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Sample records for curcas phorbol esters

  1. The potential of white-rot fungi to degrade phorbol esters of Jatropha curcas L. seed cake

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Barros, de C.R.M.; Ferreira, L.M.M.; Nunes, F.M.; Bezerra, R.M.F.; Dias, A.A.; Guedes, C.; Cone, J.W.; Marques, G.S.M.; Rodrigues, M.A.M.

    2011-01-01

    The potential of solid-state cultivation, with three white-rot fungi (Bjerkandera adusta, Ganoderma resinaceum and Phlebia rufa), to decrease phorbol esters concentration of Jatropha curcas L. was evaluated in this study. Incubation was conducted in 250¿mL Erlenmeyer flasks without agitation at 28°C

  2. The potential of white-rot fungi to degrade phorbol esters of Jatropha curcas L. seed cake

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Barros, de C.R.M.; Ferreira, L.M.M.; Nunes, F.M.; Bezerra, R.M.F.; Dias, A.A.; Guedes, C.; Cone, J.W.; Marques, G.S.M.; Rodrigues, M.A.M.

    2011-01-01

    The potential of solid-state cultivation, with three white-rot fungi (Bjerkandera adusta, Ganoderma resinaceum and Phlebia rufa), to decrease phorbol esters concentration of Jatropha curcas L. was evaluated in this study. Incubation was conducted in 250¿mL Erlenmeyer flasks without agitation at 28°C

  3. Fatty acid methyl esters yield and phorbol esters degradation during transesterification of Jatropha curcas oil by alkaline, acid and enzyme catalyzed method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tosa Koji

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Jatropha curcas has recently been the focus of intense research as a raw material of biomass fuel. However, the carcinogenesis promoter action of the phorbol esters in the Jatropha raises concerns for health and environmental risk. The purpose of the present study is to determine the relationship between the fatty acid methyl esters yield and the phorbol esters degradation ratio during the transesterification of the Jatropha oil by alkaline, acid and enzyme catalyzed method, respectively. The phorbol esters in Jatropha oil were degraded during the transesterification of the Jatropha curcas oil by alkaline and acid catalyzed methanol methods. The degradation ratio was significantly correlated with the fatty acid methyl esters yields in alkaline catalyzed transesterification. The results obtained in this study suggest that the health and environmental risk of the phorbol esters in a Jatropha BDF can be significantly reduced by a complete transesterification of the crude oil by controlling the transesterification condition appropriately.

  4. Linkage mapping in the oilseed cropJatropha curcasL. reveals a locus controlling the biosynthesis of phorbol esters which cause seed toxicity

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    Current efforts to grow the tropical oilseed crop Jatropha curcas L. economically are hampered by the lack of cultivars and the presence of toxic phorbol esters (PE) within the seeds of most provenances. These PE restrict the conversion of seed cake into animal feed, although naturally occurring ‘nontoxic’ provenances exist which produce seed lacking PE. As an important step towards the development of genetically improved varieties of J. curcas, we constructed a linkage map from four F2 mappi...

  5. Linkage mapping in the oilseed crop Jatropha curcas L. reveals a locus controlling the biosynthesis of phorbol esters which cause seed toxicity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    King, A.J.; Montes, L.R.; Clarke, J.G.; Affleck, J.; Li, Y.; Witsenboer, H.; Vossen, van der E.; Linde, van der P.; Tripathi, Y.; Tavares, E.; Shukla, P.; Rajasekaran, T.; Loo, van E.N.; Graham, I.A.

    2013-01-01

    Current efforts to grow the tropical oilseed crop Jatropha curcas L. economically are hampered by the lack of cultivars and the presence of toxic phorbol esters (PE) within the seeds of most provenances. These PE restrict the conversion of seed cake into animal feed, although naturally occurring ‘no

  6. Multistage Solvent Extraction for High Yield Oil and Phorbol Esters Removal from Thai Toxic Jatropha curcas Meal

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    Rayakorn NOKKAEW

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available In this study, we investigate the possibility for the production of high yield oil and phorbol esters removed from Thai toxic Jatropha curcas meal. Optimum oil recovery by hexane extraction to obtain high oil yield was accomplished in 3 stages of batch extraction, following which the de-oiled meal was further determined for the optimum conditions for removal of phorbol esters (PEs by aqueous ethanol extraction from the first to the third stage of batch extraction with the aim of yielding detoxified de-oiled meal product for use as a raw material in animal feed. The optimum conditions for oil extraction was 3-stage extraction with each stage operated at 1:3 (w/v of toxic meal to hexane at 40 °C for 30 min. This condition gave 100 % de-oiling efficiency compared with the Soxhlet extraction method. The optimum condition for PEs removal from the de-oiled meal involved 2-stage extraction with each stage operated at 1:3 (w/v of de-oiled meal to aqueous ethanol at 50 °C for 30 min. Liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS in the multiple reaction monitoring mode, was used to confirm the PEs residue in the detoxified de-oiled meal. The confirmation showed that the 2 stages of PEs extraction could remove 100 % of the PEs from the de-oiled meal. The results from our study can provide the basis for the efficient commercial production of both J. curcas oil and detoxified de-oiled meal.

  7. Linkage mapping in the oilseed crop Jatropha curcas L. reveals a locus controlling the biosynthesis of phorbol esters which cause seed toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Andrew J; Montes, Luis R; Clarke, Jasper G; Affleck, Julie; Li, Yi; Witsenboer, Hanneke; van der Vossen, Edwin; van der Linde, Piet; Tripathi, Yogendra; Tavares, Evanilda; Shukla, Parul; Rajasekaran, Thirunavukkarasu; van Loo, Eibertus N; Graham, Ian A

    2013-10-01

    Current efforts to grow the tropical oilseed crop Jatropha curcas L. economically are hampered by the lack of cultivars and the presence of toxic phorbol esters (PE) within the seeds of most provenances. These PE restrict the conversion of seed cake into animal feed, although naturally occurring 'nontoxic' provenances exist which produce seed lacking PE. As an important step towards the development of genetically improved varieties of J. curcas, we constructed a linkage map from four F₂ mapping populations. The consensus linkage map contains 502 codominant markers, distributed over 11 linkage groups, with a mean marker density of 1.8 cM per unique locus. Analysis of the inheritance of PE biosynthesis indicated that this is a maternally controlled dominant monogenic trait. This maternal control is due to biosynthesis of the PE occurring only within maternal tissues. The trait segregated 3 : 1 within seeds collected from F₂ plants, and QTL analysis revealed that a locus on linkage group 8 was responsible for phorbol ester biosynthesis. By taking advantage of the draft genome assemblies of J. curcas and Ricinus communis (castor), a comparative mapping approach was used to develop additional markers to fine map this mutation within 2.3 cM. The linkage map provides a framework for the dissection of agronomic traits in J. curcas, and the development of improved varieties by marker-assisted breeding. The identification of the locus responsible for PE biosynthesis means that it is now possible to rapidly breed new nontoxic varieties.

  8. Detoxification of Toxic Phorbol Esters from Malaysian Jatropha curcas Linn. Kernel by Trichoderma spp. and Endophytic Fungi

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    Azhar Najjar

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The presence of phorbol esters (PEs with toxic properties limits the use of Jatropha curcas kernel in the animal feed industry. Therefore, suitable methods to detoxify PEs have to be developed to render the material safe as a feed ingredient. In the present study, the biological treatment of the extracted PEs-rich fraction with non-pathogenic fungi (Trichoderma harzianum JQ350879.1, T. harzianum JQ517493.1, Paecilomyces sinensis JQ350881.1, Cladosporium cladosporioides JQ517491.1, Fusarium chlamydosporum JQ350882.1, F. chlamydosporum JQ517492.1 and F. chlamydosporum JQ350880.1 was conducted by fermentation in broth cultures. The PEs were detected by liquid chromatography-diode array detector-electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (LC-DAD-ESIMS and quantitatively monitored by HPLC using phorbol-12-myristate 13-acetate as the standard. At day 30 of incubation, two T. harzianum spp., P. sinensis and C. cladosporioides significantly (p < 0.05 removed PEs with percentage losses of 96.9%–99.7%, while F. chlamydosporum strains showed percentage losses of 88.9%–92.2%. All fungal strains could utilize the PEs-rich fraction for growth. In the cytotoxicity assay, cell viabilities of Chang liver and NIH 3T3 fibroblast cell lines were less than 1% with the untreated PEs-rich fraction, but 84.3%–96.5% with the fungal treated PEs-rich fraction. There was no inhibition on cell viability for normal fungal growth supernatants. To conclude, Trichoderma spp., Paecilomyces sp. and Cladosporium sp. are potential microbes for the detoxification of PEs.

  9. Degradation of Jatropha curcas phorbol esters derived from Jatropha oil cake and their tumor-promoting activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakao, Motoyuki; Hasegawa, Go; Yasuhara, Tadashi; Ishihara, Yoko

    2015-04-01

    Large amount of oil cake is generated during biodiesel production from Jatropha seeds. Although Jatropha oil cake is rich in plant nutrients, presence of toxic phorbol esters restricts the usage of oil cake as a fertilizer. The objective of this study is to evaluate the components and tumor promoting activity of phorbol esters in Jatropha oil cake-supplemented soil and plants grown in the treated soil. Contents and their biological activity of Jatropha phorbol esters in soil and plants were sequentially analyzed by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and in vitro cell transformation assay, respectively. Disappearance of Jatropha phorbol-ester-specific peaks were followed with HPLC during incubation of Jatropha oil cake with soil for five weeks. Along with the degradation of Jatropha phorbol ester in soil, tumor-promoting activity in the sample was also attenuated and ultimately disappeared. Jatropha phorbol esters and tumor promoting activity were not detected from mustard spinach grown in the Jatropha oil cake-supplemented soil. In addition, the esterase KM109 degrades DHPB (see definition below; Jatropha phorbol ester) and reduced its tumor-promoting activity. From these data, we conclude: (1) components and tumor promoting activity of Jatropha phorbol esters in the oil cake disappeared completely by incubation with soil for five-week, (2) Jatropha phorbol esters did not transfer into plants grown in the Jatropha oil cake-supplemented soil, and (3) DHPB can be degraded by esterase from soil bacterium. These observations are useful for utilization of Jatropha oil cake as a fertilizer.

  10. Capacity of ensilage of Jatropha curcas L. cake to degrade forbol esters

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    André Soares de Oliveira

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to evaluate the capacity of the ensilage of Jatropha curcas L. expeller cake to reduce the phorbol esters and its effect on fermentative losses, by adding soluble carbohydrates or microbial inoculants. The design was completely randomized with four replications in a 3 × 2 factorial arrangement, with three sources of soluble carbohydrates (SC, control, 50 g sucrose/kg or 50 g crude glycerin/kg as fed and two doses of microbial inoculants (MI, 0 or 5 × 10(5 ufc Lactobacillus plantarum + 3.33 × 10(5 ufc Propionibacterium per g as fed. Twenty-four mini-silos (982 cm³ of polyvinyl chloride were created and opened after 60 days of fermentation at room temperature. The pre-hydrated Jatropha curcas L. cake (282 g of water/kg contained 0.424 mg of phorbol esters/g of dry matter. Ensiling reduced the phorbol esters in 47.4%, on average, regardless of the SC or MI. There was no interaction effect between SC and MI on effluent, gases or total dry matter losses. However, both losses were increased when SC were added, and it was higher with glycerin that than sucrose. The addition of MI reduced all fermentation losses. The process of ensiling, although partially to reduce the phorbol esters of pre-hydrated Jatropha curcas L. cake, is not indicated as a biodestoxification procedure.

  11. Cytotoxic phorbol esters of Croton tiglium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiao-Long; Wang, Lun; Li, Fu; Yu, Kai; Wang, Ming-Kui

    2013-05-24

    Chemical investigation of the seeds of Croton tiglium afforded eight new phorbol diesters (three phorbol diesters, 1-3, and five 4-deoxy-4α-phorbol diesters, 4-8), together with 11 known phorbol diesters (nine phorbol diesters, 9-17, and two 4-deoxy-4α-phorbol diesters, 18 and 19). The structures of compounds 1-8 were determined by spectroscopic data information and chemical degradation experiments. The cytotoxic activities of the phorbol diesters were evaluated against the SNU387 hepatic tumor cell line, and compound 3 exhibited the most potent activity (IC50 1.2 μM).

  12. Stimulation of chicken growth hormone release by phorbol esters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez, F M; Malamed, S; Scanes, C G

    1990-11-01

    Synergism between thyrotropin-releasing hormone (TRH) and human pancreatic growth hormone-releasing factor (hpGRF) has been shown in a primary (48 hr) culture of chicken adenohypophyseal cells established in this laboratory. The purpose of the present study was to determine if phorbol esters acting alone or in concert with TRH or hpGRF affect chicken GH release. Collagenase-dissociated chicken adenohypophyseal cells were treated (2 hr) with combinations of TRH, hpGRF, phorbol esters (activators of protein kinase C; PKC), and pharmacologic agents that increase cAMP. Phorbol myristate acetate (PMA) or phorbol dibutyrate (PDBu) alone stimulated GH release in a dose-dependent manner; either phorbol ester (10(-6) M) increased GH release from 100 to 390% over the value obtained in the absence of test agents (control). Similarly, hpGRF (10(-9) M), 8 Br-cAMP (10(-3) M), forskolin (10(-6) M), or isobutylmethylxanthine (IBMX, 10(-3) M) alone elevated GH release by at least 60% over the control value. The combined effects of phorbol esters (either PMA or PDBu) and hpGRF, 8 Br-cAMP, or forskolin on GH release were additive. Only one combination, phorbol esters with IBMX, exerted synergistic effects on GH release. No synergy was shown between TRH (1.3 x 10(-9) M) and either phorbol ester. These findings are the first to implicate PKC in chicken GH release in vitro. In addition, these studies, together with previous results, suggest that TRH and hpGRF synergy occurs via a pathway that arises prior to activation of PKC.

  13. New phorbol ester constituents from croton oil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marshall, G.T.

    1985-01-01

    Eighteen phorbol and 4-deoxy-4..cap alpha..-phorbol mono-and diesters have been isolated from croton oil, the seed oil of Croton tiglium L., using a rapid and efficient purification procedure consisting of initial solvent partition followed by droplet counter-current chromatography, reversed-phase chromatography, and preparative thin-layer chromatography. Their structures were determined using physical and spectral characteristics and by hydrolysis and/or synthetic experiments. In this manner, six known long-chain phorbol diesters were isolated, comprising 12-O-decanoylphorbol-13-acetate, 12-O-dodecanoylphorbol-13-acetate, 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate, 12-O-hexadecanoylphorbol-13-acetate, 12-O-..cap alpha..-methylbutyrylphorbol-13-decanoate, and 12-O-acetylphorbol-13-decanoate. In addition, five new short-chain phorbol diesters were isolated, namely, 12-O-tigylphorbol-13-isobutyrate, 12-O-..cap alpha..-methylbutyrylphorbol-13-isobutyrate, 12-O-tiglylphorbol-13-..cap alpha..-methylbutyrate, 12-O-tiglylphorbol-13-acetate, and 12-O-..cap alpha..-methylbutyrylphorbol-13-acetate. A sixth diester obtained, phorbol-12,13-diacetate, has not been isolated previously from any natural source. A complete /sup 1/H nuclear magnetic spectroscopic assignment of phorbol-12,13,20-triacetate was made using two-dimensional /sup 1/H-/sup 1/H shift correlation, nuclear Overhauser, and /sup 1/H-/sup 13/C shift correlation spectroscopies. Evaluation of twenty four croton oil diterpene isolates and derivatives in the in vitro P-388 lymphocytic leukemia and KB nasopharyngeal carcinoma cell bioassay systems revealed 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate to be the most cytotoxic.

  14. PHYTOCHEMICAL STUDY OF CELL CULTURE JATROPHA CURCAS

    OpenAIRE

    KOMAR RUSLAN; ARTRI; ELFAHMI

    2011-01-01

    Jatropha curcas belongs to the Euphorbiaceae family which has potential economically. This plant has been reported to contain toxic compounds such as curcin and phorbol ester and its derivatives. These compounds may become a problem if J. curcas will be explored as a source of biofuel. In order to provide safety plants, the research on the study of phytochemical and initiation of cell and organ culture have been carried out. J curcas which has been collected from different regions in Indonesi...

  15. Reduction of phorbol ester content in jatropha cake using high energy gamma radiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Runumi Gogoi

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, an attempt has been made to remove phorbol ester present in jatropha cake by exposing it to gamma radiation. A sensitizer was also used to accelerate the degradation of phorbol esters. The phorbol ester content in the cake was estimated by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC. It was observed that gamma irradiation of the jatropha seed cake was effective in reducing the phorbol ester content. Originally, the phorbol ester content in the cake was found as 0.29 mg/g, which on exposure to radiation was reduced by 33.4% and 96% with radiation dose of 30 and 125 kGy respectively. The presence of a sensitizer was found to enhances the susceptibility of phorbol esters degradation by oxidative degradation on exposure to ionizing radiation.

  16. Phorbol esters and neurotransmitter release: more than just protein kinase C?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silinsky, Eugene M; Searl, Timothy J

    2003-01-01

    This review focuses on the effects of phorbol esters and the role of phorbol ester receptors in the secretion of neurotransmitter substances. We begin with a brief background on the historical use of phorbol esters as tools to decipher the role of the enzyme protein kinase C in signal transduction cascades. Next, we illustrate the structural differences between active and inactive phorbol esters and the mechanism by which the binding of phorbol to its recognition sites (C1 domains) on a particular protein acts to translocate that protein to the membrane. We then discuss the evidence that the most important nerve terminal receptor for phorbol esters (and their endogenous counterpart diacylglycerol) is likely to be Munc13. Indeed, Munc13 and its invertebrate homologues are the main players in priming the secretory apparatus for its critical function in the exocytosis process. PMID:12711617

  17. Antiallergic Phorbol Ester from the Seeds of Aquilaria malaccensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korinek, Michal; Wagh, Vitthal D; Lo, I-Wen; Hsu, Yu-Ming; Hsu, Hsue-Yin; Hwang, Tsong-Long; Wu, Yang-Chang; Cheng, Yuan-Bin; Chen, Bing-Hung; Chang, Fang-Rong

    2016-03-21

    The Aquilaria malaccensis (Thymelaeaceae) tree is a source of precious fragrant resin, called agarwood, which is widely used in traditional medicines in East Asia against diseases such as asthma. In our continuous search for active natural products, A. malaccensis seeds ethanolic extract demonstrated antiallergic effect with an IC50 value less than 1 µg/mL. Therefore, the present research aimed to purify and identify the antiallergic principle of A. malaccensis through a bioactivity-guided fractionation approach. We found that phorbol ester-rich fraction was responsible for the antiallergic activity of A. malaccensis seeds. One new active phorbol ester, 12-O-(2Z,4E,6E)-tetradeca-2,4,6-trienoylphorbol-13-acetate, aquimavitalin (1) was isolated. The structure of 1 was assigned by means of 1D and 2D NMR data and high-resolution mass spectrometry (HR-MS). Aquimavitalin (1) showed strong inhibitory activity in A23187- and antigen-induced degranulation assay with IC50 values of 1.7 and 11 nM, respectively, with a therapeutic index up to 71,000. The antiallergic activities of A. malaccensis seeds and aquimavitalin (1) have never been revealed before. The results indicated that A. malaccensis seeds and the pure compound have the potential for use in the treatment of allergy.

  18. Stimulation of receptor protein-tyrosine phosphatase alpha activity and phosphorylation by phorbol ester

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    den Hertog, J; Sap, J; Pals, C E

    1995-01-01

    with the phorbol ester 12-O-tetradecanoyl-phorbol-13-acetate, a direct activator of protein kinase C, induced a rapid, transient increase in RPTP alpha activity due to a 2- to 3-fold increase in substrate affinity. A transient increase in RPTP alpha serine phosphorylation was concomitant with the enhanced activity....... Tryptic phosphopeptide mapping of RPTP alpha demonstrated that phosphorylation of three tryptic peptides was enhanced in response to phorbol ester. In vitro dephosphorylation of RPTP alpha from phorbol ester-treated cells reduced RPTP alpha activity to prestimulation levels, indicating that enhanced...

  19. Stimulation of Paramecium phagocytosis by phorbol ester and forskolin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wyroba, E

    1987-09-01

    Phorbol ester (PMA) exerted a dose- and time- dependent stimulating effect on phagocytosis in axenic Paramecium aurelia. When cells were exposed to 200-800 nM PMA in the presence of latex beads, the phagocytic coefficient was enhanced 2.25 to 3.14 times, during 10 min of continuous treatment and then rapidly declined. A similar effect was observed when the cells were exposed to a forskolin treatment, which resulted in nearly a twofold increase in phagocytic activity after a 10 min pulse. Both PMA and forskolin strongly stimulated phagocytosis (i.e. fivefold and threefold, respectively) in cells in which such activity had been completely inhibited by pre-exposure to the beta-receptor antagonist 1-propranolol.

  20. PHYTOCHEMICAL STUDY OF CELL CULTURE JATROPHA CURCAS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    KOMAR RUSLAN

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Jatropha curcas belongs to the Euphorbiaceae family which has potential economically. This plant has been reported to contain toxic compounds such as curcin and phorbol ester and its derivatives. These compounds may become a problem if J. curcas will be explored as a source of biofuel. In order to provide safety plants, the research on the study of phytochemical and initiation of cell and organ culture have been carried out. J curcas which has been collected from different regions in Indonesia showed to contain relatively the same profile of chemical contents. Dominant compounds that were detected by GCMS are hidrocarbon such as 2-heptenal, decadienal, hexsadecane, pentadecane, cyclooctane etc, fatty acid such as oktadecanoate acid, etthyl linoleate, ethyl stearate, heksadecanoate acid and steroid such as stigmasterol, fucosterol, sitosterol. No phorbol ester and its derivatives have been detected yet by the GCMS method. Callus and suspension cultures of J. curcas have been established to be used for further investigation.

  1. Phorbol ester and atrial natriuretic peptide receptor response on vascular smooth muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasunari, K; Kohno, M; Murakawa, K; Yokokawa, K; Horio, T; Takeda, T

    1992-04-01

    At least two types of receptors for natriuretic peptides have been reported: biologically active receptors coupled with guanylate cyclase (atrial natriuretic peptide [ANP]-B receptors) and clearance receptors (ANP-C receptors). To elucidate the role of protein kinase C (PKC) in the regulation of ANP-B receptors, vascular smooth muscle cells in culture were treated with phorbol ester. Incubation with receptor agonists and phorbol ester led to the desensitization of receptor-mediated cyclic guanosine monophosphate (ANP-B receptor response) in rat vascular smooth muscle cells. Although a PKC inhibitor and downregulation of PKC by long-term incubation of cells with phorbol esters blocked the phorbol ester-induced desensitization of the ANP-B receptor response, they did not block the ANP-induced desensitization of the ANP-B receptor response. In addition, when desensitization by phorbol esters was observed, ANP was still capable of desensitization. These observations suggest that the mechanism for regulating ANP-B receptor sensitivity may be both PKC-dependent and PKC-independent and mediated by phorbol esters and ANP, respectively.

  2. Biological responsiveness to the phorbol esters and specific binding of (/sup 3/H)phorbol 12,13-dibutyrate in the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans, a manipulable genetic system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lew, K.K.; Chritton, S.; Blumberg, P.M.

    1982-01-01

    Because of its suitability for genetic studies, the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans was examined for its responsiveness to the phorbol esters. Phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate had three effects. It inhibited the increase in animal size during growth; it decreased the yield of progeny; and it caused uncoordinated movement of the adult. The effects on nematode size, progeny yield, and movement were quantitated. Concentrations of phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate yielding half-maximal responses were 440, 460, and 170 nM, respectively. As was expected from the biological responsiveness of the nematodes, specific, saturable binding of phorbol ester to nematode extracts was found. (/sup 3/H)phorbol 12,13-dibutyrate bound with a dissociation constant of 26.8 +/- 3.9 nM. At saturation, 5.7 +/- 1.4 pmole/mg protein was bound.

  3. Phorbol ester and vasopressin activate phospholipase D in Leydig cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vinggaard, Anne Marie; Hansen, Harald S.

    1991-01-01

    In the present study evidence is provided for the existence of phospholipase D (PLD) activity in rat Leydig cells. Leydig cells were cultured and labelled with [H]myristic acid. In the presence of ethanol, phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) stimulated the formation of [H]phosphatidylethanol ([...

  4. Phorbol ester and vasopressin activate phospholipase D in Leydig cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vinggaard, Anne Marie; Hansen, Harald S.

    1991-01-01

    In the present study evidence is provided for the existence of phospholipase D (PLD) activity in rat Leydig cells. Leydig cells were cultured and labelled with [H]myristic acid. In the presence of ethanol, phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) stimulated the formation of [H]phosphatidylethanol ([...

  5. Selective proliferation of normal human melanocytes in vitro in the presence of phorbol ester and cholera toxin.

    OpenAIRE

    Eisinger, M.; Marko, O

    1982-01-01

    Cultures consisting almost entirely of human melanocytes were obtained from epidermal single-cell suspensions by using phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (10 ng/ml) in the culture medium. At this concentration, phorbol ester is toxic to human keratinocytes but not to melanocytes. When the seeding density was optimal (0.8-2 x 10(4)/cm2) and the medium contained both phorbol ester and cholera toxin, melanocytes proliferated extensively. Under these conditions, human melanocytes could be passaged s...

  6. Five new phorbol esters with cytotoxic and selective anti-inflammatory activities from Croton tiglium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jun-Feng; Yang, Sheng-Hui; Liu, Yan-Qun; Li, Din-Xiang; He, Wei-Jun; Zhang, Xiao-Xiao; Liu, Yong-Hong; Zhou, Xiao-Jiang

    2015-05-01

    Five new phorbol esters, (four phorbol diesters, 1-4, and one 4-deoxy-4α-phorbol diester, 5), as well as four known phorbol esters analogues (6-9) were isolated and identified from the branches and leaves of Croton tiglium. Their structures were elucidated mainly by extensive NMR spectroscopic, and mass spectrometric analysis. Among them, compound (1) was the first example of a naturally occurring phorbol ester with the 20-aldehyde group. Compounds 2-5, and 7-9 showed potent cytotoxicity against the K562, A549, DU145, H1975, MCF-7, U937, SGC-7901, HL60, Hela, and MOLT-4 cell lines, with IC50 values ranging from 1.0 to 43 μM, while none of the compounds exhibited cytotoxic effects on normal human cell lines 293T and LX-2, respectively. In addition, compound 3 exhibited moderate COX-1 and COX-2 inhibition, with IC50 values of 0.14 and 8.5 μM, respectively.

  7. Interaction between a phorbol ester and dopamine DA1 receptors on vascular smooth muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasunari, K; Kohno, M; Murakawa, K; Yokokawa, K; Horio, T; Takeda, T

    1993-01-01

    The interaction between dopamine DA1 receptors and a phorbol ester was studied to elucidate the role of protein kinase C in the response of this receptor. The in vitro binding of [3H]Sch 23390 to DA1 receptor sites on vascular smooth muscle cells was saturable. The extent of [3H]Sch 23390 binding to phorbol ester-treated cells was increased without any change in the dissociation constant. The production of adenosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate (cAMP) in response to DA1 receptor stimulation was enhanced by preincubation of vascular smooth muscle cells with the phorbol ester for 4 h. However, no enhancement was observed when the medium used for preincubation was supplemented with a protein kinase C inhibitor. Direct stimulation of stimulatory guanine nucleotide-binding regulatory protein with 5-guanylylimidodiphosphate and direct stimulation of adenylate cyclase with forskolin produced no significant differences in cyclase levels between phorbol ester-treated and untreated cells. These results suggest that activation of protein kinase C triggers an increase in the membrane expression of DA1 receptors, thereby enhancing receptor-coupled cAMP generation.

  8. Regulation of urokinase receptors in monocytelike U937 cells by phorbol ester phorbol myristate acetate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Picone, R; Kajtaniak, E L; Nielsen, L S

    1989-01-01

    A specific surface receptor for urokinase plasminogen activator (uPA) recognizes the amino-terminal growth factor-like sequence of uPA, a region independent from and not required for the catalytic activity of this enzyme. The properties of the uPA receptor (uPAR) and the localization and distribu......A specific surface receptor for urokinase plasminogen activator (uPA) recognizes the amino-terminal growth factor-like sequence of uPA, a region independent from and not required for the catalytic activity of this enzyme. The properties of the uPA receptor (uPAR) and the localization...... and distribution of uPA in tumor cells and tissues suggest that the uPA/uPAR interaction may be important in regulating extracellular proteolysis-dependent processes (e.g., invasion, tissue destruction). Phorbol myristate acetate (PMA), an inducer of U937 cell differentiation to macrophage-like cells, elicits...

  9. Phorbol esters broaden the action potential in CA1 hippocampal pyramidal cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Storm, J F

    1987-03-20

    Intracellular recordings were made from CA1 pyramidal cells in rat hippocampal slices. Single action potentials were elicited by injection of brief current pulses. Bath application of phorbol esters (4 beta-phorbol-12,13-diacetate, 0.3-5 microM; or 4 beta-phorbol-12,13-dibutyrate, 5-10 microM) broadened the action potential in each of the cells tested (n = 9). The broadening reflected slowing of the repolarization, whereas the upstroke of the spike was unchanged. This effect may enhance transmitter release from synaptic terminals, and contribute to enhancement of synaptic transmission through activation of protein kinase C, a mechanism which has been associated with long term potentiation.

  10. Tumor-promoting phorbol ester transiently down-modulates the p53 level and blocks the cell cycle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skouv, J; Jensen, P O; Forchhammer, J

    1994-01-01

    Activation of the protein kinase C signaling pathway by tumor-promoting phorbol esters, such as 4 beta-phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA), induced a decrease in the level of p53 mRNA in several serum-starved human cell lines. Also, the tumor-promoting phosphatase inhibitor okadaic acid induced...... rate or the p53 mRNA stability. The protein synthesis inhibitor cycloheximide completely abolished the PMA-induced down-modulation of the p53 mRNA, suggesting that a short-lived protein was involved in the down-modulation. Flow cytometric cell cycle analysis showed that the phorbol ester treatment...

  11. Tephrosia purpurea alleviates phorbol ester-induced tumor promotion response in murine skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saleem, M; Ahmed Su; Alam, A; Sultana, S

    2001-02-01

    In recent years, considerable emphasis has been placed on identifying new cancer chemopreventive agents, which could be useful for the human population. Tephrosia purpurea has been shown to possess significant activity against hepatotoxicity, pharmacological and physiological disorders. Earlier we showed that Tephrosia purpurea inhibits benzoyl peroxide-mediated cutaneous oxidative stress and toxicity. In the present study, we therefore assessed the effect of Tephrosia purpurea on 12-O-tetradecanoyl phorbal-13-acetate (TPA; a well-known phorbol ester) induced cutaneous oxidative stress and toxicity in murine skin. The pre-treatment of Swiss albino mice with Tephrosia purpurea prior to application of croton oil (phorbol ester) resulted in a dose-dependent inhibition of cutaneous carcinogenesis. Skin tumor initiation was achieved by a single topical application of 7,12-dimethyl benz(a)anthracene (DMBA) (25 microg per animal per 0.2 ml acetone) to mice. Ten days later tumor promotion was started by twice weekly topical application of croton oil (0.5% per animal per 0.2 ml acetone, v /v). Topical application of Tephrosia purpurea 1 h prior to each application of croton oil (phorbol ester) resulted in a significant protection against cutaneous carcinogenesis in a dose-dependent manner. The animals pre-treated with Tephrosia purpurea showed a decrease in both tumor incidence and tumor yield as compared to the croton oil (phorbol ester)-treated control group. In addition, a significant reduction in TPA-mediated induction in cutaneous ornithine decarboxylase (ODC) activity and [3H]thymidine incorporation was also observed in animals pre-treated with a topical application of Tephrosia purpurea. The effect of topical application of Tephrosia purpurea on TPA-mediated depletion in the level of enzymatic and non-enzymatic molecules in skin was also evaluated and it was observed that topical application of Tephrosia purpurea prior to TPA resulted in the significant recovery of

  12. Phorbol Ester Modulation of Ca2+ Channels Mediates Nociceptive Transmission in Dorsal Horn Neurones

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gary J. Stephens

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Phorbol esters are analogues of diacylglycerol which activate C1 domain proteins, such as protein kinase C (PKC. Phorbol ester/PKC pathways have been proposed as potential therapeutic targets for chronic pain states, potentially by phosphorylating proteins involved in nociception, such as voltage-dependent Ca2+ channels (VDCCs. In this brief report, we investigate the potential involvement of CaV2 VDCC subtypes in functional effects of the phorbol ester, phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA on nociceptive transmission in the spinal cord. Effects of PMA and of selective pharmacological blockers of CaV2 VDCC subtypes on nociceptive transmission at laminae II dorsal horn neurones were examined in mouse spinal cord slices. Experiments were extended to CaV2.3(−/− mice to complement pharmacological studies. PMA increased the mean frequency of spontaneous postsynaptic currents (sPSCs in dorsal horn neurones, without an effect on event amplitude or half-width. sPSC frequency was reduced by selective VDCC blockers, w-agatoxin-IVA (AgTX; CaV2.1, w-conotoxin-GVIA (CTX; CaV2.2 or SNX-482 (CaV2.3. PMA effects were attenuated in the presence of each VDCC blocker and, also, in CaV2.3(−/− mice. These initial data demonstrate that PMA increases nociceptive transmission at dorsal horn neurones via actions on different CaV2 subtypes suggesting potential anti-nociceptive targets in this system.

  13. Phorbol esters potentiate rapid dopamine release from median eminence and striatal synaptosomes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shu, C.; Selmanoff, M.

    1988-06-01

    In the present study, we investigated the ability of phorbol esters to potentiate Ca2+-dependent depolarization-induced release of tritium-labeled dopamine ((3H)DA) from median eminence and striatal synaptosomes. Phorbol esters potentiated (3H)DA release in a concentration-dependent manner in both kinds of dopaminergic nerve terminals and with a potency series similar to that reported for stimulation of protein kinase-C (PKC) activity in other cell systems. Evoked (3H)DA release was increased by 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA; 10(-7) M) after 1, 3, 5, and 10 sec of depolarization. The effect of TPA was suppressed by sphingosine, a PKC inhibitor. TPA enhanced (3H)DA release evoked by high K+, veratridine or the Ca2+ ionophore A23187. Phorbol ester potentiation was found to be depolarization dependent, as it was present from 30-75 mM, but not at 5-20 mM external K+. Potentiation was seen at all external Ca2+ concentrations studied between 0.01-3 mM. However, in the absence of external free Ca2+ (i.e. with 0.1 mM EGTA), the phorbol effect was not present. These data indicate that an increase in intrasynaptosomal Ca2+ concentration is necessary for the enhancement of (3H)DA release by phorbol esters to occur. The combination of TPA and the Ca2+ ionophore A23187 does not show the marked synergism observed in some other systems, that is maximal release was not reinstated. This suggests that in dopaminergic nerve terminals, activation of PKC has a modulatory, rather than a mediating, effect on release. Recently, we have shown that hyperprolactinemia stimulated (3H)DA release from median eminence synaptosomes by an external Ca2+-independent mechanism which might involve the PKC pathway. However, in the present work we found that the TPA and PRL effects on evoked (3H)DA release were additive, suggesting that two independent mechanisms are involved.

  14. Two New Phorbol-Type Diterpene Esters from Synadenium grantii Hook F. Leaves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emad M. Hassan

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Two new phorbol-type diterpene esters has been isolated from the chloroform extract of the leaves of Synadenium grantii Hook F. and identified as 3,4,12,13-tetraacetylphorbol-20-phenylacetate and 4-deoxyphor bol-12,13-ditiglate for which the trivial names Synagrantol A & B respectively, were adopted. Furthermore, two known triterpenes were isolated. The structures of all isolated compounds were established by 1D and 2D NMR spectroscopy including 1H and 13C NMR, HSQC and HMBC techniques. The cytotoxicity as well as the antiparasitic activity of the chloroform extract was performed and proved to be active.

  15. Synthesis And Characterization Of Ester Trimethylolpropane Based Jatropha Curcas Oil As Biolubricant Base Stocks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noor Hafizah Arbain

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Biolubricant production of ester trimethylolpropane (ET was conducted via esterification of fatty acid (FA of Jatropha curcas oil with trimethylolpropane (TMP. The condition for this reaction was as follows: temperature was 150°C, time of reaction was 3 hours, molar ratio of FA: TMP was 4:1, and 2 % w/w catalyst (based on weight of FA. Sulfuric acid was used as the catalyst in this reaction. The composition of ET was determined by gas chromatography (GC-FID. The ester group was confirmed by fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR and the structure was confirmed by proton and carbon Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (1H-NMR and 13C-NMR spectra. 55% of product was successfully synthesized in this research. The pour point of the product was observed as low as –30°C, flash point was >300 °C and viscosity was 79 cP.

  16. The action of a phorbol ester on voltage-dependent parameters of the sodium current in isolated hippocampal neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chizhmakov, I V; Klee, M R

    1994-03-01

    The action of a phorbol ester (phorbol-12,13-diacetate) on the voltage-activated sodium current has been investigated by the voltage-clamp method in acutely isolated pyramidal neurons from rat hippocampus. The intracellular perfusion of isolated pyramidal neurons for 30-40 min induced a gradual 10-15 mV shift in both the current-voltage relationship and voltage-dependent steady-state inactivation to more negative potentials. The application of phorbol ester (1-10 microM) to isolated neurons for the same time increased the amplitude of sodium current by 15-20%, shifted the above-mentioned voltage-dependent parameters for an additional 10-15 mV in the same direction and changed the slope of the steady-state inactivation curve. In contrast, after prolonged incubation of slices in the phorbol ester-containing solution (1-10 microM) for 0.5-3 h, subsequent application of phorbol ester at the same concentration caused neither the addition shift of the voltage-dependent characteristics of sodium channels nor the change of the slope of the steady-state inactivation curve. However, in this case an increase in the amplitude of sodium current by 15-20% during 30-40 min intracellular perfusion was observed.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  17. Surface membrane CD4 turnover in phorbol ester stimulated T-lymphocytes. Evidence of degradation and increased synthesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, B K; Andresen, B S; Christensen, E I

    1990-01-01

    Down-regulation of surface membrane CD4 (smCD4) in phorbol ester stimulated T-cells resulted from internalization. Internalization (T1/2 = 15 min at 50 ng PMA/ml) was followed by degradation of CD4-bound antibodies. Degradation in unstimulated T-cells was comparatively insignificant. Release...

  18. Protein kinase C isozymes, novel phorbol ester receptors and cancer chemotherapy.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Barry, O P

    2012-02-03

    Recent years have seen extensive growth in the understanding of the role(s) of the various PKC isozymes and novel receptors for the phorbol ester tumor promoters. The PKC family of serine-threonine kinases is an important regulator of signaling cascades that control cell proliferation and death, and therefore represent targets for cancer therapy. While past interests have focused on PKC-selective inhibitors, more recently, intensive research has been underway for selective activators and inhibitors for each individual PKC isozyme. In the past few years a large number of PKC activators and inhibitors with potential as anticancer agents have been developed. A number of these compounds are already in Phase II clinical testing. As a new generation of cancer chemotherapeutic agents are designed, developed and put through a series of rigorous clinical trials, we can anticipate achieving exquisite control over PKC-mediated regulatory pathways, leading ultimately to a greater understanding of different cancers.

  19. Phorbol esters enhance attachment of NIH/3T3 cells to laminin and type IV collagen substrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kato, Shigemi; Ben, T.L.; De Luca, L.M. (National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD (USA))

    1988-11-01

    The effect of phorbol esters on the adhesive properties of NIH/3T3 mouse fibroblasts was investigated using plastic substrates precoated with the extracellular matrix proteins fibronectin, collagen, and laminin. Treatment with phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) enhanced NIH/3T3 cell attachment to laminin and type IV collagen substrates but had little or no effect on attachment to fibronectin and type I collagen substrates. The effect of PMA in enhancing cell attachment to laminin and type IV collagen substrates was dose dependent between 10{sup {minus}9} and 10{sup {minus}7} M. PMA was effective as early as 30 min; the effect reached a maximum at 2 h and decreased gradually. Phorbol 12, 13-dibenzoate and phorbol 12, 13-diacetate were effective but to a lesser extent and phorbol 12-myristate and phorbol 13-acetate showed little or no effect. These results suggest that PMA may enhance NIH/3T3 cell adhesion through effects on laminin and type IV collagen receptors. Retinoic acid, which itself requires at least 6 h to show an effect on attachment, did not have any effect on cell attachment in 2 h and, if anything, slightly inhibited PMA-enhanced cell attachment to laminin and type IV collagen substrates.

  20. Proteome analysis of developing seeds of Jatropha curcas L.

    OpenAIRE

    Mohibullah Shah

    2014-01-01

    Physic nut (Jatropha curcas L.) is an important crop due to its ability of storing high content of oil in the seeds, which can serve as raw material for biodiesel production. Because of the presence of toxic constituents like phorbol esters (PEs) and curcins, the seed cake produced as a result of oil extraction cannot be utilize for animal feed. Development of the genotypes better suited for the industrial applications and biodiesel production as well as with lower level of toxic constituent...

  1. Bryostatin, an activator of the calcium phospholipid-dependent protein kinase, blocks phorbol ester-induced differentiation of human promyelocytic leukemia cells HL-60

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kraft, A.S.; Smith, J.B.; Berkow, R.L.

    1986-03-01

    Phorbol esters bind to and activate a calcium phospholipid-dependent protein kinase (C kinase). Some researchers believe that activation of C kinase is necessary for the induction of phorbol ester biologic effects. The authors' research indicates that bryostatin, a macrocyclic lactone that binds to the phorbol ester receptor in human polymorphonuclear leukocytes, also binds to this receptor in the human promyelocytic leukemia cell line, HL-60. Bryostatin activates partially purified C kinase from HL-60 cells in vitro, and when applied to HL-60 cells in vivo, it decreases measurable cytoplasmic C kinase activity. Unlike the phorbol esters, bryostatin is unable to induce a macrophage-like differentiation of HL-60 cells; however, bryostatin, in a dose-dependent fashion, blocks phorbol ester-induced differentiation of HL-60 cells and, if applied within 48 hr of phorbol esters, halts further differentiation. These results suggest that activation of the C kinase by some agents is not sufficient for induction of HL-60 cell differentiation and imply that some of the biologic effects of phorbol esters may occur through a more complex mechanism than previously thought.

  2. Acute effects of tumor-promoting phorbol esters on hepatic intermediary metabolism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vaartjes, W.J.; Haas, C.G.M. de

    1985-01-01

    In hepatocytes isolated from meal-fed rats, phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate as well as phorbol 12,13-didecanoate stimulated de novo fatty acid synthesis in a dose-dependent manner. Moreover, phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate inhibited ketogenesis from exogenous oleate, but slightly enhanced oleate est

  3. Effects of Jatropha curcas oil in Lactuca sativa root tip bioassays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrade-Vieira, Larissa F; Botelho, Carolina M; Laviola, Bruno G; Palmieri, Marcel J; Praça-Fontes, Milene M

    2014-03-01

    Jatropha curcas L. (Euphorbiaceae) is important for biofuel production and as a feed ingredient for animal. However, the presence of phorbol esters in the oil and cake renders the seeds toxic. The toxicity of J. curcas oil is currently assessed by testing in animals, leading to their death. The identification of toxic and nontoxic improved varieties is important for the safe use of J. curcas seeds and byproducts to avoid their environmental toxicity. Hence, the aim of this study was to propose a short-term bioassay using a plant as a model to screen the toxicity of J. curcas oil without the need to sacrifice any animals. The toxicity of J. curcas oil was evident in germination, root elongation and chromosomal aberration tests in Lactuca sativa. It was demonstrated that J. curcas seeds contain natural compounds that exert phyto-, cyto- and genotoxic effects on lettuce, and that phorbol esters act as aneugenic agents, leading to the formation of sticky chromosomes and c-metaphase cells. In conclusion, the tests applied have shown reproducibility, which is important to verify the extent of detoxification and to determine toxic doses, thus reducing the numbers of animals that would be used for toxicity tests.

  4. Effects of Jatropha curcas oil in Lactuca sativa root tip bioassays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LARISSA F. ANDRADE-VIEIRA

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Jatropha curcas L. (Euphorbiaceae is important for biofuel production and as a feed ingredient for animal. However, the presence of phorbol esters in the oil and cake renders the seeds toxic. The toxicity of J. curcas oil is currently assessed by testing in animals, leading to their death. The identification of toxic and nontoxic improved varieties is important for the safe use of J. curcas seeds and byproducts to avoid their environmental toxicity. Hence, the aim of this study was to propose a short-term bioassay using a plant as a model to screen the toxicity of J. curcas oil without the need to sacrifice any animals. The toxicity of J. curcas oil was evident in germination, root elongation and chromosomal aberration tests in Lactuca sativa. It was demonstrated that J. curcas seeds contain natural compounds that exert phyto-, cyto- and genotoxic effects on lettuce, and that phorbol esters act as aneugenic agents, leading to the formation of sticky chromosomes and c-metaphase cells. In conclusion, the tests applied have shown reproducibility, which is important to verify the extent of detoxification and to determine toxic doses, thus reducing the numbers of animals that would be used for toxicity tests.

  5. Phorbol Esters from Jatropha Meal Triggered Apoptosis, Activated PKC-δ, Caspase-3 Proteins and Down-Regulated the Proto-Oncogenes in MCF-7 and HeLa Cancer Cell Lines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Syahida Ahmad

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Jatropha meal produced from the kernel of Jatropha curcas Linn. grown in Malaysia contains phorbol esters (PEs. The potential benefits of PEs present in the meal as anticancer agent are still not well understood. Hence, this study was conducted to evaluate the cytotoxic effects and mode of actions of PEs isolated from Jatropha meal against breast (MCF-7 and cervical (HeLa cancer cell lines. Isolated PEs inhibited cells proliferation in a dose-dependent manner of both MCF-7 and HeLa cell lines with the IC50 of 128.6 ± 2.51 and 133.0 ± 1.96 µg PMA equivalents/mL respectively, while the values for the phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA as positive control were 114.7 ± 1.73 and 119.6 ± 3.73 µg/mL, respectively. Microscopic examination showed significant morphological changes that resemble apoptosis in both cell lines when treated with PEs and PMA at IC50 concentration after 24 h. Flow cytometry analysis and DNA fragmentation results confirmed the apoptosis induction of PEs and PMA in both cell lines. The PEs isolated from Jatropha meal activated the PKC-δ and down-regulated the proto-oncogenes (c-Myc, c-Fos and c-Jun. These changes probably led to the activation of Caspase-3 protein and apoptosis cell death occurred in MCF-7 and HeLa cell lines upon 24 h treatment with PEs and PMA. Phorbol esters of Jatropha meal were found to be promising as an alternative to replace the chemotherapeutic drugs for cancer therapy.

  6. Phorbol esters from Jatropha meal triggered apoptosis, activated PKC-δ, caspase-3 proteins and down-regulated the proto-oncogenes in MCF-7 and HeLa cancer cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oskoueian, Ehsan; Abdullah, Norhani; Ahmad, Syahida

    2012-09-10

    Jatropha meal produced from the kernel of Jatropha curcas Linn. grown in Malaysia contains phorbol esters (PEs). The potential benefits of PEs present in the meal as anticancer agent are still not well understood. Hence, this study was conducted to evaluate the cytotoxic effects and mode of actions of PEs isolated from Jatropha meal against breast (MCF-7) and cervical (HeLa) cancer cell lines. Isolated PEs inhibited cells proliferation in a dose-dependent manner of both MCF-7 and HeLa cell lines with the IC₅₀ of 128.6 ± 2.51 and 133.0 ± 1.96 µg PMA equivalents/mL respectively, while the values for the phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) as positive control were 114.7 ± 1.73 and 119.6 ± 3.73 µg/mL, respectively. Microscopic examination showed significant morphological changes that resemble apoptosis in both cell lines when treated with PEs and PMA at IC₅₀ concentration after 24 h. Flow cytometry analysis and DNA fragmentation results confirmed the apoptosis induction of PEs and PMA in both cell lines. The PEs isolated from Jatropha meal activated the PKC-δ and down-regulated the proto-oncogenes (c-Myc, c-Fos and c-Jun). These changes probably led to the activation of Caspase-3 protein and apoptosis cell death occurred in MCF-7 and HeLa cell lines upon 24 h treatment with PEs and PMA. Phorbol esters of Jatropha meal were found to be promising as an alternative to replace the chemotherapeutic drugs for cancer therapy.

  7. Effect of Chimaerins, Novel Receptors for Phorbol Esters, on Breast Cancer Cell Proliferation and Cell Cycle Progression

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-07-01

    Slack, M. J. Weber, and A. D. Catling . 2002. Rac-PAK signaling stimulates extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) activation by regulating formation...cancer: overexpression, mutation analysis, and characterization of a new isoform, Rac1b. Oncogene 19:3013–3020. 45. Seger, R., and E. G. Krebs. 1995. The...design powerful new tools that are not only PKC isozyme-specific but also discriminative to non-PKC phorbol ester receptors. A question still remains

  8. Potentiation of phorbol ester-induced coronary vasoconstriction in dogs following endothelium disruption

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roberts, R.B.; Ku, D.D.

    1986-03-05

    In the present study, the effect of phorbol ester, 12-0-tetradecanoylphorbol 13-acetate (TPA), activation of protein kinase C on coronary vascular reactivity was studied in isolated dog coronary arteries. Addition of TPA (10-100 nM) produced a slow, time- and dose-dependent contraction reaching a maximum at approx 2-3 hrs and was essentially irreversible upon washing. Disruption of the endothelium(EC) greatly accelerated the development as well as increase the magnitude of TPA contraction (50-100%). Prior treatment of vessels with phentolamine (1..mu..M), cyproheptadine (1..mu..H) and ibuprofen (1..mu..g/ml) did not alter the TPA contraction. Furthermore, in contrast to previously reported calcium-dependence of TPA contraction in other vessels, complete removal of extracellular calcium (Ca/sub 0/) or addition of 1..mu..M nimodipine after TPA(30nM) resulted in only 32 +/- 4% and 25 +/- 3% reversal of TPA contraction, respectively. Addition of amiloride (10..mu..M to 1mM), however, resulted in a dose-dependent reversal of TPA contraction. The results of the present study indicate that a similar activation of protein kinase C by TPA leads to potent coronary vasoconstriction, which is not completely dependent on Ca/sub 0/. More importantly, these results further support their hypothesis that EC also functions as an inhibitory barrier to prevent circulating vasoconstrictors from exerting their deleterious constrictory effects.

  9. Phorbol esters, but not the hormonal form of vitamin D, induce changes in protein kinase C during differentiation of human histiocytic lymphoma cell line (U-937)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mezzetti, G.; Bagnara, G.P.; Monti, M.G.; Casolo, L.P.; Bonsi, l.; Brunelli, M.A.

    1987-05-25

    Human histiocytic lymphoma cells (U-937) undergo similar differentiation when incubated with the phorbol ester 12-0-tetradecanoyl phorbol-13-acetate (TPA) and 1,25-dihydroxycholecalciferol. In this action, TPA somehow implicates calcium-sensitive and phospholipid-dependent protein kinase (protein kinase C), which is rapidly and significantly affected by this inducer. On the contrary, 1,25-dihydroxy-cholecalciferol in its differentiating action does not involve protein kinase C thus suggesting that the secosteroid induces monocytic differentiation possibly through a different mechanism of that of phorbol ester. 13 references, 2 figures, 1 table.

  10. The Effects of Various Acid Catalyst on the Esterification of Jatropha Curcas Oil based Trimethylolpropane Ester as Biolubricant Base Stock

    OpenAIRE

    Noor Hafizah Arbain; Jumat Salimon

    2011-01-01

    Biolubricant production of trimethylolpropane ester (ET) was conducted via esterification of fatty acid (FA) of Jatropha curcas oil with trimethylolpropane (TMP). The condition for this reaction was as follows: temperature was 150 °C, time of reaction was 3 hours, molar ratio of FA: TMP was 4:1 and 2% wt/wt concentrated catalyst (based on weight of FA). Different catalyst was used in this reaction such as perchloric acid, sulfuric acid, p-toluenesulfonic acid, hydrochloric acid and nitric aci...

  11. Primary culture of human skin melanocyte and comparison of culture in the presence and absence of phorbol ester

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reza Yarani

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Primary culture takes place following the cell isolation from tissues. Isolation and culture of melanocytes based on their roll in the protection of body against hazardous sun rays, production of skin, cornea and hair color is really important. This study was done to set isolation, culture and proliferation of melanocytes from children foreskin and adult eyelashes, and also comparison of two types of melanocyte culture medium. Methods: Human foreskin and eyelash samples were used for melanocyte isolation and culture. After isolation of epidermis from dermis, epidermis cell suspensions were prepared by enzymatic digestion. The isolated cells were cultured in two melanocyte selective culture media. Immunocytochemistary and reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR assays were used for confirmation of isolated and cultured melanocytes. Results: Our results indicated that isolated melanocyte cultured in the selective medium without phorbol esters is better than the melanocytes cultured in selective medium cont-aining phorbol esters not only morphologically but also physiologically and from the aspect of cell adhesion. In addition, the results showed that isolated melanocyte from adult eyelashes are more dendritic than melanocytes isolated from children foreskin. Conversely, our results indicated that the number of cell passages in melanocyte isolat-ed from foreskin is more than melanocytes isolated from adult eyelashes. Conclusion: Melanocytes cultured in selective medium containing convenient growth factors in absence of phorbol esters show more native physiological and adhesive properties. In addition, melanocyte isolated from younger tissues such as foreskin have better proliferative and sub-culturing properties so we suggest isolation and culture of younger tissues.

  12. Dietary lipid varying in corn and coconut oil influences protein kinase C in phorbol ester-treated mouse skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mouat, M F; Locniskar, M F

    1998-01-01

    An earlier study indicated that increased levels of corn oil in the diet resulted in decreased tumor yield after promotion by the phorbol ester 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate in Sencar mouse epidermis (J Leyton, ML Lee, M Locniskar, MA Belury, TJ Slaga, et al. Cancer Res 51, 907-915, 1991). In the present study we investigated whether corn oil diets could alter the subcellular distribution and activity of protein kinase C (PKC), which is part of an important signaling pathway in carcinogenesis. We used three 15% (wt/wt) fat semipurified diets containing three ratios of corn oil to coconut oil: 1.0%:14.0% (Diet L), 7.9%:7.1% (Diet M), and 15.0%:0.0% (Diet H). The translocation to the membrane fraction of epidermal PKC by 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate was decreased as the corn oil content of the diet was increased, and this correlates with the decrease in tumor yield. The translocation to the membrane fraction of specific isoforms of PKC was affected by increased dietary corn oil: the largest decreases were in cytosolic PKC-alpha and -beta, and the smallest change was in PKC-epsilon. The other isoforms, PKC-delta and -zeta, were unaffected. The major constituent of corn oil is linoleic acid, which did not affect the binding of phorbol ester to PKC, which suggests that inhibition of such binding was not responsible for the effects of increased dietary corn oil. Products of linoleic acid metabolism, i.e., arachidonic acid and 13-hydroxyoctadecadienoic acid, also did not affect the binding of phorbol ester to PKC. Thus the results of these studies suggest that the subcellular distributions of PKC and its isoforms can be modulated by dietary lipids.

  13. Phorbol ester reduces ethanol excitation of dopaminergic neurons of the ventral tegmental area: Involvement of protein kinase C theta

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sudarat eNimitvilai

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Neurons of the ventral tegmental area (VTA play a key role in the rewarding and reinforcing effects of drugs of abuse, including alcohol. Ethanol directly increases the firing rate of dopaminergic (DAergic VTA neurons, but modulation of the firing rate of DAergic VTA neurons can be controlled by a number of factors, including some that are under the control of protein kinase C (PKC. Application of phorbol esters activates PKC and the present study assessed the effect of a phorbol ester, phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA, on ethanol-induced excitation of DA VTA neurons. Ethanol-induced excitation of DAergic VTA neurons was reduced significantly in the presence of PMA. This action of PMA was antagonized by chelerythrine chloride, a non-selective antagonist of PKC, but not by moderate concentrations of antagonists of conventional PKC isoforms (Gö6976 and Gö6983. A PKC δ/θ inhibitor antagonized PMA-induced reduction of ethanol excitation. Since PKCδ antagonist Gö6983 did not antagonize the effect of PMA on ethanol excitation, the PMA reduction of ethanol excitation is most likely to be mediated by PKCθ. Antagonists of intracellular calcium pathways were ineffective in antagonizing PMA action on ethanol excitation, consistent with the lack of calcium dependence of PKCθ. In summary, ethanol-induced excitation of VTA neurons is attenuated in the presence of PMA, and this attenuation appears to be mediated by PKCθ. This novel mechanism for interfering with ethanol activation of reward-related neurons could provide a new target for pharmacotherapy to ameliorate alcoholism.

  14. Beta phorbol ester- and diacylglycerol-induced augmentation of transmitter release is mediated by Munc13s and not by PKCs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rhee, Jeong Seop; Betz, Andrea; Pyott, Sonja; Reim, Kerstin; Varoqueaux, Frederique; Augustin, Iris; Hesse, Dörte; Südhof, Thomas C; Takahashi, Masami; Rosenmund, Christian; Brose, Nils

    2002-01-01

    Munc13-1 is a presynaptic protein with an essential role in synaptic vesicle priming. It contains a diacylglycerol (DAG)/beta phorbol ester binding C(1) domain and is a potential target of the DAG second messenger pathway that may act in parallel with PKCs. Using genetically modified mice that expre

  15. Phorbol Esters Isolated from Jatropha Meal Induced Apoptosis-Mediated Inhibition in Proliferation of Chang and Vero Cell Lines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Syahida Ahmad

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available The direct feeding of Jatropha meal containing phorbol esters (PEs indicated mild to severe toxicity symptoms in various organs of different animals. However, limited information is available on cellular and molecular mechanism of toxicity caused by PEs present in Jatropha meal. Thus, the present study was conducted to determine the cytotoxic and mode of action of PEs isolated from Jatropha meal using human hepatocyte (Chang and African green monkey kidney (Vero cell lines. The results showed that isolated PEs inhibited cell proliferation in a dose-dependent manner in both cell lines with the CC50 of 125.9 and 110.3 μg/mL, respectively. These values were compatible to that of phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA values as positive control i.e., 124.5 and 106.3 μg/mL respectively. Microscopic examination, flow cytometry and DNA fragmentation results confirmed cell death due to apoptosis upon treatment with PEs and PMA at CC50 concentration for 24 h in both cell lines. The Western blot analysis revealed the overexpression of PKC-δ and activation of caspase-3 proteins which could be involved in the mechanism of action of PEs and PMA. Consequently, the PEs isolated form Jatropha meal caused toxicity and induced apoptosis-mediated proliferation inhibition toward Chang and Vero cell lines involving over-expression of PKC-δ and caspase-3 as their mode of actions.

  16. Effects of 1-beta-D-arabinofuranosylcytosine and phorbol ester on differentiation of human K562 erythroleukemia cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, T; Mitchell, T; Sariban, E; Sabbath, K; Griffin, J; Kufe, D

    1985-06-01

    We have previously demonstrated that 1-beta-D-arabinofuranosylcytosine (ara-C) induces hemoglobin synthesis in human K562 erythroleukemia cells. The present study extends these findings by demonstrating that ara-C treatment of K562 cells results in both increased heme synthesis and accumulation of alpha-, gamma-, epsilon-, and zeta-globin RNA. The results also demonstrate that ara-C enhances K562 cell surface expression of glycophorin. Furthermore, we demonstrate that phorbol ester (12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate; TPA) inhibits the effects of ara-C on heme production, accumulation of globin RNA, and glycophorin expression. The inhibitory effect occurs maximally when K562 cells are treated with TPA before undergoing ara-C-induced commitment to erythroid differentiation. These findings suggest that TPA inhibits an early step in the process required for ara-C to enhance expression of genes involved in the erythroid program.

  17. Effect of wortmannin and phorbol ester on Paramecium fluid-phase uptake in the presence of transferrin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiejak, J; Surmacz, L; Wyroba, E

    2001-01-01

    The kinetics of the uptake of the fluid phase marker Lucifer Yellow (LY), and its alteration by wortmannin, an inhibitor of phosphatidylinositol-3 kinase (PI-3K), and the PKC modulators: GF 109203 X, an inhibitor, and phorbol ester, an activator was studied in eukaryotic model Paramecium aurelia. Spectrophotometric quantification of LY accumulation was performed in the presence or absence of transferrin, a marker of receptor-mediated endocytosis. Internalization of LY showed a curvilinear kinetics: the high initial rate of LY uptake (575 ng LY/mg protein/hr) decreased almost 5-fold within 15 min, reaching plateau at 126 ng/mg protein/hr. Transferrin induced a small increase (7.5%) in the fluid phase uptake rate (after 5 min) followed by a small decrease at longer incubation times. Lucifer Yellow and transferrin (visualized by streptavidin-FITC) were localized in Paramecium by 3-D reconstruction by confocal microscopy. LY showed a scattered, diffuse fluorescence typical of fluid phase uptake whereas transferrin accumulated in membrane-surrounded endosomes. Wortmannin did not affect LY accumulation but decreased it when transferrin was present in the incubation medium. This suggests an effect on the transferrin uptake pathway, presumably on the stage of internalization in "mixing" endosomes to which transferrin and LY were targeted. Phorbol ester diminished LY accumulation by 22% and this effect persisted up to 25 min of incubation. PKC inhibitor did not affect LY uptake. However, in the presence of transferrin, the LY uptake increased within the first 15 minutes followed by a rapid 20% decrease in comparison to the control. Such an effect of PKC modulators suggests that PMA action on fluid phase uptake is not directly mediated by PKC.

  18. Effect of wortmannin and phorbol ester on Paramecium fluid-phase uptake in the presence of transferrin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Wiejak

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available The kinetics of the uptake of the fluid phase marker Lucifer Yellow (LY, and its alteration by wortmannin, an inhibitor of phosphatidylinositol-3 kinase (PI-3K, and the PKC modulators: GF 109203 X, an inhibitor, and phorbol ester, an activator was studied in eukaryotic model Paramecium aurelia. Spectrophotometric quantification of LY accumulation was performed in the presence or absence of transferrin, a marker of receptor-mediated endocytosis. Internalization of LY showed a curvilinear kinetics: the high initial rate of LYuptake (575 ng LY/ mg protein /hr decreased almost 5-fold within 15 min, reaching plateau at 126 ng/ mg protein /hr. Transferrin induced a small increase (7.5% in the fluid phase uptake rate (after 5 min followed by a small decrease at longer incubation times. Lucifer Yellow and transferrin (visualized by streptavidin– FITC were localized in Paramecium by 3-D reconstruction by confocal microscopy. LY showed a scattered, diffuse fluorescence typical of fluid phase uptake whereas transferrin accumulated in membrane-surrounded endosomes. Wortmannin did not affect LY accumulation but decreased it when transferrin was present in the incubation medium. This suggests an effect on the transferrin uptake pathway, presumably on the stage of internalization in “mixing” endosomes to which transferrin and LY were targeted. Phorbol ester diminished LY accumulation by 22% and this effect persisted up to 25 min of incubation. PKC inhibitor did not affect LY uptake. However, in the presence of transferrin, the LY uptake increased within the first 15 minutes followed by a rapid 20% decrease in comparison to the control. Such an effect of PKC modulators suggests that PMA action on fluid phase uptake is not directly mediated by PKC.

  19. In-situ Alkaline Transesterification of Jatropha curcas seed Oil for Production of Biodiesel and Nontoxic Jatropha seed Cake

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Novizar Nazir

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The production of fatty acid methyl ester (FAME by direct in situ alkaline-catalyzed transesterification of the triglycerides (TG in Jatropha curcas seeds was examined. The experimental results showed that the amount of Jatropha curcas seed oil dissolved in methanol was approximately 83% of the total oil and the conversion of this oil could achieve 98% under the following conditions: less than 2% moisture content in Jatropha curcas seed flours, 0.3–0.335 mm particle size, 0.08 mol/L NaOH concentration in methanol, 171:1 methanol/oil mole ratio, 45.66 oC reaction temperature and 3.02 h reaction time. The use of alkaline methanol as extraction and reaction solvent, which would be useful for extraction oil and phorbol esters, would reduce the phorbol esters content in the Jatropha curcas seed cake. The cake after in-situ transesterification is rich in protein and is a potential source of livestock feed. Further, the the toxicity studies were also investigated on male rate by feeding the seed cake after after in-situ transesterification as well as the from solvent and mechanical extraction. Food intake, growth rate, protein efficiency ratio (PER and transformation index (TI showed that the meal is potential as protein supplement to livestock feed.

  20. Decrease of epidermal histidase activity by tumor-promoting phorbol esters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colburn, N H; Lau, S; Head, R

    1975-11-01

    The potent skin tumor promoter (12-O-tetradecanoyl phorbol-13-acetate (TPA) stimulates epidermal macromolecular synthesis as well as proliferation, but little is known of specific functional aberrations produced by TPA. This report presents results of a study on the effects of TPA on epidermal histidase (L-histidine ammonia lyase), an enzyme found in normal epidermis but not in dermis or in mouse squamous cell carcinomas. Histidase activity was assayed on postmitochondrial supernatants obtained from hairless mouse epidermis after removal by keratotome. Topical TPA treatment at doses active in tumor promotion (1.7 to 17.0 nmoles/application) produced dose-dependent decreases in epidermal histidase specific activity at 19 hr posttreatment. The onset of the decrease occurred at 12 hr with recovery to control level specific activity by 5 days, showing kinetics similar to those obtained for stimulation of DNA synthesis. This decrease in histidase could not be attributed to a general inhibition of soluble protein synthesis or to the appearance of an inhibitor of histidase activity. The strong promoter TPA produced a greater histidase decrease than did the moderate promoter and mitogen 12,13-didecanoyl phorbol at equimolar dose, while phorbol, a nonpromoter and nonmitogen, produced no effects on histidase. The relationship of this histidase depression to tumor promotion and not initiation is further indicated by the finding that (a) Tween 60, a structurally unrelated tumor promotor, also produced a decrease in histidase; and (b) the tumor initiator urethan and an initiating dose of 9,10-dimethybenz(a)anthracene showed no effects on histadase activity.

  1. Modulation of the transient receptor potential vanilloid channel TRPV4 by 4alpha-phorbol esters: a structure-activity study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klausen, Thomas Kjaer; Pagani, Alberto; Minassi, Alberto

    2009-01-01

    . Binding of 4alpha-phorbol esters occurs in a loop in the TM3-TM4 domain of TRPV4 that is analogous to the capsaicin binding site of TRPV1, and the ester decoration of ring C and the A,B ring junction are critical for activity. The lipophilic ester groups on ring C serve mainly as a steering element......, affecting the orientation of the diterpenoid core into the ligand binding pocket, while the nature of the A,B ring junction plays an essential role in the Ca(2+)-dependence of the TRPV4 response. Taken together, our results show that 4alpha-phorbol is a useful template to investigate the molecular details...

  2. The Effects of Various Acid Catalyst on the Esterification of Jatropha Curcas Oil based Trimethylolpropane Ester as Biolubricant Base Stock

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noor Hafizah Arbain

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Biolubricant production of trimethylolpropane ester (ET was conducted via esterification of fatty acid (FA of Jatropha curcas oil with trimethylolpropane (TMP. The condition for this reaction was as follows: temperature was 150 °C, time of reaction was 3 hours, molar ratio of FA: TMP was 4:1 and 2% wt/wt concentrated catalyst (based on weight of FA. Different catalyst was used in this reaction such as perchloric acid, sulfuric acid, p-toluenesulfonic acid, hydrochloric acid and nitric acid. The composition of ET was determined by Gas Chromatography (GC-FID. The ester group was confirmed by Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR and the structure was confirmed by proton and carbon Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (1H-NMR and 13C-NMR spectra. 70% of ET was successfully synthesized using perchloric acid in this research. The pour point of the product was observed as low as –23 °C, flash point is >300 °C and viscosity index is 150.

  3. Comparison of transcriptional response to phorbol ester, bryostatin 1, and bryostatin analogues in LNCaP and U937 cancer cell lines provides insight into their differential mechanism of action

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kedei, N.; Telek, A.; Michalowski, A.M.; Kraft, M.B.; Li, W.; Poudel, Y.B.; Rudra, A.; Petersen, M.E.; Keck, G.E.; Blumberg, P.M.

    2012-01-01

    Bryostatin 1, like the phorbol esters, binds to and activates protein kinase C (PKC) but paradoxically antagonizes many but not all phorbol ester responses. Previously, we have compared patterns of biological response to bryostatin 1, phorbol ester, and the bryostatin 1 derivative Merle 23 in two human cancer cell lines, LNCaP and U937. Bryostatin 1 fails to induce a typical phorbol ester biological response in either cell line, whereas Merle 23 resembles phorbol ester in the U937 cells and bryostatin 1 in the LNCaP cells. Here, we have compared the pattern of their transcriptional response in both cell lines. We examined by qPCR the transcriptional response as a function of dose and time for a series of genes regulated by PKCs. In both cell lines bryostatin 1 differed primarily from phorbol ester in having a shorter duration of transcriptional modulation. This was not due to bryostatin 1 instability, since bryostatin 1 suppressed the phorbol ester response. In both cell lines Merle 23 induced a pattern of transcription largely like that of phorbol ester although with a modest reduction at later times in the LNCaP cells, suggesting that the difference in biological response of the two cell lines to Merle 23 lies downstream of this transcriptional regulation. For a series of bryostatins and analogues which ranged from bryostatin 1-like to phorbol ester-like in activity on the U937 cells, the duration of transcriptional response correlated with the pattern of biological activity, suggesting that this may provide a robust platform for structure activity analysis. PMID:23146662

  4. Comparison of transcriptional response to phorbol ester, bryostatin 1, and bryostatin analogs in LNCaP and U937 cancer cell lines provides insight into their differential mechanism of action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kedei, N; Telek, A; Michalowski, A M; Kraft, M B; Li, W; Poudel, Y B; Rudra, A; Petersen, M E; Keck, G E; Blumberg, P M

    2013-02-01

    Bryostatin 1, like the phorbol esters, binds to and activates protein kinase C (PKC) but paradoxically antagonizes many but not all phorbol ester responses. Previously, we have compared patterns of biological response to bryostatin 1, phorbol ester, and the bryostatin 1 derivative Merle 23 in two human cancer cell lines, LNCaP and U937. Bryostatin 1 fails to induce a typical phorbol ester biological response in either cell line, whereas Merle 23 resembles phorbol ester in the U937 cells and bryostatin 1 in the LNCaP cells. Here, we have compared the pattern of their transcriptional response in both cell lines. We examined by qPCR the transcriptional response as a function of dose and time for a series of genes regulated by PKCs. In both cell lines bryostatin 1 differed primarily from phorbol ester in having a shorter duration of transcriptional modulation. This was not due to bryostatin 1 instability, since bryostatin 1 suppressed the phorbol ester response. In both cell lines Merle 23 induced a pattern of transcription largely like that of phorbol ester although with a modest reduction at later times in the LNCaP cells, suggesting that the difference in biological response of the two cell lines to Merle 23 lies downstream of this transcriptional regulation. For a series of bryostatins and analogs which ranged from bryostatin 1-like to phorbol ester-like in activity on the U937 cells, the duration of transcriptional response correlated with the pattern of biological activity, suggesting that this may provide a robust platform for structure activity analysis. Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  5. EFFECT OF PHORBOL ESTER ON cAMP-DEPENDENT PROTEIN KINASE ACTIVITY IN CARDIOMYOCYTES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周文华; 肖殿模; 郑超强; 王小鲁; 张俊保

    1995-01-01

    Cardiomyocytes isolated from neonatal rats were treated with phorbol-12-myristate-13-acetate(PMA) ranging from 10-11 to 10-7mol/L for 20 min,causing cytosol protein kinase A (PKA) activity to decrease while particulate PKA activity increase in a concentration-dependent manner.The change of PKA activity induced by PMA was abolished completely by pretreatment of polymyxin B or depletion of protein kinase C (PKC).Type Ⅱ PKA activity in particulate fraction was enhanced remarkably,while that of type I PKA was not altered when the cells were treated with 100 nmol/L PMA.The results suggested that subcellular distribution and activity of PKA in cardiomyocytes may be regulated by PKC.

  6. Principes toxiques, toxicité et technologie de détoxification de la graine de Jatropha curcas L. (synthèse bibliographique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nesseim, TDT.

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Toxic principles, toxicity and technology of detoxification of Jatropha curcas L. seed: a review. The use of meal from the crushing of Jatropha curcas seed for livestock feed is limited owing to the variable amounts of seed available. This availability depends on the level and variety of toxic and antinutritional compounds contained in the seed at a given time; the most important of these compounds are phorbol esters and curcin. The phorbol esters present in J. curcas seed are Euphorbiaceae diterpenes, known for their inflammatory action resulting in irritation and toxicity to insects, fish and mammals. These compounds are sometimes completely degraded in soil and they may be reduced by physical, chemical or biological processes, with a reduction ratio of between 50 and 95%. Curcin is an irritating toxalbumin with lectin activity; it is inactivated by heat treatment at 121 °C for 30 min. Other antinutritional compounds are also present in J. curcas seed, such as saponins and an inhibitor of trypsin activity. This trypsin-inhibiting compound interferes with the digestion process and its reduction is achieved through thermal, chemical or biological treatments. The elimination of, or at least a reduction in the levels of, these molecules represents a prerequisite for using J. curcas meal in the livestock feed sector.

  7. Structural insights into the interactions of phorbol ester and bryostatin complexed with protein kinase C: a comparative molecular dynamics simulation study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thangsunan, Patcharapong; Tateing, Suriya; Hannongbua, Supa; Suree, Nuttee

    2016-07-01

    Protein kinase C (PKC) isozymes are important regulatory enzymes that have been implicated in many diseases, including cancer, Alzheimer's disease, and in the eradication of HIV/AIDS. Given their potential clinical ramifications, PKC modulators, e.g. phorbol esters and bryostatin, are also of great interest in the drug development. However, structural details on the binding between PKC and its modulators, especially bryostatin - the highly potent and non-tumor promoting activator for PKCs, are still lacking. Here, we report the first comparative molecular dynamics study aimed at gaining structural insight into the mechanisms by which the PKC delta cys2 activator domain is used in its binding to phorbol ester and bryostatin-1. As anticipated in the phorbol ester binding, hydrogen bonds are formed through the backbone atoms of Thr242, Leu251, and Gly253 of PKC. However, the opposition of H-bond formation between Thr242 and Gly253 may cause the phorbol ester complex to become less stable when compared with the bryostatin binding. For the PKC delta-bryostatin complex, hydrogen bonds are formed between the Gly253 backbone carbonyl and the C30 carbomethoxy substituent of the ligand. Additionally, the indole Nε1 of the highly homologous Trp252 also forms an H-bond to the C20 ester group on bryostatin. Backbone fluctuations also suggest that this latter H-bond formation may abrogate the transient interaction between Trp252 and His269, thus dampening the fluctuations observed on the nearby Zn(2+)-coordinating residues. This new dynamic fluctuation dampening model can potentially benefit future design of new PKC modulators.

  8. Some phorbol esters may partially resemble bryostatin 1 in their actions on LNCaP prostate cancer cells and U937 leukemia cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kedei, Noemi; Lubart, Emanuel; Lewin, Nancy E.; Telek, Andrea; Lim, Langston; Mannan, Poonam; Garfield, Susan H.; Kraft, Matthew B.; Keck, Gary E.; Kolusheva, Sofiya; Jelinek, Raz; Blumberg, Peter M.

    2012-01-01

    Phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) and bryostatin 1 are both potent protein kinase C (PKC) activators. In LNCaP human prostate cancer cells, PMA induces tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFα) secretion and inhibits proliferation; bryostatin 1 does not and itself blocks the response to PMA. This difference has been attributed to bryostatin 1 not localizing PKCδ to the plasma membrane. Since phorbol ester liphophilicity influences PKCδ localization, we have examined in LNCaP cells a series of phorbol esters and related derivatives spanning some 8 logs in lipophilicity (LogP) to see if any behave like bryostatin 1. The compounds showed marked differences in their effects on proliferation and TNFα secretion. For example, maximal responses for TNFα secretion relative to PMA ranged from 97% for octyl-indolactam V to 24% for phorbol 12,13-dibenzoate. Dose response curves ranged from monophasic for indolactam V to markedly biphasic for sapintoxin D. The divergent patterns of response, however, correlated neither with lipophilicity, with plasma membrane translocation of PKCδ, or with the ability to interact with model membranes. In U937 human leukemia cells, a second system in which PMA and bryostatin 1 have divergent effects, viz. PMA but not bryostatin 1 inhibits proliferation and induces attachment, all the compounds acted like PMA for proliferation but several induced a reduced level or a biphasic dose response curve for attachment. We conclude that active phorbol esters are not all equivalent. Depending on the system, some may partially resemble bryostatin 1 in their behavior, encouraging the concept that bryostatin-like behavior may be obtained from other structural templates. PMID:21542090

  9. Some phorbol esters might partially resemble bryostatin 1 in their actions on LNCaP prostate cancer cells and U937 leukemia cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kedei, Noemi; Lubart, Emanuel; Lewin, Nancy E; Telek, Andrea; Lim, Langston; Mannan, Poonam; Garfield, Susan H; Kraft, Matthew B; Keck, Gary E; Kolusheva, Sofiya; Jelinek, Raz; Blumberg, Peter M

    2011-05-16

    Phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) and bryostatin 1 are both potent protein kinase C (PKC) activators. In LNCaP human prostate cancer cells, PMA induces tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFα) secretion and inhibits proliferation; bryostatin 1 does not, and indeed blocks the response to PMA. This difference has been attributed to bryostatin 1 not localizing PKCδ to the plasma membrane. Since phorbol ester lipophilicity influences PKCδ localization, we have examined in LNCaP cells a series of phorbol esters and related derivatives spanning some eight logs in lipophilicity (logP) to see if any behave like bryostatin 1. The compounds showed marked differences in their effects on proliferation and TNFα secretion. For example, maximal responses for TNFα secretion relative to PMA ranged from 97 % for octyl-indolactam V to 24 % for phorbol 12,13-dibenzoate. Dose-response curves ranged from monophasic for indolactam V to markedly biphasic for sapintoxin D. The divergent patterns of response, however, correlated neither to lipophilicity, to plasma membrane translocation of PKCδ, nor to the ability to interact with model membranes. In U937 human leukemia cells, a second system in which PMA and bryostatin 1 have divergent effects, viz. PMA but not bryostatin 1 inhibits proliferation and induces attachment, all the compounds acted like PMA for proliferation, but several induced a reduced level or a biphasic dose-response curve for attachment. We conclude that active phorbol esters are not all equivalent. Depending on the system, some might partially resemble bryostatin 1 in their behavior; this encourages the concept that bryostatin-like behavior may be obtained from other structural templates. Copyright © 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  10. Toxic Compound, Anti-Nutritional Factors and Functional Properties of Protein Isolated from Detoxified Jatropha curcas Seed Cake

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Worapot Suntornsuk

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Jatropha curcas is a multipurpose tree, which has potential as an alternative source for biodiesel. All of its parts can also be used for human food, animal feed, fertilizer, fuel and traditional medicine. J. curcas seed cake is a low-value by-product obtained from biodiesel production. The seed cake, however, has a high amount of protein, with the presence of a main toxic compound: phorbol esters as well as anti-nutritional factors: trypsin inhibitors, phytic acid, lectin and saponin. The objective of this work was to detoxify J. curcas seed cake and study the toxin, anti-nutritional factors and also functional properties of the protein isolated from the detoxified seed cake. The yield of protein isolate was approximately 70.9%. The protein isolate was obtained without a detectable level of phorbol esters. The solubility of the protein isolate was maximal at pH 12.0 and minimal at pH 4.0. The water and oil binding capacities of the protein isolate were 1.76 g water/g protein and 1.07 mL oil/g protein, respectively. The foam capacity and stability, including emulsion activity and stability of protein isolate, had higher values in a range of basic pHs, while foam and emulsion stabilities decreased with increasing time. The results suggest that the detoxified J. curcas seed cake has potential to be exploited as a novel source of functional protein for food applications.

  11. Phorbol ester-mediated desensitization of histamine Hl receptors on a cultured smooth muscle cell line

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mitsuhashi, M.; Payan, D.G.

    1988-01-01

    The present study was undertaken in order to examine the effect of protein kinase C (PKC) on histamine Hl receptors, (HlR) present on the smooth muscle cell line, DDT/sub 1/MF-2. (/sup 3/H)-pyrilamine binding revealed that specific (/sup 3/H)-pyrilamine binding sites were reduced be pretreatment with 12-O-tetra-decanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA), an activator of PKC, but not the Kd. The TPA analogue, 4..cap alpha.. phorbol 12,13-didecanoate, which does not activate PKC, failed to induce down-regulation of HlR. TPA-induced down regulation of HlR was inhibited by pretreatment with 1-(5-Isoquinilinesulfonyl)-2-methylpiperazine dihydrochloride (H-7), a PKC inhibitor, in a dose dependent manner. The H-7 analogue, H-8, which is a less potent inhibitor of PKC, but a potent inhibitor of cyclic nucleotide dependent protein kinase, had no effect on HlR. Moreover, treatment with TPA inhibited histamine-induced increases in (Ca/sup 2 +/)/sub i/ in cells loaded with the fluorescent indicator, indo-1. These data suggest that HlR in DDT/sub 1/MF-2 cells were functionally regulated by PKC.

  12. Phorbol ester-modulation of estrogenic genomic effects triggered by the environmental contaminant benzanthracene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolasa, Elise; Balaguer, Patrick; Houlbert, Noémie; Fardel, Olivier

    2012-09-01

    Aryl hydrocarbon receptor-dependent genomic effects of environmental polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) have been shown to be modulated by non-genomic protein kinase C (PKC)-related pathways. The present study was designed to determine whether PKC activation may also impair estrogenic genomic response triggered by PAHs. Treatment by the PKC activator phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) was found to markedly and differentially impair the up-regulation of estrogenic markers triggered by the estrogenic PAH benzanthracene (BZA) in cultured human mammary cells; BZA-mediated mRNA up-regulation of pS2 and amphiregulin was thus increased, whereas that of progesterone receptor and CXCL12 was repressed. BZA/PMA cotreatment however failed to alter BZA-mediated increase of activity of a luciferase gene reporter construct driven by an estrogen response element, thus discarding any global effect of PMA toward BZA-triggered estrogen receptor activation. Various chemicals inhibiting PKCs or extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) as well as the knock-down of PKCδ expression counteracted the PMA-mediated increase of pS2 mRNA up-regulation triggered by BZA, demonstrating that it was dependent on PKCs, including PKCδ isoform, and ERKs. This non-genomic modulation of estrogenic effects of PAHs by PKC activation may have to be considered when considering the deleterious effects of these environmental contaminants towards the endocrine system.

  13. Increase in phorbol ester binding in liver microsomes after chronic administration of phenobarbital

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Menez, J.F.; Deitrich, R.A. (Univ. of Colorado, Denver (United States))

    1991-03-15

    The effect of chronic administration of phenobarbital on the binding of phorbol-12,13-dibutyrate (({sup 3}H)PDBu), an activator of protein kinase C (PKC), was examined in rat liver microsomes. A significant increase in the number of binding sites was observed in microsomes of Fisher 344 rats. However, no change appeared in liver cytosol binding of PDBu. Consequently, a translocation process of PKC is unlikely. The increase in ({sup 3}H)PDBu binding in liver microsomes is significant 24 h. after one injection of phenobarbital and reaches its maximum in 2 days. In other strains of rats (ACI and lean Zucker), significant differences were found in the increase of ({sup 3}H)PDBu binding in microsomes. Fisher 344 were the most sensitive, lean Zucker rats, the least sensitive. Those results parallel the pentoxy-resorufin O demethylase activity in the microsomes of the same animals. EC{sub 50} values for inhibition of ({sup 3}H)PDBu binding by pentobarbital were determined in control microsomes from Fisher and Zucker rats. In Fisher rats, ({sup 3}H)PDBu binding in microsomes was found to be more sensitive to the inhibitory effect of pentobarbital than in lean Zucker rats, which suggests that the more microsomes are inhibited in vitro the greater the increase in PKC in microsomes following chronic barbiturate treatment.

  14. Reversal by arterial hypercapnia of phorbol ester-induced cerebrovascular constriction in piglets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Busija, D.W.; Smith, T.L.; Jing Chen (Bowman Gray School of Medicine, Winston-Salem, NC (United States))

    1991-03-11

    Phorbol 12,13 Dibutyrate (PDB), an activator of protein kinase C, causes pronounced and sustained constriction of piglet pial arterioles. The authors investigated whether a physiological stimulus, namely arterial hypercapnia, could still dilate pial arterioles in the presence of PDB. A closed cranial window was implanted over the parietal cortex of piglets, 1-5 days of age, and diameter of one arteriole determined by intravital microscopy. Diameter was determined during baseline conditions, after topical application of 10{sup {minus}6}M(n = 2) or 10{sup {minus}5}M(n = 4) PDB, and during arterial hypercapnia induced by inhalation of 10% CO{sub 2} air. PDB was flushed out from under the window prior to the latter two measurements. Arteriolar diameter was 130 {plus minus} 14 um (n = 6) during baseline, and decreased to 82 {plus minus} 13 um after PDB application. However, during arterial hypercapnia, diameter increased to 153 {plus minus} 14 um. Following hypercapnia, diameter returned to values seen in the presence of PDB alone. The authors conclude that arterial hypercapnia is able to counteract the effects of PDB, possibly by activating a more potent intracellular mechanism or by interfering with protein kinase C related events involved in smooth muscle contraction.

  15. Diminished macrophage apoptosis and reactive oxygen species generation after phorbol ester stimulation in Crohn's disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christine D Palmer

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Crohn's Disease (CD is a chronic relapsing disorder characterized by granulomatous inflammation of the gastrointestinal tract. Although its pathogenesis is complex, we have recently shown that CD patients have a systemic defect in macrophage function, which results in the defective clearance of bacteria from inflammatory sites. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here we have identified a number of additional macrophage defects in CD following diacylglycerol (DAG homolog phorbol-12-myristate-13-acetate (PMA activation. We provide evidence for decreased DNA fragmentation, reduced mitochondrial membrane depolarization, impaired reactive oxygen species production, diminished cytochrome c release and increased IL-6 production compared to healthy subjects after PMA exposure. The observed macrophage defects in CD were stimulus-specific, as normal responses were observed following p53 activation and endoplasmic reticulum stress. CONCLUSION: These findings add to a growing body of evidence highlighting disordered macrophage function in CD and, given their pivotal role in orchestrating inflammatory responses, defective apoptosis could potentially contribute to the pathogenesis of CD.

  16. The bryostatin 1 A-ring acetate is not the critical determinant for antagonism of phorbol ester-induced biological responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keck, Gary E; Li, Wei; Kraft, Matthew B; Kedei, Noemi; Lewin, Nancy E; Blumberg, Peter M

    2009-06-04

    The contribution of the A-ring C(7) acetate to the function of bryostatin 1 has been investigated through synthesis and biological evaluation of an analogue incorporating this feature into the bryopyran core structure. No enhanced binding affinity for protein kinase C (PKC) was observed, relative to previously characterized analogues lacking the C(7) acetate. Functional assays showed biological responses characteristic of those induced by the phorbol ester PMA and distinctly different from those observed with bryostatin 1.

  17. Procyanidins from grape seeds protect against phorbol ester-induced oxidative cellular and genotoxic damage

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yin LU; Wan-zhou ZHAO; Zai CHANG; Wen-xing CHEN; Lin LI

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the inhibitory effects of Vitis vinifera procyanidins (PAs) on carcinogen-induced oxidative stress.METHODS: The single cell gel electrophoresis technique (comet assay) was employed to detect DNA damage induced by the carcinogen phorbol-12-myristate-13-acetate (PMA). The release of hydrogen peroxidase from polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs) was assayed by the horseradish peroxidase-mediated oxidation of phenol red. The microplate assay was used to detect the presence of oxidative products by means of 2',7'-dichlorofiuorescindiacetate (DCFH-DA). The superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity of liver mitochondria was assayed, based on the ability of SOD to inhibit the generation of superoxidate anions by the xanthine-xanthine oxidase system. The malondialdehyde (MDA) level was determined by the thiobarbimric acid (TBA) assay. RESULTS: DNA of NIH3T3 cells was significantly damaged after addition of PMA. The length of the comet tail was observed ,while in normal cells the comet tail could not be observed. PAs showed significant protective effects on carcinogen PMA-induced DNA damage. Through assessment of DCFH-DA oxidation, PAs were shown to inhibit the PMA-induced release of hydrogen peroxide by PMNs, and to inhibit respiratory burst activity in NIH3T3 mouse fibroblasts. Ex vivo study showed that serum from rats administered with PAs displayed similar effects in a dose-dependent manner. In addition, PAs suppressed liver mitochondrial lipid peroxidation induced by PMA. PAs protected the activity of SOD and decreased the level of MDA in liver mitochondria damaged by PMA. CONCLUSION: Dietary PAs from grape seeds protect against carcinogen-induced oxidative cellular and genotoxic damage.

  18. Cross Talk Mechanism among EMT, ROS, and Histone Acetylation in Phorbol Ester-Treated Human Breast Cancer MCF-7 Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tetsuro Kamiya

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT plays a pivotal role in the progression of cancer, and some transcription factors including Slug and Snail are known to be involved in EMT processes. It has been well established that the excess production of reactive oxygen species (ROS and epigenetics such as DNA methylation and histone modifications participate in carcinogenesis; however, the cross talk mechanism among EMT, ROS, and epigenetics remains unclear. In the present study, we demonstrated that the treatment of human breast cancer MCF-7 cells with phorbol ester (TPA, a protein kinase C activator, significantly induced cell proliferation and migration, and these were accompanied by the significant induction of Slug expression. Moreover, the TPA-elicited induction of Slug expression was regulated by histone H3 acetylation and NADPH oxidase (NOX 2-derived ROS signaling, indicating that ROS and histone acetylation are involved in TPA-elicited EMT processes. We herein determined the cross talk mechanism among EMT, ROS, and histone acetylation, and our results provide an insight into the progression of cancer metastasis.

  19. Protein kinase C-associated kinase (PKK) mediates Bcl10-independent NF-kappa B activation induced by phorbol ester.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muto, Akihiro; Ruland, Jürgen; McAllister-Lucas, Linda M; Lucas, Peter C; Yamaoka, Shoji; Chen, Felicia F; Lin, Amy; Mak, Tak W; Núñez, Gabriel; Inohara, Naohiro

    2002-08-30

    Protein kinase C-associated kinase (PKK) is a recently described kinase of unknown function that was identified on the basis of its specific interaction with PKC beta. PKK contains N-terminal kinase and C-terminal ankyrin repeats domains linked to an intermediate region. Here we report that the kinase domain of PKK is highly homologous to that of two mediators of nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-kappa B) activation, RICK and RIP, but these related kinases have different C-terminal domains for binding to upstream factors. We find that expression of PKK, like RICK and RIP, induces NF-kappa B activation. Mutational analysis revealed that the kinase domain of PKK is essential for NF-kappa B activation, whereas replacement of serine residues in the putative activation loop did not affect the ability of PKK to activate NF-kappa B. A catalytic inactive PKK mutant inhibited NF-kappa B activation induced by phorbol ester and Ca(2+)-ionophore, but it did not block that mediated by tumor necrosis factor alpha, interleukin-1 beta, or Nod1. Inhibition of NF-kappa B activation by dominant negative PKK was reverted by co-expression of PKC beta I, suggesting a functional association between PKK and PKC beta I. PKK-mediated NF-kappa B activation required IKK alpha and IKK beta but not IKK gamma, the regulatory subunit of the IKK complex. Moreover, NF-kappa B activation induced by PKK was not inhibited by dominant negative Bimp1 and proceeded in the absence of Bcl10, two components of a recently described PKC signaling pathway. These results suggest that PKK is a member of the RICK/RIP family of kinases, which is involved in a PKC-activated NF-kappa B signaling pathway that is independent of Bcl10 and IKK gamma.

  20. Modulation of phorbol ester-elicited events in mouse epidermis by dietary n-3 and n-6 fatty acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belury, M A; Leyton, J; Patrick, K E; Cumberland, A G; Locniskar, M; Fischer, S M

    1991-09-01

    Because arachidonic acid-derived eicosanoids are potent modulators of hyperproliferation and inflammation during skin tumor promotion with the phorbol ester, 12-0-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA) (17, 18), it was hypothesized that dietary modification of epidermal fatty acids might modulate TPA-induced biochemical events in mouse skin. Semipurified diets containing 10% total fat composed of corn oil (CO) or a combination of CO and menhaden oil (MO) or coconut oil (CT) were fed to SENCAR mice for 4 weeks. Fatty acid composition of epidermal phospholipids generally reflected fatty acid composition of dietary oils fed to the mice. Since fatty acid-derived eicosanoids are thought to be essential in tumorigenesis, we compared the effects of dietary fats on prostaglandin E (PGE) production in epidermis treated with a single dose of TPA. TPA-induced PGE production in mouse epidermis from mice fed the MO diet was significantly reduced compared to PGE production in epidermal homogenates from mice fed the CO or CT diets. Type of dietary fats did not appear to modulate TPA-induced vascular permeability, however hyperplasia was slightly elevated in skins of mice fed MO. The subcellular distribution of protein kinase C, the plasma membrane receptor for TPA predominantly located in the cytosol (80%), was altered in epidermis from mice fed the MO diet compared to preparations from mice fed CO or CT diets which exhibited normal protein kinase C distribution. Our results suggest that n-3 rich dietary lipids modulate TPA-elicited events in mouse skin to a greater extent than diets containing higher proportions of saturated or n-6 fatty acids.

  1. Insights on profiling of phorbol, deoxyphorbol, ingenol and jatrophane diterpene esters by high performance liquid chromatography coupled to multiple stage mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nothias-Scaglia, Louis-Félix; Schmitz-Afonso, Isabelle; Renucci, Franck; Roussi, Fanny; Touboul, David; Costa, Jean; Litaudon, Marc; Paolini, Julien

    2015-11-27

    This paper reports our effort to develop a comprehensive HPLC-MS(n)-based dereplication strategy for phorbol ester (PE), deoxyphorbol ester (dPE) and ingenol ester (IE) profiling in plant extracts. This strategy is composed of two sequential analysis exploiting specific hybrid triple quadrupole/linear ion trap instrument modes. A first run was performed using a multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) mode targeting fragmentation of PE and dPE/IE coupled with the acquisition of MS(2) spectrum for the ions at m/z 311 and m/z 313, respectively. A second run was then completed based on precursor ion scan mode (PIS) and automatic MS(2) acquisition for each quasimolecular ion. The developed approach was used to investigate ten Euphorbia extracts showing bioactivity against chikungunya virus replication. Experiments allowed partial annotation of three dPE/IE but no PE was detected. Results suggested that other types of diterpene esters displayed PE- and dPE/IE-like fragmentations. The study of jatrophane ester (JE) standards by CID fragmentation using low and high resolution mass spectrometry confirmed this hypothesis, highlighting challenges and difficulties of diterpene esters profiling within plant extracts. Nonetheless, the present LC-MS(n) method can be easily adapted to profile other types of diterpene esters.

  2. ONCOGENIC TRANSFORMATION OF SYRIAN HAMSTER EMBRYO CELLS BY 5.3-MeVα PARTICLES AND A TUMOR PROMOTER PHORBOL ESTER

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    寿江; 龚诒芬; 吴德昌

    1996-01-01

    The primary Syrian hamster embryo(SHE) cells were used to study the oneogenic transformation by 235pu a particles or X-rays alone or in combination with a chemical promoter phorbol ester. Survival curves of SHE cells following exposure to a-partieles or X-rays were fitted to single-or multi-target models,respectively. Model parameters were:Do=0. 55 Gy,n= 1 for a particles;Do=l. 44 Gy,Dq 3. 0 Gy,n=7. 7 for X-rays. Incidence of a particles or X-rays induced cell transformation was dose-dependant, a partieles were more efficient in inducing cell transformation than that of X rays. The enhancement of SHE cell transformarion by phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate(PMA) following exposure to a particles of 0. 25-1.00 Gy was observed.

  3. Convergent assembly of highly potent analogues of bryostatin 1 via pyran annulation: bryostatin look-alikes that mimic phorbol ester function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keck, Gary E; Kraft, Matthew B; Truong, Anh P; Li, Wei; Sanchez, Carina C; Kedei, Noemi; Lewin, Nancy E; Blumberg, Peter M

    2008-05-28

    Highly potent bryostatin analogues which contain the complete bryostatin core structure have been synthesized using a pyran annulation approach as a key strategic element. The A ring pyran was assembled using a pyran annulation reaction between a C1-C8 hydroxy allylsilane and an aldehyde comprising C9-C13. This pyran was transformed to a new hydroxy allylsilane and then coupled with a preformed C ring aldehyde subunit in a second pyran annulation, with concomitant formation of the B ring. This tricyclic intermediate was elaborated to bryostatin analogues which displayed nanomolar to subnanomolar affinity for PKC, but displayed properties indistinguishable from a phorbol ester in a proliferation/attachment assay.

  4. Immunodeficiency after allogeneic bone marrow transplantation in man. Effect of phorbol ester (phorbol myristate acetate) and calcium ionophore (A23187) in vitro

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, J; Hofmann, B; Langhoff, E

    1989-01-01

    This study was undertaken to clarify the mechanism behind the severely decreased lymphocyte proliferative response upon stimulation with mitogens and antigens seen after allogeneic bone marrow transplantation (BMT) in man. We investigated eight BMT patients and eight controls and found that the p......This study was undertaken to clarify the mechanism behind the severely decreased lymphocyte proliferative response upon stimulation with mitogens and antigens seen after allogeneic bone marrow transplantation (BMT) in man. We investigated eight BMT patients and eight controls and found...... that the proliferative response of patient cells was reduced both when the cells were stimulated with phytohaemagglutinin (PHA) and when they were stimulated with a combination of phorbol myristate acetate (PMA), which is an activator of protein kinase C (PKC), and the calcium ionophore A23187, which irreversibly opens......) receptors (CD25) was only slightly decreased. However, the production of IL-2 was severely decreased in patient cells after stimulation with A23187/PMA (median 3541 units), although it was higher than in PHA-stimulated control cells (median 354 units). These results show that a direct activation of PKC...

  5. Continuous catalyst-free production of esters from Jatropha curcas L. oil under supercritical ethanol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Silva

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available In the present study, the transesterification of Jatropha oil in a continuous catalyst-free process using supercritical ethanol was investigated. Experiments were performed in a packed-bed tubular reactor by studying the effect on the reaction of temperature, pressure, water and cosolvent (n-hexane concentrations, keeping the oil:ethanol mass ratio fixed at 1:1 for different residence times. The results demonstrated that temperature and pressure had a positive effect on fatty acid ethyl ester (FAEE production and it was observed that the free fatty acids present in vegetable oil promote faster reaction kinetics due to simultaneous esterification and transesterification reactions. The addition of water and a cosolvent increased the FAEE yields at 573 K and 20 MPa. Within the experimental ranges investigated, water and the cosolvent decreased the decomposition of fatty acids. Appreciable reaction yields (~90 wt% were achieved at 573 K, 20 MPa, with an oil:ethanol mass ratio of 1:1 and 10 wt% water.

  6. Phenotypic modulation of chronic lymphocytic leukemia cells by phorbol ester: induction of IgM secretion and changes in the expression of B cell-associated surface antigens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, J; Mellstedt, H; Aman, P; Biberfeld, P; Klein, G

    1984-01-01

    Freshly explanted neoplastic populations from 22 cases of phenotypically well-characterized chronic type B lymphocytic leukemia were studied for their capacity to respond to the phorbol ester TPA in vitro. In all but four cases the secretion of IgM was either induced or increased, often to a high level. In contrast, the export of free immunoglobulin (Ig) light chains, an almost consistent feature of the B lymphocytic leukemias, remained relatively constant after TPA treatment. Parallel changes in leukemic cell surface phenotype were probed with both "conventional" and monoclonal antibodies, revealing some modulation of markers in every case investigated. A diminution in the level of surface Ig (preferentially IgD) and the accumulation of cytoplasmic Ig observed after phorbol ester treatment were accompanied by a corresponding reduction or loss of the B1 antigen and usually of B2 when present. The most consistent change induced by TPA was the appearance of BB-1, a marker of activated B lymphocytes, which was rarely expressed on fresh leukemic cells. Another marker of activated lymphocytes, LB-1, was also often induced or increased in its expression after exposure of the cells to TPA. The magnitude of the TPA response appeared to relate to the stage of maturation arrest of the individual leukemic clones rather than to any clinical parameter explored. The significance of the findings to normal B cell differentiation and their potential clinical utility are discussed.

  7. Chronic ethanol consumption decreases the phorbol ester binding to membranal but not cytosolic protein kinase C in rat brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandey, S C; Dwivedi, Y; Piano, M R; Schwertz, D W; Davis, J M; Pandey, G N

    1993-01-01

    We examined the effect of 60 days of ethanol treatment on protein kinase C (PKC) in membrane and cytosolic fractions of the rat cerebral cortex. Membranal and cytosolic PKC were determined by binding technique using [3H]-phorbol 12,13 dibutyrate (PDBU) as radioligand and phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) as displacer. Chronic ethanol consumption resulted in a decrease in the maximum number of binding sites (Bmax) of [3H]-PDBU binding to membranal PKC without significant change in the apparent dissociation constant (KD) in the rat cortex. We also observed that chronic ethanol consumption had no significant effect on Bmax or KD of [3H]-PDBU binding to cytosolic PKC in the rat cerebral cortex. These results suggest that chronic ethanol consumption leads to the down-regulation of brain PKC associated with membrane but not with cytosol.

  8. Stimulation of ribosomal protein S6 kinase activity by pp60/sup v-src/ or by serum: dissociation from phorbol ester-stimulated activity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blenis, J.; Erikson, R.L.

    1986-03-01

    Ribosomal protein S6 kinase activity was measured in lysates prepared from serum-deprived chicken embryo fibroblasts (CEF) treated for various times with phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA). Maximal activity was observed within 15 min, and it declined to the initial level by 4 hr. Incubation of these cells with PMA 4-60 hr after the initial treatment did not result in an additional increase in S6 protein kinase activity. These results are consistent with down-regulation of the PMA receptor, protein kinase C, and the dependence of PMA-stimulated S6 kinase activity on this enzyme. Long-term pretreatment of CEF with PMA only partially attenuated the stimulation of the S6 protein kinase activity by serum or by expression of the Rous sarcoma virus transforming gene product, pp60/sup v-src/. A similar protein kinase activity also was stimulated in cells treated with cycloheximide or sodium vanadate. Pretreatment with PMA had little effect on this response. These data indicate that it is likely that there are at least two mechanisms through which S6 kinase activity can be regulated, one of which apparently utilizes protein kinase C whereas the other(s) does not. Additional experiments show PMA-stimulated glucose transport was not attenuated by long-term incubation with phorbol ester, suggesting that another mechanism, which is not dependent on the presence of protein kinase C, maintains this response after the proposed down-regulation of the PMA receptor.

  9. Internalization, lysosomal degradation and new synthesis of surface membrane CD4 in phorbol ester-activated T-lymphocytes and U-937 cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, C M; Christensen, E I; Andresen, B S

    1992-01-01

    degradation was low in resting cells. Endocytosis and/or degradation of anti-CD4 mAb was suppressed by H7, and by inhibitors of membrane traffic (Monensin) and lysosome function (methylamine, chloroquine). Immunocytochemistry localized CD4 to the surface of unstimulated T-cells. Upon PMA stimulation...... occasional labeling was seen in endosomes but whole cell CD4 decreased dramatically. However, methylamine-treated PMA blasts showed accumulation of CD4 in lysosomes and accordingly, pulse-chase experiments in biolabeled cell cultures suggested a manifest reduction of CD4 half-life in response to PMA. Despite...... in activated cells was further evidenced by metabolic labeling and Northern blot analysis demonstrating unaltered or slightly increased CD4 protein and mRNA levels resulting from PMA. Our findings demonstrate that phorbol esters downregulate the cellular CD4 pool by endocytosis and subsequent lysosomal...

  10. Inhibitory action of sphingosine, sphinganine and dexamethasone on glucose uptake: Studies with hydrogen peroxide and phorbol ester

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murray, D.K.; Hill, M.E.; Nelson, D.H. (Univ. of Utah School of Medicine, Salt Lake City (USA))

    1990-01-01

    The mechanism of the inhibitory action of glucocorticoids on glucose uptake is incompletely understood. Treatment with corticosteriods of cells in which glucose uptake is stimulated at insulin postbinding and postreceptor sites may clarify the site of the steroid inhibitory action. Hydrogen peroxide, which has been shown to stimulate the insulin receptor tyrosine kinase, and phorbol myristate acetate (PMA) which stimulates protein kinase C were, therefore, used as stimulators of glucose transport in this study. These studies demonstrate that dexamethasone and the sphingoid bases, sphinganine and sphingosine, inhibit glucose uptake that has been stimulated at either the receptor kinase or protein kinase C level in both 3T3-L1 and 3T3-C2 cells. These data confirm glucocorticoid inhibitory action at a post binding level and support the suggestion that some corticosteriod inhibitory effects may be mediated by an action on sphingolipid metabolism.

  11. Inhibition of hormone-sensitive lipase gene expression by cAMP and phorbol esters in 3T3-F442A and BFC-1 adipocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plée-Gautier, E; Grober, J; Duplus, E; Langin, D; Forest, C

    1996-09-15

    Hormone-sensitive lipase (HSL) catalyses the rate-limiting step in adipocyte lipolysis. Short-term hormonal regulation of HSL activity is well characterized, whereas little is known about the control of HSL gene expression. We have measured HSL mRNA content of 3T3-F442A and BFC-1 adipocytes in response to the cAMP analogue 8-(4-chlorophenylthio)-cAMP (8-CPT-cAMP) and to the phorbol ester phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) by Northern blot, using a specific mouse cDNA fragment. Treatment of the cells for 12 or 6 h with, respectively, 0.5 mM 8-CPT-cAMP or 1 microM PMA produced a maximal decrease of about 60% in HSL mRNA. These effects were unaffected by the protein-synthesis inhibitor anisomycin, suggesting that cAMP and PMA actions were direct. The reduction in HSL mRNA was accompanied by a reduction in HSL total activity. The intracellular routes that cAMP and PMA follow for inducing such an effect seemed clearly independent. (i) After desensitization of the protein kinase C regulation pathway by a 24 h treatment of the cells with 1 microM PMA, PMA action was abolished whereas cAMP was still fully active. (ii) Treatment with saturating concentrations of both agents produced an additive effect. (iii) The synthetic glucocorticoid dexamethasone had no proper effect on HSL gene expression but potentiated cAMP action without affecting PMA action. cAMP inhibitory action on HSL is unexpected. Indeed, the second messenger of catecholamines is the main activator of HSL by phosphorylation. We envision that a long-term cAMP treatment of adipocytes induces a counter-regulatory process that reduces HSL content and, ultimately, limits fatty acid depletion from stored triacylglycerols.

  12. Phenotypes and phorbol ester-induced differentiation of human histiocytic lymphoma cell lines (U-937 and SU-DHL-1) and Reed-Sternberg cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, S M; Hsu, P L

    1986-02-01

    Hodgkin's mononuclear cells, Reed-Sternberg (H-RS) cells, and U-937 and SU-DHL-1 histocytic cell lines were induced to differentiate by phorbol ester in cultures. The phenotypes of cells were determined by a panel of antibodies specific for monocytes, histiocytes, and interdigitating reticulum cells. Before induction, SU-DHL-1 cells and H-RS cells expressed similar markers, such as HeFi-1, 2H9, 1A2, and 1E9. In addition, SU-DHL-1 cells were also stained by Tac and Leu M5. Other monocyte markers, including OK M1, Co Mo2, BRL Mo1, BRL Mo2, and Leu M3 were consistently negative in both types of cells. After induction, SU-DHL-1 cells conserved the same phenotype, but H-RS cells became negative for HeFi-1, 1A2, and 2H9. The U-937 cells expressed Leu M1 and Co Mo2 and became positive for Leu M5, OK M1, Co Mo2, BRL Mo2, 2H9, and 1E9 after phorbol ester induction. The U-937 cells did not express HeFi-1 or 1A2. The marker expression of H-RS cells, SU-DHL-1 cells, and U-937 cells were compared with those of histiocytes or interdigitating reticulum cells in lymphoid tissues and with neoplastic cells in true histiocytic lymphoma and malignant histiocytosis. It is concluded that SU-DHL-1, U-937, and H-RS cells are derived from or most closely related to fixed histiocytes, free histiocytes, and interdigitating reticulum cells, respectively. Our study further confirms the diagnosis of SU-DHL-1 as true histiocytic lymphoma but reveals that U-937 is a case of malignant histiocytosis rather than the previously diagnosed histiocytic lymphoma. The phenotypes and induction properties of SU-DHL-1 cells are quite different from those of U-937 cells, which suggests that true histiocytic lymphoma and malignant histiocytosis are two distinct disease entities.

  13. Deregulation of the actin cytoskeleton and macropinocytosis in response to phorbol ester by the mutant protein kinase C gamma that causes spinocerebellar ataxia type 14

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazuhiro eYamamoto

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Several missense mutations in the protein kinase Cγ (γPKC gene have been found to cause spinocerebellar ataxia type 14 (SCA14, an autosomal dominant neurodegenerative disease. γPKC is a neuron-specific member of the classical PKCs and is activated and translocated to subcellular regions as a result of various stimuli, including diacylglycerol synthesis, increased intracellular Ca2+ and phorbol esters. We investigated whether SCA14 mutations affect the γPKC-related functions by stimulating HeLa cells with TPA (12-O-tetradecanoylpholbol 13-acetate, a type of phorbol ester. Wild-type (WT γPKC-GFP was translocated to the plasma membrane within 10 min of TPA stimulation, followed by its perinuclear translocation and cell shrinkage, in a PKC kinase activity- and microtubule-dependent manner. On the other hand, although SCA14 mutant γPKC-GFP exhibited a similar translocation to the plasma membrane, the subsequent perinuclear translocation and cell shrinkage were significantly impaired in response to TPA. Translocated WT γPKC colocalized with F-actin and formed large vesicular structures in the perinuclear region. The uptake of FITC-dextran, a marker of macropinocytosis, was promoted by TPA stimulation in cells expressing WT γPKC, and FITC-dextran was surrounded by γPKC-positive vesicles. Moreover, TPA induced the phosphorylation of MARCKS, which is a membrane-substrate of PKC, resulting in the translocation of phosphorylated MARCKS to the perinuclear region, suggesting that TPA induces macropinocytosis via γPKC activation. However, TPA failed to activate macropinocytosis and trigger the translocation of phosphorylated MARCKS in cells expressing the SCA14 mutant γPKC. These findings suggest that γPKC is involved in the regulation of the actin cytoskeleton and macropinocytosis in HeLa cells, while SCA14 mutant γPKC fails to regulate these processes due to its reduced kinase activity at the plasma membrane. This property might be involved in

  14. Differential regulation of vitamin D receptor expression in distinct leukemic cell lines upon phorbol ester-induced growth arrest

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Folgueira M.A.A.K.

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available A close correlation between vitamin D receptor (VDR abundance and cell proliferation rate has been shown in NIH-3T3 fibroblasts, MCF-7 breast cancer and in HL-60 myeloblastic cells. We have now determined if this association occurs in other leukemic cell lines, U937 and K562, and if VDR content is related to c-myc expression, which is also linked to cell growth state. Upon phorbol myristate acetate (PMA treatment, cells from the three lineages (HL-60, U937 and K562 differentiated and expressed specific surface antigens. All cell lines analyzed were growth inhibited by PMA and the doubling time was increased, mainly due to an increased fraction of cells in the G0/G1 phase, as determined by flow cytometry measurements of incorporated bromodeoxyuridine and cell DNA content. C-myc mRNA expression was down-regulated and closely correlated to cell growth arrest. However, VDR expression in leukemic cell lines, as determined by immunofluorescence and Northern blot assays, was not consistently changed upon inhibition of cell proliferation since VDR levels were down-regulated only in HL-60 cells. Our data suggest that VDR expression cannot be explained simply as a reflection of the leukemic cell growth state.

  15. 1,25-dihydroxycholecalciferol-induced differentiation of myelomonocytic leukemic cells unresponsive to colony stimulating factors and phorbol esters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bettens, F.; Schlick, E.; Farrar, W.; Ruscetti, F.

    1986-12-01

    The murine myelomonocytic leukemia cell line WEHI-3B D/sup +/, which differentiates in response to granulocyte colony stimulating factor (G-CSF), can also be induced to differentiate into monocyte-macrophages by phorbol myristate acetate (PMA) treatment, whereas the WEHI-3B D/sup -/ subline, which is unresponsive to G-CSF and PMA, can be induced to differentiate to granulocytes as well as monocytes by 1,25-dihydroxycholecalciferol (1,25-(OH)/sub 2/ D3), the biologically active metabolite of vitamin D3. A newly developed variant of the WEHI-3B D/sup +/ line, named WEHI-3B D/sup +/G, which was responsive to G-CSF but not to PMA, was also differentiated to granulocytes by 1,25-(OH)/sub 2/ D3. Although vitamin D3 has been reported to induce macrophage differentiation in responsive tumor cells, this is the first demonstration that 1,25-(OH)/sub 2/ D3 can induce granulocyte differentiation. In both differentiation pathways, cessation of cellular proliferation accompanies changes in morphologic and cytochemical properties of the cells. This suggests that leukemic cell lines unresponsive to differentiation agents acting at the cell surface retain their ability to differentiate in response to agents that do not act via the plasma membrane such as 1,25-(OH)/sub 2/ D3, which has cytosolic/nuclear receptors. These results suggest that low doses of 1,25-(OH)/sub 2/ D3 may be useful in combination with hemopoietic growth factors (CSFs) as therapeutic agent to induce leukemic cell differentiation in vivo.

  16. Comparative study of vanadate- and phorbol ester-induced cyclo-oxygenase-2 expression in human endothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirai, K; Ezumi, Y; Nishida, E; Uchiyama, T; Takayama, H

    1999-11-01

    Our previous study showed that vanadate, an inhibitor of protein tyrosine phosphatases, induced the expression of cyclo-oxygenase (COX)-2 in a protein-tyrosine-kinase (PTK)-dependent manner in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC). Here, we further compared the actions of vanadate and phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA), an activator of protein kinase C (PKC), on induction of COX-2 with special reference to mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) in HUVEC. Vanadate induced activation of three families of MAPKs, extracellular signal-regulated kinases 1 and 2 (ERK1/2), p38, and c-Jun amino-terminal kinase (JNK) 1, while activation of ERK 1/2 alone was induced by PMA. The former activation by vanadate and the latter one by PMA were inhibited by tyrphostin-47, an inhibitor of PTKs, and by Ro31-8220, a PKC inhibitor, respectively. Either tyrphostin-47, PD98059, a specific inhibitor of the upstream kinase toward ERK1/2, or SB203580, a specific inhibitor of p38, completely suppressed vanadate-induction of COX-2 mRNA and protein. On the other hand, PMA-induction of COX-2 mRNA and protein was abolished by Ro31-8220 or PD98059 but not by SB203580. These data indicate that PMA-induced and PKC-dependent expression of COX-2 requires mainly activation of ERK 1/2 among MAPKs, while activation of both ERK1/2 and p38 or possibly of all three families of MAPKs is necessary for vanadate-induced and PTK-dependent expression of COX-2.

  17. Differential regulation by phorbol ester of formyl-methionyl peptide and leukotriene B sub 4 receptors on human neutrophils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goldman, D.W.; Chung, S.; Richards, S. (John Hopkins Univ., Baltimore, MD (United States))

    1991-03-15

    Activation of protein kinase C (PKC) with suboptimal does of phorbol myristyl acetate (PMA) will increase fMP receptor expression with parallel potentiation of superoxide generation. PMA-induced changes in leukotriene B{sub 4} (LTB{sub 4}) receptor expression were assessed in parallel with fMP receptor expression to determine if these two independent receptor classes are regulated in a similar manner by PKC. The relative density of fMP receptors was assessed by flow cytometry. The relative density of receptors for LTB{sub 4} was quantitated by incubating 2 {times} 10{sup 6} Ns with 10nM({sup 3}H)-LTB{sub 4} and determining the amount of radioactivity bound after filtration on glass fiber filters. Incubation of N with 10ng/mL PMA induced a 3.2-fold increase in fMP receptor expression by 5 min which was sustained for up to 15 min. In contrast, LTB{sub 4} receptor density decreased by 36% within 5 min. in response to 10 ng/mL PMA. Staurosporine, a potent antagonist of PKC, had no effect of fMP receptor expression but markedly enhanced LTB{sub 4} receptor expression by 1.7-fold at 200nM. PKC acts to decrease the surface expression of LTB{sub 4} receptors in contrast to the enhancement of fMP receptor expression, suggesting in contrast to the enhancement of fMP receptor expression, suggesting that potentiation of N function by PMA may be stimulus-specific.

  18. Production and Optimization of Oleic Acid Ethyl Ester Synthesis Using Lipase From Rice Bran (Oryza sativa L. and Germinated Jatropha Seeds (Jatropha curcas L. by Response Surface Methodology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Indro Prastowo

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Normal 0 false false false MicrosoftInternetExplorer4 Recently, the fatty acid ethyl ester has been synthesized in place of fatty acid methyl ester since ethanol has been more renewable. In this research, oleic acid ethyl ester (OAEE was synthesized using germinated jatropha seeds (Jatropha curcas.L and rice bran (Oryza sativa as source of lipase. The objective of the research was to optimize the synthesis conditions using Response Surface Methodology. Factors, such as crude enzyme concentration, molar ratio of oleic acid to ethanol, and the reaction time, were evaluated. The results show that lipase from germinated jatropha seeds had the hydrolitic and esterifi cation activity about 6.73 U/g and 298.07 U/g, respectively. Lipase from rice bran had the hydrolitic and esterifi cation activity about 10.57 U/g and 324.03 U/g, respectively. The optimum conditions of esterifi cation reaction using germinated jatropha seed lipase as biocatalyst were crude enzyme concentration of 0.31 g/ml, molar ratio of oleic acid to ethanol of 1 : 1.81, and reaction time of 50.9 min. The optimum conditions of esterifi cation reaction using rice bran lipase were crude enzyme concentration of 0.29 g/ml, molar ratio of oleic acid to ethanol of 1 : 2.05, and reaction time of 58.61 min. The obtained amounts of OAEE were 810.77 μmole and 626.92 μmole for lipases from rice bran and germinated jatropha seed, respectively. /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Table Normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0cm 5.4pt 0cm 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0cm; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:10.0pt; font-family:"Times New Roman"; mso-fareast-font-family:"Times New Roman"; mso-ansi-language:#0400; mso-fareast-language:#0400; mso-bidi-language:#0400;}

  19. Assessment of Jatropha curcas L. biodiesel seed cake toxicity using the zebrafish (Danio rerio) embryo toxicity (ZFET) test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hallare, Arnold V; Ruiz, Paulo Lorenzo S; Cariño, J C Earl D

    2014-05-01

    Consequent to the growing demand for alternative sources of energy, the seeds from Jatropha curcas remain to be the favorite for biodiesel production. However, a significant volume of the residual organic mass (seed cake) is produced during the extraction process, which raises concerns on safe waste disposal. In the present study, we assessed the toxicity of J. curcas seed cake using the zebrafish (Danio rerio) embryotoxicity test. Within 1-h post-fertilization (hpf), the fertilized eggs were exposed to five mass concentrations of J. curcas seed cake and were followed through 24, 48, and 72 hpf. Toxicity was evaluated based on lethal endpoints induced on zebrafish embryos namely egg coagulation, non-formation of somites, and non-detachment of tail. The lowest concentration tested, 1 g/L, was not able to elicit toxicity on embryos whereas 100 % mortality (based also on lethal endpoints) was recorded at the highest concentration at 2.15 g/L. The computed LC50 for the J. curcas seed cake was 1.61 g/L. No further increase in mortality was observed in the succeeding time points (48 and 72 hpf) indicating that J. curcas seed cake exerted acute toxicity on zebrafish embryos. Sublethal endpoints (yolk sac and pericardial edema) were noted at 72 hpf in zebrafish embryos exposed to higher concentrations. The observed lethal endpoints induced on zebrafish embryos were discussed in relation to the active principles, notably, phorbol esters that have remained in the seed cake even after extraction.

  20. Bryostatin 1 inhibits phorbol ester-induced apoptosis in prostate cancer cells by differentially modulating protein kinase C (PKC) delta translocation and preventing PKCdelta-mediated release of tumor necrosis factor-alpha.

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Burstin, Vivian A; Xiao, Liqing; Kazanietz, Marcelo G

    2010-09-01

    Bryostatin 1, a macrocyclic lactone that has been widely characterized as an ultrapotent protein kinase C (PKC) activator, displays marked pharmacological differences with the typical phorbol ester tumor promoters. Bryostatin 1 impairs phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA)-induced tumor promotion in mice and is in clinical trials as an anticancer agent for a number of hematopoietic malignancies and solid tumors. In this study, we characterized the effect of bryostatin 1 on LNCaP prostate cancer cells, a cellular model in which PKC isozymes play important roles in the control of growth and survival. Although phorbol esters promote a strong apoptotic response in LNCaP cells via PKCdelta-mediated release of TNFalpha, bryostatin 1 failed to trigger a death effect even at high concentrations, and it prevented PMA-induced apoptosis in these cells. Mechanistic analysis revealed that bryostatin 1 is unable to induce TNFalpha release, and it impairs the secretion of this cytokine from LNCaP cells in response to PMA. Unlike PMA, bryostatin 1 failed to promote the translocation of PKCdelta to the plasma membrane. Moreover, bryostatin 1 prevented PMA-induced PKCdelta peripheral translocation. Studies using a membrane-targeted PKCdelta construct revealed that the peripheral localization of the kinase is a requisite for triggering apoptosis in LNCaP cells, arguing that mislocalization of PKCdelta may explain the actions of bryostatin 1. The identification of an antiapoptotic effect of bryostatin 1 may have significant relevance in the context of its therapeutic efficacy.

  1. Bryostatin 1 Inhibits Phorbol Ester-Induced Apoptosis in Prostate Cancer Cells by Differentially Modulating Protein Kinase C (PKC) δ Translocation and Preventing PKCδ-Mediated Release of Tumor Necrosis Factor-α

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Burstin, Vivian A.; Xiao, Liqing

    2010-01-01

    Bryostatin 1, a macrocyclic lactone that has been widely characterized as an ultrapotent protein kinase C (PKC) activator, displays marked pharmacological differences with the typical phorbol ester tumor promoters. Bryostatin 1 impairs phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA)-induced tumor promotion in mice and is in clinical trials as an anticancer agent for a number of hematopoietic malignancies and solid tumors. In this study, we characterized the effect of bryostatin 1 on LNCaP prostate cancer cells, a cellular model in which PKC isozymes play important roles in the control of growth and survival. Although phorbol esters promote a strong apoptotic response in LNCaP cells via PKCδ-mediated release of TNFα, bryostatin 1 failed to trigger a death effect even at high concentrations, and it prevented PMA-induced apoptosis in these cells. Mechanistic analysis revealed that bryostatin 1 is unable to induce TNFα release, and it impairs the secretion of this cytokine from LNCaP cells in response to PMA. Unlike PMA, bryostatin 1 failed to promote the translocation of PKCδ to the plasma membrane. Moreover, bryostatin 1 prevented PMA-induced PKCδ peripheral translocation. Studies using a membrane-targeted PKCδ construct revealed that the peripheral localization of the kinase is a requisite for triggering apoptosis in LNCaP cells, arguing that mislocalization of PKCδ may explain the actions of bryostatin 1. The identification of an antiapoptotic effect of bryostatin 1 may have significant relevance in the context of its therapeutic efficacy. PMID:20516369

  2. Effect of biodiesel production parameters on viscosity and yield of methyl esters: Jatropha curcas, Elaeis guineensis and Cocos nucifera

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Godwin Kafui Ayetor

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available In this study, the effect of H2SO4 on viscosity of methyl esters from Jatropha oil (JCME, palm kernel oil (PKOME from Elaeis guineensis species, and coconut oil (COME has been studied. Effect of methanol to oil molar mass ratio on yield of the three feedstocks has also been studied. Methyl ester yield was decreased by esterification process using sulphuric acid anhydrous (H2SO4. Jatropha methyl ester experienced a viscosity reduction of 24% (4.1–3.1 mm2/s with the addition of 1% sulphuric acid. In this work palm kernel oil (PKOME, coconut oil (COME and Jatropha oil (JCME were used as feedstocks for the production of biodiesel to investigate optimum parameters to obtain high yield. For each of the feedstock, the biodiesel yield increased with increase in NaOH concentration. The highest yield was obtained with 1% NaOH concentration for all. The effect of methanol in the range of 4:1–8:1 (molar ratio was investigated, keeping other process parameters fixed. Optimum ratios of palm kernel oil and coconut oil biodiesels yielded 98% each at methanol:oil molar ratio of 8:1. The physiochemical properties obtained for each methyl showed superior properties compared with those reported in published data.

  3. Topical application of a platelet activating factor receptor agonist suppresses phorbol ester-induced acute and chronic inflammation and has cancer chemopreventive activity in mouse skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahu, Ravi P; Rezania, Samin; Ocana, Jesus A; DaSilva-Arnold, Sonia C; Bradish, Joshua R; Richey, Justin D; Warren, Simon J; Rashid, Badri; Travers, Jeffrey B; Konger, Raymond L

    2014-01-01

    Platelet activating factor (PAF) has long been associated with acute edema and inflammatory responses. PAF acts by binding to a specific G-protein coupled receptor (PAF-R, Ptafr). However, the role of chronic PAF-R activation on sustained inflammatory responses has been largely ignored. We recently demonstrated that mice lacking the PAF-R (Ptafr-/- mice) exhibit increased cutaneous tumorigenesis in response to a two-stage chemical carcinogenesis protocol. Ptafr-/- mice also exhibited increased chronic inflammation in response to phorbol ester application. In this present study, we demonstrate that topical application of the non-hydrolysable PAF mimetic (carbamoyl-PAF (CPAF)), exerts a potent, dose-dependent, and short-lived edema response in WT mice, but not Ptafr -/- mice or mice deficient in c-Kit (c-KitW-sh/W-sh mice). Using an ear inflammation model, co-administration of topical CPAF treatment resulted in a paradoxical decrease in both acute ear thickness changes associated with a single PMA application, as well as the sustained inflammation associated with chronic repetitive PMA applications. Moreover, mice treated topically with CPAF also exhibited a significant reduction in chemical carcinogenesis. The ability of CPAF to suppress acute and chronic inflammatory changes in response to PMA application(s) was PAF-R dependent, as CPAF had no effect on basal or PMA-induced inflammation in Ptafr-/- mice. Moreover, c-Kit appears to be necessary for the anti-inflammatory effects of CPAF, as CPAF had no observable effect in c-KitW-sh/W-sh mice. These data provide additional evidence that PAF-R activation exerts complex immunomodulatory effects in a model of chronic inflammation that is relevant to neoplastic development.

  4. Involvement of the antioxidative property of morusin in blocking phorbol ester-induced malignant transformation of JB6 P(+) mouse epidermal cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Pai-Shan; Hu, Chao-Chin; Wang, Chau-Jong; Lee, Yean-Jang; Chung, Wei-Chia; Tseng, Tsui-Hwa

    2017-02-25

    Chemoprevention has been acknowledged as an important and practical strategy for managing cancer. We have previously synthesized morusin, a prenylated flavonoid that exhibits anti-cancer progression activity. In the present study, we evaluated the anti-cancer promotion potential of morusin by using the mouse epidermal JB6 P(+) cell model. Extensive evidence shows that tumor promotion by phorbol esters is due to the stimulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Therefore, the effect of morusin on 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA)-induced ROS production was assessed. Noncytotoxic concentrations of morusin were found to dose-dependently reduce TPA-induced ROS production. Moreover, morusin inhibited TPA-induced activator protein-1 (AP-1) and nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) activation, which can mediate cell proliferation and malignant transformation. Furthermore, morusin inhibited the TPA upregulation of cyclooxygenase 2 (COX-2), which may be regulated by AP-1 and NF-κB. In addition, noncytotoxic concentrations of morusin reduced the TPA-promoted cell growth of JB6 P(+) cells and inhibited TPA-induced malignant properties, such as cytoskeletal rearrangement and cell migration of JB6 P(+) cells. Similar to the effects of glutathione (GSH) pretreatment, morusin inhibited TPA-induced expression of N-cadeherin and vimentin, which are malignant cell surface proteins. Finally, morusin treatment dose-dependently suppressed the TPA-induced anchorage-independent cell transformation of JB6 P(+) cells. In conclusion, our results evidence that morusin possesses anti-cancer promotion potential because of its antioxidant property, which mediates multiple transformation-associated gene expression.

  5. Phorbol ester-treated human acute myeloid leukemia cells secrete G-CSF, GM-CSF and erythroid differentiation factor into serum-free media in primary culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scher, W; Eto, Y; Ejima, D; Den, T; Svet-Moldavsky, I A

    1990-12-10

    Upon treatment with the phorbol ester, tetradecanoylphorbol 13-acetate (PMA), peripheral mononuclear blood cells from patients with acute myeloid leukemia secrete into serum-free cell-conditioned media (PMA-CCM) at least three distinct nondialysable 'hematopoietic' factors: granulocyte-colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF), granulocyte/macrophage-colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) and erythroid differentiation factor (EDF, activin A). G-CSF was identified by its stimulation of [3H]thymidine incorporation into a G-CSF-responsive cell line, NSF-60, and the inhibition of its stimulation by a G-CSF-specific monoclonal antibody (MAB). GM-CSF was identified by its stimulation of [3H]thymidine incorporation into a GM-CSF-responsive line, TALL-101, and the inhibition of its stimulation by a GM-CSF-specific MAB. EDF was identified by its ability to stimulate erythroid differentiation in mouse erythroleukemia cell lines, its identical retention times to those of authentic EDF on three successive reverse-phase HPLC columns and characterization of its penultimate N-terminal residue as leucine which is the same as that of authentic EDF. Both authentic EDF and the erythroid-stimulating activity in PMA-CCM were found to act synergistically with a suboptimal inducing concentration of a well-studied inducing agent, dimethyl sulfoxide, in inducing erythroid differentiation. In addition, a fourth activity was observed in PMA-CCM: normal human fetal bone marrow cell-proliferation stimulating activity (FBMC-PSA). FBMC-PSA was identified by its ability to stimulate the growth of granulocytes and macrophages in FBMC suspension cultures, which neither recombinant G-CSF or GM-CSF were found to do.

  6. Thymoquinone inhibits phorbol ester-induced activation of NF-κB and expression of COX-2, and induces expression of cytoprotective enzymes in mouse skin in vivo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kundu, Joydeb Kumar [College of Pharmacy, Keimyung University, Daegu 704-701 (Korea, Republic of); Liu, Lijia; Shin, Jun-Wan [Tumor Microenvironment Global Core Research Center, College of Pharmacy, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-742 (Korea, Republic of); Surh, Young-Joon, E-mail: surh@plaza.snu.ac.kr [Tumor Microenvironment Global Core Research Center, College of Pharmacy, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-742 (Korea, Republic of); Cancer Research Institute, Seoul National University, Seoul 110-799 (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-09-06

    Highlights: •Thymoquinone inhibits phorbol ester-induced COX-2 expression in mouse skin. •Thymoquinone attenuates phosphorylation of IκBα and DNA binding of NF-κB in mouse skin. •Thymoquinone inhibits phosphorylation of p38 MAP kinase, JNK and Akt in mouse skin. •Thymoquinone induces the expression of cytoprotective proteins in mouse skin. -- Abstract: Thymoquinone (TQ), the active ingredient of Nigella sativa, has been reported to possess anti-inflammatory and chemopreventive properties. The present study was aimed at elucidating the molecular mechanisms of anti-inflammatory and antioxidative activities of thymoquinone in mouse skin. Pretreatment of female HR-1 hairless mouse skin with TQ attenuated 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA)-induced expression of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2). TQ diminished nuclear translocation and the DNA binding of nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-κB) via the blockade of phosphorylation and subsequent degradation of IκBα in TPA-treated mouse skin. Pretreatment with TQ attenuated the phosphorylation of Akt, c-Jun-N-terminal kinase and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase, but not that of extracellular signal-regulated kinase-1/2. Moreover, topical application of TQ induced the expression of heme oxygenase-1, NAD(P)H-quinoneoxidoreductase-1, glutathione-S-transferase and glutamate cysteine ligase in mouse skin. Taken together, the inhibitory effects of TQ on TPA-induced COX-2 expression and NF-κB activation, and its ability to induce the expression of cytoprotective proteins provide a mechanistic basis of anti-inflammatory and antioxidative effects of TQ in hairless mouse skin.

  7. Stimulation of hepatic glycogenolysis by phorbol-12-myristate-13-acetate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Patel, T.B.

    1986-05-01

    In isolated perfused rat livers, infusion of phorbol-12-myristate-13-acetate (150 nM) resulted in a three-fold stimulation of the rate of glucose production. This response was maximal at perfusate phorbol ester concentration of 150 nM, and was significantly diminished at higher concentrations of the phorbol ester (e.g. 300 nM). Stimulation of glycogenolysis by phorbol ester was greatly decreased in livers perfused infusion into livers perfused with calcium-free medium. Phorbol-12-myristate-13-acetate infusion into livers perfused in the absence of calcium did not result in calcium efflux from the livers. Additionally, in hepatocytes isolated from livers of fed rats neither the phorbol ester nor 1-oleoyl-2-acetyl-rac-glycerol, stimulated the rate of glucose production. This last result along with the observations that in isolated perfused rat livers, phorbol-12-myristate-13-acetate increases portal pressure, and decreases oxygen consumption suggests that stimulation of hepatic glycogenolysis by phorbol ester is the result of increased vasoconstriction, and is not a consequence of a direct effect of the phorbol ester on liver parenchymal cells.

  8. Involvement of CD11b integrin in the alteration of metabolic factors after phorbol ester stimulation of human myeloid leukemia cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mandel Katharina

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Previous work has demonstrated that phorbol ester (TPA-induced adherence of human U937 myeloid leukemia cells can be blocked upon down-modulation of the β2-integrin CD11b after stable transfection of U937 cells with a pMTH1 vector-containing the CD11b gene in antisense orientation (asCD11b-U937 [Otte et al., (2011]. In the present study, alterations in metabolism-associated factors, particularly intra- and extracellular proteases were investigated. A measurement of telomerase activity in the leukemic cells revealed continuously decreasing telomere adducts within 72 h of TPA treatment in pMTH1-U937 cells. In contrast, telomerase activity sustained in asCD11b-U937 upon TPA-induced differentiation. Flow cytometric analysis confirmed unchanged CD11b levels in TPA-induced asCD11b-U937 in contrast to elevated levels in pMTH1-U937 whereby the expression of other β2-integrins including CD11a, CD11c and CD18 was increased in both populations after TPA treatment. Moreover, adherent pMTH1-U937 demonstrated the expression of monocytic differentiation markers including F4-80 and CD14 and an increased MIP-1α production which remained at low or undetectable in TPA-induced asCD11b-U937. These effects indicated an altered response of the different cell populations to the TPA-induced differentiation process. Indeed, Western blot analysis revealed differences in the expression levels of intracellular metabolic factors including MnSOD and p97/VCP and after measurement of 20 S proteasomal proteolytic activity. In addition, increased levels of extracellular metabolic factors including the matrix metalloproteinases MMP-1, MMP-7 and MMP-9 were observed in pMTH1-U937 cells in contrast to unaltered levels in asCD11b-U937 cells.

  9. Evaluation of physicochemical properties of Jatropha curcas seeds from four different agro-climatic areas of Ghana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.K. Chikpah

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Jatropha curcas is a drought resistant multipurpose small shrub/tree with significant economic importance because of its several potential agricultural, industrial and medicinal uses. The study was conducted to provide quantitative data on the physical and chemical properties of seeds and kernels of Jatropha curcas grown locally in four different agro-climatic areas of Ghana (1. Nyankpala, Northern Region, 2. Dambai, Volta Region, 3. WA, Upper West Region, 4. Techiman, Brong Ahafo Region, that differ in agro-climatic conditions. The average seed weight was between 0.65 – 0.73 g and average kernel and shell weights ranged between (0.41- 0.45 g and (0.24 – 0.28 g respectively. The kernel forms larger proportion of the seed and the percentage kernel weight of whole seed was highest in seeds obtained from Nyankpala, sample 1 (62.74 % and lower in seeds from WA, sample 3 (61.19 %. The seeds have dry matter content of (93.13 – 94.18 %, crude protein (18.21 -19.97 %, lipid (36.52-38.64 %, carbohydrate (14.70 – 16.64 %, crude fibre (14.14 – 19.04 % and total ash (5.03 – 5.71 %. The kernels of Jatropha samples were very rich in lipid (55.51 – 56.83 % that did not vary significantly (p > 0.05 among the four samples. The kernels also contained high crude protein that varied between (23.08 – 25.88 %. Crude fibre was low in the kernels (3.68 – 5.52 %. The seeds and kernels of Jatropha curcas samples also contained varying amounts of antinutrients such as crude phorbol ester, phytic acid and tannins. Crude phorbol ester concentrations in the seed samples are sample 1(5.35 mg/g, sample 2 (6.20 mg/g, sample 3(5.30 mg/g and sample 4(6.82 mg/g. However, the concentration of crude phorbol ester in the kernels (1K, 2K, 3K, and 4K ranged between (5.0 – 6.45 mg/g. The phytic acid content (% dry matter in seeds and kernels were between the range (8.71 -10.15 % and (7.88-9.50 % respectively. Tannins content in the kernel was low (0.05 – 0

  10. The effects of phorbol ester activation and reactive oxygen species scavengers on the macrophage-mediated foreign body reaction to polyurethanes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McBane, Joanne E; Matheson, Loren A; Santerre, J Paul; Labow, Rosalind S

    2009-12-15

    Phorbol myristate acetate, a protein kinase C activator, inhibited monocyte-derived macrophage (MDM)-mediated degradation of aliphatic (HDI) polycarbonate-based polyurethanes but not degradation of the aromatic polycarbonate-based polyurethane (MDI). The objectives of this study were to determine if reactive oxygen species are involved in the phorbol myristate acetate effect on esterase activity and MDM-mediated polycarbonate-based polyurethane degradation and to find a good marker of material-initiated activation of MDM. The phorbol myristate acetate-dependent effects of the material chemistry on cell activation and degradation were evaluated by adding reactive oxygen species scavengers, catalase plus superoxide dismutase to MDM and assaying possible markers of MDM activation: esterase activity, acid phosphatase activity, and high molecular weight group box 1 protein (HMGB1). All treatments reduced the esterase activity in MDM on HDI but not in MDM on MDI. Acid phosphatase was inhibited in MDM to varying degrees on all surfaces by phorbol myristate acetate or catalase plus superoxide dismutase either alone or together. Secretion of HMGB1 from MDM on HDI431 was higher than MDI; however only secretion from MDM on HDI was inhibited by phorbol myristate acetate. In MDM on HDI, catalase plus superoxide dismutase reduced intracellular HMGB1 levels +/- phorbol myristate acetate; whereas, catalase, superoxide dismutase plus phorbol myristate acetate increased intracellular HMGB1 in MDM on MDI, suggesting that esterase and HMGB1 are more specific markers of activation than acid phosphatase. Manipulation of signaling pathways may provide insight surrounding the mechanism of activation for oxidative and/or hydrolytic degradative pathways in the MDM response to material surface chemistry.

  11. Combustion and Emission Characteristics of Variable Compression Ignition Engine Fueled with Jatropha curcas Ethyl Ester Blends at Different Compression Ratio

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajneesh Kumar

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Engine performance and emission characteristics of unmodified biodiesel fueled diesel engines are highly influenced by their ignition and combustion behavior. In this study, emission and combustion characteristics were studied when the engine operated using the different blends (B10, B20, B30, and B40 and normal diesel fuel (B0 as well as when varying the compression ratio from 16.5 : 1 to 17.5 : 1 to 18.5 : 1. The change of compression ratio from 16.5 : 1 to 18.5 : 1 resulted in 27.1%, 27.29%, 26.38%, 28.48%, and 34.68% increase in cylinder pressure for the blends B0, B10, B20, B30, and B40, respectively, at 75% of rated load conditions. Higher peak heat release rate increased by 23.19%, 14.03%, 26.32%, 21.87%, and 25.53% for the blends B0, B10, B20, B30, and B40, respectively, at 75% of rated load conditions, when compression ratio was increased from16.5 : 1 to 18.5 : 1. The delay period decreased by 21.26%, CO emission reduced by 14.28%, and NOx emission increased by 22.84% for B40 blends at 75% of rated load conditions, when compression ratio was increased from 16.5 : 1 to 18.5 : 1. It is concluded that Jatropha oil ester can be used as fuel in diesel engine by blending it with diesel fuel.

  12. Co-composting of physic nut (Jatropha curcas) deoiled cake with rice straw and different animal dung.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Manab; Uppal, H S; Singh, Reena; Beri, Shanuja; Mohan, K S; Gupta, Vikas C; Adholeya, Alok

    2011-06-01

    To address the dispensing of this growing volume, a study on utilization of jatropha (Jatropha curcas) deoiled cake through compost production was carried out. The deoiled cake was composted with rice straw, four different animal dung (cow dung, buffalo dung, horse dung and goat dung) and hen droppings in different proportions followed by assessment, and comparison of biochemical characteristics among finished composts. Nutrient content in finished compost was within the desired level whereas metals such as copper, lead and nickel were much below the maximum allowable concentrations. Although a few finished material contained phorbol ester (0.12 mg/g), but it was far below the original level found in the deoiled cake. Such a study indicates that a huge volume of jatropha deoiled cake can be eliminated through composting.

  13. Number of Hydroxyl Groups on the B-Ring of Flavonoids Affects Their Antioxidant Activity and Interaction with Phorbol Ester Binding Site of PKCδ C1B Domain: In Vitro and in Silico Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kongpichitchoke, Teeradate; Hsu, Jue-Liang; Huang, Tzou-Chi

    2015-05-13

    Although flavonoids have been reported for their benefits and nutraceutical potential use, the importance of their structure on their beneficial effects, especially on signal transduction mechanisms, has not been well clarified. In this study, three flavonoids, pinocembrin, naringenin, and eriodictyol, were chosen to determine the effect of hydroxyl groups on the B-ring of flavonoid structure on their antioxidant activity. In vitro assays, including DPPH scavenging activity, ROS quantification by flow cytometer, and proteins immunoblotting, and in silico analysis by molecular docking between the flavonoids and C1B domain of PKCδ phorbol ester binding site were both used to complete this study. Eriodictyol (10 μM), containing two hydroxyl groups on the B-ring, exhibited significantly higher (p groups on its B-ring, which consequently contributed to greater antioxidant activity over pinocembrin and naringenin.

  14. The preparation and characterization of a novel biodiesel named curcas oil diethylene glycol ether ester%一种含醚新型生物柴油的制备与表征

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    蒋大勇

    2012-01-01

    以精制麻风树油、甲醇和二乙二醇甲醚为反应物,以KOH为催化剂,制备出一种高含氧量的新型生物柴油——麻风树油二乙二醇甲醚酯.通过正交试验,确定了其最佳合成条件是醇油物质的量比为6∶1,催化剂用量为原料油质量的1.2%,反应温度为65℃,反应时间为30 min.通过FT-IR和1H-NMR分析并验证了产物的分子结构,测试了该生物柴油及其与0#柴油混合的燃料理化性质,包括油溶性、烟点、运动粘度、凝点、闭杯闪点;在相同测试条件下,比较其与伊柴油、麻风树油甲酯的碳烟排放情况.结果表明,麻风树油二乙二醇甲醚酯具有较高的含氧量,其理化性能和排放性能良好,既可以作为柴油添加剂,也可以代替柴油单独进行使用,具有一定的推广应用价值.%In this paper, a novel biodiesel named curcas oil diethylene glycol ether esters (GDGEE) with higher oxygen content was prepared by refined curcas oil, methanol and ethylene glycol monomethyl ether as the reaction and KOH as catalyst., The optimum synthesis conditions were determined by orthogonal test. The molar ratio of methanol to oil was 6:1, catalyst amount was 1.2% of feedstock quality, reaction temperature was 65 ℃, reaction time was 30 minutes. FT-IR and IH-NMR were used to analysis and validate the molecular structure of curcas oil diethylene glycol ether esters. The physical and chemical properties of GDGEE and its blends with 0# diesel oil were tested by the national standard method. The physical and chemical properties include oil soluble, smoke point, kinematic viscosity, freezing point and closed flash point. At last, smoke emission were test among GDGEE, curcas oil methyl and 0# diesel in the same diesel engine. The results confirm that GDGEE owns the higher oxygen content, good physochemical and emission properties, which can be used as diesel fuel additives or also be used instead of diesel fuel alone. A certain application

  15. System-wide analysis of the transcriptional network of human myelomonocytic leukemia cells predicts attractor structure and phorbol-ester-induced differentiation and dedifferentiation transitions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakata, Katsumi; Ohyanagi, Hajime; Sato, Shinji; Nobori, Hiroya; Hayashi, Akiko; Ishii, Hideshi; Daub, Carsten O.; Kawai, Jun; Suzuki, Harukazu; Saito, Toshiyuki

    2015-02-01

    We present a system-wide transcriptional network structure that controls cell types in the context of expression pattern transitions that correspond to cell type transitions. Co-expression based analyses uncovered a system-wide, ladder-like transcription factor cluster structure composed of nearly 1,600 transcription factors in a human transcriptional network. Computer simulations based on a transcriptional regulatory model deduced from the system-wide, ladder-like transcription factor cluster structure reproduced expression pattern transitions when human THP-1 myelomonocytic leukaemia cells cease proliferation and differentiate under phorbol myristate acetate stimulation. The behaviour of MYC, a reprogramming Yamanaka factor that was suggested to be essential for induced pluripotent stem cells during dedifferentiation, could be interpreted based on the transcriptional regulation predicted by the system-wide, ladder-like transcription factor cluster structure. This study introduces a novel system-wide structure to transcriptional networks that provides new insights into network topology.

  16. Fluorescent redox dyes. 1. Production of fluorescent formazan by unstimulated and phorbol ester- or digitonin-stimulated Ehrlich ascites tumor cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stellmach, J

    1984-01-01

    The reduction of a new series of tetrazolium salts to red fluorescent formazans by Ehrlich ascites tumor cells is described. The qualitative effect on this reaction of two cell surface-active compounds and of six exogenous electron carriers was investigated by varying the incubation conditions. After incubation of Ehrlich ascites cells with the new colourless, water soluble 5-cyan-2.3-ditolyltetrazolium salts, bright red water-insoluble formazan crystals on the cell surface can be observed under fluorescence microscopy. The production of formazan is enhanced by 12-0-tetradecanoyl-phorbol-13-acetate (TPA) or digitonin (DIG), two potent stimulators of oxygen consumption or by the electron carriers phenazine methosulphate (PMS), 1-methoxy-phenazine methosulphate (MPMS), meldola blue (MB), methylene blue (MTB), and 2.6-dichlorindophenol (DCIP). These results provide further evidence for the existence of redox enzymes bound to the plasma membrane of intact ascites cells and for a free radical mechanism of tetrazolium salt reduction. The fluorescence property of the new redox dyes offers the advantage of high sensitivity. Moreover, their greater homogeneity relative to the commonly used di-tetrazolium salts lowers the chances of misinterpretations due to impurities. The possible application of these new mono-tetrazolium salts to cytochemical investigations of oxidative metabolic reactions is discussed.

  17. Synthesis of fatty acid methyl ester from crude jatropha (Jatropha curcas Linnaeus) oil using aluminium oxide modified Mg-Zn heterogeneous catalyst.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olutoye, M A; Hameed, B H

    2011-06-01

    The synthesis of fatty acid methyl esters (FAME) as a substitute to petroleum diesel was investigated in this study from crude jatropha oil (CJO), a non-edible, low-cost alternative feedstock, using aluminium modified heterogeneous basic oxide (Mg-Zn) catalyst. The transesterification reaction with methanol to methyl esters yielded 94% in 6h with methanol-oil ratio of 11:1, catalyst loading of 8.68 wt.% at 182°C and the properties of CJO fuel produced were determine and found to be comparable to the standards according to ASTM. In the range of experimental parameters investigated, it showed that the catalyst is selective to production of methyl esters from oil with high free fatty acid (FFA) and water content of 7.23% and 3.28%, respectively in a single stage process. Thus, jatropha oil is a promising feedstock for methyl ester production and large scale cultivation will help to reduce the product cost.

  18. Differential effects of histone deacetylase inhibitors on phorbol ester- and TGF-beta1 induced murine tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinases-1 gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, David A; Billingham, Olivia; Sampieri, Clara L; Edwards, Dylan R; Clark, Ian M

    2005-04-01

    Expression of the tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinases-1 (Timp-1) gene can be induced by either phorbol myristate acetate (PMA) or transforming growth factor beta1 (TGF-beta1), although the signalling pathways involved are not clearly defined. Canonically, histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACi) such as trichostatin A (TSA) or sodium butyrate (NaB) increase total cellular histone acetylation and activate expression of susceptible genes. Remarkably, PMA and TGF-beta1 stimulation of Timp-1 show a differential response to TSA or NaB. TSA or NaB potentiate PMA-induced Timp-1 expression but repress TGF-beta1-induced Timp-1 expression. The repression of TGF-beta1-induced Timp-1 by TSA was maximal at 5 ng.mL(-1), while for the superinduction of PMA-induced Timp-1 expression, the maximal dose is > 500 ng x mL(-1) TSA. A further HDACi, valproic acid, did not block TGF-beta1-induced Timp-1 expression, demonstrating that different HDACs impact on the induction of Timp-1. For either PMA or TGF-beta1 to induce Timp-1 expression, new protein synthesis is required, and the induction of AP-1 factors closely precedes that of Timp-1. The effects of the HDACi can be reiterated in transient transfection using Timp-1 promoter constructs. Mutation or deletion of the AP-1 motif (-59/-53) in the Timp-1 promoter diminishes PMA-induction of reporter constructs, however, the further addition of TSA still superinduces the reporter. In c-Jun-/- cells, PMA still stimulates Timp-1 expression, but TSA superinduction is lost. Transfection of a series of Timp-1 promoter constructs identified three regions through which TSA superinduces PMA-induced Timp-1 and we have demonstrated specific protein binding to two of these regions which contain either an avian erythroblastosis virus E26 (v-ets) oncogene homologue (Ets) or Sp1 binding motif.

  19. Irradiation with narrowband-ultraviolet B suppresses phorbol ester-induced up-regulation of H1 receptor mRNA in HeLa cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitamura, Yoshiaki; Mizuguchi, Hiroyuki; Okamoto, Kentaro; Kitayama, Mika; Fujii, Tatsuya; Fujioka, Akira; Matsushita, Toshio; Mukai, Takashi; Kubo, Yoshiaki; Kubo, Nobuo; Fukui, Hiroyuki; Takeda, Noriaki

    2016-01-01

    Conclusion These findings suggest that low dose irradiation with 310 nm NB-UVB specifically suppressed the up-regulation of H1R gene expression without inducing apoptosis and that UVB of shorter or longer wavelength than 310 nm NB-UVB had no such effects. Objective To develop a narrowband-ultraviolet B(NB-UVB) phototherapy for allergic rhinitis, this study investigated the effects of irradiation with NB-UVB at wavelength of 310 nm on phorbol-12-myristate-13-acetate (PMA)-induced up-regulation of histamine H1 receptor (H1R) mRNA in HeLa cells. Methods The mRNA levels of H1R in HeLa cells were measured using real-time RT-PCR. Apoptosis were evaluated with DNA fragmentation assay. Results PMA induced a significant increase in H1R mRNA expression in HeLa cells. Irradiation with 305 nm UVB and 310 nm NB-UVB, but not with 315 nm UVB at doses of 200 and 300 mJ/cm(2) significantly suppressed PMA-induced up-regulation of H1R mRNA. At a dose of 200 mJ/cm(2), irradiation with 305 nm UVB, but not with 310 nm NB-UVB, induced apoptosis, although exposure of the cells to both 305 and 310 nm UVB induced apoptosis at a dose of 300 mJ/cm(2) after PMA treatment in HeLa cells. Conversely, irradiation with 315 nm UVB at doses of 200 and 300 mJ/cm(2) did not induce apoptosis.

  20. 2-Arachidonoyl-glycerol suppresses interferon-gamma production in phorbol ester/ionomycin-activated mouse splenocytes independent of CB1 or CB2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaplan, Barbara L F; Ouyang, Yanli; Rockwell, Cheryl E; Rao, Gautham K; Kaminski, Norbert E

    2005-06-01

    2-Arachidonoyl-glycerol (2-AG), an endogenous ligand for cannabinoid receptor types 1 and 2 (CB1 and CB2), has previously been demonstrated to modulate immune functions including suppression of interleukin-2 expression and nuclear factor of activated T cells (NFAT) activity. The objective of the present studies was to investigate the effect of 2-AG on interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) expression and associated upstream signaling events. Pretreatment of splenocytes with 2-AG markedly suppressed phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate plus calcium ionophore (PMA/Io)-induced IFN-gamma secretion. In addition, 2-AG suppressed IFN-gamma steady-state mRNA expression in a concentration-dependent manner. To unequivocally determine the putative involvement of CB1 and CB2, splenocytes derived from CB1(-/-)/CB2(-/-) knockout mice were used. No difference in the magnitude of IFN-gamma suppression by 2-AG in wild-type versus CB1/CB2 null mice was observed. Time-of-addition studies revealed that 2-AG treatment up to 12 h post-cellular activation resulted in suppression of IFN-gamma, which was consistent with a time course conducted with cyclosporin A, an inhibitor of NFAT activity. Coincidentally, 2-AG perturbed the nuclear translocation of NFAT protein and blocked thapsigargin-induced elevation in intracellular calcium, suggesting that altered calcium regulation might partly explain the suppression of NFAT nuclear translocation and subsequent IFN-gamma production. Indeed, Io partially attenuated the 2-AG-induced suppression of PMA/Io-stimulated IFN-gamma production. Taken together, these data demonstrate that 2-AG suppresses IFN-gamma expression in murine splenocytes in a CB receptor-independent manner and that the mechanism partially involves suppression of intracellular calcium signaling and perturbation of NFAT nuclear translocation.

  1. Genistein inhibits phorbol ester-induced NF-κB transcriptional activity and COX-2 expression by blocking the phosphorylation of p65/RelA in human mammary epithelial cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chung, Myung-Hoon; Kim, Do-Hee [Research Institute for Pharmaceutical Sciences, College of Pharmacy, Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Na, Hye-Kyung [Department of Food and Nutrition, Sungshin Women' s University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Jung-Hwan; Kim, Ha-Na [Research Institute for Pharmaceutical Sciences, College of Pharmacy, Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Haegeman, Guy [LEGEST, University of Gent (Belgium); Surh, Young-Joon, E-mail: surh@snu.ac.kr [Research Institute for Pharmaceutical Sciences, College of Pharmacy, Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Department of Molecular Medicine and Biopharmaceutical Sciences, Graduate School of Convergence Science and Technology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Cancer Research Institute, Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-10-15

    Genistein, an isoflavone present in soy products, has chemopreventive effects on mammary carcinogenesis. In the present study, we have investigated the effects of genistein on phorbol ester-induced expression of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) that plays an important role in the pathophysiology of inflammation-associated carcinogenesis. Pretreatment of cultured human breast epithelial (MCF10A) cells with genistein reduced COX-2 expression induced by 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA). There are multiple lines of evidence supporting that the induction of COX-2 is regulated by the eukaryotic transcription factor NF-κB. Genistein failed to inhibit TPA-induced nuclear translocation and DNA binding of NF-κB as well as degradation of IκB. However, genistein abrogated the TPA-induced transcriptional activity of NF-κB as determined by the luciferase reporter gene assay. Genistein inhibited phosphorylation of the p65 subunit of NF-κB and its interaction with cAMP regulatory element-binding protein-binding protein (CBP)/p300 and TATA-binding protein (TBP). TPA-induced NF-κB phosphorylation was abolished by pharmacological inhibition of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK). Likewise, pharmacologic inhibition or dominant negative mutation of ERK suppressed phosphorylation of p65. The above findings, taken together, suggest that genistein inhibits TPA-induced COX-2 expression in MCF10A cells by blocking ERK-mediated phosphorylation of p65 and its subsequent interaction with CBP and TBP.

  2. An antisense oligodeoxynucleotide targeted against the type II sub. beta. regulatory subunit mRNA of protein kinase inhibits cAMP-induced differentiation in HL-60 leukemia cells without affecting phorbol ester effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tortora, G.; Clair, T.; Cho-Chung, Y.S. (National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD (USA))

    1990-01-01

    The type II{sub {beta}} regulatory subunit of cAMP-dependent protein kinase (RII{sub {beta}}) has been hypothesized to play an important role in the growth inhibition and differentiation induced by site-selective cAMP analogs in human cancer cells, but direct proof of this function has been lacking. To address this tissue, HL-60 human promyelocytic leukemia cells were exposed to RII{sub {beta}} antisense synthetic oligodeoxynucleotide, and the effects on cAMP-induced growth regulation were examined. Exposure of these cells to RII{sub {beta}} antisense oligodeoxynucleotide resulted in a decrease in cAMP analog-induced growth inhibition and differentiation without apparent effect on differentiation induced by phorbol esters. This loss in cAMP growth regulatory function correlated with a decrease in basal and induced levels of RII{sub {beta}} protein. Exposure to RII{sub {beta}} sense, RI{sub {alpha}} and RII{sub {alpha}} antisense, or irrelevant oligodeoxynucleotides had no such effect. These results show that the RII{sub {beta}} regulatory subunit of protein kinase plays a critical role in the cAMP-induced growth regulation of HL-60 leukemia cells.

  3. Dioscin and methylprotodioscin isolated from the root of Asparagus cochinchinensis suppressed the gene expression and production of airway MUC5AC mucin induced by phorbol ester and growth factor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hyun Jae; Park, Jin Sung; Yoon, Yong Pill; Shin, Ye Jin; Lee, Sang Kook; Kim, Yeong Shik; Hong, Jang-Hee; Son, Kun Ho; Lee, Choong Jae

    2015-05-15

    The root of Asparagus cochinchinensis (Lour.) Merr. has been utilized as mucoregulators and expectorants for controlling the airway inflammatory diseases in folk medicine. We investigated whether dioscin and methylprotodioscin isolated from the root of Asparagus cochinchinensis (Lour.) Merr. suppress the gene expression and production of airway MUC5AC mucin induced by phorbol ester and growth factor. Confluent NCI-H292 cells were pretreated with dioscin or methylprotodioscin for 30 min and then stimulated with EGF or PMA for 24 h. The MUC5AC mucin gene expression was measured by RT-PCR. Production of MUC5AC mucin protein was measured by ELISA. (1) Dioscin and methylprotodioscin suppressed the expression of MUC5AC mucin gene induced by EGF or PMA; (2) dioscin suppressed the production of MUC5AC mucin induced by either EGF at 10(-5) M (p production of MUC5AC mucin induced by either EGF at 10(-4) M (p Asparagus cochinchinensis suppress the gene expression and production of MUC5AC mucin, by directly acting on airway epithelial cells, and the results are consistent with the traditional use of Asparagus cochinchinensis as remedy for diverse inflammatory pulmonary diseases. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  4. Bioactive Compounds and Biological Activities of Jatropha curcas L. Kernel Meal Extract

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdul Rahman Omar

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Defatted Jatropha curcas L. (J. curcas seed kernels contained a high percentage of crude protein (61.8% and relatively little acid detergent fiber (4.8% and neutral detergent fiber (9.7%. Spectrophotometric analysis of the methanolic extract showed the presence of phenolics, flavonoids and saponins with values of 3.9, 0.4 and 19.0 mg/g DM, respectively. High performance liquid chromatography (HPLC analyses showed the presence of gallic acid and pyrogallol (phenolics, rutin and myricetin (flavonoids and daidzein (isoflavonoid. The amount of phorbol esters in the methanolic extract estimated by HPLC was 3.0 ± 0.1 mg/g DM. Other metabolites detected by GC-MS include: 2-(hydroxymethyl-2 nitro-1,3-propanediol, β-sitosterol, 2-furancarboxaldehyde, 5-(hydroxymethy and acetic acid in the methanolic extract; 2-furancarboxaldehyde, 5-(hydroxymethy, acetic acid and furfural (2-furancarboxaldehyde in the hot water extract. Methanolic and hot water extracts of kernel meal showed antimicrobial activity against both Gram positive and Gram negative pathogenic bacteria (inhibition range: 0–1.63 cm at the concentrations of 1 and 1.5 mg/disc. Methanolic extract exhibited antioxidant activities that are higher than hot water extract and comparable to β-carotene. The extracts tended to scavenge the free radicals in the reduction of ferric ion (Fe3+ to ferrous ion (Fe2+. Cytotoxicity assay results indicated the potential of methanolic extract as a source of anticancer therapeutic agents toward breast cancer cells.

  5. Activation of p38 and JNK MAPK pathways abrogates requirement for new protein synthesis for phorbol ester mediated induction of select MMP and TIMP genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sampieri, Clara L; Nuttall, Robert K; Young, David A; Goldspink, Deborah; Clark, Ian M; Edwards, Dylan R

    2008-03-01

    The human matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) gene family includes 24 genes whose regulated expression, together with that of four tissue inhibitors of metalloproteinases (TIMPs), is essential in tissue remodelling and cell signalling. Quantitative real-time-PCR (qPCR) analysis was used to evaluate the shared and unique patterns of control of these two gene families in human MRC-5 and WI-38 fibroblasts in response to the protein kinase C (PKC) activator phorbol-12-myristate-13-acetate (PMA). The requirement for ongoing translation was analysed using three protein synthesis inhibitors, anisomycin, cycloheximide and emetine. PMA induced MMP1, 3, 8, 9, 10, 12, 13, 14 and TIMP1 and TIMP3 RNAs after 4-8 h, and induction of all except MMP9 and TIMP3 was blocked by all protein synthesis inhibitors. However, even though all inhibitors effectively blocked translation, PMA-induction of MMP9 and TIMP3 was blocked by emetine but was insensitive to cycloheximide and anisomycin. Anisomycin alone induced MMP9 and TIMP3, along with MMP25 and MMP19. The extracellular signal-regulated kinases (ERKs)-1/2 were strongly activated by PMA, while anisomycin activated the c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) and p38 pathways, and cycloheximide activated p38, but emetine had no effect on the stress-activated mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathways. The involvement of the p38 and JNK pathways in the selective effects of anisomycin and cycloheximide on MMP/TIMP expression was supported by use of pharmacological inhibitors. These data confirm that most inducible MMPs and TIMP1 behave as "late" activated, protein synthesis-dependent genes in fibroblasts. However, the requirement of protein synthesis for PMA-induction of MMPs and TIMPs is not universal, since it is abrogated for MMP9 and TIMP3 by stimulation of the stress-activated MAPK pathways. The definition of clusters of co-regulated genes among the two gene families will aid in bioinformatic dissection of control mechanisms.

  6. Genetic Diversity in Jatropha curcas L. Assessed with SSR and SNP Markers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan M. Montes

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Jatropha curcas L. (jatropha is an undomesticated plant that has recently received great attention for its utilization in biofuel production, rehabilitation of wasteland, and rural development. Knowledge of genetic diversity and marker-trait associations is urgently needed for the design of breeding strategies. The main goal of this study was to assess the genetic structure and diversity in jatropha germplasm with co-dominant markers (Simple Sequence Repeats (SSR and Single Nucleotide Polymorphism (SNP in a diverse, worldwide, germplasm panel of 70 accessions. We found a high level of homozygosis in the germplasm that does not correspond to the purely outcrossing mating system assumed to be present in jatropha. We hypothesize that the prevalent mating system of jatropha comprise a high level of self-fertilization and that the outcrossing rate is low. Genetic diversity in accessions from Central America and Mexico was higher than in accession from Africa, Asia, and South America. We identified makers associated with the presence of phorbol esters. We think that the utilization of molecular markers in breeding of jatropha will significantly accelerate the development of improved cultivars.

  7. Differential effect of 1{alpha},25-dihydroxyvitamin D{sub 3} on Hsp28 and PKC{beta} gene expression in the phorbol ester-resistant human myeloid HL-525 leukemic cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Yong J.; Galoforo, S.S.; Berns, C.M. [William Beaumont Hospital, Royal Oak, MI (United States). Dept. of Radiation Oncology] [and others

    1997-08-01

    We investigated the effect of 1{alpha},25-dihydroxyvitamin D{sub 3} [1,25-(OH){sub 2}D{sub 3}] on the expression of the 28-kDa heat shock protein gene (hsp28) and the protein kinase C beta gene (PKC{beta}) in the human myeloid HL-60 leukemic cell variant HL-525, which is resistance to phorbol ester-induced macrophage differentiation. Northern and Western blot analysis showed little or no hsp28 gene expression in the HL-60 cell variant, HL-205, which is susceptible to such differentiation, while a relatively high basal level of hps28 gene expression was observed in the HL-525 cells. However, both cell lines demonstrated heat shock-induced expression of this gene. During treatment with 50-300 nM 1,25-(OH){sub 2}D{sub 3}, a marked reduction of hsp28 gene expression was not associated with heat shock transcription factor-heat shock element (HSF-HSE) binding activity. Our results suggest that the differential effect of 1,25-(OH){sub 2}D{sub 3} on hsp28 and PKC{beta} gene expression is due to the different sequence composition of the vitamin D response element in the in the promoter region as well as an accessory factor for each gene or that 1,25-(OH){sub 2}D{sub 3} increases PKC{beta} gene expression, which in turn negatively regulates the expression of the hsp28 gene, or vice versa.

  8. Synthesis and properties of highly branched Jatropha curcas L. oil derivatives

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Daniel, Louis; Ardiyanti, Agnes R.; Schuur, Boelo; Manurung, Robert; Broekhuis, Antonius A.; Heeres, Hero J.

    2011-01-01

    The synthesis and properties of a number of novel branched Jatropha curcas L. oil (JO) derivatives containing vicinal di-ester units in the fatty acid chains are reported. Both the length (acetyl vs. hexanoyl) and the stereochemistry of the vicinal di-ester units (cis vs. trans) were varied. The com

  9. Modification of serum, pancreatic, and microbial lipase activities by phorbol diesters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Z C; Cabot, M C

    1987-01-01

    The influence of phorbol diesters on the in vitro hydrolysis of diacylglycerols was examined using enzymes from rat serum, porcine pancreas, and Rhizopus delemar. Two main phenomena were observed: 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA), when added to the enzyme assay system, stimulated 2- to 3-fold the hydrolysis of [9,10-3H]dioleoylglycerol by serum lipase. The hydrolysis of dioleoylglycerol by either pancreatic or R. delemar lipase was, on the other hand, inhibited by TPA. A 50% inhibition of the pancreatic and R. delemar enzymes was attained with 10 and 2.0 microM TPA, respectively. The pattern of enzyme stimulation (rat serum), with regard to increasing TPA concentrations, was hyperbolic. Stimulation was not influenced by Triton X-100, but it was highly dependent on the structure of the phorbol ester: TPA greater than phorbol didecanoate greater than tetradecanoylphorbol. Phorbol dibutyrate, phorbol acetate, myristic acid, and mezerein were without influence. Lipase activity was inhibited most strongly by TPA and the nonpromoter 4-O-methyl-TPA; the weaker promoter, phorbol dibutyrate, was relatively inactive. The inhibition of R. delemar lipase by TPA was reversible. Collectively, these data show that phorbol diesters can interact with enzymes other than protein kinase C. It is believed, by virtue of their structural similarity to diacylglycerols, that phorbol diesters may serve directly as intracellular regulators of lipid metabolism. In such a manner phorbol esters could sustain or attenuate the second messenger signal by modifying diacylglycerol metabolism, a manifestation of the pleiotropic action.

  10. On the role of c-Jun in the induction of PAI-1 gene expression by phorbol ester, serum, and IL-1α in HepG2 cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Arts, J.; Grimbergen, J.; Toet, K.; Kooistra, T.

    1999-01-01

    We have characterized the regulation of plasminogen activator inhibitor- 1 (PAI-1) gene expression by phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA), serum, and interleukin-1α (IL-1α) in the human hepatoma cell line HepG2. PMA, serum, and IL-1α induced a rapid and transient 28-fold (PMA), 9-fold (serum), and

  11. Biodiesel synthesis from Jatropha curcas L. oil and ethanol in a continuous centrifugal contactor separator

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Abduh, Muhammad Yusuf; van Ulden, Wouter; Kalpoe, Vijay; van de Bovenkamp, Hendrik H.; Manurung, Robert; Heeres, Hero J.

    2013-01-01

    The synthesis of fatty acid ethyl esters (FAEE) from Jatropha curcas L. oil was studied in a batch reactor and a continuous centrifugal contactor separator (CCCS) using sodium ethoxide as the catalyst. The effect of relevant process variables like rotational speed, temperature, catalyst concentratio

  12. An improved preparation of phorbol from croton oil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pagani, Alberto; Gaeta, Simone; Savchenko, Andrei I; Williams, Craig M; Appendino, Giovanni

    2017-01-01

    Background: Croton oil is the only commercial source of the diterpenoid phorbol (1a), the starting material for the semi-synthesis of various diesters extensively used in biomedical research to investigate cell function and to evaluate in vivo anti-inflammatory activity. While efficient chemoselective esterification protocols have been developed for phorbol, its isolation from croton oil is technically complicated, and involves extensive manipulation of very toxic materials like the oil or its native diterpenoid fraction. Results: The preparation of a crude non-irritant phorboid mixture from croton oil was telescoped to only five operational steps, and phorbol could then be purified by gravity column chromatography and crystallization. Evidence is provided that two distinct phorboid chemotypes of croton oil exist, differing in the relative proportion of type-A and type-B esters and showing different stability to deacylation. Conclusion: The isolation of phorbol from croton oil is dangerous because of the toxic properties of the oil, poorly reproducible because of differences in its phorboid profile, and time-consuming because of the capricious final crystallization step. A solution for these issues is provided, suggesting that the poor-reproducibility of croton oil-based anti-inflammatory assays are the result of poor quality and/or inconsistent composition of croton oil.

  13. Production of additives from Jatropha Curcas L. methyl esther as a way to improve diesel engine performance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silitonga, A.S. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Medan State Polytechnic (Indonesia)], email: ardinsu@yahoo.co.id, email: a_atabani2@msn.com; Mahlia, T.M.I. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Syiah Kuala University, (Indonesia); Masjuki, H.H. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Malaya (Malaysia); Ghofur, A. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Lambung Mangkurat University (Indonesia); Abdullahe [Department of Chemical Engineering, Lambung Mangkurat University (Indonesia)

    2011-07-01

    Nowadays we are searching for ideal alternative fuels in order to reduce harmful gas emissions and improve air quality. And many kinds of bio-diesel have been proposed. This paper introduces a bio-diesel converted from the oil of Jatropha curcas L. through a series of physical and chemical processes. This bio-diesel, which has a high cetane number, is better adapted than diesel or other, edible, vegetable oils to be an ideal alternative fuel. Moreover, the additive promotes the physico-chemical characteristics of Jatropha curcas methyl ester, further enhancing its desirability as a substitute for diesel oil. This paper analyzes and reports the results of a laboratory-scale investigation of the feasibility of blending diesel with an additive produced from Jatropha curcas methyl ester. It finds that this additive can improve engine performance and reduce exhaust emissions.

  14. Application of metal triflate catalysts for the trans-esterification of Jatropha curcas L. oil with methanol and higher alcohols

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Daniel, Louis; Rasrendra, Carolus B.; Kloekhorst, Arjan; Broekhuis, Antonius A.; Manurung, Robert; Heeres, Hero J.

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes an experimental study on the application of metal triflate salts for the (trans-) esterification of fatty esters (triolein, methyl oleate, methyl linoleate), fatty acid (oleic acid), as well as Jatropha curcas L. oil with methanol and higher alcohols (ethanol, n-propanol, iso-pr

  15. Tumor promoter 12-0-tetradecanoyl-phorbol-13-acetate elevates serum progesterone levels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharma, O.K.; Kerr, S.J.

    1979-04-27

    The phorbol ester 12-0-tetradecanoyl-13-acetate (TPA), the most potent promoter of two-stage carcinogenesis in mouse skin, simulates some of the early effects of several carcinogens in immature chicks. Actinomycin D, ethionine, thioacetamide (non-mutagenic in the Ames Salmonella test) and kepone are known to increase serum progesterone concentrations and induce synthesis of ovalbumin in chicks. Intraperitoneal administration of TPA to chicks caused a 5- to 7-fold elevation of serum progesterone levels and induced ovalbumin synthesis. Phorbol ester, 4..cap alpha..-phorbol-12, 13-didecanoate, which is inactive as a mouse skin tumor promoter, did not increase serum progesterone levels nor did it induce ovalbumin synthesis.

  16. Detoxification of Jatropha curcas oil by ultraviolet irradiation combined with ethanol washing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao, Jh.

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Jatropha curcas oil (JCO is non-edible due to the content of phorbolesters (PEs which are very toxic. The aim of this study was to evaluate the potential of JCO, treated by ultraviolet irradiation combined with ethanol washing, as an edible oil. The results showed that PEs can be significantly decreased by 100% (p Jatropha curcas oil (DJCO. In addition, the quality of DJCO was improved with enhanced DPPH radical scavenging. Therefore, DJCO with good quality will become a good resource for edible oil.El aceite de Jatropha curcas (JCO no es comestible debido a su contenido en esteres de forbol (PES que son muy tóxicos. El objetivo de este estudio fue evaluar el potencial de JCO como aceite comestible, cuando se trató mediante irradiación ultravioleta en combinación con lavados de etanol. Los resultados mostraron que el contenido de PES puede disminuir significativamente, hasta el 100% (p Jatropha curcas detoxificado (DJCO. Además, las cualidades de DJCO han mejorado teniendo una mayor capacidad de eliminación de radicales DPPH. Por lo tanto, DJCO con estas buenas cualidades se convertirá en un buen recurso de aceite comestible.

  17. Biodiesel production from Jatropha curcas oil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jain, Siddharth; Sharma, M.P. [Alternate Hydro Energy Centre, Indian Institute of Technology Roorkee, Roorkee, Uttarakhand 247667 (India)

    2010-12-15

    In view of the fast depletion of fossil fuel, the search for alternative fuels has become inevitable, looking at huge demand of diesel for transportation sector, captive power generation and agricultural sector, the biodiesel is being viewed a substitute of diesel. The vegetable oils, fats, grease are the source of feedstocks for the production of biodiesel. Significant work has been reported on the kinetics of transesterification of edible vegetable oils but little work is reported on non-edible oils. Out of various non-edible oil resources, Jatropha curcas oil (JCO) is considered as future feedstocks for biodiesel production in India and limited work is reported on the kinetics of transesterification of high FFA containing oil. The present study reports a review of kinetics of biodiesel production. The paper also reveals the results of kinetics study of two-step acid-base catalyzed transesterification process carried out at pre-determined optimum temperature of 65 and 50 C for esterification and transesterification process, respectively, under the optimum condition of methanol to oil ratio of 3:7 (v/v), catalyst concentration 1% (w/w) for H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} and NaOH and 400 rpm of stirring. The yield of methyl ester (ME) has been used to study the effect of different parameters. The maximum yield of 21.2% of ME during esterification and 90.1% from transesterification of pretreated JCO has been obtained. This is the first study of its kind dealing with simplified kinetics of two-step acid-base catalyzed transesterification process carried at optimum temperature of both the steps which took about 6 h for complete conversion of TG to ME. (author)

  18. Regulation of urokinase receptors in monocytelike U937 cells by phorbol ester phorbol myristate acetate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Picone, R; Kajtaniak, E L; Nielsen, L S

    1989-01-01

    A specific surface receptor for urokinase plasminogen activator (uPA) recognizes the amino-terminal growth factor-like sequence of uPA, a region independent from and not required for the catalytic activity of this enzyme. The properties of the uPA receptor (uPAR) and the localization and distribu...

  19. Effect of phorbol and Bryostatin I on chondrogenic expression of chick limb bud, in vitro

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garrison, J.C.; Pettit, G.R.; Uyeki, E.M.

    1987-10-26

    The present paper describes the effects of PMA (phorbol 12-myristate 13 acetate) on in vitro chondrogenesis in non-passaged, embryonic limb bud cells, relative to the effects of Bryostatin I. This compound also activates C kinase and binds competitively to the phorbol ester receptor, yet does not affect cell differentiation. Levels of PMA as low as 10/sup -7/ M markedly reduced cartilage formation in 4-day cultures, as indicated by nodule count and Alcian blue staining for chondroitin sulfate. Coadministration of Bryostatin I at equimolar concentration prevented the PMA inhibitory effect on chondrocytic expression. This confirms other findings that phorbol activation of C kinase cannot exclusively account for the activity of phorbol on cell expression. Altering the time of PMA exposure demonstrated that PMA inhibited chondrocyte phenotypic expression, rather than cell commitment: early exposure to PMA had little inhibitor effect on the staining index, whereas, exposure from 49-96 h and 0-96 h had moderate and strong inhibitory effects, respectively, on cartilage synthesis. Further research on the phorbol/Bryostatin I interaction should add to their knowledge of the control processes involved in tumor promotion and cell differentiation. 21 references, 3 figures.

  20. Antiallergic Phorbol Ester from the Seeds of Aquilaria malaccensis

    OpenAIRE

    Michal Korinek; Wagh, Vitthal D.; I-Wen Lo; Yu-Ming Hsu; Hsue-Yin Hsu; Tsong-Long Hwang; Yang-Chang Wu; Yuan-Bin Cheng; Bing-Hung Chen; Fang-Rong Chang

    2016-01-01

    The Aquilaria malaccensis (Thymelaeaceae) tree is a source of precious fragrant resin, called agarwood, which is widely used in traditional medicines in East Asia against diseases such as asthma. In our continuous search for active natural products, A. malaccensis seeds ethanolic extract demonstrated antiallergic effect with an IC50 value less than 1 µg/mL. Therefore, the present research aimed to purify and identify the antiallergic principle of A. malaccensis through a bioactivity-guided fr...

  1. Culture in vitro de Jatropha curcas L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toussaint, A.

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available In vitro culture of Jatropha curcas L.. The extension of Jatropha curcas L. cultivation as a biofuel feedstock species requires the distribution of a very large number of plants to the producers in a very short period of time. These plants have to be able to give a high oil yield and be morphologically and phenotypically homogeneous to facilitate cultural operations. If high oil content can be obtained by varietal selection, the achievement of homogeneous material passes by the in vitro propagation. Various methods of mass production of plant material by axenic culture have been published. This study reviews the protocols published for in vitro propagation of J. curcas and discusses their applicability to an industrial scale.

  2. Biology and biotechnological advances in Jatropha curcas - A biodiesel plant

    KAUST Repository

    Reddy, Muppala P.

    2009-10-31

    Increasing global demand for energy, the impending depletion of fossil fuels, and concern over global climate change have lead to a resurgence in the development of alternative energy sources. Bio-fuels and bio-energy encompass a wide range of alternative sources of energy of biological origin, and offer excellent, environmentally friendly opportunities to address these issues. The recognition that Jatropha oil can yield high quality biodiesel has led to a surge of interest in Jatropha across the globe, more so in view of the potential for avoiding the dilemma of food vs fuel. Hardiness, rapid growth, easy propagation, short gestation period, wide adaptation, and optimum plant size combine to make this species suitable for sustainable cultivation on wastelands. Besides biodiesel from the seed, the plant produces several useful products that also have commercial value. Large scale cultivation remains the single most important factor that will ultimately determine the success of Jatropha as a source of bio-fuel. The limited knowledge of the genetics of this species, low and inconsistent yields, the narrow genetic variability, and vulnerability to insects and diseases are major constraints in successful cultivation of Jatropha as a bio-fuel crop. Despite the optimal protein content and composition of the pressed cake, the presence of phorbol esters makes it unsuitable for consumption by livestock. A non-toxic variety with low or no phorbol ester content has been identified from Mexico, and the utility of pressed cake from this variety as livestock feed has been demonstrated successfully. In the absence of any morphological differences, identification of linked markers for toxic/non-toxic varieties will add value to the crop and facilitate further improvement. This chapter discusses current efforts towards assessing the diversity and phylogeny of Jatropha, identification of specific markers for toxic and non-toxic varieties, and aspects of micropropagation and genetic

  3. Reproductive biology characteristic of Jatropha curcas (Euphorbiaceae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiu-Rong Wang

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Jatropha curcas belongs to family of Euphorbiaceae, and is an important biological tree species for diesel production. The current descriptions of the phenotypic traits for male and female flowers are not comprehensive and there have been no reports about the process of J. curcas from pollen germination on stigma to pollen tubes conducting fertilization after entering the ovary and ovule. To assess this, experiments were undertaken to study the reproductive biology characteristic of J. curcas in Guiyang Guizhou Province, China. Floral structure and pollen germination process were described in detail and the breeding system was determined. The results showed that flower of J. curcas was both unisexual and monoecious, with a flowering phase between April-November. Both female and male flowers have five petals in contorted arrangement and five calyxes in imbricated arrangement. Female flower originated from bisexual flower finally formed unisexual flowers as the stamen ceased growth in different period. The pistil had 3-5 styles, connected at base and separated into 3-5 stigmas on the top. Each stigma had 2-4 lobes. The styles were hollow. The pollen germinated on the surface of the stigma, is then transported via the vascular tissues, which was arranged in bundles, and finally channeled through the micropyle to enter the blastula. The pollen tube was shaped in a long uneven cylinder. The top end of it became swollen and formed a small round hole for the purpose of releasing sperm nuclei while the pollen tube itself was growing and extending. Estimation of out-crossing index and artificial pollination experiments indicated that J. curcas was capable of both self-pollination and cross-pollination. The germination speed of the pollen on the stigma did not differ so much between the one by self-pollination and the one by cross-pollination, and the pollen from the two different sources could both reach the ovary within one day. Both artificial

  4. Kinetics of acid base catalyzed transesterification of Jatropha curcas oil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Siddharth; Sharma, M P

    2010-10-01

    Out of various non-edible oil resources, Jatropha curcas oil (JCO) is considered as future feedstock for biodiesel production in India. Limited work is reported on the kinetics of transesterification of high free fatty acids containing oil. The present study reports the results of kinetic study of two-step acid base catalyzed transesterification process carried out at an optimum temperature of 65 °C and 50 °C for esterification and transesterification respectively under the optimum methanol to oil ratio of 3:7 (v/v), catalyst concentration 1% (w/w) for H₂SO₄ and NaOH. The yield of methyl ester (ME) has been used to study the effect of different parameters. The results indicate that both esterification and transesterification reaction are of first order with reaction rate constant of 0.0031 min⁻¹ and 0.008 min⁻¹ respectively. The maximum yield of 21.2% of ME during esterification and 90.1% from transesterification of pretreated JCO has been obtained.

  5. Urokinase receptor mRNA level and gene transcription are strongly and rapidly increased by phorbol myristate acetate in human monocyte-like U937 cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, L R; Rønne, E; Roldan, A.L.

    1991-01-01

    enhancement after 24 h of treatment. Half-maximal stimulation occurs at approximately 5 nM PMA. The effect is observed only with phorbol esters that also act as tumor promotors. The protein synthesis inhibitor cycloheximide (10 micrograms/ml) also increases the level of u-PAR mRNA. Nuclear run-on experiments...

  6. Reproductive biology characteristic of Jatropha curcas (Euphorbiaceae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiu-Rong Wang

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Jatropha curcas belongs to family of Euphorbiaceae, and is an important biological tree species for diesel production. The current descriptions of the phenotypic traits for male and female flowers are not comprehensive and there have been no reports about the process of J. curcas from pollen germination on stigma to pollen tubes conducting fertilization after entering the ovary and ovule. To assess this, experiments were undertaken to study the reproductive biology characteristic of J. curcas in Guiyang Guizhou Province, China. Floral structure and pollen germination process were described in detail and the breeding system was determined. The results showed that flower of J. curcas was both unisexual and monoecious, with a flowering phase between April-November. Both female and male flowers have five petals in contorted arrangement and five calyxes in imbricated arrangement. Female flower originated from bisexual flower finally formed unisexual flowers as the stamen ceased growth in different period. The pistil had 3-5 styles, connected at base and separated into 3-5 stigmas on the top. Each stigma had 2-4 lobes. The styles were hollow. The pollen germinated on the surface of the stigma, is then transported via the vascular tissues, which was arranged in bundles, and finally channeled through the micropyle to enter the blastula. The pollen tube was shaped in a long uneven cylinder. The top end of it became swollen and formed a small round hole for the purpose of releasing sperm nuclei while the pollen tube itself was growing and extending. Estimation of out-crossing index and artificial pollination experiments indicated that J. curcas was capable of both self-pollination and cross-pollination. The germination speed of the pollen on the stigma did not differ so much between the one by self-pollination and the one by cross-pollination, and the pollen from the two different sources could both reach the ovary within one day. Both artificial

  7. Anthelmintic activity of latex of Jatropha curcas (ratanjot

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mr. Hitesh Kumar Parmar

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available A multitude of plants have been used for the treatment of helmenthiasis throughout the world. One such plant is Jatropha curcas. It is known as ratanjot or biodiesel plant, which belongs to the family Euphorbiaceae. It possesses many uses like antidiabetic, antmicrobial and antioxidant. The phytochemical prospection of the fresh and dried latex showed the presence of different classes of secondary metabolites that have demonstrated antimicrobial action. The present research work investigated the Anthelmintic activity of latex of leaves of Jatropha curcas. The major finding of the present work illustrates that aqueous latex of Jatropha curcas has shown better Anthelmintic activity than control Jatropha latex and standard drug, piperazine citrate.

  8. Biodiesel production from Jatropha curcas oil catalyzed by whole ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    my mord

    2013-07-03

    Jul 3, 2013 ... reaction conditions for biodiesel production via transesterification between Jatropha curcas (physic nut) oil and ... to be a potential feedstock for enzyme produced bio- .... The growth rate of A. pullulans var. melanogenum SRY.

  9. Conversion of crude Jatropha curcas seed oil into biodiesel using liquid recombinant Candida rugosa lipase isozymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuo, Ting-Chun; Shaw, Jei-Fu; Lee, Guan-Chiun

    2015-09-01

    The versatile Candida rugosa lipase (CRL) has been widely used in biotechnological applications. However, there have not been feasibility reports on the transesterification of non-edible oils to produce biodiesel using the commercial CRL preparations, mixtures of isozymes. In the present study, four liquid recombinant CRL isozymes (CRL1-CRL4) were investigated to convert various non-edible oils into biodiesel. The results showed that recombinant CRL2 and CRL4 exhibited superior catalytic efficiencies for producing fatty acid methyl ester (FAME) from Jatropha curcas seed oil. A maximum 95.3% FAME yield was achieved using CRL2 under the optimal conditions (50 wt% water, an initial 1 equivalent of methanol feeding, and an additional 0.5 equivalents of methanol feeding at 24h for a total reaction time of 48 h at 37 °C). We concluded that specific recombinant CRL isozymes could be excellent biocatalysts for the biodiesel production from low-cost crude Jatropha oil.

  10. Environmental impacts of Jatropha curcas biodiesel in India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gmünder, Simon; Singh, Reena; Pfister, Stephan; Adheloya, Alok; Zah, Rainer

    2012-01-01

    In the context of energy security, rural development and climate change, India actively promotes the cultivation of Jatropha curcas, a biodiesel feedstock which has been identified as suitable for achieving the Indian target of 20% biofuel blending by 2017. In this paper, we present results concerning the range of environmental impacts of different Jatropha curcas cultivation systems. Moreover, nine agronomic trials in Andhra Pradesh are analysed, in which the yield was measured as a function of different inputs such as water, fertilizer, pesticides, and arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi. Further, the environmental impact of the whole Jatropha curcas biodiesel value chain is benchmarked with fossil diesel, following the ISO 14040/44 life cycle assessment procedure. Overall, this study shows that the use of Jatropha curcas biodiesel generally reduces the global warming potential and the nonrenewable energy demand as compared to fossil diesel. On the other hand, the environmental impacts on acidification, ecotoxicity, eutrophication, and water depletion all showed increases. Key for reducing the environmental impact of Jatropha curcas biodiesel is the resource efficiency during crop cultivation (especially mineral fertilizer application) and the optimal site selection of the Jatropha curcas plantations.

  11. Insecticidal activity of Jatropha curcas extracts against housefly, Musca domestica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chauhan, Nitin; Kumar, Peeyush; Mishra, Sapna; Verma, Sharad; Malik, Anushree; Sharma, Satyawati

    2015-10-01

    The hexane and ether extracts of leaves, bark and roots of Jatropha curcas were screened for their toxicity against different developmental stages of housefly. The larvicidal, pupicidal and adulticidal activities were analysed at various concentrations (0.78-7.86 mg/cm(2)) of hexane and ether extracts. The lethal concentration values (LC50) of hexane extract of J. curcas leaves were 3.0 and 0.27 mg/cm(2) for adult and larval stages of housefly, respectively, after 48 h. Similarly, the ether extract of leaf showed the LC50 of 2.20 and 4.53 mg/cm(2) for adult and larval stages of housefly. Least toxicity was observed with hexane root extract of J. curcas with LC50 values of 14.18 and 14.26 mg/cm(2) for adult and larvae of housefly, respectively, after 48 h. The variation in LC50 against housefly pupae was found to be 8.88-13.10 mg/cm(2) at various J. curcas extract concentrations. The GC-MS analysis of J. curcas leaf extract revealed the presence of trans-phytol (60.81 %), squalene (28.58 %), phytol (2.52 %) and nonadecanone (1.06 %) as major components that could be attributed for insecticidal activity of J. curcas extracts.

  12. Rational use of Jatropha curcas L. in food and medicine : from toxicity problems to safe applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Insanu, Muhamad

    2014-01-01

    Jatropha curcas L. is natural sources of biodiesel. It has high potential economic values. Different parts of J. curcas have their own potencies, unfortunately these were not known by the farmers. The aim of this thesis is to give an overview of the additional values of Jatropha curcas L. by charact

  13. Rational use of Jatropha curcas L. in food and medicine : from toxicity problems to safe applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Insanu, Muhamad

    2014-01-01

    Jatropha curcas L. is natural sources of biodiesel. It has high potential economic values. Different parts of J. curcas have their own potencies, unfortunately these were not known by the farmers. The aim of this thesis is to give an overview of the additional values of Jatropha curcas L. by charact

  14. Diacylglycerols mimic phorbol diester induction of leukemic cell differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebeling, J G; Vandenbark, G R; Kuhn, L J; Ganong, B R; Bell, R M; Niedel, J E

    1985-01-01

    Activation of cellular protein kinase C appears to be involved in the mechanism by which phorbol diesters induce differentiation of human myeloid leukemia cells (HL-60). Protein kinase C is thought to be physiologically activated by diacylglycerol derived from receptor-mediated phosphatidylinositol hydrolysis. sn-1,2-diacylglycerols with short saturated acyl side chains (C4-C10) were synthesized and found to be potent activators of protein kinase C partially purified from HL-60 cells. These diacylglycerols were also competitive inhibitors of [3H]phorbol dibutyrate binding to the soluble phorbol diester receptor. The most potent diacylglycerol, sn-1,2-dioctanoylglycerol, displaced greater than 90% of [3H]phorbol dibutyrate from the phorbol diester receptor of intact HL-60 cells. Because of probable cellular metabolism of sn-1,2-dioctanoylglycerol, hourly doses were required to maintain persistent occupancy of the phorbol diester binding site. Treatment of HL-60 cells with either phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate or sn-1,2-dioctanoylglycerol produced identical phosphoprotein changes. Finally, sn-1,2-dioctanoylglycerol induced differentiation of the HL-60 cells into cells with morphologic characteristics of macrophages. Substitution of the hydroxyl group at position 3 with a hydrogen, chloro, or sulfhydryl moiety inactivated sn-1,2-dioctanoylglycerol. These data strengthen the hypothesis that protein kinase C activation plays a role in macrophage differentiation. Images PMID:3156372

  15. Detoxification of Jatropha curcas kernel cake by a novel Streptomyces fimicarius strain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xing-Hong; Ou, Lingcheng; Fu, Liang-Liang; Zheng, Shui; Lou, Ji-Dong; Gomes-Laranjo, José; Li, Jiao; Zhang, Changhe

    2013-09-15

    A huge amount of kernel cake, which contains a variety of toxins including phorbol esters (tumor promoters), is projected to be generated yearly in the near future by the Jatropha biodiesel industry. We showed that the kernel cake strongly inhibited plant seed germination and root growth and was highly toxic to carp fingerlings, even though phorbol esters were undetectable by HPLC. Therefore it must be detoxified before disposal to the environment. A mathematic model was established to estimate the general toxicity of the kernel cake by determining the survival time of carp fingerling. A new strain (Streptomyces fimicarius YUCM 310038) capable of degrading the total toxicity by more than 97% in a 9-day solid state fermentation was screened out from 578 strains including 198 known strains and 380 strains isolated from air and soil. The kernel cake fermented by YUCM 310038 was nontoxic to plants and carp fingerlings and significantly promoted tobacco plant growth, indicating its potential to transform the toxic kernel cake to bio-safe animal feed or organic fertilizer to remove the environmental concern and to reduce the cost of the Jatropha biodiesel industry. Microbial strain profile essential for the kernel cake detoxification was discussed.

  16. Jatropha curcas L:Phytochemical, antimicrobial and larvicidal properties

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sillma Rampadarath; Daneshwar Puchooa; Rajesh Jeewon

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate antimicrobial activities as well as the phytochemical and lav-icidal properties of different parts of Jatropha curcas L. (J. curcas) growing in Mauritius. Methods: Determination of the presence of phytochemicals in the crude plants extracts by test tube reactions. Disc diffusion method and microdilution method were used to detect the antimicrobial sensitivity and activity (minimal inhibitory concentration). The crude solvent extracts were also tested on the larvae of two insects, Bactrocera zonata and Bactrocera cucurbitae (Diptera, Tephritidae). Results: The antimicrobial activities were significantly dependent for the different crude plant extracts on the thirteen microorganisms tested. For the Gram-positive bacteria, the crude ethyl acetate extract was more efficient compared to the Gram-negative bacteria with both solvents being effective. The crude ethyl acetate extract of J. curcas bark and mature seed oil showed the highest efficacy. The highest mortality percentage was observed after 24 h for both Diptera flies with (66.67 ± 2.89)%of Bactrocera cucurbitae larvae killed by ethyl acetate extract of J. curcas bark. Conclusions: This paper compared the different J. curcas plant sections with respect to the effectiveness of the plant as a potential candidate for new pharmaceuticals. The lar-vicidal effect was also studied in order to demonstrate the dual purpose of the plant.

  17. Phytoremediation of heavy metal contaminated soil by Jatropha curcas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Fang-Chih; Ko, Chun-Han; Tsai, Ming-Jer; Wang, Ya-Nang; Chung, Chin-Yi

    2014-12-01

    This study employed Jatropha curcas (bioenergy crop plant) to assist in the removal of heavy metals from contaminated field soils. Analyses were conducted on the concentrations of the individual metals in the soil and in the plants, and their differences over the growth periods of the plants were determined. The calculation of plant biomass after 2 years yielded the total amount of each metal that was removed from the soil. In terms of the absorption of heavy metal contaminants by the roots and their transfer to aerial plant parts, Cd, Ni, and Zn exhibited the greatest ease of absorption, whereas Cu, Cr, and Pb interacted strongly with the root cells and remained in the roots of the plants. J. curcas showed the best absorption capability for Cd, Cr, Ni, and Zn. This study pioneered the concept of combining both bioremediation and afforestation by J. curcas, demonstrated at a field scale.

  18. Coagulant and anticoagulant activities in Jatropha curcas latex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osoniyi, Omolaja; Onajobi, Funmi

    2003-11-01

    Jatropha curcas Linn. (Euphorbiaceae), a medicinal plant commonly grown in the Tropics, is traditionally used as a haemostatic. Investigation of the coagulant activity of the latex of Jatropha curcas showed that whole latex significantly (Platex, however, prolonged the clotting time: at high dilutions, the blood did not clot at all. This indicates that Jatropha curcas latex possesses both procoagulant and anticoagulant activities. Prothrombin time (PT) and activated partial thromboplastin time (APTT) tests on plasma confirm these observations. Solvent partitioning of the latex with ethyl acetate and butanol led to a partial separation of the two opposing activities: at low concentrations, the ethyl acetate fraction exhibited a procoagulant activity, while the butanol fraction had the highest anticoagulant activity. The residual aqueous fraction had no significant effect on the clotting time of blood and the PT but slightly prolonged the APTT.

  19. Variabilité morphologiques et conservation des morphotypes de Jatropha curcas Linn. (Euphoriaceae au Benin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charlemagne Judes Gbemavo

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available This study is a contribution to Jatropha curcas cultivation and seeks to analyze the morphological variability and identification of morphotypes of Jatropha curcas. The study was conducted in 44 communities equitably distributed among 22 towns (populations and geographically widespread in the 10 phytodistricts of Benin. Per population, at least 30 individuals of the species spaced at least 20 meters apart were randomly selected for the collection of morphological data. In total, 840 individuals, 714 leaves, 2294 fruits and 3465 seeds of Jatropha curcas were measured in all the country. The part of the variability of Jatropha curcas morphological traits due to individual, populations, phytodistricts, climatic zones were determined using the variance component analysis. The stepwise discriminant analysis was performed on Jatropha curcas populations to identify the morphological traits which discriminate them and the numeric classification was realized to regroup Jatropha curcas populations. The results show that variability of Jatropha curcas morphological traits is generally larger at individual level or between individuals of the same population than between populations, phytodistricts and climatic zones except fruits and seeds weight whose variability is larger between populations. Ten of twenty-one morphological traits studied were identified as the most discriminant variables of Jatropha curcas. Four morphological groups of Jatropha curcas were distinguished in Benin considering 10 discriminant variables. Keywords: morphological traits, variability, Jatropha curcas, Benin.

  20. Ester Formation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lopez Garzon, C.S.; Straathof, A.J.J.

    2014-01-01

    The present invention is in the field of a process for producing an ester, such as a biobased ester, from an aqueous biomass comprising solution, batch wise or continuously, wherein use of raw material is limited and if possible re-used. The present invention is in the field of green technology.

  1. Ester Formation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lopez Garzon, C.S.; Straathof, A.J.J.

    2014-01-01

    The present invention is in the field of a process for producing an ester, such as a biobased ester, from an aqueous biomass comprising solution, batch wise or continuously, wherein use of raw material is limited and if possible re-used. The present invention is in the field of green technology.

  2. Microbial growth in Acrocomia aculeata pulp oil, Jatropha curcas oil, and their respective biodiesels under simulated storage conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juciana Clarice Cazarolli

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available With increasing demands for biodiesel in Brazil, diverse oil feedstocks have been investigated for their potentials for biodiesel production. Due to the high biodegradability of natural oils and their respective biodiesels, microbial growths and consequent deterioration of final product quality are generally observed during storage. This study was aimed at evaluating the susceptibility of Acrocomia aculeata pulp oil and Jatropha curcas oil as well as their respective biodiesels to biodeterioration during a simulated storage period. The experiment was conducted in microcosms containing oil/biodiesel and an aqueous phase over 30 d. The levels of microbial contamination included biodiesel and oil as received, inoculated with fungi, and sterile. Samples were collected every 7 d to measure pH, surface tension, acidity index, and microbial biomass. The initial and final ester contents of the biodiesels were also determined by gas chromatography. The major microbial biomass was detected in A. aculeata pulp and J. curcas biodiesels. Significant reductions in pH values were observed for treatments with A. aculeata pulp biodiesel as a carbon source (p

  3. Screening of antioxidants as stabilisers for Jatropha curcas L. oil

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Subroto, Erna; Manurung, Robert; Heeres, Hero Jan; Broekhuis, Antonius Augustinus

    2013-01-01

    The effect of antioxidants on the oxidation stability of oils extracted from Jatropha curcas seeds was measured by the accelerated oxidation test specified in EN 14112 using commercial Rancimat 873 equipment. To find the appropriate antioxidant for jatropha oil, fourteen different antioxidants were

  4. Screening of antioxidants as stabilisers for Jatropha curcas L. oil

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Subroto, Erna; Manurung, Robert; Heeres, Hero Jan; Broekhuis, Antonius Augustinus

    The effect of antioxidants on the oxidation stability of oils extracted from Jatropha curcas seeds was measured by the accelerated oxidation test specified in EN 14112 using commercial Rancimat 873 equipment. To find the appropriate antioxidant for jatropha oil, fourteen different antioxidants were

  5. Jatropha curcas L: Phytochemical, antimicrobial and larvicidal properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sillma Rampadarath

    2016-10-01

    Conclusions: This paper compared the different J. curcas plant sections with respect to the effectiveness of the plant as a potential candidate for new pharmaceuticals. The larvicidal effect was also studied in order to demonstrate the dual purpose of the plant.

  6. Potential land for plantation of Jatropha curcas as feedstocks for biodiesel in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    As a renewable energy,biofuel has attracted great attention in China and the rest of world.Concerned with the national food security,China recently has shifted its biofuel development priority from grain-based to non-grain-based biofuels,including forest-based biodiesel,since 2007.Jatropha curcas is one of major biodiesel feedstocks.However,there is rising debate on availability of land for expanding Jatropha curcas areas.The overall goal of this paper is to evaluate potential land for Jatropha curcas used as feedstock for biodiesel in China.Based on remote sensing data on land use,data on meteorological,soil and land slope,and suitable environment for Jatropha curcas plantation,this study uses Agro Ecological Zone method and considers social-economic constraints to evaluate potential suitable land for Jatropha curcas plantation in China’s major Jatropha curcas production region,Southwest China.The results show that while there are some potential lands to expand Jatropha curcas areas,amount of these lands will hardly meet the government’s target for Jatropha curcas-based biodiesels development in the future.China may need to reconsider its long-term targets on the development of Jatropha curcas-based biodiesels.

  7. Full chain energy analysis of biodiesel from Jatropha curcas L. in Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prueksakorn, Kritana; Gheewala, Shabbir H

    2008-05-01

    Biodiesel production from Jatropha curcas Linnaeus (JCL) has been considered for partial substitution of diesel fuel for transportation in Thailand. The aim of this study is to investigate the energy consumption for long-term investment (20 years) of Jatropha Methyl Ester (JME) production in Thailand using a life cycle approach. Apart from the average result, two scenarios--best and worst case--are set up to illustrate the range of results due to the variety of management practices. The main contributors to the energy use are JCL cultivation, transesterification, and transportation process. The net energy gain (NEG) and net energy ratio (NER) of biodiesel and coproducts from the life cycle of JCL are 4720 GJ/ha and 6.03, respectively. Even if only biodiesel is considered without coproducts, the NER is 1.42, still higher than 1. The study will support decision makers in the energy policy sector to make informed decisions vis-a-vis promotion of JCL plantations for biodiesel.

  8. Jatropha curcas L. Root Structure and Growth in Diverse Soils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ofelia Andrea Valdés-Rodríguez

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Unlike most biofuel species, Jatropha curcas has promise for use in marginal lands, but it may serve an additional role by stabilizing soils. We evaluated the growth and structural responsiveness of young J. curcas plants to diverse soil conditions. Soils included a sand, a sandy-loam, and a clay-loam from eastern Mexico. Growth and structural parameters were analyzed for shoots and roots, although the focus was the plasticity of the primary root system architecture (the taproot and four lateral roots. The sandy soil reduced the growth of both shoot and root systems significantly more than sandy-loam or clay-loam soils; there was particularly high plasticity in root and shoot thickness, as well as shoot length. However, the architecture of the primary root system did not vary with soil type; the departure of the primary root system from an index of perfect symmetry was 14±5% (mean ± standard deviation. Although J. curcas developed more extensively in the sandy-loam and clay-loam soils than in sandy soil, it maintained a consistent root to shoot ratio and root system architecture across all types of soil. This strong genetic determination would make the species useful for soil stabilization purposes, even while being cultivated primarily for seed oil.

  9. Inhibition of mild steel corrosion using Jatropha Curcas leaf extract

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    OLORUNFEMI MICHAEL AJAYI

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Jatropha Curcas leaf was investigated as a green inhibitor on the degradation of mild steel in 4 M HCl and 4 M H2SO4 aqueous solutions using gasometric technique. Mild steel coupons of dimension 2 × 1.5 cm were immersed in test solutions of uninhibited acid and also those with extract concentrations of 4 ml, 6 ml, 8 ml and 10 ml at 30 oC, for up to 30 minutes. The results showed that as the concentration of the extract increases, there was reduction in the corrosion rate. As the extract concentration increased from 4 ml to 10 ml at 30 minutes exposure, the volume of hydrogen gas evolved decreased from 19.1 cm3 to 11.2 cm3 in H2SO4 medium, while it reduced to 5 cm3 from 9 cm3 in HCl medium. Also, the metal surface-phytoconstituent interaction mechanism showed that 6 minutes is the best exposure time for the adsorption of the extract in both acidic media. The Jatropha Curcas leaf extract was adsorbed on the mild steel surface to inhibit corrosion, while the experimental data obtained at 30 minutes exposure in both acidic media were well fitted with the Langmuir adsorption isotherm. Hence, Jatropha Curcas leaf extract is a good and safe inhibitor in both acidic solutions.

  10. Floral display and breeding system of Jatropha curcas L.

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Luo Chang-wei; Li Kun; Chen You; Sun Yong-yu

    2007-01-01

    Plant flowering and breeding characteristics are important for us to understand the reproduction of plant populations. In this paper, we studied the reproduction characteristics of Jatropha curcas in Yuanjiang County (23°36'N, 101°00'E), Yunnan Province.The plant produces flowers in dichasial inflorescences. Normally, the flowers are unisexual, and male and female flowers are produced in the same inflorescence. Only a few male flowers are produced in an inflorescence, and fruits are produced only through pollination between different flowers from the same or different plants. By the treatments of emasculation, bagging and artificial pollination in this experiment, there were few but same fruit set ratios when the inflorescences were emasculated, bagged, or bagged with net, except artificial pollination treatments, which showed that Jatropha curcas could produce fruit through apomixis but not wind pollination. When the inflorescences were unbagged, unemasculated and with free pollination treatments, or bagged, emasculated and with artificial cross-pollination treatments, or unbagged, emasculated and with free pollination treatments, there were many fruits produced. It showed that Jatropha curcas shows outcrossing, is self-compatible, and demanding for pollinators. Normally, the male flowers open first and a few flowers bloom in one day in a raceme. These flowers last a long time in bloom. However, a large number of female flowers open from the third to the fifth day, with some female flowers opening first in a few raceme. This shows a tendency to promote xenogamy and minimize geitonogamy.

  11. Phytoremediation of mercury-contaminated soils by Jatropha curcas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marrugo-Negrete, José; Durango-Hernández, José; Pinedo-Hernández, José; Olivero-Verbel, Jesús; Díez, Sergi

    2015-05-01

    Jatropha curcas plants species were tested to evaluate their phytoremediation capacity in soils contaminated by different levels of mercury. The experimental treatments consisted of four levels of mercury concentrations in the soil - T0, T1, T5, and T10 (0, 1, 5, and 10 μg Hg per g soil, respectively). The total mercury content absorbed by the different plant tissues (roots, stems and leaves) was determined during four months of exposure. The growth behavior, mercury accumulation, translocation (TF) and bioconcentration (BCF) factors were determined. The different tissues in J. curcas can be classified in order of decreasing accumulation Hg as follows: roots>leaves>stems. The highest cumulative absorption of the metal occurred between the second and third month of exposure. Maximum TF was detected during the second month and ranged from 0.79 to 1.04 for the different mercury concentrations. Values of BCF ranged from 0.21 to 1.43. Soils with T1 showed significantly higher BCF (1.43) followed by T10 (1.32) and T5 (0.91), all of them at the fourth month. On the other hand TFs were low (range 0.10-0.26) at the en of the experiment. The maximum reduction of biomass (16.3%) occurred for T10 (10 μg Hg g(-1)). In sum, J. curcas species showed high BCFs and low TFs, and their use could be a promising approach to remediating mercury-contaminated soils.

  12. POTENSI JARAK PAGAR (JATROPHA CURCAS SEBAGAI LARVASIDA HAYATI PENCEGAH PENYAKIT DEMAM BERDARAH DENGUE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dyah Iswantini

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Recently, Indonesia has big problem caused by dengue haemorraghic fever with A. aegypti as vector. Potential medicine and vaccine for curing this disease have not been found. The effective method to prevent this disease is the use of A. aegypti larvicidal. The chemical larvicidal has disadvantage for evironmental aspect. To solve this problem, the biological larvicidal has a good chance to develop. Indonesia has megadiversity which can be developed as biological larvicidal. Crude aqueous extracts and ethanol extracts of Jatropha curcas (Jarak pagar seed and oil of Jatropha curcas were evaluated for larvicidal potential against the Aedes aegypti mosquito. Among all extracts, Jatropha curcas oil possessed a highest activity against the 3th instar larvae of Aedes. LC50 values of Jatropha curcas oil was 1507 ppm for 24 h and 866 ppm for 48 h. It was suggested that the Croton tiglium oil and Jatropha curcas oil possess larvicidal properties that could be developed and used as biological larvicidal

  13. Insulin and phorbol myristic acetate induce ornithine decarboxylase in Reuber H35 rat hepatoma cells by different mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodman, S A; Esau, B; Koontz, J W

    1988-11-01

    Reuber H35 rat hepatoma cells respond to insulin or to tumor promoting phorbol esters with an increase in ornithine decarboxylase enzyme activity. This occurs in a time- and dose-dependent manner with both types of agonist. We report here that the increase in ornithine decarboxylase activity with optimal concentrations of both agonists is additive. Furthermore, the initial increase is dependent on continued RNA and protein synthesis. We also find that both of these agonists cause an increase in mRNA coding for ornithine decarboxylase in a time- and dose-dependent manner which suggests that the increase in enzyme activity can be accounted for by the increase in transcript levels. The difference in the time course of induction by the agonists, the additivity of induction by the two agonists, the differential sensitivity of induction to cycloheximide and RNA synthesis inhibitors, and the observation that phorbol myristic acetate causes a further increase in ornithine decarboxylase activity and transcript levels in cells already maximally induced by insulin suggest that these two agonists act through separate mechanisms.

  14. Effect of plant growth regulators on fatty acids composition in Jatropha curcas L. callus culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernandez, Ludwi Rodríguez; Mendiola, Martha A Rodríguez; Castro, Carlos Arias; Gutiérrez-Miceli, Federico A

    2015-01-01

    The influence of Naphtaleneacetic acid (NAA) and 6-Benzylaminopurine (BAP) on callus formation, its morphology and fatty acids profile were examined from Jatropha curcas L. Embryo from seeds of J. curcas L. were sown in Murashige and skoog (MS) medium with NAA and BAP. All treatments induced callus formation, however callus morphology was different in most of the treatments. Higher callus biomass was presented with 1.0 NAA + 0.5 BAP mg/L. Plant growth regulators modifies the fatty acids profile in callus of J. curcas L. BAP was induced linoleic and linolenic acids.

  15. Environmental Impact Calculation of the Production of Biocombustible Derived from the Jatropha curcas Oil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro Antonio Rodriguez Ramos

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available This article shows the environmental impact on the life cycle of the Jatropha curcas for its use asbiodiesel using a Numeric Matrix.The sustainability analysis was made using the matrix (22.23: thatis, 22 activities of the life cycle of the production of bio-fuel from the Jatropha Curcas Oil, in Cuba, and23 factors (13 component and 4 sub-systems that influence in the sustainability. Each activity wasqualified according to the positive impact, negative or nil provoked. This study gives the possibility toknow how the implementation of this culture impacts in the Cuban ecosystem to produce bio-fuelfrom the Oil of Jatropha curcas.

  16. Nutrient accumulation, export and cycling in Jatropha curcas L .

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Hissao Kurihara

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT The knowledge concerning nutrient accumulation rate allows defining the best amount and most appropriate time for its supply. Estimating nutrient amount in the aerial part of the plants is particularly important to species such as Jatropha curcas L., since there are no consistent calibration studies to indicate the amount of fertilizer to be applied. The objective of this study was to evaluate nutrient accumulation, export and cycling in Jatropha curcas. The experiment was carried out in Cassilândia, state of Mato Grosso do Sul, Brazil, during 52 months in a completely randomized design, with four replications and fifteen treatments, which consisted of different evaluation times. A large variation in the amount of nutrients accumulated in leaves was found due to senescence and leaf abscission in the driest and/or coldest period of the year. Nutrient accumulation in the aerial part is relatively low in the first 22 months. To meet Jatropha curcas requirements, fertilization during the first two years must provide 40; 50; 50; 21; 16; 5; 0.7; 0.3; 4; 8 and 1 kg ha-1 of N, P2O5, K2O, Ca, Mg, S, B, Cu, Fe, Mn and Zn, respectively. From the third year of cultivation, topdressing fertilization should restitute 40, 110, 55 and 3 kg ha-1 of N, P2O5, K2O and S, respectively. To replace the exported amount of nutrients, it should be supplied more 50, 100, 30 and 3 kg ha-1 of N, P2O5, K2O and S, respectively, per ton of grain to be produced.

  17. PHYTOCHEMICAL SCREENING OF LEAVES OF JATROPHA CURCAS PLANT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahirrao R.A.

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available The various extract of leaves Jatropha curcas Linn. belonging to the family Euphorbiaceae were investigated for its physicochemical and phytochemical screening. Ash value (total ash, acid insoluble ash and water soluble ash, extractive values, Loss on drying were studied dry weight. Ash content analysis was showed total ash, acid insoluble ash and water soluble ash [7.40 %, 4.42 % and 6.12 % respectively]. The moisture content was found to be 1.70 %. Preliminary phytochemical analysis test showed the presence of steroids, flavonoids, alkaloids, saponins, triterpenoids, tannins and carbohydrate.

  18. [Cicatrization effect of Jatropha curcas latex (Angiospermae: Euforbiaceae)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salas, J; Tello, V; Zavaleta, A; Villegas, L; Salas, M; Fernández, I; Vaisberg, A

    1994-01-01

    The wound healing effects of Jathopha curcas latex upon surgical wound produced in Balb/c mice skin, were studied with a modification of the Hoowes-Sooy-Harvey method. The effects of topical treatment using single 50 ul doses of latex at different dilutions (10% to 100%) was compared with a multiple dose treatment (four 25 ul/dose q12h, latex 5% to 100%). The single dose treatment with 10%, 50% or 100% latex and the multiple dose treatment with dilutions between 5% and 10%, have a healing effect but only on males. The multiple dose treatment with 50% or pure undiluted latex produced caustic lesions to treated skin.

  19. Diffusion Modeling: A Study of the Diffusion of “Jatropha Curcas ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Diffusion of innovation is a versatile social science theory which typically ... Jatropha Curcas based diesel oil (Jacodiesel) in the context of a specific social environment. ... Innovation, Communicative Influence, Multi-media and Communication ...

  20. A field assessment of the agronomic performance and water use of Jatropha curcas in South Africa

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Everson, CS

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available . curcas in a silvopastoral experiment with Pennisetum clandestinum at the Ukulinga research farm of the University of KwaZulu-Natal near Pietermaritzburg, South Africa. Measurements of daily total evaporation rates during DecembereFebruary (summer...

  1. Analysis of the genetic diversity of physic nut, Jatropha curcas L. accessions using RAPD markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rafii, M Y; Shabanimofrad, M; Puteri Edaroyati, M W; Latif, M A

    2012-06-01

    A sum of 48 accessions of physic nut, Jatropha curcas L. were analyzed to determine the genetic diversity and association between geographical origin using RAPD-PCR markers. Eight primers generated a total of 92 fragments with an average of 11.5 amplicons per primer. Polymorphism percentages of J. curcas accessions for Selangor, Kelantan, and Terengganu states were 80.4, 50.0, and 58.7%, respectively, with an average of 63.04%. Jaccard's genetic similarity co-efficient indicated the high level of genetic variation among the accessions which ranged between 0.06 and 0.81. According to UPGMA dendrogram, 48 J. curcas accessions were grouped into four major clusters at coefficient level 0.3 and accessions from same and near states or regions were found to be grouped together according to their geographical origin. Coefficient of genetic differentiation (G(st)) value of J. curcas revealed that it is an outcrossing species.

  2. Jatropha curcas: from biodiesel generation to medicinal applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paulillo, Luis Cesar; Mo, ChengLin; Isaacson, Janalee; Lessa, Luciene; Lopes, Edjacy; Romero-Suarez, Sandra; Brotto, Leticia; Abreu, Eduardo; Gutheil, William; Brotto, Marco

    2012-12-01

    Jatropha curcas (JC) is a multipurpose perennial plant that belongs to the Euphorbiaceae family and is native to arid and semiarid tropical regions worldwide. It has many attributes and considerable potential for renewable energy, fish and livestock feeding. Despite its rich application as a renewable source and for animal feeding, JC has barely been explored for its medicinal potential. Here we review several patents related to JC that show it has been underused for medicinal purposes. For example, only one invention disclosure to date utilizes JC, combined with three other plants, in a preparation for wound healing. Motivated by support from the Brazilian funding agencies and anecdotal accounts in Brazil of the medicinal value of JC, we performed a series of pilot studies that demonstrate that JC is able to protect skeletal muscle cells in vitro against the deleterious effects of ethanol. We were able to determine that JC's effects are mediated by the up regulation of HSP60, a critical mitochondrial heat shock related protein that is essential for intracellular REDOX regulation. Given the fact that ethanol myopathy accounts for more than 50% of all cases of myopathy worldwide, we hope that our studies will sparkle new interest from the scientific community to explore the medicinal properties of Jatropha curcas, including the development of new patents leading to new drugs and new targets for the treatment of muscle diseases and other human diseases.

  3. Proteomic Analysis the Seed Development of Jatropha curcas

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hui Liu; Setsuko Komatsu; Qing Yang; Shihua Shen

    2012-01-01

    Differential proteomic analysis and cellular structure observation were employed to analyze the developing seeds at 5,10,15,20,25 and 30 days after flowering.Results revealed that 214 of 355 protein spots with significant changes in abundance were identified through MALDI/TOF-TOF MS.Energy and metabolism related proteins were notable abundant in developing Jatropha curcas seed,accounting for 47% and 36% of the identified differentially expressed proteins respectively.The expressional profiles of energy and metabolic proteins identified in this study ensured a comprehensive overview on the carbon flux to lipid accumulation from the early to late stages of seed development.It seems that glycolysis and OPP are the major pathways for producing carbon flux in developing J.curcas seeds.These data suggested that sugar mobilization from glucose to coenzyme A and its acyl derivative is collaboration between the cytosol and plastids and that temporal control of enzymes and pathways extends beyond transcription.

  4. Evaluation and bioinduction of energy components of Jatropha curcas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Augustus, G.D.P.S.; Jayabalan, M. [Research Centre in Bombay, V.H.N.S.N. College, Virudhunagar (India); Seiler, G.J. [USDA, ARS, Northern Crop Science Lab., Fargo, ND (United States)

    2002-09-01

    Jatropha curcas is a multipurpose species with many attributes and considerable potential. The oil from the seeds is potentially the most valuable end product. Nearly 40% of the land area in India is wasteland. However, a large number of latex bearing and oil yielding plants can grow under such unfavorable agroclimatic conditions. J. curcas, a Euphorbiaceae grows well under such adverse climatic conditions because of its low moisture demands, fertility requirements, and tolerance to high temperatures. The seed contains 19.0% oil, 4.7% polyphenol, and 3.9% hydrocarbon. This semi-drying oil could be an efficient substitute for diesel fuel. The gross heat value for the seed (0% moisture content) was 4980.3 cal/g (20.85 MJ/kg), oil was 9036.1 cal/g (37.83 MJ/kg), and hydrocarbon was 9704.4 cal/g (40.63 MJ/kg). The oil fraction consists of both saturated fatty acids, palmitic acid (14.1%), stearic acid (6.7%) and unsaturated fatty acids, oleic acid (47.0%), and linoleic acid (31.6%). Treatment of plants with growth regulators significantly influenced the production of hydrocarbons. Among the treatments, ethephon and morphactin induced the maximum production of hydrocarbon with 5.0% and 5.4%, respectively. (author)

  5. Therapeutic biology of Jatropha curcas: a mini review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Reena; Sah, Nand K; Sharma, P B

    2008-08-01

    Jatropha curcas is a drought resistant, perennial plant that grows even in the marginal and poor soil. Raising Jatropha is easy. It keeps producing seeds for many years. In the recent years, Jatropha has become famous primarily for the production of biodiesel; besides this it has several medicinal applications, too. Most parts of this plant are used for the treatment of various human and veterinary ailments. The white latex serves as a disinfectant in mouth infections in children. The latex of Jatropha contains alkaloids including Jatrophine, Jatropham and curcain with anti-cancerous properties. It is also used externally against skin diseases, piles and sores among the domestic livestock. The leaves contain apigenin, vitexin and isovitexin etc. which along with other factors enable them to be used against malaria, rheumatic and muscular pains. Antibiotic activity of Jatropha has been observed against organisms including Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli. There are some chemical compounds including curcin (an alkaloid) in its seeds that make it unfit for common human consumption. The roots are known to contain an antidote against snake venom. The root extract also helps to check bleeding from gums. The soap prepared from Jatropha oil is efficient against buttons. Many of these traditional medicinal properties of Jatropha curcas need to be investigated in depth for the marketable therapeutic products vis-à-vis the toxicological effects thereof. This mini review aims at providing brief biological significance of this plant along with its up-to-date therapeutic applications and risk factors.

  6. Is Phosphorylation of the α1 Subunit at Ser-16 Involved in the Control of Na,K-ATPase Activity by Phorbol Ester–activated Protein Kinase C?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Féraille, Eric; Béguin, Pascal; Carranza, Maria-Luisa; Gonin, Sandrine; Rousselot, Martine; Martin, Pierre-Yves; Favre, Hervé; Geering, Käthi

    2000-01-01

    The α1 subunit of Na,K-ATPase is phosphorylated at Ser-16 by phorbol ester-sensitive protein kinase(s) C (PKC). The role of Ser-16 phosphorylation was analyzed in COS-7 cells stably expressing wild-type or mutant (T15A/S16A and S16D-E) ouabain-resistant Bufo α1 subunits. In cells incubated at 37°C, phorbol 12,13-dibutyrate (PDBu) inhibited the transport activity and decreased the cell surface expression of wild-type and mutant Na,K-pumps equally (∼20–30%). This effect of PDBu was mimicked by arachidonic acid and was dependent on PKC, phospholipase A2, and cytochrome P450-dependent monooxygenase. In contrast, incubation of cells at 18°C suppressed the down-regulation of Na,K-pumps and revealed a phosphorylation-dependent stimulation of the transport activity of Na,K-ATPase. Na,K-ATPase from cells expressing α1-mutants mimicking Ser-16 phosphorylation (S16D or S16E) exhibited an increase in the apparent Na affinity. This finding was confirmed by the PDBu-induced increase in Na sensitivity of the activity of Na,K-ATPase measured in permeabilized nontransfected COS-7 cells. These results illustrate the complexity of the regulation of Na,K-ATPase α1 isozymes by phorbol ester-sensitive PKCs and reveal 1) a phosphorylation-independent decrease in cell surface expression and 2) a phosphorylation-dependent stimulation of the transport activity attributable to an increase in the apparent Na affinity. PMID:10637289

  7. Response of brown hisex chicks to low levels of Jatropha curcas, Ricinus communis or their mixture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    el Badwi, S M; Mousa, H M; Adam, S E; Hapke, H J

    1992-08-01

    Feeding Jatropha curcas seed at 0.5% of the basic diet for 2 w was not lethal to chicks. In chicks fed 0.5% Ricinus communis seed or a mixture of 0.5% J curcas + 0.5% R communis for 2 w, there was dullness, poor growth, locomotor disturbance and death. Pathological changes were correlated with alterations in clinical chemistry and hematology.

  8. Jatropha curcas latex inhibits the release of collagenase by gingival fibroblast

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fazwishni Siregar

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Folkloric use of J. curcas latex among others are to cure tooth pain, bleeding gum and as anti-inflammatory drug. Collagenase is a neutral protease released by activated macrophage and also by fibroblasts in small amounts. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of J. curcas latex on collagenase released by fibroblasts. Four doses of J. curcas latex from 37.5-300 g/ml were added to 3 human gingival primary fibroblast cell culture. After 1 to 4 days of incubation, collagenase in the supernatant was assayed with collagen. The degradation products were then separated by SDS-PAGE and the density of ¾ A bands were measured semi quantitatively by Adobe Photo computer program. Result showed that J. curcas latex decreased collagenase released by human gingival fibroblast, and increasing dose inhibits more. It may be concluded that the latex of J. curcas inhibits the release of collagenase by human gingival fibroblast. (Med J Indones 2007; 16:219-23Keywords: Jatropha curcas, collagenase, human gingival fibroblast, collagenase assay, SDS-PAGE

  9. Immunodeficiency after allogeneic bone marrow transplantation in man. Effect of phorbol ester (phorbol myristate acetate) and calcium ionophore (A23187) in vitro

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, J; Hofmann, B; Langhoff, E

    1989-01-01

    This study was undertaken to clarify the mechanism behind the severely decreased lymphocyte proliferative response upon stimulation with mitogens and antigens seen after allogeneic bone marrow transplantation (BMT) in man. We investigated eight BMT patients and eight controls and found...

  10. PEMANFAATAN BUNGKIL BIJI JARAK PAGAR (JATROPHA CURCAS TERFERMENTASI SEBAGAI PAKAN AYAM KAMPUNG

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sumiati

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Jatropha curcas meal (JCM is very potential as protein source for poultry. The JCM contained high crude protein, i.e. 56,4-63,8% (without hull and 22,39-31,41% (hulled JCM. JCM serves as a highly nutritious and economic protein supplement in animal feed, if the toxins and antinutrients contained in the JCM are removed. The toxic compounds isolated from jatropha seed include curcin, phorbolesters, and the antinutrients include antitrypsins, tannin, saponin, phytic acid, and high fiber. The objective of this research was to evaluate the effect of feeding fermented JCM on the performances of kampong chickens. In this study, tempeh fungi (fungi using in fermenting soybean used to ferment the JCM. Two hundred kampung chickens were used in this experiment and reared from day old up to 10 weeks of age. The data analyzed with a Completely Randomized Design with 5 treatment diets and 4 replications, with 10 birds in each replicate. The experimental diets were: T0 (the control diet, without Jatropha curcas meal, T1 (the diet contained 5% untreated Jatropha curcas meal, T2 (the diet contained 5% fermented Jatropha curcas meal + cellulase 200 ml/ton of feed, T3 (the diet contained 5% fermented Jatropha curcas meal + 1000 FTU phytase, and T4 (the diet contained 5% fermented Jatropha curcas meal + cellulase 200 ml/ton + 1000 FTU phytase. The results showed that there were no significant difference on the parameters observed due to the treatments. Feeding fermented Jatropha curcas meal supplemented with cellulase + phytase(T4 yielded the final body weight and feed conversion ratio similar to those the control (T0 diet. There was no mortality observed in all treatments. Using JCM 5% in the diet is safe for the kampong chickens

  11. Stage-Specific Fatty Acid Fluxes Play a Regulatory Role in Glycerolipid Metabolism during Seed Development in Jatropha curcas L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaitanya, Bharatula Sri Krishna; Kumar, Sumit; Kaki, Shiva Shanker; Balakrishna, Marrapu; Karuna, Mallampalli Sri Lakshmi; Prasad, Rachapudi Badari Narayana; Sastry, Pidaparty Seshadri; Reddy, Attipalli Ramachandra

    2015-12-23

    The present study describes the changes in lipid profile as well as fatty acid fluxes during seed development in Jatropha curcas L. Endosperm from 34, 37, and 40 days after anthesis (DAA), incubated with [(14)C]acetate, showed significant synthesis of phosphatidylcholine (PC) at seed maturation. The fatty acid methyl ester profile showed PC from 34 DAA was rich in palmitic acid (16:0), whereas PC from 37 and 40 DAA was rich in oleic acid (18:1n-9). Molecular species analysis of diacylglycerol (DAG) indicated DAG (16:0/18:2n-6) was in abundance at 34 DAA, whereas DAG (18:1n-9/18:2n-6) was significantly high at 40 DAA. Triacylglycerol (TAG) analysis revealed TAG (16:0/18:2n-6/16:0) was abundant at 34 DAA, whereas TAG (18:1n-9/18:2n-6/18:1n-9) formed the majority at 40 DAA. Expression of two types of diacylglycerol acyltransferases varied with seed maturation. These data demonstrate stage-specific distinct pools of PC and DAG synthesis during storage TAG accumulation in Jatropha seed.

  12. FAME Production from Jatropha curcas Seed Oil via Calcium Oxide Catalyzed Transesterification and its Purification using Acid Activated Bentonite

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    Novizar Nazir

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the study of transesterification of Jatropha curcas oil (JCO via environmentally benign process using calcium oxide as heterogeneous catalyst.  Response surface methodology (RSM based on central composite design (CCD was performed to optimize three reaction variables in this study.  The transesterification process variables were reaction time, x1 (60 minutes-120 minutes,   molar ratio of methanol: oil, x2 (5:1 – 13:1, and amount of catalyst,  x3 (0.5 % –1.50 % of mass fraction.  Since water washing method is not suitable to purify CaO synthesized fatty acid methyl esters (FAME,   the purification of as-synthesized FAME with acid-activated bentonites to eliminate the remaining calcium was also investigated.   It was found that the yield of JCO FAME could reach up to 94.35 % using the following reaction conditions: 79.33 minutes reaction time, 10.41:1 methanol:oil molar ratio and 0.99 %  catalyst at reaction temperature 65oC.  Among bentonites used in the purification,   2.5% of H2SO4-activated bentonite shows a good performance as decalcifying agent for FAME purification.  The properties of purified jatropha FAME were comparable to those of diesel and satisfied the international standard.

  13. Determinación de las propiedades físicas y carga crítica del aceite vegetal Jatropha curcas L // Determination of physical properties and critical load of Jatropha curcas L vegetable oil

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    Calixto Rodríguez-Martínez

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available En el trabajo se determinaron las propiedades físicas y la carga critica del aceite de Jatropha curcas L, obtenido de las plantas cultivadas en la provincia de Guantánamo en Cuba. Estas propiedades fueron comparadas con las propiedades de otros aceites vegetales (aceite ricino, aceite de girasol, aceite de colza y aceite de soya usados como biolubricantes. Los resultados mostraron que las propiedades físicas del aceite de Jatropha curcas L fueron similares a la mayoría de los aceites vegetales. La carga crítica del aceite de la Jatropha curcas L ocupa una posición intermedia entre el aceite ricino y los aceites de girasol, colza y soya, lo cual permite asegurar que el aceite de Jatropha curcas L es un buen candidato para como biolubricante.Palabras claves: biolubricantes, aceites vegetales, Jatropha curcas L, propiedades físicas, carga crítica._______________________________________________________________________________AbstractIn this paper the physical properties and the critical load of the Jatropha curcas L oil, plantations located in Guantanamo province, Cuba were determined. These properties together with other vegetable oils (castor, sunflower, rapeseed and soybean oils used as biolubricant were compared. These results have showed that the physical properties of the Jatropha curcas L oil were similar to most of vegetable oils.The critical load of Jatropha curcas oil has an intermediate position just castor oil and sunflower, rapeseed and soybean oils. Jatropha curcas oil has good potential as the renewable energy as well as biolubricant feedstock.Key words: biolubricants, vegetable oils, Jatropha curcas L, physical properties, critical load.

  14. [Poisoning with Jatropha curcas: 24 cases reported to Paris and Marseille Poisons Centers].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langrand, J; Médernach, C; Schmitt, C; Blanc-Brisset, I; Villa, A F; de Haro, L; Garnier, R

    2015-03-01

    Jatropha curcas L. is an inedible plant belonging to the Euphorbiaceae family that is growing in subtropical zones of all continents. We report a series of 24 cases of poisoning with J. curcas seeds or fruits reported to poison centers in Paris and Marseille between December 2000 and June 2014. Fifteen adults and 9 children ingested J. curcas seeds or fruits. All patients experienced gastrointestinal disorders, within the first hours following ingestion: nausea, vomiting, diarrhea and abdominal pain. Laboratory investigations performed in 10 patients revealed minor abnormalities: CK elevation (8 cases), dehydration (5 cases) with moderate elevation of serum creatinine levels (3 cases), and mildly increased serum bilirubin (8 cases). Complete remission of all clinical signs was observed within 48 hours in the 20 cases for which the outcome was known. Previously published cases of J. curcas poisoning were very similar to ours: As in our series, gastrointestinal disorders were always present. They were sometimes associated with neurological or cardiovascular signs, and hepatic or renal disorders; these were generally interpreted as complications of severe gastroenteritis, although direct toxic effects could not be formally excluded. In most cases, simple supportive measures were sufficient to ensure complete recovery within 24-48 hours. J Curcas poisoning incidence is certainly increasing because the plant is cultivated to produce biodiesel and is now largely present in most subtropical countries. As a consequence, local health professionals should be informed of the toxic properties of this plant.

  15. SELECTED LIVER AND KIDNEY BIOCHEMICAL PROFILES OF HYBRID CATFISH EXPOSED TO JATROPHA CURCAS LEAF DUST

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    Kabir M. Adamu

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available This study investigated the effect of sublethal concentrations (7.50, 5.00, 2.50 and 0.00 gL (control of Jatropha curcas leaf dust on some liver and kidney biochemical profiles such as total protein, total bilirubin, total albumin and total globulin of hybrid catfish (Clarias gariepinus (♀ and Heterobranchus bidorsalis (♂ after a 14-day experimental period. The result was significantly different in the mean value of determined liver total bilirubin, while total protein, albumin and globulin were insignificantly different in the exposed fish compared with the control. The kidney revealed varying levels of insignificant difference in its level of total protein, total albumin, total bilirubin and total globulin. Therefore, this investigation has revealed that sublethal concentration of Jatropha curcas has no effect on the basic function of the determined biochemical profiles of hybrid catfish and that the changes were directly proportional to J. curcas concentration.

  16. Global analysis of transcriptome responses and gene expression profiles to cold stress of Jatropha curcas L.

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    Haibo Wang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Jatropha curcas L., also called the Physic nut, is an oil-rich shrub with multiple uses, including biodiesel production, and is currently exploited as a renewable energy resource in many countries. Nevertheless, because of its origin from the tropical MidAmerican zone, J. curcas confers an inherent but undesirable characteristic (low cold resistance that may seriously restrict its large-scale popularization. This adaptive flaw can be genetically improved by elucidating the mechanisms underlying plant tolerance to cold temperatures. The newly developed Illumina Hiseq™ 2000 RNA-seq and Digital Gene Expression (DGE are deep high-throughput approaches for gene expression analysis at the transcriptome level, using which we carefully investigated the gene expression profiles in response to cold stress to gain insight into the molecular mechanisms of cold response in J. curcas. RESULTS: In total, 45,251 unigenes were obtained by assembly of clean data generated by RNA-seq analysis of the J. curcas transcriptome. A total of 33,363 and 912 complete or partial coding sequences (CDSs were determined by protein database alignments and ESTScan prediction, respectively. Among these unigenes, more than 41.52% were involved in approximately 128 known metabolic or signaling pathways, and 4,185 were possibly associated with cold resistance. DGE analysis was used to assess the changes in gene expression when exposed to cold condition (12°C for 12, 24, and 48 h. The results showed that 3,178 genes were significantly upregulated and 1,244 were downregulated under cold stress. These genes were then functionally annotated based on the transcriptome data from RNA-seq analysis. CONCLUSIONS: This study provides a global view of transcriptome response and gene expression profiling of J. curcas in response to cold stress. The results can help improve our current understanding of the mechanisms underlying plant cold resistance and favor the screening of

  17. Toxicidade do pericarpo da Jatropha curcas em ovinos

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    O.R. Ferreira

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available O pinhão manso (Jatropha curcas é uma planta cultivada para a produção de biocombustível. O pericarpo é um coproduto com potencial para alimentação animal, e a presença de componentes tóxicos, principalmente ésteres de forbol, pode limitar sua utilização. Assim, objetivou-se avaliar a toxicidade do pericarpo. Vinte ovinos foram distribuídos em quatro grupos - um grupo-controle, que não recebeu a planta, e três experimentais, que receberam o pericarpo nas concentrações de 15% (G15, 30% (G30 e 45% (G45, durante 23 dias. Após o 10º dia, a ingestão do pericarpo promoveu redução do consumo de alimento, diarreia, desidratação e caquexia. Todos os grupos tratados apresentaram redução na concentração de fosfatase alcalina. Animais do G30 apresentaram redução na concentração de ureia e proteínas totais e elevação de potássio e sódio. No G45, houve aumento de aspartato aminotransferase, albumina, creatinina bilirrubina indireta e total. A avaliação anatomo-histopatológica revelou ascite, hidropericárdio, congestão no trato gastrintestinal e nos pulmões, edema pulmonar, aderências à parede torácica, degeneração hepática centrolobular e das células tubulares renais, pneumonia linfo-histiocitica e enterite linfoplasmocitária e histiocítica. À análise fitoquímica, constatou-se 0,3845mg de ésteres de forbol/g de pericarpo. Conclui-se que o pericarpo de J. curcas é tóxico, não sendo recomendado para alimentação de ovinos.

  18. Differential effect of bryostatin 1 and phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate on HOP-92 cell proliferation is mediated by down-regulation of protein kinase Cdelta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Sung Hee; Hyman, Tehila; Blumberg, Peter M

    2006-07-15

    Bryostatin 1 is currently in clinical trials as a cancer chemotherapeutic agent. Although bryostatin 1, like phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA), is a potent activator of protein kinase C (PKC), it induces only a subset of those responses induced by PMA and antagonizes others. We report that, in the HOP-92 non-small cell lung cancer line, bryostatin 1 induced a biphasic proliferative response, with maximal proliferation at 1 to 10 nmol/L. This biphasic response mirrored a biphasic suppression of the level of PKCdelta protein, with maximal suppression likewise at 1 to 10 nmol/L bryostatin 1. The typical phorbol ester PMA, in contrast to bryostatin 1, had no effect on the level of PKCdelta and modest suppression of cell proliferation, particularly evident at later treatment times. Flow cytometric analysis revealed changes in the fraction of cells in the G0-G1 and S phases corresponding to the effects on proliferation. Cells overexpressing PKCdelta exhibited a lower rate of cell proliferation compared with control untreated cells and showed neither a proliferative response nor a loss of PKCdelta in response to bryostatin 1. Conversely, treatment with PKCdelta small interfering RNA significantly increased the cellular growth compared with controls. We conclude that the differential effect on cellular proliferation induced by bryostatin 1 compared with PMA reflects the differential suppression of PKCdelta.

  19. Urokinase receptor mRNA level and gene transcription are strongly and rapidly increased by phorbol myristate acetate in human monocyte-like U937 cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, L R; Rønne, E; Roldan, A L;

    1991-01-01

    We have studied the effect of the tumor promotor phorbol myristate acetate (PMA) on the level of mRNA for the receptor for urokinase-type plasminogen activator (u-PAR) in the human monocyte-like cell line U937. PMA causes an early increase in the u-PAR mRNA level which reaches a maximal 50-fold...... enhancement after 24 h of treatment. Half-maximal stimulation occurs at approximately 5 nM PMA. The effect is observed only with phorbol esters that also act as tumor promotors. The protein synthesis inhibitor cycloheximide (10 micrograms/ml) also increases the level of u-PAR mRNA. Nuclear run-on experiments...... show a time-dependent increase in the u-PAR gene transcription rate after exposure of the cells to PMA. The PMA-induced increase in u-PAR mRNA is paralleled by a time-dependent increase in u-PAR protein as detected by cross-linking studies with radiolabeled ligand. We conclude that PMA stimulates...

  20. Microwave assisted biodiesel production from Jatropha curcas L. seed by two-step in situ process: optimization using response surface methodology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaliliannosrati, Hamidreza; Amin, Nor Aishah Saidina; Talebian-Kiakalaieh, Amin; Noshadi, Iman

    2013-05-01

    The synthesis of fatty acid ethyl esters (FAEEs) by a two-step in situ (reactive) esterification/transesterification from Jatropha curcas L. (JCL) seeds using microwave system has been investigated. Free fatty acid was reduced from 14% to less than 1% in the first step using H2SO4 as acid catalyst after 35 min of microwave irradiation heating. The organic phase in the first step was subjected to a second reaction by adding 5 N KOH in ethanol as the basic catalyst. Response surface methodology (RSM) based on central composite design (CCD) was utilized to design the experiments and analyze the influence of process variables (particles seed size, time of irradiation, agitation speed and catalyst loading) on conversion of triglycerides (TGs) in the second step. The highest triglycerides conversion to fatty acid ethyl esters (FAEEs) was 97.29% at the optimum conditions:seed size, 12.21 min irradiation time, 8.15 ml KOH catalyst loading and 331.52 rpm agitation speed in the 110 W microwave power system.

  1. Relative Coagulation Effectiveness of Jatropha curcas Press Cake (Physic Nut and Aluminium Sulphate in Purifying Domestic Sewage

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    Kamoru Akanni ADENIRAN

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available An investigation was conducted on the relative effectiveness of using press cake of dried Jatropha curcas (Physic nut seed and alum (Aluminium sulphate for the purification of domestic sewage. The experimental design used was Completely Randomized Design (CRD replicated three times. Physical and chemical properties of domestic sewage were investigated before and after the purification exercise. Treatments imposed included: the control culture (no alum and Jatropha, 10 mg/l of Aluminium Sulphate (alum treatment, 80 mg/l of J. curcas treatment, 100 mg/l of J. curcas treatment and 120 mg/l of J. curcas treatment. The results showed that for the total dissolved solids, cultured tanks treated with 80 mg/l of J. curcas reduced the sewage concentration from 30.1 mg/l to 23.20 mg/l, Biological Oxygen Demand (BOD was reduced from 30.55 mg/l to 30.10 mg/l, increased acidity from 5.33 mg/l to 5.66 mg/l, reduced alkalinity from 6.35 mg/l to 6.0 mg/l, reduced pH from 7.6 to 6.55, and likewise 10 mg/l of alum also reduced pH from 7.6 to 6.55. The cultured tanks treated with 120 mg/l of J. curcas performed best in reducing turbidity and Chemical Oxygen Demand (COD of the sewage. The turbidity was reduced from 5.99 NTU to 5.6 NTU; 120 mg/l of J. curcas also reduced total hardness from 9.6 mg/l to 7.15 mg/l, total solids from 55.6 mg/l to 55.17 mg/l. Cultured tanks treated with 10 mg/l of alum reduced total dissolved solids from 30.1 mg/l to 24.30 mg/l, while those treated with 80 mg/l of J. curcas reduced it from 30.1 mg/l to 23.20 mg/l, 100 mg/l and 120 mg/l of J. curcas reduced it to 25.20 mg/l. Total suspended solids increased from 25.5 mg/l to 30.96 mg/l for 10 mg/l of alum, to 30.22 mg/l for 80 mg/l of J. curcas, 30.26 mg/l for 100 mg/l of J. curcas and 30.38 mg/l for 120 mg/l of J. curcas. Conductivity increased withion the study period from 525 μS/cm to 830 μS/cm for 10 mg/l of alum, to 590 μS/cm for 80 mg/l of J. curcas, 634 μS/cm for 100 mg/l of J

  2. Combining Ability for Germination Traits in Jatropha curcas L.

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    A. K. M. Aminul Islam

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Six parents of Jatropha curcas were crossed in half diallel fashion, and the F1s were evaluated to determine the combining ability for nine germination parameters. The ratio between general combining ability (GCA and specific combining ability (SCA variances indicated preponderance of additive gene action for all the characters except germination percentage, time of 50% germination, seedling length, and seedling vigor index. The parents P1 and P2 were the best general combiner for most of the characters studied. The cross P1×P5 was the best specific combiner for speed of emergence, germination percentage, germination energy, germination index, and seedling vigor index, the cross P2×P5 for mean germination time, time of 50% germination, and seedling length, and the cross P4×P5 for number of days to first germination. The germination percentage varied from 58.06 to 92.76% among the parents and 53.43 to 98.96% among the hybrids. The highest germination (98.96% was observed in hybrid P2×P4, and none of the hybrids or parents showed 100% germination. The highest germination index (GI and seedling vigor index (SVI were found in hybrid P1×P5 and P2×P5, respectively. The results of this study provide clue for the improvement of Jatropha variety through breeding program.

  3. Combining ability for germination traits in Jatropha curcas L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Islam, A K M Aminul; Anuar, Nurina; Yaakob, Zahira; Ghani, Jaharah A; Osman, Mohamad

    2013-01-01

    Six parents of Jatropha curcas were crossed in half diallel fashion, and the F 1s were evaluated to determine the combining ability for nine germination parameters. The ratio between general combining ability (GCA) and specific combining ability (SCA) variances indicated preponderance of additive gene action for all the characters except germination percentage, time of 50% germination, seedling length, and seedling vigor index. The parents P 1 and P 2 were the best general combiner for most of the characters studied. The cross P 1 × P 5 was the best specific combiner for speed of emergence, germination percentage, germination energy, germination index, and seedling vigor index, the cross P 2 × P 5 for mean germination time, time of 50% germination, and seedling length, and the cross P 4 × P 5 for number of days to first germination. The germination percentage varied from 58.06 to 92.76% among the parents and 53.43 to 98.96% among the hybrids. The highest germination (98.96%) was observed in hybrid P 2 × P 4, and none of the hybrids or parents showed 100% germination. The highest germination index (GI) and seedling vigor index (SVI) were found in hybrid P 1 × P 5 and P 2 × P 5, respectively. The results of this study provide clue for the improvement of Jatropha variety through breeding program.

  4. Biomass and carbon stock in Jatropha curcas L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Moreira Miquelino Eleto Torres

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available This study aims to quantify the biomass and carbon stock in a crop of physic nut Jatropha curcas in Viçosa-MG at age three years. For biomass quantification, the direct or destructive method was applied to sample plants selected according to height, crown diameter and number of branches. For the determination of dry biomass in the field, the proportionality method was used. The determination of total carbon content was done in the Laboratory of Forest Soils of the Federal University of Viçosa, and the estimation of CO2 equivalent was based on the 3.67 factor. The carbon stock found in the third year of cultivation was 4.182 tC.ha-1 (15.349 tCO2-e.ha-1 and the mean annual increment (MAI was 1.394 tC.ha-1.year-1. Results revealed that the potential carbon increment in the physic nut crop is similar to values found in other crops and natural forests yet lower than in eucalyptus crops.

  5. Improving Jatropha curcas seed protein recovery by using counter current multistage extraction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lestari, D.; Mulder, W.J.; Sanders, J.P.M.

    2010-01-01

    Jatropha curcas seed press cake contains 23 wt% proteins (dry basis). Due to the toxic compounds in Jatropha, we will use the proteins for non-food applications. Related to non-food applications, an efficient protein extraction to obtain a high protein recovery and high protein concentration with go

  6. Manipulation of Auxin Response Factor 19 affects seed size in the woody perennial Jatropha curcas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yanwei; Wang, Chunming; Wang, Ning; Jiang, Xiyuan; Mao, Huizhu; Zhu, Changxiang; Wen, Fujiang; Wang, Xianghua; Lu, Zhijun; Yue, Genhua; Xu, Zengfu; Ye, Jian

    2017-01-01

    Seed size is a major determinant of seed yield but few is known about the genetics controlling of seed size in plants. Phytohormones cytokinin and brassinosteroid were known to be involved in the regulation of herbaceous plant seed development. Here we identified a homolog of Auxin Response Factor 19 (JcARF19) from a woody plant Jatropha curcas and genetically demonstrated its functions in controlling seed size and seed yield. Through Virus Induced Gene Silencing (VIGS), we found that JcARF19 was a positive upstream modulator in auxin signaling and may control plant organ size in J. curcas. Importantly, transgenic overexpression of JcARF19 significantly increased seed size and seed yield in plants Arabidopsis thaliana and J. curcas, indicating the importance of auxin pathway in seed yield controlling in dicot plants. Transcripts analysis indicated that ectopic expression of JcARF19 in J. curcas upregulated auxin responsive genes encoding essential regulators in cell differentiation and cytoskeletal dynamics of seed development. Our data suggested the potential of improving seed traits by precisely engineering auxin signaling in woody perennial plants. PMID:28102350

  7. Planting Jatropha curcas on Constrained Land: Emission and Effects from Land Use Change

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. S. Firdaus

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A study was carried out to assess carbon emission and carbon loss caused from land use change (LUC of converting a wasteland into a Jatropha curcas plantation. The study was conducted for 12 months at a newly established Jatropha curcas plantation in Port Dickson, Malaysia. Assessments of soil carbon dioxide (CO2 flux, changes of soil total carbon and plant biomass loss and growth were made on the wasteland and on the established plantation to determine the effects of land preparation (i.e., tilling and removal of the wasteland's native vegetation. Overall soil CO2 flux showed no significant difference (<0.05 between the two plots while no significant changes (<0.05 on soil total carbon at both plots were detected. It took 1.5 years for the growth of Jatropha curcas to recover the biomass carbon stock lost during land conversion. As far as the present study is concerned, converting wasteland to Jatropha curcas showed no adverse effects on the loss of carbon from soil and biomass and did not exacerbate soil respiration.

  8. Tree or shrub: a functional branch analysis of Jatropha curcas L.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tjeuw, J.; Mulia, R.; Slingerland, M.A.; Noordwijk, van M.

    2015-01-01

    Jatropha curcas is an oil-bearing semi-evergreen shrub or small tree with potential as a source of sustainable biofuel, yet information regarding vegetative and fruit biomass in relation to plant architecture is lacking. Research conducted in Indonesia used the tree based functional branch analysis

  9. Rational use of Jatropha curcas L. in food and medicine : from toxicity problems to safe applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Insanu, Muhamad; Dimaki, Chryssa; Wilkins, Richard; Brooker, John; van der Linde, Piet; Kayser, Oliver

    Jatropha curcas L. has become an important plant for biorefinery and production of biodiesel. From its ethnobotanical use, the plant is known for several activities which are associated with high toxicity. The latest development in engineering technology enables detoxification of native oil and

  10. Jatropha curcas L., a multipurpose stress resistant plant with a potential for ethnomedicine and renewable energy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Debnath, Mousumi; Bisen, P S

    2008-08-01

    Jatropha curcas is a stress--resistant perennial plant growing on marginal soils. This plant is widespread throughout arid and semiarid tropical regions of the world and has been used as a traditional folk medicine in many countries. J.curcas is a source of several secondary metabolites of medicinal importance. The leaf, fruits, latex and bark contain glycosides, tannins, phytosterols, flavonoids and steroidal sapogenins that exhibit wide ranging medicinal properties. The plant products exhibit anti-bacterial and anti-fungal activities. The paper highlights the ability of various metabolites present in the plant to act as therapeutic agents and plant protectants. The plant is designated as an energy plant and use of J.curcas oil as biodiesel is a promising and commercially viable alternative to diesel oil. The seeds of the plant are not only a source of biodiesel but also contain several metabolites of pharmaceutical importance. Commercial exploitation for biopharmaceuticals and bio-energy production are some of the prospective future potential of this plant. Further reclamation of wastelands and dry lands is also possible with J.curcas cultivation.

  11. Preparation and properties of binderless boards from Jatropha curcas L. seed cake

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hidayat, H.; Keijsers, E.R.P.; Prijanto, U.; Dam, J.E.G. van; Heeres, H.J.

    2014-01-01

    The potential of Jatropha curcas L. seed cake after oil extraction (expelling of seeds followed by hexane extraction) as a raw material for binderless boards was investigated. The composition of the de-oiled seed cake was investigated using a range of techniques (proximate-, ultimate analyses, TG/DG

  12. Ants contribute significantly to the pollination of a biodiesel plant, Jatropha curcas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Chang W; Li, Kun; Chen, Xiao M; Huang, Zachary Y

    2012-10-01

    Ants are the most abundant visitors to the flowers of Jatropha curcas L., but it is not clear how much they contribute to the pollination of this plant. In this study, we observed floral visitor assemblage and foraging behavior of ants, measured pollen loads carried by ants and deposited on stigmas, and determined the contribution of ants to the female reproductive success of J. curcas through exclusion experiments. Ants were the most abundant pollinators, accounting for 71.03 and 78.17% of total visits at two study sites. Among different ant species, Tapinoma melanocephalum (F.) is always the most abundant and the only common ant species at two study sites, which might suggest its important role in the pollination of J. curcas. Pollen loads carried by ants were significantly different among different species at two study sites. Pollen loads carried by ants increased with increased body length. Although the flowers exposed only to the ants produced less fruit than those exposed only to the winged visitors, ants alone resulted in almost 60% fruit set. Thus, ants could play a major role in the pollination of J. curcas if winged insects are absent.

  13. Rational use of Jatropha curcas L. in food and medicine : from toxicity problems to safe applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Insanu, Muhamad; Dimaki, Chryssa; Wilkins, Richard; Brooker, John; van der Linde, Piet; Kayser, Oliver

    2013-01-01

    Jatropha curcas L. has become an important plant for biorefinery and production of biodiesel. From its ethnobotanical use, the plant is known for several activities which are associated with high toxicity. The latest development in engineering technology enables detoxification of native oil and othe

  14. Reply to Jongschaap et al.: The water footprint of Jatropha curcas under poor growing conditions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoekstra, A.Y.; Gerbens-Leenes, P.W.; Van der Meer, T.H.

    2009-01-01

    Hoekstra, A.Y, Gerbens-Leenes, W. and Van der Meer, T.H., 2009. Reply to Jongschaap et al.: The water footprint of Jatropha curcas under poor growing conditions. Proceedings of the National Academy of Science (PNAS), 106 (42), E119

  15. Biological control of phytophagous arthropods in the physic nut tree Jatropha curcas L. in Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flávio Lemes Fernandes

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Jatropha curcas has a high biofuel oil content, which could replace polluting fuels, and has great potential for large scale monoculture cultivation in the conventional system. We explored the occurrence, spatial distribution and the functional response of the main phytophagous species of this plant and their natural enemies to explore the potential for conservative biological control. We began sampling phytophagous species and predators when J. curcas plants were six months old. The most common species of phytophagous insects were nymphs and adults of Empoasca kraemeri, followed by Frankliniella schultzei and Myzus persicae. Among the predators, Ricoseius loxocheles, Iphiseioides zuluagai, Araneidae, larvae and adults of Psyllobora vigintimaculata and Anthicus sp. were the most frequently encountered. The most common parasitoids were the families Encyrtidae and Braconidae. The highest densities of E. kraemeri and F. schultzei on the edges of the J. curcas crop follow spatial patterns similar to those of their natural enemies I. zuluagai and Anthicus sp. These arthropods can be considered efficient predators of immature stages of E. kraemeri and F. schultzei on J. curcas.

  16. Proteomic analysis of oil bodies in mature Jatropha curcas seeds with different lipid content.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hui; Wang, Cuiping; Chen, Fan; Shen, Shihua

    2015-01-15

    To reveal the difference among three mature Jatropha curcas seeds (JcVH, variant with high lipid content; JcW, wild type and JcVL, variant with low lipid content) with different lipid content, comparative proteomics was employed to profile the changes of oil body (OB) associated protein species by using gels-based proteomic technique. Eighty-three protein species were successfully identified through LTQ-ES-MS/MS from mature JcW seeds purified OBs. Two-dimensional electrophoresis analysis of J. curcas OB associated protein species revealed they had essential interactions with other organelles and demonstrated that oleosin and caleosin were the most abundant OB structural protein species. Twenty-eight OB associated protein species showed significant difference among JcVH, JcW and JcVL according to statistical analysis. Complementary transient expression analysis revealed that calcium ion binding protein (CalBP) and glycine-rich RNA binding protein (GRP) were well targeted in OBs apart from the oleosins. This study demonstrated that ratio of lipid content to caleosins abundance was involved in the regulation of OB size, and the mutant induced by ethylmethylsulfone treatment might be related to the caleosin like protein species. These findings are important for biotechnological improvement with the aim to alter the lipid content in J. curcas seeds. The economic value of Jatropha curcas largely depends on the lipid content in seeds which are mainly stored in the special organelle called oil bodies (OBs). In consideration of the biological importance and applications of J. curcas OB in seeds, it is necessary to further explore the components and functions of J. curcas OBs. Although a previous study concerning the J. curcas OB proteome revealed oleosins were the major OB protein component and additional protein species were similar to those in other oil seed plants, these identified OB associated protein species were corresponding to the protein bands instead of protein

  17. Aquaporin JcPIP2 is involved in drought responses in Jatropha curcas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ying; Wang, Yunxiao; Jiang, Luding; Xu, Ying; Wang, Yingchun; Lu, Daihua; Chen, Fang

    2007-10-01

    Water channel proteins, aquaporins, play fundamental roles in transmembrane water movements in plants. A new full-length cDNA encoding aquaporin was isolated from the seedlings of Jatropha curcas. The gene of the plasma membrane intrinsic protein (PIP) from J. curcas (JcPIP2) contained an 843 bp open reading frame encoding a protein of 280 amino acids. The amino acid sequence showed 94% identity with Ricinus communis PIP. Injection of JcPIP2 complementary RNA into Xenopus oocytes increased 10-fold the osmotic water permeability of the oocytes. Immunodetection of JcPIP2 with anti-JcPIP2 antibody indicated that this protein is ubiquitously located in all tested tissues of the plant. To investigate the relationship between aquaporins and drought resistance in J. curcas, the abundance of JcPIP2 was examined in seedlings of two J. curcas populations, GaoYou CSC63 and YanBian S1, under water deficit with PEG6000. Under field conditions, those two populations, GaoYou CSC63 was resistant to water deficit, but YanBian S1 was sensitive to water deprivation. With the increasing degree of drought stress, JcPIP2 level increased in seedlings of GaoYou CSC63, whereas there was no significant change in seedlings of YanBian S1. Compared with YanBian S1, GaoYou CSC63 also showed higher root hydraulic conductivity and lower decreasing trend in the seedlings under water deficit. These results indicated that JcPIP2 probably played a role in drought resistance in J. curcas.

  18. Aquaporin JcPIP2 is Involved in Drought Responses in Jatropha curcas

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ying ZHANG; Yunxiao WANG; Luding JIANG; Ying XU; Yingchun WANG; Daihua LU; Fang CHEN

    2007-01-01

    Water channel proteins, aquaporins, play fundamental roles in transmembrane water movements in plants. A new full-length cDNA encoding aquaporin was isolated from the seedlings of Jatropha curcas.The gene of the plasma membrane intrinsic protein (PIP) from J. curcas (JcPIP2) contained an 843 bp open reading frame encoding a protein of 280 amino acids. The amino acid sequence showed 94% identity with Ricinus communis PIP. Injection of JcPIP2 complementary RNA into Xenopus oocytes increased 10-fold the osmotic water permeability of the oocytes. Immunodetection of JcPIP2 with anti-JcPIP2 antibody indicated that this protein is ubiquitously located in all tested tissues of the plant. To investigate the relationship between aquaporins and drought resistance in J. curcas, the abundance of JcPIP2 was examined in seedlings of two J. curcas populations, Gao You CSC63 and YanBian S1, under water deficit with PEG6000. Under field conditions, those two populations, Gao You CSC63 was resistant to water deficit, but YanBian S1 was sensitive to water deprivation. With the increasing degree of drought stress, JcPIP2 level increased in seedlings of Gao You CSC63, whereas there was no significant change in seedlings of YanBian S1. Compared with YanBian S1, GaoYou CSC63 also showed higher root hydraulic conductivity and lower decreasing trend in the seedlings under water deficit. These results indicated that JcPIP2 probably played a role in drought resistance in J. curcas.

  19. Phorbol myristate acetate and dioctanoylglycerol inhibit transport in rabbit proximal convoluted tubule

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baum, M.; Hays, S.R. (Univ. of Texas Health Science Center, Dallas (USA))

    1988-01-01

    The present in vitro microperfusion study examined the effect of protein kinase C activation on transport in the rabbit proximal convoluted tubule (PCT). PCT were perfused with an ultrafiltrate-like solution and were bathed in a serumlike albumin solution. Addition of phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate, an activator of protein kinase C, inhibited volume absorption from 1.06 {plus minus} 0.10 to 0.77 {plus minus} 0.07 nl{center dot}mm{sup {minus}1}min{sup {minus}1}, and 0.76 {plus minus} 0.14 to 0.48 {plus minus} 0.08 nl{center dot}mm{sup {minus}1}{center dot}min{sup {minus}1}, respectively. Bath phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate had no effect on volume absorption. In contrast, bath 4{alpha}-phorbol, an inactive phorbol that does not activate protein kinase C, had no effect on J{sub v}. Bath L-{alpha}-dioctanoylglycerol, another known activator of protein kinase C, inhibited volume absorption. A 10-fold lower concentration of L-{alpha}-dioctanoylglycerol had no effect on J{sub v}. Both 5 x 10{sup {minus}8} M phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate and 10{sup {minus}4} M L-{alpha}-dioctanoylglycerol inhibited glucose, bicarbonate, and chloride transport in the PCT. These data are consistent with protein kinase C activation playing a role in the modulation of proximal tubular transport.

  20. Kinetics and Thermodynamics of Sorption of 4-Nitrophenol on Activated Kaolinitic Clay and Jatropha Curcas Activated Carbon from Aqueous Solution

    OpenAIRE

    Samsudeen Olanrewaju Azeez; Folahan Amao Adekola

    2016-01-01

    Adsorption behaviour of 4-nitrophenol (4-NP) on activated kaolinitic clay and Jatropha curcas activated carbon was investigated. The kaolinitic clay and Jatropha curcas were activated with 1 M HNO3 and 0.5 M NaOH respectively and were characterized by XRF, XRD, BET, SEM and FTIR techniques. The effects of processing parameters, such as initial 4-NP concentration, temperature, pH, contact time and adsorbent dosage on the adsorption process were investigated. The results obtained showed that Ja...

  1. Combined effects of low light and water stress on Jatropha curcas L. promotes shoot growth and morphological adjustment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabella Christina Silveira Carneiro

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Jatropha curcas (physic nut is a plant with economic and pharmaceutical uses. Basic studies on the influence of environmental factors on the early development of J. curcas are important for improving farming techniques and increasing productivity. This study investigated the adjustments of J. curcas to the environmental factors of drought and light stress in order to determine which factors most strongly affect the allocation of biomass during early growth. Leaves, stems, and roots of young plants were sampled and leaf area was measured during January and June in 2011. Plants of J. curcas that were grown in shade and subjected to water stress showed higher biomass allocation to aerial parts (mainly stems, which can be explained as a strategy for maximizing carbon assimilation. The pattern of biomass allocation between aerial components and the root system changed in plants grown in shade. During June 2011, biomass in shade-grown J. curcas was preferentially allocated to stems, indicating long-term adjustment. The lower biomass allocation to the root system suggests reduced exploitation of soil water even when this resource is scarce. Thus, over the long term, growth of J. curcas may be compromised by the combined effects of light stress and water deficit.

  2. Repertoire of SSRs in the Castor Bean Genome and Their Utilization in Genetic Diversity Analysis in Jatropha curcas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arti Sharma

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Castor bean and Jatropha contain seed oil of industrial importance, share taxonomical and biochemical similarities, which can be explored for identifying SSRs in the whole genome sequence of castor bean and utilized in Jatropha curcas. Whole genome analysis of castor bean identified 5,80,986 SSRs with a frequency of 1 per 680 bp. Genomic distribution of SSRs revealed that 27% were present in the non-genic region whereas 73% were also present in the putative genic regions with 26% in 5′UTRs, 25% in introns, 16% in 3′UTRs and 6% in the exons. Dinucleotide repeats were more frequent in introns, 5′UTRs and 3′UTRs whereas trinucleotide repeats were predominant in the exons. The transferability of randomly selected 302 SSRs, from castor bean to 49 J. curcas genotypes and 8 Jatropha species other than J. curcas, showed that 211 (~70% amplified on Jatropha out of which 7.58% showed polymorphisms in J. curcas genotypes and 12.32% in Jatropha species. The higher rate of transferability of SSR markers from castor bean to Jatropha coupled with a good level of PIC (polymorphic information content value (0.2 in J. curcas genotypes and 0.6 in Jatropha species suggested that SSRs would be useful in germplasm analysis, linkage mapping, diversity studies and phylogenetic relationships, and so forth, in J. curcas as well as other Jatropha species.

  3. Repertoire of SSRs in the Castor Bean Genome and Their Utilization in Genetic Diversity Analysis in Jatropha curcas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Arti; Chauhan, Rajinder Singh

    2011-01-01

    Castor bean and Jatropha contain seed oil of industrial importance, share taxonomical and biochemical similarities, which can be explored for identifying SSRs in the whole genome sequence of castor bean and utilized in Jatropha curcas. Whole genome analysis of castor bean identified 5,80,986 SSRs with a frequency of 1 per 680 bp. Genomic distribution of SSRs revealed that 27% were present in the non-genic region whereas 73% were also present in the putative genic regions with 26% in 5'UTRs, 25% in introns, 16% in 3'UTRs and 6% in the exons. Dinucleotide repeats were more frequent in introns, 5'UTRs and 3'UTRs whereas trinucleotide repeats were predominant in the exons. The transferability of randomly selected 302 SSRs, from castor bean to 49 J. curcas genotypes and 8 Jatropha species other than J. curcas, showed that 211 (∼70%) amplified on Jatropha out of which 7.58% showed polymorphisms in J. curcas genotypes and 12.32% in Jatropha species. The higher rate of transferability of SSR markers from castor bean to Jatropha coupled with a good level of PIC (polymorphic information content) value (0.2 in J. curcas genotypes and 0.6 in Jatropha species) suggested that SSRs would be useful in germplasm analysis, linkage mapping, diversity studies and phylogenetic relationships, and so forth, in J. curcas as well as other Jatropha species.

  4. Bio-oil extraction of Jatropha curcas with ionic liquid co-solvent: Fate of biomass protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Severa, Godwin; Edwards, Melisa; Cooney, Michael J

    2017-02-01

    The fate of oil-seed biomass protein has been tracked through all steps of a multi-phase extraction process using an ionic liquid based co-solvent system previously demonstrated to extract bio-oil and phorbol esters and to recover fermentable sugars from Jatropha oil seed. These analyses, however, did not address the fate of biomass protein. This work demonstrated that the majority of protein (∼86%) tracked with the biomass with the balance lost to co-solvent (∼12%) and methanol (∼2%) washes. A significant portion of the ionic liquid remained with the treated biomass and required aggressive methanol washes to recover. A system analysis showed a net-positive energy balance and thus the potential of this system to produce both bio-oil and protein-rich toxin-free biomass. While these results further support Jatropha as an oil seed crop, the additional costs of solvent recovery will need to be addressed if commercialization is to be realized.

  5. Ester Tuiksoo / Ester Tuiksoo ; interv. Piret Tali

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Tuiksoo, Ester, 1965-

    2007-01-01

    Juhan Partsi valitsuse (05.04.2004-13.04.2005) ja Andrus Ansipi valitsuse (13.04.2005-) põllumajandusminister Ester Tuiksoo oma lapsepõlvest ja elukutsevalikust, poliitilise karjääri algusest ja erakonna valikust, ministritöö kogemustest, naistest poliitikas

  6. Ester Tuiksoo / Ester Tuiksoo ; interv. Piret Tali

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Tuiksoo, Ester, 1965-

    2007-01-01

    Juhan Partsi valitsuse (05.04.2004-13.04.2005) ja Andrus Ansipi valitsuse (13.04.2005-) põllumajandusminister Ester Tuiksoo oma lapsepõlvest ja elukutsevalikust, poliitilise karjääri algusest ja erakonna valikust, ministritöö kogemustest, naistest poliitikas

  7. Effect of the phorbol ester 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA) upon membrane ionic exchanges in sea urchin eggs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ciapa, B.; Payan, P. (UA 651 Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique, Nice (France)); Allemand, D. (Centre Scientifique de Monaco, Monte Carlo (Monaco))

    1989-12-01

    The effect of TPA (12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate) upon ionic exchanges was investigated in eggs of the sea urchin Arbacia lixula. Ouabain-sensitive {sup 86}Rb uptake and amiloride-sensitive {sup 24}Na influx were dramatically stimulated after TPA addition, indicating an enhancement of total ionic permeabilities. Stimulation by TPA of both Na{sup +}/H{sup +} and Na{sup +}/K{sup +} exchanges was canceled by amiloride, suggesting that activation of protein kinase C elicits, via Na{sup +}/H{sup +} activity, stimulation of the sodium pump. However, TPA did not stimulate sodium pump activity and Na{sup +}/H{sup +} exchange at the same rate as fertilization, probably because of an absence of calcium-dependent events. Further fertilization of TPA pretreated eggs triggered an enhancement of sodium pump activity when the TPA treatment duration did not exceed 10 minutes. It is suggested that TPA activates preexisting transporting mechanisms in plasma membranes of unfertilized eggs (Na{sup +} stat, pH stat).

  8. JWA deficiency suppresses dimethylbenz[a]anthracene-phorbol ester induced skin papillomas via inactivation of MAPK pathway in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhenghua Gong

    Full Text Available Our previous studies indicated that JWA plays an important role in DNA damage repair, cell migration, and regulation of MAPKs. In this study, we investigated the role of JWA in chemical carcinogenesis using conditional JWA knockout (JWA(Δ2/Δ2 mice and two-stage model of skin carcinogenesis. Our results indicated that JWA(Δ2/Δ2 mice were resistant to the development of skin papillomas initiated by 7, 12-dimethylbenz(aanthracene (DMBA followed by promotion with 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA. In JWA(Δ2/Δ2 mice, the induction of papilloma was delayed, and the tumor number and size were reduced. In primary keratinocytes from JWA(Δ2/Δ2 mice, DMBA exposure induced more intensive DNA damage, while TPA-promoted cell proliferation was reduced. The further mechanistic studies showed that JWA deficiency blocked TPA-induced activation of MAPKs and its downstream transcription factor Elk1 both in vitro and in vivo. JWA(Δ2/Δ2 mice are resistance to tumorigenesis induced by DMBA/TPA probably through inhibition of transcription factor Elk1 via MAPKs. These results highlight the importance of JWA in skin homeostasis and in the process of skin tumor development.

  9. Biofuels from Jatropha curcas oil – Perspectives for tropical regions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Becker Klaus

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Almost 40% of the world’s population of 6,7 billion people do not have access to affordable energy resources and drinking water of acceptable quality. But nothing is more important than the alleviation of hunger. The number of hungry people, according to the newest FAO statistics, has risen to close to one billion in 2008. Therefore, special attention needs to be given to research in food and agriculture. To this stock of global problems new challenges are added through the increase in human population of 80 million persons a year and the concomitant loss of large areas of former fertile agricultural land, mostly in the poorest countries. Jatropha curcas is the most primitive member of the large genus Euphorbiaceae. The name is derived from the Greek iatros (doctor and trophe (food. Jatropha curcas is a perennial plant, native and widely spread throughout the tropics. It is not grazed by animals, grows readily on degraded lands, is drought and to some extent disease resistant. It is a multipurpose plant. There are two genotypes of Jatropha curcas, a toxic and a non-toxic one. The latter genotype is found in Mexico only. Well developed dry seeds from Jatropha curcas weigh between 650- 750 mg and contain 30-35% of oil that is suitable for conversion into biodiesel of high quality by the conventional, proven processes. The kernel forms around 65% of the seeds. The de-oiled kernel meal has a crude protein content of between 58% and 60% and a favourable amino acid profile. Extracts of the toxic genotype provide chemicals with potential in medicinal, pharmaceutical and bio-pesticide application. In contrast to other fossil fuel alternatives, like biofuels from food crops such as maize, soybean, sugar cane and palm, bioenergy from Jatropha curcas grown on wasteland incurs no carbon debt and thus, offers immediate and sustained greenhouse gas advantages. Potential benefits of large scale Jatropha plantations on degraded land are expected to be

  10. Characterizing parameters of Jatropha curcas cell cultures for microgravity studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vendrame, Wagner A.; Pinares, Ania

    2013-06-01

    Jatropha (Jatropha curcas) is a tropical perennial species identified as a potential biofuel crop. The oil is of excellent quality and it has been successfully tested as biodiesel and in jet fuel mixes. However, studies on breeding and genetic improvement of jatropha are limited. Space offers a unique environment for experiments aiming at the assessment of mutations and differential gene expression of crops and in vitro cultures of plants are convenient for studies of genetic variation as affected by microgravity. However, before microgravity studies can be successfully performed, pre-flight experiments are necessary to characterize plant material and validate flight hardware environmental conditions. Such preliminary studies set the ground for subsequent spaceflight experiments. The objectives of this study were to compare the in vitro growth of cultures from three explant sources (cotyledon, leaf, and stem sections) of three jatropha accessions (Brazil, India, and Tanzania) outside and inside the petriGAP, a modified group activation pack (GAP) flight hardware to fit petri dishes. In vitro jatropha cell cultures were established in petri dishes containing a modified MS medium and maintained in a plant growth chamber at 25 ± 2 °C in the dark. Parameters evaluated were surface area of the explant tissue (A), fresh weight (FW), and dry weight (DW) for a period of 12 weeks. Growth was observed for cultures from all accessions at week 12, including subsequent plantlet regeneration. For all accessions differences in A, FW and DW were observed for inside vs. outside the PetriGAPs. Growth parameters were affected by accession (genotype), explant type, and environment. The type of explant influenced the type of cell growth and subsequent plantlet regeneration capacity. However, overall cell growth showed no abnormalities. The present study demonstrated that jatropha in vitro cell cultures are suitable for growth inside PetriGAPs for a period of 12 weeks. The parameters

  11. Determination of Some Physical Properties of Jatropha (Jatropha Curcas Oil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olasheu, T.I

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The energy crisis and shortage of fuel emanating from total dependence on mineral oil with resultant socioeconomic problems demand the need to explore the use of renewable energy as alternative. This study evaluates the physical properties Jatropha (Jatropha curcas oil as alternative base oil for lubricant in auto engines. A quantity of 32 kg dried base decorticated seeds of Jatropha was locally obtained. Volume of 4 litres of Jatropha oil was extracted from the seeds using existing hydraulic press machine, while its physical properties was determined through laboratory analytical procedure of American Society for Testing and Materials analytical standard 960-52 (ASTM,D960-52. The properties determined were: viscosity, density, flash point, pour point, melting point, refractive index, specific heat and thermal conductivity. Comparisons of the properties were also made with the standard lubricant (SAE 40 engine oil. The principles of flow theories were employed to develop heat generated equation in terms of temperature, density and viscosity of the oil and a computer program in C++ language was thus written. Sensitivity analysis was performed on the effect of temperature change, (30 oC to 100 oC on value of density and viscosity. The physical properties of Jatropha oil are viscosity (162.8 cst, density (0.920 g/ml, flash point (113oC, pour point (7.7oC, melting point (4 to 5oC, refractive index (1.435, specific heat (0.082 KJ/Kg/K and thermal conductivity (4.250 W/moC. Comparative analysis showed that the values of viscosity, density, thermal conductivity and pour point for Jatropha oil were higher than the values of SAE 40 engine oil while specific heat, flash point and refractive index values of Jatropha oil were less than the values of SAE 40 engine oil. The result showed that the average values for density and viscosity of Jatropha oil were 890.75 Kgm-3 and 0.1385 N.S/m2 . Sensitivity analysis showed that Jatropha oil has highest density and

  12. Saponification of Jatropha curcas Seed Oil: Optimization by D-Optimal Design

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jumat Salimon

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study, the effects of ethanolic KOH concentration, reaction temperature, and reaction time to free fatty acid (FFA percentage were investigated. D-optimal design was employed to study significance of these factors and optimum condition for the technique predicted and evaluated. The optimum conditions for maximum FFA% were achieved when 1.75 M ethanolic KOH concentration was used as the catalyst, reaction temperature of 65°C, and reaction time of 2.0 h. This study showed that ethanolic KOH concentration was significant variable for saponification of J. curcas seed oil. In an 18-point experimental design, percentage of FFA for saponification of J. curcas seed oil can be raised from 1.89% to 102.2%.

  13. Does Biodiesel from Jatropha Curcas Represent a Sustainable Alternative Energy Source?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isidro Ovando-Medina

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Various government agencies around the world have proposed vegetable oils and their conversion to biodiesel as a renewable alternative to fossil fuels. Due to its adaptability to marginal soils and environments, the cultivation of Jatropha curcas is frequently mentioned as the best option for producing biodiesel. In the present work the current situation of proven and potential reserves of fossil fuel, and the production and consumption model for the same are analyzed, in order to later review the sustainability of the production process which begins with the cultivation of J. curcas, and culminates with the consumption of biodiesel. A review of the following topics is proposed in order to improve the sustainability of the process: areas destined for cultivation, use of external (chemical inputs in cultivation, processes for converting the vegetable oil to biodiesel, and, above all, the location for ultimate consumption of the biofuel.

  14. Reproductive biology of the biofuel plant Jatropha curcas in its center of origin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rincón-Rabanales, Manuel; Vargas-López, Laura I; Adriano-Anaya, Lourdes; Vázquez-Ovando, Alfredo; Salvador-Figueroa, Miguel; Ovando-Medina, Isidro

    2016-01-01

    In this work, we studied the main characteristics of flowering, reproductive system and diversity of pollinators for the biofuel plant Jatropha curcas (L.) in a site of tropical southeastern Mexico, within its center of origin. The plants were monoecious with inflorescences of unisexual flowers. The male flowers produced from 3062-5016 pollen grains (266-647 per anther). The plants produced fruits with both geitonogamy and xenogamy, although insect pollination significantly increased the number and quality of fruits. A high diversity of flower visiting insects (36 species) was found, of which nine were classified as efficient pollinators. The native stingless bees Scaptotrigona mexicana (Guérin-Meneville) and Trigona (Tetragonisca) angustula (Latreille) were the most frequent visitors and their presence coincided with the hours when the stigma was receptive. It is noteworthy that the female flowers open before the male flowers, favoring xenogamy, which may explain the high genetic variability reported in J. curcas for this region of the world.

  15. Antimicrobial Activity and Chemical Constituents of the Extract from Jatropha curcas Fruit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kanda Saosoong

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The antimicrobial activity and chemical constituents of the methanolic extract from J. curcas fruit were evaluated in this study. The crude extract was achieved by extraction with 60 % (v/v methanol. It showed the potencies of antimicrobial activity against P. putida, P. syringae pv. sesami, X. campestris, X. campestris pv. glycines, X. campestris pv. vesicatoria and R. solanacearum with the presence of inhibition zone in the range of 8.0 ± 0.0 to 13.7 ± 0.6 mm and MIC value at 214.29 ± 0.00 mg/mL. Furthermore, flavone compound can be proposed by the analysis of gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS. According to the group of flavonoid compounds have strong bioactive properties; the results suggested that J. curcas fruit has highly potential as effective natural bioactive sources.

  16. Cytological characterization of Jatropha curcas callus in different periods of cultivation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dalilhia Nazaré dos Santos

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The aimed was characterization and determining the time for Jatropha curcas callus subculture. The pattern of J. curcascallus development is sigmoidal with 5 distinct phases, and transplantation should be performed at the end of the deceleration phase(approximately day 28. During callus development, it was observed that at the onset of growth in the exponential phase the cells wereinternally disorganized; in the linear phase, respiratory metabolism was resumed through reorganization of the first mitochondria;and by the mid-deceleration phase, the cells were entirely active, and several organelles were detected. This organizational status wasmaintained throughout the stationary phase during which somatic pre-embryos were identified. At the end of the stationary phase, intracellulardisruption began, and the cells entered senescence, which characterized the decline phase for the J. curcas calli growth curve.

  17. Indirect measurement of photosynthetic pigments in the leaves of Jatropha curcas
    Quantificação indireta de pigmentos fotossintetizantes em folhas de Jatropha curcas

    OpenAIRE

    João Paulo Gonsiorkiewicz Rigon; Silvia Capuani; José Félix de Brito Neto; Napoleão Esberard de Macêdo Beltrão

    2013-01-01

    O objetivo do presente trabalho foi gerar modelos matemáticos capazes de reportar os pigmentos fotossintéticos e proteína solúvel nas folhas de Jatropha curcas por meio da relação entre leituras realizadas por espectrofotometria clássica e por clorofilômetro, ClorofiLOG® 1030. O trabalho foi realizado na Embrapa Algodão, na cidade de Campina Grande (PB). Para a análise indireta, foi usado o equipamento portátil para leituras em discos foliares com diferentes estádios de desenvolvimento. A clo...

  18. PLAGAS POTENCIALES DEL CULTIVO DE Jatropha curcas L., EN EL OCCIDENTE DE ANTIOQUIA, COLOMBIA POTENTIAL PEST OF Jatropha curcas L. CROP IN WESTERN ANTIOQUIA, COLOMBIA

    OpenAIRE

    Francisco Cristóbal Yepes Rodríguez; Manyer Ana Luisa Carmona; Norman Correa Zuluaga; Jhon Alveiro Quiroz Gamboa

    2012-01-01

    Resumen. Se da información sobre la biología, comportamiento, hábitos e importancia económica de las chinches Leptoglossus zonatus Dallas, 1852 (Hemiptera: Coreidae) y Agonosoma trilineatum (Fabricius, 1781) (Hemiptera: Scutelleridae) y se advierte sobre su presencia en una parcela de Jatropha curcas establecida en Santa Fe de Antioquia. Además, se halló que la pringamosa, Echidoscolus rubulosus es el hospedero silvestre de la segunda especie, en este ecosistema de bosque seco tropical. Se co...

  19. Kinetics and Thermodynamics of Oil Extraction from Jatropha curcas L. Using Ethanol as a Solvent

    OpenAIRE

    Silmara Bispo dos Santos; Marcio Arêdes Martins; Ana Lívia Caneschi; Paulo Rafael Morette Aguilar; Jane Sélia dos Reis Coimbra

    2015-01-01

    In the study the yield and kinetic and thermodynamic parameters of the oil extraction process from Jatropha curcas L. using ethanol as a solvent were evaluated for different temperatures, moisture contents of the solid phase, and particle sizes. The extraction process yield increased with contact time of solid particles with the solvent until reaching equilibrium (saturation of the solvent), for all the temperatures, moisture contents, and average particle sizes. These parameters significantl...

  20. GC-MS analysis of hexane extract of Jatropha curcas L. seed oil

    OpenAIRE

    Warra, Aliyu A.; Abubakar, Ahmed

    2015-01-01

    The spectral interpretation here was based on compounds identification. The following fatty acids were identified considering the peaks and library fragments; Oleic acid, Stearic acid, Palmitic acid Margaric acid, 6-Octadecenoic acid, Elaidic acid  Erucic acid, Methyl ricinoleate, 11-octadecenoic acid,10-undecenoic acid.  The results indicated that the Jatropha curcas L seed oil has potential in the production of cosmetics, perfumery and pharmaceuticals.The spectral interpretation here was ba...

  1. Comparative toxicity of Ricinus communis and Jatropha curcas in Brown Hisex chicks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    el Badwi, S M; Adam, S E; Hapke, H J

    1995-02-01

    Symptoms, lesions and changes in growth, haematology and clinical chemistry were investigated in Brown Hisex chicks fed diets containing 0.5% Jatropha curcas seed or 0.5% Ricinus communis seed. High mortality and more severe changes occurred in chicks on Ricinus diet than Jatropha feed. The results indicated that caution should be observed in tropical countries where people are accustomed to chewing castor bean when in need of a laxative.

  2. Assessment of genetic stability in micropropagules of Jatropha curcas genotypes by RAPD and AFLP analysis

    KAUST Repository

    Sharma, Sweta K.

    2011-07-01

    Jatropha curcas (Euphorbiaceae), a drought resistant non edible oil yielding plant, has acquired significant importance as an alternative renewable energy source. Low and inconsistent yields found in field plantations prompted for identification of high yielding clones and their large scale multiplication by vegetative propagation to obtain true to type plants. In the current investigation plantlets of J. curcas generated by axillary bud proliferation (micropropagation) using nodal segments obtained from selected high yielding genotypes were assessed for their genetic stability using Randomly Amplified Polymorphic DNA (RAPD) and Amplified Fragment Length Polymorphism (AFLP) analyses. For RAPD analysis, 21 out of 52 arbitrary decamer primers screened gave clear reproducible bands. In the micropropagated plantlets obtained from the 2nd sub-culture, 4 out of a total of 177 bands scored were polymorphic, but in the 8th and 16th sub-cultures (culture cycle) no polymorphisms were detected. AFLP analysis revealed 0.63%, 0% and 0% polymorphism in the 2nd, 8th and 16th generations, respectively. When different genotypes, viz. IC 56557 16, IC 56557 34 and IC 56557 13, were assessed by AFLP, 0%, 0.31% and 0.47% polymorphisms were found, respectively, indicating a difference in genetic stability among the different genotypes. To the best of our knowledge this is the first report on assessment of genetic stability of micropropagated plantlets in J. curcas and suggests that axillary shoot proliferation can safely be used as an efficient micropropagation method for mass propagation of J. curcas. © 2011 Elsevier B.V.

  3. KARAKTERISTIK PERTUMBUHAN JARAK PAGAR (Jatropha curcas L.) YANG DITAMBAHKAN CENDAWAN ENDOFIT PADA LAHAN PASCA TAMBANG TIMAH

    OpenAIRE

    Sukmarayu P. Gedoan; Alex Hartana; Hamim Hamim; Utut Widyastuti; Nampiah Sukarno

    2013-01-01

    Tin mining activity caused canging in physical and chemical characteristic of the soil that were not suitable for growth of plants. The objective of this experiment was to study accessions of Jatropha curcas planted on post tin mining land which were given endophyte. This research was conducted in a Sinar Baru village TS 133, district of Bangka, Bangka Belitung province for field research conducted in May 2007 to April 2008. The experimentas a factorial experiment in the design of the randomi...

  4. Transformation of Inhibitor of Meristem Activity (IMA) Gene into Jatropha curcas L.

    OpenAIRE

    Asri Pirade Paserang; Aris Tjahjoleksono; Utut Widyastuti; Suharsono Suharsono

    2015-01-01

    Jatropha is one of the many biodiesel plants developed in tropical countries. Efforts to increase its productivity can be done using various methods of breeding. One of the breeding methods is the introduction of genes into the Jatropha plant. The aim of this study is to assess the success of genetic transformation using the Inhibitor of Meristem Activity (IMA) gene in Jatropha curcas. The research procedures included inoculation of explants with Agrobacterium tumefaciens, callus induction, s...

  5. Penggunaan Polistirena Sulfonat Sebagai Katalis Transesterifikasi Minyak Jarak Pagar (Jatropha Curcas) Berkadar Asam Lemak Bebas Tinggi

    OpenAIRE

    Sidabutar, Adelina

    2012-01-01

    A transesterification of castor oil containing free fatty acid 7 % was catalysed by sulfonated polystyrene. Several factor reaction conditions such as mol ratio, temperature reaction, concentration of catalyst and interval time reaction has been observeted. General reaction materials involving castor oil (jatropha curcas), methanol, cosolvent eter, aerosyl, and polystyrene sulfonated were mixture in stainless stell reactor. The reaction was processed by using 50 gr castor oil, 26 ml methanol...

  6. Chitosan effects on phytopathogenic fungi and seed germination of Jatropha curcas L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diana Pabón-Baquero

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Jatropha curcas es una planta con gran potencial agrícola e industrial. En este estudio se aislaron dos hongos de semillas no germinadas. Los aislamientos fúngicos se identificaron morfológica y molecularmente como Fusarium equiseti y Curvularia lunata. Los efectos del quitosano se evaluaron sobre el crecimiento micelial, esporulación y germinación de esporas de F. equiseti y C. lunata. Además, se estudió el efecto sobre la germinación de las semillas de J. curcas. Los resultados demostraron que todas las concentraciones probadas de quitosano (0.5, 1.0, 2.0 y 4.0 mg·mL-1 inhibieron el crecimiento micelial de los hongos. Las respuestas de esporulación y germinación de esporas fueron diferentes dependiendo de la especie fúngica; el quitosano inhibió completamente la esporulación C. lunata y la germinación de esporas de F. equiseti. La inoculación con F. equiseti y C. lunata redujo la germinación de semillas de J. curcas 20 y 26.6 %, respectivamente; sin embargo, la aplicación de quitosano antes de la inoculación inhibió la actividad patogénica. En conclusión, el quitosano no afectó la germinación de las semillas y causó efectos inhibitorios en F. equiseti y C. lunata. Este es el primer reporte del efecto del quitosano en J. curcas.

  7. Extraction and purification of curcain, a protease from the latex of Jatropha curcas Linn.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nath, L K; Dutta, S K

    1991-02-01

    A proteolytic enzyme, curcain, has been extracted from the latex of Jatropha curcas Linn. The enzyme was purified by chromatography on carboxymethyl cellulose and gel filtration on Sephadex G-200. The homogeneity of protein associated with curcain was established by non-denatured polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis using a discontinuous buffer system. The molecular weight of curcain was estimated by Sephadex G-100 gel filtration using a calibration curve of standard proteins to be around 22,000 daltons.

  8. A novel chloroplastic isopentenyl diphosphate isomerase gene from Jatropha curcas: Cloning, characterization and subcellular localization

    OpenAIRE

    Wei, Lei; Yin, Li; Hu,Xiaole; Xu, Ying; Chen,Fang

    2014-01-01

    Background Jatropha curcas is a rich reservoir of pharmaceutically active terpenoids. More than 25 terpenoids have been isolated from this plant, and their activities are anti-bacterial, anti-fungal, anti-cancer, insecticidal, rodenticidal, cytotoxic and molluscicidal. But not much is known about the pathway involved in the biosynthesis of terpenoids. The present investigation describes the cloning, characterization and subcellular localization of isopentenyl diphosphate isomerase (IPI) gene ...

  9. Reproductive biology of the biofuel plant Jatropha curcas in its center of origin

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    In this work, we studied the main characteristics of flowering, reproductive system and diversity of pollinators for the biofuel plant Jatropha curcas (L.) in a site of tropical southeastern Mexico, within its center of origin. The plants were monoecious with inflorescences of unisexual flowers. The male flowers produced from 3062–5016 pollen grains (266–647 per anther). The plants produced fruits with both geitonogamy and xenogamy, although insect pollination significantly increased the numb...

  10. Antimicrobial compounds from leaf extracts of Jatropha curcas, Psidium guajava, and Andrographis paniculata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, M M; Ahmad, S H; Mohamed, M T M; Ab Rahman, M Z

    2014-01-01

    The present research was conducted to discover antimicrobial compounds in methanolic leaf extracts of Jatropha curcas and Andrographis paniculata and ethanolic leaf extract of Psidium guajava and the effectiveness against microbes on flower preservative solution of cut Mokara Red orchid flowers was evaluated. The leaves were analyzed using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. A total of nine, 66, and 29 compounds were identified in J. curcas, P. guajava, and A. paniculata leaf extracts, with five (88.18%), four (34.66%), and three (50.47%) having unique antimicrobial compounds, respectively. The experimental design on vase life was conducted using a completely randomized design with 10 replications. The flower vase life was about 6 days in the solution containing the P. guajava and A. paniculata leaf extracts at 15 mg/L. Moreover, solution with leaf extracts of A. paniculata had the lowest bacterial count compared to P. guajava and J. curcas. Thus, these leaf extracts revealed the presence of relevant antimicrobial compounds. The leaf extracts have the potential as a cut flower solution to minimize microbial populations and extend flower vase life. However, the activities of specific antimicrobial compounds and double or triple combination leaf extracts to enhance the effectiveness to extend the vase life need to be tested.

  11. Antimicrobial Compounds from Leaf Extracts of Jatropha curcas, Psidium guajava, and Andrographis paniculata

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. M. Rahman

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The present research was conducted to discover antimicrobial compounds in methanolic leaf extracts of Jatropha curcas and Andrographis paniculata and ethanolic leaf extract of Psidium guajava and the effectiveness against microbes on flower preservative solution of cut Mokara Red orchid flowers was evaluated. The leaves were analyzed using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. A total of nine, 66, and 29 compounds were identified in J. curcas, P. guajava, and A. paniculata leaf extracts, with five (88.18%, four (34.66%, and three (50.47% having unique antimicrobial compounds, respectively. The experimental design on vase life was conducted using a completely randomized design with 10 replications. The flower vase life was about 6 days in the solution containing the P. guajava and A. paniculata leaf extracts at 15mg/L. Moreover, solution with leaf extracts of A. paniculata had the lowest bacterial count compared to P. guajava and J. curcas. Thus, these leaf extracts revealed the presence of relevant antimicrobial compounds. The leaf extracts have the potential as a cut flower solution to minimize microbial populations and extend flower vase life. However, the activities of specific antimicrobial compounds and double or triple combination leaf extracts to enhance the effectiveness to extend the vase life need to be tested.

  12. Smooth muscle relaxant evaluation of Jatropha curcas Linn (Euphorbiaceae) and isolation of triterpenes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falodun, Abiodun; Nworgu, Z A M; Osayemwenre, Erharuyi

    2011-12-20

    Jatropha curcas is a herbal preparation used in the tropics for the treatment of threatened abortion and related problems associated with pregnancy. The Stem bark of Jatropha curcas is used ethno medicinally in Nigeria especially in the eastern part of the country for the treatment of infertility and spontaneous abortion (miscarriage). The present study was undertaken in order to validate the folkloric claim, using scientific experimental procedures and bioassay guided fractionation. The crude powdered sample was subjected to phytochemical screening testing for the presence of alkaloids, tannins, saponins and carbohydrates. Chromatographic analysis (TLC and VLC) were carried out using various solvent systems. The effect of methanolic extracts on rat uterine contractions was studied in vitro, in 40ml organ baths containing physiological salt solution of De Jalon maintained at 370C, aerated with 95% O2 and 5% CO2 with an isometric transducer connected an UgoBasile recorder under a resting tension of 750mg. The result of the phytochemical screening revealed the presence of glycosides, tannins, saponins and alkaloids. The extract abolished significantly the spontaneous contraction of the uterus and reduced acetylcholine induced uterine contractions at a dose of 50mg/ml. The tocolytic effects indicate the presence of active principle(s) which would explain the ethno medicinal use of the stem bark of Jatropha curcas to treat spontaneous abortion.

  13. Molecular approaches to improvement of Jatropha curcas Linn. as a sustainable energy crop.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sudhakar Johnson, T; Eswaran, Nalini; Sujatha, M

    2011-09-01

    With the increase in crude oil prices, climate change concerns and limited reserves of fossil fuel, attention has been diverted to alternate renewable energy sources such as biofuel and biomass. Among the potential biofuel crops, Jatropha curcas L, a non-domesticated shrub, has been gaining importance as the most promising oilseed, as it does not compete with the edible oil supplies. Economic relevance of J. curcas for biodiesel production has promoted world-wide prospecting of its germplasm for crop improvement and breeding. However, lack of adequate genetic variation and non-availability of improved varieties limited its prospects of being a successful energy crop. In this review, we present the progress made in molecular breeding approaches with particular reference to tissue culture and genetic transformation, genetic diversity assessment using molecular markers, large-scale transcriptome and proteome studies, identification of candidate genes for trait improvement, whole genome sequencing and the current interest by various public and private sector companies in commercial-scale cultivation, which highlights the revival of Jatropha as a sustainable energy crop. The information generated from molecular markers, transcriptome profiling and whole genome sequencing could accelerate the genetic upgradation of J. curcas through molecular breeding.

  14. Molecular Cloning, Expression Analysis, and Functional Characterization of the H(+)-Pyrophosphatase from Jatropha curcas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yumei; Luo, Zhu; Zhang, Mengru; Liu, Chang; Gong, Ming; Zou, Zhurong

    2016-04-01

    H(+)-pyrophosphatase (H(+)-PPase) is a primary pyrophosphate (PPi)-energized proton pump to generate electrochemical H(+) gradient for ATP production and substance translocations across membranes. It plays an important role in stress adaptation that was intensively substantiated by numerous transgenic plants overexpressing H(+)-PPases yet devoid of any correlated studies pointing to the elite energy plant, Jatropha curcas. Herein, we cloned the full length of J. curcas H(+)-PPase (JcVP1) complementary DNA (cDNA) by reverse transcription PCR, based on the assembled sequence of its ESTs highly matched to Hevea brasiliensis H(+)-PPase. This gene encodes a polypeptide of 765 amino acids that was predicted as a K(+)-dependent H(+)-PPase evolutionarily closest to those of other Euphorbiaceae plants. Many cis-regulatory elements relevant to environmental stresses, molecular signals, or tissue-specificity were identified by promoter prediction within the 1.5-kb region upstream of JcVP1 coding sequence. Meanwhile, the responses of JcVP1 expression to several common abiotic stresses (salt, drought, heat, cold) were characterized with a considerable accordance with the inherent stress tolerance of J. curcas. Moreover, we found that the heterologous expression of JcVP1 could significantly improve the salt tolerance in both recombinant Escherichia coli and Saccharomyces cerevisiae, and this effect could be further fortified in yeast by N-terminal addition of a vacuole-targeting signal peptide from the H(+)-PPase of Trypanosoma cruzi.

  15. Endophytic Fungi Isolated from Oil-Seed Crop Jatropha curcas Produces Oil and Exhibit Antifungal Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Susheel; Kaushik, Nutan

    2013-01-01

    Jatropha curcas L., a perennial plant grown in tropics and subtropics is popularly known for its potential as biofuel. The plant is reported to survive under varying environmental conditions having tolerance to stress and an ability to manage pest and diseases. The plant was explored for its endophytic fungi for use in crop protection. Endophytic fungi were isolated from leaf of Jatropha curcas, collected from New Delhi, India. Four isolates were identified as Colletotrichum truncatum, and other isolates were identified as Nigrospora oryzae, Fusarium proliferatum, Guignardia cammillae, Alternaria destruens, and Chaetomium sp. Dual plate culture bioassays and bioactivity assays of solvent extracts of fungal mycelia showed that isolates of Colletotrichum truncatum were effective against plant pathogenic fungi Fusarium oxysporum and Sclerotinia sclerotiorum. Isolate EF13 had highest activity against S. sclerotiorum. Extracts of active endophytic fungi were prepared and tested against S. sclerotiorum. Ethyl acetate and methanol extract of C. truncatum EF10 showed 71.7% and 70% growth inhibition, respectively. Hexane extracts of C. truncatum isolates EF9, EF10, and EF13 yielded oil and the oil from EF10 was similar to oil of the host plant, i.e., J. curcas. PMID:23409154

  16. Jatropha curcas: A potential crop for phytoremediation of coal fly ash

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jamil, S.; Abhilash, P.C.; Singh, N.; Sharma, P.N. [National Botany Research Institute, Lucknow (India)

    2009-12-15

    A greenhouse pot experiment was conducted to test the heavy metal phytoremediation capacity of Jatropha curcas from fly ash. Both natural accumulation by J. curcas and chemically enhanced phytoextraction was investigated. Plants were grown on FA and FA amended with fertile garden soil, in presence and absence of chemical chelating agent EDTA at 0.1 g kg{sup -1} and 0.3 g kg{sup -1} of soil. EDTA enhanced the uptake of all five elements (Fe, Al, Cr, Cu and Mn) tested. Fe and Mn were retained more in roots while Cu, Al and Cr were translocated more to the shoot. Metal accumulation index indicates that the effect of EDTA at 0.3 g kg{sup -1} was more pronounced than EDTA at 0.1 g kg{sup -1} in terms of metal accumulation. Biomass was enhanced up to 37% when FA was amended with GS. Heavy metal uptake was enhanced by 117% in root, 62% in stem, 86% in leaves when EDTA was applied at 0.3 g kg{sup -1} to FA amended with GS. Study suggest that J. curcas has potential of establishing itself on FA when provided with basic plant nutrients and can also accumulate heavy metals many folds from FA without attenuating plant growth.

  17. Effects of lead (Pb on Jatropha curcas L. growth under hydroponic conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enrico Palchetti

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The contamination of the environment with pollutants, like heavy metals from human activity, has caused the loss of agricultural land. One possible solution could be the utilization of phytoremediation technique with particular plant, capable of absorbing the contaminants from soil. Jatropha curcas, an important plant for the biodiesel production, in particular in tropical areas, has the capacity to grown in marginal land, compromised for food cultivation. The experiment was conducted in hydroponic conditions with the objective to evaluate the response and growth parameters of juvenile plants grown in presence of different Pb levels (0-100-200 mg/L. It was possible to study the interaction in the plant between some mineral element (Ca, Mg, Zn and Fe and morphological parameters and Pb, and evaluate some tolerance indicators. Results showed that the plants were able to grow in presence of Pb and to accumulate high levels of heavy metal in the roots, followed by the stems and leaves. However, Jatropha curcas subjected to Pb treatment demonstrated stunted growth and alterations in mineral elements contents. The results suggest that J. curcas may tolerate the levels of Pb imposed, but there is low translocation of heavy metal to aerial tissues, within the time period of analysis.

  18. Sex expression and floral diversity in Jatropha curcas: a population study in its center of origin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adriano-Anaya, María de Lourdes; Pérez-Castillo, Edilma; Salvador-Figueroa, Miguel; Ruiz-González, Sonia; Vázquez-Ovando, Alfredo; Grajales-Conesa, Julieta

    2016-01-01

    Sex expression and floral morphology studies are central to understand breeding behavior and to define the productive potential of plant genotypes. In particular, the new bioenergy crop Jatropha curcas L. has been classified as a monoecious species. Nonetheless, there is no information about its reproductive diversity in the Mesoamerican region, which is considered its center of origin and diversification. Thus, we determined sex expression and floral morphology in J. curcas populations from southern Mexico and Guatemala. Our results showed that most of J. curcas specimens had typical inflorescences with separate sexes (monoecious); meanwhile, the rest were atypical (gynoecious, androecious, andromonoecious, androgynomonoecious). The most important variables to group these populations, based on a discriminant analysis, were: male flower diameter, female petal length and male nectary length. From southern Mexico “Guerrero” was the most diverse population, and “Centro” had the highest variability among the populations from Chiapas. A cluster analysis showed that the accessions from southern Mexico were grouped without showing any correlation with the geographical origin, while those accessions with atypical sexuality were grouped together. To answer the question of how informative are floral morphological traits compared to molecular markers, we perform a Mantel correlation test between the distance matrix generated in this study and the genetic distance matrix (AFLP) previously reported for the same accessions. We found significant correlation between data at the level of accessions. Our results contribute to design genetic improvement programs by using sexually and morphologically contrasting plants from the center of origin. PMID:27257548

  19. Seed viability of Jatropha curcas in different fruit maturity stages after storage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    IGP MULIARTA ARYANA

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Santoso BB, Budianto A, Aryana IGPM. 2012. Seed viability of Jatropha curcas in different fruit maturity stages after storage. Nusantara Bioscience 4: 113-117. The effect of fruit maturity stages and seed storage period to seed viability were investigated. Seed samples of West Lombok, West Nusa Tenggara genotype of Jatropha curcas were collected from standing two year old trees at experimental field. The seed samples obtained were in four different stages of fruit maturity involving early maturity (green fruit, physiological maturity (yellow fruit, over maturity (brownies fruit, and senescence (black-dry fruit. The results showed that fruit maturity had an influence as well storage period on the seed viability of Jatropha curcas. The best fruit maturity stage for seed viability including seed oil content was yellow fruit and brownies fruit. For germination to be maintained or preserved, seeds could be stored in the ambient room storage for at least five months. For the purpose of oil extraction, seed should preferably be stored maximum not more than four months under ambient room conditions.

  20. Diversity and genetic parameter estimates for yield and its components in Jatropha curcas L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freitas, R G; Dias, L A S; Cardoso, P M R; Evaristo, A B; Silva, M F; Araújo, N M

    2016-03-24

    Jatropha curcas L. is one of the most promising oilseeds for biodiesel and biokerosene production, but few basic studies or breeding programs have been conducted for the species. We estimated genetic parameters and diversity based on 10 yield traits in 77 half-sib progenies of J. curcas after 52 months in the field, and evaluated correlations between them and the oil content of the seeds. The mean grain yield per plant was 377.9 g (ranging from 169.8 to 772.1 g) and the mean oil content was 36.2% (ranging from 30 to 39.6%). Moderate estimates of heritability at the mean progeny level were obtained for the length of the fruit (84.7%), length (69.1%) and width (68.2%) of the seed, and grain yield per plant (62.2%). Oil content was only positively and significantly correlated with 100-seed weight. Our study revealed a range of possible crosses to be investigated in J. curcas. Progeny production should be evaluated over several crop seasons for the accurate selection of the best progenies.

  1. Structure prediction and binding sites analysis of curcin protein of Jatropha curcas using computational approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, Mugdha; Gupta, Shishir K; Abhilash, P C; Singh, Nandita

    2012-07-01

    Ribosome inactivating proteins (RIPs) are defense proteins in a number of higher-plant species that are directly targeted toward herbivores. Jatropha curcas is one of the biodiesel plants having RIPs. The Jatropha seed meal, after extraction of oil, is rich in curcin, a highly toxic RIP similar to ricin, which makes it unsuitable for animal feed. Although the toxicity of curcin is well documented in the literature, the detailed toxic properties and the 3D structure of curcin has not been determined by X-ray crystallography, NMR spectroscopy or any in silico techniques to date. In this pursuit, the structure of curcin was modeled by a composite approach of 3D structure prediction using threading and ab initio modeling. Assessment of model quality was assessed by methods which include Ramachandran plot analysis and Qmean score estimation. Further, we applied the protein-ligand docking approach to identify the r-RNA binding residue of curcin. The present work provides the first structural insight into the binding mode of r-RNA adenine to the curcin protein and forms the basis for designing future inhibitors of curcin. Cloning of a future peptide inhibitor within J. curcas can produce non-toxic varieties of J. curcas, which would make the seed-cake suitable as animal feed without curcin detoxification.

  2. Transformation of Inhibitor of Meristem Activity (IMA Gene into Jatropha curcas L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asri Pirade Paserang

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Jatropha is one of the many biodiesel plants developed in tropical countries. Efforts to increase its productivity can be done using various methods of breeding. One of the breeding methods is the introduction of genes into the Jatropha plant. The aim of this study is to assess the success of genetic transformation using the Inhibitor of Meristem Activity (IMA gene in Jatropha curcas. The research procedures included inoculation of explants with Agrobacterium tumefaciens, callus induction, screening test of selection media, regeneration, and gene expression analysis using Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR. IMA is one of the genes that controls flowering genes and ovule development. It was first isolated from tomato plants and has been successfully overexpressed in these plants using the Cauliflower Mosaic Virus (CaMV 35S promoter. In this experiment, plant transformation was performed on J. curcas as the target. Explant callus formation in both the control and treated samples was good, but shoot formation decreased dramatically in the treated explants. PCR analysis indicated that IMA genes can be inserted into J. curcas with the size of the IMA gene is 500 bp.

  3. Hydrolysis optimization and characterization study of preparing fatty acids from Jatropha curcas seed oil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salimon Jumat

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Fatty acids (FAs are important as raw materials for the biotechnology industry. Existing methods of FAs production are based on chemical methods. In this study potassium hydroxide (KOH-catalyzed reactions were utilized to hydrolysis Jatropha curcas seed oil. Results The parameters effect of ethanolic KOH concentration, reaction temperature, and reaction time to free fatty acid (FFA% were investigated using D-Optimal Design. Characterization of the product has been studied using Fourier transforms infrared spectroscopy (FTIR, gas chromatography (GC and high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC. The optimum conditions for maximum FFA% were achieved at 1.75M of ethanolic KOH concentration, 65°C of reaction temperature and 2.0 h of reaction time. Conclusions This study showed that ethanolic KOH concentration was significant variable for J. curcas seed oil hydrolysis. In a 18-point experimental design, FFA% of hydrolyzed J. curcas seed oil can be raised from 1.89% to 102.2%, which proved by FTIR and HPLC.

  4. Biotechnological approaches for the genetic improvement of Jatropha curcas L.: A biodiesel plant

    KAUST Repository

    Kumar, Nitish

    2015-08-14

    Ever increasing demand for energy sources and reduction of non-renewable fossil fuel reserves have lead to exploration of alternative and renewable energy sources. Due to wide distribution, agronomic suitability, and desirable oil properties, J. curcas has been identified as a renewable and alternative energy source of biodiesel. Large scale commercial cultivation of this crop would not only be environmentally friendly and be worthwhile in carbon sequestration but also in decreasing the energy supply pressures. Wide adaptation across geographic regions, short gestation period compared to most tree species, rapid growth, hardiness, optimum plant size, and easy propagation in combination make this species suitable for large scale cultivation on barren lands. The limited information of the genetics and inheritance of desirable traits, unpredictable and low yields, the limited diversity and susceptibility to diseases and insects are however, key limitations in fruitful farming of J. curcas. In this review, an effort is made to project the current biotechnology and molecular biology tools employed in the direction of, evaluating the genetic diversity and phylogeny revelation of Jatropha spp., identification of genetic markers for desirable traits, development of efficient micropropagation and regeneration system, and genetic transformation methods for J. curcas. © 2015 Elsevier B.V.

  5. Molecular characterization and genetic diversity of Jatropha curcas L. in Costa Rica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcela Vásquez-Mayorga

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available We estimated the genetic diversity of 50 Jatropha curcas samples from the Costa Rican germplasm bank using 18 EST-SSR, one G-SSR and nrDNA-ITS markers. We also evaluated the phylogenetic relationships among samples using nuclear ribosomal ITS markers. Non-toxicity was evaluated using G-SSRs and SCARs markers. A Neighbor-Joining (NJ tree and a Maximum Likelihood (ML tree were constructed using SSR markers and ITS sequences, respectively. Heterozygosity was moderate (He = 0.346, but considerable compared to worldwide values for J. curcas. The PIC (PIC = 0.274 and inbreeding coefficient (f =  − 0.102 were both low. Clustering was not related to the geographical origin of accessions. International accessions clustered independently of collection sites, suggesting a lack of genetic structure, probably due to the wide distribution of this crop and ample gene flow. Molecular markers identified only one non-toxic accession (JCCR-24 from Mexico. This work is part of a countrywide effort to characterize the genetic diversity of the Jatropha curcas germplasm bank in Costa Rica.

  6. Endophytic fungi isolated from oil-seed crop Jatropha curcas produces oil and exhibit antifungal activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Susheel; Kaushik, Nutan

    2013-01-01

    Jatropha curcas L., a perennial plant grown in tropics and subtropics is popularly known for its potential as biofuel. The plant is reported to survive under varying environmental conditions having tolerance to stress and an ability to manage pest and diseases. The plant was explored for its endophytic fungi for use in crop protection. Endophytic fungi were isolated from leaf of Jatropha curcas, collected from New Delhi, India. Four isolates were identified as Colletotrichum truncatum, and other isolates were identified as Nigrospora oryzae, Fusarium proliferatum, Guignardia cammillae, Alternaria destruens, and Chaetomium sp. Dual plate culture bioassays and bioactivity assays of solvent extracts of fungal mycelia showed that isolates of Colletotrichum truncatum were effective against plant pathogenic fungi Fusarium oxysporum and Sclerotinia sclerotiorum. Isolate EF13 had highest activity against S. sclerotiorum. Extracts of active endophytic fungi were prepared and tested against S. sclerotiorum. Ethyl acetate and methanol extract of C. truncatum EF10 showed 71.7% and 70% growth inhibition, respectively. Hexane extracts of C. truncatum isolates EF9, EF10, and EF13 yielded oil and the oil from EF10 was similar to oil of the host plant, i.e., J. curcas.

  7. Effect of biosludge and biofertilizer amendment on growth of Jatropha curcas in heavy metal contaminated soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juwarkar, Asha Ashok; Yadav, Santosh Kumar; Kumar, Phani; Singh, Sanjeev Kumar

    2008-10-01

    The pot experiments were conducted to evaluate the effect of different concentrations of arsenic, chromium and zinc contaminated soils, amended with biosludge and biofertilizer on the growth of Jatropha curcas which is a biodiesel crop. The results further showed that biosludge alone and in combination with biofertilizer significantly improved the survival rates and enhanced the growth of the plant. With the amendments, the plant was able to grow and survive upto 500, 250 and 4,000 mg kg(-1) of As, Cr and Zn contaminated soils, respectively. The results also showed that zinc enhanced the growth of J. curcas more as compared to other metals contaminated soils. The heavy metal accumulation in plant increased with increasing concentrations of heavy metals in soil, where as a significant reduction in the metal uptake in plant was observed, when amended with biosludge and biofertilizer and biosludge alone. It seems that the organic matter present in the biosludge acted as metal chelator thereby reducing the toxicity of metals to the plant. Findings suggest that plantation of J. curcas may be promoted in metal contaminated soils, degraded soils or wasteland suitably after amending with organic waste.

  8. Differential antioxidative enzyme responses of Jatropha curcas L. to chromium stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yadav, Santosh Kumar; Dhote, Monika; Kumar, Phani; Sharma, Jitendra; Chakrabarti, Tapan; Juwarkar, Asha A

    2010-08-15

    Chromium (Cr) tolerant and accumulation capability of Jatropha curcas L. was tested in Cr spiked soil amended with biosludge and biofertilizer. Plants were cultivated in soils containing 0, 25, 50, 100 and 250 mg kg(-1) of Cr for one year with and without amendment. Plant tissue analysis showed that combined application of biosludge and biofertilizer could significantly reduce Cr uptake and boost the plant biomass, whereas biofertilizer alone did not affect the uptake and plant growth. Antioxidative responses of catalase (CAT), ascorbate peroxidase (APX) and glutathione S-transferase (GST) were increased with increasing Cr concentration in plant. Hyperactivity of the CAT and GST indicated that antioxidant enzymes played an important role in protecting the plant from Cr toxicity. However, APX took a little part in detoxification of H(2)O(2) due to its sensitivity to Cr. Therefore, reduced APX activity was recorded. Reduced glutathione (GSH) activity was recorded in plant grown on/above 100 mg kg(-1) of Cr in soil. The study concludes that J. curcas could grow under chromium stress. Furthermore, the results encouraged that J. curcas is a suitable candidate for the restoration of Cr contaminated soils with the concomitant application of biosludge and biofertilizer. Copyright 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Progeny evaluation of Jatropha curcas and Pongamia pinnata with comparison to bioproductivity and biodiesel parameters

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Vinod Kumar Patil; Prithviraj Bhandare; Pramod B. Kulkarni; G. R. Naik

    2015-01-01

    Progeny studies of Jatropha curcas and Pong-amia pinnata were carried with respect to bioproductivity, pod and seed characters which is one of the selection meth-ods in tree improvement programmes. Variations in bio-productivity and biodiesel parameters of both the plants were compared every 6 months for 4 years of investigation and analyzed by analysis of variance and correlation coefficient by Pearson’s method using software Graphpad instat 3.06 (for Windows and Mac). P. pinnata has better germination rate (71.4%), 100 pod weight (PW) (311.59 g) and 100 seed weight (SW) (173.46 g) as compared to J. curcas for ger-mination rate (43.2%), 100 PW (111.29 g) and 100 SW (67.46 g). P. pinnata has strong correlation for plant height to canopy growth (CG) (0.948), collar diameter (CD) (0.994), number of branches per plant (NBP) (0.995) and to number of leaves per branch (NLB) (0.862) as compared to J. curcas which showed good correlation among plant height to CG (0.976), CD (0.970), NBP (0.988), NLB (0.920) and to number of pods per branch (0.657). However, J. curcas depicted negative correlation for pod breadth to seed length (SL) (-0.447), seed breadth (-0.248) and to seed thickness (ST) (-0.364) and among the 100 PW to SL (-0.199), ST (-0.220) and to 100 SW (-0.704). About 4 kg of P. pinnata seeds were required for each liter of crude oil which yields 896 ml of biodiesel on transesterification as compared to 5.66 kg of J. curcas seeds for a liter of crude oil, producing about 663 ml of biodiesel. The quality of biodiesel meets the major specification of American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) standards for biodiesel. The crude glyc-erin and seed cake obtained as byproduct during biodiesel production were also measured which can be purified and used in composting, animal feeds, pharmaceuticals and cosmetic industries.

  10. PLAGAS POTENCIALES DEL CULTIVO DE Jatropha curcas L., EN EL OCCIDENTE DE ANTIOQUIA, COLOMBIA POTENTIAL PEST OF Jatropha curcas L. CROP IN WESTERN ANTIOQUIA, COLOMBIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco Cristóbal Yepes Rodríguez

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Resumen. Se da información sobre la biología, comportamiento, hábitos e importancia económica de las chinches Leptoglossus zonatus Dallas, 1852 (Hemiptera: Coreidae y Agonosoma trilineatum (Fabricius, 1781 (Hemiptera: Scutelleridae y se advierte sobre su presencia en una parcela de Jatropha curcas establecida en Santa Fe de Antioquia. Además, se halló que la pringamosa, Echidoscolus rubulosus es el hospedero silvestre de la segunda especie, en este ecosistema de bosque seco tropical. Se considera que ambos artrópodos podrían ser plagas potenciales del cultivo de esta oleaginosa en la región del occidente de Antioquia.Abstract. This paper provides information about the biology, the behavior, the habits and the economic importance of both the Leptoglossus zonatus Dallas, 1852 (Hemiptera: Coreidae bug and Agonosoma trilineatum (Fabricius, 1781 (Hemiptera: Scutelleridae bug. We warn about the discovery of these insects in a parcel of J. curcas, established in Santa Fe de Antioquia. We also found that the Pringamosa plant, Echidoscolus rubulosus, is the wild host of the second specie in this tropical dry forest ecosystem. Both arthropods might be considered as potential pests of the oilseed crop in this region of western Antioquia.

  11. Aspergillus-fermented Jatropha curcas seed cake: proximate composition and effects on biochemical indices in Wistar rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    FAOZIYAT SULAIMAN ADENIKE

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available This study evaluated Jatropha curcas seed cake fermented by Aspergillus niger for use as a potential source of protein in animal feed production. Wistar rats were randomly assigned to 4 groups (A–D, of 3 rats each and fed different protein-rich diets for 4 weeks. Group 1 (control was fed with soybean as a protein source, while Groups 2, 3, and 4 were given feeds supplemented instead with Aspergillus-fermented J. curcas, unfermented J. curcas, and a mix of Aspergillus-fermented J. curcas and soybean (1:1, respectively. At the end of the experiment, rats were sacrificed, and their serum and vital organs were harvested for further analyses. Proximate analyses of the various diet combinations showed significant (P < 0.05 variations in crude protein, crude fibre, ether extract, and ash content. Enzyme assays (alanine transaminase, aspartate transaminase, and alkaline phosphatase in rat serum and tissue homogenates indicate that the detoxification of J. curcas kernel cake by A. niger fermentation is viable and promising. Body weight generally did not differ significantly between the groups, but all rats put on weight in week 1 (Group 2 most strongly. The initial weight gain was followed by a slight decreasing trend in all groups in weeks 2–4, probably due to an adaptation mechanism. One rat fed with the unfermented cake (Group 3 died in week 2, confirming that the cake is not safe for direct consumption until it is processed. Our data support further use of Aspergillus-fermented J. curcas as an alternative protein source in animal feed preparation.

  12. Floral Biology and Hybridization Potential of Nine Accessions of Physic Nut Jatropha curcas L. originating from Three Continents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahoton, LE.

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Jatropha curcas is a shrub which has an important economic and medicinal role in tropical and subtropical zones of the world. The oil of its kernels can serve as fuel feedstock to produce diesel, indicating its potential as a renewable source of energy. In an attempt to introduce new variation into cultivated Jatropha curcas, a program of intraspecific hybridization with several ecotypes originating from Africa, Asia and America was undertaken. Field studies were performed over three years 2009, 2010 and 2011. Before achieving hybridization, the floral ratio and the breeding system of physic nut were studied in Southern Benin ecological conditions. Significant differences (P< 0.05 were observed between the analysed ecotypes regarding the number of female flowers. This study has also confirmed that the breeding system of Jatropha curcas is essentially outcrossing and that foraging insects are the main pollination actors of female flowers. New intraspecific hybrid combinations were produced involving nine accessions. Crosses results varied according to the origin and the direction of the hybridization. Crosses between accessions of J. curcas originating from Africa and Asia gave hybrids without difficulty. The data obtained confirm that apomixis might play a major role in J. curcas a reproductive biology. Considering the high number of female flowers per inflorescence produced by the accession from Ecuador, and the large genetic distance existing between this accession and those from Africa and Asia, it should constitute a valuable genetic stock for the development of F1 hybrids with local ecotypes of J. curcas. However, the use of growth regulators might be necessary to improve the hybridization success rate when it is used as female parent.

  13. Apomorphine and its esters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borkar, Nrupa; Chen, Zhizhong; Saaby, Lasse

    2016-01-01

    Oral delivery of apomorphine via prodrug principle may be a potential treatment for Parkinson's disease. The purpose of this study was to investigate the transport and stability of apomorphine and its esters across Caco-2 cell monolayer and their affinity towards chylomicrons. Apomorphine...... cells. Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations were performed to understand the stability of the esters on a molecular level. The affinity of the compounds towards plasma derived chylomicrons was assessed. The A-B transport of intact DLA was about 150 times lower than the transport of apomorphine...

  14. Performance and emission characteristics of a DI compression ignition engine operated on Honge, Jatropha and sesame oil methyl esters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Banapurmath, N.R.; Tewari, P.G. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, B.V.B. College of Engineering and Technology, Vidyanagar, Poona-Bangalore Road, Hubli 580031 (India); Hosmath, R.S. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, K.L.E' s C.E.T., Belgaum (India)

    2008-09-15

    The high viscosity of vegetable oils leads to problem in pumping and spray characteristics. The inefficient mixing of vegetable oils with air contributes to incomplete combustion. The best way to use vegetable oils as fuel in compression ignition (CI) engines is to convert it into biodiesel. Biodiesel is a methyl or ethyl ester of fatty acids made from vegetable oils (both edible and non-edible) and animal fat. The main resources for biodiesel production can be non-edible oils obtained from plant species such as Pongamia pinnata (Honge oil), Jatropha curcas (Ratanjyot), Hevea brasiliensis (Rubber) and Calophyllum inophyllum (Nagchampa). Biodiesel can be used in its pure form or can be blended with diesel to form different blends. It can be used in CI engines with very little or no engine modifications. This is because it has properties similar to mineral diesel. This paper presents the results of investigations carried out on a single-cylinder, four-stroke, direct-injection, CI engine operated with methyl esters of Honge oil, Jatropha oil and sesame oil. Comparative measures of brake thermal efficiency, smoke opacity, HC, CO, NO{sub X}, ignition delay, combustion duration and heat release rates have been presented and discussed. Engine performance in terms of higher brake thermal efficiency and lower emissions (HC, CO, NO{sub X}) with sesame oil methyl ester operation was observed compared to methyl esters of Honge and Jatropha oil operation. (author)

  15. Effect of phorbol derivatives and staurosporine on gravitropic response of primary root of maize

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mulkey, T.J.; Kim, S.Y. (Indiana State Univ., Terre Haute (United States)); Lee, J.S. (Ewha Womans Univ., Seoul (Korea))

    1991-05-01

    Time-lapse videography and computer-based, video image digitization were used to examine the effects of phorbol derivatives (phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate, TPA; phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate 4-O-methyl ether, mTPA) and staurosporine on the kinetics of gravicurvature of primary roots of maize (Zea mays L., Pioneer 3343 and Golden Cross Bantam). Pretreatment of roots with TPA (3 hr, 1 {mu}M) decreases the time lag prior to induction of positive gravicurvature in horizontally-oriented roots by > 60%. The rate of curvature is not significantly different than the rate observed in control roots. Wrongway curvature which is observed in 30-40% of control roots is not observed in TPA-pretreated roots. Oscillatory movements observed in control roots after completion of gravitropic reorientation is completely dampened in TPA-pretreated roots. Pretreatment of roots with mTPA(3hr,1{mu}M), the inactive analog of TPA, does not significantly alter the kinetics of gravicurvature of primary roots of maize. Staurosporine (10{sup {minus}8}M), a microbial alkaloid which has been reported to have antifungal activity and to inhibit phospholipid/Ca{sup ++} dependent protein kinase, completely inhibits TPA-induced alteration of the kinetics of gravitropism. DAG (1-oleoyl-2-acetyl-rac-glycerol), a synthetic diglyceride activator of protein kinase C, exhibits similar activity to TPA. TPA-induced alterations in tissue response to auxin are presented.

  16. Esters van tetrathioorthotinzuur

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kramer, Jan

    1934-01-01

    Claesson claims to have obtained the tetraethyl ester of tetrathioorthostannic acid by shaking an aqueous solution of stannic chloride with ethylmercaptan and by distilling the heavy oily product. This could not be confirmed. A mixture of different products is formed, containing possibly among

  17. Phosphate Esters, Thiophosphate Esters and Metal Thiophosphates as Lubricant Additives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David W. Johnson

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Phosphate esters, thiophosphate esters and metal thiophosphates have been used as lubricant additives for over 50 years. While their use has been extensive, a detailed knowledge of how they work has been a much more recent development. In this paper, the use of phosphate esters and thiophosphate esters as anti-wear or extreme pressure additives is reviewed with an emphasis on their mechanism of action. The review includes the use of alkyl phosphates, triaryl phosphates and metal containing thiophosphate esters. The mechanisms of these materials interacting with a range of iron and steel based bearing material are examined.

  18. Toxicity, tunneling and feeding behavior of the termite, Coptotermes vastator, in sand treated with oil of the physic nut, Jatropha curcas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acda, Menandro N

    2009-01-01

    Oil of the physic nut, Jatropha curcas L. (Malpighiales: Euphorbiaceae), was evaluated in the laboratory for its barrier and repellent activity against the Philippine milk termite Coptotermes vastator Light (Isoptera: Rhinotermitidae). The study showed that J. curcas oil had anti-feeding effect, induced reduction in tunneling activity and increased mortality in C. vastator. Behavior of termites exposed to sand treated with J. curcas oil indicated that it is toxic or repellent to C. vastator. Toxicity and repellent thresholds, were higher than those reported for other naturally occurring compounds tested against the Formosan subterranean termite.

  19. A method for seedling recovery in Jatropha curcas after cryogenic exposure of the seeds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafael de C. Silva

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Actually, the germplasm of Jatropha spp. is conserved as whole plants in field collections. Under this storage method, the genetic resources are exposed to disease, pest and natural hazards such as human error, drought and weather damage. Besides, field genebanks are costly to maintain and with important requirements of trained personnel. Thus, the development of efficient techniques to ensure its safe conservation and regeneration is therefore of paramount importance. In this work we describe a method for Jatropha curcas seeds cryoexposure and seedling recovery after thawed. In a first experiment, an efficient protocol for in vitro plant recovery was carried out using zygotic embryo or seeds with or without coat. In a second experiment, desiccated seeds with or without coat were exposed to liquid nitrogen and evaluated after cryoexposure. Germination percentages were variable among treatments, and seeds demonstrated tolerance to liquid nitrogen exposure under certain conditions. Seeds of J. curcas presented up to 99.6% germination after seed coat removal. Seeds with coat cultured in vitro did not germinate, and were 60% contaminated. The germination of the zygotic embryos was significantly higher in the ½ MS medium (93.1% than in WPM medium (76.2%, but from zygotic embryo, abnormal seedlings reached up to 99%. Seeds with coat exposed to liquid nitrogen showed 60% germination in culture after coat removal with good plant growth, and seeds cryopreserved without coat presented 82% germination, but seedlings showed a reduced vigor and a significant increase in abnormal plants. Seeds cultured in vitro with coat did not germinate, independently of cryoexposure or not. This study reports the first successful in vitro seedling recovery methodology for Jatropha curcas seeds, after a cryopreservation treatment, and is recommended as an efficient procedure for in vitro plant recovery, when seeds are conserved in germplasm banks by low or cryotemperatures.

  20. Growth and Physiological Response of Jatropha Interspecific Hybrid (Jatropha curcas x J. integerrima under Salt Stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dhimas Handhi Putranto

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Interspecific hybrid of Jatropha curcas x J. integerrima is expected to answer the low oil yield problem of Jatropha (Jatropha curcas L.. However, as a novel invention, research concerning on Jatropha interspecific hybrid is still limited especially in the aspect of its adaptability to unfavorable environment such as salt stress condition. It is interesting to know how Jatropha interspecific hybrid responses to salt stress condition due to the moderate salt tolerance ability of its mother plant (J. curcas L.. The objectives of this study were to compare the growth and physiological response of interspecific hybrid and non-hybrid Jatropha under salt stress. Three varieties of both interspecific hybrid and non-hybrid Jatropha seedling were exposed with 3 levels of sodium chloride treatment in Hoagland media solution which are 2.0 (control, 8.0, and 16.0 dS m-1 for 7 weeks. The parameters measured include plant height, number of leaves, shoot dry weight, specific leaf area, chlorophyll content (SPAD Index, leaf water potential, and leaf solute concentration. V2 (interspecific hybrid showed the highest potential as moderate salt tolerant variety among experimental Jatropha varieties due to its increasing trend of leaf number, dry weight, and total leaf area at moderate salinity level   (8 dS m-1. KUBP 35 and KUBP 40 showed the best growth performance under salt stress among experimental Jatropha varieties, but its potential to be moderate salt tolerant variety was still lower than V2 variety. The solute concentration, osmotic potential, and turgor potential of both interspecific hybrid (V2 and non-hybrid variety (KUBP 35 and KUBP 40 showed an increasing pattern which could be implied as an adaptive response to salt stress. This study has showed that Jatropha interspecific hybrid might have an adaptive physiological response to salt stress and could be considered as potential moderate salt tolerant variety under salt stress.

  1. Fenologia reprodutiva e produÃÃo de sementes de Jatropha curcas L.

    OpenAIRE

    Neusa Francisca Michelon Herzog

    2012-01-01

    O pinhÃo-manso (Jatropha curcas L.) pertencente à famÃlia Euphorbiaceae, à nativo das AmÃricas, apresenta-se disseminado nas regiÃes tropicais e subtropicais do globo e amplamente distribuÃdo nos continentes AsiÃtico e Africano. Esta espÃcie tem as sementes como principal forma de dispersÃo. De modo geral, sabe-se que o material reprodutivo (sementes e frutos) à bastante influenciado pelas caracterÃsticas das plantas genitoras, pelas condiÃÃes climÃticas do local em que atua sobre o desenvolv...

  2. Fenologia reprodutiva e produÃÃo de sementes de Jatropha curcas L.

    OpenAIRE

    Neusa Francisca Michelon Herzog

    2012-01-01

    O pinhÃo-manso (Jatropha curcas L.) pertencente à famÃlia Euphorbiaceae, à nativo das AmÃricas, apresenta-se disseminado nas regiÃes tropicais e subtropicais do globo e amplamente distribuÃdo nos continentes AsiÃtico e Africano. Esta espÃcie tem as sementes como principal forma de dispersÃo. De modo geral, sabe-se que o material reprodutivo (sementes e frutos) à bastante influenciado pelas caracterÃsticas das plantas genitoras, pelas condiÃÃes climÃticas do local em que atua sobre o desenvolv...

  3. Curcacycline A--a novel cyclic octapeptide isolated from the latex of Jatropha curcas L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van den Berg, A J; Horsten, S F; Kettenes-van den Bosch, J J; Kroes, B H; Beukelman, C J; Leeflang, B R; Labadie, R P

    1995-01-30

    From the latex of Jatropha curcas L. (Euphorbiaceae) a novel cyclic octapeptide was isolated, which we named curcacycline A. The compound was found to contain one threonine, one valine, two glycine, and four leucine residues. By two-dimensional 1H-NMR spectroscopy (HOHAHA and ROESY), its sequence was determined to be Gly1-Leu2-Leu3-Gly4-Thr5-Val6-Leu7-Leu8-Gly1+ ++. Curcacycline A displays a moderate inhibition of (i) classical pathway activity of human complement and (ii) proliferation of human T-cells.

  4. Utilization of palm empty fruit bunch for the production of biodiesel from Jatropha curcas oil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yaakob, Zahira; Sukarman, Irwan Sukma Bin; Narayanan, Binitha; Abdullah, Siti Rozaimah Sheikh; Ismail, Manal

    2012-01-01

    Transesterification reaction of Jatropha curcas oil with methanol was carried out in the presence of ash generated from Palm empty fruit bunch (EFB) in a heterogeneous catalyzed process. The ash was doped with KOH by impregnation to achieve a potassium level of 20 wt.%. Under optimum conditions for the EFB-catalyzed (65 °C, oil/methanol ratio of 15, 90 min, 20 wt.% EFB ash catalyst) and the KOH-EFB-catalyzed reactions (65 °C, oil/methanol ratio of 15, 45 min, 15 wt.% of KOH doped EFB ash), biodiesel (>98%) with specifications higher than those stipulated by European biodiesel quality standard EN 14214 was obtained.

  5. Producción de biodiesel a partir de cultivos alternativos: experiencia con Jatropha curcas

    OpenAIRE

    Huerga, Ignacio Roberto

    2010-01-01

    Fil: Huerga, Ignacio Roberto. Universidad Nacional del Litoral. Facultad de Ingeniería Química; Argentina. En la búsqueda de nuevos cultivos para producción de biodiesel, Jatropha Curcas surge como una alternativa a aquellos que se utilizan actualmente. Para evaluar su factibilidad del cultivo, se utilizaron muestras de semillas provenientes de la localidad de Yuto (Jujuy, Argentina), clasificadas en función del período de cosecha y estado de maduración del fruto. La extracción d...

  6. The biomedical significance of the phytochemical, proximate and mineral compositions of the leaf, stem bark and root of Jatropha curcas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atamgba Agbor Asuk

    2015-08-01

    Conclusions: The outcome of this study suggests that the leaf, stem bark and root of J. curcas have very good medicinal potentials, meet the standard requirements for drug formulation and serve as good sources of energy and nutrients except for the presence of some anti-nutritional elements predominant in the leaf.

  7. Dilute H2SO4-catalyzed hydrothermal pretreatment to enhance enzymatic digestibility of Jatropha curcas fruit hull for ethanol fermentation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Marasabessy, Ahmad; Kootstra, Maarten; Sanders, Johan P.M.; Weusthuis, Ruud A.

    2012-01-01

    Dilute sulfuric acid pretreatment of the Jatropha curcas fruit hull at high temperatures (140°C to 180°C) performed in a 110-mL stainless steel reactor was investigated to enhance the enzymatic digestibility of its lignocellulosic components. Carbohydrates accounted for 43% of the dry matter of t

  8. The use of Jatropha curcas to achieve a self sufficient water distribution system: A case study in rural Senegal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Archer, Alexandra

    The use of Jatropha curcas as a source of oil for fueling water pumps holds promise for rural communities struggling to achieve water security in arid climates. The potential for use in developing communities as an affordable, sustainable fuel source has been highly recommended for many reasons: it is easily propagated, drought resistant, grows rapidly, and has high-oil-content seeds, as well as medicinal and economic potential. This study uses a rural community in Senegal, West Africa, and calculates at what level of Jatropha curcas production the village is able to be self-sufficient in fueling their water system to meet drinking, sanitation and irrigation requirements. The current water distribution system was modelled to represent irrigation requirements for nine different Jatropha curcas cultivation and processing schemes. It was found that a combination of using recycled greywater for irrigation and a mechanical press to maximize oil recovered from the seeds of mature Jatropha curcas trees, would be able to operate the water system with no diesel required.

  9. Jatrophidin I, a cyclic peptide from Brazilian Jatropha curcas L.: isolation, characterization, conformational studies and biological activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altei, Wanessa F; Picchi, Douglas G; Abissi, Barbara M; Giesel, Guilherme M; Flausino, Otavio; Reboud-Ravaux, Michèle; Verli, Hugo; Crusca, Edson; Silveira, Edilberto R; Cilli, Eduardo M; Bolzani, Vanderlan S

    2014-11-01

    A cyclic peptide, jatrophidin I, was isolated from the latex of Jatropha curcas L. Its structure was elucidated by extensive 2D NMR spectroscopic analysis, with additional conformational studies performed using Molecular Dynamics/Simulated Annealing (MD/SA). Jatrophidin I had moderate protease inhibition activity when compared with pepstatin A; however, the peptide was inactive in antimalarial, cytotoxic and antioxidant assays.

  10. Kinetics and Thermodynamics of Sorption of 4-Nitrophenol on Activated Kaolinitic Clay and Jatropha Curcas Activated Carbon from Aqueous Solution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samsudeen Olanrewaju Azeez

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Adsorption behaviour of 4-nitrophenol (4-NP on activated kaolinitic clay and Jatropha curcas activated carbon was investigated. The kaolinitic clay and Jatropha curcas were activated with 1 M HNO3 and 0.5 M NaOH respectively and were characterized by XRF, XRD, BET, SEM and FTIR techniques. The effects of processing parameters, such as initial 4-NP concentration, temperature, pH, contact time and adsorbent dosage on the adsorption process were investigated. The results obtained showed that Jatropha curcas activated carbon exhibited higher performance than activated kaolinitic clay for the removal of 4-nitrophenol from aqueous solution. Langmuir, Freundlich, Temkin and Dubinin-Radushkevich models were used to describe the adsorption isotherms. The adsorption data were best fitted with Freundlich model. The experimental data of the two adsorbate-adsorbent systems fitted very well with the pseudo-second order kinetic model with r2 values of 0.999 respectively. Adsorption thermodynamic parameters were also estimated. The results revealed that the adsorption of 4-nitrophenol onto both adsorbents were exothermic processes and spontaneous for Jatropha curcas activated carbon but non spontaneous for activated kaolinitic clay.

  11. Comparative Transcriptome Analysis between Gynoecious and Monoecious Plants Identifies Regulatory Networks Controlling Sex Determination in Jatropha curcas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Mao-Sheng; Pan, Bang-Zhen; Fu, Qiantang; Tao, Yan-Bin; Martínez-Herrera, Jorge; Niu, Longjian; Ni, Jun; Dong, Yuling; Zhao, Mei-Li; Xu, Zeng-Fu

    2016-01-01

    Most germplasms of the biofuel plant Jatropha curcas are monoecious. A gynoecious genotype of J. curcas was found, whose male flowers are aborted at early stage of inflorescence development. To investigate the regulatory mechanism of transition from monoecious to gynoecious plants, a comparative transcriptome analysis between gynoecious and monoecious inflorescences were performed. A total of 3,749 genes differentially expressed in two developmental stages of inflorescences were identified. Among them, 32 genes were involved in floral development, and 70 in phytohormone biosynthesis and signaling pathways. Six genes homologous to KNOTTED1-LIKE HOMEOBOX GENE 6 (KNAT6), MYC2, SHI-RELATED SEQUENCE 5 (SRS5), SHORT VEGETATIVE PHASE (SVP), TERMINAL FLOWER 1 (TFL1), and TASSELSEED2 (TS2), which control floral development, were considered as candidate regulators that may be involved in sex differentiation in J. curcas. Abscisic acid, auxin, gibberellin, and jasmonate biosynthesis were lower, whereas cytokinin biosynthesis was higher in gynoecious than that in monoecious inflorescences. Moreover, the exogenous application of gibberellic acid (GA3) promoted perianth development in male flowers and partly prevented pistil development in female flowers to generate neutral flowers in gynoecious inflorescences. The arrest of stamen primordium at early development stage probably causes the abortion of male flowers to generate gynoecious individuals. These results suggest that some floral development genes and phytohormone signaling pathways orchestrate the process of sex determination in J. curcas. Our study provides a basic framework for the regulation networks of sex determination in J. curcas and will be helpful for elucidating the evolution of the plant reproductive system.

  12. Cloning and expression analysis of carboxyltransferase of acetyl-coA carboxylase from Jatropha curcas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Wu-Wei; Gao, Shun; Wang, Sheng-Hua; Zhu, Jin-Qiu; Xu, Ying; Tang, Lin; Chen, Fang

    2010-01-01

    A full-length cDNA of the carboxyltransferase (accA) gene of acetyl-coenzym A (acetyl-CoA) carboxylase from Jatropha curcas was cloned and sequenced. The gene with an open reading frame (ORF) of 1149 bp encodes a polypeptide of 383 amino acids, with a molecular mass of 41.9 kDa. Utilizing fluorogenic real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), the expression levels of the accA gene in leaves and fruits at early, middle and late stages under pH 7.0/8.0 and light/darkness stress were investigated. The expression levels of the accA gene in leaves at early, middle and late stages increased significantly under pH 8.0 stress compared to pH 7.0. Similarly, the expression levels in fruits showed a significant increase under darkness condition compared to the control. Under light stress, the expression levels in the fruits at early, middle and late stages showed the largest fluctuations compared to those of the control. These findings suggested that the expression levels of the accA gene are closely related to the growth conditions and developmental stages in the leaves and fruits of Jatropha curcas.

  13. Biological effects of low energy nitrogen ion implantation on Jatropha curcas L. seed germination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Gang; Wang, Xiao-teng; Gan, Cai-ling; Fang, Yan-qiong; Zhang, Meng

    2012-09-01

    To explore the biological effects of nitrogen ion beam implantation on dry Jatropha curcas seed, a beam of N+ with energy of 25 keV was applied to treat the dry seed at six different doses. N+ beam implantation greatly decreased germination rate and seedling survival rate. The doses within the range of 12 × 1016 to 15 × 1016 ions cm-2 severely damaged the seeds: total antioxidant capacity (TAC), germination rate, seedling survival rate, reduced ascorbate acid (HAsA) and reduced glutathione (GSH) contents, and most of the tested antioxidases activity (i.e. catalase (CAT), ascorbate peroxidase (APX) and superoxide dismutase (SOD)) reached their lowest levels. At a dose of 18 × 1016 ion cm-2, biological repair took place: moderate increases were found in TAC, germination rate, seedling survival rate, HAsA and GSH contents, and some antioxidant enzyme activities (i.e. CAT, APX, SOD and GPX). The dose of 18 × 1016 ions cm-2 may be the optimum dose for use in dry J. curcas seed mutation breeding. CAT, HAsA and GSH contributed to the increase of TAC, but CAT was the most important. POD performed its important role as seed was severely damaged. The main role of the HAsA-GSH cycle appeared to be for regeneration of HAsA.

  14. Expression of a ribosome inactivating protein (curcin 2) in Jatropha curcas is induced by stress

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Wei Qin; Huang Ming-Xing; Xu Ying; Zhang Xin-Shen; Chen Fang

    2005-06-01

    The open reading frame (ORF) encoding curcin 2 was cloned from total genomic and cDNA of Jatropha curcas leaves, which were treated by drought, temperature stress and fungal infection, by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and reverse transcriptase (RT)-PCR amplification. The ORF has 927 bp that encodes a precursor protein of 309 amino acid residues. There are high similarities with curcin and the conserved domain of ribosome inactivating proteins (RIPs). Antiserum to curcin recognized one band of 32 kDa on Western blot of the leaves treated by temperature stresses at 4°C and 50°C and by fungal infections of Pestalotia funerea, Curvularia lunata (Walk) Boed, Gibberelle zeae (Schw.) Petch. Two bands of 32 kDa and 65 kDa were recognized on Western blot of the leaves treated by 10%–40% polyethylene glycol (PEG). In addition, the 32 kDa band is nearly the molecular weight of curcin 2. This finding suggests that the protein of 32 kDa should be related to curcin 2. The presence of this protein molecular marker under stresses may provide an experimental foundation to study the stress proteins in J. curcas.

  15. Arabinogalactan protein cluster from Jatropha curcas seed embryo contains fasciclin, xylogen and LysM proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sehlbach, Maria; König, Simone; Mormann, Michael; Sendker, Jandirk; Hensel, Andreas

    2013-10-15

    An non-GPI-anchored AGP cluster (Y2) was isolated from the seeds of Jatropha curcas L. (Euphorbiaceae) composed of 4.8% polypeptides (mainly Ala, Ser, Gly, Hyp, Glu) and a carbohydrate moiety composed of Gal, Ara, GlcA, Rha, Man and GlcN. Besides the typical structural features of arabinogalactan proteins, typical N-glycan linker of the complex type (GlcNAc4Man3Gal2Fuc1Xyl1) were identified. O-glycosylation occurred mainly via Hyp and to a lesser extent via Thr and Ser. N-glycans from the complex type, carrying at the innermost GlcNAc at position O-3 one α-Fuc-residue, were also present. MS analysis of the tryptic digest assigned peptides of three major protein groups: fasciclin-like arabinogalactan proteins, xylogen-like proteins and LysM domain-containing proteins. They could not be separated further and it is indicated that various homologous protein forms co-exist. Histological investigation of J. curcas seeds revealed the presence of AGPs in the vessels of cotyledons and in the procambium ring of the embryo. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Effect of auxins and associated biochemical changes during clonal propagation of the biofuel plant - Jatropha curcas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kochhar, Sunita; Singh, S.P.; Kochhar, V.K. [National Botanical Research Institute, Lucknow 226001 (India)

    2008-12-15

    Rooting and sprouting behaviour of stem cuttings of biofuel plant Jatropha curcas and their performance under field conditions have been studied in relation to auxin application. Pretreatment with indole-3-butyric acid (IBA) and 1-naphthalene acetic acid (NAA) increased both the rooting and sprouting. Sprouting of buds on the cuttings preceded rooting. The rooting and sprouting in J. curcas was more with IBA than NAA. The endogenous auxin contents were found to increase almost 15 days prior to rooting, indicating that mobilization of auxin rather than the absolute contents of auxin may be involved in root initiation. Indole acetic acid oxidase (IAA-oxidase) seems to be involved for triggering and initiating the roots/root primordia, whereas peroxidase is involved in both root initiation and the elongation processes as supported by the peroxidase and IAA-oxidase isoenzyme analysis in the cuttings. The clonally propagated plants (cutting-raised plants) performed better in the field as compared to those raised from the seeds. The plants produced from auxin-treated cuttings produced fruits and seeds in the same year as compared to the plants raised from seeds or from untreated or control cuttings that did not produce any seeds in 1 year of this study. Jatropha plants in general produce seeds after 2-3 years. (author)

  17. Energy potential of biomass and charcoal of Jatropha curcas peel and pie

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ailton Teixeira do Vale

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available In the production of biodiesel from Jatropha curcas, are produced residues in the peel and of pie form. One alternative use of these residues is in the energy production. The present work analyzed the energy potential of the peel and the pie of Jatropha curcas in the following conditions: in natura and charcoal, determining: the moisture content (VITAL, 1997; the ash, fixed carbon and volatile matter (ABNT NBR 8112/86; the density and the gravimetric yield. The peel presented: moisture of 18,9%; density of 100kg/m3; volatile matter of 72,6%, fixed carbon of 13% and 14,4% of ashes and heat combustion of 3.641kcal/kg. The carbonized peel produced 38.1% of charcoal, with: 29% of volatile matter, 45% of fixed carbon and 25% of ashes; and heat combustion of 3.954kcal/kg. The pie presented: moisture of 2.41%, 601kg/m3 of density; volatile matter of 77.84%, fixed carbon 14.21% and 7,95% ashes and 5.122kcal/kg of heat combustion. In the carbonization of the pie, 32% of charcoal was produced containing: 18.27% of volatile matter, 71.29% of fixed carbon, 10.43% of ashes and heat combustion of 6.234kcal/kg. The high ashe contents are related to the fertilization of the plant.

  18. In vitro regeneration from petiole explants of non-toxic Jatropha curcas

    KAUST Repository

    Kumar, Nitish

    2011-01-01

    Jatropha curcas, a multipurpose shrub has acquired significant economic potential as biodiesel plant. The seeds or pressed cake is toxic due to the presence of toxic substances and is not useful as food/fodder despite having the best protein composition. A simple, efficient, and reproducible method for plant regeneration through direct organogenesis from petiole explants of non-toxic J. curcas was developed using Murashige and Skoog (MS) medium supplemented with different concentrations of thidiazuron (TDZ). The best induction of shoot buds (57.61%), and number of shoot buds (4.98) per explant were obtained when in vitro petiole explants were placed horizontally on MS medium supplemented with 2.27 mu M TDZ. The Induced shoot buds were transferred to MS medium containing 10 mu M kinetin (Kn), 4.5 mu M 6-benzyl aminopurine (BA), and 5.5 mu M alpha-naphthaleneacetic acid (NAA) for shoot proliferation and subsequent elongation was achieved on MS medium supplemented with 2.25 mu M BA and 8.5 mu M IAA. The elongated shoots could be rooted on half-strength MS medium with 15 mu M IBA, 11.4 mu M IAA and 5.5 mu M NAA with more than 90% survival rate. (C) 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. KARAKTERISTIK PERTUMBUHAN JARAK PAGAR (Jatropha curcas L. YANG DITAMBAHKAN CENDAWAN ENDOFIT PADA LAHAN PASCA TAMBANG TIMAH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sukmarayu P. Gedoan

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Tin mining activity caused canging in physical and chemical characteristic of the soil that were not suitable for growth of plants. The objective of this experiment was to study accessions of Jatropha curcas planted on post tin mining land which were given endophyte. This research was conducted in a Sinar Baru village TS 133, district of Bangka, Bangka Belitung province for field research conducted in May 2007 to April 2008. The experimentas a factorial experiment in the design of the randomized complete block design with three replications. The main plot is 7 accessions consisting of: accession Madiun, Ponorogo, Jember, Dompu, Lampung, Bengkulu, andSukabumi, while the subplot of the land without giving endophyte fungal (control and the provision of endophyte fungal in baglog 250 g. Each experimental unit contained four plants per plot.The result showed that vegetative growth the highest for the former tin mining land given endophyte fungal vary in some accessions. Accession to the highest Sukabumi: plant height, branch number, plant dry weight, dry weight of the shoot, and root dry weight, the largest diameter have Jember accession, accession Dompu had the highest canopy diameter, and the accession of Lampung has the lowest ratio of shoot roots.Keywords: Jatropha curcas, accession, fungal endophyte

  20. Optimalisasi ekstraksi DNA jarak pagar (Jatropha curcas melalui pemilihan daun yang sesuai

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    EINSTIVINA NURYANDANI

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Prayitno E, Nuryandani E. 2011. Optimalisasi ekstraksi DNA jarak pagar (Jatropha curcas melalui pemilihan daun yang sesuai. Bioteknologi 8: 24-31. Jarak pagar (Jatropha curcas L. mempunyai peran penting sebagai sumber bahan bakar nabati. Usaha pemuliaan tanaman ini secara molekuler sering terkendala sulitnya ekstraksi DNA. Penelitian ini bertujuan untuk mengetahui daun yang sesuai untuk digunakan sebagai sumber DNA. Penelitian ini dilakukan pada empat aksesi jarak pagar yaitu J1 dan J2 (Jawa Tengah, S1 (Sumatera Selatan, dan S2 (Bengkulu. Ekstraksi dilakukan pada daun pertama, ketiga, kelima, ketujuh, dan daun kuning dari setiap aksesi dengan metode Doyle and Doyle (1987 yang dimodifikasi. Kualitas dan kuantitas DNA hasil ekstraksi diketahui melalui visualisasi dengan pembanding DNA lambda, spektrofotometer UV-Vis pada panjang gelombang 260/280, dan pemotongan menggunakan enzim EcoRI. Hasil penelitiaan menunjukkan bahwa daun ketiga memadai untuk digunakan sebagai sumber DNA. Kuantitas DNA daun ketiga J1 (19,33 µg/mL, J2 (26,21 µg/mL, S1 (31,20 µg/mL, dan S2 (61,03 µg/mL. Sedangkan kemurniannya masing-masing yaitu 1,9063 (J11, 2,0162 (J2, 2,0116 (S1, dan 2,0856 (S2.

  1. PERFORMANCE OF LAYER HEN FED FERMENTED Jatropha Curcas L. MEAL SUPPLEMENTED WITH CELLULASE AND PHYTASE ENZYME

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Sumiati

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the experiment was to study the effect of feeding fermented Jatropha curcas L.meal (JCM supplemented with cellulase and phytase on the performances of ISA-Brown laying henaged 25-30 weeks. The Jatropha curcas meal was fermented using Rizhopus oligosporus. In this study200 laying hens were used and distributed to 5 treatments and 4 replications in Completely RandomizedDesign. The diet treatments were: R0 = control diet (without JCM, R1; diet contained fermented JCM7.5%, R2; diet contained fermented JCM 7.5% + celullase 200 g/ton, R3; diet contained fermented JCM7.5% + phytase 200 g/ton and R4; diet contained fermented JCM 7.5% + cellulase 200 g/ton + phytase200 g/ton. The parameters observed were feed consumption, hen day egg production, egg massproduction, egg weight and feed conversion ratio. The results showed that feeding fermented JCM 7.5%,both enzyme supplemented as well as unsupplemented significantly decreased (P<0.05 the feedconsumption, hen day egg and egg mass production. However, the treatments did not influence the eggweight. Supplementation of cellulase (R2 or phytase (R3 improved the feed conversion ratio with thevalue as same as the R0 diet.

  2. Assessment of Antioxidant and Cytoprotective Potential of Jatropha (Jatropha curcas) Grown in Southern Italy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papalia, Teresa; Barreca, Davide; Panuccio, Maria Rosaria

    2017-01-01

    Jatropha (Jatropha curcas L.) is a plant native of Central and South America, but widely distributed in the wild or semi-cultivated areas in Africa, India, and South East Asia. Although studies are available in literature on the polyphenolic content and bioactivity of Jatropha curcas L., no information is currently available on plants grown in pedoclimatic and soil conditions different from the autochthon regions. The aim of the present work was to characterize the antioxidant system developed by the plant under a new growing condition and to evaluate the polyphenol amount in a methanolic extract of leaves. Along with these analyses we have also tested the antioxidant and cytoprotective activities on lymphocytes. RP-HPLC-DAD analysis of flavonoids revealed a chromatographic profile dominated by the presence of flavone C-glucosydes. Vitexin is the most abundant identified compound followed by vicenin-2, stellarin-2, rhoifolin, and traces of isovitexin and isorhoifolin. Methanolic extract had high scavenging activity in all antioxidant assays tested and cytoprotective activity on lymphocytes exposed to tertz-buthylhydroperoxide. The results highlighted a well-defined mechanism of adaptation of the plant and a significant content of secondary metabolites with antioxidant properties, which are of interest for their potential uses, especially as a rich source of biologically active products. PMID:28335473

  3. Reproductive biology of the biofuel plant Jatropha curcas in its center of origin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuel Rincón-Rabanales

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available In this work, we studied the main characteristics of flowering, reproductive system and diversity of pollinators for the biofuel plant Jatropha curcas (L. in a site of tropical southeastern Mexico, within its center of origin. The plants were monoecious with inflorescences of unisexual flowers. The male flowers produced from 3062–5016 pollen grains (266–647 per anther. The plants produced fruits with both geitonogamy and xenogamy, although insect pollination significantly increased the number and quality of fruits. A high diversity of flower visiting insects (36 species was found, of which nine were classified as efficient pollinators. The native stingless bees Scaptotrigona mexicana (Guérin-Meneville and Trigona (Tetragonisca angustula (Latreille were the most frequent visitors and their presence coincided with the hours when the stigma was receptive. It is noteworthy that the female flowers open before the male flowers, favoring xenogamy, which may explain the high genetic variability reported in J. curcas for this region of the world.

  4. Stability of agronomic and yield related traits of Jatropha curcas accessions raised from cuttings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mat, Nurul Hidayah Che; Yaakob, Zahira; Ratnam, Wickneswari

    2016-11-01

    Monitoring stability of agronomic and yield related traits is important for prediction of crop yields. This study was a latter study for the evaluation of 295 J. curcas individuals representing 21 accessions from eight countries at Biodiesel Research Station of Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia, Kuala Pilah planted in December 2012. In this study, 183 J. curcas individuals were selected randomly from the population and their growth performance evaluated from December 2013 to December 2014. All the individual plants were raised from cuttings. The yield related data were recorded periodically and performance of each accession was analyzed using Statistical Analysis System (SAS) 9.4. Five traits which were number of fruits per plant (NFPP), number of fruits per inflorescence (NFPI), hundred seed weight (g) (HSW), number of seeds per plant (NSPP) and yield per plant (g) (YPP) showed significant differences among the accessions after two years of planting. Maximum values for each trait were 208 cm for plant height (PH), 31 for number of branches per plant (BPP), 115 for number of inflorescence per plant (NIPP), 582 for NFPP, 7 for NFPI, 307 for number of flowers per inflorescence (NFI), 17 for number of female flowers per inflorescence (NFFPI), 91.6 g for HSW, 1647.1 for NSPP and 927.6 g for YPP. Most of the plants which had performed well in the first year were among the best performers in the second year.

  5. Molecular analysis of ARF1 expression profiles during development of physic nut (Jatropha curcas L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Xiaobo; Lin, Fanrong; Lii, Yifan; Gou, Chunbao; Chen, Fang

    2011-03-01

    A cDNA clone designated arf1 was isolated from a physic nut (Jatropha curcas L.) endosperm cDNA library which encodes a small GTP-binding protein and has significant homology to ADP-ribosylation factors (ARF) in plants, animals and microbes. The cDNA contains an open reading frame that encodes a polypeptide of 181 amino acids with a calculated molecular mass of 20.7 kDa. The deduced amino acid sequence showed high homology to known ARFs from other organisms. The products of the arf1 obtained by overexpression in E. coli revealed the specific binding activity toward GTP. The expression of arf1 was observed in flowers, roots, stems and leaves as analyzed by RT-PCR, and its transcriptional level was highest in flowers. In particular, the accumulation of arf1 transcripts was different under various environmental stresses in seedlings. The results suggest that arf1 plays distinct physiological roles in Jatropha curcas cells.

  6. Method of making alkyl esters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elliott, Brian

    2010-09-14

    Methods of making alkyl esters are described herein. The methods are capable of using raw, unprocessed, low-cost feedstocks and waste grease. Generally, the method involves converting a glyceride source to a fatty acid composition and esterifying the fatty acid composition to make alkyl esters. In an embodiment, a method of making alkyl esters comprises providing a glyceride source. The method further comprises converting the glyceride source to a fatty acid composition comprising free fatty acids and less than about 1% glyceride by mass. Moreover, the method comprises esterifying the fatty acid composition in the presence of a solid acid catalyst at a temperature ranging firm about 70.degree. C. to about 120.degree. C. to produce alkyl esters, such that at least 85% of the free fatty acids are converted to alkyl esters. The method also incorporates the use of packed bed reactors for glyceride conversion and/or fatty acid esterification to make alkyl esters.

  7. Bayesian Multi-Trait Analysis Reveals a Useful Tool to Increase Oil Concentration and to Decrease Toxicity in Jatropha curcas L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva Junqueira, Vinícius; de Azevedo Peixoto, Leonardo; Galvêas Laviola, Bruno; Lopes Bhering, Leonardo; Mendonça, Simone; Agostini Costa, Tania da Silveira; Antoniassi, Rosemar

    2016-01-01

    The biggest challenge for jatropha breeding is to identify superior genotypes that present high seed yield and seed oil content with reduced toxicity levels. Therefore, the objective of this study was to estimate genetic parameters for three important traits (weight of 100 seed, oil seed content, and phorbol ester concentration), and to select superior genotypes to be used as progenitors in jatropha breeding. Additionally, the genotypic values and the genetic parameters estimated under the Bayesian multi-trait approach were used to evaluate different selection indices scenarios of 179 half-sib families. Three different scenarios and economic weights were considered. It was possible to simultaneously reduce toxicity and increase seed oil content and weight of 100 seed by using index selection based on genotypic value estimated by the Bayesian multi-trait approach. Indeed, we identified two families that present these characteristics by evaluating genetic diversity using the Ward clustering method, which suggested nine homogenous clusters. Future researches must integrate the Bayesian multi-trait methods with realized relationship matrix, aiming to build accurate selection indices models. PMID:27281340

  8. Studies on glycogen autophagy: effects of phorbol myristate acetate, ionophore A23187, or phentolamine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalamidas, S A; Kotoulas, O B; Hann, A C

    2002-06-15

    The effects of agents that could manipulate the lysosomal calcium such as phorbol myristate acetate, ionophore A23187, and phentolamine on the lysosomal glycogen degradation were studied by electron microscopy, morphometric analysis, and biochemical assays in newborn rat hepatocytes. Phorbol myristate acetate, which promotes the input of calcium to lysosomes, increased the total volume of autophagic vacuoles and the activity of lysosomal glycogen-hydrolyzing acid alpha 1,4 glucosidase and decreased the fractional volume of undigested glycogen inside the autophagic vacuoles and also decreased the activity of acid mannose 6-phosphatase. Ionophore A23187, which releases lysosomal calcium, produced opposite results in these enzyme activities. Phentolamine, an alpha-adrenergic blocking agent which interferes with the generation of phosphoinositides and may activate the lysosomal calcium uptake pump, increased the total volume of autophagic vacuoles and the activity of lysosomal glycogen-hydrolyzing acid glucosidase and decreased the fractional volume of undigested glycogen inside the autophagic vacuoles. The results of this study constitute evidence that changes in lysosomal calcium may influence certain aspects of autophagy, including the degradation of glycogen inside the autophagic vacuoles. They also support our previous postulate [Kalamidas and Kotoulas (2000a,b) Histol Histopathol 15:29-35, 1011-1018] that stimulation of autophagic mechanisms in newborn rat hepatocytes may be associated with acid mannose 6-phosphatase activity-deficient lysosomes.

  9. Esters with water esters 2-c to 6-c

    CERN Document Server

    Getzen, F W; Hefter, G T; Maczynski, Andrzej

    1992-01-01

    This volume is the first of two devoted to esters and water. It includes solubility data for binary systems containing an ester and water up to the end of 1988. The critical evaluations were all prepared by one author and an introductory section has been included to elaborate the philosophy and methodology followed in the evaluations.

  10. Biological effects of low energy nitrogen ion implantation on Jatropha curcas L. seed germination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu Gang, E-mail: xg335300@yahoo.com.cn [Center for Research and Development of Fine Chemicals, Guizhou University, Guiyang 550025 (China); Institute of Entomology, Guizhou University, Guiyang 550025 (China); Wang Xiaoteng [Department of Agricultural Resources and Environment, College of Agricultural, Guizhou University, Guiyang 550025 (China); Gan Cailing; Fang Yanqiong; Zhang Meng [College of Life Sciences, Guizhou University, Guiyang 550025 (China)

    2012-09-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We analyzed biological effects of N{sup +} implantation on dry Jatropha curcas seed. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer N{sup +} implantation greatly decreased seedling survival rate. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer At doses beyond 15 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 16} ion cm{sup -2}, biological repair took place. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer CAT was essential for H{sub 2}O{sub 2} removal. POD mainly functioned as seed was severely hurt. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer HAsA-GSH cycle mainly contributed to the regeneration of HAsA. - Abstract: To explore the biological effects of nitrogen ion beam implantation on dry Jatropha curcas seed, a beam of N{sup +} with energy of 25 keV was applied to treat the dry seed at six different doses. N{sup +} beam implantation greatly decreased germination rate and seedling survival rate. The doses within the range of 12 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 16} to 15 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 16} ions cm{sup -2} severely damaged the seeds: total antioxidant capacity (TAC), germination rate, seedling survival rate, reduced ascorbate acid (HAsA) and reduced glutathione (GSH) contents, and most of the tested antioxidases activity (i.e. catalase (CAT), ascorbate peroxidase (APX) and superoxide dismutase (SOD)) reached their lowest levels. At a dose of 18 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 16} ion cm{sup -2}, biological repair took place: moderate increases were found in TAC, germination rate, seedling survival rate, HAsA and GSH contents, and some antioxidant enzyme activities (i.e. CAT, APX, SOD and GPX). The dose of 18 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 16} ions cm{sup -2} may be the optimum dose for use in dry J. curcas seed mutation breeding. CAT, HAsA and GSH contributed to the increase of TAC, but CAT was the most important. POD performed its important role as seed was severely damaged. The main role of the HAsA-GSH cycle appeared to be for regeneration of HAsA.

  11. Amélioration du taux de multiplication in vitro de Jatropha curcas L

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mergeai, G.

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Improvement of the Rate of in vitro Multiplication of Jatropha curcas L. In order to improve the in vitro multiplication rate (number of shoots/explant/subculture of Jatropha curcas L. axillary nodes taken from young plants of two accessions of this species (originating from Cameroon and Senegal have been cultivated for three weeks on a MS medium supplemented with 8.87 μM BAP, 4.92 μM IBA, and 30 g/l sucrose at pH 5.7 ± 0.1, and solidified with 0.7% agar. The shoots obtained from each original explant were then transferred to proliferation media (PM consisting of MS medium supplemented with 2.21 to 8.9 μM BA or 2.21 to 8.9 μM kinetin in combination with 2.46 μM IBA. Each combination was completed with 33.12 μM adenine sulfate, 82.92 μM of glutamine and 30 g / L sucrose. The best multiplication rate was obtained for the PM medium containing 6.65 μM BA and 2.46 μM AIB. On this medium 42.72 ± 3.22 and 38.15 ± 4.7 shoots/explant were obtained respectively for the accessions from Cameroon and Senegal after 6 weeks of culture, and the mean multiplication rates were 8.27 ± 1.27 (accession from Cameroon and 7.89 ± 1.13 (accession from Senegal shoots per explant during the 7 following subcultures (3 weeks/subculture. This medium was also the one that allowed the best overall growth in shoot height. Leafy shoots obtained have been rooted in a medium containing half of the major mineral components of MS supplemented with 5.7 μM IBA, 1.5% sucrose and solidified with 0.7% agar, then acclimated with a survival rate of 97%. These results allow considering the establishment of industrial units of plantlet multiplication from elite clones of Jatropha curcas.

  12. In-situ Transesterification of Jatropha curcas L. Seeds for Biodiesel Production using Supercritical Methanol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ishak M.A.M.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In-situ supercritical methanol transesterification for production of biodiesel from Jatropha curcas L. (JCL seeds was successfully being carried out via batch-wise reactor system, under varying temperatures of 180 - 300 °C, pressures of 6 - 18 MPa, reaction time of 5 - 35 min and seeds-to-methanol ratio of 1:15 - 1:45 (w/v. In this study, the extracted oil obtained showed the presence of FAME referring as biodiesel, indicating that transesterification reaction had occurred during the extraction process. The results showed that the biodiesel yield was obtained at optimum conditions of 280 °C, 12 MPa, 30 min and 1:40 (w/v were 97.9%.

  13. Isolation of high-quality RNA from various tissues of Jatropha curcas for downstream applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, G Raja Krishna; Eswaran, Nalini; Johnson, T Sudhakar

    2011-06-01

    A method for isolating transcriptionally active RNA for downstream applications from diverse tissues of Jatropha curcas, a plant rich in latex, lipids, waxes, polysaccharide, polyphenols, and secondary metabolites, is described. The described method uses alkaline borate buffer during tissue homogenization to negate the formation of viscous gel observed in guanidium-salt-containing methods. By this method, quality RNA was extracted from leaf, immature inflorescence, endosperm, and root tissues with yields ranging from 1.80 to 7.80mg/100mg fresh weight (FW). The total RNA obtained was found to be suitable for poly(A)(+)RNA purification, complementary DNA (cDNA) synthesis, cloning of full-length cDNA, and cDNA library construction.

  14. Colecta y caracterización de procedencias de Jatropha curcas L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R Machado

    Full Text Available El objetivo de esta investigación fue realizar la caracterización de nueve procedencias de Jatropha curcas, colectadas en varias provincias de Cuba, durante la fase de vivero y la de establecimiento. Para caracterizar estos materiales se utilizó la metodología para la colecta y caracterización de germoplasma. En el vivero, la brotación de los propágulos se produjo a partir de los 7 o los 14 días de la plantación; mientras que la emergencia de las plántulas, al utilizar semilla, ocurrió a los 14 días. El porcentaje de supervivencia de los propágulos fluctuó entre 20 y 86,6 %, y a partir de semilla, entre 86,6 y 90 %. La supervivencia en el campo varió entre 66,6 y 100 % en las procedencias trasplantadas por propágulos y, en sentido general, resultó superior a la que se detectó en el vivero. En las procedencias trasladadas por plántulas no se detectó variación en la supervivencia (90,9 % para las dos accesiones: CSSS-5 y CSS-6. Se concluye que el porcentaje de brotación, la emergencia, el arraigamiento y la supervivencia fueron indicadores muy variables, tanto en condiciones de vivero como en campo, lo que estuvo indisolublemente ligado al genotipo, la edad y la calidad de la semilla de los materiales colectados (tanto propágulos como semilla. Se recomienda colectar J. curcas en otras zonas, con el fin de contribuir al incremento del germoplasma de esta importante especie, que constituye un recurso genético alternativo para la producción de biocombustible.

  15. Antibacterial potential of Jatropha curcas synthesized silver nanoparticles against food borne pathogens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nitin Chauhan

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The aqueous leaf extract of Jatropha curcas was used for the synthesis of silver nanoparticles (Jc-AgNps which were further evaluated for its antibacterial potential against food borne pathogens. J. curcas leaf extract could synthesize stable silver nanoparticles (Zeta potential: -23.4 mV with absorption band at 430 nm. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR indicated various biological compounds responsible for capping and stabilizing Jc-AgNps in suspension, while the presence of silver was authenticated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM equipped with energy-dispersive X-ray (EDX. Jc-AgNps were confirmed to be uniform in shape, size and behaviour through dynamic light scattering (DLS, transmission electron microscopy (TEM, X-ray diffraction (XRD, SEM, and atomic force microscopy (AFM analysis. To investigate the antibacterial activity, disc diffusion and microplate dilution assays were performed and zone of inhibition (ZOI as well as minimum inhibitory/bactericidal concentrations (MIC/MBCs were evaluated against selected bacterial strains. Overall results showed that Escherichia coli (ZOI: 23 mm, MBC: 0.010 mg/ml was the most sensitive organism, whereas Staphylococcus aureus (ZOI: 14.66 mm, MBC: 0.041 mg/ml and Salmonella enterica (ZOI: 16.66 mm, MBC: 0.041 mg/ml were the least sensitive against Jc-AgNps. The detailed microscopic investigations using SEM, TEM and AFM were performed to understand the antibacterial impacts of Jc-AgNps against Listeria monocytogenes. SEM and TEM analysis showed the clear deformation and disintegration of treated L. monocytogenes cells, whereas AFM established a decrease in the height and cell surface roughness (RMS value in the treated L. monocytogenes.

  16. Microorganismos patógenos en Jatropha curcas Linnaeus. Estrategias potenciales para su manejo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O Alonso

    Full Text Available Jatropha curcas Linnaeus (piñón botija, considerada la gran promesa verde para el biodiesel, es una planta de la que existen considerables incógnitas en el ámbito científico desde el punto de vista agronómico, sobre todo en lo referente a los microorganismos causantes de enfermedades, entre las que sobresale la conocida como damping off (estrangulamiento de las plántulas que es provocada por varias especies de hongos. Por ello, el objetivo de este artículo es compilar la mayor cantidad de información sobre los principales microorganismos fitopatógenos que afectan a J. curcas, así como las posibles estrategias para su manejo, con el fin de obtener rendimientos eficientes y rentables de este cultivo energético en Cuba. Se encontraron 48 agentes causales de enfermedades; los más representativos fueron los hongos, entre los que predominan los que producen la roya y el mildiu polvoso, fundamentalmente. En cuanto al manejo fitosanitario, se citan las medidas culturales preventivas y las químicas, como curativas. De ahí que en Cuba, al igual que en otros países donde se cultiva el piñón botija, sea imprescindible conocer los fitopatógenos que pueden reducir los rendimientos de dicha planta, para después implementar un sistema de manejo fitosanitario que contribuya a evitar pérdidas considerables en la producción de biodiesel como producto final.

  17. Shoot regeneration from cotyledonary leaf explants of jatropha curcas: A biodiesel plant

    KAUST Repository

    Kumar, Nitish Chandramohana

    2010-03-07

    A simple, high frequency, and reproducible method for plant regeneration through direct organogenesis from cotyledonary leaf explants of Jatropha curcas was developed using Murashige and Skoog (MS) medium supplemented with different concentrations of thidiazuron (TDZ) or 6-benzyl aminopurine (BAP). Medium containing TDZ has greater influence on regeneration as compared to BAP. The induced shoot buds were transferred to MS medium containing 10 lM kinetin (Kn), 4.5 lM BAP, and 5.5 lM a-naphthaleneacetic acid (NAA) for shoot proliferation. The proliferated shoots could be elongated on MS medium supplemented with different concentrations and combinations of BAP, indole-3-acetic acid (IAA), NAA, and indole-3-butyric acid (IBA). MS medium with 2.25 lM BAP and 8.5 lM IAA was found to be the best combination for shoot elongation. However, significant differences in plant regeneration and shoot elongation were observed among the genotypes studied. Rooting was achieved when the basal cut end of elongated shoots were dipped in half strength MS liquid medium containing dif- ferent concentrations and combinations of IBA, IAA, and NAA for 4 days, followed by transfer to growth regulators free half strength MS medium supplemented 0.25 mg l-1 activated charcoal. Elongated shoot treated with 15 lM IBA, 5.7 lM IAA, and 11 lM NAA resulted in highest percent rooting. The rooted plants could be established in soil with more than 90% survival rate. The method developed may be useful in improvement of J. curcas through genetic modification. © Franciszek Górski Institute of Plant Physiology, Polish Academy of Sciences, Kraków 2010.

  18. Efficient culture protocol for plant regeneration from cotyledonary petiole explants of Jatropha curcas L.

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    Ying Liu

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available A high-frequency and reproducible protocol for induction of adventitious shoot buds and plant regeneration from cotyledonary petiole explants of Jatropha curcas L. has been developed. The cotyledonary petiole explants of J. curcas cultured directly on medium supplemented with thidiazuron (TDZ induce regeneration of poor quality shoot buds that have a low regeneration frequency. However, treating the explants with high concentrations (10–60 mg/L of TDZ solution for certain time periods (5–80 min significantly increased the regeneration frequency and improved the quality of the regenerated shoot buds. The best shoot buds induction (88.42% and number of shoot buds (12.67 per explant were observed when in vitro explants were treated with 20 mg/L TDZ solution for 20 min before being transferred on hormone-free medium after 30 days. Regeneration was also influenced by the orientation (horizontal or vertical of the explants on the medium, and by the origin of the cotyledonary petioles (in vitro or in vivo used for the preparation of explants. We performed subsequent experiments for elongation and rooting of the regenerated shoot buds. Addition of L-arginine to the medium was conducive to the elongation of the shoot buds. A concentration of 7.5 mg/L L-arginine yielded the best results. The elongated shoots could initiate roots to become intact plantlets in half-strength Murashige and Skoog medium containing 0.1 mg/L indole-3-butyric acid. After acclimatization, these plantlets could be transplanted to the soil and the growth was normal. Therefore, application of the methods described here helped to increase plant regeneration efficiency.

  19. Biochemical evaluation of protein fractions from physic nut (Jatropha curcas L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chel-Guerrero, L.

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available J. curcas seed proteins were fractioned according to the Osborne method and some biochemical properties were determined for these fractions. Glutelins (378 g kg–1 protein and globulins (201 g kg–1 protein were the main components. Albumins and prolamins were the minor components. Protein digestibility was highest in glutelins and globulins with values of 81 and 80% respectively. Electrophoresis analysis showed that globulins and glutelins exhibited similar polypeptide profiles. Electrophoresis patterns suggested that there could be a structural relationship among 2S, 7S and 11S storage proteins from plant sources. According to the FAO⁄WHO reference, the protein fractions had acceptable levels of most of the essential amino acids, but its globulins and glutelins were low in lysine and tryptophan.Las proteínas de semillas de J. curcas L. se fraccionaron empleando el método de Osborne y posteriormente se determinaron algunas de sus propiedades bioquímicas y nutricionales. Las fracciones mayoritarias resultaron ser glutelinas (378 g kg–1 de proteína y globulinas (201 g kg–1 de proteína mientras que las albúminas y prolaminas fueron las fracciones minoritarias. La digestibilidad de la proteína resultó ser más alta en las glutelinas y globulinas, con valores de 81 y 80% respectivamente. El análisis por electroforesis mostró que las globulinas y glutelinas presentaron perfiles similares, los resultados sugieren que podría existir una relación con proteínas de almacenamiento 2S, 7S y 11S de origen vegetal. Asimismo, de acuerdo con la FAO/WHO, las fracciones proteínicas tuvieron niveles aceptables para la mayoría de los aminoácidos esenciales, sin embargo, las globulinas y glutelinas fueron deficientes en Lys y Trp.

  20. New lipophilic tyrosyl esters. Comparative antioxidant evaluation with hydroxytyrosyl esters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mateos, Raquel; Trujillo, Mariana; Pereira-Caro, Gema; Madrona, Andrés; Cert, Arturo; Espartero, José Luis

    2008-11-26

    New lipophilic esters of tyrosol, a naturally occurring phenol with interesting biological properties, have been synthesized in good yields by a chemoselective procedure, using lipase from Candida antarctica or p-toluenesulfonic acid as catalysts. Their antioxidant activities have been evaluated by the Rancimat test in lipophilic food matrices, as well as by FRAP and ABTS assays in methanolic solutions, and compared with those of previously synthesized hydroxytyrosyl esters. Free tyrosol, hydroxytyrosol, butylhydroxytoluene, and alpha-tocopherol were used as standards. All methods used for the antioxidant activity evaluation emphasized the high influence of the ortho-diphenolic structure on the antioxidant capacity, tyrosol and its derivatives being less active than hydroxytyrosol and its analogues and even less than BHT and alpha-tocopherol. In addition, the Rancimat test revealed a lower activity for ester derivatives than for their respective reference compounds (HTy or Ty), in agreement with the polar paradox. On the other hand, FRAP and ABTS methods reported an opposite behavior between the synthetic esters and their respective references. Thus, hydroxytyrosyl esters were more active than HTy, whereas tyrosyl esters were less active than Ty. The length and nature of the acyl side chain did not seem to play an important role in the antioxidant activity of either the hydroxytyrosyl or tyrosyl ester series, since no significant differences were observed among them.

  1. Oyster and Pyramidella Shells as Heterogeneous Catalysts for the Microwave-Assisted Biodiesel Production from Jatropha curcas Oil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Achanai Buasri

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Microwave-assisted biodiesel production via transesterification of Jatropha curcas oil with methanol using solid oxide catalyst derived from waste shells of oyster and Pyramidella was studied. The shells were calcined at 900°C for 2 h and calcium oxide (CaO catalyst characterizations were carried out by X-ray diffraction (XRD, X-ray fluorescence (XRF, scanning electron microscope (SEM, and the Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET surface area measurements. The effects of reaction variables such as reaction time, microwave power, methanol/oil molar ratio, and catalyst loading on the yield of biodiesel were investigated. Reusability of waste shell catalyst was also examined. The results indicated that the economic and environmentally friendly catalysts derived from oyster and Pyramidella shells showed good reusability and had high potential to be used as biodiesel production catalysts under microwave-assisted transesterification of Jatropha curcas oil with methanol.

  2. Evaluation of plant performance of Jatropha curcas L. under different agro-practices for optimizing biomass - A case study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Behera, Soumit K.; Srivastava, Pankaj; Singh, Nandita [National Botanical Research Institute, CSIR, Rana Pratap Marg, Lucknow 226001, UP (India); Tripathi, Ritu; Singh, J.P. [Solar Energy Centre, Ministry of New and Renewable Energy, Gwalpahari, Gurgaon (India)

    2010-01-15

    Jatropha curcas L., a multipurpose, drought resistant, perennial plant belonging to Euphorbiaceae family has gained lot of importance for the production of biodiesel. The properties of the crop and its oil have persuaded investors, policy makers and clean development mechanism (CDM) project developers to consider Jatropha as a substitute for fossil fuels to reduce greenhouse gas emissions. However, basic agronomic properties of Jatropha are not thoroughly understood and the environmental effects have not been investigated yet. Grey literature reports are very optimistic on simultaneous wasteland reclamation capability and oil yields. Studies were undertaken at Solar Energy Centre, Gurgaon, India to evaluate the plant performance under different agro-practices with special reference to irrigation scheduling, VAM and biofertilizers' applications, plant spacing, pruning trials for maximizing tree architecture and higher biomass. Parallel experiments were undertaken to understand the scope of J. curcas for intercropping practices in the under storey of dominating monoculture tree stands (Prosopis, Acacia and Neem). (author)

  3. Local Perceptions about the Effects of Jatropha (Jatropha curcas) and Castor (Ricinus communis) Plantations on Households in Ghana and Ethiopia

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    Biofuel plantations have been hyped as a means to reinvigorate Africa’s rural areas. Yet there is still apprehension about the negative environmental and social impacts of large-scale commercial biofuel production around rising food prices, land grabbing, ecological damage, and disruption of rural livelihoods. Given the extent of Jatropha curcas production in Ghana and Ethiopia and Castor bean ( Ricinus communis ) in Ethiopia, this paper presents the results of a study that assessed the socio...

  4. Performance of Jatropha curcas L. in Semi-arid Zone: Seed Germination, Seedling Growth and Early Field Growth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharif AHAMAD

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available There is a lack of information on basic agronomic properties of Jatropha curcas L. (jatropha cultivation on the marginal lands in the semi-arids. Evaluation of agronomic performance of identified elite strains of J. curcas in marginal lands would be of paramount importance for addressing gap areas in their agronomic properties and subsequently for harnessing their optimum economic potentials. The present study undertook the task of analysing the growth performance of a high oil bearing elite strain of J. curcas–DARL-2 in degraded land in semi-arid zone of Deccan Plateau, India. While undertaking the assessment of growth performance of elite strain DARL-2, two other native (wild strains (namely AHN-1 and AHN-2 of J. curcas were also considered so that a comparative evaluation could be carried out. The role of gypsum was also investigated on J. curcas in the nursery stage as well its carry over effects on growth performance of transplanted trees in the field. Two types of substrates, gypsum-treated soil (GS and untreated soil (SL were used for growing seedlings of all the three jatropha strains. Seedlings (120-days-old of DARL-2 exhibited greater plant height, collar diameter and number of branches but root length was greater in the local strains. In the second year of field transplantation, DARL-2 strain exhibited significantly (p<0.05 greater plant height and number of branches/plant. No carry over effects of gypsum treatment were observed in field transplanted plants as none of the growth parameters significantly varied among the substrate types.

  5. A comparative analysis of physical and chemical properties of Jatropha Curcas. L, Calophyllum Inophyllum. L and Sterculia Feotida. L oil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silitonga, A.S. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Medan State Polytechnic (Indonesia)], email: ardinsu@yahoo.co.id, email: a_atabani2@msn.com; Atabani, A.E. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Khartoum (Sudan); Mahlia, T.M.I. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Syiah Kuala University, (Indonesia); Masjuki, H.H.; Badruddin, I.A. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Malaya (Malaysia)

    2011-07-01

    Production of bio-diesel converted from edible oil has raised the issue of competition for resources between food production and fuel production, as well as other questions of environmental impact. It has been established that producing bio-diesel from non-edible vegetable oils was one of the effective ways to resolve these issues. Jatropha curcas L., Calophyllum inophyllum L., and Sterculia foetida L. are all non-edible oils and all can be potential sources for future energy supply. The purpose of this paper is to reveal the results of a comparative analysis of the physical and chemical properties of Jatropha curcas L., Calophyllum inophyllum L., and Sterculia foetida L. oils. Physical and chemical properties of these vegetable oils, such as density, iodine value, free fatty acid, etc. were investigated and measured. These properties were then compared with those of other non-edible vegetable oils in terms of potential. This paper finds that the results of analysis indicate that there is high potential for using Jatropha curcas L., Calophyllum inophyllum L., and Sterculia foetida L. crude oil as an alternative fuel.

  6. Roots distribution of Jatropha curcas trees in Brazilian savana; Distribuicao das raizes de plantas adultas de pinhao manso no cerrado

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Araujo, Fausto J.M.; Costa, Hugo T.; Alves Junior, Jose; Evangelista, Adao W.P.; Oliveira, Pedro H. L. de [Universidade Federal de Goias (EA/UFG), Goiania, GO (Brazil). Escola de Agronomia e Eng. de Alimentos], E-mail: jose.junior@pq.cnpq.br

    2010-07-01

    The Jatropha curcas L. presents a great potential for fuel, but there are few studies to assess roots distribution of this species. The root system is responsible for water uptake and should be considered in irrigation water requirement calculations. Studies show that Jatropha curcas trees irrigated can be double productivity. The objective of the work was to evaluate root distribution of Jatropha curcas L. trees spacing 3 x 2 m in a Clay soil of Brazilian Savana (Porangatu, north of Goias state). The evaluation was carried in three trees non-irrigated with three years old, five deeps 0.0-0.30 m, 0.30-0.60 m, 0.60-0.90 m, 0.90-1.2, 1.2-1.5 m and five distances from the trunk 0.0-0.25; 0.25-0.50; 0.50-0.75, 0.75-1.0 and 1.0-1.25 m. Trenches were dug from the plant trunk longitudinally and orthogonally in respect to row plants. Afterwards, root samples were collected according to the monolith method and separated from the soil. Root length and root density were determined by using grid 1 cm{sup 2}. The results showed more than 80% of roots concentrated at 0.0-1.0 m of deep, 1.0 m horizontal distance from the trunk. (author)

  7. Larvicidal activity of a toxin from the seeds of Jatropha curcas Linn. against Aedes aegypti Linn. and Culex quinquefasciatus Say.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chanthakan, Nuchsuk; Nuanchawee, Wetprasit; Sittiruk, Roytrakul; Sunanta, Ratanapo

    2012-06-01

    The larvicidal effects of the crude protein extract and purified toxin, Jc-SCRIP, from the seed coat of Jatropha curcas Linn. against the third instar larvae of mosquitoes, Aedes aegypti Linn. and Culex quinquefasciatus Say, were investigated. This test compared the effects of the purified toxin with crude protein extracts from seed kernels of J. curcas and Ricinus communis. At various concentrations of purified toxin and crude protein extract, the larval mortality of both Ae. aegypti and Cx. quinquefasciatus were positively correlated with increased exposure time. The larvae of Cx. quinquefasciatus were more susceptible to the toxin and both extracts than the larvae of Ae. aegypti. After 24 hours of exposure, the extract showed larvicidal activity against Ae. aegypti and Cx. quinquefasciatus with (LC50) values of 3.89 mg/ml and 0.0575 mg/ml, respectively. The toxin, Jc-SCRIP, showed larvicidal activity against Ae. aegypti and Cx. quinquefasciatus with (LC50) values of 1.44 mg/ml and 0.0303 mg/ ml, respectively. These results indicated that the crude protein extract and Jc-SCRIP were more toxic to the third instar larvae of Cx. quinquefasciatus than that of Ae. aegypti. The potent larvicidal activities of the seed coat extract and the Jc-SCRIP toxin from J. curcas suggest that they may be used as bioactive agents to control the mosquito population.

  8. ISOLATION, CLONING AND CHARACTERIZATION OF ACTIN-ENCODING cDNAs FROM Jatropha curcas L. IP-2P

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kinya Akashi

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Actin is a major component of the plant cytoskeleton, so all cells contain this protein. Actin is expressed constitutivelyand is involved in basic housekeeping functions required for cell maintenance. Because of this, it has been frequentlyused as an internal control to normalize changes in gene expressions analysis. Actually, the information of nucleotidesequence of actin gene of Jatropha curcas L. population IP-2P from Indonesia is not available yet. The objective of thisresearch was to isolate, clone and characterize cDNA of actin genes of J. curcas IP-2P. Three partial actin genesequences had been successfully isolated by PCR using total cDNA as template, and actin primer designed fromconserved region of Arabidopsis thaliana. Nucleotide sequence analysis showed that the length of JcACT fragment is610, 534, and 701 bp encoding 203, 177, and 234 amino acids respectively. Local alignment analysis based on mRNAsequences shows that JcACT fragment shares 98% similarity with actin mRNA of Hevea brasiliensis and 99% withactin mRNA of Ricinus communis. Based on deduced amino acid sequence, JcACT is 100% identical to actins fromPrunus salicina, Gossypium hirsutum, and Betula luminifera. Even though these clones of cDNA are not completed yet,they can be used as reference in J. curcas L. gene expression analysis.

  9. Physical localization and DNA methylation of 45S rRNA gene loci in Jatropha curcas L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhiyun Gong

    Full Text Available In eukaryotes, 45S rRNA genes are arranged in tandem arrays of repeat units, and not all copies are transcribed during mitosis. DNA methylation is considered to be an epigenetic marker for rDNA activation. Here, we established a clear and accurate karyogram for Jatropha curcas L. The chromosomal formula was found to be 2n=2x=22=12m+10 sm. We found that the 45S rDNA loci were located at the termini of chromosomes 7 and 9 in J. curcas. The distribution of 45S rDNA has no significant difference in J. curcas from different sources. Based on the hybridization signal patterns, there were two forms of rDNA - dispersed and condensed. The dispersed type of signals appeared during interphase and prophase, while the condensed types appeared during different stages of mitosis. DNA methylation analysis showed that when 45S rDNA stronger signals were dispersed and connected to the nucleolus, DNA methylation levels were lower at interphase and prophase. However, when the 45S rDNA loci were condensed, especially during metaphase, they showed different forms of DNA methylation.

  10. Antioxidant and Antiradical Activities of Manihot esculenta Crantz (Euphorbiaceae Leaves and Other Selected Tropical Green Vegetables Investigated on Lipoperoxidation and Phorbol-12-myristate-13-acetate (PMA Activated Monocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ange Mouithys-Mickalad

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abelmoschus esculentus (Malvaceae, Hibiscus acetosella (Malvaceae, Manihot esculenta Crantz (Euphorbiaceae and Pteridium aquilinum (Dennstaedtiaceae leaves are currently consumed as vegetables by migrants from sub-Saharan Africa living in Western Europe and by the people in the origin countries, where these plants are also used in the folk medicine. Manihot leaves are also eaten in Latin America and some Asian countries. This work investigated the capacity of aqueous extracts prepared from those vegetables to inhibit the peroxidation of a linoleic acid emulsion. Short chain, volatile C-compounds as markers of advanced lipid peroxidation were measured by gas chromatography by following the ethylene production. The generation of lipid hydroperoxides, was monitored by spectroscopy using N-N′-dimethyl-p-phenylene-diamine (DMPD. The formation of intermediate peroxyl, and other free radicals, at the initiation of the lipid peroxidation was investigated by electron spin resonance, using α-(4-pyridyl-1-oxide-N-tert-butylnitrone as spin trap agent. The ability of the extracts to decrease the cellular production of reactive oxygen species (ROS in “inflammation like” conditions was studied by fluorescence technique using 2′,7′-dichlorofluorescine-diacetate as fluorogenic probe, in a cell model of human monocytes (HL-60 cells activated with phorbol ester. Overall the extracts displayed efficient concentration-dependent inhibitory effects. Their total polyphenol and flavonoid content was determined by classic colorimetric methods. An HPLC-UV/DAD analysis has clearly identified the presence of some polyphenolic compounds, which explains at least partially the inhibitions observed in our models. The role of these plants in the folk medicine by sub-Saharan peoples as well as in the prevention of oxidative stress and ROS related diseases requires further consideration.

  11. Induction of CD3 delta epsilon omega by phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vangsted, A; Neisig, A; Wallin, H

    1993-01-01

    The effect of phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) on the synthesis, assembly and processing of the components of the T cell receptor (TcR) was studied with special focus on the CD3 omega chain. Treatment of the human leukemic T cell line Jurkat with PMA increased the synthesis of the Ti alpha, CD......3 gamma and CG3 zeta chains two- to threefold and the synthesis of Ti beta and CD3 delta epsilon omega complexes five- to sevenfold as assessed by metabolic labeling, immunoprecipitation and sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis followed by scanning densitometry. The amount...... of TcR complexes expressed on the cell surface was decreased after 16 h of PMA treatment. Based on these results we propose a role of CD3 omega in retention of TcR complexes. From PMA-treated CEM cells more than 50-fold the amount of CD3 delta epsilon omega complexes was immunoprecipitated as compared...

  12. Caracterización de una biograsa de aceite vegetal de Jatropha curcas L y jabón de litio//Characterization of biogrease based on Jatropha curcas L vegetable oil and Lithium Soap Thickener

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliano Chitue de Assunção Nascimento

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Los aceites vegetales poseen un gran potencial como fluido base y como sustituto de los aceites minerales para la formulación de grasas lubricantes, estos aceites son biodegradables y renovables. En el trabajo se determinaron las propiedades  fisicoquímicas, antidesgaste y de extrema presión de una biograsa de aceite vegetal de Jatropha curcas L y jabón de litio empleando los métodos de pruebas estándar para las grasas lubricantes. La biograsa posee un color amarillo claro, una textura suave y homogénea,  un grado de penetración NLGI 1, una temperatura de goteo de 145 oC, magnitudes adecuadas del contenido de álcalis libre y corrosión al cobre; así como  propiedades antidesgaste y de extrema presión similares a otras grasas minerales y biograsas formuladas con diferentes aceites vegetales. Palabras claves: biograsa, aceite de Jatropha curcas L, jabón de litio, propiedades fisicoquímicas, propiedades antidesgaste, propiedades de extrema presión. Characterization of biogrease based on Jatropha curcas L vegetable oil and Lithium Soap Thickener. Abstract Vegetable oils have a great potential as a base fluid and a substitute for mineral oil in grease formulation, these oils are biodegradable and renewable. In this paper were determined the  physicochemical, antiwear and extreme pressure properties of a biogrease based on Jatropha curcas L vegetable oil and lithium soap thickener using the lubricanting greases standard test methods. The biogrease have a light yellow color, soft and homogeneous texture, a penetration grade NLGI 1, a drop point of 145 oC, appropriate magnitudes of free alkalis and copper corrosion; as well as antiwear and extreme pressure properties similar to the other mineral lubricating grease and formulated biogreases with differents vegetable oils. Key words: biogrease, Jatropha curcas L vegetable oil, lithium soap thickener, physicochemical properties, antiwear properties, extreme pressure properties.

  13. Dissipation of excess photosynthetic energy contributes to salinity tolerance: a comparative study of salt-tolerant Ricinus communis and salt-sensitive Jatropha curcas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lima Neto, Milton C; Lobo, Ana K M; Martins, Marcio O; Fontenele, Adilton V; Silveira, Joaquim Albenisio G

    2014-01-01

    The relationships between salt tolerance and photosynthetic mechanisms of excess energy dissipation were assessed using two species that exhibit contrasting responses to salinity, Ricinus communis (tolerant) and Jatropha curcas (sensitive). The salt tolerance of R. communis was indicated by unchanged electrolyte leakage (cellular integrity) and dry weight in leaves, whereas these parameters were greatly affected in J. curcas. The leaf Na+ content was similar in both species. Photosynthesis was intensely decreased in both species, but the reduction was more pronounced in J. curcas. In this species biochemical limitations in photosynthesis were more prominent, as indicated by increased C(i) values and decreased Rubisco activity. Salinity decreased both the V(cmax) (in vivo Rubisco activity) and J(max) (maximum electron transport rate) more significantly in J. curcas. The higher tolerance in R. communis was positively associated with higher photorespiratory activity, nitrate assimilation and higher cyclic electron flow. The high activity of these alternative electron sinks in R. communis was closely associated with a more efficient photoprotection mechanism. In conclusion, salt tolerance in R. communis, compared with J. curcas, is related to higher electron partitioning from the photosynthetic electron transport chain to alternative sinks. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  14. Caracterización morfológica y productiva de procedencias de Jatropha curcas L. Morphological and productive characterization of Jatropha curcas L. provenances

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R Machado

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available El objetivo de este trabajo fue caracterizar la variabilidad morfológica y productiva de procedencias de Jatropha curcas. Para ello se midió o estimó: la altura; el grosor de las ramas primarias y del tallo; la altura de la primera rama; las enfermedades; el número de ramas primarias, secundarias y terciarias; el número y el peso de los frutos; el rendimiento de semillas; el peso de 100 semillas; las dimensiones de la semilla y el contenido de aceite. Para interpretar los resultados se utilizó ACP y análisis de conglomerados. La altura fue el indicador más variable, seguido por el grosor de las ramas primarias, el número de ramas secundarias y primarias, y el grosor del tallo, los cuales explicaron el 57,7% de la variabilidad. Sobre la base de estos indicadores se formaron seis grupos. Los valores extremos superiores, en todos los indicadores morfológicos, se encontraron en el grupo I (SSCS-3, y los inferiores en el grupo IV (SSCS-7 y SSCS-6. Solo seis de las diez procedencias sembradas produjeron frutos; mientras que las plantadas lo hicieron en todos los casos. De las sembradas sobresalieron: San Miguel, D-1 y SSCS-3, con rendimientos estimados de 2 325; 243 y 169 kg de semilla/ha; y de las plantadas: Cabo Verde, SSCE-10 y SSCE-7 con 814; 327 y 93,2 kg de semilla/ha, respectivamente. En la SSCE-10 y en la Cabo Verde el porcentaje de aceite alcanzó un 32,8 y 35,0%, respectivamente. Los resultados permitieron identificar las procedencias sobresalientes, tanto en los indicadores morfológicos (SSCS-3 como en los productivos (Cabo Verde, SSCE-10 y San Miguel.The objective of this work was to characterize the morphological and productive variability of Jatropha curcas provenances. For that purpose the following indicators were measured or estimated: height; diameter of primary branches and stem; height of the first branch; diseases; number of primary, secondary and tertiary branches; fruit number and weight; seed yield; weight of 100

  15. Indirect measurement of photosynthetic pigments in the leaves of Jatropha curcasQuantificação indireta de pigmentos fotossintetizantes em folhas de Jatropha curcas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    João Paulo Gonsiorkiewicz Rigon

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available O objetivo do presente trabalho foi gerar modelos matemáticos capazes de reportar os pigmentos fotossintéticos e proteína solúvel nas folhas de Jatropha curcas por meio da relação entre leituras realizadas por espectrofotometria clássica e por clorofilômetro, ClorofiLOG® 1030. O trabalho foi realizado na Embrapa Algodão, na cidade de Campina Grande (PB. Para a análise indireta, foi usado o equipamento portátil para leituras em discos foliares com diferentes estádios de desenvolvimento. A clorofila nestes discos foi então determinada usando o método clássico, enquanto que para a determinação da proteína solúvel utilizou-se a metodologia de Bradford. Os dados foram submetidos a análise de variância e de regressão em que as leituras obtidas com o medidor portátil de clorofila foram as variáveis dependentes e os pigmentos fotossintéticos e de proteínas solúveis, determinadas pelo método clássico foram as variáveis independentes. Os resultados indicaram que, com exceção da clorofila b, e proteína solúvel, os modelos matemáticos obtidos por meio do clorofilômetro portátil ClorofiLOG® 1030 podem ser utilizados para estimar a concentração dos pigmentos fotossintéticos com alta precisão, poupando tempo e reagentes químicos normalmente utilizados em procedimentos convencionais.O objetivo do presente trabalho foi gerar modelos matemáticos capazes de reportar os pigmentos fotossintéticos e proteína solúvel nas folhas de Jatropha curcas por meio da relação entre leituras realizadas por espectrofotometria clássica e por clorofilômetro, ClorofiLOG® 1030. O trabalho foi realizado na Embrapa Algodão, na cidade de Campina Grande (PB. Para a análise indireta, foi usado o equipamento portátil para leituras em discos foliares com diferentes estádios de desenvolvimento. A clorofila nestes discos foi então determinada usando o método clássico, enquanto que para a determinação da proteína solúvel utilizou

  16. Esters van tetrathioorthokiezelzuur en tetrathioorthogermaniumzuur

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stienstra, Folkert Jans

    1934-01-01

    The germaniun tetrachloride required was prepared from the mineral germanite. For this a simpler method was elaborated. For the preparation of the esters of tetrathioorthosilicic acid and tetrathioorthogermanic acid, silicon tetrachloride and germanium tetrachloride were made to react with a

  17. Liquid Crystalline Esters of Dibenzophenazines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kevin John Anthony Bozek

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A series of esters of 2,3,6,7-tetrakis(hexyloxydibenzo[a,c]phenazine-11-carboxylic acid was prepared in order to probe the effects of the ester groups on the liquid crystalline behavior. These compounds exhibit columnar hexagonal phases over broad temperature ranges. Variations in chain length, branching, terminal groups, and the presence of cyclic groups were found to modify transition temperatures without substantially destabilizing the mesophase range.

  18. OPTIMASI PRODUKSI METIL ESTER SULFONAT DARI METIL ESTER MINYAK JELANTAH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sri Hidayati

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available OPTIMATION OF METHYL ESTER SULFONATES PRODUCTION FROM WASTE COOKING METHYL ESTER. An experiment of sulfonation process of methyl ester to produce methyl ester sulfonates (MES was caried out using waste palm methyl ester and sulfuric acid as sulfonating agent with variation of H2SO4 concentration (60% (K1, 70% (K2, dan 80% (K3 and sulfonation time (60 minute (L1, 75 minute (L2 and 90 minute (L3 using factorial on Randomized Complete Design Block. The experiment result showed the best sulfonation condition present in 80% H2SO4 concentration and sulfonation time of 90 minutes.  The best characteristic of MES is produced showed surface tension of 27.35 dyne/cm, emulsion stability of 89.44%, acid value of 17.72 mg KOH/g and interfacial tension of 0.0361 dyne/cm at MES concentration of 2% in 10,000 ppm salinity water. Sebuah penelitian tentang proses produksi metil ester sulfonat menggunakan minyak bekas kelapa sawit dilakukan dengan menggunakan H2SO4 sebagai agen pensulfonasi dengan variasi konsentrasi H2SO4 (60% (K1, 70% (K2, dan 80% (K3 dan lama sulfonasi (60 menit (L1, 75 menit (L2 and 90 menit (L3 dengan menggunakan faktorial dalam Rancangan Kelompok Teracak Lengkap. Hasil penelitian menunjukkan bahwa kondisi proses sulfonasi terbaik terdapat pada konsentrasi H2SO4 80% dan lama reaksi 90 menit. Karakteristik Metil Ester Sulfonat (MES terbaik yang dihasilkan memperlihatkan nilai tegangan permukaan 27,35 dyne/cm, stabilitas emulsi 89,44%, nilai bilangan asam antara 17,72 mg KOH/g dan nilai tegangan antar muka pada konsentrasi MES 2% di dalam air dengan salinitas 10.000 ppm yaitu 0,0361 dyne/cm.

  19. Mecanismos de interacción entre el extracto etanólico de Jatropha curcas L. y metoclopramida en el sistema gastrointestinal.

    OpenAIRE

    Goicochea-Lugo, Sergio; Zavala-Flores, Ernesto; Salazar-Granara, Alberto; Universidad de San Martín de Porres

    2014-01-01

    OBJETIVODeterminar los mecanismos de interacción entre el extracto etanólico de Jatrohpa curcas L. y la metoclopramida sobre el sistema gastrointestinal.MATERIAL Y MÉTODOSe usó 30 ratones albinos machos, en5 grupos; los que recibieron por vía oral: Grupo 1: Jatropha curcas L. 800 mg/Kg, y 0, 5mg/Kg de metoclopramida. Grupo 2: 0.5 mg/mL de metoclopramida. Grupo 3: 1.5 mg/Kg de Atropina. Grupo 4: 800 mg/kg de Jatropha curcas L. Grupo 5: no recibió medicamento. A todos, se les administró por vía...

  20. Effects of soil moisture conservation practice, irrigation and fertilization on Jatropha curcas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aran Phiwngam

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available A field experiment was conducted on an Ultic Haplustalf at the Kanchanaburi Research Station, Muang district, Kanchanaburi province, western Thailand between July 2011 and June 2012. Split plots in a randomized complete block design with four replications were employed, having eight main plots (soil moisture conservation practice and irrigation, W1–W8 and 2 sub plots (fertilization, F1 and F2. Jatropha curcas (KUBP 78-9 Var., having been planted at 2 × 2 m spacing, was aged 2 yr when the experiment was commenced. The highly significantly heaviest 100-seed weight of 42 g was obtained 1 mth after water irrigation which had been applied at the rate of 16 L/plant, particularly in the treatment with crop residue mulching (W8 but there were no significant differences among the other treatments where irrigation had been applied (W5–W7. Fertilization and a combination between different fertilizers and soil moisture conservation schemes plus irrigation showed no different effect on the weight of 100 seeds throughout the year of measurement. Growing J. curcas with drip-irrigated water at the rate of 16 L/plant applied every 2 d and crop residue mulching (W8 significantly gave the highest seed yield of 1301.3 kg/ha at 15% moisture content. There were no significant differences among the seed yields from the plots applied with the same amount of irrigated water but with no mulching (W7 and half that amount of irrigated water with crop residue mulching (W6, producing yields of 1112.0 kg/ha and 1236.3 kg/ha, respectively. Three-year-old J. curcas gave inferior seed yield when grown with no irrigated water supply (W1–W4. The application of 50–150–150 kg/ha of N–P2O5–K2O significantly induced a higher amount of seed yield (933.9 kg/ha than did the addition of 93.75–93.75–93.75 kg/ha of N–P2O5–K2O (786.3 kg/ha. The interaction between soil moisture conservation plus irrigation and fertilizer was clear. Applying 50–150

  1. Jatropha curcas

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    USER

    2014-11-08

    Nov 8, 2014 ... :atropha biodiesel for about 80% reduction in CO2 emission from the use of fossil fuel. It is therefore ... total energy consumption in the transport sector globally (IEA .... dioxide by both mechanical and solvent extraction was.

  2. Cyclic electron flow, NPQ and photorespiration are crucial for the establishment of young plants of Ricinus communis and Jatropha curcas exposed to drought.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lima Neto, M C; Cerqueira, J V A; da Cunha, J R; Ribeiro, R V; Silveira, J A G

    2017-07-01

    Although plant physiological responses to drought have been widely studied, the interaction between photoprotection, photorespiration and antioxidant metabolism in water-stressed plants is scarcely addressed. This study aimed to evaluate the physiological adjustments preserving photosynthesis and growth in two plant species with different tolerance to drought: Jatropha curcas and Ricinus communis. We measured stress indicators, gas exchange, photochemistry of PSII and PSI, antioxidant enzymes, cyclic electron flow and photorespiration. Physiological stress indicators associated with reduction in growth confirmed R. communis as sensitive and J. curcas as tolerant to drought. Drought induced loss of photosynthesis in R. communis, whereas J. curcas maintained higher leaf gas exchange and photochemistry under drought. In addition, J. curcas showed higher dissipation of excess energy and presented higher cyclic electron flow when exposed to drought. Although none of these mechanisms have been triggered in R. communis, this species showed increases in photorespiration. R. communis displayed loss of Rubisco content while the Rubisco relative abundance did not change in J. curcas under drought. Accordingly, the in vivo maximum Rubisco carboxylation rate (Vcmax ) and the maximum photosynthetic electron transport rate driving RuBP regeneration (Jmax ) were less affected in J. curcas. Both species displayed an efficient antioxidant mechanism by increasing activities of ascorbate peroxidase (APX) and superoxide dismutase (SOD). Overall, we suggest that the modulation of different photoprotective mechanisms is crucial to mitigate the effects caused by excess energy, maintaining photosynthetic apparatus efficiency and promoting the establishment of young plants of these two species under drought. © 2017 German Botanical Society and The Royal Botanical Society of the Netherlands.

  3. Stable genetic transformation of Jatropha curcas via Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated gene transfer using leaf explants

    KAUST Repository

    Kumar, Nitish

    2010-07-01

    Jatropha curcas is an oil bearing species with multiple uses and considerable economic potential as a biofuel crop. A simple and reproducible protocol was developed for Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated stable genetic transformation of J. curcas using leaf explains. Agrobacterium strain LBA 4404 harbouring the binary vector pCAMBIA 1304 having sense-dehydration responsive element binding (S-DREB2A), beta-glucuronidase (gus), and hygromycin-phosphotransferase (hpt) genes were used for gene transfer. A number of parameters such as preculture of explains, wounding of leaf explants, Agrobacterium growth phase (OD), infection duration, co-cultivation period, co-cultivation medium pH, and acetosyringone, were studied to optimized transformation efficiency. The highest transformation efficiency was achieved using 4-day precultured, non-wounded leaf explants infected with Agrobacterium culture corresponding to OD(600)=0.6 for 20 min, followed by co-cultivation for 4 days in a co-cultivation medium containing 100 mu M acetosyringone, pH 5.7. Co-cultivated leaf explants were initially cultured on Murashige and Skoog (MS) medium supplemented with 2.27 mu M thidiazuron (TDZ) for regeneration of shoot buds, followed by selection on same medium with 5 mu g ml(-1) hygromycin. Selected shoot buds were transferred to MS medium containing 10 mu M kinetin (Kn), 4.5 mu M 6-benzyl aminopurine (BA), and 5.5 mu M alpha-naphthaleneacetic acid (NAA) for proliferation. The proliferated shoots were elongated on MS medium supplemented with 2.25 mu M BA and 8.5 mu M indole-3-acetic acid (IAA). The elongated shoots were rooted on half strength MS medium supplemented with 15 mu M indole-3-butyric acid (IBA), 5.7 mu M IAA, 5.5 mu M NAA, and 0.25 mg l(-1) activated charcoal. GUS histochemical analysis of the transgenic tissues further confirmed the transformation event. PCR and DNA gel blot hybridization were performed to confirm the presence of transgene. A transformation efficiency of 29% was

  4. Regeneration in Jatropha curcas: Factors affecting the efficiency of in vitro regeneration

    KAUST Repository

    Sharma, Sweta K.

    2011-07-01

    Factors influencing in vitro regeneration through direct shoot bud induction from hypocotyl explants of Jatropha curcas were studied in the present investigation. Regeneration in J. curcas was found to be genotype dependent and out of four toxic and one non-toxic genotype studied, non-toxic was least responsive. The best results irrespective of genotype were obtained on the medium containing 0.5mgL-1 TDZ (Thidiazuron) and in vitro hypocotyl explants were observed to have higher regeneration efficiency as compared to ex vitro explant in both toxic and non-toxic genotypes. Adventitious shoot buds could be induced from the distal end of explants in all the genotypes. The number of shoot buds formed and not the number of explants responding to TDZ treatment were significantly affected by the position of the explant on the seedling axis. Explants from younger seedlings (≤15 days) were still juvenile and formed callus easily, whereas the regeneration response declined with increase in age of seedlings after 30 days. Transient reduction of Ca2+ concentrations to 0.22gL-1 in the germination medium increased the number of responding explants.Induced shoot buds, upon transfer to MS medium containing 2mgL-1 Kn (Kinetin) and 1mgL-1 BAP (6-benzylamino purine) elongated. These elongated shoots were further proliferated on MS medium supplemented with 1.5mgL-1 IAA (indole-3-acetic acid) and 0.5mgL-1 BAP and 3.01-3.91cm elongation was achieved after 6 weeks. No genotype specific variance in shoot elongation was observed among the toxic genotypes except the CSMCRI-JC2, which showed reduced response. And for proliferation among the toxic genotypes, CSMCRI-JC4 showed highest number of shoots formed. Among the rest, no significant differences were observed. The elongated shoot could be rooted by pulse treatment on half-strength MS medium supplemented with 2% sucrose, 3mgL-1 IBA (indole-3-butyric acid), 1mgL-1 IAA, 1mgL-1 NAA (α-naphthalene acetic acid) and subsequent transfer on 0

  5. IDENTIFICACIÓN, CARACTERIZACIÓN Y EVALUACIÓN DE RIZOBACTERIAS PARA EL CONTROL DE HONGOS FITOPATÓGENOS DE SEMILLAS DE Jatropha curcas L.

    OpenAIRE

    Toledo Hernández, Erubiel

    2013-01-01

    Jatropha curcas L. ha ganado importancia en los últimos años debido a su gran potencial para obtener biodiesel, característica por la cual es conocida mundialmente. Algunos estudios han evidenciado que diferentes partes de la planta están expuestas al ataque de hongos fitopatógenos tales como Aspergillus, Fusarium, Rhizopus, entre otros. Existen escasos trabajos acerca del potencial de las rizobacterias de J. curcas en el control biológico de fitopatógenos. El objetivo de este trabajo f...

  6. Dosis-respuesta sobre la motilidad intestinal y el sistema nervioso de la interacción entre Jatropha curcas L. y metoclopramida

    OpenAIRE

    Zavala Flores, Ernesto; Goicochea Lugo, Sergio; Agurto Muñóz, Thalia; Adrianzen Rodriguéz, Sandra; Coronel Bustamante, Gianmarco; Salazar Granara, Alberto Alcibíades

    2013-01-01

    OBJETIVO: Determinar el efecto dosis-respuesta sobre la motilidad intestinal y el sistema nervioso, de la interacción entre el extracto etanólico de las semilla de J. curcas L. y metoclopramida. MÉTODO: Se utilizaron 90 ratones albinos,formando 10 grupos de interacción que recibieron por vía oral (VO), en dosis establecida metoclopramida 0,5 mg/kg y en dosis escalonada extracto etanólico de la semilla de J. curcas L. (100 a 1000 mg/kg). Otros 5 grupos recibieron por VO, 0,5 mg/kg de metocl...

  7. Integración de Jatropha curcas L. en agroecosistemas como materia prima para biodiesel en la región centro de Chiapas, México.

    OpenAIRE

    Solís Guzmán, Blanca Flor

    2012-01-01

    Jatropha curcas L. es una opción de importancia en Chiapas como materia prima para biodiesel y se han establecido alrededor de 10 mil hectáreas, aún con escasa información como cultivo. El objetivo de este trabajo fue determinar el potencial de integración de J. curcas en agroecosistemas de la Región Centro de Chiapas, México. Esta investigación se realizó en tres etapas de 2008 a 2011. Primero se determinaron áreas potenciales con el programa ArcView GIS Ver. 3.2®, en dos escenarios: 1) pend...

  8. Caracterización e Incidencia de hongos fitopatógenos foliares en tres biotipos de Jatropha curcas en Sinaloa, México

    OpenAIRE

    Bermúdez Álvarez, Enrique Miguel

    2014-01-01

    Jatropha curcas es una planta resistente a la sequía y debido al alto contenido de aceite en su semilla, es considerada una fuente importante para la producción de biodiesel. En diferentes países se han reportado algunas enfermedades fúngicas en J. curcas; sin embargo, en México aún son escasos los estudios de caracterización de hongos fitopatógenos en este cultivo. Por lo que, el objetivo de este proyecto fue caracterizar y determinar la incidencia de hongos fitopatógenos f...

  9. PEMANFAATAN METIL ESTER JARAK PAGAR MENJADI SURFAKTAN MES UNTUK APLIKASI SEBAGAI OIL WELL STIMULATION AGENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erliza Hambali

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Year by year, globally the production of petroleum decreases but its demand increases. The world will get the energy crisis including Indonesia if that condition happens continously. Because of that, Indonesia starts to develop IOR (improved oil recovery method for their oil fields. IOR method is an improvement of the secondary phase in which the oil recovery is expected to increase oil production. One method of IOR is chemical injection with surfactant for injection. Surfactant is dissolved with injection water and injected to reservoir. Generally, surfactant of petroleum sulphonates is used for oil recovery. Due to the weaknesses of petroleum suphonates such as not resistant in high salinity and high hardness water, therefore it triggers to get surfactant substitute like MES (methyl ester sulphonates that is synthesized by bio-oil from Jatropha curcas L. The study was aimed to know the performance of MES surfactant formula from jatropha oil for IOR in fluid sample of oil field and synthetic sandstone core. The best condition from this research was surfactant 0.2 PV with the soaking time of 12 hours. This formula gave the highest of incremental total oil recovery 61%. The number were resulted from 48% waterflooding and 13% surfactant injection.

  10. Physical properties of soil cultivated with Jatropha curcas and associated green vegetation covers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Willian José Ferreira

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The cultivation of physic nut (Jatropha curcas L. is a sustainable option for biodiesel production due to its adaptation to different agro-ecological conditions and its high content of non-edible oil grains. The possibility of its cultivation in degraded low fertility soils makes the physic nut attractive to the Paraíba do Sul Valley region. This study evaluated physical attributes and water processes of an Oxisol which had been previously used for livestock and later converted to experimental farming. The soil was intercropped with perennial herbaceous legumes (Arachis pintoi and Calopogonio muconoides in place of the original cover of Brachiaria brizantha, largely cultivated in the region. We determined the soil texture, the levels of saturation and water retention, soil resistance to root penetration and the basic infiltration rate of water into the soil (VIB. The soil resistance to root penetration in B. brizantha ranged from high to moderate at 30 cm depth, while the addition of perennial herbaceous legumes as cover crops intercropped with Jatropha reduced this resistance and increased the average soil VIB from 4 mm h-1 (B. brizantha to 33 mm h-1. We conclude that the association of herbaceous legumes with Jatropha contributed to the improvement of the soil’s physical properties.

  11. Kinetics and Thermodynamics of Oil Extraction from Jatropha curcas L. Using Ethanol as a Solvent

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silmara Bispo dos Santos

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In the study the yield and kinetic and thermodynamic parameters of the oil extraction process from Jatropha curcas L. using ethanol as a solvent were evaluated for different temperatures, moisture contents of the solid phase, and particle sizes. The extraction process yield increased with contact time of solid particles with the solvent until reaching equilibrium (saturation of the solvent, for all the temperatures, moisture contents, and average particle sizes. These parameters significantly influenced (95% confidence the extracted oil yield. A convective mass transfer model was used to simulate the extraction process and estimate the kinetic and thermodynamic parameters. For all conditions evaluated, values of oil yield in the liquid phase close to equilibrium were obtained in approximately 20 min. The variations of enthalpy and entropy were positive, indicating that the process is endothermic and irreversible. Values obtained for the variation in Gibbs free energy showed that the extraction process using ethanol as a solvent is spontaneous and thermodynamically favorable for the moisture content of 0%, where the smaller the average particle size the greater the spontaneity of the process.

  12. Branching, flowering and fruiting of Jatropha curcas treated with ethephon or benzyladenine and gibberellins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne P. Costa

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Jatropha curcas L. has been identified for biofuel production but it presents limited commercial yields due to limited branching and a lack of yield uniformity. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effects of single application of ethephon or a combination of 6-benzyladenine (BA with gibberellic acid isomers A4 and A7 (GA4+7 on branch induction, flowering and fruit production in jatropha plants with and without leaves. Plants with and without leaves showed differences for growth and reproductive variables. For all variables except inflorescence set, there were no significant statistical interactions between the presence of leaves and plant growth regulators concentration. The total number of flowers per inflorescence was reduced as ethephon concentration was increased. As BA + GA4 +7 concentration increased, seed dry weight increased. Thus, ethephon and BA + GA4 +7 applications appeared to affect flowering and seed production to a greater extent than branching. The inability to discern significant treatment effects for most variables might have been due to the large variability within plant populations studied and thus resulting in an insufficient sample size. Therefore, data collected from this study were used for statistical estimations of sample sizes to provide a reference for future studies.

  13. Greenhouse gas emissions and land use change from Jatropha curcas-based jet fuel in Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailis, Robert E; Baka, Jennifer E

    2010-11-15

    This analysis presents a comparison of life-cycle GHG emissions from synthetic paraffinic kerosene (SPK) produced as jet fuel substitute from jatropha curcas feedstock cultivated in Brazil against a reference scenario of conventional jet fuel. Life cycle inventory data are derived from surveys of actual Jatropha growers and processors. Results indicate that a baseline scenario, which assumes a medium yield of 4 tons of dry fruit per hectare under drip irrigation with existing logistical conditions using energy-based coproduct allocation methodology, and assumes a 20-year plantation lifetime with no direct land use change (dLUC), results in the emissions of 40 kg CO₂e per GJ of fuel produced, a 55% reduction relative to conventional jet fuel. However, dLUC based on observations of land-use transitions leads to widely varying changes in carbon stocks ranging from losses in excess of 50 tons of carbon per hectare when Jatropha is planted in native cerrado woodlands to gains of 10-15 tons of carbon per hectare when Jatropha is planted in former agro-pastoral land. Thus, aggregate emissions vary from a low of 13 kg CO₂e per GJ when Jatropha is planted in former agro-pastoral lands, an 85% decrease from the reference scenario, to 141 kg CO₂e per GJ when Jatropha is planted in cerrado woodlands, a 60% increase over the reference scenario. Additional sensitivities are also explored, including changes in yield, exclusion of irrigation, shortened supply chains, and alternative allocation methodologies.

  14. Ascorbate peroxidase from Jatropha curcas enhances salt tolerance in transgenic Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Y; Cai, J; Yang, F X; Zhou, B; Zhou, L R

    2015-05-11

    Ascorbate peroxidase (APX) plays a central role in the ascorbate-glutathione cycle and is a key enzyme in cellular H2O2 me-tabolism. It includes a family of isoenzymes with different character-istics, which are identified in many higher plants. In the present study, we isolated the APX gene from Jatropha curcas L, which is similar with other previously characterized APXs as revealed by alignment and phylogenetic analysis of its deduced amino acid sequence. Real-time qPCR analysis showed that the expression level of JcAPX transcript significantly increased under NaCl stress. Subsequently, to elucidate the contribution of JcAPX to the protection against salt-induced oxi-dative stress, the expression construct p35S: JcAPX was created and transformed into Arabidopsis and transcribed. Under 150-mM NaCl stress, compared with wild type (WT), the overexpression of JcAPX in Arabidopsis increased the germination rate, the number of leaves, and the rosette area. In addition, the transgenic plants had longer roots, higher total chlorophyll content, higher total APX activity, and lower H2O2 content than the WT under NaCl stress conditions. These results suggested that higher APX activity in transgenic lines increases the salt tolerance by enhancing scavenging capacity for reactive oxygen spe-cies under NaCl stress conditions.

  15. Biodiesel Production from Crude Jatropha curcas L.Oil with Trace Acid Catalyst

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘颖颖; 鲁厚芳; 蒋炜; 李东升; 刘世界; 梁斌

    2012-01-01

    Biodiesel produced from crude Jatropha curcas L.oil with trace sulfuric acid catalyst(0.02%-0.08% oil) was investigated at 135-184 ℃.Both esterification and transesterification can be well carried out simultane-ously.Factors affecting the process were investigated,which included the reaction temperature,reaction time,the molar ratio of alcohol to oil,catalyst amount,water content,free fatty acid(FFA) and fatty acid methyl ester(FAME) content.Under the conditions at 165 ℃,0.06%(by mass) H2SO4 of the oil mass,1.6 MPa and 20:1 methanol/oil ratio,the yield of glycerol reached 84.8% in 2 hours.FFA and FAME showed positive effect on the transesterification in certain extent.The water mass content below 1.0% did not show a noticeable effect on trans-esterification.Reaction kinetics in the range of 155 ℃ to 175 ℃ was also measured.

  16. Biodiesel preparation from Jatropha curcas oil catalyzed by hydrotalcite loaded with K2CO3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teng, Guangyuan; Gao, Lijing; Xiao, Guomin; Liu, Hu; Lv, Jianhua

    2010-11-01

    This paper discusses the synthesis of biodiesel catalyzed by solid base of K(2)CO(3)/HT using Jatropha curcas oil as feedstock. Mg-Al hydrotalcite was prepared using co-precipitation methods, in which the molar ratio of Mg to Al was 3:1. After calcined at 600 degrees C for 3 h, the Mg-Al hydrotalcite and K(2)CO(3) were ground and mixed according to certain mass ratios, in which some water was added. The mixture was dried at 65 degrees C, and after that it was calcined at 600 degrees C for 3 h. Then, this Mg-Al hydrotalcite loaded with potassium carbonate was obtained and used as catalyst in the experiments. Analyses of XRD and SEM characterizations for catalyst showed the metal oxides formed in the process of calcination brought about excellent catalysis effect. In order to achieve the optimal technical reaction condition, five impact factors were also investigated in the experiments, which were mass ratio, molar ratio, reaction temperature, catalyst amount and reaction time. Under the best condition, the biodiesel yield could reach up to 96%.

  17. Characterization of Jatropha curcas L. Protein Cast Films with respect to Packaging Relevant Properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriele Gofferje

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available There is increasing research ongoing towards the substitution of petrochemical based plastics by more sustainable raw materials, especially in the field of bioplastics. Proteins of different types such as whey, casein, gelatine, or zein show potential beyond the food and feed industry as, for instance, the application in packaging. Protein based coatings provide different packaging relevant properties such as barrier against permanent gases, certain water vapour barrier, and mechanical resistance. The aim of this study was to explore the potential for packaging applications of proteins from Jatropha curcas L. and to compare the performance with literature data on cast films from whey protein isolate. As a by-product from oil extraction, high amounts of Jatropha meal are obtained requiring a concept for its sustainable utilization. Jatropha seed cake includes up to 40% (w/w of protein which is currently not utilized. The present study provides new data on the potential of Jatropha protein for packaging applications. It was shown that Jatropha protein cast films show suitable barrier and mechanical properties depending on the extraction and purification method as well as on the plasticiser content. Based on these findings Jatropha proteins own potential to be utilized as coating material for food packaging applications.

  18. Pseudomonas fluorescens and Pseudomonas putida for Promoting Growth of Jatropha curcas Seedling Root

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    Sri Sumarsih

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Pseudomonas fluorescens and P. putida are Plant Growth Promoting Rhizobacteria (PGPR that can produce growth hormone. The objective of this study is to know the effects of those two combined species of PGPR on seedling root growth of Jatropha curcas. The condition of the seedling root determines the success of dry land cultivation. The root which has wider coverage, is larger in number, and is bigger in diameter makes seedling more resistant to stress in dry land environment. In the experiment, two kinds of plant materials are used for seedling, the Jatropha seed and stem material, which are treated in a mixed culture of PGPR. For the Jatropha seed, this mixed culture of PGPR is given at the same time of cultivating the sprout on the seedling medium. For the stem cutting, the PGPR is poured in together during the first watering of the seedling cultivation medium. In the fourthweek, the observed growth parameters are root length, root diameter, primary and secondary lateral root numbers, Root Length Density (RLD, Frequency of Lateral Root (FLR, and Specific Root Length (SRL. These data are analyzed using analysis of variant with DMRT test at 0.05 level of significance. The result of this study shows that PGPR tend to reduce FLR values on the seedling root made from seeds. On the seedling root made from stem cutting, PGPR increase the root length, primary and secondary lateral root numbers, root diameter, FLR and SRL values as well.

  19. The Effects of Biofuel Feedstock Production on Farmers’ Livelihoods in Ghana: The Case of Jatropha curcas

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    Emmanuel Acheampong

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The widespread acquisition of land for large-scale/commercial production of biofuel crops in Ghana has raised concerns from civil society organizations, local communities and other parties, regarding the impact of these investments on local livelihoods. This paper assessed the effect of large-scale acquisition of land for production of Jatropha curcas on farmers’ livelihoods in Ghana. The study was conducted in 11 communities spanning the major agro-ecological zones and political divisions across Ghana. Methods of data collection included questionnaire survey, interviews and focus group discussions. Results show that several households have lost their land to Jatropha plantations leading, in some cases, to violent conflicts between biofuel investors, traditional authorities and the local communities. Most people reported that, contrary to the belief that Jatropha does well on marginal lands, the lands acquired by the Jatropha Companies were productive lands. Loss of rights over land has affected households’ food production and security, as many households have resorted to reducing the area they have under cultivation, leading to shortening fallow periods and declining crop yields. In addition, although the cultivation of Jatropha led to the creation of jobs in the communities where they were started, such jobs were merely transient. The paper contends that, even though the impact of Jatropha feedstock production on local livelihoods in Ghana is largely negative, the burgeoning industry could be developed in ways that could support local livelihoods.

  20. Transcriptome analysis of the oil-rich seed of the bioenergy crop Jatropha curcas L

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    Moreira Raquel C

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To date, oil-rich plants are the main source of biodiesel products. Because concerns have been voiced about the impact of oil-crop cultivation on the price of food commodities, the interest in oil plants not used for food production and amenable to cultivation on non-agricultural land has soared. As a non-food, drought-resistant and oil-rich crop, Jatropha curcas L. fulfils many of the requirements for biofuel production. Results We have generated 13,249 expressed sequence tags (ESTs from developing and germinating Jatropha seeds. This strategy allowed us to detect most known genes related to lipid synthesis and degradation. We have also identified ESTs coding for proteins that may be involved in the toxicity of Jatropha seeds. Another unexpected finding is the high number of ESTs containing transposable element-related sequences in the developing seed library (800 when contrasted with those found in the germinating seed library (80. Conclusions The sequences generated in this work represent a considerable increase in the number of sequences deposited in public databases. These results can be used to produce genetically improved varieties of Jatropha with increased oil yields, different oil compositions and better agronomic characteristics.

  1. Drivers and Consequences of the First Jatropha curcas Plantations in Mexico

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    Ofelia Andrea Valdés Rodríguez

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Jatropha curcas has received great attention and national support by Mexican authorities interested in promoting cash crops to alleviate poverty and rural crises. Thus, several states have implemented programs to sponsor its cultivation and research. This paper analyzes the policies generated by the Mexican government to promote the establishment of Jatropha plantations for biofuel purposes. The supporting schemes, the state-of-the-art national research and the environmental implications of establishing this new crop were reviewed to assess their impact on small-scale producers that participated in these programs. Scientific research on native germplasm indicates the existence of great diversity in Mexico, including non-toxic ecotypes, from which highly productive varieties are being developed. However, when the plantation programs started, producers were not technically or economically prepared to face the risks associated with this new crop, nor was there a good internal supply-chain. Consequently, some programs have been abandoned and the low productivity and income generated by the plantations have not satisfied producer expectations. Thus, there is a need to review the national strategy to support this crop and to develop a well-structured biofuel market in the country for the success of Jatropha plantations in Mexico.

  2. Does epigenetic polymorphism contribute to phenotypic variances in Jatropha curcas L.?

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    Bui Ha TN

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There is a growing interest in Jatropha curcas L. (jatropha as a biodiesel feedstock plant. Variations in its morphology and seed productivity have been well documented. However, there is the lack of systematic comparative evaluation of distinct collections under same climate and agronomic practices. With the several reports on low genetic diversity in jatropha collections, there is uncertainty on genetic contribution to jatropha morphology. Result In this study, five populations of jatropha plants collected from China (CN, Indonesia (MD, Suriname (SU, Tanzania (AF and India (TN were planted in one farm under the same agronomic practices. Their agronomic traits (branching pattern, height, diameter of canopy, time to first flowering, dormancy, accumulated seed yield and oil content were observed and tracked for two years. Significant variations were found for all the agronomic traits studied. Genetic diversity and epigenetic diversity were evaluated using florescence Amplified Fragment Length Polymorphism (fAFLP and methylation sensitive florescence AFLP (MfAFLP methods. Very low level of genetic diversity was detected (polymorphic band Conclusion Our study confirmed climate and practice independent differences in agronomic performance among jatropha collections. Such agronomic trait variations, however, were matched by very low genetic diversity and medium level but significant epigenetic diversity. Significant difference in inner cytosine and double cytosine methylation at CCGG sites was also found among populations. Most epigenetic differential markers can be inherited as epialleles following Mendelian segregation. These results suggest possible involvement of epigenetics in jatropha development.

  3. Dynamic Modeling of Reversible Methanolysis of Jatropha curcas Oil to Biodiesel

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    Azhari M. Syam

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Many kinetics studies on methanolysis assumed the reactions to be irreversible. The aim of the present work was to study the dynamic modeling of reversible methanolysis of Jatropha curcas oil (JCO to biodiesel. The experimental data were collected under the optimal reaction conditions: molar ratio of methanol to JCO at 6 : 1, reaction temperature of 60°C, 60 min of reaction time, and 1% w/w of catalyst concentration. The dynamic modeling involved the derivation of differential equations for rates of three stepwise reactions. The simulation study was then performed on the resulting equations using MATLAB. The newly developed reversible models were fitted with various rate constants and compared with the experimental data for fitting purposes. In addition, analysis of variance was done statistically to evaluate the adequacy and quality of model parameters. The kinetics study revealed that the reverse reactions were significantly slower than forward reactions. The activation energies ranged from 6.5 to 44.4 KJ mol−1.

  4. Effect of Jatropha curcas Peptide Fractions on the Angiotensin I-Converting Enzyme Inhibitory Activity

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    Maira R. Segura-Campos

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Hypertension is one of the most common worldwide diseases in humans. Angiotensin I-converting enzyme (ACE plays an important role in regulating blood pressure and hypertension. An evaluation was done on the effect of Alcalase hydrolysis of defatted Jatropha curcas kernel meal on ACE inhibitory activity in the resulting hydrolysate and its purified fractions. Alcalase exhibited broad specificity and produced a protein hydrolysate with a 21.35% degree of hydrolysis and 34.87% ACE inhibition. Ultrafiltration of the hydrolysate produced peptide fractions with increased biological activity (24.46–61.41%. Hydrophobic residues contributed substantially to the peptides’ inhibitory potency. The 5–10 and <1 kDa fractions were selected for further fractionation by gel filtration chromatography. ACE inhibitory activity (% ranged from 22.66 to 45.96% with the 5–10 kDa ultrafiltered fraction and from 36.91 to 55.83% with the <1 kDa ultrafiltered fraction. The highest ACE inhibitory activity was observed in F2 ( μg/mL from the 5–10 kDa fraction and F1 ( μg/mL from the <1 kDa fraction. ACE inhibitory fractions from Jatropha kernel have potential applications in alternative hypertension therapies, adding a new application for the Jatropha plant protein fraction and improving the financial viability and sustainability of a Jatropha-based biodiesel industry.

  5. Ricinus communis and Jatropha curcas (Euphorbiaceae) seed oil toxicity against Atta sexdens rubropilosa (Hymenoptera: Formicidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alonso, E C; Santos, D Y A C

    2013-04-01

    Leaf-cutting ants are the main herbivores in the New World tropics. Although the toxicity of seed oils against these ants has been poorly investigated, previous results revealed that seed oils exert considerable toxic activity against these insects. This paper analyzes the toxic action and deterrent properties of castor oil, Ricinus communis L., and physic nut oil, Jatropha curcas L., against workers of the leaf-cutting ant Atta sexdens rubropilosa reared in laboratory. Toxic effect was analyzed by feeding insects artificial diets supplemented with different oil concentrations and direct contact with the two oils. Deterrent activity was assessed by measuring the frequency of attendance to diets during the first 48 h of the ingestion bioassay. Castor oil at 10 and 30 mg/ml and physic nut oil at 5, 10, and 30 mg/ml were toxic by ingestion. In the direct contact bioassay, toxicity was observed for physic nut oil at 0.1 and 0.2 mg/ml, whereas castor oil exerted toxic effects only when the highest concentration was applied. Also, castor oil had a more pronounced deterrent effect against the leaf-cutting ant, compared with physic nut oil. Methods to apply these oils to control these insects are discussed.

  6. Genome-wide analysis of the GRAS gene family in physic nut (Jatropha curcas L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Z Y; Wu, P Z; Chen, Y P; Li, M R; Wu, G J; Jiang, H W

    2015-12-29

    GRAS proteins play vital roles in plant growth and development. Physic nut (Jatropha curcas L.) was found to have a total of 48 GRAS family members (JcGRAS), 15 more than those found in Arabidopsis. The JcGRAS genes were divided into 12 subfamilies or 15 ancient monophyletic lineages based on the phylogenetic analysis of GRAS proteins from both flowering and lower plants. The functions of GRAS genes in 9 subfamilies have been reported previously for several plants, while the genes in the remaining 3 subfamilies were of unknown function; we named the latter families U1 to U3. No member of U3 subfamily is present in Arabidopsis and Poaceae species according to public genome sequence data. In comparison with the number of GRAS genes in Arabidopsis, more were detected in physic nut, resulting from the retention of many ancient GRAS subfamilies and the formation of tandem repeats during evolution. No evidence of recent duplication among JcGRAS genes was observed in physic nut. Based on digital gene expression data, 21 of the 48 genes exhibited differential expression in four tissues analyzed. Two members of subfamily U3 were expressed only in buds and flowers, implying that they may play specific roles. Our results provide valuable resources for future studies on the functions of GRAS proteins in physic nut.

  7. Genome-wide analysis of the WRKY gene family in physic nut (Jatropha curcas L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Wangdan; Xu, Xueqin; Zhang, Lin; Wu, Pingzhi; Chen, Yaping; Li, Meiru; Jiang, Huawu; Wu, Guojiang

    2013-07-25

    The WRKY proteins, which contain highly conserved WRKYGQK amino acid sequences and zinc-finger-like motifs, constitute a large family of transcription factors in plants. They participate in diverse physiological and developmental processes. WRKY genes have been identified and characterized in a number of plant species. We identified a total of 58 WRKY genes (JcWRKY) in the genome of the physic nut (Jatropha curcas L.). On the basis of their conserved WRKY domain sequences, all of the JcWRKY proteins could be assigned to one of the previously defined groups, I-III. Phylogenetic analysis of JcWRKY genes with Arabidopsis and rice WRKY genes, and separately with castor bean WRKY genes, revealed no evidence of recent gene duplication in JcWRKY gene family. Analysis of transcript abundance of JcWRKY gene products were tested in different tissues under normal growth condition. In addition, 47 WRKY genes responded to at least one abiotic stress (drought, salinity, phosphate starvation and nitrogen starvation) in individual tissues (leaf, root and/or shoot cortex). Our study provides a useful reference data set as the basis for cloning and functional analysis of physic nut WRKY genes.

  8. Genome-Wide Analysis of the NAC Gene Family in Physic Nut (Jatropha curcas L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Zhenying; Xu, Xueqin; Xiong, Wangdan; Wu, Pingzhi; Chen, Yaping; Li, Meiru; Wu, Guojiang; Jiang, Huawu

    2015-01-01

    The NAC proteins (NAM, ATAF1/2 and CUC2) are plant-specific transcriptional regulators that have a conserved NAM domain in the N-terminus. They are involved in various biological processes, including both biotic and abiotic stress responses. In the present study, a total of 100 NAC genes (JcNAC) were identified in physic nut (Jatropha curcas L.). Based on phylogenetic analysis and gene structures, 83 JcNAC genes were classified as members of, or proposed to be diverged from, 39 previously predicted orthologous groups (OGs) of NAC sequences. Physic nut has a single intron-containing NAC gene subfamily that has been lost in many plants. The JcNAC genes are non-randomly distributed across the 11 linkage groups of the physic nut genome, and appear to be preferentially retained duplicates that arose from both ancient and recent duplication events. Digital gene expression analysis indicates that some of the JcNAC genes have tissue-specific expression profiles (e.g. in leaves, roots, stem cortex or seeds), and 29 genes differentially respond to abiotic stresses (drought, salinity, phosphorus deficiency and nitrogen deficiency). Our results will be helpful for further functional analysis of the NAC genes in physic nut.

  9. Integrated genome sequence and linkage map of physic nut (Jatropha curcas L.), a biodiesel plant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Pingzhi; Zhou, Changpin; Cheng, Shifeng; Wu, Zhenying; Lu, Wenjia; Han, Jinli; Chen, Yanbo; Chen, Yan; Ni, Peixiang; Wang, Ying; Xu, Xun; Huang, Ying; Song, Chi; Wang, Zhiwen; Shi, Nan; Zhang, Xudong; Fang, Xiaohua; Yang, Qing; Jiang, Huawu; Chen, Yaping; Li, Meiru; Wang, Ying; Chen, Fan; Wang, Jun; Wu, Guojiang

    2015-03-01

    The family Euphorbiaceae includes some of the most efficient biomass accumulators. Whole genome sequencing and the development of genetic maps of these species are important components in molecular breeding and genetic improvement. Here we report the draft genome of physic nut (Jatropha curcas L.), a biodiesel plant. The assembled genome has a total length of 320.5 Mbp and contains 27,172 putative protein-coding genes. We established a linkage map containing 1208 markers and anchored the genome assembly (81.7%) to this map to produce 11 pseudochromosomes. After gene family clustering, 15,268 families were identified, of which 13,887 existed in the castor bean genome. Analysis of the genome highlighted specific expansion and contraction of a number of gene families during the evolution of this species, including the ribosome-inactivating proteins and oil biosynthesis pathway enzymes. The genomic sequence and linkage map provide a valuable resource not only for fundamental and applied research on physic nut but also for evolutionary and comparative genomics analysis, particularly in the Euphorbiaceae.

  10. Enriching Genomic Resources and Marker Development from Transcript Sequences of Jatropha curcas for Microgravity Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Wenlan; Paudel, Dev

    2017-01-01

    Jatropha (Jatropha curcas L.) is an economically important species with a great potential for biodiesel production. To enrich the jatropha genomic databases and resources for microgravity studies, we sequenced and annotated the transcriptome of jatropha and developed SSR and SNP markers from the transcriptome sequences. In total 1,714,433 raw reads with an average length of 441.2 nucleotides were generated. De novo assembling and clustering resulted in 115,611 uniquely assembled sequences (UASs) including 21,418 full-length cDNAs and 23,264 new jatropha transcript sequences. The whole set of UASs were fully annotated, out of which 59,903 (51.81%) were assigned with gene ontology (GO) term, 12,584 (10.88%) had orthologs in Eukaryotic Orthologous Groups (KOG), and 8,822 (7.63%) were mapped to 317 pathways in six different categories in Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genome (KEGG) database, and it contained 3,588 putative transcription factors. From the UASs, 9,798 SSRs were discovered with AG/CT as the most frequent (45.8%) SSR motif type. Further 38,693 SNPs were detected and 7,584 remained after filtering. This UAS set has enriched the current jatropha genomic databases and provided a large number of genetic markers, which can facilitate jatropha genetic improvement and many other genetic and biological studies. PMID:28154822

  11. Silver nanoparticles impede phorbol myristate acetate-induced monocyte-macrophage differentiation and autophagy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Yingying; Wang, Liming; Bai, Ru; Zhang, Tianlu; Chen, Chunying

    2015-09-01

    Monocytes/macrophages are important constituents of the innate immune system. Monocyte-macrophage differentiation is not only crucial for innate immune responses, but is also related to some cardiovascular diseases. Silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) are one of the most widely used nanomaterials because of their broad-spectrum antimicrobial properties. However, the effect of AgNPs on the functions of blood monocytes is scarcely reported. Here, we report the impedance effect of AgNPs on THP-1 monocyte differentiation, and that this effect was mediated by autophagy blockade and lysosomal impairment. Firstly, AgNPs inhibit phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA)-induced monocyte differentiation by down-regulating both expression of surface marker CD11b and response to lipopolysaccharide (LPS) stimulation. Secondly, autophagy is activated during PMA-induced THP-1 monocyte differentiation, and the autophagy inhibitor chloroquine (CQ) can inhibit this process. Thirdly, AgNPs block the degradation of the autophagy substrate p62 and induce autophagosome accumulation, which demonstrates the blockade of autophagic flux. Fourthly, lysosomal impairments including alkalization and decrease of lysosomal membrane stability were observed in AgNP-treated THP-1 cells. In conclusion, we demonstrate that the impedance of monocyte-macrophage differentiation by AgNPs is mediated by autophagy blockade and lysosomal dysfunction. Our results suggest that crosstalk exists in different biological effects induced by AgNPs.

  12. Contraction of rat thoracic aorta strips induced by phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Itoh, H.; Lederis, K.

    1987-02-01

    Phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) induced a slow and progressive increase in tension of rat thoracic aorta strips in the presence of extracellular CaS . Complete relaxation could not be obtained in CaS -free buffer containing 1 mM ethyleneglycol-bis(US -aminoethylether)-N,N'-tetraacetic acid (EGTA) and 10 X M PMA. In the absence of extracellular CaS , PMA (10 X M) induced a small but sustained contraction which was not altered by the addition of another 2 mM EGTA and 3 x 10 V M verapamil. Papaverine (10 U M) relaxed the PMA-induced contraction to the base line, but phentolamine (10 V M), cyproheptadine (10 V M), atropine (10 V M) and tetrodotoxine (10 W M) did not change the contraction. CaS -depleted muscle strips, prepared by four repeated applications of 10 X M norepinephrine in CaS -free buffer, were contracted by 10 X M PMA, but at a lower maximum tension than nontreated strips. The action of PMA on rat aorta strips in CaS -free buffer did not require the presence of the adventitial layer or endothelial cells. These results suggest that PMA may induce activation of protein kinase C and smooth muscle contraction in the absence of extracellular CaS , without an increase in myoplasmic CaS .

  13. Survival and growth responses of Jatropha curcas L. to three restoration techniques on degraded soils in Burkina Faso

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    François Wenemi Kagambèga

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Land degradation is a major problem in the Sahelian countries. Erosion control through establishment of vegetation cover is at important strategy to reverse the trend. Our research objective was to analyse the e-ffects of three restoration techniques on Jatropha curcas L. seedlings growth and survivorship. Were conducted two separate field trials, involving the sowing and planting of J. curcas, in which several different soil restoration techniques were applied. The trial was monitored using a ran-domized block study design over a period of two years. The design included ten different treatments, six in the sowing trial and four in the planting trial, each with three replicates. In the first experiment, growth rate was found to be significantly higher in the Sub-Soiling treatment, that received additional organic matter than other treatments. However, overall survival rate was low (18%. In the second experiment, the Half-moon treatment yielded a significantly higher growth both in height (df = 3, F = 56.74, p < 0.05 and diameter (df = 3, F = 31.76, p < 0.05 and survival rate compared to those of the other treatments (df = 3, F = 50.4, p < 0.05. In conclusion, planting seedlings produced a greater survival rate than sowing seeds. Among tested the soil restoration and water conservation techniques the Half-moon technique was found as the most effective. This is recommended to be used for improving the revegetation of J. curcas in the future. 

  14. Bioaccumulation of nutrient elements from fly ash-amended soil in Jatropha curcas L.: a biofuel crop.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaudhary, Doongar R; Ghosh, Arup

    2013-08-01

    Fly ash (FA) from coal-burning industries may be a potential inorganic soil amendment; the insight of its nutrient release and supply to soil may enhance their agricultural use. The study was conducted to assess the ability of fly ash (a coal fired thermal plant waste) to reduce soil fertility depletion and to study bioaccumulation of mineral nutrients in Jatropha curcas grown on soils amended with fly ash. Fly ash was amended to field soil at six rates (0, 5, 10, 20, 40, and 70 % w/w) on which J. curcas was grown. After 8 months of growth, the height of jatropha plants was significantly increased at 5 and 10 % FA-amended soil, whereas, biomass significantly increased at 5, 10, and 20 % FA-amended soil compared to control soil (0 % FA). Leaf nutrients uptake, followed by stems and roots uptake were highly affected by fly ash amendment to soil. Most of nutrients accumulation were increased up to 20 % fly ash and decreased thereafter. The results of available nutrient analysis of soil revealed that availability of nitrogen, potassium, sulfur, copper, iron, mangnese, and zinc declined significantly at higher levels of fly ash amendments, whereas, availability of phosphorus increased at these levels. However, pH, organic carbon, and available boron were not influenced significantly by fly ash amendment to soil. Microbial biomass C, N, and ratio of microbial-C to organic C were significantly reduced at 20 % fly ash and higher amounts. This study revealed that J. curcas plants could gainfully utilize the nutrients available in fly ash by subsequently amending soil.

  15. Jatropha curcas L., una especie arbórea con potencial energético en Cuba Jatropha curcas L., a tree species with energetic potential in Cuba

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Odalys C Toral

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Jatropha curcas es una especie multipropósito, con innumerables atributos y un potencial considerable. Es una planta de origen tropical, de la familia Euphorbiaceae, que puede crecer tanto en zonas de altas como de bajas precipitaciones anuales. Es altamente resistente a la sequía y se puede cultivar en áreas marginales, por lo que resulta excepcional para la recuperación de tierras degradadas, sin competir con la producción de cultivos para la alimentación humana y animal. Además, se usa como cercas y setos vivos, se le atribuyen propiedades medicinales e insecticidas, e incluso puede ser utilizado como cultivo comercial. Esta especie es de rápido crecimiento y la producción de semillas puede comenzar incluso en el primer año de establecida la plantación, lo que depende de muchos factores, como las precipitaciones y la forma de propagación que se utilice (por semillas o por estacas. Su establecimiento, manejo y productividad en diferentes condiciones climatológicas aún no está bien documentado, principalmente en lo que concierne a sus requerimientos de nutrientes o fertilizantes y, en el caso de Cuba, la mayoría de los estudios relacionados con su agrotecnia y producción están en ciernes. Esta planta aporta muchos productos beneficiosos, especialmente a partir de sus semillas, de las cuales se puede extraer aceite, con una calidad similar al de la palma aceitera. Este aceite puede reemplazar al keroseno, al petróleo y a la leña/carbón con relativo éxito, por lo que se promueve su uso internacionalmente para satisfacer las demandas de las zonas rurales en cuanto a la iluminación, cocina y fuerza motriz. Otros usos muy importantes lo constituyen la producción de biocombustible a partir del aceite, la fabricación de jabón y la extracción de glicerina con fines industriales. Su cultivo y expansión podría proporcionar nuevas fuentes de empleo, así como mejorar el medio ambiente y el nivel y la calidad de vida de la

  16. Synergism between thapsigargin and the phorbol ester 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol 13-acetate on the release of [C]arachidonic acid and histamine from rat peritoneal mast cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, S.; Hansen, Harald S.; Jensen, B.

    1987-01-01

    Thapsigargin is a potent skin irritating sesquiterpene lactone isolated from the roots of Thapsia garganica L. (Apiaceae). In rat peritoneal mast cells thapsigargin induced a calcium-dependent non-cytotoxic [C]arachidonic acid and histamine release. A minor amount of the released [C...

  17. N-terminal truncation of the dopamine transporter abolishes phorbol ester- and substance P receptor-stimulated phosphorylation without impairing transporter internalization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Granas, Charlotta; Ferrer, Jasmine; Loland, Claus Juul;

    2003-01-01

    (q)-coupled human substance P receptor (hNK-1) co-expressed with hDAT in HEK293 cells and in N2A neuroblastoma cells. In both cell lines, activation of the hNK-1 receptor by substance P reduced the V(max) for [(3)H]dopamine uptake to the same degree as did PMA ( approximately 50 and approximately 20% in HEK293...

  18. PHORBOL ESTER ACTIVATION OF AN NHE-LIKE ELECTRONEUTRAL NA+/H+ ANTIPORTER IN ISOLATED E-CELLS OF LOBSTER (HOMARUS AMERICANUS) HEPATOPANCREAS. (R823068)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The perspectives, information and conclusions conveyed in research project abstracts, progress reports, final reports, journal abstracts and journal publications convey the viewpoints of the principal investigator and may not represent the views and policies of ORD and EPA. Concl...

  19. PHORBOL ESTER ACTRIVATION OF AN NHE-LIKE ELECTRONEUTRAL NA+/H+ ANTIPORTER IN ISOLATED E-CELLS FROM THE ATLANTIC LOBSTER. (R823068)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The perspectives, information and conclusions conveyed in research project abstracts, progress reports, final reports, journal abstracts and journal publications convey the viewpoints of the principal investigator and may not represent the views and policies of ORD and EPA. Concl...

  20. 巴豆中的两个新的佛波内酯类化合物%Two novel phorbol esters from Croton tiglium L.

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    窦文彤; 郝艳平; 刘俊丽; 袁丹; 付宏征

    2016-01-01

    对巴豆地上部分的化学成分进行研究,采用反复硅胶,葡聚糖凝胶,ODS以及制备型高效液相色谱技术进行分离纯化.通过质谱和一维,二维核磁共振波谱方法鉴定其结构.从中共分离并鉴定了10个佛波内酯类化合物,分别为两个新化合物2-甲基丁酸酯-13-异丁酸酯-4α-去氧佛波内酯(1),20-甲酰基-13-乙酸酯-4α-去氧佛波内酯(10)和8个已知化合物:12-乙酸酯-13-(2-甲基)丁酸酯-4α-去氧佛波内酯,12-巴豆酯-13-乙酸酯-4α-去氧佛波内酯,12-巴豆酯-13-(2-甲基)丁酸酯-4α-去氧佛波内酯,12-(2-甲基)丁酸酯-13-乙酸酯-4α-去氧佛波内酯,12-巴豆酯-13-异丁酸酯4α-去氧佛波内酯,12-巴豆基-13-(2-甲基)丁酸酯佛波内酯,12-巴豆酯基-13-乙酸酯佛波内酯,12-巴豆酯基-7-氧化-5-烯基-13-(2-甲基)丁酸酯佛波内酯.

  1. Stimulation of AIDS lymphocytes with calcium ionophore (A23187) and phorbol ester (PMA): studies of cytoplasmic free Ca, IL-2 receptor expression, IL-2 production, and proliferation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hofmann, B; Moller, J; Langhoff, E

    1989-01-01

    nine patients with AIDS with the response of lymphocytes from nine control subjects showed that the response of AIDS lymphocytes was severely decreased when stimulated with PHA and no further response could be achieved by stimulation with A23187/PMA. On the other hand, no significant difference between...... the PHA-induced rise of cytoplasmic free calcium concentration ([Ca2+]1) in normal and AIDS lymphocytes was observed. The percentage of cells expressing IL-2 receptors (CD25) was also normal both after addition of PHA and after addition of A23187/PMA and the expression was normal on both CD4 and CD8 cells....... The production of IL-2 in normal lymphocytes stimulated with A23187/PMA was 33 times higher than that after stimulation with PHA. In AIDS lymphocytes the production of IL-2 induced by all activators was severely decreased compared to control subjects, although the production of IL-2 after stimulation with A23187...

  2. Selective proliferation of normal human melanocytes in vitro in the presence of phorbol ester and cholera toxin by Eisinger and Marko.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Glynis

    2014-01-01

    Melanocytes are pigment producing cells that arise from the neural crest and migrate to the skin early in fetal development. The pigment that melanocytes synthesize, melanin, plays a critical role in protecting the skin from mutagenic ultraviolet irradiation. Melanocytes are also precursor cells for melanoma, a deadly form of skin cancer. Because melanocytes make up a minority population of cells in the epidermis they have been difficult to propagate in culture. The landmark paper by Eisinger and Marko, described below, was the first successful report of large scale propagation of pure cultures of melanocytes. This paper set the stage for an explosive growth in knowledge in the biology of human melanocytes and allowed scientists to begin dissecting the different oncogenic events involved in the transition of melanocytes to melanoma.

  3. [The inhibitory effect of As₂O₃ combined with phorbol ester on the proliferation of Kasumi-1 cells and its mechanism].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Fangfang; Xu, Jinxia; Mi, Ruihua; Fan, Ruihua; Yin, Qingsong; Wei, Xudong

    2014-06-01

    To investigate the inhibitory effect of arsenic trioxide (As₂O₃) combined with tetradecanoylphorbol acetate (TPA) on the proliferation of Kasumi-1 cell line and its mechanism. Kasumi-1 cells were treated with 200 nmol/L TPA, different concentrations of As₂O₃ alone and combined with 200 nmol/L TPA. The proliferative inhibition rates were determined with CCK-8. Annexin V was adopted to detect apoptosis. Colony formation assay was used to determine the cloning efficiency. Flow cytometry was used to detect the cell differentiation and cell cycle changes. Western blot was employed to detect the expression of P38 and p-P38. The proliferation inhibition rates of Kasumi-1 cells by TPA combined with different concentrations of As₂O₃ (0.2, 2.0 and 20.0 mmol/L)for 48 h were (25.56 ± 7.29)%, (60.63 ± 6.64)%, and (73.37 ± 2.15)%, the apoptosis rates were (61.65 ± 2.62)%, (75.39 ± 1.04)%, and (89.95 ± 1.46)%, and the colony formation rates were (76.17 ± 2.06)%, (38.50 ± 1.87)%, and (18.53 ± 2.20)%, respectively, compared with the different concentrations of As₂O₃ alone groups, the difference was statistically significant (PKasumi-1 cells were arrested at G1 phase compared with the control group, while As₂O₃ increased the percentage of Kasumi-1 cells in the G2 phase. Combination treatment increased the expression of p-P38 of Kasumi-1 cells compared with the cells exposed to As₂O₃ alone. TPA can enhance the effect of As₂O₃ on inducing apoptosis and regulating cell cycle, thereby enhancing its anti-leukemia effect.

  4. Thymoquinone inhibits phorbol ester-induced activation of NF-κB and expression of COX-2, and induces expression of cytoprotective enzymes in mouse skin in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kundu, Joydeb Kumar; Liu, Lijia; Shin, Jun-Wan; Surh, Young-Joon

    2013-09-06

    Thymoquinone (TQ), the active ingredient of Nigella sativa, has been reported to possess anti-inflammatory and chemopreventive properties. The present study was aimed at elucidating the molecular mechanisms of anti-inflammatory and antioxidative activities of thymoquinone in mouse skin. Pretreatment of female HR-1 hairless mouse skin with TQ attenuated 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA)-induced expression of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2). TQ diminished nuclear translocation and the DNA binding of nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-κB) via the blockade of phosphorylation and subsequent degradation of IκBα in TPA-treated mouse skin. Pretreatment with TQ attenuated the phosphorylation of Akt, c-Jun-N-terminal kinase and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase, but not that of extracellular signal-regulated kinase-1/2. Moreover, topical application of TQ induced the expression of heme oxygenase-1, NAD(P)H-quinoneoxidoreductase-1, glutathione-S-transferase and glutamate cysteine ligase in mouse skin. Taken together, the inhibitory effects of TQ on TPA-induced COX-2 expression and NF-κB activation, and its ability to induce the expression of cytoprotective proteins provide a mechanistic basis of anti-inflammatory and antioxidative effects of TQ in hairless mouse skin.

  5. Functional dissection of nuclear envelope mRNA translocation system: effects of phorbol ester and a monoclonal antibody recognizing cytoskeletal structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schröder, H C; Diehl-Seifert, B; Rottmann, M; Messer, R; Bryson, B A; Agutter, P S; Müller, W E

    1988-03-01

    Unidirectional transport of poly(A)-containing mRNA [poly(A)+ mRNA] through the nuclear envelope pore complex is thought to be an energy (ATP or GTP)-dependent process which involves a nuclear envelope nucleoside triphosphatase (NTPase). In the intact envelope, this enzyme is regulatable by poly(A) binding and by poly(A)-dependent phosphorylation/dephosphorylation of other components of the mRNA translocation system, which are as yet unidentified. Monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) were elicited against the poly(A) binding nuclear envelope fraction isolated from rat liver. The mAbs were screened for their modulatory effects on mRNA transport in vitro. One stable clone decreased the efflux of rapidly labeled RNA and of one specific mRNA (ovalbumin) from isolated nuclei. It increased the binding of poly(A) to the envelope and increased the maximal catalytic rate of the NTPase, but it did not alter the apparent Km of the enzyme or the extent of its stimulation by poly(A). The nuclear envelope-associated protein kinase that down-regulates the NTPase was inhibited by the antibody, while other protein kinases were not affected. Because both the NTPase and mRNA efflux were inhibited by the tumor promoter, 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol 13-acetate, the sensitive kinase is probably protein kinase C. Protein kinase C was found to be associated with the isolated nuclear envelope. The antibody reacted with both a Mr 83,000 and a Mr 65,000 nuclear envelope polypeptide from rat liver and other tissues. By immunofluorescence microscopy in CV-1 cells, the antibody localized to the nuclear envelope and, in addition, to cytoplasmic filaments which show some superposition with the microfilament network.

  6. Regulation of synthesis and activity of NAD(+)-dependent 15-hydroxy-prostaglandin dehydrogenase (15-PGDH) by dexamethasone and phorbol ester in human erythroleukemia (HEL) cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xun, C.Q.; Ensor, C.M.; Tai, H.H. (Univ. of Kentucky, Lexington (USA))

    1991-06-28

    Dexamethasone stimulated 15-PGDH activity in HEL cells in a time and concentration dependent manner. Increase in 15-PGDH activity by dexamethasone was found to be accompanied by an increase in enzyme synthesis as revealed by Western blot and (35S)methionine labeling studies. In addition to dexamethasone, other anti-inflammatory steroids also increased 15-PGDH activity in the order of their glucocorticoid activity. Among sex steroids only progesterone increased significantly 15-PGDH activity. 12-0-Tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA) also induced the synthesis of 15-PGDH but inhibited the enzyme activity. It appears that TPA caused a time dependent inactivation of 15-PGDH by a protein kinase C mediated mechanism.

  7. Effect of phorbol ester on 6-keto PGF sup 1. alpha. production in aorta from control-salt and aldosterone-salt hypertensive rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, S.B.; Jones, A.W. (Univ. of Missouri, Columbia (United States))

    1991-03-11

    The authors have previously shown that norepinephrine (NE) stimulated 6-keto-PGF{sub 1{alpha}} and thromboxane B{sub 2}(TXB{sub 2}) production in aorta from control-salt (CSR) and aldosterone-salt hypertensive rats (AHR) through the alpha-1 adrenoceptor (A1AR). While there was no difference in NE-stimulated TXB{sub 2} production between CSR and AHR, 6-keto-PGF{sub 1{alpha}} production was attenuated in aorta from AHR compared tissues. The authors were interested in whether the source of the arachidonic acid (AA) metabolites was through direct coupling of the A1AR and PLA{sub 2} or secondary to activation of PLC. One approach to answering this question was to bypass the receptor and activate protein kinase-C (PKC) directly. PMA caused a time-dependent increase in both 6-keto-PGF{sub 1{alpha}} and TXB{sub 2}. The time course was much slower than NE-stimulated production of these metabolites, but the pattern was similar with TXB{sub 2} appearing before 6-keto-PGF{sub 1{alpha}}. The PMA concentration-response curves for 6-keto-PGF{sub 1{alpha}} production for CSR and AHR were nearly superimposable. Staurosporine inhibited PMA stimulated 6-keto-PGF{sub 1{alpha}} production in CSR and AHR with nearly equal potency. Thus, while activation of PKC results in increases in AA metabolites, alterations in this pathway do not appear to be responsible for the differences observed with NE-stimulated 6-keto-PGF{sub 1{alpha}} production. These data support the concept of direct coupling between the A1AR and PLA{sub 2} in vascular smooth muscle.

  8. Existing landraces of Jatropha Curcas L. (physic nut) in Nepal and analysis of their bio-diesel content

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharma, Ram Prasad

    2010-09-15

    The aim of this work was to find the existing landraces of Jatropha curcas in different agro ecological regions of Nepal and their Bio-Diesel content. More specifically, research efforts focused on (1) existing landraces (varieties) in all three topographic regions of Nepal (2) Bio-diesel content in those varieties (3) Bio-Diesel content in varieties from Laos (4) Constraints faced by the Nepalese Jatropha grower (5) Compare the quality of Bio-diesel between the Nepalese varieties and Laos varieties. To collect all the information, Seeds were collected from Nepal (Terai: Chitwan; Hill: Palpa and Syanja; Mountain: Tanahu and Gorkha) and Vientiane province from Laos.

  9. Chemical constituents of methanolic extracts of Jatropha curcas L and effects on Spodoptera frugiperda (J. E. Smith) (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ribeiro, Sandra Santos; Silva, Thanany Brasil da; Moraes, Valeria Regina de Souza; Nogueira, Paulo Cesar de Lima; Costa, Emmanoel Vilaca [Universidade Federal de Sergipe (UFS), Aracaju, SE (Brazil). Dept. de Quimica; Bernardo, Antonio Rogerio; Matos, Andreia Pereira; Fernandes, Batista; Silva, Maria Fatima das Gracas Fernandes da [Universidade Federal de Sao Carlos (UFSCAR), SP (Brazil). Dept. de Quimica; Pessoa, Angela Maria dos Santos; Silva-Mann, Renata, E-mail: djbf@ufscar.br [Universidade Federal de Sergipe (UFS), Aracaju, SE (Brazil). Dept. de Engenharia Agronomica

    2012-07-01

    The biological activity of seven extracts from leaves of different Jatropha curcas L (Euphorbiaceae) accessions was evaluated on Spodoptera frugiperda. Methanol extracts were incorporated into an artificial diet and offered to the larval stage of S. frugiperda. The parameters evaluated were length of larval and pupal stages, mortality of larval and total cycle stage, and weight of pupae. The extracts of the EMB accessions showed the best result for larval mortality at 60.00 and 56.67%, compared with the control, respectively. Hexane partition of the methanol extract of the leaves of PM-14 accessions allowed the identification of phytosterols, phytol and n-alkanols. (author)

  10. ODABRANI JETRENI I BUBREŽNI BIOKEMIJSKI PROFILI HIBRIDNOG SOMA IZLOŽENOG LISNOM PRAHU JATROPHA CURCAS

    OpenAIRE

    Adamu, Kabir M.; Isah, M. C.; T. A. Baba; Idris, T. M.

    2013-01-01

    Ova studija istražuje učinak subletalnih koncentracija (7,50, 5,00, 2,50 i 0,00 gL (kontrola)) lisnog praha Jatropha curcas na neke jetrene i bubrežne biokemijske profile, kao što su ukupni protein, ukupni bilirubin, ukupni albumin i ukupni globulin hibridnog soma (Clarias gariepinus (♀) i Heterobranchus bidorsalis (♂)), nakon četrnaestodnevnog eksperimentalnog razdoblja. Rezultat se značajno razlikovao u srednjoj vrijednosti određenog jetrenog ukupnog bilirubina, dok se ukupni protein, a...

  11. Revisão: Jatropha curcas L.: aspectos morfofisiológicos e químicos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivana Oliveira Virgens

    Full Text Available Resumo Jatropha curcas L. (pinhão-manso é uma espécie vegetal oleaginosa cujo óleo, extraído de suas sementes, apresenta múltiplas aplicações para comunidades locais, além da sua potencial aplicação em diferentes setores industriais, dentre os quais a indústria de biodiesel, constituindo-se, assim, em mais uma fonte de matéria-prima dentro do elenco de espécies oleaginosas úteis. Aspectos morfofisiológicos e físico-químicos são de grande importância quando se tem interesse na prospecção de espécies vegetais visando sua domesticação e exploração comercial. O objetivo deste estudo foi realizar uma revisão do estado da arte sobre a J. curcas, compilando estudos acerca da caracterização morfofisiológica, assim como acerca da composição química das sementes, gerando assim informações que auxiliem na exploração do potencial de produção e cultivo da espécie, a fim de subsidiar estudos que propiciem a exploração comercial sustentável dessa cultura. O conhecimento morfológico disponível sobre J. curcas possibilita o entendimento preciso do ciclo biológico da planta, entretanto, estudos fisiológicos ainda necessitam ser desenvolvidos para uma melhor compreensão do comportamento dela, principalmente em termos de armazenamento, condições ótimas de germinação e formação de mudas, assim como sobre o comportamento da espécie quando sob condições adversas, tais como excessiva insolação, restrição hídrica e temperaturas elevadas, dentre outras. A descrição da composição química, caracterização de compostos tóxicos e fatores antinutricionais da semente já existentes forneceram informações que podem dar suporte a produção e exploração comercial de J. curcas, porém estudos e testes com animais devem ser conduzidos para confirmar com maior segurança suas aplicações comerciais.

  12. Utilization of zinc chloride for surface modification of activated carbon derived from Jatropha curcas L. for absorbent material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pratumpong, P; Toommee, S

    2016-12-01

    The objective of this research is to produce the low-cost activated carbon from Jatropha curcas L. by chemical activation using zinc chloride ZnCl2. The effects of the impregnation ratio on the surface and chemical properties of activated carbon were investigated. The impregnation ratio was selected at the range of 1:1-10:1 for investigation. The optimum conditions resulted in an activated carbon with a carbon content of 80% wt, while the specific surface area evaluated using nitrogen adsorption isotherm corresponds to 600 m(2)/g.

  13. The biomedical significance of the phytochemical, proximate and mineral compositions of the leaf, stem bark and root of Jatropha curcas

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Atamgba; Agbor; Asuk; Margaret; Akpana; Agiang; Kayode; Dasofunjo; Amonor; James; Willie

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To analyse the phytochemical contents of leaf, stem bark and root of Jatropha curcas(J. curcas) in four solvent extracts and their proximate and mineral compositions. Methods: Standard analytical procedures were used for the determination of phytochemicals, proximate and mineral compositions of the leaf, stem bark and root extracts of J. curcas. Results: Results of the analysis showed the presence of polyphenols, flavonoids, alkaloids, cardiac glycosides, coumarins, saponins, terpenoids, steroids, triterpenoid saponins, carotenoids, phlobatannins and tannins in the leaf, stem bark and root of all the solvent extracts. Flavonoids were present in the highest amount in the ethyl acetate extracts of the leaf(7.35% ± 0.02%), stem bark(4.12% ± 0.01%) and root(3.35% ± 0.02%) followed by polyphenols in the methanol extracts of leaf(4.62% ± 0.02%), stem bark(2.77% ± 0.05%) and root(2.49% ± 0.02%). Poly-acetylated compounds were absent in all the solvent extracts of the leaf, stem bark and root. However, some anti-nutritional agents such as oxalates, phytates and cyanates were present in all the solvent extracts of the leaf, stem bark and root except the ethyl acetate. Phytates were high in the aqueous solvent of the leaf(6.12% ± 0.00%) but low in the stem bark(1.00% ± 0.05%) and root(0.89% ± 0.03%). Proximate composition showed appreciable amounts of total carbohydrate(36.33% ± 0.72%), crude protein(26.00% ± 0.47%) and reducing sugars(5.87% ± 0.14%) in the leaf, while crude fat was more in the stem bark(16.70% ± 0.30%). There was corresponding substantial energy in the leaf [(1 514.77 ± 20.87) kJ /100 g] and stem bark [(907.00 ± 8.52) kJ /100 g]. Moisture and ash contents of the leaf, stem bark and root were within acceptable limits for the use in drugs formulation. The mineral composition showed substantial amounts of important elements such as Fe, Ca, Na, Mg and Zn. Others were P, K and Se. Conclusions: The outcome of this study suggests that the

  14. Ester Tuiksoo otsib endiselt pesa / Paavo Kangur

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Kangur, Paavo, 1966-

    2012-01-01

    Maadevahetuse protsessi raames süüdistati Ester Tuiksood, et põllumajandusministrina sai ta altkäemaksu Rävala 19 asunud korteri kasutamise eest. Ester Tuiksoo ja kinnisvaraeksperdi Tõnis Rüütli kommentaarid

  15. Synthesis of substituted 2-cyanoarylboronic esters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lysén, Morten; Hansen, Henriette M; Begtrup, Mikael

    2006-01-01

    The synthesis of substituted 2-cyanoarylboronic esters is described via lithiation/in situ trapping of the corresponding methoxy-, trifluoromethyl-, fluoro-, chloro-, and bromobenzonitriles. The crude arylboronic esters were obtained in high yields and purities and with good regioselectivities....

  16. ANALYSIS OF COCONUT ETHYL ESTER (BIODIESEL) AND ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ANALYSIS OF COCONUT ETHYL ESTER (BIODIESEL) AND FOSSIL DIESEL BLENDING: PROPERTIES AND CORROSION CHARACTERISTICS. ... resulting coconut oil ethyl ester (COEE) was blended with fossil diesel (B0). ... Article Metrics.

  17. Ester Tuiksoo otsib endiselt pesa / Paavo Kangur

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Kangur, Paavo, 1966-

    2012-01-01

    Maadevahetuse protsessi raames süüdistati Ester Tuiksood, et põllumajandusministrina sai ta altkäemaksu Rävala 19 asunud korteri kasutamise eest. Ester Tuiksoo ja kinnisvaraeksperdi Tõnis Rüütli kommentaarid

  18. Antiviral Activity of Diterpene Esters on Chikungunya Virus and HIV Replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nothias-Scaglia, Louis-Félix; Pannecouque, Christophe; Renucci, Franck; Delang, Leen; Neyts, Johan; Roussi, Fanny; Costa, Jean; Leyssen, Pieter; Litaudon, Marc; Paolini, Julien

    2015-06-26

    Recently, new daphnane, tigliane, and jatrophane diterpenoids have been isolated from various Euphorbiaceae species, of which some have been shown to be potent inhibitors of chikungunya virus (CHIKV) replication. To further explore this type of compound, the antiviral activity of a series of 29 commercially available natural diterpenoids was evaluated. Phorbol-12,13-didecanoate (11) proved to be the most potent inhibitor, with an EC50 value of 6.0 ± 0.9 nM and a selectivity index (SI) of 686, which is in line with the previously reported anti-CHIKV potency for the structurally related 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (13). Most of the other compounds exhibited low to moderate activity, including an ingenane-type diterpene ester, compound 28, with an EC50 value of 1.2 ± 0.1 μM and SI = 6.4. Diterpene compounds are known also to inhibit HIV replication, so the antiviral activities of compounds 1-29 were evaluated also against HIV-1 and HIV-2. Tigliane- (4β-hydroxyphorbol analogues 10, 11, 13, 15, 16, and 18) and ingenane-type (27 and 28) diterpene esters were shown to inhibit HIV replication in vitro at the nanomolar level. A Pearson analysis performed with the anti-CHIKV and anti-HIV data sets demonstrated a linear relationship, which supported the hypothesis made that PKC may be an important target in CHIKV replication.

  19. Liquid Crystalline Thermosets from Ester, Ester-imide, and Ester-amide Oligomers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dingemans, Theodorus J. (Inventor); Weiser, Erik S. (Inventor); St. Clair, Terry L. (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    Main chain thermotropic liquid crystal esters, ester-imides, and ester-amides were prepared from AA, BB, and AB type monomeric materials and end-capped with phenylacetylene, phenylmaleimide, or nadimide reactive end-groups. The end-capped liquid crystal oligomers are thermotropic and have, preferably, molecular weights in the range of approximately 1000-15,000 grams per mole. The end-capped liquid crystaloligomers have broad liquid crystalline melting ranges and exhibit high melt stability and very low melt viscosities at accessible temperatures. The end-capped liquid crystal oli-gomers are stable forup to an hour in the melt phase. They are highly processable by a variety of melt process shape forming and blending techniques. Once processed and shaped, the end-capped liquid crystal oigomers were heated to further polymerize and form liquid crystalline thermosets (LCT). The fully cured products are rubbers above their glass transition temperatures.

  20. Mechanical properties and chemical stability of pivalolactone-based poly(ether ester)s

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tijsma, E.J.; Does, van der L.; Bantjes, A.; Vulic, I.

    1994-01-01

    The processing, mechanical and chemical properties of poly(ether ester)s, prepared from pivalolactone (PVL), 1,4-butanediol (4G) and dimethyl terephthalate (DMT), were studied. The poly(ether ester)s could easily be processed by injection moulding, owing to their favourable rheological and thermal p

  1. Cross species amplification ability of novel microsatellites isolated from Jatropha curcas and genetic relationship with sister taxa : Cross species amplification and genetic relationship of Jatropha using novel microsatellites

    KAUST Repository

    Pamidimarri, D. V N N Sudheer

    2010-07-30

    The present investigation was undertaken with an aim to check the ability of cross species amplification of microsatellite markers isolated from Jatropha curcas-a renewable source of biodiesel to deduce the generic relationship with its six sister taxa (J. glandulifera, J. gossypifolia, J. integerrima, J. multifida, J. podagrica, and J. tanjorensis). Out of the 49 markers checked 31 markers showed cross species amplification in all the species studied. JCDS-30, JCDS-69, JCDS-26, JCMS-13 and JCMS-21 amplified in J. curcas. However, these markers did not show any cross species amplification. Overall percentage of polymorphism (PP) among the species studied was 38% and the mean genetic similarity (GS) was found to be 0.86. The highest PP (24) and least GS (0.76) was found between J. curcas/J. podagrica and J. curcas/J. multifida and least PP (4.44) and highest GS (0.96) was found between J. integerrima/J. tanjorensis. Dendrogram analysis showed good congruence to RAPD and AFLP than nrDNA ITS data reported earlier. The characterized microsatellites will pave way for intraspecies molecular characterization which can be further utilized in species differentiation, molecular identification, characterization of interspecific hybrids, exploitation of genetic resource management and genetic improvement of the species through marker assisted breeding for economically important traits. © 2010 Springer Science+Business Media B.V.

  2. Esters van tetrathioorthokiezelzuur en tetrathioorthogermaniumzuur

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stienstra, Folkert Jans

    1934-01-01

    The germaniun tetrachloride required was prepared from the mineral germanite. For this a simpler method was elaborated. For the preparation of the esters of tetrathioorthosilicic acid and tetrathioorthogermanic acid, silicon tetrachloride and germanium tetrachloride were made to react with a suspens

  3. 40 CFR 721.2805 - Acrylate ester.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Acrylate ester. 721.2805 Section 721... Acrylate ester. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as an acrylate ester (PMN P-96-824) is subject to reporting under...

  4. 40 CFR 721.537 - Organosilane ester.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Organosilane ester. 721.537 Section... § 721.537 Organosilane ester. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as an organosilane ester (PMN P-96-1661/P-95-1654)...

  5. 40 CFR 721.3034 - Methylamine esters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Methylamine esters. 721.3034 Section... Substances § 721.3034 Methylamine esters. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as methylamine esters (PMN P-94-982) is subject...

  6. Crystallographic Analysis of Analogous Silicon and Carbon Containing Di(Cyanate Ester)s and Tri(Cyanate Ester)s

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-05-29

    lander are made from M55J/cyanate ester composites • The solar panel supports on the MESSENGER space probe use cyanate ester composite tie layers...Distribution Unlimited. PA# 17275 Cyanate Esters Around the Solar System 3 Images: courtesy NASA (public release) • The science decks on the Mars Phoenix

  7. Phytochemical analysis of Jatropha curcas L. during different seasons and developmental stages and seedling growth of wheat (Triticum aestivum L) as affected by extracts/leachates of Jatropha curcas L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomar, Nisha Singh; Sharma, Malini; Agarwal, R M

    2015-01-01

    Jatropha curcas shows invasive characters and is a significant source of many phytochemicals with varying biological activities. Different plant parts of Jatropha curcas L exhibited variation in their phytochemical constituents. Leaves and ovary walls were found to contain higher contents of total phenols, tannins and phytic acid whereas free amino acids were greater in leaves. Young leaves of Jatropha show greater contents of all these metabolites. Further, plants exhibit seasonal differences as leaves collected during summer (May-June) have greater accumulation of total phenols, tannins and free amino acids however, phytic acid was more during rainy season. Leachates and extracts in their higher concentrations adversely affected the germination and growth of wheat seedlings however, lower concentrations were more or less stimulatory. These treatments not only decreased the length, fresh and dry weight of seedlings but also affected the chlorophyll contents and activity of enzymes such as nitrate reductase, aminotransferases in wheat seedlings however, the activity of superoxide dismutase and ascorbate peroxidases increased. Experiments indicate harmful allelopathic effects of Jatropha leachates /extracts on wheat seedlings, hence further experimentation and analysis is recommended before continued plantation of Jatropha particularly on fertile soils. However. Growth of Jatropha plants on saline soils and their potential for accumulating sodium, potassium and chloride are the attributes suggesting the possibility of use of Jatropha plants in improving saline soils.

  8. Increased intestinal protein permeability in a model of lung injury induced by phorbol myristate acetate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    St John, R C; Mizer, L A; Weisbrode, S E; Dorinsky, P M

    1991-11-01

    Multiple nonpulmonary organ failure is a frequent complication of the adult respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), and contributes significantly to the high mortality rate associated with this disorder. Although previous studies suggest that systemic organ injury may be an integral component of ARDS, little is known about the specific functional alterations that occur in these target organs. The present study was designed, therefore, to test the hypothesis that endothelial damage, as assessed by microvascular permeability changes, develops in systemic organs in a model of acute lung injury. To test this postulate, the microvascular permeability for total protein was estimated using the steady-state relationship between the lymph (CL) to plasma (Cp) protein concentration ratio (i.e., CL/Cp) and lymph flow in autoperfused cat ileum preparations. Specifically, CL/Cp was measured in five cats, 2 h after acute lung injury was induced by intravenously administered phorbol myristate acetate (PMA), 15 micrograms/kg, and the results were compared with those of seven time-matched control animals. Prior to PMA infusion, the PaO2/FIO2 ratio was 451 +/- 28 in both groups and remained unchanged (486 +/- 26) in the control group. By contrast, the PaO2/FIO2 ratio fell to 275 +/- 95 after PMA infusion (p less than 0.05). In addition, whereas CL/Cp was 0.099 +/- 0.008 in the control animals, it increased to 0.36 +/- 0.06 in the PMA-injured animals (p less than 0.01). In summary, this study demonstrated that in this model of acute lung injury produced by PMA-induced activation of circulating inflammatory cells, both acute lung injury and systemic organ injury (i.e., morphologic and permeability alterations) occurred.

  9. Phorbol myristate acetate and catechol as skin cocarcinogens in SENCAR mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Duuren, B.L.; Melchionne, S.; Seidman, I.

    1986-09-01

    The enhancement of the carcinogenicity of benzo(a) pyrene (B(a)P) and ..beta..-propiolactone (BPL) by the mouse skin cocarcinogens phorbol myristate acetate (PMA) and catechol were examined in female SENCAR mice, 30 per group. The carcinogen and cocarcinogen were applied simultaneously, three times weekly for 490-560 days. B(a)P and BPL were used at constant doses of 5 and 50 ..mu..g, respectively, in all experiments. PMA was used at three doses, 2.5, 1.0, and 0.5 ..mu..g per application, and catechol was used at one dose, 2 mg per application. Control groups included animals that received carcinogen only, cocarcinogen only, acetone only, and no treatment. The carcinogenicity of B(a)P and BPL were enhanced by the cocarcinogens, particularly in terms of tumor multiplicity. For both carcinogens, the most marked cocarcinogenic effects were observed at the lowest dose of PMA used (0.5 ..mu..g per application). This observation applied for days to first tumor, animals with tumors, tumor multiplicity, and incidence of malignant skin tumors. Catechol applied alone did not induce any tumors; with PMA alone there were significant incidences of benign and malignant tumors, e.g., at a dose of only 0.5 ..mu..g per application, 15 of 30 animals had 28 tumors, 5 of which were squamous carcinomas. In two-stage carcinogenesis experiments with 7,12-dimethylbenz(a)anthracene (DMBA) as initiator and PMA as promoter, SENCAR mice showed a greater susceptibility to tumor induction when compared to ICR/Ha mice used in earlier work. This susceptibility was most notable in terms of rate of tumor appearance and tumor multiplicity.

  10. Effect of nickel on regeneration in Jatropha curcas L. and assessment of genotoxicity using RAPD markers

    KAUST Repository

    Sarkar, Tanmoy

    2010-07-08

    The aim of the present study was to determine the effect of nickel on shoot regeneration in tissue culture as well as to identify polymorphisms induced in leaf explants exposed to nickel through random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD). In vitro leaf explants of Jatropha curcas were grown in nickel amended Murashige and Skoog (MS) medium at four different concentrations (0, 0.01, 0.1, 1 mM) for 3 weeks. Percent regeneration, number of shoots produced and genotoxic effects were evaluated by RAPD using leaf explants obtained from the first three treatments following 5 weeks of their subsequent subculture in metal free MS medium. Percent regeneration decreased with increase in addition of nickel to the medium up to 14 days from 42.31% in control to zero in 1.0 mM. The number of shoot buds scored after 5 weeks was higher in control as compared to all other treatments except in one of the metal free subculture medium wherein the shoot number was higher in 0.01 mM treatment (mean = 7.80) than control (mean = 7.60). RAPD analysis produced only 5 polymorphic bands (3.225%) out of a total of 155 bands from 18 selected primers. Only three primers OPK-19, OPP-2, OPN-08 produced polymorphic bands. The dendrogram showed three groups A, B, and C. Group A samples showed 100% genetic similarity within them. Samples between groups B and C were more genetically distant from each other as compared to samples between groups A and B as well as groups A and C. Cluster analysis based on RAPD data correlated with treatments. © 2010 Springer Science+Business Media, LLC.

  11. Role of biotechnological interventions in the improvement of castor (Ricinus communis L.) and Jatropha curcas L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sujatha, M; Reddy, T P; Mahasi, M J

    2008-01-01

    Castor and Jatropha belong to the Euphorbiaceae family. This review highlights the role of biotechnological tools in the genetic improvement of castor and jatropha. Castor is monotypic and breeding programmes have mostly relied on the variability available in the primary gene pool. The major constraints limiting profitable cultivation are: vulnerability to insect pests and diseases, and the press cake is toxic which restrict its use as cattle feed. Conventional breeding techniques have limited scope in improvement of resistance to biotic stresses and in quality improvement owing to low genetic variability for these traits. Genetic diversity was assessed using protein based markers while use of molecular markers is at infancy. In vitro studies in castor have been successful in shoot proliferation from meristematic explants, but not callus-mediated regeneration. Genetic transformation experiments have been initiated for development of insect resistant and ricin-free transgenics with very low transformation frequency. In tropical and subtropical countries jatropha is viewed as a potential biofuel crop. The limitations in available germplasm include; lack of knowledge of the genetic base, poor yields, low genetic diversity and vulnerability to a wide array of insects and diseases. Great scope exists for genetic improvement through conventional methods, induced mutations, interspecific hybridization and genetic transformation. Reliable and highly efficient tissue culture protocols for direct and callus-mediated shoot regeneration and somatic embryogenesis are established for jatropha which indicates potential for widening the genetic base through biotechnological tools. Assessment of genetic diversity using molecular markers disclosed low interaccessional variability in local Jatropha curcas germplasm. The current status and future prospects of in vitro regeneration, genetic transformation and the role of molecular tools in the genetic enhancement of the two

  12. Global analysis of gene expression profiles in developing physic nut (Jatropha curcas L. seeds.

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    Huawu Jiang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Physic nut (Jatropha curcas L. is an oilseed plant species with high potential utility as a biofuel. Furthermore, following recent sequencing of its genome and the availability of expressed sequence tag (EST libraries, it is a valuable model plant for studying carbon assimilation in endosperms of oilseed plants. There have been several transcriptomic analyses of developing physic nut seeds using ESTs, but they have provided limited information on the accumulation of stored resources in the seeds. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We applied next-generation Illumina sequencing technology to analyze global gene expression profiles of developing physic nut seeds 14, 19, 25, 29, 35, 41, and 45 days after pollination (DAP. The acquired profiles reveal the key genes, and their expression timeframes, involved in major metabolic processes including: carbon flow, starch metabolism, and synthesis of storage lipids and proteins in the developing seeds. The main period of storage reserves synthesis in the seeds appears to be 29-41 DAP, and the fatty acid composition of the developing seeds is consistent with relative expression levels of different isoforms of acyl-ACP thioesterase and fatty acid desaturase genes. Several transcription factor genes whose expression coincides with storage reserve deposition correspond to those known to regulate the process in Arabidopsis. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The results will facilitate searches for genes that influence de novo lipid synthesis, accumulation and their regulatory networks in developing physic nut seeds, and other oil seeds. Thus, they will be helpful in attempts to modify these plants for efficient biofuel production.

  13. Recycled Urban Wastewater for Irrigation of Jatropha curcas L. in Abandoned Agricultural Arid Land

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    María Dorta-Santos

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available In a global context in which obtaining new energy sources is of paramount importance, the production of biodiesel from plant crops is a potentially viable alternative to the use of fossil fuels. Among the species used to produce the raw material for biodiesel, Jatropha curcas L. (JCL has enjoyed increased popularity in recent years, due partly to its ability to grow in degraded zones and under arid and semi-arid conditions. The present study evaluates the potential for JCL production under irrigation with non-conventional water resources in abandoned agricultural soils of the island of Fuerteventura (Canary Islands, Spain, which is one of the most arid parts of the European Union. JCL growth and productivity are compared during the first 39 months of cultivation in two soil types (clay-loam and sandy-loam and with two irrigation water qualities: recycled urban wastewater (RWW and desalinated brackish water (DBW. The results indicate that JCL growth (in terms of plant height and stem diameter was significantly influenced both by soil type and water quality, with better development observed in the sandy-loam soil under RWW irrigation. Productivity, measured as cumulative seed production, was not affected by soil type but was affected by water quality. Production under RWW irrigation was approximately seven times greater than with DBW (mean ~2142 vs. 322 kg·ha−1. The higher nutrient content, especially P, K and Mg, and lower B content of the RWW were found to be key factors in the greater productivity observed under irrigation with this type of water.

  14. VARIABILIDAD DEL GEN NUCLEAR G3PDH EN JATROPHA CURCAS L.

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    Sonia Castro Guzmán

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Jatrophacurcas L.es una especie nativa de América tropical; en nuestro país se ha venido utilizando principalmente como medicinal y alimenticia desde la época prehispánica. Actualmente el aceite extraído de sus semillas ha adquirido importancia internacional ya que puede ser transformado a biodiesel. El conocimiento que existe sobre la variabilidad genética de la especie es escaso. Un gen utilizado con éxito para el estudio de patrones de variación y origen de la yuca (ManihotesculentaL. y del caco (Theobromacacao L. es el gen nuclearG3pdh(Gliceraldehído3 fosfato deshidrogenasa involucrado en la fotosíntesis. Con base en ello, en este trabajo se exploró la variabilidad del gen G3pdh en individuos deJ. curcasprovenientes de 15 poblaciones de los estados de Veracruz, Campeche, Yucatán y Quintana Roo. Para obtener el gen G3pdh completo de alrededor de 1000 pares de bases, se amplificó utilizando losprimersdiseñados porStrandet al. (1997 y los dosprimersinternos reverse diseñados porOlsenySchaal(1999 para obtener segmentos más cortos, de 600 y 800 pares de bases aproximadamente. Por primera vez se amplificaron aproximadamente 500pby los resultados demuestran que el gen G3pdh es útil para analizar la variabilidad deJ. curcas, y con un importante potencial para evaluar la distribución y evolución de sus poblaciones en México, conocer las relaciones ancestro descendiente a nivel poblacional y explicar las causas de la distribución de los distintoshaplotipos.

  15. Biotechnological approaches to determine the impact of viruses in the energy crop plant Jatropha curcas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramkat, Rose C; Calari, Alberto; Maghuly, Fatemeh; Laimer, Margit

    2011-08-03

    Geminiviruses infect a wide range of plant species including Jatropha and cassava both belonging to family Euphorbiaceae. Cassava is traditionally an important food crop in Sub - Saharan countries, while Jatropha is considered as valuable biofuel plant with great perspectives in the future. A total of 127 Jatropha samples from Ethiopia and Kenya and 124 cassava samples from Kenya were tested by Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay (ELISA) for RNA viruses and polymerase chain reaction for geminiviruses. Jatropha samples from 4 different districts in Kenya and Ethiopia (analyzed by ELISA) were negative for all three RNA viruses tested: Cassava brown streak virus (CBSV), Cassava common mosaic virus, Cucumber mosaic virus, Three cassava samples from Busia district (Kenya) contained CBSV. Efforts to develop diagnostic approaches allowing reliable pathogen detection in Jatropha, involved the amplification and sequencing of the entire DNA A molecules of 40 Kenyan isolates belonging to African cassava mosaic virus (ACMV) and East African cassava mosaic virus - Uganda. This information enabled the design of novel primers to address different questions: a) primers amplifying longer sequences led to a phylogenetic tree of isolates, allowing some predictions on the evolutionary aspects of Begomoviruses in Jatrophia; b) primers amplifying shorter sequences represent a reliable diagnostic tool. This is the first report of the two Begomoviruses in J. curcas. Two cassava samples were co - infected with cassava mosaic geminivirus and CBSV. A Defective DNA A of ACMV was found for the first time in Jatropha. Cassava geminiviruses occurring in Jatropha might be spread wider than anticipated. If not taken care of, this virus infection might negatively impact large scale plantations for biofuel production. Being hosts for similar pathogens, the planting vicinity of the two crop plants needs to be handled carefully.

  16. Biotechnological approaches to determine the impact of viruses in the energy crop plant Jatropha curcas

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    Maghuly Fatemeh

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Geminiviruses infect a wide range of plant species including Jatropha and cassava both belonging to family Euphorbiaceae. Cassava is traditionally an important food crop in Sub - Saharan countries, while Jatropha is considered as valuable biofuel plant with great perspectives in the future. Results A total of 127 Jatropha samples from Ethiopia and Kenya and 124 cassava samples from Kenya were tested by Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay (ELISA for RNA viruses and polymerase chain reaction for geminiviruses. Jatropha samples from 4 different districts in Kenya and Ethiopia (analyzed by ELISA were negative for all three RNA viruses tested: Cassava brown streak virus (CBSV, Cassava common mosaic virus, Cucumber mosaic virus, Three cassava samples from Busia district (Kenya contained CBSV. Efforts to develop diagnostic approaches allowing reliable pathogen detection in Jatropha, involved the amplification and sequencing of the entire DNA A molecules of 40 Kenyan isolates belonging to African cassava mosaic virus (ACMV and East African cassava mosaic virus - Uganda. This information enabled the design of novel primers to address different questions: a primers amplifying longer sequences led to a phylogenetic tree of isolates, allowing some predictions on the evolutionary aspects of Begomoviruses in Jatrophia; b primers amplifying shorter sequences represent a reliable diagnostic tool. This is the first report of the two Begomoviruses in J. curcas. Two cassava samples were co - infected with cassava mosaic geminivirus and CBSV. A Defective DNA A of ACMV was found for the first time in Jatropha. Conclusion Cassava geminiviruses occurring in Jatropha might be spread wider than anticipated. If not taken care of, this virus infection might negatively impact large scale plantations for biofuel production. Being hosts for similar pathogens, the planting vicinity of the two crop plants needs to be handled carefully.

  17. Anaerobic digestion of Jatropha curcas L. press cake and effects of an iron-additive.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Thomas

    2011-11-01

    Oil production from Jatropha curcas L. seeds generates large amounts of Jatropha press cake (JPC) which can be utilized as a substrate for biogas production. The objective of this work was to investigate anaerobic mono-digestion of JPC and the effects of an iron additive (IA) on gas quality and process stability during the increase of the organic loading rate (OLR). With the increase of the OLR from 1.3 to 3.2 g(VS) L(-1) day(-1), the biogas yield in the reference reactor (RR) without IA decreased from 512 to 194 L(N) kg(VS) (-1) and the CH₄ concentration decreased from 69.3 to 44.4%. In the iron additive reactor (IAR), the biogas yield decreased from 530 to 462 L(N) kg(VS) (-1) and the CH₄ concentration decreased from 69.4 to 61.1%. The H₂S concentration in the biogas was reduced by addition of the IA to values below 258 ppm in the IAR while H₂S concentration in the RR increased and exceeded the detection limit of 5000 ppm. The acid capacity (AC) in the RR increased to more than 20 g L(-1), indicating an accumulation of organic acids caused by process instability. AC values in the IAR remained stable at values below 5 g L(-1). The results demonstrate that JPC can be used as sole substrate for anaerobic digestion up to an OLR of 2.4 g(VS) l(-1) day(-1). The addition of IA has effectively decreased the H(2)S content in the biogas and has improved the stability of the anaerobic process and the biogas quality.

  18. Genome-wide analysis of the MYB gene family in physic nut (Jatropha curcas L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Changpin; Chen, Yanbo; Wu, Zhenying; Lu, Wenjia; Han, Jinli; Wu, Pingzhi; Chen, Yaping; Li, Meiru; Jiang, Huawu; Wu, Guojiang

    2015-11-01

    The MYB proteins comprise one of the largest transcription factor families in plants, and play key roles in regulatory networks controlling development, metabolism, and stress responses. A total of 125 MYB genes (JcMYB) have been identified in the physic nut (Jatropha curcas L.) genome, including 120 2R-type MYB, 4 3R-MYB, and 1 4R-MYB genes. Based on exon-intron arrangement of MYBs from both lower (Physcomitrella patens) and higher (physic nut, Arabidopsis, and rice) plants, we can classify plant MYB genes into ten groups (MI-X), except for MIX genes which are nonexistent in higher plants. We also observed that MVIII genes may be one of the most ancient MYB types which consist of both R2R3- and 3R-MYB genes. Most MYB genes (76.8% in physic nut) belong to the MI group which can be divided into 34 subgroups. The JcMYB genes were nonrandomly distributed on its 11 linkage groups (LGs). The expansion of MYB genes across several subgroups was observed and resulted from genome triplication of ancient dicotyledons and from both ancient and recent tandem duplication events in the physic nut genome. The expression patterns of several MYB duplicates in the physic nut showed differences in four tissues (root, stem, leaf, and seed), and 34 MYB genes responded to at least one abiotic stressor (drought, salinity, phosphate starvation, and nitrogen starvation) in leaves and/or roots based on the data analysis of digital gene expression tags. Overexpression of the JcMYB001 gene in Arabidopsis increased its sensitivity to drought and salinity stresses.

  19. PHYTOCHEMICAL SCREENING AND IN VITRO ANTIMICROBIAL ANALYSIS OF THE ETHANOL STEM BARK EXTRACT OF JATROPHA CURCAS LINN. (EUPHORBIACEAE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. H. Wakirwa

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available This study covers the phytochemical and antimicrobial analysis of the ethanol stem bark extract of Jatropha curcas Linn. The results obtained indicates the presence of some secondary metabolites; saponins, tannins, cardiac glycosides, carbohydrates, reducing sugars, flavonoids and terpenoids. The extract also exhibited antimicrobial activities which were dose-dependent with zones of inhibition ranging from 10-15mm for Staphylococcus aureus, 11-17mm for E. coli, 10-18mm for Klebsiella pneumoniae, and 14-26mm for Candida albicans. The MIC of the extract on the clinical isolates (Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli, and Klebsiella pneumonia was 25mg/ml, 25mg/ml and 50mg/ml, respectively. While the MBC of Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli and Klebsiella pneumoniae was 50mg/ml, 50mg/ml and 100mg/ml, respectively. The results obtained indicate that ethanol stem bark extract of Jatropha curcas has antibacterial and antifungal activity which can be attributed to the presence of some of the essential secondary metabolites.

  20. Phytochemical characterization, antimicrobial activity and reducing potential of seed oil, latex, machine oil and presscake of Jatropha curcas

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    Amit Sharma

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: This study aims to evaluate the antimicrobial activity, phytochemical studies and thin layer chromatography analysis of machine oil, hexane extract of seed oil and methanol extract of presscake& latex of Jatropha curcas Linn (family Euphorbiaceae. Materials and Methods: J. curcas extracts were subjected to preliminary qualitative phytochemical screening to detect the major phytochemicals followed by its reducing power and content of phenol and flavonoids in different fractions. Thin layer chromatography was also performed using different solvent systems for the analysis of a number of constituents in the plant extracts. Antimicrobial activity was evaluated by the disc diffusion method, while the minimum inhibitory concentration, minimum bactericidal concentration and minimum fungicidal concentration were calculated by micro dilution method. Results: The methanolic fraction of latex and cake exhibited marked antifungal and antibacterial activities against Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. Phytochemical analysis revealed the presence of alkaloids, saponins, tannins, terpenoids, steroids, glycosides, phenols and flavonoids. Reducing power showed dose dependent increase in concentration compared to standard Quercetin. Furthermore, this study recommended the isolation and separation of bioactive compounds responsible for the antibacterial activity which would be done by using different chromatographic methods such as high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC, GC-MS etc. Conclusion: The results of the above study suggest that all parts of the plants possess potent antibacterial activity. Hence, it is important to isolate the active principles for further testing of antimicrobial and other biological efficacy.

  1. Fuzzy Modeling to Evaluate the Effect of Temperature on Batch Transesterification of Jatropha Curcas for Biodiesel Production

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    Vipan Kumar Sohpal

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Biodiesel is an alternative source of fuel that can be synthesized from edible, non-edible and waste oils through transesterification. Firstly Transesterification reaction of Jatropha Curcas oil with butanol in the ratio of 1:25 investigated by using of sodium hydroxide catalyst with mixing intensity of 250 rpm in isothermal batch reactor. Secondly the fuzzy model of the temperature is developed. Performance was evaluated by comparing fuzzy model with the batch kinetic data. Fuzzy models were developed using adaptive neurofuzzy inference system (ANFIS. © 2011 BCREC UNDIP. All rights reserved(Received: 27th January 2011, Revised: 13rd February 2011; Accepted: 16th February 2011[How to Cite: V.K. Sohpal, A. Singh, A. Dey. (2011. Fuzzy Modeling to Evaluate the Effect of Temperature on Batch Transesterification of Jatropha Curcas for Biodiesel Production. Bulletin of Chemical Reaction Engineering and Catalysis, 6(1: 31-38. doi:10.9767/bcrec.6.1.816.31-38][How to Link / DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.9767/bcrec.6.1.816.31-38 || or local:  http://ejournal.undip.ac.id/index.php/bcrec/article/view/816 ] | View in 

  2. Hydrothermal liquefaction of de-oiled Jatropha curcas cake using Deep Eutectic Solvents (DESs) as catalysts and co-solvents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alhassan, Yahaya; Kumar, Naveen; Bugaje, Idris M

    2016-01-01

    Biomass liquefaction using ionic liquids (ILs) as catalysts has received appreciable attention, in renewable fuels and chemicals production, recently. However, issues associated with the production cost, long reaction time and use of volatile solvents are undeniably challenging. Thus, Deep Eutectic Solvents (DESs) emerged as promising and potential ILs substitutes. The hydrothermal liquefaction of de-oiled Jatropha curcas cake was catalyzed by four synthesized DESs as catalysts and co-solvents for selective extraction. Proximate and ultimate analyses including ash, moisture and carbon contents of bio-crude produced varied slightly. The higher heating values found ranges from 21.15 ± 0.82 MJ/kg to 24.30 ± 0.98 MJ/kg. The bio-crude yields obtained using ChCl-KOH DES was 43.53 wt% and ChCl-p-TsOH DES was 38.31 wt%. Bio-crude yield using ChCl-FeCl3 DES was 30.80 wt%. It is suggested that, the selectivity of bio-crude could be improved, by using DESs as catalyst and co-solvent in HTL of biomass such as de-oiled J. curcas cake.

  3. Comparative evaluation of Jatropha curcas L. seed meals obtained by different methods of defatting on toxic, antinutritional and nutritive factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Jianhui; Zhang, Hui

    2014-06-01

    Different methods of defatting have a great impact on toxic, antinutritional and nutritive factors in the oilseed meals. In order to find the most suitable methods of defatting for Jatropha curcas seed meals, the Jatropha curcas L. seed meals, defatted by Soxhlet extraction and screw-press were characterized for their toxic, anti-nutritional and nutrient factors in this study. The toxins (phorbolesters, 3.1 and 2.9 mg/g) and some anti-nutritional factors (saponins, 2.9 and 2.6%; phytates, 11.1 and 11.6%) in meals obtained by the two defatting methods were present at high concentrations. However, the trypsin inhibitors activity (TIA) and lectin (2.7 mg/g and 1.5 mg/ml) in the screw-pressed meal were significantly lower, due to the high temperature (120 °C) used in this defatting process. From nutritional side, the values of crude protein (CP), buffer-soluble nitrogen, non-protein nitrogen, pepsin insoluble nitrogen, in vitro protein digestibility (IVPD), as well as essential amino acid index (EAAI), biological value (BV), nutritional index (NI) and protein-digestibility-corrected amino acid score (PDCAAS) of the meal obtained by Soxhlet extraction were better than the screw-pressed meal. However, taking practical application into account, from detoxification side, screw-pressed meal is better for detoxification.

  4. Antioxidant and Chelating Activity of Nontoxic Jatropha curcas L. Protein Hydrolysates Produced by In Vitro Digestion Using Pepsin and Pancreatin

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    Santiago Gallegos Tintoré

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The antioxidant and metal chelating activities in J. curcas protein hydrolysates have been determined. The hydrolysates were produced by treatment of a nontoxic genotype with the digestive enzymes pepsin and pancreatin and then were characterized by fast protein liquid chromatography and reverse phase chromatography. Peptidic fractions with higher radical scavenging activity were analysed by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry. The antioxidant activity was determined by measuring inhibition of the oxidative degradation of β-carotene and by measuring the reactive oxygen species (ROS in Caco-2 cell cultures. Cu2+ and Fe2+ chelating activities were also determined. The hydrolysates inhibited the degradation of β-carotene and the formation of ROS in Caco-2 cells. The lower molecular weight peptidic fractions from FPLC had stronger antioxidant activity in cell cultures compared with the hydrolysates, which correlated with a higher content in antioxidant and chelating amino acids. These fractions were characterized by a large presence of peptides with different molecular masses. The hydrolysates exhibited both Cu2+ and Fe2+ chelating activity. It was concluded that J. curcas is a good source of antioxidant and metal chelating peptides, which may have a positive impact on the economic value of this crop, as a potential source of food functional components.

  5. Effect of temperature and pre-germination treatments on seed germination and seedling vigor of Jatropha curcas L

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    Thais Cremon

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available To date, there are no official methods used to test the seed germination of physic nut (Jatropha curcas and there have only been a few attempts to optimize the germination of this species. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of different temperatures and pre-germination treatments on the germination and seedling vigor of J. curcas. The treatments were arranged in a completely randomized factorial scheme with four temperatures (20, 25, 30 and 20-30°C x two types of seeds (with and without the seed tegument x six periods of water imbibition (0, 6, 12, 18, 24 and 30h. The seeds were sown using a roller system with four replications of 50 seeds for each treatment. The germination percentage was higher for seeds stored at 25°C, when the seed tegument was maintained. When the time of water imbibition was increased, the germination percentage decreased, as well as the index of germination velocity and the percentage of germination of the first count. Imbibition for up to 12h led to an increase in hypocotyl growth. For this species, the maximum germination potential and highest vigor were obtained at 25°C, for seeds with teguments that were maintained and were not submitted to water imbibition.

  6. [Effects of drought stress and nitrogen fertilization rate on the accumulation of osmolytes in Jatropha curcas seedlings].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Li; Liu, Yong-An; Xie, Cai-Yong; Jiang, Xue; Wang, Yong-Jie; Li, Yin-Hua; Yan, Zhen; Hu, Ting-Xing

    2012-03-01

    A pot experiment with controlled water supply was conducted to study the effects of different drought stress degree (80% FC, 60% FC, 40% FC, and 20% FC) and nitrogen fertilization rate (0 g x pot(-1), 1.2 g x pot(-1), 3.6 g x pot(-1), and 6.0 g x pot(-1)) on the accumulation of osmolytes in different organs of Jatropha curcas seedlings. Under drought stress, the soluble protei and free proline in seedling shoots and roots and the soluble sugar in seedling shoots had a great accumulation, and the free proline content in seedling leaves had a great increase with increasing drought stress degree. Also under drought stress, the Na+, Ca2+, and Mg2+ all highly accumulated in seedling various organs, while K only accumulated greatly in shoots but slightly in leaves and roots. The effects of nitrogen fertilization on the accumulation of osmolytes in seedlings depended on drought stress degree and nitrogen fertilization rate. At 80% FC and 60% FC, increasing nitrogen fertilization rate could markedly promote the accumulation of osmolytes in the organs of J. curcas seedlings; at 40% FC, applying 6.0 g x pot(-1) weakened the promotion effect on the osmolytes accumulation; whereas at 20%, applying 1.2 g x pot(-1) made the plants have a higher capability in osmoregulation, but applying 3.6 g x pot(-1) and 6.0 g x pot(-1) had less promotion effect, and even, inhibited osmolytes accumulation.

  7. Methods of making alkyl esters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elliott, Brian

    2010-08-03

    A method comprising contacting an alcohol, a feed comprising one or more glycerides and equal to or greater than 2 wt % of one or more free fatty acids, and a solid acid catalyst, a nanostructured polymer catalyst, or a sulfated zirconia catalyst in one or more reactors, and recovering from the one or more reactors an effluent comprising equal to or greater than about 75 wt % alkyl ester and equal to or less than about 5 wt % glyceride.

  8. Niacinamide mitigated the acute lung injury induced by phorbol myristate acetate in isolated rat's lungs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Chia-Chih; Hsieh, Nan-Kuang; Liou, Huey Ling; Chen, Hsing I

    2012-03-01

    Phorbol myristate acetate (PMA) is a strong neutrophil activator and has been used to induce acute lung injury (ALI). Niacinamide (NAC) is a compound of B complex. It exerts protective effects on the ALI caused by various challenges. The purpose was to evaluate the protective effects of niacinamide (NAC) on the PMA-induced ALI and associated changes. The rat's lungs were isolated in situ and perfused with constant flow. A total of 60 isolated lungs were randomized into 6 groups to received Vehicle (DMSO 100 μg/g), PMA 4 μg/g (lung weight), cotreated with NAC 0, 100, 200 and 400 mg/g (lung weight). There were 10 isolated lungs in each group. We measured the lung weight and parameters related to ALI. The pulmonary arterial pressure and capillary filtration coefficient (Kfc) were determined in isolated lungs. ATP (adenotriphosphate) and PARP [poly(adenosine diphophate-ribose) polymerase] contents in lung tissues were detected. Real-time PCR was employed to display the expression of inducible and endothelial NO synthases (iNOS and eNOS). The neutrophil-derived mediators in lung perfusate were determined. PMA caused increases in lung weight parameters. This agent produced pulmonary hypertension and increased microvascular permeability. It resulted in decrease in ATP and increase in PARP. The expression of iNOS and eNOS was upregulated following PMA. PMA increased the neutrophil-derived mediators. Pathological examination revealed lung edema and hemorrhage with inflammatory cell infiltration. Immunohistochemical stain disclosed the presence of iNOS-positive cells in macrophages and endothelial cells. These pathophysiological and biochemical changes were diminished by NAC treatment. The NAC effects were dose-dependent. Our results suggest that neutrophil activation and release of neutrophil-derived mediators by PMA cause ALI and associated changes. NO production through the iNOS-producing cells plays a detrimental role in the PMA-induced lung injury. ATP is beneficial

  9. Niacinamide mitigated the acute lung injury induced by phorbol myristate acetate in isolated rat's lungs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lin Chia-Chih

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Phorbol myristate acetate (PMA is a strong neutrophil activator and has been used to induce acute lung injury (ALI. Niacinamide (NAC is a compound of B complex. It exerts protective effects on the ALI caused by various challenges. The purpose was to evaluate the protective effects of niacinamide (NAC on the PMA-induced ALI and associated changes. Methods The rat's lungs were isolated in situ and perfused with constant flow. A total of 60 isolated lungs were randomized into 6 groups to received Vehicle (DMSO 100 μg/g, PMA 4 μg/g (lung weight, cotreated with NAC 0, 100, 200 and 400 mg/g (lung weight. There were 10 isolated lungs in each group. We measured the lung weight and parameters related to ALI. The pulmonary arterial pressure and capillary filtration coefficient (Kfc were determined in isolated lungs. ATP (adenotriphosphate and PARP [poly(adenosine diphophate-ribose polymerase] contents in lung tissues were detected. Real-time PCR was employed to display the expression of inducible and endothelial NO synthases (iNOS and eNOS. The neutrophil-derived mediators in lung perfusate were determined. Results PMA caused increases in lung weight parameters. This agent produced pulmonary hypertension and increased microvascular permeability. It resulted in decrease in ATP and increase in PARP. The expression of iNOS and eNOS was upregulated following PMA. PMA increased the neutrophil-derived mediators. Pathological examination revealed lung edema and hemorrhage with inflammatory cell infiltration. Immunohistochemical stain disclosed the presence of iNOS-positive cells in macrophages and endothelial cells. These pathophysiological and biochemical changes were diminished by NAC treatment. The NAC effects were dose-dependent. Conclusions Our results suggest that neutrophil activation and release of neutrophil-derived mediators by PMA cause ALI and associated changes. NO production through the iNOS-producing cells plays a detrimental

  10. MODELING AND ANALYSIS OF PERFORMANCE, COMBUSTION AND EMMISSION CHARACTERISTICS OF JATROPHA METHYL ESTER BLEND DIESEL FOR CI ENGINE WITH VARIABLE COMPRESSION RATIO

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    S.ABINAV VISWANATH

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available An experimental study was conducted on a four stroke single cylinder compression ignition engine to determine the performance, combustion and exhaust emission characteristics under different compression ratio using an alternate fuel. The raw oil from the jatropha seed was subjected to transesterification process and is supplied to the engine as jatropha methyl ester (JME blended with diesel. The blends used in our paper are 10%, 20% and 30%. We found that the performance of the engine under VCR is maximum at 20% blend for CR18. The fuelconsumption is also found to be increased with, a higher proportion of jatropha curcas oil in the blend. But BSFC is low at 20% JME-D. Emission was found to be optimum at CR18 for all blends of the methyl ester. At high engine load, the peak cylinder pressure was found to be higher for 20% JME-D under compression ratio 18. Using STAR CD software, three dimensional simulations are deployed and the results generated are compared against experimental output.

  11. Oleosomas de semillas de Jatropha curcas L. como estimadores de diversidad en poblaciones del Sur de México

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriano-Anaya, M. L.

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available In this work, we used oleosome data to estimate the variability in eight J. curcas populations of Southern Mexico, using a multivariate approach. We found spherical oleosomes with diameters between 2.18 μm and 4.15 μm, which have two types of spatial arrangements: clustered and dispersed. A discriminant analysis showed that populations with more differentiation are Oaxaca and Veracruz, while Isthmus was the most diverse. The most informative variables for their contribution to the discriminant functions were oleosome size and number of oleosomes·μL of tissue−1. A heritability study with seeds harvested in two consecutive years showed that the variables oleosomes·μL of tissue−1 and oleosomes per cell have high broad sense heritabilities (h2bs=94.3% and h2bs=92.2%, respectively. A cluster analysis revealed high levels of dissimilarity between individuals. Correlation was found between the ratio oleosomes/tissue (volume/volume and total oil content of the seed. The identification of genotypes with contrasting characteristics could provide the basis for future studies of the inheritance of characters in J. curcas.Se estudiaron los caracteres de oleosomas de la planta para biocombustibles Jatropha curcas L. y se estimó la diversidad de ocho poblaciones del sur de México. Se encontraron oleosomas esféricos, con diámetros entre 2.18 μm y 4.15 μm, presentando dos tipos de arreglos espaciales: agrupados y dispersos. Un análisis discriminante mostró que las poblaciones más diferenciadas del resto son Oaxaca y Veracruz, mientras que Istmo fue la más diversa. Las variables más informativas por su contribución a las funciones discriminantes fueron tamaño de oleosoma y número de oleosomas·μL de tejido−1. En un estudio de heredabilidad con semillas cosechadas en dos años consecutivos se encontró que las variables oleosomas·μL de tejido−1 y oleosomas por célula tienen muy altas heredabilidades en sentido amplio (h2bs=94.3% y h

  12. Molecular cloning and expression of heteromeric ACCase subunit genes from Jatropha curcas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Keyu; Chiam, Huihui; Tian, Dongsheng; Yin, Zhongchao

    2011-04-01

    Acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACCase) catalyzes the biotin-dependent carboxylation of acetyl-CoA to produce malonyl-CoA, which is the essential first step in the biosynthesis of long-chain fatty acids. ACCase exists as a multi-subunit enzyme in most prokaryotes and the chloroplasts of most plants and algae, while it is present as a multi-domain enzyme in the endoplasmic reticulum of most eukaryotes. The heteromeric ACCase of higher plants consists of four subunits: an α-subunit of carboxyltransferase (α-CT, encoded by accA gene), a biotin carboxyl carrier protein (BCCP, encoded by accB gene), a biotin carboxylase (BC, encoded by accC gene) and a β-subunit of carboxyltransferase (β-CT, encoded by accD gene). In this study, we cloned and characterized the genes accA, accB1, accC and accD that encode the subunits of heteromeric ACCase in Jatropha (Jatropha curcas), a potential biofuel plant. The full-length cDNAs of the four subunit genes were isolated from a Jatropha cDNA library and by using 5' RACE, whereas the genomic clones were obtained from a Jatropha BAC library. They encode a 771 amino acid (aa) α-CT, a 286-aa BCCP1, a 537-aa BC and a 494-aa β-CT, respectively. The single-copy accA, accB1 and accC genes are nuclear genes, while the accD gene is located in chloroplast genome. Jatropha α-CT, BCCP1, BC and β-CT show high identity to their homologues in other higher plants at amino acid level and contain all conserved domains for ACCase activity. The accA, accB1, accC and accD genes are temporally and spatially expressed in the leaves and endosperm of Jatropha plants, which are regulated by plant development and environmental factors. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Increasing Hermaphrodite Flowers using Plant Growth Regulators in Andromonoecious Jatropha curcas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    DASUMIATI

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Jatropha curcas (JC is a crop with potential for use in biodiesel. Production of biodiesel requires plant seed as raw material, so the viability of JC for use in biodiesel will dependent greatly on the plant’s production of flowers. Generally, this plant is monoecious, meaning it has both male and female flowers. However, very rarely JC plants may be andromonoecious. Andromonoecious specimens of JC produce hermaphrodite and male flowers in the same plant. The number of hermaphrodite flowers per inflorescence is generally low compared to the number of male flowers. The aim of this study was to increase the proportion of hermaphrodite flowers by using plant growth regu- lators (PGRs in andromonoecious JC. Our experiment was conducted in Randomized Block Design (RBD with 9 treatments, namely kinetin, GA3, and IAA with concentrations of 0 ppm as a control, 50 and 100 ppm of each PGRs. The treatments were applied to stem cuttings from each plant and repeated 4 times. PGRs were applied by spraying the leaves within the buds of each plant. Applications took place weekly beginning when the plants entered flower initiating phase, until inflorescence produced. Observations were conducted during the treatment period (10 weeks. Results showed that plants treated with IAA, GA3, and kinetin at 50 and 100 ppm produced increased inflorescence per plant. The increases measured were 155.4 and 92.9% of (IAA, 120.4 and 151% (GA3, 96.6 and 51.7% (kinetin respectively. In addition, we found that application and GA3 at concentrations of 50 and 100 ppm, and kinetin at 50 ppm, increased the number of hermaphrodite flowers per inflorescence by 50%, and increased the number of hermaphrodite flowers per plant by 275.6 and 183.1% (IAA, 219.5 and 254.1% (GA3, 162.9 and 103.1% (kinetin respectively. As would be expected, the number of fruit per plant increased in those specimens treated with IAA, GA3, and kinetin at 50 and 100 ppm. The increases measured were 301.7 and 167

  14. Colecta de Jatropha curcas y su comportamiento en fase de vivero y de establecimiento (Nota técnica Collection of Jatropha curcas and its performance in nursery and establishment stages (Technical note

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R Machado

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available El objetivo de este trabajo fue colectar material de J. curcas con características morfológicas adecuadas para la producción de semilla, así como determinar su comportamiento en la fase de vivero y la de establecimiento. En el vivero se observó variación en los días necesarios para el arraigamiento de los propágulos (14 a 35 días y en la emergencia de las plántulas (7 a 28 días. La supervivencia de los propágulos fluctuó entre 73 y 100%; mientras que a partir de semilla estuvo entre 26,6 y 85,0%. La supervivencia en la fase de campo varió entre 45,4 y 93,3% en las procedencias trasladadas por propágulos, pero en la mayoría resultó inferior a la que se detectó en el vivero. En las procedencias sembradas directamente también se detectó variación en la supervivencia, pero el número de plantas emergidas a los 56 días fue alto. En estas condiciones se mantuvo un patrón de variación similar en el porcentaje de plantas arraigadas y de supervivencia, pero fue evidente el efecto del estrés causado por el traslado. Se concluye que la edad de las plantas y de las partes elegidas en el material donante, así como la calidad de la semilla, pudieron influir en la variación de los días necesarios para el arraigamiento o la emergencia y en el porcentaje de supervivencia. Se recomienda utilizar el procedimiento descrito para la colecta de J. curcas, enfatizando en la vía vegetativa, con el fin de acceder a procedencias con características adecuadas para la producción de semilla y con ello mantener el genotipo de los materiales colectados.The objective of this work was to collect J. curcas material with adequate morphological characteristics for seed production, as well as to determine its performance in the nursery and establishment stages. In nursery variation was observed in the necessary days for the rooting of the propagules (14 to 35 days and in seedling emergence (7 to 28 days. The propagule survival fluctuated between 73 and

  15. Alterações anatômicas em folhas e raízes de Jatropha curcas L. cultivadas sob estresse salino Anatomical changes in the leaves and roots of Jatropha curcas L. cultivated under saline stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gemima Manço de Melo

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available A espécie Jatropha curcas L. está entre as mais destacadas fontes de grãos oleaginosos, com baixa exigência hídrica e nutricional, sendo promissora para regiões áridas e semiáridas, em geral sujeitas à salinização do solo. Objetivou-se neste trabalho avaliar o efeito de diferentes concentrações salinas, sobre a anatomia de folhas e raízes de Jatropha curcas. Cinqüenta sementes foram semeadas em bandejas, e as plântulas transferidas para potes com capacidade para 5 litros, o ensaio foi conduzido em casa de vegetação. Após 21 dias da germinação, as plantas foram submetidas aos seguintes tratamentos salinos: 25; 50; 75; 100; 150 e 200 mM de NaCl, além do controle (0 mM de NaCl, em delineamento inteiramente casualizado, com cinco repetições por tratamento. Ao final do 32º dia de tratamento, a terceira folha e raízes, medindo aproximadamente 5 cm de comprimento, foram coletadas e fixadas em FAA 50. Seções transversais da porção mediana da nervura central da folha e da região mediana da raiz foram cortadas e coradas com safrablau. Foram observadas na folha redução no número de células do xilema e floema e alterações em sua distribuição, em função do aumento das concentrações de sal na solução. Nas raízes observou-se que, quanto mais alta a concentração salina, maior a lignificação das células xilemáticas e endodérmicas, e maior a redução no diâmetro e no número de elementos de vaso. Portanto, ocorrem alterações anatômicas em folhas e raízes das plantas quando cultivadas sob altas concentrações salinas.The species Jatropha curcas L. is among the most prominent sources of oilseeds, with low water requirement and nutrition, and promising to arid and semiarid regions, usually subject to soil salinization. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of different salt concentrations on the anatomy of leaves and roots of Jatropha curcas. Fifty seeds were sown in trays and the seedlings

  16. Efecto del EcoMic® en la emergencia de plántulas de Jatropha curcas (Nota Técnica Effect of EcoMic® on the emergence of Jatropha curcas seedlings (Technical Note

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yolai Noda

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Con el objetivo de estudiar el efecto del EcoMic® en la emergencia de las plántulas de Jatropha curcas, se hizo una prueba de observación en el laboratorio de análisis químico de la Estación Experimental de Pastos y Forrajes «Indio Hatuey». Se usaron semillas recién cosechadas, en dos tratamientos: semillas inoculadas con EcoMic® (T1, y sin inóculo (T2, con cuatro réplicas de 100 semillas cada una. Se utilizó un diseño totalmente aleatorizado y se realizaron 15 observaciones (a los 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15 y 16 días de emergencia. Las medias se compararon a través de un análisis descriptivo. El efecto del T1 fue notable durante todo el período; a partir del cuarto día se observaron 45 plántulas emergidas, lo que representó el 11,2% del total de las tratadas con este biofertilizante, y el último día del estudio había emergido el 96,2%. En el T2 no se observaron plántulas emergidas en ningún momento. Se concluye que el EcoMic® ejerció un efecto positivo en la emergencia de las plántulas de J. curcas al ser utilizado como inóculo en condiciones de laboratorio. Se recomienda realizar estudios pregerminativos para determinar la dormancia en la semilla de Jatropha, teniendo en cuenta el empleo del EcoMic® como uno de los tratamientos.In order to study the effect of EcoMic® on the emergence of Jatropha curcas seedlings, an observation test was conducted in the laboratory of chemical analysis of the Experimental Station of Pastures and Forages «Indio Hatuey». Newly-harvested seeds were used, in two treatments: seeds inoculated with EcoMic® (T1, and without inoculation (T2, with four replications of 100 seeds each. A completely randomized design was used and 15 observations were made (2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15 and 16 days after emergence. The means were compared through a descriptive analysis. The effect of T1 was remarkable throughout the period; since the fourth day 45

  17. Control of macrophage cell differentiation in human promyelocytic HL-60 leukemia cells by 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D/sub 3/ and phorbol-12-myristate-13-acetate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murao, S.; Gemmell, M.A.; Callaham, M.F.; Anderson, N.L.; Huberman, E.

    1983-10-01

    Human promyelocytic leukemia cells (HL-60) were induced to differentiate into macrophage-like cells in a dose (3 x 10/sup -10/ to 10/sup -7/ M) and time (1 to 6 days)-dependent manner by 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D/sub 3/ and the tumor promoter, phorbol-12-myristate-13-acetate. Differentiation was determined by an increase in the percentage of morphologically mature cells, in lysozyme and nonspecific esterase activities, and in reactivity with the murine OKM1 monoclonal antibody. Two HL-60 cell variants, designated as R-80 and B-II, were also examined. R-80 cells, which are resistant to induction of cell differentiation by phorbol-12-myristate-13-acetate, also exhibited resistance, although to a lesser degree, to induction of cell differentiation by 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D/sub 3/. Te resistance to the action of the two compounds is presumably not due to similar binding sites for the two inducers, since 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D/sub 3/ was unable to compete for the phorbol diester binding sites as measured by (/sup 3/H)phorbol-12,13-dibutyrate binding. B-II cells were resistant to induction of cell differentiation by 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D/sub 3/, phorbol-12-myristate-13-acetate, retinoic acid, and dimethyl sulfoxide. Two-dimensional electrophoretic analysis of HL-60 cell protein patterns indicated that treatment of the HL-60 cells with 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D/sub 3/, phorbol-12-myristate-13-acetate, retinoic acid, and dimethyl sulfoxide caused the cells to express various monocyte-macrophage and granulocyte marker proteins. These results indicate that 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D/sub 3/ induces in the HL-60 cells a phenotype that resembles, but is not identical to, that of peripheral monocytes-macrophages. 40 references, 3 figures, 1 table.

  18. Establishment and Optimization of Protocol for Genomic DNA Extraction from Seeds of Jatropha curcas%麻疯树(Jatropha curcas L.)种子总DNA提取方法的建立和优化

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李静; 曾德贤; 吴子欢; 范林元; 刘飞虎

    2011-01-01

    A protocol to extract genomic DNA from seeds of Jatropha curcas was established and optimized in order to overleap seedling cultnre and decrease the experimental time. Considering the high contents of proteins. polyphenols and polysaccharides in the seeds, this protocol applied efficient procedures based on CTAB method to remove the secondary metabolites and impuriy. Antioxidant PVP was used to remove polyphenols when sample was homogenized , whereas the cell nuchlear separation buffer was used to remove polysacchandes, and then phenol - chloroform - isoamyl alcohol ( volume proportion = 25 ∶ 24∶ 1 ) extraction to get rid of proteins. The obtained genomic DNA with satisfied concentration and quality couH be used in the test of electrophoresis and ISSR-PCR amplification.%用种子提取DNA可省却培育幼苗过程而加快实验进度,为此建立了麻疯树(Jatropha curcas L.)种子DNA提取方法.针对麻疯树种子富含蛋白质、多酚及多糖等次生物质的特点,基于CTAB法进行优化,在研磨种子时加入抗氧化剂PVP去除多酚,接着用核分离缓冲液去除多糖,再通过酚-氯仿-异戊醇(体积比=25:24:1)抽提去除蛋白质.所提取的麻疯树种子总DNA浓度和质量均较高,经琼脂糖凝胶电泳和ISSR-PCR扩增得到了非常清晰的DNA条带.

  19. Ester Tuiksoo. Proua Suhkru kibedad päevad / Ester Tuiksoo ; interv. Piret Tali

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Tuiksoo, Ester, 1965-

    2005-01-01

    Põllumajandusminister Ester Tuiksoo, kellel peagi täitub ministri ametis aasta Euroopa Liidu suhkrutrahvist, maaettevõtlusest, põllumajandusest, Euroopa Liidu toetustest, ministri elu- ja teenistuskäigust. Lisa: Ester Tuiksoo

  20. Ester Tuiksoo. Proua Suhkru kibedad päevad / Ester Tuiksoo ; interv. Piret Tali

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Tuiksoo, Ester, 1965-

    2005-01-01

    Põllumajandusminister Ester Tuiksoo, kellel peagi täitub ministri ametis aasta Euroopa Liidu suhkrutrahvist, maaettevõtlusest, põllumajandusest, Euroopa Liidu toetustest, ministri elu- ja teenistuskäigust. Lisa: Ester Tuiksoo

  1. Method of making a cyanate ester foam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Celina, Mathias C.; Giron, Nicholas Henry

    2014-08-05

    A cyanate ester resin mixture with at least one cyanate ester resin, an isocyanate foaming resin, other co-curatives such as polyol or epoxy compounds, a surfactant, and a catalyst/water can react to form a foaming resin that can be cured at a temperature greater than 50.degree. C. to form a cyanate ester foam. The cyanate ester foam can be heated to a temperature greater than 400.degree. C. in a non-oxidative atmosphere to provide a carbonaceous char foam.

  2. Comparative Bio-activity Guided Characterization of Biocide from Jatropha curcas and Ricinus communius L Seeds Oil

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    Asnake G. Ede

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available This study reports the characterization of biocide from Jatropha (Jatropha curca and castor (Ricinus communius L seeds oil. The biocide potential of the seeds oil was evaluated against termite (Odontotermes obesus and cockroach (Blattela germanica. The bioassay study showed that Jatropha 10% oil caused 100% mortality in 48 hrs and 72 hrs against termite and cockroach, respectively. Castor 10% oil caused 100% mortality in 60hrs and 72 hrs against termite and cockroach, respectively. The LD50 was determined to be 0.64% and 1.24% for termite and cockroach, respectively for jatropha oil after 72hrs exposure. It was determined to be 1.43% and 1.08% for termite and cockroach respectively for castor oil. The biocidal potential of the oil is statistically significant (p<0.05 when compared with blank and solvent controls at all concentration tested. Various physicochemical parameters were also evaluated in accordance with American standard testing method specifications.

  3. Bioaccumulation and phyto-translocation of arsenic, chromium and zinc by Jatropha curcas L.: impact of dairy sludge and biofertilizer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yadav, Santosh Kumar; Juwarkar, Asha A; Kumar, G Phani; Thawale, Prashant R; Singh, Sanjeev K; Chakrabarti, Tapan

    2009-10-01

    The present study was planned to remediate the metalloid and metal contaminated soil by using non-edible and economic plant species Jatropha curcas L. The experiment was conducted on pots to improve the survival rate, metal tolerance and growth response of the plant on soil; having different concentrations of arsenic, chromium and zinc. The soil was amended with dairy sludge and bacterial inoculum (Azotobacter chroococcum) as biofertilizer. The results of the study showed that the bioaccumulation potential was increased with increase in metalloid and metal concentration in soil system. Application of dairy sludge significantly reduces the DTPA-extractable As, Cr and Zn concentration in soil. The application of organic amendment stabilizes the As, Cr and Zn and reduced their uptake in plant tissues.

  4. Growth of Jatropha curcas on heavy metal contaminated soil amended with industrial wastes and Azotobacter. A greenhouse study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, G P; Yadav, S K; Thawale, P R; Singh, S K; Juwarkar, A A

    2008-04-01

    The aims of the study were to evaluate the effect of organic wastes (biosludge and dairy sludge) and biofertilizer (Azotobacter chroococcum) on the planting conditions of Jatropha curcas in metal contaminated soils. Results showed that the plants survival rate in heavy metal contaminated soil increased with addition of amendments. Treatment T6 (heavy metal contaminated soils+dairy sludge+biofertilizer) observed to be the best treatment for growth (height and biomass) as compared with the treatment T5 (heavy metal contaminated soils+biosludge+biofertilizer). In addition, organic amendments provided nutrients such as carbon, N, P and K to support plant growth and reduced the metal toxicity to plant. The present study showed that metal contaminated lands/soils could be suitably remediated by adapting appropriate measures.

  5. Fumaric acid esters in dermatology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uwe Wollina

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Fumaric acid esters (FAE are substances of interest in dermatology. FAE exert various activities on cutaneous cells and cytokine networks. So far only a mixture of dimethylfumarate (DMF and three salts of monoethylfumarate (MEF have gained approval for the oral treatment of moderate-to-severe plaque-type psoriasis in Germany. DMF seems to be the major active component. There is evidence that FAE are not only effective and safe in psoriasis but granulomatous non-infectious diseases like granuloma annulare, necrobiosis lipoidica and sarcoidosis. In vitro and animal studies suggest some activity in malignant melanoma as well.

  6. Steroidal esters from Ferula sinkiangensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Guangzhi; Li, Xiaojin; Cao, Li; Shen, Liangang; Zhu, Jun; Zhang, Jing; Wang, Junchi; Zhang, Lijing; Si, Jianyong

    2014-09-01

    Two new steroidal esters with an unusual framework, Sinkiangenorin A and B, a new organic acid glycoside, Sinkiangenorin C, and four known lignin compounds were isolated from the seeds of Ferula sinkiangensis. The structures of these compounds were established by spectroscopic analysis and single-crystal X-ray diffraction. All of the isolated compounds were tested against Hela, K562 and AGS human cancer cell lines. Sinkiangenorin C showed cytotoxic activity against AGS cells with an IC50 of 36.9 μM.

  7. Cobalt-catalyzed hydrogenation of esters to alcohols: unexpected reactivity trend indicates ester enolate intermediacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srimani, Dipankar; Mukherjee, Arup; Goldberg, Alexander F G; Leitus, Gregory; Diskin-Posner, Yael; Shimon, Linda J W; Ben David, Yehoshoa; Milstein, David

    2015-10-12

    The atom-efficient and environmentally benign catalytic hydrogenation of carboxylic acid esters to alcohols has been accomplished in recent years mainly with precious-metal-based catalysts, with few exceptions. Presented here is the first cobalt-catalyzed hydrogenation of esters to the corresponding alcohols. Unexpectedly, the evidence indicates the unprecedented involvement of ester enolate intermediates.

  8. JcTI-I, a novel trypsin inhibitor from Jatropha curcas seed cake with potential for bacterial infection treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helen Paula S Costa

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Jatropha curcas seed cake is a low-value by-product resulting from biodiesel production. The seed cake is highly toxic, but it has great potential for biotechnology applications as it is a repository of biomolecules that could be important in agriculture, medicine and industry. To explore this potential, a novel trypsin inhibitor called JcTI-I was purified by fractionation of the crude extract with trichloroacetic acid (2.5%, v/v followed by affinity chromatography (Trypsin-Sepharose 4B and molecular exclusion (Sephacryl S-200. Non-reducing SDS-PAGE and gel filtration showed that JcTI-I has approximately 20.0 kDa. Mass spectrometry analysis revealed that the intact molecular mass of JcTI-I is 10.252 kDa. Moreover, JcTI-I is a glycoprotein with 6.4% (m/m carbohydrates, pI of 6.6, N-terminal sequence similarity around 60% to plant albumins and high stability to heat, pH and salinity. JcTI-I presented antibacterial activity against the human pathogenic bacteria Salmonella enterica subspecies enterica serovar choleraesuis and Staphylococcus aureus, with minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC less than 5 µg/mL. Furthermore, JcTI-I did have inhibitory activity against the serine proteases from the tested bacteria. Otherwise, no hemolytic activity of human erythrocytes and signs of acute toxicity to mice were observed for JcTI-I. The results demonstrate the benefits of J. curcas seed cake as a source of trypsin inhibitor with potential for biotechnological application as a new antimicrobial agent against human pathogenic bacteria.

  9. JcCBF2 gene from Jatropha curcas improves freezing tolerance of Arabidopsis thaliana during the early stage of stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Linghui; Gao, Jihai; Qin, Xiaobo; Shi, Xiaodong; Luo, Lin; Zhang, Guozhen; Yu, Hongwu; Li, Chenyang; Hu, Minchao; Liu, Qifan; Xu, Ying; Chen, Fang

    2015-05-01

    High chilling-susceptibility is becoming the bottleneck for cultivation and commercialization of Jatropha curcas L. For insights to chilling resistance ability of this plant species, a cold response transcription factor, JcCBF2, was cloned and studied. It codes a 26 kDa protein, which contains all conserved motifs unique to the C-repeat binding factor (CBF) family and has high similarity to CBFs of Ricinus communis and Populus. Its transcripts express specifically in leaves of Jatropha at cold temperature. After transmitting the report vector, 35S::JcCBF2-GFP, into Arabidopsis thaliana, JcCBF2 protein is main detected in cell nucleus, being consistent to the nuclear orientation signal in its N-terminal. Compared to the control Arabidopsis, the frozen leaves of JcCBF2-overexpressed seedlings grow stronger with less malondialdehyde, smaller leaf conductivity and activer superoxide dismutase, showing their higher freezing tolerance. RT-PCR tests revealed that JcCBF2 functioned mainly at the early stage (0-6 h) of resistance events in Arabidopsis, and its transcripts reduced after 6 h. In addition, JcCBF2 could quickly regulate transcripts of some cold-responsive (COR) genes such as RD29A, COR105A and COR6.6, also during the early stage of frozen treatment. This study not only proves the chilling resistance roles of JcCBF2, but also presents a candidate gene engineering for improvement of chilling tolerance in J. curcas.

  10. Phylloplane bacteria of Jatropha curcas: diversity, metabolic characteristics, and growth-promoting attributes towards vigor of maize seedling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubey, Garima; Kollah, Bharati; Ahirwar, Usha; Mandal, Asit; Thakur, Jyoti Kumar; Patra, Ashok Kumar; Mohanty, Santosh Ranjan

    2017-10-01

    The complex role of phylloplane microorganisms is less understood than that of rhizospheric microorganisms in lieu of their pivotal role in plant's sustainability. This experiment aims to study the diversity of the culturable phylloplane bacteria of Jatropha curcas and evaluate their growth-promoting activities towards maize seedling vigor. Heterotrophic bacteria were isolated from the phylloplane of J. curcas and their 16S rRNA genes were sequenced. Sequences of the 16S rRNA gene were very similar to those of species belonging to the classes Bacillales (50%), Gammaproteobacteria (21.8%), Betaproteobacteria (15.6%), and Alphaproteobacteria (12.5%). The phylloplane bacteria preferred to utilize alcohol rather than monosaccharides and polysaccharides as a carbon source. Isolates exhibited ACC (1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid) deaminase, phosphatase, potassium solubilization, and indole acetic acid (IAA) production activities. The phosphate-solubilizing capacity (mg of PO4 solubilized by 10(8) cells) varied from 0.04 to 0.21. The IAA production potential (μg IAA produced by 10(8) cells in 48 h) of the isolates varied from 0.41 to 9.29. Inoculation of the isolates to maize seed significantly increased shoot and root lengths of maize seedlings. A linear regression model of the plant-growth-promoting activities significantly correlated (p < 0.01) with the growth parameters. Similarly, a correspondence analysis categorized ACC deaminase and IAA production as the major factors contributing 41% and 13.8% variation, respectively, to the growth of maize seedlings.

  11. JcTI-I: a novel trypsin inhibitor from Jatropha curcas seed cake with potential for bacterial infection treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Helen P. S.; Oliveira, Jose T. A.; Sousa, Daniele O. B.; Morais, Janne K. S.; Moreno, Frederico B.; Monteiro-Moreira, Ana Cristina O.; Viegas, Ricardo A.; Vasconcelos, Ilka M.

    2014-01-01

    Jatropha curcas seed cake is a low-value by-product resulting from biodiesel production. The seed cake is highly toxic, but it has great potential for biotechnology applications as it is a repository of biomolecules that could be important in agriculture, medicine, and industry. To explore this potential, a novel trypsin inhibitor called JcTI-I was purified by fractionation of the crude extract with trichloroacetic acid (2.5%, v/v) followed by affinity chromatography (Trypsin-Sepharose 4B) and molecular exclusion (Sephacryl S-200). Non-reducing sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and gel filtration showed that JcTI-I has approximately 20.0~kDa. Mass spectrometry analysis revealed that the intact molecular mass of JcTI-I is 10.252~kDa. Moreover, JcTI-I is a glycoprotein with 6.4% (m/m) carbohydrates, pI of 6.6, N-terminal sequence similarity around 60% to plant albumins and high stability to heat, pH, and salinity. JcTI-I presented antibacterial activity against the human pathogenic bacteria Salmonella enterica subspecies enterica serovar choleraesuis and Staphylococcus aureus, with minimum inhibitory concentration less than 5~μg/mL. Furthermore, JcTI-I did have inhibitory activity against the serine proteases from the tested bacteria. Otherwise, no hemolytic activity of human erythrocytes and signs of acute toxicity to mice were observed for JcTI-I. The results demonstrate the benefits of J. curcas seed cake as a source of trypsin inhibitor with potential for biotechnological application as a new antimicrobial agent against human pathogenic bacteria. PMID:24523715

  12. Seasonal variation in the populations of Polyphagotarsonemus latus and Tetranychus bastosi in physic nut (Jatropha curcas) plantations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosado, Jander F; Picanço, Marcelo C; Sarmento, Renato A; da Silva, Ricardo Siqueira; Pedro-Neto, Marçal; Carvalho, Marcos Alberto; Erasmo, Eduardo A L; Silva, Laila Cristina Rezende

    2015-07-01

    Studies on the seasonal variation of agricultural pest species are important for the establishment of integrated pest control programs. The seasonality of pest attacks on crops is affected by biotic and abiotic factors, for example, climate and natural enemies. Besides that, characteristics of the host plant, crop management, location and the pests' bioecology also affect this seasonality. The mites Polyphagotarsonemus latus (Prostigmata: Tarsonemidae) and Tetranychus bastosi (Prostigmata: Tetranychidae) are the most important pests in the cultivation of physic nut, Jatropha curcas (Euphorbiaceae). All parts of J. curcas can be used for a wide range of purposes. In addition many researchers have studied its potential for use as neat oil, as transesterified oil (biodiesel), or as a blend with diesel. However studies about physic nut pests have been little known. The objective of this study was to assess the seasonal variation of P. latus and T. bastosi in physic nut. This study was conducted at three sites in the state of Tocantins, Brazil. We monitored climatic elements and the densities of the two mite species and of their natural enemies for a period of 2 years. Attack by P. latus occurred during rainy seasons, when the photoperiod was short and the physic nut had new leaves. In contrast, attack by T. bastosi occurred during warmer seasons with longer photoperiods and stronger winds. Populations of both mites and their natural enemies were greater in sites with greater plant diversity adjacent to the plantations. The predators found in association with P. latus and T. bastosi were Euseius concordis (Acari: Phytoseiidae), spiders, Stethorus sp. (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae) and Chrysoperla sp. (Neuroptera: Chrysopidae).

  13. Isolation of novel microsatellites using FIASCO by dual probe enrichment from Jatropha curcas L. and study on genetic equilibrium and diversity of Indian population revealed by isolated microsatellites

    KAUST Repository

    Pamidimarri, D. V N N Sudheer

    2010-03-11

    Jatropha curcas L. belongs to family Euphorbiaceae, native to South America attained significant importance for its seed oil which can be converted to biodiesel, a renewable energy source alternative to conventional petrodiesel. Very few attempts were made to isolate novel microsatellite markers and assessment of the extent of genetic equilibrium and diversity that exists in J. curcas. Therefore, the present investigation was undertaken to isolate the novel microsatellites and access genetic equilibrium, diversity that exists among 44 diverse germplasm collected from distinct geographical areas in India using isolated microsatellites. The overall efficiency of the enrichment of microsatellite by dual probe in the present study found to be 54% and among the sequences obtained the percentage of sequences having suitable flanking regions for the primer designing was found to be 89.58%. The mean co-efficient of genetic similarity (CGS) was found to be 0.97. The overall diversity obtained by microsatellites was found to be low in comparison with the diversity reported by multilocus markers systems observed in earlier studies; however, the good allele polymorphism was observed. The overall dendrogram of microsatellite analysis resulted in random clustering of germplasm and not in accordance to geographical area of collection. The present study, diversity analysis using microsatellite markers concludes the low genetic diversity and genetic disequlibrium of J. curcas in India and will provide pavement for further intra-population studies on narrow geographical areas to understand the population genetic structure, phylogeography and molecular ecological studies. The germplasm characterized, and the microsatellite markers isolated and characterized in the present study can be employed efficiently in breeding programs for genetic improvement of the species through marker assisted selection and QTL analysis, for further genetic resource management and help in making the J

  14. Phylogeography and molecular diversity analysis of Jatropha curcas L. and the dispersal route revealed by RAPD, AFLP and nrDNA-ITS analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sudheer Pamidimarri, D V N; Reddy, Muppala P

    2014-05-01

    Jatropha curcas L. (Euphorbiaceae) has acquired a great importance as a renewable source of energy with a number of environmental benefits. Very few attempts were made to understand the extent of genetic diversity and its distribution. This study was aimed to study the diversity and deduce the phylogeography of Jatropha curcas L. which is said to be the most primitive species of the genus Jatropha. Here we studied the intraspecific genetic diversity of the species distributed in different parts of the globe. The study also focused to understand the molecular diversity at reported probable center of origin (Mexico), and to reveal the dispersal route to other regions based on random amplified polymorphic DNA, amplified fragment length polymorphism and nrDNA-ITS sequences data. The overall genetic diversity of J. curcas found in the present study was narrow. The highest genetic diversity was observed in the germplasm collected from Mexico and supports the earlier hypothesis based on morphological data and natural distribution, it is the center for origin of the species. Least genetic diversity found in the Indian germplasm and clustering results revealed that the species was introduced simultaneously by two distinct germplasm and subsequently distributed in different parts of India. The present molecular data further revealed that J. curcas might have spread from the center of the origin to Cape Verde, than to Spain, Portuguese to other neighboring countries and simultaneously to Africa. The molecular evidence supports the Burkill et al. (A dictionary of the economic products of the Malay Peninsula, Governments of Malaysia and Singapore by the Ministry of Agriculture and Co-operatives. Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia, 1966) view of Portuguese might have introduced the species to India. The clustering pattern suggests that the distribution was interfered by human activity.

  15. Phylogeography and molecular diversity analysis of Jatropha curcas L. and the dispersal route revealed by RAPD, AFLP and nrDNA-ITS analysis

    KAUST Repository

    Sudheer Pamidimarri, D. V N

    2014-01-29

    Jatropha curcas L. (Euphorbiaceae) has acquired a great importance as a renewable source of energy with a number of environmental benefits. Very few attempts were made to understand the extent of genetic diversity and its distribution. This study was aimed to study the diversity and deduce the phylogeography of Jatropha curcas L. which is said to be the most primitive species of the genus Jatropha. Here we studied the intraspecific genetic diversity of the species distributed in different parts of the globe. The study also focused to understand the molecular diversity at reported probable center of origin (Mexico), and to reveal the dispersal route to other regions based on random amplified polymorphic DNA, amplified fragment length polymorphism and nrDNA-ITS sequences data. The overall genetic diversity of J. curcas found in the present study was narrow. The highest genetic diversity was observed in the germplasm collected from Mexico and supports the earlier hypothesis based on morphological data and natural distribution, it is the center for origin of the species. Least genetic diversity found in the Indian germplasm and clustering results revealed that the species was introduced simultaneously by two distinct germplasm and subsequently distributed in different parts of India. The present molecular data further revealed that J. curcas might have spread from the center of the origin to Cape Verde, than to Spain, Portuguese to other neighboring countries and simultaneously to Africa. The molecular evidence supports the Burkill et al. (A dictionary of the economic products of the Malay Peninsula, Governments of Malaysia and Singapore by the Ministry of Agriculture and Co-operatives. Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia, 1966) view of Portuguese might have introduced the species to India. The clustering pattern suggests that the distribution was interfered by human activity. © Springer Science+Business Media 2014.

  16. Synthesis of insecticidal sucrose esters

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Song Zi-juan; Li Shu-jun; Chen Xi; Liu Li-mei; Song Zhan-qian

    2006-01-01

    Some synthetic sucrose esters (SE) are a relatively new class of insecticidal compounds produced by reacting sugars with fatty acids, which are safe for the environment. Especially, sucrose esters composed of C6-C12 fatty acids have desirable insecticidal properties against many soft-bodied arthropod pests. In our study, sucrose octanoate which has the highest activity against a range of arthropod species was synthesized by a trans-esterification method and proved its insecticidal property. Under the condition of a homogeneous liquid, sucrose octanoate was prepared by reacting ethyl octanoate with sucrose at reduced pressure; the yield was 79.11%. Sucrose octanoate synthesized was identified and its property analyzed by IR, TLC and spectrophotometric analysis. It was shown that the ratio of monoester to polyester in sucrose octanoate was 1.48:1. The insecticidal activity of the synthetic sucrose octanoate was evaluated at a concentration of 4 and 8 mg·mL-1. The mortality of first-instar larvae ofLymantria dispar from its contact toxicity was 72.5% after 36 hours, the revision insect reduced rate of Aphis glycines reached above 80% at 4 and 8 mg·mL-1 after being treated for 5 days. Since the SE products are nontoxic to humans and higher animals, fully biodegradable and hydrolyzed to readily metabolizable sucrose and fatty acid, they are not harmful to crops and appear to be good insecticide candidates.

  17. Comparative analysis of rubber seed methyl ester with other methyl ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Comparative analysis of rubber seed methyl ester with other methyl esters. ... In order to achieve a two-step transesterification process was developed to convert rubber seed oil to its methyl esters. The first step, acid catalyzed ... Article Metrics.

  18. Complex Approach to Conceptual Design of Machine Mechanically Extracting Oil from Jatropha curcas L. Seeds for Biomass-Based Fuel Production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mašín, Ivan; Petrů, Michal

    One of important sources of biomass-based fuel is Jatropha curcas L. Great attention is paid to the biofuel produced from the oil extracted from the Jatropha curcas L. seeds. A mechanised extraction is the most efficient and feasible method for oil extraction for small-scale farmers but there is a need to extract oil in more efficient manner which would increase the labour productivity, decrease production costs, and increase benefits of small-scale farmers. On the other hand innovators should be aware that further machines development is possible only when applying the systematic approach and design methodology in all stages of engineering design. Systematic approach in this case means that designers and development engineers rigorously apply scientific knowledge, integrate different constraints and user priorities, carefully plan product and activities, and systematically solve technical problems. This paper therefore deals with the complex approach to design specification determining that can bring new innovative concepts to design of mechanical machines for oil extraction. The presented case study as the main part of the paper is focused on new concept of screw of machine mechanically extracting oil from Jatropha curcas L. seeds.

  19. Complex Approach to Conceptual Design of Machine Mechanically Extracting Oil from Jatropha curcas L. Seeds for Biomass-Based Fuel Production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mašín, Ivan

    2016-01-01

    One of important sources of biomass-based fuel is Jatropha curcas L. Great attention is paid to the biofuel produced from the oil extracted from the Jatropha curcas L. seeds. A mechanised extraction is the most efficient and feasible method for oil extraction for small-scale farmers but there is a need to extract oil in more efficient manner which would increase the labour productivity, decrease production costs, and increase benefits of small-scale farmers. On the other hand innovators should be aware that further machines development is possible only when applying the systematic approach and design methodology in all stages of engineering design. Systematic approach in this case means that designers and development engineers rigorously apply scientific knowledge, integrate different constraints and user priorities, carefully plan product and activities, and systematically solve technical problems. This paper therefore deals with the complex approach to design specification determining that can bring new innovative concepts to design of mechanical machines for oil extraction. The presented case study as the main part of the paper is focused on new concept of screw of machine mechanically extracting oil from Jatropha curcas L. seeds. PMID:27668259

  20. Expanding ester biosynthesis in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez, Gabriel M; Tashiro, Yohei; Atsumi, Shota

    2014-04-01

    To expand the capabilities of whole-cell biocatalysis, we have engineered Escherichia coli to produce various esters. The alcohol O-acyltransferase (ATF) class of enzyme uses acyl-CoA units for ester formation. The release of free CoA upon esterification with an alcohol provides the free energy to facilitate ester formation. The diversity of CoA molecules found in nature in combination with various alcohol biosynthetic pathways allows for the biosynthesis of a multitude of esters. Small to medium volatile esters have extensive applications in the flavor, fragrance, cosmetic, solvent, paint and coating industries. The present work enables the production of these compounds by designing several ester pathways in E. coli. The engineered pathways generated acetate esters of ethyl, propyl, isobutyl, 2-methyl-1-butyl, 3-methyl-1-butyl and 2-phenylethyl alcohols. In particular, we achieved high-level production of isobutyl acetate from glucose (17.2 g l(-1)). This strategy was expanded to realize pathways for tetradecyl acetate and several isobutyrate esters.

  1. Esteróles en esponjas marinas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmenza Duque

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Esta revisión bibliográfica comprende la mayona del trabajo publicado hasta el momento sobre esteróles aislados de esponjas marinas. Estos esteróles comprenden compuestos desde Cig hasta C31 con estructuras convencionales y con estructuras novedosas (núcleo y/o cadena lateral no convencional.

  2. Preparation of Spirocyclic β-Proline Esters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fjelbye, Kasper; Marigo, Mauro; Clausen, Rasmus Prætorius

    2017-01-01

    A series of novel N-Bn-protected spirocyclic β-proline esters were prepared using [3+2] cycloaddition and subsequently converted into their corresponding aldehydes. In addition, two novel N-Cbz-protected spirocyclic β-proline esters were prepared using intramolecular cyclization starting from...

  3. Chloride secretion induced by phorbol dibutyrate and forskolin in the human colonic carcinoma cell line HT-29Cl.19A is regulated by different mechanisms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R.B. Bajnath (R.); K. Dekker (K.); H.R. de Jonge (Hugo); J.A. Groot (J.)

    1995-01-01

    textabstractThe human colonic carcinoma cell line HT29cl.19A responds to the protein kinase C activator PDB (4-β-phorbol 12,13-dibutyrate), as it does to forskolin (an activator of adenylyl cyclase), with a secretory response when the cells are grown on filters and studied at 36 °C. Previously, we s

  4. Ethanolysis of rapeseed oil - distribution of ethyl esters, glycerides and glycerol between ester and glycerol phases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cernoch, Michal; Hájek, Martin; Skopal, Frantisek

    2010-04-01

    The distribution of ethyl esters, triglycerides, diglycerides, monoglycerides, and glycerol between the ester and glycerol phase was investigated after the ethanolysis of rapeseed oil at various reaction conditions. The determination of these substances in the ester and glycerol phases was carried out by the GC method. The amount of ethyl esters in the glycerol phase was unexpectedly high and therefore the possibility of the reduction of this amount was investigated. The distribution coefficients and the weight distributions of each investigated substance were calculated and compared mutually. The distribution coefficients between the ester and glycerol phase increase in this sequence: glycerol, monoglycerides, diglycerides, ethyl esters, and triglycerides. Soaps and monoglycerides in the reaction mixture cause a worse separation of ethyl esters from the reaction mixture. The existence of a non-separable reaction mixture was observed also, and its composition was determined.

  5. Anticholinesterase activity of fluorochloronitroacetic acid esters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ivanov, Yu.Ya.; Brel, V.K. Martynov, I.V.

    1984-11-01

    Results are presented from pharmacologic and biochemical experiments leading to the conclusion that fluorochloronitroacetic acid esters have anticholinesterase activity. Since the esters caused muscular weakness in mice, experiments were performed on isolated tissue preparation. The biochemical experiments consisted of finding the biomolecular constants of irreversible inhibition of acetylcholinesterase by the esters, using acetylcholinesterase from human erythrocytes, as well as horse serum cholinesterase. The ethyl and n-propyl esters of halogen nitroacetic acid were used in all experiments. It was found that the propyl ester caused an increase in the force of individual contractions in the isolated muscle specimens, plus an inability of the muscle to retain tetanus. The substances were determined to have an anticholinesterase effect. The mechanism of cholinesterase inhibition is not yet known. It is probable that the substances acylate the serine hydroxyl of the esterase center of the cholinestersase. 7 references, 1 figure.

  6. Over-expression of JcDREB, a putative AP2/EREBP domain-containing transcription factor gene in woody biodiesel plant Jatropha curcas, enhances salt and freezing tolerance in transgenic Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Mingjuan; Liu, Xiaofei; Deng, Huaping; Shen, Shihua

    2011-12-01

    Jatropha curcas L. is an all-purpose biodiesel plant and is widely distributed in tropical and subtropical climates. It can grow well on poor quality soil which is not qualified for crop cultivation. This is very important for relieving land, food and energy crises. However, tropical and subtropical distribution limits the production of J. curcas seed. So it is valuable to know the molecular mechanism of J. curcas response to adverse abiotic environmental factors, especially freezing stress, in order to change the plant's characteristics. Until now there are just a few reports about J. curcas molecular biology. In this paper, we cloned and characterized a DNA binding protein from this plant, designated as JcDREB. Sequence analysis and yeast one-hybrid assays show that JcDREB can effectively function as a transcription factor of DREB protein family belonging to A-6 subgroup member. Expression patterns of JcDREB showed that it was induced by cold, salt and drought stresses, not by ABA. Over-expression of JcDREB in transgenic Arabidopsis exhibited enhanced salt and freezing stresses. Understanding the molecular mechanisms of J. curcas responses to environmental stresses, for example, high salinity, drought and low temperature, is crucial for improving their stress tolerance and productivity. This work provides more information about A-6 subgroup members of DREB subfamily.

  7. Antifungal properties of halofumarate esters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gershon, H; Shanks, L

    1978-04-01

    Alkyl esters (C1--C4) of the four halofumaric acids were tested for antifungal activity against Candida albicans, Aspergillus niger, Mucor mucedo, and Trichophyton mentagrophytes at pH 5.6 and 7.0 in the absence and presence of 10% beef serum in Sabouraud dextrose agar. The most toxic compound to each organism was: C. albicans, ethyl iodofumarate (0.054 mmole/liter); A. niger, methyl bromofumarate (0.090 mmole/liter); M. mucedo, methyl fluorofumarate (0.037 mmole/liter); and T. mentagrophytes, ethyl iodofumarate (0.020 mmole/liter). The order of overall activity of the six most toxic compounds was: ethyl iodofumarate greater than ethyl chlorofumarate greater than methyl iodofumarate = methyl bromofumarate greater than methyl chlorofumarate greater than bromofumarate.

  8. Caracterización morfofisiológica de Jatropha curcas L. variedad Brasil cultivada en dos zonas de Colombia Morphophysiological characterization of Jatropha curcas L. variety Brazil in two areas of Colombia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erik Alexander Pedraza Sánchez

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available La Jatrofa o piñón (Jatropha curcas L. es una planta oleaginosa que ha adquirido importancia en Colombia por su alta producción y calidad de aceite para biocombustibles, despertando el interés en la investigación de su fisiología y desempeño productivo. El estudio se realizó en dos zonas de producción (Vichada y Santander, Colombia y en él se midieron la altura de la planta, el número de tallos, el área foliar, el peso seco de la hoja, el área foliar específica, el peso foliar específico, el porcentaje y perfil de ácidos grasos del aceite. Se utilizó un diseño experimental completamente al azar en el cual se consideraron dos zonas de producción, tres repeticiones y seis plantas por repetición. Las condiciones de las zonas de producción influyeron en el desarrollo vegetativo del cultivo; en ambas zonas, las hojas de los estratos inferiores de la planta presentaron mayor área. El área foliar específica y el peso foliar específico también variaron en las zonas de estudio. El contenido de aceite en la semilla no presentó variaciones y solamente el porcentaje de los ácidos grasos linoleico y oleico mostraron diferencias significativas entre las zonas.Piñón or Jatrofa (Jatropha curcas L. is an oleaginous plant that has gained importance in Colombia for their high production and quality of oil for biofuels, it has attracted interest by the investigation of its physiology and production performance. The study was conducted in two production areas (Vichada and Santander, determining plant height, stem number, leaf area, leaf dry weight, specific leaf area, specific leaf weight, percentage of oil extraction and solvent the fatty acid profile of oil by gas chromatography. A complete randomized blocks design, two production areas, three replications and six plants for replication was utilized. The conditions of the production areas influenced the development of the crop growing season, with the lower leaves of the plant showed

  9. New ester alkaloids from lupins (genus lupinus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mühlbauer, P; Witte, L; Wink, M

    1988-06-01

    Esters of 13-hydroxylupanine and 4-hydroxylupanine with acetic, propionic, butyric, isobutyric, valeric, isovaleric, tiglic, benzoic, and TRANS-cinnamic acid have been synthesized and characterized by capillary gas-liquid chromatography and mass spectrometry (EI-MS, CI-MS). In LUPINUS POLYPHYLLUS, L. ALBUS, L. ANGUSTIFOLIUS, and L. MUTABILIS we could identify new ester alkaloids (e.g. 13-propyloxylupanine, 13-butyryloxylupanine, 13-isobutyryloxylupanine, and 4-tigloyloxylupanine) besides the known esters, i.e. 13-acetoxylupanine, 13-isovaleroyloxylupanine, 13-angeloyloxylupanine, 13-tigloyloxylupanine, 13-benzoyloxylupanine, 13- CIS-cinnamoyloxylupanine nine, and 13- TRANS-cinnamoyloxylupanine.

  10. Cold Flow Properties of Fatty Esters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Kleinová

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available The article is devoted to the study of cold fl ow properties of neat esters of branched chain alcohols with fatty acids and blends of these esters with fossil diesel fuel. According to the determined CFPP values, the influence of alcohol branching on the fuel filterability is negligible and was detected only in the case of 2-ethyl hexanol. Fossil fuel blending with fatty esters up to 10 % vol. does not substantially change the cold flow properties of fossil fuel. DSC cooling scan parameters should be employed to predict CFPP of blended diesel fuel.

  11. Synthesis of Trimethylolpropane Esters of Calophyllum Methyl Esters : Effect of Temperature and Molar Ratio

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yeti Widyawati

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Trimethylolpropane esters were synthesized by transesterification of calophyllum methyl esters and trimethylolpropane using a calcium oxide as the catalyst. The results showed that the optimal reaction conditions (temperature: 130 0C, reaction time: 5 h, reactant molar ratio: 3.9:1, catalyst amount 3%w/w, and formed  trimethylolpropane ester of 79.0% were obtained. The basic physicochemical properties of the trimethylolpropane esters were the following : kinematic viscosities of 56.40 cSt and 8.8 cSt at 40 0C and 100 0C,  viscosity index 193, flash point 218 0C and pour point -3 0C. So Methyl esters of fatty acids of would callophylum  methyl ester is good raw material for the synthesis of lubricating oils.

  12. Propiedades físicas y mecánicas de granos de Jatropha curcas cultivadas en Colombia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julio César Betancur-Prisco

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Una opción promisoria en el campo de los biocombustibles es el biodiesel obtenido del aceite de los granos de Jatropha curcas . Ésta es una planta que se desarrolla en países tropicales, puede crecer en suelos marginales, con poca irrigación y ayuda a controlar la erosión de los suelos. Este arbusto crece rápidamente y produce semillas con un contenido de aceite alrededor del 35%, y es una especie que no compite con los cultivos con fines alimenticios. Sin embargo, para que la producción de biodiesel a partir de Jatropha sea sostenible y rentable se requiere investigación y desarrollo tecnológico, en todas las etapas de la cadena productiva. Este artículo presenta los resultados de un proceso de investigación y evaluación que tiene como objetivo determinar algunas características físicas y mecánicas de los granos de Jatropha curcas . Estos datos brindan información relevante para el diseño de equipos y procesos para la producción de aceite de Jatropha . Como resultado de la investigación se obtuvieron datos como son: la fuerza (119 N, la energía (332 N.mm y la deformación (2,8 mm requeridas para la fractura, dimensiones promedio de los granos (longitud: 10,8 mm/ancho: 17,8 mm/espesor: 8,6 mm, fracciones de cáscara (38% y albumen (62% en la semilla, humedad del grano (5,2%, contenido de aceite (29% m/m, poder calorífico de la cáscara (0,3 MJ/kg, y el albumen (0,8 MJ/kg; entre otras. Todas estas variables, además de ser útiles para el proceso de diseño, permiten evaluar usos alternativos para subproductos del proceso de extracción. Cabe anotar, que es poca la información que se encuentra con respecto a este grano, en el contexto colombiano.

  13. 21 CFR 172.854 - Polyglycerol esters of fatty acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Polyglycerol esters of fatty acids. 172.854 Section... HUMAN CONSUMPTION Multipurpose Additives § 172.854 Polyglycerol esters of fatty acids. Polyglycerol esters of fatty acids, up to and including the decaglycerol esters, may be safely used in food in...

  14. Ester Tuiksoo - riigi peakokk / Peeter Kuimet

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Kuimet, Peeter

    2007-01-01

    Põllumajandusminister Ester Tuiksoo eelseisvast vastuvõtust Estonias, jopede kinkimisest maaelu arengukava väljatöötamisega seotud inimestele. Minister Tuiksoo kohta tehtud kriitikast. SDE esimehe Ivari Padari arvamus. Lisa: Tuiksoo jopedest ja tassidest

  15. Space-Qualifiable Cyanate Ester Elastomer Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — In Phase 1, CRG demonstrated the feasibility of a novel approach to prepare cyanate ester based elastomers. This approach polymerizes in-situ siloxane within a...

  16. Space-Qualifiable Cyanate Ester Elastomer Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Cornerstone Research Group, Inc. (CRG) proposes to design and develop a space-qualifiable cyanate ester elastomer for application in self-deployable space structures...

  17. Ester Tuiksoo - riigi peakokk / Peeter Kuimet

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Kuimet, Peeter

    2007-01-01

    Põllumajandusminister Ester Tuiksoo eelseisvast vastuvõtust Estonias, jopede kinkimisest maaelu arengukava väljatöötamisega seotud inimestele. Minister Tuiksoo kohta tehtud kriitikast. SDE esimehe Ivari Padari arvamus. Lisa: Tuiksoo jopedest ja tassidest

  18. Application of Jatropha curcas L. seed oil (Euphorbiaceae and microcurrent on the healing of experimental wounds in Wistar rats Aplicação do óleo das sementes de Jatropha curcas L. (Euphorbiaceae e microcorrente no reparo de lesões experimentais em ratos Wistar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Roberto Passarini Junior

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: To investigate the effects of Jatropha curcas L. seed oil and microcurrent stimulation on the healing of wounds experimentally induced in Wistar rats. METHODS: Forty-eight animals were divided into four groups: (A control; (B treated with microcurrent (10 µA/2 min; (C treated with J. curcas seed oil, and (D treated with J. curcas seed oil plus microcurrent. Tissues samples were obtained two, six, ten and 14 days after injury and submitted to structural and morphometric analyses. RESULTS: The animals of groups A and C showed similar responses in terms of repair area, total number of cells, number of newly formed blood vessels, epithelial thickness, and percentage of area occupied by mature collagen fibers. Significant differences in all parameters analyzed were observed between animals of groups B and D and the control 10 and 14 days after experimentally induced injury. The morphometric data confirmed the structural findings CONCLUSIONS: The application of J. curcas seed oil alone was not effective on experimental wound healing when compared to control, but microcurrent application alone or combined with the oil exerted significant differences in the parameters studied. These findings suggest that the positive results were due to microcurrent stimulation.OBJETIVO: Investigar os efeitos do óleo das sementes de Jatropha curcas L.e microcorrente em lesões experimentais em de ratos Wistar. MÉTODOS: Quarenta e oito animais foram divididos em quatro grupos: (A controle, (B tratado com aplicação de microcorrente, (C tratado com óleo de sementes de J. curcas e (D tratado com de óleo de sementes de J. curcas associado à microcorrente. Amostras de tecido foram obtidas no 2º, 6º, 10º e 14º dia após a lesão e submetidas às análises estrutural e morfométrica. RESULTADOS: Os animais dos grupos A e C apresentaram respostas semelhantes quanto a seus efeitos sobre as medidas da área de reparo, número total de células e de vasos sangu

  19. Acción analgésica y neurofarmacológica de las fracciones soluble y no soluble del extracto etanólico de la semilla de Jatropha curcas L.

    OpenAIRE

    Salazar Granara, Alberto Alcibíades; Goicochea Lugo, Sergio; Zavala Flores, Ernesto; Cazuza Nascimento, Letícia; Luján Carpio, Elmer; Pante Medina, Juan Carlos

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCCIÓN: Estudios preclínicos evidencian efectos dosis dependiente sobre la analgesia e inflamación y neurotoxicidad de las hojas, corteza y raíz de J. curcas L. El propósito del estudio fue evaluar la actividad analgésica y neurofarmacológica de las fracciones de la semilla de J. curcas L. MÉTODOS: Estudio experimental, preclínico y prospectivo. Se distribuyeron 48 ratones en seis grupos control: ácido acético, diclofenaco, tramadol, agua destilada, diazepam y ca...

  20. Pharmacokinetics of Ketorolac Pentyl Ester, a Novel Ester Derivative of Ketorolac, in Rabbits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jann-Inn Tzeng

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available Ketorolac is a potent nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug. Recently, a novel ester of ketorolac, ketorolac pentyl ester, was synthesized. When prepared in injectable oil, the new agent demonstrated a long duration of action. Ketorolac pentyl ester was synthesized using a prodrug design by esterification of ketorolac, and appeared to be a prodrug of ketorolac in vivo, which needed to be confirmed. The aim of the present study was to establish the prodrug's pharmacokinetics in vivo, and to confirm whether or not ketorolac pentyl ester was a prodrug of ketorolac. Pharmacokinetic profiles of intravenous ketorolac and its pentyl ester on an equal-molar basis in six rabbits were evaluated. A high-performance liquid chromatographic method was used to determine the plasma concentrations of ketorolac and its pentyl ester. We found that the plasma concentrations of ketorolac pentyl ester declined rapidly after injection and so did the conversion of ketorolac pentyl ester to ketorolac. Also, the conversion of ketorolac was proved complete when compared with intravenous ketorolac under an equi-molar basis. In conclusion, this in vivo pharmacokinetic study confirmed that keterolac pentyl ester was a prodrug of keterolac.

  1. Preliminary evaluation of anhydrous ethanol as a solvent in the oilseed extraction of Jatropha curcas L.; Evaluacion preliminar del etanol anhidro como solvente en la extraccion de aceite de semillas de jatrofa (Jatropha curcas L.)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brossard-Gonzalez, C.; Ferrari, R. A.; Pighinelli, A. L.; Park, K. J.

    2010-07-01

    A preliminary evaluation was performed on anhydrous ethanol as a solvent for the extraction of oil from whole Jatropha curcas L. seeds (32.24 % lipids, 16.05 % proteins), supplied from Mato Grosso, Brazil. The methodology of factorial 2k designs was followed, which included a comparison between pressing and n-hexane extraction methods. The regression model corresponding to the comparison between ethanol and n-hexane, varying extraction time, did not have lack of fit and presented an R2 of 99%. The experimental design for the pressing method, varying press rotation speed and temperature, yielded a poorly fitted linear model. The oil composition extracted with ethanol was similar to those obtained by n-hexane and by pressing. The highest yield (36.7%) was obtained using ethanol for 4 hours. The excess of extracted material was attributed to additional solubilization of impurities that could be diminished by limiting the extraction time to 1 hour. The oil extracted with ethanol and by pressing have the same color. It is presumed that the purification steps for both oils should be similar. Further studies using mixtures of ethanol with small proportions of n-hexane are suggested. (Author) 20 refs.

  2. Rapid Output Growth of Special Acrylic Esters

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Lianzhi

    2007-01-01

    @@ Acrylic esters are usually classified into general-purpose varieties and special varieties. The production and application of general-purpose varieties is already quite matured in the world and their output growth tends to be flat. Owing to the development of coatings, electronics, automobiles,textiles, printing and construction sectors, especially the application of radiation curing technology in various sectors, special acrylic esters have developed rapidly.

  3. New daucane esters from Ferula tingitana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miski, M; Mabry, T J

    1986-01-01

    In addition to the three known daucane esters (2,3,8) and one phenylpropanoid (9), the petroleum ether extract of the roots of Ferula tingitana yielded four new daucane esters: 14-p-anisoyloxy-dauc-4,8-diene (1), acetyltingitanol (4), acetyldesoxodehydrolaserpitine (5), and 4-beta-hydroxy-6-alpha-p-hydroxybenzoyloxy-10-alpha-angeloyloxy dauc-8-ene (6). A possible biogenetic pathway for 1,5-cis- and 1,5-trans-daucanes is presented.

  4. Conversion of carbohydrates to levulinic acid esters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2014-01-01

    The present invention relates to the field of converting carbohydrates into levulinic acid, a platform chemical for many chemical end products. More specifically the invention relates to a method for converting carbohydrates such as mono-, di- or polysaccharides, obtained from for example biomass...... production into a suitable levulinic acid ester in the presence of a zeolite or zeotype catalyst and a suitable alcohol, and the ester may be further converted into levulinic acid if desired....

  5. Synthesis of a new energetic nitrate ester

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chavez, David E [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2008-01-01

    Nitrate esters have been known as useful energetic materials since the discovery of nitroglycerin by Ascanio Sobrero in 1846. The development of methods to increase the safety and utility of nitroglycerin by Alfred Nobel led to the revolutionary improvement in the utility of nitroglycerin in explosive applications in the form of dynamite. Since then, many nitrate esters have been prepared and incorporated into military applications such as double-based propellants, detonators and as energetic plasticizers. Nitrate esters have also been shown to have vasodilatory effects in humans and thus have been studied and used for treatments of ailments such as angina. The mechanism of the biological response towards nitrate esters has been elucidated recently. Interestingly, many of the nitrate esters used for military purposes are liquids (ethylene glycol dinitrate, propylene glycol dinitrate, etc). Pentaerythritol tetranitrate (PETN) is one of the only solid nitrate esters, besides nitrocellulose, that is used in any application. Unfortunately, PETN melting point is above 100 {sup o}C, and thus must be pressed as a solid for detonator applications. A more practical material would be a melt-castable explosive, for potential simplification of manufacturing processes. Herein we describe the synthesis of a new energetic nitrate ester (1) that is a solid at ambient temperatures, has a melting point of 85-86 {sup o}C and has the highest density of any known nitrate ester composed only of carbon, hydrogen, nitrogen and oxygen. We also describe the chemical, thermal and sensitivity properties of 1 as well as some preliminary explosive performance data.

  6. Principal Disease and Insect Pests of Jatropha curcas L. in the Lower Valley of the Senegal River

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Terren, M.

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Jatropha curcas L. seed oil is proven to be toxic to many microorganisms, insects and animals. Despite its toxicity, Jatropha is not pest and disease resistant. The following major pests and diseases affecting Jatropha in the lower valley of the Senegal river have been identified: the leaf miner Stomphastis thraustica (Meyrick, 1908 (Lepidoptera, Gracillariidae, the leaf and stem miner Pempelia morosalis (Saalmuller, 1880 (Lepidoptera, Pyralidae and the shield-backed bug Calidea panaethiopica (Kirkaldy, 1909 (Heteroptera, Scutelleridae, which can cause flower and fruit abortion. Damage from these pests was particularly great during the second year after the plantations were set up (2009 and before later receding. Nevertheless, the worst attacks were caused by a vascular disease transmitted through the soil, which killed 65% of the plants in four years. It is mainly characterised by collar and root rot, which causes foliage to yellow and wilt, before the plant eventually dies. These threats should increase if larger areas are planted with Jatropha. Considering the scale of the damage caused by these attacks in Bokhol, the development of an integrated pest management programme adapted to the local context should be considered.

  7. Glyphosate sub-lethal toxicity to non-target organisms occurring in Jatropha curcas plantations in Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Saraiva, Althiéris Souza; Sarmento, Renato Almeida; Pedro-Neto, Marçal; Teodoro, Adenir Vieira; Erasmo, Eduardo Andrea Lemus; Belchior, Diana Cléssia Vieira; de Azevedo, Emiliano Brandão

    2016-10-01

    Weed management in physic nut plantations has generally been performed by spraying the herbicide glyphosate. However, the effects of glyphosate on non-target organisms present in the crop system are unknown. Here, we evaluated the toxicity of glyphosate (Roundup Transorb(®)) against the pest species Polyphagotarsonemus latus (Acari: Tarsonemidae) and Tetranychus bastosi (Acari: Tetranychidae) which can be exposed by drift. These mites are considered pests of the physic nut; however, they can also feed and reside on weeds associated with the crop, serving as food sources for predatory mites. When subjected to residue (by ingestion of sap of treated plants), and direct contact to glyphosate, P. latus reproduction was affected but T. bastosi was affected only by the residual effect. Although the herbicide caused a reduction in the number of eggs laid by the females of both pest mites, it is suggested that sublethal effects of glyphosate stimulates oviposition of P. latus and T. bastosi: both species displayed higher reproductive rates when exposed to 0.36 kg ha(-1) of the herbicide. We conclude that glyphosate negatively affects the arthropod herbivores studied and we discuss possible implications on their biological control in Jatropha curcas plantations.

  8. Optimization of Concentration and EM4 Augmentation for Improving Bio-Gas Productivity from Jatropha curcas Linn Capsule Husk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Praptiningsih G.A

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Most literature suggests that two-phase digestion is more efficient than single-phase. The series of two-phase digestion studies have been conducted from 2011 to 2013 at the research farm of PT Bumimas Ekapersada, West Java, Indonesia. This paper reports on a research on optimation of concentration and augmentation of EM-4 (effective microorganism-4, a local commercial decomposer, as efforts to stabilize a biogas technology which made ​​from husk capsules of Jatropha curcas Linn (DH-JcL. The studies of increasing organic loading rate (OLR for the two-phase digestion was conducted to improve efficiency.  The concentration variable studied was 1: 8 (1 part DH-JCL and 8 parts water, compared to 1: 12 as a control. The augmentation treatment is the addition of EM-4 by 5% (v/v. It was also examined the augmentation of F2-EM4 (150 times duplication of EM-4 due to cost consideration. The studies were conducted in the laboratory which using a liter and two liters of glass digester and glass wool as immobilized growth. The results of this study support the previous studies: the optimum concentration was 1: 8, EM-4 was able to increase biogas production in two-phase digestion, yet biogas production decrease at single-phase. F2-EM4’s ability to support production of biogas were equivalent to that of EM-4.

  9. Callus Growth Kinetics of Physic Nut (Jatropha curcas L.) and Content of Fatty Acids from Crude Oil Obtained In Vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Luz Costa, Jefferson; da Silva, André Luís Lopes; Bier, Mário César Jucoski; Brondani, Gilvano Ebling; Gollo, André Luiz; Letti, Luiz Alberto Junior; Erasmo, Eduardo Andrea Lemus; Soccol, Carlos Ricardo

    2015-06-01

    The callus growth kinetics allows identifying the appropriate moment for callus pealing and monitoring the accumulation of primary and secondary metabolites. The physic nut (Jatropha curcas L.) is a plant species used for biofuel production due to its high oil content; however, this plant presents a great amount of bioactive compounds which can be useful for industry. The aim of this research was to establish a calli growth curve and to evaluate the fatty acid profile of crude oil extracted from callus. The callus growth kinetics presented a sigmoid standard curve with six distinct phases: lag, exponential, linear, deceleration, stationary, and decline. Total soluble sugars were higher at the inoculation day. Reducing sugars were higher at the inoculation day and at the 80th day. The highest percentage of ethereal extract (oil content) was obtained at the 120th day of culture, reaching 18 % of crude oil from the callus. The calli produced medium-chain and long-chain fatty acids (from 10 to 18 carbon atoms). The palmitic acid was the fatty acid with the highest proportion in oil (55.4 %). The lipid profile obtained in callus oil was different from the seed oil profile.

  10. Local Perceptions about the Effects of Jatropha (Jatropha curcas and Castor (Ricinus communis Plantations on Households in Ghana and Ethiopia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joleen A. Timko

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Biofuel plantations have been hyped as a means to reinvigorate Africa’s rural areas. Yet there is still apprehension about the negative environmental and social impacts of large-scale commercial biofuel production around rising food prices, land grabbing, ecological damage, and disruption of rural livelihoods. Given the extent of Jatropha curcas production in Ghana and Ethiopia and Castor bean (Ricinus communis in Ethiopia, this paper presents the results of a study that assessed the socio-economic implications of industrial Jatropha plantations on local livelihoods in Ghana, and of industrial Jatropha and Castor plantations on local livelihoods in Ethiopia. This study used primary data collected from 234 households in Ghana and 165 in Ethiopia. The cultivation of Jatropha and Castor has had several important effects on local livelihoods in the study sites, most notably decreases in household landholdings due to the arrival of industrial Jatropha or Castor plantations; and the resulting changes these plantations have caused in household socio-economic status, food security, fallow periods, and fodder availability. We consider how a lack of meaningful consultation between local people, their traditional authorities and the biofuel company managers, along with shortcomings in each country’s broader land acquisition process and poor land use information, may have contributed to these overall negative effects on local livelihoods. We conclude by suggesting several ways that emerging biofuel industries could be improved from the perspective of local people and their livelihoods.

  11. Identification and validation of superior reference gene for gene expression normalization via RT-qPCR in staminate and pistillate flowers of Jatropha curcas – A biodiesel plant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karuppaiya, Palaniyandi; Yan, Xiao-Xue; Liao, Wang; Chen, Fang; Tang, Lin

    2017-01-01

    Physic nut (Jatropha curcas L) seed oil is a natural resource for the alternative production of fossil fuel. Seed oil production is mainly depended on seed yield, which was restricted by the low ratio of staminate flowers to pistillate flowers. Further, the mechanism of physic nut flower sex differentiation has not been fully understood yet. Quantitative Real Time—Polymerase Chain Reaction is a reliable and widely used technique to quantify the gene expression pattern in biological samples. However, for accuracy of qRT-PCR, appropriate reference gene is highly desirable to quantify the target gene level. Hence, the present study was aimed to identify the stable reference genes in staminate and pistillate flowers of J. curcas. In this study, 10 candidate reference genes were selected and evaluated for their expression stability in staminate and pistillate flowers, and their stability was validated by five different algorithms (ΔCt, BestKeeper, NormFinder, GeNorm and RefFinder). Resulting, TUB and EF found to be the two most stably expressed reference for staminate flower; while GAPDH1 and EF found to be the most stably expressed reference gene for pistillate flowers. Finally, RT-qPCR assays of target gene AGAMOUS using the identified most stable reference genes confirmed the reliability of selected reference genes in different stages of flower development. AGAMOUS gene expression levels at different stages were further proved by gene copy number analysis. Therefore, the present study provides guidance for selecting appropriate reference genes for analyzing the expression pattern of floral developmental genes in staminate and pistillate flowers of J. curcas. PMID:28234941

  12. Osmoconditioning prevents the onset of microtubular cytoskeleton and activation of cell cycle and is detrimental for germination of Jatropha curcas L. seeds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Brito, C D; Loureiro, M B; Ribeiro, P R; Vasconcelos, P C T; Fernandez, L G; de Castro, R D

    2016-11-01

    Jatropha curcas is an oilseed crop renowned for its tolerance to a diverse range of environmental stresses. In Brazil, this species is grown in semiarid regions where crop establishment requires a better understanding of the mechanisms underlying appropriate seed, seedling and plant behaviour under water restriction conditions. In this context, the objective of this study was to investigate the physiological and cytological profiles of J. curcas seeds in response to imbibition in water (control) and in polyethylene glycol solution (osmoticum). Seed germinability and reactivation of cell cycle events were assessed by means of different germination parameters and immunohistochemical detection of tubulin and microtubules, i.e. tubulin accumulation and microtubular cytoskeleton configurations in water imbibed seeds (control) and in seeds imbibed in the osmoticum. Immunohistochemical analysis revealed increasing accumulation of tubulin and appearance of microtubular cytoskeleton in seed embryo radicles imbibed in water from 48 h onwards. Mitotic microtubules were only visible in seeds imbibed in water, after radicle protrusion, as an indication of cell cycle reactivation and cell proliferation, with subsequent root development. Imbibition in osmoticum prevented accumulation of microtubules, i.e. activation of cell cycle, therefore germination could not be resumed. Osmoconditioned seeds were able to survive re-drying and could resume germination after re-imbibition in water, however, with lower germination performance, possibly due to acquisition of secondary dormancy. This study provides important insights into understanding of the physiological aspects of J. curcas seed germination in response to water restriction conditions. © 2016 German Botanical Society and The Royal Botanical Society of the Netherlands.

  13. Jatropha curcas and Ricinus communis differentially affect arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi diversity in soil when cultivated for biofuel production in a Guantanamo (Cuba) tropical system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alguacil, M. M.; Torrecillas, E.; Hernández, G.; Torres, P.; Roldán, A.

    2012-04-01

    The arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) are a key, integral component of the stability, sustainability and functioning of ecosystems. In this study, we characterised the AMF biodiversity in a control soil and in a soil cultivated with Jatropha curcas or Ricinus communis, in a tropical system in Guantanamo (Cuba), in order to verify if a change of land use to biofuel plant production had any effect on the AMF communities. We also asses whether some soil properties related with the soil fertility (total N, Organic C, microbial biomass C, aggregate stability percentage, pH and electrical conductivity) were changed with the cultivation of both crop species. The AM fungal small sub-unit (SSU) rRNA genes were subjected to PCR, cloning, sequencing and phylogenetic analyses. Twenty AM fungal sequence types were identified: 19 belong to the Glomeraceae and one to the Paraglomeraceae. Two AMF sequence types related to cultured AMF species (Glo G3 for Glomus sinuosum and Glo G6 for Glomus intraradices-G. fasciculatum-G. irregulare) disappeared in the soil cultivated with J. curcas and R. communis. The soil properties (total N, Organic C and microbial biomass C) were improved by the cultivation of the two plant species. The diversity of the AMF community decreased in the soil of both crops, with respect to the control soil, and varied significantly depending on the crop species planted. Thus, R. communis soil showed higher AMF diversity than J. curcas soil. In conclusion, R. communis could be more suitable in long-term conservation and sustainable management of these tropical ecosystems.

  14. Copper-catalyzed cascade reactions of α,β-unsaturated esters with keto esters

    OpenAIRE

    Zhengning Li; Chongnian Wang; Zengchang Li

    2015-01-01

    A copper-catalyzed cascade reaction of α,β-unsaturated esters with keto esters is reported. It features a copper-catalyzed reductive aldolization followed by a lactonization. This method provides a facile approach to prepare γ-carboxymethyl-γ-lactones and δ-carboxymethyl-δ-lactones under mild reaction conditions.

  15. [Regularities of endogenous lipid metabolites formation in phorbol 12-miristate 13-acetate-stimulated peripheral blood lymphocytes at leukemia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batikian, T B; Akopian, G V; Lazian, M P; Torgomian, T R; Kazarian, R A; Amirkhanian, E S; Tadevosian, Iu V

    2011-01-01

    Regularities of biologically active lipid metabolites formation in dynamics (5, 10, 30, 60 s) by phorbol 12-miristate 13-acetate stimulation in [14C]palmitic acid have been investigated in normal and leukemia peripheral blood lymphocytes prelabeled with [14C]palmitate. In normal cells there was two-phase formation of 1,2-diacylglycerol (5, 30 s), lysophosphatidylcholine (10, 60 s), as well as free palmitic acid at 10 s of stimulation. Under the identical experimental conditions there was inhibition of investigated lipid release processes at early (5 and 10 s) stages of stimulation of leukemic lymphocytes. At later (30, 60 s) terms of these lymphocytes the activation, basically, similar to norm changes in the formation of palmitic acid-containing metabolites except free palmitic acid (the level of which raised only at 60 second of the post-stimulation) was found. Various protein kinases C are involved in the regulation of investigated lipid levels at certain stages of signal transduction both in norm, and in blast cells. Short-term (5, 10 s) activations of healthy donors lymphocytes are coupled to functioning of Ca2+-independent isoforms of protein kinase C. The inhibition of this protein kinase C in leukemic cells leads to normalization of the investigated lipid release. The data obtained suggests disorders of early membrane-bound reactions in agonist - and a protein kinase C-mediated processes of formation palmitic acid-containing lipid metabolites in the leukemic cells in comparison with the norm.

  16. ERK2-Pyruvate Kinase Axis Permits Phorbol 12-Myristate 13-Acetate-induced Megakaryocyte Differentiation in K562 Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaman, Noor; Iqbal, Mohammad Askandar; Siddiqui, Farid Ahmad; Gopinath, Prakasam; Bamezai, Rameshwar N K

    2015-09-25

    Metabolic changes that contribute to differentiation are not well understood. Overwhelming evidence shows the critical role of glycolytic enzyme pyruvate kinase (PK) in directing metabolism of proliferating cells. However, its role in metabolism of differentiating cells is unclear. Here we studied the role of PK in phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA)-induced megakaryocytic differentiation in human leukemia K562 cells. We observed that PMA treatment decreased cancer-type anabolic metabolism but increased ATP production, along with up-regulated expression of two PK isoforms (PKM2 and PKR) in an ERK2-dependent manner. Interestingly, silencing of PK (PKM2 and PKR) inhibited PMA-induced megakaryocytic differentiation, as revealed by decreased expression of megakaryocytic differentiation marker CD61 and cell cycle behavior. Further, PMA-induced ATP production reduced greatly upon PK silencing, suggesting that PK is required for ATP synthesis. In addition to metabolic effects, PMA treatment also translocated PKM2, but not PKR, into nucleus. ERK1/2 knockdowns independently and together suggested the role of ERK2 in the up-regulation of both the isoforms of PK, proposing a role of ERK2-PK isoform axis in differentiation. Collectively, our findings unravel ERK2 guided PK-dependent metabolic changes during PMA induction, which are important in megakaryocytic differentiation.

  17. ERK2-Pyruvate Kinase Axis Permits Phorbol 12-Myristate 13-Acetate-induced Megakaryocyte Differentiation in K562 Cells*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaman, Noor; Iqbal, Mohammad Askandar; Siddiqui, Farid Ahmad; Gopinath, Prakasam; Bamezai, Rameshwar N. K.

    2015-01-01

    Metabolic changes that contribute to differentiation are not well understood. Overwhelming evidence shows the critical role of glycolytic enzyme pyruvate kinase (PK) in directing metabolism of proliferating cells. However, its role in metabolism of differentiating cells is unclear. Here we studied the role of PK in phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA)-induced megakaryocytic differentiation in human leukemia K562 cells. We observed that PMA treatment decreased cancer-type anabolic metabolism but increased ATP production, along with up-regulated expression of two PK isoforms (PKM2 and PKR) in an ERK2-dependent manner. Interestingly, silencing of PK (PKM2 and PKR) inhibited PMA-induced megakaryocytic differentiation, as revealed by decreased expression of megakaryocytic differentiation marker CD61 and cell cycle behavior. Further, PMA-induced ATP production reduced greatly upon PK silencing, suggesting that PK is required for ATP synthesis. In addition to metabolic effects, PMA treatment also translocated PKM2, but not PKR, into nucleus. ERK1/2 knockdowns independently and together suggested the role of ERK2 in the up-regulation of both the isoforms of PK, proposing a role of ERK2-PK isoform axis in differentiation. Collectively, our findings unravel ERK2 guided PK-dependent metabolic changes during PMA induction, which are important in megakaryocytic differentiation. PMID:26269597

  18. Modulation by cyclic AMP and phorbol myristate acetate of cephaloridine-induced injury in rat renal cortical slices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohda, Y; Gemba, M

    2001-01-01

    Intracellular signaling pathways of cAMP and protein kinase C (PKC) have been suggested to modulate the generation of free radicals. We investigated the effects of cAMP and phorbol myristate acetate (PMA), a PKC activator, on cephaloridine (CER)-induced renal cell injury, which has been reported to be due to the generation of free radicals. Incubation of rat renal cortical slices with CER resulted in increases in lipid peroxidation and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) release and in decreases in gluconeogenesis and p-aminohippurate (PAH) accumulation in rat renal cortical slices, suggesting free radical-induced injury in slices exposed to CER. A derivative of cAMP ameliorated not only the increase in lipid peroxidation but also the renal cell damage induced by CER. This amelioration by a cAMP derivative of lipid peroxidation and renal cell damage caused by CER was blocked by KT 5720, a protein kinase A (PKA) inhibitor. Lipid peroxidation and the indices of cell injury were increased by PMA. PMA also enhanced CER-induced lipid peroxidation and cell damage in the slices. This enhancement by PMA of CER-induced injury was blocked by H-7, a PKC inhibitor. These results indicated that intracellular signaling pathways of cAMP and PKC modulate free radical-mediated nephrotoxicity induced by CER.

  19. Detection of testosterone esters in blood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forsdahl, Guro; Erceg, Damir; Geisendorfer, Thomas; Turkalj, Mirjana; Plavec, Davor; Thevis, Mario; Tretzel, Laura; Gmeiner, Günter

    2015-01-01

    Injections of synthetic esters of testosterone are among the most common forms of testosterone application. In doping control, the detection of an intact ester of testosterone in blood gives unequivocal proof of the administration of exogenous testosterone. The aim of the current project was to investigate the detection window for injected testosterone esters as a mixed substance preparation and as a single substance preparation in serum and plasma. Furthermore, the suitability of different types of blood collection devices was evaluated. Collection tubes with stabilizing additives, as well as non-stabilized serum separation tubes, were tested. A clinical study with six participants was carried out, comprising a single intramuscular injection of either 1000 mg testosterone undecanoate (Nebido(®)) or a mixture of 30 mg testosterone propionate, 60 mg testosterone phenylpropionate, 60 mg testosterone isocaproate, and 100 mg testosterone decanoate (Sustanon(®)). Blood was collected throughout a testing period of 60 days. The applied analytical method for blood analysis included liquid-liquid extraction and preparation of oxime derivatives, prior to TLX-sample clean-up and liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) detection. All investigated testosterone esters could be detected in post-administration blood samples. The detection time depended on the type of ester administered. Furthermore, results from the study show that measured blood concentrations of especially short-chained testosterone esters are influenced by the type of blood collection device applied. The testosterone ester detection window, however, was comparable. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  20. Gene discovery from Jatropha curcas by sequencing of ESTs from normalized and full-length enriched cDNA library from developing seeds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sugantham Priyanka Annabel

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Jatropha curcas L. is promoted as an important non-edible biodiesel crop worldwide. Jatropha oil, which is a triacylglycerol, can be directly blended with petro-diesel or transesterified with methanol and used as biodiesel. Genetic improvement in jatropha is needed to increase the seed yield, oil content, drought and pest resistance, and to modify oil composition so that it becomes a technically and economically preferred source for biodiesel production. However, genetic improvement efforts in jatropha could not take advantage of genetic engineering methods due to lack of cloned genes from this species. To overcome this hurdle, the current gene discovery project was initiated with an objective of isolating as many functional genes as possible from J. curcas by large scale sequencing of expressed sequence tags (ESTs. Results A normalized and full-length enriched cDNA library was constructed from developing seeds of J. curcas. The cDNA library contained about 1 × 106 clones and average insert size of the clones was 2.1 kb. Totally 12,084 ESTs were sequenced to average high quality read length of 576 bp. Contig analysis revealed 2258 contigs and 4751 singletons. Contig size ranged from 2-23 and there were 7333 ESTs in the contigs. This resulted in 7009 unigenes which were annotated by BLASTX. It showed 3982 unigenes with significant similarity to known genes and 2836 unigenes with significant similarity to genes of unknown, hypothetical and putative proteins. The remaining 191 unigenes which did not show similarity with any genes in the public database may encode for unique genes. Functional classification revealed unigenes related to broad range of cellular, molecular and biological functions. Among the 7009 unigenes, 6233 unigenes were identified to be potential full-length genes. Conclusions The high quality normalized cDNA library was constructed from developing seeds of J. curcas for the first time and 7009 unigenes coding