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Sample records for curculio conotrachelus nenuphar

  1. Behavioral and electroantennogram responses of plum curculio, Conotrachelus nenuphar, to selected noxious plant extracts and insecticides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gӧkçe, A; Stelinski, L L; Nortman, D R; Bryan, W W; Whalon, M E

    2014-01-01

    Behavioral and electroantennogram responses of plum curculio, Conotrachelus nenuphar (Herbst) (Coleoptera: Curculionidae), adults were tested for several methanolic plant extracts and organically approved insecticides. Plant extracts were evaluated for their potential as antifeedants or oviposition deterrents. These extract responses were also compared to those elicited by the non-neurotoxic, organic irritant-insecticide kaolin clay. Both sexes of plum curculio exhibited antennal response as measured by electroantennogram, which ranged from 0.2 to 1.1 mV, to plant extracts and the organic irritant/insecticide, with the greatest response to the extract of rough cocklebur, Xanthium strumarium L. (1.1 mV). No choice tests were conducted to compare feeding and oviposition by plum curculio on untreated apples or on apples treated with one of the extracts or the insecticide. The insecticide pyrethrum and extracts of X. strumarium and greater burdock, Arctium lappa L., significantly reduced feeding. Also, pyrethrum, A. lappa, Humulus lupulus L. (common hop), X. strumarium, and Verbascum songaricum Schrenk extracts completely inhibited egg deposition. In no-choice assays, the effects of kaolin clay with incorporated plant extracts on plum curculio feeding and oviposition were monitored as complementary tests. A. lappa-kaolin, H. lupulus-kaolin, and X. strumarium-kaolin mixtures significantly reduced the feeding of plum curculio compared to the control or kaolin clay alone. Each of the plant extract-kaolin mixtures evaluated, with the exception of Bifora radians Bieberstein (wild bishop), completely inhibited plum curculio oviposition as compared to controls.

  2. Ovicidal Activity of Organophosphate, Oxadiazine, Neonicotinoid and Insect Growth Regulator Chemistries on Northern Strain Plum Curculio, Conotrachelus nenuphar

    OpenAIRE

    Hoffmann, Eric J.; Middleton, Samantha M.; Wise, John C.

    2008-01-01

    An in vitro method was developed for assessing ovicidal effects of the organophosphate azinphos-methyl, the neonicotioids thiacloprid, thiamethoxam and clothianidin, the oxadiazine indoxacarb and the insect growth regulators novaluron and pyriproxifen on the plum curculio, Conotrachelus nenuphar (Herbst)(Coleoptera: Curculionidae). The baseline survivorship of this method was 88 percent. Plum curculio eggs were most sensitive to azinphos-methyl. Thiacloprid, clothianidin and the chitin synthe...

  3. Establishing abiotic and biotic factors necessary for reliable male pheromone production and attraction to pheromones by female plum curculios Conotrachelus nenuphar (Coleoptera: Curculionidae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The plum curculio Conotrachelus nenuphar (Herbst) (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) is a key pest of stone and pome fruit. Though grandisoic acid was identified as a male-produced aggregation pheromone for this species, other components likely exist, as have been identified various curculionids. To determ...

  4. Behavioral responses of plum curculio (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) to different enantiomer concentrations and blends of the synthetic aggregation pheromone grandisoic acid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Host plant odors are important for insect location of food and mates. Synergy between host plant odors and aggregation pheromones occurs in many Curculionidae species. The plum curculio Conotrachelus nenuphar Herbst (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) is a major pest of pome and stone fruit. Males produce t...

  5. Precise and low-cost monitoring of plum curculio (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) pest activity in pyramid traps with cameras.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selby, R D; Gage, S H; Whalon, M E

    2014-04-01

    Incorporating camera systems into insect traps potentially benefits insect phenology modeling, nonlethal insect monitoring, and research into the automated identification of traps counts. Cameras originally for monitoring mammals were instead adapted to monitor the entrance to pyramid traps designed to capture the plum curculio, Conotrachelus nenuphar (Herbst) (Coleoptera: Curculionidae). Using released curculios, two new trap designs (v.I and v.II) were field-tested alongside conventional pyramid traps at one site in autumn 2010 and at four sites in autumn 2012. The traps were evaluated on the basis of battery power, ease-of-maintenance, adaptability, required-user-skills, cost (including labor), and accuracy-of-results. The v.II design fully surpassed expectations, except that some trapped curculios were not photographed. In 2012, 13 of the 24 traps recorded every curculio entering the traps during the 18-d study period, and in traps where some curculios were not photographed, over 90% of the omissions could be explained by component failure or external interference with the motion sensor. Significantly more curculios entered the camera traps between 1800 and 0000 hours. When compared with conventional pyramid traps, the v.I traps collected a similar number of curculios. Two observed but not significant trends were that the v.I traps collected twice as many plum curculios as the v.II traps, while at the same time the v.II traps collected more than twice as many photos per plum curculio as the v.I traps. The research demonstrates that low-cost, precise monitoring of field insect populations is feasible without requiring extensive technical expertise.

  6. Field efficacy of entomopathogenic fungi and nematodes targeting caged last-instar plum curculio (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) in Michigan cherry and apple orchards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereault, R J; Whalon, M E; Alston, D G

    2009-08-01

    The plum curculio (Conotrachelus nenuphar Herbst) is a key pest of pome and stone fruit in eastern North America. We tested the efficacy of five pathogens over the course of three seasons in 10 Michigan apple and cherry orchards, with introductions of larvae to caged pots containing pathogen-treated soil. The nematode Steinernema riobrave was the most effective pathogen in the 2 yr it was tested, but only in soils with the highest sand content (81-88%) and when it was applied 1 h or 5 d after last instars of plum curculio. S. carpocapsae in an organic formulation was less effective, but significantly reduced plum curculio emergence in 1 yr of the study when applied 3 d before C. nenuphar larvae were introduced. Beauveria bassiana was effective in only 1 of the 3 yr it was tested, only in soils with lower sand content, and only when it was introduced within 1 h of plum curculio larvae. Metarhizium anisopliae and Heterorhabditis bacteriophora were ineffective. Michigan orchards may require sprinkler irrigation coupled with precise timing recommendations and oviposition monitoring to enhance entomopathogen application efficacy against soil-dwelling last instars.

  7. Phenology and infestation patterns of plum curculio (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) on four highbush blueberry cultivars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polavarapu, Sridhar; Kyryczenko-Roth, Vera; Barry, James D

    2004-12-01

    The plum curculio, Conotrachelus nenuphar (Herbst), is a well known pest in apple and peach orchards, but it also is capable of having an economic impact in highbush blueberries. Host phenology and plum curculio oviposition patterns were determined on four highbush blueberry cultivars differing in fruit maturation period. Numbers of oviposition scars were higher on early- ('Weymouth') and mid-season ('Duke' and 'Bluecrop') blueberries than on late-season 'Elliott' in 2001, 2002, and 2003. In 2002, eggs were first present on the three earliest cultivars 21 d before those on 'Elliott', whereas eggs were found on 'Elliott' >40 d after the last sample with eggs for the other three cultivars. The pattern of host phenology and infestation levels suggested that plum curculio oviposition synchronizes well with the availability of suitable fruit for oviposition on early and mid-season cultivars compared with a late-season cultivar of highbush blueberries. The implications of a transition to use of reduced-risk insecticides are discussed in relation to plum curculio management.

  8. Description and key to larvae of Curculio spp. of eastern United States and Canada (coleoptera: Curculionidae)

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    Lester P. Gibson

    1985-01-01

    A general description of Curculio larvae is given. Ke y characters are presented to separate 15 of the 16 described species of eastern North America. A brief key for separating Curculio larvae from Conotrachelus and lepidopterous larvae is presented.

  9. Effectiveness of odor-baited trap trees for plum curculio (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) monitoring in commercial apple orchards in the northeast.

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    Piñero, Jaime C; Agnello, Arthur M; Tuttle, Arthur; Leskey, Tracy C; Faubert, Heather; Koehler, Glen; Los, Lorraine; Morin, Glenn; Leahy, Kathleen; Cooley, Daniel R; Prokopy, Ronald J

    2011-10-01

    The plum curculio, Conotrachelus nenuphar (Herbst), is a key pest of pome and stone fruit in eastern and central North America. For effective management of this insect pest in commercial apple (Malus spp.) orchards in the northeastern United States and Canada, one of the greatest challenges has been to determine the need for and timing of insecticide applications that will protect apple fruit from injury by adults. In a 2004-2005 study, we assessed the efficacy and economic viability of a reduced-risk integrated pest management strategy involving an odor-baited trap tree approach to determine need for and timing of insecticide use against plum curculio based on appearance of fresh egg-laying scars. Evaluations took place in commercial apple orchards in seven northeastern U.S. states. More specifically, we compared the trap-tree approach with three calendar-driven whole-block sprays and with heat-unit accumulation models that predict how long insecticide should be applied to orchard trees to prevent injury by plum curculio late in the season. Trap tree plots received a whole-plot insecticide spray by the time of petal fall, and succeeding sprays (if needed) were applied to peripheral-row trees only, depending on a threshold of one fresh plum curculio egg-laying scar out of 25 fruit sampled from a single trap tree. In both years, level of plum curculio injury to fruit sampled from perimeter-row, the most interior-row trees and whole-plot injury in trap tree plots did not differ significantly from that recorded in plots subject to conventional management or in plots managed using the heat-unit accumulation approach. The amount of insecticide used in trap tree plots was reduced at least by 43% compared with plots managed with the conventional approach. Advantages and potential pitfalls of the bio-based trap tree approach to plum curculio monitoring in apple orchards are discussed.

  10. Abiotic factors and trap design modulate the performance of traps used to monitor the plum curculio.

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    Lamothe, Steve; Chouinard, Gérald; Vincent, Charles

    2008-12-01

    All published studies on effects of abiotic factors on plum curculio, Conotrachelus nenuphar (Hersbt), adults have taken a retrospective approach. Here, we present the results of experiments where factors and their levels were determined and controlled a priori. We compared the effectiveness of miniature pyramidal traps (45 by 20 by 20 cm) constructed of four kind of materials--wood, geotextile, nylon screening, and corrugated plastic--to monitor overwintered and summer adults of univoltine plum curculio. We also studied the effects of photoperiod, temperature, wind, and rain on pyramidal trap effectiveness. The experiments, which were replicated over time, were done in two controlled chambers that were divided into four sections, corresponding to simulated combinations (wind or no wind/rain or no rain). The temperatures tested (15, 20, and 25 degrees C) were randomly assigned in the chambers. During scotophase, geotextile traps captured significantly more overwintered and summer adults than traps made of other materials. The maximum proportion of captures (for overwintered and summer adults) during photophase was obtained at 25 degrees C, and it was significantly different than captures at 15 and 20 degrees C. During scotophase, significantly more overwintered and summer plum curculios were caught at 20 and 25 degrees C than at 15 degrees C. Our experiments demonstrated that geotextile is a good alternative to wooden pyramidal trap. Our results suggest that captures were higher 1) at night, 2) during warmer periods (20 and 25 degrees C), 3) when wind velocity was low and 4) during or shortly after rainfall, and 5) that photoperiod is a factor having an important predictive value for plum curculio captures.

  11. Curative activity of insecticides against plum curculio (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) in tart cherries.

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    Hoffmann, Eric J; Vandervoort, Christine; Wise, John C

    2009-10-01

    Tart cherry, Prunus cerasus L. variety Montmorency, fruit were infested with plum curculio, Conotrachelus nenuphar (Herbst) (Coleoptera: Curculionidae), and treated with insecticides to target late instars, neonates, and eggs. The organophosphates azinphos-methyl and phosmet and the neonicotinoid thiamethoxam reduced larval emergence rates by >90% for all life stage targets; after >30 d, few surviving larvae were found inside fruit. Acetamiprid and thiacloprid also had curative activity and yielded >75% reductions in emergence and few surviving larvae in the fruit after >30 d. The juvenile hormone analog pyriproxyfen reduced larval emergence, but 66% of fruit that was treated to target late-instars still had live larvae inside of them after >30 d. Novaluron, chlorantraniliprole, and esfenvalerate had no curative activity. Indoxacarb had limited curative activity, and all targeted life stages had larval emergence. Internal and external residues were analyzed and are discussed in relation to their penetration and curative potential. The curative activity of azinphos-methyl has played an important role in meeting federal standards for infestation-free tart cherries at processing. Regulatory changes are eliminating the use of this compound, and new integrated pest management programs for plum curculio will need to address the loss of azinphos-methyl's curative activity.

  12. Odor-baited trap trees: a new approach to monitoring plum curculio (Coleoptera: Curculionidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prokopy, Ronald J; Chandler, Bradley W; Dynok, Sara A; Piñero, Jaime C

    2003-06-01

    We compared a trap approach with a trap-tree approach to determine the need and timing of insecticide applications against overwintered adult plum curculios, Conotrachelus nenuphar (Herbst.), in commercial apple orchards in Massachusetts in 2002. All traps and trap trees were baited with benzaldehyde (attractive fruit odor) plus grandisoic acid (attractive pheromone). Sticky clear Plexiglas panel traps placed at orchard borders, designed to intercept adults immigrating from border areas by flight, captured significantly more adults than similarly placed black pyramid traps, which are designed to capture adults immigrating primarily by crawling, or Circle traps wrapped around trunks of perimeter-row trees, which are designed to intercept adults crawling up tree trunks. None of these trap types, however, exhibited amounts of captures that correlated significantly with either weekly or season-long amounts of fresh ovipositional injury to fruit by adults. Hence, none appears to offer high promise as a tool for effectively monitoring the seasonal course of plum curculio injury to apples in commercial orchards in Massachusetts. In contrast, baiting branches of selected perimeter-row trees with benzaldehyde plus grandisoic acid led to significant aggregation (14-15-fold) of ovipositional injury, markedly facilitating monitoring of the seasonal course of injury to apples. A concurrent experiment revealed that addition of other synthetic fruit odor attractants to apple trees baited with benzaldehyde plus grandisoic acid did not enhance aggregation of ovipositional injury above that of this dual combination. We conclude that monitoring apples on odor-baited trap trees for fresh ovipositional injury could be a useful new approach for determining need and timing of insecticide application against plum curculio in commercial orchards.

  13. Comparing the emergence of northern strain plum Curculio larvae from multiple fruit varieties.

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    Selby, R D; Whalon, M E

    2014-08-01

    Increasing restrictions on chemical pesticide use in orchards have encouraged the use of alternative strategies to control the northern strain of the plum curculio, Conotrachelus nenuphar (Herbst). Some of these strategies target larvae as they emerge from fruit, so existing models for larval emergence from fruit were evaluated for accuracy while examining the effect of multiple larvae and fruit type on emergence timing. Larval head width growth rate was established and used to gauge larval development. Larval emergence timing, quantified as degree-days (base 11.1 degrees C), was recorded in tart cherries on trees, and emergence timing was recorded in multiple apple varieties both in cyclical field conditions and in constant laboratory conditions. Ovipositing females and fruit were isolated, so larvae in a fruit were all siblings. Adult emergences from pupation in soil were recorded in the laboratory and compared with existing model predictions. Model predictions did not accurately reflect the timing of larval or adult emergence, and future incorporation of factors that could improve models are discussed. Colder conditions and changing host fruit type had no significant effect on larval emergence timing but changing host fruit type correlated with a shorter pupation interval. Results suggested that females preferred to oviposit on multiple fruit rather than lay multiple eggs in one fruit. Higher numbers of larvae per fruit did not significantly alter the timing of first larval emergence, although more larvae per fruit resulted in a significantly longer emergence period in apples.

  14. Plum curculio (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) adult mortality and associated fruit injury after exposure to field-aged insecticides on tart cherry branches.

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    Hoffmann, Eric J; Vandervoort, Christine; Wise, John C

    2010-08-01

    Plum curculio, Conotrachelus nenuphar (Herbst) (Coleoptera: Curculionidae), adults were exposed to field-aged residues of thiamethoxam, acetamiprid, thiacloprid, indoxacarb, or azinphos-methyl on tart cherry, Prunus cerasus L. variety Montmorency. At 1, 3, 7, and 14 d postapplication, fruit were sampled for chemical residues, and bioassays were used to assess beetle mortality and plant tissue injury. Azinphos-methyl had lethal activity within 1 d of exposure at all postapplication intervals and significant fruit protection extended to 14 d postapplication. All of the neonicotinoids had lethal activity at 3 d posttreatment, with acetamiprid activity extending to 7 d. Antifeedant and oviposition deterrent effects were seen with thiamethoxam and thiacloprid; damage incidence was significantly reduced in the absence of significant beetle mortality or intoxication. Thiamethoxam and acetamiprid penetrated into leaf and fruit tissue and were detected in the interior tissues at 14 d postapplication, but interior thiacloprid residues were not detected after day 1. Indoxacarb provided some fruit protection out to 7 d postapplication, and 14-d-old residues intoxicated beetles, but the slow action of this compound allowed significant damage to occur before beetles were incapacitated. Indoxacarb was only detected as a surface residue after the first day postapplication. These data on the plant-insect-chemistry interactions will support use and management decisions as compounds with acute contact activity are phased out.

  15. Fruit Damage Patterns Caused by Ovipositing Females of Conotrachelus dimidiatus (Coleoptera: Curculionidae in Guava Trees

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    Felipe Tafoya

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available We evaluated the damage patterns produced by females of the guava weevil Conotrachelus dimidiatus Champion, 1904 (Coleoptera: Curculionidae, according to the position of the damaged fruit in guava trees Psidium guajava L. in Calvillo, Aguascalientes, Mexico. The trees were subdivided in eight zones, and during one year the level of fruit lesions due to oviposition was registered. Results showed a higher level of damage in the upper and external zone of the trees (P≤.05. We found no significant differences in damage between the four cardinal points (P≥.05. During the year, the level of damage was recorded and was higher in the months of August and September (P≤.05 associated with rainfall (0.86, P=.06 and increase in temperature (0.84, P=.03. The most susceptible fruits were in the size range of 2.1–4.0 cm (polar diameter. The information from this study will be used to design and establish effective control strategies for the guava weevil, taking into account location of the most susceptible fruits, seasonality of the pest, and the abiotic factors.

  16. Danos de Conotrachelus dubiae (Coleoptera: curculionidae em frutos de camu-camu (Myrciaria dubia na Amazônia Central Damage of camu-camu (Myrciaria dubia fruits by Conotrachelus dubiae (Coleoptera: curculionidae in Central Amazonia

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    Sidney Alberto do Nascimento Ferreira

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available No Brasil, a ocorrência de Conotrachelus dubiae O'Brien, 1995 (Coleoptera: Curculionidae em camu-camu [Myrciaria dubia (H.B.K. McVaugh, Myrtaceae] tinha sido constatada somente em populações naturais. Relata-se sua ocorrência em um cultivo experimental, onde se avaliou os danos de C. dubiae em frutos de camu-camu, em diferentes graus de amadurecimento, entre 1999 e 2003. Os danos causados pela larva aumentaram com o amadurecimento dos frutos, havendo maior comprometimento da polpa do fruto (30 a 90% do que das sementes (7%. A incidência desse inseto pode implicar em perdas quantitativas significativas na produção de camu-camu.In Brazil, the occurrence of Conotrachelus dubiae O'Brien, 1995 (Coleoptera: Curculionidae in camu-camu [Myrciaria dubia (H.B.K. McVaugh, Myrtaceae] had only been verified in natural populations. This report describes its occurrence in an experimental cultivation, where damage of camu-camu fruits by C. dubiae at different ripening stages was evaluated between 1999 and 2003. The damage caused by the larva increased with the degree of ripening of the fruits, with greater damage of fruit pulp (30 to 90% than to seeds (7%. The incidence of this insect may cause significant quantitative losses in the camu-camu production.

  17. Infectivity of Steinernema carpocapsae and S. feltiae to larvae and adults of the hazelnut weevil, Curculio nucum: Differential virulence and entry routes

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    The hazel nut weevil, Curculio nucum, is a major pest of hazel nuts, particularly in Europe; hazel nut weevil is also closely related to other nut-attacking weevils such as pecan weevil (Curculio caryae). In this study, the basis for differential susceptibility of the hazelnut weevil (to entomopatho...

  18. Laboratory mortality and mycosis of adult Curculio caryae (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) following application of Metarhizium anisopliae in the laboratory and field

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    The pecan weevil, Curculio caryae, is a key pest of pecans. Our objective was to determine the potential of Metarhizium anisopliae to control emerging C. caryae adults. First, a laboratory test was conducted to compare four Beauveria bassiana strains (Bb GA2, BbLA3, BbMS1, and GHA) and three M. an...

  19. Field efficacy against the hazelnut weevil, Curculio nucum and short-term persistence of entomopathogenic nematodes

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    L. Batalla-Carrera

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The hazelnut weevil, Curculio nucum L. (Coleoptera: Curculionidae is a pest affecting hazelnut orchards in Europe, with an important economical repercussion. Its potential control, short-term field persistence and the vertical distribution of native entomopathogenic nematode strains were tested in Muntanyes de Prades, Tarragona (NE Iberian Peninsula over two consecutive years. Steinernema feltiae strain D114, Steinernema sp. strain D122 and Heterorhabditis bacteriophora strain DG46 were used in summer and spring applications at a dosage of 5·105 IJs m-2. The three nematode species reduced the hazelnut weevil population, ranging from 32% to 88% efficacy, without significant differences in efficacy or between the two applications. Persistence evaluation was carried out during 9 weeks for S. feltiae (D114, Steinernema sp. (D122 and H. bacteriophora (DG46 and showed all species capable of lasting for this period. Nematodes and larval vertical distribution was assessed. Most of the hazelnut weevil stayed within the first 25 cm although some were found as deep as 40 cm. Entomopathogenic nematodes were found along all 40 cm depth. This study proves the suitability of entomopathogenic nematodes to control the hazelnut weevil.

  20. Entomogenous nematodes: a field study for biological control of Curculio elephas Gyl. (Coleoptera Curculionidae); Nematodi entomoparassiti: una prova di impiego in campo della lotta contro il balanino del castagno, Curculio elephas Gyl. (Coleoptera Curculionidae)

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    Rapagnani, M.R.; Caffarelli, V.; Letardi, A.; Barlattani, M. [ENEA, Centro Ricerche Casaccia, Rome (Italy). Dipt. Innovazione; Lazzari, L.; Ruggeri, L. [BIOERRE, Crespellano, Bologna (Italy); Lelli, L.

    1999-02-01

    Biological control of chestnut weevil (Curculio elephas Gyl.) using entomogenous nematodes (Steinernematidae and Heterorhabditidae) was investigated under field conditions. Experiments of infectivity, soil persistence and mobility of the infective juveniles stage of the nematodes were carried out through laboratory tests. Experimental results on developing infectivity process if entomogenous nematodes, have shown both inhibition at low temperature (average value 12 C) and mechanic barrier of weevil pupal envelope. Use of dispersal media as water or peat, was not relevant on experimental results. Further researches are required to test low temperature-resistant strain. [Italiano] Vengono riportati i risultati di uno studio di lotta biologica contro il balanino del castagno (Curculio elephas Gyl.) realizzato utilizzando ceppi di nematodi entomoparassiti (Steinernematidae and Heterorhabditidae). Sono stati monitorati, in campo, l`andamento dell`infestazione del balanino del castagno, l`efficacia del trattamento e l`andamento della temperatura sia climatica che nel terreno a due diverse profondita`. Nel corso dello studio e` stata controllata periodicamente, con prove di laboratorio, la persistenza nel terreno e la capacita` infettiva dei nematodi utilizzati. Lo studio ha messo in evidenza la difficolta` da parte dei nematodi di esplicare la propria azione di entomoparassiti in condizioni di temperatura media attorno ai 12 C e di superare la barriera fisica operata dalla celletta entro cui si impupa il balanino. Il mezzo utilizzato per la dispersione dei nematodi (acqua o torba) risulta essere indifferente rispetto al risultato ottenuto. L`esperienza ha evidenziato l`interesse, in questo tipo di lotta, alla sperimentazione di ceppi di nematodi resistenti alle basse temperature.

  1. Harmonic radar: efficacy at detecting and recovering insects on agricultural host plants.

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    Boiteau, Gilles; Vincent, Charles; Meloche, François; Leskey, Tracy C; Colpitts, Bruce G

    2011-02-01

    In pest management research, harmonic radar systems have been largely used to study insect movement across open or vegetation-poor areas because the microwave signal is attenuated by the high water content of vegetation. This study evaluated whether the efficacy of this technology is sufficient to track insects in vegetative landscapes. Field efficacy data were collected using portable harmonic microwave radar and electronic dipole tags mounted on adults of three economically important pests: Leptinotarsa decemlineata (Say), Diabrotica virgifera virgifera (LeConte) [corrected] and Conotrachelus nenuphar Herbst. Detection and recovery of tagged Colorado potato beetles, plum curculios and western corn rootworms was high within and among potato plants, moderate within apple trees and high within, but not between, corn plants respectively. The efficacy of the radar depends on the ability of the operator to move around the host, scanning for a signal 'sightline' with the tagged insect among plant structures. The detection rate of tagged insects by harmonic radar systems is high enough to track the walking path of pests through low row crops such as potato, tall row crops such as corn or tall but well-separated trees of orchard-type crops by adapting the scanning procedure to the vegetative architecture. Copyright © 2010 Crown in the right of Canada. Published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  2. Evaluation of Pathogenicity of the Fungi Metarhizium anisopliae and Beauveria bassiana in Hazelnut Weevil (Curculio nucum L., Coleoptera, Curculionidae) Larvae.

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    Cheng, Yunqing; Liu, Ting; Zhao, Yixin; Geng, Wanting; Chen, Longtao; Liu, Jianfeng

    2016-12-01

    The nut weevil (Curculio nucum) is one of the most important and widespread pests in hazelnut orchards. In order to screen entomopathogenic fungal strains with high virulence against C. nucum, the growth rate, sporulation, and cumulative mortality of different Metarhizium anisopliae and Beauveria bassiana strains were investigated, and the process by which M. anisopliae CoM 02 infects C. nucum larvae was observed using scanning electron microscopy. The results indicated that the growth rate and sporulation of different fungal strains significantly differed. Thirteen days after inoculation with M. anisopliae CoM 02, the cumulative mortality of C. nucum larvae reached 100 %, which was considerably higher than that of the other five strains. As the most virulent of the six test strains, the cadaver rate, LT50, and LT90 of M. anisopliae CoM 02 were 93.4 %, 7.05 and 11.90 days, respectively. Analysis of the infection process by scanning electron microscopy showed that the spore attachment, hyphal germination, hyphal rapid growth, and sporulation of M. anisopliae CoM 02 occurred on the 3rd, 5th, 7th, and 11th day after inoculation, respectively, indicating that the infection cycle takes approximately 11 days. This finding suggests that the highly virulent M. anisopliae plays an important role in the biocontrol of C. nucum in China.

  3. Ciclo biológico, comportamiento y censo del picudo del camu camu, Conotrachelus dubiae O'Brien 1995 (Coleoptera: Curculionidae en Pucallpa, Perú Biological cycle, behavior and census of camu camu weevil, Conotrachelus dubiae O'Brien 1995 (Coleoptera: Curculionidae, in Pucallpa, Peru

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    Diana Perez

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available El picudo, Conotrachelus dubiae O'Brien 1995, es una de las plagas mas importantes del camu camu Myrciaria dubia H.B.K. Mc Vaugh en la Amazonía Peruana. El objetivo del presente estudio fue determinar el ciclo biológico de este insecto bajo condiciones de laboratorio y describir su comportamiento y fluctuación en condiciones de campo en Pucallpa, Ucayali, Perú. El porcentaje de eclosión de larvas fue de 87%, la duración del periodo de incubación de los huevos fue de 5,5±0,9 (4 a 7 días, del estado larval en el fruto 22,2±1,9 (20 a 25 días y en el suelo (fase pre-pupa, 54,4±5,5 (46 a 67 días, del periodo pupal 11,8±0,9 (9 a 13 días y la longevidad del adulto fue de 51,8±18,9 (9 a 75 días. Los adultos se alimentaron de frutos de diferentes diámetros y estados de maduración y de botones florales, ramas tiernas y flores. No se registró la presencia de adultos de C. dubiae en frutos secos, ni en la base del tallo, sino en ritidomas. La mayor actividad de alimentación y de reproducción de los adultos fue entre 18:30 a 22:00 h. Los adultos fueron observados en el cultivo durante todo el año, encontrándose con mayor frecuencia en los meses de enero a marzo en pisos bajos inundables y entre octubre a diciembre en tierra firme no inundable, coincidiendo con la fase de floración y fructificación de la planta.Camu camu weevil Conotrachelus dubiae O'Brien, 1995 is a one of the main pests of camu camu (Myrciaria dubia H.B.K. Mc Vaugh in Peruvian Amazonia. The aim of this study was to determine the biological cycle of this insect under laboratory conditions, to describe its behavior and population numbers under field conditions in Pucallpa, Ucayali, Peru. The percentage of hatching was 87%; the egg incubation period was 5.5±0.9 (4 to 7 days; the length of the larval stage inside the fruit was 22.2±1.9 (20 to 25 days, and the length larval stage (pre-pupa underground was 54.4±5.5 (46 to 67 days. The length of pupal period was 11.8

  4. The resistance of hazel (Corylus avellana L. to hazelnut weevil (Curculio nucum L., Coleoptera, Curculionidae. Part I. Evaluation of the resistance of several cultivars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zdzisław Piskornik

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available In the course of 5 year investigations (1981-1985 considerable differences were found in the resistance of 24 hazel cultivars to hazelnut weevil (Curculio nucum L.. The resistance was determined on the basis of the percentage of nuts damaged by larvae in the total yield. Six classes of resistance were established, from class I - very resistant cultivars, to class VI - very susceptible cultivars. In feeding experiments a positive correlation, significant at the 1% and 5% level was found between the frequency of beetle feeding on hazel fruitlets during the time of oviposition (July, and the class of resistance of cultivars; a negative correlation between these parameters was found in August, i.e. during hatching and development of larvae in the nuts. In July the beetles fed more readily and more frequently on nuts of susceptible cultivars, whereas they avoided them in August, i.e. in the period when larvae developed in many fruits of these cultivars.

  5. Assessment of electron beam-induced DNA damage in larvae of chestnut weevil, Curculio sikkimensis (Heller) (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) using comet assay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Todoriki, Setsuko [Radiation and Information Technology Laboratory, National Food Research Institute, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8642 (Japan)]. E-mail: setsuko@nfri.affrc.go.jp; Hasan, Mahbub [Laboratory for Stored Product Protection, Department of Zoology, Rajshahi University, Rajshahi 6205 (Bangladesh); Miyanoshita, Akihiro [Radiation and Information Technology Laboratory, National Food Research Institute, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8642 (Japan); Imamura, Taro [Radiation and Information Technology Laboratory, National Food Research Institute, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8642 (Japan); Hayashi, Toru [Radiation and Information Technology Laboratory, National Food Research Institute, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8642 (Japan)

    2006-02-15

    Effect of electron beam treatment on DNA damage in mature larvae of chestnut weevil Curculio sikkimensis (Heller) was assessed using single-cell gel electrophoresis (DNA comet assay). Electrons at acceleration voltages of 0 (control), 300, 750, 1000, and 1500 kV at radiation doses of 1 and 4 kGy were used. Electron beam-treated chestnut larvae showed typical DNA fragmentation, compared with cells from non-treated ones which showed a more intact DNA. Investigations using the comet assay showed that the parameters including tail length, tail moment, olive tail moment as well as the quota of DNA damage at both the doses were significantly larger than the control batch larvae. Thus, this technique could contribute to analytical identification of an effective disinfestation and quarantine treatment.

  6. Assessment of electron beam-induced DNA damage in larvae of chestnut weevil, Curculio sikkimensis (Heller) (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) using comet assay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Todoriki, Setsuko; Hasan, Mahbub; Miyanoshita, Akihiro; Imamura, Taro; Hayashi, Toru

    2006-02-01

    Effect of electron beam treatment on DNA damage in mature larvae of chestnut weevil Curculio sikkimensis (Heller) was assessed using single-cell gel electrophoresis (DNA comet assay). Electrons at acceleration voltages of 0 (control), 300, 750, 1000, and 1500 kV at radiation doses of 1 and 4 kGy were used. Electron beam-treated chestnut larvae showed typical DNA fragmentation, compared with cells from non-treated ones which showed a more intact DNA. Investigations using the comet assay showed that the parameters including tail length, tail moment, olive tail moment as well as the quota of DNA damage at both the doses were significantly larger than the control batch larvae. Thus, this technique could contribute to analytical identification of an effective disinfestation and quarantine treatment.

  7. Ultrastructure in Antennal Sensilla of Curculio dentipes%柞栎象成虫触角感受器超微结构

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王重舒; 李燕; 陈玉宝; 高文韬; 孟庆繁

    2016-01-01

    为研究柞栎象( Curculio dentipes)寄主定位机制,利用环境扫描电镜对柞栎象触角形态、感受器的类型及分布特点等进行了观察。结果表明:柞栎象触角上有感受器5种类型10个亚型,分别为:刺形感受器2个亚型、毛形感受器4个亚型、锥形感受器、齿形感受器2个亚型和腔形感受器。柞栎象雌雄成虫触角性二型不明显,很难作为形态上性别鉴定的可靠依据。雄虫触角感受器数量多于雌虫,但差异不显著。柞栎象触角感受器从基部至端部(柄节至棒节第4亚节)有明显的分化趋势。%For the biological characteristics of Curculio dentipes, we used environmental scanning electron microscopy (ESEM) to observe and describe the morphology of antennal sensilla on adults of both sexes .We observed ten different types of sen-silla, two types of sensillachaetica , four types of sensillatrichodea , one type of sensillabasiconica ,two types of sensilladen -tiform and one type of sensilla cavity .The differentiation trend of antennal sensilla was not obvious , and it tended to more refined from the base to the end of antennas .Antennae of males had more sensilla than those of females , but it is not signif-icantly.There were obvious differentiation from base to top of sensilla .

  8. Variation in C:N:S stoichiometry and nutrient storage related to body size in a holometabolous insect (Curculio davidi) (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) larva.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Xiao; Small, Gaston E; Zhou, Xuan; Wang, Donger; Li, Hongwang; Liu, Chunjiang

    2015-01-01

    Body size can be an important factor controlling consumer stoichiometry. In holometabolous insects, body size is typically associated with nutrient storage. Consumer stoichiometry is known to vary within species across a range of body sizes; however, the contribution of nutrient storage to this variation is not well understood. We used the fifth-instar larvae of the oak weevil (Coleoptera: Curculio davidi Fairmaire), which is characterized by a high capacity for nutrient storage, to investigate the effect of shifts in nutrient storage with body mass on variations in larva stoichiometry. Our results showed that weevil larvae with larger body mass had a lower carbon (C) content, reflecting decreases in the sequestration rate of C-rich lipids. Larger larvae had elevated concentrations of nitrogen (N), sulfur (S), and protein. The similar patterns of variation in elemental composition and macromolecule storage with body weight indicate that the shift in nutrient storage is the main factor causing the variation in larval stoichiometry with body weight. This finding was further supported by the low variation in residual larval biomass C, N, and S concentrations after lipid extraction. These results help decipher the physiological mechanism of stoichiometric regulation in growing organisms. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Entomological Society of America.

  9. Infectivity of Steinernema carpocapsae and S. feltiae to Larvae and Adults of the Hazelnut Weevil, Curculio nucum: Differential Virulence and Entry Routes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batalla-Carrera, Laia; Morton, Ana; Shapiro-Ilan, David; Strand, Michael R; García-Del-Pino, Fernando

    2014-09-01

    We investigated the existing susceptibility differences of the hazelnut weevil, Curculio nucum L. (Coleoptera:, Curculionidae) to entomopathogenic nematodes by assessing the main route of entry of the nematodes, Steinernema carpocapsae strain B14 and S. feltiae strain D114, into larvae and adult insects, as well as host immune response. Our results suggested that S. carpocapsae B14 and S. feltiae D114 primarily entered adult insects and larvae through the anus. Larvae were more susceptible to S. feltiae D114 than S. carpocapsae B14 and adults were highly susceptible to S. carpocapsae B14 but displayed low susceptibility to S. feltiae D114. Penetration rate correlated with nematode virulence. We observed little evidence that hazelnut weevils mounted any cellular immune response toward S. carpocapsae B14 or S. feltiae D114. We conclude the differential susceptibility of hazelnut weevil larvae and adults to S. carpocapsae B14 and S. feltiae D114 primarily reflected differences in the ability of these two nematodes to penetrate the host.

  10. Integrated assessment of climate change impact on surface runoff contamination by pesticides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gagnon, Patrick; Sheedy, Claudia; Rousseau, Alain N; Bourgeois, Gaétan; Chouinard, Gérald

    2016-07-01

    Pesticide transport by surface runoff depends on climate, agricultural practices, topography, soil characteristics, crop type, and pest phenology. To accurately assess the impact of climate change, these factors must be accounted for in a single framework by integrating their interaction and uncertainty. This article presents the development and application of a framework to assess the impact of climate change on pesticide transport by surface runoff in southern Québec (Canada) for the 1981-2040 period. The crop enemies investigated were: weeds for corn (Zea mays); and for apple orchard (Malus pumila), 3 insect pests (codling moth [Cydia pomonella], plum curculio [Conotrachelus nenuphar], and apple maggot [Rhagoletis pomonella]), 2 diseases (apple scab [Venturia inaequalis], and fire blight [Erwinia amylovora]). A total of 23 climate simulations, 19 sites, and 11 active ingredients were considered. The relationship between climate and phenology was accounted for by bioclimatic models of the Computer Centre for Agricultural Pest Forecasting (CIPRA) software. Exported loads of pesticides were evaluated at the edge-of-field scale using the Pesticide Root Zone Model (PRZM), simulating both hydrology and chemical transport. A stochastic model was developed to account for PRZM parameter uncertainty. Results of this study indicate that for the 2011-2040 period, application dates would be advanced from 3 to 7 days on average with respect to the 1981-2010 period. However, the impact of climate change on maximum daily rainfall during the application window is not statistically significant, mainly due to the high variability of extreme rainfall events. Hence, for the studied sites and crop enemies considered, climate change impact on pesticide transported in surface runoff is not statistically significant throughout the 2011-2040 period. Integr Environ Assess Managem 2016;12:559-571. © Her Majesty the Queen in Right of Canada 2015; Published 2015 SETAC.

  11. Evaluation of hydrophobic and hydrophilic kaolin particle films for peach crop, arthropod and disease management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lalancette, Norman; Belding, Robert D; Shearer, Peter W; Frecon, Jerome L; Tietjen, William H

    2005-01-01

    Hydrophobic and/or hydrophilic kaolin particle film treatments to peach (Prunus persica (L) Batsch) trees were evaluated for crop and pest management capabilities in six studies from 1997 to 2000. Unsprayed control and standard treatments, the latter consisting of a commercial pesticide program, were included for comparison. Treatments in initial studies were applied via handgun, which resulted in a uniform and heavy deposit of kaolin after the first application. In contrast, treatments in subsequent studies used airblast equipment, which provided a uniform but less dense coverage, even after multiple applications. Results showed that both formulations of kaolin provided control of oriental fruit moth (Grapholita molesta (Busck)), plum curculio (Conotrachelus nenuphar (Herbst)) and Japanese beetle (Popillia japonica Newman) that was comparable with or better than the standard pesticide program. Effective management of late season catfacing insects (tarnished plant bugs Lygus lineolaris (Palisot de Beauvois) and stinkbugs Acrosternum hilare (Say), Euschistus servus (Say), and E tristigmus (Say)) and leafrollers (undetermined species) was also observed, although kaolin applications significantly increased phytophagous mite (Panonychus ulmi (Koch)) levels. In contrast to arthropod management, kaolin failed to control either peach scab (Cladosporium carpophilum (Von Thumen)) or rusty spot (Podosphaera leucotricha (Ell and Ev) ES Salmon) in any of the 4 years of the study. However, hydrophobic kaolin provided effective brown rot (Monilinia fructicola (G Winter) Honey) control when applied via handgun, and partial control when applied via airblast; hydrophilic kaolin failed to provide any control. These results suggest that hydrophobicity and deposit density may be important factors for effective disease management. The application of kaolin significantly delayed fruit maturation, increased fruit size and increased soluble solids relative to the standard. This effect

  12. The resistance of hazel (Corylus avellana to hazelnut weevil (Curculio nucum L.- Coleoptera, Curculionidae. Part II. The physicochemical characteristics of the pericarp and dynamics of nut development and cultivar resistance to the pest

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zdzisław Piskornik

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Significant differences were found among the 22 studied hazel cultivars (Corylus avellana L. in their resistance to hazelnut weevil (Curculio nucum L. which is the main pest of this crop in Europe. The study investigated the relationships between the resistance of the cultivars to the pest and the physicochemical properties of the pericarp, i.e. the lignification dynamics, changes in thickness and hardness during nut development and the rate of nutlet development. Correlation analysis showed that there was no dependence between the physicochemical properties of the pericarp and the resistance of the hazel cultivars to the hazelnut weevil. Nut development dynamics were also found to be unrelated to resistance to the pest. Laboratory feeding experiments showed that during the initial feeding phase and at the time the insect searches for an oviposition site, it seems to prefer cultivars with the largest nutlets. However, in the period of intensive oviposition, traits other than nutlet size seem to be decisive for the beetles choice of cultivar.

  13. Evaluación de daño de gorgojos en poblaciones de alfalfa (Medicago sativa L. con alto número de raíces laterales Evaluation of root curculio/weevil damage in alfalfa (Medicago sativa L. populations with large numbers of lateral roots

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. S. Odorizzi

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available El aumento del número de raíces laterales a través del mejoramiento puede ser importante para reducir el daño provocado por el complejo de gorgojos de la alfalfa. El objetivo fue evaluar, en cuatro ambientes (siembras de otoño y primavera con y sin riego, el comportamiento de 10 poblaciones seleccionadas por alto número de raíces laterales. Los caracteres evaluados fueron: categoría (Cat de daño de gorgojos (de 1 = sin daño a 5 = daño severo, rendimiento promedio de forraje (BP, número de raíces secundarias (NRLR y diámetro de raíces laterales (DRLR. Las poblaciones s755, s545 y s614 presentaron los mayores valores de DRLR y NRLR, el menor daño de gorgojos (Cat 2+3 y la mayor variabilidad para los caracteres estudiados. Las poblaciones s545 y s616 exhibieron el mayor DRLR y el menor NRLR, respectivamente. Las condiciones de riego propiciaron un menor daño, y fueron menos afectadas en estos ambientes las poblaciones s545, s614 y s617; por el contrario, las poblaciones s461, s755, s463 resultaron las más afectadas. Los daños más severos (Cat 4+5 se observaron en secano y las poblaciones s618 y s616 fueron las más afectadas; sólo bajo estas condiciones el mayor daño se correlacionó con menor BP.Increasing the number of lateral roots through breeding may be important to reduce the damage caused by the root curculio complex in alfalfa in Argentina. The objective was to evaluate the performance of ten alfalfa experimental populations selected for their large number of lateral roots under four environmental conditions (fall and spring planting with or without irrigation. The evaluated traits were curculio damage (Categories (Cat 1 = no damage to 5 = very severe damage, dry matter yield (BP, number of secondary roots (NRLR, and diameter of lateral roots (DRLR. Populations s755, s545 and s614 had the highest values for DRLR and NRLR, the least damage from weevil (Cat 2 +3, and the largest variability (mean square for all the

  14. Screening of Metarhizium anisopliae Strain with High Virulence against Larvae of Curculio chinensis(Coleoptera:Curculionidae)%感染油茶象幼虫的高致病力金龟子绿僵菌菌株筛选

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    何学友; 蔡守平; 杜月飞; 陈德兰; 黄金水; 李孔泉

    2015-01-01

    Objective]Curculio chinensis ( Coleoptera: Curculionidae ) is one of the most serious pests of oil-tea Camellia fruits. Screening of Metarhizium anisopliae strains with high virulence against this pest is important for using fungi as biocontrol agent to suppress this pest.[Method]Colony growth and sporulation of 7 strains of M. anisopliae were measured and their virulence against C. chinensis larvae were investigated in laboratory by using two inoculating methods ( Being dipped on larvae with conidia suspension of 107 spores·mL -1 and being mixed in soil with 105 spores·g -1 ) . The infection effects in field were evaluated through spraying conidia suspension of two superior strains. [Result]Bioassay results showed that larvae of C. chinensis were susceptible to different M. anisopliae strains. The larval mortalities reached 100% on the 13 th day after inoculation using dipping inoculative method and the 9 th day for conidia-soil mixing inoculative method. The median lethal time ( LT50 ) of dipping inoculative method was 1. 65 days to 4. 26 days,and that of conidia-soil mixing inoculative method was 1. 96 days to 3. 51 days. The FJMa201101 and FJMa201205 strains of M. anisopliae were the most virulent against larvae of C. chinensis. When larvae inoculated with FJMa201101,the LT50 was 1. 65 days,and the infection rate was 86. 6% when using dipping inoculative method,while the LT50 was 2. 11 days and the infection rate was 94. 5% respectively for conidia-soil mixing inoculative method. When inoculated with FJMa201205,the LT50 was 1. 71 days with the infection rate of 91. 1% by using dipping inoculative method,whilst it was 1. 96 days with the infection rate of 88. 9% with conidia-soil mixing inoculative method. In field test,there was no significant difference in infection rate between the two superior strains,but the infection rates of larvae introduced to soil after spraying conidia suspension were significantly higher than those introduced before spraying

  15. Dicty_cDB: FC-AQ10 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available equence. 668 0.0 3 BQ476680 |BQ476680.1 curculio4h01.g Curculio glandium cDNA Curculio glandium cDNA clone curculio...6 2 BQ476431 |BQ476431.1 curculio4h01.b Curculio glandium cDNA Curculio glandium cDNA clone curculio4h01 5',

  16. Dicty_cDB: FC-IC1176 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ING DRAFT SEQUENCE, 2 unordered pieces. 36 2.6 2 BQ476544 |BQ476544.1 curculio2d05.g Curculio glandium cDNA ...Curculio glandium cDNA clone curculio2d05 3', mRNA sequence. 40 15 1 BQ476270 |BQ476270.1 curculio2e10.b Cur...culio glandium cDNA Curculio glandium cDNA clone curculio2e10 5', mRNA sequence. 40 15 1 BQ476190 |BQ476190.1 curculio...1d05.b Curculio glandium cDNA Curculio glandium cDNA clone curculio1d05

  17. Dicty_cDB: FC-IC1238 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available icus clone CH230-91F12, WORKING DRAFT SEQUENCE, 2 unordered pieces. 36 2.6 2 BQ476544 |BQ476544.1 curculio2d...05.g Curculio glandium cDNA Curculio glandium cDNA clone curculio2d05 3', mRNA sequence. 40 15 1 BQ476270 |BQ476270.1 curculio...2e10.b Curculio glandium cDNA Curculio glandium cDNA clone curculio2e10 5', mRNA sequence.... 40 15 1 BQ476190 |BQ476190.1 curculio1d05.b Curculio glandium cDNA Curculio glandium cDNA clone curculio

  18. Dicty_cDB: FC-IC1174 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available icus clone CH230-91F12, WORKING DRAFT SEQUENCE, 2 unordered pieces. 36 2.6 2 BQ476544 |BQ476544.1 curculio2d...05.g Curculio glandium cDNA Curculio glandium cDNA clone curculio2d05 3', mRNA sequence. 40 15 1 BQ476270 |BQ476270.1 curculio...2e10.b Curculio glandium cDNA Curculio glandium cDNA clone curculio2e10 5', mRNA sequence.... 40 15 1 BQ476190 |BQ476190.1 curculio1d05.b Curculio glandium cDNA Curculio glandium cDNA clone curculio

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    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 2 map 6163571-6199719 strain AX4, complete sequence. 660 0.0 3 BQ476680 |BQ476680.1 curculio4h01.g Curculio ...glandium cDNA Curculio glandium cDNA clone curculio4h01 3', mRNA sequence. 54 7e-09 3 BQ476431 |BQ476431.1 curculio...4h01.b Curculio glandium cDNA Curculio glandium cDNA clone curculio4h01 5'

  20. Dicty_cDB: FC-IC1685 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available attus norvegicus clone CH230-91F12, WORKING DRAFT SEQUENCE, 2 unordered pieces. 36 3.4 3 BQ476463 |BQ476463.1 curculio...5c04.b Curculio glandium cDNA Curculio glandium cDNA clone curculio5c04 5', mRNA sequence. 40 14 1 BQ476691 |BQ476691.1 cur...culio5a09.g Curculio glandium cDNA Curculio glandium cDNA clone curculio

  1. Dicty_cDB: SSJ321 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ish DNA sequence from clone DKEY-5P1 in linkage group 20. 46 0.59 1 BQ476622 |BQ476622.1 curculio...3e06.g Curculio glandium cDNA Curculio glandium cDNA clone curculio3e06 3', mRNA sequence. 4...0.59 1 BQ476340 |BQ476340.1 curculio3e06.b Curculio glandium cDNA Curculio glandium cDNA clone curculio3e06

  2. Dicty_cDB: FC-BQ11 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available um chromosome 2 map 6163571-6199719 strain AX4, complete sequence. 626 0.0 5 BQ476680 |BQ476680.1 curculio4h...01.g Curculio glandium cDNA Curculio glandium cDNA clone curculio4h01 3', mRNA se...quence. 54 9e-09 3 BQ476431 |BQ476431.1 curculio4h01.b Curculio glandium cDNA Curculio glandium cDNA clone curculio

  3. Dicty_cDB: SSJ346 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 0.097 4 BQ476381 |BQ476381.1 curculio4b06.b Curculio glandium cDNA Curculio glandium cDNA clone curculio..., WORKING DRAFT SEQUENCE, 8 ordered pieces. 36 0.19 6 BQ476658 |BQ476658.1 curculio4b06.g Curculio glandium ...cDNA Curculio glandium cDNA clone curculio4b06 3', mRNA sequence. 38 0.21 2 AF462

  4. Dicty_cDB: FC-AW08 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available yostelium discoideum chromosome 2 map 6163571-6199719 strain AX4, complete sequence. 668 0.0 5 BQ476680 |BQ476680.1 curculio...4h01.g Curculio glandium cDNA Curculio glandium cDNA clone curculio...4h01 3', mRNA sequence. 54 5e-09 3 BQ476431 |BQ476431.1 curculio4h01.b Curculio glandium cDNA Curculio glandium cDNA clone curculio

  5. Dicty_cDB: FC-IC1151 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Rattus norvegicus clone CH230-91F12, WORKING DRAFT SEQUENCE, 2 unordered pieces. 36 3.4 3 BQ476211 |BQ476211.1 curculio...1f10.b Curculio glandium cDNA Curculio glandium cDNA clone curculio1f10 5', mRNA sequence. 40 14... 1 BQ476277 |BQ476277.1 curculio2f07.b Curculio glandium cDNA Curculio glandium cDNA clone curculio

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    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available rchaeoglobus fulgidus section 5 of 172 of the complete genome. 46 0.26 1 BQ476340 |BQ476340.1 curculio...3e06.b Curculio glandium cDNA Curculio glandium cDNA clone curculio3e06 5', mRNA sequen...ce. 46 0.26 1 BQ476622 |BQ476622.1 curculio3e06.g Curculio glandium cDNA Curculio glandium cDNA clone curculio

  7. Dicty_cDB: FC-IC0557 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 5 unordered pieces. 40 9.0 2 BQ476463 |BQ476463.1 curculio5c04.b Curculio glandium cDNA Curculio glandium cDNA clone curculio...5c04 5', mRNA sequence. 40 14 1 BQ476691 |BQ476691.1 curculio5a...09.g Curculio glandium cDNA Curculio glandium cDNA clone curculio5a09 3', mRNA sequence. 40 14 1 BZ979340 |B

  8. Dicty_cDB: FC-IC1066 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available culio2d05.g Curculio glandium cDNA Curculio glandium cDNA clone curculio2d05 3', mR...NA sequence. 40 15 1 BQ476270 |BQ476270.1 curculio2e10.b Curculio glandium cDNA Curculio glandium cDNA clone curculio...2e10 5', mRNA sequence. 40 15 1 BQ476190 |BQ476190.1 curculio1d05.b Curculio glandium cDNA Curculio glandium cDNA clone curc...ulio1d05 5', mRNA sequence. 40 15 1 BQ476736 |BQ476736.1 curculio...5h06.g Curculio glandium cDNA Curculio glandium cDNA clone curculio5h06 3', mRNA sequence. 40 15 1 BQ476527 |BQ476527.1 curc

  9. Dicty_cDB: VSI829 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available lio4h01.g Curculio glandium cDNA Curculio glandium cDNA clone curculio4h01 3', mRNA... sequence. 54 2e-08 3 BQ476431 |BQ476431.1 curculio4h01.b Curculio glandium cDNA Curculio glandium cDNA clone curculio...ideum chromosome 2 map 6163571-6199719 strain AX4, complete sequence. 846 0.0 5 BQ476680 |BQ476680.1 curcu

  10. Dicty_cDB: FC-BE10 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available O0200928. 46 0.45 1 BQ476340 |BQ476340.1 curculio3e06.b Curculio glandium cDNA Curculio glandium cDNA clone curculio...ence from clone DKEY-5P1 in linkage group 20. 46 0.45 1 BQ476622 |BQ476622.1 curculio3e06.g Curculio glandiu...m cDNA Curculio glandium cDNA clone curculio3e06 3', mRNA sequence. 46 0.45 1 AC104590 |AC104590.4 Homo sapi

  11. Dicty_cDB: FC-IC1290 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available C100407 |AC100407.1 Mus musculus clone RP23-134O4, LOW-PASS SEQUENCE SAMPLING. 34 9.6 2 BQ476211 |BQ476211.1 curculio...1f10.b Curculio glandium cDNA Curculio glandium cDNA clone curculio1f10 5', mRNA sequence. 40 14 1 BQ476277 |BQ476277.1 curc...ulio2f07.b Curculio glandium cDNA Curculio glandium cDNA clone curculio2f07 5', mRN...A sequence. 40 14 1 BQ476738 |BQ476738.1 curculio5h10.g Curculio glandium cDNA Cu...rculio glandium cDNA clone curculio5h10 3', mRNA sequence. 40 14 1 dna update 2003.12.10 Homology vs Protein

  12. Dicty_cDB: FC-IC0039 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 32.6 Rattus norvegicus clone CH230-91F12, WORKING DRAFT SEQUENCE, 2 unordered pieces. 36 2.6 2 BQ476544 |BQ476544.1 curculio...2d05.g Curculio glandium cDNA Curculio glandium cDNA clone curculio2d05 3', mRNA sequence. 4...0 15 1 BQ476270 |BQ476270.1 curculio2e10.b Curculio glandium cDNA Curculio glandium cDNA clone curculio2e10 ...5', mRNA sequence. 40 15 1 BQ476190 |BQ476190.1 curculio1d05.b Curculio glandium ...cDNA Curculio glandium cDNA clone curculio1d05 5', mRNA sequence. 40 15 1 dna update 2003.12. 9 Homology vs

  13. Dicty_cDB: VSB436 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available equence from clone DKEY-5P1 in linkage group 20. 46 0.47 1 BQ476340 |BQ476340.1 curculio...3e06.b Curculio glandium cDNA Curculio glandium cDNA clone curculio3e06 5', mRNA sequence. 46 0.47 1 BQ476622 |BQ476622.1 curc...ulio3e06.g Curculio glandium cDNA Curculio glandium cDNA clone curculio3e06 3', mRN

  14. Dicty_cDB: FC-IC1073 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AC100407 |AC100407.1 Mus musculus clone RP23-134O4, LOW-PASS SEQUENCE SAMPLING. 34 9.4 2 BQ476463 |BQ476463.1 curculio...5c04.b Curculio glandium cDNA Curculio glandium cDNA clone curculio5c04 5', mRNA sequence. 40 14 1 BQ476691 |BQ476691.1 cur...culio5a09.g Curculio glandium cDNA Curculio glandium cDNA clone curculio

  15. Dicty_cDB: SSB115 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 218A13, WORKING DRAFT SEQUENCE, 1 ordered piece. 46 0.44 1 BQ476340 |BQ476340.1 curculio3e06.b Curculio glan...dium cDNA Curculio glandium cDNA clone curculio3e06 5', mRNA sequence. 46 0.44 1 BQ476622 |BQ476622.1 curculio...3e06.g Curculio glandium cDNA Curculio glandium cDNA clone curculio3e06 3', mRN

  16. Dicty_cDB: SSF753 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ered piece. 46 0.45 1 BQ476340 |BQ476340.1 curculio3e06.b Curculio glandium cDNA ...Curculio glandium cDNA clone curculio3e06 5', mRNA sequence. 46 0.45 1 BQ476622 |BQ476622.1 curculio3e06.g C...urculio glandium cDNA Curculio glandium cDNA clone curculio3e06 3', mRNA sequence. 46 0.45 1 AE001102 |AE001

  17. Dicty_cDB: FC-IC1161 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available culus clone RP23-134O4, LOW-PASS SEQUENCE SAMPLING. 34 9.4 2 BQ476463 |BQ476463.1 curculio5c04.b Curculio gl...andium cDNA Curculio glandium cDNA clone curculio5c04 5', mRNA sequence. 40 14 1 BQ476691 |BQ476691.1 curculio...5a09.g Curculio glandium cDNA Curculio glandium cDNA clone curculio5a09 3', mRN

  18. Dicty_cDB: FC-BM17 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available quence. 682 0.0 2 BQ476680 |BQ476680.1 curculio4h01.g Curculio glandium cDNA Curc...ulio glandium cDNA clone curculio4h01 3', mRNA sequence. 54 2e-08 3 BQ476431 |BQ476431.1 curculio4h01.b Curc...ulio glandium cDNA Curculio glandium cDNA clone curculio4h01 5', mRNA sequence. 54 3e-06 2 BQ623728 |BQ62372

  19. Dicty_cDB: FC-IC0345 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AC100407 |AC100407.1 Mus musculus clone RP23-134O4, LOW-PASS SEQUENCE SAMPLING. 34 9.6 2 BQ476463 |BQ476463.1 curculio...5c04.b Curculio glandium cDNA Curculio glandium cDNA clone curculio5c04 5', mRNA sequence. 40 14 1 BQ476691 |BQ476691.1 cur...culio5a09.g Curculio glandium cDNA Curculio glandium cDNA clone curculio

  20. Dicty_cDB: FC-IC0445 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available culus clone RP23-134O4, LOW-PASS SEQUENCE SAMPLING. 34 9.6 2 BQ476463 |BQ476463.1 curculio5c04.b Curculio gl...andium cDNA Curculio glandium cDNA clone curculio5c04 5', mRNA sequence. 40 14 1 BQ476691 |BQ476691.1 curculio...5a09.g Curculio glandium cDNA Curculio glandium cDNA clone curculio5a09 3', mRN

  1. Dicty_cDB: VSD213 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NCE, 1 ordered piece. 46 0.95 1 BQ476622 |BQ476622.1 curculio3e06.g Curculio glandium cDNA Curculio glandium cDNA clone curculio...3e06 3', mRNA sequence. 46 0.95 1 BQ476340 |BQ476340.1 curculio3e06.b Curculio glandium ...cDNA Curculio glandium cDNA clone curculio3e06 5', mRNA sequence. 46 0.95 1 AP004

  2. Dicty_cDB: FC-IC1210 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AC100407 |AC100407.1 Mus musculus clone RP23-134O4, LOW-PASS SEQUENCE SAMPLING. 34 9.4 2 BQ476463 |BQ476463.1 curculio...5c04.b Curculio glandium cDNA Curculio glandium cDNA clone curculio5c04 5', mRNA sequence. 40 14 1 BQ476691 |BQ476691.1 cur...culio5a09.g Curculio glandium cDNA Curculio glandium cDNA clone curculio

  3. Dicty_cDB: FC-BR03 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ain AX4, complete sequence. 644 0.0 3 BQ476680 |BQ476680.1 curculio4h01.g Curculi...o glandium cDNA Curculio glandium cDNA clone curculio4h01 3', mRNA sequence. 54 6e-09 3 BQ476431 |BQ476431.1 curculio...4h01.b Curculio glandium cDNA Curculio glandium cDNA clone curculio4h01 5', mRNA sequence. 54 7e-07

  4. Dicty_cDB: FC-IC0210 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AC100407 |AC100407.1 Mus musculus clone RP23-134O4, LOW-PASS SEQUENCE SAMPLING. 34 9.6 2 BQ476463 |BQ476463.1 curculio...5c04.b Curculio glandium cDNA Curculio glandium cDNA clone curculio5c04 5', mRNA sequence. 40 14 1 BQ476691 |BQ476691.1 cur...culio5a09.g Curculio glandium cDNA Curculio glandium cDNA clone curculio

  5. Dicty_cDB: SSB215 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available mRNA sequence. 48 1e-06 2 BQ476340 |BQ476340.1 curculio3e06.b Curculio glandium ...cDNA Curculio glandium cDNA clone curculio3e06 5', mRNA sequence. 46 0.38 1 BQ476622 |BQ476622.1 curculio3e0...6.g Curculio glandium cDNA Curculio glandium cDNA clone curculio3e06 3', mRNA sequence. 46 0.38 1 AC132016 |

  6. Dicty_cDB: VSD850 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available -FP_00819 5', mRNA sequence. 56 2e-06 2 BQ476431 |BQ476431.1 curculio4h01.b Curculio glandium cDNA Curculio glandium cDNA clone curcu...lio4h01 5', mRNA sequence. 50 8e-06 2 BQ476680 |BQ476680.1 curculio...4h01.g Curculio glandium cDNA Curculio glandium cDNA clone curculio4h01 3', mRNA sequence. 50 8e-

  7. Dicty_cDB: VSF364 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available te sequence. 1027 0.0 2 BQ476680 |BQ476680.1 curculio4h01.g Curculio glandium cDN...A Curculio glandium cDNA clone curculio4h01 3', mRNA sequence. 54 4e-08 3 BQ476431 |BQ476431.1 curculio4h01....b Curculio glandium cDNA Curculio glandium cDNA clone curculio4h01 5', mRNA sequence. 54 3e-06 2 BQ623728 |B

  8. Dicty_cDB: VSK384 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 771 HISTONE H1.1. [2] TR:Q93901 ;, mRNA sequence. 48 0.18 1 BQ476431 |BQ476431.1 curculio4h01.b Curculio gla...ndium cDNA Curculio glandium cDNA clone curculio4h01 5', mRNA sequence. 36 0.21 2 BQ476680 |BQ476680.1 cur...culio4h01.g Curculio glandium cDNA Curculio glandium cDNA clone curculio4h01 3', mR

  9. Dicty_cDB: FC-IC1165 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AC100407 |AC100407.1 Mus musculus clone RP23-134O4, LOW-PASS SEQUENCE SAMPLING. 34 9.4 2 BQ476463 |BQ476463.1 curculio...5c04.b Curculio glandium cDNA Curculio glandium cDNA clone curculio5c04 5', mRNA sequence. 40 14 1 BQ476691 |BQ476691.1 cur...culio5a09.g Curculio glandium cDNA Curculio glandium cDNA clone curculio

  10. Dicty_cDB: VSA450 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available T SEQUENCE, 1 ordered piece. 46 0.46 1 BQ476622 |BQ476622.1 curculio3e06.g Curculio glandium cDNA Curculio glandium cDNA clone curcul...io3e06 3', mRNA sequence. 46 0.46 1 BQ476340 |BQ476340.1 curculio...3e06.b Curculio glandium cDNA Curculio glandium cDNA clone curculio3e06 5', mRNA sequence. 46 0.46

  11. Dicty_cDB: VSJ540 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available osome 2 map 6163571-6199719 strain AX4, complete sequence. 668 0.0 6 BQ476680 |BQ476680.1 curculio4h01.g Cur...culio glandium cDNA Curculio glandium cDNA clone curculio4h01 3', mRNA sequence. 54 2e-08 3 BQ476431 |BQ476431.1 curculio...4h01.b Curculio glandium cDNA Curculio glandium cDNA clone curculio4h01 5', mRNA sequence. 54 2

  12. Dicty_cDB: FC-IC1585 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available e sequence. 628 0.0 5 BQ476680 |BQ476680.1 curculio4h01.g Curculio glandium cDNA Curculio glandium cDNA clone curculio...4h01 3', mRNA sequence. 54 3e-08 3 BQ476431 |BQ476431.1 curculio4h01.b Curculio glandium cDNA Curc...ulio glandium cDNA clone curculio4h01 5', mRNA sequence. 54 3e-06 2 BQ623728 |BQ6

  13. Dicty_cDB: FC-BB03 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 19 strain AX4, complete sequence. 668 0.0 3 BQ476680 |BQ476680.1 curculio4h01.g Curculio glandium cDNA Curcu...lio glandium cDNA clone curculio4h01 3', mRNA sequence. 54 5e-09 3 BQ476431 |BQ476431.1 curculio...4h01.b Curculio glandium cDNA Curculio glandium cDNA clone curculio4h01 5', mRNA sequence. 54

  14. Dicty_cDB: VSK343 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ence. 916 0.0 4 BQ476431 |BQ476431.1 curculio4h01.b Curculio glandium cDNA Curcul...io glandium cDNA clone curculio4h01 5', mRNA sequence. 54 1e-06 2 BQ476680 |BQ476680.1 curculio4h01.g Curcul...io glandium cDNA Curculio glandium cDNA clone curculio4h01 3', mRNA sequence. 54 2e-06 2 BQ623728 |BQ623728.

  15. Dicty_cDB: FC-IC1304 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AC100407 |AC100407.1 Mus musculus clone RP23-134O4, LOW-PASS SEQUENCE SAMPLING. 34 9.6 2 BQ476463 |BQ476463.1 curculio...5c04.b Curculio glandium cDNA Curculio glandium cDNA clone curculio5c04 5', mRNA sequence. 40 14 1 BQ476691 |BQ476691.1 cur...culio5a09.g Curculio glandium cDNA Curculio glandium cDNA clone curculio

  16. Dicty_cDB: FC-AK02 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available p 6163571-6199719 strain AX4, complete sequence. 668 0.0 3 BQ476680 |BQ476680.1 curculio4h01.g Curculio glan...dium cDNA Curculio glandium cDNA clone curculio4h01 3', mRNA sequence. 54 2e-08 3 BQ476431 |BQ476431.1 cur...culio4h01.b Curculio glandium cDNA Curculio glandium cDNA clone curculio4h01 5', mR

  17. Dicty_cDB: FC-IC1366 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AC100407 |AC100407.1 Mus musculus clone RP23-134O4, LOW-PASS SEQUENCE SAMPLING. 34 9.6 2 BQ476463 |BQ476463.1 curculio...5c04.b Curculio glandium cDNA Curculio glandium cDNA clone curculio5c04 5', mRNA sequence. 40 14 1 BQ476691 |BQ476691.1 cur...culio5a09.g Curculio glandium cDNA Curculio glandium cDNA clone curculio

  18. Dicty_cDB: VSD185 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available and Malpighian tubule cDNA library Ctenocephalides felis cDNA clone 3254-25, mRNA sequence. 48 2e-06 2 BQ476622 |BQ476622.1 curculio...3e06.g Curculio glandium cDNA Curculio glandium cDNA clone curculio...3e06 3', mRNA sequence. 46 0.46 1 BQ476340 |BQ476340.1 curculio3e06.b Curculio glandium cDNA Curc...ulio glandium cDNA clone curculio3e06 5', mRNA sequence. 46 0.46 1 AX345182 |AX345182.1 Sequence 253 from Pa

  19. Dicty_cDB: FC-IC1502 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AC100407 |AC100407.1 Mus musculus clone RP23-134O4, LOW-PASS SEQUENCE SAMPLING. 34 9.6 2 BQ476463 |BQ476463.1 curculio...5c04.b Curculio glandium cDNA Curculio glandium cDNA clone curculio5c04 5', mRNA sequence. 40 14 1 BQ476691 |BQ476691.1 cur...culio5a09.g Curculio glandium cDNA Curculio glandium cDNA clone curculio

  20. Dicty_cDB: FC-IC1758 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ces. 40 15 1 BQ476544 |BQ476544.1 curculio2d05.g Curculio glandium cDNA Curculio glandium cDNA clone curculio...2d05 3', mRNA sequence. 40 15 1 BQ476270 |BQ476270.1 curculio2e10.b Curculio gla...ndium cDNA Curculio glandium cDNA clone curculio2e10 5', mRNA sequence. 40 15 1 dna update 2003.12.11 Homolo

  1. Dicty_cDB: SSL271 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 2 of the complete genome. 46 0.31 1 BQ476340 |BQ476340.1 curculio3e06.b Curculio glandium cDNA Curculio glandium cDNA clone curculio...quence 253 from Patent WO0200928. 46 0.31 1 BQ476622 |BQ476622.1 curculio3e06.g Curculio glandium cDNA Curcu...lio glandium cDNA clone curculio3e06 3', mRNA sequence. 46 0.31 1 BX004766 |BX004766.9 Zebrafish DNA sequenc

  2. Dicty_cDB: FC-BA22 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ictyostelium discoideum chromosome 2 map 6163571-6199719 strain AX4, complete sequence. 811 0.0 3 BQ476680 |BQ476680.1 curculio...4h01.g Curculio glandium cDNA Curculio glandium cDNA clone curculio...4h01 3', mRNA sequence. 54 3e-08 3 BQ476431 |BQ476431.1 curculio4h01.b Curculio glandium cDNA Curculio glandium cDNA clone curcu...lio4h01 5', mRNA sequence. 54 3e-06 2 BQ623728 |BQ623728.1 USDA-FP_00819 Ridge pine

  3. Dicty_cDB: VSG491 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ctyostelium discoideum chromosome 2 map 6163571-6199719 strain AX4, complete sequence. 1082 0.0 2 BQ476680 |BQ476680.1 curculio...4h01.g Curculio glandium cDNA Curculio glandium cDNA clone curculio...4h01 3', mRNA sequence. 54 3e-08 3 BQ476431 |BQ476431.1 curculio4h01.b Curculio glandium cDNA Curculio glandium cDNA clone curcu...lio4h01 5', mRNA sequence. 54 3e-06 2 BQ623728 |BQ623728.1 USDA-FP_00819 Ridge pine

  4. Dicty_cDB: FC-BB05 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available strain AX4, complete sequence. 668 0.0 3 BQ476680 |BQ476680.1 curculio4h01.g Curculio glandium cDNA Curculio glandium cDNA clone curc...ulio4h01 3', mRNA sequence. 54 5e-09 3 BQ476431 |BQ476431.1 curculio...4h01.b Curculio glandium cDNA Curculio glandium cDNA clone curculio4h01 5', mRNA sequence. 54 6e

  5. Dicty_cDB: SSG643 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available EQUENCE, 1 ordered piece. 46 0.52 1 BQ476340 |BQ476340.1 curculio3e06.b Curculio glandium cDNA Curculio glandium cDNA clone curculio...3e06 5', mRNA sequence. 46 0.52 1 BQ476622 |BQ476622.1 curculio3e06.g Curculio gland...ium cDNA Curculio glandium cDNA clone curculio3e06 3', mRNA sequence. 46 0.52 1 A

  6. Dicty_cDB: FC-IC1159 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AC100407 |AC100407.1 Mus musculus clone RP23-134O4, LOW-PASS SEQUENCE SAMPLING. 34 9.4 2 BQ476463 |BQ476463.1 curculio...5c04.b Curculio glandium cDNA Curculio glandium cDNA clone curculio5c04 5', mRNA sequence. 40 14 1 BQ476691 |BQ476691.1 cur...culio5a09.g Curculio glandium cDNA Curculio glandium cDNA clone curculio

  7. Dicty_cDB: FC-IC0542 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 2 AC100407 |AC100407.1 Mus musculus clone RP23-134O4, LOW-PASS SEQUENCE SAMPLING. 34 9.6 2 BQ476211 |BQ476211.1 curculio...1f10.b Curculio glandium cDNA Curculio glandium cDNA clone curculio1f10 5', mRNA sequence. 40 14... 1 BQ476738 |BQ476738.1 curculio5h10.g Curculio glandium cDNA Curculio glandium cDNA clone curculio

  8. Curculio Curculis lupus: biology, behavior and morphology of immatures of the cannibal weevil Anchylorhynchus eriospathae G. G. Bondar, 1943

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bená, Daniela de Cássia; Vanin, Sergio Antonio

    2014-01-01

    Weevils are one of the largest groups of living organisms, with more than 60,000 species feeding mostly on plants. With only one exception, their described larvae are typical plant-feeders, with mouthparts adapted to chewing plant material. Here we describe the second case of a weevil with early-instar larvae adapted to killing conspecifics. We have studied the life history of Anchylorhynchus eriospathae G. G. Bondar, 1943 (Curculioninae: Derelomini sensu Caldara, Franz & Oberprieler (2014)), a species whose immatures feed internally on palm flowers and fruits. We provide detailed descriptions of all immature stages, including the extremely modified first-instar larva. Unlike other weevils and later instars, this stage exhibits a flat body with very long ventropedal lobe setae, a large and prognathous head with a gula, and falciform mandibles, each with a serrate retinaculum, that are used to fight with and eventually kill other first-instar larvae. We also provide biological notes on all stages and the results of behavioral tests that showed that larval aggression occurs only among early life stages. Finally we show that adult size is highly dependent on timing of oviposition. This specialized killer first instar probably evolved independently from the one other case known in weevils, in Revena rubiginosa (Conoderinae: Bariditae sensu Prena, Colonnelli & Hespenheide (2014)). Interestingly, both lineages inhabit the same hosts, raising the possibility that both intra- and inter-specific competition shaped those phenotypes. Given the scarcity of knowledge on early larval stages of concealed insect herbivores, it is possible that our findings represent an instance of a much broader phenomenon. Our observations also allowed us to conclude that Anchylorhynchus eriospathae and A. hatschbachi G. G. Bondar, 1943 are actually the same species, which we synonymize here by considering the latter as a junior synonym (new synonymy). PMID:25101231

  9. Virulencia, producción y desplazamiento de nematodos entomopatógenos sobre larvas del picudo de la guayaba Conotrachelus psidii Marshall (Coleoptera: Curculionidae en laboratorio.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriana Sáenz Aponte

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The guava weevil Conotrach­elus psidii Marshall is a major pest affecting guava cultiva­tion in Santander, Colombia; it causes serious losses in the quality and the volume of fruit produced. Biological control is a viable option for pest management; entomo­pathogenic nematodes (EPNs, particularly, have shown good results (63-90% mortality in controlling fourth in­star larvae of the guava weevil. In this study we evaluated the effect of seven species of EPNs isolated in Colom­bia: Steinernema websteri JCL006, Steinernema sp. 1 JCL024, Steinernema sp. 2 JCL007, Steinernema sp. 3 JCL027, S. co­lombiense SNI0198, Heterorhabditis bacteriophora HNI0100 and Heterorhabditis sp. SL0708 on fourth instar larvae of the guava weevil in laboratory conditions, and measured the production and the displacement of the most viru­lent. Heterorhabditis sp. SL0708 induced mortality of 85%, Steinernema sp. 1 JCL024 75% and S. colombiense SNI0198 55%, the other species of EPNs, less than 25% mortality. Increased production of JI by weevil larva was recorded in Heterorhabditis sp. SL0708, which also showed greater recognition capability when the host was C. psidii.

  10. Dicty_cDB: SHE320 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available apiens clone RP11-25H8, WORKING DRAFT SEQUENCE, 3 unordered pieces. 42 3.3 2 BQ476515 |BQ476515.1 curculio2b...08.g Curculio glandium cDNA Curculio glandium cDNA clone curculio2b08 3', mRNA sequence. 44 3.4 1 BU520833 |

  11. Dicty_cDB: VSC244 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available gene for cytochrome c, partial sequence, country:Japan:Okinawa. 30 0.12 3 BQ476583 |BQ476583.1 curculio2h12....g Curculio glandium cDNA Curculio glandium cDNA clone curculio2h12 3', mRNA seque

  12. Dicty_cDB: SSE376 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available |BX004766.9 Zebrafish DNA sequence from clone DKEY-5P1 in linkage group 20. 46 0.57 1 BQ476622 |BQ476622.1 curculio...3e06.g Curculio glandium cDNA Curculio glandium cDNA clone curculio3e06 3

  13. Dicty_cDB: VSC868 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 5171 ) ribosomal protein L7a [Takifugu rubripes], mRNA sequence. 60 3e-05 1 BQ476680 |BQ476680.1 curculio4h0...1.g Curculio glandium cDNA Curculio glandium cDNA clone curculio4h01 3', mRNA sequence. 54 3e-05 2 CA845440

  14. Dicty_cDB: FC-IC0320 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AC100407 |AC100407.1 Mus musculus clone RP23-134O4, LOW-PASS SEQUENCE SAMPLING. 34 9.6 2 BQ476463 |BQ476463.1 curculio...5c04.b Curculio glandium cDNA Curculio glandium cDNA clone curculio5c04 5', mRNA sequence. 40 14 1

  15. Dicty_cDB: FC-AP15 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available mRNA sequence. 60 3e-05 1 BQ476680 |BQ476680.1 curculio4h01.g Curculio glandium ...cDNA Curculio glandium cDNA clone curculio4h01 3', mRNA sequence. 54 4e-05 2 CA845440 |CA845440.1 hab99h11.y

  16. Dicty_cDB: FC-IC1600 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available TD ZM_0.6_1.0_KB Zea mays genomic clone ZMMBTa362D24, DNA sequence. 40 14 1 BQ476467 |BQ476467.1 curculio5c1...1.b Curculio glandium cDNA Curculio glandium cDNA clone curculio5c11 5', mRNA seq

  17. Dicty_cDB: VSE118 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available sculus polycystic kidney disease 1 protein (Pkd1) mRNA. 46 0.26 1 BQ476298 |BQ476298.1 curculio2h12.b Curcul...io glandium cDNA Curculio glandium cDNA clone curculio2h12 5', mRNA sequence. 46

  18. Dicty_cDB: FC-IC1555 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available TD ZM_0.6_1.0_KB Zea mays genomic clone ZMMBTa362D24, DNA sequence. 40 14 1 BQ476467 |BQ476467.1 curculio5c1...1.b Curculio glandium cDNA Curculio glandium cDNA clone curculio5c11 5', mRNA seq

  19. Dicty_cDB: FC-BF14 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Y15171 ) ribosomal protein L7a [Takifugu rubripes], mRNA sequence. 60 4e-05 1 BQ476680 |BQ476680.1 curculio4...h01.g Curculio glandium cDNA Curculio glandium cDNA clone curculio4h01 3', mRNA sequence. 54 4e-05 2 CA84544

  20. Dicty_cDB: SSC532 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available c, partial sequence, country:Japan:Okinawa. 30 0.21 3 BQ476298 |BQ476298.1 curculio2h12.b Curculio glandium... cDNA Curculio glandium cDNA clone curculio2h12 5', mRNA sequence. 46 0.37 1 dna update 2003. 7.28 Homology

  1. Dicty_cDB: FC-IC0775 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available P11-2P5. 40 19 1 BQ476277 |BQ476277.1 curculio2f07.b Curculio glandium cDNA Curcu...rofa cDNA 3', mRNA sequence. 40 19 1 BQ476738 |BQ476738.1 curculio5h10.g Curculio glandium cDNA Curculio glandium cDNA clone curculio...lio glandium cDNA clone curculio2f07 5', mRNA sequence. 40 19 1 CF175519 |CF175519.1 799477 MARC 3PIG Sus sc

  2. Dicty_cDB: SSJ336 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available io3e06.b Curculio glandium cDNA Curculio glandium cDNA clone curculio...3e06 5', mRNA sequence. 46 0.074 2 BQ476622 |BQ476622.1 curculio3e06.g Curculio glandium cDNA C...urculio glandium cDNA clone curculio3e06 3', mRNA sequence. 46 0.078 2 AE001102 |AE001102.1 Archaeoglobus fu...6 2 BH574218 |BH574218.1 BOGJP86TR BOGJ Brassica oleracea genomic clone BOGJP86, DNA sequence. 30 0.030 3 BQ476340 |BQ476340.1 curcul

  3. The types of Palaearctic species of the families Apionidae, Rhynchitidae, Attelabidae and Curculionidae in the collection of Étienne Louis Geoffroy (Coleoptera, Curculionoidea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alonso-Zarazaga, M. A.

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available The study of 131 more or less complete Curculionoid specimens of the collection Étienne Louis Geoffroy, conserved in the Muséum d’Histoire Naturelle de Paris (Entomologie has permitted the identification of several nominal species that were nomina dubia and the establishment of several new synonymies and combinations, and, in some cases, the reversion of precedence following Art. 23.9 of the Code, declaring nomina protecta and nomina oblita. New synonymies are (the first term is the valid name: Lixus filiformis (Fabricius, 1781 = Curculio longus Gmelin, 1790; Lasiorhynchites cavifrons (Gyllenhal, 1833 nom. protectum = Rhinomacer viridis Geoffroy, 1785, nom. oblitum; Byctiscus betulae (Linnaeus, 1758 = Rhinomacer auratus Geoffroy, 1785; Neocoenorrhinus pauxillus (Germar, 1824 nom. protectum = Rhinomacer caeruleus Geoffroy, 1785, nom. oblitum; Deporaus betulae (Linnaeus, 1758 = Curculio nigrostriatus Goeze, 1777 = Rhinomacer niger Geoffroy, 1785 = Curculio fuliginosus Gmelin, 1790; Coniocleonus hollbergii (F√•hraeus, 1842 = Curculio sulcatus Goeze, 1777 = Curculio sulcatus Geoffroy, 1785 = Curculio sulcatus Gmelin, 1790; Larinus iaceae (Fabricius, 1775 = Curculio carduelis Goeze, 1777; Hypera postica (Gyllenhal, 1813, nom. protectum = Curculio fasciolatus Geoffroy, 1785, nom. oblitum; Charagmus griseus (Fabricius, 1775 = Curculio cupreosquamosus Goeze, 1777 = Curculio intersectus Geoffroy, 1785 = Curculio squamosus Gmelin, 1790; Sitona hispidulus (Fabricius, 1777 = Curculio griseus Goeze, 1777 = Curculio modestus Geoffroy, 1785 = Curculio geoffroaei Gmelin, 1790; Aulacobaris cuprirostris (Fabricius, 1787 = Curculio viridisericeus Goeze, 1777; Cleopomiarus plantarum (Germar, 1824, nom. protectum = Curculio

  4. Effect of garlic extraction on injury by cowpea, Curculio Chalcodermes aenus Boheman (Coleoptera: Cucurlionidae), and other pests, to cowpea, Vigna unguiculata L. Walp

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garlic-based oils and extract formulations have been used as insecticides against various insects on numerous crops, but there are contradictions among findings on the insecticidal or repellent properties of garlic-based products. In a field plot test, the effects of garlic extract on control of th...

  5. Asincronía hospedero-plaga y búsqueda de resistencia a Rhagoletis pomonella en Crataegus spp.; fuentes de atracción y preferencia de Conotrachelus crataegi para oviposición en tejocote

    OpenAIRE

    Muñiz Merino, Manolo

    2012-01-01

    La mosca de la fruta (Rhagoletis pomonella) y el picudo o barrenador del hueso son las dos principales plagas del tejocote (Crataegus spp.) en México. El presente trabajo se realizó en dos fases: una para determinar la importancia de la asincronía Rhagoletis-Crataegus y evaluar la resistencia de 20 genotipos de tejocote a la mosca; la otra para identificar, observar el comportamiento de adultos, buscar fuentes de atracción y estudiar la preferencia de oviposición del picudo. Los resultados de...

  6. Addenda and Corrigenda to the Catalogue of Palaearctic Coleoptera, volumes 7 and 8 (Curculionoidea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alonso-Zarazaga, Miguel A.

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Additions, corrections, comments and nomenclatural novelties for the volumes 7 and 8 of the Catalogue of Palaearctic Coleoptera are provided. For the exact authorship of these check the text. One new species is described: Mecinus tavaresi Caldara & Fogato, sp. nov. from Portugal and Spain. New synonymies are: Compsapoderus (Compsapoderus erythropterus (Gmelin, 1790 = Attelabus intermedius Hellwig, 1795, syn. nov.; Paroplapoderus (Erycapoderus angulipennis (Kolbe, 1886 = Paroplapoderus (Erycapoderus angulipennis shaanxinsis Legalov, 2004, syn. nov. (Attelabidae; Aspidapion (Koestlinia aeneum (Fabricius, 1775 = Aspidapion (Koestlinia motschulskyi (Hochhuth, 1847, syn. nov., Taeniapion rufescens (Gyllenhal, 1833 = Taeniapion notatum (Wagner, 1912, syn. nov. (Apionidae; Larinus (Larinomesius scolymi (Olivier, 1807 = Curculio teres Hellwig, 1795, syn. nov. (Curculionidae; Lixus paraplecticus (Linnaeus, 1758 = Curculio phellandrii Linnaeus, 1764, syn. nov. (Curculionidae; Curculio alternans Hellwig, 1795= Curculio alternans Herbst, 1795, syn. nov. (Curculionidae; Sibinia lyrata Faust, 1889= Sibinia attalica var. judea Pic, 1901, syn. nov. (Curculionidae; Phyllobius (Metaphyllobius pomaceus Gyllenhal, 1834= Curculio prasinus Olivier, 1791, syn. nov. (Curculionidae. New homonymies are: Attelabus intermedius Hellwig, 1795 (non Attelabus intermedius Illiger, 1794; Baris marshalli Ramesha & Ramamurthy, 2011 (non Baris marshalli Hustache, 1938. New replacement names are: Baris ramamurthyi Alonso-Zarazaga nom. nov. for Baris bimaculata Pajni & Kohli, 1990 (non Hustache, 1932; Archarius (Archarius kwonleeanus Alonso-Zarazaga nom. nov. for Archarius (Archarius parvus (Kwon & Lee, 1990 (non Archarius (Archarius parvus (Hong & Wang, 1987, a fossil species; Curculio (Curculio zhangianus Alonso-Zarazaga nom. nov. for Curculio (Curculio helleri Pelsue & Zhang, 2002 (non Curculio (Curculio helleri (Voss, 1932; Lixus trichromus Alonso-Zarazaga nom. nov. for Lixus

  7. On the identity of some weevil species described by Johann Christian Fabricius (1745–1808 in the Museum of Zoology of Copenhagen (Coleoptera, Cucujoidea, Curculionoidea, Tenebrionoidea

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    Miguel Alonso-Zarazaga

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The types of thirty-two nominal weevil species described by Johann Christian Fabricius are reviewed and lecto- and paralectotypes are designated for twenty-two of them. A neotype is designated for Curculio sticticus Fabricius, 1777. Protapion varipes (Germar, 1817 is declared a nomen protectum over Curculio flavipes Fabricius, 1775. Based on a study of syntypes, Rhinomacer curculioides Fabricius, 1781 is confirmed as a member of Mycterus (Mycteridae, Bruchus undatus Fabricius, 1787 is tentatively transferred to Erotylidae, Curculio fulvirostris Fabricius, 1787 and Anthribus roboris Fabricius, 1798 are confirmed as members of Salpingus (Salpingidae, and Brachycerus cristatus Fabricius, 1798 is transferred to Tenebrionidae. Based on lectotype designation, Curculio caninus Fabricius, 1792 is confirmed as a synonym of Sitona lineatus (Linnaeus, 1758 and Curculio innocuus Fabricius, 1802 as a synonym of Cneorhinus barcelonicus (Herbst, 1797. Bruchus rufipes Fabricius, 1792 is not considered an available species name, but a later use of Bruchus rufipes Olivier, 1790. Cossonus incisus Pascoe, 1885 is reinstated as valid from synonymy under Cossonus illigeri Champion, 1909 and Cossonus vulneratus Illiger, 1805 from synonymy under Cossonus canaliculatus (Fabricius, 1792 (a primary homonym of Curculio canaliculatus Olivier, 1791. Cossonus canaliculatus Fabricius, 1802 is a secondary homonym of the former and is replaced with Cossonus incisus. Salpingus fulvirostris (Fabricius, 1787 is reinstated as valid from synonymy under Salpingus planirostris (Fabricius, 1787, a primary homonym of Curculio planirostris Piller & Mitterpacher, 1783. The following new combinations are proposed: Brachysomus erinaceus (Fabricius, 1802 (from Curculio, Bronchus ferus (Gyllenhal, 1840 (from Hipporhinus, Bronchus glandifer (Fabricius, 1792 (from Curculio, Bronchus nivosus (Sparrman, 1785 (from Curculio, Bronchus sparrmani (Gyllenhal, 1833 (from Hipporhinus, Coelocephalapion

  8. Controlling pecan weevil with beneficial fungi: the impact of fungal species and fertilizer regimes

    Science.gov (United States)

    The pecan weevil, Curculio caryae (Horn), is a key pest of pecan. Prior research indicated the potential for using entomopathogenic fungi to suppress pecan weevil in the soil. We compared the efficacy of two fungal species, Beauveria bassiana (GHA strain) and Metarhizium brunneum (F52), in their a...

  9. Effects of entomopathogenic fungus species, and impact of fertilizers, on biological control of pecan weevil (Coleoptera: Curculionidae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The pecan weevil, Curculio caryae (Horn), is a key pest of pecan. Prior research indicated potential to use Hypocreales fungi for suppression of C. caryae. In this study, we first compared the efficacy of two fungal spp. Beauveria bassiana (GHA strain) and Metarhizium brunneum (F52) in ability to ...

  10. The theatrical life of things: Plautus and the physical

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    Alison Sharrock

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper examines the semiotics of props and other physical items in Plautus’ Curculio. The play is over-determined with props: a candle, a door, fragrant wine, water, a ring, which comes in twice (and has a twin, a letter to go with it, a seal with represented elephant-slaying sword, a missing eye, a bad gut, animal names, like the wolfy banker Lyco, and the weevil-parasite Curculio, and a property manager who comes out for a little chat with the audience about the real-life Rome they can see around them. I am particularly concerned with the most powerfully metatheatrical and metapoetic elements, including the preternaturally quiet door, and the ring which has a life of its own weaving through the play and indeed through the comic tradition.

  11. Acorn fall and weeviling in a northern red oak seedling orchard

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniel R. Miller; Scott E. Schlarbaum

    2005-01-01

    In 2000, we determined levels of damage by acorn weevils (Curculio spp.) and patterns of acorn fall in a northern red oak (Quercus rubra L.) seedling orchard in eastern Tennessee. The mean (±SE) production of acorns among 43 selected trees was 5,930 ± 586 acorns per tree with a maximum production level of 16,969 acorns for one tree...

  12. On the identity of some weevil species described by Johann Christian Fabricius (1745-1808) in the Museum of Zoology of Copenhagen (Coleoptera, Cucujoidea, Curculionoidea, Tenebrionoidea).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alonso-Zarazaga, Miguel A

    2014-01-01

    The types of thirty-two nominal weevil species described by Johann Christian Fabricius are reviewed and lecto- and paralectotypes are designated for twenty-two of them. A neotype is designated for Curculiosticticus Fabricius, 1777. Protapionvaripes (Germar, 1817) is declared a nomen protectum over Curculioflavipes Fabricius, 1775. Based on a study of syntypes, Rhinomacercurculioides Fabricius, 1781 is confirmed as a member of Mycterus (Mycteridae), Bruchusundatus Fabricius, 1787 is tentatively transferred to Erotylidae, Curculiofulvirostris Fabricius, 1787 and Anthribusroboris Fabricius, 1798 are confirmed as members of Salpingus (Salpingidae), and Brachyceruscristatus Fabricius, 1798 is transferred to Tenebrionidae. Based on lectotype designation, Curculiocaninus Fabricius, 1792 is confirmed as a synonym of Sitonalineatus (Linnaeus, 1758) and Curculioinnocuus Fabricius, 1802 as a synonym of Cneorhinusbarcelonicus (Herbst, 1797). Bruchusrufipes Fabricius, 1792 is not considered an available species name, but a later use of Bruchusrufipes Olivier, 1790. Cossonusincisus Pascoe, 1885 is reinstated as valid from synonymy under Cossonusilligeri Champion, 1909 and Cossonusvulneratus Illiger, 1805 from synonymy under Cossonuscanaliculatus (Fabricius, 1792) (a primary homonym of Curculiocanaliculatus Olivier, 1791). Cossonuscanaliculatus Fabricius, 1802 is a secondary homonym of the former and is replaced with Cossonusincisus. Salpingusfulvirostris (Fabricius, 1787) is reinstated as valid from synonymy under Salpingusplanirostris (Fabricius, 1787), a primary homonym of Curculioplanirostris Piller & Mitterpacher, 1783. The following new combinations are proposed: Brachysomuserinaceus (Fabricius, 1802) (from Curculio), Bronchusferus (Gyllenhal, 1840) (from Hipporhinus), Bronchusglandifer (Fabricius, 1792) (from Curculio), Bronchusnivosus (Sparrman, 1785) (from Curculio), Bronchussparrmani (Gyllenhal, 1833) (from Hipporhinus), Coelocephalapionatrirostre (Fabricius, 1802

  13. Concept Specifications/Prerequisites for DeepWind Deliverable D8.1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt Paulsen, Uwe; Schløer, Signe; Larsén, Xiaoli Guo

    The work is a result of the contributions within the DeepWind project which is supported by the European Commission, Grant 256769 FP7 Energy 2010 - Future emerging technologies, and by the DeepWind beneficiaries: DTU(DK), AAU(DK), TUDELFT(NL), TUTRENTO(I), DHI(DK), SINTEF(N), MARINTEK(N), MARIN......(NL), NREL(USA), STATOIL(N), VESTAS(DK) and NENUPHAR(F). The report discuss the design considerations for offshore wind turbines, both in general and specifically for Darrieus-type floating turbines, as is the focus of the DeepWind project. The project is considered in a North Sea environment, notably close...

  14. Evaluation of the DeepWind concept

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt Paulsen, Uwe; Borg, Michael; Gonzales Seabra, Luis Alberto

    , as well as the technical and scientific recommendations are performed. The work is a result of the contributions within the DeepWind project which is supported by the European Commission, Grant 256769 FP7 Energy 2010 - Future emerging technologies, and by the DeepWind beneficiaries: DTU(DK), AAU......The report describes the DeepWind 5 MW conceptual design as a baseline for results obtained in the scientific and technical work packages of the DeepWind project. A comparison of DeepWi nd with existing VAWTs and paper projects are carried out and the evaluation of the concept in terms of cost......(DK), TUDELFT(NL), TUTRENTO(I), DHI(DK), SINTEF(N), MARINTEK(N), MARIN(NL), NREL(USA), STATOIL(N), VESTAS(D K) and NENUPHAR(F)....

  15. Quarantine treatment of agricultural products for export and import by gamma irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kwon, Joong Ho; Roh, M.J.; Chung, H.W.; Lee, J.E.; Park, N.Y.; Kwon, Y.J.; Seo, S.J. [Kyungbuk National University, Taegu (Korea)

    1999-04-01

    To pre-establish an alternative technique to the toxic fumigant, methyl bromide which is the current quarantine measure of agricultural products for export and import, some selected agricultural products, such as chestnut, acorn, red bean and mung bean, were subjected to a preliminary study to confirm the comparative effects of gamma irradiation and MBr fumigant on their disinfestation and quality, thereby preparing the basic data for the practical approach. Current quarantine activities were examined and the related limitations were investigated. Quarantine-related pests were investigated on their radiosensitivity and disinfestation effects by both treatments. The pests in chestnut and acorn, Curculio skkimensis Heller, Curculio dentipes Roelofs, and Dichocrocis punctiferalis Guenee showed an increased mortality when exposed to above 0.5 kGy irradiation, resulting in 100% of mortality three weeks later. Callosobruchus chinensis Linne from both red and mung beans revealed a apparent mortality at around 10 days after irradiation of 1 to 3 kGy. Current fumigation was perfect in its disinfesting capability, but it caused the detrimental effects on physical quality of agricultural produce. Whereas, irradiation doses suitable for controlling the pests did not induce any significant changes in the quality of the samples. (author). 53 refs., 74 figs., 138 tabs.

  16. Direct Effects of Carpophagous Insects on the Germination Ability and Early Abscission of Oak Acorns

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    CSÓKA, György

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Carpophagous insects play an important role in decreasing the viability of acorns in bothdirect and indirect ways. Therefore they significantly influence the reproductive potential of oaks. As adirect effect, their feeding on the embryo and on the cotyledons may prevent the germination of theacorn and on the other hand, their damage causes premature acorn abscission. During 3 years, 60acorn samples from five oak species (Turkey oak – Quercus cerris, pedunculate oak – Quercus robur,sessile oak – Quercus petraea, downy oak – Quercus pubescens, red oak – Quercus rubra have beeninvestigated. The average rate of damage varied a lot between years, but was always significant (2000:36%, 2001: 61%, 2002: 51%. The insects’ influence causing premature acorn abscission wassignificant both for pedunculate and Turkey oaks. The premature acorn abscission was 34% of thetotal crop in 2000 for pedunculate oak (Curculio spp. 26%, Cydia spp. 2% and Andricusquercuscalicis 6% and 39% in 2001 (Curculio spp. 14%, Cydia spp. 2%, Andricus quercuscalicis13%, Callirhytis glandium 10%. In case of Turkey oak it was 29% in 2001 (C. glandium 16%,Neuroterus saliens 13%, and 12% in 2002 (C. glandium 10%, N. saliens 2%.

  17. Elemental stoichiometry and compositions of weevil larvae and two acorn hosts under natural phosphorus variation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Huawei; Du, Baoming; Liu, Chunjiang

    2017-04-05

    To understand how different trophic organisms in a parasite food chain adapt to the differences in soil nutrient conditions, we investigated stoichiometric variation and homeostasis of multiple elements in two acorn trees, Quercus variabilis and Quercus acutissima, and their parasite weevil larvae (Curculio davidi Fairmaire) at phosphorus (P)-deficient and P-rich sites in subtropical China where P-rich ores are scattered among dominant P-deficient soils. Results showed that elemental stoichiometry and compositions of both acorns and weevil larvae differed significantly between P-deficient and P-rich sites (p stoichiometry and compositions (p stoichiometry and composition and physiological regulations of nutritional needs in organisms and provide possible stoichiometric responses of both plants and animals to P loading, a worldwide issue from excess release of P into the environment.

  18. Elemental stoichiometry and compositions of weevil larvae and two acorn hosts under natural phosphorus variation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Huawei; Du, Baoming; Liu, Chunjiang

    2017-04-01

    To understand how different trophic organisms in a parasite food chain adapt to the differences in soil nutrient conditions, we investigated stoichiometric variation and homeostasis of multiple elements in two acorn trees, Quercus variabilis and Quercus acutissima, and their parasite weevil larvae (Curculio davidi Fairmaire) at phosphorus (P)-deficient and P-rich sites in subtropical China where P-rich ores are scattered among dominant P-deficient soils. Results showed that elemental stoichiometry and compositions of both acorns and weevil larvae differed significantly between P-deficient and P-rich sites (p plants and animals to P loading, a worldwide issue from excess release of P into the environment.

  19. 衢州市油茶害虫及天敌种类调查%Insect pests of Camellia oleifera and their natural enemies in Quzhou, China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    华正媛; 王井田; 刘剑; 王浩杰; 舒金平; 徐天森

    2012-01-01

    油茶Camellia oleifera是中国亚热带地区重要的经济作物之一,现已大面积栽培,但油茶害虫一直未受到充分关注.系统调查了浙江省衢州地区油茶害虫和天敌昆虫的种类,分析了其组成结构.结果表明:在衢州地区油茶上共查有害虫225种,隶属于9目55科,主要种类有油茶织蛾Casmara patrona,茶籽象Curculio chinensis,桃蛀螟Dichocrocis punctiferalis,环茸毒蛾Dasychira dudgeoni,黑跗眼天牛Chrenoma atritarsis,黄翅大白蚁Macrotermes barneyi和黑翅土白蚁Odontotermes fomosanus等,在所有害虫中鳞翅目害虫所占的比例最高;查获油茶害虫天敌昆虫49种,隶属于属于4目11科.表5参23.%Camellia oleifera, which has been widely planted in eastern China, is one of the most important economic trees in subtropical areas of China. In this work, pests of C. oleifera and their natural enemies in Quzhou City of Zhejiang Province were surveyed in the field, collected, and then analyzed. Results revealed 225 pest insects belonging to nine orders in 55 families with seven major insect species: Casmara patrona, Curculio chinemis, Dichocrocis punctiferalis, Dasychira dudgeoni, Chrenoma atritarsis, Macrotermes bar-neyi, and Odontotermes fomosanus. Among the insect pests that damaged C. oleifera trees, Lepidoptera were predominant. Also found were 49 natural enemies belonging to 4 orders and 11 families. [Ch, 5 tab. 23 ref.

  20. INTEGRATED MANAGEMENT OF CHROMOLAENA ODORATA EMPHASIZING THE CLASSICAL BIOLOGICAL CONTROL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SOEKISMAN TJITROSEMITO

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available Chromolaena odorata, Siam weed, a very important weed of Java Island (Indonesia is native to Central and South America. In the laboratory it showed rapid growth (1.15 g/g/week in the first 8 weeks of its growth. The biomass was mainly as leaves (LAR : 317.50 cm'/g total weight. It slowed down in the following month as the biomass was utilized for stem and branch formation. This behavior supported the growth of C. odorata into a very dense stand. It flowered, fruited during the dry season, and senesced following maturation of seeds from inflorescence branches. These branches dried out, but soon the stem resumed aggressive growth following the wet season. Leaf biomass was affected by the size of the stem in its early phase of regrowth, but later on it was more affected by the number of branches. The introduction of Pareuchaetes pseudoinsulata to Indonesia, was successful only in North Sumatera. In Java it has not been reported to establish succesfully. The introduction of another biological control agent, Procecidochares conneca to Indonesia was shown to be sp ecific and upon release in West Java it established immediately. It spread exponentia lly in the first 6 months of its release. Field monitoring continues to eval uate the impact of the agents. Other biocontrol agents (Actmole anteas and Conotrachelus wilt be introduced to Indonesia in 1997 through ACIAR Project on the Biological Control of Chromolaena odorata in Indonesia and Papua New Guinea.

  1. 湖北省罗田县板栗害虫种类调查%Investigation on the species of insect pests infesting on the chestnut plant (Castanea mollissima Blume)in Luotian County,Hubei Province

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    肖云丽; 汪玉平; 孙康; 徐向阳; 晏绍良; 钟玉林

    2015-01-01

    The species of insect pests infesting on chestnut plant Castanea mollissima Blume were systematically in-vestigated from 2013 to 2014 in Luotian County,Hubei Province.One hundred and ninety-two chestnut pest spe-cies in 61 families under 5 orders were recorded from Luotian County,among them,62 branch and trunk pests species in 23 families,1 53 leaf,bud and flower pests species in 49 families,1 5 fruit pests species in 8 families. Eighty-one named species in 37 families under 4 orders were firstly reported feeding on chestnut plants,including 24 branch and trunk pests species in 13 families,60 leaf,bud and flower pests species in 28 families,and 7 fruit pests species in 4 families.Cyllorhynchites cumulatus (Voss),Curculio davidi Fairmaire,Niphades castanes Chao,Conogethes punctiferalis (Guenée),Synanthedon kunmingensis Yang & Wang,Synanthedon menglaensis Yang & Wang,Lachnus tropicalis (van der Goot),Phalera assimilis (Bremer & Grey),and Dryocosmus kuriphi-lus Yasumatsu caused serious damage in the chestnut production.%2013-2014年度系统调查了湖北省罗田县板栗害虫种类,经分类整理与鉴定,罗田县板栗害虫共计5目61科192种,其中枝干害虫23科62种,叶芽花序害虫49科153种、果实害虫8科15种;板栗新纪录害虫4目37科81种(已命名种),其中枝干害虫13科24种,叶芽花序害虫28科60种,果实害虫4科7种。对板栗生产造成严重危害的主要有:果实害虫板栗剪枝象[Cyllorhynchites cumulatus (Voss)]、栗实象(Curculio davidi Fairmaire)、栗雪片象(Niphades castanes Chao)和桃多斑野螟[Conogethes punctiferalis (Guenée)];枝干害虫昆明兴透翅蛾(Synanthedon kunmingensis Yang & Wang)、勐腊兴透翅蛾(Synanthedon menglaensis Yang & Wang)和板栗大蚜[Lachnus tropicalis (van der Goot)];叶芽害虫栎掌舟蛾[Phalera assimilis (Bremer & Grey)]和板栗瘿蜂(Dryo-cosmus kuriphilus Yasumatsu)。

  2. Competitiveness of gamma irradiation with fumigation for chestnuts associated with quarantine and quality security

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Joong-Ho; Kwon, Yong-Jung; Byun, Myung-Woo; Kim, Kyong-Su

    2004-09-01

    Comparative effects of gamma irradiation and methyl bromide (MeBr) fumigation were determined for fresh chestnut on mortality of pests and quality stability. Chestnut was exposed to both irradiation at 0-10 kGy and MeBr fumigation in commercial conditions, and then subjected to the corresponding study during storage at 5°C for 6 months. Pests with quarantine importance for chestnut were found Curculio sikkimensis Heller and Dichocrocis punctiferalis Guenee, which showed 100% mortality by MeBr at the 3rd day after fumigation and by irradiation at 0.5 kGy in about 4 weeks. Sprouting was controlled for 6 months with treatments of 0.25 kGy or more and of MeBr, but rotting rate dramatically increased from 2 months after fumigation. Irradiation over 1 kGy as well as fumigation significantly caused changes in the color of stored chestnut. Considering the cumulative mortality of chestnut pests, irradiation at the range of 0.5 kGy is recommendable as one of alternatives to MeBr fumigation for both quarantine and sprout control purposes.

  3. Competitiveness of gamma irradiation with fumigation for chestnuts associated with quarantine and quality security

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kwon, J.-H. E-mail: jhkwon@knu.ac.kr; Kwon, Y.-J.; Byun, M.-W.; Kim, K.-S

    2004-10-01

    Comparative effects of gamma irradiation and methyl bromide (MeBr) fumigation were determined for fresh chestnut on mortality of pests and quality stability. Chestnut was exposed to both irradiation at 0-10 kGy and MeBr fumigation in commercial conditions, and then subjected to the corresponding study during storage at 5 deg. C for 6 months. Pests with quarantine importance for chestnut were found Curculio sikkimensis Heller and Dichocrocis punctiferalis Guenee, which showed 100% mortality by MeBr at the 3rd day after fumigation and by irradiation at 0.5 kGy in about 4 weeks. Sprouting was controlled for 6 months with treatments of 0.25 kGy or more and of MeBr, but rotting rate dramatically increased from 2 months after fumigation. Irradiation over 1 kGy as well as fumigation significantly caused changes in the color of stored chestnut. Considering the cumulative mortality of chestnut pests, irradiation at the range of 0.5 kGy is recommendable as one of alternatives to MeBr fumigation for both quarantine and sprout control purposes.

  4. Imbalance of predator and prey armament: geographic clines in phenotypic interface and natural selection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toju, Hirokazu; Sota, Teiji

    2006-01-01

    The escalation of defensive/offensive arms is ubiquitous in prey-predator evolutionary interactions. However, there may be a geographically varying imbalance in the armaments of participating species that affects the outcome of local interactions. In a system involving the Japanese camellia (Camellia japonica) and its obligate seed predator, the camellia weevil (Curculio camelliae), we investigated the geographic variation in physical defensive/offensive traits and that in natural selection on the plant's defense among 17 populations over a 700-km-wide area in Japan. The sizes of the plant defensive apparatus (pericarp thickness) and the weevil offensive apparatus (rostrum length) clearly correlated with each other across populations. Nevertheless, the balance in armaments between the two species was geographically structured. In the populations for which the balance was relatively advantageous for the plant's defense, natural selection on the trait was stronger because in the other populations, most plant individuals were too vulnerable to resist the attacks of the weevil, and their seeds were infested independent of pericarp thickness. We also found that the imbalance between the defensive/offensive armaments and the intensity of natural selection showed clear latitudinal clines. Overall, our results suggest that the imbalance of armament between sympatric prey and predator could determine the strength of local selection and that climatic conditions could affect the local and overall trajectory of coevolutionary arms races.

  5. Phylogeography and the geographic cline in the armament of a seed-predatory weevil: effects of historical events vs. natural selection from the host plant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toju, Hirokazu; Sota, Teiji

    2006-11-01

    Japanese camellia (Camellia japonica) and its seed predator, the camellia weevil (Curculio camelliae), provide a notable example of a geographic mosaic of coevolution. In the species interaction, the offensive trait of the weevil (rostrum length) and the defensive trait of the plant (pericarp thickness) are involved in a geographically-structured arms race, and these traits and selective pressures acting on the plant defence vary greatly across a geographical landscape. To further explore the geographical structure of this interspecific interaction, we tested whether the geographical variation in the weevil rostrum over an 800-km range along latitude is attributed to local natural selection or constrained by historical (phylogeographical) events of local populations. Phylogeographical analyses of the mitochondrial DNA sequences of the camellia weevil revealed that this species has experienced differentiation into two regions, with a population bottleneck and subsequent range and/or population expansion within each region. Although these phylogeographical factors have affected the variation in rostrum length, analyses of competing factors for the geographical variation revealed that this pattern is primarily determined by the defensive trait of the host plant rather than by the effects of historical events of populations and a climatic factor (annual mean temperature). Thus, our study suggests the overwhelming strength of coevolutionary selection against the effect of historical events, which may have limited local adaptation.

  6. Adaptive divergence of scaling relationships mediates the arms race between a weevil and its host plant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toju, Hirokazu; Sota, Teiji

    2006-12-22

    Coevolution of exaggerated morphologies between insects and plants is a well-known but poorly understood phenomenon in evolutionary biology. In the antagonistic interaction between a seed-predatory insect, the camellia weevil (Curculio camelliae), and its host plant, Japanese camellia (Camellia japonica), we examined the evolutionary trajectory of an exaggerated offensive trait of the weevil (rostrum length) in terms of scaling relationship. Sampling throughout Japan revealed that the ratio of the rostrum length to overall body size was correlated with the ratio of the pericarp thickness to overall fruit size across the localities. We found a geographical interpopulation divergence in a parameter pertaining to the allometric equation of rostrum length (the coefficient a in y=axb, where y and x denote rostrum and body lengths, respectively), and the pattern of geographical differentiation in the allometric coefficient was closely correlated with the variation in the pericarp thickness of Japanese camellia. Our results provide a novel example of a geographically diverged scaling relationship in an insect morphology resulting from a coevolutionary arms race with its host plant.

  7. Fine-scale local adaptation of weevil mouthpart length and camellia pericarp thickness: altitudinal gradient of a putative arms race.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toju, Hirokazu

    2008-05-01

    Although coevolutionary theory predicts that evolutionary interactions between species are spatially hierarchical, few studies have examined coevolutionary processes at multiple spatial scales. In an antagonistic system involving a plant, the Japanese camellia (Camellia japonica), and its obligate seed predator, the camellia weevil (Curculio camelliae), I elucidated the local adaptation of a camellia defensive armament (pericarp thickness) and a weevil offensive armament (rostrum length) within Yakushima Island (ca. 30 km in diameter), compared to a larger-scale variation in those traits throughout Japan reported in previous studies. Results showed that camellia pericarp thickness and weevil rostrum length vary remarkably within several kilometers on this island. In addition, geographic variation in each camellia and weevil armament was best explained by the armament size of the sympatric participant than by abiotic environmental heterogeneity. However, I also found that camellia pericarp thickness significantly decreased in cool-temperate (i.e., highland) areas, suggesting the contributions of climate on the spatial structuring of the weevil-camellia interaction. Interestingly, relatively thin pericarps occurred not only in the highlands but also in some low-altitude areas, indicating that other factors such as nonrandom or asymmetric gene flow play important roles in the metapopulation processes of interspecific interactions at small spatial scales.

  8. 荔波县板栗虫害及天敌调查研究%Investigation on Natural Enemy and Insect Pest of Castanea mollissima in Libo County

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    莫显平

    2015-01-01

    对荔波县翁昂板栗生产区的虫害种类、危害及天敌情况进行调查,结果表明:板栗主要害虫有32种,其中危害较严重的是栗实象、栗瘿蜂、红蜡蚧、桃蛀螟、桃黑斑蚜5种害虫;板栗害虫的天敌昆虫有11种,其中中华长尾小蜂、大草蛉蜂、七星瓢虫是栗瘿蜂和桃黑斑蚜的重要天敌。%The overall situation of insect species,damage and natural enemy of Castanea mollissima in Libo County were surveyed.The results showed that there were 32 species of pests,including 5 pests of Curculio davidi,Dryocosmus kuriphilus,Ceroplastes rubens,Conogethes punctiferalis,Cnoromaphis jaglandicola.There were 11 natural enemies for the pests of Castanea mollissima,among which Torymus sinensis,Chrysopa sepfempuncfafa,Coccinella septempunctata were important enemies for Dryocosmus kuriphilus,Cnoromaphis jaglandicola.

  9. Effects of combining microbial and chemical insecticides on mortality of the Pecan Weevil (Coleoptera: Curculionidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shapiro-Ilan, David I; Cottrell, Ted E; Wood, Bruce W

    2011-02-01

    The pecan weevil, Curculio caryae (Horn), is a key pest of pecan [Carya illinoinensis (Wangenh.) K. Koch]. Current control recommendations are based on chemical insecticide applications. Microbial control agents such as the entomopathogenic nematode, Steinernema carpocapsae (Weiser) and the fungus Beauveria bassiana (Balsamo) Vuillemin occur naturally in southeastern U.S. pecan orchards and have shown promise as alternative control agents for C. caryjae. Conceivably, the chemical and microbial agents occur simultaneously within pecan orchards or might be applied concurrently. The objective of this study was to determine the interactions between two chemical insecticides that are used in commercial C. caryae control (i.e., carbaryl and cypermethrin applied below field rates) and the microbial agents B. bassiana and S. carpocapsae. In laboratory experiments, pecan weevil larval or adult mortality was assessed after application of microbial or chemical treatments applied singly or in combination (microbial + chemical agent). The nature of interactions (antagonism, additivity, or synergy) in terms of weevil mortality was evaluated over 9 d (larvae) or 5 d (adults). Results for B. bassiana indicated synergistic activity with carbaryl and antagonism with cypermethrin in C. caryae larvae and adults. For S. carpocapsae, synergy was detected with both chemicals in C. caryae larvae, but only additive effects were detected in adult weevils. Our results indicate that the chemical-microbial combinations tested are compatible with the exception of B. bassiana and cypermethrin. In addition, combinations that exhibited synergistic interactions may provide enhanced C. caryae control in commercial field applications; thus, their potential merits further exploration.

  10. Design, Analysis, Hybrid Testing and Orientation Control of a Floating Platform with Counter-Rotating Vertical-Axis Wind Turbines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanner, Samuel Adam Chinman

    the model scale. Under certain wind and wave headings, it is possible to control the orientation of the platform in regular waves to maximize the power output from the turbines. A time-domain numerical simulation tool is able to confirm some of the experimental findings, taking into account the decoupled properties of the slow-drift hydrodynamics and wind turbine aerodynamics. Future platform designs are discussed, including the French-based, pre-commercial design from Nenuphar Wind, called the TwinFloat, which is closely related to concepts examined in the thesis.

  11. Preferência para alimentação e oviposição do manhoso, Chalcodermus bimaculatus Fiedler (Coleoptera: Curculionidae, em genótipos de feijão-caupi. = The feeding and oviposition preference of Chalcodermus bimaculatus Fiedler (Coleoptera: Curculionidae in cowpea genotype.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Cesar Silva Lima

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Objetivou-se com este trabalho avaliar a resistência do tipo antixenose de dez genótipos de feijão-caupi (Vigna unguiculata (L. Walp. ao manhoso (Chalcodermus bimaculatus Fiedler, em condições de campo. Os tratamentos consistiram de dez genótipos, sendo: Pretinho Precoce 1, UFRR Grão Verde, Apiaú, Iracema, BRS Mazagão, IT85D-3428-4-3-HP e IT85D-3428-4-R2-4-HM, Pingo de Ouro, Epace 10 e Pitiúba. O delineamento experimental utilizado foi o de blocos ao acaso com quatro repetições. A parcela experimental (2,8 x 5,0 m continha quatro fileiras de 5,0 m, espaçadas de 0,70 m com área total de 14 m2, deixando-se após o desbaste cinco plantas por metro. O cultivo se deu em condições de campo nos anos agrícolas 2004 e 2005. As avaliações foram realizadas semanalmente coletando-se aleatoriamente 10 vagens (no ponto de grão verde de cada genótipo nas fileiras centrais das parcelas. No laboratório de Entomologia Agrícola do CCA/UFRR fazia-se a contagem do número de cicatrizes superficiais na vagem, número de grãos perfurados na vagem, comprimento da vagem e o número de grãos cheios na vagem. Concluiu-se que BRS Mazagão apresenta resistência do tipo não-preferência para oviposição de C. bimaculatus; que Pingo de Ouro foi o mais preferido pelo manhoso tanto para alimentação quanto para a oviposição; e que há correlação positiva entre o número de cicatrizes superficiais por 10 cm de vagem do feijão-caupi e a percentagem de grãos perfurados na vagem. = The objective of this study was to evaluate the type antixenosis resistance of 10 cowpea genotypes, Vigna unguiculata (L. Walp., (Pretinho Precoce 1, UFRR Grão Verde, Apiaú, Iracema, BRS-Mazagão, IT85D-3428-4-3-HP and IT85D-3428-4-R2-4-HM, Pingo de Ouro, Epace 10, and Pitiúba to curculio, Chalcodermus bimaculatus Fiedler, during field conditions. Theexperimental design used consisted of randomized blocks with four replications. The genotypes were sowed in field

  12. New Curculionoidea (Coleoptera records for Canadа

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hume Douglas

    2013-06-01

    schevyrewi Semenov Tjan-Shansky, 1902; Tyloderma foveolatum (Say, 1832; (all Curculionidae; Ontario – Trichapion nigrum (Herbst, 1797; Nanophyes marmoratus marmoratus (Goeze, 1777 (both Brentidae; Asperosoma echinatum (Fall, 1917; Micracis suturalis LeConte, 1868; Orchestes alni (Linnaeus, 1758; Phloeosinus pini Swaine, 1915; Scolytus schevyrewi Semenov Tjan-Shansky, 1902; Xyleborinus attenuatus (Blandford, 1894 (all Curculionidae; Quebec – Trigonorhinus alternatus (Say, 1826; Trigonorhinus tomentosus tomentosus (Say, 1826 (both Anthribidae; Trichapion nigrum (Herbst, 1797; Trichapion porcatum (Boheman, 1839; Nanophyes marmoratus marmoratus (Goeze, 1777 (all Brentidae; Lissorhoptrus oryzophilus Kuschel, 1952 (Brachyceridae; Acalles carinatus LeConte, 1876; Ampeloglypter ampelopsis (Riley, 1869; Anthonomus rufipes LeConte, 1876; Anthonomus suturalis LeConte, 1824; Ceutorhynchus hamiltoni Dietz, 1896; Curculio pardalis (Chittenden, 1908; Cyrtepistomus castaneus (Roelofs, 1873; Larinus planus (Fabricius, 1792; Mecinus janthinus (Germar, 1821; Microhyus setiger LeConte, 1876; Microplontus campestris (Gyllenhal, 1837; Orchestes alni (Linnaeus, 1758; Otiorhynchus ligustici (Linnaeus, 1758; Rhinusa neta (Germar, 1821; Trichobaris trinotata (Say, 1832; Tychius liljebladi Blatchley, 1916; Xyleborinus attenuatus (Blandford, 1894; Xyleborus affinis Eichhoff, 1868 (all Curculionidae; Sphenophorus incongruus Chittenden, 1905 (Dryophthoridae; New Brunswick – Euparius paganus Gyllenhal, 1833; Allandrus populi Pierce, 1930; Gonotropis dorsalis (Thunberg, 1796; Euxenus punctatus LeConte, 1876 (all Anthribidae; Loborhynchapion cyanitinctum (Fall, 1927 (Brentidae; Pseudanthonomus seriesetosus Dietz, 1891; Curculio sulcatulus (Casey, 1897; Lignyodes bischoffi (Blatchley, 1916; Lignyodes horridulus (Casey, 1892; Dietzella zimmermanni (Gyllenhal, 1837; Parenthis vestitus Dietz, 1896; Pelenomus squamosus LeConte, 1876; Psomus armatus Dietz, 1891; Rhyncolus macrops Buchanan, 1946; Magdalis

  13. Diversity and infection prevalence of endosymbionts in natural populations of the chestnut weevil: relevance of local climate and host plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toju, Hirokazu; Fukatsu, Takema

    2011-02-01

    Many insects are ubiquitously associated with multiple endosymbionts, whose infection patterns often exhibit spatial and temporal variations. How such endosymbiont variations are relevant to local adaptation of the host organisms is of ecological interest. Here, we report a comprehensive survey of endosymbionts in natural populations of the chestnut weevil Curculio sikkimensis, whose larvae are notorious pests of cultivated chestnuts and also infest acorns of various wild oaks. From 968 insects representing 55 localities across the Japanese Archipelago and originating from 10 host plant species, we identified six distinct endosymbiont lineages, namely Curculioniphilus, Sodalis, Serratia, Wolbachia, Rickettsia and Spiroplasma, at different infection frequencies (96.7%, 12.8%, 82.3%, 82.5%, 28.2% and 6.8%, respectively) and with different geographical distribution patterns. Multiple endosymbiont infections were very common; 3.18±0.61 (ranging from 1.74 to 5.50) endosymbionts per insect on average in each of the local populations. Five pairs of endosymbionts (Curculioniphilus-Serratia, Curculioniphilus-Wolbachia, Sodalis-Rickettsia, Wolbachia-Rickettsia and Rickettsia-Spiroplasma) co-infected the same host individuals more frequently than expected, while infections with Serratia and Wolbachia were negatively correlated to each other. Infection frequencies of the endosymbionts were significantly correlated with climatic and ecological factors: for example, higher Sodalis, Wolbachia and Rickettsia infections at localities of higher temperature; lower Wolbachia and Rickettsia infections at localities of greater snowfall; and higher Curculioniphilus, Sodalis, Serratia, Wolbachia and Rickettsia infections on acorns than on chestnuts. These patterns are discussed in relation to potential host-endosymbiont co-evolution via local adaptation across geographical populations.

  14. Molecular diagnostic for boll weevil (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) based on amplification of three species-specific microsatellites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kyung Seok; Szendrei, Zsofia; Rodriguez-Saona, Cesar; Mulder, Phillip G; Sappington, Thomas W

    2009-04-01

    The boll weevil, Anthonomus grandis grandis Boheman (Coleoptera: Curculionidae), is a serious pest of cultivated cotton, Gossypium hirsutum L., in the Americas, and reinfestation of zones from which they have been eradicated is of perpetual concern. Extensive arrays of pheromone traps monitor for reintroductions, but occasionally the traps collect nontarget weevils that can be misidentified by scouts. For example, the congeneric pepper weevil, Anthonomus eugenii Cano, and other superficially similar weevils are attracted to components of the boll weevil lure or trap color. Although morphologically distinguishable by trained personnel, the potential for misidentification is compounded when captured weevils are dismembered or partially consumed by ants or ground beetles that sometimes feed on them in the traps. Because misidentification can have expensive consequences, a molecular diagnostic tool would be of great value to eradication managers. We demonstrate that a cocktail of three primer pairs in a single polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplify species-specific microsatellites that unambiguously distinguish the boll weevil from three other weevil species tested, including pepper weevil; cranberry weevil, Anthonomus eugenii musculus Say; and pecan weevil, Curculio caryae Horn. However, it does not distinguish the boll weevil from the subspecific "thurberia" weevil. A universal internal transcribed spacer primer pair included in the cocktail cross-amplifies DNA from all species, serving as a positive control. Furthermore, the diagnostic primers amplified the target microsatellites from various boll weevil adult body parts, indicating that the PCR technology using the primer cocktail is sensitive enough to positively identify a boll weevil even when the body is partly degraded.

  15. 鼎湖山锥栗种子扩散过程中死亡因素分析%Analysis of seed death of Castanopsis chinensis in the dispersal process in Dinghushan biosphere reserve

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杜彦君; 彭闪江; 徐国良; 黄忠良

    2006-01-01

    研究了锥栗(Castanopsis chinensis)种子扩散过程中死亡的主要因素.实验分为无处理组、鸟类取食组、排除鸟类取食组、排除哺乳动物组和种子袋法.结果表明,扩散前种子主要受栗实象甲(Curculio davidi )取食和病原体感染,其取食率在鼎湖山3种林型之间显示了较大差异.排除实验的研究表明,锥栗种子在扩散后承受啮齿类、鸟类等动物取食和病原体感染致死的巨大压力,其中无覆盖处理实验组的种子取食平均比例高达93.3%,鸟类对种子取食率约为80%,排除鸟类实验组中的种子平均取食率为92.4%,非哺乳动物对种子的取食在3个林型有差异,但不是显著性的.因此,巨大的种子死亡或丧失是锥栗自然更新率非常低的主要原因.

  16. Natural selection drives the fine-scale divergence of a coevolutionary arms race involving a long-mouthed weevil and its obligate host plant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toju Hirokazu

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background One of the major recent advances in evolutionary biology is the recognition that evolutionary interactions between species are substantially differentiated among geographic populations. To date, several authors have revealed natural selection pressures mediating the geographically-divergent processes of coevolution. How local, then, is the geographic structuring of natural selection in coevolutionary systems? Results I examined the spatial scale of a "geographic selection mosaic," focusing on a system involving a seed-predatory insect, the camellia weevil (Curculio camelliae, and its host plant, the Japanese camellia (Camellia japonica. In this system, female weevils excavate camellia fruits with their extremely-long mouthparts to lay eggs into seeds, while camellia seeds are protected by thick pericarps. Quantitative evaluation of natural selection demonstrated that thicker camellia pericarps are significantly favored in some, but not all, populations within a small island (Yakushima Island, Japan; diameter ca. 30 km. At the extreme, camellia populations separated by only several kilometers were subject to different selection pressures. Interestingly, in a population with the thickest pericarps, camellia individuals with intermediate pericarp thickness had relatively high fitness when the potential costs of producing thick pericarps were considered. Also importantly, some parameters of the weevil - camellia interaction such as the severity of seed infestation showed clines along temperature, suggesting the effects of climate on the fine-scale geographic differentiation of the coevolutionary processes. Conclusion These results show that natural selection can drive the geographic differentiation of interspecific interactions at surprisingly small spatial scales. Future studies should reveal the evolutionary/ecological outcomes of the "fine scale geographic mosaics" in biological communities.

  17. 噻虫啉防治板栗主要害虫技术研究%Research on Technology of Using Thiacloprid MSP to Control the Main Insect Pests of Chinese Chestnut

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    徐同冰

    2012-01-01

    In this paper,researches were made on using 2% thiacloprid MSP to control the five main Chinese chestnut pests,including Dryocosmus kuriphilus,Dichocrocis punctiferalis Guenee,Curculio davidi Fairmaire,Characoma ruficirra Hampson and Cryllorhynobites ursulus Roelots.They belonged to the three kinds of pests,which were leaf pests,seed pests and branch tip pests.Using the method of spraying MSP among the mountains could achieve a lot of advantages,such as a lasting efficacy,reducing pesticide times,preventing many kinds of insects,low cost,and good effect.In these tests,different doses of 1.5 kg,3.0 kg and 4.5 kg per hectare were adopted and their average control effect ranged between 60.69% and 94.71%.%2%噻虫啉微胶囊粉剂防治叶部害虫、种实害虫和枝梢害虫3个类群中的栗瘿蜂、桃蛀螟、栗实象、栗皮夜蛾和剪枝象甲等5种板栗主要害虫,采取山间雾化喷粉的施药方法,药效持续期长,减少施药次数,一药兼防多虫,成本低效果好。试验采用每公顷1.5 kg、3.0 kg和4.5 kg不同剂量配方施药,平均防治效果在60.69%~94.71%之间。

  18. Woody stem galls interact with foliage to affect community associations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, W R; Rieske, L K

    2009-04-01

    Gall wasps (Hymenoptera: Cynipidae) hijack the physiology of their host plant to produce galls that house wasps throughout their immature stages. The gall-maker-host plant interaction is highly evolved, and galls represent an extended phenotype of the gall wasp. We evaluated two-way interactions between stem galls produced by Dryocosmus kuriphilus Yasumatsu on Castanea spp. (Fagales: Fagaceae) and foliage directly attached to galls (gall leaves) using gall leaf excision experiments and herbivore bioassays. Early season gall leaf excision decreased the dry weight per chamber (nutritive index) and thickness of the protective schlerenchyma layer and increased the number of empty chambers and the occurrence and size of exterior fungal lesions. Leaf excision also caused a modestly significant (alpha = 0.1) increase in the incidence of feeding chamber fungi and herbivory by Curculio sayi Gyllenhal (Coleoptera: Curculionidae), and a modest decrease in parasitoids. This study shows that gall leaves are important for stem gall development, quality, and defenses, adding support for the nutrient and enemy hypotheses. We also evaluated the effects of stem galls on the suitability of gall leaves to Lymantria dispar L. (Lepidoptera: Lymantriidae) herbivory to assess the extent of gall defenses in important source leaves. Relative growth rate of L. dispar larvae was greater on gall leaves compared with normal leaves, indicating that, despite their importance, gall leaves may be more suitable to generalist insect herbivores, suggesting limitations to the extended phenotype of the gall wasp. Our results improve our knowledge of host-cynipid interactions, gall source-sink relations, and D. kuriphilus community interactions.

  19. Effects of entomopathogenic fungus species, and impact of fertilizers, on biological control of pecan weevil (Coleoptera: Curculionidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shapiro-Ilan, David I; Gardner, Wayne A; Wells, Lenny; Cottrell, Ted E; Behle, Robert W; Wood, Bruce W

    2013-04-01

    The pecan weevil, Curculio caryae (Horn), is a key pest of pecan, Carya illinoinensis (Wangenh.) K. Koch. Prior research indicated the potential for use of Hypocreales fungi to suppress C. caryae. We compared the efficacy of two fungal spp., Beauveria bassiana (GHA strain) and Metarhizium brunneum (F52), in their ability to cause C. caryae mortality. The fungus, B. bassiana, was applied to trunks of pecan trees (a method previously shown to be effective in C. caryae suppression) and efficacy was compared with M. brunneum applied to the ground or to the trunk with or without SoyScreen Oil as an ultraviolet protecting agent. Results indicated B. bassiana to be superior to M. brunneum regardless of application method; consequently, the potential for applying B. bassiana to control C. caryae was explored further. Specifically, the impact of different fertilizer regimes (as used by pecan growers) on the persistence of B. bassiana (GHA) in soil was determined. B. bassiana was applied to soil in a pecan orchard after one of several fertilizer treatments--i.e., ammonium nitrate, crimson clover, poultry litter, clover plus poultry litter, and a no-fertilizer control. B. bassiana persistence up to 49 d in 2009 and 2010 was assessed by plating soil onto selective media and determining the number of colony forming units, and by baiting soil with a susceptible host, Galleria mellonella (L.). Fertilizer treatments did not impact B. bassiana persistence. We conclude that standard fertilizers for nitrogen management, when applied according to recommended practices, are unlikely to negatively impact survival of B. bassiana in pecan orchards when the fungus is applied for C. caryae suppression during weevil emergence. Additional research on interactions between entomopathogenic fungi and fertilizer amendments (or other tree nutrition or soil management practices) is merited.

  20. Análisis de la variabilidad de caracteres de raíz en poblaciones de alfalfa (Medicago sativa L. con alto número de raíces laterales Root traits variability in alfalfa (Medicago sativa L. populations with a high number of lateral roots

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Odorizzi

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Para atenuar el daño provocado por los gorgojos de la alfalfa en la Argentina, el mejoramiento orientado al aumento del número de raíces laterales puede ser importante. Los objetivos de este trabajo fueron estimar bajo cuatro condiciones ambientales, componentes de varianza, heredabilidad en sentido amplio (H y correlaciones entre biomasa aérea y caracteres de raíz en 10 poblaciones de alfalfa de grado 6 a 9 de reposo invernal, mejoradas por sistema de raíz ramificada en la E.E.A. Manfredi-INTA. Los caracteres evaluados fueron: rendimiento de biomasa promedio (BP, diámetro de raíz pivotante (DP, número de raíces laterales (NRLR, diámetro de raíces laterales (DRLR y sistema radicular tipo ramificado (R. Hubo ausencia de correlación entre BP y los caracteres de raíz en la mayoría de los ambientes, indicando que se debe seleccionar por ambos caracteres en forma específica e individual. En ambientes con riego, DP fue el que más se correlacionó con BP (r =0,47; p In order to provide some level of tolerance to the alfalfa root curculio in Argentina, the improvement directed to increasing the number of secondary roots could be important. The objectives of this work were to estimate under four environmental conditions, variance components, trait heritabilities (H and correlations among aerial and root traits in 10 alfalfa populations ranging from 6 to 9 fall dormancy, obtained by the alfalfa breeding program at the Exp. Stn. of Manfredi- INTA. The evaluated traits were average forage yield per cut (BP, taproot diameter (DP, number of lateral roots (NRLR, lateral root diameter (DRLR and branched-type root system (R. Considerable variation for all traits was detected across all environments. There was no correlation between BP and most of root traits in almost every environmental condition, indicating that selection for yield and root traits could be independently managed. Under irrigation, DP was positively (r =0,47; p<0,01 correlated

  1. Temporal dynamics of the arthropod community in Castanea henryi forests under different management modes%不同经营管理方式下锥栗林节肢动物群落的时序动态

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    叶世森; 施丹阳; 郑郁善; 胡凤玉

    2014-01-01

    [目的]研究不同经营管理方式对锥栗林(Castanea henryi)节肢动物群落及主要害虫种群数量时序动态的影响,为锥栗林害虫防治提供科学依据.[方法]通过对不同经营管理方式下的锥栗林节肢动物群落的系统调查,分析和比较了生产上典型的5种经营管理方式下锥栗林节肢动物群落的物种丰富度、个体数量、物种多样性指数、天敌与害虫个体数量比例及主要害虫种群数量的时序动态.[结果]不同经营管理方式下锥栗林林冠层节肢动物群落的物种丰富度、个体数量、物种多样性指数变化趋势大体一致,物种丰富度、个体数量最高值在6月,物种多样性指数最高值在5月,但不同经营管理方式下物种丰富度、个体数量、物种多样性指数高低不同,管理精细未用药型锥栗林物种多样性指数最高,管理撂荒型的物种丰富度、个体数量最高;相对锥栗林管理撂荒型,其它各种经营管理方式都明显地降低了下木层的物种丰富度、个体数量、物种多样性指数,不同经营管理方式下下木层物种丰富度、个体数量、物种多样性指数的动态变化相差较大;管理精细未用药型林冠层天敌与害虫个体数量比例相对最高,波动变化较大,自然控害能力最强;管理精细的锥栗林主要害虫栗瘿蜂Dryocosmus kuriphilus(Yasumatus)、栗实象Curculio davidi Fairmaire、栗链蚧Asterolecanium castaneae(Russell)种群数量显著低于管理撂荒和管理粗放的锥栗林.[结论]不同经营管理方式对锥栗林节肢动物群落及主要害虫种群数量的时序动态有较大影响,对锥栗林科学的精细管理有助于对主要害虫的有效控制.

  2. 不同经营管理方式下锥栗林节肢动物群落的时序动态

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    叶世森; 施丹阳; 郑郁善; 胡凤玉

    2014-01-01

    【目的】研究不同经营管理方式对锥栗林(Castanea henryi)节肢动物群落及主要害虫种群数量时序动态的影响,为锥栗林害虫防治提供科学依据。【方法】通过对不同经营管理方式下的锥栗林节肢动物群落的系统调查,分析和比较了生产上典型的5种经营管理方式下锥栗林节肢动物群落的物种丰富度、个体数量、物种多样性指数、天敌与害虫个体数量比例及主要害虫种群数量的时序动态。【结果】不同经营管理方式下锥栗林林冠层节肢动物群落的物种丰富度、个体数量、物种多样性指数变化趋势大体一致,物种丰富度、个体数量最高值在6月,物种多样性指数最高值在5月,但不同经营管理方式下物种丰富度、个体数量、物种多样性指数高低不同,管理精细未用药型锥栗林物种多样性指数最高,管理撂荒型的物种丰富度、个体数量最高;相对锥栗林管理撂荒型,其它各种经营管理方式都明显地降低了下木层的物种丰富度、个体数量、物种多样性指数,不同经营管理方式下下木层物种丰富度、个体数量、物种多样性指数的动态变化相差较大;管理精细未用药型林冠层天敌与害虫个体数量比例相对最高,波动变化较大,自然控害能力最强;管理精细的锥栗林主要害虫栗瘿蜂Dryocosmus kuriphilus(Yasumatus)、栗实象Curculio davidi Fairmaire、栗链蚧Asterolecanium castaneae(Russell)种群数量显著低于管理撂荒和管理粗放的锥栗林。【结论】不同经营管理方式对锥栗林节肢动物群落及主要害虫种群数量的时序动态有较大影响,对锥栗林科学的精细管理有助于对主要害虫的有效控制。

  3. Systematics of the weevil genus Mecinus Germar, 1821 (Coleoptera: Curculionidae). I. Taxonomic treatment of the species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caldara, Roberto; Fogato, Valter

    2013-01-01

    , 1849) (= G. hircinum Desbrochers des Loges, 1893 syn. n.). The following lectotypes are designated: Curculio labilis Herbst, 1795; C. pyraster Herbst, 1795; Gymnetron alboscutellatum Hustache, 1913; G. alboscutellatum var. atratulum Solari, 1933; G. biarcuatum Desbrochers des Loges, 1871; G. bicolor Gyllenhal, 1838; G. bonnairei Desbrochers des Loges, 1898; G. caucasicum Reitter, 1907; G. conirostre Desbrochers des Loges, 1875; G. hircinum Desbrochers des Loges, 1893; G. ictericum Gyllenhal, 1838; G. ictericum var. albohirtum Desbrochers des Loges, 1893; G. inermicrum Desbrochers des Loges, 1875; G. laterufum Pic, 1900; G. lebedevi Roubal, 1926; G. logesi Pic, 1900; G. longirostre Pic, 1921; G. longulum Desbrochers des Loges, 1893; G. moricei Pic, 1902; G. nigronotatum Pic, 1906; G. nigronotatum var. vaulogeri Pic, 1930; G. pirazzolii Stierlin, 1867; G. plantaginis Eppelsheim, 1875; G. saladense Pic, 1902; G. sanguinipes Chevrolat, 1859; G. seriatum Jacquet, 1888; G. simum Mulsant & Rey, 1859; G. tychioides H. Brisout de Barneville, 1862; G. variabile Rosenhauer, 1856; G. variabile var. brevipenne Desbrochers des Loges, 1893; G. variabile var. curtulum Reitter, 1907; Mecinus andalusicus Faust, 1890; M. angustulus Desbrochers des Loges, 1893; M. angustulus var. rufipennis Pic, 1915; M. brevithorax Desbrochers des Loges, 1893; M. comosus Boheman, 1845; M. echinatus Desbrochers des Loges, 1893; M. fairmairei Tournier, 1873; M. horridulus Desbrochers des Loges, 1893; M. humeralis Tournier, 1873; M. longiusculus var. subcylindricus Pic, 1896; M. nasutus Tournier, 1873; M. pascuorum Gyllenhal, 1813; M. pici Reitter, 1907; M. pici var. favarcqui Pic, 1915; M. pici var. theresae Reitter, 1907; M. reichei Tournier, 1873; M. schneideri Kirsch, 1870; M. sublineellus Faimaire, 1880; M. tournieri Fairmaire, 1876. On the basis of a phylogenetic analysis the species are arranged in seven monophyletic groups and two complexes of species, the latter assembling species with a high