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Sample records for curculionidae coleoptera curculionoidea

  1. New Curculionoidea (Coleoptera) records for Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douglas, Hume; Bouchard, Patrice; Anderson, Robert S; de Tonnancour, Pierre; Vigneault, Robert; Webster, Reginald P

    2013-01-01

    The following species of Curculionoidea are recorded from Canada for the first time, in ten cases also representing new records at the generic level: Ischnopterapion (Ischnopterapion) loti (Kirby, 1808); Stenopterapion meliloti (Kirby, 1808) (both Brentidae); Atrichonotus taeniatulus (Berg, 1881); Barinus cribricollis (LeConte, 1876); Caulophilus dubius (Horn, 1873); Cionus scrophulariae (Linnaeus, 1758); Cryptorhynchus tristis LeConte, 1876; Cylindrocopturus furnissi Buchanan, 1940; Cylindrocopturus quercus (Say, 1832); Desmoglyptus crenatus (LeConte, 1876); Pnigodes setosus LeConte, 1876; Pseudopentarthrum parvicollis (Casey, 1892); Sibariops confinis (LeConte, 1876); Sibariops confusus (Boheman, 1836); Smicronyx griseus LeConte, 1876; Smicronyx lineolatus Casey, 1892; Euwallacea validus (Eichhoff, 1875); Hylocurus rudis (LeConte, 1876); Lymantor alaskanus Wood, 1978; Phloeotribus scabricollis (Hopkins, 1916); Scolytus oregoni Blackman, 1934; Xyleborus celsus Eichhoff, 1868; Xyleborus ferrugineus (Fabricius, 1801); Xylosandrus crassiusculus (Motschulsky, 1866) (all Curculionidae). In addition the following species were recorded for the first time from these provinces and territories: Yukon - Dendroctonus simplex LeConte, 1868; Phloetribus piceae Swaine, 1911 (both Curculionidae); Northwest Territories - Loborhynchapion cyanitinctum (Fall, 1927) (Brentidae); Nunavut - Dendroctonus simplex LeConte, 1868 (Curculionidae); Alberta - Anthonomus tectus LeConte, 1876; Promecotarsus densus Casey, 1892; Dendroctonus ponderosae Hopkins, 1902; Hylastes macer LeConte, 1868; Rhyncolus knowltoni (Thatcher, 1940); Scolytus schevyrewi Semenov Tjan-Shansky, 1902 (all Curculionidae); Saskatchewan - Phloeotribus liminaris (Harris, 1852); Rhyncolus knowltoni (Thatcher, 1940); Scolytus schevyrewi Semenov Tjan-Shansky, 1902 (all Curculionidae); Manitoba - Cosmobaris scolopacea Germar, 1819; Listronotus maculicollis (Kirby, 1837); Listronotus punctiger LeConte, 1876; Scolytus schevyrewi

  2. Naamlijst van de snuitkevers van Nederland en het omliggende gebied (Curculionoidea: Curculionidae, Apionidae, Attelabidae, Urodontidae, Anthribidae en Nemonychidae)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heijerman, T.

    1993-01-01

    Check list of the weevils occurring in The Netherlands and adjacent regions (Curculionoidea: Curculionidae, Apionidae, Attelabidae, Urodontidae, Anthribidae and Nemonychidae). A new check list of weevils occurring in The Netherlands and adjacent regions is presented. Since the previous list of

  3. Key to higher taxa of South American weevils based on adult characters (Coleoptera, Curculionoidea Clave de taxones superiores de gorgojos sudamericanos basada en caracteres de los adultos (Coleoptera, Curculionoidea

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    ADRIANA E. MARVALDI

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available The weevils (Coleoptera: Curculionoidea from South America are currently classified in the following families and subfamilies: Nemonychidae (Rhinorhynchinae, Anthribidae (Anthribinae, Belidae (Belinae and Oxycoryninae, Attelabidae (Attelabinae and Rhynchitinae, Brentidae (Apioninae and Brentinae, Caridae (Carinae and Curculionidae (Erirhininae, Dryophthorinae, Entiminae, Aterpinae, Gonipterinae, Rhythirrininae, Thecesterninae, Eugnominae, Hyperinae, Curculioninae, Cryptorhynchinae, Mesoptiliinae (= Magdalidinae, Molytinae, Baridinae, Lixinae, Conoderinae (= Zygopinae, Cossoninae, Scolytinae and Platypodinae. In the present contribution we bring a dichotomous key for the identification of seven families and 28 subfamilies of Curculionoidea from South America, and for 21 tribes of the highly heterogeneous subfamilies Curculioninae and Molytinae. These tribes are Curculionini Anthonomini, Ceutorhynchini, Derelomini, Otidocephalini, Erodiscini, Camarotini, Piazorhinini, Prionobrachiini, Smicronychini, Rhamphini and Tychiini, within Curculioninae; and Hylobiini, Pissodini, Conotrachelini, Cleogonini, Sternechini, Pacholenini, Cholini, Petalochilini and Amalactini, within Molytinae. Most of them have been classified as subfamilies in traditional schemes. The key is mainly based on external morphological characters, but also includes data on genitalia, mouth parts and other biological features. Definitions and illustrations of diagnostic characters used in the key are providedLos gorgojos (Coleoptera: Curculionoidea de América del Sur se clasifican actualmente en las siguientes familias y subfamilias: Nemonychidae (Rhinorhynchinae, Anthribidae (Anthribinae, Belidae (Belinae y Oxycoryninae, Attelabidae (Attelabinae y Rhynchitinae, Brentidae (Apioninae y Brentinae, Caridae (Carinae y Curculionidae (Erirhininae, Dryophthorinae, Entiminae, Aterpinae, Gonipterinae, Rhythirrininae, Thecesterninae, Eugnominae, Hyperinae, Curculioninae, Cryptorhynchinae

  4. A revised checklist species of the Curculionoidea (Coleoptera, excluding Scolytinae of Rostov Oblast and Kalmykia, the southern part of European Russia

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    Yuri G. Arzanov

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available This work provides a list of 703 species of weevils (Coleoptera: Curculionoidea, excluding Scolytinae recorded in two adjacent administrative regions in the southern part of European Russia: Rostov Oblast and the Republic of Kalmykia. The species diversity of the ten recorded families is as follows: Nemonychidae (1, Anthribidae (10, Rhynchitidae (12, Attelabidae (2, Apionidae (70, Nanophyidae (12, Brachyceridae (2, Dryophthoridae (4, Erirhinidae (13, Curculionidae (577, excluding Scolytinae. In total, 151 species are added to the faunal list of the southern European Russia.

  5. New Curculionoidea (Coleoptera records for Canadа

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    Hume Douglas

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The following species of Curculionoidea are recorded from Canada for the first time, in ten cases also representing new records at the generic level: Ischnopterapion (Ischnopterapion loti (Kirby, 1808; Stenopterapion meliloti (Kirby, 1808 (both Brentidae; Atrichonotus taeniatulus (Berg, 1881; Barinus cribricollis (LeConte, 1876; Caulophilus dubius (Horn, 1873; Cionus scrophulariae (Linnaeus, 1758; Cryptorhynchus tristis LeConte, 1876; Cylindrocopturus furnissi Buchanan, 1940; Cylindrocopturus quercus (Say, 1832; Desmoglyptus crenatus (LeConte, 1876; Pnigodes setosus LeConte, 1876; Pseudopentarthrum parvicollis (Casey, 1892; Sibariops confinis (LeConte, 1876; Sibariops confusus (Boheman, 1836; Smicronyx griseus LeConte, 1876; Smicronyx lineolatus Casey, 1892; Euwallacea validus (Eichhoff, 1875; Hylocurus rudis (LeConte, 1876; Lymantor alaskanus Wood, 1978; Phloeotribus scabricollis (Hopkins, 1916; Scolytus oregoni Blackman, 1934; Xyleborus celsus Eichhoff, 1868; Xyleborus ferrugineus (Fabricius, 1801; Xylosandrus crassiusculus (Motschulsky, 1866 (all Curculionidae. In addition the following species were recorded for the first time from these provinces and territories: Yukon – Dendroctonus simplex LeConte, 1868; Phloetribus piceae Swaine, 1911 (both Curculionidae; Northwest Territories – Loborhynchapion cyanitinctum (Fall, 1927 (Brentidae; Nunavut – Dendroctonus simplex LeConte, 1868 (Curculionidae; Alberta – Anthonomus tectus LeConte, 1876; Promecotarsus densus Casey, 1892; Dendroctonus ponderosae Hopkins, 1902; Hylastes macer LeConte, 1868; Rhyncolus knowltoni (Thatcher, 1940; Scolytus schevyrewi Semenov Tjan-Shansky, 1902 (all Curculionidae; Saskatchewan – Phloeotribus liminaris (Harris, 1852; Rhyncolus knowltoni (Thatcher, 1940; Scolytus schevyrewi Semenov Tjan-Shansky, 1902 (all Curculionidae; Manitoba – Cosmobaris scolopacea Germar, 1819; Listronotus maculicollis (Kirby, 1837; Listronotus punctiger LeConte, 1876; Scolytus

  6. (coleoptera: curculionidae) to beauveria bassiana and metarhizium ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

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    SUSCEPTIBILITY OF SITOPHILUS ZEAMAIS (MOSTCH.) (COLEOPTERA: CURCULIONIDAE) TO BEAUVERIA BASSIANA AND METARHIZIUM ANISOPLIAE. Addis Teshome1 and Tadele Tefera 2, ∗. 1 Ethiopian Institute of Agricultural Research, Bako Research Centre, PO Box 2003, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia. 2 Department ...

  7. Curculionoidea (Coleoptera) from southern Turkey | Avgın | African ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A checklist of Curculionoidea is given from southern Turkey (Adana, Osmaniye and Hatay provinces). The known localities and ecological notes on each of them were reported based on literature records and on recently collected material. Lixus farinifer Reitter is newly recorded from Turkey, and 35 species (2 Rhynchitidae, ...

  8. Micromorphology of the elytral cuticle of beetles, with an emphasis on weevils (Coleoptera: Curculionoidea).

    Science.gov (United States)

    van de Kamp, Thomas; Riedel, Alexander; Greven, Hartmut

    2016-01-01

    The elytral cuticle of 40 beetle species, comprising 14 weevils (Curculionoidea) and 26 representatives of other taxa, is examined. All weevils and 18 other species have an endocuticle with prominent macrofibers, which corresponds to a modified pseudo-orthogonal cuticle. Angles between successive layers of macrofibers range between 30° and 90°, but are constantly less than 60° in weevils. In all Curculionoidea, as well as in one buprestid and one erotylid species exo- and endocuticle are densely interlocked. In the weevil Sitophilus granarius, transmission electron microscopy revealed vertical microfibrils extending from the exocuticle between the macrofibers of the underlaying endocuticle. Vertical microfibrils connecting successive macrofiber layers of the endocuticle were observed in S. granarius and Trigonopterus nasutus. Distinct cuticular characters are traced on a beetle phylogeny: the angles between unidirectional endocuticle layers; the presence and the shape of endocuticular macrofibers; and the interlocking of exo- and endocuticle. While character traits seem to be more or less randomly distributed among Coleoptera, the Curculionoidea have a uniform groundplan: The "weevil-specific" combination of characters includes 1) interlocking of exo- and endocuticle, 2) an endocuticle with distinct ovoid macrofibers embedded in a matrix and 3) comparatively small angles between successive endocuticular layers. Thus, phylogenetic constraints appear equally important to functional factors in the construction of the weevil elytron. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Sexual Dimorphism of Rhyssomatus subtilis (Coleoptera: Curculionidae)

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    Cazado, Lucas Emiliano; O'brien, Charles W.; Casmuz, Augusto S.; Gastaminza, Gerardo A.; Murúa, María Gabriela

    2017-01-01

    Examination with a binocular microscope of adults of Rhyssomatus subtilis Fielder (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) revealed distinct differences between the sexes in the foreleg, which permits their differentiation with complete accuracy. In the female the profemual process is weak, subacute, angulate and the protibia has an uncus and mucro. In the male the profemur process is strong, curved, subacute, tooth-like and lacks an protibia uncus. La examinación con microscopio binocular de los adult...

  10. A review of the weevil fauna (Coleoptera, Curculionoidea of Araucaria angustifolia (Bert. O. Kuntze (Araucariaceae in South Brazil

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    Roland Mecke

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available The beetle superfamily Curculionoidea includes 43 species associated with Araucaria angustifolia trees in South Brazil. These weevil species belong to the families Nemonychidae (Brarus Kuschel, 1997, Rhynchitoplesius Voss, 1952, Brentidae (Taphroderes Schönherr, 1826 and Curculionidae, the latter including the subfamilies Curculioninae (Heilipodus Kuschel, 1955, Spermologus Schönherr, 1843, Cossoninae (Araucarius Kuschel, 1966, Eurycorynophorus Voss, 1964, Scolytinae (Ambrosiodmus Hopkins, 1915, Araptus Eichhoff, 1871, Cnesinus LeConte, 1868, Corthylus Erichson, 1836, Cryptocarenus Eggers, 1936, Hypothenemus Westwood, 1834, Monarthrum Kirsch, 1866, Pagiocerus Eichhoff, 1868, Phloeotribus Latreille, 1896, Pityophthorus Eichhoff, 1864, Xylechinosomus Schedl, 1963, Xyleborus Eichhoff, 1864, Xyleborinus Reitter, 1913 and Platypodinae (Cenocephalus Chapuis, 1865, Platypus Herbst, 1893, Tesserocerus Saunders, 1836. A checklist of all species including remarks on their life histories and taxonomic notes are presented. In addition, a key for the identification of adult Curculionoidea associated with Araucaria angustifolia to genus or species level is provided.A superfamília Curculionoidea compreende 43 espécies associadas à Araucaria angustifolia no sul do Brasil. As espécies destes gorgulhos pertencem às famílias Nemonychidae (Brarus Kuschel, 1997, Rhynchitoplesius Voss, 1952, Brentidae (Taphroderes Schönherr, 1826 e Curculionidae, (Curculioninae: Heilipodus Kuschel, 1955, Spermologus Schönherr, 1843; Cossoninae: Araucarius Kuschel, 1966, Eurycorynophorus Voss, 1964; Scolytinae: Ambrosiodmus Hopkins, 1915, Araptus Eichhoff, 1871, Cnesinus LeConte, 1868, Corthylus Erichson, 1836, Cryptocarenus Eggers, 1936, Hypothenemus Westwood, 1834, Monarthrum Kirsch, 1866, Pagiocerus Eichhoff, 1868, Phloeotribus Latreille, 1896, Pityophthorus Eichhoff, 1864, Xylechinosomus Schedl, 1963, Xyleborus Eichhoff, 1864, Xyleborinus Reitter, 1913; Platypodinae

  11. Fauna Europaea: Coleoptera 2 (excl. series Elateriformia, Scarabaeiformia, Staphyliniformia and superfamily Curculionoidea)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alonso Zarazaga, Miguel-Angel; Slipinski, Adam; Nilsson, Anders; Jelínek, Josef; Taglianti, Augusto Vigna; Turco, Federica; Otero, Carlos; Canepari, Claudio; Kral, David; Liberti, Gianfranco; Sama, Gianfranco; Nardi, Gianluca; Löbl, Ivan; Horak, Jan; Kolibac, Jiri; Háva, Jirí; Sapiejewski, Maciej; Jäch, Manfred; Bologna, Marco Alberto; Biondi, Maurizio; Nikitsky, Nikolai B.; Mazzoldi, Paolo; Zahradnik, Petr; Wegrzynowicz, Piotr; Constantin, Robert; Gerstmeier, Roland; Zhantiev, Rustem; Fattorini, Simone; Tomaszewska, Wioletta; Rücker, Wolfgang H.; Vazquez-Albalate, Xavier; Cassola, Fabio; Angelini, Fernando; Johnson, Colin; Schawaller, Wolfgang; Regalin, Renato; Baviera, Cosimo; Rocchi, Saverio; Cianferoni, Fabio; Beenen, Ron; Schmitt, Michael; Sassi, David; Kippenberg, Horst; Zampetti, Marcello Franco; Trizzino, Marco; Chiari, Stefano; Carpaneto, Giuseppe Maria; Sabatelli, Simone

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Fauna Europaea provides a public web-service with an index of scientific names (including synonyms) of all living European land and freshwater animals, their geographical distribution at country level (up to the Urals, excluding the Caucasus region), and some additional information. The Fauna Europaea project covers about 230,000 taxonomic names, including 130,000 accepted species and 14,000 accepted subspecies, which is much more than the originally projected number of 100,000 species. This represents a huge effort by more than 400 contributing specialists throughout Europe and is a unique (standard) reference suitable for many users in science, government, industry, nature conservation and education. Coleoptera represent a huge assemblage of holometabolous insects, including as a whole more than 200 recognized families and some 400,000 described species worldwide. Basic information is summarized on their biology, ecology, economic relevance, and estimated number of undescribed species worldwide. Little less than 30,000 species are listed from Europe. The Coleoptera 2 section of the Fauna Europaea database (Archostemata, Myxophaga, Adephaga and Polyphaga excl. the series Elateriformia, Scarabaeiformia, Staphyliniformia and the superfamily Curculionoidea) encompasses 80 families (according to the previously accepted family-level systematic framework) and approximately 13,000 species. Tabulations included a complete list of the families dealt with, the number of species in each, the names of all involved specialists, and, when possible, an estimate of the gaps in terms of total number of species at an European level. A list of some recent useful references is appended. Most families included in the Coleoptera 2 Section have been updated in the most recent release of the Fauna Europaea index, or are ready to be updated as soon as the FaEu data management environment completes its migration from Zoological Museum Amsterdam to Berlin Museum für Naturkunde

  12. A new species of Larinus Dejean (Coleoptera: Curculionidae from China

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    Levent Gültekin

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Based on specimens in the Natural History Museum (London, a new species of the genus Larinus Dejan, 1821 (Coleoptera: Curculionidae: Lixinae, Larinus barclayi sp. nov., is described from China. The new species is assigned to the subgenus Phyllonomeus Gistel, 1856, compared with closely related species, and colour digital photographs of morphological characters are presented.

  13. Attractant and disruptant semiochemicals for Dendroctonus jeffreyi (Coleoptera: Curculionidae: Scolytinae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brian Strom; Smith S.L.; Brownie C.

    2013-01-01

    Jeffrey pine, Pinus jeffreyi Greville and Balfour, is a dominant yellow pine and important overstory component of forests growing on diverse sites from southwestern Oregon to Baja California to western Nevada. The Jeffrey pine beetle, Dedroctonus jeffreyi Hopkins (Coleoptera: Curculionidae: Scolytinae), is monophagous on Jeffrey...

  14. A coffee berry borer (Coleoptera: Curculionidae: Scolytinae) bibliography

    Science.gov (United States)

    One hundred years ago, one of the most significant biological invasions of an agricultural insect pest in the Americas was initiated. Endemic to Africa, the coffee berry borer (Hypothenemus hampei; Coleoptera: Curculionidae) was accidentally introduced to Brazil in 1913 and years later invaded coffe...

  15. The nearly complete mitochondrial genome of a snout weevil, Eucryptorrhynchus brandti (Coleoptera: Curculionidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zhi-Teng; Yu, Bo; Du, Yu-Zhou

    2016-07-01

    We report the nearly complete mitochondrial genome of a snout weevil, Eucryptorrhynchus brandti (Coleoptera: Curculionidae). The 16,919 bp long genome consists of 13 protein-coding genes, 2 ribosomal RNAs, 22 transfer RNAs and a partial control region. A phylogenetic tree has been built using the 13 protein-coding genes of 11 related species from Coleoptera. Our results would contribute to further study of phylogeny in Coleoptera.

  16. A Role for Intercept Traps in the Ambrosia Beetle (Coleoptera: Curculionidae: Scolytinae) IPM Strategy at Ornamental Nurseries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Invasive ambrosia beetles (Coleoptera: Curculionidae: Scolytinae) cause significant damage to ornamental nursery tree crops throughout the Eastern U. S. Depending on surrounding habitat, some nurseries can undergo large influxes of ambrosia beetles from the forest to susceptible nursery stock. Eth...

  17. Host range expansion and increased damage potential of Euwallacea nr. fornicatus (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) in Florida

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ambrosia beetles in the Euwallacea nr. fornicatus complex (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) vector Fusarium spp. fungi pathogenic to susceptible hosts, including avocado. The Florida avocado production area in Miami-Dade County was surveyed for E. nr. fornicatus upon observations of initial damage in 2016...

  18. Behavioral assays for evaluating host preferences of Euwallacea nr. fornicatus (Coleoptera: Curculionidae: Scolytinae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    In 2010, the exotic ambrosia beetle, Euwallacea nr. fornicatus Eichhoff (Coleoptera: Curculionidae: Scolytinae) was first discovered in Florida avocado groves. Introduction of its symbiotic Fusarium spp. fungi into galleries in the xylem tissue results in Fusarium-dieback disease. Unlike most ambros...

  19. Influence of temperature on spring flight initiation for southwestern ponderosa pine bark beetles (Coleoptera: Curculionidae, Scolytinae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    M. L. Gaylord; K. K. Williams; R. W. Hofstetter; J. D. McMillin; T. E. Degomez; M. R. Wagner

    2008-01-01

    Determination of temperature requirements for many economically important insects is a cornerstone of pest management. For bark beetles (Coleoptera: Curculionidae, Scolytinae), this information can facilitate timing of management strategies. Our goals were to determine temperature predictors for flight initiation of three species of Ips bark beetles...

  20. Rearing redbay ambrosia beetle, Xyleborus glabratus (Coleoptera: Curculionidae: Scolytinae), on semi-artifical media

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    M. Lake Maner; James Hanula; S. Kristine Braman

    2014-01-01

    Semi-artificial diets consisting of redbay (Persea borbonia (L.) Spreng,; Laurales: Lauraceae) sawdust and various nutrients were tested for rearing Xyleborus glabratus Eichoff (Coleoptera: Curculionidae: Scolytinae) in vitro. Comparison of 2 media, modified and standard, adapted from Biedermann et al. (2009) showed that the more...

  1. Lack of genetic differentiation in aggressive and secondary bark beetles (Coleoptera: Curculionidae, Scolytinae) from Arizona

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christopher J. Allender; Karen M. Clancy; Tom E. DeGomez; Joel D. McMillin; Scott A. Woolbright; Paul Keim; David M. Wagner

    2008-01-01

    Bark beetles (Coleoptera: Curculionidae, Scolytinae) play an important role as disturbance agents in ponderosa pine (Pinus ponderosa Douglas ex Lawson) forests of Arizona. However, from 2001 to 2003, elevated bark beetle activity caused unprecedented levels of ponderosa pine mortality. A better understanding of the population structure of these...

  2. Temperature influences on diapause induction and survival in the boll weevil (Coleoptera: Curculionidae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The boll weevil, Anthonomus grandis grandis Boheman (Coleoptera: Curculionidae), has been the most important pest of cotton (Gossypium spp.) wherever it occurs. Although eradication programs in the U.S. have reduced the range of this pest, the weevil remains an intractable problem in subtropical Tex...

  3. Vertical Distribution and Daily Flight Periodicity of Ambrosia Beetles (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) in Florida Avocado Orchards Affected by Laurel Wilt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menocal, Octavio; Kendra, Paul E; Montgomery, Wayne S; Crane, Jonathan H; Carrillo, Daniel

    2018-03-08

    Ambrosia beetles have emerged as significant pests of avocado ((Persea americana Mill. [Laurales: Lauraceae])) due to their association with pathogenic fungal symbionts, most notably Raffaelea lauricola T.C. Harr., Fraedrich & Aghayeva (Ophiostomatales: Ophiostomataceae), the causal agent of the laurel wilt (LW) disease. We evaluated the interaction of ambrosia beetles with host avocado trees by documenting their flight height and daily flight periodicity in Florida orchards with LW. Flight height was assessed passively in three avocado orchards by using ladder-like arrays of unbaited sticky traps arranged at three levels (low: 0-2 m; middle: 2-4 m; high: 4-6 m). In total, 1,306 individuals of 12 Scolytinae species were intercepted, but six accounted for ~95% of the captures: Xyleborus volvulus (Fabricius) (Coleoptera: Curculionidae), Xyleborinus saxesenii Ratzeburg (Coleoptera: Curculionidae), Euplatypus parallelus (Fabricius) (Coleoptera: Curculionidae), Xyleborus bispinatus Eichhoff (Coleoptera: Curculionidae), Xyleborus affinis Eichhoff (Coleoptera: Curculionidae), and Hypothenemus sp. (Coleoptera: Curculionidae). The primary vector of R. lauricola, Xyleborus glabratus Eichhoff (Coleoptera: Curculionidae), was not detected. Females of X. volvulus showed a preference for flight at low levels and X. bispinatus for the low and middle levels; however, captures of all other species were comparable at all heights. At a fourth orchard, a baiting method was used to document flight periodicity. Females of X. saxesenii and Hypothenemus sp. were observed in flight 2-2.5 h prior to sunset; X. bispinatus, X. volvulus, and X. affinis initiated flight at ~1 h before sunset and Xylosandrus crassiusculus (Motschulsky) (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) at 30 min prior to sunset. Results suggest that ambrosia beetles in South Florida fly near sunset (when light intensity and wind speed decrease) at much greater heights than previously assumed and have species-specific patterns in host

  4. Especies mexicanas de Curculionidae (Insecta: Coleoptera) asociadas con agaves (Asparagaceae: Agavoideae) Mexican species of Curculionidae (Insecta: Coleoptera) associated to agaves (Asparagaceae: Agavoideae)

    OpenAIRE

    Alberto Romo; Juan J. Morrone

    2012-01-01

    Se estudiaron las especies de picudos o gorgojos (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) asociadas con agaves (Asparagaceae: Agavoideae) en México. Se registraron 5 especies asociadas con especies de Agave, Furcraea, Hesperoyucca, Polianthes y Yucca; de éstas, 4 pertenecen a la subfamilia Dryophthorinae (Scyphophorus acupunctatus, S. yuccae, Rhinostomus frontalis y Cactophagus spinolae) y 1 a la Baridinae (Peltophorus polymitus). Se presentan diagnosis, ilustraciones y una clave para la identificación de...

  5. Molecular markers detect cryptic predation on coffee berry borer (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) by silvanid and laemophloeid flat bark beetles (Coleoptera: Silvanidae, Laemophloeidae) in coffee beans

    Science.gov (United States)

    The coffee berry borer, Hypothenemus hampei(Coleoptera: Curculionidae)(Ferrari), is a serious pest of coffee worldwide and has been recently introduced in Hawai’i, first detected in the state in 2010. Adult silvanid flat bark beetles, Cathartus quadricollis (Coleoptera: Silvanidae) and adult laemoph...

  6. Attractant and disruptant semiochemicals for Dendroctonus jeffreyi (Coleoptera: Curculionidae: Scolytinae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strom, B L; Smith, S L; Brownie, C

    2013-04-01

    Jeffrey pine, Pinus jeffreyi Greville and Balfour, is a dominant yellow pine and important overstory component of forests growing on diverse sites from southwestern Oregon to Baja California to western Nevada. The Jeffrey pine beetle, Dendroctonus jeffreyi Hopkins (Coleoptera: Curculionidae: Scolytinae), is monophagous on Jeffrey pine and its primary insect pest. Despite the importance of P. jeffreyi, difficult terrain, environmental concerns, and lack of roads can constrain pest management activities. Semiochemicals are often easier to apply and more environmentally acceptable than other options, but they are lacking in this system. Attractants have been identified, but field bioassays have been limited because of infrequent or short duration outbreaks and a lack of beetles during nonoutbreak periods. Disruptant semiochemicals have not been assessed for D. jeffreyi during outbreak conditions; however, commercially available semiochemicals have been implicated as disruptants for this bark beetle. The objective of this study was to identify the most effective commercially available attractant and disruptant semiochemicals for D. jeffreyi. Our highest observed catch occurred with the blend of 5% 1-heptanol and 95% n-heptane. When this was used to challenge potential disruptant semiochemicals, the combination of S-(-)-verbenone and the green leaf volatile blend (cis-3-Hexenol and 1-Hexanol) reduced trap catch by ≍80%. However, frontalin was most effective, reducing the number of D. jeffreyi caught by >96%. Within each year of the study, the percentage female of D. jeffreyi caught with our attractant decreased from start to end of the experimental period. On average, our first collection in a year (mid-June to early July) was 59% female, whereas our last (mid-August) was 34%. Frontalin was equally or more effective against females (the pioneering sex) than males, providing optimism that semiochemical disruption may be possible for protecting Jeffrey pines from D

  7. Synchrony, Weather, and Cycles in Southern Pine Beetle (Coleoptera: Curculionidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reeve, John D

    2018-02-08

    Spatial synchrony and cycles are common features of forest insect pests, but are often studied as separate phenomenon. Using time series of timber damage caused by Dendroctonus frontalis Zimmermann (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) (southern pine beetle) in 10 states within the southern United States, this study examines synchrony in D. frontalis abundance, the synchronizing effects of temperature extremes, and the evidence for shared cycles among state populations. Cross-correlation and cluster analyses are used to quantify synchrony across a range of geographic distances and to identify groups of states with synchronous dynamics. Similar techniques are used to quantify spatial synchrony in temperature extremes and to examine their relationship to D. frontalis fluctuations. Cross-wavelet analysis is then used to examine pairs of time series for shared cycles. These analyses suggest there is substantial synchrony among states in D. frontalis fluctuations, and there are regional groups of states with similar dynamics. Synchrony in D. frontalis fluctuations also appears related to spatial synchrony in summer and winter temperature extremes. The cross-wavelet results suggest that D. frontalis dynamics may differ among regions and are not stationary. Significant oscillations were present in some states over certain time intervals, suggesting an endogenous feedback mechanism. Management of D. frontalis outbreaks could potentially benefit from a multistate regional approach because populations are synchronous on this level. Extreme summer temperatures are likely to become the most important synchronizing agent due to climate change. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Entomological Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  8. Resistance of Selected Sorghum Genotypes to Maize Weevil (Coleoptera: Curculionidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vyavhare, Suhas S; Pendleton, Bonnie B; Peterson, Gary C

    2018-04-09

    The maize weevil, Sitophilus zeamais (Motschulsky) (Coleoptera: Curculionidae), is a major insect pest of stored grain. This study evaluated resistance of grain of 26 sorghum genotypes, Sorghum bicolor (L.) Moench, to maize weevil under laboratory conditions. Three female and two male newly emerged maize weevils were reared with 5 g of grain in each of 10 vials for each of the 26 sorghum genotypes in a laboratory experiment. The weevils and grain of each genotype were scored once every 3 wk for a total of five times during 105 d. The numbers of live and newly emerged maize weevils, dead weevils from the initial population, damage score (scale of 1-5), and grain weight loss were used to indicate resistance. The least percentage weight loss of 23.9 and 24.1% was recorded for sorghum genotypes Sureño and (5BRON151*Tegemeo)-HG7, respectively. Genotypes B.HF8 and (A964*P850029)-HW6 had the most weight loss, 70.6 and 67.7%, at 105 d after infestation. Genotypes B.HF8 and (A964*P850029)-HW6 consistently exhibited the highest numbers of maize weevil, 63 and 84, per vial at 105 d after infestation. Sorghum genotypes Sureño, (SV1*Sima/IS23250)-LG15, (5BRON151*Tegemeo)-HG7, and (B35*B9501)-HD9 ranked among the top four genotypes with least damage rating more often than any other genotype across the five sampling dates. On the other hand, genotypes B.HF8, (A964*P850029)-HW6, (Segaolane*WM#322)LG2, and (Tx2880*(Tx2880*(Tx2864*(Tx436*(Tx2864*PI550607)))))-PR3-CM1 were more often ranked among the top four genotypes with the highest damage rating. Our results indicate that grain of genotype Sureno is most resistant to the maize weevil among screened genotypes.

  9. ESPECIES DE DRYOPHTHORINAE (COLEOPTERA: CURCULIONIDAE ASOCIADAS A PLÁTANO Y BANANO (Musa spp. EN COLOMBIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    JOSE RUBIO-GOMEZ

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available RESUMEN Se presenta una sinopsis de los escarabajos de la subfamilia Dryophthorinae (Coleoptera: Curculionidae asociados a cultivos de plátano y banano en Colombia. Adicionalmente se ofrecen claves ilustradas para las especies del país. Se registran seis especies asociadas a dichos cultivos: Cosmopolites sordidus (Germar, 1824, Metamasius hemipterus (Linnaeus, 1758, Metamasius hebetatus (Gyllenhal, 1838, Metamasius submaculatus Champion, 1910, Rhyncophorus palmarum (Linnaeus, 1758 y Polytus mellerborgii (Boheman, 1838. Palabras clave: picudos, plátano, banano, Polytus, Colombia. ABSTRACT This synopsis is about beetle’s subfamily Dryophthorinae (Coleoptera: Curculionidae associated to plantain and banana crops. Additionally keys illustrated for the species of the country are offered. Six species associated to these cultures are registered: Cosmopolites sordidus (Germar, 1824, Metamasius hemipterus (Linnaeus, 1758, Metamasius hebetatus (Gyllenhal, 1838, Metamasius submaculatus Champion, 1910, Rhyncophorus palmarum (Linnaeus, 1758 y Polytus mellerborgii (Boheman, 1838. Key words: weevils, plantain, banana, Polytus, Colombia.

  10. Sampling of Rhyssomatus subtilis (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) adults on soybean, using the vertical beat sheet method

    OpenAIRE

    Cazado, Lucas Emiliano; Casmuz, Augusto S.; Scalora, Franco S.; Gómez, César Horacio; Murúa, María Gabriela; Gastaminza, Gerardo A.; Willink, Eduardo

    2017-01-01

    Rhyssomatus subtilis Fiedler (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) adults were sampled in 10 soybean crop fields in Northwestern Argentina throughout 2012 and 2014, using the vertical beat sheet (VBS) method. The obtained values were contrasted with the total number of adults actually present in those fields, which demonstrated that the abovementioned method caught 60% of individuals. Therefore, it became evident that these data needed to be corrected by dividing the values obtained with VBS by 0.65, n...

  11. A checklist of the genus Blosyrus Schoenherr (Coleoptera: Curculionidae: Entiminae of the world

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    G. Mahendiran

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available An annotated checklist of Blosyrus Schoenherr (Coleoptera: Curculionidae: Entiminae comprising 101 species with their updated nomenclature, synonyms and distribution is given. The distribution pattern indicates that the genus is diversified mostly in the Sub-Saharan Africa and Asia regions. Out of 101 species, 92 occur in Sub-Saharan Africa. From India, eight species were recorded. In India, the distribution is mainly in West Bengal, Assam, Maharashtra, Andhra Pradesh, Karnataka and Tamil Nadu.

  12. First record of acerola weevil, Anthonomus tomentosus (Faust, 1894 (Coleoptera: Curculionidae, in Brazil

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    A. L. Marsaro Júnior

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The weevil of acerola fruits, Anthonomus tomentosus (Faust, 1894 (Coleoptera: Curculionidae, is recorded for the first time in Brazil. Samples of this insect were collected in fruits of acerola, Malpighia emarginata D.C. (Malpighiaceae, in four municipalities in the north-central region of Roraima State, in the Brazilian Amazon. Information about injuries observed in fruits infested with A. tomentosus, its distribution in Roraima, and suggestions for pest management are presented.

  13. Especies mexicanas de Curculionidae (Insecta: Coleoptera asociadas con agaves (Asparagaceae: Agavoideae Mexican species of Curculionidae (Insecta: Coleoptera associated to agaves (Asparagaceae: Agavoideae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alberto Romo

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Se estudiaron las especies de picudos o gorgojos (Coleoptera: Curculionidae asociadas con agaves (Asparagaceae: Agavoideae en México. Se registraron 5 especies asociadas con especies de Agave, Furcraea, Hesperoyucca, Polianthes y Yucca; de éstas, 4 pertenecen a la subfamilia Dryophthorinae (Scyphophorus acupunctatus, S. yuccae, Rhinostomus frontalis y Cactophagus spinolae y 1 a la Baridinae (Peltophorus polymitus. Se presentan diagnosis, ilustraciones y una clave para la identificación de las 5 especies de curculiónidos asociados con agaves. Se establecen las siguientes sinonimias: Sphenophorus validus LeConte, 1858 = Cactophagus spinolae (Gyllenhal, 1838; y Zygops polymitus seminiveus LeConte, 1884, Z. p. leopardinus Desbrochers, 1891 y Z. p. suffusus Casey, 1892 = Peltophorus polymitus Boheman, 1845.Weevils (Coleoptera: Curculionidae associated with agaves (Asparagaceae: Agavoideae from Mexico are analyzed. Five species were recorded associated with species of Agave, Furcraea, Hesperoyucca, Polianthes, and Yucca. Four of these species belong to the subfamily Dryophthorinae (Scyphophorus acupunctatus, S. yuccae, Rhinostomus frontalis, and Cactophagus spinolae and 1 belongs to the subfamily Baridinae (Peltophorus polymitus. Diagnoses, illustrations and a key are presented for identifying the 5 species of weevils found on agaves. The following synonymies are established: Sphenophorus validus LeConte, 1858 = Cactophagus spinolae (Gyllenhal, 1838; and Zygops polymitus seminiveus LeConte, 1884, Z. p. leopardinus Desbrochers, 1891, and Z. p. suffusus Casey, 1892 = Peltophorus polymitus Boheman, 1845.

  14. Influence of elevation on bark beetle (Coleoptera: Curculionidae, Scolytinae) community structure and flight periodicity in ponderosa pine forests of Arizona

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly K. Williams; Joel D. McMillin; Tom E. DeGomez; Karen M. Clancy; Andy Miller

    2008-01-01

    We examined abundance and flight periodicity of five Ips and six Dendroctonus species (Coleoptera: Curculionidae, Scolytinae) among three different elevation bands in ponderosa pine (Pinus ponderosa Douglas ex. Lawson) forests of northcentral Arizona. Bark beetle populations were monitored at 10 sites in each of three elevation...

  15. Biology and host preferences of Cryptorhynchus melastomae (Coleoptera: Curculionidae), a possible biocontrol agent for Miconia calvescens (Melastomataceae) in Hawaii

    Science.gov (United States)

    E. Reichert; M.T. Johnson; E. Chacon; R.S. Anderson; T.A. Wheeler

    2010-01-01

    The introduced plant Miconia calvescens (Melastomataceae) poses a grave threat to Hawaii's native ecosystems and biodiversity. One potential candidate for classical biological control is Cryptorhynchus melastomae (Coleoptera: Curculionidae: Cryptorhynchinae), a stem-boring weevil from Central and South America. This weevil...

  16. The historical role of Ips hauseri (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) in the spruce forest of Ile-Alatausky and Medeo National Parks

    Science.gov (United States)

    N. Mukhamadiev; A. Lynch; C. O' Connor; A. Sagitov; N. Ashikbaev; I. Panyushkina

    2014-01-01

    On 17 May and 27 June 2011 severe cyclonic storms damaged several hundred hectares of spruce forest (Picea schrenkiana) in the Tian Shan Mountains. Bark beetle populations increased rapidly in dead and damaged trees, particularly Ips hauseri, I. typographus, I. sexdentatus, and Piiyogenesperfossus (all Coleoptera: Curculionidae), and there is concern about the...

  17. Efficacy of two insecticides for protecting loblolly pines (Pinus taeda L.) from subcortical beetles (Coleoptera: Curculionidae and Cerambycidae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordon L. Burke; James L. Hanula; Scott Horn; Jackson P. Audley; Kamal JK. Gandhi

    2012-01-01

    Tests were conducted on two insecticides (carbaryl and bifenthrin) for excluding subcortical beetles (Coleoptera: Curculionidae and Cerambycidae) from loblolly pine trees (Pinus taeda L.). Two trap designs (single- and double-pane windows) and two trapping heights (1.5 and 4m) were also evaluated for maximizing beetle catches.

  18. Flight periodicity of the Douglas-fir beetle, Dendroctonus pseudotsugae Hopkins (Coleoptera: Curculionidae: Scolytinae) in Colorado, U.S.A

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jose F. Negron; Willis C. Schaupp; Lee Pederson

    2011-01-01

    There are about 500 species of bark beetles (Coleoptera: Curculionidae: Scolytinae) in the United States (Wood 1982). A number of them are important disturbance agents in forested ecosystems, occasionally creating large tracts of dead trees. One eruptive species is the Douglas-fir beetle, Dendroctonus pseudotsugae Hopkins, which utilizes Douglas-fir, Pseudotsuga...

  19. Rearing Xyleborus volvulus (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) on Media Containing Sawdust from Avocado or Silkbay, with or without Raffaelea lauricola (Ophiostomatales: Ophiostomataceae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Like other ambrosia beetles, Xyleborus volvulus Fabricius (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) lives in a mutualistic symbiotic relationship with fungi that serve as food source. Until recently, X. volvulus was not considered a pest, and none of its symbionts were considered plant pathogens. However, recent ...

  20. Olfactometer responses of plum curculio Conotrachelus nenuphar (Herbst) (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) to host plant volatiles, synthetic grandisoic acid, and live conspecifics

    Science.gov (United States)

    The plum curculio Conotrachelus nenuphar (Herbst) (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) is a major pest of pome and stone fruit, but will also attack other fruits. Males produce the aggregation pheromone grandisoic acid; emitting only the (+)- enantiomer which is attractive to both sexes of the univoltine an...

  1. Intra-annual variation in responses by flying southern pine beetles (Coleoptera: Curculionidae: Scolytinae) to pheromone component endo-brevicomin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brian T. Sullivan; Cavell Brownie; JoAnne P. Barrett

    2016-01-01

    The southern pine beetle Dendroctonus frontalis Zimmermann (Coleoptera: Curculionidae: Scolytinae) is attracted to an aggregation pheromone that includes the multifunctional pheromone component endobrevicomin. The effect of endo-brevicomin on attractive lures varies from strong enhancement to reduction of beetle attraction depending upon release rate, lure component...

  2. Distribution and ultrastructure of the antennal sensilla of the grape weevil Naupactus xanthographus (Coleoptera: Curculionidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vera, Waleska; Bergmann, Jan

    2018-03-12

    The grape weevil, Naupactus xanthographus Germar (Coleoptera: Curculionidae), is a polyphagous insect native to southern South America that causes considerable damage in grape and other fruit species. In this study, the morphology and ultrastructure of the antennae and the antennal sensilla of N. xanthographus were investigated using scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy. The antennae consist of a scape, a pedicel, a funicle, and a zone called the "club," which are all formed by a total of 12 antennomers. Different types of sensilla were observed: sensilla trichoidea, sensilla chaetica type 1 and 2, sensilla basiconica, and sensilla rod-like. No sexual dimorphism was observed. The possible functions of the sensilla are discussed in relation to their morphology and ultrastructure. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Interaction of Insecticide and Media Moisture on Ambrosia Beetle (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) Attacks on Selected Ornamental Trees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frank, Steven D; Anderson, Amanda L; Ranger, Christopher M

    2017-12-08

    Exotic ambrosia beetles, particularly Xylosandrus crassiusculus (Motschulsky) (Coleoptera: Curculionidae: Scolytinae) and Xylosandrus germanus (Blandford) (Coleoptera: Curculionidae: Scolytinae), are among the most damaging pests of ornamental trees in nurseries. Growers have had few tactics besides insecticide applications to reduce ambrosia beetle attacks but recent research has shown that attacks may be reduced by maintaining media moisture below a 50% threshold thereby reducing flood stress. We compared the efficacy of managing media moisture and insecticide applications for reducing ambrosia beetle attacks on three ornamental tree species in North Carolina. During trials in spring 2013 and 2015, flooded Cornus florida and Cornus kousa were heavily attacked despite sprays with permethrin, but nonflooded C. kousa or C. florida were not attacked. In spring 2015 trials, both nonflooded and flooded Styrax japonicus were heavily attacked regardless of permethrin applications. Although ethanol emissions were not measured, the apparently healthy nonflooded S. japonicus trees may have been exposed to an unknown physiological stress, such as low temperature injury, the previous winter, which predisposed them to beetle attack. However, ethanol levels within host tissues were not measured as part of the current study. X. crassiusculus (75%), Xyloborinus saxesenii Ratzburg (13%), and X. germanus (9%) were the most abundant species collected in ethanol baited traps deployed in 2015, while X. crassiusculus (63%) and X. germanus (36%) were the predominant species reared from attacked trees. Results indicate that managing media moisture levels at or below 50%, and maximizing tree health overall, may provide significant protection against Xylosandrus spp. attacks in flood intolerant tree species. © The Authors 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Entomological Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  4. Feromônios de agregação em curculionidae (insecta: coleoptera e sua implicação taxonômica Aggregation pheromone in curculionidae (insecta: coleoptera and their taxonomic implication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bianca Giuliano Ambrogi

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The pheromones of the weevils has been the most studied and used so far for Coleoptera species. The majority of reported weevil pheromones is produced by males and usually attract both sexes. The identified pheromone compounds are classified in two categories: ten-carbon compounds with terpenoid branching and compounds of various sizes, apparently of fatty-acid origin. These pheromone structural categories are consistent within subfamilies. This review aims to give an overview of the aggregation pheromones identified for Curculionidae pests, describing the relationship of the molecules structural pattern among subfamilies, and propose an identification key based on the structure of the pheromone components.

  5. Timing and host plant associations in the evolution of the weevil tribe Apionini (Apioninae, Brentidae, Curculionoidea, Coleoptera) indicate an ancient co-diversification pattern of beetles and flowering plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winter, Sven; Friedman, Ariel L L; Astrin, Jonas J; Gottsberger, Brigitte; Letsch, Harald

    2017-02-01

    Host plant shifts of insects can lead to a burst of diversification driven by their arrival in a new adaptive zone. In this context, our study aims to explore timing and patterns in the evolution of the weevil tribe Apionini (Brentidae, Curculionoidea, Coleoptera), particularly in relation to affiliations with their host plants. The classification of Apionini is difficult because of their relatively uniform appearance. Most taxa live mono- or oligophagously on members of Asteraceae or Fabaceae, but many are associated with other plant families, like Lamiaceae, Malvaceae and Polygonaceae. However, a comprehensive hypothesis of the phylogenetic relationships within the tribe Apionini is still missing. In the present study, we reconstructed trees and estimated divergence times among tribes. These results were further used to reconstruct the ancestral host plant use in Apionini weevils and to infer if the divergence timing of putative subtribes corresponds with the occurrence and radiation of their specific host plant groups. Phylogenetic analyses confirm the monophyly of most subtribes, with the exceptions of Oxystomatina, Kalcapiina and Aspidapiina. The subribe Aplemonina is inferred to be sister to all remaining Apionini. Divergence time estimates indicate the first occurrence of Apionini in the Upper Cretaceous and a simultaneous occurrence of several families of flowering plants and the occupation by Apionini weevil herbivores. These conspicuous coincidences support either an ancient co-diversification scenario or an escalating diversification in weevils induced by the radiation of flowering plants. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Efficacy of traps, lures, and repellents for Xylosandrus compactus (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) and other ambrosia beetles on Coffea arabica plantations and Acacia koa nurseries in Hawaii

    Science.gov (United States)

    E. G. Burbano; M.G. Wright; N.E. Gillette; S. Mori; N. Dudley; N. Jones; M. Kaufmann

    2012-01-01

    The black twig borer, Xylosandrus compactus (Eichhoff) (Coleoptera: Curculionidae: Scolytinae), is a pest of coffee and many endemic Hawaiian plants. Traps baited with chemical attractants commonly are used to capture ambrosia beetles for purposes of monitoring, studying population dynamics, predicting outbreaks, and mass trapping to reduce damage...

  7. Effectiveness of Cedar Oil Products for Preventing Host Use by Ips avulsus (Eichhoff) (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) in a Modified Small-Bolt Assay

    Science.gov (United States)

    B. L. Strom; L. M. Roton

    2011-01-01

    Insecticide products based on cedar oil are readily available, but evaluations against pine bark beetles (Coleoptera: Curculionidae: Scolytinae) are lacking. In the southeastern U.S., the southern pine beetle, Dendroctonus frontalis Zimm, is the major bark beetle pest for which tree protectants are applied. However, Ips avulsus (Eichhoff) are more consistently...

  8. New records of Paracrias Ashmead (Hymenoptera, Eulophidae as parasitoids on weevil larvae (Coleoptera, Curculionidae in Brazil, with the description of a new species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciano Palmieri

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Paracrias strii Schauff, 1985 and P. ceratophaga Palmieri & Hansson sp. nov. are first record in Brazil and both are associated with Ceratopus Schoenherr larvae (Coleoptera, Curculionidae reared from syconia of two species of fig-trees. Both Paracrias species are diagnosed and illustrated. Males of P. ceratophaga sp. nov. are described. The association of Paracrias with weevil larvae is briefly discussed.

  9. Efficacy of “Verbenone Plus” for protecting ponderosa pine trees and stands from Dendroctonus brevicomis (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) attack in British Columbia and California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christopher J. Fettig; Stephen R. McKelvey; Christopher P. Dabney; Dezene P.W. Huber; Cameron C. Lait; Donald L Fowler; John H. Borden

    2012-01-01

    The western pine beetle, Dendroctonus brevicomis LeConte (Coleoptera: Curculionidae, Scolytinae), is a major cause of ponderosa pine, Pinus ponderosa Douglas ex Lawson, mortality in much of western North America. We review several years of research that led to the identification of Verbenone Plus, a novel four-component...

  10. First field collection of the Rough Sweetpotato Weevil, Blosyrus asellus(Olivier)(Coleoptera: Curculionidae) on Hawaii Island, with notes on detection methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rough sweetpotato weevil, Blosyrus asellus(Olivier)(Coleoptera: Curculionidae), was first detected in the state of Hawaii at a commercial Okinawan sweetpotato farm in Waipio, Oahu, on 14 November 2008. Reported here is, the first detection of this pest in sweetpotato fields on the island of Hawaii (...

  11. Entomopathogenic fungi as a biological control agents for the vector of the laurel wilt disease, the redbay ambrosia beetle, Xyleborus glabratus (Coleoptera: Curculionidae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The redbay ambrosia beetle (RAB), Xyleborus glabratus (Coleoptera: Curculionidae: Scolytinae) vectors the fungal pathogen, Raffaelea lauricola, which causes laurel wilt (LW), a lethal disease of trees in the family Lauraceae, including the most commercially important crop in this family, avocado, Pe...

  12. Responses of Dendroctonus brevicomis (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) in behavioral assays: Implications to development of a semiochemical-based tool for tree protection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christopher J. Fettig; Stephen R. McKelvey; Christopher P. Dabney; Dezene P.W. Huber

    2012-01-01

    Currently, techniques for managing western pine beetle, Dendroctonus brevicomis LeConte (Coleoptera: Curculionidae, Scolytinae), infestations are limited to tree removals (thinning) that reduce stand density and presumably host susceptibility, and/or the use of insecticides to protect individual trees. There continues to be significant interest in...

  13. Xyleborus bispinatus (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) reared on artificial media using sawdust from avocado or silkbay in presence or absence of the laurel wilt pathogen (Raffaelea lauricola).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xyleborus bispinatus Eichhoff (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) was reported in Florida for the first time in 2013. Previously, it was unrecognized and not distinguished from the morphologically similar Xyleborus ferrugineus (F.). Like other members of the tribe Xyleborini, X. ferrugineus (and possibly X....

  14. Wingnut (Juglandaceae) as a new generic host for Pityophthorus juglandis (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) and the thousand cankers disease pathogen, Geosmithia morbida (Ascomycota: Hypocreales)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stacy M. Hishinuma; Paul L. Dallara; Mohammad A. Yaghmour; Marcelo M. Zerillo; Corwin M. Parker; Tatiana V. Roubtsova; Tivonne L. Nguyen; Ned A. Tisserat; Richard M. Bostock; Mary L. Flint; Steven J. Seybold

    2016-01-01

    The walnut twig beetle (WTB), Pityophthorus juglandis Blackman (Coleoptera: Curculionidae), vectors a fungus, Geosmithia morbida Kolarík, Freeland, Utley, and Tisserat (Ascomycota: Hypocreales), which colonises and kills the phloem of walnut and butternut trees, Juglans Linnaeus (Juglandaceae). Over the...

  15. Evaluation of lure combinations containing essential oils and volatile spiroketals for detection of host-seeking Xyleborus glabratus (Coleoptera: Curculionidae: Scolytinae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The invasive redbay ambrosia beetle, Xyleborus glabratus Eichhoff (Coleoptera: Curculionidae: Scolytinae) vectors the fungal pathogen (Raffaelea lauricola) that causes laurel wilt, a disease responsible for widespread mortality of trees in the Lauraceae in the southeastern U.S. Early detection of in...

  16. Lack of genetic differentiation in aggressive and secondary bark beetles (Coleoptera: Curculionidae, Scolytinae) from Arizona.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allender, Christopher J; Clancy, Karen M; Degomez, Tom E; McMillin, Joel D; Woolbright, Scott A; Keim, Paul; Wagner, David M

    2008-06-01

    Bark beetles (Coleoptera: Curculionidae, Scolytinae) play an important role as disturbance agents in ponderosa pine (Pinus ponderosa Douglas ex Lawson) forests of Arizona. However, from 2001 to 2003, elevated bark beetle activity caused unprecedented levels of ponderosa pine mortality. A better understanding of the population structure of these species will facilitate analysis of their dispersal patterns and improve management strategies. Here, we use fluorescently labeled amplified fragment length polymorphism (fAFLP) analysis to resolve genetic variation among and within sampling locations in northcentral Arizona of Ips pini (Say), Dendroctonus brevicomis LeConte, and D. frontalis Zimmermann. We generated genetic fingerprints for >500 beetle specimens and analyzed genetic diversity. For all species, gene flow estimates among sampling locations were high, and significant population subdivision was not discernible across a large portion of ponderosa pine forests in Arizona. However, a weak relationship was detected with I. pini population structure and elevation. Because of the lack of genetic differentiation detected throughout the large study area, our findings suggest these insects are capable of long distance dispersal and exhibit a high degree of gene flow across a broad region. We conclude that our results are consistent with strong dispersal patterns and large population sizes of all three species.

  17. Electrophysiological and behavioral responses of Dendroctonus valens (Coleoptera: Curculionidae: Scolytinae) to four bark beetle pheromones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Longwa; Clarke, Stephen R; Sun, Jianghua

    2009-04-01

    The red turpentine beetle, Dendroctonus valens LeConte (Coleoptera: Curculionidae: Scolytinae), has caused extensive mortality of Pinus tabuliformis Carrière in north central China. The electrophysiological and behavioral activities of the four bark beetle pheromones, frontalin, exo-brevicomin, trans-verbenol, and cis-verbenol, singly or in combination with host-produced kairomones, were tested on red turpentine beetles. Both sexes showed a consistent electrophysiological response to the four test compounds. In Y-tube olfactometer bioassays, walking red turpentine beetles selected the host compound (+)-3-carene over any of the test compounds, but significantly higher numbers chose each tested pheromone over a blank control. The four compounds, tested singly or in combination, were not attractive to red turpentine beetles in field trapping studies in 2006 and 2007 and also did not significantly increase trap catch when combined with (+)-3-carene. Frontalin, alone or in combination with exo-brevicomin and trans-verbenol, significantly reduced the attractiveness of (+)-3-carene in 2006 but not in 2007. The possible roles of the pheromones in host and mate finding and selection are discussed.

  18. Susceptibility of fruit from diverse apple and crabapple germplasm to attack by plum curculio (Coleoptera: Curculionidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myers, Clayton T; Leskey, Tracy C; Forsline, Philip L

    2007-10-01

    Plum curculio, Conotrachelus nenuphar (Herbst) (Coleoptera: Curculionidae), is an important apple, Malus domestica Borkh., pest that significantly hinders sustainable apple production in eastern North America. The potential for host plant resistance to plum curculio among apple germplasm has never been rigorously evaluated. Thus, studies were conducted to assess the susceptibility of a number of exotic and domestic Malus accessions housed at the USDA Plant Genetic Resources Unit (PGRU) "core" collection in Geneva, NY. Contrary to earlier published reports and promising data from a field assessment in 2005, these results suggest that there is probably little potential for genetic resistance to plum curculio among the Malus germplasm collection evaluated. More specifically, four Malus hybrid selections that have previously been released with claims of plum curculio resistance were shown to be susceptible to plum curculio attack. Because there are additional accessions housed at PGRU outside of the core collection that are currently classified as resistant, further studies are necessary to evaluate the true resistance qualities of these releases. It is also important to clarify such discrepancies in both the USDA online Germplasm Resources Information Network and in the horticultural literature. Although other Malus species exhibited some variability in fruit susceptibility, none could be classified as being truly resistant to plum curculio attack by any definition that would have relevance to commercial production and sale of apples.

  19. Blueberry Cultivars Differ in Susceptibility to the Elephant Weevil, Orthorhinus cylindrirostris (Coleoptera: Curculionidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murdoch, Gregory; Clift, Alan D; Mansfield, Sarah

    2017-10-01

    The accumulated damage from elephant weevil larvae, Orthorhinus cylindrirostris (F.) (Coleoptera: Curculionidae), reduces blueberry yield and shortens the productive lifespan of blueberry plants by several years. Selective breeding to develop pest-resistant blueberry cultivars is a possible control option, but the relationship between O. cylindrirostris populations, plant damage, and blueberry yield has not been described. A field survey of 17 blueberry cultivars was conducted on a commercial farm to measure O. cylindrirostris populations (emergence holes and adult numbers) and yield from plants of different ages (2-12 yr). Blueberry plants accumulated damage over time, that is, older plants tended to have more O. cylindrirostris emergence holes than younger plants. All cultivars received some level of O. cylindrirostris attack but this did not always lead to yield losses. Newer cultivars that have been in production since 2000 were less susceptible to O. cylindrirostris than older cultivars. Removal of highly susceptible cultivars from commercial blueberry farms may reduce O. cylindrirostris populations. There is potential for selective breeding to increase plant resistance to O. cylindrirostris if the specific resistance mechanisms can be identified in blueberry. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Entomological Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  20. Insecticidal activities of constituents of Litsea cubeba fruit extracts effective against the maize weevil (Coleoptera: Curculionidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hong Jian; Zheng, Lian He; Zhao, Kuo; Chen, Yan; Yi, Zou

    2017-09-01

    In this study, we investigated the insecticidal activities, including contact toxicity, fumigant toxicity, and repellent activity, of Litsea cubeba fruit extracts against Sitophilus zeamais Motschulsky (Coleoptera: Curculionidae). The extracts, obtained by liquid-liquid extraction in n-hexane, ethyl acetate, chloroform, and water were analyzed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Among the different extract types, chloroform extracts exhibited the strongest repellent, contact, and fumigant activities against S. zeamais. The main components of the chloroform extracts were identified as laurine (21.15%) and 2,6-diisopropyl aniline (16.14%), followed by chlorobutanol (10.54%), 3-O-methyl-N-acetyl-d-glucosamine (10.03%), and 6-methyl-5-hepten-2-one (8.33%). Among the identified components of the chloroform extracts, chlorobutanol showed the strongest fumigant toxicity (LD50 = 21.91 mg/liter), contact toxicity (LD50 = 54.25 µg/adult), and repellent activity against S. zeamais. These results indicate that L. cubeba fruit extracts possess natural insecticide-like activities against S. zeamais. © The Authors 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Entomological Society of America.

  1. Impact of Cultivation and Subsequent Burial on Cydia pomonella (Lepidoptera: Tortricidae) and Conotrachelus nenuphar (Coleoptera: Curculionidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baughman, William B; Nelson, Peter N; Grieshop, Matthew J

    2015-06-01

    We assessed the efficacy of cultivation as a potential management strategy for codling moth, Cydia pomonella L. (Lepidoptera: Tortricidae), and plum curculio, Conotrachelus nenuphar Herbst (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) in apple orchards. Cocooned codling moth pupae and thinning apples infested with plum curculio larvae were cultivated over in the field. Emergence, percent burial, damage to buried fruit, and depth of burial was recorded. In the laboratory, both insects were buried at variable depths in sand and potting soil and emergence was measured. A greater proportion of plum curculio larvae buried in infested fruit under laboratory conditions survived to adulthood compared with unburied infested fruit, down to 15 cm. No codling moth adults emerged from under 1 cm or more of sand. Buried codling moth larvae experienced drastically reduced survival to adulthood compared with unburied larvae. These results indicate that strip cultivation may negatively impact codling moth diapausing larvae and pupae on the ground, but not likely to negatively impact plum curculio in infested dropped apples. © The Authors 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Entomological Society of America.

  2. Development and Life History of Sitophilus zeamais (Coleoptera: Curculionidae on Cereal Crops

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James Adebayo Ojo

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The maize weevil, Sitophilus zeamais Motschulsky (Coleoptera: Curculionidae, is one of the most destructive pests of stored cereals. Knowledge of the life history and biology is important to the development of an integrated pest management program. Investigation was carried out on developmental biology of S. zeamais on four main cereal crops, maize, rice, sorghum, and millet, under laboratory conditions. Egg incubation, oviposition periods, and larval instar development were not different significantly among the food hosts. Number of eggs laid varied significantly among the cereal grains; mean fecundity was highest on maize (67.2±3.16 and lowest on millet (53.8±0.17. Number of immature (larva and pupa and adult stages varied significantly among the cereal grains. There exist four larval instars with a varied mean head capsule width, with a mean total instar larval developmental period of 23.1, 22.2, 22.2, and 21.6 d on maize, rice, sorghum, and millet, respectively. There was linear relationship and significant correlation between the stages of larval development and head capsule width. The mean developmental period from egg to adult varied, being highest on maize (34.7 d and lowest on sorghum (33.5 d.

  3. Screening hybrid poplar clones for susceptibility to Cryptorhynchus lapathi (Coleoptera: Curculionidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hannon, Eugene R; Kittelson, Neal T; Eaton, Jake A; Brown, John J

    2008-02-01

    The poplar-and-willow borer, Cryptorhynchus lapathi (L.) (Coleoptera: Curculionidae), is a wood-boring pest of economic importance in irrigated hybrid poplar (Populus spp.) farms in eastern Washington and Oregon. There is no practical insecticide control tactic against either the larval or adult stage of C. lapathi. To assess variability in C. lapathi toward clone preference, we initiated a no-choice study on 180 caged trees that consisted of five clones in a randomized complete block design. C. lapathi was significantly more successful at establishing a population in two clones with Populus trichocarpa X P. deltoides (TxD) parentage (female x male) than in either of two clones with P. deltoides x P. nigra (DxN) parentage (female x male), or a single clone with P. deltoides x P. maximowiczii (DxM) parentage (female X male). There were no significant differences in the rate of weevil development among infested clones, with the exception of DxM trees. Larvae in DxM clones developed on average to the fourth size grouping and those in the two TxD clones developed on average to the fifth size grouping, and this difference was significant. These results corroborate our general damage surveys conducted in the field. Our findings provide growers with the option to choose less susceptible varieties when replanting.

  4. Naturally-Occurring Entomopathogenic Fungi on Three Bark Beetle Species (Coleoptera: Curculionidae in Bulgaria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Slavimira A. Draganova

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Bark beetles (Coleoptera: Curculionidae: Scolytinae belong to one of the most damaging groups of forest insects and the activity of their natural enemies –pathogens, parasitoids,parasites or predators suppressing their population density,is of great importance. Biodiversity of entomopathogenic fungi on bark beetles in Bulgaria has been investigated sporadically. The aim of this preliminary study was to find, identify and study morphological characteristics of fungal entomopathogens naturally-occurring in populations of three curculionid species – Ips sexdentatus Boern, Ips typographus (L. and Dryocoetes autographus (Ratz.. Dead pest adults were found under the bark of Pinus sylvestris and Picea abies trees collectedfrom forests in the Maleshevska and Vitosha Mountains. Fungal pathogens were isolated into pure cultures on SDAY (Sabouraud dextrose agar with yeast extract and were identified based on morphological characteristics both on the host and in a culture.Morphological characteristics of the isolates were studied by phenotypic methods. The fungal isolates obtained from dead adults of Ips sexdentatus, Ips typographus and D. autographus were found to belong to the species Beauveria bassiana (Bals. – Criv. Vuillemin,Beauveria brongniartii (Saccardo Petch and Isaria farinosa (Holmsk. Fries (anamorph Ascomycota, Sordariomycetes: Hypocreales, Cordycipitaceae. Morphological traits of the isolates are described.

  5. Microstructure and nanoindentation of the rostrum of Curculio longinasus Chittenden, 1927 (Coleoptera: Curculionidae)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, Sudhanshu S.; Jansen, Michael A.; Franz, Nico M.; Chawla, Nikhilesh

    2016-01-01

    The rostrum is an extension of the cuticle of the head of weevils (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) and is often used to bore holes for oviposition (the process of laying eggs) into host plant tissue where larval development occurs. In members of the genus Curculio Linnaeus, 1758, the rostrum is long, slender, and strongly curved, but is nevertheless used to excavate straight bore-holes in the fruit of various host plants, through significant deformation of this structure. In this study, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was used to examine the rostrum of Curculio longinasus Chittenden, 1927, leading to a microstructural model that describes its deformation behavior. Specifically, we used the continuous stiffness measurement (CSM) technique in nanoindentation to measure the Young's modulus and hardness of rostrum. The values of Young's modulus and hardness for the endocuticle were measured to be 8.91 ± 0.93 GPa and 558 ± 60 MPa, respectively. These results are critical for generating accurate finite element models of the head's mechanical behavior while it undergoes deformation. - Highlights: •SEM was used to examine the rostrum of Curculio longinasus Chittenden, 1927. •Nanoindentation to measure the Young's modulus and hardness of rostrum. •Results are critical for finite element models of the head's mechanical behavior.

  6. Phenology of the Dalmatian Toadflax Biological Control Agent Mecinus janthiniformis (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) in Utah.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willden, Samantha A; Evans, Edward W

    2018-02-08

    The phenology of the stem-mining weevil Mecinus janthiniformis Toševski and Caldara (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) as adults attacking Dalmatian toadflax, Linaria dalmatica (L.) Miller (Plantaginaceae), was studied in 2014-2015 at two low elevation sites in northern Utah. The seasonal pattern of adult weevil abundance on the host plant at the two sites was most similar between years when described by degree-day accumulation, versus calendar date. Repeated censusing over the growing season revealed that males appeared first and subsequently peaked in abundance on the host plant earlier than females did, such that the adult population was dominated by males early in the season and by females late in the season. Peak female abundance on the host plant occurred at the time when Dalmatian toadflax stems reached their maximum height and density and when they began flowering widely. Maximum toadflax stem heights and densities, and flowering activity, were markedly reduced in 2015 compared to 2014. In contrast to these host plant parameters that vary between years, degree-day accumulation can be used readily for timing collection and survey efforts for adult weevils and female adult weevils in particular. Use of degree-day accumulation can thereby facilitate implementation of redistribution and monitoring programs for M. janthiniformis as a biological control agent of Dalmatian toadflax. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Entomological Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  7. Identification, Expression Patterns, and Functional Characterization of Chemosensory Proteins in Dendroctonus armandi (Coleoptera: Curculionidae: Scolytinae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhumei; Dai, Lulu; Chu, Honglong; Fu, Danyang; Sun, Yaya; Chen, Hui

    2018-01-01

    The Chinese white pine beetle, Dendroctonus armandi Tsai and Li (Coleoptera: Curculionidae: Scolytinae), is a serious pest of coniferous forests in China. Thus, there is considerable interest in developing eco-friendly pest-control methods, with the use of semiochemicals as a distinct possibility. Olfaction is extremely important for fitness of D. armandi because it is the primary mechanism through which the insect locates hosts and mates. Thus, here we characterized nine full-length genes encoding chemosensory proteins (CSPs) from D. armandi . The genes were ubiquitously and multiply expressed across different developmental stages and adult tissues, indicating various roles in developmental metamorphosis, olfaction, and gustation. Ligand-binding assays implied that DarmCSP2 may be the carrier of D. armandi pheromones and various plant host volatiles. These volatiles were identified through RNA interference of DarmCSP2 as: (+)-α-pinene, (+)-β-pinene, (-)-β-pinene, (+)-camphene, (+)-3-carene, and myrcene. The systematic chemosensory functional analysis of DarmCSP2 in this study clarified the molecular mechanisms underlying D. armandi olfaction and provided a theoretical foundation for eco-friendly pest control.

  8. DUE NUOVE SPECIE DI OTIORHYNCHUS (LIXORRHYNCHUS REITTER, 1914 E UNA NUOVA SPECIE DI RAYMONDIONYMUS WOLLASTON, 1873 DEI MONTI AURUNCI (LAZIO (COLEOPTERA, CURCULIONOIDEA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paolo Magrini

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Nella presente nota vengono descritti tre nuovi Curculionoidea ipogei dei Monti Aurunci (Lazio: Otiorhynchus (Lixorrhynchus avoni n. sp.; Otiorhynchus (Lixorrhyn­chus paulae n. sp. e Raymondionymus pulcherrimus n. sp. Nel testo vengono riportate immagini fotografiche dei principali caratteri esoscheletrici (sia interni che esterni che contraddistinguono le nuove specie, nell’ambito dei gruppi di appartenenza. Una cartina geografica riassume lo stato dell’attuale distribuzione dei Lixorrhynchus anoftalmi o microftalmi in Italia penisulare e nell’area Sardo-Corsa. Le prime due specie presentano indubbie affinità con Otiorhynchus (Lixorrhynchus bastianinii Magrini, Meoli & Abbazzi, 2005, recentemente descritto dei Monti Aurunci centrali [Grava dei Serini (= Grotta dei Serini 587 La/FR], mentre la terza specie costituisce, insieme a R. meggiolaroi (Osella, 1977 (Liguria, R. eximius Meregalli & Osella, 2006 (Lazio, Monti Simbruini e R. zoiai (Osella & Giusto, 1985 (Piemonte, Massiccio del Monviso, un gruppo immediatamente riconoscibile rispetto ai taxa congeneri, per la particolare conformazione del pronoto.

  9. Danos de Conotrachelus dubiae (Coleoptera: curculionidae em frutos de camu-camu (Myrciaria dubia na Amazônia Central Damage of camu-camu (Myrciaria dubia fruits by Conotrachelus dubiae (Coleoptera: curculionidae in Central Amazonia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sidney Alberto do Nascimento Ferreira

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available No Brasil, a ocorrência de Conotrachelus dubiae O'Brien, 1995 (Coleoptera: Curculionidae em camu-camu [Myrciaria dubia (H.B.K. McVaugh, Myrtaceae] tinha sido constatada somente em populações naturais. Relata-se sua ocorrência em um cultivo experimental, onde se avaliou os danos de C. dubiae em frutos de camu-camu, em diferentes graus de amadurecimento, entre 1999 e 2003. Os danos causados pela larva aumentaram com o amadurecimento dos frutos, havendo maior comprometimento da polpa do fruto (30 a 90% do que das sementes (7%. A incidência desse inseto pode implicar em perdas quantitativas significativas na produção de camu-camu.In Brazil, the occurrence of Conotrachelus dubiae O'Brien, 1995 (Coleoptera: Curculionidae in camu-camu [Myrciaria dubia (H.B.K. McVaugh, Myrtaceae] had only been verified in natural populations. This report describes its occurrence in an experimental cultivation, where damage of camu-camu fruits by C. dubiae at different ripening stages was evaluated between 1999 and 2003. The damage caused by the larva increased with the degree of ripening of the fruits, with greater damage of fruit pulp (30 to 90% than to seeds (7%. The incidence of this insect may cause significant quantitative losses in the camu-camu production.

  10. Coleoptera: Curculionidae

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    W. Z. 2004 Observation on the life history of Curculio bimacula- tus Faust and its control with Paecilomyces farinosus. For. Pest. Dis. 5, 21–24. Van Oosterhout C., Hutchinson W. F., Wills D. P. M. and Shipley P. 2004 MICRO-CHECKER: software for identifying and correct- ing genotyping errors in microsatellite data. Mol. Ecol ...

  11. Coleoptera: Curculionidae

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    primer (5 -GATGAGTCCTGAGTAAN-3 ). The PCR prod- ucts were denatured and hybridized to 5 -biotinylated (AG)15 probes. Hybridization products containing microsatellites were selectively captured with streptavidin-coated magnetic beads (Promega, Madison, USA). After stringent washing, the captured DNA fragments ...

  12. Distribution of the Related Weevil Species Sitophilus oryzae and S. zeamais (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) in Farmer Stored Grains of China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, F; Yan, X P

    2018-03-28

    Sitophilus oryzae (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) and Sitophilus zeamais (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) are major insect pests of farm-stored grains in China. Moreover, their respective distribution and prevalence are not yet assessed for grain storage facilities in China. The two species are often difficult to identify by morphology because they are immature or their presence is only evident from fragments. Species-specific primers were, therefore, designed based on the cytochrome c oxidase subunit I (COI) of 34 populations found throughout China and three foreign populations. Following the validation of this molecular-based approach for species identification, the distribution of the two species in China was determined from 68 different grain storage facilities. The results indicate that S. zeamais is prevalent throughout the country whereas S. oryzae is mainly present in the south and the center of China. It is believed that this distribution pattern is in function of ecological adaptation, mostly determined by temperature and the grain species. This is the first report of its kind, demonstrating the distribution of S. zeamais and S. oryzae in grain storage facilities throughout China and analyzed by species-specific primers of COI.

  13. Reproductive Plasticity of an Invasive Insect Pest, Rice Water Weevil (Coleoptera: Curculionidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yunshang; Ao, Yan; Jiang, Mingxing

    2017-12-05

    Reproductive plasticity is a key determinant of species invasiveness. However, there are a limited number of studies addressing this issue in exotic insects. The rice water weevil Lissorhoptrus oryzophilus Kuschel (Coleoptera: Curculionidae), which is native to North America, is one of the most invasive insect pests in east Asia. In this study, we investigated the reproductive status of first-generation females (progeny of overwintered weevils) from five geographic regions in southern and northern China in the field, and reproductive status and ovipositional features of females provided with suitable host plants in the laboratory after collection. Under field conditions, a proportion of females oviposited, while the rest remained in diapause from all three southern regions investigated, but reproductive development did not take place in females from the two northern regions, where the weevil produces only one generation per year. However, when fed host plants in the laboratory, females from all regions laid eggs. They typically had a very short ovipositional period (3-6 d on average on rice at a temperature of 27°C), laid a low number of eggs, and did not die soon after oviposition; this was different from common reproductive females. We concluded that first-generation L. oryzophilus females, which largely enter diapause after emergence, are highly plastic in their reproductive performance and are ready to reproduce under favorable conditions. Our results indicate the significance of their reproductive plasticity for geographic spread and population development. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Entomological Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  14. Tropical Plant Extracts as Sources of Grain-Protectant Compounds Against Sitophilus zeamais Motschulsky (Coleoptera: Curculionidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribeiro, L P; Vendramim, J D; Andrade, M S; Bicalho, K U; Silva, M F G F; Vieira, P C; Fernandes, J B

    2014-10-01

    The toxicity of organic plant extracts to Sitophilus zeamais Motschulsky (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) was assessed for three tropical plant species: branches, leaves, and seeds of Annona montana (Annonaceae), branches of Aristolochia paulistana (Aristolochiaceae), and leaves and branches of Casearia sylvestris (Salicaceae). The screening assay resulted that the extracts of A. montana seeds obtained with hexane (LC50 = 534.75 mg kg(-1) and LT50 = 6.10 days) and with dichloromethane (LC50 = 424.67 mg kg(-1) and LT50 = 5.03 days) were the most promising treatments, followed by the extract prepared from A. montana leaves with hexane (LC50 = 837.70 mg kg(-1) and LT50 = 4.90 days). Moreover, extracts (at 1,500 mg kg(-1)) prepared from C. sylvestris branches with dichloromethane and A. paulistana with hexane caused significant mortality (37% and 41.5%, respectively) beyond sublethal effects on S. zeamais. Therefore, based on the biological assays, extraction yield, and evaluation of the chromatographic profile of the crude extracts by TLC, the hexane extract of A. montana seeds was selected and fractioned using liquid-liquid partitioning. The hydroalcoholic fraction caused mortality of 55.5%, significantly superior to dichloromethane fraction, which caused 35.5% of mortality. Chemical analyses ((1)H NMR, HPLC, and TLC) were performed, and the results showed the presence of alkaloids and acetogenins in both active fractions, which have been associated with bioactivity. Therefore, extracts prepared from A. montana seeds (especially) is an interesting source of new compounds with promising grain-protectant properties.

  15. Metabolic and Behavioral Mechanisms of Indoxacarb Resistance in Sitophilus zeamais (Coleoptera: Curculionidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haddi, Khalid; Mendonça, Larine P; Dos Santos, Milaine F; Guedes, Raul Narciso C; Oliveira, Eugênio E

    2015-02-01

    The control of the most important pest of stored maize, the weevil Sitophilus zeamais Motschulsky (Coleoptera: Curculionidae), is mainly achieved with the use of pyrethroid insecticides. However, the intensive use of these compounds has led to the selection of resistant populations and has compromised the control efficacy of this insect pest. Here, the toxicity of indoxacarb for a potential use in the control of S. zeamais was assessed on 13 Brazilian populations. Concentration-mortality bioassays, in the presence of synergists (piperonyl butoxide, triphenyl phosphate, and diethyl maleate), were used to assess potential metabolic-based indoxacarb resistance mechanisms. We also assessed the behavioral (locomotory) responses of these populations to indoxacarb exposure. The results showed significant differences between the populations (LD50 values ranged from 0.06 to 13.99 mg a.i/kg of grains), resulting in resistance ratios of >200-fold between the least (Canarana-MT) and the most (Espirito Santo do Pinhal-SP) susceptible populations. The results obtained with synergized indoxacarb suggest the involvement of esterases and glutathione-S-transferases on indoxacarb action, and also suggest the involvement of cytochrome P450-dependent monooxygenases as a potential indoxacarb resistance mechanism in Brazilian populations of S. zeamais. Although indoxacarb-induced behavioral avoidance varied among populations, some resistant populations (e.g., Canarana-MT) were able to reduce exposure to indoxacarb by spending more time in the nontreated areas. Collectively, our findings indicate that the behavioral (locomotory) and physiological responses of these insects may compromise the control efficacy of oxadiazine insecticides (e.g., indoxacarb) in Brazilian populations of S. zeamais. © The Authors 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Entomological Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  16. Residue Age and Attack Pressure Influence Efficacy of Insecticide Treatments Against Ambrosia Beetles (Coleoptera: Curculionidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reding, Michael E; Ranger, Christopher M

    2018-02-09

    Management of ambrosia beetles in ornamental nurseries relies, in part, on insecticide treatments to prevent beetles from boring into trees. However, data on residual efficacy of commonly used pyrethroid insecticides is needed to gauge the duration that trees are protected during spring when peak beetle pressure occurs. Residual efficacy of bifenthrin and permethrin trunk sprays was examined in field trials which used trees injected with 10% ethanol to ensure host attack pressure. Permethrin consistently reduced attacks by Xylosandrus germanus (Blandford; Coleoptera: Curculionidae) and other ambrosia beetles for at least 4 wk, while efficacy of bifenthrin was inconsistent and lasted only about 10 d. Since previous studies demonstrated attacks are positively correlated with host ethanol emissions, we injected trees with 2.5, 5, and 10% ethanol to determine if residual efficacy was affected by attack pressure. Preventive treatments with bifenthrin reduced ambrosia beetle attacks at all concentrations of injected ethanol compared to non-sprayed controls. There was no interaction between attack pressure and insecticide treatment with respect to total attacks or attacks by X. germanus. However, increasing attack pressure did increase the probability of attacks on insecticide treated trees by X. germanus and other Scolytinae. Results from our current study will improve the ability of growers to make decisions on frequency of protective sprays, but residual efficacy of insecticide treatments may decline as attack pressure increases. Cultural practices should therefore maximize host vigor and minimize attack pressure associated with stress-induced ethanol emissions. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Entomological Society of America 2017. This work is written by (a) US Government employee(s) and is in the public domain in the US.

  17. Aggregation Pheromone of the Bearded Weevil, Rhinostomus barbirostris (Coleoptera: Curculionidae): Identification, Synthesis, Absolute Configuration and Bioactivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reis, Analú C; Neta, Palmira L S; Jordão, Jéssica P; Moura, José Inácio L; Vidal, Diogo M; Zarbin, Paulo H G; Fávaro, Carla F

    2018-04-16

    The bearded weevil, Rhinostomus barbirostris (Coleoptera: Curculionidae: Dryophthorinae), attacks coconut trees, oil palms and other species of Arecaceae. Besides direct damage, R. barbirostris may be a vector of diseases in coconut and oil palms, such as stem bleeding (resinosis) and red ring disease. Currently, the only method to control this weevil is by visual observation of damage and removal of infected plants. Semiochemical-based trapping could improve the effectiveness of monitoring and management of R. barbirostris. In comparisons of volatiles released by R. barbirostris males and females by gas chromatography (GC) two male-specific compounds were observed. GC-mass spectrometry (MS) and GC-Fourier transform-infrared (FTIR) analyses of the natural compounds suggested these were diastereoisomers of 5-hydroxy-4-methylheptan-3-one, also known as sitophilure, a pheromone component of other dryophthorine species. Synthesis of the mixture of all four stereoisomers of sitophilure was performed in two steps, and the chemical structures were confirmed by comparing GC retention times and MS and FTIR spectra of natural and synthetic compounds. The absolute configurations of the two male-specific compounds were elucidated by enantioselective GC; the major component was the (4S,5R)-isomer, and the minor component (4S,5S)-sitophilure. In analyses by GC-electroantennography (EAG) the antennae of male and female R. barbirostris only responded to the (4S,5R)-isomer of the synthetic sitophilure. The stereoisomeric mixture of sitophilure was attractive to both sexes of R. barbirostris in laboratory experiments in the presence of sugar cane volatiles, and a similar result was obtained in a preliminary field trapping test.

  18. Bark and ambrosia beetles (Coleoptera: Curculionidae: Scolytinae and Platypodinae infesting mango trees (Mangifera indica L. in Southern Thailand, with two new species recorded for Thailand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wisut Sittichaya

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Fifteen species of ambrosia beetles and two bark beetle belonging to the curculionid subfamilies Scolytinae andPlatypodinae (Coleoptera: Curculionidae were collected from three infested mango trees (Mangifera indica L. in theresearch orchards of the Faculty of Natural Resources, Prince of Songkla University, Songkhla Province. Two species,Arixyleborus grandis (Schedl and Xyleborinus sculptilis (Schedl, are recorded for the first time in Thailand.

  19. Development and survival of the spruce bark beetle, Ips typographus (Coleoptera: Curculionidae: Scolytinae) at low temperatures in the laboratory and the field

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Štefková, Kristýna; Okrouhlík, Jan; Doležal, Petr

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 114, JAN 11 (2017), s. 1-6 E-ISSN 1802-8829 Grant - others:MSM ČR(CZ) LH12098; Lesy ČR(CZ) 08/2009 Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : Coleoptera * Curculionidae * Scolytinae Subject RIV: ED - Physiology OBOR OECD: Biology (theoretical, mathematical, thermal, cryobiology, biological rhythm), Evolutionary biology Impact factor: 1.167, year: 2016 http://www.eje.cz/pdfs/eje/2017/01/01.pdf

  20. A survey of the weevils of Ukraine. Bark and ambrosia beetles (Coleoptera: Curculionidae: Platypodinae and Scolytinae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikulina, Tatyana; Mandelshtam, Mikhail; Petrov, Alexander; Nazarenko, Vitalij; Yunakov, Nikolai

    2015-01-22

    Our knowledge of Ukrainian bark and ambrosia beetles (Coleoptera: Curculionidae: Scolytinae and Platypodinae) is summarized as a baseline for future studies of the fauna, with a checklist including information on distribution, host trees, biology and taxonomy. One hundred twenty-two species are recorded from Ukraine, of which seven are recorded for the first time. One species is recorded for the first time from Europe. Previous records of 24 species are considered dubious and requiring confirmation. In contrast to the Palaearctic Catalogue (Knížek 2011b), we consider Anisandrus maiche to be first described by Kurentsov (1941) rather than by Eggers (1942); A. maiche (Eggers, 1942) is a junior synonym of A. maiche (Kurentsov, 1941). 

  1. Seasonal shifts in accumulation of glycerol biosynthetic gene transcripts in mountain pine beetle, Dendroctonus ponderosae Hopkins (Coleoptera: Curculionidae, larvae

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    Jordie D. Fraser

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Winter mortality is a major factor regulating population size of the mountain pine beetle, Dendroctonus ponderosae Hopkins (Coleoptera: Curculionidae. Glycerol is the major cryoprotectant in this freeze intolerant insect. We report findings from a gene expression study on an overwintering mountain pine beetle population over the course of 35 weeks. mRNA transcript levels suggest glycerol production in the mountain pine beetle occurs through glycogenolytic, gluconeogenic and potentially glyceroneogenic pathways, but not from metabolism of lipids. A two-week lag period between fall glycogen phosphorylase transcript and phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase transcript up-regulation suggests that gluconeogenesis serves as a secondary glycerol-production process, subsequent to exhaustion of the primary glycogenolytic source. These results provide a first look at the details of seasonal gene expression related to the production of glycerol in the mountain pine beetle.

  2. Jumping mechanisms and performance in beetles. II. Weevils (Coleoptera: Curculionidae: Rhamphini).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nadein, Konstantin; Betz, Oliver

    2018-03-01

    We describe the kinematics and performance of the natural jump in the weevil Orchestes fagi (Fabricius, 1801) (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) and its jumping apparatus with underlying anatomy and functional morphology. In weevils, jumping is performed by the hind legs and involves the extension of the hind tibia. The principal structural elements of the jumping apparatus are (1) the femoro-tibial joint, (2) the metafemoral extensor tendon, (3) the extensor ligament, (4) the flexor ligament, (5) the tibial flexor sclerite and (6) the extensor and flexor muscles. The kinematic parameters of the jump (from minimum to maximum) are 530-1965 m s -2 (acceleration), 0.7-2.0 m s -1 (velocity), 1.5-3.0 ms (time to take-off), 0.3-4.4 μJ (kinetic energy) and 54-200 (g-force). The specific joint power as calculated for the femoro-tibial joint during the jumping movement is 0.97 W g -1 . The full extension of the hind tibia during the jump was reached within up to 1.8-2.5 ms. The kinematic parameters, the specific joint power and the time for the full extension of the hind tibia suggest that the jump is performed via a catapult mechanism with an input of elastic strain energy. A resilin-bearing elastic extensor ligament that connects the extensor tendon and the tibial base is considered to be the structure that accumulates the elastic strain energy for the jump. According to our functional model, the extensor ligament is loaded by the contraction of the extensor muscle, while the co-contraction of the antagonistic extensor and flexor muscles prevents the early extension of the tibia. This is attributable to the leverage factors of the femoro-tibial joint providing a mechanical advantage for the flexor muscles over the extensor muscles in the fully flexed position. The release of the accumulated energy is performed by the rapid relaxation of the flexor muscles resulting in the fast extension of the hind tibia propelling the body into air. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All

  3. Molecular Markers Detect Cryptic Predation on Coffee Berry Borer (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) by Silvanid and Laemophloeid Flat Bark Beetles (Coleoptera: Silvanidae, Laemophloeidae) in Coffee Beans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sim, Sheina B; Yoneishi, Nicole M; Brill, Eva; Geib, Scott M; Follett, Peter A

    2016-02-01

    The coffee berry borer, Hypothenemus hampei (Ferrari) (Coleoptera: Curculionidae), is a serious pest of coffee worldwide. It was first detected in Hawai'i in 2010. Two predatory beetles, Cathartus quadricollis (Coleoptera: Silvanidae) and Leptophloeus sp. (Coleoptera: Laemophloeidae), have been observed in H. hampei-infested coffee. Under laboratory conditions, colony-reared C. quadricollis and Leptophloeus sp. prey upon all life stages of H. hampei. However, the H. hampei life cycle occurs almost exclusively within a coffee bean obscured from direct observation. Thus, it is unknown if C. quadricollis and Leptophloeus sp. consume H. hampei as prey in the wild. To demonstrate predation of H. hampei by C. quadricollis and Leptophloeus sp., a molecular assay was developed utilizing species-specific primers targeting short regions of the mitochondrial COI gene to determine species presence. Using these primers, wild C. quadricollis and Leptophloeus sp. were collected and screened for the presence of H. hampei DNA using PCR. Analysis of collections from five coffee farms revealed predation of C. quadricollis and Leptophloeus sp. on H. hampei. Further laboratory testing showed that H. hampei DNA could be detected in predators for as long as 48 h after feeding, indicating the farm-caught predators had preyed on H. hampei within 2 d of sampling. This study demonstrates the utility of molecular markers for the study of the ecology of predators and prey with cryptic behavior, and suggests C. quadricollis and Leptophloeus sp. might be useful biocontrol agents against H. hampei. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Entomological Society of America 2015. This work is written by US Government employees and is in the public domain in the US.

  4. The types of Palaearctic species of the families Apionidae, Rhynchitidae, Attelabidae and Curculionidae in the collection of Étienne Louis Geoffroy (Coleoptera, Curculionoidea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alonso-Zarazaga, M. A.

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available The study of 131 more or less complete Curculionoid specimens of the collection Étienne Louis Geoffroy, conserved in the Muséum d’Histoire Naturelle de Paris (Entomologie has permitted the identification of several nominal species that were nomina dubia and the establishment of several new synonymies and combinations, and, in some cases, the reversion of precedence following Art. 23.9 of the Code, declaring nomina protecta and nomina oblita. New synonymies are (the first term is the valid name: Lixus filiformis (Fabricius, 1781 = Curculio longus Gmelin, 1790; Lasiorhynchites cavifrons (Gyllenhal, 1833 nom. protectum = Rhinomacer viridis Geoffroy, 1785, nom. oblitum; Byctiscus betulae (Linnaeus, 1758 = Rhinomacer auratus Geoffroy, 1785; Neocoenorrhinus pauxillus (Germar, 1824 nom. protectum = Rhinomacer caeruleus Geoffroy, 1785, nom. oblitum; Deporaus betulae (Linnaeus, 1758 = Curculio nigrostriatus Goeze, 1777 = Rhinomacer niger Geoffroy, 1785 = Curculio fuliginosus Gmelin, 1790; Coniocleonus hollbergii (F√•hraeus, 1842 = Curculio sulcatus Goeze, 1777 = Curculio sulcatus Geoffroy, 1785 = Curculio sulcatus Gmelin, 1790; Larinus iaceae (Fabricius, 1775 = Curculio carduelis Goeze, 1777; Hypera postica (Gyllenhal, 1813, nom. protectum = Curculio fasciolatus Geoffroy, 1785, nom. oblitum; Charagmus griseus (Fabricius, 1775 = Curculio cupreosquamosus Goeze, 1777 = Curculio intersectus Geoffroy, 1785 = Curculio squamosus Gmelin, 1790; Sitona hispidulus (Fabricius, 1777 = Curculio griseus Goeze, 1777 = Curculio modestus Geoffroy, 1785 = Curculio geoffroaei Gmelin, 1790; Aulacobaris cuprirostris (Fabricius, 1787 = Curculio viridisericeus Goeze, 1777; Cleopomiarus plantarum (Germar, 1824, nom. protectum = Curculio nigrostriatus Goeze, 1777 = Curculio floriger Geoffroy, 1785, nom. oblitum = Curculio subglobosus Gmelin, 1790, nom. oblitum; Anisorhynchus scabrosus (Geoffroy, 1785 = Curculio barbatus Rossi, 1794; Hylobius abietis (Linnaeus, 1758 = Curculio tigris Gmelin, 1790; Sitophilus granarius (Linnaeus, 1758 = Curculio contractus Geoffroy, 1785; Phyllobius pomaceus Gyllenhal, 1834 = Curculio auratus Geoffroy, 1785; Hylobius transversovittatus (Goeze, 1777 = Curculio fascialis Gmelin, 1790. New combinations are: Leucophyes occidentalis (Dieckmann, 1982 (from Leucosomus and Anisorhynchus scabrosus (Geoffroy, 1785 (from Curculio. The following names have been reinstated (stat. res. as valid: Trachyphloeus spinosus (Goeze, 1777 for the species known as Trachyphloeus olivieri Bedel, 1883, Lixus pulverulentus (Scopoli, 1763 for the species known as Lixus angustatus (Fabricius, 1775. Hypera melancholica (Fabricius, 1793 is confirmed as the valid name for the species hitherto named Hypera fuscocinerea (Marsham, 1802 or Hypera murina (Fabricius, 1793. The following names are considered nomina dubia, since there is no identifiable type material: Curculio pulex Goeze, 1777, Rhinomacer minutus Geoffroy, 1785, Curculio pulex Gmelin, 1790 (non Goeze, 1777, Rhinomacer striatusi> Geoffroy, 1785, Rhinomacer fulgidusi> Geoffroy, 1785, Curculio transversofasciatus Goeze, 1777, Curculio fasciatus Geoffroy, 1785 (non Scopoli, 1763, nec Str√∂m, 1768, nec Degeer, 1775, nec Mu.ller, 1776, Curculio fuscatus Gmelin, 1790, Curculio sulcatus Goeze, 1777: 410 (non Fabricius, 1775, nec Goeze, 1777: 381, Curculio incisus Geoffroy, 1785, Curculio exaratus Gmelin, 1790, Curculio quadratus Goeze, 1777, Curculio quadrilis Geoffroy, 1785, Curculio griseosericeus Goeze, 1777, Curculio communis Geoffroy, 1785, Curculio thoracespinosus Goeze, 1777, Curculio armatus Geoffroy, 1785, Curculio denticulatus Gmelin, 1790 (non Schrank, 1781, nec Geoffroy, 1785, Curculio muricatus Goeze, 1777 (non Drury, 1773, Curculio murinus Geoffroy, 1785 (non Müller, 1764, Curculio fuscipes Geoffroy, 1785, Curculio tesselatus Geoffroy, 1785 (non Fabricius, 1781, Curculio sericeus Goeze, 1777, Curculio villosus Geoffroy, 1785 (non Fabricius, 1781, Curculio sericeus Gmelin, 1790 (non Goeze, 1777, nec Schaller, 1783, nec Piller & Mitterpacher, 1783, Curculio virgo Goeze, 1777, Curculio virgo Geoffroy, 1785 (non Goeze, 1777, Curculio virgo Gmelin, 1790 (non Goeze, 1777, nec Geoffroy, 1785, Curculio punctulatus Geoffroy, 1785.

    El estudio de 131 ejemplares de Curculiónidos, más o menos completos, de la colección Étienne Louis Geoffroy conservados en el Muséum d’Histoire Naturelle de París (Entomología ha permitido identificar varias especies nominales que eran consideradas nomina dubia y establecer varias nuevas sinonimias y combinaciones, e incluso, en algunos casos, recuperar la prioridad de acuerdo con el Art. 23.9 del Código, declarando nomina protecta y nomina oblita. Las nuevas sinonimias son (se indica en primer lugar el nombre válido: Lixus filiformis (Fabricius, 1781 = Curculio longus Gmelin, 1790; Lasiorhynchites cavifrons (Gyllenhal, 1833 nom. protectum = Rhinomacer viridis Geoffroy, 1785, nom. oblitum; Byctiscus betulae (Linnaeus, 1758 = Rhinomacer auratus Geoffroy, 1785; Neocoenorrhinus pauxillus (Germar, 1824 nom. protectum = Rhinomacer caeruleus Geoffroy, 1785, nom. oblitum; Deporaus betulae (Linnaeus, 1758 = Curculio nigrostriatus Goeze, 1777 = Rhinomacer niger Geoffroy, 1785 = Curculio fuliginosus Gmelin, 1790; Coniocleonus hollbergii (Fåhraeus, 1842 = Curculio sulcatus Goeze, 1777 = Curculio sulcatus Geoffroy, 1785 = Curculio sulcatus Gmelin, 1790; Larinus iaceae (Fabricius, 1775 = Curculio carduelis Goeze, 1777; Hypera postica (Gyllenhal, 1813, nom. protectum = Curculio fasciolatus Geoffroy, 1785, nom. oblitum; Charagmus griseus (Fabricius, 1775 = Curculio cupreosquamosus Goeze, 1777 = Curculio intersectus Geoffroy, 1785 = Curculio squamosus Gmelin, 1790; Sitona hispidulus (Fabricius, 1777 = Curculio griseus Goeze, 1777 = Curculio modestus Geoffroy, 1785 = Curculio geoffroaei Gmelin, 1790; Aulacobaris cuprirostris (Fabricius, 1787 = Curculio viridisericeus Goeze, 1777; Cleopomiarus plantarum (Germar, 1824, nom. protectum = Curculio nigrostriatus Goeze, 1777 = Curculio floriger Geoffroy, 1785, nom. oblitum = Curculio subglobosus Gmelin, 1790, nom. oblitum; Anisorhynchus scabrosus (Geoffroy, 1785 = Curculio barbatus Rossi, 1794; Hylobius abietis (Linnaeus, 1758 = Curculio tigris Gmelin, 1790; Sitophilus granarius (Linnaeus, 1758 = Curculio contractus Geoffroy, 1785; Phyllobius pomaceus Gyllenhal, 1834 = Curculio auratus Geoffroy, 1785; Hylobius transversovittatus (Goeze, 1777 = Curculio fascialis Gmelin, 1790. Las nuevas combinaciones son: Leucophyes occidentalis (Dieckmann, 1982 (desde Leucosomus y Anisorhynchus scabrosus (Geoffroy, 1785 (desde Curculio. Se han restablecido como válidos los siguientes nombres (stat. res.: Trachyphloeus spinosus (Goeze, 1777 para la especie conocida como Trachyphloeus olivieri Bedel, 1883, y Lixus pulverulentus (Scopoli, 1763 para Lixus angustatus (Fabricius, 1775. Se confirma como nombre válido Hypera melancholica (Fabricius, 1793 para la especie denominada hasta ahora Hypera fuscocinerea (Marsham, 1802 o Hypera murina (Fabricius, 1793. Al no poder indentificar el material tipo se consideran nomina dubia los siguientes nombres: Curculio pulex Goeze, 1777, Rhinomacer minutus Geoffroy, 1785, Curculio pulex Gmelin, 1790 (non Goeze, 1777, Rhinomacer striatus Geoffroy, 1785, Rhinomacer fulgidus Geoffroy, 1785, Curculio transversofasciatus Goeze, 1777, Curculio fasciatus Geoffroy, 1785 (non Scopoli, 1763, nec Ström, 1768, nec Degeer, 1775, nec Müller, 1776, Curculio fuscatus Gmelin, 1790, Curculio sulcatus Goeze, 1777: 410 (non Fabricius, 1775, nec Goeze, 1777: 381, Curculio incisus Geoffroy, 1785, Curculio exaratus Gmelin, 1790, Curculio quadratus Goeze, 1777, Curculio quadrilis Geoffroy, 1785, Curculio griseosericeus Goeze, 1777, Curculio communis Geoffroy, 1785, Curculio thoracespinosus Goeze, 1777, Curculio armatus Geoffroy, 1785, Curculio denticulatus Gmelin, 1790 (non Schrank, 1781, nec Geoffroy, 1785, Curculio muricatus Goeze, 1777 (non Drury, 1773, Curculio murinus Geoffroy, 1785 (non Müller, 1764, Curculio fuscipes Geoffroy, 1785, Curculio tesselatus Geoffroy, 1785 (non Fabricius, 1781, Curculio sericeus Goeze, 1777, Curculio villosus Geoffroy, 1785 (non Fabricius, 1781, Curculio sericeus Gmelin, 1790 (non Goeze, 1777, nec Schaller, 1783, nec Piller & Mitterpacher, 1783, Curculio virgo Goeze, 1777, Curculio virgo Geoffroy, 1785 (non Goeze, 1777, Curculio virgo Gmelin, 1790 (non Goeze, 1777, nec Geoffroy, 1785, Curculio punctulatus Geoffroy, 1785.

  5. New record of an ambrosia beetle, Dinoplatypus hamatus (Blandford (Coleoptera: Curculionidae: Platypodinae in Korea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sangwook Park

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Dinoplatypus hamatus (Blandford (Curculionidae: Platypodinae is reported from Korea for the first time. We provided a key to Korean species of Dinoplatypus Wood and included photographic images of two Korean Dinoplatypus species.

  6. Response to host volatiles by native and introduced populations of Dendroctonus valens (Coleoptera: Curculionidae, Scolytinae) in North America and China.  Journal of Chemical Ecology 33: 131-146.

    Science.gov (United States)

    N. Erbilgin; S.R. Mori; J.H. Sun; J.D. Stein; D.R. Owen; L.D. Merrill; R. Campos Bolande; os; K.F. Raffa; T. Mendez Montiel; D.L. Wood; N.E.  Gillette

    2007-01-01

    Bark beetles (Coleoptera: Curculionidae, Scolytinae) have specialized feeding habits, and commonly colonize only one or a few closely related host genera in their geographical ranges. The red turpentine beetle, Dendroctonus valens LeConte, has a broad geographic distribution in North America and exploits volatile cues from a wide variety of pines...

  7. Re-description and first host and biology records of Entedon magnificus (Girault & Dodd) (Hymenoptera, Eulophidae), a natural enemy of Gonipterus weevils (Coleoptera, Curculionidae), a pest of Eucalyptus trees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gumovsky, Alex; De Little, Dave; Rothmann, Sergio; Jaques, Lorena; Mayorga, Sandra Elizabeth Ide

    2015-05-19

    Entedon magnificus (Girault & Dodd) (Hymenoptera: Eulophidae, Entedoninae) is recorded as a gregarious larval endoparasitoid of Gonipterus weevils (Coleoptera: Curculionidae), significant pests of Eucalyptus trees. Entedon magnificus is re-described and illustrated based on females and males from Australia and Tasmania.

  8. Bioecología del barrenador grande de la semilla de aguacate Heilipus lauri Boheman (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) en la región central de México

    OpenAIRE

    Castañeda Vildózola, Alvaro

    2012-01-01

    A pesar de que Heilipus lauri Boheman (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) es una plaga que puede repercutir negativamente en la comercialización exterior del aguacate cultivado en México, se carece de información científica básica y aplicada sobre este insecto. La existente es muy superficial e imprecisa que no puede sustentar aspectos relacionados con su morfología, biología y distribución en nuestro país. Considerando lo anterior se propone generar información básica que pueda s...

  9. Bioatividade da azadiractina e de inseticidas sintéticos sobre a broca-do-café, Hypothenemus hampei (FERRARI, 1867) (COLEOPTERA: CURCULIONIDAE), em laboratório

    OpenAIRE

    Tatiane Lobak

    2016-01-01

    A broca-do-café, Hypothenemus hampei (Ferrari, 1867) (Coleoptera: Curculionidae), é praga limitante à produtividade e a qualidade dos grãos. Com a proibição do uso do endossulfam, para seu controle, em 2013, novas alternativas devem ser pesquisadas, visto que atualmente tem se seis princípios ativos registrados no Brasil, incluindo a azadiractina. Assim, o objetivo deste trabalho foi avaliar a bioatividade da azadiractina e de inseticidas sintéticos sobre a broca-do-café, em condições de labo...

  10. Ultrastructure of Sensory Receptors on the Antennae and Mouthparts of the Adult, Sitophilus oryzae L. and Sitophilus granarius L. (Coleoptera: Curculionidae)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fouda, M.A.; Al-Dali, A.G.; Ghannam, I.S.

    2016-01-01

    The ultrastructure of sensilla on the antennae and mouthparts of adult Sitophilus oryzae L. and S. granarius L. (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) were examined using scanning electron microscopy. Two types of sensilla trichoidea (ST1 and ST2), two types of sensilla basiconica (SB1 and SB2) and one type of sensilla chaetica (SC) were observed on the antennae of the two weevils species. Mouthparts in both species have two sub-types of sensilla basiconica (SB1 and SB2) and one type of sensilla chaetica (SC).

  11. Efficacy of two systemic insecticides injected into loblolly pine for protection against southern pine bark beetles (Coleoptera: Curculionidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grosman, Donald M; Clarke, Stephen R; Upton, William W

    2009-06-01

    We evaluated the efficacy of systemic insecticides emamectin benzoate and fipronil for preventing mortality of individual loblolly pines, Pinus taeda L., as a result of attacks by southern pine bark beetles (Coleoptera: Curculionidae, Scolytinae) for two consecutive years in Mississippi (2005-2006) and Alabama (2006-2007). Trees were injected once in the spring of 2005 (Mississippi) or 2006 (Alabama) and then were baited with species-specific bark beetle lures several weeks later. The southern pine beetle, Dendroctonus frontalis Zimmermann, was the target species but was changed to Ips spp. in Mississippi (but not Alabama) the second year because of few southern pine beetle attacks on baited trees. Single injections of emamectin benzoate were effective in reducing tree mortality caused by bark beetles compared with untreated checks. Although less effective overall, fipronil also significantly reduced tree mortality from southern pine beetle compared with the checks during the second year in Alabama. Tree mortality continued well after the lures had been removed. Evaluations of bolts taken from experimental trees killed in 2006 indicated that emamectin benzoate effectively prevented parent bark beetle gallery construction and that fipronil significantly reduced lengths of galleries constructed by adult beetles, brood development, and emergence, compared with checks. In contrast, neither insecticide treatment prevented the bark beetles from inoculating blue stain fungi, Ophiostoma spp., into treated trees.

  12. Aerial release of Rhinoncomimus latipes (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) to control Persicaria perfoliata (Polygonaceae) using an unmanned aerial system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Yong-Lak; Gururajan, Srikanth; Thistle, Harold; Chandran, Rakesh; Reardon, Richard

    2018-01-01

    Rhinoncomimus latipes (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) is a major biological control agent against the invasive plant Persicaria perfoliata. Release of R. latipes is challenging with the current visit-and-hand release approach because P. perfoliata shows a high degree of patchiness in the landscape, possesses recurved barbs on its stems, and often spreads into hard-to-access areas. This 3-year study developed and evaluated unmanned aerial systems (UAS) for precise aerial release of R. latipes to control P. perfoliata. We have developed two UAS (i.e. quad-rotor and tri-rotor) and an aerial release system to disseminate R. latipes. These include pods containing R. latipes and a dispenser to accommodate eight pods. Results of field tests to evaluate the systems showed no significant (P > 0.05) effects on survivorship and feeding ability of R. latipes after aerial release. Our study demonstrates the potential of UAS for precision aerial release of biological control agents to control invasive plants. The aerial deployment systems we have developed, including both pods and a dispenser, are low cost, logistically practical, and effective with no negative effects on aerially released R. latipes. © 2017 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2017 Society of Chemical Industry.

  13. Efficacy of two insecticides for protecting loblolly pines (Pinus taeda L.) from subcortical beetles (Coleoptera: Curculionidae and Cerambycidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burke, Jordan L; Hanula, James L; Horn, Scott; Audley, Jackson P; Gandhi, Kamal J K

    2012-07-01

    Tests were conducted on two insecticides (carbaryl and bifenthrin) for excluding subcortical beetles (Coleoptera: Curculionidae and Cerambycidae) from loblolly pine trees (Pinus taeda L.). Two trap designs (single- and double-pane windows) and two trapping heights (1.5 and 4 m) were also evaluated for maximizing beetle catches. In July 2009, 15 loblolly pine trees were double girdled and were either left unsprayed or sprayed with carbaryl or bifenthrin. A total of 28 473 bark beetles were caught in window traps, including Ips avulsus Eichoff, I. grandicollis (Eichhoff), I. calligraphus (Germar) and Dendroctonus terebrans (Olivier). Both insecticides significantly reduced colonization of the trees by bark and woodboring beetles by 300-400%, with no differences in efficacy observed between the two insecticides. About 59% more I. avulsus were caught in double- than in single-pane window traps, with no differences for any other species. Traps at 4 m caught more I. avulsus and I. grandicollis (290 and 153% respectively), while traps at 1.5 m caught more D. terebrans (215%). Either bifenthrin or carbaryl can be used to exclude subcortical beetles from loblolly pine trees. Trapping data reflect known vertical partitioning on the bole by these insects. Double-pane traps were slightly more effective than single-pane traps in catching subcortical beetles. Copyright © 2012 Society of Chemical Industry.

  14. Repellent Activity of the Essential Oil from the Heartwood of Pilgerodendron uviferum (D. Don) Florin against Aegorhinus superciliosus (Coleoptera: Curculionidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espinoza, Javier; Urzúa, Alejandro; Tampe, Jocelyne; Parra, Leonardo; Quiroz, Andrés

    2016-04-22

    The weevil Aegorhinus superciliosus Guérin (Coleoptera: Curculionidae), which is endemic to Central-Southern Chile and Argentina, is one of the major berry pests in Chile and the most important pest in the La Araucanía Region (38°44'9″S, 72°35'25″W). Due to the poor effectiveness and problems surrounding the implementation of the traditional control methods using organophosphate and carbamate insecticides, new strategies for controlling this pest are needed. In this communication, we evaluated the behavioral responses of male and female A. superciliosus to volatile compounds released from the essential oil (EO) obtained from the heartwood of Pilgerodendron uviferum (D. Don) Florin using olfactometric bioassays. The composition of the EO was analyzed using gas chromatography (GC) and gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS). According to these analyses, δ-cadinol (24.16%), cubenol (22.64%), 15-copaenol (15.46%) and δ-cadinene (10.81%) were the principal components of the EO. The Pilgerodendron uviferum EO, which is almost exclusively composed of sesquiterpenes (99.5%), exhibited a repellent effect against A. superciliosus adults, regardless of the sex or concentration used (56.6 mg/cm³ and 1.58 × 10(-2) mg/cm³). The EO has low volatility and greater persistence than the EOs composed of monoterpenes and is considered a good model in the search for raspberry weevil repellents.

  15. Electroantennographic and behavioral responses of adults of raspberry weevil Aegorhinus superciliosus (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) to odors released from conspecific females.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mutis, Ana; Parra, Leonardo; Manosalva, Loreto; Palma, Rubén; Candia, Oscar; Lizama, Marcelo; Pardo, Fernando; Perich, Fernando; Quiroz, Andrés

    2010-08-01

    The raspberry weevil, Aegorhinus superciliosus (Guérin) (Coleoptera: Curculionidae), is the most important pest in blueberry and raspberry fields in the south of Chile. In this study, we investigated the electroantennographic and behavioral responses of A. superciliosus to semiochemicals released from conspecific individual adults, with particular attention to male attraction to females. Odors released from females significantly attracted males in a Y-tube olfactometer. Gas chromatographic and mass spectral analysis of female volatile extracts revealed the presence of limonene and α-pinene. Electroantennogram recordings from both sexes indicated that males of A. superciliosus possess olfactory sensitivity for the R isomer of limonene and α-pinene, whereas females only perceived R-limonene. Behavioral assays using synthetic compounds showed that only R-limonene elicited an attraction response from male weevils. Field experiments confirmed the laboratory results, showing that R-limonene was attractive to weevils. This is the first report of intraspecific chemical communication in this weevil. We discuss the origin of these compounds, their possible role in the sexual behavior of this species, and their potential use in a pest control strategy.

  16. Biological traits and the complex of parasitoids of the elm pest Orchestes steppensis (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) in Xinjiang, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Q; Triapitsyn, S V; Wang, C; Zhong, W; Hu, H-Y

    2018-02-01

    The flee-weevil Orchestes steppensis Korotyaev (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) is a steppe eastern Palaearctic species, notable as a serious pest of elms (Ulmus spp., Ulmaceae), by feeding on the leaves (adults) or mining them heavily (larvae), especially of Ulmus pumila L. in Xinjiang, China. We have corrected the previous misidentifications of this weevil in China as O. alni (L.) or O. mutabilis Boheman and demonstrated that it is likely to be an invasive species in Xinjiang. Prior to this study, natural enemies of O. steppensis were unknown in Xinjiang. Resulting from field investigation and rearing in the laboratory during 2013-2016, seven parasitoid species were found to be primary and solitary, attacking larval and pupal stages of the host weevil. Pteromalus sp. 2 is the dominant species and also is the most competitive among the seven parasitoids, which could considered to be a perspective biological control agent of O. steppensis. Yet, the current control of this pest by the local natural enemies in Xinjiang is still currently inefficient, even though in 2016 parasitism was about 36% on U. pumila in Urumqi, so the potential for a classical biological control program against it needs to be further investigated, including an assessment of its parasitoids and other natural enemies in the native range of O. steppensis. The presented information on the natural enemies of this weevil can be also important for a potential classical biological control program against it in North America (Canada and USA), where it is a highly damaging and rapidly spreading invasive species.

  17. Predation by Flat Bark Beetles (Coleoptera: Silvanidae and Laemophloeidae) on Coffee Berry Borer (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) in Hawaii coffee

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coffee berry borer(CBB), Hypothenemus hampei, is a serious pest of coffee worldwide and a new invasive pest in Hawaii. Adult flat bark beetles, mainly Leptophloeus sp.(75%) and Cathartus quadricollis(21%) (Coleoptera: Laemophloeidae and Silvanidae, respectively), were found feeding in CBB-infested c...

  18. Insecticidal efficacy of silica gel with Juniperus oxycedrus ssp. oxycedrus (Pinales: Cupressaceae) essential oil against Sitophilus oryzae (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) and Tribolium confusum (Coleoptera: Tenebrionidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Athanassiou, Christos G; Kavallieratos, Nickolas C; Evergetis, Epameinondas; Katsoula, Anna-Maria; Haroutounian, Serkos A

    2013-08-01

    Laboratory bioassays were carried out to evaluate the effect of silica gel enhanced with the essential oil (EO) of Juniperus oxycedrus L. ssp. oxycedrus (Pinales: Cupressaceae) (derived from berry specimens from Greece) against adults of Sitophilus oryzae (L.) (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) and Tribolium confusum Jacquelin du Val (Coleoptera: Tenebrionidae). For that purpose, a dry mixture consisting of 500 mg of silica gel that had absorbed 2.18 mg of EO (total weight: 502.18 mg) was tested at three doses; 0.125, 0.250, and 0.5 g/kg of wheat, corresponding to 125, 250, and 500 ppm, respectively, and silica gel alone at 0.5 g/kg of wheat corresponding to 500 ppm, at different exposure intervals (24 and 48 h and 7 and 14 d for S. oryzae; 24 and 48 h and 7, 14, and 21 d for T. confusum). The chemical content of the specific EO was determined by gas chromatography (GC)-mass spectrometry (MS) analyses indicating the presence of 31 constituents with myrcene and germacrene-D being the predominant compounds. The bioactivity results for S. oryzae indicated that 48 h of exposure in wheat resulted in an 82% mortality for treatment with 500 ppm of the enhanced silica gel. For 7 d of exposure, 100 and 98% of S. oryzae adults died when they were treated with 500 and 250 ppm of enhanced silica gel, respectively. At 14 d of exposure, all adults died both at 250 and 500 ppm of enhanced silica gel. At 48 h, 7 and 14 d of exposure significantly less S. oryzae adults died in wheat treated with silica gel alone than at 250 or 500 ppm of enhanced silica gel. In the case of T. confusum, at 7 d of exposure, mortality in wheat treated with silica gel only was significantly higher in comparison to the other treatments. At the 14 d of exposure mortality in wheat treated with 500 ppm of silica gel alone was significantly higher than 125 and 250 ppm of the enhanced silica gel. Similar trends were also noted at 21 d of exposure, indicating that there is no enhancement effect from the addition of

  19. Immediate and delayed mortality of Rhyzopertha dominica (Coleoptera: Bostrichidae) and Sitophilus oryzae (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) adults exposed to spinosad-treated commodities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Getchell, Anna Iversen; Subramanyam, Bhadriraju

    2008-06-01

    A series of tests was conducted to characterize differences in the mortality of the lesser grain borer, Rhyzopertha dominica (F.) (Coleoptera: Bostrichidae), and rice weevil, Sitophilus oryzae (L.) (Coleoptera: Curculionidae), exposed to three commodities treated with a liquid and dry spinosad formulation. In laboratory bioassays, adults of the two insect species were exposed to untreated wheat, Triticum aestivum L., corn, Zea mays L., and sorghum, Sorghum bicolor (L.) Moench., and to commodities treated with 1 mg (AI)/kg of liquid and dry spinosad formulations. Mortality was assessed from independent samples examined at specific time intervals to determine immediate mortality and after 24 h of recovery on untreated grain at 28 degrees C and 65% RH to determine delayed mortality. Comparison of the time required for 50% (LT50) and 95% (LT95) mortality indicated that R. dominica adults were consistently and significantly more susceptible (died quickly) than S. oryzae adults when exposed to spinosad-treated commodities. In general, the toxicity of liquid and dry spinosad formulations was similar against R. dominica or S. oryzae. The toxicity of spinosad to each species varied slightly among the three commodities, and there were no consistent trends to suggest that spinosad was more effective on one commodity versus another. LT50 values based on immediate mortality for R. dominica on all commodities ranged from 0.45 to 0.74 d; corresponding values based on delayed mortality ranged from 0.04 to 0.23 d, suggesting delayed toxic action of spinosad in R. dominica. LT50 values based on immediate and delayed mortality for S. oryzae on all three commodities treated with the two spinosad formulations were essentially similar and ranged from 2.75 to 4.56 d. LT95 values for R. dominica based on immediate mortality on spinosad-treated commodities ranged from 1.75 to 3.36 d, and those based on delayed mortality ranged from 0.49 to 1.88 d. There were no significant differences in

  20. Seasonal Phenology and Life-History of Dendroctonus simplex (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) in the Great Lakes Region of North America.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKee, Fraser R; Aukema, Brian H

    2016-08-01

    The eastern larch beetle, Dendroctonus simplex LeConte (Coleoptera: Curculionidae), is distributed throughout the North American boreal forest sympatric with its primary host, the eastern larch or tamarack, Larix laricina (Du Roi) K. Koch. Outbreaks of eastern larch beetles are typically small and associated with stressed tamaracks. Since 2000, however, an outbreak has killed >90,000 ha of tamarack in Minnesota and surrounding Great Lakes region. Identifying the causes of this epidemic is challenging due to knowledge gaps regarding the insect's biology. We present field data from 2011 to 2014 on degree days associated with spring emergence, dispersal, host colonization, and re-emergence from colonized hosts by mature adult beetles, as well as degree days associated with larval development, and prewinter emergence by adult progeny at study sites in northern Minnesota. After initial host colonization in early spring we found that a second brood was established in early summer by re-emerging parents. In 2012, a third brood was established. Across study years, first broods developed to adults by late summer, with many beetles relocating to the base of the host tree to overwinter. Second broods often reached adulthood and initiated prewinter emergence. The third brood of 2012 overwintered as adults, pupae, and late-instars, resuming development the following spring. Each spring, emergence of adult beetles from all broods established the previous year was highly synchronous. Knowledge of the biology of eastern larch beetles along the southern margin of their range aids in understanding how population dynamics may change with a changing climate. © The Authors 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Entomological Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  1. Simple and Efficient Trap for Bark and Ambrosia Beetles (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) to Facilitate Invasive Species Monitoring and Citizen Involvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steininger, M S; Hulcr, J; Šigut, M; Lucky, A

    2015-06-01

    Bark and ambrosia beetles (Coleoptera: Curculionidae: Scolytinae & Platypodinae) are among the most damaging forest pests worldwide, and monitoring is essential to damage prevention. Unfortunately, traps and attractants that are currently used are costly, and agencies rely on limited field personnel for deployment. The situation can be greatly aided by 1) the development of cost-effective trapping techniques, and 2) distribution of the effort through the Citizen Science approach. The goal of this study was to test a simple, effective trap that can be made and deployed by anyone interested in collecting bark and ambrosia beetles. Three trap types made from 2-liter soda bottles and, separately, four attractants were compared. Simple, one-window traps performed comparably at capturing species in traps painted or with multiple windows. A comparison of attractants in two-window traps found that 95% ethanol attracted the highest number of species but that Purell hand sanitizer (70% ethanol) and then Germ-X hand sanitizer (63% ethanol) were also effective. A perforated zip-top plastic bag containing Purell hanging over a trap filled with automobile antifreeze attracted the fewest species and individual specimens. Overall, >4,500 bark and ambrosia beetles, including 30 species were captured, representing a third of the regional species diversity. More than three quarters of the specimens were nonnative, representing nearly half of the known regional exotic species. These results suggest that simple one-window soda bottle traps baited with ethanol-based hand sanitizer will be effective and inexpensive tools for large-scale monitoring of bark and ambrosia beetles. © The Authors 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Entomological Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  2. Pepper Weevil (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) Preferences for Specific Pepper Cultivars, Plant Parts, Fruit Colors, Fruit Sizes, and Timing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seal, Dakshina R.; Martin, Cliff G.

    2016-01-01

    Peppers (Capsicum spp.) are an important crop in the USA, with about 32,000 ha cultivated in 2007, which resulted in $588 million in farm revenue. The pepper weevil, Anthonomus eugenii Cano (Coleoptera: Curculionidae), is the most troublesome insect pest of peppers in the southern United States. It is therefore urgent to find different vulnerabilities of pepper cultivars, fruit and plants parts, fruit colors and sizes, and timing to infestation by A. eugenii. Also relevant is testing whether fruit length and infestation state affect fruit numbers, weights, and proportions of fruit that are infested. Counts of A. eugenii adults and marks from oviposition and feeding suggested that C. chinense Jacquin “Habanero” was least susceptible, and C. annuum L. cultivars “SY” and “SR” were most susceptible. Comparison of plant parts and fruit sizes revealed that A. eugenii preferred the peduncle, calyx, and top of pepper fruits over the middle, bottom, leaves, or remainder of flowers. Anthonomus eugenii does not discriminate between green or yellow fruit color nor vary diurnally in numbers. Based on adult counts, medium to extra-large fruits (≥1.5 cm long) attracted more weevils than small fruits (fruit numbers or fruit weights that were infested, there were no differences between large and small fruits. Choice of pepper cultivar can thus be an important part of an IPM cultural control program designed to combat A. eugenii by reduced susceptibility or by synchronous fruit drop of infested fruits. Our results are potentially helpful in developing scouting programs including paying particular attention to the preferred locations of adults and their sites of feeding and oviposition on the fruit. The results also suggested the potential value of spraying when the fruits are still immature to prevent and control infestation. PMID:26959066

  3. Comparison of Trap Types, Placement, and Colors for Monitoring Anthonomus musculus (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) Adults in Highbush Blueberries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Diego; Salamanca, Jordano; Kyryczenko-Roth, Vera; Alborn, Hans T; Rodriguez-Saona, Cesar

    2018-01-01

    Abstract The cranberry weevil, Anthonomus musculus Say (Coleoptera: Curculionidae), is a key (univoltine) pest of highbush blueberries in the northeast United States. To date, however, no trapping system has been developed to successfully monitor this pest. In 2012–2014, studies were conducted in commercial highbush blueberry farms in New Jersey to 1) evaluate the efficacy of various commercially available traps, designed for other weevil species (e.g., pepper weevil, plum curculio, boll weevil, red palm weevil, and black vine weevil), in capturing A. musculus adults; 2) test whether the relative location of traps within the blueberry canopy affects adult captures and 3) determine the effects of different colored (yellow, white, green, red, blue, brown, and black) sticky traps on weevil captures. For a comparison with existing techniques, we also monitored the number of overwintered adult weevils on blueberry bushes using beat sheet sampling. Of all traps and colors tested, the most A. musculus adults were caught on yellow sticky traps and more adults were captured when these traps were placed at the bottom half of the blueberry canopy, i.e., 0.5–1.0 m above ground. Most weevils were caught on colored traps late in the season (i.e., during bloom), which corresponds mostly to the second (summer) adult generation. Thus, number of overwintered adults caught on traps did not correlate with those on bushes. Although our study identified traps that can be used to capture A. musculus adults, these traps alone (i.e., without semiochemicals) have so far limited applicability for monitoring overwintered adult weevils in highbush blueberries.

  4. Potential of contact insecticides to control Xyleborus glabratus (Coleoptera: Curculionidae), a vector of laurel wilt disease in avocados.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrillo, Daniel; Crane, Jonathan H; Peña, Jorge E

    2013-12-01

    Xyleborus glabratus Eichhoff (Coleoptera: Curculionidae: Scolytinae) is an invasive ambrosia beetle that vectors laurel wilt, a new disease that threatens avocado and other species in the Lauraceae Family. The lethal concentrations (LC50 & 90) of nine commercial insecticides to X. glabratus were determined by using a bolt-dip bioassay. Different formulations of bifenthrin, permethrin, fenpropathrin, z-cypermethrin + bifenthrin, 1-cyhalothrin + thiamethoxam, malathion, chlorpyrifos, carbaryl, and methomyl were tested. Four concentrations of each insecticide were tested (0.5, 0.1, 0.03, and 0.01 of the label rate) and with water as a control. Beetles were exposed to treated bolts and mortality registered 48 h later. After 2 wk, bolts were destructively sampled to determine the number of beetles that constructed galleries and were alive inside the wood. Probit analysis was used to determine the LC50 & 90. Six pesticides were applied directly to the trunk and limbs of avocado trees in a commercial grove. Limbs of treated trees were cut weekly after the application and exposed to X. glabratus to determine the number of beetles boring into the logs. The toxicity of pesticides to X. glabratus was greatly reduced 2 wk after application. Among the tested pesticides, malathion and z-cypermethrin + bifenthrin provided the best suppression of X. glabratus. Among the insecticides registered for use in avocado, fenpropathrin and malathion were the most effective in protecting trees from attack by X. glabratus. Other pesticides that are currently not registered for use in avocados could be useful for managing this ambrosia beetle.

  5. Precise and low-cost monitoring of plum curculio (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) pest activity in pyramid traps with cameras.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selby, R D; Gage, S H; Whalon, M E

    2014-04-01

    Incorporating camera systems into insect traps potentially benefits insect phenology modeling, nonlethal insect monitoring, and research into the automated identification of traps counts. Cameras originally for monitoring mammals were instead adapted to monitor the entrance to pyramid traps designed to capture the plum curculio, Conotrachelus nenuphar (Herbst) (Coleoptera: Curculionidae). Using released curculios, two new trap designs (v.I and v.II) were field-tested alongside conventional pyramid traps at one site in autumn 2010 and at four sites in autumn 2012. The traps were evaluated on the basis of battery power, ease-of-maintenance, adaptability, required-user-skills, cost (including labor), and accuracy-of-results. The v.II design fully surpassed expectations, except that some trapped curculios were not photographed. In 2012, 13 of the 24 traps recorded every curculio entering the traps during the 18-d study period, and in traps where some curculios were not photographed, over 90% of the omissions could be explained by component failure or external interference with the motion sensor. Significantly more curculios entered the camera traps between 1800 and 0000 hours. When compared with conventional pyramid traps, the v.I traps collected a similar number of curculios. Two observed but not significant trends were that the v.I traps collected twice as many plum curculios as the v.II traps, while at the same time the v.II traps collected more than twice as many photos per plum curculio as the v.I traps. The research demonstrates that low-cost, precise monitoring of field insect populations is feasible without requiring extensive technical expertise.

  6. Pengendalian hama penggerek ubi jalar Cylas formicarius (Fabricus (Coleoptera: Curculionidae menggunakan cendawan entomopatogen Beauveria bassiana (Balsamo Vuillemen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marida Santi Yudha Ika Bayu

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Cylas formicarius (Fabricus (Coleoptera: Curculionidae is one of the major pest on sweetpotato which can cause yield lost up to 100%. The objective of this study was to obtain the effective and efficiency control technique of sweetpotato weevils. The research was conducted on June–October 2014 at Muneng Research Station, Probolinggo, East Java, using randomized block design, five treatments and three replicates. The treatments consisted of immersion of sweetpotato cuttings in the suspension of conidia Beauveria bassiana (Bals. Vuill. for 30 minutes before planting; application of suspension of conidia B. bassiana on soil at 2, 4, 6, 8, 10, and 12 weeks after sowing (WAS; immersion of sweetpotato cuttings in the suspension of conidia B. bassiana for 30 minutes before planting combined with application of suspension of conidia B. bassiana on soil at 2, 4, 6, 8, 10, and 12 WAS; application of chemical insecticide every week; and control. Analysis of variance showed that the application of various control technique significantly lowered the population of larvae and imago of C. formicarius and the level of tuber damage. The population level found on all treatments ranged from 1–4 eggs/plant, 1–19 larvae/plant, 0–0.2 pupae/plant and 0–4 imago/plant. The weight of tuber was 571–700 g/plant with the level of damage 6–53%. Low level of damage was found in the aplication of suspension of conidia B. bassiana on soil at 2, 4, 6, 8, 10, and 12 WAS which were 6%. Application of suspension of conidia B. bassiana on soil at 2, 4, 6, 8, 10, and 12 WAS can suppress the population of C. formicarius on tuber and reduce the level of damage up to 48%.

  7. Biology and morphology of immature stages of Adosomus roridus (Coleoptera: Curculionidae: Lixinae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trnka, Filip; Stejskal, Robert; Skuhrovec, Jiří

    2015-09-28

    Mature larva and pupa of Adosomus (s. str.) roridus (Pallas, 1781) (Curculionidae: Lixinae: Cleonini) are described and compared with ten other taxa of Cleonini with known larvae. This weevil is an oligophagous species on the Asteraceae family. From our observations in Slovakia, we found active adults from April to September in dry sunny places within extensively used or fallow vineyards and in ruderal vegetation with host plants. The weevil is a root borer--larvae, pupae and fresh adults were collected from the root necks and roots of Common Tansy (Tanacetum vulgare L.) and rarely from Mugwort (Artemisia vulgaris L.). Each plant was usually occupied by one larva, or more rarely with two or three larvae. The new generation of adult individuals appeared from early summer to autumn. Both larvae and some of the adults overwinter, which is quite unique within Cleonini.

  8. Flutuação Populacional de Rhynchophorus palmarum L. (Coleoptera: Curculionidae em Plantios de Palma de Óleo em Roraima

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Esta pesquisa teve como objetivo avaliar a flutuação populacional de Rhynchophorus palmarum L. (Coleoptera: Curculionidae em plantios de Elaeis guineensis Jacq, em ecossistemas de savana e floresta no estado de Roraima. A pesquisa foi desenvolvida durante o período de janeiro de 2011 a fevereiro de 2012 nos campos experimentais da Embrapa Roraima: Monte Cristo e Caroebe, numa área de 2 hectares com a cultura da Palma de Óleo, em cada campo. Foram distribuídas armadilhas iscadas com roletes de cana-de-açúcar e feromônio de agregação para captura dos insetos no entorno dos plantios. Ocorreu flutuação de R. palmarum com picos populacionais nos meses de julho e agosto no ecossistema de savana e de abril a setembro no ambiente de floresta. A população de R. palmarum foi menor em meses de baixa precipitação pluviométrica nos dois ambientes avaliados com a Palma de Óleo em Roraima Population Fluctuation of Rhynchophorus palmarum L. (Coleoptera: Curculionidae in Plantations of Oil Palm in Roraima Abstract. This research aimed to evaluate the population fluctuation Rhynchophorus palmarum L. (Coleoptera: Curculionidae in Elaeis guineensis Jacq plantations in forest and savanna ecosystems in the state of Roraima. The research was conducted during the period from January 2011 to February 2012 in the experimental field of Embrapa Roraima: Monte Cristo and Caroebe in an area of 2 hectares with culture Oil Palm in each field. Traps baited with rollers cane sugar and aggregation pheromone for capturing insects in the vicinity of the plantations were distributed. Fluctuation occurred R. palmarum with population peaks in the months of July and August in the savanna ecosystem and from April to September in the forest environment. The population of R. palmarum was lower in months of low rainfall in the two environments assessed with a palm-oil-in Roraima.

  9. Rediscovery and redescription of Centrodora damoni (Girault) (Hymenoptera: Aphelinidae) from Australia, an egg parasitoid of Gonipterus spp (Coleoptera: Curculionidae), after nearly a century

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, Samantha E; Valente, Carlos; Gonçalves, Catarina

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background Centrodora is a relatively common and widespread genus of morphologically diverse species, and is the most polyphagous genus known within the Aphelinidae, attacking eggs of insects in addition to pupae of Diptera and Hymenoptera, and nymphs of Hemiptera (Polaszek 1991). There are currently about 60 valid species in the genus, but given its morphological and biological diversity, some elevation of species-groups and subgenera to genus-level might be useful in future. Centrodora is represented in Australia by twelve species (Noyes 2015). New information Centrodora damoni (Girault) is redescribed and diagnosed from recently collected specimens reared from the eucalyptus weevil Gonipterus sp. near scutellatus Gyllenhal (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) from Tasmania, Australia. A lectotype is designated from a syntype specimen. PMID:27226747

  10. Biology of Pityophthorus pulchellus tuberculatus (Coleoptera: Curculionidae: Scolytinae) in Lodgepole Pine in Northern Idaho.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furniss, Malcolm M; Kegley, Sandra J

    2018-04-19

    The twig beetle, Pityophthorus pulchellus tuberculatus Eichhoff, infests dead branches of pines in western United States and Canada, including lodgepole pine, Pinus contorta Douglas, in northern Idaho. Adult broods overwintered in their host and emerged and colonized new hosts in late April. Males initiated galleries and were joined by up to seven females, each of which constructed an egg gallery radiating from a central chamber. Galleries had an average of 4.7 egg niches each with an egg that was large relative to the mother beetle. Two larval instars were recognized. Dentition of larval mandibles differed in shape from that in literature. Mature larvae pupated either in a cell excavated on the wood surface or in a cell below the wood surface. First-generation adults mined extensively in the inner bark and wood before emerging to infest new trees in late June. Their progeny became adults beginning in early August and likewise mined and fed on the inner bark and wood before overwintering. Predacious beetles present as larvae in the galleries included Enoclerus lecontei (Wolcott) (Coleoptera: Cleridae) and Lasconotus sp. (Coleoptera: Zopheridae). Parasitoid Hymenoptera reared from infested trees were Cosmophorus pityophthori Rohwer (Braconidae), Phasmidiasta n. sp. (Braconidae), Spathius sp. (Braconidae), Acerocephala n. sp. (Pteromalidae), Metacolus fasciatus Girault (Pteromalidae), Rhaphitelus maculatus Walker (Pteromalidae), Rhopalicus sp. (Pteromalidae), and an unidentified pteromalid.

  11. Susceptibility of Two Sitophilus species (Coleoptera: Curculionidae to Essential Oils from Foeniculum vulgare and Satureja hortensis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asgar Ebadollahi

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available This study was conducted to determine the insecticidal activity of essential oils from Fennel, Foeniculum vulgare (Apiaceae, and Summer savory, Satureja hortensis (Lamiaceae, against two stored-product insects. Essential oils from two species of plants were obtained by Clevenger-type water distillation and their fumigant toxicities were tested against adults of the wheat weevil, Sitophilus granarius and rice weevil, Sitophilus oryzae (Curculionidae. The mortality was determined after 24 and 48 hrs from beginning of exposure. LC50 values of each essential oil were estimated for each insect species. Fumigation bioassays revealed that essential oils from two plants had strong insecticidal activity on experimental insects. LC50 values indicated that S. granarius was more susceptible than S. oryzae to essential oils at the exposure time 24 and 48 hrs. The mortality effect of S. hortensis oil was lower than F. vulgare oil. The LC50 values decreased with the duration of exposure to the essential oil concentrations. In all case, responses varied according to plant material, concentration, and exposure time. These results indicated that essential oils from S. hortensis and F. vulgare could be applicable to the management of stored product insects to decrease ecologically detrimental effects of utilization synthetic insecticides.

  12. Simulação do dano causado por larvas de Oryzophagus oryzae (Coleoptera: Curculionidae a cultivares de arroz irrigado

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    Martins José Francisco da Silva

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Oryzophagus oryzae (Costa Lima, 1936 (Coleoptera: Curculionidae é a praga-chave da cultura do arroz irrigado na Região Sul do Brasil. As larvas causam os principais danos ao cortarem drasticamente as raízes das plantas. Dois experimentos sobre simulação do dano larval foram realizados testando um equipamento cujo componente principal é uma lâmina metálica em forma de U, para corte das raízes. Raízes das cultivares BR-Irga 414 e Bluebelle, de ciclo biológico curto, e suscetíveis ao inseto e BR-Irga 410 e Dawn, de ciclo médio e resistentes, foram submetidas aos tratamentos de (1 corte artificial, com o simulador, (2 corte natural, pelas larvas e (3 sem corte, artificial ou natural, protegidas com inseticida. A simulação foi praticada na fase vegetativa das plantas, 31 dias pós-irrigação por inundação, época do pico da população larval nas raízes. Avaliaram-se dados sobre comprimento, peso de matéria seca e volume de raízes, imediatamente após a aplicação do tratamento de simulação e na pré-emissão de panículas, população larval em plantas submetidas ao dano natural, e produtividade de grãos. Na avaliação efetuada imediatamente após a simulação, em todas as cultivares, não ocorreu diferença entre índices de dano às raízes resultantes do uso do simulador e da alimentação de larvas. Na fase de pré-emissão das panículas, os índices de recuperação do sistema radicular das plantas submetidas aos danos natural e artificial, também foram similares. As cultivares de ciclo médio apresentaram maior recuperação dos tecidos radiculares e menor perda de produtividade de grãos, confirmando o maior grau de resistência a O. oryzae. Concluiu-se que o método de simulação é aplicável em pesquisas sobre resistência de arroz ao inseto, principalmente na identificação de genótipos tolerantes.

  13. A taxonomic note on Homorosoma horridulum Voss, 1958 (Coleoptera: Curculionidae), with new records from Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korotyaev, Boris A; Yoshitake, Hiraku; Huang, Junhao

    2014-04-08

    Homorosoma horridulum Voss 1958 (Curculionidae: Ceutorhynchinae) was described from Kuatun, China, based on two specimens in the J. Klapperich collection. Since that time it has been uninvestigated for more than half a century, except by Colonnelli (2004), who listed it in his world catalogue of the subfamily. The recent examination of the holotype of H. horridulum revealed that it should be placed in the genus Scleropteroides Colonnelli 1979. In addition, Scleropteroides specimens from Taiwan agree well with the holotype of H. horridulum not only in general appearance but also in male genital structures. Here we transfer Homorosoma horridulum Voss 1958 to the genus Scleropteroides Colonnelli 1979 as Scleropteroides horridulus (Voss 1958) and record the species from Taiwan for the first time. Depositories of specimens examined are abbreviated as follows: CMNC: Canadian Museum of Nature, Ottawa; CWOB: C.W. O'Brien collection, Green Valley, Arizona, USA; EUMJ: Laboratory of Environmental Entomology, Faculty of Agriculture, Ehime University, Matsuyama, Japan; NIAES: National Institute for Agro-Environmental Sciences, Tsukuba, Japan; SMNH: Swedish Museum of Natural History, Stockholm, Sweden; and ZIN: Zoological Institute, Russian Academy of Sciences, St. Petersburg, Russia. Before going further, we wish to express our cordial thanks to R. S. Anderson, François Génier (CMNC), H. Kojima (Tokyo University of Agriculture), M. Sakai (Ehime University), C.W. O'Brien, and B. Viklund (SMNH) for the loan or donation of specimens examined. The first author thanks the late P. Lindskog (SMNH) for the help during his first visit to Stockholm. The study by the first author was supported by Grant No 13-04-01002 from the Russian Foundation for Basic Research.

  14. Taxonomy and cladistics of the group of genera related to Cyrtomon Schoenherr (Coleoptera: Curculionidae: Naupactini

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    ANALÍA A. LANTERI

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available En esta contribución se actualiza la información taxonómica y geográ- fica sobre cinco géneros de gorgojos (Curculionidae: Entiminae: Naupactini dis- tribuidos en Argentina, Brasil, Bolivia, Paraguay y Uruguay. Como resultado de un análisis cladístico basado en 48 caracteres morfológicos y 18 taxones terminales (dos del grupo externo y 16 del grupo en estudio se obtuvo un árbol de máxima parsimonia con dos subgrupos principales, uno formado por Mendozella Hustache como taxón hermano de Cyrtomon Schoenherr, y otro por Lamprocyphopsis Lan- teri, Priocyphopsis Lanteri y Priocyphus Hustache. De acuerdo con este resultado Cyrtomon hirsutus (Hustache es la especie hermana de Mendozella curvispinis (Hustache, en consecuencia se estableció la nueva combinación Mendozella hir - suta (Hustache, y se establece que el género Mendozella incluye actualmente dos especies, ambas distribuidas en Mendoza, Argentina. Cyrtomon se recuperó como grupo monofilético con seis species, C. gibber (Pallas, C. pistor (Boheman, C. luridus (Boheman, C. inhalatus (Germar, C. ovalipennis (Hustache y C. glaucus (Bovie. Priocyphus es monofilético e incluye cinco species, P. bosqi Hustache, P. hustachei Kuschel, P. inops Kuschel, P. kuscheli Lanteri y la especie nueva Prio- cyphus cordobensis; Lamprocyphopsis incluye dos especies, L. viridinitens (Kus- chel y L. paraguayensis Lanteri; y Priocyphopsis es monotípico, con la especie tipo P. humeridens (Hustache como grupo hermano de Priocyphus . Se brindan diagnosis de todos los géneros, una clave para la identificación de todas las espe- cies y fotografías de hábitos, en la mayoría de los casos de sus ejemplares tipo. Se ilustran los caracteres diagnósticos de la cabeza y rostro, tibias anteriores y genita- lia con dibujos lineales. Se describen por primera vez los genitales de la hembra de Mendozella hirsuta y los genitales masculinos de Priocyphus kuscheli.

  15. Elucidating the Common Generalist Predators of Conotrachelus nenuphar (Herbst) (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) in an Organic Apple Orchard Using Molecular Gut-Content Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Jason M.; Szendrei, Zsofia; Grieshop, Matthew

    2016-01-01

    Conotrachelus nenuphar (Herbst) (Coleoptera: Curculionidae), plum curculio, is a serious direct pest of North American tree fruit including, apples, cherries, peaches and plums. Historically, organophosphate insecticides were used for control, but this tool is no longer registered for use in tree fruit. In addition, few organically approved insecticides are available for organic pest control and none have proven efficacy as this time. Therefore, promoting biological control in these systems is the next step, however, little is known about the biological control pathways in this system and how these are influenced by current mechanical and cultural practices required in organic systems. We used molecular gut-content analysis for testing field caught predators for feeding on plum curculio. During the study we monitored populations of plum curculio and the predator community in a production organic apple orchard. Predator populations varied over the season and contained a diverse assemblage of spiders and beetles. A total of 8% of all predators (eight Araneae, two Hemiptera, and six Coleoptera species) assayed for plum curculio predation were observed positive for the presence of plum curculio DNA in their guts, indicating that these species fed on plum curculio prior to collection Results indicate a number of biological control agents exist for this pest and this requires further study in relation to cultural practices. PMID:27348005

  16. Minimal effective dose of phosphine to control the cashew root borer, Marshallius bondari Rosado-Neto (Coleoptera: Curculionidae Dose mínima efetiva de fosfina no controle da broca-da-raiz do cajueiro, Marshallius bondari Rosado-Neto (Coleoptera: Curculionidae

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    Ervino Bleicher

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this research was to determine, in field conditions, the minimal of phosphine effective dose for the cashew root borer control. Three experiments were set up at three different periods: August, October and November, 1994, to control the cashew root borer, Marshallius bondari Rosado-Neto (Coleoptera: Curculionidae, in Piaui State, Brazil. One, two, three and six phosphine tablets of three gram each, per plant were tested. In the August essay, phosphine was inefficient to control the borer. In the October essay, control was achieved using as little as 2 tablets per plant and in November with one tablet per plant to control the adult borers in the soil. Higher efficiency was achieved when treatment was applied far away from the last rain, in other words, as soil dries out.Objetivou-se determinar, em condições de campo, a dose mínima de fosfina para o controle da broca da raiz do cajueiro. Foram instalados 3 experimentos em épocas distintas, sendo o primeiro em agosto, o segundo em outubro e o terceiro em novembro de 1994 para o controle de Marshallius bondari Rosado-Neto (Coleoptera: Curculionidae em cajueiro, Anacardium occidentale L. no município de Pio IX, Estado do Piauí. Foram testadas 1; 2; 3 e 6 pastilhas de fosfina na forma de fosfeto de alumínio, de 3 gramas cada, por planta. No ensaio conduzido em agosto nenhum tratamento foi eficiente para o controle de brocas adultas no solo. No ensaio instalado em outubro, a fosfina foi eficiente a partir de duas pastilhas por planta e no ensaio de novembro a partir de uma pastilha por planta para o controle de adultos no solo. A eficiência foi tanto maior quanto maior foi o tempo decorrido após a última chuva, estando, portanto, o solo mais seco.

  17. Influence of age and diet on the performance of Cephalonomia stephanoderis (Hymenoptera, Bethylidae a parasitoid of the coffee berry borer, Hypothenemus hampei (Coleoptera, Curculionidae

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    Jaime Gómez

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The importance of age and feeding on the performance of Cephalonomia stephanoderis (Hymenoptera, Bethylidae, a parasitoid of the coffee berry borer, Hypothenemus hampei (Coleoptera, Curculionidae was investigated in the laboratory. Groups of female parasitoids were subject to the following treatments: a group fed during one, five and ten days after emergence of adults with coffee borer larvae; another group fed only with honey solution during five days after emergence; and as a control, a third group was kept without food for five days. At the end of each treatment, survivorship, parasitoid activity (walking and flying capacity in an arena, search capacity for finding coffee borer-infested berries, host feeding and oviposition (on immature hosts, were assessed. Unfed females showed a significant decrease in survivorship compared to individuals that were fed. The type of meal (insects or honey did not significantly influence parasitoid activity, search and oviposition capacities. Females fed with honey solution significantly consumed less immature coffee borers. Younger females (one day old walked and flew out of the arena significantly faster than older ones (5 and 10 days old. Implications of these results are discussed on the performance of C. stephanoderis as a biological control agent of the coffee berry borer.

  18. Synergism between demethylation inhibitor fungicides or gibberellin inhibitor plant growth regulators and bifenthrin in a pyrethroid-resistant population of Listronotus maculicollis (Coleoptera: Curculionidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramoutar, D; Cowles, R S; Requintina, E; Alm, S R

    2010-10-01

    In 2007-2008, the "annual bluegrass weevil," Listronotus maculicollis Kirby (Coleoptera: Curculionidae), a serious pest of Poa annua L. (Poales: Poaceae) on U.S. golf courses, was shown to be resistant to two pyrethroids, bifenthrin and lambda-cyhalothrin. In 2008, we showed that bifenthrin resistance was principally mediated by oxidase detoxification (cytochrome P450 [P450]). P450s can be inhibited by demethylation inhibitor fungicides and gibberellin inhibitor plant growth regulators, both of which are commonly used on golf courses. We tested these compounds for synergistic activity with bifenthin against a pyrethroid-resistant population of L. maculicollis. The LD50 value for bifenthrin was significantly reduced from 87 ng per insect (without synergists) to 9.6-40 ng per insect after exposure to the fungicides fenarimol, fenpropimorph, prochloraz, propiconazole, and pyrifenox and the plant growth regulators flurprimidol, paclobutrazol, and trinexapac-ethyl. Simulated field exposure with formulated products registered for use on turf revealed enhanced mortality when adult weevils were exposed to bifenthrin (25% mortality, presented alone) combined with field dosages of propiconizole, fenarimol, flurprimidol, or trinexapac-ethyl (range, 49-70% mortality).

  19. Mattesia weiseri sp. nov., a new neogregarine (Apicomplexa: Lipotrophidae) pathogen of the great spruce bark beetle, Dendroctonus micans (Coleoptera: Curculionidae, Scolytinae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yaman, Mustafa; Radek, Renate

    2015-08-01

    A new neogregarine pathogen of the great spruce bark beetle, Dendroctonus micans (Coleoptera: Curculionidae, Scolytinae), is described based on light microscopy and ultrastructural characteristics. The pathogen infects the fat body and the hemolymph of the beetle. The infection was nonsynchronous so that different developmental stages could be observed simultaneously in the hemolymph. All life stages from sporozoite to oocyst of the pathogen including micronuclear and macronuclear merozoites were detected. The sporozoites measured about 8.7 × 1.9 μm and trophozoites, 11.9 × 3.3 μm. Micronuclear merozoites seen in the hemolymph were motile, elongate, slightly broader at the anterior pole, and measured 18.4 × 2.0 μm. Macronuclear merozoites had a size of ca. 16.4 × 2.3 μm. Gametogamy results in the formation of two paired oocysts within a gametocyst. The lemon-shaped oocyst measured 10.9 × 6.1 μm and had a very thick wall (375-450 nm). All morphological and ultrastructural characteristics of the life cycle stages indicate that the described neogregarine in D. micans is clearly different from known Mattesia species infecting bark beetles, and from any other described Mattesia spp. Therefore, we create a new species, Mattesia weiseri sp. nov.

  20. The morphology of the immature stages of two rare Lixus species (Coleoptera, Curculionidae, Lixinae) and notes on their biology

    OpenAIRE

    Trnka,Filip; Stejskal,Robert; Skuhrovec,Jiří

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The mature larvae and pupae of Lixus (Ortholixus) bituberculatus Smreczy?ski, 1968 and Lixus (Dilixellus) neglectus Fremuth, 1983 ( Curculionidae : Lixinae : Lixini ) are described and compared with known larvae of 21 other Lixus and 2 Hypolixus taxa. The mature larva and pupa of Lixus bituberculatus are the first immature stages described representing the subgenus Ortholixus . The larva of Lixus neglectus , in the subgenus Dilixellus , is distinguished from the known larvae of four ...

  1. The response of Dendroctonus valens (Coleoptera: Scolytidae) and Temnochila chlorodia (Coleoptera: Trogossitidae) to Ips paraconfusus (Coleoptera: Scolytidae) pheromone components and verbenone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christopher J. Fettig; Stepehen R. McKelvey; Christopher P. Dabney; Robert R. Borys

    2007-01-01

    The red turpentine beetle, Dendroctonus valens LeConte, 1860 (Coleoptera: Curculionidae, Scolytinae), is a common bark beetle species found throughout much of North America and China. In 2004, we observed that California fivespined ips, Ips paraconfusus Lanier, 1970 (Coleoptera: Curculionidae, Scolytinae), attack densities in logging debris were inversely related to D...

  2. Catalog of the coleoptera of America North of Mexico. Family: Curculionidae. Subfamily: Polydrosinae. Tribe: Tanymecini. Agriculture handbook (Research)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Howden, A.T.

    1993-09-01

    The Coleoptera, or beetles, are represented in the world by about 220,000 described species, of which about 24,000 occur in the United States and Canada. A comprehensive taxonomic catalog of beetles for this area has not been available except the series of world-based 'Coleopterorum Catalogus' volumes (1909-present, Junk, Berlin).

  3. Primeiro registro de Chalcodermus bicolor (Coleoptera: Curculionidae em plantios de eucalipto First record of Chalcodermus bicolor in eucalypt plantations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodolfo Molinário de Souza

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Este trabalho objetivou relatar, pela primeira vez, o ataque de um besouro podador em plantios de clones híbridos de eucalipto (Eucalyptus urophylla vs. E. grandis, localizados nos Estados da Bahia e do Espírito Santo. A espécie foi determinada como sendo Chalcodermus bicolor Fiedler, 1936 (Curculionidae: Molytinae. A fêmea poda os ponteiros e constrói um pequeno orifício onde deposita um único ovo, logo abaixo do ponto de incisão. O eucalipto é o primeiro hospedeiro relatado para esta espécie de besouro.This research aimed to record, for the first time, the damage caused by a pruner beetle on hybrid eucalypts cloned trees (Eucalyptus urophylla vs. E. grandis, located in Bahia and Espírito Santo States, Brazil. The specie was determined as Chalcodermus bicolor Fiedler, 1936 (Curculionidae: Molytinae. The female prunes the tree shoot and lays a single egg inside a small hole, just below the incision point. Eucalypt is the first host recorded to this pruner beetle specie.

  4. Antennal transcriptome analysis of the chemosensory gene families in the tree killing bark beetles, Ips typographus and Dendroctonus ponderosae (Coleoptera: Curculionidae: Scolytinae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersson, Martin N; Grosse-Wilde, Ewald; Keeling, Christopher I; Bengtsson, Jonas M; Yuen, Macaire M S; Li, Maria; Hillbur, Ylva; Bohlmann, Jörg; Hansson, Bill S; Schlyter, Fredrik

    2013-03-21

    The European spruce bark beetle, Ips typographus, and the North American mountain pine beetle, Dendroctonus ponderosae (Coleoptera: Curculionidae: Scolytinae), are severe pests of coniferous forests. Both bark beetle species utilize aggregation pheromones to coordinate mass-attacks on host trees, while odorants from host and non-host trees modulate the pheromone response. Thus, the bark beetle olfactory sense is of utmost importance for fitness. However, information on the genes underlying olfactory detection has been lacking in bark beetles and is limited in Coleoptera. We assembled antennal transcriptomes from next-generation sequencing of I. typographus and D. ponderosae to identify members of the major chemosensory multi-gene families. Gene ontology (GO) annotation indicated that the relative abundance of transcripts associated with specific GO terms was highly similar in the two species. Transcripts with terms related to olfactory function were found in both species. Focusing on the chemosensory gene families, we identified 15 putative odorant binding proteins (OBP), 6 chemosensory proteins (CSP), 3 sensory neuron membrane proteins (SNMP), 43 odorant receptors (OR), 6 gustatory receptors (GR), and 7 ionotropic receptors (IR) in I. typographus; and 31 putative OBPs, 11 CSPs, 3 SNMPs, 49 ORs, 2 GRs, and 15 IRs in D. ponderosae. Predicted protein sequences were compared with counterparts in the flour beetle, Tribolium castaneum, the cerambycid beetle, Megacyllene caryae, and the fruit fly, Drosophila melanogaster. The most notable result was found among the ORs, for which large bark beetle-specific expansions were found. However, some clades contained receptors from all four beetle species, indicating a degree of conservation among some coleopteran OR lineages. Putative GRs for carbon dioxide and orthologues for the conserved antennal IRs were included in the identified receptor sets. The protein families important for chemoreception have now been identified in

  5. Basic bio-ecological parameters of the invasive red palm weevil, Rhynchophorus ferrugineus (Coleoptera: Curculionidae), in Phoenix canariensis under Mediterranean climate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dembilio, O; Jacas, J A

    2011-04-01

    The invasive red palm weevil, Rhynchophorus ferrugineus Olivier (Coleoptera, Curculionidae), is one of the most destructive pests of palms in the world. Since its detection in the Mediterranean Basin, the ornamental Phoenix canariensis Hort. ex Chabaud has become its main host. This study was aimed at determining the life cycle of R. ferrugineus in live P. canariensis palms. Egg lethal temperature threshold and thermal constant were determined in the laboratory and resulted in 13.1°C and 40.4 degree days (DD), respectively. A semi field assay was carried out in a mesh enclosure where living P. canariensis palms were artificially infested with neonate larvae at one-month intervals from June 2008 to May 2009 under natural conditions. Infested palms were dissected at different time intervals. Maximum mortality rates for R. ferrugineus were observed for palms infested either in December or January (100%), whereas those infested from April through September showed maximum survival rates. Mean monthly temperatures below 10.3°C were lethal for neonate larvae, as 4.5°C were for older immature stages. All recovered larvae could be classed according to one of 13 instars. A thermal constant of 666.5 DD was estimated for complete larval development. Pupal develoment required an additional 282.5 DD. Based on these results and on the temperatures from 46 climatic stations selected in the Iberian Peninsula, less than one generation per year can be expected in areas with mean annual temperature below 15°C and more than two where mean annual temperature is above 19°C.

  6. Cotton harvest at 40% versus 75% boll-splitting on yield and economic return under standard and proactive boll weevil (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) spray regimes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Showler, A T; Robinson, J R C

    2008-10-01

    The standard practice of two or three preemptive insecticide applications at the start of pinhead (1-2-mm-diameter) squaring followed by threshold-triggered (when 10% of randomly selected squares have oviposition punctures) insecticide applications for boll weevil, Anthonomus grandis grandis Boheman (Coleoptera: Curculionidae), control does not provide reliable protection of cotton, Gossypium hirsutum L., lint production. This study, conducted during 2004 and 2005, showed that three to six fewer spray applications in a "proactive" approach, in which spraying began at the start of large (5.5-8-mm-diameter) square formation and continued at approximately 7-d intervals while large squares were abundant, resulted in fewer infested squares and 1.4- to 1.7-fold more lint than the standard treatment. Fewer sprays and increased yield made proactive spraying significantly more profitable than the standard approach, which resulted in relatively low or negative economic returns. Harvest at 75% boll-split in the proactive spray regime of 2005 resulted in four-fold greater economic return than cotton harvested at 40% boll-split because of improved protection of large squares and the elimination of late-season sprays inherent to standard spray regime despite the cost of an extra irrigation in the 75% boll-split treatments. The earlier, 40% harvest trigger does not avoid high late-season boll weevil pressure, which exerts less impact on bolls, the predominant form of fruiting body at that time, than on squares. Proactive spraying and harvest timing are based on an important relationship between nutrition, boll weevil reproduction, and economic inputs; therefore, the tactic of combining proaction with harvest at 75% boll-split is applicable where boll weevils are problematic regardless of climate or region, or whether an eradication program is ongoing.

  7. Trap Style, Bait, and Height Deployments in Black Walnut Tree Canopies Help Inform Monitoring Strategies for Bark and Ambrosia Beetles (Coleoptera: Curculionidae: Scolytinae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klingeman, William E; Bray, Alicia M; Oliver, Jason B; Ranger, Christopher M; Palmquist, Debra E

    2017-10-01

    Knowledge about which bark and ambrosia beetle species are active and at what heights in black walnut canopies is not well understood. Neither is the role of these beetles in spreading Thousand Cankers Disease. To assist with future planned research, which will assess the extent to which these beetle species are associated with Geosmithia morbida Kolařík, Freeland, Utley, and Tisserat (Ascomycota: Hypocreales: Bionectriaceae), experiments were undertaken to monitor bark and ambrosia beetles in urban landscapes and parks in Tennessee between 2011 and 2013. Within mature walnut tree canopies, sticky panel, modified soda bottle, and Lindgren traps were deployed at different heights, with and without ethanol as an attractant and with and without walnut stem sections, or in situ limbs that had been girdled or injection with ethanol to simulate stressed tree tissues. Bark and ambrosia beetle species (Coleoptera: Curculionidae: Scolytinae) collected in greatest abundance included Ambrosiodmus rubricollis (Eichhoff), Ambrosiophilus atratus (Eichhoff), Cnestus mutilatus (Blandford), Dryoxylon onoharaense (Murayama), Euwallacea validus (Eichhoff), Monarthrum fasciatum (Say), Monarthrum mali (Fitch), Xyleborinus saxesenii (Ratzeburg), Xyleborus affinis Eichhoff, Xyleborus ferrugineus (Fabricius), Xylosandrus crassiusculus (Motschulsky), and Xylosandrus germanus (Blandford). C. mutilatus, X. saxesenii, and X. crassiusculus were more active higher in trees than most other species and were strongly attracted to ethanol via all means of lure deployment. C. mutilatus, which were captured from April through October and increased in abundance across the 3-yr study, were most abundant in late May with a second activity period in late August. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Entomological Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  8. A taxonomic monograph of the leaf-litter inhabiting weevil genus Plumolepilius new genus (Coleoptera: Curculionidae: Molytinae: Conotrachelini) from Mexico, Guatemala, and El Salvador.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrios-Izás, Manuel A; Anderson, Robert S; Morrone, Juan J

    2016-09-14

    We describe the Mesoamerican leaf litter weevil genus Plumolepilius Barrios-Izás & Anderson, new genus (Coleoptera: Curculionidae: Molytinae: Conotrachelini) (type species P. trifiniensis Barrios-Izás & Anderson, new species), species of which inhabit mountain ecosystems from the state of Chiapas in southeastern Mexico to northern Panama. In this paper we describe nine new species from Mexico, Guatemala, and El Salvador: P. trifiniensis Barrios-Izás & Anderson, new species (El Salvador and Guatemala); P. branstetteri Barrios-Izás & Anderson, new species (Guatemala and Mexico); P. longinoi Barrios-Izás & Anderson, new species (Guatemala and Mexico); P. cortezi Barrios-Izás & Anderson, new species (Guatemala and Mexico); P. canoi Barrios-Izás & Anderson, new species (Guatemala); P. schusteri Barrios-Izás & Anderson, new species (Guatemala and Mexico); P. daryi Barrios-Izás & Anderson, new species (Guatemala); P. yolnabajensis Barrios-Izás & Anderson, new species (Guatemala); and P. macalajauensis Barrios-Izás & Anderson, new species (Guatemala).        The genus and the species are named and described, information on their geographical distributions is given and images of the habitus of both sexes and the aedeagus are presented. A key to the species of Plumolepilius based on males is included.        The monophyly of Plumolepilius was confirmed by a parsimony analysis of external and male aedeagus morphology and the genus is best characterized by the presence of plumose scales lining the prosternal channel. Phylogenetic analysis supports that Lepilius Champion 1905 is the sister genus of Plumolepilius.

  9. Olive trees protected from the olive bark beetle, Phloeotribus scarabaeoides (Bernard 1788) (Coleoptera, Curculionidae, Scolytinae) with a pyrethroid insecticide: Effect on the insect community of the olive grove.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruano, Francisca; Campos, Mercedes; Sánchez-Raya, A Juan; Peña, Aránzazu

    2010-06-01

    Field studies were performed in two successive years, 2005 and 2006, in different olive groves of the province of Granada (South-eastern Spain) by spraying olive trees (Olea europaea) with a pyrethroid insecticide, deltamethrin, for the control of the olive bark beetle Phloeotribus scarabaeoides (Bernard 1788) (Coleoptera, Curculionidae, Scolytinae). Three olive groves received each year three treatments in June consisting of water (control) and two insecticide doses, which were halved the second year. From June to September six olives trees per site were inspected every 15d for feeding galleries in olive branches; the arthropods, collected in traps placed below the olive trees (three traps per site), were identified and counted. Results show that feeding galleries were significantly reduced, what proves that the pyrethroid insecticide efficiently protected the olive trees from the olive bark beetle with a single application and even at the lower dose employed in 2006. Some repellent effect may occur as deduced from the number of P. scarabaeoides individuals captured. Other individuals from the insect community were also affected to a great extent by insecticide application, though no statistical differences were found among the treatments due to the high variability in insect captures. Among the parasitoids, Scelionidae, Encyrtidae, Eurytomidae and Pteromalidae were captured in great numbers. Mirids were the predators whose numbers drastically increased in traps placed under the treated trees, while spiders and ants were less affected. A knock-down effect was noticed for some insect groups, for instance mirids and Euphyllura olivina. Approximately 80% of their captures corresponded to the first date of sampling after insecticide application. 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Proteomics indicators of the rapidly shifting physiology from whole mountain pine beetle, Dendroctonus ponderosae (Coleoptera: Curculionidae, adults during early host colonization.

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    Caitlin Pitt

    Full Text Available We developed proteome profiles for host colonizing mountain pine beetle adults, Dendroctonus ponderosae Hopkins (Coleoptera: Curculionidae. Adult insects were fed in pairs on fresh host lodgepole pine, Pinus contorta Dougl. ex Loud, phloem tissue. The proteomes of fed individuals were monitored using iTRAQ and compared to those of starved beetles, revealing 757 and 739 expressed proteins in females and males, respectively, for which quantitative information was obtained. Overall functional category distributions were similar for males and females, with the majority of proteins falling under carbohydrate metabolism (glycolysis, gluconeogenesis, citric acid cycle, structure (cuticle, muscle, cytoskeleton, and protein and amino acid metabolism. Females had 23 proteins with levels that changed significantly with feeding (p<0.05, FDR<0.20, including chaperones and enzymes required for vitellogenesis. In males, levels of 29 proteins changed significantly with feeding (p<0.05, FDR<0.20, including chaperones as well as motor proteins. Only two proteins, both chaperones, exhibited a significant change in both females and males with feeding. Proteins with differential accumulation patterns in females exhibited higher fold changes with feeding than did those in males. This difference may be due to major and rapid physiological changes occurring in females upon finding a host tree during the physiological shift from dispersal to reproduction. The significant accumulation of chaperone proteins, a cytochrome P450, and a glutathione S-transferase, indicate secondary metabolite-induced stress physiology related to chemical detoxification during early host colonization. The females' activation of vitellogenin only after encountering a host indicates deliberate partitioning of resources and a balancing of the needs of dispersal and reproduction.

  11. Cross-resistance Patterns to Insecticides of Several Chemical Classes Among Listronotus maculicollis (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) Populations With Different Levels of Resistance to Pyrethroids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kostromytska, Olga S; Wu, Shaohui; Koppenhöfer, Albrecht M

    2018-02-09

    The annual bluegrass weevil (ABW), Listronotus maculicollis Kirby (Coleoptera: Curculionidae), is the most damaging golf course insect pest in eastern North America. Heavy reliance on synthetic insecticides against this pest has led to widespread problems in controlling ABW with pyrethroid resistance already reported from populations in southern New England. This study evaluated the degree and scope of ABW resistance, determined existing cross-resistance patterns, and confirmed laboratory findings under greenhouse conditions. The susceptibility of 10 ABW populations to insecticides of different chemical classes was assessed in topical, feeding, and greenhouse assays. The level of susceptibility to pyrethroids varied significantly among populations (LD50s ranging 2.4-819.1 ng per insect for bifenthrin and 1.1-362.7 ng for λ-cyhalothrin in the topical assay). Three populations were relatively susceptible to pyrethroids, and seven populations had moderate to high resistance levels (RR50 for bifenthrin ranging 30.5-343.1). The toxicity of chlorpyrifos (RR50s ranging 3.3-15.3), spinosad (RR50s 2.4-7.7), clothianidin (RR50s 4.2-9.7), and indoxacarb (RR50s 2.8-9.7) was decreased for the pyrethroid-resistant populations. Toxicity data for bifenthrin and chlorpyrifos obtained under more realistic greenhouse conditions confirmed laboratory observations, indicating that the topical assay is an accurate method of detection and measurement of resistance level. The current study expanded the previously known geographic range of ABW pyrethroid resistance to include the New York metropolitan area, New Jersey, and eastern Pennsylvania and provided clear evidence of cross-resistance not only within the pyrethroid class but also to several other chemical classes. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Entomological Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  12. Behavioral Responses of Pityophthorus juglandis (Coleoptera: Curculionidae: Scolytinae) to Volatiles of Black Walnut and Geosmithia morbida (Ascomycota: Hypocreales: Bionectriaceae), the Causal Agent of Thousand Cankers Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blood, B L; Klingeman, W E; Paschen, M A; Hadžiabdic, Ð; Couture, J J; Ginzel, M D

    2018-04-05

    Thousand cankers disease (TCD) is a pest complex formed by the association of the walnut twig beetle (WTB), Pityophthorus juglandis Blackman (Coleoptera: Curculionidae: Scolytinae), with the fungal pathogen Geosmithia morbida Kolařík, Freeland, Utley and Tisserat (Ascomycota: Hypocreales: Bionectriaceae). Current monitoring and detection efforts for WTB rely on a pheromone lure that is effective over a limited distance while plant- and fungal-derived volatiles that may facilitate host location remain poorly understood. In this study, we test the hypothesis that adult beetles are attracted to volatiles of black walnut, Juglans nigra L. (Juglandaceae), and the pathogen, G. morbida. We measured the response of beetles to head-space volatiles collected from leaves and stems of 12 genotypes of black walnut and found genotypic variation in the attractiveness of host trees to adult WTB. Volatile profiles of the most attractive genotypes contained more α-pinene and β-pinene, and adult beetles were attracted to both of these compounds in olfactometer bioassays. In bioassays, we also demonstrated that adult WTB are attracted to volatiles of G. morbida. These findings suggest that, in addition to the aggregation pheromone, dispersing WTB potentially use host plant and fungal volatiles to locate suitable larval hosts. Finally, we conducted a field experiment to determine the extent to which ethanol, a common attractant for bark beetles, and limonene, a known bark beetle repellent, influence the behavior of adult WTB to pheromone-baited traps. Although ethanol did not increase trap capture, WTB were repelled by limonene, suggesting that this compound could be used to manipulate and manage WTB populations.

  13. Biogeografía histórica de la familia Curculionidae (Coleoptera en las subregiones Subantártica y Chilena Central Historical biogeography of family Curculionidae (Coleoptera on Subantarctic and Central Chilean subregions

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    Paula Posadas

    2003-07-01

    Full Text Available El análisis de los patrones de distribución y la información filogenética de 71 especies de Curculionidae, distribuidas en las subregiones Subantártica y Chilena Central, aplicando los métodos biogeográficos de los árboles reconciliados y análisis de parsimonia de Brooks (BPA, resulta en un único cladograma general de áreas: ((Chile Central (Maule, Bosque Valdiviano (Islas Malvinas (Páramo Magallánico, Bosque Magallánico. La aplicación del análisis de dispersión-vicarianza (DIVA muestra que el evento vicariante más frecuente es el que separa las Islas Malvinas de las otras dos provincias subantárticas meridionales. Por otra parte, de acuerdo con los resultados del DIVA, se evidencia que las relaciones entre el Maule, Bosque Valdiviano y Chile Central no se deberían a eventos de vicarianza sino a eventos de dispersión, ya que el 61% del total de los eventos de dispersión implica a estas tres áreas. Aún más, los eventos de dispersión más frecuentes implican al Maule, ya sea en relación con Chile Central o con el Bosque Valdiviano, por lo que se deduce que la aparente complejidad de las relaciones biogeográficas del Maule podría estar relacionada con dichos eventos de dispersión.The application of the historical biogeographic techniques of reconciled trees and Brooks parsimony analysis (BPA to the distributional and phylogenetic information of 71 species of Curculionidae ranged in the Subantarctic and Central Chilean subregions results in a single general area cladogram: ((Central Chile (Maule, Valdivian Forest (Malvinas Islands (Magellanic Moorland, Magellanic Forest. The application of dispersal-vicariance analysis (DIVA to the same data set shows as the most frequent vicariant event the split of Islas Malvinas from the two southern Subantarctic provinces. In addition, DIVA results evidenced that the relationship among Maule, Valdivian Forest, and Central Chile did not arise from vicariance events (common history

  14. Influence of 60Co gamma radiation on Zabrotes subfasciatus (Bohemann, 1833) (Coleoptera, Curculionidae) and beams Phaseolus vulgaris

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moraes Rego, A.F. de; Rodrigues, Z.A.; Oliveira, M.L. de; Santana, M.D.

    1986-01-01

    Influence of gamma radiation on Zabrotes subfasciatus (Boh, 1833) (Coleoptera Bruchidae) and the beans Phaseolus vulgaris (L.). The effects of 60 CO gamma radiation, 50 Gy, on both Phaseolus vulgaris (L.) seedbeans and adults of Zabrotes subfasciatus were studied using the no free choise method. Radiation decreased insect fertility hence insect population and it damage loss of weight and germination of seedbeans. However, radiation resulted in abnamal seedlings, showing various degrees of morphological malformation, although there was no effect on germination rates or seedling vigor. (Author) [pt

  15. Rhinusa Stephens: a taxonomic revision of the species belonging to the R. tetra and R. bipustulata groups (Coleoptera Curculionidae

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    Roberto Caldara

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The species of Rhinusa Stephens, 1829 (Curculionidae, Curculioninae, Mecinini belonging to the R. tetra and R. bipustulata groups are revised. Four of them from Middle East are new to science. The R. bipustulata group includes five species: R. bipustulata (Rossi, 1792; R. pelletieri sp. nov.; R. scrophulariae Caldara, 2009; R. algirica (Brisout de Barneville, 1862; R. emmrichi (Bajtenov, 1979, whereas the R. tetra group includes nine species: R. tetra (Fabricius, 1792; R. verbasci (Rosenschoeld, 1838; R. ensifer sp. nov.; R. moroderi (Reitter, 1906; R. weilli sp. nov.; R. comosa (Rosenschoeld, 1838; R. acifer sp. nov.; R asellus (Gravenhorst, 1807; R. tenuirostris (Stierlin, 1888. The following new synonym is proposed: Rhinusa bipustulata (Rossi, 1792 (= Gymnetron municipale Voss, 1960 syn. nov.. The neotype of Rhynchaenus asellus Gravenhorst, 1807 was designated. Moreover, the following lectotypes are designated: Cionus spilotus Germar, 1821; Gymnetron bipustulatum var. germari Faust, 1889; Gymnetron bodenheimeri Wagner, 1926; Gymnetron cylindrirostre Gyllenhal, 1838; Gymnetron nasutum Rosenschoeld, 1838; Gymnetron plagiatum Gyllenhal, 1838; Gymnetron polonicum Rosenschoeld, 1838; Gymnetron tenuirostre Stierlin, 1888. A key to the species, diagnoses of species groups, descriptions or redescriptions, notes on type specimens, synonymies, comparative notes, distribution, bionomics when available, photographs of habitus and drawings of rostra, terminalia and other useful characters for taxonomy are provided.

  16. Biology and host associations of redbay ambrosia beetle (Coleoptera: Curculionidae: Scolytinae), exotic vector of laurel wilt killing redbay trees in the southeastern United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanula, James L; Mayfield, Albert E; Fraedrich, Stephen W; Rabaglia, Robert J

    2008-08-01

    The redbay ambrosia beetle, Xyleborus glabratus Eichhoff (Coleoptera: Curculionidae: Scolytinae), and its fungal symbiont, Raffaelea sp., are new introductions to the southeastern United States responsible for the wilt of mature redbay, Persea borbonia (L.) Spreng., trees. In 2006 and 2007, we investigated the seasonal flight activity of X. glabratus, its host associations, and population levels at eight locations in South Carolina and Georgia where infestations ranged from very recent to at least several years old. Adults were active throughout the year with peak activity in early September. Brood development seems to take 50-60 d. Wood infested with beetles and infected with the Raffaelea sp. was similar in attraction to uninfested redbay wood, whereas both were more attractive than a nonhost species. Sassafras, Sassafras albidium (Nutt.) Nees, another species of Lauraceae, was not attractive to X. glabratus and very few beetle entrance holes were found in sassafras wood compared with redbay. Conversely, avocado, Persea americana Mill., was as attractive to X. glabratus as swampbay, P. palustris (Raf.) Sarg., and both were more attractive than the nonhost red maple, Acer rubrum L. However, avocado had relatively few entrance holes in the wood. In 2007, we compared X. glabratus populations in areas where all mature redbay have died to areas where infestations were very active and more recent. Trap catches of X. glabratus and numbers of entrance holes in trap bolts of redbay were correlated with the number of dead trees with leaves attached. Older infestations where mature host trees had been eliminated by the wilt had low numbers of beetles resulting in trap catches ranging from 0.04 to 0.12 beetles per trap per d compared with 4-7 beetles per trap per d in areas with numerous recently dead trees. Our results indicate beetle populations drop dramatically after suitable host material is gone and provide hope that management strategies can be developed to restore

  17. Primera cita del enemigo natural Acalanthis quadrisignata (Coleoptera: Trogossitidae asociado con cámaras pupales de Pissodes castaneus (Coleoptera: Curculionidae, en la provincia de Chubut, Patagonia, Argentina

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    Cecilia A. GOMEZ

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Acalanthis quadrisignata Erichson (Coleoptera: Trogossitidae es un coleóptero predador endémico del sur de Chile y de la Argentina, que habita bosques nativos. En el marco de un estudio sobre el ciclo de vida de Pissodes castaneus De Geer se colocaron trozas trampa y se muestrearon residuos forestales, entre septiembre de 2014 y 2015, en una plantación de Pinus radiata (D. Don, en la localidad de Trevelin (Chubut, Argentina, donde se hallaron adultos de A. quadrisignata en el interior de cámaras pupales del gorgojo. Éste constituye el primer registro de un enemigo natural de P. castaneus en la Patagonia argentina. Esta contribución agrega un nuevo ambiente donde se desarrolla la especie y una nueva cita a su distribución geográfica en Argentina.

  18. The morphology of the immature stages of two rare Lixus species (Coleoptera, Curculionidae, Lixinae) and notes on their biology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trnka, Filip; Stejskal, Robert; Skuhrovec, Jiří

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The mature larvae and pupae of Lixus (Ortholixus) bituberculatus Smreczyński, 1968 and Lixus (Dilixellus) neglectus Fremuth, 1983 (Curculionidae: Lixinae: Lixini) are described and compared with known larvae of 21 other Lixus and 2 Hypolixus taxa. The mature larva and pupa of Lixus bituberculatus are the first immature stages described representing the subgenus Ortholixus. The larva of Lixus neglectus, in the subgenus Dilixellus, is distinguished from the known larvae of four species in this subgenus by having more pigmented sclerites on the larval body. All descriptions of mature larvae from the tribe Lixini, as do all known species from the tribe Cleonini, fit the diagnosis of the mature larva of the Lixinae subfamily. Furthermore, new biological information of these species in the Czech Republic, Slovakia and Romania is provided. For Lixus bituberculatus, a chicory, Cichorium intybus L. (Asteraceae), is identified as a host plant, and Lixus neglectus is found on dock Rumex thyrsiflorus Fingerh. (Polygonaceae). Both species are probably monophagous or oligophagous. Adults of Lixus bituberculatus often inhabit host plants growing in active, dry and sunny pastures with sparse patches without vegetation, being mostly active during the night in April/May and then again in September, when the highest activity levels are observed. Adults of Lixus neglectus inhabit dry grasslands on sandy soils with host plants, being active during the day from May to September, with the highest level of activity in May/June and September. The larvae of both species are borers in the stem and root of the host plant, and they pupate in root or root neck. Adults leave the pupation cells at the end of summer and do not hibernate in the host plants. Finally, Romania is a new geographic record for Lixus bituberculatus. PMID:27551208

  19. Two new genera of Nanophyidae with six desmomeres (Coleoptera, Curculionoidea

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    Miguel Alonso-Zarazaga

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available A new genus Lyalia is described in Nanophyidae and three species are included in it: Lyalia curvata sp. n. (Vietnam, L. robusta (Pic, 1921, comb. n. (from Nanophyes (Java, Bali, Laos and L. albolineata (Pajni & Bhateja, 1982, comb. n. (from Ctenomerus (India: Assam. Ctenomerus lagerstroemiae G. A. K. Marshall, 1923 is a syn. n. of L. robusta. Thus, the genus Ctenomerus Schoenherr, 1843 is restricted to the Afrotropical Realm. Kantohia gen. n. is erected for Kantohia taiwana (Kantoh & Kojima, 2009 (from Shiva (Taiwan. A key to the Nanophyinae genera with six desmomeres is presented.

  20. Volatile and within-needle terpene changes to Douglas-fir trees associated with Douglas-fir beetle (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) attack

    Science.gov (United States)

    A. D. Giunta; Justin Runyon; M. J. Jenkins; M. Teich

    2016-01-01

    Mass attack by tree-killing bark beetles (Curculionidae: Scolytinae) brings about large chemical changes in host trees that can have important ecological consequences. For example, mountain pine beetle (Dendroctonus ponderosae Hopkins) attack increases emission of terpenes by lodgepole pine (Pinus contorta Dougl. ex Loud.), affecting foliage flammability with...

  1. Flight Dynamics and Abundance of Ips sexdentatus (Coleoptera: Curculionidae: Scolytinae in Different Sawmills from Northern Spain: Differences between Local Pinus radiata (Pinales: Pinaceae and Southern France Incoming P. pinaster Timber

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    Sergio López

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In January 2009, the windstorm “Klaus” struck the southern part of France, affecting 37.9 million m3 of maritime pine Pinus pinaster Aiton (Pinales: Pinaceae. This breeding plant material favored the outbreak of Ips sexdentatus (Börner (Coleoptera: Curculionidae: Scolytinae. As much of this timber is imported to the Basque Country (northern Spain, a potential risk to conifer stands is generated, due to the emergence of the incoming beetles. Thus, flight dynamics and beetle abundance were compared in different sawmills, according to the timber species (either local P. radiata D. Don or imported P. pinaster. A maximum flight peak of I. sexdentatus was observed in mid-June in P. pinaster importing sawmills, whereas a second lighter peak occurred in September. In contrast, only a maximum peak in mid-June was observed in P. radiata inhabiting beetles, being significantly smaller than in local P. pinaster trading sawmills. In addition, significant differences were found between imported P. pinaster and P. radiata regarding the number of insects beneath the bark. The development of IPM strategies for controlling I. sexdentatus populations is recommended, due to the insect abundance found in P. pinaster imported timber.

  2. Survival of Seasonal Flooding in the Amazon by the Terrestrial Insect Conotrachelus dubiae O'Brien & Couturier (Coleoptera: Curculionidae), a Pest of the Camu-Camu Plant, Myrciaria dubia (Myrtaceae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delgado, C; Couturier, G; Fine, P V A

    2014-08-01

    The weevil Conotrachelus dubiae O'Brien & Couturier (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) is a pest of an economically important Amazonian fruit tree Myrciaria dubia (Myrtaceae). This tree grows in seasonally flooded environments, and how weevil larvae survive flooding has not been studied. From December 2004 to May 2009, five experiments were conducted in natural conditions and in the laboratory, with the aim of understanding the mechanisms that allow the survival of C. dubiae larvae in seasonal floods in Amazonia. The larvae of C. dubiae were kept under water for over 93 days. Older instars exposed to periodic circulation of water survived better than younger instars in addition to all larvae that were kept continuously under uncirculated water. Individuals that were collected from plots of M. dubia located in flooded soils and non-flooded soils did not exhibit statistically significant differences in their levels of survival indicating that the variation in survival of flooding events is due to phenotypic plasticity of the species and not to local adaptation by the populations in different environments. We speculate that larvae can survive floods without major physiological changes as larvae appear to obtain oxygen from water by cutaneous diffusion, assisted by caudal movements.

  3. as Sitophilus zeamais (Coleoptera: Curculionidae)

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2008-10-20

    Oct 20, 2008 ... Voucher specimens are kept at the University herbarium. The essential oil was extracted by steam distillation using. Clavenger apparatus (Guenter, 1949). ..... Wudiri BB, Fatobi TO (1992). Cereal in the food economy of Nigeria. In: Lawani, S.M and Babalay, T (Eds), Recent developments in cereal.

  4. Atividade inseticida do óleo essencial de Tanaecium nocturnum (Barb. Rodr. Bur. & K. Shum (Bignoneaceae sobre Sitophilus zeamais Motsch. (Coleoptera: Curculionidae Insecticide activity of the essencial oil Tanaecium nocturnum (Barb. Rodr. Bur. & K. Shum (Bignoneaceae on Sitophilus zeamais Motsch. (Coleoptera: Curculionidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Murilo Fazolin

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available O óleo essencial extraído de folhas frescas de Tanaecium nocturnum (Barb. Rodr. Bur.& K. Shum por destilação de arraste a vapor foi avaliado quanto à toxicidade a Sitophilus zeamais Motsch., principal praga do milho armazenado. Papel de filtro e grãos de milho foram impregnados pelo óleo para se avaliar o efeito por via de contato (papel-filtro e fumigação, respectivamente. Para avaliação do efeito da aplicação tópica 0,5 µl das diferentes concentrações do óleo foram aplicadas em adultos do inseto. A partir de uma ampla faixa de concentrações, foram determinadas as mais promissoras para os bioensaios definitivos. Na determinação das dose/concentrações-letais (DL50 e CL50 foi utilizada a análise de Probit, realizando-se também, uma análise de regressão linear conjunta de todos os dados de mortalidade. O óleo de T. nocturnum foi considerado tóxico para S. zeamais baseado nos seguintes valores: CL50 de 14,1 ng.cm-2 e CL50 de 1.321,6 ng.g-1 de grãos para os efeitos de contacto (papel-filtro e fumigação, respectivamente, e DL50 de 14,7 µg.mg-1 de inseto para efeito tópico. Porcentagens de mortalidade próximas a 100 % foram obtidas nas concentrações de: 2 e 5 % (m/v (contato, 3 4, e 5 % (m/v (fumigação e 10 % (m/v para o efeito de aplicação tópica. O presente estudo mostrou que o ácido cianídrico, liberado do óleo essencial de T. nocturnum por hidrólise, pode ter atividade inseticida para S. zeamais e que concentrações acima de 4 % (m/v são promissoras no controle do inseto.Insecticidal activities of Tanaecium nocturnum (Barb. Rodr. Bur. & K. Shum (Bignoneaceae essential oil against Sitophilus zeamais Motsch. (Coleoptera: Curculionidae. The essential oil extracted from fresh leaves of the Tanaecium nocturnum (Barb. Rodr. Bur.& K. Shum by steam distillation, was tested against maize weevil Sitophilus zeamais Motsch.. Filter paper and maize grains impregnation was employed, for contact and fumigant

  5. The infestation by an exotic ambrosia beetle, Euplatypus parallelus (F. (Coleoptera: Curculionidae: Platypodinae of Angsana trees (Pterocarpus indicus Willd. in southern Thailand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara Bumrungsri

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available An exotic ambrosia beetle, Euplatypus parallelus (F. was collected from infested Pterocarpus indicus Willd. trees in Prince of Songkla University. Larvae and eggs were found in simple galleries with a single branch. Either a single male or a male and a female were found in each gallery. Half of these infested trees were previously attacked by long-horned beetles probably Aristobia horridula (Hope (Coleoptera: Cerambycidae, while some of them appeared to be healthy. Fusarium oxysporum Schlecht.:Fr. was isolated from frass, sapwood samples and insect larvae, and might be a cause of death of P.indicus.

  6. Abridged life tables for Cephalonomia stephanoderis and Prorops nasuta (Hymenoptera: Bethylidae) Parasitoids of Hypothenemus hampei (Coleoptera: Scolytidae) reared on artificial diet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biological aspects and demographic parameters of Cephalonomia stephanoderis Betrem (Hymenoptera: Bethylidae) and Prorops nasuta Waterston (Hymenoptera: Bethylidae) parasitoids of the coffee berry borer (CBB), Hypothenemus hampei (Ferrari) (Coleoptera: Curculionidae: Scolytinae) were investigated usi...

  7. A taxonomic monograph of the genus Dodomeira Bellò & Baviera,  a new genus of Peritelini from Sicily (Coleoptera: Curculionidae: Entiminae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bello, Cesare; Osella, Giuseppe; Baviera, Cosimo

    2017-10-13

    The genus Dodomeira Bellò & Baviera gen. n. of the tribe Peritelini Lacordaire (1863) (Curculionidae: Entiminae) which includes 39 species is described. Seven species are transferred from Pseudomeira Stierlin, 1881: Dodomeira confusa (Pierotti, 2012) comb. n., Dodomeira exigua (Stierlin, 1861) comb. n., Dodomeira ficuzzensis (Bellò & Baviera, 2011) comb. n., Dodomeira himerensis (Bellò & Baviera, 2011) comb. n., Dodomeira petrensis (Bellò & Baviera, 2011) comb. n., Dodomeira pfisteri (Stierlin, 1864) comb. n., Dodomeira trinacriae (Bellò & Baviera, 2011) comb. n.. Thirty-two species are new for science and here described: Dodomeira adrianae Bellò & Baviera sp. n., Dodomeira alta Bellò & Baviera sp. n., Dodomeira angelae Bellò & Baviera sp. n., Dodomeira asinelliensis Bellò & Baviera sp. n., Dodomeira belicensis Bellò & Baviera sp. n., Dodomeira bertoni Bellò & Baviera sp. n., Dodomeira calatina Bellò & Baviera sp. n., Dodomeira caoduroi Bellò & Baviera sp. n. n., Dodomeira elima Bellò & Baviera sp. n., Dodomeira enzoi Bellò & Baviera sp. n., Dodomeira fossor Bellò & Baviera sp. n., Dodomeira forbicionii Bellò & Baviera sp. n., Dodomeira genistae Bellò & Baviera sp. n., Dodomeira giustoi Bellò & Baviera sp. n., Dodomeira hiemalis Bellò & Baviera sp. n., Dodomeira ibleiensis Bellò & Baviera sp. n., Dodomeira illuminatae Bellò & Baviera sp. n., Dodomeira juliae Bellò & Baviera sp. n., Dodomeira laliaensis Bellò & Baviera sp. n., Dodomeira magrinii Bellò & Baviera sp. n., Dodomeira montivaga Bellò & Baviera sp. n., Dodomeira margheritae Bellò & Baviera sp. n., Dodomeira maritimaensis Bellò & Baviera sp. n., Dodomeira nobilis Bellò & Baviera sp. n., Dodomeira paladinii Bellò & Baviera sp. n., Dodomeira sabellai Bellò & Baviera sp. n., Dodomeira saccoi Bellò & Baviera sp. n., Dodomeira sicana Bellò & Baviera sp. n., Dodomeira sicelidis Bellò & Baviera sp. n., Dodomeira siderea Bellò & Baviera sp. n., Dodomeira silvanae Bellò & Baviera

  8. Adult Diapause in Coleoptera

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivo Hodek

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Recent studies dealing with adult (reproductive diapause in the Coleoptera are reviewed, as a kind of supplement to the classic compendia. In the first two sections, the general characteristics of adult diapause are described and principal terms explained. Original articles dealing with 19 species from nine coleopteran families (Coccinellidae, Chrysomelidae, Bruchidae, Curculionidae, Carabidae, Silphidae, Scolytidae, Scarabaeidae, and Endomychidae are reviewed. Finally attempts are made at generalisations from the papers reviewed, and hypotheses on diapause evolution are inferred. A polyphenic character of diapause is a prominent feature in C. septempunctata and L. decemlineata, but has been found also in other Coleoptera and in insects generally and often generates voltinism heterogeneity within populations.

  9. The current status of the distribution range of the western pine beetle, Dendroctonus brevicomis (Curculionidae: Solytinae) in northern Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    O. Valerio-Mendoza; F. Armendariz-Toledano; G. Cuellar-Rodriguez; Jose F. Negron; G. Zuniga

    2017-01-01

    The distribution range of the western pine beetle Dendroctonus brevicomis LeConte (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) is supported only by scattered records in the northern parts of Mexico, suggesting that its populations may be marginal and rare in this region. In this study, we review the geographical distribution of D. brevicomis in northern Mexico and perform a geometric...

  10. Emergence of Buprestidae, Cerambycidae, and Scolytinae (Coleoptera) from mountain pine beetle-killed and fire-killed ponderosa pines in the Black Hills, South Dakota, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheryl L. Costello; William R. Jacobi; Jose F. Negron

    2013-01-01

    Wood borers (Coleoptera: Cerambycidae and Buprestidae) and bark beetles (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) infest ponderosa pines, Pinus ponderosa P. Lawson and C. Lawson, killed by mountain pine beetle (MPB), Dendroctonus ponderosae Hopkins, and fire. No data is available comparing wood borer and bark beetle densities or species guilds associated with MPB-killed or fire-...

  11. Relación entre la colonización de la encina por Curculio elephas Gyllenhal (Coleoptera, Curculionidae) y el periodo de caída natural de frutos

    OpenAIRE

    Soria Iglesias, Francisco Javier; Jiménez, A.; Villagrán Pinteño, Miguel; Ocete Rubio, María Elvira

    2005-01-01

    En un encinar del SW de España se ha realizado el seguimiento de una población del gorgojo Curculio elephas Gyll. (Coleóptera, Curculionidae) durante 2001 y 2002. La finalidad del trabajo fue valorar y relacionar la incidencia de la infestación del insecto con el proceso de maduración y caída natural de frutos de la encina. Durante ...

  12. Tribolium castaneum (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) sensitivity to ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Nowadays, chemical control strategies in crop protection are mostly based on biopesticides or on low persistence synthetic molecules. These tools are alternatives of some products exhibiting adverse effects on consumers and polluting environment. Biopesticides made of essential oils of aromatic plants are more and more ...

  13. Bisexual populations of Otiorhynchus rugifrons (Coleoptera : Curculionidae)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heijerman, Th.; Hodge, P.J.

    2005-01-01

    Vooral binnen het snuitkevergenus Otiorhynchus komen veel soorten voor die zich parthenogenetisch voortplanten. Sommige van deze soorten hebben in een beperkt deel van het areaal toch mannetjes. Voorbeelden hiervan zijn O, raucus, O. nodosus, O. rugosostriatus, O. scaber, O. veterator, O. sulcatus,

  14. TWO NEW ITALIAN CEUTORHYNCHUS (Coleoptera, Curculionidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enzo Colonnelli

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Are described and illustrated two new Italian species of Ceutorhynchus. The first of them, C. apenninus n. sp. from central Italy, collected on the montane crucifer Isatis allionii P. W. Ball., is close to C. peyerimhoffi Hustache from Spain, Italy and Algeria, also living on Isatis. The second, C. magnanoi n. sp. from southern Italy is very close to the French C. matthiolae Hoffmann, and was collected of Matthiola like the species from southern France.

  15. Detection and quantification of Leptographium wageneri, the cause of black-stain root disease, from bark beetles (Coleoptera: Scolytidae) in North California using regular and real-time PCR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolfgang Schweigkofler; William J. Otrosina; Sheri L. Smith; Daniel R. Cluck; Kevin Maeda; Kabir G. Peay; Matteo Garbelotto

    2005-01-01

    Black-stain root disease is a threat to conifer forests in western North America. The disease is caused by the ophiostomatoid fungus Leptographium wageneri (W.B. Kendr.) M.J. Wingf., which is associated with a number of bark beetle (Coleoptera: Scolytidae) and weevil species (Coleoptera: Curculionidae). We developed a polymerase chain reaction test...

  16. Primer registro de Naupactus ruizi (Coleoptera: Curculionoidea asociado con Pinus ponderosa (Gymnospermae: Pinaceae en Patagonia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cecilia A. GOMEZ

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Naupactus ruizi (Brèthes es un gorgojo de rostro corto, distribuido en la Argentina y Chile, que habita en ambientes áridos asociado con vegetación xerofítica y alcanza el rango más austral entre los miembros de la tribu Naupactini. Un relevamiento de insectos y de patógenos como plagas potenciales, realizado durante el 2005 en plantaciones de Pinus spp. en la Patagonia andina argentina, resultó en el hallazgo de adultos de N. ruizi que se alimentaban de acículas de Pinus ponderosa Dougl. ex Laws. Este hallazgo es sorprendente dado que las especies de Naupactini, consumen casi exclusivamente angiospermas. Interpretamos que el cambio de huésped, habría ocurrido como consecuencia de una colonización reciente favorecida por la amplia distribución geográfica del gorgojo y su capacidad para sobrevivir en hábitats marginales, donde probablemente las plantas nativas son escasas y el nuevo huésped presenta una gran abundancia local.

  17. Spatio-temporal analysis of Xyleborus glabratus (Coleoptera: Circulionidae: Scolytinae) Invasion in Eastern U.S. Forests

    Science.gov (United States)

    F.H. Koch; W.D. Smith

    2008-01-01

    The non-native redbay ambrosia beetle, Xyleborus glabratus Eichhoff (Coleoptera: Curculionidae: Scolytinae), has recently emerged as a signiÞcant pest of southeastern U.S. coastal forests. SpeciÞcally, a fungal symbiont (Raffaelea sp.) of X. glabratus has caused mortality of redbay (Persea borbonia...

  18. Bioindication Potential of the Coleoptera

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Belitskaya Mariya Nikolaevna

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Different families of Coleoptera ambiguously respond to the pollution of SPZs with industrial emissions. For example, the SPZ of Volgograd aluminum plant has the changing biodiversity of insect communities at different distances from the pollution source. The increasing level of pollution is accompanied by the reduction in species abundance. At a distance of 200 m a special ecological zone with the specific composition of the entomofauna was formed. It is significantly different from other habitats. No Cerambycidae species may survive in the zone of maximum pollution, and the number of Curculionidae species is reduced significantly. The number of Cerambycidae decreases by more than 40 % in the presence of even minimal contamination. The most sensitive bioindicators are represented by such insects as Cerambycidae, Curculionidae and Chrysomelidae. Changes in the indices can be described by the function y = arctan (x, where x is the distance from the pollution source (in meters. The specificity of this function is to identify levels of possible changes of species richness and numerical abundance of communities. On the basis of trigonometric functions describing the changes in the species composition and abundance, the authors offered the method for assessing the quality of the environment in SPZs. The use of three families of insects opens up prospects of differentiation zones of technogenic pressure.

  19. High-level phylogeny of the Coleoptera inferred with mitochondrial genome sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Ming-Long; Zhang, Qi-Lin; Zhang, Li; Guo, Zhong-Long; Liu, Yong-Jian; Shen, Yu-Ying; Shao, Renfu

    2016-11-01

    The Coleoptera (beetles) exhibits tremendous morphological, ecological, and behavioral diversity. To better understand the phylogenetics and evolution of beetles, we sequenced three complete mitogenomes from two families (Cleridae and Meloidae), which share conserved mitogenomic features with other completely sequenced beetles. We assessed the influence of six datasets and three inference methods on topology and nodal support within the Coleoptera. We found that both Bayesian inference and maximum likelihood with homogeneous-site models were greatly affected by nucleotide compositional heterogeneity, while the heterogeneous-site mixture model in PhyloBayes could provide better phylogenetic signals for the Coleoptera. The amino acid dataset generated more reliable tree topology at the higher taxonomic levels (i.e. suborders and series), where the inclusion of rRNA genes and the third positions of protein-coding genes improved phylogenetic inference at the superfamily level, especially under a heterogeneous-site model. We recovered the suborder relationships as (Archostemata+Adephaga)+(Myxophaga+Polyphaga). The series relationships within Polyphaga were recovered as (Scirtiformia+(Elateriformia+((Bostrichiformia+Scarabaeiformia+Staphyliniformia)+Cucujiformia))). All superfamilies within Cucujiformia were recovered as monophyletic. We obtained a cucujiform phylogeny of (Cleroidea+(Coccinelloidea+((Lymexyloidea+Tenebrionoidea)+(Cucujoidea+(Chrysomeloidea+Curculionoidea))))). This study showed that although tree topologies were sensitive to data types and inference methods, mitogenomic data could provide useful information for resolving the Coleoptera phylogeny at various taxonomic levels by using suitable datasets and heterogeneous-site models. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Primer registro de Naupactus ruizi (Coleoptera: Curculionoidea asociado con Pinus ponderosa (Gymnospermae: Pinaceae en Patagonia First record of Naupactus ruizi (Coleoptera: Curculionoidea associated to Pinus ponderosa (Gymnospermae: Pinaceae in Patagonia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cecilia A. Gómez

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available Naupactus ruizi (Brèthes es un gorgojo de rostro corto, distribuido en la Argentina y Chile, que habita en ambientes áridos asociado con vegetación xerofítica y alcanza el rango más austral entre los miembros de la tribu Naupactini. Un relevamiento de insectos y de patógenos como plagas potenciales, realizado durante el 2005 en plantaciones de Pinus spp. en la Patagonia andina argentina, resultó en el hallazgo de adultos de N. ruizi que se alimentaban de acículas de Pinus ponderosa Dougl. ex Laws. Este hallazgo es sorprendente dado que las especies de Naupactini, consumen casi exclusivamente angiospermas. Interpretamos que el cambio de huésped, habría ocurrido como consecuencia de una colonización reciente favorecida por la amplia distribución geográfica del gorgojo y su capacidad para sobrevivir en hábitats marginales, donde probablemente las plantas nativas son escasas y el nuevo huésped presenta una gran abundancia local.Naupactus ruizi (Brèthes is a broad-nosed weevil recorded from Argentina and Chile , that inhabits arid environments with xerophitic vegetation and reaches the southern most distribution of the tribe Naupactini. A survey of potential insect pests and pathogens of plantations of Pinus spp. and other forest species, conducted during 2005 in Argentinean Patagonian Andean forestations, allowed to find N. ruizi feeding on pine needles of Pinus ponderosa Dougl. ex Laws. This finding was unexpected, since species of Naupactini consume almost exclusively angiosperms. We interpret that the new host association may represent a recent host shift, probably facilitated by the broad range of the weevil, its capacity to survive in marginal habitats where natural hosts are scarce, and the local abundance of the new host.

  1. Volume 9 Number 2

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    OLUWOLE

    Table 1: Insect Invaders Encountered and their Stages at Collection from Decaying. Banana / Plantain Pseudo stems. Insect Order. Family. Genus. Species. Life Stage Encountered. Number (%). Coleoptera. Curculionidae Curculionidae. Curculionidae Curculionidae. Curculionidae Curculionidae. Curculionidae.

  2. Family-Group Names In Coleoptera (Insecta

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrice Bouchard

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available We synthesize data on all known extant and fossil Coleoptera family-group names for the first time. A catalogue of 4887 family-group names (124 fossil, 4763 extant based on 4707 distinct genera in Coleoptera is given. A total of 4492 names are available, 183 of which are permanently invalid because they are based on a preoccupied or a suppressed type genus. Names are listed in a classification framework. We recognize as valid 24 superfamilies, 211 families, 541 subfamilies, 1663 tribes and 740 subtribes. For each name, the original spelling, author, year of publication, page number, correct stem and type genus are included. The original spelling and availability of each name were checked from primary literature. A list of necessary changes due to Priority and Homonymy problems, and actions taken, is given. Current usage of names was conserved, whenever possible, to promote stability of the classification. New synonymies (family-group names followed by genus-group names: Agronomina Gistel, 1848 syn. n. of Amarina Zimmermann, 1832 (Carabidae, Hylepnigalioini Gistel, 1856 syn. n. of Melandryini Leach, 1815 (Melandryidae, Polycystophoridae Gistel, 1856 syn. n. of Malachiinae Fleming, 1821 (Melyridae, Sclerasteinae Gistel, 1856 syn. n. of Ptilininae Shuckard, 1839 (Ptinidae, Phloeonomini Ádám, 2001 syn. n. of Omaliini MacLeay, 1825 (Staphylinidae, Sepedophilini Ádám, 2001 syn. n. of Tachyporini MacLeay, 1825 (Staphylinidae, Phibalini Gistel, 1856 syn. n. of Cteniopodini Solier, 1835 (Tenebrionidae; Agronoma Gistel 1848 (type species Carabus familiaris Duftschmid, 1812, designated herein syn. n. of Amara Bonelli, 1810 (Carabidae, Hylepnigalio Gistel, 1856 (type species Chrysomela caraboides Linnaeus, 1760, by monotypy syn. n. of Melandrya Fabricius, 1801 (Melandryidae, Polycystophorus Gistel, 1856 (type species Cantharis aeneus Linnaeus, 1758, designated herein syn. n. of Malachius Fabricius, 1775 (Melyridae, Sclerastes Gistel, 1856 (type species

  3. The Current Status of the Distribution Range of the Western Pine Beetle, Dendroctonus brevicomis (Curculionidae: Solytinae) in Northern Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valerio-Mendoza, O; Armendáriz-Toledano, F; Cuéllar-Rodríguez, G; Negrón, José F; Zúñiga, G

    2017-09-01

    The distribution range of the western pine beetle Dendroctonus brevicomis LeConte (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) is supported only by scattered records in the northern parts of Mexico, suggesting that its populations may be marginal and rare in this region. In this study, we review the geographical distribution of D. brevicomis in northern Mexico and perform a geometric morphometric analysis of seminal rod shape to evaluate its reliability for identifying this species with respect to other members of the Dendroctonus frontalis Zimmermann (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) complex. Our results provide 30 new records, with 26 distributed in the Sierra Madre Occidental and 4 in the Sierra Madre Oriental. These records extend the known distribution range of D. brevicomis to Durango and Tamaulipas states in northern Mexico. Furthermore, we find high geographic variation in size and shape of the seminal rod, with conspicous differences among individuals from different geographical regions, namely west and east of the Great Basin and between mountain systems in Mexico. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Entomological Society of America.

  4. Taxonomic changes in palaeotropical Xyleborini (Coleoptera, Curculionidae, Scolytinae)

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hulcr, Jiří

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 2012, č. 56 (2010), s. 105-119 ISSN 1313-2989 Grant - others:National Science Foundation(US) DEB-0328920; National Geographic Society(US) 7922-05 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50070508 Keywords : ambrosia beetles * Debus * Microperus Subject RIV: EG - Zoology Impact factor: 0.514, year: 2010 http://www.pensoft.net/J_FILES/1/articles/520/520-G-12- layout .pdf

  5. The external morphology of Austroplatypus incompertus (Schedl (Coleoptera, Curculionidae, Platypodinae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deborah Kent

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Previous descriptions of adult Austroplatypus incompertus (Schedl are completed by the addition of descriptions and illustrations of the adults and, in particular, their maxillary palps. I describe and illustrate the non-adult phases of the life cycle and provide a key to the larval instars. The sexual dimorphism of A. incompertus is atypical and includes a latitudinal cline which obeys Bergmann’s rule. The taxonomic position of the genus within the Platypodinae is clarified. Platypus incostatus Schedl is recognised as the male of the species, and hence a new synonym of A. incompertus.

  6. Gamma radiation effects in Sitophilus oryzae (Linne, 1763) (Coleoptera, Curculionidae)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pacheco, J.M.

    1973-01-01

    Lethal effects were studied for the egg, larval and pupal stages as well as sterilization of adults of Sitophilus oryzae (L.) by the application of gamma radiation. Irradiation of pupae with an estimated dosis of 7887 ± 158 rad inhibits adult emergency. Hypotheses have been suggested that the apparent density and (or) nutrient value of food substrates decisively influence the sterilizing dosis for this insect. Thus, in rice and maize which are apparently denser and (or) of higher nutrient value than maccaroni, insects are sterilized by a dosis of 7 krad, while in maccaroni the sterilizing dosis decreases to 5 krad. (author)

  7. A repellent against the coffee berry borer (Coleoptera: Curculionidae: Scolytinae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The coffee berry borer continues to pose a formidable challenge to coffee growers worldwide. Due to the cryptic life habit of the insect inside coffee berries, effective pest management strategies have been difficult to develop. A sesquiterpene, (E,E)-a-farnesene, produced by infested coffee berries...

  8. Components of competitiveness in sterile male boll weevils (Coleoptera: Curculionidae)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Villavaso, E.J.; McGovern, W.L.; Wagner, T.L.; Willers, J.L.

    1998-01-01

    This study examines the relative importance of age at the time of irradiation on attractiveness, mating ability, sperm transfer, prior mating, and longevity as factors of competitiveness in sterile male boll weevil, Anthonomus grandis grandis Boheman. The amount of sperm transferred by irradiated males appeared to be the most important factor in competitiveness. More sperm was transferred by virgin males irradiated on day 5 than by virgin males irradiated on day 2, and males irradiated on day 5 had greater impact on egg hatch than those irradiated on day 2. The amount of sperm in spermathecae of females mated to virgin mates irradiated on day 5 was indistinguishable from that in females mated to virgin control males. Mating ability of males of all treatments was similar. Comparable numbers of boll weevils were captured in traps baited with males irradiated at 2 or 5 d during the first 4-5 d after irradiation, but thereafter, generally more weevils were captured in traps baited with males irradiated at 2 d or with control males. Attractiveness of males irradiated at 2 d was generally comparable to that of control males. More than 91% of irradiated males individually caged on cotton, Gossypium hirsutum L., plants lived for 10 d in the field, and 40% lived for 14 d; all individually caged control males lived 14 d. When released into cotton fields, however, the numbers of both irradiated and control males declined sharply over 14 d. Thus, the potential for an effective 2-wk life span in the field suggested by the caged study did not appear to apply to laboratory-reared weevils released into cotton fields

  9. A taxonomic monograph of Nearctic Scolytus Geoffroy (Coleoptera, Curculionidae, Scolytinae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Sarah M.; Cognato, Anthony I.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract The Nearctic bark beetle genus Scolytus Geoffroy was revised based in part on a molecular and morphological phylogeny. Monophyly of the native species was tested using mitochondrial (COI) and nuclear (28S, CAD, ArgK) genes and 43 morphological characters in parsimony and Bayesian phylogenetic analyses. Parsimony analyses of molecular and combined datasets provided mixed results while Bayesian analysis recovered most nodes with posterior probabilities >90%. Native hardwood- and conifer-feeding Scolytus species were recovered as paraphyletic. Native Nearctic species were recovered as paraphyletic with hardwood-feeding species sister to Palearctic hardwood-feeding species rather than to native conifer-feeding species. The Nearctic conifer-feeding species were monophyletic. Twenty-five species were recognized. Four new synonyms were discovered: Scolytus praeceps LeConte, 1868 (= Scolytus abietis Blackman, 1934; = Scolytus opacus Blackman, 1934), Scolytus reflexus Blackman, 1934 (= Scolytus virgatus Bright, 1972; = Scolytus wickhami Blackman, 1934). Two species were reinstated: Scolytus fiskei Blackman, 1934 and Scolytus silvaticus Bright, 1972. A diagnosis, description, distribution, host records and images were provided for each species and a key is presented to all species. PMID:25408617

  10. A taxonomic monograph of Nearctic Scolytus Geoffroy (Coleoptera, Curculionidae, Scolytinae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah Smith

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The Nearctic bark beetle genus Scolytus Geoffroy was revised based in part on a molecular and morphological phylogeny. Monophyly of the native species was tested using mitochondrial (COI and nuclear (28S, CAD, ArgK genes and 43 morphological characters in parsimony and Bayesian phylogenetic analyses. Parsimony analyses of molecular and combined datasets provided mixed results while Bayesian analysis recovered most nodes with posterior probabilities >90%. Native hardwood- and conifer-feeding Scolytus species were recovered as paraphyletic. Native Nearctic species were recovered as paraphyletic with hardwood-feeding species sister to Palearctic hardwood-feeding species rather than to native conifer-feeding species. The Nearctic conifer-feeding species were monophyletic. Twenty-five species were recognized. Four new synonyms were discovered: S. praeceps LeConte, 1868 (= S. abietis Blackman, 1934; = S. opacus Blackman, 1934, S. reflexus Blackman, 1934 (= S. virgatus Bright, 1972; = S. wickhami Blackman, 1934. Two species were reinstated: S. fiskei Blackman, 1934 and S. silvaticus Bright, 1972. A diagnosis, description, distribution, host records and images were provided for each species and a key is presented to all species.

  11. Gorgojos (Coleoptera: Curculionidae perjudiciales para "frutos rojos" en la Argentina Weevils (Coleoptera: Curculionidae harmful for berry fruits in Argentina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Guadalupe Del Rio

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Se registraron seis especies de gorgojos de rostro corto de la subfamilia Entiminae que causan daños en cultivos de frutos rojos, en la Argentina. Tres de ellas son exóticas y se distribuyen a lo largo de los bosques patagónicos: Otiorhynchus ovatus (Linnaeus, O. rugosostriatus (Goeze y O. sulcatus (Fabricius(Otiorhynchini; otras tres son nativas y habitan en la zona norte y central del país: Hyphantus sulcifrons Boheman (Anypotactini, Naupactusxanthographus (Germary N. cervinus Boheman (Naupactini. Las larvas viven en el suelo y se alimentan de la superficie externa de las raíces de sus plantas hospedadoras, causan daños más importantes que los adultos, los cuales se alimentan principalmente sobre el follaje. Los principales objetivos de esta contribución son: aportar una clave, diagnosis y fotografías de los hábitos de las seis especies para facilitar su correcta determinación; brindar datos sobre su distribución, plantas hospedadoras y biología, y citar la especie O. ovatus por primera vez para la Argentina, asociada con cultivos de arándano y frutilla.Six species of broad nosed weevils of the subfamily Entiminae are recorded as harmful for berries in Argentina. Three of them are exotic and distributed along the Patagonian forests: Otiorhynchus ovatus (Linnaeus, O. rugosostriatus (Goeze and O. sulcatus (Fabricius(Otiorhynchini and three are native and range in the northern and central areas of this country: Hyphantus sulcifrons Boheman (Anypotactini, Naupactusxanthographus (Germarand N. cervinus Boheman (Naupactini. Larvae live in soil and bore externally on the roots of their host plants, causing more damage than adults that usually feed on the leaves. The main objectives of this contribution are: to give a dichotomous key, diagnoses and habitus photographs for the identification of the six species; to provide information on their geographic distributions, host plants and biology; and to bring the first record of O. ovatus for Argentina and new host associations with cranberry and strawberry.

  12. Family-group names in Coleoptera (Insecta)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouchard, Patrice; Bousquet, Yves; Davies, Anthony E.; Alonso-Zarazaga, Miguel A.; Lawrence, John F.; Lyal, Chris H. C.; Newton, Alfred F.; Reid, Chris A. M.; Schmitt, Michael; Ślipiński, S. Adam; Smith, Andrew B. T.

    2011-01-01

    Abstract We synthesize data on all known extant and fossil Coleoptera family-group names for the first time. A catalogue of 4887 family-group names (124 fossil, 4763 extant) based on 4707 distinct genera in Coleoptera is given. A total of 4492 names are available, 183 of which are permanently invalid because they are based on a preoccupied or a suppressed type genus. Names are listed in a classification framework. We recognize as valid 24 superfamilies, 211 families, 541 subfamilies, 1663 tribes and 740 subtribes. For each name, the original spelling, author, year of publication, page number, correct stem and type genus are included. The original spelling and availability of each name were checked from primary literature. A list of necessary changes due to Priority and Homonymy problems, and actions taken, is given. Current usage of names was conserved, whenever possible, to promote stability of the classification. New synonymies (family-group names followed by genus-group names): Agronomina Gistel, 1848 syn. nov. of Amarina Zimmermann, 1832 (Carabidae), Hylepnigalioini Gistel, 1856 syn. nov. of Melandryini Leach, 1815 (Melandryidae), Polycystophoridae Gistel, 1856 syn. nov. of Malachiinae Fleming, 1821 (Melyridae), Sclerasteinae Gistel, 1856 syn. nov. of Ptilininae Shuckard, 1839 (Ptinidae), Phloeonomini Ádám, 2001 syn. nov. of Omaliini MacLeay, 1825 (Staphylinidae), Sepedophilini Ádám, 2001 syn. nov. of Tachyporini MacLeay, 1825 (Staphylinidae), Phibalini Gistel, 1856 syn. nov. of Cteniopodini Solier, 1835 (Tenebrionidae); Agronoma Gistel 1848 (type species Carabus familiaris Duftschmid, 1812, designated herein) syn. nov. of Amara Bonelli, 1810 (Carabidae), Hylepnigalio Gistel, 1856 (type species Chrysomela caraboides Linnaeus, 1760, by monotypy) syn. nov. of Melandrya Fabricius, 1801 (Melandryidae), Polycystophorus Gistel, 1856 (type species Cantharis aeneus Linnaeus, 1758, designated herein) syn. nov. of Malachius Fabricius, 1775 (Melyridae), Sclerastes

  13. Contact toxicity of deltamethrin against Tribolium castaneum (Coleoptera: Tenebrionidae), Sitophilus oryzae (Coleoptera: Curculionidae), and Rhyzopertha dominica (Coleoptera: Bostrichidae) adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    This study was conducted to evaluate deltamethrin-incorporated ZeroFly® Storage Bags for efficacy against stored-product insect pests. We evaluated response to deltamethrin concentrations for adults of three stored-product insects, Tribolium castaneum (Herbst), Sitophilus oryzae (L.), and Rhyzoperth...

  14. On the identity of some weevil species described by Johann Christian Fabricius (1745-1808) in the Museum of Zoology of Copenhagen (Coleoptera, Cucujoidea, Curculionoidea, Tenebrionoidea).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alonso-Zarazaga, Miguel A

    2014-01-01

    The types of thirty-two nominal weevil species described by Johann Christian Fabricius are reviewed and lecto- and paralectotypes are designated for twenty-two of them. A neotype is designated for Curculiosticticus Fabricius, 1777. Protapionvaripes (Germar, 1817) is declared a nomen protectum over Curculioflavipes Fabricius, 1775. Based on a study of syntypes, Rhinomacercurculioides Fabricius, 1781 is confirmed as a member of Mycterus (Mycteridae), Bruchusundatus Fabricius, 1787 is tentatively transferred to Erotylidae, Curculiofulvirostris Fabricius, 1787 and Anthribusroboris Fabricius, 1798 are confirmed as members of Salpingus (Salpingidae), and Brachyceruscristatus Fabricius, 1798 is transferred to Tenebrionidae. Based on lectotype designation, Curculiocaninus Fabricius, 1792 is confirmed as a synonym of Sitonalineatus (Linnaeus, 1758) and Curculioinnocuus Fabricius, 1802 as a synonym of Cneorhinusbarcelonicus (Herbst, 1797). Bruchusrufipes Fabricius, 1792 is not considered an available species name, but a later use of Bruchusrufipes Olivier, 1790. Cossonusincisus Pascoe, 1885 is reinstated as valid from synonymy under Cossonusilligeri Champion, 1909 and Cossonusvulneratus Illiger, 1805 from synonymy under Cossonuscanaliculatus (Fabricius, 1792) (a primary homonym of Curculiocanaliculatus Olivier, 1791). Cossonuscanaliculatus Fabricius, 1802 is a secondary homonym of the former and is replaced with Cossonusincisus. Salpingusfulvirostris (Fabricius, 1787) is reinstated as valid from synonymy under Salpingusplanirostris (Fabricius, 1787), a primary homonym of Curculioplanirostris Piller & Mitterpacher, 1783. The following new combinations are proposed: Brachysomuserinaceus (Fabricius, 1802) (from Curculio), Bronchusferus (Gyllenhal, 1840) (from Hipporhinus), Bronchusglandifer (Fabricius, 1792) (from Curculio), Bronchusnivosus (Sparrman, 1785) (from Curculio), Bronchussparrmani (Gyllenhal, 1833) (from Hipporhinus), Coelocephalapionatrirostre (Fabricius, 1802) (from Attelabus), Nerthopssticticus (Fabricius, 1777) (from Curculio), Piezotracheluscrotalariae (Fabricius, 1802) (from Attelabus), and Poropterusgranulatus (Fabricius, 1802) (from Curculio). The junior homonym Brachycerusuva Fabricius, 1792 (non Sparrman, 1785) is replaced by Brachycerusfabricii nom. n. The following new synonymies are established: Brachycerusobesus (Fabricius, 1775) = Curculioscalaris Fabricius, 1777, syn. n., Brachydereslusitanicus (Fabricius, 1781) = Curculiomoratus Fabricius, 1798, syn. n., Brachypera (Brachypera) crinita (Boheman, 1834) = Curculiostriatus Fabricius, 1787, syn. n., Brachysomuserinaceus (Fabricius, 1802) = Brachysomusvillosulus (Germar, 1824), syn. n., Bronchusabruptecostatus (Gyllenhal, 1833) = Curculiospectrum Fabricius, 1802, syn. n., Bronchusnivosus (Sparrman, 1785) = Curculiorecurvus Fabricius, 1802, syn. n., Camptorhinustibialis (Sparrman, 1785) = Rhynchaenusalienatus Fabricius, 1802, syn. n., Coelocephalapionatrirostre (Fabricius, 1802) = Coelocephalapionluteirostre (Gerstäcker, 1854), syn. n., Cyrtoderescristatus (DeGeer, 1778) (Tenebrionidae) = Brachyceruscristatus Fabricius, 1798, syn. n., Desmidophorushebes (Fabricius, 1781) = Curculiotuberculatus Fabricius, 1792, syn. n., Donussalviae (Schrank, 1789) = Curculiodenticornis Fabricius, 1798, syn. n., Exomiasholosericeus (Fabricius, 1802) = Exomiaschevrolati (Boheman, 1842), syn. n., Nerthopssticticus (Fabricius, 1777) = Nerthopsguttatus (Olivier, 1807), syn. n., Phyllobiusoblongus (Linnaeus, 1758) = Curculiomali Fabricius, 1782, syn. n., and Rhinocyllusconicus (Froelich, 1792) = Bruchuspunctatus Fabricius, 1798, syn. n. Bronchussynthesys sp. n. is described to represent the concept of Hipporhinusspectrum sensu Marshall, 1904, a misidentification.

  15. The attractiveness of manuka oil and ethanol, alone and in combination, to xyleborus glabratus (Coleoptera: Curculionidae: Scolytinae) and other curculionidae

    Science.gov (United States)

    C.W. Johnson; R.S. Cameron; J.L. Hanula; C. Bates

    2014-01-01

    The increasing volume of international commerce in the last century has resulted in an exchange of organisms at an alarming rate. Among those exhibiting a significant threat to forests are the bark and ambrosia beetles and their associated fungi. Between 1985 and 2005, 18 scolytinae species introductions to the U.S. were recorded, and others have been documented since...

  16. Estirpes de Bacillus thuringiensis efetivas contra insetos das ordens Lepidoptera, Coleoptera e Diptera Bacillus thuringiensis strains effective against insects of Lepidoptera, Coleoptera and Diptera orders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lílian Botelho Praça

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available O objetivo deste trabalho foi selecionar entre 300 estirpes de Bacillus thuringiensis as efetivas simultaneamente contra larvas de Spodoptera frugiperda J.E. Smith e Anticarsia gemmatalis Hübner (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae, Anthonomus grandis Boheman (Coleoptera: Curculionidae, Aedes aegypti Linnaeus e Culex quinquefasciatus Say (Diptera: Culicidae. Foram selecionadas duas estirpes de B. thuringiensis, denominadas S234 e S997, que apresentaram atividade contra as três ordens de insetos. As estirpes foram caracterizadas por métodos morfológicos, bioquímicos e moleculares. As mesmas apresentaram duas proteínas principais de 130 e 65 kDa, produtos de reação em cadeia da polimerase de tamanho esperado para a detecção dos genes cry1Aa, cry1Ab, cry1Ac, cry1B e cry2 e cristais bipiramidais, cubóides e esféricos.The aim of this work was to select among 300 strains of Bacillus thuringiensis those which are simultaneously effective against larvae of Spodoptera frugiperda J.E. Smith and Anticarsia gemmatalis Hübner (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae, Anthonomus grandis Boheman (Coleoptera: Curculionidae, Aedes aegypti Linnaeus and Culex quinquefasciatus Say (Diptera: Culicidae. Two strains of B. thuringiensis were selected, S234 and S997, which presented activity against those three insect orders. Both strains were characterized by morphological, biochemical and molecular methods. They have presented two main proteins with 130 and 65 kDa, polimerase chain reaction products with expected sizes for detection of the genes cry1Aa, cry1Ab, cry1Ac, cry1B and cry2 and bipiramidal, cubical and spherical crystals.

  17. Plant extracts on Hypothenemus hampei (Coleoptera: Curculionidae and Beauveria bassianaExtratos vegetais sobre Hypothenemus hampei (Coleoptera: Curculionidae e Beauveria bassiana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janaina Zorzetti

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Looking for alternatives to pesticides for Hypothenemus hampei control, the objective of this study was to evaluate the potential of aqueous and ethanolic plant extracts of Moringa oleifera (Moringa and Tephrosia purpurea (tephrosia (seeds, leaves and roots and Melia azedarach (cinnamon, Nerium oleander (oleander and Azadirachta indica (neem (leaves only, on mortality and repellency of H. hampei and its compatibility with Beauveria bassiana, an important natural enemy of this pest. To assess the mortality, coffee leaves (Coffea arabica L were treated by immersion in a solution of endosulfan and plant extracts at a concentration of 10% and then offered to adults of H. hampei. The repellency was evaluated in multiple-choice tests and in no-choice tests among coffee fruit treated and untreated The compatibility between extracts and Beauveria bassiana (CG 452 was analyzed by quantifying germination, colony forming units, growth and yield / productivity of conidia. The highest mortalities were observed when leaves were treated with ethanolic extract of T. purpurea (leaves which did not differ from endosulfan, and aqueous and ethanolic extracts from M. oleifera seeds . In free-choice tests, all the ethanolic extracts showed repellent action, being higher for M. oleifera (root and T. purpurea (seed. The aqueous extracts of M. oleifera (leaves and seeds and N. oleander (leaves showed the highest repellency. In no-choice tests the highest repellency level was for coffee fruits treated with A. indica (leaves. The ethanolic extract of M. oleifera leaves negatively affected B. bassiana germination. These studies showed the potential of these plant extracts for use in the field as an alternative to chemical control, once they are also selective for B. bassiana. Visando alternativas ao uso de agrotóxicos no controle de Hypothenemus hampei, o objetivo deste trabalho foi avaliar o potencial de extratos vegetais aquosos e etanólicos de Moringa oleifera (moringa e Tephrosia purpurea (tephrosia (sementes, folhas e raízes e Melia azedarach,(cinamomo Nerium oleander, (espirradeira Azadirachta indica (nim (apenas folhas, na mortalidade e repelência de H. hampei, e sua compatibilidade com Beauveria bassiana, importante inimigo natural desta praga. Para avaliar a mortalidade, ofereceram-se aos adultos, folhas de cafeeiro (Coffea arabica L tratadas por imersão em solução de endosulfan e em extratos vegetais na concentração de 10%. A repelência foi avaliada em testes com e sem chance de escolha, entre frutos de cafeeiro tratados e não tratados. A compatibilidade entre os extratos e Beauveria bassiana (CG 452 foi analisada quantificando a germinação, unidades formadoras de colônias, crescimento vegetativo e produção/produtividade de conídios. As maiores mortalidades foram observadas quando folhas foram tratadas com o extrato etanólico das de T. purpurea (folhas que não diferiu do endosulfan, e de extrato aquoso e etanólico da semente de M. oleifera. Em testes com chance de escolha, todos os extratos etanólicos possuíram ação repelente, sendo que a maior repelência foi causada por M. oleifera (raiz e T. purpurea (semente. Os extratos aquosos de folhas e semente de M. oleifera e de folhas de N. oleander apresentaram a maior repelência. Nos ensaios sem chance de escolha o maior nível de repelência foi para frutos de cafeeiro tratados com A. indica (folhas. O extrato etanólico de folhas de M. oleifera afetou negativamente a germinação. Estes estudos mostraram o potencial desses extratos para uso a campo como uma alternativa ao controle químico, sendo também seletivos para B. bassiana.

  18. Parisoschoenus obesulus Casey (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) is not a pest of young coconut tree fruits; Parisoschoenus obesulus Casey (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) nao e praga de frutos novos do coqueiro

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moura, Jose I.L.; Sgrillo, Ricardo B.; Valle, Raul R.; Delabie, Jacques H.C. [Comissao Executiva da Lavoura Cacaueira, Itabuna, BA (Brazil)], e-mail: jinaciolacerda@yahoo.com.br, e-mail: sgrillo@cepec.gov.br, e-mail: raul@cepec.gov.br, e-mail: jacques.delabie@gmail.com; Ferreira, Joana M.S. [EMBRAPA Tabuleiros Costeiros, Aracaju, SE (Brazil)], e-mail: joana@cpatc.embrapa.br; Almeida, Alex-Alan F. de [Universidade Estadual de Santa Cruz (UESC), Ilheus, BA (Brazil). Dept. de Ciencias Biologicas], e-mail: alex@uesc.br; Cividanes, Francisco J. [Universidade Estadual Paulista (UNESP), Jaboticabal, SP (Brazil). Dept. de Fitossanidade], e-mail: fjcivida@fcav.unesp.br

    2009-03-15

    This study aimed to evaluate if Parisoschoenus obesulus Casey only attacks naturally aborting coconuts and, consequently, is not a pest of young fruits of coconut tree. Aiming to test this hypothesis, inflorescences at diverse stages of physiological development were offered to individuals of P. obesulus. The Results showed that only aborting fruits were colonized by P. obesulus corroborating the established hypothesis. (author)

  19. Plant compounds insecticide activity against Coleoptera pests of stored products

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moreira, Marcio Dionizio; Picanco, Marcelo Coutinho; Guedes, Raul Narciso Carvalho; Campos, Mateus Ribeiro de; Silva, Gerson Adriano; Martins, Julio Claudio [Universidade Federal de Vicosa (UFV), MG (Brazil). Dept. de Biologia Animal]. E-mail: marcio.dionizio@gmail.com; picanco@ufv.br; guedes@ufv.br; mateusc3@yahoo.com.br; agronomiasilva@yahoo.com.br

    2007-07-15

    The objective of this work was to screen plants with insecticide activity, in order to isolate, identify and assess the bioactivity of insecticide compounds present in these plants, against Coleoptera pests of stored products: Oryzaephilus surinamensis L. (Silvanidae), Rhyzopertha dominica F. (Bostrichidae) and Sitophilus zeamais Mots. (Curculionidae). The plant species used were: basil (Ocimum selloi Benth.), rue (Ruta graveolens L.), lion's ear (Leonotis nepetifolia (L.) R.Br.), jimson weed (Datura stramonium L.), baleeira herb (Cordia verbenacea L.), mint (Mentha piperita L.), wild balsam apple (Mormodica charantia L.), and billy goat weed or mentrasto (Ageratum conyzoides L.). The insecticide activity of hexane and ethanol extracts from those plants on R. dominica was evaluated. Among them, only hexane extract of A. conyzoides showed insecticide activity; the hexane extract of this species was successively fractionated by silica gel column chromatography, for isolation and purification of the active compounds. Compounds 5,6,7,8,3',4',5'-heptamethoxyflavone; 5,6,7,8,3'-pentamethoxy-4',5'-methilenedioxyflavone and coumarin were identified. However, only coumarin showed insecticide activity against three insect pests (LD{sub 50} from 2.72 to 39.71 mg g{sup -1} a.i.). The increasing order of insects susceptibility to coumarin was R. dominica, S. zeamais and O. surinamensis. (author)

  20. Insecticidal potential of natural zeolite and diatomaceous earth formulations against rice weevil (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) and red flour beetle (Coleoptera: Tenebrionidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrić, Goran G; Marković, Mirjana M; Adamović, Milan; Daković, Aleksandra; Golić, Marijana Prazić; Kljajić, Petar J

    2012-04-01

    Insecticidal potential of natural zeolites and diatomaceous earths originating from Serbia against Sitophilus oryzae (L.) and Tribolium castaneum (Herbst) was evaluated. Two natural zeolite formulations (NZ and NZ Modified) were applied to wheat at rates of 0.50, 0.75, and 1.0 g/kg, while two diatomaceous earth (DE) formulations (DE S-1 and DE S-2) were applied at rates of 0.25, 0.50, 0.75, and 1.0 g/kg. A bioassay was conducted under laboratory conditions: temperature of 24 +/- 1 degrees C, relative humidity in the range 50-55%, in tests with natural zeolites, and 60-65%, in tests with DEs, and in all combinations for progeny production. Mortality was assessed after 7, 14, and 21 d of insect contact with treated wheat, and the total mortality after an additional 7-d recovery on untreated broken wheat. Progeny production was also assessed after 8 wk for S. oryzae and 12 wk for T. castaneum. The highest mortality for S. oryzae and T. castaneum was found after the longest exposure period and 7 d of recovery, on wheat treated with NZ at the highest rate and DEs at rates of 0.50 -1.0 g/kg. Progeny reduction higher than 90% was achieved after 14 and 21 d of contact of both beetle pests with wheat treated with DE S-1 at 0.50-1.0 g/kg and DE S-2 at 0.75-1.0 g/kg, while the same level of reduction was achieved only for T. castaneum after its contact with the highest rate of NZ formulation. NZ Modified, applied even at the highest rate, revealed much lower insecticidal potential.

  1. Seasonal variation in the diet of common quail Coturnix coturnix in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    1996-06-03

    Jun 3, 1996 ... Caraboidea' Carabidae (ground beetles). 16. Gyrinidae (whirligig beetles). Dysticidae. Cucujoidea: Coccinellidae (lady birds). 4. Erolylidae. 2. Anthicidae. 2. Melanoidae (blister, oil &. CMR beetles). Corylophidae. 5. Curculionoidea: Curculionidae (weevils, snout beetles). 43. Elaleroidea (click beetles).

  2. Current state of knowledge on Wolbachia infection among Coleoptera: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kajtoch, Łukasz; Kotásková, Nela

    2018-01-01

    Despite great progress in studies on Wolbachia infection in insects, the knowledge about its relations with beetle species, populations and individuals, and the effects of bacteria on these hosts, is still unsatisfactory. In this review we summarize the current state of knowledge about Wolbachia occurrence and interactions with Coleopteran hosts. An intensive search of the available literature resulted in the selection of 86 publications that describe the relevant details about Wolbachia presence among beetles. These publications were then examined with respect to the distribution and taxonomy of infected hosts and diversity of Wolbachia found in beetles. Sequences of Wolbachia genes ( 16S rDNA, ftsZ ) were used for the phylogenetic analyses. The collected publications revealed that Wolbachia has been confirmed in 204 beetle species and that the estimated average prevalence of this bacteria across beetle species is 38.3% and varies greatly across families and genera (0-88% infected members) and is much lower (c. 13%) in geographic studies. The majority of the examined and infected beetles were from Europe and East Asia. The most intensively studied have been two groups of herbivorous beetles: Curculionidae and Chrysomelidae. Coleoptera harbor Wolbachia belonging to three supergroups: F found in only three species, and A and B found in similar numbers of beetles (including some doubly infected); however the latter two were most prevalent in different families. A total of 59% of species with precise data were found to be totally infected. Single infections were found in 69% of species and others were doubly- or multiply-infected. Wolbachia caused numerous effects on its beetle hosts, including selective sweep with host mtDNA (found in 3% of species), cytoplasmic incompatibility (detected in c. 6% of beetles) and other effects related to reproduction or development (like male-killing, possible parthenogenesis or haplodiploidy induction, and egg development

  3. External and internal structure of weevils (Insecta: Coleoptera) investigated with phase-contrast X-ray imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoennicke, M.G.; Cusatis, C.; Rigon, L.; Menk, R.-H.; Arfelli, F.; Foerster, L.A.; Rosado-Neto, G.H.

    2010-01-01

    Weevils (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) are identified by the external structure (dorsal, ventral and lateral features) and also by internal structure. The genitalia can be used to distinguish the sex and to identify the insects when the external structure appears identical. For this purpose, a destructive dissecting microscopy procedure is usually employed. In this paper, phase contrast X-ray imaging (radiography and tomography) is employed to investigate the internal structure (genitalia) of two entire species of weevils that presents very similar external structures (Sitophilus oryzae and Sitophilus zeamais). The detection of features, which looks like the genital structure, shows that such non-destructive technique could be used as an alternative method for identification of insects. This method is especially useful in examining the internal features of precious species from museum collections, as already described in the recent literature.

  4. External and internal structure of weevils (Insecta: Coleoptera) investigated with phase-contrast X-ray imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hönnicke, M. G.; Cusatis, C.; Rigon, L.; Menk, R.-H.; Arfelli, F.; Foerster, L. A.; Rosado-Neto, G. H.

    2010-08-01

    Weevils (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) are identified by the external structure (dorsal, ventral and lateral features) and also by internal structure. The genitalia can be used to distinguish the sex and to identify the insects when the external structure appears identical. For this purpose, a destructive dissecting microscopy procedure is usually employed. In this paper, phase contrast X-ray imaging (radiography and tomography) is employed to investigate the internal structure (genitalia) of two entire species of weevils that presents very similar external structures ( Sitophilus oryzae and Sitophilus zeamais). The detection of features, which looks like the genital structure, shows that such non-destructive technique could be used as an alternative method for identification of insects. This method is especially useful in examining the internal features of precious species from museum collections, as already described in the recent literature.

  5. External and internal structure of weevils (Insecta: Coleoptera) investigated with phase-contrast X-ray imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoennicke, M.G., E-mail: mhonnicke@bnl.go [NSLS II, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY (United States); Cusatis, C. [LORXI, Departamento de Fisica-UFPR, Curitiba (Brazil); Rigon, L. [Instituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Trieste (Italy); Menk, R.-H. [Sincrotrone Trieste SCPa, Basovizza, Trieste (Italy); Arfelli, F. [Instituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Trieste (Italy); Dipartamento di Fisica-Universita di Trieste, Trieste (Italy); Foerster, L.A.; Rosado-Neto, G.H. [Departamento de Zoologia-UFPR, Curitiba (Brazil)

    2010-08-21

    Weevils (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) are identified by the external structure (dorsal, ventral and lateral features) and also by internal structure. The genitalia can be used to distinguish the sex and to identify the insects when the external structure appears identical. For this purpose, a destructive dissecting microscopy procedure is usually employed. In this paper, phase contrast X-ray imaging (radiography and tomography) is employed to investigate the internal structure (genitalia) of two entire species of weevils that presents very similar external structures (Sitophilus oryzae and Sitophilus zeamais). The detection of features, which looks like the genital structure, shows that such non-destructive technique could be used as an alternative method for identification of insects. This method is especially useful in examining the internal features of precious species from museum collections, as already described in the recent literature.

  6. Attaching lures to multiple-funnel traps targeting saproxylic beetles (Coleoptera) in pine stands: inside or outside funnels?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Daniel R; Crowe, Christopher M; Barnes, Brittany F; Gandhi, Kamal J K; Duerr, Donald A

    2013-02-01

    We conducted two field trapping experiments with multiple-funnel traps in 2008 and one experiment in 2010 to determine the effects of lure placement (inside or outside funnels) on catches of saproxylic species of beetles (Coleoptera). The experiments were conducted in southern pine (Pinus spp.) stands in central Georgia using combinations of ethanol, alpha-pinene, ipsenol, and ipsdienol lures. We report on a modification to the multiple-funnel trap that allows placement of large lures inside the confines of the funnels with minimal blockage. In general, catches of five species of common longhorn beetles (Cerambycidae), two species of regeneration weevils (Curculionidae), four species of bark beetles (Curculionidae: Scolytinae), and seven species of beetle predators and ectoparasites (Cleridae, Histeridae, Tenebrionidae, Trogossitidae, and Zopheridae) were higher in funnel traps with lures attached inside the funnels than in those with lures attached outside of the funnels. Catches of the remaining species were unaffected by lure placement. In no instance were catches of any species lower in funnel traps with lures attached inside the funnels than in those with lures attached outside of the funnels. For most species, catches in modified funnel traps with ethanol, alpha-pinene, ipsenol, and ipsdienol lures attached inside funnels were comparable with those in cross-vane panel traps.

  7. Effects of a Commercial Chitosan Formulation on Bark Beetle (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) Resistance Parameters in Loblolly Pine

    Science.gov (United States)

    K. D. Klepzig; B. L. Strom

    2011-01-01

    A commercially available chitosan product, Beyond™, was evaluated for its effects on loblolly pine, Pinus taeda L., responses believed related to bark beetle resistance. Treatments were applied 4 times at approx. 6-wk intervals between May and November 2008. Five treatments were evaluated: ground application (soil drench), foliar application, ground...

  8. Walnut Twig Beetle (Coleoptera: Curculionidae: Scolytinae) Colonization of Eastern Black Walnut Nursery Trees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Audley, Jackson; Klingeman, William E; Mayfield, Albert; Myers, Scott; Taylor, Adam

    2017-05-01

    Thousand cankers disease, caused by the invasive bark beetle Pityophthorus juglandis Blackman and an associated fungal pathogen Geosmithia morbida M.Kolařík, E. Freeland, C. Utley, N. Tisserat, currently threatens the health of eastern black walnut (Juglans nigra L.) in North America. Both the beetle and pathogen have expanded beyond their native range via transport of infested walnut wood. Geosmithia morbida can develop in seedlings following inoculation, but the ability of P. juglandis to colonize young, small diameter trees has not been investigated. This study assessed the beetle's colonization behavior on J. nigra nursery trees. Beetles were caged directly onto the stems of walnut seedlings from five nursery sources representing a range of basal stem diameter classes. Seedlings were also exposed to P. juglandis in a limited choice, field-based experiment comparing pheromone-baited and unbaited stems. When beetles were caged directly onto stems, they probed and attempted to colonize seedlings across the range of diameters and across sources tested, including stems as small as 0.5 cm in diameter. In the field experiment, beetles only attempted to colonize seedlings that were baited with a pheromone lure and appeared to prefer (though not statistically significant) the larger diameter trees. Despite several successful penetrations into the phloem, there was no evidence of successful progeny development within the young trees in either experiment. Further investigation is recommended to better elucidate the risk nursery stock poses as a pathway for thousand cankers disease causal organisms. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Entomological Society of America.

  9. Pest Management Strategies Against the Coffee Berry Borer (Coleoptera: Curculionidae: Scolytinae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Infante, Francisco

    2018-03-22

    Coffee ( Coffea arabica and C. canephora) is one of the most widely traded agricultural commodities and the main cash crop in ∼80 tropical countries. Among the factors that limit coffee production, the coffee berry borer, Hypothenemus hampei (Ferrari) has been considered the main insect pest, causing losses of over U.S. $500 million dollars annually. Control of this pest has been hindered by two main factors: the cryptic nature of the insect (i.e., protected inside the coffee berry) and the availability of coffee berries in the field allowing the survival of the pest from one generation to the next. Coffee berry borer control has primarily been based on the use of synthetic insecticides. Management strategies have focused on the use of African parasitoids ( Cephalonomia stephanoderis, Prorops nasuta, and Phymastichus coffea), fungal entomopathogens ( Beauveria bassiana), and insect traps. These approaches have had mixed results. Recent work on the basic biology of the insect has provided novel insights that might be useful in developing novel pest management strategies. For example, the discovery of symbiotic bacteria responsible for caffeine breakdown as part of the coffee berry borer microbiome opens new possibilities for pest management via the disruption of these bacteria. Some chemicals with repellent propieties have been identified, and these have a high potential for field implementation. Finally, the publication of the CBB genome has provided insights on the biology of the insect that will help us to understand why it has been so successful at exploiting the coffee plant. Here I discuss the tools we now have against the CBB and likely control strategies that may be useful in the near future.

  10. Basil oil fumigation increases radiation sensitivity in adult Sitophilus oryzae (Coleoptera: Curculionidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    The biological activity of basil (Ocimum basilicum L.) oil was tested against the stored product pest rice weevil, Sitophilus oryzae(L.). Adult weevils were exposed to seven different concentrations of basil oil ranging from 0.12 µl/ml-0.60 µl/ml in Petri dishes and mortality was assessed at 3,4 and...

  11. Host suitability analysis of the bark beetle Scolytus amygdali (Coleoptera: Curculionidae: Scolytinae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeiri, A; Ahmed, M Z; Braham, M; Qiu, B-L

    2015-08-01

    Scolytus amygdali is a polyphagous insect pest that feeds on fruit trees and forest trees. Our study assessed the host preference and reproductive potential of S. amygdali on four tree species: almond (Prunus dulcis), apricot (Prunus armeniaca), peach (Prunus persica), and plum (Prunus domestica). Females of S. amygdali produced maternal galleries that were longer on peach than the other three trees, and female fecundity was highest on peach. Females with longer maternal galleries produced more eggs, indicating a positive correlation between maternal gallery length and female fertility. The under-bark development time of S. amygdali is significantly shorter on plum (45 days) and almond (56 days) than on apricot (65 days) and peach (64 days). Despite this longer development time on peach, our results still suggest that, of the four types of tree tested, peach is the most preferred host for S. amygdali.

  12. Egg distribution and sampling of Diaprepes abbreviatus (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) on silver buttonwood

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pena, J.E.; Mannion, C.; Amalin, D.; Hunsberger, A.

    2007-01-01

    Taylor's power law and Iwao's patchiness regression were used to analyze spatial distribution of eggs of the Diaprepes root weevil, Diaprepes abbreviatus (L.), on silver buttonwood trees, Conocarpus erectus, during 1997 and 1998. Taylor's power law and Iwao's patchiness regression provided similar descriptions of variance-mean relationship for egg distribution within trees. Sample size requirements were determined. Information presented in this paper should help to improve accuracy and efficiency in sampling of the weevil eggs in the future. (author) [es

  13. Resposta de Sitophilus zeamais Motschulsky 1885 (Coleoptera: Curculionidae frente ao extrato de Capsicum annuum L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliana Ferreira da Silva

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available O uso desenfreado de agrotóxicos vem a ser um caso de saúde pública, pois prejudica a saúde do trabalhador do campo assim como do consumidor final desses produtos. O Sitophilus zeamais é uma praga de armazenamento que ataca o milho, e no combate a essa praga comumente é utilizado produtos tóxicos. Visando essa problemática, a busca por produtos alternativos vem a ser um campo de investigação promissor, pois esse método de controle não gera resíduos para o homem tão pouco ao meio ambiente. O extrato utilizado para avaliar o potencial de repelência foi o de Capsicum annuum L. popularmente conhecido como pimentão. Os testes foram realizados com a utilização de arenas, onde em cada arena foram liberados 30 adultos de S. zeamais, não sexados e após 24 horas, foram registrados o número de insetos em cada recipiente. Os grãos de milho foram tratados com volume de extrato correspondente a 1,0% da massa de grãos, nas concentrações 0,0 (álcool 70%; 25,0; 50,0; 75,0 e 100,0% (volume de extrato/volume álcool. O experimento foi organizado segundo o delineamento inteiramente casualizado e constou de cinco tratamentos e quatro repetições. As maiores repelências foram observadas nas concentrações de 25% e 100%, repelindo 72 e 70% dos insetos respectivamente. Sendo assim a utilização desse extrato pode ser empregado no tratamento de sementes armazenadas, evitando assim uma maior infestação desses insetos, preservando assim a integridade física e fisiológica das sementes.

  14. Pectinases from Sphenophorus levis Vaurie, 1978 (Coleoptera: Curculionidae): putative accessory digestive enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evangelista, Danilo Elton; de Paula, Fernando Fonseca Pereira; Rodrigues, André; Henrique-Silva, Flávio

    2015-01-01

    The cell wall in plants offers protection against invading organisms and is mainly composed of the polysaccharides pectin, cellulose, and hemicellulose, which can be degraded by plant cell wall degrading enzymes (PCWDEs). Such enzymes are often synthesized by free living microorganisms or endosymbionts that live in the gut of some animals, including certain phytophagous insects. Thus, the ability of an insect to degrade the cell wall was once thought to be related to endosymbiont enzyme activity. However, recent studies have revealed that some phytophagous insects are able to synthesize their own PCWDEs by endogenous genes, although questions regarding the origin of these genes remain unclear. This study describes two pectinases from the sugarcane weevil, Sphenophorus levis Vaurie, 1978 (Sl-pectinases), which is considered one of the most serious agricultural pests in Brazil. Two cDNA sequences identified in a cDNA library of the insect larvae coding for a pectin methylesterase (PME) and an endo-polygalacturonase (endo-PG)-denominated Sl-PME and Sl-endoPG, respectively-were isolated and characterized. The quantitative real-time reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction expression profile for both Sl-pectinases showed mRNA production mainly in the insect feeding stages and exclusively in midgut tissue of the larvae. This analysis, together Western blotting data, suggests that Sl-pectinases have a digestive role. Phylogenetic analyses indicate that Sl-PME and Sl-endoPG sequences are closely related to bacteria and fungi, respectively. Moreover, the partial genomic sequences of the pectinases were amplified from insect fat body DNA, which was certified to be free of endosymbiotic DNA. The analysis of genomic sequences revealed the existence of two small introns with 53 and 166 bp in Sl-endoPG, which is similar to the common pattern in fungal introns. In contrast, no intron was identified in the Sl-PME genomic sequence, as generally observed in bacteria. These data support the theory of horizontal gene transfer proposed for the origin of insect pectinases, reinforcing the acquisition of PME genes from bacteria and endo-PG genes from fungi. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Entomological Society of America.

  15. A new record of fungus-beetle symbiosis in Scolytodes bark beetles (Scolytinae, Curculionidae, Coleoptera)

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hulcr, J.; Kolařík, Miroslav; Kirkendall, L.

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 43, - (2007), s. 151-159 ISSN 0334-5114 Grant - others:GA ČR(CZ) GD206/03/H034 Program:GD Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50200510 Source of funding: V - iné verejné zdroje Keywords : scolytodes unipunctatus * cecropia * raffaela Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 0.598, year: 2007

  16. New records of Iranian bark beetles (Coleoptera: Curculionidae, Scolytinae) and their host plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amini, Sudabe; Nozari, Jamasb; Mandelshtam, Michail Yu; Knížek, Miloš; Etemad, Vahid; Faccoli, Massimo

    2017-11-17

    Bark and ambrosia beetles from the subfamily Scolytinae are among the most important pests in forests of Northern Iran. During investigations conducted in 2013-2016 in different parts of northern forests, the species Crypturgus cribrellus Reitter, Liparthrum bartschti Mühl, Scolytus varshalovitchi Michalski, Scolytus sulcifrons Rey, Scolytus triarmatus (Eggers) and Trypophloeus granulatus (Ratzeburg) were recorded for the first time in Iran; Trypophloeus and Liparthrum were new genera for Iran. As new host plants we found Zelkova sp. for Scolytus varshalovitchi, Michalski, Populus sp. for Liparthrum bartschti, Mühl, Alnus sp. and Pterocarya fraxinifolia for Taphrorychus lenkoranus Reitter, Pterocarya fraxinifolia for Ernoporicus caucasicus (Lindemann), Carpinus sp. for Pteleobius vittatus (Fabricius), Parrotia persica for Scolytus intricatus (Ratzeburg), Alnus sp. and Pterocarya fraxinifolia for Hypothenemus eruditus (Westwood).

  17. Scolytinae in hazelnut orchards of Turkey: clarification of species and identification key (Coleoptera, Curculionidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Celal Tuncer

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Hazelnut, a very important cash crop in Turkey, is frequently colonized by bark and ambrosia beetle species (Scolytinae. Some scolytine species may cause economic damage while other species do not; therefore, proper identification is important in orchard management. Extensive sampling demonstrated that the most common pest species in Turkey’s hazelnut orchards are Anisandrus dispar, Xylosandrus germanus, and Xyleborinus saxesenii. Hypothenemus eruditus can also be common, but only colonizes branches that are already dead. Lymantor coryli, Hypoborus ficus, Taphrorychus ramicola, and Taphrorychus hirtellus are rare and do not causes damage to live plants. Xyleborinus saxesenii appears to have been frequently misidentified and misreported as either L. coryli or Xyleborus xylographus. The former is rare, and the latter probably does not occur in Turkey. To avoid future misidentifications, a dichotomous identification key is provided for bark and ambrosia beetles of hazelnut orchards in Turkey.

  18. Phytosanitation Methods Influence Posttreatment Colonization of Juglans nigra Logs by Pityophthorus juglandis (Coleoptera: Curculionidae: Scolytinae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    J. Audley; A. E. Mayfield; S. W. Myers; A. Taylor; W. E. Klingeman

    2015-01-01

    Several North American walnut species (Juglans spp.) are threatened by thousand cankers disease which is caused by the walnut twig beetle (Pityophthorus juglandis Blackman) and its associated fungal plant pathogen, Geosmithia morbida M. Kolarý´k, E. Freeland, C. Utley and N. Tisserat sp. nov. Spread of this...

  19. Essential oil of Cinnamodendron dinisii Schwanke for the control of Sitophilus zeamais Motschulsky (Coleoptera: Curculionidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. VEDOVATTO

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT The use of natural compounds is a less aggressive alternative for the control of insects in stored grains, in relation to synthetic chemical agents. Plants with insecticidal properties can be used as a source of these compounds to the direct application in pest control. In this work, the essential oil of Cinnamodendron dinisii was chemically characterized and tested regarding its insecticidal and repellent effect on the control of Sitophilus zeamais in stored grains. The essential oil was obtained by hydrodistillation and analyzed by gas chromatography–mass spectrometry (GC-MS. The insecticidal potential was evaluated through the maintenance of the insects during 24 hours in contact with several doses of the oil, in the absence of feed substrate. The Bioassays of repellency were conducted with lethal doses (LD5, LD25, LD50 and LD95 obtained from insecticidal bioassay. In order to compare the treatments, the preference index (PI was used. The essential oil of C. dinisii had insecticidal activity against S. zeamais, causing a linear and crescent mortality with LD of 0.04, 0.17, 0.34 and 0.63 µL/cm2, respectively. The repellency ranged from 55.4% to 85.2%, using the LD values previously mentioned. The DL5 was neutral regarding repellence (PI index -0,09, but from DL25 on, the PI index was between -0.1 and -1.0, indicating repellence activity.

  20. Neue Calandriden (Coleoptera Curculionidae) von den grossen Sunda-Inseln und Nordindien

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Günther, K.

    1935-01-01

    Otidognathus inexspectatus nov. spec. (Fig. 1) ♀. Körperoberfläche matt, wächsern, Farbe dunkel rotbraun mit schwarzen Zeichnungen. Kopf und Rüssel glänzend schwarz, Rüssel ganz schwach gebogen, fast so lang wie das Halsschild, mit feinem Mittelkiel und Puncturen im basalen Drittel; zwischen den

  1. Geographic variation in bacterial communities associated with the red turpentine beetle (Coleoptera: Curculionidae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aaron S. Adams; Sandye M. Adams; Cameron R. Currie; Nancy E. Gillette; Kenneth F. Raffa

    2010-01-01

    Bacterial communities are known to play important roles in insect life histories, yet their consistency or variation across populations is poorly understood. Bacteria associated with the bark beetle Dendroctonus valens LeConte from eight populations, ranging from Wisconsin to Oregon, were evaluated and compared. We used the culture-independent technique of denaturing...

  2. Geographical Distribution and New Host Associations of Rhyssomatus Subtilis (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) in Argentina

    OpenAIRE

    Cazado, Lucas Emiliano; Murúa, María Gabriela; Casmuz, Augusto; Socías, María Guillermina; Vera, Maria Teresa; O'Brien, W.O.; Gastaminza, Gerardo Alfredo

    2015-01-01

    The genus Rhyssomatus Schoenherr, 1837 includes 176 Neotropical and Nearctic species, many of which have agricultural importance because they are phytophagous during the larval and adult stages (O’Brien & Wibmer 1982; Wibmer & O’Brien 1986; Costa et al. 1988; Socías et. al. 2009) Fil: Cazado, Lucas Emiliano. Gobierno de Tucumán. Ministerio de Desarrollo Productivo. Estación Experimental Agroindustrial Obispo Colombres; Argentina. Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Científicas y Técnicas. ...

  3. Insecticidal potency of RNAi-based catalase knockdown in Rhynchophorus ferrugineus (Oliver) (Coleoptera: Curculionidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Ayedh, Hassan; Rizwan-Ul-Haq, Muhammad; Hussain, Abid; Aljabr, Ahmed M

    2016-11-01

    Palm trees around the world are prone to notorious Rhynchophorus ferrugineus, which causes heavy losses of palm plantations. In Middle Eastern countries, this pest is a major threat to date palm orchards. Conventional pest control measures with the major share of synthetic insecticides have resulted in insect resistance and environmental issues. Therefore, in order to explore better alternatives, the RNAi approach was employed to knock down the catalase gene in fifth and tenth larval instars with different dsRNA application methods, and their insecticidal potency was studied. dsRNA of 444 bp was prepared to knock down catalase in R. ferrugineus. Out of the three dsRNA application methods, dsRNA injection into larvae was the most effective, followed by dsRNA application by artificial feeding. Both methods resulted in significant catalase knockdown in various tissues, especially the midgut. As a result, the highest growth inhibition of 123.49 and 103.47% and larval mortality of 80 and 40% were observed in fifth-instar larvae, whereas larval growth inhibition remained at 86.83 and 69.08% with larval mortality at 30 and 10% in tenth-instar larvae after dsRNA injection and artificial diet treatment. The topical application method was the least efficient, with the lowest larval growth inhibition of 57.23 and 45.61% and 0% mortality in fifth- and tenth-instar larvae. Generally, better results were noted at the high dsRNA dose of 5 µL. Catalase enzyme is found in most insect body tissues, and thus its dsRNA can cause broad-scale gene knockdown within the insect body, depending upon the application method. Significant larval mortality and growth inhibition after catalase knockdown in R. ferrugineus confirms its insecticidal potency and suggests a bright future for RNAi-based bioinsecticides in pest control. © 2016 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2016 Society of Chemical Industry.

  4. A remarkable new genus and species of Lixini (Coleoptera: Curculionidae: Lixinae from Madagascar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Levent Gültekin

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Klassius gen. nov. with type species Klassius klassi sp. nov. is described from Madagascar in tribe Lixini, and illustrated. The new genus is close to Larinus and related genera from which differs by its elytra triangularly shaped, humeri so strongly inflated as to appear as an hemisphaerical disc ventrally, prosternum with a faint trace of shallow rostral canal, base of elytra arcuate towards prothorax, metepimeron completely and metanepisternum partly concealed by elytra, lateral intervals angularly curved on abdominal ventrites and flattened. Relationships between close genera are briefly discussed.

  5. Extratos botânicos no controle de Sitophilus zeamais Motschulsky 1885 (Coleoptera: Curculionidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco de Assis Cardoso Almeida

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available O uso crescente e indiscriminado de inseticidas sintéticos vem acarretando diversos problemas para saúde humana e para o meio ambiente. Uma alternativa é o emprego de plantas com ação inseticida, podendo ser aplicados na forma de pó, extratos ou óleos. Diante o exposto, objetivou-se com este trabalho avaliar a ação de extratos hidroalcoólicos de Mormodica charantia (Melão-de-São-Caetano e Capsicum baccatum (Pimenta Dedo-de-Moça no controle do Sitophilus zeamais. Os bioensaios foram realizados no Laboratório de Análise de Sementes, da Universidade Federal de Campina Grande, Campus I, Campina Grande, Paraíba. Os extratos vegetais foram avaliados quanto a sua atratividade/repelência e quanto à mortalidade. Ambos os bioensaios foram organizados de acordo com o delineamento inteiramente casualizado, dispostos em esquema fatorial 2 x 2 (extratos e procedimentos e 4 x 5 (extratos e doses. As médias dos fatores foram comparadas pelo teste de Tukey (P ≤ 0,05. Com base nos resultados concluiu-se que os extratos hidroalcoólicos M. charantia e C. baccatum foram eficientes no controle dos adultos de S. zeamais, com destaque para o extrato de C. baccatum que a partir da dose de 6 mL foi 100% eficiente na mortalidade deste inseto praga.

  6. Morphometric assessment of the red stripe weevils, Rhynchophorus vulneratus (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) from several localities in Malaysia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sazali, Siti Nurlydia; Hazmi, Izfa Riza; Rahim, Faszly; Abang, Fatimah; Jemain, Abdul Aziz

    2018-04-01

    The recognition of intraspecific variation could enhance knowledge and understanding on the population divergence that might be resulted from different geographical areas. To study the possible effect derived from different locations, a morphometric study of the red stripe weevils, Rhynchophorus vulneratus from different localities in Malaysia was conducted using field and voucher specimens. A total of twenty-three morphological characters were examined from 108 individuals of R. vulneratus representing population of Kota Samarahan, Mukah and central of Peninsular Malaysia. The data were subjected to univariate one-way single factor analysis of variance (ANOVA) and analysed in factor analysis using SPSS version 22.0 software. Univariate ANOVA showed that all tested variables were significantly different (p<0.05) except for mesocoxal distance (MSD), meanwhile from the factor analysis, the first three factors with eigenvalues greater than 1.0 were successfully extracted, resulting in a high variation of 82.687%. For factor 1, 39.213% of total variation was recorded, factor 2 accounted for 34.096% and factor 3 contributing to 9.377%, respectively. The mixed plotting among the twenty-three morphological characters suggests a strong correlation among the parameters examined and further statistical analysis should be conducted to include environmental factors such as habitat types, food availability and predation effect.

  7. Identification of pigmented Serratia marcescens symbiotically associated with Rhynchophorus ferrugineus Olivier (Coleoptera: Curculionidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scrascia, Maria; Pazzani, Carlo; Valentini, Franco; Oliva, Marta; Russo, Valentina; D'Addabbo, Pietro; Porcelli, Francesco

    2016-10-01

    To characterize red pigment-producing bacteria (RPPB) regularly released during oviposition by red palm weevil (RPW), RPPB were recovered from eggs deposited in apples supplied as substrate for oviposition. The presence of RPPB was also detected from gut, the reproductive apparatus of dissected adult and virgin insects and from pupal cases collected within infested palms. RPPB were also identified all along the tissue of these palms. Analysis of the 16S rDNA, gyrB, rpoB, recA, and groEL sequences assigned RPPB to the species Serratia marcescens. RPPB exhibited an antimicrobial activity assessed by the agar well diffusion method against a number of gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria. In this study, we first report the identification of a red pigment-producing S. marcescens as extracellular symbiont of RPW. Route of transmission, detection within different organs, and a wide spread along the infested palm tissue, suggested S. marcescens is present as extracellular symbiont in different developmental stages of the RPW. Additionally, the antimicrobial activity exhibited versus Bacillus spp., Paenibacillus spp., and Lysinibacillus spp., reported as insect pathogens and potential candidates for biocontrol agents, could ascribe for S. marcescens a potential protective role. © 2016 The Authors. MicrobiologyOpen published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Behavior study weevil ultradian sitophilus oryzae (coleoptera: curculionidae) treated with ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barrenechea, C.D.; Ritacco, M.

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study is to determine the sublethal dose of beetle Sitophilus oryzae primary pest grain products through the application of ionizing radiation as disinfestation. process. This beetle is a small insect, reddish brown, 3 mm in length that is characterized by the prolongation of his face. It causes severe damages in the material infesting either larval or adult state. They get their power supply of various materials, which include: grains of wheat, corn, rice, noodles and biscuits, among others. The insect under study, is bred in a natural substrate that infests (noodles) preventing the arrival of direct light and environmental conditions while maintaining the temperature ranging between 19 and 23 o O C with 41% relative humidity average. The adults are irradiated in darkness in the irradiation plant located at the Ezeiza Atomic Center (PISI), whose source is approximately 750 kCi 60 Co activity. Mature specimens are irradiated at 2 kGy, with a dose rate of between 260.00 and 286.33 Gy / min and at temperatures ranging between 15.4 and 18.1 o C until the moment. The material is observed 3 times daily stages comprising ultradian (morning, afternoon and evening) observed number of live / dead etolology, taxismo, physiology and restoration post irradiation, these data are compared with untreated. material. Were irradiated until 255 individuals, verifying the LD 50 for the second day post irradiation. It is found that immediately after the application of the method, adults lose the ability to move, being initially temporarily until it becomes final. Insects move only certain parts of the body (legs and antennae, mainly). In some specimens are observed in the mouth secretions transparent and light yellow in the anal region (under study), response evidenced in adult insects control of this species (author)

  9. The Role of the Beetle Hypocryphalus mangiferae (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) in the Spatiotemporal Dynamics of Mango Wilt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galdino, Tarcísio Visintin da Silva; Ferreira, Dalton de Oliveira; Santana Júnior, Paulo Antônio; Arcanjo, Lucas de Paulo; Queiroz, Elenir Aparecida; Sarmento, Renato Almeida; Picanço, Marcelo Coutinho

    2017-06-01

    The knowledge of the spatiotemporal dynamics of pathogens and their vectors is an important step in determining the pathogen dispersion pattern and the role of vectors in disease dynamics. However, in the case of mango wilt little is known about its spatiotemporal dynamics and the relationship of its vector [the beetle Hypocryphalus mangiferae (Stebbing 1914)] to these dynamics. The aim of this work was to determine the spatial-seasonal dynamic of H. mangiferae attacks and mango wilt in mango orchards and to verify the importance of H. mangiferae in the spatiotemporal dynamics of the disease. Two mango orchards were monitored during a period of 3 yr. The plants in these orchards were georeferenced and inspected monthly to quantify the number of plants attacked by beetles and the fungus. In these orchards, the percentage of mango trees attacked by beetles was always higher than the percentage infected by the fungus. The colonization of mango trees by beetles and the fungus occurred by colonization of trees both distant and proximal to previously attacked trees. The new plants attacked by the fungus emerged in places where the beetles had previously begun their attack. This phenomenon led to a large overlap in sites of beetle and fungal occurrence, indicating that establishment by the beetle was followed by establishment by the fungus. This information can be used by farmers to predict disease infection, and to control bark beetle infestation in mango orchards. © The Authors 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Entomological Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  10. Overseeding endophytic perennial ryegrass into stands of Kentucky bluegrass to manage bluegrass billbug (Coleoptera: Curculionidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richmond, D S; Niemczyk, H D; Shetlar, D J

    2000-12-01

    Studies were conducted to determine the utility of overseeding endophyte enhanced varieties of perennial ryegrass, Lolium perenne L., into existing stands of Kentucky bluegrass, Poa pratensis L., to manage bluegrass billbug, Sphenophorus parvulus Gyllenhal, larval populations and their damage. Two commercial varieties of endophyte enhanced perennial ryegrass (Repell II and Triple Play) were overseeded at two different rates in the field. S. parvulus larval populations, their damage, and turfgrass composition were monitored over the course of 3 yr. Significantly fewer larvae were found in plots overseeded with Repell II, whereas Triple Play had no significant effect on larval population density. Endophyte infection was confirmed in approximately 58% of all Repell II shoots, whereas only approximately 31% of Triple Play shoots were infected. Regression analysis, using a segmented model, demonstrated that larval populations declined as the proportion of endophyte-infected perennial ryegrass increased. However, no additional reductions in larval population density were achieved in stands containing >40% endophyte-infected perennial ryegrass. Visual damage varied with cultivar, seeding rate, and year, but generally decreased as the proportion of endophyte-infected perennial ryegrass increased. Although seeding rate had an initial effect on turfgrass composition, these differences were not detected after the first year of the study. Results indicate overseeding existing stands of Kentucky bluegrass with endophytic varieties of perennial ryegrass can reduce S. parvulus larval populations and their damage. However, plant genetic characteristics (i.e., different cultivars) may be overriding determinants of many aspects of plant performance including establishment, tolerance to insect feeding, and expression of endophyte-mediated resistance.

  11. Wolbachia endosymbionts in haplodiploid and diploid scolytine beetles (Coleoptera: Curculionidae: Scolytinae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawasaki, Yuuki; Schuler, Hannes; Stauffer, Christian; Lakatos, Ferenc; Kajimura, Hisashi

    2016-05-19

    Haplodiploidy is a sex determination system in which fertilized diploid eggs develop into females and unfertilized haploid eggs develop into males. The evolutionary explanations for this phenomenon include the possibility that haplodiploidy can be reinforced by infection with endosymbiotic bacteria, such as Wolbachia. The subfamily Scolytinae contains species with haplodiploid and diploid sex determination systems. Thus, we studied the association with Wolbachia in 12 diploid and 11 haplodiploid scolytine beetles by analyzing wsp and multilocus sequence typing (MLST) of five loci in this endosymbiont. Wolbachia genotypes were compared with mitochondrial (COI) and nuclear (EF) genotypes in the scolytines. Eight of the 23 scolytine species were infected with Wolbachia, with haplodiploids at significantly higher rates than diploid species. Cloning and sequencing detected multiple infections with up to six Wolbachia strains in individual species. Phylogenetic analyses of wsp and five MLST genes revealed different Wolbachia strains in scolytines. Comparisons between the beetle and Wolbachia phylogenies revealed that closely related beetles were infected with genetically different Wolbachia strains. These results suggest the horizontal transmission of multiple Wolbachia strains between scolytines. We discuss these results in terms of the evolution of different sex determination systems in scolytine beetles. © 2016 Society for Applied Microbiology and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. Review of the genera of Conoderinae (Coleoptera, Curculionidae) from North America, Central America, and the Caribbean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anzaldo, Salvatore S.

    2017-01-01

    Abstract The thirty-nine extant genera of Conoderinae known to occur in North America, Central America, and the Caribbean are reviewed based on external morphology. An identification key is provided along with diagnoses, distributions, species counts, and natural history information, when known, for each genus. Morphological character systems of importance for weevil classification are surveyed, potential relationships among the tribes and genera are discussed, and groups most in need of taxonomic and phylogenetic attention are identified. The following genera are transferred to new tribes: Acoptus LeConte, 1876 from the Lechriopini to the Othippiini (new placement) and the South American genus Hedycera Pascoe, 1870 from the Lechriopini to the Piazurini (new placement). Philides Champion, 1906 and Philinna Champion, 1906 are transferred from the Lechriopini to Conoderinae incertae sedis (new placement) although their placement as conoderines is uncertain. The species Copturomimus cinereus Heller, 1895 is designated as the type species of the genus Copturomimus Heller, 1895. PMID:28769729

  13. A revision of the New Zealand weevil genus Irenimus Pascoe, 1876 (Coleoptera: Curculionidae: Entiminae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Samuel D J

    2017-05-08

    The taxonomy of the New Zealand weevil genus Irenimus Pascoe, 1876 is revised, resulting in a narrower concept of the genus than has been considered in recent decades. In total, the genus now contains only seven species. In addition to the type species, I. parilis Pascoe, 1876, the genus contains I. duplex (Broun, 1904) and five newly described species: I. aniptus new species (type locality, Oamaru, DN), I. crinitus new species (type locality, Hakataramea Valley, SC), I. minimus new species (type locality, Alexandra, CO), I. stichus new species (type locality, Tekapo, MK) and I. thoracicus new species (type locality, Oamaru, DN). The genus Chalepistes new genus is established to contain the majority of species previously described in the genus Catoptes Schönherr, 1842, but also including species described in Brachyolus White, 1846; Irenimus Pascoe, 1876; Inophloeus Pascoe, 1875; and Nicaeana Pascoe, 1877. A total of 27 valid described species are new combinations with Chalepistes: C. aequalis (Broun, 1895) (from Irenimus), C. albosparsus (Broun, 1917) (from Irenimus), C. apicalis (Broun, 1923) (from Catoptes), C. asperatus (Broun, 1914) (from Brachyolus), C. compressus (Broun, 1880) (from Irenimus), C. costifer (Broun, 1886) (from Inophloeus), C. curvus (Barratt & Kuschel, 1996) (from Irenimus), C. dehiscens (Broun, 1917) (from Catoptes), C. dugdalei (Barratt & Kuschel, 1996) (from Irenimus), C. egens (Broun, 1904) (from Irenimus), C. inaequalis (Sharp, 1886) (from Brachyolus), C. instabilis (Marshall, 1931) (from Catoptes), C. latipennis (Broun, 1893) (from Catoptes), C. limbatus (Broun, 1909) (from Catoptes), C. lobatus (Broun, 1921) (from Catoptes), C. patricki (Barratt & Kuschel, 1996) (from Irenimus), C. pensus (Broun, 1914) (from Inophloeus), C. placidus (Broun, 1914) (from Nicaeana), C. posticalis (Broun, 1893) (from Irenimus), C. rhesus (Pascoe, 1875) (from Inophloeus), C. rubidus (Broun, 1881) (from Inophloeus), C. similis (Barratt & Kuschel, 1996) (from Irenimus), C. spectabilis (Broun, 1914) (from Catoptes), C. spermophilus (Broun, 1895), revised status (from Irenimus), C. stolidus (Broun, 1886) (from Irenimus), C. tenebricus (Broun, 1893) (from Catoptes), C. vastator (Broun, 1893) (from Irenimus). Numerous new synonyms with species of Chalepistes are also proposed: Brachyolus fuscipictus Broun, 1914 and Brachyolus terricola Broun, 1917 are junior subjective synonyms of Chalepistes asperatus (Broun); Brachyolus cervalis Broun, 1903 and Brachyolus sylvaticus Broun, 1910 are junior subjective synonyms of Chalepistes costifer (Broun); Inophloeus tricostatus Broun, 1915 is a junior subjective synonym of Chalepistes pensus (Broun); Catoptes pallidipes Broun, 1917, Catoptes flaviventris Broun, 1917 and Catoptes nigricans Broun, 1917 are junior subjective synonyms of Chalepistes placidus (Broun); Inophloeus longicornis Broun, 1904, Inophloeus medius Broun, 1893, Inophloeus sulcicollis Broun, 1914 and Inophloeus suturalis Broun, 1893 are junior subjective synonyms of Chalepistes rhesus (Pascoe); Inophloeus albonotata Broun, 1893, Catoptes asperellus Broun, 1893, Irenimus bicostatus Broun, 1886, Catoptes caliginosus Broun, 1893, Catoptes chalmeri Broun, 1893, Catoptes decorus Broun, 1893, Inophloeus discrepans Broun, 1904, Catoptes fumosus Broun, 1914, Catoptes furvus Broun, 1893, Catoptes humeralis Broun, 1893, Catoptes longulus Sharp, 1886, Inophloeus nigellus Broun, 1881, Irenimus pilosellus Broun, 1886 and Catoptes scutellaris Sharp, 1886 are junior subjective synonyms of Chalepistes rubidus (Broun); Catoptes subnitidus Broun, 1914 and Catoptes curvatus Broun, 1914 are junior subjective synonyms of Chalepistes spermophilus (Broun); Catoptes brevicornis Sharp, 1886 and Catoptes vexator Broun, 1904 are junior subjective synonyms of Chalepistes stolidus (Broun); and Catoptes aemulator Broun, 1893 and Catoptes argentalis Broun, 1914 are junior subjective synonyms of Chalepistes tenebricus (Broun). Additional new combinations include Inophloeus robustus (Broun, 1917) (from Catoptes) and Nicaeana fraudator (Marshall, 1931) (from Catoptes), while Catoptes postrectus Marshall, 1931 is a new synonym of Protolobus obscurus Sharp, 1886.

  14. New species and records of Scolytodes (Coleoptera, Curculionidae: Scolytinae) from South America.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordal, Bjarte H

    2013-01-01

    Seventeen new species of Scolytodes Ferrari are described from Venezuela, Ecuador, Peru, Bolivia and Argentina: Scolytodes cenchros, S. concavifrons, S. conpunctus, S. fraterniatratus, S. frontocarinatus, S. solarius and S. trigonus from Cecropia leafstalks; S. pascopomus from a fruit husk; S. obovatus, S. clusiaphilus, S. clusiapraelatus and S. uniseriatus from Clusia litter sifting; S. grossepunctatus and S. fulvus from general litter sifting; and S. inusitatus, S. sagittarius and S. sus collected by flight intercept traps. The synonymy of S. imitans and S. nitidissimus is confirmed. Additional South American records are given for S. chapuisi (Ecuador), S. interpunctatus (Peru), S. maurus (Ecuador), and S. suspectus (Ecuador), all taken from Cecropia leafstalks, and S. similis (Peru) and S. unipunctatus (Bolivia).

  15. Extremely low infection levels of pathogens and nematodes in Trypodendron spp. (Coleoptera: Curculionidae

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    Wegensteiner Rudolf

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The striped ambrosia beetles Trypodendron lineatum and T. domesticum are timber forest pests in the Palearctic region and North America. Because only a few pathogens are known for Trypodendron species, the aim of this work was to determine the spectrum of pathogen species of T. lineatum, T. laeve, and T. domesticum. Trypodendron species were collected in pheromone traps at nine localities in the Czech Republic, five localities in Poland, and one locality in Austria. In total, 2,439 T. lineatum, 171 T. domesticum, and 17 T. laeve beetles were dissected and examined. Infection was found in only two of the 17 specimens of T. laeve and in only two of the 171 specimens of T. domesticum; in all four cases, the parasites were nematodes. Parasitisation of T. lineatum by nematodes was found in T. lineatum at eight localities with a mean (± SE parasitisation level of 8.1 ± 4.7%. A Chytridiopsis sp. was detected in cells of the midgut epithelium of one T. lineatum specimen, and Gregarina sp. was detected in the midgut lumen of two T. lineatum specimens; no other pathogens were found in T. lineatum. The low infection rates and the tendency for infection by nematodes can be explained by the monogamy of Trypodendron spp. and their feeding on fungi in short galleries that are not connected to the galleries of conspecifics.

  16. Odontopus brevirostris (Hustache, 1936 (Coleoptera, Curculionidae associated with new host plants belonging to Annona (Annonaceae

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    Germano H. Rosado-Neto

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Odontopus brevirostris (Hustache, 1936 feeding on Annona squamosa L., A. cherimola Mill., A. glabra L., and A. muricata L. was observed. The last three host plants are recorded for the first time. The endophitic oviposition occurs in the veins of the ventral surface of the young leaves. The larvae, leaf miners, eat the parenchyma and the adults make small holes in the leaves. The pupation occurs in spherical cocoons protected by a sort of nest (pupation chamber between the two epidermal layers.

  17. Biochemical properties of digestive carbohydrases from the sugar beet weevil, Lixus incanescens (Coleoptera: Curculionidae

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    Seyed Mohammad Ahsaei

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The sugar beet weevil, Lixus incanescens B., is one of the most important pests of sugar beet plant in Iran. The petioles and leaves of sugar beet are attacked by larvae and adults of the sugar beet weevil. Chemical application is currently used for controlling the pest. Digestion in the alimentary canal of the sugar beet weevil is facilitated by some carbohydrases. Results of the in vitro studies indicated the presence of alpha-amylase, beta-glucosidase and beta-galactosidase in the digestive tract of the pest. Highest activities of alpha-amylase, beta-glucosidase and beta-galactosidase were at pH 5, pH 5 and pH 4, respectively. No significant alpha-glucosidase and alpha-galactosidase activity was detected in the pest's digestive system. Optimum temperatures for alpha-amylase, beta-glucosidase and beta-galactosidase activity were determined at 45, 50 and 40 oC, respectively. alpha-amylase was more stable under acidic condition (pH 4 to pH 6 than under highly acidic and alkaline condition. Na+ and K+ increased alpha-amylase activity, but sodium dodecyl sulfate significantly decreased amylase activity. Also, the activity of alpha-amylase was inhibited by the other compounds such as MgCl2, CaCl2 and EDTA. Zymogram analysis using native-PAGE revealed one band of alpha-amylase activity in Lixus incanescens. High activity of carbohydrases in the digestive system of adults was determined and further researches are needed to be applied to design new strategies for controlling the sugar beet weevil based on natural carbohydrase inhibitors.

  18. Phylogeography of the bark beetle Dendroctonus mexicanus Hopkins (Coleoptera: Curculionidae: Scolytinae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miguel A. Anducho-Reyes; Anthony I. Cognato; Jane L. Hayes; Gerardo. Zuniga

    2008-01-01

    Dendroctonus mexicanus is polyphagous within the Pinus genus and has a wide geographical distribution in Mexico and Guatemala. We examined the pattern of genetic variation across the range of this species to explore its demographic history and its phylogeographic pattern. Analysis of the mtDNA sequences of 173 individuals from...

  19. NOTE TASSONOMICHE E NOMENCLATORIALI SU ALCUNE SPECIE PALEARTICHE DI SIBINIA E TYCHIUS (COLEOPTERA, CURCULIONIDAE

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    Roberto Caldara

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available In accordo con le disposizioni del codice internazionale di Nomenclatura Zoologica, vengono proposte otto azioni allo scopo di salvaguardare la stabilità della nomenclatura attuale di alcune specie della tribù Tychiini. seguendo le indicazioni dell’Articolo 23.9.1, Sibinia subelliptica Desbrochers, 1873 è considerato nomen protectum e Gymnetron schaumi Becker, 1864 è considerato nomen oblitum; Sibinia phalerata Gyllenhal, 1836 è considerato nomen protectum e Sibinia centromaculata Villa & Villa, 1835 è considerato nomen oblitum. Essendo presenti le condizioni richieste dall’articolo 75.3, vengono designati i neotipi dei seguenti taxa: Sibinia centromaculata Villa & Villa, 1835; Sybines pulchellus Desbrochers, 1875. Sono inoltre stabiliti i lectotypi di: Gymne­ tron schaumi Becker, 1864; Sibinia attalica Gyllenhal var. lateralis Desbrochers, 1895; Sibinia cinctella Desbrochers, 1898; Sibinia pozuelica Fuente, 1910; Tychius barceloni­cus Desbrochers, 1908; Tychius edentatus Desbrochers, 1895; Tychius pallidicornis Desbrochers, 1875; Tychius parvulus Stephens, 1831; Tychius seductor Desbrochers, 1908. Vengono proposte le seguenti nuove sinonimie: Sibinia bipunctata Kirsch, 1870 = Sibi­nia postsignata Voss, 1971 n. syn.; Sibinia exigua Faust = Sibinia cinctella Desbrochers, 1898 n. syn.; Sibinia femoralis Germar, 1824 = Sibinia attalica var. lateralis Desbrochers, 1895 n. syn. = Sibinia consanguinea Desbrochers, 1895 n. syn. = Sibinia attalica var. curtula Desbrochers, 1907 n. syn. = Sibinia dilataticollis Desbrochers, 1907 n. syn.= Sibinia seducta Desbrochers, 1907 n. syn. = Sibinia pozuelica Fuente, 1910 n. syn.; Si­binia pici Desbrochers = Sibinia otiosa Hustache, 1944 n. syn. = Sibinia praeventa Hustache, 1944 n. syn.; Sibinia subelliptica Desbrochers, 1873 = Sibinia schaumei Desbrochers, 1895 n. syn.; Sibinia unicolor Fåhraeus, 1843 = Sybines pulchellus Desbrochers, 1875 n. syn. = Sibinia ochreata Schilsky, 1912 n. syn. = Sibinia sobrina Voss, 1936 n. syn.; Sibinia variata Gyllenhal, 1836 = Sibinia rubripes Desbrochers, 1907 n. syn.; Sibi­nia viscariae (Linnaeus = Sibinia submeticollis Desbrochers, 1908 n. syn.; Tychiusar­ gentatus Chevrolat, 1859 = Tychius dimidiatipennis Desbrochers, 1873 n. syn. = Tychius argenteosquamosus Desbrochers, 1908 n. syn. = Tychius seductor Desbrochers, 1908 n. syn.; Tychius medicaginis C. Brisout, 1862 = Tychius griseus Petri, 1915 (non Schaeffer, 1908 n. syn.; Tychius breviusculus Desbrochers, 1873 = Tychius humeralis Desbrochers, 1908 n. syn.; Tychius cinnamomeus Kiesenwetter, 1851 = Tychius adspersus Desbrochers, 1908 n. syn. = Tychius barcelonicus Desbrochers, 1908 n. syn.; Tychius cu­prifer (Panzer, 1799 = Myllocerus subcostatus Kolenati, 1858 n. syn.; Tychius cuprinus Rosenhauer, 1856 = Tychius tuberculirostris Hustache, 1944 n. syn.; Tychius dieckmanni Caldara, 1986 = Lepidotychius babaevi Bajtenov & Soyunov, 1990 n. syn.; Tychius ele­gantulus C. Brisout, 1862 = Tychius pulcher Pic, 1925 n. syn.; Tychius elongatulus Desbrochers, 1897 = Tychius longitarsis Desbrochers, 1898 n. syn.; Tychius grenieri C. Brisout, 1861 = Tychius sparsus Hustache, 1944; Tychius immaculicollis Desbrochers, 1907 = Tychius elegans Desbrochers, 1896 (non Brullé, 1832 = Tychius ifranensis Hustache, 1944 n. syn. = Tychius kocheri Hustache, 1944 n. syn. = Tychius teluetensis Hustache, 1944 n. syn.; Tychius lautus Gyllenhal, 1836 = Tychius obductus Hochhuth, 1851 n. syn. = Tychius cilicensis Pic, 1905 n. syn.; Tychius oschianus Faust, 1885 = Tychius pubicol­lis Petri, 1915 n. syn.; Tychius pardalis Escalera, 1914 = Tychius circulatus Hustache, 1944 n. syn.; Tychius picirostris (Fabricius, 1787 = sTychius parvulus Stephens, 1831 n. syn.; Tychius polylineatus (Germar, 1824 = Tychius orbiculatus Hustache, 1944 n. syn.; Tychius stephensi Schoenherr, 1836 = Tychius pallidicornis Desbrochers, 1875 n. syn. Sono considerati nomi infrasubspecifici e pertanto non utilizzabili: Sibinia attalica Gyllenhal var. unicolor Desbrochers, 1895: 102 (non Fåhraeus, 1843; Sibinia attalica subsp. tibiella var. desbordesi Hoffmann, 1954; Tychius pusillus var. inermis Hoffmann, 1954. Sibinia suturella Motschulsky, 1858 (non Fårhaeus, 1843 viene trasferita al genere Smicronyx.

  20. Pectinases From Sphenophorus levis Vaurie, 1978 (Coleoptera: Curculionidae): Putative Accessory Digestive Enzymes

    OpenAIRE

    Evangelista, Danilo Elton; Pereira de Paula, Fernando Fonseca; Rodrigues, Andre [UNESP; Henrique-Silva, Flavio

    2015-01-01

    The cell wall in plants offers protection against invading organisms and is mainly composed of the polysaccharides pectin, cellulose, and hemicellulose, which can be degraded by plant cell wall degrading enzymes (PCWDEs). Such enzymes are often synthesized by free living microorganisms or endosymbionts that live in the gut of some animals, including certain phytophagous insects. Thus, the ability of an insect to degrade the cell wall was once thought to be related to endosymbiont enzyme activ...

  1. Does white clover (Trifolium repens abundance in temperate pastures determine Sitona obsoletus (Coleoptera: Curculionidae larval populations?

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    Mark Richard McNeill

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available To determine if host plant abundance determined the size of clover root weevil (CRW Sitona obsoletus larval populations, a study was conducted over four years in plots sown in ryegrass (Lolium perenne (cv. Nui sown at either 6 or 30 kg/ha and white clover (Trifolium repens sown at a uniform rate of 8 kg/ha. This provided a range of % white clover content to investigate CRW population establishment and impacts on white clover survival. Larval sampling was carried out in spring (October when larval densities are near their spring peak at Lincoln (Canterbury, New Zealand with % clover measured in autumn (April and spring (September of each year. Overall, mean larval densities measured in spring 2012, 2013, 2014 and 2015 were 310, 38, 59 and 31 larvae m-2, respectively. There was a significant decline in larval populations between 2012 and 2013, but spring populations were relatively uniform thereafter. The mean % white clover measured in autumns of 2012 to 2015 was 17, 10, 3 and 11%, respectively. In comparison, mean spring % white clover from 2012 to 2015, averaged c. 5% each year. Analysis relating spring (October larval populations to % white clover measured in each plot in autumn (April found the 2012 larval population to be statistically significantly larger in the ryegrass 6 kg/ha plots than 30 kg/ha plots. Thereafter, sowing rate had no significant effect on larval populations. From 2013 to 2015, spring larval populations had a negative relationship with the previous autumn % white clover with the relationship highly significant for the 2014 data. When CRW larval populations in spring 2013 to 2015 were predicted from the 2013 to 2015 autumn % white clover, respectively, based on their positive relationship in 2012, the predicted densities were substantially larger than those observed. Conversely, when 2015 spring larval data and % clover was regressed against 2012-2014 larval populations, observed densities tended to be higher than predicted, but the numbers came closer to predicted for the 2013 and 2014 populations. These differences are attributed to a CRW population decline that was not accounted by % white clover changes, the CRW

  2. Extratos botânicos no controle de Sitophilus zeamais Motschulsky 1885 (Coleoptera: Curculionidae)

    OpenAIRE

    Francisco de Assis Cardoso Almeida; Juliana Ferreira da Silva

    2013-01-01

    O uso crescente e indiscriminado de inseticidas sintéticos vem acarretando diversos problemas para saúde humana e para o meio ambiente. Uma alternativa é o emprego de plantas com ação inseticida, podendo ser aplicados na forma de pó, extratos ou óleos. Diante o exposto, objetivou-se com este trabalho avaliar a ação de extratos hidroalcoólicos de Mormodica charantia (Melão-de-São-Caetano) e Capsicum baccatum (Pimenta Dedo-de-Moça) no controle do Sitophilus zeamais. Os bioensaios foram realizad...

  3. Efficacy of diatomaceous earth to control internal infestations of rice weevil and maize weevil (Coleoptera: Curculionidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arthur, Frank H; Throne, James E

    2003-04-01

    Densities of 10, 20, and 30 hard red winter wheat kernels, Triticum aestivum L., were infested with different life stages of the rice weevil, Sitophilus oryzae (L.), mixed with 35 g of wheat treated with 300 ppm of the Protect-It (Mississauga, Ontario, Canada) formulation of diatomaceous earth (DE), and held at 22, 27, and 32 degrees C. A similar test was conducted by exposing densities of 6, 12, and 18 corn kernels infested with different life stages of the maize weevil, Sitophilus zeamais Motschulsky, mixed with 30 g of corn, Zea mays L., treated with 300 ppm of DE. Mortality of adults emerging from kernels in wheat treated with DE was always greater than controls, and ranged from 56 to 90% at 22 degrees C and was >90% at 27 and 32 degrees C. In most treatment combinations, exposure to DE suppressed F1 progeny by 60-90% relative to untreated controls. Mortality of adult maize weevils on treated corn held at 22 and 27 degrees C was lower than mortality of rice weevils on wheat, and ranged from 4 to 84%. F1 production was low in corn held at 22 degrees C, and no F1s were produced in either the controls or the treatments at 32 degrees C. In treated corn held at 27 degrees C, exposure to the DE suppressed F1 progeny by approximately 70-80% relative to the untreated controls. Results of this study show that rice weevils and maize weevils emerging from infested kernels as adults are susceptible to DE, and these results are comparable to other studies in which adult weevils were exposed directly on wheat or corn treated with DE. Although adult weevils will be killed by exposure to DE, some oviposition could still occur and progeny suppression may not be complete; however, application of DE to commodities already infested with internal feeders, such as the rice weevil and the maize weevil, could help eliminate or suppress the infestation.

  4. Gallery productivity, emergence, and flight activity of the redbay ambrosia beetle (Coleoptera: Curculionidae: Scolytinae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maner, M Lake; Hanula, James L; Braman, S Kristine

    2013-08-01

    Flight and emergence of the redbay ambrosia beetle, Xyleborus glabratus Eichhoff, were monitored from March 2011 through August 2012 using Lindgren funnel traps baited with manuka oil and emergence traps attached over individual beetle galleries on infested redbay (Persea borbonia (L.) Sprengel) trees. Of the 432 gallery entrances covered with emergence traps, 235 (54.4%) successfully produced at least two adults. Gallery success rates and time until adult emergence were highly variable and strongly depended on time of year galleries were initiated. Successful galleries produced 23.4 ± 2.50 (x ± SE) adult X. glabratus but one had 316 adults emerge from it. Galleries were active for an average of 231.9 ± 6.13 d but five were active for over 1 yr and one gallery produced beetles for 497 d. In total, 5,345 female and 196 males were collected during the study resulting in a sex ratio of ~27:1 (female:male) emerging from galleries. Ambrosia beetles other than X. glabratus were recovered from 18 galleries or ~4% of those studied. Beetles that attacked larger diameter trees were more likely to be successful and produce more brood. Lindgren trap captures reflected emergence trap collections but with a delay of about 1 mo between peaks in emergence and capture in traps. Peaks of activity occurred in fall 2011 and spring 2012, but at least some adult beetles were collected using both methods in every month of the year.

  5. Sapwood Stored Resources Decline in Whitebark and Lodgepole Pines Attacked by Mountain Pine Beetles (Coleoptera: Curculionidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lahr, Eleanor C; Sala, Anna

    2016-12-01

    Recent outbreaks of forest insects have been directly linked to climate change-induced warming and drought, but effects of tree stored resources on insects have received less attention. We asked whether tree stored resources changed following mountain pine beetle (Dendroctonus ponderosae Hopkins) attack and whether they affected beetle development. We compared initial concentrations of stored resources in the sapwood of whitebark pine (Pinus albicaulis Engelmann) and lodgepole pine (Pinus contorta Douglas ex. Louden) with resource concentrations one year later, in trees that were naturally attacked by beetles and trees that remained unattacked. Beetles did not select host trees based on sapwood resources-there were no consistent a priori differences between attacked versus unattacked trees-but concentrations of nonstructural carbohydrate (NSC), lipids, and phosphorus declined in attacked trees, relative to initial concentrations and unattacked trees. Whitebark pine experienced greater resource declines than lodgepole pine; however, sapwood resources were not correlated with beetle success in either species. Experimental manipulation confirmed that the negative effect of beetles on sapwood and phloem NSC was not due to girdling. Instead, changes in sapwood resources were related to the percentage of sapwood with fungal blue-stain. Overall, mountain pine beetle attack affected sapwood resources, but sapwood resources did not contribute directly to beetle success; instead, sapwood resources may support colonization by beetle-vectored fungi that potentially accelerate tree mortality. Closer attention to stored resource dynamics will improve our understanding of the interaction between mountain pine beetles, fungi, and host trees, an issue that is relevant to our understanding of insect range expansion under climate change. © The Authors 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Entomological Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  6. Alfalfa weevil (Coleoptera:Curculionidae) management in alfalfa by spring grazing with cattle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buntin, G D; Bouton, J H

    1996-12-01

    The effect of continuous, intensive grazing by cattle in the 1st alfalfa growth cycle on larval densities of the alfalfa weevil, Hyera postica (Gyllenhal), was evaluated in "Alfagraze' and "Apollo' alfalfa, which are tolerant and not tolerant to grazing, respectively. In small-cage exclusion trials, grazing reduced larval numbers in 1991 by 65% in Alfagraze and by 32% in Apollo. Larval numbers in 1992 were low (alfalfa weevil larvae caused moderate leaf injury in 1993 and severe injury in 1994 before grazing reduced larval numbers. Use of permethrin at 0.11 kg (AI)/ha or carbofuran or chlorpyrifos at 0.28 kg (AI)/ha effectively reduced larval numbers and prevented leaf injury before grazing began. Therefore, a combination of an early application of an insecticide treatment with a short grazing restriction followed by continuous grazing will control alfalfa weevil larvae while allowing cattle to graze and directly use forage of grazing-tolerant alfalfa.

  7. Beauveria bassiana Strains for Biological Control of Cosmopolites sordidus (Germ. (Coleoptera: Curculionidae in Plantain

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    Marilene Fancelli

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to select strains of Beauveria bassiana for controlling Cosmopolites sordidus (Germ. in plantain farms (cv. Terra of the “Recôncavo” and southern regions in the state of Bahia, Brazil. The virulence of 32 B. bassiana isolates against C. sordidus was determined under laboratory conditions. Three isolates (CNPMF 407, CNPMF 218, and CNPMF 416 were selected for evaluation under field conditions in plantations located in the counties of Mutuípe and Wenceslau Guimarães. Population of C. sordidus was estimated every 15 days by using pseudostem traps. The efficiency of the three strains of B. bassiana was compared to chemical control (carbofuran, 4g/trap and absence of control. Carbofuran caused around 90% of adult mortality after 12 months, with a reduction in the population of C. sordidus since the first evaluation. A low number of trapped insects was observed in the fungus-treated plots, suggesting the efficiency of the isolates in controlling the C. sordidus population. The strain CNPMF 218 was the most efficient in controlling C. sordidus adults in both locations, causing around 20% mortality, leading to 40% population size reduction after 12 months.

  8. Bioactivity of diatomaceous earth to Sitophilus zeamais (Coleoptera: Curculionidae in different application conditions

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    Adalberto H. Sousa

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to evaluate the insecticidal activity of diatomaceous earth (DE at different ambient temperatures on adult Sitophilus zeamais and progeny, using different doses and exposure periods. The experiments were performed in Petri dishes containing 40 g of the whole corn kernel, treated with DE at doses of 0, 0.25, 0.5 and 1.0 kg Mg-1. Each dish was infested with 25 S. zeamais adults and kept at climatic chambers under temperatures of 20, 25, 30, 35 and 40 ºC. The insect mortality was recorded after six and 15 days from the beginning of the bioassays. The grains evaluated at 15 days were separated from insects and kept in the dishes for another 75 days under the same temperature conditions. After this period the effect of ambient temperature and of diatomaceous earth doses on the emergence of S. zeamais in the F1 generation was evaluated. It was found that the mortality of S. zeamais increased with the higher dose and temperature during the exposure period of six and 15 days. The number of insects emerged reduced with increasing temperature in these two exposure periods. The increase of temperature and exposure period favored the efficacy of DE in lower doses for control of S. zeamais.

  9. New associations of phoretic mites on Pityokteines curvidens (Coleoptera, Curculionidae, Scolytinae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milan Pernek; Stefan Wirth; Stacy R. Blomquist; Dimitrios N. Avtzis; John C. Moser

    2012-01-01

    Abstract: The species composition and abundance of phoretic mites of the bark beetle Pityokteines curvidens caught in pheromone traps were investigated in Croatia. The P. curvidens trapping programs have been in an experimental phase in Croatia since 2004 as a possible monitoring and control system. The trapping program also permits the opportunity to sample phoretic...

  10. Taxonomic notes on the afrotropical genera Hapalogenius Hagedorn, Hylesinopsis Eggers, and Rhopalopselion Hagedorn (Coleoptera, Curculionidae, Scolytinae

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    Roger Beaver

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Taxonomic confusion among the afrotropical scolytine genera Hapalogenius Hagedorn, Hylesinopsis Eggers and Rhopalopselion Hagedorn, and their synonyms is discussed with especial reference to the catalogues of Wood and Bright (1992, and Alonso-Zarazaga and Lyal (2009. A key is given to separate the three genera recognised, and the species considered to be included in each genus are listed. Hylesinopsis is resurrected from synonymy with Hapalogenius, and shown not to be closely related to it. Chilodendron Schedl is considered to be a synonym of Hylesinopsis and not of Xylechinus Chapuis. The following new synonymy is proposed at specific level: Hapalogenius africanus (Eggers (= Hapalogenius lesnei Eggers, = Metahylesinus brincki Schedl; Hapalogenius fuscipennis (Chapuis (= Hapalogenius bimaculatus Eggers; Hapalogenius oblongus (Eggers (= Metahylesinus striatus Schedl; Hylesinopsis fasciata (Hagedorn (= Kissophagus punctatus Eggers; Phrixosoma niger Eggers (= Hapalogenius niger Schedl. The following species are returned to Hylesinopsis from Hapalogenius to which they were transferred by Alonso-Zarazaga and Lyal (2009: Hylesinopsis alluaudi (Lepesme, H. angolensis (Schedl, H. arabiae (Schedl, H. atra (Nunberg, H. confusa (Eggers, H. decellei (Nunberg, H. dubia Eggers, H. emarginata (Nunberg, H. fasciata (Hagedorn, H. ficus (Schedl, H. granulata (Lepesme, H. hirsuta (Schedl, H. joveri (Schedl, H. pauliani (Lepesme, H. punctata (Eggers, H. saudiarabiae (Schedl. The following new combination is given: Hylesinopsis leprosula (Browne from Cryphalus Erichson. New distributional records are given for some species.

  11. Migration and dispersal of Anthonomus grandis (Coleoptera: Curculionidae in South America

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teodoro STADLER

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available El presente estudio sobre la dispersión de Anthonomus grandis Boheman, el picudo del algodonero, en Argentina, Brasil, Paraguay y Bolivia, explora las características ecológicas y fisiológicas que han permitido a este insecto dispersarse y establecerse exitosamente en América del Sur. La plasticidad fenotípica de A. grandis se caracteriza por un tiempo de desarrollo flexible, ciclo de vida multivoltino con generaciones superpuestas, la capacidad de alimentarse con polen de diversas familias botánicas así como de otras fuentes de alimento y por su habilidad para migrar y dispersarse con la ayuda del viento. Todo esto hace de esta especie una plaga clave para el cultivo del algodón. Los cultivos de cítricos en Misiones, Argentina, son posibles sitios para la hibernación de esta especie. En esta región fueron capturadas grandes cantidades de individuos prediapausantes, provenientes de algodonales en post-cosecha en Paraguay, atraídos probablemente por compuestos volátiles de cítricos cultivados en la zona. La quiescencia facultativa que atraviesan los adultos ante condiciones adversas, conlleva a un retraso en el desarrollo que se relaciona con las condiciones desfavorables. Esto sugiere que la hibernación en A. grandis puede ser definida como «oligopausa», una forma intermedia de diapausa. Desde su introducción en Brasil en 1983 y hasta el 2006, el picudo se ha dispersado en dirección sudoeste hacia Argentina, a una velocidad promedio de 61 km año-1. Sin embargo, le ha insumido aproximadamente diez años cruzar 250 km, desde Paraguay hacia el centro de la zona algodonera de Argentina. Este progreso más lento se debe probablemente a las acciones llevadas a cabo en el marco del programa de erradicación del picudo del algodonero, por parte del gobierno de Argentina. La llegada del picudo al área central de cultivo de algodón en la Argentina, así como a otras áreas de cultivo en Paraguay y Argentina, confirma el hecho de que el picudo debería finalmente incluirse en un programa único de manejo integrado de plagas del algodón.

  12. Scolytinae (Coleoptera: Curculionidae Asociados a Dos Maderas en un Bosque muy Húmedo Premontano (Antioquia, Colombia

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    John Alexander Pulgarín Díaz

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Resumen. Cedrela odorata y Jacaranda copaia son especies importantes en el neotrópico para protección y producción. Los insectos xilófagos que las atacan se han estudiado poco. Se caracterizó la diversidad de Scolytinae que perforan tales maderas y se comparó por especie forestal, época y ecosistema; se estudió su similitud por especie forestal; se probó su asociación con las maderas; y se midió su daño y el de otros insectos. Se expusieron trozas de las maderas en bosque, pastizal y su ecotono, por un mes, en época lluviosa y seca; luego se extrajeron los insectos de su interior. Las especies capturadas fueron Xyleborus ferrugineus, X. affinis y Platypodini. La diversidad de los Scolytinae fue baja, menor en J. copaia, la época seca y el potrero. Esta fauna fue similar entre las dos maderas. No se evidenció asociación entre las especies de escolitinos y las maderas. Los ataques fueron leves y no deterioraron gravemente los leños, siendo los Scolytinae los que más daños causan. Las diferencias encontradas radican principalmente en que los escolitinos capturados son generalistas y en las diferencias ambientales probadas. Se recomienda apear la madera en época seca y trasladarla a potreros para evitar ataques de organismos xilófagos.Abstract. Cedrela odorata and Jacaranda copaia are important species in the neotropics for protection and production. Xylophagous insects that attack the mentioned woods, have been little studied. Scolytinae that bore the mentioned woods diversity's was characterized and compared among species, season and ecosystem; similarity between forest species was studied; its association and woods was tested; and the damage produced by this and other insects was measured. Wood logs were exposed in a forest, grassland and its ecotono, for a month, in a rainy and dry season, then the insects from its interior were extracted. The captured species were Xyleborus ferrugineus, X. affinis and Platypodini. Scolytinae that attack the studied woods' diversity was low, lowest in J. copaia, the dry season and in the grassland. The fauna was similar between the two woods. Association between scolitins and wood species was not proved. The attacks were low and do not damage the logs seriously, been scolitins the most damaging insects. Differences found are due because captured scolitins are generalist and the environmental differences, mainly. It is recommended to harvest the wood in dry season and take it to grasslands to avoid xylophagous insects attack.

  13. A contribution to the study of biology of Curculio elephas Gyll. (Coleoptera, Curculionidae

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    Drekić Milan

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available One of the insects that feeds on pedunculate oak acorns and reduces its seed yield is Curculio elephas Gyll. The study of Curculio elephas Gyll is necessary because of the severe damages caused by this insect and also owing to its insufficiently investigated biology. The research was conducted in the common oak seed orchard at Banov Brod, forest estate „Sremska Mitrovica“, and in the entomological laboratory. The adults emerge from the soil chambers from mid July till the beginning of September. The presence of adults, as determined by crown fogging, ranged from the end of July till the beginning of September with the highest number in mid August. After emerging from the soil, females are already fertile with the developed eggs in the ovaries. They start egg laying after 1 to 8 days and they lay from one to seven eggs per day. Egg laying period lasts from 7 to 20 days. Fertility of C. elephas females ranges from 5 to 40 eggs, while their fecundity ranges from 19 to 45 eggs. At the end of the larval stage, larvae bore into the soil and stay there from one to three years. The species hibernates only in the larval stage. C. elephas has a one-year life cycle, while a minor part of the population has a two or three-year life cycle.

  14. External rostral characters for differentiation of sexes in the biological control agent Mecinus janthinus (Coleoptera: Curculionidae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marjolein Schat; Sharlene E. Sing; Robert K. D. Peterson

    2007-01-01

    The stem-boring weevil, Mecinus janthinus (Germar), is a promising, well established classical biological control agent for the exotic invasive weed Dalmatian toadflax (Linaria dalmatica (L.) Mill.) (Scrophulariaceae). In this paper we present readily apparent rostral characters that can be used for sex differentiation of live stem-boring weevils at low magnification....

  15. Review of the genera of Conoderinae (Coleoptera, Curculionidae from North America, Central America, and the Caribbean

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    Salvatore S. Anzaldo

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The thirty-nine extant genera of Conoderinae known to occur in North America, Central America, and the Caribbean are reviewed based on external morphology. An identification key is provided along with diagnoses, distributions, species counts, and natural history information, when known, for each genus. Morphological character systems of importance for weevil classification are surveyed, potential relationships among the tribes and genera are discussed, and groups most in need of taxonomic and phylogenetic attention are identified. The following genera are transferred to new tribes: Acoptus LeConte, 1876 from the Lechriopini to the Othippiini (new placement and the South American genus Hedycera Pascoe, 1870 from the Lechriopini to the Piazurini (new placement. Philides Champion, 1906 and Philinna Champion, 1906 are transferred from the Lechriopini to Conoderinae incertae sedis (new placement although their placement as conoderines is uncertain. The species Copturomimus cinereus Heller, 1895 is designated as the type species of the genus Copturomimus Heller, 1895.

  16. Occurrence of Microsporidium sp. and other pathogens in Ips amitinus (Coleoptera: Curculionidae)

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Holuša, J.; Lukášová, K.; Žižka, Zdeněk; Handel, U.; Haidler, B.; Wegensteiner, R.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 61, č. 3 (2016), s. 621-628 ISSN 1230-2821 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LO1509 Institutional support: RVO:61388971 Keywords : Small spruce bark beetle * Scolytinae * microsporidia Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 1.160, year: 2016

  17. Quarantine treatment for Sitophilus zeamais (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) through gamma radiation from Cobalt-60

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramos, Amanda Cristina Oliveira; Potenza, Marcos Roberto

    2009-01-01

    Pests like beetles, moths, fungus and mites normally attack stored products such as grains, spices, flours, brans and tobacco in bale. Among these pests the Sitophilus zeamais is one of the most important pests due its elevated potential of reproduction, infesting a great number of products, inducing great damages. This work had as objective to determine the efficacy of gamma radiation from Cobalt-60 as quarantine treatment for S. zeamais. The insects used in this experiment were reared in maize grains, at the Laboratorio de Artropodes of the Instituto Biologico/SP, on climatic room with 27 ± 2 deg C of temperature and relative humidity of 70 ± 5%. Samples containing 25 adult insects were put in acrylic recipients measuring 2.8cm x 2.8cm. Each treatment had four repetitions, in a total of 100 insects for treatment. They were irradiated with growing doses of gamma radiation: 0 (control); 0,25; 0,5; 0,75; 1,0; 1,25; 1,5; 1,75; 2,0; 2,25 2,5; 2,75; 3,0; 3,5 e 4,0 kGy, in a experimental irradiator of Cobalt-60, model Gammacell-220, located at the Centro de Tecnologia da Radiacoes - CTR of the Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares - IPEN/CNEN/SP. After irradiation, the samples were transferred to plastic recipients measuring 3,5cm x 10cm, with perforated lids (to allow gaseous exchanges). After the irradiation the samples were kept in climatic room (27 ± 2 deg C and 70 ± 5%). The mortality of insects was evaluated 1 hour after the irradiation and also on the next 7 days. By the results obtained we can conclude that was the dose of 2.75 kGy that induced the immediate mortality for adult insects of the specie S. zeamais. (author)

  18. Research of bionic design on tools with rostrum of cyrtotrachelus bugueti guer (coleoptera: curculionidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Shun; Li, Longhai; Tong, Jin; Li, Mo

    2017-05-01

    To improve the torsional resistance capability of multilayered composite pipes, a bionic design was presented based on the rostrum of Cyrtotrachelus Bugueti Guer. Morphology and mechanical properties of the weevil's rostrum were studied. Scanning electron microscope (SEM) was employed to observe the macro-/microstructure and inner structure. Nanoindentation was carried out to measure the elastic modulus and the hardness of the biological materials. Based on the structure of rostrum, a mathematical model of multilayered biomimetic pipe was established with the statistical methods. Then, the 3D biomimetic cylinder was built and the torsional resistance capability was analyzed using the finite element analysis. From the SEM and nanoindentation, it was found that the rostrum is a cylindrical hollow multilayered structure composed by three materials. In the transverse section of rostrum, the materials' moduli are 3.07, 3.15, and 8.64 GPa, the hardness are 172.71, 125.32, and 278.99 MPa, respectively. In the longitudinal section, the moduli are 3.01, 4.35, and 7.66 GPa, the hardness are157.46, 149.15, and 253.51 MPa, respectively. The results of simulation showed that the distributional type of lamination has a significant effect on the torsional resistance capability of multilayered structure. The biomimetic structure, which imitates the lamination of rostrum, is superior in the aspect of torsional resistance compared with the nonlaminated or uniform laminated structure. Additionally, the bionic method is feasible and efficient. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Susceptibility and Immune Defence Mechanisms of Rhynchophorus ferrugineus (Olivier (Coleoptera: Curculionidae against Entomopathogenic Fungal Infections

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    Abid Hussain

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Insects infected with entomopathogenic fungi, experience physiological changes that influence their growth and immune defence. The potential of nine isolates of entomopathogenic fungi was evaluated after determining percent germination and relative conidial hydrophobicity. However, nutritional indices were evaluated after immersing eighth-instar Rhynchophorus ferrugineus larvae into each isolate suspension (1 × 107 conidia/mL. The results showed that isolates B6884 and M9374 had 44.51% and 39.02% higher conidial hydrophobicity compared with isolate I03011 (least virulent. The results of nutritional index assays revealed a significant reduction in growth indices after infection with different isolates. Compared with control, B6884 and M9374 greatly decreased larval growth by reducing the efficacy of conversion of ingested food (36%–47% and Efficacy of conversion of digested food (50%–63%. Furthermore, only isolate B6884 induced 100% mortality within 12 days. Compared with control, isolate I03011, possessing the lowest conidial hydrophobicity, only reduced 0.29% of the efficacy of conversion of ingested food (ECI and 0.48% of the efficacy of conversion of digested food (ECD. Similarly, transcriptomic analysis of genes related to the Red palm weevil (RPW immune response, including pathogen recognition receptors (C-type lectin and endo-beta-1,4-glucanse, signal modulator (Serine protease-like protein, signal transductors (Calmodulin-like protein and EF-hand domain containing protein and effectors (C-type lysozyme, Cathepsin L., Defensin-like protein, Serine carboxypeptidase, and Thaumatin-like protein, was significantly increased in larval samples infected with B6884 and M9374. These results suggest that for an isolate to be virulent, conidial hydrophobicity and germination should also be considered during pathogen selection, as these factors could significantly impact host growth and immune defence mechanisms.

  20. Residue age and tree attractiveness influence efficacy of insecticide treatments against ambrosia beetles (Coleoptera: Curculionidae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Management of ambrosia beetles in ornamental nurseries relies, in part, on treatments of insecticides to prevent beetles from boring into trees emitting stress-induced ethanol. However, data on residual efficacy of commonly used pyrethroid insecticides is warranted to gauge the duration that trees ...

  1. Development of host-based lures for redbay ambrosia beetle (Coleoptera: Curculionidae: Scolytinae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The redbay ambrosia beetle, Xyleborus glabratus, a species endemic to Southeast Asia, was first detected in the USA in 2002 near Savannah, GA. Since then, it has become a serious invasive pest, now established in nine southeastern states. Females vector Raffaelea lauricola, the fungus that causes ...

  2. Effect of sterile boll weevils (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) and insecticide in isolated small plots in Florida

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Villavaso, E.J.; McGovern, W.L.; Roberson, J.L.; Smith, J.W.; Ray, H.W.; Monke, B.J.

    1992-01-01

    In the spring and summer of 1989, insecticide and sterile boll weevils, Anthonomus grandis, were applied to plots of cotton on 2 private research farms at Vero Beach, Florida, to suppress the native population of A. grandis. Plots were treated weekly with azinphos-methyl followed by the release of about 500 sterile boll weevils per acre 2 days later. Egg hatch was 5% on the Mobay farm where serially planted plots of cotton were destroyed soon after blooming. On the Ciba-Geigy farm egg hatch averaged 32% prior to the formation of bolls 2.5 cm (1 in.) or larger in diameter and 77% when bolls were larger than 2.5 cm in diameter. Normally, egg hatch in fields with no sterile weevils is about 94%, so their effectiveness in preventing or significantly lowering the reproductive activity of native females entering the cotton fields was demonstrated. After natives began emerging from the clumped areas where oviposition had taken place, the effectiveness of the sterile weevils was significantly diminished. The Ciba-Geigy research farm had received more than 30 applications of azinphos-methyl during the 1988 growing season, and the Mobay farm had received 6 applications of methomyl. In 1989, 16 pheromone-baited traps placed around the perimeter of each farm captured an average of 12 (Mobay) and 37 (Ciba-Geigy) native weevils per week before and during the treatment period. At Ciba-Geigy 41% of the trapped weevils were sterile compared to 34% at Mobay. In 1990, 16 pheromone traps placed around the Mobay and Ciba-Geigy farms averaged 0 and 4 weevils per week, resp., during the growing season

  3. Selective breeding for increased pheromone production in the boll weevil (Coleoptera: Curculionidae)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McCoy, J.R.; Wright, J.E.

    1990-01-01

    The male boll weevil, Anthonomus grandis grandis Boheman, uses an aggregating pheromone to attract females, after which mating often occurs. Sterile boll weevil release programs depend upon this phenomenon to produce sterile matings with feral females. In an effort to increase the effectiveness of the individual sterile male and thereby reduce the number of sterile males required per hectare, a selective-breeding system was used to increase the total pheromone produced by individual male boll weevils. This breeding program increased the total pheromone production by individual male boll weevils to 4.5 times that of the parent population. After irradiation-induced sterilization, there remained 2.2 times more pheromone produced by the selected strain. Therefore, these sterile weevils should be about 2.2 times more attractive to feral females than the parent weevils now in use, and they have the potential to reduce the number of sterile males required in a sterile release program

  4. Attraction of Sphenophorus levis Vaurie adults (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) to vegetal tissues at different conservation levels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giron-Perez, Katherine; Nakano, Octavio; Silva, Amanda C; Oda-Souza, Melissa

    2009-01-01

    The occurrence of the sugarcane weevil Sphenophorus levis Vaurie is important in sugarcane in some regions in Brazil. Damage is caused by the larvae as they bore into the nodes and can reach 30 ton/ha/year. Many control alternatives have been attempted, but none were satisfactory, except for the use of toxic baits. Therefore, it is necessary to optimize their efficiency or to propose new techniques. The objective of the current study was to evaluate the attractiveness of adults of S. levis to sugarcane nodes and pineapple peelings in an 'Y' tube olfactometer. The sugarcane internodes were treated with 10% molasses, and tested after different periods of fermentation (24, 48 e 72h), at different times of the day (diurnal and nocturnal) and with both sexes. These tests were carried out in order to correlate the response of S. levis to ethyl acetate and ethanol release as a result of the fermentation process. The release of both compounds was monitored by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). Our data indicated that sugarcane internodes mixed with 10% molasses fermented for 24h and 48h were the most attractive to S. levis (up to 90%). Pineapple peelings attracted 62.5% of the tested insects. The olfactory response was higher during the day, and no differences were found between the sexes. The production of ethanol in all plant substrates was higher than ethyl acetate, but we could not establish a clear correlation with the insect response to baits. (author)

  5. Quarantine treatment for Sitophilus zeamais (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) through gamma radiation from Cobalt-60

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramos, Amanda Cristina Oliveira, E-mail: amandaramos@usp.b [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Potenza, Marcos Roberto, E-mail: potenza@biologico.sp.gov.b [Instituto Biologico de Sao Paulo, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Centro de Pesquisa e Desenvolvimento de Sanidade Vegetal; Arthur, Valter, E-mail: varthur@cena.usp.b [Centro de Energia Nuclear na Agricultura (CENA/USP), Piracicaba, SP (Brazil)

    2009-07-01

    Pests like beetles, moths, fungus and mites normally attack stored products such as grains, spices, flours, brans and tobacco in bale. Among these pests the Sitophilus zeamais is one of the most important pests due its elevated potential of reproduction, infesting a great number of products, inducing great damages. This work had as objective to determine the efficacy of gamma radiation from Cobalt-60 as quarantine treatment for S. zeamais. The insects used in this experiment were reared in maize grains, at the Laboratorio de Artropodes of the Instituto Biologico/SP, on climatic room with 27 +- 2 deg C of temperature and relative humidity of 70 +- 5%. Samples containing 25 adult insects were put in acrylic recipients measuring 2.8cm x 2.8cm. Each treatment had four repetitions, in a total of 100 insects for treatment. They were irradiated with growing doses of gamma radiation: 0 (control); 0,25; 0,5; 0,75; 1,0; 1,25; 1,5; 1,75; 2,0; 2,25 2,5; 2,75; 3,0; 3,5 e 4,0 kGy, in a experimental irradiator of Cobalt-60, model Gammacell-220, located at the Centro de Tecnologia da Radiacoes - CTR of the Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares - IPEN/CNEN/SP. After irradiation, the samples were transferred to plastic recipients measuring 3,5cm x 10cm, with perforated lids (to allow gaseous exchanges). After the irradiation the samples were kept in climatic room (27 +- 2 deg C and 70 +- 5%). The mortality of insects was evaluated 1 hour after the irradiation and also on the next 7 days. By the results obtained we can conclude that was the dose of 2.75 kGy that induced the immediate mortality for adult insects of the specie S. zeamais. (author)

  6. A model for long-distance dispersal of boll weevils (Coleoptera: Curculionidae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westbrook, John K.; Eyster, Ritchie S.; Allen, Charles T.

    2011-07-01

    The boll weevil, Anthonomus grandis (Boheman), has been a major insect pest of cotton production in the US, accounting for yield losses and control costs on the order of several billion US dollars since the introduction of the pest in 1892. Boll weevil eradication programs have eliminated reproducing populations in nearly 94%, and progressed toward eradication within the remaining 6%, of cotton production areas. However, the ability of weevils to disperse and reinfest eradicated zones threatens to undermine the previous investment toward eradication of this pest. In this study, the HYSPLIT atmospheric dispersion model was used to simulate daily wind-aided dispersal of weevils from the Lower Rio Grande Valley (LRGV) of southern Texas and northeastern Mexico. Simulated weevil dispersal was compared with weekly capture of weevils in pheromone traps along highway trap lines between the LRGV and the South Texas / Winter Garden zone of the Texas Boll Weevil Eradication Program. A logistic regression model was fit to the probability of capturing at least one weevil in individual pheromone traps relative to specific values of simulated weevil dispersal, which resulted in 60.4% concordance, 21.3% discordance, and 18.3% ties in estimating captures and non-captures. During the first full year of active eradication with widespread insecticide applications in 2006, the dispersal model accurately estimated 71.8%, erroneously estimated 12.5%, and tied 15.7% of capture and non-capture events. Model simulations provide a temporal risk assessment over large areas of weevil reinfestation resulting from dispersal by prevailing winds. Eradication program managers can use the model risk assessment information to effectively schedule and target enhanced trapping, crop scouting, and insecticide applications.

  7. Starvation-induced morphological responses of the boll weevil, Anthonomus grandis grandis Boheman (Coleoptera: Curculionidae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Status of the boll weevil, Anthonomus grandis grandis Boheman, as a pest of cotton (Gossypium spp.) in the United States has diminished because of progress by eradication programs. However, this pest remains of critical importance in South America, and intractable populations in extreme South Texas ...

  8. Interaction of insecticide and media moisture on ambrosia beetle (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) attacks on ornamental trees

    Science.gov (United States)

    Exotic ambrosia beetles, particularly Xylosandrus crassiusculus (Motschulsky) and Xylosandrus germanus (Blandford), are among the most economically damaging pests of ornamental trees in nurseries. Growers have had few tactics besides insecticide applications to reduce ambrosia beetle attacks but rec...

  9. Effects of hermetic storage on adult Sitophilus oryzae L. (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) acoustic activity patterns and mortality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hermetic storage is of interest to farmers and warehouse managers as a method to control insect pests in small storage facilities. To develop improved understanding of effects of hermetic storage on insect pest activity and mortality over time, oxygen levels, acoustic signals, and observations of vi...

  10. Nematodes associated with Ips cembrae (Coleoptera: Curculionidae): comparison of generations, sexes and sampling methods

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Grucmanová, Š.; Holuša, J.; Čermák, J.; Nermuť, Jiří

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 140, č. 5 (2016), s. 395-403 ISSN 0931-2048 Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : Bursaphelenchus * Contortylenchus * Cryptaphelenchus Subject RIV: EG - Zoology Impact factor: 1.641, year: 2016 http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/jen.12269/abstract

  11. Nematodes associated with the double-spined bark beetle Ips duplicatus (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) in central Europe

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Grucmanová, Š.; Holuša, J.; Nermuť, Jiří

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 138, č. 10 (2014), s. 723-732 ISSN 0931-2048 Grant - others:Czech University of Life Sciences in Prague(CZ) 20134325; Czech University of Life Sciences in Prague(CZ) 20124302 Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : galleries * generations * Ips duplicatus Subject RIV: EH - Ecology, Behaviour Impact factor: 1.650, year: 2014 http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/jen.12142/epdf

  12. Chilling effect on termination of reproductive diapause in Listronotus maculicollis (Coleoptera: Curculionidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Shaohui; Kostromytska, Olga S; Xue, Fangsen; Koppenhöfer, Albrecht M

    2018-01-01

    Diapausing adults of the annual bluegrass weevil, Listronotus maculicollis, were collected from their hibernating sites at different times in autumn and winter, and subjected to different conditions to observe diapause termination by dissecting and measuring the reproductive organs. When diapausing weevils were maintained under laboratory cold conditions (10 h light at 6 °C:14 h dark at 4 °C) from early December to late March, the sizes of reproductive organs of both sexes increased or fluctuated slightly, and very few females had developing oocytes, suggesting that most adults did not resume development during the chilling period. When diapausing weevils (chilled for 40-83 days) were transferred to warm conditions (LD 14:10 and 21 °C) for different lengths of time, reproductive organ sizes in both sexes increased as chilling period prolonged, implying that chilling played an important role in diapause termination. Under field conditions, an apparent peak of reproductive development was observed on January 07 when 80% of males and 53% of females had resumed growth of reproductive organs. Diapausing weevils collected in September without chilling did not develop successfully despite exposure to warm conditions. In contrast, 87% of males and 93% of females collected from the field on January 21 had initiated reproductive development after 5 days of exposure to warm conditions, indicating the necessity of chilling for diapause termination. Male and female reproductive organ sizes increased faster and to a greater final size the longer the preceding chilling period was. The prolonged chilling period in the field resulted in more synchronized and advanced development in L. maculicollis when exposed to warm conditions. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Mycobiota associated with the ambrosia beetle Scolytodes unipunctatus (Coleoptera: Curculionidae, Scolytinae)

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kolařík, Miroslav; Hulcr, J.

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 113, č. 1 (2009), s. 44-60 ISSN 0953-7562 Grant - others:PřF UK(CZ) GP206/08/P322 Program:GP Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50200510 Keywords : ambrosia fungi * custingophora * custingophora cecropiae Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 2.921, year: 2009

  14. Infestation of Pseudopiazurus papayanus (Marshall) (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) on Carica spp. and Vasconcella spp. genotypes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fancelli, Marilene; Sanches, Nilton F.; Dantas, Jorge L.L.; Caldas, Ranulfo C.; Morales, Cinara F.G.

    2008-01-01

    The papaya borer weevil, Pseudopiazurus papayanus (Marshall), is generally considered a secondary pest, but it has been reported in high infestations in Northeast Brazil. This work aimed at evaluating the occurrence of P. papayanus and reporting its infestation level in papaya genotypes kept at the germplasm bank of EMBRAPA Cassava and Tropical Fruits (Cruz das Almas, Bahia, Brazil). The number of larvae, pupae and adults found in each plant of 65 Carica spp. genotypes and of three Vasconcella spp. genotypes was registered in three to five plants of each genotype, by cutting the exsudating trunks lengthwise. Papaya borer weevil was found in C. papaya and V. cauliflora but not in those of V. quercifolia. Among the evaluated genotypes, 52.4% of those belonging to the Solo group were infested, against 25.0% of the Formosa group. Larval infestation was the best criterion for sorting out genotypes concerning this insect infestation. This is also the first occurrence of the papaya borer weevil . (author)

  15. Dispersal and overwintering behavior of plum curculio, Conotrachelus nenuphar (Herbst), (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) in southern Quebec

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lafleur, G.

    1988-01-01

    Two techniques for applying the isotope {sup 65}Zn to the body surface of plum curculio (PC), Conotrachelus nenuphar (Herbst), are described. Mortality increased with both increase in radioactivity and duration of exposure. A mixture of radioisotope and paint was applied to the elytra of >5000 beetles to study their dispersal and overwintering behavior in the field. In fall, labeled PC were released in orchards, woodlots, and field microplots. From orchards, PC migrated massively towards high tree silhouettes and hibernated in woodlots. The following spring, they reinfested the orchards. In a field choice experiment, comprising four microhabitats, 86% of labeled beetles hibernated in those with a thick litter layer. Few PC (<1%) hibernated within the soil in field conditions. Survival was clearly related to the preferred microhabitat type. Females dispersed further than males. Within woodlots PC migrated south, which confirmed the southern migratory tendency observed in all of the other field experiments. Adults were most active between sunset and sunrise. In spring, following their migration to the orchard, PC were found on the ground under the apple trees. Highest mean PC activity was recorded at fruit set.

  16. Parasitoid complex of Stereonychus fraxini (De Geer) (Coleoptera, Curculionidae) in Serbia

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Drekić, M.; Mihajlović, L. J.; Lozan, Aurel

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 65, č. 2 (2013), s. 733-737 ISSN 0354-4664 Grant - others:Ministry of Education and Science of the Republic of Serbia(RS) III 43002 Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : Stereonychus fraxini * parasitoids * Serbia Subject RIV: EH - Ecology, Behaviour Impact factor: 0.607, year: 2013 http://www.doiserbia.nb.rs/img/doi/0354-4664/2013/0354-46641302733D.pdf

  17. Ultrastructure of labial glands of .I.Scolytus intricatus./I. (Coleoptera: Curculionidae:Scolytinae)

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Šobotník, Jan

    2003-01-01

    Roč. 67, - (2003), s. 233-238 ISSN 1211-376X R&D Projects: GA ČR GA203/00/0219; GA MŠk OC E16.10 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z4055905 Keywords : ultrastructure * labial gland * .I.Scolytus./I. Subject RIV: CC - Organic Chemistry

  18. Parisoschoenus obesulus Casey (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) is not a pest of young coconut tree fruits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moura, Jose I.L.; Sgrillo, Ricardo B.; Valle, Raul R.; Delabie, Jacques H.C.; Ferreira, Joana M.S.; Almeida, Alex-Alan F. de; Cividanes, Francisco J.

    2009-01-01

    This study aimed to evaluate if Parisoschoenus obesulus Casey only attacks naturally aborting coconuts and, consequently, is not a pest of young fruits of coconut tree. Aiming to test this hypothesis, inflorescences at diverse stages of physiological development were offered to individuals of P. obesulus. The Results showed that only aborting fruits were colonized by P. obesulus corroborating the established hypothesis. (author)

  19. Classical Biological Control of Water Hyacinth, Eichhornia Crassipes (Liliales: Pomteridiaeae), Using Neochentina Spp, Weevils (Curculionidae), During the Re-Inversion Period in the Lake victoria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ochiel, G.R.S.

    2002-01-01

    The paper presents recent results from an ongoing classical biological control programme for water hyacinth, implemented by Kenya Agricultural Research Institute Under the Lake Environmental Project. After the successful control of the weed, a re-inversion in the lake was experienced in August 2000 in Nyakach Bay. Between november 2000 and June 2001, approximately 5600 adults Neochetina spp. (coleoptera: Curculionidae) weevils, biological control agents for water hyacinth Eichhornia crassipes (Liliales: Ponteridaceae) were harvested, from the Kibos rearing facility, Namba-Okana 'field security' and community weevil rearing units. Weevils were released on water hyacinth at thirteen sites in Berkeley, Nyakach, Osodo, Kendu, Homa and Karungu and Muhuru Bays, at Kuja-Migori river tributaries and upstream of Nzoia, Yala and Sondu-Miriu rivers. In general, reproductive and growth potential (number of daughter plants, petiole length and laminar area) and fresh weight of the weed was suppressed. there was a gradual increase in insect population levels (number of weevils plant -1 ) and damage to plants by weevil larvae. there is need to carry out an aerial survey to verify the visual estimates of water hyacinth cover and intensify mass rearing and releases of weevils in hotspot areas and to concentrate releases in riverine systems

  20. Coleoptera in the Altai Mountains (Mongolia: species richness and community patterns along an ecological gradient

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    Oyundelger Khurelpurev

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The Altai Mountains located in western Mongolia comprise diverse habitats including forest, mountain steppe, dry steppe, semidesert, and desert. This study used advanced statistics to examine how diversity and species composition of beetle communities depend on vegetation pattern and environmental factors along an ecological gradient from steppe to desert. Our study included the beetle families Tenebrionidae, Carabidae, Curculionidae, and Coccinellidae, which account for the majority of the known beetle fauna in the area. The most abundant Coleoptera in all plots were Harpalus limbaris, Corsyra fusula, and Anatolica cellicola; otherwise, we caught a large number of rare species. The beta diversity of communities was correlated with distance between plots. Species richness of beetles was positively impacted by plant cover and correlated negatively with rising temperatures, whereas Shannon diversity of beetle communities was significantly higher in areas with higher precipitation. Distribution and community composition of Coleopterans were governed by environmental factors, especially plant diversity, mean annual temperature, and summer precipitation, as revealed by redundancy analysis.

  1. Observations on the Cave-Associated Beetles (Coleoptera of Nova Scotia, Canada

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    Moseley M.

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available The cave-associated invertebrates of Nova Scotia constitute a fauna at a very early stage of post-glacial recolonization. TheColeoptera are characterized by low species diversity. A staphylinid Quedius spelaeus spelaeus, a predator, is the only regularlyencountered beetle. Ten other terrestrial species registered from cave environments in the province are collected infrequently. Theyinclude three other rove-beetles: Brathinus nitidus, Gennadota canadensis and Atheta annexa. The latter two together with Catopsgratiosus (Leiodidae constitute a small group of cave-associated beetles found in decompositional situations. Quedius s. spelaeusand a small suite of other guanophiles live in accumulations of porcupine dung: Agolinus leopardus (Scarabaeidae, Corticariaserrata (Latrididae, and Acrotrichis castanea (Ptilidae. Two adventive weevils Otiorhynchus ligneus and Barypeithes pellucidus(Curculionidae collected in shallow cave passages are seasonal transients; Dermestes lardarius (Dermestidae, recorded fromone cave, was probably an accidental (stray. Five of the terrestrial beetles are adventive Palaearctic species. Aquatic beetles arecollected infrequently. Four taxa have been recorded: Agabus larsoni (Dytiscidae may be habitual in regional caves; another Agabussp. (probably semivittatus, Dytiscus sp. (Dytiscidae, and Crenitis digesta (Hydrophilidae are accidentals. The distribution andecology of recorded species are discussed, and attention is drawn to the association of beetles found in a Nova Scotia “ice cave”.

  2. FAUNÍSTIC STUDY OF BEETLES (COLEOPTERA IN A SILVICULTURAL-PASTORAL SYSTEM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander Machado Auad

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to conduct a survey of beetles (Coleoptera in a silvicultural-pastoral system, estimating constancy, abundance, richness, diversity of families and seasonality, from July 2006 to June 2008. The study was carried out at the Embrapa Dairy Cattle station, in Coronel Pacheco, Minas Gerais, Brazil. The beetles were collected in Malaise traps, every two weeks, and taken to the laboratory for analysis. A total of 26 families, 294 morphospecies and 1,606 specimens were found. The Elateridae, Mordelidae, Chrysomelidae, Coccinellidae and Curculionidae families were the most abundant, rich and diverse. The Scarabaeidae and Scolytidae families were also among the most abundant, and the Cerambycidae family was among the richest, while the Bruchidae and Carabidae families presented high diversity.  The largest number of individuals and morphospecies sampled occurred during the period of rain. November 2007 presented the most (n = 535 specimens captures of any month, followed by October 2006, September 2007, March and April of 2008.

  3. Use of indigenous knowledge in the management of field and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Curculionidae), Prostephanus truncates (Coleoptera: Bostrichidae), Tribolium spp (Coleoptera: Tenebrionidae), Bruchus rufimanus (Coleoptera; Bruchidae), Rhyzopertha dominica (Coleoptera: Bostrichidae) and rodents on storage. IK based control methods used by farmers ranged from animal by-products (cow's urine and ...

  4. 1825 (Coleoptera: Cerambycidae

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    Márcia d´Avila

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The erva-mate (Ilex paraguariensis A.St.-Hil. has a social, cultural and economic importance in the southern states of Brazil. The pure stands of this culture was responsible for the increase of many species of insects. Hedypathes betulinus (Klug, 1825 (Coleoptera: Cerambycidae is considered the main pest from an economic viewpoint because of its difficult control and potential for damage. The larval phase occurs inside the twings and trunks, what makes more difficult to deal with its detention and management. Cultural and mechanical management are the most indicated, such as collection of adults, prunning and burning of plant parts damaged by the insect, balanced nutrition, adequate plant density and maintenance of areas with native vegetation or also the introduction of policulture. These strategies may increase the agroecossystem balance and thus a reduction of the insect-pest to an aceptable level. Therefore, the objective of this study was to assemble and the discuss the information on the bioecology and management of erva-mate borer.

  5. Current state of knowledge on Wolbachia infection among Coleoptera: a systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Łukasz Kajtoch

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Background Despite great progress in studies on Wolbachia infection in insects, the knowledge about its relations with beetle species, populations and individuals, and the effects of bacteria on these hosts, is still unsatisfactory. In this review we summarize the current state of knowledge about Wolbachia occurrence and interactions with Coleopteran hosts. Methods An intensive search of the available literature resulted in the selection of 86 publications that describe the relevant details about Wolbachia presence among beetles. These publications were then examined with respect to the distribution and taxonomy of infected hosts and diversity of Wolbachia found in beetles. Sequences of Wolbachia genes (16S rDNA, ftsZ were used for the phylogenetic analyses. Results The collected publications revealed that Wolbachia has been confirmed in 204 beetle species and that the estimated average prevalence of this bacteria across beetle species is 38.3% and varies greatly across families and genera (0–88% infected members and is much lower (c. 13% in geographic studies. The majority of the examined and infected beetles were from Europe and East Asia. The most intensively studied have been two groups of herbivorous beetles: Curculionidae and Chrysomelidae. Coleoptera harbor Wolbachia belonging to three supergroups: F found in only three species, and A and B found in similar numbers of beetles (including some doubly infected; however the latter two were most prevalent in different families. A total of 59% of species with precise data were found to be totally infected. Single infections were found in 69% of species and others were doubly- or multiply-infected. Wolbachia caused numerous effects on its beetle hosts, including selective sweep with host mtDNA (found in 3% of species, cytoplasmic incompatibility (detected in c. 6% of beetles and other effects related to reproduction or development (like male-killing, possible parthenogenesis or haplodiploidy

  6. Current state of knowledge on Wolbachia infection among Coleoptera: a systematic review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotásková, Nela

    2018-01-01

    Background Despite great progress in studies on Wolbachia infection in insects, the knowledge about its relations with beetle species, populations and individuals, and the effects of bacteria on these hosts, is still unsatisfactory. In this review we summarize the current state of knowledge about Wolbachia occurrence and interactions with Coleopteran hosts. Methods An intensive search of the available literature resulted in the selection of 86 publications that describe the relevant details about Wolbachia presence among beetles. These publications were then examined with respect to the distribution and taxonomy of infected hosts and diversity of Wolbachia found in beetles. Sequences of Wolbachia genes (16S rDNA, ftsZ) were used for the phylogenetic analyses. Results The collected publications revealed that Wolbachia has been confirmed in 204 beetle species and that the estimated average prevalence of this bacteria across beetle species is 38.3% and varies greatly across families and genera (0–88% infected members) and is much lower (c. 13%) in geographic studies. The majority of the examined and infected beetles were from Europe and East Asia. The most intensively studied have been two groups of herbivorous beetles: Curculionidae and Chrysomelidae. Coleoptera harbor Wolbachia belonging to three supergroups: F found in only three species, and A and B found in similar numbers of beetles (including some doubly infected); however the latter two were most prevalent in different families. A total of 59% of species with precise data were found to be totally infected. Single infections were found in 69% of species and others were doubly- or multiply-infected. Wolbachia caused numerous effects on its beetle hosts, including selective sweep with host mtDNA (found in 3% of species), cytoplasmic incompatibility (detected in c. 6% of beetles) and other effects related to reproduction or development (like male-killing, possible parthenogenesis or haplodiploidy induction, and

  7. A variabilidade espacial das famílias de Coleoptera (Insecta entre fragmentos de Floresta Ombrófila Mista Montana (Bioma Araucária e plantação de Pinus elliottii Engelmann, no Parque Ecológico Vivat Floresta, Tijucas do Sul, Paraná, Brasil Spatial variability of Coleoptera (Insecta families between a Montane Ombrophilous Mixed Forest (Bioma Araucaria and Pinus elliottii Engelmann plantation fragments, in the Parque Ecológico Vivat Floresta, Tijucas do Sul, Paraná, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Norma G. Ganho

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Várias questões sobre a biodiversidade vêm sendo levantadas nas últimas décadas. Uma delas é o papel que as plantações florestais exóticas monoculturais desempenham na manutenção da fauna nativa, principalmente de insetos. Estudos têm demonstrado que os Coleoptera são sensíveis a variações florísticas e estruturais, em pequena escala espacial. Para analisar as possíveis diferenças na diversidade de Coleoptera entre um ambiente de floresta natural e uma plantação florestal exótica monocultural foi desenvolvido um inventário no Parque Ecológico Vivat Floresta, Tijucas do Sul, Paraná. Para tanto, durante 52 semanas (agosto de 2004 a julho de 2005, seis armadilhas malaise foram dispostas ao longo de um transecto através de dois ambientes adjacentes, com diferentes condições florísticas: três em fragmento da floresta natural (Floresta Ombrófila Mista e três na plantação de Pinus elliottii exótico. Neste primeiro estudo, as comunidades de Coleoptera foram analisadas com base na abundância e na riqueza das famílias. Foram coletados 12397 exemplares de 57 famílias. A abundância foi maior na floresta natural, decrescendo do interior desta para o interior da plantação de pinus. O ecótono - borda da floresta natural/borda da plantação de pinus - foi o mais rico em famílias. Como observado em inventários de outras localidades, os estudos apoiados em dados das famílias que se incluem nos primeiros 60% da abundância total de cada área, mostram os mesmos resultados quando são aplicados os dados de todas as famílias. Na plantação de pinus as famílias dominantes foram, pela ordem: Cerambycidae, Staphylinidae, Curculionidae, Nitidulidae, Lampyridae, Scolytidae, Chrysomelidae; na floresta natural: Chrysomelidae, Cerambycidae, Curculionidae, Lampyridae, Nitidulidae, Staphylinidae.An important question for biodiversity is what is the impact of monocultures of exotic forest trees on native fauna, especially

  8. A diversidade inventarial de Coleoptera (Insecta em uma paisagem antropizada do Bioma Araucária The inventory diversity of Coleoptera (Insecta of an anthropized landscape in the Biome Araucaria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Norma G. Ganho

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Como parte do Projeto PROVIVE, foram analisadas a riqueza de espécies, a composição taxonômica, a proporção de espécies raras e a constância taxonômica ao nível de família relacionada à riqueza de espécies, em comunidades de Coleoptera, em Vila Velha, Ponta Grossa, Paraná. Os dados foram obtidos a partir de coletas através de armadilha malaise no estrato do sub-bosque de cinco áreas com diferentes graus de intervenção antrópica, de setembro de 1999 a agosto de 2000. As 52 semanas de amostragem nas cinco áreas resultaram na coleta de 10.822 indivíduos de 1659 espécies. Todas as áreas apresentaram alta riqueza de espécies e diversidade, como indicado por vários índices. A área em estágio mais avançado de sucessão vegetal foi menos rica do que aquelas em estágio inicial/intermediária. De acordo com diferentes estimadores de riqueza de espécies, o número de espécies coletadas poderia aumentar de 22-123% com o aumento do esforço de coleta. As áreas menos conservadas foram mais ricas em espécies raras ("singletons", "doubletons" e únicas do que as mais conservadas. Nas cinco áreas houve uma constância taxonômica entre as famílias mais ricas (Curculionidae, Chrysomelidae, Cerambycidae, Staphylinidae, Mordelidae, Elateridae, Scarabaeidae, Coccinellidae e Tenebrionidae envolvendo 60% do total de espécies, como observado para a abundância de indivíduos. A existência de um padrão de constância taxonômica de famílias, quando considerados 60% da riqueza de espécies e/ou de abundância de indivíduos por local, poderá tornar mais fácil e rápido o estudo de comunidades de Coleoptera, habilitando a ordem a ser um táxon indicador de condições ambientais de áreas florestadas.The species richness, taxonomic composition, rare species, and taxonomic constancy at family level were studied in communities of Coleoptera in Vila Velha, Ponta Grossa, Paraná, as part of PROVIVE project. The data were gathered

  9. Molecular evidence of facultative intraguild predation by Monochamus titillator larvae (Coleoptera: Cerambycidae) on members of the southern pine beetle guild

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoeller, Erich N.; Husseneder, Claudia; Allison, Jeremy D.

    2012-11-01

    The southern pine bark beetle guild (SPBG) is arguably the most destructive group of forest insects in the southeastern USA. This guild contains five species of bark beetles (Coleoptera: Curculionidae: Scolytinae): Dendroctonus frontalis, Dendroctonus terebrans, Ips avulsus, Ips calligraphus, and Ips grandicollis. A diverse community of illicit receivers is attracted to pheromones emitted by the SPBG, including the woodborers Monochamus carolinensis and Monochamus titillator (Coleoptera: Cerambycidae). These woodborers have been traditionally classified as resource competitors; however, laboratory assays suggest that larval M. carolinensis may be facultative intraguild predators of SPBG larvae. This study used polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based molecular gut content analyses to characterize subcortical interactions between M. titillator and members of the SPBG. The half-lives of SPBG DNA were estimated in the laboratory prior to examining these interactions in the field. A total of 271 field-collected M. titillator larvae were analyzed and 26 (9.6 %) tested positive for DNA of members of the SPBG. Of these larvae, 25 (96.2 %) tested positive for I. grandicollis and one (3.8 %) for I. calligraphus. Failure to detect D. terebrans and D. frontalis was likely due to their absence in the field. I. avulsus was present, but primers developed using adult tissues failed to amplify larval tissue. Results from this study support the hypothesis that larval Monochamus spp. are facultative intraguild predators of bark beetle larvae. Additionally, this study demonstrates the capabilities of PCR in elucidating the interactions of cryptic forest insects and provides a tool to better understand mechanisms driving southern pine beetle guild population fluctuations.

  10. Beetles from Sălaj County, Romania (Coleoptera, excluding Carabidae

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    Merkl O.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available During a faunistical exploration of Sǎlaj county carried out in 2014 and 2015, 840 beetle species were recorded, including two species of Community interest (Natura 2000 species: Cucujus cinnaberinus (Scopoli, 1763 and Lucanus cervus Linnaeus, 1758. Notes on the distribution of Augyles marmota (Kiesenwetter, 1850 (Heteroceridae, Trichodes punctatus Fischer von Waldheim, 1829 (Cleridae, Laena reitteri Weise, 1877 (Tenebrionidae, Brachysomus ornatus Stierlin, 1892, Lixus cylindrus (Fabricius, 1781 (Curculionidae, Mylacomorphus globus (Seidlitz, 1868 (Curculionidae are given.

  11. Sampling methods for Graphoderus bilineatus (Coleoptera: Dytiscidae).

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koese, B.; Cuppen, J.G.M.

    2006-01-01

    Onderzoek naar vangmethodes voor Graphoderus bilineatus (Coleoptera: Dytiscidae) Als onderdeel van een integrale studie naar de waterroofkever Graphoderus bilineatus in Nederland (in opdracht van het ministerie van lnv), werd een vergelijkend onderzoek uitgevoerd naar verschillende

  12. Entomogenous nematodes: a field study for biological control of Curculio elephas Gyl. (Coleoptera Curculionidae); Nematodi entomoparassiti: una prova di impiego in campo della lotta contro il balanino del castagno, Curculio elephas Gyl. (Coleoptera Curculionidae)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rapagnani, M.R.; Caffarelli, V.; Letardi, A.; Barlattani, M. [ENEA, Centro Ricerche Casaccia, Rome (Italy). Dipt. Innovazione; Lazzari, L.; Ruggeri, L. [BIOERRE, Crespellano, Bologna (Italy); Lelli, L.

    1999-02-01

    Biological control of chestnut weevil (Curculio elephas Gyl.) using entomogenous nematodes (Steinernematidae and Heterorhabditidae) was investigated under field conditions. Experiments of infectivity, soil persistence and mobility of the infective juveniles stage of the nematodes were carried out through laboratory tests. Experimental results on developing infectivity process if entomogenous nematodes, have shown both inhibition at low temperature (average value 12 C) and mechanic barrier of weevil pupal envelope. Use of dispersal media as water or peat, was not relevant on experimental results. Further researches are required to test low temperature-resistant strain. [Italiano] Vengono riportati i risultati di uno studio di lotta biologica contro il balanino del castagno (Curculio elephas Gyl.) realizzato utilizzando ceppi di nematodi entomoparassiti (Steinernematidae and Heterorhabditidae). Sono stati monitorati, in campo, l`andamento dell`infestazione del balanino del castagno, l`efficacia del trattamento e l`andamento della temperatura sia climatica che nel terreno a due diverse profondita`. Nel corso dello studio e` stata controllata periodicamente, con prove di laboratorio, la persistenza nel terreno e la capacita` infettiva dei nematodi utilizzati. Lo studio ha messo in evidenza la difficolta` da parte dei nematodi di esplicare la propria azione di entomoparassiti in condizioni di temperatura media attorno ai 12 C e di superare la barriera fisica operata dalla celletta entro cui si impupa il balanino. Il mezzo utilizzato per la dispersione dei nematodi (acqua o torba) risulta essere indifferente rispetto al risultato ottenuto. L`esperienza ha evidenziato l`interesse, in questo tipo di lotta, alla sperimentazione di ceppi di nematodi resistenti alle basse temperature.

  13. Fluctuación poblacional de Xyleborus ferrugineus y X. affinis (Coleoptera: Curculionidae en ecosistemas de Tabasco, México Population fluctuation of Xyleborus ferrugineus and X. affinis (Coleoptera: Curculionidae in ecosystems of Tabasco, Mexico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo Rangel

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Los Scolytinae son insectos comúnmente conocidos como coleópteros descortezadores o ambrosiales debido a su forma de alimentarse. Existen especies que restringen su actividad reproductiva a una planta huésped o a un número reducido de ellas, otras son altamente polífagas. Se estudiaron las poblaciones de Scolytinae con el objetivo de conocer la fluctuación poblacional de X. ferrugineus y X. affinis en ecosistemas de Tabasco, México durante noviembre 2010-julio 2011, febrero 2010-enero 2011 y 2007. Los métodos de captura utilizados fueron trampa de alcohol, trampa de luz y captura directa sobre sus plantas huésped. Se recolectaron 688 especímenes de X. ferrugineus y 3 911 de X. affinis. La fluctuación poblacional de X. ferrugineus mostró de manera general poblaciones bajas en los ecosistemas estudiados sin alguna estacionalidad marcada, registrándose los máximos picos poblacionales tanto en época seca (marzo-mayo como lluviosa (septiembre-diciembre. A diferencia de las poblaciones de X. affinis que fueron más abundantes y mostraron en la mayoría de los sitios (excepto en el Jardín Botánico José Narciso Rovirosa que se presentó en mayo picos poblacionales en época lluviosa. Las trampas de alcohol y de luz son métodos de recolecta que pueden ser complementarios para el monitoreo de las poblaciones de estos insectos, los cuales se encuentran presentes durante la mayor parte del año y su fluctuación poblacional es dependiente de los recursos alimenticios y sobre todo de factores ambientales como la temperatura y humedad. Se sugiere que X. affinis se ha adaptado y explotado los recursos de mejor manera que X. ferrugineus en estos ecosistemas, a juzgar por la abundancia observada. Las correlaciones entre la abundancia y los factores climáticos presentaron valores positivos y negativos. Los resultados reflejan el comportamiento de las poblaciones, sin embargo, hace falta evaluar de manera detallada algunos factores biológicos y abióticos que influyen en las fluctuaciones de éstos insectos.The Scolytinae insects are commonly known as bark or ambrosial beetles because of their feeding habits. Among them, some species restrict their reproductive activity to a host plant or a small number of them, whereas others are highly polyphagous. In order to evaluate the population dynamics of Scolytinae species, populations of Xyleborus ferrugineus and X. affinis in ecosystems from Tabasco, Mexico were studied. The study was carried out from November 2010-July 2011, February 2010-January 2011 and 2007. The trapping methods used were alcohol traps, light traps and direct capture on their host plants. A total of 688 specimens of X. ferrugineus and 3 911 specimens of X. affinis were collected. The population dynamics of X. ferrugineus showed low size population in the studied ecosystems, without any marked seasonality. The highest population sizes were recorded both in dry season (March-May and rainy season (September-December. Unlike the populations of X. ferrugineus, those of X. affinis were more abundant and showed the highest peaks during the rainy seasons (except in May at the Botanical Garden “José Narciso Rovisora”. Alcohol and light traps can be complementary methods for monitoring the populations of these types of insects. They occur most of the year and theirs population dynamics depends on food resources availability as well as environmental factors such as temperature and humidity. Judging by the observed abundance it is suggested that X. affinis has been adapted and exploited resources in a better way than X. ferrugineus in those ecosystems. Correlations between abundance and climatic factors had both positive and negative values. The results reflect the behavior of populations. However, a detail assessment of the biological and abiotic factors that influence the fluctuations of these insects is required.

  14. Insecticidal Effect of Fruit Extracts from Xylopia aethiopica and Dennettia tripetala (Annonaceae against Sitophilus oryzae (Coleoptera: Curculionidae Efecto Insecticida de Extractos de Fruta de Xylopia aethiopica y Dennettia tripetala (Annonaceae contra Sitophilus oryzae (Coleoptera: Curculionidae

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    Donald A . Ukeh

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The insecticidal and repellent activities of fruit extracts of Xylopia aethiopica (Dunal A. Rich. and Dennettia tripetala (Baker f. G.E. Schatz belonging to the family Annonaceae was studied against Sitophilus oryzae (L., an economic, primary post-harvest pest of rice, and other cereal products. Infested rice grains (100 g treated with 1, 2, 3, 4, and 5% (w/w powders of both plants were evaluated for toxicity against S. oryzae every 24 h for 3 d, and during Fi progeny emergence. The essential oils of both plants were also applied at 0.5, 1, 1.5 and 2 mg cm-2 filter paper in Petri dishes for toxicity bioassays at 24 h exposure. Repellence bioassay with 10 μL solution of essential oils on filter paper was performed in a Y-Tube airflow olfactometer. Results indicate that powders of both plants significantly (P La actividad insecticida y repelente de los extractos frutales de Xylopia aethiopica (Dunal A. Rich. y Dennettia tripetala (Baker f. G.E. Schatz pertenecientes a la familia Annonaceae fueron evaluados contra Sitophilus oryzae (L., plaga primaria de importancia económica en poscosecha de arroz y otros cereales. Granos de arroz (100 g infestados tratados con polvos de ambas plantas al 1, 2, 3, 4, y 5% (p/p fueron evaluados para la toxicidad contra S. oryzae cada 24 h por 3 d y durante la emergencia de la progenie F1. Los aceites esenciales de ambas plantas también fueron aplicados en papel filtro a 0,5; 1; 1,5 y 2 mg cm-2 en cajas de Petri para bioensayos de toxicidad con exposición de 24 h. Bioensayos de repelencia con 10 μL de solución de los aceites esenciales impregnados en papel filtro fueron realizados en un olfatómetro de flujo de aire Y-Tube. Los resultados indican que los polvos de ambas plantas causan una mortalidad significativa de estos insectos (P < 0,001 y una reducción en la emergencia de la progenie F1 con relación al control. Los aceites esenciales también mostraron un efecto adulticida significativo (P < 0,001 después de 24 h con la dosis más alta (2 mg cm-2, produciendo un 100% de mortalidad. De igual manera, tanto hembras como machos de S. oryzae evitan el tratamiento en una proporción significativamente mayor al control en los ensayos de repelencia en el olfatómetro Y-Tube. Estos resultados sugieren que los extractos naturales de X. aethiopica and D. tripetala tienen un uso potencial en el manejo integrado de plagas de productos almacenados contra S. oryzae.

  15. Efeito do óleo essencial de Tagetes patula L. (Asteraceae sobre Sitophilus zeamais Motschulsky (Coleoptera, Curculionidae Efeito do óleo essencial de Tagetes patula L. (Asteraceae sobre Sitophilus zeamais Motschulsky (Coleoptera, Curculionidae

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    Rozane Maria Restello

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Resistência de pragas a inseticidas, danos ao ambiente em função da poluição do solo e de recursos hídricos vem sendo observados pelo uso de inseticidas químicos no controle de pragas em grãos armazenados. Com o intuito de minimizar estes problemas, estão sendo estudadas alternativas como o uso de inseticidas botânicos. Este trabalho foi realizado com o objetivo de avaliar o efeito do óleo essencial de Tagetes patula L. sobre, Sitophilus zeamais Motschulsky, 1855 em milho sob condições de laboratório. O óleo essencial de T. patula foi obtido através de arraste a vapor com aparelho clevenger. A caracterização química dos compostos encontrados no óleo essencial de T. patula foi realizada através de cromatografia gasosa acoplado a espectrometria de massas, sendo observados: limoneno (37,05%, terpinoleno (32,61%, piperitone (14,40%, eofitadieno (5,91%, sabineno (2,88%, trans-ocimeno (2,02%, beta-cariofileno (1,98%, farnesol (1,84% e alfa-pineno (1,30%. Os insetos utilizados nos bioensaios foram mantidos em temperatura e umidade relativa controlada. Foram avaliados os efeitos do óleo essencial de T. patula sobre o comportamento (atratividade e/ou repelência e atividade inseticida sobre adultos de S. zeamais através de dois bioensaios. Pelos resultados pode-se observar o efeito repelente e inseticida do óleo essencial de T. patula sobre S. zeamais, na concentração de 10 µL (pCountless problems due to the use of chemical insecticides for the control of pests in stored grains have been observed. In order to minimize these problems, alternative measures have been developed, including the use of botanical insecticides. This work was carried out with the objective of evaluating the effect of the essential oil of Tagetes patula L. on, Sitophilus zeamais (Mots., 1855 in corn kernels in laboratory conditions. The T. patula essential oil was obtained through hidrodestilation with the Clevenger device. The chemical characterization of the compounds found in the essential oil of T. patula was carried by gas chromatography connected to the mass spectrometer. The compounds found were: limonene (37.05%, terpinolene (32.61%, piperitone (14.40%, neophitadiene (5.91%, sabinene (2.88%, trans-ocimene (2.02%, beta-cariphilene (1.98%, farnesol (1.84%, and alpha-pinene (1.30%. The insects used in the bio-test were kept under controled temperature and relative humidity environment. Two bioassays were carried out to evaluate the effect of the essential oil of T. patula on the behavior (activity/repellence and insecticide activity on adults of S. zeamais. The results showed that this essential oil was efficient (concentration of 10 µL to control adults of S. zeamais adults.

  16. Migration and dispersal of Anthonomus grandis (Coleoptera: Curculionidae in South America Migración y dispersión de Anthonomus grandis (Coleoptera: Curculionidae en América del Sur

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    Teodoro Stadler

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available This study discusses the dispersal of Anthonomus grandis Boheman, the cotton boll weevil, in Argentina, Brazil, Paraguay and Bolivia, exploring the ecological and physiological factors that have made the dispersal and establishment of this insect in South America so successful. The boll weevil's phenotypic plasticity is represented by its flexible developmental time, its multivoltine life cycle with several overlapping generations, its capacity to feed on pollen from diverse botanical families as well as from non pollen food sources and its ability to migrate and disperse aided by winds. These characteristics make it a key pest for cotton. Probable overwintering «hot spots» for the boll weevil were identified in Misiones-Argentina, where large numbers of prediapausing weevils concentrate after arrival from newly harvested cotton fields in Paraguay, probably attracted by citrus orchards volatiles. The boll weevil's facultative quiescence is always relative to environmental adverse conditions. This suggests that overwintering in the boll weevil can be defined as «oligopause», an intermediate form of diapause. Since its introduction to Brazil in 1983, until 2006, it has spread southwest at an average of 61 km year-1 towards Argentina. However, it took the boll weevil approximately ten years to move 250 km between Paraguay and the main cotton growing area in Argentina. This slower progress is probably due to the actions taken by the Argentine government through the boll weevil eradication program. The arrival of the boll weevil at the cotton cropping areas in Paraguay and Argentina reinforces the fact that the boll weevil should finally be included in an integrated cotton pest management program jointly with other major cotton pests.El presente estudio sobre la dispersión de Anthonomus grandis Boheman, el picudo del algodonero, en Argentina, Brasil, Paraguay y Bolivia, explora las características ecológicas y fisiológicas que han permitido a este insecto dispersarse y establecerse exitosamente en América del Sur. La plasticidad fenotípica de A. grandis se caracteriza por un tiempo de desarrollo flexible, ciclo de vida multivoltino con generaciones superpuestas, la capacidad de alimentarse con polen de diversas familias botánicas así como de otras fuentes de alimento y por su habilidad para migrar y dispersarse con la ayuda del viento. Todo esto hace de esta especie una plaga clave para el cultivo del algodón. Los cultivos de cítricos en Misiones, Argentina, son posibles sitios para la hibernación de esta especie. En esta región fueron capturadas grandes cantidades de individuos prediapausantes, provenientes de algodonales en post-cosecha en Paraguay, atraídos probablemente por compuestos volátiles de cítricos cultivados en la zona. La quiescencia facultativa que atraviesan los adultos ante condiciones adversas, conlleva a un retraso en el desarrollo que se relaciona con las condiciones desfavorables. Esto sugiere que la hibernación en A. grandis puede ser definida como «oligopausa», una forma intermedia de diapausa. Desde su introducción en Brasil en 1983 y hasta el 2006, el picudo se ha dispersado en dirección sudoeste hacia Argentina, a una velocidad promedio de 61 km año-1. Sin embargo, le ha insumido aproximadamente diez años cruzar 250 km, desde Paraguay hacia el centro de la zona algodonera de Argentina. Este progreso más lento se debe probablemente a las acciones llevadas a cabo en el marco del programa de erradicación del picudo del algodonero, por parte del gobierno de Argentina. La llegada del picudo al área central de cultivo de algodón en la Argentina, así como a otras áreas de cultivo en Paraguay y Argentina, confirma el hecho de que el picudo debería finalmente incluirse en un programa único de manejo integrado de plagas del algodón.

  17. Evaluation of irradiated essential oils to control of Sitophilus zeamais Mots. (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) and Blatella germanica (L.) (Dictyopera: Blattellidae); Avaliacao de produtos naturais irradiados para o controle de Sitophilus zeamais Mots. (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) e Blatella germanica (L.) (Dictyopera: Blattellidae)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Potenza, Marcos Roberto

    2004-07-01

    This work aimed to evaluate the effect of irradiated essential oils of Eucalyptus citriodora, Eucalyptus globulus, Pinus sp., Azadirachta indica, Cymbopogon nardus, Cupressus sempervirens, Cymbopogons citratus and Juniperus communis and aqueous, hexanic and ethanolic irradiated extracts of Solanum paniculatum, Dahlia pinnata, Lycopersicon esculentum, Nephrolepis pectinata, Ruta graveolens, Ficus elastica, Lavandula angustifolia, Rhododendron simsii, Agave angustifolia, Ocimum basilicum, Allamanda cathartica, Dieffenbachia brasiliensis, Pennisetum purpureum, Annona squamosa, Coffea arabica and Hibiscus rosa-sinensis, in order to identify new substances to integrated pest management (IPM) and to observe possible effects of gamma radiation about extracts and essential oils efficiency such as increase, reduction, activation and inactivation of the same to the pest control. It evaluated the effect of contact on Sitophilus zeamais and by ingestion in Blattella germanica. To irradiation was used an experimental irradiator of Cobalt-60, type Gammacell 220. The essential oils were submitted increasing doses of gamma radiation: 2.5; 5.0; 7.5 and 10.0 kGy. The bioassay with B. germanica demonstrated efficiency between 22.0 e 30.0% and between 30.0 and 42.0%, respectively, to irradiated essential oils of E. citriodora and E. globulus and they demonstrated too repellency to the nymphs. The gamma radiation used promoted changes in essential oils of E. citriodora e E. globulus that they began to show efficiency on B. germanica nymphs besides a significant reduction of repellency. Essential oils of Pinus sp., A. indica, C. sempervirens and J. communis did not display efficiency. The essential oils of C. nardus, and C. citratus had low efficiency. The gamma radiation increased the efficiency of ethanolic extract of D. Pinnata with dose of 7.5 kGy, showing 48.0% of efficiency on B. germanica nymphs. The gamma radiation showed adverse effect on the aqueous extract of R. Graveolens, decreasing its efficiency of 20.0% to 2.0% in doses of 2.5; 7.5 and 10.0 kGy and 4,0% In dose of 5.0 kGy. The bioassay with S. zeamais demonstrated that irradiated essential oils of E. citriodora, E. globulus e Pinus sp. with dose of 5.0 kGy presented 100.0; 92.0 and 100.0% of efficiency, respectively. The essential oil of A. indica in different doses of gamma radiation didn't display efficiency on S. zeamais adults. It was not found out gamma radiation effects on efficiency from essential oils of C. nardus, C. sempervirens, C. citratus and J. communis, besides the oil of C. nardus in doses of gamma radiation applied was highly efficient over than 90.0%. The gamma radiation increased the efficiency of ethanolic extract of L. esculentum getting 70.0% of efficiency with dose of 5.0 kGy on S. zeamais adults. The gamma radiation showed adverse effect on the aqueous extract of R. Graveolens, decreasing its efficiency of 20.0% to 12.0; 6.0 and 2.0% in doses of 5.0; 7.5 and 10.0 kGy, respectively. According to results we verified that the gamma radiation interfered on behavior of some essential oils to pest control and it can obtain increase, reduction, activation and inactivation from the same. (author)

  18. Infestation of Pseudopiazurus papayanus (Marshall) (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) on Carica spp. and Vasconcella spp. genotypes; Infestacao de Pseudopiazurus papayanus (Marshall) (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) em genotipos de Carica spp. e Vasconcella spp

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fancelli, Marilene; Sanches, Nilton F.; Dantas, Jorge L.L.; Caldas, Ranulfo C. [EMBRAPA Mandioca e Fruticultura Tropical, Cruz das Almas, BA (Brazil)]. E-mail: fancelli@cnpmf.embrapa.br; Morales, Cinara F.G. [Fundacao Estadual de Pesquisa Agropecuaria (FEPAGRO), Ijui, RS (Brazil)

    2008-09-15

    The papaya borer weevil, Pseudopiazurus papayanus (Marshall), is generally considered a secondary pest, but it has been reported in high infestations in Northeast Brazil. This work aimed at evaluating the occurrence of P. papayanus and reporting its infestation level in papaya genotypes kept at the germplasm bank of EMBRAPA Cassava and Tropical Fruits (Cruz das Almas, Bahia, Brazil). The number of larvae, pupae and adults found in each plant of 65 Carica spp. genotypes and of three Vasconcella spp. genotypes was registered in three to five plants of each genotype, by cutting the exsudating trunks lengthwise. Papaya borer weevil was found in C. papaya and V. cauliflora but not in those of V. quercifolia. Among the evaluated genotypes, 52.4% of those belonging to the Solo group were infested, against 25.0% of the Formosa group. Larval infestation was the best criterion for sorting out genotypes concerning this insect infestation. This is also the first occurrence of the papaya borer weevil . (author)

  19. Attraction of Sphenophorus levis Vaurie adults (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) to vegetal tissues at different conservation levels; Atracao de adultos de Sphenophorus levis Vaurie (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) a fragmentos vegetais em diferentes estados de conservacao

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Giron-Perez, Katherine; Nakano, Octavio; Silva, Amanda C; Oda-Souza, Melissa [Escola Superior de Agricultura Luiz de Queiroz (ESALQ/USP), Piracicaba, SP (Brazil). Dept. de Entomologia e Acarologia], e-mail: entomologa@ymail.com, e-mail: onakano@esalq.usp.br

    2009-07-01

    The occurrence of the sugarcane weevil Sphenophorus levis Vaurie is important in sugarcane in some regions in Brazil. Damage is caused by the larvae as they bore into the nodes and can reach 30 ton/ha/year. Many control alternatives have been attempted, but none were satisfactory, except for the use of toxic baits. Therefore, it is necessary to optimize their efficiency or to propose new techniques. The objective of the current study was to evaluate the attractiveness of adults of S. levis to sugarcane nodes and pineapple peelings in an 'Y' tube olfactometer. The sugarcane internodes were treated with 10% molasses, and tested after different periods of fermentation (24, 48 e 72h), at different times of the day (diurnal and nocturnal) and with both sexes. These tests were carried out in order to correlate the response of S. levis to ethyl acetate and ethanol release as a result of the fermentation process. The release of both compounds was monitored by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). Our data indicated that sugarcane internodes mixed with 10% molasses fermented for 24h and 48h were the most attractive to S. levis (up to 90%). Pineapple peelings attracted 62.5% of the tested insects. The olfactory response was higher during the day, and no differences were found between the sexes. The production of ethanol in all plant substrates was higher than ethyl acetate, but we could not establish a clear correlation with the insect response to baits. (author)

  20. Resistance of irradiated and non-irradiated corn grain genotypes against the weevil Sitophilus zeamais Mots., 1855 (Coleoptera: Curculionidae).; Resistencia de graos de genotipos de milho irradiados e nao irradiados ao gorgulho Sitophilus zeamais Mots., 1855 (Coleoptera: Curculionidae)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oliveira, Carolina Natali de

    2005-07-01

    The resistance of 13 /////com grain genotypes was evaluated against the attack of Sitophilus zeamais (Mots.) by means of a no-choice test; 6 of them were selected (AGN 2012, AGN 30AOO, AGN 31A31, AGN 25A23, AGN 32A43, and AGN 35A42) and then submitted to a free-choice test where attractiveness and non preference for oviposition were assessed. The grain from the selected genotypes were later treated with Cobalt-60 gamma radiation at the doses of 0.0; 0.5; 1.0; and 1.5 kGy and submitted to the same tests. Based on the results, it was verified that genotypes AGN 2012 (30.6 eggs), AGN 31A31 (33.6 eggs), and AGN 30AOO (34.8 eggs) showed a non-preference for oviposition type of resistance, while non-preference for feeding and/or antibiosis were observed in the first two genotypes only. Genotypes AGN 25A23, AGN 32A43, and AGN 35A42 were the most susceptible to com weevil. The increasing gamma radiation ({sup 60}Co) doses reduced the mean mass of adults in genotype AGN 2012; however, the same parameter increased in genotype AGN 35A42; when treated at the dose of 1.5 kGy, genotypes AGN 2012 and AGN 31A31 showed a reduction in their mean masses of adults, while genotypes AGN 30AOO and AGN 35A42 showed higher mean mass of adults values. The increasing gamma radiation doses ({sup 60}Co) provided a reduction in mean grain dry mass consumed by the weevil; however, it was concluded that irradiation did not break com grain resistance and can be used for S. zeamais disinfestation prior to storage. (author)

  1. A new spermophagous species of Heilipus Germar from the Amazonian Region (Coleoptera, Curculionidae, Molytinae Uma nova espécie espermatófaga de Heilipus Germar da Região Amazônica (Coleoptera, Curculionidae, Molytinae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergio A. Vanin

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Heilipus odoratus sp. nov. (type locality: Brazil, Amazonas, Manaus is described based on adults reared from seeds of Aniba rosaeodora Ducke (Lauraceae, popularly called "pau-rosa". The species is spermophagous and develops from egg to adult inside the seeds. The new taxon is compared with the similar Heilipus draco (Fabricius, 1801. Illustrations of larva, pupa, adult and of important structures for species identification are given, including the male and female genitalia, figured for the first time for a species of Heilipus.Heilipus odoratus sp. nov., (localidade tipo: Brasil,Amazonas, Manaus é descrita com base em adultos criados em sementes de Aniba rosaedora Ducke (Lauraceae, conhecida como "pau-rosa". A espécie é espermatófaga e o ciclo de ovo a adulto transcorre no interior da semente. O táxon novo é comparado com Heilipus draco (Fabricius, 1801, espécie semelhante. Ilustrações da larva, pupa, adulto e estruturas importantes para a identificação da espécie são fornecidas, incluindo figuras das genitálias do macho e da fêmea, apresentadas pela primeira vez para uma espécie de Heilipus.

  2. ALTURA DE VOO DE ESCOLITÍNEOS (COLEOPTERA, SCOLYTINAE EM POVOAMENTO DE Pinus taeda L. NO SUL DO BRASIL

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    Leonardo Mortari Machado

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Scolytids (Curculionidae, Scolytinae are small borer beetles belonging to the order Coleoptera that develop within or under the bark of trees. In northern countries, these insects cause significant damage especially when outbreaks occur. In Brazil, in general, the damage is minor when compared to the northern hemisphere. Given the importance of subfamily Scolytinae, this paper aims at providing a better understanding of the behavior of Scolytids, mainly regarding the flight height in a stand of Pinus taeda L. For the execution of this work 72, intercept flight traps were installed in area belonging to the State Foundation for Agricultural Research (FEPAGRO, located in Santa Maria, Rio Grande do Sul state. The treatments correspond to heights of 0.5; 1.0; 1.5; 2.0; 2.5; 3.0; 3.5; 4.0; 4.5; 5.0; 5.5 and 6.0 meters. It was possible to capture: Hypothenemus eruditus in greater abundance at the range of 1 to 1.5 meters; Xyleborus ferrugineus , Xyleborinus gracilis and Xyleborus affinis to 0.5 meters; Xyleborinus saxeseni and Xylosandrus retusus with no preference. It is concluded that the range between 0.5 and 1.5 meters is ideal to analyze quantitatively the scolytids present in the Pinus taeda.

  3. Mother-derived trans-generational immune priming in the red palm weevil, Rhynchophorus ferrugineus Olivier (Coleoptera, Dryophthoridae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Z H; Lin, Y T; Hou, Y M

    2014-12-01

    Rhynchophorus ferrugineus (Coleoptera, Curculionidae) is the most destructive pest of palm trees worldwide containing it invasive areas, such as the southern part of China. It is always emphasized to develop integrated pest management based on biological agents, but their success is not very exciting. Presently, the immune defenses of this pest against biological agents attract scarce attention. It is still unclear whether immune priming also generally occurs in insect pests and in response to different pathogens. Our results indicated that previous challenge of bacteria pathogen enhanced the magnitude of phenoloxidase activity and antibacterial activity in R. ferrugineus larvae against the secondary infection. Furthermore, trans-generational immune priming was also determined in this pest, and only challenged R. ferrugineus mothers transferred the immune protection to their offspring which suggested males and females of this pest might have evolved different strategies on the investment of delivering immune protection to their offspring. Importantly, our data provide the evidence to suggest that different kinds of biological control agents might be used alternatively or in combination to fight against R. ferrugineus because of the existence of immune priming with low species-specific level. On the other hand, for this invasive pest, the immune priming may also facilitate its adaptation and dispersal in the new regions.

  4. Insecticidal effect of three diatomaceous earth formulations against adults of Sitophilus oryzae (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) and Tribolium confusum (Coleoptera: Tenebrionidae) on oat, rye, and triticale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Athanassiou, Christos G; Kavallieratos, Nickolas G; Andris, Nickolas S

    2004-12-01

    Bioassays were conducted in the laboratory to assess the effect of the diatomaceous earth (DE) formulations Insecto, SilicoSec, and PyriSec, on stored oat, rye, and triticale, against adults of the rice weevil, Sitophilus oryzae (L.), and the confused flour beetle, Tribolium confusum Jacquelin du Val. The DEs were tested at three dose rates, 0.75, 1, and 1.5 g of DE/kg of grain. Adults of the two aforementioned species were exposed to all combinations of grain-formulation-dose rate, at 26 degrees C and 60% RH. Mortality in DE-treated commodities was recorded after 24 h, 48 h, 7 d, and 14 d of exposure for S. oryzae and T. confusum and after 21 d for T. confusum. In S. oryzae, adult mortality was almost 100% after 7 d of exposure in all three grains examined. The mortality of T. confusum adults in DE-treated grains did not reach 100%, even after 21 d of exposure. Generally, the application of DE in rye caused higher adult mortality of T. confusum than in the other two products. All three dose rates tested provided the same mortality level of S. oryzae adults after 7 d of exposure. In contrast, 1.5 g of DE resulted in significant higher adult mortality of T. confusum, in comparison with the other dose rates, even after 21 d of exposure. All formulations were equally effective after 7 d of exposure against S. oryzae, but at 48 h of exposure, PyriSec caused significantly higher mortality than the other two formulations. For both species, progeny production in the treated grains was significantly reduced in comparison with the untreated grains, whereas significant differences were noted among commodities, formulations, and dose rates. No progeny were recorded in the treated rye for either species or in the treated triticale for S. oryzae.

  5. Is Prey Specificity Constrained by Geography? Semiochemically Mediated Oviposition in Rhizophagus grandis (Coleoptera: Monotomidae) with Its Specific Prey, Dendroctonus micans (Coleoptera: Curculionidae: Scolytinae), and with Exotic Dendroctonus species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dohet, Loïc; Grégoire, Jean-Claude

    2017-08-01

    Examples of totally specific predators are rare, and the mechanisms underlying this specificity are often poorly understood. In Eurasia, the Monotomid beetle Rhizophagus grandis is found only in the galleries of its prey, the bark beetle Dendroctonus micans. The specificity of R. grandis relies on kairomones which female predators use to adjust their oviposition to the number of prey larvae available in a gallery. Yet these chemical signals are still largely unknown. The North American D. punctatus and D. valens, which are not sympatric with R. grandis but have a similar ecology as D. micans, could also elicit predator oviposition, which would suggest that specificity in this predator-prey system is constrained by geography. In order to further identify these determinants of specificity, we used artificial oviposition boxes to compare the oviposition level of R. grandis in the presence of larvae of each of the three prey species. We jointly used sequential dynamic headspace extractions and gas chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry to investigate oviposition stimuli associated with each prey species and potential oviposition inhibitors emitted by the predator. We further assessed potential stimuli with the analysis of emissions from D. micans larvae reared alone. Overall, we identified and quantified 67 compounds, mostly terpenes. Several robust candidate stimulants or inhibitors of R. grandis' oviposition were identified. The three prey species elicited similar oviposition levels in R. grandis, which suggests that this predator could form new associations outside of its native range.

  6. Temperature alters the relative abundance and population growth rates of species within the Dendroctonus frontalis (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    L. Evans; Richard Hoffstetter; Matthew Ayres; Kier Klepzig

    2011-01-01

    Temperature has strong effects on metabolic processes ofindividuals and demographics of populations, but effects on ecological communities are not well known. Many economically and ecologically important pest species have obligate associations with other organisms; therefore, effects of temperature on these species might be mediated by strong interactions. The southern...

  7. Isolation and characterization of 16 microsatellite loci in the mountain pine beetle, Dendroctonus ponderosae Hopkins (Coleoptera: Curculionidae: Scolytinae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    C. S. Davis; K. E. Mock; B. J. Bentz; S. M. Bromilow; N. V. Bartell; B. W. Murray; A. D. Roe; J. E. K. Cooke

    2009-01-01

    We isolated 16 polymorphic microsatellite loci in the mountain pine beetle (Dendroctonus ponderosae Hopkins) and developed conditions for amplifying these markers in four multiplex reactions. Three to 14 alleles were detected per locus across two sampled populations. Observed and expected heterozygosities ranged from 0.000 to 0.902 and from 0.100 to 0.830, respectively...

  8. Histological Studies On The Midgut Of The GAMMA Irradiated Red Palm Weevil, RHYNCHOPHORUS FERRUGINEUS (OLIVIER) Coleoptera: CURCULIONIDAE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MOHAMED, H.F.

    2010-01-01

    In the present study, histological structure of irradiated R. ferrugineus adult male midgut show the transverse sections of the anterior midgut of male adults irradiated with 10 and 15 Gy of gamma radiation. At 10 Gy, the epithelial cells of the stomodaeal valve are a mixture of enlarged cuboidal, oval, pear-shaped cells or undifferentiated but at the high dose 15 Gy, most of the cells were undifferentiated or seem to be diffused together. The cells appeared to rest on a basement membrane. This basement membrane and the circular muscle, which encircle the cells, were broken in some parts with the high dose (15 Gy). The second type of the epithelial cells was elongated columnar or cuboidal of swollen cells with amount of vacuoles appeared in the cytoplasm. The nuclei were rounded and located in the middle part of the cells; some of them appeared karyolysed or pyknotized. In some regions, two cells appeared combined together and few of old cells were ruptured from the apical margin of the cells. The cells of the regenerative crypts and the regenerative cells were swollen and vacuolated.

  9. STUDY UPON THE SPECIES IPS TYPOGRAPHUS L. (COLEOPTERA, CURCULIONIDAE IN THE RAŞINARI FORESTRY ECOSYSTEM, SIBIU COUNTY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iuliana ANTONIE

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The disturbance of the equilibrium between the endogenous and exogenous command factors of human origin leads to massive perturbations in the forestry ecosystems affecting all the living beings within the biocenosis and especially the forestry entomologic fauna. Under some circumstances the pest insects from the forestry ecosystem can produce big damages to the trees in the case of maintaining high effectives of these and for many years, too. Our study aimed the monitoring the species Ips typographus L., a forestry pest, which by its action produces important damages to the spruce fir. The research work ran for two years, during 2012-2013, in the area of Raşinari Forestry District, Sibiu County. The work method was to install at the skirt of the forest the traps with pheromones bait in the researched area. There were collected a number of 4,146 samples of which in 2012 were captured 1,973 individuals and in 2013 were captured 2,173 individuals. There was established a growth of the pest population in the studied biotope, this being the same as at the national level. As a consequence there are imposed further studies in order to find the most proper solutions regarding stopping the dissemination of the insect into new territories and maintaining the density of the population of the pest beyond the economic level of damage.

  10. Winter flooding of California rice fields reduces immature populations of Lissorhoptrus oryzophilus (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) in the spring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aghaee, Mohammad-Amir; Godfrey, Larry D

    2017-07-01

    In California, rice fields are flooded over the winter months (November to March) to facilitate degradation of post-harvest rice straw and to provide temporary habitat for migratory waterfowl. Prior research showed that winter flood rice fields had fewer rice water weevil (Lissorhoptrus oryzophilus), larvae and pupae during the rice production season than fields that were left unflooded in the winter. A series of experiments were conducted to provide further support for these trends under controlled conditions and to find a mechanism for this phenomenon. Under winter flooded conditions there was a 50% reduction in populations of weevil immatures compared with the untreated control (no straw or winter flood). These same conditions corresponded to a 20% increase in the amount of silicon found in plant tissues in 2014 and a 39 to 90% decrease in methane production in the soil from 2013 to 2014, respectively. Evidence from previous field research and these controlled studies supports winter flooding as an appropriate tactic for controlling L. oryzophilus populations in the spring. However, the mechanism that would explain why winter flooding adversely affects L. oryzophilus immatures remains unclear. © 2016 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2016 Society of Chemical Industry.

  11. Control of Cosmopolites sordidus (Coleoptera:Curculionidae with entomopathogenic fungi Beauveria bassiana and Metarhizium anisopliae in banana cultivation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco José Carvalho Moreira

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The continuous use of pesticides promotes rapid and effective reduction of pests, however, this practice entails the pests the possibility of developing resistance by subjecting the farmer to change product constantly increase the dose or even mix or use more toxic products. Being Cosmopolites sordidus one beetle nocturnal that affect the banana tree because their larvae open galleries in its rhizome and lower pseudostem, resulting in decline, overturning and death of the plant. In view of this and the population's awareness of this problem, the greater has been the participation of organic agriculture in food supply. In this context, this study aimed to evaluate the effect of two entomopathogenic fungi in control of C. sordidus in banana cultivation. The trial was held in lot E-104, the Irrigated Perimeter of Baixo Acaraú, in Marco, Ceará state. The statistical design was completely randomized, in factorial 2 x 5, two fungi (Beauveria bassiana and Metharizium anisopliae in five concentrations (0, 5, 10, 15 and 20 g L-1, 5 repetitions each. We evaluated the number of insects for bait in each evaluation and the total number of captured insects. It was found that the fungus B. bassiana was more effective in controlling C. sordidus. It was also observed that the higher concentrations of 10, 15 and 20 g L-1 were more effective. We conclude that the biological control with B. bassiana can be used, as is shown adapted to climatic conditions in the study area.

  12. Entomopathogens Associated to Citrus and Their Pathogenicity on Compsus viridivittatus Guérin-Méneville (Coleoptera: Curculionidae: Entiminae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paola Andrea Zuluaga Cárdenas

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available C. viridivittatus, citrus weevil distributed throughoutthe coffee maker and Andean region of Colombia. Thelarvae feed on roots and adults on leaves and flowers. On three citrus farms of the Valley were isolate and evaluated fungi and entompathogenic nematodes M. anisopliaeand B. bassiana and Steinernema sp. and Heterorabditis sp. on larvae of C. viridivittatus 26, 36, 48 and 53 days of age. In 120 from 132 soil samples were found 21 fungi and none nematodes. Commercial B. bassiana B9 and B10 caused 100 % adult mortality in a time of 4.3 and 4 days. M. anisopliae M6 y M7 caused 94 % and 97 % of mortality to the 4.3 and 5 days. Steinernema sp. UNS09 caused 65 % of mortality on larvae of 48 and 53 days of age, seven days later. No were differences between UNS09 Steinernema and Heterorhabditis UNH16. Steinernema sp. UNS09 caused 85.7 % of mortality on 53 days larvae and 81.9 % and 81.1 % to larvae of 36 and 26 days. Heterorhabditis sp. UNH16 killed larvae of 36, 26 and 56 days was 79 %, 81 % and 75.4 % seven days later. In conclusion, fungi and nematodes can be an alternative to management of C. viridivittatus larvae.

  13. Hunting billbug (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) life cycle and damaging life stage in North Carolina, with notes on other billbug species abundance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doskocil, J P; Brandenburg, R L

    2012-12-01

    In the southeastern United States, hunting billbug, Sphenophorus venatus vestitus Chittenden, adults are often observed in turfgrass, but our knowledge of their biology and ecology is limited. Field surveys and experiments were conducted to determine the species composition, life cycle, damaging life stage, and distribution of billbugs within the soil profile in turfgrass in North Carolina. Linear pitfall trapping revealed six species of billbug, with the hunting billbug making up 99.7% of all beetles collected. Data collected from turf plus soil sampling suggest that hunting billbugs have two overlapping generations per year in North Carolina and that they overwinter as both adults and larvae. Field experiments provided evidence that adult hunting billbugs are capable of damaging warm season turfgrasses.

  14. Clothianidin and Imidacloprid Residues in Poa annua (Poales: Poaceae) and Their Effects on Listronotus maculicollis (Coleoptera: Curculionidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clavet, Christopher; Requintina, Matthew; Hampton, Emily; Cowles, Richard S; Byrne, Frank J; Alm, Steven R

    2014-12-01

    Competitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay was used to quantify the amounts of the neonicotinoids clothianidin and imidacloprid in Poa annua L. clippings from treated golf course fairways. Average clothianidin residues 7 d after application ranged from 674 to 1,550 ng/g tissue in 2012 and 455-2,220 ng/g tissue in 2013. Average clothianidin residues the day of application ranged from 17,100-38,800 ng/g tissue in 2014. Average imidacloprid residues 7 d after treatment ranged from 1,950-3,030 ng/g tissue in 2012 and 7,780-9,230 ng/g tissue in 2013. Average imidacloprid residues the day of application ranged from 31,500-40,400 ng/g tissue in 2014. Neonicotinoid or bifenthrin-neonicotinoid combination products applied in field plots in 2012 did not significantly reduce the numbers of larvae relative to the untreated control. However, in 2013, statistically significant reductions in the numbers of larvae recovered from treated field plots were associated with the presence of bifenthrin alone or when used in combination with neonicotinoid active ingredients. Listronotus maculicollis (Kirby) adults caged on neonicotinoid-, bifenthrin-, and bifenthrin-neonicotinoid-treated P. annua turf plugs fed on P. annua leaves, but mortality was only highly significantly different between treated and untreated foliage when weevils were placed on treated foliage the day after treatment and allowed to feed for 7 d. The modest degree of population suppression with bifenthrin in these experiments may not be adequate to justify the continued use of these products due to the increased risk of insecticide resistance and disruption of biological control. © 2014 Entomological Society of America.

  15. Aquatic Plant Control Research Program. Biological Control of Pistia stratiotes L. (Waterlettuce) Using Neohydronomus affinis Hustache (Coleoptera: Curculionidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-07-01

    affinis and evaluates the performance of this biocontrol agent at three water- lettuce sites in south Florida. 6 Pistia stratiotes Description 9...varies sea- sonally and among sites (DeWald and Lounibos 1990). 20. Dray et al. (1988) investigated the fauna associated with water- lettuce in Florida...abundant, but whose impact is unclear, are Draeculacephala inscripta Van Duzee (a leafhopper), Rhopalosiphum nymphaeae L. (an aphid ), and Pseudococcus sp

  16. Investigations on gallery patterns of the Almond bark bettle (Scolytus amygdali Guerin-Méneville, 1847 (Coleoptera, Curculionidae in Tunisia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asma Zeiri

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The Almond bark beetle Scolytus amygdali Guerin-Meneville, 1847 is a serious beetle that can affect important economic crops in Tunisia. The species is morphologically similar to other bark beetles attacking fruit trees such as Scolytus mediterraneus. The gallery systems of both species are also generally hard to differentiate. A detailed study about gallery systems has carried out in the central region of Tunisia in order to give more details on beetle damage under the bark. Maternal and larval galleries from infested branches of almond were examined and measured. It is hoped that these details of the shape and measurements of the gallery systems of Scolytus amygdali will facilitate the identification of infestations of almond bark beetles attacking fruit trees in Tunisia.

  17. Description of Phloeosinus laricionis sp. n. (Coleoptera: Curculionidae, Scolytinae), a new bark beetle species from southern Europe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faccoli, Massimo; Sidoti, Agatino

    2013-01-01

    We describe a new species of pine bark beetle, Phloeosinus laricionis, associated with a pine decline recently affecting young plantations of Pinus nigra ssp. laricio Poiret growing on the Etna volcano, Sicily (South Italy). The new species is morphologically close to the group species of P. cedri Brisout, P. acatayi Schedl, and P. pfefferi Knížek, having all odd interstriae on the declivity of elytra bearing small, individual, sparse, more or less sharply pointed tubercles in males, or with smaller sparse blunt, nippled tubercles in females. While the other species of the same group live on cedars, the new species is the only Palaearctic Phloeosinus known from pine.

  18. Characterization of two non-native invasive bark beetles, Scolytus schevyrewi and Scolytus multistriatus (Coleoptera: Curculionidae: Scolytinae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patricia L. Johnson; Jane L. Hayes; John E. Rinehart; Walter S. Sheppard

    2008-01-01

    Scolytus schevyrewi Semenov, the banded elm bark beetle, and S. multistriatus Marsham, the smaller European elm bark beetle, are morphologically similar. Reliance on adult external morphological characters for identification can be problematic because of wide within species variability and the need for good-quality specimens....

  19. Two newly introduced tropical bark and ambrosia beetles (Coleoptera: Curculionidae, Scolytinae) damaging figs (Ficus carica) in southern Italy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faccoli, Massimo; Campo, Giuseppe; Perrotta, Giancarlo; Rassati, Davide

    2016-07-14

    In summer 2014, the bark beetle Hypocryphalus scabricollis (Eichhoff) and the ambrosia beetle Xyleborus bispinatus Eichhoff, species new to Italy and Europe, respectively, were found for the first time in south-eastern Sicily (Italy). Large infestations of the two species were recorded in many plantations of common fig (Ficus carica L.) both in 2014 and 2015. Data concerning insect characteristics, taxonomy, and distribution are briefly reported.

  20. Responses of bark beetle (Coleoptera: Curculionidae: Scolytinae community structure to green-tree retention in pine tree forest from Korea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Da-Som Kim

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available This study was aimed to investigate the response of bark beetle community structure to green-tree retention in a Korean pine tree forest between 2013 and 2015. Five types of retention methods were evaluated to investigate the retention effect on insect community structure at various sites in Keunjeogol, Samcheok, and Gangwon-do. Lindgren funnel traps were installed to collect insects from July to August, over a 3-year period. Overall, 690 individuals and 29 species of Scolytinae were collected, with populations of insects appearing to gradually increase by each year of the study. Results of the insect community analysis showed that most survey sites presented a higher diversity than the control site annually except in 2015. This study can be used as a baseline dataset for the long-term study of early changes in insect community in response to green-tree retention in forests.

  1. Infestations of the cypress bark beetles Phloeosinus rudis, P. bicolor and P. thujae in The Netherlands (Coleoptera: Curculionidae: Scolytinae).

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moraal, L.G.

    2010-01-01

    In de zomer van 2004 trad er grote sterfte op bij coniferen in Rotterdam en nabijgelegen steden zoals Ridderkerk, Sleeuwijk, Maassluis, Nieuw-Lekkerland en Dordrecht. De sterfte trad op bij een solitaire 60-jarige Thuja maar ook bij coniferenhagen van Thuja, Chamaecyparis en Juniperus. Na 2004 werd

  2. North American Lauraceae: terpenoid emissions, relative attraction and boring preferences of redbay ambrosia beetle, Xyleborus glabratus (coleoptera: curculionidae: scolytinae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kendra, Paul E; Montgomery, Wayne S; Niogret, Jerome; Pruett, Grechen E; Mayfield, Albert E; MacKenzie, Martin; Deyrup, Mark A; Bauchan, Gary R; Ploetz, Randy C; Epsky, Nancy D

    2014-01-01

    The invasive redbay ambrosia beetle, Xyleborus glabratus, is the primary vector of Raffaelea lauricola, a symbiotic fungus and the etiologic agent of laurel wilt. This lethal disease has caused severe mortality of redbay (Persea borbonia) and swampbay (P. palustris) trees in the southeastern USA, threatens avocado (P. americana) production in Florida, and has potential to impact additional New World species. To date, all North American hosts of X. glabratus and suscepts of laurel wilt are members of the family Lauraceae. This comparative study combined field tests and laboratory bioassays to evaluate attraction and boring preferences of female X. glabratus using freshly-cut bolts from nine species of Lauraceae: avocado (one cultivar of each botanical race), redbay, swampbay, silkbay (Persea humilis), California bay laurel (Umbellularia californica), sassafras (Sassafras albidum), northern spicebush (Lindera benzoin), camphor tree (Cinnamomum camphora), and lancewood (Nectandra coriacea). In addition, volatile collections and gas chromatography-mass spectroscopy (GC-MS) were conducted to quantify terpenoid emissions from test bolts, and electroantennography (EAG) was performed to measure olfactory responses of X. glabratus to terpenoids identified by GC-MS. Significant differences were observed among treatments in both field and laboratory tests. Silkbay and camphor tree attracted the highest numbers of the beetle in the field, and lancewood and spicebush the lowest, whereas boring activity was greatest on silkbay, bay laurel, swampbay, and redbay, and lowest on lancewood, spicebush, and camphor tree. The Guatemalan cultivar of avocado was more attractive than those of the other races, but boring response among the three was equivalent. The results suggest that camphor tree may contain a chemical deterrent to boring, and that different cues are associated with host location and host acceptance. Emissions of α-cubebene, α-copaene, α-humulene, and calamenene were positively correlated with attraction, and EAG analyses confirmed chemoreception of terpenoids by antennal receptors of X. glabratus.

  3. Efficacy of α-Copaene, Cubeb, and Eucalyptol Lures for Detection of Redbay Ambrosia Beetle (Coleoptera: Curculionidae: Scolytinae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kendra, Paul E; Montgomery, Wayne S; Schnell, Elena Q; Deyrup, Mark A; Epsky, Nancy D

    2016-12-01

    Redbay ambrosia beetle, Xyleborus glabratus Eichhoff, is a wood-boring pest that has now invaded nine states in the southeastern United States. The beetle's dominant fungal symbiont (Raffaelea lauricola) is phytopathogenic, inducing laurel wilt in trees within the family Lauraceae. Members of the genus Persea are particularly susceptible to the lethal disease, including native redbay (P. borbonia) and swampbay (P. palustris), as well as commercial avocado (P. americana). Cubeb oil lures are the current standard for detection of X. glabratus, but recently eucalyptol and a 50% α-copaene oil have been identified as additional attractants. This study used a combination of binary-choice bioassays, field cage release-and-recapture assays, and a 12-wk field trial to compare efficacy of eucalyptol and copaene lures relative to commercial cubeb lures. In addition, GC-MS was used to quantify emissions from lures field-aged for 12 wk. In laboratory bioassays, copaene lures were more attractive than eucalyptol lures. In field cage assays, copaene lures recaptured a higher percentage of released beetles than cubeb lures. In the field test, cubeb lures captured fewer beetles than copaene lures, and lowest captures were obtained with eucalyptol lures. Combining eucalyptol with either copaene or cubeb lures did not increase captures over those lures deployed alone. Both copaene and cubeb lures were effective in attracting X. glabratus for 12 wk, but field life of eucalyptol lures was only 4 wk, consistent with the quantification of lure emissions. Results suggest that the 50% α-copaene lure provides the best pest detection currently available for X. glabratus. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Entomological Society of America 2016. This work is written by US Government employees and is in the public domain in the US.

  4. Low beta diversity of ambrosia beetles (Coleoptera: Curculionidae: Scolytinae and Platypodinae) in lowland rainforests of Papua New Guinea

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hulcr, J.; Novotný, Vojtěch; Maurer, B. A.; Cognato, A. I.

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 117, č. 2 (2008), s. 214-222 ISSN 0030-1299 R&D Projects: GA ČR GD206/03/H034 Grant - others:National Science Foundation(US) PEET DEB-0328920; National Science Foundation(US) DEB-02-11591; National Geographic Society(US) 7922-05 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50070508 Keywords : beta diversity * rainforests * Papua New Guinea Subject RIV: EH - Ecology, Behaviour Impact factor: 2.970, year: 2008

  5. Presence and significance of Bacillus thuringiensis Cry proteins associated with the Andean weevil Premnotrypes vorax (Coleoptera: Curculionidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SilvioAlejandro López-Pazos

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available The Andean weevil Premnotrypes vorax represents an important cause of damage to Colombian potato crops. Due to the impact of this plague on the economy of the country, we searched for new alternatives for its biological control, based on the entomopathogenic bacteria Bacillus thuringiensis. A total of 300 B. thuringiensis strains obtained from potato plantations infested with P. vorax were analyzed through crystal morphology, SDS-PAGE, PCR and bioassays. We used site- directed mutagenesis to modify the Cry3Aa protein. Most of the B. thuringiensis isolates had a bipyramidal crystal morphology. SDS-PAGE analyses had seven strains groups with σ-endotoxins from 35 to 135 kDa. The genes cry 2 and cry 1 were significantly more frequent in the P. vorax habitat (PCR analyses. Three mutant toxins, 1 (D354E, 2 (R345A, ∆Y350, ∆Y351, and 3 (Q482A, S484A, R485A, were analyzed to assess their activity against P. vorax larvae. Toxicity was low, or absent, against P. vorax for isolates, wild type cry 3Aa and cry 3Aa mutants. The genetic characterization of the collection provides opportunities for the selection of strains to be tested in bioassays against other insect pests of agricultural importance, and for designing Cry proteins with improved insecticidal toxicity. Rev. Biol. Trop. 57 (4: 1235-1243. Epub 2009 December 01.El gorgojo andino Premnotrypes vorax es una causa importante de daño en los cultivos colombianos de este tubérculo. Debido al impacto que esta plaga tiene sobre la economía del país, nos interesamos en buscar alternativas nuevas para el control biológico de P. vorax, basadas en la bacteria entomopatógena Bacillus thuringiensis. Se recolectaron un total de 300 cepas de B. thuringiensis a partir de plantaciones de papa infestadas con P. vorax, las cuales fueron analizadas por medio de la morfología del cristal, SDS-PAGE, PCR y ensayos biológicos. La mayoría de los aislamientos de B. thuringiensis presentaron cristales bipiramidales. Los análisis de SDS-PAGE indicaron la presencia de siete grupos de cepas con σ- endotoxinas que variaban entre 35 a 135 kDa. Las pruebas con PCR demostraron que los genes cry 2 y cry 1 fueron significativamente más frecuentes en el medioambiente de P. vorax. Además, se utilizó la mutagénesis sitio-dirigida para modificar la proteína Cry3Aa. Se analizaron tres toxinas mutantes, 1 (D354E, 2 (R345A, ∆Y350, ∆Y351, y 3 (Q482A, S484A, R485A, para determinar su actividad contra larvas de P. vorax. Los ensayos de toxicidad señalaron escasa, o nula, actividad hacia P. vorax tanto para las cepas, la toxina Cry3Aa de referencia y las proteínas Cry3Aa mutantes. La caracterización genética de la colección puede proveer oportunidades para la selección de cepas que pueden evaluarse por medio de bioensayos contra otros insectos-plaga de importancia agrícola, y para el diseño de proteínas Cry con actividad toxica mejorada.

  6. Potential use of essential oils from Cameroon applied as fumigant or contact insecticides against Sitophilus zeamais Motsch. (Coleoptera: Curculionidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kouninki, H; Haubruge, E; Noudjou, F E; Lognay, G; Malaisse, F; Ngassoum, M B; Goudoum, A; Mapongmetsem, P M; Ngamo, L S T; Hance, T

    2005-01-01

    Essential oils from seven plants species currently found in Cameroon were extracted by steam distillation and tested for their insecticidal activities against Sitophilus zeamats Motsch. Responses varied with the test applied and the plant species. For the contact toxicity, the acetone was used in order to dilute the pure essential oil. Formulations of 1% of essential oils of Xylopia aethiopica and Ocimum gratissimum were the most toxic and led to 96 and 98% of mortality respectively after 24 h. There was no death in control (0% of mortality). Fumigation test were done by applying 300 microl of pure essential oils in the bottom of closed 800 ml glass containers. In that case, the essential oil of Hyptis spicigera was the most toxic (fumigant) after 48 hours of fumigation followed by Annona seregalensis and Xylopia aethiopica 96 and 95% of mortality respectively. Some of the essential oils of plant species tested are promising for pest control in farmer granaries. However, further investigations are to be done on formulation and side effects.

  7. Austromonticola, a new genus of broad-nosed weevil (Coleoptera, Curculionidae, Entiminae from montane areas of New Zealand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samuel D. J. Brown

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Austromonticola gen. n. is proposed for a group of eight New Zealand alpine broad-nosed weevil species, all of which are here described: A. atriarius sp. n. (type locality: Umbrella Mountains, Central Otago, A. caelibatus sp. n. (type locality: Ohau Range, Mackenzie, A. furcatus sp. n. (type locality: Old Man Range, Central Otago, A. inflatus sp. n. (type locality: Hawkdun Range, Central Otago, A. planulatus sp. n. (type locality: St Marys Range, Central Otago, A. postinventus sp. n. (type locality: Kirkliston Range, South Canterbury, A. mataura sp. n. (type locality: Mt Dick, Otago Lakes and A. rotundus sp. n. (type locality: Old Man Range, Central Otago. All species occur exclusively above 1000 m elevation in the mountains of Central Otago and South Canterbury in the South Island. A phylogeny of the genus, including six outgroups, was inferred from 33 morphological characters. It resolved the genus as monophyletic, and revealed two strongly supported clades within Austromonticola. DNA sequences of four gene regions were obtained from five species. Of these, the 3' end of COI proved to be the most suitable for the identification of specimens. Females of all species have diagnostic secondary sexual structures on the elytra and ventrites. These structures are hypothesised to have evolved to assist with oviposition in and beside cushion plants or by selection for structures to mitigate the costs to females of prolonged mating.

  8. Toxicity of lemon grass Cymbopogon citratus powder and methanol extract against rice weevil Sitophilus oryzae (Coleoptera: Curculionidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Osaigbokan Uwamose

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To evaluate the toxicity potential of lemon grass [Cymbopogon citratus (C. citratus] products against adult rice weevil, Sitophilus oryzae. Methods: Lemon grass (C. citratus leaves were sundried for 7 days, pulverized and sieved using 0.5 mm mesh size to obtain fine powders. About 500 g of the powder were dissolved in 1000 mL of 90% methanol to produce the extract. The powder and extract were used for the bioassay. The powder was tested at 1.0, 1.5, 2.0 and 2.5 g/10 g rice grains, respectively. The toxic potential of the extract of concentration of 1.0, 1.5, 2.0, and 2.5 mg/mL were evaluated using the filter paper method. The experiment was setup on a completely randomized design using three replicates per treatment. Results: The results indicated significant difference (F = 7.450; df = 3.15; P < 0.05 in mean percentage mortality after 24, 48, 72, and 96 h exposure with the powder compared with the control. Significantly (F = 5.519; df = 3.15; P < 0.05 higher percentage adult mortality was also observed in the extract after 24, 48, 72, and 96 h exposure compared with the control. The LC50 value of the powder was 4.91 g/10 g of rice while the LT50 was 160.51 h. The LC50 value of the extract was 2.16 mg/20 mL of methanol with an LT50 of 75.10 h. The methanol extract of C. citratus showed the highest mortality compared to the powder which was less toxic. Conclusions: The study showed that C. citratus products are promising insecticides and can be used effectively in the management of Sitophilus oryzae in storage..

  9. Acanthotomicus sp. (Coleoptera: Curculionidae: Scolytinae), a New Destructive Insect Pest of North American Sweetgum Liquidambar styraciflua in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Lei; Li, You; Xu, Ying; Hulcr, Jiri; Cognato, Anthony I; Wang, Jian-Guo; Ju, Rui-Ting

    2017-08-01

    A previously unknown bark beetle species, Acanthotomicus sp., has emerged as a lethal pest of American sweetgum (Liquidambar styraciflua) in China. Our survey of nursery records from around Shanghai suggests that American sweetgum have been under heavy attack since at least 2013, resulting in the death of > 10,000 trees. Mass attacks of the apparently sweetgum-specific Acanthotomicus sp. can be diagnosed by accumulation of resinous exudates on the trunk, wilted foliage, and eventual numerous exit holes of the new generation. A Chinese native sweetgum Liquidambar formosana can also be colonized by Acanthotomicus sp. This pest is of concern not only as a killer of sweetgum in the Chinese nursery trade but also as a potentially destructive invasive pest of sweetgum in North America. This discovery suggests that global preinvasion assessment of pests is warranted. © The Authors 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Entomological Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  10. Contribution to the knowledge of the weevil subgenus Choilisanus Reitter, 1912, genus Otiorhynchus Germar, 1822 (Coleoptera: Curculionidae: Entiminae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Genrik E. Davidian

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available A new species Otiorhynchus ege Davidian & Gültekin sp. nov. is described from Aegean Region of Turkey. Closely related species Otiorhynchus balcanicus Stierlin, 1861, Otiorhynchus leuthneri Smreczyński, 1977 and Otiorhynchus latinasus Reitter 1898 from the subgenus Choilisanus Reitter, 1912 are redescribed, the lectotype of Otiorhynchus latinasus is designated, and a key to five species which are allied to Otiorhynchus balcanicus is given. Colour illustration, including habitus and photos of important morphological characters are presented.

  11. A review of the Palaearctic species of Larinus Dejean (Coleoptera: Curculionidae in C. J. Schoenherr collection: nomenclature and lectotype designations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Levent Gültekin

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The syntypes of 41 species of Larinus Dejean described by L. Gyllenhal and C. H. Boheman, housed at the C. J. Schoenherr collection in the Swedish Museum of Natural History, Stockholm and the Museum of Evolution, Uppsala University, are examined. Lectotypes are designated, a nomenclatural review performed, many previous synonyms confirmed and three new synonyms proposed: Larinus planus (Fabricius, 1792 (= Larinus rusticanus Gyllenhal, 1835 syn. nov.; Larinus carlinae (Olivier, 1807 (= Larinus sulphurifer Boheman, 1843 syn. nov.; Larinus minutus Gyllenhal, 1835 (= Larinus puncticollis Capiomont, 1874 syn. nov.. Colour images for 15 lectotypes are presented.

  12. Effects of crop sanitation on banana weevil, Cosmopolites sordidus (Germar) (Coleoptera : Curculionidae), populations and crop damage in Uganda

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Masanza, M.; Gold, C.S.; Huis, van A.; Ragama, P.E.

    2006-01-01

    Crop sanitation, i.e. destruction of crop residues, has been hypothesized to lower banana weevil damage by removing adult refuges and breeding sites. Although it has been widely recommended to farmers, limited data are available to demonstrate the efficacy of this method. The effects of crop

  13. The resin composition of ponderosa pine (Pinus ponderosa) attacked by the roundheaded pine beetle (Dendroctonus adjunctus) (Coleoptera: Curculionidae, Scolytinae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melissa J. Fischer; Kristen M. Waring; Richard W. Hofstetter; Thomas E. Kolb

    2008-01-01

    Dendroctonus adjunctus is an aggressive bark beetle species that attacks several species of pine throughout its range from southern Utah and Colorado south to Guatemala. A current outbreak of D. adjunctus provided a unique opportunity to study the relationship between this beetle and pine resin chemistry in northern Arizona. We...

  14. Respiratory metabolic responsiveness during the pupal stage of the red palm weevil, Rhynchophorus ferrugineus (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) to certain plant extracts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bream, A S; Ghoneim, K S; Tanani, M A; Nassar, M I

    2001-01-01

    The prepupae of Rhynchophorus ferrugineous were topically applied with one of three dose-levels (0.1, 0.005 or 0.001 microgram/insect) of Jojoba oil (Joj) or azadirachtin (Azt). The daily O2 consumption and CO2 respiratory output were determined and the respiratory quotient (RQ) was calculated. After Joj treatments, O2 consumption of early- and late pupae increased as the dose-level was decreased. The respiration curve did not assume an U-shaped pattern as common in the pupal stage of many insect species. Also, an inhibitory action of Azt on the pupal respiration has been clearly exhibited. A similar result of the respiration curve was observed by Azt. All dose levels of Joj, but only the higher two ones of Azt, suppressed the CO2 release. Both botanicals inhibited the RQ during the pupal stage. However, all RQ mean values of treated or control pupae were 0.7.

  15. Hypothenemus hampei (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) and its interactions with Azteca instabilis and Pheidole synanthropica (Hymenoptera: Formicidae) in a shade coffee agroecosystem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiménez-Soto, Estelí; Cruz-Rodríguez, Juan A; Vandermeer, John; Perfecto, Ivette

    2013-10-01

    The coffee berry borer is currently the most important insect pest of coffee worldwide. In shaded coffee farms such as Finca Irlanda in Chiapas, Mexico, natural enemies limit coffee berry borer and potentially prevent outbreaks. This research aimed to determine the effect of ants on coffee berry borer damage and to describe behaviors of Azteca instabilis F. Smith and Pheidole synanthropica (Longino 2009) when encountering the coffee berry borer. To these ends, an ant survey was conducted in a 2,500-m(2) plot within the farm. A 4- by 4-m coordinate system was established, and the coffee plant or shade tree closest to the coordinate point was sampled using tuna fish for a total of 168 coffee plants and 46 shade trees sampled. In addition, up to 100 berries were harvested from 138 coffee plants to measure damage and verify the presence of the coffee berry borer. Behavior was determined in the field by placing live coffee berry borer adults on berries and video recording all attacks. Results showed that plants with ants had less percentage of damaged berries and shorter coffee berry borer galleries than plants without ants. However, the length of galleries in plants with A. instabilis showed no significant differences from plants without ants. P. synanthropica was observed carrying coffee berry borer to the nest in 50% of the cases, whereas A. instabilis threw coffee berry borer off of the coffee plant in 79% of the cases. Results indicate that the presence of these species of ants reduce coffee berry borer damage and suggest that different behaviors could explain the pattern of coffee berry borer attack in this agroecosystem.

  16. Fungi associated with Ips acuminatus (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) in Ukraine with a special emphasis on pathogenicity of ophiostomatoid species

    OpenAIRE

    Davydenko, Kateryna; Vasaitis, Rimvydas; Menkis, Audrius

    2017-01-01

    Conifer bark beetles are well known to be associated with fungal complexes, which consist of pathogenic ophiostomatoid fungi as well as obligate saprotroph species. However, there is little information on fungi associated with Ips acuminatus in central and eastern Europe. The aim of the study was to investigate the composition of the fungal communities associated with the pine engraver beetle, I. acuminatus, in the forest-steppe zone in Ukraine and to evaluate the pathogenicity of six associa...

  17. Assessment of bacterial endosymbiont diversity in Otiorhynchus spp. (Coleoptera: Curculionidae larvae using a multitag 454 pyrosequencing approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hirsch Jacqueline

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Weevils of the genus Otiorhynchus are regarded as devastating pests in a wide variety of horticultural crops worldwide. So far, little is known on the presence of endosymbionts in Otiorhynchus spp.. Investigation of endosymbiosis in this genus may help to understand the evolution of different reproductive strategies in these weevils (parthenogenesis or sexual reproduction, host-symbiont interactions, and may provide a future basis for novel pest management strategy development. Here, we used a multitag 454 pyrosequencing approach to assess the bacterial endosymbiont diversity in larvae of four economically important Otiorhynchus species. Results High-throughput tag-encoded FLX amplicon pyrosequencing of a bacterial 16S rDNA fragment was used to characterise bacterial communities associated with different Otiorhynchus spp. larvae. By sequencing a total of ~48,000 PCR amplicons, we identified 49 different operational taxonomic units (OTUs as bacterial endosymbionts in the four studied Otiorhynchus species. More than 90% of all sequence reads belonged either to the genus Rickettsia or showed homology to the phylogenetic group of “Candidatus Blochmannia” and to endosymbionts of the lice Pedicinus obtusus and P. badii. By using specific primers for the genera Rickettsia and “Candidatus Blochmannia”, we identified a new phylogenetic clade of Rickettsia as well as “Candidatus Nardonella” endosymbionts in Otiorhynchus spp. which are closely related to “Candidatus Blochmannia” bacteria. Conclusions Here, we used multitag 454 pyrosequencing for assessment of insect endosymbiotic communities in weevils. As 454 pyrosequencing generates only quite short sequences, results of such studies can be regarded as a first step towards identifying respective endosymbiotic species in insects. In the second step of our study, we analysed sequences of specific gene regions for a more detailed phylogeny of selected endosymbiont genera. As a result we identified the presence of Rickettsia and “Candidatus Nardonella” endosymbionts in Otiorhynchus spp.. This knowledge is an important step in exploring bacteria-insect associations for potential use in insect pest control.

  18. Is the invasive species Listronotus bonariensis (Kuschel (Coleoptera: Curculionidae (Argentine stem weevil a threat to New Zealand natural grassland ecosystems?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara Ingeborg Patricia Barratt

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Listronotus bonariensis (Argentine stem weevil is a stem-boring weevil that has become a major pasture pest in New Zealand, and cool climate turf grass in Australia. This species is also frequently found in native tussock grassland in New Zealand. Laboratory and field trials were established to determine the risk posed to both seedlings and established plants of three native grass species compared to what happens with the most common host of this species, Lolium perenne (ryegrass. Adult weevil feeding damage scores were higher on Poa colensoi and Festuca novae-zelandiae than Chionochloa rigida. Oviposition was lower on P. colensoi than L. perenne, and no eggs were laid on F. novae-zealandiae. In field trials using the same four species established as spaced plants L. bonariensis laid more eggs per tiller in L. perenne in a low altitude pasture site than in ryegrass in a higher altitude site. No were eggs found on the three native grass species at the tussock sites, and only low numbers were found on other grasses at the low altitude pasture site. Despite this, numbers of adult weevils were extracted from the plants in the field trials. These may have comprised survivors of the original weevils added to the plants, together with naturally occurring individuals arising from the next field generation. Irrespective, higher numbers were recovered from the tussock site plants than from those from the pasture site. It was concluded that L. bonariensis is likely to have a greater impact on native grass seedling survival than on established plants.

  19. A simple method for preparing artificial larval diet of the West Indian sweetpotato weevil, Euscepes postfasciatus (Fairmaire) (Coleoptera: Curculionidae)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uesato, T.; Kohama, T.

    2008-01-01

    The method for preparing ordinary larval artificial diet for Euscepes postfasciatus (old diet) was complicated and time consuming. Some ingredients (casein, saccharose, salt mixture, etc.) of the diet were added to boiled agar solution, others (vitamin mixture, sweetpotato powder, etc.) were added after the solution was cooled to 55degC. To simplify the diet preparation, we combined all ingredients before mixing with water, and then boiled the solution (new diet). There were no significant differences of survival rate (from egg hatching to adult eclosion) and right elytron length between the weevils reared on the old and new diets, but the development period (from egg to adult) of the weevils fed the new diet was significantly (1.3 days) longer than that of those fed the old diet. Preparation time of the new diet was half that of the old diet. These results suggest that simplified diet preparation can be introduced into the mass-rearing of E. postfasciatus

  20. Tempo-Spatial Dynamics of Adult Plum Curculio (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) Based on Semiochemical-Baited Trap Captures in Blueberries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernandez-Cumplido, Johnattan; Leskey, Tracy C; Holdcraft, Robert; Zaman, Faruque U; Hahn, Noel G; Rodriguez-Saona, Cesar

    2017-06-01

    Plum curculio, Conotrachelus nenuphar (Herbst), has become an important pest of highbush blueberries in the northeastern United States. Here, we conducted experiments in 2010-2013 to compare the efficacy of semiochemical-baited traps for C. nenuphar versus conventional (beating cloth) sampling methods in blueberries, and to understand the seasonal abundance and distribution of C. nenuphar adults within and among blueberry fields using these traps. Black pyramid traps baited with the C. nenuphar aggregation pheromone grandisoic acid and the fruit volatile benzaldehyde caught three to four times more adults than unbaited traps without causing an increase in injury to berries in neighboring bushes. Numbers of adult weevils caught in traps correlated with those on bushes (beating cloth samples), indicating that trap counts can predict C. nenuphar abundance in the field. Early in the season, traps placed 20 m from field edges near a forest caught higher C. nenuphar numbers than traps placed at farther distances, suggesting movement of overwintered weevils from outside fields. Using a trapping network across multiple fields in an organic farm, we found evidence of C. nenuphar aggregation in "hotspots"; early in the season, C. nenuphar numbers in traps were higher in the middle of fields, and there was a correlation between these numbers and distance from the forest in 2013 but not in 2012. These results show that semiochemical-baited traps are effective in capturing C. nenuphar adults in blueberries, and that these traps should be placed in the interior of fields preferably, but not exclusively, near wooded habitats to maximize their efficacy. © The Authors 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Entomological Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  1. Estudio morfológico y taxonómico del género "Sitona" Germar, 1817 (Coleoptera, Curculionidae)

    OpenAIRE

    Velázquez de Castro González, Antonio Jesús

    1997-01-01

    La clasificación del género sitona germar, 1817 ha sido puesta a prueba con el estudio de su anatomía interna y externa, incluyendo observaciones con el microscopio electrónico de barrido. Se ha clarificado la terminología de distintas piezas internas como son el pro ventrículo, el metendosternito y el saco interno del edeago. Además se realiza un estudio detallado de las piezas bucales. Tras realizar este estudio se utilizan los caracteres encontrados para realizar un estudio de taxonomía, p...

  2. Resistance of irradiated and non-irradiated corn grain genotypes against the weevil Sitophilus zeamais Mots., 1855 (Coleoptera: Curculionidae)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oliveira, Carolina Natali de

    2005-01-01

    The resistance of 13 /////com grain genotypes was evaluated against the attack of Sitophilus zeamais (Mots.) by means of a no-choice test; 6 of them were selected (AGN 2012, AGN 30AOO, AGN 31A31, AGN 25A23, AGN 32A43, and AGN 35A42) and then submitted to a free-choice test where attractiveness and non preference for oviposition were assessed. The grain from the selected genotypes were later treated with Cobalt-60 gamma radiation at the doses of 0.0; 0.5; 1.0; and 1.5 kGy and submitted to the same tests. Based on the results, it was verified that genotypes AGN 2012 (30.6 eggs), AGN 31A31 (33.6 eggs), and AGN 30AOO (34.8 eggs) showed a non-preference for oviposition type of resistance, while non-preference for feeding and/or antibiosis were observed in the first two genotypes only. Genotypes AGN 25A23, AGN 32A43, and AGN 35A42 were the most susceptible to com weevil. The increasing gamma radiation ( 60 Co) doses reduced the mean mass of adults in genotype AGN 2012; however, the same parameter increased in genotype AGN 35A42; when treated at the dose of 1.5 kGy, genotypes AGN 2012 and AGN 31A31 showed a reduction in their mean masses of adults, while genotypes AGN 30AOO and AGN 35A42 showed higher mean mass of adults values. The increasing gamma radiation doses ( 60 Co) provided a reduction in mean grain dry mass consumed by the weevil; however, it was concluded that irradiation did not break com grain resistance and can be used for S. zeamais disinfestation prior to storage. (author)

  3. Evaluation of irradiated essential oils to control of Sitophilus zeamais Mots. (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) and Blatella germanica (L.) (Dictyopera: Blattellidae)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Potenza, Marcos Roberto

    2004-01-01

    This work aimed to evaluate the effect of irradiated essential oils of Eucalyptus citriodora, Eucalyptus globulus, Pinus sp., Azadirachta indica, Cymbopogon nardus, Cupressus sempervirens, Cymbopogons citratus and Juniperus communis and aqueous, hexanic and ethanolic irradiated extracts of Solanum paniculatum, Dahlia pinnata, Lycopersicon esculentum, Nephrolepis pectinata, Ruta graveolens, Ficus elastica, Lavandula angustifolia, Rhododendron simsii, Agave angustifolia, Ocimum basilicum, Allamanda cathartica, Dieffenbachia brasiliensis, Pennisetum purpureum, Annona squamosa, Coffea arabica and Hibiscus rosa-sinensis, in order to identify new substances to integrated pest management (IPM) and to observe possible effects of gamma radiation about extracts and essential oils efficiency such as increase, reduction, activation and inactivation of the same to the pest control. It evaluated the effect of contact on Sitophilus zeamais and by ingestion in Blattella germanica. To irradiation was used an experimental irradiator of Cobalt-60, type Gammacell 220. The essential oils were submitted increasing doses of gamma radiation: 2.5; 5.0; 7.5 and 10.0 kGy. The bioassay with B. germanica demonstrated efficiency between 22.0 e 30.0% and between 30.0 and 42.0%, respectively, to irradiated essential oils of E. citriodora and E. globulus and they demonstrated too repellency to the nymphs. The gamma radiation used promoted changes in essential oils of E. citriodora e E. globulus that they began to show efficiency on B. germanica nymphs besides a significant reduction of repellency. Essential oils of Pinus sp., A. indica, C. sempervirens and J. communis did not display efficiency. The essential oils of C. nardus, and C. citratus had low efficiency. The gamma radiation increased the efficiency of ethanolic extract of D. Pinnata with dose of 7.5 kGy, showing 48.0% of efficiency on B. germanica nymphs. The gamma radiation showed adverse effect on the aqueous extract of R. Graveolens, decreasing its efficiency of 20.0% to 2.0% in doses of 2.5; 7.5 and 10.0 kGy and 4,0% In dose of 5.0 kGy. The bioassay with S. zeamais demonstrated that irradiated essential oils of E. citriodora, E. globulus e Pinus sp. with dose of 5.0 kGy presented 100.0; 92.0 and 100.0% of efficiency, respectively. The essential oil of A. indica in different doses of gamma radiation didn't display efficiency on S. zeamais adults. It was not found out gamma radiation effects on efficiency from essential oils of C. nardus, C. sempervirens, C. citratus and J. communis, besides the oil of C. nardus in doses of gamma radiation applied was highly efficient over than 90.0%. The gamma radiation increased the efficiency of ethanolic extract of L. esculentum getting 70.0% of efficiency with dose of 5.0 kGy on S. zeamais adults. The gamma radiation showed adverse effect on the aqueous extract of R. Graveolens, decreasing its efficiency of 20.0% to 12.0; 6.0 and 2.0% in doses of 5.0; 7.5 and 10.0 kGy, respectively. According to results we verified that the gamma radiation interfered on behavior of some essential oils to pest control and it can obtain increase, reduction, activation and inactivation from the same. (author)

  4. Determining the vulnerability of Mexican pine forests to bark beetles of the genus Dendroctonus Erichson (Coleoptera: Curculionidae: Scolytinae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Y. Salinas-Moreno; A. Ager; C.F. Vargas; J.L. Hayes; G. Zuniga

    2010-01-01

    Bark beetles of the genus Dendroctonus are natural inhabitants of forests; under particular conditions some species of this genus can cause large-scale tree mortality. However, only in recent decades has priority been given to the comprehensive study of these insects in Mexico. Mexico possesses high ecological diversity in Dendroctonus-...

  5. Attack pattern of Platypus koryoensis (Coleoptera: Curculionidae: Platypodidae) in relation to crown dieback of Mongolian oak in Korea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung-Su Lee; Robert A. Haack; Won Il. Choi

    2011-01-01

    The ambrosia beetle, Platypus koryoensis (Murayama), vectors the Korean oak wilt (KOW) pathogen, Raffaelea quercus-mongolicae K.H. Kim, Y.J. Choi, & H.D. Shin, in Korea, which is highly lethal to Mongolian oak, Quercus mongolica Fisch., and is considered a major threat to forest ecosystem health. We...

  6. Pissodes castaneus (De Geer, 1775) (Coleoptera: Curculionidae), the bark pine weevil: a pest or a biological indicator?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edson Tadeu Iede; Wilson Reis Filho; Susete Rocio C. Penteado; Scheila Messa. Zaleski

    2011-01-01

    The risk of introduction of exotic forest pests is a global problem, evidenced by records of interceptions even in countries that have a quite effective system of plant protection. The banded pine weevil, Pissodes castaneus, is native to Europe and North Africa and was introduced into Argentina and Uruguay and recently into Brazil where it was first...

  7. Evidence for the presence of a female produced sex pheromone in the banana weevil, Cosmopolites sordidus Germar (Coleoptera: Curculionidae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behavior-modifying chemicals such as pheromones and kairomones have great potential in pest management. Studies reported here investigated chemical cues involved in mating and aggregation behavior of banana weevil, Cosmopolites sordidus, a major insect pest of banana in every country where bananas a...

  8. Actividad biológica de hongos entomopatógenos sobre Premnotrypes vorax Hustache (Coleoptera: Curculionidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge Enrique Villamil

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available El gusano blanco (Premnotrypes vorax Hustache ocasiona pérdidas considerables en el cultivo de la papa, las cuales pueden llegar hasta el 100% dependiendo del nivel de infestación y manejo del cultivo. El objetivo del presente estudio fue determinar el efecto individual y combinado de dos aislamientos autóctonos de Beauveria spp. en comparación con dos bioplaguicidas a base de Metarhizium anisopliae y Beauveria brongniartii, sobre P. vorax en condiciones de campo. Se empleó el Diseño Completamente al Azar, con ocho tratamientos y cuatro repeticiones Se hicieron inoculaciónes mediante aspersión dirigida a la base de la planta, utilizando una concentración 5x108 conidias.g-1. Se evaluó porcentaje de daño, porcentaje de control y rendimiento al momento de cosecha (t ha-1. Los resultados indicaron que las cepas comerciales en combinación Metaril® W.P + B. brongniartii® W.P (T6 y el aislamiento autóctono de Beauveria sp. Bv01 (T1, presentaron los menores porcentajes de daño (3,1±0,06 y 3,5±0,2%, los mayores porcentajes de control (77±0,46 y 76,7±1,78%, y la mejor producción (19±0,40t ha-1 y 18±0,25t ha-1 con diferencias significativas (Duncan p≤0,05 respecto a los demás tratamientos y el control regional. Se destacó el T6, ya que mostró el mejor potencial biológico por su rendimiento en cosecha, representando una alternativa promisoria para el control de P. vorax al ser incorporado dentro de un esquema de manejo integrado de la plaga en la región.

  9. Variation in manuka oil lure efficacy for capturing Xyleborus glabratus (Coleoptera: Curculionidae: Scholytinae), and Cubeb oil as an alternative attractant

    Science.gov (United States)

    James Hanula; Brian Sullivan; David Wakarchuk

    2013-01-01

    Redbay ambrosia beetle, Xyleborus glabratus Eichoff, is an exotic species to North America vectoring a deadly vascular wilt disease of redbay [Persea borbonia (L.) Spreng], swampbay [P. palustris (Raf.) Sarg.], avocado (P. americana Mill.), and sassafras [Sassafras albidum (...

  10. α-Copaene is an attractant, synergistic with quercivorol, for improved detection of Euwallacea nr. fornicatus (Coleoptera: Curculionidae: Scolytinae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kendra, Paul E; Owens, David; Montgomery, Wayne S; Narvaez, Teresa I; Bauchan, Gary R; Schnell, Elena Q; Tabanca, Nurhayat; Carrillo, Daniel

    2017-01-01

    The tea shot-hole borer, Euwallacea fornicatus Eichhoff, is an ambrosia beetle endemic to Asia and a pest of commercial tea, Camellia sinensis (L.) Kuntze. Recently, a complex of species morphologically similar to E. fornicatus has been recognized, which includes new pests established in Israel and the USA, both in California and Florida. Collectively termed E. nr. fornicatus, these cryptic species carry symbiotic Fusarium spp. fungi, some of which cause dieback disease in susceptible hosts, which include avocado, Persea americana Miller. Due to the threat to this economically important crop, research was initiated to evaluate efficacy of kairomone-based lures for detection of the beetle in Florida (termed the Florida tea shot hole borer, FL-TSHB). A series of field tests were conducted in 2016 in commercial avocado groves known to have FL-TSHB at various population levels. All tests evaluated lures containing quercivorol (p-menth-2-en-1-ol) and α-copaene, presented separately and in combination; and one test evaluated effect of trap type on beetle captures. In addition, electroantennography (EAG) was used to quantify female olfactory responses to lure emissions. This study identified (-)-α-copaene as a new attractant for FL-TSHB, equivalent in efficacy to quercivorol (the standard lure for Euwallacea detection in the USA); however, the combination of lures captured significantly more FL-TSHB than either lure alone. This combination resulted in synergistic attraction at two field sites and additive attraction at a third site. Sticky panel traps captured more FL-TSHB than comparably-baited Lindgren funnel traps. Females engaged in host-seeking flight from 11:00 to 16:00 hr (EST), with peak numbers observed between 12:00 and 13:00 hr. EAG analyses confirmed olfactory chemoreception of both kairomones, with a higher response elicited with the combination of volatiles. Results indicate that detection of pest E. nr. fornicatus in Florida can be improved by using a two-component lure consisting of p-menth-2-en-1-ol and (-)-α-copaene.

  11. Variation in manuka oil lure efficacy for capturing Xyleborus glabratus (Coleoptera: Curculionidae: Scolytinae), and cubeb oil as an alternative attractant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanula, James L; Sullivan, Brian T; Wakarchuk, David

    2013-04-01

    Redbay ambrosia beetle, Xyleborus glabratus Eichoff, is an exotic species to North America vectoring a deadly vascular wilt disease of redbay [Persea borbonia (L.) Spreng], swampbay [P. palustris (Raf.) Sarg.], avocado (P. americana Mill.), and sassafras [Sassafras albidum (Nutt.) Nees]. Xyleborus glabratus is attracted to manuka oil lures, which are commercially available, and phoebe oil. Variable efficacy of manuka oil lures and insufficient availability of phoebe oil prompted us to investigate the reasons behind changes in manuka oil lure efficacy and to test cubeb oil, a readily available essential oil from Piper cubeba L. seeds, as an alternative attractant. Attraction, release rates and durations, and volatile composition of manuka oil lures manufactured in 2008 were compared with manuka oil lures manufactured in 2012, and to whole and a distilled fraction of cubeb oil. Manuka oil lures from 2008 were more attractive to X. glabratus than controls for 8 wk, whereas lures from 2012 were attractive for only 2 wk. Cubeb oil and the distilled fraction of it were as attractive as or more attractive than manuka oil in three trials. In gravimetric studies, manuka oil lures from 2008 and cubeb oil lures continued to release volatiles for 57 d, whereas lures from 2012 stopped after 16 d. The chemical composition of volatiles released from new manuka oil lures from 2008 was similar to 2012; however, a preservative (butylated hydroxytoluene) was detected in the 2008 lures. Cubeb oil was an effective attractant for X. glabratus that lasted 8-9 wk when released from bubble lures.

  12. First report of Xyleborus glabratus (Coleoptera: Curculionidae: Scolytinae) and laurel wilt in Louisiana, USA: The disease continues westward on sassafras

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephen W. Fraedrich; C. Wood Johnson; Roger D. Menard; Thomas C. Harrington; Rabiu Olatinwo; G. Susan Best

    2015-01-01

    Laurel wilt, caused by Raffaelea lauricola Harrington, Fraedrich & Aghayeva (Ophiostomatales: Ophiostomataceae), has spread rapidly through the coastal plains forests of the southeastern United States (USA) with devastating effects on redbay (Persea borbonia [L.] Spreng.; Laurales: Lauraceae) populations (Fraedrich et...

  13. Persistence and efficacy of three diatomaceous earth formulations against Sitophilus oryzae (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) on wheat and barley.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Athanassiou, Christos G; Kavallieratos, Nickolas G; Economou, Leonidas P; Dimizas, Constantin B; Vayias, Basileios J; Tomanović, Snezana; Milutinović, Marija

    2005-08-01

    The insecticidal and residual efficacy of three diatomaceous earth (DE) formulations, Insecto, PyriSec, and SilicoSec, against Sitophilus oryzae (L.) on barley and wheat was assessed. For this purpose, 4-kg lots of barley and wheat were treated with the above-mentioned DE formulations, in three dose rates (0.75, 1, and 1.5 g/kg grain) and stored at 26 degrees C. Samples of these lots were taken at the day of storage, and every 45 d, until the completion of a 450-d period of storage. Bioassays were conducted by exposing S. oryzae adults to these samples, at 26 degrees C and 57% RH. In these bioassays, the DE efficacy was evaluated by recording adult mortality after 24 h, 48 h, 7 d, and 14 d of exposure on the treated grains. After the 14-d count, all adults were removed, and the samples were left at the same conditions for an additional 45 d, to evaluate the capacity for progeny production in the treated grains. Adult mortality after 14 d of exposure was exponentially decreased with time. During the first 270 d of storage, mortality was > 90%, and progeny production was 90% after 14 d of exposure) during the first 270 d of storage.

  14. Effects of gallery density and species ratio on the fitness and fecundity of two sympatric bark beetles (Coleoptera: Curculionidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, T S; Hofstetter, R W

    2009-06-01

    Interspecific interactions among tree-killing bark beetle species may have ecologically important consequences on beetle population dynamics. Using two tree-killing beetle species (Dendroctonus brevicomis and D. frontalis), we performed observational and experimental studies to verify cross-attraction and co-colonization under field conditions in northern Arizona and test the effects of gallery density and species ratio on response variables of average gallery length, offspring size (progeny fitness), and offspring production per centimeter gallery (fecundity). Our results show that both D. frontalis and D. brevicomis aggregate to pheromones synthesized de novo by D. brevicomis under field conditions and that galleries of both D. brevicomis and D. frontalis occurred together in the same region of a single host tree with significant frequency. In experimental manipulations of species ratios, the presence of conspecific beetles in the gallery environment strongly mediated fecundity, but D. frontalis was the only species that suffered negative impacts from the presence of heterospecific beetles in the gallery environment. Interactions did not result in any apparent fitness effects for progeny of either species, which suggests that multispecies aggregations and co-colonization may be a dominant ecological strategy in the region and result in niche sharing.

  15. The push-pull tactic for mitigation of mountain pine beetle (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) damage in lodgepole and whitebark pines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillette, Nancy E; Mehmel, Constance J; Mori, Sylvia R; Webster, Jeffrey N; Wood, David L; Erbilgin, Nadir; Owen, Donald R

    2012-12-01

    In an attempt to improve semiochemical-based treatments for protecting forest stands from bark beetle attack, we compared push-pull versus push-only tactics for protecting lodgepole pine (Pinus contorta Douglas ex Loudon) and whitebark pine (Pinus albicaulis Engelm.) stands from attack by mountain pine beetle (Dendroctonus ponderosae Hopkins) in two studies. The first was conducted on replicated 4.04-ha plots in lodgepole pine stands (California, 2008) and the second on 0.81-ha plots in whitebark pine stands (Washington, 2010). In both studies, D. ponderosae population levels were moderate to severe. The treatments were 1) push-only (D. ponderosae antiaggregant semiochemicals alone); 2) push-pull (D. ponderosae antiaggregants plus perimeter traps placed at regular intervals, baited with four-component D. ponderosae aggregation pheromone); and 3) untreated controls. We installed monitoring traps baited with two-component D. ponderosae lures inside each plot to assess effect of treatments on beetle flight. In California, fewer beetles were collected in push-pull treated plots than in control plots, but push-only did not have a significant effect on trap catch. Both treatments significantly reduced the rate of mass and strip attacks by D. ponderosae, but the difference in attack rates between push-pull and push-only was not significant. In Washington, both push-pull and push-only treatments significantly reduced numbers of beetles caught in traps. Differences between attack rates in treated and control plots in Washington were not significant, but the push-only treatment reduced attack rates by 30% compared with both the control and push-pull treatment. We conclude that, at these spatial scales and beetle densities, push-only may be preferable for mitigating D. ponderosae attack because it is much less expensive, simpler, and adding trap-out does not appear to improve efficacy.

  16. Antifeedant effect of commercial chemicals and plant extracts against Schistocerca americana (Orthoptera: Acrididae) and Diaprepes abbreviatus (Coleoptera: Curculionidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandoval-Mojica, Andres F; Capinera, John L

    2011-07-01

    The deterrent effect of seven commercial compounds against Schistocerca americana (Drury) nymphs and Diaprepes abbreviatus L. adults, two important citrus pests, was investigated. Extracts of three Florida local plants were also tested as deterrents. Antifeedant activity was assayed using a leaf-disk bioassay in choice and no-choice tests. The residual activity of the commercial compounds that significantly deterred the insects was assayed by applying them to foliage of citrus plants exposed to three time intervals of sunlight. Sabadilla, azadirachtin and ryanodine effectively deterred S. americana, whereas rotenone, sabadilla and ryanodine reduced the feeding activity of D. abbreviatus. Methanol and methylene chloride extracts of Ceratiola ericoides Michaux deterred D. abbreviatus, but only methylene chloride extract dissuaded S. americana. Methanol extract of Ardisia crenata Sims functioned as a feeding deterrent against both S. americana and D. abbreviatus, but only the latter species was deterred by methylene chloride extract of A. crenata. Extracts of Illicium parviflorum Michaux ex Ventetat only dissuaded the insects in choice bioassays. Rapid loss of effectiveness was observed under field conditions. Sabadilla was the only compound that maintained its antifeedant properties in the field, but only against S. americana. Based on their deterrency, some of the commercial products and plant extracts have potential for use as substitute crop protectants against the pest species tested. Copyright © 2011 Society of Chemical Industry.

  17. A new Thelastomatidae, Oryctophila bonaerensis sp. nov. (Nematoda parasite of curculionid beetle larvae of Prosalbus rufus (Coleoptera: Curculionidae from Argentina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nora B. Camino

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Oryctophila bonaerensis sp. nov. parasitizing curculionid beetle larvae from Argentina, is described and illustrated. The species is characterized by a prominent genital cone and a short and filiform tail appendage. Female with vulva at midlenght of body, vagina long, S-shaped, monodelphic, opistodelphic. Male with one club-shaped spicule. Genital papillae arranged as follows: one pair of large preanal papillae and three pairs of postanal papillae of various sizes: a pair of medium sized papillae is immediately posterior to the anus, followed by a pair of large papillae, and one pair of small papillae at the base of the caudal appendage.

  18. Combining larval parasitoids and an entomopathogenicfungus for biological control of Sitophilus granarius (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) in stored grain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Lise Stengaard; Steenberg, Tove

    2006-01-01

    The potential of combining different natural enemies for biological control of Sitophilus granarius (L.) in grain was investigated in a laboratory study. We compared the effect of two species of larval parasitoids, Lariophagus distinguendus Förster and Anisoptermalus calandrae (Howard), alone...... suppression (>99.9%) was obtained in units with L. distinguendus, followed by units with A. calandrae. In units with both parasitoids and the entomopathogen, the pest suppression level was 83-98%. Although the parasitoids were negatively affected by the fungus, they still exerted some degree of control...

  19. Fluctuación poblacional de Xyleborus ferrugineus y X. affinis (Coleoptera: Curculionidae en ecosistemas de Tabasco, México

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo Rangel

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Los Scolytinae son insectos comúnmente conocidos como coleópteros descortezadores o ambrosiales debido a su forma de alimentarse. Existen especies que restringen su actividad reproductiva a una planta huésped o a un número reducido de ellas, otras son altamente polífagas. Se estudiaron las poblaciones de Scolytinae con el objetivo de conocer la fluctuación poblacional de X. ferrugineus y X. affinis en ecosistemas de Tabasco, México durante noviembre 2010-julio 2011, febrero 2010-enero 2011 y 2007. Los métodos de captura utilizados fueron trampa de alcohol, trampa de luz y captura directa sobre sus plantas huésped. Se recolectaron 688 especímenes de X. ferrugineus y 3 911 de X. affinis. La fluctuación poblacional de X. ferrugineus mostró de manera general poblaciones bajas en los ecosistemas estudiados sin alguna estacionalidad marcada, registrándose los máximos picos poblacionales tanto en época seca (marzo-mayo como lluviosa (septiembre-diciembre. A diferencia de las poblaciones de X. affinis que fueron más abundantes y mostraron en la mayoría de los sitios (excepto en el Jardín Botánico José Narciso Rovirosa que se presentó en mayo picos poblacionales en época lluviosa. Las trampas de alcohol y de luz son métodos de recolecta que pueden ser complementarios para el monitoreo de las poblaciones de estos insectos, los cuales se encuentran presentes durante la mayor parte del año y su fluctuación poblacional es dependiente de los recursos alimenticios y sobre todo de factores ambientales como la temperatura y humedad. Se sugiere que X. affinis se ha adaptado y explotado los recursos de mejor manera que X. ferrugineus en estos ecosistemas, a juzgar por la abundancia observada. Las correlaciones entre la abundancia y los factores climáticos presentaron valores positivos y negativos. Los resultados reflejan el comportamiento de las poblaciones, sin embargo, hace falta evaluar de manera detallada algunos factores biológicos y abióticos que influyen en las fluctuaciones de éstos insectos.

  20. The Influence of Abiotic Factors on an Invasive Pest of Pulse Crops, Sitona lineatus (L. (Coleoptera: Curculionidae, in North America

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. Olfert

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Pea leaf weevil, Sitona lineatus (L., native to Europe and North Africa, has been introduced into many other countries around the world, including the USA and Canada. Adults are oligophagous pests on leguminaceous plants. Sitona lineatus was first recorded in Canada in 1997, near Lethbridge, Alberta. Since then, it has spread north in Alberta and west into Saskatchewan in 2007. Bioclimatic simulation models were used to predict the distribution and extent of establishment of S. lineatus in Canada based on its current geographic range, phenology, relative abundance, and empirical data. The study identified areas in Canada that are at risk for future establishment of S. lineatus and developed a better understanding of climate effects. Climate change projections (General Circulation Models were then imposed on the bioclimatic model of S. lineatus. Bioclimatic model output varied for each of the three General Circulation Models. In terms of suitability for pest establishment (Ecoclimatic Index, the NCAR273 CCSM climate data resulted in the most significant shift northward.

  1. α-Copaene is an attractant, synergistic with quercivorol, for improved detection of Euwallacea nr. fornicatus (Coleoptera: Curculionidae: Scolytinae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul E Kendra

    Full Text Available The tea shot-hole borer, Euwallacea fornicatus Eichhoff, is an ambrosia beetle endemic to Asia and a pest of commercial tea, Camellia sinensis (L. Kuntze. Recently, a complex of species morphologically similar to E. fornicatus has been recognized, which includes new pests established in Israel and the USA, both in California and Florida. Collectively termed E. nr. fornicatus, these cryptic species carry symbiotic Fusarium spp. fungi, some of which cause dieback disease in susceptible hosts, which include avocado, Persea americana Miller. Due to the threat to this economically important crop, research was initiated to evaluate efficacy of kairomone-based lures for detection of the beetle in Florida (termed the Florida tea shot hole borer, FL-TSHB. A series of field tests were conducted in 2016 in commercial avocado groves known to have FL-TSHB at various population levels. All tests evaluated lures containing quercivorol (p-menth-2-en-1-ol and α-copaene, presented separately and in combination; and one test evaluated effect of trap type on beetle captures. In addition, electroantennography (EAG was used to quantify female olfactory responses to lure emissions. This study identified (--α-copaene as a new attractant for FL-TSHB, equivalent in efficacy to quercivorol (the standard lure for Euwallacea detection in the USA; however, the combination of lures captured significantly more FL-TSHB than either lure alone. This combination resulted in synergistic attraction at two field sites and additive attraction at a third site. Sticky panel traps captured more FL-TSHB than comparably-baited Lindgren funnel traps. Females engaged in host-seeking flight from 11:00 to 16:00 hr (EST, with peak numbers observed between 12:00 and 13:00 hr. EAG analyses confirmed olfactory chemoreception of both kairomones, with a higher response elicited with the combination of volatiles. Results indicate that detection of pest E. nr. fornicatus in Florida can be improved by using a two-component lure consisting of p-menth-2-en-1-ol and (--α-copaene.

  2. North American Lauraceae: terpenoid emissions, relative attraction and boring preferences of redbay ambrosia beetle, Xyleborus glabratus (coleoptera: curculionidae: scolytinae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul E Kendra

    Full Text Available The invasive redbay ambrosia beetle, Xyleborus glabratus, is the primary vector of Raffaelea lauricola, a symbiotic fungus and the etiologic agent of laurel wilt. This lethal disease has caused severe mortality of redbay (Persea borbonia and swampbay (P. palustris trees in the southeastern USA, threatens avocado (P. americana production in Florida, and has potential to impact additional New World species. To date, all North American hosts of X. glabratus and suscepts of laurel wilt are members of the family Lauraceae. This comparative study combined field tests and laboratory bioassays to evaluate attraction and boring preferences of female X. glabratus using freshly-cut bolts from nine species of Lauraceae: avocado (one cultivar of each botanical race, redbay, swampbay, silkbay (Persea humilis, California bay laurel (Umbellularia californica, sassafras (Sassafras albidum, northern spicebush (Lindera benzoin, camphor tree (Cinnamomum camphora, and lancewood (Nectandra coriacea. In addition, volatile collections and gas chromatography-mass spectroscopy (GC-MS were conducted to quantify terpenoid emissions from test bolts, and electroantennography (EAG was performed to measure olfactory responses of X. glabratus to terpenoids identified by GC-MS. Significant differences were observed among treatments in both field and laboratory tests. Silkbay and camphor tree attracted the highest numbers of the beetle in the field, and lancewood and spicebush the lowest, whereas boring activity was greatest on silkbay, bay laurel, swampbay, and redbay, and lowest on lancewood, spicebush, and camphor tree. The Guatemalan cultivar of avocado was more attractive than those of the other races, but boring response among the three was equivalent. The results suggest that camphor tree may contain a chemical deterrent to boring, and that different cues are associated with host location and host acceptance. Emissions of α-cubebene, α-copaene, α-humulene, and calamenene were positively correlated with attraction, and EAG analyses confirmed chemoreception of terpenoids by antennal receptors of X. glabratus.

  3. Freezing as a treatment to prevent the spread of coffee berry borer, Hypothenemus hampei (Ferrari) (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) in coffee

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coffee berry borer, Hypothenemus hampei (Ferrari) is the most serious insect pest of coffee around the world. While it is already present in most of the world’s major coffee growing regions, it is important to delay further spread and to prevent re-introductions which might include hyperparasites or...

  4. 1-Octen-3-ol is repellent to Ips pini (Coleoptera: Curculionidae: Scolytinae) in the midwestern United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Therese M. Poland; Tina M. Pureswaran Deepa S. Ciaramitaro; John H. Borden

    2009-01-01

    In field experiments at three sites in Michigan and Ohio we tested the activity of 1-octen-3-ol in combination with ipsdienol, the aggregation pheromone of the pine engraver, Ips pini (Say). When 1-octen-3-ol was added to funnel traps baited with ipsdienol, significantly fewer beetles of either sex were captured than in traps baited with ipsdienol...

  5. a-Copaene is an attractant, synergistic with quercivorol, for improved detection of Euwallacea nr. fornicatus (Coleoptera: Curculionidae: Scolytinae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The tea shot-hole borer, Euwallacea fornicatus Eichhoff, is an ambrosia beetle endemic to Asia and a pest of commercial tea, Camellia sinensis (L.) Kuntze. Recently, a complex of species morphologically similar to E. fornicatus has been recognized, which includes new pests established in Israel and...

  6. Irradiation as a potential phytosanitary treatment for the mango pulp weevil sternochetus frigidus (Fabr.) (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) in Philippine sugar mango

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Obra, Glenda B.; Resilva, Sotero S.; Lorenzana, Louella Rowena J.

    2013-01-01

    Irradiation was explored as a method of quarantine disinfestation treatment for the mango pulp weevil Sternochetus frigidus (Fabr.) S. frigidus is an important quarantine pest preventing the export of mangoes from the Philippines to countries with strict quarantine regulations. Mangoes obtained from Guimaras Island are exempt from this ban as they are certified to be free from seed weevil and pulp weevil infestation. In the dose-response tests, S. frigidus larvae, pupae and adults in mangoes were irradiated at target doses of 25, 50, 75, 100, 150, 300 and 400 Gy. The number of eggs laid by adult females decreased with increasing dose. Treatment with irradiation doses ≥75 Gy resulted in sterility in adults developing from larvae and pupae while doses of ≥100 Gy resulted in sterility in irradiated adults. The adult was the most tolerant stage based on sterility or prevention of adult reproduction. Significant differences were observed in adult longevity among treatment doses in S. frigidus, but none between sexes and in the interaction between dose and sex. (author)

  7. Controle de Sitophilus zeamais Mots., 1855 (Coleoptera: Curculionidae com inseticidas empregados em frutíferas temperadas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Faria João Luiz

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available O gorgulho do milho Sitophilus zeamais Mots. tem sido relatado com freqüência atacando frutíferas temperadas em condições de campo, com destaque para o pessegueiro em Pelotas, RS, macieira em Fraiburgo, SC e videira na Serra Gaúcha, RS. Este trabalho avaliou, em laboratório, o efeito dos inseticidas deltametrina (Decis 25 CE, 40mL 100L-1, dimetoato (Dimetoato 400 CE, 150mL 100L-1, triclorfon (Dipterex 500 SNAqC, 300mL 100L-1, fosmet (Imidan 500 PM, 200g 100L-1, fention (Lebaycid 500 CE, 100mL 100L-1, clorpirifós (Lorsban 480 BR, 150mL 100L-1, malation (Malation 1000, 200mL 100L-1, carbaril (Sevin 480 SC, 360mL 100L-1, fenitrotion (Sumithion 500 CE, 150mL 100L-1 e metidation (Supracid 400 CE, 100mL 100L-1 atualmente empregados no controle de pragas em frutíferas temperadas e os novos inseticidas tiametoxam (Actara 250 WG, 15 e 30g 100L-1, benzoato de emamectina (Proclaim 5 SG, 10 e 20g 100L-1, imidacloprid (Provado 200 SC, 30 e 60mL 100L-1, spinosad (Tracer 480 CE, 10 e 20mL 100L-1 e etofenprox (Trebon 100 SC, 100 e 150mL 100L-1. No primeiro experimento, frutos de maçã foram mergulhados na calda inseticida por 10 segundos e oferecidos a adultos de S. zeamais sp (contato residual e, no segundo, os produtos foram aplicados diretamente sobre os insetos (contato direto em torre de pulverização. Os inseticidas triclorfon (150g 100L-1, fention (50g 100L-1, clorpirifós (72g 100L-1, malation (200g 100L-1, metidation (40g 100L-1 e tiametoxam (3,75 e 7,5g 100L-1 foram eficientes no controle do gorgulho do milho, via contato residual, enquanto fention (50g 100L-1, clorpirifós (72g 100L-1, malation (200g 100L-1, fenitrotion (75g 100L-1 e metidation (40g 100L-1 foram eficientes via contato direto.

  8. Effects of microwave treatment of live oak acorns on germination and on Curculio sp. (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) larvae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crocker, R.L.; Morgan, D.L.; Longnecker, M.T.

    1987-01-01

    Microwave irradiation of live oak acorns was evaluated in the laboratory as an alternative to hydrothermal treatments for controlling larvae of weevils, Curculio sp., in commercial production of live oaks. Seed and larvae contained therein exposed to microwaves for 0-180s suffered similarly increasing levels of mortality; quenching the seed briefly in cool water reduced injury both to the pest and its host. The approach, as tested, does not appear promising as a means of weevil control. (author)

  9. Trap deployments in black walnut tree canopies help inform monitoring strategies for bark and ambrosia beetles (Coleoptera: Curculionidae: Scolytinae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thousand cankers disease is caused by plant pathogenic Geosmithia morbida Kolarík, Freeland, Utley, and Tisserat; a fungus vectored primarily by the walnut twig beetle, Pityophthorus juglandis (Blackman). The role of other bark and ambrosia beetle species in persistence and spread of this disease r...

  10. Morphology of salivary gland and distribution of dopamine and serotonin on red palm weevil (RPW), Rhynchophorus ferrugineus (Coleoptera: Curculionidae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hidayah, A. S. Nurul; Wahida, O. Nurul; Shafinaz, M. N. Norefrina; Idris, A. G.

    2013-11-01

    The Red Palm Weevil (RPW), Rhynchophorus ferrugineus (Olivier, 1790) is insect pest to plants of the family Palmaceae. No study has been reported on the digestive mechanism of Red Palm Weevil (RPW). Salivary glands are responsible in the feeding regulation of insect while serotonin and dopamine play a significant role in the regulation of this gland. It is great to see the morphology of the salivary gland and how dopamine and serotonin possibly play their role in this gland. Two variation of RPW, striped and spotted RPW were chosen. The morphology of the gland of both RPW variants examined by using light microscopy was found to be a tubular type. Immunohistochemical analysis conducted showed that serotonin and dopamine in both variations did not innervate the glands suggesting they are not act as neurotransmitter. However, it can be detected on few areas within the glands. This suggests that serotonin and dopamine may act as a hormone because there is no evidence on the nerve fibers. The role of these biogenic amines in the salivary gland of RPW needs further investigation. Hopefully the data would help in understanding the mechanism of salivary glands control by biogenic amines in RPW specifically and insects with sucking mouthpart generally.

  11. Vertical Distribution and Daily Flight Periodicity of Ambrosia Beetles (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) in Florida Avocado Orchards Affected by Laurel Wilt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ambrosia beetles have emerged as significant pests of avocado (Persea americana Miller) due to their association with pathogenic fungal symbionts, most notably Raffaelea lauricola, the causal agent of laurel wilt. We evaluated the interaction of ambrosia beetles with host avocado trees by documentin...

  12. a-Copaene and quercivorol lures: Chemical analysis and efficacy for detection of Euwallacea nr. fornicatus (Coleoptera: Curculionidae: Scolytinae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Invasive ambrosia beetles in the Euwallacea nr. fornicatus complex vector a fungal pathogen responsible for Fusarium dieback, a disease that impacts avocado (Persea americana) and numerous native trees in the USA, Israel, and other countries. Currently, these pests are detected with quercivorol lure...

  13. Description of new Dryocoetes (Coleoptera, Curculionidae, Scolytinae) speciesfrom Afghanistan and Northern India and redescription of Scolytoplatypus kunala Strohm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandelshtam, Michail Yu.; V. Petrov, Alexander

    2010-01-01

    Abstract A new bark beetle species, Dryocoetes brownei from Northern India and Afghanistan, is described as a new to science and redescription of Scolytoplatypus kunala Strohmeyer, 1908, previously known only from the female holotype, is provided. PMID:21594179

  14. Phoretic uropodine mites (Acari: Mesostigmata associated with the red palm weevil, Rhynchophorus ferrugineus (Coleoptera: Curculionidae in Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V.R. Farmahiny Farahani

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available During an investigation on phoretic mite associates of the red palm weevil, Rhynchophorus ferrugineus, in Sistan and Balouchestan Province of Iran, two uropodine species were collected and identified as Centrouropoda almerodai (Uropodidae and Uroobovella marginata (Dinychidae. This is the first record of the genus Centrouropoda from Iran and the first record of phoretic mites associated with this weevil from the country.

  15. High diversity and variability in the bacterial microbiota of the coffee berry borer (Coleoptera: Curculionidae), with emphasis on Wolbachia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mariño, Yobana A; Ospina, Oscar E; Verle Rodrigues, José C; Bayman, Paul

    2018-03-30

    Variation in microbiota of the coffee berry borer (CBB) Hypothenemus hampei was studied. Diversity, structure and function of bacterial communities were compared between eggs vs. adults, CBBs from shade coffee vs. sun coffee, CBBs from the field vs. raised in the lab, and CBBs with and without the antibiotic tetracycline. We sequenced the region V4 of the gene 16 S rRNA. Pseudomonadaceae and Enterobacteriaceae, particularly Pseudomonas and Pantoea, dominated microbiota of the CBB. Comparative functional inferences with PICRUSt suggested that samples from the field were enriched for genes involved in carbohydrate and protein digestion and absorption, while lab-reared samples were higher in genes for melanization and caffeine metabolism. Microbiota of the CBB was diverse and dominated by the genus Pseudomonas, several species of which have been previously associated with caffeine degradation in this insect. Wolbachia was the only endosymbiont detected with known ability to manipulate host reproduction. This study demonstrates that stage of development and origin of samples affected the structure and function of the CBB's bacterial communities. This is the first attempt to predict functional significance of the CBB microbiota in nutrition, reproduction and defense. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  16. Investigating the potential of an autodissemination system for managing populations of vine weevil, Otiorhynchus sulcatus (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) with entomopathogenic fungi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pope, Tom W; Hough, Gemma; Arbona, Charlotte; Roberts, Harriet; Bennison, Jude; Buxton, John; Prince, Gill; Chandler, Dave

    2018-04-12

    Vine weevil, also known as black vine weevil, (Otiorhynchus sulcatus) is an economically important pest affecting soft fruit and nursery stock in temperate regions. We used laboratory and polytunnel experiments to investigate a novel control system based on autodissemination of spores of an entomopathogenic fungus to populations of adult vine weevils. The fungus was applied as a conidial powder, used on its own or formulated with talc, to a simple plastic refuge for vine weevils. The potential for adult weevils to disseminate the fungus was investigated first in polytunnel experiments using fluorescent powders applied to the refuge in lieu of fungal conidia. In this system, 88% of adult weevils came in contact with the powder within 48 hours. When the powder was applied to five adult weevils that were then placed within a population of 35 potential recipients, it was transmitted on average to 75% of the recipient population within 7 days. Three isolates of entomopathogenic fungi (Beauveria bassiana isolate codes 433.99 and 1749.11 and Metarhizium brunneum isolate code 275.86), selected from a laboratory virulence screen. These three isolates were then investigated for efficacy when applied as conidial powders in artificial refuges placed among populations of adult weevils held in experimental boxes in the laboratory at 20°C. Under this regime, the fungal isolates caused 70 - 90% mortality of adult weevils over 28 days. A final polytunnel experiment tested the efficacy of conidial powders of M. brunneum 275.86 placed in artificial refuges to increase vine weevil mortality. Overall weevil mortality was relatively low (26-41%) but was significantly higher in cages in which the conidial powders were placed in refuge traps than in cages with control traps. The lower weevil mortality recorded in the polytunnel experiment compared to the laboratory test was most likely a consequence of the greater amounts of inoculum required to kill adult weevils when conditions fluctuate between favourable and unfavourable temperatures e.g. below 15°C. The potential of an autodissemination system for entomopathogenic fungi as a means of controlling vine weevil as part of an integrated pest management programme is discussed. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  17. Efficacy and Cost of Trap-Bait Combinations for Capturing Rhynchophorus palmarum L. (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) in Ornamental Palm Polycultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murguía-González, J; Landero-Torres, I; Leyva-Ovalle, O R; Galindo-Tovar, M E; Llarena-Hernández, R C; Presa-Parra, E; García-Martínez, M A

    2018-04-01

    Ornamental palms are an economically important component of international trade yet have recently experienced yield losses in Mexico due to red ring and bud rot diseases, which are spread by Rhynchophorus palmarum L. Considering that massive capture is a common strategy to control this pest and the cost of commercial traps and baits could be inaccessible for small farmers, an inexpensive trap-bait combination is desired. In this study, 16 trap-bait combinations for capturing R. palmarum were assessed in ornamental palm polycultures over the course of 1 year. An expensive yellow bucket trap combined with aggregation pheromone + insecticide + banana was compared with inexpensive, handmade trap-bait combinations. A total of 4712 weevils were collected in all traps, of which 52.7% were male and 47.3% female. The efficacy of the handmade trap made from a colorless polyethylene bottle and baited with banana + pineapple + sugarcane + sugarcane molasses was similar to that of the yellow bucket trap baited with aggregation pheromone + insecticide + banana. These two trap-bait combinations remained effective even when the R. palmarum population significantly decreased during the dry, warm season. The affordable handmade trap baited with food attractants and without insecticides was highly efficient in capturing R. palmarum and therefore represents an effective tool for monitoring weevil populations. As ornamental crops have recently gained greater economic importance in the studied region, the use of a novel and cheap trap-bait combination could offer great benefits to producers and form part of the integrated management of R. palmarum.

  18. Evaluation of Semiochemical-Baited Traps for Monitoring the Pea Leaf Weevil, Sitona lineatus (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) in Field Pea Crops.

    Science.gov (United States)

    St Onge, Amanda; Cárcamo, Héctor A; Evenden, Maya L

    2018-02-08

    The pea leaf weevil (PLW), Sitona lineatus L., is a pest of field pea (Pisum sativum L.) and faba bean (Vicia faba L.) that recently invaded the Canadian Prairie Provinces. Although most damage is done by larvae that feed on root nodules, adults are easier to monitor than larvae. Both male and female weevils respond to a male-produced aggregation pheromone and to volatiles released by host plants. The current study tests the attractiveness of synthetic aggregation pheromone, 4-methyl-3,5-heptanedione, and host plant volatiles linalool, (Z)-3-hexenol, and (Z)-3-hexenyl acetate to PLWs in spring when weevils are reproductively active and in fall when weevils seek overwintering sites. Different combinations of semiochemical lures at various doses, released from a variety of devices were tested in pitfall traps. Semiochemical-baited traps captured both male and female weevils in both seasons but the sex ratio varied with season. Weevils did not respond in a dose-dependent manner to pheromone, as all pheromone lures were equally attractive. Pheromone release rate was determined by the release device and not the pheromone dose in the lure. The addition of plant volatiles sometimes increased weevil captures but plant volatiles alone were not attractive to PLW adults. An additional study tested the effect of trap type on weevil capture. Of the 12 different trap types tested, pheromone-baited pitfall traps were most successful in attracting and retaining weevils. Bycatch of other Sitona species was limited to a few specimens of the sweet clover weevil, Sitona cylindricollis Fahraeus. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Entomological Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  19. Method of screening radiation induced jute mutants for resistance to the jute weevil, Apion corchori marsh (coleoptera, curculionidae)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shahjahan, M.

    1973-04-01

    The jute variety, D-154 (Corchorus capsularis), was treated with ionizing radiation and several jute plant mutants were evolved from it. They were the C-22 (seg), C-26 (seg), C-29 (seg), C-34, C-34 p.c., C-35 and C-38 (seg). These mutants were cultivated in the Tongi Atomic Energy Agricultural Experiment Station, Dacca, and exposed to natural infestation for estimating their resistance to the jute weevil, Apion corchori Marsh. But there was no known way of determining their damage by the jute weevils. Therefore, it was considered very essential to find out an effective screening method for evaluating the resistance of the jute weevils in the jute plants. Three methods were found to be more or less equally effective. They were the average attack, height-unit and frequency method. The results obtained by each one of them were analyzed and compared. Each method recorded the highest attack for C-34 and the lowest attack for both the C-38 (seg) and C-22 (seg). Hence the C-34 mutant seemed to be more susceptible when compared with other jute plant mutants.

  20. Coleoptera Associated with Decaying Wood in a Tropical Deciduous Forest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muñoz-López, N Z; Andrés-Hernández, A R; Carrillo-Ruiz, H; Rivas-Arancibia, S P

    2016-08-01

    Coleoptera is the largest and diverse group of organisms, but few studies are dedicated to determine the diversity and feeding guilds of saproxylic Coleoptera. We demonstrate the diversity, abundance, feeding guilds, and succession process of Coleoptera associated with decaying wood in a tropical deciduous forest in the Mixteca Poblana, Mexico. Decaying wood was sampled and classified into four stages of decay, and the associated Coleoptera. The wood was identified according to their anatomy. Diversity was estimated using the Simpson index, while abundance was estimated using a Kruskal-Wallis test; the association of Coleoptera with wood species and decay was assessed using canonical correspondence analysis. Decay wood stage I is the most abundant (51%), followed by stage III (21%). We collected 93 Coleoptera belonging to 14 families, 41 genera, and 44 species. The family Cerambycidae was the most abundant, with 29% of individuals, followed by Tenebrionidae with 27% and Carabidae with 13%. We recognized six feeding guilds. The greatest diversity of Coleoptera was recorded in decaying Acacia farnesiana and Bursera linanoe. Kruskal-Wallis analysis indicated that the abundance of Coleoptera varied according to the species and stage of decay of the wood. The canonical analysis showed that the species and stage of decay of wood determined the composition and community structure of Coleoptera.

  1. Quercivorol as a lure for the polyphagous and Kuroshio shot hole borers, Euwallacea spp. nr. fornicatus (Coleoptera: Scolytinae, vectors of Fusarium dieback

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christine Dodge

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The polyphagous shot hole borer and Kuroshio shot hole borer, two members of the Euwallacea fornicatus species complex (Coleoptera: Curculionidae: Scolytinae, are invasive ambrosia beetles that harbor distinct species of Fusarium fungal symbionts. Together with the damage caused by gallery construction, these two phytopathogenic Fusarium species are responsible for the emerging tree disease Fusarium dieback, which affects over 50 common tree species in Southern California. Host trees suffer branch dieback as the xylem is blocked by invading beetles and fungi, forcing the costly removal of dead and dying trees in urban areas. The beetles are also threatening natural riparian habitats, and avocado is susceptible to Fusarium dieback as well, resulting in damage to the avocado industries in California and Israel. Currently there are no adequate control mechanisms for shot hole borers. This paper summarizes efforts to find a suitable lure to monitor shot hole borer invasions and dispersal. Field trials were conducted in two counties in Southern California over a span of two years. We find that the chemical quercivorol is highly attractive to these beetles, and perform subsequent field experiments attempting to optimize this lure. We also explore other methods of increasing trap catch and effects of other potential attractants, as well as the deterrents verbenone and piperitone.

  2. Tanyproctini (Coleoptera: Scarabaeidae: Melolonthinae) of Socotra Island

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Král, D.; Sehnal, R.; Bezděk, Aleš

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 52, suppl. 2 (2012), s. 153-182 ISSN 0374-1036 Grant - others:Ministry of Education, Youth and Sports (CZ) LA10036/MSMT Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : Coleoptera * Scarabaeidae * Melolonthinae Subject RIV: EG - Zoology Impact factor: 0.963, year: 2012 http://www.aemnp.eu/PDF/52_s2/52_S2_153.pdf

  3. Cytogenetic characterization of Eurysternus caribaeus (Coleoptera ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Journal of Genetics; Volume 88; Issue 2. Cytogenetic characterization of Eurysternus caribaeus (Coleoptera: Scarabaeidae): evidence of sex-autosome fusion and diploid number reduction prior to species dispersion. Amanda Paulino De Arcanjo Diogo Cavalcanti Cabral-De-Mello Ana Emília Barros E ...

  4. Naamlijst van de Nederlandse Bladkevers (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beenen, R.; Winkelman, J.

    1993-01-01

    Checklist of the Dutch leaf-beetles (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae). A new checklist of the leaf-beetles of The Netherlands is presented. It is to be used in the European Invertebrate Survey project 'The Leaf-beetles of The Netherlands'. The list is annotated to explain changes in faunistic status and

  5. Dung beetles (Coleoptera: Scarabaeidae: Scarabaeinae) of the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The dung beetle fauna of the subfamily Scarabaeinae (Coleoptera: Scarabaeidae) occurring in the Laikipia District of Kenya was surveyed. A total of 79 species were found which are diagnosed, keyed, and known dung preferences discussed. Seven species are new records for Kenya, namely Allogymnopleurus ...

  6. Parasitism and olfactory responses of Dastarcus helophoroides (Coleoptera: Bothrideridae) to different Cerambycid hosts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jian-Rong Wei; Zhong-Qi Yang; Therese M. Poland; Jia-Wei. Du

    2009-01-01

    Dastarcus helophoroides (Fairmaire) (Coleoptera: Bothrideridae) is an important natural enemy of longhorned beetles (Coleoptera: Cerambycidae). It is distributed throughout most Provinces in China. We investigated whether there were differences among D. helophoroides populations collected from different hosts in different...

  7. Bioactivity of flours of seeds of leguminous crops Pisum sativum ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Bioactivity of flours of seeds of leguminous crops Pisum sativum, Phaseolus vulgaris and Glycine max used as botanical insecticides against Sitophilus oryzae Linnaeus (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) on sorghum grains.

  8. Insecticidal Properties of Peumus boldus Molina Powder Used Alone and Mixed with Lime Against Sitophilus zeamais Motschulsky (Coleopter: Curculionidae Propiedades Insecticidas del Polvo de Peumus boldus Molina Solo y en Mezcla con Cal contra Sitophilus zeamais Motschulsky (Coleoptera: Curculionidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriel Bustos-Figueroa

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available The insecticidal properties of boldus (Peumus boldus Molina powder used alone and mixed with lime against adults of maize weevil (Sitophilus zeamais Motschulsky were evaluated under laboratory conditions. Additionally, aeration effects (presence or absence and temperature (room temperature vs. 3 ºC on insecticidal properties were studied over time. A mortality rate of 100% was observed at 20 g kg-1 (w/w of P. boldus powder when used alone and mixed with lime in proportions of 50:50, 60:40, and 80:20. The 50% lethal concentration (LC50 for all treatments was Se evaluaron las propiedades insecticidas del polvo de boldo (Peumus boldus Molina, solo y en mezcla con cal, bajo condiciones de laboratorio. Adicionalmente, se evaluó el efecto de la aeración (presencia vs. ausencia y de la temperatura (temperatura ambiente vs. 3 ºC sobre la mortalidad y emergencia de adultos de la F1. La concentración de 20 g kg-1 (p/p del polvo de boldo ya sea solo o en combinación con cal en las proporciones de 50:50, 60:40 y 80:20 mostraron 100% de mortalidad. La concentración letal 50% (CL50, en todos los tratamientos fue menor a 5 g kg-1 (p/p mientras que la CL90 no superó 11 g kg-1 (p/p. La mezcla del polvo con los granos de maíz tanto solo como en mezcla con cal no afectó la germinación. La temperatura y la aeración no afectaron la mortalidad de los adultos parentales ni la emergencia de adultos de la F1. Cuando se mezcló el maíz con el polvo de boldo molido 24 h antes de la infestación con adultos, la mortalidad de los adultos parentales y la emergencia de adultos de la F1 fue de 100 y de 0%, respectivamente. Los resultados no fueron satisfactorios cuando el polvo de boldo almacenado durante 30, 60 y 90 d fue mezclado con el maíz infestado. La toxicidad del follaje de boldo es alta 24 h después de pulverizarse; si el tiempo es mayor, la toxicidad declina significativamente.

  9. Immatures of Acanthocinini (Coleoptera, Cerambycidae, Lamiinae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sônia A. Casari

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Immatures of Acanthocinini (Coleoptera, Cerambycidae, Lamiinae. Larva and pupa of Eutrypanus dorsalis (Germar, 1928, collected in trunks of Pinus elliottii Engelm., and Paratenthras martinsi Monné, 1998, collected in spathes of Scheelea phalerata (Mart. ex Spreng. Burret, are described and illustrated. Larva and pupa of Lophopoeum timbouvae Lameere, 1884, collected in Hymenaea corbaril L., Enterolobium contortisiliquum (Vell. Morong and Pterogyne nitens Tul., are redescribed and illustrated. A table with all described immatures of Lamiinae, and a comparison among the immatures of Acanthocinini are presented. Biological notes and new records are also included.

  10. Plant compounds insecticide activity against Coleoptera pests of stored products Compostos de plantas com atividade inseticida a coleópteros-praga de produtos armazenados

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Márcio Dionizio Moreira

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this work was to screen plants with insecticide activity, in order to isolate, identify and assess the bioactivity of insecticide compounds present in these plants, against Coleoptera pests of stored products: Oryzaephilus surinamensis L. (Silvanidae, Rhyzopertha dominica F. (Bostrichidae and Sitophilus zeamais Mots. (Curculionidae. The plant species used were: basil (Ocimum selloi Benth., rue (Ruta graveolens L., lion's ear (Leonotis nepetifolia (L. R.Br., jimson weed (Datura stramonium L., baleeira herb (Cordia verbenacea L., mint (Mentha piperita L., wild balsam apple (Mormodica charantia L., and billy goat weed or mentrasto (Ageratum conyzoides L.. The insecticide activity of hexane and ethanol extracts from those plants on R. dominica was evaluated. Among them, only hexane extract of A. conyzoides showed insecticide activity; the hexane extract of this species was successively fractionated by silica gel column chromatography, for isolation and purification of the active compounds. Compounds 5,6,7,8,3',4',5'-heptamethoxyflavone; 5,6,7,8,3'-pentamethoxy-4',5'-methilenedioxyflavone and coumarin were identified. However, only coumarin showed insecticide activity against three insect pests (LD50 from 2.72 to 39.71 mg g-1 a.i.. The increasing order of insects susceptibility to coumarin was R. dominica, S. zeamais and O. surinamensis.O objetivo deste trabalho foi selecionar plantas com atividade inseticida, para isolar, identificar e avaliar a bioatividade de compostos inseticidas presentes nessas plantas, contra as seguintes pragas de produtos armazenados da ordem Coleoptera: Sitophilus zeamais Mots. (Curculionidae, Rhyzopertha dominica F. (Bostrichidae e Oryzaephilus surinamensis L. (Silvanidae. As espécies de plantas usadas foram: anis (Ocimum selloi Benth, arruda (Ruta graveolens L., cordão-de-frade (Leonotis nepetifolia L., datura (Datura stramonium L., erva baleeira (Cordia verbenacea L., hortelã (Mentha piperita L., mel

  11. Efficacy of deltamethrin against stored-product beetles at short exposure intervals or on a partially-treated rice mass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stored product insects can potentially be exposed to grain protectants for variable time periods. Adults of six species, the lesser grain borer, Rhyzopertha dominica (F.) (Coleoptera: Bostrychidae), the granary weevil Sitophilus granarius (L.) (Coleoptera: Curculionidae), and the red flour beetle, ...

  12. The evolution of asymmetric genitalia in Coleoptera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schilthuizen, Menno; de Jong, Paulien; van Beek, Rick; Hoogenboom, Tamara; Schlochtern, Melanie Meijer Zu

    2016-12-19

    The evolution of asymmetry in male genitalia is a pervasive and recurrent phenomenon across almost the entire animal kingdom. Although in some taxa the asymmetry may be a response to the evolution of one-sided, male-above copulation from a more ancestral female-above condition, in other taxa, such as Mammalia and Coleoptera, this explanation appears insufficient. We carried out an informal assessment of genital asymmetry across the Coleoptera and found that male genital asymmetry is present in 43% of all beetle families, and at all within-family taxonomic levels. In the most diverse group, Cucujiformia, however, genital asymmetry is comparatively rare. We also reconstructed the phylogeny of the leiodid tribe Cholevini, and mapped aspects of genital asymmetry on the tree, revealing that endophallus sclerites, endophallus, median lobe and parameres are, in a nested fashion, increasingly unlikely to have evolved asymmetry. We interpret these results in the light of cryptic female choice versus sexually antagonistic coevolution and advocate further ways in which the phenomenon may be better understood.This article is part of the themed issue 'Provocative questions in left-right asymmetry'. © 2016 The Authors.

  13. Control Sitophilus zeamais (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) in Maize (Zea mays L.) treated with diatomaceous eart Coltrol de Sitophilus zeamais (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) en maíz (Zea mays L.) tratados con tierra de diatomeas Controle de Sitophilus zeamais (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) em milho (Zea mays L.) tratado com terra de diatomácea

    OpenAIRE

    Juliana Neitzke; Ivan Carlos Riedo; Nádia C. de Oliveira

    2010-01-01

    Maize (Zea mays L.) is one of the most important cereals grown worldwide. As the product is sold fresh, the major concern is to maintain the quality of the grain, but its storage is difficult due to wide range of pests that can attack, reducing the quality. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of diatomaceous earth in the mortality of maize weevil Sitophilus zeamais in maize grains stored in different dosages and check the exposu...

  14. Studies on the dispersal of Sphenophorus levis vaurie, 1978 (Col. curculionidae) adults in sugar cane by the use of radioactive tracer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Precetti, A.A.C.M.; Teran, F.O.; Wiendl, F.M.; Sgrillo, R.B.

    1983-01-01

    Studies are carried out on the dispersal of Sphenophorus levis vaurie, 1978 (Col, Curculionidae) using phosphorus 32 as radioactive tracer. The natural population of insects and the medium dispersal are estimated. After the conclusions, some recommendations are given concerning manners to prevent the pest dissemination. (M.A.) [pt

  15. Fauna de Coleoptera no Parque Estadual de Vila Velha, Ponta Grossa, Paraná, Brasil: abundância e riqueza das famílias capturadas através de armadilhas de solo Coleoptera fauna in the Parque Estadual de Vila Velha, Ponta Grossa, Paraná, Brazil: abundance and family richness captured with pitfall traps

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renato C. Marinoni

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper is a part of the studies on the Coleoptera fauna from Vila Velha, Ponta Grossa, Parana gathered through malaise and pitfall traps in sites with different floristic conditions. The present study deal with the data of pitfall trap captures, installed close to the malaise traps. The data were obtained weekly (52 samples, from September 1999 to August 2000. This survey was carried out on five areas, three of them with different plant succession stages (initial, intermediate, and advanced. The other two sites were: in Araucaria angustifolia plantation area, with the understory invaded by native forest vegetation and in the edge area. In the last one, two pitfall traps were installed, one inside the forest and other in the field vegetation. The Coleoptera communities were analyzed according the abundance, family richness, and the floristic conditions of the sites. The total of specimens collected was 13,093 belonging to 35 families. The most abundant site was the one in initial stage of succession; the abundance was lowest in the edge area. The beetle faunal composition of the five sites, including all the families, were not significantly different. However, when listed only the seven dominant families, the results showed the outside edge fauna composition significantly different from the other sites. Among the most abundant families in the Vila Velha litter are Staphylinidae, Ptiliidae, Nitidulidae, Scarabaeidae, Scolytidae, Hydrophilidae and Endomychidae, eventually substituted by Latridiidae, Corylophidae, Curculionidae, Carabidae and Histeridae. Several comparisons were made with the data from malaise and pitfall traps data obtained in Vila Velha, and from other studies in several world regions. From these comparisons was possible to highlight: the beetle family richness is higher when captured by malaise than pitfall trap; the family taxonomic compositions in the litter from several regions of the world are more similar among

  16. Effects of gamma irradiation on the emergence of larvae of curculio sikkimensis (Heller) (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) and Cydia kurokoi (Amsel) (Lepidoptera: Tortricidae)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Imamura, Taro; Todoriki, Setsuko; Miyanoshita, Akihiro; Hayashi, Toru

    2004-01-01

    The effects of gamma irradiation on the emergence of larvae of the chestnut weevil, Curculio sikkimensis (Heller), were investigated. One hundred chestnuts were irradiated in a 60 Co irradiator (Gammacell 220, Nordion, Canada) at a dose rate of 0.40 kGy/h. The doses at which irradiation was carried out were 50, 100, 200, 300, 400, 500 and 1000 Gy. After treatment, the chestnuts were kept at 25degC, 70% RH and emerged larvae were counted daily. Larvae of the nut fruit moth, Cydia kurokoi (Amsel), also emerged from the chestnuts. The data on the chestnut weevil were subjected to probit analysis and the LD 99.9 of weevil larvae was estimated to be about 500 Gy. (author)

  17. Microwave radiation effects on the different stages of Sitophilus oryzae (Linne, 1763) (Coleoptera, Curculionidae) evolutive cycle in rice, focusing its control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Franco, Jose G.; Franco, Suely S.H.; Franco, Caio H.; Arthur, Paula B.; Arthur, Valter

    2013-01-01

    As insects increase in radio tolerance as they develop and usually several developmental stages of pest may present in grain shipped commodity, it is important to know the microwave radiation susceptibility of stages of the target insect before the establishment of microwave radiation quarantine treatments. The current research had the aim to evaluate the microwave radiation effects on several phases of the rice weevil evolution cycle (S.oryzae), focusing its control. This specie is considered as on of the most serious worldwide pests for stored grains. The tests have been done in glass vials with 250 grams of whole grain (brown) rice and the irradiation was done in a 2,450 MHz commercial microwave oven, model Carousel II (potency of 800W). It was determined the exposure time needed to each phase control for the insect evolutive cycle, concluding that the immature phases (larvae and pupae), contained inside the rice, are more sensitive, requiring only 100 seconds to obtain 100% control while the egg phase requires a longer exposure (130 seconds). Referring to the grown phase, the time required to attain the lethal dose was 160 seconds. All the exposure time have been irradiated with a low potency (240 W). It also displayed that to greater quantities of rice (1.0 kg), with egg presence and forming a 2.0-centimeter layer on the microwave plate surface, it required an exposure time of 180 seconds. Therefore, in a more effective way, we can recommend these 180 seconds exposure time to the control of all phases concerning the insect evolutive cycle. (author)

  18. Correlation between the infestation level of Sitophilus zeamais Motschulsky, 1855 (Coleoptera, Curculionidae and the quality factors of stored corn, Zea mays L. (Poaceae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Aparecida Braga Caneppele

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available This experiment was carried out in order to evaluate the effect of Sitophilus zeamais on physical, physiological and sanitary quality of stored corn. Samples of 500 g of the hybrid OC-705, in three replicates, were conditioned in glasses covered with a screened lid, and kept in chamber at 25±2ºC, 70±5% RH and 12 h of photophase, for 150 days. The infestation levels were 0, 5, 15 and 50 adults/replicate, for the storage periods of 30, 60, 90, 120 and 150 days. The moisture content, classification, weight loss, germination and internal infestation were evaluated monthly. Significant inverse correlations were verified between the number of insects and both the germination and the weight loss; also between the internal infestation and the germination and the standard type. The presence of S. zeamais showed a positive correlation with the weight loss, what means that the internal and external infestations contribute to the reduction of physiological and physical quality of corn seeds. The mean dry matter loss was 0,36%/day, corresponding to a consumption of 0,0001%/insect/month. As the result of those damages, the product suffered reduction of the commercial grade in 30 days, with significant loss in all quality factors.

  19. Influence of trap distance from a source population and multiple traps on captures and attack densities of the redbay ambrosia beetle (Coleoptera: Curculionidae: Scolytinae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    James L. Hanula; Albert (Bud) Mayfield; Laurie S. Reid; Scott Horn

    2016-01-01

    The redbay ambrosia beetle, Xyleborus glabratus Eichhoff, is the principal vector of laurel wilt disease in North America. Lures incorporating essential oils of manuka plants (Leptospermum scoparium J. R. Forster & G. Forster) or cubeb seeds (Piper cubeba L.f.) are the most effective in-flight...

  20. 3-Methylcyclohex-2-en-1-one for area and individual tree protection against spruce beetle (Coleoptera: Curculionidae: Scolytinae) attack in the southern Rocky Mountains

    Science.gov (United States)

    E. Matthew Hansen; A. Steven Munson; Darren C. Blackford; Andrew D. Graves; Tom W. Coleman; L. Scott. Baggett

    2017-01-01

    We tested 3-methylcyclohex-2-en-1-one (MCH) and an Acer kairomone blend (AKB) as repellent semiochemicals for area and single tree protection to prevent spruce beetle (Dendroctonus rufipennis Kirby) attacks at locations in Utah and New Mexico. In the area protection study, we compared host infestation rates of MCH applications at three densities (20, 40, and 80 g MCH...

  1. Alternative food sources and over wintering feeding behavior of the boll weevil, Anthonomus grandis boheman (coleoptera: curculionidae) under the tropical conditions of central Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ribeiro, Paulina de A.; Sujii, Edison R.; Pires, Carmen S.S.; Fontes, Eliana M.G.; Diniz, Ivone R.; Salgado-Labouriau, Maria L.

    2010-01-01

    The boll weevil causes serious damage to the cotton crop in South America. Several studies have been published on this pest, but its phenology and behavior under the tropical conditions prevailing in Brazil are not well-known. In this study the feeding behavior and main food sources of adult boll weevils throughout the year in Central Brazil was investigated. The digestive tract contents of insects captured in pheromone traps in two cotton fields and two areas of native vegetation (gallery forest and cerrado sensu stricto) were analyzed. The insect was captured all through the year only in the cerrado. It fed on pollen of 19 different plant families, on Pteridophyta and fungi spores and algae cysts. Simpson Index test showed that the cerrado provided greater diversity of pollen sources. In the beginning of the cotton cycle, the plant families used for pollen feeding were varied: in cotton area 1, the weevil fed on Poaceae (50%), Malvaceae and Smilacaceae (25% each); in cotton area 2 the pollen sources were Malvaceae (50%), Asteraceae (25%) and Fabaceae and Clusiaceae (25% each); in the cerrado they were Chenopodiaceae (67%) and Scheuchzeriaceae (33%). No weevils were collected in the gallery forest in this period. After cotton was harvested, the family Smilacaceae was predominant among the food plants exploited in all the study areas. These results help to explain the survivorship of adult boll weevil during cotton fallow season in Central Brazil and they are discussed in the context of behavioral adaptations to the prevailing tropical environmental conditions. (author)

  2. Systemic Insecticides Reduce Feeding, Survival and Fecundity of Adult Black Vine Weevils (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) on a Variety of Ornamental Nursery Crops

    Science.gov (United States)

    A series of bioassays were conducted to test the systemic activity of clothianidin, chlorantraniliprole, dinotefuran, and thiamethoxam against adult black vine weevils (Otiorhynchus sulcatus F.) on Taxus, Heuchera, Astilbe, Sedum, Euonymus, and Rhododendron grown in containers. The insecticides wer...

  3. Responses of the cabbage seedpod weevil, Ceutorhynchus obstrictus (Marsham) (Coleoptera: Curculionidae), to seed treatments of canola (Brassica napus L.) with the neonicotinoid compounds clothianidin and imidacloprid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dosdall, Lloyd M

    2009-12-01

    The cabbage seedpod weevil, Ceutorhynchus obstrictus (Marsham), is a major pest in the production of canola (Brassica napus L.) in North America and Europe, and effective population control is often essential for economical crop production. In North America, neonicotinoid insecticides have been used for several years in canola as seed treatments for reducing herbivory by flea beetles. The neonicotinoids clothianidin and imidacloprid were investigated to determine their effects on preimaginal development and on emergence of new-generation adults of C. obstrictus in comparison with effects of lindane, a chlorinated hydrocarbon seed treatment. Mean numbers of second- and third-instar larvae were significantly higher in plants seed-treated with lindane than in plants treated with the neonicotinoid compounds, even though weevil oviposition was similar for all treatments. Emergence of new-generation adults was reduced by 52 and 39% for plants seed-treated with clothianidin and imidacloprid, respectively, compared with emergence from plants treated with lindane. Seed treatment with both clothianidin and imidacloprid produced systemic insecticidal effects on larvae of C. obstrictus, with clothianidin slightly more effective than imidacloprid. Use of clothianidin or imidacloprid as seed treatments can comprise an important component in the integrated management of cabbage seedpod weevil in canola. (c) 2009 Society of Chemical Industry.

  4. Contributions by Host Trees and Insect Activity to Bacterial Communities in Dendroctonus valens (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) Galleries, and Their High Overlap With Other Microbial Assemblages of Bark Beetles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mason, Charles J; Hanshew, Alissa S; Raffa, Kenneth F

    2016-04-01

    Bark beetles are associated with a diversity of symbiotic microbiota that can mediate interactions with their host plants. Dendroctonus valens LeConte is a widely distributed bark beetle in North and Central America, and initiates solitary attacks on several species of Pinus in the Great Lakes region. In this study, we aimed to further characterize the bacterial community associated with D. valens feeding galleries using next-generation sequencing, and the possible contributions of both tree-resident and insect-associated bacteria to these consortia. We found that D. valens galleries harbor a diversity of microbial associates. Many of these associates were classified into a few taxonomic groups, of which Gammaproteobacteria were the most abundant class. Of the Gammaproteobacteria detected, many formed clades with 16S-rRNA sequences of bacteria previously associated with D. valens Many of the bacteria sequences detected in the galleries were similar to bacteria that function in detoxification, kairomone metabolism, and nitrogen fixation and cycling. The abundance of bacteria in galleries were 7× and 44× higher than in the surrounding uninfested tissues, and that were not attacked by D. valens, respectively. This suggests that the bacteria present in beetle galleries are largely introduced by D. valens and proliferate in this environment. © The Authors 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Entomological Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  5. Species composition, seasonal activity, and semiochemical response of native and exotic bark and ambrosia beetles (Coleoptera: Curculionidae: Scolytinae) in northeastern Ohio.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gandhi, Kamal J K; Cognato, Anthony I; Lightle, Danielle M; Mosley, Bryson J; Nielsen, David G; Herms, Daniel A

    2010-08-01

    In 2007, we surveyed the alien and endemic scolytine (bark and ambrosia beetles) fauna of northeastern Ohio, and for the most abundant species, we characterized their seasonal activity and response to three semiochemical baits. In total ,5,339 scolytine beetles represented by 47 species and 29 genera were caught in Lindgren funnel traps. Three species constituted 57% of the total catch, including Xylosandrus germanus (Blandford), Tomicus piniperda (L.), and Dryocoetes autographus (Ratzeburg). Of the total captured, 32% of the species and approximately 60% of the individuals were exotic, suggesting that exotic species numerically dominate the scolytine fauna in some urban areas. More native and exotic species were caught in traps baited with ethanol alone than in traps baited with other lures. However, significantly more individuals, especially of T. piniperda, D. autographus, Gnathotrichus materiarius (Fitch), and Ips grandicollis (Eichhoff), and species were caught in traps baited with ethanol plus alpha-pinene than in traps baited with ethanol alone or the exotic Ips lure. This suggests that among these baits, the ethanol plus alpha-pinene baits may be useful in maximizing scolytine beetle catches of these species within this region. Species diversity and richness for both native and exotic beetles was greatest in traps baited with ethanol alone. The period of peak trap capture varied depending upon species: X. germanus was most abundant in traps in mid-May and early-August; T. piniperda in mid-May; D. autographus in early June, mid-July, and mid-September; Anisandrus sayi Hopkins and G. materiarius in mid-May, mid-July, and early September; and I. grandicollis in early April, mid-July, and late September.

  6. Reproduction abilities of Ips typographus (L. (Coleoptera: Curculionidae, Scolytinae in the stands damaged by the wind in 2013 in the Kościeliska Valley (Tatra National Park

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grodzki Wojciech

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available At the end of 2013, strong wind destroyed spruce stands on large areas of Kościeliska Valley in Tatra Mts. in Poland. In 2015–2017, 304 bark samples were collected from 106 spruces; 25 cm × 25 cm large samples were taken from 2 or 4 sections of infested trees in July/August each year. The infestation density, sex ratio, length of maternal galleries, number of progeny and impact of natural enemies were recorded. The infestation density in individual years was 0.79–0.86 mating chambers per dm2, the average length of maternal gallery (55.2–56.6 mm did not differ between years, The average number of progeny per female from 3-year pooled data was 18.22, the highest in 2015 (27.4 then collapsed to 15.5–16.8. The gallery systems with 2 females, in which the reproduction success was the highest, dominated (62.6%. The frequency of parasitoids or entomopathogens was very low (2–20% mortality rate in 19 bark samples. Possible reasons of relatively low reproduction success regardless generally favourable breeding conditions and its collapse after first year, such as high infestation density and low survival rate of larvae because of climatic conditions (drought, are discussed. Taking into account the described population features, very intense tree mortality and mechanisms known from the other wind events, further development of the outbreak can be expected in this area.

  7. Colonization of Artificially Stressed Black Walnut Trees by Ambrosia Beetle, Bark Beetle, and Other Weevil Species (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) in Indiana and Missouri.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reed, Sharon E; Juzwik, Jennifer; English, James T; Ginzel, Matthew D

    2015-12-01

    Thousand cankers disease (TCD) is a new disease of black walnut (Juglans nigra L.) in the eastern United States. The disease is caused by the interaction of the aggressive bark beetle Pityophthorus juglandis Blackman and the canker-forming fungus, Geosmithia morbida M. Kolarik, E. Freeland, C. Utley & Tisserat, carried by the beetle. Other insects also colonize TCD-symptomatic trees and may also carry pathogens. A trap tree survey was conducted in Indiana and Missouri to characterize the assemblage of ambrosia beetles, bark beetles, and other weevils attracted to the main stems and crowns of stressed black walnut. More than 100 trees were girdled and treated with glyphosate (Riverdale Razor Pro, Burr Ridge, Illinois) at 27 locations. Nearly 17,000 insects were collected from logs harvested from girdled walnut trees. These insects represented 15 ambrosia beetle, four bark beetle, and seven other weevil species. The most abundant species included Xyleborinus saxeseni Ratzburg, Xylosandrus crassiusculus Motschulsky, Xylosandrus germanus Blandford, Xyleborus affinis Eichhoff, and Stenomimus pallidus Boheman. These species differed in their association with the stems or crowns of stressed trees. Multiple species of insects were collected from individual trees and likely colonized tissues near each other. At least three of the abundant species found (S. pallidus, X. crassiusculus, and X. germanus) are known to carry propagules of canker-causing fungi of black walnut. In summary, a large number of ambrosia beetles, bark beetles, and other weevils are attracted to stressed walnut trees in Indiana and Missouri. Several of these species have the potential to introduce walnut canker pathogens during colonization. © The Authors 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Entomological Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  8. The flight periodicity, attack patterns, and life history of Dryocoetes confusus Swaine (Coleoptera: Curculionida: Scolytinae), the western balsam bark beetle, in north central Colorado

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jose F. Negron; John B. Popp

    2009-01-01

    Dryocoetes confusus Swaine, the western balsam bark beetle, is an important bark beetle associated with Abies lasiocarpa (Hook.) Nutt. (subalpine fir) in western North America. Little information is available on the life cycle and ecology of this insect in Colorado. In this study in north central Colorado, we examined its...

  9. Study on the Tribe Ochyromerini (Coleoptera, Curculionidae) from East Asia I, Descriptions of New Species of the Genera Endaeus and Endaenidius

    OpenAIRE

    Kojima, Hiroaki; Morimoto, Katsura

    1995-01-01

    This is the first part of our systematic study on the tribe Ochyromerini (=Endaeini) from East Asia with descriptions of 28 new species of the weevils in the genera Endaeus Schoenherr and Endaenidius Morimoto as follows: Endaeus albolineatus sp. nov. (E. Malaysia), Endaeus niger sp. nov. (E. Malaysia), Endaeus zonatus sp. nov. (E. Malaysia), Endaeus robustus sp. nov. (Thailand), Endaeus longipes sp. nov. (E. Malaysia), Endaeus formosanus sp. nov. (Taiwan), Endaeus elongatus sp. nov. (Taiwan),...

  10. Xyleborus glabratus, X. affinis, and X. ferrugineus (Coleoptera: Curculionidae: Scolytinae): electroantennogram responses to host-based attractants and temporal patterns in host-seeking flight.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kendra, Paul E; Montgomery, Wayne S; Niogret, Jerome; Deyrup, Mark A; Guillén, Larissa; Epsky, Nancy D

    2012-12-01

    The redbay ambrosia beetle, Xyleborus glabratus Eichhoff, is an exotic wood-boring insect that vectors the mycopathogen responsible for laurel wilt, a lethal vascular disease of trees in the Lauraceae, including avocado (Persea americana Mill.). Effective semiochemical-based detection and control programs for X. glabratus will require an understanding of the chemical ecology and host-seeking behaviors of this new invasive pest. This study 1) presents an electroantennography (EAG) method developed for assessment of olfactory responses in ambrosia beetles; 2) uses that new method to quantify EAG responses of X. glabratus, X. affinis, and X. ferrugineus to volatiles from three host-based attractants: manuka oil (essential oil extract from Leptospermum scoparium Forst. & Forst.), phoebe oil (extract from Phoebe porosa Mex.), and wood from silkbay (Persea humilis Nash); and 3) documents temporal differences in host-seeking flight of the sympatric Xyleborus species. Field observations revealed that X. glabratus engages in flight several hours earlier than X. affinis and X. ferrugineus, providing a window for selective capture of the target pest species. In EAG analyses with X. glabratus, antennal response to phoebe oil was equivalent to response to host Persea wood, but EAG response elicited with manuka oil was significantly less. In comparative studies, EAG response of X. glabratus was significantly higher than response of either X. affinis or X. ferrugineus to all three host-based substrates. Future research will use this EAG method to measure olfactory responses to synthetic terpenoids, facilitating identification of the specific kairomones used by X. glabratus for host location.

  11. Temporal analysis of sesquiterpene emissions from manuka and phoebe oil lures and efficacy for attraction of Xyleborus glabratus (Coleoptera: Curculionidae: Scolytinae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kendra, Paul E; Niogret, Jerome; Montgomery, Wayne S; Sanchez, Jorge S; Deyrup, Mark A; Pruett, Grechen E; Ploetz, Randy C; Epsky, Nancy D; Heath, Robert R

    2012-04-01

    Redbay ambrosia beetle, Xyleborus glabratus Eichhoff, is an exotic wood-borer that vectors the fungal agent (Raffaelea lauricola) responsible for laurel wilt. Laurel wilt has had severe impact on forest ecosystems in the southeastern United States, killing a large proportion of native Persea trees, particularly redbay (P. borbonia) and swampbay (P. palustris), and currently poses an economic threat to avocado (P. americana) in Florida. To control the spread of this lethal disease, effective attractants are needed for early detection of the vector. Two 12-wk field tests were conducted in Florida to evaluate efficacy and longevity of manuka and phoebe oil lures, and to relate captures of X. glabratus to release rates of putative sesquiterpene attractants. Two trap types were also evaluated, Lindgren funnel traps and sticky panel traps. To document lure emissions over time, a separate set of lures was aged outdoors for 12 wk and sampled periodically to quantify volatile sesquiterpenes using super-Q adsorbant and gas chromatography-mass spectroscopy analysis. Phoebe lures captured significantly more X. glabratus than manuka lures, and sticky traps captured more beetles than funnel traps. Phoebe lures captured X. glabratus for 10-12 wk, but field life of manuka lures was 2-3 wk. Emissions of alpha-copaene, alpha-humulene, and cadinene were consistently higher from phoebe lures, particularly during the 2-3 wk window when manuka lures lost efficacy, suggesting that these sesquiterpenes are primary kairomones used by host-seeking females. Results indicate that the current monitoring system is suboptimal for early detection of X. glabratus because of rapid depletion of sesquiterpenes from manuka lures.

  12. Effect of tree species and end seal on attractiveness and utility of cut bolts to the redbay ambrosia beetle and granulate ambrosia beetle (coleoptera: Curculionidae: Scolytinae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayfield, A E; Hanula, J L

    2012-04-01

    The redbay ambrosia beetle, Xyleborus glabratus Eichhoff, is a non-native invasive pest and vector of the fungus that causes laurel wilt disease in certain trees of the family Lauraceae. This study assessed the relative attractiveness and suitability of cut bolts of several tree species to X. glabratus. In 2009, female X. glabratus were equally attracted to traps baited with swampbay (Persea palustris (Rafinesque) Sargent) and camphortree (Cinnamomum camphora (L.) J. Presl), which were more attractive than avocado (Persea americana Miller), lancewood (Ocotea coriacea (Swartz) Britton), and sweetbay (Magnolia virginiana L.). These species were more attractive than loblolly bay (Gordonia lasianthus (L.) J. Ellis). X. glabratus entrance hole density and emergence from caged bolts were highest on swampbay and camphortree. In 2010, swampbay was significantly more attractive to X. glabratus than sassafras (Sassafras albidum (Nuttall) Nees), yellow poplar (Liriodendron tulipifera L.), and eastern redbud (Cercis canadensis L.). Sassafras bolts end sealed with a liquid wax-and-water emulsion were more attractive to X. glabratus than end-sealed bolts of yellow poplar and redbud. Relative to unsealed bolts, end seal decreased X. glabratus entrance hole density on swampbay and decreased granulate ambrosia beetle (Xylosandrus crassiusculus (Motschulsky)) trap catch, entrance hole density, and adult emergence from swampbay. X. crassiusculus was not attracted to sassafras, yellow poplar, and redbud and was not more attracted to manuka oil than to unbaited traps. Sassafras was more attractive to X. glabratus than previously reported and supported reproducing populations of the insect. End sealing bolts with a wax-and-water emulsion may not be optimal for attracting and rearing ambrosia beetles in small logs.

  13. ESTRUTURA DA ASSEMBLEIA DE SCOLYTINAE (COLEOPTERA: CURCULIONIDAE EM ÁREAS FLORESTADAS COM Eucalyptus spp. NO SUL DO RIO GRANDE DO SUL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jutiane Wollmann

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to contribute to the knowledge of the assembly of Scolytinae beetles associated with Eucalyptus plantations in southern Rio Grande do Sul state, Brazil, and determine species of importance to the culture. Biweekly samples were taken from five Fibria Celulose S/A farms forested with Eucalyptus spp., from February 2006 to December 2010, with flight intercept traps baited with 95% ethanol. We collected 7,365 specimens within 76 species, 18 genera, and seven tribes. Corthylini, represented by the genera Corthylus , Monarthum , Amphicranus , Metacorthylus , Microcorthylus and Tricolus , and Xyleborini, by Ambrosiodmus , Dryocoetoides , Xyleborinus , Xyleborus and Xylosandrus , were the most representative tribes, with 42.1% and 31.6% species, respectively. Xylosandrus retusus (Eichhoff and Xyleborinus saxeseni (Ratzeburg were the most abundant species, with 52.64% and 27.98% of all specimens sampled, followed by Corthylus antennarius Schedl with 4.15% beetles collected. Fifteen species were common to all sites, including Xyleborus ferrugineus (Fabricius, considered a potential pest to the culture, while 25 species were found exclusively in only one site. The farm Cerro Alegre had the highest species richness and larger number of exclusive species; São Manoel farm presented the highest diversity index and equitability; Aroeira farm had the highest frequency of Scolytinae and São Francisco farm showed the greatest abundance and dominance. The study of Scolytinae assemblages showed the predominance of Xylosandrus retusus and Xyleborinus saxeseni in all studied environmentals.

  14. Survival and development of a stored-product pest, Sitophilus zeamais (Coleoptera: Curculionidae), and its natural enemy, the parasitoid Lariophagus distinguendus (Hymenoptera. Pteromalidae), on transgenic Bt maize

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Lise S.; Lövei, Gabor L; Székács, András

    2013-01-01

    -product pests and their biological control. Results Weevils were not harmfully affected by transgenic Bt maize in their development characteristics (development time, body mass), and females emerging from transgenic maize kernels were larger. However, significantly fewer parasitoid females emerged from weevils......Background The effect of transgenic maize (Zea mays L.) containing a lepidopteran-specific Bt toxin on a stored-product pest, Sitophilus zeamais Motschulsky, and its parasitoid, Lariophagus distinguendus Förster, was examined in the laboratory to test the impact of transgenic maize on stored...

  15. Two new species of Otiorhynchus Germar, 1822 (Coleoptera: Curculionidae: Entiminae from eastern Turkey with new taxonomical contributions to the subgenus Choilisanus Reitter, 1912

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Genrik E. Davidian

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Two new species Otiorhynchus karadeniz Davidian & Gültekin sp. nov. and Otiorhynchus aziziyensis Davidian & Gültekin sp. nov. are described from eastern Turkey. Otiorhynchus karadeniz Davidian & Gültekin sp. nov. closely related to Otiorhynchus (Choilisanus megareoides Smreczyński, 1977. Otiorhynchus aziziyensis Davidian & Gültekin sp. nov. is tentatively included in the subgenus Choilisanus Reitter, 1912. Stierlinellus Reitter, 1913 is resurrected from synonym of Choilisanus Reitter, 1912. Otiorhynchus megareus Reitter, 1913 and Otiorhynchus rotundicollis Stierlin, 1876 are redescribed. Colour illustrations of habitus and important morphological characters are presented.

  16. Molecular, morphological and pathogenic characterization of six strains of Metarhizium spp. (Deuteromycotina: Hyphomycetes for the control of Aegorhinus superciliosus (Coleoptera: Curculionidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Sepúlveda

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Aegorhinus superciliosus is an important pest on blueberry (Vaccinium corymbosum L. and other fruit trees. The use of entomopathogenic fungi as Metarhizium spp. has been evaluated for the control of this insect, but variability has been observed among different strains. The aim of this study was to characterize six promising strains of Metarhizium spp. for the control of A. superciliosus. The studied strains were QuM173c, Qu-M363, Qu-M171a, Qu-M156a, Qu-M421, and Qu-M430, all of which belonged to the Chilean Collection of Microbial Genetic Resources (ChCMGR of the Institute de Investigaciones Agropecuarias (INIA, Chile. Molecular characterization was made by sequencing the ITS region (Internal Transcribed Spacers, ITS-5.8S rDNA. The morphology of conidia was evaluated through scanning electron microscopy and radial colony growth was evaluated in potato dextrose agar (PDA, Sabouraud dextrose agar (SDA, agar enriched with larvae of Galleria mellonella (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae (GA, and agar enriched with adults of A. superciliosus (AA. Pathogenicity was studied based on mortality of adults of A. superciliosus inoculated with conidia. Sequencing of the ITS-5.8S rDNA region indicates that the strains belong to the clade of M. anisopliae var. anisopliae, except for Qu-M171a, which was identified as M. anisopliae var. lepidiotum. Conidia average length for the six strains was 5.09 pm and average conidia width was 1.92 pm. Radial colony growth differences were observed between strains (p < 0.01 and between different growth media (p < 0.01. The strains exhibited the highest colony growth in the GA medium, while in the AA medium they showed the lowest (p < 0.01. Pathogenicity tests show that Qu-M430 reached a 90% mortality rate (p < 0.01. Results show that there is variability between the studied strains, which is expressed in their morphology, molecular characteristics and pathogenicity towards A. superciliosus.

  17. The resin composition of ponderosa pine (Pinus ponderosa) attacked by the roundheaded pine beetle (Dendroctonus adjunctus) (Coleoptera: Curculionidae, Scolytinae) (P-53)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melissa J. Fischer; Kristen M. Waring; Richard W. Hofstetter; Thomas E. Kolb

    2008-01-01

    Dendroctonus adjunctus is an aggressive bark beetle species that attacks several species of pine throughout its range from southern Utah and Colorado south to Guatemala. A current outbreak of D. adjunctus provided a unique opportunity to study the relationship between this beetle and pine resin chemistry in northern Arizona. We compared the resin composition of trees...

  18. The resistance of hazel (Corylus avellana L. to hazelnut weevil (Curculio nucum L., Coleoptera, Curculionidae. Part I. Evaluation of the resistance of several cultivars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zdzisław Piskornik

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available In the course of 5 year investigations (1981-1985 considerable differences were found in the resistance of 24 hazel cultivars to hazelnut weevil (Curculio nucum L.. The resistance was determined on the basis of the percentage of nuts damaged by larvae in the total yield. Six classes of resistance were established, from class I - very resistant cultivars, to class VI - very susceptible cultivars. In feeding experiments a positive correlation, significant at the 1% and 5% level was found between the frequency of beetle feeding on hazel fruitlets during the time of oviposition (July, and the class of resistance of cultivars; a negative correlation between these parameters was found in August, i.e. during hatching and development of larvae in the nuts. In July the beetles fed more readily and more frequently on nuts of susceptible cultivars, whereas they avoided them in August, i.e. in the period when larvae developed in many fruits of these cultivars.

  19. Influence of climatic conditions and elevation on the spatial distribution and abundance of Trypodendron ambrosia beetles (Coleoptera: Curculionidae: Scolytinae) in Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robin M. Reich; John E. Lundquist; Robert E. Acciavati

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this study was to model the influence of temperature and precipitation on the distribution and abundance of the ambrosia beetles in the genus Trypodendron. Although these beetles do not attack and kill healthy trees, their gallery holes and accompanying black and gray stain associated with symbiotic ambrosial fungi can cause significant economic losses...

  20. (1R,2S,6R)-Papayanal: a new male-specific volatile compound released by the guava weevil Conotrachelus psidii (Coleoptera: Curculionidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romero-Frías, Alicia; Murata, Yasuhiro; Simões Bento, José Maurício; Osorio, Coralia

    2016-05-01

    The guava weevil, Conotrachelus psidii is an aggressive pest of guava (Psidium guajava L.) that causes irreparable damages inside the fruit. The volatile compounds of male and female insects were separately collected by headspace solid-phase microextraction or with dynamic headspace collection on a polymer sorbent, and comparatively analyzed by GC-MS. (1R,2S,6R)-2-Hydroxymethyl-2,6-dimethyl-3-oxabicyclo[4.2.0]octane (papayanol), and (1R,2S,6R)-2,6-dimethyl-3-oxabicyclo[4.2.0]octane-2-carbaldehyde (papayanal) were identified (ratio of 9:1, respectively) as male-specific guava weevil volatiles. Papayanal structure was confirmed by comparison of spectroscopic (EIMS) and chromatographic (retention time) data with those of the synthetic pure compound. The behavioral response of the above-mentioned compounds was studied in a Y-tube olfactometer bioassay, and their role as aggregation pheromone candidate components was suggested in this species.

  1. Insectos descortezadores (coleoptera: curculionidae) y cambio clImático: problemática actual y perspectivas en los bosques templados

    OpenAIRE

    Ek del-Val; Cuauhtémoc Sáenz-Romero

    2017-01-01

    En los bosques templados están sucediendo modificaciones importantes debido al cambio climático; en latitudes polares va en aumento su área de distribución, mientras que en las tropicales se reduce por incremento en la temperatura y las sequías. Uno de los agentes bióticos reguladores de los bosques templados son los insectos descortezadores que ocasionan la mortalidad de ciertos árboles. Estos insectos han aumentado en número, favorecidos por el cambio climático y las consecuencias sobre los...

  2. Insectos descortezadores (coleoptera: curculionidae) y cambio clImático: problemática actual y perspectivas en los bosques templados

    OpenAIRE

    Ek del-Val; Cuauhtémoc Sáenz-Romero

    2017-01-01

    En los bosques templados están sucediendo modificaciones importantes debido al cambio climático; en latitudes polares va en aumento su área de distribución, mientras que en las tropicales se reduce por incremento en la temperatura y las sequías. Uno de los agentes bióticos reguladores de los bosques templados son los insectos descortezadores que ocasionan la mortalidad de ciertos árboles. Estos insectos han aumentado en número, favorecidos por el cambio climático y las consecuencias sobr...

  3. Cloning and characterization of a basic Cysteine-like protease (Cathespsin L1) expressed in the gut of larval Diaprepes abbreviatus L. (Coleoptera: Curculionidae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diaprepes abbreviatus is an important pest that causes extensive damage to citrus in the USA. Analysis of an expressed sequence tag (EST) library from the digestive tract of larvae and adult D. abbreviatus identified cathepsins as major putative digestive enzymes. One class, sharing amino acid seque...

  4. Ocorrência e danos de larvas de Heilipus rufipes Perty (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) em abacateiro (Persea americana Mill.) no Estado do Ceará

    OpenAIRE

    Lourenção, André L.; Soares, Nilberto B.; Rosado-Neto, Germano H.

    2003-01-01

    No início de 2001, em pomar comercial de abacateiro (Persea americana Mill.) situado no município de São Benedito, estado do Ceará, foi observada intensa infestação de larvas de Heilipus rufipes Perty, broqueando a base das árvores. O ataque se concentrava na região do colo, havendo também galerias na bifurcação de ramos mais baixos da copa e nas raízes mais superficiais. Nas árvores severamente atacadas, as raízes mais grossas, próximas à superfície do solo, exibiam galerias e extensas áreas...

  5. Effect of tree species and end seal on attractiveness and utility of cut bolts to the redbay Ambrosia beetle and granulate Ambrosia beetle (Coleoptera: Curculionidae: Scolytinae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albert E. Mayfield; James L. Hanula

    2012-01-01

    The redbay ambrosia beetle, Xyleborus glabratus Eichhoff, is a non-native invasive pest and vector of the fungus that causes laurel wilt disease in certain trees of the family Lauraceae. This study assessed the relative attractiveness and suitability of cut bolts of several tree species to X. glabratus. In 2009, female X. glabratus were equally attracted to traps...

  6. La morfología de Laparocerus undatus Wollaston, 1864 y consideraciones sobre la tribu Laparocerini Lacordaire, 1863 (Coleoptera, Curculionidae, Entiminae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Machado, A.

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available This morphological study of Laparocerus undatus Wollaston, 1864 covers the external and internal anatomy of the imago, including the alimentary canal, the central nervous system and the reproductive system. The anatomy of the larva and pupa, unknown in this genus, is also described. Laparocerus are Entimin weevils that bear some primitive characters, not frequent in the group. The justification of a tribe Laparocerini, not revised since it was established by Lacordaire in 1863, is considered. Similarities of adult and preimaginal characters with those of other genera and tribes are discussed, and genetic relationships are researched using partial sequences of the 16SrRNA gen obtained from GenBank for some twenty tribe representative species. Laparocerus has important singular characters or a combination of them and is clearly separate from the other Entiminae studied. It has possibly a basal phylogenetic position within the group. Some combined diagnostic characters for Laparocerini are proposed, in particular: presence of a dehiscent mandible process (or its scar, phanerognatus mouth parts, long scape, eyes and antennal scroba not dorsal, suture of ventrites 1-2 arcuate at middle, ventrite 2 as long as 3 and 4 together, femora unarmed, tibiae mucronate with open corbels, claws connate, and VIII sternite of male membranaceous bearing a short spiculum relictum; in the larvae, antennae are cushion shaped with an oval base and the mala has five ventral setae; the pupa lacks mandibular setae. These and other characters are used to evaluate the other genera traditionally assigned to Laparocerini. Recent exclusion of some of these genera by other authors is corroborated and the removal of Merimnetes, Neomerimnetes and Cyrtozemia is here proposed. Asmaratrox and Straticus from Africa remain as Laparocerini, pending confirmation. Finally, the convenience of splitting Laparocerus into several genera or keeping it as a single genus with many subgenera is discussed in a biogeographical context.Se presenta un estudio morfológico de Laparocerus undatus Wollaston, 1864 que comprende la anatomía externa e interna del adulto, incluido el canal alimentario, sistema nervioso central y sistema reproductor. También se describen las anatomías de la larva y de la pupa, hasta ahora desconocidas en el género. Los Laparocerus son curculiónidos entiminos que muestran algunos caracteres primitivos infrecuentes en el grupo. Se plantea si se justifica o no mantener la tribu Laparocerini, pendiente de revisión desde que fuera establecida por Lacordaire en 1863. Se discuten las semejanzas halladas en los caracteres imaginales y preimaginales con otros géneros y tribus, y se buscan las relaciones genéticas más cercanas empleando secuencias parciales del gen 16SrRNA de una veintena de especies, obtenidas de GenBank. Laparocerus presenta importantes caracteres singulares o combinación de ellos, y se separa claramente de los demás Entiminae estudiados, ocupando una posición posiblemente basal dentro del grupo. Se proponen algunos caracteres diagnósticos para Laparocerini: presencia de mandíbulas con prolongación dehiscente (o su cicatriz, piezas bucales fanerognatas, escapo antenal largo, ojos y escrobas no dorsales, sutura entre el primer y segundo ventrito sinuosa al medio, éste tan largo como el tercero y cuarto reunidos; fémures sin dientes, tibias mucronadas con cestilla abierta, uñas soldadas y esternito VIII masculino completamente membranoso y provisto de un pequeño espículo relicto; en la larva coinciden las antenas de base oval con sensilo en forma de almohadilla y una mala con cinco setas en su cara ventral; la pupa carece de setas mandibulares. En función de estos y otros caracteres, se discuten los demás géneros atribuidos a Laparocerini, corroborando las exclusiones hechas por otros autores recientemente, y proponiendo la exclusión de Merimnetes, Neomerimnetes y Cyrtozemia. Quedan pendientes de confirmar si son Laparocerini dos géneros africanos: Asmaratrox y Straticus. Finalmente se discute en contexto biogeográfico la conveniencia de desglosar Laparocerus en una quincena de géneros independientes, o de mantenerlo unificado como un único género con varios subgéneros.

  7. Effect of chipping on emergence of the redbay ambrosia beetle (Coleoptera: Curculionidae: Scolytinae) and recovery of the laurel wilt pathogen from infested wood chips.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spence, D J; Smith, J A; Ploetz, R; Hulcr, J; Stelinski, L L

    2013-10-01

    Significant mortality ofredbay trees (Persea borbonia (L.) Spreng.) in the southeastern United States has been caused by Raffaelea lauricola, T.C. Harr., Fraedrich, & Aghayeva (Harrington et al. 2008), a fungal symbiont of the exotic redbay ambrosia beetle, Xyleborus glabratus, Eichhoff (Fraedrich et al. 2008). This pathogen causes laurel wilt, which is an irreversible disease that can kill mature trees within a few weeks in summer. R. lauricola has been shown to be lethal to most native species of Lauraceae and cultivated avocado (Persea americana Mill.) in the southeastern United States. In this study, we examined the survival of X. glabratus and R. lauricola in wood chips made from infested trees by using a standard tree chipper over a 10-wk period. After 2 wk, 14 X. glabratus were recovered from wood chips, whereas 339 X. glabratus emerged from nonchipped bolts. R. lauricola was not found 2 d postchipping from wood chips, indicating that the pathogen is not likely to survive for long inside wood chips. In contrast, R. lauricola persisted in dead, standing redbay trees for 14 mo. With large volumes of wood, the potential for infested logs to be moved between states or across U.S. borders is significant. Results demonstrated that chipping wood from laurel wilt-killed trees can significantly reduce the number of X. glabratus and limit the persistence of R. lauricola, which is important for sanitation strategies aimed at limiting the spread of this disease.

  8. Comparison of lodgepole and jack pine resin chemistry: implications for range expansion by the mountain pine beetle, Dendroctonus ponderosae (Coleoptera: Curculionidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erin L. Clark

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The mountain pine beetle, Dendroctonus ponderosae, is a significant pest of lodgepole pine in British Columbia (BC, where it has recently reached an unprecedented outbreak level. Although it is native to western North America, the beetle can now be viewed as a native invasive because for the first time in recorded history it has begun to reproduce in native jack pine stands within the North American boreal forest. The ability of jack pine trees to defend themselves against mass attack and their suitability for brood success will play a major role in the success of this insect in a putatively new geographic range and host. Lodgepole and jack pine were sampled along a transect extending from the beetle’s historic range (central BC to the newly invaded area east of the Rocky Mountains in north-central Alberta (AB in Canada for constitutive phloem resin terpene levels. In addition, two populations of lodgepole pine (BC and one population of jack pine (AB were sampled for levels of induced phloem terpenes. Phloem resin terpenes were identified and quantified using gas chromatography. Significant differences were found in constitutive levels of terpenes between the two species of pine. Constitutive α-pinene levels – a precursor in the biosynthesis of components of the aggregation and antiaggregation pheromones of mountain pine beetle – were significantly higher in jack pine. However, lower constitutive levels of compounds known to be toxic to bark beetles, e.g., 3-carene, in jack pine suggests that this species could be poorly defended. Differences in wounding-induced responses for phloem accumulation of five major terpenes were found between the two populations of lodgepole pine and between lodgepole and jack pine. The mountain pine beetle will face a different constitutive and induced phloem resin terpene environment when locating and colonizing jack pine in its new geographic range, and this may play a significant role in the ability of the insect to persist in this new host.

  9. Comparison of lodgepole and jack pine resin chemistry: implications for range expansion by the mountain pine beetle, Dendroctonus ponderosae (Coleoptera: Curculionidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Erin L; Pitt, Caitlin; Carroll, Allan L; Lindgren, B Staffan; Huber, Dezene P W

    2014-01-01

    The mountain pine beetle, Dendroctonus ponderosae, is a significant pest of lodgepole pine in British Columbia (BC), where it has recently reached an unprecedented outbreak level. Although it is native to western North America, the beetle can now be viewed as a native invasive because for the first time in recorded history it has begun to reproduce in native jack pine stands within the North American boreal forest. The ability of jack pine trees to defend themselves against mass attack and their suitability for brood success will play a major role in the success of this insect in a putatively new geographic range and host. Lodgepole and jack pine were sampled along a transect extending from the beetle's historic range (central BC) to the newly invaded area east of the Rocky Mountains in north-central Alberta (AB) in Canada for constitutive phloem resin terpene levels. In addition, two populations of lodgepole pine (BC) and one population of jack pine (AB) were sampled for levels of induced phloem terpenes. Phloem resin terpenes were identified and quantified using gas chromatography. Significant differences were found in constitutive levels of terpenes between the two species of pine. Constitutive α-pinene levels - a precursor in the biosynthesis of components of the aggregation and antiaggregation pheromones of mountain pine beetle - were significantly higher in jack pine. However, lower constitutive levels of compounds known to be toxic to bark beetles, e.g., 3-carene, in jack pine suggests that this species could be poorly defended. Differences in wounding-induced responses for phloem accumulation of five major terpenes were found between the two populations of lodgepole pine and between lodgepole and jack pine. The mountain pine beetle will face a different constitutive and induced phloem resin terpene environment when locating and colonizing jack pine in its new geographic range, and this may play a significant role in the ability of the insect to persist in this new host.

  10. Biocontrol Potential of Lariophagus distinguendus (Hymenoptera: Pteromalidae) Against Sitophilus granarius (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) at Low Temperatures: Reproduction and Parasitoid-Induced Mortality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Lise Stengård

    2007-01-01

    the potential of this parasitoid against S. granarius in temperate regions, where grain is cooled with ambient air to achieve safe storage conditions. The influence of constant temperatures of 16, 18, and 20°C on life table parameters and parasitoid-induced mortality (PIM) was investigated in the laboratory. L....... distinguendus is able to develop and reproduce at temperatures as low as 16°C. The intrinsic rate of natural increase, r m , was 0.0182, 0.0222, and 0.0792 d -1 at 16, 18, and 20°C, respectively. The proportion of hosts killed due to parasitoid-induced mortality was highest at 20°C. At this temperature......, it amounted to 70% of the total mortality exerted by the parasitoid; at 18 and 16°C, it was 57 and 42% of the total, respectively. L. distinguendus is a promising biocontrol agent for grain stores in temperate regions because it is able to develop and reproduce at temperatures down to 16°C; its development...

  11. Virulencia, producción y desplazamiento de nematodos entomopatógenos sobre larvas del picudo de la guayaba Conotrachelus psidii Marshall (Coleoptera: Curculionidae en laboratorio.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriana Sáenz Aponte

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The guava weevil Conotrach­elus psidii Marshall is a major pest affecting guava cultiva­tion in Santander, Colombia; it causes serious losses in the quality and the volume of fruit produced. Biological control is a viable option for pest management; entomo­pathogenic nematodes (EPNs, particularly, have shown good results (63-90% mortality in controlling fourth in­star larvae of the guava weevil. In this study we evaluated the effect of seven species of EPNs isolated in Colom­bia: Steinernema websteri JCL006, Steinernema sp. 1 JCL024, Steinernema sp. 2 JCL007, Steinernema sp. 3 JCL027, S. co­lombiense SNI0198, Heterorhabditis bacteriophora HNI0100 and Heterorhabditis sp. SL0708 on fourth instar larvae of the guava weevil in laboratory conditions, and measured the production and the displacement of the most viru­lent. Heterorhabditis sp. SL0708 induced mortality of 85%, Steinernema sp. 1 JCL024 75% and S. colombiense SNI0198 55%, the other species of EPNs, less than 25% mortality. Increased production of JI by weevil larva was recorded in Heterorhabditis sp. SL0708, which also showed greater recognition capability when the host was C. psidii.

  12. Alternative food sources and overwintering feeding behavior of the boll weevil, Anthonomus grandis boheman (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) under the tropical conditions of Central Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribeiro, Paulina de A; Sujii, Edison R; Diniz, Ivone R; Medeiros, Maria A de; Salgado-Labouriau, Maria L; Branco, Marina C; Pires, Carmen S S; Fontes, Eliana M G

    2010-01-01

    The boll weevil causes serious damage to the cotton crop in South America. Several studies have been published on this pest, but its phenology and behavior under the tropical conditions prevailing in Brazil are not well-known. In this study the feeding behavior and main food sources of adult boll weevils throughout the year in Central Brazil was investigated. The digestive tract contents of insects captured in pheromone traps in two cotton fields and two areas of native vegetation (gallery forest and cerrado sensu stricto) were analyzed. The insect was captured all through the year only in the cerrado. It fed on pollen of 19 different plant families, on Pteridophyta and fungi spores and algae cysts. Simpson Index test showed that the cerrado provided greater diversity of pollen sources. In the beginning of the cotton cycle, the plant families used for pollen feeding were varied: in cotton area 1, the weevil fed on Poaceae(50%), Malvaceae and Smilacaceae (25% each); in cotton area 2 the pollen sources were Malvaceae (50%), Asteraceae (25%) and Fabaceae and Clusiaceae (25% each); in the cerrado they were Chenopodiaceae (67%) and Scheuchzeriaceae (33%). No weevils were collected in the gallery forest in this period. After cotton was harvested, the family Smilacaceae was predominant among the food plants exploited in all the study areas. These results help to explain the survivorship of adult boll weevil during cotton fallow season in Central Brazil and they are discussed in the context of behavioral adaptations to the prevailing tropical environmental conditions.

  13. Susceptibility and possible resistance mechanisms in the palm species Phoenix dactylifera, Chamaerops humilis and Washingtonia filifera against Rhynchophorus ferrugineus (Olivier, 1790) (Coleoptera: Curculionidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cangelosi, B; Clematis, F; Curir, P; Monroy, F

    2016-06-01

    Rhynchophorus ferrugineus, known as the Red Palm Weevil (RPW), is reported as a pest of up to 40 palm species. However, the susceptibility degree and the defense mechanisms of these species against this weevil are still poorly known. In Europe, the RPW is a major pest of Phoenix canariensis while other palm species, including the congeneric Phoenix dactylifera, seem to be less suitable hosts for this insect. The aim of our study was to compare the defensive response of P. dactylifera, Chamaerops humilis and Washingtonia filifera against R. ferrugineus and try to define the mechanisms of resistance that characterize these species. Bioassays were carried out to evaluate the mortality induced on RPW larvae by extracts from the leaf rachis of the studied palm species. Tests at semi-field scale were also conducted, based either on forced palm infestation, with larvae of RPW, or on natural infestation, with adult females. Rachis extracts from C. humilis and W. filifera caused 100% larval mortality after 2 days of exposure, while extracts of P. dactylifera did not impair larval survival. Independently of the effect of the leaf extracts, the weevils were unable to naturally infest the three palm species, although larval survival was high after forced infestation of the plants. We concluded that the observed lack of infestation of P. dactylifera by RPW is due to factors other than antibiosis. In W. filifera and C. humilis, although the presence of antixenosis mechanisms cannot be excluded, resistance to R. ferrugineus seems to rely on the presence of antibiosis compounds.

  14. Evaluation of freshly prepared juice from garlic (Allium sativum L. as a biopesticide against the maize weevil, Sitophilus zeamais (Motsch. (Coleoptera: Curculionidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nwachukwu Ifeanyi Daniel

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Freshly prepared garlic (Allium sativum L. juice, containing the antimicrobial allicin, was evaluated as a possible grain pro-tectant against the maize weevil, Sitophilus zeamais (Motsch.. Each experiment was set out in Completely Randomized Design (CRD with four replications, and there was a control treatment. Adult mortality and weight loss percentage were investigated. There was an observed increase in adult mortality following days of exposure in all treatments. Statistically significant (p < 0.05 reduced grain loss was also observed in all the treatments when compared with the control. The juice samples were freshly prepared from an indigenous Nigerian garlic cultivar (GUN and a cultivar purchased from a supermarket in Germany (GAG. These garlic juice samples exhibited lethal effects causing at least 90% adult mortality in contact toxicity tests. The amount of allicin in GUN was 1.88 mg/ml according to High Pressure Liquids Chromatography (HPLC analysis, while the amount of allicin in GAG was 3.50 mg/ml. This study highlights the potential of A. sativum containing allicin for biorational control of maize grains against S. zeamais infestation and damage.

  15. Determination of behaviour of the corn weevil Sitophilus zeamais, Motschulsky, 1855 (Coleoptera, Curculionidae) in corn, rice and wheat grains by using radioactive tracer iodine-131

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pacheco, I.A.

    1989-01-01

    The dispersion behaviour and distribution pattern of Sitophilus zeamais Motschulsky, 1855 through a bulk of corn, rice and wheat,leaving from a infestation focus, was investigated by means of tracer methodology. Adults insects were labeled with the gamma emitter 131 I, through bath in Na 131 I solution and released onto the top of grain mass deposited in cylinders each 430 mm height and 195 mm in diameter, filled to 20 mm of the top with grains. The cylinders were enclosed with lids. The insects were detected through the bulk of the grain by means of a crystal scintillator, in fourteen sites, zero 3, 6, 12, 24, 48, 72, 96 and 120 hours after releasing. (author)

  16. Mortality and reduced brood production in walnut twig beetles, Pityophthorus juglandis (Coleoptera: Curculionidae), following exposure to commercial strains of entomopathogenic fungi Beauveria bassiana and Metarhizium brunneum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Louela A. Castrillo; Albert E. Mayfield; Michael H. Griggs; Robert Camp; Bryan Mudder; Adam Taylor; John D. Vandenberg

    2017-01-01

    Thousand cankers disease (TCD), caused by the walnut twig beetle (WTB), Pityophthorus juglandis, and its associated fungal symbiont, Geosmithia morbida, is a disease of economic and ecological concern on eastern black...

  17. Effects of temperature variation before and after gamma irradiation on the longevity and reproduction of Sitophilus zeamais Motschulsky, 1855 (Coleoptera, Curculionidae)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Camargo, A.A.; Wiendl, F.M.; Bergamo, M.A.

    1983-01-01

    A basic study of radiobiology in order to verify the synergistic effects of the sudden variation of temperature on the longevity and reproduction of Sitophilus zeamais Mots., 1855 is done, before and after gamma irradiation, and to analyse such effects in the practical application of the irradiation system of stored grains for human consumption. Also to take advantage of the synergistic effects so as to reduce the dose rate necessary to control weevils attacking stored grains. The insects were irradiated at the rates of 0 (control), 2, 4, 8, 16, 32 and 64 krad, by using a 60-Cobalt source. In a first experiment, the insects were exposed to cooling at -8 0 C below zero for 15 minutes after irradiation; in a second experiment this treatment was done before irradiation. The countings of the insect birth and death rates were weekly done. From these data one can conclude that the adult longevity decreased and the mortality increased when the insects were cooled before irradiation, and also that cooling before irradiation induces a more deleterious effect on the insect than cooling after irradiation, resulting in a lower birth rate. (Author) [pt

  18. Mortality and reduced brood production in walnut twig beetles, Pityophthorus juglandis (Coleoptera: Curculionidae), following exposure to commercial strains of Beauveria bassiana and Metarhizium brunneum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thousand cankers disease (TCD), caused by the walnut twig beetle (WTB), Pityophthorus juglandis, and its associated fungal symbiont, Geosmithia morbida, is a disease of economic and ecological concern on eastern black walnut, Juglans nigra. Numerous attacks and gallery formation by the WTB and subse...

  19. Microwave radiation effects on the different stages of Sitophilus oryzae (Linne, 1763) (Coleoptera, Curculionidae) evolutive cycle in rice, focusing its control

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Franco, Jose G.; Franco, Suely S.H., E-mail: gilmita@uol.com.br, E-mail: zegilmar60@gmail.com [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Franco, Caio H.; Arthur, Paula B.; Arthur, Valter, E-mail: caiohaddadfranco@lnbio.cnpem.com.br, E-mail: arthur@cena.usp.br [Centro de Energia Nuclear na Agricultura (CENA/USP), Piracicaba, SP (Brazil). Lab. de Radiobiologia e Ambiente

    2013-07-01

    As insects increase in radio tolerance as they develop and usually several developmental stages of pest may present in grain shipped commodity, it is important to know the microwave radiation susceptibility of stages of the target insect before the establishment of microwave radiation quarantine treatments. The current research had the aim to evaluate the microwave radiation effects on several phases of the rice weevil evolution cycle (S.oryzae), focusing its control. This specie is considered as on of the most serious worldwide pests for stored grains. The tests have been done in glass vials with 250 grams of whole grain (brown) rice and the irradiation was done in a 2,450 MHz commercial microwave oven, model Carousel II (potency of 800W). It was determined the exposure time needed to each phase control for the insect evolutive cycle, concluding that the immature phases (larvae and pupae), contained inside the rice, are more sensitive, requiring only 100 seconds to obtain 100% control while the egg phase requires a longer exposure (130 seconds). Referring to the grown phase, the time required to attain the lethal dose was 160 seconds. All the exposure time have been irradiated with a low potency (240 W). It also displayed that to greater quantities of rice (1.0 kg), with egg presence and forming a 2.0-centimeter layer on the microwave plate surface, it required an exposure time of 180 seconds. Therefore, in a more effective way, we can recommend these 180 seconds exposure time to the control of all phases concerning the insect evolutive cycle. (author)

  20. Alternative food sources and over wintering feeding behavior of the boll weevil, Anthonomus grandis boheman (coleoptera: curculionidae) under the tropical conditions of central Brazil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ribeiro, Paulina de A.; Sujii, Edison R.; Pires, Carmen S.S.; Fontes, Eliana M.G. [EMBRAPA Recursos Geneticos e Biotecnologia (CENARGEN), Brasilia, DF (Brazil)], e-mail: paulina723@hotmail.com, e-mail: sujii@cenargen.embrapa.br, e-mail: cpires@cenargen.embrapa.br, e-mail: eliana@cenargen.embrapa.br; Diniz, Ivone R. [Universidade de Brasilia (UnB), DF (Brazil). Dept. de Zoologia], e-mail: irdiniz@unb.br; Medeiros, Maria A. de; Branco, Marina C. [EMBRAPA Hortalicas, Brasilia, DF (Brazil)], e-mail: medeiros@cnph.embrapa.br, e-mail: marina@cnph.embrapa.br; Salgado-Labouriau, Maria L. [Universidade de Brasilia (UnB), DF (Brazil). Dept. de Geologia], e-mail: mlea@unb.br

    2010-01-15

    The boll weevil causes serious damage to the cotton crop in South America. Several studies have been published on this pest, but its phenology and behavior under the tropical conditions prevailing in Brazil are not well-known. In this study the feeding behavior and main food sources of adult boll weevils throughout the year in Central Brazil was investigated. The digestive tract contents of insects captured in pheromone traps in two cotton fields and two areas of native vegetation (gallery forest and cerrado sensu stricto) were analyzed. The insect was captured all through the year only in the cerrado. It fed on pollen of 19 different plant families, on Pteridophyta and fungi spores and algae cysts. Simpson Index test showed that the cerrado provided greater diversity of pollen sources. In the beginning of the cotton cycle, the plant families used for pollen feeding were varied: in cotton area 1, the weevil fed on Poaceae (50%), Malvaceae and Smilacaceae (25% each); in cotton area 2 the pollen sources were Malvaceae (50%), Asteraceae (25%) and Fabaceae and Clusiaceae (25% each); in the cerrado they were Chenopodiaceae (67%) and Scheuchzeriaceae (33%). No weevils were collected in the gallery forest in this period. After cotton was harvested, the family Smilacaceae was predominant among the food plants exploited in all the study areas. These results help to explain the survivorship of adult boll weevil during cotton fallow season in Central Brazil and they are discussed in the context of behavioral adaptations to the prevailing tropical environmental conditions. (author)

  1. Kairomonal responses of natural enemies and associates of the Southern Ips (Coleoptera: Curculionidae: Scolytinae) to Ipsdienol, Ipsenol and Cis-Verbenol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeremy D. Allison; Jessica L. McKenney; Daniel R. Miller; Matthew L. Gimmel

    2013-01-01

    Bark beetle infested pines are an ephemeral habitat utilized by a diverse assemblage of insects. Although many bark beetle insect associates have little or no measurable impact on bark beetle brood production, some reduce brood production by either competing with brood for the limited phloem tissue or by feeding on brood. Several studies have observed synchrony between...

  2. Effects of gamma irradiation on some major elements and mating competitiveness of the red Palm Weevil, Rhynchophorus Ferrugineus (OLIVIER), Coleoptera : Curculionidae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohamed, H.F.; EL-Naggar, S.M.; EL-Kkoly, E.M.S.

    2006-01-01

    In the present study, effects of three gamma doses (5, 10 and 15 Gray) applied to adult male and female weevils of the red palm weevil, Rhynchophorus ferrugineus (Olivier), were investigated. The concentration levels of sodium, potassium, calcium and phosphorous were determined in the haemolymph treated and untreated F1 progeny (males or females) at the 4th instar larvae descendants from irradiated parents male and female weevils. Results indicated that gamma irradiation might have an effect on most investigated elements. No clear relationship could be detected among the applied doses and effect on the level of any of the studied elements. Male mating competitiveness was determined from the egg infertility resulting from F1 males originating from irradiated parental male weevils confined in various ratios with unirradiated adults. Studies comparing mating performance of irradiated males with that of normal males revealed that the mating competitiveness of the irradiated males was increased as the ratio of irradiated to unirradiated males increased from 1 : 1 to 3 : 1 , except at the lesser dose 5 Gy .The results also showed that the infertility was increased as the ratios increased except at the dose rate 10 Gy . The irradiated males were not fully competitive with normal males at the dose 5 Gy among the two ratios 1 : 1 and 3 : 1 and also among the ratio 1:1 at the doses 10 and 15 Gy. The irradiated males were fully competitive with normal males at the doses 10 and 15 Gy among the ratio 3 : 1

  3. Scolytus stepheni sp. n. - a new species of bark-beetle (Coleoptera, Curculionidae, Scolytinae) from Northern India with a key to Indian Scolytus Geoffroy, 1762 species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandelshtam, Michail Yu.; V. Petrov, Alexander

    2010-01-01

    Abstract A new species of bark-beetle from Kashmir, Scolytus stepheni sp. n., dedicated to the late Professor Emeritus Stephen Lane Wood, is described and figured. Key to Indian Scolytus Geoffroy, 1762 species is provided. PMID:21594178

  4. Response of promising corn and sorghum cultivars to the attack of irradiated and non-irradiated Sitophilus zeamais (Coleoptera, Curculionidae) Motschulsky 1855, under laboratory conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moraes Rego, A.F. de; Souza Leao Veiga, A.F. de; Rodrigues, Z.A.; Oliveira, M.L.; Pimentel, M.L. (Pernambuco Univ., Recife (Brazil). Dept. de Energia Nuclear)

    1984-12-01

    The response of corn and sorghum cultivars to Sitophilus zeamais is studied. Two experiments were conducted : experiment 1 - with non-irradiated insects and experiment 2 - with insects irradiated with 5 krad of /sup 60/Co gamma radiation. Six corn cultivars (Centralmex; Azteca; Azteca-2-espigas; Dentado Composto; Jatina C/sup 3/, normal e Jatina C/sup 3/, dwarf) and nine sorghum cultivars (7300116, 7300206, 7300261, 7300003, 7300007, 7301011, 7301163, 7301154, 7300040) were tested, using a completely randomized design with 5 replications, each one consisting of 40g of grain and an infesting population of 30 insects. To measure the resistance, two methods were adopted : free choice and non-free choice and the following parameters were assessed : infesting insects, hatched insects, loss of weight and germination capacity of grains.

  5. Assessment of electron beam-induced DNA damage in larvae of chestnut weevil, Curculio sikkimensis (Heller) (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) using comet assay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Todoriki, Setsuko [Radiation and Information Technology Laboratory, National Food Research Institute, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8642 (Japan)]. E-mail: setsuko@nfri.affrc.go.jp; Hasan, Mahbub [Laboratory for Stored Product Protection, Department of Zoology, Rajshahi University, Rajshahi 6205 (Bangladesh); Miyanoshita, Akihiro [Radiation and Information Technology Laboratory, National Food Research Institute, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8642 (Japan); Imamura, Taro [Radiation and Information Technology Laboratory, National Food Research Institute, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8642 (Japan); Hayashi, Toru [Radiation and Information Technology Laboratory, National Food Research Institute, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8642 (Japan)

    2006-02-15

    Effect of electron beam treatment on DNA damage in mature larvae of chestnut weevil Curculio sikkimensis (Heller) was assessed using single-cell gel electrophoresis (DNA comet assay). Electrons at acceleration voltages of 0 (control), 300, 750, 1000, and 1500 kV at radiation doses of 1 and 4 kGy were used. Electron beam-treated chestnut larvae showed typical DNA fragmentation, compared with cells from non-treated ones which showed a more intact DNA. Investigations using the comet assay showed that the parameters including tail length, tail moment, olive tail moment as well as the quota of DNA damage at both the doses were significantly larger than the control batch larvae. Thus, this technique could contribute to analytical identification of an effective disinfestation and quarantine treatment.

  6. Effects of temperature variation before and after gamma irradiation on the longevity and reproduction of Sitophilus zeamais Motschulsky, 1855 (Coleoptera, Curculionidae)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Camargo, A.A.; Wiendl, F.M. (Centro de Energia Nuclear na Agricultura, Piracicaba (Brazil)); Bergamo, M.A. (UNESP, Rio Claro (Brazil))

    1983-06-01

    A basic study of radiobiology in order to verify the synergistic effects of the sudden variation of temperature on the longevity and reproduction of Sitophilus zeamais Mots., 1855 is done, before and after gamma irradiation, and to analyse such effects in the practical application of the irradiation system of stored grains for human consumption. Also to take advantage of the synergistic effects so as to reduce the dose rate necessary to control weevils attacking stored grains. The insects were irradiated at the rates of 0 (control), 2, 4, 8, 16, 32 and 64 krad, by using a 60-Cobalt source. In a first experiment, the insects were exposed to cooling at -8/sup 0/C below zero for 15 minutes after irradiation; in a second experiment this treatment was done before irradiation. The countings of the insect birth and death rates were weekly done. From these data one can conclude that the adult longevity decreased and the mortality increased when the insects were cooled before irradiation, and also that cooling before irradiation induces a more deleterious effect on the insect than cooling after irradiation, resulting in a lower birth rate.

  7. Damage by yam beetle heteroligus meles ( Coleoptera:Dynastidae ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Damage by yam beetle heteroligus meles (Coleoptera:Dynastidae) under different population in yam cropping system. FO Tobih, SO Emosairue. Abstract. No Abstract. Global Journal of Pure and Applied Physics Vol. 14 (1) 2008 pp. 5-8. Full Text: EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT · DOWNLOAD FULL ...

  8. Diet based fitness variability of Coccinella novemnotata (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coccinella novemnotata (Herbst) is a species of North American native lady beetle (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae) that has come under great ecological duress over the past 30 years and is experiencing a significant decline throughout its native range. This species once was widely distributed across mos...

  9. Review of the tribe Chilocorini Mulsant from Iran (Coleoptera, Coccinellidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biranvand, Amir; Tomaszewska, Wioletta; Li, Wenjing; Nicolas, Vincent; Shakarami, Jahanshir; Fekrat, Lida; Hesami, Shahram

    2017-01-01

    The Iranian checklist of the tribe Chilocorini Mulsant, 1846 (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae) is updated. In total, 13 species belonging to four genera ( Brumoides Chapin, 1965, Chilocorus Leach, 1815, Exochomus Redtenbacher, 1843, and Parexochomus Barovsky, 1922) are listed from Iran. An identification key to all genera and species currently known from Iran is presented along with illustrations of adult specimens and male genitalia.

  10. Changing distributions of Cantharidae and Buprestidae within Great Britain (Coleoptera)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Alexander, K.

    2003-01-01

    Changing distributions of Cantharidae and Buprestidae within Great Britain (Coleoptera) Data are presented on the distribution of selected species from two coleopteran families chosen to represent a random slice of the British fauna. The species have been chosen as exhibiting extremes of range

  11. Elmidae Curtis, 1830 (Coleoptera, Polyphaga, Byrrhoidea) of the Neotropical region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segura, Melissa Ottoboni; Dos Passos, Maria Ines Da Silva; Fonseca-Gessner, Alaíde Aparecida; Froehlich, Claudio Gilberto

    2013-10-29

    A bibliography of significant taxonomic papers on Elmidae (Coleoptera, Polyphaga, Byrrhoidea), and a checklist of valid species and subspecies and their geographic distributions are provided. Forty-seven genera and 430 valid species are included. Maps show the geographic distribution of the genera by country.

  12. Using Malaise traps to sample ground beetles (Coleoptera: Carabidae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michael D. Ulyshen; James L. Hanula; Scott Horn

    2005-01-01

    Pitfall traps provide an easy and inexpensive way to sample ground-dwelling arthropods (Spence and Niemela 1994; Spence et al. 1997; Abildsnes and Tommeras 2000) and have been used exclusively in many studies of the abundance and diversity of ground beetles (Coleoptera: Carabidae). Despite the popularity of this trapping technique, pitfall traps have many disadvantages...

  13. Morphometric analysis of instar variation in Tenebrio molitor (Coleoptera: Tenebrionidae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Measurements of head capsule, mandible, metanotum, and body weight were done on larvae of Tenebrio molitor L. (Coleoptera: Tenebrionide) from the second to the last instar. Instar number varied from 14 to 18, but 15 or 16 instars were the most common. The value of dimensional measurements was evalua...

  14. Two new species of South American Glaresidae (Coleoptera: Scarabaeoidea).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paulsen, M J

    2016-08-24

    Two new species of South American Glaresidae (Coleoptera: Scarabaeoidea) are described: Glaresis smithi Paulsen, new species from Argentina, and Glaresis mondacai Paulsen, new species from Chile and Peru. The species are compared to their closest congener, Glaresis fritzi Martínez et al., and a key is provided for the known South American species of the genus Glaresis Erichson.

  15. Paracrossidius radekcervenkai (Coleoptera: Scarabaeidae: Aphodiinae), a new species from China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Červenka, Radek; Nakládal, Oto

    2017-05-18

    A new species of Paracrossidius Balthasar, 1932 (Coleoptera Scarabaeidae: Aphodiinae) from China is described and compared with similar species. Paracrossidius was originally described as a monotypic subgenus based on the type species Aphodius (Paracrossidius) instigator Balthasar, 1932 from Sichuan Province, China. Paracrossidius is currently considered a genus with 10 previously described species, most of which inhabit various parts of China (Dellacasa et al. 2016).

  16. Mating frequency and fecundity in Agrilus anxius (Coleoptera: Buprestidae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Claire E. Rutledge; Melody A. Keena

    2012-01-01

    Bronze birch borers (Agrilus anxius Gory) (Coleoptera: Buprestidae), a key pest of birches in North America, have the potential to be a major threat to Eurasian birch forests. Therefore, the consequences of single versus multiple mating on the longevity, fecundity and fertility of female A. anxius were examined. There were three...

  17. An annotated checklist of Malachiidae (Coleoptera: Cleroidea) from Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirutenko, Vladyslav; Ghahari, Hassan

    2016-09-09

    A checklist of Iranian Malachiidae (Coleoptera) is given in this paper. Eighty two species from 22 genera (subfamily Malachiinae) are listed in the fauna of Iran. Of these species, 31 are endemic to Iran, and one Anthocomus pupillatus Abeille de Perrin, 1890 is a new record for this country.

  18. A new species of Xylotrechus Chevrolat from China (Coleoptera, Cerambycidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Shulin; Yang, Weicheng

    2017-01-01

    Xylotrechus tristisfacies sp. n. (Coleoptera, Cerambycidae, Cerambycinae, Clytini) from China is described and illustrated. Characters distinguishing the new species from its close relatives, which possess an entirely black or dark brown pronotum with a black median stripe on the disc and dense yellowish to gray pubescent elytra with black or brown spots or bands, are presented.

  19. Coleoptera of the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory: an annotated checklist

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stafford, M.P.; Barr, W.F.; Johnson, J.B.

    1986-04-30

    An insect survey was conducted on the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory during the summers of 1981-1983. This site is on the Snake River Plains in southeastern Idaho. Presented here is an annotated checklist of the Coleoptera collected. Successful collecting methods, dates of adult occurrence, and relative abundance are given for each species. Relevant biological information is also presented for some species.

  20. Catalogue of Diplotaxini (Coleoptera: Scarabaeidae: Melolonthinae) of the Old World

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Bezděk, Aleš

    2004-01-01

    Roč. 463, - (2004), s. 1-90 ISSN 1175-5326 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IBS5007015 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5007907 Keywords : Coleoptera * Scarabaeoidea * Diplotaxini Subject RIV: EG - Zoology

  1. Model selection in statistical historical biogeography of Neotropical insects-The Exophthalmus genus complex (Curculionidae: Entiminae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Guanyang; Basharat, Usmaan; Matzke, Nicholas; Franz, Nico M

    2017-04-01

    Statistical historical biogeographic methods rely on models that represent various biogeographic processes. Until recently model selection in this domain was not widely used, and the impact of differential model selection on inferring biogeographic scenarios was not well understood. Focusing on Neotropical weevils in the Exophthalmus genus complex (EGC) (Insecta: Curculionidae: Entiminae), we compare three commonly used biogeographic models - DIVA (Dispersal-Vicariance Analysis), DEC (Dispersal-Extinction-Cladogenesis) and BayArea (Bayesian Analysis of Biogeography), and examine the impact of modeling founder-event jump dispersal on historical biogeographic reconstructions. We also investigate the biogeographic events that have shaped patterns of distribution, diversification, and endemism in this weevil lineage. We sample representatives of 65 species of the EGC and 26 outgroup terminals from the Neotropics, including Caribbean islands and the mainland. We reconstruct a molecular phylogeny based on six genes and apply molecular dating using a relaxed clock with three fossil calibration points. Historical biogeographic estimations and alternative biogeographic models are computed and compared with the R package BioGeoBEARS. Model selection strongly favors biogeographic models that include founder-event jump dispersal. Without modeling jump dispersal, estimations based on the three biogeographic models are dramatically different, especially for early-diverging nodes. When jump dispersal is included, the three biogeographic models perform similarly. Accordingly, we show that the Neotropical mainland was colonized by Caribbean species in the early Miocene, and that in situ diversification accounts for a majority (∼75%) of the biogeographic events in the EGC. Our study highlights the need to assess wide-ranging historical biogeographic processes - including founder-event jump dispersal - for best-fitting statistical Caribbean biogeographic reconstructions. Moreover

  2. Natural enemies of emerald ash borer (Coleoptera: Buprestidae) in northeast China, with notes on two species of parasitic Coleoptera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao-Yi Wang; Liang-Ming Cao; Zhong-Qi Yang; Jian J. Duan; Juli R. Gould; Leah S. Bauer

    2016-01-01

    To investigate natural enemies of emerald ash borer (EAB), Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire (Coleoptera: Buprestidae), in northeastern China, we conducted field surveys of ash (Fraxinus Linnaeus (Oleaceae)) trees in semi-natural forests and plantations at variable EAB densities from 2008 to 2013. Our surveys revealed a complex of...

  3. Het voorkomen van de glanskevers van het genus Caprophilus in Nederland (Coleoptera: Nitidulidae)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oude, de J.

    2005-01-01

    The occurrence of nitidulid beetles of the genus Carpophilus in the Netherlands (Coleoptera: Nitidulidae) Some species of the genus Carpophilus (Coleoptera: Nitidulidae) may act as pests of stored products like cocoabeans, peanuts, dried fruits like figs and dates, imported from tropical or

  4. Intercept™ Panel Trap (INT PT) effective in management of forest Coleoptera

    Science.gov (United States)

    D. Czokajlo; J. McLaughlin; L. I. Abu Ayyash; S. Teale; J. Wickham; J. Warren; R. Hoffman; B. Aukema; K. Raffa; P. Kirsch

    2003-01-01

    Trap efficacy in capturing economically important forest Coleoptera was measured in field trials comparing the Intercept Panel Trap (INT PT) with the Multi-Funnel Trap. The INT PT was designed to provide a better option for the monitoring of forest Coleoptera. The trap is made of corrugated plastic and is very robust under rigorous field conditions, but still...

  5. Interactions of Coccinella novemnotata (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae) and Coccinella septempunctata (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae) While Foraging for Aphids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ugine, Todd A; Hoki, Evan; Losey, John E

    2018-02-08

    The importation and establishment of Coccinella septempunctata L. (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae) in North America purportedly caused the displacement and local extirpation of the native ninespotted lady beetle, Coccinella novemnotata Herbst (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae), across most of its former range, and several reports have shown that C. septempunctata maintains competitive advantages over C. novemnotata. We investigated the role of aphid density on the retention time of these two species on fava bean plants, and the effect of con- versus heterospecific pairings of adult beetles on the foraging behavior of C. novemnotata. We found that aphid density did not affect C. novemnotata's retention time, but did affect the retention time of C. septempunctata, which left plants without aphids significantly faster than C. novemnotata. Additionally, C. septempunctata females left plants significantly faster than their male counterparts, whereas we observed no difference between the two sexes for C. novemnotata. Our test of pairs of beetles showed that C. novemnotata were together on plants more frequently than conspecific pairs of C. septempunctata and heterospecific pairs of beetles, and that all beetles were more likely to be found together on the aphid-infested plant versus the non-infested plant regardless of the pairs' composition. These results show that C. novemnotata spend more time foraging for aphids when aphids are scarce compared with C. septempunctata, and that C. novemnotata is less tolerant of occupying plants inhabited by C. septempunctata versus a conspecific beetle, adding additional mechanisms whereby C. septempunctata could outcompete C. novemnotata in the field. © The Author(s) 2018. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Entomological Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  6. Modelo de armadilha etanólica de interceptação de voo para captura de escolitíneos (Curculionidae: Scolytinae Ethanolic model of flight interception trap to capture scolytine (Curculionidae: Scolytinae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Augusto Bolson Murari

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available

    Este estudo teve por objetivo desenvolver um modelo alternativo de armadilha etanólica de interceptação de insetos voadores, visando à redução dos custos relacionados aos levantamentos de insetos da subfamília Scolytinae (Curculionidae, realizados em ecossistemas florestais. O modelo de armadilha, denominado de PET-SM, foi confeccionado com materiais recicláveis: prato plástico, garrafa de polietileno (PET de dois litros, garrafa PET de 600 mL, e mangueira com álcool 96° GL empregado como atrativo. Em comparação a outros modelos utilizados para monitoramento de Scolytinae, o modelo PET-SM mostrou-se eficiente na captura, apresentando um maior número de espécies coletadas e oferecendo um menor custo de confecção.

     

    doi: 10.4336/2012.pfb.32.69.115

    This study aimed to develop an alternative model of trap for interception with ethanol for flying insects, in order to reduce the costs related to surveys of insects of the subfamily Scolytinae (Curculionidae, conducted in forest ecosystems. The model of trap, called PET-SM, was manufactured with recyclable materials: plastic plate, polyethylene (PET bottle of two liters, PET bottle of 600 mL, and a hose with alcohol 96 GL used as attractive. Compared to other models used to monitor Scolytinae, the PET-SM model proved to be effective for capture, presenting a greater number of species and offering a lower cost of manufacture.

     

    doi: 10.4336/2012.pfb.32.69.115

  7. Ciclo biológico, comportamiento y censo del picudo del camu camu, Conotrachelus dubiae O'Brien 1995 (Coleoptera: Curculionidae en Pucallpa, Perú Biological cycle, behavior and census of camu camu weevil, Conotrachelus dubiae O'Brien 1995 (Coleoptera: Curculionidae, in Pucallpa, Peru

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diana Perez

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available El picudo, Conotrachelus dubiae O'Brien 1995, es una de las plagas mas importantes del camu camu Myrciaria dubia H.B.K. Mc Vaugh en la Amazonía Peruana. El objetivo del presente estudio fue determinar el ciclo biológico de este insecto bajo condiciones de laboratorio y describir su comportamiento y fluctuación en condiciones de campo en Pucallpa, Ucayali, Perú. El porcentaje de eclosión de larvas fue de 87%, la duración del periodo de incubación de los huevos fue de 5,5±0,9 (4 a 7 días, del estado larval en el fruto 22,2±1,9 (20 a 25 días y en el suelo (fase pre-pupa, 54,4±5,5 (46 a 67 días, del periodo pupal 11,8±0,9 (9 a 13 días y la longevidad del adulto fue de 51,8±18,9 (9 a 75 días. Los adultos se alimentaron de frutos de diferentes diámetros y estados de maduración y de botones florales, ramas tiernas y flores. No se registró la presencia de adultos de C. dubiae en frutos secos, ni en la base del tallo, sino en ritidomas. La mayor actividad de alimentación y de reproducción de los adultos fue entre 18:30 a 22:00 h. Los adultos fueron observados en el cultivo durante todo el año, encontrándose con mayor frecuencia en los meses de enero a marzo en pisos bajos inundables y entre octubre a diciembre en tierra firme no inundable, coincidiendo con la fase de floración y fructificación de la planta.Camu camu weevil Conotrachelus dubiae O'Brien, 1995 is a one of the main pests of camu camu (Myrciaria dubia H.B.K. Mc Vaugh in Peruvian Amazonia. The aim of this study was to determine the biological cycle of this insect under laboratory conditions, to describe its behavior and population numbers under field conditions in Pucallpa, Ucayali, Peru. The percentage of hatching was 87%; the egg incubation period was 5.5±0.9 (4 to 7 days; the length of the larval stage inside the fruit was 22.2±1.9 (20 to 25 days, and the length larval stage (pre-pupa underground was 54.4±5.5 (46 to 67 days. The length of pupal period was 11.8±0.9 (9 to 13 days, and the longevity of adults was 51.8±18.9 (9 to 75 days. Adults feed on fruits of different diameters and state of ripeness. Weevils also feed on buds, fresh branches and flowers. Adults of C. dubiae were only found in the rhizome, not in dry fruits or on the stem base.. The highest feeding and reproductive activity of adults was between 18:30 to 22:00 h. Adults were observed during the whole year, with the highest frequency between January and March in low seasonally flooded soils and between October to December in upland unflooded soils, coinciding with flowering and fruiting plant phenology.

  8. Ecologia e variação espacial de Naupactus lar Germar (Coleoptera, Curculionidae, Entiminae no Parque Nacional da Restinga de Jurubatiba, RJ Ecology and spatial variation of Naupactus lar Germar (Coleoptera, Curculionidae, Entiminae at the National Park of Restinga de Jurubatiba, State of Rio de Janeiro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina de Oliveira Araujo

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available O presente trabalho teve como objetivos descrever o padrão de variação espacial na coloração de N. lar no Parque Nacional da Restinga de Jurubatiba e estudar aspectos da sua ecologia e de seu comportamento. O trabalho foi realizado de fevereiro de 2003 a maio de 2004, em excursões bimestrais a quatro diferentes áreas do parque, vistoriando um total de 120 plantas de Byrsonima sericea, um de seus principais hospedeiros. Foram encontrados quatro tipos de coloração (amarelo, rosa, laranja e branco, sendo que nem todas as formas ocorreram juntas no mesmo local. Quase todos os machos adultos observados em campo apresentaram coloração amarela, com exceção de um indivíduo alaranjado. Já as fêmeas apresentaram todos os padrões de cores citados. Cruzamentos realizados em laboratório demonstraram que indivíduos de diferentes colorações e/ou diferentes áreas copulam normalmente entre si, indicando não haver barreira mecânica ou comportamental que impeça a cópula entre as diferentes formas. Adultos de N. lar ocorreram o ano todo, apresentando as maiores abundâncias entre outubro e fevereiro, e as mais baixas, entre abril e agosto. Tanto a porcentagem de ocupação das plantas, quanto a densidade de indivíduos de N. lar nas plantas acompanharam o padrão de sua flutuação populacional. Assim, parece que N. lar apresenta uma estação reprodutiva por ano, entre os meses de outubro e fevereiro, época coincidente com a estação chuvosa e emissão de ramos novos pela planta de alimentação.The present work aimed to describe the pattern of spatial variation of N. lar at the National Park of Restinga de Jurubatiba and to study aspects of the species ecology and behavior. Bimonthly surveys were conducted on 120 Byrsonima sericea plants, one of its main hosts, from February 2003 to May 2004, in four different areas of the park. Four color morphs were found (yellow, pink, orange and white, but not all occurred together in the same area. Almost all adult males observed in field were yellow, except for one orange individual. Females, however, showed all cited color morphs. Tests in laboratory showed that individuals of different colors and/or from different sites mated normally among themselves, indicating that there is no mechanical or behavioral barrier preventing copulation among them. Adults of N. lar occurred throughout the year, showing an abundance peak between October and February, and lower numbers between April and August. Both percentage of plant occupation and density of individuals on plants followed the pattern of the populational fluctuation. In this way, it seems that N. lar presents one reproductive season per year, between October and February, period of rainy season and production of new leaves of the food plants.

  9. Rhyssomatus subtilis Fiedler (Coleoptera: Curculionidae, primer registro para la Argentina y primera cita de planta hospedera, Glycine max (L Merr. Rhyssomatus subtilis Fiedler (Coleoptera: Curculionidae, first record for Argentina and first record of Glycine max (L Merr. as a host plant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Guillermina Socías

    Full Text Available Los monitoreos de insectos efectuados en los cultivos de soja del noroeste argentino (NOA durante las campañas 2005/2006, 2006/2007 y 2007/2008 resultaron en el hallazgo de adultos de Rhyssomatus subtilis Fiedler, 1937. Esta nota es la primera cita de dicha especie para la Argentina. No se conoce el hospedero original, por lo tanto, la soja es también la primera planta registrada como hospedera de esta especie.Samplings of insects on soybean crops during 2005/2006, 2006/2007 and 2007/2008 seasons in Northwestern Argentina (NWA led to the discovery of adults of Rhyssomatus subtilis Fiedler, 1937. This note is the first report of this species in Argentina. In addition, soybean is reported for the first time as a host plant for this species in Argentina.

  10. Respuesta kairomonal de coleópteros asociados a Dendroctonus frontalis y dos especies de Ips (Coleoptera: Curculionidae en bosques de Chiapas, México Kairomonal response of coleopterans associated with Dendroctonus frontalis and two Ips species (Coleoptera: Curculionidae in forest of Chiapas, Mexico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bernardo Domínguez-Sánchez

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Se evaluó la diversidad de escarabajos descortezadores y la respuesta diferencial de sus coleópteros asociados a feromonas comerciales de agregación, en bosques de pino del estado de Chiapas, México. Durante los meses de junio a octubre del 2006, se colocaron 40 trampas multiembudo tipo Lindgren cebadas con las feromonas racémicas frontalina, ipsenol e ipsdienol y un testigo (sin feromona. La captura fue más abundante para los escarabajos descortezadores Dendroctonus frontalis (Zimmermann con frontalina, y de Ips spp. con ipsenol e ipsdienol. Se registró respuesta kairomonal específica de los depredadores Temnochila chlorodia (Mannerheim, Enoclerus ablusus (Barr y Elacatis sp. hacia las feromonas de agregación. Tanto para descortezadores como para depredadores, las mayores abundancias fueron registradas durante el verano y a comienzos del otoño. Temmnochila chlorodia exhibió una atracción diferencial hacia los semioquímicos evaluados, mientras que E. ablusus, Elacatis sp. y Leptostylus sp. fueron atraídos principalmente por las feromonas ipsenol e ipsdienol. Además, por primera vez para México se determinó la respuesta kairomonal del fitófago Leptostylus sp. (Cerambycidae. Estos resultados indican que hay una comunicación intra e inter específica entre los escarabajos descortezadores y sus especies asociadas que promueven interacciones de competencia y depredación.We assessed the bark beetle diversity and the response of associated predators to aggregation pheromones in pine forests in Chiapas, Mexico. From June to October 2006, 40 Lindgren funnel traps were established with different baits that included frontalin, ipsenol and ipsdienol pheromones and a control (without pheromone. We registered the attractiveness of frontalin to the bark beetle Dendroctonus frontalis (Zimmermann, and ipsenol and ipsdienol to Ips spp. Kairomonal specific response of the predators Temnochila chlorodia (Mannerheim, Enoclerus ablusus (Barr and Elacatis sp. was detected. We registered an important increase in abundance of bark beetles and predators during the summer to the beginning of fall. T. chlorodia exhibited differential attraction to the three pheromones evaluated, whereas E. ablusus, Elacatis sp. and Leptostylus sp. were significantly attracted to ipsenol and ipsdienol. This is the first report of kairomonal response of the phytophagous Leptostylus sp. (Cerambycidae for México. Our results showed that inter-and intra-specific communication between different bark beetles and associated species may occur, which promotes competitive and predator interaction between them.

  11. Viabilidade da antecipação do tratamento de sementes de arroz com inseticidas em relação à data de semeadura no controle de Oryzophagus oryzae (Coleoptera: Curculionidae Viability of the advance rice seed treatment with insecticides in relation to sowing date in the control of Oryzophagus oryzae (Coleoptera: Curculionidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anderson Dionei Grützmacher

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Oryzophagus oryzae (Costa Lima, 1936 é uma das pragas mais prejudiciais da cultura do arroz irrigado, sendo seu controle efetuado tradicionalmente com inseticidas granulados aplicados na água de irrigação. No entanto, o uso de inseticidas aplicados às sementes tem sido considerado promissor. Embora existam máquinas adequadas para aplicação de inseticidas às sementes, há dificuldade de assegurar a qualidade das sementes tratadas, em poucos dias ou mesmo horas antes da semeadura. Assim, objetivou-se avaliar a viabilidade do tratamento de sementes de arroz com inseticidas aplicados com antecedência à data de semeadura para o controle de O. oryzae. Dois experimentos foram instalados na Estação Experimental de Terras Baixas da Embrapa Clima Temperado, localizada no município de Capão do Leão, Rio Grande do Sul (RS, em duas épocas (1997/1998 e 2004/2005. O delineamento experimental foi em blocos ao acaso com quatro repetições. Foram avaliados os inseticidas carbosulfano e fipronil aplicados manualmente às sementes de arroz em diferentes épocas que antecederam a semeadura e foram avaliadas as variáveis poder germinativo e vigor das sementes, plantas emergidas, população larval e produtividade de grãos. O tratamento das sementes de arroz com inseticidas, antecipadamente à data de semeadura, visando ao controle de O. oryzae, demonstrou ser viável. Os inseticidas carbosulfano e fipronil são adequados ao tratamento antecipado das sementes, se aplicados até 75 dias antes da semeadura.Oryzophagus oryzae (Costa Lima, 1936 is one of the most important pests of irrigated rice, whose control is made traditionally with granulated insecticides on the irrigation water. However, the use of insecticides on the seeds has been considered a promising method. Although there are adequate implements to apply insecticides on the seeds, it’s hard to make this treatment with quality and in a big quantity, few days or hours before sowing. In this context, the viability of treat the rice seeds in an advance of sowing date has been evaluated. Two experiments were performed at Embrapa Clima Temperado, Capão do Leão, RS, Brazil in 1997/98 and 2004/05. The experimental design was in blocks at random with four repetitions, being evaluated the insecticides carbosulfan and fipronil applied manually to the seeds of rice in different times that preceded the sowing. Germination power and vigour, emerged plants, larval population and grains productivity were considered. The rice seeds treatment with insecticides in advance of sowing date trying to achieve the control of O. oryzae, demonstrate viability. The insecticides carbosulfan and fipronil are adequate to advance seeds treatment, if applied until 75 days before sowing.

  12. Método de diagnóstico para el monitoreo de resistencia a insecticidas en poblaciones de "picudo del algodonero", Anthonomus grandis (Coleoptera: Curculionidae A diagnostic test for insecticide resistance monitoring in "cotton boll weevil" Anthonomus grandis (Coleoptera: Curculionidae populations

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    Teodoro Stadler

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available El control de las poblaciones de Anthonomus grandis Boheman, por debajo de su umbral de daño económico durante el ciclo del cultivo del algodón, se realiza en forma efectiva hasta el momento, a través de insecticidas de síntesis. La presión selectiva de las aplicaciones extensivas e intensivas de insecticidas hace imperativa la detección temprana de focos de resistencia a los mismos, en función de un correcto manejo del fenómeno. Se desarrolló un método de diagnóstico de resistencia para A. grandis a partir de la técnica "vial test", que fue adaptada en forma de "kit" para el monitoreo rápido y sencillo de los focos de resistencia en el campo. La toxicidad (CL99, para calcular la concentración discriminante (CD del insecticida y la preparación del "kit", se obtiene a partir de bioensayos de laboratorio con una cepa normal susceptible de A. grandis. Se determinó la vida media de los insecticidas dentro de los viales por CIPAC MT 46, para establecer una fecha de vencimiento del "kit". La CD y el método en su conjunto fueron validados a través de ensayos a campo. El "kit", usado en el monitoreo de resistencia en el campo, fue especialmente diseñado para ser utilizado en las condiciones geográficas, económicas y socio-culturales presentes en la región algodonera argentina. La implementación de esta técnica permitirá conseguir la información necesaria, y así obtener una apropiada alternancia de insecticidas. Como consecuencia, se prevé una reducción de impacto ambiental de las prácticas agronómicas en el control de plagas en algodón.The in-season control of the cotton boll weevil Anthonomus grandis Boheman is done by insecticide application, which so far is the only effective way to reduce boll weevil populations to levels below economic significance. The extensive and intensive control actions with insecticides cause selective pressure on pest populations. Thus, to achieve an accurate insecticide resistance management of boll weevil, the assessment of changes in the susceptibility to chemicals of A. grandis populations is required. A field method for insecticide resistance diagnosis in cotton boll weevil was developed which is based on the principle of the "vial-test". The method was adapted to a kit that provides a fast, simple and reliable tool that allows a direct pre-assessment of early insecticide resistance outbreaks in A. grandis field populations. The toxicity (LC99 data to calculate the discriminating concentration of the insecticide to be used for the preparation of the kit was assessed by laboratory toxicity screening on normal susceptible adult A. grandis. To establish the expiration date for the kit, the half-life of the pesticide inside the vials was assessed by CIPAC MT 46. The DC for the two pesticides as well as the whole method was validated in field trials. The insecticide resistance field test kit was shown as a valuable tool to be used directly at the local geographical, economical and socio-cultural circumstances of the Argentine cotton growing area. Early resistance diagnosis on cotton boll weevil populations allows proper pesticide alternation, leading to a subsequent lower environmental impact of agronomic practices for the control of insect pests in cotton.

  13. Evaluation of resistance of corn hybrids against the attack of Sitophilus zeamais motschulsky (Coleoptera: Curculionidae in stored kernels/ Avaliação da resistência de híbridos de milho ao ataque de Sitophilus zeamais motschulsky (Coleoptera: Curculionidae no grão armazenado

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    Antônio Carlos Gerage

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Resistance of corn hybrids, cultivated or in phase of genetic improvement in Paraná, was evaluated against the attack of Sitophilus zeamais, main grain pest of corn storage. Samples of kernels of eleven hybrids of corn, IPD T1/3AC, IPD 029, IPT 4/029, AG 5011, IPS G/58, IPT 2/15, IPT 4/15, IPT T/23, IPT 5/T02, IPT 2/92 and IPT 9/13, were infested with adults of S. zeamais and maintained in BOD, at 27±1°C, 75±5% RH and 12 hours of photophase. After 30 days of infestation the following parameters of resistance were evaluated: susceptibility index, reduce of dry mass of the grains, number of emerged insects, biological cycle and adult mass. The most susceptible hybrids to the attack of S. zeamais were: IPD T1/3AC and IPD 029; while the most resistant were: IPT 4/029, AG 5011, IPS G/58, IPT 2/15 and IPT 4/15.A resistência de híbridos de milho, cultivados ou em fase de melhoramento genético no Paraná, foi avaliada com relação ao ataque de Sitophilus zeamais, principal praga de grãos armazenados de milho. Amostras de grãos de onze híbridos de milho, IPD T1/3AC, IPD 029, IPT 4/029, AG 5011, IPS G/58, IPT 2/15, IPT 4/15, IPT T/23, IPT 5/T02, IPT 2/92 e IPT 9/13, foram infestadas com adultos de S. zeamais e mantidas em BOD, a 27±1°C, 75±5% UR e 12 horas de fotofase. Após trinta dias da infestação foram avaliados os seguintes parâmetros de resistência: índice de suscetibilidade, perda de massa seca dos grãos, número de insetos emergidos, ciclo biológico e massa dos adultos. Os híbridos mais suscetíveis ao ataque de S. zeamais foram: IPD T1/3AC e IPD 029, enquanto que os mais resistentes foram: IPT 4/029, AG 5011, IPS G/58, IPT 2/15 e IPT 4/15.

  14. Xylosandrus germanus (Coleoptera, Curculionidae, Scolytinae – un potenţial dăunător al pădurilor, livezilor şi viilor din România [Xylosandrus germanus (Coleoptera, Curculionidae, Scolytinae – a potential pest of forests, orchards and vineyards in Romania

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    Olenici Nicolai

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The black timber bark beetle, Xylosandrus germanus (Blandford 1894, is a new species for Romanian fauna and a potential invasive pest in our forests, orchards and vineyards, but there is little information about it in our scientific literature. Consequently, a short synthesis of the knowledge concerning the biology, ecology, damages, survey and control of the pest, is presented for the foresters, as well as for owners of orchards and vineyards. Preliminary data on its distribution and flight activity suggest that the pest may already be present in many zones of the country and that would have a generation per year.

  15. Inoculation methods and virulence of Beauveria bassiana (Bals. Vuill. to Cosmopolites sordidus (Germar (Coleoptera:Curculionidae in laboratory / Métodos de inoculação e virulência de Beauveria bassiana (Bals. Vuill. a Cosmopolites sordidus (Germar (Coleoptera:Curculionidae em laboratório

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    Marilene Francelli

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available The research aimed to assess different inoculation methods of Beauveria bassiana (Bals. Vuill. on Cosmopolites sordidus (Germar adults, in laboratory conditions on an isolates selection bioassay. Conidial suspensions of UEL151 strain were applied on insects through the following methods: spray, immersion, dorsal and ventral topical. Low mortalities were achieved for all inoculation methods, with a higher value for immersion (21.7% at 37 days after application (DAA, as the rest of methods were significantly lower. The evaluation must be extended to a maximum of 22 DAA because the sporulation rate (confirmed mortality / total mortality decreased with time in all methods, with values of 95.8 and 75.3%, at 22 and 37 DAA, respectively, on the immersion method. Dorsal and ventral topical methods caused not significant C. sordidus virulence, so new tests are necessary with different fungus concentrations.A pesquisa teve o objetivo de avaliar distintos métodos de inoculação de Beauveria bassiana (Bals. Vuill. em adultos de Cosmopolites sordidus (Germar em condições de laboratório para utilização em bioensaios de seleção de isolados. Suspensões de conídios do isolado UEL151 foram aplicadas nos insetos através dos seguintes métodos: pulverização, imersão, tópica dorsal e tópica ventral. Em todos os métodos de inoculação obtiveram-se baixos valores de mortalidade total e confirmada, com valor máximo para a imersão dos insetos (21,7% aos 37 dias após a aplicação (DAA, o qual foi significativamente maior ao resto dos métodos. Verificou-se que a avaliação deve ser de no máximo 22 DAA nas condições deste experimento, já que a taxa de esporulação (mortalidade confirmada/mortalidade total diminuiu com o tempo em todos os métodos, com valores de 95,8 e 75,3%, aos 22 e 37 daa, respectivamente no caso da imersão. Os métodos de inoculação tópica dorsal e ventral não causaram virulência significativa de C. sordidus com B. bassiana, pelo que se precisam pesquisar os mesmos, com diferentes concentrações do fungo as usadas neste ensaio.

  16. Resposta de Cosmopolites sordidus (Germar (Coleoptera, Curculionidae aos voláteis da planta hospedeira e de adultos coespecíficos em olfatômetro Response of Cosmopolites sordidus (Germar (Coleoptera, Curculionidae to host volatiles and conspecific in olfactometer

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    Fernando A. C. de Mendonça

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available The response of Cosmopolites sordidus (Germar, 1824 to the volatiles of its host banana plant (Musa paradisiaca cv. Prata and conspecific adults was studied. In olfactometer, the attraction of males and females of C. sordidus to rhizome and pseudotem of the banana, fresh or rotting, was observed. The results suggested that the aggregation pheromone is produced by males and that it attracts both sexes, and that there is another pheromone produced by females which attracts males only. The results also suggest that the females are the first responsible for the aggregation of the species, but the male pheromone is mainly responsible for the mass aggregation. Nevertheless, the aggregation phenomenon is a consequence of the mutual action of both pheromones plus the kairomones produced by the banana plant.

  17. Functionality of the plastron in adults of Neochetina eichhorniae Warner (Coleoptera, Curculionidae: aspects of the integument coating and submersion laboratory experiments Funcionalidade do plastrão em adultos de Neochetina eichhorniae Warner (Coleoptera, Curculionidae: aspectos do revestimento tegumentar e experimentos laboratoriais de submersão

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    Wesley Oliveira de Sousa

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The plastron theory was tested in adults of Neochetina eichhorniae Warner, 1970, through the analysis of the structure that coats these insects' integument and also through submersion laboratorial experiments. The tegument processes were recognized in three types: agglutinated scales with large perforations, plumose scales of varied sizes and shapes, and hairs. The experiments were carried out on 264 adult individuals which were kept submerged at different time intervals (n = 11 and in two types of treatment, natural non-aerated water and previously boiled water, with four repetitions for each treatment. The tests showed a maximum mortality after 24 hours of immersion in the previously boiled water treatment. The survival of the adults was negative and significantly correlated with the types of treatment employed and within the different time intervals. The values of oxygen dissolved in water (mg/l differed significantly within the types of treatment employed. They were positively correlated with the survival of the adults in the two types of treatment, although more markedly in the treatment with previously boiled water. The mortality of adults after 24 hours of submersion in the treatment with previously boiled water may be associated with the physical-chemical conditions of the non-tested water in this study, such as low surface tension and concentration of solutes. These results suggest plastron functionality in the adults of this species.A teoria plastrão foi testada em adultos de Neochetina eichhorniae Warner, 1970, por meio da análise da estrutura que reveste o tegumento destes insetos e em experimentos laboratoriais de submersão. Os processos tegumentares foram reconhecidos em três tipos: escamas aglutinadas e com perfurações largas; escamas plumosas de tamanhos e formas variadas; e pêlos. Os experimentos realizados com 264 indivíduos adultos os quais permaneciam submersos por diferentes intervalos de tempo (n = 11 e em dois tratamentos, água natural não aerada e água previamente fervida, com quatro repetições para cada tratamento, revelaram uma mortalidade máxima após 24 horas de mergulho no tratamento água previamente fervida. A sobrevivência dos adultos foi negativa e significativamente correlacionada com os tratamentos empregados e entre os diferentes intervalos de tempo. Os valores de oxigênio dissolvido (mg/l na água diferiram significativamente entre os tratamentos aplicados, sendo positivamente correlacionado com a sobrevivência dos adultos nos dois tratamentos, embora mais acentuadamente no tratamento com água previamente fervida. A mortalidade dos adultos após 24 horas de mergulho no tratamento com água previamente fervida pode estar associada às condições físico-químicas da água não testadas neste estudo, como, por exemplo, baixa tensão superficial e concentração de solutos. Estes resultados sugerem uma funcionalidade do plastrão nos adultos desta espécie.

  18. Preferência para alimentação e oviposição do manhoso, Chalcodermus bimaculatus Fiedler (Coleoptera: Curculionidae, em genótipos de feijão-caupi. = The feeding and oviposition preference of Chalcodermus bimaculatus Fiedler (Coleoptera: Curculionidae in cowpea genotype.

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    Antonio Cesar Silva Lima

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Objetivou-se com este trabalho avaliar a resistência do tipo antixenose de dez genótipos de feijão-caupi (Vigna unguiculata (L. Walp. ao manhoso (Chalcodermus bimaculatus Fiedler, em condições de campo. Os tratamentos consistiram de dez genótipos, sendo: Pretinho Precoce 1, UFRR Grão Verde, Apiaú, Iracema, BRS Mazagão, IT85D-3428-4-3-HP e IT85D-3428-4-R2-4-HM, Pingo de Ouro, Epace 10 e Pitiúba. O delineamento experimental utilizado foi o de blocos ao acaso com quatro repetições. A parcela experimental (2,8 x 5,0 m continha quatro fileiras de 5,0 m, espaçadas de 0,70 m com área total de 14 m2, deixando-se após o desbaste cinco plantas por metro. O cultivo se deu em condições de campo nos anos agrícolas 2004 e 2005. As avaliações foram realizadas semanalmente coletando-se aleatoriamente 10 vagens (no ponto de grão verde de cada genótipo nas fileiras centrais das parcelas. No laboratório de Entomologia Agrícola do CCA/UFRR fazia-se a contagem do número de cicatrizes superficiais na vagem, número de grãos perfurados na vagem, comprimento da vagem e o número de grãos cheios na vagem. Concluiu-se que BRS Mazagão apresenta resistência do tipo não-preferência para oviposição de C. bimaculatus; que Pingo de Ouro foi o mais preferido pelo manhoso tanto para alimentação quanto para a oviposição; e que há correlação positiva entre o número de cicatrizes superficiais por 10 cm de vagem do feijão-caupi e a percentagem de grãos perfurados na vagem. = The objective of this study was to evaluate the type antixenosis resistance of 10 cowpea genotypes, Vigna unguiculata (L. Walp., (Pretinho Precoce 1, UFRR Grão Verde, Apiaú, Iracema, BRS-Mazagão, IT85D-3428-4-3-HP and IT85D-3428-4-R2-4-HM, Pingo de Ouro, Epace 10, and Pitiúba to curculio, Chalcodermus bimaculatus Fiedler, during field conditions. Theexperimental design used consisted of randomized blocks with four replications. The genotypes were sowed in field conditions in 2004 and 2005, in plots of 2.8 x 5.0 m, each containing 4 spaced arrays of 0.70 m, being left after the rough-hewing 5 plants per meter. The evaluations were done weekly by collecting 10 random pods (green beans in point of each genotype in the central rows of each plot. In the Laboratory of Agricultural Entomology (CCA/UFRR were determined the number of superficial scars on the pods, the number of perforated grains by pod, the length of the pods, and full grains. It was concluded that BRS-Mazagão presented the type no-preference of resistance for oviposition of C. bimaculatus; that Pingo de Ouro was the most favorable for the curculio for feeding as well as for oviposition; and that a positive correlation exists among the number of superfi cial scars in the bean and the percentage of grains perforated.

  19. Captura de Rhynchophorus palmarum L. (Coleoptera: curculionidae em armadilhas iscadas com o feromônio de agregação e compostos voláteis de frutos do abacaxi Trap catches of Rhynchophorus palmarum L. (Coleoptera: curculionidae baited with its aggregation pheromone and volatile compounds from pineapple

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    Adriana Guimarães Duarte

    2003-04-01

    Full Text Available O objetivo deste trabalho foi determinar os índices de captura de Rhynchophorus palmarum em armadilhas iscadas com o feromônio de agregação, 6-metil-2(E-hepten-4-ol (rincoforol, associado a toletes de cana-de-açúcar, a pedaços de frutos do abacaxi e a seis compostos voláteis isolados de frutos do abacaxi. Os compostos voláteis do abacaxi são caracterizados por uma mistura de ésteres metílicos e etílicos, sendo o octanoato de metila e o octanoato de etila os mais abundantes. As armadilhas iscadas com o rincoforol associado a toletes de cana-de-açúcar e as iscas com rincoforol associado a pedaços de abacaxi não apresentaram diferenças significativas no número de besouros capturados. No entanto, ambas apresentaram índices de captura superiores àquelas em que o rincoforol foi utilizado em associação com voláteis do abacaxi. Não se observaram efeitos significativos do local e época de captura, nem no número de machos e de fêmeas capturados.The aim of this work was to investigate the capture of Rhynchophorus palmarum in traps baited with its aggregation pheromone, 6-methyl-2(E-hepten-4-ol (rhynchophorol, in association with sugar cane, pieces of pineapple fruit, and six volatile compounds from pineapple. A mixture of methyl and ethyl esters, being methyl octanoate and ethyl octanoate the most abundant, characterizes the volatile compounds from pineapple fruits. Traps baited with rhynchophorol in association with sugar cane and those baited with rhynchophorol in association with pieces of pineapple, showed no significant differences in the number of trapped weevils. However, both traps caught significantly more weevils, than those baited with rhynchophorol in association with pineapple volatiles. There were no significant effects from place and time or in the number of male and female weevils trapped.

  20. Two new species of Scymnini (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae) from Karnataka, India.

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    Poorani, J

    2015-01-01

    The Scymnini (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae) of the Indian region is rich and highly speciose, with nearly 90 described species and scores of undescribed species (Poorani 2002). There is a dire need to systematically revise the genera and species of this tribe from the Indian region. Due to paucity of representative collections covering the entire region and lack of access to types, it is difficult to identify most of the Scymnini of the Indian region to species. As a result, many economically important species remain poorly characterized, or worse, unnamed. Two economically important and unique species of Scymnini (Coccinellidae) belonging to Horniolus Weise (1900) and Scymnus (Pullus) Mulsant (1846) from the Southern Indian state of Karnataka that have remained unnamed for long are treated in this paper. These species are externally similar to other known species and often misidentified. Horniolussororius sp. n. and Scymnus (Pullus) rajeshwariae sp. n. (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae) are described here and illustrated with notes on their biology and related species.

  1. Biocontrol of larval mosquitoes by Acilius sulcatus (Coleoptera: Dytiscidae)

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    Chandra, Goutam; Mandal, Samir K; Ghosh, Arup K; Das, Dipanwita; Banerjee, Siddhartha S; Chakraborty, Sumanta

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Background Problems associated with resistant mosquitoes and the effects on non-target species by chemicals, evoke a reason to find alternative methods to control mosquitoes, like the use of natural predators. In this regard, aquatic coleopterans have been explored less compared to other insect predators. In the present study, an evaluation of the role of the larvae of Acilius sulcatus Linnaeus 1758 (Coleoptera: Dytiscidae) as predator of mosquito immatures was made in the laboratory...

  2. Two new Larainae species from Guayana region, Venezuela (Coleoptera: Elmidae).

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    Laššová, Kristína; Ciampor, Fedor; Ciamporová-Zaťovičová, Zuzana

    2014-01-06

    Two new species of the subfamily Larainae (Insecta: Coleoptera: Elmidae), Hexanchorus angeli n. sp. and Hypsilara autanai n. sp., are described from Guyana region in Venezuela. We provide habitus photographs, detail drawings of both male and female genitalia, and description of morphological features important for discrimination of the new species. Molecular differences within genera were measured using 816bp fragment of mtDNA gene for cytochrome oxidase c subunit I. Sequence divergences among species are discussed.

  3. White grub (Coleoptera: Melolonthidae mortality induced by Ophiocordyceps melolonthae

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    Geraldo Salgado-Neto

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT: The occurrence of white grub roots in soybean crops in the South of Brazil has gradually increased. However, there is not information on the biological control of grubs by entomopathogenic fungi. This study aimed to induce infection by Ophiocordyceps melolonthae and analyze longevity in Cyclocephala modesta and Dyscinetus gagates larvae (Coleoptera: Melolonthidae. In the laboratory, Cyclocephala modesta and Dyscinetus gagates had a mortality rate of 85% and 75%, respectively.

  4. The genus Trichocnemis LeConte, 1851 (Coleoptera, Cerambycidae, Prioninae)

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    Swift, Ian; Santos-Silva, Antonio; Nearns, Eugenio H.

    2010-01-01

    Abstract The history of the genus Trichocnemis LeConte, 1851 (Coleoptera, Cerambycidae, Prioninae) is discussed. Its taxonomic status in relation to the genera Ergates Audinet-Serville, 1832 and Callergates Lameere, 1904 is clarified. The synonymy of Macrotoma californica White, 1853, Macrotoma spiculigera White, 1853, and Trichocnemis spiculatus LeConte, 1851 is confirmed. A key to all three genera and their species is provided. PMID:21594014

  5. Estados inmaduros de Ancognatha ustulata (Coleoptera: Melolonthidae: Dynastinae: Cyclocephalini Immature stages of Ancognatha ustulata (Coleoptera: Melolonthidae: Dynastinae: Cyclocephalini

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    Jhon César Neita-Moreno

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Se describen y se ilustran por primera vez la larva de tercer estadio y la pupa de Ancognatha ustulata Burmeister, 1847 (Coleoptera: Melolonthidae: Dynastinae: Cyclocephalini. Se aportan datos sobre la biología de la especie y su distribución en Colombia. Se proporciona una clave para la identificación de las larvas de tercer estadio conocidas de las especies del género Ancognatha Erichson.The third instar larva and pupa of Ancognatha ustulata Burmeister, 1847 (Coleoptera: Melolonthidae: Dynastinae: Cyclocephalini are described and illustrated for the first time. New data on larval biology and distribution of the species in Colombia are included. A key to the known third stage larvae of Ancognatha Erichson is provided.

  6. Sex- and Size-Related Patterns of Carrion Visitation in Necrodes littoralis (Coleoptera: Silphidae) and Creophilus maxillosus (Coleoptera: Staphylinidae).

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    Mądra-Bielewicz, Anna; Frątczak-Łagiewska, Katarzyna; Matuszewski, Szymon

    2017-09-01

    The estimation of postmortem interval (PMI) based on successional patterns of adult insects is largely limited, due to the lack of potential PMI markers. Sex and size of adult insects could be easily used for such estimation. In this study, sex- and size-related patterns of carrion attendance by adult insects were analyzed in Necrodes littoralis (Coleoptera: Silphidae) and Creophilus maxillosus (Coleoptera: Staphylinidae). For both species, abundance of males and females changed similarly during decomposition. A slightly female-biased sex ratio was recorded in N. littoralis. Females of N. littoralis started visiting carcasses, on average, one day earlier than males. There was a rise in size of males of N. littoralis at the end of decomposition, whereas for females of both species and males of C. maxillosus, no size-related patterns of carrion visitation were found. Current results demonstrate that size and sex of adult carrion beetles are poor indicators of PMI. © 2016 American Academy of Forensic Sciences.

  7. Os grupos tróficos em Coleoptera The trophic groups in Coleoptera

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    Renato C. Marinoni

    2001-03-01

    Full Text Available The beetles are a useful group for studies on trophic structure of communities, mainly in forested areas. These kind of studies are based on food habits of species groups. The different terms applied to nomminated these groups (trophic category, ecologic group, trophic group, guild, trophic guild are discussed. The term trophic group, a natural unity, is proposed to form a group of species with the same food habits, not considering the trophic level. The guild, an artificial unity, is recognized as an important tool to group organisms group that use the same resources as defined by the investigator (Hawkins & MacMaiion, 1989; Simberloff & Dayan 1991; Wilson 1999. The known alimentary habits of Coleoptera are classified in five trophic groups - herbivores, algivores, fungívores, detrivores and carnivores. Within each trophic group, subgroups are recognized. The subgroup are in a lower hierarchic level and are defined by morphological (herbivores, taxonomic (fungivores atributes of the food, by the food origin (detrivores and by the way that the food is obtained (carnivores. A food resource diagram showing connections among the trophic groups, based on consumer-consumed (predator-prey relations, is presented.

  8. A catalogue of Lithuanian beetles (Insecta, Coleoptera)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamutis, Vytautas; Tamutė, Brigita; Ferenca, Romas

    2011-01-01

    Abstract This paper presents the first complete and updated list of all 3597 species of beetles (Insecta: Coleoptera) belonging to 92 familiesfound and published in Lithuania until 2011, with comments also provided on the main systematic and nomenclatural changes since the last monographic treatment in two volumes (Pileckis and Monsevičius 1995, 1997). The introductory section provides a general overview of the main features of the territory of Lithuania, the origins and formation of the beetle fauna and their conservation, the faunistic investigations in Lithuania to date revealing the most important stages of the faunistic research process with reference to the most prominent scientists, an overview of their work, and their contribution to Lithuanian coleopteran faunal research. Species recorded in Lithuania by some authors without reliable evidence and requiring further confirmation with new data are presented in a separate list, consisting of 183 species. For the first time, analysis of errors in works of Lithuanian authors concerning data on coleopteran fauna has been conducted and these errors have been corrected. All available published and Internet sources on beetles found in Lithuania have been considered in the current study. Over 630 literature sources on species composition of beetles, their distribution in Lithuania and neighbouring countries, and taxonomic revisions and changes are reviewed and cited. An alphabetical list of these literature sources is presented. After revision of public beetle collections in Lithuania, the authors propose to remove 43 species from the beetle species list of the country on the grounds, that they have been wrongly identified or published by mistake. For reasons of clarity, 19 previously noted but later excluded species are included in the current checklist with comments. Based on faunal data from neighbouring countries, species expected to occur in Lithuania are matnioned. In total 1390 species are attributed to this

  9. A catalogue of Lithuanian beetles (Insecta: Coleoptera

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vytautas Tamutis

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the first complete and updated list of all 3597 species of beetles (Insecta: Coleoptera belonging to 92 families found and published in Lithuania until 2011, with comments also provided on the main systematic and nomenclatural changes since the last monograic treatment (Pileckis and Monsevičius 1995, 1997. The introductory section provides a general overview of the main features of territory of the Lithuania, the origins and formation of the beetle fauna and their conservation, the faunistic investigations in Lithuania to date revealing the most important stages of the faunistic research process with reference to the most prominent scientists, an overview of their work, and their contribution to Lithuanian coleopteran faunal research.Species recorded in Lithuania by some authors without reliable evidence and requiring further confirmation with new data are presented in a separate list, consisting of 183 species. For the first time, analysis of errors in works of Lithuanian authors concerning data on coleopteran fauna has been conducted and these errors have been corrected. All available published and Internet sources on beetles found in Lithuania have been considered in the current study. Over 630 literature sources on species composition of beetles, their distribution in Lithuania and neighbouring countries, and taxonomic revisions and changes are reviewed and cited. An alphabetical list of these literature sources is presented. After revision of public beetle collections in Lithuania, the authors propose to remove 43 species from the beetle species list of the country on the grounds, that they have been wrongly identified or published by mistake. For reasons of clarity, 19 previously noted but later excluded species are included in the current checklist with comments. Based on faunal data from neighbouring countries, species expected to occur in Lithuania are also mentioned. In total 1390 species are attributed to this

  10. UMA NOVA ESPÉCIE DE SPASALUS (COLEOPTERA PASSALIDAE) DO ALTO RIO NEGRO. AMAZONAS, BRASIL.

    OpenAIRE

    Fonseca,Claudio Ruy Vasconcelos da

    1992-01-01

    Spasalus ellanae, uma nova eepécie PASSALIDAE (COLEOPTERA) alto rio Negro, Amazonas, Brasil, é descrita e ilustrada. Spasalus ellanae n. sp. from Negro river, Amazonas, Brazil, is described and illustrated.

  11. A predictive distribution model for Graphoderus bilineatus in the Netherlands (Coleoptera: Dytiscidae).

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sierdsema, H.; Cuppen, J.G.M.

    2006-01-01

    Een voorspellend verspreidingsmodel voor de gestreepte waterroofkever Graphoderus bilineatus in Nederland (Coleoptera: Dytiscidae) Op verzoek van de Provincie Zuid-Holland en het Ministerie van lnv is het huidige voorkomen en de biotoopvoorkeur van de gestreepte waterroofkever Graphoderus bilineatus

  12. Host range specificity of Scymnus camptodromus (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae), a predator of hemlock woolly adelgid (Hemiptera: Adelgidae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samita Limbu; Katie Cassidy; Melody Keena; Patrick Tobin; Kelli Hoover

    2015-01-01

    Scymnus (Neopullus) camptodromus Yu and Liu (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae) was brought to the United States from China as a potential biological control agent for hemlock woolly adelgid (Adelges tsugae Annand) (Hemiptera: Adelgidae). Scymnus camptodromus phenology is...

  13. Scymnus camptodromus (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae) larval development and predation of hemlock woolly adelgid (Hemiptera: Adelgidae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samita Limbu; Melody A. Keena; David Long; Nancy Ostiguy; Kelli. Hoover

    2015-01-01

    Development time and prey consumption of Scymnus (Neopullus) camptodromus Yu and Liu (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae) larvae by instar, strain, and temperature were evaluated. S. camptodromus, a specialist predator of hemlock woolly adelgid Adelges tsugae (Annand) (Hemiptera:...

  14. An unusual new species of Micraspis Chevrolat (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae) from northeastern India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poorani, J

    2014-01-01

    Micraspispusillus sp. n. (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae) is described and illustrated from the northeastern region of India. It is unusual in possessing very large eye canthus and is the smallest species of the genus known from India so far.

  15. A new species of Scymnobius Casey (Coleoptera, Coccinellidae, Scymnini from Pernambuco, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Adriano Giorgi

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available A new species of Scymnobius Casey (Coleoptera, Coccinellidae, Scymnini from Pernambuco, Brazil. Scymnobius pernambucensis sp. nov. from Pernambuco, Brazil, is described and illustrated. This is the third species of this genus recorded from Brazil.

  16. Two new fossil species of Cryptocephalus Geoffroy (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae) from Baltic and Dominican Amber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Two new species of Cryptocephalus Geoffroy (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae) are described and illustrated from fossil resin: Cryptocephalus groehni sp. nov (Baltic amber) and Cryptocephalus kheelorum sp. nov. (Dominican amber). These are the first described species of Cryptocephalinae from fossil resin. ...

  17. Illustrated guide to the emerald ash borer, Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire and related species (Coleoptera, Buprestidae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The 33 species of Agrilus (Coleoptera: Buprestidae) hypothesized to be most closely related to Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire (the emerald ash borer), are described and illustrated. Morphology (adults and immatures), biology, distribution, detailed taxonomic history and systematics are presented fo...

  18. Significantly higher Carabid beetle (Coleoptera: Carabidae) catch in conventionally than in organically managed Christmas tree plantations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bagge, Søren; Lund, Malthe; Rønn, Regin

    2012-01-01

    trapped carabid beetles (Coleoptera, Carabidae) varied between conventionally and organically managed Caucasian Fir (Abies nordmanniana (Stev.)) plantations, in northern Zealand, Denmark. We recorded significantly higher numbers of carabid beetle specimens and species at conventionally than at organically...

  19. Parasitylenchus sp. (Tylenchomorpha: Allantonematidae) parasitizing field populations of Harmonia axyridis (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harding, Susanne; Poinar, George O. Jr.; Dimitrova, Desislava V.

    2011-01-01

    Adults of the invasive harlequin ladybird, Harmonia axyridis (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae), were found to be parasitized by nematodes (Tylenchomorpha: Allantonematidae) in Denmark. The nematodes were identified as Parasitylenchus sp. Major morphological characters of the nematodes did not differ...

  20. Review of the tribe Hyperaspidini Mulsant (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae) from Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biranvand, Amir; Tomaszewska, Wioletta; Nedvěd, Oldřich; Khormizi, Mehdi Zare; Nicolas, Vincent; Canepari, Claudio; Shakarami, Jahanshir; Fekrat, Lida; Fürsch, Helmut

    2017-02-22

    The Iranian species of the tribe Hyperaspidini Mulsant, 1846 (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae) are reviewed. The current list includes 12 species, all placed in a single genus Hyperaspis Chevrolat, 1836. Hyperapsis asiatica Lewis, 1896 and H. pumila Mulsant, 1850 are excluded from the Iranian list of Coccinellidae. Diagnoses of the tribe Hyperaspidini and the genus Hyperaspis are given. Images of adult beetles and diagnostic characters of the male genitalia of all species distributed in Iran are shown. A key to identification of the species is presented. Distribution records are provided for each species along with information on host plants and prey species when available.

  1. Revision of the genus Endochilus Weise (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae: Chilocorini).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Łączyński, Piotr; Tomaszewska, Wioletta

    2014-05-20

    The members of the endemic African genus Endochilus Weise, 1898 (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae: Chilocorini) are redescribed, diagnosed, and illustrated. Lectotypes are designated for Endochilus compater Weise, Endochilus minor Weise, Endochilus plagiatus Sicard, Endochilus rubicundus Weise, and Endochilus styx Sicard. One new species is described: Endochilus abdominalis sp nov. Notes on the genus and nomenclatural history for each species are provided. A key for identification of all species is presented. Adult characters concerning similarities of Endochilus to other genera of African Chilocorini are discussed. This is an open access paper. We use the Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 license that permits unrestricted use, provided that the paper is properly attributed.

  2. Papel dos besouros (Insecta, Coleoptera na Entomologia Forense

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wellington Emanuel dos Santos

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Esse trabalho apresenta uma revisão do papel que os besouros (Insecta, Coleoptera desempenham na Entomologia Forense. Discussões sobre ocorrência em cadáveres humanos e carcaças animais, estimativas de Intervalo Pós-Morte (IPM, estudos realizados no Brasil e em outros países, principais famílias de importância forense e aspectos biológicos, ecológicos e biogeográficos das espécies são apresentadas.

  3. Papel dos besouros (Insecta, Coleoptera) na Entomologia Forense

    OpenAIRE

    Wellington Emanuel dos Santos

    2014-01-01

    Esse trabalho apresenta uma revisão do papel que os besouros (Insecta, Coleoptera) desempenham na Entomologia Forense. Discussões sobre ocorrência em cadáveres humanos e carcaças animais, estimativas de Intervalo Pós-Morte (IPM), estudos realizados no Brasil e em outros países, principais famílias de importância forense e aspectos biológicos, ecológicos e biogeográficos das espécies são apresentadas.

  4. Revision of the genus Altitatiayus Weinreich(Coleoptera, Lucanidae, Lucaninae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paschoal C. Grossi

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Revision of the genus Altitatiayus Weinreich (Coleoptera, Lucanidae, Lucaninae. The South American genus Altitatiayus Weinreich is revised and now includes six species, A. rotundatus (Boileau, A. ruficollis (Lüderwaldt, A. godinhorum (Bomans & Arnaud, A. dulceae (Bomans & Arnaud, A. trifurcatus (Grossi & Racca-Filho and A. koikei sp. nov. (Minas Gerais, Brazil. All species are described and illustrated. For the first time male and female genitalia are illustrated for five species and observations on the behavior of two species are included.

  5. The tribe Phanaeini (Coleoptera: Scarabaeidae: Scarabaeinae in Peru

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis Figueroa

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available We examine the occurrence of the tribe Phanaeini (Coleoptera: Scarabaeidae: Scarabaeinae in Peru based on the collection at Museo de Historia Natural of the Universidad Nacional Mayor de San Marcos and on data provided in literature. Each species is presented with citations of its diagnosis, distribution and related comments. Peruvian Phanaeini includes 30 species in nine genera: Coprophanaeus, Dendropaemon, Gromphas, Oruscatus, Oxysternon, Phanaeus, Sulcophanaeus, Tetramereia and Megatharsis. Oruscatus davus is the only species distributed in the high Andes; Phanaeus lunaris and P. achilles occur in the northern arid zone shared by Peru and Ecuador; the remaining species are Amazonian.

  6. Revision of the Australian Ceratocanthinae (Coleoptera, Scarabaeoidea, Hybosoridae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alberto Ballerio

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available The Australian fauna of Ceratocanthinae (Coleoptera, Scarabaeoidea, Hybosoridae is revised. Two genera are present, both shared with Asia, with a total of seven species, all localized in eastern Queensland and all except one, endemic to Australia. Cyphopisthes is comprised of three species, two of them new (Cyphopisthes yorkensis sp. n. and C. monteithi sp. n., the latter, together with C. descarpentriesi Paulian, 1977 displaying an unusual ecology, with occurrence in the southern Queensland dry rainforest/scrub habitats, and Pterorthochaetes is comprised of four species, two of them new (Pterorthochaetes danielsi sp. n. and P.storeyi sp. n.. Descriptions, distribution, ecological remarks and a key to species are provided.

  7. Ground beetles (Coleoptera, Carabidae agrocenoses of spring and winter wheat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luboš Purchart

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available On two monitoring areas of the Central Institute for Supervising and Testing in Agriculture (ÚKZÚZ loaded with risk elements we carried out investigations of beetles of the family Carabidae (Coleoptera in agricultural stands of winter and spring wheat. The focus of the present study is on synecological characteristics and in some extent on the impact of agricultural practise on the population and seasonal dynamics of the most important representatives of ground beetles. This paper precedes the following article aimed to contents of heavy metals in ground beetles.

  8. Checklist of beetles (Coleoptera of Canada and Alaska. Second edition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yves Bousquet

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available All 8237 species-group taxa of Coleoptera known to occur in Canada and Alaska are recorded by province/territory or state, along with their author(s and year of publication, in a classification framework. Only presence of taxa in each Canadian province or territory and Alaska is noted. Labrador is considered a distinct geographical entity. Adventive and Holarctic species-group taxa are indicated. References to pertinent identification keys are given under the corresponding supraspecific taxa in the data archive.

  9. Checklist of beetles (Coleoptera) of Canada and Alaska. Second edition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bousquet, Yves; Bouchard, Patrice; Davies, Anthony E.; Sikes, Derek S.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract All 8237 species-group taxa of Coleoptera known to occur in Canada and Alaska are recorded by province/territory or state, along with their author(s) and year of publication, in a classification framework. Only presence of taxa in each Canadian province or territory and Alaska is noted. Labrador is considered a distinct geographical entity. Adventive and Holarctic species-group taxa are indicated. References to pertinent identification keys are given under the corresponding supraspecific taxa in the data archive. PMID:24363590

  10. Variations on a Theme: Antennal Lobe Architecture across Coleoptera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kollmann, Martin; Schmidt, Rovenna; Heuer, Carsten M; Schachtner, Joachim

    2016-01-01

    Beetles comprise about 400,000 described species, nearly one third of all known animal species. The enormous success of the order Coleoptera is reflected by a rich diversity of lifestyles, behaviors, morphological, and physiological adaptions. All these evolutionary adaptions that have been driven by a variety of parameters over the last about 300 million years, make the Coleoptera an ideal field to study the evolution of the brain on the interface between the basic bauplan of the insect brain and the adaptions that occurred. In the current study we concentrated on the paired antennal lobes (AL), the part of the brain that is typically responsible for the first processing of olfactory information collected from olfactory sensilla on antenna and mouthparts. We analyzed 63 beetle species from 22 different families and thus provide an extensive comparison of principal neuroarchitecture of the AL. On the examined anatomical level, we found a broad diversity including AL containing a wide range of glomeruli numbers reaching from 50 to 150 glomeruli and several species with numerous small glomeruli, resembling the microglomerular design described in acridid grasshoppers and diving beetles, and substructures within the glomeruli that have to date only been described for the small hive beetle, Aethina tumida. A first comparison of the various anatomical features of the AL with available descriptions of lifestyle and behaviors did so far not reveal useful correlations. In summary, the current study provides a solid basis for further studies to unravel mechanisms that are basic to evolutionary adaptions of the insect olfactory system.

  11. Complete mitochondrial genome of Cryptolestes pusillus (Coleoptera: Laemophloeidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Lei; Liu, Guanghua; Sun, Tanyi; Xin, Tianrong; Li, Meiyun; Zou, Zhiwen; Xia, Bin

    2016-09-01

    In this study, the complete mitochondrial genome of Cryptolestes pusillus (GenBank accession number KT070713) was sequenced by long PCR and primer walking methods. The total length of mitochondrial DNA is 15 502 bp and contains 13 protein-coding genes, two ribosomal RNA genes, 22 transfer RNA genes, and a A + T-rich region. The base composition of the genome is A (39.04%), T (37.07%), C (23.4%), and G (14.6%). Except for COI and ATP8 with TCC and ATC as start codon, respectively, the remaining protein-coding genes initiated with the three orthodox start codons. Two complete stop codons (TAA and TAG) and two incomplete stop codons (COIII stop with T and ND5 stop with TA) were used in the protein-coding genes. The A + T-rich region is located between 12s rRNA and tRNA(Ile) with the length of 859 bp. The phylogenetic relationships of Coleoptera species were constructed based on the nucleotide sequences of 13 protein-coding genes of mitogenome using the neighbor-joining method. The molecular-based phylogenetic analysis supported the traditional morphological classification on relationships within Coleoptera species.

  12. Rove beetles of medical importance in Brazil (Coleoptera, Staphylinidae, Paederinae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliana S. Vieira

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Rove beetles of medical importance in Brazil (Coleoptera, Staphylinidae, Paederinae. The rove beetles of the genus Paederus Fabricius, 1775 are the most important group within Coleoptera causing dermatitis around the world. The medical importance of Paederus depends on its toxic hemolymph released when these beetles are crushed on human skin. The effects are mainly dermatitis linearis and some sporadic cases of conjunctivitis. In Brazil seven species of Paederus are known to cause dermatitis: P. amazonicus Sharp, 1876, P. brasiliensis Erichson, 1840, P. columbinus Laporte, 1835, P. ferus Erichson, 1840, P. mutans Sharp, 1876, P. protensus Sharp, 1876 stat. rev., and Paederus rutilicornis Erichson, 1840. Paederus mutans and P. protensus are for the first time recorded as of medical importance, whereas the record of P. rutilicornis in Brazil is doubtful. All seven species are redescribed and a dichotomous key is provided. The geographic distributions of all species are documented. The results provided here include the most recent and relevant taxonomic revision of Paederus of the Neotropical region, the first identification key for Brazilian species and the increase of recorded species of medical importance in the world.

  13. The life history and immature stages of the weevil Anthonomus monostigma Champion (Coleoptera: Curculiondidae) on Miconia calvescens DC (Melastomataceae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eduardo Chacón-Madrigal; M.Tracy Johnson; Paul. Hanson

    2012-01-01

    We describe and illustrate the life history and immature stages of Anthonomus monostigma Champion (Curculionidae: Curculioninae: Anthonomini). This weevil is a fruit borer in Miconia calvescens DC (Melastomataceae), a Neotropical tree that is invasive in Pacific islands. The larva has three instars, and development from egg to...

  14. Evaluating the impact of invasive species in forest landscapes: the southern pine beetle and the hemlock woolly adelgid

    Science.gov (United States)

    John D. Waldron; Robert N. Coulson; David M. Cairns; Charles W. Lafon; Maria D. Tchakerian; Weimin Xi; Kier Klepzig; Andrew. Birt

    2010-01-01

    The southern pine beetle, Dendroctonus frontalis (Zimmerman) (Coleoptera: Curculionidae: Scolytinae) (SPB), is an indigenous invasive species that infests and causes mortality to pines (Pinus spp.) throughout the Southern United States. The hemlock woolly adelgid, Adelges tsugae (Annand) (Homoptera:...

  15. The potential of using botanical insecticides for the control of the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The potential of using botanical insecticides for the control of the banana weevil, Cosmopolites sordidus(Coleoptera: Curculionidae). W Tinzaara, W Tushemereirwe, CK Nankinga, CS Gold, I Kashaija ...

  16. Visualizing the mesothoracic spiracles in a bark beetle: The coffee berry borer, Hypothenemus hampei

    Science.gov (United States)

    In a low-temperature scanning electron microscopy study aimed at determining whether the coffee berry borer (Hypothenemus hampei (Ferrari); Coleoptera: Curculionidae: Scolytinae) possesses mycangia, we fortuitously detected the mesothoracic spiracles, which are usually concealed. The mesothoracic s...

  17. Catalogue of Tenebrionidae (Coleoptera of North America

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yves Bousquet

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available This catalogue includes all valid family-group (8 subfamilies, 52 tribes, 14 subtribes, genus-group (349 genera, 86 subgenera, and species-group names (2825 species, 215 subspecies of darkling beetles (Coleoptera: Tenebrionidae known to occur in North America1 and their available synonyms. Data on extant, subfossil and fossil taxa are given. For each name the author and year and page number of the description are provided, with additional information (e.g., type species for genus-group names, author of synonymies for invalid taxa depending on the taxon rank. Several new nomenclatural acts are included. One new genus, Lepidocnemeplatia Bousquet and Bouchard, is described. Spelaebiosis Bousquet and Bouchard [for Ardoinia Özdikmen, 2004], Blapstinus marcuzzii Aalbu [for Blapstinus kulzeri Marcuzzi, 1977], and Hymenorus campbelli Bouchard [for Hymenorus oculatus Doyen and Poinar, 1994] are proposed as new replacement names. Supporting evidence is provided for the conservation of usage of Tarpela micans (Fabricius, 1798 nomen protectum over Tarpela vittata (Olivier, 1793 nomen oblitum. The generic names Psilomera Motschulsky, 1870 [= Stenomorpha Solier, 1836], Steneleodes Blaisdell, 1909 [= Xysta Eschscholtz, 1829], Ooconibius Casey, 1895 and Euconibius Casey, 1895 [= Conibius LeConte, 1851] are new synonyms (valid names in square brackets. The following 127 new synonymies of species-group names, listed in their original combination, are proposed (valid names, in their current combination, placed in square brackets: Bothrasida mucorea Wilke, 1922 [= Pelecyphorus guanajuatensis (Champion, 1884]; Parasida zacualpanicola Wilke, 1922 [= Pelecyphorus asidoides Solier, 1836]; Stenosides kulzeri Pallister, 1954, Stenosides bisinuatus Pallister, 1954, and Parasida trisinuata Pallister, 1954 [= Pelecyphorus dispar (Champion, 1892]; Asida favosa Champion, 1884 and Asida similata Champion, 1884 [= Pelecyphorus fallax (Champion, 1884]; Ologlyptus bicarinatus

  18. Catalogue of Tenebrionidae (Coleoptera) of North America

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bousquet, Yves; Thomas, Donald B.; Bouchard, Patrice; Smith, Aaron D.; Aalbu, Rolf L.; Johnston, M. Andrew; Jr., Warren E. Steiner

    2018-01-01

    Abstract This catalogue includes all valid family-group (8 subfamilies, 52 tribes, 14 subtribes), genus-group (349 genera, 86 subgenera), and species-group names (2825 species, 215 subspecies) of darkling beetles (Coleoptera: Tenebrionidae) known to occur in North America1 and their available synonyms. Data on extant, subfossil and fossil taxa are given. For each name the author and year and page number of the description are provided, with additional information (e.g., type species for genus-group names, author of synonymies for invalid taxa) depending on the taxon rank. Several new nomenclatural acts are included. One new genus, Lepidocnemeplatia Bousquet and Bouchard, is described. Spelaebiosis Bousquet and Bouchard [for Ardoinia Özdikmen, 2004], Blapstinus marcuzzii Aalbu [for Blapstinus kulzeri Marcuzzi, 1977], and Hymenorus campbelli Bouchard [for Hymenorus oculatus Doyen and Poinar, 1994] are proposed as new replacement names. Supporting evidence is provided for the conservation of usage of Tarpela micans (Fabricius, 1798) nomen protectum over Tarpela vittata (Olivier, 1793) nomen oblitum. The generic names Psilomera Motschulsky, 1870 [= Stenomorpha Solier, 1836], Steneleodes Blaisdell, 1909 [= Xysta Eschscholtz, 1829], Ooconibius Casey, 1895 and Euconibius Casey, 1895 [= Conibius LeConte, 1851] are new synonyms (valid names in square brackets). The following 127 new synonymies of species-group names, listed in their original combination, are proposed (valid names, in their current combination, placed in square brackets): Bothrasida mucorea Wilke, 1922 [= Pelecyphorus guanajuatensis (Champion, 1884)]; Parasida zacualpanicola Wilke, 1922 [= Pelecyphorus asidoides Solier, 1836]; Stenosides kulzeri Pallister, 1954, Stenosides bisinuatus Pallister, 1954, and Parasida trisinuata Pallister, 1954 [= Pelecyphorus dispar (Champion, 1892)]; Asida favosa Champion, 1884 and Asida similata Champion, 1884 [= Pelecyphorus fallax (Champion, 1884)]; Ologlyptus bicarinatus

  19. Vertical stratification of beetles (Coleoptera) and flies (Diptera) in temperate forest canopies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maguire, Dorothy Y; Robert, Katleen; Brochu, Kristen; Larrivée, Maxim; Buddle, Christopher M; Wheeler, Terry A

    2014-02-01

    Forest canopies support high arthropod biodiversity, but in temperate canopies, little is known about the spatial distribution of these arthropods. This is an important first step toward understanding ecological roles of insects in temperate canopies. The objective of this study was to assess differences in the species composition of two dominant and diverse taxa (Diptera and Coleoptera) along a vertical gradient in temperate deciduous forest canopies. Five sugar maple trees from each of three deciduous forest sites in southern Quebec were sampled using a combination of window and trunk traps placed in three vertical strata (understory, mid-canopy, and upper-canopy) for three sampling periods throughout the summer. Coleoptera species richness and abundance did not differ between canopy heights, but more specimens and species of Diptera were collected in the upper-canopy. Community composition of Coleoptera and Diptera varied significantly by trap height. Window traps collected more specimens and species of Coleoptera than trunk traps, although both trap types should be used to maximize representation of the entire Coleoptera community. There were no differences in abundance, diversity, or composition of Diptera collected between trap types. Our data confirm the relevance of sampling all strata in a forest when studying canopy arthropod biodiversity.

  20. Acoustic detection of Rhynchophorus ferrugineus (Coleoptera: Dryophthoridae) and Oryctes elegans (Coleoptera: Scarabaeidae) in Phoenix dactylifera (Arecales: Arecacae) trees and offshoots in Saudi Arabian orchards

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhynchophorus ferrugineus (Olivier) (Coleoptera: Dryophthoridae) larvae are cryptic, internal-tissue feeding pests of palm trees that are difficult to detect until after they have caused severe economic damage; consequently, infestations may remain undetected until they are widespread in an orchard....