decrease the loss of neurological function and brain tissue.

  20. Oxidation of HMGB1 causes attenuation of its pro-inflammatory activity and occurs during liver ischemia and reperfusion.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anding Liu

    Full Text Available High mobility group box 1 (HMGB1 is a nuclear transcription factor. Once HMGB1 is released by damaged cells or activated immune cells, it acts as danger molecule and triggers the inflammatory signaling cascade. Currently, evidence is accumulating that posttranslational modifications such as oxidation may modulate the pro-inflammatory potential of danger signals. We hypothesized that oxidation of HMGB1 may reduce its pro-inflammatory potential and could take place during prolonged ischemia and upon reperfusion.Liver grafts were cold preserved for 24 h and flushed with saline in hourly intervals to collect the effluent. Liver grafts, cold-preserved for 6 h, were transplanted into syngeneic recipients to obtain serum and liver samples 24 h after initiation of reperfusion. Addition of the effluent to a macrophage culture induced the synthesis of tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α and interleukin (IL-6. The stimulatory activity of graft effluent was reduced after depletion of HMGB1 via immunoprecipitation. Oxidation of the effluent HMGB1 using H(2O(2 attenuated its stimulatory activity as well. Liver transplantation of cold preserved grafts caused HMGB1 translocation and release as determined by immunohistochemistry and ELISA-assay, respectively. Using Western blot with non-reducing conditions revealed the presence of oxidized HMGB1 in liver samples obtained after 12 h and in effluent samples after 16 h of cold preservation as well as in liver and serum samples obtained 24 h after reperfusion.These observations confirm that post-translational oxidation of HMGB1 attenuates its pro-inflammatory activity. Oxidation of HMGB1 as induced during prolonged ischemia and by reoxygenation during reperfusion in vivo might also attenuate its pro-inflammatory activity. Our findings also call for future studies to investigate the mechanism of the inhibitory effect of oxidized HMGB1 on the pro-inflammatory potential.

  1. Investigation on Curcumin nanocomposite for wound dressing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venkatasubbu, G Devanand; Anusuya, T

    2017-05-01

    Curcuma longa (turmeric) has a long history of use in medicine as a treatment for inflammatory conditions. The primary active constituent of turmeric and the one responsible for its vibrant yellow color is curcumin. Curcumin is used for treatment of wound and inflammation. It had antimicrobial and antioxidant property. It has low intrinsic toxicity and magnificent properties like with comparatively lesser side-effects. Cotton cloth is one of the most successful wound dressings which utilize the intrinsic properties of cotton fibers. Modern wound dressings, however, require other properties such as antibacterial and moisture maintaining capabilities. In this study, conventional cotton cloth was coated with Curcumin composite for achieving modern wound dressing properties. Curcumin nanocomposite is characterized. The results show that coated cotton cloth with Curcumin nanocomposite has increased drying time (74%) and water absorbency (50%). Furthermore, they show antibacterial efficiency against bacterial species present in wounds. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Natural derivatives of curcumin attenuate the Wnt/β-catenin pathway through down-regulation of the transcriptional coactivator p300

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ryu, Min-Jung; Cho, Munju; Song, Jie-Young; Yun, Yeon-Sook; Choi, Il-Whan; Kim, Dong-Eun; Park, Byeoung-Soo; Oh, Sangtaek

    2008-01-01

    Curcumin, a component of turmeric (Curcuma longa), has been reported to suppress β-catenin response transcription (CRT), which is aberrantly activated in colorectal cancer. However, the effects of its natural analogs (demethoxycurcumin [DMC] and bisdemethoxycurcumin [BDMC]) and metabolite (tetrahydrocurcumin [THC]) on the Wnt/β-catenin pathway have not been investigated. Here, we show that DMC and BDMC suppressed CRT that was activated by Wnt3a conditioned-medium (Wnt3a-CM) without altering the level of intracellular β-catenin, and inhibited the growth of various colon cancer cells, with comparable potency to curcumin. Additionally, DMC and BDMC down-regulated p300, which is a positive regulator of the Wnt/β-catenin pathway. Notably, THC also inhibited CRT and cell proliferation, but to a much lesser degree than curcumin, DMC, or BDMC, indicating that the conjugated bonds in the central seven-carbon chain of curcuminoids are essential for the inhibition of Wnt/β-catenin pathway and the anti-proliferative activity of curcuminoids. Thus, our findings suggest that curcumin derivatives inhibit the Wnt/β-catenin pathway by decreasing the amount of the transcriptional coactivator p300.

  3. Attenuation of TRPV1 and TRPV4 Expression and Function in Mouse Inflammatory Pain Models Using Electroacupuncture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei-Hsin Chen

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Although pain is a major human affliction, our understanding of pain mechanisms is limited. TRPV1 (transient receptor potential vanilloid subtype 1 and TRPV4 are two crucial receptors involved in inflammatory pain, but their roles in EA- (electroacupuncture- mediated analgesia are unknown. We injected mice with carrageenan (carra or a complete Freund’s adjuvant (CFA to model inflammatory pain and investigated the analgesic effect of EA using animal behavior tests, immunostaining, Western blotting, and a whole-cell recording technique. The inflammatory pain model mice developed both mechanical and thermal hyperalgesia. Notably, EA at the ST36 acupoint reversed these phenomena, indicating its curative effect in inflammatory pain. The protein levels of TRPV1 and TRPV4 in DRG (dorsal root ganglion neurons were both increased at day 4 after the initiation of inflammatory pain and were attenuated by EA, as demonstrated by immunostaining and Western blot analysis. We verified DRG electrophysiological properties to confirm that EA ameliorated peripheral nerve hyperexcitation. Our results indicated that the AP (action potential threshold, rise time, and fall time, and the percentage and amplitude of TRPV1 and TRPV4 were altered by EA, indicating that EA has an antinociceptive role in inflammatory pain. Our results demonstrate a novel role for EA in regulating TRPV1 and TRPV4 protein expression and nerve excitation in mouse inflammatory pain models.

  4. Novel dipeptide nanoparticles for effective curcumin delivery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alam S

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Shadab Alam,* Jiban J Panda,* Virander S Chauhan International Centre for Genetic Engineering and Biotechnology, New Delhi, India*Both authors contributed equally to this workBackground: Curcumin, the principal curcuminoid of the popular Indian spice turmeric, has a wide spectrum of pharmaceutical properties such as antitumor, antioxidant, antiamyloid, and anti-inflammatory activity. However, poor aqueous solubility and low bioavailability of curcumin is a major challenge in its development as a useful drug. To enhance the aqueous solubility and bioavailability of curcumin, attempts have been made to encapsulate it in liposomes, polymeric nanoparticles (NPs, lipid-based NPs, biodegradable microspheres, cyclodextrin, and hydrogels.Methods: In this work, we attempted to entrap curcumin in novel self-assembled dipeptide NPs containing a nonprotein amino acid, α,β-dehydrophenylalanine, and investigated the biological activity of dipeptide-curcumin NPs in cancer models both in vitro and in vivo.Results: Of the several dehydrodipeptides tested, methionine-dehydrophenylalanine was the most suitable one for loading and release of curcumin. Loading of curcumin in the dipeptide NPs increased its solubility, improved cellular availability, enhanced its toxicity towards different cancerous cell lines, and enhanced curcumin’s efficacy towards inhibiting tumor growth in Balb/c mice bearing a B6F10 melanoma tumor.Conclusion: These novel, highly biocompatible, and easy to construct dipeptide NPs with a capacity to load and release curcumin in a sustained manner significantly improved curcumin’s cellular uptake without altering its anticancer or other therapeutic properties. Curcumin-dipeptide NPs also showed improved in vitro and in vivo chemotherapeutic efficacy compared to curcumin alone. Such dipeptide-NPs may also improve the delivery of other potent hydrophobic drug molecules that show poor cellular uptake, bioavailability, and efficacy

  5. Inhibition of HIV-1 by curcumin A, a novel curcumin analog

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumari, Namita; Kulkarni, Amol A; Lin, Xionghao; McLean, Charlee; Ammosova, Tatiana; Ivanov, Andrey; Hipolito, Maria; Nekhai, Sergei; Nwulia, Evaristus

    2015-01-01

    Despite the remarkable success of combination antiretroviral therapy at curtailing HIV progression, emergence of drug-resistant viruses, chronic low-grade inflammation, and adverse effects of combination antiretroviral therapy treatments, including metabolic disorders collectively present the impetus for development of newer and safer antiretroviral drugs. Curcumin, a phytochemical compound, was previously reported to have some in vitro anti-HIV and anti-inflammatory activities, but poor bioavailability has limited its clinical utility. To circumvent the bioavailability problem, we derivatized curcumin to sustain retro-aldol decomposition at physiological pH. The lead compound derived, curcumin A, showed increased stability, especially in murine serum where it was stable for up to 25 hours, as compared to curcumin that only had a half-life of 10 hours. Both curcumin and curcumin A showed similar inhibition of one round of HIV-1 infection in cultured lymphoblastoid (also called CEM) T cells (IC50=0.7 μM). But in primary peripheral blood mononuclear cells, curcumin A inhibited HIV-1 more potently (IC50=2 μM) compared to curcumin (IC50=12 μM). Analysis of specific steps of HIV-1 replication showed that curcumin A inhibited HIV-1 reverse transcription, but had no effect on HIV-1 long terminal repeat basal or Tat-induced transcription, or NF-κB-driven transcription at low concentrations that affected reverse transcription. Finally, we showed curcumin A induced expression of HO-1 and decreased cell cycle progression of T cells. Our findings thus indicate that altering the core structure of curcumin could yield more stable compounds with potent antiretroviral and anti-inflammatory activities. PMID:26366056

  6. Palmitic Acid Curcumin Ester Facilitates Protection of Neuroblastoma against Oligomeric Aβ40 Insult

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhangyang Qi

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: The generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS caused by amyloid-β (Aβ is considered to be one of mechanisms underlying the development of Alzheimer’s disease. Curcumin can attenuate Aβ-induced neurotoxicity through ROS scavenging, but the protective effect of intracellular curcumin on neurocyte membranes against extracellular Aβ may be compromised. To address this issue, we synthesized a palmitic acid curcumin ester (P-curcumin which can be cultivated on the cell membrane and investigated the neuroprotective effect of P-curcumin and its interaction with Aβ. Methods: P-curcumin was prepared through chemical synthesis. Its structure was determined via nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR and high-resolution mass spectrometry (HRMS. An MTT assay was used to assess Aβ cytotoxicity and the protective effect of P-curcumin on SH-SY5Y cells. The effect of P-curcumin on Aβ-induced ROS production in vitro and in vivo were assessed based on changes in dichlorofluorescein (DCF fluorescence. A spectrophotometric method was employed to detect lipid peroxidation. To mimic the interaction of P-curcumin on cell membranes with Aβ, liposomes were prepared by thin film method. Finally, the interactions between free P-curcumin and P-curcumin cultivated on liposomes and Aβ were determined via spectrophotometry. Results: A novel derivative, palmitic acid curcumin ester was prepared and characterized. This curcumin, cultivated on the membranes of neurocytes, may prevent Aβ-mediated ROS production and may inhibit the direct interaction between Aβ and the cellular membrane. Furthermore, P-curcumin could scavenge Aβ-mediated ROS as curcumin in vitro and in vivo, and had the potential to prevent lipid peroxidation. Morphological analyses showed that P-curcumin was better than curcumin at protecting cell shape. To examine P-curcumin’s ability to attenuate direct interaction between Aβ and cell membranes, the binding affinity of Aβ to curcumin

  7. Palmitic Acid Curcumin Ester Facilitates Protection of Neuroblastoma against Oligomeric Aβ40 Insult

    OpenAIRE

    Zhangyang Qi; Meihao Wu; Yun Fu; Tengfei Huang; Tingting Wang; Yanjie Sun; Zhibo Feng; Changzheng Li

    2017-01-01

    Background/Aims: The generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) caused by amyloid-β (Aβ) is considered to be one of mechanisms underlying the development of Alzheimer’s disease. Curcumin can attenuate Aβ-induced neurotoxicity through ROS scavenging, but the protective effect of intracellular curcumin on neurocyte membranes against extracellular Aβ may be compromised. To address this issue, we synthesized a palmitic acid curcumin ester (P-curcumin) which can be cultivated on the cell membrane...

  8. CURCUMIN- PHARMACOLOGICAL ACTIONS AND ITS ROLE IN DENTISTRY

    OpenAIRE

    SHARMILA DEVI DEVARAJ, PRASANNA NEELAKANTAN

    2014-01-01

    Turmeric (Curcuma longa) is an ancient dye, flavouring and medical herb, widely used in Asian countries. It is a herb that has been widely used in Indian medicine, cookery, and cosmetics. The main component of turmeric is curcumin. Curcumin has a surprisingly wide range of beneficial properties includes anti inflammatory, antioxidant, chemopreventive, chemotherapeutic activity etc.  The activity of curcumin derived from its complex chemistry as well as its ability to influence the multiple si...

  9. Long term effect of curcumin in restoration of tumour suppressor p53 and phase-II antioxidant enzymes via activation of Nrf2 signalling and modulation of inflammation in prevention of cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laxmidhar Das

    Full Text Available Inhibition of carcinogenesis may be a consequence of attenuation of oxidative stress via activation of antioxidant defence system, restoration and stabilization of tumour suppressor proteins along with modulation of inflammatory mediators. Previously we have delineated significant role of curcumin during its long term effect in regulation of glycolytic pathway and angiogenesis, which in turn results in prevention of cancer via modulation of stress activated genes. Present study was designed to investigate long term effect of curcumin in regulation of Nrf2 mediated phase-II antioxidant enzymes, tumour suppressor p53 and inflammation under oxidative tumour microenvironment in liver of T-cell lymphoma bearing mice. Inhibition of Nrf2 signalling observed during lymphoma progression, resulted in down regulation of phase II antioxidant enzymes, p53 as well as activation of inflammatory signals. Curcumin potentiated significant increase in Nrf2 activation. It restored activity of phase-II antioxidant enzymes like GST, GR, NQO1, and tumour suppressor p53 level. In addition, curcumin modulated inflammation via upregulation of TGF-β and reciprocal regulation of iNOS and COX2. The study suggests that during long term effect, curcumin leads to prevention of cancer by inducing phase-II antioxidant enzymes via activation of Nrf2 signalling, restoration of tumour suppressor p53 and modulation of inflammatory mediators like iNOS and COX2 in liver of lymphoma bearing mice.

  10. Hypoxia attenuates inflammatory mediators production induced by Acanthamoeba via Toll-like receptor 4 signaling in human corneal epithelial cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pan, Hong [Department of Ophthalmology, Qilu Hospital, Shandong University, 107, Wenhua Xi Road, Jinan 250012 (China); The Key Laboratory of Cardiovascular Remodeling and Function Research, Chinese Ministry of Education and Chinese Ministry of Public Health, Qilu Hospital, Shandong University, 107, Wenhua Xi Road, Jinan 250012 (China); Wu, Xinyi, E-mail: xywu8868@163.com [Department of Ophthalmology, Qilu Hospital, Shandong University, 107, Wenhua Xi Road, Jinan 250012 (China)

    2012-04-13

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Hypoxia attenuates Acanthamoeba-induced the production of IL-8 and IFN-{beta}. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Hypoxia inhibits TLR4 expression in a time-dependent manner in HCECs. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Hypoxia inhibits Acanthamoeba-induced the activation of NF-{kappa}B and ERK1/2 in HCECs. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Hypoxia decreases Acanthamoeba-induced inflammatory response via TLR4 signaling. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer LPS-induced the secretion of IL-6 and IL-8 is abated by hypoxia via TLR4 signaling. -- Abstract: Acanthamoeba keratitis (AK) is a vision-threatening corneal infection that is intimately associated with contact lens use which leads to hypoxic conditions on the corneal surface. However, the effect of hypoxia on the Acanthamoeba-induced host inflammatory response of corneal epithelial cells has not been studied. In the present study, we investigated the effect of hypoxia on the Acanthamoeba-induced production of inflammatory mediators interleukin-8 (IL-8) and interferon-{beta} (IFN-{beta}) in human corneal epithelial cells and then evaluated its effects on the Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) signaling, including TLR4 and myeloid differentiation primary response gene (88) (MyD88) expression as well as the activation of nuclear factor kappa-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells (NF-{kappa}B) and extracellular signal-regulated kinases 1/2 (ERK1/2). We then studied the effect of hypoxia on a TLR4-specific inflammatory response triggered by the TLR4 ligand lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Our data showed that hypoxia significantly decreased the production of IL-8 and IFN-{beta}. Furthermore, hypoxia attenuated Acanthamoeba-triggered TLR4 expression as well as the activation of NF-{kappa}B and ERK1/2, indicating that hypoxia abated Acanthamoeba-induced inflammatory responses by affecting TLR4 signaling. Hypoxia also inhibited LPS-induced IL-6 and IL-8 secretion, myeloid differentiation primary response gene (88

  11. Hypoxia attenuates inflammatory mediators production induced by Acanthamoeba via Toll-like receptor 4 signaling in human corneal epithelial cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pan, Hong; Wu, Xinyi

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Hypoxia attenuates Acanthamoeba-induced the production of IL-8 and IFN-β. ► Hypoxia inhibits TLR4 expression in a time-dependent manner in HCECs. ► Hypoxia inhibits Acanthamoeba-induced the activation of NF-κB and ERK1/2 in HCECs. ► Hypoxia decreases Acanthamoeba-induced inflammatory response via TLR4 signaling. ► LPS-induced the secretion of IL-6 and IL-8 is abated by hypoxia via TLR4 signaling. -- Abstract: Acanthamoeba keratitis (AK) is a vision-threatening corneal infection that is intimately associated with contact lens use which leads to hypoxic conditions on the corneal surface. However, the effect of hypoxia on the Acanthamoeba-induced host inflammatory response of corneal epithelial cells has not been studied. In the present study, we investigated the effect of hypoxia on the Acanthamoeba-induced production of inflammatory mediators interleukin-8 (IL-8) and interferon-β (IFN-β) in human corneal epithelial cells and then evaluated its effects on the Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) signaling, including TLR4 and myeloid differentiation primary response gene (88) (MyD88) expression as well as the activation of nuclear factor kappa-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells (NF-κB) and extracellular signal-regulated kinases 1/2 (ERK1/2). We then studied the effect of hypoxia on a TLR4-specific inflammatory response triggered by the TLR4 ligand lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Our data showed that hypoxia significantly decreased the production of IL-8 and IFN-β. Furthermore, hypoxia attenuated Acanthamoeba-triggered TLR4 expression as well as the activation of NF-κB and ERK1/2, indicating that hypoxia abated Acanthamoeba-induced inflammatory responses by affecting TLR4 signaling. Hypoxia also inhibited LPS-induced IL-6 and IL-8 secretion, myeloid differentiation primary response gene (88) MyD88 expression and NF-κB activation, confirming that hypoxia suppressed the LPS-induced inflammatory response by affecting TLR4 signaling. In conclusion

  12. Ginsenoside Rc from Korean Red Ginseng (Panax ginseng C.A. Meyer) Attenuates Inflammatory Symptoms of Gastritis, Hepatitis and Arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Tao; Rhee, Man Hee; Lee, Jongsung; Kim, Seung Hyung; Yang, Yanyan; Kim, Han Gyung; Kim, Yong; Kim, Chaekyun; Kwak, Yi-Seong; Kim, Jong-Hoon; Cho, Jae Youl

    2016-01-01

    Korean Red Ginseng (KRG) is an herbal medicine prescribed worldwide that is prepared from Panax ginseng C.A. Meyer (Araliaceae). Out of ginseng's various components, ginsenosides are regarded as the major ingredients, exhibiting anticancer and anti-inflammatory activities. Although recent studies have focused on understanding the anti-inflammatory activities of KRG, compounds that are major anti-inflammatory components, precisely how these can suppress various inflammatory processes has not been fully elucidated yet. In this study, we aimed to identify inhibitory saponins, to evaluate the in vivo efficacy of the saponins, and to understand the inhibitory mechanisms. To do this, we employed in vitro lipopolysaccharide-treated macrophages and in vivo inflammatory mouse conditions, such as collagen (type II)-induced arthritis (CIA), EtOH/HCl-induced gastritis, and lipopolysaccharide (LPS)/D-galactosamine (D-GalN)-triggered hepatitis. Molecular mechanisms were also verified by real-time PCR, immunoblotting analysis, and reporter gene assays. Out of all the ginsenosides, ginsenoside Rc (G-Rc) showed the highest inhibitory activity against the expression of tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-[Formula: see text], interleukin (IL)-1[Formula: see text], and interferons (IFNs). Similarly, this compound attenuated inflammatory symptoms in CIA, EtOH/HCl-mediated gastritis, and LPS/D-galactosamine (D-GalN)-triggered hepatitis without altering toxicological parameters, and without inducing gastric irritation. These anti-inflammatory effects were accompanied by the suppression of TNF-[Formula: see text] and IL-6 production and the induction of anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10 in mice with CIA. G-Rc also attenuated the increased levels of luciferase activity by IRF-3 and AP-1 but not NF-[Formula: see text]B. In support of this phenomenon, G-Rc reduced TBK1, IRF-3, and ATF2 phosphorylation in the joint and liver tissues of mice with hepatitis. Therefore, our results strongly suggest that

  13. Efficacy of Biodegradable Curcumin Nanoparticles in Delaying Cataract in Diabetic Rat Model

    OpenAIRE

    Grama, Charitra N.; Suryanarayana, Palla; Patil, Madhoosudan A.; Raghu, Ganugula; Balakrishna, Nagalla; Kumar, M. N. V. Ravi; Reddy, Geereddy Bhanuprakash

    2013-01-01

    Curcumin, the active principle present in the yellow spice turmeric, has been shown to exhibit various pharmacological actions such as antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, antimicrobial, and anti-carcinogenic activities. Previously we have reported that dietary curcumin delays diabetes-induced cataract in rats. However, low peroral bioavailability is a major limiting factor for the success of clinical utilization of curcumin. In this study, we have administered curcumin encapsulated nanoparticles ...

  14. Epigallocatechin-3-gallate attenuates lipopolysaccharide-induced mastitis in rats via suppressing MAPK mediated inflammatory responses and oxidative stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jinglou; Xu, Jun; Li, Jingjing; Du, Lifen; Chen, Tao; Liu, Ping; Peng, Sisi; Wang, Mingwei; Song, Hongping

    2015-05-01

    Green tea (Camellia sinensis) is an extremely popular beverage worldwide. Epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG) is one of the major catechins isolated from green tea and contributes to its beneficial therapeutic functions including antioxidant, anti-inflammatory and anti-cancer effects. However, the effect of EGCG on mastitis is not yet known. This study was to investigate the protective potential of EGCG against mastitis in rats. The rat mastitis model was induced by injecting lipopolysaccharide (LPS) into the duct of mammary gland. The mammary gland was collected after the experimental period. The levels of mammary oxidative stress and inflammatory responses were assessed by measuring the local activities of antioxidant enzymes and the levels of inflammatory cytokines. The mammary expressions of mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs), nuclear factor κB-p65 (NFκB-p65) and hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α) were evaluated by western blot analysis. It was found that EGCG obviously normalized LPS-induced low activities of antioxidant enzymes as well as decreased the high levels of inflammatory cytokines. Additionally, EGCG inhibited the mammary over-expression of MAPKs, NFκB-p65 and HIF-1α. These results indicated that EGCG was able to attenuate LPS-induced mastitis in rats by suppressing MAPK related oxidative stress and inflammatory responses. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Radiation-induced surge of macrophage foam cell formation, oxidative damage, and cytokine release is attenuated by a nanoformulation of curcumin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soltani, Behrooz; Bodaghabadi, Narges; Ghaemi, Nasser; Sadeghizadeh, Majid

    2017-03-01

    We examined the potential of a dendrosomal nanoformulation of curcumin (DNC) for intervention of ionizing radiation (IR)-induced damage (particularly leading to atherosclerosis), employing an irradiated THP-1 macrophage model. Differentiated THP-1 macrophages were irradiated and treated with curcumin or DNC nanoformulation (and oxidized low density lipoprotein, ox-LDL, to promote foam cells). Chemical, biochemical, and genetics tools including viability and apoptosis, multiple ELISA, real-time PCR, Western blotting, enzyme activity, and fluorimetry assays were employed to illustrate IR damage as well as the DNC intervention potential. DNC per se at 10 μM exerted no cytotoxic effects on macrophages. However, it caused apoptosis in 2 Gy-irradiated macrophages which were treated with ox-LDL, chiefly through a caspase-dependent pathway involving caspase-3. Concurrently, 10 μM DNC prevented the IR-induced rise in lipid accumulation (72% decrease compared to IR control, p DNC facilitated the uptake of curcumin in irradiated macrophages, increased glutathione peroxidase expression and activity, restored glutathione (GSH) level, and upregulated the expression of a cholesterol efflux gene, ABCA1. Two other antioxidants, resveratrol and N-acetyl cycteine (NAC), could simulate some of the beneficial effects of DNC against IR-induced CD36 expression and lipid accumulation, which were obviated by buthionine sulfoximine (BSO) pre-treatment of macrophages. However, some modulatory effects of DNC, particularly on lipid accumulation and the expression of SR-A and ABCA1 genes, seemed to be independent of its antioxidant effect, since they were still observed in BSO-pretreated macrophages, depleted of GSH. DNC treatment suppresses IR-induced oxidative damage, inflammation, and foam cell formation in macrophages through multiple mechanisms.

  16. Curcumin Inhibits Gastric Inflammation Induced by Helicobacter Pylori Infection in a Mouse Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, António M.; Lopes, Teresa; Oleastro, Mónica; Gato, Inês Vale; Floch, Pauline; Benejat, Lucie; Chaves, Paula; Pereira, Teresa; Seixas, Elsa; Machado, Jorge; Guerreiro, António S.

    2015-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection triggers a sequence of gastric alterations starting with an inflammation of the gastric mucosa that, in some cases, evolves to gastric cancer. Efficient vaccination has not been achieved, thus it is essential to find alternative therapies, particularly in the nutritional field. The current study evaluated whether curcumin could attenuate inflammation of the gastric mucosa due to H. pylori infection. Twenty-eight C57BL/6 mice, were inoculated with the H. pylori SS1 strain; ten non-infected mice were used as controls. H. pylori infection in live mice was followed-up using a modified 13C-Urea Breath Test (13C-UBT) and quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Histologically confirmed, gastritis was observed in 42% of infected non-treated mice at both 6 and 18 weeks post-infection. These mice showed an up-regulation of the expression of inflammatory cytokines and chemokines, as well as of toll-like receptors (TLRs) and MyD88, at both time points. Treatment with curcumin decreased the expression of all these mediators. No inflammation was observed by histology in this group. Curcumin treatment exerted a significant anti-inflammatory effect in H. pylori-infected mucosa, pointing to the promising role of a nutritional approach in the prevention of H. pylori induced deleterious inflammation while the eradication or prevention of colonization by effective vaccine is not available. PMID:25569625

  17. Curcumin Inhibits Gastric Inflammation Induced by Helicobacter Pylori Infection in a Mouse Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    António M. Santos

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori infection triggers a sequence of gastric alterations starting with an inflammation of the gastric mucosa that, in some cases, evolves to gastric cancer. Efficient vaccination has not been achieved, thus it is essential to find alternative therapies, particularly in the nutritional field. The current study evaluated whether curcumin could attenuate inflammation of the gastric mucosa due to H. pylori infection. Twenty-eight C57BL/6 mice, were inoculated with the H. pylori SS1 strain; ten non-infected mice were used as controls. H. pylori infection in live mice was followed-up using a modified 13C-Urea Breath Test (13C-UBT and quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR. Histologically confirmed, gastritis was observed in 42% of infected non-treated mice at both 6 and 18 weeks post-infection. These mice showed an up-regulation of the expression of inflammatory cytokines and chemokines, as well as of toll-like receptors (TLRs and MyD88, at both time points. Treatment with curcumin decreased the expression of all these mediators. No inflammation was observed by histology in this group. Curcumin treatment exerted a significant anti-inflammatory effect in H. pylori-infected mucosa, pointing to the promising role of a nutritional approach in the prevention of H. pylori induced deleterious inflammation while the eradication or prevention of colonization by effective vaccine is not available.

  18. Curcumin inhibits gastric inflammation induced by Helicobacter pylori infection in a mouse model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, António M; Lopes, Teresa; Oleastro, Mónica; Gato, Inês Vale; Floch, Pauline; Benejat, Lucie; Chaves, Paula; Pereira, Teresa; Seixas, Elsa; Machado, Jorge; Guerreiro, António S

    2015-01-06

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection triggers a sequence of gastric alterations starting with an inflammation of the gastric mucosa that, in some cases, evolves to gastric cancer. Efficient vaccination has not been achieved, thus it is essential to find alternative therapies, particularly in the nutritional field. The current study evaluated whether curcumin could attenuate inflammation of the gastric mucosa due to H. pylori infection. Twenty-eight C57BL/6 mice, were inoculated with the H. pylori SS1 strain; ten non-infected mice were used as controls. H. pylori infection in live mice was followed-up using a modified 13C-Urea Breath Test (13C-UBT) and quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Histologically confirmed, gastritis was observed in 42% of infected non-treated mice at both 6 and 18 weeks post-infection. These mice showed an up-regulation of the expression of inflammatory cytokines and chemokines, as well as of toll-like receptors (TLRs) and MyD88, at both time points. Treatment with curcumin decreased the expression of all these mediators. No inflammation was observed by histology in this group. Curcumin treatment exerted a significant anti-inflammatory effect in H. pylori-infected mucosa, pointing to the promising role of a nutritional approach in the prevention of H. pylori induced deleterious inflammation while the eradication or prevention of colonization by effective vaccine is not available.

  19. Inhibition of soluble epoxide hydrolase attenuates high-fat-diet-induced hepatic steatosis by reduced systemic inflammatory status in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan Liu

    Full Text Available Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease is associated with obesity and considered an inflammatory disease. Soluble epoxide hydrolase (sEH is a major enzyme hydrolyzing epoxyeicosatrienoic acids and attenuates their cardiovascular protective and anti-inflammatory effects. We examined whether sEH inhibition can protect against high-fat (HF-diet-induced fatty liver in mice and the underlying mechanism. Compared with wild-type littermates, sEH-null mice showed lower diet-induced lipid accumulation in liver, as seen by Oil-red O staining and triglycerides levels. We studied the effect of sEH inhibition on diet-induced fatty liver by feeding C57BL/6 mice an HF diet for 8 weeks (short-term or 16 weeks (long-term and administering t-AUCB, a selective sEH inhibitor. sEH inhibition had no effect on the HF-diet-increased body and adipose tissue weight or impaired glucose tolerance but alleviated the diet-induced hepatic steatosis. Adenovirus-mediated overexpression of sEH in liver increased the level of triglycerides in liver and the hepatic inflammatory response. Surprisingly, the induced expression of sEH in liver occurred only with the long-term but not short-term HF diet, which suggests a secondary effect of HF diet on regulating sEH expression. Furthermore, sEH inhibition attenuated the HF-diet-induced increase in plasma levels of proinflammatory cytokines and their mRNA upregulation in adipose tissue, which was accompanied by increased macrophage infiltration. Therefore, sEH inhibition could alleviate HF-diet-induced hepatic steatosis, which might involve its anti-inflammatory effect in adipose tissue and direct inhibition in liver. sEH may be a therapeutic target for HF-diet-induced hepatic steatosis in inhibiting systemic inflammation.

  20. Curcumin as potential therapeutic natural product: a nanobiotechnological perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shome, Soumitra; Talukdar, Anupam Das; Choudhury, Manabendra Dutta; Bhattacharya, Mrinal Kanti; Upadhyaya, Hrishikesh

    2016-12-01

    Nanotechnology-based drug delivery systems can resolve the poor bioavailability issue allied with curcumin. The therapeutic potential of curcumin can be enhanced by making nanocomposite preparation of curcumin with metal oxide nanoparticles, poly lactic-co-glycolic acid (PLGA) nanoparticles and solid lipid nanoparticles that increases its bioavailability in the tissue. Curcumin has manifold therapeutic effects which include antidiabetic, antihypertensive, anticancer, anti-inflammatory and antimicrobial properties. Curcumin can inhibit diabetes, heavy metal and stress-induced hypertension with its antioxidant, chelating and inhibitory effects on the pathways that lead to hypertension. Curcumin is an anticancer agent that can prevent abnormal cell proliferation. Nanocurcumin is an improved form of curcumin with enhanced therapeutic properties due to improved delivery to the diseased tissue, better internalization and reduced systemic elimination. Curcumin has multiple pharmacologic effects, but its poor bioavailability reduces its therapeutic effects. By conjugating curcumin to metal oxide nanoparticles or encapsulation in lipid nanoparticles, dendrimers, nanogels and polymeric nanoparticles, the water solubility and bioavailability of curcumin can be improved and thus increase its pharmacological effectiveness. © 2016 Royal Pharmaceutical Society.

  1. Curcumin prevents human dendritic cell response to immune stimulants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shirley, Shawna A.; Montpetit, Alison J.; Lockey, R.F.; Mohapatra, Shyam S.

    2008-01-01

    Curcumin, a compound found in the Indian spice turmeric, has anti-inflammatory and immunomodulatory properties, though the mechanism remains unclear. Dendritic cells (DCs) are important to generating an immune response and the effect of curcumin on human DCs has not been explored. The role curcumin in the DC response to bacterial and viral infection was investigated in vitro using LPS and Poly I:C as models of infection. CD14 + monocytes, isolated from human peripheral blood, were cultured in GM-CSF- and IL-4-supplemented medium to generate immature DCs. Cultures were incubated with curcumin, stimulated with LPS or Poly I:C and functional assays were performed. Curcumin prevents DCs from responding to immunostimulants and inducing CD4 + T cell proliferation by blocking maturation marker, cytokine and chemokine expression and reducing both migration and endocytosis. These data suggest a therapeutic role for curcumin as an immune suppressant

  2. Release-Modulated Antioxidant Activity of a Composite Curcumin-Chitosan Polymer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Toole, Martin G; Soucy, Patricia A; Chauhan, Rajat; Raju, Mandapati V Ramakrishnam; Patel, Dhruvina N; Nunn, Betty M; Keynton, Megan A; Ehringer, William D; Nantz, Michael H; Keynton, Robert S; Gobin, Andrea S

    2016-04-11

    Curcumin is known to have immense therapeutic potential but is hindered by poor solubility and rapid degradation in solution. To overcome these shortcomings, curcumin has been conjugated to chitosan through a pendant glutaric anhydride linker using amide bond coupling chemistry. The hybrid polymer has been characterized by UV-visible, fluorescence, and infrared spectroscopies as well as zeta potential measurements and SEM imaging. The conjugation reactivity was confirmed through gel permeation chromatography and quantification of unconjugated curcumin. An analogous reaction of curcumin with glucosamine, a small molecule analogue for chitosan, was performed and the purified product characterized by mass spectrometry, UV-visible, fluorescence, and infrared spectroscopies. Conjugation of curcumin to chitosan has greatly improved curcumin aqueous solubility and stability, with no significant curcumin degradation detected after one month in solution. The absorbance and fluorescence properties of curcumin are minimally perturbed (λmax shifts of 2 and 5 nm, respectively) by the conjugation reaction. This conjugation strategy required use of one out of two curcumin phenols (one of the main antioxidant functional groups) for covalent linkage to chitosan, thus temporarily attenuating its antioxidant capacity. Hydrolysis-based release of curcumin from the polymer, however, is accompanied by full restoration of curcumin's antioxidant potential. Antioxidant assays show that curcumin radical scavenging potential is reduced by 40% after conjugation, but that full antioxidant potential is restored upon hydrolytic release from chitosan. Release studies show that curcumin is released over 19 days from the polymer and maintains a concentration of 0.23 ± 0.12 μM curcumin/mg polymer/mL solution based on 1% curcumin loading on the polymer. Release studies in the presence of carbonic anhydrase, an enzyme with known phenolic esterase activity, show no significant difference from

  3. The AMPAR Antagonist Perampanel Attenuates Traumatic Brain Injury Through Anti-Oxidative and Anti-Inflammatory Activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Tao; Dai, Shu-Hui; Jiang, Zhi-Quan; Luo, Peng; Jiang, Xiao-Fan; Fei, Zhou; Gui, Song-Bai; Qi, Yi-Long

    2017-01-01

    Perampanel is a novel α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazole propionate receptor (AMPAR) antagonist, approved in over 35 countries as an adjunctive therapy for the treatment of seizures. Recently, it was found to exert protective effects against ischemic neuronal injury in vitro. In the present study, we investigated the potential protective effects of perampanel in a traumatic brain injury (TBI) model in rats. Oral administration with perampanel at a dose of 5 mg/kg exerted no major organ-related toxicities. We found that perampanel significantly attenuated TBI-induced brain edema, brain contusion volume, and gross motor dysfunction. The results of Morris water maze test demonstrated that perampanel treatment also improved cognitive function after TBI. These neuroprotective effects were accompanied by reduced neuronal apoptosis, as evidenced by decreased TUNEL-positive cells in brain sections. Moreover, perampanel markedly inhibited lipid peroxidation and obviously preserved the endogenous antioxidant system after TBI. In addition, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) was performed at 4 and 24 h after TBI to evaluate the expression of inflammatory cytokines. The results showed that perampanel suppressed the expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines TNF-α and IL-1β, whereas increased the levels of anti-inflammatory cytokines IL-10 and TGF-β1. These data show that the orally active AMPAR antagonist perampanel affords protection against TBI-induced neuronal damage and neurological dysfunction through anti-oxidative and anti-inflammatory activity.

  4. A Chemically Modified Curcumin (CMC 2.24) Inhibits Nuclear Factor κB Activation and Inflammatory Bone Loss in Murine Models of LPS-Induced Experimental Periodontitis and Diabetes-Associated Natural Periodontitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elburki, Muna S; Rossa, Carlos; Guimarães-Stabili, Morgana R; Lee, Hsi-Ming; Curylofo-Zotti, Fabiana A; Johnson, Francis; Golub, Lorne M

    2017-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the effect of a novel chemically modified curcumin (CMC 2.24) on NF-κB and MAPK signaling and inflammatory cytokine production in two experimental models of periodontal disease in rats. Experimental model I: Periodontitis was induced by repeated injections of LPS into the gingiva (3×/week, 3 weeks); control rats received vehicle injections. CMC 2.24, or the vehicle, was administered by daily oral gavage for 4 weeks. Experimental model II: Diabetes was induced in adult male rats by streptozotocin injection; periodontal breakdown then results as a complication of uncontrolled hyperglycemia. Non-diabetic rats served as controls. CMC 2.24, or the vehicle, was administered by oral gavage daily for 3 weeks to the diabetics. Hemimaxillae and gingival tissues were harvested, and bone loss was assessed radiographically. Gingival tissues were pooled according to the experimental conditions and processed for the analysis of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) and bone-resorptive cytokines. Activation of p38 MAPK and NF-κB signaling pathways was assessed by western blot. Both LPS and diabetes induced an inflammatory process in the gingival tissues associated with excessive alveolar bone resorption and increased activation of p65 (NF-κB) and p38 MAPK. In both models, the administration of CMC 2.24 produced a marked reduction of inflammatory cytokines and MMPs in the gingival tissues, decreased bone loss, and decreased activation of p65 (NF-κB) and p38 MAPK. Inhibition of these cell signaling pathways by this novel tri-ketonic curcuminoid (natural curcumin is di-ketonic) may play a role in its therapeutic efficacy in locally and systemically associated periodontitis.

  5. Preparation of curcumin nanoparticle by using reinforcement ionic gelation technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suryani, Halid, Nur Hatidjah Awaliyah; Akib, Nur Illiyyin; Rahmanpiu, Mutmainnah, Nina

    2017-05-01

    Curcumin, a polyphenolic compound present in curcuma longa has a wide range of activities including anti-inflammatory properties. The potency of curcumin is limited by its poor oral bioavailability because of its poor solubility in aqueous. Various methods have been tried to solve the problem including its encapsulation into nanoparticle. The aim of this study is to develop curcumin nanoparticle by using reinforcement ionic gelation technique and to evaluate the stability of curcumin nanoparticles in gastrointestinal fluid. Curcumin nanoparticles were prepared by using reinforcement ionic gelation technique with different concentrations of chitosan, trypolyphosphate, natrium alginate and calcium chloride. Curcumin nanoparticles were then characterized including particle size and zeta potential by using particle size analyzer and morphology using a transmission electron microscope, entrapment efficiency using UV-Vis Spectrophotometer and chemical structure analysis by Infra Red Spectrophotometer (FTIR). Furthermore, the stability of curcumin nanoparticles were evaluated on artificial gastric fluid and artificial intestinal fluids by measuring the amount of curcumin released in the medium at a time interval. The result revealed that curcumin nanoparticles can be prepared by reinforcement ionic gelation technique, the entrapment efficiency of curcumin nanoparticles were from 86.08 to 91.41%. The average of particle size was 272.9 nm and zeta potential was 12.05 mV. The morphology examination showed that the curcumin nanoparticles have spherical shape. The stability evaluation of curcumin nanoparticles showed that the nanoparticles were stable on artificial gastric fluid and artificial intestinal fluid. This result indicates that curcumin nanoparticles have the potential to be developed for oral delivery.

  6. Curcumin, a potential therapeutic candidate for retinal diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lei-Lei; Sun, Yue; Huang, Kun; Zheng, Ling

    2013-09-01

    Curcumin, the major extraction of turmeric, has been widely used in many countries for centuries both as a spice and as a medicine. In the last decade, researchers have found the beneficial effects of curcumin on multiple disorders are due to its antioxidative, anti-inflammatory, and antiproliferative properties, as well as its novel function as an inhibitor of histone aectyltransferases. In this review, we summarize the recent progress made on studying the beneficial effects of curcumin on multiple retinal diseases, including diabetic retinopathy, glaucoma, and age-related macular degeneration. Recent clinical trials on the effectiveness of phosphatidylcholine formulated curcumin in treating eye diseases have also shown promising results, making curcumin a potent therapeutic drug candidate for inflammatory and degenerative retinal and eye diseases. © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  7. JMJD2A attenuation affects cell cycle and tumourigenic inflammatory gene regulation in lipopolysaccharide stimulated neuroectodermal stem cells

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    Das, Amitabh, E-mail: amitabhdas.kn@gmail.com [Department of Bionanotechnology, Hanyang University, Seoul 133-791 (Korea, Republic of); Chai, Jin Choul, E-mail: jincchai@gmail.com [Department of Molecular and Life Science, Hanyang University, 1271 Sa 3-dong, Ansan 426-791, Gyeonggi-do (Korea, Republic of); Jung, Kyoung Hwa, E-mail: khjung2@gmail.com [Department of Molecular and Life Science, Hanyang University, 1271 Sa 3-dong, Ansan 426-791, Gyeonggi-do (Korea, Republic of); Das, Nando Dulal, E-mail: nando.hu@gmail.com [Clinical Research Centre, Inha University School of Medicine, Incheon 400-711 (Korea, Republic of); Kang, Sung Chul, E-mail: gujiju11@gmail.com [Department of Molecular and Life Science, Hanyang University, 1271 Sa 3-dong, Ansan 426-791, Gyeonggi-do (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Young Seek, E-mail: yslee@hanyang.ac.kr [Department of Molecular and Life Science, Hanyang University, 1271 Sa 3-dong, Ansan 426-791, Gyeonggi-do (Korea, Republic of); Seo, Hyemyung, E-mail: hseo@hanyang.ac.kr [Department of Molecular and Life Science, Hanyang University, 1271 Sa 3-dong, Ansan 426-791, Gyeonggi-do (Korea, Republic of); Chai, Young Gyu, E-mail: ygchai@hanyang.ac.kr [Department of Bionanotechnology, Hanyang University, Seoul 133-791 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Molecular and Life Science, Hanyang University, 1271 Sa 3-dong, Ansan 426-791, Gyeonggi-do (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-11-01

    JMJD2A is a lysine trimethyl-specific histone demethylase that is highly expressed in a variety of tumours. The role of JMJD2A in tumour progression remains unclear. The objectives of this study were to identify JMJD2A-regulated genes and understand the function of JMJD2A in p53-null neuroectodermal stem cells (p53{sup −/−} NE-4Cs). We determined the effect of LPS as a model of inflammation in p53{sup −/−} NE-4Cs and investigated whether the epigenetic modifier JMJD2A alter the expression of tumourigenic inflammatory genes. Global gene expression was measured in JMJD2A knockdown (kd) p53{sup −/−} NE-4Cs and in LPS-stimulated JMJD2A-kd p53{sup −/−} NE-4C cells. JMJD2A attenuation significantly down-regulated genes were Cdca2, Ccnd2, Ccnd1, Crebbp, IL6rα, and Stat3 related with cell cycle, proliferation, and inflammatory-disease responses. Importantly, some tumour-suppressor genes including Dapk3, Timp2 and TFPI were significantly up-regulated but were not affected by silencing of the JMJD2B. Furthermore, we confirmed the attenuation of JMJD2A also down-regulated Cdca2, Ccnd2, Crebbp, and Rest in primary NSCs isolated from the forebrains of E15 embryos of C57/BL6J mice with effective p53 inhibitor pifithrin-α (PFT-α). Transcription factor (TF) motif analysis revealed known binding patterns for CDC5, MYC, and CREB, as well as three novel motifs in JMJD2A-regulated genes. IPA established molecular networks. The molecular network signatures and functional gene-expression profiling data from this study warrants further investigation as an effective therapeutic target, and studies to elucidate the molecular mechanism of JMJD2A-kd-dependent effects in neuroectodermal stem cells should be performed. - Highlights: • Significant up-regulation of epigenetic modifier JMJD2A mRNA upon LPS treatment. • Inhibition of JMJD2A attenuated key inflammatory and tumourigenic genes. • Establishing IPA based functional genomics in JMJD2A-attenuated p53{sup

  8. Dark chocolate attenuates intracellular pro-inflammatory reactivity to acute psychosocial stress in men: A randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuebler, Ulrike; Arpagaus, Angela; Meister, Rebecca E; von Känel, Roland; Huber, Susanne; Ehlert, Ulrike; Wirtz, Petra H

    2016-10-01

    Flavanol-rich dark chocolate consumption relates to lower risk of cardiovascular mortality, but underlying mechanisms are elusive. We investigated the effect of acute dark chocolate consumption on inflammatory measures before and after stress. Healthy men, aged 20-50years, were randomly assigned to a single intake of either 50g of flavanol-rich dark chocolate (n=31) or 50g of optically identical flavanol-free placebo-chocolate (n=34). Two hours after chocolate intake, both groups underwent the 15-min Trier Social Stress Test. We measured DNA-binding-activity of the pro-inflammatory transcription factor NF-κB (NF-κB-BA) in peripheral blood mononuclear cells, as well as plasma and whole blood mRNA levels of the pro-inflammatory cytokines IL-1β and IL-6, and the anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10, prior to chocolate intake as well as before and several times after stress. We also repeatedly measured the flavanol epicatechin and the stress hormones epinephrine and cortisol in plasma and saliva, respectively. Compared to the placebo-chocolate-group, the dark-chocolate-group revealed a marginal increase in IL-10 mRNA prior to stress (p=0.065), and a significantly blunted stress reactivity of NF-κB-BA, IL-1β mRNA, and IL-6 mRNA (p's⩽0.036) with higher epicatechin levels relating to lower pro-inflammatory stress reactivity (p's⩽0.033). Stress hormone changes to stress were controlled. None of the other measures showed a significant chocolate effect (p's⩾0.19). Our findings indicate that acute flavanol-rich dark chocolate exerts anti-inflammatory effects both by increasing mRNA expression of the anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10 and by attenuating the intracellular pro-inflammatory stress response. This mechanism may add to beneficial effects of dark chocolate on cardiovascular health. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Sirtuin inhibition attenuates the production of inflammatory cytokines in lipopolysaccharide-stimulated macrophages

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    Fernandes, Claudia A. [Universite catholique de Louvain, Louvain Drug Research Institute (LDRI), Pharmaceutics and Drug Delivery Research Group, Brussels B-1200 (Belgium); Fievez, Laurence [University of Liege, GIGA-Research, Laboratory of Cellular and Molecular Immunology, Liege B-4000 (Belgium); Neyrinck, Audrey M.; Delzenne, Nathalie M. [Universite catholique de Louvain, LDRI, Metabolism and Nutrition Research Group, Brussels B-1200 (Belgium); Bureau, Fabrice [University of Liege, GIGA-Research, Laboratory of Cellular and Molecular Immunology, Liege B-4000 (Belgium); Vanbever, Rita, E-mail: rita.vanbever@uclouvain.be [Universite catholique de Louvain, Louvain Drug Research Institute (LDRI), Pharmaceutics and Drug Delivery Research Group, Brussels B-1200 (Belgium)

    2012-04-20

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Lipopolysaccharide-stimulated macrophages were treated with cambinol and sirtinol. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cambinol and sirtinol decreased lipopolysaccharide-induced cytokines. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cambinol decreased NF-{kappa}B activity but had no impact on p38 MAPK activation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Sirtuins are an interesting target for the treatment of inflammatory diseases. -- Abstract: In several inflammatory conditions such as rheumatoid arthritis or sepsis, the regulatory mechanisms of inflammation are inefficient and the excessive inflammatory response leads to damage to the host. Sirtuins are class III histone deacetylases that modulate the activity of several transcription factors that are implicated in immune responses. In this study, we evaluated the impact of sirtuin inhibition on the activation of lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated J774 macrophages by assessing the production of inflammatory cytokines. The pharmacologic inhibition of sirtuins decreased the production of tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-{alpha}) interleukin 6 (IL-6) and Rantes. The reduction of cytokine production was associated with decreased nuclear factor kappa B (NF-{kappa}B) activity and inhibitor kappa B alpha (I{kappa}B{alpha}) phosphorylation while no impact was observed on the phosphorylation status of p38 mitogen-activated kinase (p38 MAPK). This work shows that sirtuin pharmacologic inhibitors are a promising tool for the treatment of inflammatory conditions.

  10. Telmisartan attenuates colon inflammation, oxidative perturbations and apoptosis in a rat model of experimental inflammatory bowel disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hany H Arab

    Full Text Available Accumulating evidence has indicated the implication of angiotensin II in the pathogenesis of inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD via its proinflammatory features. Telmisartan (TLM is an angiotensin II receptor antagonist with marked anti-inflammatory and antioxidant actions that mediated its cardio-, reno- and hepatoprotective actions. However, its impact on IBD has not been previously explored. Thus, we aimed to investigate the potential alleviating effects of TLM in tri-nitrobenezene sulphonic acid (TNBS-induced colitis in rats. Pretreatment with TLM (10 mg/kg p.o. attenuated the severity of colitis as evidenced by decrease of disease activity index (DAI, colon weight/length ratio, macroscopic damage, histopathological findings and leukocyte migration. TLM suppressed the inflammatory response via attenuation of tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α, prostaglandin E2 (PGE2 and myeloperoxidase (MPO activity as a marker of neutrophil infiltration besides restoration of interleukin-10 (IL-10. TLM also suppressed mRNA and protein expression of nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB p65 and mRNA of cyclo-oxygenase-2 (COX-2 and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS proinflammatory genes with concomitant upregulation of PPAR-γ. The alleviation of TLM to colon injury was also associated with inhibition of oxidative stress as evidenced by suppression of lipid peroxides and nitric oxide (NO besides boosting glutathione (GSH, total anti-oxidant capacity (TAC and the activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD and glutathione peroxidase (GPx. With respect to apoptosis, TLM downregulated the increased mRNA, protein expression and activity of caspase-3. It also suppressed the elevation of cytochrome c and Bax mRNA besides the upregulation of Bcl-2. Together, these findings highlight evidences for the beneficial effects of TLM in IBD which are mediated through modulation of colonic inflammation, oxidative stress and apoptosis.

  11. Maternal obesity attenuates predelivery inflammatory reaction in C57BL/6N mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Appel, Sarah; Schulze-Edinghausen, Merle; Kretschmer, Tobias; Storck, Sarah; Janoschek, Ruth; Bae-Gartz, Inga; Handwerk, Marion; Wohlfarth, Maria; Nüsken, Kai-Dietrich; Hucklenbruch-Rother, Eva; Heykants, Malte; Mahabir, Esther; Dötsch, Jörg

    2017-08-01

    Inflammation and oxidative stress are known to increase before labour. Whether gonadal white adipose tissue (gWAT) participates in this process and whether labour-related processes in placental and adipose tissue are altered in obese women is unknown. In our mouse model, lean mice display elevated placental inflammation and oxidative stress towards the end of pregnancy, accompanied by an increased expression of pro-inflammatory factors in gWAT. Obese mice also display elevated levels of pro-inflammatory factors and oxidative stress in placentas shortly before birth. However, placental infiltration with leukocytes and an increase in gWAT pro-inflammatory factor expression in obese dams are lacking. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Ischemic preconditioning attenuates remote pulmonary inflammatory infiltration of diabetic rats with an intestinal and hepatic ischemia-reperfusion injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farid José Thomaz Neto

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: To assess ischemic preconditioning (IPC effects in pulmonary lesion in intestinal and hepatic ischemia-reperfusion (IR injury models using diabetic rats. METHODS: Diabetes (DM was induced in 28 male Wistar rats by alloxan (42 mg/kg, IV. After 28 days, severe DM rats were submitted to intestinal or hepatic IR injury with or without IPC. Intestinal IR (30 min of mesenteric artery occlusion and 30 min of reperfusion; n=6 and IPC groups (10 min ischemia, 10 min reperfusion, followed by intestinal IR; n=6, and Hepatic IR (30 min of hepatic pedicle occlusion and 30 min of reperfusion; n=5 and IPC groups (10 min ischemia, 10 min reperfusion, followed by hepatic IR; n=5, were compared to DM rats group (n=6. Plasmatic lactate, glycemia were measured before and after IR injury. Histomorphology of lung was performed counting inflammatory cells. Data was expressed in mean± SE. P<0.05. RESULTS: Glycemia and lactate were similar among groups. IPC did not interfere in these parameters. On histological evaluation, IR increased inflammatory cells infiltration in pulmonary parenchyma compared to control in both IR injury models. IPC attenuated inflammatory infiltration in lungs. CONCLUSION: Ischemic preconditioning protects against remote ischemia-reperfusion injury in lung on intestinal or hepatic ischemia-reperfusion model with acute diabetes.

  13. Schinus terebinthifolius Raddi ( Aroeira) leaves oil attenuates inflammatory responses in cutaneous wound healing in mice 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estevão, Lígia Reis Moura; Simões, Ricardo Santos; Cassini-Vieira, Puebla; Canesso, Maria Cecilia Campos; Barcelos, Lucíola da Silva; Rachid, Milene Alvarenga; Câmara, Cláudio Augusto Gomes da; Evêncio-Neto, Joaquim

    2017-09-01

    To investigated the inflammatory, angiogenic and fibrogenic activities of the Schinus terebinthifolius Raddi leaves oil (STRO) on wound healing. The excisional wound healing model was used to evaluate the effects of STRO. The mice were divided into two groups: Control, subjected to vehicle solution (ointment lanolin/vaseline base), or STRO- treated group, administered topically once a day for 3, 7 and 14 days post-excision. We evaluated the macroscopic wound closure rate; the inflammation was evaluated by leukocytes accumulation and cytokine levels in the wounds. The accumulation of neutrophil and macrophages in the wounds were determined by assaying myeloperoxidase and N-acetyl-β-D-glucosaminidase activities. The levels of TNF-α, CXCL-1 and CCL-2 in wound were evaluated by ELISA assay. Angiogenesis and collagen fibers deposition were evaluated histologically. We observed that macroscopic wound closure rate was improved in wounds from STRO-group than Control-group. The wounds treated with STRO promoted a reduction in leucocyte accumulation and in pro-inflammatory cytokine. Moreover, STRO treatment increased significantly the number of blood vessels and collagen fibers deposition, as compared to control group. Topical application of STRO display anti-inflammatory and angiogenic effects, as well as improvement in collagen replacement, suggesting a putative use of this herb for the development of phytomedicines to treat inflammatory diseases, including wound healing.

  14. Salsalate attenuates diet induced non-alcoholic steatohepatitis in mice by decreasing lipogenic and inflammatory processes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Liang, W.; Verschuren, L.; Mulder, P.; Hoorn, J.W.A. van der; Verheij, J.; Dam, A.D. van; Boon, M.R.; Princen, H.M.G.; Havekes, L.M.; Kleemann, R.; Hoek, A.M. van den

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Salsalate (salicylsalicylic acid) is an anti-inflammatory drug that was recently found to exert beneficial metabolic effects on glucose and lipid metabolism. Although its utility in the prevention and management of a wide range of vascular disorders, including type 2 diabetes

  15. Dietary L-arginine supplementation attenuates lipopolysaccharide-induced inflammatory response in broiler chickens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Two experiments were conducted to investigate the effect of dietary L-arginine (Arg) supplementation on inflammatory response and innate immunity of broilers. Experiment 1 was designed as a 2 × 3 factorial arrangement (n = 8 cages/treatment; 6 birds/cage) with 3 dietary Arg concentrations (1.05, 1.4...

  16. Induction of MicroRNA-21 with Exogenous Hydrogen Sulfide Attenuates Myocardial Ischemic and Inflammatory Injury in Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toldo, Stefano; Das, Anindita; Mezzaroma, Eleonora; Chau, Vinh Q.; Marchetti, Carlo; Durrant, David; Samidurai, Arun; Van Tassell, Benjamin W.; Yin, Chang; Ockaili, Ramzi A.; Vigneshwar, Navin; Mukhopadhyay, Nitai D.; Kukreja, Rakesh C.; Abbate, Antonio; Salloum, Fadi N.

    2014-01-01

    Background Maintaining physiological levels of hydrogen sulfide (H2S) during ischemia is necessary to limit injury to the heart. Due to the anti-inflammatory effects of H2S, we proposed that the H2S donor, Na2S, would attenuate myocardial injury through upregulation of ‘protective’ microRNA (miR)-21 and suppression of the inflammasome, a macromolecular structure that amplifies inflammation and mediates further injury. Methods and Results Na2S-induced miR-21 expression was measured by qPCR in adult primary rat cardiomyocytes and in the mouse heart. We measured inflammasome formation and activity in cardiomyocytes challenged with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and adenosine-tri-phosphate (ATP) or simulated ischemia/reoxygenation; and in the heart following regional myocardial ischemia/reperfusion (I/R), in the presence or absence of Na2S. To assess the direct anti-inflammatory effects of H2S in vivo, we utilized a peritonitis model by way of intraperitoneal injection of zymosan A. Na2S attenuated inflammasome formation and activity - measured by counting cytoplasmic aggregates of the scaffold protein Apoptosis Speck-like protein containing a Caspase-recruitment domain (ASC; −57%) and caspase-1 activity (−50%) in isolated cardiomyocytes and in the mouse heart (all P<0.05). Na2S also inhibited apoptosis (−38%) and necrosis (−43%) in cardiomyocytes in vitro and reduced myocardial infarct size (−63%) following I/R injury in vivo (all P<0.05). These protective effects were absent in cells treated with antagomiR-21 and in miR-21 KO mice. Na2S also limited the severity of inflammasome-dependent inflammation in the model of peritonitis (P<0.05) in wild-type but not in miR-21 KO mice. Conclusions Na2S induces cardioprotective effects through miR-21-dependent attenuation of ischemic and inflammatory injury in cardiomyocytes. PMID:24825878

  17. Anti-ischemic effect of curcumin in rat brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shukla, Pradeep K; Khanna, Vinay K; Ali, Mohd M; Khan, Mohd Y; Srimal, Rikhab C

    2008-06-01

    Turmeric has been in use since ancient times as a condiment and due to its medicinal properties. Curcumin, the yellow colouring principle in turmeric, is polyphenolic and major active constituent. Besides anti-inflammatory, thrombolytic and anticarcinogenic activities, curcumin also possesses strong antioxidant property. In view of the novel combination of properties, neuroprotective efficacy of curcumin was studied in rat middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) model. Rats were subjected to 2 h of focal ischemia followed by 72 h of reperfusion. They were pre-treated with curcumin (100 mg/kg, po) for 5 days prior to MCAO and for another 3 days after MCAO. The parameters studied were behavioural, biochemical and histological. Treatment with curcumin could significantly improve neurobehavioral performance compared to untreated ischemic rats as judged by its effect on rota-rod performance and grid walking. A significant inhibition in lipid peroxidation and an increase in superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity in corpus striatum and cerebral cortex was observed following treatment with curcumin in MCAO rats as compared to MCAO group. Intracellular calcium levels were decreased following treatment with curcumin in MCAO rats. Histologically, a reduction in the infarct area from 33% to 24% was observed in MCAO rats treated with curcumin. The study demonstrates the protective efficacy of curcumin in rat MCAO model.

  18. Novel delivery system for natural products: Nano-curcumin formulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahimi, Hamid Reza; Nedaeinia, Reza; Sepehri Shamloo, Alireza; Nikdoust, Shima; Kazemi Oskuee, Reza

    2016-01-01

    Curcumin is extracted from Curcuma longa and regulates the intracellular signal pathways which control the growth of cancerous cell, inflammation, invasion and apoptosis. Curcumin molecules have special intrinsic features that can target the intracellular enzymes, genome (DNA) and messengers (RNA). A wide range of studies have been conducted on the physicochemical traits and pharmacological effects of curcumin on different diseases like cardiovascular diseases, diabetes, cancer, rheumatoid arthritis, Alzheimer's, inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), and even it has wound healing. Oral bioavailability of curcumin is rather poor, which would certainly put some boundaries in the employment of this drug. Bibliographical searches were performed using MEDLINE/ScienceDirect/OVID up to February 2015 using the following keywords (all fields): ("Curcumin" OR "Curcuma longa") AND [(nanoparticles) OR (Nanomicelles) OR (micro emulsions) OR (liposome) OR (phospholipid). Consequently, for any developments of curcumin in the future, analogues of curcumin that have better bioavailability or substitute formulations are needed crucially. These studies indicated that nanotechnology can formulate curcumin effectively, and this nano-formulated curcumin with a potent ability against various cancer cells, were represented to have better efficacy and bioavailability under in vivo conditions.

  19. Peritoneal administration of Met-RANTES attenuates inflammatory and nociceptive responses in a murine neuropathic pain model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liou, Jiin-Tarng; Mao, Chih-Chieh; Ching-Wah Sum, Daniel; Liu, Fu-Chao; Lai, Ying-Shu; Li, Jui-Chin; Day, Yuan-Ji

    2013-01-01

    The C-C motif chemokine ligand 5 (CCL5; also known as regulated on activation, normal T expressed and secreted, or RANTES) is a member of the CC family of chemokines that specifically attract and activate leukocytes to sites of inflammation. Although CCL5 has been implicated in the processing of pain, its detailed mechanisms of action are still unknown. In this study, we investigated the potential of the Met-RANTES, a selective CCL5 receptor antagonist, via peritoneal administration to modulate the recruitment of inflammatory cells in injured sites and attenuate nociceptive responses in a neuropathic pain model in mice. Nociceptive sensitization, immune cell infiltration, multiple cytokine secretion, and opioid peptide expression in damaged nerves were studied. Our results indicated that Met-RANTES-treated mice had less behavioral hypersensitivity after partial sciatic nerve ligation. Macrophage infiltration, pro-inflammatory cytokine (TNFα, IL-1β, IL-6, and IFNγ) protein secretion, and enkephalin, β-endorphin, and dynorphin mRNA expression in damaged nerves following partial sciatic nerve ligation were significantly decreased, and anti-inflammatory cytokine (IL-10) protein was significantly increased in Met-RANTES-treated mice. These results suggest that CCL5 is capable of regulating the microenvironment that controls behavioral hypersensitivity at the level of the peripheral injured site in a murine chronic neuropathic pain model. The present study identifies the potent pro-inflammatory potential of CCL5 and verifies the possible role of selective CCL5 receptor inhibitor in a murine neuropathic pain model. Copyright © 2013 American Pain Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Myeloid-specific Acat1 ablation attenuates inflammatory responses in macrophages, improves insulin sensitivity, and suppresses diet-induced obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Li-Hao; Melton, Elaina M; Li, Haibo; Sohn, Paul; Jung, DaeYoung; Tsai, Ching-Yi; Ma, Tian; Sano, Hiroyuki; Ha, HyeKyung; Friedline, Randall H; Kim, Jason K; Usherwood, Edward; Chang, Catherine Cy; Chang, Ta-Yuan

    2018-03-13

    Macrophages are phagocytes that play important roles in health and diseases. Acyl-CoA:cholesterol acyltransferase 1 [ACAT1] converts cellular cholesterol to cholesteryl esters, and is expressed in many cell types. Unlike global Acat1 knockout [KO], myeloid-specific Acat1 KO [Acat1 -M/-M ] does not cause overt abnormalities in mice. Here we performed analyses in age and sex matched Acat1 -M/-M and wild-type mice on chow or Western diet, and discovered that Acat1 -M/-M mice exhibit resistance to Western diet-induced obesity. On both chow and Western diets, Acat1 -M/-M mice display decreased adipocyte size and increased insulin sensitivity. When.fed with Western diet, Acat1 -M/-M mice contain fewer infiltrating macrophages in white adipose tissue (WAT), with significantly diminished inflammatory phenotype. Without Acat1, the [Ly6C hi ] monocytes express reduced levels of integrin beta 1, which plays a key role in the interaction between monocytes and the inflamed endothelium. Adoptive transfer experiment showed that the appearance of leukocytes from Acat1 -M/-M mice to the inflamed WAT of WT mice is significantly diminished. Under Western diet, Acat1 -M/-M causes suppression of multiple pro-inflammatory genes in WAT. Cell culture experiments show that in Raw 264.7 macrophages, inhibiting ACAT1 with a small molecule ACAT1-specific inhibitor reduces inflammatory responses to lipopolysaccharide. We conclude that under Western diet, blocking ACAT1 in macrophages attenuates inflammation in WAT. Other results show that Acat1 -M/-M does not compromise anti-viral immune response. Our work reveals that blocking ACAT1 -M/-M suppresses diet-induced obesity in part by slowing down monocyte infiltration to WAT, as well as by reducing the inflammatory responses of adipose tissue macrophages.

  1. Hypoxia attenuates purinergic P2X receptor-induced inflammatory gene expression in brainstem microglia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Smith SMC

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Stephanie MC Smith,1,2 Gordon S Mitchell,1,2 Scott A Friedle,3 Christine M Sibigtroth,1 Stéphane Vinit,1 Jyoti J Watters1–31Department of Comparative Biosciences, 2Comparative Biomedical Sciences Training Program, 3Program in Cellular and Molecular Biology, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI, USAAbstract: Hypoxia and increased extracellular nucleotides are frequently coincident in the brainstem. Extracellular nucleotides are potent modulators of microglial inflammatory gene expression via P2X purinergic receptor activation. Although hypoxia is also known to modulate inflammatory gene expression, little is known about how hypoxia or P2X receptor activation alone affects inflammatory molecule production in brainstem microglia, nor how hypoxia and P2X receptor signaling interact when they occur together. In the study reported here, we investigated the ability of a brief episode of hypoxia (2 hours in the presence and absence of the nonselective P2X receptor agonist 2′(3′-O-(4-benzoylbenzoyladenosine-5′-triphosphate (BzATP to promote inflammatory gene expression in brainstem microglia in adult rats. We evaluated inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS, tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFα, and interleukin (IL-6 messenger RNA levels in immunomagnetically isolated brainstem microglia. While iNOS and IL-6 gene expression increased with hypoxia and BzATP alone, TNFα expression was unaffected. Surprisingly, BzATP-induced inflammatory effects were lost after hypoxia, suggesting that hypoxia impairs proinflammatory P2X-receptor signaling. We also evaluated the expression of key P2X receptors activated by BzATP, namely P2X1, P2X4, and P2X7. While hypoxia did not alter their expression, BzATP upregulated P2X4 and P2X7 mRNAs; these effects were ablated in hypoxia. Although both P2X4 and P2X7 receptor expression correlated with increased microglial iNOS and IL-6 levels in microglia from normoxic rats, in hypoxia, P2X7 only correlated with IL-6, and P2X

  2. Curcumin enhances recovery of pancreatic islets from cellular stress induced inflammation and apoptosis in diabetic rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rashid, Kahkashan; Sil, Parames C.

    2015-01-01

    The phytochemical, curcumin, has been reported to play many beneficial roles. However, under diabetic conditions, the detail mechanism of its beneficial action in the glucose homeostasis regulatory organ, pancreas, is poorly understood. The present study has been designed and carried out to explore the role of curcumin in the pancreatic tissue of STZ induced and cellular stress mediated diabetes in eight weeks old male Wistar rats. Diabetes was induced with a single intraperitoneal dose of STZ (65 mg/kg body weight). Post to diabetes induction, animals were treated with curcumin at a dose of 100 mg/kg body weight for eight weeks. Underlying molecular and cellular mechanism was determined using various biochemical assays, DNA fragmentation, FACS, histology, immunoblotting and ELISA. Treatment with curcumin reduced blood glucose level, increased plasma insulin and mitigated oxidative stress related markers. In vivo and in vitro experimental results revealed increased levels of proinflammatory cytokines (TNF-α, IL1-β and IFN-γ), reduced level of cellular defense proteins (Nrf-2 and HO-1) and glucose transporter (GLUT-2) along with enhanced levels of signaling molecules of ER stress dependent and independent apoptosis (cleaved Caspase-12/9/8/3) in STZ administered group. Treatment with curcumin ameliorated all the adverse changes and helps the organ back to its normal physiology. Results suggest that curcumin protects pancreatic beta-cells by attenuating inflammatory responses, and inhibiting ER/mitochondrial dependent and independent pathways of apoptosis and crosstalk between them. This uniqueness and absence of any detectable adverse effect proposes the possibility of using this molecule as an effective protector in the cellular stress mediated diabetes mellitus. - Highlights: • STZ induced cellular stress plays a vital role in pancreatic dysfunction. • Cellular stress causes inflammation, pancreatic islet cell death and diabetes. • Deregulation of Nrf-2

  3. Curcumin enhances recovery of pancreatic islets from cellular stress induced inflammation and apoptosis in diabetic rats

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    Rashid, Kahkashan; Sil, Parames C., E-mail: parames@jcbose.ac.in

    2015-02-01

    The phytochemical, curcumin, has been reported to play many beneficial roles. However, under diabetic conditions, the detail mechanism of its beneficial action in the glucose homeostasis regulatory organ, pancreas, is poorly understood. The present study has been designed and carried out to explore the role of curcumin in the pancreatic tissue of STZ induced and cellular stress mediated diabetes in eight weeks old male Wistar rats. Diabetes was induced with a single intraperitoneal dose of STZ (65 mg/kg body weight). Post to diabetes induction, animals were treated with curcumin at a dose of 100 mg/kg body weight for eight weeks. Underlying molecular and cellular mechanism was determined using various biochemical assays, DNA fragmentation, FACS, histology, immunoblotting and ELISA. Treatment with curcumin reduced blood glucose level, increased plasma insulin and mitigated oxidative stress related markers. In vivo and in vitro experimental results revealed increased levels of proinflammatory cytokines (TNF-α, IL1-β and IFN-γ), reduced level of cellular defense proteins (Nrf-2 and HO-1) and glucose transporter (GLUT-2) along with enhanced levels of signaling molecules of ER stress dependent and independent apoptosis (cleaved Caspase-12/9/8/3) in STZ administered group. Treatment with curcumin ameliorated all the adverse changes and helps the organ back to its normal physiology. Results suggest that curcumin protects pancreatic beta-cells by attenuating inflammatory responses, and inhibiting ER/mitochondrial dependent and independent pathways of apoptosis and crosstalk between them. This uniqueness and absence of any detectable adverse effect proposes the possibility of using this molecule as an effective protector in the cellular stress mediated diabetes mellitus. - Highlights: • STZ induced cellular stress plays a vital role in pancreatic dysfunction. • Cellular stress causes inflammation, pancreatic islet cell death and diabetes. • Deregulation of Nrf-2

  4. Inhibition of HIV-1 by curcumin A, a novel curcumin analog

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kumari N

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Namita Kumari,1,2,* Amol A Kulkarni,3,* Xionghao Lin,2 Charlee McLean,1 Tatiana Ammosova,2 Andrey Ivanov,2 Maria Hipolito,1 Sergei Nekhai,2 Evaristus Nwulia11Translational Neuroscience Laboratory, 2Department of Medicine, Center for Sickle Cell Disease, College of Medicine, 3College of Pharmacy, Howard University, Washington, DC, USA*These authors contributed equally to this study Abstract: Despite the remarkable success of combination antiretroviral therapy at curtailing HIV progression, emergence of drug-resistant viruses, chronic low-grade inflammation, and adverse effects of combination antiretroviral therapy treatments, including metabolic disorders collectively present the impetus for development of newer and safer antiretroviral drugs. Curcumin, a phytochemical compound, was previously reported to have some in vitro anti-HIV and anti-inflammatory activities, but poor bioavailability has limited its clinical utility. To circumvent the bioavailability problem, we derivatized curcumin to sustain retro-aldol decomposition at physiological pH. The lead compound derived, curcumin A, showed increased stability, especially in murine serum where it was stable for up to 25 hours, as compared to curcumin that only had a half-life of 10 hours. Both curcumin and curcumin A showed similar inhibition of one round of HIV-1 infection in cultured lymphoblastoid (also called CEM T cells (IC50=0.7 µM. But in primary peripheral blood mononuclear cells, curcumin A inhibited HIV-1 more potently (IC50=2 µM compared to curcumin (IC50=12 µM. Analysis of specific steps of HIV-1 replication showed that curcumin A inhibited HIV-1 reverse transcription, but had no effect on HIV-1 long terminal repeat basal or Tat-induced transcription, or NF-κB-driven transcription at low concentrations that affected reverse transcription. Finally, we showed curcumin A induced expression of HO-1 and decreased cell cycle progression of T cells. Our findings thus indicate that

  5. Blueberry polyphenols attenuate kainic acid-induced decrements in cognition and alter inflammatory gene expression in rat hippocampus

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    Shukitt-Hale, Barbara; Lau, Francis C.; Carey, Amanda N.; Galli, Rachel L.; Spangler, Edward L.; Ingram, Donald K.; Joseph, James A.

    2016-01-01

    Cognitive impairment in age-related neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's disease may be partly due to long-term exposure and increased susceptibility to inflammatory insults. In the current study, we investigated whether polyphenols in blueberries can reduce the deleterious effects of inflammation induced by central administration of kainic acid by altering the expression of genes associated with inflammation. To this end, 4-month-old male Fischer-344 (F344) rats were fed a control, 0.015% piroxicam (an NSAID) or 2% blueberry diet for 8 weeks before either Ringer's buffer or kainic acid was bilaterally micro-infused into the hippocampus. Two weeks later, following behavioral evaluation, the rats were killed and total RNA from the hippocampus was extracted and used in real-time quantitative RT-PCR (qRT-PCR) to analyze the expression of inflammation-related genes. Kainic acid had deleterious effects on cognitive behavior as kainic acid-injected rats on the control diet exhibited increased latencies to find a hidden platform in the Morris water maze compared to Ringer's buffer-injected rats and utilized non-spatial strategies during probe trials. The blueberry diet, and to a lesser degree the piroxicam diet, was able to improve cognitive performance. Immunohistochemical analyses of OX-6 expression revealed that kainic acid produced an inflammatory response by increasing the OX-6 positive areas in the hippocampus of kainic acid-injected rats. Kainic acid up-regulated the expression of the inflammatory cytokines IL-1β and TNF-α, the neurotrophic factor IGF-1, and the transcription factor NF-κB. Blueberry and piroxicam supplementations were found to attenuate the kainic acid-induced increase in the expression of IL-1β, TNF-α, and NF-κB, while only blueberry was able to augment the increased IGF-1 expression. These results indicate that blueberry polyphenols attenuate learning impairments following neurotoxic insult and exert anti-inflammatory actions

  6. Curcumin and aging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curcumin has been used commonly as a spice, food additive, and an herbal medicine worldwide. Known as a bioactive polyphenolic, curcumin has a broad range of beneficial properties to human health. Recently, active research on curcumin with respect to aging and related traits in model organisms has d...

  7. Flavonoids of Polygonum hydropiper L. attenuates lipopolysaccharide-induced inflammatory injury via suppressing phosphorylation in MAPKs pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Junyu; Wei, Yingyi; Hu, Tingjun

    2016-01-22

    Polygonum hydropiper L. is widely used as a traditional remedy for the treatment of dysentery, gastroenteritis. It has been used to relieve swelling and pain, dispel wind and remove dampness, eliminate abundant phlegm and inflammatory for a long time. Previous study showed that antioxidants especially flavonoids pretreatment alleviated sepsis-induced injury in vitro and in vivo. In the present study, the possible anti-inflammatory effect of flavonoids from normal butanol fraction of Polygonum hydropiper L. extract (FNP) against inflammation induced by lipopolysaccharide (LPS) was evaluated in vivo and in vitro. The content of total flavonoid of FNP was determined by the aluminum colorimetric method. The content of rutin, quercetin and quercitrin was determined by HPLC method. Mice received FNP orally 3 days before an intra-peritoneal (i.p.) injection of lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Total superoxidase dismutase (T-SOD), total antioxidant capacity (T-AOC), glutathione peroxidase (GSH-PX), glutathione (GSH), myeloperoxidase (MPO) and malondialdehyde (MDA) levels were measured. Tumor necrosis factor-α levels in serum and tissue was measured. mRNA expressions of pro-inflammatory cytokines in lung were assessed by Real-Time PCR. Histopathological changes were evaluated in lung, ileum and colon. We also investigated FNP on reactive oxygen species (ROS), nitric oxide (NO) and pro-inflammatory cytokines (TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-6 and IL-8) production, inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), Cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) protein expression, phosphorylation of MAPKs and AMPK in LPS-stimulated RAW264.7 cells. FNP increased the levels of T-SOD, T-AOC, GSH-PX and GSH, decreased the levels of TNF-α, MPO and MDA, attenuate the histopathological lesion in LPS-stimulated mice. FNP inhibited production of inflammatory cytokines, ROS and NO, protein expressions of iNOS and COX-2, phosphorylation of ERK, JNK and c-JUN in MAPKs, promoted phosphorylation of AMPKα suppressed by LPS. These results

  8. MicroRNA-132 attenuates LPS-induced inflammatory injury by targeting TRAF6 in neuronal cell line HT-22.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Yang-Fei; Wang, Dan; Liu, Yan-Ru; Ma, Xing-Rong; Lu, Hong; Zhang, Bo-Ai

    2018-01-29

    Epilepsy is a common neurological disorder in the central nervous system. Inflammation disrupts the blood-brain barrier, which is responsible for maintaining brain homeostasis. This study was aimed to investigate the functional role of microRNA (miR)-132 in hippocampal HT-22 cells under lipopolysaccharide (LPS) stimulation. In vitro cell inflammatory model was constructed by LPS stimulation. Inflammatory cell injury was evaluated according to the alterations of cell viability, apoptosis and expression of inflammatory cytokines. Then, miR-132 level after LPS treatment was assessed. Subsequently, miR-132 was abnormally expressed after cell transfection and the effects of miR-132 on LPS-induced cell inflammatory injury as well as phosphorylated levels of key kinases in the NF-κB and MAPK kinase (MEK)/ERK pathways were determined. The target gene was virtually screened and verified, and whether miR-132 affected HT-22 cells under LPS stimulation through regulating the target gene was verified. The results showed that the level of miR-132 was down-regulated by LPS in HT-22 cells, and the LPS-induced inflammatory injury could be reduced by miR-132 overexpression. Then, the phosphorylated levels of kinases in the NF-κB and MEK/ERK pathways were inhibited by miR-132 overexpression. Necrosis factor receptor-associated factor 6 (TRAF6) was predicted and verified to be a target of miR-132. Moreover, the alterations induced by miR-132 overexpression in the LPS-treated HT-22 cells were abrogated by TRAF6 overexpression. Therefore, we drew the conclusion that LPS down-regulated miR-132 and miR-132 attenuated LPS-induced inflammatory cell injury by targeting TRAF6, along with the inhibition of the NF-κB and MEK/ERK pathways. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  9. Neuroprotective effects of curcumin on endothelin-1 mediated cell death in hippocampal neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stankowska, Dorota L; Krishnamoorthy, Vignesh R; Ellis, Dorette Z; Krishnamoorthy, Raghu R

    2017-06-01

    Alzheimer's disease is a progressive neurodegenerative disease characterized by loss of hippocampal neurons leading to memory deficits and cognitive decline. Studies suggest that levels of the vasoactive peptide endothelin-1 (ET-1) are increased in the brain tissue of Alzheimer's patients. Curcumin, the main ingredient of the spice turmeric, has been shown to have anti-inflammatory, anti-cancer, and neuroprotective effects. However, the mechanisms underlying some of these beneficial effects are not completely understood. The objective of this study was to determine if curcumin could protect hippocampal neurons from ET-1 mediated cell death and examine the involvement of c-Jun in this pathway. Primary hippocampal neurons from rat pups were isolated using a previously published protocol. Viability of the cells was measured by the live/dead assay. Immunoblot and immunohistochemical analyses were performed to analyze c-Jun levels in hippocampal neurons treated with either ET-1 or a combination of ET-1 and curcumin. Apoptotic changes were evaluated by immunoblot detection of cleaved caspase-3, cleaved fodrin, and a caspase 3/7 activation assay. ET-1 treatment produced a 2-fold increase in the levels of c-Jun as determined by an immunoblot analysis in hippocampal neurons. Co-treatment with curcumin significantly attenuated the ET-1 mediated increase in c-Jun levels. ET-1 caused increased neuronal cell death of hippocampal neurons indicated by elevation of cleaved caspase-3, cleaved fodrin and an increased activity of caspases 3 and 7 which was attenuated by co-treatment with curcumin. Blockade of JNK, an upstream effector of c-Jun by specific inhibitor SP600125 did not fully protect from ET-1 mediated activation of pro-apoptotic enzymes in primary hippocampal cells. Our data suggests that one mechanism by which curcumin protects against ET-1-mediated cell death is through blocking an increase in c-Jun levels. Other possible mechanisms include decreasing pro

  10. Nutrition and exercise can attenuate inflammatory and psychobiological changes in hypoxia?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aline Venticinque Caris

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Exposure to hypoxia causes damage in several physiological systems, whose tissues are dependent on the O2 supply. Recently, there has been growing attention on the immunosuppressive and inflammatory potential of the hypoxia, including stimulation, nuclear factor kappa B pathway in macrophages and Th2 response from lymphocytes. These changes may result in transient immunosuppression and happen at the same time to worsening of cognition and other psychobiological aspects. Furthermore, exercise and nutrition, especially glutamine supplementation may provide important role, not pharmacological partially reversing the effects of hypoxia. In fact, recent studies show that moderate exercise can improve cognition in people exposed to hypoxia while the exercise associated with glutamine supplementation can reverse the increase in inflammatory markers and the Th1/Th2 balance. This review aims to bring the light of the discussion about nonpharmacological ways to prevent the effects of hypoxia on the connection between the immune system and the central nervous system.

  11. Repeated Excessive Exercise Attenuates the Anti-Inflammatory Effects of Exercise in Older Men

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sahl, Ronni E.; Andersen, Peter R.; Gronbaek, Katja

    2017-01-01

    Introduction/Purpose: A number of studies have investigated the effect of training with a moderate exercise dose (3–6 h/weekly) on the inflammatory profile in blood, and the data are inconsistent. Cross-sectional studies indicate a positive effect of physical activity level on inflammation levels...... and risk of metabolic disease. However, it is not clear whether this may be dose dependent and if very prolonged repeated exercise therefore may be beneficial for low-grade inflammation. Based on this we studied how excessive repeated prolonged exercise influenced low-grade inflammation and adipose tissue...... anti-inflammatory macrophage content in six older male recreationally trained cyclists. Low-grade inflammation and adipose tissue macrophage content were investigated in six older trained men (age: 61 ± 4 years; VO2peak: 48 ± 2 mL kg−1 min−1) following repeated prolonged exercise. Methods: Cycling...

  12. Schinus terebinthifolius Raddi ( Aroeira) leaves oil attenuates inflammatory responses in cutaneous wound healing in mice

    OpenAIRE

    Estevão, Lígia Reis Moura; Simões, Ricardo Santos; Cassini-Vieira, Puebla; Canesso, Maria Cecilia Campos; Barcelos, Lucíola da Silva; Rachid, Milene Alvarenga; Câmara, Cláudio Augusto Gomes da; Evêncio-Neto, Joaquim

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Purpose: To investigated the inflammatory, angiogenic and fibrogenic activities of the Schinus terebinthifolius Raddi leaves oil (STRO) on wound healing. Methods: The excisional wound healing model was used to evaluate the effects of STRO. The mice were divided into two groups: Control, subjected to vehicle solution (ointment lanolin/vaseline base), or STRO- treated group, administered topically once a day for 3, 7 and 14 days post-excision. We evaluated the macroscopic wound clo...

  13. Amitriptyline, clomipramine, and maprotiline attenuate the inflammatory response by inhibiting neutrophil migration and mast cell degranulation

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    José Alves Gurgel

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Despite the recognized anti-inflammatory potential of heterocyclic antidepressants, the mechanisms concerning their modulating effects are not completely known. Thus, we evaluated the anti-inflammatory effect of amitriptyline, clomipramine, and maprotiline and the possible modulating properties of these drugs on neutrophil migration and mast cell degranulation. Methods: The hind paw edema and air-pouch models of inflammation were used. Male Wistar rats were treated with saline, amitriptyline, clomipramine or maprotiline (10, 30, or 90 mg/kg, per os [p.o.] 1 h before the injection of carrageenan (300 μg/0.1 mL/paw or dextran (500 μg/0.1 mL/paw. Then, edema formation was measured hourly. Neutrophil migration to carrageenan (500 μg/pouch and N-formyl-methionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine (fMLP (10-6 M/mL/pouch was also investigated in 6-day-old air-pouch cavities. Compound 48/80-induced mast cell degranulation was assessed in the mesenteric tissues of antidepressant-treated rats. Results: All tested antidepressants prevented both carrageenan- and dextran-induced edema. The anti-inflammatory effect of these drugs partially depends on the modulation of neutrophil migration, since they significantly counteracted the chemotactic response of both carrageenan and fMLP (p < 0.01. Furthermore, amitriptyline, clomipramine and maprotiline inhibited compound 48/80-induced mast cell degranulation (p < 0.001. Conclusions: These results suggest an important anti-inflammatory role of heterocyclic antidepressants, which is dependent on the modulation of neutrophil migration and mast cell stabilization.

  14. Attenuated age-impact on systemic inflammatory markers in the presence of a metabolic burden.

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    Anuurad Erdembileg

    Full Text Available The overall burden of chronic disease, inflammation and cardiovascular risk increases with age. Whether the relationship between age and inflammation is impacted by presence of an adverse metabolic burden is not known.We determined inflammatory markers in humans (336 Caucasians and 224 African Americans and in mice, representing a spectrum of age, weight and metabolic burden.In humans, levels of inflammatory markers increased significantly with age in subjects without the metabolic syndrome, (P=0.009 and P=0.037 for C-reactive protein, P<0.001 and P=0.001 for fibrinogen, P<0.001 and P=0.005 for serum amyloid-A, for Caucasians and African Americans, respectively. In contrast, trend patterns of inflammatory markers did not change significantly with age in subjects with metabolic syndrome in either ethnic group, except for fibrinogen in Caucasians. A composite z-score for systemic inflammation increased significantly with age in subjects without metabolic syndrome (P=0.004 and P<0.006 for Caucasians and African Americans, respectively but not in subjects with metabolic syndrome (P=0.009 for difference in age trend between metabolic syndrome and non-metabolic syndrome. In contrast, no similar age trend was found in vascular inflammation. The findings in humans were paralleled by results in mice as serum amyloid-A levels increased across age (range 2-15 months, P<0.01 and were higher in ob/ob mice compared to control mice (P<0.001.Presence of a metabolic challenge in mice and humans influences levels of inflammatory markers over a wide age range. Our results underscore that already at a young age, presence of a metabolic burden enhances inflammation to a level that appears to be similar to that of decades older people without metabolic syndrome.

  15. Bensal HP Attenuates the Inflammatory Response in Hair Shaving Associated Dermatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ray, Anjana; Mordorski, Breanne; Landriscina, Angelo; Rosen, Jamie; Nosanchuk, Joshua; Friedman, Adam

    2016-07-01

    Shaving is an ubiquitous practice, and cutaneous irritation and inflammation are common sequelae, which may be worsened by underlying skin conditions or poor hair removal techniques. Moisturizing shaving creams and aftershaves are available to help maintain or restore the epidermal barrier; however, many continue to suffer from post-shave redness, itching, and pain. To reduce post-shave inflammation, some products have included botanical and other natural ingredients, which are often favored by consumers. We evaluated Bensal HP, an ointment containing 3% oak bark extract, 3% salicylic acid, and 6% benzoic acid, which has documented anti-inflammatory and antimicrobial properties, in a murine model of shave irritation to determine whether it would be useful in this clinical setting. Shaving dermatitis was simulated using a depilatory agent and electric clippers, and the shaved area was photographed and treated with Bensal HP daily for four days. Compared to untreated controls, mice treated with Bensal HP experienced a visible reduction in skin irritation and inflammation. These findings were mirrored on histology, as Bensal HP-treated areas demonstrated increased epidermal integrity and decreased dermal inflammatory infiltrate compared to untreated skin. Using immunohistochemistry, fewer neutrophils and macrophages were noted, and cytokine analysis also revealed decreased IL-6 in Bensal HP-treated skin at 24 and 96 hours after shaving. These results highlight the potential of Bensal HP as an anti-inflammatory treatment for shave irritation. Given the product's application against a variety of inflammatory and infectious skin disorders, its use against shave irritation may also improve comorbid skin conditions, such as pseudofolliculitis barbae. J Drugs Dermatol. 2016;15(7):836-840.

  16. Annatto carotenoids attenuate oxidative stress and inflammatory response after high-calorie meal in healthy subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roehrs, Miguel; Conte, Lisiane; da Silva, Dariane Trivisiol; Duarte, Thiago; Maurer, Luana Haselein; de Carvalho, José Antonio Mainardi; Moresco, Rafael Noal; Somacal, Sabrina; Emanuelli, Tatiana

    2017-10-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of annatto carotenoids intake associated to a single high-calorie meal (high fat and high carbohydrate) in postprandial biochemical, inflammatory and oxidative stress markers. Twelve healthy subjects (6 men, 6 women) were included in this randomised, controlled crossover study. Baseline blood samples were collected from fasting subjects that immediately received high-calorie meal without carotenoid (placebo) or containing 1.2mg/kg bixin (BIX) or 0.06mg/kg norbixin (NBIX). Blood samples were taken 60, 120 and 240min after meal intake. NBIX intake did not affect biochemical blood markers but reduced the postprandial levels of inflammatory cytokines (IL-1, IL-6 and TNF-α) and lipid oxidation 60-120min after meal. BIX only partially prevented postprandial-induced lipid oxidation. Results indicate that the intake of NBIX may be an alternative to reduce the postprandial inflammatory and oxidative stress responses to high-calorie meals. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. CETP Lowers TLR4 Expression Which Attenuates the Inflammatory Response Induced by LPS and Polymicrobial Sepsis

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    Tatiana Martins Venancio

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Sepsis is a systemic inflammatory response to infection eliciting high mortality rate which is a serious health problem. Despite numerous studies seeking for therapeutic alternatives, the mechanisms involved in this disease remain elusive. In this study we evaluated the influence of cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP, a glycoprotein that promotes the transfer of lipids between lipoproteins, on the inflammatory response in mice. Human CETP transgenic mice were compared to control mice (wild type, WT after polymicrobial sepsis induced by cecal ligation and puncture (CLP, aiming at investigating their survival rate and inflammatory profiles. Macrophages from the peritoneal cavity were stimulated with LPS in the presence or absence of recombinant CETP for phenotypic and functional studies. In comparison to WT mice, CETP mice showed higher survival rate, lower IL-6 plasma concentration, and decreased liver toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4 and acyloxyacyl hydrolase (AOAH protein. Moreover, macrophages from WT mice to which recombinant human CETP was added decreased LPS uptake, TLR4 expression, NF-κB activation and IL-6 secretion. This raises the possibility for new therapeutic tools in sepsis while suggesting that lowering CETP by pharmacological inhibitors should be inconvenient in the context of sepsis and infectious diseases.

  18. Therapeutic potential of curcumin in digestive diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dulbecco, Pietro; Savarino, Vincenzo

    2013-12-28

    Curcumin is a low-molecular-weight hydrophobic polyphenol that is extracted from turmeric, which possesses a wide range of biological properties including anti-inflammatory, anti-oxidant, anti-proliferative and anti-microbial activities. Despite its diverse targets and substantial safety, clinical applications of this molecule for digestive disorders have been largely limited to case series or small clinical trials. The poor bioavailability of curcumin is likely the major hurdle for its more widespread use in humans. However, complexation of curcumin into phytosomes has recently helped to bypass this problem, as it has been demonstrated that this new lecithin formulation enables increased absorption to a level 29-fold higher than that of traditional curcuminoid products. This allows us to achieve much greater tissue substance delivery using significantly lower doses of curcumin than have been used in past clinical studies. As curcumin has already been shown to provide good therapeutic results in some small studies of both inflammatory and neoplastic bowel disorders, it is reasonable to anticipate an even greater efficacy with the advent of this new technology, which remarkably improves its bioavailability. These features are very promising and may represent a novel and effective therapeutic approach to both functional and organic digestive diseases.

  19. Study of curcumin immunomodulatory effects on reactive astrocyte cell function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seyedzadeh, Mir Hadi; Safari, Zohreh; Zare, Ahad; Gholizadeh Navashenaq, Jamshid; Razavi, Seyed Alireza; Kardar, Gholam Ali; Khorramizadeh, Mohammad Reza

    2014-09-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is considered an inflammatory and neurodegenerative disease of the central nervous system (CNS) which most often presents as relapsing-remitting episodes. Recent evidence suggests that activated astrocytes play a dual functional role in CNS inflammatory disorders such as MS. In this study, we tried to induce anti-inflammatory functions of astrocytes by curcumin. The effects of curcumin were examined on human a astrocyte cell line (U373-MG) induced by lipopolysaccharide (LPS) in vitro. Matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-9 activity was assessed by gelatin zymography. Cytokine levels were evaluated by quantitative ELISA method and mRNA expression was measured by real-time PCR. We found that curcumin decreased the release of IL-6 and reduced MMP-9 enzyme activity. It down-regulated MCP-1 mRNA expression too. However, curcumin did not have significant effects on the expression of neurotrophin (NT)-3 and insulin-like growth factor (IGF)-1 mRNAs. Results suggest that curcumin might beneficially affect astrocyte population in CNS neuroinflammatory environment lean to anti-inflammatory response and help to components in respects of CNS repair. Our findings offer curcumin as a new therapeutic agent with the potential of regulating astrocyte-mediated inflammatory diseases in the CNS. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Pyrrolidinedithiocarbamate attenuates bleomycin-induced pulmonary fibrosis in rats: Modulation of oxidative stress, fibrosis, and inflammatory parameters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaafan, Mai A; Zaki, Hala F; El-Brairy, Amany I; Kenawy, Sanaa A

    The current study aimed to investigate the modulatory effects of pyrrolidinedithiocarbamate (PDTC; 100 mg/kg) on bleomycin-induced pulmonary fibrosis (5 mg/kg; intratracheal) in rats. Rats were randomly assigned to three groups: normal control, bleomycin control, and PDTC-treated groups. Lung injury was evaluated through histological examination, immunohistochemical detection of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) in lung tissue and evaluating the total and differential leucocytes count in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid. Lung tissue was used for biochemical assessment of lung content of hydroxyproline, transforming growth factor beta-1 (TGF-β1), tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) as well as analysis of lipid peroxides, reduced glutathione (GSH), and total nitrite contents. PDTC attenuated bleomycin-induced pulmonary fibrosis as evidenced by histological observations, decreased iNOS expression and prevention of bleomycin-induced altered total and differential leukocytes count. Additionally, PDTC caused a significant decrease in lung contents of hydroxyproline, TGF-β1, TNF-α, lipid peroxides, and total nitrite coupled with increase in lung GSH content as compared to bleomycin control group. PDTC attenuated bleomycin-induced pulmonary fibrosis in rats via its anti-inflammatory, antioxidant, and antifibrotic activities.

  1. Sulforaphane improves oxidative status without attenuating the inflammatory response or cardiac impairment induced by ischemia-reperfusion in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonetto, Jéssica Hellen Poletto; Fernandes, Rafael Oliveira; Seolin, Bruna Gazzi de Lima; Müller, Dalvana Daneliza; Teixeira, Rayane Brinck; Araujo, Alex Sander; Vassallo, Dalton; Schenkel, Paulo Cavalheiro; Belló-Klein, Adriane

    2016-05-01

    Sulforaphane, a natural isothiocyanate, demonstrates cardioprotection associated with its capacity to stimulate endogenous antioxidants and to inhibit inflammation. The aim of this study was to investigate whether sulforaphane is capable of attenuating oxidative stress and inflammatory responses through the TLR4/MyD88/NFκB pathway, and thereby could modulate post-ischemic ventricular function in isolated rat hearts submitted to ischemia and reperfusion. Male Wistar rats received sulforaphane (10 mg·kg(-1)·day(-1)) or vehicle i.p. for 3 days. Global ischemia was performed using isolated hearts, 24 h after the last injection, by interruption of the perfusion flow. The protocol included a 20 min pre-ischemic period followed by 20 min of ischemia and a 20 min reperfusion. Although no changes in mechanical function were observed, sulforaphane induced a significant increase in superoxide dismutase and heme oxygenase-1 expression (both 66%) and significantly reduced reactive oxygen species levels (7%). No differences were observed for catalase and glutathione peroxidase expression or their activities, nor for thioredoxin reductase, glutaredoxin reductase and glutathione-S-transferase. No differences were found in lipid peroxidation or TLR4, MyD88, and NF-κB expression. In conclusion, although sulforaphane was able to stimulate endogenous antioxidants modestly, this result did not impact inflammatory signaling or cardiac function of hearts submitted to ischemia and reperfusion.

  2. Carrot juice ingestion attenuates high fructose-induced circulatory pro-inflammatory mediators in weanling Wistar rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahesh, Malleswarapu; Bharathi, Munugala; Raja Gopal Reddy, Mooli; Pappu, Pranati; Putcha, Uday Kumar; Vajreswari, Ayyalasomayajula; Jeyakumar, Shanmugam M

    2017-03-01

    Adipose tissue, an endocrine organ, plays a vital role not only in energy homeostasis, but also in the development and/or progression of various metabolic diseases, such as insulin resistance, type 2 diabetes and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), via several factors and mechanisms, including inflammation. This study tested, whether carrot juice administration affected the adipose tissue development and its inflammatory status in a high fructose diet-induced rat model. For this purpose, male weanling Wistar rats were divided into four groups and fed either control or high fructose diet of AIN-93G composition with or without carrot juice ingestion for an 8 week period. Administration of carrot juice did not affect the adiposity and cell size of visceral fat depot; retroperitoneal white adipose tissue (RPWAT), which was corroborated with unaltered expression of genes involved in adipogenic and lipogenic pathways. However, it significantly reduced the high fructose diet-induced elevation of plasma free fatty acid (FFA) (P ≤ 0.05), macrophage chemoattractant protein 1 (MCP1) (P ≤ 0.01) and high sensitive C-reactive protein (hsCRP) (P ≤ 0.05) levels. Carrot juice administration attenuated the high fructose diet-induced elevation of levels of circulatory FFA and pro-inflammatory mediators; MCP1 and hsCRP without affecting the adiposity and cell size of visceral fat depot; RPWAT. © 2016 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2016 Society of Chemical Industry.

  3. Curcumin improves prostanoid ratio in diabetic mesenteric arteries associated with cyclooxygenase-2 and NF-κB suppression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patumraj S

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Sirada Rungseesantivanon1, Naris Thengchaisri4, Preecha Ruangvejvorachai2, Suthiluk Patumraj31Interdepartment of Physiology, Graduate School, 2Department of Pathology, 3Department of Physiology, Faculty of Medicine, Chulalongkorn University, Bangkok, Thailand; 4Department of Companion Animal Clinical Sciences, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Kasetsart University, Bangkok, ThailandBackground: Curcumin, the active ingredient from turmeric rhizomes, has been shown to have a wide range of pharmacological properties including antioxidant and anti-inflammatory effects. Curcumin has been reviewed for its multiple molecular action on inhibiting tumor angiogenesis via its mechanisms of cyclooxygenase (COX-2, and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF inhibition. In this present study, we aimed to assess the effects of curcumin on preventing diabetes-induced vascular dysfunction in association with COX-2, nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB expression, and prostanoid production.Methods: Twelve-week-old male Wistar rats were separated into five groups: 1 diabetes with 0.9% normal saline (DM-NSS; n = 10, 2 diabetes treated with curcumin 30 mg/kg (n = 10, 3 diabetes treated with curcumin 300 mg/kg (n = 10, 4 the control with 0.9% normal saline (n = 10, and 5 the control treated with 300 mg/kg (n = 10. Daily oral feeding of curcumin was started at 6 weeks after the streptozotocin injection. Levels of 6-keto prostaglandin (PG F1α and thromboxane (TX B2 were determined from mesenteric perfusates using enzyme immunoassay kits. Protein kinase C (PKC-ßII and COX-2 with NF-κB levels were analyzed in the mesenteric arteries by immunofluorescent staining and immunohistochemistry, respectively.Results: The ratio of 6-keto-PGF1α and TXB2 was significantly decreased in DM-NSS compared with the control (P < 0.05. Double-immunofluorescent staining with specific antibodies for PKC-βII and a-smooth muscle actins showed that the diabetic mesenteric arteries contained increased

  4. In vitro evaluation of antioxidant and neuroprotective effects of curcumin loaded in Pluronic micelles

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    Cvetelina Gorinova

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Curcumin is a polyphenolic substance with attractive pharmacological activities (e.g. antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, anticancer. Incorporation of curcumin in polymeric micelles could overcome the problems associated with its instability and low aqueous solubility. The aim of this study was to load curcumin in polymeric micelles based on Pluronic® P 123 or Pluronic® F 127 triblock copolymers and evaluate the antioxidant and neuroprotective effects after micellization. The micelles were prepared and loaded with curcumin by applying the dissolution method. Higher encapsulation efficiency was observed in the micelles formulated with Pluronic® P 123. These micelles were characterized with small size and narrow size distribution. The effects of micellar curcumin were investigated in two in vitro models. First, the capacity of micellar curcumin to inhibit iron/ascorbic acid-induced lipid peroxidation in rat liver microsomes was evaluated. Micellar curcumin and free drug showed similar inhibition of lipid peroxidation. Second, micellar curcumin and free curcumin showed protective potential in a model of 6-hydroxydopamine induced neurotoxicity in rat brain synaptosomes. The results from both methods indicated preservation of antioxidant and neuroprotective activity of curcumin in micelles. The small micellar size, high loading capacity and preservation of antioxidant activity of curcumin into Pluronic micelles, suggested their further evaluation as a curcumin delivery system.

  5. Curcumin Ameliorates the Reduction Effect of PGE2 on Fibrillar β-Amyloid Peptide (1-42)-Induced Microglial Phagocytosis through the Inhibition of EP2-PKA Signaling in N9 Microglial Cells

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    Yang, Ju; Shen, Ting-ting; Chen, Yi; Yang, Xue-Sen

    2016-01-01

    Inflammatory activation of microglia and β amyloid (Aβ) deposition are considered to work both independently and synergistically to contribute to the increased risk of Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Recent studies indicate that long-term use of phenolic compounds provides protection against AD, primarily due to their anti-inflammatory actions. We previously suggested that phenolic compound curcumin ameliorated phagocytosis possibly through its anti-inflammatory effects rather than direct regulation of phagocytic function in electromagnetic field-exposed N9 microglial cells (N9 cells). Here, we explored the prostaglandin-E2 (PGE2)-related signaling pathway that involved in curcumin-mediated phagocytosis in fibrillar β-amyloid peptide (1–42) (fAβ42)-stimulated N9 cells. Treatment with fAβ42 increased phagocytosis of fluorescent-labeled latex beads in N9 cells. This increase was attenuated in a dose-dependent manner by endogenous and exogenous PGE2, as well as a selective EP2 or protein kinase A (PKA) agonist, but not by an EP4 agonist. We also found that an antagonist of EP2, but not EP4, abolished the reduction effect of PGE2 on fAβ42-induced microglial phagocytosis. Additionally, the increased expression of endogenous PGE2, EP2, and cyclic adenosine monophosphate (AMP), and activation of vasodilator-stimulated phosphoprotein, cyclic AMP responsive element-binding protein, and PKA were depressed by curcumin administration. This reduction led to the amelioration of the phagocytic abilities of PGE2-stimulated N9 cells. Taken together, these data suggested that curcumin restored the attenuating effect of PGE2 on fAβ42-induced microglial phagocytosis via a signaling mechanism involving EP2 and PKA. Moreover, due to its immune modulatory effects, curcumin may be a promising pharmacological candidate for neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:26824354

  6. Curcumin Protects against Monosodium Glutamate Neurotoxicity and Decreasing NMDA2B and mGluR5 Expression in Rat Hippocampus

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    Rania M. Khalil

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Monosodium glutamate (MSG is a flavor enhancer used in food industries. MSG is well documented to induce neurotoxicity. Curcumin (CUR reportedly possesses beneficial effects against various neurotoxic insults. Hence, this present study has been designed to evaluate the neuroprotective effect of curcumin on MSG-induced neurotoxicity in rats. Methods: Thirty-two male Wister rats were divided into four groups (n=8: Control group, MSG group, CUR group and MSG + CUR group. CUR (Curcumin 150 mg/kg, orally was given day after day for four weeks along with MSG (4 mg/kg, orally. After 4 weeks, rats were sacrificed and brain hippocampus was isolated immediately on ice. Inflammatory marker TNFα and acetylcholinesterase (AChE activity (marker for cholinergic function were estimated. Gene expressions of metabotropic glutamate receptor 5 (mGluR5 and N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor 2B (NMDA2B along with glutamate concentration were assessed. Results: Treatment with CUR significantly attenuated AChE activity and TNFα in MSG-treated animals. The anti-inflammatory properties of CUR may be responsible for this observed neuroprotective action. A possible role of CUR to attenuate both glutamate level and gene expression of NMDA2B and mGLUR5 in brain hippocampus was established when compared to MSG group. Conclusion: We concluded that CUR as flavor enhancer protects against MSG-induced neurotoxicity in rats.

  7. Celastrol Attenuates Inflammatory and Neuropathic Pain Mediated by Cannabinoid Receptor Type 2

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    Longhe Yang

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Celastrol, a major active ingredient of Chinese herb Tripterygium wilfordii Hook. f. (thunder god vine, has exhibited a broad spectrum of pharmacological activities, including anti-inflammation, anti-cancer and immunosuppression. In the present study, we used animal models of inflammatory pain and neuropathic pain, generated by carrageenan injection and spared nerve injury (SNI, respectively, to evaluate the effect of celastrol and to address the mechanisms underlying pain processing. Intraperitoneal (i.p. injection of celastrol produced a dose-dependent inhibition of carrageenan-induced edema and allodynia. Real-time PCR analysis showed that celastrol (0.3 mg/kg, i.p. significantly reduced mRNA expressions of inflammatory cytokines, TNF-α, IL-6, IL-1β, in carrageenan-injected mice. In SNI mice, pain behavior studies showed that celastrol (1 mg/kg, i.p. effectively prevented the hypersensitivity of mechanical nociceptive response on the third day post-surgery and the seventh day post-surgery. Furthermore, the anti-hyperalgesic effects of celastrol in carrageenan-injected mice and SNI mice were reversed by SR144528 (1 mg/kg, i.p., a specific cannabinoid receptor-2 (CB2 receptor antagonist, but not by SR141716 (1 mg/kg, i.p., a specific cannabinoid receptor-1 (CB1 receptor antagonist. Taken together, our results demonstrate the analgesia effects of celastrol through CB2 signaling and propose the potential of exploiting celastrol as a novel candidate for pain relief.

  8. Methoxsalen supplementation attenuates bone loss and inflammatory response in ovariectomized mice.

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    Ham, Ju Ri; Choi, Ra-Yeong; Yee, Sung-Tae; Hwang, Yun-Ho; Kim, Myung-Joo; Lee, Mi-Kyung

    2017-12-25

    Methoxsalen (MTS) is a natural bioactive compound found in a variety of plants that has many known biofunctions; however, its effects on osteoporosis and related mechanisms are not clear. This study examined whether MTS exhibited preventive effects against postmenopausal osteoporosis. Female C3H/HeN mice were divided into four groups: Sham, ovariectomy (OVX), OVX with MTS (0.02% in diet), and OVX with estradiol (0.03 μg/day, s.c). After 6 weeks, MTS supplementation significantly increased femur bone mineral density and bone surface along with bone surface/total volume. MTS significantly elevated the levels of serum formation markers (estradiol, osteocalcin and bone-alkaline phosphatase) such as estradiol in OVX mice. Tartrate resistant acid phosphatase staining revealed that MTS suppressed osteoclast numbers and formation in femur tissues compared with the OVX group. Supplementation of MTS slightly up-regulated osteoblastogenesis-related genes (Runx-2, osterix, osteocalcin, and Alp) expression, whereas it significantly down-regulated inflammatory genes (Nfκb and Il6) expression in femur tissue compared with the OVX group. These results indicate that MTS supplementation effectively prevented OVX-induced osteoporosis via enhancement of bone formation and suppression of inflammatory response in OVX mice. Our study provides valid scientific information regarding the development and application of MTS as a food ingredient, a food supplement or an alternative agent for preventing postmenopausal osteoporosis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Psoralidin suppresses osteoclastogenesis in BMMs and attenuates LPS-mediated osteolysis by inhibiting inflammatory cytokines.

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    Kong, Lingbo; Ma, Rui; Yang, Xiaobin; Zhu, Ziqi; Guo, Hua; He, Baorong; Wang, Biao; Hao, Dingjun

    2017-10-01

    Psoralidin is a metabolic product from the seed of psoraleacorylifolia, possessed anti-inflammatory and immunomodulatory effects. We speculated that psoralidin might impact osteoclastogenesis and bone loss. By using both in vitro and in vivo studies, we observed psoralidin strongly inhibited RANKL induced osteoclast formation during preosteoclast cultures, suggesting that it acts on osteoclast precursors to inhibit RANKL/RANK signaling. At the molecular level, by using MAPKs specific inhibitors (U-0126, SB-203580 and SP-600125) we demonstrated that psoralidin markedly abrogated the phosphorylation of p38, ERK, JNK. Moreover, the RANKL induced NF-κB/p65 phosphorylation and I-κB degradation were significantly inhibited by psoralidin. Further, psoralidin significantly suppressed osteoclastogenesis marker genes of TRAP, Cathepsin K and OSCAR. These were accompanied by the decreased expression of c-Fos and NFATc1 transcription factors. Consistent with in vitro results, our in vivo and serologic studies showed psoralidin inhibited lipopolysaccharide induced bone resorption by suppressing the inflammatory cytokines: TNF-α and IL-6 expression, as well as the ratio of RNAKL : OPG. These results collectively suggested that psoralidin could represent a novel therapeutic strategy for osteoclast-related disorders, such as rheumatoid arthritis and postmenopausal osteoporosis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Apoptosis induction and attenuation of inflammatory gene expression in murine macrophages via multitherapeutic nanomembranes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pierstorff, Erik; Krucoff, Max; Ho, Dean

    2008-01-01

    The realization of optimized therapeutic delivery is impaired by the challenge of localized drug activity and by the dangers of systemic cytotoxicity which often contribute to patient treatment complications. Here we demonstrate the block copolymer-mediated deposition and release of multiple therapeutics which include an LXRα/β agonist 3-((4-methoxyphenyl)amino)-4-phenyl-1-(phenylmethyl)-1H-pyrrole-2,5-dione (LXRa) and doxorubicin hydrochloride (Dox) at the air-water interface via Langmuir-Blodgett deposition, as well as copolymer-mediated potent drug elution toward the Raw 264.7 murine macrophage cell line. The resultant copolymer-therapeutic hybrid serves as a localized platform that can be functionalized with virtually any drug due to the integrated hydrophilic and hydrophobic components of the polymer structure. In addition, the sequestering function of the copolymer to anchor the drugs to implant surfaces can enhance delivery specificity when compared to systemic drug administration. Confirmation of drug functionality was confirmed via suppression of the interleukin 6 (Il-6) and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFα) inflammatory cytokines (LXRa), as well as DNA fragmentation analysis (Dox). Furthermore, the fragmentation assays and gene expression analysis demonstrated the innate biocompatibility of the copolymeric material at the gene expression level via the confirmed absence of material-induced apoptosis and a lack of inflammatory gene expression. This modality enables layer-by-layer control of agonist and chemotherapeutic functionalization at the nanoscale for the localization of drug dosage, while simultaneously utilizing the copolymer platform as an anchoring mechanism for drug sequestering, all with an innate material thickness of 4 nm per layer, which is orders of magnitude thinner than existing commercial technologies. Furthermore, these studies comprehensively confirmed the potential translational applicability of copolymeric nanomaterials as

  11. Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG and Bifidobacterium longum attenuate lung injury and inflammatory response in experimental sepsis.

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    Ludmila Khailova

    Full Text Available Probiotic use to prevent nosocomial gastrointestinal and potentially respiratory tract infections in critical care has shown great promise in recent clinical trials of adult and pediatric patients. Despite well-documented benefits of probiotic use in intestinal disorders, the potential for probiotic treatment to reduce lung injury following infection and shock has not been well explored.Evaluate if Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG (LGG or Bifidobacterium longum (BL treatment in a weanling mouse model of cecal ligation and puncture (CLP peritonitis will protect against lung injury.3 week-old FVB/N mice were orally gavaged with 200 µl of either LGG, BL or sterile water (vehicle immediately prior to CLP. Mice were euthanized at 24 h. Lung injury was evaluated via histology and lung neutrophil infiltration was evaluated by myeloperoxidase (MPO staining. mRNA levels of IL-6, TNF-α, MyD88, TLR-4, TLR-2, NFΚB (p50/p105 and Cox-2 in the lung analyzed via real-time PCR. TNF-α and IL-6 in lung was analyzed via ELISA.LGG and BL treatment significantly improved lung injury following experimental infection and sepsis and lung neutrophil infiltration was significantly lower than in untreated septic mice. Lung mRNA and protein levels of IL-6 and TNF-α and gene expression of Cox-2 were also significantly reduced in mice receiving LGG or BL treatment. Gene expression of TLR-2, MyD88 and NFΚB (p50/p105 was significantly increased in septic mice compared to shams and decreased in the lung of mice receiving LGG or BL while TLR-4 levels remained unchanged.Treatment with LGG and BL can reduce lung injury following experimental infection and sepsis and is associated with reduced lung inflammatory cell infiltrate and decreased markers of lung inflammatory response. Probiotic therapy may be a promising intervention to improve clinical lung injury following systemic infection and sepsis.

  12. Angelica Sinensis attenuates inflammatory reaction in experimental rat models having spinal cord injury.

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    Xu, Jun; E, Xiao-Qiang; Liu, Hui-Yong; Tian, Jun; Yan, Jing-Long

    2015-01-01

    This study was aimed to evaluate the effect of Angelica Sinensis on experimental rat models in which spinal cord injury was induced by studying different factors. Different factors causing inflammation play a key role in pathophysiology of SCI. Here three groups of rats (n=15, each was used). These included a sham control group where only laminectomy was performed, SCI group where SCI was induced and AS/SCI group where although SCI was induced but Angelica Sinensis was also administered to study its effect and draw a comparison with control. The expression of I-kBα and NF-kB p65 was also studied using western blotting and after recording optical density (OD) values of western blots. MPO activity was used to measure the effect of 20 mg/kg Angelica Sinensis. The levels of proinflammatory cytokines TNF-α, IL-1β and IL-6 were also studied. As compared with SCI group and sham control it was observed that Angelica Sinensis significantly reduced the expression of I-kBα and NF-kB p65, (PSinensis in rat models can attenuate the secondary damage caused by SCI and thus help in controlling the pathology of SCI in rats.

  13. Preparation, characterization and anti-colitis activity of curcumin-asafoetida complex encapsulated in turmeric nanofiber.

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    Gopi, Sreeraj; Amalraj, Augustine; Jude, Shintu; Varma, Karthik; Sreeraj, T R; Haponiuk, Józef T; Thomas, Sabu

    2017-12-01

    Ulcerative colitis (UC) is a main form of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Asafoetida (ASF) and turmeric have traditionally been used for the treatment of various inflammatory diseases, including UC, because ASF is rich in sulfur compounds and turmeric contains curcumin (CUR). Turmeric nanofiber (TNF), the modified cell wall component of turmeric is considered to play important role in the human diet, health and can be used as a carrier agent to encapsulate bioactive components. A novel gut health product (GHP) was formulated by encapsulation of ASF and CUR complex onto TNF. The GHP was characterized by UPLC, GC-MS, FTIR, XRD, SEM with EDS and DSC studies. GHP was evaluated for anti-colitis activity in a rat model of 5% dextran sulfate sodium (DSS) induced UC. Treatment with GHP significantly attenuated the disease activity index, colitis score, histopathological changes and myeloperoxidase activity. GHP has significant protective effects against DSS induced colitis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Curcumin modulates dopaminergic receptor, CREB and phospholipase c gene expression in the cerebral cortex and cerebellum of streptozotocin induced diabetic rats

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    George Naijil

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Curcumin, an active principle component in rhizome of Curcuma longa, has proved its merit for diabetes through its anti-oxidative and anti-inflammatory properties. This study aims at evaluating the effect of curcumin in modulating the altered dopaminergic receptors, CREB and phospholipase C in the cerebral cortex and cerebellum of STZ induced diabetic rats. Radioreceptor binding assays and gene expression was done in the cerebral cortex and cerebellum of male Wistar rats using specific ligands and probes. Total dopaminergic receptor binding parameter, Bmax showed an increase in cerebral cortex and decrease in the cerebellum of diabetic rats. Gene expression studies using real time PCR showed an increased expression of dopamine D1 and D2 receptor in the cerebral cortex of diabetic rats. In cerebellum dopamine D1 receptor was down regulated and D2 receptor showed an up regulation. Transcription factor CREB and phospholipase C showed a significant down regulation in cerebral cortex and cerebellum of diabetic rats. We report that curcumin supplementation reduces diabetes induced alteration of dopamine D1, D2 receptors, transcription factor CREB and phospholipase C to near control. Our results indicate that curcumin has a potential to regulate diabetes induced malfunctions of dopaminergic signalling, CREB and Phospholipase C expression in cerebral cortex and cerebellum and thereby improving the cognitive and emotional functions associated with these regions. Furthermore, in line with these studies an interaction between curcumin and dopaminergic receptors, CREB and phospholipase C is suggested, which attenuates the cortical and cerebellar dysfunction in diabetes. These results suggest that curcumin holds promise as an agent to prevent or treat CNS complications in diabetes.

  15. Curcumin modulates dopaminergic receptor, CREB and phospholipase C gene expression in the cerebral cortex and cerebellum of streptozotocin induced diabetic rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, T Peeyush; Antony, Sherin; Gireesh, G; George, Naijil; Paulose, C S

    2010-05-31

    Curcumin, an active principle component in rhizome of Curcuma longa, has proved its merit for diabetes through its anti-oxidative and anti-inflammatory properties. This study aims at evaluating the effect of curcumin in modulating the altered dopaminergic receptors, CREB and phospholipase C in the cerebral cortex and cerebellum of STZ induced diabetic rats. Radioreceptor binding assays and gene expression was done in the cerebral cortex and cerebellum of male Wistar rats using specific ligands and probes. Total dopaminergic receptor binding parameter, B(max) showed an increase in cerebral cortex and decrease in the cerebellum of diabetic rats. Gene expression studies using real time PCR showed an increased expression of dopamine D1 and D2 receptor in the cerebral cortex of diabetic rats. In cerebellum dopamine D1 receptor was down regulated and D2 receptor showed an up regulation. Transcription factor CREB and phospholipase C showed a significant down regulation in cerebral cortex and cerebellum of diabetic rats. We report that curcumin supplementation reduces diabetes induced alteration of dopamine D1, D2 receptors, transcription factor CREB and phospholipase C to near control. Our results indicate that curcumin has a potential to regulate diabetes induced malfunctions of dopaminergic signalling, CREB and Phospholipase C expression in cerebral cortex and cerebellum and thereby improving the cognitive and emotional functions associated with these regions. Furthermore, in line with these studies an interaction between curcumin and dopaminergic receptors, CREB and phospholipase C is suggested, which attenuates the cortical and cerebellar dysfunction in diabetes. These results suggest that curcumin holds promise as an agent to prevent or treat CNS complications in diabetes.

  16. Resistance Training with Co-ingestion of Anti-inflammatory Drugs Attenuates Mitochondrial Function

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    Daniele A. Cardinale

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The current study aimed to examine the effects of resistance exercise with concomitant consumption of high vs. low daily doses of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs on mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation in skeletal muscle. As a secondary aim, we compared the effects of eccentric overload with conventional training.Methods: Twenty participants were randomized to either a group taking high doses (3 × 400 mg/day of ibuprofen (IBU; 27 ± 5 year; n = 11 or a group ingesting a low dose (1 × 75 mg/day of acetylsalicylic acid (ASA; 26 ± 4 year; n = 9 during 8 weeks of supervised knee extensor resistance training. Each of the subject's legs were randomized to complete the training program using either a flywheel (FW device emphasizing eccentric overload, or a traditional weight stack machine (WS. Maximal mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation (CI+IIP from permeabilized skeletal muscle bundles was assessed using high-resolution respirometry. Citrate synthase (CS activity was assessed using spectrophotometric techniques and mitochondrial protein content using western blotting.Results: After training, CI+IIP decreased (P < 0.05 in both IBU (23% and ASA (29% with no difference across medical treatments. Although CI+IIP decreased in both legs, the decrease was greater (interaction p = 0.015 in WS (33%, p = 0.001 compared with FW (19%, p = 0.078. CS activity increased (p = 0.027 with resistance training, with no interactions with medical treatment or training modality. Protein expression of ULK1 increased with training in both groups (p < 0.001. The increase in quadriceps muscle volume was not correlated with changes in CI+IIP (R = 0.16.Conclusion: These results suggest that 8 weeks of resistance training with co-ingestion of anti-inflammatory drugs reduces mitochondrial function but increases mitochondrial content. The observed changes were not affected by higher doses of NSAIDs consumption, suggesting that the resistance training

  17. The effects of Curcuma longa and curcumin on reproductive systems.

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    Mohebbati, R; Anaeigoudari, A; Khazdair, M R

    2017-10-26

    Curcuma longa (C. longa) was used in some countries such as China and India for various medicinal purposes. Curcumin, the active component of C. longa, is commonly used as a coloring agent in foods, drugs, and cosmetics. C. longa and curcumin have been known to act as antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, anti-mutagen, and anti-carcinogenic agents. Th e attempt of the present review was to give an effort on a detailed literature survey concentrated on the protective effects of C. longa and curcumin on the reproductive organs activity. The databases such as, PubMed, Web of Science, Google Scholar, Scopus, and Iran- Medex, were considered. The search terms were "testis" or "ovary" and "Curcuma longa", "curcumin", "antioxidant effect", "anti-inflammatory effect" and "anti-cancer effect". C. longa and curcumin inhibited the production of the tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) and increased the caspases (3, 8 and 9) activities in HL-60 prostate cancer. Furthermore, C. longa and curcumin suppressed the vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), phosphorylated signal transducers and activators of the transcription 3 (STAT) and matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) in ovarian cancer cell line. C. longa and curcumin might decrease the risk of cancer and other malignant diseases in the reproductive system. C. longa and curcumin have a protective effect on the reproductive organs activity such as, anti-inflammatory, anti-apoptotic, and antioxidant effects in normal cells but showed pro-apoptotic effects in the malignant cells. Therefore, different effects of C. longa and curcumin are dependent on the doses and the type of cells used in various models studied.

  18. Oxidative Metabolites of Curcumin Poison Human Type II Topoisomerases†

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    Ketron, Adam C.; Gordon, Odaine N.; Schneider, Claus; Osheroff, Neil

    2013-01-01

    The polyphenol curcumin is the principal flavor and color component of the spice turmeric. Beyond its culinary uses, curcumin is believed to positively impact human health and displays antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, antibacterial, and chemopreventive properties. It also is in clinical trials as an anticancer agent. In aqueous solution at physiological pH, curcumin undergoes spontaneous autoxidation that is enhanced by oxidizing agents. The reaction proceeds through a series of quinone methide and other reactive intermediates to form a final dioxygenated bicyclopentadione product. Several naturally occurring polyphenols that can form quinones have been shown to act as topoisomerase II poisons (i.e., increase levels of topoisomerase II-mediated DNA cleavage). Because several of these compounds have chemopreventive properties, we determined the effects of curcumin, its oxidative metabolites, and structurally related degradation products (vanillin, ferulic acid, and feruloylmethane), on the DNA cleavage activities of human topoisomerase IIα and IIβ. Intermediates in the curcumin oxidation pathway increased DNA scission mediated by both enzymes ~4-5–fold. In contrast, curcumin and the bicyclopentadione, as well as vanillin, ferulic acid, and feruloylmethane, had no effect on DNA cleavage. As found for other quinone-based compounds, curcumin oxidation intermediates acted as redox-dependent (as opposed to interfacial) topoisomerase II poisons. Finally, under conditions that promote oxidation, the dietary spice turmeric enhanced topoisomerase II-mediated DNA cleavage. Thus, even within the more complex spice formulation, oxidized curcumin intermediates appear to function as topoisomerase II poisons. PMID:23253398

  19. Challenges associated with curcumin therapy in Alzheimer disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belkacemi, Abdenour; Doggui, Sihem; Dao, Lé; Ramassamy, Charles

    2011-11-04

    Curcumin, the phytochemical agent in the spice turmeric, which gives Indian curry its yellow colour, is also a traditional Indian medicine. It has been used for millennia as a wound-healing agent and for treating a variety of ailments. The antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, antiproliferative and other properties of curcumin have only recently gained the attention of modern pharmacology. The mechanism of action of curcumin is complex and multifaceted. In part, curcumin acts by activating various cytoprotective proteins that are components of the phase II response. Over the past decade, research with curcumin has increased significantly. In vitro and in vivo studies have demonstrated that curcumin could target pathways involved in the pathophysiology of Alzheimer disease (AD), such as the β-amyloid cascade, tau phosphorylation, neuroinflammation or oxidative stress. These findings suggest that curcumin might be a promising compound for the development of AD therapy. However, its insolubility in water and poor bioavailability have limited clinical trials and its therapeutic applications. To be effective as a drug therapy, curcumin must be combined with other drugs, or new delivery strategies need to be developed.

  20. Neonatal overfeeding attenuates acute central pro-inflammatory effects of short-term high fat diet

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    Guohui eCai

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Neonatal obesity predisposes individuals to obesity throughout life. In rats, neonatal overfeeding also leads to early accelerated weight gain that persists into adulthood. The phenotype is associated with dysfunction in a number of systems including paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus (PVN responses to psychological and immune stressors. However, in many cases weight gain in neonatally overfed rats stabilizes in early adulthood so the animal does not become more obese as it ages. Here we examined if neonatal overfeeding by suckling rats in small litters predisposes them to exacerbated metabolic and central inflammatory disturbances if they are also given a high fat diet in later life. In adulthood we gave the rats normal chow, 3 days, or 3 weeks high fat diet (45% kcal from fat and measured peripheral indices of metabolic disturbance. We also investigated hypothalamic microglial changes, as an index of central inflammation, as well as PVN responses to lipopolysaccharide (LPS. Surprisingly, neonatal overfeeding did not predispose rats to the metabolic effects of a high fat diet. Weight changes and glucose metabolism were unaffected by the early life experience. However, short term (3 day high fat diet was associated with more microglia in the hypothalamus and a markedly exacerbated PVN response to LPS in control rats; effects not seen in the neonatally overfed. Our findings indicate neonatally overfed animals are not more susceptible to the adverse metabolic effects of a short-term high fat diet but may be less able to respond to the central effects.

  1. Curcumin and diabetes: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Dong-Wei; Fu, Min; Gao, Si-Hua; Liu, Jun-Li

    2013-01-01

    Turmeric (Curcuma longa), a rhizomatous herbaceous perennial plant of the ginger family, has been used for the treatment of diabetes in Ayurvedic and traditional Chinese medicine. The active component of turmeric, curcumin, has caught attention as a potential treatment for diabetes and its complications primarily because it is a relatively safe and inexpensive drug that reduces glycemia and hyperlipidemia in rodent models of diabetes. Here, we review the recent literature on the applications of curcumin for glycemia and diabetes-related liver disorders, adipocyte dysfunction, neuropathy, nephropathy, vascular diseases, pancreatic disorders, and other complications, and we also discuss its antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties. The applications of additional curcuminoid compounds for diabetes prevention and treatment are also included in this paper. Finally, we mention the approaches that are currently being sought to generate a "super curcumin" through improvement of the bioavailability to bring this promising natural product to the forefront of diabetes therapeutics.

  2. Curcumin mediates anticancer effects by modulating multiple cell signaling pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunnumakkara, Ajaikumar B; Bordoloi, Devivasha; Harsha, Choudhary; Banik, Kishore; Gupta, Subash C; Aggarwal, Bharat B

    2017-08-01

    Curcumin, a component of a spice native to India, was first isolated in 1815 by Vogel and Pelletier from the rhizomes of Curcuma longa (turmeric) and, subsequently, the chemical structure of curcumin as diferuloylmethane was reported by Milobedzka et al. [(1910) 43., 2163-2170]. Since then, this polyphenol has been shown to exhibit antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, anticancer, antiviral, antibacterial, and antifungal activities. The current review primarily focuses on the anticancer potential of curcumin through the modulation of multiple cell signaling pathways. Curcumin modulates diverse transcription factors, inflammatory cytokines, enzymes, kinases, growth factors, receptors, and various other proteins with an affinity ranging from the pM to the mM range. Furthermore, curcumin effectively regulates tumor cell growth via modulation of numerous cell signaling pathways and potentiates the effect of chemotherapeutic agents and radiation against cancer. Curcumin can interact with most of the targets that are modulated by FDA-approved drugs for cancer therapy. The focus of this review is to discuss the molecular basis for the anticancer activities of curcumin based on preclinical and clinical findings. © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Portland Press Limited on behalf of the Biochemical Society.

  3. Targeted delivery of curcumin for treating type 2 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maradana, Muralidhara Rao; Thomas, Ranjeny; O'Sullivan, Brendan J

    2013-09-01

    Type 2 diabetes is a chronic condition in which cells have reduced insulin signalling, leading to hyperglycemia and long-term complications, including heart, kidney and liver disease. Macrophages activated by dying or stressed cells, induce the transcription factor nuclear factor kappa-B leading to the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines including TNF and IL-6. These inflammatory macrophages in liver and adipose tissue promote insulin resistance, and medications which reduce inflammation and enhance insulin signalling improve glucose control. Curcumin is an anti-oxidant and nuclear factor kappa-B inhibitor derived from turmeric. A number of studies have shown that dietary curcumin reduces inflammation and delays or prevents obesity-induced insulin resistance and associated complications, including atherosclerosis and immune mediate liver disease. Unfortunately dietary curcumin is poorly absorbed by the digestive system and undergoes glucuronidation and excretion rather than being released into the serum and systemically distributed. This confounds understanding of how dietary curcumin exerts its beneficial effects in type 2 diabetes and associated diseases. New improved methods of delivering curcumin are being developed including nanoparticles and lipid/liposome formulations that increase absorption and bioavailability of curcumin. Development and refinement of these technologies will enable cell-directed targeting of curcumin and improved therapeutic outcome. © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  4. Curcumin: a Polyphenol with Molecular Targets for Cancer Control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qadir, Muhammad Imran; Naqvi, Syeda Tahira Qousain; Muhammad, Syed Aun

    2016-01-01

    Curcumin, is a polyphenol from Curcuma longa (turmeric plant), is a polyphenol that belongs to the ginger family which has long been used in Ayurveda medicines to treat various diseases such as asthma, anorexia, coughing, hepatic diseases, diabetes, heart diseases, wound healing and Alzheimer's. Various studies have shown that curcumin has anti-infectious, anti-inflammatory, anti-oxidant, hepatoprotective, thrombosuppressive, cardio protective, anti-arthritic, chemo preventive and anti-carcinogenic activities. It may suppress both initiation and progression stages of cancer. Anticancer activity of curcumin is due to negative regulation of inflammatory cytokines, transcription factors, protein kinases, reactive oxygen species (ROS) and oncogenes. This review focuses on the different targets of curcumin to treat cancer.

  5. Curcumin-Free Turmeric Exhibits Activity against Human HCT-116 Colon Tumor Xenograft: Comparison with Curcumin and Whole Turmeric

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasad, Sahdeo; Tyagi, Amit K.; Siddik, Zahid H.; Aggarwal, Bharat B.

    2017-01-01

    Extensive research within last two decades has indicated that curcumin extracted from turmeric (Curcuma longa), exhibits anticancer potential, in part through the modulation of inflammatory pathways. However, the residual antitumor activity of curcumin-free turmeric (CFT) relative to curcumin or turmeric is not well-understood. In the present study, therefore, we determined activities of these agents in both in vitro and in vivo models of human HCT-116 colorectal cancer (CRC). When examined in an in vitro antiproliferative, clonogenic or anti-inflammatory assay system, we found that curcumin was highly active whereas turmeric and CFT had relatively poor activity against CRC cells. However, when examined in vivo at an oral dose of either 100 or 500 mg/kg given to nude mice bearing CRC xenografts, all three preparations of curcumin, turmeric, and CFT similarly suppressed the growth of the xenograft. The effect of CFT on suppression of tumor growth was dose-dependent, with 500 mg/kg tending to be more effective than 100 mg/kg. Interestingly, 100 mg/kg curcumin or turmeric was found to be more effective than 500 mg/kg. When examined in vivo for the expression of biomarkers associated with cell survival (cIAP-1, Bcl-2, and survivin), proliferation (Ki-67 and cyclin D1) and metastasis (ICAM-1 and VEGF), all were down-modulated. These agents also suppressed inflammatory transcription factors (NF-κB and STAT3) in tumor cells. Overall, our results with CFT provide evidence that turmeric must contain additional bioactive compounds other than curcumin that, in contrast to curcumin, exhibit greater anticancer potential in vivo than in vitro against human CRC. Moreover, our study highlights the fact that the beneficial effects of turmeric and curcumin in humans may be more effectively realized at lower doses, whereas CFT could be given at higher doses without loss in favorable activity. PMID:29311914

  6. Curcumin-Free Turmeric Exhibits Activity against Human HCT-116 Colon Tumor Xenograft: Comparison with Curcumin and Whole Turmeric

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sahdeo Prasad

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Extensive research within last two decades has indicated that curcumin extracted from turmeric (Curcuma longa, exhibits anticancer potential, in part through the modulation of inflammatory pathways. However, the residual antitumor activity of curcumin-free turmeric (CFT relative to curcumin or turmeric is not well-understood. In the present study, therefore, we determined activities of these agents in both in vitro and in vivo models of human HCT-116 colorectal cancer (CRC. When examined in an in vitro antiproliferative, clonogenic or anti-inflammatory assay system, we found that curcumin was highly active whereas turmeric and CFT had relatively poor activity against CRC cells. However, when examined in vivo at an oral dose of either 100 or 500 mg/kg given to nude mice bearing CRC xenografts, all three preparations of curcumin, turmeric, and CFT similarly suppressed the growth of the xenograft. The effect of CFT on suppression of tumor growth was dose-dependent, with 500 mg/kg tending to be more effective than 100 mg/kg. Interestingly, 100 mg/kg curcumin or turmeric was found to be more effective than 500 mg/kg. When examined in vivo for the expression of biomarkers associated with cell survival (cIAP-1, Bcl-2, and survivin, proliferation (Ki-67 and cyclin D1 and metastasis (ICAM-1 and VEGF, all were down-modulated. These agents also suppressed inflammatory transcription factors (NF-κB and STAT3 in tumor cells. Overall, our results with CFT provide evidence that turmeric must contain additional bioactive compounds other than curcumin that, in contrast to curcumin, exhibit greater anticancer potential in vivo than in vitro against human CRC. Moreover, our study highlights the fact that the beneficial effects of turmeric and curcumin in humans may be more effectively realized at lower doses, whereas CFT could be given at higher doses without loss in favorable activity.

  7. Disruption of δ-opioid receptor phosphorylation at threonine 161 attenuates morphine tolerance in rats with CFA-induced inflammatory hypersensitivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hai-Jing; Xie, Wei-Yan; Hu, Fang; Zhang, Ying; Wang, Jun; Wang, Yun

    2012-04-01

    Our previous study identified Threonine 161 (Thr-161), located in the second intracellular loop of the δ-opioid receptor (DOR), as the only consensus phosphorylation site for cyclin-dependent kinase 5 (Cdk5). The aim of this study was to assess the function of DOR phosphorylation by Cdk5 in complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA)-induced inflammatory pain and morphine tolerance. Dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons of rats with CFA-induced inflammatory pain were acutely dissociated and the biotinylation method was used to explore the membrane localization of phosphorylated DOR at Thr-161 (pThr-161-DOR), and paw withdrawal latency was measured after intrathecal delivery of drugs or Tat-peptide, using a radiant heat stimulator in rats with CFA-induced inflammatory pain. Both the total amount and the surface localization of pThr-161-DOR were significantly enhanced in the ipsilateral DRG following CFA injection. Intrathecal delivery of the engineered Tat fusion-interefering peptide corresponding to the second intracellular loop of DOR (Tat-DOR-2L) increased inflammatory hypersensitivity, and inhibited DOR- but not µ-opioid receptor-mediated spinal analgesia in CFA-treated rats. However, intrathecal delivery of Tat-DOR-2L postponed morphine antinociceptive tolerance in rats with CFA-induced inflammatory pain. Phosphorylation of DOR at Thr-161 by Cdk5 attenuates hypersensitivity and potentiates morphine tolerance in rats with CFA-induced inflammatory pain, while disruption of the phosphorylation of DOR at Thr-161 attenuates morphine tolerance.

  8. Dopamine attenuates the chemoattractant effect of interleukin-8: a novel role in the systemic inflammatory response syndrome.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Sookhai, S

    2012-02-03

    Activated neutrophil (PMN) adherence to vascular endothelium comprises a key step for both transendothelial migration and initiation of potentially deleterious release of PMN products. The biogenic amine, dopamine (DA), has been used for several decades in patients to maintain hemodynamic stability. The effect of dopamine on PMN transendothelial migration and adhesion receptor expression and on the endothelial molecules, E-selectin and ICAM-1, was evaluated. PMN were isolated from healthy controls, stimulated with lipopolysaccharide (LPS), and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) and treated with dopamine. CD 11b and CD 18 PMN adhesion receptor expression were assessed flow cytometrically. In a separate experiment, the chemoattractant peptide, IL-8, was placed in the lower chamber of transwells, and PMN migration was assessed. Human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) were stimulated with LPS\\/TNF-alpha and incubated with dopamine. ICAM-1 and E-selectin endothelial molecule expression were assessed flow cytometrically. There was a significant increase in transendothelial migration in stimulated PMN compared with normal PMN (40 vs. 14%, P < 0.001). In addition, PMN CD11b\\/CD18 was significantly upregulated in stimulated PMN compared with normal PMN (252.4\\/352.4 vs. 76.7\\/139.4, P < 0.001) as were endothelial E-selectin\\/ICAM-1 expression compared with normal EC (8.1\\/9 vs. 3.9\\/3.8, P < 0.05). After treatment with dopamine, PMN transmigration was significantly decreased compared with stimulated PMN (8% vs. 40%, P < 0.001). Furthermore, dopamine also attenuated PMN CD11b\\/CD18 and the endothelial molecules E-selectin and ICAM-1 compared with stimulated PMN\\/EC that were not treated dopamine (174\\/240 vs. 252\\/352, P < 0.05 and 4\\/4.4 vs. 8.1\\/9, P < 0.05. respectively). The chemoattractant effect of IL-8 was also attenuated. These results identify for the first time that dopamine attenuates the initial interaction between PMN and the endothelium

  9. Can curcumin modulate allergic rhinitis in rats?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acar, M; Muluk, N Bayar; Yigitaslan, S; Cengiz, B P; Shojaolsadati, P; Karimkhani, H; Ada, S; Berkoz, M; Cingi, C

    2016-12-01

    This study aimed to explore the effects of curcumin on experimental allergic rhinitis in rats. Twenty-eight male Wistar albino rats were randomly divided into four groups: a control group; a group in which allergic rhinitis was induced and no treatment given; a group in which allergic rhinitis was induced followed by treatment with azelastine hydrochloride on days 21-28; and a group in which allergic rhinitis was induced followed by treatment with curcumin on days 21-28. Allergy symptoms and histopathological features of the nasal mucosa were examined. The sneezing and nasal congestion scores were higher in the azelastine and curcumin treatment groups than in the control group. Histopathological examination showed focal goblet cell metaplasia on the epithelial surface in the azelastine group. In the curcumin group, there was a decrease in goblet cell metaplasia in the epithelium, decreased inflammatory cell infiltration and vascular proliferation in the lamina propria. Curcumin is an effective treatment for experimentally induced allergic rhinitis in rats.

  10. Role of H-bond formation in the photoreactivity of curcumin

    OpenAIRE

    Nardo, Luca; Paderno, Roberta; Andreoni, Alessandra; Másson, Már; Haukvik, Tone; TØnnesen, Hanne Hjorth

    2008-01-01

    Curcumin is the main constituent of curry. In its ground state it shows chemo-preventive, chemo-therapeutic and anti-inflammatory effects. For its immunostimulating action it has been considered for the development of drugs suitable for treating AIDS and cystic fibrosis. Further biological action is induced in curcumin by photoactivation: in suitable environmental conditions electronically excited curcumin can act as a singlet oxygen generator. Moreover, cytotoxicity is enhanced by light expo...

  11. CURCUMIN FOR ALZHEIMER’S DISEASE (AD) POTENTIAL TREATMENT

    OpenAIRE

    Sutiono, Dias Rima; Iasmartua, Steven

    2017-01-01

    Various studies had been conducted regarding the effect of curcumin on AD patients, thus, many of the studies had suggested that curcumin had the potential to prevent and treat AD through several molecular mechanisms including act as anti-inflammatory, anti-oxidant, binding the Aβ plaques, metal chelation, and lowering cholesterol level. One of the prominent characteristics of this neurodegenerative disease is shown by the presence of beta amyloids plaques (Aβ) and inflammation inside the pat...

  12. Protective Effects of Curcumin on Manganese-Induced BV-2 Microglial Cell Death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Euteum; Chun, Hong Sung

    2017-08-01

    Curcumin, a bioactive component in tumeric, has been shown to exert antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, anticarcinogenic, hepatoprotective, and neuroprotective effects, but the effects of curcumin against manganese (Mn)-mediated neurotoxicity have not been studied. This study examined the protective effects of curcumin on Mn-induced cytotoxicity in BV-2 microglial cells. Curcumin (0.1-10 µM) dose-dependently prevented Mn (250 µM)-induced cell death. Mn-induced mitochondria-related apoptotic characteristics, such as caspase-3 and -9 activation, cytochrome c release, Bax increase, and Bcl-2 decrease, were significantly suppressed by curcumin. In addition, curcumin significantly increased intracellular glutathione (GSH) and moderately potentiated superoxide dismutase (SOD), both which were diminished by Mn treatment. Curcumin pretreatment effectively suppressed Mn-induced upregulation of malondialdehyde (MDA), total reactive oxygen species (ROS). Moreover, curcumin markedly inhibited the Mn-induced mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP) loss. Furthermore, curcumin was able to induce heme oxygenase (HO)-1 expression. Curcumin-mediated inhibition of ROS, down-regulation of caspases, restoration of MMP, and recovery of cell viability were partially reversed by HO-1 inhibitor (SnPP). These results suggest the first evidence that curcumin can prevent Mn-induced microglial cell death through the induction of HO-1 and regulation of oxidative stress, mitochondrial dysfunction, and apoptotic events.

  13. Study on the interaction between curcumin and CopC by spectroscopic and docking methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Zhen; Yuan, Wen; Zhu, Ruitao; Wang, Song; Zhang, Caifeng; Yang, Binsheng

    2017-03-01

    Curcumin is a widely studied polyphenolic compound which has a variety of biological activity as anti-inflammatory and antitumor drugs. Recent research reported that copper chaperone binding with small molecular may relate to the treatment of cancer. In this work, the interaction between curcumin and CopC has been investigated in detail by means of UV-vis absorption, FTIR, CD, fluorescence spectroscopic and molecular docking methods The results showed that the CopC conformation was altered by curcumin with reduction of β-sheet and increase of random coil. Furthermore, curcumin can form a host-guest inclusion supramolecular complex with curcumin, and the forming constant had been calculated to be (2.85±0.21)×10 5 M -1 . In addition, the binding ability between Cu 2+ and curcumin was less than that between Cu 2+ and CopC. Moreover, the binding of curcumin with Cu 2+ has an effect on the binding ability between curcumin and CopC. The thermodynamic parameters ΔH and ΔS at different temperatures were obtained. The formation of CopC-curcumin complex depended on the hydrophobic force, and the binding average distance between CopC and curcumin was determined. What's more, the binding site of curcumin to CopC was shown vividly by an automated public domain software package ArgusLab 4.0.1. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Repetitive Hyperbaric Oxygenation Attenuates Reactive Astrogliosis and Suppresses Expression of Inflammatory Mediators in the Rat Model of Brain Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irena Lavrnja

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The exact mechanisms by which treatment with hyperbaric oxygen (HBOT exerts its beneficial effects on recovery after brain injury are still unrevealed. Therefore, in this study we investigated the influence of repetitive HBOT on the reactive astrogliosis and expression of mediators of inflammation after cortical stab injury (CSI. CSI was performed on male Wistar rats, divided into control, sham, and lesioned groups with appropriate HBO. The HBOT protocol was as follows: 10 minutes of slow compression, 2.5 atmospheres absolute (ATA for 60 minutes, and 10 minutes of slow decompression, once a day for 10 consecutive days. Data obtained using real-time polymerase chain reaction, Western blot, and immunohistochemical and immunofluorescence analyses revealed that repetitive HBOT applied after the CSI attenuates reactive astrogliosis and glial scarring, and reduces expression of GFAP (glial fibrillary acidic protein, vimentin, and ICAM-1 (intercellular adhesion molecule-1 both at gene and tissue levels. In addition, HBOT prevents expression of CD40 and its ligand CD40L on microglia, neutrophils, cortical neurons, and reactive astrocytes. Accordingly, repetitive HBOT, by prevention of glial scarring and limiting of expression of inflammatory mediators, supports formation of more permissive environment for repair and regeneration.

  15. Curcumin induces M2 macrophage polarization by secretion IL-4 and/or IL-13.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Shanshan; Zhou, Juan; Liu, Na; Wang, Lijun; Gao, Qiyue; Wu, Yan; Zhao, Qiang; Liu, Peining; Wang, Shun; Liu, Yan; Guo, Ning; Shen, Yan; Wu, Yue; Yuan, Zuyi

    2015-08-01

    To address the underlying mechanisms by which curcumin facilitates M2 phenotype polarization of macrophages and its roles in the protective effects during experimental autoimmune myocarditis (EAM). The expression of classic M2 markers, including macrophage mannose receptor (MMR), arginase-1 (Arg-1) and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ (PPAR-γ) was upregulated in curcumin-treated Raw264.7 macrophages. Curcumin increased interleukin-4 (IL-4) and interleukin-13 (IL-13) mRNA expression and protein secretion. Curcumin notably increased STAT6 phosphorylation. Leflunomide, a STAT6 inhibitor, and IL-4 and/or IL-13 neutralizing antibodies antagonized the induction of MMR, Arg-1 and PPAR-γ by curcumin in Raw264.7 cells. In vivo, 6-week old male Lewis rats were used to induce EAM and orally administrated with curcumin or corn oil for 3weeks after myosin injection. Cardiac functional parameters, including left ventricular fractional shortening (LVFS), ejection fraction (EF), left ventricular end-systolic diameter (LVEDs) and heart rate (HR) were significantly improved by curcumin treatment. Curcumin also reduced the inflammatory cell infiltration and myocardial mRNA levels of interleukin-1β (IL-1β) and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS). Meanwhile, the myocardial mRNA levels of MMR and Arg-1 were markedly up-regulated by curcumin. Immunofluorescence assay showed that the number of CD68(+) MMR(+) and CD68(+) Arg-1(+) double positive macrophages in curcumin-treated myocardial tissue was significantly higher than untreated control. The number of CD68(+) iNOS(+) double positive macrophages was increased obviously in EAM group, but decreased markedly by curcumin treatment. Taken together, these results show that curcumin induces macrophage M2 polarization by secretion of IL-4 and/or IL-13. Curcumin ameliorates EAM by reducing infiltration inflammatory macrophages and by polarizing M0 and M1 macrophages to M2 phenotype. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights

  16. Astrocyte production of the chemokine macrophage inflammatory protein-2 is inhibited by the spice principle curcumin at the level of gene transcription

    OpenAIRE

    Tomita, Michiyo; Holman, Brita J; Santoro, Christopher P; Santoro, Thomas J

    2005-01-01

    Abstract Background In neuropathological processes associated with neutrophilic infiltrates, such as experimental allergic encephalitis and traumatic injury of the brain, the CXC chemokine, macrophage inflammatory protein-2 (MIP-2) is thought to play a pivotal role in the induction and perpetuation of inflammation in the central nervous system (CNS). The origin of MIP-2 in inflammatory disorders of the brain has not been fully defined but astrocytes appear to be a dominant source of this chem...

  17. Dietary supplementation with curcumin enhances metastatic growth of Lewis lung carcinoma in mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curcumin is a phenolic compound derived from the Curcuma longa plant, commonly known as turmeric. Curcumin has been used traditionally in Ayurvedic medicine as it has therapeutic properties including being anti-inflammatory, anti-oxidant and anti-microbial. The present study investigated the effects...

  18. Ulinastatin Protects Against LPS-Induced Acute Lung Injury by Attenuating TLR4/NF-κB Pathway Activation and Reducing Inflammatory Mediators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Chao; Yin, Chengfen; Shou, Songtao; Wang, Jun; Yu, Lechang; Li, Xuening; Chai, Yanfen

    2018-01-10

    Acute lung injury (ALI) and its severe form, acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), remain the leading causes of morbidity and mortality in intensive care units. Ulinastatin (UTI), a serine protease inhibitor, possesses anti-inflammatory properties and has been suggested to modulate lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced sepsis; thus, it is now widely used in the treatment of pancreatitis, sepsis, and septic shock. Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4), an essential LPS signaling receptor, plays a critical role in the activation of innate immunity. The aim of this study was to investigate whether UTI alleviates ALI by attenuating TLR4 expression and to explore the underlying molecular mechanisms involved. Male C56BL/6 mice were administered UTI intravenously 1 h before and 6 h after exposure to LPS by intra-tracheal instillation. Human lung epithelial (BEAS-2B) cells were incubated with LPS in the presence or absence of UTI. An enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay was used to detect levels of inflammatory cytokines. Western blot analysis was performed to detect changes in TLR4 expression and nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) activation. UTI significantly protected animals from LPS-induced ALI, decreasing the lung wet/dry weight ratio, ALI score, total cells, neutrophils, macrophages, myeloperoxidase activity, and malondialdehyde content, factors associated with lung histological damage. UTI treatment also markedly attenuated levels of TLR4 and other pro-inflammatory cytokines. Furthermore, UTI significantly attenuated LPS-induced increases in TLR4 protein expression and NF-κB activation in lung tissues. Similarly, UTI markedly attenuated TLR4 expression and NF-κB activation in LPS-stimulated BEAS-2B cells. These findings indicate that UTI ameliorates LPS-induced ALI by attenuating the TLR4/NF-κB pathway activation.

  19. Attenuation of mouse somatic and emotional inflammatory pain by hydralazine through scavenging acrolein and inhibiting neuronal activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Lu; Wang, Wen; Dong, Yu-Lin; Wang, Wei; Huang, Jing; Wang, Xue-Ying; Wang, Li-Ying; Li, Yun-Qing; Wu, Sheng-Xi

    2012-01-01

    Acrolein signaling is important during spinal cord injury; whether it is involved in somatic and emotional pain is not clear. Hydralazine is a potent antihypertensive drug and can scavenge acrolein efficiently. We hypothesized that hydralazine decreases spinal level acrolein and renders analgesic effects with some side effects, which was tested in the current study. Subcutaneous injection of formalin was used to induce somatic and emotional pain responses. The spinal neuronal activation (FOS expression) and acrolein expression were evaluated at 2 hours after subcutaneous formalin injection. The possible side effects of hydralazine on the murine central nervous system or cardiovascular system were evaluated at one hour after hydralazine injection with open field, elevated plus maze and rotarod tests, or telemetrical measurement of mean artery blood pressure and heart rate. The subcutanous injection of formalin into the left hind paw induced significant somatic and emotional pain responses, evaluated by the biphasic spontaneous flinch/licking of the injected hind paw and interphase ultrasonic vocalizations during the one hour window after formalin injection. The spinal acrolein level was significantly increased and neurons were activated at 2 hours after formalin injection. Intraperitoneal injection of hydralazine (at 0.1, 1 or 10 mg/kg of body weight) at one hour before formalin challenging dose-dependently attenuated the formalin induced pain responses with an analgesic 50% effect dose ranging from 0.2 to 1 mg/kg of body weight. Furthermore, the neuronal activation and elevated acrolein expression were dose-dependently inhibited by hydralazine pretreatment. The side effects of intraperitoneal hydralazine on locomotion, anxiety, and motor coordination at one hour after hydralazine administration had negative results. The main side effects of hydralazine were an insignificant decrease of blood pressure and a significant increase of heart rates at high dose (10 mg

  20. Curcumin Resource Database

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Anil; Chetia, Hasnahana; Sharma, Swagata; Kabiraj, Debajyoti; Talukdar, Narayan Chandra; Bora, Utpal

    2015-01-01

    Curcumin is one of the most intensively studied diarylheptanoid, Curcuma longa being its principal producer. This apart, a class of promising curcumin analogs has been generated in laboratories, aptly named as Curcuminoids which are showing huge potential in the fields of medicine, food technology, etc. The lack of a universal source of data on curcumin as well as curcuminoids has been felt by the curcumin research community for long. Hence, in an attempt to address this stumbling block, we have developed Curcumin Resource Database (CRDB) that aims to perform as a gateway-cum-repository to access all relevant data and related information on curcumin and its analogs. Currently, this database encompasses 1186 curcumin analogs, 195 molecular targets, 9075 peer reviewed publications, 489 patents and 176 varieties of C. longa obtained by extensive data mining and careful curation from numerous sources. Each data entry is identified by a unique CRDB ID (identifier). Furnished with a user-friendly web interface and in-built search engine, CRDB provides well-curated and cross-referenced information that are hyperlinked with external sources. CRDB is expected to be highly useful to the researchers working on structure as well as ligand-based molecular design of curcumin analogs. Database URL: http://www.crdb.in PMID:26220923

  1. Curcumin Resource Database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Anil; Chetia, Hasnahana; Sharma, Swagata; Kabiraj, Debajyoti; Talukdar, Narayan Chandra; Bora, Utpal

    2015-01-01

    Curcumin is one of the most intensively studied diarylheptanoid, Curcuma longa being its principal producer. This apart, a class of promising curcumin analogs has been generated in laboratories, aptly named as Curcuminoids which are showing huge potential in the fields of medicine, food technology, etc. The lack of a universal source of data on curcumin as well as curcuminoids has been felt by the curcumin research community for long. Hence, in an attempt to address this stumbling block, we have developed Curcumin Resource Database (CRDB) that aims to perform as a gateway-cum-repository to access all relevant data and related information on curcumin and its analogs. Currently, this database encompasses 1186 curcumin analogs, 195 molecular targets, 9075 peer reviewed publications, 489 patents and 176 varieties of C. longa obtained by extensive data mining and careful curation from numerous sources. Each data entry is identified by a unique CRDB ID (identifier). Furnished with a user-friendly web interface and in-built search engine, CRDB provides well-curated and cross-referenced information that are hyperlinked with external sources. CRDB is expected to be highly useful to the researchers working on structure as well as ligand-based molecular design of curcumin analogs. © The Author(s) 2015. Published by Oxford University Press.

  2. A Potential Role of the Curry Spice Curcumin in Alzheimer’s Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Ringman, John M.; Frautschy, Sally A.; Cole, Gregory M.; Masterman, Donna L.; Cummings, Jeffrey L.

    2005-01-01

    There is substantial in-vitro data indicating that curcumin has antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, and anti-amyloid activity. In addition, studies in animal models of Alzheimer’s disease (AD) indicate a direct effect of curcumin in decreasing the amyloid pathology of AD. As the widespread use of curcumin as a food additive and relatively small short-term studies in humans suggest safety, curcumin is a promising agent in the treatment and/or prevention of AD. Nonetheless, important information re...

  3. Neuroprotective properties of curcumin in toxin-base animal models of Parkinson's disease: a systematic experiment literatures review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xin-Shi; Zhang, Zeng-Rui; Zhang, Man-Man; Sun, Miao-Xuan; Wang, Wen-Wen; Xie, Cheng-Long

    2017-08-17

    Curcumin (diferuloylmethane), a polyphenol extracted from the plant Curcuma longa, is widely used in Southeast Asia, China and India in food preparation and for medicinal purposes. Meanwhile, the neuroprotective actions of curcumin have been documented for experimental therapy in Parkinson's disease (PD). In this study, we used a systematic review to comprehensively assess the efficacy of curcumin in experimental PD. Using electronic and manual search for the literatures, we identified studies describing the efficacy of curcumin in animal models of PD. We identified 13 studies with a total of 298 animals describing the efficacy of curcumin in animal models of PD. The methodological quality of all preclinical trials is ranged from 2 to 5. The majority of the experiment studies demonstrated that curcumin was more significantly neuroprotection effective than control groups for treating PD. Among them, five studies indicated that curcumin had an anti-inflammatory effect in the PD animal models (p curcumin, by which it protected substantia nigra neurons and improved striatal dopamine levels. Furthermore, two studies in this review displayed that curcumin treatment was also effective in reducing neuronal apoptosis and improving functional outcome in animal models of PD. Most of the preclinical studies demonstrated the positive findings while one study reported that curcumin had no beneficial effects against Mn-induced disruption of hippocampal metal and neurotransmitter homeostasis. The results demonstrated a marked efficacy of curcumin in experimental model of PD, suggesting curcumin probably a candidate neuroprotective drug for human PD patients.

  4. Curcumin nanoparticles ameliorate ICAM-1 expression in TNF-α-treated lung epithelial cells through p47 (phox and MAPKs/AP-1 pathways.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feng-Lin Yen

    Full Text Available Upregulation of intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1 involves adhesions between both circulating and resident leukocytes and the human lung epithelial cells during lung inflammatory reactions. We have previously demonstrated that curcumin-loaded polyvinylpyrrolidone nanoparticles (CURN improve the anti-inflammatory and anti-oxidative properties of curcumin in hepatocytes. In this study, we focused on the effects of CURN on the expression of ICAM-1 in TNF-α-treated lung epithelial cells and compared these to the effects of curcumin water preparation (CURH. TNF-αinduced ICAM-1 expression, ROS production, and cell-cell adhesion were significantly attenuated by the pretreatment with antioxidants (DPI, APO, or NAC and CURN, but not by CURH, as revealed by western blot analysis, RT-PCR, promoter assay, and ROS detection and adhesion assay. In addition, treatment of TNF-α-treated cells with CURN and antioxidants also resulted in an inhibition of activation of p47 (phox and phosphorylation of MAPKs, as compared to that using CURH. Our findings also suggest that phosphorylation of MAPKs may eventually lead to the activation of transcription factors. We also observed that the effects of TNF-α treatment for 30 min, which includes a significant increase in the binding activity of AP-1 and phosphorylation of c-jun and c-fos genes, were reduced by CURN treatment. In vivo studies have revealed that CURN improved the anti-inflammation activities of CURH in the lung epithelial cells of TNF-α-treated mice. Our results indicate that curcumin-loaded polyvinylpyrrolidone nanoparticles may potentially serve as an anti-inflammatory drug for the treatment of respiratory diseases.

  5. Donepezil, an acetylcholinesterase inhibitor, attenuates LPS-induced inflammatory response in murine macrophage cell line RAW 264.7 through inhibition of nuclear factor kappa B translocation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arikawa, Mikihiko; Kakinuma, Yoshihiko; Noguchi, Tatsuya; Todaka, Hiroshi; Sato, Takayuki

    2016-10-15

    We have previously demonstrated that the pharmacotherapy with donepezil, an acetylcholinesterase inhibitor, suppresses cardiac remodeling in a mouse model of ischemic heart failure after myocardial infarction (MI). However, the precise mechanisms of the cardioprotective effect of donepezil have not been completely delineated. Because post-ischemic inflammation is a pathological key event in the cardiac remodeling process following MI, we investigated the hypothesis that donepezil acts as an inhibitor of inflammatory mediators. RAW 264.7 murine macrophage cells were pretreated with donepezil (100µM) prior to a pro-inflammatory stimulation by administration of lipopolysaccharide (LPS, 10ng/ml). Donepezil significantly reduced intra- and extracellular levels of various kinds of inflammatory mediators such as TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-2, IL-6 and IL-18 after the LPS stimulation, and attenuated LPS-induced nuclear translocation of nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB). These results indicate that donepezil possesses an anti-inflammatory property. However, the inhibitory effect of donepezil on the macrophage inflammatory responses was never reproduced by ACh, nor was disrupted by ACh receptor blockers. Moreover, other kinds of acetylcholinesterase inhibitors failed to inhibit the inflammatory responses in LPS-stimulated macrophage cells. These results suggest that a cholinergic anti-inflammatory pathway would not be involved in the anti-inflammatory effect of donepezil and that the specific characteristics of donepezil in suppressing the LPS-induced cytokine release and the NF-κB activation would be independent of its acetylcholinesterase inhibition. The present study showed that donepezil exerts an anti-inflammatory effect independently of acetylcholinesterase inhibitory action, thereby donepezil may contribute to cardioprotection during cardiac remodeling process in an ischemic heart failure after MI. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Quercetin inhibits expression of inflammatory cytokines through attenuation of NF-kappaB and p38 MAPK in HMC-1 human mast cell line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Min, Y-D; Choi, C-H; Bark, H; Son, H-Y; Park, H-H; Lee, S; Park, J-W; Park, E-K; Shin, H-I; Kim, S-H

    2007-05-01

    Mast cell-mediated allergic inflammation is involved in many diseases such as asthma, sinusitis, and rheumatoid arthritis. Mast cells induce production of pro-inflammatory cytokines with immune regulatory properties. We investigated the effect of quercetin on the expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines in human mast cell line, HMC-1. HMC-1 cells were stimulated with phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) and calcium ionophore A23187 (PMACI). Quercetin decreased the gene expression and production of tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha, interleukin (IL)-1beta, IL-6, and IL-8 in PMACI-stimulated HMC-1 cells. Quercetin attenuated PMACI-induced activation of NF-kappaB and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase. Our study provides evidence that quercetin may suitable for the treatment of mast cell-derived allergic inflammatory diseases.

  7. Mechanism of anticarcinogenic properties of curcumin and its application for radio-sensitization and clinical treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Enomoto, Atsushi; Miyagawa, Kiyoshi; Yamada, Junko

    2016-01-01

    Curcumin is a yellow-colored polyphenol and a major component of turmeric (Curcuma longa). It is also an active ingredient in the herbal remedy and dietary spice. Curcumin has a long history of administration in traditional medicine of China. Extensive investigations on pharmacological activity of curcumin have demonstrated that curcumin possesses anti-carcinogenic, anti-inflammatory, and anti-oxidant properties. Curcumin, a kind of phytochemical, due to its beneficial pharmacological effects and an excellent safety profile, is demonstrated to be a potential candidate for the prevention and/or treatment of a variety of diseases. In this review, we introduce pharmacological action and molecular targets of curcumin, and describe its application for radio-sensitization and clinical treatment. (author)

  8. Curcumin reduces lung inflammation via Wnt/β-catenin signaling in mouse model of asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xia; Lv, Jian-Ning; Li, Hui; Jiao, Bo; Zhang, Qiu-Hong; Zhang, Yong; Zhang, Jie; Liu, Yan-Qin; Zhang, Ming; Shan, Hu; Zhang, Jin-Zhao; Wu, Run-Miao; Li, Ya-Li

    2017-05-01

    Asthma is a chronic inflammatory, heterogeneous airway disease affecting millions of people around the world. Curcumin has been found to have anti-inflammatory and antifibrosis effects. Researchers reported that curcumin regulated Wnt/β-catenin signaling in lots of cells. However, whether curcumin regulates the levels of Wnt/β-Catenin signaling in lung tissues and DCs (dendritic cells) remains unclear. In this study, we assessed the effects of curcumin on DCs and asthma. C57BL/6 mice immunized with OVA (ovalbumin) were challenged thrice with an aerosol of OVA every second day for 8 days. Dexamethasone or curcumin was administered intraperitoneally to OVA-immunized C57BL/6 mice on day 24 once a day for 9 days. Mice were analyzed for effects of curcumin on asthma, inflammatory cell infiltration and cytokine levels in lung tissue. DCs were isolated from mouse bone morrow. The surface markers CD40, CD86 and CD11c of DCs was detected by FACS (fluorescence activated cell sorting) and the function of DCs was detected by mixed lymphocyte reaction. The expression of GSK-3β and β-catenin was detected by Western Blot. Results showed that OVA increased the number of inflammatory factors in BALF (bronchoalveolar lavage fluid), elevated lung inflammation scores in mice. Curcumin dose-dependently reversed the alterations induced by OVA in the asthmatic mice. Curcumin activated Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway in DCs and asthmatic mouse lungs. Curcumin could influence the morphology and function of DCs, ease asthma symptom and inflammatory reaction through the activation of Wnt/β-catenin signaling. These results provide new evidence new evidence for application of curcumin on asthma.

  9. Augmentation of therapeutic potential of curcumin using nanotechnology: current perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sivasami, Pulavendran; Hemalatha, Thiagarajan

    2018-02-28

    Curcumin, an active principle of Curcuma longa, is extracted from the rhizome. Its therapeutic efficiency has been proved using various in vitro and in vivo models. Inflammatory, neoplastic and preneoplastic diseases are the major targets using curcumin as therapeutic agent. Feasible clinical formulations could not be obtained because of its lack of solubility, stability and higher degradation rate. Recently, many techniques have been evolved to improve the physicochemical properties of pharmacological compounds, thereby increasing their biological activity. Curcumin has been developed using various techniques, particularly micro and nanotechnology to improve its stability and bioavailability. This review focuses on the studies pertaining to the delivery of curcumin in the form of micro and nanosize formulations for the treatment of a variety of diseases.

  10. Attenuation of meal-induced inflammatory and thrombotic responses in overweight men and women after 6-week daily strawberry (Fragaria) intake. A randomized placebo-controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellis, Collin L; Edirisinghe, Indika; Kappagoda, Tissa; Burton-Freeman, Britt

    2011-01-01

    A pro-thrombotic, pro-inflammatory diet can play a causative role in atherosclerotic-cardiovascular diseases. Dietary intervention studies provide insight into their pathophysiological manifestations and opportunities for prevention and management. We previously showed in an acute-meal setting that a beverage containing polyphenolic- and antioxidant-rich strawberry (Fragaria) vs placebo attenuated postprandial (fed-state) increases in biomarkers of oxidative and inflammatory stress, and insulin concentrations, induced by a high carbohydrate/fat (HCF) meal. In the present study, we aimed to extend our findings and investigate hypotheses related to the effects of chronic/6-week (wk) strawberry consumption on HCF meal-induced increases in glucose, insulin, and indicators of inflammation and hemostasis. In a crossover design, 14 women and 10 men (mean age, BMI: 50.9±15 years, 29.2±2.3 kg/m(2), respectively), were randomized to a 6-wk strawberry or placebo beverage followed by an HCF meal with assessments for 6-hours (h) postprandially. HCF meal responses after 6-wk strawberry beverage showed significantly attenuated postprandial PAI-1 concentrations compared to the placebo (p =0.002); the difference was most notable at 6 h. The IL-1 β response was attenuated with strawberry compared to the placebo (p =0.05). IL-6 attenuation was apparent but non-significant; IL-6 rose significantly from baseline to 6 h after the HCF meal following a placebo (p ≤0.01), although it remained relatively flat following the strawberry beverage from fasting to 6 h. No significant treatment-related differences were apparent for platelet aggregation, hsCRP, TNF-α, insulin, or glucose. These data are the first to suggest that regular consumption of strawberry, a polyphenolic- and antioxidant-rich fruit, may provide protection from HCF meal-induced increases in fibrinolytic and inflammatory factors in at-risk men and women.

  11. Curcumin Modulates Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma Cell-Derived Exosomal Function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osterman, Carlos J. Diaz; Lynch, James C.; Leaf, Patrick; Gonda, Amber; Ferguson Bennit, Heather R.; Griffiths, Duncan; Wall, Nathan R.

    2015-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer has the highest mortality rates of all cancer types. One potential explanation for the aggressiveness of this disease is that cancer cells have been found to communicate with one another using membrane-bound vesicles known as exosomes. These exosomes carry pro-survival molecules and increase the proliferation, survival, and metastatic potential of recipient cells, suggesting that tumor-derived exosomes are powerful drivers of tumor progression. Thus, to successfully address and eradicate pancreatic cancer, it is imperative to develop therapeutic strategies that neutralize cancer cells and exosomes simultaneously. Curcumin, a turmeric root derivative, has been shown to have potent anti-cancer and anti-inflammatory effects in vitro and in vivo. Recent studies have suggested that exosomal curcumin exerts anti-inflammatory properties on recipient cells. However, curcumin’s effects on exosomal pro-tumor function have yet to be determined. We hypothesize that curcumin will alter the pro-survival role of exosomes from pancreatic cancer cells toward a pro-death role, resulting in reduced cell viability of recipient pancreatic cancer cells. The main objective of this study was to determine the functional alterations of exosomes released by pancreatic cancer cells exposed to curcumin compared to exosomes from untreated pancreatic cancer cells. We demonstrate, using an in vitro cell culture model involving pancreatic adenocarcinoma cell lines PANC-1 and MIA PaCa-2, that curcumin is incorporated into exosomes isolated from curcumin-treated pancreatic cancer cells as observed by spectral studies and fluorescence microscopy. Furthermore, curcumin is delivered to recipient pancreatic cancer cells via exosomes, promoting cytotoxicity as demonstrated by Hoffman modulation contrast microscopy as well as AlamarBlue and Trypan blue exclusion assays. Collectively, these data suggest that the efficacy of curcumin may be enhanced in pancreatic cancer cells through

  12. Curcumin and Chronic Kidney Disease (CKD: Major Mode of Action through Stimulating Endogenous Intestinal Alkaline Phosphatase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siddhartha S. Ghosh

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Curcumin, an active ingredient in the traditional herbal remedy and dietary spice turmeric (Curcuma longa, has significant anti-inflammatory properties. Chronic kidney disease (CKD, an inflammatory disease, can lead to end stage renal disease resulting in dialysis and transplant. Furthermore, it is frequently associated with other inflammatory disease such as diabetes and cardiovascular disorders. This review will focus on the clinically relevant inflammatory molecules that play a role in CKD and associated diseases. Various enzymes, transcription factors, growth factors modulate production and action of inflammatory molecules; curcumin can blunt the generation and action of these inflammatory molecules and ameliorate CKD as well as associated inflammatory disorders. Recent studies have shown that increased intestinal permeability results in the leakage of pro-inflammatory molecules (cytokines and lipopolysaccharides from gut into the circulation in diseases such as CKD, diabetes and atherosclerosis. This change in intestinal permeability is due to decreased expression of tight junction proteins and intestinal alkaline phosphatase (IAP. Curcumin increases the expression of IAP and tight junction proteins and corrects gut permeability. This action reduces the levels of circulatory inflammatory biomolecules. This effect of curcumin on intestine can explain why, despite poor bioavailability, curcumin has potential anti-inflammatory effects in vivo and beneficial effects on CKD.

  13. Skin penetration behavior of lipid-core nanocapsules for simultaneous delivery of resveratrol and curcumin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Friedrich, R.B.; Kann, B.; Coradini, K.; Offerhaus, Herman L.; Beck, R.C.R.; Windbergs, M.

    2015-01-01

    Polyphenols, which are secondary plant metabolites, gain increasing research interest due to their therapeutic potential. Among them, resveratrol and curcumin are two agents showing antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, antimicrobial as well as anticarcinogenic effects. In addition to their individual

  14. Interleukin-22 ameliorates liver fibrogenesis by attenuating hepatic stellate cell activation and downregulating the levels of inflammatory cytokines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Dong-Hong; Guo, Xiao-Yun; Qin, Shan-Yu; Luo, Wei; Huang, Xiao-Li; Chen, Mei; Wang, Jia-Xu; Ma, Shi-Jia; Yang, Xian-Wen; Jiang, Hai-Xing

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the effect of interleukin (IL)-22 on hepatic fibrosis in mice and the possible mechanism involved. METHODS: Liver fibrosis was induced in male BALB/c mice by CCl4. Recombinant IL-22 (rmIL-22) was administered intraperitoneally in CCl4-treated mice. Fibrosis was assessed by histology and Masson staining. The activation of hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) was investigated by analysis of α-smooth muscle actin expression. The frequencies of T helper (Th) 22 cells, Th17 cells and Th1 cells, the expression of inflammatory cytokines [IL-22, IL-17A, interferon-γ (IFN-γ), tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), IL-6, IL-1β] and transcription factors [aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR), RAR-related orphan receptor (RORγt), T-bet] mRNA in the liver were investigated. In addition, the plasma levels of IL-22, IL-17A, IFN-γ, TNF-α, IL-6 and IL-1β were evaluated. RESULTS: Significant elevations in circulating Th22 cells, Th17 cells, Th1 cells, IL-22, IL-17A, and IFN-γ were observed in the hepatic fibrosis group compared with the control group (P < 0.01). Treatment with rmIL-22 in mice with hepatic fibrosis ameliorated the severity of hepatic fibrosis, which was confirmed by lower hepatic fibrosis pathological scores (P < 0.01). RmIL-22 decreased the frequencies of Th22 cells (6.71% ± 0.97% vs 8.09% ± 0.74%, P < 0.01), Th17 cells (4.34% ± 0.37% vs 5.71% ± 0.24%, P < 0.01), Th1 cells (3.09% ± 0.49% vs 4.91% ± 0.73%, P < 0.01), and the levels of IL-22 (56.23 ± 3.08 vs 70.29 ± 3.01, P < 0.01), IL-17A (30.74 ± 2.77 vs 45.68 ± 2.71, P < 0.01), and IFN-γ (74.78 ± 2.61 vs 124.89 ± 2.82, P < 0.01). Down-regulation of IL-22, IL-17A, IFN-γ, TNF-α, IL-6, IL-1β, AHR RORγt, and T-bet gene expression in the liver was observed in the rmIL-22 group (P < 0.01). CONCLUSION: The frequencies of Th22, Th17 and Th1 cells are elevated in hepatic fibrosis. RmIL-22 can attenuate HSC activation and down-regulate the levels of inflammatory cytokines, thereby ameliorating

  15. A novel imidazopyridine derivative, X22, attenuates sepsis-induced lung and liver injury by inhibiting the inflammatory response in vitro and in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ge, Xiangting; Feng, Zhiguo; Xu, Tingting; Wu, Beibei; Chen, Hongjin; Xu, Fengli; Fu, Lili; Shan, Xiaoou; Dai, Yuanrong; Zhang, Yali; Liang, Guang

    2016-01-01

    Sepsis remains a leading cause of death worldwide. Despite years of extensive research, effective drugs to treat sepsis in the clinic are lacking. In this study, we found a novel imidazopyridine derivative, X22, which has powerful anti-inflammatory activity. X22 dose-dependently inhibited lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced proinflammatory cytokine production in mouse primary peritoneal macrophages and RAW 264.7 macrophages. X22 also downregulated the LPS-induced proinflammatory gene expression in vitro. In vivo, X22 exhibited a significant protection against LPS-induced death. Pretreatment or treatment with X22 attenuated the sepsis-induced lung and liver injury by inhibiting the inflammatory response. In addition, X22 showed protection against LPS-induced acute lung injury. We additionally found that pretreatment with X22 reduced the inflammatory pain in the acetic acid and formalin models and reduced the dimethylbenzene-induced ear swelling and acetic acid-increased vascular permeability. Together, these data confirmed that X22 has multiple anti-inflammatory effects and may be a potential therapeutic option in the treatment of inflammatory diseases.

  16. Curcumin ameliorates diclofenac sodium-induced nephrotoxicity in male albino rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Ahmady Y; Gad, Amany M; El-Raouf, Ola M Abd

    2017-10-01

    Exposure to drugs often results in toxicity in the kidney which represents the major control system maintaining homeostasis of the body and thus is especially susceptible to xenobiotics. Nephrotoxicity is a life-threatening side-effect of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs). Diclofenac is one of the most frequently prescribed NSAIDs and have been reported to cause multiple organs damage. Curcumin (CUR) exhibits nephroprotective properties. Therefore, rats were divided into four groups; rats of groups 3 and 4 received diclofenac (100 mg/kg, i.m.), whereas rats of groups 2 and 4 received CUR (100 mg/kg, p.o.) for 3 days. Diclofenac revealed a significant increase in urea and creatinine levels and malondialdehyde concentration and marked reduction in catalase activity and reduced glutathione concentration. Histopathologically, diclofenac produced fatty changes and eosinophilic casts were detected in the renal tubules, those were attenuated by administration of CUR prior diclofenac. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Dexmedetomidine attenuates pancreatic injury and inflammatory response in mice with pancreatitis by possible reduction of NLRP3 activation and up-regulation of NET expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yong; Pan, Yiyuan; Gao, Lin; Lu, Guotao; Zhang, Jingzhu; Xie, Xiaochun; Tong, Zhihui; Li, Baiqiang; Li, Gang; Li, Weiqin

    2018-01-22

    Previous studies have shown that acute inflammation is associated with increased sympathetic activity, which in turn increases the inflammatory response and leads to organ damage. The present study aimed to investigate whether dexmedetomidine administration during acute pancreatitis (AP) lessens pancreatic pathological and functional injury and the inflammatory response, and to explore the underlying mechanisms. Mild pancreatitis was induced in mice with caerulein, and severe pancreatitis was induced with caerulein plus lipopolysaccharide (LPS). After pancreatitis induction, dexmedetomidine at 10 or 20 μg/kg was injected via the tail vein. Pancreatic pathological and functional injury was assessed by histology and serum levels of amylase and lipase, respectively. The inflammatory response was evaluated by determining serum levels of inflammatory factors. The expression of myeloperoxidase (MPO) was examined by immunohistochemistry. The expression of norepinephrine transporter (NET), NLRP3, pro-IL-1β, and interleukin (IL)-1β in pancreatic tissue was detected by Western blot and real-time PCR. Dexmedetomidine at 20 μg/kg significantly attenuated pancreatic pathological injury, reduced serum levels of amylase, lipase, IL-1β, IL-6, and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, and decreased the expression of MPO in pancreatic tissue in both mouse models of pancreatitis. In addition, dexmedetomidine at 20 μg/kg significantly down-regulated the expression of NLRP3, pro-IL-1β, and IL-1β in pancreatic tissue, but up-regulated the expression of NET in both mouse models. Dexmedetomidine attenuates pancreatic injury and inflammatory response in mice with pancreatitis possibly by reducing NLRP3 activation and up-regulating NET expression. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Opioid Self-Administration is Attenuated by Early-Life Experience and Gene Therapy for Anti-Inflammatory IL-10 in the Nucleus Accumbens of Male Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lacagnina, Michael J; Kopec, Ashley M; Cox, Stewart S; Hanamsagar, Richa; Wells, Corinne; Slade, Susan; Grace, Peter M; Watkins, Linda R; Levin, Edward D; Bilbo, Staci D

    2017-10-01

    Early-life conditions can contribute to the propensity for developing neuropsychiatric disease, including substance abuse disorders. However, the long-lasting mechanisms that shape risk or resilience for drug addiction remain unclear. Previous work has shown that a neonatal handling procedure in rats (which promotes enriched maternal care) attenuates morphine conditioning, reduces morphine-induced glial activation, and increases microglial expression of the anti-inflammatory cytokine interleukin-10 (IL-10). We thus hypothesized that anti-inflammatory signaling may underlie the effects of early-life experience on later-life opioid drug-taking. Here we demonstrate that neonatal handling attenuates intravenous self-administration of the opioid remifentanil in a drug-concentration-dependent manner. Transcriptional profiling of the nucleus accumbens (NAc) from handled rats following repeated exposure to remifentanil reveals a suppression of pro-inflammatory cytokine and chemokine gene expression, consistent with an anti-inflammatory phenotype. To determine if anti-inflammatory signaling alters drug-taking behavior, we administered intracranial injections of plasmid DNA encoding IL-10 (pDNA-IL-10) into the NAc of non-handled rats. We discovered that pDNA-IL-10 treatment reduces remifentanil self-administration in a drug-concentration-dependent manner, similar to the effect of handling. In contrast, neither handling nor pDNA-IL-10 treatment alters self-administration of food or sucrose rewards. These collective observations suggest that neuroimmune signaling mechanisms in the NAc are shaped by early-life experience and may modify motivated behaviors for opioid drugs. Moreover, manipulation of the IL-10 signaling pathway represents a novel approach for influencing opioid reinforcement.

  19. A novel chalcone derivative attenuates the diabetes-induced renal injury via inhibition of high glucose-mediated inflammatory response and macrophage infiltration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fang, Qilu; Zhao, Leping; Wang, Yi; Zhang, Yali; Li, Zhaoyu; Pan, Yong; Kanchana, Karvannan; Wang, Jingying; Tong, Chao; Li, Dan; Liang, Guang

    2015-01-01

    Inflammation plays a central role in the development and progression of diabetic nephropathy (DN). Researches on novel anti-inflammatory agents may offer new opportunities for the treatment of DN. We previously found a chalcone derivative L6H21 could inhibit LPS-induced cytokine release from macrophages. The aim of this study was to investigate whether L6H21 could ameliorate the high glucose-mediated inflammation in NRK-52E cells and attenuate the inflammation-mediated renal injury. According to the results, L6H21 showed a great inhibitory effect on the expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines, cell adhesion molecules, chemokines, and macrophage adhesion via down-regulation of NF-κB/MAPKs activity in high glucose-stimulated renal NRK-52E cells. Further, in vivo oral administration with L6H21 at a dosage of 20 mg/kg/2 days showed a decreased expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines, cell adhesion molecules, which subsequently contributed to the inhibition on renal macrophage infiltration, the reduction of serum creatinine and BUN levels, and the improvement on the fibrosis and pathological changes in the renal tissues of diabetic mice. These findings provided that chalcone derived L6H21 may be a promising anti-inflammatory agent and have the potential in the therapy of diabetic nephropathy, and importantly, MAPK/NF-κB signaling system may be a novel therapeutic target for human DN in the future. - Highlights: • Inflammation plays a central role in the development of diabetic nephropathy. • Compound L6H21 reduced the high glucose-mediated inflammation in NRK-52E cells. • Compound L6H21 attenuated the inflammation-mediated renal injury. • L6H21 exhibited anti-inflammatory effects via inactivation of NF-κB/MAPKs. • MAPKs/NF-κB may be a novel therapeutic target in diabetic nephropathy treatment

  20. A novel chalcone derivative attenuates the diabetes-induced renal injury via inhibition of high glucose-mediated inflammatory response and macrophage infiltration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fang, Qilu [Chemical Biology Research Center, School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Wenzhou Medical University, Wenzhou, Zhejiang (China); Zhao, Leping [Department of Pharmacy, the Affiliated Yueqing Hospital, Wenzhou Medical University, Wenzhou, Zhejiang (China); Wang, Yi; Zhang, Yali [Chemical Biology Research Center, School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Wenzhou Medical University, Wenzhou, Zhejiang (China); Li, Zhaoyu [Department of International High School, Shanghai Jiaotong University Nanyang Affiliated (Kunshan) School, Minhang District, Shanghai (China); Pan, Yong; Kanchana, Karvannan; Wang, Jingying; Tong, Chao [Chemical Biology Research Center, School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Wenzhou Medical University, Wenzhou, Zhejiang (China); Li, Dan, E-mail: yqyyld@163.com [Department of Nephrology, the Affiliated Yueqing Hospital, Wenzhou Medical University, Wenzhou, Zhejiang (China); Liang, Guang, E-mail: wzmcliangguang@163.com [Chemical Biology Research Center, School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Wenzhou Medical University, Wenzhou, Zhejiang (China)

    2015-01-15

    Inflammation plays a central role in the development and progression of diabetic nephropathy (DN). Researches on novel anti-inflammatory agents may offer new opportunities for the treatment of DN. We previously found a chalcone derivative L6H21 could inhibit LPS-induced cytokine release from macrophages. The aim of this study was to investigate whether L6H21 could ameliorate the high glucose-mediated inflammation in NRK-52E cells and attenuate the inflammation-mediated renal injury. According to the results, L6H21 showed a great inhibitory effect on the expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines, cell adhesion molecules, chemokines, and macrophage adhesion via down-regulation of NF-κB/MAPKs activity in high glucose-stimulated renal NRK-52E cells. Further, in vivo oral administration with L6H21 at a dosage of 20 mg/kg/2 days showed a decreased expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines, cell adhesion molecules, which subsequently contributed to the inhibition on renal macrophage infiltration, the reduction of serum creatinine and BUN levels, and the improvement on the fibrosis and pathological changes in the renal tissues of diabetic mice. These findings provided that chalcone derived L6H21 may be a promising anti-inflammatory agent and have the potential in the therapy of diabetic nephropathy, and importantly, MAPK/NF-κB signaling system may be a novel therapeutic target for human DN in the future. - Highlights: • Inflammation plays a central role in the development of diabetic nephropathy. • Compound L6H21 reduced the high glucose-mediated inflammation in NRK-52E cells. • Compound L6H21 attenuated the inflammation-mediated renal injury. • L6H21 exhibited anti-inflammatory effects via inactivation of NF-κB/MAPKs. • MAPKs/NF-κB may be a novel therapeutic target in diabetic nephropathy treatment.

  1. The pro-resolving lipid mediator maresin 1 (MaR1 attenuates inflammatory signaling pathways in vascular smooth muscle and endothelial cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anuran Chatterjee

    Full Text Available Inflammation and its resolution are central to vascular injury and repair. Maresins comprise a new family of bioactive lipid mediators synthesized from docosahexaenoic acid, an ω-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid. They have been found to exert anti-inflammatory and pro-resolving responses in macrophages, neutrophils and bronchial epithelial cells and impart beneficial actions in murine models of peritonitis and colitis. We investigated the impact of maresin-1 (MaR1 on tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α induced inflammatory responses in human vascular endothelial (EC and smooth muscle cells (VSMC.Primary cultures of human saphenous vein EC and VSMC were employed. We tested the naturally occurring MaR1 as modulator of TNF-α effects, with examination of monocyte adhesion, oxidant stress, and intracellular inflammatory signaling pathways.MaR1 attenuated TNF-α induced monocyte adhesion and reactive oxygen species (ROS generation in both EC and VSMC, associated with down-regulated expression (cell surface of the adhesion molecule E-selectin (in EC and NADPH-oxidases (NOX4, NOX1, NOX2. MaR1 attenuated TNF-α induced release of pro-inflammatory mediators by EC and VSMC. MaR1 caused an attenuation of TNF-α induced NF-κB activation in both cell types associated with inhibition of I-κ Kinase (IKK phosphorylation, IκB-α degradation and nuclear translocation of the NF- κB p65 subunit. MaR1 also caused a time-dependent increase in intracellular cyclic AMP (cAMP in both naive and TNF-α stimulated VSMC and EC.MaR1 has broad anti-inflammatory actions on EC and VSMC, which may be partly mediated through up-regulation of cAMP and down-regulation of the transcription factor NF-κB. The results suggest that the pro-resolving lipid mediator MaR1 exerts homeostatic actions on vascular cells that counteract pro-inflammatory signals. These findings may have direct relevance for acute and chronic states of vascular inflammation.

  2. Curcumin and endometriosis: Review on potential roles and molecular mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arablou, Tahereh; Kolahdouz-Mohammadi, Roya

    2018-01-01

    Endometriosis, an estrogen-dependent inflammatory disease, is one of the most common chronic gynecological disorders affecting women in reproductive age. It is characterized by the presence of endometrial-like tissue outside the uterus. The exact pathophysiology of endometriosis is not still well-known, but the immune system and inflammation have been considered as pivotal factors in disease progression. Turmeric, an important spice all around the world, is obtained from the rhizomes of Curcuma longa, a member of the Zingiberaceae family. It has been used in the prevention and treatment of many diseases since ancient times. Curcumin is the principal polyphenol isolated from turmeric. Several evidences have shown the anti-inflammatory, antioxidant, anti-tumor, anti-angiogenesis, and anti-metastatic activities of curcumin. In this review, relevant articles on the effect of curcumin on endometriosis and possible molecular mechanisms are discussed. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  3. Epicatechin attenuates atherosclerosis and exerts anti-inflammatory effects on diet-induced human-CRP and NFκB in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrison, Martine; van der Heijden, Roel; Heeringa, Peter; Kaijzel, Eric; Verschuren, Lars; Blomhoff, Rune; Kooistra, Teake; Kleemann, Robert

    2014-03-01

    Previous studies investigating flavanol-rich foods provide indications for potential cardioprotective effects of these foods, but the effects of individual flavanols remain unclear. We investigated whether the flavanol epicatechin can reduce diet-induced atherosclerosis, with particular emphasis on the cardiovascular risk factors dyslipidaemia and inflammation. ApoE*3-Leiden mice were fed a cholesterol-containing atherogenic diet with or without epicatechin (0.1% w/w) to study effects on early- and late-stage atherosclerosis (8 w and 20 w). In vivo effects of epicatechin on diet-induced inflammation were studied in human-CRP transgenic mice and NFκB-luciferase reporter mice. Epicatechin attenuated atherosclerotic lesion area in ApoE*3-Leiden mice by 27%, without affecting plasma lipids. This anti-atherogenic effect of epicatechin was specific to the severe lesion types, with no effect on mild lesions. Epicatechin mitigated diet-induced increases in plasma SAA (in ApoE*3-Leiden mice) and plasma human-CRP (in human-CRP transgenic mice). Microarray analysis of aortic gene expression revealed an attenuating effect of epicatechin on several diet-induced pro-atherogenic inflammatory processes in the aorta (e.g. chemotaxis of cells, matrix remodelling), regulated by NFκB. These findings were confirmed immunohistochemically by reduced lesional neutrophil content in HCE, and by inhibition of diet-induced NFκB activity in epicatechin-treated NFκB-luciferase reporter mice. Epicatechin attenuates development of atherosclerosis and impairs lesion progression from mild to severe lesions in absence of an effect on dyslipidaemia. The observed reduction of circulating inflammatory risk factors by epicatechin (e.g. SAA, human-CRP), as well as its local anti-inflammatory activity in the vessel wall, provide a rationale for epicatechin's anti-atherogenic effects. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Curcumin in chemoprevention of breast cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katarzyna Terlikowska

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Breast cancer is the most common malignant cancer among women, both in Poland and worldwide. Due to the constantly increasing number of breast cancer cases, it is vital to develop effective activities in primary and secondary prevention. One of the promising methods of best value, connecting both types of cancer prevention, appears to be chemoprevention. Chemoprevention uses natural or synthetic compounds to inhibit, delay or reverse the process of carcinogenesis. Among ingredients of natural origin, great attention is paid to curcumin – a broad-spectrum anti-cancer polyphenol derivative, extracted from the rhizome of Curcuma longa L. Curcumin has a number of chemopreventive properties such as anti-inflammatory activity, induction of apoptosis, inhibition of angiogenesis as well as tumor metastasis. Numerous in vitro and in vivo studies have demonstrated the mentioned anti-cancer effect in the epithelial breast cell line MCF-10A and in the epithelial breast cell lines MCF-7, BT-474, SK-BR-3-hr and MDA-MB-231. The main problem associated with the use of curcumin as a chemopreventive agent in humans is its low absorption from the gastrointestinal tract, poor solubility in body fluids and low bioavailability. Current studies are underway to increase the bioavailability and effectiveness of curcumin in vivo. Good results in the prevention and the treatment of breast cancer could be ensured by curcumin nanoparticles coated with albumin, known as nanocurcumin. The studies using nanocurcumin, however, are still in the preclinical stage, which is why there is a need to conduct extensive long-term randomized clinical trials to determine its effectiveness.

  5. Turmeric (Curcuma longa) and its major constituent (curcumin) as nontoxic and safe substances: Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soleimani, Vahid; Sahebkar, Amirhossein; Hosseinzadeh, Hossein

    2018-02-26

    Curcumin is the major constituent of turmeric (Curcuma longa). Turmeric has been widely used as a spice in foods and for therapeutic applications such as anti-inflammatory, antihyperlipidemic, and antimicrobial activities. Turmeric and curcumin are nonmutagenic and nongenotoxic. Oral use of turmeric and curcumin did not have reproductive toxicity in animals at certain doses. Studies on human did not show toxic effects, and curcumin was safe at the dose of 6 g/day orally for 4-7 weeks. However, some adverse effects such as gastrointestinal upsets may occur. Moreover, oral bioavailable formulations of curcumin were safe for human at the dose of 500 mg two times in a day for 30 days, but there are still few trials and more studies are needed specially on nanoformulations and it should be discussed in a separate article. In addition, curcumin is known as a generally recognized as safe substance. This review discusses the safety and toxicity of turmeric and curcumin in medicine. Turmeric and curcumin are nontoxic for human especially in oral administration. Turmeric and curcumin are also safe in animals. They are nonmutagenic and are safe in pregnancy in animals but more studies in human are needed. Copyright © 2018 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  6. Inhibitory Effect of Curcumin on Candida-albicans compared with Nystatin: an in-vitro Study

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    Neda Babaii

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Curcumin is the active ingredient in the traditional herbal remedy and dietary spice turmeric (Curcuma longa. Curcumin has a surprisingly wide range of beneficial properties, including anti-inflammatory, antioxidant, chemopreventive and chemotherapeutic activity. on basis of recent studies; it has antifungal and antibacterial effects. The aim of this study was in-vitro evaluation of antifungal effect of curcumin on candida albicans and comparing it with nystatin. Methods: after preparing curcumin powder, 3 laboratory methods were used to evaluate antifungal effect. The first method was cell count technique, used to evaluate the amount of candida albicans after time, in different concentrations of curcumin in Dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO. The second was cup bioassay, in which inhibitory a zone of curcumin in DMSO was evaluated in sabouraud culture plates; and in third method, inhibitory zones of dried disks; which contained curcumin in DMSO were evaluated. Results: the result of all three methods showed that curcumin has antifungal effect and this effect increases in more concentrations. Conclusion: curcumin has apparent and dose dependent antifungal effect on candida albicans.

  7. Wound Healing Effects of Curcumin: A Short Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tejada, Silvia; Manayi, Azadeh; Daglia, Maria; Nabavi, Seyed F; Sureda, Antoni; Hajheydari, Zohreh; Gortzi, Olga; Pazoki-Toroudi, Hamidreza; Nabavi, Seyed M

    Wound healing is a complex process that consists of several phases that range from coagulation, inflammation, accumulation of radical substances, to proliferation, formation of fibrous tissues and collagen, contraction of wound with formation of granulation tissue and scar. Since antiquity, vegetable substances have been used as phytotherapeutic agents for wound healing, and more recently natural substances of vegetable origin have been studied with the attempt to show their beneficial effect on wound treatment. Curcumin, the most active component of rhizome of Curcuma longa L. (common name: turmeric), has been studied for many years due to its bio-functional properties, especially antioxidant, radical scavenger, antimicrobial and anti-inflammatory activities, which play a crucial role in the wound healing process. Moreover, curcumin stimulated the production of the growth factors involved in the wound healing process, and so curcumin also accelerated the management of wound restoration. The aim of the present review is collecting and evaluating the literature data regarding curcumin properties potentially relevant for wound healing. Moreover, the investigations on the wound healing effects of curcumin are reported. In order to produce a more complete picture, the chemistry and sources of curcumin are also discussed.

  8. Synthetic and Medicinal Prospective of Structurally Modified Curcumins.

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    Kumar, Bhupinder; Singh, Virender; Shankar, Ravi; Kumar, Kapil; Rawal, Ravindra K

    2017-01-01

    Curcumin, a natural yellow phenolic compound, is present in various types of herbs, particularly in Turmeric, Curcuma longa Linn. (Zingiberaceae family) rhizomes. Curcumin is a polyphenolic natural compound with diverse and attractive biological activities. In the last decade curcumine and its various synthetic analogues have been prepared and evaluated for various pharmacological activities that prove it as a lead molecule against several biological targets. It is a natural antioxidant and exhibited many pharmacological activities such as anti-inflammatory, anti-microbial, anticancer, anti-Alzheimer in both preclinical and clinical studies. Moreover, Curcumin and its analogues have anti-tubercular, cardioprotective, anti-diabetic, hepatoprotective, neuroprotective, nephroprotective, antirheumatic and anti-viral activities. The substitutions of 1,6-heptadiene linkage moiety via carbonyl group sustituion and addition of heterocyclic linker; isoxazole, 1H-pyrazole, cyclopentanone, piperidin-4-one, N-methylpiperidin-4-one enhance biological activities. The structure activity relationship of various curcumin analogues is studied for medicinal purposes and it reveals that monocarbonyl linkage analogues have anticancer properties. The current review gives an insight of the history, chemistry, analogues and most interesting in vitro and in vivo studies on the biological effects of Curcumin and its analogues.

  9. Combination of Erythromycin and Curcumin Alleviates Staphylococcus aureus Induced Osteomyelitis in Rats

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    Zubin Zhou

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Osteomyelitis is commonly caused by Staphylococcus aureus. Both erythromycin and curcumin can suppress S. aureus growth, but their roles in osteomyelitis are barely studied. We aim to explore the activities of erythromycin and curcumin against chronical osteomyelitis induced by methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA. Chronicle implant-induced osteomyelitis was established by MRSA infection in male Wistar rats. Four weeks after bacterial inoculation, rats received no treatment, erythromycin monotherapy, curcumin monotherapy, or erythromycin plus curcumin twice daily for 2 weeks. Bacterial levels, bone infection status, inflammatory signals and side effects were evaluated. Rats tolerated all treatments well, with no death or side effects such as, diarrhea and weight loss. Two days after treatment completion, erythromycin monotherapy did not suppress bacterial growth and had no effect in bone infection, although it reduced serum pro-inflammatory cytokines tumor necrosis factor (TNF-α and interleukin (IL-6. Curcumin monotherapy slightly suppressed bacterial growth, alleviated bone infection and reduced TNF-α and IL-6. Erythromycin and curcumin combined treatment markedly suppressed bacterial growth, substantially alleviated bone infection and reduced TNF-α and IL-6. Combination of erythromycin and curcumin lead a much stronger efficiency against MRSA induced osteomyelitis in rats than monotherapy. Our study suggests that erythromycin and curcumin could be a new combination for treating MRSA induced osteomyelitis.

  10. Resistance exercise attenuates skeletal muscle oxidative stress, systemic pro-inflammatory state, and cachexia in Walker-256 tumor-bearing rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padilha, Camila Souza; Borges, Fernando Henrique; Costa Mendes da Silva, Lilian Eslaine; Frajacomo, Fernando Tadeu Trevisan; Jordao, Alceu Afonso; Duarte, José Alberto; Cecchini, Rubens; Guarnier, Flávia Alessandra; Deminice, Rafael

    2017-09-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of resistance exercise training (RET) on oxidative stress, systemic inflammatory markers, and muscle wasting in Walker-256 tumor-bearing rats. Male (Wistar) rats were divided into 4 groups: sedentary controls (n = 9), tumor-bearing (n = 9), exercised (n = 9), and tumor-bearing exercised (n = 10). Exercised and tumor-bearing exercised rats were exposed to resistance exercise of climbing a ladder apparatus with weights tied to their tails for 6 weeks. The physical activity of control and tumor-bearing rats was confined to the space of the cage. After this period, tumor-bearing and tumor-bearing exercised animals were inoculated subcutaneously with Walker-256 tumor cells (11.0 × 10 7 cells in 0.5 mL of phosphate-buffered saline) while control and exercised rats were injected with vehicle. Following inoculation, rats maintained resistance exercise training (exercised and tumor-bearing exercised) or sedentary behavior (control and tumor-bearing) for 12 more days, after which they were euthanized. Results showed muscle wasting in the tumor-bearing group, with body weight loss, increased systemic leukocytes, and inflammatory interleukins as well as muscular oxidative stress and reduced mTOR signaling. In contrast, RET in the tumor-bearing exercised group was able to mitigate the reduced body weight and muscle wasting with the attenuation of muscle oxidative stress and systemic inflammatory markers. RET also prevented loss of muscle strength associated with tumor development. RET, however, did not prevent the muscle proteolysis signaling via FBXO32 gene messenger RNA expression in the tumor-bearing group. In conclusion, RET performed prior tumor implantation prevents cachexia development by attenuating tumor-induced systemic pro-inflammatory condition with muscle oxidative stress and muscle damage.

  11. Protein from Hevea brasiliensis “Hev b 13” latex attenuates systemic inflammatory response and lung lesions in rats with sepsis

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    L. A. Araújo

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Sepsis induces a severe systemic inflammatory response that may result in multiple organ dysfunction and death. Studies using a protein derived from natural Hevea brasiliensis (rubber tree latex, denominated Hev b 13, have demonstrated important anti-inflammatory effects, but no data have been published regarding its effects on sepsis. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of Hev b 13 on the inflammatory response and lung lesions of septal rats. Male Wistar rats were submitted to cecal ligation and puncture (CLP, randomized into groups and treated with subcutaneously administered doses of 0.5/2.0/3.0 mg/Kg of Hev b 13. Next, animals were subdivided into three different points in time (1, 6 and 24 hours after treatments for collection of blood samples and euthanasia accompanied by organ removal. Total and differential leukocyte counts, cytokine dosage and histological assessment were analyzed. Treatment with Hev b 13 resulted in a significant decline in total and differential leukocytes as well as suppression of TNF-α and IL-6 production, associated with the increase in IL-10 and IL-4 in plasma and lung tissue. Moreover, it reduced morphological and pathological changes found in the lungs, including neutrophil infiltration, edema and alveolar thickening. The present study concluded that Hev b 13 exerts anti-inflammatory effects and attenuates lung lesions in septal rats, showing potential for clinical application.

  12. Date syrup-derived polyphenols attenuate angiogenic responses and exhibits anti-inflammatory activity mediated by vascular endothelial growth factor and cyclooxygenase-2 expression in endothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taleb, Hajer; Morris, R Keith; Withycombe, Cathryn E; Maddocks, Sarah E; Kanekanian, Ara D

    2016-07-01

    Bioactive components such as polyphenols, present in many plants, are purported to have anti-inflammatory and antiangiogenic properties. Date syrup, produced from date fruit of the date palm tree, has traditionally been used to treat a wide range of diseases with etiologies involving angiogenesis and inflammation. It was hypothesized that polyphenols in date syrup reduce angiogenic responses such as cell migration, tube formation, and matrix metalloproteinase activity in an inflammatory model by exhibiting anti-inflammatory activity mediated by vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and the prostaglandin enzyme cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) in endothelial cells. Date syrup polyphenols at 60 and 600μg/mL reduced inflammation and suppressed several stages of angiogenesis, including endothelial cell migration, invasion, matrix metalloproteinase activity, and tube formation, without evidence of cytotoxicity. VEGF and COX-2 expression induced by tumor necrosis factor-alpha at both gene expression and protein level was significantly reduced by date syrup polyphenols in comparison to untreated cells. In conclusion, polyphenols in date syrup attenuated angiogenic responses and exhibited anti-inflammatory activity mediated by VEGF and COX-2 expression in endothelial cells. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Zhen-wu-tang attenuates cationic bovine serum albumin-induced inflammatory response in membranous glomerulonephritis rat through inhibiting AGEs/RAGE/NF-κB pathway activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Junbiao; Liu, Bihao; Liang, Chunling; Ouyang, Hui; Lin, Jin; Zhong, Yanchun; He, Yu; Zhou, Jie; Zhou, Yuan; Zhou, Jiuyao

    2016-04-01

    Zhen-wu-tang (ZWT), a traditional Chinese compound formula recorded in the Treatise on Febrile Diseases, has significant inhibitory effects on inflammatory damage and oxidative lesions in rats, but its mechanism of action remains unclear. The aim of the present study was to explore whether the anti-inflammatory and anti-oxidative effects of ZWT were mediated by the AGEs/RAGE/NF-κB signaling pathway in rats with cationic bovine serum albumin (C-BSA)-induced membranous glomerulonephritis (MGN). We found that ZWT significantly reduced the production of malondialdehyde (MDA), but enhanced the superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity. The ELISA results showed that ZWT not only reduced the serum levels of AGEs but also decreased the release of inflammatory mediators (TNF-α, IL-1β, and IL-6). Meanwhile, HE staining showed that pathological kidney injury was alleviated by ZWT. In addition, ZWT suppressed the expression of RAGE1 and NF-κB p65, as well as the nuclear translocation of NF-κB p65. The accumulation of AGEs, oxidative lesions and inflammation damage were reduced by an AGE inhibitor. Thus, the present study demonstrates that AGEs play a role in the pathogenesis of MGN and that AGE inhibition could reduce the inflammatory reactions and oxidative lesions in MGN. In general, ZWT attenuated MGN, in part, by inhibiting the AGEs/RAGE/NF-κB pathway. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Preclinical assessment of curcumin as a potential therapy for B-CLL.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Everett, Peter C; Meyers, John A; Makkinje, Anthony; Rabbi, Mohammed; Lerner, Adam

    2007-01-01

    Curcumin, the principle component of the spice turmeric, has been used as an anti-inflammatory medication in India and China for centuries. Recent studies, predominantly using actively dividing cell lines, have suggested that this compound could be used as a chemopreventative or therapeutic agent for epithelial tumors. As curcumin has been reported to inhibit the NIK/IKK complex, an activity that would be expected to induce apoptosis in B cell malignancies, we sought to determine whether curcumin induces apoptosis in vitro in primary chronic lymphocytic leukemia (B-CLL) cells. Primary leukemic cells were incubated with varying dosages of curcumin, followed by assessment for apoptosis. The role of PPARgamma or NF-kappaB signaling in curcumin-induced apoptosis was examined by cotreatment with a PPARgamma antagonist or EMSA of nuclear NFkappaB complexes. We also examined whether a clinically achievable concentration of curcumin (1 microM) would augment the apoptotic effects of fludarabine, dexamethasone, vincristine or the PDE4 inhibitor rolipram. In B-CLL cells from 14 patients, curcumin-induced apoptosis with a mean EC(50) of 5.5 microM. In contrast, the EC(50) for whole mononuclear cells from a healthy donor was 21.8 microM. In a 48 hr wash-out time course, curcumin-induced apoptosis was time-dependent, with a substantial reduction in apoptosis observed when curcumin was removed after 5 hr. Curcumin treatment reduced basal nuclear NF-kappaB levels and 1 microM curcumin augmented both vinca alkaloid and PDE4 inhibitor-induced apoptosis in B-CLL cells. Our studies suggest that curcumin may augment the efficacy of established or experimental therapies for B-CLL.

  15. Curcumin nanodisks: formulation and characterization

    OpenAIRE

    Ghosh, Mistuni; Singh, Amareshwar T. K.; Xu, Wenwei; Sulchek, Todd; Gordon, Leo I.; Ryan, Robert O.

    2010-01-01

    Nanodisks (ND) are nanoscale, disk-shaped phospholipid bilayers whose edge is stabilized by apolipoproteins. In the present study, ND were formulated with the bioactive polyphenol, curcumin, at a 6:1 phospholipid:curcumin molar ratio. Atomic force microscopy revealed that curcumin-ND are particles with diameters

  16. Curcumin and Diabetes: A Systematic Review

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    Dong-wei Zhang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Turmeric (Curcuma longa, a rhizomatous herbaceous perennial plant of the ginger family, has been used for the treatment of diabetes in Ayurvedic and traditional Chinese medicine. The active component of turmeric, curcumin, has caught attention as a potential treatment for diabetes and its complications primarily because it is a relatively safe and inexpensive drug that reduces glycemia and hyperlipidemia in rodent models of diabetes. Here, we review the recent literature on the applications of curcumin for glycemia and diabetes-related liver disorders, adipocyte dysfunction, neuropathy, nephropathy, vascular diseases, pancreatic disorders, and other complications, and we also discuss its antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties. The applications of additional curcuminoid compounds for diabetes prevention and treatment are also included in this paper. Finally, we mention the approaches that are currently being sought to generate a “super curcumin” through improvement of the bioavailability to bring this promising natural product to the forefront of diabetes therapeutics.

  17. Curcumin protects against myocardial infarction-induced cardiac fibrosis via SIRT1 activation in vivo and in vitro

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    Xiao J

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Jie Xiao, Xi Sheng, Xinyu Zhang, Mengqi Guo, Xiaoping JiKey Laboratory of Cardiovascular Remodeling and Function Research, Chinese Ministry of Education and Chinese Ministry of Health, Qilu Hospital of Shandong University, Jinan, Shandong, People’s Republic of ChinaAbstract: Curcumin, a polyphenolic compound derived from turmeric, protects against myocardial injury by alleviating oxidative stress, inflammation, apoptosis, and fibrosis. However, the role of curcumin and its mechanism of action on interstitial fibrosis after myocardial infarction (MI are poorly understood. To clarify, MI was induced by a permanent ligation of the left anterior descending coronary artery in adult mice, and the effects of curcumin were evaluated 4 weeks after the MI event. In vitro, we treated cardiac fibroblasts (CFs with Ang II, and investigated the anti-fibrotic mechanism of curcumin. Our results showed that curcumin significantly attenuated collagen deposition in vivo and inhibited CF proliferation and migration, and MMP expression. In addition, we found that the down-regulation of SIRT1 after MI was attenuated by curcumin pretreatment, which indicated that the activation of SIRT1 might be involved in the protective action of curcumin. This hypothesis was confirmed by genetic inhibition of SIRT1 (siRNA-SIRT1 in Ang II-treated CFs. Our results provide new insights into the mechanism underlying the anti-fibrotic effects of curcumin in the heart.Keywords: curcumin, myocardial infarction, angiotensin II, cardiac fibroblasts, fibrosis, SIRT1

  18. Curcumin and curcumin-like molecules: from spice to drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchiani, A; Rozzo, C; Fadda, A; Delogu, G; Ruzza, P

    2014-01-01

    Curcumin is the major yellow pigment extracted from turmeric, a commonly used spice in Asian cuisine and extensively employed in ayurvedic herbal remedies. A number of studies have shown that curcumin can be a prevention and a chemotherapeutic agent for colon, skin, oral and intestinal cancers. Curcumin is also well known for its antiinflammatory and antioxidant properties, showing high reactivity towards peroxyl radicals, and thus acting as a free radical scavenger. Recently, experimental studies have demonstrated that curcumin might be used in the prevention and the cure of Alzheimer's disease. Indeed, curcumin injected peripherally in vivo into aged Tg mice crossed the blood-brain barrier and bound to amyloid plaques, reducing amyloid levels and plaque formation decisively. The present review will resume the most recent developments in the medicinal chemistry of curcumin and curcumin-like molecules.

  19. Nebulized Recombinant Human Tissue Factor Pathway Inhibitor Attenuates Coagulation and Exerts Modest Anti-inflammatory Effects in Rat Models of Lung Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van den Boogaard, Florry E; Hofstra, Jorrit J; Brands, Xanthe; Levi, Marcel M; Roelofs, Joris J T H; Zaat, Sebastiaan A J; Van't Veer, Cornelis; van der Poll, Tom; Schultz, Marcus J

    2017-04-01

    Critically ill patients are at a constant risk of direct (e.g., by pneumonia) or indirect lung injury (e.g., by sepsis). Excessive alveolar fibrin deposition is a prominent feature of lung injury, undermining pulmonary integrity and function. We examined the effect of local administration of recombinant human tissue factor pathway inhibitor (rh-TFPI), a natural anticoagulant, in two well-established models of lung injury in rats. Rats received intratracheal instillation of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, causing direct lung injury, or they received an intravenous injection of Escherichia coli lipopolysaccharide (LPS), causing indirect lung injury. Rats were randomized to local treatment with rh-TFPI or placebo through repeated nebulization. Challenge with P. aeruginosa or LPS was associated with increased coagulation and decreased fibrinolysis in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) and plasma. Rh-TFPI levels in BALF increased after nebulization, whereas plasma rh-TFPI levels remained low and systemic TFPI activity was not affected. Nebulization of rh-TFPI attenuated pulmonary and systemic coagulation in both models, without affecting fibrinolysis. Nebulization of rh-TFPI modestly reduced the inflammatory response and bacterial growth of P. aeruginosa in the alveolar compartment. Local treatment with rh-TFPI does not alter systemic TFPI activity; however, it attenuates both pulmonary and systemic coagulopathy. Furthermore, nebulized rh-TFPI modestly reduces the pulmonary inflammatory response and allows increased bacterial clearance in rats with direct lung injury caused by P. aeruginosa.

  20. Importance of TLR2 on hepatic immune and non-immune cells to attenuate the strong inflammatory liver response during Trypanosoma cruzi acute infection.

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    Eugenio Antonio Carrera-Silva

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Toll-like receptors (TLR and cytokines play a central role in the pathogen clearance as well as in pathological processes. Recently, we reported that TLR2, TLR4 and TLR9 are differentially modulated in injured livers from BALB/c and C57BL/6 (B6 mice during Trypanosoma cruzi infection. However, the molecular and cellular mechanisms involved in local immune response remain unclear. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In this study, we demonstrate that hepatic leukocytes from infected B6 mice produced higher amounts of pro-inflammatory cytokines than BALB/c mice, whereas IL10 and TGFβ were only released by hepatic leukocytes from BALB/c. Strikingly, a higher expression of TLR2 and TLR4 was observed in hepatocytes of infected BALB/c mice. However, in infected B6 mice, the strong pro-inflammatory response was associated with a high and sustained expression of TLR9 and iNOS in leukocytes and hepatic tissue respectively. Additionally, co-expression of gp91- and p47-phox NADPH oxidase subunits were detected in liver tissue of infected B6 mice. Notably, the pre-treatment previous to infection with Pam3CSK4, TLR2-agonist, induced a significant reduction of transaminase activity levels and inflammatory foci number in livers of infected B6 mice. Moreover, lower pro-inflammatory cytokines and increased TGFβ levels were detected in purified hepatic leukocytes from TLR2-agonist pre-treated B6 mice. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our results describe some of the main injurious signals involved in liver immune response during the T. cruzi acute infection. Additionally we show that the administration of Pam3CSk4, previous to infection, can attenuate the exacerbated inflammatory response of livers in B6 mice. These results could be useful to understand and design novel immune strategies in controlling liver pathologies.

  1. REVIEW: Curcumin and Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamaguchi, Tsuyoshi; Ono, Kenjiro; Yamada, Masahito

    2010-10-01

    Curcumin has a long history of use as a traditional remedy and food in Asia. Many studies have reported that curcumin has various beneficial properties, such as antioxidant, antiinflammatory, and antitumor. Because of the reported effects of curcumin on tumors, many clinical trials have been performed to elucidate curcumin's effects on cancers. Recent reports have suggested therapeutic potential of curcumin in the pathophysiology of Alzheimer's disease (AD). In in vitro studies, curcumin has been reported to inhibit amyloid-β-protein (Aβ) aggregation, and Aβ-induced inflammation, as well as the activities of β-secretase and acetylcholinesterase. In in vivo studies, oral administration of curcumin has resulted in the inhibition of Aβ deposition, Aβ oligomerization, and tau phosphorylation in the brains of AD animal models, and improvements in behavioral impairment in animal models. These findings suggest that curcumin might be one of the most promising compounds for the development of AD therapies. At present, four clinical trials concerning the effects of curcumin on AD has been conducted. Two of them that were performed in China and USA have been reported no significant differences in changes in cognitive function between placebo and curcumin groups, and no results have been reported from two other clinical studies. Additional trials are necessary to determine the clinical usefulness of curcumin in the prevention and treatment of AD. © 2010 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  2. Low-methoxyl lemon pectin attenuates inflammatory responses and improves intestinal barrier integrity in caerulein-induced experimental acute pancreatitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sun, Yajun; He, Yue; Wang, Fei; Zhang, Hao; de Vos, Paul; Sun, Jia

    Scope: Acute pancreatitis (AP) is a common clinical acute abdominal disease. The intestinal injury associated with AP will aggravate the condition retroactively. This study investigates whether the low-methoxyl pectin (LMP) isolated from lemon could attenuate AP and associated intestinal injury.

  3. Curcumin in Cell Death Processes: A Challenge for CAM of Age-Related Pathologies

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    S. Salvioli

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Curcumin, the yellow pigment from the rhizoma of Curcuma longa, is a widely studied phytochemical which has a variety of biological activities: anti-inflammatory and anti-oxidative. In this review we discuss the biological mechanisms and possible clinical effects of curcumin treatment on cancer therapy, and neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's Disease, with particular attention to the cell death processes induced by curcumin. Since oxidative stress and inflammation are major determinants of the aging process, we also argue that curcumin can have a more general effect that slows down the rate of aging. Finally, the effects of curcumin can be described as xenohormetic, since it activates a sort of stress response in mammalian cells.

  4. Efficacy of biodegradable curcumin nanoparticles in delaying cataract in diabetic rat model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grama, Charitra N; Suryanarayana, Palla; Patil, Madhoosudan A; Raghu, Ganugula; Balakrishna, Nagalla; Kumar, M N V Ravi; Reddy, Geereddy Bhanuprakash

    2013-01-01

    Curcumin, the active principle present in the yellow spice turmeric, has been shown to exhibit various pharmacological actions such as antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, antimicrobial, and anti-carcinogenic activities. Previously we have reported that dietary curcumin delays diabetes-induced cataract in rats. However, low peroral bioavailability is a major limiting factor for the success of clinical utilization of curcumin. In this study, we have administered curcumin encapsulated nanoparticles in streptozotocin (STZ) induced diabetic cataract model. Oral administration of 2 mg/day nanocurcumin was significantly more effective than curcumin in delaying diabetic cataracts in rats. The significant delay in progression of diabetic cataract by nanocurcumin is attributed to its ability to intervene the biochemical pathways of disease progression such as protein insolubilization, polyol pathway, protein glycation, crystallin distribution and oxidative stress. The enhanced performance of nanocurcumin can be attributed probably to its improved oral bioavailability. Together, the results of the present study demonstrate the potential of nanocurcumin in managing diabetic cataract.

  5. Effect of curcumin (Curcuma longa extract) on LPS-induced acute lung injury is mediated by the activation of AMPK.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Joungmin; Jeong, Seong-Wook; Quan, Hui; Jeong, Cheol-Won; Choi, Jeong-Il; Bae, Hong-Beom

    2016-02-01

    Curcumin, a biphenolic compound extracted from turmeric (Curcuma longa), possesses potent anti-inflammatory activity. The present study investigated whether curcumin could increase 5' adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK) activity in macrophages and modulate the severity of lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced acute lung injury. Macrophages were treated with curcumin and then exposed (or not) to LPS. Acute lung injury was induced by intratracheal administration of LPS in BALB/c mice. Curcumin increased phosphorylation of AMPK and acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACC), a downstream target of AMPK, in a time- and concentration-dependent manner. Curcumin did not increase phosphorylation of liver kinase B1, a primary kinase upstream of AMPK. STO-609, an inhibitor of calcium(2+)/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase kinase, diminished curcumin-induced AMPK phosphorylation, but transforming growth factor-beta-activated kinase 1 inhibitor did not. Curcumin also diminished the LPS-induced increase in phosphorylation of inhibitory κB-alpha and the production of tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), macrophage inflammatory protein (MIP)-2, and interleukin (IL)-6 by macrophages. Systemic administration of curcumin significantly decreased the production of TNF-α, MIP-2, and IL-6 as well as neutrophil accumulation in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid, and also decreased pulmonary myeloperoxidase levels and the wet/dry weight ratio in mice subjected to LPS treatment. These results suggest that the protective effect of curcumin on LPS-induced acute lung injury is associated with AMPK activation.

  6. UVB promotes the initiation of uveitic inflammatory injury in vivo and is attenuated by UV-blocking protection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Yi-Ching; Liou, Jyh-Cheng; Kuo, Chan-Yen; Tsai, Yun-Shan; Lin, En-Chieh; Hsieh, Ching-Ju; Lin, Si-Ping; Chen, Bo-Yie

    2017-01-01

    Uveitic inflammatory injury can cause irreversible visual loss; however, no single animal model recapitulates all the characteristics of human uveitis. Ultraviolet radiation (UVR) is one of the risk factors for uveitis, but the role of UVR in the pathogenesis of uveitic injury is unclear. The aim of this study was to elucidate whether UVB promotes the initiation of, and subsequently contributes to, uveitic inflammatory injury. Mice were assigned to either a blank control group or one of three UVB treatment groups: no protection, protection with Nelfilcon A contact lens (Food and Drug Administration [FDA] class II, about 46.8% UVB transmittance), or protection with Etafilcon A contact lens (FDA class IV, about 0.55% UVB transmittance). The contact lenses acted as blocking barriers against UVR. After the application of UVR, pathologic injuries were determined with slit-lamp microscopy and histologic examination. Compared with the intact status of the controls, the anterior eyes of the UVB groups showed pathologic alterations in physiologic properties and tissue integrity. UVR promoted anterior uveitic inflammatory injury, with expansion of the hyperemic iris vessels, over-production of aqueous humor protein, disruption of the blood-aqueous barrier, and embedding of infiltrative leukocytes inside the iridocorneal angle. However, blockage of UVR in vivo retarded the progression of uveitic inflammatory injury. The highest level of UV protection in the Etafilcon A group resulted in greater inhibition of uveitic inflammatory injury than that in the Nelfilcon A group. This study demonstrates that UVB initiated and promoted uveitic inflammatory injury. UV protection is needed for the clinical management of anterior uveitis. The Etafilcon A lenses provide better protection of the anterior segment of the eye against UVB damage compared with the Nelfilcon A lenses.

  7. Hydrogen sulfide in paraventricular nucleus attenuates blood pressure by regulating oxidative stress and inflammatory cytokines in high salt-induced hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Yan-Feng; Zhang, Dong-Dong; Yu, Xiao-Jing; Gao, Hong-Li; Liu, Kai-Li; Qi, Jie; Li, Hong-Bao; Yi, Qiu-Yue; Chen, Wen-Sheng; Cui, Wei; Zhu, Guo-Qing; Kang, Yu-Ming

    2017-03-15

    Hydrogen sulfide (H 2 S) is an important gaseous signaling molecule in neuro-modulation, anti-inflammatory, anti-oxidant and anti-hypertensive effects. The paraventricular nucleus (PVN) is a major integrative nucleus in regulating BP and SNA. The aim of this study is to explore whether endogenous or exogenous H 2 S changed by hydroxylamine hydrochloride (HA) or GYY4137 infused in the PVN affects RSNA and MAP by regulating oxidative stress or the balance between pro-inflammatory cytokines (PICs) and anti-inflammatory cytokines in high salt-induced hypertensive rats. Male Dahl rats were fed by high-salt or normal-salt diet. At the end of the 4th week, GYY4137, HA or vehicle was microinjected into bilateral PVN for 6 weeks. The levels of MAP, HR, plasma norepinephrine (NE), reactive oxygen species (ROS), NOX2, NOX4 and IL-1β were increased significantly in high salt-induced hypertensive rats. Higher levels of these parameters were detected in the group treated by HA, but lower levels in the GYY4137 group. The trends of H 2 S, CBS, IL-10 and Cu/Zn SOD were opposite to the parameters described above. These findings suggest that endogenous or exogenous H 2 S in the PVN attenuates sympathetic activity and hypertensive response, which are partly due to decrease of ROS and PICs within the PVN in high salt-induced hypertension. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Improved bioavailability of targeted Curcumin delivery efficiently regressed cardiac hypertrophy by modulating apoptotic load within cardiac microenvironment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ray, Aramita; Rana, Santanu; Banerjee, Durba; Mitra, Arkadeep; Datta, Ritwik; Naskar, Shaon; Sarkar, Sagartirtha

    2016-01-01

    Cardiomyocyte apoptosis acts as a prime modulator of cardiac hypertrophy leading to heart failure, a major cause of human mortality worldwide. Recent therapeutic interventions have focussed on translational applications of diverse pharmaceutical regimes among which, Curcumin (from Curcuma longa) is known to have an anti-hypertrophic potential but with limited pharmacological efficacies due to low aqueous solubility and poor bioavailability. In this study, Curcumin encapsulated by carboxymethyl chitosan (CMC) nanoparticle conjugated to a myocyte specific homing peptide was successfully delivered in bioactive form to pathological myocardium for effective regression of cardiac hypertrophy in a rat (Rattus norvegicus) model. Targeted nanotization showed higher cardiac bioavailability of Curcumin at a low dose of 5 mg/kg body weight compared to free Curcumin at 35 mg/kg body weight. Moreover, Curcumin/CMC-peptide treatment during hypertrophy significantly improved cardiac function by downregulating expression of hypertrophy marker genes (ANF, β-MHC), apoptotic mediators (Bax, Cytochrome-c) and activity of apoptotic markers (Caspase 3 and PARP); whereas free Curcumin in much higher dose showed minimal improvement during compromised cardiac function. Targeted Curcumin treatment significantly lowered p53 expression and activation in diseased myocardium via inhibited interaction of p53 with p300-HAT. Thus attenuated acetylation of p53 facilitated p53 ubiquitination and reduced the apoptotic load in hypertrophied cardiomyocytes; thereby limiting cardiomyocytes' need to enter the regeneration cycle during hypertrophy. This study elucidates for the first time an efficient targeted delivery regimen for Curcumin and also attributes towards probable mechanistic insight into its therapeutic potential as a cardio-protective agent for regression of cardiac hypertrophy. - Highlights: • Cardiomyocyte targeted Curcumin/CMC-peptide increases bioavailability of the drug. • Curcumin

  9. Dissolution enhancement of curcumin via curcumin-prebiotic inulin nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fares, Mohammad M; Salem, Mu'taz Sheikh

    2015-01-01

    Dissolution enhancement of curcumin via prebiotic inulin designed to orally deliver poorly water-soluble curcumin at duodenum low acidity (pH 5.5) was investigated. Different prebiotic inulin-curcumin nanoparticles were synthesized in ethanol-water binary system at different pre-adjusted pH values. Characterization via FTIR, XRD and TGA revealed the formation of curcumin-inulin conjugates, whereas surface morphology via SEM and TEM techniques implied the formation of nanoparticle beads and nanoclusters. Prebiotic inulin-curcumin nanoparticles prepared at pH 7.0 demonstrated a maximum curcumin dissolution enhancement of ≈90% with respect to 30% for curcumin alone at pH 5.5. Power law constant values were in accordance with dissolution enhancement investigations. All samples show Fickian diffusion mechanism. XRD investigations confirm that inulin maintain its crystalline structure in curcumin-inulin conjugate structure, which confirms that it can exert successfully its prebiotic role in the gastrointestinal (GI) tract. Therefore, the use of curcumin-inulin nanoparticles can perform dual-mission in the GI tract at the duodenum environment; release of 90% of curcumin followed by prebiotic activity of inulin, which will probably play a significant role in cancer therapeutics for the coming generations.

  10. Examining the potential clinical value of curcumin in the prevention and diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goozee, K G; Shah, T M; Sohrabi, H R; Rainey-Smith, S R; Brown, B; Verdile, G; Martins, R N

    2016-02-14

    Curcumin derived from turmeric is well documented for its anti-carcinogenic, antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties. Recent studies show that curcumin also possesses neuroprotective and cognitive-enhancing properties that may help delay or prevent neurodegenerative diseases, including Alzheimer's disease (AD). Currently, clinical diagnosis of AD is onerous, and it is primarily based on the exclusion of other causes of dementia. In addition, phase III clinical trials of potential treatments have mostly failed, leaving disease-modifying interventions elusive. AD can be characterised neuropathologically by the deposition of extracellular β amyloid (Aβ) plaques and intracellular accumulation of tau-containing neurofibrillary tangles. Disruptions in Aβ metabolism/clearance contribute to AD pathogenesis. In vitro studies have shown that Aβ metabolism is altered by curcumin, and animal studies report that curcumin may influence brain function and the development of dementia, because of its antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties, as well as its ability to influence Aβ metabolism. However, clinical studies of curcumin have revealed limited effects to date, most likely because of curcumin's relatively low solubility and bioavailability, and because of selection of cohorts with diagnosed AD, in whom there is already major neuropathology. However, the fresh approach of targeting early AD pathology (by treating healthy, pre-clinical and mild cognitive impairment-stage cohorts) combined with new curcumin formulations that increase bioavailability is renewing optimism concerning curcumin-based therapy. The aim of this paper is to review the current evidence supporting an association between curcumin and modulation of AD pathology, including in vitro and in vivo studies. We also review the use of curcumin in emerging retinal imaging technology, as a fluorochrome for AD diagnostics.

  11. Curcumin Differs from Tetrahydrocurcumin for Molecular Targets, Signaling Pathways and Cellular Responses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bharat B. Aggarwal

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Curcumin (diferuloylmethane, a golden pigment from turmeric, has been linked with antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, anticancer, antiviral, antibacterial, and antidiabetic properties. Most of the these activities have been assigned to methoxy, hydroxyl, α,β-unsaturated carbonyl moiety or to diketone groups present in curcumin. One of the major metabolites of curcumin is tetrahydrocurcumin (THC, which lacks α,β-unsaturated carbonyl moiety and is white in color. Whether THC is superior to curcumin on a molecular level is unclear and thus is the focus of this review. Various studies suggest that curcumin is a more potent antioxidant than THC; curcumin (but not THC can bind and inhibit numerous targets including DNA (cytosine-5-methyltransferase-1, heme oxygenase-1, Nrf2, β-catenin, cyclooxygenase-2, NF-kappaB, inducible nitric oxide synthase, nitric oxide, amyloid plaques, reactive oxygen species, vascular endothelial growth factor, cyclin D1, glutathione, P300/CBP, 5-lipoxygenase, cytosolic phospholipase A2, prostaglandin E2, inhibitor of NF-kappaB kinase-1, -2, P38MAPK, p-Tau, tumor necrosis factor-α, forkhead box O3a, CRAC; curcumin can inhibit tumor cell growth and suppress cellular entry of viruses such as influenza A virus and hepatitis C virus much more effectively than THC; curcumin affects membrane mobility; and curcumin is also more effective than THC in suppressing phorbol-ester-induced tumor promotion. Other studies, however, suggest that THC is superior to curcumin for induction of GSH peroxidase, glutathione-S-transferase, NADPH: quinone reductase, and quenching of free radicals. Most studies have indicated that THC exhibits higher antioxidant activity, but curcumin exhibits both pro-oxidant and antioxidant properties.

  12. Resveratrol Attenuates Acute Inflammatory Injury in Experimental Subarachnoid Hemorrhage in Rats via Inhibition of TLR4 Pathway

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    Xiang-Sheng Zhang

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4 has been proven to play a critical role in neuroinflammation and to represent an important therapeutic target following subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH. Resveratrol (RSV, a natural occurring polyphenolic compound, has a powerful anti-inflammatory property. However, the underlying molecular mechanisms of RSV in protecting against early brain injury (EBI after SAH remain obscure. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of RSV on the TLR4-related inflammatory signaling pathway and EBI in rats after SAH. A prechiasmatic cistern SAH model was used in our experiment. The expressions of TLR4, high-mobility group box 1 (HMGB1, myeloid differentiation factor 88 (MyD88, and nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB were evaluated by Western blot and immunohistochemistry. The expressions of Iba-1 and pro-inflammatory cytokines in brain cortex were determined by Western blot, immunofluorescence staining, or enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Neural apoptosis, brain edema, and neurological function were further evaluated to investigate the development of EBI. We found that post-SAH treatment with RSV could markedly inhibit the expressions of TLR4, HMGB1, MyD88, and NF-κB. Meanwhile, RSV significantly reduced microglia activation, as well as inflammatory cytokines leading to the amelioration of neural apoptosis, brain edema, and neurological behavior impairment at 24 h after SAH. However, RSV treatment failed to alleviate brain edema and neurological deficits at 72 h after SAH. These results indicated that RSV treatment could alleviate EBI after SAH, at least in part, via inhibition of TLR4-mediated inflammatory signaling pathway.

  13. Tanshinone IIA attenuates the inflammatory response and apoptosis after traumatic injury of the spinal cord in adult rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xin Yin

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Spinal cord injury (SCI, including immediate mechanical injury and secondary injury, is associated with the inflammatory response, apoptosis and oxidative stress in response to traumatic injury. Tanshinone IIA (TIIA is one of the major extracts obtained from Salvia miltiorrhiza BUNGE, which has anti-inflammatory and anti-apoptotic effects on many diseases. However, little is known about the effects of TIIA treatment on SCI. Therefore, the aim of the present study is to evaluate the pharmacological action of TIIA on secondary damage and the underlying mechanisms of experimental SCI in rats. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: SCI was generated using a weight drop device on the dorsal spinal cord via a two-level T9-T11 laminectomy. SCI in rats resulted in severe trauma, characterized by locomotor disturbance, edema, neutrophil infiltration, the production of astrocytes and inflammatory mediators, apoptosis and oxidative stress. TIIA treatment (20 mg/kg, i.p. after SCI induced significant effects: (1 improved motor function (Basso, Beattie and Bresnahan scores, (2 reduced the degree of tissue injury (histological score, neutrophil infiltration (myeloperoxidase activity and the expression of astrocytes, (3 inhibited the activation of SCI-related pathways, such as NF-κB and MAPK signaling pathways, (4 decreased the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines (TNF-α, IL-1β, and IL-6 and iNOS, (5 reduced apoptosis (TUNEL staining, and Bcl-2 and caspase-3 expression and (6 reversed the redox state imbalance. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The results clearly show that TIIA has a prominent protective effect against SCI through inhibiting the inflammatory response and apoptosis in the spinal cord tissue after SCI.

  14. Tanshinone IIA attenuates the inflammatory response and apoptosis after traumatic injury of the spinal cord in adult rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Xin; Yin, Yue; Cao, Fa-Le; Chen, Yu-Fei; Peng, Ye; Hou, Wu-Gang; Sun, Shu-Kai; Luo, Zhuo-Jing

    2012-01-01

    Spinal cord injury (SCI), including immediate mechanical injury and secondary injury, is associated with the inflammatory response, apoptosis and oxidative stress in response to traumatic injury. Tanshinone IIA (TIIA) is one of the major extracts obtained from Salvia miltiorrhiza BUNGE, which has anti-inflammatory and anti-apoptotic effects on many diseases. However, little is known about the effects of TIIA treatment on SCI. Therefore, the aim of the present study is to evaluate the pharmacological action of TIIA on secondary damage and the underlying mechanisms of experimental SCI in rats. SCI was generated using a weight drop device on the dorsal spinal cord via a two-level T9-T11 laminectomy. SCI in rats resulted in severe trauma, characterized by locomotor disturbance, edema, neutrophil infiltration, the production of astrocytes and inflammatory mediators, apoptosis and oxidative stress. TIIA treatment (20 mg/kg, i.p.) after SCI induced significant effects: (1) improved motor function (Basso, Beattie and Bresnahan scores), (2) reduced the degree of tissue injury (histological score), neutrophil infiltration (myeloperoxidase activity) and the expression of astrocytes, (3) inhibited the activation of SCI-related pathways, such as NF-κB and MAPK signaling pathways, (4) decreased the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines (TNF-α, IL-1β, and IL-6) and iNOS, (5) reduced apoptosis (TUNEL staining, and Bcl-2 and caspase-3 expression) and (6) reversed the redox state imbalance. The results clearly show that TIIA has a prominent protective effect against SCI through inhibiting the inflammatory response and apoptosis in the spinal cord tissue after SCI.

  15. Curcumin synergizes with resveratrol to inhibit colon cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majumdar, Adhip P N; Banerjee, Sanjeev; Nautiyal, Jyoti; Patel, Bhaumik B; Patel, Vaishali; Du, Jianhua; Yu, Yingjie; Elliott, Althea A; Levi, Edi; Sarkar, Fazlul H

    2009-01-01

    Development and progression of many malignancies, including colorectal cancer, are associated with activation of multiple signaling pathways. Therefore, inhibition of these signaling pathways with noncytotoxic natural products represents a logical preventive and/or therapeutic approach for colon cancer. Curcumin and resveratrol, both of which inhibit the growth of transformed cells and colon carcinogenesis, were selected to examine whether combining them would be an effective preventive and/or therapeutic strategy for colon cancer. Indeed, the combination of curcumin and resveratrol was found to be more effective in inhibiting growth of p53-positive (wt) and p53-negative colon cancer HCT-116 cells in vitro and in vivo in SCID xenografts of colon cancer HCT-116 (wt) cells than either agent alone. Analysis by Calcusyn software showed synergism between curcumin and resveratrol. The inhibition of tumors in response to curcumin and/or resveratrol was associated with the reduction in proliferation and stimulation of apoptosis accompanied by attenuation of NF-kappaB activity. In vitro studies have further demonstrated that the combinatorial treatment caused a greater inhibition of constitutive activation of EGFR and its family members as well as IGF-1R. Our current data suggest that the combination of curcumin and resveratrol could be an effective preventive/therapeutic strategy for colon cancer.

  16. Production of Curcumin-Loaded Silk Fibroin Nanoparticles for Cancer Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montalbán, Mercedes G; Coburn, Jeannine M; Lozano-Pérez, A Abel; Cenis, José L; Víllora, Gloria; Kaplan, David L

    2018-02-24

    Curcumin, extracted from the rhizome of Curcuma longa , has been widely used in medicine for centuries due to its anti-inflammatory, anti-cancer, anti-oxidant and anti-microbial effects. However, its bioavailability during treatments is poor because of its low solubility in water, slow dissolution rate and rapid intestinal metabolism. For these reasons, improving the therapeutic efficiency of curcumin using nanocarriers (e.g., biopolymer nanoparticles) has been a research focus, to foster delivery of the curcumin inside cells due to their small size and large surface area. Silk fibroin from the Bombyx mori silkworm is a biopolymer characterized by its biocompatibility, biodegradability, amphiphilic chemistry, and excellent mechanical properties in various material formats. These features make silk fibroin nanoparticles useful vehicles for delivering therapeutic drugs, such as curcumin. Curcumin-loaded silk fibroin nanoparticles were synthesized using two procedures (physical adsorption and coprecipitation) more scalable than methods previously described using ionic liquids. The results showed that nanoparticle formulations were 155 to 170 nm in diameter with a zeta potential of approximately -45 mV. The curcumin-loaded silk fibroin nanoparticles obtained by both processing methods were cytotoxic to carcinogenic cells, while not decreasing viability of healthy cells. In the case of tumor cells, curcumin-loaded silk fibroin nanoparticles presented higher efficacy in cytotoxicity against neuroblastoma cells than hepatocarcinoma cells. In conclusion, curcumin-loaded silk fibroin nanoparticles constitute a biodegradable and biocompatible delivery system with the potential to treat tumors by local, long-term sustained drug delivery.

  17. Differential regulation of CD4(+) T helper cell responses by curcumin in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanakasabai, Saravanan; Casalini, Eli; Walline, Crystal C; Mo, Caiqing; Chearwae, Wanida; Bright, John J

    2012-11-01

    Nutraceuticals and phytochemicals are important regulators of human health and diseases. Curcumin is a polyphenolic phytochemical isolated from the rhizome of the plant Curcuma longa (turmeric) that has been traditionally used for the treatment of inflammation and wound healing for centuries. Systematic analyses have shown that curcumin exerts its beneficial effects through antioxidant, antiproliferative and anti-inflammatory properties. We and others have shown earlier that curcumin ameliorates experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) model for multiple sclerosis. In this study, we show that C57BL/6 mice induced to develop EAE express elevated levels of interferon (IFN) γ and interleukin (IL)-17 in the central nervous system (CNS) and lymphoid organs that decreased significantly following in vivo treatment with curcumin. The EAE mice also showed elevated expression of IL-12 and IL-23 that decreased after treatment with curcumin. Ex vivo and in vitro treatment with curcumin resulted in a dose-dependent decrease in the secretion of IFNγ, IL-17, IL-12 and IL-23 in culture. The inhibition of EAE by curcumin was also associated with an up-regulation of IL-10, peroxisome proliferator activated receptor γ and CD4(+)CD25(+-)Foxp3(+) Treg cells in the CNS and lymphoid organs. These findings highlight that curcumin differentially regulates CD4(+) T helper cell responses in EAE. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Preparation and anti-cancer activity of polymer-encapsulated curcumin nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ha, Phuong Thu; Tran, Dai Lam; Nguyen, Xuan Phuc; Le, Mai Huong; Ha Tran, Thi Hong; Hoang, Thi My Nhung; Huong Le, Thi Thu; Duong, Tuan Quang

    2012-01-01

    Curcumin (Cur) is a yellow compound isolated from rhizome of the herb curcuma longa. Curcumin possesses antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, anti-carcinogenic and antimicrobial properties, and suppresses proliferation of many tumor cells. However, the clinical application of curcumin in cancer treatment is considerably limited due to its serious poor delivery characteristics. In order to increase the hydrophilicity and drug delivery capability, we encapsulated curcumin into copolymer PLA-TPGS, 1,3-beta-glucan (Glu), O-carboxymethyl chitosan (OCMCs) and folate-conjugated OCMCs (OCMCs-Fol). These polymer-encapsulated curcumin nanoparticles (Cur-PLA-TPGS, Cur-Glu, Cur-OCMCs and Cur-OCMCs-Fol) were characterized by infrared (IR), fluorescence (FL), photoluminescence (PL) spectra, field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM), and found to be spherical particles with an average size of 50–100 nm, being suitable for drug delivery applications. They were much more soluble in water than not only free curcumin but also other biodegradable polymer-encapsulated curcumin nanoparticles. The anti-tumor promoting assay was carried out, showing the positive effects of Cur-Glu and Cur-PLA-TPGS on tumor promotion of Hep-G2 cell line in vitro. Confocal microscopy revealed that the nano-sized curcumin encapsulated by polymers OCMCs and OCMCs-Fol significantly enhanced the cellular uptake (cancer cell HT29 and HeLa). (paper)

  19. Preparation and anti-cancer activity of polymer-encapsulated curcumin nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thu Ha, Phuong; Huong Le, Mai; Nhung Hoang, Thi My; Thu Huong Le, Thi; Quang Duong, Tuan; Tran, Thi Hong Ha; Tran, Dai Lam; Phuc Nguyen, Xuan

    2012-09-01

    Curcumin (Cur) is a yellow compound isolated from rhizome of the herb curcuma longa. Curcumin possesses antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, anti-carcinogenic and antimicrobial properties, and suppresses proliferation of many tumor cells. However, the clinical application of curcumin in cancer treatment is considerably limited due to its serious poor delivery characteristics. In order to increase the hydrophilicity and drug delivery capability, we encapsulated curcumin into copolymer PLA-TPGS, 1,3-beta-glucan (Glu), O-carboxymethyl chitosan (OCMCs) and folate-conjugated OCMCs (OCMCs-Fol). These polymer-encapsulated curcumin nanoparticles (Cur-PLA-TPGS, Cur-Glu, Cur-OCMCs and Cur-OCMCs-Fol) were characterized by infrared (IR), fluorescence (FL), photoluminescence (PL) spectra, field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM), and found to be spherical particles with an average size of 50-100 nm, being suitable for drug delivery applications. They were much more soluble in water than not only free curcumin but also other biodegradable polymer-encapsulated curcumin nanoparticles. The anti-tumor promoting assay was carried out, showing the positive effects of Cur-Glu and Cur-PLA-TPGS on tumor promotion of Hep-G2 cell line in vitro. Confocal microscopy revealed that the nano-sized curcumin encapsulated by polymers OCMCs and OCMCs-Fol significantly enhanced the cellular uptake (cancer cell HT29 and HeLa).

  20. Protective Effects of Indian Spice Curcumin Against Amyloid-β in Alzheimer's Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy, P Hemachandra; Manczak, Maria; Yin, Xiangling; Grady, Mary Catherine; Mitchell, Andrew; Tonk, Sahil; Kuruva, Chandra Sekhar; Bhatti, Jasvinder Singh; Kandimalla, Ramesh; Vijayan, Murali; Kumar, Subodh; Wang, Rui; Pradeepkiran, Jangampalli Adi; Ogunmokun, Gilbert; Thamarai, Kavya; Quesada, Kandi; Boles, Annette; Reddy, Arubala P

    2018-01-01

    The purpose of our article is to assess the current understanding of Indian spice, curcumin, against amyloid-β (Aβ)-induced toxicity in Alzheimer's disease (AD) pathogenesis. Natural products, such as ginger, curcumin, and gingko biloba have been used as diets and dietary supplements to treat human diseases, including cancer, cardiovascular, respiratory, infectious, diabetes, obesity, metabolic syndromes, and neurological disorders. Products derived from plants are known to have protective effects, including anti-inflammatory, antioxidant, anti-arthritis, pro-healing, and boosting memory cognitive functions. In the last decade, several groups have designed and synthesized curcumin and its derivatives and extensively tested using cell and mouse models of AD. Recent research on Aβ and curcumin has revealed that curcumin prevents Aβ aggregation and crosses the blood-brain barrier, reach brain cells, and protect neurons from various toxic insults of aging and Aβ in humans. Recent research has also reported that curcumin ameliorates cognitive decline and improves synaptic functions in mouse models of AD. Further, recent groups have initiated studies on elderly individuals and patients with AD and the outcome of these studies is currently being assessed. This article highlights the beneficial effects of curcumin on AD. This article also critically assesses the current limitations of curcumin's bioavailability and urgent need for new formulations to increase its brain levels to treat patients with AD.

  1. Curcumin delivered through bovine serum albumin/polysaccharides multilayered microcapsules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paşcalău, V; Soritau, O; Popa, F; Pavel, C; Coman, V; Perhaita, I; Borodi, G; Dirzu, N; Tabaran, F; Popa, C

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the paper is to obtain and characterize k-carrageenan-chitosan dual hydrogel multilayers shell BSA gel microcapsules, as a carrier for curcumin, and as a possible antitumoral agent in biological studies. We used the CaCO3 template to synthesize non-toxic CaCO3/BSA particles as microtemplates by coprecipitating a CaCl2 solution that contains dissolved BSA, with an equimolar Na2CO3 solution. The microcapsules shell is assembled through a layer-by-layer deposition technique of calcium cross-linked k-carrageenan hydrogel alternating with polyelectrolite complex hydrogel formed via electrostatic interactions between k-carrageenan and chitosan. After the removal of CaCO3 through Ca(2+) complexation with EDTA, and by a slightly treatment with HCl diluted solution, the BSA core is turned into a BSA gel through a thermal treatment. The BSA gel microcapsules were then loaded with curcumin, through a diffusion process from curcumin ethanolic solution. All the synthesized particles and microcapsules were stucturally characterized by: Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy, UV-Vis Spectrometry, X-ray diffraction, thermal analysis, fluorescence spectroscopy, fluorescence optical microscopy, confocal laser scanning microscopy and scanning electron microscopy. The behavior of curcumin loaded microcapsules in media of different pH (SGF, SIF and PBS) was studied in order to reveal the kinetics and the release profile of curcumin. The in vitro evaluation of the antitumoral activity of encapsulated curcumin microcapsules on HeLa cell line and the primary culture of mesenchymal stem cells is the main reason of the microcapsules synthesis as BSA-based vehicle meant to enhance the biodisponibility of curcumin, whose anti-tumor, anti-oxidant and anti-inflammatory properties are well known. © The Author(s) 2015.

  2. Curcumin as a potential candidate for treating hyperlipidemia: A review of cellular and metabolic mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panahi, Yunes; Ahmadi, Yasin; Teymouri, Manouchehr; Johnston, Thomas P; Sahebkar, Amirhossein

    2018-01-01

    Curcumin is an herbal polyphenol extensively investigated for antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, and hypolipidaemic properties. In the present review, the efficacy of curcumin for improving a plasma lipid profile has been evaluated and compared with statins, a well-known class of medicines for treating hypercholesterolemia and hyperlipidaemia. Curcumin is presumably most effective in reducing triglyceride (TG), while statins are most efficient in lowering low-density lipoproteins-cholesterol (LDL-C). Additionally, various molecular and metabolic mediators of cholesterol and plasma lipid homeostasis are discussed in relation to how they are modulated by curcumin or statins. Overall, curcumin influences the same mediators of plasma lipid alteration as statins do. Almost all the pathways through which cholesterol trafficking takes place are affected by these agents. These include gastrointestinal absorption of dietary cholesterol, hepatocellular removal of plasma cholesterol, the mediators of reverse cholesterol transport, and removal of cholesterol from peripheral tissues. Moreover, the reactive oxygen species (ROS) scavenging potential of curcumin limits the risk of lipid peroxidation that triggers inflammatory responses causing cardiovascular diseases (CVD) and atherosclerosis. Taken together, curcumin could be used as a safe and well-tolerated adjunct to statins to control hyperlipidaemia more effectively than statins alone. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Escin attenuates cognitive deficits and hippocampal injury after transient global cerebral ischemia in mice via regulating certain inflammatory genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Leiming; Fu, Fenghua; Zhang, Xiumei; Zhu, Mei; Wang, Tian; Fan, Huaying

    2010-09-01

    Considerable evidence has been accumulated demonstrating an important role for inflammation in ischemic brain injury and its contribution to greater cerebral damage after ischemia. Blocking the inflammatory reaction promotes neuroprotection and shows therapeutic potential for clinical treatment of ischemic brain injury. Escin, a natural mixture of triterpenoid saponin isolated from the seed of the horse chestnut, demonstrates antiedematous and anti-inflammatory effects. Here we assessed neuroprotective effects of escin with a transient global cerebral ischemia model. Global cerebral ischemia was induced by occluding both common carotid arteries and withdrawing 0.3ml of blood from the tail vein in mice. Treatment with escin was initiated 0.5h after ischemia induction and given once a day for three consecutive days. Then animals were assessed using the Morris water-maze test and step-down passive avoidance test. Acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activity, histological pathology, and expression of inflammatory genes in the hippocampus were determined. The results showed escin significantly improved learning and memory recovery and reduced hippocampal damage in the cerebral ischemic mice. However, donepezil merely improved learning and memory recovery but did not ameliorate hippocampal damage in the cerebral ischemic mice. Furthermore, we found escin significantly downregulated certain inflammatory gene expression and upregulated expression of granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF), which was recently reported as a neuroprotective protein in the brain. Our results indicate that inhibition of inflammation and protection of hippocampal neurons by escin may be a potentially useful therapy for ischemic brain injury. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Curcumin and Endothelial Function: Evidence and Mechanisms of Protective Effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karimian, Maryam S; Pirro, Matteo; Johnston, Thomas P; Majeed, Muhammed; Sahebkar, Amirhossein

    2017-01-01

    The endothelium is a large paracrine organ regulating cell growth, vascular tone and thrombogenicity as well as platelet and leukocyte interactions. Endothelial function can be assessed by noninvasive techniques [e.g. flow-mediated vasodilation, nitroglycerin-mediated dilation and pulse wave velocity] and measuring specific circulating biomarkers [cell adhesion molecules, endothelial microparticles and endothelial progenitor cells]. Impaired endothelial function plays a key role in the development of atherosclerosis, arterial hypertension, heart failure, ischemia-reperfusion injury, Alzheimer's disease and other conditions. Endothelial function is also involved in growth and proliferation of tumor cells. We performed a literature review and assessed the role of the natural polyphenol, curcumin, as a potential inexpensive, well-tolerated, and safe agent for improving endothelial function. Curcumin exerts several positive pharmacological effects; these include anti-inflammatory, antioxidant, anti-hypertensive, anti-cancer, antiviral, anti-infective and wound-healing properties. Specifically, curcumin's anti-inflammatory effects are thought to be caused by reducing trans-endothelial monocyte migration by reduction of mRNA and protein expression of intercellular adhesion molecule-1, vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 and P-selectin and by modulating NFκB, JNK, p38 and STAT-3 in endothelial cells. Dietary curcumin supplementation can also increase antioxidant activity through the induction of heme oxygenase-1, a scavenger of free radicals, and by reduction of reactive oxygen species and Nox-2. Curcumin appears to improve endothelial function but additional research is needed to determine the precise mechanism(s) and biomarkers involved in curcumin's therapeutic effects on endothelial dysfunction. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  5. Assessment in vitro of radioprotective efficacy of curcumin and resveratrol

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sebastia, Natividad, E-mail: natividad.sebastia@uv.es [Area de Nutricion y Bromatologia, Facultat de Farmacia, Universitat de Valencia, Av. Vicent Andres Estelles s/n, 46100 Burjassot (Spain); Montoro, Alegria [Servicio de Proteccion Radiologica, Hospital Universitario La Fe, 46009, Valencia (Spain); Montoro, Amparo [Area de Nutricion y Bromatologia, Facultat de Farmacia, Universitat de Valencia, Av. Vicent Andres Estelles s/n, 46100 Burjassot (Spain); Almonacid, Miguel; Villaescusa, Juan Ignacio [Servicio de Proteccion Radiologica, Hospital Universitario La Fe, 46009, Valencia (Spain); Cervera, Jose; Such, Esperanza; Silla, Ma Angeles [Servicio de Hematologia, Hospital Universitario La Fe, 46009, Valencia (Spain); Soriano, Jose Miguel [Area de Nutricion y Bromatologia, Facultat de Farmacia, Universitat de Valencia, Av. Vicent Andres Estelles s/n, 46100 Burjassot (Spain)

    2011-09-15

    Many natural substances have been studied in recent past to be used as radioprotectors to mitigate ionizing radiation-induced damage in mammalian systems due to its effectiveness given both pre- and post-irradiation and for long time with out drug-related toxicity. Curcumin and trans-resveratrol are both natural occurring polyphenols, obtained from the root of Curcuma longa and from grapes and other berries, respectively. These compounds have shown antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, immunostimulant and anti-carcinogenic properties. Our aim was to evaluate the radioprotective efficacy, in vitro, of curcumin and trans-resveratrol separately against radiation-induced chromosomal aberrations. The study was carried out by the pre-treatment of human blood lymphocytes at concentrations from 0 to 500 {mu}g mL{sup -1} and from 0 to 50 {mu}g mL{sup -1} for curcumin and trans-resveratrol, respectively. The results showed that all concentrations tested reduced radiation-induced chromosomal damage. Maximum damage protection was observed at the concentration of 5 {mu}g mL{sup -1} for curcumin and 0.5 {mu}g mL{sup -1} for trans-resveratrol. Thus, our results show that curcumin and trans-resveratrol pre-treatment significantly protect normal lymphocytes against {gamma}-radiation-induced cellular damage.

  6. Assessment in vitro of radioprotective efficacy of curcumin and resveratrol

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sebastia, Natividad; Montoro, Alegria; Montoro, Amparo; Almonacid, Miguel; Villaescusa, Juan Ignacio; Cervera, Jose; Such, Esperanza; Silla, Ma Angeles; Soriano, Jose Miguel

    2011-01-01

    Many natural substances have been studied in recent past to be used as radioprotectors to mitigate ionizing radiation-induced damage in mammalian systems due to its effectiveness given both pre- and post-irradiation and for long time with out drug-related toxicity. Curcumin and trans-resveratrol are both natural occurring polyphenols, obtained from the root of Curcuma longa and from grapes and other berries, respectively. These compounds have shown antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, immunostimulant and anti-carcinogenic properties. Our aim was to evaluate the radioprotective efficacy, in vitro, of curcumin and trans-resveratrol separately against radiation-induced chromosomal aberrations. The study was carried out by the pre-treatment of human blood lymphocytes at concentrations from 0 to 500 μg mL -1 and from 0 to 50 μg mL -1 for curcumin and trans-resveratrol, respectively. The results showed that all concentrations tested reduced radiation-induced chromosomal damage. Maximum damage protection was observed at the concentration of 5 μg mL -1 for curcumin and 0.5 μg mL -1 for trans-resveratrol. Thus, our results show that curcumin and trans-resveratrol pre-treatment significantly protect normal lymphocytes against γ-radiation-induced cellular damage.

  7. Biochemical effect of curcumin on hyperlipidemia induced in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Omayma A.R.,

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available This study was performed to investigate the effect of oral supplementation of curcumin, garlic extract and olive oil on lipid profile, nitric oxide, adiponectin, endothelin-1, blood glucose and some inflammatory markers in normal, diabetic and hyperlipidemic rats supplementing high fat and cholesterol-enriched diet. Forty female adult albino rats were divided into four equal groups of 10 rats each. Group (1: negative control received normal diet only, group (2: rats fed on normal diet and received curcumin orally, group (3: positive control received hyperlipidemic diet, group (4: rats fed on hyperlipidemic diet and received curcumin (350 mg/ 1 kg b.w. orally. The obtained results revealed that, curcumin supplementations to hyperlipidemic rats showed a significant increase in serum HDL-cholesterol, nitric oxide, adiponectin and Endothelin-1 concentrations and significantly decrease in serum total cholesterol, triacylglycerols, LDL cholesterol, Fasting blood glucose, Glycated Hemoglobin (HbA1C, high sensitive C-reactive protein and Interleukin-6 levels. These results suggest that, curcumin supplementations may have some benefits in patients suffering from dyslipidemia and diabetes.

  8. Cannabidiol protects against hepatic ischemia/reperfusion injury by attenuating inflammatory signaling and response, oxidative/nitrative stress, and cell death

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukhopadhyay, Partha; Rajesh, Mohanraj; Horváth, Béla; Bátkai, Sándor; Park, Ogyi; Tanashian, Galin; Gao, Rachel Y; Patel, Vivek; Wink, David A.; Liaudet, Lucas; Haskó, György; Mechoulam, Raphael; Pacher, Pál

    2011-01-01

    Ischemia-reperfusion (I/R) is a pivotal mechanism of liver damage following liver transplantation or hepatic surgery. We have investigated the effects of cannabidiol(CBD), the non-psychotropic constituent of marijuana, in a mouse model of hepatic I/R injury. I/R triggered time-dependent increases/changes in markers of liver injury (serum transaminases), hepatic oxidative/nitrative stress (4-hydroxy-2-nonenal, nitrotyrosine content/staining, gp91phox and inducible nitric oxide synthase mRNA), mitochondrial dysfunction (decreased complex I activity), inflammation (tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), cyclooxygenase 2, macrophage inflammatory protein-1α/2, inter-cellular adhesion molecule 1 mRNA levels, tissue neutrophil infiltration, nuclear factor kappa B (NF-KB) activation), stress signaling (p38MAPK and JNK) and cell death (DNA fragmentation, PARP activity, and TUNEL). CBD significantly reduced the extent of liver inflammation, oxidative/nitrative stress and cell death, and also attenuated the bacterial endotoxin-triggered NF-KB activation and TNF-α production in isolated Kupffer cells, likewise the adhesion molecules expression in primary human liver sinusoidal endothelial cells stimulated with TNF-α, and attachment of human neutrophils to the activated endothelium. These protective effects were preserved in CB2 knockout mice and were not prevented by CB1/2 antagonists in vitro. Thus, CBD may represent a novel, protective strategy against I/R injury by attenuating key inflammatory pathways and oxidative/nitrative tissue injury, independent from classical CB1/2 receptors. PMID:21362471

  9. Curcumin, Inflammation, and Chronic Diseases: How Are They Linked?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan He

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available It is extensively verified that continued oxidative stress and oxidative damage may lead to chronic inflammation, which in turn can mediate most chronic diseases including cancer, diabetes, cardiovascular, neurological, inflammatory bowel disease and pulmonary diseases. Curcumin, a yellow coloring agent extracted from turmeric, shows strong anti-oxidative and anti-inflammatory activities when used as a remedy for the prevention and treatment of chronic diseases. How oxidative stress activates inflammatory pathways leading to the progression of chronic diseases is the focus of this review. Thus, research to date suggests that chronic inflammation, oxidative stress, and most chronic diseases are closely linked, and the antioxidant properties of curcumin can play a key role in the prevention and treatment of chronic inflammation diseases.

  10. Enhanced endocytosis of nano-curcumin in nasopharyngeal cancer cells: An atomic force microscopy study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasanth, R.; Nair, Greshma; Girish, C. M.

    2011-10-01

    Recent studies in drug development have shown that curcumin can be a good competent due to its improved anticancer, antioxidant, anti-proliferative, and anti-inflammatory activities. A detailed real time characterization of drug (curcumin)-cell interaction is carried out in human nasopharyngeal cancer cells using atomic force microscopy. Nanocurcumin shows an enhanced uptake over micron sized drugs attributed to the receptor mediated route. Cell membrane stiffness plays a critical role in the drug endocytosis in nasopharyngeal cancer cells.

  11. Preparation of curcumin loaded nanoparticles: physicochemical characterization and in vitro evaluation

    OpenAIRE

    Drakalska, Elena; Momekova, Denitsa; Rangelov, Stanislav; Lambov, Nikolay

    2016-01-01

    Curcumin is the active principle of the spice turmeric, produced by the rhizome of Curcuma longa (Zingiberaceae), which is widely used in traditional eastern medicine as a hepatoprotective, anti-infectious and anti-inflammatory remedy. A compelling body of recent evidence has shown that curcumin is endowed by pleiotropic antineoplastic effects, due to modulation of NFkB and other cell signaling pathways, implicated in cell survival, apoptosis and angiogenesis.

  12. Presenting a New Standard Drug Model for Turmeric and Its Prized Extract, Curcumin

    OpenAIRE

    Franco Cavaleri

    2018-01-01

    Various parts of the turmeric plant have been used as medicinal treatment for various conditions from ulcers and arthritis to cardiovascular disease and neuroinflammation. The rhizome’s curcumin extract is the most studied active constituent, which exhibits an expansive polypharmacology with influence on many key inflammatory markers. Despite the expansive reports of curcucmin’s therapeutic value, clinical reliability and research repeatability with curcumin treatment are still poor. The phar...

  13. Curcumin Nanotechnologies and Its Anticancer Activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subramani, Parasuraman Aiya; Panati, Kalpana; Narala, Venkata Ramireddy

    2017-04-01

    Cancer is one of the leading causes of death worldwide. Curcumin is a well-established anticancer agent in vitro but its efficacy is yet to be proven in clinical trials. Poor bioavailability of curcumin is the principal reason behind the lack of efficiency of curcumin in clinical trials. Many studies prove that the bioavailability of curcumin can be improved by administering it through nanoparticle drug carriers. This review focuses on the efforts made in the field of nanotechnology to improve the bioavailability of curcumin. Nanotechnologies of curcumin come in various shapes and sizes. The simplest curcumin nanoparticle that increased the bioavailability of curcumin is the curcumin-metal complex. On the other hand, we have intricate thermoresponsive nanoparticles that can release curcumin upon stimulation (analogous to a remote control). Future research required for developing potent curcumin nanoparticles is also discussed.

  14. A Novel Combination of Wheat Peptides and Fucoidan Attenuates Ethanol-Induced Gastric Mucosal Damage through Anti-Oxidant, Anti-Inflammatory, and Pro-Survival Mechanisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juntao Kan

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Gastritis or peptic ulcer is believed to affect about half of people worldwide. Traditional medications can lead to adverse effects, therefore, alternative nutritional strategies are needed to prevent the development of gastric mucosal damage. A novel combination of two food-grade ingredients, wheat peptides and fucoidan (WPF, was prepared to treat male Sprague Dawley rats for 30 days before gastric mucosal damage was induced by oral administration of ethanol. The serum levels of biomarkers were determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Biomarkers in stomach tissue were analyzed using immunohistochemistry. In addition, human gastric epithelial cell line (GES-1 was used to investigate protein expression by Western blot. WPF could attenuate ethanol-induced gastric mucosal damage in an inverse dose-dependent manner, with both ulcer index and pathological index improved. WPF increased superoxide dismutase level and decreased malondialdehyde level. WPF also decreased the levels of interleukin-8, platelet-activating factor, and Caspase 3, while increasing the levels of prostaglandin E-2, epidermal growth factor (EGF, and EGF receptor (EGFR. Furthermore, phosphorylation of EGFR and extracellular signal–regulated kinases was induced by WPF in GES-1 cells. In conclusion, the novel combination of wheat peptides and fucoidan attenuated ethanol-induced gastric mucosal damage in rats through anti-oxidant, anti-inflammatory, and pro-survival mechanisms.

  15. Inflammatory Renin-Angiotensin System Disruption Attenuates Sensory Hyperinnervation and Mechanical Hypersensitivity in a Rat Model of Provoked Vestibulodynia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakrabarty, Anuradha; Liao, Zhaohui; Mu, Ying; Smith, Peter G

    2018-03-01

    Vestibulodynia is characterized by perivaginal mechanical hypersensitivity, hyperinnervation, and abundant inflammatory cells expressing renin-angiotensin system proteins. We developed a tractable rat model of vestibulodynia to further assess the contributions of the renin-angiotensin system. Complete Freund's adjuvant injected into the posterior vestibule induced marked vestibular hypersensitivity throughout a 7-day test period. Numbers of axons immunoreactive for PGP9.5, calcitonin gene-related peptide, and GFRα2 were increased. Numbers of macrophages and T cells were also increased whereas B cells were not. Renin-angiotensin-associated proteins were abundant, with T cells as well as macrophages contributing to increased renin and angiotensinogen. Media conditioned with inflamed vestibular tissue promoted neurite sprouting by rat dorsal root ganglion neurons in vitro, and this was blocked by the angiotensin II receptor type 2 receptor antagonist PD123319 or by an angiotensin II function blocking antibody. Sensory axon sprouting induced by inflamed tissue was dependent on activity of angiotensin-converting enzyme or chymase, but not cathepsin G. Thus, vestibular Complete Freund's adjuvant injection substantially recapitulates changes seen in patients with provoked vestibulodynia, and shows that manipulation of the local inflammatory renin-angiotensin system may be a useful therapeutic strategy. This study provides evidence that inflammation of the rat vestibule induces a phenotype recapitulating behavioral and cytological features of human vestibulodynia. The model confirms a crucial role of the local inflammatory renin-angiotensin system in hypersensitivity and hyperinnervation. Targeting this system holds promise for developing new nonopioid analgesic treatment strategies. Copyright © 2017 The American Pain Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. sGC(alpha)1(beta)1 attenuates cardiac dysfunction and mortality in murine inflammatory shock models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buys, Emmanuel S; Cauwels, Anje; Raher, Michael J; Passeri, Jonathan J; Hobai, Ion; Cawley, Sharon M; Rauwerdink, Kristen M; Thibault, Helene; Sips, Patrick Y; Thoonen, Robrecht; Scherrer-Crosbie, Marielle; Ichinose, Fumito; Brouckaert, Peter; Bloch, Kenneth D

    2009-08-01

    Altered cGMP signaling has been implicated in myocardial depression, morbidity, and mortality associated with sepsis. Previous studies, using inhibitors of soluble guanylate cyclase (sGC), suggested that cGMP generated by sGC contributed to the cardiac dysfunction and mortality associated with sepsis. We used sGC(alpha)(1)-deficient (sGC(alpha)(1)(-/-)) mice to unequivocally determine the role of sGC(alpha)(1)beta(1) in the development of cardiac dysfunction and death associated with two models of inflammatory shock: endotoxin- and TNF-induced shock. At baseline, echocardiographic assessment and invasive hemodynamic measurements of left ventricular (LV) dimensions and function did not differ between wild-type (WT) mice and sGC(alpha)(1)(-/-) mice on the C57BL/6 background (sGC(alpha)(1)(-/-B6) mice). At 14 h after endotoxin challenge, cardiac dysfunction was more pronounced in sGC(alpha)(1)(-/-B6) than WT mice, as assessed using echocardiographic and hemodynamic indexes of LV function. Similarly, Ca(2+) handling and cell shortening were impaired to a greater extent in cardiomyocytes isolated from sGC(alpha)(1)(-/-B6) than WT mice after endotoxin challenge. Importantly, morbidity and mortality associated with inflammatory shock induced by endotoxin or TNF were increased in sGC(alpha)(1)(-/-B6) compared with WT mice. Together, these findings suggest that cGMP generated by sGC(alpha)(1)beta(1) protects against cardiac dysfunction and mortality in murine inflammatory shock models.

  17. Curcumin inhibits oral squamous cell carcinoma SCC-9 cells proliferation by regulating miR-9 expression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xiao, Can; Wang, Lili; Zhu, Lifang; Zhang, Chenping; Zhou, Jianhua

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • miR-9 expression level was significantly decreased in OSCC tissues. • Curcumin significantly inhibited SCC-9 cells proliferation. • miR-9 mediates the inhibition of SCC-9 proliferation by curcumin. • Curcumin suppresses Wnt/β-catenin signaling in SCC-9 cells. • miR-9 mediates the suppression of Wnt/β-catenin signaling by curcumin. - Abstract: Curcumin, a phytochemical derived from the rhizome of Curcuma longa, has shown anticancer effects against a variety of tumors. In the present study, we investigated the effects of curcumin on the miR-9 expression in oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) and explored the potential relationships between miR-9 and Wnt/β-catenin pathway in curcumin-mediated OSCC inhibition in vitro. As the results shown, the expression levels of miR-9 were significantly lower in clinical OSCC specimens than those in the adjacent non-tumor tissues. Furthermore, our results indicated that curcumin inhibited OSCC cells (SCC-9 cells) proliferation through up-regulating miR-9 expression, and suppressing Wnt/β-catenin signaling by increasing the expression levels of the GSK-3β, phosphorylated GSK-3β and β-catenin, and decreasing the cyclin D1 level. Additionally, the up-regulation of miR-9 by curcumin in SCC-9 cells was significantly inhibited by delivering anti-miR-9 but not control oligonucleotides. Downregulation of miR-9 by anti-miR-9 not only attenuated the growth-suppressive effects of curcumin on SCC-9 cells, but also re-activated Wnt/β-catenin signaling that was inhibited by curcumin. Therefore, our findings would provide a new insight into the use of curcumin against OSCC in future

  18. Curcumin inhibits oral squamous cell carcinoma SCC-9 cells proliferation by regulating miR-9 expression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xiao, Can [Department of Occupational Medicine and Environmental Health, School of Public Health, Soochow University, Suzhou 215123 (China); Department of Stomatology, The First Affiliated Hospital of Soochow University, Suzhou 215006 (China); Wang, Lili; Zhu, Lifang [Department of Stomatology, The First Affiliated Hospital of Soochow University, Suzhou 215006 (China); Zhang, Chenping, E-mail: zhang_cping@163.com [Department of Head and Neck Tumors, Shanghai Ninth People’s Hospital Affiliated Shanghai JiaoTong University School of Medicine, Shanghai 200011 (China); Zhou, Jianhua [Department of Occupational Medicine and Environmental Health, School of Public Health, Soochow University, Suzhou 215123 (China)

    2014-11-28

    Highlights: • miR-9 expression level was significantly decreased in OSCC tissues. • Curcumin significantly inhibited SCC-9 cells proliferation. • miR-9 mediates the inhibition of SCC-9 proliferation by curcumin. • Curcumin suppresses Wnt/β-catenin signaling in SCC-9 cells. • miR-9 mediates the suppression of Wnt/β-catenin signaling by curcumin. - Abstract: Curcumin, a phytochemical derived from the rhizome of Curcuma longa, has shown anticancer effects against a variety of tumors. In the present study, we investigated the effects of curcumin on the miR-9 expression in oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) and explored the potential relationships between miR-9 and Wnt/β-catenin pathway in curcumin-mediated OSCC inhibition in vitro. As the results shown, the expression levels of miR-9 were significantly lower in clinical OSCC specimens than those in the adjacent non-tumor tissues. Furthermore, our results indicated that curcumin inhibited OSCC cells (SCC-9 cells) proliferation through up-regulating miR-9 expression, and suppressing Wnt/β-catenin signaling by increasing the expression levels of the GSK-3β, phosphorylated GSK-3β and β-catenin, and decreasing the cyclin D1 level. Additionally, the up-regulation of miR-9 by curcumin in SCC-9 cells was significantly inhibited by delivering anti-miR-9 but not control oligonucleotides. Downregulation of miR-9 by anti-miR-9 not only attenuated the growth-suppressive effects of curcumin on SCC-9 cells, but also re-activated Wnt/β-catenin signaling that was inhibited by curcumin. Therefore, our findings would provide a new insight into the use of curcumin against OSCC in future.

  19. The Sirt1 activator SRT1720 attenuates angiotensin II-induced atherosclerosis in apoE−/− mice through inhibiting vascular inflammatory response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Yi xi; Zhang, Man; Cai, Yuehua; Zhao, Qihui; Dai, Wenjian

    2015-01-01

    Activation of the silent mating type information regulation 2 homolog 1 (SIRT1) has been shown consistent antiinflammatory function. However, little information is available on the function of SIRT1 during Angiotensin II (AngII)-induced atherosclerosis. Here we report atheroprotective effects of sirt1 activation in a model of AngII-accelerated atherosclerosis, characterized by suppression pro-inflammatory transcription factors Nuclear transcription factor (NF)-κB and Signal Transducers and Activators of Transcription. (STAT) signaling pathway, and atherosclerotic lesion macrophage content. In this model, administration of the SIRT1 agonist SRT1720 substantially attenuated AngII-accelerated atherosclerosis with decreasing blood pressure and inhibited NF-κB and STAT3 activation, which was associated with suppression of inflammatory factor and atherogenic gene expression in the artery. In vitro studies demonstrated similar changes in AngII-treated VSMCs and macrophages: SIRT1 activation inhibited the expression levels of proinflammatory factor. These studies uncover crucial proinflammatory mechanisms of AngII and highlight actions of SIRT1 activation to inhibit AngII signaling, which is atheroprotective. - Highlights: • SRT1720 reduced atherosclerotic lesion size in aortic arches and atherosclerotic lesion macrophage content. • SRT1720 could inhibit the phosphorylation of STAT3 and p65 phosphorylation and translocation. • SRT1720 could inhibit the expression of proinflammatory factor.

  20. The Sirt1 activator SRT1720 attenuates angiotensin II-induced atherosclerosis in apoE{sup −/−} mice through inhibiting vascular inflammatory response

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Yi xi; Zhang, Man; Cai, Yuehua; Zhao, Qihui; Dai, Wenjian, E-mail: wjdai@126.com

    2015-10-02

    Activation of the silent mating type information regulation 2 homolog 1 (SIRT1) has been shown consistent antiinflammatory function. However, little information is available on the function of SIRT1 during Angiotensin II (AngII)-induced atherosclerosis. Here we report atheroprotective effects of sirt1 activation in a model of AngII-accelerated atherosclerosis, characterized by suppression pro-inflammatory transcription factors Nuclear transcription factor (NF)-κB and Signal Transducers and Activators of Transcription. (STAT) signaling pathway, and atherosclerotic lesion macrophage content. In this model, administration of the SIRT1 agonist SRT1720 substantially attenuated AngII-accelerated atherosclerosis with decreasing blood pressure and inhibited NF-κB and STAT3 activation, which was associated with suppression of inflammatory factor and atherogenic gene expression in the artery. In vitro studies demonstrated similar changes in AngII-treated VSMCs and macrophages: SIRT1 activation inhibited the expression levels of proinflammatory factor. These studies uncover crucial proinflammatory mechanisms of AngII and highlight actions of SIRT1 activation to inhibit AngII signaling, which is atheroprotective. - Highlights: • SRT1720 reduced atherosclerotic lesion size in aortic arches and atherosclerotic lesion macrophage content. • SRT1720 could inhibit the phosphorylation of STAT3 and p65 phosphorylation and translocation. • SRT1720 could inhibit the expression of proinflammatory factor.

  1. Salidroside attenuates inflammatory responses by suppressing nuclear factor-κB and mitogen activated protein kinases activation in lipopolysaccharide-induced mastitis in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Depeng; Fu, Yunhe; Zhang, Wen; Su, Gaoli; Liu, Bo; Guo, Mengyao; Li, Fengyang; Liang, Dejie; Liu, Zhicheng; Zhang, Xichen; Cao, Yongguo; Zhang, Naisheng; Yang, Zhengtao

    2013-01-01

    Mastitis is defined as inflammation of the mammary gland in domestic dairy animals and humans. Salidroside, a major component isolated from Rhodiola rosea L., has potent anti-inflammatory properties, but whether it can be used in mastitis treatment has not yet been investigated. The aim of this study was to assess the protective effects of salidroside against lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced mastitis in mice and the mechanism of action. We used a mouse mastitis model in which mammary gland inflammation was induced by LPS challenge. Salidroside administered 1 h before LPS infusion significantly attenuated inflammatory cell infiltration, reduced the activity of myeloperoxidase in mammary tissue, and decreased the concentration of tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin (IL)-1β, and IL-6 in a dose-dependent manner. Further studies revealed that salidroside down-regulated phosphorylation of LPS-induced nuclear transcription factor-kappaB (NF-κB) p65 and inhibitor of NF-κB α (IκBα) in the NF-κB signal pathway, and suppressed phosphorylation of p38, extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) and c-jun NH(2)-terminal kinase (JNK) in MAPKs signal pathways. This study demonstrates that salidroside is an effective suppressor of inflammation and may be a candidate for the prophylaxis of mastitis.

  2. Ethanol extract of Cordyceps militaris grown on germinated soybeans attenuates dextran-sodium-sulfate- (DSS-) induced colitis by suppressing the expression of matrix metalloproteinases and inflammatory mediators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Dong Ki; Park, Hye-Jin

    2013-01-01

    The effect of Cordyceps militaris (CM) grown on germinated soybeans (GSC) in the inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) model was studied. To demonstrate the preventive effect of GSC extract in a dextran-sodium-sulfate- (DSS-) induced acute colitis mouse model, GSC was administered 2 days before DSS coadministration. GSC significantly suppressed DSS-induced disease activity index (DAI) as well as histopathological scores, compared to control or CM-treated group. To elucidate the anti-IBD activity of GSC, we checked the level of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) and inflammatory mediators. GSC extract decreased the level of MMP-3 and -9 mRNAs and p53 proteins. The level and activity of LPS-induced MMP-9 were reduced in GSC-treated RAW264.7 cells. It also attenuated the level of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and tumor necrosis factor- (TNF-) α mRNAs both in colon tissue and in macrophage cells. These results suggest that GSC can be applied as a protective agent against IBDs.

  3. The effect of curcumin (turmeric on Alzheimer′s disease: An overview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mishra Shrikant

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper discusses the effects of curcumin on patients with Alzheimer′s disease (AD. Curcumin (Turmeric, an ancient Indian herb used in curry powder, has been extensively studied in modern medicine and Indian systems of medicine for the treatment of various medical conditions, including cystic fibrosis, haemorrhoids, gastric ulcer, colon cancer, breast cancer, atherosclerosis, liver diseases and arthritis. It has been used in various types of treatments for dementia and traumatic brain injury. Curcumin also has a potential role in the prevention and treatment of AD. Curcumin as an antioxidant, anti-inflammatory and lipophilic action improves the cognitive functions in patients with AD. A growing body of evidence indicates that oxidative stress, free radicals, beta amyloid, cerebral deregulation caused by bio-metal toxicity and abnormal inflammatory reactions contribute to the key event in Alzheimer′s disease pathology. Due to various effects of curcumin, such as decreased Beta-amyloid plaques, delayed degradation of neurons, metal-chelation, anti-inflammatory, antioxidant and decreased microglia formation, the overall memory in patients with AD has improved. This paper reviews the various mechanisms of actions of curcumin in AD and pathology.

  4. TPGS-Stabilized Curcumin Nanoparticles Exhibit Superior Effect on Carrageenan-Induced Inflammation in Wistar Rat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heni Rachmawati

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Curcumin, a hydrophobic polyphenol compound derived from the rhizome of the Curcuma genus, has a wide spectrum of biological and pharmacological applications. Previously, curcumin nanoparticles with different stabilizers had been produced successfully in order to enhance solubility and per oral absorption. In the present study, we tested the anti-inflammatory effect of d-α-Tocopheryl polyethylene glycol 1000 succinate (TPGS-stabilized curcumin nanoparticles in vivo. Lambda-carrageenan (λ-carrageenan was used to induce inflammation in rats; it was given by an intraplantar route and intrapelurally through surgery in the pleurisy test. In the λ-carrageenan-induced edema model, TPGS-stabilized curcumin nanoparticles were given orally one hour before induction and at 0.5, 4.5, and 8.5 h after induction with two different doses (1.8 and 0.9 mg/kg body weight (BW. Sodium diclofenac with a dose of 4.5 mg/kg BW was used as a standard drug. A physical mixture of curcumin-TPGS was also used as a comparison with a higher dose of 60 mg/kg BW. The anti-inflammatory effect was assessed on the edema in the carrageenan-induced paw edema model and by the volume of exudate as well as the number of leukocytes reduced in the pleurisy test. TPGS-stabilized curcumin nanoparticles with lower doses showed better anti-inflammatory effects, indicating the greater absorption capability through the gastrointestinal tract.

  5. Methanol Extract of Artemisia apiacea Hance Attenuates the Expression of Inflammatory Mediators via NF-κB Inactivation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ji Choul Ryu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Artemisia apiacea Hance is one of the most widely used herbs for the treatment of malaria, jaundice, and dyspeptic complaint in oriental medicine. This study investigated the effects of methanol extracts of A. apiacea Hance (MEAH on the induction of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS and proinflammatory mediators by lipopolysaccharide (LPS in Raw264.7 macrophage cells and also evaluated the in vivo effect of MEAH on carrageenan-induced paw edema in rats. MEAH treatment in Raw264.7 cells significantly decreased LPS-inducible nitric oxide production and the expression of iNOS in a concentration-dependent manner, while MEAH (up to 100 μg/mL had no cytotoxic activity. Results from immunoblot analyses and ELISA revealed that MEAH significantly inhibited the expression of cyclooxygenase-2, tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin-1β, and interleukin-6 in LPS-activated cells. As a plausible molecular mechanism, increased degradation and phosphorylation of inhibitory-κBα and nuclear factor-κB accumulation in the nucleus by LPS were partly blocked by MEAH treatment. Finally, MEAH treatment decreased the carrageenan-induced formation of paw edema and infiltration of inflammatory cells in rats. These results demonstrate that MEAH has an anti-inflammatory therapeutic potential that may result from the inhibition of nuclear factor-κB activation, subsequently decreasing the expression of proinflammatory mediators.

  6. G protein-coupled receptor kinase-3-deficient mice exhibit WHIM syndrome features and attenuated inflammatory responses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarrant, Teresa K.; Billard, Matthew J.; Timoshchenko, Roman G.; McGinnis, Marcus W.; Serafin, D. Stephen; Foreman, Oded; Esserman, Denise A.; Chao, Nelson J.; Lento, William E.; Lee, David M.; Patel, Dhavalkumar; Siderovski, David P.

    2013-01-01

    Chemokine receptor interactions coordinate leukocyte migration in inflammation. Chemokine receptors are GPCRs that when activated, are phosphorylated by GRKs to turn off G protein-mediated signaling yet recruit additional signaling machinery. Recently, GRK3 was identified as a negative regulator of CXCL12/CXCR4 signaling that is defective in human WHIM syndrome. Here, we report that GRK3−/− mice exhibit numerous features of human WHIM, such as impaired CXCL12-mediated desensitization, enhanced CXCR4 signaling to ERK activation, altered granulocyte migration, and a mild myelokathexis. Moreover, GRK3−/− protects mice from two acute models of inflammatory arthritis (K/BxN serum transfer and CAIA). In these granulocyte-dependent disease models, protection of GRK3−/− mice is mediated by retention of cells in the marrow, fewer circulating granulocytes in the peripheral blood, and reduced granulocytes in the joints during active inflammation. In contrast to WHIM, GRK3−/− mice have minimal hypogammaglobulinemia and a peripheral leukocytosis with increased lymphocytes and absent neutropenia. Thus, we conclude that the loss of GRK3-mediated regulation of CXCL12/CXCR4 signaling contributes to some, but not all, of the complete WHIM phenotype and that GRK3 inhibition may be beneficial in the treatment of inflammatory arthritis. PMID:23935208

  7. Attenuation of stress induced memory deficits by nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) in rats: Role of antioxidant enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emad, Shaista; Qadeer, Sara; Sadaf, Sana; Batool, Zehra; Haider, Saida; Perveen, Tahira

    2017-04-01

    Repeated stress paradigms have been shown to cause devastating alterations on memory functions. Stress is linked with inflammation. Psychological and certain physical stressors could lead to neuroinflammation. Inflammatory process may occur by release of mediators and stimulate the production of prostaglandins through cyclooxygenase (COX). Treatment with COX inhibitors, which restrain prostaglandin production, has enhanced memory in a number of neuroinflammatory states showing a potential function for raised prostaglandins in these memory shortfalls. In the present study, potential therapeutic effects of indomethacin and diclofenac sodium on memory in both unrestraint and restraint rats were observed. Two components, long term memory and short term memory were examined by Morris water maze (MWM) and elevated plus maze (EPM) respectively. The present study also demonstrated the effect of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) on lipid peroxidation (LPO) and activities of antioxidant enzymes along with the activity of acetylcholinesterase (AChE). Results of MWM and EPM showed significant effects of drugs in both unrestraint and restraint rats as escape latency and transfer latency, in respective behavioral models were decreased as compared to that of control. This study also showed NSAIDs administration decreased LPO and increased antioxidant enzymes activity and decreased AChE activity in rats exposed to repeated stress. In conclusion this study suggests a therapeutic potential of indomethacin and diclofenac against repeated stress-induced memory deficits. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Urban & Partner Sp. z o.o.

  8. Nitric oxide-induced activation of the AMP-activated protein kinase α2 subunit attenuates IκB kinase activity and inflammatory responses in endothelial cells.

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    Elke Bess

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: In endothelial cells, activation of the AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK has been linked with anti-inflammatory actions but the events downstream of kinase activation are not well understood. Here, we addressed the effects of AMPK activation/deletion on the activation of NFκB and determined whether the AMPK could contribute to the anti-inflammatory actions of nitric oxide (NO. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Overexpression of a dominant negative AMPKα2 mutant in tumor necrosis factor-α-stimulated human endothelial cells resulted in increased NFκB activity, E-selectin expression and monocyte adhesion. In endothelial cells from AMPKα2(-/- mice the interleukin (IL-1β induced expression of E-selectin was significantly increased. DETA-NO activated the AMPK and attenuated NFκB activation/E-selectin expression, effects not observed in human endothelial cells in the presence of the dominant negative AMPK, or in endothelial cells from AMPKα2(-/- mice. Mechanistically, overexpression of constitutively active AMPK decreased the phosphorylation of IκB and p65, indicating a link between AMPK and the IκB kinase (IKK. Indeed, IKK (more specifically residues Ser177 and Ser181 was found to be a direct substrate of AMPKα2 in vitro. The hyper-phosphorylation of the IKK, which is known to result in its inhibition, was also apparent in endothelial cells from AMPKα2(+/+ versus AMPKα2(-/- mice. CONCLUSIONS: These results demonstrate that the IKK is a direct substrate of AMPKα2 and that its phosphorylation on Ser177 and Ser181 results in the inhibition of the kinase and decreased NFκB activation. Moreover, as NO potently activates AMPK in endothelial cells, a portion of the anti-inflammatory effects of NO are mediated by AMPK.

  9. Alpinetin attenuates inflammatory responses by interfering toll-like receptor 4/nuclear factor kappa B signaling pathway in lipopolysaccharide-induced mastitis in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Haijin; Mo, Xiaodong; Yu, Jinlong; Huang, Zonghai

    2013-09-01

    Alpinetin, a novel plant flavonoid derived from Alpinia katsumadai Hayata, has been reported to exhibit anti-inflammatory properties. However, the effect of alpinetin on mastitis has not been investigated. The aim of this study was to investigate the protective effect of alpinetin against lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced mastitis and to clarify the possible mechanism. In the present study, primary mouse mammary epithelial cells and an LPS-induced mouse mastitis model were used to investigate the effect of alpinetin on mastitis and the possible mechanism. In vivo, we observed that alpinetin significantly attenuated the infiltration of neutrophilic granulocytes, and the activation of myeloperoxidase; down-regulated the level of pro-inflammatory cytokines, including TNF-α, IL-1β and IL-6; inhibited the phosphorylation of IκB-α, NF-κB p65 and the expression of TLR4, caused by LPS. In vitro, we also observed that alpinetin inhibited the expression of TLR4 and the production of TNF-α, IL-1β and IL-6 in LPS-stimulated primary mouse mammary epithelial cells. However, alpinetin could not inhibit the production of IL-1β and IL-6 in TNF-α-stimulated primary mouse mammary epithelial cells. In conclusion, our results suggest that the anti-inflammatory effects of alpinetin against LPS-induced mastitis may be due to its ability to inhibit TLR4-mediated NF-κB signaling pathways. Alpinetin may be a promising potential therapeutic reagent for mastitis treatment. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Lignans From Forsythia x Intermedia Leaves and Flowers Attenuate the Pro-inflammatory Function of Leukocytes and Their Interaction With Endothelial Cells

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    Barbara Michalak

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Aim of the study: Taking into account that overactivated leukocytes are an important factor in the development of many chronic diseases, we investigated the activity of phytochemically characterized (HPLC-DAD-MSn extracts from forsythia leaves and flowers on the pro- and anti-inflammatory functions of leukocytes (effects on IL-1β, IL-8, TNF-α, and TGFβ release and their adherence to endothelial cells. Using bio-guided fractionation, we isolated the active compounds and determined their biological activity, and we included the positive control quercetin.Methods: The effect on IL-1β, TNF-α, IL-8, and TGF-α production by leukocytes was measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA. The surface expression of adhesion molecules was analyzed with flow cytometry, and the neutrophil attachment to the endothelial cells was assessed fluorimetrically. The effects on p38MAPK, ERK1/2 and JNK phosphorylation were determined using western blots.Results: Leaf extracts had the effect of decreasing TNF-α production in neutrophils and monocyte/macrophage cells. The bio-guided fractionation led to the isolation of the following lignan aglycones: (+-pinoresinol, (+-epipinoresinol, (−-matairesinol, (+-phillygenin, and (−-arctigenin. Only phillygenin was able to stimulate the anti-inflammatory function of macrophages by inducing TGF-β release and IL-10 receptor surface expression. Arctigenin, phillygenin, and a metabolite produced by the gut microbiota, enterolactone, decreased TNF-α and IL-1β production and neutrophil adhesion to endothelial cells, probably by attenuating the p38 and ERK kinase pathways.Conclusion:Forsythia x intermedia is a valuable source of active lignans, which may be potential candidates for treating inflammatory diseases that are associated with the excessive production of cytokines such as TNF-α and IL-1β.

  11. Curcumin Conjugated with PLGA Potentiates Sustainability, Anti-Proliferative Activity and Apoptosis in Human Colon Carcinoma Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waghela, Bhargav N.; Sharma, Anupama; Dhumale, Suhashini; Pandey, Shashibahl M.; Pathak, Chandramani

    2015-01-01

    Curcumin, an ingredient of turmeric, exhibits a variety of biological activities such as anti-inflammatory, anti-atherosclerotic, anti-proliferative, anti-oxidant, anti-cancer and anti-metastatic. It is a highly pleiotropic molecule that inhibits cell proliferation and induces apoptosis in cancer cells. Despite its imperative biological activities, chemical instability, photo-instability and poor bioavailability limits its utilization as an effective therapeutic agent. Therefore, enhancing the bioavailability of curcumin may improve its therapeutic index for clinical setting. In the present study, we have conjugated curcumin with a biodegradable polymer Poly (D, L-lactic-co-glycolic acid) and evaluated its apoptotic potential in human colon carcinoma cells (HCT 116). The results show that curcumin-PLGA conjugate efficiently inhibits cell proliferation and cell survival in human colon carcinoma cells as compared to native curcumin. Additionally, curcumin conjugated with PLGA shows improved cellular uptake and exhibits controlled release at physiological pH as compared to native curcumin. The curcumin-PLGA conjugate efficiently activates the cascade of caspases and promotes intrinsic apoptotic signaling. Thus, the results suggest that conjugation potentiates the sustainability, anti-proliferative and apoptotic activity of curcumin. This approach could be a promising strategy to improve the therapeutic index of cancer therapy. PMID:25692854

  12. Synergistic effect of the interaction between curcumin and diclofenac on the formalin test in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Paz-Campos, Marco A; Ortiz, Mario I; Chávez Piña, Aracely E; Zazueta-Beltrán, Liliana; Castañeda-Hernández, Gilberto

    2014-10-15

    The association of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs with certain plant extracts can increase antinociceptive activity, permitting the use of lower doses and thus limiting side effects. Therefore, the aim objective of the current study was to examine the effects of curcumin on the nociception and pharmacokinetics of diclofenac in rats. Antinociception was assessed using the formalin test. Diluted formalin was injected subcutaneously into the dorsal surface of the right hind paw. Nociceptive behavior was quantified as the number of flinches of the injected paw during 60 min after injection, and a reduction in formalin-induced flinching was interpreted as an antinociceptive response. Rats were treated with oral diclofenac (1-31 mg/kg), curcumin (3.1-100 mg/kg) or the diclofenac-curcumin combination (2.4-38.4 mg/kg). To determine the possibility of a pharmacokinetic interaction, the oral bioavailability of diclofenac (10 mg/kg) was studied in presence and the absence of curcumin (31 mg/kg). Diclofenac, curcumin, or diclofenac-curcumin combination produced an antinociceptive effect on the formalin test. ED30 values were estimated for the individual drugs, and an isobologram was constructed. The derived theoretical ED30 for the antinociceptive effect (19.2 mg/kg) was significantly different from the observed experimental ED30 value (9.8 mg/kg); hence, the interaction between diclofenac and curcumin that mediates the antinociceptive effect was synergistic. Notwithstanding, the interaction does not appear to involve pharmacokinetic mechanisms, as oral curcumin failed to produce any significant alteration in oral diclofenac bioavailability. Data suggest that the diclofenac-curcumin combination can interact at the systemic level and may have therapeutic advantages for the clinical treatment of inflammatory pain. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  13. Curcumin as a potential therapeutic candidate for Helicobacter pylori associated diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarkar, Avijit; De, Ronita; Mukhopadhyay, Asish K

    2016-01-01

    Curcumin, a yellow pigment and principal polyphenolic Curcuminoid obtained from the turmeric rhizome Curcuma longa, is commonly used as a food-coloring agent. Studies suggest that curcumin has a wide range of beneficial properties e.g., anti-inflammatory, anti-oxidant, anti-cancer, anti-proliferative, anti-fungal and anti-microbial. These pleiotropic activities prompted several research groups to elucidate the role of curcumin in Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection. This is the first review with this heading where we discussed regarding the role of curcumin as an anti-H. pylori agent along with its potential in other gastrointestinal diseases. Based on several in vitro, early cell culture, animal research and few pre-clinical trials, curcumin projected as a potential therapeutic candidate against H. pylori mediated gastric pathogenesis. This review sheds light on the anti-H. pylori effects of curcumin in different models with meticulous emphasis on its anti-oxidant, anti-inflammatory and anti-carcinogenic effects as well as some critical signaling and effecter molecules. Remarkably, non-toxic molecule curcumin fulfills the characteristics for an ideal chemopreventive agent against H. pylori mediated gastric carcinogenesis but the foremost challenge is to obtain the optimum therapeutic levels of curcumin, due to its low solubility and poor bioavailability. Further, we have discussed about the possibilities for improving its efficacy and bioavailability. Lastly, we concluded with the anticipation that in near future curcumin may be used to develop a therapeutic drug against H. pylori mediated gastric ailments through improved formulation or delivery systems, facilitating its enhanced absorption and cellular uptake. PMID:26973412

  14. Curcumin Protects against Ischemic Stroke by Titrating Microglia/Macrophage Polarization

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    Zongjian Liu

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Stroke is the most common type of cerebrovascular disease and is a leading cause of disability and death. Ischemic stroke accounts for approximately 80% of all strokes. The remaining 20% of strokes are hemorrhagic in nature. To date, therapeutic options for acute ischemic stroke are very limited. Recent research suggests that shifting microglial phenotype from the pro-inflammatory M1 state toward the anti-inflammatory and tissue-reparative M2 phenotype may be an effective therapeutic strategy for ischemic stroke. The dietary phytochemical curcumin has shown promise in experimental stroke models, but its effects on microglial polarization and long-term recovery after stroke are unknown. Here we address these gaps by subjecting mice to distal middle cerebral artery occlusion (dMCAO and administering curcumin intraperitoneally (150 mg/kg immediately after ischemia and 24 h later. Histological studies revealed that curcumin post-treatment significantly reduced cerebral ischemic damage 3 days after dMCAO. Sensorimotor functions—as measured by the adhesive removal test and modified Garcia scores—were superior in curcumin-treated mice at 3, 5, 7 and 10 days after stroke. RT-PCR measurements revealed an elevation of M2 microglia/macrophage phenotypic markers and a reduction in M1 markers in curcumin-treated brains 3 days after dMCAO. Immunofluorescent staining further showed that curcumin treatment significantly increased the number of CD206+Iba1+ M2 microglia/macrophages and reduced the number of CD16+Iba1+ M1 cells 10 days after stroke. In vitro studies using the BV2 microglial cell line confirmed that curcumin inhibited lipopolysaccharide (LPS and interferon-γ (IFN-γ-induced M1 polarization. Curcumin treatment concentration-dependently reduced the expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines, including TNF-α, IL-6 and IL-12p70, in the absence of any toxic effect on microglial cell survival. In conclusion, we demonstrate that curcumin has a

  15. Curcumin Inhibits Apoptosis of Chondrocytes through Activation ERK1/2 Signaling Pathways Induced Autophagy

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    Xiaodong Li

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Osteoarthritis (OA is an inflammatory disease of load-bearing synovial joints that is currently treated with drugs that exhibit numerous side effects and are only temporarily effective in treating pain, the main symptom of the disease. Consequently, there is an acute need for novel, safe, and more effective chemotherapeutic agents for the treatment of osteoarthritis and related arthritic diseases. Curcumin, the principal curcuminoid and the most active component in turmeric, is a biologically active phytochemical. Evidence from several recent in vitro studies suggests that curcumin may exert a chondroprotective effect through actions such as anti-inflammatory, anti-oxidative stress, and anti-catabolic activity that are critical for mitigating OA disease pathogenesis and symptoms. In the present study, we investigated the protective mechanisms of curcumin on interleukin 1β (IL-1β-stimulated primary chondrocytes in vitro. The treatment of interleukin (IL-1β significantly reduces the cell viability of chondrocytes in dose and time dependent manners. Co-treatment of curcumin with IL-1β significantly decreased the growth inhibition. We observed that curcumin inhibited IL-1β-induced apoptosis and caspase-3 activation in chondrocytes. Curcumin can increase the expression of phosphorylated extracellular signal-regulated kinases 1/2 (ERK1/2, autophagy marker light chain 3 (LC3-II, and Beclin-1 in chondrocytes. The expression of autophagy markers could be decreased when the chondrocytes were incubated with ERK1/2 inhibitor U0126. Our results suggest that curcumin suppresses apoptosis and inflammatory signaling through its actions on the ERK1/2-induced autophagy in chondrocytes. We propose that curcumin should be explored further for the prophylactic treatment of osteoarthritis in humans and companion animals.

  16. Activation of KCNN3/SK3/K(Ca)2.3 channels attenuates enhanced calcium influx and inflammatory cytokine production in activated microglia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolga, Amalia M; Letsche, Till; Gold, Maike; Doti, Nunzianna; Bacher, Michael; Chiamvimonvat, Nipavan; Dodel, Richard; Culmsee, Carsten

    2012-12-01

    In neurons, small-conductance calcium-activated potassium (KCNN/SK/K(Ca)2) channels maintain calcium homeostasis after N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor activation, thereby preventing excitotoxic neuronal death. So far, little is known about the function of KCNN/SK/K(Ca)2 channels in non-neuronal cells, such as microglial cells. In this study, we addressed the question whether KCNN/SK/K(Ca)2 channels activation affected inflammatory responses of primary mouse microglial cells upon lipopolysaccharide (LPS) stimulation. We found that N-cyclohexyl-N-[2-(3,5-dimethyl-pyrazol-1-yl)-6-methyl-4-pyrimidinamine (CyPPA), a positive pharmacological activator of KCNN/SK/K(Ca)2 channels, significantly reduced LPS-stimulated activation of microglia in a concentration-dependent manner. The general KCNN/SK/K(Ca)2 channel blocker apamin reverted these effects of CyPPA on microglial proliferation. Since calcium plays a central role in microglial activation, we further addressed whether KCNN/SK/K(Ca)2 channel activation affected the changes of intracellular calcium levels, [Ca(2+)](i), in microglial cells. Our data show that LPS-induced elevation of [Ca(2+)](i) was attenuated following activation of KCNN2/3/K(Ca)2.2/K(Ca)2.3 channels by CyPPA. Furthermore, CyPPA reduced downstream events including tumor necrosis factor alpha and interleukin 6 cytokine production and nitric oxide release in activated microglia. Further, we applied specific peptide inhibitors of the KCNN/SK/K(Ca)2 channel subtypes to identify which particular channel subtype mediated the observed anti-inflammatory effects. Only inhibitory peptides targeting KCNN3/SK3/K(Ca)2.3 channels, but not KCNN2/SK2/K(Ca)2.2 channel inhibition, reversed the CyPPA-effects on LPS-induced microglial proliferation. These findings revealed that KCNN3/SK3/K(Ca)2.3 channels can modulate the LPS-induced inflammatory responses in microglial cells. Thus, KCNN3/SK3/K(Ca)2.3 channels may serve as a therapeutic target for reducing microglial

  17. Encapsulated Curcumin for Transdermal Administration

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To develop a proniosomal carrier system of curcumin for transdermal delivery. Methods: Proniosomes of curcumin were prepared by encapsulation of the drug in a mixture of Span 80, cholesterol and diethyl ether by ether injection method, and then investigated as a transdermal drug delivery system (TDDS).

  18. Novel Curcumin Diclofenac Conjugate Enhanced Curcumin Bioavailability and Efficacy in Streptococcal Cell Wall-induced Arthritis

    OpenAIRE

    Jain, S. K.; Gill, M. S.; Pawar, H. S.; Suresh, Sarasija

    2014-01-01

    Curcumin-diclofenac conjugate as been synthesized by esterification of phenolic group of curcumin with the acid moiety of diclofenac, and characterized by mass spectrometry, NMR, FTIR, DSC, thermogravimetric analysis and X-ray diffraction analysis. The relative solubility of curcumin-diclofenac conjugate, curcumin and diclofenac; stability of curcumin-diclofenac conjugate in intestinal extract; permeability study of curcumin-diclofenac conjugate using the everted rat intestinal sac method; st...

  19. Objectively measured physical activity and inflammatory markers among US adults with diabetes: implications for attenuating disease progression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loprinzi, Paul D; Ramulu, Pradeep Y

    2013-09-01

    To examine the association between objectively measured physical activity and markers of inflammation (ie, white blood cell count, neutrophil count, and C-reactive protein level) among a national sample of adults with diabetes. Data from the 2003-2006 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey cycles were used. The data were evaluated from November 25, 2012, to May 3, 2013. Participants wore an accelerometer for 4 days or longer to assess physical activity, with blood samples obtained to assess the aforementioned inflammatory markers. Accelerometer-derived light physical activity and moderate to vigorous physical activity were inversely associated with white blood cell and neutrophil counts, whereas time spent in moderate to vigorous physical activity was inversely associated with C-reactive protein levels. Adults with diabetes engaging in more physical activity have lower degrees of inflammation, suggesting that physical activity may reduce disease progression through mitigating inflammation, which is an important finding because increased inflammation among those with diabetes can worsen disease progression, including diabetic end-organ damage. Copyright © 2013 Mayo Foundation for Medical Education and Research. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. A poly(glycerol-sebacate-curcumin) polymer with potential use for brain gliomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Zhi-Jie; Sun, Bo; Tao, Rong-Bin; Xie, Xin; Lu, Xi-Li; Dong, De-Li

    2013-01-01

    Curcumin has multiple biological and pharmacological activities, including antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, antiviral, antibacterial, antifungal, and antitumor activities. However, the clinical use of curcumin is limited because of its poor oral absorption and extremely poor bioavailability. In order to overcome these limitations, we conjugate curcumin chemically into the known biocompatible and biodegradable polymer, poly(glycerol-sebacate), and prepare the unitary poly(glycerol-sebacate-curcumin) polymer. The structure, the in vitro degradation, the drug release, and antitumor activity as well as the in vivo degradation and tissue biocompatibility of poly(glycerol-sebacate-curcumin) polymer are investigated. The in vitro degradation and drug release profile of poly(glycerol-sebacate-curcumin) are in a linear manner. The in vitro antitumor assay shows that poly(glycerol-sebacate-curcumin) polymer significantly inhibits human malignant glioma cells, U87 and T98 cells. In view of the cytotoxicity against brain gliomas, local use of this polymer would be a potential method for brain tumors. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Curcumin-induced histone acetylation inhibition improves stress-induced gastric ulcer disease in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Ping; Zhou, Renmin; Hu, Guorui; Liu, Zhifeng; Jin, Yu; Yang, Guang; Li, Mei; Lin, Qian

    2015-03-01

    Curcumin is known to possess anti‑inflammatory properties. Despite the fact that curcumin is known to be a strong inhibitor of H+, K+‑ATPase activity, the mechanism underlying the curcumin‑induced inhibition of the transcription of the H+, K+‑ATPase α subunit in gastric mucosal parietal cells remains unclear. The present study investigated the possible mechanism by which curcumin inhibits stomach H+, K+‑ATPase activity during the acute phase of gastric ulcer disease. A rat model of stress‑induced gastric ulcers was produced, in which the anti‑ulcer effects of curcumin were examined. Curcumin‑induced inhibition of the H+, K+‑ATPase promoter via histone acetylation, was verified using a chromatin immunoprecipitation assay. The results showed that curcumin improved stress‑induced gastric ulcer disease in rats, as demonstrated by increased pH values and reduced gastric mucosal hemorrhage and ulcer index. These effects were accompanied by a significant reduction in the level of histone H3 acetylation at the site of the H+, K+‑ATPase promoter and in the expression of the gastric H+,K+‑ATPase α subunit gene and protein. In conclusion, curcumin downregulated the acetylation of histone H3 at the site of the H+, K+‑ATPase promoter gene, thereby inhibiting the transcription and expression of the H+, K+‑ATPase gene. Curcumin was shown to have a preventive and therapeutic effect in gastric ulcer disease.

  2. Polydatin attenuates d-galactose-induced liver and brain damage through its anti-oxidative, anti-inflammatory and anti-apoptotic effects in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Lie-Qiang; Xie, You-Liang; Gui, Shu-Hua; Zhang, Xie; Mo, Zhi-Zhun; Sun, Chao-Yue; Li, Cai-Lan; Luo, Dan-Dan; Zhang, Zhen-Biao; Su, Zi-Ren; Xie, Jian-Hui

    2016-11-09

    Accumulating evidence has shown that chronic injection of d-galactose (d-gal) can mimic natural aging, with accompanying liver and brain injury. Oxidative stress and apoptosis play a vital role in the aging process. In this study, the antioxidant ability of polydatin (PD) was investigated using four established in vitro systems. An in vivo study was also conducted to investigate the possible protective effect of PD on d-gal-induced liver and brain damage. The results showed that PD had remarkable in vitro free radical scavenging activity on 2,2-diphenyl-1-picryl-hydrazyl (DPPH˙), 2,2'-azino-bis(3-ethylbenzo-thiazoline-6-sulfonic acid) (ABTS + ˙) radical ions, and hydroxyl and superoxide anions. Results in vivo indicated that, in a group treated with d-gal plus PD, PD remarkably decreased the depression of body weight and organ indexes, reduced the levels of the serum alanine aminotransferase (ALT) and aspartate aminotransferase (AST), and alleviated alterations in liver and brain histopathology. PD also significantly decreased the level of MDA and elevated SOD, GSH-Px, CAT activity and T-AOC levels in the liver and brain. In addition, the levels of inflammatory mediators, such as TNF-α, IL-1β and IL-6 in serum were markedly reduced after PD treatment. Western blotting results revealed that PD treatment noticeably attenuated the d-gal-induced elevation of Bcl-2/Bax ratio and caspase-3 protein expression in liver and brain. Overall, our findings indicate that PD treatment could effectively attenuate d-gal-induced liver and brain damage, and the mechanism might be associated with decreasing the oxidative stress, inflammation and apoptosis caused by d-gal. PD holds good potential for further development into a promising pharmaceutical candidate for the treatment of age-associated diseases.

  3. Modulation of neuro-inflammatory condition, acetylcholinesterase and antioxidant levels by genistein attenuates diabetes associated cognitive decline in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajput, Mithun Singh; Sarkar, Purnima Dey

    2017-04-25

    The association of diabetes and cognitive decline may indicate that high sugar level might be a risk factor for Alzheimer's disease. A collective term 'diabetes associated cognitive decline' (DACD) has been coined for the patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus showing decline in their cognitive function, especially weak episodic memory, cognitive inflexibility and poor psychomotor performance leading towards Alzheimer's disease. However, at present, no specific treatment exists for the prevention and/or treatment of DACD. Genistein, an isoflavone phytoestrogen, reveals neuroprotective effects in many experimental murine models, though its role on DACD with probable mechanistic approach has still been scope for research. The motive behind the present study is to investigate the outcome of genistein treatment against DACD in streptozotocin-induced diabetic mice with Morris water maze paradigm followed by open field trial to rule out the possibility of impairment in locomotor performance. Chronic (30 days) genistein treatment (2.5, 5.0 and 10.0 mg/kg, i.p. once daily) in diabetic mice significantly lowered hyperglycemia, recovered cognitive performance by affecting acetylcholinesterase activity and oxidative stress and ameliorated neuro-inflammatory condition by varying TNF-α, IL-1β and nitrite levels as impaired in diabetic mice. Thirty days treatment with vitamin C or metformin also improved diabetes-induced memory impairment and significantly dragged these biochemical parameters towards respective controls. Locomotor performance was not influenced by diabetic condition or any associated treatment. It is concluded that genistein supplementation might be a prospective therapeutic approach for the treatment and/or avoidance of diabetic linked learning and memory dysfunction. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Ginkgo biloba extracts attenuate lipopolysaccharide-induced inflammatory responses in acute lung injury by inhibiting the COX-2 and NF-κB pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Xin; Chen, Nan; Ma, Chun-Hua; Tao, Jing; Bao, Jian-An; Zong-Qi, Cheng; Chen, Zu-Tao; Miao, Li-Yan

    2015-01-01

    In the present study, we analyzed the role of Ginkgo biloba extract in lipopolysaccharide(LPS)-induced acute lung injury (ALI). ALI was induced in mice by intratracheal instillation of LPS. G. biloba extract (12 and 24 mg·kg(-1)) and dexamethasone (2 mg·kg(-1)), as a positive control, were given by i.p. injection. The cells in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) were counted. The degree of animal lung edema was evaluated by measuring the wet/dry weight ratio. The superoxidase dismutase (SOD) and myeloperoxidase (MPO) activities were assayed by SOD and MPO kits, respectively. The levels of inflammatory mediators, tumor necrosis factor-a, interleukin-1b, and interleukin-6, were assayed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Pathological changes of lung tissues were observed by H&E staining. The levels of NF-κB p65 and COX-2 expression were detected by Western blotting. Compared to the LPS group, the treatment with the G. biloba extract at 12 and 24 mg·kg(-1) markedly attenuated the inflammatory cell numbers in the BALF, decreased NF-κB p65 and COX-2 expression, and improved SOD activity, and inhibited MPO activity. The histological changes of the lungs were also significantly improved. The results indicated that G. biloba extract has a protective effect on LPS-induced acute lung injury in mice. The protective mechanism of G. biloba extract may be partly attributed to the inhibition of NF-κB p65 and COX-2 activation. Copyright © 2015 China Pharmaceutical University. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. S-Propargyl-cysteine (SPRC) attenuated lipopolysaccharide-induced inflammatory response in H9c2 cells involved in a hydrogen sulfide-dependent mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Li-Long; Liu, Xin-Hua; Gong, Qi-Hai; Zhu, Yi-Zhun

    2011-06-01

    The present study attempts to investigate the effects of S-propargyl-cysteine (SPRC), a sulfur-containing amino acid, on lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced inflammatory response in H9c2 cardiac myocytes. We found that SPRC prevented nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) activation assessed by NF-κB p65 phosphorylation and IκBα degradation, suppressed LPS-induced extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2) phosphorylation and intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) production. Furthermore, incubation of H9c2 cells with SPRC induced phosphorylation of Akt in a time- and concentration-dependent manner. In addition, SPRC attenuated LPS-induced mRNA and protein expression of tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), and mRNA expression of intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS). The effects of SPRC were abolished by cystathionine γ-lyase [CSE-an enzyme that synthesizes hydrogen sulfide (H(2)S)] inhibitor, DL: -propargylglycine (PAG), SPRC-induced Akt phosphorylation and TNF-α release was also abolished by the phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) inhibitor LY294002. Furthermore, SPRC also increased LPS-induced down-regulation expression of CSE and H(2)S level in H9c2 cells. PAG abolished SPRC-induced up-regulation of H(2)S level. Therefore, we concluded that SPRC produced an anti-inflammatory effect in LPS-stimulated H9c2 cells partly through the CSE/H(2)S pathway by impairing IκBα/NF-κB signaling and by activating PI3K/Akt signaling pathway.

  6. Passive therapy with humanized anti-staphylococcal enterotoxin B antibodies attenuates systemic inflammatory response and protects from lethal pneumonia caused by staphylococcal enterotoxin B-producing Staphylococcus aureus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karau, Melissa J; Tilahun, Mulualem E; Krogman, Ashton; Osborne, Barbara A; Goldsby, Richard A; David, Chella S; Mandrekar, Jayawant N; Patel, Robin; Rajagopalan, Govindarajan

    2017-10-03

    Drugs such as linezolid that inhibit bacterial protein synthesis may be beneficial in treating infections caused by toxigenic Staphylococcus aureus. As protein synthesis inhibitors have no effect on preformed toxins, neutralization of pathogenic exotoxins with anti-toxin antibodies may be beneficial in conjunction with antibacterial therapy. Herein, we evaluated the efficacy of human-mouse chimeric high-affinity neutralizing anti-staphylococcal enterotoxin B (SEB) antibodies in the treatment of experimental pneumonia caused by SEB-producing S. aureus. Since HLA class II transgenic mice mount a stronger systemic immune response following challenge with SEB and are more susceptible to SEB-induced lethal toxic shock than conventional mice strains, HLA-DR3 transgenic mice were used. Lethal pneumonia caused by SEB-producing S. aureus in HLA-DR3 transgenic mice was characterized by robust T cell activation and elevated systemic levels of several pro-inflammatory cytokines and chemokines. Prophylactic administration of a single dose of linezolid 30 min prior to the onset of infection attenuated the systemic inflammatory response and protected from mortality whereas linezolid administered 60 min after the onset of infection failed to confer significant protection. Human-mouse chimeric high-affinity neutralizing anti-SEB antibodies alone, but not polyclonal human IgG, mitigated this response and protected from death when administered immediately after initiation of infection. Further, anti-SEB antibodies as well as intact polyclonal human IgG, but not its Fab or Fc fragments, protected from lethal pneumonia when followed with linezolid therapy 60 min later. In conclusion, neutralization of superantigens with high-affinity antibodies may have beneficial effects in pneumonia.

  7. Benznidazole, the trypanocidal drug used for Chagas disease, induces hepatic NRF2 activation and attenuates the inflammatory response in a murine model of sepsis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lambertucci, Flavia; Motiño, Omar; Villar, Silvina; Rigalli, Juan Pablo; Luján Alvarez, María de; Catania, Viviana A; Martín-Sanz, Paloma; Carnovale, Cristina Ester; Quiroga, Ariel Darío; Francés, Daniel Eleazar; Ronco, María Teresa

    2017-01-01

    Molecular mechanisms on sepsis progression are linked to the imbalance between reactive oxygen species (ROS) production and cellular antioxidant capacity. Previous studies demonstrated that benznidazole (BZL), known for its antiparasitic action on Trypanosoma cruzi, has immunomodulatory effects, increasing survival in C57BL/6 mice in a model of polymicrobial sepsis induced by cecal ligation and puncture (CLP). The mechanism by which BZL inhibits inflammatory response in sepsis is poorly understood. Also, our group recently reported that BZL is able to activate the nuclear factor erytroide-derived 2-Like 2 (NRF2) in vitro. The aim of the present work was to delineate the beneficial role of BZL during sepsis, analyzing its effects on the cellular redox status and the possible link to the innate immunity receptor TLR4. Specifically, we analyzed the effect of BZL on Nrf2 regulation and TLR4 expression in liver of mice 24 hours post-CLP. BZL was able to induce NRF2 nuclear protein localization in CLP mice. Also, we found that protein kinase C (PKC) is involved in the NRF2 nuclear accumulation and induction of its target genes. In addition, BZL prompted a reduction in hepatic CLP-induced TLR4 protein membrane localization, evidencing its immunomodulatory effects. Together, our results demonstrate that BZL induces hepatic NRF2 activation with the concomitant increase in the antioxidant defenses, and the attenuation of inflammatory response, in part, by inhibiting TLR4 expression in a murine model of sepsis. - Highlights: • BZL improves survival rate after polymicrobial sepsis • BZL enhances hepatic NRF2 nuclear accumulation in a model of sepsis, in part, by a mechanism dependent on PKC activation • BZL-enhanced NRF2 induction regulates antioxidant enzymes and increases antioxidant cellular defenses in sepsis • BZL blocks liver ROS production and ROS-induced TLR4 plasma membrane expression in septic mice

  8. Curcumin and its Derivatives: Their Application in Neuropharmacology and Neuroscience in the 21st Century

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Wing-Hin; Loo, Ching-Yee; Bebawy, Mary; Luk, Frederick; Mason, Rebecca S; Rohanizadeh, Ramin

    2013-01-01

    Curcumin (diferuloylmethane), a polyphenol extracted from the plant Curcuma longa, is widely used in Southeast Asia, China and India in food preparation and for medicinal purposes. Since the second half of the last century, this traditional medicine has attracted the attention of scientists from multiple disciplines to elucidate its pharmacological properties. Of significant interest is curcumin’s role to treat neurodegenerative diseases including Alzheimer’s disease (AD), and Parkinson’s disease (PD) and malignancy. These diseases all share an inflammatory basis, involving increased cellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) accumulation and oxidative damage to lipids, nucleic acids and proteins. The therapeutic benefits of curcumin for these neurodegenerative diseases appear multifactorial via regulation of transcription factors, cytokines and enzymes associated with (Nuclear factor kappa beta) NFκB activity. This review describes the historical use of curcumin in medicine, its chemistry, stability and biological activities, including curcumin's anti-cancer, anti-microbial, anti-oxidant, and anti-inflammatory properties. The review further discusses the pharmacology of curcumin and provides new perspectives on its therapeutic potential and limitations. Especially, the review focuses in detail on the effectiveness of curcumin and its mechanism of actions in treating neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s diseases and brain malignancies. PMID:24381528

  9. Curcumin: Reintroduced Therapeutic Agent from Traditional Medicine for Alcoholic Liver Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamid Reza Rahimi

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Alcoholic liver disease (ALD is the main cause of chronic liver disease across the world and can lead to fibrosis and cirrhosis. The etiopathogenesis of ALD is related to ethanol-induced oxidative stress, glutathione reduction, abnormal methionine metabolism, malnutrition, and production of endotoxins that activate Kupffer cells. Curcumin is an active ingredient of the rhizome of turmeric. The substance is shown to have minor adverse effects. As the substance possess low bioavailability in free formulation, different strategies has been conducted to improve its bioavailability which resulted in production of nanomiscels and nanoparticles. Curcumin can provide protection for the liver against toxic effects of alcohol use. Several studies showed curcumin blocks endotoxin-mediated activation of NF-κB and suppresses the expression of cytokines, chemokines, COX-2, and iNOS in Kupffer cells. According to the molecular studies, curcumin inhibits NF-κB signaling pathway, regulates cytokines production and modulates immune response. It has been shown that curcumin can suppress gene expression, especially cytokines genes resulting in down-regulation of tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α, interleukin 1 (IL-1, IL-6, IL-8, adhesion molecules (ICAM, VCAM and C-reactive protein. Hence, curcumin can have therapeutic effects on the majority of chronic inflammatory diseases such as asthma, bronchitis, inflammatory bowel disease, rheumatoid arthritis, ALD, fatty liver, and allergy.

  10. Curcumin decreases the expression of Pokemon by suppressing the binding activity of the Sp1 protein in human lung cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Jiajun; Meng, Xianfeng; Gao, Xudong; Tan, Guangxuan

    2010-03-01

    Pokemon, which stands for POK erythroid myeloid ontogenic factor, can regulate expression of many genes and plays an important role in tumorigenesis. Curcumin, a natural and non-toxic yellow compound, has capacity for antioxidant, free radical scavenger, anti-inflammatory properties. Recent studies shows it is a potential inhibitor of cell proliferation in a variety of tumour cells. To investigate whether curcumin can regulate the expression of Pokemon, a series of experiments were carried out. Transient transfection experiments demonstrated that curcumin could decrease the activity of the Pokemon promoter. Western blot analysis suggested that curcumin could significantly decrease the expression of the Pokemon. Overexpression of Sp1 could enhance the activity of the Pokemon promoter, whereas knockdown of Sp1 could decrease its activity. More important, we also found that curcumin could decrease the expression of the Pokemon by suppressing the stimulation of the Sp1 protein. Therefore, curcumin is a potential reagent for tumour therapy which may target Pokemon.

  11. Curcumin Inhibits Growth of Human NCI-H292 Lung Squamous Cell Carcinoma Cells by Increasing FOXA2 Expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Lingling; Liu, Jinjin; Zhu, Linyun; Chen, Qingge; Meng, Ziyu; Sun, Li; Hu, Junsheng; Ni, Zhenhua; Wang, Xiongbiao

    2018-01-01

    Lung squamous cell carcinoma (LSCC) is a common histological lung cancer subtype, but unlike lung adenocarcinoma, limited therapeutic options are available for treatment. Curcumin, a natural compound, may have anticancer effects in various cancer cells, but how it may be used to treat LSCC has not been well studied. Here, we applied curcumin to a human NCI-H292 LSCC cell line to test anticancer effects and explored underlying potential mechanisms of action. Curcumin treatment inhibited NCI-H292 cell growth and increased FOXA2 expression in a time-dependent manner. FOXA2 expression was decreased in LSCC tissues compared with adjacent normal tissues and knockdown of FOXA2 increased NCI-H292 cells proliferation. Inhibition of cell proliferation by curcumin was attenuated by FOXA2 knockdown. Moreover inhibition of STAT3 pathways by curcumin increased FOXA2 expression in NCI-H292 cells whereas a STAT3 activator (IL-6) significantly inhibited curcumin-induced FOXA2 expression. Also, SOCS1 and SOCS3, negative regulators of STAT3 activity, were upregulated by curcumin treatment. Thus, curcumin inhibited human NCI-H292 cells growth by increasing FOXA2 expression via regulation of STAT3 signaling pathways.

  12. Modulation of curcumin-induced Akt phosphorylation and apoptosis by PI3K inhibitor in MCF-7 cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kizhakkayil, Jaleel; Thayyullathil, Faisal; Chathoth, Shahanas; Hago, Abdulkader; Patel, Mahendra [Cell Signaling Laboratory, Department of Biochemistry, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, UAE University, P.O. Box 17666, Al Ain (United Arab Emirates); Galadari, Sehamuddin, E-mail: sehamuddin@uaeu.ac.ae [Cell Signaling Laboratory, Department of Biochemistry, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, UAE University, P.O. Box 17666, Al Ain (United Arab Emirates)

    2010-04-09

    Curcumin has been shown to induce apoptosis in various malignant cancer cell lines. One mechanism of curcumin-induced apoptosis is through the PI3K/Akt signaling pathway. Akt, also known as protein kinase B (PKB), is a member of the family of phosphatidylinositol 3-OH-kinase regulated Ser/Thr kinases. The active Akt regulates cell survival and proliferation; and inhibits apoptosis. In this study we found that curcumin induces apoptotic cell death in MCF-7 cells, as assessed by MTT assay, DNA ladder formation, PARP cleavage, p53 and Bax induction. At apoptotic inducing concentration, curcumin induces a dramatic Akt phosphorylation, accompanied by an increased phosphorylation of glycogen synthase kinase 3{beta} (GSK3{beta}), which has been considered to be a pro-growth signaling molecule. Combining curcumin with PI3K inhibitor, LY290042, synergizes the apoptotic effect of curcumin. The inhibitor LY290042 was capable of attenuating curcumin-induced Akt phosphorylation and activation of GSK3{beta}. All together, our data suggest that blocking the PI3K/Akt survival pathway sensitizes the curcumin-induced apoptosis in MCF-7 cells.

  13. Modulation of curcumin-induced Akt phosphorylation and apoptosis by PI3K inhibitor in MCF-7 cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kizhakkayil, Jaleel; Thayyullathil, Faisal; Chathoth, Shahanas; Hago, Abdulkader; Patel, Mahendra; Galadari, Sehamuddin

    2010-01-01

    Curcumin has been shown to induce apoptosis in various malignant cancer cell lines. One mechanism of curcumin-induced apoptosis is through the PI3K/Akt signaling pathway. Akt, also known as protein kinase B (PKB), is a member of the family of phosphatidylinositol 3-OH-kinase regulated Ser/Thr kinases. The active Akt regulates cell survival and proliferation; and inhibits apoptosis. In this study we found that curcumin induces apoptotic cell death in MCF-7 cells, as assessed by MTT assay, DNA ladder formation, PARP cleavage, p53 and Bax induction. At apoptotic inducing concentration, curcumin induces a dramatic Akt phosphorylation, accompanied by an increased phosphorylation of glycogen synthase kinase 3β (GSK3β), which has been considered to be a pro-growth signaling molecule. Combining curcumin with PI3K inhibitor, LY290042, synergizes the apoptotic effect of curcumin. The inhibitor LY290042 was capable of attenuating curcumin-induced Akt phosphorylation and activation of GSK3β. All together, our data suggest that blocking the PI3K/Akt survival pathway sensitizes the curcumin-induced apoptosis in MCF-7 cells.

  14. Curcumin Inhibits Growth of Human NCI-H292 Lung Squamous Cell Carcinoma Cells by Increasing FOXA2 Expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lingling Tang

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Lung squamous cell carcinoma (LSCC is a common histological lung cancer subtype, but unlike lung adenocarcinoma, limited therapeutic options are available for treatment. Curcumin, a natural compound, may have anticancer effects in various cancer cells, but how it may be used to treat LSCC has not been well studied. Here, we applied curcumin to a human NCI-H292 LSCC cell line to test anticancer effects and explored underlying potential mechanisms of action. Curcumin treatment inhibited NCI-H292 cell growth and increased FOXA2 expression in a time-dependent manner. FOXA2 expression was decreased in LSCC tissues compared with adjacent normal tissues and knockdown of FOXA2 increased NCI-H292 cells proliferation. Inhibition of cell proliferation by curcumin was attenuated by FOXA2 knockdown. Moreover inhibition of STAT3 pathways by curcumin increased FOXA2 expression in NCI-H292 cells whereas a STAT3 activator (IL-6 significantly inhibited curcumin-induced FOXA2 expression. Also, SOCS1 and SOCS3, negative regulators of STAT3 activity, were upregulated by curcumin treatment. Thus, curcumin inhibited human NCI-H292 cells growth by increasing FOXA2 expression via regulation of STAT3 signaling pathways.

  15. Dietary curcumin prevents ocular toxicity of naphthalene in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandya, U; Saini, M K; Jin, G F; Awasthi, S; Godley, B F; Awasthi, Y C

    2000-06-05

    Administration of naphthalene is known to cause cataract formation in rats and rabbits and naphthalene-initiated cataract is frequently used as a model for studies on senile cataract in humans. Oxidative stress has been implicated in the mechanism of naphthalene-induced cataract. Curcumin, a constituent of turmeric, a spice used in Indian curry dishes, is an effective antioxidant and is known to induce the enzymes of glutathione-linked detoxification pathways in rats. During the present studies, we have examined whether low levels of dietary curcumin could prevent naphthalene-induced opacification of rat lens. The presence of apoptotic cells in lens epithelial cells was also examined by catalytically incorporating labeled nucleotide to DNA with either Klenow fragment of DNA polymerase or by terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase (TdT), which forms polymeric tail using the principle of TUNEL assay. The results of these studies demonstrated that the rats treated with naphthalene and kept on a diet supplemented with only 0.005% (w/w) curcumin had significantly less opacification of lenses as compared to that observed in rats treated only with naphthalene. Our studies also demonstrate, for the first time, that naphthalene-initiated cataract in lens is accompanied and perhaps preceded by apoptosis of lens epithelial cells and that curcumin attenuates this apoptotic effect of naphthalene.

  16. SCM-198 attenuates early atherosclerotic lesions in hypercholesterolemic rabbits via modulation of the inflammatory and oxidative stress pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yanfei; Guo, Wei; Wen, Yadan; Xiong, Qinghui; Liu, Hongrui; Wu, Jian; Zou, Yunzeng; Zhu, Yizhun

    2012-09-01

    GPx in the aorta. In a rabbit atherosclerotic model, SCM-198 dose-dependently ameliorated the progression of atherosclerotic lesions and vascular dysfunction accompanied by the suppression of inflammatory factors and oxidative stress. These findings suggested that SCM-198 might be a potential agent for the treatment of atherosclerosis. Crown Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Curcumin: a novel therapeutic for burn pain and wound healing

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-01

    1. Introduction 2. Curcumin overview 3. Curcumin as an antiinflammatory: potential for wound healing 4. Potential barriers to curcumin ...bioavailability 5. Curcumin delivery vehicles 6. Conclusion 7. Expert opinion Review Curcumin : a novel therapeutic for burn pain and wound healing Bopaiah...Additionally, severe burn wounds cause scarring and are susceptible to infection. Recent encouraging findings demonstrate that curcumin , a major

  18. Turmeric (Curcuma longa) attenuates food allergy symptoms by regulating type 1/type 2 helper T cells (Th1/Th2) balance in a mouse model of food allergy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Hee Soon; See, Hye-Jeong; Jung, Sun Young; Choi, Dae Woon; Kwon, Da-Ae; Bae, Min-Jung; Sung, Ki-Seung; Shon, Dong-Hwa

    2015-12-04

    Turmeric (Curcuma longa) has traditionally been used to treat pain, fever, allergic and inflammatory diseases such as bronchitis, arthritis, and dermatitis. In particular, turmeric and its active component, curcumin, were effective in ameliorating immune disorders including allergies. However, the effects of turmeric and curcumin have not yet been tested on food allergies. Mice were immunized with intraperitoneal ovalbumin (OVA) and alum. The mice were orally challenged with 50mg OVA, and treated with turmeric extract (100mg/kg), curcumin (3mg/kg or 30 mg/kg) for 16 days. Food allergy symptoms including decreased rectal temperature, diarrhea, and anaphylaxis were evaluated. In addition, cytokines, immunoglobulins, and mouse mast cell protease-1 (mMCP-1) were evaluated using ELISA. Turmeric significantly attenuated food allergy symptoms (decreased rectal temperature and anaphylactic response) induced by OVA, but curcumin showed weak improvement. Turmeric also inhibited IgE, IgG1, and mMCP-1 levels increased by OVA. Turmeric reduced type 2 helper cell (Th2)-related cytokines and enhanced a Th1-related cytokine. Turmeric ameliorated OVA-induced food allergy by maintaining Th1/Th2 balance. Furthermore, turmeric was confirmed anti-allergic effect through promoting Th1 responses on Th2-dominant immune responses in immunized mice. Turmeric significantly ameliorated food allergic symptoms in a mouse model of food allergy. The turmeric as an anti-allergic agent showed immune regulatory effects through maintaining Th1/Th2 immune balance, whereas curcumin appeared immune suppressive effects. Therefore, we suggest that administration of turmeric including various components may be useful to ameliorate Th2-mediated allergic disorders such as food allergy, atopic dermatitis, and asthma. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Exogenous heat shock cognate protein 70 pretreatment attenuates cardiac and hepatic dysfunction with associated anti-inflammatory responses in experimental septic shock.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Jong-Hau; Yang, Rei-Cheng; Lin, Shih-Jen; Liou, Shu-Fen; Dai, Zen-Kong; Yeh, Jwu-Lai; Wu, Jiunn-Ren

    2014-12-01

    It has been recently demonstrated that intracellular heat shock cognate protein 70 (HSC70) can be released into extracellular space with physiologic effects. However, its extracellular function in sepsis is not clear. In this study, we hypothesize that extracellular HSC70 can protect against lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced myocardial and hepatic dysfunction because of its anti-inflammatory actions. In Wistar rats, septic shock developed with hypotension, tachycardia, and myocardial and hepatic dysfunction at 4 h following LPS administration (10 mg/kg, i.v.). Pretreatment with recombinant bovine HSC70 (20 μg/kg, i.v.) attenuated LPS-induced hypotension and tachycardia by 21% and 23%, respectively (P shock cognate protein 70 also prevented LPS-induced hypoglycemia (217 vs. 59 mg/dL, P shock, extracellular HSC70 conveys pleiotropic protection on myocardial, hepatic, and systemic derangements, with associated inhibition of proinflammatory mediators including tumor necrosis factor α, nitric oxide, cyclooxygenase 2, and matrix metalloproteinase 9, through mitogen-activated protein kinase/nuclear factor κB signaling pathways. Therefore, extracellular HSC70 may have a promising role in the prophylactic treatment of sepsis.

  20. Baicalein attenuates inflammatory responses by suppressing TLR4 mediated NF-κB and MAPK signaling pathways in LPS-induced mastitis in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Xuexiu; Wei, Zhengkai; Zhou, Ershun; Chen, Libin; Kou, Jinhua; Wang, Jingjing; Yang, Zhengtao

    2015-09-01

    Baicalein is a phenolic flavonoid presented in the dry roots of Scutellaria baicalensis Georgi. It has been reported that baicalein possesses a number of biological properties, such as antiviral, antioxidative, anti-inflammatory, antithrombotic, and anticancer properties. However, the effect of baicalein on mastitis has not yet been reported. This research aims to detect the effect of baicalein on lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced mastitis in mice and to investigate the molecular mechanisms. Baicalein was administered intraperitoneally 1h before and 12h after LPS treatment. The results indicated that baicalein treatment markedly attenuated the damage of the mammary gland induced by LPS, suppressed the activity of myeloperoxidase (MPO) and the levels of tumor necrosis factor (TNF-α) and interleukin (IL-1β) in mice with LPS-induced mastitis. Besides, baicalein blocked the expression of Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) and then suppressed the phosphorylation of nuclear transcription factor-kappaB (NF-κB) p65 and degradation inhibitor of NF-κBα (IκBα) and, and inhibited the phosphorylation of p38, extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) and c-jun NH2-terminal kinase (JNK) in mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signal pathway. These findings suggested that baicalein may have a potential prospect against mastitis. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  1. Development of Prediction Model and Experimental Validation in Predicting the Curcumin Content of Turmeric (Curcuma longa L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akbar, Abdul; Kuanar, Ananya; Joshi, Raj K; Sandeep, I S; Mohanty, Sujata; Naik, Pradeep K; Mishra, Antaryami; Nayak, Sanghamitra

    2016-01-01

    The drug yielding potential of turmeric ( Curcuma longa L.) is largely due to the presence of phyto-constituent 'curcumin.' Curcumin has been found to possess a myriad of therapeutic activities ranging from anti-inflammatory to neuroprotective. Lack of requisite high curcumin containing genotypes and variation in the curcumin content of turmeric at different agro climatic regions are the major stumbling blocks in commercial production of turmeric. Curcumin content of turmeric is greatly influenced by environmental factors. Hence, a prediction model based on artificial neural network (ANN) was developed to map genome environment interaction basing on curcumin content, soli and climatic factors from different agroclimatic regions for prediction of maximum curcumin content at various sites to facilitate the selection of suitable region for commercial cultivation of turmeric. The ANN model was developed and tested using a data set of 119 generated by collecting samples from 8 different agroclimatic regions of Odisha. The curcumin content from these samples was measured that varied from 7.2% to 0.4%. The ANN model was trained with 11 parameters of soil and climatic factors as input and curcumin content as output. The results showed that feed-forward ANN model with 8 nodes (MLFN-8) was the most suitable one with R 2 value of 0.91. Sensitivity analysis revealed that minimum relative humidity, altitude, soil nitrogen content and soil pH had greater effect on curcumin content. This ANN model has shown proven efficiency for predicting and optimizing the curcumin content at a specific site.

  2. Comparative evaluation of inhibitory effect of curcumin and doxycycline on matrix metalloproteinase-9 activity in chronic periodontitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanjeela Rakshith Guru

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objectives: The pathogenesis of inflammatory periodontal diseases essentially involves degradation of extracellular matrix molecules, and collagen breakdown and matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs are proteinases primarily involved in this process. It is known that doxycycline downregulates MMP activity. Curcumin has anti-inflammatory effect and also downregulates MMP activity. Thus, a study was conducted to evaluate the anti-inflammatory effect of curcumin by its inhibition of MMP-9 activity and compare the same with doxcycline, which has known anticollagenase activity. Subjects and Methods: Gingival tissue samples were obtained from thirty patients diagnosed with chronic periodontitis. The tissue extracts were treated with Curcumin and doxycycline and inhibition of MMP-9 analyzed by gelatinzymography. Gels obtained were stained with Coomassie Brilliant Blue, and enzymatic activities detected as bands of gelatinlysis against blue background. Relative MMP-9 levels were measured by scanning the clear zones and analyzing the percentage inhibition. Results: Results showed that MMP-9 activity was significantly decreased by both the drugs. Curcumin showed 61.01% reduction in the MMP-9 activity at 1500 μg/ml concentration and doxycycline showed 59.58% reduction in the MMP-9 activity at 300 μg/ml concentration. Conclusion: The current study showed that curcumin has inhibitory effect on polymorphonuclear leukocyte-type MMP-9 involved in matrix degradation in periodontitis. Since Curcumin has a potent anti-inflammatory effect, it may have therapeutic potential as a host modulation agent in periodontal diseases.

  3. Metabolomic Elucidation of the Effects of Curcumin on Fibroblast-Like Synoviocytes in Rheumatoid Arthritis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joong Kyong Ahn

    Full Text Available Rheumatoid arthritis (RA is a chronic systemic inflammatory disease characterized by synovial inflammation and joint disability. Curcumin is known to be effective in ameliorating joint inflammation in RA. To obtain new insights into the effect of curcumin on primary fibroblast-like synoviocytes (FLS, N = 3, which are key effector cells in RA, we employed gas chromatography/time-of-flight mass spectrometry (GC/TOF-MS-based metabolomics. Metabolomic profiling of tumor necrosis factor (TNF-α-stimulated and curcumin-treated FLS was performed using GC/TOF-MS in conjunction with univariate and multivariate statistical analyses. A total of 119 metabolites were identified. Metabolomic analysis revealed that metabolite profiles were clearly distinct between TNF-α-stimulated vs. the control group (not stimulated by TNF-α or curcumin. Treatment of FLS with curcumin showed that the metabolic perturbation by TNF-α could be reversed to that of the control group to a considerable extent. Curcumin-treated FLS had higher restoration of amino acid and fatty acid metabolism, as indicated by the prominent metabolic restoration of intermediates of amino acid and fatty acid metabolism, compared with that observed in TNF-α-stimulated FLS. In particular, the abundance of glycine, citrulline, arachidonic acid, and saturated fatty acids in TNF-α-stimulated FLS was restored to the control level after treatment with curcumin, suggesting that the effect of curcumin on preventing joint inflammation may be elucidated with the levels of these metabolites. Our results suggest that GC/TOF-MS-based metabolomic investigation using FLS has the potential for discovering the mechanism of action of curcumin and new targets for therapeutic drugs in RA.

  4. Targeting multiple pro-apoptotic signaling pathways with curcumin in prostate cancer cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariela Rivera

    Full Text Available Curcumin, an extract from the turmeric rhizome (Curcuma longa, is known to exhibit anti-inflammatory, antioxidant, chemopreventive and antitumoral activities against aggressive and recurrent cancers. Accumulative data indicate that curcumin may induce cancer cell death. However, the detailed mechanism underlying its pro-apoptotic and anti-cancer effects remains to be elucidated. In the present study, we examined the signaling pathways triggered by curcumin, specifically, the exact molecular mechanisms of curcumin-induced apoptosis in highly metastatic human prostate cancer cells. The effect of curcumin was evaluated using for the first time in prostate cancer, a gel-free shotgun quantitative proteomic analysis coupled with Tandem Mass Tag isobaric labeling-based-signaling networks. Results were confirmed at the gene expression level by qRT-PCR and at the protein expression level by western blot and flow cytometry. Our findings revealed that curcumin induced an Endoplasmic Reticulum stress-mediated apoptosis in PC3. The mechanisms by which curcumin promoted cell death in these cells were associated with cell cycle arrest, increased reactive oxygen species, autophagy and the Unfolded Protein Response. Furthermore, the upregulation of ER stress was measured using key indicators of ER stress: Glucose-Regulated Protein 78, Inositol-Requiring Enzyme 1 alpha, Protein Disulfide isomerase and Calreticulin. Chronic ER stress induction was concomitant with the upregulation of pro-apoptotic markers (caspases 3,9,12 and Poly (ADP-ribose polymerase. The downregulated proteins include anti-apoptotic and anti-tumor markers, supporting their curcumin-induced pro-apoptotic role in prostate cancer cells. Taken together, these data suggest that curcumin may serve as a promising anticancer agent by inducing a chronic ER stress mediated cell death and activation of cell cycle arrest, UPR, autophagy and oxidative stress responses.

  5. Targeting multiple pro-apoptotic signaling pathways with curcumin in prostate cancer cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivera, Mariela; Ramos, Yanilda; Rodríguez-Valentín, Madeline; López-Acevedo, Sheila; Cubano, Luis A.; Zou, Jin; Zhang, Qiang; Wang, Guangdi

    2017-01-01

    Curcumin, an extract from the turmeric rhizome (Curcuma longa), is known to exhibit anti-inflammatory, antioxidant, chemopreventive and antitumoral activities against aggressive and recurrent cancers. Accumulative data indicate that curcumin may induce cancer cell death. However, the detailed mechanism underlying its pro-apoptotic and anti-cancer effects remains to be elucidated. In the present study, we examined the signaling pathways triggered by curcumin, specifically, the exact molecular mechanisms of curcumin-induced apoptosis in highly metastatic human prostate cancer cells. The effect of curcumin was evaluated using for the first time in prostate cancer, a gel-free shotgun quantitative proteomic analysis coupled with Tandem Mass Tag isobaric labeling-based-signaling networks. Results were confirmed at the gene expression level by qRT-PCR and at the protein expression level by western blot and flow cytometry. Our findings revealed that curcumin induced an Endoplasmic Reticulum stress-mediated apoptosis in PC3. The mechanisms by which curcumin promoted cell death in these cells were associated with cell cycle arrest, increased reactive oxygen species, autophagy and the Unfolded Protein Response. Furthermore, the upregulation of ER stress was measured using key indicators of ER stress: Glucose-Regulated Protein 78, Inositol-Requiring Enzyme 1 alpha, Protein Disulfide isomerase and Calreticulin. Chronic ER stress induction was concomitant with the upregulation of pro-apoptotic markers (caspases 3,9,12) and Poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase. The downregulated proteins include anti-apoptotic and anti-tumor markers, supporting their curcumin-induced pro-apoptotic role in prostate cancer cells. Taken together, these data suggest that curcumin may serve as a promising anticancer agent by inducing a chronic ER stress mediated cell death and activation of cell cycle arrest, UPR, autophagy and oxidative stress responses. PMID:28628644

  6. Synthesis and characterization of curcumin-sulfonamide hybrids: Biological evaluation and molecular docking studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banuppriya, Govindharasu; Sribalan, Rajendran; Padmini, Vediappen

    2018-03-01

    Curcumin-sulfonamide hybrids (4a-e) were synthesized and their in vitro antioxidant, anti-inflammatory and anticancer activities were studied. The synthesized compounds showed a very good potent activity towards antioxidant and anti-inflammatory studies rather than its parent as well as standard. These compounds have exhibited an excellent toxicity effect to the cancer cell lines such as A549 and AGS. The compounds 4a and 4c have showed good anticancer activity than curcumin. The molecular docking studies were also performed against various Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor (EGFR) enzymes. The DFT calculations were also done in order to support the docking results.

  7. Discovery of curcumin, a component of golden spice, and its miraculous biological activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Subash C; Patchva, Sridevi; Koh, Wonil; Aggarwal, Bharat B

    2012-03-01

    1. Curcumin is the active ingredient of the dietary spice turmeric and has been consumed for medicinal purposes for thousands of years. Modern science has shown that curcumin modulates various signalling molecules, including inflammatory molecules, transcription factors, enzymes, protein kinases, protein reductases, carrier proteins, cell survival proteins, drug resistance proteins, adhesion molecules, growth factors, receptors, cell cycle regulatory proteins, chemokines, DNA, RNA and metal ions. 2. Because of this polyphenol's potential to modulate multiple signalling molecules, it has been reported to possess pleiotropic activities. First demonstrated to have antibacterial activity in 1949, curcumin has since been shown to have anti-inflammatory, anti-oxidant, pro-apoptotic, chemopreventive, chemotherapeutic, antiproliferative, wound healing, antinociceptive, antiparasitic and antimalarial properties as well. Animal studies have suggested that curcumin may be active against a wide range of human diseases, including diabetes, obesity, neurological and psychiatric disorders and cancer, as well as chronic illnesses affecting the eyes, lungs, liver, kidneys and gastrointestinal and cardiovascular systems. 3. Although many clinical trials evaluating the safety and efficacy of curcumin against human ailments have already been completed, others are still ongoing. Moreover, curcumin is used as a supplement in several countries, including India, Japan, the US, Thailand, China, Korea, Turkey, South Africa, Nepal and Pakistan. Although inexpensive, apparently well tolerated and potentially active, curcumin has not been approved for the treatment of any human disease. 4. In the present article, we discuss the discovery and key biological activities of curcumin, with a particular emphasis on its activities at the molecular and cellular levels, as well as in animals and humans. © 2011 The Authors. Clinical and Experimental Pharmacology and Physiology © 2011 Blackwell

  8. Curcumin Improves Amyloid β-Peptide (1-42) Induced Spatial Memory Deficits through BDNF-ERK Signaling Pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lu; Fang, Yu; Xu, Yuming; Lian, Yajun; Xie, Nanchang; Wu, Tianwen; Zhang, Haifeng; Sun, Limin; Zhang, Ruifang; Wang, Zhenhua

    2015-01-01

    Curcumin, the most active component of turmeric, has various beneficial properties, such as antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, and antitumor effects. Previous studies have suggested that curcumin reduces the levels of amyloid and oxidized proteins and prevents memory deficits and thus is beneficial to patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD). However, the molecular mechanisms underlying curcumin's effect on cognitive functions are not well-understood. In the present study, we examined the working memory and spatial reference memory in rats that received a ventricular injection of amyloid-β1-42 (Aβ1-42), representing a rodent model of Alzheimer's disease (AD). The rats treated with Aβ1-42 exhibited obvious cognitive deficits in behavioral tasks. Chronic (seven consecutive days, once per day) but not acute (once a day) curcumin treatments (50, 100, and 200 mg/kg) improved the cognitive functions in a dose-dependent manner. In addition, the beneficial effect of curcumin is accompanied by increased BDNF levels and elevated levels of phosphorylated ERK in the hippocampus. Furthermore, the cognition enhancement effect of curcumin could be mimicked by the overexpression of BDNF in the hippocampus and blocked by either bilateral hippocampal injections with lentiviruses that express BDNF shRNA or a microinjection of ERK inhibitor. These findings suggest that chronic curcumin ameliorates AD-related cognitive deficits and that upregulated BDNF-ERK signaling in the hippocampus may underlie the cognitive improvement produced by curcumin.

  9. Curcumin blocks interleukin-1 signaling in chondrosarcoma cells.

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    Thomas Kalinski

    Full Text Available Interleukin (IL-1 signaling plays an important role in inflammatory processes, but also in malignant processes. The essential downstream event in IL-1 signaling is the activation of nuclear factor (NF-κB, which leads to the expression of several genes that are involved in cell proliferation, invasion, angiogenesis and metastasis, among them VEGF-A. As microenvironment-derived IL-1β is required for invasion and angiogenesis in malignant tumors, also in chondrosarcomas, we investigated IL-1β-induced signal transduction and VEGF-A expression in C3842 and SW1353 chondrosarcoma cells. We additionally performed in vitro angiogenesis assays and NF-κB-related gene expression analyses. Curcumin is a substance which inhibits IL-1 signaling very early by preventing the recruitment of IL-1 receptor associated kinase (IRAK to the IL-1 receptor. We demonstrate that IL-1 signaling and VEGF-A expression are blocked by Curcumin in chondrosarcoma cells. We further show that Curcumin blocks IL-1β-induced angiogenesis and NF-κB-related gene expression. We suppose that IL-1 blockade is an additional treatment option in chondrosarcoma, either by Curcumin, its derivatives or other IL-1 blocking agents.

  10. Curcumin: a potential neuroprotective agent in Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mythri, R B; Bharath, M M Srinivas

    2012-01-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is an age-associated neurodegenerative disease clinically characterized as a movement disorder. The motor symptoms in PD arise due to selective degeneration of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra of the ventral midbrain thereby depleting the dopamine levels in the striatum. Most of the current pharmacotherapeutic approaches in PD are aimed at replenishing the striatal dopamine. Although these drugs provide symptomatic relief during early PD, many patients develop motor complications with long-term treatment. Further, PD medications do not effectively tackle tremor, postural instability and cognitive deficits. Most importantly, most of these drugs do not exhibit neuroprotective effects in patients. Consequently, novel therapies involving natural antioxidants and plant products/molecules with neuroprotective properties are being exploited for adjunctive therapy. Curcumin is a polyphenol and an active component of turmeric (Curcuma longa), a dietary spice used in Indian cuisine and medicine. Curcumin exhibits antioxidant, anti-inflammatory and anti-cancer properties, crosses the blood-brain barrier and is neuroprotective in neurological disorders. Several studies in different experimental models of PD strongly support the clinical application of curcumin in PD. The current review explores the therapeutic potential of curcumin in PD.

  11. Curcumin and folic acid abrogated methotrexate induced vascular endothelial dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sankrityayan, Himanshu; Majumdar, Anuradha S

    2016-01-01

    Methotrexate, an antifolate drug widely used in rheumatoid arthritis, psoriasis, and cancer, is known to cause vascular endothelial dysfunction by causing hyperhomocysteinemia, direct injury to endothelium or by increasing the oxidative stress (raising levels of 7,8-dihydrobiopterin). Curcumin is a naturally occurring polyphenol with strong antioxidant and anti-inflammatory action and therapeutic spectra similar to that of methotrexate. This study was performed to evaluate the effects of curcumin on methotrexate induced vascular endothelial dysfunction and also compare its effect with that produced by folic acid (0.072 μg·g(-1)·day(-1), p.o., 2 weeks) per se and in combination. Male Wistar rats were exposed to methotrexate (0.35 mg·kg(-1)·day(-1), i.p.) for 2 weeks to induce endothelial dysfunction. Methotrexate exposure led to shedding of endothelium, decreased vascular reactivity, increased oxidative stress, decreased serum nitrite levels, and increase in aortic collagen deposition. Curcumin (200 mg·kg(-1)·day(-1) and 400 mg·kg(-1)·day(-1), p.o.) for 4 weeks prevented the increase in oxidative stress, decrease in serum nitrite, aortic collagen deposition, and also vascular reactivity. The effects were comparable with those produced by folic acid therapy. The study shows that curcumin, when concomitantly administered with methotrexate, abrogated its vascular side effects by preventing an increase in oxidative stress and abating any reduction in physiological nitric oxide levels.

  12. Curcumin Reverse Methicillin Resistance in Staphylococcus aureus

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    Su-Hyun Mun

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Curcumin, a natural polyphenolic flavonoid extracted from the rhizome of Curcuma longa L., was shown to possess superior potency to resensitize methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA to antibiotics. Previous studies have shown the synergistic activity of curcumin with β-lactam and quinolone antibiotics. Further, to understand the anti-MRSA mechanism of curcumin, we investigated the potentiated effect of curcumin by its interaction in diverse conditions. The mechanism of anti-MRSA action of curcumin was analyzed by the viability assay in the presence of detergents, ATPase inhibitors and peptidoglycan (PGN from S. aureus, and the PBP2a protein level was analyzed by western blotting. The morphological changes in the curcumin-treated MRSA strains were investigated by transmission electron microscopy (TEM. We analyzed increased susceptibility to MRSA isolates in the presence of curcumin. The optical densities at 600 nm (OD600 of the suspensions treated with the combinations of curcumin with triton X-100 and Tris were reduced to 63% and 59%, respectively, compared to curcumin without treatment. N,N'-dicyclohexylcarbodiimide (DCCD and sodium azide (NaN3 were reduced to 94% and 55%, respectively. When peptidoglycan (PGN from S. aureus was combined with curcumin, PGN (0–125 μg/mL gradually blocked the antibacterial activity of curcumin (125 μg/mL; however, at a concentration of 125 µg/mL PGN, it did not completely block curcumin. Curcumin has a significant effect on the protein level of PBP2a. The TEM images of MRSA showed damage of the cell wall, disruption of the cytoplasmic contents, broken cell membrane and cell lysis after the treatment of curcumin. These data indicate a remarkable antibacterial effect of curcumin, with membrane permeability enhancers and ATPase inhibitors, and curcumin did not directly bind to PGN on the cell wall. Further, the antimicrobial action of curcumin involved in the PBP2a-mediated resistance mechanism was

  13. Curcumin Protects β-Lactoglobulin Fibril Formation and Fibril-Induced Neurotoxicity in PC12 Cells.

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    Mansooreh Mazaheri

    Full Text Available In this study the β-lactoglobulin fibrillation, in the presence or absence of lead ions, aflatoxin M1 and curcumin, was evaluated using ThT fluorescence, Circular dichroism spectroscopy and atomic force microscopy. To investigate the toxicity of the different form of β-Lg fibrils, in the presence or absence of above toxins and curcumin, we monitored changes in the level of reactive oxygen species and morphology of the differentiated neuron-like PC12 cells. The cell viability, cell body area, average neurite length, neurite width, number of primary neurites, percent of bipolar cells and node/primary neurite ratios were used to assess the growth and complexity of PC12 cells exposed to different form of β-Lg fibrils. Incubation of β-Lg with curcumin resulted in a significant decrease in ROS levels even in the presence of lead ions and aflatoxin M1. The β-Lg fibrils formed in the presence of lead ions and aflatoxin M1 attenuated the growth and complexity of PC12 cells compared with other form of β-Lg fibrils. However, the adverse effects of these toxins and protein fibrils were negated in the presence of curcumin. Furthermore, the antioxidant and inhibitory effects of curcumin protected PC12 cells against fibril neurotoxicity and enhanced their survival. Thus, curcumin may provide a protective effect toward β-Lg, and perhaps other protein, fibrils mediated neurotoxicity.

  14. Does combined therapy of curcumin and epigallocatechin gallate have a synergistic neuroprotective effect against spinal cord injury?

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    Jiri Ruzicka

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Systematic inflammatory response after spinal cord injury (SCI is one of the factors leading to lesion development and a profound degree of functional loss. Anti-inflammatory compounds, such as curcumin and epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG are known for their neuroprotective effects. In this study, we investigated the effect of combined therapy of curcumin and EGCG in a rat model of acute SCI induced by balloon compression. Immediately after SCI, rats received curcumin, EGCG, curcumin + EGCG or saline [daily intraperitoneal doses (curcumin, 6 mg/kg; EGCG 17 mg/kg] and weekly intramuscular doses (curcumin, 60 mg/kg; EGCG 17 mg/kg] for 28 days. Rats were evaluated using behavioral tests (the Basso, Beattie, and Bresnahan (BBB open-field locomotor test, flat beam test. Spinal cord tissue was analyzed using histological methods (Luxol Blue-cresyl violet staining and immunohistochemistry (anti-glial fibrillary acidic protein, anti-growth associated protein 43. Cytokine levels (interleukin-1β, interleukin-4, interleukin-2, interleukin-6, macrophage inflammatory protein 1-alpha, and RANTES were measured using Luminex assay. Quantitative polymerase chain reaction was performed to determine the relative expression of genes (Sort1, Fgf2, Irf5, Mrc1, Olig2, Casp3, Gap43, Gfap, Vegf, NfκB, Cntf related to regenerative processes in injured spinal cord. We found that all treatments displayed significant behavioral recovery, with no obvious synergistic effect after combined therapy of curcumin and ECGC. Curcumin and EGCG alone or in combination increased axonal sprouting, decreased glial scar formation, and altered the levels of macrophage inflammatory protein 1-alpha, interleukin-1β, interleukin-4 and interleukin-6 cytokines. These results imply that although the expected synergistic response of this combined therapy was less obvious, aspects of tissue regeneration and immune responses in severe SCI were evident.

  15. Investigating the use of curcumin-loaded electrospun filaments for soft tissue repair applications

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    Mouthuy PA

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Pierre-Alexis Mouthuy,1,2 Maja Somogyi Škoc,3 Ana Čipak Gašparović,1 Lidija Milković,1 Andrew J Carr,2 Neven Žarković1 1Laboratory for Oxidative Stress, Rudjer Boskovic Institute, Zagreb, Croatia; 2Botnar Research Centre, Nuffield Department of Orthopaedics, Rheumatology and Musculoskeletal Sciences, Medical Science Division, University of Oxford, Oxford, UK; 3Department of Materials, Fibres and Textile Testing, University of Zagreb, Zagreb, Croatia Abstract: Electrospun filaments represent a new generation of medical textiles with promising applications in soft tissue repair. A potential strategy to improve their design is to combine them with bioactive molecules. Curcumin, a natural compound found in turmeric, is particularly attractive for its antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, and antimicrobial properties. However, investigating the range of relevant doses of curcumin in materials designed for tissue regeneration has remained limited. In this paper, a wide range of curcumin concentrations was explored and the potential of the resulting materials for soft tissue repair applications was assessed. Polydioxanone (PDO filaments were prepared with various amounts of curcumin: 0%, 0.001%, 0.01%, 0.1%, 1%, and 10% (weight to weight ratio. The results from the present study showed that, at low doses (≤0.1%, the addition of curcumin has no influence on the spinning process or on the physicochemical properties of the filaments, whereas higher doses lead to smaller fiber diameters and improved mechanical properties. Moreover, filaments with 0.001% and 0.01% curcumin stimulate the metabolic activity and proliferation of normal human dermal fibroblasts (NHDFs compared with the no-filament control. However, this stimulation is not significant when compared to the control filaments (0%. Highly dosed filaments induce either the inhibition of proliferation (with 1% or cell apoptosis (with 10% as a result of the concentrations of curcumin found in the

  16. Isolation and synthesis of curcumin

    OpenAIRE

    Zetterström, Susanna

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this thesis was to evaluate pre-existing methods for isolation and synthesis of curcumin. Two different isolation methods were used, where only the extraction step differs from each other. To obtain pure curcumin, column chromatography was needed to separate the compound from its analogues. As for the isolation the synthesis was also carried out by two different methods, the first in a conventional way and the second one by using irradiation of microwaves. The result of the experim...

  17. Curcumin and synthetic analogs induce reactive oxygen species and decreases specificity protein (Sp) transcription factors by targeting microRNAs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gandhy, Shruti U; Kim, KyoungHyun; Larsen, Lesley; Rosengren, Rhonda J; Safe, Stephen

    2012-01-01

    Curcumin inhibits growth of several cancer cell lines, and studies in this laboratory in bladder and pancreatic cancer cells show that curcumin downregulates specificity protein (Sp) transcription factors Sp1, Sp3 and Sp4 and pro-oncogenic Sp-regulated genes. In this study, we investigated the anticancer activity of curcumin and several synthetic cyclohexanone and piperidine analogs in colon cancer cells. The effects of curcumin and synthetic analogs on colon cancer cell proliferation and apoptosis were determined using standardized assays. The changes in Sp proteins and Sp-regulated gene products were analysed by western blots, and real time PCR was used to determine microRNA-27a (miR-27a), miR-20a, miR-17-5p and ZBTB10 and ZBTB4 mRNA expression. The IC 50 (half-maximal) values for growth inhibition (24 hr) of colon cancer cells by curcumin and synthetic cyclohexanone and piperidine analogs of curcumin varied from 10 μM for curcumin to 0.7 μM for the most active synthetic piperidine analog RL197, which was used along with curcumin as model agents in this study. Curcumin and RL197 inhibited RKO and SW480 colon cancer cell growth and induced apoptosis, and this was accompanied by downregulation of specificity protein (Sp) transcription factors Sp1, Sp3 and Sp4 and Sp-regulated genes including the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), hepatocyte growth factor receptor (c-MET), survivin, bcl-2, cyclin D1 and NFκB (p65 and p50). Curcumin and RL197 also induced reactive oxygen species (ROS), and cotreatment with the antioxidant glutathione significantly attenuated curcumin- and RL197-induced growth inhibition and downregulation of Sp1, Sp3, Sp4 and Sp-regulated genes. The mechanism of curcumin-/RL197-induced repression of Sp transcription factors was ROS-dependent and due to induction of the Sp repressors ZBTB10 and ZBTB4 and downregulation of microRNAs (miR)-27a, miR-20a and miR-17-5p that regulate these repressors. These results identify a new and highly potent

  18. Curcumin, the golden nutraceutical: multitargeting for multiple chronic diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunnumakkara, Ajaikumar B; Bordoloi, Devivasha; Padmavathi, Ganesan; Monisha, Javadi; Roy, Nand Kishor; Prasad, Sahdeo; Aggarwal, Bharat B

    2017-06-01

    Curcumin, a yellow pigment in the Indian spice Turmeric (Curcuma longa), which is chemically known as diferuloylmethane, was first isolated exactly two centuries ago in 1815 by two German Scientists, Vogel and Pelletier. However, according to the pubmed database, the first study on its biological activity as an antibacterial agent was published in 1949 in Nature and the first clinical trial was reported in The Lancet in 1937. Although the current database indicates almost 9000 publications on curcumin, until 1990 there were less than 100 papers published on this nutraceutical. At the molecular level, this multitargeted agent has been shown to exhibit anti-inflammatory activity through the suppression of numerous cell signalling pathways including NF-κB, STAT3, Nrf2, ROS and COX-2. Numerous studies have indicated that curcumin is a highly potent antimicrobial agent and has been shown to be active against various chronic diseases including various types of cancers, diabetes, obesity, cardiovascular, pulmonary, neurological and autoimmune diseases. Furthermore, this compound has also been shown to be synergistic with other nutraceuticals such as resveratrol, piperine, catechins, quercetin and genistein. To date, over 100 different clinical trials have been completed with curcumin, which clearly show its safety, tolerability and its effectiveness against various chronic diseases in humans. However, more clinical trials in different populations are necessary to prove its potential against different chronic diseases in humans. This review's primary focus is on lessons learnt about curcumin from clinical trials. This article is part of a themed section on Principles of Pharmacological Research of Nutraceuticals. To view the other articles in this section visit http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/bph.v174.11/issuetoc. © 2016 The British Pharmacological Society.

  19. Curcumin Mitigates Accelerated Aging after Irradiation in Drosophila by Reducing Oxidative Stress

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    Ki Moon Seong

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Curcumin, belonging to a class of natural phenol compounds, has been extensively studied due to its antioxidative, anticancer, anti-inflammatory, and antineurodegenerative effects. Recently, it has been shown to exert dual activities after irradiation, radioprotection, and radiosensitization. Here, we investigated the protective effect of curcumin against radiation damage using D. melanogaster. Pretreatment with curcumin (100 μM recovered the shortened lifespan caused by irradiation and increased eclosion rate. Flies subjected to high-dose irradiation showed a mutant phenotype of outstretched wings, whereas curcumin pretreatment reduced incidence of the mutant phenotype. Protein carbonylation and formation of γH2Ax foci both increased following high-dose irradiation most likely due to generation of reactive oxygen species. Curcumin pretreatment reduced the amount of protein carbonylation as well as formation of γH2Ax foci. Therefore, we suggest that curcumin acts as an oxidative stress reducer as well as an effective protective agent against radiation damage.

  20. Protective Effects of Indian Spice Curcumin Against Amyloid Beta in Alzheimer’s Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy, P. Hemachandra; Manczak, Maria; Yin, Xiangling; Grady, Mary Catherine; Mitchell, Andrew; Tonk, Sahil; Kuruva, Chandra Sekhar; Bhatti, Jasvinder Singh; Kandimalla, Ramesh; Vijayan, Murali; Kumar, Subodh; Wang, Rui; Adi Pradeepkiran, Jangampalli; Ogunmokun, Gilbert; Thamarai, Kavya; Quesada, Kandi; Boles, Annette; Reddy, Arubala P

    2018-01-01

    The purpose of our article is to assess the current understanding of Indian spice ‘Curcumin’ against amyloid-β (Aβ)-induced toxicity in Alzheimer’s disease (AD) pathogenesis. Natural products, such as ginger, curcumin and gingko biloba have been used as diets and dietary supplements to treat human diseases, including cancer, cardiovascular, respiratory, infectious, diabetes, obesity, metabolic syndromes and neurological disorders. Products derived from plants are known to have protective effects, including anti-inflammatory, anti-oxidant, anti-arthritis, pro-healing and boosting memory cognitive functions. In the last decade, several groups have designed and synthesized curcumin and its derivatives and extensively tested using cell and mouse models of AD. Recent research on amyloid-β and curcumin has revealed that curcumin prevents amyloid-β aggregation and crosses the blood brain barrier (BBB), reach brain cells and protect neurons from various toxic insults of aging and amyloid-β in humans. Recent research has also reported that curcumin ameliorates cognitive decline and improves synaptic functions in mouse models of AD. Further, recent groups have initiated studies on elderly individuals and patients with AD and the outcome of these studies is currently being assessed. This article highlights the beneficial effects of curcumin on AD. This article also critically assesses the current limitations of curcumin’s bioavailability and urgent need for new formulation to increase its brain levels to treat patients with AD. PMID:29332042

  1. Uncoupling of oxidative phosphorylation by curcumin: Implication of its cellular mechanism of action

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lim, Han Wern; Lim, Hwee Ying; Wong, Kim Ping

    2009-01-01

    Curcumin is a phytochemical isolated from the rhizome of turmeric. Recent reports have shown curcumin to have antioxidant, anti-inflammatory and anti-tumor properties as well as affecting the 5'-AMP activated protein kinase (AMPK), mTOR and STAT-3 signaling pathways. We provide evidence that curcumin acts as an uncoupler. Well-established biochemical techniques were performed on isolated rat liver mitochondria in measuring oxygen consumption, F 0 F 1 -ATPase activity and ATP biosynthesis. Curcumin displays all the characteristics typical of classical uncouplers like fccP and 2,4-dinitrophenol. In addition, at concentrations higher than 50 μM, curcumin was found to inhibit mitochondrial respiration which is a characteristic feature of inhibitory uncouplers. As a protonophoric uncoupler and as an activator of F 0 F 1 -ATPase, curcumin causes a decrease in ATP biosynthesis in rat liver mitochondria. The resulting change in ATP:AMP could disrupt the phosphorylation status of the cell; this provides a possible mechanism for its activation of AMPK and its downstream mTOR and STAT-3 signaling.

  2. Curcumin Inhibits Chondrocyte Hypertrophy of Mesenchymal Stem Cells through IHH and Notch Signaling Pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Zhen; Dou, Ce; Dong, Shiwu

    2017-01-01

    Using tissue engineering technique to repair cartilage damage caused by osteoarthritis is a promising strategy. However, the regenerated tissue usually is fibrous cartilage, which has poor mechanical characteristics compared to hyaline cartilage. Chondrocyte hypertrophy plays an important role in this process. Thus, it is very important to find out a suitable way to maintain the phenotype of chondrocytes and inhibit chondrocyte hypertrophy. Curcumin deriving from turmeric was reported with anti-inflammatory and anti-tumor pharmacological effects. However, the role of curcumin in metabolism of chondrocytes, especially in the chondrocyte hypertrophy remains unclear. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are widely used in cartilage tissue engineering as seed cells. So we investigated the effect of curcumin on chondrogenesis and chondrocyte hypertrophy in MSCs through examination of cell viability, glycosaminoglycan synthesis and specific gene expression. We found curcumin had no effect on expression of chondrogenic markers including Sox9 and Col2a1 while hypertrophic markers including Runx2 and Col10a1 were down-regulated. Further exploration showed that curcumin inhibited chondrocyte hypertrophy through Indian hedgehog homolog (IHH) and Notch signalings. Our results indicated curcumin was a potential agent in modulating cartilage homeostasis and maintaining chondrocyte phenotype.

  3. Uncoupling of oxidative phosphorylation by curcumin: Implication of its cellular mechanism of action

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    Lim, Han Wern; Lim, Hwee Ying [Department of Biochemistry, Yong Loo Lin School of Medicine, National University of Singapore, Singapore 119260 (Singapore); Wong, Kim Ping, E-mail: bchsitkp@nus.edu.sg [Department of Biochemistry, Yong Loo Lin School of Medicine, National University of Singapore, Singapore 119260 (Singapore)

    2009-11-06

    Curcumin is a phytochemical isolated from the rhizome of turmeric. Recent reports have shown curcumin to have antioxidant, anti-inflammatory and anti-tumor properties as well as affecting the 5'-AMP activated protein kinase (AMPK), mTOR and STAT-3 signaling pathways. We provide evidence that curcumin acts as an uncoupler. Well-established biochemical techniques were performed on isolated rat liver mitochondria in measuring oxygen consumption, F{sub 0}F{sub 1}-ATPase activity and ATP biosynthesis. Curcumin displays all the characteristics typical of classical uncouplers like fccP and 2,4-dinitrophenol. In addition, at concentrations higher than 50 {mu}M, curcumin was found to inhibit mitochondrial respiration which is a characteristic feature of inhibitory uncouplers. As a protonophoric uncoupler and as an activator of F{sub 0}F{sub 1}-ATPase, curcumin causes a decrease in ATP biosynthesis in rat liver mitochondria. The resulting change in ATP:AMP could disrupt the phosphorylation status of the cell; this provides a possible mechanism for its activation of AMPK and its downstream mTOR and STAT-3 signaling.

  4. A comprehensive approach to ascertain the binding mode of curcumin with DNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haris, P.; Mary, Varughese; Aparna, P.; Dileep, K. V.; Sudarsanakumar, C.

    2017-03-01

    Curcumin is a natural phytochemical from the rhizoma of Curcuma longa, the popular Indian spice that exhibits a wide range of pharmacological properties like antioxidant, anticancer, anti-inflammatory, antitumor, and antiviral activities. In the published literatures we can see different studies and arguments on the interaction of curcumin with DNA. The intercalative binding, groove binding and no binding of curcumin with DNA were reported. In this context, we conducted a detailed study to understand the mechanism of recognition of dimethylsulfoxide-solubilized curcumin by DNA. The interaction of curcumin with calf thymus DNA (ctDNA) was confirmed by agarose gel electrophoresis. The nature of binding and energetics of interaction were studied by Isothermal Titration Calorimetry (ITC), Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC), UV-visible, fluorescence and melting temperature (Tm) analysis. The experimental data were compared with molecular modeling studies. Our investigation confirmed that dimethylsulfoxide-solubilized curcumin binds in the minor groove of the ctDNA without causing significant structural alteration to the DNA.

  5. The beneficial role of curcumin on inflammation, diabetes and neurodegenerative disease: A recent update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Shatadal; Banerjee, Sharmistha; Sil, Parames C

    2015-09-01

    The concept of using phytochemicals has ushered in a new revolution in pharmaceuticals. Naturally occurring polyphenols (like curcumin, morin, resveratrol, etc.) have gained importance because of their minimal side effects, low cost and abundance. Curcumin (diferuloylmethane) is a component of turmeric isolated from the rhizome of Curcuma longa. Research for more than two decades has revealed the pleiotropic nature of the biological effects of this molecule. More than 7000 published articles have shed light on the various aspects of curcumin including its antioxidant, hypoglycemic, anti-inflammatory and anti-cancer activities. Apart from these well-known activities, this natural polyphenolic compound also exerts its beneficial effects by modulating different signalling molecules including transcription factors, chemokines, cytokines, tumour suppressor genes, adhesion molecules, microRNAs, etc. Oxidative stress and inflammation play a pivotal role in various diseases like diabetes, cancer, arthritis, Alzheimer's disease and cardiovascular diseases. Curcumin, therefore, could be a therapeutic option for the treatment of these diseases, provided limitations in its oral bioavailability can be overcome. The current review provides an updated overview of the metabolism and mechanism of action of curcumin in various organ pathophysiologies. The review also discusses the potential for multifunctional therapeutic application of curcumin and its recent progress in clinical biology. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Curcumin Modulates Macrophage Polarization Through the Inhibition of the Toll-Like Receptor 4 Expression and its Signaling Pathways

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    Yaoyao Zhou

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: Curcumin, the active ingredient in curcuma rhizomes, has a wide range of therapeutic effects. However, its atheroprotective activity in human acute monocytic leukemia THP-1 cells remains unclear. We investigated the activity and molecular mechanism of action of curcumin in polarized macrophages. Methods: Phorbol myristate acetate (PMA-treated THP-1 cells were differentiated to macrophages, which were further polarized to M1 cells by lipopolysaccharide (LPS; 1 µg/ml and interferon (IFN-γ (20 ng/ml and treated with varying curcumin concentrations. [3H]thymidine (3H-TdR incorporation assays were utilized to measure curcumin-induced growth inhibition. The expression of tumor necrosis factor-a (TNF-a, interleukin (IL-6, and IL-12B (p40 were measured by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA. Macrophage polarization and its mechanism were evaluated by flow cytometry and western blot. Additionally, toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4 small interfering RNA and mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK inhibitors were used to further confirm the molecular mechanism of curcumin on macrophage polarization. Results: Curcumin dose-dependently inhibited M1 macrophage polarization and the production of TNF-a, IL-6, and IL-12B (p40. It also decreased TLR4 expression, which regulates M1 macrophage polarization. Furthermore, curcumin significantly inhibited the phosphorylation of ERK, JNK, p38, and nuclear factor (NF-γB. In contrast, SiTLR4 in combination with p-JNK, p-ERK, and p-p38 inhibition reduced the effect of curcumin on polarization. Conclusions: Curcumin can modulate macrophage polarization through TLR4-mediated signaling pathway inhibition, indicating that its effect on macrophage polarization is related to its anti-inflammatory and atheroprotective effects. Our data suggest that curcumin could be used as a therapeutic agent in atherosclerosis.

  7. Systemic treatment with resveratrol and/or curcumin reduces the progression of experimental periodontitis in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corrêa, M G; Pires, P R; Ribeiro, F V; Pimentel, S Z; Casarin, R C V; Cirano, F R; Tenenbaum, H T; Casati, M Z

    2017-04-01

    Periodontitis is a chronic inflammatory disease of periodontal tissues that leads to the destruction of bone and other connective tissues. Resveratrol and curcumin are plant-derived substances with biological properties that may have immunomodulatory properties. This study investigated the effect of continuous administration of resveratrol and curcumin and the association of resveratrol and curcumin on the progression of experimental periodontitis in rats. Forty Wistar rats were assigned randomly to the following groups: group 1, experimental periodontitis + placebo (PL) (n = 10); group 2, experimental periodontitis + resveratrol (RSV) (n = 10); group 3, experimental periodontitis + curcumin (C) (n = 10); and group 4, experimental periodontitis + resveratrol + curcumin (COMBI) (n = 10). Periodontitis was induced in rats by tying a silk suture, as a ligature, around one of the first molars. Daily administration of the placebo solution, 10 mg/kg of resveratrol, 100 mg/kg of curcumin or 10 mg/kg of resveratrol plus 100 mg/kg of curcumin was carried out from day 0 to day 30. At the end of the relevant experimental periods, rats were killed and the specimens obtained were processed for morphometric analysis of bone loss. Gingival tissues surrounding the first molar were collected for quantification of interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-4, interferon-gamma (IFN-γ) and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) using a Luminex/MAGPIX assay. Intergroup comparisons of the morphometric outcomes revealed higher bone-loss values in the PL group (p 0.05). The immunoenzymatic assay of the gingival tissue showed a lower concentration of IL-1β in the COMBI group in comparison with the PL group (p 0.05). Resveratrol and curcumin are capable of reducing alveolar bone loss in an animal model of periodontitis. This occurred when these agents were added singly or in combination with one another, but there did not appear to be either synergistic or additive effects. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A

  8. Curcumin ameliorates insulin signalling pathway in brain of Alzheimer's disease transgenic mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Hui-Li; Dang, Hui-Zi; Fan, Hui; Chen, Xiao-Pei; Rao, Ying-Xue; Ren, Ying; Yang, Jin-Duo; Shi, Jing; Wang, Peng-Wen; Tian, Jin-Zhou

    2016-12-01

    Deficits in glucose, impaired insulin signalling and brain insulin resistance are common in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD); therefore, some scholars even called AD type 3 diabetes mellitus. Curcumin can reduce the amyloid pathology in AD. Moreover, it is a well-known fact that curcumin has anti-oxidant and anti-inflammatory properties. However, whether or not curcumin could regulate the insulin signal transduction pathway in AD remains unclear. In this study, we used APPswe/PS1dE9 double transgenic mice as the AD model to investigate the mechanisms and the effects of curcumin on AD. Immunohistochemical (IHC) staining and a western blot analysis were used to test the major proteins in the insulin signal transduction pathway. After the administration of curcumin for 6 months, the results showed that the expression of an insulin receptor (InR) and insulin receptor substrate (IRS)-1 decreased in the hippocampal CA1 area of the APPswe/PS1dE9 double transgenic mice, while the expression of phosphatidylinositol-3 kinase (PI3K), phosphorylated PI3K (p-PI3K), serine-threonine kinase (AKT) and phosphorylated AKT (p-AKT) increased. Among the curcumin groups, the medium-dose group was the most effective one. Thus, we believe that curcumin may be a potential therapeutic agent that can regulate the critical molecules in brain insulin signalling pathways. Furthermore, curcumin could be adopted as one of the AD treatments to improve a patient's learning and memory ability. © The Author(s) 2016.

  9. Curcumin structure-function, bioavailability, and efficacy in models of neuroinflammation and Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Begum, Aynun N; Jones, Mychica R; Lim, Giselle P; Morihara, Takashi; Kim, Peter; Heath, Dennis D; Rock, Cheryl L; Pruitt, Mila A; Yang, Fusheng; Hudspeth, Beverly; Hu, Shuxin; Faull, Kym F; Teter, Bruce; Cole, Greg M; Frautschy, Sally A

    2008-07-01

    Curcumin can reduce inflammation and neurodegeneration, but its chemical instability and metabolism raise concerns, including whether the more stable metabolite tetrahydrocurcumin (TC) may mediate efficacy. We examined the antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, or anti-amyloidogenic effects of dietary curcumin and TC, either administered chronically to aged Tg2576 APPsw mice or acutely to lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-injected wild-type mice. Despite dramatically higher drug plasma levels after TC compared with curcumin gavage, resulting brain levels of parent compounds were similar, correlating with reduction in LPS-stimulated inducible nitric-oxide synthase, nitrotyrosine, F2 isoprostanes, and carbonyls. In both the acute (LPS) and chronic inflammation (Tg2576), TC and curcumin similarly reduced interleukin-1beta. Despite these similarities, only curcumin was effective in reducing amyloid plaque burden, insoluble beta-amyloid peptide (Abeta), and carbonyls. TC had no impact on plaques or insoluble Abeta, but both reduced Tris-buffered saline-soluble Abeta and phospho-c-Jun NH(2)-terminal kinase (JNK). Curcumin but not TC prevented Abeta aggregation. The TC metabolite was detected in brain and plasma from mice chronically fed the parent compound. These data indicate that the dienone bridge present in curcumin, but not in TC, is necessary to reduce plaque deposition and protein oxidation in an Alzheimer's model. Nevertheless, TC did reduce neuroinflammation and soluble Abeta, effects that may be attributable to limiting JNK-mediated transcription. Because of its favorable safety profile and the involvement of misfolded proteins, oxidative damage, and inflammation in multiple chronic degenerative diseases, these data relating curcumin dosing to the blood and tissue levels required for efficacy should help translation efforts from multiple successful preclinical models.

  10. Production of Curcumin-Loaded Silk Fibroin Nanoparticles for Cancer Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mercedes G. Montalbán

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Curcumin, extracted from the rhizome of Curcuma longa, has been widely used in medicine for centuries due to its anti-inflammatory, anti-cancer, anti-oxidant and anti-microbial effects. However, its bioavailability during treatments is poor because of its low solubility in water, slow dissolution rate and rapid intestinal metabolism. For these reasons, improving the therapeutic efficiency of curcumin using nanocarriers (e.g., biopolymer nanoparticles has been a research focus, to foster delivery of the curcumin inside cells due to their small size and large surface area. Silk fibroin from the Bombyx mori silkworm is a biopolymer characterized by its biocompatibility, biodegradability, amphiphilic chemistry, and excellent mechanical properties in various material formats. These features make silk fibroin nanoparticles useful vehicles for delivering therapeutic drugs, such as curcumin. Curcumin-loaded silk fibroin nanoparticles were synthesized using two procedures (physical adsorption and coprecipitation more scalable than methods previously described using ionic liquids. The results showed that nanoparticle formulations were 155 to 170 nm in diameter with a zeta potential of approximately −45 mV. The curcumin-loaded silk fibroin nanoparticles obtained by both processing methods were cytotoxic to carcinogenic cells, while not decreasing viability of healthy cells. In the case of tumor cells, curcumin-loaded silk fibroin nanoparticles presented higher efficacy in cytotoxicity against neuroblastoma cells than hepatocarcinoma cells. In conclusion, curcumin-loaded silk fibroin nanoparticles constitute a biodegradable and biocompatible delivery system with the potential to treat tumors by local, long-term sustained drug delivery.

  11. Composite wound dressings of pectin and gelatin with aloe vera and curcumin as bioactive agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tummalapalli, Mythili; Berthet, Morgane; Verrier, Bernard; Deopura, B L; Alam, M S; Gupta, Bhuvanesh

    2016-01-01

    Aloe vera and curcumin loaded oxidized pectin-gelatin (OP-Gel) matrices were used as antimicrobial finishes on nonwoven cotton fabrics to produce composite wound care devices. The drug release characteristics of the biocomposite dressings indicated that curcumin is released through a biphasic mechanism - erosion of the polymeric matrix, followed by diffusion, while aloe vera is released upon leaching of the polymeric matrix. A 50/50 composition of aloe vera/curcumin was used to fabricate OP-Gel-Aloe Curcumin dressings. However, contrary to our expectations, OP-Gel-Aloe Curcumin dressings exhibited lesser antimicrobial activity compared to OP-Gel-Aloe and OP-Gel-Curcumin dressings. The cytocompatibility of the fabricated dressings was evaluated using NIH3T3 mouse fibroblast cells. OP-Gel-Aloe treated fibroblasts had the highest viability, with the matrices providing a substrate for good cell attachment and proliferation. On the other hand, OP-Gel-Curcumin and OP-Gel-Aloe Curcumin seemed to have induced apoptosis in NIH3T3 cells. In vivo wound healing analysis was carried out using an excisional splint wound model on C57BL/6J mice. OP-Gel-Aloe treated wounds exhibited very rapid healing with 80% of the wound healing in just 8 days. Furthermore, aloe vera exerted a strong anti-inflammatory effect and prominent scar prevention. Histological examination revealed that an ordered collagen formation and neovascularization could be observed along with migration of nuclei. Therefore, OP-Gel-Aloe biocomposite dressings are proposed as viable materials for effective wound management. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Research on curcumin: A meta-analysis of potentially malignant disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ara, Syeda Arshiya; Mudda, Jayashree A; Lingappa, Ashok; Rao, Purushottam

    2016-01-01

    Turmeric has been described in ayurveda, and is referred by different names in different cultures, the active principle called curcumin or diferuloylmethane, has been shown to exhibit numerous activities. Extensive research over the last half century has revealed several important functions of curcumin. It binds to a variety of proteins and inhibits the activity of various kinases. By modulating the activation of various transcription factors, curcumin regulates the expression of inflammatory enzymes, cytokines, adhesion molecules, and cell survival proteins. Various preclinical, clinical, and animal studies suggest that curcumin has potential as an antiproliferative, anti-invasive, and antiangiogenic, as a mediator of chemoresistance, chemopreventive, and as a therapeutic agent. Thus, curcumin a spice once relegated to the kitchen shelf has moved into the clinic and may prove to be "Curecumin." Methodology and Objectives: The focus of this publication is to provide research on curcumin with scientific publications on curcumin indexed in PubMed, Google J-Gate including systematic reviews, randomized controlled trials (RCT's), observational studies, or case series reports for various potentially malignant disorders (PMD's) with special attention to studies on oral submucous fibrosis. This research will be valuable in terms of identifying opportunities to provide recommendations for future research, in terms of the populations to research, the types of interventions needed, the types of outcomes to be measured, the study designs needed, to initiate a pathway for a low-cost research plan for future clinical trials in this field with an emphasis on conducting studies in regions of the world where PMD's are prevalent. There is a lacunae for scientific review of curcumin for PMDs specially on OSMF. Appropriate therapeutic interventions are needed for the initial, intermediate, and advanced stages of the disease. High-quality RCTs should be initiated.

  13. Production of Curcumin-Loaded Silk Fibroin Nanoparticles for Cancer Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coburn, Jeannine M.; Cenis, José L.; Víllora, Gloria; Kaplan, David L.

    2018-01-01

    Curcumin, extracted from the rhizome of Curcuma longa, has been widely used in medicine for centuries due to its anti-inflammatory, anti-cancer, anti-oxidant and anti-microbial effects. However, its bioavailability during treatments is poor because of its low solubility in water, slow dissolution rate and rapid intestinal metabolism. For these reasons, improving the therapeutic efficiency of curcumin using nanocarriers (e.g., biopolymer nanoparticles) has been a research focus, to foster delivery of the curcumin inside cells due to their small size and large surface area. Silk fibroin from the Bombyx mori silkworm is a biopolymer characterized by its biocompatibility, biodegradability, amphiphilic chemistry, and excellent mechanical properties in various material formats. These features make silk fibroin nanoparticles useful vehicles for delivering therapeutic drugs, such as curcumin. Curcumin-loaded silk fibroin nanoparticles were synthesized using two procedures (physical adsorption and coprecipitation) more scalable than methods previously described using ionic liquids. The results showed that nanoparticle formulations were 155 to 170 nm in diameter with a zeta potential of approximately −45 mV. The curcumin-loaded silk fibroin nanoparticles obtained by both processing methods were cytotoxic to carcinogenic cells, while not decreasing viability of healthy cells. In the case of tumor cells, curcumin-loaded silk fibroin nanoparticles presented higher efficacy in cytotoxicity against neuroblastoma cells than hepatocarcinoma cells. In conclusion, curcumin-loaded silk fibroin nanoparticles constitute a biodegradable and biocompatible delivery system with the potential to treat tumors by local, long-term sustained drug delivery. PMID:29495296

  14. Curcumin for the treatment of major depression: a randomised, double-blind, placebo controlled study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopresti, Adrian L; Maes, Michael; Maker, Garth L; Hood, Sean D; Drummond, Peter D

    2014-01-01

    Curcumin, the principal curcuminoid derived from the spice turmeric, influences several biological mechanisms associated with major depression, namely those associated with monoaminergic activity, immune-inflammatory and oxidative and nitrosative stress pathways, hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis activity and neuroprogression. We hypothesised that curcumin would be effective for the treatment of depressive symptoms in individuals with major depressive disorder. In a randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled study, 56 individuals with major depressive disorder were treated with curcumin (500 mg twice daily) or placebo for 8 weeks. The primary measure was the Inventory of Depressive Symptomatology self-rated version (IDS-SR30). Secondary outcomes included IDS-SR30 factor scores and the Spielberger State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI). From baseline to week 4, both curcumin and placebo were associated with improvements in IDS-SR30 total score and most secondary outcome measures. From weeks 4 to 8, curcumin was significantly more effective than placebo in improving several mood-related symptoms, demonstrated by a significant group x time interaction for IDS-SR30 total score (F1, 53=4.22, p=.045) and IDS-SR30 mood score (F1, 53=6.51, p=.014), and a non-significant trend for STAI trait score (F1, 48=2.86, p=.097). Greater efficacy from curcumin treatment was identified in a subgroup of individuals with atypical depression. Partial support is provided for the antidepressant effects of curcumin in people with major depressive disorder, evidenced by benefits occurring 4 to 8 weeks after treatment. Investigations with larger sample sizes, over extended treatment periods, and with varying curcumin dosages are required. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Curcumin derivative with the substitution at C-4 position, but not curcumin, is effective against amyloid pathology in APP/PS1 mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yanagisawa, Daijiro; Ibrahim, Nor Faeizah; Taguchi, Hiroyasu; Morikawa, Shigehiro; Hirao, Koichi; Shirai, Nobuaki; Sogabe, Takayuki; Tooyama, Ikuo

    2015-01-01

    Recent evidence supports the amyloid cascade hypothesis that a pathological change of amyloid β (Aβ) in the brain is an initiating event in Alzheimer's disease (AD). Accordingly, modulating the abnormal Aβ aggregation is considered a potential therapeutic target in AD. Curcumin, a low-molecular-weight polyphenol derived from the well-known curry spice turmeric, has shown favorable effects on preventing or treating AD pathology. The present study investigated the effects of curcumin and 2 novel curcumin derivatives, FMeC1 and FMeC2, on AD pathology in APPswe/PS1dE9 double transgenic mice. Mice fed a chow diet that contained FMeC1 for 6 months showed a reduction in insoluble Aβ deposits and glial cell activity together with reduced cognitive deficits, compared to animals receiving a control diet or with curcumin or FMeC2 in their diet. Both curcumin and FMeC1 modulated the formation of Aβ aggregates; however, only FMeC1 significantly attenuated the cell toxicity of Aβ. These results indicate that FMeC1 may have potential for preventing AD. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Tamoxifen and curcumin binding to serum albumin. Spectroscopic study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maciążek-Jurczyk, M.; Maliszewska, M.; Pożycka, J.; Równicka-Zubik, J.; Góra, A.; Sułkowska, A.

    2013-07-01

    Tamoxifen (TMX) is widely used for the breast cancer treatment and is known as chemopreventive agent. Curcumin (CUR) is natural phenolic compound with broad spectrum of biological activity e.g. anti-inflammatory, antimicrobial, antiviral, antifungal and chemopreventive. Combination of tamoxifen and curcumin could be more effective with lower toxicity than each agent alone in use for the treatment or chemoprevention of breast cancer. Binding of drugs to serum albumin is an important factor, which determines toxicity and therapeutic dosage of the drugs. When two drugs are administered together the competition between them for the binding site on albumin can result in a decrease in bound fraction and an increase in the concentration of free biologically active fraction of drug.

  17. Effects of different extracts of curcumin on TPC1 papillary thyroid cancer cell line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perna, Angelica; De Luca, Antonio; Adelfi, Laura; Pasquale, Tammaro; Varriale, Bruno; Esposito, Teresa

    2018-02-15

    The thyroid gland is one of the largest endocrine glands in the body. The vast majority of TCs (> 90%) originate from follicular cells and are defined as differentiated thyroid cancers (DTC) and the two histological subtypes are the papillary TC with its variants and the follicular TC. Curcumin possesses a wide variety of biological functions, and thanks to its properties, it has gained considerable attention due to its profound medicinal values (Prasad, Gupta, Tyagi, and Aggarwal, Biotechnol Adv 32:1053-1064, 2014). We have undertaken the present work in order to define the possible role of curcumin in modulating the genetic expression of cell markers and to understand the effectiveness of this nutraceutical in modulating the regression of cancer phenotype. As a template we used the TPC-1 cells treated with the different extracts of turmeric, and examined the levels of expression of different markers (proliferative, inflammatory, antioxidant, apoptotic). Treatment with the three different curcumin extracts displays anti-inflammatory, antioxidant properties and it is able to influence cell cycle with slightly different effects upon the extracts. Furthermore curcumin is able to influence cell metabolic activity vitality. In conclusion curcumin has the potential to be developed as a safe therapeutic but further studies are needed to verify its antitumor ability in vivo.

  18. Comparison of pharmaceutical nanoformulations for curcumin: enhancement of aqueous solubility and carrier retention

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Allijn, Iris Eva; Schiffelers, Raymond M.; Storm, Gerrit

    2016-01-01

    Curcumin, originally used in traditional medicine and as a spice, is one of the most studied and most popular natural products of the past decade. It has been described to be an effective anti-inflammatory and anti-cancer drug and protects against chronic diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis and

  19. Comparison of pharmaceutical nanoformulations for curcumin : Enhancement of aqueous solubility and carrier retention

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Allijn, Iris E.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/369493192; Schiffelers, Raymond M.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/212909509; Storm, G|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/073356328

    2016-01-01

    Curcumin, originally used in traditional medicine and as a spice, is one of the most studied and most popular natural products of the past decade. It has been described to be an effective anti-inflammatory and anti-cancer drug and protects against chronic diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis and

  20. N(6)-(2-Hydroxyethyl)adenosine in the Medicinal Mushroom Cordyceps cicadae Attenuates Lipopolysaccharide-Stimulated Pro-inflammatory Responses by Suppressing TLR4-Mediated NF-κB Signaling Pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Meng-Ying; Chen, Chin-Chu; Lee, Li-Ya; Lin, Ting-Wei; Kuo, Chia-Feng

    2015-10-23

    Natural products play an important role in promoting health with relation to the prevention of chronic inflammation. N(6)-(2-Hydroxyethyl)adenosine (HEA), a physiologically active compound in the medicinal mushroom Cordyceps cicadae, has been identified as a Ca(2+) antagonist and shown to control circulation and possess sedative activity in pharmacological tests. The fruiting body of C. cicadae has been widely applied in Chinese medicine. However, neither the anti-inflammatory activities of HEA nor the fruiting bodies of C. cicadae have been carefully examined. In this study, we first cultured the fruiting bodies of C. cicadae and then investigated the anti-inflammatory activities of water and methanol extracts of wild and artificially cultured C. cicadae fruiting bodies. Next, we determined the amount of three bioactive compounds, adenosine, cordycepin, and HEA, in the extracts and evaluated their synergistic anti-inflammatory effects. Moreover, the possible mechanism involved in anti-inflammatory action of HEA isolated from C. cicadae was investigated. The results indicate that cordycepin is more potent than adenosine and HEA in suppressing the lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated release of pro-inflammatory cytokines by RAW 264.7 macrophages; however, no synergistic effect was observed with these three compounds. HEA attenuated the LPS-induced pro-inflammatory responses by suppressing the toll-like receptor (TLR)4-mediated nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) signaling pathway. This result will support the use of HEA as an anti-inflammatory agent and C. cicadae fruiting bodies as an anti-inflammatory mushroom.

  1. Curcumin Protects against Atherosclerosis in Apolipoprotein E-Knockout Mice by Inhibiting Toll-like Receptor 4 Expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shanshan; Zou, Jun; Li, Peiyang; Zheng, Xiumei; Feng, Dan

    2018-01-17

    Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) has been reported to play a critical role in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis, the current study aimed to investigate whether curcumin suppresses atherosclerosis development in ApoE-knockout (ApoE -/- ) mice by inhibiting TLR4 expression. ApoE -/- mice were fed a high-fat diet supplemented with or without curcumin (0.1% w/w) for 16 weeks. Curcumin supplementation significantly reduced TLR4 expression and macrophage infiltration in atherosclerotic plaques. Curcumin also reduced aortic interleukin-1β (IL-1β), tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1) and intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) expression, nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) activity, and plasma IL-1β, TNF-α, soluble VCAM-1 and ICAM-1 levels. In addition, aortic sinus sections revealed that curcumin treatment reduced the extent of atherosclerotic lesions and inhibited atherosclerosis development. In vitro, curcumin inhibited NF-κB activation in macrophages and reduced TLR4 expression induced by lipopolysaccharide. Our results indicate that curcumin protects against atherosclerosis at least partially by inhibiting TLR4 expression and its related inflammatory reaction.

  2. Consumption of dairy yogurt with the polysaccharide rhamnogalacturonan from the peel of the Korean citrus hallabong enhances immune function and attenuates the inflammatory response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Mi-Hyang; Kim, Minjoo; Kim, Minkyung; Kwak, Jung Hyun; Chang, Dong Hoon; Yu, Won Kyu; Lee, Sang-Hyun; Lee, Jong Ho

    2016-06-15

    The aim of this study was to investigate the impact of consuming dairy yogurt supplemented with rhamnogalacturonan (RG), a polysaccharide from the peel of the Korean citrus hallabong, on natural killer (NK) cell activity and circulating cytokine levels. A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study was conducted on 120 nondiabetic and nonobese subjects. Over an eight-week period, the test group consumed one pack (150 mL) of dairy yogurt containing 50 mg of probiotics and 100 mg of hallabong peel polysaccharide (60% RG) each day, whereas the placebo group consumed the same product without the hallabong peel supplement. NK cell activity (%) was measured based on the ratios of the effector cells (E; peripheral blood mononuclear cells, PBMCs) from each participant relative to the target cells (T; K562 cells) at E : T ratios of 10 : 1, 5 : 1, 2.5 : 1, or 1.25 : 1. NK cell activities under all assay conditions and interleukin (IL)-12 and interferon (IFN)-γ levels were significantly increased in the test group at eight weeks compared to the baseline values, whereas the placebo group showed a significant increase only in NK cell activity at E : T = 1.25 : 1. The test group had significantly greater increases in the changes in serum NK cell activity at the E : T ratios of 10 : 1, 5 : 1, and 2.5 : 1 and in the increases in IL-12 and IFN-γ levels than were observed in the placebo group, after adjusting for baseline values. After eight weeks of treatment, significant reductions were found in IL-6 and IL-1β levels in both the placebo and test groups. The daily consumption of dairy yogurt supplemented with RG, a polysaccharide from the peel of the Korean citrus hallabong, enhanced NK cell function and attenuated pro-inflammatory cytokine levels (ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT02535663).

  3. Modulation of the Proteasome Pathway by Nano-Curcumin and Curcumin in Retinal Pigment Epithelial Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos de Carvalho, J Emanuel; Verwoert, Milan T; Vogels, Ilse M C; Schipper-Krom, Sabine; Van Noorden, Cornelis J F; Reits, Eric A; Klaassen, Ingeborg; Schlingemann, Reinier O

    2018-01-01

    Curcumin has multiple biological effects including the modulation of protein homeostasis by the ubiquitin-proteasome system. The purpose of this study was to assess the in vitro cytotoxic and oxidative effects of nano-curcumin and standard curcumin and characterize their effects on proteasome regulation in retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells. Viability, cell cycle progression, and reactive oxygen species (ROS) production were determined after treatment with nano-curcumin or curcumin. Subsequently, the effects of nano-curcumin and curcumin on proteasome activity and the gene and protein expression of proteasome subunits PA28α, α7, β5, and β5i were assessed. Nano-curcumin (5-100 μM) did not show significant cytotoxicity or anti-oxidative effects against H2O2-induced oxidative stress, whereas curcumin (≥10 μM) was cytotoxic and a potent inducer of ROS production. Both nano-curcumin and curcumin induced changes in proteasome-mediated proteolytic activity characterized by increased activity of the proteasome subunits β2 and β5i/β1 and reduced activity of β5/β1i. Likewise, nano-curcumin and curcumin affected mRNA and protein levels of household and immunoproteasome subunits. Nano-curcumin is less toxic to RPE cells and less prone to induce ROS production than curcumin. Both nano-curcumin and curcumin increase proteasome-mediated proteolytic activity. These results suggest that nano-curcumin may be regarded as a proteasome-modulating agent of limited cytotoxicity for RPE cells. The Author(s). Published by S. Karger AG, Basel.

  4. Curcumin affects cell survival and cell volume regulation in human renal and intestinal cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kössler, Sonja; Nofziger, Charity; Jakab, Martin; Dossena, Silvia; Paulmichl, Markus

    2012-01-01

    Curcumin (1,7-bis(4-hydroxy-3-methoxyphenyl)-1E,6E-heptadiene-3,5-dione or diferuloyl methane) is a polyphenol derived from the Curcuma longa plant, commonly known as turmeric. This substance has been used extensively in Ayurvedic medicine for centuries for its anti-oxidant, analgesic, anti-inflammatory and antiseptic activity. More recently curcumin has been found to possess anti-cancer properties linked to its pro-apoptotic and anti-proliferative actions. The underlying mechanisms of these diverse effects are complex, not fully elucidated and subject of intense scientific debate. Despite increasing evidence indicating that different cation channels can be a molecular target for curcumin, very little is known about the effect of curcumin on chloride channels. Since, (i) the molecular structure of curcumin indicates that the substance could potentially interact with chloride channels, (ii) chloride channels play a role during the apoptotic process and regulation of the cell volume, and (iii) apoptosis is a well known effect of curcumin, we set out to investigate whether or not curcumin could (i) exert a modulatory effect (direct or indirect) on the swelling activated chloride current ICl swell in a human cell system, therefore (ii) affect cell volume regulation and (iii) ultimately modulate cell survival. The ICl swell channels, which are essential for regulating the cell volume after swelling, are also known to be activated under isotonic conditions as an early event in the apoptotic process. Here we show that long-term exposure of a human kidney cell line to extracellular 0.1–10 μM curcumin modulates ICl swell in a dose-dependent manner (0.1 μM curcumin is ineffective, 0.5–5.0 μM curcumin increase, while 10 μM curcumin decrease the current), and short-term exposure to micromolar concentrations of curcumin does not affect ICl swell neither if applied from the extracellular nor from the intracellular side – therefore, a direct effect of curcumin on ICl

  5. Intravenous curcumin efficacy on healing and scar formation in rabbit ear wounds under nonischemic, ischemic, and ischemia-reperfusion conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Shengxian; Xie, Ping; Hong, Seok Jong; Galiano, Robert; Singer, Adam; Clark, Richard A F; Mustoe, Thomas A

    2014-01-01

    Curcumin, a spice found in turmeric, is widely used in alternative medicine for its purported anti-inflammatory and antioxidant activities. The goal of this study was to test the curcumin efficacy on rabbit ear wounds under nonischemic, ischemic, and ischemia-reperfusion conditions. Previously described models were utilized in 58 New Zealand White rabbits. Immediately before wounding, rabbits were given intravenous crude or pure curcumin (6 μg/kg, 30 μg/kg, or 60 μg/kg) dissolved in 1% ethanol. Specimens were collected at 7-8 days to evaluate the effects on wound healing and at 28 days to evaluate the effects on hypertrophic scarring. Student's t test was applied to screen difference between any treatment and control group, whereas analysis of variance was applied to further analyze for all treatment groups in aggregate in some specific experiments. Treatment with crude curcumin suggested accelerated wound healing that reached significance for reepithelialization in lower and medium doses and granulation tissue formation in lower dose. Purified curcumin became available and was used for all later experiments. Treatment with pure curcumin suggested accelerated wound healing that reached significance for reepithelialization in lower and medium doses and granulation tissue formation in lower dose. Treatment with pure curcumin significantly promoted nonischemic wound healing in a dose-response fashion compared with controls as judged by increased reepithelialization and granulation tissue formation. Improved wound healing was associated with significant decreases in pro-inflammatory cytokines interleukin (IL)-1 and IL-6 as well as the chemokine IL-8. Curcumin also significantly reduced hypertrophic scarring. The effects of curcumin were examined under conditions of impaired healing including ischemic and ischemia-reperfusion wound healing, and beneficial effects were also seen, although the dose response was less clear. Systemically administrated pure

  6. Curcumin Enhances the Anti-Trypanosoma cruzi Activity of Benznidazole-Based Chemotherapy in Acute Experimental Chagas Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novaes, Rômulo Dias; Sartini, Marcus Vinicius Pessoa; Rodrigues, João Paulo Ferreira; Gonçalves, Reggiani Vilela; Santos, Eliziária Cardoso; Souza, Raquel Lopes Martins; Caldas, Ivo Santana

    2016-06-01

    Although curcumin can increase the effectiveness of drugs against malaria, combination therapies using the molecule have never been investigated in Chagas disease (ChD). Therefore, we evaluated the efficacy of curcumin as a complementary strategy to benznidazole (Bz)-based chemotherapy in mice acutely infected with Trypanosoma cruzi Eighty-four 12-week-old Swiss mice were equally randomized into seven groups: uninfected (NI), T. cruzi infected and untreated (INF), infected and treated with 100 mg/kg of body weight Bz (B100), 50 mg/kg Bz (B50), 100 mg/kg curcumin (C100), 100 mg/kg Bz plus 100 mg/kg curcumin (B100 plus C100), and 50 mg/kg Bz plus 100 mg/kg curcumin (B50 plus C100). After microscopic identification of blood trypomastigotes (4 days after inoculation), both drugs were administered by gavage once a day for 20 days. Curcumin showed limited antiparasitic, anti-inflammatory, and antioxidant effects when administered alone. When curcumin and Bz were combined, there was a drastic reduction in parasitemia, parasite load, mortality, anti-T. cruzi IgG reactivity, circulating levels of cytokines (gamma interferon [IFN-γ], interleukin 4 [IL-4], and MIP1-α), myocardial inflammation, and morphological and oxidative cardiac injury; these results exceeded the isolated effects of Bz. The combination of Bz and curcumin was also effective at mitigating liver toxicity triggered by Bz, increasing the parasitological cure rate, and preventing infection recrudescence in noncured animals, even when the animals were treated with 50% of the recommended therapeutic dose of Bz. By limiting the toxic effects of Bz and enhancing its antiparasitic efficiency, the combination of the drug with curcumin may be a relevant therapeutic strategy that is possibly better tolerated in ChD treatment than Bz-based monotherapy. Copyright © 2016, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  7. [Study on stability of curcumine, demethoxycurcumin and bisdemethoxycurcumin].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Gang; Cui, Jing-jing; Bi, Rui; Zhao, Lin-lin; Zhang, Wei-guo

    2008-11-01

    To investigate the stability of curcumin, demethoxycurcumin and bisdemethoxycurcumin in different buffer solution. To determine concentration of curcumin by HPLC when added curcumin, demethoxycurcumin and bisdemethoxycurcumin into the buffer solution the equation of degradation was established. The sequence of stability are bisdemethoxycurcumin > or = demethoxycurcumin > or =curcumin at the same condition. The demethoxycurcumin can stabilize curcumin more strong than the others. The demethoxycurcumin is a nature stabilizing agent for curcumin.

  8. Mechanism of antiinflammatory actions of curcumine and boswellic acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ammon, H P; Safayhi, H; Mack, T; Sabieraj, J

    1993-03-01

    Curcumine from Curcuma longa and the gum resin of Boswellia serrata, which were demonstrated to act as anti-inflammatories in in vivo animal models, were studied in a set of in vitro experiments in order to elucidate the mechanism of their beneficial effects. Curcumine inhibited the 5-lipoxygenase activity in rat peritoneal neutrophils as well as the 12-lipoxygenase and the cyclooxygenase activities in human platelets. In a cell free peroxidation system curcumine exerted strong antioxidative activity. Thus, its effects on the dioxygenases are probably due to its reducing capacity. Boswellic acids were isolated from the gum resin of Boswellia serrata and identified as the active principles. Boswellic acids inhibited the leukotriene synthesis via 5-lipoxygenase, but did not affect the 12-lipoxygenase and the cyclooxygenase activities. Additionally, boswellic acids did not impair the peroxidation of arachidonic acid by iron and ascorbate. The data suggest that boswellic acids are specific, non-redox inhibitors of leukotriene synthesis either interacting directly with 5-lipoxygenase or blocking its translocation.

  9. Inhibition of Enveloped Viruses Infectivity by Curcumin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Hsiao-Wei; Ou, Jun-Lin; Chiou, Shyan-Song; Chen, Jo-Mei; Wong, Min-Liang; Hsu, Wei-Li

    2013-01-01

    Curcumin, a natural compound and ingredient in curry, has antiinflammatory, antioxidant, and anticarcinogenic properties. Previously, we reported that curcumin abrogated influenza virus infectivity by inhibiting hemagglutination (HA) activity. This study demonstrates a novel mechanism by which curcumin inhibits the infectivity of enveloped viruses. In all analyzed enveloped viruses, including the influenza virus, curcumin inhibited plaque formation. In contrast, the nonenveloped enterovirus 71 remained unaffected by curcumin treatment. We evaluated the effects of curcumin on the membrane structure using fluorescent dye (sulforhodamine B; SRB)-containing liposomes that mimic the viral envelope. Curcumin treatment induced the leakage of SRB from these liposomes and the addition of the influenza virus reduced the leakage, indicating that curcumin disrupts the integrity of the membranes of viral envelopes and of liposomes. When testing liposomes of various diameters, we detected higher levels of SRB leakage from the smaller-sized liposomes than from the larger liposomes. Interestingly, the curcumin concentration required to reduce plaque formation was lower for the influenza virus (approximately 100 nm in diameter) than for the pseudorabies virus (approximately 180 nm) and the vaccinia virus (roughly 335 × 200 × 200 nm). These data provide insights on the molecular antiviral mechanisms of curcumin and its potential use as an antiviral agent for enveloped viruses. PMID:23658730

  10. Inhibition of enveloped viruses infectivity by curcumin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tzu-Yen Chen

    Full Text Available Curcumin, a natural compound and ingredient in curry, has antiinflammatory, antioxidant, and anticarcinogenic properties. Previously, we reported that curcumin abrogated influenza virus infectivity by inhibiting hemagglutination (HA activity. This study demonstrates a novel mechanism by which curcumin inhibits the infectivity of enveloped viruses. In all analyzed enveloped viruses, including the influenza virus, curcumin inhibited plaque formation. In contrast, the nonenveloped enterovirus 71 remained unaffected by curcumin treatment. We evaluated the effects of curcumin on the membrane structure using fluorescent dye (sulforhodamine B; SRB-containing liposomes that mimic the viral envelope. Curcumin treatment induced the leakage of SRB from these liposomes and the addition of the influenza virus reduced the leakage, indicating that curcumin disrupts the integrity of the membranes of viral envelopes and of liposomes. When testing liposomes of various diameters, we detected higher levels of SRB leakage from the smaller-sized liposomes than from the larger liposomes. Interestingly, the curcumin concentration required to reduce plaque formation was lower for the influenza virus (approximately 100 nm in diameter than for the pseudorabies virus (approximately 180 nm and the vaccinia virus (roughly 335 × 200 × 200 nm. These data provide insights on the molecular antiviral mechanisms of curcumin and its potential use as an antiviral agent for enveloped viruses.

  11. Extraction of curcumin from Curcuma longa L. using ultrasound assisted supercritical carbon dioxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimthet, Chhouk; Wahyudiono, Kanda, Hideki; Goto, Motonobu

    2017-05-01

    Curcumin is one of phenolic compounds, which has been recently shown to have useful pharmacological properties such as anti-inflammatory, anti-bacterial, anti-carcinogenic, antifungal, and antimicrobial activities. The objective of this research is to extract the curcumin from Curcuma longa L. using ultrasound assisted supercritical carbon dioxide extraction (USC-CO2). The extraction was performed at 50°C, 25 MPa, CO2 flow rate of 3 mL/min with 10% cosolvent. The result of extraction, thermogravimetry (TG), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and scanning electron microscope (SEM) showed that ultrasound power could disrupt cell wall and release the target compounds from Curcuma longa L. USC-CO2 could provide higher curcumin content in the extracts and faster extraction compared to SC-CO2 extraction without ultrasound.

  12. Curcumin, a component of golden spice: from bedside to bench and back.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasad, Sahdeo; Gupta, Subash C; Tyagi, Amit K; Aggarwal, Bharat B

    2014-11-01

    Although the history of the golden spice turmeric (Curcuma longa) goes back thousands of years, it is only within the past century that we learned about the chemistry of its active component, curcumin. More than 6000 articles published within the past two decades have discussed the molecular basis for the antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, antibacterial, antiviral, antifungal, and anticancer activities assigned to this nutraceutical. Over sixty five clinical trials conducted on this molecules, have shed light on the role of curcumin in various chronic conditions, including autoimmune, cardiovascular, neurological, and psychological diseases, as well as diabetes and cancer. The current review provides an overview of the history, chemistry, analogs, and mechanism of action of curcumin. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  13. Polymeric nanoparticle-encapsulated curcumin ("nanocurcumin": a novel strategy for human cancer therapy

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    Maitra Amarnath

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Curcumin, a yellow polyphenol extracted from the rhizome of turmeric (Curcuma longa, has potent anti-cancer properties as demonstrated in a plethora of human cancer cell line and animal carcinogenesis models. Nevertheless, widespread clinical application of this relatively efficacious agent in cancer and other diseases has been limited due to poor aqueous solubility, and consequently, minimal systemic bioavailability. Nanoparticle-based drug delivery approaches have the potential for rendering hydrophobic agents like curcumin dispersible in aqueous media, thus circumventing the pitfalls of poor solubility. Results We have synthesized polymeric nanoparticle encapsulated formulation of curcumin – nanocurcumin – utilizing the micellar aggregates of cross-linked and random copolymers of N-isopropylacrylamide (NIPAAM, with N-vinyl-2-pyrrolidone (VP and poly(ethyleneglycolmonoacrylate (PEG-A. Physico-chemical characterization of the polymeric nanoparticles by dynamic laser light scattering and transmission electron microscopy confirms a narrow size distribution in the 50 nm range. Nanocurcumin, unlike free curcumin, is readily dispersed in aqueous media. Nanocurcumin demonstrates comparable in vitro therapeutic efficacy to free curcumin against a panel of human pancreatic cancer cell lines, as assessed by cell viability and clonogenicity assays in soft agar. Further, nanocurcumin's mechanisms of action on pancreatic cancer cells mirror that of free curcumin, including induction of cellular apoptosis, blockade of nuclear factor kappa B (NFκB activation, and downregulation of steady state levels of multiple pro-inflammatory cytokines (IL-6, IL-8, and TNFα. Conclusion Nanocurcumin provides an opportunity to expand the clinical repertoire of this efficacious agent by enabling ready aqueous dispersion. Future studies utilizing nanocurcumin are warranted in pre-clinical in vivo models of cancer and other diseases that might benefit

  14. Attenuation of inflammatory response by a novel chalcone protects kidney and heart from hyperglycemia-induced injuries in type 1 diabetic mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fang, Qilu; Wang, Jingying; Wang, Lintao; Zhang, Yali; Yin, Haimin; Li, Yunzhou; Tong, Chao; Liang, Guang; Zheng, Chao

    2015-01-01

    High glucose-induced inflammatory response in diabetic complications plays an important role in disease occurrence and development. With inflammatory cytokines and signaling pathways as important mediators, targeting inflammation may be a new avenue for treating diabetic complications. Chalcones are a class of natural products with various pharmacological activities. Previously, we identified L2H17 as a chalcone with good anti-inflammatory activity, inhibiting LPS-induced inflammatory response in macrophages. In this study, we examined L2H17's effect on hyperglycemia-induced inflammation both in mouse peritoneal macrophages and a streptozotocin-induced T1D mouse model. Our results indicate that L2H17 exhibits a strong inhibitory effect on the expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines, cell adhesion molecules, chemokines and macrophage adhesion via modulation of the MAPK/NF-κB pathway. Furthermore, in vivo oral administration of L2H17 resulted in a significant decrease in the expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines and cell adhesion molecules, contributing to a reduction of key markers for renal and cardiac dysfunction and improvements in fibrosis and pathological changes in both renal and cardiac tissues of diabetic mice. These findings provide the evidence supporting targeting MAPK/NF-κB pathway may be effective therapeutic strategy for diabetic complications, and suggest that L2H17 may be a promising anti-inflammatory agent with potential as a therapeutic agent in the treatment of renal and cardiac diabetic complications. - Highlights: • Chalcones are a class of natural products with various pharmacological activities. • We identified L2H17 a chalcone with good anti-inflammatory activity. • L2H17 improved histological abnormalities both in diabetic heart and kidney. • L2H17 reduced inflammatory responses in HG-stimulated mouse peritoneal macrophages. • MAPKs/NF-κB pathway may be a promising therapeutic target for diabetic complications.

  15. Chemopreventive properties of curcumin analogues ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Chemopreventive properties of curcumin analogues, hexagamavunone-0 and gamavutone-0, in rat colorectal cancer model. ... Histopathological analysis was performed using H & E staining and immunohistochemistry with antibodies against adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) and cyclooxygenase 2 (COX-2). Results: All ...

  16. Synthesis, Characterization and In Vitro Anticancer Activity of C-5 Curcumin Analogues with Potential to Inhibit TNF-α-Induced NF-κB Activation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amit Anthwal

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In a search of new compounds active against cancer, synthesis of a series of C-5 curcumin analogues was carried out. The new compounds demonstrated good cytotoxicity against chronic myeloid leukemia (KBM5 and colon cancer (HCT116 cell lines. Further, these compounds were found to have better potential to inhibit TNF-α-induced NF-κB activation in comparison to curcumin, which show their potential to act as anti-inflammatory agents. Some compounds were found to show higher cytotoxicity against cancer cell lines in comparison to curcumin used as standard.

  17. Nanoparticle-Encapsulated Curcumin Inhibits Diabetic Neuropathic Pain Involving the P2Y12 Receptor in the Dorsal Root Ganglia

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    Tianyu Jia

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Diabetic peripheral neuropathy results in diabetic neuropathic pain (DNP. Satellite glial cells (SGCs enwrap the neuronal soma in the dorsal root ganglia (DRG. The purinergic 2 (P2 Y12 receptor is expressed on SGCs in the DRG. SGC activation plays an important role in the pathogenesis of DNP. Curcumin has anti-inflammatory and antioxidant properties. Because curcumin has poor metabolic stability in vivo and low bioavailability, nanoparticle-encapsulated curcumin was used to improve its targeting and bioavailability. In the present study, our aim was to investigate the effects of nanoparticle-encapsulated curcumin on DNP mediated by the P2Y12 receptor on SGCs in the rat DRG. Diabetic peripheral neuropathy increased the expression levels of the P2Y12 receptor on SGCs in the DRG and enhanced mechanical and thermal hyperalgesia in rats with diabetes mellitus (DM. Up-regulation of the P2Y12 receptor in SGCs in the DRG increased the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines. Up-regulation of interleukin-1β (IL-1β and connexin43 (Cx43 resulted in mechanical and thermal hyperalgesia in rats with DM. The nanoparticle-encapsulated curcumin decreased up-regulated IL-1β and Cx43 expression and reduced levels of phosphorylated-Akt (p-Akt in the DRG of rats with DM. The up-regulation of P2Y12 on SGCs and the up-regulation of the IL-1β and Cx43 in the DRG indicated the activation of SGCs in the DRG. The nano-curcumin treatment inhibited the activation of SGCs accompanied by its anti-inflammatory effect to decrease the up-regulated CGRP expression in the DRG neurons. Therefore, the nanoparticle-encapsulated curcumin treatment decreased the up-regulation of the P2Y12 receptor on SGCs in the DRG and decreased mechanical and thermal hyperalgesia in rats with DM.

  18. Redox modulation of curcumin stability: Redox active antioxidants increase chemical stability of curcumin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nimiya, Yoshiki; Wang, Weicang; Du, Zheyuan; Sukamtoh, Elvira; Zhu, Julia; Decker, Eric; Zhang, Guodong

    2016-03-01

    Substantial studies have shown that curcumin, a dietary compound from turmeric, has beneficial effects on many diseases. However, curcumin rapidly degrades at physiological pH, making it difficult to interpret whether the observed actions of curcumin are from curcumin itself or its degradation products. Therefore, it is important to better understand the mechanisms involved in curcumin degradation and the roles of degradation in its biological actions. Here, we show that a series of redox active antioxidants with diverse chemical structures, including gallic acid, ascorbate (vitamin C), tert-butylhydroquinone (TBHQ), caffeic acid, rosmarinic acid, and Trolox (a water-soluble analog of vitamin E), dramatically increased curcumin stability in phosphate buffer at physiological pH. When treated in basal cell culture medium in MC38 colon cancer cells, curcumin rapidly degraded with a half-life of several minutes and showed a weak antiproliferative effect; co-addition of antioxidants enhanced stability and antiproliferative effect of curcumin. Finally, co-administration of antioxidant significantly increased plasma level of curcumin in animal models. Together, these studies strongly suggest that a redox-dependent mechanism plays a critical role in mediating curcumin degradation. In addition, curcumin itself, instead of its degradation products, is largely responsible for the observed biological actions of curcumin. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  19. Modulation of the Proteasome Pathway by Nano-Curcumin and Curcumin in Retinal Pigment Epithelial Cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ramos de Carvalho, J. Emanuel; Verwoert, Milan T.; Vogels, Ilse M. C.; Schipper-Krom, Sabine; van Noorden, Cornelis J. F.; Reits, Eric A.; Klaassen, Ingeborg; Schlingemann, Reinier O.

    2018-01-01

    Curcumin has multiple biological effects including the modulation of protein homeostasis by the ubiquitin-proteasome system. The purpose of this study was to assess the in vitro cytotoxic and oxidative effects of nano-curcumin and standard curcumin and characterize their effects on proteasome

  20. Comparison of remicade to curcumin for the treatment of Crohn's disease: A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Allaire; Hossain, Ivy; VanderMolen, Julia; Nicol, Kara

    2017-08-01

    The aim of this study was to review the literature to assess if there is evidence to support the use of Curcumin as a safe complementary therapy in treating Crohn's Disease (CD) in conjunction with Remicade. Systematic searches were performed by three researchers using electronic databases (ProQuest Medical Library, CINAHL Complete, and PUBMED) to locate and identify articles to meet a predetermined set of inclusion criteria. Specifically full text, peer-reviewed articles published after 2007 were included if they studied human participants 18 years or older. Tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-a) and Interleukin-1 (IL-1) levels increase in CD patients. Remicade reduces TNF-a in adults with CD. The issues are eventual loss of response (LOR) once IL-1 increases, and severe risks such as malignancy. CD patients using Curcumin saw a 55 point mean reduction in the Crohn's Disease Activity Index, reducing IL-1 and Crp. Plus it reduced TNF-a and PPMTase which improved colorectal cancer outcomes. LOR of Remicade occurs when IL-1 increases, and it can cause malignancy. Research shows Curcumin reduces IL-1 and improves cancer outcomes. Future research, using both Remicade and Curcumin, would have to be done, but preliminary data would suggest using both would reduce LOR. Curcumin, even by itself, was found to be a cheap and safe way to reduce CD symptoms and inflammatory markers. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Curcumin, an active component of turmeric (Curcuma longa), and its effects on health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kocaadam, Betül; Şanlier, Nevin

    2017-09-02

    Turmeric (Curcuma longa) is a type of herb belonging to ginger family, which is widely grown in southern and south western tropical Asia region. Turmeric, which has an importance place in the cuisines of Iran, Malesia, India, China, Polynesia, and Thailand, is often used as spice and has an effect on the nature, color, and taste of foods. Turmeric is also known to have been used for centuries in India and China for the medical treatments of illnesses such as dermatologic diseases, infection, stress, and depression. Turmeric's effects on health are generally centered upon an orange-yellow colored, lipophilic polyphenol substance called "curcumin," which is acquired from the rhizomes of the herb. Curcumin is known recently to have antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, anticancer effects and, thanks to these effects, to have an important role in prevention and treatment of various illnesses ranging notably from cancer to autoimmune, neurological, cardiovascular diseases, and diabetic. Furthermore, it is aimed to increase the biological activity and physiological effects of the curcumin on the body by synthesizing curcumin analogues. This article reviews the history, chemical and physical features, analogues, metabolites, mechanisms of its physiological activities, and effects on health of curcumin.

  2. Efficacy of biodegradable curcumin nanoparticles in delaying cataract in diabetic rat model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charitra N Grama

    Full Text Available Curcumin, the active principle present in the yellow spice turmeric, has been shown to exhibit various pharmacological actions such as antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, antimicrobial, and anti-carcinogenic activities. Previously we have reported that dietary curcumin delays diabetes-induced cataract in rats. However, low peroral bioavailability is a major limiting factor for the success of clinical utilization of curcumin. In this study, we have administered curcumin encapsulated nanoparticles in streptozotocin (STZ induced diabetic cataract model. Oral administration of 2 mg/day nanocurcumin was significantly more effective than curcumin in delaying diabetic cataracts in rats. The significant delay in progression of diabetic cataract by nanocurcumin is attributed to its ability to intervene the biochemical pathways of disease progression such as protein insolubilization, polyol pathway, protein glycation, crystallin distribution and oxidative stress. The enhanced performance of nanocurcumin can be attributed probably to its improved oral bioavailability. Together, the results of the present study demonstrate the potential of nanocurcumin in managing diabetic cataract.

  3. Recent Advances of Curcumin in the Prevention and Treatment of Renal Fibrosis

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    Xuejiao Sun

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Curcumin, a polyphenol derived from the turmeric, has received attention as a potential treatment for renal fibrosis primarily because it is a relatively safe and inexpensive compound that contributes to kidney health. Here, we review the literatures on the applications of curcumin in resolving renal fibrosis in animal models and summarize the mechanisms of curcumin and its analogs (C66 and (1E,4E-1,5-bis(2-bromophenyl penta-1,4-dien-3-one(B06 in preventing inflammatory molecules release and reducing the deposition of extracellular matrix at the priming and activation stage of renal fibrosis in animal models by consulting PubMed and Cnki databases over the past 15 years. Curcumin exerts antifibrotic effect through reducing inflammation related factors (MCP-1, NF-κB, TNF-α, IL-1β, COX-2, and cav-1 and inducing the expression of anti-inflammation factors (HO-1, M6PRBP1, and NEDD4 as well as targeting TGF-β/Smads, MAPK/ERK, and PPAR-γ pathways in animal models. As a food derived compound, curcumin is becoming a promising drug candidate for improving renal health.

  4. Neuroinflammation in Alzheimer's disease: different molecular targets and potential therapeutic agents including curcumin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ray, Balmiki; Lahiri, Debomoy K

    2009-08-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a neurodegenerative disorder of the elderly. Deposition of amyloid beta plaque and associated neuroinflammation are the major hallmarks of AD. Whereas reactive oxygen species (ROS) and activated microglial cells contribute to neuronal loss, nuclear factor kappaB and apolipoprotein E participate in inflammatory process of AD. Current FDA approved drugs provide only symptomatic relief in AD. For broad spectrum of activity, some natural products are also being tested. Turmeric is used as an anti-inflammatory medicine in various regions of Asia. Curcumin, which is a yellow colored polyphenol compound present in turmeric, showed anti-inflammatory properties. Herein, we discuss the neurobiological and neuroinflammatory pathways of AD, evaluate different molecular targets and potential therapeutic agents, including curcumin, for the treatment of AD.

  5. The Essential Medicinal Chemistry of Curcumin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Kathryn M; Dahlin, Jayme L; Bisson, Jonathan; Graham, James; Pauli, Guido F; Walters, Michael A

    2017-03-09

    Curcumin is a constituent (up to ∼5%) of the traditional medicine known as turmeric. Interest in the therapeutic use of turmeric and the relative ease of isolation of curcuminoids has led to their extensive investigation. Curcumin has recently been classified as both a PAINS (pan-assay interference compounds) and an IMPS (invalid metabolic panaceas) candidate. The likely false activity of curcumin in vitro and in vivo has resulted in >120 clinical trials of curcuminoids against several diseases. No double-blinded, placebo controlled clinical trial of curcumin has been successful. This manuscript reviews the essential medicinal chemistry of curcumin and provides evidence that curcumin is an unstable, reactive, nonbioavailable compound and, therefore, a highly improbable lead. On the basis of this in-depth evaluation, potential new directions for research on curcuminoids are discussed.

  6. Silence of long noncoding RNA PANDAR switches low-dose curcumin-induced senescence to apoptosis in colorectal cancer cells

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    Chen T

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Tao Chen,1,* Peng Yang,1,* Hui Wang,1 Zhen-Yu He2 1Department of General Surgery, The Second Clinical Medical College of Nanjing Medical University, 2Department of General Surgery, The Second Affiliated Hospital of Nanjing Medical University, Nanjing, Jiangsu, People’s Republic of China *These authors contributed equally to this work Abstract: Long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs are emerging as having multiple roles in cancer progression. However, roles of lncRNAs in chemotherapy for colorectal cancer (CRC remain unclear. This study investigated the biological functions of lncRNA PANDAR in CRC cells treated with curcumin chemotherapy. Herein, we identified that PANDAR expression was not notably differential in CRC tissues compared with the corresponding normal tissues. Consistently, in vitro experiments revealed that knockdown of PANDAR could not change the proliferation, apoptosis, or senescence of CRC cells. Further analyses showed that low-dose curcumin could induce senescence in CRC cells without affecting cell apoptosis. Moreover, expression of PANDAR was increased in curcumin-treated CRC cells. Furthermore, silencing PANDAR in curcumin-treated cells increased apoptosis and greatly attenuated senescence possibly by stimulating the expression of PUMA. Together, these findings indicate that knockdown of lncRNA PANDAR switches curcumin-induced senescence to apoptosis, which may be potentially valuable in CRC therapy. Keywords: colorectal cancer, long noncoding RNA, PANDAR, curcumin, chemotherapy

  7. Curcuma Contra Cancer? Curcumin and Hodgkin's Lymphoma

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    Stefanie Kewitz

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Curcumin, a phytochemical isolated from curcuma plants which are used as coloring ingredient for the preparation of curry powder, has several activities which suggest that it might be an interesting drug for the treatment or prevention of cancer. Curcumin targets different pathways which are involved in the malignant phenotype of tumor cells, including the nuclear factor kappa B (NFKB pathway. This pathway is deregulated in multiple tumor entities, including Hodgkin's lymphoma (HL. Indeed, curcumin can inhibit growth of HL cell lines and increases the sensitivity of these cells for cisplatin. In this review we summarize curcumin activities with special focus on possible activities against HL cells.

  8. Cinnamon extract attenuates TNF-alpha-induced intestinal lipoprotein ApoB48 overproduction by regulating inflammatory, insulin, and lipoprotein pathways in enterocytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    We evaluated whether a water extract of cinnamon (CE = Cinnulin PF®) attenuates the dyslipidemia induced by TNF-alpha in Triton WR-1339-treated hamsters, and whether CE inhibited the over-secretion of apoB48-induced by TNF-alpha in enterocytes in a 35S-labelling study. In vivo, oral treatment with C...

  9. Curcumin protects dopaminergic neurons against inflammation-mediated damage and improves motor dysfunction induced by single intranigral lipopolysaccharide injection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Neha; Sharma, Sheetal; Nehru, Bimla

    2017-06-01

    Various studies have indicated a lower incidence and prevalence of neurological conditions in people consuming curcumin. The ability of curcumin to target multiple cascades, simultaneously, could be held responsible for its neuroprotective effects. The present study was designed to investigate the potential of curcumin in minimizing microglia-mediated damage in lipopolysaccharide (LPS) induced model of PD. Altered microglial functions and increased inflammatory profile of the CNS have severe behavioral consequences. In the current investigation, a single injection of LPS (5 ug/5 µl PBS) was injected into the substantia nigra (SN) of rats, and curcumin [40 mg/kg b.wt (i.p.)] was administered daily for a period of 21 days. LPS triggered an inflammatory response characterized by glial activation [Iba-1 and glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP)] and pro-inflammatory cytokine production (TNF-α and IL-1β) leading to extensive dopaminergic loss and behavioral abnormality in rats. The behavioral observations, biochemical markers, quantification of dopamine and its metabolites (DOPAC and HVA) using HPLC followed by IHC of tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) were evaluated after 21 days of LPS injection. Curcumin supplementation prevented dopaminergic degeneration in LPS-treated animals by normalizing the altered levels of biomarkers. Also, a significant improvement in TH levels as well as behavioral parameters (actophotometer, rotarod, beam walking and grid walking tests) were seen in LPS injected rats. Curcumin shielded the dopaminergic neurons against LPS-induced inflammatory response, which was associated with suppression of glial activation (microglia and astrocytes) and transcription factor NF-κB as depicted from RT-PCR and EMSA assay. Curcumin also suppressed microglial NADPH oxidase activation as observed from NADPH oxidase activity. The results suggested that one of the important mechanisms by which curcumin mediates its protective effects in the LPS-induced PD

  10. Parenteral MCT/ω-3 Polyunsaturated Fatty Acid-Enriched Intravenous Fat Emulsion Is Associated With Cytokine and Fatty Acid Profiles Consistent With Attenuated Inflammatory Response in Preterm Neonates: A Randomized, Double-Blind Clinical Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skouroliakou, Maria; Konstantinou, Dimitris; Agakidis, Charalampos; Kaliora, Andriana; Kalogeropoulos, Nick; Massara, Paraskevi; Antoniadi, Marina; Panagiotakos, Demosthenes; Karagiozoglou-Lampoudi, Thomais

    2016-04-01

    Soybean oil-based intravenous fat emulsion (IVFE) administered to preterm neonates can induce oxidative stress and inflammatory response, which are associated with severe complications of prematurity. This study aimed to test the hypothesis that administration of medium-chain triglyceride (MCT)/ω-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA)-enriched IVFE in preterm neonates is associated with a cytokine and fatty acid (FA) profile consistent with attenuated inflammatory response. In a double-blind randomized study, 60 preterm neonates (gestational age 26-32 weeks) were randomized to receive either MCT/ω-3 PUFA-enriched IVFE (intervention group) or soybean oil-based IVFE (control group). Serum biochemistry, tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, interleukin (IL)-6, IL-8, α-tocopherol, and FAs were assessed at baseline, on day of life 15, and day of life 30 or at the end of intervention. All cytokine levels changed significantly across the 3 time points, whereas the type of IVFE had a significant effect on final IL-6 and IL-8 levels, which were lower in the intervention group. The difference in final IL-6 and IL-8 levels remained significant after controlling for bronchopulmonary dysplasia and/or infection. α-Tocopherol and FA values changed significantly over time. MCT/ω-3 PUFA-enriched IVFE administration was associated with significantly higher α-tocopherol, eicosapentaenoic acid, docosahexaenoic acid, and ω-3 PUFAs and lower linolenic acid, total PUFA, and ω-6/ω-3 PUFA values compared with soybean oil-based IVFE. Both IVFEs were well tolerated. Compared with the soybean oil-based IVFE, the MCT/ω-3 PUFA-enriched IVFE is associated with a more favorable cytokine and FA profile consistent with attenuated inflammatory response in preterm neonates. © 2015 American Society for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition.

  11. Curcumin labels amyloid pathology in vivo, disrupts existing plaques, and partially restores distorted neurites in an Alzheimer mouse model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Alloza, M; Borrelli, L A; Rozkalne, A; Hyman, B T; Bacskai, B J

    2007-08-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is characterized by senile plaques and neurodegeneration although the neurotoxic mechanisms have not been completely elucidated. It is clear that both oxidative stress and inflammation play an important role in the illness. The compound curcumin, with a broad spectrum of anti-oxidant, anti-inflammatory, and anti-fibrilogenic activities may represent a promising approach for preventing or treating AD. Curcumin is a small fluorescent compound that binds to amyloid deposits. In the present work we used in vivo multiphoton microscopy (MPM) to demonstrate that curcumin crosses the blood-brain barrier and labels senile plaques and cerebrovascular amyloid angiopathy (CAA) in APPswe/PS1dE9 mice. Moreover, systemic treatment of mice with curcumin for 7 days clears and reduces existing plaques, as monitored with longitudinal imaging, suggesting a potent disaggregation effect. Curcumin also led to a limited, but significant reversal of structural changes in dystrophic dendrites, including abnormal curvature and dystrophy size. Together, these data suggest that curcumin reverses existing amyloid pathology and associated neurotoxicity in a mouse model of AD. This approach could lead to more effective clinical therapies for the prevention of oxidative stress, inflammation and neurotoxicity associated with AD.

  12. Activation of muscarinic M-1 cholinoceptors by curcumin to increase glucose uptake into skeletal muscle isolated from Wistar rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Tse-Chou; Lin, Chian-Shiung; Hsu, Chih-Chieh; Chen, Li-Jen; Cheng, Kai-Chun; Cheng, Juei-Tang

    2009-11-20

    Curcumin, an active principle contained in rhizome of Curcuma longa, has been mentioned to show merit for diabetes through its anti-oxidative and anti-inflammatory properties. In the present study, we found that curcumin caused a concentration-dependent increase of glucose uptake into skeletal muscle isolated from Wistar rats. This action was inhibited by pirenzepine at concentration enough to block muscarinic M-1 cholinoceptor (M(1)-mAChR). In radioligand binding assay, the binding of [(3)H]-pirenzepine was also displaced by curcumin in a concentration-dependent manner. In the presence of inhibitors for PLC-PI3K pathway, either U73122 (phospholipase C inhibitor) or LY294002 (phosphoinositide 3-kinase inhibitor), curcumin-stimulated glucose uptake into skeletal muscle was markedly reduced. In Western blotting analysis, the membrane protein level of glucose transporter 4 (GLUT4) increased by curcumin was also reversed by blockade of M(1)-mAChR or PLC-PI3K pathway in a same manner. In conclusion, the obtained results suggest that curcumin can activate M(1)-mAChR at concentrations lower than to scavenge free radicals for increase of glucose uptake into skeletal muscle through PLC-PI3-kinase pathway.

  13. Oral administration of curcumin and salsalate attenuates high fat diet-induced up-regulation of pro-inflammatory colonic cytokines via suppression of Akt/NFkappaB in azoxymethane-treated mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Background: Obesity, a robust risk factor for colorectal cancer (CRC), is known to elevate the concentrations of proinflammatory cytokines in the murine colon. Also, signaling through the Akt pathway, which is known to be activated by proinflammatory cytokines, is thought to play a role in colorecta...

  14. 5-aminoimidazole-4-carboxamide-1-beta-4-ribofuranoside (AICAR attenuates the expression of LPS- and Aβ peptide-induced inflammatory mediators in astroglia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giri Shailendra

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Alzheimer's disease (AD pathology shows characteristic 'plaques' rich in amyloid beta (Aβ peptide deposits. Inflammatory process-related proteins such as pro-inflammatory cytokines have been detected in AD brain suggesting that an inflammatory immune reaction also plays a role in the pathogenesis of AD. Glial cells in culture respond to LPS and Aβ stimuli by upregulating the expression of cytokines TNF-α, IL-1β, and IL-6, and also the expression of proinflammatory genes iNOS and COX-2. We have earlier reported that LPS/Aβ stimulation-induced ceramide and ROS generation leads to iNOS expression and nitric oxide production in glial cells. The present study was undertaken to investigate the neuroprotective function of AICAR (a potent activator of AMP-activated protein kinase in blocking the pro-oxidant/proinflammatory responses induced in primary glial cultures treated with LPS and Aβ peptide. Methods To test the anti-inflammatory/anti-oxidant functions of AICAR, we tested its inhibitory potential in blocking the expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines and iNOS, expression of COX-2, generation of ROS, and associated signaling following treatment of glial cells with LPS and Aβ peptide. We also investigated the neuroprotective effects of AICAR against the effects of cytokines and inflammatory mediators (released by the glia, in blocking neurite outgrowth inhibition, and in nerve growth factor-(NGF induced neurite extension by PC-12 cells. Results AICAR blocked LPS/Aβ-induced inflammatory processes by blocking the expression of proinflammatory cytokine, iNOS, COX-2 and MnSOD genes, and by inhibition of ROS generation and depletion of glutathione in astroglial cells. AICAR also inhibited down-stream signaling leading to the regulation of transcriptional factors such as NFκB and C/EBP which are critical for the expression of iNOS, COX-2, MnSOD and cytokines (TNF-α/IL-1β and IL-6. AICAR promoted NGF-induced neurite growth

  15. Enhanced anti-tumor activity of a new curcumin-related compound against melanoma and neuroblastoma cells

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    Pastorino Fabio

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Sharing the common neuroectodermal origin, melanoma and neuroblastoma are tumors widely diffused among adult and children, respectively. Clinical prognosis of aggressive neuroectodermal cancers remains dismal, therefore the search for novel therapies against such tumors is warranted. Curcumin is a phytochemical compound widely studied for its antioxidant, anti-inflammatory and anti-cancer properties. Recently, we have synthesized and tested in vitro various curcumin-related compounds in order to select new anti-tumor agents displaying stronger and selective growth inhibition activity on neuroectodermal tumors. Results In this work, we have demonstrated that the new α,β-unsaturated ketone D6 was more effective in inhibiting tumor cells growth when compared to curcumin. Normal fibroblasts proliferation was not affected by this treatment. Clonogenic assay showed a significant dose-dependent reduction in both melanoma and neuroblastoma colony formation only after D6 treatment. TUNEL assay, Annexin-V staining, caspases activation and PARP cleavage unveiled the ability of D6 to cause tumor cell death by triggering apoptosis, similarly to curcumin, but with a stronger and quicker extent. These apoptotic features appear to be associated with loss of mitochondrial membrane potential and cytochrome c release. In vivo anti-tumor activity of curcumin and D6 was surveyed using sub-cutaneous melanoma and orthotopic neuroblastoma xenograft models. D6 treated mice exhibited significantly reduced tumor growth compared to both control and curcumin treated ones (Melanoma: D6 vs control: P and D6 vs curcumin P Neuroblastoma: D6 vs both control and curcumin: P . Conclusions Our data indicate D6 as a good candidate to develop new therapies against neural crest-derived tumors.

  16. Curcumin ameliorates macrophage infiltration by inhibiting NF-κB activation and proinflammatory cytokines in streptozotocin induced-diabetic nephropathy

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    Suzuki Kenji

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chronic inflammation plays an important role in the progression of diabetic nephropathy (DN and that the infiltration of macrophages in glomerulus has been implicated in the development of glomerular injury. We hypothesized that the plant polyphenolic compound curcumin, which is known to exert potent anti-inflammatory effect, would ameliorate macrophage infiltration in streptozotocin (STZ-induced diabetic rats. Methods Diabetes was induced with STZ (55 mg/kg by intraperitoneal injection in rats. Three weeks after STZ injection, rats were divided into three groups, namely, control, diabetic, and diabetic treated with curcumin at 100 mg/kg/day, p.o., for 8 weeks. The rats were sacrificed 11 weeks after induction of diabetes. The excised kidney was used to assess macrophage infiltration and expression of various inflammatory markers. Results At 11 weeks after STZ injection, diabetic rats exhibited renal dysfunction, as evidenced by reduced creatinine clearance, increased blood glucose, blood urea nitrogen and proteinuria, along with marked reduction in the body weight. All of these abnormalities were significantly reversed by curcumin. Hyperglycemia induced the degradation of IκBα and NF-κB activation and as a result increased infiltration of macrophages (52% as well as increased proinflammatory cytokines: TNF-α and IL-1β. Curcumin treatment significantly reduced macrophage infiltration in the kidneys of diabetic rats, suppressed the expression of above proinflammatory cytokines and degradation of IκBα. In addition, curcumin treatment also markedly decreased ICAM-1, MCP-1 and TGF-β1 protein expression. Moreover, at nuclear level curcumin inhibited the NF-κB activity. Conclusion Our results suggested that curcumin treatment protect against the development of DN in rats by reducing macrophage infiltration through the inhibition of NF-κB activation in STZ-induced diabetic rats.

  17. Curcumin protects microglia and primary rat cortical neurons against HIV-1 gp120-mediated inflammation and apoptosis.

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    Luyan Guo

    Full Text Available Curcumin is a molecule found in turmeric root that has anti-inflammatory, antioxidant, and anti-tumor properties and has been widely used as both an herbal drug and a food additive to treat or prevent neurodegenerative diseases. To explore whether curcumin is able to ameliorate HIV-1-associated neurotoxicity, we treated a murine microglial cell line (N9 and primary rat cortical neurons with curcumin in the presence or absence of neurotoxic HIV-1 gp120 (V3 loop protein. We found that HIV-1 gp120 profoundly induced N9 cells to produce reactive oxygen species (ROS, tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α and monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1. HIV-1 gp120 also induced apoptosis of primary rat cortical neurons. Curcumin exerted a powerful inhibitory effect against HIV-1 gp120-induced neuronal damage, reducing the production of ROS, TNF-α and MCP-1 by N9 cells and inhibiting apoptosis of primary rat cortical neurons. Curcumin may exert its biological activities through inhibition of the delayed rectification and transient outward potassium (K(+ current, as curcumin effectively reduced HIV-1 gp120-mediated elevation of the delayed rectification and transient outward K(+ channel current in neurons. We conclude that HIV-1 gp120 increases ROS, TNF-α and MCP-1 production in microglia, and induces cortical neuron apoptosis by affecting the delayed rectification and transient outward K(+ channel current. Curcumin reduces production of ROS and inflammatory mediators in HIV-1-gp120-stimulated microglia, and protects cortical neurons against HIV-1-mediated apoptosis, most likely through inhibition of HIV-1 gp120-induced elevation of the delayed rectification and transient outward K(+ current.

  18. Antioxidant and antiinflammatory activities of curcumin on diabetes mellitus and its complications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Bo; Li, Jun; Cao, Hong

    2013-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus (DM) has reached pandemic status and shows no signs of abatement. It can severely impair people's quality of life and affects patients all over the world. Since it is a serious, chronic metabolic disease, it can bring about many kinds of complications, which can in turn increase mortality. In recent decades, more and more studies have shown that oxidative stress and inflammatory reactions play critical roles in the pathogenesis of DM. There is an increasing demand for natural antidiabetic medicines that do not have the same side effects as modern drugs. Curcumin, a phytochemical found in the spice turmeric, has been used in India for centuries, and it has no known side effects. It has been shown to have some beneficial effects against various chronic illnesses. Many of these therapeutic actions can be attributed to its potent anti-oxidant and anti-inflammatory activities. In view of the oxidative stress and inflammatory mechanisms of DM, curcumin can be considered suitable for the prevention and amelioration of diabetes. In this review, we summarize the nosogenesis of DM, giving primary focus to oxidative stress and inflammation. We discuss the anti-oxidant and anti-inflammatory activities of curcumin in DM and its ability to mitigate the effects on DM and its associated complications in detail.

  19. Turkish Scorzonera Species Extracts Attenuate Cytokine Secretion via Inhibition of NF-kappa B Activation, Showing Anti-Inflammatory Effect in Vitro

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Acikara, O. B.; Hošek, J.; Babula, P.; Cvačka, Josef; Buděšínský, Miloš; Dračínský, Martin; Iscan, G. S.; Kadlecová, D.; Ballová, L.; Šmejkal, K.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 21, č. 1 (2016), č. článku 43. ISSN 1420-3049 Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : anti-inflammatory activity * IL-1 beta * NF-kappa B * Scorzonera * phenolic * TNF-alpha * triterpen Subject RIV: CC - Organic Chemistry Impact factor: 2.861, year: 2016 http://www.mdpi.com/1420-3049/21/1/43/htm

  20. The pro-resolving lipid mediator Maresin 1 protects against cerebral ischemia/reperfusion injury by attenuating the pro-inflammatory response

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xian, Wenjing [Department of Anesthesiology, Institute of Anesthesiology and Critical Care Medicine, Union Hospital, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan (China); Wu, Yan [Department of Neurology, Union Hospital, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan (China); Xiong, Wei [Department of Anesthesiology, Institute of Anesthesiology and Critical Care Medicine, Union Hospital, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan (China); Department of Critical Care Medicine, Union Hospital, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan (China); Li, Longyan [Department of Critical Care Medicine, Union Hospital, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan (China); Li, Tong [Department of Hepatobiliary Surgery, Union Hospital, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan (China); Pan, Shangwen [Department of Critical Care Medicine, Union Hospital, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan (China); Song, Limin [Department of Anesthesiology, Institute of Anesthesiology and Critical Care Medicine, Union Hospital, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan (China); Department of Critical Care Medicine, Union Hospital, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan (China); Hu, Lisha [Department of Critical Care Medicine, Union Hospital, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan (China); Pei, Lei [Department of Neurobiology, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan (China); Yao, Shanglong, E-mail: ysltian@163.com [Department of Anesthesiology, Institute of Anesthesiology and Critical Care Medicine, Union Hospital, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan (China); and others

    2016-03-25

    Inflammation plays a crucial role in acute ischemic stroke pathogenesis. Macrophage-derived Maresin 1 (MaR1) is a newly uncovered mediator with potent anti-inflammatory abilities. Here, we investigated the effect of MaR1 on acute inflammation and neuroprotection in a mouse brain ischemia reperfusion (I/R) model. Male C57 mice were subjected to 1-h middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) and reperfusion. By the methods of 2,3,5-triphenyltetrazolium chloride, haematoxylin and eosin or Fluoro-Jade B staining, neurological deficits scoring, ELISA detection, immunofluorescence assay and western blot analysis, we found that intracerebroventricular injection of MaR1 significantly reduced the infarct volume and neurological defects, essentially protected the brain tissue and neurons from injury, alleviated pro-inflammatory reactions and NF-κB p65 activation and nuclear translocation. Taken together, our results suggest that MaR1 significantly protects against I/R injury probably by inhibiting pro-inflammatory reactions. - Highlights: • MaR1 significantly protects against ischemia reperfusion injury. • MaR1 inhibits pro-inflammatory cytokines and chemokines and reducing glial activation and neutrophil infiltration. • These effects at least partially occurred via suppression of the NF-κB p65 signalling pathway.

  1. Potential effects of curcumin on peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma in vitro and in vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Natural peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma (PPAR-gamma) agonists are found in food and may be important for health through their anti-inflammatory properties. Curcumin (Cur) is a bright yellow spice, derived from the rhizome of Curcuma longa Linn. It has been shown to have many biologi...

  2. Curcumin nanoformulations : A review of pharmaceutical properties and preclinical studies and clinical data related to cancer treatment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Naksuriya, Ornchuma; Okonogi, Siriporn; Schiffelers, Raymond M.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/212909509; Hennink, Wim E.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/070880409

    2014-01-01

    Curcumin, a natural yellow phenolic compound, is present in many kinds of herbs, particularly in Curcuma longa Linn. (turmeric). It is a natural antioxidant and has shown many pharmacological activities such as anti-inflammatory, anti-microbial, anti-cancer, and anti-Alzheimer in both preclinical

  3. Spinal injection of docosahexaenoic acid attenuates carrageenan-induced inflammatory pain through inhibition of microglia-mediated neuroinflammation in the spinal cord.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Y; Zhao, L-X; Cao, D-L; Gao, Y-J

    2013-06-25

    Neuroinflammation in the spinal cord plays a critical role in the processing of inflammatory pain. Docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), a predominant omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid in the central nervous system, is known to modulate inflammatory responses in various neurodegenerative disorders. In this study, we investigated whether DHA could reduce inflammatory pain and inhibit neuroinflammation in the spinal cord following carrageenan injection in mice. Intrathecal (i.t.) injection of DHA at 15min before carrageenan injection blocked carrageenan-induced pain hypersensitivity for more than 6h. In addition, i.t. injection of DHA at 3h after carrageenan transiently reversed carrageenan-induced heat hyperalgesia and mechanical allodynia. Furthermore, DHA treatment reduced carrageenan-induced activation of microglia, phosphorylation of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK), and production of proinflammatory cytokines (tumor necrosisfactor-α - TNF-α and interleukin-1β - IL-1β) in the L4-5 spinal cord. In cultured microglial cells, DHA dose-dependently reduced lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced phosphorylation of p38, production of proinflammatory cytokines (TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-6) and chemokines (CCL2, CCL3 and CXCL10). p38 inhibitor SB203580 inhibited LPS-induced expression of proinflammatory cytokines and chemokines in a dose-dependent manner. Taken together, these results provide evidence that DHA has antinociceptive effect in inflammatory pain, which may be attributed to, at least partially, suppressing a microglia-mediated inflammatory response through inhibition of p38 MAPK activation. Copyright © 2013 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Low-dose benznidazole treatment results in parasite clearance and attenuates heart inflammatory reaction in an experimental model of infection with a highly virulent Trypanosoma cruzi strain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cevey, Ágata Carolina; Mirkin, Gerardo Ariel; Penas, Federico Nicolás; Goren, Nora Beatriz

    2016-04-01

    Chagas disease, caused by Trypanosoma cruzi, is the main cause of dilated cardiomyopathy in the Americas. Antiparasitic treatment mostly relies on benznidazole (Bzl) due to Nifurtimox shortage or unavailability. Both induce adverse drug effects (ADE) of varied severity in many patients, leading to treatment discontinuation or abandonment. Since dosage may influence ADE, we aimed to assess Bzl efficacy in terms of parasiticidal and anti-inflammatory activity, using doses lower than those previously reported. BALB/c mice infected with the T. cruzi RA strain were treated with different doses of Bzl. Parasitaemia, mortality and weight change were assessed. Parasite load, tissue infiltrates and inflammatory mediators were studied in the heart. Serum creatine kinase (CK) activity was determined as a marker of heart damage. The infection-independent anti-inflammatory properties of Bzl were studied in an in vitro model of LPS-treated cardiomyocyte culture. Treatment with 25 mg/kg/day Bzl turned negative the parasitological parameters, induced a significant decrease in IL-1β, IL-6 and NOS2 in the heart and CK activity in serum, to normal levels. No mortality was observed in infected treated mice. Primary cultured cardiomyocytes treated with Bzl showed that inflammatory mediators were reduced via inhibition of the NF-κB pathway. A Bzl dose lower than that previously reported for treatment of experimental Chagas disease exerts adequate antiparasitic and anti-inflammatory effects leading to parasite clearance and tissue healing. This may be relevant to reassess the dose currently used for the treatment of human Chagas disease, aiming to minimize ADE.

  5. Low-dose benznidazole treatment results in parasite clearance and attenuates heart inflammatory reaction in an experimental model of infection with a highly virulent T